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Sample records for a2 receptor expression

  1. Striatal adenosine-cannabinoid receptor interactions in rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Chiodi, Valentina; Ferrante, Antonella; Ferraro, Luca; Potenza, Rosa Luisa; Armida, Monica; Beggiato, Sarah; Pèzzola, Antonella; Bader, Michael; Fuxe, Kjell; Popoli, Patrizia; Domenici, Maria Rosaria

    2016-03-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors (A2 A Rs) and cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1 Rs) are highly expressed in the striatum, where they functionally interact and form A2A /CB1 heteroreceptor complexes. We investigated the effects of CB1 R stimulation in a transgenic rat strain over-expressing A2 A Rs under the control of the neural-specific enolase promoter (NSEA2A rats) and in age-matched wild-type (WT) animals. The effects of the CB1 R agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) were significantly lower in NSEA2A rats than in WT animals, as demonstrated by i) electrophysiological recordings of synaptic transmission in corticostriatal slices; ii) the measurement of glutamate outflow from striatal synaptosomes and iii) in vivo experiments on locomotor activity. Moreover, while the effects of WIN were modulated by both A2 A R agonist (CGS 21680) and antagonists (ZM 241385, KW-6002 and SCH-442416) in WT animals, the A2 A R antagonists failed to influence WIN-mediated effects in NSEA2A rats. The present results demonstrate that in rats with genetic neuronal over-expression of A2 A Rs, the effects mediated by CB1 R activation in the striatum are significantly reduced, suggesting a change in the stoichiometry of A2A and CB1 receptors and providing a strategy to dissect the involvement of A2 A R forming or not forming heteromers in the modulation of striatal functions. These findings add additional evidence for the existence of an interaction between striatal A2 A Rs and CB1 Rs, playing a fundamental role in the regulation of striatal functions. We studied A2A -CB1 receptor interaction in transgenic rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors under the control of the neuron-specific enolase promoter (NSEA2A ). In these rats, we demonstrated a reduced effect of the CB1 receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 in the modulation of corticostriatal synaptic transmission and locomotor activity, while CB1 receptor expression level did not change with respect to WT rats. A reduction in the expression of A2A -CB1

  2. Dissecting striatal adenosine-cannabinoid receptor interactions. New clues from rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Ferré, Sergi; Sebastião, Ana Maria

    2016-03-01

    This Editorial highlights a study by Chiodi et al. () showing that the effects mediated by cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) activation in the striatum are significantly reduced in rats with neuronal over-expression of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). Two hypotheses are derived from that study. Hypothesis A: two subpopulations of pre-synaptic CB1R in corticostriatal glutamatergic terminals exist, one forming and another not forming heteromers with A2AR. Hypothesis B: CB1R are predominantly forming heteromers with A2AR. In the case of hypothesis A, the A2AR might be required for CB1R-A2AR heteromeric signaling, whereas non-heteromeric CB1R activity is inhibited by A2ARs. In the case of hypothesis B, up-regulation of A2ARs may perturb heteromeric stoichiometry, thus reducing CB1R functioning. In any case, pre-synaptic striatal A2AR-CB1R heteromers emerge as important targets of the effects of cannabinoids demonstrated at the neuronal and behavioral level. Read the highlighted article 'Striatal adenosine-cannabinoid receptor interactions in rats over-expressing adenosine A2A receptors' on page 907. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  3. Thyroid expression of an A2 adenosine receptor transgene induces thyroid hyperplasia and hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed Central

    Ledent, C; Dumont, J E; Vassart, G; Parmentier, M

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is the major intracellular second messenger of thyrotropin (TSH) action on thyroid cells. It stimulates growth as well as the function and differentiation of cultured thyrocytes. The adenosine A2 receptor, which activates adenylyl cyclase via coupling to the stimulating G protein (Gs), has been shown to promote constitutive activation of the cAMP cascade when transfected into various cell types. In order to test whether the A2 receptor was able to function similarly in vivo and to investigate the possible consequences of permanent adenylyl cyclase activation in thyroid cells, lines of transgenic mice were generated expressing the canine A2 adenosine receptor under control of the bovine thyroglobulin gene promoter. Thyroid-specific expression of the A2 adenosine receptor transgene promoted gland hyperplasia and severe hyperthyroidism causing premature death of the animals. The resulting goitre represents a model of hyperfunctioning adenomas: it demonstrates that constitutive activation of the cAMP cascade in such differentiated epithelial cells is sufficient to stimulate autonomous and uncontrolled function and growth. Images PMID:1371462

  4. Influence of CGS 21680, a selective adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist, on NMDA receptor function and expression in the brain of Huntington's disease mice.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, Antonella; Martire, Alberto; Armida, Monica; Chiodi, Valentina; Pézzola, Antonella; Potenza, Rosa Luisa; Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Popoli, Patrizia

    2010-04-06

    The effect of chronic treatment with the selective adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist CGS 21680 on N-Methyl-d-Aspartate (NMDA) receptor function and expression has been studied in the striatum and cortex of R6/2 mice, a genetic mouse model of Huntington's disease (HD). Starting from 8weeks of age, R6/2 and wild type (WT) mice were treated daily with CGS 21680 (0.5mg/kg i.p.) for 3weeks and the expression levels of NMDA receptor subunits were then evaluated. In addition, to study CGS 21680-induced changes in NMDA receptor function, NMDA-induced toxicity in corticostriatal slices from both R6/2 and WT mice was investigated. We found that CGS 21680 increased NR2A subunit expression and the NR2A/NR2B ratio in the cortex of R6/2 mice, having no effect in WT mice. In the striatum, CGS 21680 reduced NR1 expression in both R6/2 and WT mice while the effect on NR2A and NR2/NR2B expression was genotype-dependent, reducing and increasing their expression in WT and R6/2 mice, respectively. On the contrary, NMDA-induced toxicity in corticostriatal slices was not modified by the treatment in WT or HD mice. These results demonstrate that in vivo activation of A(2A) receptors modulates the subunit composition of NMDA receptors in the brain of HD mice.

  5. Enhancement of AMPA currents and GluR1 membrane expression through PKA-coupled adenosine A(2A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Dias, Raquel B; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Sebastião, Ana M

    2012-02-01

    Phosphorylation of glutamate α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors by Protein Kinase A (PKA) is known to regulate AMPA receptor (AMPAR) trafficking and stabilization at the postsynaptic membrane, which in turn is one of the key mechanisms by which synaptic transmission and plasticity are tuned. However, not much is known as to how Gs-coupled receptors contribute to endogenous PKA-mediated regulation of AMPA receptor function. Here we report that activation of the excitatory A(2A) adenosine receptor by 2-[4-(2-p-carboxyethyl)phenylamino]-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS 21680, 1-30 nM) facilitates AMPA-evoked currents in CA1 pyramidal neurons, by a mechanism dependent on PKA activation, but not on protein synthesis. This modulation of AMPA currents was mimicked by forskolin (1 μM) and did not occur in stratum radiatum interneurons. Superfusion of the A(2A) receptor agonist also caused an increase in the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), as well as in the membrane levels of GluR1 subunits phosphorylated at the PKA site (Ser845). The impact of this increase on GluR1-containing AMPA receptor expression was evidenced by the potentiation of LTP at the CA3-CA1 synapse that followed brief activation of A(2A) receptors. We thus propose that in conditions of increased adenosine availability, A(2A) receptor activation is responsible for setting part of the endogenous GluR1 Ser-845 phosphorylation tonus and hence, the availability of the GluR1-containing AMPA receptor extrasynaptic pool for synaptic insertion and reinforcement of synaptic strength.

  6. The Parkinson's disease-associated GPR37 receptor interacts with striatal adenosine A2A receptor controlling its cell surface expression and function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Morató, Xavier; Luján, Rafael; López-Cano, Marc; Gandía, Jorge; Stagljar, Igor; Watanabe, Masahiko; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Ciruela, Francisco

    2017-08-25

    G protein-coupled receptor 37 (GPR37) is an orphan receptor associated to Parkinson's disease (PD) neuropathology. Here, we identified GPR37 as an inhibitor of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) cell surface expression and function in vivo. In addition, we showed that GPR37 and A2AR do oligomerize in the striatum. Thus, a close proximity of GPR37 and A2AR at the postsynaptic level of striatal synapses was observed by double-labelling post-embedding immunogold detection. Indeed, the direct receptor-receptor interaction was further substantiated by proximity ligation in situ assay. Interestingly, GPR37 deletion promoted striatal A2AR cell surface expression that correlated well with an increased A2AR agonist-mediated cAMP accumulation, both in primary striatal neurons and nerve terminals. Furthermore, GPR37-/- mice showed enhanced A2AR agonist-induced catalepsy and an increased response to A2AR antagonist-mediated locomotor activity. Overall, these results revealed a key role for GPR37 controlling A2AR biology in the striatum, which may be relevant for PD management.

  7. High-level expression, purification and characterization of a constitutively active thromboxane A2 receptor polymorphic variant.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bing; Chakraborty, Raja; Eilers, Markus; Dakshinamurti, Shyamala; O'Neil, Joe D; Smith, Steven O; Bhullar, Rajinder P; Chelikani, Prashen

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) exhibit some level of basal signaling even in the absence of a bound agonist. This basal or constitutive signaling can have important pathophysiological roles. In the past few years, a number of high resolution crystal structures of GPCRs have been reported, including two crystal structures of constitutively active mutants (CAM) of the dim-light receptor, rhodopsin. The structural characterizations of CAMs are impeded by the lack of proper expression systems. The thromboxane A2 receptor (TP) is a GPCR that mediates vasoconstriction and promotes thrombosis in response to the binding of thromboxane. Here, we report on the expression and purification of a genetic variant and CAM in TP, namely A160T, using tetracycline-inducible HEK293S-TetR and HEK293S (GnTI¯)-TetR cell lines. Expression of the TP and the A160T genes in these mammalian cell lines resulted in a 4-fold increase in expression to a level of 15.8 ±0.3 pmol of receptor/mg of membrane protein. The receptors expressed in the HEK293S (GnTI(-))-TetR cell line showed homogeneous glycosylation. The functional yield of the receptors using a single step affinity purification was 45 µg/10⁶ cells. Temperature- dependent secondary structure changes of the purified TP and A160T receptors were characterized using circular dichroism (CD) spectropolarimetry. The CD spectra shows that the loss of activity or thermal sensitivity that was previously observed for the A160T mutant, is not owing to large unfolding of the protein but rather to a more subtle effect. This is the first study to report on the successful high-level expression, purification, and biophysical characterization of a naturally occurring, diffusible ligand activated GPCR CAM.

  8. High-Level Expression, Purification and Characterization of a Constitutively Active Thromboxane A2 Receptor Polymorphic Variant

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bing; Chakraborty, Raja; Eilers, Markus; Dakshinamurti, Shyamala; O’Neil, Joe D.; Smith, Steven O.; Bhullar, Rajinder P.; Chelikani, Prashen

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) exhibit some level of basal signaling even in the absence of a bound agonist. This basal or constitutive signaling can have important pathophysiological roles. In the past few years, a number of high resolution crystal structures of GPCRs have been reported, including two crystal structures of constitutively active mutants (CAM) of the dim-light receptor, rhodopsin. The structural characterizations of CAMs are impeded by the lack of proper expression systems. The thromboxane A2 receptor (TP) is a GPCR that mediates vasoconstriction and promotes thrombosis in response to the binding of thromboxane. Here, we report on the expression and purification of a genetic variant and CAM in TP, namely A160T, using tetracycline-inducible HEK293S-TetR and HEK293S (GnTI¯)-TetR cell lines. Expression of the TP and the A160T genes in these mammalian cell lines resulted in a 4-fold increase in expression to a level of 15.8 ±0.3 pmol of receptor/mg of membrane protein. The receptors expressed in the HEK293S (GnTI-)-TetR cell line showed homogeneous glycosylation. The functional yield of the receptors using a single step affinity purification was 45 µg/106 cells. Temperature- dependent secondary structure changes of the purified TP and A160T receptors were characterized using circular dichroism (CD) spectropolarimetry. The CD spectra shows that the loss of activity or thermal sensitivity that was previously observed for the A160T mutant, is not owing to large unfolding of the protein but rather to a more subtle effect. This is the first study to report on the successful high-level expression, purification, and biophysical characterization of a naturally occurring, diffusible ligand activated GPCR CAM. PMID:24086743

  9. Expression, Purification and Crystallisation of the Adenosine A2A Receptor Bound to an Engineered Mini G Protein.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Byron; Tate, Christopher G

    2017-04-20

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) promote cytoplasmic signalling by activating heterotrimeric G proteins in response to extracellular stimuli such as light, hormones and nucleosides. Structure determination of GPCR-G protein complexes is central to understanding the precise mechanism of signal transduction. However, these complexes are challenging targets for structural studies due to their conformationally dynamic and inherently transient nature. We recently developed an engineered G protein, mini-Gs, which addressed these problems and allowed the formation of a stable GPCR-G protein complex. Mini-Gs facilitated the structure determination of the human adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) in its G protein-bound conformation at 3.4 Å resolution. Here, we describe a step by step protocol for the expression and purification of A2AR, and crystallisation of the A2AR-mini-Gs complex.

  10. Nuclear receptor expression atlas in BMDCs: Nr4a2 restricts immunogenicity of BMDCs and impedes EAE.

    PubMed

    Saini, Ankita; Mahajan, Sahil; Gupta, Pawan

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily of transcription factors regulates various key aspects of physiological processes; however, their role(s) in immune cells' function are just beginning to unravel. Although few NRs have been shown to be critical for dendritic cell (DC) function, a lack of knowledge about their complete representation in DCs has limited the ability to harness their full potential. Here, we performed a comprehensive NR expression profiling and identified the key members of NR superfamily being expressed in immature, immunogenic, and tolerogenic DCs. Comparative analysis revealed discrete changes in the expression of various NRs among the studied DC subtypes, indicating a likely role in the modulation of DC functionality. Next, we characterized Nr4a2, a member of orphan NR family, and found that it suppresses the activation of bone marrow derived dendritic cells triggered by LPS. Overexpression and knockdown of Nr4a2 demonstrated that Nr4a2 orchestrates the expression of immunoregulatory genes, hence inducing a tolerogenic phenotype in bone marrow derived dendritic cells. Furthermore, we also found that Nr4a2 provides protection from EAE by promoting an increase in Treg cells, while limiting effector T cells. Our findings suggest a previously unidentified role for Nr4a2 as a regulator of DC tolerogenicity and demonstrate its potential as therapeutic target in DC-associated pathophysiologies. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Leishmania amazonensis impairs DC function by inhibiting CD40 expression via A2B adenosine receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Amanda B; Serafim, Tiago D; Marques-da-Silva, Eduardo A; Meyer-Fernandes, José R; Afonso, Luís C C

    2012-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play an essential role in the modulation of immune responses and several studies have evaluated the interactions between Leishmania parasites and DCs. While extracellular ATP exhibits proinflammatory properties, adenosine is an important anti-inflammatory mediator. Here we investigated the effects of Leishmania infection on DC responses and the participation of purinergic signalling in this process. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) from C57BL/6J mice infected with Leishmania amazonensis, Leishmania braziliensis or Leishmania major metacyclic promastigotes showed decreased major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and CD86 expression and increased ectonucleotidase expression as compared with uninfected cells. In addition, L. amazonensis-infected DCs, which had lower CD40 expression, exhibited a decreased ability to induce T-cell proliferation. The presence of MRS1754, a highly selective A(2B) adenosine receptor antagonist at the time of infection increased MHC class II, CD86 and CD40 expression in L. amazonensis-infected DCs and restored the ability of the infected DCs to induce T-cell proliferation. Similar results were obtained through the inhibition of extracellular ATP hydrolysis using suramin. In conclusion, we propose that A(2B) receptor activation may be used by L. amazonensis to inhibit DC function and evade the immune response. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Activation of nuclear receptor NR5A2 increases Glut4 expression and glucose metabolism in muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bolado-Carrancio, A.; Riancho, J.A.; Sainz, J.; Rodríguez-Rey, J.C.

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • NR5A2 expression in C2C12 is associated with myotube differentiation. • DLPC induces an increase in GLUT4 levels and glucose uptake in C2C12 myotubes. • In high glucose conditions the activation of NR5A2 inhibits fatty acids oxidation. - Abstract: NR5A2 is a nuclear receptor which regulates the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism, pluripotency maintenance and cell differentiation. It has been recently shown that DLPC, a NR5A2 ligand, prevents liver steatosis and improves insulin sensitivity in mouse models of insulin resistance, an effect that has been associated with changes in glucose and fatty acids metabolism in liver. Because skeletal muscle is a major tissue in clearing glucose from blood, we studied the effect of the activation of NR5A2 on muscle metabolism by using cultures of C2C12, a mouse-derived cell line widely used as a model of skeletal muscle. Treatment of C2C12 with DLPC resulted in increased levels of expression of GLUT4 and also of several genes related to glycolysis and glycogen metabolism. These changes were accompanied by an increased glucose uptake. In addition, the activation of NR5A2 produced a reduction in the oxidation of fatty acids, an effect which disappeared in low-glucose conditions. Our results suggest that NR5A2, mostly by enhancing glucose uptake, switches muscle cells into a state of glucose preference. The increased use of glucose by muscle might constitute another mechanism by which NR5A2 improves blood glucose levels and restores insulin sensitivity.

  13. Activation of cytokine production by secreted phospholipase A2 in human lung macrophages expressing the M-type receptor.

    PubMed

    Granata, Francescopaolo; Petraroli, Angelica; Boilard, Eric; Bezzine, Sofiane; Bollinger, James; Del Vecchio, Luigi; Gelb, Michael H; Lambeau, Gerard; Marone, Gianni; Triggiani, Massimo

    2005-01-01

    Secreted phospholipases A(2) (sPLA(2)) are enzymes released in plasma and extracellular fluids during inflammatory diseases. Because human group IB and X sPLA(2)s are expressed in the lung, we examined their effects on primary human lung macrophages (HLM). Both sPLA(2)s induced TNF-alpha and IL-6 release in a concentration-dependent manner by increasing their mRNA expression. This effect was independent of their enzymatic activity because 1) the capacity of sPLA(2)s to mobilize arachidonic acid from HLM was unrelated to their ability to induce cytokine production; and 2) two catalytically inactive isoforms of group IB sPLA(2) (bromophenacyl bromide-inactivated human sPLA(2) and the H48Q mutant of the porcine sPLA(2)) were as effective as the catalytically active sPLA(2)s in inducing cytokine production. HLM expressed the M-type receptor for sPLA(2)s at both mRNA and protein levels, as determined by RT-PCR, immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and flow cytometry. Me-indoxam, which decreases sPLA(2) activity as well as binding to the M-type receptor, suppressed sPLA(2)-induced cytokine production. Incubation of HLM with the sPLA(2)s was associated with phosphorylation of ERK1/2, and a specific inhibitor of this pathway, PD98059, significantly reduced the production of IL-6 elicited by sPLA(2)s. In conclusion, two distinct sPLA(2)s produced in the human lung stimulate cytokine production by HLM via a mechanism that is independent of their enzymatic activity and involves activation of the ERK1/2 pathway. HLM express the M-type receptor, but its involvement in eliciting cytokine production deserves further investigation.

  14. Effect of caffeine on the expression of cytochrome P450 1A2, adenosine A2A receptor and dopamine transporter in control and 1-methyl 4-phenyl 1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine treated mouse striatum.

