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Sample records for a2 peroxidase expression

  1. Heterologous Expression of Peroxidases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Weert, Sandra; Lokman, B. Christien

    The industrial importance of peroxidases has led to much research in the past two decades on the development of a cost effective and efficient production process for peroxidases. Unfortunately, even today, no clear answers can be given to questions such as (1) should the peroxidase be expressed in bacteria, yeast, or fungi? (2) which is the optimal production strain (e.g., protease deficient, heme overproducing)? (3) which expression vector should be chosen? and (4) what purification method should be used? Strategies that have proven successful for one peroxidase can fail for another one; for each individual peroxidase, a new strategy has to be developed. This chapter gives an overview of the heterologous production of heme containing peroxidases in various systems. It focuses on the heterologous production of fungal peroxidases as they have been subject of considerable research for their industrial and environmental applications. An earlier study has also been performed by Conesa et al. [1] and is extended with recent proceedings.

  2. Antisense RNA suppression of peroxidase gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.; Bradford, S.; De Leon, F.D. )

    1989-04-01

    The 5{prime} half the anionic peroxidase cDNA of tobacco was inserted into a CaMV 35S promoter/terminator expression cassette in the antisense configuration. This was inserted into the Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation vector pCIBIO which includes kanamycin selection, transformed into two species of tobacco (N. tabacum and M. sylvestris), and plants were subsequently regenerated on kanamycin. Transgenic plants were analyzed for peroxidase expression and found to have 3-5 fold lower levels of peroxidase than wild-type plants. Isoelectric focusing demonstrated that the antisense RNA only suppressed the anionic peroxidase. Wound-induced peroxidase expression was found not to be affected by the antisense RNA. Northern blots show a greater than 5 fold suppression of anionic peroxidase mRNA in leaf tissue, and the antisense RNA was expressed at a level 2 fold over the endogenous mRNA. Plants were self-pollinated and F1 plants showed normal segregation. N. sylvestris transgenic plants with the lowest level of peroxidase are epinastic, and preliminary results indicate elevated auxin levels. Excised pith tissue from both species of transgenic plants rapidly collapse when exposed to air, while pith tissue from wild-type plants showed little change when exposed to air. Further characterization of these phenotypes is currently being made.

  3. Differential activity and structure of highly similar peroxidases. Spectroscopic, crystallographic, and enzymatic analyses of lignifying Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase A2 and horseradish peroxidase A2.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, K L; Indiani, C; Henriksen, A; Feis, A; Becucci, M; Gajhede, M; Smulevich, G; Welinder, K G

    2001-09-18

    Anionic Arabidopsis thaliana peroxidase ATP A2 was expressed in Escherichia coli and used as a model for the 95% identical commercially available horseradish peroxidase HRP A2. The crystal structure of ATP A2 at 1.45 A resolution at 100 K showed a water molecule only 2.1 A from heme iron [Ostergaard, L., et al. (2000) Plant Mol. Biol. 44, 231-243], whereas spectroscopic studies of HRP A2 in solution at room temperature [Feis, A., et al. (1998) J. Raman Spectrosc. 29, 933-938] showed five-coordinated heme iron, which is common in peroxidases. Presented here, the X-ray crystallographic, single-crystal, and solution resonance Raman studies at room temperature confirmed that the sixth coordination position of heme iron of ATP A2 is essentially vacant. Furthermore, electronic absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopy showed that the heme environments of recombinant ATP A2 and glycosylated plant HRP A2 are indistinguishable at neutral and alkaline pH, from room temperature to 12 K, and are highly flexible compared with other plant peroxidases. Ostergaard et al. (2000) also demonstrated that ATP A2 expression and lignin formation coincide in Arabidopsis tissues, and docking of lignin precursors into the substrate binding site of ATP A2 predicted that coniferyl and p-coumaryl alcohols were good substrates. In contrast, the additional methoxy group of the sinapyl moiety gave rise to steric hindrance, not only in A2 type peroxidases but also in all peroxidases. We confirm these predictions for ATP A2, HRP A2, and HRP C. The specific activity of ATP A2 was lower than that of HRP A2 (pH 4-8), although a steady-state study at pH 5 demonstrated very little difference in their rate constants for reaction with H2O2 (k1 = 1.0 microM(-1) x s(-1). The oxidation of coniferyl alcohol, ferulic, p-coumaric, and sinapic acids by HRP A2, and ATP A2, however, gave modest but significantly different k3 rate constants of 8.7 +/- 0.3, 4.0 +/- 0.2, 0.70 +/- 0.03, and 0.04 +/- 0.2 microM(-1) x

  4. Widespread Occurrence of Expressed Fungal Secretory Peroxidases in Forest Soils

    PubMed Central

    Kellner, Harald; Luis, Patricia; Pecyna, Marek J.; Barbi, Florian; Kapturska, Danuta; Krüger, Dirk; Zak, Donald R.; Marmeisse, Roland; Vandenbol, Micheline; Hofrichter, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fungal secretory peroxidases mediate fundamental ecological functions in the conversion and degradation of plant biomass. Many of these enzymes have strong oxidizing activities towards aromatic compounds and are involved in the degradation of plant cell wall (lignin) and humus. They comprise three major groups: class II peroxidases (including lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, versatile peroxidase and generic peroxidase), dye-decolorizing peroxidases, and heme-thiolate peroxidases (e.g. unspecific/aromatic peroxygenase, chloroperoxidase). Here, we have repeatedly observed a widespread expression of all major peroxidase groups in leaf and needle litter across a range of forest ecosystems (e.g. Fagus, Picea, Acer, Quercus, and Populus spp.), which are widespread in Europe and North America. Manganese peroxidases and unspecific peroxygenases were found expressed in all nine investigated forest sites, and dye-decolorizing peroxidases were observed in five of the nine sites, thereby indicating biological significance of these enzymes for fungal physiology and ecosystem processes. Transcripts of selected secretory peroxidase genes were also analyzed in pure cultures of several litter-decomposing species and other fungi. Using this information, we were able to match, in environmental litter samples, two manganese peroxidase sequences to Mycena galopus and Mycena epipterygia and one unspecific peroxygenase transcript to Mycena galopus, suggesting an important role of this litter- and coarse woody debris-dwelling genus in the disintegration and transformation of litter aromatics and organic matter formation. PMID:24763280

  5. Widespread occurrence of expressed fungal secretory peroxidases in forest soils.

    PubMed

    Kellner, Harald; Luis, Patricia; Pecyna, Marek J; Barbi, Florian; Kapturska, Danuta; Krüger, Dirk; Zak, Donald R; Marmeisse, Roland; Vandenbol, Micheline; Hofrichter, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Fungal secretory peroxidases mediate fundamental ecological functions in the conversion and degradation of plant biomass. Many of these enzymes have strong oxidizing activities towards aromatic compounds and are involved in the degradation of plant cell wall (lignin) and humus. They comprise three major groups: class II peroxidases (including lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, versatile peroxidase and generic peroxidase), dye-decolorizing peroxidases, and heme-thiolate peroxidases (e.g. unspecific/aromatic peroxygenase, chloroperoxidase). Here, we have repeatedly observed a widespread expression of all major peroxidase groups in leaf and needle litter across a range of forest ecosystems (e.g. Fagus, Picea, Acer, Quercus, and Populus spp.), which are widespread in Europe and North America. Manganese peroxidases and unspecific peroxygenases were found expressed in all nine investigated forest sites, and dye-decolorizing peroxidases were observed in five of the nine sites, thereby indicating biological significance of these enzymes for fungal physiology and ecosystem processes. Transcripts of selected secretory peroxidase genes were also analyzed in pure cultures of several litter-decomposing species and other fungi. Using this information, we were able to match, in environmental litter samples, two manganese peroxidase sequences to Mycena galopus and Mycena epipterygia and one unspecific peroxygenase transcript to Mycena galopus, suggesting an important role of this litter- and coarse woody debris-dwelling genus in the disintegration and transformation of litter aromatics and organic matter formation.

  6. Peroxidases.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, P J

    2000-12-01

    The family of human peroxidases described includes myeloperoxidase, eosinophil peroxidase, uterine peroxidase, lactoperoxidase, salivary peroxidase, thyroid peroxidase and prostaglandin H1/2 synthases. The chemical identity of the peroxidase compound I and II oxidation states for the different peroxidases are compared. The identities of the distal and proximal amino acids of the catalytic site of each peroxidase are also compared. The gene characteristics and chromosomal location of the human peroxidase family have been tabulated and their molecular evolution discussed. Myeloperoxidase polymorphism and the mutations identified so far that affect myeloperoxidase activity and modulate their susceptibility to disease is described. The mechanisms for hypohalous and hypothiocyanate formation by the various peroxidases have been compared. The cellular function of the peroxidases and their hypohalites have been described as well as their inflammatory effects. The peroxidase catalysed cooxidation of drugs and xenobiotics that results in oxygen activation by redox cycling has been included. Low-density lipoprotein oxidation (initiation of atherosclerosis), chemical carcinogenesis, idiosyncratic drug reactions (e.g. agranulocytosis), liver necrosis or teratogenicity initiated by the cooxidation of endogenous substrates, plasma amino acids, drugs and xenobiotics catalysed by peroxidases or peroxidase containing cells have also been compared. Finally, peroxidase inhibitors currently in use for treating various diseases are described.

  7. Peroxidase gene expression during tomato fruit ripening

    SciTech Connect

    Biggs, M.S.; Flurkey, W.H.; Handa, A.K.

    1987-04-01

    Auxin oxidation has been reported to play a critical role in the initiation of pear fruit ripening and a tomato fruit peroxidase (POD) has been shown to have IAA-oxidase activity. However, little is known about changes in the expression of POD mRNA in tomato fruit development. They are investigating the expression of POD mRNA during tomato fruit maturation. Fruit pericarp tissues from six stages of fruit development and ripening (immature green, mature green, breaker, turning, ripe, and red ripe fruits) were used to extract poly (A)/sup +/ RNAs. These RNAs were translated in vitro in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system using L-/sup 35/S-methionine. The /sup 35/S-labeled products were immunoprecipitated with POD antibodies to determine the relative proportions of POD mRNA. High levels of POD mRNA were present in immature green and mature green pericarp, but declined greatly by the turning stage of fruit ripening. In addition, the distribution of POD mRNA on free vs bound polyribosomes will be presented, as well as the presence or absence of POD mRNA in other tomato tissues.

  8. Fungal laccase, manganese peroxidase and lignin peroxidase: gene expression and regulation.

    PubMed

    Janusz, Grzegorz; Kucharzyk, Katarzyna H; Pawlik, Anna; Staszczak, Magdalena; Paszczynski, Andrzej J

    2013-01-10

    Extensive research efforts have been dedicated to characterizing expression of laccases and peroxidases and their regulation in numerous fungal species. Much attention has been brought to these enzymes broad substrate specificity resulting in oxidation of a variety of organic compounds which brings about possibilities of their utilization in biotechnological and environmental applications. Research attempts have resulted in increased production of both laccases and peroxidases by the aid of heterologous and homologous expression. Through analysis of promoter regions, protein expression patterns and culture conditions manipulations it was possible to compare and identify common pathways of these enzymes' production and secretion. Although laccase and peroxidase proteins have been crystallized and thoroughly analyzed, there are still a lot of questions remaining about their evolutionary origin and the physiological functions. This review describes the present understanding of promoter sequences and correlation between the observed regulatory effects on laccase, manganese peroxidase and lignin peroxidase genes transcript levels and the presence of specific response elements. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Evolution and expression of class III peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Mathé, Catherine; Barre, Annick; Jourda, Cyril; Dunand, Christophe

    2010-08-01

    Class III peroxidases are members of a large multigenic family, only detected in the plant kingdom and absent from green algae sensu stricto (chlorophyte algae or Chlorophyta). Their evolution is thought to be related to the emergence of the land plants. However class III peroxidases are present in a lower copy number in some basal Streptophytes (Charapyceae), which predate land colonization. Gene structures are variable among organisms and within species with respect to the number of introns, but their positions are highly conserved. Their high copy number, as well as their conservation could be related to plant complexity and adaptation to increasing stresses. No specific function has been assigned to respective isoforms, but in large multigenic families, particular structure-function relations can be expected. Plant peroxidase sequences contain highly conserved residues and motifs, variable domains surrounded by conserved residues and present a low identity level among their promoter regions, further suggesting the existence of sub-functionalization of the different isoforms. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Expression of a thioredoxin peroxidase in insulin-producing cells.

    PubMed

    Boschero, A C; Stoppiglia, L F; Collares-Buzato, C B; Bosqueiro, J R; Delghingaro-Augusto, V; Leite, A; Carvalho, C P F; Netto, L E S; Carneiro, E M

    2002-12-01

    The presence of thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx), also known as thiol specific antioxidant (TSA), was investigated in neonatal and adult rat islets, and in the beta-cell line HIT-T15. Western blotting of extracts from neonatal and adult pancreatic islets and from the tumoral cell line HIT-T15 revealed the presence of a 25 kDa protein that comigrated with purified yeast TPx. Endocrine pancreatic TPx accounted for approximately 0.01% of the total protein content. Treatment with H2O2 for 3 h increased the expression of TPx in HIT-T15 cells. The distribution of TPx throughout the islet cells was confirmed by immunocytochemistry. Since pancreatic beta-cells possess a weak antioxidant enzyme defense system, especially with regard to hydrogen peroxidase-decomposing enzymes, the presence of a TPx analog in islets suggests that this enzyme may play a role in protecting pancreatic cells against reactive oxygen species.

  11. Determinants of human plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPx-3) expression.

    PubMed

    Bierl, Charlene; Voetsch, Barbara; Jin, Richard C; Handy, Diane E; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2004-06-25

    Plasma glutathione peroxidase (GPx-3) is a selenocysteine-containing protein with antioxidant properties. GPx-3 deficiency has been associated with cardiovascular disease and stroke. The regulation of GPx-3 expression remains largely uncharacterized, however, and we studied its transcriptional and translational determinants in a cultured cell system. In transient transfections of a renal cell line (Caki-2), the published sequence cloned upstream of a luciferase reporter gene produced minimal activity (relative luminescence (RL) = 0.6 +/- 0.4). Rapid amplification of cDNA ends was used to identify a novel transcription start site that is located 233 bp downstream (3') of the published site and that produced a >25-fold increase in transcriptional activity (RL = 16.8 +/- 1.9; p < 0.0001). Analysis of the novel GPx-3 promoter identified Sp-1- and hypoxia-inducible factor-1-binding sites, as well as the redox-sensitive metal response element and antioxidant response element. Hypoxia was identified as a strong transcriptional regulator of GPx-3 expression, in part through the presence of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1-binding site, leading to an almost 3-fold increase in expression levels after 24 h compared with normoxic conditions (normalized RL = 3.5 +/- 0.3 versus 1.2 +/- 0.1; p < 0.001). We also investigated the role of the translational cofactors tRNA(Sec), SECIS-binding protein-2, and SelD (selenophosphate synthetase D) in GPx-3 protein expression. tRNA(Sec) and SelD significantly enhanced GPx-3 expression, whereas SECIS-binding protein-2 showed a trend toward increased expression. These results demonstrate the presence of a novel functional transcription start site for the human GPx-3 gene with a promoter regulated by hypoxia, and identify unique translational determinants of GPx-3 expression.

  12. Effects of elevated peroxidase levels and corn earworm feeding on gene expression in tomato

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tomato gene arrays were used to investigate how high levels of transgenic peroxidase expression and feeding by the corn earworm, Helicoverpa zea, affected expression of defensive and other genes. High peroxidase activity significantly upregulated proteinase inhibitors and a few other defensive gene...

  13. Three differentially expressed basic peroxidases from wound-lignifying Asparagus officinalis.

    PubMed

    Holm, Kirsten B; Andreasen, Per H; Eckloff, Reinhard M G; Kristensen, Brian K; Rasmussen, Søren K

    2003-10-01

    The activity of ionically bound peroxidases from an asparagus spear increased from 5-24 h post-harvest. Isoelectric focusing showed that the post-harvest increase of the total peroxidase activity was due to the increase of several distinct isoperoxidases. Concomitantly, a decrease in the activity of two anionic peroxidases was observed. Peroxidases with pI 5.9, 6.4 and 9.2 were detected only at 24 h post-harvest, whereas four peroxidases, with pI 8.7, 8.1, 7.4, and 6.7, detected throughout the time-course, increased in their activity. Histochemical staining demonstrated that lignin and peroxidase activity were located in the vascular bundles throughout the period of measurement. Lignin was detected in the cell walls of the protoxylem in the vascular bundles of the asparagus stem. A cDNA library of mRNA isolated from asparagus spears 24 h post-harvest was screened for peroxidases using homologous and heterologous probes. Three clones were isolated and the corresponding mature asparagus peroxidases displayed 70%, 76% and 81% amino acid sequence identity to each other. These new asparagus peroxidases are typical class III plant peroxidases in terms of conserved regions with a calculated pI >9.2, which is consistent with most basic peroxidases. One of the genes was shown to be a constitutively expressed single-copy gene, whereas the others showed an increased expression at post-harvest. The highest similarity in the amino acid sequence (71-77%) was found in peroxidases from roots of winter grown turnip TP7, to Arabidopsis AtP49, to an EST sequence from cotton fibres and to TMV-infected tobacco.

  14. Expression of peroxidase-like genes, H2O2 production, and peroxidase activity during the hypersensitive response to Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria in Capsicum annuum.

    PubMed

    Do, Hyun Mee; Hong, Jeum Kyu; Jung, Ho Won; Kim, Sang Hee; Ham, Jong Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2003-03-01

    Pepper ascorbate peroxidase-like (CAPOA1), thioredoxin peroxidase-like (CAPOT1), and peroxidase-like (CAPO1) clones were isolated from pepper leaves inoculated with avirulent strain Bv5-4a of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria. CAPOA1, CAPOT1, and CAPO1 mRNA disappeared 18 to 30 h after the bacterial infection when the hypersensitive response (HR) was visible. In contrast, peroxidase activity reached a peak at 18 h after infection and then declined at 24 and 30 h when H2O2 accumulation level was maximal. These results suggest that the striking accumulation of H2O2 and strong decrease in peroxidase activity during the programmed cell death may be due to the strong suppression of CAPOA1, CAPOT1, and CAPO1 gene expression. Infection by Phytophthora capsici or Colletotricum gloeosporioides also induced the expression of the three putative peroxidase genes in pepper tissues. CAPOA1 mRNAs were in situ localized in phloem areas of vascular bundles in pepper tissues infected by Colletotricum. coccodes, P. capsici, or C. gloeosporioides. Exogenous treatment with H2O2 strongly induced the CAPOA1 and CAPOT1 transcription 1 h after treatment, while the CAPO1 transcripts accumulated 12 h after H2O2 treatment. We suggest that pepper ascorbate peroxidase and thioredoxin peroxidase genes may function as regulators of H2O2 level and total peroxidase activity in the oxidative burst during the HR to incompatible pathogen interaction in pepper plant.

  15. Manganese regulation of manganese peroxidase expression and lignin degradation by the white rot fungus Dichomitus squalens

    SciTech Connect

    Perie, F.; Gold, M.H. )

    1991-08-01

    Extracellular manganese peroxidase and laccase activities were detected in cultures of Dichomitus squalens (Polyporus anceps) under conditions favoring lignin degradation. In contrast, neither extracellular lignin peroxidase nor aryl alcohol oxidase activity was detected in cultures grown under a wide variety of conditions. The mineralization of {sup 14}C-ring-, -side chain-, and -methoxy-labeled synthetic guaiacyl lignins by D. squalens and the expression of extracellular manganese peroxidase were dependent on the presence of Mn(II), suggesting that manganese peroxidase is an important component of this organism's lignin degradation system. The expression of laccase activity was independent of manganese. In contrast to previous findings with Phanero-chaete chrysosporium, lignin degradation by D. squalens proceeded in the cultures containing excess carbon and nitrogen.

  16. Lignin-degrading peroxidases in white-rot fungus Trametes hirsuta 072. Absolute expression quantification of full multigene family.

    PubMed

    Vasina, Daria V; Moiseenko, Konstantin V; Fedorova, Tatiana V; Tyazhelova, Tatiana V

    2017-01-01

    Ligninolytic heme peroxidases comprise an extensive family of enzymes, which production is characteristic for white-rot Basidiomycota. The majority of fungal heme peroxidases are encoded by multigene families that differentially express closely related proteins. Currently, there were very few attempts to characterize the complete multigene family of heme peroxidases in a single fungus. Here we are focusing on identification and characterization of peroxidase genes, which are transcribed and secreted by basidiomycete Trametes hirsuta 072, an efficient lignin degrader. The T. hirsuta genome contains 18 ligninolytic peroxidase genes encoding 9 putative lignin peroxidases (LiP), 7 putative short manganese peroxidases (MnP) and 2 putative versatile peroxidases (VP). Using ddPCR method we have quantified the absolute expression of the 18 peroxidase genes under different culture conditions and on different growth stages of basidiomycete. It was shown that only two genes (one MnP and one VP) were prevalently expressed as well as secreted into cultural broth under all conditions investigated. However their transcriptome and protein profiles differed in time depending on the effector used. The expression of other peroxidase genes revealed a significant variability, so one can propose the specific roles of these enzymes in fungal development and lifestyle.

  17. Lignin-degrading peroxidases in white-rot fungus Trametes hirsuta 072. Absolute expression quantification of full multigene family

    PubMed Central

    Vasina, Daria V.; Moiseenko, Konstantin V.; Fedorova, Tatiana V.; Tyazhelova, Tatiana V.

    2017-01-01

    Ligninolytic heme peroxidases comprise an extensive family of enzymes, which production is characteristic for white-rot Basidiomycota. The majority of fungal heme peroxidases are encoded by multigene families that differentially express closely related proteins. Currently, there were very few attempts to characterize the complete multigene family of heme peroxidases in a single fungus. Here we are focusing on identification and characterization of peroxidase genes, which are transcribed and secreted by basidiomycete Trametes hirsuta 072, an efficient lignin degrader. The T. hirsuta genome contains 18 ligninolytic peroxidase genes encoding 9 putative lignin peroxidases (LiP), 7 putative short manganese peroxidases (MnP) and 2 putative versatile peroxidases (VP). Using ddPCR method we have quantified the absolute expression of the 18 peroxidase genes under different culture conditions and on different growth stages of basidiomycete. It was shown that only two genes (one MnP and one VP) were prevalently expressed as well as secreted into cultural broth under all conditions investigated. However their transcriptome and protein profiles differed in time depending on the effector used. The expression of other peroxidase genes revealed a significant variability, so one can propose the specific roles of these enzymes in fungal development and lifestyle. PMID:28301519

  18. Thiol peroxidases mediate specific genome-wide regulation of gene expression in response to hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Fomenko, Dmitri E.; Koc, Ahmet; Agisheva, Natalia; Jacobsen, Michael; Kaya, Alaattin; Malinouski, Mikalai; Rutherford, Julian C.; Siu, Kam-Leung; Jin, Dong-Yan; Winge, Dennis R.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is thought to regulate cellular processes by direct oxidation of numerous cellular proteins, whereas antioxidants, most notably thiol peroxidases, are thought to reduce peroxides and inhibit H2O2 response. However, thiol peroxidases have also been implicated in activation of transcription factors and signaling. It remains unclear if these enzymes stimulate or inhibit redox regulation and whether this regulation is widespread or limited to a few cellular components. Herein, we found that Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells lacking all eight thiol peroxidases were viable and withstood redox stresses. They transcriptionally responded to various redox treatments, but were unable to activate and repress gene expression in response to H2O2. Further studies involving redox transcription factors suggested that thiol peroxidases are major regulators of global gene expression in response to H2O2. The data suggest that thiol peroxidases sense and transfer oxidative signals to the signaling proteins and regulate transcription, whereas a direct interaction between H2O2 and other cellular proteins plays a secondary role. PMID:21282621

  19. Binding of peroxiredoxin 6 to substrate determines differential phospholipid hydroperoxide peroxidase and phospholipase A2 activities

    PubMed Central

    Manevich, Yefim; Shuvaeva, Tea; Dodia, Chandra; Kazi, Altaf; Feinstein, Sheldon I.; Fisher, Aron B.

    2010-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin 6 (Prdx6) differs from other mammalian peroxiredoxins both in its ability to reduce phospholipid hydroperoxides at neutral pH and in having phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity that is maximal at acidic pH. We previously showed an active site C47 for peroxidase activity and a catalytic triad S32-H26-D140 necessary for binding of phospholipid and PLA2 activity. This study evaluated binding of reduced and oxidized phospholipid hydroperoxide to Prdx6 at cytosolic pH. Incubation of recombinant Prdx6 with 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine hydroperoxide (PLPCOOH) resulted in peroxidase activity, cys47 oxidation as detected with Prdx6-SO2(3) antibody, and a marked shift in the Prdx6 melting temperature by circular dichroism analysis indicating that PLPCOOH is a specific substrate for Prdx6. Preferential Prdx6 binding to oxidized liposomes was detected by changes in DNS-PE or bis-Pyr fluorescence and by ultrafiltration. Site-specific mutation of S32 or H26 in Prdx6 abolished binding while D140 mutation had no effect. Treatment of A549 cells with peroxides led to lipid peroxidation and translocation of Prdx6 from the cytosol to the cell membrane. Thus, the pH specificity for the two enzymatic activities of Prdx6 can be explained by the differential binding kinetics of the protein; Prdx6 binds to reduced phospholipid at acidic pH but at cytosolic pH binds only phospholipid that is oxidized compatible with a role for Prdx6 in the repair of peroxidized cell membranes. PMID:19236840

  20. The ligninolytic peroxidases in the genus Pleurotus: divergence in activities, expression, and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Knop, Doriv; Yarden, Oded; Hadar, Yitzhak

    2015-02-01

    Mushrooms of the genus Pleurotus are comprised of cultivated edible ligninolytic fungi with medicinal properties and a wide array of biotechnological and environmental applications. Like other white-rot fungi (WRF), they are able to grow on a variety of lignocellulosic biomass substrates and degrade both natural and anthropogenic aromatic compounds. This is due to the presence of the non-specific oxidative enzymatic systems, which are mainly consisted of lacasses, versatile peroxidases (VPs), and short manganese peroxidases (short-MnPs). Additional, less studied, peroxidase are dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) and heme-thiolate peroxidases (HTPs). During the past two decades, substantial information has accumulated concerning the biochemistry, structure and function of the Pleurotus ligninolytic peroxidases, which are considered to play a key role in many biodegradation processes. The production of these enzymes is dependent on growth media composition, pH, and temperature as well as the growth phase of the fungus. Mn(2+) concentration differentially affects the expression of the different genes. It also severs as a preferred substrate for these preoxidases. Recently, sequencing of the Pleurotus ostreatus genome was completed, and a comprehensive picture of the ligninolytic peroxidase gene family, consisting of three VPs and six short-MnPs, has been established. Similar enzymes were also discovered and studied in other Pleurotus species. In addition, progress has been made in the development of molecular tools for targeted gene replacement, RNAi-based gene silencing and overexpression of genes of interest. These advances increase the fundamental understanding of the ligninolytic system and provide the opportunity for harnessing the unique attributes of these WRF for applied purposes.

  1. Effect of iron concentration on the expression and activity of catalase-peroxidases in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Yeruva, Veena C; Sundaram, C A S Sivagami; Sritharan, Manjula

    2005-02-01

    Mycobacterial catalases are known to exist in different isoforms. We studied the influence of iron concentration on the expression and activity of the different isoforms in Mycobacterium bovis BCG, M. smegmatis, M. fortuitum, M. kansasii and M. vaccae by growing them under iron-sufficient (4 microg Fe/mL) and iron-deficient (0.02 microg Fe/ml) conditions. Upon iron deprivation, significant differences were observed in the catalase/peroxidase activities in both quantitative spectrophotometric assays and in the activity staining in native gels. Notable feature was that the peroxidase activity showed a significant decrease upon iron deprivation in all the mycobacteria, except M. vaccae. Peroxidase activity in all the mycobacteria, irrespective of the iron status was susceptible to heat inactivation. However, the isoforms of catalase showed differences in their heat stability, indicating possible structural differences in these proteins. For example, M. bovis BCG expressed a heat labile catalase under iron-sufficient conditions, while a heat stable catalase band of similar mobility was expressed under iron-deprivation conditions. The study clearly indicates that iron plays an important role in the regulation of expression of the different isoforms of the catalase-peroxidases.

  2. Involvement of ArcA and Fnr in expression of Escherichia coli thiol peroxidase gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, S J; Han, Y H; Kim, I H; Kim, H K

    1999-08-01

    To explore the oxygen response regulators involved in thiol peroxidase gene (tpx) expression in Escherichia coli, we constructed a single-copy tpx-lacZ operon fusion and monitored tpx-lacZ expression in various genetic backgrounds. Expression of the tpx-lacZ fusion was increased 4-fold by aerobic growth. Anaerobic expression of tpx-lacZ in either (delta)arcA or delta(fnr) strains was 2.5-fold depressed compared with that of the wild-type strain. The results of immunoblotting experiments also demonstrated that ArcA and Fnr regulatory proteins repressed thiol peroxidase gene expression during anaerobic growth. Inspection of the tpx promoter region revealed putative binding sites for ArcA and Fnr. It thus appears that ArcA and Fnr function as repressors by blocking the binding of RNA polymerase to the tpx promoter in E. coli under anaerobic growth conditions.

  3. Selenium-enriched Agaricus bisporus increases expression and activity of glutathione peroxidase-1 and expression of glutathione peroxidase-2 in rat colon.

    PubMed

    Maseko, Tebo; Howell, Kate; Dunshea, Frank R; Ng, Ken

    2014-03-01

    The effect of dietary supplementation with Se-enriched Agaricus bisporus on cytosolic gluthathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1), gastrointestinal specific glutathione peroxidase-2 (GPx-2), thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR-1) and selenoprotein P (SeP) mRNA expression and GPx-1 enzyme activity in rat colon was examined. Rats were fed for 5weeks with control diet (0.15μg Se/g feed) or Se-enriched diet fortified with selenised mushroom (1μg Se/g feed). The mRNA expression levels were found to be significantly (P<0.01) up-regulated by 1.65-fold and 2.3-fold for GPx-1 and GPx-2, respectively, but were not significantly different for TrxR-1 and SeP between the 2 diet treatments. The up-regulation of GPx-1 mRNA expression was consistent with GPX-1 activity level, which was significantly (P<0.05) increased by 1.77-fold in rats fed with the Se-enriched diet compared to the control diet. The results showed that selenised A. bisporus can positively increase GPx-1 and GPx-2 gene expression and GPx-1 enzyme activity in rat colon.

  4. Expression and Characterization of Windmill Palm Tree (Trachycarpus fortunei) Peroxidase by Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Wen, Boting; Baker, Margaret R; Zhao, Hongwei; Cui, Zongjun; Li, Qing X

    2017-06-14

    Currently, commercial plant peroxidases are all native and are isolated from plants such as horseradish and soybean. No recombinant plant peroxidase products have been available on the commercial market. The gene encoding peroxidase was cloned from windmill palm tree leaves. The codon-optimized gene was transformed into Pichia pastoris for expression. The recombinant windmill palm tree peroxidase (rWPTP) expressed by P. pastoris showed high stability under pH 2-10 and temperatures up to 70 °C to many metallic salts and organic solvents. The substrate specificity of WPTP was determined, and among the substrates tested, 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) was most suitable for WPTP. The Michaelis constants with the substrates H2O2 and ABTS were 4.6 × 10(-4) and 1.6 × 10(-4) M, respectively. The rWPTP expressed in P. pastoris may be a suitable enzyme for the biosynthesis of polymers because of its high stability and activity under acidic conditions.

  5. Heme precursor injection is effective for Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase fusion protein production by a silkworm expression system.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kounosuke; Lee, Jae Man; Tomozoe, Yusuke; Kusakabe, Takahiro; Kamiya, Noriho

    2015-10-01

    Recombinant peroxidase from Arthromyces ramosus, fused with domains of antibody-binding proteins, was successfully obtained by a silkworm larvae expression system. The catalytic activity of the fusion peroxidase was increased 6-fold with the injection of 5-aminolevulinic acid into silkworm larvae as a heme precursor. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Efficient expression of a Phanerochaete chrysosporium manganese peroxidase gene in Aspergillus oryzae

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, P.; Whitwam, R.E.; Tien, Ming

    1996-03-01

    A manganese peroxidase (mnp1) from Phanerochaete chrysosporium was efficiently expressed in Aspergillus oryzae. Expression was achieved by fusing the mature cDNA of mnp1 with the A. oryzae Taka amylase promoter and secretion signal. The 3{prime} untranslated region of the glucoamylase gene of Asperigillus awamori provided the terminator. The recombinant protein (rMnP) was secreted in an active form, permitting rapid detection and purification. Physical and kinetic properties of rMnP were similar to those of the native protein. The A. oryzae expression system is well suited for both mechanistic and site-directed mutagenesis studies. 34 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression profile of a glutathione peroxidase-like thioredoxin peroxidase (TPxGl) of the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei.

    PubMed

    Haselton, Kyle J; David, Robin; Fell, Katherine; Schulte, Emily; Dybas, Matthew; Olsen, Kenneth W; Kanzok, Stefan M

    2015-06-01

    Glutathione peroxidases (GPx) comprise an important group of redox active proteins with diverse functions, including antioxidant defense and signaling. Although the genome of the malaria parasite Plasmodium does not contain a genuine GPx gene a glutathione peroxidase-like thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx(Gl)) has recently been identified and biochemically characterized in the human malaria parasite P. falciparum. To gain more insight into the potential biological function of this enzyme we have cloned and expressed TPx(Gl) of the rodent model system P. berghei (PbTPx(Gl)). Biochemical characterization confirmed that the protein is redox active with the P. berghei thioredoxin system. We compared PbTPx(Gl) to recently characterized thioredoxin-dependent GPx-type proteins of other organisms, and generated the first hypothetical 3D model of a Plasmodium TPx(Gl), which shows the conservation of the thioredoxin-fold as well as the spatial orientation of a classic GPx catalytic tetrad. In vivo studies indicate that PbTPx(Gl) is continuously expressed in all P. berghei asexual blood stages, gametocytes and in early mosquito-stage parasites. Confocal microscopy suggest a cytoplasmic localization of PbTPx(Gl) in all investigated parasite life stages, specifically in mature ookinetes. Our data provides new insights into the structure and ubiquitous expression of Plasmodium TPx(Gl) and warrants further investigation into this potentially important redox enzyme. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Differential expression on mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase (mTcTXNPx) in Trypanosoma cruzi after ferrocenyl diamine hydrochlorides treatments.

    PubMed

    Kohatsu, Andréa A N; Silva, Flávia A J; Francisco, Acácio I; Rimoldi, Aline; Silva, Marco T A; Vargas, Maria D; Rosa, João A da; Cicarelli, Regina M B

    Resistance to benznidazole in certain strains of Trypanosoma cruzi may be caused by the increased production of enzymes that act on the oxidative metabolism, such as mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase which catalyses the reduction of peroxides. This work presents cytotoxicity assays performed with ferrocenyl diamine hydrochlorides in six different strains of T. cruzi epimastigote forms (Y, Bolivia, SI1, SI8, QMII, and SIGR3). The last four strains have been recently isolated from triatominae and mammalian host (domestic cat). The expression of mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase was analyzed by the Western blotting technique using polyclonal antibody anti mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase obtained from a rabbit immunized with the mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase recombinant protein. All the tested ferrocenyl diamine hydrochlorides were more cytotoxic than benznidazole. The expression of the 25.5kDa polypeptide of mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase did not increase in strains that were more resistant to the ferrocenyl compounds (SI8 and SIGR3). In addition, a 58kDa polypeptide was also recognized in all strains. Ferrocenyl diamine hydrochlorides showed trypanocidal activity and the expression of 25.5kDa mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase is not necessarily increased in some T. cruzi strains. Most likely, other mechanisms, in addition to the over expression of this antioxidative enzyme, should be involved in the escape of parasites from cytotoxic oxidant agents.

  9. Induction of hairy roots and characterization of peroxidase expression as a potential root growth marker in sesame.

    PubMed

    Chun, J-A; Lee, J-W; Yi, Y-B; Park, G-Y; Chung, C-H

    2009-01-01

    Using hypocotyl and cotyledon of sesame seedlings, hairy root cultures were established and cDNA coding for a peroxidase was cloned from the roots. The frequency of sesame hairy root formation was higher in hypocotyl (33.4%) than cotyledon (9.3%). Applicable levels of kanamycin and hygromycin as a selectable marker were 100 microg/mL and 30 microg/mL, respectively. The peroxidase cDNA showed relatively high sequence identity with and similarity to plant class III peroxidase family. The cDNA encoded polypeptide was identified with the presence of three sequence features: 1) the putative 4 disulfide bridges, 2) an ER-targeted signal sequence in the N-terminus, and 3) two triplets, NXS for glycosylation. A real-time RT-PCR exhibited an abrupt increase in the peroxidase transcription activity after 4-week cultures of the sesame hairy roots and its highest level in 6-week cultured hairy roots. In contrast, the growth pattern of sesame hairy roots showed a typical sigmoidal curve. The active hairy root growth began after 2-week culture and their stationary growth phase occurred after 5-week culture. These results suggested that the peroxidase expression patterns at its transcription level could be used a potential indicator signaling a message that there will be no longer active growth in hairy root cultures. The sesame peroxidase gene was differentially expressed in different tissues.

  10. Tryparedoxin peroxidase of Leishmania donovani: molecular cloning, heterologous expression, specificity, and catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Flohé, Leopold; Budde, Heike; Bruns, Karsten; Castro, Helena; Clos, Joachim; Hofmann, Birgit; Kansal-Kalavar, Sonia; Krumme, Dirk; Menge, Ulrich; Plank-Schumacher, Karin; Sztajer, Helena; Wissing, Joseph; Wylegalla, Claudia; Hecht, Hans-Jürgen

    2002-01-15

    Tryparedoxin peroxidase (TXNPx) of Trypanosomatidae is the terminal peroxidase of a complex redox cascade that detoxifies hydroperoxides by NADPH (Nogoceke et al., Biol. Chem. 378, 827-836, 1997). A gene putatively coding for a peroxiredoxin-type TXNPx was identified in L. donovani and expressed in Escherichia coli to yield an N-terminally His-tagged protein (LdH6TXNPx). LdH6TXNPx proved to be an active peroxidase with tryparedoxin (TXN) 1 and 2 of Crithidia fasciculata as cosubstrates. LdH6TXNPx efficiently reduces H2O2, is moderately active with t-butyl and cumene hydroperoxide, but only marginally with linoleic acid hydroperoxide and phosphatidyl choline hydroperoxide. The enzyme displays ping-pong kinetics with a k(cat) of 11.2 s(-1) and limiting K(m) values for t-butyl hydroperoxide and CfTXN1 of 50 and 3.6 microM, respectively. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that C52 and C173, as in related peroxiredoxins, are involved in catalysis. Exchanges of R128 against D and T49 against S and V, supported by molecular modelling, further disclose that the SH group of C52 builds the center of a novel catalytic triad. By hydrogen bonding with the OH of T49 and by the positive charge of R128 the solvent-exposed thiol of C52 becomes deprotonated to react with ROOH. Molecular models of oxidized TXNPx show C52 disulfide-bridged with C173' that can be attacked by C41 of TXN2. By homology, the deduced mechanism may apply to most peroxiredoxins and complements current views of peroxiredoxin catalysis. (c)2002 Elsevier Science.

  11. Epitope expression in nine commercial kits for the determination of anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies.

    PubMed

    Whitham, K; Patel, D; Ward, A M

    1999-01-01

    Anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies, from patients with autoimmune disease, bind predominantly to two neighbouring, non-identical, conformational domains referred to as domains A and B. In recent years a number of ELISA assays have been developed for the detection of anti-TPO antibodies, however, considerable variation between the different commercial assay kits has been documented in inter-laboratory surveys (UK NEQAS). This investigation assessed the differences between nine commercial ELISA assays currently available in the UK. The anti-TPO kits varied in terms of their imprecision and accuracy and in the density of coated antigen. Recombinant antigen containing kits demonstrated partial destruction of the B epitope, possibly due to the close proximity of both epitope regions in the recombinant molecule. None of the kits expressed only one epitope although there were differences in the degrees of expression of each epitope. Clinicians should be aware of the variability of the numbers generated, when interpreting test results.

  12. Expression of Cryptosporidium parvum thioredoxin peroxidase in COS-7 cells confers radioprotection.

    PubMed

    Hong, Semie; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Yoon, Sejoung; Kim, Kyoungjin; Sim, Seobo; Park, Woo-Yoon; Yu, Jae-Ran

    2016-04-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is one of the most radioresistant organisms identified to date. In a previous study, we found that thioredoxin peroxidase (CpTPx) was significantly upregulated in this species following exposure to high dose (10 kGy) of γ-irradiation. To assess the potential of CpTPx to confer radioprotection in mammalian cells, it was expressed in COS-7 African green monkey kidney cells (CpTPx-COS7). For comparison, the thioredoxin peroxidase of Cryptosporidium muris (CmTPx) was also expressed in these cells (CmTPx-COS7 cells), which has been confirmed to have lesser antioxidant activity than CpTPx in the previous study. Notably, the survival rates of CpTPx-COS7 cells were significantly higher (12-22%) at 72 h after 8 Gy irradiation than CmTPx-COS7 or non-transfected COS-7 (ntCOS-7) counterparts. In addition, CpTPx revealed a 50% of ROS reduction in irradiated CpTPx-COS7 cells, while γ-H2AX DNA damage marker expression was not significantly changed. Furthermore, the amount of apoptosis only increased to about 120% after 2-8 Gy irradiation compared to 200-300% increase observed in ntCOS-7 cells. CmTPx was shown to have antioxidant and DNA damage protection activities; however, these activities were always lower than those of CpTPx. These results suggest that the potent antioxidant and protective activities of CpTPx are well conserved in this cell-based system and that CpTPx contributed to the radioprotection of mammalian cells through its exceptional antioxidant activity.

  13. Comparative Cold Shock Expression and Characterization of Fungal Dye-Decolorizing Peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Christoph J; Zelena, Kateryna; Berger, Ralf G

    2016-08-01

    Dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) from Auricularia auricula-judae, Bjerkandera adusta, Pleurotus ostreatus and Marasmius scorodonius (Basidiomycota) were expressed in Escherichia coli using the cold shock-inducible expression system pCOLD I DNA. Functional expression was achieved without the addition of hemin or the co-expression of any chaperones. The presence or absence of the native signal sequence had a strong impact on the success of the expression, but the effect was not consistent for the different DyPs. While BaDyP and AajDyP were stable at 50 °C, the more thermolabile MsP2 and PoDyp, upon catalytic intervention, lend themselves to more rapid thermal inactivation. The bleaching of norbixin (E 160b) using MsP2 was most efficient at pH 4.0, while BaDyP and AajDypP worked best in the weakly acidic to neutral range, indicating a choice of DyPs for a broad field of applications in different food matrices.

  14. Truncated-gene reporter system for studying the regulation of manganese peroxidase expression.

    PubMed

    Gettemy, J M; Li, D; Alic, M; Gold, M H

    1997-06-01

    The expression of manganese peroxidase (MnP) in nitrogen-limited cultures of Phanerochaete chrysosporium is regulated by Mn, heat shock (HS), and H2O2 at the level of gene transcription. We have constructed a homologous gene reporter system to further examine the regulation of two mnp genes, mnp1 and mnp2, encoding individual MnP isozymes. Internal deletions of 234 and 359 bp were made within the coding regions of the mnp1 and mnp2 genes, respectively. The truncated mnp genes were subcloned into the shuttle vector pOGI18, which includes the Schizophylum commune ade5 gene as a selectable marker, and transformed into a P. chrysosporium Ade1 auxotrophic mutant. Northern-blot analysis of purified Ade+ transformants demonstrated that both of the truncated mnp genes were regulated in a manner similar to the endogenous mnp genes with respect to nitrogen limitation and induction by Mn, HS, and H2O2.

  15. Polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase expression in four pineapple varieties (Ananas comosus L.) after a chilling injury.

    PubMed

    Raimbault, Astrid-Kim; Marie-Alphonsine, Paul-Alex; Horry, Jean-Pierre; Francois-Haugrin, Madlyn; Romuald, Karell; Soler, Alain

    2011-01-12

    Pineapple internal browning (IB) is a chilling injury that produces enzymatic browning associated with flesh translucency. Pineapple biodiversity allowed the investigation of how polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (POD) activities with their different isoforms are involved in the IB mechanism. Fruits of four varieties that expressed IB symptoms differently, Smooth Cayenne (SCay) and the hybrids MD2, Flhoran 41 (Flh 41), and Flhoran 53 (Flh 53), were stressed by cold. The susceptible varieties showed classical brown spots but different patterns of IB, whereas MD2 and controls showed no IB. Enzymatic activities were measured on fruit protein extracts and PPO and POD isoforms separated on mini-gels (PhastSystem). Only PPO activity was significantly enhanced in the presence of IB. Up to six PPO isoforms were identified in the susceptible varieties. PPO was barely detectable in the nonsusceptible variety MD2 and in controls. The number of PPO isoforms and the total PPO activity after chilling are varietal characteristics.

  16. Ligninolytic peroxidase gene expression by Pleurotus ostreatus: differential regulation in lignocellulose medium and effect of temperature and pH.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Castanera, Raul; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; López-Lucendo, María F; Ramírez, Lucía; Pisabarro, Antonio G; Martínez, Angel T

    2014-11-01

    Pleurotus ostreatus is an important edible mushroom and a model lignin degrading organism, whose genome contains nine genes of ligninolytic peroxidases, characteristic of white-rot fungi. These genes encode six manganese peroxidase (MnP) and three versatile peroxidase (VP) isoenzymes. Using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, secretion of four of these peroxidase isoenzymes (VP1, VP2, MnP2 and MnP6) was confirmed when P. ostreatus grows in a lignocellulose medium at 25°C (three more isoenzymes were identified by only one unique peptide). Then, the effect of environmental parameters on the expression of the above nine genes was studied by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR by changing the incubation temperature and medium pH of P. ostreatus cultures pre-grown under the above conditions (using specific primers and two reference genes for result normalization). The cultures maintained at 25°C (without pH adjustment) provided the highest levels of peroxidase transcripts and the highest total activity on Mn(2+) (a substrate of both MnP and VP) and Reactive Black 5 (a VP specific substrate). The global analysis of the expression patterns divides peroxidase genes into three main groups according to the level of expression at optimal conditions (vp1/mnp3>vp2/vp3/mnp1/mnp2/mnp6>mnp4/mnp5). Decreasing or increasing the incubation temperature (to 10°C or 37°C) and adjusting the culture pH to acidic or alkaline conditions (pH 3 and 8) generally led to downregulation of most of the peroxidase genes (and decrease of the enzymatic activity), as shown when the transcription levels were referred to those found in the cultures maintained at the initial conditions. Temperature modification produced less dramatic effects than pH modification, with most genes being downregulated during the whole 10°C treatment, while many of them were alternatively upregulated (often 6h after the thermal shock) and downregulated (12h) at 37°C. Interestingly, mnp4 and

  17. Transcriptional regulation of heat shock proteins and ascorbate peroxidase by CtHsfA2b from African bermudagrass conferring heat tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiuyun; Huang, Wanlu; Yang, Zhimin; Liu, Jun; Huang, Bingru

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress transcription factor A2s (HsfA2s) are key regulators in plant response to high temperature. Our objectives were to isolate an HsfA2 gene (CtHsfA2b) from a warm-season grass species, African bermudagrass (Cynodon transvaalensis Burtt-Davy), and to determine the physiological functions and transcriptional regulation of HsfA2 for improving heat tolerance. Gene expression analysis revealed that CtHsfA2b was heat-inducible and exhibited rapid response to increasing temperature. Ectopic expression of CtHsfA2b improved heat tolerance in Arabidopsis and restored heat-sensitive defects of Arabidopsis hsfa2 mutant, which was demonstrated by higher survival rate and photosynthetic parameters, and lower electrolyte leakage in transgenic plants compared to the WT or hsfa2 mutant. CtHsfA2b transgenic plants showed elevated transcriptional regulation of several downstream genes, including those encoding ascorbate peroxidase (AtApx2) and heat shock proteins [AtHsp18.1-CI, AtHsp22.0-ER, AtHsp25.3-P and AtHsp26.5-P(r), AtHsp70b and AtHsp101-3]. CtHsfA2b was found to bind to the heat shock element (HSE) on the promoter of AtApx2 and enhanced transcriptional activity of AtApx2. These results suggested that CtHsfA2b could play positive roles in heat protection by up-regulating antioxidant defense and chaperoning mechanisms. CtHsfA2b has the potential to be used as a candidate gene to genetically modify cool-season species for improving heat tolerance. PMID:27320381

  18. Expression and characterization of soybean seed coat peroxidase in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3).

    PubMed

    Liu, Changqing; Zheng, Kai; Xu, Ying; Stephen, Lacmata Tamekou; Wang, Jiming; Zhao, Hongwei; Yue, Tongqing; Nian, Rui; Zhang, Haibo; Xian, Mo; Liu, Huizhou

    2017-06-23

    Soybean seed coat peroxidase (SBP) is a valuable enzyme having a broad variety of applications in analytical chemistry, biochemistry, and food processing. In the present study, the sscp gene (Gene ID: 548068) was optimized based on the preferred codon usage of Escherichia coli, synthesized, and expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3). SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis of this expressed protein revealed that its molecular weight is approximately 39 kDa. The effects of induction temperature, concentration of isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside and hemin, induction time, expression time were optimized to enhance SBP production with a maximum activity of 11.23 U/mL (8.64 U/mg total protein). Furthermore, the kinetics of enzyme-catalyzed reactions of recombinant protein was determined. When 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) was used as substrate, optimum reaction temperature and pH of the enzyme were 85°C and 5.0, respectively. The effects of metal ions on the enzymatic reaction were also further investigated. The SBP was successfully expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3) which would provide a more efficient production strategy for industrial applications of SBP.

  19. Molecular Cloning and Tissue-Specific Expression of an Anionic Peroxidase in Zucchini1

    PubMed Central

    Carpin, Sabine; Crèvecoeur, Michèle; Greppin, Hubert; Penel, Claude

    1999-01-01

    A calcium-pectate-binding anionic isoperoxidase (APRX) from zucchini (Cucurbita pepo) was purified and subjected to N-terminal amino acid microsequencing. The cDNA encoding this enzyme was obtained by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction from a cDNA library. It encoded a mature protein of 309 amino acids exhibiting all of the sequence characteristics of a plant peroxidase. Despite the presence of a C-terminal propeptide, APRX was found in the apoplast. APRX protein and mRNA were found in the root, hypocotyls, and cotyledons. In situ hybridization showed that the APRX-encoding gene was expressed in many different tissues. The strongest expression was observed in root epidermis and in some cells of the stele, in differentiating tracheary elements of hypocotyl, in the lower and upper epidermis, in the palisade parenchyma of cotyledons, and in lateral and adventitious root primordia. In the hypocotyl hook there was an asymmetric expression, with the inner part containing more transcripts than the outer part. Treatment with 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid reduced the expression of the APRX-encoding gene in the lower part of the hypocotyl. Our observations suggest that APRX could be involved in lignin formation and that the transcription of its gene was related to auxin level. PMID:10398715

  20. Techno-economic analysis of horseradish peroxidase production using a transient expression system in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Walwyn, David Richard; Huddy, Suzanne M; Rybicki, Edward P

    2015-01-01

    Despite the advantages of plant-based transient expression systems relative to microbial or mammalian cell systems, the commercial production of recombinant proteins using plants has not yet been achieved to any significant extent. One of the challenges has been the lack of published data on the costs of manufacture for products other than biopharmaceuticals. In this study, we report on the techno-economic analysis of the production of a standard commercial enzyme, namely, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), using a transient expression system in Nicotiana benthamiana. Based on the proven plant yield of 240 mg HRP/kg biomass, a biomass productivity of 15-kg biomass/m(2)/year and a process yield of 54 % (mg HRP product/mg HRP in biomass), it is apparent that HRP can be manufactured economically via transient expression in plants in a large-scale facility (>5 kg HRP/year). At this level, the process is competitive versus the existing technology (extraction of the enzyme from horseradish), and the product is of comparable or improved activity, containing only the preferred isoenzyme C. Production scale, protein yield and biomass productivity are found to be the most important determinants of overall viability.

  1. Rachiplusia nu larva as a biofactory to achieve high level expression of horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Romero, Lucía Virginia; Targovnik, Alexandra Marisa; Wolman, Federico Javier; Cascone, Osvaldo; Miranda, María Victoria

    2011-05-01

    A process based on orally-infected Rachiplusia nu larvae as biological factories for expression and one-step purification of horseradish peroxidase isozyme C (HRP-C) is described. The process allows obtaining high levels of pure HRP-C by membrane chromatography purification. The introduction of the partial polyhedrin homology sequence element in the target gene increased HRP-C expression level by 2.8-fold whereas it increased 1.8-fold when the larvae were reared at 27 °C instead of at 24 °C, summing up a 4.6-fold overall increase in the expression level. Additionally, HRP-C purification by membrane chromatography at a high flow rate greatly increase D the productivity without affecting the resolution. The V(max) and K(m) values of the recombinant HRP-C were similar to those of the HRP from Armoracia rusticana roots. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

  2. Phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase: expression pattern during testicular development in mouse and evolutionary conservation in spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Nayernia, Karim; Diaconu, Mihaela; Aumüller, Gerhard; Wennemuth, Gunther; Schwandt, Iris; Kleene, Kenneth; Kuehn, Hartmut; Engel, Wolfgang

    2004-04-01

    Phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPx) is a selenoprotein belonging to the family of glutathione peroxidases and has been implicated in antioxidative defense and spermatogenesis. PHGPx accounts for almost the entire selenium content of mammalian testis. In an attempt to verify the expression pattern of PHGPx, testes of mouse mutants with arrest at different stages of germ cell development and testes of mice at different ages were subjected to immunostaining with a monoclonal anti-PHGPx antibody. PHGPx was detected in Leydig cells of testes in all developmental stages. In the seminiferous tubuli, the PHGPx staining was first observed in testes of 21-day-old mice which is correlated with the appearance of the first spermatids. This result was confirmed when the testes of mutant mice with defined arrest of germ cell development were used. An immunostaining was observed in the seminiferous tubuli of olt/olt and qk/qk mice which show an arrest at spermatid differentiation. In Western blot analysis of proteins extracted from testes of mutant mice and from developing testes, two signals at 19- and 22-kDa were observed which confirm the existence of two PHGPx forms in testicular cells. In mouse spermatozoa, a subcellular localization of PHGPx and sperm mitochondria-associated cysteine-rich protein (SMCP) was demonstrated, indicating the localization of PHGPx in mitochondria of spermatozoa midpiece. For verifying the midpiece localization of PHGPx in other species, spermatozoa of Drosophila melanogaster, frog, fish, cock, mouse, rat, pig, bull, and human were used in immunostaining using anti-PHGPx antibody. A localization of PHGPx was found in the midpiece of spermatozoa in all species examined. In electronmicroscopical analysis, PHGPx signals were found in the mitochondria of midpiece. These results indicate a conserved crucial role of PHGPx during sperm function and male fertility.

  3. AhpA is a peroxidase expressed during biofilm formation in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Zwick, Joelie V; Noble, Sarah; Ellaicy, Yasser K; Coe, Gabrielle Dierker; Hakey, Dylan J; King, Alyssa N; Sadauskas, Alex J; Faulkner, Melinda J

    2017-02-01

    Organisms growing aerobically generate reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide. These reactive oxygen molecules damage enzymes and DNA, potentially causing cell death. In response, Bacillus subtilis produces at least nine potential peroxide-scavenging enzymes; two belong to the alkylhydroperoxide reductase (Ahp) class of peroxidases. Here, we explore the role of one of these Ahp homologs, AhpA. While previous studies demonstrated that AhpA can scavenge peroxides and thus defend cells against peroxides, they did not clarify when during growth the cell produces AhpA. The results presented here show that the expression of ahpA is regulated in a manner distinct from that of the other peroxide-scavenging enzymes in B. subtilis. While the primary Ahp, AhpC, is expressed during exponential growth and stationary phase, these studies demonstrate that the expression of ahpA is dependent on the transition-state regulator AbrB and the sporulation and biofilm formation transcription factor Spo0A. Furthermore, these results show that ahpA is specifically expressed during biofilm formation, and not during sporulation or stationary phase, suggesting that derepression of ahpA by AbrB requires a signal other than those present upon entry into stationary phase. Despite this expression pattern, ahpA mutant strains still form and maintain robust biofilms, even in the presence of peroxides. Thus, the role of AhpA with regard to protecting cells within biofilms from environmental stresses is still uncertain. These studies highlight the need to further study the Ahp homologs to better understand how they differ from one another and the unique roles they may play in oxidative stress resistance.

  4. Expressed Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored Horseradish Peroxidase Identifies Co-Clustering Molecules in Individual Lipid Raft Domains

    PubMed Central

    Miyagawa-Yamaguchi, Arisa; Kotani, Norihiro; Honke, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Lipid rafts that are enriched in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins serve as a platform for important biological events. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of these events, identification of co-clustering molecules in individual raft domains is required. Here we describe an approach to this issue using the recently developed method termed enzyme-mediated activation of radical source (EMARS), by which molecules in the vicinity within 300 nm from horseradish peroxidase (HRP) set on the probed molecule are labeled. GPI-anchored HRP fusion proteins (HRP-GPIs), in which the GPI attachment signals derived from human decay accelerating factor and Thy-1 were separately connected to the C-terminus of HRP, were expressed in HeLa S3 cells, and the EMARS reaction was catalyzed by these expressed HRP-GPIs under a living condition. As a result, these different HRP-GPIs had differences in glycosylation and localization and formed distinct clusters. This novel approach distinguished molecular clusters associated with individual GPI-anchored proteins, suggesting that it can identify co-clustering molecules in individual raft domains. PMID:24671047

  5. Expression of glutathione, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione S-transferase pi in canine mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Glutathione (GSH) is one of the most important agents of the antioxidant defense system of the cell because, in conjunction with the enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and glutathione S transferase pi (GSTpi), it plays a central role in the detoxification and biotransformation of chemotherapeutic drugs. This study evaluated the expression of GSH and the GSH-Px and GSTpi enzymes by immunohistochemistry in 30 canine mammary tumors, relating the clinicopathological parameters, clinical outcome and survival of the bitches. In an in vitro study, the expression of the genes glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLC) and glutathione synthetase (GSS) that synthesize GSH and GSH-Px gene were verified by qPCR and subjected to treatment with doxorubicin, to check the resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy. Results The immunohistochemical expression of GSH, GSH-Px and GSTpi was compared with the clinical and pathological characteristics and the clinical outcome in the bitches, including metastasis and death. The results showed that high immunoexpression of GSH was correlated to the absence of tumor ulceration and was present in dogs without metastasis (P < 0.05). There was significant correlation of survival with the increase of GSH (P < 0.05). The expression of the GSH-Px and GSTpi enzymes showed no statistically significant correlation with the analyzed variables (p > 0.05). The analysis of the relative expression of genes responsible for the synthesis of GSH (GCLC and GSS) and GSH-Px by quantitative PCR was done with cultured cells of 10 tumor fragments from dogs with mammary tumors. The culture cells showed a decrease in GCLC and GSS expression when compared with no treated cells (P < 0.05). High GSH immunoexpression was associated with better clinical outcomes. Conclusion Therefore, high expression of the GSH seems to play an important role in the clinical outcome of patients with mammary tumors and suggest its use as prognostic marker. The in

  6. Cloning of a new glutathione peroxidase gene from tea plant (Camellia sinensis) and expression analysis under biotic and abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian-Yu

    2014-12-01

    Tea plant, Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze, a well-known heavy metal hyperaccumulator, possesses a powerful tolerance to heavy metals. The heavy metal stresses lead to reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and high concentration of ROS is harmful to plants. The glutathione peroxidase gene has positive function to damage induced by ROS. To understand the mechanism of tolerance to deferent stresses in tea plant, a new glutathione peroxidase gene of tea plant was cloned and its expression pattern was analyzed under abiotic and biotic stresses. A novel cDNA encoding glutathione peroxidase of tea plant (Camellia sinensis) was isolated by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method and designated as CsGPX2 (GenBank Accession No. JQ247186). This full-length sequence was 917 nucleotides including a 510 bp open reading frame (ORF), which encoded a polypeptide of 169 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence showed high homology with glutathione peroxidases of angiosperms and contained the characteristic conserved motifs of ILAFPCNQF and FTVKD, the highest level of similarity was 85% to a glutathione peroxidase from Ricinus communis (Accession NO. XP_002509790.1). Tissue expression pattern analysis indicated that CsGPX2 expressed similarly in root, stem, leaf and flower of tea plant. The CsGPX2 gene showed strong responses to most abiotic stresses including salinity, heavy metal toxicity, drought, heat, plant hormones, but could not be induced by biotic treatment. The result suggested that CsGPX2 had potential function in protecting tea plant from peroxidative damage induced by some abiotic stresses.

  7. The effects of valsartan on renal glutathione peroxidase expression in alleviation of cyclosporine nephrotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Raeisi, Sina; Ghorbanihaghjo, Amir; Argani, Hassan; Dastmalchi, Siavoush; Ghasemi, Babollah; Ghazizadeh, Teimour; Rashtchizadeh, Nadereh; Mesgari Abbasi, Mehran; Bargahi, Nasrin; Nemati, Mahboob; Mota, Ali; Vatankhah, Amir Mansour

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Nephrotoxicity as a side effect caused by the immunosuppressive drug, cyclosporine-A (CsA), can be a major problem in transplant medicine. Oxidative stress may play an important role in the CsA-induced nephrotoxicity. It has been shown that the antihypertensive drug, valsartan (Val), has also renoprotective effects but, its molecular mechanism is largely unknown. In the present study, it was aimed to evaluate the Val effect in the alleviation of CsA nephrotoxicity via probable renal glutathione peroxidase (GPx) upregulation and oxidative stress decrease. Methods: Thirty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups based on CsA and/or Val administration: group A (Control, 1 mL/kg/day of olive oil as vehicle), group B (CsA, 30 mg/kg/day), group C (CsA+Val, 30+30 mg/kg/day), and group D (Val, 30 mg/kg/day). After the administration period (six weeks), renal GPx expression was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Plasma levels of GPx and 8-Hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonyl groups (PCG) were measured by spectrophotometer. Plasma levels of urea and creatinine were measured by an autoanalyzer. Results: CsA treatment led to the decrease in renal expression and plasma levels of GPx in comparison to other study groups. Rats received CsA were detected to have significantly (p<0.05) higher plasma 8-OHdG, MDA, PCG, urea, and creatinine levels in comparison to other groups. Plasma urea and creatinine levels were negatively correlated with renal GPx expression and positively correlated with the oxidative stress markers. Conclusion:Administration of Val may result in attenuating the nephrotoxic side effect of CsA via probable renal GPx upregulation, and subsequently oxidative stress decrease. PMID:27853675

  8. Different peroxidase activities and expression of abiotic stress-related peroxidases in apical root segments of wheat genotypes with different drought stress tolerance under osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Csiszár, Jolán; Gallé, Agnes; Horváth, Edit; Dancsó, Piroska; Gombos, Magdolna; Váry, Zsolt; Erdei, László; Györgyey, János; Tari, Irma

    2012-03-01

    One-week-old seedlings of Triticum aestivum L. cv. Plainsman V, a drought tolerant; and Cappelle Desprez, a drought sensitive wheat cultivar were subjected gradually to osmotic stress using polyethylene glycol (PEG 6000) reaching 400 mOsm on the 11th day. Compared to controls cv. Plainsman V maintained the root growth and relative water content of root tissues, while these parameters were decreased in the drought sensitive cv. Cappelle Desprez under PEG-mediated osmotic stress. Simultaneously, H(2)O(2) content in 1-cm-long apical segment of roots comprising the proliferation and elongation zone, showed a transient increase in cv. Plainsman V and a permanent raise in cv. Cappelle Desprez. Measurements of the transcript levels of selected class III peroxidase (TaPrx) coding sequences revealed significant differences between the two cultivars on the 9th day, two days after applying 100 mOsm PEG. The abundance of TaPrx04 transcript was enhanced transitionally in the root apex of cv. Plainsman V but decreased in cv. Cappelle Desprez under osmotic stress while the expression of TaPrx01, TaPrx03, TaPrx19, TaPrx68, TaPrx107 and TaPrx109-C decreased to different extents in both cultivars. After a transient decrease, activities of soluble peroxidase fractions of crude protein extracts rose in both cultivars on day 11, but the activities of cell wall-bound fractions increased only in cv. Cappelle Desprez under osmotic stress. Parallel with high H(2)O(2) content of the tissues, certain isoenzymes of covalently bound fraction in cv. Cappelle Desprez showed increased activity suggesting that they may limit the extension of root cell walls in this cultivar.

  9. rhEPO (recombinant human eosinophil peroxidase): expression in Pichia pastoris and biochemical characterization

    PubMed Central

    Ciaccio, Chiara; Gambacurta, Alessandra; Sanctis, Giampiero DE; Spagnolo, Domenico; Sakarikou, Christina; Petrella, Giovanni; Coletta, Massimo

    2006-01-01

    A Pichia pastoris expression system has for the first time been successfully developed to produce rhEPO (recombinant human eosinophil peroxidase). The full-length rhEPO coding sequence was cloned into the pPIC9 vector in frame with the yeast α-Factor secretion signal under the transcriptional control of the AOX (acyl-CoA oxidase) promoter, and transformed into P. pastoris strain GS115. Evidence for the production of rhEPO by P. pastoris as a glycosylated dimer precursor of approx. 80 kDa was determined by SDS/PAGE and gel filtration chromatography. Recombinant hEPO undergoes proteolytic processing, similar to that in the native host, to generate two chains of approx. 50 and 20 kDa. A preliminary biochemical characterization of purified rhEPO demonstrated that the spectral and kinetic properties of the recombinant wild-type EPO are comparable with those of the native enzyme and are accompanied by oxidizing activity towards several physiological anionic substrates such as SCN−, Br− and Cl−. On the basis of the estimated Km and kcat values it is evident that the pseudohalide SCN− is the most specific substrate for rhEPO, consistent with the catalytic properties of other mammalian EPOs purified from blood. PMID:16396635

  10. [Cloning, expression and activity analysis of full-length gene encoding thioredoxin peroxidase from Oncomelania hupensis].

    PubMed

    Ma, Xian-Liang; Liu, Qin; Zhang, Yi

    2012-08-30

    To clone and express full-length thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx) gene of Oncomelania hupensis and study on the peroxidase activity of the recombinant protein. Total RNA was obtained from the cultivated O. hupensis and a cDNA sequence of the TPx gene was cloned by RT-PCR. The TPx cDNA ends were amplified by the SMARTer RACE cDNA Amplification Kit. After sequencing, blasting and matching, the full-length cDNA of the TPx gene was obtained. The TPx cDNA was ligated with the pGEM-Teasy and transformed into E. coli DH5alpha. After sequencing and blasting, the characteristics of biological information of the TPx gene was analyzed. The positive recombinants with pGEM-Teasy/TPx and expression vector pET-28a were digested by the double restriction enzymes, ligated each other, transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3), and induced by IPTG for expression. The recombinant TPx was expressed as a histidine fusion protein and was purified with Ni chromatography and NTA cation exchange chromatography. The expressed and purified TPx was analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The different concentrations of TPx recombinant protein (10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 microg/ml) were added into hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) reduction test in vitro to calculate the clearance rate of H2O2, each concentration with parallel control of dithiothreitol sugar alcohol (DTT). In the protection test of super-coiled DNA, the TPx protein was added with a concentration of 2.5, 5.0, and 10 microg/ml, respectively, to observe the protective effect of super-coiled DNA in metal-catalyzed oxidation (MCO). The complete cDNA encoding TPx was 992 bp. ORF was 747 bp with GenBank accession number of JN831437. The ORF encoded 249 amino acids, and the relative molecular weight (M(r)) of predicted protein was 27 000. The recombinant plasmid pET28a/TPx was built, and the soluble recombinant protein was obtained by induction and purification. The results of SDS-PAGE showed that the M(r) was 27 000. H2O2 reduction test in vitro showed that the H2O2

  11. [Cloning, Expression and Immunodiagnostic Evaluation of the Fasciola gigantica Thioredoxin Peroxidase].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue-qi; Zhou, Yan; Cheng, Na; Chen, Mu-xin; Ai, Lin; Liu, Yu-hua; Zhang, Jian-guo; Luo, Jia-jun; Xu, Xue-nian

    2015-04-01

    To immunoscreen the gene encoding thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx) from a cDNA library made from adult Fasciola gigantica worms, clone and express the gene, and evaluate the immunodiagnostic value of TPx recombinant protein. The A ZAP cDNA library was immunoscreened with pooled serum of fascioliasis gigantica patients. The obtained positive clones were sequenced and analyzed by multiple sequence alignment. The full-length (rFgTPx) and N-termianal truncated (rFgTPx_nt) sequence of FgTPx was subcloned into prokaryotic plasmid pET28a(+) with a non-fusion expression technique, respectively. The recombinant proteins of rFgTPx and rFgTPx_nt were purified by His-bind affinity column (Ni-NTA). rFgTPx and rFgTPx_nt were used in indirect ELISA to test the antibody response of the serum samples. Sera of 27 fascioliasis gigantica patients, 15 patients with schistosomaisis japonica, 15 clonorchiasis sinensis patients, and 32 healthy donors were tested by using the recombinant protein based ELISA. The TPx recombinant proteins were obtained through expression, purification and renaturation, the relative molecular mass of rFgTPx and rFgTPx_nt were Mr 30,000 and Mr 26,000, respectively. The total diagnostic coincidence rate, sensitivity and specificity of rFgTPx_nt-based ELISA was 87.6% (78/89), 66.7% (18/27), and 96.8% (60/62), respectively. The cross reaction with Schistosoma japonicum and Clonorchis sinensis was 0 and 1/15 for rFgTPx_nt, respectively. Before and after treatment, A450 value of the serum samples from fascioliasis patients was 0.233 ± 0.088 and 0.129 ± 0.072, respectively (t = 4.27, P < 0.01). The gene encoding TPx is expressed in the prokaryotic expression system. The recombinant protein shows proper sensitivity and high specificity for the serodiagnosis of Fasciola gigantica infection.

  12. Ectopic Expression of a Horseradish Peroxidase Enhances Growth Rate and Increases Oxidative Stress Resistance in Hybrid Aspen

    PubMed Central

    Kawaoka, Akiyoshi; Matsunaga, Etsuko; Endo, Saori; Kondo, Shinkichi; Yoshida, Kazuya; Shinmyo, Atsuhiko; Ebinuma, Hiroyasu

    2003-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that overexpression of the horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) peroxidase prxC1a gene stimulated the growth rate of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. Here, the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S::prxC1a construct was introduced into hybrid aspen (Populus sieboldii × Populus grandidentata). The growth rate of these transformed hybrid aspen plants was substantially increased under greenhouse conditions. The average stem length of transformed plants was 25% greater than that of control plants. There was no other obvious phenotypic difference between the transformed and control plants. Fast-growing transformed hybrid aspen showed high levels of expression of prxC1a and had elevated peroxidase activities toward guaiacol and ascorbate. However, there was no increase of the endogenous class I ascorbate peroxidase activities in the transformed plants by separate assay and activity staining of native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Furthermore, calli derived from the transformed hybrid aspen grew faster than those from control plants and were resistant to the oxidative stress imposed by hydrogen peroxide. Therefore, enhanced peroxidase activity affects plant growth rate and oxidative stress resistance. PMID:12857800

  13. Transmutation of human glutathione transferase A2-2 with peroxidase activity into an efficient steroid isomerase.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, Par L; Johansson, Ann-Sofie; Mannervik, Bengt

    2002-08-16

    A major goal in protein engineering is the tailor-making of enzymes for specified chemical reactions. Successful attempts have frequently been based on directed molecular evolution involving libraries of random mutants in which variants with desired properties were identified. For the engineering of enzymes with novel functions, it would be of great value if the necessary changes of the active site could be predicted and implemented. Such attempts based on the comparison of similar structures with different substrate selectivities have previously met with limited success. However, the present work shows that the knowledge-based redesign restricted to substrate-binding residues in human glutathione transferase A2-2 can introduce high steroid double-bond isomerase activity into the enzyme originally characterized by glutathione peroxidase activity. Both the catalytic center activity (k(cat)) and catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) match the values of the naturally evolved glutathione transferase A3-3, the most active steroid isomerase known in human tissues. The substrate selectivity of the mutated glutathione transferase was changed 7000-fold by five point mutations. This example demonstrates the functional plasticity of the glutathione transferase scaffold as well as the potential of rational active-site directed mutagenesis as a complement to DNA shuffling and other stochastic methods for the redesign of proteins with novel functions.

  14. A ripening associated peroxidase from papaya having a role in defense and lignification: heterologous expression and in-silico and in-vitro experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Veda P; Dwivedi, Upendra N

    2015-01-25

    Fruit ripening associated full length cDNA of a peroxidase from papaya was cloned and heterologously expressed. The expressed peroxidase was activated by in-vitro re-folding in the presence of hemin and calcium. The purified recombinant peroxidase exhibited broad substrate affinity in the order of o-dianisidine>pyrogallol>guaiacol and was found to be a homotetramer of 155kDa with each subunit having a size of 38kDa. The basis of the distinctive preferences for various substrates was investigated through in-silico molecular modeling approaches. Thus, when the modeled papaya peroxidase-heme complex was docked with these substrates, the in-silico binding efficiency was found to be in agreement with those of wet lab results with the involvement of Arg37, Phe40, His41, Pro137, Asn138, His139, His167, and Phe239 as the common interacting residues in all the cases. However, the binding of the different substrates were found to be associated with conformational changes in the peroxidase. Thus, in the case of o-dianisidine (the most efficient substrate), the protein was folded in the most compact fashion when compared to guaiacol (the least efficient substrate). Protein function annotation analyses revealed that the papaya peroxidase may have biological roles in oxidation-reduction processes, stresses, defense responses etc. In order to further validate its role in lignifications, the papaya peroxidase was compared with a lignin biosynthetic peroxidase from Leucaena leucocephala, a tree legume. Thus, based on 3D structure superimposition and docking, both peroxidases exhibited a great extent of similarity suggesting the papaya peroxidase having a role in lignification (defense response) too. The predicted functions of papaya peroxidase in defense response and lignification were further validated experimentally using qRT-PCR analyses and measurement of oxidation of coniferyl alcohol.

