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Sample records for a2 noradrenergic neurons

  1. A2 noradrenergic neurons regulate forced swim test immobility.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hyungwoo; Kerman, Ilan A

    2016-10-15

    The Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rat is a widely used animal model of depression, which is characterized by dysregulation of noradrenergic signaling. We previously demonstrated that WKY rats show a unique behavioral profile on the forced swim test (FST), characterized by high levels of immobility upon initial exposure and a greater learning-like response by further increasing immobility upon re-exposure than the genetically related Wistar rats. In the current study we aimed to determine whether altered activation of brainstem noradrenergic cell groups contributes to this behavioral profile. We exposed WKY and Wistar rats, to either 5min of forced swim or to the standard two-day FST (i.e. 15min forced swim on Day 1, followed by 5min on Day 2). We then stained their brains for FOS/tyrosine hydroxylase double-immunocytochemistry to determine potential differences in the activation of the brainstem noradrenergic cell groups. We detected a relative hyperactivation in the locus coeruleus of WKY rats when compared to Wistars in response to both one- and two-day forced swim. In contrast, within the A2 noradrenergic cell group, WKY rats exhibited diminished levels of FOS across both days of the FST, suggesting their lesser activation. We followed up these observations by selectively lesioning the A2 neurons, using anti-dopamine-β-hydroxylase-conjugated saporin, in Wistar rats, which resulted in increased FST immobility on both days of the test. Together these data indicate that the A2 noradrenergic cell group regulates FST behavior, and that its hypoactivation may contribute to the unique behavioral phenotype of WKY rats.

  2. Histamine excites noradrenergic neurons in locus coeruleus in rats.

    PubMed

    Korotkova, Tatiana M; Sergeeva, Olga A; Ponomarenko, Alexei A; Haas, Helmut L

    2005-07-01

    Histamine is implicated in the control of many brain functions, in particular the control of arousal. Histaminergic neurons send dense projections through the entire brain, including the locus coeruleus (LC)--the main noradrenergic (NAergic) nucleus. In this study, we have examined the effect of bath-applied histamine on cells in the LC by single-unit recordings in slices and the expression of histamine receptors in this area by single-cell RT-PCR. Histamine (10 microM) increased the firing of NAergic cells to 130+/-9% of control, 100 microM to 256+/-58% of control. This excitation was unaffected by blocking synaptic transmission. Histamine-mediated excitation was blocked by an H1 receptor antagonist, mepyramine, in 78% of cells and by cimetidine, an H2 receptor antagonist, in 42% of cells, but not by the H3 receptor antagonist, thioperamide. RT-PCR revealed that mRNA for the H1 receptor was expressed in 77% of isolated LC neurons, mRNA for the H2 receptor in 41% of LC neurons and H3 receptors in 29%. These findings underline the coordination between aminergic systems and suggest that the arousal induced by the histamine system could involve excitation of noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus.

  3. Hindbrain A2 noradrenergic neuron adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation, upstream kinase/phosphorylase protein expression, and receptivity to hormone and fuel reporters of short-term food deprivation are regulated by estradiol.

    PubMed

    Briski, Karen P; Alenazi, Fahaad S H; Shakya, Manita; Sylvester, Paul W

    2016-09-12

    Estradiol (E) mitigates acute and postacute adverse effects of 12 hr-food deprivation (FD) on energy balance. Hindbrain 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates hyperphagic and hypothalamic metabolic neuropeptide and norepinephrine responses to FD in an E-dependent manner. Energy-state information from AMPK-expressing hindbrain A2 noradrenergic neurons shapes neural responses to metabolic imbalance. Here we investigate the hypothesis that FD causes divergent changes in A2 AMPK activity in E- vs. oil (O)-implanted ovariectomized female rats, alongside dissimilar adjustments in circulating metabolic fuel (glucose, free fatty acids [FFA]) and energy deficit-sensitive hormone (corticosterone, glucagon, leptin) levels. FD decreased blood glucose in oil (O)- but not E-implanted ovariectomized female rats and elevated and reduced glucagon levels in O and E, respectively. FD decreased circulating leptin in O and E, but increased corticosterone and FFA concentrations in E only. Western blot analysis of laser-microdissected A2 neurons showed that glucocorticoid receptor type II and very-long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 3 protein profiles were amplified in FD/E vs. FD/O. A2 total AMPK protein was elevated without change in activity in FD/O, whereas FD/E exhibited increased AMPK activation along with decreased upstream phosphatase expression. The catecholamine biosynthetic enzyme dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DβH) was increased in FD/O but not FD/E A2 cells. The data show discordance between A2 AMPK activation and glycemic responses to FD; sensor activity was refractory to glucose decrements in FD/O but augmented in FD/E despite stabilized glucose and elevated FFA levels. E-dependent amplification of AMPK activity may reflect adaptive conversion to fatty acid oxidation and/or glucocorticoid stimulation. FD augmentation of A2 DβH protein profiles in FD/O but not FD/E animals suggests that FD may correspondingly regulate NE synthesis vs. metabolism/release in the

  4. Resilience to chronic stress is mediated by noradrenergic regulation of dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Isingrini, Elsa; Perret, Léa; Rainer, Quentin; Amilhon, Bénédicte; Guma, Elisa; Tanti, Arnaud; Martin, Garance; Robinson, Jennifer; Moquin, Luc; Marti, Fabio; Mechawar, Naguib; Williams, Sylvain; Gratton, Alain; Giros, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) help mediate stress susceptibility and resilience. However, upstream mechanisms controlling these neurons remain unknown. Noradrenergic (NE) neurons in the locus coeruleus, implicated in the pathophysiology of depression, have direct connections within the VTA. Here we demonstrate that NE neurons regulate vulnerability to social defeat through inhibitory control of VTA DA neurons.

  5. Lesioning noradrenergic neurons of the locus coeruleus in C57Bl/6 mice with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine injection, to assess molecular, electrophysiological and biochemical changes in noradrenergic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Szot, P.; Knight, L.; Franklin, A.; Sikkema, C.; Foster, S.; Wilkinson, C.W.; White, S.S.; Raskind, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    The locus coeruleus (LC) is the major loci of noradrenergic innervation to the forebrain. Due to the extensive central nervous system innervation of the LC noradrenergic system, a reduction in the number of LC neurons could result in significant changes in noradrenergic function in many forebrain regions. LC noradrenergic neurons were lesioned in adult male C57Bl/6 mice with the unilateral administration of 6-hydroxydopamine (6OHDA) (vehicle on the alternate side). Noradrenergic markers were measured 3 weeks later to determine the consequence of LC loss in the forebrain. Direct administration of 6OHDA into the LC results in the specific reduction of noradrenergic neurons in the LC (as measured by electrophysiology, immunoreactivity and in situ hybridization), the lateral tegmental neurons and dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) and ventral tegmental region were unaffected. The loss of LC noradrenergic neurons did not result in compensatory changes in the expression of mRNA for norepinephrine (NE) synthesizing enzymes. The loss of LC noradrenergic neurons is associated with reduced NE tissue concentration and NE transporter (NET) binding sites in the frontal cortex and hippocampus, as well as other forebrain regions such as the amygdala and SN. Adrenoreceptor (AR) binding sites (α1- and α2-AR) were not significantly affected on the 6OHDA-treated side compared to the vehicle-treated side, although there is a reduction of AR binding sites on both the vehicle- and 6OHDA-treated side in specific forebrain regions. These studies indicate that unilateral stereotaxic injection of 6OHDA into mice reduces noradrenergic LC neurons and reduces noradrenergic innervation to many forebrain regions, including the contralateral side. PMID:22542679

  6. Noradrenergic Modulation of Arousal

    PubMed Central

    Berridge, Craig W.

    2008-01-01

    Through a highly divergent efferent projection system, the locus coeruleus-noradrenergic system supplies norepinephrine throughout the central nervous system. State-dependent neuronal discharge activity of locus coeruleus neurons has long-suggested a role of this system in the induction of an alert waking state. More recent work supports this hypothesis, demonstrating robust wake-promoting actions of the locus coeruleus-noradrenergic system. Norepinephrine enhances arousal, in part, via actions of β- and α1-receptors located within multiple subcortical structures, including the general regions of the medial septal area and the medial preoptic areas. Recent anatomical studies suggest that arousal-enhancing actions of norepinephrine are not limited to the locus coeruleus system and likely include the A1 and A2 noradrenergic cell groups. Thus, noradrenergic modulation of arousal state involves multiple noradrenergic systems acting with multiple subcortical regions. Pharmacological studies indicate that the combined actions of these systems are necessary for the sustained maintenance of arousal levels associated with spontaneous waking. Enhanced arousal state is a prominent aspect of both stress and psychostimulant drug action and evidence indicates that noradrenergic systems likely play an important role in both stress-related and psychostimulant-induced arousal. These and other observations suggest that the dysregulation of noradrenergic neurotransmission could well contribute to the dysregulation of arousal associated with a variety of behavioral disorders including insomnia and stress-related disorders. PMID:18199483

  7. Drugs of abuse specifically sensitize noradrenergic and serotonergic neurons via a non-dopaminergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lanteri, Christophe; Salomon, Lucas; Torrens, Yvette; Glowinski, Jacques; Tassin, Jean-Pol

    2008-06-01

    A challenge in drug dependence is to delineate long-term neurochemical modifications induced by drugs of abuse. Repeated d-amphetamine was recently shown to disrupt a mutual regulatory link between noradrenergic and serotonergic neurons, thus inducing long-term increased responses to d-amphetamine and para-chloroamphetamine, respectively. We show here that such a sensitization of noradrenergic and serotonergic neurons also occurs following repeated treatment with cocaine, morphine, or alcohol, three compounds belonging to main groups of addictive substances. In all cases, this sensitization is prevented by alpha 1b-adrenergic and 5-HT2A receptors blockade, indicating the critical role of these receptors on long-term effects of drugs of abuse. However, repeated treatments with two non-addictive antidepressants, venlafaxine, and clorimipramine, which nevertheless inhibit noradrenergic and serotonergic reuptake, do not induce noradrenergic and serotonergic neurons sensitization. Similarly, this sensitization does not occur following repeated treatments with a specific inhibitor of dopamine (DA) reuptake, GBR12783. Moreover, we show that the effects of SCH23390, a D1 receptor antagonist known to inhibit development of d-amphetamine behavioral sensitization, are due to its 5-HT2C receptor agonist property. SCH23390 blocks amphetamine-induced release of norepinephrine and RS102221, a 5-HT2C antagonist, can reverse this inhibition as well as inhibition of noradrenergic sensitization and development of behavioral sensitization induced by repeated d-amphetamine. We propose that noradrenergic/serotonergic uncoupling is a common neurochemical consequence of repeated consumption of drugs of abuse, unrelated with DA release. Our data also suggest that compounds able to restore the link between noradrenergic and serotonergic modulatory systems could represent important therapeutic targets for investigation.

  8. Role of nucleus of the solitary tract noradrenergic neurons in post-stress cardiovascular and hormonal control in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Bundzikova-Osacka, Jana; Ghosal, Sriparna; Packard, Benjamin A.; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M.; Herman, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress causes hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity and cardiovascular dyshomeostasis. Noradrenergic neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) are considered to play a role in these changes. Here, we tested the hypothesis that NTS noradrenergic A2 neurons are required for cardiovascular and HPA axis responses to both acute and chronic stress. Adult male rats received bilateral microinjection into the NTS of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to lesion A2 neurons [cardiovascular study, n= 5; HPA study, n= 5], or vehicle [cardiovascular study, n= 6; HPA study, n= 4]. Rats were exposed to acute restraint stress followed by 14 days of chronic variable stress (CVS). On the last day of testing, rats were placed in a novel elevated plus maze (EPM) to test post-CVS stress responses. Lesions of NTS A2 neurons reduced the tachycardic response to acute restraint, confirming that A2 neurons promote sympathetic activation following acute stress. In addition, CVS increased the ratio of low frequency to high frequency power for heart rate variability, indicative of sympathovagal imbalance, and this effect was significantly attenuated by 6-OHDA lesion. Lesions of NTS A2 neurons reduced acute restraint-induced corticosterone secretion, but did not affect the corticosterone response to the EPM, indicating that A2 neurons promote acute HPA axis responses, but are not involved in CVS-mediated HPA axis sensitization. Collectively, these data indicate that A2 neurons promote both cardiovascular and HPA axis responses to acute stress. Moreover, A2 catecholaminergic neurons may contribute to the potentially deleterious enhancement of sympathetic drive following chronic stress. PMID:25765732

  9. Sequential Loss of LC Noradrenergic and Dopaminergic Neurons Results in a Correlation of Dopaminergic Neuronal Number to Striatal Dopamine Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Szot, Patricia; Franklin, Allyn; Sikkema, Carl; Wilkinson, Charles W.; Raskind, Murray A.

    2012-01-01

    Noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC) are significantly reduced in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and the LC exhibits neuropathological changes early in the disease process. It has been suggested that a loss of LC neurons can enhance the susceptibility of dopaminergic neurons to damage. To determine if LC noradrenergic innervation protects dopaminergic neurons from damage, the dopaminergic neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) was administered to adult male C57Bl/6 mice 3 days after bilateral LC administration of 6-hydroxydopamine (6OHDA), a time when there is a significant reduction in LC neuronal number and innervation to forebrain regions. To assess if LC loss can affect dopaminergic loss four groups of animals were studied: control, 6OHDA, MPTP, and 6OHDA + MPTP; animals sacrificed 3 weeks after MPTP administration. The number of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) and ventral tegmental area (VTA), and noradrenergic neurons in the LC were determined. Catecholamine levels in striatum were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The loss of LC neurons did not affect the number of dopaminergic neurons in the SN and VTA compared to control; however, LC 6OHDA significantly reduced striatal dopamine (DA; 29% reduced) but not norepinephrine (NE) concentration. MPTP significantly reduced SN and VTA neuronal number and DA concentration in the striatum compared to control; however, there was not a correlation of striatal DA concentration with SN or VTA neuronal number. Administration of 6OHDA prior to MPTP did not enhance MPTP-induced damage despite an effect of LC loss on striatal DA concentration. However, the loss of LC neurons before MPTP resulted now in a correlation between SN and VTA neuronal number to striatal DA concentration. These results demonstrate that the loss of either LC or DA neurons can affect the function of each others systems, indicating the importance of both the noradrenergic and

  10. A central neuropathic pain model by DSP-4 induced lesion of noradrenergic neurons: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Takashi; Kushikata, Tetsuya; Kudo, Mihoko; Kudo, Tsuyoshi; Hirota, Kazuyoshi

    2010-09-06

    Neuropathic pain models are classified as central and peripheral pain models. Although various peripheral neuropathic pain models are established, central pain models are based only on spinal cord injury. DSP-4 is a competitive inhibitor of norepinephrine uptake that selectively degenerates the locus coeruleus (LC)-noradrenergic neurons projection to the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. In the present study, we have tested whether lesion of LC-noradrenergic neurons by ip DSP-4 (0, 10, 30, 50 mg/kg, n=7 each) could provide a new central neuropathic pain model in rats using a hot-plate and tail-flick tests. DSP-4 significantly reduced the hot-plate latency and norepinephrine contents especially in the coerulean regions. However, DSP-4 did not change tail-flick latency. There are significant correlations of the latency in the hot-plate test with norepinephrine contents in the cerebral cortex (r=0.432, p=0.022), the hippocampus (r=0.465, p=0.013) and the pons (r=0.400, p=0.035) but not with those in the hypothalamus and the spinal cord. As response to hot-plate and tail-flick implies supra-spinal process and spinal reflex, respectively, central neuropathic pain may be facilitated by DSP-4 depleting LC-noradrenergic neurons although the present data are preliminary.

  11. The Sensory Impact of Nicotine on Noradrenergic and Dopaminergic Neurons of the Nicotine Reward - Addiction Neurocircuitry.

    PubMed

    Rose, Jed E; Dehkordi, Ozra; Manaye, Kebreten F; Millis, Richard M; Cianaki, Salman Ameri; Jayam-Trouth, Annapurni

    2016-04-01

    The sensory experience of smoking is a key component of nicotine addiction known to result, in part, from stimulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) at peripheral sensory nerve endings. Such stimulation of nAChRs is followed by activation of neurons at multiple sites in the mesocorticolimbic reward pathways. However, the neurochemical profiles of CNS cells that mediate the peripheral sensory impact of nicotine remain unknown. In the present study in mice, we first used c-Fos immunohistochemistry to identify CNS cells stimulated by nicotine (NIC, 40 μg/kg, IP) and by a peripherally-acting analog of nicotine, nicotine pyrrolidine methiodide (NIC-PM, 30 μg/kg, IP). Sequential double-labelling was then performed to determine whether noradrenergic and dopaminergic neurons of the nicotine reward-addiction circuitry were primary targets of NIC and NIC-PM. Double-labelling of NIC and/or NIC-PM activated c-Fos immunoreactive cells with tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) showed no apparent c-Fos expression by the dopaminergic cells of the ventral tegmental area (VTA). With the exception of sparse numbers of TH immunoreactive D11 cells, dopamine-containing neurons in other areas of the reward-addiction circuitry, namely periaqueductal gray, and dorsal raphe, were also devoid of c-Fos immunoreactivity. Noradrenergic neurons of locus coeruleus (LC), known to innervate VTA, were activated by both NIC and NIC-PM. These results demonstrate that noradrenergic neurons of LC are among the first structures that are stimulated by single acute IP injection of NIC and NIC-PM. Dopaminergic neurons of VTA and other CNS sites, did not respond to acute IP administration of NIC or NIC-PM by induction of c-Fos.

  12. Role of nucleus of the solitary tract noradrenergic neurons in post-stress cardiovascular and hormonal control in male rats.

    PubMed

    Bundzikova-Osacka, Jana; Ghosal, Sriparna; Packard, Benjamin A; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M; Herman, James P

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress causes hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity and cardiovascular dyshomeostasis. Noradrenergic (NA) neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) are considered to play a role in these changes. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that NTS NA A2 neurons are required for cardiovascular and HPA axis responses to both acute and chronic stress. Adult male rats received bilateral microinjection into the NTS of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to lesion A2 neurons [cardiovascular study, n = 5; HPA study, n = 5] or vehicle [cardiovascular study, n = 6; HPA study, n = 4]. Rats were exposed to acute restraint stress followed by 14 d of chronic variable stress (CVS). On the last day of testing, rats were placed in a novel elevated plus maze (EPM) to test post-CVS stress responses. Lesions of NTS A2 neurons reduced the tachycardic response to acute restraint, confirming that A2 neurons promote sympathetic activation following acute stress. In addition, CVS increased the ratio of low-frequency to high-frequency power for heart rate variability, indicative of sympathovagal imbalance, and this effect was significantly attenuated by 6-OHDA lesion. Lesions of NTS A2 neurons reduced acute restraint-induced corticosterone secretion, but did not affect the corticosterone response to the EPM, indicating that A2 neurons promote acute HPA axis responses, but are not involved in CVS-mediated HPA axis sensitization. Collectively, these data indicate that A2 neurons promote both cardiovascular and HPA axis responses to acute stress. Moreover, A2 catecholaminergic neurons may contribute to the potentially deleterious enhancement of sympathetic drive following chronic stress.

  13. Activation of noradrenergic neurons projecting to the diencephalon following central administration of histamine is mediated by H1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Fleckenstein, A E; Lookingland, K J; Moore, K E

    1994-02-28

    The effect of histamine on the activity of noradrenergic neurons terminating in discrete regions of the diencephalon was examined in male rats. Noradrenergic neuronal activity was estimated by measuring the concentration of norepinephrine and its metabolite 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethyleneglycol [MHPG] in the medial zona incerta [MZI] and in the dorsomedial [DMN], periventricular [PeVN] and medial preoptic hypothalamic nuclei [MPN]. The intracerebroventricular administration of histamine effected a time-related increase in MHPG concentrations in the MZI, DMN, PeVN and MPN; these effects were blocked by the H1 antagonist mepyramine but not the H2 antagonist zolantidine. Neither mepyramine nor zolantidine affected basal MHPG concentrations in any of the brain regions examined. These results indicate that central administration of histamine increases the activity of noradrenergic neurons projecting to the diencephalon via an action at H1 but not H2 receptors.

  14. Noradrenergic refinement of glutamatergic neuronal circuits in the lateral superior olivary nucleus before hearing onset.

    PubMed

    Hirao, Kenzo; Eto, Kei; Nakahata, Yoshihisa; Ishibashi, Hitoshi; Nagai, Taku; Nabekura, Junichi

    2015-09-01

    Neuronal circuit plasticity during development is fundamental for precise network formation. Pioneering studies of the developmental visual cortex indicated that noradrenaline (NA) is crucial for ocular dominance plasticity during the critical period in the visual cortex. Recent research demonstrated tonotopic map formation by NA during the critical period in the auditory system, indicating that NA also contributes to synaptic plasticity in this system. The lateral superior olive (LSO) in the auditory system receives glutamatergic input from the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN) and undergoes circuit remodeling during postnatal development. LSO is innervated by noradrenergic afferents and is therefore a suitable model to study the function of NA in refinement of neuronal circuits. Chemical lesions of the noradrenergic system and chronic inhibition of α2-adrenoceptors in vivo during postnatal development in mice disrupted functional elimination and strengthening of VCN-LSO afferents. This was potentially mediated by activation of presynaptic α2-adrenoceptors and inhibition of glutamate release because NA presynaptically suppressed excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) through α2-adrenoceptors during the first two postnatal weeks in an in vitro study. Furthermore, NA and α2-adrenoceptor agonist induced long-term suppression of EPSCs and decreased glutamate release. These results suggest that NA has a critical role in synaptic refinement of the VCN-LSO glutamatergic pathway through failure of synaptic transmission. Because of the ubiquitous distribution of NA afferents and the extensive expression of α2-adrenoceptors throughout the immature brain, this phenomenon might be widespread in the developing central nervous system.

  15. Statins Promote Long-Term Recovery after Ischemic Stroke by Reconnecting Noradrenergic Neuronal Circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyoung Joo; Cheon, So Young; Kim, Gyung Whan

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase (statins), widely used to lower cholesterol in coronary heart and vascular disease, are effective drugs in reducing the risk of stroke and improving its outcome in the long term. After ischemic stroke, cardiac autonomic dysfunction and psychological problems are common complications related to deficits in the noradrenergic (NA) system. This study investigated the effects of statins on the recovery of NA neuron circuitry and its function after transient focal cerebral ischemia (tFCI). Using the wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) transgene technique combined with the recombinant adenoviral vector system, NA-specific neuronal pathways were labeled, and were identified in the locus coeruleus (LC), where NA neurons originate. NA circuitry in the atorvastatin-treated group recovered faster than in the vehicle-treated group. The damaged NA circuitry was partly reorganized with the gradual recovery of autonomic dysfunction and neurobehavioral deficit. Newly proliferated cells might contribute to reorganizing NA neurons and lead anatomic and functional recovery of NA neurons. Statins may be implicated to play facilitating roles in the recovery of the NA neuron and its function. PMID:26448880

  16. Effect of the selective noradrenergic reuptake inhibitor reboxetine on the firing activity of noradrenaline and serotonin neurons.

    PubMed

    Szabo, S T; Blier, P

    2001-06-01

    Reboxetine is a non-tricyclic antidepressant with selective noradrenergic (NA) reuptake-blocking effects. The effects of acute and sustained administration of reboxetine, on the firing activity of locus coeruleus NA neurons and dorsal raphe 5-HT neurons, were assessed using in vivo extracellular unitary recording in rats anaesthetized with chloral hydrate. Reboxetine (0.1-1.25 mg/kg, i.v.) dose-dependently decreased the firing activity of NA neurons (ED50 = 480 +/- 14 microg/kg). A 2-day treatment with reboxetine at 1.25, 2.5, 5, or 10 mg/kg per day (using osmotic minipumps implanted subcutaneously) produced significant decreases of 52%, 68%, 81%, and 83%, respectively, of NA firing activity. When the reboxetine treatment (2.5 mg/kg per day) duration was prolonged to 7 days, a 66% decrease in NA firing activity was observed which further decreased to 80% after 21 days of treatment. In contrast, 5-HT neuron firing rate remained unaltered following short- and long-term reboxetine treatments. The suppressant effect of the alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine on the firing activity of NA neurons was unchanged in long-term reboxetine-treated rats, but its effect on the firing activity of 5-HT neurons was blunted. The enhancement of NA firing activity by the 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH-DPAT was abolished in long-term reboxetine-treated rats, whereas, the inhibitory effect of the 5-HT2 agonist DOI was attenuated by about three-fold. In conclusion, sustained NA reuptake blockade by reboxetine lead to profound alterations in the function of NA neurons and of 5-HT receptors modulating their firing activity.

  17. Transcription factor activating protein 2 beta (TFAP2B) mediates noradrenergic neuronal differentiation in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ikram, Fakhera; Ackermann, Sandra; Kahlert, Yvonne; Volland, Ruth; Roels, Frederik; Engesser, Anne; Hertwig, Falk; Kocak, Hayriye; Hero, Barbara; Dreidax, Daniel; Henrich, Kai-Oliver; Berthold, Frank; Nürnberg, Peter; Westermann, Frank; Fischer, Matthias

    2016-02-01

    Neuroblastoma is an embryonal pediatric tumor that originates from the developing sympathetic nervous system and shows a broad range of clinical behavior, ranging from fatal progression to differentiation into benign ganglioneuroma. In experimental neuroblastoma systems, retinoic acid (RA) effectively induces neuronal differentiation, and RA treatment has been therefore integrated in current therapies. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying differentiation are still poorly understood. We here investigated the role of transcription factor activating protein 2 beta (TFAP2B), a key factor in sympathetic nervous system development, in neuroblastoma pathogenesis and differentiation. Microarray analyses of primary neuroblastomas (n = 649) demonstrated that low TFAP2B expression was significantly associated with unfavorable prognostic markers as well as adverse patient outcome. We also found that low TFAP2B expression was strongly associated with CpG methylation of the TFAP2B locus in primary neuroblastomas (n = 105) and demethylation with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine resulted in induction of TFAP2B expression in vitro, suggesting that TFAP2B is silenced by genomic methylation. Tetracycline inducible re-expression of TFAP2B in IMR-32 and SH-EP neuroblastoma cells significantly impaired proliferation and cell cycle progression. In IMR-32 cells, TFAP2B induced neuronal differentiation, which was accompanied by up-regulation of the catecholamine biosynthesizing enzyme genes DBH and TH, and down-regulation of MYCN and REST, a master repressor of neuronal genes. By contrast, knockdown of TFAP2B by lentiviral transduction of shRNAs abrogated RA-induced neuronal differentiation of SH-SY5Y and SK-N-BE(2)c neuroblastoma cells almost completely. Taken together, our results suggest that TFAP2B is playing a vital role in retaining RA responsiveness and mediating noradrenergic neuronal differentiation in neuroblastoma.

  18. The mechanism of noradrenergic alpha 1 excitatory modulation of pontine reticular formation neurons.

    PubMed

    Stevens, D R; McCarley, R W; Greene, R W

    1994-11-01

    The alpha 1 adrenergic receptor occurs in all major divisions of the CNS and is thought to play a role in all behaviors influenced by norepinephrine (NE). In the medial pontine reticular formation (mPRF), the proposed site of adrenergic enhancement of startle responses (Davis, 1984), alpha 1 agonists excite most neurons (Gerber et al., 1990). We here report that alpha 1 excitation results from a reduction of a voltage- and calcium-dependent potassium current, not previously recognized as ligand-modulated. The calcium sensitivity is suggested by its antagonism with Mg2+, Cd2+, Ba2+, low concentrations of tetraethylammonium, and charybdotoxin. The voltage sensitivity of this conductance falls within the membrane potential range critical to action potential generation. Based on this voltage sensitivity, the change in repetitive firing characteristics may be predicted according to a mathematical model of the mPRF neuronal electrophysiology. The predicted response to a 50% decrease in the phenylephrine (PE)-sensitive conductance is similar to the observed responses, with respect to both the current response under voltage-clamp conditions and alterations of the AHP and frequency/current curve. In contrast, modeling a reduction of a voltage-insensitive leak current predicts none of these changes. Thus, the noradrenergic reduction of this current depolarizes the membrane, increases the likelihood of an initial response to depolarizing input, and increases firing rate during sustained depolarization in a manner consistent with an NE role as an excitatory neuromodulator of the mPRF.

  19. Glutamate input to noradrenergic neurons plays an essential role in the development of morphine dependence and psychomotor sensitization.

    PubMed

    Parkitna, Jan Rodriguez; Solecki, Wojciech; Gołembiowska, Krystyna; Tokarski, Krzysztof; Kubik, Jakub; Gołda, Sławomir; Novak, Martin; Parlato, Rosanna; Hess, Grzegorz; Sprengel, Rolf; Przewłocki, Ryszard

    2012-11-01

    The brain's noradrenergic system is involved in the development of behaviours induced by drugs of abuse, e.g. dependence and withdrawal, and also reward or psychomotor effects. To investigate how noradrenergic system activity is controlled in the context associated with drug-induced behaviours, we generated a Cre/loxP mouse model in which the essential glutamate NMDA receptor subunit NR1 is ablated in cells expressing dopamine β-hydroxylase (Dbh). As a result, the noradrenergic cells in NR1DbhCre mice lack the NMDA receptor-dependent component of excitatory post-synaptic currents. The mutant mice displayed no obvious behavioural alterations, had unchanged noradrenaline content and mild increase in dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens. Interestingly, NR1DbhCre animals did not develop morphine-induced psychomotor sensitization. However, when the morphine injections were preceded by treatment with RX821002, an antagonist of α2-adrenergic receptors, the development of sensitization was restored. Conversely, pretreatment with clonidine, an agonist of α2-adrenergic receptors, blocked development of sensitization in wild-type mice. We also found that while the development of tolerance to morphine was normal in mutant mice, withdrawal symptoms were attenuated. These data reveal that NMDA receptors on noradrenergic neurons regulate development of opiate dependence and psychomotor sensitization, by controlling drug-induced noradrenaline signalling.

  20. Ultrastructural evidence for synaptic contacts between cortical noradrenergic afferents and endocannabinoid-synthesizing post-synaptic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Beverly A. S.; Heldt, Nathan A.; Mackie, Ken; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) are involved in a myriad of physiological processes that are mediated through the activation of cannabinoid receptors, which are ubiquitously distributed within the nervous system. One neurochemical target at which cannabinoids interact to have global effects on behavior is brain noradrenergic circuitry. We, and others, have previously shown that CB type 1 receptors (CB1r) are positioned to pre-synaptically modulate norepinephrine (NE) release in the rat frontal cortex (FC). Diacylglycerol lipase (DGL) is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). While DGL-α is expressed in the FC in the rat brain, it is not known whether noradrenergic afferents target neurons expressing synthesizing enzymes for the endocannabinoid, 2-AG. In the present study, we employed high-resolution neuroanatomical approaches to better define cellular sites for interactions between noradrenergic afferents and FC neurons expressing DGL-α. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed close appositions between processes containing the norepinephrine transporter (NET) or dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DβH) and cortical neurons expressing DGL-α-immunoreactivity. Ultrastructural analysis using immunogold-silver labeling for DGL-α and immunoperoxidase labeling for NET or DβH confirmed that NET-labeled axon terminals were directly apposed to FC somata and dendritic processes that exhibited DGL-α-immunoreactivity. Finally, tissue sections were processed for immunohistochemical detection of DGL-α , CB1r and DβH. Triple label immunofluorescence revealed that CB1r and DβH were co-localized in common cellular profiles and these were in close association with DGL-α. Taken together, these data provide anatomical evidence for direct synaptic associations between noradrenergic afferents and cortical neurons exhibiting endocannabinoid synthesizing machinery. PMID:26162236

  1. A1 noradrenergic neurons lesions reduce natriuresis and hypertensive responses to hypernatremia in rats.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Elaine Fernanda; Freiria-Oliveira, André Henrique; Custódio, Carlos Henrique Xavier; Ghedini, Paulo César; Bataus, Luiz Artur Mendes; Colombari, Eduardo; de Castro, Carlos Henrique; Colugnati, Diego Basile; Rosa, Daniel Alves; Cravo, Sergio L D; Pedrino, Gustavo Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    Noradrenergic neurons in the caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM; A1 group) contribute to cardiovascular regulation. The present study assessed whether specific lesions in the A1 group altered the cardiovascular responses that were evoked by hypertonic saline (HS) infusion in non-anesthetized rats. Male Wistar rats (280-340 g) received nanoinjections of antidopamine-β-hydroxylase-saporin (A1 lesion, 0.105 ng.nL(-1)) or free saporin (sham, 0.021 ng.nL(-1)) into their CVLMs. Two weeks later, the rats were anesthetized (2% halothane in O2) and their femoral artery and vein were catheterized and led to exit subcutaneously between the scapulae. On the following day, the animals were submitted to HS infusion (3 M NaCl, 1.8 ml • kg(-1), b.wt., for longer than 1 min). In the sham-group (n = 8), HS induced a sustained pressor response (ΔMAP: 35±3.6 and 11±1.8 mmHg, for 10 and 90 min after HS infusion, respectively; P<0.05 vs. baseline). Ten min after HS infusion, the pressor responses of the anti-DβH-saporin-treated rats (n = 11)were significantly smaller(ΔMAP: 18±1.4 mmHg; P<0.05 vs. baseline and vs. sham group), and at 90 min, their blood pressures reached baseline values (2±1.6 mmHg). Compared to the sham group, the natriuresis that was induced by HS was reduced in the lesioned group 60 min after the challenge (196±5.5 mM vs. 262±7.6 mM, respectively; P<0.05). In addition, A1-lesioned rats excreted only 47% of their sodium 90 min after HS infusion, while sham animals excreted 80% of their sodium. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed a substantial destruction of the A1 cell group in the CVLM of rats that had been nanoinjected withanti-DβH-saporin. These results suggest that medullary noradrenergic A1 neurons are involved in the excitatory neural pathway that regulates hypertensive and natriuretic responses to acute changes in the composition of body fluid.

  2. The inhibition of the dorsal paragigantocellular reticular nucleus induces waking and the activation of all adrenergic and noradrenergic neurons: a combined pharmacological and functional neuroanatomical study.

    PubMed

    Clément, Olivier; Valencia Garcia, Sara; Libourel, Paul-Antoine; Arthaud, Sébastien; Fort, Patrice; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé

    2014-01-01

    GABAergic neurons specifically active during paradoxical sleep (PS) localized in the dorsal paragigantocellular reticular nucleus (DPGi) are known to be responsible for the cessation of activity of the noradrenergic neurons of the locus coeruleus during PS. In the present study, we therefore sought to determine the role of the DPGi in PS onset and maintenance and in the inhibition of the LC noradrenergic neurons during this state. The effect of the inactivation of DPGi neurons on the sleep-waking cycle was examined in rats by microinjection of muscimol, a GABAA agonist, or clonidine, an alpha-2 adrenergic receptor agonist. Combining immunostaining of the different populations of wake-inducing neurons with that of c-FOS, we then determined whether muscimol inhibition of the DPGi specifically induces the activation of the noradrenergic neurons of the LC. Slow wave sleep and PS were abolished during 3 and 5 h after muscimol injection in the DPGi, respectively. The application of clonidine in the DPGi specifically induced a significant decrease in PS quantities and delayed PS appearance compared to NaCl. We further surprisingly found out that more than 75% of the noradrenergic and adrenergic neurons of all adrenergic and noradrenergic cell groups are activated after muscimol treatment in contrast to the other wake active systems significantly less activated. These results suggest that, in addition to its already know inhibition of LC noradrenergic neurons during PS, the DPGi might inhibit the activity of noradrenergic and adrenergic neurons from all groups during PS, but also to a minor extent during SWS and waking.

  3. Atomoxetine modulates spontaneous and sensory-evoked discharge of locus coeruleus noradrenergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bari, A.; Aston-Jones, G.

    2012-01-01

    Atomoxetine (ATM) is a potent norepinephrine (NE) uptake inhibitor and increases both NE and dopamine synaptic levels in prefrontal cortex, where it is thought to exert its beneficial effects on attention and impulsivity. At the behavioral level, ATM has been shown to cause improvements on measures of executive functions, such as response inhibition, working memory and attentional set shifting across different species. However, the exact mechanism of action for ATM’s effects on cognition is still not clear. One possible target for the cognitive enhancing effects of ATM is the noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC), the only source of NE to key forebrain areas such as cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Although it is known that ATM increases NE availability overall by blocking reuptake of NE, the effects of this agent on impulse activity of LC neurons have not been reported. Here, the effect of ATM (0.1 – 1 mg/kg, ip) on NE-LC neurons was investigated by recording extracellular activity of LC neurons in isoflurane-anesthetized rats. ATM caused a significant decrease of the tonic activity of LC single-units, although leaving intact the sensory-evoked excitatory component of LC phasic response. Moreover, the magnitude of the inhibitory component of LC response to paw stimulation was increased after 1 mg/kg of ATM and its duration was prolonged at 0.3 mg/kg. Together, these effects of ATM produced an increase in the phasic-to-tonic ratio of LC phasic response to sensory stimulation. ATM also modulated the average sensory-evoked local field potential (LFP) and spike-field coherence in LC depending on the dose tested. The lower dose (0.1 mg/kg) significantly decreased early positive and negative components of the sensory-evoked LFP response. Higher doses (0.3–1 mg/kg) initially increased and then decreased the amplitude of components of the evoked fields, whereas the spike-field coherence was enhanced by 1 mg/kg ATM across frequency bands. Finally, coherence between LC

  4. Ablation of the central noradrenergic neurons for unraveling their roles in stress and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Itoi, Keiichi

    2008-01-01

    Despite considerable evidence suggesting the relationship between the central noradrenergic (NA) system and fear/anxiety states, previous animal studies have not demonstrated sheer involvement of the locus coeruleus (LC) in mediating fear or anxiety. Following the negative results of 6-hydroexydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced LC ablation in fear-conditioning studies, most researchers dared not approach this problem using the ablation strategy. The results obtained by a limited number of endeavors, conducted later, were not consistent with the idea of LC being related to anxiety, either, with the exception of the study by Lapiz and colleagues. Since methodological problems were recognized in the neurotoxin-induced NA ablation, employed in previous studies, a novel mouse model was developed in which the LC-NA neurons were ablated selectively and thoroughly by the immunotoxin-mediated cellular targeting. The use of this model clearly demonstrated that the LC was part of the anxiety circuitry. The reason for the discrepancy between the latest study and previous ones is not clear, but it may be due either to the difference in the experimental paradigms or to the different methods for LC ablation. In any case, our findings have shed light on the LC as a locus pertaining to anxiety behavior, and may help link the apparently inconsistent results in previous studies. In addition, the novel method for the LC cell targeting, presented here may provide a potential means for studying the physiological roles of the LC including sleep/wakefulness, as well as its possible involvement in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders, including depression, anxiety disorders, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

  5. Inhibition of A5 Neurons Facilitates the Occurrence of REM Sleep-Like Episodes in Urethane-Anesthetized Rats: A New Role for Noradrenergic A5 Neurons?

    PubMed

    Fenik, Victor B; Marchenko, Vitaliy; Davies, Richard O; Kubin, Leszek

    2012-01-01

    When rapid eye movement (REM) sleep occurs, noradrenergic cells become silent, with the abolition of activity in locus coeruleus (LC) neurons seen as a key event permissive for the occurrence of REM sleep. However, it is not known whether silencing of other than LC noradrenergic neurons contributes to the generation of REM sleep. In urethane-anesthetized rats, stereotyped REM sleep-like episodes can be repeatedly elicited by injections of the cholinergic agonist, carbachol, into a discrete region of the dorsomedial pons. We used this preparation to test whether inhibition of ventrolateral pontine noradrenergic A5 neurons only, or together with LC neurons, also can elicit REM sleep-like effects. To silence noradrenergic cells, we sequentially injected the α(2)-adrenergic agonist clonidine (20-40 nl, 0.75 mM) into both A5 regions and then the LC. In two rats, successful bilateral clonidine injections into the A5 region elicited the characteristic REM sleep-like episodes (hippocampal theta rhythm, suppression of hypoglossal nerve activity, reduced respiratory rate). In five rats, bilateral clonidine injections into the A5 region and then into one LC triggered REM sleep-like episodes, and in two rats injections into both A5 and then both LC were needed to elicit the effect. In contrast, in three rats, uni- or bilateral clonidine injections only into the LC had no effect, and clonidine injections placed in another six rats outside of the A5 and/or LC regions were without effect. The REM sleep-like episodes elicited by clonidine had similar magnitude of suppression of hypoglossal nerve activity (by 75%), similar pattern of hippocampal changes, and similar durations (2.5-5.3 min) to the episodes triggered in the same preparation by carbachol injections into the dorsomedial pontine reticular formation. Thus, silencing of A5 cells may importantly enable the occurrence of REM sleep-like episodes, at least under anesthesia. This is a new role for noradrenergic A5

  6. Effects of lesioning noradrenergic neurones in the locus coeruleus on conditioned and unconditioned aversive behaviour in the rat.

    PubMed

    Neophytou, S I; Aspley, S; Butler, S; Beckett, S; Marsden, C A

    2001-08-01

    1. The brain noradrenergic system may have a role in anxiety disorder. This study has examined the effect of bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the noradrenergic neurones in the locus coeruleus (LC) of male Lister hooded rats on behaviour produced by unconditioned and conditioned aversive stimuli. 2. The 6-hydroxydopamine (4 microg) lesions markedly reduced the noradrenaline content of the locus coeruleus hypothalamus, frontal cortex and the periaqueductal grey area without altering the levels of either dopamine or 5-hydroxytryptamine measured 14 days after administration. 3. Exposure to ultrasound (20 kHz at 98 dB for 60 sec), an unconditioned aversive stimulus, induced a defence response in the rats characterised by an increase in activity (running and jumping) followed by a period of inactivity (freezing). 4. Lesioning of the LC significantly attenuated the duration of freezing but was without effect on the active phase of the response. A similar reduction in freezing behaviour was seen with LC lesions when rats were exposed (3 hours after the acquisition) to the contextual cue of the conditioned emotion response paradigm. 5. These findings confirm that the locus coeruleus is involved in the regulation of fear-related behaviour in the rat both in an unconditioned and a conditioned model. Furthermore the results indicate that noradrenaline modifies defence behaviour rather than being the principle activating mechanism.

  7. Alpha-2 noradrenergic receptor activation inhibits the hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih ) in neurons of the ventral tegmental area

    PubMed Central

    Inyushin, Mikhail U.; Arencibia-Albite, Francisco; Vázquez-Torres, Rafael; Vélez-Hernández, María E.; Jiménez-Rivera, Carlos A.

    2010-01-01

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) is the source of dopaminergic projections innervating cortical structures and ventral forebrain. Dysfunction of this mesocorticolimbic system is critically involved in psychiatric disorders such as addiction and schizophrenia. Changes in VTA dopamine (DA) neuronal activity can alter neurotransmitter release at target regions which modify information processing in the reward circuit. Here we studied the effect of α-2 noradrenergic receptor activation on the hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih ) in DA neurons of the rat VTA. Brain slice preparations using whole-cell current and voltage-clamp techniques were employed. Clonidine and UK14304 (α-2 receptor selective agonists) were found to decrease Ih amplitude and to slow its rate of activation indicating a negative shift in the current’s voltage dependence. Two non-subtype-selective α-2 receptor antagonists, yohimbine and RS79948, prevented the effects of α-2 receptor activation. RX821002, a noradrenergic antagonist specific for α-2A and α-2D did not prevent Ih inhibition. This result suggests that clonidine might be acting via an α-2C subtype since this receptor is the most abundant variant in the VTA. Analysis of a second messenger system associated with the α-2 receptor revealed that Ih inhibition is independent of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and resulted from the activation of protein kinase C. It is suggested that the α-2 mediated hyperpolarizing shift in Ih voltage dependence can facilitate the transition from pacemaker firing to afferent-driven burst activity. This transition may play a key role on the changes in synaptic plasticity that occurs in the mesocorticolimbic system under pathological conditions. PMID:20122999

  8. Chromogranin A immunoreactivity in human cerebrospinal fluid: properties, relationship to noradrenergic neuronal activity, and variation in neurologic disease.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, D T; Cervenka, J H; Stone, R A; Parmer, R J; Franco-Bourland, R E; Madrazo, I; Langlais, P J

    1993-10-01

    Although measurement of chromogranin A in the bloodstream is of value in sympathoadrenal investigations, little is systematically known about chromogranin A in cerebrospinal fluid, despite substantial knowledge about its occurrence and distribution in brain. We therefore applied a homologous human chromogranin A radioimmunoassay to cerebrospinal fluid, in order to evaluate the properties and stability of cerebrospinal fluid chomogranin A, as well as its relationship to central noradrenergic neuronal activity, to peripheral (plasma) chromogranin A, and to disease states such as hypertension, renal failure and Parkinsonism. Authentic, physically stable chromogranin A immunoreactivity was found in cerebrospinal fluid (at 37-146 ng/ml; mean, 87.0 +/- 6.0 ng/ml in healthy subjects), and several lines of evidence (including 3.39 +/- 0.27-fold higher chromogranin A in cerebrospinal fluid than in plasma) indicated that it originated from a local central nervous system source, rather than the periphery. Cerebrospinal fluid chromogranin A values were not influenced by administration of effective antihypertensive doses of clonidine or propranolol, and were not related to the cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of norepinephrine, methoxyhydroxyphenylglycol, or dopamine-beta-hydroxylase; thus, cerebrospinal fluid chromogranin A was not closely linked to biochemical or pharmacologic indices of central noradrenergic neuronal activity. Cerebrospinal fluid chromogranin A was not changed (P > 0.1) in essential hypertension (84.2 +/- 14.0 ng/ml) or renal failure (72.2 +/- 13.4 ng/ml), despite a marked (7.1-fold; P < 0.001) increase in plasma chromogranin A in renal failure, and a modest (1.5-fold; P = 0.004) increase in plasma chromogranin A in essential hypertension.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Functional recovery of locus coeruleus noradrenergic neurons after DSP-4 lesion: effects on dopamine levels and neuroleptic induced-parkinsonian symptoms in rats.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, J; Schmidt, W J

    2004-01-01

    Noradrenaline has been shown to control dopamine turnover and release in rat brain. Noradrenergic lesion with N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) decreases dopamine release in the striatum and enhances catalepsy in experimental models of Parkinson's disease. However, in due course, sprouting of remaining noradrenergic axons, to compensate for the decreased noradrenaline is said to occur in specific brain regions. Though this is to some extent understood, the longstanding effects of noradrenergic lesion on dopaminergic neurons of the basal ganglia and in Parkinsonian behavior is not known. Here the question is addressed, whether locus coeruleus lesion with DSP-4 in rats alters dopamine concentration of the basal ganglia and influences Parkinsonian behavior in a long term (6 months). Parkinsonian behavior was assessed by catalepsy and activity cage after challenging with subthreshold dose of haloperidol (0.2 mg/kg), on 7, 30, 90, 120 and 180 days after DSP-4 lesion. The concentrations of noradrenaline and dopamine and its metabolites were estimated by HPLC. 6 months after DSP-4 lesion, increased concentration of noradrenaline was found in prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Other regions remain unaffected. The concentration of dopamine remained unchanged. However, dopamine turnover appeared to be increased in prefrontal cortex and reduced in striatum and nucleus accumbens. Catalepsy and hypoactivity were observed in DSP-4 lesioned animals after haloperidol challenge on 7th, 30th and 60th day. Though dopamine turnover was reduced after 6 months in the striatum, haloperidol-induced catalepsy was not observed after 60 days. These results indicate a gradual functional recovery, perhaps hyperinnervation of noradrenergic neurons after DSP-4 treatment and the reversal of its effects on dopaminergic neurons and on Parkinsonian symptoms.

  10. Dopamine beta-hydroxylase immunoreactivity in human cerebrospinal fluid: properties, relationship to central noradrenergic neuronal activity and variation in Parkinson's disease and congenital dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, D T; Cervenka, J H; Stone, R A; Levine, G L; Parmer, R J; Franco-Bourland, R E; Madrazo, I; Langlais, P J; Robertson, D; Biaggioni, I

    1994-02-01

    1. Dopamine beta-hydroxylase is stored and released with catecholamines by exocytosis from secretory vesicles in noradrenergic neurons and chromaffin cells. Although dopamine beta-hydroxylase enzymic activity is measurable in cerebrospinal fluid, such activity is unstable, and its relationship to central noradrenergic neuronal activity in humans is not clearly established. To explore the significance of cerebrospinal fluid dopamine beta-hydroxylase, we applied a homologous human dopamine beta-hydroxylase radioimmunoassay to cerebrospinal fluid, in order to characterize the properties and stability of cerebrospinal fluid dopamine beta-hydroxylase, as well as its relationship to central noradrenergic neuronal activity and its variation in disease states such as hypertension, renal failure, Parkinsonism and congenital dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency. 2. Authentic, physically stable dopamine beta-hydroxylase immunoreactivity was present in normal human cerebrospinal fluid at a concentration of 31.3 +/- 1.4 ng/ml (range: 18.5-52.5 ng/ml), but at a 283 +/- 27-fold lower concentration than that found in plasma. Cerebrospinal fluid and plasma dopamine beta-hydroxylase concentrations were correlated (r = 0.67, P = 0.001). Some degree of local central nervous system control of cerebrospinal fluid dopamine beta-hydroxylase was suggested by incomplete correlation with plasma dopamine beta-hydroxylase (with an especially marked dissociation in renal disease) as well as the lack of a ventricular/lumbar cerebrospinal dopamine beta-hydroxylase concentration gradient. 3. Cerebrospinal fluid dopamine beta-hydroxylase was not changed by the central alpha 2-agonist clonidine at a dose that diminished cerebrospinal fluid noradrenaline, nor did cerebrospinal fluid dopamine beta-hydroxylase correspond between subjects to cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of noradrenaline or methoxyhydroxyphenylglycol; thus, cerebrospinal fluid dopamine beta-hydroxylase concentration was not closely

  11. Noradrenergic and serotonergic modulation of a hyperpolarization-activated cation current in thalamic relay neurones.

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, D A; Pape, H C

    1990-01-01

    1. Modulation of the hyperpolarization-activated cation current, Ih, by noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) was examined in guinea-pig and cat medial and lateral geniculate relay neurones using the in vitro slice technique. 2. In the absence of pharmacological antagonists, local application of NA resulted in a slow depolarization and decrease in apparent input conductance, a response which was blocked by local or bath application of the alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin. Application of NA after pharmacological block of alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptors, or application of 5-HT in all conditions, induced a 1-3 mV slow depolarization which was associated with a pronounced increase in apparent input conductance. This response to NA and 5-HT persisted during blocked synaptic transmission and was present in both the guinea-pig and cat medial and lateral geniculate nuclei. 3. The increase in membrane conductance elicited by NA was mimicked by the beta-specific agonist isoprenaline and blocked by the beta-antagonists propranolol and atenolol, indicating that it is mediated by beta-adrenoceptors. The response to 5-HT was blocked by the 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 antagonist methysergide, but not by the 5-HT2 antagonist ritanserin. Applications of either the 5-HT1A agonist ipsapirone or the partial agonist 8-hydroxy-dipropylaminotetralin (8-OHDPAT) were without effect. 4. Current versus voltage relationships obtained under voltage clamp revealed NA and 5-HT to cause a voltage-dependent inward shift at membrane potentials negative to approximately -60 mV. This response appeared to be shared by NA and 5-HT since maximal application of 5-HT greatly reduced or abolished the response to NA. 5. Application of NA and/or 5-HT during hyperpolarizing voltage steps in voltage clamp resulted in a marked increase in amplitude of the hyperpolarization-activated cation current, Ih. In addition, the rate of activation of Ih was strongly increased during activation of beta-adrenoceptors. 6

  12. Noradrenergic and serotonergic modulation of a hyperpolarization-activated cation current in thalamic relay neurones.

    PubMed

    McCormick, D A; Pape, H C

    1990-12-01

    1. Modulation of the hyperpolarization-activated cation current, Ih, by noradrenaline (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) was examined in guinea-pig and cat medial and lateral geniculate relay neurones using the in vitro slice technique. 2. In the absence of pharmacological antagonists, local application of NA resulted in a slow depolarization and decrease in apparent input conductance, a response which was blocked by local or bath application of the alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin. Application of NA after pharmacological block of alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptors, or application of 5-HT in all conditions, induced a 1-3 mV slow depolarization which was associated with a pronounced increase in apparent input conductance. This response to NA and 5-HT persisted during blocked synaptic transmission and was present in both the guinea-pig and cat medial and lateral geniculate nuclei. 3. The increase in membrane conductance elicited by NA was mimicked by the beta-specific agonist isoprenaline and blocked by the beta-antagonists propranolol and atenolol, indicating that it is mediated by beta-adrenoceptors. The response to 5-HT was blocked by the 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 antagonist methysergide, but not by the 5-HT2 antagonist ritanserin. Applications of either the 5-HT1A agonist ipsapirone or the partial agonist 8-hydroxy-dipropylaminotetralin (8-OHDPAT) were without effect. 4. Current versus voltage relationships obtained under voltage clamp revealed NA and 5-HT to cause a voltage-dependent inward shift at membrane potentials negative to approximately -60 mV. This response appeared to be shared by NA and 5-HT since maximal application of 5-HT greatly reduced or abolished the response to NA. 5. Application of NA and/or 5-HT during hyperpolarizing voltage steps in voltage clamp resulted in a marked increase in amplitude of the hyperpolarization-activated cation current, Ih. In addition, the rate of activation of Ih was strongly increased during activation of beta-adrenoceptors. 6

  13. Tonic regulation of the activity of noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus of the conscious rat studied by dual-probe microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Y; Kawahara, H; Westerink, B H

    1999-03-27

    In the present study, receptor specific compounds were infused via a microdialysis probe in the vicinity of the right locus coeruleus (LC). During the infusion of these compounds, the extracellular content of noradrenaline was recorded in the ipsilateral medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) with a second microdialysis probe. Agonists and antagonists of various subtypes receptors that have been described to be localized on LC cells, were infused near the LC. The receptors investigated were: alpha2-adrenergic, muscarinic, nicotinic, GABAergic (GABAA and GABAB), glutamatergic (NMDA and non-NMDA). The compounds infused were: clonidine (100 microM), idazoxan (50 microM), bicuculline (50 microM), muscimol (50 microM), baclofen (50 microM), CGP52432 (100 microM), NMDA (300 microM), CPP (300 microM), kainate (100 microM), DNQX (500 microM), oxotremorine (100 microM), atropine (10 microM), nicotine (100 microM) and mecamylamine (100 microM). Evidence was provided that GABAA, NMDA, non-NMDA glutamate, and muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the LC played roles in controlling the activity of noradrenaline neurons. The LC noradrenergic neurons were not tonically excitated by glutamatergic or cholinergic afferent neurons, and were not tonically inhibited by alpha2 autoreceptors. Tonic inhibition was evident for GABAergic neurons, acting via GABAA receptors.

  14. The stimulatory effect of clonidine through imidazoline receptors on locus coeruleus noradrenergic neurones is mediated by excitatory amino acids and modulated by serotonin.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ortega, J A; Ugedo, L; Pineda, J; García-Sevilla, J A

    1995-08-01

    Clonidine and other imidazoline/oxazoline drugs, such as cirazoline and rilmenidine, have been shown to stimulate the activity of noradrenergic neurones in the locus coeruleus (NA-LC) by an alpha 2-adrenoceptor-independent mechanism through the activation of I-imidazoline receptors. The endogenous modulation of the stimulatory effect of clonidine on NA-LC neurones was further investigated after inactivation of alpha 2-adrenoceptors with N-ethoxycarbonyl-2-ethoxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline (EEDQ). In EEDQ-pretreated rats (6 mg/kg, i.p., 6 h), clonidine caused a rapid and dose-dependent (320-5120 micrograms/kg, i.v.) increase in the firing rate of NA-LC neurones (ED50 = 809 micrograms/kg, Emax = 90%). The stimulatory effect of clonidine on NA-LC neurones was completely blocked by pretreatment of rats with the excitatory amino acid receptor antagonist kynurenic acid (1-3 mumol in 10-30 microliters, i.c.v., 2-5 min before clonidine). In contrast, the stimulatory effect of clonidine on NA-LC neurones was potentiated by pretreatment with reserpine (5 mg/kg, s.c., 18 h) (Emax increased by 63%). Pretreatment with alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine (250 mg/kg, i.p., 24 h) did not alter the stimulatory effect of clonidine, but pretreatment with p-chloro-phenylalanine (400 mg/kg, i.p., 24 h) markedly enhanced the stimulatory effect of clonidine on NA-LC neurones (Emax increased by 139%). The present results indicate that the imidazoline receptor-mediated stimulatory effect of clonidine on NA-LC neurones is an indirect effect dependent on an excitatory amino acid pathway and modulated by an inhibitory serotonin mechanism.

  15. Opposing local effects of endocannabinoids on the activity of noradrenergic neurons and release of noradrenaline: relevance for their role in depression and in the actions of CB(1) receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kirilly, E; Hunyady, L; Bagdy, G

    2013-01-01

    There is strong evidence that endocannabinoids modulate signaling of serotonin and noradrenaline, which play key roles in the pathophysiology and treatment of anxiety and depression. Most pharmacological and genetic, human and rodent studies suggest that the presence of under-functioning endocannabinoid type-1 (CB(1)) receptors is associated with increased anxiety and elevated extracellular serotonin concentration. In contrast, noradrenaline is presumably implicated in the mediation of depression-type symptoms of CB(1) receptor antagonists. Evidence shows that most CB(1) receptors located on axons and terminals of GABA-ergic, serotonergic or glutamatergic neurons stimulate the activity of noradrenergic neurons. In contrast, those located on noradrenergic axons and terminals inhibit noradrenaline release efficiently. In this latter process, excitatory ionotropic or G protein-coupled receptors, such as the NMDA, alpha1 and beta1 adrenergic receptors, activate local endocannabinoid synthesis at postsynaptic sites and stimulate retrograde endocannabinoid neurotransmission acting on CB(1) receptors of noradrenergic terminals. The underlying mechanisms include calcium signal generation, which activates enzymes that increase the synthesis of both anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol, while G(q/11) protein activation also increases the formation of 2-arachidonoylglycerol from diacylglycerol during the signaling process. In addition, other non-CB(1) receptor endocannabinoid targets such as CB(2), transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha and possibly GPR55 can also mediate some of the endocannabinoid effects. In conclusion, both neuronal activation and neurotransmitter release depend on the in situ synthesized endocannabinoids and thus, local endocannabinoid concentrations in different brain areas may be crucial in the net effect, namely in the regulation of neurons located postsynaptically to the noradrenergic synapse.

  16. Interactions between Brainstem Noradrenergic Neurons and the Nucleus Accumbens Shell in Modulating Memory for Emotionally Arousing Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerfoot, Erin C.; Williams, Cedric L.

    2011-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens shell (NAC) receives axons containing dopamine-[beta]-hydroxylase that originate from brainstem neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Recent findings show that memory enhancement produced by stimulating NTS neurons after learning may involve interactions with the NAC. However, it is unclear whether these…

  17. Heterogeneous Responses to Antioxidants in Noradrenergic Neurons of the Locus Coeruleus Indicate Differing Susceptibility to Free Radical Content

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Ramatis B.; Gravina, Fernanda S.; Lim, Rebecca; Brichta, Alan M.; Callister, Robert J.; van Helden, Dirk F.

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of the antioxidants trolox and dithiothreitol (DTT) on mouse Locus coeruleus (LC) neurons. Electrophysiological measurement of action potential discharge and whole cell current responses in the presence of each antioxidant suggested that there are three neuronal subpopulations within the LC. In current clamp experiments, most neurons (55%; 6/11) did not respond to the antioxidants. The remaining neurons exhibited either hyperpolarization and decreased firing rate (27%; 3/11) or depolarization and increased firing rate (18%; 2/11). Calcium and JC-1 imaging demonstrated that these effects did not change intracellular Ca2+ concentration but may influence mitochondrial function as both antioxidant treatments modulated mitochondrial membrane potential. These suggest that the antioxidant-sensitive subpopulations of LC neurons may be more susceptible to oxidative stress (e.g., due to ATP depletion and/or overactivation of Ca2+-dependent pathways). Indeed it may be that this subpopulation of LC neurons is preferentially destroyed in neurological pathologies such as Parkinson's disease. If this is the case, there may be a protective role for antioxidant therapies. PMID:22577493

  18. 5-HT1A receptor activation counteracted the effect of acute immobilization of noradrenergic neurons in the rat locus coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Rioja, José; Santín, Luis J; López-Barroso, Diana; Doña, Alicia; Ulzurrun, Eugenia; Aguirre, José A

    2007-01-22

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of acute stress and the 5-HT(1A) receptor involvement in both, the hippocampus noradrenaline (NA) tissue levels and the c-Fos immunoreactivity (c-Fos-IR) in the catecholaminergic neurons of the locus coeruleus (LC). Double immunocytochemical staining of tyrosine hydroxilase (TH) and c-Fos protein combined with stereological techniques were used to study the specific cell activation in the LC neurons in five experimental groups (control group, immobilization (1h) group, 8-OH-DPAT group (8-OH-DPAT 0.3mg/kg, s.c.), DPAT+IMMO group (8-OH-DPAT 0.3mg/kg, s.c., 30' prior acute immobilization) and WAY+DPAT+IMMO group (WAY-100635 0.3mg/kg, s.c. and 8-OH-DPAT 0.3mg/kg, s.c., 45'and 30', respectively, before immobilization). The results showed that hippocampal NA tissue levels and c-Fos-IR in the TH positive neurons of the LC were significantly increased immediately and after 90', respectively, after the immobilization period. Pre-treatment with 8-OH-DPAT counteracted the effects induced by immobilization, but pre-treatment with WAY-100635 did not block the effects induced by 8-OH-DPAT. These results suggest that noradrenaline system is associated in a significant way with immobilization stress. The role of 5-HT(1A) receptor activation in this stress response is also discussed.

  19. Targeting of locus ceruleus noradrenergic neurons expressing human interleukin-2 receptor α-subunit in transgenic mice by a recombinant immunotoxin anti-Tac(Fv)-PE38: a study for exploring noradrenergic influence upon anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors.

    PubMed

    Itoi, Keiichi; Sugimoto, Naoya; Suzuki, Saya; Sawada, Keisuke; Das, Gopal; Uchida, Katsuya; Fuse, Toshimitsu; Ohara, Shinji; Kobayashi, Kazuto

    2011-04-20

    The noradrenergic (NA) neurons in the locus ceruleus (LC) were ablated with a high degree of selectivity by immunotoxin-mediated neuronal targeting. Transgenic mice were used in which the human interleukin-2 receptor-α subunit (hIL-2Rα; Tac) is expressed under the promoter of dopamine β-hydroxylase. The recombinant immunotoxin, which is composed of the Fv fragment of an anti-hIL-2Rα monoclonal antibody fused to a truncated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin [anti-Tac(Fv)-PE38], was injected bilaterally into the LC of the mouse. As a result, the LC-NA neurons disappeared almost completely, and tissue noradrenaline was depleted in brain regions that receive NA inputs from the LC. The decrement of tissue noradrenaline content was more profound compared with that in mice treated with N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4), a neurotoxin capable of ablating axons originating from the LC-NA neurons. Mice treated with either the immunotoxin or DSP-4 presented increased anxiety-like behaviors; in contrast, only the immunotoxin-treated mice, and not the DSP-4-treated mice, showed increased depression-like behavior. The immunotoxin-mediated neuronal targeting may provide a means for further unraveling the links between the LC and pathological manifestations of neurological disorders.

  20. Functional neuroanatomy of the central noradrenergic system.

    PubMed

    Szabadi, Elemer

    2013-08-01

    The central noradrenergic neurone, like the peripheral sympathetic neurone, is characterized by a diffusely arborizing terminal axonal network. The central neurones aggregate in distinct brainstem nuclei, of which the locus coeruleus (LC) is the most prominent. LC neurones project widely to most areas of the neuraxis, where they mediate dual effects: neuronal excitation by α₁-adrenoceptors and inhibition by α₂-adrenoceptors. The LC plays an important role in physiological regulatory networks. In the sleep/arousal network the LC promotes wakefulness, via excitatory projections to the cerebral cortex and other wakefulness-promoting nuclei, and inhibitory projections to sleep-promoting nuclei. The LC, together with other pontine noradrenergic nuclei, modulates autonomic functions by excitatory projections to preganglionic sympathetic, and inhibitory projections to preganglionic parasympathetic neurones. The LC also modulates the acute effects of light on physiological functions ('photomodulation'): stimulation of arousal and sympathetic activity by light via the LC opposes the inhibitory effects of light mediated by the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus on arousal and by the paraventricular nucleus on sympathetic activity. Photostimulation of arousal by light via the LC may enable diurnal animals to function during daytime. LC neurones degenerate early and progressively in Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, leading to cognitive impairment, depression and sleep disturbance.

  1. Prenatal exposure to MDMA alters noradrenergic neurodevelopment in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, V.B.; Koprich, J.B.; Chen, E.Y.; Kordower, J.H.; Terpstra, B.; Lipton, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ecstasy) binds with high affinity to the norepinephrine transporter (NET), making the noradrenergic system a potential target during fetal exposure. Recent data indicates that adult rats that had been prenatally exposed to MDMA display persistent deficits in working memory and attention; behaviors consistent with abnormal noradrenergic signaling in the forebrain. The present study was designed to investigate whether prenatal exposure to MDMA from embryonic days 14–20 affects the structure and/or function of the noradrenergic system of the rat on postnatal day 21. Offspring that were prenatally exposed to MDMA exhibited an increase in noradrenergic fiber density in the prelimbic region of the prefrontal cortex and the CA1 region of the hippocampus that was not accompanied by an increase in the number of noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus. Direct tissue autoradiography using tritiated nisoxetine demonstrated that while NET binding was not altered in the prelimbic cortex, the dentate gyrus, or the locus coeruleus, it was increased in the CA1, CA2, and CA3 regions of the hippocampus. Basal levels of norepinephrine were increased in the prefrontal cortex and the nucleus accumbens of MDMA-exposed rats, as compared to saline-treated controls. These findings indicate that prenatal exposure to MDMA results in structural changes in the noradrenergic system as well as functional alterations in NE neurotransmission in structures that are critical in attentional processing. PMID:21978916

  2. A Comprehensive Analysis of the Effect of DSP4 on the Locus Coeruleus Noradrenergic System in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Szot, Patricia; Miguelez, Cristina; White, Sylvia S.; Franklin, Allyn; Sikkema, Carl; Wilkinson, Charles W.; Ugedo, Luisa; Raskind, Murray A.

    2014-01-01

    Degeneration of the noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC) is a major component of Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), but the consequence of noradrenergic neuronal loss has different effects on the surviving neurons in the two disorders. Therefore, understanding the consequence of noradrenergic neuronal loss is important in determining the role of this neurotransmitter in these neurodegenerative disorders. The goal of the study was to determine if the neurotoxin N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4) could be used as a model for either (or both) AD or PD. Rats were administered DSP4 and sacrificed 3 days, 2 weeks and 3 months later. DSP4-treatment resulted in a rapid, though transient reduction in norepinephrine (NE) and NE transporter (NET) in many brain regions receiving variable innervation from the LC. Alpha1-adrenoreceptors binding site concentrations were unchanged in all brain regions at all three time points. However, an increase in α2-AR was observed in many different brain regions 2 weeks and 3 months after DSP4. These changes observed in forebrain regions occurred without a loss in LC noradrenergic neurons. Expression of synthesizing enzymes or NET did not change in amount of expression/neuron despite the reduction in NE tissue content and NET binding site concentrations at early time points, suggesting no compensatory response. In addition, DSP4 did not affect basal activity of LC at any time point in anesthetized animals, but 2 weeks after DSP4 there is a significant increase in irregular firing of noradrenergic neurons. These data indicate that DSP4 is not a selective LC noradrenergic neurotoxin, but does affect noradrenergic neuron terminals locally, as evident by the changes in transmitter and markers at terminal regions. However, since DSP4 did not result in a LOSS of noradrenergic neurons, it is not considered an adequate model for noradrenergic neuronal loss observed in AD and PD. PMID:20045445

  3. The role of the central noradrenergic system in behavioral inhibition.

    PubMed

    Stone, Eric A; Lin, Yan; Sarfraz, Yasmeen; Quartermain, David

    2011-06-24

    Although the central noradrenergic system has been shown to be involved in a number of behavioral and neurophysiological processes, the relation of these to its role in depressive illness has been difficult to define. The present review discusses the hypothesis that one of its chief functions that may be related to affective illness is the inhibition of behavioral activation, a prominent symptom of the disorder. This hypothesis is found to be consistent with most previous neuropsychopharmacological and immunohistochemical experiments on active behavior in rodents in a variety of experimental conditions using manipulation of neurotransmission at both locus coeruleus and forebrain adrenergic receptors. The findings support a mechanism in which high rates of noradrenergic neural activity suppress the neural activity of principal neurons in forebrain regions mediating active behavior. The suppression may be mediated through postsynaptic galaninergic and adrenergic receptors, and via the release of corticotrophin-releasing hormone. The hypothesis is consistent with clinical evidence for central noradrenergic system hyperactivity in depressives and with the view that this hyperactivity is a contributing etiological factor in the disorder. A similar mechanism may underlie the ability of the noradrenergic system to suppress seizure activity suggesting that inhibition of the spread of neural activation may be a unifying function.

  4. A review of the adverse effects and safety of noradrenergic antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Whiskey, Eromona; Taylor, David

    2013-08-01

    There are a variety of noradrenergic antidepressants available, most of which act by inhibiting neuronal noradrenaline re-uptake, although few drugs are specific for this action. Where drugs have numerous actions the adverse effects of noradrenaline reuptake may be difficult to isolate, although in this respect the adverse effects of reboxetine, a specific noradrenaline re-uptake inhibitor, are illuminating. Noradrenergic antidepressants typically cause minor changes in blood and heart rate, sweating and insomnia. Other pharmacological actions shown by non-specific antidepressants may act to worsen or mitigate these adverse effects. Noradrenergic drugs are less likely than selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) to cause sexual dysfunction but more likely to cause urinary hesitancy. Doubts remain over the relative propensity for antidepressants with different modes of action to cause diabetes and hyponatraemia. Noradrenergic actions do not seem to confer a risk of death in overdose.

  5. Dopaminergic, serotonergic, and noradrenergic deficits in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Buddhala, Chandana; Loftin, Susan K; Kuley, Brandon M; Cairns, Nigel J; Campbell, Meghan C; Perlmutter, Joel S; Kotzbauer, Paul T

    2015-01-01

    Objective People with Parkinson disease (PD) frequently develop dementia, which is associated with neocortical deposition of alpha-synuclein (α-syn) in Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites. In addition, neuronal loss and deposition of aggregated α-syn also occur in multiple subcortical nuclei that project to neocortical, limbic, and basal ganglia regions. Therefore, we quantified regional deficits in innervation from these PD-affected subcortical nuclei, by measuring the neurotransmitters and neurotransmitter transporter proteins originating from projections of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta, serotonergic neurons in dorsal raphé nuclei, noradrenergic neurons in locus coeruleus, and cholinergic neurons in nucleus basalis of Meynert. Methods High-performance liquid chromatography and novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were performed to quantify dopaminergic, serotonergic, noradrenergic, and cholinergic innervation in postmortem brain tissue. Eight brain regions from 15 PD participants (with dementia and Braak stage 6 α-syn deposition) and six age-matched controls were tested. Results PD participants compared to controls had widespread reductions of dopamine transporter in caudate, amygdala, hippocampus, inferior parietal lobule (IPL), precuneus, and visual association cortex (VAC) that exceeded loss of dopamine, which was only significantly reduced in caudate and amygdala. In contrast, PD participants had comparable deficits of both serotonin and serotonin transporter in caudate, middle frontal gyrus, IPL, and VAC. PD participants also had significantly reduced norepinephrine levels for all eight brain regions tested. Vesicular acetylcholine transporter levels were only quantifiable in caudate and hippocampus and did not differ between PD and control groups. Interpretation These results demonstrate widespread deficits in dopaminergic, serotonergic, and noradrenergic innervation of neocortical, limbic, and basal ganglia regions in advanced

  6. Action of the noradrenergic system on adult-born cells is required for olfactory learning in mice.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Melissa M; Bath, Kevin; Kuczewski, Nicola; Sacquet, Joëlle; Didier, Anne; Mandairon, Nathalie

    2012-03-14

    We have previously shown that an experience-driven improvement in olfactory discrimination (perceptual learning) requires the addition of newborn neurons in the olfactory bulb (OB). Despite this advance, the mechanisms which govern the selective survival of newborn OB neurons following learning remain largely unknown. We propose that activity of the noradrenergic system is a critical mediator providing a top-down signal to control the selective survival of newly born cells and support perceptual learning. In adult mice, we used pharmacological means to manipulate the noradrenergic system and neurogenesis and to assess their individual and additive effects on behavioral performance on a perceptual learning task. We then looked at the effects of these manipulations on regional survival of adult-born cells in the OB. Finally, using confocal imaging and electrophysiology, we investigated potential mechanisms by which noradrenaline could directly influence the survival of adult-born cells. Consistent with our hypotheses, direct manipulation of noradrenergic transmission significantly effect on adult-born cell survival and perceptual learning. Specifically, learning required both the presence of adult-born cell and noradrenaline. Finally, we provide a mechanistic link between these effects by showing that adult-born neurons receive noradrenergic projections and are responsive to noradrenaline. Based upon these data we argue that noradrenergic transmission is a key mechanism selecting adult-born neurons during learning and demonstrate that top-down neuromodulation acts on adult-born neuron survival to modulate learning performance.

  7. Purkinje cell loss and the noradrenergic system in the cerebellum of pcd mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Ghetti, B; Fuller, R W; Sawyer, B D; Hemrick-Luecke, S K; Schmidt, M J

    1981-12-01

    Purkinje cells in the cerebellum receive inhibitory noradrenergic input from the locus coeruleus. In pcd mutant mice all Purkinje cells degenerate by 45 days of age. The purpose of the present studies was to determine if the loss of these cerebellar neurons affects the amounts of norepinephrine in the cerebellum of mice 25-280 days of age. No significant changes in norepinephrine content were detected during or after Purkinje cell degeneration. However, since degeneration led to a reduction in cerebellar weight, the norepinephrine concentration was increased in pcd mutants. These results indicate that despite the loss of a major postsynaptic target (Purkinje cells), the cerebellar noradrenergic input remains stable.

  8. PROJECTIONS FROM THE RAT CUNEIFORM NUCLEUS TO THE A7, A6 (LOCUS COERULEUS), AND A5 PONTINE NORADRENERGIC CELL GROUPS

    PubMed Central

    Bajic, Dusica; Proudfit, Herbert K.