    PubMed

    Singh, Seema; Singh, Kavita; Gupta, Satya Prakash; Patel, Devendra Kumar; Singh, Vinod Kumar; Singh, Raj Kumar; Singh, Mahendra Pratap

    2009-08-04

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by the selective loss of dopaminergic neurons of the nigrostriatal pathway. Epidemiological studies have shown an inverse relationship between coffee consumption and susceptibility to PD. Cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) is involved in caffeine metabolism and its clearance. Caffeine, on the other hand, antagonizes adenosine A(2A) receptor and regulates dopamine signaling through dopamine transporter (DAT). The present study was undertaken to investigate the expression of CYP1A2, adenosine A(2A) receptor and DAT in mouse striatum and to assess their levels in 1-methyl 4-phenyl 1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropryridine (MPTP) treated mouse striatum with and without caffeine treatment. The animals were treated intraperitoneally daily with caffeine (20 mg/kg) for 8 weeks, followed by MPTP (20 mg/kg)+caffeine (20 mg/kg) for 4 weeks or vice versa, along with respective controls. Tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity, levels of dopamine and 1-methyl 4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP(+)), expressions of CYP1A2, adenosine A(2A) receptor and DAT and CYP1A2 catalytic activity were measured in control and treated mouse brain. Caffeine partially protected MPTP-induced neurodegenerative changes and modulated MPTP-mediated alterations in the expression and catalytic activity of CYP1A2, expression of adenosine A(2A) receptor and DAT. The results demonstrate that caffeine alters the striatal CYP1A2, adenosine A(2A) receptor and DAT expressions in mice exposed to MPTP.

  15. Akt as a mediator of secretory phospholipase A2 receptor-involved inducible nitric oxide synthase expression.

    PubMed

    Park, Dae-Won; Kim, Jae-Ryong; Kim, Seong-Yong; Sonn, Jong-Kyung; Bang, Ok-Sun; Kang, Shin-Sung; Kim, Jung-Hye; Baek, Suk-Hwan

    2003-02-15

    The induction of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) by group IIA phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) involves the stimulation of a novel signaling cascade. In this study, we demonstrate that group IIA PLA(2) up-regulates the expression of iNOS through a novel pathway that includes M-type secretory PLA(2) receptor (sPLA(2)R), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), and Akt. Group IIA PLA(2) stimulated iNOS expression and promoted nitrite production in a dose- and time-dependent manner in Raw264.7 cells. Upon treating with group IIA PLA(2), Akt is phosphorylated in a PI3K-dependent manner. Pretreatment with LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, strongly suppressed group IIA PLA(2)-induced iNOS expression and PI3K/Akt activation. The promoter activity of iNOS was stimulated by group IIA PLA(2), and this was suppressed by LY294002. Transfection with Akt cDNA resulted in Akt protein overexpression in Raw264.7 cells and effectively enhanced the group IIA PLA(2)-induced reporter activity of the iNOS promoter. M-type sPLA(2)R was highly expressed in Raw264.7 cells. Overexpression of M-type sPLA(2)R enhanced group IIA PLA(2)-induced promoter activity and iNOS protein expression, and these effects were abolished by LY294002. However, site-directed mutation in residue responsible for PLA(2) catalytic activity markedly reduced their ability to production of nitrites and expression of iNOS. These results suggest that group IIA PLA(2) induces nitrite production by involving of M-type sPLA(2)R, which then mediates signal transduction events that lead to PI3K/Akt activation.

  16. Role of Site-Specific N-Glycans Expressed on GluA2 in the Regulation of Cell Surface Expression of AMPA-Type Glutamate Receptors.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Yusuke; Morise, Jyoji; Morita, Ippei; Takematsu, Hiromu; Oka, Shogo

    2015-01-01

    The AMPA-type glutamate receptor (AMPAR), which is a tetrameric complex composed of four subunits (GluA1-4) with several combinations, mediates the majority of rapid excitatory synaptic transmissions in the nervous system. Cell surface expression levels of AMPAR modulate synaptic plasticity, which is considered one of the molecular bases for learning and memory formation. To date, a unique trisaccharide (HSO3-3GlcAβ1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc), human natural killer-1 (HNK-1) carbohydrate, was found expressed specifically on N-linked glycans of GluA2 and regulated the cell surface expression of AMPAR and the spine maturation process. However, evidence that the HNK-1 epitope on N-glycans of GluA2 directly affects these phenomena is lacking. Moreover, it is thought that other N-glycans on GluA2 also have potential roles in the regulation of AMPAR functions. In the present study, using a series of mutants lacking potential N-glycosylation sites (N256, N370, N406, and N413) within GluA2, we demonstrated that the mutant lacking the N-glycan at N370 strongly suppressed the intracellular trafficking of GluA2 from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in HEK293 cells. Cell surface expression of GluA1, which is a major subunit of AMPAR in neurons, was also suppressed by co-expression of the GluA2 N370S mutant. The N370S mutant and wild-type GluA2 were co-immunoprecipitated with GluA1, suggesting that N370S was properly associated with GluA1. Moreover, we found that N413 was the main potential site of the HNK-1 epitope that promoted the interaction of GluA2 with N-cadherin, resulting in enhanced cell surface expression of GluA2. The HNK-1 epitope on N-glycan at the N413 of GluA2 was also involved in the cell surface expression of GluA1. Thus, our data suggested that site-specific N-glycans on GluA2 regulate the intracellular trafficking and cell surface expression of AMPAR.

  17. Synergistic Up-Regulation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression in Murine Macrophages by Adenosine A2A Receptor Agonists and Endotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Leibovich, Samuel Joseph; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Pinhal-Enfield, Grace; Belem, Paula C.; Elson, Genie; Rosania, Anthony; Ramanathan, Madhuri; Montesinos, Carmen; Jacobson, Marlene; Schwarzschild, Michael A.; Fink, J. Stephen; Cronstein, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Under normoxic conditions, macrophages from C57BL mice produce low levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Hypoxia stimulates VEGF expression by ∼500%; interferon-γ (IFN-γ) with endotoxin [lipopolysaccharide (LPS)] also stimulates VEGF expression by ∼50 to 150% in an inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-dependent manner. Treatment of normoxic macrophages with 5′-N-ethyl-carboxamido-adenosine (NECA), a nonselective adenosine A2 receptor agonist, or with 2-[p-(2-carboxyethyl)-phenylethyl amino]-5′-N-ethyl-carboxamido-adenosine (CGS21680), a specific adenosine A2A receptor agonist, modestly increases VEGF expression, whereas 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyl adenosine (CCPA), an adenosine A1 agonist, does not. Treatment with LPS (0 to 1000 ng/ml), or with IFN-γ (0 to 300 U/ml), does not affect VEGF expression. In the presence of LPS (EC50 < 10 ng/ml), but not of IFN-γ, both NECA and CGS21680 synergistically up-regulate VEGF expression by as much as 10-fold. This VEGF is biologically active in vivo in the rat corneal bioassay of angiogenesis. Inhibitors of iNOS do not affect this synergistic induction of VEGF, and macrophages from iNOS−/− mice produce similar levels of VEGF as wild-type mice, indicating that NO does not play a role in this induction. Under hypoxic conditions, VEGF expression is slightly increased by adenosine receptor agonists but adenosine A2 or A1 receptor antagonists 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargyl xanthine (DMPX), ZM241385, and 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DCPCX) do not modulate VEGF expression. VEGF expression is also not reduced in hypoxic macrophages from A3−/− and A2A−/− mice. Thus, VEGF expression by hypoxic macrophages does not seem to depend on endogenously released or exogenous adenosine. VEGF expression is strongly up-regulated by LPS/NECA in macrophages from A3−/− but not A2A−/− mice, confirming the role of adenosine A2A receptors in this pathway. LPS with NECA strongly up-regulates VEGF expression by

  18. Expressions of adenosine A2A receptors in coronary arteries and peripheral blood mononuclear cells are correlated in coronary artery disease patients.

    PubMed

    Gariboldi, Vlad; Vairo, Donato; Guieu, Régis; Marlingue, Marion; Ravis, Eléonore; Lagier, David; Mari, Alissa; Thery, Elsa; Collart, Frédéric; Gaudry, Marine; Bonello, Laurent; Paganelli, Franck; Condo, Jocelyne; Kipson, Nathalie; Fenouillet, Emmanuel; Ruf, Jean; Mottola, Giovanna

    2017-03-01

    Altered coronary blood flow occurs in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Adenosine strongly impacts blood flow mostly via adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) expressed in coronary tissues. As part of a systemic regulation of the adenosinergic system, we compared A2AR expression in situ, and on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in CAD patients. Aortic and coronary tissues, and PBMC were sampled in 20 CAD patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery and consecutively included. Controls were PBMC obtained from 15 healthy subjects. Expression and activity of A2AR were studied by Western blotting and cAMP measurement, respectively. A2AR expression on PBMC was lower in patients than in controls (0.83±0.31 vs 1.2±0.35 arbitrary units; p<0.01), and correlated with A2AR expression in coronary and aortic tissues (Pearson's r: 0.77 and 0.59, p<0.01, respectively). Basal and maximal cAMP productions following agonist stimulation of PBMC were significantly lower in patients than in controls (120±42 vs 191±65 and 360±113 vs 560±215pg/10(6) cells, p<0.05, respectively). In CAD patients, the increase from basal to maximal cAMP production in PBMC and aortic tissues was similar (+300% and +246%, respectively). Expression of A2AR on PBMC correlated with those measured in coronary artery and aortic tissues in CAD patients, A2AR activity of PBMC matched that observed in aorta, and A2AR expression and activity in PBMC were found reduced as compared to controls. Measuring the expression level of A2AR on PBMC represents a good tool to address in situ expression in coronary tissues of CAD patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A2B and A3 Adenosine Receptors Modulate Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Interleukin-8 Expression in Human Melanoma Cells Treated with Etoposide and Doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    Merighi, Stefania; Simioni, Carolina; Gessi, Stefania; Varani, Katia; Mirandola, Prisco; Tabrizi, Mojgan Aghazadeh; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Borea, Pier Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Cancer patients undergoing treatment with systemic cancer chemotherapy drugs often have abnormal growth factor and cytokine profiles. Thus, serum levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8) are elevated in patients with malignant melanoma. In addition to IL-8, aggressive melanoma cells secrete, through its transcriptional regulator hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which promotes angiogenesis and metastasis of human cancerous cells. Whether these responses are related to adenosine, a ubiquitous mediator expressed at high concentrations in cancer and implicated in numerous inflammatory processes, is not known and is the focus of this study. We have examined whether the DNA-damaging agents etoposide (VP-16) and doxorubicin can affect IL-8, VEGF, and HIF-1 expressions in human melanoma cancer cells. In particular, we have investigated whether these responses are related to the modulation of the adenosine receptor subtypes, namely, A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. We have demonstrated that A2B receptor blockade can impair IL-8 production, whereas blocking A3 receptors, it is possible to further decrease VEGF secretion in melanoma cells treated with VP-16 and doxorubicin. This understanding may present the possibility of using adenosine antagonists to reduce chemotherapy-induced inflammatory cytokine production and to improve the ability of chemotherapeutic drugs to block angiogenesis. Consequently, we conclude that adenosine receptor modulation may be useful for refining the use of chemotherapeutic drugs to treat human cancer more effectively. PMID:19794965

  20. Activation of the A2B adenosine receptor in B16 melanomas induces CXCL12 expression in FAP-positive tumor stromal cells, enhancing tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Sorrentino, Claudia; Miele, Lucio; Porta, Amalia; Pinto, Aldo; Morello, Silvana

    2016-01-01

    The A2B receptor (A2BR) can mediate adenosine-induced tumor proliferation, immunosuppression and angiogenesis. Targeting the A2BR has proved to be therapeutically effective in some murine tumor models, but the mechanisms of these effects are still incompletely understood. Here, we report that pharmacologic inhibition of A2BR with PSB1115, which inhibits tumor growth, decreased the number of fibroblast activation protein (FAP)-expressing cells in tumors in a mouse model of melanoma. This effect was associated with reduced expression of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2. Treatment of melanoma-associated fibroblasts with the A2BR agonist Bay60-6583 enhanced CXCL12 and FGF2 expression. This effect was abrogated by PSB1115. The A2AR agonist CGS21680 did not induce CXCL12 or FGF2 expression in tumor associated fibroblasts. Similar results were obtained under hypoxic conditions in skin-derived fibroblasts, which responded to Bay60-6583 in an A2BR-dependent manner, by stimulating pERK1/2. FGF2 produced by Bay60-6583-treated fibroblasts directly enhanced the proliferation of melanoma cells. This effect could be reversed by PSB1115 or an anti-FGF2 antibody. Interestingly, melanoma growth in mice receiving Bay60-6583 was attenuated by inhibition of the CXCL12/CXCR4 pathway with AMD3100. CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4 are involved in angiogenesis and immune-suppression. Treatment of mice with AMD3100 reduced the number of CD31+ cells induced by Bay60-6583. Conversely, CXCR4 blockade did not affect the accumulation of tumor-infiltrating MDSCs or Tregs. Together, our data reveal an important role for A2BR in stimulating FGF2 and CXCL12 expression in melanoma-associated fibroblasts. These factors contribute to create a tumor-promoting microenvironment. Our findings support the therapeutic potential of PSB1115 for melanoma. PMID:27590504

  1. Differential Expression of Adenosine A1 and A2A Receptors After Upper Cervical (C2) Spinal Cord Hemisection in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Theodor; Kreipke, Christian; Alilain, Warren; Nantwi, Kwaku D

    2007-01-01

    Background: In an animal model of spinal cord injury, a latent respiratory motor pathway can be pharmacologically activated via adenosine receptors to restore respiratory function after cervical (C2) spinal cord hemisection that paralyzes the hemidiaphragm ipsilateral to injury. Although spinal phrenic motoneurons immunopositive for adenosine receptors have been demonstrated (C3–C5), it is unclear if adenosine receptor protein levels are altered after C2 hemisection and theophylline administration. Objective: To assess the effects of C2 spinal cord hemisection and theophylline administration on the expression of adenosine receptor proteins. Methods: Adenosine A1 and A2A receptor protein levels were assessed in adult rats classified as (a) noninjured and theophylline treated, (b) C2 hemisected, (c) C2 hemisected and administered theophylline orally (3× daily) for 3 days only, and (d) C2 hemisected and administered theophylline (3× daily for 3 days) and assessed 12 days after drug administration. Assessment of A1 protein levels was carried out via immunohistochemistry and A2A protein levels by densitometry. Results: Adenosine A1 protein levels decreased significantly (both ipsilateral and contralateral to injury) after C2 hemisection; however, the decrease was attenuated in hemisected and theophylline-treated animals. Attenuation in adenosine A1 receptor protein levels persisted when theophylline administration was stopped for 12 days prior to assessment. Adenosine A2A protein levels were unchanged by C2 hemisection; however, theophylline reduced the levels within the phrenic motoneurons. Furthermore, the decrease in A2A levels persisted 12 days after theophylline was withdrawn. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that theophylline mitigates the effects of C2 hemisection by attenuating the C2 hemisection–induced decrease in A1 protein levels. Furthermore, A2A protein levels are unaltered by C2 hemisection but decrease after continuous or interrupted theophylline

  2. Cigarette Smoke Impairs A2A Adenosine Receptor Mediated Wound Repair through Up-regulation of Duox-1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zhi; Zhang, Hui; Dixon, Jendayi; Traphagen, Nicole; Wyatt, Todd A.; Kharbanda, Kusum; Simet Chadwick, Samantha; Kolliputi, Narasaiah; Allen-Gipson, Diane S.

    2017-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) exposure and intrinsic factors such as the NADPH oxidases produce high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), ensuing inflammatory tissue injury. We previously demonstrated that CS-generated ROS, particularly hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), impaired adenosine stimulated wound repair. We hypothesized that CS exposure modulates expression of Dual oxidase 1 (Duox-1), a NADPH oxidases known to generate H2O2. To test this hypothesis, we used human bronchial epithelial cell line Nuli-1 and C57BL/6 mice. Cells were treated with 5% CS extract (CSE) for various periods of time, and mice were exposed to whole body CS for six weeks. Both CSE and CS treatment induced increased expression of Duox-1, and silencing of Doux-1 improved the rate of cell wound repair induced by CSE treatment. Nuli-1 cells pretreated with thapsigargin but not calcium ionophore exhibited increased Duox-1 mRNA expression. CSE treatment stimulated PKCα activation, which was effectively blocked by pretreatment with diphenylene iodonium, a NADPH oxidase inhibitor. Compared to control, lungs from CS-exposed mice showed a significant increase in PKCα activity and Duox-1 expression. Collectively, the data demonstrated that CS exposure upregulates expression of Duox-1 protein. This further leads to H2O2 production and PKCα activation, inhibiting A2AAR-stimulated wound repair. PMID:28337995

  3. Transcriptomic Analysis Shows Decreased Cortical Expression of NR4A1, NR4A2 and RXRB in Schizophrenia and Provides Evidence for Nuclear Receptor Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Corley, Susan M.; Wilkins, Marc R.; Shannon Weickert, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Many genes are differentially expressed in the cortex of people with schizophrenia, implicating factors that control transcription more generally. Hormone nuclear receptors dimerize to coordinate context-dependent changes in gene expression. We hypothesized that members of two families of nuclear receptors (NR4As), and retinoid receptors (RARs and RXRs), are altered in the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) of people with schizophrenia. We used next generation sequencing and then qPCR analysis to test for changes in mRNA levels for transcripts encoding nuclear receptors: orphan nuclear receptors (3 in the NR4A, 3 in the RAR, 3 in the RXR families and KLF4) in total RNA extracted from the DLPFC from people with schizophrenia compared to controls (n = 74). We also correlated mRNA levels with demographic factors and with estimates of antipsychotic drug exposure (schizophrenia group only). We tested for correlations between levels of transcription factor family members and levels of genes putatively regulated by these transcription factors. We found significantly down regulated expression of NR4A1 (Nurr 77) and KLF4 mRNAs in people with schizophrenia compared to controls, by both NGS and qPCR (p = or <0.01). We also detected decreases in NR4A2 (Nurr1) and RXRB mRNAs by using qPCR in the larger cohort (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively). We detected decreased expression of RARG and NR4A2 mRNAs in females with schizophrenia (p<0.05). The mRNA levels of NR4A1, NR4A2 and NR4A3 were all negative correlated with lifetime estimates of antipsychotic exposure. These novel findings, which may be influenced by antipsychotic drug exposure, implicate the orphan and retinoid nuclear receptors in the cortical pathology found in schizophrenia. Genes down stream of these receptors can be dysregulated as well, but the direction of change is not immediately predictable based on the putative transcription factor changes. PMID:27992436

  4. Transcriptomic Analysis Shows Decreased Cortical Expression of NR4A1, NR4A2 and RXRB in Schizophrenia and Provides Evidence for Nuclear Receptor Dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Corley, Susan M; Tsai, Shan-Yuan; Wilkins, Marc R; Shannon Weickert, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Many genes are differentially expressed in the cortex of people with schizophrenia, implicating factors that control transcription more generally. Hormone nuclear receptors dimerize to coordinate context-dependent changes in gene expression. We hypothesized that members of two families of nuclear receptors (NR4As), and retinoid receptors (RARs and RXRs), are altered in the dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) of people with schizophrenia. We used next generation sequencing and then qPCR analysis to test for changes in mRNA levels for transcripts encoding nuclear receptors: orphan nuclear receptors (3 in the NR4A, 3 in the RAR, 3 in the RXR families and KLF4) in total RNA extracted from the DLPFC from people with schizophrenia compared to controls (n = 74). We also correlated mRNA levels with demographic factors and with estimates of antipsychotic drug exposure (schizophrenia group only). We tested for correlations between levels of transcription factor family members and levels of genes putatively regulated by these transcription factors. We found significantly down regulated expression of NR4A1 (Nurr 77) and KLF4 mRNAs in people with schizophrenia compared to controls, by both NGS and qPCR (p = or <0.01). We also detected decreases in NR4A2 (Nurr1) and RXRB mRNAs by using qPCR in the larger cohort (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively). We detected decreased expression of RARG and NR4A2 mRNAs in females with schizophrenia (p<0.05). The mRNA levels of NR4A1, NR4A2 and NR4A3 were all negative correlated with lifetime estimates of antipsychotic exposure. These novel findings, which may be influenced by antipsychotic drug exposure, implicate the orphan and retinoid nuclear receptors in the cortical pathology found in schizophrenia. Genes down stream of these receptors can be dysregulated as well, but the direction of change is not immediately predictable based on the putative transcription factor changes.