  15. Expression, purification and crystallization of a dye-decolourizing peroxidase from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Rai, Amrita; Fedorov, Roman; Manstein, Dietmar J

    2014-02-01

    Dye-decolourizing peroxidases are haem-containing peroxidases with broad substrate specificity. Using H2O2 as an electron acceptor, they efficiently decolourize various dyes that are of industrial and environmental relevance, such as anthraquninone- and azo-based dyes. In this study, the dye-decolourizing peroxidase DdDyP from Dictyostelium discoideum was overexpressed in Escherichia coli strain Rosetta(DE3)pLysS, purified and crystallized using the vapour-diffusion method. A native crystal diffracted to 1.65 Å resolution and belonged to space group P4(1)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 141.03, c = 95.56 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The asymmetric unit contains two molecules.

  16. Cloning and Expression Analysis of a Gene Encoding for Ascorbate Peroxidase and Responsive to Salt Stress in Beet (Beta vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Dunajska-Ordak, Kamila; Skorupa-Kłaput, Monika; Kurnik, Katarzyna; Tretyn, Andrzej; Tyburski, Jarosław

    2014-01-01

    BvpAPX is a full-length cDNA-encoding peroxisomal ascorbate peroxidase isolated from leaves of salt-stressed beet (Beta vulgaris) plants. A high level of identity has been reported between the deduced amino acid sequence of BvpAPX and other known ascorbate peroxidases. The genomic sequence of BvpAPX revealed a gene composed of 5 exons and 4 introns. Several sequence motifs revealed in the 5'UTR region of the gene confer to BvpAPX a putative responsiveness to various abiotic stresses. We determined the effect of salt stress on BvpAPX expression in leaves of the cultivated beet varieties, Huzar and Janosik, and their wild salt-tolerant relative B. vulgaris ssp. maritima. Plants were subjected to salt stress during a 32-day culture period (long-term salt treatment). An alternative salinization protocol consisted of an 18-h incubation of detached beet leaves in media supplemented with toxic salt concentrations (short-term salt treatment). RT-Q-PCR analysis revealed that BvpAPX expression markedly increased in leaves of plants subjected to conditions of long-term treatment with salinity, whereas BvpAPX transcript levels remained unaffected in detached leaves during short-term salt treatment. In addition, several leaf redox system parameters, such as ascorbate peroxidase activity or ascorbic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and lipid hydroperoxide concentration, were determined in the leaves of beet plants subjected to salt stress conditions.

  17. Identification, heterologous expression and characterization of a dye-decolorizing peroxidase of Pleurotus sapidus.

    PubMed

    Lauber, Christiane; Schwarz, Tatiana; Nguyen, Quoc Khanh; Lorenz, Patrick; Lochnit, Guenter; Zorn, Holger

    2017-08-23

    The coding sequence of a peroxidase from the secretome of Pleurotus sapidus was cloned from a cDNA library. Bioinformatic analyses revealed an open reading frame of 1551 bp corresponding to a primary translation product of 516 amino acids. The DyP-type peroxidase was heterologously produced in Trichoderma reesei with an activity of 55,000 U L(-1). The enzyme was purified from the culture supernatant, biochemically characterized and the kinetic parameters were determined. The enzyme has an N-terminal signal peptide composed of 62 amino acids. Analysis by Blue Native PAGE and activity staining with ABTS, as well as gel filtration chromatography showed the native dimeric state of the enzyme (115 kDa). Analysis of the substrate range revealed that the recombinant enzyme catalyzes, in addition to the conversion of some classic peroxidase substrates such as 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylthiazoline-6-sulfonate) and substituted phenols like 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, also the decolorization of the anthraquinonic dye Reactive Blue 5. The enzyme also catalyzes bleaching of natural colorants such as β-carotene and annatto. Surprisingly, β-carotene was transformed in the presence and absence of H2O2 by rPsaDyP, however enzyme activity was increased by the addition of H2O2. This indicates that the rPsaDyP has an oxidase function in addition to a peroxidase activity. As a consequence of the high affinity to the characteristic substrate Reactive Blue 5 the rPsaDyP belongs functionally to the dyp-type peroxidase family.

  18. Enhanced disease resistance in transgenic carrot (Daucus carota L.) plants over-expressing a rice cationic peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Wally, O; Punja, Z K

    2010-10-01

    Plant class III peroxidases are involved in numerous responses related to pathogen resistance including controlling hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) levels and lignin formation. Peroxidases catalyze the oxidation of organic compounds using H(2)O(2) as an oxidant. We examined the mechanisms of disease resistance in a transgenic carrot line (P23) which constitutively over-expresses the rice cationic peroxidase OsPrx114 (previously known as PO-C1) and which exhibits enhanced resistance to necrotrophic foliar pathogens. OsPrx114 over-expression led to a slight enhancement of constitutive transcript levels of pathogenesis-related (PR) genes. These transcript levels were dramatically increased in line P23 compared to controls [GUS construct under the control of 35S promoter (35S::GUS)] when tissues were treated with cell wall fragments of the fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (SS-walls), and to a lesser extent with 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid. There was no basal increase in basal H(2)O(2) levels in tissues of the line P23. However, during an oxidative burst response elicited by SS-walls, H(2)O(2) accumulation was reduced in line P23 despite, typical media alkalinization associated with oxidative burst responses was observed, suggesting that OsPrx114 was involved in rapid H(2)O(2) consumption during the oxidative burst response. Tap roots of line P23 had increased lignin formation in the outer periderm tissues, which was further increased during challenge inoculation with Alternaria radicina. Plant susceptibility to a biotrophic pathogen, Erysiphe heraclei, was not affected. Disease resistance to necrotrophic pathogens in carrot as a result of OsPrx114 over-expression is manifested through increased PR transcript accumulation, rapid removal of H(2)O(2) during oxidative burst response and enhanced lignin formation.

  19. NMR Studies of Peroxidases.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitch, Nigel Charles

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Peroxidases are a haem-containing group of enzymes with a wide diversity of function within biological systems. While a common characteristic is the ability to catalyse the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water, it is the accompanying processes of hormone synthesis and degradation which have generated such a high level of interest. However, information at the molecular level is limited to a single well-resolved crystal structure, that of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase. This thesis presents a strategy for the investigation of peroxidase structure and function based on proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, a technique which has the ability to address aspects of both protein structure and protein dynamics in solution. The application of one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques has been developed in the context of plant peroxidases, notably the isoenzyme HRP-C derived from the horseradish root. Characterisation of the proton NMR spectra of HRP -C in resting and ligated states provided new information enabling the structure of the binding site for aromatic donor molecules, such as indole-3-propionic, ferulic and benzhydroxamic acids, to be resolved. In order to overcome difficulties encountered with a protein of the complexity of peroxidase, additional information was obtained from chemical shift parameters and the use of peroxidase variants produced by site-directed mutagenesis. A comparative study using NMR spectroscopy was undertaken for wild-type recombinant HRP-C expressed in Escherichia coli, and two protein variants with substitutions made to residues located on the distal side of the haem pocket, Phe41 to Val and Arg38 to Lys. NMR analyses of a plant peroxidase from barley grains and the fungal peroxidase from Coprinus cinereus were also successful using methods conceived with HRP-C. Examination of three specifically constructed recombinant protein variants of C. cinereus

  20. Expression and Function of Cell Wall-Bound Cationic Peroxidase in Asparagus Somatic Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Hiroyuki; Kotake, Toshihisa; Nakagawa, Naoki; Sakurai, Naoki; Nevins, Donald J.

    2003-01-01

    Cultured asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L. cv Y6) cells induced to regenerate into whole plants through somatic embryogenesis secreted a 38-kD protein into cell walls. The full-length cDNA sequence of this protein (Asparagus officinalis peroxidase 1 [AoPOX1]) determined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction showed similarity with plant peroxidases. AoPOX1 transcripts were particularly abundant during early somatic embryogenesis. To evaluate the in vivo function of AoPOX1 protein, purified recombinant AoPOX1 protein was reacted with a series of phenolic substrates. The AoPOX1 protein was effective in the metabolism of feruloyl (o-methoxyphenol)-substituted substrates, including coniferyl alcohol. The reaction product of coniferyl alcohol was fractionated and subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis and 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis, indicating that the oxidation product of coniferyl alcohol in the presence of AoPOX1 was dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol. The concentration of dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol in the cultured medium of the somatic embryos was in the range of 10−8 m. Functions of the AoPOX1 protein in the cell differentiation are discussed. PMID:12692335

  1. Expression and function of cell wall-bound cationic peroxidase in asparagus somatic embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Hiroyuki; Kotake, Toshihisa; Nakagawa, Naoki; Sakurai, Naoki; Nevins, Donald J

    2003-04-01

    Cultured asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L. cv Y6) cells induced to regenerate into whole plants through somatic embryogenesis secreted a 38-kD protein into cell walls. The full-length cDNA sequence of this protein (Asparagus officinalis peroxidase 1 [AoPOX1]) determined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction showed similarity with plant peroxidases. AoPOX1 transcripts were particularly abundant during early somatic embryogenesis. To evaluate the in vivo function of AoPOX1 protein, purified recombinant AoPOX1 protein was reacted with a series of phenolic substrates. The AoPOX1 protein was effective in the metabolism of feruloyl (o-methoxyphenol)-substituted substrates, including coniferyl alcohol. The reaction product of coniferyl alcohol was fractionated and subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis and (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis, indicating that the oxidation product of coniferyl alcohol in the presence of AoPOX1 was dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol. The concentration of dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol in the cultured medium of the somatic embryos was in the range of 10(-8) M. Functions of the AoPOX1 protein in the cell differentiation are discussed.

  2. Induced peroxidase and cytoprotective enzyme expressions support adaptation of HUVECs to sustain subsequent H2O2 exposure.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hemang; Chen, Juan; Kavdia, Mahendra

    2016-01-01

    H2O2 mediates autocrine and paracrine signaling in the vasculature and can propagate endothelial dysfunction. However, it is not clear how endothelial cells withstand H2O2 exposure and promote H2O2-induced vascular remodeling. To understand the innate ability of endothelial cells for sustaining excess H2O2 exposure, we investigated the genotypic and functional regulation of redox systems in primary HUVECs following an H2O2 treatment. Primary HUVECs were exposed to transient H2O2 exposure and consistent H2O2 exposure. Following H2O2 treatments for 24, 48 and 72 h, we measured O2(-) production, mitochondrial membrane polarization (MMP), and gene expressions of pro-oxidative enzymes, peroxidase enzymes, and cytoprotective intermediates. Our results showed that the 24 h H2O2 exposure significantly increased O2(-) levels, hyperpolarized MMP, and downregulated CAT, GPX1, TXNRD1, NFE2L2, ASK1, and ATF2 gene expression in HUVECs. At 72 h, HUVECs in both treatment conditions were shown to adapt to reduce O2(-) levels and normalize MMP. An upregulation of GPX1, TXNRD1, and HMOX1 gene expression and a recovery of NFE2L2 and PRDX1 gene expression to control levels were observed in both consistent and transient treatments at 48 and 72 h. The response of endothelial cells to excess levels of H2O2 involves a complex interaction amongst O2(-) levels, mitochondrial membrane polarization and anti- and pro-oxidant gene regulation. As a part of this response, HUVECs induce cytoprotective mechanisms including the expression of peroxidase and antioxidant enzymes along with the downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes. This adaptation assists HUVECs to withstand subsequent exposures to H2O2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Vibrio cholerae thiol peroxidase-glutaredoxin fusion is a 2-Cys TSA/AhpC subfamily acting as a lipid hydroperoxide reductase.

    PubMed

    Cha, Mee-Kyung; Hong, Seung-Keun; Lee, Dong-Suk; Kim, Il-Han

    2004-03-19

    Recently, novel hybrid thiol peroxidase (TPx) proteins fused with a glutaredoxin (Grx) were found from some pathogenic bacteria, cyanobacteria, and anaerobic sulfur-oxidizing phototroph. The phylogenic tree analysis that was constructed from the aligned sequences showed two major branches. Haemophilus influenzae TPx.Grx was grouped in one branch as a 1-Cys subfamily of the thiol-specific antioxident protein/AhpC family. Most TPx.Grx proteins, including Vibrio cholerae TPx.Grx, were grouped in the 2-Cys subfamily. To explain the existence of two subgroups in novel hybrid TPx proteins, we have compared the kinetics given by V. cholerae TPx.Grx, H. influenzae TPx.Grx, their separated TPx domains, and a set of mutants devoid of the redox-active cysteines. The kinetic study described here demonstrates clearly that V. cholerae TPx.Grx is a 2-Cys TPx subfamily. For the first time, we also demonstrate the lipid peroxidase activity of V. cholerae TPx.Grx fusion and suggest the in vivo function of 2-Cys TPx.Grx fusion serving as a lipid peroxidase.

  4. The Glutathione Peroxidase Gene Family in Gossypium hirsutum: Genome-Wide Identification, Classification, Gene Expression and Functional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingyang; Li, Kun; Li, Haipeng; Song, Chun-Peng; Miao, Yuchen

    2017-01-01

    The plant glutathione peroxidase (GPX) family consists of multiple isoenzymes with distinct subcellular locations, tissue-specific expression patterns and environmental stress responses. In this study, 13 putative GPXs from the genome of Gossypium hirsutum (GhGPXs) were identified and a conserved pattern among plant GPXs were exhibited, besides this they also responded to multiple environmental stresses and we predicted that they had hormone responsive cis-elements in their promoter regions. Most of the GhGPXs on expression in yeast can scavenge H2O2. Our results showed that different members of the GhGPX gene family were co-ordinately regulated under specific environmental stress conditions, and suggested the importance of GhGPXs in hormone treatments and abiotic stress responses. PMID:28300195

  5. An N-terminal peptide extension results in efficient expression, but not secretion, of a synthetic horseradish peroxidase gene in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Kis, Mihaly; Burbridge, Emma; Brock, Ian W; Heggie, Laura; Dix, Philip J; Kavanagh, Tony A

    2004-03-01

    Native horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) peroxidase, HRP (EC 1.11.1.7), isoenzyme C is synthesized with N-terminal and C-terminal peptide extensions, believed to be associated with protein targeting. This study aimed to explore the specific functions of these extensions, and to generate transgenic plants with expression patterns suitable for exploring the role of peroxidase in plant development and defence. Transgenic Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) plants expressing different versions of a synthetic horseradish peroxidase, HRP, isoenzyme C gene were constructed. The gene was engineered to include additional sequences coding for either the natural N-terminal or the C-terminal extension or both. These constructs were placed under the control of a constitutive promoter (CaMV-35S) or the tobacco RUBISCO-SSU light inducible promoter (SSU) and introduced into tobacco using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. To study the effects of the N- and C-terminal extensions, the localization of recombinant peroxidase was determined using biochemical and molecular techniques. Transgenic tobacco plants can exhibit a ten-fold increase in peroxidase activity compared with wild-type tobacco levels, and the majority of this activity is located in the symplast. The N-terminal extension is essential for the production of high levels of recombinant protein, while the C-terminal extension has little effect. Differences in levels of enzyme activity and recombinant protein are reflected in transcript levels. There is no evidence to support either preferential secretion or vacuolar targeting of recombinant peroxidase in this heterologous expression system. This leads us to question the postulated targeting roles of these peptide extensions. The N-terminal extension is essential for high level expression and appears to influence transcript stability or translational efficiency. Plants have been generated with greatly elevated cytosolic peroxidase activity, and smaller increases in apoplastic

  6. Effects of retinoids on iodine metabolism, thyroid peroxidase gene expression, and deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in porcine thyroid cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Arai, M; Tsushima, T; Isozaki, O; Shizume, K; Emoto, N; Demura, H; Miyakawa, M; Onoda, N

    1991-12-01

    Effects of retinoids on DNA synthesis, iodine metabolism, and thyroid peroxidase messenger RNA levels were studied in cultured porcine thyroid cells. Retinol (10(-8)-10(-5) M) alone did not affect DNA synthesis but potentiated that induced by epidermal growth factor or insulin-like growth factor-I without changes in the number or affinity of receptors for the growth factors, suggesting that retinol stimulates postreceptor events responsible for DNA synthesis. Retinol was an inhibitor of TSH-stimulated iodine metabolism. Iodide uptake and release of organified iodine stimulated by TSH or forskolin were inhibited dose dependently by treatment with retinol. The inhibition was detected at 10(-8) M and was approximately 50% at 10(-6) M. The potency of retinoic acid was comparable to that of retinol. The inhibitory effect of retinol was detected after treatments of thyroid cells for 24 h, and the maximal effect occurred after 48 h incubation. The cAMP accumulation in cultures treated with TSH plus retinol was lower than that of control cultures treated with TSH alone. However, iodide uptake stimulated by 8-bromo-cAMP was also inhibited by retinoids. Retinol reduced TSH- or 8-bromo-cAMP-stimulated gene expression of thyroid peroxidase. Thus, the data suggest that retinoids inhibit TSH-stimulated iodine metabolism by reducing cAMP accumulation and also by acting on the steps subsequent to cAMP production.

  7. Is there loss or qualitative changes in the expression of thyroid peroxidase protein in thyroid epithelial cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Czarnocka, B; Pastuszko, D; Janota-Bzowski, M; Weetman, A P; Watson, P F; Kemp, E H; McIntosh, R S; Asghar, M S; Jarzab, B; Gubala, E; Wloch, J; Lange, D

    2001-01-01

    There is disagreement concerning the expression of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) in thyroid cancer, some studies finding qualitative as well as quantitative differences compared to normal tissue. To investigate TPO protein expression and its antigenic properties, TPO was captured from a solubilizate of thyroid microsomes by a panel of murine anti-TPO monoclonal antibodies and detected with a panel of anti-human TPO IgGκ Fab. TPO protein expression in 30 samples of malignant thyroid tissue was compared with TPO from adjacent normal tissues. Virtual absence of TPO expression was observed in 8 cases. In the remaining 22 malignant thyroid tumours the TPO protein level varied considerably from normal to nearly absent when compared to normal thyroid tissue or tissues from patients with Graves' disease (range less than 0.5 to more than 12.5 μg mg−1 of protein). When expressed TPO displayed similar epitopes, to that of TPO from Graves' disease tissue. The results obtained by the TPO capturing method were confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis with both microsomes and their solubilizates. The present results show that in about two-thirds of differentiated thyroid carcinomas, TPO protein is expressed, albeit to a more variable extent than normal; when present, TPO in malignant tissues is immunologically normal. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaignhttp://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11556840

  8. Ligninolytic peroxidase genes in the oyster mushroom genome: heterologous expression, molecular structure, catalytic and stability properties, and lignin-degrading ability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The genome of Pleurotus ostreatus, an important edible mushroom and a model ligninolytic organism of interest in lignocellulose biorefineries due to its ability to delignify agricultural wastes, was sequenced with the purpose of identifying and characterizing the enzymes responsible for lignin degradation. Results Heterologous expression of the class II peroxidase genes, followed by kinetic studies, enabled their functional classification. The resulting inventory revealed the absence of lignin peroxidases (LiPs) and the presence of three versatile peroxidases (VPs) and six manganese peroxidases (MnPs), the crystal structures of two of them (VP1 and MnP4) were solved at 1.0 to 1.1 Å showing significant structural differences. Gene expansion supports the importance of both peroxidase types in the white-rot lifestyle of this fungus. Using a lignin model dimer and synthetic lignin, we showed that VP is able to degrade lignin. Moreover, the dual Mn-mediated and Mn-independent activity of P. ostreatus MnPs justifies their inclusion in a new peroxidase subfamily. The availability of the whole POD repertoire enabled investigation, at a biochemical level, of the existence of duplicated genes. Differences between isoenzymes are not limited to their kinetic constants. Surprising differences in their activity T50 and residual activity at both acidic and alkaline pH were observed. Directed mutagenesis and spectroscopic/structural information were combined to explain the catalytic and stability properties of the most interesting isoenzymes, and their evolutionary history was analyzed in the context of over 200 basidiomycete peroxidase sequences. Conclusions The analysis of the P. ostreatus genome shows a lignin-degrading system where the role generally played by LiP has been assumed by VP. Moreover, it enabled the first characterization of the complete set of peroxidase isoenzymes in a basidiomycete, revealing strong differences in stability properties and providing

  9. Increases of Catalase and Glutathione Peroxidase Expressions by Lacosamide Pretreatment Contributes to Neuroprotection Against Experimentally Induced Transient Cerebral Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun Young; Park, Joon Ha; Chen, Bai Hui; Shin, Bich Na; Lee, Yun Lyul; Kim, In Hye; Cho, Jeong-Hwi; Lee, Tae-Kyeong; Lee, Jae-Chul; Won, Moo-Ho; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Yan, Bing Chun; Hwang, In Koo; Cho, Jun Hwi; Kim, Young-Myeong; Kim, Sung Koo

    2016-09-01

    Lacosamide is a new antiepileptic drug which is widely used to treat partial-onset seizures. In this study, we examined the neuroprotective effect of lacosamide against transient ischemic damage and expressions of antioxidant enzymes such as Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1), Mn-superoxide dismutase (SOD2), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in the hippocampal cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) region following 5 min of transient global cerebral ischemia in gerbils. We found that pre-treatment with 25 mg/kg lacosamide protected CA1 pyramidal neurons from transient global cerebral ischemic insult using hematoxylin-eosin staining and neuronal nuclear antigen immunohistochemistry. Transient ischemia dramatically changed expressions of SOD1, SOD2 and GPX, not CAT, in the CA1 pyramidal neurons. Lacosamide pre-treatment increased expressions of CAT and GPX, not SOD1 and 2, in the CA1 pyramidal neurons compared with controls, and their expressions induced by lacosamide pre-treatment were maintained after transient cerebral ischemia. In brief, pre-treatment with lacosamide protected hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons from ischemic damage induced by transient global cerebral ischemia, and the lacosamide-mediated neuroprotection may be closely related to increases of CAT and GPX expressions by lacosamide pre-treatment.

  10. Effect of natural antioxidants on superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase mRNA expression in leukocytes from periparturient dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Colitti, M; Stefanon, B

    2006-01-01

    During the peripartum period, high-yielding dairy cows experience metabolic stress, which alters their homeostasis and exposes the cows to illness. The aim of this study was to quantify the expression levels of genes involved in antioxidant defences during the transition period in the blood of dairy cows and to evaluate the regulative activity on these genes of natural antioxidants in the diet. Three groups of 7 heifers each, at the 7th month of pregnancy, were used. Starting from 3 weeks before the expected calving date (-22 days), the three groups were allotted to the following experimental treatments: control (CTR, basal diet); lycopene (LYC, basal diet + lycopene 540 mg/day) and grape polyphenols (POL, basal diet + grape polyphenols 10 g/day). Blood was sampled at 22 and 8 days before and 8, 15 and 22 after calving and analysed for the expression level of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (Cu/ZnSOD) using the real-time PCR technique with LUX (Light Upon eXtension) fluorogenic primers. During the peripartum period (-22 days until + 22 days from calving), Cu/ ZnSOD mRNA expression decreased (p<0.05) in the CTR and LYC groups, but increased at 15 days after calving in the POL group. No significant differences were found in GPx mRNA expression. The results suggest that grape polyphenols may have a controlling effect on peripartum metabolic stress through modulation of superoxide dismutase expression.

  11. [Enhancement of functional expression of wheat peroxidase WP1 in prokaryotic system by co-transforming with hemA and hemL of Esherichia coli].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Shan, Liwei; Su, Shuaikun; Nan, Yanni; Guo, Zhongyu; Fan, Sanhong

    2012-07-01

    Wheat grain peroxidase 1 (WP1) belonged to class III plant peroxidase with cofactor heme, which not only has antifungal activity, but also influences the processing quality of flour. In order to enhance functional expression of WP1 in prokaryotic system by increasing endogenous heme synthesis, we constructed a recombinant plasmid pACYC-A-L containing hemA and hemL of Esherichia coli. Then, we co-transformed it into host strain T7 Express with secretive expression vector (pMAL-p4x-WP1) or non-secretive expression vector (pET21a-MBP-WP1), respectively. The MBP-WP1 fusion protein was further purified by amylose affinity chromatography and its peroxidase activity was assayed using 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) as substrate. At 12 h after induction at 28 degree, the extracellular 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) production of T7 Express/pACYC-A-L was up to 146.73 mg/L, simultaneously the extracellular porphrins also increased dramatically. The peroxidase activity of functional MBP-WP1 obtained from T7 Express/ (pACYC-A-L + pMAL-p4x-WP1) was 14.6-folds of that purified from T7 Express/ pET21a-MBP-WP1. This study not only successfully enhanced functional expression of wheat peroxidase 1 in Esherichia coli, but also provided beneficial references for other important proteins with cofactor heme.

  12. Ectopic expression of cytosolic superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase leads to salt stress tolerance in transgenic plums.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Vivancos, Pedro; Faize, Mohamed; Barba-Espin, Gregorio; Faize, Lydia; Petri, Cesar; Hernández, José Antonio; Burgos, Lorenzo

    2013-10-01

    To fortify the antioxidant capacity of plum plants, genes encoding cytosolic antioxidants ascorbate peroxidase (cytapx) and Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (cytsod) were genetically engineered in these plants. Transgenic plum plants expressing the cytsod and/or cytapx genes in cytosol have been generated under the control of the CaMV35S promoter. High levels of cytsod and cytapx gene transcripts suggested that the transgenes were constitutively and functionally expressed. We examined the potential functions of cytSOD and cytAPX in in vitro plum plants against salt stress (100 mm NaCl). Several transgenic plantlets expressing cytsod and/or cytapx showed an enhanced tolerance to salt stress, mainly lines C5-5 and J8-1 (expressing several copies of sod and apx, respectively). Transformation as well as NaCl treatments influenced the antioxidative metabolism of plum plantlets, including enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants. Transgenic plantlets exhibited higher contents of nonenzymatic antioxidants glutathione and ascorbate than nontransformed control, which correlated with lower accumulation of hydrogen peroxide. Overall, our results suggest that transformation of plum plants with genes encoding antioxidant enzymes enhances the tolerance to salinity.

  13. The membrane-tethered transcription factor ANAC089 serves as redox-dependent suppressor of stromal ascorbate peroxidase gene expression.

    PubMed

    Klein, Peter; Seidel, Thorsten; Stöcker, Benedikt; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2012-01-01

    The stromal ascorbate peroxidase (sAPX) functions as central element of the chloroplast antioxidant defense system. Its expression is under retrograde control of chloroplast signals including redox- and reactive oxygen species-linked cues. The sAPX promoter of Arabidopsis thaliana was dissected in transient reporter assays using mesophyll protoplasts. The study revealed regulatory elements up to -1868 upstream of the start codon. By yeast-one-hybrid screening, the transcription factor ANAC089 was identified to bind to the promoter fragment 2 (-1262 to -1646 bp upstream of translational initiation). Upon mutation of the cis-acting element CACG, binding of ANAC089 was abolished. Expression of a fused fluorescent protein version and comparison with known endomembrane markers localized ANAC089 to the trans-Golgi network and the ER. The transcription factor was released upon treatment with reducing agents and targeted to the nucleus. Transactivation assays using wild type and mutated versions of the promoter showed a partial suppression of reporter expression. The data indicate that ANAC089 functions in a negative retrograde loop, lowering sAPX expression if the cell encounters a highly reducing condition. This conclusion was supported by reciprocal transcript accumulation of ANAC089 and sAPX during acclimation to low, normal, and high light conditions.

  14. The glutathione peroxidase gene family of Lotus japonicus: characterization of genomic clones, expression analyses and immunolocalization in legumes.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Javier; Matamoros, Manuel A; Naya, Loreto; James, Euan K; Rouhier, Nicolas; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Becana, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Despite the multiple roles played by antioxidants in rhizobia-legume symbioses, little is known about glutathione peroxidases (GPXs) in legumes. Here the characterization of six GPX genes of Lotus japonicus is reported. Expression of GPX genes was analysed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in L. japonicus and Lotus corniculatus plants exposed to various treatments known to generate reactive oxygen and/or nitrogen species. LjGPX1 and LjGPX3 were the most abundantly expressed genes in leaves, roots and nodules. Compared with roots, LjGPX1 and LjGPX6 were highly expressed in leaves and LjGPX3 and LjGPX6 in nodules. In roots, salinity decreased GPX4 expression, aluminium decreased expression of the six genes, and cadmium caused up-regulation of GPX3, GPX4 and GPX5 after 1 h and down-regulation of GPX1, GPX2, GPX4 and GPX6 after 3-24 h. Exposure of roots to sodium nitroprusside (a nitric oxide donor) for 1 h increased the mRNA levels of GPX4 and GPX6 by 3.3- and 30-fold, respectively. Thereafter, the GPX6 mRNA level remained consistently higher than that of the control. Immunogold labelling revealed the presence of GPX proteins in root and nodule amyloplasts and in leaf chloroplasts of L. japonicus and other legumes. Labelling was associated with starch grains. These results underscore the differential regulation of GPX expression in response to cadmium, aluminium and nitric oxide, and strongly support a role for GPX6 and possibly other GPX genes in stress and/or metabolic signalling.

  15. Glutathione peroxidase-1 inhibits UVA-induced AP-2{alpha} expression in human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Lei; Venkataraman, Sujatha; Coleman, Mitchell C.; Spitz, Douglas R.; Wertz, Philip W.; Domann, Frederick E. . E-mail: frederick-domann@uiowa.edu

    2006-12-29

    In this study, we found a role for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in UVA-induced AP-2{alpha} expression in the HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line. UVA irradiation not only increased AP-2{alpha}, but also caused accumulation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in the cell culture media, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by itself could induce the expression of AP-2{alpha}. By catalyzing the removal of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} from cells through over-expression of GPx-1, induction of AP-2{alpha} expression by UVA was abolished. Induction of transcription factor AP-2{alpha} by UVA had been previously shown to be mediated through the second messenger ceramide. We found that not only UVA irradiation, but also H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by itself caused increases of ceramide in HaCaT cells, and C2-ceramide added to cells induced the AP-2{alpha} signaling pathway. Finally, forced expression of GPx-1 eliminated UVA-induced ceramide accumulation as well as AP-2{alpha} expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that GPx-1 inhibits UVA-induced AP-2{alpha} expression by suppressing the accumulation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

  16. Novel promoter sequence required for manganese regulation of manganese peroxidase isozyme 1 gene expression in Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Ma, Biao; Mayfield, Mary B; Godfrey, Bruce J; Gold, Michael H

    2004-06-01

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP) is a major, extracellular component of the lignin-degrading system produced by the wood-rotting basidiomycetous fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium. The transcription of MnP-encoding genes (mnps) in P. chrysosporium occurs as a secondary metabolic event, triggered by nutrient-nitrogen limitation. In addition, mnp expression occurs only under Mn2+ supplementation. Using a reporter system based on the enhanced green fluorescent protein gene (egfp), we have characterized the P. chrysosporium mnp1 promoter by examining the effects of deletion, replacement, and translocation mutations on mnp1 promoter-directed egfp expression. The 1,528-bp mnp1 promoter fragment drives egfp expression only under Mn2+-sufficient, nitrogen-limiting conditions, as required for endogenous MnP production. However, deletion of a 48-bp fragment, residing 521 bp upstream of the translation start codon in the mnp1 promoter, or replacement of this fragment with an unrelated sequence resulted in egfp expression under nitrogen limitation, both in the absence and presence of exogenous Mn2+. Translocation of the 48-bp fragment to a site 120 bp downstream of its original location resulted in Mn2+-dependent egfp expression under conditions similar to those observed with the wild-type mnp1 promoter. These results suggest that the 48-bp fragment contains at least one Mn2+-responsive cis element. Additional promoter-deletion experiments suggested that the Mn2+ element(s) is located within the 33-bp sequence at the 3' end of the 48-bp fragment. This is the first promoter sequence containing a Mn2+-responsive element(s) to be characterized in any eukaryotic organism. Copyright 2004 American Society for Microbiology

  17. Expression of a fungal manganese peroxidase in Escherichia coli: a comparison between the soluble and refolded enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Ren, Kai; Jia, Rong; Chen, Wenting; Sun, Ruirui

    2016-12-01

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP) from Irpex lacteus F17 has been shown to have a strong ability to degrade recalcitrant aromatic pollutants. In this study, a recombinant MnP from I. lacteus F17 was expressed in Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3) in the form of inclusion bodies, which were refolded to achieve an active enzyme. Further, we optimized the in vitro refolding conditions to increase the recovery yield of the recombinant protein production. Additionally, we attempted to express recombinant MnP in soluble form in E. coli, and compared its activity with that of refolded MnP. Refolded MnP was obtained by optimizing the in vitro refolding conditions, and soluble MnP was produced in the presence of four additives, TritonX-100, Tween-80, ethanol, and glycerol, through incubation at 16 °C. Hemin and Ca(2+) supplementation was crucial for the activity of the recombinant protein. Compared with refolded MnP, soluble MnP showed low catalytic efficiencies for Mn(2+) and H2O2 substrates, but the two enzymes had an identical, broad range substrate specificity, and the ability to decolorize azo dyes. Furthermore, their enzymatic spectral characteristics were analysed by circular dichroism (CD), electronic absorption spectrum (UV-VIS), fluorescence and Raman spectra, indicating the differences in protein conformation between soluble and refolded MnP. Subsequently, size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analyses demonstrated that refolded MnP was a good monomer in solution, while soluble MnP predominantly existed in the oligomeric status. Our results showed that two forms of recombinant MnP could be expressed in E. coli by varying the culture conditions during protein expression.

  18. High animal fat intake enhances prostate cancer progression and reduces glutathione peroxidase 3 expression in early stages of TRAMP mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Seo-Na; Han, Juhee; Abdelkader, Tamer Said; Kim, Tae-Hyoun; Lee, Ji Min; Song, Juha; Kim, Kyung-Sul; Park, Jong-Hwan; Park, Jae-Hak

    2014-09-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in Western men, and more men have been diagnosed at younger ages in recent years. A high-fat Western-style diet is a known risk factor for prostate cancer and increases oxidative stress. We evaluated the association between dietary animal fat and expression of antioxidant enzymes, particularly glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3), in the early stages of transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice. Six-week-old male nontransgenic and TRAMP mice were placed on high animal fat (45% Kcal fat) or control (10% Kcal fat) diets and sacrificed after 5 or 10 weeks. The histopathological score increased with age and high-fat diet consumption. The histopathological scores in dorsal and lateral lobes increased in the 10-week high-fat diet group (6.2±0.2 and 6.2±0.4, respectively) versus the 10-week control diet group (5.3±0.3 and 5.2±0.2, respectively). GPx3 decreased both at the mRNA and protein levels in mouse prostate. GPx3 mRNA expression decreased (∼36.27% and ∼23.91%, respectively) in the anterior and dorsolateral prostate of TRAMP mice fed a high-fat diet compared to TRAMP mice fed a control diet. Cholesterol treatment increased PC-3 human prostate cancer cell proliferation, decreased GPx3 mRNA and protein levels, and increased H2 O2 levels in culture medium. Moreover, increasing GPx3 mRNA expression by troglitazone in PC-3 cells decreased cell proliferation and lowered H2 O2 levels. Dietary fat enhances prostate cancer progression, possibly by suppressing GPx3 expression and increasing proliferation of prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) epithelial cells. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Spatial and temporal expression of zebrafish glutathione peroxidase 4 a and b genes during early embryo development.

    PubMed

    Mendieta-Serrano, Mario A; Schnabel, Denhí; Lomelí, Hilda; Salas-Vidal, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Antioxidant cellular mechanisms are essential for cell redox homeostasis during animal development and in adult life. Previous in situ hybridization analyses of antioxidant enzymes in zebrafish have indicated that they are ubiquitously expressed. However, spatial information about the protein distribution of these enzymes is not available. Zebrafish embryos are particularly suitable for this type of analysis due to their small size, transparency and fast development. The main objective of the present work was to analyze the spatial and temporal gene expression pattern of the two reported zebrafish glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPx4) genes during the first day of zebrafish embryo development. We found that the gpx4b gene shows maternal and zygotic gene expression in the embryo proper compared to gpx4a that showed zygotic gene expression in the periderm covering the yolk cell only. Following, we performed a GPx4 protein immunolocalization analysis during the first 24-h of development. The detection of this protein suggests that the antibody recognizes GPx4b in the embryo proper during the first 24 h of development and GPx4a at the periderm covering the yolk cell after 14-somite stage. Throughout early cleavages, GPx4 was located in blastomeres and was less abundant at the cleavage furrow. Later, from the 128-cell to 512-cell stages, GPx4 remained in the cytoplasm but gradually increased in the nuclei, beginning in marginal blastomeres and extending the nuclear localization to all blastomeres. During epiboly progression, GPx4b was found in blastoderm cells and was excluded from the yolk cell. After 24 h of development, GPx4b was present in the myotomes particularly in the slow muscle fibers, and was excluded from the myosepta. These results highlight the dynamics of the GPx4 localization pattern and suggest its potential participation in fundamental developmental processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Altered placental glutathione peroxidase mRNA expression in preeclampsia according to the presence or absence of labor.

    PubMed

    Roland-Zejly, L; Moisan, V; St-Pierre, I; Bilodeau, J-F

    2011-02-01

    Increased placental oxidative stress in preeclampsia (PE) has been associated in part to a decrease in glutathione peroxidase (GPX) antioxidant activity. However, it is not clear if GPX mRNA expression is affected in PE, and how the presence of labor may impair this expression. In this study, we characterized by quantitative PCR, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, the expression of four GPX (GPX1 to 4) in the placenta of normotensive (NP; n = 23) and PE pregnancies (n = 25) according to mode of delivery: vaginal delivery (with labor) or cesarean (without labor); the tissue layer: amnion-chorion (AC) and villi; and the sampling site: peri-insertion or peripheral. Concomitantly, oxidative stress markers mRNA expression, HSP70 and HO-1 were measured. All GPX mRNA and protein were detected in all layers of the placenta and sampling sites. In absence of labor, GPX1 is more expressed near the umbilical cord than at the periphery of the villi (p = 0.037). At the periphery of AC membranes, GPX2 was more expressed in PE than in controls in presence of labor (p = 0.037). Interestingly, GPX4 mRNA level was clearly deficient in the PE villi in presence or absence of labor (p < 0.0473). Also, the GPX4 expression in PE was lower than controls in AC membranes in presence of labor (p = 0.0007). Oxidative stress markers, HSP70 and HO-1, were higher in PE placental membranes than in controls in absence of labor (p < 0.011). HSP70 was also upregulated in PE placental membranes in presence of labor (p = 0.034). Correlations between stress markers and GPX mRNA expression were mostly present in AC membranes in presence of labor in NP. Most of the latter correlations were lost in PE. In conclusion, our results suggest that the reported decrease in GPx activity and increased oxidative stress in PE placental villi may be attributed in part to GPX4 independently of the presence or absence of labor. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. An N‐terminal Peptide Extension Results in Efficient Expression, but not Secretion, of a Synthetic Horseradish Peroxidase Gene in Transgenic Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    KIS, MIHALY; BURBRIDGE, EMMA; BROCK, IAN W.; HEGGIE, LAURA; DIX, PHILIP J.; KAVANAGH, TONY A.

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims Native horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) peroxidase, HRP (EC 1.11.1.7), isoenzyme C is synthesized with N‐terminal and C‐terminal peptide extensions, believed to be associated with protein targeting. This study aimed to explore the specific functions of these extensions, and to generate transgenic plants with expression patterns suitable for exploring the role of peroxidase in plant development and defence. • Methods Transgenic Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) plants expressing different versions of a synthetic horseradish peroxidase, HRP, isoenzyme C gene were constructed. The gene was engineered to include additional sequences coding for either the natural N‐terminal or the C‐terminal extension or both. These constructs were placed under the control of a constitutive promoter (CaMV‐35S) or the tobacco RUBISCO‐SSU light inducible promoter (SSU) and introduced into tobacco using Agrobacterium‐mediated transformation. To study the effects of the N‐ and C‐terminal extensions, the localization of recombinant peroxidase was determined using biochemical and molecular techniques. • Key Results Transgenic tobacco plants can exhibit a ten‐fold increase in peroxidase activity compared with wild‐type tobacco levels, and the majority of this activity is located in the symplast. The N‐terminal extension is essential for the production of high levels of recombinant protein, while the C‐terminal extension has little effect. Differences in levels of enzyme activity and recombinant protein are reflected in transcript levels. • Conclusions There is no evidence to support either preferential secretion or vacuolar targeting of recombinant peroxidase in this heterologous expression system. This leads us to question the postulated targeting roles of these peptide extensions. The N‐terminal extension is essential for high level expression and appears to influence transcript stability or translational efficiency. Plants have been

  2. Differential expression of trehalose 6-P phosphatase and ascorbate peroxidase transcripts in nodule cortex of Phaseolus vulgaris and regulation of nodule O2 permeability.

    PubMed

    Bargaz, Adnane; Lazali, Mohamed; Amenc, Laurie; Abadie, Josiane; Ghoulam, Cherki; Farissi, Mohamed; Faghire, Mustapha; Drevon, Jean-Jacques

    2013-07-01

    Although the role of phosphatases and antioxidant enzymes have been documented in phosphorus (P) deficiency tolerance, gene expression differences in the nodules of nitrogen fixing legumes should also affect tolerance to this soil constraint. In this study, root nodules were induced by Rhizobium tropici CIAT899 in two Phaseolus vulgaris recombinant inbred lines (RIL); RIL115 (low P-tolerant) and RIL147 (low P-sensitive) under hydroaeroponic culture with sufficient versus deficient P supply. Trehalose 6-P phosphatase and ascorbate peroxidase transcripts were localized within nodules in which O2 permeability was measured. Results indicate that differential tissues-specific expression of trehalose 6-P phosphatase and ascorbate peroxidase transcripts within nodules was detected particularly in infected zone and cortical cells. Under P-deficiency, trehalose 6-P phosphatase transcript was increased and mainly localized in infected zone and outer cortex of RIL115 as compared to RIL147. Ascorbate peroxidase transcript was highly expressed under P-sufficiency in the infected zone, inner cortex and vascular traces of RIL115 rather than RIL147. In addition, significant correlations were found between nodule O2 permeability and both peroxidase (r = 0.66*) and trehalose 6-P phosphatase enzyme activities (r = 0.79*) under sufficient and deficient P conditions, respectively. The present findings suggest that the tissue-specific localized trehalose 6-P phosphatase and ascorbate peroxidase transcripts of infected cells and nodule cortex are involved in nitrogen fixation efficiency and are likely to play a role in nodule respiration and adaptation to P-deficiency.

  3. Influence of heat stress on leaf ultrastructure, photosynthetic performance, and ascorbate peroxidase gene expression of two pear cultivars (Pyrus pyrifolia).

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong-feng; Zhang, Dong; Liu, Guo-qin; Hussain, Sayed; Teng, Yuan-wen

    2013-12-01

    Plants encounter a variety of stresses in natural environments. One-year-old pot-grown trees of pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai cv. Cuiguan and Wonhwang) were exposed to two heat stress regimes. Under constant short-term heat stress, chloroplasts and mitochondria were visibly damaged. Relative chlorophyll content and maximum photochemical efficiency of photosystem II were significantly decreased, which indicated that the leaf photosynthetic capability declined. Under chronic heat stress, mesophyll cell ultrastructure was not obviously damaged, but leaf photosynthetic capability was still restrained. As chronic heat stress was a simulation of the natural environment in summer, further study of the responses under this stress regime was undertaken. Ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity was increased in 'Cuiguan', but not in 'Wonhwang'. Inducible expression of PpAPX genes in the cytoplasm, chloroplasts and peroxisomes was consistent with increased APX activity in 'Cuiguan', whereas only weak induction of PpAPX genes was observed in 'Wonhwang'. The isoenzymes cytosolic APX1 (cAPX1) and stromal APX (sAPX) were confirmed to be localized in the cytoplasm and chloroplasts, respectively.

  4. Selenoprotein M gene expression, peroxidases activity and hydrogen peroxide concentration are differentially regulated in gill and hepatopancreas of the white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei during hypoxia and reoxygenation.

    PubMed

    García-Triana, Antonio; Peregrino-Uriarte, Alma Beatriz; Yepiz-Plascencia, Gloria

    2016-09-01

    In many organisms, episodes of low O2 concentration (hypoxia) and the subsequent rise of O2 concentration (reoxygenation) result in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress. Selenoprotein M (SelM), is a selenocysteine containing protein with redox activity involved in the antioxidant response. It was previously shown that in the white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei, the silencing of SelM by RNAi decreased peroxidase activity in gill. In this work, we report the structure of the SelM gene (LvSelM) and its relative expression in hepatopancreas and gill after 24h of hypoxia followed by 1h of reoxygenation. The gene is composed by four exons interrupted by tree introns. In gills and hepatopancreas, SelM expression increased after 24h of hypoxia followed by 1h of reoxygenation, while peroxidases activity diminished in hepatopancreas but increased in gills. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration was higher in hepatopancreas in response to hypoxia for 6h and did not change after 24 of hypoxia followed by reoxygenation; conversely, no change was detected in gill. SelM appears to be a key enzyme in gill oxidative stress regulation, since the higher expression is associated with an increase in peroxidases activity while maintaining H2O2 concentration. In contrast, in hepatopancreas there is a higher expression after hypoxia and reoxygenation for 24h, but peroxidases activity was lower and the change in H2O2 occurred after 6h of hypoxia and this level was maintained during reoxygenation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Selection for low or high primary dormancy in Lolium rigidum Gaud seeds results in constitutive differences in stress protein expression and peroxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Goggin, Danica E.; Powles, Stephen B.; Steadman, Kathryn J.

    2011-01-01

    Seed dormancy in wild Lolium rigidum Gaud (annual ryegrass) populations is highly variable and not well characterized at the biochemical level. To identify some of the determinants of dormancy level in these seeds, the proteomes of subpopulations selected for low and high levels of primary dormancy were compared by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of extracts from mature, dry seeds. High-dormancy seeds showed higher expression of small heat shock proteins, enolase, and glyoxalase I than the low-dormancy seeds. The functional relevance of these differences in protein expression was confirmed by the fact that high-dormancy seeds were more tolerant to high temperatures imposed at imbibition and had consistently higher glyoxalase I activity over 0–42 d dark stratification. Higher expression of a putative glutathione peroxidase in low-dormancy seeds was not accompanied by higher activity, but these seeds had a slightly more oxidized glutathione pool and higher total peroxidase activity. Overall, these biochemical and physiological differences suggest that L. rigidum seeds selected for low dormancy are more prepared for rapid germination via peroxidase-mediated cell wall weakening, whilst seeds selected for high dormancy are constitutively prepared to survive environmental stresses, even in the absence of stress during seed development. PMID:20974739

  6. Human thyroid peroxidase (TPO) isoforms, TPO-1 and TPO-2: analysis of protein expression in Graves' thyroid tissue.

    PubMed

    Gardas, A; Lewartowska, A; Sutton, B J; Pasieka, Z; McGregor, A M; Banga, J P

    1997-11-01

    Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) is the key enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of thyroid hormones and is an important autoantigen in autoimmune thyroid disease. Different messenger RNA species coding for TPO are present in thyroid tissue, including the species coding for a 933-amino acid protein (termed TPO-1) and a second in which exon 10 is deleted and which is 57 residues shorter (termed TPO-2). However, it is not known whether the smaller, TPO-2 isoform is expressed as a protein in thyroid cells. In SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions, TPO appears in the thyroid microsome and purified protein preparations as a closely migrating double band of approximately 105 (larger form) and 100 kilodaltons (smaller form). We investigated the presence of the isoform TPO-2 polypeptide in Graves' thyroid tissue using rabbit antisera to three different synthetic peptides from exon 10 (specific for TPO-1) and a polyclonal rabbit and monoclonal anti-TPO antibody (both of which are specific for the two forms of TPO). The larger and smaller forms of TPO were purified by electroelution after gel electrophoresis of highly purified natural TPO from Graves' thyroid microsomes. Both of the purified forms of TPO react with all three anti-exon 10 peptide antibodies, the polyclonal anti-TPO and the monoclonal antibody anti-TPO. This shows that both forms of TPO contain exon 10-encoded polypeptide of TPO-1. Interestingly, the proportion of the larger and smaller forms of TPO varied in different Graves' thyroid microsome preparations. To investigate the presence of the smaller TPO-2 isoform in the purified natural TPO preparation, affinity depletion of TPO-1 using the anti-exon 10 peptide antibodies was carried out. The binding of anti-exon 10 peptide antibodies to the immunodepleted TPO-1 fraction was considerably diminished in comparison to binding of polyclonal anti-TPO, suggesting the presence of small amounts (< 10%) of TPO-2 expressed as a protein in thyroid cells. Our results extend previous

  7. Recombinant horseradish peroxidase: production and analytical applications.

    PubMed

    Grigorenko, V G; Andreeva, I P; Rubtsova, M Yu; Egorov, A M

    2015-04-01

    Horseradish peroxidase is a key enzyme in bio- and immunochemical analysis. New approaches in functional expression of the peroxidase gene in E. coli cells and the subsequent refolding of the resulting protein yield a recombinant enzyme that is comparable in its spectral and catalytic characteristics to the native plant peroxidase. Genetic engineering approaches allow production of recombinant peroxidase conjugates with both protein antigens and Fab antibody fragments. The present article reviews the use of recombinant horseradish peroxidase as the marker enzyme in ELISA procedures as well as in amperometric sensors based on direct electron transfer.

  8. Improvement of manganese peroxidase production by the hyper lignin-degrading fungus Phanerochaete sordida YK-624 by recombinant expression of the 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase gene.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Hirofumi; Misumi, Kenta; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Kawagishi, Hirokazu

    2013-12-01

    The manganese peroxidase (MnP) gene (mnp4) promoter of Phanerochaete sordida YK-624 was used to drive expression of 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase (als), which is a key heme biosynthesis enzyme. The expression plasmid pMnP4pro-als was transformed into P. sordida YK-624 uracil auxotrophic mutant UV-64, and 14 recombinant als expressing-transformants were generated. Average cumulative MnP activities in the transformants were 1.18-fold higher than that of control transformants. In particular, transformants A-14 and A-61 showed significantly higher MnP activity (approximately 2.8-fold) than wild type. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the increased MnP activity was caused by elevated recombinant als expression. These results suggest that the production of MnP is improved by high expression of als.

  9. Effect of Myomectomy on Endometrial Glutathione Peroxidase 3 (GPx3) and Glycodelin mRNA Expression at the Time of the Implantation Window

    PubMed Central

    Farimani Sanoee, Marzieh; Alizamir, Tahereh; Faramarzi, Shamila; Saidijam, Massoud; Yadegarazari, Reza; Shabab, Nooshin; Rastgoo Haghi, Alireza; Alizadeh, Zohreh

    2014-01-01

    Background: In fertile women, glycodelin and glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3) genes expression rises during the luteal phase, with a peak occurring during the implantation window. The expression of these genes decreases in women with myomas. To determine whether myomectomy would reverse glycodelin and GPx3 expression, we evaluated the transcript levels of these genes in the endometrium of patients before and after myomectomy. Methods: Expression of glycodelin and GPx3 genes were examined prospectively during the midluteal phase in the endometrium obtained from infertile women with myoma (n = 12) before and three months after myomectomy. Endometrial expression of these genes was evaluated using quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Results: Endometrial glycodelin mRNA expression levels (normalized to 18S rRNA expression) were increased significantly in endometrium of patients after myomectomy (P = 0.02). GPx3 mRNA expression was increased insignificantly after myomectomy (P = 0.43). Conclusion: The results showed that myomectomy increased endometrial glycodelin (significantly) and GPx3 (not significantly) gene expression after 3 months. Study at different times and detecting expression of these genes can reveal more details. Iran. PMID:24518545

  10. Expression and characteristics of manganese peroxidase from Ganoderma lucidum in Pichia pastoris and its application in the degradation of four dyes and phenol.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Guo, Meng-Yuan; Gao, Yan-Hua; Bai, Xiao-Hui; Zhou, Xuan-Wei

    2017-02-23

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP) of white rot basidiomycetes, an extracellular heme enzyme, is part of a peroxidase superfamily that is capable of degrading the different phenolic compounds. Ganoderma, a white rot basidiomycete widely distributed worldwide, could secrete lignin-modifying enzymes (LME), including laccase (Lac), lignin peroxidases (LiP) and MnP. After the selection of a G. lucidum strain from five Ganoderma strains, the 1092 bp full-length cDNA of the MnP gene, designated as G. lucidum MnP (GluMnP1), was cloned from the selected strain. We subsequently constructed an eukaryotic expression vector, pAO815:: GlMnP, and transferred it into Pichia pastoris SMD116. Recombinant GluMnP1 (rGluMnP1) was with a yield of 126 mg/L and a molecular weight of approximately 37.72 kDa and a specific enzyme activity of 524.61 U/L. The rGluMnP1 could be capable of the decolorization of four types of dyes and the degradation of phenol. Phenol and its principal degradation products including hydroquinone, pyrocatechol, resorcinol, benzoquinone, were detected successfully in the experiments. The rGluMnP1 could be effectively expressed in Pichia pastoris and with a higher oxidation activity. We infer that, in the initial stages of the reaction, the catechol-mediated cycle should be the principal route of enzymatic degradation of phenol and its oxidation products. This study highlights the potential industrial applications associated with the production of MnP by genetic engineering methods, and the application of industrial wastewater treatment.

  11. Palm tree peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Sakharov, I Yu

    2004-08-01

    Over the years novel plant peroxidases have been isolated from palm trees leaves. Some molecular and catalytic properties of palm peroxidases have been studied. The substrate specificity of palm peroxidases is distinct from the specificity of other plant peroxidases. Palm peroxidases show extremely high stability under acidic and alkaline conditions and high thermal stability. Moreover, these enzymes are more stable with respect to hydrogen peroxide treatment than other peroxidases. Due to their extremely high stability, palm peroxidases have been used successfully in the development of new bioanalytical tests, the construction of improved biosensors, and in polymer synthesis.

  12. Intracellular catalase/peroxidase from the phytopathogenic rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea: expression analysis and biochemical characterization of the recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Zamocky, Marcel; Furtmüller, Paul G; Bellei, Marzia; Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Stadlmann, Johannes; Vlasits, Jutta; Obinger, Christian

    2009-03-01

    Phytopathogenic fungi such as the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea are unique in having two catalase/peroxidase (KatG) paralogues located either intracellularly (KatG1) or extracellularly (KatG2). The coding genes have recently been shown to derive from a lateral gene transfer from a (proteo)bacterial genome followed by gene duplication and diversification. Here we demonstrate that KatG1 is expressed constitutively in M. grisea. It is the first eukaryotic catalase/peroxidase to be expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli in high amounts, with high purity and with almost 100% haem occupancy. Recombinant MagKatG1 is an acidic, mainly homodimeric, oxidoreductase with a predominant five-co-ordinated high-spin haem b. At 25 degrees C and pH 7.0, the E(0)' (standard reduction potential) of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple was found to be -186+/-10 mV. It bound cyanide monophasically with an apparent bimolecular rate constant of (9.0+/-0.4)x10(5) M(-1).s(-1) at pH 7.0 and at 25 degrees C and with a K(d) value of 1.5 muM. Its predominantly catalase activity was characterized by a pH optimum at 6.0 and k(cat) and K(m) values of 7010 s(-1) and 4.8 mM respectively. In addition, it acts as a versatile peroxidase with a pH optimum in the range 5.0-5.5 using both one-electron [2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) o-dianisidine, pyrogallol or guaiacol] and two-electron (Br(-), I(-) or ethanol) donors. Structure-function relationships are discussed with respect to data reported for prokaryotic KatGs, as is the physiological role of MagKatG1. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that (intracellular) MagKatG1 can be regarded as a typical representative for catalase/peroxidase of both phytopathogenic and saprotrophic fungi.

  13. Molecular characterization of the lignin-forming peroxidase: Role in growth, development and response to stress

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1993-01-01

    This laboratory has continued its comprehensive study of the structure and function of plant peroxidases and their genes. Specifically, we are characterizing the anionic peroxidase of tobacco. During the past year we have completed the nucleotide sequence of the tobacco anionic peroxidase gene, joined the anionic peroxidase promoter to [Beta]-glucuronidase and demonstrated expression in transformed plants, measured lignin, auxin, and ethylene levels in transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing the anionic peroxidase, developed chimeric peroxidase genes to over-or under-express the anionic peroxidase in tissue specific manner in transgenic plants, and over-expressed the tobacco anionic peroxidase in transgenic tomato and sweetgum plants.

  14. [Characterization of lignin and Mn peroxidases from Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    Lignin peroxidases were investigated with respect to enzyme kinetics and NMR spectroscopy of the heme domain. MN peroxidases were studied with respect to the role of oxalate in enzyme activity, the NMR spectroscopy of the heme domain. Gene expression of both lignin and MN peroxidases were examined as well as expression of site-directed mutants aimed at scale up production of these enzymes.

  15. The effect of alcohol and hydrogen peroxide on liver hepcidin gene expression in mice lacking antioxidant enzymes, glutathione peroxidase-1 or catalase.

    PubMed

    Harrison-Findik, Duygu Dee; Lu, Sizhao

    2015-05-06

    This study investigates the regulation of hepcidin, the key iron-regulatory molecule, by alcohol and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in glutathione peroxidase-1 (gpx-1(-/-)) and catalase (catalase(-/-)) knockout mice. For alcohol studies, 10% ethanol was administered in the drinking water for 7 days. Gpx-1(-/-) displayed significantly higher hepatic H2O2 levels than catalase(-/-) compared to wild-type mice, as measured by 2'-7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). The basal level of liver hepcidin expression was attenuated in gpx-1(-/-) mice. Alcohol increased H2O2 production in catalase(-/-) and wild-type, but not gpx-1(-/-), mice. Hepcidin expression was inhibited in alcohol-fed catalase(-/-) and wild-type mice. In contrast, alcohol elevated hepcidin expression in gpx-1(-/-) mice. Gpx-1(-/-) mice also displayed higher level of basal liver CHOP protein expression than catalase(-/-) mice. Alcohol induced CHOP and to a lesser extent GRP78/BiP expression, but not XBP1 splicing or binding of CREBH to hepcidin gene promoter, in gpx-1(-/-) mice. The up-regulation of hepatic ATF4 mRNA levels, which was observed in gpx-1(-/-) mice, was attenuated by alcohol. In conclusion, our findings strongly suggest that H2O2 inhibits hepcidin expression in vivo. Synergistic induction of CHOP by alcohol and H2O2, in the absence of gpx-1, stimulates liver hepcidin gene expression by ER stress independent of CREBH.

  16. Identification of the expressed protein and the impact of change in ascorbate peroxidase activity related to endodormancy breaking in Pyrus pyrifolia.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Yoshihiro; Kuroki, Katsuou; Jiang, Mingfeng; Matsumoto, Kazuhiro; Tamura, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    Endodormancy is an important feature of perennial deciduous fruit trees that survive in the extreme climates brought about by seasonal variation. To acquire a comprehensive knowledge of the biochemical processes occurring just before endodormancy breaking, the buds collected in the pre-breaking period (PP) phase were used as samples to identify the proteins related to the breaking of endodormancy in the Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai). Using nano-ESI-LC-MS/MS analysis, 96 proteins were overlapped by analyses of three times and identified as expressed proteins at the PP stage. Among these proteins, dehydrin, several classes of heat shock proteins (HSP), auxin-binding protein, and auxin-induced protein were identified in the floral bud in the PP stage. The majority of these proteins were involved primarily in the oxidation-reduction process. We focused on catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) as enzymes regulating the levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the bud. From measurements taken during the deepest period (DP), PP, mid-breaking period (MP), and late-breaking period (LP) of endodormancy, CAT activity decreased gradually, while APX activity also decreased from DP to MP, but then increased rapidly during LP. Protein data for PP and the rapid increase in APX activity observed in LP provided knowledge of the biochemical processes that regulate the consecutive transition from endodormancy breaking to ecodormancy induction in the Japanese pear.

  17. Thiocyanate-dependent induction of endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression by phagocyte peroxidases: a novel HOSCN-specific oxidant mechanism to amplify inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Guo; Mahmud, Shawn A; Nguyen, Julia; Slungaard, Arne

    2006-12-15

    Both eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) preferentially oxidize SCN(-) to generate HOSCN, a weak, sulfhydryl-reactive oxidant, as a major physiologic product. We here show that HOSCN is a uniquely potent phagocyte oxidant inducer of E-selectin, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1 expression in HUVEC as detected by Western blot and flow cytometry. EMSA and inhibitor studies show that HOSCN up-regulation of these adhesion molecules is transcriptionally mediated through a mechanism that is dependent upon activation of the NF-kappaB p65/p50 transcription factor and constitutively suppressed by PI3K-Akt pathway activity. HUVEC monolayers exposed to HOSCN bind 8-fold more neutrophils and 3- to 4-fold more Aml14.3D10 cells (a differentiated cell line model of mature eosinophils) than control monolayers. Blocking Ab studies confirm the involvement of E-selectin and ICAM-1 but not VCAM-1 in neutrophil adhesion and of all three in Aml14.3D10 adhesion. Intraperitoneal injection of HOSCN evoked an 8-fold increase in neutrophil peritoneal extravasation. In addition to NF-kappaB, HOSCN also activates the potentially proinflammatory transcription factors Stat4, CDP, GRE, CBF, Ets-1/PEA3, and TFIID, a pattern easily distinguishable from that induced by LPS. These results suggest that phagocyte peroxidases function to amplify inflammation through a novel, HOSCN-specific oxidant mechanism.

  18. High-yield production of manganese peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, and versatile peroxidase in Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Coconi-Linares, Nancy; Magaña-Ortíz, Denis; Guzmán-Ortiz, Doralinda A; Fernández, Francisco; Loske, Achim M; Gómez-Lim, Miguel A

    2014-11-01

    The white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium secretes extracellular oxidative enzymes during secondary metabolism, but lacks versatile peroxidase, an enzyme important in ligninolysis and diverse biotechnology processes. In this study, we report the genetic modification of a P. chrysosporium strain capable of co-expressing two endogenous genes constitutively, manganese peroxidase (mnp1) and lignin peroxidase (lipH8), and the codon-optimized vpl2 gene from Pleurotus eryngii. For this purpose, we employed a highly efficient transformation method based on the use of shock waves developed by our group. The expression of recombinant genes was verified by PCR, Southern blot, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), and assays of enzymatic activity. The production yield of ligninolytic enzymes was up to four times higher in comparison to previously published reports. These results may represent significant progress toward the stable production of ligninolytic enzymes and the development of an effective fungal strain with promising biotechnological applications.

  19. Nitric oxide-repressed Forkhead factor FoxE1 expression is involved in the inhibition of TSH-induced thyroid peroxidase levels.

    PubMed

    Montesinos, María del Mar; Nicola, Juan Pablo; Nazar, Magalí; Peyret, Victoria; Lucero, Ariel Maximiliano; Pellizas, Claudia Gabriela; Masini-Repiso, Ana María

    2016-01-15

    Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) is essential for thyroid hormone synthesis mediating the covalent incorporation of iodine into tyrosine residues of thyroglobulin process known as organification. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) via cAMP signaling is the main hormonal regulator of TPO gene expression. In thyroid cells, TSH-stimulated nitric oxide (NO) production inhibits TSH-induced thyroid-specific gene expression, suggesting a potential autocrine role of NO in modulating thyroid function. Indeed, NO donors downregulate TSH-induced iodide accumulation and organification in thyroid cells. Here, using FRTL-5 thyroid cells as model, we obtained insights into the molecular mechanism underlying the inhibitory effects of NO on iodide organification. We demonstrated that NO donors inhibited TSH-stimulated TPO expression by inducing a cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase-mediated transcriptional repression of the TPO gene. Moreover, we characterized the FoxE1 binding site Z as mediator of the NO-inhibited TPO expression. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that NO decreases TSH-induced FoxE1 expression, thus repressing the transcripcional activation of TPO gene. Taken together, we provide novel evidence reinforcing the inhibitory role of NO on thyroid cell function, an observation of potential pathophysiological relevance associated with human thyroid pathologies that come along with changes in the NO production.

  20. Molecular cloning, sequence analysis, prokaryotic expression, and function prediction of foot-specific peroxidase in Hydra magnipapillata Chinese strain.

    PubMed

    Pan, H C; Yang, H Q; Zhao, F X; Qian, X C

    2014-08-28

    The cDNA sequence of foot-specific peroxidase PPOD1 from the Chinese strain of Hydra magnipapillata was cloned by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The cDNA sequence contained a coding region with an 873-bp open reading frame, a 31-bp 5'-untranslated region, and a 36-bp 3'-untranslated region. The structure prediction results showed that PPOD1 contains 10.34% of α-helix, 38.62% of extended strand, 12.41% of β-turn, and 38.62% of random coil. The structural core was α-helix at the N terminus. The GenBank protein blast server showed that PPOD1 contains 2 fascin-like domains. In addition, high-level PPOD1 activity was only present in the ectodermal epithelial cells located on the edge of the adhesive face of the basal disc, and that these cells extended lamellipodia and filopodia when the basal disc was tightly attached to a glass slide. The fascin-like domains of Hydra PPOD1 might contribute to the bundling of the actin filament of these cells, and hence, the formation of filopodia. In conclusion, these cells might play an important role in strengthening the adsorbability of the basal disc to substrates.

  1. Molecular characterization of two glutathione peroxidase genes of Panax ginseng and their expression analysis against environmental stresses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu-Jin; Jang, Moon-Gi; Noh, Hae-Yong; Lee, Hye-Jin; Sukweenadhi, Johan; Kim, Jong-Hak; Kim, Se-Yeong; Kwon, Woo-Saeng; Yang, Deok-Chun

    2014-02-01

    Glutathione peroxidases (GPXs) are a group of enzymes that protect cells against oxidative damage generated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). GPX catalyzes the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or organic hydroperoxides to water or alcohols by reduced glutathione. The presence of GPXs in plants has been reported by several groups, but the roles of individual members of this family in a single plant species have not been studied. Two GPX cDNAs were isolated and characterized from the embryogenic callus of Panax ginseng. The two cDNAs had an open reading frame (ORF) of 723 and 681bp with a deduced amino acid sequence of 240 and 226 residues, respectively. The calculated molecular mass of the matured proteins are approximately 26.4kDa or 25.7kDa with a predicated isoelectric point of 9.16 or 6.11, respectively. The two PgGPXs were elevated strongly by salt stress and chilling stress in a ginseng seedling. In addition, the two PgGPXs showed different responses against biotic stress. The positive responses of PgGPX to the environmental stimuli suggested that ginseng GPX may help to protect against environmental stresses.

  2. Photosynthetic electron transport regulates the expression of cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase genes in Arabidopsis during excess light stress.

    PubMed Central

    Karpinski, S; Escobar, C; Karpinska, B; Creissen, G; Mullineaux, P M

    1997-01-01

    Exposure of Arabidopsis plants that were maintained under low light (200 mumol of photons m-2 sec-1) to excess light (2000 mumol of photons m-2 sec-1) for 1 hr caused reversible photoinhibition of photosynthesis. Measurements of photosynthetic parameters and the use of electron transport inhibitors indicated that a novel signal transduction pathway was initiated at plastoquinone and regulated, at least in part, by the redox status of the plastoquinone pool. This signal, which preceded the photooxidative burst of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) associated with photoinhibition of photosynthesis, resulted in a rapid increase (within 15 min) in mRNA levels of two cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase genes (APX1 and APX2). Treatment of leaves with exogenous reduced glutathione abolished this signal, suggesting that glutathione or the redox status of the glutathione pool has a regulatory impact on this signaling pathway. During recovery from photooxidative stress, transcripts for cytosolic glutathione reductase (GOR2) increased, emphasizing the role of glutathione in this stress. PMID:9144965

  3. Molecular cloning, expression, and functional characterization of a 2Cys-peroxiredoxin in Chinese cabbage.

    PubMed

    Cheong, N E; Choi, Y O; Lee, K O; Kim, W Y; Jung, B G; Chi, Y H; Jeong, J S; Kim, K; Cho, M J; Lee, S Y

    1999-07-01

    A cDNA (C2C-Prx) corresponding to a 2Cys-peroxiredoxin (2Cys-Prx) was isolated from a leaf cDNA library of Chinese cabbage. The predicted amino acid sequence of C2C-Prx has 2 conserved cysteines and several peptide domains present in most of the 2Cys-Prx subfamily members. It shows the highest sequence homology to the 2Cys-Prx enzymes of spinach (88%) and Arabidopsis (86%). Southern analysis using the cDNA insert of C2C-Prx revealed that it consists of a small multigene family in Chinese cabbage genome. RNA blot analysis showed that the gene was predominantly expressed in the leaf tissue of Chinese cabbage seedlings, but the mRNA was generally expressed in most tissues of mature plant, except roots. The expression of C2C-Prx was slightly induced by treatment with H2O2 (100 microM) or Fe3+/O2/DTT oxidation system, but not by ABA (50 microM) or GA3 (10 microM). The C2C-Prx is encoded as a preprotein of 273 amino acids containing a putative chloroplast-targeting signal of 65 amino acids at its N-terminus. The N-terminally truncated recombinant protein (deltaC2C-Prx) migrates as a dimer in a non-reducing SDS-polyacrylamide gel and as a monomer in a reducing condition. The deltaC2C-Prx shows no immuno cross-reactivity to antiserum of the yeast thiol-specific antioxidant protein, and vice versa. The deltaC2C-Prx prevents the inactivation of glutamine synthetase and the DNA cleavage in the metal-catalyzed oxidation system. In the yeast thioredoxin system containing thioredoxin reductase, thioredoxin, and NADPH, the deltaC2C-Prx exhibits peroxidase activity on H2O2.

  4. The Effect of Alcohol and Hydrogen Peroxide on Liver Hepcidin Gene Expression in Mice Lacking Antioxidant Enzymes, Glutathione Peroxidase-1 or Catalase

    PubMed Central

    Harrison-Findik, Duygu Dee; Lu, Sizhao

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the regulation of hepcidin, the key iron-regulatory molecule, by alcohol and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in glutathione peroxidase-1 (gpx-1−/−) and catalase (catalase−/−) knockout mice. For alcohol studies, 10% ethanol was administered in the drinking water for 7 days. Gpx-1−/− displayed significantly higher hepatic H2O2 levels than catalase−/− compared to wild-type mice, as measured by 2'-7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). The basal level of liver hepcidin expression was attenuated in gpx-1−/− mice. Alcohol increased H2O2 production in catalase−/− and wild-type, but not gpx-1−/−, mice. Hepcidin expression was inhibited in alcohol-fed catalase−/− and wild-type mice. In contrast, alcohol elevated hepcidin expression in gpx-1−/− mice. Gpx-1−/− mice also displayed higher level of basal liver CHOP protein expression than catalase−/− mice. Alcohol induced CHOP and to a lesser extent GRP78/BiP expression, but not XBP1 splicing or binding of CREBH to hepcidin gene promoter, in gpx-1−/− mice. The up-regulation of hepatic ATF4 mRNA levels, which was observed in gpx-1−/− mice, was attenuated by alcohol. In conclusion, our findings strongly suggest that H2O2 inhibits hepcidin expression in vivo. Synergistic induction of CHOP by alcohol and H2O2, in the absence of gpx-1, stimulates liver hepcidin gene expression by ER stress independent of CREBH. PMID:25955433

  5. Differential expression of peroxidase and ABC transporter as the key regulatory components for degradation of azo dyes by Penicillium oxalicum SAR-3.

    PubMed

    Saroj, Samta; Kumar, Karunesh; Prasad, Manoj; Singh, R P

    2014-12-01

    Fungal species are potential dye decomposers since these secrete spectra of extracellular enzymes involved in catabolism. However, cellular mechanisms underlying azo dye catalysis and detoxification are incompletely understood and obscure. A potential strain designated as Penicillium oxalicum SAR-3 demonstrated broad-spectrum catabolic ability of different azo dyes. A forward suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library of P. oxalicum SAR-3 constructed in presence and absence of azo dye Acid Red 183 resulted in identification of 183 unique expressed sequence tags (ESTs) which were functionally classified into 12 functional categories. A number of novel genes that affect specifically organic azo dye degradation were discovered. Although the ABC transporters and peroxidases emerged as prominent hot spot for azo dye detoxification, we also identified a number of proteins that are more proximally related to stress-responsive gene expression. Majority of the ESTs (29.5%) were grouped as hypothetical/unknown indicating the presence of putatively novel genes. Analysis of few ESTs through quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed their possible role in AR183 degradation. The ESTs identified in the SSH library provide a novel insight on the transcripts that are expressed in P. oxalicum strain SAR-3 in response to AR183.