    2013-01-01

    Stimulation of neurons in the cuneiform nucleus (CnF) produces antinociception and cardiovascular responses that could be mediated, in part, by noradrenergic neurons that innervate the spinal cord dorsal horn. The present study determined the projections of neurons in the CnF to the pontine noradrenergic neurons in the A5, A6 (locus coeruleus), and A7 cell groups that are known to project to the spinal cord. Injections of the anterograde tracer, biotinylated dextran amine in the CnF of Sasco Sprague-Dawley rats labeled axons located near noradrenergic neurons that were visualized by processing tissue sections for tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactivity. Anterogradely-labeled axons were more dense on the side ipsilateral to the BDA deposit. Both A7 and A5 cell groups received dense projections from neurons in the CnF, whereas locus coeruleus received only a sparse projection. Highly varicose anterogradely-labeled axons from the CnF were found in close apposition to dendrites and somata of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive neurons in pontine tegmentum. Although definitive evidence for direct pathways from CnF neurons to the pontine noradrenergic cell groups requires ultrastructural analysis, the results of the present studies provide presumptive evidence of direct projections from neurons in the CnF to the pontine noradrenergic neurons of the A7, locus coeruleus, and A5 cell groups. These results support the suggestion that the analgesia and cardiovascular responses produced by stimulation of neurons in the CnF may be mediated, in part, by pontine noradrenergic neurons. PMID:23524296

  9. Noradrenergic lesioning with an anti-dopamine beta-hydroxylase immunotoxin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picklo, M. J.; Wiley, R. G.; Lappi, D. A.; Robertson, D.

    1994-01-01

    Sympathectomy has been achieved by a variety of methods but each has its limitations. These include lack of tissue specificity, incomplete lesioning, and the age range of susceptibility to the lesioning. To circumvent these drawbacks, an immunotoxin was constructed using a monoclonal antibody against the noradrenergic specific enzyme dopamine beta-hydroxylase (D beta H) coupled via a disulfide bond to saporin, a ribosomal inactivating protein. Three days after intravenous injection of the anti-D beta H immunotoxin (50 micrograms) into adult Sprague-Dawley rats, 66% of neurons in the superior cervical ganglia were chromatolytic. Superior cervical ganglia neurons were poisoned in 1 day old and 1 week old (86% of neurons) neonatal rats following subcutaneous injection of 3.75 and 15 micrograms, respectively. The anti-D beta H immunotoxin will be a useful tool in the study of the peripheral noradrenergic system in adult and neonatal animals.

  10. GPR88 in A2AR Neurons Enhances Anxiety-Like Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Meirsman, Aura Carole; Robé, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract GPR88 is an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor highly expressed in striatal dopamine D1 (receptor) R- and D2R-expressing medium spiny neurons. This receptor is involved in activity and motor responses, and we previously showed that this receptor also regulates anxiety-like behaviors. To determine whether GPR88 in D2R-expressing neurons contributes to this emotional phenotype, we generated conditional Gpr88 knock-out mice using adenosine A2AR (A2AR)-Cre-driven recombination, and compared anxiety-related responses in both total and A2AR-Gpr88 KO mice. A2AR-Gpr88 KO mice showed a selective reduction of Gpr88 mRNA in D2R-expressing, but not D1R-expressing, neurons. These mutant mice showed increased locomotor activity and decreased anxiety-like behaviors in light/dark and elevated plus maze tests. These phenotypes were superimposable on those observed in total Gpr88 KO mice, demonstrating that the previously reported anxiogenic activity of GPR88 operates at the level of A2AR-expressing neurons. Further, A2AR-Gpr88 KO mice showed no change in novelty preference and novelty-suppressed feeding, while these responses were increased and decreased, respectively, in the total Gpr88 KO mice. Also, A2AR-Gpr88 KO mice showed intact fear conditioning, while the fear responses were decreased in total Gpr88 KO. We therefore also show for the first time that GPR88 activity regulates approach behaviors and conditional fear; however, these behaviors do not seem mediated by receptors in A2AR neurons. We conclude that Gpr88 expressed in A2AR neurons enhances ethological anxiety-like behaviors without affecting conflict anxiety and fear responses. PMID:27570825

  11. Neuronal damage by secretory phospholipase A2: modulation by cytosolic phospholipase A2, platelet-activating factor, and cyclooxygenase-2 in neuronal cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Kolko, Miriam; Rodriguez de Turco, Elena B; Diemer, Nils H; Bazan, Nicolas G

    2003-02-27

    Activation of cytosolic phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)) is an early event in brain injury, which leads to the formation and accumulation of bioactive lipids: platelet-activating factor (PAF), free arachidonic acid, and eicosanoids. A cross-talk between secretory PLA(2) (sPLA(2)) and cPLA(2) in neural signal transduction has previously been suggested (J Biol Chem 271:32722; 1996). Here we show, using neuronal cell cultures, an up-regulation of cPLA(2) expression and an inhibition by the selective cPLA(2) inhibitor AACOCF3 after exposure to neurotoxic concentrations of sPLA(2)-OS2. Pretreatment of neuronal cultures with recombinant PAF acetylhydrolase (rPAF-AH) or the presynaptic PAF receptor antagonist, BN52021, partially blocked neuronal cell death induced by sPLA(2)-OS2. Furthermore, selective COX-2 inhibitors ameliorated sPLA(2)-OS2-induced neurotoxicity. We conclude that sPLA(2)-OS2 activates a neuronal signaling cascade that includes activation of cPLA(2), arachidonic acid release, PAF production, and induction of COX-2.

  12. Angiotensin II-noradrenergic interactions in renovascular hypertensive rats.

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, J B; Robertson, D; Jackson, E K

    1987-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that interactions of endogenous angiotensin II (AII) with the noradrenergic neuroeffector junction are important in renin-dependent hypertension. In the in situ blood-perfused rat mesentery, in normal rats exogenous AII potentiated mesenteric vascular responses to periarterial (sympathetic) nerve stimulation (PNS) more than vascular responses to exogenous norepinephrine (NE). In 2-kidney-1-clip (2K-1C) rats with renovascular hypertension mesenteric vascular responses to PNS and NE were greater than in sham-operated rats, and renovascular hypertension mimicked the effects of exogenous AII with respect to enhancing responses to PNS more than responses to NE. In 2K-1C rats, but not in sham-operated rats, 1-Sar-8-Ile-AII markedly suppressed vascular responses to PNS, without influencing responses to NE. Finally, 1-Sar-8-Ile-AII attenuated sympathetic nerve stimulation-induced neuronal spillover of NE in 2K-1C rats, but not in sham-operated rats. These data indicate that renovascular hypertension enhances noradrenergic neurotransmission, and that this enhancement is mediated in part by AII-induced facilitation of NE release. PMID:3301900

  13. Human group IIA secretory phospholipase A2 induces neuronal cell death via apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yagami, Tatsurou; Ueda, Keiichi; Asakura, Kenji; Hata, Satoshi; Kuroda, Takayuki; Sakaeda, Toshiyuki; Takasu, Nobuo; Tanaka, Kazushige; Gemba, Takefumi; Hori, Yozo

    2002-01-01

    Expression of group IIA secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2-IIA) is documented in the cerebral cortex (CTX) after ischemia, suggesting that sPLA2-IIA is associated with neurodegeneration. However, how sPLA2-IIA is involved in the neurodegeneration remains obscure. To clarify the pathologic role of sPLA2-IIA, we examined its neurotoxicity in rats that had the middle cerebral artery occluded and in primary cultures of cortical neurons. After occlusion, sPLA2 activity was increased in the CTX. An sPLA2 inhibitor, indoxam, significantly ameliorated not only the elevated activity of the sPLA2 but also the neurodegeneration in the CTX. The neuroprotective effect of indoxam was observed even when it was administered after occlusion. In primary cultures, sPLA2-IIA caused marked neuronal cell death. Morphologic and ultrastructural characteristics of neuronal cell death by sPLA2-IIA were apoptotic, as evidenced by condensed chromatin and fragmented DNA. Before apoptosis, sPLA2-IIA liberated arachidonic acid (AA) and generated prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), an AA metabolite, from neurons. Indoxam significantly suppressed not only AA release, but also PGD2 generation. Indoxam prevented neurons from sPLA2-IIA-induced neuronal cell death. The neuroprotective effect of indoxam was observed even when it was administered after sPLA2-IIA treatment. Furthermore, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor significantly prevented neurons from sPLA2-IIA-induced PGD2 generation and neuronal cell death. In conclusion, sPLA2-IIA induces neuronal cell death via apoptosis, which might be associated with AA metabolites, especially PGD2. Furthermore, sPLA2 contributes to neurodegeneration in the ischemic brain, highlighting the therapeutic potential of sPLA2-IIA inhibitors for stroke.

  14. Topographic architecture of stress-related pathways targeting the noradrenergic locus coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Van Bockstaele, E J; Bajic, D; Proudfit, H; Valentino, R J

    2001-06-01

    Peripheral sympathetic nerves and brainstem noradrenergic neurons of the locus coeruleus (LC) respond in parallel to a variety of stress-related stimuli which results in norepinephrine release both peripherally and centrally. Elucidation of central pathways subserving modulation of LC neurons point to extranuclear noradrenergic dendrites of LC somata that extend into peri-coerulear areas as a major target of afferents that participate in behavioral and physiological responses to stress. Anterograde tract tracing combined with immunoelectron microscopic detection of the catecholamine synthesizing enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) has demonstrated that the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and the ventrolateral aspect of the periaqueductal gray (PAG), regions that participate in coordinating autonomic and motor behavior in response to stress, preferentially target the rostral ventromedial aspect of the peri-LC. In contrast, limbic forebrain afferents including the central nucleus of the amygdala (CNA) and the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), regions that coordinate emotional responses to external stressors, provide direct synaptic input to noradrenergic dendrites that extend into rostral dorsolateral peri-coerulear areas. Neurochemical identification of transmitter systems impinging on LC indicate that the CNA provides corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a peptide essential for integrated physiological responses to stress, to the dorsolateral LC. Endogenous opioid peptides that originate from medullary sources, however, target primarily the "core" of the LC. Our physiological data suggest that stress engages CRF and opioid afferents to the LC, which have opposing influences on this noradrenergic system. The balance between opioid and CRF influences acting in the LC may, in part, maintain the balance of active and passive coping behaviors in response to stress. Understanding the afferent and neurochemical organization of the LC may help elucidate

  15. A Noradrenergic Lesion Exacerbates Neurodegeneration in a Down Syndrome Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Lockrow, Jason; Boger, Heather; Gerhardt, Greg; Aston-Jones, Gary; Bachman, David; Granholm, Ann-Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) acquire Alzheimer’s-like dementia (AD) and associated neuropathology earlier and at significantly greater rates than age-matched normosomic individuals. However, biological mechanisms have not been discovered and there is currently limited therapy for either DS- or AD-related dementia. Segmental trisomy 16 (Ts65Dn) mice provide a useful model for many of the degenerative changes which occur with age in DS including cognitive deficits, neuroinflammation, and degeneration of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. Loss of noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC) neurons is an early event in AD and in DS, and may contribute to the neuropathology. We report that Ts65Dn mice exhibit progressive loss of norepinephrine (NE) phenotype in LC neurons. In order to determine whether LC degeneration contributes to memory loss and neurodegeneration in Ts65Dn mice, we administered the noradrenergic neurotoxin N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4; 2 doses of 50 mg/kg, i.p.) to Ts65Dn mice at four months of age, prior to working memory loss. At eight months of age, Ts65Dn mice treated with DSP-4 exhibited an 80% reduction in hippocampal NE, coupled with a marked increase in hippocampal neuroinflammation. Noradrenergic depletion also resulted in accelerated cholinergic neuron degeneration and a further impairment of memory function in Ts65Dn mice. In contrast, DSP-4 had minimal effects on normosomic littermates, suggesting a disease-modulated vulnerability to NE loss in the DS mouse model. These data suggest that noradrenergic degeneration may play a role in the progressive memory loss, neuroinflammation, and cholinergic loss occurring in DS individuals, providing a possible therapeutic avenue for future clinical studies. PMID:21098982

  16. Enhanced assymetrical noradrenergic transmission in the olfactory bulb of deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Abramoff, Tamara; Guil, María J; Morales, Vanina P; Hope, Sandra I; Soria, Celeste; Bianciotti, Liliana G; Vatta, Marcelo S

    2013-10-01

    The ablation of olfactory bulb induces critical changes in dopamine, and monoamine oxidase activity in the brain stem. Growing evidence supports the participation of this telencephalic region in the regulation blood pressure and cardiovascular activity but little is known about its contribution to hypertension. We have previously reported that in the olfactory bulb of normotensive rats endothelins enhance noradrenergic activity by increasing tyrosine hydroxylase activity and norepinephrine release. In the present study we sought to establish the status of noradrenergic activity in the olfactory bulb of deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt hypertensive rats. Different steps in norepinephrine transmission including tyrosine hydroxylase activity, neuronal norepinephrine release and uptake were assessed in the left and right olfactory bulb of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats. Increased tyrosine hydroxylase activity, and decreased neuronal norepinephrine uptake were observed in the olfactory bulb of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats. Furthermore the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase and its phosphorylated forms were also augmented. Intriguingly, asymmetrical responses between the right and left olfactory bulb of normotensive and hypertensive rats were observed. Neuronal norepinephrine release was increased in the right but not in the left olfactory bulb of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats, whereas non asymmetrical differences were observed in normotensive animals. Present findings indicate that the olfactory bulb of hypertensive rats show an asymmetrical increase in norepinephrine activity. The observed changes in noradrenergic transmission may likely contribute to the onset and/or progression of hypertension in this animal model.

  17. Cytosolic phospholipase A(2) alpha mediates electrophysiologic responses of hippocampal pyramidal neurons to neurotoxic NMDA treatment.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ying; Kishimoto, Koji; Linden, David J; Sapirstein, Adam

    2007-04-03

    The arachidonic acid-generating enzyme cytosolic phospholipase A(2) alpha (cPLA(2)alpha) has been implicated in the progression of excitotoxic neuronal injury. However, the mechanisms of cPLA(2)alpha toxicity have yet to be determined. Here, we used a model system exposing mouse hippocampal slices to NMDA as an excitotoxic injury, in combination with simultaneous patch-clamp recording and confocal Ca(2+) imaging of CA1 pyramidal neurons. NMDA treatment caused significantly greater injury in wild-type (WT) than in cPLA(2)alpha null CA1 neurons. Bath application of NMDA evoked a slow inward current in voltage-clamped neurons (composed of both NMDA receptor-mediated and other conductances) that was smaller in cPLA(2)alpha null than in WT slices. This was not due to down-regulation of NMDA receptor function because NMDA receptor-mediated currents were equivalent in each genotype following brief photolysis of caged glutamate. Current-clamp recordings were made during and following NMDA exposure by eliciting a single action potential with a brief current injection. After NMDA exposure, WT CA1 neurons developed a spike-evoked plateau potential and an increased spike-evoked dendritic Ca(2+) transient. These effects were absent in CA1 neurons from cPLA(2)alpha null mice and WT neurons treated with a cPLA(2)alpha inhibitor. The Ca-sensitive K-channel toxins, apamin and paxilline, caused spike broadening and Ca(2+) enhancement in WT and cPLA(2)alpha null slices. NMDA application in WT and arachidonate applied to cPLA(2)alpha null cells occluded the effects of apamin/paxilline. These results indicate that cPLA(2)alpha activity is required for development of aberrant electrophysiologic events triggered by NMDA receptor activation, in part through attenuation of K-channel function.

  18. Snake phospholipase A2 neurotoxins enter neurons, bind specifically to mitochondria, and open their transition pores.

    PubMed

    Rigoni, Michela; Paoli, Marco; Milanesi, Eva; Caccin, Paola; Rasola, Andrea; Bernardi, Paolo; Montecucco, Cesare

    2008-12-05

    Snake presynaptic neurotoxins with phospholipase A(2) activity are potent inducers of paralysis through inhibition of the neuromuscular junction. These neurotoxins were recently shown to induce exocytosis of synaptic vesicles following the production of lysophospholipids and fatty acids and a sustained influx of Ca(2+) from the medium. Here, we show that these toxins are able to penetrate spinal cord motor neurons and cerebellar granule neurons and selectively bind to mitochondria. As a result of this interaction, mitochondria depolarize and undergo a profound shape change from elongated and spaghetti-like to round and swollen. We show that snake presynaptic phospholipase A(2) neurotoxins facilitate opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, an inner membrane high-conductance channel. The relative potency of the snake neurotoxins was similar for the permeability transition pore opening and for the phospholipid hydrolysis activities, suggesting a causal relationship, which is also supported by the effect of phospholipid hydrolysis products, lysophospholipids and fatty acids, on mitochondrial pore opening. These findings contribute to define the cellular events that lead to intoxication of nerve terminals by these snake neurotoxins and suggest that mitochondrial impairment is an important determinant of their toxicity.

  19. Noradrenergic Stimulation Impairs Memory Generalization in Women.

    PubMed

    Kluen, Lisa Marieke; Agorastos, Agorastos; Wiedemann, Klaus; Schwabe, Lars

    2017-03-02

    Memory generalization is essential for adaptive decision-making and action. Our ability to generalize across past experiences relies on medial-temporal lobe structures, known to be highly sensitive to stress. Recent evidence suggests that stressful events may indeed interfere with memory generalization. Yet, the mechanisms involved in this generalization impairment are unknown. We tested here whether a pharmacological elevation of major stress mediators, noradrenaline, and glucocorticoids is sufficient to disrupt memory generalization. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled design, healthy men and women received orally a placebo, hydrocortisone, the α2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine that leads to increased noradrenergic stimulation, or both drugs, before they completed an associative learning task probing memory generalization. Drugs left learning performance intact. Yohimbine, however, led to a striking generalization impairment in women, but not in men. Hydrocortisone, in turn, had no effect on memory generalization, neither in men nor in women. The present findings indicate that increased noradrenergic activity, but not cortisol, is sufficient to disrupt memory generalization in a sex-specific manner, with relevant implications for stress-related mental disorders characterized by generalization deficits.

  20. Differential roles of phospholipases A2 in neuronal death and neurogenesis: implications for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, Evelin L; da Silva, Emanuelle R; Novaes, Barbara de A; Skaf, Heni D; Gattaz, Wagner F

    2010-12-01

    The involvement of phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) in Alzheimer disease (AD) was first investigated nearly 15 years ago. Over the years, several PLA(2) isoforms have been detected in brain tissue: calcium-dependent secreted PLA(2) or sPLA(2) (IIA, IIC, IIE, V, X, and XII), calcium-dependent cytosolic PLA(2) or cPLA(2) (IVA, IVB, and IVC), and calcium-independent PLA(2) or iPLA(2) (VIA and VIB). Additionally, numerous in vivo and in vitro studies have suggested the role of different brain PLA(2) in both physiological and pathological events. This review aimed to summarize the findings in the literature relating the different brain PLA(2) isoforms with alterations found in AD, such as neuronal cell death and impaired neurogenesis process. The review showed that sPLA(2)-IIA, sPLA(2)-V and cPLA(2)-IVA are involved in neuronal death, whereas sPLA(2)-III and sPLA(2)-X are related to the process of neurogenesis, and that the cPLA(2) and iPLA(2) groups can be involved in both neuronal death and neurogenesis. In AD, there are reports of reduced activity of the cPLA(2) and iPLA(2) groups and increased expression of sPLA(2)-IIA and cPLA(2)-IVA. The findings suggest that the inhibition of cPLA(2) and iPLA(2) isoforms (yet to be determined) might contribute to impaired neurogenesis, whereas stimulation of sPLA(2)-IIA and cPLA(2)-IVA might contribute to neurodegeneration in AD.

  1. Norepinephrine deficiency in Parkinson's disease: the case for noradrenergic enhancement.

    PubMed

    Espay, Alberto J; LeWitt, Peter A; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2014-12-01

    The dramatic response of most motor and some nonmotor symptoms to dopaminergic therapies has contributed to maintaining the long-established identity of Parkinson's disease (PD) as primarily a nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) deficiency syndrome. However, DA neurotransmission may be neither the first nor the major neurotransmitter casualty in the neurodegenerative sequence of PD. Growing evidence supports earlier norepinephrine (NE) deficiency resulting from selective degeneration of neurons of the locus coeruleus and sympathetic ganglia. Dopaminergic replacement therapy therefore would seem to neglect some of the motor, behavioral, cognitive, and autonomic impairments that are directly or indirectly associated with the marked deficiency of NE in the brain and elsewhere. Therapeutic strategies to enhance NE neurotransmission have undergone only limited pharmacological testing. Currently, these approaches include selective NE reuptake inhibition, presynaptic α2 -adrenergic receptor blockade, and an NE prodrug, the artificial amino acid L-threo-3,4-dihydroxyphenylserine. In addition to reducing the consequences of deficient noradrenergic signaling, enhancement strate gies have the potential for augmenting the effects of dopaminergic therapies in PD. Furthermore, early recognition of the various clinical manifestations associated with NE deficiency, which may precede development of motor symptoms, could provide a window of opportunity for neuroprotective interventions.

  2. Coordinated forms of noradrenergic plasticity in the locus coeruleus and primary auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Ana Raquel O.; Froemke, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    The cerebral cortex is plastic and represents the world according to the significance of sensory stimuli. However, cortical networks are embodied within complex circuits including neuromodulatory systems such as the noradrenergic locus coeruleus, providing information about internal state and behavioral relevance. While norepinephrine is important for cortical plasticity, it is unknown how modulatory neurons themselves respond to changes of sensory input. Here we examine how locus coeruleus neurons are modified by experience, and the consequences of locus coeruleus plasticity on cortical representations and sensory perception. We made whole-cell recordings from rat locus coeruleus and primary auditory cortex (AI), pairing sounds with locus coeruleus activation. Although initially unresponsive, locus coeruleus neurons developed and maintained auditory responses afterwards. Locus coeruleus plasticity induced changes in AI responses lasting at least hours and improved auditory perception for days to weeks. Our results demonstrate that locus coeruleus is highly plastic, leading to substantial changes in regulation of brain state by norepinephrine. PMID:26301326

  3. Stress Conditions Increase Vimentin Cleavage by Omi/HtrA2 Protease in Human Primary Neurons and Differentiated Neuroblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Lucotte, Bérangère; Tajhizi, Mehdi; Alkhatib, Dareen; Samuelsson, Eva-Britt; Wiehager, Birgitta; Schedin-Weiss, Sophia; Sundström, Erik; Winblad, Bengt; Tjernberg, Lars O; Behbahani, Homira

    2015-12-01

    Dysfunctional Omi/HtrA2, a mitochondrial serine protease, has been implicated in various neurodegenerative disorders. Despite the wealth of evidence on the roles of Omi/HtrA2 in apoptosis, little is known about its cytosolic targets, the cleavage of which could account for the observed morphological changes such as cytoskeletal reorganizations in axons. By proteomic analysis, vimentin was identified as a substrate for Omi/HtrA2 and we have reported increased Omi/HtrA2 protease activity in Alzheimer disease (AD) brain. Here, we investigated a possible link between Omi/HtrA2 and vimentin cleavage, and consequence of this cleavage on mitochondrial distribution in neurons. In vitro protease assays showed vimentin to be cleaved by Omi/HtrA2 protease, and proximity ligation assay demonstrated an increased interaction between Omi/HtrA2 and vimentin in human primary neurons upon stress stimuli. Using differentiated neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, we showed that Omi/HtrA2 under several different stress conditions induces cleavage of vimentin in wild-type as well as SH-SY5Y cells transfected with amyloid precursor protein with the Alzheimer disease-associated Swedish mutation. After stress treatment, inhibition of Omi/HtrA2 protease activity by the Omi/HtrA2 specific inhibitor, Ucf-101, reduced the cleavage of vimentin in wild-type cells. Following altered vimentin filaments integrity by stress stimuli, mitochondria was redistributed in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells and human primary neurons. In summary, the findings outlined in this paper suggest a role of Omi/HtrA2 in modulation of vimentin filamentous structure in neurons. Our results provide important findings for understanding the biological role of Omi/HtrA2 activity during stress conditions, and give knowledge of interplay between Omi/HtrA2 and vimentin which might affect mitochondrial distribution in neurons.

  4. Differential sensitivity of intranuclear and systemic oxytocin release to central noradrenergic receptor stimulation during mid- and late gestation in rats.

    PubMed

    Lipschitz, David L; Crowley, William R; Bealer, Steven L

    2004-09-01

    A number of changes occur in the oxytocin (OT) system during gestation, such as increases in hypothalamic OT mRNA, increased neural lobe and systemic OT, and morphological and electrophysiological changes in OT-containing magnocellular neurons, suggestive of altered neuronal sensitivity, which may be mediated by ovarian steroids. Because central norepinephrine (NE) and histamine (HA) are potent stimulators of OT release during parturition and lactation, the present study investigated the effects of central noradrenergic and histaminergic receptor activation on systemic (NE, HA) and intranuclear (NE) OT release in pregnant rats and in ovariectomized rats treated with ovarian steroids. Plasma OT levels in late gestation were significantly higher compared with all other groups, and neither adrenergic nor histaminergic receptor blockade decreased these elevated levels. Furthermore, the alpha-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine, but not histamine, stimulated systemic OT release to a significantly greater extent in late gestation than in midpregnant, ovariectomized, or steroid-treated females. Although basal extracellular OT levels in the paraventricular nucleus, as measured with microdialysis, were unchanged during pregnancy or steroid treatment, noradrenergic receptor stimulation of intranuclear OT release was significantly elevated in midgestation females compared with all other groups. These studies indicate that sensitivity of intranuclear and systemic OT release to noradrenergic receptor activation differentially varies during the course of gestation.

  5. Lithium increases synaptic GluA2 in hippocampal neurons by elevating the δ-catenin protein.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Mobeen; Kim, Seonil; Patel, Sunny; Khatri, Latika; Hikima, Takuya; Rice, Margaret E; Ziff, Edward B

    2017-02-01

    Lithium (Li(+)) is a drug widely employed for treating bipolar disorder, however the mechanism of action is not known. Here we study the effects of Li(+) in cultured hippocampal neurons on a synaptic complex consisting of δ-catenin, a protein associated with cadherins whose mutation is linked to autism, and GRIP, an AMPA receptor (AMPAR) scaffolding protein, and the AMPAR subunit, GluA2. We show that Li(+) elevates the level of δ-catenin in cultured neurons. δ-catenin binds to the ABP and GRIP proteins, which are synaptic scaffolds for GluA2. We show that Li(+) increases the levels of GRIP and GluA2, consistent with Li(+)-induced elevation of δ-catenin. Using GluA2 mutants, we show that the increase in surface level of GluA2 requires GluA2 interaction with GRIP. The amplitude but not the frequency of mEPSCs was also increased by Li(+) in cultured hippocampal neurons, confirming a functional effect and consistent with AMPAR stabilization at synapses. Furthermore, animals fed with Li(+) show elevated synaptic levels of δ-catenin, GRIP, and GluA2 in the hippocampus, also consistent with the findings in cultured neurons. This work supports a model in which Li(+) stabilizes δ-catenin, thus elevating a complex consisting of δ-catenin, GRIP and AMPARs in synapses of hippocampal neurons. Thus, the work suggests a mechanism by which Li(+) can alter brain synaptic function that may be relevant to its pharmacologic action in treatment of neurological disease.

  6. Noradrenergic regulation of hypothalamic cells that produce growth hormone-releasing hormone and somatostatin and the effect of altered adiposity in sheep.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, J; Manley, T R; Yue, Q; Namavar, M R; Clarke, I J

    2005-06-01

    The growth hormone (GH) axis is sensitive to alteration in body weight and there is evidence that central noradrenergic systems regulate neurones that produce growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) and somatostatin (SRIF). This study reports semiquantitative estimates of the noradrenergic input to neuroendocrine GHRH and SRIF neurones in the sheep of different body weights. We also studied the effects of altered body weight on expression of dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH), the enzyme that produces noradrenalin from dopamine. Ovariectomised ewes were made Lean (39.6 +/- 2.6 kg; Mean +/- SEM) by dietary restriction, whereas Normally Fed animals (61.2 +/- 0.8 kg) were maintained on a regular diet. Brains were perfused for immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridisation. The Mean +/- SEM number of GHRH-immunoreactive (-IR) cells was lower in Normally Fed (65 +/- 7) than in Lean (115 +/- 14) animals, whereas the number of SRIF-IR cells was similar in the two groups (Normally Fed, 196 +/- 17; Lean 230 +/- 21). Confocal microscopic analysis revealed that the percentage of GHRH-IR cells (Normally Fed 36 +/- 1.5% versus Lean 32 +/- 4.6%) and percentage of SRIF-IR cells (Normally Fed 30 +/- 40.4% versus Lean 32 +/- 2.3%) contacted by noradrenergic fibres did not change with body weight. FluoroGold retrograde tracer injections confirmed that noradrenergic projections to the arcuate nucleus are from ventrolateral medulla and noradrenergic projections to periventricular nucleus arise from the ventrolateral medulla, nucleus of solitary tract, locus coeruleus (LC) and the parabrachial nucleus (PBN). DBH expressing cells were identified using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridisation and the level of expression (silver grains/cell) quantified by image analysis. The number of DBH cells was similar in Normally Fed and Lean animals, but the level of expression/cell was lower (P < 0.02) in the PBN and LC of Lean animals. These results provide an anatomical basis for the

  7. Ontogenetic noradrenergic lesion alters histaminergic activity in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Przemyslaw; Jochem, Jerzy; Zwirska-Korczala, Krystyna; Josko, Jadwiga; Noras, Lukasz; Kostrzewa, Richard M; Brus, Ryszard

    2008-04-01

    To determine whether noradrenergic nerves might have a modulatory role on the sensitivity or reactivity of histaminergic receptor systems in brain, behavioral effects of the respective histamine H1, H2 and H3 antagonists S(+)chlorpheniramine, cimetidine and thioperimide in control adult rats were compared to the effects in adult rats that had been lesioned as neonates with the noradrenergic neurotoxin DSP-4. On the 1st and 3rd days after birth rat pups were treated with either saline or DSP-4 (50 mg/kg sc), then returned to their home cages with the dam. At 8 weeks when rats were tested, S(+)chlorpheniramine (10 mg/kg ip) was found to increase locomotor activity in intact and DSP-4 lesioned rats, while cimetidine (5 mg/kg, ip) and thioperimide (5 mg/kg, ip) increased activity several-fold solely in the DSP-4 group. Exploratory activity, nociceptive activity, and irritability were little altered by the histamine antagonists, although oral activity was increased by thioperimide in intact and lesioned rats, and by cimetidine or S(+)chlorpheniramine in DSP-4 rats. High performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection was used to determine that DSP-4 produced a 90% reduction in frontal cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus, with a 90% elevation of NE in cerebellum--reflecting reactive sprouting of noradrenergic fibers consequent to lesion of noradrenergic tracts projecting to proximal brain regions. These findings indicate that perinatal noradrenergic fiber lesioning in rat brain is associated with an altered behavioral spectrum by histamine H1, H2 and H3 receptor antagonists, thereby implicating histaminergic systems as modulators of noradrenergic systems in brain.

  8. Upregulation of mitochondrial protease HtrA2/Omi contributes to manganese-induced neuronal apoptosis in rat brain striatum.

    PubMed

    Jiang, J K; Ma, X; Wu, Q Y; Qian, W B; Wang, N; Shi, S S; Han, J L; Zhao, J Y; Jiang, S Y; Wan, C H

    2014-05-30

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace element that is required for normal brain functioning. However, excessive intake of Mn has been known to lead to neuronal loss and clinical symptoms resembling idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD), whose precise molecular mechanism remains largely elusive. In the study, we established a Mn-exposed rat model and identified a mitochondrial protease, the mature form of high temperature requirement A2 (HtrA2/Omi), which was significantly upregulated in rat brain striatum after Mn exposure. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the expression of mature HtrA2 was remarkably increased following Mn exposure. In addition, immunofluorescence assay demonstrated that overexposure to Mn could lead to significant elevation in the number of HtrA2-positive neurons. Accordingly, the expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), a well-characterized target of HtrA2-mediated proteolysis, was progressively decreased following Mn exposure, and was correlated with increased level of active caspase-3. Further, we showed that Mn exposure decreased the viability and induced apparent apoptosis of NFG-differentiated PC12 cells. Importantly, the expression of HtrA2 was progressively increased, whereas the level of cellular XIAP was reduced during Mn-induced apoptosis. In addition, blockage of HtrA2 activity with UCF-101 restored Mn-induced reduction in XIAP expression. Finally, we observed that UCF-101 treatment ameliorated Mn-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells. Collectively, these findings suggested that upregulated HtrA2 played a role in Mn-induced neuronal death in brain striatum.

  9. Central noradrenergic lesion induced by DSP-4 impairs the acquisition of avoidance reactions and prevents molecular changes in the amygdala.

    PubMed

    Radwanska, Kasia; Nikolaev, Evgenij; Kaczmarek, Leszek

    2010-10-01

    The noradrenergic system plays and an important modulatory role in memory consolidation of emotionally arousing tasks. However, the molecular cascades regulated in the brain by norepinephrine and involved in memory formation are still largely unknown. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the role of the noradrenergic system on the acquisition of a highly emotionally arousing task-two-way active avoidance training-and its molecular and cellular substrates. The selective norepinephrine neurotoxin N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2 bromobenzylamine (DSP-4, 50mg/kg) was used. DSP-4-treated rats were trained in a shuttle box to avoid a footshock signaled by an auditory stimulus. Immunohistochemical mapping of the neuronal plasticity-related molecules c-Fos protein and the activated form of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (phosphorylated ERK [pERK]) was then employed. We found that DSP-4 treatment depleted the expression of the norepinephrine marker dopamine -hydroxylase (DBH) in the locus coeruleus and its projection area, the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala, confirming locus coeruleus noradrenergic lesion in the experimental animals. Furthermore, DSP-4 treatment impaired the acquisition of the avoidance reaction. We also found that acquisition of the active avoidance reaction induced c-Fos expression and ERK activation in the amygdala and piriform cortex. This upregulation was prevented by DSP-4 treatment. Thus, our data suggest that the noradrenergic system is involved in the acquisition of the active avoidance reaction by regulating ERK pathway activity and c-Fos expression in the amygdala and piriform cortex.

  10. Physical Exercise Affects Attentional Orienting Behavior through Noradrenergic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Andrea M.; Buttolph, Thomas; Green, John T.; Bucci, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHRs), a commonly-used animal model of ADHD, exhibit little habituation of the orienting response to repeated presentations of a non-reinforced visual stimulus. However, SHRs that have access to a running wheel for 5, 10, or 21 days exhibit robust habituation that is indistinguishable from normo-active rats. Two days of exercise, in comparison, was not sufficient to affect habituation. Here we tested the hypothesis that the effect of exercise on orienting behavior in SHRs is mediated by changes in noradrenergic function. In Experiment 1, we found that 5, 10, or 21 days of access to a running wheel, but not 2 days, significantly reduced levels of the norepinephrine transporter (NET) in medial prefrontal cortex. In Experiment 2, we tested for a causal relationship between changes in noradrenergic function and orienting behavior by blocking noradrenergic receptors during exercise. Rats that received propranolol (beta adrenergic/noradrenergic receptor blocker) during 10 days of exercise failed to exhibit an exercise-induced reduction in orienting behavior. The results inform a growing literature regarding the effects of exercise on behavior and the potential use of exercise as a treatment for mental disorders. PMID:26030434

  11. AMPA receptor pHluorin-GluA2 reports NMDA receptor-induced intracellular acidification in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Rathje, Mette; Fang, Huaqiang; Bachman, Julia L; Anggono, Victor; Gether, Ulrik; Huganir, Richard L; Madsen, Kenneth L

    2013-08-27

    NMDA receptor activation promotes endocytosis of AMPA receptors, which is an important mechanism underlying long-term synaptic depression. The pH-sensitive GFP variant pHluorin fused to the N terminus of GluA2 (pH-GluA2) has been used to assay NMDA-mediated AMPA receptor endocytosis and recycling. Here, we demonstrate that in somatic and dendritic regions of hippocampal neurons a large fraction of the fluorescent signal originates from intracellular pH-GluA2, and that the decline in fluorescence in response to NMDA and AMPA primarily describes an intracellular acidification, which quenches the pHluorin signal from intracellular receptor pools. Neurons expressing an endoplasmic reticulum-retained mutant of GluA2 (pH-GluA2 ΔC49) displayed a larger response to NMDA than neurons expressing wild-type pH-GluA2. A similar NMDA-elicited decline in pHluorin signal was observed by expressing cytosolic pHluorin alone without fusion to GluA2 (cyto-pHluorin). Intracellular acidification in response to NMDA was further confirmed by using the ratiometric pH indicator carboxy-SNARF-1. The NMDA-induced decline was followed by rapid recovery of the fluorescent signal from both cyto-pHluorin and pH-GluA2. The recovery was sodium-dependent and sensitive to Na(+)/H(+)-exchanger (NHE) inhibitors. Moreover, recovery was more rapid after shRNA-mediated knockdown of the GluA2 binding PDZ domain-containing protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1). Interestingly, the accelerating effect of PICK1 knockdown on the fluorescence recovery was eliminated in the presence of the NHE1 inhibitor zoniporide. Our results indicate that the pH-GluA2 recycling assay is an unreliable assay for studying AMPA receptor trafficking and also suggest a role for PICK1 in regulating intracellular pH via modulation of NHE activity.

  12. CRH engagement of the locus coeruleus noradrenergic system mediates stress-induced anxiety

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Jordan G.; Al-Hasani, Ream; Siuda, Edward R.; Hong, Daniel Y.; Norris, Aaron J.; Ford, Christopher P.; Bruchas, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The locus coeruleus noradrenergic (LC-NE) system is one of the first systems engaged following a stressful event. While numerous groups have demonstrated that LC-NE neurons are activated by many different stressors, the underlying neural circuitry and the role of this activity in generating stress-induced anxiety has not been elucidated. Using a combination of in vivo chemogenetics, optogenetics, and retrograde tracing we determine that increased tonic activity of the LC-NE system is necessary and sufficient for stress-induced anxiety and aversion. Selective inhibition of LC-NE neurons during stress prevents subsequent anxiety-like behavior. Exogenously increasing tonic, but not phasic, activity of LC-NE neurons is alone sufficient for anxiety-like and aversive behavior. Furthermore, endogenous corticotropin releasing hormone+ (CRH+) LC inputs from the amygdala increase tonic LC activity, inducing anxiety-like behaviors. These studies position the LC-NE system as a critical mediator of acute stress-induced anxiety and offer a potential intervention for preventing stress-related affective disorders. PMID:26212712

  13. CRH Engagement of the Locus Coeruleus Noradrenergic System Mediates Stress-Induced Anxiety.

    PubMed

    McCall, Jordan G; Al-Hasani, Ream; Siuda, Edward R; Hong, Daniel Y; Norris, Aaron J; Ford, Christopher P; Bruchas, Michael R

    2015-08-05

    The locus coeruleus noradrenergic (LC-NE) system is one of the first systems engaged following a stressful event. While numerous groups have demonstrated that LC-NE neurons are activated by many different stressors, the underlying neural circuitry and the role of this activity in generating stress-induced anxiety has not been elucidated. Using a combination of in vivo chemogenetics, optogenetics, and retrograde tracing, we determine that increased tonic activity of the LC-NE system is necessary and sufficient for stress-induced anxiety and aversion. Selective inhibition of LC-NE neurons during stress prevents subsequent anxiety-like behavior. Exogenously increasing tonic, but not phasic, activity of LC-NE neurons is alone sufficient for anxiety-like and aversive behavior. Furthermore, endogenous corticotropin-releasing hormone(+) (CRH(+)) LC inputs from the amygdala increase tonic LC activity, inducing anxiety-like behaviors. These studies position the LC-NE system as a critical mediator of acute stress-induced anxiety and offer a potential intervention for preventing stress-related affective disorders.

  14. Noradrenergic modulation of space exploration in visual neglect.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Paresh A; Parton, Andrew D; Greenwood, Richard; Husain, Masud

    2006-01-01

    Visual neglect after stroke is often associated with a failure to explore contralesional space. Here, we show that guanfacine, a noradrenergic agonist that modulates dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, improves leftward space exploration in selected right-hemisphere patients with neglect. The positive effects of guanfacine were associated with extended ability to maintain attention on task. The results suggest that neuropharmacological targeting of intact frontal areas might be one way to enhance cognitive function after damage to posterior brain regions in selected individuals.

  15. Noradrenergic regulation of plasticity marker expression in the adult rodent piriform cortex.

    PubMed

    Vadodaria, Krishna C; Yanpallewar, Sudhirkumar U; Vadhvani, Mayur; Toshniwal, Devyani; Liles, L Cameron; Rommelfanger, Karen S; Weinshenker, David; Vaidya, Vidita A

    2017-02-23

    The adult rodent piriform cortex has been reported to harbor immature neurons that express markers associated with neurodevelopment and plasticity, namely polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) and doublecortin (DCX). We characterized the expression of PSA-NCAM and DCX across the rostrocaudal axis of the rat piriform cortex and observed higher numbers of PSA-NCAM and DCX positive cells in the posterior subdivision. As observed in the rat piriform cortex, Nestin-GFP reporter mice also revealed a similar gradient of GFP-positive cells with an increasing rostro-caudal gradient of expression. Given the extensive noradrenergic innervation of the piriform cortex and its role in regulating piriform cortex function and synaptic plasticity, we addressed the influence of norepinephrine (NE) on piriform cortex plasticity marker expression. Depletion of NE by treatment with the noradrenergic neurotoxin DSP-4 significantly increased the number of DCX and PSA-NCAM immunopositive cells in the piriform cortex of adult rats. Similarly, DSP-4 treated Nestin-GFP reporter mice revealed a robust induction of GFP-positive cells within the piriform cortex following NE depletion. Genetic loss of NE in dopamine β-hydroxylase knockout (Dbh -/-) mice phenocopied the effects of DSP-4, with an increase noted in PSA-NCAM and DCX positive cells in the piriform cortex. Further, chronic α2-adrenergic receptor stimulation with the agonist guanabenz increased PSA-NCAM and DCX positive cells in the piriform cortex of adult rats and GFP-positive cells in the piriform cortex of Nestin-GFP mice. By contrast, chronic α2-adrenergic receptor blockade with the antagonist yohimbine reduced PSA-NCAM and DCX positive cells in the piriform cortex of adult rats. Our results provide novel evidence for a role of NE in regulating the expression of plasticity markers, including PSA-NCAM, DCX, and nestin, within the adult mouse and rat piriform cortex.

  16. Noradrenergic regulation of fear and drug-associated memory reconsolidation.

    PubMed

    Otis, James M; Werner, Craig T; Mueller, Devin

    2015-03-01

    Emotional and traumatic experiences lead to the development of particularly strong memories that can drive neuropsychiatric disorders, such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and drug addiction. Disruption of these memories would therefore serve as a powerful treatment option, and targeting the pathologic emotional, but not declarative, component of a memory would be ideal for clinical intervention. Research reveals that after retrieval of a consolidated memory, the memory can be destabilized, and must then be reconsolidated through synaptic plasticity to allow subsequent retrieval. Disruption of reconsolidation-related plasticity would therefore impair specific, reactivated memories. Noradrenergic signaling strengthens synaptic plasticity and is essential for encoding the emotional components of memory. Consistent with this, investigations have now revealed that noradrenergic signaling is a critical mechanism for reconsolidation of emotional memories in rodent and human models. Here, we discuss these investigations and promising clinical trials indicating that disruption of noradrenergic signaling during reconsolidation may abolish the pathologic emotional, but not declarative, component of memories allowing alleviation of neuropsychiatric disorders including PTSD and drug addiction.

  17. Physiological Roles of Group X-secreted Phospholipase A2 in Reproduction, Gastrointestinal Phospholipid Digestion, and Neuronal Function*

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Hiroyasu; Isogai, Yuki; Masuda, Seiko; Taketomi, Yoshitaka; Miki, Yoshimi; Kamei, Daisuke; Hara, Shuntaro; Kobayashi, Tetsuyuki; Ishikawa, Yukio; Ishii, Toshiharu; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Taguchi, Ryo; Ishimoto, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Noriko; Yokota, Yasunori; Hanasaki, Kohji; Suzuki-Yamamoto, Toshiko; Yamamoto, Kei; Murakami, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Although the secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) family has been generally thought to participate in pathologic events such as inflammation and atherosclerosis, relatively high and constitutive expression of group X sPLA2 (sPLA2-X) in restricted sites such as reproductive organs, the gastrointestinal tract, and peripheral neurons raises a question as to the roles played by this enzyme in the physiology of reproduction, digestion, and the nervous system. Herein we used mice with gene disruption or transgenic overexpression of sPLA2-X to clarify the homeostatic functions of this enzyme at these locations. Our results suggest that sPLA2-X regulates 1) the fertility of spermatozoa, not oocytes, beyond the step of flagellar motility, 2) gastrointestinal phospholipid digestion, perturbation of which is eventually linked to delayed onset of a lean phenotype with reduced adiposity, decreased plasma leptin, and improved muscle insulin tolerance, and 3) neuritogenesis of dorsal root ganglia and the duration of peripheral pain nociception. Thus, besides its inflammatory action proposed previously, sPLA2-X participates in physiologic processes including male fertility, gastrointestinal phospholipid digestion linked to adiposity, and neuronal outgrowth and sensing. PMID:21266581

  18. Physiological roles of group X-secreted phospholipase A2 in reproduction, gastrointestinal phospholipid digestion, and neuronal function.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hiroyasu; Isogai, Yuki; Masuda, Seiko; Taketomi, Yoshitaka; Miki, Yoshimi; Kamei, Daisuke; Hara, Shuntaro; Kobayashi, Tetsuyuki; Ishikawa, Yukio; Ishii, Toshiharu; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Taguchi, Ryo; Ishimoto, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Noriko; Yokota, Yasunori; Hanasaki, Kohji; Suzuki-Yamamoto, Toshiko; Yamamoto, Kei; Murakami, Makoto

    2011-04-01

    Although the secreted phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2)) family has been generally thought to participate in pathologic events such as inflammation and atherosclerosis, relatively high and constitutive expression of group X sPLA(2) (sPLA(2)-X) in restricted sites such as reproductive organs, the gastrointestinal tract, and peripheral neurons raises a question as to the roles played by this enzyme in the physiology of reproduction, digestion, and the nervous system. Herein we used mice with gene disruption or transgenic overexpression of sPLA(2)-X to clarify the homeostatic functions of this enzyme at these locations. Our results suggest that sPLA(2)-X regulates 1) the fertility of spermatozoa, not oocytes, beyond the step of flagellar motility, 2) gastrointestinal phospholipid digestion, perturbation of which is eventually linked to delayed onset of a lean phenotype with reduced adiposity, decreased plasma leptin, and improved muscle insulin tolerance, and 3) neuritogenesis of dorsal root ganglia and the duration of peripheral pain nociception. Thus, besides its inflammatory action proposed previously, sPLA(2)-X participates in physiologic processes including male fertility, gastrointestinal phospholipid digestion linked to adiposity, and neuronal outgrowth and sensing.

  19. The effect of chronic in vivo infusion of forskolin on noradrenergic receptor sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Suzdak, P D; Browne, R G

    1985-01-01

    Forskolin, a diterpene isolated from the plant Coleus forskolii, activates the catalytic subunit of adenylate cyclase, resulting in a hormone receptor-independent increase in the intracellular production of cyclic AMP. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of chronic in vivo infusion of forskolin on noradrenergic neuronal activity. Forskolin was infused into the right lateral ventricle of male Sprague Dawley rats via Alzet osmotic minipumps (model 2001) for 7 days. Chronic infusion of forskolin resulted in a decrease in norepinephrine-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in the limbic forebrain. Chronic infusion of forskolin also resulted in a decrease in the Bmax for 3H-dihydroalprenolol (3H-DHA) binding to beta-adrenergic receptors in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, with no apparent change in the Kd values. These data suggest the possibility of a novel therapeutic approach to modulating receptor sensitivity, and that chronic infusion of forskolin may be a useful model for studying the role of cyclic AMP in the control of neuronal activity.

  20. Interleukin-1beta but not tumor necrosis factor-alpha potentiates neuronal damage by quinolinic acid: protection by an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Stone, Trevor W; Behan, Wilhelmina M H

    2007-04-01

    Quinolinic acid is an agonist at glutamate receptors sensitive to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). It has been implicated in neural dysfunction associated with infections, trauma, and ischemia, although its neurotoxic potency is relatively low. This study was designed to examine the effects of a combination of quinolinic acid and the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Compounds were administered to the hippocampus of anesthetized male rats, animals being allowed to recover for 7 days before histological analysis of the hippocampus for neuronal damage estimated by counting of intact, healthy neurons. A low dose of quinolinic acid or IL-1beta produced no damage by itself, but the two together induced a significant loss of pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus. Higher doses produced almost total loss of pyramidal cells. Intrahippocampal TNF-alpha produced no effect alone but significantly reduced the neuronal loss produced by quinolinic acid. The adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist ZM241385 reduced neuronal loss produced by the combinations of quinolinic acid and IL-1beta. The results suggest that simultaneous quinolinic acid and IL-1beta, both being induced by cerebral infection or injury, are synergistic in the production of neuronal damage and could together contribute substantially to traumatic, infective, or ischemic cerebral damage. Antagonism of adenosine A(2A) receptors protects neurons against the combination of quinolinic acid and IL-1beta.

  1. Improvement of the noradrenergic symptom cluster following treatment with milnacipran.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Siegfried; Meshkat, Diana; Kutzelnigg, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Depression has a major impact on social functioning. Decreased concentration, mental and physical slowing, loss of energy, lassitude, tiredness, and reduced self-care are all symptoms related to reduced noradrenergic activity. Depressed mood; loss of interest or pleasure; sleep disturbances; and feelings of worthlessness, pessimism, and anxiety are related to reduced activity of both serotonergic and noradrenergic neurotransmission. The importance of noradrenergic neurotransmission in social functioning is supported by studies with the specific norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor reboxetine. In healthy volunteers, reboxetine increases cooperative social behavior and social drive. A placebo-controlled study in depressed patients comparing reboxetine with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine showed significantly greater improvement in social adaptation with reboxetine. Two recent studies have examined the effect of the serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor milnacipran on social adaptation. A study in depressed patients found that at the end of 8 weeks of treatment with milnacipran, 42.2% patients were in remission on the Social Adaptation Self-evaluation Scale (SASS). Another study in depressed workers or homemakers found that mean depression scores were significantly reduced after 2 weeks, whereas the SASS scores were significantly improved after 4 weeks. A preliminary study comparing depressed patients treated with milnacipran or the SSRI paroxetine showed that milnacipran treatment resulted in a greater number of patients in social remission. The available data thus suggest that milnacipran may improve social functioning, with a possibly greater effect than the SSRI paroxetine. These preliminary data suggest further evaluation of social dysfunction and its treatment outcome in future trials of milnacipran.

  2. Clonidine and Cortical Plasticity: Possible Evidence for Noradrenergic Involvement.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-31

    D 616 CLONIDINE AND CORTICAL PLASTICITY POSSIBLE EVIDENCE / FOR NORADRENERGIC IN..(U) BROWIN UNIV PROVIDENCE RICENTER FOR NEURAL SCIENCE S B NELSON...plasticity in kitten visual cortex, we monocularly deprived kittens while administering the at-2 adrenergic agonist clonidine (CLON). To avoid bias in...Distribution/ AvailabilitY Codes Avail and/or Dist Special I. S N 0102- LF. 014- 6601 SECuRITY CLASSIVrCATION OF TMIS PA*S St’e DOI@ MAIN Clonidine and Cortical

  3. The selective neurotoxin DSP-4 impairs the noradrenergic projections from the locus coeruleus to the inferior colliculus in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hormigo, Sebastián; Horta Júnior, José de Anchieta de Castro e; Gómez-Nieto, Ricardo; López, Dolores E.

    2012-01-01

    The inferior colliculus (IC) and the locus coeruleus (LC) are two midbrain nuclei that integrate multimodal information and play a major role in novelty detection to elicit an orienting response. Despite the reciprocal connections between these two structures, the projection pattern and target areas of the LC within the subdivisions of the rat IC are still unknown. Here, we used tract-tracing approaches combined with immunohistochemistry, densitometry, and confocal microscopy (CM) analysis to describe a projection from the LC to the IC. Biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) injections into the LC showed that the LC-IC projection is mainly ipsilateral (90%) and reaches, to a major extent, the dorsal and lateral part of the IC and the intercollicular commissure. Additionally, some LC fibers extend into the central nucleus of the IC. The neurochemical nature of this projection is noradrenergic, given that tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine beta hydroxylase (DBH) colocalize with the BDA-labeled fibers from the LC. To determine the total field of the LC innervations in the IC, we destroyed the LC neurons and fibers using a highly selective neurotoxin, DSP-4, and then studied the distribution and density of TH- and DBH-immunolabeled axons in the IC. In the DSP-4 treated animals, the number of axonal fibers immunolabeled for TH and DBH were deeply decreased throughout the entire rostrocaudal extent of the IC and its subdivisions compared to controls. Our densitometry results showed that the IC receives up to 97% of its noradrenergic innervations from the LC neurons and only 3% from non-coeruleus neurons. Our results also indicate that TH immunoreactivity in the IC was less impaired than the immunoreactivity for DBH after DSP-4 administration. This is consistent with the existence of an important dopaminergic projection from the substantia nigra to the IC. In conclusion, our study demonstrates and quantifies the noradrenergic projection from the LC to the IC and its

  4. The selective neurotoxin DSP-4 impairs the noradrenergic projections from the locus coeruleus to the inferior colliculus in rats.

    PubMed

    Hormigo, Sebastián; Horta Júnior, José de Anchieta de Castro E; Gómez-Nieto, Ricardo; López, Dolores E

    2012-01-01

    The inferior colliculus (IC) and the locus coeruleus (LC) are two midbrain nuclei that integrate multimodal information and play a major role in novelty detection to elicit an orienting response. Despite the reciprocal connections between these two structures, the projection pattern and target areas of the LC within the subdivisions of the rat IC are still unknown. Here, we used tract-tracing approaches combined with immunohistochemistry, densitometry, and confocal microscopy (CM) analysis to describe a projection from the LC to the IC. Biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) injections into the LC showed that the LC-IC projection is mainly ipsilateral (90%) and reaches, to a major extent, the dorsal and lateral part of the IC and the intercollicular commissure. Additionally, some LC fibers extend into the central nucleus of the IC. The neurochemical nature of this projection is noradrenergic, given that tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine beta hydroxylase (DBH) colocalize with the BDA-labeled fibers from the LC. To determine the total field of the LC innervations in the IC, we destroyed the LC neurons and fibers using a highly selective neurotoxin, DSP-4, and then studied the distribution and density of TH- and DBH-immunolabeled axons in the IC. In the DSP-4 treated animals, the number of axonal fibers immunolabeled for TH and DBH were deeply decreased throughout the entire rostrocaudal extent of the IC and its subdivisions compared to controls. Our densitometry results showed that the IC receives up to 97% of its noradrenergic innervations from the LC neurons and only 3% from non-coeruleus neurons. Our results also indicate that TH immunoreactivity in the IC was less impaired than the immunoreactivity for DBH after DSP-4 administration. This is consistent with the existence of an important dopaminergic projection from the substantia nigra to the IC. In conclusion, our study demonstrates and quantifies the noradrenergic projection from the LC to the IC and its

  5. Antinociceptive effects of neurotropin in a rat model of central neuropathic pain: DSP-4 induced noradrenergic lesion.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Takashi; Kushikata, Tetsuya; Kudo, Mihoko; Kudo, Tsuyoshi; Hirota, Kazuyoshi

    2011-09-26

    Neurotropin is a nonprotein extract isolated from inflamed skin of rabbits inoculated with vaccinia virus, and used for treatment of neuropathic pain. In the present study, we have determined whether neurotropin could exert antinociceptive action using the central neuropathic pain model that we recently established. Rats were randomly allocated to 3 groups: Sham group (n=20), DSP-4 [N-(-2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine] group (50mg/kg ip, n=18), and DSP-4+5,7-DHT [5,7-dihydroxytryptamine] group (ip DSP-4 50mg/kg+icv 5,7-DHT 200μg, n=18). In Sham, DSP-4 and DSP-4+5,7-DHT groups, the effects of ip neurotropin (100NU/Kg) on hot-plate latency in rats with no lesion, noradrenergic neuron depletion and both noradrenergic and serotonergic neuronal depletion were studied, respectively. Rats in each group were subdivided equally to 2 subgroups: saline and neurotropin. After completion of the hot-plate tests, each rat was decapitated, the cerebral cortex was dissected from its internal structure for measurement of norepinephrine contents. Hot-plate latency significantly decreased by ∼40% 10 days after ip DSP-4 or after ip DSP-4 and 5,7-DHT. Norepinephrine contents in DSP-4 treated rats (55.6±6.3ng/ng tissue) and DSP-4+5,7-DHT treated rats (35.3±6.3ng/ng tissue) were significantly lower than those in intact rats (131.6±5.7ng/ng tissue, p<0.01). Neurotropin significantly increased the area under the curve (AUC) of the hot-plate latency in the DSP-4 and DSP-4+5,7-DHT groups but not in the Sham group. There was a significant correlation between AUC and norepinephrine contents in saline subgroup (p<0.01, r=0.597) but not in neurotropin subgroup in DSP-4 group. Neurotropin exerted an antinociceptive effect in DSP-4 induced central neuropathic pain. The present data suggest neuronal pathways other than descending inhibitory noradrenergic and serotonergic systems may be involved in neurotropin mediated antinociception.

  6. The memory function of noradrenergic activity in non-REM sleep.

    PubMed

    Gais, Steffen; Rasch, Björn; Dahmen, Johannes C; Sara, Susan; Born, Jan

    2011-09-01

    There is a long-standing assumption that low noradrenergic activity during sleep reflects mainly the low arousal during this brain state. Nevertheless, recent research has demonstrated that the locus coeruleus, which is the main source of cortical noradrenaline, displays discrete periods of intense firing during non-REM sleep, without any signs of awakening. This transient locus coeruleus activation during sleep seems to occur in response to preceding learning-related episodes. In the present study, we manipulate noradrenergic activity during sleep in humans with either the α2-autoreceptor agonist clonidine or the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor reboxetine. We show that reducing noradrenergic activity during sleep, but not during wakefulness, impairs subsequent memory performance in an odor recognition task. Increasing noradrenergic availability during sleep, in contrast, enhances memory retention. We conclude that noradrenergic activity during non-REM sleep interacts with other sleep-related mechanisms to functionally contribute to off-line memory consolidation.

  7. Protocerebral mediodorsal A2' neurosecretory neurons in late pupae of yellow mealworm (Tenebrio molitor) after exposure to a static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Perić-Mataruga, Vesna; Prolić, Zlatko; Nenadović, Vera; Mrdaković, Marija; Vlahović, Milena

    2006-01-01

    The activity of large dorsomedial protocerebral A2' neurosecretory neurons were investigated in late pupae of Tenebrio molitor L, which were exposed to a static magnetic field of 320 mT. Experimental groups were C: the control group which was kept at 5 meters from the magnet; CMF: pupae which were reared in control conditions and sacrificed on the eighth day of pupal stage (parents were kept in a magnetic field); and MF: pupae kept in a permanent magnetic field for eight days. Our results indicate the effects of a static magnetic field on the cytological characteristics and activity of large A2' neurosecretory neurons of Tenebrio molitor pupae.

  8. Early synaptic deficits in the APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease involve neuronal adenosine A2A receptors

    PubMed Central

    Viana da Silva, Silvia; Haberl, Matthias Georg; Zhang, Pei; Bethge, Philipp; Lemos, Cristina; Gonçalves, Nélio; Gorlewicz, Adam; Malezieux, Meryl; Gonçalves, Francisco Q.; Grosjean, Noëlle; Blanchet, Christophe; Frick, Andreas; Nägerl, U Valentin; Cunha, Rodrigo A.; Mulle, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity in the autoassociative network of recurrent connections among hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells is thought to enable the storage of episodic memory. Impaired episodic memory is an early manifestation of cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the APP/PS1 mouse model of AD amyloidosis, we show that associative long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP) is abolished in CA3 pyramidal cells at an early stage. This is caused by activation of upregulated neuronal adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) rather than by dysregulation of NMDAR signalling or altered dendritic spine morphology. Neutralization of A2AR by acute pharmacological inhibition, or downregulation driven by shRNA interference in a single postsynaptic neuron restore associative CA3 LTP. Accordingly, treatment with A2AR antagonists reverts one-trial memory deficits. These results provide mechanistic support to encourage testing the therapeutic efficacy of A2AR antagonists in early AD patients. PMID:27312972

  9. Noradrenergic System in Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease A Target for Therapy.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Cristy; Fahimi, Atoossa; Das, Devsmita; Mojabi, Fatemeh S; Ponnusamy, Ravikumar; Salehi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Locus coeruleus (LC) neurons in the brainstem send extensive noradrenergic (NE)-ergic terminals to the majority of brain regions, particularly those involved in cognitive function. Both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Down syndrome (DS) are characterized by similar pathology including significant LC degeneration and dysfunction of the NE-ergic system. Extensive loss of NE-ergic terminals has been linked to alterations in brain regions vital for cognition, mood, and executive function. While the mechanisms by which NE-ergic abnormalities contribute to cognitive dysfunction are not fully understood, emergent evidence suggests that rescue of NE-ergic system can attenuate neuropathology and cognitive decline in both AD and DS. Therapeutic strategies to enhance NE neurotransmission have undergone limited testing. Among those deployed to date are NE reuptake inhibitors, presynaptic α-adrenergic receptor antagonists, NE prodrugs, and β-adrenergic agonists. Here we examine alterations in the NE-ergic system in AD and DS and suggest that NE-ergic system rescue is a plausible treatment strategy for targeting cognitive decline in both disorders.

  10. Noradrenergic Modulation of Intrinsic and Synaptic Properties of Lumbar Motoneurons in the Neonatal Rat Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Tartas, Maylis; Morin, France; Barrière, Grégory; Goillandeau, Michel; Lacaille, Jean-Claude; Cazalets, Jean-René; Bertrand, Sandrine S.

    2009-01-01

    Although it is known that noradrenaline (NA) powerfully controls spinal motor networks, few data are available regarding the noradrenergic (NAergic) modulation of intrinsic and synaptic properties of neurons in motor networks. Our work explores the cellular basis of NAergic modulation in the rat motor spinal cord. We first show that lumbar motoneurons express the three classes of adrenergic receptors at birth. Using patch-clamp recordings in the newborn rat spinal cord preparation, we characterized the effects of NA and of specific agonists of the three classes of adrenoreceptors on motoneuron membrane properties. NA increases the motoneuron excitability partly via the inhibition of a KIR like current. Methoxamine (α1), clonidine (α2) and isoproterenol (β) differentially modulate the motoneuron membrane potential but also increase motoneuron excitability, these effects being respectively inhibited by the antagonists prazosin (α1), yohimbine (α2) and propranolol (β). We show that the glutamatergic synaptic drive arising from the T13-L2 network is enhanced in motoneurons by NA, methoxamine and isoproterenol. On the other hand, NA, isoproterenol and clonidine inhibit both the frequency and amplitude of miniature glutamatergic EPSCs while methoxamine increases their frequency. The T13-L2 synaptic drive is thereby differentially modulated from the other glutamatergic synapses converging onto motoneurons and enhanced by presynaptic α1 and β receptor activation. Our data thus show that the NAergic system exerts a powerful and complex neuromodulation of lumbar motor networks in the neonatal rat spinal cord. PMID:20300468

  11. Effects of phospholipase A2 inhibitors on coupling of alpha 2-adrenoceptors to inwardly rectifying potassium currents in guinea-pig submucosal neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, R. J.; Surprenant, A.

    1993-01-01

    1. Noradrenaline hyperpolarizes guinea-pig submucosal neurones by opening inwardly rectifying potassium channels. Intracellular recordings were made from submucosal neurones and the possible involvement of the phospholipase A2 pathway in this response was examined. 2. The non-specific phospholipase A2 inhibitors, quinacrine (10 microM) and 4-bromophenacyl bromide (4-BPB, 10 microM) inhibited nerve-evoked inhibitory synaptic potentials (i.p.s.ps) and hyperpolarizations to somatostatin and UK 14304. Quinacrine and 4-BPB also blocked the inward rectification present in current-voltage curves in the absence of somatostatin or UK 14304. 3. The more selective phospholipase A2 inhibitor, cyclosporin A (10 microM) and the lipoxygenase and cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA, 20 microM) and nordihydroguairetic acid (NDGA, 20 microM) did not alter i.p.s.ps or hyperpolarizations to UK 14304. 4. Exogenously applied arachidonic acid (1-300 microM) did not mimic the i.p.s.p. or the hyperpolarization to UK 14304. 5. We conclude that arachidonic acid or its eicosanoid metabolites produced by phospholipase A2 stimulation are unlikely to be involved in the receptor G-protein coupled activation of potassium currents in submucosal neurones. The inhibition of the noradrenaline-induced hyperpolarization by quinacrine and 4-BPB is most likely due primarily to blockade of the basal inwardly rectifying potassium conductance present in these neurones. PMID:7902174

  12. Noradrenergic and GABAB Receptor Activation Differentially Modulate Inputs to the Premotor Nucleus RA in Zebra Finches

    PubMed Central

    Sizemore, Max; Perkel, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Neuromodulators can rapidly modify neural circuits, altering behavior. Songbirds provide an excellent system for studying the role of neuromodulation in modifying circuits that underlie behavior because song learning and production are mediated by a discrete set of interconnected nuclei. We examined the neuromodulatory effects of noradrenergic and GABAB receptor activation on synaptic inputs to the premotor robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA) in zebra finches using whole cell voltage-clamp recording in vitro. In adults, norepinephrine strongly reduced input from the lateral magnocellular nucleus of the anterior nidopallium (LMAN) but only slightly reduced the input from nucleus HVC (proper name), the excitatory input from axon collaterals of other RA neurons, and input from GABAergic interneurons. The effect of norepinephrine was mimicked by the α2 adrenoceptor agonist UK14,304 and blocked by the α2 antagonist yohimbine. Conversely, the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen strongly decreased HVC, collateral, and GABAergic inputs to RA neurons while causing little reduction in the LMAN input. In juveniles undergoing song learning, norepinephrine reduced the LMAN input, caused only a small reduction in the HVC input, and greatly reduced the collateral and GABAergic inputs. Baclofen caused similar results in juvenile and adult birds, reducing HVC, collateral, and GABAergic inputs significantly more than the LMAN input. Significant increases in paired-pulse ratio accompanied all reductions in synaptic transmission, suggesting a presynaptic locus. The reduction in the LMAN input by norepinephrine may be important for mediating changes in song elicited by different social contexts and is well-placed to play a role in song learning. PMID:18463188

  13. Corticotropin releasing factor dose-dependently modulates excitatory synaptic transmission in the noradrenergic nucleus locus coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Prouty, Eric W; Waterhouse, Barry D; Chandler, Daniel J

    2017-03-01

    The noradrenergic nucleus locus coeruleus (LC) is critically involved in the stress response and receives afferent input from a number of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) containing structures. Several in vivo and in vitro studies in rat have shown that CRF robustly increases the firing rate of LC neurons in a dose-dependent manner. While it is known that these increases are dependent on CRF receptor subtype 1 and mediated by effects of cAMP intracellular signaling cascades on potassium conductance, the impact of CRF on synaptic transmission within LC has not been clarified. In the present study, we used whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology to assess how varying concentrations of bath-applied CRF affect AMPA-receptor dependent spontaneous excitatory post-synaptic currents (sEPSCs). Compared to vehicle, 10, 25, and 100 nm CRF had no significant effects on any sEPSC parameters. Fifty nanomolar CRF, however, significantly increased sEPSC amplitude, half-width, and charge transfer, while these measures were significantly decreased by 200 nm CRF. These observations suggest that stress may differentially affect ongoing excitatory synaptic transmission in LC depending on how much CRF is released from presynaptic terminals. Combined with the well-documented effects of CRF on membrane properties and spontaneous LC discharge, these observations may help explain how stress and CRF release are able to modulate the signal to noise ratio of LC neurons. These findings have implications for how stress affects the fidelity of signal transmission and information flow through LC and how it might impact norepinephrine release in the CNS.

  14. Phospholipase A2 – nexus of aging, oxidative stress, neuronal excitability, and functional decline of the aging nervous system? Insights from a snail model system of neuronal aging and age-associated memory impairment

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Petra M.; Watson, Shawn N.; Wildering, Willem C.

    2014-01-01

    The aging brain undergoes a range of changes varying from subtle structural and physiological changes causing only minor functional decline under healthy normal aging conditions, to severe cognitive or neurological impairment associated with extensive loss of neurons and circuits due to age-associated neurodegenerative disease conditions. Understanding how biological aging processes affect the brain and how they contribute to the onset and progress of age-associated neurodegenerative diseases is a core research goal in contemporary neuroscience. This review focuses on the idea that changes in intrinsic neuronal electrical excitability associated with (per)oxidation of membrane lipids and activation of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) enzymes are an important mechanism of learning and memory failure under normal aging conditions. Specifically, in the context of this special issue on the biology of cognitive aging we portray the opportunities offered by the identifiable neurons and behaviorally characterized neural circuits of the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis in neuronal aging research and recapitulate recent insights indicating a key role of lipid peroxidation-induced PLA2 as instruments of aging, oxidative stress and inflammation in age-associated neuronal and memory impairment in this model system. The findings are discussed in view of accumulating evidence suggesting involvement of analogous mechanisms in the etiology of age-associated dysfunction and disease of the human and mammalian brain. PMID:25538730

  15. Behavioral models in mice. Implication of the alpha noradrenergic system.

    PubMed

    Hascoët, M; Bourin, M; Bradwejn, J

    1991-01-01

    1. The mechanism of action of drugs might change according to the test used. Several noradrenergic drugs were tested in order to understand their implication in the mobility tests. 2. It was found that clonidine, an Alpha 2 agonist, acted differently according to the test used. It provoked sedation in spontaneous activity test, and anti-immobility effects in the other tests. 3. Tail suspension test is able to show the double acting of clonidine. 4. Idazoxan might act either as an alpha 2 antagonist or as partial alpha 2 agonist. TST shown the unexpected partial alpha agonist effect of the molecule. 5. Forced swimming test is more specific for predicting antidepressant activity than tail suspension test which is close to a spontaneous activity model.

  16. Noradrenergic antidepressants increase cortical dopamine: potential use in augmentation strategies.

    PubMed

    Masana, Mercè; Castañé, Anna; Santana, Noemí; Bortolozzi, Analía; Artigas, Francesc

    2012-09-01

    Most antidepressant treatments, based on serotonin (5-HT) and/or norepinephrine (NE) transporter blockade, show limited efficacy and slow onset of action, requiring the use of augmentation strategies. Here we report on a novel antidepressant strategy to selectively increase DA function in prefrontal cortex (PFC) without the potential tolerance problems associated to DA transporter blockade. This approach is based on previous observations indicating that extracellular DA in rat medial PFC (mPFC) - but not in nucleus accumbens (NAc) - arises from noradrenergic terminals and is sensitive to noradrenergic drugs. A low dose of reboxetine (3 mg/kg i.p.; NE reuptake inhibitor) non-significantly increased extracellular DA in mPFC. Interestingly, its combined administration with 5 mg/kg s.c. mirtazapine (non-selective α₂-adrenoceptor antagonist) increased extracellular DA in mPFC (264 ± 28%), but not in NAc. Extracellular NE (but not 5-HT) in mPFC was also enhanced by the combined treatment (472 ± 70%). Repeated (×3) reboxetine + mirtazapine administration produced a moderate additional increase in mPFC DA and markedly reduced the immobility time (-51%) in the forced-swim test. Neurochemical and behavioral effects of the reboxetine + mirtazapine combination persisted in rats pretreated with citalopram (3 mg/kg, s.c.), suggesting its potential usefulness to augment SSRI effects. In situ hybridization c-fos studies were performed to examine the brain areas involved in the above antidepressant-like effects, showing changes in c-fos expression in hippocampal and cortical areas. BDNF expression was also increased in the hippocampal formation. Overall, these results indicate a synergistic effect of the reboxetine + mirtazapine combination to increase DA and NE function in mPFC and to evoke robust antidepressant-like responses.

  17. Substantial role of locus coeruleus-noradrenergic activation and capsaicin-insensitive primary afferent fibers in bee venom's anti-inflammatory effect.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young Bae; Yoon, Seo Yeon; Kim, Hyun Woo; Roh, Dae Hyun; Kang, Seuk Yun; Ryu, Yeon Hee; Choi, Sun Mi; Han, Ho Jae; Lee, Hye Jung; Kim, Kee Won; Beitz, Alvin J; Lee, Jang Hern

    2006-06-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate significant interactions between the immune and nervous systems. Our recent study reveals that 'bee venom (BV) induced anti-inflammatory effect' (BVAI) was produced by sympathetic preganglionic neuronal activation and subsequent adrenomedullary catecholamine release in a zymosan-induced inflammation model. However, the specific peripheral input and the supraspinal neuronal systems that are involved in this BVAI remain to be defined. Here we show that subcutaneous BV injection into left hind limb significantly reduces zymosan-induced leukocyte migration and that this effect is completely inhibited by denervation of the left sciatic nerve. This BVAI was not affected by the destruction of capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent fibers using either neonatal capsaicin or resiniferatoxin (RTX) pretreatment. BV injection into the left hind limb significantly increased Fos expression in the contralateral locus coeruleus (LC) in non-inflamed mice. In zymosan-inflamed mice, BV injection produced a further increase in LC Fos expression as compared with non-inflamed mice. This BV-induced Fos increase in the LC was not affected by RTX pretreatment. Pharmacological blockage of central noradrenergic activity by either central chemical sympathectomy (i.c.v. 6-hydroxydopamine) or alpha2 adrenoceptor antagonism (i.c.v. idazoxan) completely blocked BVAI. Taken together, these results suggest that BVAI is mediated by peripheral activation of capsaicin-insensitive primary afferent fibers and subsequent central noradrenergic activation including the LC.

  18. Neurotoxic effects of DSP-4 on the central noradrenergic system in male zebra finches.

    PubMed

    Waterman, Susanna A; Harding, Cheryl F

    2008-04-09

    When administered systemically, the noradrenergic neurotoxin N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) appears to target the noradrenergic innervation originating in the locus coeruleus causing long-term decrements in noradrenergic function. In songbirds, DSP-4-treatment decreased female-directed singing by males and copulation solicitation responses of females to male songs. However, DSP-4 treatment in songbirds did not lower measures of NE function in the brain to the same extent as it does in mammals. The current study had two goals: determining if two DSP-4 treatments 10 days apart would cause significant decrements in noradrenergic function in male zebra finches and determining if, as in other species, the noradrenergic innervation of midbrain and cortical areas would be profoundly affected while hypothalamic areas were spared. Dopamine-beta-hydroxylase immunoreactivity (DBH-ir) was quantified in thirteen brain regions (five vocal control nuclei, one auditory nucleus, two hypothalamic nuclei, and five additional areas that demonstrated high DBH labeling in controls). Within 20 days, DSP-4 treatment profoundly reduced the number of DBH-ir cells in both the locus coeruleus and ventral subcoeruleus. Unlike a previous study, DBH labeling delineated four out of five vocal control nuclei and an auditory nucleus. As expected, DSP-4 treatment significantly decreased DBH labeling in all areas examined in the mesencephalon and telencephalon without significantly affecting DBH-ir in hypothalamic areas. This double treatment regime appears to be much more effective in decreasing noradrenergic function in songbirds than the single treatment typically used.