  5. Excess adenosine A2B receptor signaling contributes to priapism through HIF-1α mediated reduction of PDE5 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Chen; Wen, Jiaming; Zhang, Yujin; Dai, Yingbo; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Weiru; Qi, Lin; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Kellems, Rodney E.; Xia, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Priapism is featured with prolonged and painful penile erection and is prevalent among males with sickle cell disease (SCD). The disorder is a dangerous urological and hematological emergency since it is associated with ischemic tissue damage and erectile disability. Here we report that phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) gene expression and PDE activity is significantly reduced in penile tissues of two independent priapic models: SCD mice and adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient mice. Moreover, using ADA enzyme therapy to reduce adenosine or a specific antagonist to block A2B adenosine receptor (ADORA2B) signaling, we successfully attenuated priapism in both ADA−/− and SCD mice by restoring penile PDE5 gene expression to normal levels. This finding led us to further discover that excess adenosine signaling via ADORA2B activation directly reduces PDE5 gene expression in a hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α)-dependent manner. Overall, we reveal that excess adenosine-mediated ADORA2B signaling underlies reduced penile PDE activity by decreasing PDE5 gene expression in a HIF-1α-dependent manner and provide new insight for the pathogenesis of priapism and novel therapies for the disease.—Ning, C., Wen, J., Zhang, Y., Dai, Y., Wang, W., Zhang, W., Qi, L., Grenz, A., Eltzschig, H. K., Blackburn, M. R., Kellems, R. E., Xia, Y. Excess adenosine A2B receptor signaling contributes to priapism through HIF-1α mediated reduction of PDE5 gene expression. PMID:24614760

  6. The significance of the altered expression of lysophosphatidic acid receptors, autotaxin and phospholipase A2 as the potential biomarkers in type 1 endometrial cancer biology.

    PubMed

    Wasniewski, Tomasz; Woclawek-Potocka, Izabela; Boruszewska, Dorota; Kowalczyk-Zieba, Ilona; Sinderewicz, Emilia; Grycmacher, Katarzyna

    2015-11-01

    In order to study lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling associated with type 1 endometrial carcinoma (EC), we evaluated the LPA receptors (LPARs), autotaxin (ATX) and phospholipase A2 (PLA2) expression in EC and normal endometrium with correlation to clinicopathological features. We investigated LPAR1, LPAR2, LPAR3, LPAR4, ATX and PLA2 expression at mRNA and protein levels using quantitative real-time PCR and western blot analyses in 37 ECs and 10 normal endometria. All the examined LPARs (except for LPAR3 protein), ATX and PLA2 were overexpressed in cancerous compared to healthy endometrium. The studied ECs showed the highest LPAR2 and LPAR1 expression. Statistically positive correlations were found between depth of myoinvasion and levels of LPAR1, LPAR2 and PLA2 transcripts and proteins. We also found positive correlations between LPAR1, LPAR2, LPAR4 and PLA2 expression with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage. The expression of LPAR1, LPAR2 and PLA2 was positively associated with the age of patients. Positive correlations were found between the expression of LPAR1 mRNA, LPAR2 mRNA and protein and LPAR3 mRNA and body mass index (BMI) of the examined patients. We found no association between the expression levels of the studied factors and diabetes or hypertension among the examined patients. Owing to the highest LPAR2 and LPAR1 expression in EC and positive correlations of these two receptors with the depth of myoinvasion and the FIGO stage, we believe that LPAR2 and LPAR1 show promise as predictors of the EC progression as well as the main receptors responsible for LPA action in the EC tissue.

  7. Adenosine A2A receptor signaling attenuates LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine formation of mouse macrophages by inducing the expression of DUSP1.

    PubMed

    Köröskényi, Krisztina; Kiss, Beáta; Szondy, Zsuzsa

    2016-07-01

    Adenosine is known to reduce inflammation by suppressing the activity of most immune cells. Previous studies have shown that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated mouse macrophages produce adenosine, and the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) signaling activated in an autocrine manner attenuates LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine formation. It has been suggested that A2AR signaling inhibits LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production through a unique cAMP-dependent, but PKA- and Epac-independent signaling pathway. However, the mechanism of inhibition was not identified so far. Here we report that LPS stimulation enhances A2AR expression in mouse bone marrow derived macrophages, and loss of A2ARs results in enhanced LPS-induced pro-inflammatory response. Loss of A2ARs in A2AR null macrophages did not alter the LPS-induced NF-κB activation, but an enhanced basal and LPS-induced phosphorylation of MAP kinases (especially that of JNKs) was detected in A2AR null cells. A2AR signaling did not alter the LPS-induced phosphorylation of their upstream kinases, but by regulating adenylate cyclase activity it enhanced the expression of dual specific phosphatase (DUSP)1, a negative regulator of MAP kinases. As a result, lower basal and LPS-induced DUSP1 mRNA and protein levels can be detected in A2AR null macrophages. Silencing of DUSP1 mRNA expression resulted in higher basal and LPS-induced JNK phosphorylation and LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine formation in wild type macrophages, but had no effect on that in A2AR null cells. Our data indicate that A2AR signaling regulates both basal and LPS-induced DUSP1 levels in macrophages via activating the adenylate cyclase pathway.

  8. Adenovirus-mediated expression of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A2 targeting hepatic stellate cell attenuates liver fibrosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pengguo; Li, Jie; Huo, Yan; Lu, Jin; Wan, Lili; Yang, Quanjun; Huang, Jinlu; Gan, Run; Guo, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a wound-healing response characterized with the accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM). And hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the principal cell source of ECM. NR4A2 (Nurr1) is a member of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A family and acts as transcription factor. It participates in regulating cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. We previously demonstrated that NR4A2 expression in fibrotic liver reduced significantly compared with normal liver and NR4A2 knockout in HSCs promoted ECM production. In the present study we explored the role of NR4A2 on liver fibrosis. Studies in cultured HSCs demonstrated that NR4A2 over-expression suppressed the activation of HSCs, such as ECM production and invasion ability. Moreover cell cycle was arrested, cell apoptosis was promoted and cell signaling pathway was influenced. Adenovirus-mediated delivery of NR4A2 in rats ameliorated significantly dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) induced liver fibrosis. The In vivo experiments produced results consistent with in vitro experiments. Taken together these results demonstrate NR4A2 enhancement attenuates liver fibrosis via suppressing the activation of HSCs and NR4A2 may be an ideal target for anti-fibrotic therapy. PMID:27646469

  9. Antigen receptors on immature, but not mature, B and T cells are coupled to cytosolic phospholipase A2 activation: expression and activation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 correlate with lymphocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, J J; Stewart, A; Courtney, C A; Fleming, M C; Reid, P; Jackson, C G; Wise, A; Wakelam, M J; Harnett, M M

    1996-03-15

    The Ag receptors on mature B and T cells are not coupled to the activation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and arachidonic acid release. Moreover, phorbol esters such as PMA, which can activate cPLA2 via mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase in most cell types, also failed to induce the release of arachidonate from mature cells, suggesting that the cPLA2 pathway may not be functional in mature lymphocytes. Interestingly, Western blot analysis revealed that cPLA2, which had previously been thought to be expressed ubiquitously, is not expressed in mature B or T cells and that cytosolic phospholipase A2 expression could not be up-regulated in lymphocytes following culture with a range of cytokines most likely to be involved in an immune response such as IL-1 alpha, IL-3, or TNF-alpha. In contrast, cPLA2 was shown to be expressed and activated in thymocytes and immature B cells under conditions in which ligation of the Ag receptors led to growth arrest and/or apoptosis. Taken together, these data suggest that cPLA2 does not play a role in Ag receptor-mediated lymphocyte activation, but may be involved in the molecular mechanisms underlying lymphocyte maturation and/or self tolerance by clonal deletion.

  10. Induction of progesterone receptor A form attenuates the induction of cytosolic phospholipase A2alpha expression by cortisol in human amnion fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chunming; Ni, Xiaotian; Zhu, Ping; Li, Wenjiao; Zhu, Xiaoou; Sun, Kang

    2010-05-01

    Cytosolic phospholipase A2alpha (cPLA(2alpha), now known as PLA2G4A) is the enzyme catalyzing the formation of the rate-limiting substrate, arachidonic acid, for prostaglandin (PG) synthesis. The increasing expression of PLA2G4A toward term gestation in human amnion fibroblasts is believed to be the crucial event in parturition. Human amnion fibroblasts produce cortisol, progesterone and express glucocorticoid receptor (GR), progesterone receptor A (PGRA) form at term. The roles of progesterone and PGRA in the induction of PLA2G4A by cortisol via GR in the amnion fibroblasts remain largely unknown. Using cultured human term amnion fibroblasts, we found that cortisol induced the expression of PGRA, which was attenuated by inhibiting PG synthesis with indomethacin. Knockdown of PGRA expression or inhibition of endogenous progesterone production with trilostane significantly enhanced the induction of PLA2G4A by cortisol, whereas overexpression of PGRA attenuated the induction of PLA2G4A by cortisol. Although exogenous progesterone did not alter PLA2G4A expression under basal conditions, it attenuated cortisol-induced PLA2G4A expression at concentrations about tenfold higher, which might be achieved by competition with cortisol for GR. In conclusion, PGRA in the presence of endogenous progesterone is a transdominant repressor of the induction of PLA2G4A by cortisol. High level of progesterone may compete with cortisol for GR, thus further inhibiting the induction of PLA2G4A by cortisol. Moreover, increased PG synthesis by cortisol may feed back on the expression of PGRA leading to attenuation of cortisol-induced PLA2G4A expression. The above findings may be pertinent to the inconsistent effects of glucocorticoids on parturition in humans.

  11. Hypercalcemia stimulates expression of intrarenal phospholipase A2 and prostaglandin H synthase-2 in rats. Role of angiotensin II AT1 receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Mangat, H; Peterson, L N; Burns, K D

    1997-01-01

    In chronic hypercalcemia, inhibition of thick ascending limb sodium chloride reabsorption is mediated by elevated intrarenal PGE2. The mechanisms and source of elevated PGE2 in hypercalcemia are not known. We determined the effect of hypercalcemia on intrarenal expression of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), prostaglandin H synthase-1 (PGHS-1), and prostaglandin H synthase-2 (PGHS-2), enzymes important in prostaglandin production. In rats fed dihydrotachysterol to induce hypercalcemia, Western blot analysis revealed significant upregulation of both cPLA2 and PGHS-2 in the kidney cortex and the inner and outer medulla. Immunofluorescence localized intrarenal cPLA2 and PGHS-2 to interstitial cells of the inner and outer medulla, and to macula densa and cortical thick ascending limbs in both control and hypercalcemic rats. Hypercalcemia had no effect on intrarenal expression of PGHS-1. To determine if AT1 angiotensin II receptor activation was involved in the stimulation of cPLA2 and PGHS-2 in hypercalcemia, we treated rats with the AT1 receptor antagonist, losartan. Losartan abolished the polydipsia associated with hypercalcemia, prevented the increase in cPLA2 protein in all regions of the kidney, and diminished PGHS-2 expression in the inner medulla. In addition, losartan completely prevented the increase in urinary PGE2 excretion in hypercalcemic rats. Intrarenal levels of angiotensin II were unchanged in hypercalcemia. These data indicate that hypercalcemia stimulates intrarenal cPLA2 and PGHS-2 protein expression. Our results further support a role for angiotensin II, acting on AT1 receptors, in mediating this stimulation. PMID:9329957

  12. Expression of Receptors for Tetanus Toxin and Monoclonal Antibody A2B5 by Pancreatic Islet Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenbarth, G. S.; Shimizu, K.; Bowring, M. A.; Wells, S.

    1982-08-01

    Studies of the reaction of antibody A2B5 and tetanus toxin with pancreatic islet cells, islet cell tumors, and other human amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation (APUD) tumors are described. By indirect immunofluorescence, antibody A2B5 and tetanus toxin were shown to specifically bind to the plasma membrane of human, rat, chicken, and mouse islet cells. The binding of antibody A2B5 to the cell surface of living islet cells has allowed isolation of these cells from a suspension of pancreatic cells by using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter. In studies designed to determine whether tetanus toxin and antibody A2B5 bound to the same surface antigen, A2B5 and tetanus toxin did not compete for binding to normal islet cells, a human islet cell tumor, or a rat islet cell tumor. In addition to binding to islet cell tumors, antibody A2B5 reacts with frozen sections, isolated cells, and cell lines of neural, neural crest, and APUD origin.

  13. STAT5-glucocorticoid receptor interaction and MTF-1 regulate the expression of ZnT2 (Slc30a2) in pancreatic acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liang; Lichten, Louis A.; Ryu, Moon-Suhn; Liuzzi, Juan P.; Wang, Fudi; Cousins, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    The exocrine pancreas plays an important role in endogenous zinc loss by regulating excretion into the intestinal tract and hence influences the dietary zinc requirement. The present experiments show that the zinc transporter ZnT2 (Slc30a2) is localized to the zymogen granules and that dietary zinc restriction in mice decreased the zinc concentration of zymogen granules and ZnT2 expression. Excess zinc given orally increased ZnT2 expression and was associated with increased pancreatic zinc accumulation. Rat AR42J acinar cells when induced into a secretory phenotype, using the glucocorticoid analog dexamethasone (DEX), exhibited increased ZnT2 expression and labile zinc as measured with a fluorophore. DEX administrated to mice also induced ZnT2 expression that accompanied a reduction of the pancreatic zinc content. ZnT2 promoter analyses identified elements required for responsiveness to zinc and DEX. Zinc regulation was traced to a MRE located downstream from the ZnT2 transcription start site. Responsiveness to DEX is produced by two upstream STAT5 binding sites that require the glucocorticoid receptor for activation. ZnT2 knockdown in the AR42J cells using siRNA resulted in increased cytoplasmic zinc and decreased zymogen granule zinc that further demonstrated that ZnT2 may mediate the sequestration of zinc into zymogen granules. We conclude, based upon experiments with intact mice and pancreatic acinar cells in culture, that ZnT2 participates in zinc transport into pancreatic zymogen granules through a glucocorticoid pathway requiring glucocorticoid receptor and STAT5, and zinc-regulated signaling pathways requiring MTF-1. The ZnT2 transporter appears to function in a physiologically responsive manner involving entero-pancreatic zinc trafficking. PMID:20133611

  14. Excess adenosine A2B receptor signaling contributes to priapism through HIF-1α mediated reduction of PDE5 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ning, Chen; Wen, Jiaming; Zhang, Yujin; Dai, Yingbo; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Weiru; Qi, Lin; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger K; Blackburn, Michael R; Kellems, Rodney E; Xia, Yang

    2014-06-01

    Priapism is featured with prolonged and painful penile erection and is prevalent among males with sickle cell disease (SCD). The disorder is a dangerous urological and hematological emergency since it is associated with ischemic tissue damage and erectile disability. Here we report that phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) gene expression and PDE activity is significantly reduced in penile tissues of two independent priapic models: SCD mice and adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient mice. Moreover, using ADA enzyme therapy to reduce adenosine or a specific antagonist to block A(2B) adenosine receptor (ADORA2B) signaling, we successfully attenuated priapism in both ADA(-/-) and SCD mice by restoring penile PDE5 gene expression to normal levels. This finding led us to further discover that excess adenosine signaling via ADORA2B activation directly reduces PDE5 gene expression in a hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α)-dependent manner. Overall, we reveal that excess adenosine-mediated ADORA2B signaling underlies reduced penile PDE activity by decreasing PDE5 gene expression in a HIF-1α-dependent manner and provide new insight for the pathogenesis of priapism and novel therapies for the disease.

  15. Activation of adenosine A2A receptor signaling regulates the expression of cytokines associated with immunologic dysfunction in BTBR T(+) Itpr3(tf)/J mice.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Mushtaq A; Attia, Sabry M; Nadeem, Ahmed; Bakheet, Saleh A; Raish, Mohammad; Khan, Tajdar H; Al-Shabanah, Othman A; Ahmad, Sheikh F

    2017-07-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by stereotypical repetitive behavior, impaired social interaction, and deficits in communication. The BTBR T(+) Itpr3(tf)/J (BTBR) mice have been extensively used as an animal model of the ASD-like phenotype. Adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) are considered potential targets in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we used the A2AR antagonist SCH 5826 (SCH) and the A2AR agonist CGS 21680 (CGS) to investigate the activation of A2AR signaling in immune cells. Further, we examined the effects of A2ARs on the expression of the cytokines interleukin 2 (IL-2), IL-6, IL-9, interferon gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) in the spleen and in splenic CD4(+) T cells. In addition, we assessed the mRNA and protein expression levels of these cytokines in the brain tissue. Our results showed that the levels of IL-2(+), IL-6(+), IL-9(+), IFN-γ(+), and TNF-α(+) were significantly lower, whereas the levels of TGF-β(+) in the spleen and in splenic CD4(+) T cells were significantly higher in the CGS-treated mice than in the BTBR control and SCH-treated mice. In addition, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analysis showed a decrease in the mRNA and protein expression levels of IL-2, IL-6, IL-9, IFN-γ(+), and TNF-α(+) and an increase in the mRNA and protein expression levels of TGF-β in the CGS-treated mice, while treatment with BTBR alone and SCH resulted in increased Th1 levels and decreased Th2 levels in the brain tissue. Our results suggest that treatment the A2AR agonist CGS may be a promising therapeutic option for neuroimmune dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Echinacea purpurea up-regulates CYP1A2, CYP3A4 and MDR1 gene expression by activation of pregnane X receptor pathway

    PubMed Central

    Awortwe, Charles; Manda, Vamshi K.; Avonto, Cristina; Khan, Shabana I.; Khan, Ikhlas A.; Walker, Larry A.; Bouic, Patrick J.; Rosenkranz, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the mechanism underlying Echinacea-mediated induction of CYP1A2, CYP3A4 and MDR1 in terms of human pregnane X receptor (PXR) activation. Crude extracts and fractions of Echinacea purpurea were tested for PXR activation in HepG2 cells by a reporter gene assay. Quantitative real-time PCR was carried out to determine their effects on CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 mRNA expressions. Capsules and fractions were risk ranked as high, intermediate and remote risk of drug-metabolizing enzymes induction based on EC50 values determined for respective CYPs. Fractions F1, F2 and capsule (2660) strongly activated PXR with 5-, 4- and 3.5-fold increase in activity, respectively. Echinacea preparations potentiated up-regulation of CYP1A2, CYP3A4 and MDR1 via PXR activation. Thus E. purpurea preparations cause herb–drug interaction by up-regulating CYP1A2, CYP3A4 and P-gp via PXR activation. PMID:25377539

  17. Echinacea purpurea up-regulates CYP1A2, CYP3A4 and MDR1 gene expression by activation of pregnane X receptor pathway.