  6. Tobacco seeds simultaneously over-expressing Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase display enhanced seed longevity and germination rates under stress conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Pyo; Baek, Kwang-Hyun; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Bang, Jae-Woog; Kwon, Suk-Yoon

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced during seed desiccation, germination, and ageing, leading to cellular damage and seed deterioration and, therefore, decreased seed longevity. The effects of simultaneous over-expression of two antioxidant enzymes on seed longevity and seed germination under stressful conditions were investigated. Transgenic tobacco simultaneously over-expressing the Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) genes in plastids showed normal growth and seed development. Furthermore, the transgenic seeds displayed increased CuZnSOD and APX enzymatic activities during seed development and maintained antioxidant enzymatic activity after two years of dried storage at room temperature. The two-year stored non-transgenic seeds (aged NT seeds) had higher levels of ion leakage than the two-year stored transgenic seeds (aged CA seeds), indicating membrane damage caused by ROS was more severe in the aged NT seeds than the aged CA seeds. The aged CA seeds decreased germination rates as compared to newly harvested transgenic and non-transgenic seeds. The aged CA seeds, however, significantly increased germination rates under various abiotic stress conditions as compared to aged NT seeds. These data strongly suggest that simultaneous over-expression of the CuZnSOD and APX genes in plastids improves seed longevity and germination under various environmental stress conditions by attenuating the effects of oxidative stress produced by elongated storage conditions and harsh environmental stresses. PMID:20423937

  7. Tobacco seeds simultaneously over-expressing Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase display enhanced seed longevity and germination rates under stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Pyo; Baek, Kwang-Hyun; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Bang, Jae-Woog; Kwon, Suk-Yoon

    2010-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced during seed desiccation, germination, and ageing, leading to cellular damage and seed deterioration and, therefore, decreased seed longevity. The effects of simultaneous over-expression of two antioxidant enzymes on seed longevity and seed germination under stressful conditions were investigated. Transgenic tobacco simultaneously over-expressing the Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) genes in plastids showed normal growth and seed development. Furthermore, the transgenic seeds displayed increased CuZnSOD and APX enzymatic activities during seed development and maintained antioxidant enzymatic activity after two years of dried storage at room temperature. The two-year stored non-transgenic seeds (aged NT seeds) had higher levels of ion leakage than the two-year stored transgenic seeds (aged CA seeds), indicating membrane damage caused by ROS was more severe in the aged NT seeds than the aged CA seeds. The aged CA seeds decreased germination rates as compared to newly harvested transgenic and non-transgenic seeds. The aged CA seeds, however, significantly increased germination rates under various abiotic stress conditions as compared to aged NT seeds. These data strongly suggest that simultaneous over-expression of the CuZnSOD and APX genes in plastids improves seed longevity and germination under various environmental stress conditions by attenuating the effects of oxidative stress produced by elongated storage conditions and harsh environmental stresses.

  8. Maneb disturbs expression of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, increases reactive oxygen species production, and induces genotoxicity in liver of adult mice.

    PubMed

    Ben Amara, Ibtissem; Ben Saad, Hajer; Hamdaoui, Latifa; Karray, Aida; Boudawara, Tahia; Ben Ali, Yassine; Zeghal, Najiba

    2015-08-01

    Maneb (MB), a fungicide largely used in agriculture throughout the world including Tunisia, protects many vegetables, fruits and field crops against a wide spectrum of fungal diseases. However there is a lack of informations regarding the risks arising from MB exposure on non target organisms, especially mammals. The aim of this study was to investigate the morphological, biochemical and molecular aspects of liver injury after exposure of mice to MB. Four doses of MB corresponding to 1/8 (group D1), 1/6 (group D2), 1/4 (group D3), and 1/2 (group D4) of lethal dose (DL50 = 1500 mg/kg body weight) were administered to adult mice. Oxidative stress parameters were also objectified by molecular and histological endpoints in the liver. Maneb caused hepatotoxicity as characterized by the significant increase in the levels of malondialdehyde and protein oxidation marker, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP). The activities of catalase, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and the levels of glutathione decreased significantly in all treated mice, while vitamin C levels decreased only in group D4. We also noted a significant decrease in gene expression of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase enzymes. Maneb caused nucleic acids degradation testifying its genotoxicity. Yet, biochemical markers in plasma showed a decrease in total protein and an increase in aspartate, alanine amino transferases and bilirubin levels in all treatment groups. Moreover, plasma levels of cholesterol, triglycerides and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol significantly increased, while those of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol decreased. These biochemical alterations were correlated with significantly histological changes. Our data showed, for the first time, that intraperitoneal injection of very high non environmentally relevant MB concentrations to adult mice resulted in oxidative stress leading to hepatotoxicity and the impairment of defense systems, confirming the

  9. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the Met244Ala variant of catalase–peroxidase (KatG) from the haloarchaeon Haloarcula marismortui

    PubMed Central

    Ten-i, Tomomi; Kumasaka, Takashi; Higuchi, Wataru; Tanaka, Satoru; Yoshimatsu, Katsuhiko; Fujiwara, Taketomo; Sato, Takao

    2007-01-01

    The covalent modification of the side chains of Trp95, Tyr218 and Met244 within the active site of Haloarcula marismortui catalase–peroxidase (KatG) appears to be common to all KatGs and has been demonstrated to be particularly significant for its bifunctionality [Smulevich et al. (2006 ▶), J. Inorg. Biochem. 100, 568–585; Jakopitsch, Kolarich et al. (2003 ▶), FEBS Lett. 552, 135–140; Jakopitsch, Auer et al. (2003 ▶), J. Biol. Chem. 278, 20185–20191; Jakopitsch et al. (2004 ▶), J. Biol. Chem. 279, 46082–46095; Regelsberger et al. (2001 ▶), Biochem. Soc. Trans. 29, 99–105; Ghiladi, Knudsen et al. (2005 ▶), J. Biol. Chem. 280, 22651–22663; Ghiladi, Medzihradzky et al. (2005 ▶), Biochemistry, 44, 15093–15105]. The Met244Ala variant of the H. marismortui KatG enzyme was expressed in haloarchaeal host cells and purified to homogeneity. The variant showed a complete loss of catalase activity, whereas the peroxidase activity of this mutant was highly enhanced owing to an increase in its affinity for the peroxidatic substrate. The variant was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with ammonium sulfate and NaCl as precipitants. The reddish-brown rod-shaped crystals obtained belong to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 315.24, b = 81.04, c = 74.77 Å, β = 99.81°. A crystal frozen using lithium sulfate as the cryoprotectant diffracted to beyond 2.0 Å resolution. Preliminary X-ray analysis suggests the presence of a dimer in the asymmetric unit. PMID:18007045

  10. Cissus quadrangularis ethanol extract upregulates superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression in hydrogen peroxide-injured human ECV304 cells.

    PubMed

    Sapsrithong, Tarat; Kaewprem, Weeraya; Tongumpai, Sarunya; Nusuetrong, Punnee; Meksuriyen, Duangdeun

    2012-09-28

    Cissus quadrangularis has been widely used in traditional medicine for the treatment of hemorrhoid. However, the detailed mechanism of antioxidant defense of C. quadrangularis in endothelial cells under oxidative stress remains unclear. The present study aims to elucidate the protective role of ethanol extract of C. quadrangularis (CQE) including its constituents, quercetin and resveratrol, on hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-injured human umbilical vein endothelial ECV304 cells. Viability, genotoxicity and protein expression of ECV304 cells were analyzed by MTT, alkaline comet and Western blot, respectively. Production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined using dichlorofluorescein fluorescence dye. After exposing cells to CQE containing quercetin and resveratrol, DNA damage was not observed. CQE including quercetin and resveratrol significantly attenuated ROS in H(2)O(2)-injured ECV304 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. The protein expression of superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) increased in the cells treated with CQE, quercetin or resveratrol prior to H(2)O(2) exposure, as compared with control. The results provide a molecular mechanism of C. quadrangularis, which could be partially related to quercetin and resveratrol, in restoring ROS in endothelial cells through the upregulation of Cu/Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD, GPx and eNOS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Expression of an alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) peroxidase gene in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana enhances resistance to NaCl and H2O2.

    PubMed

    Teng, K; Xiao, G Z; Guo, W E; Yuan, J B; Li, J; Chao, Y H; Han, L B

    2016-05-23

    Peroxidases (PODs) are enzymes that play important roles in catalyzing the reduction of H2O2 and the oxidation of various substrates. They function in many different and important biological processes, such as defense mechanisms, immune responses, and pathogeny. The POD genes have been cloned and identified in many plants, but their function in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is not known, to date. Based on the POD gene sequence (GenBank accession No. L36157.1), we cloned the POD gene in alfalfa, which was named MsPOD. MsPOD expression increased with increasing H2O2. The gene was expressed in all of the tissues, including the roots, stems, leaves, and flowers, particularly in stems and leaves under light/dark conditions. A subcellular analysis showed that MsPOD was localized outside the cells. Transgenic Arabidopsis with MsPOD exhibited increased resistance to H2O2 and NaCl. Moreover, POD activity in the transgenic plants was significantly higher than that in wild-type Arabidopsis. These results show that MsPOD plays an important role in resistance to H2O2 and NaCl.

  12. Nanostructures for peroxidases

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana M.; Prieto, Tatiana; Nantes, Iseli L.

    2015-01-01

    Peroxidases are enzymes catalyzing redox reactions that cleave peroxides. Their active redox centers have heme, cysteine thiols, selenium, manganese, and other chemical moieties. Peroxidases and their mimetic systems have several technological and biomedical applications such as environment protection, energy production, bioremediation, sensors and immunoassays design, and drug delivery devices. The combination of peroxidases or systems with peroxidase-like activity with nanostructures such as nanoparticles, nanotubes, thin films, liposomes, micelles, nanoflowers, nanorods and others is often an efficient strategy to improve catalytic activity, targeting, and reusability. PMID:26389124

  13. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the Met244Ala variant of catalase–peroxidase (KatG) from the haloarchaeon Haloarcula marismortui

    SciTech Connect

    Ten-i, Tomomi; Kumasaka, Takashi; Higuchi, Wataru; Tanaka, Satoru; Yoshimatsu, Katsuhiko; Fujiwara, Taketomo; Sato, Takao

    2007-11-01

    The Met244Ala variant of the H. marismortui KatG enzyme was expressed in haloarchaeal host cells and purified to homogeneity. The variant was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with ammonium sulfate and NaCl as precipitants. The reddish-brown rod-shaped crystals obtained belong to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 315.24, b = 81.04, c = 74.77 Å, β = 99.81°. The covalent modification of the side chains of Trp95, Tyr218 and Met244 within the active site of Haloarcula marismortui catalase–peroxidase (KatG) appears to be common to all KatGs and has been demonstrated to be particularly significant for its bifunctionality [Smulevich et al. (2006 ▶), J. Inorg. Biochem.100, 568–585; Jakopitsch, Kolarich et al. (2003 ▶), FEBS Lett.552, 135–140; Jakopitsch, Auer et al. (2003 ▶), J. Biol. Chem.278, 20185–20191; Jakopitsch et al. (2004 ▶), J. Biol. Chem.279, 46082–46095; Regelsberger et al. (2001 ▶), Biochem. Soc. Trans.29, 99–105; Ghiladi, Knudsen et al. (2005 ▶), J. Biol. Chem.280, 22651–22663; Ghiladi, Medzihradzky et al. (2005 ▶), Biochemistry, 44, 15093–15105]. The Met244Ala variant of the H. marismortui KatG enzyme was expressed in haloarchaeal host cells and purified to homogeneity. The variant showed a complete loss of catalase activity, whereas the peroxidase activity of this mutant was highly enhanced owing to an increase in its affinity for the peroxidatic substrate. The variant was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with ammonium sulfate and NaCl as precipitants. The reddish-brown rod-shaped crystals obtained belong to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 315.24, b = 81.04, c = 74.77 Å, β = 99.81°. A crystal frozen using lithium sulfate as the cryoprotectant diffracted to beyond 2.0 Å resolution. Preliminary X-ray analysis suggests the presence of a dimer in the asymmetric unit.

  14. The Ve-mediated resistance response of the tomato to Verticillium dahliae involves H2O2, peroxidase and lignins and drives PAL gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Verticillium dahliae is a fungal pathogen that infects a wide range of hosts. The only known genes for resistance to Verticillium in the Solanaceae are found in the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) Ve locus, formed by two linked genes, Ve1 and Ve2. To characterize the resistance response mediated by the tomato Ve gene, we inoculated two nearly isogenic tomato lines, LA3030 (ve/ve) and LA3038 (Ve/Ve), with V. dahliae. Results We found induction of H2O2 production in roots of inoculated plants, followed by an increase in peroxidase activity only in roots of inoculated resistant plants. Phenylalanine-ammonia lyase (PAL) activity was also increased in resistant roots 2 hours after inoculation, while induction of PAL activity in susceptible roots was not seen until 48 hours after inoculation. Phenylpropanoid metabolism was also affected, with increases in ferulic acid, p-coumaric acid, vanillin and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde contents in resistant roots after inoculation. Six tomato PAL cDNA sequences (PAL1 - PAL6) were found in the SolGenes tomato EST database. RT-PCR analysis showed that these genes were expressed in all organs of the plant, albeit at different levels. Real-time RT-PCR indicated distinct patterns of expression of the different PAL genes in V. dahliae-inoculated roots. Phylogenetic analysis of 48 partial PAL cDNAs corresponding to 19 plant species grouped angiosperm PAL sequences into four clusters, suggesting functional differences among the six tomato genes, with PAL2 and PAL6 presumably involved in lignification, and the remaining PAL genes implicated in other biological processes. An increase in the synthesis of lignins was found 16 and 28 days after inoculation in both lines; this increase was greater and faster to develop in the resistant line. In both resistant and susceptible inoculated plants, an increase in the ratio of guaiacyl/syringyl units was detected 16 days after inoculation, resulting from the lowered amount of syringyl units in the

  15. Peroxidase(s) in Environment Protection

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Neelam; Kanwar, Shamsher S.

    2013-01-01

    Industrial discharges of untreated effluents into water bodies and emissions into air have deteriorated the quality of water and air, respectively. The huge amount of pollutants derived from industrial activities represents a threat for the environment and ecologic equilibrium. Phenols and halogenated phenols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), endocrine disruptive chemicals (EDC), pesticides, dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), industrial dyes, and other xenobiotics are among the most important pollutants. Peroxidases are enzymes that are able to transform a variety of compounds following a free radical mechanism, thereby yielding oxidized or polymerized products. The peroxidase transformation of these pollutants is accompanied by a reduction in their toxicity, due to loss of biological activity, reduction in the bioavailability, or the removal from aqueous phase, especially when the pollutant is found in water. The review describes the sources of peroxidases, the reactions catalyzed by them, and their applications in the management of pollutants in the environment. PMID:24453894

  16. Peroxidase(s) in environment protection.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Neelam; Kanwar, Shamsher S

    2013-01-01

    Industrial discharges of untreated effluents into water bodies and emissions into air have deteriorated the quality of water and air, respectively. The huge amount of pollutants derived from industrial activities represents a threat for the environment and ecologic equilibrium. Phenols and halogenated phenols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), endocrine disruptive chemicals (EDC), pesticides, dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), industrial dyes, and other xenobiotics are among the most important pollutants. Peroxidases are enzymes that are able to transform a variety of compounds following a free radical mechanism, thereby yielding oxidized or polymerized products. The peroxidase transformation of these pollutants is accompanied by a reduction in their toxicity, due to loss of biological activity, reduction in the bioavailability, or the removal from aqueous phase, especially when the pollutant is found in water. The review describes the sources of peroxidases, the reactions catalyzed by them, and their applications in the management of pollutants in the environment.

  17. Increased expression of native cytosolic Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase improves tolerance to oxidative and chilling stresses in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz).

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Yang, Jun; Duan, Xiaoguang; Jiang, Yueming; Zhang, Peng

    2014-08-05

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is a tropical root crop, and is therefore, extremely sensitive to low temperature; its antioxidative response is pivotal for its survival under stress. Timely turnover of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plant cells generated by chilling-induced oxidative damages, and scavenging can be achieved by non-enzymatic and enzymatic reactions in order to maintain ROS homeostasis. Transgenic cassava plants that co-express cytosolic superoxide dismutase (SOD), MeCu/ZnSOD, and ascorbate peroxidase (APX), MeAPX2, were produced and tested for tolerance against oxidative and chilling stresses. The up-regulation of MeCu/ZnSOD and MeAPX2 expression was confirmed by the quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, and enzymatic activity analyses in the leaves of transgenic cassava plant lines with a single-transgene integration site. Upon exposure to ROS-generating agents, 100 μM ROS-generating reagent methyl viologen and 0.5 M H₂O₂, higher levels of enzymatic activities of SOD and APX were detected in transgenic plants than the wild type. Consequently, the oxidative stress parameters, such as lipid peroxidation, chlorophyll degradation and H₂O₂ synthesis, were lower in the transgenic lines than the wild type. Tolerance to chilling stress at 4°C for 2 d was greater in transgenic cassava, as observed by the higher levels of SOD, catalase, and ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes (e.g., APX, monodehydroascorbate reductase, dehydroascorbate reducatase and glutathione reductase) and lower levels of malondialdehyde content. These results suggest that the expression of native cytosolic SOD and APX simultaneously activated the antioxidative defense mechanisms via cyclic ROS scavenging, thereby improving its tolerance to cold stress.

  18. Increased expression of native cytosolic Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase improves tolerance to oxidative and chilling stresses in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is a tropical root crop, and is therefore, extremely sensitive to low temperature; its antioxidative response is pivotal for its survival under stress. Timely turnover of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plant cells generated by chilling-induced oxidative damages, and scavenging can be achieved by non-enzymatic and enzymatic reactions in order to maintain ROS homeostasis. Results Transgenic cassava plants that co-express cytosolic superoxide dismutase (SOD), MeCu/ZnSOD, and ascorbate peroxidase (APX), MeAPX2, were produced and tested for tolerance against oxidative and chilling stresses. The up-regulation of MeCu/ZnSOD and MeAPX2 expression was confirmed by the quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, and enzymatic activity analyses in the leaves of transgenic cassava plant lines with a single-transgene integration site. Upon exposure to ROS-generating agents, 100 μM ROS-generating reagent methyl viologen and 0.5 M H2O2, higher levels of enzymatic activities of SOD and APX were detected in transgenic plants than the wild type. Consequently, the oxidative stress parameters, such as lipid peroxidation, chlorophyll degradation and H2O2 synthesis, were lower in the transgenic lines than the wild type. Tolerance to chilling stress at 4°C for 2 d was greater in transgenic cassava, as observed by the higher levels of SOD, catalase, and ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes (e.g., APX, monodehydroascorbate reductase, dehydroascorbate reducatase and glutathione reductase) and lower levels of malondialdehyde content. Conclusions These results suggest that the expression of native cytosolic SOD and APX simultaneously activated the antioxidative defense mechanisms via cyclic ROS scavenging, thereby improving its tolerance to cold stress. PMID:25091029

  19. Biochemical and pathological studies on peroxidases -an updated review.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amjad A; Rahmani, Arshad H; Aldebasi, Yousef H; Aly, Salah M

    2014-05-13

    Peroxidases represent a family of isoenzymes actively involved in oxidizing reactive oxygen species, innate immunity, hormone biosynthesis and pathogenesis of several diseases. Different types of peroxidases have organ, tissues, cellular and sub-cellular level of specificities in their function. Different diseases lead to varied expressions of peroxidases based on several mechanisms proposed. Several researches are going on to understand its deficiency, over-expression and malfunction in relation with different diseases. Some common diseases of mankind like cancer, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes directly or indirectly involve the role of peroxidases. So the status of peroxidase levels may also function as a marker of different diseases. Although many types of diseases in human beings have a strong correlation with tissue specific peroxidases, the clear role of these oxido-reductases is not yet fully understood. Here we are focusing on the role of peroxidases in relations with different diseases occurring due to oxidative stress.

  20. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Donald L.; Ramachandra, Muralidhara

    1993-01-01

    A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

  1. Simultaneous expression of choline oxidase, superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase in potato plant chloroplasts provides synergistically enhanced protection against various abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Raza; Kim, Yun-Hee; Kim, Myoung-Duck; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Cho, Kwangsoo; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2010-04-01

    Plants synthesize compatible solutes such as glycinebetaine (GB) in response to abiotic stresses. To evaluate the synergistic and protective effect of GB, transgenic potato plants expressing superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) targeting to chloroplasts (referred to as SSA plants) were retransformed with a bacterial choline oxidase (codA) gene to synthesize GB in chloroplast in naturally occurring non-accumulator potato plants (including SSA) under the control of the stress-inducible SWPA2 promoter (referred to as SSAC plants). GB accumulation resulted in enhanced protection of these SSAC plants and lower levels of H(2)O(2) compared with SSA and non-transgenic (NT) plants after methyl viologen (MV)-mediated oxidative stress. Additionally, SSAC plants demonstrated synergistically enhanced tolerance to salt and drought stresses at the whole-plant level. GB accumulation in SSAC plants helped to maintain higher activities of SOD, APX and catalase following oxidative, salt and drought stress treatments than is observed in SSA and NT plants. Conclusively, GB accumulation in SSAC plants along with overexpression of antioxidant genes rendered the plants tolerant to multiple environmental stresses in a synergistic fashion.

  2. Expression of the secondary granule proteins major basic protein 1 (MBP-1) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPX) is required for eosinophilopoiesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Alfred D; Jacobsen, Elizabeth A; Ochkur, Sergei I; McGarry, Michael P; Shim, Kevin G; Nguyen, David T C; Protheroe, Cheryl; Colbert, Dana; Kloeber, Jake; Neely, Joseph; Shim, Kelly P; Dyer, Kimberly D; Rosenberg, Helene F; Lee, James J; Lee, Nancy A

    2013-08-01

    Eosinophil activities are often linked with allergic diseases such as asthma and the pathologies accompanying helminth infection. These activities have been hypothesized to be mediated, in part, by the release of cationic proteins stored in the secondary granules of these granulocytes. The majority of the proteins stored in these secondary granules (by mass) are major basic protein 1 (MBP-1) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPX). Unpredictably, a knockout approach targeting the genes encoding these proteins demonstrated that, unlike in mice containing a single deficiency of only MBP-1 or EPX, the absence of both granule proteins resulted in the near complete loss of peripheral blood eosinophils with no apparent impact on any other hematopoietic lineage. Moreover, the absence of MBP-1 and EPX promoted a concomitant loss of eosinophil lineage-committed progenitors in the marrow, identifying a specific blockade in eosinophilopoiesis as the causative event. Significantly, this blockade of eosinophilopoiesis is also observed in ex vivo cultures of marrow progenitors and is not rescued in vivo by adoptive bone marrow engraftment, suggesting a cell-autonomous defect in marrow progenitors. These observations implicate a role for granule protein gene expression as a regulator of eosinophilopoiesis and provide another strain of mice congenitally deficient of eosinophils.

  3. Glutathione Peroxidase 5 Is Expressed by the Entire Pig Male Genital Tract and Once in the Seminal Plasma Contributes to Sperm Survival and In Vivo Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Barranco, Isabel; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Perez-Patiño, Cristina; Vicente-Carrillo, Alejandro; Parrilla, Inmaculada; Ceron, Jose J.; Martinez, Emilio A.; Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto; Roca, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione peroxidase-5 (GPX5) is an H2O2-scavenging enzyme identified in boar seminal plasma (SP). This study attempted to clarify its origin and role on sperm survival and fertility after artificial insemination (AI). GPX5 was expressed (Western blot and immunocytochemistry using a rabbit primary polyclonal antibody) in testes, epididymis and accessory sex glands (6 boars). SP-GPX5 concentration differed among boars (11 boars, P < 0.001), among ejaculates within boar (44 ejaculates, P < 0.001) and among portions within ejaculate (15 ejaculates). The first 10 mL of the sperm rich fraction (SRF, sperm-peak portion) had a significantly lower concentration (8.87 ± 0.78 ng/mL) than the rest of the SRF and the post-SRF (11.66 ± 0.79 and 12.37 ± 0.79 ng/mL, respectively, P < 0.005). Sperm motility of liquid-stored semen AI-doses (n = 44, at 15–17°C during 72h) declined faster in AI-doses with low concentrations of SP-GPX5 compared to those with high-levels. Boars (n = 11) with high SP-GPX5 showed higher farrowing rates and litter sizes than those with low SP-GPX5 (a total of 5,275 inseminated sows). In sum, GPX5 is widely expressed in the boar genital tract and its variable presence in SP shows a positive relationship with sperm quality and fertility outcomes of liquid-stored semen AI-doses. PMID:27627110

  4. Glutathione Peroxidase 5 Is Expressed by the Entire Pig Male Genital Tract and Once in the Seminal Plasma Contributes to Sperm Survival and In Vivo Fertility.

    PubMed

    Barranco, Isabel; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Perez-Patiño, Cristina; Vicente-Carrillo, Alejandro; Parrilla, Inmaculada; Ceron, Jose J; Martinez, Emilio A; Rodriguez-Martinez, Heriberto; Roca, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione peroxidase-5 (GPX5) is an H2O2-scavenging enzyme identified in boar seminal plasma (SP). This study attempted to clarify its origin and role on sperm survival and fertility after artificial insemination (AI). GPX5 was expressed (Western blot and immunocytochemistry using a rabbit primary polyclonal antibody) in testes, epididymis and accessory sex glands (6 boars). SP-GPX5 concentration differed among boars (11 boars, P < 0.001), among ejaculates within boar (44 ejaculates, P < 0.001) and among portions within ejaculate (15 ejaculates). The first 10 mL of the sperm rich fraction (SRF, sperm-peak portion) had a significantly lower concentration (8.87 ± 0.78 ng/mL) than the rest of the SRF and the post-SRF (11.66 ± 0.79 and 12.37 ± 0.79 ng/mL, respectively, P < 0.005). Sperm motility of liquid-stored semen AI-doses (n = 44, at 15-17°C during 72h) declined faster in AI-doses with low concentrations of SP-GPX5 compared to those with high-levels. Boars (n = 11) with high SP-GPX5 showed higher farrowing rates and litter sizes than those with low SP-GPX5 (a total of 5,275 inseminated sows). In sum, GPX5 is widely expressed in the boar genital tract and its variable presence in SP shows a positive relationship with sperm quality and fertility outcomes of liquid-stored semen AI-doses.

  5. Yeast cytochrome c peroxidase: mutagenesis and expression in Escherichia coli show tryptophan-51 is not the radical site in compound I

    SciTech Connect

    Fishel, L.A.; Villafranca, J.E.; Mauro, J.M.; Kraut, J.

    1987-01-27

    Using oligonucleotide-directed site-specific mutagenesis, they have constructed a system for the mutation and expression of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP, EC 1.11.1.5) in Escherichia coli and applied it to test the hypothesis that Trp-51 is the locus of the free radical observed in compound I of CCP. The system was created by substituting a CCP gene modified by site-directed mutagenesis, CCP(MI), for the fol gene in a vector previously used for mutagenesis and overexpression of dihydrofolate reductase. E. coli transformed with the resulting plasmid produced the CCP(MI) enzyme in large quantities, more than 15 mg/L of cell culture, of which 10% is holo- and 90% is apo-CCP(MI). The apoenzyme was easily converted to holoenzyme by the addition of bovine hemin. Purified CCP(MI) has the same catalytic activity and spectra as bakers' yeast CCP. A mutation has been made in CCP(MI), Trp-51 to Phe. The Phe-51 mutant protein CCP(MI,F51) is fully active, and the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum, at 89 K, of its oxidized intermediate, compound I, displays a strong sharp resonance at g = 2.004, which is very similar to the signal observed for compound I of both bakers' yeast CCP and CCP(MI). However, UV-visible and EPR spectroscopy revealed that the half-life of CCP(MI,F51) compound I at 23 /sup 0/C is only 1.4% of that observed for the compound I forms of CCP(MI) or bakers' yeast CCP. Thus, Trp-51 is not necessary for the formation of the free radical observed in compound I but appears to exert a significant influence on its stability.

  6. The synergistic effect of beta-boswellic acid and Nurr1 overexpression on dopaminergic programming of antioxidant glutathione peroxidase-1-expressing murine embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Abasi, M; Massumi, M; Riazi, G; Amini, H

    2012-10-11

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder in which the nigro-striatal dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons have been selectively lost. Due to side effects of levodopa, a dopamine precursor drug, recently cell replacement therapy for PD has been considered. Lack of sufficient amounts of, embryos and ethical problems regarding the use of dopamine-rich embryonic neural cells have limited the application of these cells for PD cell therapy. Therefore, many investigators have focused on using the pluripotent stem cells to generate DAergic neurons. This study is aimed first to establish a mouse embryonic stem (mES) cell line that can stably co-express Nurr1 (Nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, member 2) transcription factor in order to efficiently generate DAergic neurons, and glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPX-1) to protect the differentiated DAergic-like cells against oxidative stress. In addition to genetic engineering of ES cells, the effect of Beta-boswellic acid (BBA) on DAergic differentiation course of mES cells was sought in the present study. To that end, the feeder-independent CGR8 mouse embryonic stem cells were transduced by Nurr1- and GPX-1-harboring Lentiviruses and the generated Nurr1/GPX-1-expresssing ES clones were characterized and verified. Gene expression analyses demonstrated that BBA treatment and overexpression of Nurr1 has a synergistic effect on derivation of DAergic neurons from Nurr1/GPX-1-expressing ES cells. The differentiated cells could exclusively synthesize and secrete dopamine in response to stimuli. Overexpression of GPX-1 in genetically engineered Nurr1/GPX-1-ES cells increased the viability of these cells during their differentiation into CNS stem cells. In conclusion, the results demonstrated that Nurr1-overexpressing feeder-independent ES cells like the feeder-dependent ES cells, can be efficiently programmed into functional DAergic neurons and additional treatment of cells by BBA can even augment this efficiency. GPX-1

  7. Molecular characterization of the lignin-forming peroxidase: Role in growth, development and response to stress. Progress summary report, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1993-03-01

    This laboratory has continued its comprehensive study of the structure and function of plant peroxidases and their genes. Specifically, we are characterizing the anionic peroxidase of tobacco. During the past year we have completed the nucleotide sequence of the tobacco anionic peroxidase gene, joined the anionic peroxidase promoter to {Beta}-glucuronidase and demonstrated expression in transformed plants, measured lignin, auxin, and ethylene levels in transgenic tobacco plants over-expressing the anionic peroxidase, developed chimeric peroxidase genes to over-or under-express the anionic peroxidase in tissue specific manner in transgenic plants, and over-expressed the tobacco anionic peroxidase in transgenic tomato and sweetgum plants.

  8. Therapeutic Efficacy of a Subunit Vaccine in Controlling Chronic Trypanosoma cruzi Infection and Chagas Disease Is Enhanced by Glutathione Peroxidase Over-Expression.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shivali; Smith, Charity; Auclair, Sarah; Delgadillo, Anahi De Jesus; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi-induced oxidative and inflammatory responses are implicated in chagasic cardiomyopathy. In this study, we examined the therapeutic utility of a subunit vaccine against T. cruzi and determined if glutathione peroxidase (GPx1, antioxidant) protects the heart from chagasic pathogenesis. C57BL/6 mice (wild-type (WT) and GPx1 transgenic (GPxtg) were infected with T. cruzi and at 45 days post-infection (dpi), immunized with TcG2/TcG4 vaccine delivered by a DNA-prime/Protein-boost (D/P) approach. The plasma and tissue-sections were analyzed on 150 dpi for parasite burden, inflammatory and oxidative stress markers, inflammatory infiltrate and fibrosis. WT mice infected with T. cruzi had significantly more blood and tissue parasite burden compared with infected/GPxtg mice (n = 5-8, p<0.01). Therapeutic vaccination provided >15-fold reduction in blood and tissue parasites in both WT and GPxtg mice. The increase in plasma levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO, 24.7%) and nitrite (iNOS activity, 45%) was associated with myocardial increase in oxidant levels (3-4-fold) and non-responsive antioxidant status in chagasic/WT mice; and these responses were not controlled after vaccination (n = 5-7). The GPxtg mice were better equipped than the WT mice in controlling T. cruzi-induced inflammatory and oxidative stress markers. Extensive myocardial and skeletal tissue inflammation noted in chagasic/WT mice, was significantly more compared with chagasic/GPxtg mice (n = 4-6, p<0.05). Vaccination was equally effective in reducing the chronic inflammatory infiltrate in the heart and skeletal tissue of infected WT and GPxtg mice (n = 6, p<0.05). Hypertrophy (increased BNP and ANP mRNA) and fibrosis (increased collagen) of the heart were extensively present in chronically-infected WT and GPxtg mice and notably decreased after therapeutic vaccination. We conclude the therapeutic delivery of D/P vaccine was effective in arresting the chronic parasite persistence and chagasic

  9. [Characterization of lignin and Mn peroxidases from Phanerochaete chrysosporium]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    Lignin peroxidases were investigated with respect to enzyme kinetics and NMR spectroscopy of the heme domain. MN peroxidases were studied with respect to the role of oxalate in enzyme activity, the NMR spectroscopy of the heme domain. Gene expression of both lignin and MN peroxidases were examined as well as expression of site-directed mutants aimed at scale up production of these enzymes.

  10. Regulation of Leishmania (L.) amazonensis protein expression by host T cell dependent responses: differential expression of oligopeptidase B, tryparedoxin peroxidase and HSP70 isoforms in amastigotes isolated from BALB/c and BALB/c nude mice.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Priscila Camillo; Velasquez, Leonardo Garcia; Lepique, Ana Paula; de Rezende, Eloiza; Bonatto, José Matheus Camargo; Barcinski, Marcello Andre; Cunha-Neto, Edecio; Stolf, Beatriz Simonsen

    2015-02-01

    Leishmaniasis is an important disease that affects 12 million people in 88 countries, with 2 million new cases every year. Leishmania amazonensis is an important agent in Brazil, leading to clinical forms varying from localized (LCL) to diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis (DCL). One interesting issue rarely analyzed is how host immune response affects Leishmania phenotype and virulence. Aiming to study the effect of host immune system on Leishmania proteins we compared proteomes of amastigotes isolated from BALB/c and BALB/c nude mice. The athymic nude mice may resemble patients with diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis, considered T-cell hyposensitive or anergic to Leishmania's antigens. This work is the first to compare modifications in amastigotes' proteomes driven by host immune response. Among the 44 differentially expressed spots, there were proteins related to oxidative/nitrosative stress and proteases. Some correspond to known Leishmania virulence factors such as OPB and tryparedoxin peroxidase. Specific isoforms of these two proteins were increased in parasites from nude mice, suggesting that T cells probably restrain their posttranslational modifications in BALB/c mice. On the other hand, an isoform of HSP70 was increased in amastigotes from BALB/c mice. We believe our study may allow identification of potential virulence factors and ways of regulating their expression.

  11. Regulation of Leishmania (L.) amazonensis Protein Expression by Host T Cell Dependent Responses: Differential Expression of Oligopeptidase B, Tryparedoxin Peroxidase and HSP70 Isoforms in Amastigotes Isolated from BALB/c and BALB/c Nude Mice

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Priscila Camillo; Velasquez, Leonardo Garcia; Lepique, Ana Paula; de Rezende, Eloiza; Bonatto, José Matheus Camargo; Barcinski, Marcello Andre; Cunha-Neto, Edecio; Stolf, Beatriz Simonsen

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is an important disease that affects 12 million people in 88 countries, with 2 million new cases every year. Leishmania amazonensis is an important agent in Brazil, leading to clinical forms varying from localized (LCL) to diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis (DCL). One interesting issue rarely analyzed is how host immune response affects Leishmania phenotype and virulence. Aiming to study the effect of host immune system on Leishmania proteins we compared proteomes of amastigotes isolated from BALB/c and BALB/c nude mice. The athymic nude mice may resemble patients with diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis, considered T-cell hyposensitive or anergic to Leishmania´s antigens. This work is the first to compare modifications in amastigotes’ proteomes driven by host immune response. Among the 44 differentially expressed spots, there were proteins related to oxidative/nitrosative stress and proteases. Some correspond to known Leishmania virulence factors such as OPB and tryparedoxin peroxidase. Specific isoforms of these two proteins were increased in parasites from nude mice, suggesting that T cells probably restrain their posttranslational modifications in BALB/c mice. On the other hand, an isoform of HSP70 was increased in amastigotes from BALB/c mice. We believe our study may allow identification of potential virulence factors and ways of regulating their expression. PMID:25692783

  12. Novel Applications of Peroxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rob, Abdul; Ball, Andrew S.; Tuncer, Munir; Wilson, Michael T.

    1997-02-01

    The article entitled "Novel Biocatalysts Will Work Even Better for Industry" published recently in this Journal (1) was informative and interesting. However it touched only briefly on the application of peroxidase as catalyst. Here, we would like to mention in more detail the novel applications of peroxidase in agricultural, paper pulp, water treatment, pharmaceutical, and medical situations. Firstly, the peroxidase isolated from Phanerochaete chyrosporium has been shown to detoxify herbicides such as atrazine to less toxic compounds and would certainly find potential application in agriculture (2). Secondly, the peroxidase produced by Streptomyces thermoviolaceus may find application in the paper pulp industry as a delignifying agent (3). Thirdly, it has been shown that extracellular peroxidase produced by Streptomyces avermitilis can remove the intense color from paper-mill effluent obtained after semichemical alkaline pulping of wheat straw (4), and thus this enzyme might find application as a catalyst in water treatment plants. Fourthly, the heme-containing horseradish peroxidase enzyme has been exploited in several diagnostic applications in pharmaceutics and medicine, such as the detection of human immunodeficiency virus and cystic fibrosis (5-10). Finally, recent work from our laboratory has suggested that thermophilic nonheme peroxidase produced by Thermomonospora fusca BD25 may find medical use in the diagnosis of myocardial infarction (11, 12). Literature Cited 1. Wiseman, A. J. Chem. Educ. 1996, 73, 55-58. 2. Mougin, C. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 1994, 60, 705-708. 3. McCarthy A. J.; Peace, W.; Broda, P. Appl. Microbiol. Technol. 1985, 23, 238-244. 4. Hernandez, M; Rodriguez J; Soliveri, J; Copa, J. L; Perez, M. I; Arias, M. E. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 1994, 60, 3909-3913. 5. Hopfer, S. M.; Aslanzadeh, J. Ann. Clin. Lab. Sci. 1995, 25, 475-480. 6. Suzuki, K; Iman, M. J. Virol. Methods 1995, 55, 347-356. 7. Nielsen, K. J. Immunoassay 1995, 16, 183-197. 8

  13. Roles of apoplastic peroxidases in plant response to wounding.

    PubMed

    Minibayeva, Farida; Beckett, Richard Peter; Kranner, Ilse

    2015-04-01

    Apoplastic class III peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7) play key roles in the response of plants to pathogen infection and abiotic stresses, including wounding. Wounding is a common stress for plants that can be caused by insect or animal grazing or trampling, or result from agricultural practices. Typically, mechanical damage to a plant immediately induces a rapid release and activation of apoplastic peroxidases, and an oxidative burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS), followed by the upregulation of peroxidase genes. We discuss how plants control the expression of peroxidases genes upon wounding, and also the sparse information on peroxidase-mediated signal transduction pathways. Evidence reviewed here suggests that in many plants production of the ROS that comprise the initial oxidative burst results from a complex interplay of peroxidases with other apoplastic enzymes. Later responses following wounding include various forms of tissue healing, for example through peroxidase-dependent suberinization, or cell death. Limited data suggest that ROS-mediated death signalling during the wound response may involve the peroxidase network, together with other redox molecules. In conclusion, the ability of peroxidases to both generate and scavenge ROS plays a key role in the involvement of these enigmatic enzymes in plant stress tolerance.

  14. DNA Methyl Transferase 1 Reduces Expression of SRD5A2 in the Aging Adult Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Rongbin; Wang, Zongwei; Bechis, Seth K.; Otsetov, Alexander G.; Hua, Shengyu; Wu, Shulin; Wu, Chin-Lee; Tabatabaei, Shahin; Olumi, Aria F.

    2016-01-01

    5-α Reductase type 2 (SRD5A2) is a critical enzyme for prostatic development and growth. Inhibition of SRD5A2 by finasteride is used commonly for the management of urinary obstruction caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia. Contrary to common belief, we have found that expression of SRD5A2 is variable and absent in one third of benign adult prostates. In human samples, absent SRD5A2 expression is associated with hypermethylation of the SRD5A2 promoter, and in vitro SRD5A2 promoter activity is suppressed by methylation. We show that methylation of SRD5A2 is regulated by DNA methyltransferase 1, and inflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis factor α, NF-κB, and IL-6 regulate DNA methyltransferase 1 expression and thereby affect SRD5A2 promoter methylation and gene expression. Furthermore, we show that increasing age in mice and humans is associated with increased methylation of the SRD5A2 promoter and concomitantly decreased protein expression. Artificial induction of inflammation in prostate primary epithelial cells leads to hypermethylation of the SRD5A2 promoter and silencing of SRD5A2, whereas inhibition with tumor necrosis factor α inhibitor reactivates SRD5A2 expression. Therefore, expression of SRD5A2 is not static and ubiquitous in benign adult prostate tissues. Methylation and expression of SRD5A2 may be used as a gene signature to tailor therapies for more effective treatment of prostatic diseases. PMID:25700986

  15. Lignin-degrading Peroxidases from Genome of Selective Ligninolytic Fungus Ceriporiopsis subverispora

    Treesearch

    Elena Fernandez-Fueyo; Francisco J. Ruiz-Duenas; Yuta Miki; Marta Jesus Martinez; Kenneth E. Hammel; Angel T. Martinez

    2012-01-01

    Background: The first genome of a selective lignin degrader is available. Results: Its screening shows 26 peroxidase genes, and 5 genes were heterologously expressed and the catalytic properties investigated. Conclusion: Two new peroxidases oxidize simple and dimeric lignin models and efficiently depolymerize lignin. Significance: Although lignin peroxidase and...

  16. Regulation of LH/FSH expression by secretoglobin 3A2 in the mouse pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Miyano, Yuki; Tahara, Shigeyuki; Sakata, Ichiro; Sakai, Takafumi; Abe, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Shioko; Kurotani, Reiko

    2014-04-01

    Secretoglobin (SCGB) 3A2 was originally identified as a downstream target for the homeodomain transcription factor NKX2-1 in the lung. NKX2-1 plays a role in the genesis and expression of genes in the thyroid, lung and ventral forebrain; Nkx2-1-null mice have no thyroid and pituitary and severely hypoplastic lungs and hypothalamus. To demonstrate whether SCGB3A2 plays any role in pituitary hormone production, NKX2-1 and SCGB3A2 expression in the mouse pituitary gland was examined by immunohistochemical analysis and RT-PCR. NKX2-1 was localized in the posterior pituitary lobe, whereas SCGB3A2 was observed in both anterior and posterior lobes as shown by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Expression of CCAAT-enhancer binding proteins (C/EBPs), which regulate mouse Scgb3a2 transcription, was also examined by RT-PCR. C/EBPβ, γ, δ and ζ were expressed in the adult mouse pituitary gland. SCGB3A2 was expressed in the anterior and posterior lobes from postnatal days 1 and 5, respectively and the areas where SCGB3A2 expression was found coincided with the area where FSH-secreting cells were found. Double-staining for SCGB3A2 and pituitary hormones revealed that SCGB3A2 was mainly localized in gonadotrophs in 49 % of FSH-secreting cells and 47 % of LH-secreting cells. In addition, SCGB3A2 dramatically inhibited LH and FSH mRNA expression in rat pituitary primary cell cultures. These results suggest that SCGB3A2 regulates FSH/LH production in the anterior pituitary lobe and that transcription factors other than NKX2-1 may regulate SCGB3A2 expression.

  17. Expression and role of a2 vacuolar-ATPase (a2V) in trafficking of human neutrophil granules and exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Gilman-Sachs, Alice; Tikoo, Anjali; Akman-Anderson, Leyla; Jaiswal, Mukesh; Ntrivalas, Evangelos; Beaman, Kenneth

    2015-06-01

    Neutrophils kill microorganisms by inducing exocytosis of granules with antibacterial properties. Four isoforms of the "a" subunit of V-ATPase-a1V, a2V, a3V, and a4V-have been identified. a2V is expressed in white blood cells, that is, on the surface of monocytes or activated lymphocytes. Neutrophil associated-a2V was found on membranes of primary (azurophilic) granules and less often on secondary (specific) granules, tertiary (gelatinase granules), and secretory vesicles. However, it was not found on the surface of resting neutrophils. Following stimulation of neutrophils, primary granules containing a2V as well as CD63 translocated to the surface of the cell because of exocytosis. a2V was also found on the cell surface when the neutrophils were incubated in ammonium chloride buffer (pH 7.4) a weak base. The intracellular pH (cytosol) became alkaline within 5 min after stimulation, and the pH increased from 7.2 to 7.8; this pH change correlated with intragranular acidification of the neutrophil granules. Upon translocation and exocytosis, a2V on the membrane of primary granules remained on the cell surface, but myeloperoxidase was secreted. V-ATPase may have a role in the fusion of the granule membrane with the cell surface membrane before exocytosis. These findings suggest that the granule-associated a2V isoform has a role in maintaining a pH gradient within the cell between the cytosol and granules in neutrophils and also in fusion between the surface and the granules before exocytosis. Because a2V is not found on the surface of resting neutrophils, surface a2V may be useful as a biomarker for activated neutrophils. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  18. Peroxidase gene discovery from the horseradish transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Horseradish peroxidases (HRPs) from Armoracia rusticana have long been utilized as reporters in various diagnostic assays and histochemical stainings. Regardless of their increasing importance in the field of life sciences and suggested uses in medical applications, chemical synthesis and other industrial applications, the HRP isoenzymes, their substrate specificities and enzymatic properties are poorly characterized. Due to lacking sequence information of natural isoenzymes and the low levels of HRP expression in heterologous hosts, commercially available HRP is still extracted as a mixture of isoenzymes from the roots of A. rusticana. Results In this study, a normalized, size-selected A. rusticana transcriptome library was sequenced using 454 Titanium technology. The resulting reads were assembled into 14871 isotigs with an average length of 1133 bp. Sequence databases, ORF finding and ORF characterization were utilized to identify peroxidase genes from the 14871 isotigs generated by de novo assembly. The sequences were manually reviewed and verified with Sanger sequencing of PCR amplified genomic fragments, resulting in the discovery of 28 secretory peroxidases, 23 of them previously unknown. A total of 22 isoenzymes including allelic variants were successfully expressed in Pichia pastoris and showed peroxidase activity with at least one of the substrates tested, thus enabling their development into commercial pure isoenzymes. Conclusions This study demonstrates that transcriptome sequencing combined with sequence motif search is a powerful concept for the discovery and quick supply of new enzymes and isoenzymes from any plant or other eukaryotic organisms. Identification and manual verification of the sequences of 28 HRP isoenzymes do not only contribute a set of peroxidases for industrial, biological and biomedical applications, but also provide valuable information on the reliability of the approach in identifying and characterizing a large group

  19. Peroxidase gene discovery from the horseradish transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Näätsaari, Laura; Krainer, Florian W; Schubert, Michael; Glieder, Anton; Thallinger, Gerhard G

    2014-03-24

    Horseradish peroxidases (HRPs) from Armoracia rusticana have long been utilized as reporters in various diagnostic assays and histochemical stainings. Regardless of their increasing importance in the field of life sciences and suggested uses in medical applications, chemical synthesis and other industrial applications, the HRP isoenzymes, their substrate specificities and enzymatic properties are poorly characterized. Due to lacking sequence information of natural isoenzymes and the low levels of HRP expression in heterologous hosts, commercially available HRP is still extracted as a mixture of isoenzymes from the roots of A. rusticana. In this study, a normalized, size-selected A. rusticana transcriptome library was sequenced using 454 Titanium technology. The resulting reads were assembled into 14871 isotigs with an average length of 1133 bp. Sequence databases, ORF finding and ORF characterization were utilized to identify peroxidase genes from the 14871 isotigs generated by de novo assembly. The sequences were manually reviewed and verified with Sanger sequencing of PCR amplified genomic fragments, resulting in the discovery of 28 secretory peroxidases, 23 of them previously unknown. A total of 22 isoenzymes including allelic variants were successfully expressed in Pichia pastoris and showed peroxidase activity with at least one of the substrates tested, thus enabling their development into commercial pure isoenzymes. This study demonstrates that transcriptome sequencing combined with sequence motif search is a powerful concept for the discovery and quick supply of new enzymes and isoenzymes from any plant or other eukaryotic organisms. Identification and manual verification of the sequences of 28 HRP isoenzymes do not only contribute a set of peroxidases for industrial, biological and biomedical applications, but also provide valuable information on the reliability of the approach in identifying and characterizing a large group of isoenzymes.

  20. Molecular Phylogeny of Heme Peroxidases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zámocký, Marcel; Obinger, Christian

    All currently available gene sequences of heme peroxidases can be phylogenetically divided in two superfamilies and three families. In this chapter, the phylogenetics and genomic distribution of each group are presented. Within the peroxidase-cyclooxygenase superfamily, the main evolutionary direction developed peroxidatic heme proteins involved in the innate immune defense system and in biosynthesis of (iodinated) hormones. The peroxidase-catalase superfamily is widely spread mainly among bacteria, fungi, and plants, and particularly in Class I led to the evolution of bifunctional catalase-peroxidases. Its numerous fungal representatives of Class II are involved in carbon recycling via lignin degradation, whereas Class III secretory peroxidases from algae and plants are included in various forms of secondary metabolism. The family of di-heme peroxidases are predominantly bacteria-inducible enzymes; however, a few corresponding genes were also detected in archaeal genomes. Four subfamilies of dyp-type peroxidases capable of degradation of various xenobiotics are abundant mainly among bacteria and fungi. Heme-haloperoxidase genes are widely spread among sac and club fungi, but corresponding genes were recently found also among oomycetes. All described families herein represent heme peroxidases of broad diversity in structure and function. Our accumulating knowledge about the evolution of various enzymatic functions and physiological roles can be exploited in future directed evolution approaches for engineering peroxidase genes de novo for various demands.

  1. Thioredoxin peroxidases from Brugia malayi.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, I; Eisinger, S W; Raghavan, N; Scott, A L

    1998-03-15

    Parasite-derived antioxidant proteins have been implicated in playing an important role in protection against the oxygen radicals that are generated during aerobic metabolism and in defense against host immune cell attack. Here we report that filarial nematodes include the thioredoxin peroxidase/thiol-specific antioxidant (TPx/TSA) family of antioxidant proteins as part of their complex defense against radical-mediated damage. At the protein level, the TPx/TSA from Brugia malayi (Bm-TPx-1) was approximately 50% identical and approximately 60% similar to TPx/TSAs from mammals, amphibians and yeast. Bm-TPx-1 was also approximately 60% identical to putative TPx proteins from a related filarial nematode, Onchocerca volvulus, and from the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. That B. malayi may express multiple forms of molecules with TPx/TSA activity was indicated by the identification of a B. malayi gene encoding a second, distinct member of the TPx/TSA family (Bm-tpx-2). Bm-tpx-1 was found to be transcribed in all stages of the parasite present in the mammalian host and the 25 kDa translation product was present in all of the developmental stages studied. The results of immunohistochemical, immunofluorescent and immunoprecipitation studies showed Bm-TPx-1 to be localized in the cells of the hypodermis/lateral chord in adult parasites and not to be present at the surface or in excretory/secretory products. The distribution in the parasite suggests that Bm-TPx-1 may play its major role in countering radicals produced within cells. A recombinant form of Bm-TPx-1 was biologically active and capable of protecting DNA from oxygen radical-mediated damage. Thioredoxin peroxidases may prove to be a critical component in the parasite's defense against injury caused by oxygen radicals derived from endogenous and exogenous sources.

  2. Effect of triclosan, triclocarban, 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether, and bisphenol A on the iodide uptake, thyroid peroxidase activity, and expression of genes involved in thyroid hormone synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuanfeng; Beland, Frederick A; Fang, Jia-Long

    2016-04-01

    Triclosan, triclocarban, 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47), and bisphenol A (BPA) have been reported to disturb thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis. We have examined the effects of these chemicals on sodium/iodide symporter (NIS)-mediated iodide uptake and the expression of genes involved in TH synthesis in rat thyroid follicular FRTL-5 cells, and on the activity of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) using rat thyroid microsomes. All four chemicals inhibited NIS-mediated iodide uptake in a concentration-dependent manner. A decrease in the iodide uptake was also observed in the absence of sodium iodide. Kinetic studies showed that all four chemicals were non-competitive inhibitors of NIS, with the order of Ki values being triclosanexpression of three genes involved in TH synthesis, Slc5a5, Tpo, and Tgo, and three thyroid transcription factor genes, Pax8, Foxe1, and Nkx2-1, was examined using quantitative real-time PCR. No significant changes in the expression of any genes were observed with triclosan or triclocarban. BDE-47 decreased the level of Tpo, while BPA altered the expression of all six genes. Triclosan and triclocarban inhibited the activity of TPO at 166 and >300 μM, respectively. Neither BDE-47 nor BPA affected TPO activity. In conclusion, triclosan, triclocarban, BDE-47, and BPA inhibited iodide uptake, but had differential effects on the expression of TH synthesis-related genes and the activity of TPO.

  3. Caffeine induces CYP1A2 expression in rat hepatocytes but not in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Vaynshteyn, David; Jeong, Hyunyoung

    2012-06-01

    Caffeine is the active constituent in coffee. Continual consumption of caffeine can lead to an attenuated response also known as tolerance. Results from rat studies have shown that caffeine is an inducer of CYP1A2, the enzyme responsible for caffeine's metabolism. This suggests that CYP1A2 induction by caffeine may be in part responsible for caffeine tolerance. However, whether caffeine induces CYP1A2 expression in humans remains unknown. Our results from luciferase assays performed in HepG2 cells showed that caffeine is not an activator of the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a major transcription factor involved in upregulation of CYP1A2. Furthermore, caffeine did not induce CYP1A2 expression in primary human hepatocytes at a concentration attained by ordinary coffee drinking. On the other hand, caffeine enhanced CYP1A2 expression by 9-fold in rat hepatocytes. Our results suggest that caffeine from ordinary coffee drinking does not induce CYP1A2 expression in humans and that factors other than CYP1A2 induction by caffeine likely contribute to development of caffeine tolerance in humans.

  4. Biochemical and Pathological Studies on Peroxidases –An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Amjad A.; Rahmani, Arshad H.; Aldebasi, Yousef H.; Aly, Salah M.

    2014-01-01

    Peroxidases represent a family of isoenzymes actively involved in oxidizing reactive oxygen species, innate immunity, hormone biosynthesis and pathogenesis of several diseases. Different types of peroxidases have organ, tissues, cellular and sub-cellular level of specificities in their function. Different diseases lead to varied expressions of peroxidases based on several mechanisms proposed. Several researches are going on to understand its deficiency, over-expression and malfunction in relation with different diseases. Some common diseases of mankind like cancer, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes directly or indirectly involve the role of peroxidases. So the status of peroxidase levels may also function as a marker of different diseases. Although many types of diseases in human beings have a strong correlation with tissue specific peroxidases, the clear role of these oxido-reductases is not yet fully understood. Here we are focusing on the role of peroxidases in relations with different diseases occurring due to oxidative stress. PMID:25168993

  5. Minimal influence of G-protein null mutations on ozone-induced changes in gene expression, foliar injury, gas exchange and peroxidase activity in Arabidopsis thaliana L

    PubMed Central

    Booker, Fitzgerald; Burkey, Kent; Morgan, Patrick; Fiscus, Edwin; Jones, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Ozone (O3) uptake by plants leads to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the intercellular space of leaves and induces signalling processes reported to involve the membrane-bound heterotrimeric G-protein complex. Therefore, potential G-protein-mediated response mechanisms to O3 were compared between Arabidopsis thaliana L. lines with null mutations in the α- and β-subunits (gpa1-4, agb1-2 and gpa1-4/agb1-2) and Col-0 wild-type plants. Plants were treated with a range of O3 concentrations (5, 125, 175 and 300 nL L−1) for 1 and 2 d in controlled environment chambers. Transcript levels of GPA1, AGB1 and RGS1 transiently increased in Col-0 exposed to 125 nL L−1 O3 compared with the 5 nL L−1 control treatment. However, silencing of α and β G-protein genes resulted in little alteration of many processes associated with O3 injury, including the induction of ROS-signalling genes, increased leaf tissue ion leakage, decreased net photosynthesis and stomatal conductance, and increased peroxidase activity, especially in the leaf apoplast. These results indicated that many responses to O3 stress at physiological levels were not detectably influenced by α and β G-proteins. PMID:21988569

  6. Ectopic over-expression of peroxisomal ascorbate peroxidase (SbpAPX) gene confers salt stress tolerance in transgenic peanut (Arachis hypogaea).

    PubMed

    Singh, Natwar; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

    2014-08-15

    Peroxisomal ascorbate peroxidase gene (SbpAPX) of an extreme halophyte Salicornia brachiata imparts abiotic stress endurance and plays a key role in the protection against oxidative stress. The cloned SbpAPX gene was transformed to local variety of peanut and about 100 transgenic plants were developed using optimized in vitro regeneration and Agrobacterium mediated genetic transformation method. The T0 transgenic plants were confirmed for the gene integration; grown under controlled condition in containment green house facility; seeds were harvested and T1 plants were raised. Transgenic plants (T1) were further confirmed by PCR using gene specific primers and histochemical GUS assay. About 40 transgenic plants (T1) were selected randomly and subjected for salt stress tolerance study. Transgenic plants remained green however non-transgenic plants showed bleaching and yellowish leaves under salt stress conditions. Under stress condition, transgenic plants continued normal growth and completed their life cycle. Transgenic peanut plants exhibited adequate tolerance under salt stress condition and thus could be explored for the cultivation in salt affected areas for the sustainable agriculture. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Minimal influence of G-protein null mutations on ozone-induced changes in gene expression, foliar injury, gas exchange and peroxidase activity in Arabidopsis thaliana L.

    PubMed

    Booker, Fitzgerald; Burkey, Kent; Morgan, Patrick; Fiscus, Edwin; Jones, Alan

    2012-04-01

    Ozone (O(3)) uptake by plants leads to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the intercellular space of leaves and induces signalling processes reported to involve the membrane-bound heterotrimeric G-protein complex. Therefore, potential G-protein-mediated response mechanisms to O(3) were compared between Arabidopsis thaliana L. lines with null mutations in the α- and β-subunits (gpa1-4, agb1-2 and gpa1-4/agb1-2) and Col-0 wild-type plants. Plants were treated with a range of O(3) concentrations (5, 125, 175 and 300 nL L(-1)) for 1 and 2 d in controlled environment chambers. Transcript levels of GPA1, AGB1 and RGS1 transiently increased in Col-0 exposed to 125 nL L(-1) O(3) compared with the 5 nL L(-1) control treatment. However, silencing of α and β G-protein genes resulted in little alteration of many processes associated with O(3) injury, including the induction of ROS-signalling genes, increased leaf tissue ion leakage, decreased net photosynthesis and stomatal conductance, and increased peroxidase activity, especially in the leaf apoplast. These results indicated that many responses to O(3) stress at physiological levels were not detectably influenced by α and β G-proteins.

  8. [Involvement of the receptor component protein in the regulation of vascular peroxidase-1 expression induced by calcitonin gene-related peptide and angiotensin II in vascular smooth muscle cell].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Mei; Peng, Hong-Yan; Guo, Feng; Quan, Hai-Yan; Luo, Jing-Fei; Qin, Xu-Ping

    2015-04-25

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) play important roles in vascular injury and protection. In order to determine the role of CGRP receptor component protein (RCP) in signal transduction whereby CGRP and Ang II mediate the expression of vascular peroxidase-1 (VPO1) in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC), mouse derived A10 vascular smooth muscle cell line (A10VSMC) was cultured with CGRP or/and Ang II in vitro. RCP-specific small interference RNA (siRNA-RCP) was used to silence oligonucleotide sequence. Western blot and RT-PCR were used to determine the protein and mRNA expressions of RCP and VPO1, respectively. The results showed that the expressions of RCP and VPO1 were increased in the presence of CGRP or Ang II in the quiescent A10VSMC. But the protein expressions of RCP and VPO1 induced by Ang II were decreased by pretreatment of CGRP (P < 0.05). The expressions of VPO1 were decreased in all the groups treated with siRNA-RCP, compared with those of wide-type counterparts. Meanwhile, the expression of VPO1 was significantly induced by CGRP but not Ang II in the siRNA-RCP treated A10VSMCs. Ang II in combination with CGRP increased the protein expression of VPO1 in the siRNA-RCP-transfected cells, compared with Ang II alone, and this effect could be abolished by catalase. The results suggest that RCP may play an important role in the integration of signal transduction whereby CGRP and Ang II receptors jointly regulate VPO1 expression in VSMC.

  9. Correlation of Nr4a2 expression with the neuron progenitors in adult zebrafish brain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Luo, Guang Rui; Li, Ting; Liu, Ting Xi; Le, Weidong

    2013-11-01

    Our previous study showed that although Nr4a2b transcripts have little co-localization with tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the posterior tuberculum area, knockdown of Nr4a2 caused a decrease in the number of TH-positive (TH(+)) neurons in the posterior tuberculum area. It suggests that Nr4a2 expression in the progenitors may play an important role in regulating differentiation rather than survival of TH(+) progenitors in the posterior tuberculum area during early zebrafish embryogenesis. In this study, we determined the correlation between TH and Nr4a2 in adult zebrafish brain and found that Nr4a2b was co-localized with the spindle-shaped TH(+) cells in the posterior tuberculum area and some small round TH(+) cells in the pretectum area, but not with large pear-shaped TH(+) cells in adult zebrafish diencephalon. In the pretectum area, Nr4a2(+) cells were localized next to the dorsal side of TH(+) cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Nr4a2 was co-expressed with nestin in the progenitors of pretectum area and caudal periventricular hypothalamic zones with a lateral symmetry pattern beside the diencephalic ventricle. Co-expression of Nr4a2 and nestin in these areas was remarkably declined with aging. These findings indicate that Nr4a2 is expressed in the neuronal progenitors and plays a crucial role in the differentiation process of dopamine neuron from the stem cell. The change in Nr4a2 expression with aging suggests its possible association with neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. An aryl-alcohol oxidase of Pleurotus sapidus: heterologous expression, characterization, and application in a 2-enzyme system.

    PubMed

    Galperin, Ilya; Javeed, Aysha; Luig, Hanno; Lochnit, Günter; Rühl, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Aryl-alcohol oxidases (AAOs) are enzymes supporting the degradation of lignin by fungal derived class II peroxidases produced by white-rot fungi. AAOs are able to generate H2O2 as a by-product via oxidation of an aryl-alcohol into its correspondent aldehyde. In this study, an AAO was heterologously expressed in a basidiomycete host for the first time. The gene for an AAO of the white-rot fungus Pleurotus sapidus, a close relative to the oyster mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus, was cloned into an expression vector and put under control of the promotor of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene 2 (gpdII) of the button mushroom Agaricus bisporus. The expression vector was transformed into the model basidiomycete Coprinopsis cinerea, and several positive transformants were obtained. The best producing transformants were grown in shake-flasks and in a stirred tank reactor reaching enzymatic activities of up to 125 U L(-1) using veratryl alcohol as a substrate. The purified AAO was biochemically characterized and compared to the previously described native and recombinant AAOs from other Pleurotus species. In addition, a two-enzyme system comprising a dye-decolorizing peroxidase (DyP) from Mycetinis scorodonius and the P. sapidus AAO was successfully employed to bleach the anthraquinone dye Reactive Blue 5.

  11. Prognostic significance of glutathione peroxidase 2 in gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongzhe; Sun, Liang; Tong, Jinxue; Chen, Xiuhui; Li, Hui; Zhang, Qifan

    2017-06-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the glutathione peroxidase 2 may actually play important roles in tumorigenesis and progression in various human cancers such as colorectal carcinomas and lung adenocarcinomas. However, the role of glutathione peroxidase 2 in gastric carcinoma remains to be determined. In this study, the expression and prognostic significance of glutathione peroxidase 2 in gastric carcinoma were investigated and the well-known prognostic factor Ki-67 labeling index was also assessed as positive control. Glutathione peroxidase 2 expression levels in the tumor tissue specimens, the matched adjacent normal tissue specimens, and the lymph node metastases of 176 patients with gastric carcinoma were evaluated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and immunohistochemical staining. The associations between glutathione peroxidase 2 expression levels, as determined by immunohistochemical staining, and multiple clinicopathological characteristics were determined by Pearson's chi-square test and Spearman's correlation analysis. The relationships between glutathione peroxidase 2 expression and other clinicopathological variables and patient prognoses were analyzed further by the Kaplan-Meier method, the log-rank test, and Cox multivariate regression. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and immunohistochemical staining results showed that glutathione peroxidase 2 expression levels were upregulated in both the primary tumor foci and the lymph node metastases of patients with gastric carcinoma (all p values < 0.05). Furthermore, Pearson's chi-square tests, as well as Spearman's correlation analysis, revealed that glutathione peroxidase 2 expression levels were strongly correlated with the Ki-67 labeling index, differentiation, histological patterns, Lauren classifications, lymph node metastasis, vascular invasion, tumor-node-metastasis stages, Helicobacter pylori infection, and overall survival (all p values

  12. Lignin-degrading Peroxidases from Genome of Selective Ligninolytic Fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora*

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J.; Miki, Yuta; Martínez, María Jesús; Hammel, Kenneth E.; Martínez, Angel T.

    2012-01-01

    The white-rot fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora delignifies lignocellulose with high selectivity, but until now it has appeared to lack the specialized peroxidases, termed lignin peroxidases (LiPs) and versatile peroxidases (VPs), that are generally thought important for ligninolysis. We screened the recently sequenced C. subvermispora genome for genes that encode peroxidases with a potential ligninolytic role. A total of 26 peroxidase genes was apparent after a structural-functional classification based on homology modeling and a search for diagnostic catalytic amino acid residues. In addition to revealing the presence of nine heme-thiolate peroxidase superfamily members and the unexpected absence of the dye-decolorizing peroxidase superfamily, the search showed that the C. subvermispora genome encodes 16 class II enzymes in the plant-fungal-bacterial peroxidase superfamily, where LiPs and VPs are classified. The 16 encoded enzymes include 13 putative manganese peroxidases and one generic peroxidase but most notably two peroxidases containing the catalytic tryptophan characteristic of LiPs and VPs. We expressed these two enzymes in Escherichia coli and determined their substrate specificities on typical LiP/VP substrates, including nonphenolic lignin model monomers and dimers, as well as synthetic lignin. The results show that the two newly discovered C. subvermispora peroxidases are functionally competent LiPs and also suggest that they are phylogenetically and catalytically intermediate between classical LiPs and VPs. These results offer new insight into selective lignin degradation by C. subvermispora. PMID:22437835

  13. Lignin-degrading peroxidases from genome of selective ligninolytic fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Miki, Yuta; Martínez, María Jesús; Hammel, Kenneth E; Martínez, Angel T

    2012-05-11

    The white-rot fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora delignifies lignocellulose with high selectivity, but until now it has appeared to lack the specialized peroxidases, termed lignin peroxidases (LiPs) and versatile peroxidases (VPs), that are generally thought important for ligninolysis. We screened the recently sequenced C. subvermispora genome for genes that encode peroxidases with a potential ligninolytic role. A total of 26 peroxidase genes was apparent after a structural-functional classification based on homology modeling and a search for diagnostic catalytic amino acid residues. In addition to revealing the presence of nine heme-thiolate peroxidase superfamily members and the unexpected absence of the dye-decolorizing peroxidase superfamily, the search showed that the C. subvermispora genome encodes 16 class II enzymes in the plant-fungal-bacterial peroxidase superfamily, where LiPs and VPs are classified. The 16 encoded enzymes include 13 putative manganese peroxidases and one generic peroxidase but most notably two peroxidases containing the catalytic tryptophan characteristic of LiPs and VPs. We expressed these two enzymes in Escherichia coli and determined their substrate specificities on typical LiP/VP substrates, including nonphenolic lignin model monomers and dimers, as well as synthetic lignin. The results show that the two newly discovered C. subvermispora peroxidases are functionally competent LiPs and also suggest that they are phylogenetically and catalytically intermediate between classical LiPs and VPs. These results offer new insight into selective lignin degradation by C. subvermispora.

  14. EphA2 Expression Regulates Inflammation and Fibroproliferative Remodeling in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Finney, Alexandra C; Funk, Steven D; Green, Jonette M; Yurdagul, Arif; Rana, Mohammad Atif; Pistorius, Rebecca; Henry, Miriam; Yurochko, Andrew; Pattillo, Christopher B; Traylor, James G; Chen, Jin; Woolard, Matthew D; Kevil, Christopher G; Orr, A Wayne

    2017-08-08

    Atherosclerotic plaque formation results from chronic inflammation and fibroproliferative remodeling in the vascular wall. We previously demonstrated that both human and mouse atherosclerotic plaques show elevated expression of EphA2, a guidance molecule involved in cell-cell interactions and tumorigenesis. Here, we assessed the role of EphA2 in atherosclerosis by deleting EphA2 in a mouse model of atherosclerosis (Apoe(-)(/-)) and by assessing EphA2 function in multiple vascular cell culture models. After 8 to 16 weeks on a Western diet, male and female mice were assessed for atherosclerotic burden in the large vessels, and plasma lipid levels were analyzed. Despite enhanced weight gain and plasma lipid levels compared with Apoe(-/-) controls, EphA2(-/-)Apoe(-/-) knockout mice show diminished atherosclerotic plaque formation, characterized by reduced proinflammatory gene expression and plaque macrophage content. Although plaque macrophages express EphA2, EphA2 deletion does not affect macrophage phenotype, inflammatory responses, and lipid uptake, and bone marrow chimeras suggest that hematopoietic EphA2 deletion does not affect plaque formation. In contrast, endothelial EphA2 knockdown significantly reduces monocyte firm adhesion under flow. In addition, EphA2(-/-)Apoe(-/-) mice show reduced progression to advanced atherosclerotic plaques with diminished smooth muscle and collagen content. Consistent with this phenotype, EphA2 shows enhanced expression after smooth muscle transition to a synthetic phenotype, and EphA2 depletion reduces smooth muscle proliferation, mitogenic signaling, and extracellular matrix deposition both in atherosclerotic plaques and in vascular smooth muscle cells in culture. Together, these data identify a novel role for EphA2 in atherosclerosis, regulating both plaque inflammation and progression to advanced atherosclerotic lesions. Cell culture studies suggest that endothelial EphA2 contributes to atherosclerotic inflammation by

  15. Striatal adenosine-cannabinoid receptor interactions in rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Chiodi, Valentina; Ferrante, Antonella; Ferraro, Luca; Potenza, Rosa Luisa; Armida, Monica; Beggiato, Sarah; Pèzzola, Antonella; Bader, Michael; Fuxe, Kjell; Popoli, Patrizia; Domenici, Maria Rosaria

    2016-03-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors (A2 A Rs) and cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1 Rs) are highly expressed in the striatum, where they functionally interact and form A2A /CB1 heteroreceptor complexes. We investigated the effects of CB1 R stimulation in a transgenic rat strain over-expressing A2 A Rs under the control of the neural-specific enolase promoter (NSEA2A rats) and in age-matched wild-type (WT) animals. The effects of the CB1 R agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) were significantly lower in NSEA2A rats than in WT animals, as demonstrated by i) electrophysiological recordings of synaptic transmission in corticostriatal slices; ii) the measurement of glutamate outflow from striatal synaptosomes and iii) in vivo experiments on locomotor activity. Moreover, while the effects of WIN were modulated by both A2 A R agonist (CGS 21680) and antagonists (ZM 241385, KW-6002 and SCH-442416) in WT animals, the A2 A R antagonists failed to influence WIN-mediated effects in NSEA2A rats. The present results demonstrate that in rats with genetic neuronal over-expression of A2 A Rs, the effects mediated by CB1 R activation in the striatum are significantly reduced, suggesting a change in the stoichiometry of A2A and CB1 receptors and providing a strategy to dissect the involvement of A2 A R forming or not forming heteromers in the modulation of striatal functions. These findings add additional evidence for the existence of an interaction between striatal A2 A Rs and CB1 Rs, playing a fundamental role in the regulation of striatal functions. We studied A2A -CB1 receptor interaction in transgenic rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors under the control of the neuron-specific enolase promoter (NSEA2A ). In these rats, we demonstrated a reduced effect of the CB1 receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 in the modulation of corticostriatal synaptic transmission and locomotor activity, while CB1 receptor expression level did not change with respect to WT rats. A reduction in the expression of A2A -CB1

  16. The molecular characterization of the lignin-forming peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    This laboratory is committed to understanding the function of plant peroxidases via a multi-disciplinary approach. We have chosen the lignin-forming peroxidase from tobacco as the first isoenzyme to be subjected to this comprehensive approach. The goals which were set out upon the initiation of this project were as follows: (1) utilize a cDNA clone to the tobacco anionic peroxidase to generate transgenic plants which either over-produced this isoenzyme or specifically under-produced this isoenzyme via antisense RNA, (2) describe any phenotypic changes resulting from altered peroxidase expression, (3) perform morphological, physiological, and biochemical analysis of the above mentioned plants to help in determining the in planta function for this enzyme, and (4) clone and characterize the gene for the tobacco anionic peroxidase. A summary of progress thus far which includes both published and unpublished work will be presented in three sections: generation and characterization of transgenic plants, description of phenotypes, and biochemical and physiological analysis of peroxidase function, and cloning and characterization of the tobacco anionic peroxidase gene.

  17. Intensity of HLA-A2 Expression Significantly Decreased in Occult Hepatitis B Infection.

    PubMed

    Askari, Azam; Hassanshahi, Gholam Hossein; Ghalebi, Seyed Razi; Jafarzadeh, Abdollah; Mohit, Maryam; Hajghani, Masomeh; Kazemi Arababadi, Mohammad

    2014-06-01

    Occult hepatitis B infected (OBI) patients cannot eradicate hepatitis B virus (HBV)-DNA from their liver and peripheral blood, completely. The main aim of this study was to investigate the rate of HLA-A2 expression on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with OBI. In this experimental study, intensity of HLA-A2 was measured on the PBMCs of 57 OBI patients and 100 HBsAg-/anti-HBc+/HBV-DNA samples were enrolled as controls; measurements were performed using the flow cytometry technique. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that 19 (33.3%) OBI patients and 28 (28%) controls expressed HLA-A2 antigen on their PBMCs. There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding the rate of individuals expressing HLA-A2 antigen. Statistical analyses showed that the intensity of HLA-A2 expression significantly decreased in OBI patients (3.58 ± 0.1) in comparison to healthy controls (4.21 ± 0.25; P < 0.001). According to these results it can be concluded that decreased intensity of HLA-A2 on the PBMCs of OBI patients may lead to resistance of HBV in the patients.