  19. A 5-HT2A/2C receptor agonist, 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane, mitigates developmental neurotoxicity of ethanol to serotonergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Tsukasa; Sakata-Haga, Hiromi; Fukui, Yoshihiro

    2016-07-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure causes the reduction of serotonergic (5-HTergic) neurons in the midbrain raphe nuclei. In the present study, we examined whether an activation of signaling via 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors during the fetal period is able to prevent the reduction of 5-HTergic neurons induced by prenatal ethanol exposure. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were given a liquid diet containing 2.5 to 5.0% (w/v) ethanol on gestational days (GDs) 10 to 20 (Et). As a pair-fed control, other pregnant rats were fed the same liquid diet except that the ethanol was replaced by isocaloric sucrose (Pf). Each Et and Pf group was subdivided into two groups; one of the groups was treated with 1 mg/kg (i.p.) of 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI), an agonist for 5-HT2A/2C receptors, during GDs 13 to 19 (Et-DOI or Pf-DOI), and another was injected with saline vehicle only (Et-Sal or Pf-Sal). Their fetuses were removed by cesarean section on GD 19 or 20, and fetal brains were collected. An immunohistological examination of 5-HTergic neurons in the fetuses on embryonic day 20 using an antibody against tryptophan hydroxylase revealed that the number of 5-HTergic neurons in the midbrain raphe nuclei was significantly reduced in the Et-Sal fetuses compared to that of the Pf-Sal and Pf-DOI fetuses, whereas there were no significant differences between Et-DOI and each Pf control. Thus, we concluded that the reduction of 5-HTergic neurons that resulted in prenatal ethanol exposure could be alleviated by the enhancement of signaling via 5-HT2A/2C receptors during the fetal period.

  20. Neurotrophin-3 promotes the cholinergic differentiation of sympathetic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Brodski, Claude; Schnürch, Harald; Dechant, Georg

    2000-01-01

    Neurotrophins influence the epigenetic shaping of the vertebrate nervous system by regulating neuronal numbers during development and synaptic plasticity. Here we attempt to determine whether these growth factors can also regulate neurotransmitter plasticity. As a model system we used the selection between noradrenergic and cholinergic neurotransmission by paravertebral sympathetic neurons. Developing sympathetic neurons express the neurotrophin receptors TrkA and TrkC, two highly related receptor tyrosine kinases. Whereas the TrkA ligand nerve growth factor (NGF) has long been known to regulate both the survival and the expression of noradrenergic traits in sympathetic neurons, the role of TrkC and of its ligand neurotrophin-3 (NT3) has remained unclear. We found that TrkC expression in the avian sympathetic chain overlaps substantially with that of choline acetyltransferase. In sympathetic chain explants, transcripts of the cholinergic marker genes choline acetyltransferase and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide were strongly enriched in the presence of NT3 compared with NGF, whereas the noradrenergic markers tyrosine hydroxylase and norepinephrine transporter were reduced. The transcription factor chicken achaete scute homolog 1 was coexpressed with cholinergic markers. The effects of NT3 are reversed and antagonized by NGF. They are independent of neuronal survival and developmentally regulated. These results suggest a role for NT3 as a differentiation factor for cholinergic neurons and establish a link between neurotrophins and neurotransmitter plasticity. PMID:10931939

  1. Modulation of Ca2+-currents by sequential and simultaneous activation of adenosine A1 and A 2A receptors in striatal projection neurons.

    PubMed

    Hernández-González, O; Hernández-Flores, T; Prieto, G A; Pérez-Burgos, A; Arias-García, M A; Galarraga, E; Bargas, J

    2014-01-01

    D(1)- and D(2)-types of dopamine receptors are located separately in direct and indirect pathway striatal projection neurons (dSPNs and iSPNs). In comparison, adenosine A(1)-type receptors are located in both neuron classes, and adenosine A(2A)-type receptors show a preferential expression in iSPNs. Due to their importance for neuronal excitability, Ca(2+)-currents have been used as final effectors to see the function of signaling cascades associated with different G protein-coupled receptors. For example, among many other actions, D(1)-type receptors increase, while D(2)-type receptors decrease neuronal excitability by either enhancing or reducing, respectively, CaV1 Ca(2+)-currents. These actions occur separately in dSPNs and iSPNs. In the case of purinergic signaling, the actions of A(1)- and A(2A)-receptors have not been compared observing their actions on Ca(2+)-channels of SPNs as final effectors. Our hypotheses are that modulation of Ca(2+)-currents by A(1)-receptors occurs in both dSPNs and iSPNs. In contrast, iSPNs would exhibit modulation by both A(1)- and A2A-receptors. We demonstrate that A(1)-type receptors reduced Ca(2+)-currents in all SPNs tested. However, A(2A)-type receptors enhanced Ca(2+)-currents only in half tested neurons. Intriguingly, to observe the actions of A(2A)-type receptors, occupation of A(1)-type receptors had to occur first. However, A(1)-receptors decreased Ca(V)2 Ca(2+)-currents, while A(2A)-type receptors enhanced current through Ca(V)1 channels. Because these channels have opposing actions on cell discharge, these differences explain in part why iSPNs may be more excitable than dSPNs. It is demonstrated that intrinsic voltage-gated currents expressed in SPNs are effectors of purinergic signaling that therefore play a role in excitability.

  2. Cholinergic, but not dopaminergic or noradrenergic, enhancement sharpens visual spatial perception in humans.

    PubMed

    Gratton, Caterina; Yousef, Sahar; Aarts, Esther; Wallace, Deanna L; D'Esposito, Mark; Silver, Michael A

    2017-03-23

    unknown. Here we demonstrate that cholinergic enhancement improves detection of a target flanked by distractors, consistent with sharpened visuospatial perceptual representations. Furthermore, while most pharmacological studies focus on a single neurotransmitter, many neuromodulators can have related effects on cognition and perception. Thus, we also demonstrate that enhancing noradrenergic and dopaminergic systems does not systematically improve visuospatial perception or alter its tuning. Our results link visuospatial tuning effects of acetylcholine at the neuronal and perceptual levels and provide insights into the connection between cholinergic signaling and visual attention.

  3. L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel is involved in the snake venom group IA secretory phospholipase A2-induced neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yagami, Tatsurou; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Kohma, Hiromi; Nakamura, Tsutomu; Takasu, Nobuo; Okamura, Noboru

    2013-03-01

    Snake venom group IA secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2-IA) is known as a neurotoxin. Snake venom sPLA2s are neurotoxic in vivo and in vitro, causing synergistic neurotoxicity to cortical cultures when applied with toxic concentrations of glutamate. However, it has not yet been cleared sufficiently how sPLA2-IA exerts neurotoxicity. Here, we found sPLA2-IA induced neuronal cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. This death was a delayed response requiring a latent time for 6h. sPLA2-IA-induced neuronal cell death was accompanied with apoptotic blebbing, condensed chromatin, and fragmented DNA, exhibiting apoptotic features. NMDA receptor blockers suppressed the neurotoxicity of sPLA2-IA, but an AMPA receptor blocker did not. Interestingly, L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel (L-VDCC) blocker significantly protected neurons from the sPLA2-IA-induced apoptosis. On the other hand, neither N-VDCC blockers nor P/Q-VDCC blocker did. In conclusion, we demonstrated that sPLA2-IA induced neuronal cell death via apoptosis. Furthermore, the present study suggests that not only NMDA receptor but also L-VDCC contributed to the neurotoxicity of snake venom sPLA2-IA.

  4. Intrinsic neural circuits between dorsal midbrain neurons that control fear-induced responses and seizure activity and nuclei of the pain inhibitory system elaborating postictal antinociceptive processes: a functional neuroanatomical and neuropharmacological study.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Renato L; Ferreira, Célio M R; Ribeiro, Sandro J; Carvalho, Andressa D; Elias-Filho, Daoud H; Garcia-Cairasco, Norberto; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2005-02-01

    The blockade of GABA-mediated Cl(-) influx with pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) was used in the present work to induce seizures in Rattus norvegicus. The aim of this work was to study the involvement of monoamines in the antinociception induced by convulsions elicited by peripheral administration of PTZ (64 mg/kg). The analgesia was measured by the tail-flick test in seven or eight Wistar rats per group. Convulsions were followed by statistically significant increase in the tail-flick latencies (TFL), at least for 120 min of the postictal period. Peripheral administration of methysergide (0.5, 1, 2, and 3 mg/kg) caused a significant decrease in the TFL in seizing animals, as compared to controls, in all postictal periods studied. These findings were corroborated by the pretreatment with ketanserin, a 5-HT(2A/2C)-serotonergic/alpha(1)-noradrenergic receptors antagonist, at the same doses. Peripheral administration of yohimbine (0.5, 1, 2, and 3 mg/kg), alpha(2)-noradrenergic antagonist, also decreased the postictal analgesia either at initial or more terminal periods of the postictal analgesia. These data were corroborated with peripheral administrations of propranolol, a beta-noradrenergic receptor blocker that caused a decrease in the postictal analgesia consistently in later stages (after the first 20-min post-tonic-clonic convulsive reactions) of the post-seizure analgesia, except for the highest dose. These results indicate that monoamines may be involved in the postictal analgesia. The blockade of 5-HT(2A/2C)-serotoninergic, alpha(1)-noradrenergic, or alpha(2)-noradrenergic receptors before tonic clonic seizure-induced analgesia antagonized the increase in the nociceptive threshold caused by seizures in initial steps of the temporal antinociceptive curve, as compared to the blockade of beta-noradrenergic ones. These findings suggest that the recruitment of alpha-noradrenergic receptor and serotonergic receptors was made immediately after convulsions and in other

  5. Role of noradrenergic and GABA-ergic inputs in pedunculopontine tegmentum for regulation of rapid eye movement sleep in rats.

    PubMed

    Pal, Dinesh; Mallick, Birendra Nath

    2006-07-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep disturbance is associated with several psycho-behavioral disorders, hence, it is important to understand its neural mechanism of regulation. Although it was known that the noradrenergic (NA-ergic) neurons from locus coeruleus (LC) project to the pedunculopontine tegmentum (PPT), the role of noradrenaline (NA) alone and in association with GABA, an inhibitory neurotransmitter, in PPT for REM sleep regulation was not known and was investigated in this study in freely moving normally behaving rats. Rats were surgically prepared for electrophysiological sleep-wake recording and simultaneous bilateral microinjections into PPT. 200nl of prazosin (alpha1-antagonist) or clonidine (alpha2-agonist) or propranolol (beta-antagonist) or combination of picrotoxin (GABA-A antagonist) and clonidine or vehicle (control) was microinjected bilaterally into PPT using a remote-controlled pump and the effects on REM sleep compared. Prazosin, clonidine and propranolol increased the total time spent in REM sleep whereas co-injection of picrotoxin and clonidine did not affect REM sleep. The results suggest that NA in PPT tonically inhibits REM sleep, possibly by acting on the cholinergic REM-ON neurons, while GABA inhibits the release of NA for REM sleep regulation. A model of neural connections explaining such regulation has been presented.

  6. Reduced noradrenergic innervation of ventral midbrain dopaminergic cell groups and the subthalamic nucleus in MPTP-treated parkinsonian monkeys.

    PubMed

    Masilamoni, Gunasingh Jeyaraj; Groover, Olivia; Smith, Yoland

    2017-04-01

    There is anatomical and functional evidence that ventral midbrain dopaminergic (DA) cell groups and the subthalamic nucleus (STN) receive noradrenergic innervation in rodents, but much less is known about these interactions in primates. Degeneration of NE neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC) and related brainstem NE cell groups is a well-established pathological feature of Parkinson's disease (PD), but the development of such pathology in animal models of PD has been inconsistent across species and laboratories. We recently demonstrated 30-40% neuronal loss in the LC, A5 and A6 NE cell groups of rhesus monkeys rendered parkinsonian by chronic administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). In this study, we used dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DβH) immunocytochemistry to assess the impact of this neuronal loss on the number of NE terminal-like varicosities in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC), ventral tegmental area (VTA), retrorubral field (RRF) and STN of MPTP-treated parkinsonian monkeys. Our findings reveal that the NE innervation of the ventral midbrain and STN of normal monkeys is heterogeneously distributed being far more extensive in the VTA, RRF and dorsal tier of the SNC than in the ventral SNC and STN. In parkinsonian monkeys, all regions underwent a significant (~50-70%) decrease in NE innervation. At the electron microscopic level, some DβH-positive terminals formed asymmetric axo-dendritic synapses in VTA and STN. These findings demonstrate that the VTA, RRF and SNCd are the main ventral midbrain targets of ascending NE inputs, and that these connections undergo a major break-down in chronically MPTP-treated parkinsonian monkeys. This severe degeneration of the ascending NE system may contribute to the pathophysiology of ventral midbrain and STN neurons in PD.

  7. Haploinsufficiency for translation elongation factor eEF1A2 in aged mouse muscle and neurons is compatible with normal function.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Lowri A; Doig, Jennifer; Churchhouse, Antonia M D; Davies, Faith C J; Squires, Charlotte E; Newbery, Helen J; Abbott, Catherine M

    2012-01-01

    Translation elongation factor isoform eEF1A2 is expressed in muscle and neurons. Deletion of eEF1A2 in mice gives rise to the neurodegenerative phenotype "wasted" (wst). Mice homozygous for the wasted mutation die of muscle wasting and neurodegeneration at four weeks post-natal. Although the mutation is said to be recessive, aged heterozygous mice have never been examined in detail; a number of other mouse models of motor neuron degeneration have recently been shown to have similar, albeit less severe, phenotypic abnormalities in the heterozygous state. We therefore examined the effects of ageing on a cohort of heterozygous +/wst mice and control mice, in order to establish whether a presumed 50% reduction in eEF1A2 expression was compatible with normal function. We evaluated the grip strength assay as a way of distinguishing between wasted and wild-type mice at 3-4 weeks, and then performed the same assay in older +/wst and wild-type mice. We also used rotarod performance and immunohistochemistry of spinal cord sections to evaluate the phenotype of aged heterozygous mice. Heterozygous mutant mice showed no deficit in neuromuscular function or signs of spinal cord pathology, in spite of the low levels of eEF1A2.

  8. The adenosine A2A receptor antagonist ZM241385 enhances neuronal survival after oxygen-glucose deprivation in rat CA1 hippocampal slices

    PubMed Central

    Pugliese, AM; Traini, C; Cipriani, S; Gianfriddo, M; Mello, T; Giovannini, MG; Galli, A; Pedata, F

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Activation of adenosine A2A receptors in the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices during oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), a model of cerebral ischaemia, was investigated. Experimental approach: We made extracellular recordings of CA1 field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fepsps) followed by histochemical and immunohistochemical techniques coupled to Western blots. Key results: OGD (7 or 30 min duration) elicited an irreversible loss of fepsps invariably followed by the appearance of anoxic depolarization (AD), an unambiguous sign of neuronal damage. The application of the selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, ZM241385 (4-(2-[7-amino-2-{2-furyl}{1,2,4}triazolo{2,3-a}{1,3,5}triazin-5-ylamino]ethyl)phenol; 100–500 nmol·L−1) prevented or delayed AD appearance induced by 7 or 30 min OGD and protected from the irreversible fepsp depression elicited by 7 min OGD. Two different selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonists, SCH58261 and SCH442416, were less effective than ZM241385 during 7 min OGD. The extent of CA1 cell injury was assessed 3 h after the end of 7 min OGD by propidium iodide. Substantial CA1 pyramidal neuronal damage occurred in untreated slices, exposed to OGD, whereas injury was significantly prevented by 100 nmol·L−1 ZM241385. Glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) immunostaining showed that 3 h after 7 min OGD, astrogliosis was appreciable. Western blot analysis indicated an increase in GFAP 30 kDa fragment which was significantly reduced by treatment with 100 nmol·L−1 ZM241385. Conclusions and implications: In the CA1 hippocampus, antagonism of A2A adenosine receptors by ZM241385 was protective during OGD (a model of cerebral ischaemia) by delaying AD appearance, decreasing astrocyte activation and improving neuronal survival. PMID:19422385

  9. Impact of bounded noise on the formation and instability of spiral wave in a 2D Lattice of neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yuangen; Deng, Haiyou; Yi, Ming; Ma, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Spiral waves in the neocortex may provide a spatial framework to organize cortical oscillations, thus help signal communication. However, noise influences spiral wave. Many previous theoretical studies about noise mainly focus on unbounded Gaussian noise, which contradicts that a real physical quantity is always bounded. Furthermore, non-Gaussian noise is also important for dynamical behaviors of excitable media. Nevertheless, there are no results concerning the effect of bounded noise on spiral wave till now. Based on Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model subjected to bounded noise with the form of Asin[ωt + σW(t)], the influences of bounded noise on the formation and instability of spiral wave in a two-dimensional (2D) square lattice of neurons are investigated in detail by separately adjusting the intensity σ, amplitude A, and frequency f of bounded noise. It is found that the increased intensity σ can facilitate the formation of spiral wave while the increased amplitude A tends to destroy spiral wave. Furthermore, frequency of bounded noise has the effect of facilitation or inhibition on pattern synchronization. Interestingly, for the appropriate intensity, amplitude and frequency can separately induce resonance-like phenomenon. PMID:28220877

  10. Impact of bounded noise on the formation and instability of spiral wave in a 2D Lattice of neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuangen; Deng, Haiyou; Yi, Ming; Ma, Jun

    2017-02-01

    Spiral waves in the neocortex may provide a spatial framework to organize cortical oscillations, thus help signal communication. However, noise influences spiral wave. Many previous theoretical studies about noise mainly focus on unbounded Gaussian noise, which contradicts that a real physical quantity is always bounded. Furthermore, non-Gaussian noise is also important for dynamical behaviors of excitable media. Nevertheless, there are no results concerning the effect of bounded noise on spiral wave till now. Based on Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model subjected to bounded noise with the form of Asin[ωt + σW(t)], the influences of bounded noise on the formation and instability of spiral wave in a two-dimensional (2D) square lattice of neurons are investigated in detail by separately adjusting the intensity σ, amplitude A, and frequency f of bounded noise. It is found that the increased intensity σ can facilitate the formation of spiral wave while the increased amplitude A tends to destroy spiral wave. Furthermore, frequency of bounded noise has the effect of facilitation or inhibition on pattern synchronization. Interestingly, for the appropriate intensity, amplitude and frequency can separately induce resonance-like phenomenon.

  11. Long-term administration of cocaine or serotonin reuptake inhibitors results in anatomical and neurochemical changes in noradrenergic, dopaminergic, and serotonin pathways.

    PubMed

    Horne, Malcolm K; Lee, Joohyung; Chen, Feng; Lanning, Katherine; Tomas, Doris; Lawrence, Andrew J

    2008-08-01

    The catechol and indole pathways are important components underlying plasticity in the frontal cortex and basal ganglia. This study demonstrates that administering rats either cocaine or a selective serotonin (or 5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) for 16 weeks results in reduced density of dopaminergic and noradrenergic terminals in the striatum and olfactory bulb, respectively, reflecting pruning of the terminal arbor of ventral midbrain dopaminergic and locus coeruleus noradrenergic neurones. In the striatum of cocaine-treated animals, basal dopamine levels, as well as cocaine-induced dopamine release, is diminished compared with controls. In contrast, serotonergic fibers, projecting from the raphe, sprout and have increased terminal density in the lateral septal nucleus and frontal cortex, following long-term cocaine or SSRI treatment. This is associated with elevated basal 5-HT and enhanced cocaine-induced 5-HT release in the frontal cortex. The anatomical and neurochemical changes in serotonergic fibers following cocaine or SSRI treatment may be explained by attenuated 5-HT(1A) autoreceptor function in the raphe. This study demonstrates extensive plasticity in the morphology and neurochemistry of the catechol and indole pathways that contribute to drug-induced plasticity of the corticostriatal (and other) projections. Moreover, our data suggest that drug-induced plastic adaptation is anatomically widespread and consequently, likely to have multiple and complex consequences.

  12. Neuropeptide S interacts with the basolateral amygdala noradrenergic system in facilitating object recognition memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Han, Ren-Wen; Xu, Hong-Jiao; Zhang, Rui-San; Wang, Pei; Chang, Min; Peng, Ya-Li; Deng, Ke-Yu; Wang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    The noradrenergic activity in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) was reported to be involved in the regulation of object recognition memory. As the BLA expresses high density of receptors for Neuropeptide S (NPS), we investigated whether the BLA is involved in mediating NPS's effects on object recognition memory consolidation and whether such effects require noradrenergic activity. Intracerebroventricular infusion of NPS (1nmol) post training facilitated 24-h memory in a mouse novel object recognition task. The memory-enhancing effect of NPS could be blocked by the β-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol. Furthermore, post-training intra-BLA infusions of NPS (0.5nmol/side) improved 24-h memory for objects, which was impaired by co-administration of propranolol (0.5μg/side). Taken together, these results indicate that NPS interacts with the BLA noradrenergic system in improving object recognition memory during consolidation.

  13. Cholinergic and noradrenergic triggers' in soman induced convulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, M.T.; Zimmer, L.; Ennis, M.; Etri, M.

    1993-05-13

    Considerable evidence suggests that soman induced seizure's are initiated in the piriform cortex (PC). Consistent with this, PC is the most frequent site of neuropathology in soman treated rats and other species. Previous studies in this laboratory have shown that convulsive doses of soman cause the rapid induction of the immediate early gene protein product, Fos, in piriform cortex (PC). Fos is known to be expressed when neurons undergo sustained excitatory activity. Following soman, Fos is selectively expressed by neurons in layers II Ill of PC. These neurons are known to send excitatory projections to the hippocampus and to thalamus and neocortex. Thus, we have suggested that soman may initially cause seizure activity in layer II-III PC neurons; this seizure activity could then spread to the hippocampus and neocortex. Consistent with this hypothesis, we have observed that Fos is expressed in hippocampus, thalamus and neocortex subsequent to its expression in PC.

  14. Orexin neurons suppress narcolepsy via 2 distinct efferent pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Emi; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Sakurai, Takeshi; Mieda, Michihiro

    2014-01-01

    The loss of orexin neurons in humans is associated with the sleep disorder narcolepsy, which is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy. Mice lacking orexin peptides, orexin neurons, or orexin receptors recapitulate human narcolepsy phenotypes, further highlighting a critical role for orexin signaling in the maintenance of wakefulness. Despite the known role of orexin neurons in narcolepsy, the precise neural mechanisms downstream of these neurons remain unknown. We found that targeted restoration of orexin receptor expression in the dorsal raphe (DR) and in the locus coeruleus (LC) of mice lacking orexin receptors inhibited cataplexy-like episodes and pathological fragmentation of wakefulness (i.e., sleepiness), respectively. The suppression of cataplexy-like episodes correlated with the number of serotonergic neurons restored with orexin receptor expression in the DR, while the consolidation of fragmented wakefulness correlated with the number of noradrenergic neurons restored in the LC. Furthermore, pharmacogenetic activation of these neurons using designer receptor exclusively activated by designer drug (DREADD) technology ameliorated narcolepsy in mice lacking orexin neurons. These results suggest that DR serotonergic and LC noradrenergic neurons play differential roles in orexin neuron–dependent regulation of sleep/wakefulness and highlight a pharmacogenetic approach for the amelioration of narcolepsy. PMID:24382351

  15. Loss of HtrA2/Omi activity in non-neuronal tissues of adult mice causes premature aging.

    PubMed

    Kang, S; Louboutin, J-P; Datta, P; Landel, C P; Martinez, D; Zervos, A S; Strayer, D S; Fernandes-Alnemri, T; Alnemri, E S

    2013-02-01

    mnd2 mice die prematurely as a result of neurodegeneration 30-40 days after birth due to loss of the enzymatic activity of the mitochondrial quality control protease HtrA2/Omi. Here, we show that transgenic expression of human HtrA2/Omi in the central nervous system of mnd2 mice rescues them from neurodegeneration and prevents their premature death. Interestingly, adult transgenic mnd2 mice develop accelerated aging phenotypes, such as premature weight loss, hair loss, reduced fertility, curvature of the spine, heart enlargement, increased autophagy, and death by 12-17 months of age. These mice also have elevated levels of clonally expanded mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions in their tissues. Our results provide direct genetic evidence linking mitochondrial protein quality control to mtDNA deletions and aging in mammals.

  16. Noradrenergic Control of Odor Recognition in a Nonassociative Olfactory Learning Task in the Mouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veyrac, Alexandra; Nguyen, Veronique; Marien, Marc; Didier, Anne; Jourdan, Francois

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined the influence of pharmacological modulations of the locus coeruleus noradrenergic system on odor recognition in the mouse. Mice exposed to a nonrewarded olfactory stimulation (training) were able to memorize this odor and to discriminate it from a new odor in a recall test performed 15 min later. At longer delays (30 or…

  17. Restoring Spinal Noradrenergic Inhibitory Tone Attenuates Pain Hypersensitivity in a Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bing; Chen, Li-Hua

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether restoring descending noradrenergic inhibitory tone can attenuate pain in a PD rat model, which was established by stereotaxic infusion of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the bilateral striatum (CPu). PD rats developed thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity at the 4th week after surgery. HPLC analysis showed that NE content, but not dopamine or 5-HT, significantly decreased in lumbar spinal cord in PD rats. Additional noradrenergic depletion by injection of N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) aggravated pain hypersensitivity in PD rats. At the 5th week after injection of 6-OHDA, systemic treatment with pharmacological norepinephrine (NE) precursor droxidopa (L-DOPS) or α2 adrenoceptor agonist clonidine significantly attenuated thermal and mechanical pain hypersensitivity in PD rats. Furthermore, application of norepinephrine (NE) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors duloxetine, but not 5-HT selective reuptake inhibitors sertraline, significantly inhibited thermal and mechanical pain hypersensitivity in PD rats. Systemic administration of Madopar (L-DOPA) or the D2/D3 agonist pramipexole slightly inhibited the thermal, but not mechanical, hypersensitivity in PD rats. Thus, our study revealed that impairment of descending noradrenergic system may play a key role in PD-associated pain and restoring spinal noradrenergic inhibitory tone may serve as a novel strategy to manage PD-associated pain. PMID:27747105

  18. Facilitation of Learning by Social-Emotional Feedback in Humans Is Beta-Noradrenergic-Dependent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihov, Yoan; Mayer, Simon; Musshoff, Frank; Maier, Wolfgang; Kendrick, Keith M.; Hurlemann, Rene

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive behavior in dynamic environments critically depends on the ability to learn rapidly and flexibly from the outcomes of prior choices. In social environments, facial expressions of emotion often serve as performance feedback and thereby guide declarative learning. Abundant evidence implicates beta-noradrenergic signaling in the modulatory…

  19. The Memory Function of Noradrenergic Activity in Non-REM Sleep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gais, Steffen; Rasch, Bjorn; Dahmen, Johannes C.; Sara, Susan; Born, Jan

    2011-01-01

    There is a long-standing assumption that low noradrenergic activity during sleep reflects mainly the low arousal during this brain state. Nevertheless, recent research has demonstrated that the locus coeruleus, which is the main source of cortical noradrenaline, displays discrete periods of intense firing during non-REM sleep, without any signs of…

  20. Orphanin FQ/Nociceptin Interacts with the Basolateral Amygdala Noradrenergic System in Memory Consolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roozendaal, Benno; Lengvilas, Ray; McGaugh, James L.; Civelli, Olivier; Reinscheid, Rainer K.

    2007-01-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA) mediates hormonal and neurotransmitter effects on the consolidation of emotionally influenced memory and that such modulatory influences involve noradrenergic activation of the BLA. As the BLA also expresses a high density of receptors for orphanin FQ/nociceptin…

  1. Noradrenergic Action in Prefrontal Cortex in the Late Stage of Memory Consolidation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tronel, Sophie; Feenstra, Matthijs G. P.; Sara, Susan J.

    2004-01-01

    These experiments investigated the role of the noradrenergic system in the late stage of memory consolidation and in particular its action at beta receptors in the prelimbic region (PL) of the prefrontal cortex in the hours after training. Rats were trained in a rapidly acquired, appetitively motivated foraging task based on olfactory…

  2. Cervical Stimulation Activates A1 and Locus Coeruleus Neurons that Project to the Paraventricular Nucleus of the Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Poletini, Maristela O.; McKee, De’Nise T.; Szawka, Raphael E.; Bertram, Richard; Helena, Cleyde V. V.; Freeman, Marc E.

    2012-01-01

    In female rats, stimulation of the uterine cervix during mating induces two daily surges of prolactin. Inhibition of hypothalamic dopamine release and stimulation of oxytocin neurons in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) are required for prolactin secretion. We aim to better understand how stimulation of the uterine cervix is translated into two daily prolactin surges. We hypothesize that noradrenergic neurons in the A1, A2, and locus coeruleus (LC) are responsible for conveying the peripheral stimulus to the PVN. In order to determine whether projections from these neurons to the PVN are activated by cervical stimulation (CS), we injected a retrograde tracer, Fluoro-Gold (FG), into the PVN of ovariectomized rats. Fourteen days after injection, animals were submitted to artificial CS or handling and perfused with a fixative solution. Brains were removed and sectioned from the A1, A2, and LC for c-Fos, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and FG triple-labeling using immunohistochemistry. CS increased the percentage of TH/FG+ double-labeled neurons expressing c-Fos in the A1 and LC. CS also increased the percentage of TH+ neurons expressing c-Fos within the A1 and A2, independent of their projections to the PVN. Our data reinforce the significant contributions of the A1 and A2 to carry sensory information during mating, and provide evidence of a functional pathway in which CS activates A1 and LC neurons projecting to the PVN, which is potentially involved in the translation of CS into two daily prolactin surges. PMID:22732530

  3. Neuroinflammatory pathways in binge alcohol-induced neuronal degeneration: oxidative stress cascade involving aquaporin, brain edema, and phospholipase A2 activation.

    PubMed

    Collins, Michael A; Neafsey, Edward J

    2012-01-01

    Chronic binge alcohol exposure in adult rat models causes neuronal degeneration in the cortex and hippocampus that is not reduced by excitotoxic receptor antagonists, but is prevented by antioxidants. Neuroinflammatory (glial-neuronal) signaling pathways are believed to underlie the oxidative stress and brain damage. Based on our experimental results as well as increased knowledge about the pro-neuroinflammatory potential of glial water channels, we propose that induction of aquaporin-4 can be a critical initiating factor in alcohol's neurotoxic effects, through the instigation of cellular edema-based neuroinflammatory cascades involving increased phospholipase A2 activities, polyunsaturated fatty acid release/membrane depletion, decreased prosurvival signaling, and oxidative stress. A testable scheme for this pathway is presented that incorporates recent findings in the alcohol-brain literature indicating a role for neuroimmune activation (upregulation of NF-kappaB, proinflammatory cytokines, and toll-like receptors). We present the argument that such neuroimmune activation could be associated with or even dependent on increased aquaporin-4 and glial swelling as well.

  4. The noradrenergic paradox: implications in the management of depression and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, Alonso; Bruins, Robert; Katzman, Martin A; Blier, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Both major depressive disorder and the anxiety disorders are major causes of disability and markedly contribute to a significant global burden of the disease worldwide. In part because of the significant socioeconomic burden associated with these disorders, theories have been developed to specifically build clinical treatment approaches. One such theory, the monoaminergic hypothesis, has led to the development of several generations of selective and nonselective inhibitors of transporters of serotonin and norepinephrine, with the goal of augmenting monoaminergic transmission. These efforts have led to considerable success in the development of antidepressant therapeutics. However, there is a strong correlation between enhanced noradrenergic activity and fear and anxiety. Consequently, some physicians have expressed concerns that the same enhanced noradrenergic activity that alleviates depression could also promote anxiety. The fact that the serotonergic and noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors are successfully used in the treatment of anxiety and panic disorders seems paradoxical. This review was undertaken to determine if any clinical evidence exists to show that serotonergic and noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors can cause anxiety. The PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched, and the results limited to randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies performed in nongeriatric adults and with clear outcome measures were reported. Based on these criteria, a total of 52 studies were examined. Patients in these studies suffered from depression or anxiety disorders (generalized and social anxiety disorders, panic disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder). The large majority of these studies employed venlafaxine or duloxetine, and the remainder used tri-cyclic antidepressants, atomoxetine, or reboxetine. All the studies reported clinically significant alleviation of depressive and/or anxious symptoms by these therapeutics. In none of these

  5. The noradrenergic paradox: implications in the management of depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Alonso; Bruins, Robert; Katzman, Martin A; Blier, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Both major depressive disorder and the anxiety disorders are major causes of disability and markedly contribute to a significant global burden of the disease worldwide. In part because of the significant socioeconomic burden associated with these disorders, theories have been developed to specifically build clinical treatment approaches. One such theory, the monoaminergic hypothesis, has led to the development of several generations of selective and nonselective inhibitors of transporters of serotonin and norepinephrine, with the goal of augmenting monoaminergic transmission. These efforts have led to considerable success in the development of antidepressant therapeutics. However, there is a strong correlation between enhanced noradrenergic activity and fear and anxiety. Consequently, some physicians have expressed concerns that the same enhanced noradrenergic activity that alleviates depression could also promote anxiety. The fact that the serotonergic and noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors are successfully used in the treatment of anxiety and panic disorders seems paradoxical. This review was undertaken to determine if any clinical evidence exists to show that serotonergic and noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors can cause anxiety. The PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched, and the results limited to randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies performed in nongeriatric adults and with clear outcome measures were reported. Based on these criteria, a total of 52 studies were examined. Patients in these studies suffered from depression or anxiety disorders (generalized and social anxiety disorders, panic disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder). The large majority of these studies employed venlafaxine or duloxetine, and the remainder used tri-cyclic antidepressants, atomoxetine, or reboxetine. All the studies reported clinically significant alleviation of depressive and/or anxious symptoms by these therapeutics. In none of these

  6. Regulation of central noradrenergic activity by 5-HT(3) receptors located in the locus coeruleus of the rat.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Jorge E; Mendiguren, Aitziber; Pineda, Joseba; Meana, J Javier

    2012-06-01

    A functional interaction between serotonergic and noradrenergic systems has been shown in the locus coeruleus (LC). Noradrenaline (NA) levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) are dependent on the firing rate of LC neurons, which is controlled by α(2) adrenoceptors (α2ADR). The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of 5-HT(3) receptors (5HT3R) in the modulation of central noradrenergic activity. We measured extracellular NA concentrations in the LC and PFC by dual-probe microdialysis in awake rats and the firing rate of LC neurons by electrophysiological techniques in vitro. Administration of the 5HT3R agonists SR57227 (1-100 μM) and m-chlorophenylbiguanide (mCPBG, 1-100 μM) into the LC increased NA in this nucleus (E(max) = 675 ± 121% and E(max) = 5575 ± 1371%, respectively) and decreased NA in the PFC (E(max) = -49 ± 6% and E(max) = -25 ± 11%, respectively). Administration of the 5HT3R antagonist Y25130 (50 μM) into LC attenuated SR57227 effect in the LC (E(max) = 323 ± 28%) and PFC (E(max) = -37 ± 7%). The α2ADR antagonist RS79948 (1 μM) blocked the SR57227 effect in the PFC but it did not change the effect in the LC (E(max) = 677 ± 202%). In electrophysiological assays, both mCPBG (1-10 μM) and SR57227 (1-10 μM) reduced the firing rate of about 50% of tested LC neurons (maximal effect = -37 ± 2% and -31 ± 4%, respectively); this effect was partially blocked by Y25130 (50 μM). Administration of RS79948 (1 μM) reversed the inhibition induced by mCPBG. Competition radioligand assays against [(3)H]UK14304 and [(3)H]RX821002 (α2ADR selective drugs) in the rat brain cortex showed a very weak affinity of SR57227 for α2ADR, whereas the affinity of mCPBG for α2ADR was 17-fold higher than that of SR57227 for α2ADR. The present results suggest that 5HT3R stimulate NA release in the LC, which promotes simultaneously a decrease in the firing rate of LC neurons through α2ADR and then a decrease

  7. Crystal structure of the BoNT/A2 receptor-binding domain in complex with the luminal domain of its neuronal receptor SV2C

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Roger M.; Schärer, Martin A.; Wieser, Mara M.; Li, Xiaodan; Frey, Daniel; Kammerer, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    A detailed molecular understanding of botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT)/host-cell-receptor interactions is fundamental both for developing strategies against botulism and for generating improved BoNT variants for medical applications. The X-ray crystal structure of the receptor-binding domain (HC) of BoNT/A1 in complex with the luminal domain (LD) of its neuronal receptor SV2C revealed only few specific side-chain – side-chain interactions that are important for binding. Notably, two BoNT/A1 residues, Arg 1156 and Arg 1294, that are crucial for the interaction with SV2, are not conserved among subtypes. Because it has been suggested that differential receptor binding of subtypes might explain their differences in biological activity, we determined the crystal structure of BoNT/A2-HC in complex with SV2C-LD. Although only few side-chain interactions are conserved between the two BoNT/A subtypes, the overall binding mode of subtypes A1 and A2 is virtually identical. In the BoNT/A2-HC – SV2C complex structure, a missing cation-π stacking is compensated for by an additional salt bridge and an anion-π stacking interaction, which explains why the binding of BoNT/A subtypes to SV2C tolerates variable side chains. These findings suggest that motif extensions and a shallow binding cleft in BoNT/A-HC contribute to binding specificity. PMID:28252640

  8. 5-HT₂A receptor inactivation potentiates the acute antidepressant-like activity of escitalopram: involvement of the noradrenergic system.

    PubMed

    Quesseveur, G; Repérant, C; David, D J; Gardier, A M; Sanchez, C; Guiard, B P

    2013-04-01

    Evidence suggests that the serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT2AR) modulates the therapeutic activity of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Indeed, among the genetic factors known to influence the individual response to antidepressants, the HTR2A gene has been associated with SSRIs response in depressed patients. However, in these pharmacogenetic studies, the consequences of HTR2A gene polymorphisms on 5-HT2AR expression or function are lacking and the precise role of this receptor is still matter of debate. This study examined the effect of 5-HT2AR agonism or antagonism with DOI and MDL100907, respectively, on the serotonergic system and the antidepressant-like activity of the SSRI escitalopram in mouse. The 5-HT2AR agonist DOI decreased the firing rate of 5-HT neurons in the dorsal raphe (DR) nucleus of 5-HT2AR(+/+) anesthetized mice. This inhibitory response persisted in 5-HT2CR(-/-) but was completely blunted in 5-HT2AR(-/-) mutants. Moreover, the suppressant effect of DOI on DR 5-HT neuronal activity in 5-HT2AR(+/+) mice was attenuated by the loss of noradrenergic neurons induced by the neurotoxin DSP4. Conversely, in 5-HT2AR(+/+) mice, the pharmacological inactivation of the 5-HT2AR by the selective antagonist MDL100907 reversed escitalopram-induced decrease in DR 5-HT neuronal activity. Remarkably, in microdialysis experiments, a single injection of escitalopram increased cortical extracellular 5-HT, but not NE, levels in awake 5-HT2AR(+/+) mice. Although the addition of MDL100907 did not potentiate 5-HT neurotransmission, it allowed escitalopram to increase cortical NE outflow and consequently to elicit an antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test. These results suggest that the blockade of the 5-HT2AR may strengthen the antidepressant-like effect of escitalopram by facilitating the enhancement of the brain NE transmission. They provide support for the use of atypical antipsychotics with SSRIs as a relevant antidepressant augmentation

  9. Peripheral nerve injury and gabapentin, but not their combinations impair attentional behavior via direct effects on noradrenergic signaling in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Suto, Takashi; Eisenach, James C.; Hayashida, Ken-ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain following peripheral nerve damage is often accompanied by a reduction in prefrontal cortex (PFC)-related cognitive functions, which are regulated by noradrenaline, released from efferents originating in the locus coeruleus (LC). L5-L6 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) increased tissue content and extracellular concentrations of noradrenaline in microdialysates from the PFC, and impaired attentional level in the novel object recognition test. Systemic gabapentin, commonly used to treat chronic pain, impaired the novel object recognition task in normal, but not SNL animals. Accordingly, gabapentin increased c-fos expression in LC neurons and noradrenaline release in the PFC in normal animals, but in SNL animals, gabapentin failed to increase c-fos expression in LC neurons projecting to the PFC and failed to increase noradrenaline release in the PFC. In contrast, locally perfused gabapentin reduced noradrenaline release in the PFC in vivo and in PFC synaptosomes in vitro. SNL- and gabapentin-induced impairment of novel object recognition task was reversed by intraperitoneal injection of the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin. These results suggest that increase in noradrenergic tone, induced by nerve injury or gabapentin, impairs PFC functions possibly via α1-adrenoceptor-mediated mechanisms, that the net effect of gabapentin on noradrenaline release in the PFC would depend on sometimes opposing actions at different sites, and that nerve injury selectively impairs the response to gabapentin in PFC projecting neurons in the LC. PMID:24837843

  10. Clinacanthus nutans Extracts Modulate Epigenetic Link to Cytosolic Phospholipase A2 Expression in SH-SY5Y Cells and Primary Cortical Neurons.

    PubMed

    Tan, Charlene Siew-Hon; Ho, Christabel Fung-Yih; Heng, Swan-Ser; Wu, Jui-Sheng; Tan, Benny Kwong-Huat; Ng, Yee-Kong; Sun, Grace Y; Lin, Teng-Nan; Ong, Wei-Yi

    2016-09-01

    Clinacanthus nutans Lindau (C. nutans), commonly known as Sabah Snake Grass in southeast Asia, is widely used in folk medicine due to its analgesic, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory properties. Our recent study provided evidence for the regulation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) mRNA expression by epigenetic factors (Tan et al. in Mol Neurobiol. doi: 10.1007/s12035-015-9314-z , 2015). This enzyme catalyzes the release of arachidonic acid from glycerophospholipids, and formation of pro-inflammatory eicosanoids or toxic lipid peroxidation products such as 4-hydroxynonenal. In this study, we examined the effects of C. nutans ethanol leaf extracts on epigenetic regulation of cPLA2 mRNA expression in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells and mouse primary cortical neurons. C. nutans modulated induction of cPLA2 expression in SH-SY5Y cells by histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, MS-275, MC-1568, and TSA. C. nutans extracts also inhibited histone acetylase (HAT) activity. Levels of cPLA2 mRNA expression were increased in primary cortical neurons subjected to 0.5-h oxygen-glucose deprivation injury (OGD). This increase was significantly inhibited by C. nutans treatment. Treatment of primary neurons with the HDAC inhibitor MS-275 augmented OGD-induced cPLA2 mRNA expression, and this increase was modulated by C. nutans extracts. OGD-stimulated increase in cPLA2 mRNA expression was also reduced by a Tip60 HAT inhibitor, NU9056. In view of a key role of cPLA2 in the production of pro-inflammatory eicosanoids and free radical damage, and the fact that epigenetic effects on genes are often long-lasting, results suggest a role for C. nutans and phytochemicals to inhibit the production of arachidonic acid-derived pro-inflammatory eicosanoids and chronic inflammation, through epigenetic regulation of cPLA2 expression.

  11. Enhanced noradrenergic transmission in the spontaneously hypertensive rat anococcygeus muscle

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Altayó, Francesc; Giraldo, Jesús; McGrath, John C; Vila, Elisabet

    2003-01-01

    There is a long-known hyper-responsiveness of vascular adrenergic transmission in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) that is uncovered specifically in the presence of cocaine and attributed to blockade of the neuronal monoamine transporter. We have now used the rat anococcygeus muscle to investigate whether this phenomenon is generic to sympathetic transmission to smooth muscle rather than a purely vascular phenomenon. We sought the origin of the effect by successively blocking the buffering effects of the neuronal monoamine transporter, prejunctional α2-adrenoceptors and NO from nitrergic nerves with desipramine (0.1 μM), rauwolscine (0.01 μM) and L-NG-nitro-arginine (100 μM). In the presence of desipramine, contractile responses to electrical field stimulation but not to noradrenaline (1 nM–100 μM) were greater in SHR than in Wistar–Kyoto (WKY). Neither inhibition of prejunctional α2-adrenoceptors nor the blockade of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) accounted for the differential enhancement of response in SHR. The enhanced effectiveness of motor neurotransmission in SHR becomes most apparent when all known major buffering mechanisms are removed. When nitrergic responses were isolated pharmacologically (phentolamine 1 μM and guanethidine 30 μM; tone raised with carbachol 50 μM), they were not different between SHR and WKY. Western blots showed that both nNOS and tyrosine hydroxylase are expressed to a similar extent in anococcygeus muscle from SHR and WKY, suggesting similar adrenergic and nitrergic innervations in the two strains. This suggests that enhanced motor transmission is due to increased transmitter release per varicosity rather than there being normal transmission from a greater number of sites. We conclude that there is a generic enhancement of sympathetic transmission in SHR rather than this being a vascular phenomenon. PMID:14504140

  12. Noradrenergic blockade stabilizes prefrontal activity and enables fear extinction under stress.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Paul J; Giustino, Thomas F; Seemann, Jocelyn R; Maren, Stephen

    2015-07-14

    Stress-induced impairments in extinction learning are believed to sustain posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Noradrenergic signaling may contribute to extinction impairments by modulating medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) circuits involved in fear regulation. Here we demonstrate that aversive fear conditioning rapidly and persistently alters spontaneous single-unit activity in the prelimbic and infralimbic subdivisions of the mPFC in behaving rats. These conditioning-induced changes in mPFC firing were mitigated by systemic administration of propranolol (10 mg/kg, i.p.), a β-noradrenergic receptor antagonist. Moreover, propranolol administration dampened the stress-induced impairment in extinction observed when extinction training is delivered shortly after fear conditioning. These findings suggest that β-adrenoceptors mediate stress-induced changes in mPFC spike firing that contribute to extinction impairments. Propranolol may be a helpful adjunct to behavioral therapy for PTSD, particularly in patients who have recently experienced trauma.

  13. Orally administrated dipeptide Ser-Tyr efficiently stimulates noradrenergic turnover in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Takashi; Moriyasu, Kazuki; Nakahata, Akane; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Matsui, Toshiro; Furuya, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of orally administrated dipeptides containing Tyr (Y) on the metabolism of catecholamines in mouse brains. We found that among eight synthetic dipeptides whose sequences are present frequently in soy proteins, Ser-Tyr (SY), Ile-Tyr, and Tyr-Pro had the highest apparent permeability coefficients in monolayers of human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. When administrated orally, SY markedly increased tyrosine content in the cerebral cortex compared to the vehicle control, Ile-Tyr, Tyr-Pro, and Y alone. The oral administration of SY more effectively increased 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethyleneglycol, the principal metabolite of noradrenaline, in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus than did Ile-Tyr, Tyr-Pro, or Y alone. Central noradrenergic turnover was also markedly stimulated by SY administration. These in vivo observations strongly suggest that SY is more potent in boosting central catecholamine transmission, particularly the noradrenergic system, than Y alone or other dipeptides that include Y.

  14. Arginine vasotocin V1a2 receptor and GnRH-I co-localize in preoptic neurons of the sex changing grouper, Epinephelus adscensionis.

    PubMed

    Kline, Richard J; Holt, G Joan; Khan, Izhar A

    2016-01-01

    The arginine vasotocin/vasopressin (AVT/AVP) and gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) systems are known to control sexual behaviors and reproduction, respectively, in different vertebrate groups. However, a direct functional connection between these two neuroendocrine systems has not been demonstrated for any vertebrate species. Therefore, the objective of this research was to test the hypothesis that AVT acts on the GnRH system via an AVT V1a receptor in a sex changing grouper species, the rock hind, Epinephelus adscensionis. AVT V1a2 receptors were co-localized with GnRH-I on neurons in the preoptic anterior hypothalamus identifying a structural linkage between the AVT system and GnRH-I. Transcripts for avt, gnrh-I, and two AVT receptor subtypes (v1a1 and v1a2) were isolated and characterized for E. adscensionis and their expression was measured in males and females by q-RT-PCR. Translation of V1a-type cDNA sequences revealed two distinct forms of the AVT V1a receptor in E. adscensionis brain similar to those reported for other species. The observation of significantly higher gnrh-I mRNA in the POA+H of rock hind males as compared to females suggests differential regulation of the gnrh-I transcripts in the two sexes of this protogynous species. In male E. adscensionis, but not in females, a negative relationship was seen between plasma 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) and the v1a1 receptor mRNA levels in the POA+H, while a positive trend was observed between 11-KT and v1a2 receptor mRNA levels, indicating that these receptor forms may be differentially regulated.

  15. Plasma Dopamine-Beta-Hydroxylase as an Index of Peripheral Noradrenergic Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-08-17

    ABSTRACT Tit le of Dissertation: Plasma Dopamine-Beta- Hydroxylase as an Index of Peripheral Noradrenergic Act iv i ty John P. A f f ron t i...Pharmacology Dopamine-Beta- Hydroxylase (DBH) (E .C . I .14.17.1) is the biosynthetic enzyme for norepinephrine and is released with the neurotransmitter dur...lu id DBH as an index of central non- adrenergic act ivi ty is addressed. PLASMA DOPAMINE-BETA- HYDROXYLASE ACTIVITY AS AN INDEX OF PERIPHERAL

  16. The role of brain noradrenergic system in the regulation of liver cytochrome P450 expression.

    PubMed

    Sadakierska-Chudy, Anna; Haduch, Anna; Rysz, Marta; Gołembiowska, Krystyna; Daniel, Władysława A

    2013-09-15

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of the brain noradrenergic system on the expression of cytochrome P450 in the liver. The experiment was carried out on male Wistar rats. Intracerebroventricular injection of the noradrenergic neurotoxin DSP-4 diminished noradrenaline level in the brain. Simultaneously, significant decreases in the serum concentration of the growth hormone, testosterone and the thyroid hormone thyroxine, as well as an increase in corticosterone level were observed. The concentrations of triiodothyronine and the cytokines interleukine 2 (IL-2) and 6 (IL-6) were not changed by DSP-4. The neurotoxin produced complex changes in the functioning of cytochrome P450. Significant decreases in the activity of liver CYP2C11 (measured as a rate of the 2α- and 16α-hydroxylation of testosterone) and CYP3A (measured as a rate of the 2β- and 6β-hydroxylation of testosterone) were found. In contrast, the activity of CYP1A (measured as a rate of caffeine metabolism) rose, while that of CYP2A (measured as a rate of the 7α-hydroxylation of testosterone), CYP2C6 (measured as a rate of the 7-hydroxylation of warfarin) and CYP2D (the 1'-hydroxylation of bufuralol) remained unchanged. The changes in the activity of CYP1A, CYP2C11 and CYP3A correlated positively with those in CYP protein levels and with the CYP mRNA levels of CYP1A1, CYP2C11 and CYP3A1/2 genes, respectively. The obtained results indicate an important role of the brain noradrenergic system in the neuroendocrine regulation of liver cytochrome P450 expression, which may be of significance in pathological states involving this system, or during pharmacotherapy with drugs affecting noradrenergic transmission.

  17. Histamine in the locus coeruleus promotes descending noradrenergic inhibition of neuropathic hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hong; Jin, Cong-Yu; Viisanen, Hanna; You, Hao-Jun; Pertovaara, Antti

    2014-12-01

    Among brain structures receiving efferent projections from the histaminergic tuberomammillary nucleus is the pontine locus coeruleus (LC) involved in descending noradrenergic control of pain. Here we studied whether histamine in the LC is involved in descending regulation of neuropathic hypersensitivity. Peripheral neuropathy was induced by unilateral spinal nerve ligation in the rat with a chronic intracerebral and intrathecal catheter for drug administrations. Mechanical hypersensitivity in the injured limb was assessed by monofilaments. Heat nociception was assessed by determining radiant heat-induced paw flick. Histamine in the LC produced a dose-related (1-10μg) mechanical antihypersensitivity effect (maximum effect at 15min and duration of effect 30min), without influence on heat nociception. Pretreatment of LC with zolantidine (histamine H2 receptor antagonist), but not with pyrilamine (histamine H1 receptor antagonist), and spinal administration of atipamezole (an α2-adrenoceptor antagonist), prazosine (an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist) or bicuculline (a GABAA receptor antagonist) attenuated the antihypersensitivity effect of histamine. The histamine-induced antihypersensitivity effect was also reduced by pretreatment of LC with fadolmidine, an α2-adrenoceptor agonist inducing autoinhibition of noradrenergic cell bodies. Zolantidine or pyrilamine alone in the LC failed to influence pain behavior, while A-960656 (histamine H3 receptor antagonist) suppressed hypersensitivity. A plausible explanation for these findings is that histamine, due to excitatory action mediated by the histamine H2 receptor on noradrenergic cell bodies, promotes descending spinal α1/2-adrenoceptor-mediated inhibition of neuropathic hypersensitivity. Blocking the autoinhibitory histamine H3 receptor on histaminergic nerve terminals in the LC facilitates release of histamine and thereby, increases descending noradrenergic pain inhibition.

  18. Estrogen regulates energy metabolic pathway and upstream adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase and phosphatase enzyme expression in dorsal vagal complex metabolosensory neurons during glucostasis and hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Tamrakar, Pratistha; Ibrahim, Baher A; Gujar, Amit D; Briski, Karen P

    2015-02-01

    The ability of estrogen to shield the brain from the bioenergetic insult hypoglycemia is unclear. Estradiol (E) prevents hypoglycemic activation of the energy deficit sensor adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in hindbrain metabolosensory A2 noradrenergic neurons. This study investigates the hypothesis that estrogen regulates A2 AMPK through control of fuel metabolism and/or upstream protein kinase/phosphatase enzyme expression. A2 cells were harvested by laser microdissection after insulin or vehicle (V) injection of E- or oil (O)-implanted ovariectomized female rats. Cell lysates were evaluated by immunoblot for glycolytic, tricarboxylic acid cycle, respiratory chain, and acetyl-CoA-malonyl-CoA pathway enzymes. A2 phosphofructokinase (PFKL), isocitrate dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, and ATP synthase subunit profiles were elevated in E/V vs. O/V; hypoglycemia augmented PFKL and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase expression in E only. Hypoglycemia increased A2 Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase-β in O and reduced protein phosphatase in both groups. A2 phospho-AMPK levels were equivalent in O/V vs. E/V but elevated during hypoglycemia in O only. These results implicate E in compensatory upregulation of substrate catabolism and corresponding maintenance of energy stability of A2 metabolosensory neurons during hypoglycemia, outcomes that support the potential viability of molecular substrates for hormone action as targets for therapies alleviating hypoglycemic brain injury.

  19. [The effect of noradrenaline on the neuronal reactions of the motor cortex evoked by conditional stimulation].

    PubMed

    Storozhuk, V M; Stezhka, V V; Ivanova, S F

    1990-01-01

    In chronic experiments on cats the influence of iontophoretic application of adrenomimetic ephedrin and beta-adrenoblocker obsidan (propranolol) on motor cortex neuron reactions following conditional stimuli was investigated under instrumental placing reaction. It was shown for a majority of neurons that the background impulse activity and reactions following conditional stimulation were suppressed by the influence of ephedrin and on the contrary were increased by obsidan application. It is concluded that there exists a consistent tonic suppressing influence of the noradrenergic system on background and evoked cortical neurons impulse activity in the natural state. It is supposed that noradrenergic influence temporal increase may serve as an important link in mechanisms of external inhibition during stress situations, aversive effects, and distractive external excitations.

  20. NORADRENERGIC, BUT NOT CHOLINERGIC, DEAFFERENTATION OF PREFRONTAL CORTEX IMPAIRS ATTENTIONAL SET-SHIFTING

    PubMed Central

    McGAUGHY, J.; ROSS, R. S.; EICHENBAUM, H.

    2008-01-01

    Both norepinephrine and acetylcholine have been shown to be critically involved in mediating attention but there remains debate about whether they serve similar or unique functions. Much of what is known about the role of these neurochemicals in cognition is based on manipulations done at the level of the cell body but these findings are difficult to reconcile with data regarding the unique contribution of cortical subregions, e.g. the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, to attention. In the current study, we directly compared the effects of noradrenergic and cholinergic deafferentation of the rat medial prefrontal cortex, the homologue of primate dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, using an intradimensional/extradimensional attentional set shifting task, a task previously shown to be able to dissociate the function of the primate dorsolateral prefrontal cortex from orbitofrontal cortex. We found that noradrenergic, but not cholinergic, deafferentation produces specific impairments in the ability to shift attentional set. We also clarified the nature of the attentional deficits by assessing the ability of rats to disregard irrelevant stimuli. Noradrenergic lesions did not alter the ability of rats to ignore irrelevant stimuli, suggesting that the attentional deficit results from an overly focused attentional state that retards learning that a new stimulus dimension predicts reward. PMID:18355972

  1. MPTP and DSP-4 susceptibility of substantia nigra and locus coeruleus catecholaminergic neurons in mice is independent of parkin activity

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Bobby; von Coelln, Rainer; Mandir, Allen S.; Trinkaus, Daniel B.; Farah, Mohamed H.; Lim, Kah Leong; Calingasan, Noel Y.; Beal, M. Flint; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2007-01-01

    Mutations in the parkin gene cause autosomal recessive familial Parkinson’s disease (PD). Parkin-deficient mouse models fail to recapitulate nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration as seen in PD, but produce deficits in dopaminergic neurotransmission and noradrenergic-dependent behavior. Since sporadic PD is thought to be caused by a combination of genetic susceptibilities and environmental factors, we hypothesized that neurotoxic insults from catecholaminergic toxins would render parkin knockout mice more vulnerable to neurodegeneration. Accordingly, we investigated the susceptibility of catecholaminergic neurons in parkin knockout mice to the potent dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurotoxins 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) respectively. We report that nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons in parkin knockout mice do not show increased susceptibility to the parkinsonian neurotoxin, MPTP, in acute, subacute and chronic dose regimens of the neurotoxin. Additionally, parkin knockout mice do not show increased vulnerability to the noradrenergic neurotoxin, DSP-4, regarding levels of norepinephrine in cortex, brain stem and spinal cord. These findings suggest that absence of parkin in mice does not increase susceptibility to the loss of catecholaminergic neurons upon exposure to both dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurotoxins. PMID:17336077

  2. Orexinergic neurons and barbiturate anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kushikata, T; Hirota, K; Yoshida, H; Kudo, M; Lambert, D G; Smart, D; Jerman, J C; Matsuki, A

    2003-01-01

    Orexins (OXs) regulate sleep with possible interactions with brain noradrenergic neurons. In addition, noradrenergic activity affects barbiturate anesthesia. As we have also recently reported that OXs selectively evoke norepinephrine release from rat cerebrocortical slices we hypothesized that barbiturate anesthesia may result from of an interaction with central orexinergic systems. To test this hypothesis, we performed a series of in vivo and in vitro studies in rats. In vivo, the effects of i.c.v. OX A, B and SB-334867-A (OX1 receptor antagonist) on pentobarbital, thiopental or phenobarbital-induced anesthesia times (loss of righting reflex) was assessed. In vitro effects of barbiturates and SB-334867-A on OX-evoked norepinephrine release from cerebrocortical slice was examined. In Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing human OX1/OX2 receptors OX A- and B-evoked increases in intracellular Ca2+ were measured with and without barbiturates. OX A and B significantly decreased pentobarbital, thiopental and phenobarbital anesthesia times by 15-40%. SB-334867-A increased thiopental-induced anesthesia time by approximately by 40%, and reversed the decrease produced by OX A. In vitro, all anesthetic barbiturates inhibited OX-evoked norepinephrine release with clinically relevant IC50 values. A GABAA antagonist, bicuculline, did not modify the inhibitory effects of thiopental and the GABAA agonist, muscimol, did not inhibit norepinephrine release. In addition there was no interaction of barbiturates with either OX1 or OX2 receptors. Collectively our data suggest that orexinergic neurons may be an important target for barbiturates, and GABAA, OX1 and OX2 receptors may not be involved in this interaction.

  3. Differential effects of histamine on the activity of hypothalamic dopaminergic neurons in the rat.

    PubMed

    Fleckenstein, A E; Lookingland, K J; Moore, K E

    1994-01-01

    The effect of intracerebroventricular administration of histamine on hypothalamic dopaminergic neuronal activity was estimated in male rats by measuring concentrations of dopamine and its metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) in brain regions containing terminals or perikarya of these neurons. Three distinct, regionally specific neurochemical responses were apparent. In the median eminence and intermediate lobe of the pituitary, histamine affected neither DOPAC nor dopamine concentrations, suggesting no effect on tuberoinfundibular or periventricular-hypophysial dopaminergic neuronal activity. In the medial zona incerta and in the dorsomedial, rostral periventricular and medial preoptic hypothalamic nuclei, histamine effected a dose- and time-related increase in both DOPAC and dopamine concentrations; these effects were blocked by destruction of noradrenergic neurons projecting to these regions, suggesting that these changes are attributable to noradrenergic neuronal activation, and that histamine does not affect the activity of incertohypothalamic or periventricular-preoptic dopaminergic neurons located in these brain regions. In the suprachiasmatic, caudal periventricular and paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei, histamine effected a dose- and time-related increase in DOPAC, but not dopamine, concentrations; these effects were blocked by the H1 antagonist mepyramine, but not the H2 antagonist zolantidine. Destruction of noradrenergic neurons projecting to these regions did not prevent the histamine-induced increases in DOPAC concentrations. These data indicate that histamine increases the activity of dopaminergic neurons projecting to the suprachiasmatic, caudal periventricular and paraventricular nuclei via an action at H1 receptors. Overall, these results reveal that i.c.v. administration of histamine differentially affects the activity of the various dopaminergic neuronal systems of the rat hypothalamus.

  4. Involvement of histaminergic and noradrenergic receptors in the oxytocin-induced food intake in neonatal meat-type chicks.

    PubMed

    Mirnaghizadeh, Seyed Vahid; Zendehdel, Morteza; Babapour, Vahab

    2017-03-01

    Oxytocin neurons have a physiological role in food intake and energy balance. Several studies have shown that central histaminergic and adrenergic systems synapse on oxytocin neurons but there is no information for their interaction on food intake regulation in birds. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of α-fluoromethylhistidine (α-FMH, histidine decarboxylase inhibitor), chlorpheniramine (histamine H1 receptors antagonist), famotidine (histamine H2 receptors antagonist), thioperamide (histamine H3 receptors antagonist), prazosin (α1 receptor antagonist), yohimbine (α2 receptor antagonist), metoprolol (β1 adrenergic receptor antagonist), ICI 118,551 (β2 adrenergic receptor antagonist) and SR59230R (β3 adrenergic receptor antagonist) on oxytocin-induced hypophagia in 3-h food-deprived (FD3) neonatal broiler chicken. In Experiment 1, 3 h-fasted chicks were given an ICV injection of saline, α-FMH (250 nmol), oxytocin (10 μg) and co-injection of α-FMH + oxytocin. Experiments 2-9 were similar to experiment 1 except birds were injected with chlorpheniramine (300 nmol), famotidine (82 nmol), thioperamide (300 nmol), prazosin (10 nmol), yohimbine (13 nmol), metoprolol (24 nmol), ICI 118,551(5 nmol) and SR59230R (20 nmol) instead of α-FMH, respectively. After injection cumulative food intake was measured until 120 min post injection. According to the results, ICV injection of oxytocin significantly decreased food intake in broiler chickens (P < 0.001). ICV injection of α-FMH significantly attenuated hypophagic effect of oxytocin (P < 0.001). Also, co-injection of chlorpheniramine plus oxytocin significantly decreased the effect of oxytocin on food intake (P < 0.001). Co-administration of thioperamide and oxytocin significantly amplified hypophagic effect of oxytocin in chickens (P < 0.001). In addition, ICI 118,551 attenuated hypophagic effect of oxytocin (P < 0.001); while

  5. Behavioral reactivity to a noradrenergic challenge after chronic oral methylphenidate (ritalin) in rats.

    PubMed

    Leblanc-Duchin, Denise; Taukulis, Harald K

    2004-12-01

    Methylphenidate (Ritalin) is routinely used for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It is a psychomotor stimulant with pharmacodynamics similar to those established for cocaine and amphetamine with primary activation of the noradrenergic and dopaminergic systems. Long-term exposure to psychostimulants including methylphenidate (MPD) is believed to result in enduring functional changes along both these pathways and various behaviors mediated by these systems may be affected. In the present experiment, the effects of intermittent oral administration of methylphenidate (10 mg/kg) to rats over a 4-week period were subsequently (after a drug washout interval) assessed in three animal models sensitive to noradrenergic manipulation: the elevated plus-maze, predator odor avoidance, and social interaction tests. The behaviors of methylphenidate-experienced animals were compared with untreated controls. Thirty minutes prior to testing, half the animals with each of these histories received an injection of yohimbine hydrochloride (2.0 mg/kg), an alpha2-adrenoreceptor blocker intended to evoke noradrenergic system activation, while the remainder received a saline injection. Yohimbine was expected to reduce both exploration of novel stimuli and interaction with conspecifics, and it was predicted that methylphenidate would potentiate these effects. Relative to saline-tested controls, rats that received both the methylphenidate treatment and the yohimbine challenge exhibited the least exploration in the predator odor test and the lowest duration of interaction with an unfamiliar conspecific partner in the social interaction test. The behavior patterns observed in this group of rats suggest heightened emotionality and defensiveness that are typically seen when rats are administered drugs known to be anxiogenic in human subjects. In the plus-maze, exploratory locomotor activities remained unaltered by either drug while yohimbine decreased risk

  6. Activation of histamine H3 receptors inhibits renal noradrenergic neurotransmission in anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, T; Tamai, I; Matsumura, Y

    2001-05-01

    To investigate the possible involvement of histamine H(3) receptors in renal noradrenergic neurotransmission, effects of (R)alpha-methylhistamine (R-HA), a selective H3-receptor agonist, and thioperamide (Thiop), a selective H3-receptor antagonist, on renal nerve stimulation (RNS)-induced changes in renal function and norepinephrine (NE) overflow in anesthetized dogs were examined. RNS (0.5-2.0 Hz) produced significant decreases in urine flow and urinary sodium excretion and increases in NE overflow rate (NEOR), without affecting renal hemodynamics. When R-HA (1 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)) was infused intravenously, mean arterial pressure and heart rate were significantly decreased, and there was a tendency to reduce basal values of urine flow and urinary sodium excretion. During R-HA infusion, RNS-induced antidiuretic action and increases in NEOR were markedly attenuated. Thiop infusion (5 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1)) did not affect basal hemodynamic and excretory parameters. Thiop infusion caused RNS-induced antidiuretic action and increases in NEOR similar to the basal condition. When R-HA was administered concomitantly with Thiop infusion, R-HA failed to attenuate the RNS-induced antidiuretic action and increases in NEOR. However, in the presence of pyrilamine (a selective H1-receptor antagonist) or cimetidine (a selective H2-receptor antagonist) infusion, R-HA attenuated the RNS-induced actions, similarly to the case without these antagonists. Thus functional histamine H3 receptors, possibly located on renal noradrenergic nerve endings, may play the role of inhibitory modulators of renal noradrenergic neurotransmission.

  7. Prenatal drug exposures sensitize noradrenergic circuits to subsequent disruption by chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Theodore A; Skavicus, Samantha; Seidler, Frederic J

    2015-12-02

    We examined whether nicotine or dexamethasone, common prenatal drug exposures, sensitize the developing brain to chlorpyrifos. We gave nicotine to pregnant rats throughout gestation at a dose (3mg/kg/day) producing plasma levels typical of smokers; offspring were then given chlorpyrifos on postnatal days 1-4, at a dose (1mg/kg) that produces minimally-detectable inhibition of brain cholinesterase activity. In a parallel study, we administered dexamethasone to pregnant rats on gestational days 17-19 at a standard therapeutic dose (0.2mg/kg) used in the management of preterm labor, followed by postnatal chlorpyrifos. We evaluated cerebellar noradrenergic projections, a known target for each agent, and contrasted the effects with those in the cerebral cortex. Either drug augmented the effect of chlorpyrifos, evidenced by deficits in cerebellar β-adrenergic receptors; the receptor effects were not due to increased systemic toxicity or cholinesterase inhibition, nor to altered chlorpyrifos pharmacokinetics. Further, the deficits were not secondary adaptations to presynaptic hyperinnervation/hyperactivity, as there were significant deficits in presynaptic norepinephrine levels that would serve to augment the functional consequence of receptor deficits. The pretreatments also altered development of cerebrocortical noradrenergic circuits, but with a different overall pattern, reflecting the dissimilar developmental stages of the regions at the time of exposure. However, in each case the net effects represented a change in the developmental trajectory of noradrenergic circuits, rather than simply a continuation of an initial injury. Our results point to the ability of prenatal drug exposure to create a subpopulation with heightened vulnerability to environmental neurotoxicants.

  8. Pharmacologic reduction of CNS noradrenergic activity in PTSD: the case for clonidine and prazosin.

    PubMed

    Boehnlein, James K; Kinzie, J David

    2007-03-01

    This article reviews the neurobiologic rationale for and presents clinical guidance concerning the use of medications that reduce central nervous system noradrenergic activity in the treatment of intrusive symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. The authors reviewed neurobiological studies, nonclinical studies using animal models, clinical case reports, open-label drug studies, and blinded, placebo-controlled drug studies. This review of the basic science and clinical literature, and the authors' clinical experience with culturally and demographically diverse populations, indicate that clonidine and prazosin can play a useful role in treating sleep disturbance and hyperarousal in posttraumatic stress disorder, with minimal adverse effects and low financial cost.

  9. Autoradiographic analysis of alpha 1-noradrenergic receptors in the human brain postmortem. Effect of suicide

    SciTech Connect

    Gross-Isseroff, R.; Dillon, K.A.; Fieldust, S.J.; Biegon, A. )

    1990-11-01

    In vitro quantitative autoradiography of alpha 1-noradrenergic receptors, using tritiated prazosin as a ligand, was performed on 24 human brains postmortem. Twelve brains were obtained from suicide victims and 12 from matched controls. We found significant lower binding to alpha 1 receptors in several brain regions of the suicide group as compared with matched controls. This decrease in receptor density was evident in portions of the prefrontal cortex, as well as the temporal cortex and in the caudate nucleus. Age, sex, presence of alcohol, and time of death to autopsy did not affect prazosin binding, in our sample, as measured by autoradiography.

  10. Noradrenergic interactions via autonomic nervous system: a promising target for extinction-based exposure therapy?

    PubMed

    Calişkan, Gürsel; Albrecht, Anne

    2013-12-01

    Fearful associations can be replaced by neutral associations through repetitive exposure of an individual to the fearful situation without the aversive component. Recently, Peña and colleagues (Peña DF, Engineer ND, McIntyre CK. Biol Psychiatry 73: 1071-1077, 2013) demonstrated that pairing activation of noradrenergic (NA) pathways through vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) with extinction learning accelerates consolidation of extinction memories in rats. Their findings stress the importance of activating the NA system through VNS in treatment of anxiety disorders such as PTSD or phobia.

  11. Noradrenaline hyperpolarizes identified rat mesopontine cholinergic neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Williams, J A; Reiner, P B

    1993-09-01

    Inhibition of brainstem cholinergic neurons by noradrenergic neurons of the locus ceruleus has long been suggested as a key mechanism of behavioral state control. In particular, the commonly held view is that noradrenaline (NA) plays a permissive role in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep generation by disinhibiting brainstem cholinergic neurons. While this notion has been supported by numerous investigations, the inhibition of cholinergic neurons by NA has never been directly demonstrated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of NA upon identified cholinergic neurons in the rat mesopontine tegmentum. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in slices, 175 cells were studied during bath application of 50 microM NA. Cholinergic neurons were positively identified by intracellular labeling with biocytin and subsequent staining with NADPH-diaphorase, a reliable marker for brainstem cholinergic neurons (Vincent et al., 1983). Successful intracellular labeling was obtained in 96 cells. Ninety-two percent (36 of 39) of cholinergic neurons hyperpolarized in response to NA, while noncholinergic cells (n = 57) exhibited mixed responses. Application of NA in a low-Ca2+, high-Mg2+ solution elicited the same hyperpolarizing effect as in normal solution, which indicated that the effect of NA on cholinergic neurons was direct. The noradrenergic hyperpolarization was mimicked by the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist UK-14,304, and was blocked by the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist idazoxan, which suggested an alpha 2-mediated response. Finally, voltage-clamp experiments revealed that NA activates the inwardly rectifying potassium current, IKG.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Noradrenergic-Dopaminergic Interactions Due to DSP-4-MPTP Neurotoxin Treatments: Iron Connection.

    PubMed

    Archer, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    The investigations of noradrenergic lesions and dopaminergic lesions have established particular profiles of functional deficits and accompanying alterations of biomarkers in brain regions and circuits. In the present account, the focus of these lesions is directed toward the effects upon dopaminergic neurotransmission and expression that are associated with the movement disorders and psychosis-like behavior. In this context, it was established that noradrenergic denervation, through administration of the selective noradrenaline (NA) neurotoxin, DSP-4, should be performed prior to the depletion of dopamine (DA) with the selective neurotoxin, MPTP. Employing this regime, it was shown that (i) following DSP-4 (50 mg/kg) pretreatment of C57/Bl6 mice, both the functional and neurochemical (DA loss) effects of MPTP (2 × 20 and 2 × 40 mg/kg) were markedly exacerbated, and (ii) following postnatal iron (Fe(2+), 7.5 mg/kg, on postnatal days 19-12), pretreatment with DSP-4 followed by the lower 2 × 20 mg/kg MPTP dose induced even greater losses of motor behavior and striatal DA. As yet, the combination of NA-DA depletions, and even more so Fe(2+)-NA-DA depletion, has been considered to present a movement disorder aspect although studies exploring cognitive domains are lacking. With intrusion of iron overload into this formula, the likelihood of neuropsychiatric disorder, as well, unfolds.

  13. Concurrent glucocorticoid and noradrenergic activity shifts instrumental behavior from goal-directed to habitual control.

    PubMed

    Schwabe, Lars; Tegenthoff, Martin; Höffken, Oliver; Wolf, Oliver T

    2010-06-16

    Stress modulates instrumental action in favor of habitual stimulus-response processes that are insensitive to changes in outcome value and at the expense of goal-directed action-outcome processes. The neuroendocrine mechanism underlying this phenomenon is unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that concurrent glucocorticoid and noradrenergic activity bias instrumental behavior toward habitual performance. To this end, healthy men and women received hydrocortisone, the alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine or both orally before they were trained in two instrumental actions leading to two distinct food outcomes. After training, one of the outcomes was devalued by inviting participants to eat that food to satiety. A subsequent extinction test revealed whether instrumental performance was goal-directed or habitual. Participants that received hydrocortisone or yohimbine alone decreased responding to the devalued action in the extinction test, i.e., they behaved goal-directed. The combined administration of hydrocortisone and yohimbine, however, rendered participants' behavior insensitive to changes in the value of the goal (i.e., habitual). These findings demonstrate that the concerted action of glucocorticoids and noradrenergic activity shifts instrumental behavior from goal-directed to habitual control.

  14. Blood--brain barrier sodium/potassium pump: modulation by central noradrenergic innervation.

    PubMed

    Harik, S I

    1986-06-01

    The active transport of Na+ and K+ across the blood--brain barrier by the membrane-bound enzyme Na+/K+-activated ATPase of brain microvessel endothelial cells has a major role in the maintenance of brain water and electrolyte homeostasis. To test whether the putative noradrenergic innervation of cerebral microvessels from the nucleus locus ceruleus contributes to the regulation of Na+/K+-ATPase activity of the blood--brain barrier, specific [3H]ouabain-binding studies were performed on cerebral microvessels and crude cortical membranes obtained from Wistar rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion of the nucleus locus ceruleus. Such lesion depleted norepinephrine by about 90% in the ipsilateral cerebral cortex without affecting the contralateral cortex. [3H]Ouabain binding to membranes of cerebral cortex and the cerebral microvessels was specific and saturable. The maximal ouabain-binding capacity in microvessels of the ipsilateral, norepinephrine-depleted, cerebral cortex was reduced by about 40%, without change in the affinity of binding. [3H]Ouabain binding to crude membrane fractions of the cerebral cortex was not significantly affected by locus ceruleus lesion. The results suggest that Na+/K+-ATPase activity of cerebral microvessels, and the consequent transport of Na+ and K+ across the blood--brain barrier, is modulated by noradrenergic innervation from the locus ceruleus.