    PubMed

    Awortwe, Charles; Manda, Vamshi K; Avonto, Cristina; Khan, Shabana I; Khan, Ikhlas A; Walker, Larry A; Bouic, Patrick J; Rosenkranz, Bernd

    2015-03-01

    1.This study investigated the mechanism underlying Echinacea-mediated induction of CYP1A2, CYP3A4 and MDR1 in terms of human pregnane X receptor (PXR) activation. 2.Crude extracts and fractions of Echinacea purpurea were tested for PXR activation in HepG2 cells by a reporter gene assay. Quantitative real-time PCR was carried out to determine their effects on CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 mRNA expressions. Capsules and fractions were risk ranked as high, intermediate and remote risk of drug-metabolizing enzymes induction based on EC50 values determined for respective CYPs. 3. Fractions F1, F2 and capsule (2660) strongly activated PXR with 5-, 4- and 3.5-fold increase in activity, respectively. Echinacea preparations potentiated up-regulation of CYP1A2, CYP3A4 and MDR1 via PXR activation. 4.Thus E. purpurea preparations cause herb-drug interaction by up-regulating CYP1A2, CYP3A4 and P-gp via PXR activation.

  18. Influence of early life status epilepticus on the developmental expression profile of the GluA2 subunit of AMPA receptors.

    PubMed

    Szczurowska, E; Ergang, P; Kubová, H; Druga, R; Salaj, M; Mareš, P

    2016-09-01

    AMPA receptors (AMPARs) are responsible for fast excitatory neurotransmission, and their prolonged activation can result in the generation and spread of epileptic seizures. At early stages of postnatal development, the majority of AMPARs are permeable to both Na(+) and Ca(2+) ions. This permeability, which increases neuronal excitability, is due to the lack of the GluA2 subunit, encoded by the GRIA2A gene, and/or the presence of an unedited GluA2 subunit Q/R site (glutamine instead of arginine). Lithium chloride- and pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (LiCl/Pilo-SE) in rodents represents a model of severe seizures that result in development of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The aim of this study was to determine how LiCl/Pilo-SE induced early in life (at postnatal day 12; P12) alters normal expression of the GRIA2A gene and GluA2 protein. SE was interrupted by an injection of paraldehyde (Para). Control groups were 1) naïve animals, and 2) siblings of SE rats receiving only LiCl and paraldehyde (LiCl/Para). The expression profile of GRIA2A mRNA was determined via qPCR, and GluA2 protein levels were measured by western blotting. The analysis was performed at 3h (protein levels), and then 3-, 6-, 13-, and 60days, following LiCl/Pilo-SE or LiCl/Para injection (i.e. at P12, P15, P18, P25, P72 respectively). Six different brain regions were analyzed: frontal (CXFR), parietal (CXPAR), and occipital (CXOC) cortex, dorsal (HD) and ventral (HV) hippocampus, and thalamus (TH). There was a significant increase in GRIA2A mRNA expression in the CXFR, CXPAR, and CXOC of P18 SE animals. In CXFR and HD, increased expression of GluA2 AMPAR subunit protein was detected, as well as a surge in GRIA2A mRNA and GluA2 protein expression especially at P18. In HD the surge was detected not only during development (P18), but also later in life (P72). Since high levels of GluA2 can be neuroprotective (by decreasing Ca(2+) permeability), our data suggest that the neocortex and dorsal

  19. Anti-Phospholipase A2 Receptor (PLA2R) Antibody and Glomerular PLA2R Expression in Japanese Patients with Membranous Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Shohei; Iseri, Ken; Saito, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Yasutaka; Suzuki, Taihei; Wada, Yukihiro; Matsumoto, Kei; Shibata, Takanori

    2016-01-01

    The phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R) is the major target antigen (Ag) in idiopathic membranous nephropathy (IMN). Recently, several types of immunoassay systems for anti-PLA2R antibody (Ab) have been developed. However, the correlation of serum anti-PLA2R Abs and glomerular expression of PLA2R Ag, and their association with clinicopathological characteristics have yet to be proven in Japanese patients. We examined serum anti-PLA2R Abs by both ELISA and cell-based indirect immunofluorescence assay (CIIFA), and glomerular PLA2R expression by immunofluorescence (IF) in 59 biopsy-proven MN patients including IMN (n = 38) and secondary MN (SMN) (n = 21). In this study, anti-PLA2R Abs were present in 50% of IMN patients, but was absent in SMN patients. The concordance rate between ELISA and CIIFA was 100%. Serum IgG levels were significantly lower in anti-PLA2R Ab-positive patients. Serum albumin levels correlated inversely with serum anti-PLA2R Ab titers. The prevalence and intensity of glomerular staining for IgG4 by IF were significantly higher in anti-PLA2R Ab-positive patients than in -negative patients. Glomerular PLA2 Ag expression evaluated by IF was positive in 52.6% of IMN patients, but was absent in SMN patients. The concordance rate between the prevalence of glomerular PLA2R Ag expression and anti-PLA2R Ab was 84.2%. The prevalence of anti-PLA2R Abs measured by ELISA/CIIFA was equivalent to previous Japanese studies evaluated using Western blotting. These analyses showed an excellent specificity for the diagnosis of IMN, and anti-PLA2R positivity was associated with some clinicopathological features, especially glomerular IgG4-dominant deposition. PMID:27355365

  20. Altered expression of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors in the carotid body and nucleus tractus solitarius of adult male and female rats following neonatal caffeine treatment.

    PubMed

    Bairam, Aida; Joseph, Vincent; Lajeunesse, Yves; Kinkead, Richard

    2009-09-01

    Neonatal caffeine treatment (adenosine receptor antagonist, 15 mg/kg/day, between postnatal days 3 and 12) affects respiratory patterns in adult male but not female rats as shown by an increase in the respiratory frequency in the early phase of response to hypoxia and an increase in the tidal volume in the late phase of response. Here, we tested the hypothesis that these changes are correlated with modified expression of adenosine receptors in the chemoreflex pathway. Carotid bodies, nucleus tractus solitarii, and superior cervical ganglia were collected from 3-month-old male and female rats that were either naive (not manipulated during the neonatal period) or treated with caffeine (NCT) or water (NWT) between postnatal days 3 and 12 by gavage. Western blot analysis was used to assess the expression of adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors and tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme for dopamine synthesis. In male rats, there was a 37% increase in the level of A(2A) receptor and a 17% decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase in the carotid body of NCT (p<0.001) as compared to NWT rats. In the nucleus tractus solitarius, we found a 13% and 19% decrease in A(1) receptor expression in NWT and NCT rats (p<0.01), respectively, compared to naive rats. In the superior cervical ganglion, there was no change in A(1) receptor, A(2A) receptor, and tyrosine hydroxylase expression. In female rats, the only changes observed were decreases of 12% and 15% in A(1) receptor levels in the nucleus tractus solitarius of NWT and NCT rats (p<0.01), respectively, compared to naive rats. We conclude that NCT induces long-term changes in the adenosine receptor system. These changes may partially explain the modifications of the respiratory pattern induced by NCT in adults. The increased expression of the adenosine A(2A) receptor (specific to male rats), combined with the decreased tyrosine hydroxylase expression in the carotid body, suggests that NCT affects adenosine-dopamine interactions

  1. Thromboxane A2 receptor +795T>C and chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on Th2 cells -466T>C gene polymorphisms in patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Kohyama, Kenya; Hashimoto, Masayuki; Abe, Shyuzo; Kodaira, Kazumi; Yukawa, Tatsuo; Hozawa, Soichiro; Morioka, Junichiro; Inamura, Hiroaki; Yano, Megumi; Ota, Mayumi; Sagara, Hironori; Kurosawa, Motohiro

    2012-02-01

    It is well known that aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) is more common in women than in men, however, whether gene polymorphisms of the thromboxane A2 receptor (TBXA2R) and chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecules expressed on Th2 cells (CRTH2) are associated with the susceptibility of AERD remains unknown. In this study, we examined the gene polymorphisms in a Japanese population. DNA specimens were obtained from the following three groups: 96 patients with AERD, 500 patients with aspirin-tolerant asthma (ATA) and 100 normal controls. The target DNA sequence of each gene was amplified, and an allelic discrimination assay for single nucleotide polymorphisms relating to expression of each gene was carried out. The frequencies of the CC/CT genotype of TBXA2R +795T>C were higher than those of the TT genotype in AERD patients compared to ATA patients (P=0.015). In female AERD patients, but not in males, frequencies of the CC/CT genotype were higher than those of the TT genotype of TBXA2R +795T>C compared to female ATA patients (P=0.013). Also, frequencies of the TT genotype of CRTH2 -466T>C were higher than those of the CC/CT genotype in AERD patients compared to ATA patients (P=0.034). In female AERD patients, but not in male, frequencies of the TT genotype were higher than those of the CC/CT genotype of CRTH2 -466T>C in AERD patients compared to female ATA patients (P=0.046). Based on our investigations, no significant relationship was found between the genotype and the clinical characteristics according to these gene polymorphisms in AERD patients. Our results suggest that an association between the TBXA2R and CRTH2 gene polymorphisms with AERD may exist in the Japanese population.

  2. Adenosine A2A and A2B Receptors Differentially Modulate Keratinocyte Proliferation: Possible Deregulation in Psoriatic Epidermis.

    PubMed

    Andrés, Rosa M; Terencio, María Carmen; Arasa, Jorge; Payá, Miguel; Valcuende-Cavero, Francisca; Navalón, Pedro; Montesinos, María Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine is a potent regulator of inflammation and immunity, but the role of adenosine receptors in keratinocytes remains controversial. We determined that in addition to A2B receptors, human epidermal keratinocytes also express A2A receptors, although to a lower extent. Through the use of selective adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists, we showed that physiological concentrations of adenosine activate A2B receptors in normal human keratinocytes, inducing cell cycle arrest through the increase of intracellular calcium but not through cAMP signaling. In contrast, the selective activation of A2A receptors by CGS-21680 induces keratinocyte proliferation via p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. Adenosine and selective A2A and A2B agonists presented anti-inflammatory profiles independent of adenosine receptors but mediated by membrane phosphatase activation. Finally, keratinocyte exposure to diverse inflammatory cytokines altered adenosine receptor expression by reducing A2B and increasing A2A, a pattern also observed in psoriatic epidermis. Because increased epidermal turnover and inflammatory response are characteristics of psoriatic disease, further studies are needed to assess the role and consequences of the altered adenosine receptor expression in lesional and nonlesional psoriatic keratinocytes. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Adenosine A2A Receptors and A2A Receptor Heteromers as Key Players in Striatal Function

    PubMed Central

    Ferré, Sergi; Quiroz, César; Orru, Marco; Guitart, Xavier; Navarro, Gemma; Cortés, Antonio; Casadó, Vicent; Canela, Enric I.; Lluis, Carme; Franco, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    A very significant density of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) is present in the striatum, where they are preferentially localized postsynaptically in striatopallidal medium spiny neurons (MSNs). In this localization A2ARs establish reciprocal antagonistic interactions with dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs). In one type of interaction, A2AR and D2R are forming heteromers and, by means of an allosteric interaction, A2AR counteracts D2R-mediated inhibitory modulation of the effects of NMDA receptor stimulation in the striatopallidal neuron. This interaction is probably mostly responsible for the locomotor depressant and activating effects of A2AR agonist and antagonists, respectively. The second type of interaction involves A2AR and D2R that do not form heteromers and takes place at the level of adenylyl cyclase (AC). Due to a strong tonic effect of endogenous dopamine on striatal D2R, this interaction keeps A2AR from signaling through AC. However, under conditions of dopamine depletion or with blockade of D2R, A2AR-mediated AC activation is unleashed with an increased gene expression and activity of the striatopallidal neuron and with a consequent motor depression. This interaction is probably the main mechanism responsible for the locomotor depression induced by D2R antagonists. Finally, striatal A2ARs are also localized presynaptically, in cortico-striatal glutamatergic terminals that contact the striato-nigral MSN. These presynaptic A2ARs heteromerize with A1 receptors (A1Rs) and their activation facilitates glutamate release. These three different types of A2ARs can be pharmacologically dissected by their ability to bind ligands with different affinity and can therefore provide selective targets for drug development in different basal ganglia disorders. PMID:21731559

  4. Adenosine A2A receptor regulates expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in feto-placental endothelium from normal and late-onset pre-eclamptic pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Acurio, Jesenia; Herlitz, Kurt; Troncoso, Felipe; Aguayo, Claudio; Bertoglia, Patricio; Escudero, Carlos

    2017-03-01

    We aim to investigate whether A2A/nitric oxide-mediated regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression is impaired in feto-placental endothelial cells from late-onset pre-eclampsia. Cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human placental microvascular endothelial cells (hPMECs) from normal and pre-eclamptic pregnancies were used. Assays by using small interference RNA (siRNA) for A2A were performed, and transfected cells were used for estimation of messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of VEGF, as well as for cell proliferation and angiogenesis in vitro. CGS-21680 (A2A agonist, 24 h) increases HUVEC and hPMEC proliferation in a dose response manner. Furthermore, similar to CGS-21680, the nitric oxide donor, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine oxide (SNAP), increased cell proliferation in a dose response manner (logEC50 10(-9.2) M). In hPMEC, CGS-21680 increased VEGF protein levels in both normal (∼1.5-fold) and pre-eclamptic pregnancies (∼1.2-fold), an effect blocked by the A2A antagonist, ZM-241385 (10(-5) M) and the inhibitor of NO synthase, N ω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME). Subsequently, SNAP partially recovered cell proliferation and in vitro angiogenesis capacity of cells from normal pregnancies exposed to siRNA for A2A. CGS-21680 also increased (∼1.5-fold) the level of VEGF mRNA in HUVEC from normal pregnancies, but not in pre-eclampsia. Additionally, transfection with siRNA for A2A decrease (∼30 %) the level of mRNA for VEGF in normal pregnancy compared to untransfected cells, an effect partially reversed by co-incubation with SNAP. The A2A-NO-VEGF pathway is present in endothelium from microcirculation and macrocirculation in both normal and pre-eclamptic pregnancies. However, NO signaling pathway seems to be impaired in HUVEC from pre-eclampsia.

  5. EphrinA2 Receptor (EphA2) Is an Invasion and Intracellular Signaling Receptor for Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Subbarayal, Prema; Karunakaran, Karthika; Winkler, Ann-Cathrin; Rother, Marion; Gonzalez, Erik; Meyer, Thomas F.; Rudel, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The obligate intracellular bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis invades into host cells to replicate inside a membrane-bound vacuole called inclusion. Multiple different host proteins are recruited to the inclusion and are functionally modulated to support chlamydial development. Invaded and replicating Chlamydia induces a long-lasting activation of the PI3 kinase signaling pathway that is required for efficient replication. We identified the cell surface tyrosine kinase EphrinA2 receptor (EphA2) as a chlamydial adherence and invasion receptor that induces PI3 kinase (PI3K) activation, promoting chlamydial replication. Interfering with binding of C. trachomatis serovar L2 (Ctr) to EphA2, downregulation of EphA2 expression or inhibition of EphA2 activity significantly reduced Ctr infection. Ctr interacts with and activates EphA2 on the cell surface resulting in Ctr and receptor internalization. During chlamydial replication, EphA2 remains active accumulating around the inclusion and interacts with the p85 regulatory subunit of PI3K to support the activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway that is required for normal chlamydial development. Overexpression of full length EphA2, but not the mutant form lacking the intracellular cytoplasmic domain, enhanced PI3K activation and Ctr infection. Despite the depletion of EphA2 from the cell surface, Ctr infection induces upregulation of EphA2 through the activation of the ERK pathway, which keeps the infected cell in an apoptosis-resistant state. The significance of EphA2 as an entry and intracellular signaling receptor was also observed with the urogenital C. trachomatis-serovar D. Our findings provide the first evidence for a host cell surface receptor that is exploited for invasion as well as for receptor-mediated intracellular signaling to facilitate chlamydial replication. In addition, the engagement of a cell surface receptor at the inclusion membrane is a new mechanism by which Chlamydia subverts the host cell and

  6. Effects of the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist SCH 58621 on cyclooxygenase-2 expression, glial activation, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor availability in a rat model of striatal neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Minghetti, Luisa; Greco, Anita; Potenza, Rosa Luisa; Pezzola, Antonella; Blum, David; Bantubungi, Kadiombo; Popoli, Patrizia

    2007-05-01

    Inhibition of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) is neuroprotective in several experimental models of striatal diseases. However, the mechanisms elicited by A2AR blockade are only partially known, and critical aspects about the potential beneficial effects of A2AR antagonism in models of neurodegeneration still await elucidation. In the present study, we analyzed the influence of the selective A2AR antagonist SCH 58261 in a rat model of striatal excitotoxicity obtained by unilateral intrastriatal injection of quinolinic acid (QA). We found that SCH 58261 differently affected the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) induced by QA in cortex and striatum. The antagonist enhanced COX-2 expression in cortical neurons and prevented it in striatal microglia-like cells. Similarly, SCH 58261 differently regulated astrogliosis and microglial activation in the 2 brain regions. In addition, the A2AR antagonist prevented the QA-induced increase in striatal brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels. Because COX-2 activity has been linked to excitotoxic processes and because brain-derived neurotrophic factor depletion has been observed in mouse models as well as in patients with Huntington disease, we suggest that the final outcome of A2AR blockade (namely neuroprotection vs neurodegeneration) is likely to depend on the balance among its various and region-specific effects.

  7. A2A-D2 receptor-receptor interaction modulates gliotransmitter release from striatal astrocyte processes.

    PubMed

    Cervetto, Chiara; Venturini, Arianna; Passalacqua, Mario; Guidolin, Diego; Genedani, Susanna; Fuxe, Kjell; Borroto-Esquela, Dasiel O; Cortelli, Pietro; Woods, Amina; Maura, Guido; Marcoli, Manuela; Agnati, Luigi F

    2017-01-01

    Evidence for striatal A2A-D2 heterodimers has led to a new perspective on molecular mechanisms involved in schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease. Despite the increasing recognition of astrocytes' participation in neuropsychiatric disease vulnerability, involvement of striatal astrocytes in A2A and D2 receptor signal transmission has never been explored. Here, we investigated the presence of D2 and A2A receptors in isolated astrocyte processes prepared from adult rat striatum by confocal imaging; the effects of receptor activation were measured on the 4-aminopyridine-evoked release of glutamate from the processes. Confocal analysis showed that A2A and D2 receptors were co-expressed on the same astrocyte processes. Evidence for A2A-D2 receptor-receptor interactions was obtained by measuring the release of the gliotransmitter glutamate: D2 receptors inhibited the glutamate release, while activation of A2A receptors, per se ineffective, abolished the effect of D2 receptor activation. The synthetic D2 peptide VLRRRRKRVN corresponding to the receptor region involved in electrostatic interaction underlying A2A-D2 heteromerization abolished the ability of the A2A receptor to antagonize the D2 receptor-mediated effect. Together, the findings are consistent with heteromerization of native striatal astrocytic A2A-D2 receptors that via allosteric receptor-receptor interactions could play a role in the control of striatal glutamatergic transmission. These new findings suggest possible new pathogenic mechanisms and/or therapeutic approaches to neuropsychiatric disorders. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  8. TSU-16, (Z)-3-[(2,4-dimethylpyrrol-5-yl)methylidenyl]-2-indolinone, is a potent activator of aryl hydrocarbon receptor and increases CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 expression in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka-Kawano, Kazuaki; Yoshinari, Kouichi; Nagayama, Sekio; Yamazoe, Yasushi

    2010-04-15

    (Z)-3-[(2,4-dimethylpyrrol-5-yl)methylidenyl]-2-indolinone (TSU-16), is a potent anti-angiogenic agent that inhibits the tyrosine kinase of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2. In clinical trials with daily or twice weekly intravenous administration of TSU-16, its increased clearance was observed. To understand the mechanism underlying this observation, we have investigated the TSU-16-mediated regulation of cytochrome P450 expression. In human hepatocytes, TSU-16 increased mRNA levels of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2, but not CYP2B6 and CYP3A4. The extent of increase and profiles of the time-dependent changes in CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 mRNA levels after TSU-16 treatment were similar to those after treatment with 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC), a well-known activator of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). In reporter assays using a plasmid construct that contained the human CYP1A1 5'-flanking region including the region crucial for the AhR-dependent transcription of both human CYP1A1 and CYP1A2, TSU-16 treatment increased reporter activities to an extent similar to that obtained with 3MC. Treatment of HepG2 cells and human hepatocytes with AhR-targeting siRNA suppressed the increase in both mRNA levels and CYP1A activities after treatment with TSU-16 as well as after that with omeprazole or 3MC. TSU-16 also time-dependently reduced cellular AhR protein levels in HepG2 cells to a similar extent with 3MC treatment. Furthermore, we demonstrated that unlabeled TSU-16 and 3MC but not omeprazole completely inhibited the specific binding of [(3)H]-3MC to mouse Hepa1c1c7 cytosol, suggesting TSU-16 as an AhR ligand. In conclusion, our present results suggest that TSU-16 binds to and activates AhR to enhance the expression of both human CYP1A1 and CYP1A2. Because TSU-16 is metabolized mainly by CYP1A2, its increased clearance after repeated dosing may be attributed to the enhanced expression of hepatic CYP1A2.