  18. Intensity of HLA-A2 Expression Significantly Decreased in Occult Hepatitis B Infection

    PubMed Central

    Askari, Azam; Hassanshahi, Gholam Hossein; Ghalebi, Seyed Razi; Jafarzadeh, Abdollah; Mohit, Maryam; Hajghani, Masomeh; Kazemi Arababadi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Occult hepatitis B infected (OBI) patients cannot eradicate hepatitis B virus (HBV)-DNA from their liver and peripheral blood, completely. Objectives: The main aim of this study was to investigate the rate of HLA-A2 expression on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with OBI. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, intensity of HLA-A2 was measured on the PBMCs of 57 OBI patients and 100 HBsAg-/anti-HBc+/HBV-DNA samples were enrolled as controls; measurements were performed using the flow cytometry technique. Results: Flow cytometric analysis indicated that 19 (33.3%) OBI patients and 28 (28%) controls expressed HLA-A2 antigen on their PBMCs. There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding the rate of individuals expressing HLA-A2 antigen. Statistical analyses showed that the intensity of HLA-A2 expression significantly decreased in OBI patients (3.58 ± 0.1) in comparison to healthy controls (4.21 ± 0.25; P < 0.001). Conclusions: According to these results it can be concluded that decreased intensity of HLA-A2 on the PBMCs of OBI patients may lead to resistance of HBV in the patients. PMID:25371796

  19. [Expression of EphA2 in Metastatic and Non-Metastatic Primary Uveal Melanoma].

    PubMed

    Vukoja, V; Brandenbusch, T; Tura, A; Nassar, K; Rohrbach, D J M; Lüke, M; Grisanti, S; Lüke, J

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about how the expression of Ephrin type-A receptor 2 (EphA2) influences cell-cell adhesion, migration, angiogenesis, and the formation of vasculogenic mimicry (VM) channels in uveal melanomas or how this may be related to the rate of metastasis. Paraffin embedded sections of 50 histopathologically well characterised primary uveal melanomas (mean largest tumour diameter: 16.3 mm) were evaluated with respect to the expression of EphA2. Systemic metastasis was detected in 29 patients. The remaining 21 patients were followed for a mean of 10 years. Tumour angiogensis was analysed by endoglin expression (CD105), the activity of the mature vascular system (von Willebrand factor) and the presence of VM (CD31/PAS staining). All uveal melanomas expressed EphA2, with a mean of 95.93 % positive cells ± SD: 6.3 %. There was no significant association between EphA2 and the rate of metastases (p = 0.196), endoglin expression (p = 0.652), VM (p = 0.267) or with any other clinical or histopathological factors (p < 0.05). However, there was significant up-regulation of EphA2 in the nucleus of the metastatic uveal melanoma subgroup, while cytoplasmatic localisation in the subgroup was associated with better prognosis (p = 0.006). There were low levels of EphA2 expression in the specific retinal layers, the ciliary and corneal epithelium, and the choroidal and corneal endothelium. Nuclear expression of EphA2 in this series of large tumours was significantly associated with an increased rate of metastasis. On the other hand, cytoplasmic localisation was associated with a better prognosis. As there was no correlation between EphA2 expression and angiogenesis, the mature vasculature or VM, EphA2 appears to become less important in the advanced stages of the disease. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Upregulation of glutathione peroxidase-1 expression and activity by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor promotes high-level protection of PC12 cells against 6-hydroxydopamine and hydrogen peroxide toxicities.

    PubMed

    Gharib, Ehsan; Gardaneh, Mossa; Shojaei, Sahar

    2013-06-01

    We examined the impact of strong co-presence and function of glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPX-1) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on protecting the rat dopaminergic pheochromocytoma cell line PC12 against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) toxicities. Primarily, GPX-1 over-expression by PC12 cells infected with pLV-GPX1 lentivirus vectors significantly increased cell survival against 6-OHDA toxicity (p<0.01). Addition of conditioned medium collected from growing wild-type astrocytes (Control astro-CM) increased survival rate of pLV-GPX1 infectants by 10% compared to their un-treated counterparts (p<0.05) and 20% compared to their treated empty vector control (p<0.01). Treatment of pLV-GPX1 cells with astro-CM of GDNF-over-secreting astrocytes (Test astro-CM) significantly induced GPX-1 expression, peroxidase enzymatic activity, and intra-cellular glutathione (GSH) levels. These changes paralleled with protection of 90% of GDNF⁺/GPX1⁺ PC12 cells against toxicity, a rate that was 37% up from their un-infected un-treated (GDNF⁻/GPX1⁻) controls (p<0.001), and 12% up from pLV-GPX1 cells that received only Control astro-CM (GPX⁺/GDNF⁻) (p<0.01). GPX-1 over-expression per se suppressed intra-cellular H₂O₂ elevation upon 6-OHDA exposure, and addition of GDNF medium significantly accelerated this suppression (p<0.01). Substitution of 6-OHDA with H₂O₂ induced similar intra-cellular changes and comparable protection levels. In all cell groups, increased cell survival against either compound was further confirmed by increased live cell counts measured by double staining. Following depletion of intra-cellular GSH, only 46% of pLV-GPX1 cells survived 6-OHDA toxicity, whereas over 70% of them were saved upon GDNF treatment (p<0.001). Moreover, capase-3 activation was reduced in pLV-GPX1 cells and maximized by addition of GDNF. Comparison analyses established correlations between GPX-1-GDNF co-presence and both

  1. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data From the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Part 11; Express/T-160E Project Express A2 and A3 Data Agreement Document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.; Dunning, John (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80deg E. and 11deg W., respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3-99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  2. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data From the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Part 12; Express/T-160 Project Express A2 and A3 Sensors Operations Procedures Document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunning, John (Technical Monitor); Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80 deg. E. and 11 deg. W respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3 99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  3. Altered phenotypes in plants transformed with chimeric tobacco peroxidase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    Peroxidases have been implicated in a variety of secondary metabolic reactions including lignification, cross-linking of cell wall polysaccharides, oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid, regulation of cell elongation, wound-healing, phenol oxidation, and pathogen defense. However, due to the many different isoenzymes and even more potential substrates, it has proven difficult to verify actual physiological roles for peroxidase. We are studying the molecular biology of the tobacco peroxidase genes, and have utilized genetic engineering techniques to produce transgenic plants which differ only in their expression of an individual peroxidase isoenzyme. Many of the in planta functions for any individual isoenzyme may be predicted through the morphological and physiological analysis of transformed plants.

  4. Altered phenotypes in plants transformed with chimeric tobacco peroxidase genes

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1990-12-31

    Peroxidases have been implicated in a variety of secondary metabolic reactions including lignification, cross-linking of cell wall polysaccharides, oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid, regulation of cell elongation, wound-healing, phenol oxidation, and pathogen defense. However, due to the many different isoenzymes and even more potential substrates, it has proven difficult to verify actual physiological roles for peroxidase. We are studying the molecular biology of the tobacco peroxidase genes, and have utilized genetic engineering techniques to produce transgenic plants which differ only in their expression of an individual peroxidase isoenzyme. Many of the in planta functions for any individual isoenzyme may be predicted through the morphological and physiological analysis of transformed plants.

  5. High expression of SLC34A2 is a favorable prognostic marker in lung adenocarcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaoxuan; Ye, Shan; Zhang, Min; Wu, Jing; Yan, Hong; Li, Xiaojie; He, Jie

    2017-07-01

    Dysregulation of SLC34A2 (NaPi2b) in tumors has attracted wide attention, but its expression and function in non-small cell lung cancer remains unclear. By examining its expression in lung adenocarcinoma and correlation to patient outcome, we aimed to explore its prognostic and therapeutic values in this deadly disease. Overall, 175 cases of lung adenocarcinoma sample were included in this study. Histological subtyping of them was diagnosed according to standards of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society in 2011. Protein expression of SLC34A2 and anaplastic lymphoma kinase in these samples was determined by immunohistochemistry. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutations were examined using amplification refractory mutation system. Statistical analysis was performed using software of Pearson's correlation coefficient. High expression of SLC34A2 was identified in about 2/3 patients and correlated with significantly better patient's overall survival. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutations were detected in about 53% of patients with no statistically significant difference to patient's overall survival. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement was found in 8 out of 175 patients, harboring this abnormality leads to shorter overall survival. No correlation has been found between SLC34A2 expression and epidermal growth factor receptor mutation or anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangements in lung adenocarcinoma. High expression of SLC34A2 is present in about 3/4 lung adenocarcinoma samples and predicts better outcome. Since it is a membrane protein, antibody-based drugs targeting this marker might bring new resolution to this deadly disease.

  6. GPX5 orthologs of the mouse epididymis-restricted and sperm-bound selenium-independent glutathione peroxidase are not expressed with the same quantitative and spatial characteristics in large domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Grignard, Elise; Morin, Joelle; Vernet, Patrick; Drevet, Joel R

    2005-09-01

    We report here on the cloning of cDNAs coding bovine and equine orthologs of mouse epididymis-restricted and sperm-bound glutathione peroxidase 5 (GPX5), a selenium-independent member of the multigenic GPX family in mammals. The complete sequence of bovine GPX5 as well as a partial sequence of the equine GPX5 were characterized, conceptually translated and aligned with other known mammalian GPX5 proteins. Using Northern blotting assays, we show that the level of expression of GPX5 is high in bovine but low in equine and that in both species the regionalization of GPX5 expression in epididymis is not totally identical to what was reported for rodent mouse GPX5. An antibody was produced against GPX5 and used in Western blot assays as well as in immunohistochemistry assays on bovine epididymis sections. It shows that the protein is essentially present in the cytoplasmic compartment of the caput segment 2 epithelium of the bovine epididymis. Unlike in the mouse model, bovine GPX5 seems to be poorly secreted and does not seem to be present on cauda epididymal spermatozoa.

  7. Arx together with FoxA2, regulates Shh floor plate expression.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ginam; Lim, Youngshin; Cho, Il-Taeg; Simonet, Jacqueline C; Golden, Jeffrey A

    2014-09-01

    Mutations in the Aristaless related homeodomain transcription factor (ARX) are associated with a diverse set of X-linked mental retardation and epilepsy syndromes in humans. Although most studies have been focused on its function in the forebrain, ARX is also expressed in other regions of the developing nervous system including the floor plate (FP) of the spinal cord where its function is incompletely understood. To investigate the role of Arx in the FP, we performed gain-of-function studies in the chick using in ovo electroporation, and loss-of-function studies in Arx-deficient mice. We have found that Arx, in conjunction with FoxA2, directly induces Sonic hedgehog (Shh) expression through binding to a Shh floor plate enhancer (SFPE2). We also observed that FoxA2 induces Arx through its transcriptional activation domain whereas Nkx2.2, induced by Shh, abolishes this induction. Our data support a feedback loop model for Arx function; through interactions with FoxA2, Arx positively regulates Shh expression in the FP, and Shh signaling in turn activates Nkx2.2, which suppresses Arx expression. Furthermore, our data are evidence that Arx plays a role as a context dependent transcriptional activator, rather than a primary inducer of Shh expression, potentially explaining how mutations in ARX are associated with diverse, and often subtle, defects.

  8. Antioxidant defenses in the rat placenta in late gestation: increased labyrinthine expression of superoxide dismutases, glutathione peroxidase 3, and uncoupling protein 2.

    PubMed

    Jones, Megan L; Mark, Peter J; Lewis, Jessica L; Mori, Trevor A; Keelan, Jeffery A; Waddell, Brendan J

    2010-08-01

    Placental oxidative stress plays a key role in the pathophysiology of placenta-related disorders, most notably preeclampsia (PE) and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Oxidative stress occurs when accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) damages DNA, proteins and lipids, an outcome that is limited by antioxidant enzymes; mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) may also limit oxidative stress by reducing ROS production. Here we characterized placental antioxidant defenses during normal gestation and following glucocorticoid-induced IUGR. Placentas were collected on Days 16 and 22 of normal rat pregnancy (term = Day 23) and at Day 22 after dexamethasone treatment from Day 13. Expression of several genes encoding antioxidant enzymes (Sod1, Sod2, Sod3, Cat, Gpx3, Txn1, Txnrd1, Txnrd2, and Txnrd3) and Ucp2 was measured by quantitative RT-PCR in the labyrinth (LZ) and junctional zones (JZ) of the placenta. Expression of Sod1 and Ucp2 mRNAs and the activity of xanthine oxidase, a source of ROS, all increased from Days 16 to 22 in both placental zones, whereas Sod2 and Gpx3 increased only in the rapidly growing LZ. In contrast, Sod3 and Txnrd1 expression fell in the LZ over this period, whereas total superoxide dismutase activity remained stable. Dexamethasone treatment reduced fetal-placental growth and LZ expression of Ucp2 but increased JZ expression of Txn1. Indices of placental oxidative damage (TBARS, F(2)-isoprostanes, and 8-OHdG) did not change with gestational age or dexamethasone, indicative of adequate antioxidant protection. Overall, our data suggest that the rat placenta is protected from oxidative stress by the dynamic zone- and stage-dependent expression of antioxidant defense genes.

  9. Class III peroxidases are activated in proanthocyanidin-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana seeds.

    PubMed

    Jia, Liguo; Xu, Weifeng; Li, Wenrao; Ye, Nenghui; Liu, Rui; Shi, Lu; Bin Rahman, A N M Rubaiyath; Fan, Mingshou; Zhang, Jianhua

    2013-05-01

    It has previously been shown that proanthocyanidins (PAs) in the seed coat of Arabidopsis thaliana have the ability to scavenge superoxide radicals (O2(-)). However, the physiological processess in PA-deficit seeds are not clear. It is hypothesized that there exist alternative ways in PA-deficient seeds to cope with oxidative stress. The content of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and its relevance to the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidases was investigated in both wild-type and PA-deficit mutant seeds. A biochemical staining approach was used to detect tissue localizations of peroxidase activities in PA-deficit mutant seeds. PA-deficient mutants possess significantly lower levels of H2O2 than the wild-type, despite their higher accumulation of superoxide radicals. Screening of the key antioxidant enzymes revealed that peroxidase activity was significantly over-activated in mutant seeds. This high peroxidase activity was mainly confined to the seed coat zone. Interestingly, neither ascorbate peroxidase nor glutathione peroxidase, just the guaiacol peroxidases (class III peroxidases), was specifically activated in the seed coat. However, no significant difference in peroxidase activity was observed in embryos of either mutants or the wild-type, although gene expressions of several candidate peroxidases were down-regulated in the embryos of PA-deficient seeds. The results suggest that enhanced class III peroxidase activity in the seed coat of PA-deficient mutants is an adaptive strategy for seed development and survival.

  10. Substrate oxidation sites in versatile peroxidase and other basidiomycete peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Morales, María; García, Eva; Miki, Yuta; Martínez, María Jesús; Martínez, Angel T

    2009-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) is defined by its capabilities to oxidize the typical substrates of other basidiomycete peroxidases: (i) Mn(2+), the manganese peroxidase (MnP) substrate (Mn(3+) being able to oxidize phenols and initiate lipid peroxidation reactions); (ii) veratryl alcohol (VA), the typical lignin peroxidase (LiP) substrate; and (iii) simple phenols, which are the substrates of Coprinopsis cinerea peroxidase (CIP). Crystallographic, spectroscopic, directed mutagenesis, and kinetic studies showed that these 'hybrid' properties are due to the coexistence in a single protein of different catalytic sites reminiscent of those present in the other basidiomycete peroxidase families. Crystal structures of wild and recombinant VP, and kinetics of mutated variants, revealed certain differences in its Mn-oxidation site compared with MnP. These result in efficient Mn(2+) oxidation in the presence of only two of the three acidic residues forming its binding site. On the other hand, a solvent-exposed tryptophan is the catalytically-active residue in VA oxidation, initiating an electron transfer pathway to haem (two other putative pathways were discarded by mutagenesis). Formation of a tryptophanyl radical after VP activation by peroxide was detected using electron paramagnetic resonance. This was the first time that a protein radical was directly demonstrated in a ligninolytic peroxidase. In contrast with LiP, the VP catalytic tryptophan is not beta-hydroxylated under hydrogen peroxide excess. It was also shown that the tryptophan environment affected catalysis, its modification introducing some LiP properties in VP. Moreover, some phenols and dyes are oxidized by VP at the edge of the main haem access channel, as found in CIP. Finally, the biotechnological interest of VP is discussed.

  11. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data From the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80 E. and 11 W., respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3 99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  12. Tanshinone I increases CYP1A2 protein expression and enzyme activity in primary rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wayne Y W; Zhou, Xuelin; Or, Penelope M Y; Kwan, Yiu Wa; Yeung, John H K

    2012-01-15

    This study investigated the effects of Danshen and its active ingredients on the protein expression and enzymatic activity of CYP1A2 in primary rat hepatocytes. The ethanolic extract of Danshen roots (containing mainly tanshinones) inhibited CYP1A2-catalyzed phenacetin O-deethylation (IC(50)=24.6 μg/ml) in primary rat hepatocytes while the water extract containing mainly salvianolic acid B and danshenshu had no effect. Individual tanshinones such as cryptotanshinone, dihydrotanshinone, tanshinone IIA inhibited the CYP1A2-mediated metabolism with IC(50) values at 12.9, 17.4 and 31.9 μM, respectively. After 4-day treatment of the rat hepatocytes, the ethanolic extract of Danshen and tanshinone I increased rat CYP1A2 activity by 6.8- and 5.2-fold, respectively, with a concomitant up-regulation of CYP1A2 protein level by 13.5- and 6.5-fold, respectively. CYP1A2 induction correlated with the up-regulation of mRNA level of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), which suggested a positive feedback mechanism of tanshinone I-mediated CYP1A2 induction. A formulated Danshen pill (containing mainly danshensu and salvianolic acid B and the tanshinones) up-regulated CYP1A2 protein expression and enzyme activity, but danshensu and salvianolic acid B, when used individually, did not affect CYP1A2 activity. This study was the first report on the Janus action of the tanshinones on rat CYP1A2 activity.

  13. Expression of Annexin A2 and Its Correlation With Drug Resistance and Recurrence of Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huihui; Zhao, Jin; Zhang, Man

    2016-12-01

    To explore the expressions of annexin A2 in bladder cancer cell lines and bladder cancer tissues, we want to find the relationship among annexin A2, drug resistance, and recurrence of bladder cancer. Our laboratory established the PUMC-91 bladder cancer cell line against gradient concentration of Adriamycin (0.3, 0.6, and 1.0 μg/mL), and we also collected 60 cases of surgically resected bladder cancer recurrent tissue samples. The tissues were classified into 2 groups according to the frequency of recurrence (<6 months and >2 years) after initial surgery. The method of immunohistochemistry was used to examine the differences in the expression of annexin A2. There were statistical differences in annexin A2 among normal bladder epithelial cell line SV-HUC-1, PUMC-91, PUMC-91 against 0.3 μg/mL Adriamycin, and PUMC-91 against 1.0 μg/mL Adriamycin (P < .05). The expressions of Annexin A2 were found to be higher than those that recurred at >2 years (P = .002) in the bladder cancer tissues and that recurred at <6 months after initial surgery. It was also associated with invasion depth (stage) of bladder cancer, such as higher expression in T2 (invasive muscular) group than Tis (carcinoma in situ) and T1 (invasive mucosa lamina propria) groups (P = .003 and P = .000, respectively). But, it did not correlate with the differentiation (grade) of cancer cells in bladder cancer tissues (P = .593). Annexin A2 can act as a valuable biomarker for predicting the drug resistance and recurrence of bladder cancer. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Light controls phospholipase A2α and β gene expression in Citrus sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hui-Ling; Burns, Jacqueline K.

    2010-01-01

    The low-molecular weight secretory phospholipase A2α (CssPLA2α) and β (CsPLA2β) cloned in this study exhibited diurnal rhythmicity in leaf tissue of Citrus sinensis. Only CssPLA2α displayed distinct diurnal patterns in fruit tissues. CssPLA2α and CsPLA2β diurnal expression exhibited periods of approximately 24 h; CssPLA2α amplitude averaged 990-fold in the leaf blades from field-grown trees, whereas CsPLA2β amplitude averaged 6.4-fold. Diurnal oscillation of CssPLA2α and CsPLA2β gene expression in the growth chamber experiments was markedly dampened 24 h after transfer to continuous light or dark conditions. CssPLA2α and CsPLA2β expressions were redundantly mediated by blue, green, red and red/far-red light, but blue light was a major factor affecting CssPLA2α and CsPLA2β expression. Total and low molecular weight CsPLA2 enzyme activity closely followed diurnal changes in CssPLA2α transcript expression in leaf blades of seedlings treated with low intensity blue light (24 μmol m−2 s−1). Compared with CssPLA2α basal expression, CsPLA2β expression was at least 10-fold higher. Diurnal fluctuation and light regulation of PLA2 gene expression and enzyme activity in citrus leaf and fruit tissues suggests that accompanying diurnal changes in lipophilic second messengers participate in the regulation of physiological processes associated with phospholipase A2 action. PMID:20388744

  15. Light controls phospholipase A2alpha and beta gene expression in Citrus sinensis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hui-Ling; Burns, Jacqueline K

    2010-05-01

    The low-molecular weight secretory phospholipase A2alpha (CssPLA2alpha) and beta (CsPLA2beta) cloned in this study exhibited diurnal rhythmicity in leaf tissue of Citrus sinensis. Only CssPLA2alpha displayed distinct diurnal patterns in fruit tissues. CssPLA2alpha and CsPLA2beta diurnal expression exhibited periods of approximately 24 h; CssPLA2alpha amplitude averaged 990-fold in the leaf blades from field-grown trees, whereas CsPLA2beta amplitude averaged 6.4-fold. Diurnal oscillation of CssPLA2alpha and CsPLA2beta gene expression in the growth chamber experiments was markedly dampened 24 h after transfer to continuous light or dark conditions. CssPLA2alpha and CsPLA2beta expressions were redundantly mediated by blue, green, red and red/far-red light, but blue light was a major factor affecting CssPLA2alpha and CsPLA2beta expression. Total and low molecular weight CsPLA2 enzyme activity closely followed diurnal changes in CssPLA2alpha transcript expression in leaf blades of seedlings treated with low intensity blue light (24 micromol m(-2) s(-1)). Compared with CssPLA2alpha basal expression, CsPLA2beta expression was at least 10-fold higher. Diurnal fluctuation and light regulation of PLA2 gene expression and enzyme activity in citrus leaf and fruit tissues suggests that accompanying diurnal changes in lipophilic second messengers participate in the regulation of physiological processes associated with phospholipase A2 action.

  16. Molecular characterization of the lignin-forming peroxidase: Role in growth, development and response to stress. Progress summary report, April 1, 1993--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1994-05-01

    Our group continues to focus on the characterization of the tobacco anionic peroxidase and its genes. Throughout this past year we have generated transgenic plants expressing {beta}-glucuronidase under control of the anionic peroxidase promoter, characterized effectors of peroxidase gene expression in transformed protoplasts, generated numerous transgenic plants which over- and under-express the anionic peroxidase in a tissue specific manner, characterized the role of the anionic peroxidase in the metabolism of auxin, introduced a marker (flag) into the anionic peroxidase primary protein sequence which will permit the identification of the recombinant protein in plant tissue, and described the enhancement of insect resistance as a result of over-expression of the anionic peroxidase. Although our research program has continued along the lines of the original proposal, we have redirected a significant effort to the role which this enzyme plays in the metabolism of auxin, and conversely, the role which auxin plays in regulating the expression of the anionic peroxidase gene.

  17. A novel targeted system to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs to EphA2-expressing cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Si; Placzek, William J.; Stebbins, John L.; Mitra, Sayantan; Noberini, Roberta; Koolpe, Mitchell; Zhang, Ziming; Dahl, Russell; Pasquale, Elena B.; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of anti-cancer drugs is often limited by their systemic toxicities and adverse side effects. We report that the EphA2 receptor is over-expressed preferentially in several human cancer cell lines compared to normal tissues and that an EphA2 targeting peptide (YSAYPDSVPMMS) can be effective in delivering anti-cancer agents to such tumors. Hence, we report on the synthesis and characterizations of a novel EphA2-targeting agent conjugated with the chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel. We found that the peptide-drug conjugate is dramatically more effective than paclitaxel alone at inhibiting tumor growth in a prostate cancer xenograft model, delivering significantly higher levels of drug to the tumor site. We believe these studies open the way to the development of a new class of therapeutic compounds that exploit the EphA2 receptor for drug delivery to cancer cells. PMID:22329578

  18. Detoxification and antioxidant effects of garlic and curcumin in Oreochromis niloticus injected with aflatoxin B₁ with reference to gene expression of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) by RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    El-Barbary, Manal I

    2016-04-01

    The present study aims to investigate the effects of both garlic and curcumin through evaluating their therapeutic properties as antioxidants on liver and kidney functions, hepatic antioxidants and GPx gene expression against aflatoxicosis of O. niloticus. In total, 180 of tilapia were divided into ten groups; T1 represented the negative control fed on a basal diet, and T2 was injected with a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) dose of AFB1 (6 mg/kg b.w.). Fish in T3-T6 were fed on a basal diet supplemented with both garlic (T3 and T4) and curcumin (T5 and T6) at the two concentrations of 10 and 20 g/kg diet, respectively. Fish in T7-T10 groups were injected with AFB1 and fed on the garlic (T7 and T8) and curcumin (T9 and T10) dietaries. The results showed that AFB1 has significant potency for increasing the activity of plasma AST, ALT, creatinine and uric acid values, and hepatic MDA as well as for reducing the concentrations of plasma TP, AL, GL and hepatic activity of TAC, while AFB1 led to up-regulated GPx gene expression when compared to the control (T1). These harmful effects of AFB1 were alleviated due to the garlic and curcumin dietaries in some studied parameters. Garlic reflected the highest induction of gene expression (T7); however, curcumin showed significant down-regulated (T9). These results concluded that the effects of garlic were better than curcumin at the two concentrations and the low concentration of them is more beneficial than the high concentration when it used against AFB1 in O. niloticus.

  19. No evidence for disturbed COL1A1 and A2 expression in otosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Csomor, Péter; Liktor, Balázs; Liktor, Bálint; Sziklai, István; Karosi, Tamás

    2012-09-01

    Otosclerosis is a complex bone remodeling disorder of the human otic capsule that might be associated with various mutations of A1 and A2 alleles of type-I collagen. The study herein presented, investigates the possibilty of the genetic involvement of type-I collagen in the pathogenesis of histologically confirmed otosclerosis. A total of 55 ankylotic stapes footplates were analyzed. Cortical bone fragments (n = 30), incus (n = 3) and malleus (n = 2) specimens were employed as negative controls. Specimens were divided into two groups. The first group was processed using conventional H.E. hematoxylin-eosin (H.E.) staining and type-I collagen-specific immunofluorescent assay (IFA), while the second group was examined by COL1A1 and A2-specific RT-PCR. Otosclerotic- (n = 31) and non-otosclerotic stapes footplates (n = 9) as well as cortical bones (n = 20), incus (n = 2) and malleus specimens (n = 1) showed normal and quite similar A1 and A2 allele expression confirmed by IFA. RT-PCR analysis revealed normal and consistent mRNA expression of both alleles in each specimen. Expression levels and patterns of COL1A1/A2 alleles did not show significant correlation with the histological diagnosis of otosclerosis. Type-I collagen is a highly conserved structure protein, which plays a fundamental role in the integritiy of various connective tissues. Mutations of A1 and A2 alleles result in serious systemic disorders of the skeleton, tendons and skin. Since otosclerosis is an organ-specific disease, it is difficult to explain its genetic association with type-I collagen. In conclusion, we found no evidence supporting the putative link of COL1A1 and COL1A2 alleles with otosclerosis.

  20. Efficient soluble expression of active recombinant human cyclin A2 mediated by E. coli molecular chaperones.

    PubMed

    Grigoroudis, Asterios I; McInnes, Campbell; Premnath, Padmavathy Nandha; Kontopidis, George

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial expression of human proteins continues to present a critical challenge in protein crystallography and drug design. While human cyclin A constructs have been extensively characterized in complex with cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), efforts to express the monomeric human cyclin A2 in Escherichia coli in a stable form, without the kinase subunit, have been laden with technical difficulties, including solubility, yield and purity. Here, optimized conditions are described with the aim of generating for first time, sufficient quantities of human recombinant cyclin A2 in a soluble and active form for crystallization and ligand characterization purposes. The studies involve implementation of a His-tagged heterologous expression system under conditions of auto-induction and mediated by molecular chaperone-expressing plasmids. A high yield of human cyclin A2 was obtained in natively folded and soluble form, through co-expression with groups of molecular chaperones from E. coli in various combinations. A one-step affinity chromatography method was utilized to purify the fusion protein products to homogeneity, and the biological activity confirmed through ligand-binding affinity to inhibitory peptides, representing alternatives for the key determinants of the CDK2 substrate recruitment site on the cyclin regulatory subunit. As a whole, obtaining the active cyclin A without the CDK partner (referred to as monomeric in this work) in a straightforward and facile manner will obviate protein--production issues with the CDK2/cyclin A complex and enable drug discovery efforts for non-ATP competitive CDK inhibition through the cyclin groove. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Efficient Soluble Expression of Active Recombinant Human Cyclin A2 Mediated by E. coli Molecular Chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Grigoroudis, Asterios I.; McInnes, Campbell; Premnath, Padmavathy Nandha; Kontopidis, George

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial expression of human proteins continues to present a critical challenge in protein crystallography and drug design. While human cyclin A constructs have been extensively characterized in complex with cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), efforts to express the monomeric human cyclin A2 in Escherichia coli in a stable form, without the kinase subunit, have been laden with technical difficulties, including solubility, yield and purity. Here, optimized conditions are described with the aim of generating for first time, sufficient quantities of human recombinant cyclin A2 in a soluble and active form for crystallization and ligand characterization purposes. The studies involve implementation of a His-tagged heterologous expression system under conditions of auto-induction and mediated by molecular chaperone-expressing plasmids. A high yield of human cyclin A2 was obtained in natively folded and soluble form, through co-expression with groups of molecular chaperones from E. coli in various combinations. A one-step affinity chromatography method was utilized to purify the fusion protein products to homogeneity, and the biological activity confirmed through ligand-binding affinity to inhibitory peptides, representing alternatives for the key determinants of the CDK2 substrate recruitment site on the cyclin regulatory subunit. As a whole, obtaining the active cyclin A without the CDK partner (referred as monomeric in this work) in a straightforward and facile manner will obviate protein –production issues with the CDK2/cyclin A complex and enable drug discovery efforts for non-ATP competitive CDK inhibition through the cyclin groove. PMID:25956535

  2. Role of peroxidases in the compensation of cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase knockdown in rice plants under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Bonifacio, Aurenivia; Martins, Marcio O; Ribeiro, Carolina W; Fontenele, Adilton V; Carvalho, Fabricio E L; Margis-Pinheiro, Márcia; Silveira, Joaquim A G

    2011-10-01

    Current studies, particularly in Arabidopsis, have demonstrated that mutants deficient in cytosolic ascorbate peroxidases (APXs) are susceptible to the oxidative damage induced by abiotic stress. In contrast, we demonstrate here that rice mutants double silenced for cytosolic APXs (APx1/2s) up-regulated other peroxidases, making the mutants able to cope with abiotic stress, such as salt, heat, high light and methyl viologen, similar to non-transformed (NT) plants. The APx1/2s mutants exhibited an altered redox homeostasis, as indicated by increased levels of H₂O₂ and ascorbate and glutathione redox states. Both mutant and NT plants exhibited similar photosynthesis (CO₂) assimilation and photochemical efficiency) under both normal and stress conditions. Overall, the antioxidative compensatory mechanism displayed by the mutants was associated with increased expression of OsGpx genes, which resulted in higher glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity in the cytosolic and chloroplastic fractions. The transcript levels of OsCatA and OsCatB and the activities of catalase (CAT) and guaiacol peroxidase (GPOD; type III peroxidases) were also up-regulated. None of the six studied isoforms of OsApx were up-regulated under normal growth conditions. Therefore, the deficiency in cytosolic APXs was effectively compensated for by up-regulation of other peroxidases. We propose that signalling mechanisms triggered in rice mutants could be distinct from those proposed for Arabidopsis.

  3. Expression of a Catalytically Inactive Mutant Form of Glutathione Peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) Confers a Dominant-negative Effect in Male Fertility*

    PubMed Central

    Ingold, Irina; Aichler, Michaela; Yefremova, Elena; Roveri, Antonella; Buday, Katalin; Doll, Sebastian; Tasdemir, Adrianne; Hoffard, Nils; Wurst, Wolfgang; Walch, Axel; Ursini, Fulvio; Friedmann Angeli, José Pedro; Conrad, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    The selenoenzyme Gpx4 is essential for early embryogenesis and cell viability for its unique function to prevent phospholipid oxidation. Recently, the cytosolic form of Gpx4 was identified as an upstream regulator of a novel form of non-apoptotic cell death, called ferroptosis, whereas the mitochondrial isoform of Gpx4 was previously shown to be crucial for male fertility. Here, we generated and analyzed mice with a targeted mutation of the active site selenocysteine of Gpx4 (Gpx4_U46S). Mice homozygous for Gpx4_U46S died at the same embryonic stage (E7.5) as Gpx4−/− embryos as expected. Surprisingly, male mice heterozygous for Gpx4_U46S presented subfertility. Subfertility was manifested in a reduced number of litters from heterozygous breeding and an impairment of spermatozoa to fertilize oocytes in vitro. Morphologically, sperm isolated from heterozygous Gpx4_U46S mice revealed many structural abnormalities particularly in the spermatozoa midpiece due to improper oxidation and polymerization of sperm capsular proteins and malformation of the mitochondrial capsule surrounding and stabilizing sperm mitochondria. These findings are reminiscent of sperm isolated from selenium-deprived rodents or from mice specifically lacking mitochondrial Gpx4. Due to a strongly facilitated incorporation of Ser in the polypeptide chain as compared with selenocysteine at the UGA codon, expression of the catalytically inactive Gpx4_U46S was found to be strongly increased. Because the stability of the mitochondrial capsule of mature spermatozoa depends on the moonlighting function of Gpx4 both as an enzyme oxidizing capsular protein thiols and as a structural protein, tightly controlled expression of functional Gpx4 emerges as a key for full male fertility. PMID:25922076

  4. Expression of a Catalytically Inactive Mutant Form of Glutathione Peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) Confers a Dominant-negative Effect in Male Fertility.

    PubMed

    Ingold, Irina; Aichler, Michaela; Yefremova, Elena; Roveri, Antonella; Buday, Katalin; Doll, Sebastian; Tasdemir, Adrianne; Hoffard, Nils; Wurst, Wolfgang; Walch, Axel; Ursini, Fulvio; Friedmann Angeli, José Pedro; Conrad, Marcus

    2015-06-05

    The selenoenzyme Gpx4 is essential for early embryogenesis and cell viability for its unique function to prevent phospholipid oxidation. Recently, the cytosolic form of Gpx4 was identified as an upstream regulator of a novel form of non-apoptotic cell death, called ferroptosis, whereas the mitochondrial isoform of Gpx4 was previously shown to be crucial for male fertility. Here, we generated and analyzed mice with a targeted mutation of the active site selenocysteine of Gpx4 (Gpx4_U46S). Mice homozygous for Gpx4_U46S died at the same embryonic stage (E7.5) as Gpx4(-/-) embryos as expected. Surprisingly, male mice heterozygous for Gpx4_U46S presented subfertility. Subfertility was manifested in a reduced number of litters from heterozygous breeding and an impairment of spermatozoa to fertilize oocytes in vitro. Morphologically, sperm isolated from heterozygous Gpx4_U46S mice revealed many structural abnormalities particularly in the spermatozoa midpiece due to improper oxidation and polymerization of sperm capsular proteins and malformation of the mitochondrial capsule surrounding and stabilizing sperm mitochondria. These findings are reminiscent of sperm isolated from selenium-deprived rodents or from mice specifically lacking mitochondrial Gpx4. Due to a strongly facilitated incorporation of Ser in the polypeptide chain as compared with selenocysteine at the UGA codon, expression of the catalytically inactive Gpx4_U46S was found to be strongly increased. Because the stability of the mitochondrial capsule of mature spermatozoa depends on the moonlighting function of Gpx4 both as an enzyme oxidizing capsular protein thiols and as a structural protein, tightly controlled expression of functional Gpx4 emerges as a key for full male fertility.

  5. Thyroid expression of an A2 adenosine receptor transgene induces thyroid hyperplasia and hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed Central

    Ledent, C; Dumont, J E; Vassart, G; Parmentier, M

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is the major intracellular second messenger of thyrotropin (TSH) action on thyroid cells. It stimulates growth as well as the function and differentiation of cultured thyrocytes. The adenosine A2 receptor, which activates adenylyl cyclase via coupling to the stimulating G protein (Gs), has been shown to promote constitutive activation of the cAMP cascade when transfected into various cell types. In order to test whether the A2 receptor was able to function similarly in vivo and to investigate the possible consequences of permanent adenylyl cyclase activation in thyroid cells, lines of transgenic mice were generated expressing the canine A2 adenosine receptor under control of the bovine thyroglobulin gene promoter. Thyroid-specific expression of the A2 adenosine receptor transgene promoted gland hyperplasia and severe hyperthyroidism causing premature death of the animals. The resulting goitre represents a model of hyperfunctioning adenomas: it demonstrates that constitutive activation of the cAMP cascade in such differentiated epithelial cells is sufficient to stimulate autonomous and uncontrolled function and growth. Images PMID:1371462

  6. Abilities of peroxidases to catalyse peroxidase-oxidase oxidation of thiols.

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, B E

    1988-01-01

    The abilities of various peroxidases to catalyse the peroxidase-oxidase oxidation of seven aminothiols were studied. Cysteamine and cysteine esters were found to be peroxidase-oxidase substrates for eosinophil peroxidase and myeloperoxidase, whereas other thiols tested were inactive or poorly active with these peroxidases. With lactoperoxidase and horseradish peroxidase, all the tested thiols were inactive or poorly active as peroxidase-oxidase substrates. These studies suggest that a main reason for thiols being poor peroxidase-oxidase substrates is because these thiols are poor peroxidatic substrates. PMID:2852004

  7. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of Annexin A2 gene in sika deer antler tip.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yanling; Qu, Haomiao; Lu, Binshan; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Heping

    2017-08-16

    Molecular cloning and bioinformatics analysis of Annexin A2 gene in sika deer antler tip were conducted. The role of Annexin A2 gene in the growth and development of the antler were analyzed initially. The reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to clone the cDNA sequence of the Anxa2 gene from antler tip of sika deer (Cervus nippon hortulorum) and the bioinformatics tools provided on the web site were applied to analyze the amino acid sequence of Anxa2 protein. The mRNA expression levels of the Anxa2 gene in different growth stages were examined by real-time RT-PCR. The nucleotide sequence analysis revealed an ORF of 1020 bp encoding 339 amino acids long protein of calculated molecular weight 38.6 kDa and pI value 6.09. Homologous sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis indicated that the Anxa2 mature protein of sika deer had the closest genetic distance with Cervus elaphus and Bos mutus. Real-time RT-PCR results showed that the gene had differential expression levels in different growth stages, and the expression level of the Anxa2 gene was the highest at metaphase (rapid growing period). Anxa2 gene may promote the cell proliferation, and the finding suggested Anxa2 as an important candidate for regulating the growth and development of deer antler.

  8. In Vivo and In Vitro Studies of Cytosolic Phospholipase A2 Expression in Helicobacter pylori Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nardone, Gerardo; Holicky, Eileen L.; Uhl, James R.; Sabatino, Lina; Staibano, Stefania; Rocco, Alba; Colantuoni, Vittorio; Manzo, Barbara A.; Romano, Marco; Budillon, Gabriele; Cockerill, Franklin R.; Miller, Laurence J.

    2001-01-01

    Modifications of mucosal phospholipids have been detected in samples from patients with Helicobacter pylori-positive gastritis. These alterations appear secondary to increased phospholipase A2 activity (PLA2). The cytosolic form of this enzyme (cPLA2), normally involved in cellular signaling and growth, has been implicated in cancer pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate cPLA2 expression and PLA2 activity in the gastric mucosae of patients with and without H. pylori infection. In gastric biopsies from 10 H. pylori-positive patients, cPLA2 levels, levels of mRNA as determined by reverse transcriptase PCR, levels of protein as determined by immunohistochemistry, and total PLA2 activity were higher than in 10 H. pylori-negative gastritis patients. To clarify whether H. pylori had a direct effect on the cellular expression of cPLA2, we studied cPLA2 expression in vitro with different human epithelial cell lines, one from a patient with larynx carcinoma (i.e., HEp-2 cells) and two from patients with gastric adenocarcinoma (i.e., AGS and MKN 28 cells), incubated with different H. pylori strains. The levels of cPLA2, mRNA, and protein expression were unchanged in Hep-2 cells independently of cellular adhesion or invasion of the bacteria. Moreover, no change in cPLA2 protein expression was observed in AGS or MKN 28 cells treated with wild-type H. pylori. In conclusion, our study shows increased cPLA2 expression and PLA2 activity in the gastric mucosae of patients with H. pylori infection and no change in epithelial cell lines exposed to H. pylori. PMID:11500464

  9. Expression of LAP, a SecA2-dependent secretory protein, is induced under anaerobic environment.

    PubMed

    Burkholder, Kristin M; Kim, Kwang-Pyo; Mishra, Krishna K; Medina, Sarimar; Hahm, Byoung-Kwon; Kim, Hyochin; Bhunia, Arun K

    2009-09-01

    Listeria adhesion protein (LAP), an alcohol acetaldehyde dehydrogenase homolog (lmo1634) in Listeria monocytogenes, promotes bacterial adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. Investigation of the effect of anaerobiosis, an intrinsic gastrointestinal condition, on LAP expression and LAP-mediated infection should elucidate its significance during intestinal infection. The influence of anaerobiosis on LAP expression was determined by growing L. monocytogenes wild type (WT), and lap-deficient (KB208) and -complemented (CKB208) strains anaerobically and monitoring LAP in secreted, cell wall, and whole-cell protein fractions. The effect of anaerobiosis on LAP-mediated infection was evaluated in cell culture adhesion assays and mouse infection models. Additionally, the role of secretory system SecA2 in LAP secretion was investigated. Anaerobic growth induced significant increases in level of lap transcript and protein secretion, and secretion was SecA2-dependent. Anaerobiosis facilitated greater LAP-mediated adhesion of L. monocytogenes to cultured intestinal cells. Oral administration of WT, KB208 and CKB208 to mice confirmed that LAP is essential for full virulence, and anaerobically-grown WT exhibited greater translocation to liver and spleen relative to aerobically-grown organisms. LAP, a SecA2-dependent secreted virulence factor, plays an important role during intestinal infection, particularly when L. monocytogenes is subjected to an anaerobic environment.

  10. Enhanced Phospholipase A2 Group 3 Expression by Oxidative Stress Decreases the Insulin-Degrading Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Yui, Daishi; Nishida, Yoichiro; Nishina, Tomoko; Mogushi, Kaoru; Tajiri, Mio; Ishibashi, Satoru; Ajioka, Itsuki; Ishikawa, Kinya; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Murayama, Shigeo; Yokota, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress has a ubiquitous role in neurodegenerative diseases and oxidative damage in specific regions of the brain is associated with selective neurodegeneration. We previously reported that Alzheimer disease (AD) model mice showed decreased insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) levels in the cerebrum and accelerated phenotypic features of AD when crossbred with alpha-tocopherol transfer protein knockout (Ttpa-/-) mice. To further investigate the role of chronic oxidative stress in AD pathophysiology, we performed DNA microarray analysis using young and aged wild-type mice and aged Ttpa-/- mice. Among the genes whose expression changed dramatically was Phospholipase A2 group 3 (Pla2g3); Pla2g3 was identified because of its expression profile of cerebral specific up-regulation by chronic oxidative stress in silico and in aged Ttpa-/- mice. Immunohistochemical studies also demonstrated that human astrocytic Pla2g3 expression was significantly increased in human AD brains compared with control brains. Moreover, transfection of HEK293 cells with human Pla2g3 decreased endogenous IDE expression in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings show a key role of Pla2g3 on the reduction of IDE, and suggest that cerebrum specific increase of Pla2g3 is involved in the initiation and/or progression of AD. PMID:26637123

  11. Expression of group XIIA phospholipase A2 in human digestive organs.

    PubMed

    Peuravuori, Heikki; Kollanus, Sinikka; Nevalainen, Timo J

    2014-12-01

    Cellular distribution of group XIIA phospholipase A2 (GXIIA PLA2) was studied in human digestive organs by immunohistochemistry. GXIIA PLA2 protein was detected in epithelial cells of normal gastrointestinal tract, gallbladder and pancreatic acinar cells. The GXIIA PLA2 protein was evenly distributed in the cytoplasm in contrast to secretory granular distribution of GIB PLA2 and GIIA PLA2 in pancreatic acinar cells and small intestinal Paneth cells respectively. Epithelial cells of intestinal glands in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis expressed abundant GXIIA PLA2 , whereas inflammatory cells were devoid of the enzyme protein. Tumour cells in colonic adenomas and carcinomas and pancreatic ductogenic carcinomas expressed GXIIA PLA2 protein at varying intensity levels. The putative functions of GXIIA PLA2 remain to be investigated and its role in healthy and diseased digestive organs can only be speculated on at present.

  12. SLC44A2 single nucleotide polymorphisms, isoforms, and expression: Association with severity of Meniere's disease?

    PubMed

    Nair, Thankam S; Kommareddi, Pavan K; Galano, Maria M; Miller, Danielle M; Kakaraparthi, Bala Naveen; Telian, Steven A; Arts, H Alex; El-Kashlan, Hussam; Kilijanczyk, Alyse; Lassig, Amy Anne D; Graham, Martin P; Fisher, Susan G; Stoll, Stefan W; Nair, Rajan P; Elder, James T; Carey, Thomas E

    2016-12-01

    SLC44A2 was discovered as the target of an antibody that causes hearing loss. Knockout mice develop age related hearing loss, loss of sensory cells and spiral ganglion neurons. SLC44A2 has polymorphic sites implicated in human disease. Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) is linked to rs2288904 and genome wide association studies link rs2288904 and rs9797861 to venous thromboembolism (VTE), coronary artery disease and stroke. Here we report linkage disequilibrium of rs2288904 with rs3087969 and the association of these SLC44A2 SNPs with Meniere's disease severity. Tissue-specific isoform expression differences suggest that the N-terminal domain is linked to different functions in different cell types. Heterozygosity at rs2288904 CGA/CAA and rs3087969 GAT/GAC showed a trend for association with intractable Meniere's disease compared to less severe disease and to controls. The association of SLC44A2 SNPs with VTE suggests that thrombi affecting cochlear vessels could be a factor in Meniere's disease.

  13. Prognostic significance of the expression of nuclear eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A2 in human melanoma.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Shahram; Martinka, Magdalena; Zhou, Youwen; Ong, Christopher J

    2016-11-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A2 (EIF5A2) expression is upregulated in various cancers. The present authors previously demonstrated that cytoplasmic EIF5A2 expression increases with melanoma progression and inversely correlates with patient survival. Other studies have suggested that nuclear EIF5A2 may also play a role in oncogenesis. The present study used immunohistochemistry and tissue microarray with a large number of melanocytic lesions (n=459) and demonstrated that nuclear EIF5A2 expression was significantly upregulated between common acquired nevi, dysplastic nevi and primary melanomas, and between primary melanomas and metastatic melanomas. Nuclear EIF5A2 expression was inversely associated with overall and disease-specific 5-year survival rate for all (P<0.001) and primary (P=0.014 and P=0.015, respectively) melanoma patients. Nuclear EIF5A2 expression was directly associated with melanoma thickness (P=0.036) and American Joint Committee on Cancer staging (P<0.001), which suggests the possible role of nuclear EIF5A2 in melanoma cell invasion. Subsequently, the present study investigated the association between the expression of nuclear EIF5A2 and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), which is an important factor for promoting cancer cell invasion. Nuclear EIF5A2 and a strong MMP-2 expression were directly associated, and their concurrent expression was significantly associated with a poorer overall and disease-specific 5-year survival rate for all and primary melanoma patients. Nuclear and cytoplasmic EIF5A2 expression were also demonstrated to be significantly associated, and simultaneous expression of the two forms of EIF5A2 was significantly associated with poor overall and disease-specific 5-year survival rates for all and primary melanoma patients. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that nuclear EIF5A2 expression alone and in combination with cytoplasmic EIF5A2 expression was an adverse independent prognostic factor for all and

  14. Prognostic significance of the expression of nuclear eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A2 in human melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Shahram; Martinka, Magdalena; Zhou, Youwen; Ong, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A2 (EIF5A2) expression is upregulated in various cancers. The present authors previously demonstrated that cytoplasmic EIF5A2 expression increases with melanoma progression and inversely correlates with patient survival. Other studies have suggested that nuclear EIF5A2 may also play a role in oncogenesis. The present study used immunohistochemistry and tissue microarray with a large number of melanocytic lesions (n=459) and demonstrated that nuclear EIF5A2 expression was significantly upregulated between common acquired nevi, dysplastic nevi and primary melanomas, and between primary melanomas and metastatic melanomas. Nuclear EIF5A2 expression was inversely associated with overall and disease-specific 5-year survival rate for all (P<0.001) and primary (P=0.014 and P=0.015, respectively) melanoma patients. Nuclear EIF5A2 expression was directly associated with melanoma thickness (P=0.036) and American Joint Committee on Cancer staging (P<0.001), which suggests the possible role of nuclear EIF5A2 in melanoma cell invasion. Subsequently, the present study investigated the association between the expression of nuclear EIF5A2 and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), which is an important factor for promoting cancer cell invasion. Nuclear EIF5A2 and a strong MMP-2 expression were directly associated, and their concurrent expression was significantly associated with a poorer overall and disease-specific 5-year survival rate for all and primary melanoma patients. Nuclear and cytoplasmic EIF5A2 expression were also demonstrated to be significantly associated, and simultaneous expression of the two forms of EIF5A2 was significantly associated with poor overall and disease-specific 5-year survival rates for all and primary melanoma patients. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that nuclear EIF5A2 expression alone and in combination with cytoplasmic EIF5A2 expression was an adverse independent prognostic factor for all and

  15. Plant peroxidases. Their primary, secondary and tertiary structures, and relation to cytochrome c peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Welinder, K G

    1985-09-16

    The amino acid sequences of the 51% different horseradish peroxidase HRP C and turnip peroxidase TP 7 have previously been completed by us, but the three-dimensional structures are unknown. Recently the amino acid sequence and the crystal structure of yeast cytochrome c peroxidase have appeared. The three known apoperoxidases consist of 300 +/- 8 amino acid residues. The sequences have now been aligned and show 18% and 16% identity only, between the yeast peroxidase and plant peroxidase HRP C and TP 7, respectively. We show that different structural tests all support similar protein folds in plant peroxidases and yeast peroxidase and, therefore, a common evolutionary origin. The following tests support this thesis: (a) predicted helices in the plant peroxidases follow the complex pattern observed in the crystal structure of cytochrome c peroxidase; (b) their hydropathic profiles are similar and agree with observed buried and exposed peptide chain in cytochrome c peroxidase; (c) half-cystines which are distant in the amino acid sequence of plant peroxidases become spatial neighbours when fitted into the cytochrome c peroxidase model; (d) the two-domain structure proposed from limited proteolysis of apoperoxidase HRP C is observed in the crystal structure of cytochrome c peroxidase. The similarities and differences of the plant and yeast peroxidases and the reactive side chains of a plant peroxidase active site are described. The characteristics of Ca2+-binding sequences, derived from several superfamilies, are applied to predict the Ca2+-binding sequences in plant peroxidases.

  16. The Peroxiredoxin and Glutathione Peroxidase Families in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Dayer, Régine; Fischer, Beat B.; Eggen, Rik I. L.; Lemaire, Stéphane D.

    2008-01-01

    Thiol/selenol peroxidases are ubiquitous nonheme peroxidases. They are divided into two major subfamilies: peroxiredoxins (PRXs) and glutathione peroxidases (GPXs). PRXs are present in diverse subcellular compartments and divided into four types: 2-cys PRX, 1-cys PRX, PRX-Q, and type II PRX (PRXII). In mammals, most GPXs are selenoenzymes containing a highly reactive selenocysteine in their active site while yeast and land plants are devoid of selenoproteins but contain nonselenium GPXs. The presence of a chloroplastic 2-cys PRX, a nonselenium GPX, and two selenium-dependent GPXs has been reported in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The availability of the Chlamydomonas genome sequence offers the opportunity to complete our knowledge on thiol/selenol peroxidases in this organism. In this article, Chlamydomonas PRX and GPX families are presented and compared to their counterparts in Arabidopsis, human, yeast, and Synechocystis sp. A summary of the current knowledge on each family of peroxidases, especially in photosynthetic organisms, phylogenetic analyses, and investigations of the putative subcellular localization of each protein and its relative expression level, on the basis of EST data, are presented. We show that Chlamydomonas PRX and GPX families share some similarities with other photosynthetic organisms but also with human cells. The data are discussed in view of recent results suggesting that these enzymes are important scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) but also play a role in ROS signaling. PMID:18493039

  17. Diverse functions and reactions of class III peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Shigeto, Jun; Tsutsumi, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    Higher plants contain plant-specific peroxidases (class III peroxidase; Prxs) that exist as large multigene families. Reverse genetic studies to characterize the function of each Prx have revealed that Prxs are involved in lignification, cell elongation, stress defense and seed germination. However, the underlying mechanisms associated with plant phenotypes following genetic engineering of Prx genes are not fully understood. This is because Prxs can function as catalytic enzymes that oxidize phenolic compounds while consuming hydrogen peroxide and/or as generators of reactive oxygen species. Moreover, biochemical efforts to characterize Prxs responsible for lignin polymerization have revealed specialized activities of Prxs. In conclusion, not only spatiotemporal regulation of gene expression and protein distribution, but also differentiated oxidation properties of each Prx define the function of this class of peroxidases.

  18. Horseradish and soybean peroxidases: comparable tools for alternative niches?

    PubMed

    Ryan, Barry J; Carolan, Neil; O'Fágáin, Ciarán

    2006-08-01

    Horseradish and soybean peroxidases (HRP and SBP, respectively) are useful biotechnological tools. HRP is often termed the classical plant heme peroxidase and although it has been studied for decades, our understanding has deepened since its cloning and subsequent expression, enabling numerous mutational and protein engineering studies. SBP, however, has been neglected until recently, despite offering a real alternative to HRP: SBP actually outperforms HRP in terms of stability and is now used in numerous biotechnological applications, including biosensors. Review of both is timely. This article summarizes and discusses the main insights into the structure and mechanism of HRP, with special emphasis on HRP mutagenesis, and outlines its use in a variety of applications. It also reviews the current knowledge and applications to date of SBP, particularly biosensors. The final paragraphs speculate on the future of plant heme-based peroxidases, with probable trends outlined and explored.

  19. The role of stigma peroxidases in flowering plants: insights from further characterization of a stigma-specific peroxidase (SSP) from Senecio squalidus (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    McInnis, Stephanie M; Emery, David C; Porter, Robert; Desikan, Radhika; Hancock, John T; Hiscock, Simon J

    2006-01-01

    Angiosperm stigmas have long been known to exhibit high levels of peroxidase activity when they are mature and most receptive to pollen but the biological function of stigma peroxidases is not known. A novel stigma-specific class III peroxidase gene, SSP (stigma-specific peroxidase) expressed exclusively in the stigmas of Senecio squalidus L. (Asteraceae) has recently been identified. Expression of SSP is confined to the specialized secretory cells (papillae) that compose the stigma epidermis. The literature on stigma peroxidases and hypotheses on their function(s) is reviewed here before further characterization of SSP and an attempt to determine its function are described. It is shown that SSP is localized to cytoplasmic regions of stigmatic papillae and also to the surface of these cells, possibly as a component of the pellicle, a thin layer of condensed protein typical of "dry" stigmas. Enzyme assays on recombinant SSP showed it to be a peroxidase with a preference for diphenolic substrates (ABTS and TMB) and a pH optimum of approximately 4.5. In such assays the peroxidase activity of SSP was low when compared with horseradish peroxidase. To explore the function of SSP and other stigmatic peroxidases, levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in stigmas of S. squalidus were investigated. Relatively large amounts of ROS, principally H(2)O(2), were detected in S. squalidus stigmas where most ROS/H(2)O(2) was localized to the stigmatic papillae, the location of SSP. These observations are discussed in the context of possible functions for SSP, other peroxidases, and ROS in the stigmas of angiosperms.

  20. Cloning, expression, and purification of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2) in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fujun; Wang, Yiping

    2006-05-01

    Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2) (Lp-PLA(2)) has been shown to play a crucial role in atherosclerosis, and has been proposed as a promising target for drug discovery. Here, we cloned the Lp-PLA(2) gene from differentiated THP-1 cells, and inserted a carboxy-terminal His(6)-tagged version of the gene into the pPIC9 Pichia expression vector. The Lp-PLA(2) fusion protein was successfully expressed in Pichia pastoris expression system and could be rapidly purified to apparent homogeneity using a single-step purification method. The activity of our recombinant Lp-PLA(2) was strong when [3H] PAF was used as a substrate, and the Lp-PLA(2) inhibitor SB435495 exhibited an inhibitory curve against the recombinant Lp-PLA2 (IC50 = 15.93 +/- 1 microM). This novel recombinant Lp-PLA(2) could prove useful as a screening model for Lp-PLA(2) inhibitors, and may facilitate further investigation of this protein in atherosclerosis.

  1. Hair Follicular Expression and Function of Group X Secreted Phospholipase A2 in Mouse Skin*

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kei; Taketomi, Yoshitaka; Isogai, Yuki; Miki, Yoshimi; Sato, Hiroyasu; Masuda, Seiko; Nishito, Yasumasa; Morioka, Kiyokazu; Ishimoto, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Noriko; Yokota, Yasunori; Hanasaki, Kohji; Ishikawa, Yukio; Ishii, Toshiharu; Kobayashi, Tetsuyuki; Fukami, Kiyoko; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Nakanishi, Hiroki; Taguchi, Ryo; Murakami, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Although perturbed lipid metabolism can often lead to skin abnormality, the role of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) in skin homeostasis is poorly understood. In the present study we found that group X-secreted PLA2 (sPLA2-X) was expressed in the outermost epithelium of hair follicles in synchrony with the anagen phase of hair cycling. Transgenic mice overexpressing sPLA2-X (PLA2G10-Tg) displayed alopecia, which was accompanied by hair follicle distortion with reduced expression of genes related to hair development, during a postnatal hair cycle. Additionally, the epidermis and sebaceous glands of PLA2G10-Tg skin were hyperplasic. Proteolytic activation of sPLA2-X in PLA2G10-Tg skin was accompanied by preferential hydrolysis of phosphatidylethanolamine species with polyunsaturated fatty acids as well as elevated production of some if not all eicosanoids. Importantly, the skin of Pla2g10-deficient mice had abnormal hair follicles with noticeable reduction in a subset of hair genes, a hypoplasic outer root sheath, a reduced number of melanin granules, and unexpected up-regulation of prostanoid synthesis. Collectively, our study highlights the spatiotemporal expression of sPLA2-X in hair follicles, the presence of skin-specific machinery leading to sPLA2-X activation, a functional link of sPLA2-X with hair follicle homeostasis, and compartmentalization of the prostanoid pathway in hair follicles and epidermis. PMID:21266583

  2. Cell wall lignin is polymerised by class III secretable plant peroxidases in Norway spruce.

    PubMed

    Fagerstedt, Kurt V; Kukkola, Eija M; Koistinen, Ville V T; Takahashi, Junko; Marjamaa, Kaisa

    2010-02-01

    Class III secretable plant peroxidases occur as a large family of genes in plants with many functions and probable redundancy. In this review we are concentrating on the evidence we have on the catalysis of lignin polymerization by class III plant peroxidases present in the apoplastic space in the xylem of trees. Some evidence exists on the specificity of peroxidase isozymes in lignin polymerization through substrate specificity studies, from antisense mutants in tobacco and poplar and from tissue and cell culture lines of Norway spruce (Picea abies) and Zinnia elegans. In addition, real time (RT-)PCR results have pointed out that many peroxidases have tissue specific expression patterns in Norway spruce. Through combining information on catalytic properties of the enzymes, on the expression patterns of the corresponding genes, and on the presence of monolignols and hydrogen peroxide in the apoplastic space, we can show that specific peroxidases catalyze lignin polymerization in the apoplastic space of Norway spruce xylem.

  3. Phenotypic expression of hemoglobin A2 in beta-thalassemia trait with iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Madan, N; Sikka, M; Sharma, S; Rusia, U

    1998-09-01

    Iron status was estimated in 463 heterozygous beta-thalassemics to delineate the effect of iron deficiency on the expression of hemoglobin A2 (HbA2) in these patients. One hundred and twenty-six (27.2%) patients with the trait were iron deficient. These iron-deficient patients had a significantly (p < 0.0002) higher prevalence of anemia (90.5%) compared with iron-replete patients with the trait (71.5%). The mean hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, MCV, and MCH were significantly (p < 0.0001) lower in patients with beta-thalassemia traits (BTT) who had iron deficiency than in those without iron deficiency. Mean RBC count and MCHC did not differ in the two groups. Mean HbA2 was not significantly different in the two groups of patients with the trait and was elevated (>3.5%) in all but one heterozygote investigated. Mean HbA2/cell was significantly (p < 0.05) lower in BTT patients with iron deficiency than in patients without iron deficiency. The presence of iron deficiency did not preclude the detection of BTT in this population. The effect of iron deficiency in BTT was apparent as a significant lowering of the Hb concentration and an increased prevalence of anemia. Iron therapy is warranted for BTT patients with iron-deficiency traits and would help to significantly raise their Hb concentration. The elevation of HbA2 was striking and could be used with reliability in making the diagnosis of BTT even in the presence of iron deficiency.

  4. Nucleotide sequence of the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) anionic peroxidase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-De-Leon, F.; Klotz, K.L.; Lagrimini, L.M. )

    1993-03-01

    Peroxidases have been implicated in numerous physiological processes including lignification (Grisebach, 1981), wound-healing (Espelie et al., 1986), phenol oxidation (Lagrimini, 1991), pathogen defense (Ye et al., 1990), and the regulation of cell elongation through the formation of interchain covalent bonds between various cell wall polymers (Fry, 1986; Goldberg et al., 1986; Bradley et al., 1992). However, a complete description of peroxidase action in vivo is not available because of the vast number of potential substrates and the existence of multiple isoenzymes. The tobacco anionic peroxidase is one of the better-characterized isoenzymes. This enzyme has been shown to oxidize a number of significant plant secondary compounds in vitro including cinnamyl alcohols, phenolic acids, and indole-3-acetic acid (Maeder, 1980; Lagrimini, 1991). A cDNA encoding the enzyme has been obtained, and this enzyme was shown to be expressed at the highest levels in lignifying tissues (xylem and tracheary elements) and also in epidermal tissue (Lagrimini et al., 1987). It was shown at this time that there were four distinct copies of the anionic peroxidase gene in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). A tobacco genomic DNA library was constructed in the [lambda]-phase EMBL3, from which two unique peroxidase genes were sequenced. One of these clones, [lambda]POD1, was designated as a pseudogene when the exonic sequences were found to differ from the cDNA sequences by 1%, and several frame shifts in the coding sequences indicated a dysfunctional gene (the authors' unpublished results). The other clone, [lambda]POD3, described in this manuscript, was designated as the functional tobacco anionic peroxidase gene because of 100% homology with the cDNA. Significant structural elements include an AS-2 box indicated in shoot-specific expression (Lam and Chua, 1989), a TATA box, and two intervening sequences. 10 refs., 1 tab.

  5. Systematic characterization of the peroxidase gene family provides new insights into fungal pathogenicity in Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Albely Afifa; Park, Sook-Young; Sadat, Md. Abu; Kim, Seongbeom; Choi, Jaeyoung; Jeon, Junhyun; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Fungal pathogens have evolved antioxidant defense against reactive oxygen species produced as a part of host innate immunity. Recent studies proposed peroxidases as components of antioxidant defense system. However, the role of fungal peroxidases during interaction with host plants has not been explored at the genomic level. Here, we systematically identified peroxidase genes and analyzed their impact on fungal pathogenesis in a model plant pathogenic fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae. Phylogeny reconstruction placed 27 putative peroxidase genes into 15 clades. Expression profiles showed that majority of them are responsive to in planta condition and in vitro H2O2. Our analysis of individual deletion mutants for seven selected genes including MoPRX1 revealed that these genes contribute to fungal development and/or pathogenesis. We identified significant and positive correlations among sensitivity to H2O2, peroxidase activity and fungal pathogenicity. In-depth analysis of MoPRX1 demonstrated that it is a functional ortholog of thioredoxin peroxidase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is required for detoxification of the oxidative burst within host cells. Transcriptional profiling of other peroxidases in ΔMoprx1 suggested interwoven nature of the peroxidase-mediated antioxidant defense system. The results from this study provide insight into the infection strategy built on evolutionarily conserved peroxidases in the rice blast fungus. PMID:26134974

  6. Systematic characterization of the peroxidase gene family provides new insights into fungal pathogenicity in Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Mir, Albely Afifa; Park, Sook-Young; Abu Sadat, Md; Kim, Seongbeom; Choi, Jaeyoung; Jeon, Junhyun; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2015-07-02

    Fungal pathogens have evolved antioxidant defense against reactive oxygen species produced as a part of host innate immunity. Recent studies proposed peroxidases as components of antioxidant defense system. However, the role of fungal peroxidases during interaction with host plants has not been explored at the genomic level. Here, we systematically identified peroxidase genes and analyzed their impact on fungal pathogenesis in a model plant pathogenic fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae. Phylogeny reconstruction placed 27 putative peroxidase genes into 15 clades. Expression profiles showed that majority of them are responsive to in planta condition and in vitro H2O2. Our analysis of individual deletion mutants for seven selected genes including MoPRX1 revealed that these genes contribute to fungal development and/or pathogenesis. We identified significant and positive correlations among sensitivity to H2O2, peroxidase activity and fungal pathogenicity. In-depth analysis of MoPRX1 demonstrated that it is a functional ortholog of thioredoxin peroxidase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is required for detoxification of the oxidative burst within host cells. Transcriptional profiling of other peroxidases in ΔMoprx1 suggested interwoven nature of the peroxidase-mediated antioxidant defense system. The results from this study provide insight into the infection strategy built on evolutionarily conserved peroxidases in the rice blast fungus.

  7. Wound-induced deposition of polyphenols in transgenic plants overexpressing peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M. )

    1991-06-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants transformed with a chimeric tobacco anionic peroxidase gene have previously been shown to synthesize high levels of peroxidase in all tissues throughout the plant. One of several distinguishable phenotypes of transformed plants is the rapid browning of pith tissue upon wounding. Pith tissue from plants expressing high levels of peroxidase browned within 24 hours of wounding, while tissue from control plants did not brown as late as 7 days after wounding. A correlation between peroxidase activity and wound-induced browning was observed, whereas no relationship between polyphenol oxidase activity and browning was found. The purified tobacco anionic peroxidase was subjected to kinetic analysis with substrates which resemble the precursors of lignin or polyphenolic acid. The purified enzyme was found to readily polymerize phenolic acids in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} via a modified ping-pong mechanism. The percentage of lignin and lignin-related polymers in cell walls was nearly twofold greater in pith tissue isolated from peroxidase-overproducer plants compared to control plants. Lignin deposition in wounded pith tissue from control plants closely followed the induction of peroxidase activity. However, wound-induced lignification occurred 24 to 48 hours sooner in plants overexpressing the anionic peroxidase. This suggests that the availability of peroxidase rather than substrate may delay polyphenol deposition in wounded tissue.

  8. Expression of Phospholipases A2 and C in Human Corneal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Landreville, Solange; Coulombe, Stéphanie; Carrier, Patrick; Gelb, Michael H.; Guérin, Sylvain L.; Salesse, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To achieve a better understanding of the involvement of phospholipases in the inflammation and wound-healing processes in human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs), expression of phospholipase A2s (PLA2s) and phospholipase Cs (PLCs) was examined in the human corneal epithelium. Methods Specific primers were designed for RT-PCR amplification of the known secreted (s)PLA2, cytosolic (c)PLA2, and PLC mRNAs. Corresponding PCR products were cloned and the DNA sequenced. Immunofluorescence of flatmounted corneal sections and Western blot analyses were used to detect the PLA2s and PLCs expressed by HCECs. Results The mRNAs for the following phospholipases were detected by RT-PCR in the HCECs: sPLA2GIII, -GX, and -GXIIA; cPLA2α and -γ; PLCβ1, -β2, -β3, -β4, -γ1, -γ2, -δ1, -δ3, -δ4, and -ε. Immunofluorescence analyses conducted on corneal epithelium cryosections and Western blot on freshly isolated HCECs demonstrated the presence of sPLA2GIII, -GX, and -GXIIA; cPLA2α and -γ; and PLCβ2, -β3, -γ1, -γ2, and -δ3. Conclusions Many phospholipase isoforms are expressed by HCECs and may play a major role in signal transduction (PLCs) as well as in the release of precursors of potent mediators of inflammation, such as leukotrienes and prostaglandins (PLA2s). Moreover, the sPLA2s expressed by the corneal epithelium could be involved in the normal antibacterial activity in the tears and in wound healing. PMID:15505048

  9. Characterisation of tectal ephrin-A2 expression during optic nerve regeneration in goldfish: implications for restoration of topography.

    PubMed

    King, Carolyn; Lacey, Richard; Rodger, Jennifer; Bartlett, Carole; Dunlop, Sarah; Beazley, Lyn

    2004-06-01

    EphA receptors and their ligands the ephrin-As, expressed as retinal and tectal gradients, are required for the development of retino-tectal topography [Neuron 25 (2000) 563] and its restoration during goldfish optic nerve regeneration [Mol. Cell. Neurosci. 25 (2004) 56]. We have reported previously that, during regeneration, a transient EphA3/A5 gradient is formed by differential expression across the entire retinal ganglion cell (RGC) population [Neurosci. Abs. 33 (2003) 358.2; Exp. Neurol. 183 (2003) 593]. In retino-recipient tectal layers, ephrin-A2 is normally expressed by only a sub-population of cells, but during regeneration, there is a graded increase with more expressing cells caudally than rostrally [Exp. Neurol. 166 (2000) 196]. Here, we examine the characteristics of tectal ephrin-A2 expression during regeneration. We report that the level of ephrin-A2 expression is comparable for all ephrin-A2-positive cells in normal animals and during regeneration. Using double-labelling immunohistochemistry for ephrin-A2 and specific cell markers (NeuN for neurons, GA5 for astrocytes, NN-1 for microglia/endothelial cells and 6D2 for oligodendrocytes), we demonstrate that ephrin-A2-expressing cells, as in normal animals, are exclusively neuronal. Moreover, double labelling with BrdU showed that ephrin-A2 is expressed in resident cells and not those generated during optic nerve regeneration [Brain Res. 854 (2000) 178, 153 (1978) 345].

  10. Evolutionary Divergence of Arabidopsis thaliana Classical Peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Kupriyanova, E V; Mamoshina, P O; Ezhova, T A

    2015-10-01

    Polymorphisms of 62 peroxidase genes derived from Arabidopsis thaliana were investigated to evaluate evolutionary dynamics and divergence of peroxidase proteins. By comparing divergence of duplicated genes AtPrx53-AtPrx54 and AtPrx36-AtPrx72 and their products, nucleotide and amino acid substitutions were identified that were apparently targets of positive selection. These substitutions were detected among paralogs of 461 ecotypes from Arabidopsis thaliana. Some of these substitutions are conservative and matched paralogous peroxidases in other Brassicaceae species. These results suggest that after duplication, peroxidase genes evolved under the pressure of positive selection, and amino acid substitutions identified during our study provided divergence of properties and physiological functions in peroxidases. Our predictions regarding functional significance for amino acid residues identified in variable sites of peroxidases may allow further experimental assessment of evolution of peroxidases after gene duplication.

  11. Effects of heme precursors on CYP1A2 and POR expression in the baculovirus/Spodoptera frugiperda system.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huiyuan; Ma, Jun; Liu, Nian; Wang, Shoulin

    2010-05-01

    CYP1A2 and NADPH-CYP450 oxidoreductase (POR) were expressed in the baculovirus/Spodoptera frugiperda (sf9) system. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of heme precursors on the expression of CYP1A2 and POR. The heme precursors [δ-Aminolaevulinic Acid (5-ALA), Fe(3+) and hemin] were introduced into the system to evaluate their effects on the expression of CYP1A2, POR and their co-expression. All the proteins were identified using immunoblotting, CO-difference spectroscopy, or cytochrome c assay. In the present study, functional CYP1A2 and POR were successfully expressed in the baculovirus/sf9 system, and both of them showed high activities. Co-addition of 5-ALA and Fe(3+) significantly improved expression of CYP1A2 by about 50% compared with the addition of 5-ALA, Fe(3+) or hemin alone. Either co-addition of 5-ALA and Fe(3+) or addition of 5-ALA or Fe(3+) alone improved the POR expression level 2 fold and its activity 7-10 fold compared with control (no addition). However, unlike CYP1A2, there was no difference between the co-addition and addition of these heme precursors alone. Different ratios of BvCYP1A2 to BvPOR also affected the co-expression of CYP1A2 and POR, with a 3:1 ratio of BvCYP1A2 / BvPOR significantly increasing their co-expression. Surprisingly, the addition of 0.1 mM 5-ALA or Fe(3+) alone, but not their co-addition, could significantly improve the CYP1A2 and POR co-expression (P < 0.05). 5-ALA and Fe(3+) increased the expression of CYP1A2 and POR in a baculovirus/sf9 system, but the pattern of their expression was different between their expression alone and co-expression.