  15. Chronic loss of noradrenergic tone produces β-arrestin2-mediated cocaine hypersensitivity and alters cellular D2 responses in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Gaval-Cruz, Meriem; Goertz, Richard B; Puttick, Daniel J; Bowles, Dawn E; Meyer, Rebecca C; Hall, Randy A; Ko, Daijin; Paladini, Carlos A; Weinshenker, David

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine blocks plasma membrane monoamine transporters and increases extracellular levels of dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (5-HT). The addictive properties of cocaine are mediated primarily by DA, while NE and 5-HT play modulatory roles. Chronic inhibition of dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH), which converts DA to NE, increases the aversive effects of cocaine and reduces cocaine use in humans, and produces behavioral hypersensitivity to cocaine and D2 agonism in rodents, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. We found a decrease in β-arrestin2 (βArr2) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) following chronic genetic or pharmacological DBH inhibition, and overexpression of βArr2 in the NAc normalized cocaine-induced locomotion in DBH knockout (Dbh -/-) mice. The D2/3 agonist quinpirole decreased excitability in NAc medium spiny neurons (MSNs) from control, but not Dbh -/- animals, where instead there was a trend for an excitatory effect. The Gαi inhibitor NF023 abolished the quinpirole-induced decrease in excitability in control MSNs, but had no effect in Dbh -/- MSNs, whereas the Gαs inhibitor NF449 restored the ability of quinpirole to decrease excitability in Dbh -/- MSNs, but had no effect in control MSNs. These results suggest that chronic loss of noradrenergic tone alters behavioral responses to cocaine via decreases in βArr2 and cellular responses to D2/D3 activation, potentially via changes in D2-like receptor G-protein coupling in NAc MSNs.

  16. Both a Nicotinic Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) and a Noradrenergic SNP Modulate Working Memory Performance when Attention Is Manipulated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, Pamela M.; Sundararajan, Ramya; Lin, Ming-Kuan; Kumar, Reshma; Fryxell, Karl J.; Parasuraman, Raja

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the relation between the two systems of visuospatial attention and working memory by examining the effect of normal variation in cholinergic and noradrenergic genes on working memory performance under attentional manipulation. We previously reported that working memory for location was impaired following large location precues,…

  17. Effects of the noradrenergic neurotoxin DSP-4 on the expression of α1-adrenoceptor subtypes after antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, Grzegorz; Zelek-Molik, Agnieszka; Kowalska, Marta; Bielawski, Adam; Antkiewicz-Michaluk, Lucyna; Nalepa, Irena

    2011-01-01

    We have previously reported that chronic imipramine and electroconvulsive treatments increase the α(1A)-adrenoceptor (but not the α(1B) subtype) mRNA level and the receptor density in the rat cerebral cortex. Furthermore, we have also shown that chronic treatment with citalopram does not affect the expression of either the α(1A)- or the α(1B)-adrenoceptor, indicating that the previously observed up-regulation of α(1A)-adrenoceptor may depend on the noradrenergic component of the pharmacological mechanism of action of these antidepressants. Here, we report that previous noradrenergic depletion with DSP-4 (50 mg/kg) (a neurotoxin selective for the noradrenergic nerve terminals) significantly attenuated the increase of α(1A)-adrenoceptor mRNA induced by a 14-day treatment with imipramine (IMI, 20 mg/kg, ip) and abolished the effect of electroconvulsive shock (ECS, 150 mA, 0.5 s) in the prefrontal cortex of the rat brain. The changes in the receptor protein expression (as reflected by its density) that were induced by IMI and ECS treatments were differently modulated by DSP-4 lesioning, and only the ECS-induced increase in α(1A)-adrenoceptor level was abolished. This study provides further evidence corroborating our initial hypothesis that the noradrenergic component of the action of antidepressant agents plays an essential role in the modulation of α(1A)-adrenoceptor in the rat cerebral cortex.

  18. Glucocorticoids interact with noradrenergic activation at encoding to enhance long-term memory for emotional material in women.

    PubMed

    Segal, S K; Simon, R; McFarlin, S; Alkire, M; Desai, A; Cahill, L F

    2014-09-26

    Evidence from the animal literature suggests that post-training glucocorticoids (GCs) interact with noradrenergic activation at acquisition to enhance memory consolidation for emotional stimuli. While there is evidence that GCs enhance memory for emotional material in humans, the extent to which this depends on noradrenergic activation at encoding has not been explored. In this study, 20-mg hydrocortisone was administered to healthy young women (18-35 yrs old) in a double-blind fashion 10 min prior to viewing a series of emotional and neutral images. Saliva samples were taken at baseline, 10 min after drug or placebo administration, immediately after viewing the images, 10, 20, and 30 min after viewing the images. Participants returned 1 week later for a surprise recall test. Results suggest that, hydrocortisone administration resulted in emotional memory enhancement only in participants who displayed an increase in endogenous noradrenergic activation, measured via salivary alpha-amylase at encoding. These results support findings in the animal literature, and suggest that GC-induced memory enhancement relies on noradrenergic activation at encoding in women.

  19. Potentiation of barbiturate-induced alterations in presynaptic noradrenergic function in rat frontal cortex by imidazol(in)e α2-adrenoceptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Dalley, J W; Parker, C A; Wülfert, E; Hudson, A L; Nutt, D J

    1998-01-01

    In order to resolve the extent to which presynaptic noradrenergic mechanisms contribute to the anaesthetic-sparing effects of α2-adrenoceptor agonists in vivo microdialysis was used to investigate the combined effects of sodium pentobarbitone and imidazol(in)e α2-adrenoceptor agonists on extracellular levels of noradrenaline (NA) in the rat frontal cortex.Dialysate levels of NA were markedly reduced by the addition of TTX (2 μM) or by the removal of calcium in the perfusate. These data imply that dialysate NA levels are ultimately dependent on exocytotic release mechanisms from afferent coeruleo-cortical neurones.Systemic administration of sodium pentobarbitone (85 mg kg−1, i.p.) induced general anaesthesia and reduced NA levels by 92% after 30 min. The restoration of basal levels 90 min later was closely associated with a return of the corneal blink reflex.Basal NA levels in conscious animals were not affected by an intravenous infusion of equally radioactive solutions of either imidazoline (clonidine) or imidazole (mivazerol) α2-adrenoceptor agonists. The dose rate employed for each compound was 2 μg kg−1 h−1 over 2 h.The co-administration of intravenous clonidine or mivazerol, each at 2 μg kg−1 h−1 for 2 h, with sodium pentobarbitone (85 mg kg−1, i.p.), produced a marked and prolonged reduction in NA efflux. After 2 h, NA levels remained suppressed by 95% (clonidine) and 80% (mivazerol) and animals remained deeply anaesthetized.The accumulation of tritium in brain tissue was 42–73% lower across all brain regions examined after [3H]-mivazerol administration than after [3H]-clonidine administration. Sodium pentobarbitone did not alter the accumulation of tritium in brain tissue after the administration of either α2-adrenoceptor agonist.These data demonstrate that α2-adrenoceptor agonists potentiate the inhibitory effects of sodium pentobarbitone on extracellular levels of NA in the frontal cortex. Further

  20. Ilex paraguariensis Promotes Orofacial Pain Relief After Formalin Injection: Involvement of Noradrenergic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Eudislaine Fonseca; de Oliveira, Simone Kobe; Nardi, Viviane Koepp; Gelinski, Tathiana Carla; Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos; Maraschin, Marcelo; Nardi, Geisson Marcos

    2016-01-01

    Background: Drinking mate or chimarrão, a hot infusion of Ilex paraguariensis (ILEX) leaves, is a common habit in Southern South America that has a social and almost ritualistic role. It has been used as a stimulant beverage in South America and analgesic in regions of Argentina for treatment of headache and others painful inflammatory conditions such as arthritis and rheumatism. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacological activity of I. paraguariensis infusion (ILEX) on orofacial nociception model induced by formalin, and study its mechanism of action. Materials and Methods: The analgesic effect of ILEX was assessed through writhing test, paw formalin test, paw edema induced by carrageenan, and orofacial pain induced by formalin. To study the action mechanism of ILEX, opioidergic, dopaminergic, nitrergic, and adrenergic pathways were investigated. Results: The high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of ILEX infusion revealed caffeine and theobromine. The treatment with ILEX reduced the number of writhing. However, it was effective neither in the formalin paw test nor in the paw edema induced by carrageenan. Different from formalin paw test, ILEX was able to reduce the orofacial reactivity to formalin in 31.8% (70.4 ± 2.5 s; first phase), and 20% (127.3 ± 18.9 s; second phase). The analgesic effect of ILEX results from the modulation of noradrenergic pathways since prazosin (α1-adrenoceptor antagonist, 0.15 mg/kg; intraperitoneal) reversed the analgesic effect of ILEX. Conclusions: The present report demonstrates that analgesic effect of ILEX in orofacial formalin test is due mainly to modulation of noradrenergic pathways. SUMMARY Ilex paraguariensis (ILEX) has been used as a stimulant beverage in South America and analgesic in regions of Argentina for the treatment of headache and others painful inflammatory conditions such arthritis and rheumatism.The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacological activity of ILEX on

  1. Astrocytic and neuronal accumulation of elevated extracellular K(+) with a 2/3 K(+)/Na(+) flux ratio-consequences for energy metabolism, osmolarity and higher brain function.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Leif; Xu, Junnan; Song, Dan; Yan, Enzhi; Gu, Li; Peng, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Brain excitation increases neuronal Na(+) concentration by 2 major mechanisms: (i) Na(+) influx caused by glutamatergic synaptic activity; and (ii) action-potential-mediated depolarization by Na(+) influx followed by repolarizating K(+) efflux, increasing extracellular K(+) concentration. This review deals mainly with the latter and it concludes that clearance of extracellular K(+) is initially mainly effectuated by Na(+),K(+)-ATPase-mediated K(+) uptake into astrocytes, at K(+) concentrations above ~10 mM aided by uptake of Na(+),K(+) and 2 Cl(-) by the cotransporter NKCC1. Since operation of the astrocytic Na(+),K(+)-ATPase requires K(+)-dependent glycogenolysis for stimulation of the intracellular ATPase site, it ceases after normalization of extracellular K(+) concentration. This allows K(+) release via the inward rectifying K(+) channel Kir4.1, perhaps after trans-astrocytic connexin- and/or pannexin-mediated K(+) transfer, which would be a key candidate for determination by synchronization-based computational analysis and may have signaling effects. Spatially dispersed K(+) release would have little effect on extracellular K(+) concentration and allow K(+) accumulation by the less powerful neuronal Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, which is not stimulated by increases in extracellular K(+). Since the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase exchanges 3 Na(+) with 2 K(+), it creates extracellular hypertonicity and cell shrinkage. Hypertonicity stimulates NKCC1, which, aided by β-adrenergic stimulation of the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, causes regulatory volume increase, furosemide-inhibited undershoot in [K(+)]e and perhaps facilitation of the termination of slow neuronal hyperpolarization (sAHP), with behavioral consequences. The ion transport processes involved minimize ionic disequilibria caused by the asymmetric Na(+),K(+)-ATPase fluxes.

  2. LEVOMILNACIPRAN--A SUCCESSOR OF MILNACIPRAN WITH A HIGHER NORADRENERGIC SELECTIVITY.

    PubMed

    Zadka, Łukasz; Dziwota, Ewelina; Olajossy, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    A new antidepressant, levomilnacipran, is the levorotatory enantiomer of milnacipran. The drug belongs to selective serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI) and has the highest noradrenergic selectivity of all members of this group of antidepressants. Clinical trials have confirmed the effectiveness of levomilnacipran in the treatment of depression. The drug was placed on the US market in the form of prolonged-release capsules, which greatly simplifies the treatment of psychiatric patients. The safety of the drug is also higher than the safety of a racemate, resulting in a beneficial impact on the therapeutic effect. In this paper we present current information on the pharmacological and clinical properties of the newest antidepressant--levomilnacipran.

  3. Stress-related noradrenergic activity prompts large-scale neural network reconfiguration.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Erno J; van Marle, Hein J F; Ossewaarde, Lindsey; Henckens, Marloes J A G; Qin, Shaozheng; van Kesteren, Marlieke T R; Schoots, Vincent C; Cousijn, Helena; Rijpkema, Mark; Oostenveld, Robert; Fernández, Guillén

    2011-11-25

    Acute stress shifts the brain into a state that fosters rapid defense mechanisms. Stress-related neuromodulators are thought to trigger this change by altering properties of large-scale neural populations throughout the brain. We investigated this brain-state shift in humans. During exposure to a fear-related acute stressor, responsiveness and interconnectivity within a network including cortical (frontoinsular, dorsal anterior cingulate, inferotemporal, and temporoparietal) and subcortical (amygdala, thalamus, hypothalamus, and midbrain) regions increased as a function of stress response magnitudes. β-adrenergic receptor blockade, but not cortisol synthesis inhibition, diminished this increase. Thus, our findings reveal that noradrenergic activation during acute stress results in prolonged coupling within a distributed network that integrates information exchange between regions involved in autonomic-neuroendocrine control and vigilant attentional reorienting.

  4. Close Vicinity of PrP Expressing Cells (FDC) with Noradrenergic Fibers in Healthy Sheep Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Lezmi, S.; Hunsmann, G.; Baron, T.

    2001-01-01

    In naturally and experimentally occurring scrapie in sheep, prions invade the immune system and replicate in lymphoid organs. Here we analysed immunohistochemically, in seven spleens of 6-month-old healthy sheep, the nature of the cells expressing prion protein (PrP) potentially supporting prion replication, as well as their relationship with autonomic innervation. PrP was identified using either RB1 rabbit antiserum or 4F2 monoclonal antibody directed against AA 108–123 portion of the bovine and AA 79–92 of human prion protein respectively. Using double labelling analysis, we demonstrated that PrPc is expressed by follicular dendritic cells using a specific monoclonal antibody (CNA42). We also showed the close vicinity of these PrP expressing cells with noradrenergic fibers, using a polyclonal tyrosine hydroxylase antibody. Our results may help the study of the cellular requirements for the possible neuroinvasion from the spleen. PMID:11785673

  5. Evidence for alterations in central noradrenergic signaling in irritable bowel syndrome*, **

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Steven; Suyenobu, Brandall; Naliboff, Bruce D.; Bueller, Joshua; Stains, Jean; Wong, Heng; Mandelkern, Mark; Fitzgerald, Leah; Ohning, Gordon; Gupta, Arpana; Labus, Jennifer S.; Tillisch, Kirsten; Mayer, Emeran A.

    2014-01-01

    Background/aims Alterations in noradrenergic (NE) signaling have been implicated in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and adrenergic receptors are potential treatment targets. Methods To characterize central NE signaling in IBS, 11 patients and 11 healthy controls (HCs) were studied 3 times during an auditory oddball vigilance task after double-blind ingestion of the α2-adrenoreceptor (α2AR) antagonist yohimbine (YOH), the α2AR agonist clonidine (CLO), or placebo (PLA). Regional cerebral glucose metabolism was measured with [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). Measures of anxiety, early-life trauma, plasma NE and blood pressure were acquired. Results Patients had higher plasma NE levels than HCs before and after ingestion of all drugs (all p <0.05). YOH increased plasma NE and more anxiety in patients than in HCs. After YOH, NE levels directly correlated with drug-induced increases in anxiety in IBS patients (r=0.61), but not in HCs. IBS patients showed less YOH-mediated reduction of activity in a central arousal circuit, consistent with fewer functional presynaptic α2AR. In HCs, but not in patients, activation of amygdala and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) was inversely correlated with activation of anterior mid cingulate cortex (aMCC), and state anxiety covaried directly with activity in limbic and right frontotemporal cortices, but indirectly with activity in the left frontotemporal cortex. YOH-mediated reduction of activity in brainstem and amygdala inversely correlated with early life trauma. Conclusions IBS patients showed evidence for increased noradrenergic activity consistent with downregulation of presynaptic inhibitory α2ARs. Activity within central arousal circuits was biased toward greater excitability and reduced corticolimbic inhibition in IBS. Early life trauma may be one mediator of these abnormalities. PMID:22917679

  6. Role of noradrenergic pathways in sneeze-induced urethral continence reflex in rats.

    PubMed

    Kaiho, Yasuhiro; Kamo, Izumi; Chancellor, Michael B; Arai, Yoichi; de Groat, William C; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2007-02-01

    To clarify the role of noradrenergic pathways in preventing stress urinary incontinence (SUI) during sneezing, we investigated the effect of the norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor nisoxetine and alpha-adrenoceptor antagonists phentolamine (nonspecific blocker) and prazosin (alpha(1)-receptor-selective blocker) on the neurally evoked urethral continence reflex induced by sneezing in rats. The amplitude of urethral pressure responses during sneezing (A-URS), urethral baseline pressure (UBP) at the midurethra, and sneeze-induced leak point pressure (S-LPP) were measured in normal female adult rats and rats with SUI induced by vaginal distention (VD). In normal rats, intrathecal (it) phentolamine (0.02 nmol) and prazosin (0.02 nmol) decreased A-URS by 11.9 and 15.7%, respectively, without affecting UBP. In both normal and VD rats, intravenous (iv) application of nisoxetine (1 mg/kg) increased A-URS by 17.2 and 18.3% and UBP by 23.7 and 32.7%, respectively. Phentolamine or prazosin (both it) eliminated nisoxetine-induced increases in A-URS, but not the increases in UBP, which were, however, suppressed by iv phentolamine (5 mg/kg) or prazosin (1 mg/kg). Sneezing induced fluid leakage from the urethral orifice in VD rats, but not in normal rats. In VD rats, S-LPP was increased by 30.2% by iv nisoxetine. Application of phentolamine and prazosin (both it) decreased S-LPP by 15.7 and 20.6%, respectively, and nisoxetine induced increases in S-LPP to 13.2 and 12.3%, respectively. These results indicate that activation of the noradrenergic system by a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor can prevent SUI via alpha(1-)adrenoceptors by enhancing the sneeze-induced active urethral closure mechanism at the spinal level and augmenting UBP at the periphery.

  7. CXCR4 and NMDA Receptors Are Functionally Coupled in Rat Hippocampal Noradrenergic and Glutamatergic Nerve Endings.

    PubMed

    Di Prisco, Silvia; Olivero, Guendalina; Merega, Elisa; Bonfiglio, Tommaso; Marchi, Mario; Pittaluga, Anna

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies had shown that the HIV-1 capsidic glycoprotein gp120 (strain IIIB) modulates presynaptic release-regulating NMDA receptors on noradrenergic and glutamatergic terminals. This study aims to assess whether the chemokine CXC4 receptors (CXCR4s) has a role in the gp120-mediated effects. The effect of CXCL12, the endogenous ligand at CXCR4, on the NMDA-mediated releasing activity was therefore investigated. Rat hippocampal synaptosomes were preloaded with [(3)H]noradrenaline ([(3)H]NA) or [(3)H]D-aspartate ([(3)H]D-Asp) and acutely exposed to CXCL12, to NMDA or to both agonists. CXCL12, inactive on its own, facilitated the NMDA-evoked tritium release. The NMDA antagonist MK-801 abolished the NMDA/CXCL12-evoked tritium release of both radiolabelled tracers, while the CXCR4 antagonist AMD 3100 halved it, suggesting that rat hippocampal nerve endings possess presynaptic release-regulating CXCR4 receptors colocalized with NMDA receptors. Accordingly, Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of CXCR4 proteins in synaptosomal plasmamembranes. In both synaptosomal preparations, CXCL12-induced facilitation of NMDA-mediated release was dependent upon PLC-mediated src-induced events leading to mobilization of Ca(2+) from intraterminal IP3-sensitive stores Finally, the gp120-induced facilitation of NMDA-mediated release of [(3)H]NA and [(3)H]D-Asp was prevented by AMD 3100. We propose that CXCR4s are functionally coupled to NMDA receptors in rat hippocampal noradrenergic and glutamatergic terminals and account for the gp120-induced modulation of the NMDA-mediated central effects. The NMDA/CXCR4 cross-talk could have a role in the neuropsychiatric symptoms often observed in HIV-1 positive patients.

  8. Inferior frontal gyrus preserves working memory and emotional learning under conditions of impaired noradrenergic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Benjamin; Androsch, Lucas; Jahn, Ralph T.; Alich, Therese; Striepens, Nadine; Markett, Sebastian; Maier, Wolfgang; Hurlemann, René

    2013-01-01

    Compensation has been widely applied to explain neuroimaging findings in neuropsychiatric patients. Functional compensation is often invoked when patients display equal performance and increased neural activity in comparison to healthy controls. According to the compensatory hypothesis increased activity allows the brain to maintain cognitive performance despite underlying neuropathological changes. Due to methodological and pathology-related issues, however, the functional relevance of the increased activity and the specific brain regions involved in the compensatory response remain unclear. An experimental approach that allows a transient induction of compensatory responses in the healthy brain could help to overcome these issues. To this end we used the non-selective beta-blocker propranolol to pharmacologically induce sub-optimal noradrenergic signaling in healthy participants. In two independent functional MRI (fMRI) experiments participants received either placebo or propranolol before they underwent a cognitive challenge (Experiment 1: working memory; Experiment 2: emotional learning: Pavlovian fear conditioning). In Experiment 1 propranolol had no effects on working memory performance, but evoked stronger activity in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). In Experiment 2 propranolol produced no effects on emotional memory formation, but evoked stronger activity in the right IFG. The present finding that sub-optimal beta-adrenergic signaling did not disrupt performance and concomitantly increased IFG activity is consistent with, and extends, current perspectives on functional compensation. Together, our findings suggest that under conditions of impaired noradrenergic signaling, heightened activity in brain regions located within the cognitive control network, particularly the IFG, may reflect compensatory operations subserving the maintenance of behavioral performance. PMID:24381546

  9. Exercise-Induced Noradrenergic Activation Enhances Memory Consolidation in Both Normal Aging and Patients with Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Sabrina K.; Cotman, Carl W.; Cahill, Lawrence F.

    2013-01-01

    Post-trial pharmacological activation of the noradrenergic system can facilitate memory consolidation. Because exercise activates the locus coeruleus and increases brain norepinephrine release, we hypothesized that post-trial exercise could function as a natural stimulus to enhance memory consolidation. We investigated this in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and cognitively normal elderly individuals by examining the effects of an acute bout of post-learning, aerobic exercise (6 minutes at 70% VO2 max on a stationary bicycle) on memory for some emotional images. Exercise significantly elevated endogenous norepinephrine (measured via the biomarker, salivary alpha-amylase) in both aMCI patients and controls. Additionally, exercise retrogradely enhanced memory in both aMCI patients and controls. Acute exercise that activates the noradrenergic system may serve as a beneficial, natural, and practical therapeutic intervention for cognitive decline in the aging population. PMID:22914593

  10. Exercise-induced noradrenergic activation enhances memory consolidation in both normal aging and patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Segal, Sabrina K; Cotman, Carl W; Cahill, Lawrence F

    2012-01-01

    Post-trial pharmacological activation of the noradrenergic system can facilitate memory consolidation. Because exercise activates the locus coeruleus and increases brain norepinephrine release, we hypothesized that post-trial exercise could function as a natural stimulus to enhance memory consolidation. We investigated this in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) and cognitively normal elderly individuals by examining the effects of an acute bout of post-learning, aerobic exercise (6 minutes at 70% VO2 max on a stationary bicycle) on memory for some emotional images. Exercise significantly elevated endogenous norepinephrine (measured via the biomarker, salivary alpha-amylase) in both aMCI patients and controls. Additionally, exercise retrogradely enhanced memory in both aMCI patients and controls. Acute exercise that activates the noradrenergic system may serve as a beneficial, natural, and practical therapeutic intervention for cognitive decline in the aging population.

  11. Co-localization of the cannabinoid type 1 receptor with corticotropin-releasing factor-containing afferents in the noradrenergic nucleus locus coeruleus: implications for the cognitive limb of the stress response.

    PubMed

    R Wyrofsky, Ryan; Reyes, Beverly A S; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J

    2017-03-02

    The noradrenergic system has been shown to play a key role in the regulation of stress responses, arousal, mood, and emotional states. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is a primary mediator of stress-induced activation of noradrenergic neurons in the nucleus locus coeruleus (LC). The endocannabinoid (eCB) system also plays a key role in modulating stress responses, acting as an "anti-stress" neuro-mediator. In the present study, we investigated the cellular sites for interactions between the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1r) and CRF in the LC. Immunofluorescence and high-resolution immunoelectron microscopy showed co-localization of CB1r and CRF in both the core and peri-LC areas. Semi-quantitative analysis revealed that 44% (208/468) of CRF-containing axon terminals in the core and 35% (104/294) in the peri-LC expressed CB1r, while 18% (85/468) of CRF-containing axon terminals in the core and 6.5% (19/294) in the peri-LC were presynaptic to CB1r-containing dendrites. In the LC core, CB1r + CRF axon terminals were more frequently of the symmetric (inhibitory) type; while in the peri-LC, a majority were of the asymmetric (excitatory) type. Triple label immunofluorescence results supported the ultrastructural analysis indicating that CB1r + CRF axon terminals contained either gamma amino butyric acid or glutamate. Finally, anterograde transport from the central nucleus of the amygdala revealed that CRF-amygdalar afferents projecting to the LC contain CB1r. Taken together, these results indicate that the eCB system is poised to directly modulate stress-integrative heterogeneous CRF afferents in the LC, some of which arise from limbic sources.

  12. A computational psychiatry approach identifies how alpha-2A noradrenergic agonist Guanfacine affects feature-based reinforcement learning in the macaque.

    PubMed

    Hassani, S A; Oemisch, M; Balcarras, M; Westendorff, S; Ardid, S; van der Meer, M A; Tiesinga, P; Womelsdorf, T

    2017-01-16

    Noradrenaline is believed to support cognitive flexibility through the alpha 2A noradrenergic receptor (a2A-NAR) acting in prefrontal cortex. Enhanced flexibility has been inferred from improved working memory with the a2A-NA agonist Guanfacine. But it has been unclear whether Guanfacine improves specific attention and learning mechanisms beyond working memory, and whether the drug effects can be formalized computationally to allow single subject predictions. We tested and confirmed these suggestions in a case study with a healthy nonhuman primate performing a feature-based reversal learning task evaluating performance using Bayesian and Reinforcement learning models. In an initial dose-testing phase we found a Guanfacine dose that increased performance accuracy, decreased distractibility and improved learning. In a second experimental phase using only that dose we examined the faster feature-based reversal learning with Guanfacine with single-subject computational modeling. Parameter estimation suggested that improved learning is not accounted for by varying a single reinforcement learning mechanism, but by changing the set of parameter values to higher learning rates and stronger suppression of non-chosen over chosen feature information. These findings provide an important starting point for developing nonhuman primate models to discern the synaptic mechanisms of attention and learning functions within the context of a computational neuropsychiatry framework.

  13. A computational psychiatry approach identifies how alpha-2A noradrenergic agonist Guanfacine affects feature-based reinforcement learning in the macaque

    PubMed Central

    Hassani, S. A.; Oemisch, M.; Balcarras, M.; Westendorff, S.; Ardid, S.; van der Meer, M. A.; Tiesinga, P.; Womelsdorf, T.

    2017-01-01

    Noradrenaline is believed to support cognitive flexibility through the alpha 2A noradrenergic receptor (a2A-NAR) acting in prefrontal cortex. Enhanced flexibility has been inferred from improved working memory with the a2A-NA agonist Guanfacine. But it has been unclear whether Guanfacine improves specific attention and learning mechanisms beyond working memory, and whether the drug effects can be formalized computationally to allow single subject predictions. We tested and confirmed these suggestions in a case study with a healthy nonhuman primate performing a feature-based reversal learning task evaluating performance using Bayesian and Reinforcement learning models. In an initial dose-testing phase we found a Guanfacine dose that increased performance accuracy, decreased distractibility and improved learning. In a second experimental phase using only that dose we examined the faster feature-based reversal learning with Guanfacine with single-subject computational modeling. Parameter estimation suggested that improved learning is not accounted for by varying a single reinforcement learning mechanism, but by changing the set of parameter values to higher learning rates and stronger suppression of non-chosen over chosen feature information. These findings provide an important starting point for developing nonhuman primate models to discern the synaptic mechanisms of attention and learning functions within the context of a computational neuropsychiatry framework. PMID:28091572

  14. Caffeine consumption prevents memory impairment, neuronal damage, and adenosine A2A receptors upregulation in the hippocampus of a rat model of sporadic dementia.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Janaína; Rocha, Andreia; Nunes, Fernanda; Costa, Marcelo S; Schein, Vanessa; Kazlauckas, Vanessa; Kalinine, Eduardo; Souza, Diogo O; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Porciúncula, Lisiane O

    2013-01-01

    Intracerebroventricular (icv) streptozotocin (STZ) administration induces pathological and behavioral alterations similar to those observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is thus considered an experimental model of sporadic AD. Since caffeine (an adenosine receptor antagonist) and selective antagonists of adenosine A2A receptors modify the course of memory impairment in different amyloid-β-based experimental models of AD, we now tested the impact of caffeine on STZ-induced dementia and associated neurodegeneration in the hippocampus as well as on the expression and density of adenosine receptors. Adult male rats received a bilateral infusion of saline or STZ (3 mg/kg, icv), which triggered memory deficits after four weeks, as gauged by impaired object recognition memory. This was accompanied by a reduced NeuN immunoreactivity in the hippocampal CA1 region and an increased expression and density of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR), but not A1R, in the hippocampus. Caffeine consumption (1 g/L in the drinking water starting 2 weeks before the STZ challenge) prevented the STZ-induced memory impairment and neurodegeneration as well as the upregulation of A2AR. These findings provide the first demonstration that caffeine prevents sporadic dementia and implicate the control of central A2AR as its likely mechanism of action.

  15. MDMA modulates spontaneous firing of subthalamic nucleus neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liebig, Luise; von Ameln-Mayerhofer, Andreas; Hentschke, Harald

    2015-01-01

    3,4-Methylene-dioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA, 'ecstasy') has a broad spectrum of molecular targets in the brain, among them receptors and transporters of the serotonergic (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) and noradrenergic systems. Its action on the serotonergic system modulates motor systems in rodents and humans. Although parts of the basal ganglia could be identified as mediators of the motor effects of MDMA, very little is known about the role of the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Therefore, this study investigated the modulation of spontaneous action potential activity of the STN by MDMA (2.5-20 µM) in vitro. MDMA had very heterogeneous effects, ranging from a complete but reversible inhibition to a more than twofold increase in firing at 5 µM. On average, MDMA excited STN neurons moderately, but lost its excitatory effect in the presence of the 5-HT(2A) antagonist MDL 11,939. 5-HT(1A) receptors did not appear to play a major role. Effects of MDMA on transporters for serotonin (SERT) and norepinephrine (NET) were investigated by coapplication of the reuptake inhibitors citalopram and desipramine, respectively. Similar to the effects of 5-HT(2A) receptor blockade, antagonism of SERT and NET bestowed an inhibitory effect on MDMA. From these results, we conclude that both the 5-HT and the noradrenergic system mediate MDMA-induced effects on STN neurons.

  16. Effects of noradrenergic denervation on L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia and its treatment by α- and β-adrenergic receptor antagonists in hemiparkinsonian rats

    PubMed Central

    Barnum, Christopher J.; Bhide, Nirmal; Lindenbach, David; Surrena, Margaret A.; Goldenberg, Adam A.; Tignor, Stefanie; Klioueva, Anna; Walters, Hannah; Bishop, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    While L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) remains the standard treatment for Parkinson’s disease (PD), long-term efficacy is often compromised by L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID). Recent research suggests that targeting the noradrenergic (NE) system may provide relief from both PD and LID, however, most PD patients exhibit NE loss which may modify response to such strategies. Therefore this investigation aimed to characterize the development and expression of LID and the anti-dyskinetic potential of the α2- and β-adrenergic receptor antagonists idazoxan and propranolol, respectively, in rats receiving 6-OHDA lesions with (DA lesion) or without desipramaine protection (DA + NE lesion). Male Sprague–Dawley rats (N = 110) received unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions. Fifty-three rats received desipramine to protect NE neurons (DA lesion) and 57 received no desipramine reducing striatal and hippocampal NE content 64% and 86% respectively. In experiment 1, the development and expression of L-DOPA-induced abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) and rotations were examined. L-DOPA efficacy using the forepaw adjusting steps (FAS) test was also assessed in DA- and DA + NE-lesioned rats. In experiment 2, DA- and DA + NE-lesioned rats received pre-treatments of idazoxan or propranolol followed by L-DOPA after which the effects of these adrenergic compounds were observed. Results demonstrated that moderate NE loss reduced the development and expression of AIMs and rotations but not L-DOPA efficacy while anti-dyskinetic efficacy of α2- and β-adrenergic receptor blockade was maintained. These findings suggest that the NE system modulates LID and support the continued investigation of adrenergic compounds for the improved treatment of PD. PMID:21978941

  17. Effects of noradrenergic denervation on L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia and its treatment by α- and β-adrenergic receptor antagonists in hemiparkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Barnum, Christopher J; Bhide, Nirmal; Lindenbach, David; Surrena, Margaret A; Goldenberg, Adam A; Tignor, Stefanie; Klioueva, Anna; Walters, Hannah; Bishop, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    While L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) remains the standard treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD), long-term efficacy is often compromised by L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID). Recent research suggests that targeting the noradrenergic (NE) system may provide relief from both PD and LID, however, most PD patients exhibit NE loss which may modify response to such strategies. Therefore this investigation aimed to characterize the development and expression of LID and the anti-dyskinetic potential of the α2- and β-adrenergic receptor antagonists idazoxan and propranolol, respectively, in rats receiving 6-OHDA lesions with (DA lesion) or without desipramaine protection (DA+NE lesion). Male Sprague-Dawley rats (N=110) received unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions. Fifty-three rats received desipramine to protect NE neurons (DA lesion) and 57 received no desipramine reducing striatal and hippocampal NE content 64% and 86% respectively. In experiment 1, the development and expression of L-DOPA-induced abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) and rotations were examined. L-DOPA efficacy using the forepaw adjusting steps (FAS) test was also assessed in DA- and DA+NE-lesioned rats. In experiment 2, DA- and DA+NE-lesioned rats received pre-treatments of idazoxan or propranolol followed by L-DOPA after which the effects of these adrenergic compounds were observed. Results demonstrated that moderate NE loss reduced the development and expression of AIMs and rotations but not L-DOPA efficacy while anti-dyskinetic efficacy of α2- and β-adrenergic receptor blockade was maintained. These findings suggest that the NE system modulates LID and support the continued investigation of adrenergic compounds for the improved treatment of PD.

  18. A noradrenergic sensitive endogenous clock is present in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Wongchitrat, Prapimpun; Felder-Schmittbuhl, Marie-Paule; Govitrapong, Piyarat; Phansuwan-Pujito, Pansiri; Simonneaux, Valérie

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the occurrence of endogenous oscillations of Per1, Per2, Bmal1 and Rev-erbα genes in rat pineal explants and to investigate their regulation by adrenergic ligands. Our results show a significant and sustained rhythm of Per2,Bmal1 and Rev-erbα gene expression for up to 48 h in cultured pineal gland with a pattern similar to that observed in vivo. By contrast, the rhythms of Per1 and Aa-nat, the rate-limiting enzyme for melatonin synthesis, were strongly attenuated after 24 h in culture. Addition of the exogenous adrenergic agonist isoproterenol on cultured pineal glands induced a short-term increase in mRNA levels of Per1 and Aa-nat, but not those of Per2,Bmal1 and Rev-erbα. This study demonstrates that the rat pineal gland hosts a circadian oscillator as evidenced by the sustained, noradrenergic-independent, endogenous oscillations of Per2, Bmal1 and Rev-erbα mRNA levels in cultured tissues. Only expression of Per1 was stimulated by adrenergic ligands suggesting that, in vivo, the adrenergic input could synchronize the pineal clock by acting selectively on Per1.

  19. Noradrenergic function in generalized anxiety disorder, major depressive disorder, and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sevy, S; Papadimitriou, G N; Surmont, D W; Goldman, S; Mendlewicz, J

    1989-01-15

    Plasma norepinephrine (NE), free 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenethylene glycol (MHPG), and binding of tritiated yohimbine to platelet membranes were measured in 14 patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), who were matched for age and sex with 14 patients with unipolar major depressive disorder (MDD) and 14 normal subjects. Plasma NE and MHPG levels were increased and the number of alpha2-adrenoreceptors (Bmax) was decreased in GAD patients compared with MDD and normal subjects. No differences were found between MDD patients and normal subjects for plasma NE, MHPG, and alpha2-adrenoreceptor binding. Plasma NE and MHPG were significantly correlated in MDD patients and tended toward a significant positive correlation in GAD patients. Plasma MHPG and affinity of binding platelet alpha2-adrenoreceptors (Kd) were significantly correlated in normal subjects. Thus, noradrenergic activity seems to be increased in patients with GAD, but not in patients with MDD. In GAD patients, higher levels of catecholamines may lead to a down-regulation of presynaptic alpha2-adrenoreceptors.

  20. Noradrenergic and Serotonergic Mechanisms in the Neurobiology of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Resilience

    PubMed Central

    Krystal, John H.; Neumeister, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is characterized mainly by symptoms of re-experiencing, avoidance and hyperarousal as a consequence of catastrophic and traumatic events that are distinguished from ordinary stressful life events. Although extensive research has already been done, the etiology of PTSD remains unclear. Research on the impact of trauma on neurobiological systems can be expected to inform the development of treatments that are directed specifically to symptoms of PTSD. During the past 25 years there has been a dramatic increase in the knowledge about noradrenergic and serotonergic mechanisms in stress response, PTSD and more recently in resilience and this knowledge has justified the use of antidepressants with monoaminergic mechanisms of action for patients with PTSD. Nevertheless, available treatments of PTSD are only to some extent effective and enhanced understanding of the neurobiology of PTSD may lead to the development of improved treatments for these patients. In the present review, we aim to close existing gaps between basic research in psychopathology, neurobiology and treatment development with the ultimate goal to translate basic research into clinically relevant findings which may directly benefit patients with PTSD. PMID:19332037

  1. Transdermal neuromodulation of noradrenergic activity suppresses psychophysiological and biochemical stress responses in humans

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, William J.; Boasso, Alyssa M.; Mortimore, Hailey M.; Silva, Rhonda S.; Charlesworth, Jonathan D.; Marlin, Michelle A.; Aebersold, Kirsten; Aven, Linh; Wetmore, Daniel Z.; Pal, Sumon K.

    2015-01-01

    We engineered a transdermal neuromodulation approach that targets peripheral (cranial and spinal) nerves and utilizes their afferent pathways as signaling conduits to influence brain function. We investigated the effects of this transdermal electrical neurosignaling (TEN) method on sympathetic physiology under different experimental conditions. The TEN method involved delivering high-frequency pulsed electrical currents to ophthalmic and maxillary divisions of the right trigeminal nerve and cervical spinal nerve afferents. Under resting conditions, TEN significantly suppressed basal sympathetic tone compared to sham as indicated by functional infrared thermography of facial temperatures. In a different experiment, subjects treated with TEN reported significantly lower levels of tension and anxiety on the Profile of Mood States scale compared to sham. In a third experiment when subjects were experimentally stressed TEN produced a significant suppression of heart rate variability, galvanic skin conductance, and salivary α-amylase levels compared to sham. Collectively these observations demonstrate TEN can dampen basal sympathetic tone and attenuate sympathetic activity in response to acute stress induction. Our physiological and biochemical observations are consistent with the hypothesis that TEN modulates noradrenergic signaling to suppress sympathetic activity. We conclude that dampening sympathetic activity in such a manner represents a promising approach to managing daily stress. PMID:26353920

  2. Triphenyl phosphate enhances adipogenic differentiation, glucose uptake and lipolysis via endocrine and noradrenergic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cano-Sancho, German; Smith, Anna; La Merrill, Michele A

    2017-04-01

    The use of triphenyl phosphate (TPhP) as a flame retardant or plasticizer has increased during the last decade, resulting in widespread human exposure without commensurate toxicity assessment. The main objectives of this study were to assess the in vitro effect of TPhP and its metabolite diphenyl phosphate (DPhP) on the adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells, as well as glucose uptake and lipolysis in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. TPhP increased pre-adipocyte proliferation and subsequent adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells, coinciding with increased transcription in the CEBP and PPARG pathway. Treatment of mature adipocytes with TPhP increased the basal- and insulin stimulated- uptake of the glucose analog 2-[N (-7-nitrobenz-2-oxa1, 3-diazol-4-yl) amino]-2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-NBDG). This effect was ablated by inhibition of PI3K, a member of the insulin signaling pathway. DPhP had no significant effect on cell proliferation and, compared to TPhP, a weaker effect on adipogenic differentiation and on 2-NBDG uptake. Both TPhP and DPhT significantly enhanced the isoproterenol-induced lipolysis, most likely by increasing the expression of lipolytic genes during and after differentiation. This study suggests that TPhP increases adipogenic differentiation, glucose uptake, and lipolysis in 3T3-L1 cells through endocrine and noradrenergic mechanisms.

  3. Dopaminergic and Noradrenergic Contributions to Functionality in ADHD: The Role of Methylphenidate

    PubMed Central

    Engert, Veronika; Pruessner, Jens C

    2008-01-01

    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a childhood psychiatric condition characterized by severe impulsiveness, inattention and overactivity. Methylphenidate (MPH), a psychostimulant affecting both the dopaminergic and the noradrenergic systems, is one of the most frequently prescribed treatments for ADHD. Despite the widespread use of MPH and its proven effectiveness, its precise neurochemical mechanisms of action are under debate. For the most part, MPH’s influence on subcortical dopamine neurotransmission is thought to play a crucial role in its behavioral and cognitive effects. In their hypothesis of biphasic MPH action, Seeman and Madras [42, 43] suggest that therapeutic doses of MPH elevate tonic dopamine while inhibiting phasic transmitter release in subcortical structures, leading to reduced postsynaptic receptor stimulation and psychomotor activation in response to salient stimuli. Volkow and colleagues [56] suggest that by amplifying a weak striatal dopamine signal, MPH increases the perception of a stimulus or task as salient. The enhanced interest for the task is thought to increase attention and improve performance. Recent animal studies have however shown that when administered at doses producing clinically relevant drug plasma levels and enhancing cognitive function, MPH preferentially activates dopamine and noradrenaline efflux within the prefrontal cortex relative to the subcortical structures [5]. Overall, we suggest that the delineated theories of MPH therapeutic action should not be discussed as exclusive. Studies are outlined that allow integrating the different findings and models. PMID:19587853

  4. Functional differentiation of cholinergic and noradrenergic modulation in a biophysical model of olfactory bulb granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Linster, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory bulb granule cells are modulated by both acetylcholine (ACh) and norepinephrine (NE), but the effects of these neuromodulators have not been clearly distinguished. We used detailed biophysical simulations of granule cells, both alone and embedded in a microcircuit with mitral cells, to measure and distinguish the effects of ACh and NE on cellular and microcircuit function. Cholinergic and noradrenergic modulatory effects on granule cells were based on data obtained from slice experiments; specifically, ACh reduced the conductance densities of the potassium M current and the calcium-dependent potassium current, whereas NE nonmonotonically regulated the conductance density of an ohmic potassium current. We report that the effects of ACh and NE on granule cell physiology are distinct and functionally complementary to one another. ACh strongly regulates granule cell firing rates and afterpotentials, whereas NE bidirectionally regulates subthreshold membrane potentials. When combined, NE can regulate the ACh-induced expression of afterdepolarizing potentials and persistent firing. In a microcircuit simulation developed to investigate the effects of granule cell neuromodulation on mitral cell firing properties, ACh increased spike synchronization among mitral cells, whereas NE modulated the signal-to-noise ratio. Coapplication of ACh and NE both functionally improved the signal-to-noise ratio and enhanced spike synchronization among mitral cells. In summary, our computational results support distinct and complementary roles for ACh and NE in modulating olfactory bulb circuitry and suggest that NE may play a role in the regulation of cholinergic function. PMID:26334007

  5. Functional differentiation of cholinergic and noradrenergic modulation in a biophysical model of olfactory bulb granule cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoshi; Linster, Christiane; Cleland, Thomas A

    2015-12-01

    Olfactory bulb granule cells are modulated by both acetylcholine (ACh) and norepinephrine (NE), but the effects of these neuromodulators have not been clearly distinguished. We used detailed biophysical simulations of granule cells, both alone and embedded in a microcircuit with mitral cells, to measure and distinguish the effects of ACh and NE on cellular and microcircuit function. Cholinergic and noradrenergic modulatory effects on granule cells were based on data obtained from slice experiments; specifically, ACh reduced the conductance densities of the potassium M current and the calcium-dependent potassium current, whereas NE nonmonotonically regulated the conductance density of an ohmic potassium current. We report that the effects of ACh and NE on granule cell physiology are distinct and functionally complementary to one another. ACh strongly regulates granule cell firing rates and afterpotentials, whereas NE bidirectionally regulates subthreshold membrane potentials. When combined, NE can regulate the ACh-induced expression of afterdepolarizing potentials and persistent firing. In a microcircuit simulation developed to investigate the effects of granule cell neuromodulation on mitral cell firing properties, ACh increased spike synchronization among mitral cells, whereas NE modulated the signal-to-noise ratio. Coapplication of ACh and NE both functionally improved the signal-to-noise ratio and enhanced spike synchronization among mitral cells. In summary, our computational results support distinct and complementary roles for ACh and NE in modulating olfactory bulb circuitry and suggest that NE may play a role in the regulation of cholinergic function.

  6. Functional Neuroanatomy of the Noradrenergic Locus Coeruleus: Its Roles in the Regulation of Arousal and Autonomic Function Part II: Physiological and Pharmacological Manipulations and Pathological Alterations of Locus Coeruleus Activity in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, E. R; Szabadi, E

    2008-01-01

    The locus coeruleus (LC), the major noradrenergic nucleus of the brain, gives rise to fibres innervating most structures of the neuraxis. Recent advances in neuroscience have helped to unravel the neuronal circuitry controlling a number of physiological functions in which the LC plays a central role. Two such functions are the regulation of arousal and autonomic activity, which are inseparably linked largely via the involvement of the LC. Alterations in LC activity due to physiological or pharmacological manipulations or pathological processes can lead to distinct patterns of change in arousal and autonomic function. Physiological manipulations considered here include the presentation of noxious or anxiety-provoking stimuli and extremes in ambient temperature. The modification of LC-controlled functions by drug administration is discussed in detail, including drugs which directly modify the activity of LC neurones (e.g., via autoreceptors, storage, reuptake) or have an indirect effect through modulating excitatory or inhibitory inputs. The early vulnerability of the LC to the ageing process and to neurodegenerative disease (Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases) is of considerable clinical significance. In general, physiological manipulations and the administration of stimulant drugs, α2-adrenoceptor antagonists and noradrenaline uptake inhibitors increase LC activity and thus cause heightened arousal and activation of the sympathetic nervous system. In contrast, the administration of sedative drugs, including α2-adrenoceptor agonists, and pathological changes in LC function in neurodegenerative disorders and ageing reduce LC activity and result in sedation and activation of the parasympathetic nervous system. PMID:19506724

  7. Basal adenosine modulates the functional properties of AMPA receptors in mouse hippocampal neurons through the activation of A1R A2AR and A3R

    PubMed Central

    Di Angelantonio, Silvia; Bertollini, Cristina; Piccinin, Sonia; Rosito, Maria; Trettel, Flavia; Pagani, Francesca; Limatola, Cristina; Ragozzino, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is a widespread neuromodulator within the CNS and its extracellular level is increased during hypoxia or intense synaptic activity, modulating pre- and postsynaptic sites. We studied the neuromodulatory action of adenosine on glutamatergic currents in the hippocampus, showing that activation of multiple adenosine receptors (ARs) by basal adenosine impacts postsynaptic site. Specifically, the stimulation of both A1R and A3R reduces AMPA currents, while A2AR has an opposite potentiating effect. The effect of ARs stimulation on glutamatergic currents in hippocampal cultures was investigated using pharmacological and genetic approaches. A3R inhibition by MRS1523 increased GluR1-Ser845 phosphorylation and potentiated AMPA current amplitude, increasing the apparent affinity for the agonist. A similar effect was observed blocking A1R with DPCPX or by genetic deletion of either A3R or A1R. Conversely, impairment of A2AR reduced AMPA currents, and decreased agonist sensitivity. Consistently, in hippocampal slices, ARs activation by AR agonist NECA modulated glutamatergic current amplitude evoked by AMPA application or afferent fiber stimulation. Opposite effects of AR subtypes stimulation are likely associated to changes in GluR1 phosphorylation and represent a novel mechanism of physiological modulation of glutamatergic transmission by adenosine, likely acting in normal conditions in the brain, depending on the level of extracellular adenosine and the distribution of AR subtypes. PMID:26528137

  8. Depressive-like behavior observed with a minimal loss of locus coeruleus (LC) neurons following administration of 6-hydroxydopamine is associated with electrophysiological changes and reversed with precursors of norepinephrine

    PubMed Central

    Szot, Patricia; Franklin, Allyn; Miguelez, Cristina; Wang, Yangqing; Vidaurrazaga, Igor; Ugedo, Luisa; Sikkema, Carl; Wilkinson, Charles W.; Raskind, Murray A.

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a common co-morbid condition most often observed in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and during the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Dysfunction of the central noradrenergic nervous system is an important component in depression. In AD, locus coeruleus (LC) noradrenergic neurons are significantly reduced pathologically and the reduction of LC neurons is hypothesized to begin very early in the progression of the disorder; however, it is not known if dysfunction of the noradrenergic system due to early LC neuronal loss is involved in mediating depression in early AD. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine in an animal model if a loss of noradrenergic LC neurons results in depressive-like behavior. The LC noradrenergic neuronal population was reduced by the bilateral administration of the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) directly into the LC. Forced swim test (FST) was performed three weeks after the administration of 6-OHDA (5, 10 and 14 μg/μl), animals administered the 5 μg/μl of 6-OHDA demonstrated a significant increase in immobility, indicating depressive-like behavior. This increase in immobility at the 5 μg/μl dose was observed with a minimal loss of LC noradrenergic neurons as compared to LC neuronal loss observed at 10 and 14 μg/μl dose. A significant positive correlation between the number of surviving LC neurons after 6-OHDA and FST immobile time was observed, suggesting that in animals with a minimal loss of LC neurons (or a greater number of surviving LC neurons) following 6-OHDA demonstrated depressive-like behavior. As the 6-OHDA-induced loss of LC neurons is increased, the time spent immobile is reduced. Depressive-like behavior was also observed with the 5 μg/μl dose of 6-OHDA with a second behavior test, sucrose consumption. FTS increased immobility following 6-OHDA (5 μg/μl) was reversed by the administration of a single dose of L-1-3-4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) or L-threo-3

  9. In neurons, activity-dependent association of dendritically transported mRNA transcripts with the transacting factor CBF-A is mediated by A2RE/RTS elements.

    PubMed

    Raju, Chandrasekhar S; Fukuda, Nanaho; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Göritz, Christian; Visa, Neus; Percipalle, Piergiorgio

    2011-06-01

    In neurons certain mRNA transcripts are transported to synapses through mechanisms that are not fully understood. Here we report that the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein CBF-A (CArG Box binding Factor A) facilitates dendritic transport and localization of activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKIIα) mRNAs. We discovered that, in the adult mouse brain, CBF-A has a broad distribution. In the nucleus, CBF-A was found at active transcription sites and interchromosomal spaces and close to nuclear pores. In the cytoplasm, CBF-A localized to dendrites as well as pre- and postsynaptic sites. CBF-A was found in synaptosomal fractions, associated with Arc, BDNF, and CaMKIIα mRNAs. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated a direct interaction mediated via their hnRNP A2 response element (A2RE)/RNA trafficking sequence (RTS) elements located in the 3' untranslated regions. In situ hybridization and microscopy on live hippocampal neurons showed that CBF-A is in dynamic granules containing Arc, BDNF, and CaMKIIα mRNAs. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) postsynaptic receptor stimulation led to CBF-A accumulation in dendrites; increased Arc, BDNF, and CaMKIIα mRNA levels; and increased amounts of transcripts coprecipitating with CBF-A. Finally, CBF-A gene knockdown led to decreased mRNA levels. We propose that CBF-A cotranscriptionally binds RTSs in Arc, BDNF, and CaMKIIα mRNAs and follows the transcripts from genes to dendrites, promoting activity-dependent nuclear sorting of transport-competent mRNAs.

  10. Regulation of serine (Ser)-31 and Ser40 tyrosine hydroxylase phosphorylation during morphine withdrawal in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and nucleus tractus solitarius-A2 cell group: role of ERK1/2.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Cristina; Laorden, M Luisa; Milanés, M Victoria

    2007-12-01

    Our previous studies have shown that naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal increases the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity, which is dependent on a hyperactivity of noradrenergic pathways [nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) A(2)] innervating the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Short-term regulation of catecholamine biosynthesis occurs through phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), which enhances enzymatic activity. In the present study, the effect of morphine withdrawal on site-specific TH phosphorylation in the PVN and NTS-A(2) was determined by quantitative blot immunolabeling and immunohistochemistry using phosphorylation state-specific antibodies. We show that naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal phosphorylates TH at Serine (Ser)-31 but not Ser40 in PVN and NTS-A(2), which is associated with both an increase in total TH immunoreactivity in NTS-A(2) and an enhanced TH activity in the PVN. In addition, we demonstrated that TH neurons phosphorylated at Ser31 coexpress c-Fos in NTS-A(2). We then tested whether pharmacological inhibition of ERK activation by ERK kinase contributes to morphine withdrawal-induced phosphorylation of TH at Ser31. We show that the ability of morphine withdrawal to stimulate phosphorylation at this seryl residue is reduced by SL327, an inhibitor of ERK(1/2) activation. These results suggest that morphine withdrawal increases noradrenaline turnover in the PVN, at least in part, via ERK(1/2)-dependent phosphorylation of TH at Ser31.

  11. Intrathecal reboxetine suppresses evoked and ongoing neuropathic pain behaviours by restoring spinal noradrenergic inhibitory tone.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Sam; Hickey, Louise; Donaldson, Lucy F; Lumb, Bridget M; Pickering, Anthony E

    2015-02-01

    The descending noradrenergic (NAergic) projection to the spinal cord forms part of an endogenous analgesic system. After nerve injury, a localised failure in this compensatory system has been implicated as a permissive factor in the development of neuropathic sensitisation. We investigated whether restoring descending NAergic tone with intrathecal reboxetine can oppose the development of the neuropathic pain phenotype after tibial nerve transection (TNT). Rats had a lumbar intrathecal catheter implanted at the time of nerve injury for administration of reboxetine (10 μg) in both acute and chronic dosing experiments. In acute dosing experiments, both intrathecal and systemic (30 mg/kg) reboxetine partially reversed mechanical allodynia. This antiallodynic effect of intrathecal reboxetine was blocked by prior administration of yohimbine (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist, 30 μg) but not by prazosin (α1-adrenoceptor antagonist, 30 μg) or propranolol (β-adrenoceptor antagonist, 100 μg). Chronic intrathecal reboxetine (10 μg, intrathecally, twice daily for 2 weeks) suppressed the development of cold and mechanical allodynia. Nerve-injured animals demonstrated a place preference for intrathecal reboxetine, suggesting that it also reduced spontaneous pain. In contrast, an equivalent antiallodynic dose of systemic reboxetine (30 mg/kg) was aversive in both naive and TNT rats. On cessation of chronic intrathecal reboxetine, there was a gradual development of allodynic sensitisation that was indistinguishable from control TNT animals by 7 days after the end of dosing. Our results suggest that pharmacological restoration of spinal NAergic tone with intrathecal reboxetine can suppress both allodynia and spontaneous pain in the TNT model.

  12. The effect of noradrenergic attenuation by clonidine on inhibition in the stop signal task.

    PubMed

    Logemann, H N Alexander; Böcker, Koen B E; Deschamps, Peter K H; Kemner, Chantal; Kenemans, J Leon

    2013-09-01

    Understanding the neuropharmacology of inhibition is of importance to fuel optimal treatment for disorders such as Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of noradrenergic antagonism by clonidine on behavioral-performance and brain-activity indices of inhibition. A placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized, crossover design was implemented. Male (N=21) participants performed in a visual stop signal task while EEG was recorded under clonidine in one session and under placebo in another. We expected that 100 μg clonidine would have a negative effect on EEG indices of inhibition, the Stop N2 and Stop P3. Furthermore, we expected that clonidine would negatively affect the behavioral measure of inhibition, the stop signal reaction time (SSRT). Behavioral analyses were performed on data of 17 participants, EEG analyses on a subset (N=13). Performance data suggested that clonidine negatively affected attention (response variability, omissions) without affecting inhibition as indexed by SSRT. Electrophysiological data show that clonidine reduced the Stop P3, but not the Stop N2, indicating a partial negative effect on inhibition. Results show that it is unlikely that the Stop P3 reduction was related to the effect of clonidine on lapses of attention and on peripheral cardiovascular functioning. In conclusion, the current dose of clonidine had a negative effect on attention and a partial effect on inhibitory control. This inhibitory effect was restricted to the dorsal region of the prefrontal cortex (presumably the superior frontal gyrus) as opposed to the ventral region of the prefrontal cortex (right inferior frontal gyrus).

  13. Glucocorticoid effects on memory retrieval require concurrent noradrenergic activity in the hippocampus and basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Roozendaal, Benno; Hahn, Emily L; Nathan, Sheila V; de Quervain, Dominique J-F; McGaugh, James L

    2004-09-15

    Previous findings indicate that administration of abeta-adrenoceptor antagonist systemically blocks glucocorticoid impairment of memory retrieval. Here, we report that beta-adrenoceptor activation in the hippocampus and the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA) is implicated in the impairing effects of glucocorticoids on memory retrieval. The specific glucocorticoid receptor (GR) agonist 11beta,17beta-dihydroxy-6,21-dimethyl-17alpha-pregna-4,6-trien-20yn-3-one (RU 28362) (15 ng) infused into the hippocampus of male Sprague Dawley rats 60 min before water maze retention testing, 24 hr after training, impaired probe trial retention performance, as assessed by quadrant search time and initial latency to cross the platform location. Because we found previously that RU 28362 infused into the hippocampus does not affect water maze acquisition or immediate recall, the findings suggest that the GR agonist-induced retention impairment was attributable to a selective influence on long-term memory retrieval. Likewise, systemic injections of the beta1-adrenoceptor partial agonist xamoterol (3.0 or 10.0 mg/kg, s.c.) 60 min before the probe trial dose-dependently impaired retention performance. The beta-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol (2.0 mg/kg) administered subcutaneously before retention testing did not affect retention performance alone, but blocked the memory retrieval impairment induced by concurrent intrahippocampal infusions of RU 28362. Pretest infusions of the beta1-adrenoceptor antagonist atenolol into either the hippocampus (1.25 microg in 0.5 microl) or the BLA (0.5 microg in 0.2 microl) also prevented the GR agonist-induced memory retrieval impairment. These findings suggest that glucocorticoids impair retrieval of long-term spatial memory by facilitating noradrenergic mechanisms in the hippocampus, and additionally, that norepinephrine-mediated BLA activity is critical in enabling hippocampal glucocorticoid effects on memory retrieval.

  14. Interacting noradrenergic and corticosteroid systems shift human brain activation patterns during encoding.

    PubMed

    van Stegeren, Anda H; Roozendaal, Benno; Kindt, Merel; Wolf, Oliver T; Joëls, Marian

    2010-01-01

    Emotionally arousing experiences are usually well retained, an effect that depends on the release of adrenal stress hormones. Animal studies have shown that corticosterone and noradrenaline - representing the two main stress hormone systems - act in concert to enhance memory formation by actions involving the amygdala, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Here we test whether interactions between these two stress hormone systems also affect human memory formation as well as the associated pattern of brain activation. To this end, forty-eight male human subjects received hydrocortisone, yohimbine or both before presentation of emotional and neutral pictures. Activity in the amygdala, hippocampus and PFC was monitored with functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) during encoding of these stimuli, when hormonal levels were elevated. Memory performance was tested 1 week later. We investigated whether an increased level of one of the two hormone systems would lead to differential effects compared to the combined application of the drugs on brain activation and memory performance. We report that the application of cortisol led to an overall enhancing effect on recognition memory, with no significant additional effect of yohimbine. However, during encoding the brain switched from amygdala/hippocampus activation with either hormone alone, to a strong deactivation of prefrontal areas under the influence of the combination of both exogenous hormones. Although we did not find evidence that exogenous stimulation of the noradrenergic and corticosteroid systems led to significant interaction effects on memory performance in this experiment, we conclude that stress hormone levels during encoding did differentially determine the activation pattern of the brain circuits here involved.

  15. Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Dopaminergic Neurons during Development in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Du, Yuchen; Guo, Qiang; Shan, Minghui; Wu, Yongmei; Huang, Sizhou; Zhao, Haixia; Hong, Huarong; Yang, Ming; Yang, Xi; Ren, Liyi; Peng, Jiali; Sun, Jing; Zhou, Hongli; Li, Shurong; Su, Bingyin

    2016-01-01

    As one of the model organisms of Parkinson's disease (PD) research, the zebrafish has its advantages, such as the 87% homology with human genome and transparent embryos which make it possible to observe the development of dopaminergic neurons in real time. However, there is no midbrain dopaminergic system in zebrafish when compared with mammals, and the location and projection of the dopaminergic neurons are seldom reported. In this study, Vmat2:GFP transgenic zebrafish was used to observe the development and distribution of dopaminergic neurons in real time. We found that diencephalons (DC) 2 and DC4 neuronal populations were detected at 24 h post fertilization (hpf). All DC neuronal populations as well as those in locus coeruleus (LC), raphe nuclei (Ra) and telencephalon were detected at 48 hpf. Axons were detected at 72 hpf. At 96 hpf, all the neuronal populations were detected. For the first time we reported axons from the posterior tubercle (PT) of ventral DC projected to subpallium in vivo. However, when compared with results from whole mount tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunofluorescence staining in wild type (WT) zebrafish, we found that DC2 and DC4 neuronal populations were mainly dopaminergic, while DC1, DC3, DC5 and DC6 might not. Neurons in pretectum (Pr) and telencephalon were mainly dopaminergic, while neurons in LC and Ra might be noradrenergic. Our study makes some corrections and modifications on the development, localization and distribution of zebrafish dopaminergic neurons, and provides some experimental evidences for the construction of the zebrafish PD model.

  16. Serotonergic and noradrenergic lesions suppress the enhancing effect of maternal exercise during pregnancy on learning and memory in rat pups.

    PubMed

    Akhavan, M M; Emami-Abarghoie, M; Safari, M; Sadighi-Moghaddam, B; Vafaei, A A; Bandegi, A R; Rashidy-Pour, A

    2008-02-19

    The beneficial effects of exercise on learning and memory are well documented but the effects of prenatal exposure to maternal exercise on offspring are not clear yet. Using a two-trial-per-day Morris water maze for five consecutive days, succeeded by a probe trial 2 days later we showed that maternal voluntary exercise (wheel running) by pregnant rats increased the acquisition phase of the pups' learning. Maternal forced swimming by pregnant rats increased both acquisition and retention phases of the pups' learning. Also we found that the rat pups whose mother was submitted to forced-swimming during pregnancy had significantly higher brain, liver, heart and kidney weights compared with their sedentary counterparts. On the other hand we estimated the cell number of different regions of the hippocampus in the rat pups. We found that both exercise models during pregnancy increased the cell number in cornus ammonis subregion 1 (CA1) and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in rat pups. To determine the role that noradrenergic and serotonergic neurotransmission and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors hold in mediation of the maternal exercise in offspring, we used N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4), p-chloroamphetamine (PCA) and MK-801 to eliminate or block the above systems, respectively. Blocking the NMDA receptors, significantly abolished learning and memory in rat pups from all three experimental groups. Elimination of noradrenergic or serotonergic input did not significantly attenuate the learning and memory in rat pups whose mothers were sedentary, while it significantly reversed the positive effects of maternal exercise during pregnancy on rat pups' learning and memory. The presented results suggest that noradrenergic and serotonergic systems in offspring brain seem to have a crucial specific role in mediating the effects of maternal physical activity during pregnancy on rat pups' cognitive function in both models of voluntary and forced exercise.

  17. Effect of Intrathecal Administration of Serotoninergic and Noradrenergic Drugs on Postural Performance in Rabbits With Spinal Cord Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lyalka, V. F.; Musienko, P. E.; Orlovsky, G. N.; Grillner, S.; Deliagina, T. G.

    2008-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that extensive spinal lesions at T12 in the rabbit [ventral hemisection (VHS) or 3/4-section that spares one ventral quadrant (VQ)] severely damaged the postural system. When tested on the platform periodically tilted in the frontal plane, VHS and VQ animals typically were not able to perform postural corrective movements by their hindlimbs, although EMG responses (correctly or incorrectly phased) could be observed. We attempted to restore postural control in VHS and VQ rabbits by applying serotoninergic and noradrenergic drugs to the spinal cord below the lesion through the intrathecal cannula. It was found that serotonin and quipazine (5-HT1,2,3 agonist) did not re-establish postural corrective movements. However, when applied during a 10-day period after lesion, these drugs produced a twofold increase of the proportion of correct EMG responses to tilts. It was also found that methoxamine (α1 noradrenergic agonist), as well as the mixture of methoxamine and quipazine, did not re-establish postural corrective movements and did not increase the proportion of correct EMG responses. Serotonin (at later stages) and methoxamine induced periodical bursting in EMGs, suggesting activation of spinal rhythm-generating networks. Appearance of bursting seems to perturb normal operation of postural mechanisms, as suggested by methoxamine-induced abolishment of postural effects of quipazine. When applied in an intact animal, none of the tested drugs affected the value of postural corrections or evoked periodical bursting. We conclude that activation of the serotoninergic system (but not the noradrenergic one) causes selective enhancement of spinal postural reflexes during the earlier postlesion period. PMID:18497353

  18. Central noradrenergic depletion by DSP-4 prevents stress-induced memory impairments in the object recognition task.

    PubMed

    Scullion, G A; Kendall, D A; Sunter, D; Marsden, C A; Pardon, M-C

    2009-12-01

    Environmental stress produces adverse affects on memory in humans and rodents. Increased noradrenergic neurotransmission is a major component of the response to stress and noradrenaline (NA) plays an important role in modulating processes involved in learning and memory. The present study investigated the effect of NA depletion on stress-induced changes on memory performance in the mouse. Central NA depletion was induced using the selective neurotoxin N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2 bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) and verified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A novel cage stress procedure involving exposure to a new clean cage for 1 h per day, 4 days per week for 4 weeks, was used to produce stress-induced memory deficits measured using the object recognition task. 50 mg/kg DSP-4 produced large and sustained reductions in NA levels in the frontal cortex and hippocampus measured 24 h, 1 week and 5 weeks after treatment. Four weeks of exposure to novel cage stress induced a memory deficit in the object recognition task which was prevented by DSP-4 pre-treatment (50 mg/kg 1 week before the commencement of stress).These findings indicate that chronic environmental stress adversely affects recognition memory and that this effect is, in part, mediated by the noradrenergic stress response. The implication of these findings is that drugs targeting the noradrenergic system to reduce over-activity may be beneficial in the treatment of stress-related mental disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder or anxiety in which memory is affected.

  19. Aging and aerobic fitness affect the contribution of noradrenergic sympathetic nerves to the rapid cutaneous vasodilator response to local heating.

    PubMed

    Tew, Garry A; Saxton, John M; Klonizakis, Markos; Moss, James; Ruddock, Alan D; Hodges, Gary J

    2011-05-01

    Sedentary aging results in a diminished rapid cutaneous vasodilator response to local heating. We investigated whether this diminished response was due to altered contributions of noradrenergic sympathetic nerves by assessing 1) the age-related decline and 2) the effect of aerobic fitness. Using laser-Doppler flowmetry, we measured skin blood flow (SkBF) in young (24 ± 1 yr) and older (64 ± 1 yr) endurance-trained and sedentary men (n = 7 per group) at baseline and during 35 min of local skin heating to 42°C at 1) untreated forearm sites, 2) forearm sites treated with bretylium tosylate (BT), which prevents neurotransmitter release from noradrenergic sympathetic nerves, and 3) forearm sites treated with yohimbine + propranolol (YP), which antagonizes α- and β-adrenergic receptors. SkBF was converted to cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC = SkBF/mean arterial pressure) and normalized to maximal CVC (%CVC(max)) achieved by skin heating to 44°C. Pharmacological agents were administered using microdialysis. In the young trained group, the rapid vasodilator response was reduced at BT and YP sites (P < 0.05); by contrast, in the young sedentary and older trained groups, YP had no effect (P > 0.05), but BT did (P > 0.05). Neither BT nor YP affected the rapid vasodilator response in the older sedentary group (P > 0.05). These data suggest that the age-related reduction in the rapid vasodilator response is due to an impairment of sympathetic-dependent mechanisms, which can be partly attenuated with habitual aerobic exercise. Rapid vasodilation involves noradrenergic neurotransmitters in young trained men and nonadrenergic sympathetic cotransmitters (e.g., neuropeptide Y) in young sedentary and older trained men, possibly as a compensatory mechanism. Finally, in older sedentary men, the rapid vasodilation appears not to involve the sympathetic system.

  20. Noradrenergic stimulation modulates activation of extinction-related brain regions and enhances contextual extinction learning without affecting renewal

    PubMed Central

    Lissek, Silke; Glaubitz, Benjamin; Güntürkün, Onur; Tegenthoff, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Renewal in extinction learning describes the recovery of an extinguished response if the extinction context differs from the context present during acquisition and recall. Attention may have a role in contextual modulation of behavior and contribute to the renewal effect, while noradrenaline (NA) is involved in attentional processing. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study we investigated the role of the noradrenergic system for behavioral and brain activation correlates of contextual extinction and renewal, with a particular focus upon hippocampus and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (PFC), which have crucial roles in processing of renewal. Healthy human volunteers received a single dose of the NA reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine prior to extinction learning. During extinction of previously acquired cue-outcome associations, cues were presented in a novel context (ABA) or in the acquisition context (AAA). In recall, all cues were again presented in the acquisition context. Atomoxetine participants (ATO) showed significantly faster extinction compared to placebo (PLAC). However, atomoxetine did not affect renewal. Hippocampal activation was higher in ATO during extinction and recall, as was ventromedial PFC activation, except for ABA recall. Moreover, ATO showed stronger recruitment of insula, anterior cingulate, and dorsolateral/orbitofrontal PFC. Across groups, cingulate, hippocampus and vmPFC activity during ABA extinction correlated with recall performance, suggesting high relevance of these regions for processing the renewal effect. In summary, the noradrenergic system appears to be involved in the modification of established associations during extinction learning and thus has a role in behavioral flexibility. The assignment of an association to a context and the subsequent decision on an adequate response, however, presumably operate largely independently of noradrenergic mechanisms. PMID:25745389

  1. [Neuronal mechanisms underlying pain-induced negative emotions].

    PubMed

    Minami, Masabumi

    2012-11-01

    Pain consists of sensory-discriminative and negative emotional components. Although the neuronal basis of the sensory component of pain has been studied extensively, the neuronal mechanisms underlying the negative emotional component are not well understood. Recently, behavioral studies using a conditioned place paradigm have successfully elucidated the neuronal circuits and mechanisms underlying the negative emotional component of pain. Excitotoxic lesions of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), central amygdaloid nucleus, basolateral amygdaloid nucleus (BLA), or bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) suppress intraplantar formalin-induced aversive responses. Glutamatergic transmission within the ACC and BLA via N-methyl-D-asparate (NMDA) receptors has been shown to play a critical role in these aversive responses. In the BNST, especially its ventral part, noradrenergic transmission via β-adrenergic receptors has been shown to be important for pain-induced aversion. Because persistent pain is frequently associated with psychological and emotional dysfunctions, studies on the neuronal circuits and molecular mechanisms involved in the negative emotional component of pain may have considerable clinical importance in the treatment of chronic pain. Here, I have reviewed behavioral studies investigating the neuronal mechanisms underlying the negative emotional component of pain and have introduced our data showing the pivotal role of amygdala and BNST in pain-induced aversion.

  2. Damage to Arousal-Promoting Brainstem Neurons with Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Valko, Philipp O.; Gavrilov, Yuri V.; Yamamoto, Mihoko; Noaín, Daniela; Reddy, Hasini; Haybaeck, Johannes; Weis, Serge; Baumann, Christian R.; Scammell, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Coma and chronic sleepiness are common after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Here, we explored whether injury to arousal-promoting brainstem neurons occurs in patients with fatal TBI. Methods: Postmortem examination of 8 TBI patients and 10 controls. Results: Compared to controls, TBI patients had 17% fewer serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (effect size: 1.25), but the number of serotonergic neurons did not differ in the median raphe nucleus. TBI patients also had 29% fewer noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (effect size: 0.96). The number of cholinergic neurons in the pedunculopontine and laterodorsal tegmental nuclei (PPT/LDT) was similar in TBI patients and controls. Conclusions: TBI injures arousal-promoting neurons of the mesopontine tegmentum, but this injury is less severe than previously observed in hypothalamic arousal-promoting neurons. Most likely, posttraumatic arousal disturbances are not primarily caused by damage to these brainstem neurons, but arise from an aggregate of injuries, including damage to hypothalamic arousal nuclei and disruption of other arousal-related circuitries. Citation: Valko PO, Gavrilov YV, Yamamoto M, Noain D, Reddy H, Haybaeck J, Weis S, Baumann CR, Scammell TE. Damage to arousal-promoting brainstem neurons with traumatic brain injury. SLEEP 2016;39(6):1249–1252. PMID:27091531

  3. A1 and A2a receptors mediate inhibitory effects of adenosine on the motor activity of human colon.

    PubMed

    Fornai, M; Antonioli, L; Colucci, R; Ghisu, N; Buccianti, P; Marioni, A; Chiarugi, M; Tuccori, M; Blandizzi, C; Del Tacca, M

    2009-04-01

    Experimental evidence in animal models suggests that adenosine is involved in the regulation of digestive functions. This study examines the influence of adenosine on the contractile activity of human colon. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed A(1) and A(2a) receptor expression in colonic neuromuscular layers. Circular muscle preparations were connected to isotonic transducers to determine the effects of 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX; A(1) receptor antagonist), ZM 241385 (A(2a) receptor antagonist), CCPA (A(1) receptor agonist) and 2-[(p-2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino]-5'-N-ethyl-carboxamide-adenosine (CGS 21680; A(2a) receptor agonist) on motor responses evoked by electrical stimulation or carbachol. Electrically evoked contractions were enhanced by DPCPX and ZM 241385, and reduced by CCPA and CGS 21680. Similar effects were observed when colonic preparations were incubated with guanethidine (noradrenergic blocker), L-732,138, GR-159897 and SB-218795 (NK receptor antagonists). However, in the presence of guanethidine, NK receptor antagonists and N(omega)-propyl-L-arginine (NPA; neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), the effects of DPCPX and CCPA were still evident, while those of ZM 241385 and CGS 21680 no longer occurred. Carbachol-induced contractions were unaffected by A(2a) receptor ligands, but they were enhanced or reduced by DPCPX and CCPA, respectively. When colonic preparations were incubated with guanethidine, NK antagonists and atropine, electrically induced relaxations were partly reduced by ZM 241385 or NPA, but unaffected by DPCPX. Dipyridamole or application of exogenous adenosine reduced electrically and carbachol-evoked contractions, whereas adenosine deaminase enhanced such motor responses. In conclusion, adenosine exerts an inhibitory control on human colonic motility. A(1) receptors mediate direct modulating actions on smooth muscle, whereas A(2a) receptors operate through inhibitory nitrergic nerve pathways.