  9. Remodeling of striatal NMDA receptors by chronic A(2A) receptor blockade in Huntington's disease mice.

    PubMed

    Martire, Alberto; Ferrante, Antonella; Potenza, Rosa Luisa; Armida, Monica; Ferretti, Roberta; Pézzola, Antonella; Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Popoli, Patrizia

    2010-01-01

    Excitotoxicity plays a major role in the pathogenesis of Huntington disease (HD), a fatal neurodegenerative disorder. Adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs) modulate excitotoxicity and have been suggested to play a pathogenetic role in HD. The main aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of A(2A)R blockade on the expression and functions of NMDA receptors in the striatum of HD mice (R6/2). We found that 3 weeks' treatment with SCH 58261 (0.01 mg/kg/day i.p. from the 8th week of age) modified NR1 and NR2A/NR2B expression in the striatum of R6/2 (Western blotting) while had no effect on NMDA-induced toxicity in corticostriatal slices (electrophysiological experiments). In conclusion, in vivo A(2A)R blockade induced a remodeling of NMDA receptors in the striatum of HD mice. Even though the functional relevance of the above effect remains to be fully elucidated, these results add further evidence to the modulatory role of A(2A)Rs in HD.

  10. Ligands and therapeutic perspectives of adenosine A(2A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Diniz, C; Borges, F; Santana, L; Uriarte, E; Oliveira, J M A; Gonçalves, J; Fresco, P

    2008-01-01

    Adenosine A(2A) receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor family and mediate multiple physiological effects of adenosine, both at the central nervous system (CNS) and at peripheral tissues, by activating several pathways or interacting with other receptors or proteins. Increasing evidence relate A(2A) receptors with pharmacological stress testing, neurodegenerative disorders (such as Parkinson's disease) and inflammation, renewing the interest in these receptors, increasingly viewed as promising therapeutic targets. Series of agonists and antagonists have been developed by medicinal chemistry artwork either by structure activity relationship (SAR) or quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) studies. These studies have allowed identification of the structural and electrostatic requirements for high affinity A(2A) receptor binding and, therefore, contributing to the rational design of A(2A) receptor ligands. Additional rational chemical modifications of the existing A(2A) receptor ligands may further improve their affinity/selectivity. The purpose of this review is to analize and summarize aspects related to the medicinal chemistry of A(2A) receptor ligands, their present and potencial therapeutic applications by exploring the molecular structure and physiological and pathophysiological roles of A(2A) receptors.

  11. A2BR Adenosine Receptor Modulates Sweet Taste in Circumvallate Taste Buds

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dan; Shultz, Nicole; Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Ravid, Katya; Kinnamon, Sue C.; Finger, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    In response to taste stimulation, taste buds release ATP, which activates ionotropic ATP receptors (P2X2/P2X3) on taste nerves as well as metabotropic (P2Y) purinergic receptors on taste bud cells. The action of the extracellular ATP is terminated by ectonucleotidases, ultimately generating adenosine, which itself can activate one or more G-protein coupled adenosine receptors: A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. Here we investigated the expression of adenosine receptors in mouse taste buds at both the nucleotide and protein expression levels. Of the adenosine receptors, only A2B receptor (A2BR) is expressed specifically in taste epithelia. Further, A2BR is expressed abundantly only in a subset of taste bud cells of posterior (circumvallate, foliate), but not anterior (fungiform, palate) taste fields in mice. Analysis of double-labeled tissue indicates that A2BR occurs on Type II taste bud cells that also express Gα14, which is present only in sweet-sensitive taste cells of the foliate and circumvallate papillae. Glossopharyngeal nerve recordings from A2BR knockout mice show significantly reduced responses to both sucrose and synthetic sweeteners, but normal responses to tastants representing other qualities. Thus, our study identified a novel regulator of sweet taste, the A2BR, which functions to potentiate sweet responses in posterior lingual taste fields. PMID:22253866

  12. The Macrophage A2b Adenosine Receptor Regulates Tissue Insulin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Koupenova, Milka; Carroll, Shannon; Ravid, Katya

    2014-01-01

    High fat diet (HFD)-induced type 2 diabetes continues to be an epidemic with significant risk for various pathologies. Previously, we identified the A2b adenosine receptor (A2bAR), an established regulator of inflammation, as a regulator of HFD-induced insulin resistance. In particular, HFD was associated with vast upregulation of liver A2bAR in control mice, and while mice lacking this receptor showed augmented liver inflammation and tissue insulin resistance. As the A2bAR is expressed in different tissues, here, we provide the first lead to cellular mechanism by demonstrating that the receptor's influence on tissue insulin sensitivity is mediated via its expression in macrophages. This was shown using a newly generated transgenic mouse model expressing the A2bAR gene in the macrophage lineage on an otherwise A2bAR null background. Reinstatement of macrophage A2bAR expression in A2bAR null mice fed HFD restored insulin tolerance and tissue insulin signaling to the level of control mice. The molecular mechanism for this effect involves A2bAR-mediated changes in cyclic adenosine monophosphate in macrophages, reducing the expression and release of inflammatory cytokines, which downregulate insulin receptor-2. Thus, our results illustrate that macrophage A2bAR signaling is needed and sufficient for relaying the protective effect of the A2bAR against HFD-induced tissue inflammation and insulin resistance in mice. PMID:24892847

  13. Mechanism of A2 adenosine receptor activation. I. Blockade of A2 adenosine receptors by photoaffinity labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lohse, M.J.; Klotz, K.N.; Schwabe, U.

    1991-04-01

    It has previously been shown that covalent incorporation of the photoreactive adenosine derivative (R)-2-azido-N6-p-hydroxy-phenylisopropyladenosine ((R)-AHPIA) into the A1 adenosine receptor of intact fat cells leads to a persistent activation of this receptor, resulting in a reduction of cellular cAMP levels. In contrast, covalent incorporation of (R)-AHPIA into human platelet membranes, which contain only stimulatory A2 adenosine receptors, reduces adenylate cyclase stimulation via these receptors. This effect of (R)-AHPIA is specific for the A2 receptor and can be prevented by the adenosine receptor antagonist theophylline. Binding studies indicate that up to 90% of A2 receptors can be blocked by photoincorporation of (R)-AHPIA. However, the remaining 10-20% of A2 receptors are sufficient to mediate an adenylate cyclase stimulation of up to 50% of the control value. Similarly, the activation via these 10-20% of receptors occurs with a half-life that is only 2 times longer than that in control membranes. This indicates the presence of a receptor reserve, with respect to both the extent and the rate of adenylate cyclase stimulation. These observations require a modification of the models of receptor-adenylate cyclase coupling.

  14. A2A Adenosine Receptor (A2AAR) as a Therapeutic Target in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Ahmed S.; El-shishtawy, Mamdouh M.; Zhang, Wenbo; Caldwell, Ruth B.; Liou, Gregory I.

    2011-01-01

    In diabetic retinopathy (DR), abnormalities in vascular and neuronal function are closely related to the local production of inflammatory mediators whose potential source is microglia. A2A adenosine receptor (A2AAR) has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory properties that have not been studied in DR. Here, we evaluate the role of A2AAR and its underlying signaling in retinal complications associated with diabetes. Initial studies in wild-type mice revealed that the treatment with the A2AAR agonist resulted in marked decreases in hyperglycemia-induced retinal cell death and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α release. To further assess the role of A2AAR in DR, we studied the effects of A2AAR ablation on diabetes-induced retinal abnormalities. Diabetic A2AAR−/− mice had significantly more terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling-positive cells, TNF-α release, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression compared with diabetic wild-type mice. To explore a potential mechanism by which A2AAR signaling regulates inflammation in DR, we performed additional studies using microglial cells treated with Amadori-glycated albumin, a risk factor in diabetic disorders. The results showed that activation of A2AAR attenuated Amadori-glycated albumin-induced TNF-α release in a cAMP/exchange protein directly activated by cAMP-dependent mechanism and significantly repressed the inflammatory cascade, C-Raf/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), in activated microglia. Collectively, this work provides pharmacological and genetic evidence for A2AAR signaling as a control point of cell death in DR and suggests that the retinal protective effect of A2AAR is mediated by abrogating the inflammatory response that occurs in microglia via interaction with C-Raf/ERK pathway. PMID:21514428

  15. Adenosine A2A receptor signaling affects IL-21/IL-22 cytokines and GATA3/T-bet transcription factor expression in CD4(+) T cells from a BTBR T(+) Itpr3tf/J mouse model of autism.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Sheikh F; Ansari, Mushtaq A; Nadeem, Ahmed; Bakheet, Saleh A; Almutairi, Mashal M; Attia, Sabry M

    2017-10-15

    Autism is a complex heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorder; previous studies have identified altered immune responses among individuals diagnosed with autism. An imbalance in the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and transcription factors plays a role in neurodevelopmental behavioral and autism disorders. BTBR T(+) Itpr3tf/J (BTBR) mice are used as a model for autism, as they exhibit social deficits, communication deficits, and repetitive behaviors compared with C57BL/6J (B6) mice. The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) appears to be a potential target for the improvement of behavioral, inflammatory, immune, and neurological disorders. We investigated the effects of the A2AR antagonist SCH 5826 (SCH) and agonist CGS 21680 (CGS) on IL-21, IL-22, T-bet, T-box transcription factor (T-bet), GATA3 (GATA Binding Protein 3), and CD152 (CTLA-4) expression in BTBR mice. Our results showed that BTBR mice treated with SCH had increased CD4(+)IL-21(+), CD4(+)IL-22(+), CD4(+)GATA3(+), and CD4(+)T-bet(+) and decreased CD4(+)CTLA-4(+) expression in spleen cells compared with BTBR control mice. Moreover, CGS efficiently decreased CD4(+)IL-21(+), CD4(+)IL-22(+), CD4(+)GATA3(+), and CD4(+)T-bet(+) and increased CD4(+)CTLA-4 production in spleen cells compared with SCH-treated and BTBR control mice. Additionally, SCH treatment significantly increased the mRNA and protein expression levels of IL-21, IL-22, GATA3, and T-bet in brain tissue compared with CGS-treated and BTBR control mice. The augmented levels of IL-21/IL-22 and GATA3/T-bet could be due to altered A2AR signaling. Our results indicate that A2AR agonists may represent a new class of compounds that can be developed for use in the treatment of autistic and neuroimmune dysfunctions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A critical evaluation of adenosine A2A receptors as potentially "druggable" targets in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Popoli, Patrizia; Blum, David; Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Burnouf, Sylvie; Chern, Yijuang

    2008-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a polymorphic CAG trinucleotide repeat encoding a poly-glutamine tract within the Huntingtin protein. GABAergic enkephalin neurons of the basal ganglia, which show the highest levels of expression of adenosine A(2A) receptors, are the most vulnerable in HD. Such a selective neuronal vulnerability, which occurs despite ubiquitous expression of mutant and normal Huntingtin, has suggested that adenosine A(2A) receptors might play a pathogenetic role in HD. In agreement, changes in A(2A) receptor expression and signaling have been reported in various experimental models of HD. The interpretation of the functional significance of the aberrant A(2A) receptor phenotype in HD mice is however complicated by the conflicting data so far reported on the potential neuroprotective and neurodegenerative effects of these receptors in the brain, with some data suggesting a potential pathogenetic role and some other data suggesting activation of trophic or protective pathways in neurons. The same complex profile has emerged in experimental models of HD, in which both A(2A) receptor agonists and antagonists have shown beneficial effects. The main aim of this review is to critically evaluate whether adenosine A(2A) receptors may represent a suitable target to develop drugs against HD.

  17. Expression of Plant Receptor Kinases in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Barberini, María Laura; Muschietti, Jorge P

    2017-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a useful system to express recombinant proteins and analyze protein-protein interaction. Membrane-spanning proteins like plant receptor kinases find their way to the plasma membrane when expressed in yeast and seem to retain their structure and function. Here, we describe a general yeast DNA transformation procedure based on lithium acetate, salmon sperm DNA, and polyethylene glycol used to express recombinant proteins. Yeast cells expressing plant receptor kinases can be used for in vivo and in vitro studies of receptor function.

  18. Activation of Adenosine A2A Receptors Inhibits Neutrophil Transuroepithelial Migration ▿

    PubMed Central

    Säve, Susanne; Mohlin, Camilla; Vumma, Ravi; Persson, Katarina

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine has been identified as a significant inhibitor of inflammation by acting on adenosine A2A receptors. In this study, we examined the role of adenosine and A2A receptors in the transmigration of human neutrophils across an in vitro model of the transitional bladder urothelium. Human uroepithelial cells (UROtsa) were grown on transwell inserts; uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) and neutrophils were added to the transwell system; and the number of migrating neutrophils was evaluated. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry were used to investigate the expression of adenosine receptors, the epithelial adhesion molecule ICAM-1, and the neutrophil integrin CD11b. Levels of proinflammatory interleukin-8 (IL-8) and phosphorylated IκBα were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and Luminex assays, respectively. The neutrophils expressed all four adenosine receptor subtypes (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3 receptors), but A3 receptors were not expressed by UROtsa cells. UPEC stimulated neutrophil transuroepithelial migration, which was significantly decreased in response to the specific A2A receptor agonist CGS 21680. The inhibitory effect of CGS 21680 on neutrophil migration was reversed by the A2A receptor antagonist SCH 58261. The production of chemotactic IL-8 and the expression of the adhesion molecule ICAM-1 or CD11b were not significantly affected by CGS 21680. However, a significant decrease in the level of phosporylated IκBα was revealed in response to CGS 21680. In conclusion, UPEC infection in vitro evoked neutrophil migration through a multilayered human uroepithelium. The UPEC-evoked neutrophil transmigration decreased in response to A2A receptor activation, possibly through inhibition of NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:21646447

  19. Expression of prostanoid receptors in human ductus arteriosus

    PubMed Central

    Leonhardt, Andreas; Glaser, Alexander; Wegmann, Markus; Schranz, Dietmar; Seyberth, Hannsjörg; Nüsing, Rolf

    2003-01-01

    Prostaglandins play a major role in maintaining ductal patency in utero. Ductal tone is regulated by both locally released and circulating vasodilatory prostaglandins. In infants with ductus arteriosus-dependent congenital heart disease, ductal patency is maintained by intravenous administration of prostaglandin (PG) E1. Little information is available regarding the expression of prostaglandin receptors in man. By means of RT–PCR and immunohistochemistry we studied the expression of the PGI2 receptor (IP), the four different PGE2 receptors (EP1, EP2, EP3 and EP4), and the receptors for thromboxane (Tx) A2 (TP), PGD2 (DP) and PGF2α (FP) in the ductus arteriosus of three newborn infants with ductus arteriosus-dependent congenital heart disease and intravenous infusion of PGE1 and of one 8 month old child with a patent ductus arteriosus. The EP3, EP4, FP, IP and TP receptor were markedly expressed at the mRNA and protein level, whereas the EP2 receptor was weakly expressed and the EP1 receptor was detected in two out of four tissue specimens only. The DP receptor was not detected in any of the samples. The most pronounced expression, which was located in the media of the ductus arteriosus, was observed for the EP4 and TP receptors followed by IP and FP receptor protein. These data indicate that ductal patency during the infusion of PGE1 in infants with ductus arteriosus-dependent congenital heart disease might be mediated by the EP4 and IP receptor. The data further suggest that a heterogeneous population of prostanoid receptors may contribute to the regulation of ductus arteriosus tone in humans. PMID:12598419

  20. The comparative effects of diethyldithiocarbamate-copper complex with established proteasome inhibitors on expression levels of CYP1A2/3A4 and their master regulators, aryl hydrocarbon and pregnane X receptor in primary cultures of human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Vrzal, Radim; Dvorak, Zdenek

    2016-12-01

    In the recent years, a therapeutic potential of disulfiram (Antabuse) complex with copper, as an anticancer drug, was recognized towards several cancer cell lines. The proteasome was suggested as one of the cellular targets for this compound. As the therapeutic use of diethyldithiocarbamate-copper complex (CuET) is expected to increase, it is of great interest to know whether this compound may be the source of drug-drug interactions via the induction of biotransformation enzymes, especially cytochromes P450 (CYPs). To this purpose, we examined the effect of CuET and compared it with typical inducers (rifampicin and dioxin) of CYPs and with well-established proteasome inhibitors (MG132 and bortezomib). Diethyldithiocarbamate-copper complex revealed inconsistent and rather modulatory effect on the expression of CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 in several cultures of human hepatocytes. Moreover, it was able to cause neither ubiquitin accumulation nor significant and dose-dependent inhibition of proteasome activity. It had no effect on essential transcription factors involved in regulation of selected CYPs, aryl hydrocarbon (AhR) nor pregnane X receptor (PXR). However, the AhR protein was increased in majority of examined hepatocyte cultures. The main finding of this study is that: (i) disulfiram-copper complex is not the cause of drug-drug interactions via CYP1A2/3A4 induction; (ii) proteasome inhibitors may have different impact on studied parameters in given in vitro system. © 2016 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  1. [Olfactory esthesioneuroblastoma: scintigraphic expression of somatostatin receptors].

    PubMed

    García Vicente, A; García Del Castillo, E; Soriano Castrejón, A; Alonso Farto, J

    1999-10-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma is an uncommon tumor originating in the upper nasal cavity and constitutes 3% of all intranasal neoplasms. Few references exist about the expression of somatostatin receptors in these tumors. Our case demonstrates a good correlation between the somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and magnetic resonance imaging.