  12. Cloning and functional expression of secreted phospholipases A(2) from Bothrops diporus (Yarará Chica).

    PubMed

    Yunes Quartino, Pablo Javier; Barra, José Luis; Fidelio, Gerardo Daniel

    2012-10-19

    Bothrops diporus is a very common viper in Argentina. At present, no complete sequence of secreted phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2)) from this snake has been reported. We have cloned two sPLA(2) isoenzymes as well as a putative sPLA(2)-like myotoxin from venom gland. The two sPLA(2) were expressed as inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli with an N-terminal tag of ubiquitin. After in vitro renaturation and cleavage step, using an ubiquitin specific peptidase, the recombinants exhibited sPLA(2) activity when analyzed by means of Langmuir dilauroylphosphatidylcholine monolayers as substrate. Both enzymes have a similar surface pressure-activity profile when compared with non-recombinant purified isoforms. To our knowledge, this is the first time that analysis of optimal lateral pressure of substrate monolayers by using the surface barostat technique is performed on recombinant sPLA(2)s.

  13. Loss of histone variant macroH2A2 expression associates with progression of anal neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wan-Hsiang; Miyai, Katsumi; Sporn, Judith C; Luo, Linda; Wang, Jean Y J; Cosman, Bard; Ramamoorthy, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Aims The macroH2A histone variants are epigenetic marks for inactivated chromatin. In this study, we examined the expression of macroH2A2 in anal neoplasm from anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) to anal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods AIN and anal SCC samples were analysed for macroH2A2 expression, HIV and human papilloma virus (HPV). The association of macroH2A2 expression with clinical grade, disease recurrence, overall survival and viral involvement was determined. Results macroH2A2 was expressed in normal squamous tissue and lower grade AIN (I and II). Expression was lost in 38% of high-grade AIN (III) and 71% of anal SCC (p=0.002). Patients with AIN with macroH2A2-negative lesions showed earlier recurrence than those with macroH2A2-positive neoplasm (p=0.017). With anal SCC, macroH2A2 loss was more prevalent in the HPV-negative tumours. Conclusions Loss of histone variant macroH2A2 expression is associated with the progression of anal neoplasm and can be used as a prognostic biomarker for high-grade AIN and SCC. PMID:26658220

  14. Root growth inhibition by aluminum is probably caused by cell death due to peroxidase-mediated hydrogen peroxide production.

    PubMed

    Simonovicová, M; Huttová, J; Mistrík, I; Siroká, B; Tamás, L

    2004-10-01

    The effect of aluminum on hydrogen peroxide production and peroxidase-catalyzed NADH oxidation was studied in barley roots germinated and grown between two layers of moistened filter paper. Guaiacol peroxidase activity significantly increased after 48 h and was approximately two times higher after 72 h in Al-treated roots. The oxidation of NADH was also significantly increased and, like guaiacol peroxidase activity, it was two times higher in A1-treated roots than in controls. Elevated H2O2 production was observed both 48 and 72 h after the onset of imbibition in the presence of A1. Separation on a cation exchange column allowed the detection of two peaks with NADH peroxidase and H2O2 production activity. However, a difference between control and Al-treated plants was found only in one fraction, in which four times higher guaiacol peroxidase activity and five times higher NADH peroxidase activity were expressed and about three times more H2O2 was produced. One anionic peroxidase and three cationic peroxidases were detected in this fraction by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The anionic peroxidase was activated in the Al-treated root tips and also oxidized NADH but was detectable only after a long incubation time. Two of the cationic peroxidases were capable of oxidizing NADH and producing a significant amount of H2O2, but only one of these was activated by A1 stress. The role of these peroxidases during A1 stress in barley root tips is discussed.

  15. AMPKα1 controls hepatocyte proliferation independently of energy balance by regulating Cyclin A2 expression.

    PubMed

    Merlen, Grégory; Gentric, Géraldine; Celton-Morizur, Séverine; Foretz, Marc; Guidotti, Jacques-Emmanuel; Fauveau, Véronique; Leclerc, Jocelyne; Viollet, Benoit; Desdouets, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an evolutionarily conserved sensor of cellular energy status that contributes to restoration of energy homeostasis by slowing down ATP-consuming pathways and activating ATP-producing pathways. Unexpectedly, in different systems, AMPK is also required for proper cell division. In the current study, we evaluated the potential effect of the AMPK catalytic subunit, AMPKα1, on hepatocyte proliferation. Hepatocyte proliferation was determined in AMPKα1 knockout and wild-type mice in vivo after two thirds partial hepatectomy, and in vitro in primary hepatocyte cultures. The activities of metabolic and cell cycle-related signaling pathways were measured. After partial hepatectomy, hepatocytes proliferated rapidly, correlating with increased AMPK phosphorylation. Deletion of AMPKα1 delayed liver regeneration by impacting on G1/S transition phase. The proliferative defect of AMPKα1-deficient hepatocytes was cell autonomous, and independent of energy balance. The priming phase, lipid droplet accumulation, protein anabolic responses and growth factor activation after partial hepatectomy occurred normally in the absence of AMPKα1 activity. By contrast, mRNA and protein expression of cyclin A2, a key driver of S phase progression, were compromised in the absence of AMPK activity. Importantly, AMPKα1 controlled cyclin A2 transcription mainly through the ATF/CREB element. Our study highlights a novel role for AMPKα1 as a positive regulator of hepatocyte division occurring independently of energy balance. Copyright © 2013 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Overexpression of phospholipid-hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase in human dermal fibroblasts abrogates UVA irradiation-induced expression of interstitial collagenase/matrix metalloproteinase-1 by suppression of phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxide-mediated NFkappaB activation and interleukin-6 release.

    PubMed

    Wenk, Jutta; Schüller, Jutta; Hinrichs, Christina; Syrovets, Tatjana; Azoitei, Ninel; Podda, Maurizio; Wlaschek, Meinhard; Brenneisen, Peter; Schneider, Lars-A; Sabiwalsky, Andrea; Peters, Thorsten; Sulyok, Silke; Dissemond, Joachim; Schauen, Matthias; Krieg, Thomas; Wirth, Thomas; Simmet, Thomas; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin

    2004-10-29

    Phospholipid-hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPx) exhibits high specific activity in reducing phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxides (PCOOHs) and thus may play a central role in protecting the skin against UV irradiation-triggered detrimental long term effects like cancer formation and premature skin aging. Here we addressed the role of PHGPx in the protection against UV irradiation-induced expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1). For this purpose, we created human dermal fibroblast cell lines overexpressing human PHGPx. Overexpression led to a significant increase in PHGPx activity. In contrast to a maximal 4.5-fold induction of specific MMP-1 mRNA levels in vector-transfected cells at 24 h after UVA irradiation, no MMP-1 induction occurred at any studied time point after UVA treatment of PHGPx-overexpressing fibroblasts. As interleukin-6 (IL-6) was earlier shown to mediate the UVA induction of MMP-1, we studied whether PHGPx overexpression might interfere with the NFkappaB-mediated IL-6 induction and downstream signaling. Using transient transfections of IL-6 promoter constructs containing NFkappaB binding sites, we observed a high induction of the reporter gene luciferase in vector-transfected control cells and a significantly lower induction in PHGPx-overexpressing fibroblasts following UVA irradiation. Consistently both UVA irradiation and treatment of fibroblasts with PCOOHs led to phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit, whereas cells overexpressing PHGPx exhibited impaired NFkappaB activation, p65 phosphorylation, and nuclear translocation. In line with this, the PHGPx-overexpressing fibroblasts showed a reduced constitutive and UVA irradiation-induced IL-6 release. After incubating PHGPx-overexpressing cells with PCOOHs a reduced induction of IL-6 was observed. This together with the suppression of UVA irradiation-induced IL-6 release in the presence of Trolox, a chain breaker of PCOOH-initiated lipid peroxidation

  17. Class III peroxidases are activated in proanthocyanidin-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana seeds

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Liguo; Xu, Weifeng; Li, Wenrao; Ye, Nenghui; Liu, Rui; Shi, Lu; Bin Rahman, A. N. M. Rubaiyath; Fan, Mingshou; Zhang, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims It has previously been shown that proanthocyanidins (PAs) in the seed coat of Arabidopsis thaliana have the ability to scavenge superoxide radicals (O2−). However, the physiological processess in PA-deficit seeds are not clear. It is hypothesized that there exist alternative ways in PA-deficient seeds to cope with oxidative stress. Methods The content of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and its relevance to the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidases was investigated in both wild-type and PA-deficit mutant seeds. A biochemical staining approach was used to detect tissue localizations of peroxidase activities in PA-deficit mutant seeds. Key Results PA-deficient mutants possess significantly lower levels of H2O2 than the wild-type, despite their higher accumulation of superoxide radicals. Screening of the key antioxidant enzymes revealed that peroxidase activity was significantly over-activated in mutant seeds. This high peroxidase activity was mainly confined to the seed coat zone. Interestingly, neither ascorbate peroxidase nor glutathione peroxidase, just the guaiacol peroxidases (class III peroxidases), was specifically activated in the seed coat. However, no significant difference in peroxidase activity was observed in embryos of either mutants or the wild-type, although gene expressions of several candidate peroxidases were down-regulated in the embryos of PA-deficient seeds. Conclusions The results suggest that enhanced class III peroxidase activity in the seed coat of PA-deficient mutants is an adaptive strategy for seed development and survival. PMID:23448691

  18. Cyp35a2 gene expression is involved in toxicity of fenitrothion in the soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Roh, Ji-Yeon; Choi, Jinhee

    2011-09-01

    In this study, the effect of organophosphorous (OP) pesticide, fenitrothion (FT), on the non-target organism was investigated using the soil nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. Toxicity was investigated on multiple biological levels, from organism to molecular levels, such as, immoblity, growth, fertility, development, acetyl cholinesterase (AChE) activity and stress-response gene expressions. FT may provoke serious consequences on the C. elegans population, as it induced significant developmental disturbance. As expected, FT exposure inhibits AChE activity of C. elegans. The increased expression of the cytochrome p450 family protein 35A2 (cyp35a2) gene was also observed in FT exposed worms. To experimentally demonstrate the relationships between organism-level effects and the cyp35a2 gene expression in FT-exposed C. elegans, the integration of the gene expression with biochemical-, and organism level endpoints were attempted using a C. elegans cyp35a2 RNA interference (RNAi) and cyp35a2 mutant (gk317). The 24 h-EC50s of C. elegans on FT exposure were in the order of cyp35a2 RNAi in cyp35a2 mutant (gk317)>cyp35a2 mutant (gk317)>cyp35a2 RNAi in wildtype (N2)>wildtype (N2). The higher EC50 values of cyp35a2 RNAi and cyp35a2 mutant (gk317) compared to that of wildtype C. elegans strongly supported that cyp35a2 gene plays an important role in the toxicity of FT towards C. elegans. The experiments with cyp35a2 RNAi also indicated that the development disturbance and decreased AChE activity, which were observed in FT exposed wildtype C. elegans were significantly rescued in the cyp35a2 RNAi C. elegans. Overall results suggest that the cyp35a2 may be an important gene for exerting FT toxicity in C. elegans. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Engineering Ascorbate Peroxidase Activity Into Cytochrome C Peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Meharenna, Y.T.; Oertel, P.; Bhaskar, B.; Poulos, T.L.

    2009-05-26

    Cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) have very similar structures, and yet neither CCP nor APX exhibits each others activities with respect to reducing substrates. APX has a unique substrate binding site near the heme propionates where ascorbate H-bonds with a surface Arg and one heme propionate (Sharp et al. (2003) Nat. Struct. Biol. 10, 303--307). The corresponding region in CCP has a much longer surface loop, and the critical Arg residue that is required for ascorbate binding in APX is Asn in CCP. In order to convert CCP into an APX, the ascorbate-binding loop and critical arginine were engineered into CCP to give the CCP2APX mutant. The mutant crystal structure shows that the engineered site is nearly identical to that found in APX. While wild-type CCP shows no APX activity, CCP2APX catalyzes the peroxidation of ascorbate at a rate of {approx}12 min{sup -1}, indicating that the engineered ascorbate-binding loop can bind ascorbate.

  20. Local expression of CYP19A1 and CYP19A2 in developing and adult killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus)

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wu; Willett, Kristine L.

    2008-01-01

    P450 aromatase (CYP19) is the terminal enzyme in the steroidogenic pathway and catalyzes the conversion of androgens to estrogens. Fundulus heteroclitus like other teleosts, express two CYP19 genes, CYP19A1 and CYP19A2. The expression of CYP19s in Fundulus was measured by in situ hybridization throughout development. In 90 dpf (day post-fertilization) fish and adult fish, CYP19A1 was expressed in the ooplasm of early stage I oocytes (primary growth stage). Expression of CYP19A1 was localized in the follicle cell layer of late stage I (previtellogenic stage) and stage II (vitellogenic stage) follicles, but by stage III (early maturational follicles) CYP19A1 expression was localized in the vitelline envelope. Overall, CYP19A1 oocyte membrane expression gradually declined from highest expression at late stage I to nondetectable levels by stage IV. Highest expression of CYP19A2 was detected in the brain including the hypothalamus from 4, 6, 8, 10, 14 dpf embryos, 90 dpf fry fish and adult fish brain. In females compared to males, there was higher CYP19A2 expression in olfactory bulb. In addition to the brain, there was strong CYP19A2 signal in adrenal/kidney cells in 6-14 dpf embryos. This work establishes the localization and constitutive expression of CYP19s in Fundulus which can then be compared with potential disruption of CYP19A1 and CYP19A2 expression and physiological consequences caused by environmental contaminants. PMID:17582409

  1. A Tomato Peroxidase Involved in the Synthesis of Lignin and Suberin1

    PubMed Central

    Quiroga, Mónica; Guerrero, Consuelo; Botella, Miguel A.; Barceló, Araceli; Amaya, Iraida; Medina, María I.; Alonso, Francisco J.; de Forchetti, Silvia Milrad; Tigier, Horacio; Valpuesta, Victoriano

    2000-01-01

    The last step in the synthesis of lignin and suberin has been proposed to be catalyzed by peroxidases, although other proteins may also be involved. To determine which peroxidases are involved in the synthesis of lignin and suberin, five peroxidases from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) roots, representing the majority of the peroxidase activity in this organ, have been partially purified and characterized kinetically. The purified peroxidases with isoelectric point (pI) values of 3.6 and 9.6 showed the highest catalytic efficiency when the substrate used was syringaldazine, an analog of lignin monomer. Using a combination of transgenic expression and antibody recognition, we now show that the peroxidase pI 9.6 is probably encoded by TPX1, a tomato peroxidase gene we have previously isolated. In situ RNA hybridization revealed that TPX1 expression is restricted to cells undergoing synthesis of lignin and suberin. Salt stress has been reported to induce the synthesis of lignin and/or suberin. This stress applied to tomato caused changes in the expression pattern of TPX1 and induced the TPX1 protein. We propose that the TPX1 product is involved in the synthesis of lignin and suberin. PMID:10759507

  2. The consequence of peroxidase overexpression in transgenic plants on root growth and development.

    PubMed

    Lagrimini, L M; Joly, R J; Dunlap, J R; Liu, T T

    1997-03-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants that overproduce the tobacco anionic peroxidase wilt upon reaching maturity, although having functional stomata and normal vascular anatomy and physiology. These plants were examined further to determine the cause for wilting, and thus better understand how the anionic peroxidase functions in plant growth and development. Shoots from young peroxidase overproducing plants were grafted onto wild-type tobacco root stock to determine if the roots could absorb and transmit sufficient water to maintain leaf turgidity. These grafted plants never wilted when grown in the greenhouse though shoot peroxidase activity remained ten-fold greater than in control plants, thus indicating that wilting is a consequence of peroxidase expression in the roots. Close examination of root systems revealed considerably less root mass in the transformed plant, primarily exhibited through a decrease in branching. At flowering, root growth rate and total root mass in transformed plants were less than 50% of control plants although shoot mass and growth rate were unchanged. This is in contrast to root growth in young seedlings where transformed plants performed equivalently to controls. Root hydraulic conductivity was measured to evaluate the effect of elevated peroxidase expression on water absorption and transport; however, no significant change in hydraulic conductivity was found in transformed plants. The consequence of anionic peroxidase overexpression on indoleacetic acid (IAA) metabolism was also examined. No significant difference in IAA levels was observed; however, root elongation in plants overexpressing peroxidase was insensitive to exogenous IAA. It can be concluded that the overexpression of the tobacco anionic peroxidase in transformed plants results in diminished root mass from fewer root branches, which contributes to the wilting phenomenon seen in these plants. Further, this developmental change in transformed plants may be a consequence of the

  3. Enzymatic activity and proteomic profile of class III peroxidases during sugarcane stem development.

    PubMed

    Cesarino, Igor; Araújo, Pedro; Sampaio Mayer, Juliana Lischka; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2012-06-01

    Class III peroxidases are present as large multigene families in all land plants. This large number of genes together with the diversity of processes catalyzed by peroxidases suggests possible functional specialization of each isoform. However, assigning a precise role for each individual peroxidase gene has continued to be a major bottleneck. Here we investigated the enzyme activity and translational profile of class III peroxidases during stem development of sugarcane as a first step in the estimation of physiological functions of individual isoenzymes. Internodes at three different developmental stages (young, developing and mature) were divided into pith (inner tissue) and rind (outer tissue) fractions. The rind of mature internodes presented the highest enzymatic activity and thus could be considered the ideal tissue for the discovery of peroxidase gene function. In addition, activity staining of 2DE gels revealed different isoperoxidase profiles and protein expression regulation among different tissue fractions. In-gel tryptic digestion of excised spots followed by peptide sequencing by LC-MS/MS positively matched uncharacterized peroxidases in the sugarcane database SUCEST. Multiple spots matching the same peroxidase gene were found, which reflects the generation of more than one isoform from a particular gene by post-translational modifications. The identified sugarcane peroxidases appear to be monocot-specific sequences with no clear ortholog in dicot model plant Arabidopsis thaliana.

  4. Characterization of a catalase-peroxidase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus.

    PubMed

    Kengen, S W; Bikker, F J; Hagen, W R; de Vos, W M; van der Oost, J

    2001-10-01

    A putative perA gene from Archaeoglobus fulgidus was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3), and the recombinant catalase-peroxidase was purified to homogeneity. The enzyme is a homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of 85 kDa. UV-visible spectroscopic analysis indicated the presence of protoheme IX as a prosthetic group (ferric heme), in a stoichiometry of 0.25 heme per subunit. Electron paramagnetic resonance analysis confirmed the presence of ferric heme and identified the proximal axial ligand as a histidine. The enzyme showed both catalase and peroxidase activity with pH optima of 6.0 and 4.5, respectively. Optimal temperatures of 70 degrees C and 80 degrees C were found for the catalase and peroxidase activity, respectively. The catalase activity strongly exceeded the peroxidase activity, with Vmax values of 9600 and 36 U mg(-1), respectively. Km values for H2O2 of 8.6 and 0.85 mM were found for catalase and peroxidase, respectively. Common heme inhibitors such as cyanide, azide, and hydroxylamine inhibited peroxidase activity. However, unlike all other catalase-peroxidases, the enzyme was also inhibited by 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. Although the enzyme exhibited a high thermostability, rapid inactivation occurred in the presence of H2O2, with half-life values of less than 1 min. This is the first catalase-peroxidase characterized from a hyperthermophilic microorganism.

  5. Overexpressed Ly-6A.2 mediates cell-cell adhesion by binding a ligand expressed on lymphoid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bamezai, A; Rock, K L

    1995-01-01

    The Ly-6 locus encodes several cell surface proteins whose functions are unknown. Although it is hypothesized that these proteins may be receptors, there is no direct evidence that they bind a ligand. Herein we present evidence that Ly-6A.2, a Ly-6 protein expressed on T lymphocytes, binds a ligand expressed on normal thymocytes and splenic B and T cells. We find that transgenic thymocytes that overexpress Ly-6A.2 spontaneously aggregate in culture. This homotypic adhesion requires the overexpression of Ly-6A.2 because it is not observed in cultures of nontransgenic thymocytes. The aggregation of Ly-6A.2 transgenic thymocytes is inhibited by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (which removes Ly-6A.2 and other glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins from the membrane). Some anti-Ly-6A.2 monoclonal antibodies, including nonactivating ones and Fab' fragments, inhibit this aggregation. In contrast, other anti-Ly-6A.2 monoclonal antibodies increase the aggregation of transgenic but not nontransgenic thymocytes. To further examine whether Ly-6A.2 mediates adhesion (versus inducing another adhesion pathway) reaggregation assays were performed with paraformaldehyde-fixed Tg+ thymocytes. Paraformaldehyde-fixed Tg+ thymocytes reaggregate in culture and this aggregation is also blocked by phosphatidyl-inositol-specific phospholipase C and anti-Ly-6A.2 monoclonal antibodies. These results indicate that the homotypic adhesion of cultured Ly-6A.2 transgenic thymocytes is directly mediated by Ly-6A.2 and, more importantly, strongly suggests that Ly-6A.2 binds a ligand that is expressed on thymocytes. Tg+ thymocytes also bind to nontransgenic thymocytes, B cells, and T cells, indicating that normal cells naturally express the Ly-6A.2 ligand. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7753800

  6. Increased PCP removal by Amylomyces rouxii transformants with heterologous Phanerochaete chrysosporium peroxidases supplementing their natural degradative pathway.

    PubMed

    Montiel-González, A M; Fernández, F J; Keer, N; Tomasini, A

    2009-08-01

    Fungal peroxidases and phenoloxidases are widely used in aromatic toxic compounds degradation. Peroxidases, such as lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase, as well as laccases are mainly produced by basidiomycetes and to a lower extent by other fungi, such as ascomycetes. Peroxidase-encoding genes have been described and homologous expression has been achieved in basidiomycetes. Heterologous expression has also been achieved in some non-producing peroxidase ascomycetes, like Penicillium and Aspergillus. In this work, heterologous expression of peroxidase-encoding genes, lignin peroxidase, and manganese peroxidase was achieved in a zygomycete producing only phenoloxidases (Amylomyces rouxii), aimed at coupling two different pathways used in nature for PCP removal in only one microbial strain. The ability of PCP removal was assayed with one of the obtained transformants, resulting in increased activity with respect to the ability of the parental strain cultured free of the inducer tyrosine (95% and 45%, respectively, of the initial PCP (12.5 mg L(-1)) in 120 h, or 100% and 49%, respectively, of the initial PCP after 144 h of liquid culture).

  7. Evidence for peroxidase activity in Caralluma umbellata.

    PubMed

    Achar, Raghu Ram; Venkatesh, B K; Sharanappa, P; Priya, B S; Swamy, S Nanjunda

    2014-08-01

    Vast applications of peroxidases create an increasing demand to characterize peroxidases from new sources with more applicability potential. The aim of the present study was to check the presence of peroxidase activity from Caralluma umbellata. This is the first report on the C. umbellata peroxidase (CUP). The presence of peroxidase was revealed by the histochemical analysis of the stem sections, zymographic studies, and in vitro peroxidase activity assay using various reducing substrates viz., 2, 2'-azinobis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), guaiacol, o-dianisidine, and ferulic acid. The band pattern in zymogram confirms that CUP has a molecular weight less than that of horseradish peroxidase (44 kDa). Comparative evaluation of peroxidase activity of CUP with respect to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) indicates that CUP catalyzes ABTS and ferulic acid in a similar pattern as HRP but with guaiacol, the extent of catalysis shown by CUP over HRP is high. The standard inhibitors sodium azide and sodium meta bisulphite inhibited CUP activity in a dose dependent manner.

  8. Catalase and glutathione peroxidase mimics

    PubMed Central

    Day, Brian J.

    2009-01-01

    Overproduction of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) superoxide (O2−) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are increasingly implicated in human disease and aging. ROS are also being explored as important modulating agents in a number of cell signaling pathways. Earlier work has focused on development of small catalytic scavengers of O2−, commonly referred to as superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetics. Many of these compounds also have substantial abilities to catalytically scavenge H2O2 and peroxynitrite (ONOO−). Peroxides have been increasingly shown to disrupt cell signaling cascades associated with excessive inflammation associated with a wide variety of human diseases. Early studies with enzymatic scavengers like SOD frequently reported little or no beneficial effect in biologic models unless SOD was combined with catalase or a peroxidase. Increasing attention has been devoted to developing catalase or peroxidase mimetics as a way to treat overt inflammation associated with the pathophysiology of many human disorders. This review will focus on recent development of catalytic scavengers of peroxides and their potential use as therapeutic agents for pulmonary, cardiovascular, neurodegenerative and inflammatory disorders. PMID:18948086

  9. DyP-type peroxidases comprise a novel heme peroxidase family.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Y

    2009-04-01

    Dye-decolorizing peroxidase (DyP) is produced by a basidiomycete (Thanatephorus cucumeris Dec 1) and is a member of a novel heme peroxidase family (DyP-type peroxidase family) that appears to be distinct from general peroxidases. Thus far, 80 putative members of this family have been registered in the PeroxiBase database (http://peroxibase.isbsib.ch/) and more than 400 homologous proteins have been detected via PSI-BLAST search. Although few studies have characterized the function and structure of these proteins, they appear to be bifunctional enzymes with hydrolase or oxygenase, as well as typical peroxidase activities. DyP-type peroxidase family suggests an ancient root compared with other general peroxidases because of their widespread distribution in the living world. In this review, firstly, an outline of the characteristics of DyP from T. cucumeris is presented and then interesting characteristics of the DyP-type peroxidase family are discussed.

  10. Towards uncovering the roles of switchgrass peroxidases in plant processes

    PubMed Central

    Saathoff, Aaron J.; Donze, Teresa; Palmer, Nathan A.; Bradshaw, Jeff; Heng-Moss, Tiffany; Twigg, Paul; Tobias, Christian M.; Lagrimini, Mark; Sarath, Gautam

    2013-01-01

    Herbaceous perennial plants selected as potential biofuel feedstocks had been understudied at the genomic and functional genomic levels. Recent investments, primarily by the U.S. Department of Energy, have led to the development of a number of molecular resources for bioenergy grasses, such as the partially annotated genome for switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), and some related diploid species. In its current version, the switchgrass genome contains 65,878 gene models arising from the A and B genomes of this tetraploid grass. The availability of these gene sequences provides a framework to exploit transcriptomic data obtained from next-generation sequencing platforms to address questions of biological importance. One such question pertains to discovery of genes and proteins important for biotic and abiotic stress responses, and how these components might affect biomass quality and stress response in plants engineered for a specific end purpose. It can be expected that production of switchgrass on marginal lands will expose plants to diverse stresses, including herbivory by insects. Class III plant peroxidases have been implicated in many developmental responses such as lignification and in the adaptive responses of plants to insect feeding. Here, we have analyzed the class III peroxidases encoded by the switchgrass genome, and have mined available transcriptomic datasets to develop a first understanding of the expression profiles of the class III peroxidases in different plant tissues. Lastly, we have identified switchgrass peroxidases that appear to be orthologs of enzymes shown to play key roles in lignification and plant defense responses to hemipterans. PMID:23802005

  11. Nitrogen regulation of lignin peroxidase gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Li, D; Alic, M; Gold, M H

    1994-01-01

    Western blot (immunoblot) analysis with a polyclonal antibody to lignin peroxidase (LiP) isozyme H8 from the white rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium demonstrates that LiP protein is detectable in the extracellular media of 5- and 6-day-old nitrogen-limited, but not nitrogen-sufficient, cultures. Northern (RNA) blot analysis demonstrates that lip mRNA is detectable from 5- and 6-day old cells grown in nitrogen-limited, but not nitrogen-sufficient, cultures. These results indicate that LiP expression is regulated at the level of gene transcription by nutrient nitrogen. Since lignin degradation by P. chrysosporium is derepressed by nitrogen starvation, it appears that lignin degradation and LiP expression are coordinately regulated in this organism. These results contradict a recent report which concluded that LiP protein expression is not regulated by nutrient nitrogen (C. G. Johnston and S. D. Aust, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 200:108-112, 1994). Images PMID:7944376

  12. Redundancy among Manganese Peroxidases in Pleurotus ostreatus

    PubMed Central

    Salame, Tomer M.; Knop, Doriv; Levinson, Dana; Yarden, Oded

    2013-01-01

    Manganese peroxidases (MnPs) are key players in the ligninolytic system of white rot fungi. In Pleurotus ostreatus (the oyster mushroom) these enzymes are encoded by a gene family comprising nine members, mnp1 to -9 (mnp genes). Mn2+ amendment to P. ostreatus cultures results in enhanced degradation of recalcitrant compounds (such as the azo dye orange II) and lignin. In Mn2+-amended glucose-peptone medium, mnp3, mnp4, and mnp9 were the most highly expressed mnp genes. After 7 days of incubation, the time point at which the greatest capacity for orange II decolorization was observed, mnp3 expression and the presence of MnP3 in the extracellular culture fluids were predominant. To determine the significance of MnP3 for ligninolytic functionality in Mn2+-sufficient cultures, mnp3 was inactivated via the Δku80 strain-based P. ostreatus gene-targeting system. In Mn2+-sufficient medium, inactivation of mnp3 did not significantly affect expression of nontargeted MnPs or their genes, nor did it considerably diminish the fungal Mn2+-mediated orange II decolorization capacity, despite the significant reduction in total MnP activity. Similarly, inactivation of either mnp4 or mnp9 did not affect orange II decolorization ability. These results indicate functional redundancy within the P. ostreatus MnP gene family, enabling compensation upon deficiency of one of its members. PMID:23377936

  13. Redundancy among manganese peroxidases in Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Salame, Tomer M; Knop, Doriv; Levinson, Dana; Yarden, Oded; Hadar, Yitzhak

    2013-04-01

    Manganese peroxidases (MnPs) are key players in the ligninolytic system of white rot fungi. In Pleurotus ostreatus (the oyster mushroom) these enzymes are encoded by a gene family comprising nine members, mnp1 to -9 (mnp genes). Mn(2+) amendment to P. ostreatus cultures results in enhanced degradation of recalcitrant compounds (such as the azo dye orange II) and lignin. In Mn(2+)-amended glucose-peptone medium, mnp3, mnp4, and mnp9 were the most highly expressed mnp genes. After 7 days of incubation, the time point at which the greatest capacity for orange II decolorization was observed, mnp3 expression and the presence of MnP3 in the extracellular culture fluids were predominant. To determine the significance of MnP3 for ligninolytic functionality in Mn(2+)-sufficient cultures, mnp3 was inactivated via the Δku80 strain-based P. ostreatus gene-targeting system. In Mn(2+)-sufficient medium, inactivation of mnp3 did not significantly affect expression of nontargeted MnPs or their genes, nor did it considerably diminish the fungal Mn(2+)-mediated orange II decolorization capacity, despite the significant reduction in total MnP activity. Similarly, inactivation of either mnp4 or mnp9 did not affect orange II decolorization ability. These results indicate functional redundancy within the P. ostreatus MnP gene family, enabling compensation upon deficiency of one of its members.

  14. Cloning and recombinant expression of a novel mouse-secreted phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Valentin, E; Koduri, R S; Scimeca, J C; Carle, G; Gelb, M H; Lazdunski, M; Lambeau, G

    1999-07-02

    Secreted phospholipases A2 (sPLA2s) form a class of structurally related enzymes that are involved in a variety of physiological and pathological effects including inflammation and associated diseases, cell proliferation, cell adhesion, and cancer, and are now known to bind to specific membrane receptors. Here, we report the cloning and expression of a novel sPLA2 isolated from mouse thymus. Based on its structural features, this sPLA2 is most similar to the previously cloned mouse group IIA sPLA2 (mGIIA sPLA2). As for mGIIA sPLA2, the novel sPLA2 is made up of 125 amino acids with 14 cysteines, is basic (pI = 8.71) and its gene has been mapped to mouse chromosome 4. However, the novel sPLA2 has only 48% identity with mGIIA and displays similar levels of identity with the other mouse group IIC and V sPLA2s, indicating that the novel sPLA2 is not an isoform of mGIIA sPLA2. This novel sPLA2 has thus been called mouse group IID (mGIID) sPLA2. In further contrast with mGIIA, which is found mainly in intestine, transcripts coding for mGIID sPLA2 are found in several tissues including pancreas, spleen, thymus, skin, lung, and ovary, suggesting distinct functions for the two enzymes. Recombinant expression of mGIID sPLA2 in Escherichia coli indicates that the cloned sPLA2 is an active enzyme that has much lower specific activity than mGIIA and displays a distinct specificity for binding to various phospholipid vesicles. Finally, recombinant mGIID sPLA2 did not bind to the mouse M-type sPLA2 receptor, while mGIIA was previously found to bind to this receptor with high affinity.

  15. Turning points in the evolution of peroxidase-catalase superfamily: molecular phylogeny of hybrid heme peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Zámocký, Marcel; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2014-12-01

    Heme peroxidases and catalases are key enzymes of hydrogen peroxide metabolism and signaling. Here, the reconstruction of the molecular evolution of the peroxidase-catalase superfamily (annotated in pfam as PF00141) based on experimentally verified as well as numerous newly available genomic sequences is presented. The robust phylogenetic tree of this large enzyme superfamily was obtained from 490 full-length protein sequences. Besides already well-known families of heme b peroxidases arranged in three main structural classes, completely new (hybrid type) peroxidase families are described being located at the border of these classes as well as forming (so far missing) links between them. Hybrid-type A peroxidases represent a minor eukaryotic subfamily from Excavates, Stramenopiles and Rhizaria sharing enzymatic and structural features of ascorbate and cytochrome c peroxidases. Hybrid-type B peroxidases are shown to be spread exclusively among various fungi and evolved in parallel with peroxidases in land plants. In some ascomycetous hybrid-type B peroxidases, the peroxidase domain is fused to a carbohydrate binding (WSC) domain. Both here described hybrid-type peroxidase families represent important turning points in the complex evolution of the whole peroxidase-catalase superfamily. We present and discuss their phylogeny, sequence signatures and putative biological function.

  16. Properties of a novel periplasmic catalase-peroxidase from Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Varnado, Cornelius L; Hertwig, Kristen M; Thomas, Robert; Roberts, J Kenneth; Goodwin, Douglas C

    2004-01-01

    A subset of catalase-peroxidases are distinguished by their periplasmic location and their expression by pathogens. Kinetic and spectral properties have not been reported for any of these enzymes. We report the cloning, expression, isolation, and characterization of KatP, a periplasmic catalase-peroxidase from Escherichia coli O157:H7. Absorption spectra indicated a mixture of heme states dominated by the pentacoordinate and hexacoordinate high-spin forms. Apparent k(cat) values for catalase (1.8x10(4) s(-1)) and peroxidase (77 s(-1)) activities were greater than those of other catalase-peroxidases. However, apparent K(M) values for H2O2 were also higher (27 mM for catalase and 3 mM for peroxidase). Ferric KatP reacted with peracetic acid to form compound I (8.8x10(3) M(-1) s(-1)) and with CN(-) to form a ferri-cyano complex (3.9x10(5) M(-1) s(-1)) consistent with other catalase-peroxidases. The isolation and characterization of KatP opens new avenues to explore mechanisms by which the periplasmic catalase-peroxidases may contribute to bacterial virulence.

  17. Role of Site-Specific N-Glycans Expressed on GluA2 in the Regulation of Cell Surface Expression of AMPA-Type Glutamate Receptors.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Yusuke; Morise, Jyoji; Morita, Ippei; Takematsu, Hiromu; Oka, Shogo

    2015-01-01

    The AMPA-type glutamate receptor (AMPAR), which is a tetrameric complex composed of four subunits (GluA1-4) with several combinations, mediates the majority of rapid excitatory synaptic transmissions in the nervous system. Cell surface expression levels of AMPAR modulate synaptic plasticity, which is considered one of the molecular bases for learning and memory formation. To date, a unique trisaccharide (HSO3-3GlcAβ1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc), human natural killer-1 (HNK-1) carbohydrate, was found expressed specifically on N-linked glycans of GluA2 and regulated the cell surface expression of AMPAR and the spine maturation process. However, evidence that the HNK-1 epitope on N-glycans of GluA2 directly affects these phenomena is lacking. Moreover, it is thought that other N-glycans on GluA2 also have potential roles in the regulation of AMPAR functions. In the present study, using a series of mutants lacking potential N-glycosylation sites (N256, N370, N406, and N413) within GluA2, we demonstrated that the mutant lacking the N-glycan at N370 strongly suppressed the intracellular trafficking of GluA2 from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in HEK293 cells. Cell surface expression of GluA1, which is a major subunit of AMPAR in neurons, was also suppressed by co-expression of the GluA2 N370S mutant. The N370S mutant and wild-type GluA2 were co-immunoprecipitated with GluA1, suggesting that N370S was properly associated with GluA1. Moreover, we found that N413 was the main potential site of the HNK-1 epitope that promoted the interaction of GluA2 with N-cadherin, resulting in enhanced cell surface expression of GluA2. The HNK-1 epitope on N-glycan at the N413 of GluA2 was also involved in the cell surface expression of GluA1. Thus, our data suggested that site-specific N-glycans on GluA2 regulate the intracellular trafficking and cell surface expression of AMPAR.

  18. Molecular Imaging and Quantitation of EphA2 Expression in Xenograft Models with 89Zr-DS-8895a.

    PubMed

    Burvenich, Ingrid J G; Parakh, Sagun; Gan, Hui K; Lee, Fook-Thean; Guo, Nancy; Rigopoulos, Angela; Lee, Sze-Ting; Gong, Sylvia; O'Keefe, Graeme J; Tochon-Danguy, Henri; Kotsuma, Masakatsu; Hasegawa, Jun; Senaldi, Giorgio; Scott, Andrew M

    2016-06-01

    Subtype A2 of the erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular tyrosine kinase (EphA2) cell surface receptor is expressed in a range of epithelial cancers. This study evaluated the molecular imaging of EphA2 expression in vivo in mouse tumor models using SPECT/MR and PET/MR and a humanized anti-EphA2 antibody, DS-8895a. DS-8895a was labeled with (111)In, (125)I, and (89)Zr and assessed for radiochemical purity, immunoreactivity (Lindmo analysis), antigen-binding affinity (Scatchard analysis), and serum stability in vitro. In vivo biodistribution, imaging, and pharmacokinetic studies were performed with SPECT/MR and PET/MR. A dose-escalation study was also performed to determine EphA2 receptor saturability through tissue and imaging quantitative analysis. All conjugates demonstrated good serum stability and specific binding to EphA2-expressing cells in vitro. In vivo biodistribution studies showed high uptake of (111)In-CHX-A″-DTPA-DS-8895a and (89)Zr-Df-Bz-NCS-DS-8895a in EphA2-expressing xenograft models, with no specific uptake in normal tissues. In comparison, retention of (125)I-DS-8895a in tumors was lower because of internalization of the radioconjugate and dehalogenation. These results were confirmed by SPECT/MR and PET/MR. EphA2 receptor saturation was observed at the 30 mg/kg dose. Molecular imaging of tumor uptake of DS-8895a allows noninvasive measurement of EphA2 expression in tumors in vivo and determination of receptor saturation. (89)Zr-Df-Bz-NCS-DS-8895a is suited for human bioimaging trials on the basis of superior imaging characteristics and will inform DS-8895a dose assessment and patient response evaluation in clinical trials. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  19. Somatic Mutation of the SNP rs11614913 and Its Association with Increased MIR 196A2 Expression in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huanhuan; Xu, Jingman; Zhao, Dan; Geng, Meijuan; Ge, Haize; Fu, Li; Zhu, Zhengmao

    2016-02-01

    Common genetic variants (single-nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) in microRNA genes may alter their maturation or expression, resulting in varied functional consequences. Several studies have evaluated the association between the SNP rs11614913 and cancer risk in diverse populations and in a range of cancers, with contradictory outcomes. In this study, we examined 114 paired samples (tumor and normal tissues) from breast cancer patients to study the genotype distribution and somatic mutation of the SNP in MIR 196A2 (rs11614913 C-T). In addition, we evaluated their influence on the mature MIR 196A2 expression. We found that 14% (16/114) of tumors underwent somatic mutation of the SNP rs11614913. Moreover, the CT heterozygous and the CC homozygous states of SNP rs11614913 were more prone to mutation, while the TT homozygous state appeared to be resistant. We further detected a significant increase (p = 0.002) in mature MIR 196A2 expression in breast cancer. In particular, we found a significant association between the occurrence of SNP rs11614913 mutation and high expression (p = 0.0002). In addition, the mature MIR 196A2 expression level was significantly associated with the higher tumor grade (p = 0.004). Taken together, our results seem to demonstrate that somatic mutation of SNP rs11614913 in MIR 196A2 can have an influence on its expression. In addition, it indicated that an unknown mechanism is responsible for both the mutation of SNP rs11614913 and the dysregulation of mature MIR 196A2 expression.

  20. Identification and properties of insect resistance-associated maize anionic peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Dowd, Patrick F; Johnson, Eric T; Pinkerton, T Scott

    2010-08-01

    Previous studies with transgenic plants have indicated a tobacco anionic peroxidase can confer enhanced resistance to a variety of insects when expressed in different plant species. Tissue that expresses high levels of this enzyme often browns rapidly when damaged. Maize roots damaged under sterile conditions browned and had an anionic peroxidase induced. When introduced biolistically, maize callus transformants expressing a maize peroxidase gene with a predicted isoelectric point of ca. 5.1 produced browner callus compared to a corresponding beta-glucuronidase (GUS) transformant as callus aged. Higher production of only one isozyme of ca. pI 4.5 was noted. When the callus was fed to two maize pest caterpillar species, growth rates were slower (as reflected by weights) relative to the GUS callus. Based on examination of published information and electrophoretic properties, this gene appears to code for Px11, a peroxidase isozyme that is primarily produced in root tissue and callus. When sequence of the gene in several inbreds was examined, coding variations were noted, and abilities to utilize ferulic and p-coumaric acids differed. These coding differences may influence the ability of corresponding forms of the peroxidase to promote resistance. In addition to potential use in marker assisted breeding, enhanced expression of this anionic peroxidase through breeding or genetic engineering may lead to enhanced insect or disease resistance. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Studies on the refolding process of recombinant horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Asad, Sedigheh; Dabirmanesh, Bahareh; Ghaemi, Nasser; Etezad, Seyed Masoud; Khajeh, Khosro

    2013-06-01

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is an important heme-containing glyco-enzyme that has been used in many biotechnological fields. Valuable proteins like HRP can be obtained in sufficient amounts using Escherichia coli as an expression system. However, frequently, the expression of recombinant enzyme results in inclusion bodies, and the refolding yield is generally low for proteins such as plant peroxidases. In this study, a recombinant HRP was cloned and expressed in the form of inclusion bodies. Initially, the influence of few additives on HRP refolding was assessed by the one factor at a time method. Subsequently, factors with significant effects including glycerol, GSSG/DTT, and the enzyme concentration were selected for further optimization by means of the central composite design of response surface methodology (RSM). Under the obtained optimal condition, refolding increased about twofold. The refolding process was then monitored by the intrinsic fluorescence intensity under optimal conditions (0.35 mM GSSG, 0.044 mM DTT, 7 % glycerol, 1.7 M urea, and 2 mM CaCl2 in 20 mM Tris, pH 8.5) and the reconstitution of heme to the refolded peroxidase was detected by the Soret absorbance. Additionally, samples under unfolding and refolding conditions were analyzed by Zetasizer to determine size distribution in different media.

  2. Lignin degradation by a white-rot fungus lacking lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Eggert, C.B.; Eriksson, K.E.L.

    1996-10-01

    Phanerochaete chrysosporium has been the organism of choice for studies of lignin degradation and much of this work has focused on two phenol oxidases, lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP), secreted by the fungus under ligninolytic conditions. However, many white-rot fungi, including a number of aggressive lignin degraders, seem to operate without expressing LiP activity. Laccase is another phenol oxidase that white-rot fungi often produce. However, the role played by laccase in lignin degradation has remained obscured since its low redox potential appeared to make it incapable of oxidizing non-phenolic lignin constituents. We have identified, Pychnoporus cinnabarinus lacking both LiP and MnP, but a high producer of laccase, to degrade lignin as efficiently as UP producing fungi. We have found that P. cinnabarinus, to overcome the redox potential barrier for laccase, produces a mediator for oxidation of non-phenolic lignin structures. This is the first description of how laccase may be used in a biological system for the degradation of lignin.

  3. Peroxidase catalyzed polymerization of phenol

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevan, P.T.; Li, L.O.

    1996-07-01

    The effect of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations on the removal efficiency of phenol, defined as the percentage of phenol removed from solution as a function of time, has been investigated. When phenol and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} react with an approximately one-to-one stoichiometry, the phenol is almost completely precipitated within 10 min. The reaction is inhibited at higher concentrations of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The removal efficiency increases with an increase in the concentration of HRP, but an increase in the time of treatment cannot be used to offset the reduction in removal efficiency at low concentrations of the enzyme, because of inactivation of the enzyme. One molecule of HRP is needed to remove approximately 1100 molecules of phenol when the reaction is conducted at pH 8.0 and at ambient temperature. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Dissecting striatal adenosine-cannabinoid receptor interactions. New clues from rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Ferré, Sergi; Sebastião, Ana Maria

    2016-03-01

    This Editorial highlights a study by Chiodi et al. () showing that the effects mediated by cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) activation in the striatum are significantly reduced in rats with neuronal over-expression of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). Two hypotheses are derived from that study. Hypothesis A: two subpopulations of pre-synaptic CB1R in corticostriatal glutamatergic terminals exist, one forming and another not forming heteromers with A2AR. Hypothesis B: CB1R are predominantly forming heteromers with A2AR. In the case of hypothesis A, the A2AR might be required for CB1R-A2AR heteromeric signaling, whereas non-heteromeric CB1R activity is inhibited by A2ARs. In the case of hypothesis B, up-regulation of A2ARs may perturb heteromeric stoichiometry, thus reducing CB1R functioning. In any case, pre-synaptic striatal A2AR-CB1R heteromers emerge as important targets of the effects of cannabinoids demonstrated at the neuronal and behavioral level. Read the highlighted article 'Striatal adenosine-cannabinoid receptor interactions in rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors' on page 907. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  5. Actinobacterial peroxidases: an unexplored resource for biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    le Roes-Hill, Marilize; Khan, Nuraan; Burton, Stephanie Gail

    2011-07-01

    Peroxidases are redox enzymes that can be found in all forms of life where they play diverse roles. It is therefore not surprising that they can also be applied in a wide range of industrial applications. Peroxidases have been extensively studied with particular emphasis on those isolated from fungi and plants. In general, peroxidases can be grouped into haem-containing and non-haem-containing peroxidases, each containing protein families that share sequence similarity. The order Actinomycetales comprises a large group of bacteria that are often exploited for their diverse metabolic capabilities, and with recent increases in the number of sequenced genomes, it has become clear that this metabolically diverse group of organisms also represents a large resource for redox enzymes. It is therefore surprising that, to date, no review article has been written on the wide range of peroxidases found within the actinobacteria. In this review article, we focus on the different types of peroxidases found in actinobacteria, their natural role in these organisms and how they compare with the more well-described peroxidases. Finally, we also focus on work remaining to be done in this research field in order for peroxidases from actinobacteria to be applied in industrial processes.

  6. Independent evolution of four heme peroxidase superfamilies.

    PubMed

    Zámocký, Marcel; Hofbauer, Stefan; Schaffner, Irene; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Nicolussi, Andrea; Soudi, Monika; Pirker, Katharina F; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2015-05-15

    Four heme peroxidase superfamilies (peroxidase-catalase, peroxidase-cyclooxygenase, peroxidase-chlorite dismutase and peroxidase-peroxygenase superfamily) arose independently during evolution, which differ in overall fold, active site architecture and enzymatic activities. The redox cofactor is heme b or posttranslationally modified heme that is ligated by either histidine or cysteine. Heme peroxidases are found in all kingdoms of life and typically catalyze the one- and two-electron oxidation of a myriad of organic and inorganic substrates. In addition to this peroxidatic activity distinct (sub)families show pronounced catalase, cyclooxygenase, chlorite dismutase or peroxygenase activities. Here we describe the phylogeny of these four superfamilies and present the most important sequence signatures and active site architectures. The classification of families is described as well as important turning points in evolution. We show that at least three heme peroxidase superfamilies have ancient prokaryotic roots with several alternative ways of divergent evolution. In later evolutionary steps, they almost always produced highly evolved and specialized clades of peroxidases in eukaryotic kingdoms with a significant portion of such genes involved in coding various fusion proteins with novel physiological functions.

  7. Role of fungal peroxidases in biological ligninolysis

    Treesearch

    Kenneth E. Hammel; Dan Cullen

    2008-01-01

    The degradation of lignin by filamentous fungi is a major route for the recycling of photosynthetically fixed carbon, and the oxidative mechanisms employed have potential biotechnological applications. The lignin peroxidases (LiPs), manganese peroxidases (MnPs), and closely related enzymes of white rot basidiomycetes are likely contributors to fungal ligninolysis. Many...

  8. Lignin peroxidase functionalities and prospective applications.

    PubMed

    Falade, Ayodeji O; Nwodo, Uchechukwu U; Iweriebor, Benson C; Green, Ezekiel; Mabinya, Leonard V; Okoh, Anthony I

    2017-02-01

    Ligninolytic extracellular enzymes, including lignin peroxidase, are topical owing to their high redox potential and prospective industrial applications. The prospective applications of lignin peroxidase span through sectors such as biorefinery, textile, energy, bioremediation, cosmetology, and dermatology industries. The litany of potentials attributed to lignin peroxidase is occasioned by its versatility in the degradation of xenobiotics and compounds with both phenolic and non-phenolic constituents. Over the years, ligninolytic enzymes have been studied however; research on lignin peroxidase seems to have been lagging when compared to other ligninolytic enzymes which are extracellular in nature including laccase and manganese peroxidase. This assertion becomes more pronounced when the application of lignin peroxidase is put into perspective. Consequently, a succinct documentation of the contemporary functionalities of lignin peroxidase and, some prospective applications of futuristic relevance has been advanced in this review. Some articulated applications include delignification of feedstock for ethanol production, textile effluent treatment and dye decolourization, coal depolymerization, treatment of hyperpigmentation, and skin-lightening through melanin oxidation. Prospective application of lignin peroxidase in skin-lightening functions through novel mechanisms, hence, it holds high value for the cosmetics sector where it may serve as suitable alternative to hydroquinone; a potent skin-lightening agent whose safety has generated lots of controversy and concern. © 2016 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. (Characterization of lignin peroxidases from Phanerochaete)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-14

    Work has continued on characterizing the kinetics of lignin peroxidases and has now expanded to include the chemistry of Mn peroxidases. Progress in these two area in addition to the authors work on the molecular biology of lignin biodegradation is briefly described below. Copies of two reprints and one preprint which have resulted from the work are attached.

  10. Regulation of Tissue Factor Gene Expression in Monocytes and Endothelial Cells: Thromboxane A2 as a New Player

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Michael; Mackman, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is the primary activator of the coagulation cascade. Under normal conditions, endothelial cells (ECs) and blood cells, such as monocytes, do not express TF. However, bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces TF expression in monocytes and this leads to disseminated intravascular coagulation during endotoxemia and sepsis. A variety of stimuli induce TF expression in ECs in vitro, although it is unclear how much TF is expressed by the endothelium in vivo. LPS induction of TF gene expression in monocytic cells and ECs is mediated by various intracellular signaling pathways and the transcription factors NF-κB, AP-1 and Egr-1. In contrast, vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) induces TF gene expression in ECs via the transcription factors NFAT and Egr-1. Similarly, oxidized phospholipids (oxPAPC) induce TF expression in ECs and possibly monocytes via NFAT and Egr-1. Thromboxane (TX) A2 can now be added to the list of stimuli that induce TF gene expression in both monocytes and ECs. Interestingly, inhibition of the TX-prostanoid (TP) receptor also reduces TF expression in ECs stimulated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and monocytes stimulated with LPS, which suggests that TP receptor antagonist may be useful in reducing pathologic TF expression in the vasculature. PMID:24858575

  11. A new versatile peroxidase from Pleurotus.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Dueñas, F J; Camarero, S; Pérez-Boada, M; Martínez, M J; Martínez, A T

    2001-05-01

    Lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP) have been investigated in Phanerochaete chrysosporium. A third ligninolytic peroxidase has been described in Pleurotus and Bjerkandera. Two of these versatile peroxidases (VPs) have been cloned, sequenced and characterized. They have high affinity for Mn(2+), hydroquinones and dyes, and also oxidize veratryl alcohol, dimethoxybenzene and lignin dimers. The deduced sequences show higher identity with Ph. chrysosporium LiP than MnP, but the molecular models obtained include a Mn(2+)-binding site. Concerning aromatic substrate oxidation, Pl. eryngii VP shows a putative long-range electron transfer pathway from an exposed trytophan to haem. Mutagenesis and chemical modification of this tryptophan and the acidic residues forming the Mn(2+)-binding site confirmed their role in catalysis. The existence of several substrate oxidation sites is supported further by biochemical evidence. Residue conservation in other fungal peroxidases is discussed.

  12. Predicting Expressive Vocabulary Acquisition in Children with Intellectual Disabilities: A 2-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandereet, Joke; Maes, Bea; Lembrechts, Dirk; Zink, Inge

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study's objectives were to describe expressive vocabulary acquisition in children with intellectual disabilities (ID) and to examine specific pre- and early linguistic behaviors used to request and comment, chronological age, cognitive skills, and vocabulary comprehension as predictors of expressive vocabulary. Method: This study…

  13. Predicting Expressive Vocabulary Acquisition in Children with Intellectual Disabilities: A 2-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandereet, Joke; Maes, Bea; Lembrechts, Dirk; Zink, Inge

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study's objectives were to describe expressive vocabulary acquisition in children with intellectual disabilities (ID) and to examine specific pre- and early linguistic behaviors used to request and comment, chronological age, cognitive skills, and vocabulary comprehension as predictors of expressive vocabulary. Method: This study…

  14. Suspension cell culture as a tool for the characterization of class III peroxidases in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Cesarino, Igor; Araújo, Pedro; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Creste, Silvana; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Secreted class III peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7) are implicated in a broad range of physiological processes throughout the plant life cycle. However, the unambiguous determination of the precise biological role of an individual class III peroxidase isoenzyme is still a difficult task due to genetic redundancy and broad substrate specificity in vitro. In addition, many difficulties are encountered during extraction and analysis of cell wall proteins. Since class III peroxidases are also secreted into the apoplast, the use of suspension cell cultures can facilitate isolation and functional characterization of individual isoforms. Here, we report on the characterization of class III peroxidases secreted in the spent medium of sugarcane suspension cell cultures. After treatment with specific inducers of cell wall lignification, peroxidases were isolated and activities assayed with guaiacol, syringaldazine and coniferyl alcohol. Enzymatic activity was not significantly different after treatments, regardless of the substrate, with the exception of methyl-jasmonate treatment, which led to a decreased guaiacol peroxidase activity. Remarkably, peroxidases isolated from the medium were capable of oxidizing syringaldazine, an analog to sinapyl alcohol, suggesting that sugarcane cultures can produce peroxidases putatively correlated to lignification. A proteomic approach using activity staining of 2-DE gels revealed a complex isoperoxidase profile, composed predominantly of cationic isoforms. Individual spots were excised and analyzed by LC-ESI-Q-TOF and homology-based search against the Sugarcane EST Database resulted in the identification of several proteins. Spatio-temporal expression pattern of selected genes was determined for validation of identified class III peroxidases that were preferentially expressed during sugarcane stem development.

  15. Distribution and expression of SLC45A2 in the skin of sheep with different coat colors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haidong; Xue, Linli; Li, Yanan; Zhao, Bingling; Chen, Tianzhi; Liu, Ying; Chang, Lucheng; Wang, Juan

    2016-01-01

    To investigate whether the membrane-associated transporter protein SLC45A2 is differentially expressed in the skin of sheep with different coat colors and to determine its correlation with coat color establishment in sheep. The expression of SLC45A2 in sheep skin samples with different coat colors was qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed by PCR amplification, RT-PCR, immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting. A 193-bp SLC45A2 CDS sequence was successfully amplified from sheep skin samples with diverse coat colors. RT-PCR analysis revealed that SLC45A2 mRNA was expressed in all sheep skin samples tested, with relative expression levels of 512.74 ± 121.51 in black skin, 143.38 ± 119.31 and 1.36 ± 0.09 in black dots and white dots of piebald skin, respectively, and 1.02 ± 0.23 in white skin (p < 0.01**). Positive SLC45A2 protein bands were also detected in all skin samples by Western blot analysis, with relative expression levels of 0.85 ± ± 0.17** in black skin, 0.60 ± 0.05** and 0.34 ± 0.07 in black dots and white dots of piebald skin, respectively, and 0.20 ± 0.05 in white skin (p < 0.01**). Immunohistochemical assays revealed that SLC45A2 was expressed in the hair follicle matrix, the inner and outer root sheath, and the dermal papilla in the skin tissues with different coat colors. These patterns were quantified by optical density (OD) analysis, which yielded relative expression levels of 0.23 ± 0.11 in black skin, 0.19 ± 0.09 and 0.10 ± 0.03 in black dots and white dots of piebald skin, respectively, and 0.08 ± 0.01 in white skin (p < 0.05*). SLC45A2 is detectably expressed in sheep skin of all coat colors, though at significantly different levels. SLC45A2 may participate in the establishment of coat color by regulating the synthesis and trafficking of melanin.

  16. Nuclear receptor expression atlas in BMDCs: Nr4a2 restricts immunogenicity of BMDCs and impedes EAE.

    PubMed

    Saini, Ankita; Mahajan, Sahil; Gupta, Pawan

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of transcription factors regulates various key aspects of physiological processes; however, their role(s) in immune cells' function are just beginning to unravel. Although few NRs have been shown to be critical for dendritic cell (DC) function, a lack of knowledge about their complete representation in DCs has limited the ability to harness their full potential. Here, we performed a comprehensive NR expression profiling and identified the key members of NR superfamily being expressed in immature, immunogenic, and tolerogenic DCs. Comparative analysis revealed discrete changes in the expression of various NRs among the studied DC subtypes, indicating a likely role in the modulation of DC functionality. Next, we characterized Nr4a2, a member of orphan NR family, and found that it suppresses the activation of bone marrow derived dendritic cells triggered by LPS. Overexpression and knockdown of Nr4a2 demonstrated that Nr4a2 orchestrates the expression of immunoregulatory genes, hence inducing a tolerogenic phenotype in bone marrow derived dendritic cells. Furthermore, we also found that Nr4a2 provides protection from EAE by promoting an increase in Treg cells, while limiting effector T cells. Our findings suggest a previously unidentified role for Nr4a2 as a regulator of DC tolerogenicity and demonstrate its potential as therapeutic target in DC-associated pathophysiologies. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. The apoplastic oxidative burst peroxidase in Arabidopsis is a major component of pattern-triggered immunity.

    PubMed

    Daudi, Arsalan; Cheng, Zhenyu; O'Brien, Jose A; Mammarella, Nicole; Khan, Safina; Ausubel, Frederick M; Bolwell, G Paul

    2012-01-01

    In plants, reactive oxygen species (ROS) associated with the response to pathogen attack are generated by NADPH oxidases or apoplastic peroxidases. Antisense expression of a heterologous French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) peroxidase (FBP1) cDNA in Arabidopsis thaliana was previously shown to diminish the expression of two Arabidopsis peroxidases (peroxidase 33 [PRX33] and PRX34), block the oxidative burst in response to a fungal elicitor, and cause enhanced susceptibility to a broad range of fungal and bacterial pathogens. Here we show that mature leaves of T-DNA insertion lines with diminished expression of PRX33 and PRX34 exhibit reduced ROS and callose deposition in response to microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), including the synthetic peptides Flg22 and Elf26 corresponding to bacterial flagellin and elongation factor Tu, respectively. PRX33 and PRX34 knockdown lines also exhibited diminished activation of Flg22-activated genes after Flg22 treatment. These MAMP-activated genes were also downregulated in unchallenged leaves of the peroxidase knockdown lines, suggesting that a low level of apoplastic ROS production may be required to preprime basal resistance. Finally, the PRX33 knockdown line is more susceptible to Pseudomonas syringae than wild-type plants. In aggregate, these data demonstrate that the peroxidase-dependent oxidative burst plays an important role in Arabidopsis basal resistance mediated by the recognition of MAMPs.

  18. Host gastric Lewis expression determines the bacterial density of Helicobacter pylori in babA2 genopositive infection

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, B-S; Sheu, S-M; Yang, H-B; Huang, A-H; Wu, J-J

    2003-01-01

    Background and aims: We tested if host gastric Lewis antigens and the babA2 genotype of Helicobacter pylori correlated with clinicohistological outcome. Methods: We enrolled 188 dyspeptic patients (45 with duodenal ulcer, 45 with gastric ulcer, and 98 with chronic gastritis) with H pylori infection, proved by culture and gastric histology, reviewed by the updated Sydney system. Gastric expression of Lewis (Le) antigens Lea, Leb, Lex, and Ley was determined immunochemically to determine intensity (range 0–3). The corresponding 188 H pylori isolates were screened for babA2 genotype by polymerase chain reaction. Results: All H pylori isolates had a positive babA2 genotype. We identified Lea in 33.5%, Leb in 72.9%, Lex in 86.2%, and Ley in 97.4% of biopsies from these 188 patients. Patients who expressed Leb had a higher H pylori density than those who did not express Leb (p<0.001). Among 139 patients who expressed Leb, H pylori density increased with a higher Leb intensity (p<0.05). Gastric atrophy decreased with Leb intensity and thus resulted in lower H pylori density in the antrum (p<0.05). For the 49 patients without gastric Leb expression, H pylori density was positively related with Lex and Lea expression (p<0.05). Conclusions: Taiwanese H pylori isolates are 100% babA2 genopositive. Gastric Leb as well as Lex intensity may be major determinants of H pylori density. While lacking gastric Leb expression, Lex and Lea were closely related to H pylori colonisation. PMID:12801945

  19. The UspA2 Protein of Moraxella catarrhalis Is Directly Involved in the Expression of Serum Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Attia, Ahmed S.; Lafontaine, Eric R.; Latimer, Jo L.; Aebi, Christoph; Syrogiannopoulos, George A.; Hansen, Eric J.

    2005-01-01

    Many strains of Moraxella catarrhalis are resistant to the bactericidal activity of normal human serum. Previous studies have shown that mutations involving the insertion of an antibiotic resistance cartridge into the M. catarrhalis uspA2 gene resulted in the conversion of a serum-resistant strain to a serum-sensitive phenotype. In the present study, the deletion of the entire uspA2 gene from the serum-resistant M. catarrhalis strain O35E resulted in a serum-sensitive phenotype and did not affect either the rate of growth or the lipooligosaccharide expression profile of this mutant. Inactivation of the classical complement pathway in normal human serum with Mg2+ and EGTA resulted in the survival of this uspA2 mutant. In contrast, blocking of the alternative complement pathway did not protect this uspA2 mutant from complement-mediated killing. To determine whether the UspA2 protein is directly involved in serum resistance, transformation and allelic exchange were used to replace the uspA2 gene in the serum-resistant strain O35E with the uspA2 gene from the serum-sensitive M. catarrhalis strain MC317. The resultant O35E transformant exhibited a serum-sensitive phenotype. Similarly, when the uspA2 gene from the serum-resistant strain O35E was used to replace the uspA2 gene in the serum-sensitive strain MC317, the MC317 transformant acquired serum resistance. The use of hybrid O35E-MC317 uspA2 genes showed that the N-terminal half of the O35E protein contained a 102-amino-acid region that was involved in the expression of serum resistance. In addition, when the uspA2 genes from strains O35E and MC317 were cloned and expressed in Haemophilus influenzae DB117, only the O35E UspA2 protein caused a significant increase in the serum resistance of the H. influenzae recombinant strain. These results prove that the UspA2 protein is directly involved in the expression of serum resistance by certain M. catarrhalis strains. PMID:15784586

  20. Selenium, glutathione peroxidase and other selenoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmsen, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    Selenium, as essential trace element, has long been associated with protein. The essentiality of selenium is partially understood as glutathione peroxidase contains an essential selenocysteine. Glutathione peroxidase has been purified from many tissues including rat liver. An estimated molecular weight of 105,000 was obtained for glutathione peroxidase by comparison to standards. A subunit size of 26,000 was obtained by SDS-gel electrophoresis. Glutathione peroxidase is not the only selenoprotein in the rat. In seven rat tissues examined, there were many different subunit sizes and change groups representing between 9 and 23 selenoproteins. Selenocysteine in glutathione peroxidase accounts for ca. 36% of the selenium in the rat. The mode of synthesis of glutathione peroxidase and the other selenoproteins is not understood. Glutathione peroxidase is strongly and reversibly inhibited by mercaptocarboxylic acids and other mercaptans, including some used as slow-acting drugs for the symtomatic treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The mechanism and chemistry of this inhibition is discussed. This inhibition may provide a link between selenium and arthritis.

  1. Soybean peroxidase as an industrial catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Pokora, A.R.

    1995-12-01

    Peroxidases are a large class of enzymes which are very efficient at catalysing oxidation reactions. Horseradish peroxidase, the most abundant and commercially available peroxidase, has been utilized for many years in medical diagnostic test kits but has never been used successfully in an industrial application. One of the major drawbacks associated with the peroxidases cost and has been their lack of the thermal stability required in an industrial process. Recently, we isolated has been their lack of the peroxidase from soybean seed coats. Soybean seed coats are a commodity product available year round in very large volumes. The useful operational temperature for the soy peroxidase is 40{degrees}C higher than for horseradish peroxidase resulting in shorter reaction times and greater reactor efficiency. This process can be used to produce formaldehyde-free polyphenols as well as numerous phenolic dimers used in the manufacture of anti-oxidants, U-V absorbers, epoxies as well as other materials. The process to manufacture resins and dimers will be discussed.

  2. Thiol-Based Peroxidases and Ascorbate Peroxidases: Why Plants Rely on Multiple Peroxidase Systems in the Photosynthesizing Chloroplast?

    PubMed

    Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a highly robust process allowing for rapid adjustment to changing environmental conditions. The efficient acclimation depends on balanced redox metabolism and control of reactive oxygen species release which triggers signaling cascades and potentially detrimental oxidation reactions. Thiol peroxidases of the peroxiredoxin and glutathione peroxidase type, and ascorbate peroxidases are the main peroxide detoxifying enzymes of the chloroplast. They use different electron donors and are linked to distinct redox networks. In addition, the peroxiredoxins serve functions in redox regulation and retrograde signaling. The complexity of plastid peroxidases is discussed in context of suborganellar localization, substrate preference, metabolic coupling, protein abundance, activity regulation, interactions, signaling functions, and the conditional requirement for high antioxidant capacity. Thus the review provides an opinion on the advantage of linking detoxification of peroxides to different enzymatic systems and implementing mechanisms for their inactivation to enforce signal propagation within and from the chloroplast.

  3. Thiol-Based Peroxidases and Ascorbate Peroxidases: Why Plants Rely on Multiple Peroxidase Systems in the Photosynthesizing Chloroplast?

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a highly robust process allowing for rapid adjustment to changing environmental conditions. The efficient acclimation depends on balanced redox metabolism and control of reactive oxygen species release which triggers signaling cascades and potentially detrimental oxidation reactions. Thiol peroxidases of the peroxiredoxin and glutathione peroxidase type, and ascorbate peroxidases are the main peroxide detoxifying enzymes of the chloroplast. They use different electron donors and are linked to distinct redox networks. In addition, the peroxiredoxins serve functions in redox regulation and retrograde signaling. The complexity of plastid peroxidases is discussed in context of suborganellar localization, substrate preference, metabolic coupling, protein abundance, activity regulation, interactions, signaling functions, and the conditional requirement for high antioxidant capacity. Thus the review provides an opinion on the advantage of linking detoxification of peroxides to different enzymatic systems and implementing mechanisms for their inactivation to enforce signal propagation within and from the chloroplast. PMID:26810073

  4. Recents patents in the use of peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Berenize; Torres, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    Peroxidases are hemoenzymes with a wide range of applications, from fine chemical synthesis to environmental biocatalysis. These outstanding biocatalysts are able to catalyze reactions such as heteroatom oxidation (N- and S-oxidation), epoxidation, hydroxylation, and the oxidation of alcohols and indole, often giving high yields and enantiomeric excess values. This makes these biocatalysts very useful for application to several biotechnological processes. In this paper, recent advances and patents surrounding the use of peroxidases are reviewed, covering different aspects related to the applications of peroxidases and the modifications carried out to improve their functionality as biocatalysts.

  5. Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence, and abscisic acid induction of a suberization-associated highly anionic peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Roberts, E; Kolattukudy, P E

    1989-06-01

    A highly anionic peroxidase induced in suberizing cells was suggested to be the key enzyme involved in polymerization of phenolic monomers to generate the aromatic matrix of suberin. The enzyme encoded by a potato cDNA was found to be highly homologous to the anionic peroxidase induced in suberizing tomato fruit. A tomato genomic library was screened using the potato anionic peroxidase cDNA and one genomic clone was isolated that contained two tandemly oriented anionic peroxidase genes. These genes were sequenced and were 96% and 87% identical to the mRNA for potato anionic peroxidase. Both genes consist of three exons with the relative positions of their two introns being conserved between the two genes. Primer extension analysis showed that only one of the genes is expressed in the periderm of 3 day wound-healed tomato fruits. Southern blot analyses suggested that there are two copies each of the two highly homologous genes per haploid genome in both potato and tomato. Abscisic acid (ABA) induced the accumulation of the anionic peroxidase transcripts in potato and tomato callus tissues. Northern blots showed that peroxidase mRNA was detectable at 2 days and was maximal at 8 days after transfer of potato callus to solid agar media containing 10(-4) M ABA. The transcripts induced by ABA in both potato and tomato callus were identical in size to those induced in wound-healing potato tuber and tomato fruit. The anionic peroxidase peptide was detected in extracts of potato callus grown on the ABA-containing media by western blot analysis. The results support the suggestion that stimulation of suberization by ABA involves the induction of the highly anionic peroxidase.

  6. Activation of nuclear receptor NR5A2 increases Glut4 expression and glucose metabolism in muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bolado-Carrancio, A.; Riancho, J.A.; Sainz, J.; Rodríguez-Rey, J.C.

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • NR5A2 expression in C2C12 is associated with myotube differentiation. • DLPC induces an increase in GLUT4 levels and glucose uptake in C2C12 myotubes. • In high glucose conditions the activation of NR5A2 inhibits fatty acids oxidation. - Abstract: NR5A2 is a nuclear receptor which regulates the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism, pluripotency maintenance and cell differentiation. It has been recently shown that DLPC, a NR5A2 ligand, prevents liver steatosis and improves insulin sensitivity in mouse models of insulin resistance, an effect that has been associated with changes in glucose and fatty acids metabolism in liver. Because skeletal muscle is a major tissue in clearing glucose from blood, we studied the effect of the activation of NR5A2 on muscle metabolism by using cultures of C2C12, a mouse-derived cell line widely used as a model of skeletal muscle. Treatment of C2C12 with DLPC resulted in increased levels of expression of GLUT4 and also of several genes related to glycolysis and glycogen metabolism. These changes were accompanied by an increased glucose uptake. In addition, the activation of NR5A2 produced a reduction in the oxidation of fatty acids, an effect which disappeared in low-glucose conditions. Our results suggest that NR5A2, mostly by enhancing glucose uptake, switches muscle cells into a state of glucose preference. The increased use of glucose by muscle might constitute another mechanism by which NR5A2 improves blood glucose levels and restores insulin sensitivity.

  7. The production of class III plant peroxidases in transgenic callus cultures transformed with the rolB gene of Agrobacterium rhizogenes.

    PubMed

    Shkryl, Y N; Veremeichik, G N; Bulgakov, V P; Avramenko, T V; Günter, E A; Ovodov, Y S; Muzarok, T I; Zhuravlev, Y N

    2013-10-10

    The production of plant peroxidases by plant cell cultures is of great interest because of the potential for industrial applications. We used plant cell cultures overexpressing the rolB gene to produce increased amounts of plant class III peroxidases. The rolB gene ensured the stable and permanent activation of peroxidase activity in the transformed callus cultures of different plants. In particular, the total peroxidase activity in transformed Rubia cordifolia cells was increased 23-86-fold, and the abundance of the major peroxidase gene transcripts was increased 17-125-fold (depending on the level of rolB expression) compared with non-transformed control calli. The peroxidase-activating effect of rolB was greater than that of other peroxidase inducers, such as external stresses and methyl jasmonate.

  8. Class III peroxidases in plant defence reactions.

    PubMed

    Almagro, L; Gómez Ros, L V; Belchi-Navarro, S; Bru, R; Ros Barceló, A; Pedreño, M A

    2009-01-01

    When plants are attacked by pathogens, they defend themselves with an arsenal of defence mechanisms, both passive and active. The active defence responses, which require de novo protein synthesis, are regulated through a complex and interconnected network of signalling pathways that mainly involve three molecules, salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), and ethylene (ET), and which results in the synthesis of pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. Microbe or elicitor-induced signal transduction pathways lead to (i) the reinforcement of cell walls and lignification, (ii) the production of antimicrobial metabolites (phytoalexins), and (iii) the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Among the proteins induced during the host plant defence, class III plant peroxidases (EC 1.11.1.7; hydrogen donor: H(2)O(2) oxidoreductase, Prxs) are well known. They belong to a large multigene family, and participate in a broad range of physiological processes, such as lignin and suberin formation, cross-linking of cell wall components, and synthesis of phytoalexins, or participate in the metabolism of ROS and RNS, both switching on the hypersensitive response (HR), a form of programmed host cell death at the infection site associated with limited pathogen development. The present review focuses on these plant defence reactions in which Prxs are directly or indirectly involved, and ends with the signalling pathways, which regulate Prx gene expression during plant defence. How they are integrated within the complex network of defence responses of any host plant cell will be the cornerstone of future research.