  4. Hindbrain lactate regulates preoptic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuron GnRH-I protein but not AMPK responses to hypoglycemia in the steroid-primed ovariectomized female rat.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, P K; Briski, K P

    2015-07-09

    Steroid positive-feedback activation of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) neuroendocrine axis propagates the pre ovulatory LH surge, a crucial component of female reproduction. Our work shows that this key event is restrained by inhibitory metabolic input from hindbrain A2 noradrenergic neurons. GnRH neurons express the ultra-sensitive energy sensor adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK); here, we investigated the hypothesis that GnRH nerve cell AMPK and peptide neurotransmitter responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia are controlled by hindbrain lack of the oxidizable glycolytic end-product L-lactate. Data show that hypoglycemic inhibition of LH release in steroid-primed ovariectomized female rats was reversed by coincident caudal hindbrain lactate infusion. Western blot analyses of laser-microdissected A2 neurons demonstrate hypoglycemic augmentation [Fos, estrogen receptor-beta (ER-β), phosphoAMPK (pAMPK)] and inhibition (dopamine-beta-hydroxylase, GLUT3, MCT2) of protein expression in these cells, responses that were normalized by insulin plus lactate treatment. Hypoglycemia diminished rostral preoptic GnRH nerve cell GnRH-I protein and pAMPK content; the former, but not the latter response was reversed by lactate. Results implicate caudal hindbrain lactoprivic signaling in hypoglycemia-induced suppression of the LH surge, demonstrating that lactate repletion of that site reverses decrements in A2 catecholamine biosynthetic enzyme and GnRH neuropeptide precursor protein expression. Lack of effect of lactate on hypoglycemic patterns of GnRH AMPK activity suggests that this sensor is uninvolved in metabolic-inhibition of positive-feedback-stimulated hypophysiotropic signaling to pituitary gonadotropes.

  5. DSP-4, a noradrenergic neurotoxin, produces sex-specific effects on pairing and courtship behavior in zebra finches.

    PubMed

    Vahaba, Daniel M; Lacey, William H; Tomaszycki, Michelle L

    2013-09-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) is involved in a variety of behaviors across vertebrate species. In songbirds, NE is involved in singing and auditory perception, fundamental components of pair formation. Mechanisms of pairing remain poorly understood in avian species. NE is likely involved given its role in vocal communication and perception. Here, we tested the hypothesis that DSP-4 treatments (a noradrenergic neurotoxin that decreases NE) decreases singing in males, song perception in females and pairing in both sexes using a naturalistic paradigm. Females were tested for preferences of either control or DSP-4 males in a two-choice paradigm using live males. Both sexes were then tested for courtship and pair formation in aviaries. In the two-choice paradigm, control females showed a significant preference for control males over DSP-4 males, whereas DSP-4 females showed no such preference. In the aviary tests, DSP-4 males engaged in less courtship behavior, showed decreased pairing behaviors and increased pair latencies compared to control males. In females, DSP-4 treatments did not alter courtship or pairing behavior. Lower neural densities of noradrenergic fibers in song, auditory, and affiliative regions were observed in DSP-4 animals of both sexes. Furthermore, DBH-ir densities in these regions explained variations in courtship and pairing behaviors, as well as pairing status. Our results extend previous findings to naturalistic contexts, provide evidence that DBH-ir densities in specific regions correlate with pairing-related behaviors, and inform us of sex differences in the role of NE in pairing.

  6. [Neuronal ageing].

    PubMed

    Piechota, Małgorzata; Sunderland, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Ageing leads to irreversible alterations in the nervous system, which to various extent impair its functions such as capacity to learn and memory. In old neurons and brain, similarly to what may take place in other cells, there is increased oxidative stress, disturbed energetic homeostasis and metabolism, accumulation of damage in proteins and nucleic acids. Characteristic of old neurons are alterations in plasticity, synaptic transmission, sensitivity to neurotrophic factors and cytoskeletal changes. Some markers of senescence, whose one of them is SA-beta-galactosidase were used to show the process of neuronal ageing both in vitro, and in vivo. Some research suggest that, despite the fact that neurons are postmitotic cells, it is cell cycle proteins which play a certain role in their biology, e.g. differentiation. However, their role in neuronal ageing is not known or explained. Ageing is the serious factor of development of neurodegenerative diseases among others Alzheimer disease.

  7. Locus coeruleus kappa-opioid receptors modulate reinstatement of cocaine place preference through a noradrenergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Al-Hasani, Ream; McCall, Jordan G; Foshage, Audra M; Bruchas, Michael R

    2013-11-01

    Activation of kappa-opioid receptors (KORs) in monoamine circuits results in dysphoria-like behaviors and stress-induced reinstatement of drug seeking in both conditioned place preference (CPP) and self-administration models. Noradrenergic (NA) receptor systems have also been implicated in similar behaviors. Dynorphinergic projections terminate within the locus coeruleus (LC), a primary source of norepinephrine in the forebrain, suggesting a possible link between the NA and dynorphin/kappa opioid systems, yet the implications of these putative interactions have not been investigated. We isolated the necessity of KORs in the LC in kappa opioid agonist (U50,488)-induced reinstatement of cocaine CPP by blocking KORs in the LC with NorBNI (KOR antagonist). KOR-induced reinstatement was significantly attenuated in mice injected with NorBNI in the LC. To determine the sufficiency of KORs in the LC on U50,488-induced reinstatement of cocaine CPP, we virally re-expressed KORs in the LC of KOR knockout mice. We found that KORs expression in the LC alone was sufficient to partially rescue KOR-induced reinstatement. Next we assessed the role of NA signaling in KOR-induced reinstatement of cocaine CPP in the presence and absence of a α2-agonist (clonidine), β-adrenergic receptor antagonist (propranolol), and β(1)- and β(2)-antagonist (betaxolol and ICI-118,551 HCl). Both the blockade of postsynaptic β(1)-adrenergic receptors and the activation of presynaptic inhibitory adrenergic autoreceptors selectively potentiated the magnitude of KOR-induced reinstatement of cocaine CPP but not cocaine-primed CPP reinstatement. Finally, viral restoration of KORs in the LC together with β-adrenergic receptor blockade did not potentiate KOR-induced reinstatement to cocaine CPP, suggesting that adrenergic receptor interactions occur at KOR-expressing regions external to the LC. These results identify a previously unknown interaction between KORs and NA systems and suggest a NA

  8. CHOLINERGIC AND NORADRENERGIC MODULATION OF LONG-TERM EXPLICIT MEMORY ARE ALTERED BY CHRONIC LOW-LEVEL LEAD EXPOSURE. (U915393)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent evidence suggests that septohippocampal cholinergic activity is suppressed in rats exposed to low levels of lead (Pb). As a result, noradrenergic activity may be elevated due to compensatory sympathetic sprouting. Therefore, the goals of this study were to (a) determine...

  9. Distribution of Catecholaminergic Presympathetic-Premotor Neurons in the Rat Lower Brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Hyungwoo; Kerman, Ilan A.

    2016-01-01

    We previously characterized the organization of presympathetic-premotor neurons (PSPMNs), which send descending poly-synaptic projections with collaterals to skeletal muscle and the adrenal gland. Such neurons may play a role in shaping integrated adaptive responses, and many of them were found within well-characterized regions of noradrenergic cell populations suggesting that some of the PSPMNs are catecholaminergic. To address this issue, we used retrograde trans-synaptic tract-tracing with attenuated pseudorabies virus (PRV) recombinants combined with multi-label immunofluorescence to identify PSPMNs expressing tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Our findings indicate that TH-immunoreactive (ir) PSPMNs are present throughout the brainstem within multiple cell populations, including the A1, C1, C2, C3, A5 and A7 cell groups along with the locus coeruleus (LC) and the nucleus subcoeruleus (SubC). The largest numbers of TH-ir PSPMNs were located within the LC and SubC. Within SubC and the A7 cell group, about 70% of TH-ir neurons were PSPMNs, which was a significantly greater fraction of neurons than in the other brain regions we examined. These findings indicate that TH-ir neurons near the pontomesencephalic junction that are distributed across the LC, SubC, and the A7 may play a prominent role in somatomotor-sympathetic integration, and that the major functional role of the A7 and SubC noradrenergic cell groups maybe in the coordination of concomitant activation of somatomotor and sympathetic outflows. These neurons may participate in mediating homeostatic adaptations that require simultaneous activation of sympathetic and somatomotor nerves in the periphery. PMID:26946268

  10. Distribution of catecholaminergic presympathetic-premotor neurons in the rat lower brainstem.

    PubMed

    Nam, H; Kerman, I A

    2016-06-02

    We previously characterized the organization of presympathetic-premotor neurons (PSPMNs), which send descending poly-synaptic projections with collaterals to skeletal muscle and the adrenal gland. Such neurons may play a role in shaping integrated adaptive responses, and many of them were found within well-characterized regions of noradrenergic cell populations suggesting that some of the PSPMNs are catecholaminergic. To address this issue, we used retrograde trans-synaptic tract-tracing with attenuated pseudorabies virus (PRV) recombinants combined with multi-label immunofluorescence to identify PSPMNs expressing tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Our findings indicate that TH-immunoreactive (ir) PSPMNs are present throughout the brainstem within multiple cell populations, including the A1, C1, C2, C3, A5 and A7 cell groups along with the locus coeruleus (LC) and the nucleus subcoeruleus (SubC). The largest numbers of TH-ir PSPMNs were located within the LC and SubC. Within SubC and the A7 cell group, about 70% of TH-ir neurons were PSPMNs, which was a significantly greater fraction of neurons than in the other brain regions we examined. These findings indicate that TH-ir neurons near the pontomesencephalic junction that are distributed across the LC, SubC, and the A7 may play a prominent role in somatomotor-sympathetic integration, and that the major functional role of the A7 and SubC noradrenergic cell groups maybe in the coordination of concomitant activation of somatomotor and sympathetic outflows. These neurons may participate in mediating homeostatic adaptations that require simultaneous activation of sympathetic and somatomotor nerves in the periphery.

  11. Repeated administration of the noradrenergic neurotoxin N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) modulates neuroinflammation and amyloid plaque load in mice bearing amyloid precursor protein and presenilin-1 mutant transgenes

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, Perdita L; Vidgeon-Hart, Martin P; Ashmeade, Tracey; Culbert, Ainsley A; Seymour, Zoe; Perren, Marion J; Joyce, Flora; Bate, Simon T; Babin, Anna; Virley, David J; Richardson, Jill C; Upton, Neil; Sunter, David

    2007-01-01

    Background Data indicates anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and pro-cognitive properties of noradrenaline and analyses of post-mortem brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients reveal major neuronal loss in the noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC), the main source of CNS noradrenaline (NA). The LC has projections to brain regions vulnerable to amyloid deposition and lack of LC derived NA could play a role in the progression of neuroinflammation in AD. Previous studies reveal that intraperitoneal (IP) injection of the noradrenergic neurotoxin N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4) can modulate neuroinflammation in amyloid over-expressing mice and in one study, DSP-4 exacerbated existing neurodegeneration. Methods TASTPM mice over-express human APP and beta amyloid protein and show age related cognitive decline and neuroinflammation. In the present studies, 5 month old C57/BL6 and TASTPM mice were injected once monthly for 6 months with a low dose of DSP-4 (5 mg kg-1) or vehicle. At 8 and 11 months of age, mice were tested for cognitive ability and brains were examined for amyloid load and neuroinflammation. Results At 8 months of age there was no difference in LC tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) across all groups and cortical NA levels of TASTPM/DSP-4, WT/Vehicle and WT/DSP-4 were similar. NA levels were lowest in TASTPM/Vehicle. Messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) for various inflammatory markers were significantly increased in TASTPM/Vehicle compared with WT/Vehicle and by 8 months of age DSP-4 treatment modified this by reducing the levels of some of these markers in TASTPM. TASTPM/Vehicle showed increased astrocytosis and a significantly larger area of cortical amyloid plaque compared with TASTPM/DSP-4. However, by 11 months, NA levels were lowest in TASTPM/DSP-4 and there was a significant reduction in LC TH of TASTPM/DSP-4 only. Both TASTPM groups had comparable levels of amyloid, microglial activation and astrocytosis and mRNA for inflammatory markers was

  12. Adolescent social isolation increases anxiety-like behavior and ethanol intake and impairs fear extinction in adulthood: Possible role of disrupted noradrenergic signaling.

    PubMed

    Skelly, M J; Chappell, A E; Carter, E; Weiner, J L

    2015-10-01

    Alcohol use disorder, anxiety disorders, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are highly comorbid, and exposure to chronic stress during adolescence may increase the incidence of these conditions in adulthood. Efforts to identify the common stress-related mechanisms driving these disorders have been hampered, in part, by a lack of reliable preclinical models that replicate their comorbid symptomatology. Prior work by us, and others, has shown that adolescent social isolation increases anxiety-like behaviors and voluntary ethanol consumption in adult male Long-Evans rats. Here we examined whether social isolation also produces deficiencies in extinction of conditioned fear, a hallmark symptom of PTSD. Additionally, as disrupted noradrenergic signaling may contribute to alcoholism, we examined the effect of anxiolytic medications that target noradrenergic signaling on ethanol intake following adolescent social isolation. Our results confirm and extend previous findings that adolescent social isolation increases anxiety-like behavior and enhances ethanol intake and preference in adulthood. Additionally, social isolation is associated with a significant deficit in the extinction of conditioned fear and a marked increase in the ability of noradrenergic therapeutics to decrease ethanol intake. These results suggest that adolescent social isolation not only leads to persistent increases in anxiety-like behaviors and ethanol consumption, but also disrupts fear extinction, and as such may be a useful preclinical model of stress-related psychopathology. Our data also suggest that disrupted noradrenergic signaling may contribute to escalated ethanol drinking following social isolation, thus further highlighting the potential utility of noradrenergic therapeutics in treating the deleterious behavioral sequelae associated with early life stress.

  13. Ageing is a process where the growth effect of neuronal noradrenaline changes progressively in favour of the flow mediated, neurodegenerative and inflammatory effect of plasma noradrenaline.

    PubMed

    Crotty, T P

    2016-08-01

    The noradrenaline stimulus has two components, one excitor, the other inhibitory. Neuronal noradrenaline is the excitor component and plasma noradrenaline is the inhibitory. The balance of effect between the two, the noradrenergic balance, is the controlled variable of the sympathetic system and determines the effect of noradrenaline. Neuronal noradrenaline stimulates tissues by diffusion from their sympathetic nerve endings, plasma noradrenaline does so by diffusion from their microcirculations. Changes in microcirculatory flow, by altering the flow mediated effect of plasma noradrenaline, are mainly responsible for altering the noradrenergic balance in the peripheral tissues; changes in CSF flow are speculated to be mainly responsible for doing the same in the brain, by altering the balance between synaptic noradrenaline in the brain and nonsynaptic noradrenaline in the subarachnoid CSF. When plasma noradrenaline alters the noradrenergic balance it triggers afferent sympathetic activity that alerts hypothalamic neurons to the event and they restore the balance and tissue homeostasis, within milliseconds, by adjusting the level of efferent sympathetic activity they project back to the affected tissue. Because the restoration is so rapid the effect of plasma noradrenaline is normally unobservable and dismissed as not having occurred. Because the hypothalamus is not involved with the responses of isolated canine lateral saphenous vein segments to noradrenaline, the effects of plasma noradrenaline in that preparation are not countered by reactive efferent activity and, consequently, are readily apparent in it. Quantitatively, they have been found to be a function of microcirculatory flow and noradrenaline concentration and, qualitatively, to be inhibitory, dilator, pro inflammatory and neurodegenerative. In life, due to a progressive increase in plasma noradrenaline concentration and, more so, in microcirculatory flow, the noradrenergic balance moves progressively in

  14. Hippocampal noradrenergic activation is necessary for object recognition memory consolidation and can promote BDNF increase and memory persistence.

    PubMed

    Mello-Carpes, Pâmela B; da Silva de Vargas, Liane; Gayer, Mateus Cristofari; Roehrs, Rafael; Izquierdo, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Previously we showed that activation of the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract (NTS)-Nucleus Paragigantocellularis (PGi)-Locus coeruleus (LC) pathway, which theoretically culminates with norepinephrine (NE) release in dorsal hippocampus (CA1 region) and basolateral amygdala (BLA) is necessary for the consolidation of object recognition (OR) memory. Here we show that, while the microinjection of the beta-noradrenergic receptor blocker timolol into CA1 impairs OR memory consolidation, the microinjection of norepinephrine (NE) promotes the persistence of this type of memory. Further, we show that OR consolidation is attended by an increase of norepinephrine (NE) levels and of the expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in hippocampus, which are impaired by inactivation of the NTS-PGi-LC pathway by the infusion of muscimol into the NTS.

  15. Targeting the Noradrenergic System in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Prazosin Trials.

    PubMed

    De Berardis, Domenico; Marini, Stefano; Serroni, Nicola; Iasevoli, Felice; Tomasetti, Carmine; de Bartolomeis, Andrea; Mazza, Monica; Tempesta, Daniela; Valchera, Alessandro; Fornaro, Michele; Pompili, Maurizio; Sepede, Gianna; Vellante, Federica; Orsolini, Laura; Martinotti, Giovanni; Di Giannantonio, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a chronic psychiatric disorder that may develop after exposure to a life-threatening trauma. As veterans and armed forces may deal with diverse health problems compared with civilians, they have a greater risk for psychiatric disorders, including PTSD, than civilians, even if the disorder may be also frequent in the general population. PTSD is associated with significant comorbidity, especially with mood disorders and substance abuse. Moreover, the suicide risk is higher in PTSD patients than in the general population. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs), atypical antipsychotics and benzodiazepines are commonly employed in the management of PTSD, but often these treatments fail or are discontinued due to adverse effects. It has been demonstrated that high noradrenergic activity may be associated with hyperarousal, trauma nightmares and sleep disturbances in PTSD subjects, probably through the stimulation of α -1 adrenergic receptors in the brain prefrontal cortex. The α -1 adrenoreceptor antagonist prazosin decreases noradrenaline effects at brain α-1 adrenoreceptors and may be a promising agent in the treatment of PTSD, as some studies have found it effective and well tolerated. Therefore, the present review is aimed to examine the role of noradrenergic system in the pathophysiology of PTSD. Moreover, we conducted a systematic review to evaluate the effectiveness and tolerability of prazosin in PTSD patients. Meta-analysis was used to combine data from multiple studies and better estimate the effect of prazosin on specific outcomes. We found prazosin to be significantly more efficacious than placebo in reducing distressing dreams in PTSD patients, even though our results should be interpreted with caution due to the small number of studies included in our quantitative synthesis.

  16. Local and Global Resting State Activity in the Noradrenergic and Dopaminergic Pathway Modulated by Reboxetine and Amisulpride in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Wiegers, Maike; Walter, Martin; Abler, Birgit; Graf, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    Background: Various psychiatric populations are currently investigated with resting state fMRI, with the aim of individualizing diagnostics and treatment options and improving treatment outcomes. Many of these studies are conducted in large naturalistic samples, providing rich insights regarding disease-related neural alterations, but with the common psychopharmacological medication limiting interpretations of the results. We therefore investigated the effects of common noradrenergic and anti-dopaminergic medications on local and global resting state activity (rs-activity) in healthy volunteers to further the understanding of the respective effects independent from disease-related alterations. Methods: Within a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover design, we investigated 19 healthy male subjects by resting state fMRI after the intake of reboxetine (4mg/d), amisulpride (200mg/d), and placebo for 7 days each. Treatment-related differences in local and global rs-activity were measured by the fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (fALFF) and resting state functional connectivity (rs-FC). Results: fALFF revealed alterations of local rs-activity within regions of the core noradrenergic pathway, including the locus coeruleus under reboxetine, correlated with its plasma levels. Moreover, reboxetine led to increased rs-FC between regions within this pathway, i.e. the locus coeruleus, tectum, thalamus, and amygdala. Amisulpride modulated local rs-activity of regions within the dopaminergic pathway, with the altered signal in the putamen correlating with amisulpride plasma levels. Correspondingly, amisulpride increased rs-FC between regions of the dopaminergic pathway comprising the substantia nigra and putamen. Conclusion: Our data provide evidence of how psychopharmacological agents alter local and global rs-activity within the respective neuroanatomical pathways in healthy subjects, which may help with interpreting data in psychiatric

  17. Serotonergic and noradrenergic systems are implicated in the antidepressant-like effect of ursolic acid in mice.

    PubMed

    Colla, André R S; Oliveira, Agatha; Pazini, Francis L; Rosa, Julia M; Manosso, Luana M; Cunha, Mauricio P; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2014-09-01

    Ursolic acid (UA) is a natural pentacyclic triterpenoid carboxylic acid that exerts antidepressant-like effects in the tail suspension test (TST) and in the forced swimming test, and this effect was reported to be mediated by the dopaminergic system. Many studies show that currently available antidepressant agents have effects on multiple neurotransmitter systems which account for their efficacy. Therefore, this study was aimed at investigating the possible involvement of the serotonergic, noradrenergic, glutamatergic and opioid systems in the antidepressant-like effect of UA. To this end, several pharmacological agents were administered to verify their ability to influence the antidepressant-like responses elicited by UA in the TST in mice. The open-field test was used to assess the locomotor activity. The results show that the pre-treatment of mice with ρ-chlorophenylalanine (100mg/kg, i.p., 4 days) or α-methyl-ρ-tyrosine (100mg/kg, i.p.) but not with N-methyl-d-aspartate (0.1 pmol/mouse, i.c.v.) or naloxone (1mg/kg, i.p.), was able to prevent the antidepressant-like effect of UA (0.1mg/kg, p.o.). Sub-effective doses of fluoxetine (5mg/kg, p.o.) or reboxetine (2mg/kg, p.o.), but not ketamine (0.1mg/kg, i.p.) or MK-801 (0.001 mg/kg, p.o.), was capable of potentiating the effect of a sub-effective dose of UA (0.001 mg/kg, p.o.) in the TST. None of the treatments affected locomotor activity. Altogether, the results show an involvement of the serotonergic and noradrenergic systems, but not the glutamatergic or opioid systems, in the antidepressant-like effect of UA.

  18. Noradrenergic modulation of masseter muscle activity during natural rapid eye movement sleep requires glutamatergic signalling at the trigeminal motor nucleus.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Peter B; Mir, Saba; Peever, John H

    2014-08-15

    Noradrenergic neurotransmission in the brainstem is closely coupled to changes in muscle activity across the sleep-wake cycle, and noradrenaline is considered to be a key excitatory neuromodulator that reinforces the arousal-related stimulus on motoneurons to drive movement. However, it is unknown if α-1 noradrenoceptor activation increases motoneuron responsiveness to excitatory glutamate (AMPA) receptor-mediated inputs during natural behaviour. We studied the effects of noradrenaline on AMPA receptor-mediated motor activity at the motoneuron level in freely behaving rats, particularly during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, a period during which both AMPA receptor-triggered muscle twitches and periods of muscle quiescence in which AMPA drive is silent are exhibited. Male rats were subjected to electromyography and electroencephalography recording to monitor sleep and waking behaviour. The implantation of a cannula into the trigeminal motor nucleus of the brainstem allowed us to perfuse noradrenergic and glutamatergic drugs by reverse microdialysis, and thus to use masseter muscle activity as an index of motoneuronal output. We found that endogenous excitation of both α-1 noradrenoceptor and AMPA receptors during waking are coupled to motor activity; however, REM sleep exhibits an absence of endogenous α-1 noradrenoceptor activity. Importantly, exogenous α-1 noradrenoceptor stimulation cannot reverse the muscle twitch suppression induced by AMPA receptor blockade and nor can it elevate muscle activity during quiet REM, a phase when endogenous AMPA receptor activity is subthreshold. We conclude that the presence of an endogenous glutamatergic drive is necessary for noradrenaline to trigger muscle activity at the level of the motoneuron in an animal behaving naturally.

  19. Noradrenergic mechanism involved in the nociceptive modulation of hippocampal CA3 region of normal rats.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hua; Teng, Yueqiu; Zhang, Xuexin; Yang, Chunxiao; Xu, Manying; Yang, Lizhuang

    2014-06-27

    Norepinephrine (NE) is an important neurotransmitter in the brain, and regulates antinociception. However, the mechanism of action of NE on pain-related neurons in the hippocampal CA3 region is not clear. This study examines the effects of NE, phentolamine on the electrical activities of pain-excited neurons (PENs) and pain-inhibited neurons (PINs) in the hippocampal CA3 region of rats. Trains of electric impulses applied to the right sciatic nerve were used as noxious stimulation. The electrical activities of PENs or PINs in the hippocampal CA3 region were recorded by using a glass microelectrode. Our results revealed that, in the hippocampal CA3 region, the intra-CA3 region microinjection of NE decreased the pain-evoked discharged frequency and prolonged the discharged latency of PEN, and increased the pain-evoked discharged frequency and shortened discharged inhibitory duration (ID) of PIN, exhibiting the specific analgesic effect of NE. While intra-CA3 region microinjection of phentolamine produced the opposite response. It implies that phentolamine can block the effect of endogenous NE to cause the enhanced response of PEN and PIN to noxious stimulation. On the basis of above findings we can deduce that NE, phentolamine and alpha-adrenoceptor are involved in the modulation of nociceptive information transmission in the hippocampal CA3 region.

  20. Immediate post-defeat infusions of the noradrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol impair the consolidation of conditioned defeat in male Syrian hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Cloe Luckett; Krebs-Kraft, Desiree L.; Solomon, Matia B.; Norvelle, Alisa; Parent, Marise B.; Huhman, Kim. L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Social defeat occurs when an animal is attacked and subjugated by an aggressive conspecific. Following social defeat, male Syrian hamsters fail to display species-typical territorial aggression and instead exhibit submissive or defensive behaviors even when in the presence of a non-aggressive intruder. We have termed this phenomenon conditioned defeat (CD). The mechanisms underlying CD are not fully understood, but data from our lab suggest that at least some of the mechanisms are similar to those that mediate classical fear conditioning. The goal of the present experiment was to test the hypothesis that noradrenergic signaling promotes the consolidation of CD, as in classical fear conditioning, by determining whether CD is disrupted by post-training blockade of noradrenergic activity. In Experiment 1, we determined whether systemic infusions of the noradrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol (0, 1.0, 10, or 20 mg/kg) given immediately after a 15 min defeat by a resident aggressor would impair CD tested 48h later. Hamsters that were given immediate post-training infusions of propranolol (1.0, but not 10 or 20 mg/kg) showed significantly less submissive behavior than those given vehicle infusions supporting the hypothesis that there is noradrenergic modulation of social defeat consolidation. In Experiment 2, we demonstrated that propranolol (1.0 mg/kg) given immediately, but not 4 or 24h, after defeat impaired CD tested 48h after defeat indicating that the window within which the memory for social defeat is susceptible to beta-adrenergic modulation is temporary. In Experiment 3, we examined whether central blockade of noradrenergic receptors could recapitulate the effect of systemic injections by giving an intracerebroventricular infusion of propranolol immediately after defeat and examining the effect on CD 24 h later. Centrally administered propranolol (20 μg/3μl but not 2 μg/3μl) was also effective in dose-dependently reducing consolidation of CD

  1. Immediate post-defeat infusions of the noradrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol impair the consolidation of conditioned defeat in male Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Gray, Cloe Luckett; Krebs-Kraft, Desiree L; Solomon, Matia B; Norvelle, Alisa; Parent, Marise B; Huhman, Kim L

    2015-12-01

    Social defeat occurs when an animal is attacked and subjugated by an aggressive conspecific. Following social defeat, male Syrian hamsters fail to display species-typical territorial aggression and instead exhibit submissive or defensive behaviors even when in the presence of a non-aggressive intruder. We have termed this phenomenon conditioned defeat (CD). The mechanisms underlying CD are not fully understood, but data from our lab suggest that at least some of the mechanisms are similar to those that mediate classical fear conditioning. The goal of the present experiment was to test the hypothesis that noradrenergic signaling promotes the consolidation of CD, as in classical fear conditioning, by determining whether CD is disrupted by post-training blockade of noradrenergic activity. In Experiment 1, we determined whether systemic infusions of the noradrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol (0, 1.0, 10, or 20mg/kg) given immediately after a 15 min defeat by a resident aggressor would impair CD tested 48 h later. Hamsters that were given immediate post-training infusions of propranolol (1.0, but not 10 or 20mg/kg) showed significantly less submissive behavior than did those given vehicle infusions supporting the hypothesis that there is noradrenergic modulation of the consolidation of a social defeat experience. In Experiment 2, we demonstrated that propranolol (1.0mg/kg) given immediately, but not 4 or 24h, after defeat impaired CD tested 48 h after defeat indicating that the window within which the memory for social defeat is susceptible to beta-adrenergic modulation is temporary. In Experiment 3, we examined whether central blockade of noradrenergic receptors could recapitulate the effect of systemic injections by giving an intracerebroventricular infusion of propranolol immediately after defeat and examining the effect on CD 24h later. Centrally administered propranolol (20 μg/3 μl but not 2 μg/3 μl) was also effective in dose-dependently reducing

  2. Role of the NR2A/2B subunits of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor in glutamate-induced glutamic acid decarboxylase alteration in cortical GABAergic neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Monnerie, H; Hsu, F-C; Coulter, D A; Le Roux, P D

    2010-12-29

    The vulnerability of brain neuronal cell subpopulations to neurologic insults varies greatly. Among cells that survive a pathological insult, for example ischemia or brain trauma, some may undergo morphological and/or biochemical changes that may compromise brain function. The present study is a follow-up of our previous studies that investigated the effect of glutamate-induced excitotoxicity on the GABA synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65/67)'s expression in surviving DIV 11 cortical GABAergic neurons in vitro [Monnerie and Le Roux, (2007) Exp Neurol 205:367-382, (2008) Exp Neurol 213:145-153]. An N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated decrease in GAD expression was found following glutamate exposure. Here we examined which NMDAR subtype(s) mediated the glutamate-induced change in GAD protein levels. Western blotting techniques on cortical neuron cultures showed that glutamate's effect on GAD proteins was not altered by NR2B-containing diheteromeric (NR1/NR2B) receptor blockade. By contrast, blockade of triheteromeric (NR1/NR2A/NR2B) receptors fully protected against a decrease in GAD protein levels following glutamate exposure. When receptor location on the postsynaptic membrane was examined, extrasynaptic NMDAR stimulation was observed to be sufficient to decrease GAD protein levels similar to that observed after glutamate bath application. Blocking diheteromeric receptors prevented glutamate's effect on GAD proteins after extrasynaptic NMDAR stimulation. Finally, NR2B subunit examination with site-specific antibodies demonstrated a glutamate-induced, calpain-mediated alteration in NR2B expression. These results suggest that glutamate-induced excitotoxic NMDAR stimulation in cultured GABAergic cortical neurons depends upon subunit composition and receptor location (synaptic vs. extrasynaptic) on the neuronal membrane. Biochemical alterations in surviving cortical GABAergic neurons in various disease states may contribute to the altered

  3. Neuronal activity in primate dorsal anterior cingulate cortex signals task conflict and predicts adjustments in pupil-linked arousal.

    PubMed

    Ebitz, R Becket; Platt, Michael L

    2015-02-04

    Whether driving a car, shopping for food, or paying attention in a classroom of boisterous teenagers, it's often hard to maintain focus on goals in the face of distraction. Brain imaging studies in humans implicate the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) in regulating the conflict between goals and distractors. Here we show that single dACC neurons signal conflict between task goals and distractors in the rhesus macaque, particularly for biologically relevant social stimuli. For some neurons, task conflict signals predicted subsequent changes in pupil size-a peripheral index of arousal linked to noradrenergic tone-associated with reduced distractor interference. dACC neurons also responded to errors, and these signals predicted adjustments in pupil size. These findings provide the first neurophysiological endorsement of the hypothesis that dACC regulates conflict, in part, via modulation of pupil-linked processes such as arousal.

  4. Neuronal activity in primate dorsal anterior cingulate cortex signals task conflict and predicts adjustments in pupil-linked arousal

    PubMed Central

    Ebitz, R. Becket; Platt, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Whether driving a car, shopping for food, or paying attention in a classroom of boisterous teenagers, it’s often hard to maintain focus on goals in the face of distraction. Brain imaging studies in humans implicate the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) in regulating the conflict between goals and distractors. Here we show for the first time that single dACC neurons signal conflict between task goals and distractors in the rhesus macaque, particularly for biologically-relevant social stimuli. For some neurons, task conflict signals predicted subsequent changes in pupil size—a peripheral index of arousal linked to noradrenergic tone—associated with reduced distractor interference. dACC neurons also responded to errors and these signals predicted adjustments in pupil size. These findings provide the first neurophysiological endorsement of the hypothesis that dACC regulates conflict, in part, via modulation of pupil-linked processes such as arousal. PMID:25654259

  5. High resolution quantitative element mapping of neuromelanin-containing neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinert, Tilo; Fiedler, Anja; Morawski, Markus; Arendt, Thomas

    2007-07-01

    Neuromelanin is a dark coloured intracellular pigment that appears in a specific population of neurons (dopaminergic and noradrenergic) predominantly in the substantia nigra and in the locus coeruleus. In recent years, there is increasing interest in the role of neuromelanin because of a hypothesised link between this pigment and the cell death of neuromelanin-containing neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD). Therefore, the role of neuromelanin in the pathology of PD is an actual focus in neuroscience. We have investigated the elemental contents and distributions of sulphur, calcium, iron, nickel and copper of neuromelanin in dopaminergic neurons for a Parkinson case and a control case ( in situ, 6 μm brain sections). There was no difference in the iron concentration between the two cases. However, the calcium concentration was 3-fold higher in the Parkinson case, whereas the copper and nickel concentrations decreased. An ultrastructural investigation of the concentrations of calcium and iron within the neuromelanin suggests that these two elements are not necessarily co-localized.

  6. Synaptic input to vasopressin neurons of the paraventricular nucleus (PVN)

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, A.J.; Oldfield, B.J.

    1984-01-01

    Following injections of horseradish peroxidase into the PVN, retrogradely filled cells were found in regions of the limbic system known to contain glucocorticoid concentrating neurons. To determine if these regions which include the lateral septum, medial amygdala and ventral subiculum have a monosynaptic input to vasopressin neurons the authors developed a double label ultrastructural technique to simultaneously visualize immunoreactive neuropeptide and anterogradely transported HRP. Following injections of tracer into all three of these regions, HRP labeled fibers were seen at the light microscopic level to form a halo in the perinuclear, cell poor zone around the PVN. Ultrastructural examination of this area resulted in the discovery of a small number of limbic system synapses on vasopressin dendrites. In a similar fashion they were interested in determining the distribution of noradrenergic terminals on vasopressin neurons in the various subnuclei of the PVN. The authors have combined immunocytochemistry for vasopressin with radioautography for /sup 3/H-norepinephrine (NE) at the ultrastructural level. NE terminals were numerous in the periventricular zone, innervating both vasopressin containing dendrites and non-immunoreactive dendrites and cell bodies. These studies demonstrate the need for ultrastructural analysis of synaptic input to neurosecretory cells.

  7. Dendrite complexity of sympathetic neurons is controlled during postnatal development by BMP signaling.

    PubMed

    Majdazari, Afsaneh; Stubbusch, Jutta; Müller, Christian M; Hennchen, Melanie; Weber, Marlen; Deng, Chu-Xia; Mishina, Yuji; Schütz, Günther; Deller, Thomas; Rohrer, Hermann

    2013-09-18

    Dendrite development is controlled by the interplay of intrinsic and extrinsic signals affecting initiation, growth, and maintenance of complex dendrites. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) stimulate dendrite growth in cultures of sympathetic, cortical, and hippocampal neurons but it was unclear whether BMPs control dendrite morphology in vivo. Using a conditional knock-out strategy to eliminate Bmpr1a and Smad4 in immature noradrenergic sympathetic neurons we now show that dendrite length, complexity, and neuron cell body size are reduced in adult mice deficient of Bmpr1a. The combined deletion of Bmpr1a and Bmpr1b causes no further decrease in dendritic features. Sympathetic neurons devoid of Bmpr1a/1b display normal Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation, which suggests that Smad-independent signaling paths are involved in dendritic growth control downstream of BMPR1A/B. Indeed, in the Smad4 conditional knock-out dendrite and cell body size are not affected and dendrite complexity and number are increased. Together, these results demonstrate an in vivo function for BMPs in the generation of mature sympathetic neuron dendrites. BMPR1 signaling controls dendrite complexity postnatally during the major dendritic growth period of sympathetic neurons.

  8. The antinociceptive effect of intravenous imipramine in colorectal distension-induced visceral pain in rats: the role of serotonergic and noradrenergic receptors.

    PubMed

    İlkaya, Fatih; Bilge, S Sırrı; Bozkurt, Ayhan; Baş, Duygu B; Erdal, Arzu; Çiftçioğlu, Engin; Kesim, Yüksel

    2014-07-01

    It has been shown that imipramine, a tricyclic antidepressant (TCA), is a potent analgesic agent. However, the effect of imipramine on visceral pain has not been extensively investigated. In the current study, our aim was to characterise the putative analgesic effect of intravenous imipramine on visceral pain in rats. Our second aim was to assess the involvement of serotonergic (5-HT₂,₃,₄) and noradrenergic (α(2A, 2B, 2C)) receptor subtypes in this putative antinociceptive effect of imipramine. Male Sprague Dawley rats (250-300 g) were implanted with venous catheters for drug administration and implanted with enamelled nichrome electrodes for electromyography of the external oblique muscles. Noxious visceral stimulation was applied via by colorectal distension (CRD). The visceromotor responses (VMRs) to CRD were quantified electromyographically before and after imipramine administration at 5, 15, 30, 60, 90 and 120 min. In the antagonist groups, the agents were administered 10 min before imipramine. The administration of imipramine (5-40 mg/kg) produced a dose-dependent reduction in VMR. The administration of yohimbine (a nonselective α₂-adrenoceptor antagonist, 1 mg/kg), BRL-44408 (an α(2A)-adrenoceptor antagonist, 1 mg/kg) or MK-912 (an α2C-adrenoceptor antagonist, 300 μg/kg) but not imiloxan (an α(2B)-adrenoceptor antagonist, 1 mg/kg) inhibited the antinociceptive effect of imipramine (20 mg/kg). Additionally, ketanserin (a 5-HT₂ receptor antagonist, 0.5, 1, and 2 mg/kg) and GR113808 (a 5-HT₄ receptor antagonist, 1 mg/kg) enhanced, and ondansetron (a 5-HT₃ receptor antagonist, 0.5, 1, and 2 mg/kg) failed to alter the imipramine-induced antinociceptive effect. Our data demonstrated that, in the CDR-induced rat visceral pain model, intravenous imipramine appeared to have antinociceptive potential and that α(2A)-/α(2C)-adrenoceptors and 5-HT₂/5-HT₄ receptors may be responsible for the antinociceptive effect of imipramine on visceral pain

  9. Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Dopaminergic Neurons during Development in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yuchen; Guo, Qiang; Shan, Minghui; Wu, Yongmei; Huang, Sizhou; Zhao, Haixia; Hong, Huarong; Yang, Ming; Yang, Xi; Ren, Liyi; Peng, Jiali; Sun, Jing; Zhou, Hongli; Li, Shurong; Su, Bingyin

    2016-01-01

    As one of the model organisms of Parkinson’s disease (PD) research, the zebrafish has its advantages, such as the 87% homology with human genome and transparent embryos which make it possible to observe the development of dopaminergic neurons in real time. However, there is no midbrain dopaminergic system in zebrafish when compared with mammals, and the location and projection of the dopaminergic neurons are seldom reported. In this study, Vmat2:GFP transgenic zebrafish was used to observe the development and distribution of dopaminergic neurons in real time. We found that diencephalons (DC) 2 and DC4 neuronal populations were detected at 24 h post fertilization (hpf). All DC neuronal populations as well as those in locus coeruleus (LC), raphe nuclei (Ra) and telencephalon were detected at 48 hpf. Axons were detected at 72 hpf. At 96 hpf, all the neuronal populations were detected. For the first time we reported axons from the posterior tubercle (PT) of ventral DC projected to subpallium in vivo. However, when compared with results from whole mount tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunofluorescence staining in wild type (WT) zebrafish, we found that DC2 and DC4 neuronal populations were mainly dopaminergic, while DC1, DC3, DC5 and DC6 might not. Neurons in pretectum (Pr) and telencephalon were mainly dopaminergic, while neurons in LC and Ra might be noradrenergic. Our study makes some corrections and modifications on the development, localization and distribution of zebrafish dopaminergic neurons, and provides some experimental evidences for the construction of the zebrafish PD model. PMID:27965546

  10. Mutual interactions of the presynaptic histamine H3 and prostaglandin EP3 receptors on the noradrenergic terminals in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Schlicker, E; Marr, I

    1997-07-01

    We studied whether interactions between the presynaptic histamine H3 and prostaglandin EP3 receptors on the noradrenergic neurons of the mouse brain cortex occur. Cerebral cortex slices from the mouse (and, in few experiments, from the rat) were preincubated with [3H]noradrenaline and then superfused with a physiological salt solution. Tritium overflow was evoked electrically, either at 0.3 or 3 Hz (2 min) (standard stimulation protocol) or at 100 Hz (eight pulses) (stimulation protocol under which almost no activation of the presynaptic alpha2-adrenoceptors by endogenous noradrenaline occurs). In another set of experiments, Ca2+ ions were introduced into Ca2+-free K+-rich medium containing tetrodotoxin to evoke tritium overflow. The electrically-evoked tritium overflow (0.3 Hz) was inhibited by histamine or the H3 receptor agonist imetit, acting via H3 receptors. and by prostaglandin E2 or the EP3 receptor agonist sulprostone, acting via EP3 receptors. When histamine or imetit was given first (at concentrations causing the maximum effect at H3 receptors), the effect of prostaglandin E2 on the evoked tritium overflow was attenuated by 5-10%. When prostaglandin E2 or sulprostone was given first (at concentrations causing the maximum effect at EP3 receptors), the effect of histamine or imetit on the evoked overflow was attenuated by almost 50%. The previous administration of prostaglandin E2 also blunted the effect of histamine on the evoked tritium overflow evoked at 3 Hz; the degree of attenuation was identical when the current strength was 25 mA or was increased to 100 or 200 mA in order to partially compensate for the inhibitory effect of prostaglandin E2 on the evoked overflow. In addition, prostaglandin E2 attenuated the effect of histamine when tritium overflow was evoked (i) by 100 Hz, eight pulses or (ii) by Ca2+ ions or (iii) when rat (instead of mouse) brain cortex slices were used. An interaction of prostaglandin E2 or sulprostone with the H3 receptor

  11. Reversal of noradrenergic depletion and lipid peroxidation in the pons after brain injury correlates with motor function recovery in rats.

    PubMed

    Bueno-Nava, Antonio; Montes, Sergio; DelaGarza-Montano, Paloma; Alfaro-Rodriguez, Alfonso; Ortiz, Ascencion; Gonzalez-Pina, Rigoberto

    2008-09-26

    Functional impairment after brain injury (BI) has been attributed to the inhibition of regions that are related to the injured site. Therefore, noradrenaline (NA) is thought to play a critical role in recovery from motor injury. However, the mechanism of this recovery process has not been completely elucidated. Moreover, the locus coeruleus (LC) projects from the pons through the rat sensorimotor cortex, and injury axotomizes LC fibers, depressing NA function. This was tested by measuring lipid peroxidation (LP) in the pons after sensorimotor cortex injury. Depression of function in the pons would be expected to alter areas receiving pontine efferents. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control (n=16), injured (n=10) and recovering (n=16), and they were evaluated using a beam-walking assay between 2 and 20 days after cortical injury. We performed measures of NA and LP in both sides of the pons and cerebellum. We found a decrease of NA in the pons and the cerebellum, and a concomitant increase in the motor deficit and LP in the pons of injured animals. Recovering rats had NA and LP levels that were very similar to those observed in control rats. These observations suggest that the mechanism of remote inhibition after BI involves lipid peroxidation, and that the NA decrease found in the cerebellum of injured animals is mediated by a noradrenergic depression in the pons, or in areas receiving NA projections from the pons.

  12. The antidepressant-like effect of bacopaside I: possible involvement of the oxidative stress system and the noradrenergic system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojun; Liu, Fang; Yue, Rongcai; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Jigang; Wang, Shuping; Zhang, Shoude; Wang, Rui; Shan, Lei; Zhang, Weidong

    2013-09-01

    In the present study, the antidepressant-like effect of bacopaside I, a saponin compound present in the Bacopa monniera plant, was evaluated by behavioral and neurochemical methods. Bacopaside I (50, 15 and 5 mg/kg) was given to mice via oral gavage for 7 successive days. The treatment significantly decreased the immobility time in mouse models of despair tests, but it did not influence locomotor activity. Neurochemical assays suggested that treatment by bacopaside I (50, 15 and 5 mg/kg) improved brain antioxidant activity to varying degrees after the behavioral despair test. Bacopaside I (15 and 5 mg/kg) significantly reversed reserpine-induced depressive-like behaviors, including low temperature and ptosis. Conversely, bacopaside I did not affect either brain MAO-A or MAO-B activity after the behavioral despair test in mice. Additionally, 5-hydroxytryptophan (a precursor of 5-serotonin) was not involved in the antidepressant-like effect of bacopaside I. These findings indicated that the antidepressant-like effect of bacopaside I might be related to both antioxidant activation and noradrenergic activation, although the exact mechanism remains to be further elucidated.

  13. Enhancement of noradrenergic neural transmission: an effective therapy of myasthenia gravis: a report on 52 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Lechin, F; van der Dijs, B; Pardey-Maldonado, B; John, E; Jimenez, V; Orozco, B; Baez, S; Lechin, M E

    2000-01-01

    Neurochemical, neuroautonomic and neuropharmacological assessments carried out on all our myasthenia gravis (MG) patients showed that they presented a neural sympathetic deficit plus excessive adrenal-sympathetic activity. These abnormalities were registered during the basal (supine-resting) state, as well as after several stress tests (orthostasis, exercise, oral glucose and buspirone). In addition, MG patients showed increased levels of free-serotonin (f5HT) in the plasma, supposedly associated with the increased platelet aggregability which we found in all MG patients. As the above trio of neurochemical disorders (low noradrenergic-activity + high adrenergic-activity + increased f-5HT plasma levels) is known to favor Th-1 immunosuppression + Th-2 predominance, we outlined a neuropharmacological strategy for reverting the above neurochemical disorder. This treatment provoked sudden (acute), and late sustained improvements. Acute effects have been attributed to the increase of alpha-1 activity at the spinal motoneuron level. Late improvements always paralleled a significant normalization of immunological disorders. Complete normalization was registered only in non-thymectomized MG patients.

  14. Mechanism of the noradrenergic motor control on the lower oesophageal sphincter in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Gonella, J; Niel, J P; Roman, C

    1980-01-01

    1. The release of labelled acetylcholine has been measured on lower oesophageal sphincter (l.o.s.) muscular strips previously loaded with tritiated choline. 2. This release was greatly increased by noradrenaline 10(-5) g/ml. and unaffected by atropine 10(-6) g/ml., but it was practically abolished if hemicholinium 5.2 X 10(-4) M was added to the incubating bath containing the tritiated choline. 3. A radioautographic study of sections of l.o.s. strips loaded with tritiated choline showed that the radioactivity was mainly located in the nervous cells of the enteric plexuses and that the muscular cells were very poorly labelled. 4. The increased release of acetylcholine induced by noradrenaline did not occur in a Ca2+-free or in a hypermagnesic Tyrode (12 mM). 5. Tetrodotoxin 10(-6) G/ml. had no effect on the increased release of acetylcholine induced by noradrenaline. In addition, sucrose gap recordings showed that the depolarizing effect of noradrenaline on l.o.s. muscular strips was unaffected by tetrodotoxin 10(-6) g/ml. 6. It is concluded that acetylcholine released in the l.o.s. under the action of noradrenaline originated from the synaptic endings of the cholinergic intramural neurones. Images Plate 1 PMID:7463362

  15. Selective genetic disruption of dopaminergic, serotonergic and noradrenergic neurotransmission: insights into motor, emotional and addictive behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Isingrini, Elsa; Perret, Lea; Rainer, Quentin; Sagueby, Sara; Moquin, Luc; Gratton, Alain; Giros, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Background The monoaminergic transmitters dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NE) and serotonin (5-HT) modulate cerebral functions via their extensive effects in the brain. Investigating their roles has led to the creation of vesicular monoaminergic transporter-2 (VMAT2) knockout (KO) mice. While this mutation results in postnatal death, VMAT2-heterozygous (HET) mice are viable and show a complex behavioural phenotype. However, the simultaneous alteration of the 3 systems prevents investigations into their individual functions. Methods To assess the specific role of NE, 5-HT and DA, we genetically disrupted their neurotransmission by creating conditional VMAT2-KO mice with targeted recombination. These specific recombinations were obtained by breeding VMAT2lox/lox mice with DBHcre, SERTcre and DATcre mice, respectively. We conducted a complete neurochemical and behavioural characterization of VMAT2-HET animals in each system. Results Conditional VMAT2-KO mice revealed an absence of VMAT2 expression, and a specific decrease in the whole brain levels of each monoamine. Although NE- and 5-HT-depleted mice are viable into adulthood, DA depletion results in postnatal death before weaning. Interestingly, alteration of the DA transmission fully accounted for the increased amphetamine response formerly observed in the VMAT2-HET mice, whereas alteration of the 5-HT system was solely responsible for the increase in cocaine response. Limitations We used VMAT2-HET mice that displayed a mild phenotype. Because the VMAT2-KO in DA neurons is lethal, it precluded a straightforward comparison of the full KOs in the 3 systems. Conclusion Given the intermingled functions of NE, 5-HT and DA in regulating cognitive and affective functions, this model will enhance understanding of their respective roles in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders. PMID:26505143

  16. Lack of response of serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus of freely moving cats to stressful stimuli.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, L O; Jacobs, B L

    1988-09-01

    Changes in brain serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission have been implicated in the mammalian response to stressful stimuli. The purpose of this study was to examine the extracellular single-unit activity of 5-HT neurons in cats exposed to three stressors: loud (100 dB) white noise, restraint, and confrontation with a dog. Serotonergic neurons were recorded in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) and were identified by (i) slow and regular spontaneous activity, (ii) long duration (approximately 2 ms) waveform, (iii) complete suppression of activity during REM sleep and after systemic administration of 5-methoxy-N-N-dimethyltryptamine (250 micrograms/kg i.m.), and (iv) histological localization in the DRN. Despite behavioral and physiological evidence that all three manipulations induced a stress response, the maximal firing rate of 5-HT neurons was not significantly different from that observed under unstressed conditions. These data are consistent with previous studies from our laboratory which have indicated that very few manipulations are able to perturb the slow and regular activity of these neurons. In contrast, previous work has shown that the firing rate of noradrenergic neurons in the locus ceruleus is dramatically increased by these stressors. The relative imbalance in the activity of these two neuronal groups observed during stress may affect postsynaptic neuronal processing patterns and have adaptive significance during stressful conditions.

  17. Neuronal networks and mediators of cortical neurovascular coupling responses in normal and altered brain states.

    PubMed

    Lecrux, C; Hamel, E

    2016-10-05

    Brain imaging techniques that use vascular signals to map changes in neuronal activity, such as blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging, rely on the spatial and temporal coupling between changes in neurophysiology and haemodynamics, known as 'neurovascular coupling (NVC)'. Accordingly, NVC responses, mapped by changes in brain haemodynamics, have been validated for different stimuli under physiological conditions. In the cerebral cortex, the networks of excitatory pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons generating the changes in neural activity and the key mediators that signal to the vascular unit have been identified for some incoming afferent pathways. The neural circuits recruited by whisker glutamatergic-, basal forebrain cholinergic- or locus coeruleus noradrenergic pathway stimulation were found to be highly specific and discriminative, particularly when comparing the two modulatory systems to the sensory response. However, it is largely unknown whether or not NVC is still reliable when brain states are altered or in disease conditions. This lack of knowledge is surprising since brain imaging is broadly used in humans and, ultimately, in conditions that deviate from baseline brain function. Using the whisker-to-barrel pathway as a model of NVC, we can interrogate the reliability of NVC under enhanced cholinergic or noradrenergic modulation of cortical circuits that alters brain states.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'.

  18. Characterization of GABAergic neurons in rapid-eye-movement sleep controlling regions of the brainstem reticular formation in GAD67-green fluorescent protein knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ritchie E; McKenna, James T; Winston, Stuart; Basheer, Radhika; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Thakkar, Mahesh M; McCarley, Robert W

    2008-01-01

    Recent experiments suggest that brainstem GABAergic neurons may control rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep. However, understanding their pharmacology/physiology has been hindered by difficulty in identification. Here we report that mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the GAD67 promoter (GAD67-GFP knock-in mice) exhibit numerous GFP-positive neurons in the central gray and reticular formation, allowing on-line identification in vitro. Small (10-15 microm) or medium-sized (15-25 microm) GFP-positive perikarya surrounded larger serotonergic, noradrenergic, cholinergic and reticular neurons, and > 96% of neurons were double-labeled for GFP and GABA, confirming that GFP-positive neurons are GABAergic. Whole-cell recordings in brainstem regions important for promoting REM sleep [subcoeruleus (SubC) or pontine nucleus oralis (PnO) regions] revealed that GFP-positive neurons were spontaneously active at 3-12 Hz, fired tonically, and possessed a medium-sized depolarizing sag during hyperpolarizing steps. Many neurons also exhibited a small, low-threshold calcium spike. GFP-positive neurons were tested with pharmacological agents known to promote (carbachol) or inhibit (orexin A) REM sleep. SubC GFP-positive neurons were excited by the cholinergic agonist carbachol, whereas those in the PnO were either inhibited or excited. GFP-positive neurons in both areas were excited by orexins/hypocretins. These data are congruent with the hypothesis that carbachol-inhibited GABAergic PnO neurons project to, and inhibit, REM-on SubC reticular neurons during waking, whereas carbachol-excited SubC and PnO GABAergic neurons are involved in silencing locus coeruleus and dorsal raphe aminergic neurons during REM sleep. Orexinergic suppression of REM during waking is probably mediated in part via excitation of acetylcholine-inhibited GABAergic neurons.

  19. Dysfunctional Inhibitory Mechanisms in Locus Coeruleus Neurons of the Wistar Kyoto Rat

    PubMed Central

    Bruzos-Cidón, C; Llamosas, N; Ugedo, L

    2015-01-01

    Background: The noradrenergic nucleus locus coeruleus (LC) has functional relevance in several psychopathologies such as stress, anxiety, and depression. In addition to glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic inputs, the activation of somatodendritic α2-adrenoceptors is the main responsible for LC activity regulation. The Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rat exhibits depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors and hyperresponse to stressors. Thus, the goal of the present study was to investigate in vitro the sensitivity of α2-adrenoceptors, as well as the glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic activity on LC neurons of the WKY strain. Methods: For that purpose patch-clamp whole-cell recordings were done in LC slices. Results: The α2-adrenoceptors of LC neurons from WKY rats were less sensitive to the effect induced by the agonist UK 14 304 as compared to that recorded in the Wistar (Wis) control strain. In addition, the GABAergic input to LC neurons of WKY rats was significantly modified compared to that in Wis rats, since the amplitude of spontaneous GABAergic postsynaptic currents was reduced and the half-width increased. On the contrary, no significant alterations were detected regarding glutamatergic input to LC neurons between rat strains. Conclusions: These results point out that in WKY rats the inhibitory control exerted by α2-adrenoceptors and GABAergic input onto LC neurons is dysregulated. Overall, this study supports in this animal model the hypothesis that claims an imbalance between the glutamatergic-GABAergic systems as a key factor in the pathophysiology of depression. PMID:25586927

  20. Influence of norepinephrine on somatosensory neuronal responses in the rat thalamus: a combined modeling and in vivo multi-channel, multi-neuron recording study.

    PubMed

    Moxon, Karen A; Devilbiss, David M; Chapin, John K; Waterhouse, Barry D

    2007-05-25

    Norepinephrine released within primary sensory circuits from locus coeruleus afferent fibers can produce a spectrum of modulatory actions on spontaneous or sensory-evoked activity of individual neurons. Within the ventral posterior medial thalamus, membrane currents modulated by norepinephrine have been identified. However, the relationship between the cellular effects of norepinephrine and the impact of norepinephrine release on populations of neurons encoding sensory signals is still open to question. To address this lacuna in understanding the net impact of the noradrenergic system on sensory signal processing, a computational model of the rat trigeminal somatosensory thalamus was generated. The effects of independent manipulation of different cellular actions of norepinephrine on simulated afferent input to the computational model were then examined. The results of these simulations aided in the design of in vivo neural ensemble recording experiments where sensory-driven responses of thalamic neurons were measured before and during locus coeruleus activation in waking animals. Together the simulated and experimental results reveal several key insights regarding the regulation of neural network operation by norepinephrine including: 1) cell-specific modulatory actions of norepinephrine, 2) mechanisms of norepinephrine action that can improve the tuning of the network and increase the signal-to-noise ratio of cellular responses in order to enhance network representation of salient stimulus features and 3) identification of the dynamic range of thalamic neuron function through which norepinephrine operates.

  1. Interaction between neuropeptide Y and noradrenaline on central catecholamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Illes, P; Regenold, J T

    1990-03-01

    Despite their widespread occurrence in the central nervous system, interactions between co-localized transmitters and their receptors remain poorly understood. Noradrenergic neurons of the nucleus locus coeruleus contain the peptide co-transmitter neuropeptide Y (refs 1,2). In locus coeruleus cells, stimulation of alpha2-adrenoceptors 3,4 or opioid mu-receptors 5,6 increases a potassium conductance and thereby leads to hyperpolarization and inhibition of spontaneous firing. Coupling between these receptors and the inward rectifying K+ channels involves a pertussis toxin-sensitive GTP-binding protein (Gi or Go)7. Here we investigate whether the neuropeptide Y and alpha2-receptors of locus coeruleus neurons interact with one another. When administered alone, neuropeptide Y reduces the discharge of action potentials, probably by increasing the permeability of the membrane to potassium ions through the activation of a G protein; this effect is reduced in the presence of alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists. Moreover, the peptide selectively increases the hyperpolarizing effect of alpha2-agonists, but does not enhance responses to opioid mu-agonists. We suggest that noradrenaline and its co-transmitter neuropeptide Y stimulate separate receptors, which influence each other in a specific way.

  2. Altered prejunctional modulation of intestinal cholinergic and noradrenergic pathways by α2-adrenoceptors in the presence of experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Blandizzi, Corrado; Fornai, Matteo; Colucci, Rocchina; Baschiera, Fabio; Barbara, Giovanni; Giorgio, Roberto De; Ponti, Fabrizio De; Breschi, Maria Cristina; Tacca, Mario Del

    2003-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of intestinal inflammation on: (1) the control of intestinal neurotransmission and motility by prejunctional α2-adrenoceptors and (2) the expression of intestinal α2-adrenoceptors. Experimental colitis was induced by intrarectal administration of 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (DNBS) to rats. UK-14,304 inhibited atropine-sensitive electrically evoked contractions of ileal and colonic longitudinal muscle preparations. UK-14,304 acted with similar potency, but higher efficacy, on tissues from DNBS-treated animals; its effects were antagonized with greater potency by phentolamine than rauwolscine. Electrically induced [3H]noradrenaline release from ileal preparations was reduced in the presence of colitis. Tritium outflow was decreased by UK-14,304 and stimulated by rauwolscine or phentolamine: these effects were enhanced in preparations from animals with colitis. Reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and Western blot assay demonstrated the protein expression of α2A-adrenoceptors in mucosal and muscular tissues isolated from ileum and colon. The induction of colitis increased α2A-adrenoceptor expression in both ileal and colonic muscular layers, without concomitant changes in mucosal tissues. Induction of colitis reduced gastrointestinal propulsion of a charcoal suspension in vivo. In this setting, the gastrointestinal transit was inhibited by intraperitoneal (i.p.) UK-14,304 and stimulated by i.p. rauwolscine. After pretreatment with guanethidine, the stimulant action of rauwolscine no longer occurred, and UK-14,304 exerted a more prominent inhibitory effect that was antagonized by rauwolscine. The present results indicate that, in the presence of intestinal inflammation, prejunctional α2-adrenoceptors contribute to an enhanced inhibitory control of cholinergic and noradrenergic transmission both at inflamed and noninflamed distant sites. Evidence was obtained that such modulatory actions depend on an increased

  3. Enhanced noradrenergic axon regeneration into schwann cell-filled PVDF-TrFE conduits after complete spinal cord transection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yee-Shuan; Wu, Siliang; Arinzeh, Treena Livingston; Bunge, Mary Bartlett

    2017-02-01

    Schwann cell (SC) transplantation has been utilized for spinal cord repair and demonstrated to be a promising therapeutic strategy. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of combining SC transplantation with novel conduits to bridge the completely transected adult rat spinal cord. This is the first and initial study to evaluate the potential of using a fibrous piezoelectric polyvinylidene fluoride trifluoroethylene (PVDF-TrFE) conduit with SCs for spinal cord repair. PVDF-TrFE has been shown to enhance neurite growth in vitro and peripheral nerve repair in vivo. In this study, SCs adhered and proliferated when seeded onto PVDF-TrFE scaffolds in vitro. SCs and PVDF-TrFE conduits, consisting of random or aligned fibrous inner walls, were transplanted into transected rat spinal cords for 3 weeks to examine early repair. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)(+) astrocyte processes and GFP (green fluorescent protein)-SCs were interdigitated at both rostral and caudal spinal cord/SC transplant interfaces in both types of conduits, indicative of permissivity to axon growth. More noradrenergic/DβH(+) (dopamine-beta-hydroxylase) brainstem axons regenerated across the transplant when greater numbers of GFAP(+) astrocyte processes were present. Aligned conduits promoted extension of DβH(+) axons and GFAP(+) processes farther into the transplant than random conduits. Sensory CGRP(+) (calcitonin gene-related peptide) axons were present at the caudal interface. Blood vessels formed throughout the transplant in both conduits. This study demonstrates that PVDF-TrFE conduits harboring SCs are promising for spinal cord repair and deserve further investigation. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 444-456. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Human Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC) Transgenesis Fully Rescues Noradrenergic Function in Dopamine β-Hydroxylase Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Cubells, Joseph F.; Schroeder, Jason P.; Barrie, Elizabeth S.; Manvich, Daniel F.; Sadee, Wolfgang; Berg, Tiina; Mercer, Kristina; Stowe, Taylor A.; Liles, L. Cameron; Squires, Katherine E.; Mezher, Andrew; Curtin, Patrick; Perdomo, Dannie L.; Szot, Patricia; Weinshenker, David

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) converts dopamine (DA) to norepinephrine (NE) in noradrenergic/adrenergic cells. DBH deficiency prevents NE production and causes sympathetic failure, hypotension and ptosis in humans and mice; DBH knockout (Dbh -/-) mice reveal other NE deficiency phenotypes including embryonic lethality, delayed growth, and behavioral defects. Furthermore, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the human DBH gene promoter (-970C>T; rs1611115) is associated with variation in serum DBH activity and with several neurological- and neuropsychiatric-related disorders, although its impact on DBH expression is controversial. Phenotypes associated with DBH deficiency are typically treated with L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylserine (DOPS), which can be converted to NE by aromatic acid decarboxylase (AADC) in the absence of DBH. In this study, we generated transgenic mice carrying a human bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) encompassing the DBH coding locus as well as ~45 kb of upstream and ~107 kb of downstream sequence to address two issues. First, we characterized the neuroanatomical, neurochemical, physiological, and behavioral transgenic rescue of DBH deficiency by crossing the BAC onto a Dbh -/- background. Second, we compared human DBH mRNA abundance between transgenic lines carrying either a “C” or a “T” at position -970. The BAC transgene drove human DBH mRNA expression in a pattern indistinguishable from the endogenous gene, restored normal catecholamine levels to the peripheral organs and brain of Dbh -/- mice, and fully rescued embryonic lethality, delayed growth, ptosis, reduced exploratory activity, and seizure susceptibility. In some cases, transgenic rescue was superior to DOPS. However, allelic variation at the rs1611115 SNP had no impact on mRNA levels in any tissue. These results indicate that the human BAC contains all of the genetic information required for tissue-specific, functional expression of DBH and can rescue all measured Dbh

  5. Too Much of a Good Thing: Blocking Noradrenergic Facilitation in Medial Prefrontal Cortex Prevents the Detrimental Effects of Chronic Stress on Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Jett, Julianne D; Morilak, David A

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairments associated with dysfunction of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) are prominent in stress-related psychiatric disorders. We have shown that enhancing noradrenergic tone acutely in the rat mPFC facilitated extra-dimensional (ED) set-shifting on the attentional set-shifting test (AST), whereas chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) impaired ED. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the acute facilitatory effect of norepinephrine (NE) in mPFC becomes detrimental when activated repeatedly during CUS. Using microdialysis, we showed that the release of NE evoked in mPFC by acute stress was unchanged at the end of CUS treatment. Thus, to then determine if repeated elicitation of this NE activity in mPFC during CUS may have contributed to the ED deficit, we infused a cocktail of α1-, β1-, and β2-adrenergic receptor antagonists into the mPFC prior to each CUS session, then tested animals drug free on the AST. Antagonist treatment prevented the CUS-induced ED deficit, suggesting that NE signaling during CUS compromised mPFC function. We confirmed that this was not attributable to sensitization of adrenergic receptor function following chronic antagonist treatment, by administering an additional microinjection into the mPFC immediately prior to ED testing. Acute antagonist treatment did not reverse the beneficial effects of chronic drug treatment during CUS, nor have any effect on baseline ED performance in chronic vehicle controls. Thus, we conclude that blockade of noradrenergic receptors in mPFC protected against the detrimental cognitive effects of CUS, and that repeated elicitation of noradrenergic facilitatory activity is one mechanism by which chronic stress may promote mPFC cognitive dysfunction. PMID:23132268

  6. The antidepressant-like effect of ethynyl estradiol is mediated by both serotonergic and noradrenergic systems in the forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Vega-Rivera, N M; López-Rubalcava, C; Estrada-Camarena, E

    2013-10-10

    17α-Ethynyl-estradiol (EE2, a synthetic steroidal estrogen) induces antidepressant-like effects in the forced swimming test (FST) similar to those induced by 5-HT and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (dual antidepressants). However, the precise mechanism of action of EE2 has not been studied. In the present study, the participation of estrogen receptors (ERs) and the serotonergic and the noradrenergic presynaptic sites in the antidepressant-like action of EE2 was evaluated in the FST. The effects of the ER antagonist ICI 182,780 (10 μg/rat; i.c.v.), the serotonergic and noradrenergic terminal destruction with 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT; 200 μg/rat, i.c.v.), and N-(2-chloro-ethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4; 10mg/kg, i.p.) were studied in ovariectomized rats treated with EE2 and subjected to the FST. In addition, the participation of α2-adrenergic receptors in the antidepressant-like action of EE2 was explored using the selective α2-receptor antagonist idazoxan (0.25, 0.5 and 1.0mg/kg, i.p.). EE2 induced an antidepressant-like action characterized by a decrease in immobility behavior with a concomitant increase in swimming and climbing behaviors. The ER antagonist, 5,7-DHT, DSP4, and idazoxan blocked the effects of EE2 on the immobility behavior, whereas ICI 182,780 and 5,7-DHT affected swimming behavior. The noradrenergic compound DSP4 altered climbing behavior, while Idazoxan inhibited the increase of swimming and climbing behaviors induced by EE2. Our results suggest that the antidepressant-like action of EE2 implies a complex mechanism of action on monoaminergic systems and estrogen receptors.

  7. The effect of Schisandra chinensis extracts on depression by noradrenergic, dopaminergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic systems in the forced swim test in mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Tingxu; Xu, Mengjie; Wu, Bo; Liao, Zhengzheng; Liu, Zhi; Zhao, Xu; Bi, Kaishun; Jia, Ying

    2016-06-15

    Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill., as a Chinese functional food, has been widely used in neurological disorders including insomnia and Alzheimer's disease. The treatment of classical neuropsychiatric disorder depression is to be developed from Schisandra chinensis. The antidepressant-like effects of the Schisandra chinensis extracts (SCE), and their probable involvement in the serotonergic, noradrenergic, dopaminergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic systems were investigated by the forced swim test (FST). Acute administration of SCE (600 mg kg(-1), i.g.), a combination of SCE (300 mg kg(-1), i.g.) and reboxetine (a noradrenalin reuptake inhibitor, 2.5 mg kg(-1), i.p.) or imipramine (a TCA, 2 mg kg(-1), i.p.) reduced the immobility time in the FST. Pretreatment with N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride (DSP-4, a selective noradrenergic neurotoxin, 50 mg kg(-1), i.p., 4 days), haloperidol (a non-selective D2 receptor antagonist, 0.2 mg kg(-1), i.p.), SCH 23390 (a selective D1 receptor antagonist, 0.03 mg kg(-1), i.p.), bicuculline (a competitive GABA antagonist, 4 mg kg(-1), i.p.) and N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA, an agonist at the glutamate site, 75 mg kg(-1), i.p.) effectively reversed the antidepressant-like effect of SCE (600 mg kg(-1), i.g.). However, p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA, an inhibitor of 5-HT synthesis, 100 mg kg(-1), i.p., 4 days,) did not eliminate the reduced immobility time induced by SCE (600 mg kg(-1), i.g.). Moreover, the treatments did not change the locomotor activity. Altogether, these results indicated that SCE produced antidepressant-like activity, which might be mediated by the modification of noradrenergic, dopaminergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic systems.

  8. Intermittent Short Sleep Results in Lasting Sleep Wake Disturbances and Degeneration of Locus Coeruleus and Orexinergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yan; Fenik, Polina; Zhan, Guanxia; Somach, Rebecca; Xin, Ryan; Veasey, Sigrid

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Intermittent short sleep (ISS) is pervasive among students and workers in modern societies, yet the lasting consequences of repeated short sleep on behavior and brain health are largely unexplored. Wake-activated neurons may be at increased risk of metabolic injury across sustained wakefulness. Methods: To examine the effects of ISS on wake-activated neurons and wake behavior, wild-type mice were randomized to ISS (a repeated pattern of short sleep on 3 consecutive days followed by 4 days of recovery sleep for 4 weeks) or rested control conditions. Subsets of both groups were allowed a recovery period consisting of 4-week unperturbed activity in home cages with littermates. Mice were examined for immediate and delayed (following recovery) effects of ISS on wake neuron cell metabolics, cell counts, and sleep/wake patterns. Results: ISS resulted in sustained disruption of sleep/wake activity, with increased wakefulness during the lights-on period and reduced wake bout duration and wake time during the lights-off period. Noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC) and orexinergic neurons showed persistent alterations in morphology, and reductions in both neuronal stereological cell counts and fronto-cortical projections. Surviving wake-activated neurons evidenced persistent reductions in sirtuins 1 and 3 and increased lipofuscin. In contrast, ISS resulted in no lasting injury to the sleep-activated melanin concentrating hormone neurons. Conclusions: Collectively these findings demonstrate for the first time that ISS imparts significant lasting disturbances in sleep/wake activity, degeneration of wake-activated LC and orexinergic neurons, and lasting metabolic changes in remaining neurons most consistent with premature senescence. Citation: Zhu Y, Fenik P, Zhan G, Somach R, Xin R, Veasey S. Intermittent short sleep results in lasting sleep wake disturbances and degeneration of locus coeruleus and orexinergic neurons. SLEEP 2016;39(8):1601–1611. PMID:27306266

  9. Alpha 2-adrenergic receptors influence tyrosine hydroxylase activity in retinal dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Iuvone, P M; Rauch, A L

    1983-12-12

    Dopamine (DA) is a putative neurotransmitter in a population of interneurons in the mammalian retina that are activated by photic stimulation. Pharmacological studies were conducted to determine if alpha 2-adrenergic receptors influence the activity of retinal tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), a biochemical indicator of changes in the activity of the DA-containing neurons. TH activity was low in dark-adapted retinas and high in light-exposed retinas. Systemic administration of the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonists, yohimbine and piperoxane, to dark-adapted rats significantly stimulated TH activity. This effect was apparently mediated locally within the retina because the response could also be elicited by direct injection of yohimbine into the vitreous. The dose-response relationships for the effects of alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonists on retinal TH activity were similar to those for the effects on brain noradrenergic neurons, where alpha 2-adrenoceptors have been shown to be involved in the autoregulation of neuronal activity. Clonidine, an alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist, had no effect when administered alone to dark-adapted rats, but it attenuated the stimulatory effect of yohimbine. In contrast, clonidine decreased TH activity of light-exposed retinas, an effect that was reversed by yohimbine. These observations suggest that alpha 2-adrenoceptors influence the activity of retinal DA-containing neurons.

  10. Spinal Noradrenergic Modulation and the Role of the Alpha-2 Receptor in the Antinociceptive Effect of Intrathecal Nefopam in the Formalin Test

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Shin Ho; Heo, Bong Ha; Park, Sun Hong; Kim, Woong Mo; Lee, Hyung Gon; Yoon, Myung Ha

    2014-01-01

    Background Nefopam has shown an analgesic effect on acute pain including postoperative pain. The reuptake of monoamines including serotonin and noradrenaline has been proposed as the mechanism of the analgesic action of nefopam, but it remains unclear. Although alpha-adrenergic agents are being widely used in the perioperative period, the role of noradrenergic modulation in the analgesic effect of nefopam has not been fully addressed. Methods Changes in the antinociceptive effect of intrathecal (i.t.) nefopam against formalin-elicited flinching responses were explored in Sprague-Dawley rats pretreated with i.t. 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), which depletes spinal noradrenaline. In addition, antagonism to the effect of nefopam by prazosin and yohimbine was evaluated to further elucidate the antinociceptive mechanism of i.t. nefopam. Results Pretreatment with i.t. 6-OHDA alone did not alter the flinching responses in either phase of the formalin test, while it attenuated the antinociceptive effect of i.t. nefopam significantly during phase 1, but not phase 2. The antagonist of the alpha-2 receptor, but not the alpha-1 receptor, reduced partially, but significantly, the antinociceptive effect of i.t. nefopam during phase 1, but not during phase 2. Conclusions This study demonstrates that spinal noradrenergic modulation plays an important role in the antinociceptive effect of i.t. nefopam against formalin-elicited acute initial pain, but not facilitated pain, and this action involves the spinal alpha-2 but not the alpha-1 receptor. PMID:24478897

  11. Responses of dopaminergic, serotonergic and noradrenergic networks to acute levo-tetrahydropalmatine administration in naïve rats detected at 9.4 T

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiping; Yang, Zheng; Li, Rupeng; Xie, Jun; Yin, Qian; Bloom, Alan S.; Li, Shi-Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to understand the neuropharmacological characteristics of levo-tetrahydropalmatine (l-THP), a recently found potential treatment for drug addiction, and discover its neural correlates and sites of action. Methods High-field pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI) was used to detect activation induced by acute l-THP administration in the naïve rat brain at dose levels of 5, 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg. Results Interestingly, the pharmacological profile of l-THP selectively binds to the receptors of the dopaminergic, serotonergic and noradrenergic systems. Using the phMRI method, it was demonstrated that l-THP selectively activated the key brain regions of the dopaminergic, serotonergic and noradrenergic systems in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion Numerous studies suggest a critical role of monoamines in the behavioral, pharmacological and addictive properties of psychostimulants. It is suggested that l-THP holds great potential to be a therapeutic medication for drug addiction. PMID:22079072

  12. Neuronize: a tool for building realistic neuronal cell morphologies

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Juan P.; Mata, Susana; Bayona, Sofia; Pastor, Luis; DeFelipe, Javier; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a tool, Neuronize, for building realistic three-dimensional models of neuronal cells from the morphological information extracted through computer-aided tracing applications. Neuronize consists of a set of methods designed to build 3D neural meshes that approximate the cell membrane at different resolution levels, allowing a balance to be reached between the complexity and the quality of the final model. The main contribution of the present study is the proposal of a novel approach to build a realistic and accurate 3D shape of the soma from the incomplete information stored in the digitally traced neuron, which usually consists of a 2D cell body contour. This technique is based on the deformation of an initial shape driven by the position and thickness of the first order dendrites. The addition of a set of spines along the dendrites completes the model, building a final 3D neuronal cell suitable for its visualization in a wide range of 3D environments. PMID:23761740

  13. Neuronal Migration Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understanding Sleep The Life and Death of a Neuron Order Publications Support Resources Patient Organizations Professional Societies ... birth defects caused by the abnormal migration of neurons in the developing brain and nervous system. In ...