  2. Astrocytic adenosine receptor A2A and Gs-coupled signaling regulate memory

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Anna G.; Hsiao, Edward C.; Wang, Max M.; Ho, Kaitlyn; Kim, Daniel H.; Wang, Xin; Guo, Weikun; Kang, Jing; Yu, Gui-Qiu; Adame, Anthony; Devidze, Nino; Dubal, Dena B.; Masliah, Eliezer; Conklin, Bruce R.; Mucke, Lennart

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes express a variety of G protein-coupled receptors and might influence cognitive functions, such as learning and memory. However, the roles of astrocytic Gs-coupled receptors in cognitive function are not known. We found that humans with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) had increased levels of the Gs-coupled adenosine receptor A2A in astrocytes. Conditional genetic removal of these receptors enhanced long-term memory in young and aging mice, and increased the levels of Arc/Arg3.1, an immediate-early gene required for long-term memory. Chemogenetic activation of astrocytic Gs-coupled signaling reduced long-term memory in mice without affecting learning. Similar to humans with AD, aging mice expressing human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP) showed increased levels of astrocytic A2A receptors. Conditional genetic removal of these receptors enhanced memory in aging hAPP mice. Together, these findings establish a regulatory role for astrocytic Gs-coupled receptors in memory and suggest that AD-linked increases in astrocytic A2A receptor levels contribute to memory loss. PMID:25622143

  3. Estrogen increases renal oxytocin receptor gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, N L; Young, W S; Lolait, S J

    1995-04-01

    Estrogens have been implicated in the sodium and fluid imbalances associated with the menstrual cycle and late pregnancy. An estrogen-dependent role for renal oxytocin receptors in fluid homeostasis is suggested by the present findings which demonstrate that estradiol benzoate treatment increases the expression of the oxytocin receptor messenger ribonucleic acid and 125I-OTA binding to oxytocin receptors in the renal cortex and medullary collecting ducts of ovariectomized female rats. Moreover, estradiol induced high levels of oxytocin receptor expression in outer stripe proximal tubules of ovariectomized female and adrenalectomized male rats. Proximal tubule induction was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by the antiestrogen tamoxifen, but cortical expression of oxytocin receptors in macula densa cells was unaffected by tamoxifen. These data demonstrate cell-specific regulation of oxytocin receptor expression in macula densa and proximal tubule cells, and suggest a important role for these receptors in mediating estrogen-induced alterations in renal fluid dynamics by possibly affecting glomerular filtration and water and solute reabsorption during high estrogen states.

  4. Somatostatin receptor expression in thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Helen; England, James A; Rafferty, Amy; Jesudason, Vim; Bedford, Karen; Karsai, Laszlo; Atkin, Stephen L

    2013-06-01

    Somatostatin analogues are commercially available and used for the management of acromegaly and neuroendocrine tumours, but the expression of the receptors as a target in thyroid disease has not been explored. To assess somatostatin (SST) and somatostatin receptor (SSTR1-5) expression in both normal and thyroid disorders, as a potential target for somatostatin analogue therapy, 67 thyroid tissue specimens were reviewed: 12 differentiated thyroid carcinomas, 14 follicular adenomas, 17 multinodular goitres, 14 Graves disease, 10 Hashimotos thyroiditis specimens and five normal thyroids. Tissue was immunostained for SST and SSTR1-5. Positivity and the degree of positivity were recorded by double-blinded observers. Somatostatin receptor expression was highly expressed in normal tissue for SSTR1, 3, 4 and 5 (5 of 5, 4 of 5, 4 of 5 and 5 of 5 respectively) whilst SST and SSTR 2a and b were not expressed at all. The commonest receptor expressed for all pathological subtypes grouped together was SSTR2b (63 specimens). The commonest receptors expressed in differentiated thyroid cancer were SSTR5 (11 of 12 specimens) and SSTR2b (10 of 12 specimens). The commonest receptor expressed in benign disease was SSTR2b (53 of 55 specimens). SSTR5 was significantly under-expressed in Graves disease (P < 0.05). This study illustrates that SSTR 1, 3, 4 and 5 are highly expressed in normal, benign and malignant thyroid tissue. SSTR 2a and 2b appear absent in normal tissue and present in benign and malignant thyroid tissue (P < 0.02). This suggests that focussed SSTR2 treatment may be a potential therapeutic target. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2013 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  5. Nuclear Receptor Nr4a2 Promotes Alternative Polarization of Macrophages and Confers Protection in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Sahil; Saini, Ankita; Chandra, Vemika; Nanduri, Ravikanth; Kalra, Rashi; Bhagyaraj, Ella; Khatri, Neeraj; Gupta, Pawan

    2015-07-24

    The orphan nuclear receptor Nr4a2 is known to modulate both inflammatory and metabolic processes, but the mechanism by which it regulates innate inflammatory homeostasis has not been adequately addressed. This study shows that exposure to ligands for Toll-like receptors (TLRs) robustly induces Nr4a2 and that this induction is tightly regulated by the PI3K-Akt signaling axis. Interestingly, exogenous expression of Nr4a2 in macrophages leads to their alternative phenotype with induction of genes that are prototypical M2 markers. Moreover, Nr4a2 transcriptionally activates arginase 1 expression by directly binding to its promoter. Adoptive transfer experiments revealed that increased survival of animals in endotoxin-induced sepsis is Nr4a2-dependent. Thus our data identify a previously unknown role for Nr4a2 in the regulation of macrophage polarization. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Differential expression of somatostatin receptors in medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Guyotat, J; Champier, J; Pierre, G S; Jouvet, A; Bret, P; Brisson, C; Belin, M F; Signorelli, F; Montange, M F

    2001-01-01

    Somatostatin receptors have been found on a variety of tumours like neuroendocrine breast or brain tumours. Their detection opens new diagnostic and therapeutic paths. The aim of this work was to investigate their expression in medulloblastomas. Using both techniques, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, we analysed mRNA of different subtypes of somatostatin receptors in 15 medulloblastomas and the localisation of the subtype SSTR2 receptor at the cellular level in 13 medulloblastomas. All five subtypes mRNA were variably expressed in each medulloblastoma. The signal obtained after Southern blotting for SSTR2 receptor amplification was the highest as compared to the signal obtained for the other receptor subtypes. Immunostaining for SSTR2A receptor was present in every tumour specimen and was specifically located to the cellular membrane of neoplastic cells. No staining was identified at the level of peritumoral veins. The evidence of predominant expression of SSTR2 receptors in medulloblastomas opens interesting prospects for their diagnosis and therapy.

  7. Redox regulation of chemokine receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Saccani, Alessandra; Saccani, Simona; Orlando, Simone; Sironi, Marina; Bernasconi, Sergio; Ghezzi, Pietro; Mantovani, Alberto; Sica, Antonio

    2000-01-01

    Cytokines and reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) are frequent companions at sites of acute inflammation. We have shown previously that in human monocytes, bacterial lipopolysaccharide, IL-1, and tumor necrosis factor-α induce a rapid down-regulation of the monocyte chemotactic protein-1 receptor CCR2 (CC chemokine receptor-2). These stimuli also induce production of ROI. In this paper, we investigate the influence of antioxidants and/or ROI on chemokine-receptor expression. In human monocytes, the antioxidant pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) rapidly inhibited CCR2 (95–100% of inhibition) and CCR5 (77–100% of inhibition) mRNA expression by strongly decreasing transcript stability. CCR2 half-life was decreased from 1.5 h to 45 min; CCR5 half-life was decreased from 2 h to 70 min. This inhibitory activity also included CXCR4 (CXC chemokine receptor-4) but not CXCR2 receptor and, although to a lesser extent, was shared by the antioxidants N-acetyl-l-cysteine and 2-mercaptoethanol. In contrast, the ROI-generating system xanthine/xanthine oxidase increased CCR5 and CXCR4 mRNA expression and counteracted the inhibitory effect of PDTC. Accordingly, H2O2 and the glutathione-depleting drug buthionine sulfoximine increased to different extents CCR2, CCR5, and CXCR4 mRNA expression. The PDTC-mediated inhibition of CCR5 and CXCR4 mRNA expression was associated with decreased chemotactic responsiveness (>90% inhibition) and with a marked inhibition of surface-receptor expression. In contrast, xanthine/xanthine oxidase opposed the bacterial lipopolysaccharide- and tumor necrosis factor-α-mediated inhibition of CCR5 and CXCR4 mRNA expression and increased both the CCR5 surface expression and the cell migration (3-fold) in response to macrophage inflammatory protein-1β. These results suggest that the redox status of cells is a crucial determinant in the regulation of the chemokine system. PMID:10716998

  8. Agonist Derived Molecular Probes for A2A Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Pannell, Lewis K.; Ji, Xiao-duo; Jarvis, Michael F.; Williams, Michael; Hutchison, Alan J.; Barrington, William W.; Stiles, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    The adenosine agonist 2-(4-(2-carboxyethyl)phenylethylamino)-5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS21680) was recently reported to be selective for the A2A adenosine receptor subtype, which mediates its hypotensive action. To investigate structurelactivity relationships at a distal site, CGS21680 was derivatized using a functionalized congener approach. The carboxylic group of CGS21680 has been esterified to form a methyl ester, which was then treated with ethylenediamine to produce an amine congener. The amine congener was an intermediate for acylation reactions, in which the reactive acyl species contained a reported group, or the precursor for such. For radioiodination, derivatives of p-hydroxyphenylpropionic, 2-thiophenylacetic, and p-aminophenylacetic acids were prepared. The latter derivative (PAPA-APEC) was iodinated electrophilically using [125I]iodide resulting in a radioligand which was used for studies of competition of binding to striatal A, adenosine receptors in bovine brain. A biotin conjugate and an aryl sulfonate were at least 350-fold selective for A, receptors. For spectroscopic detection, a derivative of the stable free radical tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) was prepared. For irreversible inhibition of receptors, meta- and para-phenylenediisothiocyanate groups were incorporated in the analogs. We have demonstrated that binding at A2A receptors is relatively insensitive to distal structural changes at the 2-position, and we report high affinity molecular probes for receptor characterization by radioactive, spectroscopic and affinity labelling methodology. PMID:2561548

  9. LTD expression is independent of glutamate receptor subtype.

    PubMed

    Granger, Adam J; Nicoll, Roger A

    2014-01-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) is a form of synaptic plasticity that plays a major role in the activity-dependent reshaping of synaptic transmission. LTD is expressed as a decrease in synaptic AMPA receptor number, though the exact mechanism remains controversial. Several lines of evidence have suggested necessary roles for both the GluA1 and GluA2 subunits, and specifically certain interactions with their cytoplasmic tails. However, it is unclear if either GluA1 or GluA2 are absolutely required for LTD. We tested this hypothesis using constitutive knock-outs and single-cell molecular replacement of AMPA receptor subunits in mouse hippocampus. We found that neither GluA1 or GluA2 are required for normal expression of LTD, and indeed a normal decrease in synaptic transmission was observed in cells in which all endogenous AMPA receptors have been replaced by kainate receptors. Thus, LTD does not require removal of specific AMPA receptor subunits, but likely involves a more general modification of the synapse and its ability to anchor a broad range of receptor proteins.

  10. Adenosine A2A Receptors Modulate Acute Injury and Neuroinflammation in Brain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Pedata, Felicita; Pugliese, Anna Maria; Coppi, Elisabetta; Dettori, Ilaria; Maraula, Giovanna; Cellai, Lucrezia; Melani, Alessia

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular concentration of adenosine in the brain increases dramatically during ischemia. Adenosine A2A receptor is expressed in neurons and glial cells and in inflammatory cells (lymphocytes and granulocytes). Recently, adenosine A2A receptor emerged as a potential therapeutic attractive target in ischemia. Ischemia is a multifactorial pathology characterized by different events evolving in the time. After ischemia the early massive increase of extracellular glutamate is followed by activation of resident immune cells, that is, microglia, and production or activation of inflammation mediators. Proinflammatory cytokines, which upregulate cell adhesion molecules, exert an important role in promoting recruitment of leukocytes that in turn promote expansion of the inflammatory response in ischemic tissue. Protracted neuroinflammation is now recognized as the predominant mechanism of secondary brain injury progression. A2A receptors present on central cells and on blood cells account for important effects depending on the time-related evolution of the pathological condition. Evidence suggests that A2A receptor antagonists provide early protection via centrally mediated control of excessive excitotoxicity, while A2A receptor agonists provide protracted protection by controlling massive blood cell infiltration in the hours and days after ischemia. Focus on inflammatory responses provides for adenosine A2A receptor agonists a wide therapeutic time-window of hours and even days after stroke. PMID:25165414

  11. The A2B adenosine receptor impairs the maturation and immunogenicity of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jeffrey M; Ross, William G; Agbai, Oma N; Frazier, Renea; Figler, Robert A; Rieger, Jayson; Linden, Joel; Ernst, Peter B

    2009-04-15

    The endogenous purine nucleoside adenosine is an important antiinflammatory mediator that contributes to the control of CD4(+) T cell responses. While adenosine clearly has direct effects on CD4(+) T cells, it remains to be determined whether actions on APC such as dendritic cells (DC) are also important. In this report we characterize DC maturation and function in BMDC stimulated with LPS in the presence or absence of the nonselective adenosine receptor agonist NECA (5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine). We found that NECA inhibited TNF-alpha and IL-12 in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas IL-10 production was increased. NECA-treated BMDC also expressed reduced levels of MHC class II and CD86 and were less effective at stimulating CD4(+) T cell proliferation and IL-2 production compared with BMDC exposed to vehicle control. Based on real-time RT-PCR, the A(2A) adenosine receptor (A(2A)AR) and A(2B)AR were the predominant adenosine receptors expressed in BMDC. Using adenosine receptor subtype selective antagonists and BMDC derived from A(2A)AR(-/-) and A(2B)AR(-/-)mice, it was shown that NECA modulates TNF-alpha, IL-12, IL-10, and CD86 responses predominantly via A(2B)AR. These data indicate that engagement of A(2B)AR modifies murine BMDC maturation and suggest that adenosine regulates CD4(+) T cell responses by selecting for DC with impaired immunogencity.

  12. Tyrosine Kinase Receptor Expression in Canine Liposarcoma.

    PubMed

    Avallone, G; Pellegrino, V; Roccabianca, P; Lepri, E; Crippa, L; Beha, G; De Tolla, L; Sarli, G

    2017-03-01

    The expression of tyrosine kinase receptors is attracting major interest in human and veterinary oncological pathology because of their role as targets for adjuvant therapies. Little is known about tyrosine kinase receptor (TKR) expression in canine liposarcoma (LP), a soft tissue sarcoma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunohistochemical expression of the TKRs fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFRβ); their ligands, fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGFB); and c-kit in canine LP. Immunohistochemical labeling was categorized as high or low expression and compared with the mitotic count and MIB-1-based proliferation index. Fifty canine LPs were examined, classified, and graded. Fourteen cases were classified as well differentiated, 7 as myxoid, 25 as pleomorphic, and 4 as dedifferentiated. Seventeen cases were grade 1, 26 were grade 2, and 7 were grade 3. A high expression of FGF2, FGFR1, PDGFB, and PDGFRβ was identified in 62% (31/50), 68% (34/50), 81.6% (40/49), and 70.8% (34/48) of the cases, respectively. c-kit was expressed in 12.5% (6/48) of the cases. Mitotic count negatively correlated with FGF2 ( R = -0.41; P < .01), being lower in cases with high FGF2 expression, and positively correlated with PDGFRβ ( R = 0.33; P < .01), being higher in cases with high PDGFRβ expression. No other statistically significant correlations were identified. These results suggest that the PDGFRβ-mediated pathway may have a role in the progression of canine LP and may thus represent a promising target for adjuvant cancer therapies.

  13. Adenosine A2A receptors play a role in the pathogenesis of hepatic cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Edwin S L; Montesinos, Maria Carmen; Fernandez, Patricia; Desai, Avani; Delano, David L; Yee, Herman; Reiss, Allison B; Pillinger, Michael H; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Friedman, Scott L; Cronstein, Bruce N

    2006-01-01

    Adenosine is a potent endogenous regulator of inflammation and tissue repair. Adenosine, which is released from injured and hypoxic tissue or in response to toxins and medications, may induce pulmonary fibrosis in mice, presumably via interaction with a specific adenosine receptor. We therefore determined whether adenosine and its receptors contribute to the pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis. As in other tissues and cell types, adenosine is released in vitro in response to the fibrogenic stimuli ethanol (40 mg dl−1) and methotrexate (100 nM). Adenosine A2A receptors are expressed on rat and human hepatic stellate cell lines and adenosine A2A receptor occupancy promotes collagen production by these cells. Liver sections from mice treated with the hepatotoxins carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) (0.05 ml in oil, 50 : 50 v : v, subcutaneously) and thioacetamide (100 mg kg−1 in PBS, intraperitoneally) released more adenosine than those from untreated mice when cultured ex vivo. Adenosine A2A receptor-deficient, but not wild-type or A3 receptor-deficient, mice are protected from development of hepatic fibrosis following CCl4 or thioacetamide exposure. Similarly, caffeine (50 mg kg−1 day−1, po), a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist, and ZM241385 (25 mg kg−1 bid), a more selective antagonist of the adenosine A2A receptor, diminished hepatic fibrosis in wild-type mice exposed to either CCl4 or thioacetamide. These results demonstrate that hepatic adenosine A2A receptors play an active role in the pathogenesis of hepatic fibrosis, and suggest a novel therapeutic target in the treatment and prevention of hepatic cirrhosis. PMID:16783407

  14. Contribution of Adenosine A2B Receptors in Clostridium difficile Intoxication and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuesheng; Calabrese, Gina M.; Freire, Rosemayre S.; Zaja-Milatovic, Snjezana; van Opstal, Edward; Figler, Robert A.; Linden, Joel; Guerrant, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile toxins A (TcdA) and B (TcdB) induce a pronounced systemic and intestinal inflammatory response. A2B adenosine receptors (A2BARs) are the predominant adenosine receptors in the intestinal epithelium. We investigated whether A2BARs are upregulated in human intestinal cells by TcdA or TcdB and whether blockade of A2BARs can ameliorate C. difficile TcdA-induced enteritis and alter the outcome of C. difficile infection (CDI). Adenosine receptor subtype (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3) mRNAs were assayed in HCT-8 cells. Ileal loops from wild-type rabbits and mice and A2BAR−/− mice were treated with TcdA, with or without the selective A2BAR antagonist ATL692 or PSB1115. A murine model of CDI was used to determine the effect of A2BAR deletion or blockade with the orally available agent ATL801, on clinical outcome, histopathology and intestinal interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression from infection. TcdA and TcdB upregulated A2BAR gene expression in HCT-8 cells. ATL692 decreased TcdA-induced secretion and epithelial injury in rabbit ileum. Deletion of A2BARs reduced secretion and histopathology in TcdA-challenged mouse ileum. Deletion or blockade of A2BARs reduced histopathology, IL-6 expression, weight loss, diarrhea, and mortality in C. difficile-infected mice. A2BARs mediate C. difficile toxin-induced enteritis and disease. Inhibition of A2BAR activation may be a potential strategy to limit morbidity and mortality from CDI. PMID:23045479

  15. Widespread ectopic expression of olfactory receptor genes

    PubMed Central

    Feldmesser, Ester; Olender, Tsviya; Khen, Miriam; Yanai, Itai; Ophir, Ron; Lancet, Doron

    2006-01-01

    Background Olfactory receptors (ORs) are the largest gene family in the human genome. Although they are expected to be expressed specifically in olfactory tissues, some ectopic expression has been reported, with special emphasis on sperm and testis. The present study systematically explores the expression patterns of OR genes in a large number of tissues and assesses the potential functional implication of such ectopic expression. Results We analyzed the expression of hundreds of human and mouse OR transcripts, via EST and microarray data, in several dozens of human and mouse tissues. Different tissues had specific, relatively small OR gene subsets which had particularly high expression levels. In testis, average expression was not particularly high, and very few highly expressed genes were found, none corresponding to ORs previously implicated in sperm chemotaxis. Higher expression levels were more common for genes with a non-OR genomic neighbor. Importantly, no correlation in expression levels was detected for human-mouse orthologous pairs. Also, no significant difference in expression levels was seen between intact and pseudogenized ORs, except for the pseudogenes of subfamily 7E which has undergone a human-specific expansion. Conclusion The OR superfamily as a whole, show widespread, locus-dependent and heterogeneous expression, in agreement with a neutral or near neutral evolutionary model for transcription control. These results cannot reject the possibility that small OR subsets might play functional roles in different tissues, however considerable care should be exerted when offering a functional interpretation for ectopic OR expression based only on transcription information. PMID:16716209

  16. Adenosine A2B receptor blockade slows growth of bladder and breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Cekic, Caglar; Sag, Duygu; Li, Yuesheng; Theodorescu, Dan; Strieter, Robert M; Linden, Joel

    2012-01-01

    The accumulation of high levels of adenosine in tumors activates A(2A) and A(2B) receptors on immune cells and inhibits their ability to suppress tumor growth. Deletion of adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)ARs) has been reported to activate antitumor T cells, stimulate dendritic cell (DC) function, and inhibit angiogenesis. In this study, we evaluated the effects of intermittent intratumor injection of a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist, aminophylline (AMO; theophylline ethylenediamine) and, for the first time to our knowledge, a selective A(2B)AR antagonist, ATL801. AMO and ATL801 slowed the growth of MB49 bladder and 4T1 breast tumors in syngeneic mice and reduced by 85% metastasizes of breast cancer cells from mammary fat to lung. Based on experiments with A(2A)AR(-/-) or adenosine A(2B) receptor(-/-) mice, the effect of AMO injection was unexpectedly attributed to A(2B)AR and not to A(2A)AR blockade. AMO and ATL801 significantly increased tumor levels of IFN-γ and the IFN-inducible chemokine CXCL10, which is a ligand for CXCR3. This was associated with an increase in activated tumor-infiltrating CXCR3(+) T cells and a decrease in endothelial cell precursors within tumors. Tumor growth inhibition by AMO or ATL801 was eliminated in CXCR3(-/-) mice and RAG1(-/-) mice that lack mature T cells. In RAG1(-/-) mice, A(2B)AR deletion enhanced CD86 expression on CD11b(-) DCs. Bone marrow chimera experiments demonstrated that CXCR3 and A(2B)AR expression on bone marrow cells is required for the antitumor effects of AMO. The data suggest that blockade of A(2B)ARs enhances DC activation and CXCR3-dependent antitumor responses.