  9. Age-Dependent Changes in Human Hepatic CYP2C8 and 1A2 Expression

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predicting age-specific metabolism of pyrethroids is important in evaluating age-related sensitivity. Our goal is to use an in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) approach to predict pyrethroid metabolism for different ages incorporating enzyme ontogeny and expressed enzyme ki...

  10. Age-Dependent Changes in Human Hepatic CYP2C8 and 1A2 Expression

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predicting age-specific metabolism of pyrethroids is important in evaluating age-related sensitivity. Our goal is to use an in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) approach to predict pyrethroid metabolism for different ages incorporating enzyme ontogeny and expressed enzyme ki...

  11. Use of CYP52A2A promoter to increase gene expression in yeast

    DOEpatents

    Craft, David L.; Wilson, C. Ron; Eirich, Dudley; Zhang, Yeyan

    2004-01-06

    A nucleic acid sequence including a CYP promoter operably linked to nucleic acid encoding a heterologous protein is provided to increase transcription of the nucleic acid. Expression vectors and host cells containing the nucleic acid sequence are also provided. The methods and compositions described herein are especially useful in the production of polycarboxylic acids by yeast cells.

  12. Limits of Versatility of Versatile Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Knop, Doriv; Levinson, Dana; Makovitzki, Arik; Agami, Avi; Lerer, Elad; Mimran, Avishai; Yarden, Oded

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although Mn2+ is the most abundant substrate of versatile peroxidases (VPs), repression of Pleurotus ostreatus vp1 expression occurred in Mn2+-sufficient medium. This seems to be a biological contradiction. The aim of this study was to explore the mechanism of direct oxidation by VP1 under Mn2+-deficient conditions, as it was found to be the predominant enzyme during fungal growth in the presence of synthetic and natural substrates. The native VP1 was purified and characterized using three substrates, Mn2+, Orange II (OII), and Reactive Black 5 (RB5), each oxidized by a different active site in the enzyme. While the pH optimum for Mn2+ oxidation is 5, the optimum pH for direct oxidation of both dyes was found to be 3. Indeed, effective in vivo decolorization occurred in media without addition of Mn2+ only under acidic conditions. We have determined that Mn2+ inhibits in vitro the direct oxidation of both OII and RB5 while RB5 stabilizes both Mn2+ and OII oxidation. Furthermore, OII was found to inhibit the oxidation of both Mn2+ and RB5. In addition, we could demonstrate that VP1 can cleave OII in two different modes. Under Mn2+-mediated oxidation conditions, VP1 was able to cleave the azo bond only in asymmetric mode, while under the optimum conditions for direct oxidation (absence of Mn2+ at pH 3) both symmetric and asymmetric cleavages occurred. We concluded that the oxidation mechanism of aromatic compounds by VP1 is controlled by Mn2+ and pH levels both in the growth medium and in the reaction mixture. IMPORTANCE VP1 is a member of the ligninolytic heme peroxidase gene family of the white rot fungus Pleurotus ostreatus and plays a fundamental role in biodegradation. This enzyme exhibits a versatile nature, as it can oxidize different substrates under altered environmental conditions. VPs are highly interesting enzymes due to the fact that they contain unique active sites that are responsible for direct oxidation of various aromatic compounds

  13. Geldanamycin mediates the apoptosis of gastric carcinoma cells through inhibition of EphA2 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da-Hu; Zhang, Yu-Jun; Zhang, San-Bing; Liu, Hui; Liu, Liang; Liu, Feng-Ling; Zuo, Jing

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of EphA2 in the carcinogenesis and progression of gastric carcinoma. Moreover, we aimed to determine the effect of geldanamycin (GA), an inhibitor of Hsp90, on the proliferation and apoptosis of human gastric carcinoma cells. Gastric carcinoma tissues, paired adjacent mucosa and paired normal mucosa were obtained from resected surgical specimens of gastric carcinoma, and EphA2 mRNA and protein levels were assessed by RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. FCM was used to detect cell cycle distribution and apoptosis. MGC803 cell proliferation and apoptosis were assessed by MTT and FCM, respectively. We found that EphA2 protein was increased in the carcinogenesis of gastric epithelial cells. Proliferation index (PI) was significantly upregulated following an increase in EphA2 expression in gastric carcinoma compared with dysplasia and normal samples, and was notably correlated with grade and lymph node metastasis. Knockdown of EphA2 increased the apoptosis rate and decreased the PI of MGC803 cells, which overexpressed the EphA2 protein. GA inhibited the cell proliferation of MGC803 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner and induced cell apoptosis. In addition, GA decreased the EphA2 protein expression in MGC803 cells. Overexpression of EphA2 inhibited cell growth, blocked cells in the G0/G1 stage and increased cell apoptosis induced by GA in MGC803 cells. However, knockdown of EphA2 in MGC803 cells increased the apoptosis ratio induced by GA. In conclusion, EphA2 overexpression is an important characteristic in the carcinogenesis of gastric epithelial cells, followed by an increase in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Knockdown of EphA2 blocked MGC803 cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis. In conclusion GA inhibits MGC803 cell proliferation and induces cell apoptosis by upregulating expression of EphA2.

  14. Substrates and products of eosinophil peroxidase.

    PubMed Central

    van Dalen, C J; Kettle, A J

    2001-01-01

    Eosinophil peroxidase has been implicated in promoting oxidative tissue damage in a variety of inflammatory conditions, including asthma. It uses H(2)O(2) to oxidize chloride, bromide and thiocyanate to their respective hypohalous acids. The aim of this study was to establish which oxidants eosinophil peroxidase produces under physiological conditions. By measuring rates of H(2)O(2) utilization by the enzyme at neutral pH, we determined the catalytic rate constants for bromide and thiocyanate as 248 and 223 s(-1) and the Michaelis constants as 0.5 and 0.15 mM respectively. On the basis of these values thiocyanate is preferred 2.8-fold over bromide as a substrate for eosinophil peroxidase. Eosinophil peroxidase catalysed substantive oxidation of chloride only below pH 6.5. We found that when eosinophil peroxidase or myeloperoxidase oxidized thiocyanate, another product besides hypothiocyanite was formed; it also converted methionine into methionine sulphoxide. During the oxidation of thiocyanate, the peroxidases were present as their compound II forms. Compound II did not form when GSH was included to scavenge hypothiocyanite. We propose that the unidentified oxidant was derived from a radical species produced by the one-electron oxidation of hypothiocyanite. We conclude that at plasma concentrations of bromide (20-120 microM) and thiocyanate (20-100 microM), hypobromous acid and oxidation products of thiocyanate are produced by eosinophil peroxidase. Hypochlorous acid is likely to be produced only when substrates preferred over chloride are depleted. Thiocyanate should be considered to augment peroxidase-mediated toxicity because these enzymes can convert relatively benign hypothiocyanite into a stronger oxidant. PMID:11485572

  15. Engineering the active site of ascorbate peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Lloyd Raven, E; Celik, A; Cullis, P M; Sangar, R; Sutcliffe, M J

    2001-05-01

    Understanding the catalytic versatility of haem enzymes, and in particular the relationships that exist between different classes of haem-containing proteins and the mechanisms by which the apo-protein structure controls chemical reactivity, presents a major experimental and theoretical challenge. These issues are discussed in the general context of peroxidase and cytochrome P450 chemistry, and specific issues relating to the catalytic chemistry of ascorbate peroxidase are highlighted.

  16. Boric acid increases the expression levels of human anion exchanger genes SLC4A2 and SLC4A3.

    PubMed

    Akbas, F; Aydin, Z

    2012-04-03

    Boron is an important micronutrient in plants and animals. The role of boron in living systems includes coordinated regulation of gene expression, growth and proliferation of higher plants and animals. There are several well-defined genes associated with boron transportation and tolerance in plants and these genes show close homology with human anion exchanger genes. Mutation of these genes also characterizes some genetic disorders. We investigated the toxic effects of boric acid on HEK293 cells and mRNA expression of anion exchanger (SLC4A1, SLC4A2 and SLC4A3) genes. Cytotoxicity of boric acid at different concentrations was tested by using the methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay. Gene expression profiles were examined using quantitative real-time PCR. In the HEK293 cells, the nontoxic upper concentration of boric acid was 250 μM; more than 500 μM caused cytotoxicity. The 250 μM boric acid concentration increased gene expression level of SLC4A2 up to 8.6-fold and SLC4A3 up to 2.6-fold, after 36-h incubation. There was no significant effect of boric acid on SLC4A1 mRNA expression levels.

  17. Slc27a2 expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells as a molecular marker for overweight development.

    PubMed

    Caimari, A; Oliver, P; Rodenburg, W; Keijer, J; Palou, A

    2010-05-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) can be collected easily and repeatedly. Their potential use to reflect the individual's biological status is increasingly explored. Obesity is becoming the most common health problem of the 21st century, being dietary intake an important determinant of this pathology and numerous chronic health conditions. The aim of this study is to identify PBMC genes involved in energy homeostasis, which could be good markers of overweight development. Using whole-genome microarray analysis, we evaluated the gene expression in PBMC of normoweight and diet-induced obese (cafeteria-fed) Wistar rats. Microarray analysis showed 566 genes differentially expressed between normoweight and cafeteria-fed rats. Of these, 35 genes were particularly involved in energy homeostasis. The gene with the biggest fold change was the 'solute carrier family 27 (fatty acid transporter), member 2' (slc27a2), which is implicated in lipid biosynthesis and fatty acid degradation. Scl27a2 was 33-fold overexpressed in cafeteria-fed rats compared with normoweight rats. This result was confirmed by quantitative PCR, although the overexpression was smaller (sixfold). Moreover, the increase in slc27a2 expression in PBMC of cafeteria-fed rats from 2 to 6 months of age paralleled the increase in body weight. The progressive overexpression of slc27a2 in PBMC of cafeteria-fed rats as the body weight increases suggests this gene as an early marker of overweight development related to the intake of a hyperlipidic diet.

  18. The molecular characterization of the lignin-forming peroxidase. Progress summary report, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1995-06-01

    My research program focuses entirely on the study of the lignin-forming peroxidase of tobacco. Ever since our cloning and sequencing of the first plant peroxidase cDNA, we have pioneered in the introduction of the tools of molecular biology to the study of plant peroxidases. A significant part of our effort has been focused on the construction and analysis of transgenic plants which either over- or under-express the tobacco anionic peroxidase. This research has not only supported the role for this enzyme in lignification, but has opened the door to our understanding of additional metabolic functions including auxin metabolism and insect defense. As you will learn, this enzyme`s role in auxin catabolism has lead to numerous phenotypes in transgenic plants. More recently, our attention has been directed towards the analysis of peroxidase gene expression. From this work we have learned that the anionic peroxidase gene is expressed at high levels in the xylem-forming cells, epidermis, and trichomes. This expression pattern supports its role lignification and hose defenses. We have also learned that this gene is down-regulated by auxin which indicates a strong relationship between auxin and the anionic peroxidase. 12 figs.

  19. Cloning and characterization of Plasmodium vivax thioredoxin peroxidase-1.

    PubMed

    Hakimi, Hassan; Asada, Masahito; Angeles, Jose Ma M; Inoue, Noboru; Kawazu, Shin-Ichiro

    2012-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species produced from hemoglobin digestion and the host immune system could have adverse effects on malaria parasites. To protect themselves, malaria parasites are highly dependent on the antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutases and thioredoxin-dependent peroxidases. To date, several thioredoxin peroxidases (TPx) have been characterized in Plasmodium falciparum, but the TPx in Plasmodium vivax has not yet been characterized. The complete sequence of gene coding for thioredoxin peroxidase-1 of P. vivax (PvTPx-1) was amplified by PCR and cloned. Using the recombinant PvTPx-1 (rPvTPx-1), polyclonal antibody was produced in mice for immunolocalization of the enzyme in the parasite. The antioxidant activity of rPvTPx-1 was evaluated by mixed-function oxidation assay. PvTPx-1 has two conserved cysteine residues in the amino acid sequence at the positions 50 and 170 which formed a dimer under a non-reducing condition. Using a thiol mixed-function oxidation assay, the antioxidant activity of rPvTPx-1 was revealed. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy with the specific antibody indicated that PvTPx-1 was expressed in the cytoplasm of the erythrocytic stage of the parasite in a dots-like pattern. The results suggest that P. vivax uses TPx-1 to reduce and detoxify hydrogen peroxides in order to maintain their redox homeostasis and proliferation in the host body.

  20. Expression, Purification and Crystallisation of the Adenosine A2A Receptor Bound to an Engineered Mini G Protein.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Byron; Tate, Christopher G

    2017-04-20

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) promote cytoplasmic signalling by activating heterotrimeric G proteins in response to extracellular stimuli such as light, hormones and nucleosides. Structure determination of GPCR-G protein complexes is central to understanding the precise mechanism of signal transduction. However, these complexes are challenging targets for structural studies due to their conformationally dynamic and inherently transient nature. We recently developed an engineered G protein, mini-Gs, which addressed these problems and allowed the formation of a stable GPCR-G protein complex. Mini-Gs facilitated the structure determination of the human adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) in its G protein-bound conformation at 3.4 Å resolution. Here, we describe a step by step protocol for the expression and purification of A2AR, and crystallisation of the A2AR-mini-Gs complex.

  1. Expression of the PlA2 allele of glycoprotein IIIa and its impact on platelet function

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Albert; Warner, Timothy D

    2015-01-01

    Background The platelet fibrinogen receptor represents the final common pathway of platelet activation, and is formed from two glycoprotein (GP) subunits (GPIIb/IIIa). Carriage of the mutant PlA2 allele of GPIIIa has been shown to confer an increased risk of cardiovascular events, but published studies have disagreed as to the mechanism for this association. Objectives To assess whether carriage of the PlA2 allele conforms to Mendelian patterns of expression and to identify whether carriage of the mutant allele modulates platelet function. Methods Expression of the PlA2 allele was assessed in both healthy subjects (n = 25) and patients with known coronary artery disease (n = 90) through the development and validation of a liquid chromatography, tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay. Platelet function was assessed in the patient cohort in response to multiple agonists, and these data were analysed in the context of the proteomic data. Results Expression of the wild-type PlA1 allele and mutant PlA2 alleles was readily quantifiable and conformed to Mendelian patterns in both healthy and patient cohorts. Patients who were homozygous for the mutant PlA2 allele had an increased aggregatory response to adenosine diphosphate, collagen, adrenaline, ristocetin, thrombin receptor-activating peptide 6 and U46619, when assessed using agonist-concentration response curves. Conclusions These findings support the hypothesis that carriage of the mutant PlA2 allele mediates an increased risk of cardiovascular events through the modulation of platelet reactivity. PMID:26858830

  2. Group X Secretory Phospholipase A2 Negatively Regulates ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression and cholesterol efflux in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Shridas, Preetha; Bailey, William M; Gizard, Florence; Oslund, Rob C; Gelb, Michael H; Bruemmer, Dennis; Webb, Nancy R

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Group X secretory phospholipase A2 (GX sPLA2) potently hydrolyzes plasma membranes to generate lysophospholipids and free fatty acids and has been implicated in inflammatory diseases including atherosclerosis. Here we identify a novel role for GX sPLA2 in modulating ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression and hence macrophage cholesterol efflux. Methods and Results Overexpression or exogenous addition of GX sPLA2 significantly reduced ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression in J774 macrophage-like cells, whereas GX sPLA2 deficiency in mouse peritoneal macrophages (MPMs) was associated with enhanced expression. Altered ABC transporter expression led to reduced cholesterol efflux in GX sPLA2 overexpressing J774 cells, and increased efflux in GX sPLA2-deficient MPMs. Gene regulation was dependent on GX sPLA2 catalytic activity, mimicked by arachidonic acid, abrogated when LXRα/β expression was suppressed, and partially reversed by the LXR agonist T0901317. Reporter assays indicated that GX sPLA2 suppresses the ability of LXR to trans-activate its promoters through a mechanism involving the C-terminal portion of LXR spanning the ligand binding domain. Conclusions GX sPLA2 modulates gene expression in macrophages by generating lipolytic products that suppress LXR activation. GX sPLA2 may play a previously unrecognized role in atherosclerotic lipid accumulation by negatively regulating genes critical for cellular cholesterol efflux. PMID:20844270

  3. Differential alleleic expression of the type II collagen gene (COL2A2) in osteoarthritic cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Loughlin, J.; Irven, C.; Sykes, B.; Athanasou, N.; Carr, A.

    1995-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common debilitating disease resulting from the degeneration of articular cartilage. The major protein of cartilage is type II collagen, which is encoded by the COL2A1 gene. Mutations at this locus have been discovered in several individuals with inherited disorders of cartilage. We have identified 27 primary OA patients who are heterozygous for sequence dimorphisms located in the coding region of COL2A1. These dimorphisms were used to distinguish the mRNA output from each of the two COL2A1 alleles in articular cartilage obtained from each patient. Three patients demonstrated differential allelic expression and produced <12% of the normal level of mRNA from one of their COL2A1 alleles. The same allele shows reduced expression in a well-defined OA population than in a control group, suggesting the possible existence of a rare COL2A1 allele that predisposes to OA. 31 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Effect of caffeine on the expression of cytochrome P450 1A2, adenosine A2A receptor and dopamine transporter in control and 1-methyl 4-phenyl 1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine treated mouse striatum.

    PubMed

    Singh, Seema; Singh, Kavita; Gupta, Satya Prakash; Patel, Devendra Kumar; Singh, Vinod Kumar; Singh, Raj Kumar; Singh, Mahendra Pratap

    2009-08-04

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons of the nigrostriatal pathway. Epidemiological studies have shown an inverse relationship between coffee consumption and susceptibility to PD. Cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) is involved in caffeine metabolism and its clearance. Caffeine, on the other hand, antagonizes adenosine A(2A) receptor and regulates dopamine signaling through dopamine transporter (DAT). The present study was undertaken to investigate the expression of CYP1A2, adenosine A(2A) receptor and DAT in mouse striatum and to assess their levels in 1-methyl 4-phenyl 1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropryridine (MPTP) treated mouse striatum with and without caffeine treatment. The animals were treated intraperitoneally daily with caffeine (20 mg/kg) for 8 weeks, followed by MPTP (20 mg/kg)+caffeine (20 mg/kg) for 4 weeks or vice versa, along with respective controls. Tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity, levels of dopamine and 1-methyl 4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP(+)), expressions of CYP1A2, adenosine A(2A) receptor and DAT and CYP1A2 catalytic activity were measured in control and treated mouse brain. Caffeine partially protected MPTP-induced neurodegenerative changes and modulated MPTP-mediated alterations in the expression and catalytic activity of CYP1A2, expression of adenosine A(2A) receptor and DAT. The results demonstrate that caffeine alters the striatal CYP1A2, adenosine A(2A) receptor and DAT expressions in mice exposed to MPTP.

  5. Leishmania amazonensis impairs DC function by inhibiting CD40 expression via A2B adenosine receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Amanda B; Serafim, Tiago D; Marques-da-Silva, Eduardo A; Meyer-Fernandes, José R; Afonso, Luís C C

    2012-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play an essential role in the modulation of immune responses and several studies have evaluated the interactions between Leishmania parasites and DCs. While extracellular ATP exhibits proinflammatory properties, adenosine is an important anti-inflammatory mediator. Here we investigated the effects of Leishmania infection on DC responses and the participation of purinergic signalling in this process. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) from C57BL/6J mice infected with Leishmania amazonensis, Leishmania braziliensis or Leishmania major metacyclic promastigotes showed decreased major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and CD86 expression and increased ectonucleotidase expression as compared with uninfected cells. In addition, L. amazonensis-infected DCs, which had lower CD40 expression, exhibited a decreased ability to induce T-cell proliferation. The presence of MRS1754, a highly selective A(2B) adenosine receptor antagonist at the time of infection increased MHC class II, CD86 and CD40 expression in L. amazonensis-infected DCs and restored the ability of the infected DCs to induce T-cell proliferation. Similar results were obtained through the inhibition of extracellular ATP hydrolysis using suramin. In conclusion, we propose that A(2B) receptor activation may be used by L. amazonensis to inhibit DC function and evade the immune response. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Peroxidase-dependent apoplastic oxidative burst in Arabidopsis required for pathogen resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bindschedler, Laurence V.; Dewdney, Julia; Blee, Kris A.; Stone, Julie M.; Asai, Tsuneaki; Plotnikov, Julia; Denoux, Carine; Hayes, Tezni; Gerrish, Chris; Davies, Dewi R.; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Bolwell, G. Paul

    2011-01-01

    Summary The oxidative burst is an early response to pathogen attack leading to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) including hydrogen peroxide. Two major mechanisms involving either NADPH oxidases or peroxidases that may exist singly or in combination in different plant species have been proposed for the generation of ROS. We identified an Arabidopsis thaliana azide-sensitive but diphenylene iodonium-insensitive apoplastic oxidative burst that generates H2O2 in response to a Fusarium oxysporum cell-wall preparation. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing an anti-sense cDNA encoding a type III peroxidase, French bean peroxidase type 1 (FBP1) exhibited an impaired oxidative burst and were more susceptible than wild-type plants to both fungal and bacterial pathogens. Transcriptional profiling and RT-PCR analysis showed that the anti-sense (FBP1) transgenic plants had reduced levels of specific peroxidase-encoding mRNAs, including mRNAs corresponding to Arabidopsis genes At3g49120 (AtPCb) and At3g49110 (AtPCa) that encode two class III peroxidases with a high degree of homology to FBP1. These data indicate that peroxidases play a significant role in generating H2O2 during the Arabidopsis defense response and in conferring resistance to a wide range of pathogens. PMID:16889645

  7. Purification and Characterization of Peroxidases Correlated with Lignification in Poplar Xylem1

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Jørgen Holst; Bauw, Guy; Gjesing Welinder, Karen; Van Montagu, Marc; Boerjan, Wout

    1998-01-01

    Lignin is an integral cell wall component of all vascular plants. Peroxidases are widely believed to catalyze the last enzymatic step in the biosynthesis of lignin, the dehydrogenation of the p-coumaryl alcohols. As the first stage in identifying lignin-specific peroxidase isoenzymes, the classical anionic peroxidases found in the xylem of poplar (Populus trichocarpa Trichobel) were purified and characterized. Five different poplar xylem peroxidases (PXP 1, PXP 2, PXP 3–4, PXP 5, and PXP 6) were isolated. All five peroxidases were strongly glycosylated (3.6% to 4.9% N-glucosamine), with apparent molecular masses between 46 and 54 kD and pI values between pH 3.1 and 3.8. Two of the five isolated peroxidases (PXP 3–4 and PXP 5) could oxidize the lignin monomer analog syringaldazine, an activity previously correlated with lignification in poplar. Because these isoenzymes were specifically or preferentially expressed in xylem, PXP 3–4 and PXP 5 are suggested to be involved in lignin polymerization. PMID:9733532

  8. Peroxidase Enzymes Regulate Collagen Biosynthesis and Matrix Mineralization by Cultured Human Osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    DeNichilo, Mark O; Shoubridge, Alexandra J; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Liapis, Vasilios; Zysk, Aneta; Zinonos, Irene; Hay, Shelley; Atkins, Gerald J; Findlay, David M; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The early recruitment of inflammatory cells to sites of bone fracture and trauma is a critical determinant in successful fracture healing. Released by infiltrating inflammatory cells, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) are heme-containing enzymes, whose functional involvement in bone repair has mainly been studied in the context of providing a mechanism for oxidative defense against invading microorganisms. We report here novel findings that show peroxidase enzymes have the capacity to stimulate osteoblastic cells to secrete collagen I protein and generate a mineralized extracellular matrix in vitro. Mechanistic studies conducted using cultured osteoblasts show that peroxidase enzymes stimulate collagen biosynthesis at a post-translational level in a prolyl hydroxylase-dependent manner, which does not require ascorbic acid. Our studies demonstrate that osteoblasts rapidly bind and internalize both MPO and EPO, and the catalytic activity of these peroxidase enzymes is essential to support collagen I biosynthesis and subsequent release of collagen by osteoblasts. We show that EPO is capable of regulating osteogenic gene expression and matrix mineralization in culture, suggesting that peroxidase enzymes may play an important role not only in normal bone repair, but also in the progression of pathological states where infiltrating inflammatory cells are known to deposit peroxidases.

  9. Characterization of a novel DyP-type peroxidase from Streptomyces avermitilis.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Kanako; Nishihashi, Yuriko; Narioka, Tomomi; Yoshida, Toru; Morita, Mifumi; Sugano, Yasushi

    2017-04-01

    DyP-type peroxidases are a heme peroxidase family with unique properties whose members are widely distributed from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. DyP-type peroxidases are subdivided into class P, I and V based on structure-based sequence alignment. Class V enzymes possess degradation activities for anthraquinone dyes, and include extra sequences compared with class P and I. Class V enzymes are mainly found in fungi, with only two such proteins, AnaPX and DyP2, reported in bacteria. Here, we heterologously expressed, purified and biochemically characterized SaDyP2 protein, predicted to belong to class V. SaDyP2 was purified as a ∼50 kDa enzyme containing a heme cofactor and was found to oxidize the typical peroxidase substrates, ABTS and DMP. SaDyP2 was generally thermostable and exhibited a lower optimal pH, a feature typical of DyP-type peroxidases. It also degraded anthraquinone dyes, a specific substrate of DyP-type peroxidases, although the kcat for SaDyP2 was lower than that for other class V enzymes. The Km value of SaDyP2 for anthraquinone dye was similar to that of other enzymes of this class. Homology modeling revealed that the structure of SaDyP2 best fit that of class V enzymes. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Dmy initiates masculinity by altering Gsdf/Sox9a2/Rspo1 expression in medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Tapas; Zhou, Lin Yan; Chaudhari, Aparna; Iguchi, Taisen; Nagahama, Y

    2016-01-25

    Despite identification of several sex-determining genes in non-mammalian vertebrates, their detailed molecular cascades of sex determination/differentiation are not known. Here, we used a novel RNAi to characterise the molecular mechanism of Dmy (the sex-determining gene of medaka)-mediated masculinity in XY fish. Dmy knockdown (Dmy-KD) suppressed male pathway (Gsdf, Sox9a2, etc.) and favoured female cascade (Rspo1, etc.) in embryonic XY gonads, resulting in a fertile male-to-female sex-reversal. Gsdf, Sox9a2, and Rspo1 directly interacted with Dmy, and co-injection of Gsdf and Sox9a2 re-established masculinity in XY-Dmy-KD transgenics, insinuating that Dmy initiates masculinity by stimulating and suppressing Gsdf/Sox9a2 and Rspo1 expression, respectively. Gonadal expression of Wt1a starts prior to Dmy and didn't change upon Dmy-KD. Furthermore, Wt1a stimulated the promoter activity of Dmy, suggesting Wt1a as a regulator of Dmy. These findings provide new insights into the role of vertebrate sex-determining genes associated with the molecular interplay between the male and female pathways.

  11. Dmy initiates masculinity by altering Gsdf/Sox9a2/Rspo1 expression in medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Tapas; Zhou, Lin Yan; Chaudhari, Aparna; Iguchi, Taisen; Nagahama, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Despite identification of several sex-determining genes in non-mammalian vertebrates, their detailed molecular cascades of sex determination/differentiation are not known. Here, we used a novel RNAi to characterise the molecular mechanism of Dmy (the sex-determining gene of medaka)-mediated masculinity in XY fish. Dmy knockdown (Dmy-KD) suppressed male pathway (Gsdf, Sox9a2, etc.) and favoured female cascade (Rspo1, etc.) in embryonic XY gonads, resulting in a fertile male-to-female sex-reversal. Gsdf, Sox9a2, and Rspo1 directly interacted with Dmy, and co-injection of Gsdf and Sox9a2 re-established masculinity in XY-Dmy-KD transgenics, insinuating that Dmy initiates masculinity by stimulating and suppressing Gsdf/Sox9a2 and Rspo1 expression, respectively. Gonadal expression of Wt1a starts prior to Dmy and didn’t change upon Dmy-KD. Furthermore, Wt1a stimulated the promoter activity of Dmy, suggesting Wt1a as a regulator of Dmy. These findings provide new insights into the role of vertebrate sex-determining genes associated with the molecular interplay between the male and female pathways. PMID:26806354

  12. Antigenic relationships between petunia peroxidase a and specific peroxidase isoenzymes in other Solanaceae.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, T; de Jong, A; Wijsman, H J; van Loon, L C

    1990-07-01

    A highly specific rabbit antiserum raised against peroxidase (PRXa) from petunia (Petunia hybrida) was used to investigate the antigenic relatedness of peroxidases in the Solanaceae. After SDS-PAGE of crude leaf extracts from a large number of species of this family, immunoblotting revealed that cross-reacting protein bands were present in all species tested. In order to determine whether these protein bands represent peroxidases, the peroxidase isoenzymes in thorn apple (Datura stramonium L.), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.), sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum L.), potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) were further analyzed. Immunoblots obtained after native PAGE revealed that the antiserum only recognized fast-moving peroxidase isoenzymes that are localized in the apoplast. Despite their serological relatedness, these peroxidases differed with respect to heat stability and apparent molecular weight. Differences in avidity for the petunia PRXa antiserum were suggested by immunoprecipitation with antibodies bound to protein A-Sepharose. The antiserum did not react with peroxidases from horseradish (Armoracea rusticana Gaertn., Mey and Scherb), turnip (Brassica napus L.), African marigold (Tagetes cresta L.), maize (Zea mays L.), and oats (Avena sativa L.). Apparently, the Solanaceae contain orthologous genes encoding the fast-moving anionic peroxidases homologous to petunia PRXa.

  13. Cigarette Smoke Impairs A2A Adenosine Receptor Mediated Wound Repair through Up-regulation of Duox-1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zhi; Zhang, Hui; Dixon, Jendayi; Traphagen, Nicole; Wyatt, Todd A.; Kharbanda, Kusum; Simet Chadwick, Samantha; Kolliputi, Narasaiah; Allen-Gipson, Diane S.

    2017-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) exposure and intrinsic factors such as the NADPH oxidases produce high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), ensuing inflammatory tissue injury. We previously demonstrated that CS-generated ROS, particularly hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), impaired adenosine stimulated wound repair. We hypothesized that CS exposure modulates expression of Dual oxidase 1 (Duox-1), a NADPH oxidases known to generate H2O2. To test this hypothesis, we used human bronchial epithelial cell line Nuli-1 and C57BL/6 mice. Cells were treated with 5% CS extract (CSE) for various periods of time, and mice were exposed to whole body CS for six weeks. Both CSE and CS treatment induced increased expression of Duox-1, and silencing of Doux-1 improved the rate of cell wound repair induced by CSE treatment. Nuli-1 cells pretreated with thapsigargin but not calcium ionophore exhibited increased Duox-1 mRNA expression. CSE treatment stimulated PKCα activation, which was effectively blocked by pretreatment with diphenylene iodonium, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor. Compared to control, lungs from CS-exposed mice showed a significant increase in PKCα activity and Duox-1 expression. Collectively, the data demonstrated that CS exposure upregulates expression of Duox-1 protein. This further leads to H2O2 production and PKCα activation, inhibiting A2AAR-stimulated wound repair. PMID:28337995

  14. From Zinnia to Arabidopsis: approaching the involvement of peroxidases in lignification.

    PubMed

    Novo-Uzal, Esther; Fernández-Pérez, Francisco; Herrero, Joaquín; Gutiérrez, Jorge; Gómez-Ros, Laura V; Bernal, María Ángeles; Díaz, José; Cuello, Juan; Pomar, Federico; Pedreño, María Ángeles

    2013-09-01

    Zinnia elegans constitutes one of the most useful model systems for studying xylem differentiation, which simultaneously involves secondary cell wall synthesis, cell wall lignification, and programmed cell death. Likewise, the in vitro culture system of Z. elegans has been the best characterized as the differentiation of mesophyll cells into tracheary elements allows study of the biochemistry and physiology of xylogenesis free from the complexity that heterogeneous plant tissues impose. Moreover, Z. elegans has emerged as an excellent plant model to study the involvement of peroxidases in cell wall lignification. This is due to the simplicity and duality of the lignification pattern shown by the stems and hypocotyls, and to the basic nature of the peroxidase isoenzyme. This protein is expressed not only in hypocotyls and stems but also in mesophyll cells transdifferentiating into tracheary elements. Therefore, not only does this peroxidase fulfil all the catalytic requirements to be involved in lignification overcoming all restrictions imposed by the polymerization step, but also its expression is inherent in lignification. In fact, its basic nature is not exceptional since basic peroxidases are differentially expressed during lignification in other model systems, showing unusual and unique biochemical properties such as oxidation of syringyl moieties. This review focuses on the experiments which led to a better understanding of the lignification process in Zinnia, starting with the basic knowledge about the lignin pattern in this plant, how lignification takes place, and how a sole basic peroxidase with unusual catalytic properties is involved and regulated by hormones, H2O2, and nitric oxide.

  15. The SKPO-1 peroxidase functions in the hypodermis to protect Caenorhabditis elegans from bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Tiller, George R; Garsin, Danielle A

    2014-06-01

    In recent years, the synergistic relationship between NADPH oxidase (NOX)/dual oxidase (DUOX) enzymes and peroxidases has received increased attention. Peroxidases utilize NOX/DUOX-generated H2O2 for a myriad of functions including, but not limited to, thyroid hormone biosynthesis, cross-linking extracellular matrices (ECM), and immune defense. We postulated that one or more peroxidases produced by Caenorhabditis elegans would act in host defense, possibly in conjunction with BLI-3, the only NOX/DUOX enzyme encoded by the genome that is expressed. Animals exposed to RNA interference (RNAi) of the putative peroxidase genes were screened for susceptibility to the human pathogen Enterococcus faecalis. One of three genes identified, skpo-1 (ShkT-containing peroxidase), was studied in depth. Animals mutant for this gene were significantly more susceptible to E. faecalis, but not Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A slight decrease in longevity was also observed. The skpo-1 mutant animals had a dumpy phenotype of incomplete penetrance; half the animals displayed a dumpy phenotype ranging from slight to severe, and half were morphologically wild type. The SKPO-1 protein contains the critical catalytic residues necessary for peroxidase activity, and in a whole animal assay, more H2O2 was detected from the mutant compared to the wild type, consistent with the loss of an H2O2 sink. By using tissue-specific skpo-1 RNAi and immunohistochemical localization with an anti-SKPO-1 antibody, it was determined that the peroxidase is functionally and physically present in the hypodermis. In conclusion, these results characterize a peroxidase that functions protectively in the hypodermis during exposure to E. faecalis.

  16. Halide peroxidase in tissues that interact with bacteria in the host squid Euprymna scolopes.

    PubMed

    Small, A L; McFall-Ngai, M J

    1999-03-15

    An enzyme with similarities to myeloperoxidase, the antimicrobial halide peroxidase in mammalian neutrophils, occurs abundantly in the light organ tissue of Euprymna scolopes, a squid that maintains a beneficial association with the luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri. Using three independent assays typically applied to the analysis of halide peroxidase enzymes, we directly compared the activity of the squid enzyme with that of human myeloperoxidase. One of these methods, the diethanolamine assay, confirmed that the squid peroxidase requires halide ions for its activity. The identification of a halide peroxidase in a cooperative bacterial association suggested that this type of enzyme can function not only to control pathogens, but also to modulate the interactions of host animals with their beneficial partners. To determine whether the squid peroxidase functions under both circumstances, we examined its distribution in a variety of host tissues, including those that typically interact with bacteria and those that do not. Tissues interacting with bacteria included those that have specific cooperative associations with bacteria (i.e., the light organ and accessory nidamental gland) and those that have transient nonspecific interactions with bacteria (i.e., the gills, which clear the cephalopod circulatory system of invading microorganisms). These bacteria-associated tissues were compared with the eye, digestive gland, white body, and ink-producing tissues, which do not typically interact directly with bacteria. Peroxidase enzyme assays, immunocytochemical localization, and DNA-RNA hybridizations showed that the halide-dependent peroxidase is consistently expressed in high concentration in tissues that interact bacteria. Elevated levels of the peroxidase were also found in the ink-producing tissues, which are known to have enzymatic pathways associated with antimicrobial activity. Taken together, these data suggest that the host uses a common biochemical response to

  17. Expression of group IIA phospholipase A2 is an independent predictor of favorable outcome for patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi; Huang, Chun-Jin; Yu, Guan-Zhen; Wang, Jie-Jun; Wang, Rui; Li, Yu-Mei; Wu, Qiong

    2013-10-01

    Growing evidence suggests that phospholipase A2 (PLA2) plays a pivotal role in tumorigenesis in human gastrointestinal cancer. One of the well-studied isoforms of PLA2, group IIA PLA2 (PLA2G2A), appears to exert its protumorigenic or antitumorigenic effects in a tissue-specific manner. The present study was designed to determine the expression profile and prognostic value of PLA2G2A in gastric cancer in a large Chinese cohort. By using real-time polymerase chain reaction, the amount of PLA2G2A messenger RNA in 60 pairs of fresh gastric tumors and adjacent noncancerous mucosa was measured. The immunostaining of PLA2G2A in 866 gastric cancers with paired noncancerous tissues was assayed. No expression of PLA2G2A was found in normal gastric mucosa, and focal expression of PLA2G2A was noticed in intestinal metaplasia, whereas significantly increased expression of PLA2G2A was observed in the cytoplasm of gastric cancer cells. Furthermore, the extent of PLA2G2A expression was associated with tumor size (P < .001), tumor differentiation (P = .001), T class (P < .001), N class (P < .001), and TNM stage (P < .001) of gastric cancer. Multivariate analysis showed that PLA2G2A expression was an independent predictor of survival for patients with gastric cancer (P = .024). Expression of PLA2G2A seems to be protective for patients with gastric cancer (hazard ratio, 1.423; 95% confidence interval, 1.047-1.935), and it may be a target for achieving better treatment outcomes.

  18. Legionella pneumophila Catalase-Peroxidases: Cloning of the katB Gene and Studies of KatB Function

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Purnima; Steinman, Howard M.

    1998-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative organism of Legionnaires’ pneumonia, is spread by aerosolization from man-made reservoirs, e.g., water cooling towers and air conditioning ducts, whose nutrient-poor conditions are conducive to entrance into stationary phase. Exposure to starvation conditions is known to induce several virulence traits in L. pneumophila. Since catalase-peroxidases have been extremely useful markers of the stationary-phase response in many bacterial species and may be an avenue for identifying virulence genes in L. pneumophila, an investigation of these enzymes was initiated. L. pneumophila was shown to contain two bifunctional catalase-peroxidases and to lack monofunctional catalase and peroxidase. The gene encoding the KatB catalase-peroxidase was cloned and sequenced, and lacZ fusion and null mutant strains were constructed. Null mutants in katB are delayed in the infection and lysis of cultured macrophage-like cell lines. KatB is similar to the KatG catalase-peroxidase of Escherichia coli in its 20-fold induction during exponential growth and in playing a role in resistance to hydrogen peroxide. Analysis of the changes in katB expression and in the total catalase and peroxidase activity during growth indicates that the 8- to 10-fold induction of peroxidase activity that occurs in stationary phase is attributable to KatA, the second L. pneumophila catalase-peroxidase. PMID:9765568

  19. Regulation of expression of the Haemophilus ducreyi LspB and LspA2 proteins by CpxR.

    PubMed

    Labandeira-Rey, Maria; Mock, Jason R; Hansen, Eric J

    2009-08-01

    The LspA1, LspA2, and LspB proteins of Haemophilus ducreyi comprise a two-partner secretion system that has been shown to be necessary for H. ducreyi to inhibit phagocytosis by immune cells in vitro. Inactivation of lspA1 resulted in increased levels of LspA2, suggesting that these two proteins are differentially controlled (C. J. Ward et al., Infect. Immun. 71:2478-2486, 2003). Expression of LspA2 but not LspA1 was shown to be both growth phase dependent and affected by the presence of fetal calf serum (FCS) in the growth medium. In addition, neither LspA1 nor LspA2 could be detected in culture supernatant fluid in the absence of FCS. DNA microarray analysis revealed that 324 H. ducreyi genes were differentially regulated after growth in the presence of FCS. Among these, the CpxRA two-component sensory transduction system was downregulated by the presence of FCS. Inactivation of cpxR resulted in increased expression of both LspB and LspA2. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that a recombinant H. ducreyi CpxR protein bound the promoter region of the lspB-lspA2 operon. The cpxR and cpxA genes were shown to be part of an operon containing two additional genes in H. ducreyi 35000HP. This is the first description of a two-component sensory transduction system regulating a proven virulence factor of H. ducreyi.

  20. Cytosolic Phospholipase A2α and Eicosanoids Regulate Expression of Genes in Macrophages Involved in Host Defense and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Suram, Saritha; Silveira, Lori J.; Mahaffey, Spencer; Brown, Gordon D.; Bonventre, Joseph V.; Williams, David L.; Gow, Neil A. R.; Bratton, Donna L.; Murphy, Robert C.; Leslie, Christina C.

    2013-01-01

    The role of Group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2α) activation in regulating macrophage transcriptional responses to Candida albicans infection was investigated. cPLA2α releases arachidonic acid for the production of eicosanoids. In mouse resident peritoneal macrophages, prostacyclin, prostaglandin E2 and leukotriene C4 were produced within minutes of C. albicans addition before cyclooxygenase 2 expression. The production of TNFα was lower in C. albicans-stimulated cPLA2α+/+ than cPLA2α-/- macrophages due to an autocrine effect of prostaglandins that increased cAMP to a greater extent in cPLA2α+/+ than cPLA2α-/- macrophages. For global insight, differential gene expression in C. albicans-stimulated cPLA2α+/+ and cPLA2α-/- macrophages (3 h) was compared by microarray. cPLA2α+/+ macrophages expressed 86 genes at lower levels and 181 genes at higher levels than cPLA2α-/- macrophages (≥2-fold, p<0.05). Several pro-inflammatory genes were expressed at lower levels (Tnfα, Cx3cl1, Cd40, Ccl5, Csf1, Edn1, CxCr7, Irf1, Irf4, Akna, Ifnγ, several IFNγ-inducible GTPases). Genes that dampen inflammation (Socs3, Il10, Crem, Stat3, Thbd, Thbs1, Abca1) and genes involved in host defense (Gja1, Csf3, Trem1, Hdc) were expressed at higher levels in cPLA2α+/+ macrophages. Representative genes expressed lower in cPLA2α+/+ macrophages (Tnfα, Csf1) were increased by treatment with a prostacyclin receptor antagonist and protein kinase A inhibitor, whereas genes expressed at higher levels (Crem, Nr4a2, Il10, Csf3) were suppressed. The results suggest that C. albicans stimulates an autocrine loop in macrophages involving cPLA2α, cyclooxygenase 1-derived prostaglandins and increased cAMP that globally effects expression of genes involved in host defense and inflammation. PMID:23950842

  1. Anionic peroxidase production by Arnebia euchroma callus.

    PubMed

    Farhadi, Sahar; Haghbeen, Kamahldin; Marefatjo, Mohammad-Javad; Hoor, Marjan Ghiyami; Zahiri, Hossein Shahbani; Rahimi, Karim

    2011-01-01

    Arnebia euchroma callus, obtained from the root cell culture of an Iranian native specimen, has gained a doubling time of 63 H after regular subculturing on Linsmaier-Skoog (LS) medium containing sugar (50 g/L), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (10(-6) M), and kinetin (10(-5) M) under darkness at 25°C. Despite the observed somaclonal variations, peroxidase production by the A. euchroma calli has been stable over 4 years under the aforementioned conditions. Isoelectric focusing experiments revealed that the partially purified A. euchroma peroxidases (AePoxs) are mainly anionic with pI values of about 5.5 and 6.6. AePox reaches its optimal activity at 55°C and pH 7.5. Results of the various kinetic studies suggest that AePox belongs to the type III plant peroxidases with no activity for the oxidation of 3-indoleacetic acid, but seems to play a role in the lignin biosynthesis and H(2) O(2) regulation during the proliferation of the A. euchroma cells on LS medium. Comparing the biochemical properties of AePox with horseradish peroxidase and in view of the ease of solid cell culture, the A. euchroma callus could be considered as a source of plant peroxidase for some biotechnological applications. Copyright © 2011 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. (Molecular characteristics of the lignin forming peroxidase)

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    Since this manuscript was submitted we have conducted a more thorough physiological analysis of water relations in wild-type and peroxidase overproducing plants. These experiments include pressure bomb, plasmolysis, and membrane integrity analysis. We are also in the process of analyzing other phenotypes in peroxidase overproducer plants such as excessive browning of tissue, the rapid death of tissue in culture, and poor germination of seed. Transformed plants of Nicotiana tabacum and Nicotiana sylvestris were obtained which have peroxidase activity 3--7 fold lower than wild-type plants. This was done by introducing a chimeric gene composed of the CaMV 35S promoter and the 5' half of the tobacco anionic peroxidase cDNA in the antisense RNA configuration. A manuscript which describes this work is being written, and will be submitted for publication in January 1990. The anionic peroxidase gene has been cloned by hybridization to the cloned cDNA. The entire gene is contained on an 8.7kb fragment within a lambda phage clone. Several smaller DNA fragments have been subcloned, and some have been sequenced. One exon within the coding sequence has been sequenced, along with the partial sequence of two introns. Further sequencing is being carried-out to identify the promoter, which will be later joined to a reporter gene. 6 figs.

  3. Mechanisms of catalase activity of heme peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Vlasits, Jutta; Jakopitsch, Christa; Bernroitner, Margit; Zamocky, Marcel; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2010-08-01

    In the absence of exogenous electron donors monofunctional heme peroxidases can slowly degrade hydrogen peroxide following a mechanism different from monofunctional catalases. This pseudo-catalase cycle involves several redox intermediates including Compounds I, II and III, hydrogen peroxide reduction and oxidation reactions as well as release of both dioxygen and superoxide. The rate of decay of oxyferrous complex determines the rate-limiting step and the enzymes' resistance to inactivation. Homologous bifunctional catalase-peroxidases (KatGs) are unique in having both a peroxidase and high hydrogen dismutation activity without inhibition reactions. It is demonstrated that KatGs follow a similar reaction pathway as monofunctional peroxidases, but use a unique post-translational distal modification (Met+-Tyr-Trp adduct) in close vicinity to the heme as radical site that enhances turnover of oxyferrous heme and avoids release of superoxide. Similarities and differences between monofunctional peroxidases and bifunctional KatGs are discussed and mechanisms of pseudo-catalase activity are proposed. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. High-level expression, purification and characterization of a constitutively active thromboxane A2 receptor polymorphic variant.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bing; Chakraborty, Raja; Eilers, Markus; Dakshinamurti, Shyamala; O'Neil, Joe D; Smith, Steven O; Bhullar, Rajinder P; Chelikani, Prashen

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) exhibit some level of basal signaling even in the absence of a bound agonist. This basal or constitutive signaling can have important pathophysiological roles. In the past few years, a number of high resolution crystal structures of GPCRs have been reported, including two crystal structures of constitutively active mutants (CAM) of the dim-light receptor, rhodopsin. The structural characterizations of CAMs are impeded by the lack of proper expression systems. The thromboxane A2 receptor (TP) is a GPCR that mediates vasoconstriction and promotes thrombosis in response to the binding of thromboxane. Here, we report on the expression and purification of a genetic variant and CAM in TP, namely A160T, using tetracycline-inducible HEK293S-TetR and HEK293S (GnTI¯)-TetR cell lines. Expression of the TP and the A160T genes in these mammalian cell lines resulted in a 4-fold increase in expression to a level of 15.8 ±0.3 pmol of receptor/mg of membrane protein. The receptors expressed in the HEK293S (GnTI(-))-TetR cell line showed homogeneous glycosylation. The functional yield of the receptors using a single step affinity purification was 45 µg/10⁶ cells. Temperature- dependent secondary structure changes of the purified TP and A160T receptors were characterized using circular dichroism (CD) spectropolarimetry. The CD spectra shows that the loss of activity or thermal sensitivity that was previously observed for the A160T mutant, is not owing to large unfolding of the protein but rather to a more subtle effect. This is the first study to report on the successful high-level expression, purification, and biophysical characterization of a naturally occurring, diffusible ligand activated GPCR CAM.

  5. High-Level Expression, Purification and Characterization of a Constitutively Active Thromboxane A2 Receptor Polymorphic Variant

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bing; Chakraborty, Raja; Eilers, Markus; Dakshinamurti, Shyamala; O’Neil, Joe D.; Smith, Steven O.; Bhullar, Rajinder P.; Chelikani, Prashen

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) exhibit some level of basal signaling even in the absence of a bound agonist. This basal or constitutive signaling can have important pathophysiological roles. In the past few years, a number of high resolution crystal structures of GPCRs have been reported, including two crystal structures of constitutively active mutants (CAM) of the dim-light receptor, rhodopsin. The structural characterizations of CAMs are impeded by the lack of proper expression systems. The thromboxane A2 receptor (TP) is a GPCR that mediates vasoconstriction and promotes thrombosis in response to the binding of thromboxane. Here, we report on the expression and purification of a genetic variant and CAM in TP, namely A160T, using tetracycline-inducible HEK293S-TetR and HEK293S (GnTI¯)-TetR cell lines. Expression of the TP and the A160T genes in these mammalian cell lines resulted in a 4-fold increase in expression to a level of 15.8 ±0.3 pmol of receptor/mg of membrane protein. The receptors expressed in the HEK293S (GnTI-)-TetR cell line showed homogeneous glycosylation. The functional yield of the receptors using a single step affinity purification was 45 µg/106 cells. Temperature- dependent secondary structure changes of the purified TP and A160T receptors were characterized using circular dichroism (CD) spectropolarimetry. The CD spectra shows that the loss of activity or thermal sensitivity that was previously observed for the A160T mutant, is not owing to large unfolding of the protein but rather to a more subtle effect. This is the first study to report on the successful high-level expression, purification, and biophysical characterization of a naturally occurring, diffusible ligand activated GPCR CAM. PMID:24086743

  6. Akt as a mediator of secretory phospholipase A2 receptor-involved inducible nitric oxide synthase expression.

    PubMed

    Park, Dae-Won; Kim, Jae-Ryong; Kim, Seong-Yong; Sonn, Jong-Kyung; Bang, Ok-Sun; Kang, Shin-Sung; Kim, Jung-Hye; Baek, Suk-Hwan

    2003-02-15

    The induction of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) by group IIA phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) involves the stimulation of a novel signaling cascade. In this study, we demonstrate that group IIA PLA(2) up-regulates the expression of iNOS through a novel pathway that includes M-type secretory PLA(2) receptor (sPLA(2)R), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), and Akt. Group IIA PLA(2) stimulated iNOS expression and promoted nitrite production in a dose- and time-dependent manner in Raw264.7 cells. Upon treating with group IIA PLA(2), Akt is phosphorylated in a PI3K-dependent manner. Pretreatment with LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, strongly suppressed group IIA PLA(2)-induced iNOS expression and PI3K/Akt activation. The promoter activity of iNOS was stimulated by group IIA PLA(2), and this was suppressed by LY294002. Transfection with Akt cDNA resulted in Akt protein overexpression in Raw264.7 cells and effectively enhanced the group IIA PLA(2)-induced reporter activity of the iNOS promoter. M-type sPLA(2)R was highly expressed in Raw264.7 cells. Overexpression of M-type sPLA(2)R enhanced group IIA PLA(2)-induced promoter activity and iNOS protein expression, and these effects were abolished by LY294002. However, site-directed mutation in residue responsible for PLA(2) catalytic activity markedly reduced their ability to production of nitrites and expression of iNOS. These results suggest that group IIA PLA(2) induces nitrite production by involving of M-type sPLA(2)R, which then mediates signal transduction events that lead to PI3K/Akt activation.

  7. Early changes in gene expression induced by blue light irradiation of A2E-laden retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    van der Burght, Barbro W; Hansen, Morten; Olsen, Jørgen; Zhou, Jilin; Wu, Yalin; Nissen, Mogens H; Sparrow, Janet R

    2013-11-01

    Accumulation of bisretinoids as lipofuscin in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is implicated in the pathogenesis of some blinding diseases including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). To identify genes whose expression may change under conditions of bisretinoid accumulation, we investigated the differential gene expression in RPE cells that had accumulated the lipofuscin fluorophore A2E and were exposed to blue light (430 nm). A2E-laden RPE cells were exposed to blue light (A2E/430 nm) at various time intervals. Cell death was quantified using Dead Red staining, and RNA levels for the entire genome was determined using DNA microarrays (Affymetrix GeneChip Human Genome 2.0 Plus). Array results for selected genes were confirmed by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Principal component analysis revealed that the A2E-laden RPE cells irradiated with blue light were clearly distinguishable from the control samples. We found differential regulation of genes belonging to the following functional groups: transcription factors, stress response, apoptosis and immune response. Among the last mentioned were downregulation of four genes that coded for proteins that have an inhibitory effect on the complement cascade: (complement factor H, complement factor H-related 1, complement factor I and vitronectin) and of two belonging to the classical pathway (complement component 1, s subcomponent and complement component 1, r subcomponent). This study demonstrates that blue light irradiation of A2E-laden RPE cells can alter the transcription of genes belonging to different functional pathways including stress response, apoptosis and the immune response. We suggest that these molecules may be associated to the pathogenesis of AMD and can potentially serve as future therapeutic targets. © 2013 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Peroxidase release induced by ozone in Sedum album leaves: involvement of Ca/sup 2 +/. [Sedum album

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, F.J.; Penel, C.; Greppin, H.

    1984-04-01

    The effect of ozone was studied on the peroxidase activity from various compartments of Sedum album leaves (epidermis, intercellular fluid, residual cell material, and total cell material). The greatest increase following a 2-hour ozone exposure (0.4 microliters O/sub 3/ per liter) was observed in extracellular peroxidases. Most of the main bands of peroxidase activity separated by isoelectric focusing exhibited an increase upon exposure to ozone. Incubation experiments with isolated peeled or unpeeled leaves showed that leaves from ozone-treated plants release much more peroxidases in the medium than untreated leaves. The withdrawal of Ca/sup 2 +/ ions reduced the level of extracellular peroxidase activity either in whole plants or in incubation experiments. This reduction and the activation obtained after addition of Ca/sup 2 +/ resulted from a direct requirment of Ca/sup 2 +/ by the enzyme and from an effect of Ca/sup 2 +/ on peroxidase secretion. The ionophore A23187 promoted an increase of extracellular peroxidase activity only in untreated plants. The release of peroxidases by untreated and ozone-treated leaves is considerably lowered by metabolic inhibitors (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea and sodium azide) and by puromycin.

  9. Intrinsic Peroxidase-like Activity of Ficin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yufang; Shen, Dongjun; Long, Yijuan; Xie, Zhixiong; Zheng, Huzhi

    2017-02-01

    Ficin is classified as a sulfhydryl protease isolated from the latex of fig trees. In most cases, a particular enzyme fits a few types of substrate and catalyzes one type of reaction. In this investigation, we found sufficient proofs for the intrinsic peroxidase-like activity of ficin and designed experiments to examine its effectiveness in a variety of scenarios. Ficin can transform peroxidase substrates to colored products in the existence of H2O2. Our results also indicate that the active sites of peroxidase-like activity of ficin are different from that of protease, which reveals that one enzyme may catalyze more than one kind of substrate to perform different types of reactions. On the basis of these findings, H2O2 releasing from MCF-7 cells was detected successfully. Our findings support a wider application of ficin in biochemistry and open up the possibility of utilizing ficin as enzymatic mimics in biotechnology and environmental monitoring.

  10. Intrinsic Peroxidase-like Activity of Ficin

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yufang; Shen, Dongjun; Long, Yijuan; Xie, Zhixiong; Zheng, Huzhi

    2017-01-01

    Ficin is classified as a sulfhydryl protease isolated from the latex of fig trees. In most cases, a particular enzyme fits a few types of substrate and catalyzes one type of reaction. In this investigation, we found sufficient proofs for the intrinsic peroxidase-like activity of ficin and designed experiments to examine its effectiveness in a variety of scenarios. Ficin can transform peroxidase substrates to colored products in the existence of H2O2. Our results also indicate that the active sites of peroxidase-like activity of ficin are different from that of protease, which reveals that one enzyme may catalyze more than one kind of substrate to perform different types of reactions. On the basis of these findings, H2O2 releasing from MCF-7 cells was detected successfully. Our findings support a wider application of ficin in biochemistry and open up the possibility of utilizing ficin as enzymatic mimics in biotechnology and environmental monitoring. PMID:28224979

  11. Developmental and heat stress-regulated expression of HsfA2 and small heat shock proteins in tomato anthers

    PubMed Central

    Giorno, Filomena; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Grillo, Stefania; Scharf, Klaus-Dieter; Vriezen, Wim H.; Mariani, Celestina

    2010-01-01

    The high sensitivity of male reproductive cells to high temperatures may be due to an inadequate heat stress response. The results of a comprehensive expression analysis of HsfA2 and Hsp17-CII, two important members of the heat stress system, in the developing anthers of a heat-tolerant tomato genotype are reported here. A transcriptional analysis at different developmental anther/pollen stages was performed using semi-quantitative and real-time PCR. The messengers were localized using in situ RNA hybridization, and protein accumulation was monitored using immunoblot analysis. Based on the analysis of the gene and protein expression profiles, HsfA2 and Hsp17-CII are finely regulated during anther development and are further induced under both short and prolonged heat stress conditions. These data suggest that HsfA2 may be directly involved in the activation of protection mechanisms in the tomato anther during heat stress and, thereby, may contribute to tomato fruit set under adverse temperatures. PMID:19854799

  12. Molecular cloning of two novel peroxidases and their response to salt stress and salicylic acid in the living fossil Ginkgo biloba

    PubMed Central

    Novo-Uzal, Esther; Gutiérrez, Jorge; Martínez-Cortés, Teresa; Pomar, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Peroxidase isoenzymes play diverse roles in plant physiology, such as lignification and defence against pathogens. The actions and regulation of many peroxidases are not known with much accuracy. A number of studies have reported direct involvement of peroxidase isoenzymes in the oxidation of monolignols, which constitutes the last step in the lignin biosynthesis pathway. However, most of the available data concern only peroxidases and lignins from angiosperms. This study describes the molecular cloning of two novel peroxidases from the ‘living fossil’ Ginkgo biloba and their regulation by salt stress and salicylic acid. Methods Suspension cell cultures were used to purify peroxidases and to obtain the cDNAs. Treatments with salicylic acid and sodium chloride were performed and peroxidase activity and gene expression were monitored. Key Results A novel peroxidase was purified, which preferentially used p-hydroxycinnamyl alcohols as substrates and was able to form dehydrogenation polymers in vitro from coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols. Two peroxidase full-length cDNAs, GbPrx09 and GbPrx10, were cloned. Both peroxidases showed high similarity to other basic peroxidases with a putative role in cell wall lignification. Both GbPrx09 and GbPrx10 were expressed in leaves and stems of the plant. Sodium chloride enhanced the gene expression of GbPrx09 but repressed GbPrx10, whereas salicylic acid strongly repressed both GbPrx09 and GbPrx10. Conclusions Taken together, the data suggest the participation of GbPrx09 and GbPrx10 in the developmental lignification programme of the cell wall. Both peroxidases possess the structural characteristics necessary for sinapyl alcohol oxidation. Moreover, GbPrx09 is also involved in lignification induced by salt stress, while salicylic acid-mediated lignification is not a result of GbPrx09 and GbPrx10 enzymatic activity. PMID:25139427

  13. Fast and Specific Assessment of the Halogenating Peroxidase Activity in Leukocyte-enriched Blood Samples.

    PubMed

    Flemmig, Jörg; Schwarz, Pauline; Bäcker, Ingo; Leichsenring, Anna; Lange, Franziska; Arnhold, Jürgen

    2016-07-28

    In this paper a protocol for the quick and standardized enrichment of leukocytes from small whole blood samples is described. This procedure is based on the hypotonic lysis of erythrocytes and can be applied to human samples as well as to blood of non-human origin. The small initial sample volume of about 50 to 100 µl makes this method applicable to recurrent blood sampling from small laboratory animals. Moreover, leukocyte enrichment is achieved within minutes and with low material efforts regarding chemicals and instrumentation, making this method applicable in multiple laboratory environments. Standardized purification of leukocytes is combined with a highly selective staining method to evaluate halogenating peroxidase activity of the heme peroxidases, myeloperoxidase (MPO) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), i.e., the formation of hypochlorous and hypobromous acid (HOCl and HOBr). While MPO is strongly expressed in neutrophils, the most abundant immune cell type in human blood as well as in monocytes, the related enzyme EPO is exclusively expressed in eosinophils. The halogenating activity of these enzymes is addressed by using the almost HOCl- and HOBr-specific dye aminophenyl fluorescein (APF) and the primary peroxidase substrate hydrogen peroxide. Upon subsequent flow cytometry analysis all peroxidase-positive cells (neutrophils, monocytes, eosinophils) are distinguishable and their halogenating peroxidase activity can be quantified. Since APF staining may be combined with the application of cell surface markers, this protocol can be extended to specifically address leukocyte sub-fractions. The method is applicable to detect HOCl and HOBr production both in human and in rodent leukocytes. Given the widely and diversely discussed immunological role of these enzymatic products in chronic inflammatory diseases, this protocol may contribute to a better understanding of the immunological relevance of leukocyte-derived heme peroxidases.

  14. Sequential rooting media and rooting capacity of Sequoiadendron giganteum in vitro. Peroxidase activity as a marker.

    PubMed

    Berthon, J Y; Boyer, N; Gaspar, T

    1987-10-01

    The rooting capacities of tips of seedling, juvenile and mature shoots of Sequoiadendron giganteum were compared on different rooting media (inductive and expressive media) after passage on an elongating medium. None of the cuttings rooted when continuously kept on medium containing the auxin NAA and vitamin D2. Peroxidase activity of all those cuttings on NAA+D2 first increased during the 7-9 first days and decreased in the days after. Rooting was obtained by transfer of the cuttings after periods longer than 7-9 days from the NAA+D2 inductive medium to a basal medium supplemented or not with rutin (expressive medium). The rooting capacity was emphasized by rutin treatment and was in correlation with the peroxidase peak reached on the NAA+D2 medium. Seedlings, characterised by the highest peroxidase activity, were most performing in rooting.

  15. Apolipoprotein CIII regulates lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 expression via the MAPK and NFκB pathways.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaolei; Wang, Tiedong; Zhang, Jifeng; Liu, Xingxing; Li, Zhuang; Wang, Gangqi; Song, Qi; Pang, Daxin; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Tang, Xiaochun

    2015-04-02

    Apolipoprotein CIII (apo CIII), a small glycoprotein that binds to the surfaces of certain lipoproteins, is associated with inflammatory and atherogenic responses in vascular cells. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) has been proposed as an inflammatory biomarker and potential therapeutic target for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Here, we report that apo CIII increases Lp-PLA2 mRNA and protein levels in dose- and time- dependent manner in human monocytic THP-1 cells, and the increase can be abolished by MAPK and NFκB pathway inhibitors. Lp-PLA2 inhibitor, 1-linoleoyl glycerol attenuates the inflammation induced by apo CIII. In turn, exogenous Lp-PLA2 expression upregulates apo CIII and the upregulation can be inhibited by 1-linoleoyl glycerol in HepG2 cells. Moreover, plasma Lp-PLA2 level is correlated with apo CIII expression in pig liver. In vivo, Lp-PLA2 expression in monocytes and its activity in serum were significantly increased in human apo CIII transgenic porcine models compared with wild-type pigs. Our results suggest that Lp-PLA2 and apo CIII expression level is correlated with each other in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Apolipoprotein CIII regulates lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 expression via the MAPK and NFκB pathways

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xiaolei; Wang, Tiedong; Zhang, Jifeng; Liu, Xingxing; Li, Zhuang; Wang, Gangqi; Song, Qi; Pang, Daxin; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Tang, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein CIII (apo CIII), a small glycoprotein that binds to the surfaces of certain lipoproteins, is associated with inflammatory and atherogenic responses in vascular cells. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) has been proposed as an inflammatory biomarker and potential therapeutic target for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Here, we report that apo CIII increases Lp-PLA2 mRNA and protein levels in dose- and time- dependent manner in human monocytic THP-1 cells, and the increase can be abolished by MAPK and NFκB pathway inhibitors. Lp-PLA2 inhibitor, 1-linoleoyl glycerol attenuates the inflammation induced by apo CIII. In turn, exogenous Lp-PLA2 expression upregulates apo CIII and the upregulation can be inhibited by 1-linoleoyl glycerol in HepG2 cells. Moreover, plasma Lp-PLA2 level is correlated with apo CIII expression in pig liver. In vivo, Lp-PLA2 expression in monocytes and its activity in serum were significantly increased in human apo CIII transgenic porcine models compared with wild-type pigs. Our results suggest that Lp-PLA2 and apo CIII expression level is correlated with each other in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25836672

  17. The expansion of thymopoiesis in neonatal mice is dependent on expression of high mobility group a 2 protein (Hmga2).

    PubMed

    Berent-Maoz, Beata; Montecino-Rodriguez, Encarnacion; Fice, Michael; Casero, David; Seet, Christopher S; Crooks, Gay M; Lowry, William; Dorshkind, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Cell number in the mouse thymus increases steadily during the first two weeks after birth. It then plateaus and begins to decline by seven weeks after birth. The factors governing these dramatic changes in cell production are not well understood. The data herein correlate levels of High mobility group A 2 protein (Hmga2) expression with these temporal changes in thymopoiesis. Hmga2 is expressed at high levels in murine fetal and neonatal early T cell progenitors (ETP), which are the most immature intrathymic precursors, and becomes almost undetectable in these progenitors after 5 weeks of age. Hmga2 expression is critical for the initial, exponential expansion of thymopoiesis, as Hmga2 deficient mice have a deficit of ETPs within days after birth, and total thymocyte number is repressed compared to wild type littermates. Finally, our data raise the possibility that similar events occur in humans, because Hmga2 expression is high in human fetal thymic progenitors and falls in these cells during early infancy.

  18. The Expansion of Thymopoiesis in Neonatal Mice Is Dependent on Expression of High Mobility Group A 2 Protein (Hmga2)

    PubMed Central

    Fice, Michael; Casero, David; Seet, Christopher S.; Crooks, Gay M.; Lowry, William; Dorshkind, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Cell number in the mouse thymus increases steadily during the first two weeks after birth. It then plateaus and begins to decline by seven weeks after birth. The factors governing these dramatic changes in cell production are not well understood. The data herein correlate levels of High mobility group A 2 protein (Hmga2) expression with these temporal changes in thymopoiesis. Hmga2 is expressed at high levels in murine fetal and neonatal early T cell progenitors (ETP), which are the most immature intrathymic precursors, and becomes almost undetectable in these progenitors after 5 weeks of age. Hmga2 expression is critical for the initial, exponential expansion of thymopoiesis, as Hmga2 deficient mice have a deficit of ETPs within days after birth, and total thymocyte number is repressed compared to wild type littermates. Finally, our data raise the possibility that similar events occur in humans, because Hmga2 expression is high in human fetal thymic progenitors and falls in these cells during early infancy. PMID:25933067

  19. Thiol Peroxidase Deficiency Leads to Increased Mutational Load and Decreased Fitness in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Alaattin; Lobanov, Alexei V.; Gerashchenko, Maxim V.; Koren, Amnon; Fomenko, Dmitri E.; Koc, Ahmet; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2014-01-01

    Thiol peroxidases are critical enzymes in the redox control of cellular processes that function by reducing low levels of hydroperoxides and regulating redox signaling. These proteins were also shown to regulate genome stability, but how their dysfunction affects the actual mutations in the genome is not known. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has eight thiol peroxidases of glutathione peroxidase and peroxiredoxin families, and the mutant lacking all these genes (∆8) is viable. In this study, we employed two independent ∆8 isolates to analyze the genome-wide mutation spectrum that results from deficiency in these enzymes. Deletion of these genes was accompanied by a dramatic increase in point mutations, many of which clustered in close proximity and scattered throughout the genome, suggesting strong mutational bias. We further subjected multiple lines of wild-type and ∆8 cells to long-term mutation accumulation, followed by genome sequencing and phenotypic characterization. ∆8 lines showed a significant increase in nonrecurrent point mutations and indels. The original ∆8 cells exhibited reduced growth rate and decreased life span, which were further reduced in all ∆8 mutation accumulation lines. Although the mutation spectrum of the two independent isolates was different, similar patterns of gene expression were observed, suggesting the direct contribution of thiol peroxidases to the observed phenotypes. Expression of a single thiol peroxidase could partially restore the growth phenotype of ∆8 cells. This study shows how deficiency in nonessential, yet critical and conserved oxidoreductase function, leads to increased mutational load and decreased fitness. PMID:25173844

  20. Characterization of cytosolic glutathione peroxidase and phospholipid-hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase genes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and their modulation by in vitro selenium exposure.

    PubMed

    Pacitti, D; Wang, T; Page, M M; Martin, S A M; Sweetman, J; Feldmann, J; Secombes, C J

    2013-04-15

    GPx1 (GPx1a, 1b1 and 1b2) and GPx4 (GPx4a1, a2 and b) have been identified. The discovery of a third gene encoding for GPx1 and GPx4 hints that salmonids may have the biggest selenoproteome amongst all vertebrates. Transcripts of GPx4 genes were more highly expressed in most tissues examined in vivo (except blood, head kidney and spleen), whereas those of the GPx1 genes were more responsive to selenium exposure in vitro, especially to the organic form. Interestingly, GPx1a was the most sensitive to selenium availability in non stressful conditions, whereas GPx1b1 and GPx1b2 were highly induced by exposure to selenium levels that had some toxic effects on the cells. Although the different concentrations tested of the two selenocompounds modulate GPx1 transcript expression to various degrees, no significant change of GPx1 enzymatic activity was detectable. Our results lead us to conclude that trout GPx1 transcripts expression level may represent a sensitive biomarker for selenium intake, helping to evaluate if selenium concentration and chemical speciation impact on cell homeostasis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Toxicokinetics of dioxins and other organochlorine compounds in Japanese people: association with hepatic CYP1A2 expression levels.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Michio X; Kunisue, Tatsuya; Ueda, Norifumi; Nose, Masato; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Iwata, Hisato

    2013-03-01

    Concentrations of persistent organochlorine compounds (OCs) including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the liver and adipose tissue of Japanese cadavers were measured, and their toxicokinetics were examined in association with hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A protein expression levels. Total 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin toxic equivalents (TEQs) were 66±74 and 65±57 pg/g lipid weight (mean±S.D.) in the liver and adipose tissue, respectively. Total PCBs (sum of 62 congeners targeted), p,p'-dichlorodiphenyl-dichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) and β-hexachlorocyclohexane (β-HCH) were detected at concentrations over 1 μg/g lipid in both tissues of some specimens. For most of the dioxin-like congeners, total PCBs, p,p'-DDE, oxychlordane, α- and β-HCH, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and tris(4-chlorophenyl)methane (TCPMe), age-dependent increases in concentrations were found in the adipose tissue of males. No such age-dependent trend was observed in the liver, suggesting that there are different mechanisms underlying the hepatic concentrations of OCs. Immunoblot analyses indicated detectable expression of hepatic CYP1A2 protein, whereas no CYP1A1 protein was detected. The CYP1A2 expression levels were positively correlated with concentrations (on wet weight basis) of 2,3,4,7,8-P₅CDF, the dominant TEQ-contributed congeners in the liver, indicating the induction of this CYP. Hepatic CYP1A2 protein levels were strongly correlated with the liver to adipose concentration (L/A) ratios of PCDD/F congeners with more than 5 chlorine atoms. Together with higher concentrations of the congeners in the liver than in the adipose tissue, the observation on L/A ratios of highly chlorinated PCDD/Fs suggests that induced hepatic CYP1A2 protein is involved in their sequestration in this human population, as observed in model animals (rodents). Nonetheless, the magnitude of hepatic sequestration (L

  2. Resveratrol suppresses lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 expression by reducing oxidative stress in macrophages and animal models.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shengnan; Zhang, Mingjun; Yang, Qiangbing; Shen, Ziying; Chen, Jiahuan; Yu, Biao; Wang, He; Qu, Jiali; Pang, Daxin; Ren, Wenzhi; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Tang, Xiaochun

    2017-10-01

    Resveratrol is a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound with known cardioprotective, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2 ) is associated with the risk of cardiovascular disease. Here, we investigated the effects of resveratrol on Lp-PLA2 expression in vitro and in vivo and explored the underlying mechanisms. Human monocytic cells (THP-1) were induced to differentiate into macrophages for an in vitro experimental model. Resveratrol suppressed Lp-PLA2 expression and reduced inflammation; lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 1 μg/mL), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, 10 ng/mL) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were employed to stimulate an increase in Lp-PLA2 expression and ROS levels, and the stimulation was inhibited by resveratrol (50 μM) and other antioxidants. The inhibition of resveratrol was inversed partially by sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) inhibitors (Nicotinamide, 1-10 mM) (p<0.05). Next, a chronic inflammation mouse model induced by a HFD (high fat diet) supplemented with resveratrol 100 mg/kg/day orally for 12 weeks, resulted in resveratrol-induced decreases in the Lp-PLA2 levels in the plasma and liver and increases in the superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) expression in the liver (p<0.05). Based on our results, the protective effects of resveratrol on cardiovascular events may be related to its ability to suppress Lp-PLA2 expression. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. In vivo expression of Nurr1/Nr4a2a in developing retinal amacrine subtypes in zebrafish Tg(nr4a2a:eGFP) transgenics.