  14. Neurofibromin and Neuronal Apoptosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    for these differences in the response of Nfl-/- neurons. "So What" Section. The learning disabilities associated with NF I constitute a highly variable...and +/+ neurons appear to become more significant with age. Our results may have implications for two areas: 1) the pathogenesis of learning ... disabilities in children with NF I, and 2) therapeutic strategies or targets for prolonging neuron survival, or for increasing neuronal response to protective

  15. Neuronal network of panic disorder: the role of the neuropeptide cholecystokinin.

    PubMed

    Zwanzger, P; Domschke, K; Bradwejn, J

    2012-09-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is characterized by panic attacks, anticipatory anxiety and avoidance behavior. Its pathogenesis is complex and includes both neurobiological and psychological factors. With regard to neurobiological underpinnings, anxiety in humans seems to be mediated through a neuronal network, which involves several distinct brain regions, neuronal circuits and projections as well as neurotransmitters. A large body of evidence suggests that the neuropeptide cholecystokinin (CCK) might be an important modulator of this neuronal network. Key regions of the fear network, such as amygdala, hypothalamus, peraqueductal grey, or cortical regions seem to be connected by CCKergic pathways. CCK interacts with several anxiety-relevant neurotransmitters such as the serotonergic, GABA-ergic and noradrenergic system as well as with endocannabinoids, NPY and NPS. In humans, administration of CCK-4 reliably provokes panic attacks, which can be blocked by antipanic medication. Also, there is some support for a role of the CCK system in the genetic pathomechanism of PD with particularly strong evidence for the CCK gene itself and the CCK-2R (CCKBR) gene. Thus, it is hypothesized that genetic variants in the CCK system might contribute to the biological basis for the postulated CCK dysfunction in the fear network underlying PD. Taken together, a large body of evidence suggests a possible role for the neuropeptide CCK in PD with regard to neuroanatomical circuits, neurotransmitters and genetic factors. This review article proposes an extended hypothetical model for human PD, which integrates preclinical and clinical findings on CCK in addition to existing theories of the pathogenesis of PD.

  16. Representational similarity analysis offers a preview of the noradrenergic modulation of long-term fear memory at the time of encoding.

    PubMed

    Visser, Renée M; Kunze, Anna E; Westhoff, Bianca; Scholte, H Steven; Kindt, Merel

    2015-05-01

    Neuroimaging research on emotional memory has greatly advanced our understanding of the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders. While the behavioral expression of fear at the time of encoding does not predict whether an aversive experience will evolve into long-term fear memory, the application of multi-voxel pattern analysis (MVPA) for the analysis of BOLD-MRI data has recently provided a unique marker for memory formation. Here, we aimed to further investigate the utility of this marker by modulating the strength of fear memory with an α2-adrenoceptor antagonist (yohimbine HCl). Fifty-two healthy participants were randomly assigned to two conditions - either receiving 20mg yohimbine or a placebo pill (double-blind) - prior to differential fear conditioning and MRI-scanning. We examined the strength of fear associations during acquisition and retention of fear (48 h later) by assessing the similarity of BOLD-MRI patterns and pupil dilation responses. Additionally, participants returned for a follow-up test outside the scanner (2-4 weeks), during which we assessed fear-potentiated startle responses. Replicating our previous findings, neural pattern similarity reflected the development of fear associations over time, and unlike average activation or pupil dilation, predicted the later expression of fear memory (pupil dilation 48 h later). While no effect of yohimbine was observed on markers of autonomic arousal, including salivary α-amylase (sAA), we obtained indirect evidence for the noradrenergic enhancement of fear memory consolidation: sAA levels showed a strong increase prior to fMRI scanning, irrespective of whether participants had received yohimbine, and this increase correlated with the subsequent expression of fear (48 h later). Remarkably, this noradrenergic enhancement of fear was associated with changes in neural response patterns at the time of learning. These findings provide further evidence that representational similarity analysis is a sensitive tool

  17. Cholinergic afferents to the locus coeruleus and noradrenergic afferents to the medial septum mediate LTP-reinforcement in the dentate gyrus by stimulation of the amygdala.

    PubMed

    Bergado, Jorge A; Frey, Sabine; López, Jeffrey; Almaguer-Melian, William; Frey, Julietta U

    2007-10-01

    Transient long-term potentiation (E-LTP) can be transformed into a long-lasting LTP (L-LTP) in the dentate gyrus (DG) by behavioral stimuli with high motivational content. Previous research from our group has identified several brain structures, such as the basolateral amygdala (BLA), the locus coeruleus (LC), the medial septum (MS) and transmitters as noradrenaline (NA) and acetylcholine (ACh) that are involved in these processes. Here we have investigated the functional interplay among brain structures and systems which result in the conversion of a E-LTP into a L-LTP (reinforcement) by stimulation of the BLA (BLA-R). We used topical application of specific drugs into DG, and other targets, while following the time course of LTP induced by stimulation of the perforant pathway (PP) to study their specific contribution to BLA-R. One injection cannula, a recording electrode in the DG and stimulating electrodes in the PP and the BLA were stereotactically implanted one week before electrophysiological experiments. Topical application of atropine or propranolol into the DG blocked BLA-R in both cases, but the effect of propranolol occurred earlier, suggesting a role of NA within the DG during an intermediate stage of LTP maintenance. The injection of lidocaine into the LC abolished BLA-R indicating that the LC is part of the functional neural reinforcing system. The effect on the LC is mediated by cholinergic afferents because application of atropine into the LC produced the same effect. Injection of lidocaine inactivating the MS also abolished BLA-R. This effect was mediated by noradrenergic afferents (probably from the LC) because the application of propranolol into the MS prevented BLA-R. These findings suggest a functional loop for BLA-R involving cholinergic afferents to the LC, a noradrenergic projection from the LC to the DG and the MS, and finally, the cholinergic projection from the MS to the DG.

  18. The role of the area postrema in the anorectic effects of amylin and salmon calcitonin: behavioral and neuronal phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Braegger, Fiona E; Asarian, Lori; Dahl, Kirsten; Lutz, Thomas A; Boyle, Christina N

    2014-10-01

    Amylin reduces meal size by activating noradrenergic neurons in the area postrema (AP). Neurons in the AP also mediate the eating-inhibitory effects of salmon calcitonin (sCT), a potent amylin agonist, but the phenotypes of the neurons mediating its effect are unknown. Here we investigated whether sCT activates similar neuronal populations to amylin, and if its anorectic properties also depend on AP function. Male rats underwent AP lesion (APX) or sham surgery. Meal patterns were analysed under ad libitum and post-deprivation conditions. The importance of the AP in mediating the anorectic action of sCT was examined in feeding experiments of dose-response effects of sCT in APX vs. sham rats. The effect of sCT to induce Fos expression was compared between surgery groups, and relative to amylin. The phenotype of Fos-expressing neurons in the brainstem was examined by testing for the co-expression of dopamine beta hydroxylase (DBH) or tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH). By measuring the apposition of vesicular glutamate transporter-2 (VGLUT2)-positive boutons, potential glutamatergic input to amylin- and sCT-activated AP neurons was compared. Similar to amylin, an intact AP was necessary for sCT to reduce eating. Further, co-expression between Fos activation and DBH after amylin or sCT did not differ markedly, while co-localization of Fos and TPH was minor. Approximately 95% of neurons expressing Fos and DBH after amylin or sCT treatment were closely apposed to VGLUT2-positive boutons. Our study suggests that the hindbrain pathways engaged by amylin and sCT share many similarities, including the mediation by AP neurons.

  19. Cajal bodies in neurons.

    PubMed

    Lafarga, Miguel; Tapia, Olga; Romero, Ana M; Berciano, Maria T

    2016-09-14

    Cajal is commonly regarded as the father of modern neuroscience in recognition of his fundamental work on the structure of the nervous system. But Cajal also made seminal contributions to the knowledge of nuclear structure in the early 1900s, including the discovery of the "accessory body" later renamed "Cajal body" (CB). This important nuclear structure has emerged as a center for the assembly of ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) required for splicing, ribosome biogenesis and telomere maintenance. The modern era of CB research started in the 1990s with the discovery of coilin, now known as a scaffold protein of CBs, and specific probes for small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs). In this review, we summarize what we have learned in the recent decades concerning CBs in post-mitotic neurons, thereby ruling out dynamic changes in CB functions during the cell cycle. We show that CBs are particularly prominent in neurons, where they frequently associate with the nucleolus. Neuronal CBs are transcription-dependent nuclear organelles. Indeed, their number dynamically accommodates to support the high neuronal demand for splicing and ribosome biogenesis required for sustaining metabolic and bioelectrical activity. Mature neurons have canonical CBs enriched in coilin, survival motor neuron protein and snRNPs. Disruption and loss of neuronal CBs associate with severe neuronal dysfunctions in several neurological disorders such as motor neuron diseases. In particular, CB depletion in motor neurons seems to reflect a perturbation of transcription and splicing in spinal muscular atrophy, the most common genetic cause of infant mortality.

  20. Role of neurotrophin signalling in the differentiation of neurons from dorsal root ganglia and sympathetic ganglia.

    PubMed

    Ernsberger, Uwe

    2009-06-01

    generation and survival of various DRG neuron classes, in particular proprioceptors. Its importance for peripheral projections and central connectivity of proprioceptors demonstrates the significance of NT signalling for integrating responsive neurons in neural networks. The molecular targets of NT3 signalling in proprioceptor differentiation remain to be characterized. In sympathetic ganglia, NGF signalling regulates dendritic development and axonal projections. Its role in the specification of other neuronal properties is less well analysed. In vitro analysis suggests the involvement of NT signalling in the choice between the noradrenergic and cholinergic transmitter phenotype, in the expression of various classes of ion channels and for target connectivity. In vivo analysis is required to show the degree to which NT signalling regulates these sympathetic neuron properties in developing embryos and postnatally.

  1. Chronic alcohol exposure differentially affects activation of female locus coeruleus neurons and the subcellular distribution of corticotropin releasing factor receptors.

    PubMed

    Retson, T A; Reyes, B A; Van Bockstaele, E J

    2015-01-02

    Understanding the neurobiological bases for sex differences in alcohol dependence is needed to help guide the development of individualized therapies for alcohol abuse disorders. In the present study, alcohol-induced adaptations in (1) anxiety-like behavior, (2) patterns of c-Fos activation and (3) subcellular distribution of corticotropin releasing factor receptor in locus coeruleus (LC) neurons was investigated in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats that were chronically exposed to ethanol using a liquid diet. Results confirm and extend reports by others showing that chronic ethanol exposure produces an anxiogenic-like response in both male and female subjects. Ethanol-induced sex differences were observed with increased c-Fos expression in LC neurons of female ethanol-treated subjects compared to controls or male subjects. Results also reveal sex differences in the subcellular distribution of the CRFr in LC-noradrenergic neurons with female subjects exposed to ethanol exhibiting a higher frequency of plasmalemmal CRFrs. These adaptations have implications for LC neuronal activity and its neural targets across the sexes. Considering the important role of the LC in ethanol-induced activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, the present results indicate important sex differences in feed-forward regulation of the HPA axis that may render alcohol dependent females more vulnerable to subsequent stress exposure.

  2. Progesterone Increased β-endorphin Innervation of the Locus Coeruleus, but Ovarian Steroids had no Effect on Noradrenergic Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Lima, Fernanda B; Leite, Cristiane M; Bethea, Cynthia L; Anselmo-Franci, Janete A

    2017-03-08

    With the decline of ovarian steroids levels at menopause, many women experience an increase in anxiety and stress sensitivity. The locus coeruleus (LC), a central source of noradrenaline (NE), is activated by stress and is inhibited by β-endorphin. Moreover, increased NE has been implicated in pathological anxiety syndromes. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in menopause appears to decrease anxiety and vulnerability to stress. Therefore, we questioned the effect of HRT on the inhibitory β-endorphin innervation of the LC. In addition, we found that progesterone protects serotoninergic neurons in monkeys, leading us to question whether ovarian steroids are also neuroprotective in LC neurons in monkeys. Adult Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were ovariectomized, and either treated with Silastic capsules that contained estradiol, estratiol + progesterone, progesterone alone or that were empty (ovariectomized;control). After 1 month, the LC was obtained and processed for immunohistochemistry for β-endorphin and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase -mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL). The density of β-endorphin axons was determined with image analysis using ImageJ. The TUNEL-positive neurons were counted in the entire LC. progesterone-alone significantly increased the density of the β -endorphin axons in the LC (p<0.01). No significant differences between groups in the number of TUNEL-positive cells in the LC were found. In conclusion, we found that HRT increases the inhibitory influence of β-endorphin in the LC, which could, in turn, contribute to reduce anxiety and increase stress resilience. In addition, we did not find compelling evidence of neurodegeneration or neuroprotection by HRT in the LC of Rhesus monkeys.

  3. NGF-dependent axon growth and regeneration are altered in sympathetic neurons of dystrophic mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Loredana; Persiconi, Irene; Gallo, Alessandra; Hoogenraad, Casper C; De Stefano, Maria Egle

    2017-02-02

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal disease, determined by lack of dystrophin (Dp427), a muscular cytoskeletal protein also expressed by selected neuronal populations. Consequently, besides muscular wasting, both human patients and DMD animal models suffer several neural disorders. In previous studies on the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) of wild type and dystrophic mdx mice (Lombardi et al. 2008), we hypothesized that Dp427 could play some role in NGF-dependent axonal growth, both during development and adulthood. To address this issue, we first analyzed axon regeneration potentials of SCG neurons of both genotypes after axotomy in vivo. While noradrenergic innervation of mdx mouse submandibular gland, main source of nerve growth factor (NGF), recovered similarly to wild type, iris innervation (muscular target) never did. We, therefore, evaluated whether dystrophic SCG neurons were poorly responsive to NGF, especially at low concentration. Following in vitro axotomy in the presence of either 10 or 50ng/ml NGF, the number of regenerated axons in mdx mouse neuron cultures was indeed reduced, compared to wild type, at the lower concentration. Neurite growth parameters (i.e. number, length), growth cone dynamics and NGF/TrkA receptor signaling in differentiating neurons (not injured) were also significantly reduced when cultured with 10ng/ml NGF, but also with higher NGF concentrations. In conclusion, we propose a role for Dp427 in NGF-dependent cytoskeletal dynamics associated to growth cone advancement, possibly through indirect stabilization of TrkA receptors. Considering NGF activity in nervous system development/remodeling, this aspect could concur in some of the described DMD-associated neural dysfunctions.

  4. Neuronal Source of Plasma Dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, David S.; Holmes, Courtney

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Determinants of plasma norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine concentrations are well known; those of the third endogenous catecholamine, dopamine (DA), remain poorly understood. We tested in humans whether DA enters the plasma after corelease with NE during exocytosis from sympathetic noradrenergic nerves. METHODS We reviewed plasma catecholamine data from patients referred for autonomic testing and control subjects under the following experimental conditions: during supine rest and in response to orthostasis; intravenous yohimbine (YOH), isoproterenol (ISO), or glucagon (GLU), which augment exocytotic release of NE from sympathetic nerves; intravenous tri-methaphan (TRI) or pentolinium (PEN), which decrease exocytotic NE release; or intravenous tyramine (TYR), which releases NE by nonexocytotic means. We included groups of patients with pure autonomic failure (PAF), bilateral thoracic sympathectomies (SNS-x), or multiple system atrophy (MSA), since PAF and SNS-x are associated with noradrenergic denervation and MSA is not. RESULTS Orthostasis, YOH, ISO, and TYR increased and TRI/PEN decreased plasma DA concentrations. Individual values for changes in plasma DA concentrations correlated positively with changes in NE in response to orthostasis (r =0.72, P <0.0001), YOH (r = 0.75, P < 0.0001), ISO (r = 0.71, P < 0.0001), GLU (r = 0.47, P = 0.01), and TYR (r = 0.67, P < 0.0001). PAF and SNS-x patients had low plasma DA concentrations. We estimated that DA constitutes 2%– 4% of the catecholamine released by exocytosis from sympathetic nerves and that 50%–90% of plasma DA has a sympathoneural source. CONCLUSIONS Plasma DA is derived substantially from sympathetic noradrenergic nerves. PMID:18801936

  5. Suppression of preoptic sleep-regulatory neuronal activity during corticotropin-releasing factor-induced sleep disturbance.

    PubMed

    Gvilia, Irma; Suntsova, Natalia; Kumar, Sunil; McGinty, Dennis; Szymusiak, Ronald

    2015-11-01

    Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) is implicated in sleep and arousal regulation. Exogenous CRF causes sleep suppression that is associated with activation of at least two important arousal systems: pontine noradrenergic and hypothalamic orexin/hypocretin neurons. It is not known whether CRF also impacts sleep-promoting neuronal systems. We hypothesized that CRF-mediated changes in wake and sleep involve decreased activity of hypothalamic sleep-regulatory neurons localized in the preoptic area. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of intracerebroventricular administration of CRF on sleep-wake measures and c-Fos expression in GABAergic neurons in the median preoptic nucleus (MnPN) and ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO) in different experimental conditions. Administration of CRF (0.1 nmol) during baseline rest phase led to delayed sleep onset and decreases in total amount and mean duration of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Administration of CRF during acute sleep deprivation (SD) resulted in suppression of recovery sleep and decreased c-Fos expression in MnPN/VLPO GABAergic neurons. Compared with vehicle controls, intracerebroventricular CRF potentiated disturbances of both NREM and REM sleep in rats exposed to a species-specific psychological stressor, the dirty cage of a male conspecific. The number of MnPN/VLPO GABAergic neurons expressing c-Fos was reduced in the CRF-treated group of dirty cage-exposed rats. These findings confirm the involvement of CRF in wake-sleep cycle regulation and suggest that increased CRF signaling in the brain 1) negatively affects homeostatic responses to sleep loss, 2) exacerbates stress-induced disturbances of sleep, and 3) suppresses the activity of sleep-regulatory neurons of the MnPN and VLPO.

  6. Pacemaking Kisspeptin Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Martin J.; Zhang, Chunguang; Qiu, Jian; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.

    2013-01-01

    Kisspeptin (Kiss1) neurons are vital for reproduction. GnRH neurons express the kisspeptin receptor, GPR 54, and kisspeptins potently stimulate the release of GnRH by depolarising and inducing sustained action potential firing in GnRH neurons. As such Kiss1 neurons may be the pre-synaptic pacemaker neurons in the hypothalamic circuitry that controls reproduction. There are at least two different populations of Kiss1 neurons: one in the rostral periventricular area (RP3V) that is stimulated by oestrogens and the other in the arcuate nucleus that is inhibited by oestrogens. How each of these Kiss1 neuronal populations participate in the regulation of the reproductive cycle is currently under intense investigation. Based on electrophysiological studies in the guinea pig and mouse, Kiss1 neurons in general are capable of generating burst firing behavior. Essentially all Kiss1 neurons, which have been studied thus far in the arcuate nucleus, express the ion channels necessary for burst firing, which include hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide gated cation (HCN) channels and the T-type calcium (Cav3.1) channels. Under voltage clamp conditions, these channels produce distinct currents that under current clamp conditions can generate burst firing behavior. The future challenge is to identify other key channels and synaptic inputs involved in the regulation of the firing properties of Kiss1 neurons and the physiological regulation of the expression of these channels and receptors by oestrogens and other hormones. The ultimate goal is to understand how Kiss1 neurons control the different phases of GnRH neurosecretion and hence reproduction. PMID:23884368

  7. Stem cells decreased neuronal cell death after hypoxic stress in primary fetal rat neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Tetsuro; Xu, Yan

    2012-01-01

    To explore stem cell-mediated neuronal protection through extracellular signaling pathways by transplanted stem cells, we sought to identify potential candidate molecules responsible for neuronal protection using an in vitro coculture system. Primary fetal rat hippocampal neurons underwent hypoxia (≤1% oxygen) for 96 h nad then were returned to a normoxic condition. The study group then received rat umbilical cord matrix-derived stem cells, while the control group received fresh media only. The experimental group showed decreased neuronal apoptosis compared to the control group [44.5 ± 1.6% vs. 71.0 ± 4.2% (mean ± SD, p = 0.0005) on day 5] and higher neuronal survival (4.9 ± 1.2 cells/100× field vs. 2.2 ± 0.3, p = 0.02 on day 5). Among 90 proteins evaluated using a protein array, stem cell coculture media showed increased protein secretion of TIMP-1 (5.61-fold), TIMP-2 (4.88), CNTF-Rα (3.42), activin A (2.20), fractalkine (2.04), CCR4 (2.02), and decreased secretion in MIP-2 (0.30-fold), AMPK α1 (0.43), TROY (0.48), and TIMP-3 (0.50). This study demonstrated that coculturing stem cells with primary neurons in vitro decreased neuronal cell death after hypoxia with significantly altered protein secretion. The results suggest that stem cells may offer neuronal protection through extracellular signaling.

  8. Corticospinal mirror neurons.

    PubMed

    Kraskov, A; Philipp, R; Waldert, S; Vigneswaran, G; Quallo, M M; Lemon, R N

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the properties of neurons with mirror-like characteristics that were identified as pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) and recorded in the ventral premotor cortex (area F5) and primary motor cortex (M1) of three macaque monkeys. We analysed the neurons' discharge while the monkeys performed active grasp of either food or an object, and also while they observed an experimenter carrying out a similar range of grasps. A considerable proportion of tested PTNs showed clear mirror-like properties (52% F5 and 58% M1). Some PTNs exhibited 'classical' mirror neuron properties, increasing activity for both execution and observation, while others decreased their discharge during observation ('suppression mirror-neurons'). These experiments not only demonstrate the existence of PTNs as mirror neurons in M1, but also reveal some interesting differences between M1 and F5 mirror PTNs. Although observation-related changes in the discharge of PTNs must reach the spinal cord and will include some direct projections to motoneurons supplying grasping muscles, there was no EMG activity in these muscles during action observation. We suggest that the mirror neuron system is involved in the withholding of unwanted movement during action observation. Mirror neurons are differentially recruited in the behaviour that switches rapidly between making your own movements and observing those of others.

  9. Culturing rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Audesirk, G; Audesirk, T; Ferguson, C

    2001-01-01

    Cultured neurons are widely used to investigate the mechanisms of neurotoxicity. Embryonic rat hippocampal neurons may be grown as described under a wide variety of conditions to suit differing experimental procedures, including electrophysiology, morphological analysis of neurite development, and various biochemical and molecular analyses.

  10. Neuronal Mechanisms of Intelligence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-21

    The underlying premise of this research is that the neuron itself is the functional unit in the brain for positive reinforcement . Our early studies...preference studies (an alternative method to self-stimulation for measuring reward). Keywords: Neuronal conditioning; Positive reinforcement ; Learning; and Adaptive networks.

  11. Simultaneous modulation of retrieval by dopaminergic D(1), beta-noradrenergic, serotonergic-1A and cholinergic muscarinic receptors in cortical structures of the rat.

    PubMed

    Barros, D M; Mello e Souza, T; De David, T; Choi, H; Aguzzoli, A; Madche, C; Ardenghi, P; Medina, J H; Izquierdo, I

    2001-09-28

    Retrieval of inhibitory avoidance has been recently shown to require intact glutamate receptors, protein kinases A and C and mitogen-activated protein kinase in the CA1 region of the rat hippocampus and in the entorhinal, posterior parietal and anterior cingulate cortex. These enzymatic activities are known to be modulated by dopamine D(1), beta-noradrenergic, 5HT1A and cholinergic muscarinic receptors. Here we study the effect on retrieval of this task of well-known agonists and antagonists of these receptors infused in the same brain cortical regions and into the basolateral amygdala, in rats. The drugs used were SKF38393 (D(1) agonist), noradrenaline, 8-HO-DPAT (5HT1A agonist), oxotremorine (muscarinic agonist), SCH23390 (D(1) antagonist), timolol (beta antagonist), NAN-190 (5HT1A antagonist) and scopolamine (muscarinic antagonist). All were studied at two different dose levels. The localised infusion of SKF38393, noradrenaline, NAN-190 and oxotremorine into any of the cortical structures mentioned 10 min prior to a 24-h retention test session of one-trial step-down inhibitory avoidance enhanced retention test performance. SCH2330, timolol, 8-HO-DPAT and scopolamine hindered retention test performance. In the basolateral amygdala only an enhancing effect of noradrenaline and an inhibitory effect of timolol were seen. Three hours after the infusions, retention test performance returned to normal in all cases. None of the treatments affected locomotion or rearing in an open field or behaviour in the elevated plus maze. Therefore, their effects on retention testing can be attributed to an influence on retrieval. In conclusion, memory retrieval of this apparently simple task requires the participation of CA1, entorhinal, posterior parietal and anterior cingulate cortex, and is strongly modulated by, dopaminergic D(1), beta-noradrenergic, muscarinic cholinergic and 5HT1A receptors in the four areas. The first three types of receptor enhance, and the latter inhibits

  12. Neuronal signaling through endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Cosker, Katharina E; Segal, Rosalind A

    2014-02-01

    The distinctive morphology of neurons, with complex dendritic arbors and extensive axons, presents spatial challenges for intracellular signal transduction. The endosomal system provides mechanisms that enable signaling molecules initiated by extracellular cues to be trafficked throughout the expanse of the neuron, allowing intracellular signals to be sustained over long distances. Therefore endosomes are critical for many aspects of neuronal signaling that regulate cell survival, axonal growth and guidance, dendritic branching, and cell migration. An intriguing characteristic of neuronal signal transduction is that endosomal trafficking enables physiological responses that vary based on the subcellular location of signal initiation. In this review, we will discuss the specialized mechanisms and the functional significance of endosomal signaling in neurons, both during normal development and in disease.

  13. Neuronal Signaling through Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Cosker, Katharina E.; Segal, Rosalind A.

    2014-01-01

    The distinctive morphology of neurons, with complex dendritic arbors and extensive axons, presents spatial challenges for intracellular signal transduction. The endosomal system provides mechanisms that enable signaling molecules initiated by extracellular cues to be trafficked throughout the expanse of the neuron, allowing intracellular signals to be sustained over long distances. Therefore endosomes are critical for many aspects of neuronal signaling that regulate cell survival, axonal growth and guidance, dendritic branching, and cell migration. An intriguing characteristic of neuronal signal transduction is that endosomal trafficking enables physiological responses that vary based on the subcellular location of signal initiation. In this review, we will discuss the specialized mechanisms and the functional significance of endosomal signaling in neurons, both during normal development and in disease. PMID:24492712

  14. NEURON and Python

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Michael L.; Davison, Andrew P.; Muller, Eilif

    2008-01-01

    The NEURON simulation program now allows Python to be used, alone or in combination with NEURON's traditional Hoc interpreter. Adding Python to NEURON has the immediate benefit of making available a very extensive suite of analysis tools written for engineering and science. It also catalyzes NEURON software development by offering users a modern programming tool that is recognized for its flexibility and power to create and maintain complex programs. At the same time, nothing is lost because all existing models written in Hoc, including graphical user interface tools, continue to work without change and are also available within the Python context. An example of the benefits of Python availability is the use of the xml module in implementing NEURON's Import3D and CellBuild tools to read MorphML and NeuroML model specifications. PMID:19198661

  15. Imaging calcium in neurons.

    PubMed

    Grienberger, Christine; Konnerth, Arthur

    2012-03-08

    Calcium ions generate versatile intracellular signals that control key functions in all types of neurons. Imaging calcium in neurons is particularly important because calcium signals exert their highly specific functions in well-defined cellular subcompartments. In this Primer, we briefly review the general mechanisms of neuronal calcium signaling. We then introduce the calcium imaging devices, including confocal and two-photon microscopy as well as miniaturized devices that are used in freely moving animals. We provide an overview of the classical chemical fluorescent calcium indicators and of the protein-based genetically encoded calcium indicators. Using application examples, we introduce new developments in the field, such as calcium imaging in awake, behaving animals and the use of calcium imaging for mapping single spine sensory inputs in cortical neurons in vivo. We conclude by providing an outlook on the prospects of calcium imaging for the analysis of neuronal signaling and plasticity in various animal models.

  16. NEURON and Python.

    PubMed

    Hines, Michael L; Davison, Andrew P; Muller, Eilif

    2009-01-01

    The NEURON simulation program now allows Python to be used, alone or in combination with NEURON's traditional Hoc interpreter. Adding Python to NEURON has the immediate benefit of making available a very extensive suite of analysis tools written for engineering and science. It also catalyzes NEURON software development by offering users a modern programming tool that is recognized for its flexibility and power to create and maintain complex programs. At the same time, nothing is lost because all existing models written in Hoc, including graphical user interface tools, continue to work without change and are also available within the Python context. An example of the benefits of Python availability is the use of the xml module in implementing NEURON's Import3D and CellBuild tools to read MorphML and NeuroML model specifications.

  17. REM-sleep deprivation-induced increase in ethanol intake: role of brain monoaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Aalto, J; Kiianmaa, K

    1986-01-01

    The ethanol intake of Long-Evans male rats was recorded before, during and after deprivation of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep produced with the flowerpot technique modified by using a cuff pedestal and electrified grid floor instead of water. Ethanol intake increased significantly during REM-sleep deprivation. A rebound decrease in ethanol drinking was then observed during the REM-rebound phase immediately after the termination of REM-sleep deprivation. Because REM-sleep deprivation has been reported to impair the function of central monoamine neuronal systems and because some studies have implicated these systems in the control of voluntary ethanol intake, we studied whether different monoamine uptake blocking agents could antagonize the increase in ethanol intake caused by REM-sleep deprivation. After three days of REM-sleep deprivation, the rats were given uptake blocking agents for serotonin (citalopram, 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg/day, IP), dopamine (GBR 12909, 5 mg/kg/day, IP) and noradrenaline (talsupram, 1, 5 and 10 mg/kg/day, IP). Citalopram and GBR 12909 did not modify the increased level of ethanol intake, but talsupram decreased ethanol intake to the levels seen prior to deprivation, and during the REM-rebound phase amplified the decrease found. These effects of talsupram could be antagonized by blocking mg/kg/day, IP). Prazosin alone tended to increase ethanol consumption. These findings suggest that functional alterations in central noradrenergic neurons during REM-sleep deprivation may contribute to the concurrent increase in ethanol intake.

  18. Shaping the Output of Lumbar Flexor Motoneurons by Sacral Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Cherniak, Meir; Anglister, Lili; Lev-Tov, Aharon

    2017-02-01

    The ability to improve motor function in spinal cord injury patients by reactivating spinal central pattern generators (CPGs) requires the elucidation of neurons and pathways involved in activation and modulation of spinal networks in accessible experimental models. Previously we reported on adrenoceptor-dependent sacral control of lumbar flexor motoneuron firing in newborn rats. The current work focuses on clarification of the circuitry and connectivity involved in this unique modulation and its potential use. Using surgical manipulations of the spinal gray and white matter, electrophysiological recordings, and confocal microscopy mapping, we found that methoxamine (METH) activation of sacral networks within the ventral aspect of S2 segments was sufficient to produce alternating rhythmic bursting (0.15-1 Hz) in lumbar flexor motoneurons. This lumbar rhythm depended on continuity of the ventral funiculus (VF) along the S2-L2 segments. Interrupting the VF abolished the rhythm and replaced it by slow unstable bursting. Calcium imaging of S1-S2 neurons, back-labeled via the VF, revealed that ∼40% responded to METH, mostly by rhythmic firing. All uncrossed projecting METH responders and ∼70% of crossed projecting METH responders fired with the concurrent ipsilateral motor output, while the rest (∼30%) fired with the contralateral motor output. We suggest that METH-activated sacral CPGs excite ventral clusters of sacral VF neurons to deliver the ascending drive required for direct rhythmic activation of lumbar flexor motoneurons. The capacity of noradrenergic-activated sacral CPGs to modulate the activity of lumbar networks via sacral VF neurons provides a novel way to recruit rostral lumbar motoneurons and modulate the output required to execute various motor behaviors.

  19. Stimulation of feeding by three different glucose-sensing mechanisms requires hindbrain catecholamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, Ai-Jun; Wang, Qing; Dinh, Thu T; Powers, Bethany R; Ritter, Sue

    2014-02-15

    Previous work has shown that hindbrain catecholamine neurons are required components of the brain's glucoregulatory circuitry. However, the mechanisms and circuitry underlying their glucoregulatory functions are poorly understood. Here we examined three drugs, glucosamine (GcA), phloridzin (Phl) and 5-thio-d-glucose (5TG), that stimulate food intake but interfere in different ways with cellular glucose utilization or transport. We examined feeding and blood glucose responses to each drug in male rats previously injected into the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus with anti-dopamine-β-hydroxylase conjugated to saporin (DSAP), a retrogradely transported immunotoxin that selectively lesions noradrenergic and adrenergic neurons, or with unconjugated saporin (SAP) control. Our major findings were 1) that GcA, Phl, and 5TG all stimulated feeding in SAP controls whether injected into the lateral or fourth ventricle (LV or 4V), 2) that each drug's potency was similar for both LV and 4V injections, 3) that neither LV or 4V injection of these drugs evoked feeding in DSAP-lesioned rats, and 4) that only 5TG, which blocks glycolysis, stimulated a blood glucose response. The antagonist of the MEK/ERK signaling cascade, U0126, attenuated GcA-induced feeding, but not Phl- or 5TG-induced feeding. Thus GcA, Phl, and 5TG, although differing in mechanism and possibly activating different neural populations, stimulate feeding in a catecholamine-dependent manner. Although results do not exclude the possibility that catecholamine neurons possess glucose-sensing mechanisms responsive to all of these agents, currently available evidence favors the possibility that the feeding effects result from convergent neural circuits in which catecholamine neurons are a required component.

  20. The selective noradrenergic reuptake inhibitor reboxetine restores spatial learning deficits, biochemical changes, and hippocampal synaptic plasticity in an animal model of depression.

    PubMed

    Bhagya, V; Srikumar, B N; Raju, T R; Shankaranarayana Rao, B S

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a major psychiatric illness that is associated with cognitive dysfunctions. The underlying mechanism of depression-associated memory impairment is unclear. Previously, we showed altered hippocampal synaptic plasticity in an animal model of depression. Although several antidepressants are beneficial in the treatment of depression, very little is known about the effects of these drugs on depression-associated learning and memory deficits. Prolonged antidepressant treatment might contribute to neuroplastic changes required for clinical outcomes. Accordingly, we evaluated the effect of chronic reboxetine (a selective noradrenergic reuptake inhibitor) treatment on depression-induced reduced hippocampal synaptic plasticity, neurotransmitter levels, and spatial learning and memory impairments. Depression was induced in male Wistar rats by the administration of clomipramine from postnatal days 8 to 21, and these rats were treated with reboxetine in adulthood. The neonatal clomipramine administration resulted in impaired hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), decreased hippocampal cholinergic activity and monoamine levels, and poor performance in a partially baited eight-arm radial maze task. Chronic reboxetine treatment restored the hippocampal LTP, acetylcholinesterase activity, and levels of biogenic amines and ameliorated spatial learning and memory deficits in the depressed state. Thus, restoration of hippocampal synaptic plasticity might be a cellular mechanism underlying the beneficial effect of reboxetine in depression-associated cognitive deficits. This study furthers the existing understanding of the effects of antidepressants on learning, memory, and synaptic plasticity and could ultimately assist in the development of better therapeutic strategies to treat depression and associated cognitive impairments.

  1. Noradrenergic neurotoxin, N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride (DSP-4), treatment eliminates estrogenic effects on song responsiveness in female zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata).

    PubMed

    Vyas, Akshat; Harding, Cheryl; McGowan, Joseph; Snare, Randall; Bogdan, Diane

    2008-10-01

    Female songbirds use male songs as an important criterion for mate selection. Several studies have reported that female songbirds prefer complex songs to other song types. In a recent study, the authors found that song responsiveness in female zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) is strongly modulated by circulating estrogen levels. The behavioral effects of estrogen are often mediated via norepinephrine (NE). The current study administered the noradrenergic neurotoxin, N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride (DSP-4) to estradiol-treated female zebra finches to investigate if estrogenic effects on song responsiveness are mediated via NE. The authors tested song responsiveness of adult female zebra finches for three acoustically different song types--simple, long-bout, and complex--under three treatment conditions, untreated, estradiol-treated, and estradiol + DSP-4-treated. Females only showed differential song responsiveness when treated with estradiol alone, responding more to complex songs. DSP-4 treatment eliminated this differential responsiveness. The results are discussed in the light of evidence from functional, neurochemical, and neuroanatomical studies that suggest that estrogenic effects on song processing might be mediated by NE.

  2. Effects of selective serotonin reuptake and dual serotonergic-noradrenergic reuptake treatments on attention and executive functions in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Guzmán, Ixchel; Herrera-Abarca, Jorge E; Gudayol-Ferré, Esteve; Herrera-Guzmán, Daniel; Gómez-Carbajal, Lizbeth; Peña-Olvira, Miriam; Villuendas-González, Erwin; Joan, Guàrdia-Olmos

    2010-05-30

    Several reports suggest that antidepressants may improve cognitive functioning in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). The present work aims to study the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonergic-noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) treatments on the performance of working memory, attention and executive functions in patients with MDD. A total of 73 subjects meeting the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders version IV (DSM-IV) criteria for MDD, and 37 control subjects were assessed with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and a neuropsychological battery. The subjects were medicated with escitalopram (n=36) or duloxetine (n=37) for 24 weeks. At the end of the trial, the subjects were assessed again with the same tests. The depressed subjects showed alterations in attention and cognitive functions when compared to the control group. The administration of both treatments improved working memory, as well as attention and all the executive functions, but the cognitive functions of depressed patients do not improve enough to reach the levels of performance of the control subjects. Our results suggest that both SSRI and SNRI treatments presented the same efficacy in improving attention and the remaining executive functions.

  3. Three-dimensional culture of single embryonic stem-derived neural/stem progenitor cells in fibrin hydrogels: neuronal network formation and matrix remodelling.

    PubMed

    Bento, Ana R; Quelhas, Pedro; Oliveira, Maria J; Pêgo, Ana P; Amaral, Isabel F

    2016-12-29

    In an attempt to improve the efficacy of neural stem/progenitor cell (NSPC) based therapies, fibrin hydrogels are being explored to provide a favourable microenvironment for cell survival and differentiation following transplantation. In the present work, the ability of fibrin to support the survival, proliferation, and neuronal differentiation of NSPCs derived from embryonic stem (ES) cells under monolayer culture was explored. Single mouse ES-NSPCs were cultured within fibrin (fibrinogen concentration: 6 mg/ml) under neuronal differentiation conditions up to 14 days. The ES-NSPCs retained high cell viability and proliferated within small-sized spheroids. Neuronal differentiation was confirmed by an increase in the levels of βIII-tubulin and NF200 over time. At day 14, cell-matrix constructs mainly comprised NSPCs and neurons (46.5% βIII-tubulin(+) cells). Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic and dopaminergic/noradrenergic neurons were also observed, along with a network of synaptic proteins. The ES-NSPCs expressed matriptase and secreted MMP-2/9, with MMP-2 activity increasing along time. Fibronectin, laminin and collagen type IV deposition was also detected. Fibrin gels prepared with higher fibrinogen concentrations (8/10 mg/ml) were less permissive to neurite extension and neuronal differentiation, possibly owing to their smaller pore area and higher rigidity. Overall, it is shown that ES-NSPCs within fibrin are able to establish neuronal networks and to remodel fibrin through MMP secretion and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. This three-dimensional (3D) culture system was also shown to support cell viability, neuronal differentiation and ECM deposition of human ES-NSPCs. The settled 3D platform is expected to constitute a valuable tool to develop fibrin-based hydrogels for ES-NSPC delivery into the injured central nervous system. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Anti-NGF monoclonal antibody muMab 911 does not deplete neurons in the superior cervical ganglia of young or old adult rats.

    PubMed

    Marcek, John; Okerberg, Carlin; Liu, Chang-Ning; Potter, David; Butler, Paul; Boucher, Magalie; Zorbas, Mark; Mouton, Peter; Nyengaard, Jens R; Somps, Chris

    2016-10-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) blocking therapies are an emerging and effective approach to pain management. However, concerns about the potential for adverse effects on the structure and function of the peripheral nervous system have slowed their development. Early studies using NGF antisera in adult rats reported effects on the size and number of neurons in the sympathetic chain ganglia. In the work described here, both young adult (6-8 week) and fully mature (7-8 month) rats were treated with muMab 911, a selective, murine, anti-NGF monoclonal antibody, to determine if systemic exposures to pharmacologically active levels of antibody for 1 month cause loss of neurons in the sympathetic superior cervical ganglia (SCG). State-of-the-art, unbiased stereology performed by two independent laboratories was used to determine the effects of muMab 911 on SCG neuronal number and size, as well as ganglion size. Following muMab 911 treatment, non-statistically significant trends toward smaller ganglia, and smaller and fewer neurons, were seen when routine, nonspecific stains were used in stereologic assessments. However, when noradrenergic neurons were identified using tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity, trends toward fewer neurons observed with routine stains were not apparent. The only statistically significant effects detected were lower SCG weights in muMab 911-treated rats, and a smaller volume of TH immunoreactivity in neurons from younger rats treated with muMab 911. These results indicate that therapeutically relevant exposures to the anti-NGF monoclonal antibody muMab 911 for 1 month have no effect on neuron numbers within the SCG from young or old adult rats.

  5. Dopaminergic neurons modulate GABA neuron migration in the embryonic midbrain.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Anju; Won, Chungkil; Li, Suyan; Erdélyi, Ferenc; Szabó, Gábor; Kim, Kwang-Soo

    2012-09-01

    Neuronal migration, a key event during brain development, remains largely unexplored in the mesencephalon, where dopaminergic (DA) and GABA neurons constitute two major neuronal populations. Here we study the migrational trajectories of DA and GABA neurons and show that they occupy ventral mesencephalic territory in a temporally and spatially specific manner. Our results from the Pitx3-deficient aphakia mouse suggest that pre-existing DA neurons modulate GABA neuronal migration to their final destination, providing novel insights and fresh perspectives concerning neuronal migration and connectivity in the mesencephalon in normal as well as diseased brains.

  6. Neuromorphic Silicon Neuron Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Indiveri, Giacomo; Linares-Barranco, Bernabé; Hamilton, Tara Julia; van Schaik, André; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Delbruck, Tobi; Liu, Shih-Chii; Dudek, Piotr; Häfliger, Philipp; Renaud, Sylvie; Schemmel, Johannes; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Arthur, John; Hynna, Kai; Folowosele, Fopefolu; Saighi, Sylvain; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa; Wijekoon, Jayawan; Wang, Yingxue; Boahen, Kwabena

    2011-01-01

    Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain–machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance-based Hodgkin–Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive integrate and fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips. PMID:21747754

  7. Neuronal ubiquitin homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Hallengren, Jada; Chen, Ping-Chung; Wilson, Scott M.

    2013-01-01

    Neurons have highly specialized intracellular compartments that facilitate the development and activity of the nervous system. Ubiquitination is a post-translational modification that controls many aspects of neuronal function by regulating protein abundance. Disruption of this signaling pathway has been demonstrated in neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Angleman Syndrome. Since many neurological disorders exhibit ubiquitinated protein aggregates, the loss of neuronal ubiquitin homeostasis may be an important contributor of disease. This review discusses the mechanisms utilized by neurons to control the free pool of ubiquitin necessary for normal nervous system development and function as well as new roles of protein ubiquitination in regulating synaptic activity. PMID:23686613

  8. Motor neurone disease.

    PubMed

    2016-03-23

    Essential facts Motor neurone disease describes a group of related diseases, affecting the neurones in the brain and spinal cord. Progressive, incurable and life-limiting, MND is rare, with about 1,100 people developing it each year in the UK and up to 5,000 people affected at any one time. One third of people will die within a year of diagnosis and more than half within two years. About 5% to 10% are alive at ten years.

  9. Neuronal Mechanisms of Intelligence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    numbtr) FIELOD GROUP ]SUB-GROJP operant conditioning; neuronal conditioning; positive reinforcement ; reward; learning; adaptive networks; self...gratuitous capacity for operant conditioning, the individual neuron could be an important functional unit for positive reinforcement in the brain. These...the following conditions: 1) if a brain cell with the capacity for positive reinforcement discharges in a burst of activity, and 2) if that cell’s

  10. Ghrelin in Central Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ferrini, F; Salio, C; Lossi, L; Merighi, A

    2009-01-01

    Ghrelin, an orexigenic peptide synthesized by endocrine cells of the gastric mucosa, is released in the bloodstream in response to a negative energetic status. Since discovery, the hypothalamus was identified as the main source of ghrelin in the CNS, and effects of the peptide have been mainly observed in this area of the brain. In recent years, an increasing number of studies have reported ghrelin synthesis and effects in specific populations of neurons also outside the hypothalamus. Thus, ghrelin activity has been described in midbrain, hindbrain, hippocampus, and spinal cord. The spectrum of functions and biological effects produced by the peptide on central neurons is remarkably wide and complex. It ranges from modulation of membrane excitability, to control of neurotransmitter release, neuronal gene expression, and neuronal survival and proliferation. There is not at present a general consensus concerning the source of ghrelin acting on central neurons. Whereas it is widely accepted that the hypothalamus represents the most important endogenous source of the hormone in CNS, the existence of extra-hypothalamic ghrelin-synthesizing neurons is still controversial. In addition, circulating ghrelin can theoretically be another natural ligand for central ghrelin receptors. This paper gives an overview on the distribution of ghrelin and its receptor across the CNS and critically analyses the data available so far as regarding the effects of ghrelin on central neurotransmission. PMID:19721816

  11. Ghrelin in central neurons.

    PubMed

    Ferrini, F; Salio, C; Lossi, L; Merighi, A

    2009-03-01

    Ghrelin, an orexigenic peptide synthesized by endocrine cells of the gastric mucosa, is released in the bloodstream in response to a negative energetic status. Since discovery, the hypothalamus was identified as the main source of ghrelin in the CNS, and effects of the peptide have been mainly observed in this area of the brain. In recent years, an increasing number of studies have reported ghrelin synthesis and effects in specific populations of neurons also outside the hypothalamus. Thus, ghrelin activity has been described in midbrain, hindbrain, hippocampus, and spinal cord. The spectrum of functions and biological effects produced by the peptide on central neurons is remarkably wide and complex. It ranges from modulation of membrane excitability, to control of neurotransmitter release, neuronal gene expression, and neuronal survival and proliferation. There is not at present a general consensus concerning the source of ghrelin acting on central neurons. Whereas it is widely accepted that the hypothalamus represents the most important endogenous source of the hormone in CNS, the existence of extra-hypothalamic ghrelin-synthesizing neurons is still controversial. In addition, circulating ghrelin can theoretically be another natural ligand for central ghrelin receptors. This paper gives an overview on the distribution of ghrelin and its receptor across the CNS and critically analyses the data available so far as regarding the effects of ghrelin on central neurotransmission.

  12. Neuron-Microdevice Connections.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regehr, Wade Gordon

    1988-12-01

    A new method for long-term recording and stimulation applicable to cultured neurons has been developed. Silicon -based microelectrodes have been fabricated using integrated -circuit technology and micromachining. The chronic connection is made by positioning the electrode tip into contact with the cell body, and gluing the device to the bottom of the culture dish. These "diving-board electrodes" consist of an insulated lead exposed only at the tip sealed to the cell body of a cultured neuron: A two-way electrical connection to Helisoma B19 neurons has been established for up to four days. Preliminary experiments with cultured superior cervical ganglion neurons indicate diving-board electrodes can be used with cultured neurons larger than 20mum in diameter. In a related technique Helisoma neurons grown on a special dish containing a multielectrode array were found to seal to the dish electrodes, establishing similar long-term connections. This capability will make it possible to conduct experiments with either diving-board electrodes or dishes that cannot be performed using conventional techniques.

  13. NeuronBank: A Tool for Cataloging Neuronal Circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Paul S.; Calin-Jageman, Robert; Dhawan, Akshaye; Frederick, Chad; Guo, Shuman; Dissanayaka, Rasanjalee; Hiremath, Naveen; Ma, Wenjun; Shen, Xiuyn; Wang, Hsui C.; Yang, Hong; Prasad, Sushil; Sunderraman, Rajshekhar; Zhu, Ying

    2010-01-01

    The basic unit of any nervous system is the neuron. Therefore, understanding the operation of nervous systems ultimately requires an inventory of their constituent neurons and synaptic connectivity, which form neural circuits. The presence of uniquely identifiable neurons or classes of neurons in many invertebrates has facilitated the construction of cellular-level connectivity diagrams that can be generalized across individuals within a species. Homologous neurons can also be recognized across species. Here we describe NeuronBank.org, a web-based tool that we are developing for cataloging, searching, and analyzing neuronal circuitry within and across species. Information from a single species is represented in an individual branch of NeuronBank. Users can search within a branch or perform queries across branches to look for similarities in neuronal circuits across species. The branches allow for an extensible ontology so that additional characteristics can be added as knowledge grows. Each entry in NeuronBank generates a unique accession ID, allowing it to be easily cited. There is also an automatic link to a Wiki page allowing an encyclopedic explanation of the entry. All of the 44 previously published neurons plus one previously unpublished neuron from the mollusc, Tritonia diomedea, have been entered into a branch of NeuronBank as have 4 previously published neurons from the mollusc, Melibe leonina. The ability to organize information about neuronal circuits will make this information more accessible, ultimately aiding research on these important models. PMID:20428500

  14. Synapse-to-neuron ratio is inversely related to neuronal density in mature neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Cullen, D Kacy; Gilroy, Meghan E; Irons, Hillary R; Laplaca, Michelle C

    2010-11-04

    Synapse formation is a fundamental process in neurons that occurs throughout development, maturity, and aging. Although these stages contain disparate and fluctuating numbers of mature neurons, tactics employed by neuronal networks to modulate synapse number as a function of neuronal density are not well understood. The goal of this study was to utilize an in vitro model to assess the influence of cell density and neuronal maturity on synapse number and distribution. Specifically, cerebral cortical neurons were plated in planar culture at densities ranging from 10 to 5000 neurons/mm², and synapse number and distribution were evaluated via immunocytochemistry over 21 days in vitro (DIV). High-resolution confocal microscopy revealed an elaborate three-dimensional distribution of neurites and synapses across the heights of high-density neuronal networks by 21 DIV, which were up to 18 μm thick, demonstrating the complex degree of spatial interactions even in planar high-density cultures. At 7 DIV, the mean number of synapses per neuron was less than 5, and this did not vary as a function of neuronal density. However, by 21 DIV, the number of synapses per neuron had jumped 30- to 80-fold, and the synapse-to-neuron ratio was greatest at lower neuronal densities (< 500 neurons/mm²; mean approximately 400 synapses/neuron) compared to mid and higher neuronal densities (500-4500 neurons/mm²; mean of approximately 150 synapses/neuron) (p<0.05). These results suggest a relationship between neuronal density and synapse number that may have implications in the neurobiology of developing neuronal networks as well as processes of cell death and regeneration.

  15. Morphological correlates of sex differences in acoustic startle response and prepulse inhibition through projections from locus coeruleus to cochlear root neurons.

    PubMed

    Hormigo, Sebastian; Gómez-Nieto, Ricardo; Sancho, Consuelo; Herrero-Turrión, Javier; Carro, Juan; López, Dolores E; Horta-Júnior, José de Anchieta de Castro E

    2017-04-05

    The noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC) plays an important role in the promotion and maintenance of arousal and alertness. Our group recently described coerulean projections to cochlear root neurons (CRNs), the first relay of the primary acoustic startle reflex (ASR) circuit. However, the role of the LC in the ASR and its modulation, prepulse inhibition (PPI), is not clear. In this study, we damaged LC neurons and fibers using a highly selective neurotoxin, DSP-4, and then assessed ASR and PPI in male and female rats. Our results showed that ASR amplitude was higher in males at 14 days after DSP-4 injection when compared to pre-administration values and those in the male control group. Such modifications in ASR amplitude did not occur in DSP-4-injected females, which exhibited ASR amplitude within the range of control values. PPI differences between males and females seen in controls were not observed in DSP-4-injected rats for any interstimulus interval tested. DSP-4 injection did not affect ASR and PPI latencies in either the male or the female groups, showing values that were consistent with the sex-related variability observed in control rats. Furthermore, we studied the noradrenergic receptor system in the cochlear nerve root using gene expression analysis. When compared to controls, DSP-4-injected males showed higher levels of expression in all adrenoceptor subtypes; however, DSP-4-injected females showed varied effects depending on the receptor type, with either up-, downregulations, or maintenance of expression levels. Lastly, we determined noradrenaline levels in CRNs and other LC-targeted areas using HPLC assays, and these results correlated with behavioral and adrenoceptor expression changes post DSP-4 injection. Our study supports the participation of LC in ASR and PPI, and contributes toward a better understanding of sex-related differences observed in somatosensory gating paradigms.

  16. Role of descending noradrenergic system and spinal alpha2-adrenergic receptors in the effects of gabapentin on thermal and mechanical nociception after partial nerve injury in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Mitsuo; Takasu, Keiko; Kasuya, Noriyo; Shimizu, Shinobu; Honda, Motoko; Ono, Hideki

    2005-03-01

    1. To gain further insight into the mechanisms underlying the antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic actions of gabapentin, a chronic pain model was prepared by partially ligating the sciatic nerve in mice. The mice then received systemic or local injections of gabapentin combined with either central noradrenaline (NA) depletion by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or alpha-adrenergic receptor blockade. 2. Intraperitoneally (i.p.) administered gabapentin produced antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects that were manifested by elevation of the withdrawal threshold to a thermal (plantar test) or mechanical (von Frey test) stimulus, respectively. 3. Similar effects were obtained in both the plantar and von Frey tests when gabapentin was injected intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) or intrathecally (i.t.), suggesting that it acts at both supraspinal and spinal loci. This novel supraspinal analgesic action of gabapentin was only obtained in ligated neuropathic mice, and gabapentin (i.p. and i.c.v.) did not affect acute thermal and mechanical nociception. 4. In mice in which central NA levels were depleted by 6-OHDA, the antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects of i.p. and i.c.v. gabapentin were strongly suppressed. 5. The antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects of systemic gabapentin were reduced by both systemic and i.t. administration of yohimbine, an alpha2-adrenergic receptor antagonist. By contrast, prazosin (i.p. or i.t.), an alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, did not alter the effects of gabapentin. 6. It was concluded that the antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects of gabapentin are mediated substantially by the descending noradrenergic system, resulting in the activation of spinal alpha2-adrenergic receptors.

  17. Distribution and density of contacts from noradrenergic and serotonergic boutons on the dendrites of neck flexor motoneurons in the adult cat.

    PubMed

    Maratta, Robert; Fenrich, Keith K; Zhao, Ethan; Neuber-Hess, Monica S; Rose, P Ken

    2015-08-01

    Serotonergic (5-HT) and noradrenergic (NA) input to spinal motoneurons is essential for generating plateau potentials and self-sustained discharges. Extensor motoneurons are densely innervated by 5-HT and NA synapses and have robust plateau potentials and self-sustained discharges. Conversely, plateau potentials and self-sustained discharges are very rare in flexor motoneurons. The most likely reasons for this difference are that flexor motoneurons have few 5-HT and NA synapses and/or they are distributed distant to the channels responsible for plateau potentials and self-sustained discharges. However, the distribution of 5-HT and NA synapses on flexor motoneurons is unknown. Here we describe the distribution and density of 5-HT and NA synapses on motoneurons that innervate the flexor neck muscle, rectus capitis anterior (RCA), in the adult cat. Using a combination of intracellular staining, fluorescent immunohistochemistry, and 3D reconstruction techniques, we found that 5-HT and NA synapses are widely distributed throughout the dendritic trees of RCA motoneurons, albeit with a strong bias to small-diameter dendrites and to medial dendrites in the case of NA contacts. The number of 5-HT and NA contacts per motoneuron ranged, respectively, from 381 to 1,430 and from 642 to 1,382, which is 2.3- and 1.4-fold less than neck extensor motoneurons (Montague et al., J Comp Neurol 2013;521:638-656). These results suggest that 5-HT and NA synapses on flexor motoneurons may provide a powerful means of amplifying synaptic currents without incurring plateau potentials or self-sustained discharges. This feature is well suited to meet the biomechanical demands imposed on flexor muscles during different motor tasks.

  18. Antinociceptive effects of histamine H3 receptor antagonist in the preclinical models of pain in rats and the involvement of central noradrenergic systems.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Gin C; Honore, Prisca; Pai, Madhavi; Wensink, Erica J; Chandran, Prasant; Salyers, Anita K; Wetter, Jill M; Zhao, Chen; Liu, Huaqing; Decker, Michael W; Esbenshade, Timothy A; Cowart, Marlon D; Brioni, Jorge D

    2010-10-01

    The histamine H(3) receptor is predominantly expressed in the central nervous system and plays a role in diverse physiological mechanisms. In the present study, the effects of GSK189254, a potent and selective H(3) antagonist, were characterized in preclinical pain models in rats. Systemic GSK189254 produced dose-dependent efficacy (ED(50)=0.77 mg/kg i.p.) in a rat model of monoiodoacetate (MIA) induced osteoarthritic (OA) pain as evaluated by hindlimb grip force. The role of H(3) receptors in regulating pain perception was further demonstrated using other structurally distinct H(3) antagonists. GSK189254 also displayed efficacy in a rat surrogate model indicative of central sensitization, namely phase 2 response of formalin-induced flinching, and attenuated tactile allodynia in the spinal nerve ligation model of neuropathic pain (ED(50)=1.5mg/kg i.p.). In addition, GSK189254 reversed persistent (CFA) (ED(50)=2.1mg/kg i.p,), whereas was ineffective in acute (carrageenan) inflammatory pain. When administered intrathecally (i.t.) to the lumbar spinal cord, GSK189254 produced robust effects in relieving the OA pain (ED(50)=0.0027 mg/kg i.t.). The systemic GSK189254 effect was completely reversed by the alpha-adrenergic receptor antagonist phentolamine (i.p. and i.t.) but not by the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (i.p.). Furthermore, the i.t. GSK189254 effect was abolished when co-administered with phentolamine (i.t.). These results suggest that the spinal cord is an important site of action for H(3) antagonism and the effect can be associated with activation of the noradrenergic system. Our data also provide support that selective H(3) antagonists may represent a class of agents for the treatment of pain disorders.

  19. HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 potentiates NMDA-evoked noradrenaline release by a direct action at rat hippocampal and cortical noradrenergic nerve endings.

    PubMed

    Pittaluga, A; Raiteri, M

    1994-11-01

    Exposure of rat or human neocortical or hippocampal tissue to glutamate receptor agonists elicits as Ca(2+)-dependent, exocytotic-like release of previously accumulated [3H]noradrenaline through activation of both N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors colocalized on the noradrenergic axon terminals. Here we show that the NMDA (100 microM)-evoked release of [3H]noradrenaline from superfused thin layers of isolated rat hippocampal or cortical nerve endings was potentiated when the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 coat protein gp120 was added to the superfusion medium concomitantly with NMDA. The effect of gp120 (10 pM to 3 nM) on the 100 microM NMDA-evoked release of [3H]noradrenaline was concentration-dependent; the maximal effect (approximately 140% potentiation) was reached at 100 pM of gp120. The protein was inactive on its own. The [3H]noradrenaline release evoked by NMDA (100 microM)+gp120 (100 pM) was prevented by classical NMDA receptor antagonists, as well as by 10 microM memantine. Neither the release evoked by NMDA nor that elicited by NMDA+gp120 was sensitive to the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine, suggesting no involvement of nitric oxide. The [3H]noradrenaline release elicited by 100 microM AMPA was unaffected by gp120. The protein potentiated the release evoked by 100 microM glutamate; the effect of 100 pM gp120 was quantitatively identical to that of 1 microM glycine, with no apparent additivity between gp120 and glycine. The antagonism by 1 microM 7-chloro-kynurenic acid of the NMDA-induced [3H]noradrenaline release was reversed by glycine or gp120.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. The impact of ventral noradrenergic bundle lesions on increased IL-1 in the PVN and hormonal responses to stress in male sprague dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Blandino, Peter; Hueston, Cara M; Barnum, Christopher J; Bishop, Christopher; Deak, Terrence

    2013-07-01

    The impact of acute stress on inflammatory signaling within the central nervous system is of interest because these factors influence neuroendocrine function both directly and indirectly. Exposure to certain stressors increases expression of the proinflammatory cytokine, Il-1β in the hypothalamus. Increased IL-1 is reciprocally regulated by norepinephrine (stimulatory) and corticosterone (inhibitory), yet neural pathways underlying increased IL-1 have not been clarified. These experiments explored the impact of bilateral lesions of the ventral noradrenergic bundle (VNAB) on IL-1 expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) after foot shock. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats received bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the VNAB (VNABx) and were exposed to intermittent foot shock. VNABx depleted approximately 64% of norepinephrine in the PVN and attenuated the IL-1 response produced by foot shock. However, characterization of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal response, a crucial prerequisite for interpreting the effect of VNABx on IL-1 expression, revealed a profound dissociation between ACTH and corticosterone. Specifically, VNABx blocked the intronic CRH response in the PVN and the increase in plasma ACTH, whereas corticosterone was unaffected at all time points examined. Additionally, foot shock led to a rapid and profound increase in cyclooxygenase-2 and IL-1 expression within the adrenal glands, whereas more subtle effects were observed in the pituitary gland. Together the findings were the 1) demonstration that exposure to acute stress increased expression of inflammatory factors more broadly throughout the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis; 2) implication of a modest role for norepinephrine-containing fibers of the VNAB as an upstream regulator of PVN IL-1; and 3) suggestion of an ACTH-independent mechanism controlling the release of corticosterone in VNABx rats.

  1. Equine neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Url, A; Bauder, B; Thalhammer, J; Nowotny, N; Kolodziejek, J; Herout, N; Fürst, S; Weissenböck, H

    2001-04-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) is an inherited, neurodegenerative disorder with fatal outcome in humans. It has also been described in some animal species; this is the first report of NCL in equines. Three horses showed developmental retardation, slow movements and loss of appetite at the age of six months. Neurological symptoms, as well as visual failure in one case, were noticed at the age of 1 year. Due to slowly progressing deterioration, euthanasia was indicated 1.5 years after onset of conspicuous behavior. At necropsy, slight flattening of the gyri and discoloring of the brain was noticed. Histopathology revealed eosinophilic, autofluorescent material in the perikarya of neurons throughout the brain and spinal cord. Identical material was found in neurons of retina, submucous and myenteric ganglia, as well as in glial cells. Immunohistochemistry, using antiserum against subunit c of mitochondrial ATP synthase, showed positive signals in neurons and glial cells. Electron microscopical studies revealed fingerprint profiles mixed with rectilinear structures in markedly enlarged lysosomes of neurons and renal tubules, and rectilinear structures mixed with curvilinear bodies in macrophages and lymphocytes of lymph nodes. Thus, our study presents the first occurrence of lysosomal storage disease in horses, further characterized by immunohistochemical and electron microscopical investigations as NCL.

  2. The influence of intravesical administration of resiniferatoxin (RTX) on the chemical coding of sympathetic chain ganglia (SChG) neurons supplying the porcine urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Lepiarczyk, Ewa; Majewski, Mariusz; Bossowska, Agnieszka

    2015-11-01

    Resiniferatoxin (RTX) is used as an experimental drug in therapy of neurogenic urinary bladder disorders. The present study investigated the chemical coding of sympathetic chain ganglia (SChG) neurons supplying porcine urinary bladder after intravesical RTX instillation. The SChG neurons were visualized with retrograde tracing method and their chemical profile was disclosed with double-labeling immunohistochemistry using antibodies against dopamine β-hydroxylase (DβH; marker of noradrenergic neurons), neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), somatostatin (SOM), galanin, Leu(5)-enkephalin and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). It was found that in both the control (n = 5) and RTX-treated pigs (n = 5), the vast majority (90.4 ± 2.8 and 89.7 ± 2.3%, respectively) of FB-positive (FB+) nerve cells were DβH+. RTX instillation caused a decrease in the number of FB+/DβH+ neurons immunopositive to NPY (71.1 ± 12.1 vs 43.2 ± 6.7%), VIP (21.3 ± 10.7 vs 5.3 ± 4.3%) or SOM (16.5 ± 4.6 vs 2.3 ± 2.6%) and a distinct increase in the number of FB+/DβH+ neurons immunoreactive to nNOS (0.8 ± 1 vs 5.3 ± 1.9 %). The present study for the first time has provided some information that therapeutic effects of RTX on the mammalian urinary bladder can be partly mediated by SChG neurons.

  3. Disruption of glucocorticoid receptors in the noradrenergic system leads to BDNF up-regulation and altered serotonergic transmission associated with a depressive-like phenotype in female GR(DBHCre) mice.

    PubMed

    Chmielarz, Piotr; Kreiner, Grzegorz; Kot, Marta; Zelek-Molik, Agnieszka; Kowalska, Marta; Bagińska, Monika; Daniel, Władysława Anna; Nalepa, Irena

    2015-10-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that conditional inactivation of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) in the noradrenergic system, may evoke depressive-like behavior in female but not male mutant mice (GR(DBHCre) mice). The aim of the current study was to dissect how selective ablation of glucocorticoid signaling in the noradrenergic system influences the previously reported depressive-like phenotype and whether it might be linked to neurotrophic alterations or secondary changes in the serotonergic system. We demonstrated that selective depletion of GRs enhances brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in female but not male GR(DBHCre) mice on both the mRNA and protein levels. The possible impact of the mutation on brain noradrenergic and serotonergic systems was addressed by investigating the tissue neurotransmitter levels under basal conditions and after acute restraint stress. The findings indicated a stress-provoked differential response in tissue noradrenaline content in the GR(DBHCre) female but not male mutant mice. An analogous gender-specific effect was identified in the diminished content of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, the main metabolite of serotonin, in the prefrontal cortex, which suggests down-regulation of this monoamine system in female GR(DBHCre) mice. The lack of GR also resulted in an up-regulation of alpha2-adrenergic receptor (α2-AR) density in the female but not male mutants in the locus coeruleus. We have also confirmed the utility of the investigated model in pharmacological studies, which demonstrates that the depressive-like phenotype of GR(DBHCre) female mice can be reversed by antidepressant treatment with desipramine or fluoxetine, with the latter drug evoking more pronounced effects. Overall, our study validates the use of female GR(DBHCre) mice as an interesting and novel genetic tool for the investigation of the cross-connected mechanisms of depression that is not only based on behavioral phenotypes.

  4. Neuronal survival in the brain: neuron type-specific mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pfisterer, Ulrich; Khodosevich, Konstantin

    2017-03-02

    Neurogenic regions of mammalian brain produce many more neurons that will eventually survive and reach a mature stage. Developmental cell death affects both embryonically produced immature neurons and those immature neurons that are generated in regions of adult neurogenesis. Removal of substantial numbers of neurons that are not yet completely integrated into the local circuits helps to ensure that maturation and homeostatic function of neuronal networks in the brain proceed correctly. External signals from brain microenvironment together with intrinsic signaling pathways determine whether a particular neuron will die. To accommodate this signaling, immature neurons in the brain express a number of transmembrane factors as well as intracellular signaling molecules that will regulate the cell survival/death decision, and many of these factors cease being expressed upon neuronal maturation. Furthermore, pro-survival factors and intracellular responses depend on the type of neuron and region of the brain. Thus, in addition to some common neuronal pro-survival signaling, different types of neurons possess a variety of 'neuron type-specific' pro-survival constituents that might help them to adapt for survival in a certain brain region. This review focuses on how immature neurons survive during normal and impaired brain development, both in the embryonic/neonatal brain and in brain regions associated with adult neurogenesis, and emphasizes neuron type-specific mechanisms that help to survive for various types of immature neurons. Importantly, we mainly focus on in vivo data to describe neuronal survival specifically in the brain, without extrapolating data obtained in the PNS or spinal cord, and thus emphasize the influence of the complex brain environment on neuronal survival during development.

  5. Inward rectifier potassium (Kir) current in dopaminergic periglomerular neurons of the mouse olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Borin, Mirta; Fogli Iseppe, Alex; Pignatelli, Angela; Belluzzi, Ottorino

    2014-01-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) periglomerular (PG) neurons are critically placed at the entry of the bulbar circuitry, directly in contact with both the terminals of olfactory sensory neurons and the apical dendrites of projection neurons; they are autorhythmic and are the target of numerous terminals releasing a variety of neurotransmitters. Despite the centrality of their position, suggesting a critical role in the sensory processing, their properties -and consequently their function- remain elusive. The current mediated by inward rectifier potassium (Kir) channels in DA-PG cells was recorded by adopting the perforated-patch configuration in thin slices; IKir could be distinguished from the hyperpolarization-activated current (I h ) by showing full activation in <10 ms, no inactivation, suppression by Ba(2+) in a typical voltage-dependent manner (IC50 208 μM) and reversal potential nearly coincident with EK. Ba(2+) (2 mM) induces a large depolarization of DA-PG cells, paralleled by an increase of the input resistance, leading to a block of the spontaneous activity, but the Kir current is not an essential component of the pacemaker machinery. The Kir current is negatively modulated by intracellular cAMP, as shown by a decrease of its amplitude induced by forskolin or 8Br-cAMP. We have also tested the neuromodulatory effects of the activation of several metabotropic receptors known to be present on these cells, showing that the current can be modulated by a multiplicity of pathways, whose activation in some case increases the amplitude of the current, as can be observed with agonists of D2, muscarinic, and GABAA receptors, whereas in other cases has the opposite effect, as it can be observed with agonists of α1 noradrenergic, 5-HT and histamine receptors. These characteristics of the Kir currents provide the basis for an unexpected plasticity of DA-PG cell function, making them potentially capable to reconfigure the bulbar network to allow a better flexibility.

  6. Nanoresolution radiology of neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, H. R.; Chen, S. T.; Chu, Y. S.; Conley, R.; Bouet, N.; Chien, C. C.; Chen, H. H.; Lin, C. H.; Tung, H. T.; Chen, Y. S.; Margaritondo, G.; Je, J. H.; Hwu, Y.

    2012-06-01

    We report recent advances in hard-x-ray optics—including record spatial resolution—and in staining techniques that enable synchrotron microradiology to produce neurobiology images of quality comparable to electron and visible microscopy. In addition, microradiology offers excellent penetration and effective three-dimensional detection as required for many neuron studies. Our tests include tomographic reconstruction based on projection image sets.

  7. The Reliability of Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bullock, Theodore Holmes

    1970-01-01

    The prevalent probabilistic view is virtually untestable; it remains a plausible belief. The cases usually cited can not be taken as evidence for it. Several grounds for this conclusion are developed. Three issues are distinguished in an attempt to clarify a murky debate: (a) the utility of probabilistic methods in data reduction, (b) the value of models that assume indeterminacy, and (c) the validity of the inference that the nervous system is largely indeterministic at the neuronal level. No exception is taken to the first two; the second is a private heuristic question. The third is the issue to which the assertion in the first two sentences is addressed. Of the two kinds of uncertainty, statistical mechanical (= practical unpredictability) as in a gas, and Heisenbergian indeterminancy, the first certainly exists, the second is moot at the neuronal level. It would contribute to discussion to recognize that neurons perform with a degree of reliability. Although unreliability is difficult to establish, to say nothing of measure, evidence that some neurons have a high degree of reliability, in both connections and activity is increasing greatly. An example is given from sternarchine electric fish. PMID:5462670

  8. Nanoresolution radiology of neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H. R.; Chen, S. T.; Chu, Y. S.; Conley, R.; Bouet, N.; Chien, C. C.; Chen, H. H.; Lin, C. H.; Tung, H. T.; Chen, Y. S.; Margaritondo, G.; Je, J. H.; Hwu, Y.

    2012-05-29

    We report recent advances in hard-x-ray optics—including record spatial resolution—and in staining techniques that enable synchrotron microradiology to produce neurobiology images of quality comparable to electron and visible microscopy. In addition, microradiology offers excellent penetration and effective three-dimensional detection as required for many neuron studies. Our tests include tomographic reconstruction based on projection image sets.

  9. Nanoresolution radiology of neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.R.; Chen, S.T.; Chu, Y.S.; Conley, R.; Bouet, N.; Chien, C.C.; Chen, H.H.; Lin, C.H.; Tung, H.T.; Chen, Y.S.; Margaritondo, G.; Je, J.H.; Hwu, Y.

    2013-04-08

    We report recent advances in hard-x-ray optics - including record spatial resolution - and in staining techniques that enable synchrotron microradiology to produce neurobiology images of quality comparable to electron and visible microscopy. In addition, microradiology offers excellent penetration and effective three-dimensional detection as required for many neuron studies. Our tests include tomographic reconstruction based on projection image sets.

  10. Clustered protocadherins and neuronal diversity.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Teruyoshi; Yagi, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal diversity is a fundamental requirement for complex neuronal networks and brain function. The clustered protocadherin (Pcdh) family possesses several characteristic features that are important for the molecular basis of neuronal diversity. Clustered Pcdhs are expressed predominantly in the central nervous system, in neurites, growth cones, and synapses. They consist of about 60 isoforms, and their expression is stochastically and combinatorially regulated in individual neurons. The multiple clustered Pcdhs expressed in individual neurons form heteromultimeric protein complexes that exhibit homophilic adhesion properties. Theoretically, the clustered Pcdhs could generate more than 3×10(10) possible variations in each neuron and 12,720 types of cis-tetramers per neuron. The clustered Pcdhs are important for normal neuronal development. The clustered Pcdh genes have also attracted attention as a target for epigenetic regulation.