  17. Social regulation of cortisol receptor gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Korzan, Wayne J.; Grone, Brian P.; Fernald, Russell D.

    2014-01-01

    In many social species, individuals influence the reproductive capacity of conspecifics. In a well-studied African cichlid fish species, Astatotilapia burtoni, males are either dominant (D) and reproductively competent or non-dominant (ND) and reproductively suppressed as evidenced by reduced gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH1) release, regressed gonads, lower levels of androgens and elevated levels of cortisol. Here, we asked whether androgen and cortisol levels might regulate this reproductive suppression. Astatotilapia burtoni has four glucocorticoid receptors (GR1a, GR1b, GR2 and MR), encoded by three genes, and two androgen receptors (ARα and ARβ), encoded by two genes. We previously showed that ARα and ARβ are expressed in GnRH1 neurons in the preoptic area (POA), which regulates reproduction, and that the mRNA levels of these receptors are regulated by social status. Here, we show that GR1, GR2 and MR mRNAs are also expressed in GnRH1 neurons in the POA, revealing potential mechanisms for both androgens and cortisol to influence reproductive capacity. We measured AR, MR and GR mRNA expression levels in a microdissected region of the POA containing GnRH1 neurons, comparing D and ND males. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR), we found D males had higher mRNA levels of ARα, MR, total GR1a and GR2 in the POA compared with ND males. In contrast, ND males had significantly higher levels of GR1b mRNA, a receptor subtype with a reduced transcriptional response to cortisol. Through this novel regulation of receptor type, neurons in the POA of an ND male will be less affected by the higher levels of cortisol typical of low status, suggesting GR receptor type change as a potential adaptive mechanism to mediate high cortisol levels during social suppression. PMID:25013108

  18. AMPA receptor pHluorin-GluA2 reports NMDA receptor-induced intracellular acidification in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Rathje, Mette; Fang, Huaqiang; Bachman, Julia L; Anggono, Victor; Gether, Ulrik; Huganir, Richard L; Madsen, Kenneth L

    2013-08-27

    NMDA receptor activation promotes endocytosis of AMPA receptors, which is an important mechanism underlying long-term synaptic depression. The pH-sensitive GFP variant pHluorin fused to the N terminus of GluA2 (pH-GluA2) has been used to assay NMDA-mediated AMPA receptor endocytosis and recycling. Here, we demonstrate that in somatic and dendritic regions of hippocampal neurons a large fraction of the fluorescent signal originates from intracellular pH-GluA2, and that the decline in fluorescence in response to NMDA and AMPA primarily describes an intracellular acidification, which quenches the pHluorin signal from intracellular receptor pools. Neurons expressing an endoplasmic reticulum-retained mutant of GluA2 (pH-GluA2 ΔC49) displayed a larger response to NMDA than neurons expressing wild-type pH-GluA2. A similar NMDA-elicited decline in pHluorin signal was observed by expressing cytosolic pHluorin alone without fusion to GluA2 (cyto-pHluorin). Intracellular acidification in response to NMDA was further confirmed by using the ratiometric pH indicator carboxy-SNARF-1. The NMDA-induced decline was followed by rapid recovery of the fluorescent signal from both cyto-pHluorin and pH-GluA2. The recovery was sodium-dependent and sensitive to Na(+)/H(+)-exchanger (NHE) inhibitors. Moreover, recovery was more rapid after shRNA-mediated knockdown of the GluA2 binding PDZ domain-containing protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1). Interestingly, the accelerating effect of PICK1 knockdown on the fluorescence recovery was eliminated in the presence of the NHE1 inhibitor zoniporide. Our results indicate that the pH-GluA2 recycling assay is an unreliable assay for studying AMPA receptor trafficking and also suggest a role for PICK1 in regulating intracellular pH via modulation of NHE activity.

  19. Mechanisms of the adenosine A2A receptor-induced sensitization of esophageal C fibers

    PubMed Central

    Brozmanova, M.; Mazurova, L.; Ru, F.; Tatar, M.; Hu, Y.; Yu, S.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies indicate that adenosine contributes to esophageal mechanical hypersensitivity in some patients with pain originating in the esophagus. We have previously reported that the esophageal vagal nodose C fibers express the adenosine A2A receptor. Here we addressed the hypothesis that stimulation of the adenosine A2A receptor induces mechanical sensitization of esophageal C fibers by a mechanism involving transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1). Extracellular single fiber recordings of activity originating in C-fiber terminals were made in the ex vivo vagally innervated guinea pig esophagus. The adenosine A2A receptor-selective agonist CGS21680 induced robust, reversible sensitization of the response to esophageal distention (10–60 mmHg) in a concentration-dependent fashion (1–100 nM). At the half-maximally effective concentration (EC50: ≈3 nM), CGS21680 induced an approximately twofold increase in the mechanical response without causing an overt activation. This sensitization was abolished by the selective A2A antagonist SCH58261. The adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin mimicked while the nonselective protein kinase inhibitor H89 inhibited mechanical sensitization by CGS21680. CGS21680 did not enhance the response to the purinergic P2X receptor agonist α,β-methylene-ATP, indicating that CGS21680 does not nonspecifically sensitize to all stimuli. Mechanical sensitization by CGS21680 was abolished by pretreatment with two structurally different TRPA1 antagonists AP18 and HC030031. Single cell RT-PCR and whole cell patch-clamp studies in isolated esophagus-specific nodose neurons revealed the expression of TRPA1 in A2A-positive C-fiber neurons and demonstrated that CGS21682 potentiated TRPA1 currents evoked by allylisothiocyanate. We conclude that stimulation of the adenosine A2A receptor induces mechanical sensitization of nodose C fibers by a mechanism sensitive to TRPA1 antagonists indicating the involvement of TRPA1. PMID:26564719

  20. Mechanisms of the adenosine A2A receptor-induced sensitization of esophageal C fibers.

    PubMed

    Brozmanova, M; Mazurova, L; Ru, F; Tatar, M; Hu, Y; Yu, S; Kollarik, M

    2016-02-01

    Clinical studies indicate that adenosine contributes to esophageal mechanical hypersensitivity in some patients with pain originating in the esophagus. We have previously reported that the esophageal vagal nodose C fibers express the adenosine A2A receptor. Here we addressed the hypothesis that stimulation of the adenosine A2A receptor induces mechanical sensitization of esophageal C fibers by a mechanism involving transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1). Extracellular single fiber recordings of activity originating in C-fiber terminals were made in the ex vivo vagally innervated guinea pig esophagus. The adenosine A2A receptor-selective agonist CGS21680 induced robust, reversible sensitization of the response to esophageal distention (10-60 mmHg) in a concentration-dependent fashion (1-100 nM). At the half-maximally effective concentration (EC50: ≈3 nM), CGS21680 induced an approximately twofold increase in the mechanical response without causing an overt activation. This sensitization was abolished by the selective A2A antagonist SCH58261. The adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin mimicked while the nonselective protein kinase inhibitor H89 inhibited mechanical sensitization by CGS21680. CGS21680 did not enhance the response to the purinergic P2X receptor agonist α,β-methylene-ATP, indicating that CGS21680 does not nonspecifically sensitize to all stimuli. Mechanical sensitization by CGS21680 was abolished by pretreatment with two structurally different TRPA1 antagonists AP18 and HC030031. Single cell RT-PCR and whole cell patch-clamp studies in isolated esophagus-specific nodose neurons revealed the expression of TRPA1 in A2A-positive C-fiber neurons and demonstrated that CGS21682 potentiated TRPA1 currents evoked by allylisothiocyanate. We conclude that stimulation of the adenosine A2A receptor induces mechanical sensitization of nodose C fibers by a mechanism sensitive to TRPA1 antagonists indicating the involvement of TRPA1.

  1. Hormone Receptor Expression in Human Fascial Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Fede, C.; Albertin, G.; Petrelli, L.; Sfriso, M.M.; Biz, C.; De Caro, R.

    2016-01-01

    Many epidemiologic, clinical, and experimental findings point to sex differences in myofascial pain in view of the fact that adult women tend to have more myofascial problems with respect to men. It is possible that one of the stimuli to sensitization of fascial nociceptors could come from hormonal factors such as estrogen and relaxin, that are involved in extracellular matrix and collagen remodeling and thus contribute to functions of myofascial tissue. Immunohistochemical and molecular investigations (real-time PCR analysis) of relaxin receptor 1 (RXFP1) and estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα) localization were carried out on samples of human fascia collected from 8 volunteers patients during orthopedic surgery (all females, between 42 and 70 yrs, divided into pre- and post-menopausal groups), and in fibroblasts isolated from deep fascia, to examine both protein and RNA expression levels. We can assume that the two sex hormone receptors analyzed are expressed in all the human fascial districts examined and in fascial fibroblasts culture cells, to a lesser degree in the post-menopausal with respect to the pre-menopausal women. Hormone receptor expression was concentrated in the fibroblasts, and RXFP1 was also evident in blood vessels and nerves. Our results are the first demonstrating that the fibroblasts located within different districts of the muscular fasciae express sex hormone receptors and can help to explain the link between hormonal factors and myofascial pain. It is known, in fact, that estrogen and relaxin play a key role in extracellular matrix remodeling by inhibiting fibrosis and inflammatory activities, both important factors affecting fascial stiffness and sensitization of fascial nociceptors. PMID:28076930

  2. An Update on Adenosine A2A-Dopamine D2 receptor interactions. Implications for the Function of G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ferré, S.; Quiroz, C.; Woods, A. S.; Cunha, R.; Popoli, P.; Ciruela, F.; Lluis, C.; Franco, R.; Azdad, K.; Schiffmann, S. N.

    2008-01-01

    Adenosine A2A-dopamine D2 receptor interactions play a very important role in striatal function. A2A-D2 receptor interactions provide an example of the capabilities of information processing by just two different G protein-coupled receptors. Thus, there is evidence for the coexistence of two reciprocal antagonistic interactions between A2A and D2 receptors in the same neurons, the GABAergic enkephalinergic nens. An antagonistic A2A-D2 intramembrane receptor interaction, which depends on A2A-D2 receptor heteromerization and Gq/11-PLC signaling, modulates neuronal excitability and neurotransmitter release. On the other hand, an antagonistic A2A-D2 receptor interaction at the adenylyl-cyclase level, which depends on Gs/olf- and Gi/o- type V adenylyl-cyclase signaling, modulates protein phosphorylation and gene expression. Finally, under conditions of upregulation of an activator of G protein signaling (AGS3), such as during chronic treatment with addictive drugs, a synergistic A2A-D2 receptor interaction can also be demonstrated. AGS3 facilitates a synergistic interaction between Gs/olf- and Gi/o- coupled receptors on the activation of types II/IV adenylyl cyclase, leading to a paradoxical increase in protein phosphorylation and gene expression upon co-activation of A2A and D2 receptors. The analysis of A2-D2 receptor interactions will have implications for the pathophysiology and treatment of basal ganglia disorders and drug addiction. PMID:18537670

  3. Expression of orexin receptors in the pituitary.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Tadeusz; Smolinska, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Orexin receptors type 1 (OX1R) and type 2 (OX2R) are G protein-coupled receptors whose structure is highly conserved in mammals. OX1R is selective for orexin A, and OX2R binds orexin A and orexin B with similar affinity. Orexin receptor expression was observed in human, rat, porcine, sheep as well as Xenopus laevis pituitaries, both in the adenohypophysis and in the neurohypophysis. The expression level is regulated by gonadal steroid hormones and GnRH. The majority of orexins reaching the pituitary originate from the lateral hypothalamus, but due to the presence of the receptors and the local production of orexins in the pituitary, orexins could deliver an auto/paracrine effect within the gland. Cumulative data indicate that orexins are involved in the regulation of LH, GH, PRL, ACTH, and TSH secretion by pituitary cells, pointing to orexins' effect on the functioning of the endocrine axes. Those hormones may also serve as a signal linking metabolic status with endocrine control of sleep, arousal, and reproduction processes.

  4. A2a and a2b adenosine receptors affect HIF-1α signaling in activated primary microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Merighi, Stefania; Borea, Pier Andrea; Stefanelli, Angela; Bencivenni, Serena; Castillo, Carlos Alberto; Varani, Katia; Gessi, Stefania

    2015-05-15

    Microglia are central nervous system (CNS)-resident immune cells, that play a crucial role in neuroinflammation. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), the main transcription factor of hypoxia-inducible genes, is also involved in the immune response, being regulated in normoxia by inflammatory mediators. Adenosine is an ubiquitous nucleoside that has an influence on many immune properties of microglia through interaction with four receptor subtypes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether adenosine may affect microglia functions by acting on HIF-1α modulation. Primary murine microglia were activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with or without adenosine, adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists and HIF-1α accumulation and downstream genes regulation were determined. Adenosine increased LPS-induced HIF-1α accumulation leading to an increase in HIF-1α target genes involved in cell metabolism [glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1)] and pathogens killing [inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS)] but did not induce HIF-1α dependent genes related to angiogenesis [vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)] and inflammation [tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)]. The stimulatory effect of adenosine on HIF-1α and its target genes was essentially exerted by activation of A2A through p44/42 and A2B subtypes via p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and Akt phosphorylation. Furthermore the nucleoside raised VEGF and decreased TNF-α levels, by activating A2B subtypes. In conclusion adenosine increases GLUT-1 and iNOS gene expression in a HIF-1α-dependent way, through A2A and A2B receptors, suggesting their role in the regulation of microglial cells function following injury. However, inhibition of TNF-α adds an important anti-inflammatory effect only for the A2B subtype. GLIA 2015.

  5. The A2a adenosine receptor modulates the reinforcement efficacy and neurotoxicity of MDMA.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Medina, Jessica; Ledent, Catherine; Carretón, Olga; Valverde, Olga

    2011-04-01

    Adenosine is an endogenous purine nucleoside that plays a neuromodulatory role in the central nervous system. A2a adenosine receptors have been involved in reward-related processes, inflammatory phenomena and neurotoxicity reactions. In the present study, we investigated the role of A2a adenosine receptors on the acute pharmacological effects, reinforcement and neuroinflammation induced by MDMA administration. First, the acute effects of MDMA on body temperature, locomotor activity and anxiety-like responses were measured in A2a knockout mice and wild-type littermates. Second, MDMA reinforcing properties were evaluated using the intravenous self-administration paradigm. Finally, we assessed striatal astrogliosis and microgliosis as markers of MDMA neurotoxicity. Our results showed that acute MDMA produced a biphasic effect on body temperature and increased locomotor activity and anxiogenic-like responses in both genotypes. However, MDMA reinforcing properties were dramatically affected by the lack of A2a adenosine receptors. Thus, wild-type mice maintained MDMA self-administration under a fixed ratio 1 reinforcement schedule, whereas the operant response appeared completely abolished in A2a knockout mice. In addition, the MDMA neurotoxic regime produced an enhanced inflammatory response in striatum of wild-type mice, revealed by a significant increase in glial expression, whereas such activation was attenuated in mutant mice. This is the first report indicating that A2a adenosine receptors play a key role in reinforcement and neuroinflammation induced by the widely used psychostimulant.

  6. Multiple sclerosis lymphocytes upregulate A2A adenosine receptors that are antiinflammatory when stimulated.

    PubMed

    Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Corciulo, Carmen; Targa, Martina; Merighi, Stefania; Gessi, Stefania; Casetta, Ilaria; Gentile, Mauro; Granieri, Enrico; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2013-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune-mediated inflammatory disease characterized by multifocal areas of demyelination. Experimental evidence indicates that A2A adenosine receptors (ARs) play a pivotal role in the inhibition of inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of A2A ARs in the inhibition of key pro-inflammatory mediators for the pathogenesis of MS. In lymphocytes from MS patients, A1, A2A, A2B, and A3 ARs were analyzed by using RT-PCR, Western blotting, immunofluorescence, and binding assays. Moreover the effect of A2A AR stimulation on proinflammatory cytokine release such as TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-17, and on lymphocyte proliferation was evaluated. The capability of an A2A AR agonist on the modulation of very late antigen (VLA)-4 expression and NF-κB was also explored. A2A AR upregulation was observed in lymphocytes from MS patients in comparison with healthy subjects. The stimulation of these receptors mediated a significant inhibition of TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-17, and cell proliferation as well as VLA-4 expression and NF-κB activation. This new evidence highlights that A2A AR agonists could represent a novel therapeutic tool for MS treatment as suggested by the antiinflammatory role of A2A ARs in lymphocytes from MS patients.

  7. Myometrial oxytocin receptor expression and intracellular pathways.

    PubMed

    Yulia, A; Johnson, M R

    2014-06-01

    Oxytocin (OT) signalling plays a fundamental role in the mechanisms of parturition. OT is one of the most frequently used drugs in obstetrics, promoting uterine contractions for labor induction and augmentation and to prevent postpartum hemorrhage (PPH). Expression of the oxytocin receptor (OTR) in the human myometrium is tightly regulated during pregnancy and its levels have been shown to peak upon labour onset and to fall sharply in advanced labour and the postpartum period, when the uterus become refractive to OT. However, uterine sensitivity to OT varies between pregnant women, probably reflecting differences in their myometrial OTR expression. Control of OTR expression is mediated by a combination of steroid hormone stimulation, stretch, and inflammation. This review summarises current knowledge regarding the complex regulation of myometrial OTR expression and its associated intracellular signaling pathways.