    PubMed

    Goodings, Liana; He, Jie; Wood, Alasdair J; Harris, William A; Currie, Peter D; Jusuf, Patricia R

    2017-06-01

    The Nuclear receptor subfamily 4 group A member 2 (Nr4a2) is crucial for the formation or maintenance of dopaminergic neurons in the central nervous system including the retina, where dopaminergic amacrine cells contribute to visual function. Little is known about which cells express Nr4a2 at which developmental stage. Furthermore, whether Nr4a2 functions in combination with other genes is poorly understood. Thus, we generated a novel transgenic to visualize Nr4a2 expression in vivo during zebrafish retinogenesis. A 4.1 kb fragment of the nr4a2a promoter was used to drive green fluorescent protein expression in this Tg(nr4a2a:eGFP) line. In situ hybridization showed that transgene expression follows endogenous RNA expression at a cellular level. Temporal expression and lineages were quantified using in vivo time-lapse imaging in embryos. Nr4a2 expressing retinal subtypes were characterized immunohistochemically. Nr4a2a:eGFP labeled multiple neuron subtypes including 24.5% of all amacrine interneurons. Nr4a2a:eGFP labels all tyrosine hydroxylase labeled dopaminergic amacrine cells, and other nondopaminergic GABAergic amacrine populations. Nr4a2a:eGFP is confined to a specific progenitor lineage identified by sequential expression of the bhlh transcription factor Atonal7 (Atoh7) and Pancreas transcription factor 1a (Ptf1a), and labels postmitotic postmigratory amacrine cells. Thus, developmental Nr4a2a expression indicates a role during late differentiation of specific amacrine interneurons. Tg(nr4a2a:eGFP) is an early marker of distinct neurons including dopaminergic amacrine cells. It can be utilized to assess consequences of gene manipulations and understand whether Nr4a2 only carries out its role in the presence of specific coexpressed genes. This will allow Nr4a2 use to be refined for regenerative approaches. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Molecular and enzymatic characterization of Schistosoma mansoni thioredoxin peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Kwatia, M A; Botkin, D J; Williams, D L

    2000-10-01

    The ability of Schistosoma mansoni to escape oxidative damage from immune system-generated reactive oxygen intermediates has been extensively documented. The limiting step in the parasite's detoxification process appears to be at the level of hydrogen peroxide neutralization. In the present study, the possible role of a novel class of antioxidant enzymes, thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx), in hydrogen peroxide neutralization by schistosomes was investigated. An expressed sequence tag was characterized from the Schistosoma Genome Initiative with high similarity to TPx from other organisms. The gene encodes a polypeptide containing 2 conserved active-site cysteines and flanking amino acids, and 60-70% identity with previously characterized TPx proteins. Recombinant schistosome TPx was enzymatically active and found to have thioredoxin-dependent hydrogen peroxide reducing activity of 4500 nmol hydrogen peroxide/min/mg protein. Native TPx activity was determined to be 48.1 nmol hydrogen peroxide/min/mg protein in adult worm homogenates compared with 46.9 for glutathione peroxidase. TPx activity was precipitated from adult worm homogenates with antibodies prepared against the recombinant protein. Western blotting with antibodies made against recombinant protein showed that TPx was expressed in both male and female adult worms. This is the first demonstration of a TPx activity in schistosomes and our results suggest that TPx plays a significant role in schistosome-host interactions.

  5. Guaiacol Peroxidase Zymography for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkesman, Jeff; Castro, Diana; Contreras, Lellys M.; Kurz, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise presents a novel way to introduce undergraduate students to the specific detection of enzymatic activity by electrophoresis. First, students prepare a crude peroxidase extract and then analyze the homogenate via electrophoresis. Zymography, that is, a SDS-PAGE method to detect enzyme activity, is used to specifically…

  6. Independent evolution of four heme peroxidase superfamilies

    PubMed Central

    Zámocký, Marcel; Hofbauer, Stefan; Schaffner, Irene; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Nicolussi, Andrea; Soudi, Monika; Pirker, Katharina F.; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Obinger, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Four heme peroxidase superfamilies (peroxidase–catalase, peroxidase–cyclooxygenase, peroxidase–chlorite dismutase and peroxidase–peroxygenase superfamily) arose independently during evolution, which differ in overall fold, active site architecture and enzymatic activities. The redox cofactor is heme b or posttranslationally modified heme that is ligated by either histidine or cysteine. Heme peroxidases are found in all kingdoms of life and typically catalyze the one- and two-electron oxidation of a myriad of organic and inorganic substrates. In addition to this peroxidatic activity distinct (sub)families show pronounced catalase, cyclooxygenase, chlorite dismutase or peroxygenase activities. Here we describe the phylogeny of these four superfamilies and present the most important sequence signatures and active site architectures. The classification of families is described as well as important turning points in evolution. We show that at least three heme peroxidase superfamilies have ancient prokaryotic roots with several alternative ways of divergent evolution. In later evolutionary steps, they almost always produced highly evolved and specialized clades of peroxidases in eukaryotic kingdoms with a significant portion of such genes involved in coding various fusion proteins with novel physiological functions. PMID:25575902

  7. Bioconjugation of antibodies to horseradish peroxidase (hrp)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The bioconjugation of an antibody to an enzymatic reporter such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) affords an effective mechanism by which immunoassay detection of a target antigen can be achieved. The use of heterobifunctional cross—linkers to covalently link antibodies to HRP provides a simple and c...

  8. Inhibition of Heme Peroxidases by Melamine

    PubMed Central

    Vanachayangkul, Pattaraporn; Tolleson, William H.

    2012-01-01

    In 2008 melamine-contaminated infant formula and dairy products in China led to over 50,000 hospitalizations of children due to renal injuries. In North America during 2007 and in Asia during 2004, melamine-contaminated pet food products resulted in numerous pet deaths due to renal failure. Animal studies have confirmed the potent renal toxicity of melamine combined with cyanuric acid. We showed previously that the solubility of melamine cyanurate is low at physiologic pH and ionic strength, provoking us to speculate how toxic levels of these compounds could be transported through the circulation without crystallizing until passing into the renal filtrate. We hypothesized that melamine might be sequestered by heme proteins, which could interfere with heme enzyme activity. Four heme peroxidase enzymes were selected for study: horseradish peroxidase (HRP), lactoperoxidase (LPO), and cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 (COX-1 and -2). Melamine exhibited noncompetitive inhibition of HRP (Ki  9.5 ± 0.7 mM), and LPO showed a mixed model of inhibition (Ki  14.5 ± 4.7 mM). The inhibition of HRP and LPO was confirmed using a chemiluminescent peroxidase assay. Melamine also exhibited COX-1 inhibition, but inhibition of COX-2 was not detected. Thus, our results demonstrate that melamine inhibits the activity of three heme peroxidases. PMID:22852071

  9. Guaiacol Peroxidase Zymography for the Undergraduate Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkesman, Jeff; Castro, Diana; Contreras, Lellys M.; Kurz, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory exercise presents a novel way to introduce undergraduate students to the specific detection of enzymatic activity by electrophoresis. First, students prepare a crude peroxidase extract and then analyze the homogenate via electrophoresis. Zymography, that is, a SDS-PAGE method to detect enzyme activity, is used to specifically…

  10. Chracterization of class III peroxidases from switchgrass

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Class III peroxidases (CIIIPRX) catalyze the oxidation of monolignols, generate radicals, and ultimately lead to the formation of lignin. In general, CIIIPRX genes encode a large number of isozymes with ranges of in vitro substrate specificities. In order to elucidate the mode of substrate specifici...

  11. Microbicidal Activity of Vascular Peroxidase 1 in Human Plasma via Generation of Hypochlorous Acid

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Cao, Zehong; Moore, D. Ray; Jackson, Patricia L.; Barnes, Stephen; Lambeth, J. David; Thannickal, Victor J.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the heme peroxidase family play an important role in host defense. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is expressed in phagocytes and is the only animal heme peroxidase previously reported to be capable of using chloride ion as a substrate to form the highly microbicidal species hypochlorous acid (HOCl) at neutral pH. Despite the potent bacterial killing activity of HOCl, individuals who fail to express MPO typically show only a modest increase in some fungal infections. This may point to the existence of redundant host defense mechanisms. Vascular peroxidase 1 (VPO1) is newly discovered member of the heme peroxidase family. VPO1 is expressed in cells of the cardiovascular system and is secreted into the bloodstream. In the present study, we investigate whether VPO1 is capable of generating HOCl and its role in host defense. Like MPO, VPO1 in the presence of H2O2 and chloride generates HOCl. VPO1-dependent HOCl generation was demonstrated by chlorination of taurine and tyrosine using mass spectrometry. In addition, the VPO1/H2O2/Cl− system can cause the chlorination of monochlorodimedone and the oxidation of 5-thio-2-nitrobenzoic acid. Purified VPO1 and VPO1 in plasma mediate bacterial killing that is dependent on chloride and H2O2; killing is inhibited by peroxidase inhibitors and by the H2O2 scavenger catalase. In the presence of erythrocytes, bacterial killing by VPO1 is slightly reduced. Thus, VPO1, in addition to MPO, is the second member of the heme peroxidase family capable of generating HOCl under physiological conditions. VPO1 is likely to participate in host defense, with bactericidal activity mediated through the generation of HOCl. PMID:22526679

  12. Description of the first fungal dye-decolorizing peroxidase oxidizing manganese(II).

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fueyo, Elena; Linde, Dolores; Almendral, David; López-Lucendo, María F; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J; Martínez, Angel T

    2015-11-01

    Two phylogenetically divergent genes of the new family of dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) were found during comparison of the four DyP genes identified in the Pleurotus ostreatus genome with over 200 DyP genes from other basidiomycete genomes. The heterologously expressed enzymes (Pleos-DyP1 and Pleos-DyP4, following the genome nomenclature) efficiently oxidize anthraquinoid dyes (such as Reactive Blue 19), which are characteristic DyP substrates, as well as low redox-potential dyes (such as 2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)) and substituted phenols. However, only Pleos-DyP4 oxidizes the high redox-potential dye Reactive Black 5, at the same time that it displays high thermal and pH stability. Unexpectedly, both enzymes also oxidize Mn(2+) to Mn(3+), albeit with very different catalytic efficiencies. Pleos-DyP4 presents a Mn(2+) turnover (56 s(-1)) nearly in the same order of the two other Mn(2+)-oxidizing peroxidase families identified in the P. ostreatus genome: manganese peroxidases (100 s(-1) average turnover) and versatile peroxidases (145 s(-1) average turnover), whose genes were also heterologously expressed. Oxidation of Mn(2+) has been reported for an Amycolatopsis DyP (24 s(-1)) and claimed for other bacterial DyPs, albeit with lower activities, but this is the first time that Mn(2+) oxidation is reported for a fungal DyP. Interestingly, Pleos-DyP4 (together with ligninolytic peroxidases) is detected in the secretome of P. ostreatus grown on different lignocellulosic substrates. It is suggested that generation of Mn(3+) oxidizers plays a role in the P. ostreatus white-rot lifestyle since three different families of Mn(2+)-oxidizing peroxidase genes are present in its genome being expressed during lignocellulose degradation.

  13. Description of the first fungal dye-decolorizing peroxidase oxidizing manganese(II)

    DOE PAGES

    Fernandez-Fueyo, Elena; Linde, Dolores; Almendral, David; ...

    2015-05-13

    Two phylogenetically divergent genes of the new family of dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) were found during comparison of the four DyP genes identified in the Pleurotus ostreatus genome with over 200 DyP genes from other basidiomycete genomes. The heterologously expressed enzymes (Pleos-DyP1 and Pleos-DyP4, following the genome nomenclature) efficiently oxidize anthraquinoid dyes (such as Reactive Blue 19), which are characteristic DyP substrates, as well as low redox-potential dyes (such as 2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)) and substituted phenols. However, only Pleos-DyP4 oxidizes the high redox-potential dye Reactive Black 5, at the same time that it displays high thermal and pH stability. Unexpectedly, both enzymesmore » also oxidize Mn2+ to Mn3+, albeit with very different catalytic efficiencies. Pleos-DyP4 presents a Mn2+ turnover (56 s–1) nearly in the same order of the two other Mn2+-oxidizing peroxidase families identified in the P. ostreatus genome: manganese peroxidases (100 s–1 average turnover) and versatile peroxidases (145 s–1 average turnover), whose genes were also heterologously expressed. Oxidation of Mn2+ has been reported for an Amycolatopsis DyP (24 s–1) and claimed for other bacterial DyPs, albeit with lower activities, but this is the first time that Mn2+ oxidation is reported for a fungal DyP. Interestingly, Pleos-DyP4 (together with ligninolytic peroxidases) is detected in the secretome of P. ostreatus grown on different lignocellulosic substrates. In conclusion, it is suggested that generation of Mn3+ oxidizers plays a role in the P. ostreatus white-rot lifestyle since three different families of Mn2+-oxidizing peroxidase genes are present in its genome being expressed during lignocellulose degradation.« less

  14. Notch Balances Th17 and Induced Regulatory T Cell Functions in Dendritic Cells by Regulating Aldh1a2 Expression.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Taskia Sultana; Arimochi, Hideki; Maruyama, Satoshi; Ishifune, Chieko; Tsukumo, Shin-Ichi; Kitamura, Akiko; Yasutomo, Koji

    2017-09-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are important for adaptive immune responses through the activation of T cells. The molecular interplay between DCs and T cells determines the magnitude of T cell responses or outcomes of functional differentiation of T cells. In this study, we demonstrated that DCs in mice that are Rbpj deficient in CD11c(+) cells (Rbpj(-/-) mice) promoted the differentiation of IL-17A-producing Th17 cells. Rbpj-deficient DCs expressed little Aldh1a2 protein that is required for generating retinoic acid. Those DCs exhibited a reduced ability for differentiating regulatory T cells induced by TGF-β. Rbpj protein directly regulated Aldh1a2 transcription by binding to its promoter region. The overexpression of Aldh1a2 in Rbpj-deficient DCs negated their Th17-promoting ability. Transfer of naive CD4(+) T cells into Rag1-deficient Rbpj(-/-) mice enhanced colitis with increased Th17 and reduced induced regulatory T cells (iTreg) compared with control Rag1-deficient mice. The cotransfer of iTreg and naive CD4(+) T cells into Rag1-deficient Rbpj(-/-) mice improved colitis compared with transfer of naive CD4(+) T cell alone. Furthermore, cotransfer of DCs from Rbpj(-/-) mice that overexpressed Aldh1a2 or Notch-stimulated DCs together with naive CD4(+) T cells into Rbpj(-/-)Rag1-deficient mice led to reduced colitis with increased iTreg numbers. Therefore, our studies identify Notch signaling in DCs as a crucial balancer of Th17/iTreg, which depends on the direct regulation of Aldh1a2 transcription in DCs. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. Changes in ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, guaiacol peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) nodules under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Jebara, Salwa; Jebara, Moez; Limam, Férid; Aouani, Mohamed Elarbi

    2005-08-01

    To analyse nodular antioxidant enzyme expression in response to salt stress, Phaseolus vulgaris genotype BAT477 was inoculated with reference strain CIAT899, and treated with 50 mM NaCl. Plant growth, nodulation and nitrogen fixing activity were analysed. Results showed that: (1) all parameters, particularly in nodules, were affected by salt treatments, and (2) confirmed preferential growth allocation to roots. The ARA was significantly decreased by salt treatments. Protein dosage confirmed that nodules were more affected by salt treatment than were roots. We analysed superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and peroxidase in nodules, roots and a free rhizobial strain. Our results indicated that SOD and CAT nodular isozymes had bacterial and root origins. The SOD expressed the same CuZn, Fe and Mn SOD isoforms in nodules and roots, whereas in free rhizobia we found only one Fe and Mn SOD. APX and POX nodule and root profiles had only root origins, as no rhizobial band was detected. Under salt stress, plant growth, nitrogen fixation and activities of antioxidant defense enzymes in nodules were affected. Thus, these enzymes appear to preserve symbiosis from stress turned out that NaCl salinity lead to a differential regulation of distinct SOD and POX isoenzyme. So their levels in nodules appeared to be consistent with a symbiotic nitrogen fixing efficiency hypothesis, and they seem to function as the molecular mechanisms underlying the nodule response to salinity.

  16. Creation of a Thermally Tolerant Peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Y; Nakajima, H

    2016-01-01

    An artificial peroxidase with thermal tolerance and high catalytic activity has been successfully prepared by mutagenesis of an electron transfer protein, cytochrome c552 from Thermus thermophilus. The mutant enzymes were rationally designed based on the general peroxidase mechanism and spectroscopic analyses of an active intermediate formed in the catalytic reaction. Stopped flow UV-vis spectroscopy and EPR spectroscopy with a rapid freezing sample technique revealed that the initial double mutant, V49D/M69A, which was designed to reproduce the peroxidase mechanism, formed an active oxo-ferryl heme intermediate with a protein radical predominantly localized on Tyr45 during the catalytic reaction. The magnetic power saturation measurement obtained from EPR studies showed little interaction between the oxo-ferryl heme and the tyrosyl radical. Kinetics studies indicated that the isolated oxo-ferryl heme component in the active intermediate was a possible cause of heme degradation during the reaction with H2O2. Strong interaction between the oxo-ferryl heme and the radical was achieved by replacing Tyr45 with tryptophan (resulting in the Y45W/V49D/M69A mutant), which was similar to a tryptophanyl radical found in active intermediates of some catalase-peroxidases. Compared to the protein radical intermediates of V49D/M69A mutant, those of the Y45W/V49D/M69A mutant showed higher reactivity to an organic substrate than to H2O2. The Y45W/V49D/M69A mutant exhibited improved peroxidase activity and thermal tolerance. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol mediated increases in extracellular peroxidase activity in three species of Lemnaceae.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Dilip K; Scannell, Gillian; Akhmetov, Nurlan; Fitzpatrick, Dara; Jansen, Marcel A K

    2010-11-01

    Chlorinated phenols, or chlorophenols, are persistent priority pollutants that are widespread in the environment. Class III peroxidases are well-characterised plant enzymes that can catalyse the oxidative dechlorination of chlorophenols. Expression of these enzymes by plants is commonly associated with plant stress, therefore limiting scope for phytoremediation. In this study, we have quantitatively compared peroxidase activity and phytotoxicity as a function of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP) concentration in three species of Lemnaceae; Lemna minor, Lemna gibba and Landoltia punctata. Effects of TCP on the growth rates of the three species differed considerably with L. punctata being the most tolerant species. TCP also affected photosynthetic parameters, causing a decrease in open photosystem II reaction centres (qP) and, in L. punctata only, a decrease in non-photochemical quenching (qN). In parallel, TCP exposure resulted in increased peroxidase activity in all three species. Peroxidase activity in L. minor and L. gibba displayed an inverse relationship with biomass accumulation, i.e. the more growth reduction the more peroxidase activity. In contrast, induction of peroxidase activity in L. punctata was bi-phasic, with a TCP-induced activity peak at concentrations that had no major effect on growth, and further induction under phytotoxic concentrations. The mechanism by which L. punctata recognises and responds to low concentrations of an anthropogenic compound, in the absence of wide-ranging stress, remains enigmatic. However, we conclude that this "window" of peroxidase production in the absence of major growth inhibition offers potential for the development of sustainable, peroxidise-mediated phytoremediation systems. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Activation of cytokine production by secreted phospholipase A2 in human lung macrophages expressing the M-type receptor.

    PubMed

    Granata, Francescopaolo; Petraroli, Angelica; Boilard, Eric; Bezzine, Sofiane; Bollinger, James; Del Vecchio, Luigi; Gelb, Michael H; Lambeau, Gerard; Marone, Gianni; Triggiani, Massimo

    2005-01-01

    Secreted phospholipases A(2) (sPLA(2)) are enzymes released in plasma and extracellular fluids during inflammatory diseases. Because human group IB and X sPLA(2)s are expressed in the lung, we examined their effects on primary human lung macrophages (HLM). Both sPLA(2)s induced TNF-alpha and IL-6 release in a concentration-dependent manner by increasing their mRNA expression. This effect was independent of their enzymatic activity because 1) the capacity of sPLA(2)s to mobilize arachidonic acid from HLM was unrelated to their ability to induce cytokine production; and 2) two catalytically inactive isoforms of group IB sPLA(2) (bromophenacyl bromide-inactivated human sPLA(2) and the H48Q mutant of the porcine sPLA(2)) were as effective as the catalytically active sPLA(2)s in inducing cytokine production. HLM expressed the M-type receptor for sPLA(2)s at both mRNA and protein levels, as determined by RT-PCR, immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and flow cytometry. Me-indoxam, which decreases sPLA(2) activity as well as binding to the M-type receptor, suppressed sPLA(2)-induced cytokine production. Incubation of HLM with the sPLA(2)s was associated with phosphorylation of ERK1/2, and a specific inhibitor of this pathway, PD98059, significantly reduced the production of IL-6 elicited by sPLA(2)s. In conclusion, two distinct sPLA(2)s produced in the human lung stimulate cytokine production by HLM via a mechanism that is independent of their enzymatic activity and involves activation of the ERK1/2 pathway. HLM express the M-type receptor, but its involvement in eliciting cytokine production deserves further investigation.

  19. Expression of a cytosolic phospholipase A2 by ovine endometrium on days 11-14 of a simulated oestrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Graf, G A; Burns, P D; Silvia, W J

    1999-03-01

    Oxytocin stimulates the synthesis and secretion of PGF2 alpha from uterine tissues in vivo and in vitro late in the ovine oestrous cycle. The synthesis of eicosanoids is dependent upon the availability of free arachidonic acid which is released through the activity of arachidonate releasing phospholipases. In the present study, the following hypothesis was tested: the ovine endometrium expresses a cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and expression or activity of cPLA2 increases as uterine secretory responsiveness to oxytocin develops late in the oestrous cycle. Endometrial tissue was collected from cyclic ewes on day 15 of the oestrous cycle for the preparation of tissue homogenates and isolation of mRNA to determine whether ovine endometrium expressed a cPLA2. A 110 kDa band was detected by western blotting, indicating the presence of a putative ovine cPLA2. A 834 bp fragment of the ovine cPLA2 shared 87% homology with human and mouse cDNA, and northern blot hybridization analysis indicated a single 3.4 kb transcript. A total of 20 ewes were ovariectomized and treated with progesterone and oestrogen to simulate the oestrous cycle to determine whether the expression or activity of ovine cPLA2 changed during the onset of uterine secretory responsiveness to oxytocin in vivo. On days 11-14 (n = 5 per day) of a simulated oestrous cycle, caruncular endometrium was evaluated for expression of ovine cPLA2 mRNA and protein and the synthesis of PGF2 alpha in response to melittin (a potent stimulator of PLA2 activity). Immunoreactive cPLA2 and cPLA2 mRNA were observed on all days and did not increase during the development of uterine responsiveness to oxytocin in vivo. Similarly, melittin increased the synthesis of PGF2 alpha irrespective of day, indicating the presence of a functional cPLA2 on all days examined. These data indicate that the ovine endometrium expresses a functional cPLA2 and that ample concentrations of cPLA2 are present by day 11 of a simulated oestrous

  20. The study of ascorbate peroxidase, catalase and peroxidase during in vitro regeneration of Argyrolobium roseum.

    PubMed

    Habib, Darima; Chaudhary, Muhammad Fayyaz; Zia, Muhammad

    2014-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate the micropropagation protocol of Argyrolobium roseum (Camb.), an endangered herb exhibiting anti-diabetic and immune-suppressant properties, and antioxidant enzymes pattern is evaluated. Maximum callogenic response (60 %) was observed from leaf explant at 1.0 mg L(-1) 1-nephthalene acetic acid (NAA) and 0.5 mg L(-1) 6-benzyl aminopurine (BA) in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium using hypocotyl and root explants (48 % each). Addition of AgNO3 and PVP in the culture medium led to an increase in callogenic response up to 86 % from leaf explant and 72 % from hypocotyl and root explants. The best shooting response was observed in the presence of NAA, while maximum shoot length and number of shoots were achieved based on BA-supplemented MS medium. The regenerated shoots were rooted and successfully acclimatized under greenhouse conditions. Catalase and peroxidase enzymes showed ascending pattern during in vitro plant development from seed while ascorbate peroxidase showed descending pattern. Totally reverse response of these enzymes was observed during callus induction from three different explants. During shoot induction, catalase and peroxidase increased at high rate while there was a mild reduction in ascorbate peroxidase activity. Catalase and peroxidase continuously increased; on the other hand, ascorbate peroxidase activity decreased during root development and acclimatization states. The protocol described here can be employed for the mass propagation and genetic transformation of this rare herb. This study also highlights the importance and role of ascorbate peroxidase, catalase, and peroxidase in the establishment of A. roseum in vitro culture through callogenesis and organogenesis.

  1. Feruloylated arabinoxylans are oxidatively cross-linked by extracellular maize peroxidase but not by horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Burr, Sally J; Fry, Stephen C

    2009-09-01

    Covalent cross-linking of soluble extracellular arabinoxylans in living maize cultures, which models the cross-linking of wall-bound arabinoxylans, is due to oxidation of feruloyl esters to oligoferuloyl esters and ethers. The oxidizing system responsible could be H2O2/peroxidase, O2/laccase, or reactive oxygen species acting non-enzymically. To distinguish these possibilities, we studied arabinoxylan cross-linking in vivo and in vitro. In living cultures, exogenous, soluble, extracellular, feruloylated [pentosyl-3H]arabinoxylans underwent cross-linking, beginning abruptly 8 d after sub-culture. Cross-linking was suppressed by iodide, an H2O2 scavenger, indicating dependence on endogenous H2O2. However, exogenous H2O2 did not cause precocious cross-linking, despite the constant presence of endogenous peroxidases, suggesting that younger cultures contained natural cross-linking inhibitors. Dialysed culture-filtrates cross-linked [3H]arabinoxylans in vitro only if H2O2 was also added, indicating a peroxidase requirement. This cross-linking was highly ionic-strength-dependent. The peroxidases responsible were heat-labile, although relatively heat-stable peroxidases (assayed on o-dianisidine) were also present. Surprisingly, added horseradish peroxidase, even after heat-denaturation, blocked the arabinoxylan-cross-linking action of maize peroxidases, suggesting that the horseradish protein was a competing substrate for [3H]arabinoxylan coupling. In conclusion, we show for the first time that cross-linking of extracellular arabinoxylan in living maize cultures is an action of apoplastic peroxidases, some of whose unusual properties we report.

  2. Peroxidase Activity of De novo Heme Proteins Immobilized on Electrodes‡

    PubMed Central

    Das, Aditi; Hecht, Michael H.

    2007-01-01

    De novo proteins from designed combinatorial libraries were bound to heme terminated gold electrodes. The novel heme proteins were shown to possess peroxidase activity, and this activity was compared to that of horseradish peroxidase and bovine serum albumin when immobilized in a similar fashion. The various designed proteins from the libraries displayed distinctly different levels of peroxidase activity, thereby demonstrating that the sequence and structure of a designed protein can exert a substantial effect on the peroxidase activity of immobilized heme. PMID:17765314

  3. The Apoplastic Oxidative Burst Peroxidase in Arabidopsis Is a Major Component of Pattern-Triggered Immunity[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Daudi, Arsalan; Cheng, Zhenyu; O’Brien, Jose A.; Mammarella, Nicole; Khan, Safina; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Bolwell, G. Paul

    2012-01-01

    In plants, reactive oxygen species (ROS) associated with the response to pathogen attack are generated by NADPH oxidases or apoplastic peroxidases. Antisense expression of a heterologous French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) peroxidase (FBP1) cDNA in Arabidopsis thaliana was previously shown to diminish the expression of two Arabidopsis peroxidases (peroxidase 33 [PRX33] and PRX34), block the oxidative burst in response to a fungal elicitor, and cause enhanced susceptibility to a broad range of fungal and bacterial pathogens. Here we show that mature leaves of T-DNA insertion lines with diminished expression of PRX33 and PRX34 exhibit reduced ROS and callose deposition in response to microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), including the synthetic peptides Flg22 and Elf26 corresponding to bacterial flagellin and elongation factor Tu, respectively. PRX33 and PRX34 knockdown lines also exhibited diminished activation of Flg22-activated genes after Flg22 treatment. These MAMP-activated genes were also downregulated in unchallenged leaves of the peroxidase knockdown lines, suggesting that a low level of apoplastic ROS production may be required to preprime basal resistance. Finally, the PRX33 knockdown line is more susceptible to Pseudomonas syringae than wild-type plants. In aggregate, these data demonstrate that the peroxidase-dependent oxidative burst plays an important role in Arabidopsis basal resistance mediated by the recognition of MAMPs. PMID:22247251

  4. The molecular characterization of the lignin-forming peroxidase. Progress summary report, April 1, 1989--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.

    1992-04-01

    This laboratory is committed to understanding the function of plant peroxidases via a multi-disciplinary approach. We have chosen the lignin-forming peroxidase from tobacco as the first isoenzyme to be subjected to this comprehensive approach. The goals which were set out upon the initiation of this project were as follows: (1) utilize a cDNA clone to the tobacco anionic peroxidase to generate transgenic plants which either over-produced this isoenzyme or specifically under-produced this isoenzyme via antisense RNA, (2) describe any phenotypic changes resulting from altered peroxidase expression, (3) perform morphological, physiological, and biochemical analysis of the above mentioned plants to help in determining the in planta function for this enzyme, and (4) clone and characterize the gene for the tobacco anionic peroxidase. A summary of progress thus far which includes both published and unpublished work will be presented in three sections: generation and characterization of transgenic plants, description of phenotypes, and biochemical and physiological analysis of peroxidase function, and cloning and characterization of the tobacco anionic peroxidase gene.

  5. Expressions of adenosine A2A receptors in coronary arteries and peripheral blood mononuclear cells are correlated in coronary artery disease patients.

    PubMed

    Gariboldi, Vlad; Vairo, Donato; Guieu, Régis; Marlingue, Marion; Ravis, Eléonore; Lagier, David; Mari, Alissa; Thery, Elsa; Collart, Frédéric; Gaudry, Marine; Bonello, Laurent; Paganelli, Franck; Condo, Jocelyne; Kipson, Nathalie; Fenouillet, Emmanuel; Ruf, Jean; Mottola, Giovanna

    2017-03-01

    Altered coronary blood flow occurs in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Adenosine strongly impacts blood flow mostly via adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) expressed in coronary tissues. As part of a systemic regulation of the adenosinergic system, we compared A2AR expression in situ, and on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in CAD patients. Aortic and coronary tissues, and PBMC were sampled in 20 CAD patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery and consecutively included. Controls were PBMC obtained from 15 healthy subjects. Expression and activity of A2AR were studied by Western blotting and cAMP measurement, respectively. A2AR expression on PBMC was lower in patients than in controls (0.83±0.31 vs 1.2±0.35 arbitrary units; p<0.01), and correlated with A2AR expression in coronary and aortic tissues (Pearson's r: 0.77 and 0.59, p<0.01, respectively). Basal and maximal cAMP productions following agonist stimulation of PBMC were significantly lower in patients than in controls (120±42 vs 191±65 and 360±113 vs 560±215pg/10(6) cells, p<0.05, respectively). In CAD patients, the increase from basal to maximal cAMP production in PBMC and aortic tissues was similar (+300% and +246%, respectively). Expression of A2AR on PBMC correlated with those measured in coronary artery and aortic tissues in CAD patients, A2AR activity of PBMC matched that observed in aorta, and A2AR expression and activity in PBMC were found reduced as compared to controls. Measuring the expression level of A2AR on PBMC represents a good tool to address in situ expression in coronary tissues of CAD patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Measurement of unbound bilirubin by the peroxidase test using Zone Fluidics.

    PubMed

    Ahlfors, Charles E; Marshall, Graham D; Wolcott, Duane K; Olson, Don C; Van Overmeire, Bart

    2006-03-01

    Measuring plasma unbound bilirubin concentration by the peroxidase test is useful in the management of jaundiced newborns. However, the commercially available peroxidase technology is manual, and the unbound bilirubin may be seriously underestimated at the 42-fold sample dilution and single peroxidase concentration used. We investigated improving the test by adapting it to Zone Fluidics, which is a system for automating reactant handling that requires small sample volumes and dilution. A computer-directed Zone Fluidics system was constructed using small diameter tubing to connect in series a water-surfactant reservoir, a bi-directional pump, a multiport selection valve to which peroxidase test reactants (45 mul of sample) are attached with one port open to air, and a spectrophotometer flow cell. Test reactants and air are sequentially aspirated through the valve into the tubing connecting the pump and valve to form a reactant "zone" surrounded by air. The zone is advanced to the spectrophotometer flow cell where total and unbound bilirubin are determined (37 degrees C) from the absorbance at 460 nm at a 2-fold sample dilution and 4 peroxidase concentrations. Imprecision was assessed in artificial controls and newborn plasma. Plasma results were compared with those obtained using the commercial method. The CV for unbound bilirubin in the various controls ranged from 11% to 38% (within day) and 12% to 27% (between days). Triplicate CV measurements for newborn plasma measurements ranged from 0.6% to 31% (mean 11%, n=47). Mean unbound bilirubin by Zone Fluidics was 5-fold higher than that by the commercial method. Zone Fluidics can be used to automate the peroxidase test and overcome many of the limitations of the commercially available peroxidase technology.

  7. Enhancement of AMPA currents and GluR1 membrane expression through PKA-coupled adenosine A(2A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Dias, Raquel B; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Sebastião, Ana M

    2012-02-01

    Phosphorylation of glutamate α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors by Protein Kinase A (PKA) is known to regulate AMPA receptor (AMPAR) trafficking and stabilization at the postsynaptic membrane, which in turn is one of the key mechanisms by which synaptic transmission and plasticity are tuned. However, not much is known as to how Gs-coupled receptors contribute to endogenous PKA-mediated regulation of AMPA receptor function. Here we report that activation of the excitatory A(2A) adenosine receptor by 2-[4-(2-p-carboxyethyl)phenylamino]-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS 21680, 1-30 nM) facilitates AMPA-evoked currents in CA1 pyramidal neurons, by a mechanism dependent on PKA activation, but not on protein synthesis. This modulation of AMPA currents was mimicked by forskolin (1 μM) and did not occur in stratum radiatum interneurons. Superfusion of the A(2A) receptor agonist also caused an increase in the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), as well as in the membrane levels of GluR1 subunits phosphorylated at the PKA site (Ser845). The impact of this increase on GluR1-containing AMPA receptor expression was evidenced by the potentiation of LTP at the CA3-CA1 synapse that followed brief activation of A(2A) receptors. We thus propose that in conditions of increased adenosine availability, A(2A) receptor activation is responsible for setting part of the endogenous GluR1 Ser-845 phosphorylation tonus and hence, the availability of the GluR1-containing AMPA receptor extrasynaptic pool for synaptic insertion and reinforcement of synaptic strength.

  8. A peroxidase related to the mammalian antimicrobial protein myeloperoxidase in the Euprymna–Vibrio mutualism

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Virginia M.; Small, Andrea L.; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J.

    1996-01-01

    Many animal–bacteria cooperative associations occur in highly modified host organs that create a unique environment for housing and maintaining the symbionts. It has been assumed that these specialized organs develop through a program of symbiosis-specific or -enhanced gene expression in one or both partners, but a clear example of this process has been lacking. In this study, we provide evidence for the enhanced production of an enzyme in the symbiotic organ of the squid Euprymna scolopes, which harbors a culture of the luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri. Our data show that this enzyme has a striking biochemical similarity to mammalian myeloperoxidase (MPO; EC 1.11.17), an antimicrobial dianisidine peroxidase that occurs in neutrophils. MPO and the squid peroxidase catalyze the same reaction, have similar apparent subunit molecular masses, and a polyclonal antibody to native human MPO specifically localized a peroxidase-like protein to the bacteria-containing regions of the symbiotic organ. We also provide evidence that a previously described squid cDNA encodes the protein (LO4) that is responsible for the observed dianisidine peroxidase activity. An antibody made against a fragment of LO4 immunoprecipitated dianisidine peroxidase activity from extracts of the symbiotic organ, and reacted against these extracts and human MPO in Western blot analysis. These data suggest that related biochemical mechanisms for the control of bacterial number and growth operate in associations that are as functionally diverse as pathogenesis and mutualism, and as phylogenetically distant as molluscs and mammals. PMID:8942994

  9. Ubiquity of lignin-degrading peroxidases among various wood-degrading fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Orth, A B; Royse, D J; Tien, M

    1993-01-01

    Phanerochaete chrysosporium is rapidly becoming a model system for the study of lignin biodegradation. Numerous studies on the physiology, biochemistry, chemistry, and genetics of this system have been performed. However, P. chrysosporium is not the only fungus to have a lignin-degrading enzyme system. Many other ligninolytic species of fungi, as well as other distantly related organisms which are known to produce lignin peroxidases, are described in this paper. In this study, we demonstrated the presence of the peroxidative enzymes in nine species not previously investigated. The fungi studied produced significant manganese peroxidase activity when they were grown on an oak sawdust substrate supplemented with wheat bran, millet, and sucrose. Many of the fungi also exhibited laccase and/or glyoxal oxidase activity. Inhibitors present in the medium prevented measurement of lignin peroxidase activity. However, Western blots (immunoblots) revealed that several of the fungi produced lignin peroxidase proteins. We concluded from this work that lignin-degrading peroxidases are present in nearly all ligninolytic fungi, but may be expressed differentially in different species. Substantial variability exists in the levels and types of ligninolytic enzymes produced by different white not fungi. Images PMID:8285705

  10. The abscisic acid induction of a novel peroxidase is antagonized by cytokinin in Spirodela polyrrhiza L.

    PubMed Central

    Chaloupková, K; Smart, C C

    1994-01-01

    The growth regulator abscisic acid (ABA) can be used to induce dormant bud structures (turions) in the duckweed Spirodela polyrrhiza L. In this paper we show that during this process, ABA rapidly induces elevated levels of mRNA transcripts encoding a novel basic peroxidase. In addition, we show that in the presence of the cytokinin kinetin the maintained increase is attenuated. Kinetin not only totally inhibits the induction of turions by ABA but also alleviates ABA-induced growth inhibition. This antagonism of an ABA-induced gene by a cytokinin correlates with an easily observable antagonistic effect of these two hormones on plant morphogenesis. These data contribute to a growing body of evidence linking growth regulators with changes in peroxidase gene expression and to the concept of pairs of hormones playing antagonistic roles during plant development. Finally, we discuss the possible functions that peroxidases could have during ABA-induced turion formation and growth inhibition. PMID:8066130

  11. Effect of Low and Very Low Doses of Simple Phenolics on Plant Peroxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Malarczyk, Elżbieta; Kochmańska-Rdest, Janina; Paździoch-Czochra, Marzanna

    2004-01-01

    Changes in the activity of horseradish peroxidase resulting from an addition of ethanol water dilutions of 19 phenolic compounds were observed. For each compound, the enzyme activity was plotted against the degree of dilution expressed as n = –log100 (mol/L) in the range 0 ≤ n ≥ 20. All the curves showed sinusoidal activity, more or less regular, with two to four peaks on average. Each analyzed compound had a characteristic sinusoidal shape, which was constant for samples of peroxidase from various commercial firms. This was clearly visible after function fitting to experimental results based on the Marquadt–Levenberg algorithm using the least-squares method. Among the 19 phenolics, the highest amplitudes were observed for phenol and iso- and vanillate acids and aldehydes. The specific character of each of the analyzed curves offers a possibility of choosing proper dilutions of phenolic compound for activating or inhibiting of peroxidase activity. PMID:19330128

  12. The abscisic acid induction of a novel peroxidase is antagonized by cytokinin in Spirodela polyrrhiza L.

    PubMed

    Chaloupková, K; Smart, C C

    1994-06-01

    The growth regulator abscisic acid (ABA) can be used to induce dormant bud structures (turions) in the duckweed Spirodela polyrrhiza L. In this paper we show that during this process, ABA rapidly induces elevated levels of mRNA transcripts encoding a novel basic peroxidase. In addition, we show that in the presence of the cytokinin kinetin the maintained increase is attenuated. Kinetin not only totally inhibits the induction of turions by ABA but also alleviates ABA-induced growth inhibition. This antagonism of an ABA-induced gene by a cytokinin correlates with an easily observable antagonistic effect of these two hormones on plant morphogenesis. These data contribute to a growing body of evidence linking growth regulators with changes in peroxidase gene expression and to the concept of pairs of hormones playing antagonistic roles during plant development. Finally, we discuss the possible functions that peroxidases could have during ABA-induced turion formation and growth inhibition.

  13. Differential expression of cro, the lysogenic cycle repressor determinant of bacteriophage A2, in Lactobacillus casei and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Escobedo, Susana; Rodríguez, Isabel; García, Pilar; Suárez, Juan E; Carrasco, Begoña

    2014-04-01

    Expression of bacteriophage A2-encoded cro in Escherichia coli gives rise to two co-linear polypeptides, Cro and Cro*, which were proposed to form a regulatory tandem to modulate the frequency with which the phage would choose between the lytic and the lysogenic cycles. In this communication, it is reported that Cro is the canonical product of the gene cro while Cro* results from a -1 ribosome frameshift during translation and is twelve amino acids shorter than Cro. However, frameshifting was not observed during phage development in Lactobacillus casei. Furthermore, wild type phages and cro-frameshifting negative mutants present the same phenotype, thus corroborating that only the canonical form of Cro is needed to produce a viable phage progeny. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Isolation, characterization and expression of a gene coding for a 2S albumin from Bertholletia excelsa (Brazil nut).

    PubMed

    Gander, E S; Holmstroem, K O; De Paiva, G R; De Castro, L A; Carneiro, M; Grossi de Sá, M F

    1991-03-01

    Two genes, BE2S1 and BE2S2, coding for methionine-rich albumins of Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa H.B.K.) have been cloned and their sequence determined. The genes are members of a multigene family and one of them, i.e. BE2S1, codes for one of the dominant 2S isoforms. Its expression is highly regulated during seed development and with respect to tissue specificity. Sequence analysis has shown that the genes contain one intron and that the promoter of BE2S1 shows a canonical TATA motif. The transcription initiation site is located 26 nucleotides downstream from the TATA box. Sequence comparison of the promoter regions of 2S genes from Brassica napus, Arabidopsis thaliana and B. excelsa revealed the presence of TGCA palindromic sequence that appear to be arranged in a 2S-specific manner.

  15. Transgenic mosquitoes expressing a phospholipase A(2) gene have a fitness advantage when fed Plasmodium falciparum-infected blood.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ryan C; Kizito, Christopher; Rasgon, Jason L; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Genetically modified mosquitoes have been proposed as an alternative strategy to reduce the heavy burden of malaria. In recent years, several proof-of-principle experiments have been performed that validate the idea that mosquitoes can be genetically modified to become refractory to malaria parasite development. We have created two transgenic lines of Anophelesstephensi, a natural vector of Plasmodium falciparum, which constitutively secrete a catalytically inactive phospholipase A2 (mPLA2) into the midgut lumen to interfere with Plasmodium ookinete invasion. Our experiments show that both transgenic lines expressing mPLA2 significantly impair the development of rodent malaria parasites, but only one line impairs the development of human malaria parasites. In addition, when fed on malaria-infected blood, mosquitoes from both transgenic lines are more fecund than non-transgenic mosquitoes. Consistent with these observations, cage experiments with mixed populations of transgenic and non-transgenic mosquitoes show that the percentage of transgenic mosquitoes increases when maintained on Plasmodium-infected blood. Our results suggest that the expression of an anti-Plasmodium effector gene gives transgenic mosquitoes a fitness advantage when fed malaria-infected blood. These findings have important implications for future applications of transgenic mosquito technology in malaria control.

  16. Transgenic Mosquitoes Expressing a Phospholipase A2 Gene Have a Fitness Advantage When Fed Plasmodium falciparum-Infected Blood

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ryan C.; Kizito, Christopher; Rasgon, Jason L.; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Background Genetically modified mosquitoes have been proposed as an alternative strategy to reduce the heavy burden of malaria. In recent years, several proof-of-principle experiments have been performed that validate the idea that mosquitoes can be genetically modified to become refractory to malaria parasite development. Results We have created two transgenic lines of Anophelesstephensi, a natural vector of Plasmodium falciparum, which constitutively secrete a catalytically inactive phospholipase A2 (mPLA2) into the midgut lumen to interfere with Plasmodium ookinete invasion. Our experiments show that both transgenic lines expressing mPLA2 significantly impair the development of rodent malaria parasites, but only one line impairs the development of human malaria parasites. In addition, when fed on malaria-infected blood, mosquitoes from both transgenic lines are more fecund than non-transgenic mosquitoes. Consistent with these observations, cage experiments with mixed populations of transgenic and non-transgenic mosquitoes show that the percentage of transgenic mosquitoes increases when maintained on Plasmodium-infected blood. Conclusions Our results suggest that the expression of an anti-Plasmodium effector gene gives transgenic mosquitoes a fitness advantage when fed malaria-infected blood. These findings have important implications for future applications of transgenic mosquito technology in malaria control. PMID:24098427

  17. Human Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase Is a Catalyst of Physiological Heme Peroxidase Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Freewan, Mohammed; Rees, Martin D.; Plaza, Tito S. Sempértegui; Glaros, Elias; Lim, Yean J.; Wang, Xiao Suo; Yeung, Amanda W. S.; Witting, Paul K.; Terentis, Andrew C.; Thomas, Shane R.

    2013-01-01

    The heme enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is a key regulator of immune responses through catalyzing l-tryptophan (l-Trp) oxidation. Here, we show that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) activates the peroxidase function of IDO to induce protein oxidation and inhibit dioxygenase activity. Exposure of IDO-expressing cells or recombinant human IDO (rIDO) to H2O2 inhibited dioxygenase activity in a manner abrogated by l-Trp. Dioxygenase inhibition correlated with IDO-catalyzed H2O2 consumption, compound I-mediated formation of protein-centered radicals, altered protein secondary structure, and opening of the distal heme pocket to promote nonproductive substrate binding; these changes were inhibited by l-Trp, the heme ligand cyanide, or free radical scavengers. Protection by l-Trp coincided with its oxidation into oxindolylalanine and kynurenine and the formation of a compound II-type ferryl-oxo heme. Physiological peroxidase substrates, ascorbate or tyrosine, enhanced rIDO-mediated H2O2 consumption and attenuated H2O2-induced protein oxidation and dioxygenase inhibition. In the presence of H2O2, rIDO catalytically consumed nitric oxide (NO) and utilized nitrite to promote 3-nitrotyrosine formation on IDO. The promotion of H2O2 consumption by peroxidase substrates, NO consumption, and IDO nitration was inhibited by l-Trp. This study identifies IDO as a heme peroxidase that, in the absence of substrates, self-inactivates dioxygenase activity via compound I-initiated protein oxidation. l-Trp protects against dioxygenase inactivation by reacting with compound I and retarding compound II reduction to suppress peroxidase turnover. Peroxidase-mediated dioxygenase inactivation, NO consumption, or protein nitration may modulate the biological actions of IDO expressed in inflammatory tissues where the levels of H2O2 and NO are elevated and l-Trp is low. PMID:23209301

  18. Glutathione peroxidase 4 and vitamin E cooperatively prevent hepatocellular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Bradley A; Tobe, Ryuta; Yefremova, Elena; Tsuji, Petra A; Hoffmann, Victoria J; Schweizer, Ulrich; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Hatfield, Dolph L; Conrad, Marcus

    2016-10-01

    The selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) is an essential mammalian glutathione peroxidase, which protects cells against detrimental lipid peroxidation and governs a novel form of regulated necrotic cell death, called ferroptosis. To study the relevance of Gpx4 and of another vitally important selenoprotein, cytosolic thioredoxin reductase (Txnrd1), for liver function, mice with conditional deletion of Gpx4 in hepatocytes were studied, along with those lacking Txnrd1 and selenocysteine (Sec) tRNA (Trsp) in hepatocytes. Unlike Txnrd1- and Trsp-deficient mice, Gpx4(-/-) mice died shortly after birth and presented extensive hepatocyte degeneration. Similar to Txnrd1-deficient livers, Gpx4(-/-) livers manifested upregulation of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived)-like 2 (Nrf2) response genes. Remarkably, Gpx4(-/-) pups born from mothers fed a vitamin E-enriched diet survived, yet this protection was reversible as subsequent vitamin E deprivation caused death of Gpx4-deficient mice ~4 weeks thereafter. Abrogation of selenoprotein expression in Gpx4(-/-) mice did not result in viable mice, indicating that the combined deficiency aggravated the loss of Gpx4 in liver. By contrast, combined Trsp/Txnrd1-deficient mice were born, but had significantly shorter lifespans than either single knockout, suggesting that Txnrd1 plays an important role in supporting liver function of mice lacking Trsp. In sum our study demonstrates that the ferroptosis regulator Gpx4 is critical for hepatocyte survival and proper liver function, and that vitamin E can compensate for its loss by protecting cells against deleterious lipid peroxidation.

  19. Peroxidase-Generated Apoplastic ROS Impair Cuticle Integrity and Contribute to DAMP-Elicited Defenses.

    PubMed

    Survila, Mantas; Davidsson, Pär R; Pennanen, Ville; Kariola, Tarja; Broberg, Martin; Sipari, Nina; Heino, Pekka; Palva, Erkki T

    2016-01-01

    Cuticular defects trigger a battery of reactions including enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and resistance to necrotrophic pathogens. However, the source of ROS generated by such impaired cuticles has remained elusive. Here, we report the characterization of Arabidopsis thaliana ohy1 mutant, a Peroxidase 57 (PER57) - overexpressing line that demonstrates enhanced defense responses that result both from increased accumulation of ROS and permeability of the leaf cuticle. The ohy1 mutant was identified in a screen of A. thaliana seedlings for oligogalacturonides (OGs) insensitive/hypersensitive mutants that exhibit altered growth retardation in response to exogenous OGs. Mutants impaired in OG sensitivity were analyzed for disease resistance/susceptibility to the necrotrophic phytopathogens Botrytis cinerea and Pectobacterium carotovorum. In the ohy1 line, the hypersensitivity to OGs was associated with resistance to the tested pathogens. This PER57 overexpressing line exhibited a significantly more permeable leaf cuticle than wild-type plants and this phenotype could be recapitulated by overexpressing other class III peroxidases. Such peroxidase overexpression was accompanied by the suppressed expression of cutin biosynthesis genes and the enhanced expression of genes associated with OG-signaling. Application of ABA completely removed ROS, restored the expression of genes associated with cuticle biosynthesis and led to decreased permeability of the leaf cuticle, and finally, abolished immunity to B. cinerea. Our work demonstrates that increased peroxidase activity increases permeability of the leaf cuticle. The loss of cuticle integrity primes plant defenses to necrotrophic pathogens via the activation of DAMP-responses.

  20. Peroxidase-Generated Apoplastic ROS Impair Cuticle Integrity and Contribute to DAMP-Elicited Defenses

    PubMed Central

    Survila, Mantas; Davidsson, Pär R.; Pennanen, Ville; Kariola, Tarja; Broberg, Martin; Sipari, Nina; Heino, Pekka; Palva, Erkki T.

    2016-01-01

    Cuticular defects trigger a battery of reactions including enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and resistance to necrotrophic pathogens. However, the source of ROS generated by such impaired cuticles has remained elusive. Here, we report the characterization of Arabidopsis thaliana ohy1 mutant, a Peroxidase 57 (PER57) – overexpressing line that demonstrates enhanced defense responses that result both from increased accumulation of ROS and permeability of the leaf cuticle. The ohy1 mutant was identified in a screen of A. thaliana seedlings for oligogalacturonides (OGs) insensitive/hypersensitive mutants that exhibit altered growth retardation in response to exogenous OGs. Mutants impaired in OG sensitivity were analyzed for disease resistance/susceptibility to the necrotrophic phytopathogens Botrytis cinerea and Pectobacterium carotovorum. In the ohy1 line, the hypersensitivity to OGs was associated with resistance to the tested pathogens. This PER57 overexpressing line exhibited a significantly more permeable leaf cuticle than wild-type plants and this phenotype could be recapitulated by overexpressing other class III peroxidases. Such peroxidase overexpression was accompanied by the suppressed expression of cutin biosynthesis genes and the enhanced expression of genes associated with OG-signaling. Application of ABA completely removed ROS, restored the expression of genes associated with cuticle biosynthesis and led to decreased permeability of the leaf cuticle, and finally, abolished immunity to B. cinerea. Our work demonstrates that increased peroxidase activity increases permeability of the leaf cuticle. The loss of cuticle integrity primes plant defenses to necrotrophic pathogens via the activation of DAMP-responses. PMID:28066496

  1. Suppression of SLC11A2 Expression Is Essential to Maintain Duodenal Integrity During Dietary Iron Overload

    PubMed Central

    Shirase, Tomoyuki; Mori, Kiyoshi; Okazaki, Yasumasa; Itoh, Ken; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Tabuchi, Mitsuaki; Kishi, Fumio; Jiang, Li; Akatsuka, Shinya; Nakao, Kazuwa; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2010-01-01

    Iron is essential for the survival of mammals, but iron overload causes fibrosis and carcinogenesis. Reduced iron absorption and regulated release into circulation in duodenal mucosa constitute two major mechanisms of protection against dietary iron overload; however, their relative contribution remains elusive. To study the significance of the former process, we generated SLC11A2 transgenic mice (TGs) under the control of the chicken β-actin promoter. TGs were viable and fertile, and displayed no overt abnormalities up to 20 months. No significant difference in iron concentration was observed in major solid organs between TGs and their wild-type littermates, suggesting that increased number of iron transporters does not lead to increased iron absorption. To test the sensitivity to iron overload, TGs and wild-type mice were fed with an iron-rich diet containing 2% ferric citrate. Iron supplementation caused suppression of endogenous duodenal SLC11A2 expression, down-regulation of duodenal ferroportin, and overexpression of hepatic hepcidin, precluding excessive iron uptake both in the TGs and wild-type mice. However, iron-treated TGs revealed increased mortality, resulting from oxidative mucosal damage leading to hemorrhagic erosion throughout the whole intestinal area. These findings suggest that reduced iron release from duodenal cells into circulation plays a role in mitigating excessive iron uptake from the diet and that finely regulated duodenal absorption is essential to protect intestinal mucosa from iron-induced oxidative damage. PMID:20558581

  2. Revisiting the Non-Animal Peroxidase Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Lazzarotto, Fernanda; Turchetto-Zolet, Andreia Carina; Margis-Pinheiro, Márcia

    2015-12-01

    Peroxidases reduce peroxide through substrate oxidation in order to alleviate oxidative stress in aerobic organisms. Since the initial description of the non-animal peroxidase superfamily, great effort has been made to characterize this large and heterogeneous group of proteins. Next generation sequencing data have permitted an in-depth study of the molecular evolution of this superfamily and allowed us to perform a phylogenetic reconstruction. Through this analysis, we identified two additional class I members and, here, we discuss the similarities and differences among members of this class. Our results provide new insights into the organization of these antioxidant enzymes, allowing us to propose a new model for the emergence and evolution of this superfamily.

  3. Conversion of aminonitrotoluenes by fungal manganese peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Scheibner, K; Hofrichter, M

    1998-01-01

    Preparations of extracellular manganese peroxidase from the white-rot fungus Nematoloma frowardii and the litter decaying fungus Stropharia rugosoannulata converted rapidly the main intermediates of the explosive 2,4,-trinitrotoluene--the aminonitrotoluenes. In a cell-free system, 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene, 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene and 2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene were degraded without formation of identifiable metabolites. Radioactive experiments using a complex mixture of uniform ring-labeled 14C-TNT reduction products demonstrated the partial direct mineralization of these compounds by manganese peroxidase. The extent of aminonitrotoluene conversion as well as the release of 14CO2 from TNT reduction products were considerably enhanced in the presence of thiols like reduced glutathione or the amino acid L-cystein, which probably act as secondary mediators.

  4. Isolation of a gene encoding for a class III peroxidase in female flower of Corylus avellana L.

    PubMed

    Beltramo, Chiara; Torello Marinoni, Daniela; Perrone, Irene; Botta, Roberto

    2012-04-01

    Hazelnut is a monoecious species characterized by mid-winter blooming and sporophytic incompatibility. The molecular mechanisms at the basis of the female flower development and of the pollen-stigma interaction are little known, although pollination in this species is a critical factor to ensure good yield. Differential display technique was used to study genes expressed during the female flower development, comparing styles before emergence from the bud and styles at full bloom. The full-length cDNA clone, designated CavPrx (Corylus avellana peroxidase) and isolated in mature styles, was characterized as a sequence encoding for a 330 amino acids protein, containing all the conserved features of class III peroxidases. CavPrx resulted expressed only in styles, with a peak in mature styles pollinated with compatible pollen. Class III peroxidases are expressed in several different plant tissue types and are involved in a broad spectrum of physiological processes. Until now, four peroxidases expressed in the stigma were identified in Arabidopsis thaliana and Senecio squalidus: they were assumed to be possibly involved in pollen-pistil interaction, pollen tube penetration/growth and/or in defence against pathogens. CavPrx is the first gene for a floral peroxidase isolated in hazelnut and its expression pattern suggests a possible role in the pollination process.

  5. Cytochrome bd Displays Significant Quinol Peroxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Al-Attar, Sinan; Yu, Yuanjie; Pinkse, Martijn; Hoeser, Jo; Friedrich, Thorsten; Bald, Dirk; de Vries, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome bd is a prokaryotic terminal oxidase that catalyses the electrogenic reduction of oxygen to water using ubiquinol as electron donor. Cytochrome bd is a tri-haem integral membrane enzyme carrying a low-spin haem b558, and two high-spin haems: b595 and d. Here we show that besides its oxidase activity, cytochrome bd from Escherichia coli is a genuine quinol peroxidase (QPO) that reduces hydrogen peroxide to water. The highly active and pure enzyme preparation used in this study did not display the catalase activity recently reported for E. coli cytochrome bd. To our knowledge, cytochrome bd is the first membrane-bound quinol peroxidase detected in E. coli. The observation that cytochrome bd is a quinol peroxidase, can provide a biochemical basis for its role in detoxification of hydrogen peroxide and may explain the frequent findings reported in the literature that indicate increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and decreased virulence in mutants that lack the enzyme. PMID:27279363

  6. The peroxidase activity of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Ansenberger-Fricano, Kristine; Ganini, Douglas; Mao, Mao; Chatterjee, Saurabh; Dallas, Shannon; Mason, Ronald P; Stadler, Krisztian; Santos, Janine H; Bonini, Marcelo G

    2013-01-01

    Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is an integral mitochondrial protein known as a first-line antioxidant defense against superoxide radical anions produced as by-products of the electron transport chain. Recent studies have shaped the idea that by regulating the mitochondrial redox status and H(2)O(2) outflow, MnSOD acts as a fundamental regulator of cellular proliferation, metabolism, and apoptosis, thereby assuming roles that extend far beyond its proposed antioxidant functions. Accordingly, allelic variations of MnSOD that have been shown to augment levels of MnSOD in mitochondria result in a 10-fold increase in prostate cancer risk. In addition, epidemiologic studies indicate that reduced glutathione peroxidase activity along with increases in H(2)O(2) further increase cancer risk in the face of MnSOD overexpression. These facts led us to hypothesize that, like its Cu,ZnSOD counterpart, MnSOD may work as a peroxidase, utilizing H(2)O(2) to promote mitochondrial damage, a known cancer risk factor. Here we report that MnSOD indeed possesses peroxidase activity that manifests in mitochondria when the enzyme is overexpressed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cloning the Dmrt1 and DmrtA2 genes of ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis) and mapping their expression in adult, larval, and embryonic stages

    PubMed Central

    WANG, Jin-Hua; MIAO, Liang; LI, Ming-Yun; GUO, Xiao-Fei; PAN, Na; CHEN, Ying-Ying; ZHAO, Liang

    2014-01-01

    The Dmrt family of genes are involved in sex differentiation in different species of invertebrates, and some vertebrates including human. In this study, we cloned the full-length cDNA of ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis) Dmrt1 and DmrtA2. Sequence and phylogenetic tree analyses showed ayu Dmrt1 showed highest similarity to that of Oncorhynchus mykiss while ayu DmrtA2 is most similar to that of Oryzias latipes. Fluorescence-based quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed the Dmrt1 was predominantly expressed in the testis. At the larval stages, Dmrt1 mRNA expression level was highest during 52-64 days post hatching (dph) and at the gastrula stage during embryonic development. DmrtA2, meanwhile, was specifically expressed in the ovary and was highly expressed in the female brain tissue, but not male brain tissue. During the larval stages, DmrtA2 expression remained high before day 34, and then fluctuated while generally decreasing. During embryonic development, DmrtA2 expression increased gradually and peaked at the hatching stage. Our data suggest that ayu Dmrt1 might participate in the differentiation and maintenance of testis while DmrtA2 may play a role in ovary-differentiation and mature-ovary maintenance. DmrtA2 might also participate in brain development. PMID:24668652

  8. Specificity of an HPETE peroxidase from rat PMN

    SciTech Connect

    Skoog, M.T.; Nichols, J.S.; Harrison, B.L.; Wiseman, J.S.

    1988-09-01

    The 15,000xg supernatant of sonicated rat PMN contains 5-lipoxygenase that converts arachidonic acid to 5-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HPETE) and leukotriene A4 and an HPETE peroxidase that catalyzes reduction of the 5-HPETE. The specificity of this HPETE peroxidase for peroxides, reducing agents, and inhibitors has been characterized to distinguish this enzyme from other peroxidase activities. In addition to 5-HPETE, the HPETE peroxidase will catalyze reduction of 15-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid, 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid, and 15-hydroperoxy-8,11,13-eicosatrienoic acid, but not cumene or t-butylhydroperoxides. The HPETE peroxidase accepted 5 of 11 thiols tested as reducing agents. However, glutathione is greater than 15 times more effective than any other thiol tested. Other reducing agents, ascorbate, NADH, NADPH, phenol, p-cresol, and homovanillic acid, were not accepted by HPETE peroxidase. This enzyme is not inhibited by 10 mM KCN, 2 mM aspirin, 2 mM salicylic acid, or 0.5 mM indomethacin. When 5-(14C)HPETE is generated from (14C)arachidonic acid in the presence of unlabeled 5-HPETE and the HPETE peroxidase, the 5-(14C)HETE produced is of much lower specific activity than the (14C)arachidonic acid. This indicates that the 5-(14C)HPETE leaves the active site of 5-lipoxygenase and mixes with the unlabeled 5-HPETE in solution prior to reduction and is a kinetic demonstration that 5-lipoxygenase has no peroxidase activity. Specificity for peroxides, reducing agents, and inhibitors differentiates HPETE peroxidase from glutathione peroxidase, phospholipid-hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase, a 12-HPETE peroxidase, and heme peroxidases. The HPETE peroxidase could be a glutathione S-transferase selective for fatty acid hydroperoxides.

  9. EphA2 expression is a key driver of migration and invasion and a poor prognostic marker in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Blayney, Jaine K.; McArt, Darragh G.; Redmond, Keara L.; Weir, Jessica-Anne; Bradley, Conor A.; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Shirasawa, Senji; Wang, Tingting; Srivastava, Supriya; Ong, Chee Wee; Arthur, Ken; Salto-Tellez, Manuel; Wilson, Richard H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose EphA2, a member of the Eph receptor tyrosine kinases family, is an important regulator of tumour initiation, neo-vascularization and metastasis in a wide range of epithelial and mesenchymal cancers, however its role in colorectal cancer (CRC) recurrence and progression is unclear. Experimental Design EphA2 expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in stage II/III colorectal tumours (N=338), and findings correlated with clinical outcome. The correlation between EphA2 expression and stem cell markers CD44 and Lgr5 was examined. The role of EphA2 in migration/invasion was assessed using a panel of KRAS wild-type (WT) and mutant (MT) parental and invasive CRC cell line models. Results Colorectal tumours displayed significantly higher expression levels of EphA2 compared with matched normal tissue, which positively correlated with high CD44 and Lgr5 expression levels. Moreover, high EphA2 mRNA and protein expression were found to be associated with poor overall survival in stage II/III CRC tissues, in both univariate and multivariate analyses. Pre-clinically, we found that EphA2 was highly expressed in KRASMT CRC cells and that EphA2 levels are regulated by the KRAS-driven MAPK and RalGDS-RalA pathways. Moreover, EphA2 levels were elevated in several invasive daughter cell lines and down-regulation of EphA2 using RNAi or recombinant EFNA1, suppressed migration and invasion of KRASMT CRC cells. Conclusions These data show that EpHA2 is a poor prognostic marker in stage II/III CRC, which may be due to its ability to promote cell migration and invasion, providing support for the further investigation of EphA2 as a novel prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target. PMID:26283684

  10. Characterisation and expression of secretory phospholipase A2 group IB during ontogeny of Atlantic cod ( Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Sæle, Øystein; Nordgreen, Andreas; Olsvik, Pål A; Hamre, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    The pancreatic enzyme secretory phospholipase A2 group IB (sPLA2 IB) hydrolyses phospholipids at the sn-2 position, resulting in a NEFA and a lyso-phospholipid, which are then absorbed by the enterocytes. The sPLA2 IB is a member of a family of nineteen enzymes sharing the same catalytic ability, of which nine are cytosolic and ten are secretory. Presently, there are no pharmacological tools to separate between the different secretory enzymes when measuring the enzymatic activity. Thus, it is important to support activity data with more precise techniques when isolation of intestinal content is not possible for analysis, as in the case of small teleost larvae, where the whole animal is sometimes analysed. In the present study, we characterise the sPLA2 IB gene in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) and describe its ontogeny at the genetic and protein level and compare this to the total sPLA2 activity level. A positive correlation was found between the expression of sPLA2 IB mRNA and protein. Both remained stable and low during the larval stage followed by an increase from day 62 posthatch, coinciding with the development of the pyloric ceaca. Meanwhile, total sPLA2 enzyme activity in cod was stable and relatively high during the early stages when larvae were fed live prey, followed by a decrease in activity when the fish were weaned to a formulated diet. Thus, the expression of sPLA2 IB mRNA and protein did not correlate with total sPLA2 activity.

  11. Abolishing activity against ascorbate in a cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase from switchgrass.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Frank A; Sarath, Gautam; Woodworth, Kyle; Twigg, Paul; Tobias, Christian M

    2013-10-01

    Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) is being developed as a bioenergy species. Recently an early version of its genome has been released permitting a route to the cloning and analysis of key proteins. Ascorbate peroxidases (APx) are an important part of the antioxidant defense system of plant cells and present a well studied model to understand structure-function relationships. Analysis of the genome indicates that switchgrass encodes several cytosolic ascorbate peroxidases with apparent varying levels of tissue expression. A major cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase was thus selected for further studies. This gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli cells to obtain purified active protein. Full heme incorporation of the enzyme was achieved utilizing slow growth and supplementing the media with 5-aminolevulinic acid. The enzyme was observed to be monomeric in solution via size exclusion chromatography. Activity toward ascorbate was observed that was non-Michaelis-Menten in nature. A site-directed mutant, R172S, was made in an attempt to differentiate activity against ascorbate versus other substrates. The R172S protein exhibited negligible ascorbate peroxidase activity, but showed near wild type activity toward other aromatic substrates.

  12. Effect of Ilex extracts and isolated compounds on peroxidase secretion of rat submandibulary glands.

    PubMed

    Filip, Rosana; Sebastian, Turner; Ferraro, Graciela; Anesini, Claudia

    2007-04-01

    Free radicals are involved in diverse disorders such as tumoral, central nervous system alterations, immunological and inflammatory pathologies. Peroxidase is an oral enzyme involved in the defense of the oral cavity. Ilex species such as Ilex paraguariensis St. Hil. and the commercial product made with it "Yerba Mate" are used traditionally as antirheumatics and for the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases among others and also as a beverage with nutritional and stimulant properties. The presence of polyphenolic derivatives and flavonoids in the aqueous extract has been determined by HPLC analysis. In this study, the activity of aqueous extracts of I. paraguariensis and "Yerba Mate" on peroxidase secretion in female rat submandibular glands was investigated. The contribution to this pharmacological activity by some major hydrocynnamic acid derivatives present in the crude extracts, such as chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid and the most abundant methylxanthine, caffeine, was also evaluated. Spectrophotometrical determination of peroxidase activity showed that both extracts produced a significant increase in both secreted peroxidase and total peroxidase activity, though "Yerba Mate" showed a higher activity (EC(50) "Yerba Mate": 148+/-10 microg/ml; EC(50)I. paraguariensis: 841+/-20 microg/ml). The HPLC/DAD analysis of the crude extracts was performed and chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid and caffeine were identified and quantified. The results (expressed as W/W percentage of dried material) were as follows: I. paraguariensis: chlorogenic acid: 2.80+/-0.30, caffeic acid: 0.023+/-0.004, caffeine: 1.06+/-0.06; "Yerba Mate": chlorogenic acid: 1.98+/-0.37; caffeic acid: 0.020+/-0.003, caffeine: 0.70+/-0.06. Caffeine and chlorogenic acid were proved to play an important role in the induction of peroxidase secretion induced by the extracts.

  13. Transcriptome analysis of various flower and silique development stages indicates a set of class III peroxidase genes potentially involved in pod shattering in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plant class III peroxidases exist as a large multigenic family involved in numerous functions suggesting a functional specialization of each gene. However, few genes have been linked with a specific function. Consequently total peroxidase activity is still used in numerous studies although its relevance is questionable. Transcriptome analysis seems to be a promising tool to overcome the difficulties associated with the study of this family. Nevertheless available microarrays are not completely reliable for this purpose. We therefore used a macroarray dedicated to the 73 class III peroxidase genes of A. thaliana to identify genes potentially involved in flower and fruit development. Results The observed increase of total peroxidase activity during development was actually correlated with the induction of only a few class III peroxidase genes which supports the existence of a functional specialization of these proteins. We identified peroxidase genes that are predominantly expressed in one development stage and are probable components of the complex gene networks involved in the reproductive phase. An attempt has been made to gain insight into plausible functions of these genes by collecting and analyzing the expression data of different studies in plants. Peroxidase activity was additionally observed in situ in the silique dehiscence zone known to be involved in pod shattering. Because treatment with a peroxidase inhibitor delayed pod shattering, we subsequently studied mutants of transcription factors (TF) controlling this mechanism. Three peroxidases genes -AtPrx13, AtPrx30 and AtPrx55- were altered by the TFs involved in pod shatter. Conclusions Our data illustrated the problems caused by linking only an increase in total peroxidase activity to any specific development stage or function. The activity or involvement of specific class III peroxidase genes needs to be assessed. Several genes identified in our study had not been linked to any particular

  14. Expression and regulation of phospholipase A2 in venom gland of the chinese honeybee, Apis cerana cerana.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang-Hong; Zhang, Chuan-Xi; Shen, Li-rong; Tang, Zhen-Hua; Cheng, Jia-An

    2005-09-01

    Phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) is one of the components of bee venom with a wide range of pharmacological functions. It operates as a major allergen working with other venom components to defend the colony from intruder. In the present study, the cDNA sequence of the Ac-pla(2) gene from cDNA library of the venom gland of Apis cerana was compared with the amplified corresponding region of genomic DNA. The result showed that the Ac-pla(2) gene consisted of four exons and three introns. Southern blot showed that the Ac-pla(2) gene was a single copy per haploid genome. The most active transcription period was during the first 8 days of adults, which correspondingly was the period of sharp increase of PLA(2) protein. ELISA analysis revealed that the PLA(2) was undetectable in pupal stage and the newly eclosed adult, but increased sharply to a maximum of 10-12 mug per honeybee by 8-10 days of adult life, followed by a gradual decrease to 8 mug for the rest of adult life. Transcriptional or post transcriptional regulation is the key step for Ac-pla(2) expression. The early secreted Ac-PLA(2) showed a low degree of post-translational modification; with increasing age, glycosylation was detected by Western blot and glycoprotein staining analysis. Different post-translational modifications were found among different individuals in A. cerana when compared to A. mellifera.

  15. The Reaction of Coumarins with Horseradish Peroxidase 1

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Richard W.; Sirois, J.-Claude; Morita, Hirokazu

    1975-01-01

    The peroxidase catalyzed oxidation of indole-3-acetate is inhibited by naturally occurring coumarins such as scopoletin. This inhibition is due to the preferential reactivity of the coumarins with the peroxidase compounds I, II, and III. In view of the possible growth regulatory role of coumarins in plants, the mechanism of oxidation of scopoletin by horse-radish peroxidase has been investigated. Peroxidase catalyzed coumarin oxidation requires either an electron donor and molecular oxygen or hydrogen peroxide. If peroxide is present, the reaction is mediated by peroxidase compound II which reacts rapidly and stoichiometrically with scopoletin. Different oxidation products are formed, depending on whether IAA or hydrogen peroxide promotes the reaction. A scopoletin-free radical intermediate has been isolated from the peroxide reaction mixture but was not detected in the peroxide-free system. When indole-3-acetate is the electron donor, reduced peroxidase combines with molecular oxygen to give peroxidase compound III. Added scopoletin is cooxidized with indole-3-acetate. Compared to the scopoletin peroxidation, this reaction is slower and yields fewer coumarin oxidation products. The differences observed between the two scopoletin oxidation pathways reflect: (a) the competition between indole-3-acetate and scopoletin for peroxidase compounds; (b) the lower reactivity of scopoletin with peroxidase compound III compared with peroxidase compound II. The peroxide-promoted reaction is eliminated by catalase, while the indole-3-acetate initiated oxidation is not affected by excess quantities of either catalase or superoxidase dismutase. PMID:16659024

  16. A PI 4. 6 peroxidase that specifically crosslinks extensin precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Upham, B.L; Alizadeh, H.; Ryan, K.J.; Lamport, D.T.A. )

    1991-05-01

    The primary cell wall is a microcomposite of cellulose, pectin, hemicellulose and protein. The warp-weft model of the primary cell wall hypothesize that extensin monomers are intermolecularly crosslinked orthogonal to the cellulose microfibril thus mechanically coupling the major load-bearing polymer: cellulose. Media of tomato cell cultures contains heat labile, peroxide dependent crosslinking activity, as determined by the rate of decrease in monomer concentration analyzed via Superose-6. Isoelectric focusing of tomato cell culture media indicated crosslinking was predominantly in the acidic peroxidase fraction (pI4.6). This peroxidase was partially purified by ultracentrifugation, DEAE-Trisacryl and HPLC-DEAE chromatography techniques resulting in a 90 fold purification and 45% yield. A second acidic peroxidase eluted from the HPLC-DEAE column had 25% of the crosslinking activity of the pI 4.6 peroxidase. Purified basic peroxidase had only 0.7% of the activity of the pI 4.6 peroxidase. The specific activity of the pI 4.6 peroxidase was 5,473 mg extensin crosslinked/min/mg peroxidase. The pI 4.6 peroxidase crosslinked the following extensins: tomato I and II, carrot, Ginkgo II and did not crosslink Ginkgo I, Douglas Fir, Maize, Asparagus I and II, and sugarbeet extensins as well as bovine serum albumin. Comparison of motifs common to extensins that are crosslinked by the pI 4.6 peroxidase may help identify the crosslink domain(s) of extension.