  11. Hypersensitivity of prediabetic JCR:LA-cp rats to fine airborne combustion particle-induced direct and noradrenergic-mediated vascular contraction.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Spencer D; Dreher, Kevin L; Kelly, Sandra E; Russell, James C

    2006-04-01

    Particulate matter with mean aerodynamic diameter < or =2.5 microm (PM(2.5)), from diesel exhaust, coal or residual oil burning, and from industrial plants, is a significant component of airborne pollution. Type 2 diabetes is associated with enhanced risk of adverse cardiovascular events following exposure to PM(2.5). Particle properties, sources, and pathophysiological mechanisms responsible are unknown. We studied effects of residual oil fly ash (ROFA) from a large U.S. powerplant on vascular function in a prediabetic, hyperinsulinemic model, the JCR:LA-cp rat. Residual oil fly ash leachate (ROFA-L) was studied using aortic rings from young-adult, obese, insulin-resistant rats and lean normal rats in vitro. Contractile response to phenylephrine and relaxant response to acetylcholine were determined in the presence and absence of L-NAME (N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester). In a separate series of studies, the direct contractile effects of ROFA-L on repeated exposure were determined. ROFA-L (12.5 microg ml(-1)) increased phenylephrine-mediated contraction in obese (p < 0.05), but not in lean rat aortae, with the effect being exacerbated by L-NAME, and it reduced acetylcholine-mediated relaxation of both obese and lean aortae (p < 0.0001). Initial exposure of aortae to ROFA-L caused a small contractile response (<0.05 g), which was markedly greater on second exposure in the obese (approximately 0.6 g, p < 0.0001) aortae but marginal in lean (approximately 0.1 g) aortae. Our data demonstrate that bioavailable constituents of oil combustion particles enhance noradrenergic-mediated vascular contraction, impair endothelium-mediated relaxation, and induce direct vasocontraction in prediabetic rats. These observations provide the first direct evidence of the causal properties of PM(2.5) and identify the pathophysiological role of the early prediabetic state in susceptibility to environmentally induced cardiovascular disease. These are important implications for public

  12. Neuronal cell cycle: the neuron itself and its circumstances.

    PubMed

    Frade, José M; Ovejero-Benito, María C

    2015-01-01

    Neurons are usually regarded as postmitotic cells that undergo apoptosis in response to cell cycle reactivation. Nevertheless, recent evidence indicates the existence of a defined developmental program that induces DNA replication in specific populations of neurons, which remain in a tetraploid state for the rest of their adult life. Similarly, de novo neuronal tetraploidization has also been described in the adult brain as an early hallmark of neurodegeneration. The aim of this review is to integrate these recent developments in the context of cell cycle regulation and apoptotic cell death in neurons. We conclude that a variety of mechanisms exists in neuronal cells for G1/S and G2/M checkpoint regulation. These mechanisms, which are connected with the apoptotic machinery, can be modulated by environmental signals and the neuronal phenotype itself, thus resulting in a variety of outcomes ranging from cell death at the G1/S checkpoint to full proliferation of differentiated neurons.

  13. Add neurons, subtract anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Kheirbek, Mazen A.; Hen, René

    2014-01-01

    IN BRIEF To keep memories from becoming jumbled, the brain must encode the distinct features of events and situations in a way that allows them to be distinguished from one another—a process called pattern separation. Pattern separation enables us to distinguish dangerous situations from similar ones that pose no risk. People with defects in this ability may be prone to anxiety disorders. The process occurs in one of the two regions of the brain that generate neurons throughout life. These fledgling cells seem to be critical to pattern separation. Interventions that specifically boost the ranks of rookie neurons could provide new ways to regulate mood and possibly treat conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder. PMID:24974712

  14. Micropatterning neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Hardelauf, Heike; Waide, Sarah; Sisnaiske, Julia; Jacob, Peter; Hausherr, Vanessa; Schöbel, Nicole; Janasek, Dirk; van Thriel, Christoph; West, Jonathan

    2014-07-07

    Spatially organised neuronal networks have wide reaching applications, including fundamental research, toxicology testing, pharmaceutical screening and the realisation of neuronal implant interfaces. Despite the large number of methods catalogued in the literature there remains the need to identify a method that delivers high pattern compliance, long-term stability and is widely accessible to neuroscientists. In this comparative study, aminated (polylysine/polyornithine and aminosilanes) and cytophobic (poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and methylated) material contrasts were evaluated. Backfilling plasma stencilled PEGylated substrates with polylysine does not produce good material contrasts, whereas polylysine patterned on methylated substrates becomes mobilised by agents in the cell culture media which results in rapid pattern decay. Aminosilanes, polylysine substitutes, are prone to hydrolysis and the chemistries prove challenging to master. Instead, the stable coupling between polylysine and PLL-g-PEG can be exploited: Microcontact printing polylysine onto a PLL-g-PEG coated glass substrate provides a simple means to produce microstructured networks of primary neurons that have superior pattern compliance during long term (>1 month) culture.

  15. Parvalbumin+ Neurons and Npas1+ Neurons Are Distinct Neuron Classes in the Mouse External Globus Pallidus

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Vivian M.; Hegeman, Daniel J.; Cui, Qiaoling; Kelver, Daniel A.; Fiske, Michael P.; Glajch, Kelly E.; Pitt, Jason E.; Huang, Tina Y.; Justice, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that pathological activity of the external globus pallidus (GPe), a nucleus in the basal ganglia, contributes to the motor symptoms of a variety of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Recent studies have challenged the idea that the GPe comprises a single, homogenous population of neurons that serves as a simple relay in the indirect pathway. However, we still lack a full understanding of the diversity of the neurons that make up the GPe. Specifically, a more precise classification scheme is needed to better describe the fundamental biology and function of different GPe neuron classes. To this end, we generated a novel multicistronic BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) transgenic mouse line under the regulatory elements of the Npas1 gene. Using a combinatorial transgenic and immunohistochemical approach, we discovered that parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons in the GPe represent two nonoverlapping cell classes, amounting to 55% and 27% of the total GPe neuron population, respectively. These two genetically identified cell classes projected primarily to the subthalamic nucleus and to the striatum, respectively. Additionally, parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons were distinct in their autonomous and driven firing characteristics, their expression of intrinsic ion conductances, and their responsiveness to chronic 6-hydroxydopamine lesion. In summary, our data argue that parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons are two distinct functional classes of GPe neurons. This work revises our understanding of the GPe, and provides the foundation for future studies of its function and dysfunction. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Until recently, the heterogeneity of the constituent neurons within the external globus pallidus (GPe) was not fully appreciated. We addressed this knowledge gap by discovering two principal GPe neuron classes, which were identified by their nonoverlapping

  16. Biphasic Effects of α-Asarone on Immobility in the Tail Suspension Test: Evidence for the Involvement of the Noradrenergic and Serotonergic Systems in Its Antidepressant-Like Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chellian, Ranjithkumar; Pandy, Vijayapandi; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2016-01-01

    Alpha (α)-asarone is one of the main psychoactive compounds, present in Acorus species. Evidence suggests that the α-asarone possess an antidepressant-like activity in mice. However, the exact dose-dependent effect of α-asarone and mechanism(s) involved in the antidepressant-like activity are not clear. The present study aimed to investigate the dose-dependent effect of α-asarone and the underlining mechanism(s) involved in the antidepressant-like activity of α-asarone in the mouse model of tail suspension test (TST). In this study, the acute effect of α-asarone per se at different doses (10–100 mg/kg, i.p.) on immobility in the TST was studied. Additionally, the possible mechanism(s) involved in the antidepressant-like effect of α-asarone was studied using its interaction with noradrenergic and serotonergic neuromodulators in the TST. The present results reveal that the acute treatment of α-asarone elicited biphasic responses on immobility such that the duration of the immobility time is significantly reduced at lower doses (15 and 20 mg/kg, i.p.) but increased at higher doses (50 and 100 mg/kg, i.p.) in the TST. Besides, α-asarone at higher doses (50 and 100 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly decreased the spontaneous locomotor activity. Moreover, pretreatment of mice with noradrenergic neuromodulators such as AMPT (100 mg/kg, i.p., a catecholamine synthesis inhibitor), prazosin (1 mg/kg, i.p., an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist), yohimbine (1 mg/kg, i.p., an α2-adrenoceptor antagonist) and with serotonergic neuromodulators such as PCPA (100 mg/kg, i.p., once daily for four consecutive days, a serotonin synthesis inhibitor,) and WAY100635 (0.1 mg/kg, s.c., a selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist) significantly reversed the anti-immobility effect of α-asarone (20 mg/kg, i.p.). Taken together, our results suggest that the acute treatment with α-asarone elicited biphasic actions in the TST in which antidepressant-like effect was seen at relatively lower doses (15

  17. Interactions of neurons with topographic nano cues affect branching morphology mimicking neuron-neuron interactions.

    PubMed

    Baranes, Koby; Kollmar, Davida; Chejanovsky, Nathan; Sharoni, Amos; Shefi, Orit

    2012-08-01

    We study the effect of topographic nano-cues on neuronal growth-morphology using invertebrate neurons in culture. We use photolithography to fabricate substrates with repeatable line-pattern ridges of nano-scale heights of 10-150 nm. We plate leech neurons atop the patterned-substrates and compare their growth pattern to neurons plated atop non-patterned substrates. The model system allows us the analysis of single neurite-single ridge interactions. The use of high resolution electron microscopy reveals small filopodia processes that attach to the line-pattern ridges. These fine processes, that cannot be detected in light microscopy, add anchoring sites onto the side of the ridges, thus additional physical support. These interactions of the neuronal process dominantly affect the neuronal growth direction. We analyze the response of the entire neuronal branching tree to the patterned substrates and find significant effect on the growth patterns compared to non-patterned substrates. Moreover, interactions with the nano-cues trigger a growth strategy similarly to interactions with other neuronal cells, as reflected in their morphometric parameters. The number of branches and the number of neurites originating from the soma decrease following the interaction demonstrating a tendency to a more simplified neuronal branching tree. The effect of the nano-cues on the neuronal function deserves further investigation and will strengthen our understanding of the interplay between function and form.

  18. Aging and Neuronal Vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Mattson, Mark P.; Magnus, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Everyone ages, but only some will acquire a neurodegenerative disorder in the process. Disease might occur when cells fail to respond adaptively to age-related increases in oxidative, metabolic and ionic stress resulting in excessive accumulation of damaged proteins, DNA and membranes. Determinants of neuronal vulnerability might include cell size and location, metabolism of disease-specific proteins, and repertoire of signal transduction pathways and stress resistance mechanisms. Emerging evidence on protein interaction networks that monitor and respond to the normal aging process suggests that successful neural aging is possible for most, but also cautions that cures for neurodegenerative disorders are unlikely in the near future. PMID:16552414

  19. DNA Damage Induced Neuronal Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    Experiments are proposed to examine the molecular mechanism by which mustard chemical warfare agents induce neuronal cell death . DNA damage is the...proposed underlying mechanism of mustard-induced neuronal cell death . We propose a novel research strategy to test this hypothesis by using mice with...perturbed DNA repair to explore the relationship between mustard-induced DNA damage and neuronal cell death . Initial in vitro studies (Years 1, 2 & 3

  20. [Neuronal plasticity and gene expression].

    PubMed

    Sokolova, O O; Shtark, M B; Lisachev, P D

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal plasticity--a fundamental feature of brain--provides adequate interactions with dynamic environment. One of the most deeply investigated forms of the neuronal plasticity is a long-term potentiation (LTP)--a phenomenon underlying learning and memory. Signal paths activated during LTP converge into the nuclear of the neuron, giving rise to launch of the molecular-genetic programs, which mediate structural and functional remodeling of synapses. In the review data concerning involvement of multilevel gene expression into plastic change under neuronal activation are summarized.

  1. The straintronic spin-neuron.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Ayan K; Atulasimha, Jayasimha; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo

    2015-07-17

    In artificial neural networks, neurons are usually implemented with highly dissipative CMOS-based operational amplifiers. A more energy-efficient implementation is a 'spin-neuron' realized with a magneto-tunneling junction (MTJ) that is switched with a spin-polarized current (representing weighted sum of input currents) that either delivers a spin transfer torque or induces domain wall motion in the soft layer of the MTJ to mimic neuron firing. Here, we propose and analyze a different type of spin-neuron in which the soft layer of the MTJ is switched with mechanical strain generated by a voltage (representing weighted sum of input voltages) and term it straintronic spin-neuron. It dissipates orders of magnitude less energy in threshold operations than the traditional current-driven spin neuron at 0 K temperature and may even be faster. We have also studied the room-temperature firing behaviors of both types of spin neurons and find that thermal noise degrades the performance of both types, but the current-driven type is degraded much more than the straintronic type if both are optimized for maximum energy-efficiency. On the other hand, if both are designed to have the same level of thermal degradation, then the current-driven version will dissipate orders of magnitude more energy than the straintronic version. Thus, the straintronic spin-neuron is superior to current-driven spin neurons.

  2. The biophysics of neuronal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franze, Kristian; Guck, Jochen

    2010-09-01

    For a long time, neuroscience has focused on biochemical, molecular biological and electrophysiological aspects of neuronal physiology and pathology. However, there is a growing body of evidence indicating the importance of physical stimuli for neuronal growth and development. In this review we briefly summarize the historical background of neurobiophysics and give an overview over the current understanding of neuronal growth from a physics perspective. We show how biophysics has so far contributed to a better understanding of neuronal growth and discuss current inconsistencies. Finally, we speculate how biophysics may contribute to the successful treatment of lesions to the central nervous system, which have been considered incurable until very recently.

  3. Hippocampal neurons in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Heckers, S.; Konradi, C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The hippocampus is crucial for normal brain function, especially for the encoding and retrieval of multimodal sensory information. Neuropsychiatric disorders such as temporal lobe epilepsy, amnesia, and the dementias are associated with structural and functional abnormalities of specific hippocampal neurons. More recently we have also found evidence for a role of the hippocampus in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The most consistent finding is a subtle, yet significant volume difference in schizophrenia. Here we review the cellular and molecular basis of smaller hippocampal volume in schizophrenia. In contrast to neurodegenerative disorders, total hippocampal cell number is not markedly decreased in schizophrenia. However, the intriguing finding of a selective loss of hippocampal inter-neurons deserves further study. Two neurotransmitter receptors, the GABAA and AMPA/kainate glutamate receptors, appear to be abnormal, whereas changes of the NMDA glutamate receptor are less robust. The expression of several genes, including those related to the GABAergic system, neurodevelopment, and synaptic function, is decreased in schizophrenia. Taken together, recent studies of hippocampal cell number, protein expression, and gene regulation point towards an abnormality of hippocampal architecture in schizophrenia. PMID:12111476

  4. Angiotensin II AT1 receptors mediate neuronal sensitization and sustained blood pressure response induced by a single injection of amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Marchese, N A; Paz, M C; Caeiro, X; Dadam, F M; Baiardi, G; Perez, M F; Bregonzio, C

    2017-01-06

    A single exposure to amphetamine induces neurochemical sensitization in striatal areas. The neuropeptide angiotensin II, through AT1 receptors (AT1-R) activation, is involved in these responses. However, amphetamine-induced alterations can be extended to extra-striatal areas involved in blood pressure control and their physiological outcomes. Our aim for the present study was to analyze the possible role for AT1-R in these events using a two-injection protocol and to further characterize the proposed AT1-R antagonism protocol. Central effect of orally administered AT1-R blocker (Candesartan, 3mg/kg p.o.×5days) in male Wistar rats was analyzed by spontaneous activity of neurons within locus coeruleus. In another group of animals pretreated with the AT1-R blocker or vehicle, sensitization was achieved by a single administration of amphetamine (5mg/kg i.p. - day 6) followed by a 3-week period off drug. On day 27, after receiving an amphetamine challenge (0.5mg/kg i.p.), we evaluated: (1) the sensitized c-Fos expression in locus coeruleus (LC), nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), caudal ventrolateral medulla (A1) and central amygdala (CeAmy); and (2) the blood pressure response. AT1-R blockade decreased LC neurons' spontaneous firing rate. Moreover, sensitized c-Fos immunoreactivity in TH+neurons was found in LC and NTS; and both responses were blunted by the AT1-R blocker pretreatment. Meanwhile, no differences were found neither in CeAmy nor A1. Sensitized blood pressure response was observed as sustained changes in mean arterial pressure and was effectively prevented by AT1-R blockade. Our results extend AT1-R role in amphetamine-induced sensitization over noradrenergic nuclei and their cardiovascular output.

  5. Annexin A2 Regulates TRPA1-Dependent Nociception

    PubMed Central

    Avenali, Luca; Narayanan, Pratibha; Rouwette, Tom; Cervellini, Ilaria; Sereda, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) channel is essential for vertebrate pain. Even though TRPA1 activation by ligands has been studied extensively, the molecular machinery regulating TRPA1 is only poorly understood. Using an unbiased proteomics-based approach we uncovered the physical association of Annexin A2 (AnxA2) with native TRPA1 in mouse sensory neurons. AnxA2 is enriched in a subpopulation of sensory neurons and coexpressed with TRPA1. Furthermore, we observe an increase of TRPA1 membrane levels in cultured sensory neurons from AnxA2-deficient mice. This is reflected by our calcium imaging experiments revealing higher responsiveness upon TRPA1 activation in AnxA2-deficient neurons. In vivo these findings are associated with enhanced nocifensive behaviors specifically in TRPA1-dependent paradigms of acute and inflammatory pain, while heat and mechanical sensitivity as well as TRPV1-mediated pain are preserved in AnxA2-deficient mice. Our results support a model whereby AnxA2 limits the availability of TRPA1 channels to regulate nociceptive signaling in vertebrates. PMID:25355205

  6. Annexin A2 regulates TRPA1-dependent nociception.

    PubMed

    Avenali, Luca; Narayanan, Pratibha; Rouwette, Tom; Cervellini, Ilaria; Sereda, Michael; Gomez-Varela, David; Schmidt, Manuela

    2014-10-29

    The transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) channel is essential for vertebrate pain. Even though TRPA1 activation by ligands has been studied extensively, the molecular machinery regulating TRPA1 is only poorly understood. Using an unbiased proteomics-based approach we uncovered the physical association of Annexin A2 (AnxA2) with native TRPA1 in mouse sensory neurons. AnxA2 is enriched in a subpopulation of sensory neurons and coexpressed with TRPA1. Furthermore, we observe an increase of TRPA1 membrane levels in cultured sensory neurons from AnxA2-deficient mice. This is reflected by our calcium imaging experiments revealing higher responsiveness upon TRPA1 activation in AnxA2-deficient neurons. In vivo these findings are associated with enhanced nocifensive behaviors specifically in TRPA1-dependent paradigms of acute and inflammatory pain, while heat and mechanical sensitivity as well as TRPV1-mediated pain are preserved in AnxA2-deficient mice. Our results support a model whereby AnxA2 limits the availability of TRPA1 channels to regulate nociceptive signaling in vertebrates.

  7. The Neuronal Ceroid-Lipofuscinoses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Michael J.; Rakheja, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    The neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCL's, Batten disease) represent a group of severe neurodegenerative diseases, which mostly present in childhood. The phenotypes are similar and include visual loss, seizures, loss of motor and cognitive function, and early death. At autopsy, there is massive neuronal loss with characteristic storage in…

  8. Synchronization by elastic neuronal latencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardi, Roni; Timor, Reut; Marom, Shimon; Abeles, Moshe; Kanter, Ido

    2013-01-01

    Psychological and physiological considerations entail that formation and functionality of neuronal cell assemblies depend upon synchronized repeated activation such as zero-lag synchronization. Several mechanisms for the emergence of this phenomenon have been suggested, including the global network quantity, the greatest common divisor of neuronal circuit delay loops. However, they require strict biological prerequisites such as precisely matched delays and connectivity, and synchronization is represented as a stationary mode of activity instead of a transient phenomenon. Here we show that the unavoidable increase in neuronal response latency to ongoing stimulation serves as a nonuniform gradual stretching of neuronal circuit delay loops. This apparent nuisance is revealed to be an essential mechanism in various types of neuronal time controllers, where synchronization emerges as a transient phenomenon and without predefined precisely matched synaptic delays. These findings are described in an experimental procedure where conditioned stimulations were enforced on a circuit of neurons embedded within a large-scale network of cortical cells in vitro, and are corroborated and extended by simulations of circuits composed of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with time-dependent latencies. These findings announce a cortical time scale for time controllers based on tens of microseconds stretching of neuronal circuit delay loops per spike. They call for a reexamination of the role of the temporal periodic mode in brain functionality using advanced in vitro and in vivo experiments.

  9. Neuronal avalanches and coherence potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plenz, D.

    2012-05-01

    The mammalian cortex consists of a vast network of weakly interacting excitable cells called neurons. Neurons must synchronize their activities in order to trigger activity in neighboring neurons. Moreover, interactions must be carefully regulated to remain weak (but not too weak) such that cascades of active neuronal groups avoid explosive growth yet allow for activity propagation over long-distances. Such a balance is robustly realized for neuronal avalanches, which are defined as cortical activity cascades that follow precise power laws. In experiments, scale-invariant neuronal avalanche dynamics have been observed during spontaneous cortical activity in isolated preparations in vitro as well as in the ongoing cortical activity of awake animals and in humans. Theory, models, and experiments suggest that neuronal avalanches are the signature of brain function near criticality at which the cortex optimally responds to inputs and maximizes its information capacity. Importantly, avalanche dynamics allow for the emergence of a subset of avalanches, the coherence potentials. They emerge when the synchronization of a local neuronal group exceeds a local threshold, at which the system spawns replicas of the local group activity at distant network sites. The functional importance of coherence potentials will be discussed in the context of propagating structures, such as gliders in balanced cellular automata. Gliders constitute local population dynamics that replicate in space after a finite number of generations and are thought to provide cellular automata with universal computation. Avalanches and coherence potentials are proposed to constitute a modern framework of cortical synchronization dynamics that underlies brain function.

  10. Cryopreservation of adherent neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wu; O'Shaughnessy, Thomas; Chang, Eddie

    2006-07-31

    Neuronal networks have been widely used for neurophysiology, drug discovery and toxicity testing. An essential prerequisite for future widespread application of neuronal networks is the development of efficient cryopreservation protocols to facilitate their storage and transportation. Here is the first report on cryopreservation of mammalian adherent neuronal networks. Dissociated spinal cord cells were attached to a poly-d-lysine/laminin surface and allowed to form neuronal networks. Adherent neuronal networks were embedded in a thin film of collagen gel and loaded with trehalose prior to transfer to a freezing medium containing DMSO, FBS and culture medium. This was followed by a slow rate of cooling to -80 degrees C for 24 h and then storage for up to 2 months in liquid nitrogen at -196 degrees C. The three components: DMSO, collagen gel entrapment and trehalose loading combined provided the highest post-thaw viability, relative to individual or two component protocols. The post-thaw cells with this protocol demonstrated similar neuronal and astrocytic markers and morphological structure as those detected in unfrozen cells. Fluorescent dye FM1-43 staining revealed active recycling of synaptic vesicles upon depolarizing stimulation in the post-thaw neuronal networks. These results suggest that a combination of DMSO, collagen gel entrapment and trehalose loading can significantly improve conventional slow-cooling methods in cryopreservation of adherent neuronal networks.

  11. Cell biology of neuronal endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Parton, R G; Dotti, C G

    1993-09-01

    Endocytosis is the process by which cells take in fluid and components of the plasma membrane. In this way cells obtain nutrients and trophic factors, retrieve membrane proteins for degradation, and sample their environment. In neuronal cells endocytosis is essential for the recycling of membrane after neurotransmitter release and plays a critical role during early developmental stages. Moreover, alterations of the endocytic pathway have been attributed a crucial role in the pathophysiology of certain neurological diseases. Although well characterized at the ultrastructural level, little is known of the dynamics and molecular organization of the neuronal endocytic pathways. In this respect most of our knowledge comes from studies of non-neuronal cells. In this review we will examine the endocytic pathways in neurons from a cell biological viewpoint by making comparisons with non-neuronal cells and in particular with another polarized cell, the epithelial cell.

  12. Phenotypic checkpoints regulate neuronal development.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Spitzer, Nicholas C

    2010-11-01

    Nervous system development proceeds by sequential gene expression mediated by cascades of transcription factors in parallel with sequences of patterned network activity driven by receptors and ion channels. These sequences are cell type- and developmental stage-dependent and modulated by paracrine actions of substances released by neurons and glia. How and to what extent these sequences interact to enable neuronal network development is not understood. Recent evidence demonstrates that CNS development requires intermediate stages of differentiation providing functional feedback that influences gene expression. We suggest that embryonic neuronal functions constitute a series of phenotypic checkpoint signatures; neurons failing to express these functions are delayed or developmentally arrested. Such checkpoints are likely to be a general feature of neuronal development and constitute presymptomatic signatures of neurological disorders when they go awry.

  13. [Neurons and values].

    PubMed

    Camps, Victoria

    2013-09-01

    This article examines the advances made by neuroscience in the attempt to find an answer to the question regarding the origin and foundation of moral judgements and of human behaviour in compliance with them. The conception of the brain as something dynamic and capable of adapting to the social and cultural surroundings is seen to be an important point for philosophy. At the same time, the complexity of ethical issues that cannot be reduced to observations based strictly on neurons alone also becomes quite apparent. Nevertheless, scientists and philosophers should get together and communicate with one another so as to be able to pose their questions with greater rigour and take advantage of each other's respective knowledge.

  14. Neuron's function revealed

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    There's a new way to explore biologys secrets. With a flash of light, scientists from the U.S. Department of Energys Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley zeroed in on the type of neural cell that controls swimming in larval zebrafish. Using innovative light-activated proteins and gene expression techniques, the scientists zapped several zebrafish with a pulse of light, and initiated a swimming action in a subset of fish that was traced back to the type of neuron that drives the side-to-side motion of their tail fins. The technique behind this needle-in-haystack search for the neural roots of a specific behavior could become a powerful way to learn how any biological system works. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/press-releases/2009/09/16/light-activated-protein/

  15. Comparison of independent screens on differentially vulnerable motor neurons reveals alpha-synuclein as a common modifier in motor neuron diseases.

    PubMed

    Kline, Rachel A; Kaifer, Kevin A; Osman, Erkan Y; Carella, Francesco; Tiberi, Ariana; Ross, Jolill; Pennetta, Giuseppa; Lorson, Christian L; Murray, Lyndsay M

    2017-03-31

    The term "motor neuron disease" encompasses a spectrum of disorders in which motor neurons are the primary pathological target. However, in both patients and animal models of these diseases, not all motor neurons are equally vulnerable, in that while some motor neurons are lost very early in disease, others remain comparatively intact, even at late stages. This creates a valuable system to investigate the factors that regulate motor neuron vulnerability. In this study, we aim to use this experimental paradigm to identify potential transcriptional modifiers. We have compared the transcriptome of motor neurons from healthy wild-type mice, which are differentially vulnerable in the childhood motor neuron disease Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA), and have identified 910 transcriptional changes. We have compared this data set with published microarray data sets on other differentially vulnerable motor neurons. These neurons were differentially vulnerable in the adult onset motor neuron disease Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), but the screen was performed on the equivalent population of neurons from neurologically normal human, rat and mouse. This cross species comparison has generated a refined list of differentially expressed genes, including CELF5, Col5a2, PGEMN1, SNCA, Stmn1 and HOXa5, alongside a further enrichment for synaptic and axonal transcripts. As an in vivo validation, we demonstrate that the manipulation of a significant number of these transcripts can modify the neurodegenerative phenotype observed in a Drosophila line carrying an ALS causing mutation. Finally, we demonstrate that vector-mediated expression of alpha-synuclein (SNCA), a transcript decreased in selectively vulnerable motor neurons in all four screens, can extend life span, increase weight and decrease neuromuscular junction pathology in a mouse model of SMA. In summary, we have combined multiple data sets to identify transcripts, which are strong candidates for being phenotypic modifiers

  16. Multiplying with Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbiani, F.; Krapp, H.; Koch, C.; Laurent, G.

    1998-03-01

    LGMD and DCMD are a pair of identified neurons in the locust brain thought to be involved in visually triggered escape behavior. LGMD integrates visual inputs in its dendritic arbor, converts them into spikes transmitted in a 1:1 manner to DCMD which relays this information to motor centers. We measured the spike activity of DCMD during simulated object approach and observed that its peak occured prior to the expected collision. The time difference between peak activity and collision depended linearly on the ratio of object size to approach velocity, as expected if LGMD/DCMD were detecting the moment in time when the approaching object reaches a fixed angular threshold θ_thresh on the locust's retina. The response of LGMD/DCMD could be fitted by multiplying the angular velocity at which an approaching object is increasing in size over the retina, dot θ, with an exponential function of the object's angular size, θ: f(t) = g(dot θ(t-δ) e^-α θ(t-δ)) where g is a static non-linearity, α a constant related to the angular threshold detected by LGMD/DCMD (θ_thresh = arctan (2/α)) and δ denotes the lag of the neuronal response with respect to the stimulus. This suggests that LGMD/DCMD derives its angular threshold sensitivity by multiplying dot θ with an exponential of θ. A biophysical implementation would be through linear summation of excitatory and inhibitory inputs proportional to log(dot θ) and -α θ, followed by a conversion to spike rate according to the static non-linearity (g circ exp). We have performed several experiments to test this hypothesis.

  17. Neuronal cell lines as model dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Kathleen; Baillie, Gregory J

    2016-01-01

    Background Dorsal root ganglion neuron-derived immortal cell lines including ND7/23 and F-11 cells have been used extensively as in vitro model systems of native peripheral sensory neurons. However, while it is clear that some sensory neuron-specific receptors and ion channels are present in these cell lines, a systematic comparison of the molecular targets expressed by these cell lines with those expressed in intact peripheral neurons is lacking. Results In this study, we examined the expression of RNA transcripts in the human neuroblastoma-derived cell line, SH-SY5Y, and two dorsal root ganglion hybridoma cell lines, F-11 and ND7/23, using Illumina next-generation sequencing, and compared the results with native whole murine dorsal root ganglions. The gene expression profiles of these three cell lines did not resemble any specific defined dorsal root ganglion subclass. The cell lines lacked many markers for nociceptive sensory neurons, such as the Transient receptor potential V1 gene, but expressed markers for both myelinated and unmyelinated neurons. Global gene ontology analysis on whole dorsal root ganglions and cell lines showed similar enrichment of biological process terms across all samples. Conclusions This paper provides insights into the receptor repertoire expressed in common dorsal root ganglion neuron-derived cell lines compared with whole murine dorsal root ganglions, and illustrates the limits and potentials of these cell lines as tools for neuropharmacological exploration. PMID:27130590

  18. Antidepressant-like effects of 3,6'-disinapoyl sucrose on hippocampal neuronal plasticity and neurotrophic signal pathway in chronically mild stressed rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuan; Liao, Hong-Bo; Dai-Hong, Guo; Liu, Ping; Wang, Yu-Yu; Rahman, Khalid

    2010-02-01

    Recent studies suggest that the behavioral effects of chronic antidepressant treatment are mediated by stimulation of hippocampal neuronal plasticity and neurogenesis. The present study was designed to examine the effects of 3,6'-disinapoyl sucrose (DISS), a bioactive component of Polygala tenuifolia Willd, on the expressions of four plasticity-associated genes: cell adhesion molecule L1 (CAM-L1), laminin, cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in hippocampus, all of which are involved in neuronal plasticity and neurite outgrowth. We confirmed that chronic stress in rats caused a reduction in sensitivity to reward (sucrose consumption) and a decrease in mRNA levels of CAM-L1, laminin, and BDNF, together with a decrease in protein levels of phosphorylated CREB and BDNF. Repeated administration of DISS for 21 days at doses of 5, 10 and 20mg/kg reversed stress-induced alterations in sucrose consumption and these target mRNA and protein levels. In conclusion, increased expressions in the hippocampus of three noradrenergic-regulated plasticity genes and one neurotrophic factor may be one of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the antidepressant action of DISS in chronic mild stress (CMS) rats.

  19. Analgesic Effects of Bee Venom Derived Phospholipase A2 in a Mouse Model of Oxaliplatin-Induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongxing; Lee, Younju; Kim, Woojin; Lee, Kyungjin; Bae, Hyunsu; Kim, Sun Kwang

    2015-01-01

    A single infusion of oxaliplatin, which is widely used to treat metastatic colorectal cancer, induces specific sensory neurotoxicity signs that are triggered or aggravated when exposed to cold or mechanical stimuli. Bee Venom (BV) has been traditionally used in Korea to treat various pain symptoms. Our recent study demonstrated that BV alleviates oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia in rats, via noradrenergic and serotonergic analgesic pathways. In this study, we have further investigated whether BV derived phospholipase A2 (bvPLA2) attenuates oxaliplatin-induced cold and mechanical allodynia in mice and its mechanism. The behavioral signs of cold and mechanical allodynia were evaluated by acetone and a von Frey hair test on the hind paw, respectively. The significant allodynia signs were observed from one day after an oxaliplatin injection (6 mg/kg, i.p.). Daily administration of bvPLA2 (0.2 mg/kg, i.p.) for five consecutive days markedly attenuated cold and mechanical allodynia, which was more potent than the effect of BV (1 mg/kg, i.p.). The depletion of noradrenaline by an injection of N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride (DSP4, 50 mg/kg, i.p.) blocked the analgesic effect of bvPLA2, whereas the depletion of serotonin by injecting DL-p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA, 150 mg/kg, i.p.) for three successive days did not. Furthermore, idazoxan (α2-adrenegic receptor antagonist, 1 mg/kg, i.p.) completely blocked bvPLA2-induced anti-allodynic action, whereas prazosin (α1-adrenegic antagonist, 10 mg/kg, i.p.) did not. These results suggest that bvPLA2 treatment strongly alleviates oxaliplatin-induced acute cold and mechanical allodynia in mice through the activation of the noradrenergic system, via α2-adrenegic receptors, but not via the serotonergic system. PMID:26131771

  20. The Chandelier Neuron in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Markers of GABA neurotransmission between chandelier neurons and their synaptic targets, the axon initial segment (AIS) of pyramidal neurons, are altered in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) of subjects with schizophrenia. For example, immunoreactivity for the GABA membrane transporter (GAT1) is decreased in presynaptic chandelier neuron axon terminals, whereas immunoreactivity for the GABAA receptor α2 subunit is increased in postsynaptic AIS. These alterations are most marked in cortical layers 2–3. In addition, other determinants of the function of chandelier cell-pyramidal neuron synapses, such as ankyrin-G (which regulates the recruitment of sodium channels to the AIS), are also selectively altered in superficial layer pyramidal neurons in subjects with schizophrenia. Each of these components of chandelier cell-pyramidal neuron connectivity exhibits distinctive developmental trajectories in the primate DLPFC, suggesting that disturbances in these trajectories could contribute to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Recent findings that inputs from neocortical chandelier neurons are excitatory provide new ideas about the role of this circuitry in the pathophysiology of cortical dysfunction in schizophrenia. PMID:21154915

  1. The chandelier neuron in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lewis, David A

    2011-01-01

    Markers of GABA neurotransmission between chandelier neurons and their synaptic targets, the axon initial segment (AIS) of pyramidal neurons, are altered in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) of subjects with schizophrenia. For example, immunoreactivity for the GABA membrane transporter (GAT1) is decreased in presynaptic chandelier neuron axon terminals, whereas immunoreactivity for the GABA(A) receptor α2 subunit is increased in postsynaptic AIS. These alterations are most marked in cortical layers 2-3. In addition, other determinants of the function of chandelier cell-pyramidal neuron synapses, such as ankyrin-G (which regulates the recruitment of sodium channels to the AIS), are also selectively altered in superficial layer pyramidal neurons in subjects with schizophrenia. Each of these components of chandelier cell-pyramidal neuron connectivity exhibits distinctive developmental trajectories in the primate DLPFC, suggesting that disturbances in these trajectories could contribute to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Recent findings that inputs from neocortical chandelier neurons are excitatory provide new ideas about the role of this circuitry in the pathophysiology of cortical dysfunction in schizophrenia.

  2. Exposure to advertisement calls of reproductive competitors activates vocal-acoustic and catecholaminergic neurons in the plainfin midshipman fish, Porichthys notatus.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Christopher L; Timothy, Miky; Kim, D Spencer; Bhandiwad, Ashwin A; Mohr, Robert A; Sisneros, Joseph A; Forlano, Paul M

    2013-01-01

    While the neural circuitry and physiology of the auditory system is well studied among vertebrates, far less is known about how the auditory system interacts with other neural substrates to mediate behavioral responses to social acoustic signals. One species that has been the subject of intensive neuroethological investigation with regard to the production and perception of social acoustic signals is the plainfin midshipman fish, Porichthys notatus, in part because acoustic communication is essential to their reproductive behavior. Nesting male midshipman vocally court females by producing a long duration advertisement call. Females localize males by their advertisement call, spawn and deposit all their eggs in their mate's nest. As multiple courting males establish nests in close proximity to one another, the perception of another male's call may modulate individual calling behavior in competition for females. We tested the hypothesis that nesting males exposed to advertisement calls of other males would show elevated neural activity in auditory and vocal-acoustic brain centers as well as differential activation of catecholaminergic neurons compared to males exposed only to ambient noise. Experimental brains were then double labeled by immunofluorescence (-ir) for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), an enzyme necessary for catecholamine synthesis, and cFos, an immediate-early gene product used as a marker for neural activation. Males exposed to other advertisement calls showed a significantly greater percentage of TH-ir cells colocalized with cFos-ir in the noradrenergic locus coeruleus and the dopaminergic periventricular posterior tuberculum, as well as increased numbers of cFos-ir neurons in several levels of the auditory and vocal-acoustic pathway. Increased activation of catecholaminergic neurons may serve to coordinate appropriate behavioral responses to male competitors. Additionally, these results implicate a role for specific catecholaminergic neuronal groups in

  3. Long-term estradiol-17β administration reduces population of neurons in the sympathetic chain ganglia supplying the ovary in adult gilts.

    PubMed

    Koszykowska, Marlena; Całka, Jarosław; Gańko, Marta; Jana, Barbara

    2011-08-01

    the number of perikarya expressing ERs subtype α and β, and (7) decreased the total number of the intraganglionic nerve fibers containing DβH and/or NPY. These results show that long-term E(2) treatment of adult gilts down-regulates the population of both noradrenergic and ERs expressing the SChG ovary supplying neurons. Our findings suggest also that elevated E(2) levels that occur during pathological states may regulate gonadal function(s) by affecting ovary supplying neurons.

  4. Dopaminergic regulation of orexin neurons.

    PubMed

    Bubser, Michael; Fadel, Jim R; Jackson, Lela L; Meador-Woodruff, James H; Jing, Deqiang; Deutch, Ariel Y

    2005-06-01

    Orexin/hypocretin neurons in the lateral hypothalamus and adjacent perifornical area (LH/PFA) innervate midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons that project to corticolimbic sites and subserve psychostimulant-induced locomotor activity. However, it is not known whether dopamine neurons in turn regulate the activity of orexin cells. We examined the ability of dopamine agonists to activate orexin neurons in the rat, as reflected by induction of Fos. The mixed dopamine agonist apomorphine increased Fos expression in orexin cells, with a greater effect on orexin neurons located medial to the fornix. Both the selective D1-like agonist, A-77636, and the D2-like agonist, quinpirole, also induced Fos in orexin cells, suggesting that stimulation of either receptor subtype is sufficient to activate orexin neurons. Consistent with this finding, combined SCH 23390 (D1 antagonist)-haloperidol (D2 antagonist) pretreatment blocked apomorphine-induced activation of medial as well as lateral orexin neurons; in contrast, pretreatment with either the D1-like or D2-like antagonists alone did not attenuate apomorphine-induced activation of medial orexin cells. In situ hybridization histochemistry revealed that LH/PFA cells rarely express mRNAs encoding dopamine receptors, suggesting that orexin cells are transsynaptically activated by apomorphine. We therefore lesioned the nucleus accumbens, a site known to regulate orexin cells, but this treatment did not alter apomorphine-elicited activation of medial or lateral orexin neurons. Interestingly, apomorphine failed to activate orexin cells in isoflurane-anaesthetized animals. These data suggest that apomorphine-induced arousal but not accumbens-mediated hyperactivity is required for dopamine to transsynaptically activate orexin neurons.

  5. Ensemble Neuron Tracer for 3D Neuron Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Wei; Lee, Yu-Ching; Pradana, Hilmil; Zhou, Zhi; Peng, Hanchuan

    2017-02-09

    Tracing of neuron paths is important in neuroscience. Recent studies have shown that it is possible to segment and reconstruct three-dimensional morphology of axons and dendrites using fully automatic neuron tracing methods. A specific tracer may be better than others for a specific dataset, but another tracer could perform better for some other datasets. Ensemble of learners is an effective way to improve learning accuracy in machine learning. We developed automatic ensemble neuron tracers, which consistently perform well on 57 datasets of 5 species collected from 7 laboratories worldwide. Quantitative evaluation based on the data generated by human annotators shows that the proposed ensemble tracers are valuable for 3D neuron tracing and can be widely applied to different datasets.

  6. Neuronal pathway finding: from neurons to initial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Roscigno, Cecelia I

    2004-10-01

    Neuronal pathway finding is crucial for structured cellular organization and development of neural circuits within the nervous system. Neuronal pathway finding within the visual system has been extensively studied and therefore is used as a model to review existing knowledge regarding concepts of this developmental process. General principles of neuron pathway finding throughout the nervous system exist. Comprehension of these concepts guides neuroscience nurses in gaining an understanding of the developmental course of action, the implications of different anomalies, as well as the theoretical basis and nursing implications of some provocative new therapies being proposed to treat neurodegenerative diseases and neurologic injuries. These therapies have limitations in light of current ethical, developmental, and delivery modes and what is known about the development of neuronal pathways.

  7. Towards Automatic Classification of Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Armañanzas, Rubén; Ascoli, Giorgio A.

    2015-01-01

    The classification of neurons into types has been much debated since the inception of modern neuroscience. Recent experimental advances are accelerating the pace of data collection. The resulting information growth of morphological, physiological, and molecular properties encourages efforts to automate neuronal classification by powerful machine learning techniques. We review state-of-the-art analysis approaches and availability of suitable data and resources, highlighting prominent challenges and opportunities. The effective solution of the neuronal classification problem will require continuous development of computational methods, high-throughput data production, and systematic metadata organization to enable cross-lab integration. PMID:25765323

  8. A fish on the hunt, observed neuron by neuron

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    This three-dimensional microscopy image reveals an output neuron of the optic tectum lighting up in response to visual information from the retina. The scientists used this state-of-the-art imaging technology to learn how neurons in the optic tectum take visual information and convert it into an output that drives action. More information: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2010/10/29/zebrafish-vision/

  9. Npas1+ Pallidal Neurons Target Striatal Projection Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Glajch, Kelly E.; Kelver, Daniel A.; Hegeman, Daniel J.; Cui, Qiaoling; Xenias, Harry S.; Augustine, Elizabeth C.; Hernández, Vivian M.; Verma, Neha; Huang, Tina Y.; Luo, Minmin; Justice, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    Compelling evidence demonstrates that the external globus pallidus (GPe) plays a key role in processing sensorimotor information. An anatomical projection from the GPe to the dorsal striatum has been described for decades. However, the cellular target and functional impact of this projection remain unknown. Using cell-specific transgenic mice, modern monosynaptic tracing techniques, and optogenetics-based mapping, we discovered that GPe neurons provide inhibitory inputs to direct and indirect pathway striatal projection neurons (SPNs). Our results indicate that the GPe input to SPNs arises primarily from Npas1-expressing neurons and is strengthened in a chronic Parkinson's disease (PD) model. Alterations of the GPe-SPN input in a PD model argue for the critical position of this connection in regulating basal ganglia motor output and PD symptomatology. Finally, chemogenetic activation of Npas1-expressing GPe neurons suppresses motor output, arguing that strengthening of the GPe-SPN connection is maladaptive and may underlie the hypokinetic symptoms in PD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT An anatomical projection from the pallidum to the striatum has been described for decades, but little is known about its connectivity pattern. The authors dissect the presynaptic and postsynaptic neurons involved in this projection, and show its cell-specific remodeling and strengthening in parkinsonian mice. Chemogenetic activation of Npas1+ pallidal neurons that give rise to the principal pallidostriatal projection increases the time that the mice spend motionless. This argues that maladaptive strengthening of this connection underlies the paucity of volitional movements, which is a hallmark of Parkinson's disease. PMID:27194328

  10. Leukotriene receptor antagonists, LY293111 and ONO-1078, protect neurons from the sPLA2-IB-induced neuronal cell death independently of blocking their receptors.

    PubMed

    Yagami, Tatsurou; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Kohma, Hiromi

    2013-09-01

    In the ischemic brain, leukotrienes (LTs) are increased and their receptor antagonists protect neurons. However, it has not yet been sufficiently clarified how antagonists for LT receptors exhibit neuroprotective effects. In the present study, we evaluated protective effects of receptor antagonists for LTB4 (LY293111) and cysteinyl LTs (ONO-1078) in the primary culture of rat cortical neurons. The group IB secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2-IB)-induced neuronal cell death had been established as the in vitro model for cerebral ischemia. sPLA2-IB triggered the influx of Ca(2+) into neurons via L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel (L-VDCC). Subsequently, the enzyme produced eicosanoids including LTB4 before neuronal cell death. Neither administration of LTB4 nor cysteinyl LTs such as LTC4, LTD4 and LTE4 killed neurons. However, both LY293111 and ONO-1078 significantly prevented neurons from the neurotoxicity of sPLA2-IB, suggesting that the two LT receptor blockers protected neurons through alternative pathways beside LT receptors. An L-VDCC blocker does not only inhibit the influx of Ca(2+) into neurons but also rescues neurons from the sPLA2-IB-induced neuronal cell death. The two LT receptor antagonists also blocked the sPLA2-IB-induced Ca(2+) influx significantly. Thus, LTs exhibited no neurotoxicity, but their receptor antagonists protected neurons directly in the in vitro ischemic model. Furthermore, the suppression of L-VDCC appeared to be involved in the neuroprotective effects of LY293111 and ONO-1078 independent of blocking their receptors.

  11. Interaction and intelligence in living neuronal networks interfaced with moving robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudoh, Suguru N.; Taguchi, Takahisa

    2006-01-01

    Neurons form complex networks and it seems that the living neuronal network can perform certain type of information processing. We are interested in intelligence autonomously formed in vitro. The most important features of the two-dimensional culture neural network are that it is a system in which the information processing is autonomously carries out. We reported previously that the functional connections were dynamically modified by synaptic potentiation and the process may be required for reorganization of the functional group of neurons. Such neuron assemblies are critical for information processing in brain. Certain types of feedback stimulation caused suppression of spontaneous network electrical activities and drastic re-organization of functional connections between neurons, when these activities are initially almost synchronized. The result suggests that neurons in dissociated culture autonomously re-organized their functional neuronal networks interacted with their environment. The spatio-temporal pattern of activity in the networks may be a reflection of their external environment. We also interfaced the cultured neuronal network with moving robot. The planar microelectrodes can be used for detecting neuronal electrical signals from the living neuronal network cultured on a 2-dimensional electrode array. The speed of actuators of moving robot was determined by these detected signals. Our goal is reconstruction of the neural network, which can process "thinking" in the dissociated culture system.

  12. Neuronal boost to evolutionary dynamics.

    PubMed

    de Vladar, Harold P; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2015-12-06

    Standard evolutionary dynamics is limited by the constraints of the genetic system. A central message of evolutionary neurodynamics is that evolutionary dynamics in the brain can happen in a neuronal niche in real time, despite the fact that neurons do not reproduce. We show that Hebbian learning and structural synaptic plasticity broaden the capacity for informational replication and guided variability provided a neuronally plausible mechanism of replication is in place. The synergy between learning and selection is more efficient than the equivalent search by mutation selection. We also consider asymmetric landscapes and show that the learning weights become correlated with the fitness gradient. That is, the neuronal complexes learn the local properties of the fitness landscape, resulting in the generation of variability directed towards the direction of fitness increase, as if mutations in a genetic pool were drawn such that they would increase reproductive success. Evolution might thus be more efficient within evolved brains than among organisms out in the wild.

  13. Neuronal boost to evolutionary dynamics

    PubMed Central

    de Vladar, Harold P.; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2015-01-01

    Standard evolutionary dynamics is limited by the constraints of the genetic system. A central message of evolutionary neurodynamics is that evolutionary dynamics in the brain can happen in a neuronal niche in real time, despite the fact that neurons do not reproduce. We show that Hebbian learning and structural synaptic plasticity broaden the capacity for informational replication and guided variability provided a neuronally plausible mechanism of replication is in place. The synergy between learning and selection is more efficient than the equivalent search by mutation selection. We also consider asymmetric landscapes and show that the learning weights become correlated with the fitness gradient. That is, the neuronal complexes learn the local properties of the fitness landscape, resulting in the generation of variability directed towards the direction of fitness increase, as if mutations in a genetic pool were drawn such that they would increase reproductive success. Evolution might thus be more efficient within evolved brains than among organisms out in the wild. PMID:26640653

  14. Neuronal migration and protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ohshima, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the six-layered structure of the mammalian cortex via the inside-out pattern of neuronal migration is fundamental to neocortical functions. Extracellular cues such as Reelin induce intracellular signaling cascades through the protein phosphorylation. Migrating neurons also have intrinsic machineries to regulate cytoskeletal proteins and adhesion properties. Protein phosphorylation regulates these processes. Moreover, the balance between phosphorylation and dephosphorylation is modified by extracellular cues. Multipolar-bipolar transition, radial glia-guided locomotion and terminal translocation are critical steps of radial migration of cortical pyramidal neurons. Protein kinases such as Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) involve these steps. In this review, I shall give an overview the roles of protein kinases in neuronal migration. PMID:25628530

  15. Polyphenolic Antioxidants and Neuronal Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ataie, Amin; Shadifar, Mohammad; Ataee, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Many studies indicate that oxidative stress is involved in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. Oxidative stress can induce neuronal damages, modulate intracellular signaling and ultimately leads to neuronal death by apoptosis or necrosis. To review antioxidants preventive effects on oxidative stress and neurodegenerative diseases we accumulated data from international medical journals and academic informations’ sites. According to many studies, antioxidants could reduce toxic neuronal damages and many studies confirmed the efficacy of polyphenol antioxidants in fruits and vegetables to reduce neuronal death and to diminish oxidative stress. This systematic review showed the antioxidant activities of phytochemicals which play as natural neuroprotectives with low adverse effects against some neurodegenerative diseases as Parkinson or Alzheimer diseases. PMID:27303602

  16. [Some characteristics of vertigo in vestibular neuronitis].

    PubMed

    Skliut, I A; Likhachev, S A; Rybina, O V

    2004-01-01

    The authors present a detailed clinical analysis of objective neurological symptoms and vertigo in patients with vestibular neuronitis. Diagnostic criteria are specified allowing differentiation between vertigo and dizziness, pathognomonic signs of vestibular neuronitis are outlined. Peripheral location of the pathological process in vestibular neuronitis is suggested. How rotating vertigo is forming in patients with vestibular neuronitis is hypothesized.

  17. Centrosome localization determines neuronal polarity.

    PubMed

    de Anda, Froylan Calderon; Pollarolo, Giulia; Da Silva, Jorge Santos; Camoletto, Paola G; Feiguin, Fabian; Dotti, Carlos G

    2005-08-04

    Neuronal polarization occurs shortly after mitosis. In neurons differentiating in vitro, axon formation follows the segregation of growth-promoting activities to only one of the multiple neurites that form after mitosis. It is unresolved whether such spatial restriction makes use of an intrinsic program, like during C. elegans embryo polarization, or is extrinsic and cue-mediated, as in migratory cells. Here we show that in hippocampal neurons in vitro, the axon consistently arises from the neurite that develops first after mitosis. Centrosomes, the Golgi apparatus and endosomes cluster together close to the area where the first neurite will form, which is in turn opposite from the plane of the last mitotic division. We show that the polarized activities of these organelles are necessary and sufficient for neuronal polarization: (1) polarized microtubule polymerization and membrane transport precedes first neurite formation, (2) neurons with more than one centrosome sprout more than one axon and (3) suppression of centrosome-mediated functions precludes polarization. We conclude that asymmetric centrosome-mediated dynamics in the early post-mitotic stage instruct neuronal polarity, implying that pre-mitotic mechanisms with a role in division orientation may in turn participate in this event.

  18. Network synchronization in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Penn, Yaron; Segal, Menahem; Moses, Elisha

    2016-03-22

    Oscillatory activity is widespread in dynamic neuronal networks. The main paradigm for the origin of periodicity consists of specialized pacemaking elements that synchronize and drive the rest of the network; however, other models exist. Here, we studied the spontaneous emergence of synchronized periodic bursting in a network of cultured dissociated neurons from rat hippocampus and cortex. Surprisingly, about 60% of all active neurons were self-sustained oscillators when disconnected, each with its own natural frequency. The individual neuron's tendency to oscillate and the corresponding oscillation frequency are controlled by its excitability. The single neuron intrinsic oscillations were blocked by riluzole, and are thus dependent on persistent sodium leak currents. Upon a gradual retrieval of connectivity, the synchrony evolves: Loose synchrony appears already at weak connectivity, with the oscillators converging to one common oscillation frequency, yet shifted in phase across the population. Further strengthening of the connectivity causes a reduction in the mean phase shifts until zero-lag is achieved, manifested by synchronous periodic network bursts. Interestingly, the frequency of network bursting matches the average of the intrinsic frequencies. Overall, the network behaves like other universal systems, where order emerges spontaneously by entrainment of independent rhythmic units. Although simplified with respect to circuitry in the brain, our results attribute a basic functional role for intrinsic single neuron excitability mechanisms in driving the network's activity and dynamics, contributing to our understanding of developing neural circuits.

  19. Neuronal polarization in the developing cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, Akira; Hatanaka, Yumiko

    2015-01-01

    Cortical neurons consist of excitatory projection neurons and inhibitory GABAergic interneurons, whose connections construct highly organized neuronal circuits that control higher order information processing. Recent progress in live imaging has allowed us to examine how these neurons differentiate during development in vivo or in in vivo-like conditions. These analyses have revealed how the initial steps of polarization, in which neurons establish an axon, occur. Interestingly, both excitatory and inhibitory cortical neurons establish neuronal polarity de novo by undergoing a multipolar stage reminiscent of the manner in which polarity formation occurs in hippocampal neurons in dissociated culture. In this review, we focus on polarity formation in cortical neurons and describe their typical morphology and dynamic behavior during the polarization period. We also discuss cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying polarization, with reference to polarity formation in dissociated hippocampal neurons in vitro. PMID:25904841

  20. Studies of the secretion of corticotropin-releasing factor and arginine vasopressin into the hypophysial-portal circulation of the conscious sheep. II. The central noradrenergic and neuropeptide Y pathways cause immediate and prolonged hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activation. Potential involvement in the pseudo-Cushing's syndrome of endogenous depression and anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J P; Clarke, I J; Funder, J W; Engler, D

    1994-01-01

    Studies were performed to determine the effects of intracerebroventricular norepinephrine (NE) or neuropeptide Y (NPY) on the ovine hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. NE (50 micrograms) increased mean hypophysial-portal corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) levels (1 h, 1.3- and 2.9-fold; 4 h, 2.2- and 5.7-fold) and caused acute and sustained increases in mean plasma ACTH and cortisol. NPY (50 microgram) also increased mean CRF and AVP levels (1 h, 1.4- and 4.2-fold; 4 h, 1.1- and 1.9-fold), increased pituitary-adrenal activity at 1 h, and caused ACTH hypersecretion at 4 h. When added to cultured ovine anterior pituitary cells, NPY neither increased basal ACTH release nor augmented CRF- or AVP-induced ACTH release. We conclude that: (a) activation of either the central noradrenergic or NPY pathways causes an acute and sustained stimulation of the ovine HPA axis; (b) such activation increases the AVP/CRF ratio, suggesting a dominant role for AVP in the ovine stress response; and (c) the central noradrenergic or NPY systems may cause sustained HPA activation by attenuating or disrupting the glucocorticoid negative feedback on those brain areas concerned with regulation of the HPA axis. The possible roles of the central noradrenergic and NPY systems in the etiology of the hypercortisolemia of endogenous depression and anorexia nervosa are discussed. PMID:8163648

  1. Synergistic effects of noradrenergic modulation with atomoxetine and 10 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on motor learning in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is able to induce changes in neuronal activity that outlast stimulation. The underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. They might be analogous to long-term potentiation or depression, as the duration of the effects seems to implicate changes in synaptic plasticity. Norepinephrine (NE) has been shown to play a crucial role in neuronal plasticity in the healthy and injured human brain. Atomoxetine (ATX) and other NE reuptake inhibitors have been shown to increase excitability in different systems and to influence learning processes. Thus, the combination of two facilitative interventions may lead to further increase in excitability and motor learning. But in some cases homeostatic metaplasticity might protect the brain from harmful hyperexcitability. In this study, the combination of 60 mg ATX and 10 Hz rTMS over the primary motor cortex was used to examine changes in cortical excitability and motor learning and to investigate their influence on synaptic plasticity mechanisms. Results The results of this double-blind placebo-controlled study showed that ATX facilitated corticospinal and intracortical excitability in motor cortex. 10 Hertz rTMS applied during a motor task was able to further increase intracortical excitability only in combination with ATX. In addition, only the combination of 10 Hz rTMS and ATX was capable of enhancing the total number of correct responses and reaction time significantly, indicating an interaction effect between rTMS and ATX without signs of homeostatic metaplasticity. Conclusion These results suggest that pharmacologically enhanced NE transmission and 10 Hz rTMS exert a synergistic effect on motor cortex excitability and motor learning in healthy humans. PMID:24690416

  2. GABA-A RECEPTOR ACTIVITY IN THE NORADRENERGIC LOCUS COERULEUS DRIVES TRIGEMINAL NEUROPATHIC PAIN IN THE RAT; CONTRIBUTION OF NAα1 RECEPTORS IN THE MEDIAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX

    PubMed Central

    KAUSHAL, R.; TAYLOR, B. K.; JAMAL, A. B.; ZHANG, L.; MA, F.; DONAHUE, R.; WESTLUND, K. N.

    2017-01-01

    Trigeminal neuropathic pain is described as constant excruciating facial pain. The study goal was to investigate the role of nucleus locus coeruleus (LC) in a model of chronic orofacial neuropathic pain (CCI-ION). The study examines LC’s relationship to both the medullary dorsal horn receiving trigeminal nerve sensory innervation and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). LC is a major source of CNS noradrenaline (NA) and a primary nucleus involved in pain modulation. Although descending inhibition of acute pain by LC is well established, contribution of the LC to facilitation of chronic neuropathic pain is also reported. In the present study, a rat orofacial pain model of trigeminal neuropathy was induced by chronic constrictive injury of the infraorbital nerve (CCI-ION). Orofacial neuropathic pain was indicated by development of whisker pad mechanical hypersensitivity. Hypersensitivity was alleviated by selective elimination of NA neurons, including LC (A6 cell group), with the neurotoxin anti-dopamine-β-hydroxylase saporin (anti-DβH-saporin) microinjected either intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) or into trigeminal spinal nucleus caudalis (spVc). The GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline, administered directly into LC (week 8) inhibited hypersensitivity. This indicates a valence shift in which increased GABAA signaling ongoing in LC after trigeminal nerve injury paradoxically produces excitatory facilitation of the chronic pain state. Microinjection of NAα1 receptor antagonist, benoxathian, into mPFC attenuated whisker pad hypersensitivity, while NAα2 receptor antagonist, idazoxan, was ineffective. Thus, GABAA-mediated activation of NA neurons during CCI-ION can facilitate hypersensitivity through NAα1 receptors in the mPFC. These data indicate LC is a chronic pain generator. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of IBRO. PMID:27520081

  3. Spinal Cord Neuronal Precursors Generate Multiple Neuronal Phenotypes in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Kalyani, Anjali J.; Piper, David; Mujtaba, Tahmina; Lucero, Mary T.; Rao, Mahendra S.

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal restricted precursors (NRPs) (Mayer-Proschel et al., 1997) can generate multiple neurotransmitter phenotypes during maturation in culture. Undifferentiated E-NCAM+ (embryonic neural cell adhesion molecule) immunoreactive NRPs are mitotically active and electrically immature, and they express only a subset of neuronal markers. Fully mature cells are postmitotic, process-bearing cells that are neurofilament-M and synaptophysin immunoreactive, and they synthesize and respond to different subsets of neurotransmitter molecules. Mature neurons that synthesize and respond to glycine, glutamate, GABA, dopamine, and acetylcholine can be identified by immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR, and calcium imaging in mass cultures. Individual NRPs also generate heterogeneous progeny as assessed by neurotransmitter response and synthesis, demonstrating the multipotent nature of the precursor cells. Differentiation can be modulated by sonic hedgehog (Shh) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2/4 molecules. Shh acts as a mitogen and inhibits differentiation (including cholinergic differentiation). BMP-2 and BMP-4, in contrast, inhibit cell division and promote differentiation (including cholinergic differentiation). Thus, a single neuronal precursor cell can differentiate into multiple classes of neurons, and this differentiation can be modulated by environmental signals. PMID:9742154

  4. Neurons on Parafilm: versatile elastic substrates for neuronal cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sang Jin; Nam, Yoonkey

    2012-02-15

    A variety of materials has been applied to neuronal cell culture substrates to improve the efficiency of the culture and to provide pertinent cell growth environment. Here we report the application of Parafilm(®) M ('Parafilm') as a novel substrate for neuronal culture and patterning. Cell culture results show that elastic Parafilm had effects on cell viability, length and number of neurites, and soma spreading. Parafilm was also an effective substrate to obtain patterned neuronal cultures using a conventional micro-contract printing (μCP) technique. Polylysine micropatterns in line or grid forms were readily transferred from PDMS stamp to bare Parafilm surfaces and spatially confined neuronal cultures were successfully maintained for over three weeks. We also demonstrate that batch-processing cell culture substrates can be easily fabricated using a piece of Parafilm. The softness, plasticity, and hydrophobicity were main features that made it attractive for Parafilm to be considered as a practical cell culture platform. The results can be extended to develop an inexpensive and practical neuronal culture substrates in tissue engineering and biochip applications.

  5. Glucose responsive neurons of the paraventricular thalamus control sucrose-seeking behavior

    PubMed Central

    Labouèbe, Gwenaël; Boutrel, Benjamin; Tarussio, David; Thorens, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Feeding behavior is governed by homeostatic needs and motivational drive to obtain palatable foods. Here, we identify a population of glutamatergic neurons in the paraventricular thalamus, which express the glucose transporter Glut2 (Scl2a2) and project to the nucleus accumbens. These neurons are activated by hypoglycemia and, in freely moving mice, their activation by optogenetics or Slc2a2 inactivation increases motivated sucrose but not saccharin-seeking behavior. These neurons may control sugar overconsumption in obesity and diabetes. PMID:27322418

  6. Neuronal zinc stores are modulated by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: an optical analysis in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Love, Rachal; Salazar, Gloria; Faundez, Victor

    2005-11-02

    Zinc chelation and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been explored as potential neuroprotective agents. However, it remains unknown whether NSAIDs and zinc chelation may converge on a similar cellular process. Using two-photon microscopy to observe hippocampal neurons labeled with a zinc-sensitive dye, we provide evidence that three chemically unrelated NSAIDs, niflumic acid, ibuprofen, and naproxen, acutely increase intracellular zinc stores from extracellular metal pools. Phospholipase A2 inhibitors triggered similar responses, suggesting that NSAIDs likely control zinc stores by their activity as cyclooxygenase inhibitors. These results provide evidence for a new link between cyclooxygenase metabolites and the mechanisms controlling neuronal zinc pools.

  7. Neuronal SUMOylation: Mechanisms, Physiology, and Roles in Neuronal Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Henley, Jeremy M.; Craig, Tim J.; Wilkinson, Kevin A.

    2014-01-01

    Protein SUMOylation is a critically important posttranslational protein modification that participates in nearly all aspects of cellular physiology. In the nearly 20 years since its discovery, SUMOylation has emerged as a major regulator of nuclear function, and more recently, it has become clear that SUMOylation has key roles in the regulation of protein trafficking and function outside of the nucleus. In neurons, SUMOylation participates in cellular processes ranging from neuronal differentiation and control of synapse formation to regulation of synaptic transmission and cell survival. It is a highly dynamic and usually transient modification that enhances or hinders interactions between proteins, and its consequences are extremely diverse. Hundreds of different proteins are SUMO substrates, and dysfunction of protein SUMOylation is implicated in a many different diseases. Here we briefly outline core aspects of the SUMO system and provide a detailed overview of the current understanding of the roles of SUMOylation in healthy and diseased neurons. PMID:25287864

  8. Anti-dopamine beta-hydroxylase immunotoxin-induced sympathectomy in adult rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picklo, M. J.; Wiley, R. G.; Lonce, S.; Lappi, D. A.; Robertson, D.

    1995-01-01

    Anti-dopamine beta-hydroxylase immunotoxin (DHIT) is an antibody-targeted noradrenergic lesioning tool comprised of a monoclonal antibody against the noradrenergic enzyme, dopamine beta-hydroxylase, conjugated to saporin, a ribosome-inactivating protein. Noradrenergic-neuron specificity and completeness and functionality of sympathectomy were assessed. Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats were given 28.5, 85.7, 142 or 285 micrograms/kg DHIT i.v. Three days after injection, a 6% to 73% decrease in the neurons was found in the superior cervical ganglia of the animals. No loss of sensory, nodose and dorsal root ganglia, neurons was observed at the highest dose of DHIT. In contrast, the immunotoxin, 192-saporin (142 micrograms/kg), lesioned all three ganglia. To assess the sympathectomy, 2 wk after treatment (285 micrograms/kg), rats were anesthetized with urethane (1 g/kg) and cannulated in the femoral artery and vein. DHIT-treated animals' basal systolic blood pressure and heart rate were significantly lower than controls. Basal plasma norepinephrine levels were 41% lower in DHIT-treated animals than controls. Tyramine-stimulated release of norepinephrine in DHIT-treated rats was 27% of controls. Plasma epinephrine levels of DHIT animals were not reduced. DHIT-treated animals exhibited a 2-fold hypersensitivity to the alpha-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine. We conclude that DHIT selectively delivered saporin to noradrenergic neurons resulting in destruction of these neurons. Anti-dopamine beta-hydroxylase immunotoxin administration produces a rapid, irreversible sympathectomy.

  9. Energy Model of Neuron Activation.

    PubMed

    Romanyshyn, Yuriy; Smerdov, Andriy; Petrytska, Svitlana

    2017-02-01

    On the basis of the neurophysiological strength-duration (amplitude-duration) curve of neuron activation (which relates the threshold amplitude of a rectangular current pulse of neuron activation to the pulse duration), as well as with the use of activation energy constraint (the threshold curve corresponds to the energy threshold of neuron activation by a rectangular current pulse), an energy model of neuron activation by a single current pulse has been constructed. The constructed model of activation, which determines its spectral properties, is a bandpass filter. Under the condition of minimum-phase feature of the neuron activation model, on the basis of Hilbert transform, the possibilities of phase-frequency response calculation from its amplitude-frequency response have been considered. Approximation to the amplitude-frequency response by the response of the Butterworth filter of the first order, as well as obtaining the pulse response corresponding to this approximation, give us the possibility of analyzing the efficiency of activating current pulses of various shapes, including analysis in accordance with the energy constraint.

  10. Neuronal factors determining high intelligence.

    PubMed

    Dicke, Ursula; Roth, Gerhard

    2016-01-05

    Many attempts have been made to correlate degrees of both animal and human intelligence with brain properties. With respect to mammals, a much-discussed trait concerns absolute and relative brain size, either uncorrected or corrected for body size. However, the correlation of both with degrees of intelligence yields large inconsistencies, because although they are regarded as the most intelligent mammals, monkeys and apes, including humans, have neither the absolutely nor the relatively largest brains. The best fit between brain traits and degrees of intelligence among mammals is reached by a combination of the number of cortical neurons, neuron packing density, interneuronal distance and axonal conduction velocity--factors that determine general information processing capacity (IPC), as reflected by general intelligence. The highest IPC is found in humans, followed by the great apes, Old World and New World monkeys. The IPC of cetaceans and elephants is much lower because of a thin cortex, low neuron packing density and low axonal conduction velocity. By contrast, corvid and psittacid birds have very small and densely packed pallial neurons and relatively many neurons, which, despite very small brain volumes, might explain their high intelligence. The evolution of a syntactical and grammatical language in humans most probably has served as an additional intelligence amplifier, which may have happened in songbirds and psittacids in a convergent manner.

  11. Stochastic phase-change neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuma, Tomas; Pantazi, Angeliki; Le Gallo, Manuel; Sebastian, Abu; Eleftheriou, Evangelos

    2016-08-01

    Artificial neuromorphic systems based on populations of spiking neurons are an indispensable tool in understanding the human brain and in constructing neuromimetic computational systems. To reach areal and power efficiencies comparable to those seen in biological systems, electroionics-based and phase-change-based memristive devices have been explored as nanoscale counterparts of synapses. However, progress on scalable realizations of neurons has so far been limited. Here, we show that chalcogenide-based phase-change materials can be used to create an artificial neuron in which the membrane potential is represented by the phase configuration of the nanoscale phase-change device. By exploiting the physics of reversible amorphous-to-crystal phase transitions, we show that the temporal integration of postsynaptic potentials can be achieved on a nanosecond timescale. Moreover, we show that this is inherently stochastic because of the melt-quench-induced reconfiguration of the atomic structure occurring when the neuron is reset. We demonstrate the use of these phase-change neurons, and their populations, in the detection of temporal correlations in parallel data streams and in sub-Nyquist representation of high-bandwidth signals.

  12. Stochastic phase-change neurons.

    PubMed

    Tuma, Tomas; Pantazi, Angeliki; Le Gallo, Manuel; Sebastian, Abu; Eleftheriou, Evangelos

    2016-08-01

    Artificial neuromorphic systems based on populations of spiking neurons are an indispensable tool in understanding the human brain and in constructing neuromimetic computational systems. To reach areal and power efficiencies comparable to those seen in biological systems, electroionics-based and phase-change-based memristive devices have been explored as nanoscale counterparts of synapses. However, progress on scalable realizations of neurons has so far been limited. Here, we show that chalcogenide-based phase-change materials can be used to create an artificial neuron in which the membrane potential is represented by the phase configuration of the nanoscale phase-change device. By exploiting the physics of reversible amorphous-to-crystal phase transitions, we show that the temporal integration of postsynaptic potentials can be achieved on a nanosecond timescale. Moreover, we show that this is inherently stochastic because of the melt-quench-induced reconfiguration of the atomic structure occurring when the neuron is reset. We demonstrate the use of these phase-change neurons, and their populations, in the detection of temporal correlations in parallel data streams and in sub-Nyquist representation of high-bandwidth signals.

  13. Brain Neurons as Quantum Computers:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bershadskii, A.; Dremencov, E.; Bershadskii, J.; Yadid, G.

    The question: whether quantum coherent states can sustain decoherence, heating and dissipation over time scales comparable to the dynamical timescales of brain neurons, has been actively discussed in the last years. A positive answer on this question is crucial, in particular, for consideration of brain neurons as quantum computers. This discussion was mainly based on theoretical arguments. In the present paper nonlinear statistical properties of the Ventral Tegmental Area (VTA) of genetically depressive limbic brain are studied in vivo on the Flinders Sensitive Line of rats (FSL). VTA plays a key role in the generation of pleasure and in the development of psychological drug addiction. We found that the FSL VTA (dopaminergic) neuron signals exhibit multifractal properties for interspike frequencies on the scales where healthy VTA dopaminergic neurons exhibit bursting activity. For high moments the observed multifractal (generalized dimensions) spectrum coincides with the generalized dimensions spectrum calculated for a spectral measure of a quantum system (so-called kicked Harper model, actively used as a model of quantum chaos). This observation can be considered as a first experimental (in vivo) indication in the favor of the quantum (at least partially) nature of brain neurons activity.

  14. Neuronal Mitophagy in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Vicente, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal homeostasis depends on the proper functioning of different quality control systems. All intracellular components are subjected to continuous turnover through the coordinated synthesis, degradation and recycling of their constituent elements. Autophagy is the catabolic mechanism by which intracellular cytosolic components, including proteins, organelles, aggregates and any other intracellular materials, are delivered to lysosomes for degradation. Among the different types of selective autophagy described to date, the process of mitophagy involves the selective autophagic degradation of mitochondria. In this way, mitophagy is responsible for basal mitochondrial turnover, but can also be induced under certain physiological or pathogenic conditions to eliminate unwanted or damaged mitochondria. Dysfunctional cellular proteolytic systems have been linked extensively to neurodegenerative diseases (ND) like Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), or Huntington’s disease (HD), with autophagic failure being one of the main factors contributing to neuronal cell death in these diseases. Neurons are particularly vulnerable to autophagic impairment as well as to mitochondrial dysfunction, due mostly to their particular high energy dependence and to their post-mitotic nature. The accurate and proper degradation of dysfunctional mitochondria by mitophagy is essential for maintaining control over mitochondrial quality and quantity in neurons. In this report, I will review the role of mitophagy in neuronal homeostasis and the consequences of its dysfunction in ND. PMID:28337125

  15. Neuronal factors determining high intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Dicke, Ursula; Roth, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Many attempts have been made to correlate degrees of both animal and human intelligence with brain properties. With respect to mammals, a much-discussed trait concerns absolute and relative brain size, either uncorrected or corrected for body size. However, the correlation of both with degrees of intelligence yields large inconsistencies, because although they are regarded as the most intelligent mammals, monkeys and apes, including humans, have neither the absolutely nor the relatively largest brains. The best fit between brain traits and degrees of intelligence among mammals is reached by a combination of the number of cortical neurons, neuron packing density, interneuronal distance and axonal conduction velocity—factors that determine general information processing capacity (IPC), as reflected by general intelligence. The highest IPC is found in humans, followed by the great apes, Old World and New World monkeys. The IPC of cetaceans and elephants is much lower because of a thin cortex, low neuron packing density and low axonal conduction velocity. By contrast, corvid and psittacid birds have very small and densely packed pallial neurons and relatively many neurons, which, despite very small brain volumes, might explain their high intelligence. The evolution of a syntactical and grammatical language in humans most probably has served as an additional intelligence amplifier, which may have happened in songbirds and psittacids in a convergent manner. PMID:26598734

  16. Network synchronization in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Penn, Yaron; Segal, Menahem; Moses, Elisha

    2016-01-01

    Oscillatory activity is widespread in dynamic neuronal networks. The main paradigm for the origin of periodicity consists of specialized pacemaking elements that synchronize and drive the rest of the network; however, other models exist. Here, we studied the spontaneous emergence of synchronized periodic bursting in a network of cultured dissociated neurons from rat hippocampus and cortex. Surprisingly, about 60% of all active neurons were self-sustained oscillators when disconnected, each with its own natural frequency. The individual neuron’s tendency to oscillate and the corresponding oscillation frequency are controlled by its excitability. The single neuron intrinsic oscillations were blocked by riluzole, and are thus dependent on persistent sodium leak currents. Upon a gradual retrieval of connectivity, the synchrony evolves: Loose synchrony appears already at weak connectivity, with the oscillators converging to one common oscillation frequency, yet shifted in phase across the population. Further strengthening of the connectivity causes a reduction in the mean phase shifts until zero-lag is achieved, manifested by synchronous periodic network bursts. Interestingly, the frequency of network bursting matches the average of the intrinsic frequencies. Overall, the network behaves like other universal systems, where order emerges spontaneously by entrainment of independent rhythmic units. Although simplified with respect to circuitry in the brain, our results attribute a basic functional role for intrinsic single neuron excitability mechanisms in driving the network’s activity and dynamics, contributing to our understanding of developing neural circuits. PMID:26961000

  17. Unconventional secretory processing diversifies neuronal ion channel properties

    PubMed Central

    Hanus, Cyril; Geptin, Helene; Tushev, Georgi; Garg, Sakshi; Alvarez-Castelao, Beatriz; Sambandan, Sivakumar; Kochen, Lisa; Hafner, Anne-Sophie; Langer, Julian D; Schuman, Erin M

    2016-01-01

    N-glycosylation – the sequential addition of complex sugars to adhesion proteins, neurotransmitter receptors, ion channels and secreted trophic factors as they progress through the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus – is one of the most frequent protein modifications. In mammals, most organ-specific N-glycosylation events occur in the brain. Yet, little is known about the nature, function and regulation of N-glycosylation in neurons. Using imaging, quantitative immunoblotting and mass spectrometry, we show that hundreds of neuronal surface membrane proteins are core-glycosylated, resulting in the neuronal membrane displaying surprisingly high levels of glycosylation profiles that are classically associated with immature intracellular proteins. We report that while N-glycosylation is generally required for dendritic development and glutamate receptor surface expression, core-glycosylated proteins are sufficient to sustain these processes, and are thus functional. This atypical glycosylation of surface neuronal proteins can be attributed to a bypass or a hypo-function of the Golgi apparatus. Core-glycosylation is regulated by synaptic activity, modulates synaptic signaling and accelerates the turnover of GluA2-containing glutamate receptors, revealing a novel mechanism that controls the composition and sensing properties of the neuronal membrane. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20609.001 PMID:27677849

  18. Dopaminergic Neurons Controlling Anterior Pituitary Functions: Anatomy and Ontogenesis in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Romain; Affaticati, Pierre; Bureau, Charlotte; Colin, Ingrid; Demarque, Michaël; Dufour, Sylvie; Vernier, Philippe; Yamamoto, Kei; Pasqualini, Catherine

    2015-08-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) neurons located in the preoptico-hypothalamic region of the brain exert a major neuroendocrine control on reproduction, growth, and homeostasis by regulating the secretion of anterior pituitary (or adenohypophysis) hormones. Here, using a retrograde tract tracing experiment, we identified the neurons playing this role in the zebrafish. The DA cells projecting directly to the anterior pituitary are localized in the most anteroventral part of the preoptic area, and we named them preoptico-hypophyseal DA (POHDA) neurons. During development, these neurons do not appear before 72 hours postfertilization (hpf) and are the last dopaminergic cell group to differentiate. We found that the number of neurons in this cell population continues to increase throughout life proportionally to the growth of the fish. 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation analysis suggested that this increase is due to continuous neurogenesis and not due to a phenotypic change in already-existing neurons. Finally, expression profiles of several genes (foxg1a, dlx2a, and nr4a2a/b) were different in the POHDA compared with the adjacent suprachiasmatic DA neurons, suggesting that POHDA neurons develop as a distinct DA cell population in the preoptic area. This study offers some insights into the regional identity of the preoptic area and provides the first bases for future functional genetic studies on the development of DA neurons controlling anterior pituitary functions.

  19. Simulation of Code Spectrum and Code Flow of Cultured Neuronal Networks.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Shinichi; Nishitani, Yoshi; Hosokawa, Chie; Miyoshi, Tomomitsu; Sawai, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that, in cultured neuronal networks on a multielectrode, pseudorandom-like sequences (codes) are detected, and they flow with some spatial decay constant. Each cultured neuronal network is characterized by a specific spectrum curve. That is, we may consider the spectrum curve as a "signature" of its associated neuronal network that is dependent on the characteristics of neurons and network configuration, including the weight distribution. In the present study, we used an integrate-and-fire model of neurons with intrinsic and instantaneous fluctuations of characteristics for performing a simulation of a code spectrum from multielectrodes on a 2D mesh neural network. We showed that it is possible to estimate the characteristics of neurons such as the distribution of number of neurons around each electrode and their refractory periods. Although this process is a reverse problem and theoretically the solutions are not sufficiently guaranteed, the parameters seem to be consistent with those of neurons. That is, the proposed neural network model may adequately reflect the behavior of a cultured neuronal network. Furthermore, such prospect is discussed that code analysis will provide a base of communication within a neural network that will also create a base of natural intelligence.

  20. The Bifurcating Neuron network 1.

    PubMed

    Lee, G; Farhat, N H

    2001-01-01

    The Bifurcating Neuron (BN), a chaotic integrate-and-fire neuron, is a model of a neuron augmented by coherent modulation from its environment. The BN is mathematically equivalent to the sine-circle map, and this equivalence relationship allowed us to apply the mathematics of one-dimensional maps to the design of BN networks. The study of symmetry in the BN revealed that the BN can be configured to exhibit bistability that is controlled by attractor-merging crisis. Also, the symmetry of the bistability can be controlled by the introduction of a sinusoidal fluctuation to the threshold level of the BN. These two observations led us to the design of the BN Network 1 (BNN-1), a chaotic pulse-coupled neural network exhibiting associative memory. In numerical simulations, the BNN-1 showed a better performance than the continuous-time Hopfield network, as far as the spurious-minima problem is concerned and exhibited many biologically plausible characteristics.

  1. Chimera states in bursting neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, Bidesh K.; Ghosh, Dibakar; Lakshmanan, M.

    2016-01-01

    We study the existence of chimera states in pulse-coupled networks of bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with nonlocal, global, and local (nearest neighbor) couplings. Through a linear stability analysis, we discuss the behavior of the stability function in the incoherent (i.e., disorder), coherent, chimera, and multichimera states. Surprisingly, we find that chimera and multichimera states occur even using local nearest neighbor interaction in a network of identical bursting neurons alone. This is in contrast with the existence of chimera states in populations of nonlocally or globally coupled oscillators. A chemical synaptic coupling function is used which plays a key role in the emergence of chimera states in bursting neurons. The existence of chimera, multichimera, coherent, and disordered states is confirmed by means of the recently introduced statistical measures and mean phase velocity.

  2. Towards a Neuronal Gauge Theory

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Biswa; Tozzi, Arturo; Cooray, Gerald K.; Douglas, Pamela K.; Friston, Karl J.

    2016-01-01

    Given the amount of knowledge and data accruing in the neurosciences, is it time to formulate a general principle for neuronal dynamics that holds at evolutionary, developmental, and perceptual timescales? In this paper, we propose that the brain (and other self-organised biological systems) can be characterised via the mathematical apparatus of a gauge theory. The picture that emerges from this approach suggests that any biological system (from a neuron to an organism) can be cast as resolving uncertainty about its external milieu, either by changing its internal states or its relationship to the environment. Using formal arguments, we show that a gauge theory for neuronal dynamics—based on approximate Bayesian inference—has the potential to shed new light on phenomena that have thus far eluded a formal description, such as attention and the link between action and perception. PMID:26953636

  3. Axon specification in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Fukata, Yuko; Kimura, Toshihide; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2002-08-01

    Neurons are the most highly polarized cells, comprised of two structurally and functionally distinct parts, axons and dendrites. This asymmetry enables a vectorial flow of signaling within neurons. One of the most fundamental questions still to be answered in neuroscience is how these two specialized processes initially develop. The first manifestation of polarization occurs when one of the immature neurites acquires axonal characteristics. We review recent advances that have highlighted the involvement of several cellular events in the initial formation of the axon, including membrane traffic and cytoskeletal rearrangement. We then discuss the molecular mechanisms underlying axon formation, focusing on the Rho family small GTPases and an axon-inducing neuronal protein, CRMP-2.

  4. Adenosine A2A Receptors and A2A Receptor Heteromers as Key Players in Striatal Function

    PubMed Central

    Ferré, Sergi; Quiroz, César; Orru, Marco; Guitart, Xavier; Navarro, Gemma; Cortés, Antonio; Casadó, Vicent; Canela, Enric I.; Lluis, Carme; Franco, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    A very significant density of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) is present in the striatum, where they are preferentially localized postsynaptically in striatopallidal medium spiny neurons (MSNs). In this localization A2ARs establish reciprocal antagonistic interactions with dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs). In one type of interaction, A2AR and D2R are forming heteromers and, by means of an allosteric interaction, A2AR counteracts D2R-mediated inhibitory modulation of the effects of NMDA receptor stimulation in the striatopallidal neuron. This interaction is probably mostly responsible for the locomotor depressant and activating effects of A2AR agonist and antagonists, respectively. The second type of interaction involves A2AR and D2R that do not form heteromers and takes place at the level of adenylyl cyclase (AC). Due to a strong tonic effect of endogenous dopamine on striatal D2R, this interaction keeps A2AR from signaling through AC. However, under conditions of dopamine depletion or with blockade of D2R, A2AR-mediated AC activation is unleashed with an increased gene expression and activity of the striatopallidal neuron and with a consequent motor depression. This interaction is probably the main mechanism responsible for the locomotor depression induced by D2R antagonists. Finally, striatal A2ARs are also localized presynaptically, in cortico-striatal glutamatergic terminals that contact the striato-nigral MSN. These presynaptic A2ARs heteromerize with A1 receptors (A1Rs) and their activation facilitates glutamate release. These three different types of A2ARs can be pharmacologically dissected by their ability to bind ligands with different affinity and can therefore provide selective targets for drug development in different basal ganglia disorders. PMID:21731559

  5. Copying and Evolution of Neuronal Topology

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Chrisantha; Karishma, K. K.; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2008-01-01

    We propose a mechanism for copying of neuronal networks that is of considerable interest for neuroscience for it suggests a neuronal basis for causal inference, function copying, and natural selection within the human brain. To date, no model of neuronal topology copying exists. We present three increasingly sophisticated mechanisms to demonstrate how topographic map formation coupled with Spike-Time Dependent Plasticity (STDP) can copy neuronal topology motifs. Fidelity is improved by error correction and activity-reverberation limitation. The high-fidelity topology-copying operator is used to evolve neuronal topologies. Possible roles for neuronal natural selection are discussed. PMID:19020662

  6. Calcium signals in olfactory neurons.

    PubMed

    Tareilus, E; Noé, J; Breer, H

    1995-11-09

    Laser scanning confocal microscopy in combination with the fluorescent calcium indicators Fluo-3 and Fura-Red was employed to estimate the intracellular concentration of free calcium ions in individual olfactory receptor neurons and to monitor temporal and spatial changes in the Ca(2+)-level upon stimulation. The chemosensory cells responded to odorants with a significant increase in the calcium concentration, preferentially in the dendritic knob. Applying various stimulation paradigma, it was found that in a population of isolated cells, subsets of receptor neurons display distinct patterns of responsiveness.

  7. [Nucleotide receptors in learning and neuronal plasticity].

    PubMed

    Czajkowski, Rafał

    2014-01-01

    Nucleotide signalling plays an important role in neuronal plasticity and learning. Nucleotides are released at the synaptic terminals and may act pre- and postsynaptically by activating Pland P2 receptors. The A1 receptor, activated tonically by resting concentration of adenosine regulates basal neurotransmission. The A2A receptor is activated by increased adenosine levels and participates in plastic changes. ATP may act as an independent neurotransmitter on the P2X1 receptor, or via P2X3 subtype as a neuromodulator that affects NMDA receptor signalling. The G protein coupled P2Y receptors also evoke neuromodulatory effect on the neuronal plasticity, inhibiting LTD in prefrontal cortex. P2X7 receptor is responsible for communication between astrocytes and for synchronizing their activity. ATP and adenosine released by astrocytes act as neuromodulators both at the release site and heterosynaptically. Taken together, these multiple actions of nucleotides constitute a mechanism regulating homeostatic processes that are necessary for proper brain functioning: synaptic scaling and metaplasticity.

  8. Slow waves in mutually inhibitory neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalics, Jozsi

    2004-05-01

    A variety of experimental and modeling studies have been performed to investigate wave propagation in networks of thalamic neurons and their relationship to spindle sleep rhythms. It is believed that spindle oscillations result from the reciprocal interaction between thalamocortical (TC) and thalamic reticular (RE) neurons. We consider a network of TC and RE cells reduced to a one-layer network model and represented by a system of singularly perturbed integral-differential equations. Geometric singular perturbation methods are used to prove the existence of a locally unique slow wave pulse that propagates along the network. By seeking a slow pulse solution, we reformulate the problem to finding a heteroclinic orbit in a 3D system of ODEs with two additional constraints on the location of the orbit at two distinct points in time. In proving the persistence of the singular heteroclinic orbit, difficulties arising from the solution passing near points where normal hyperbolicity is lost on a 2D critical manifold are overcome by employing results by Wechselberger [Singularly perturbed folds and canards in R3, Thesis, TU-Wien, 1998].

  9. [What mirror neurons have revealed: revisited].

    PubMed

    Murata, Akira; Maeda, Kazutaka

    2014-06-01

    The first paper on mirror neurons was published in 1992. In the span of over two decades since then, much knowledge about the relationship between social cognitive function and the motor control system has been accumulated. Direct matching of visual actions and their corresponding motor representations is the most important functional property of mirror neuron. Many studies have emphasized intrinsic simulation as a core concept for mirror neurons. Mirror neurons are thought to play a role in social cognitive function. However, the function of mirror neurons in the macaque remains unclear, because such cognitive functions are limited or lacking in macaque monkeys. It is therefore important to discuss these neurons in the context of motor function. Rizzolatti and colleagues have stressed that the most important function of mirror neurons in macaques is recognition of actions performed by other individuals. I suggest that mirror neurons in the Macaque inferior pariental lobule might be correlated with body schema. In the parieto-premotor network, matching of corollary discharge and actual sensory feedback is an essential neuronal operation. Recently, neurons showing mirror properties were found in some cortical areas outside the mirror neuron system. The current work would revisit the outcomes of mirror neuron studies to discuss the function of mirror neurons in the monkey.

  10. Which Neurons Will Be the Engram - Activated Neurons and/or More Excitable Neurons?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-il; Cho, Hye-Yeon; Han, Jin-Hee

    2016-01-01

    During past decades, the formation and storage principle of memory have received much attention in the neuroscience field. Although some studies have attempted to demonstrate the nature of the engram, elucidating the memory engram allocation mechanism was not possible because of the limitations of existing methods, which cannot specifically modulate the candidate neuronal population. Recently, the development of new techniques, which offer ways to mark and control specific populations of neurons, may accelerate solving this issue. Here, we review the recent advances, which have provided substantial evidence showing that both candidates (neuronal population that is activated by learning, and that has increased CREB level/excitability at learning) satisfy the criteria of the engram, which are necessary and sufficient for memory expression. PMID:27122991

  11. Effects of postnatal isolation rearing and antidepressant treatment on the density of serotonergic and noradrenergic axons and depressive behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Kuramochi, M; Nakamura, S

    2009-09-29

    The development of monoaminergic axons is affected by pharmacological and environmental manipulations during early periods of brain development. In addition, it has been proposed that changes in the density of monoaminergic axons are involved in the pathophysiology of depression. The present experiments examined the effects of neonatal treatment with antidepressants on the density of monoaminergic axons containing 5-HT or noradrenaline (NA) and depressive behavior in rats. In this study, clomipramine (CL) was used as an antidepressant, because a large amount of data has been accumulated on the effects of neonatal CL treatment on monoaminergic neurons and depressive behavior. It was also examined whether the effects of neonatal CL treatment could be further modified by environmental conditions. In the present experiments, postweaning isolation rearing (Iso) was examined as an environmental condition, because postweaning Iso is reported to change the density of 5-HT axons in the rat brain. Unexpectedly, neonatal CL treatment alone had no effect on the density of 5-HT or NA axons or depressive behavior. Postweaning social Iso rearing reduced the density of 5-HT axons in the central nucleus and basolateral nucleus of the amygdala and CA3 of the hippocampus. In the prelimbic area and infralimbic area of medial prefrontal cortex and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, the density of 5-HT axons was not affected by social Iso alone, but was reduced when animals were socially isolated after neonatal CL treatment. Postweaning Iso, but not neonatal CL treatment, increased immobility in the forced swim test in adolescence/early adulthood. These findings suggest that postweaning social Iso alters the density of monoaminergic axons, particularly 5-HT axons, and induces a possible model of depression, while neonatal CL treatment alone has no effect on the density of NA or 5-HT axons or depressive behavior in adolescence/early adulthood.

  12. Neurons within the same network independently achieve conserved output by differentially balancing variable conductance magnitudes.

    PubMed

    Ransdell, Joseph L; Nair, Satish S; Schulz, David J

    2013-06-12

    Biological and theoretical evidence suggest that individual neurons may achieve similar outputs by differentially balancing variable underlying ionic conductances. Despite the substantial amount of data consistent with this idea, a direct biological demonstration that cells with conserved output, particularly within the same network, achieve these outputs via different solutions has been difficult to achieve. Here we demonstrate definitively that neurons from native neural networks with highly similar output achieve this conserved output by differentially tuning underlying conductance magnitudes. Multiple motor neurons of the crab (Cancer borealis) cardiac ganglion have highly conserved output within a preparation, despite showing a 2-4-fold range of conductance magnitudes. By blocking subsets of these currents, we demonstrate that the remaining conductances become unbalanced, causing disparate output as a result. Therefore, as strategies to understand neuronal excitability become increasingly sophisticated, it is important that such variability in excitability of neurons, even among those within the same individual, is taken into account.

  13. Neuronal circuits of fear extinction.

    PubMed

    Herry, Cyril; Ferraguti, Francesco; Singewald, Nicolas; Letzkus, Johannes J; Ehrlich, Ingrid; Lüthi, Andreas

    2010-02-01

    Fear extinction is a form of inhibitory learning that allows for the adaptive control of conditioned fear responses. Although fear extinction is an active learning process that eventually leads to the formation of a consolidated extinction memory, it is a fragile behavioural state. Fear responses can recover spontaneously or subsequent to environmental influences, such as context changes or stress. Understanding the neuronal substrates of fear extinction is of tremendous clinical relevance, as extinction is the cornerstone of psychological therapy of several anxiety disorders and because the relapse of maladaptative fear and anxiety is a major clinical problem. Recent research has begun to shed light on the molecular and cellular processes underlying fear extinction. In particular, the acquisition, consolidation and expression of extinction memories are thought to be mediated by highly specific neuronal circuits embedded in a large-scale brain network including the amygdala, prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and brain stem. Moreover, recent findings indicate that the neuronal circuitry of extinction is developmentally regulated. Here, we review emerging concepts of the neuronal circuitry of fear extinction, and highlight novel findings suggesting that the fragile phenomenon of extinction can be converted into a permanent erasure of fear memories. Finally, we discuss how research on genetic animal models of impaired extinction can further our understanding of the molecular and genetic bases of human anxiety disorders.

  14. Neuronal Inhibition under the Spotlight.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Martin; Smart, Trevor G

    2015-12-02

    In this issue of Neuron,Lin et al. (2015) report an optical method to precisely manipulate the activity of GABAA receptors by designing a mutant receptor that binds photosensitive compounds. This allows for studying GABAA receptors in situ and represents a valuable tool to investigate how inhibition affects brain physiology.

  15. Motor neurone disease: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kent, Anna

    Motor neurone disease (MND) is a relatively rare, progressive and incurable neurological condition affecting patients' speech, mobility and respiratory function. Care of patients with MND is complex and involves various healthcare professionals and services. There is a need to discuss symptom management and promote palliative and end of life care from the point of diagnosis to ensure appropriate holistic care is provided.

  16. Optimal compensation for neuron loss

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, David GT; Denève, Sophie; Machens, Christian K

    2016-01-01

    The brain has an impressive ability to withstand neural damage. Diseases that kill neurons can go unnoticed for years, and incomplete brain lesions or silencing of neurons often fail to produce any behavioral effect. How does the brain compensate for such damage, and what are the limits of this compensation? We propose that neural circuits instantly compensate for neuron loss, thereby preserving their function as much as possible. We show that this compensation can explain changes in tuning curves induced by neuron silencing across a variety of systems, including the primary visual cortex. We find that compensatory mechanisms can be implemented through the dynamics of networks with a tight balance of excitation and inhibition, without requiring synaptic plasticity. The limits of this compensatory mechanism are reached when excitation and inhibition become unbalanced, thereby demarcating a recovery boundary, where signal representation fails and where diseases may become symptomatic. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12454.001 PMID:27935480

  17. Bifurcating neuron: computation and learning.

    PubMed

    Lysetskiy, Mykola; Zurada, Jacek M

    2004-03-01

    The ability of bifurcating processing units and their networks to rapidly switch between different dynamic modes has been used in recent research efforts to model new computational properties of neural systems. In this spirit, we devise a bifurcating neuron based on control of chaos collapsing to a period-3 orbit in the dynamics of a quadratic logistic map (QLM). Proposed QLM3 neuron is constructed with the third iterate of QLM and uses an external input, which governs its dynamics. The input shifts the neuron's dynamics from chaos to one of the stable fixed points. This way the inputs from certain ranges (clusters) are mapped to stable fixed points, while the rest of the inputs is mapped to chaotic or periodic output dynamics. It has been shown that QLM3 neuron is able to learn a specific mapping by adaptively adjusting its bifurcation parameter, the idea of which is based on the principles of parametric control of logistic maps [Proceedings of the International Symposium on Nonlinear Theory and its Applications (NOLTA'97), Honolulu, HI, 1997; Proceedings of SPIE, 2000]. Learning algorithm for the bifurcation parameter is proposed, which employs the error gradient descent method.

  18. Biomechanics of Single Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bernick, Kristin B.; Prevost, Thibault P.; Suresh, Subra; Socrate, Simona

    2011-01-01

    This study presents experimental results and computational analysis of the large strain dynamic behavior of single neurons in vitro with the objective of formulating a novel quantitative framework for the biomechanics of cortical neurons. Relying on the atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique, novel testing protocols are developed to enable the characterization of neural soma deformability over a range of indentation rates spanning three orders of magnitude – 10, 1, and 0.1 μm/s. Modified spherical AFM probes were utilized to compress the cell bodies of neonatal rat cortical neurons in load, unload, reload and relaxation conditions. The cell response showed marked hysteretic features, strong non-linearities, and substantial time/rate dependencies. The rheological data were complemented with geometrical measurements of cell body morphology, i.e. cross-diameter and height estimates. A constitutive model, validated by the present experiments, is proposed to quantify the mechanical behavior of cortical neurons. The model aimed to correlate empirical findings with measurable degrees of (hyper-) elastic resilience and viscosity at the cell level. The proposed formulation, predicated upon previous constitutive model developments undertaken at the cortical tissue level, was implemented into a three-dimensional finite element framework. The simulated cell response was calibrated to the experimental measurements under the selected test conditions, providing a novel single cell model that could form the basis for further refinements. PMID:20971217

  19. [The ontogeny of the mirror neuron system].

    PubMed

    Myowa-Yamakoshi, Masako

    2014-06-01

    Abstract Humans utilize the mirror neuron system to understand and predict others' actions. However, the ontogeny of the mirror neuron system remains unknown. Whether mirror neuron function is an innate trait or whether mirror neurons acquire their sensorimotor matching properties ontogenetically remains to be clarified. In this paper, I review the ontogenetic theory of the mirror neuron system. I then discuss the functioning of the mirror neuron system in the context of social cognitive abilities, which are unique to humans. Recently, some researchers argue that it is too early to interpret the function of mirror neurons as an understanding of the underlying psychological states of others. They imply that such functioning would require inferential cognitive processes that are known to involve areas outside the mirror neuron system. Filling in this missing link may be the key to elucidating the unique ability of humans to understand others' actions.

  20. Neuronal development: neighbors have to be different.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Thomas

    2007-12-18

    The assembly of neurons into functional circuits requires a multitude of cellular recognition events. Recent work on the hypervariable Drosophila Dscam gene revealed how a vast number of cell adhesion proteins contributes to neuronal patterning.

  1. Advances in applications of spiking neuron networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cios, Krzysztof J.; Sala, Dorel M.

    2000-03-01

    In this paper, we present new findings in constructing and applications of artificial neural networks that use a biologically inspired spiking neuron model. The used model is a point neuron with the interaction between neurons described by postsynaptic potentials. The synaptic plasticity is achieved by using a temporal correlation learning rule, specified as a function of time difference between the firings of pre- and post-synaptic neurons. Using this rule we show how certain associations between neurons in a network of spiking neurons can be implemented. As an example we analyze the dynamic properties of networks of laterally connected spiking neurons and we show their capability to self-organize into topological maps in response to external stimulation. In another application we explore the capability networks of spiking neurons to solve graph algorithms by using temporal coding of distances in a given spatial configuration. The paper underlines the importance of temporal dimension in artificial neural network information processing.

  2. Shape, connectedness and dynamics in neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Comin, Cesar Henrique; da Fontoura Costa, Luciano

    2013-11-15

    The morphology of neurons is directly related to several aspects of the nervous system, including its connectedness, health, development, evolution, dynamics and, ultimately, behavior. Such interplays of the neuronal morphology can be understood within the more general shape-function paradigm. The current article reviews, in an introductory way, some key issues regarding the role of neuronal morphology in the nervous system, with emphasis on works developed in the authors' group. The following topics are addressed: (a) characterization of neuronal shape; (b) stochastic synthesis of neurons and neuronal systems; (c) characterization of the connectivity of neuronal networks by using complex networks concepts; and (d) investigations of influences of neuronal shape on network dynamics. The presented concepts and methods are useful also for several other multiple object systems, such as protein-protein interaction, tissues, aggregates and polymers.

  3. Network of hypothalamic neurons that control appetite.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Jong-Woo

    2015-04-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) controls food intake and energy expenditure via tight coordinations between multiple neuronal populations. Specifically, two distinct neuronal populations exist in the arcuate nucleus of hypothalamus (ARH): the anorexigenic (appetite-suppressing) pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons and the orexigenic (appetite-increasing) neuropeptide Y (NPY)/agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neurons. The coordinated regulation of neuronal circuit involving these neurons is essential in properly maintaining energy balance, and any disturbance therein may result in hyperphagia/obesity or hypophagia/starvation. Thus, adequate knowledge of the POMC and NPY/AgRP neuron physiology is mandatory to understand the pathophysiology of obesity and related metabolic diseases. This review will discuss the history and recent updates on the POMC and NPY/AgRP neuronal circuits, as well as the general anorexigenic and orexigenic circuits in the CNS.

  4. Prospective Coding by Spiking Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Brea, Johanni; Gaál, Alexisz Tamás; Senn, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Animals learn to make predictions, such as associating the sound of a bell with upcoming feeding or predicting a movement that a motor command is eliciting. How predictions are realized on the neuronal level and what plasticity rule underlies their learning is not well understood. Here we propose a biologically plausible synaptic plasticity rule to learn predictions on a single neuron level on a timescale of seconds. The learning rule allows a spiking two-compartment neuron to match its current firing rate to its own expected future discounted firing rate. For instance, if an originally neutral event is repeatedly followed by an event that elevates the firing rate of a neuron, the originally neutral event will eventually also elevate the neuron’s firing rate. The plasticity rule is a form of spike timing dependent plasticity in which a presynaptic spike followed by a postsynaptic spike leads to potentiation. Even if the plasticity window has a width of 20 milliseconds, associations on the time scale of seconds can be learned. We illustrate prospective coding with three examples: learning to predict a time varying input, learning to predict the next stimulus in a delayed paired-associate task and learning with a recurrent network to reproduce a temporally compressed version of a sequence. We discuss the potential role of the learning mechanism in classical trace conditioning. In the special case that the signal to be predicted encodes reward, the neuron learns to predict the discounted future reward and learning is closely related to the temporal difference learning algorithm TD(λ). PMID:27341100

  5. Spiking neuron network Helmholtz machine

    PubMed Central

    Sountsov, Pavel; Miller, Paul

    2015-01-01

    An increasing amount of behavioral and neurophysiological data suggests that the brain performs optimal (or near-optimal) probabilistic inference and learning during perception and other tasks. Although many machine learning algorithms exist that perform inference and learning in an optimal way, the complete description of how one of those algorithms (or a novel algorithm) can be implemented in the brain is currently incomplete. There have been many proposed solutions that address how neurons can perform optimal inference but the question of how synaptic plasticity can implement optimal learning is rarely addressed. This paper aims to unify the two fields of probabilistic inference and synaptic plasticity by using a neuronal network of realistic model spiking neurons to implement a well-studied computational model called the Helmholtz Machine. The Helmholtz Machine is amenable to neural implementation as the algorithm it uses to learn its parameters, called the wake-sleep algorithm, uses a local delta learning rule. Our spiking-neuron network implements both the delta rule and a small example of a Helmholtz machine. This neuronal network can learn an internal model of continuous-valued training data sets without supervision. The network can also perform inference on the learned internal models. We show how various biophysical features of the neural implementation constrain the parameters of the wake-sleep algorithm, such as the duration of the wake and sleep phases of learning and the minimal sample duration. We examine the deviations from optimal performance and tie them to the properties of the synaptic plasticity rule. PMID:25954191

  6. Spiking neuron network Helmholtz machine.

    PubMed

    Sountsov, Pavel; Miller, Paul

    2015-01-01

    An increasing amount of behavioral and neurophysiological data suggests that the brain performs optimal (or near-optimal) probabilistic inference and learning during perception and other tasks. Although many machine learning algorithms exist that perform inference and learning in an optimal way, the complete description of how one of those algorithms (or a novel algorithm) can be implemented in the brain is currently incomplete. There have been many proposed solutions that address how neurons can perform optimal inference but the question of how synaptic plasticity can implement optimal learning is rarely addressed. This paper aims to unify the two fields of probabilistic inference and synaptic plasticity by using a neuronal network of realistic model spiking neurons to implement a well-studied computational model called the Helmholtz Machine. The Helmholtz Machine is amenable to neural implementation as the algorithm it uses to learn its parameters, called the wake-sleep algorithm, uses a local delta learning rule. Our spiking-neuron network implements both the delta rule and a small example of a Helmholtz machine. This neuronal network can learn an internal model of continuous-valued training data sets without supervision. The network can also perform inference on the learned internal models. We show how various biophysical features of the neural implementation constrain the parameters of the wake-sleep algorithm, such as the duration of the wake and sleep phases of learning and the minimal sample duration. We examine the deviations from optimal performance and tie them to the properties of the synaptic plasticity rule.

  7. BlastNeuron for Automated Comparison, Retrieval and Clustering of 3D Neuron Morphologies.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yinan; Long, Fuhui; Qu, Lei; Xiao, Hang; Hawrylycz, Michael; Myers, Eugene W; Peng, Hanchuan

    2015-10-01

    Characterizing the identity and types of neurons in the brain, as well as their associated function, requires a means of quantifying and comparing 3D neuron morphology. Presently, neuron comparison methods are based on statistics from neuronal morphology such as size and number of branches, which are not fully suitable for detecting local similarities and differences in the detailed structure. We developed BlastNeuron to compare neurons in terms of their global appearance, detailed arborization patterns, and topological similarity. BlastNeuron first compares and clusters 3D neuron reconstructions based on global morphology features and moment invariants, independent of their orientations, sizes, level of reconstruction and other variations. Subsequently, BlastNeuron performs local alignment between any pair of retrieved neurons via a tree-topology driven dynamic programming method. A 3D correspondence map can thus be generated at the resolution of single reconstruction nodes. We applied BlastNeuron to three datasets: (1) 10,000+ neuron reconstructions from a public morphology database, (2) 681 newly and manually reconstructed neurons, and (3) neurons reconstructions produced using several independent reconstruction methods. Our approach was able to accurately and efficiently retrieve morphologically and functionally similar neuron structures from large morphology database, identify the local common structures, and find clusters of neurons that share similarities in both morphology and molecular profiles.

  8. Neuronal communication: firing spikes with spikes.

    PubMed

    Brecht, Michael

    2012-08-21

    Spikes of single cortical neurons can exert powerful effects even though most cortical synapses are too weak to fire postsynaptic neurons. A recent study combining single-cell stimulation with population imaging has visualized in vivo postsynaptic firing in genetically identified target cells. The results confirm predictions from in vitro work and might help to understand how the brain reads single-neuron activity.

  9. Ecological constraints on the origin of neurones.

    PubMed

    Monk, Travis; Paulin, Michael G; Green, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The basic functional characteristics of spiking neurones are remarkably similar throughout the animal kingdom. Their core design and function features were presumably established very early in their evolutionary history. Identifying the selection pressures that drove animals to evolve spiking neurones could help us interpret their design and function today. This paper provides a quantitative argument, based on ecology, that animals evolved neurones after they started eating each other, about 550 million years ago. We consider neurones as devices that aid an animal's foraging performance, but incur an energetic cost. We introduce an idealised stochastic model ecosystem of animals and their food, and obtain an analytic expression for the probability that an animal with a neurone will fix in a neurone-less population. Analysis of the fixation probability reveals two key results. First, a neurone will never fix if an animal forages low-value food at high density, even if that neurone incurs no cost. Second, a neurone will fix with high probability if an animal is foraging high-value food at low density, even if that neurone is expensive. These observations indicate that the transition from neurone-less to neurone-armed animals can be facilitated by a transition from filter-feeding or substrate grazing to episodic feeding strategies such as animal-on-animal predation (macrophagy).

  10. A2A Adenosine Receptor (A2AAR) as a Therapeutic Target in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Ahmed S.; El-shishtawy, Mamdouh M.; Zhang, Wenbo; Caldwell, Ruth B.; Liou, Gregory I.

    2011-01-01

    In diabetic retinopathy (DR), abnormalities in vascular and neuronal function are closely related to the local production of inflammatory mediators whose potential source is microglia. A2A adenosine receptor (A2AAR) has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory properties that have not been studied in DR. Here, we evaluate the role of A2AAR and its underlying signaling in retinal complications associated with diabetes. Initial studies in wild-type mice revealed that the treatment with the A2AAR agonist resulted in marked decreases in hyperglycemia-induced retinal cell death and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α release. To further assess the role of A2AAR in DR, we studied the effects of A2AAR ablation on diabetes-induced retinal abnormalities. Diabetic A2AAR−/− mice had significantly more terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling-positive cells, TNF-α release, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression compared with diabetic wild-type mice. To explore a potential mechanism by which A2AAR signaling regulates inflammation in DR, we performed additional studies using microglial cells treated with Amadori-glycated albumin, a risk factor in diabetic disorders. The results showed that activation of A2AAR attenuated Amadori-glycated albumin-induced TNF-α release in a cAMP/exchange protein directly activated by cAMP-dependent mechanism and significantly repressed the inflammatory cascade, C-Raf/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), in activated microglia. Collectively, this work provides pharmacological and genetic evidence for A2AAR signaling as a control point of cell death in DR and suggests that the retinal protective effect of A2AAR is mediated by abrogating the inflammatory response that occurs in microglia via interaction with C-Raf/ERK pathway. PMID:21514428

  11. Semaphorins as mediators of neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Shirvan, A; Ziv, I; Fleminger, G; Shina, R; He, Z; Brudo, I; Melamed, E; Barzilai, A

    1999-09-01

    Shrinkage and collapse of the neuritic network are often observed during the process of neuronal apoptosis. However, the molecular and biochemical basis for the axonal damage associated with neuronal cell death is still unclear. We present evidence for the involvement of axon guidance molecules with repulsive cues in neuronal cell death. Using the differential display approach, an up-regulation of collapsin response mediator protein was detected in sympathetic neurons undergoing dopamine-induced apoptosis. A synchronized induction of mRNA of the secreted collapsin-1 and the intracellular collapsin response mediator protein that preceded commitment of neurons to apoptosis was detected. Antibodies directed against a conserved collapsin-derived peptide provided marked and prolonged protection of several neuronal cell types from dopamine-induced apoptosis. Moreover, neuronal apoptosis was inhibited by antibodies against neuropilin-1, a putative component of the semaphorin III/collapsin-1 receptor. Induction of neuronal apoptosis was also caused by exposure of neurons to semaphorin III-alkaline phosphatase secreted from 293EBNA cells. Anti-collapsin-1 antibodies were effective in blocking the semaphorin III-induced death process. We therefore suggest that, before their death, apoptosis-destined neurons may produce and secrete destructive axon guidance molecules that can affect their neighboring cells and thus transfer a "death signal" across specific and susceptible neuronal populations.

  12. Forward engineering neuronal diversity using direct reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Tsunemoto, Rachel K; Eade, Kevin T; Blanchard, Joel W; Baldwin, Kristin K

    2015-06-03

    The nervous system is comprised of a vast diversity of distinct neural cell types. Differences between neuronal subtypes drive the assembly of neuronal circuits and underlie the subtype specificity of many neurological diseases. Yet, because neurons are irreversibly post-mitotic and not readily available from patients, it has not been feasible to study specific subtypes of human neurons in larger numbers. A powerful means to study neuronal diversity and neurological disease is to establish methods to produce desired neuronal subtypes in vitro. Traditionally this has been accomplished by treating pluripotent or neural stem cells with growth factors and morphogens that recapitulate exogenous developmental signals. These approaches often require extended periods of culture, which can limit their utility. However, more recently, it has become possible to produce neurons directly from fibroblasts using transcription factors and/or microRNAs. This technique referred to as direct reprogramming or transdifferentiation has proven to be a rapid, robust, and reproducible method to generate mature neurons of many different subtypes from multiple cell sources. Here, we highlight recent advances in generating neurons of specific subtypes using direct reprogramming and outline various scenarios in which induced neurons may be applied to studies of neuronal function and neurological disease.

  13. Interactive Exploration for Continuously Expanding Neuron Databases.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongyu; Metaxas, Dimitris N; Lu, Aidong; Zhang, Shaoting

    2017-02-15

    This paper proposes a novel framework to help biologists explore and analyze neurons based on retrieval of data from neuron morphological databases. In recent years, the continuously expanding neuron databases provide a rich source of information to associate neuronal morphologies with their functional properties. We design a coarse-to-fine framework for efficient and effective data retrieval from large-scale neuron databases. In the coarse-level, for efficiency in large-scale, we employ a binary coding method to compress morphological features into binary codes of tens of bits. Short binary codes allow for real-time similarity searching in Hamming space. Because the neuron databases are continuously expanding, it is inefficient to re-train the binary coding model from scratch when adding new neurons. To solve this problem, we extend binary coding with online updating schemes, which only considers the newly added neurons and update the model on-the-fly, without accessing the whole neuron databases. In the fine-grained level, we introduce domain experts/users in the framework, which can give relevance feedback for the binary coding based retrieval results. This interactive strategy can improve the retrieval performance through re-ranking the above coarse results, where we design a new similarity measure and take the feedback into account. Our framework is validated on more than 17,000 neuron cells, showing promising retrieval accuracy and efficiency. Moreover, we demonstrate its use case in assisting biologists to identify and explore unknown neurons.

  14. Stiff substrates enhance cultured neuronal network activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quan-You; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Xie, Jing; Li, Chen-Xu; Chen, Wei-Yi; Liu, Bai-Lin; Wu, Xiao-an; Li, Shu-Na; Huo, Bo; Jiang, Lin-Hua; Zhao, Hu-Cheng

    2014-08-28

    The mechanical property of extracellular matrix and cell-supporting substrates is known to modulate neuronal growth, differentiation, extension and branching. Here we show that substrate stiffness is an important microenvironmental cue, to which mouse hippocampal neurons respond and integrate into synapse formation and transmission in cultured neuronal network. Hippocampal neurons were cultured on polydimethylsiloxane substrates fabricated to have similar surface properties but a 10-fold difference in Young's modulus. Voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel currents determined by patch-clamp recording were greater in neurons on stiff substrates than on soft substrates. Ca(2+) oscillations in cultured neuronal network monitored using time-lapse single cell imaging increased in both amplitude and frequency among neurons on stiff substrates. Consistently, synaptic connectivity recorded by paired recording was enhanced between neurons on stiff substrates. Furthermore, spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic activity became greater and more frequent in neurons on stiff substrates. Evoked excitatory transmitter release and excitatory postsynaptic currents also were heightened at synapses between neurons on stiff substrates. Taken together, our results provide compelling evidence to show that substrate stiffness is an important biophysical factor modulating synapse connectivity and transmission in cultured hippocampal neuronal network. Such information is useful in designing instructive scaffolds or supporting substrates for neural tissue engineering.

  15. Molecular profiling of neurons based on connectivity.

    PubMed

    Ekstrand, Mats I; Nectow, Alexander R; Knight, Zachary A; Latcha, Kaamashri N; Pomeranz, Lisa E; Friedman, Jeffrey M

    2014-05-22

    The complexity and cellular heterogeneity of neural circuitry presents a major challenge to understanding the role of discrete neural populations in controlling behavior. While neuroanatomical methods enable high-resolution mapping of neural circuitry, these approaches do not allow systematic molecular profiling of neurons based on their connectivity. Here, we report the development of an approach for molecularly profiling projective neurons. We show that ribosomes can be tagged with a camelid nanobody raised against GFP and that this system can be engineered to selectively capture translating mRNAs from neurons retrogradely labeled with GFP. Using this system, we profiled neurons projecting to the nucleus accumbens. We then used an AAV to selectively profile midbrain dopamine neurons projecting to the nucleus accumbens. By comparing the captured mRNAs from each experiment, we identified a number of markers specific to VTA dopaminergic projection neurons. The current method provides a means for profiling neurons based on their projections.

  16. Calcium imaging in neuron cell death.

    PubMed

    Calvo, María; Villalobos, Carlos; Núñez, Lucía

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular Ca2+ is involved in control of a large variety of cell functions including apoptosis and neuron cell death. For example, intracellular Ca2+ overload is critical in neuron cell death induced by excitotoxicity. Thus, single cell monitoring of intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt ) in neurons concurrently with apoptosis and neuron cell death is widely required. Procedures for culture and preparation of primary cultures of hippocampal rat neurons and fluorescence imaging of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in Fura2/AM -loaded neurons are described. We also describe a method for apoptosis detection by immunofluorescence imaging. Finally, a simple method for concurrent measurements of [Ca2+]cyt and apoptosis in the same neurons is described.

  17. Using light to probe neuronal function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daria, Vincent R.; Bachor, Hans-A.

    2015-08-01

    In the last few years a multi-disciplinary approach has been launched to investigate the brain using new techniques, which are capable of probing neuronal function across the entire length scales of the brain. Here, we discuss optical tools and spatial light patterning techniques to investigate brain function from the perspective of individual neurons and neuronal circuits. We discuss both biochemical and genetic tools to stimulate neurons, as well as techniques to record neuronal activity. We discuss optical projection and imaging tricks that can be dynamically customized to a particular neuron morphology and neuronal circuit layout facilitating a systematic study of their input/output transfer functions. These optical techniques will play a major role towards understanding the operation of a brain.

  18. Oscillatory integration windows in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nitin; Singh, Swikriti Saran; Stopfer, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Oscillatory synchrony among neurons occurs in many species and brain areas, and has been proposed to help neural circuits process information. One hypothesis states that oscillatory input creates cyclic integration windows: specific times in each oscillatory cycle when postsynaptic neurons become especially responsive to inputs. With paired local field potential (LFP) and intracellular recordings and controlled stimulus manipulations we directly test this idea in the locust olfactory system. We find that inputs arriving in Kenyon cells (KCs) sum most effectively in a preferred window of the oscillation cycle. With a computational model, we show that the non-uniform structure of noise in the membrane potential helps mediate this process. Further experiments performed in vivo demonstrate that integration windows can form in the absence of inhibition and at a broad range of oscillation frequencies. Our results reveal how a fundamental coincidence-detection mechanism in a neural circuit functions to decode temporally organized spiking. PMID:27976720

  19. Oscillatory integration windows in neurons.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nitin; Singh, Swikriti Saran; Stopfer, Mark

    2016-12-15

    Oscillatory synchrony among neurons occurs in many species and brain areas, and has been proposed to help neural circuits process information. One hypothesis states that oscillatory input creates cyclic integration windows: specific times in each oscillatory cycle when postsynaptic neurons become especially responsive to inputs. With paired local field potential (LFP) and intracellular recordings and controlled stimulus manipulations we directly test this idea in the locust olfactory system. We find that inputs arriving in Kenyon cells (KCs) sum most effectively in a preferred window of the oscillation cycle. With a computational model, we show that the non-uniform structure of noise in the membrane potential helps mediate this process. Further experiments performed in vivo demonstrate that integration windows can form in the absence of inhibition and at a broad range of oscillation frequencies. Our results reveal how a fundamental coincidence-detection mechanism in a neural circuit functions to decode temporally organized spiking.

  20. Neuronal Analogues of Conditioning Paradigms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-24

    Although the mechanisms of interneuronal communication have been well established, the changes underlying most forms of learning have thus far eluded...stimulating electrodes on one of the connectives was adjusted so as to produce a small excitatory postsynaptic potential ( EPSP ) in the impaled cell...two stimuli would constitute a neuronal analogue of conditioning by producing an increased EPSP in response to the test stimulus alone. If so, then

  1. Morphine-induced trafficking of a mu-opioid receptor interacting protein in rat locus coeruleus neurons.

    PubMed

    Jaremko, Kellie M; Thompson, Nicholas L; Reyes, Beverly A S; Jin, Jay; Ebersole, Brittany; Jenney, Christopher B; Grigson, Patricia S; Levenson, Robert; Berrettini, Wade H; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J

    2014-04-03

    Opiate addiction is a devastating health problem, with approximately 2million people currently addicted to heroin or non-medical prescription opiates in the United States alone. In neurons, adaptations in cell signaling cascades develop following opioid actions at the mu opioid receptor (MOR). A novel putative target for intervention involves interacting proteins that may regulate trafficking of MOR. Morphine has been shown to induce a re-distribution of a MOR-interacting protein Wntless (WLS, a transport molecule necessary for secretion of neurotrophic Wnt proteins), from cytoplasmic to membrane compartments in rat striatal neurons. Given its opiate-sensitivity and its well-characterized molecular and cellular adaptations to morphine exposure, we investigated the anatomical distribution of WLS and MOR in the rat locus coeruleus (LC)-norepinephrine (NE) system. Dual immunofluorescence microscopy was used to test the hypothesis that WLS is localized to noradrenergic neurons of the LC and that WLS and MOR co-exist in common LC somatodendritic processes, providing an anatomical substrate for their putative interactions. We also hypothesized that morphine would influence WLS distribution in the LC. Rats received saline, morphine or the opiate agonist [d-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly-ol5]-enkephalin (DAMGO), and tissue sections through the LC were processed for immunogold-silver detection of WLS and MOR. Statistical analysis showed a significant re-distribution of WLS to the plasma membrane following morphine treatment in addition to an increase in the proximity of gold-silver labels for MOR and WLS. Following DAMGO treatment, MOR and WLS were predominantly localized within the cytoplasmic compartment when compared to morphine and control. In a separate cohort of rats, brains were obtained from saline-treated or heroin self-administering male rats for pulldown co-immunoprecipitation studies. Results showed an increased association of WLS and MOR following heroin exposure. As the

  2. Morphine-induced trafficking of a mu-opioid receptor interacting protein in rat locus coeruleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jaremko, Kellie M.; Thompson, Nicholas L.; Reyes, Beverly A. S.; Jin, Jay; Ebersole, Brittany; Jenney, Christopher B.; Grigson, Patricia S.; Levenson, Robert; Berrettini, Wade H.; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    Opiate addiction is a devastating health problem, with approximately 2 million people currently addicted to heroin or non-medical prescription opiates in the United States alone. In neurons, adaptations in cell signaling cascades develop following opioid actions at the mu opioid receptor (MOR). A novel putative target for intervention involves interacting proteins that may regulate trafficking of MOR. Morphine has been shown to induce a re-distribution of a MOR-interacting protein Wntless (WLS, a transport molecule necessary for secretion of neurotrophic Wnt proteins), from cytoplasmic to membrane compartments in rat striatal neurons. Given its opiate-sensitivity and its well-characterized molecular and cellular adaptations to morphine exposure, we investigated the anatomical distribution of WLS and MOR in the rat locus coeruleus (LC)-norepinephrine (NE) system. Dual immunofluorescence microscopy was used to test the hypothesis that WLS is localized to noradrenergic neurons of the LC and that WLS and MOR co-exist in common LC somatodendritic processes, providing an anatomical substrate for their putative interactions. We also hypothesized that morphine would influence WLS distribution in the LC. Rats received saline, morphine or the opiate agonist [D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly-ol5]-enkephalin (DAMGO), and tissue sections through the LC were processed for immunogold-silver detection of WLS and MOR. Statistical analysis showed a significant re-distribution of WLS to the plasma membrane following morphine treatment in addition to an increase in the proximity of gold-silver labels for MOR and WLS. Following DAMGO treatment, MOR and WLS were predominantly localized within the cytoplasmic compartment when compared to morphine and control. In a separate cohort of rats, brains were obtained from saline-treated or heroin self-administering male rats for pulldown co-immunoprecipitation studies. Results showed an increased association of WLS and MOR following heroin exposure. As

  3. Automated identification of neurons and their locations.

    PubMed

    Inglis, A; Cruz, L; Roe, D L; Stanley, H E; Rosene, D L; Urbanc, B

    2008-06-01

    Individual locations of many neuronal cell bodies (>10(4)) are needed to enable statistically significant measurements of spatial organization within the brain such as nearest-neighbour and microcolumnarity measurements. In this paper, we introduce an Automated Neuron Recognition Algorithm (ANRA) which obtains the (x, y) location of individual neurons within digitized images of Nissl-stained, 30 microm thick, frozen sections of the cerebral cortex of the Rhesus monkey. Identification of neurons within such Nissl-stained sections is inherently difficult due to the variability in neuron staining, the overlap of neurons, the presence of partial or damaged neurons at tissue surfaces, and the presence of non-neuron objects, such as glial cells, blood vessels, and random artefacts. To overcome these challenges and identify neurons, ANRA applies a combination of image segmentation and machine learning. The steps involve active contour segmentation to find outlines of potential neuron cell bodies followed by artificial neural network training using the segmentation properties (size, optical density, gyration, etc.) to distinguish between neuron and non-neuron segmentations. ANRA positively identifies 86 +/- 5% neurons with 15 +/- 8% error (mean +/- SD) on a wide range of Nissl-stained images, whereas semi-automatic methods obtain 80 +/- 7%/17 +/- 12%. A further advantage of ANRA is that it affords an unlimited increase in speed from semi-automatic methods, and is computationally efficient, with the ability to recognize approximately 100 neurons per minute using a standard personal computer. ANRA is amenable to analysis of huge photo-montages of Nissl-stained tissue, thereby opening the door to fast, efficient and quantitative analysis of vast stores of archival material that exist in laboratories and research collections around the world.

  4. Neuronal regulation of tendon homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Paul W

    2013-08-01

    The regulation of tendon homoeostasis, including adaptation to loading, is still not fully understood. Accumulating data, however, demonstrates that in addition to afferent (sensory) functions, the nervous system, via efferent pathways which are associated with through specific neuronal mediators plays an active role in regulating pain, inflammation and tendon homeostasis. This neuronal regulation of intact-, healing- and tendinopathic tendons has been shown to be mediated by three major groups of molecules including opioid, autonomic and excitatory glutamatergic neuroregulators. In intact healthy tendons the neuromediators are found in the surrounding structures: paratenon, endotenon and epitenon, whereas the proper tendon itself is practically devoid of neurovascular supply. This neuroanatomy reflects that normal tendon homoeostasis is regulated from the tendon surroundings. After injury and during tendon repair, however, there is extensive nerve ingrowth into the tendon proper, followed by a time-dependent emergence of sensory, autonomic and glutamatergic mediators, which amplify and fine-tune inflammation and regulate tendon regeneration. In tendinopathic condition, excessive and protracted presence of sensory and glutamatergic neuromediators has been identified, suggesting involvement in inflammatory, nociceptive and hypertrophic (degenerative) tissue responses. Under experimental and clinical conditions of impaired (e.g. diabetes) as well as excessive (e.g. tendinopathy) neuromediator release, dysfunctional tendon homoeostasis develops resulting in chronic pain and gradual degeneration. Thus there is a prospect that in the future pharmacotherapy and tissue engineering approaches targeting neuronal mediators and their receptors may prove to be effective therapies for painful, degenerative and traumatic tendon disorders.

  5. Neuronal Responses to Physiological Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kagias, Konstantinos; Nehammer, Camilla; Pocock, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Physiological stress can be defined as any external or internal condition that challenges the homeostasis of a cell or an organism. It can be divided into three different aspects: environmental stress, intrinsic developmental stress, and aging. Throughout life all living organisms are challenged by changes in the environment. Fluctuations in oxygen levels, temperature, and redox state for example, trigger molecular events that enable an organism to adapt, survive, and reproduce. In addition to external stressors, organisms experience stress associated with morphogenesis and changes in inner chemistry during normal development. For example, conditions such as intrinsic hypoxia and oxidative stress, due to an increase in tissue mass, have to be confronted by developing embryos in order to complete their development. Finally, organisms face the challenge of stochastic accumulation of molecular damage during aging that results in decline and eventual death. Studies have shown that the nervous system plays a pivotal role in responding to stress. Neurons not only receive and process information from the environment but also actively respond to various stresses to promote survival. These responses include changes in the expression of molecules such as transcription factors and microRNAs that regulate stress resistance and adaptation. Moreover, both intrinsic and extrinsic stresses have a tremendous impact on neuronal development and maintenance with implications in many diseases. Here, we review the responses of neurons to various physiological stressors at the molecular and cellular level. PMID:23112806

  6. Neuronal regulation of tendon homoeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of tendon homoeostasis, including adaptation to loading, is still not fully understood. Accumulating data, however, demonstrates that in addition to afferent (sensory) functions, the nervous system, via efferent pathways which are associated with through specific neuronal mediators plays an active role in regulating pain, inflammation and tendon homeostasis. This neuronal regulation of intact-, healing- and tendinopathic tendons has been shown to be mediated by three major groups of molecules including opioid, autonomic and excitatory glutamatergic neuroregulators. In intact healthy tendons the neuromediators are found in the surrounding structures: paratenon, endotenon and epitenon, whereas the proper tendon itself is practically devoid of neurovascular supply. This neuroanatomy reflects that normal tendon homoeostasis is regulated from the tendon surroundings. After injury and during tendon repair, however, there is extensive nerve ingrowth into the tendon proper, followed by a time-dependent emergence of sensory, autonomic and glutamatergic mediators, which amplify and fine-tune inflammation and regulate tendon regeneration. In tendinopathic condition, excessive and protracted presence of sensory and glutamatergic neuromediators has been identified, suggesting involvement in inflammatory, nociceptive and hypertrophic (degenerative) tissue responses. Under experimental and clinical conditions of impaired (e.g. diabetes) as well as excessive (e.g. tendinopathy) neuromediator release, dysfunctional tendon homoeostasis develops resulting in chronic pain and gradual degeneration. Thus there is a prospect that in the future pharmacotherapy and tissue engineering approaches targeting neuronal mediators and their receptors may prove to be effective therapies for painful, degenerative and traumatic tendon disorders. PMID:23718724

  7. Results on a binding neuron model and their implications for modified hourglass model for neuronal network.

    PubMed

    Arunachalam, Viswanathan; Akhavan-Tabatabaei, Raha; Lopez, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    The classical models of single neuron like Hodgkin-Huxley point neuron or leaky integrate and fire neuron assume the influence of postsynaptic potentials to last till the neuron fires. Vidybida (2008) in a refreshing departure has proposed models for binding neurons in which the trace of an input is remembered only for a finite fixed period of time after which it is forgotten. The binding neurons conform to the behaviour of real neurons and are applicable in constructing fast recurrent networks for computer modeling. This paper develops explicitly several useful results for a binding neuron like the firing time distribution and other statistical characteristics. We also discuss the applicability of the developed results in constructing a modified hourglass network model in which there are interconnected neurons with excitatory as well as inhibitory inputs. Limited simulation results of the hourglass network are presented.

  8. Glutamate neurons are intermixed with midbrain dopamine neurons in nonhuman primates and humans

    PubMed Central

    Root, David H.; Wang, Hui-Ling; Liu, Bing; Barker, David J.; Mód, László; Szocsics, Péter; Silva, Afonso C.; Maglóczky, Zsófia; Morales, Marisela

    2016-01-01

    The rodent ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC) contain dopamine neurons intermixed with glutamate neurons (expressing vesicular glutamate transporter 2; VGluT2), which play roles in reward and aversion. However, identifying the neuronal compositions of the VTA and SNC in higher mammals has remained challenging. Here, we revealed VGluT2 neurons within the VTA and SNC of nonhuman primates and humans by simultaneous detection of VGluT2 mRNA and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; for identification of dopamine neurons). We found that several VTA subdivisions share similar cellular compositions in nonhuman primates and humans; their rostral linear nuclei have a high prevalence of VGluT2 neurons lacking TH; their paranigral and parabrachial pigmented nuclei have mostly TH neurons, and their parabrachial pigmented nuclei have dual VGluT2-TH neurons. Within nonhuman primates and humans SNC, the vast majority of neurons are TH neurons but VGluT2 neurons were detected in the pars lateralis subdivision. The demonstration that midbrain dopamine neurons are intermixed with glutamate or glutamate-dopamine neurons from rodents to humans offers new opportunities for translational studies towards analyzing the roles that each of these neurons play in human behavior and in midbrain-associated illnesses such as addiction, depression, schizophrenia, and Parkinson’s disease. PMID:27477243

  9. Optimization Methods for Spiking Neurons and Networks

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Alexander; Orchard, Garrick; Dong, Yi; Mihalaş, Ştefan; Niebur, Ernst; Tapson, Jonathan; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    Spiking neurons and spiking neural circuits are finding uses in a multitude of tasks such as robotic locomotion control, neuroprosthetics, visual sensory processing, and audition. The desired neural output is achieved through the use of complex neuron models, or by combining multiple simple neurons into a network. In either case, a means for configuring the neuron or neural circuit is required. Manual manipulation of parameters is both time consuming and non-intuitive due to the nonlinear relationship between parameters and the neuron’s output. The complexity rises even further as the neurons are networked and the systems often become mathematically intractable. In large circuits, the desired behavior and timing of action potential trains may be known but the timing of the individual action potentials is unknown and unimportant, whereas in single neuron systems the timing of individual action potentials is critical. In this paper, we automate the process of finding parameters. To configure a single neuron we derive a maximum likelihood method for configuring a neuron model, specifically the Mihalas–Niebur Neuron. Similarly, to configure neural circuits, we show how we use genetic algorithms (GAs) to configure parameters for a network of simple integrate and fire with adaptation neurons. The GA approach is demonstrated both in software simulation and hardware implementation on a reconfigurable custom very large scale integration chip. PMID:20959265

  10. Neurons containing hypocretin (orexin) project to multiple neuronal systems.

    PubMed

    Peyron, C; Tighe, D K; van den Pol, A N; de Lecea, L; Heller, H C; Sutcliffe, J G; Kilduff, T S

    1998-12-01

    The novel neuropeptides called hypocretins (orexins) have recently been identified as being localized exclusively in cell bodies in a subregion of the tuberal part of the hypothalamus. The structure of the hypocretins, their accumulation in vesicles of axon terminals, and their excitatory effect on cultured hypothalamic neurons suggest that the hypocretins function in intercellular communication. To characterize these peptides further and to help understand what physiological functions they may serve, we undertook an immunohistochemical study to examine the distribution of preprohypocretin-immunoreactive neurons and fibers in the rat brain. Preprohypocretin-positive neurons were found in the perifornical nucleus and in the dorsal and lateral hypothalamic areas. These cells were distinct from those that express melanin-concentrating hormone. Although they represent a restricted group of cells, their projections were widely distributed in the brain. We observed labeled fibers throughout the hypothalamus. The densest extrahypothalamic projection was found in the locus coeruleus. Fibers were also seen in the septal nuclei, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the paraventricular and reuniens nuclei of the thalamus, the zona incerta, the subthalamic nucleus, the central gray, the substantia nigra, the raphe nuclei, the parabrachial area, the medullary reticular formation, and the nucleus of the solitary tract. Less prominent projections were found in cortical regions, central and anterior amygdaloid nuclei, and the olfactory bulb. These results suggest that hypocretins are likely to have a role in physiological functions in addition to food intake such as regulation of blood pressure, the neuroendocrine system, body temperature, and the sleep-waking cycle.

  11. Iron is essential for neuron development and memory function in mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Erik S; Tkac, Ivan; Magid, Rhamy; O'Connor, Michael B; Andrews, Nancy C; Schallert, Timothy; Gunshin, Hiromi; Georgieff, Michael K; Petryk, Anna

    2009-04-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most prevalent micronutrient deficiency in the world and it affects neurobehavioral outcome. It is unclear whether the effect of dietary ID on the brain is due to the lack of neuronal iron or from other processes occurring in conjunction with ID (e.g. hypoxia due to anemia). We delineated the role of murine Slc11a2 [divalent metal ion transporter-1 (DMT-1)] in hippocampal neuronal iron uptake during development and memory formation. Camk2a gene promoter-driven cre recombinase (Cre) transgene (Camk2a-Cre) mice were mated with Slc11a2 flox/flox mice to obtain nonanemic Slc11a2(hipp/hipp) (double mutant, hippocampal neuron-specific knockout of Slc11a2(hipp/hipp)) mice, the first conditionally targeted model of iron uptake in the brain. Slc11a2(hipp/hipp) mice had lower hippocampal iron content; altered developmental expression of genes involved in iron homeostasis, energy metabolism, and dendrite morphogenesis; reductions in markers for energy metabolism and glutamatergic neurotransmission on magnetic resonance spectroscopy; and altered pyramidal neuron dendrite morphology in area 1 of Ammon's Horn in the hippocampus. Slc11a2(hipp/hipp) mice did not reach the criterion on a difficult spatial navigation test but were able to learn a spatial navigation task on an easier version of the Morris water maze (MWM). Learning of the visual cued task did not differ between the Slc11a2(WT/WT) and Slc11a2(hipp/hipp) mice. Slc11a2(WT/WT) mice had upregulation of genes involved in iron uptake and metabolism in response to MWM training, and Slc11a2(hipp/hipp) mice had differential expression of these genes compared with Slc11a2(WT/WT) mice. Neuronal iron uptake by DMT-1 is essential for normal hippocampal neuronal development and Slc11a2 expression is induced by spatial memory training. Deletion of Slc11a2 disrupts hippocampal neuronal development and spatial memory behavior.

  12. Glutamatergic Nonpyramidal Neurons From Neocortical Layer VI and Their Comparison With Pyramidal and Spiny Stellate Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Andjelic, Sofija; Gallopin, Thierry; Cauli, Bruno; Hill, Elisa L.; Roux, Lisa; Badr, Sammy; Hu, Emilie; Tamás, Gábor; Lambolez, Bertrand

    2009-01-01

    The deeper part of neocortical layer VI is dominated by nonpyramidal neurons, which lack a prominent vertically ascending dendrite and predominantly establish corticocortical connections. These neurons were studied in rat neocortical slices using patch-clamp, single-cell reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, and biocytin labeling. The majority of these neurons expressed the vesicular glutamate transporter but not glutamic acid decarboxylase, suggesting that a high proportion of layer VI nonpyramidal neurons are glutamatergic. Indeed, they exhibited numerous dendritic spines and established asymmetrical synapses. Our sample of glutamatergic nonpyramidal neurons displayed a wide variety of somatodendritic morphologies and a subset of these cells expressed the Nurr1 mRNA, a marker for ipsilateral, but not commissural corticocortical projection neurons in layer VI. Comparison with spiny stellate and pyramidal neurons from other layers showed that glutamatergic neurons consistently exhibited a low occurrence of GABAergic interneuron markers and regular spiking firing patterns. Analysis of electrophysiological diversity using unsupervised clustering disclosed three groups of cells. Layer V pyramidal neurons were segregated into a first group, whereas a second group consisted of a subpopulation of layer VI neurons exhibiting tonic firing. A third heterogeneous cluster comprised spiny stellate, layer II/III pyramidal, and layer VI neurons exhibiting adaptive firing. The segregation of layer VI neurons in two different clusters did not correlate either with their somatodendritic morphologies or with Nurr1 expression. Our results suggest that electrophysiological similarities between neocortical glutamatergic neurons extend beyond layer positioning, somatodendritic morphology, and projection specificity. PMID:19052106

  13. Glutamatergic nonpyramidal neurons from neocortical layer VI and their comparison with pyramidal and spiny stellate neurons.

    PubMed

    Andjelic, Sofija; Gallopin, Thierry; Cauli, Bruno; Hill, Elisa L; Roux, Lisa; Badr, Sammy; Hu, Emilie; Tamás, Gábor; Lambolez, Bertrand

    2009-02-01

    The deeper part of neocortical layer VI is dominated by nonpyramidal neurons, which lack a prominent vertically ascending dendrite and predominantly establish corticocortical connections. These neurons were studied in rat neocortical slices using patch-clamp, single-cell reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and biocytin labeling. The majority of these neurons expressed the vesicular glutamate transporter but not glutamic acid decarboxylase, suggesting that a high proportion of layer VI nonpyramidal neurons are glutamatergic. Indeed, they exhibited numerous dendritic spines and established asymmetrical synapses. Our sample of glutamatergic nonpyramidal neurons displayed a wide variety of somatodendritic morphologies and a subset of these cells expressed the Nurr1 mRNA, a marker for ipsilateral, but not commissural corticocortical projection neurons in layer VI. Comparison with spiny stellate and pyramidal neurons from other layers showed that glutamatergic neurons consistently exhibited a low occurrence of GABAergic interneuron markers and regular spiking firing patterns. Analysis of electrophysiological diversity using unsupervised clustering disclosed three groups of cells. Layer V pyramidal neurons were segregated into a first group, whereas a second group consisted of a subpopulation of layer VI neurons exhibiting tonic firing. A third heterogeneous cluster comprised spiny stellate, layer II/III pyramidal, and layer VI neurons exhibiting adaptive firing. The segregation of layer VI neurons in two different clusters did not correlate either with their somatodendritic morphologies or with Nurr1 expression. Our results suggest that electrophysiological similarities between neocortical glutamatergic neurons extend beyond layer positioning, somatodendritic morphology, and projection specificity.

  14. Human Cerebrospinal Fluid Promotes Neuronal Viability and Activity of Hippocampal Neuronal Circuits In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Alcazar, Marta; Culley, Georgia; Lyckenvik, Tim; Mobarrez, Kristoffer; Bjorefeldt, Andreas; Wasling, Pontus; Seth, Henrik; Asztely, Frederik; Harrer, Andrea; Iglseder, Bernhard; Aigner, Ludwig; Hanse, Eric; Illes, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    For decades it has been hypothesized that molecules within the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diffuse into the brain parenchyma and influence the function of neurons. However, the functional consequences of CSF on neuronal circuits are largely unexplored and unknown. A major reason for this is the absence of appropriate neuronal in vitro model systems, and it is uncertain if neurons cultured in pure CSF survive and preserve electrophysiological functionality in vitro. In this article, we present an approach to address how human CSF (hCSF) influences neuronal circuits in vitro. We validate our approach by comparing the morphology, viability, and electrophysiological function of single neurons and at the network level in rat organotypic slice and primary neuronal cultures cultivated either in hCSF or in defined standard culture media. Our results demonstrate that rodent hippocampal slices and primary neurons cultured in hCSF maintain neuronal morphology and preserve synaptic transmission. Importantly, we show that hCSF increases neuronal viability and the number of electrophysiologically active neurons in comparison to the culture media. In summary, our data indicate that hCSF represents a physiological environment for neurons in vitro and a superior culture condition compared to the defined standard media. Moreover, this experimental approach paves the way to assess the functional consequences of CSF on neuronal circuits as well as suggesting a novel strategy for central nervous system (CNS) disease modeling. PMID:26973467

  15. Selective Neuronal Vulnerability in Human Prion Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Guentchev, Marin; Wanschitz, Julia; Voigtländer, Till; Flicker, Helga; Budka, Herbert

    1999-01-01

    Human transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) or prion diseases are neurodegenerative disorders of infectious, inherited or sporadic origin and include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease (GSS), kuru and fatal familial insomnia (FFI). Clinicopathologic features of FFI differ markedly from other human TSEs. Previous studies demonstrated selective neuronal vulnerability of parvalbumin positive (PV+) GABAergic inhibitory interneurons in sporadic CJD and experimental TSEs. In this report we show uniform severe loss of PV+ neurons also in other TSEs such as GSS, kuru, new variant and familial CJD. In contrast, these neurons are mostly well preserved, or only moderately reduced, in FFI. Only PV+ neurons surrounded by isolectin-B4 positive perineuronal nets were severely affected in TSEs, suggesting a factor residing in this type of extracellular matrix around PV+ neurons as modulator for the selective neuronal vulnerability. PMID:10550300

  16. Morphological Neuron Classification Using Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Vasques, Xavier; Vanel, Laurent; Villette, Guillaume; Cif, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Classification and quantitative characterization of neuronal morphologies from histological neuronal reconstruction is challenging since it is still unclear how to delineate a neuronal cell class and which are the best features to define them by. The morphological neuron characterization represents a primary source to address anatomical comparisons, morphometric analysis of cells, or brain modeling. The objectives of this paper are (i) to develop and integrate a pipeline that goes from morphological feature extraction to classification and (ii) to assess and compare the accuracy of machine learning algorithms to classify neuron morphologies. The algorithms were trained on 430 digitally reconstructed neurons subjectively classified into layers and/or m-types using young and/or adult development state population of the somatosensory cortex in rats. For supervised algorithms, linear discriminant analysis provided better classification results in comparison with others. For unsupervised algorithms, the affinity propagation and the Ward algorithms provided slightly better results.

  17. MRI of neuronal plasticity in rodent models.

    PubMed

    Pelled, Galit

    2011-01-01

    Modifications in the behavior and architecture of neuronal networks are well documented to occur in association with learning and memory, as well as following injury. These plasticity mechanisms are crucial to ensure adequate processing of stimuli, and they also dictate the degree of recovery following peripheral or central nervous system injury. Nevertheless, the underlying neuronal mechanisms that determine the degree of plasticity of neuronal pathways are not fully understood. Recent developments in animal-dedicated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners and related hardware afford a high spatial and temporal resolution, making functional MRI and manganese-enhanced MRI emerging tools for studying reorganization of neuronal pathways in rodent models. Many of the observed changes in neuronal functions in rodent's brains following injury discussed here agree with clinical human fMRI findings. This demonstrates that animal model imaging can have a significant clinical impact in the neuronal plasticity and rehabilitation arenas.

  18. Morphological Neuron Classification Using Machine Learning

    PubMed Central

    Vasques, Xavier; Vanel, Laurent; Villette, Guillaume; Cif, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Classification and quantitative characterization of neuronal morphologies from histological neuronal reconstruction is challenging since it is still unclear how to delineate a neuronal cell class and which are the best features to define them by. The morphological neuron characterization represents a primary source to address anatomical comparisons, morphometric analysis of cells, or brain modeling. The objectives of this paper are (i) to develop and integrate a pipeline that goes from morphological feature extraction to classification and (ii) to assess and compare the accuracy of machine learning algorithms to classify neuron morphologies. The algorithms were trained on 430 digitally reconstructed neurons subjectively classified into layers and/or m-types using young and/or adult development state population of the somatosensory cortex in rats. For supervised algorithms, linear discriminant analysis provided better classification results in comparison with others. For unsupervised algorithms, the affinity propagation and the Ward algorithms provided slightly better results. PMID:27847467

  19. Anisotropic path searching for automatic neuron reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jun; Zhao, Ting; Lee, Tzumin; Myers, Eugene; Peng, Hanchuan

    2011-10-01

    Full reconstruction of neuron morphology is of fundamental interest for the analysis and understanding of their functioning. We have developed a novel method capable of automatically tracing neurons in three-dimensional microscopy data. In contrast to template-based methods, the proposed approach makes no assumptions about the shape or appearance of neurite structure. Instead, an efficient seeding approach is applied to capture complex neuronal structures and the tracing problem is solved by computing the optimal reconstruction with a weighted graph. The optimality is determined by the cost function designed for the path between each pair of seeds and by topological constraints defining the component interrelations and completeness. In addition, an automated neuron comparison method is introduced for performance evaluation and structure analysis. The proposed algorithm is computationally efficient and has been validated using different types of microscopy data sets including Drosophila's projection neurons and fly neurons with presynaptic sites. In all cases, the approach yielded promising results.

  20. A chimeric path to neuronal synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essaki Arumugam, Easwara Moorthy; Spano, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Synchronization of neuronal activity is associated with neurological disorders such as epilepsy. This process of neuronal synchronization is not fully understood. To further our understanding, we have experimentally studied the progression of this synchronization from normal neuronal firing to full synchronization. We implemented nine FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons (a simplified Hodgkin-Huxley model) via discrete electronics. For different coupling parameters (synaptic strengths), the neurons in the ring were either unsynchronized or completely synchronized when locally coupled in a ring. When a single long-range connection (nonlocal coupling) was introduced, an intermediate state known as a chimera appeared. The results indicate that (1) epilepsy is likely not only a dynamical disease but also a topological disease, strongly tied to the connectivity of the underlying network of neurons, and (2) the synchronization process in epilepsy may not be an "all or none" phenomenon, but can pass through an intermediate stage (chimera).

  1. A chimeric path to neuronal synchronization

    SciTech Connect

    Essaki Arumugam, Easwara Moorthy; Spano, Mark L.

    2015-01-15

    Synchronization of neuronal activity is associated with neurological disorders such as epilepsy. This process of neuronal synchronization is not fully understood. To further our understanding, we have experimentally studied the progression of this synchronization from normal neuronal firing to full synchronization. We implemented nine FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons (a simplified Hodgkin-Huxley model) via discrete electronics. For different coupling parameters (synaptic strengths), the neurons in the ring were either unsynchronized or completely synchronized when locally coupled in a ring. When a single long-range connection (nonlocal coupling) was introduced, an intermediate state known as a chimera appeared. The results indicate that (1) epilepsy is likely not only a dynamical disease but also a topological disease, strongly tied to the connectivity of the underlying network of neurons, and (2) the synchronization process in epilepsy may not be an “all or none” phenomenon, but can pass through an intermediate stage (chimera)

  2. A chimeric path to neuronal synchronization.

    PubMed

    Essaki Arumugam, Easwara Moorthy; Spano, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    Synchronization of neuronal activity is associated with neurological disorders such as epilepsy. This process of neuronal synchronization is not fully understood. To further our understanding, we have experimentally studied the progression of this synchronization from normal neuronal firing to full synchronization. We implemented nine FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons (a simplified Hodgkin-Huxley model) via discrete electronics. For different coupling parameters (synaptic strengths), the neurons in the ring were either unsynchronized or completely synchronized when locally coupled in a ring. When a single long-range connection (nonlocal coupling) was introduced, an intermediate state known as a chimera appeared. The results indicate that (1) epilepsy is likely not only a dynamical disease but also a topological disease, strongly tied to the connectivity of the underlying network of neurons, and (2) the synchronization process in epilepsy may not be an "all or none" phenomenon, but can pass through an intermediate stage (chimera).

  3. Nasal neuron PET imaging quantifies neuron generation and degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Van de Bittner, Genevieve C.; Riley, Misha M.; Cao, Luxiang; Herrick, Scott P.; Ricq, Emily L.; O’Neill, Michael J.; Ahmed, Zeshan; Murray, Tracey K.; Smith, Jaclyn E.; Wang, Changning; Schroeder, Frederick A.; Albers, Mark W.; Hooker, Jacob M.

    2017-01-01

    Olfactory dysfunction is broadly associated with neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases and predicts increased mortality rates in healthy individuals. Conventional measurements of olfactory health assess odor processing pathways within the brain and provide a li