  17. fPoxDB: fungal peroxidase database for comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaeyoung; Détry, Nicolas; Kim, Ki-Tae; Asiegbu, Fred O; Valkonen, Jari P T; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2014-05-08

    Peroxidases are a group of oxidoreductases which mediate electron transfer from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and organic peroxide to various electron acceptors. They possess a broad spectrum of impact on industry and fungal biology. There are numerous industrial applications using peroxidases, such as to catalyse highly reactive pollutants and to breakdown lignin for recycling of carbon sources. Moreover, genes encoding peroxidases play important roles in fungal pathogenicity in both humans and plants. For better understanding of fungal peroxidases at the genome-level, a novel genomics platform is required. To this end, Fungal Peroxidase Database (fPoxDB; http://peroxidase.riceblast.snu.ac.kr/) has been developed to provide such a genomics platform for this important gene family. In order to identify and classify fungal peroxidases, 24 sequence profiles were built and applied on 331 genomes including 216 from fungi and Oomycetes. In addition, NoxR, which is known to regulate NADPH oxidases (NoxA and NoxB) in fungi, was also added to the pipeline. Collectively, 6,113 genes were predicted to encode 25 gene families, presenting well-separated distribution along the taxonomy. For instance, the genes encoding lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, and versatile peroxidase were concentrated in the rot-causing basidiomycetes, reflecting their ligninolytic capability. As a genomics platform, fPoxDB provides diverse analysis resources, such as gene family predictions based on fungal sequence profiles, pre-computed results of eight bioinformatics programs, similarity search tools, a multiple sequence alignment tool, domain analysis functions, and taxonomic distribution summary, some of which are not available in the previously developed peroxidase resource. In addition, fPoxDB is interconnected with other family web systems, providing extended analysis opportunities. fPoxDB is a fungi-oriented genomics platform for peroxidases. The sequence-based prediction and diverse

  18. Expression of a recombinant protein, A2 family, from Leishmania infantum (Jaboticabal strain) and its evaluation in Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis serological test.

    PubMed

    Jusi, Márcia Mariza Gomes; Oliveira, Trícia Maria Ferreira de Sousa; Nakaghi, Andréa Cristina Higa; André, Marcos Rogério; Machado, Rosangela Zacarias

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to express a recombinant A2 family protein of Leishmania chagasi, Jaboticabal strain; test this protein as an antigen in serological assays; and investigate its antigenicity and immunogenicity. A protein coded by an allele of the A2 gene isolated from L. chagasi was expressed in three different strains of Escherichia coli. We used 29 sera samples from Leishmune-vaccinated dogs, 482 sera samples from dogs from endemic areas (positive controls), and 170 sera samples from dogs from non-endemic areas (negative controls) in ELISA tests using soluble Leishmaniaantigen (SLA) and His-A2 as antigen. Expressed proteins showed, by western blotting, the expression of an 11 KDa protein. Sixty-three percent (303/482) of the samples from endemic areas were positive by ELISA His-A2, whereas 93.1% (27/29) of Leishmune®-vaccinated animals were negative by His-A2-ELISA. Anti-A2 antibodies from mice inoculated with the A2 protein were detected in slides containing amastigote forms, but not in slides containing promastigote forms. The A2 recombinant protein from L. chagasi may be a useful tool in the diagnosis of CVL, and further tests regarding the infection stage and the specie of parasite at which the dogs are sampled should provide a better understanding of our results.

  19. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data from the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Part 5; Acquire Express-A3 SPT?100 Based Propulsion Subsystem and Other Subsystem Flight Operation TM-Data, Task 31

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80deg E. and 11deg W., respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3-99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  20. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data From the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Acquire Express-A3 SPT 100 Based Propulsion Subsystem and Other Subsystem Flight Operation TM-Data, Task 33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80 deg E and 11 deg W, respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, under contract NAS3-99151 to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  1. Hall Effect Thruster Interactions Data From the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 Satellites. Part 7; Acquire Express-A3 SPT-100 Based Propulsion Subsystem and Other Subsystem Flight Operation TM-Data, Task 32

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitnikova, N.; Volkov, D.; Maximov, I.; Petrusevich, V.; Allen, D.

    2003-01-01

    This 12-part report documents the data obtained from various sensor measurements taken aboard the Russian Express-A2 and Express-A3 spacecraft in Geosynchronous Earth Orbit (GEO). These GEO communications satellites, which were designed and built by NPO Prikladnoy Mekhaniki (NPO PM) of Zheleznogorsk, Russia, utilize Hall thruster propulsion systems for north-south and east-west stationkeeping and as of June 2002, were still operating at 80 E. and 11 W., respectively. Express-A2 was launched on March 12, 2000, while Express-A3 was launched on June 24, 2000. The diagnostic equipment from which these data were taken includes electric field strength sensors, ion current and energy sensors, and pressure sensors. The diagnostics and the Hall thruster propulsion systems are described in detail along with lists of tabular data from those diagnostics and propulsion system and other satellite systems. Space Power, Inc., now part of Pratt & Whitney's Chemical Systems Division, to the NASA Glenn Research Center, obtained these data over several periods from March 12, 2000, through September 30, 2001. Each of the 12 individual reports describe, in detail, the propulsion systems as well as the diagnostic sensors utilized. Finally, parts 11 and 12 include the requirements to which NPO PM prepared and delivered these data.

  2. DyP, a unique dye-decolorizing peroxidase, represents a novel heme peroxidase family: ASP171 replaces the distal histidine of classical peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Yasushi; Muramatsu, Riichi; Ichiyanagi, Atsushi; Sato, Takao; Shoda, Makoto

    2007-12-14

    DyP, a unique dye-decolorizing enzyme from the fungus Thanatephorus cucumeris Dec 1, has been classified as a peroxidase but lacks homology to almost all other known plant peroxidases. The primary structure of DyP shows moderate sequence homology to only two known proteins: the peroxide-dependent phenol oxidase, TAP, and the hypothetical peroxidase, cpop21. Here, we show the first crystal structure of DyP and reveal that this protein has a unique tertiary structure with a distal heme region that differs from that of most other peroxidases. DyP lacks an important histidine residue known to assist in the formation of a Fe4+ oxoferryl center and a porphyrin-based cation radical intermediate (compound I) during the action of ubiquitous peroxidases. Instead, our tertiary structural and spectrophotometric analyses of DyP suggest that an aspartic acid and an arginine are involved in the formation of compound I. Sequence analysis reveals that the important aspartic acid and arginine mentioned above and histidine of the heme ligand are conserved among DyP, TAP, and cpop21, and structural and phylogenetic analyses confirmed that these three enzymes do not belong to any other families of peroxidase. These findings, which strongly suggest that DyP is a representative heme peroxidase from a novel family, should facilitate the identification of additional new family members and accelerate the classification of this novel peroxidase family.

  3. Expression Analyses Revealed Thymic Stromal Co-Transporter/Slc46A2 Is in Stem Cell Populations and Is a Putative Tumor Suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Yeon; Lee, Gwanghee; Yoon, Minsang; Cho, Eun Hye; Park, Chan-Sik; Kim, Moon Gyo

    2015-01-01

    By combining conventional single cell analysis with flow cytometry and public database searches with bioinformatics tools, we extended the expression profiling of thymic stromal cotransporter (TSCOT), Slc46A2/Ly110, that was shown to be expressed in bipotent precursor and cortical thymic epithelial cells. Genome scale analysis verified TSCOT expression in thymic tissue- and cell type- specific fashion and is also expressed in some other epithelial tissues including skin and lung. Coexpression profiling with genes, Foxn1 and Hoxa3, revealed the role of TSCOT during the organogenesis. TSCOT expression was detected in all thymic epithelial cells (TECs), but not in the CD31+ endothelial cell lineage in fetal thymus. In addition, ABC transporter-dependent side population and Sca-1+ fetal TEC populations both contain TSCOT-expressing cells, indicating TEC stem cells express TSCOT. TSCOT expression was identified as early as in differentiating embryonic stem cells. TSCOT expression is not under the control of Foxn1 since TSCOT is present in the thymic rudiment of nude mice. By searching variations in the expression levels, TSCOT is positively associated with Grhl3 and Irf6. Cytokines such as IL1b, IL22 and IL24 are the potential regulators of the TSCOT expression. Surprisingly, we found TSCOT expression in the lung is diminished in lung cancers, suggesting TSCOT may be involved in the suppression of lung tumor development. Based on these results, a model for TEC differentiation from the stem cells was proposed in context of multiple epithelial organ formation. PMID:26013383

  4. Expression Analyses Revealed Thymic Stromal Co-Transporter/Slc46A2 Is in Stem Cell Populations and Is a Putative Tumor Suppressor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Yeon; Lee, Gwanghee; Yoon, Minsang; Cho, Eun Hye; Park, Chan-Sik; Kim, Moon Gyo

    2015-06-01

    By combining conventional single cell analysis with flow cytometry and public database searches with bioinformatics tools, we extended the expression profiling of thymic stromal cotransporter (TSCOT), Slc46A2/Ly110, that was shown to be expressed in bipotent precursor and cortical thymic epithelial cells. Genome scale analysis verified TSCOT expression in thymic tissue- and cell type- specific fashion and is also expressed in some other epithelial tissues including skin and lung. Coexpression profiling with genes, Foxn1 and Hoxa3, revealed the role of TSCOT during the organogenesis. TSCOT expression was detected in all thymic epithelial cells (TECs), but not in the CD31(+) endothelial cell lineage in fetal thymus. In addition, ABC transporter-dependent side population and Sca-1(+) fetal TEC populations both contain TSCOT-expressing cells, indicating TEC stem cells express TSCOT. TSCOT expression was identified as early as in differentiating embryonic stem cells. TSCOT expression is not under the control of Foxn1 since TSCOT is present in the thymic rudiment of nude mice. By searching variations in the expression levels, TSCOT is positively associated with Grhl3 and Irf6. Cytokines such as IL1b, IL22 and IL24 are the potential regulators of the TSCOT expression. Surprisingly, we found TSCOT expression in the lung is diminished in lung cancers, suggesting TSCOT may be involved in the suppression of lung tumor development. Based on these results, a model for TEC differentiation from the stem cells was proposed in context of multiple epithelial organ formation.

  5. Zebrafish foxc1a plays a crucial role in early somitogenesis by restricting the expression of aldh1a2 directly.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingyun; Yue, Yunyun; Dong, Xiaohua; Jia, Wenshuang; Li, Kui; Liang, Dong; Dong, Zhangji; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Nan, Xiaoxi; Zhang, Qinxin; Zhao, Qingshun

    2015-04-17

    Foxc1a is a member of the forkhead transcription factors. It plays an essential role in zebrafish somitogenesis. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying its controlling somitogenesis. To uncover how foxc1a regulates zebrafish somitogenesis, we generated foxc1a knock-out zebrafish using TALEN (transcription activator-like effector nuclease) technology. The foxc1a null embryos exhibited defective somites at early development. Analyses on the expressions of the key genes that control processes of somitogenesis revealed that foxc1a controlled early somitogenesis by regulating the expression of myod1. In the somites of foxc1a knock-out embryos, expressions of fgf8a and deltaC were abolished, whereas the expression of aldh1a2 (responsible for providing retinoic acid signaling) was significantly increased. Once the increased retinoic acid level in the foxc1a null embryos was reduced by knocking down aldh1a2, the reduced expression of myod1 was partially rescued by resuming expressions of fgf8a and deltaC in the somites of the mutant embryos. Moreover, a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay on zebrafish embryos revealed that Foxc1a bound aldh1a2 promoter directly. On the other hand, neither knocking down fgf8a nor inhibiting Notch signaling affected the expression of aldh1a2, although knocking down fgf8a reduced expression of deltaC in the somites of zebrafish embryos at early somitogenesis and vice versa. Taken together, our results demonstrate that foxc1a plays an essential role in early somitogenesis by controlling Fgf and Notch signaling through restricting the expression of aldh1a2 in paraxial mesoderm directly.

  6. Immobilization of Peroxidase onto Magnetite Modified Polyaniline

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Eduardo Fernandes; Molina, Fernando Javier; Lopes, Flavio Marques; García-Ruíz, Pedro Antonio; Caramori, Samantha Salomão; Fernandes, Kátia Flávia

    2012-01-01

    The present study describes the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on magnetite-modified polyaniline (PANImG) activated with glutaraldehyde. After the optimization of the methodology, the immobilization of HRP on PANImG produced the same yield (25%) obtained for PANIG with an efficiency of 100% (active protein). The optimum pH for immobilization was displaced by the effect of the partition of protons produced in the microenvironment by the magnetite. The tests of repeated use have shown that PANImG-HRP can be used for 13 cycles with maintenance of 50% of the initial activity. PMID:22489198

  7. Bioconjugation of Antibodies to Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP).

    PubMed

    Hnasko, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    The bioconjugation of an antibody to an enzymatic reporter such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) affords an effective mechanism by which immunoassay detection of a target antigen can be achieved. The use of heterobifunctional cross-linkers to covalently link antibodies to HRP provides a simple and convenient means to maintain antibody affinity while imparting a functional reporter used for antigen detection. In this chapter, we describe a process by which Sulfo-SMCC is used to generate a stable maleimide-activated HRP that is reactive with sulfhydryl groups generated in antibodies by SATA-mediated thiolation.

  8. Fungal Hybrid B heme peroxidases - unique fusions of a heme peroxidase domain with a carbohydrate-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Zámocký, Marcel; Janeček, Štefan; Obinger, Christian

    2017-08-24

    Heme peroxidases, essential peroxide converting oxidoreductases are divided into four independently evolved superfamilies. Within the largest one - the peroxidase-catalase superfamily - two hybrid lineages were described recently. Whereas Hybrid A heme peroxidases represent intermediate enzymes between ascorbate peroxidases and cytochrome c peroxidases, Hybrid B heme peroxidases are unique fusion proteins comprised of a conserved N-terminal heme peroxidase domain and a C-terminal domain of various sugar binding motifs. So far these peculiar peroxidases are only found in the kingdom of Fungi. Here we present a phylogenetic reconstruction of the whole superfamily with focus on Hybrid B peroxidases. We analyse the domain assembly and putative structure and function of the newly discovered oligosaccharide binding domains. Two distinct carbohydrate binding modules (CBM21 and CBM34) are shown to occur in phytopathogenic ascomycetous orthologs of Hybrid B heme peroxidases only. Based on multiple sequence alignment and homology modeling the structure-function relationships are discussed with respect to physiological function. A concerted action of peroxide cleavage with specific cell-wall carbohydrate binding can support phytopathogens survival within the plant host.

  9. Partial purification and characterization of a copper-induced anionic peroxidase of sunflower roots.

    PubMed

    Jouili, Hager; Bouazizi, Houda; Rossignol, Michel; Borderies, Gisèle; Jamet, Elisabeth; El Ferjani, Ezzeddine

    2008-01-01

    Treatment of 14-day-old sunflower seedlings with a toxic amount of copper (50 microM of CuSO(4)) during 5days caused significant increase in peroxidase activity in roots. Qualitative analysis of soluble proteins using native anionic PAGE followed by detection of peroxidase activity with guaïacol as electron donor in the presence of H(2)O(2) revealed five stimulated peroxidases, named A1, A2, A3, A4, and A5. These peroxidases had differential behavior during the period of treatment. A1, A2, A3 and A4 were stimulated in the first period of stress, but rapidly suppressed at 72h. A5 showed a progressive stimulation which was even increased at 120h. A1 was partially purified, identified using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), and characterized. Effects of pH and temperature on its activity were determined with guaïacol as electron donor. Optima were obtained at pH 8 and at 40 degrees C. Analysis of substrate specificity showed that A1 was active on coniferyl alcohol but not on IAA. Enzymatic activity was inhibited by a high concentration of H(2)O(2).

  10. RmpA2, an activator of capsule biosynthesis in Klebsiella pneumoniae CG43, regulates K2 cps gene expression at the transcriptional level.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yi-Chyi; Peng, Hwei-Ling; Chang, Hwan-You

    2003-02-01

    The rmpA2 gene, which encodes an activator for capsular polysaccharide (CPS) synthesis, was isolated from a 200-kb virulence plasmid of Klebsiella pneumoniae CG43. Based on the sequence homology with LuxR at the carboxyl-terminal DNA-binding motif, we hypothesized that RmpA2 exerts its effect by activating the expression of cps genes that are responsible for CPS biosynthesis. Two luxAB transcriptional fusions, each containing a putative promoter region of the K. pneumoniae K2 cps genes, were constructed and were found to be activated in the presence of multicopy rmpA2. The activation is likely due to direct binding of RmpA2 to the cps gene promoter through its C-terminal DNA binding motif. Moreover, the loss of colony mucoidy in a K. pneumoniae strain deficient in RcsB, a regulator for cps gene expression, could be recovered by complementing the strain with a multicopy plasmid carrying rmpA2. The CPS production in Lon protease-deficient K. pneumoniae significantly increased, and the effect was accompanied by an increase of RmpA2 stability. The expression of the rmpA2 gene was negatively autoregulated and could be activated when the organism was grown in M9 minimal medium. An IS3 element located upstream of the rmpA2 was required for the full activation of the rmpA2 promoter. In summary, our results suggest that the enhancement of K2 CPS synthesis in K. pneumoniae CG43 by RmpA2 can be attributed to its transcriptional activation of K2 cps genes, and the expression level of rmpA2 is autoregulated and under the control of Lon protease.

  11. RmpA2, an Activator of Capsule Biosynthesis in Klebsiella pneumoniae CG43, Regulates K2 cps Gene Expression at the Transcriptional Level

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yi-Chyi; Peng, Hwei-Ling; Chang, Hwan-You

    2003-01-01

    The rmpA2 gene, which encodes an activator for capsular polysaccharide (CPS) synthesis, was isolated from a 200-kb virulence plasmid of Klebsiella pneumoniae CG43. Based on the sequence homology with LuxR at the carboxyl-terminal DNA-binding motif, we hypothesized that RmpA2 exerts its effect by activating the expression of cps genes that are responsible for CPS biosynthesis. Two luxAB transcriptional fusions, each containing a putative promoter region of the K. pneumoniae K2 cps genes, were constructed and were found to be activated in the presence of multicopy rmpA2. The activation is likely due to direct binding of RmpA2 to the cps gene promoter through its C-terminal DNA binding motif. Moreover, the loss of colony mucoidy in a K. pneumoniae strain deficient in RcsB, a regulator for cps gene expression, could be recovered by complementing the strain with a multicopy plasmid carrying rmpA2. The CPS production in Lon protease-deficient K. pneumoniae significantly increased, and the effect was accompanied by an increase of RmpA2 stability. The expression of the rmpA2 gene was negatively autoregulated and could be activated when the organism was grown in M9 minimal medium. An IS3 element located upstream of the rmpA2 was required for the full activation of the rmpA2 promoter. In summary, our results suggest that the enhancement of K2 CPS synthesis in K. pneumoniae CG43 by RmpA2 can be attributed to its transcriptional activation of K2 cps genes, and the expression level of rmpA2 is autoregulated and under the control of Lon protease. PMID:12533454

  12. The relationship between lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase production capacities and cultivation periods of mushrooms

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian Z; Zhang, Jun L; Hu, Kai H; Zhang, Wei G

    2013-01-01

    Mushrooms are able to secrete lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP), and able to use the cellulose as sources of carbon. This article focuses on the relation between peroxidase-secreting capacity and cultivation period of mushrooms with non-laccase activity. Methylene blue and methyl catechol qualitative assay and spectrophotometry quantitative assay show LiP secreting unvaryingly accompanies the MnP secreting in mushroom strains. The growth rates of hyphae are detected by detecting the dry hyphal mass. We link the peroxidase activities to growth rate of mushrooms and then probe into the relationship between them. The results show that there are close relationships between LiP- and/or MnP-secretory capacities and the cultivation periods of mushrooms. The strains with high LiP and MnP activities have short cultivation periods. However, those strains have long cultivation periods because of the low levels of secreted LiP and/or MnP, even no detectable LiP and/or MnP activity. This study provides the first evidence on the imitate relation between the level of secreted LiP and MnP activities and cultivation periods of mushrooms with non-laccase activity. Our study has significantly increased the understanding of the role of LiP and MnP in the growth and development of mushrooms with non-laccase activity. PMID:22966760

  13. Extracellular Heme Peroxidases in Actinomycetes: a Case of Mistaken Identity

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Maria G.; Ball, Andrew S.; Reeder, Brandon J.; Silkstone, Gary; Nicholls, Peter; Wilson, Michael T.

    2001-01-01

    Actinomycetes secrete into their surroundings a suite of enzymes involved in the biodegradation of plant lignocellulose; these have been reported to include both hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes, including peroxidases. Reports of secreted peroxidases have been based upon observations of peroxidase-like activity associated with fractions that exhibit optical spectra reminiscent of heme peroxidases, such as the lignin peroxidases of wood-rotting fungi. Here we show that the appearance of the secreted pseudoperoxidase of the thermophilic actinomycete Thermomonospora fusca BD25 is also associated with the appearance of a heme-like spectrum. The species responsible for this spectrum is a metalloporphyrin; however, we show that this metalloporphyrin is not heme but zinc coproporphyrin. The same porphyrin was found in the growth medium of the actinomycete Streptomyces viridosporus T7A. We therefore propose that earlier reports of heme peroxidases secreted by actinomycetes were due to the incorrect assignment of optical spectra to heme groups rather than to non-iron-containing porphyrins and that lignin-degrading heme peroxidases are not secreted by actinomycetes. The porphyrin, an excretory product, is degraded during peroxidase assays. The low levels of secreted peroxidase activity are associated with a nonheme protein fraction previously shown to contain copper. We suggest that the role of the secreted copper-containing protein may be to bind and detoxify metals that can cause inhibition of heme biosynthesis and thus stimulate porphyrin excretion. PMID:11571150

  14. Peroxidase-induced wilting in transgenic tobacco plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.; Bradford, S. ); Rothstein, S. )

    1990-01-01

    Peroxidases are a family of isoenzymes found in all higher plants. However, little is known concerning their role in growth, development or response to stress. Plant peroxidases are heme-containing monomeric glycoproteins that utilize either H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or O{sub 2} to oxidize a wide variety of molecules. To obtain more information on possible in planta functions of peroxidases, the authors have used a cDNA clone for the primary isoenzyme form of peroxidase to synthesize high levels of this enzyme in transgenic plants. They were able to obtain Nicotiana tabacum and N. sylvestris transformed plants with peroxidase activity that is 10-fold higher than in wild-type plants by introducing a chimeric gene composed of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the tobacco anionic peroxidase cDNA. The elevated peroxidase activity was a result of increased levels of two anionic peroxidases in N. tabacum, which apparently differ in post-translational modification. Transformed plants of both species have the unique phenotype of chronic severe wilting through loss of turgor in leaves, which was initiated a the time of flowering. The peroxidase-induced wilting was shown not to be an effect of diminished water uptake through the roots, decreased conductance of water through the xylem, or increased water loss through the leaf surface of stomata. Possible explanations for the loss of turgor, and the significance of these types of experiments in studying isoenzyme families, are discussed.

  15. Peroxidase changes in barley induced by ionizing and thermal radiation.

    PubMed

    Sah, N K; Pramanik, S; Raychaudhuri, S S

    1996-01-01

    Thermal and ionizing (gamma-ray) radiations were used to induce damage to barley seeds (IB65). The activity and isozyme banding patterns of peroxidase were compared. It was found that both physical agents caused damage to barley seeds (as observed from seedling height), but their action on peroxidase activity is not similar. Gamma-Rays enhance peroxidase activity. Thermal radiation, on the other hand, tends to reduce it but fails to alter the number of peroxidase isozymes. It is conjectured that the pathways of damage by thermal and ionizing radiations are not the same.

  16. [The peroxidase content of human tears].

    PubMed

    Buchberger, W; Rieger, G

    1989-01-01

    The peroxidase-(POD)-thiocyanate-hydrogenperoxide-system is a well-known antibacterial system, which has been demonstrated to exist, for example, in milk and saliva. Earlier investigations by van Haeringen et al. established a POD level in human tears of 10(3) units/l, yet the thiocyanate concentration was only about 0.2 mmol/l. Therefore van Haeringen et al. excluded the existence of a POD-thiocyanate-hydrogenperoxide antibacterial system in human tears because of the insufficient amount of thiocyanate in the tears examined. Instead of thiocyanate halides such as J- can also complete the POD hydrogen peroxide system as electron donors. Sufficient amounts of iodide can be expected after the application of iodine-containing eye drops or after local treatment with iodine-containing brine, as done in Bad Hall in Austria. Therefore, the above mentioned antibacterial system may be of importance if the POD-level is high enough (greater than 250 units/l). We investigated 22 tear samples from healthy persons: the POD levels were below 20 units/l in 19 cases; in 3 cases the POD concentration was found to be between 20 and 50 units/l. Therefore, in normal human tear fluid, not only the amount of thiocyanate but also the concentration of POD is too low for effective antimicrobial activity of the peroxidase-thiocyanate-hydrogenperoxide system. It is so far not known whether this system is effective under pathological conditions.

  17. Catalytic mechanism of the glutathione peroxidase-type tryparedoxin peroxidase of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Schlecker, Tanja; Comini, Marcelo A.; Melchers, Johannes; Ruppert, Thomas; Krauth-Siegel, R. Luise

    2007-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness, encodes three nearly identical genes for cysteine-homologues of the selenocysteine-containing glutathione peroxidases. The enzymes, which are essential for the parasites, lack glutathione peroxidase activity but catalyse the trypanothione/Tpx (tryparedoxin)-dependent reduction of hydroperoxides. Cys47, Gln82 and Trp137 correspond to the selenocysteine, glutamine and tryptophan catalytic triad of the mammalian selenoenzymes. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that Cys47 and Gln82 are essential. A glycine mutant of Trp137 had 13% of wild-type activity, which suggests that the aromatic residue may play a structural role but is not directly involved in catalysis. Cys95, which is conserved in related yeast and plant proteins but not in the mammalian selenoenzymes, proved to be essential as well. In contrast, replacement of the highly conserved Cys76 by a serine residue resulted in a fully active enzyme species and its role remains unknown. Thr50, proposed to stabilize the thiolate anion at Cys47, is also not essential for catalysis. Treatment of the C76S/C95S but not of the C47S/C76S double mutant with H2O2 induced formation of a sulfinic acid and covalent homodimers in accordance with Cys47 being the peroxidative active site thiol. In the wild-type peroxidase, these oxidations are prevented by formation of an intramolecular disulfide bridge between Cys47 and Cys95. As shown by MS, regeneration of the reduced enzyme by Tpx involves a transient mixed disulfide between Cys95 of the peroxidase and Cys40 of Tpx. The catalytic mechanism of the Tpx peroxidase resembles that of atypical 2-Cys-peroxiredoxins but is distinct from that of the selenoenzymes. PMID:17456049

  18. Catalytic mechanism of the glutathione peroxidase-type tryparedoxin peroxidase of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Schlecker, Tanja; Comini, Marcelo A; Melchers, Johannes; Ruppert, Thomas; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise

    2007-08-01

    Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness, encodes three nearly identical genes for cysteine-homologues of the selenocysteine-containing glutathione peroxidases. The enzymes, which are essential for the parasites, lack glutathione peroxidase activity but catalyse the trypanothione/Tpx (tryparedoxin)-dependent reduction of hydroperoxides. Cys47, Gln82 and Trp137 correspond to the selenocysteine, glutamine and tryptophan catalytic triad of the mammalian selenoenzymes. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that Cys47 and Gln82 are essential. A glycine mutant of Trp137 had 13% of wild-type activity, which suggests that the aromatic residue may play a structural role but is not directly involved in catalysis. Cys95, which is conserved in related yeast and plant proteins but not in the mammalian selenoenzymes, proved to be essential as well. In contrast, replacement of the highly conserved Cys76 by a serine residue resulted in a fully active enzyme species and its role remains unknown. Thr50, proposed to stabilize the thiolate anion at Cys47, is also not essential for catalysis. Treatment of the C76S/C95S but not of the C47S/C76S double mutant with H2O2 induced formation of a sulfinic acid and covalent homodimers in accordance with Cys47 being the peroxidative active site thiol. In the wild-type peroxidase, these oxidations are prevented by formation of an intramolecular disulfide bridge between Cys47 and Cys95. As shown by MS, regeneration of the reduced enzyme by Tpx involves a transient mixed disulfide between Cys95 of the peroxidase and Cys40 of Tpx. The catalytic mechanism of the Tpx peroxidase resembles that of atypical 2-Cys-peroxiredoxins but is distinct from that of the selenoenzymes.

  19. Isoenzymes of peroxidase and esterase related to morphogenesis in Mammillaria gracillis Pfeiff. tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Balen, Biljana; Krsnik-Rasol, Marijana; Simeon-Rudolf, Vera

    2003-11-01

    In vitro propagated plants of the cactus Mammillaria gracillis Pfeiff. (Cactaceae) spontaneously produced callus. The habituated callus regenerated normal and hyperhydric shoots without the addition of grown regulators. Tumours were obtained by infecting cactus explants with Agrobacterium tumefaciens; the wild strain B6S3 (tumour TW) or with the rooty mutant GV3101 (tumour TR). Both tumour lines grew vigorously, never expressing any morphogenic potential. In this study, cactus shoots, callus, normal and hyperhydric regenerants and TW and TR tumours were compared with regard to peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) and esterase activity, and isoenzyme patterns. Guaiacol peroxidase activity was the lowest in the cactus shoots and in the normal regenerants. Callus, hyperhydric regenerants and tumours had peroxidase activity of 6 to 7 times higher. Esterase activity was measured with 1- and 2-naphthylacetate as broad-spectrum substrates. The highest esterase activity was determined in tumours with both substrates. All tissues, except the TR tumour, had higher esterase activity for 2-compared to 1-naphtylacetate. Peroxidase and esterase isoenzyme patterns were not completely identical among the investigated tissues.

  20. In planta anthocyanin degradation by a vacuolar class III peroxidase in Brunfelsia calycina flowers.

    PubMed

    Zipor, Gadi; Duarte, Patrícia; Carqueijeiro, Inês; Shahar, Liat; Ovadia, Rinat; Teper-Bamnolker, Paula; Eshel, Dani; Levin, Yishai; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Sottomayor, Mariana; Oren-Shamir, Michal

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to detailed knowledge regarding the biosynthesis of anthocyanins, the largest group of plant pigments, little is known about their in planta degradation. It has been suggested that anthocyanin degradation is enzymatically controlled and induced when beneficial to the plant. Here we investigated the enzymatic process in Brunfelsia calycina flowers, as they changed color from purple to white. We characterized the enzymatic process by which B. calycina protein extracts degrade anthocyanins. A candidate peroxidase was partially purified and characterized and its intracellular localization was determined. The transcript sequence of this peroxidase was fully identified. A basic peroxidase, BcPrx01, is responsible for the in planta degradation of anthocyanins in B. calycina flowers. BcPrx01 has the ability to degrade complex anthocyanins, it co-localizes with these pigments in the vacuoles of petals, and both the mRNA and protein levels of BcPrx01 are greatly induced parallel to the degradation of anthocyanins. Both isoelectric focusing (IEF) gel analysis and 3D structure prediction indicated that BcPrx01 is cationic. Identification of BcPrx01 is a significant breakthrough both in the understanding of anthocyanin catabolism in plants and in the field of peroxidases, where such a consistent relationship between expression levels, in planta subcellular localization and activity has seldom been demonstrated. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. Adenosine A2A receptor signaling attenuates LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine formation of mouse macrophages by inducing the expression of DUSP1.

    PubMed

    Köröskényi, Krisztina; Kiss, Beáta; Szondy, Zsuzsa

    2016-07-01

    Adenosine is known to reduce inflammation by suppressing the activity of most immune cells. Previous studies have shown that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated mouse macrophages produce adenosine, and the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) signaling activated in an autocrine manner attenuates LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine formation. It has been suggested that A2AR signaling inhibits LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production through a unique cAMP-dependent, but PKA- and Epac-independent signaling pathway. However, the mechanism of inhibition was not identified so far. Here we report that LPS stimulation enhances A2AR expression in mouse bone marrow derived macrophages, and loss of A2ARs results in enhanced LPS-induced pro-inflammatory response. Loss of A2ARs in A2AR null macrophages did not alter the LPS-induced NF-κB activation, but an enhanced basal and LPS-induced phosphorylation of MAP kinases (especially that of JNKs) was detected in A2AR null cells. A2AR signaling did not alter the LPS-induced phosphorylation of their upstream kinases, but by regulating adenylate cyclase activity it enhanced the expression of dual specific phosphatase (DUSP)1, a negative regulator of MAP kinases. As a result, lower basal and LPS-induced DUSP1 mRNA and protein levels can be detected in A2AR null macrophages. Silencing of DUSP1 mRNA expression resulted in higher basal and LPS-induced JNK phosphorylation and LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine formation in wild type macrophages, but had no effect on that in A2AR null cells. Our data indicate that A2AR signaling regulates both basal and LPS-induced DUSP1 levels in macrophages via activating the adenylate cyclase pathway.

  2. Relationship between Expression of Chalcone Synthase Genes and Chromones in Artificial Agarwood induced by Formic Acid Stimulation Combined with Fusarium sp. A2 Inoculation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaodong; Zhu, Xiaoling; Feng, Meirou; Zhong, Zhaojian; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Xiaoying; Ye, Wei; Zhang, Weimin; Gao, Xiaoxia

    2017-04-25

    Agarwood (gaharu) is a fragrant resin produced in the heartwood of resinous Gyrinops and Aquilaria species. Artificial agarwood samples were obtained from Aquilaria sinensis (Lour.) Gilg using formic acid (FA) stimulation combined with Fusarium sp. A2 inoculation. The relationship between the expression of chalcone synthase genes (CHS) and dynamic changes in chromone content was explored in resin-deposited parts of the trunks of A. sinensis. CHS gene expression levels were detected by qRT-PCR analysis. The chemical composition of agarwood obtained from the heartwood of A. sinensis before and within 1 year after induction was determined by GC-MS. After induction with FA stimulation combined with F. sp. A2 inoculation, the CHS1 gene showed relatively high expression, whereas the CHS2 gene showed low expression. The relative gene expression level of CHS1 peaked at 12 months, with a 153.1-fold increase, and the dominant period of the CHS2 gene expression was 10 months with a 14.13-fold increase. Moreover, chromones were not detected until after 2 months, and a large proportion of chromone compounds were detected after 4 months. Chromone content increased with time and peaked at 12 months. CHS1 gene expression was significantly correlated with 6-hydroxy-2-(2-phenylethyl)chromone accumulation, and CHS2 gene expression was significantly correlated with 5-hydroxy-6-methoxy-2-(2-phenylethyl)chromone accumulation. CHS gene expression was extremely sensitive to FA stimulation combined with F. sp. A2 inoculation and responded to late-onset injury. CHS genes expression also preceded the chromone accumulation. This work laid the foundation for studies on the mechanism by which genes regulate chromone biosynthesis pathways during the formation of agarwood resin in A. sinensis.

  3. Activation of the A2B adenosine receptor in B16 melanomas induces CXCL12 expression in FAP-positive tumor stromal cells, enhancing tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Sorrentino, Claudia; Miele, Lucio; Porta, Amalia; Pinto, Aldo; Morello, Silvana

    2016-01-01

    The A2B receptor (A2BR) can mediate adenosine-induced tumor proliferation, immunosuppression and angiogenesis. Targeting the A2BR has proved to be therapeutically effective in some murine tumor models, but the mechanisms of these effects are still incompletely understood. Here, we report that pharmacologic inhibition of A2BR with PSB1115, which inhibits tumor growth, decreased the number of fibroblast activation protein (FAP)-expressing cells in tumors in a mouse model of melanoma. This effect was associated with reduced expression of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2. Treatment of melanoma-associated fibroblasts with the A2BR agonist Bay60-6583 enhanced CXCL12 and FGF2 expression. This effect was abrogated by PSB1115. The A2AR agonist CGS21680 did not induce CXCL12 or FGF2 expression in tumor associated fibroblasts. Similar results were obtained under hypoxic conditions in skin-derived fibroblasts, which responded to Bay60-6583 in an A2BR-dependent manner, by stimulating pERK1/2. FGF2 produced by Bay60-6583-treated fibroblasts directly enhanced the proliferation of melanoma cells. This effect could be reversed by PSB1115 or an anti-FGF2 antibody. Interestingly, melanoma growth in mice receiving Bay60-6583 was attenuated by inhibition of the CXCL12/CXCR4 pathway with AMD3100. CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4 are involved in angiogenesis and immune-suppression. Treatment of mice with AMD3100 reduced the number of CD31+ cells induced by Bay60-6583. Conversely, CXCR4 blockade did not affect the accumulation of tumor-infiltrating MDSCs or Tregs. Together, our data reveal an important role for A2BR in stimulating FGF2 and CXCL12 expression in melanoma-associated fibroblasts. These factors contribute to create a tumor-promoting microenvironment. Our findings support the therapeutic potential of PSB1115 for melanoma. PMID:27590504

  4. Activation of glutathione peroxidase via Nrf1 mediates genistein's protection against oxidative endothelial cell injury

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Montes, Eva; Pollard, Susan E.; Vauzour, David; Jofre-Montseny, Laia; Rota, Cristina; Rimbach, Gerald; Weinberg, Peter D.; Spencer, Jeremy P.E. . E-mail: j.p.e.spencer@reading.ac.uk

    2006-08-04

    Cellular actions of isoflavones may mediate the beneficial health effects associated with high soy consumption. We have investigated protection by genistein and daidzein against oxidative stress-induced endothelial injury. Genistein but not daidzein protected endothelial cells from damage induced by oxidative stress. This protection was accompanied by decreases in intracellular glutathione levels that could be explained by the generation of glutathionyl conjugates of the oxidised genistein metabolite, 5,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyisoflavone. Both isoflavones evoked increased protein expression of {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase-heavy subunit ({gamma}-GCS-HS) and increased cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf2. However, only genistein led to increases in the cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf1 and the increased expression of and activity of glutathione peroxidase. These results suggest that genistein-induced protective effects depend primarily on the activation of glutathione peroxidase mediated by Nrf1 activation, and not on Nrf2 activation or increases in glutathione synthesis.

  5. Synergistic Up-Regulation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression in Murine Macrophages by Adenosine A2A Receptor Agonists and Endotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Leibovich, Samuel Joseph; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Pinhal-Enfield, Grace; Belem, Paula C.; Elson, Genie; Rosania, Anthony; Ramanathan, Madhuri; Montesinos, Carmen; Jacobson, Marlene; Schwarzschild, Michael A.; Fink, J. Stephen; Cronstein, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Under normoxic conditions, macrophages from C57BL mice produce low levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Hypoxia stimulates VEGF expression by ∼500%; interferon-γ (IFN-γ) with endotoxin [lipopolysaccharide (LPS)] also stimulates VEGF expression by ∼50 to 150% in an inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-dependent manner. Treatment of normoxic macrophages with 5′-N-ethyl-carboxamido-adenosine (NECA), a nonselective adenosine A2 receptor agonist, or with 2-[p-(2-carboxyethyl)-phenylethyl amino]-5′-N-ethyl-carboxamido-adenosine (CGS21680), a specific adenosine A2A receptor agonist, modestly increases VEGF expression, whereas 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyl adenosine (CCPA), an adenosine A1 agonist, does not. Treatment with LPS (0 to 1000 ng/ml), or with IFN-γ (0 to 300 U/ml), does not affect VEGF expression. In the presence of LPS (EC50 < 10 ng/ml), but not of IFN-γ, both NECA and CGS21680 synergistically up-regulate VEGF expression by as much as 10-fold. This VEGF is biologically active in vivo in the rat corneal bioassay of angiogenesis. Inhibitors of iNOS do not affect this synergistic induction of VEGF, and macrophages from iNOS−/− mice produce similar levels of VEGF as wild-type mice, indicating that NO does not play a role in this induction. Under hypoxic conditions, VEGF expression is slightly increased by adenosine receptor agonists but adenosine A2 or A1 receptor antagonists 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargyl xanthine (DMPX), ZM241385, and 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DCPCX) do not modulate VEGF expression. VEGF expression is also not reduced in hypoxic macrophages from A3−/− and A2A−/− mice. Thus, VEGF expression by hypoxic macrophages does not seem to depend on endogenously released or exogenous adenosine. VEGF expression is strongly up-regulated by LPS/NECA in macrophages from A3−/− but not A2A−/− mice, confirming the role of adenosine A2A receptors in this pathway. LPS with NECA strongly up-regulates VEGF expression by

  6. Molecular characterization of fruit-specific class III peroxidase genes in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    PubMed

    Wang, Chii-Jeng; Chan, Yuan-Li; Shien, Chin Hui; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2015-04-01

    In this study, expression of four peroxidase genes, LePrx09, LePrx17, LePrx35 and LePrxA, was identified in immature tomato fruits, and the function in the regulation of fruit growth was characterized. Analysis of amino acid sequences revealed that these genes code for class III peroxidases, containing B, D and F conserved domains, which bind heme groups, and a buried salt bridge motif. LePrx35 and LePrxA were identified as novel peroxidase genes in Solanum lycopersicum (L.). The temporal expression patterns at various fruit growth stages revealed that LePrx35 and LePrxA were expressed only in immature green (IMG) fruits, whereas LePrx17 and LePrx09 were expressed in both immature and mature green fruits. Tissue-specific expression profiles indicated that only LePrx09 was expressed in the mesocarp but not the inner tissue of immature fruits. The effects of hormone treatments and stresses on the four genes were examined; only the expression levels of LePrx17 and LePrx09 were altered. Transcription of LePrx17 was up-regulated by jasmonic acid (JA) and pathogen infection and expression of LePrx09 was induced by ethephon, salicylic acid (SA) and JA, in particular, as well as wounding, pathogen infection and H2O2 stress. Tomato plants over-expressing LePrx09 displayed enhanced resistance to H2O2 stress, suggesting that LePrx09 may participate in the H2O2 signaling pathway to regulate fruit growth and disease resistance in tomato fruits.

  7. SKELETAL MUSCLE GROUP VIA PHOSPHOLIPASE A2 (iPLA2β): EXPRESSION AND ROLE IN FATTY ACID OXIDATION†

    PubMed Central

    Carper, Michael J.; Zhang, Sheng; Turk, John; Ramanadham, Sasanka

    2009-01-01

    Among the phospholipases A2 (PLA2s) are the Group VI Ca2+-independent PLA2s (iPLA2s) and expression of multiple transcripts of iPLA2 in skeletal muscle has been reported. In the present study, phospholipase activity and sequential ATP and calmodulin affinity column chromatography analyses reveal that skeletal muscle iPLA2 exhibits properties characteristic of the iPLA2β isoform. The phospholipase activity of iPLA2β has been demonstrated to participate in signal transduction, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. We also report here that skeletal muscle from iPLA2β-null mice, relative to wild type muscle, exhibits a reduced capacity to oxidize palmitate but not palmitoyl-CoA or acetyl-CoA in the absence of changes in fatty acid transporters CD36 and CPT1 or β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity. Recently, purified iPLA2β was demonstrated to manifest a thioesterase activity which catalyzes hydrolysis of fatty acyl-CoAs. The liberated CoA-SH facilitates fatty acid transport into the mitochondria. In this regard, we find that fractions eluted from the ATP column and containing iPLA2β phospholipase activity also contained acyl-CoA thioesterase activity that was inhibited by the bromoenol lactone (BEL) suicide inhibitor of iPLA2β. We further find that acyl-CoA thioesterase activity in skeletal muscle preparations from iPLA2β-null mice is significantly reduced, relative to WT activity. These findings suggest that the absence of acyl-CoA thioesterase activity of iPLA2β can lead to reduced fatty acyl-CoA generation and impair fatty acid oxidation in iPLA2β-null mice. Our findings therefore reveal a novel function of iPLA2β, related not to its phospholipase activity but to its thioesterase activity, which contributes to optimal fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle. PMID:18937505

  8. The Parkinson's disease-associated GPR37 receptor interacts with striatal adenosine A2A receptor controlling its cell surface expression and function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Morató, Xavier; Luján, Rafael; López-Cano, Marc; Gandía, Jorge; Stagljar, Igor; Watanabe, Masahiko; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Ciruela, Francisco

    2017-08-25

    G protein-coupled receptor 37 (GPR37) is an orphan receptor associated to Parkinson's disease (PD) neuropathology. Here, we identified GPR37 as an inhibitor of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) cell surface expression and function in vivo. In addition, we showed that GPR37 and A2AR do oligomerize in the striatum. Thus, a close proximity of GPR37 and A2AR at the postsynaptic level of striatal synapses was observed by double-labelling post-embedding immunogold detection. Indeed, the direct receptor-receptor interaction was further substantiated by proximity ligation in situ assay. Interestingly, GPR37 deletion promoted striatal A2AR cell surface expression that correlated well with an increased A2AR agonist-mediated cAMP accumulation, both in primary striatal neurons and nerve terminals. Furthermore, GPR37-/- mice showed enhanced A2AR agonist-induced catalepsy and an increased response to A2AR antagonist-mediated locomotor activity. Overall, these results revealed a key role for GPR37 controlling A2AR biology in the striatum, which may be relevant for PD management.

  9. Isolation and properties of peroxidase produced by the fungus Panus tigrinus.

    PubMed

    Revin, V V; Cadimaliev, D A; Atykyan, N A; Sitkin, B V; Samuilov, V D

    2000-11-01

    Synthesis of peroxidase and laccase by the fungus Panus tigrinus was significantly stimulated by addition of the lignocellulose substrate to the culture media. Peroxidase was isolated from the culture liquid and some properties of the enzyme were investigated. P. tigrinus peroxidase belongs to a group of extracellular peroxidases similar to the plant type peroxidases.

  10. Improved manganese-oxidizing activity of DypB, a peroxidase from a lignolytic bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rahul; Grigg, Jason C.; Qin, Wei; Kadla, John F.; Murphy, Michael E.P.; Eltis, Lindsay D.

    2013-01-01

    DypB, a dye-decolorizing peroxidase from the lignolytic soil bacterium Rhodococcus jostii RHA1, catalyzes the peroxide-dependent oxidation of divalent manganese (Mn2+), albeit less efficiently than fungal manganese peroxidases. Substitution of Asn246, a distal heme residue, with alanine, increased the enzyme’s apparent kcat and kcat/Km values for Mn2+ by 80- and 15-fold, respectively. A 2.2 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of the N246A variant revealed the Mn2+ to be bound within a pocket of acidic residues at the heme edge, reminiscent of the binding site in fungal manganese peroxidase and very different to that of another bacterial Mn2+-oxidizing peroxidase. The first coordination sphere was entirely comprised of solvent, consistent with the variant’s high Km for Mn2+ (17 ± 2 mM). N246A catalyzed the manganese-dependent transformation of hard wood kraft lignin and its solvent-extracted fractions. Two of the major degradation products were identified as 2,6-dimethoxybenzoquinone and 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxybenzaldehyde, respectively. These results highlight the potential of bacterial enzymes as biocatalysts to transform lignin. PMID:23305326

  11. Improved manganese-oxidizing activity of DypB, a peroxidase from a lignolytic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rahul; Grigg, Jason C; Qin, Wei; Kadla, John F; Murphy, Michael E P; Eltis, Lindsay D

    2013-04-19

    DypB, a dye-decolorizing peroxidase from the lignolytic soil bacterium Rhodococcus jostii RHA1, catalyzes the peroxide-dependent oxidation of divalent manganese (Mn(2+)), albeit less efficiently than fungal manganese peroxidases. Substitution of Asn246, a distal heme residue, with alanine increased the enzyme's apparent k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m) values for Mn(2+) by 80- and 15-fold, respectively. A 2.2 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of the N246A variant revealed the Mn(2+) to be bound within a pocket of acidic residues at the heme edge, reminiscent of the binding site in fungal manganese peroxidase and very different from that of another bacterial Mn(2+)-oxidizing peroxidase. The first coordination sphere was entirely composed of solvent, consistent with the variant's high K(m) for Mn(2+) (17 ± 2 mM). N246A catalyzed the manganese-dependent transformation of hard wood kraft lignin and its solvent-extracted fractions. Two of the major degradation products were identified as 2,6-dimethoxybenzoquinone and 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxybenzaldehyde, respectively. These results highlight the potential of bacterial enzymes as biocatalysts to transform lignin.

  12. Cloning and characterization of a novel CYP3A1 allelic variant: analysis of CYP3A1 and CYP3A2 sex-hormone-dependent expression reveals that the CYP3A2 gene is regulated by testosterone.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, V; Lechner, M C

    1992-02-14

    A clone was isolated from a cDNA library constructed from phenobarbital-treated Wistar rat liver and proven to correspond to the full-length mRNA of a polymorphic variant of Sprague-Dawley CYP3A1. Eight nucleotide differences were detected in a single 76-nucleotide stretch and confirmed to be present in the genomic clone. They are seated in a region implicated in the definition of a substrate binding domain of the native P450. Three out of the eight nucleotide changes are nonconservative, implicating the replacement of Thr/Ala 207, Phe/Ile 213, and Ile/Val 232. This is the first report of an allelic variant of CYP3A1, a new example of interstrain P450 variability. The CYP3A subfamily is composed of several genes coding for active testosterone 6 beta-hydroxylases which are expressed in the liver. CYP3A genes are under strong and distinct developmental regulation. Conversely to CYP3A1, transiently expressed in immature animals, CYP3A2 is constitutively expressed in the liver early after birth and characterized by an extinction in the adult females. Castration of 90-day-old male rats causes a drastic reduction (80%) of CYP3A2 mRNA relative abundance. Administration of testosterone propionate restores the physiological levels of CYP3A2 mRNA characteristic of the male rat liver. Our results demonstrate the existence of a direct relationship between the male hormonal status and the constitutive expression of rat liver CYP3A2.

  13. katGI and katGII encode two different catalases-peroxidases in Mycobacterium fortuitum.

    PubMed Central

    Menéndez, M C; Ainsa, J A; Martín, C; García, M J

    1997-01-01

    It has been suggested that catalase-peroxidase plays an important role in several aspects of mycobacterial metabolism and is a virulence factor in the main pathogenic mycobacteria. In this investigation, we studied genes encoding for this protein in the fast-growing opportunistic pathogen Mycobacterium fortuitum. Nucleotide sequences of two different catalase-peroxidase genes (katGI and katGII) of M. fortuitum are described. They show only 64% homology at the nucleotide level and 55% identity at the amino acid level, and they are more similar to catalases-peroxidases from different bacteria, including mycobacteria, than to each other. Both proteins were found to be expressed in actively growing M. fortuitum, and both could also be expressed when transformed into Escherichia coli and M. aurum. We detected the presence of a copy of IS6100 in the neighboring region of a katG gene in the M. fortuitum strain in which this element was identified (strain FC1). The influence of each katG gene on isoniazid (isonicotinic acid hydrazide; INH) susceptibility of mycobacteria was checked by using the INH-sensitive M. aurum as the host. Resistance to INH was induced when katGI was transformed into INH-sensitive M. aurum, suggesting that this enzyme contributes to the natural resistance of M. fortuitum to the drug. This is the first report showing two different genes encoding same enzyme activity which are actively expressed within the same mycobacterial strain. PMID:9371430

  14. Antigen receptors on immature, but not mature, B and T cells are coupled to cytosolic phospholipase A2 activation: expression and activation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 correlate with lymphocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, J J; Stewart, A; Courtney, C A; Fleming, M C; Reid, P; Jackson, C G; Wise, A; Wakelam, M J; Harnett, M M

    1996-03-15

    The Ag receptors on mature B and T cells are not coupled to the activation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and arachidonic acid release. Moreover, phorbol esters such as PMA, which can activate cPLA2 via mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase in most cell types, also failed to induce the release of arachidonate from mature cells, suggesting that the cPLA2 pathway may not be functional in mature lymphocytes. Interestingly, Western blot analysis revealed that cPLA2, which had previously been thought to be expressed ubiquitously, is not expressed in mature B or T cells and that cytosolic phospholipase A2 expression could not be up-regulated in lymphocytes following culture with a range of cytokines most likely to be involved in an immune response such as IL-1 alpha, IL-3, or TNF-alpha. In contrast, cPLA2 was shown to be expressed and activated in thymocytes and immature B cells under conditions in which ligation of the Ag receptors led to growth arrest and/or apoptosis. Taken together, these data suggest that cPLA2 does not play a role in Ag receptor-mediated lymphocyte activation, but may be involved in the molecular mechanisms underlying lymphocyte maturation and/or self tolerance by clonal deletion.

  15. Horseradish-Peroxidase-Catalyzed Tyrosine Click Reaction.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shinichi; Nakamura, Kosuke; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-02

    The efficiency of protein chemical modification on tyrosine residues with N-methylluminol derivatives was drastically improved by using horseradish peroxidase (HRP). In the previous method, based on the use of hemin and H2 O2 , oxidative side reactions such as cysteine oxidation were problematic for functionalization of proteins selectively on tyrosine residues. Oxidative activation of N-methylluminol derivatives with a minimum amount of H2 O2 prevented the occurrence of oxidative side reactions under HRP-catalyzed conditions. As probes for HRP-catalyzed protein modification, N-methylluminol derivatives showed much higher efficiency than tyramide without inducing oligomerization of probe molecules. Tyrosine modification also proceeded in the presence of β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH, H2 O2 -free conditions).

  16. Carbon Nanodots as Peroxidase Nanozymes for Biosensing.

    PubMed

    Garg, Bhaskar; Bisht, Tanuja

    2016-12-02

    'Nanozymes', a term coined by Scrimin, Pasquato, and co-workers to describe nanomaterials with enzyme-like characteristics, represent an exciting and emerging research area in the field of artificial enzymes. Indubitably, the last decade has witnessed substantial advancements in the design of a variety of functional nanoscale materials, including metal oxides and carbon-based nanomaterials, which mimic the structures and functions of naturally occurring enzymes. Among these, carbon nanodots (C-dots) or carbon quantum dots (CQDs) offer huge potential due to their unique properties as compared to natural enzymes and/or classical artificial enzymes. In this mini review, we discuss the peroxidase-like catalytic activities of C-dots and their applications in biosensing. The scope intends to cover not only the C-dots but also graphene quantum dots (GQDs), doped C-dots/GQDs, carbon nitride dots, and C-dots/GQDs nanocomposites. Nevertheless, this mini review is designed to be illustrative, not comprehensive.

  17. ATP-enhanced peroxidase-like activity of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shah, Juhi; Purohit, Rahul; Singh, Ragini; Karakoti, Ajay Singh; Singh, Sanjay

    2015-10-15

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are known to possess intrinsic biological peroxidase-like activity that has applications in development of numerous biosensors. The reactivity of the Au atoms at the surface of AuNPs is critical to the performance of such biosensors, yet little is known about the effect of biomolecules and ions on the peroxidase-like activity. In this work, the effect of ATP and other biologically relevant molecules and ions over peroxidase-like activity of AuNPs are described. Contrary to the expectation that nanoparticles exposed to biomolecules may lose the catalytic property, ATP and ADP addition enhanced the peroxidase-like activity of AuNPs. The catalytic activity was unaltered by the addition of free phosphate, sulphate and carbonate anions however, addition of ascorbic acid to the reaction mixture diminished the intrinsic peroxidase-like activity of AuNPs, even in the presence of ATP and ADP. In contrast to AuNPs, ATP did not synergize and improve the peroxidase activity of the natural peroxidase enzyme, horseradish peroxidase.

  18. Differential peroxidase activities in three different crops upon insect feeding

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harpal; Dixit, Sameer; Verma, Praveen Chandra; Singh, Pradhyumna Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Peroxidases are the ubiquitous enzyme and reported to be present in all living genera. They catalyses reduction of peroxide and generate reactive oxygen species. In the present study we demonstrated that insect infestation induces peroxidase activity in sap and total soluble protein (TSP) of plant leaves. Three important crop plants viz. tomato, cowpea and cotton were used for this study. After infestation of chewing insect, Peroxidase activity in the sap and TSP of all the studied plants were enhanced in the range of 1.6 to 3.14 fold. Similar observations were also obtained with feeding of sap sucking insects, in which increment in peroxidase activity of sap and TSP was in the range of 1.8 to 2.53 fold. Enhanced peroxidase activity was reconfirmed by in-gel peroxidase assay. Enzyme kinetic study showed turn over efficiency of peroxidase from cotton (~101.3 min-1) was almost similar to tomato (~100.8 min-1) but higher than cowpea (~98.21min-1). MS/MS analysis of observed band showed significant similarity with the reported peroxidases in database. PMID:23857346

  19. Association of miR-196a-2 and miR-499 variants with ulcerative colitis and their correlation with expression of respective miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Ranjha, Raju; Meena, Naresh Kumar; Singh, Abhiraman; Ahuja, Vineet; Paul, Jaishree

    2017-01-01

    Background and aim MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that play an important role in regulating the gene expression of their target genes. SNP miR-196a-2 rs11614913 and miR-499 rs3746444 are reported to have association with the risk and prognosis of multiple-types of inflammatory diseases including IBD. This study was conducted to show if any association of SNP miR-196a-2rs11614913 and miR-499 rs3746444 exists with ulcerative colitis (UC) patients of north Indian population and how these polymorphisms modulate the expression profile of the respective miRNAs. Methods A total of 638 participants including 197 UC patients and 441 controls were included in this study. Polymorphisms were genotyped by PCR-RFLP and the miRNA expression was measured using qRT-PCR. Genotypes and allele frequencies were calculated using SPSS 16 software. Results MiR-196a-2 rs11614913 (C>T) and miR-499 rs3746444 (T>C) were found to be associated with UC. TT genotype of miR-196a-2 rs11614913 (p = 0.03) was negatively associated with UC whereas the heterozygous TC genotype of miR-499 rs3746444 (p = 0.003) was showing positive association with UC. Patients having a combination of both SNPs, developed disease at older age and they suffered from severe disease extent. Genotype that showed association with the disease also showed correlation with the changes in miRNA expression. Conclusion In this study we found miR-196a-2 rs11614913 and miR-499 rs3746444 were associated with UC in north Indian population. We found the genotype that showed association with UC also altered the expression of respective miRNA in the patient harboring the genotype. There was correlation between associated genotype and altered miRNA expression. PMID:28301487

  20. Adenovirus-mediated expression of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A2 targeting hepatic stellate cell attenuates liver fibrosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pengguo; Li, Jie; Huo, Yan; Lu, Jin; Wan, Lili; Yang, Quanjun; Huang, Jinlu; Gan, Run; Guo, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a wound-healing response characterized with the accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM). And hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the principal cell source of ECM. NR4A2 (Nurr1) is a member of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A family and acts as transcription factor. It participates in regulating cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. We previously demonstrated that NR4A2 expression in fibrotic liver reduced significantly compared with normal liver and NR4A2 knockout in HSCs promoted ECM production. In the present study we explored the role of NR4A2 on liver fibrosis. Studies in cultured HSCs demonstrated that NR4A2 over-expression suppressed the activation of HSCs, such as ECM production and invasion ability. Moreover cell cycle was arrested, cell apoptosis was promoted and cell signaling pathway was influenced. Adenovirus-mediated delivery of NR4A2 in rats ameliorated significantly dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) induced liver fibrosis. The In vivo experiments produced results consistent with in vitro experiments. Taken together these results demonstrate NR4A2 enhancement attenuates liver fibrosis via suppressing the activation of HSCs and NR4A2 may be an ideal target for anti-fibrotic therapy. PMID:27646469

  1. Accelerating peroxidase mimicking nanozymes using DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Biwu; Liu, Juewen

    2015-08-01

    DNA-capped iron oxide nanoparticles are nearly 10-fold more active as a peroxidase mimic for TMB oxidation than naked nanoparticles. To understand the mechanism, the effect of DNA length and sequence is systematically studied, and other types of polymers are also compared. This rate enhancement is more obvious with longer DNA and, in particular, poly-cytosine. Among the various polymer coatings tested, DNA offers the highest rate enhancement. A similar acceleration is also observed for nanoceria. On the other hand, when the positively charged TMB substrate is replaced by the negatively charged ABTS, DNA inhibits oxidation. Therefore, the negatively charged phosphate backbone and bases of DNA can increase TMB binding by the iron oxide nanoparticles, thus facilitating the oxidation reaction in the presence of hydrogen peroxide.DNA-capped iron oxide nanoparticles are nearly 10-fold more active as a peroxidase mimic for TMB oxidation than naked nanoparticles. To understand the mechanism, the effect of DNA length and sequence is systematically studied, and other types of polymers are also compared. This rate enhancement is more obvious with longer DNA and, in particular, poly-cytosine. Among the various polymer coatings tested, DNA offers the highest rate enhancement. A similar acceleration is also observed for nanoceria. On the other hand, when the positively charged TMB substrate is replaced by the negatively charged ABTS, DNA inhibits oxidation. Therefore, the negatively charged phosphate backbone and bases of DNA can increase TMB binding by the iron oxide nanoparticles, thus facilitating the oxidation reaction in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Methods, TEM, UV-vis and DLS data. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04176g

  2. Barley Coleoptile Peroxidases. Purification, Molecular Cloning, and Induction by Pathogens1

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Brian Kåre; Bloch, Helle; Rasmussen, Søren Kjærsgaard

    1999-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding the Prx7 peroxidase from barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) predicted a 341-amino acid protein with a molecular weight of 36,515. N- and C-terminal putative signal peptides were present, suggesting a vacuolar location of the peroxidase. Immunoblotting and reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction showed that the Prx7 protein and mRNA accumulated abundantly in barley coleoptiles and in leaf epidermis inoculated with powdery mildew fungus (Blumeria graminis). Two isoperoxidases with isoelectric points of 9.3 and 7.3 (P9.3 and P7.3, respectively) were purified to homogeneity from barley coleoptiles. P9.3 and P7.3 had Reinheitszahl values of 3.31 and 2.85 and specific activities (with 2,2′-azino-di-[3-ethyl-benzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid], pH 5.5, as the substrate) of 11 and 79 units/mg, respectively. N-terminal amino acid sequencing and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass-spectrometry peptide analysis identified the P9.3 peroxidase activity as due to Prx7. Tissue and subcellular accumulation of Prx7 was studied using activity-stained isoelectric focusing gels and immunoblotting. The peroxidase activity due to Prx7 accumulated in barley leaves 24 h after inoculation with powdery mildew spores or by wounding of epidermal cells. Prx7 accumulated predominantly in the epidermis, apparently in the vacuole, and appeared to be the only pathogen-induced vacuolar peroxidase expressed in barley tissues. The data presented here suggest that Prx7 is responsible for the biosynthesis of antifungal compounds known as hordatines, which accumulate abundantly in barley coleoptiles. PMID:10364401

  3. Molecular characterization of a novel peroxidase from the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Ogola, Henry Joseph Oduor; Kamiike, Takaaki; Hashimoto, Naoya; Ashida, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shibata, Hitoshi; Sawa, Yoshihiro

    2009-12-01

    The open reading frame alr1585 of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 encodes a heme-dependent peroxidase (Anabaena peroxidase [AnaPX]) belonging to the novel DyP-type peroxidase family (EC 1.11.1.X). We cloned and heterologously expressed the active form of the enzyme in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme was a 53-kDa tetrameric protein with a pI of 3.68, a low pH optima (pH 4.0), and an optimum reaction temperature of 35 degrees C. Biochemical characterization revealed an iron protoporphyrin-containing heme peroxidase with a broad specificity for aromatic substrates such as guaiacol, 4-aminoantipyrine and pyrogallol. The enzyme efficiently catalyzed the decolorization of anthraquinone dyes like Reactive Blue 5, Reactive Blue 4, Reactive Blue 114, Reactive Blue 119, and Acid Blue 45 with decolorization rates of 262, 167, 491, 401, and 256 muM.min(-1), respectively. The apparent K(m) and k(cat)/K(m) values for Reactive Blue 5 were 3.6 muM and 1.2 x 10(7) M(-1) s(-1), respectively, while the apparent K(m) and k(cat)/K(m) values for H(2)O(2) were 5.8 muM and 6.6 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. In contrast, the decolorization activity of AnaPX toward azo dyes was relatively low but was significantly enhanced 2- to approximately 50-fold in the presence of the natural redox mediator syringaldehyde. The specificity and catalytic efficiency for hydrogen donors and synthetic dyes show the potential application of AnaPX as a useful alternative of horseradish peroxidase or fungal DyPs. To our knowledge, this study represents the only extensive report in which a bacterial DyP has been tested in the biotransformation of synthetic dyes.

  4. Adaptive aneuploidy protects against thiol peroxidase deficiency by increasing respiration via key mitochondrial proteins.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Alaattin; Gerashchenko, Maxim V; Seim, Inge; Labarre, Jean; Toledano, Michel B; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2015-08-25

    Aerobic respiration is a fundamental energy-generating process; however, there is cost associated with living in an oxygen-rich environment, because partially reduced oxygen species can damage cellular components. Organisms evolved enzymes that alleviate this damage and protect the intracellular milieu, most notably thiol peroxidases, which are abundant and conserved enzymes that mediate hydrogen peroxide signaling and act as the first line of defense against oxidants in nearly all living organisms. Deletion of all eight thiol peroxidase genes in yeast (∆8 strain) is not lethal, but results in slow growth and a high mutation rate. Here we characterized mechanisms that allow yeast cells to survive under conditions of thiol peroxidase deficiency. Two independent ∆8 strains increased mitochondrial content, altered mitochondrial distribution, and became dependent on respiration for growth but they were not hypersensitive to H2O2. In addition, both strains independently acquired a second copy of chromosome XI and increased expression of genes encoded by it. Survival of ∆8 cells was dependent on mitochondrial cytochrome-c peroxidase (CCP1) and UTH1, present on chromosome XI. Coexpression of these genes in ∆8 cells led to the elimination of the extra copy of chromosome XI and improved cell growth, whereas deletion of either gene was lethal. Thus, thiol peroxidase deficiency requires dosage compensation of CCP1 and UTH1 via chromosome XI aneuploidy, wherein these proteins support hydroperoxide removal with the reducing equivalents generated by the electron transport chain. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of adaptive aneuploidy counteracting oxidative stress.

  5. Description of the first fungal dye-decolorizing peroxidase oxidizing manganese(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Fueyo, Elena; Linde, Dolores; Almendral, David; Lopez-Lucendo, María F.; Ruiz-Duenas, Francisco J.; Martinez, Angel T.

    2015-05-13

    Two phylogenetically divergent genes of the new family of dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) were found during comparison of the four DyP genes identified in the Pleurotus ostreatus genome with over 200 DyP genes from other basidiomycete genomes. The heterologously expressed enzymes (Pleos-DyP1 and Pleos-DyP4, following the genome nomenclature) efficiently oxidize anthraquinoid dyes (such as Reactive Blue 19), which are characteristic DyP substrates, as well as low redox-potential dyes (such as 2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)) and substituted phenols. However, only Pleos-DyP4 oxidizes the high redox-potential dye Reactive Black 5, at the same time that it displays high thermal and pH stability. Unexpectedly, both enzymes also oxidize Mn2+ to Mn3+, albeit with very different catalytic efficiencies. Pleos-DyP4 presents a Mn2+ turnover (56 s–1) nearly in the same order of the two other Mn2+-oxidizing peroxidase families identified in the P. ostreatus genome: manganese peroxidases (100 s–1 average turnover) and versatile peroxidases (145 s–1 average turnover), whose genes were also heterologously expressed. Oxidation of Mn2+ has been reported for an Amycolatopsis DyP (24 s–1) and claimed for other bacterial DyPs, albeit with lower activities, but this is the first time that Mn2+ oxidation is reported for a fungal DyP. Interestingly, Pleos-DyP4 (together with ligninolytic peroxidases) is detected in the secretome of P. ostreatus grown on different lignocellulosic substrates. In conclusion, it is suggested that generation of Mn3+ oxidizers plays a role in the P. ostreatus white-rot lifestyle since three different families of Mn2+-oxidizing peroxidase genes are present in its genome being expressed during lignocellulose degradation.

  6. Enzymatic characterization of in vitro-expressed Baikal seal cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1, 1A2, and 1B1: implication of low metabolic potential of CYP1A2 uniquely evolved in aquatic mammals.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Hisato; Yamaguchi, Keisuke; Takeshita, Yoko; Kubota, Akira; Hirakawa, Shusaku; Isobe, Tomohiko; Hirano, Masashi; Kim, Eun-Young

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the catalytic function of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1 enzymes in aquatic mammals. Alkoxyresorufin O-dealkylation (AROD) activities including methoxy- (MROD), ethoxy- (EROD), pentoxy- (PROD), and benzyloxyresorufin O-dealkylation (BROD), and 2- and 4-hydroxylation activities of 17β-estradiol (E2) were measured by using yeast-expressed Baikal seal (Pusa sibirica) CYP1A1, 1A2, and 1B1 proteins. Heterologous protein expression of the Baikal seal CYP1s (bsCYP1s) in yeast microsomes was confirmed by reduced CO-difference spectra and immunoblotting. Heterologously expressed human CYP1 enzyme (hCYP1) activities were simultaneously measured and compared with those of bsCYP1 isozymes. Recombinant bsCYP1A1 protein showed the highest Vmax of EROD, followed by MROD, PROD, and BROD, similar to that of hCYP1A1. Vmax/Km ratios of all AROD activities catalyzed by bsCYP1A1 were lower than those catalyzed by hCYP1A1, suggesting less potential for AROD by bsCYP1A1. Enzymatic assays for bsCYP1A2 showed no or minimal AROD activities, while hCYP1A2 displayed MROD and EROD activities. bsCYP1B1 showed an AROD profile (EROD>BROD>MROD>PROD) similar to that of hCYP1B1; however, Vmax/Km ratios of all AROD activities by bsCYP1B1 were higher. Yeast microsomes containing bsCYP1A1 and 1B1 and hCYP1A1, 1A2, and 1B1 metabolized E2 to 2-OHE2 and 4-OHE2, whereas bsCYP1A2 showed no such activity. Comparison of 4- and 2-hydroxylations of E2 by CYP1As suggests that bsCYP1A1, hCYP1A1, and 1A2 preferentially catalyze 2- rather than 4-hydroxylation. As for CYP1B1, the Vmax/Km ratios suggest that both Baikal seal and human CYPs catalyze 4- rather than 2-hydroxylation. Interspecies comparison showed that bsCYP1B1 has higher metabolic potencies for both E2 hydroxylations than does hCYP1B1, whereas the activity of bsCYP1A1 was lower than that of hCYP1A1. Messenger RNA expression levels of bsCYP1s in the liver of Baikal seals indicated that bsCYP1A1 and 1A2 enzymes contributed to 16

  7. Hydrogen peroxide-mediated inactivation of two chloroplastic peroxidases, ascorbate peroxidase and 2-cys peroxiredoxin.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, Sakihito

    2008-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as the superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide, are generated by the photosystems because photoexcited electrons are often generated in excess of requirements for CO2 fixation and used for reducing molecular oxygen, even under normal environmental conditions. Moreover, ROS generation is increased in chloroplasts if plants are subjected to stresses, such as drought, high salinity and chilling. Chloroplast-localized isoforms of ascorbate peroxidase and possibly peroxiredoxins assume the principal role of scavenging hydrogen peroxide. However, in vitro studies revealed that both types of peroxidases are easily damaged by hydrogen peroxide and lose their catalytic activities. This is one contributing factor for cellular damage that occurs under severe oxidative stress. In this review, I describe mechanisms of hydrogen peroxide-mediated inactivation of these two enzymes and discuss a reason why they became susceptible to damage by hydrogen peroxide.

  8. Incorporation of Carbohydrate Residues into Peroxidase Isoenzymes in Horseradish Roots

    PubMed Central

    Lew, Jow Y.; Shannon, Leland M.

    1973-01-01

    Sliced root tissue of the horseradish plant (Armoracia rusticana), when incubated with mannose-U-14C, incorporated radioactivity into peroxidase isoenzymes. Over 90% of the radioactivity in the highly purified peroxidase isoenzymes was present in the neutral sugar residues of the molecule, i.e. fucose, arabinose, xylose, mannose. When the root slices were incubated simultaneously with leucine-4,5-3H and mannose-U-14C, cycloheximide strongly inhibited leucine incorporation into the peptide portion of peroxidase isoenzymes but had little effect on the incorporation of 14C into the neutral sugars. These results indicated that synthesis of the peptide portion of peroxidase was completed before the monosaccharide residues were attached to the molecule. This temporal relationship between the synthesis of protein and the attachment of carbohydrate residues in the plant glycoprotein, horseradish peroxidase, appears to be similar to that reported for glycoprotein biosynthesis in many mammalian systems. PMID:16658584

  9. [Oxidation of luminol with peroxidase from royal palm leaves].

    PubMed

    Alpeeva, I S; Sakharov, I Iu

    2007-01-01

    We optimized the conditions for luminol oxidation by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) from royal palm leaves (Roystonea regia). The pH range (8.3-8.6) corresponding to maximum chemiluminescence was similar for palm tree peroxidase and horseradish peroxidase. Variations in the concentration of the Tris buffer were accompanied by changes in chemiluminescence. Note that maximum chemiluminescence was observed in the 30 mM solution. The detection limit of the enzyme assay during luminol oxidation by hydrogen peroxide was 1 p