  8. IL-21 Receptor Expression in Human Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Abigail L.; Smith, Nicola C.; Reilly, James H.; Kerr, Shauna C.; Leach, William J.; Fazzi, Umberto G.; Rooney, Brian P.; Murrell, George A. C.; Millar, Neal L.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenetic mechanisms underlying tendinopathy remain unclear, with much debate as to whether inflammation or degradation has the prominent role. Increasing evidence points toward an early inflammatory infiltrate and associated inflammatory cytokine production in human and animal models of tendon disease. The IL-21/IL-21R axis is a proinflammatory cytokine complex that has been associated with chronic inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. This project aimed to investigate the role and expression of the cytokine/receptor pair IL-21/IL-21R in human tendinopathy. We found significantly elevated expression of IL-21 receptor message and protein in human tendon samples but found no convincing evidence of the presence of IL-21 at message or protein level. The level of expression of IL-21R message/protein in human tenocytes was significantly upregulated by proinflammatory cytokines (TNFα/IL-1β) in vitro. These findings demonstrate that IL-21R is present in early human tendinopathy mainly expressed by tenocytes and macrophages. Despite a lack of IL-21 expression, these data again suggest that early tendinopathy has an inflammatory/cytokine phenotype, which may provide novel translational targets in the treatment of tendinopathy. PMID:24757284

  9. Functional efficacy of adenosine A2A receptor agonists is positively correlated to their receptor residence time

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dong; Mulder-Krieger, Thea; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Heitman, Laura H

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The adenosine A2A receptor belongs to the superfamily of GPCRs and is a promising therapeutic target. Traditionally, the discovery of novel agents for the A2A receptor has been guided by their affinity for the receptor. This parameter is determined under equilibrium conditions, largely ignoring the kinetic aspects of the ligand-receptor interaction. The aim of this study was to assess the binding kinetics of A2A receptor agonists and explore a possible relationship with their functional efficacy. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We set up, validated and optimized a kinetic radioligand binding assay (a so-called competition association assay) at the A2A receptor from which the binding kinetics of unlabelled ligands were determined. Subsequently, functional efficacies of A2A receptor agonists were determined in two different assays: a novel label-free impedance-based assay and a more traditional cAMP determination. KEY RESULTS A simplified competition association assay yielded an accurate determination of the association and dissociation rates of unlabelled A2A receptor ligands at their receptor. A correlation was observed between the receptor residence time of A2A receptor agonists and their intrinsic efficacies in both functional assays. The affinity of A2A receptor agonists was not correlated to their functional efficacy. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS This study indicates that the molecular basis of different agonist efficacies at the A2A receptor lies within their different residence times at this receptor. PMID:22324512

  10. Expression of prostacyclin receptor in human megakaryocytes.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Y; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, I; Nakamura, K; Okuno, Y; Nakagawa, O; Narumiya, S; Nakao, K

    1997-08-01

    Prostacyclin (prostaglandin I2, PGI2) is a potent vasodilator and inhibitor of platelet aggregation. Although it is well known that the specific receptor for prostacyclin (PGI2-R) is abundantly expressed on platelets, PGI2-R expression in megakaryocytes is poorly understood. In this study, we examined its expression in leukemic or normal megakaryocytes. PGI2-R mRNA was expressed in human leukemic cell lines of megakaryocytic nature as evaluated by Northern blot analysis. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-3, IL-6, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), thrombopoietin (TPO), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) enhanced PGI2-R mRNA expression. The enhancement of PGI2-R expression by PMA and TPO was associated with the upregulation of platelet factor 4 or glycoprotein IIb mRNA expression. Iloprost, an agonist of prostacyclin, induced significant cyclic (c)AMP synthesis in these leukemic cells indicating that interaction of PGI2-R and its ligand can induce postreceptor signal transduction. Furthermore, iloprost-induced cAMP synthesis was enhanced by the pretreatment with PMA or the cytokines that promoted PGI2-R expression. PMA and TPO also increased the specific binding of [3H]iloprost to these cells. Pooled normal megakaryocytic colonies from TPO-containing semisolid culture of purified human CD34+ cells expressed PGI2-R, which were increased as the megakaryocytes matured with the peak expression before proplatelet formation, as evaluated by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). These results indicate that PGI2-R is expressed in human megakaryocytes and is upregulated by cytokines involved in thrombopoiesis or inflammation. Also, it was indicated that megakaryocytic maturation accompanies enhancement of PGI2-R expression.

  11. Adenosine receptor expression and function in rat striatal cholinergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Preston, Z; Lee, K; Widdowson, L; Freeman, T C; Dixon, A K; Richardson, P J

    2000-06-01

    Cholinergic neurons were identified in rat striatal slices by their size, membrane properties, sensitivity to the NK(1) receptor agonist (Sar(9), Met(O(2))(11)) Substance P, and expression of choline acetyltransferase mRNA. A(1) receptor mRNA was detected in 60% of the neurons analysed, and A(2A) receptor mRNA in 67% (n=15). The A(1) receptor agonist R-N(6)-(2-phenylisopropyl)adenosine (R-PIA) hyperpolarized cholinergic neurons in a concentration dependent manner sensitive to the A(1) antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1, 3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX, 100 nM). In dual stimulus experiments, the A(2A) receptor antagonist 8-(3-chlorostyryl)caffeine (CSC, 500 nM) decreased release of [(3)H]-acetylcholine from striatal slices (S2/S1 0.78+/-0.07 versus 0.95+/-0.05 in control), as did adenosine deaminase (S2/S1 ratio 0.69+/-0.05), whereas the A(1) receptor antagonist DPCPX (100 nM) had no effect (S2/S1 1.05+/-0.14). In the presence of adenosine deaminase the adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist 2-p-((carboxyethyl)phenylethylamino)-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadeno sin e (CGS21680, 10 nM) increased release (S2/S1 ratio 1.03+/-0.05 versus 0.88+/-0.05 in control), an effect blocked by the antagonist CSC (500 nM, S2/S1 0.68+/-0.05, versus 0.73+/-0.08 with CSC alone). The combined superfusion of bicuculline (10 microM), saclofen (1 microM) and naloxone (10 microM) had no effect on the stimulation by CGS21680 (S2/S1 ratio 0.99+/-0.04). The A(1) receptor agonist R-PIA (100 nM) inhibited the release of [(3)H]-acetylcholine (S2/S1 ratio 0.70+/-0.03), an effect blocked by DPCPX (S2/S1 ratio 1.06+/-0.07). It is concluded that both A(1) and A(2A) receptors are expressed on striatal cholinergic neurons where they are functionally active.

  12. The A2B adenosine receptor protects against inflammation and excessive vascular adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dan; Zhang, Ying; Nguyen, Hao G.; Koupenova, Milka; Chauhan, Anil K.; Makitalo, Maria; Jones, Matthew R.; Hilaire, Cynthia St.; Seldin, David C.; Toselli, Paul; Lamperti, Edward; Schreiber, Barbara M.; Gavras, Haralambos; Wagner, Denisa D.; Ravid, Katya

    2006-01-01

    Adenosine has been described as playing a role in the control of inflammation, but it has not been certain which of its receptors mediate this effect. Here, we generated an A2B adenosine receptor–knockout/reporter gene–knock-in (A2BAR-knockout/reporter gene–knock-in) mouse model and showed receptor gene expression in the vasculature and macrophages, the ablation of which causes low-grade inflammation compared with age-, sex-, and strain-matched control mice. Augmentation of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, and a consequent downregulation of IκB-α are the underlying mechanisms for an observed upregulation of adhesion molecules in the vasculature of these A2BAR-null mice. Intriguingly, leukocyte adhesion to the vasculature is significantly increased in the A2BAR-knockout mice. Exposure to an endotoxin results in augmented proinflammatory cytokine levels in A2BAR-null mice compared with control mice. Bone marrow transplantations indicated that bone marrow (and to a lesser extent vascular) A2BARs regulate these processes. Hence, we identify the A2BAR as a new critical regulator of inflammation and vascular adhesion primarily via signals from hematopoietic cells to the vasculature, focusing attention on the receptor as a therapeutic target. PMID:16823489

  13. High salt diet exacerbates vascular contraction in the absence of adenosine A2A receptor

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Isha; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Ledent, Catherine; Mustafa, S. Jamal; Falck, John R.; Nayeem, Mohammed A

    2014-01-01

    High salt (4%NaCl, HS) diet modulates adenosine-induced vascular response through adenosine A2A-receptor (A2AAR). Evidence suggests A2AAR stimulates cyp450-epoxygenases, leading to epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) generation. The aim of this study was to understand the vascular reactivity to HS and underlying signaling mechanism in the presence or absence of A2AAR. Therefore, we hypothesized that HS enhances adenosine-induced relaxation through EETs in A2AAR+/+, but exaggerates contraction in A2AAR−/−. Organ-bath and Western-blot experiments were conducted in HS and normal salt (NS, 0.18% NaCl)-fed A2AAR+/+ and A2AAR−/− mice aortae. HS produced concentration-dependent relaxation to non-selective adenosine analog, NECA in A2AAR+/+, whereas contraction was observed in A2AAR−/− mice and this was attenuated by A1AR antagonist (DPCPX). CGS-21680 (selective A2AAR-agonist) enhanced relaxation in HS-A2AAR+/+ vs. NS-A2AAR+/+, that was blocked by EETs antagonist (14,15-EEZE). Compared to NS, HS significantly upregulated expression of vasodilators A2AAR and cyp2c29, while vasoconstrictors A1AR and cyp4a in A2AAR+/+ were downregulated. In A2AAR−/− mice, however, HS significantly downregulated the expression of cyp2c29, while A1AR and cyp4a were upregulated compared to A2AAR+/+ mice. Hence, our data suggest that in A2AAR+/+, HS enhances A2AAR-induced relaxation through increased cyp-expoxygenases-derived EETs and decreased A1AR levels, whereas in A2AAR−/−, HS exaggerates contraction through decreased cyp-epoxygenases and increased A1AR levels. PMID:24390173

  14. Potential therapeutic relevance of adenosine A2B and A2A receptors in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Popoli, Patrizia; Pepponi, Rita

    2012-09-01

    Adenosine A2B and, much more importantly, adenosine A2A receptors modulate many physiological and pathological processes in the brain. In this review, the most recent evidence concerning the role of such receptors and their potential therapeutic relevance is discussed. The low affinity of A2B receptors for adenosine implies that they might represent a good therapeutic target, since they are activated only under pathological conditions (when adenosine levels raise up to micromolar concentrations). The availability of selective ligands for A2B receptors would allow exploration of such an hypothesis. Since adenosine A2A receptors mediate both potentially neuroprotective and potentially neurotoxic effects, their role in neurodegenerative diseases is highly controversial. Nevertheless, A2A receptor antagonists have shown clear antiparkinsonian effects, and a great interest exists on the role of A2A receptors in Alzheimer's disease, brain ischaemia, spinal cord injury, drug addiction and other conditions. In order to establish whether such receptors represent a target for CNS diseases, at least two conditions are needed: the full comprehension of A2A-dependent mechanisms and the availability of ligands capable of discriminating among the different receptor populations.

  15. Functions, dysfunctions and possible therapeutic relevance of adenosine A2A receptors in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Popoli, Patrizia; Blum, David; Martire, Alberto; Ledent, Catherine; Ceruti, Stefania; Abbracchio, Maria P

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize and critically discuss the complex role played by adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs) in Huntington's disease (HD). Since A(2A)Rs are mainly localized on the neurons, which degenerate early in HD, and given their ability to stimulate glutamate outflow and inflammatory gliosis, it was hypothesized that they could be involved in the pathogenesis of HD, and that A(2A)R antagonists could be neuroprotective. This was further sustained by the demonstration that A(2A)Rs and underlying signaling systems undergo profound changes in cellular and animal models of HD. More recently, however, the equation A(2A) receptor blockade=neuroprotection has appeared too simplistic. First, it is now definitely clear that, besides mediating 'bad' responses (for example, stimulation of glutamate outflow and excessive glial activation), A(2A)Rs also promote 'good' responses (such as trophic and antinflammatory effects). This implies that A(2A)R blockade results either in pro-toxic or neuroprotective effects according to the mechanisms involved in a given experimental model. Second, since HD is a chronically progressive disease, the multiple mechanisms involving A(2A)Rs may play different relative roles along the degenerative process. Such different mechanisms can be influenced by A(2A)R activation or blockade in different ways, even leading to opposite outcomes depending on the time of agonist/antagonist administration. The number, and the complexity, of the possible scenarios is further increased by the influence of mutant Huntingtin on both the expression and functions of A(2A)Rs, and by the strikingly different effects mediated by A(2A)Rs expressed by different cell populations within the brain.

  16. Adenosine A2A receptors enable the synaptic effects of cannabinoid CB1 receptors in the rodent striatum.

    PubMed

    Tebano, Maria Teresa; Martire, Alberto; Chiodi, Valentina; Pepponi, Rita; Ferrante, Antonella; Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Frank, Claudio; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Ledent, Catherine; Popoli, Patrizia

    2009-09-01

    Adenosine A(2A), cannabinoid CB(1) and metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu(5)) receptors are all highly expressed in the striatum. The aim of the present work was to investigate whether, and by which mechanisms, the above receptors interact in the regulation of striatal synaptic transmission. By extracellular field potentials (FPs) recordings in corticostriatal slices, we demonstrated that the ability of the selective type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB(1)R) agonist WIN55,212-2 to depress synaptic transmission was prevented by the pharmacological blockade or the genetic inactivation of A(2A)Rs. Such a permissive effect of A(2A)Rs towards CB(1)Rs does not seem to occur pre-synaptically as the ability of WIN55,212-2 to increase the R2/R1 ratio under a protocol of paired-pulse stimulation was not modified by ZM241385. Furthermore, the effects of WIN55,212-2 were reduced in slices from mice lacking post-synaptic striatal A(2A)Rs. The selective mGlu(5)R agonist (RS)-2-chloro-5-hydroxyphenylglycine (CHPG) potentiated the synaptic effects of WIN55,212-2, and such a potentiation was abolished by A(2A)R blockade. Unlike the synaptic effects, the ability of WIN55,212-2 to prevent NMDA-induced toxicity was not influenced by ZM241385. Altogether, these results show that the state of activation of A(2A)Rs regulates the synaptic effects of CB(1)Rs and that A(2A)Rs may control CB(1) effects also indirectly, namely through mGlu(5)Rs.

  17. Adenosine receptors and diabetes: Focus on the A(2B) adenosine receptor subtype.

    PubMed

    Merighi, Stefania; Borea, Pier Andrea; Gessi, Stefania

    2015-09-01

    Over the last two decades, diabetes mellitus has become one of the most challenging health problems worldwide. Diabetes mellitus, classified as type I and II, is a pathology concerning blood glucose level in the body. The nucleoside adenosine has long been known to affect insulin secretion, glucose homeostasis and lipid metabolism, through activation of four G protein coupled adenosine receptors (ARs), named A1, A2A, A2B and A3. Currently, the novel promising subtype to develop new drugs for diabetes treatment is the A2BAR subtype. The use of selective agonists and antagonists for A2BAR subtype in various diabetic animal models allowed us to identify several effects of A2BAR signaling in cell metabolism. In particular, the focus of this review is to summarize the studies on purinergic signaling associated with diabetes through A2BARs modulation.

  18. Endothelial adenosine A2a receptor-mediated glycolysis is essential for pathological retinal angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiping; Yan, Siyuan; Wang, Jiaojiao; Xu, Yiming; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Shuya; Xu, Xizhen; Yang, Qiuhua; Zeng, Xianqiu; Zhou, Yaqi; Gu, Xuejiao; Lu, Sarah; Fu, Zhongjie; Fulton, David J; Weintraub, Neal L; Caldwell, Ruth B; Zhang, Wenbo; Wu, Chaodong; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Ahmad, Aftab; Kaddour-Djebbar, Ismail; Al-Shabrawey, Mohamed; Li, Qinkai; Jiang, Xuejun; Sun, Ye; Sodhi, Akrit; Smith, Lois; Hong, Mei; Huo, Yuqing

    2017-09-19

    Adenosine/adenosine receptor-mediated signaling has been implicated in the development of various ischemic diseases, including ischemic retinopathies. Here, we show that the adenosine A2a receptor (ADORA2A) promotes hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1 (HIF-1)-dependent endothelial cell glycolysis, which is crucial for pathological angiogenesis in proliferative retinopathies. Adora2a expression is markedly increased in the retina of mice with oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). Endothelial cell-specific, but not macrophage-specific Adora2a deletion decreases key glycolytic enzymes and reduces pathological neovascularization in the OIR mice. In human primary retinal microvascular endothelial cells, hypoxia induces the expression of ADORA2A by activating HIF-2α. ADORA2A knockdown decreases hypoxia-induced glycolytic enzyme expression, glycolytic flux, and endothelial cell proliferation, sprouting and tubule formation. Mechanistically, ADORA2A activation promotes the transcriptional induction of glycolytic enzymes via ERK- and Akt-dependent translational activation of HIF-1α protein. Taken together, these findings advance translation of ADORA2A as a therapeutic target in the treatment of proliferative retinopathies and other diseases dependent on pathological angiogenesis.Pathological angiogenesis in the retina is a major cause of blindness. Here the authors show that adenosine receptor A2A drives pathological angiogenesis in the oxygen-induced retinopathy mouse model by promoting glycolysis in endothelial cells via the ERK/Akt/HIF-1α pathway, thereby suggesting new therapeutic targets for disease treatment.

  19. Restriction of Receptor Movement Alters Cellular Response: Physical Force Sensing by EphA2

    SciTech Connect

    Salaita, Khalid; Nair, Pradeep M; Petit, Rebecca S; Neve, Richard M; Das, Debopriya; Gray, Joe W; Groves, Jay T

    2009-09-09

    Activation of the EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase by ephrin-A1 ligands presented on apposed cell surfaces plays important roles in development and exhibits poorly understood functional alterations in cancer. We reconstituted this intermembrane signaling geometry between live EphA2-expressing human breast cancer cells and supported membranes displaying laterally mobile ephrin-A1. Receptor-ligand binding, clustering, and subsequent lateral transport within this junction were observed. EphA2 transport can be blocked by physical barriers nanofabricated onto the underlying substrate. This physical reorganization of EphA2 alters the cellular response to ephrin-A1, as observed by changes in cytoskeleton morphology and recruitment of a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10. Quantitative analysis of receptor-ligand spatial organization across a library of 26 mammary epithelial cell lines reveals characteristic differences that strongly correlate with invasion potential. These observations reveal a mechanism for spatio-mechanical regulation of EphA2 signaling pathways.

  20. Past, present and future of A2A adenosine receptor antagonists in the therapy of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Armentero, Marie Therese; Pinna, Annalisa; Ferré, Sergi; Lanciego, José Luis; Müller, Christa E.; Franco, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Several selective antagonists for adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) are currently under evaluation in clinical trials (phases I to III) to treat Parkinson’s disease, and they will probably soon reach the market. The usefulness of these antagonists has been deduced from studies demonstrating functional interactions between dopamine D2 and adenosine A2A receptors in the basal ganglia. At present it is believed that A2AR antagonists can be used in combination with the dopamine precursor L-DOPA to minimize the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s patients. However, a considerable body of data indicates that in addition to ameliorating motor symptoms, adenosine A2AR antagonists may also prevent neurodegeneration. Despite these promising indications, one further issue must be considered in order to develop fully optimized anti-parkinsonian drug therapy, namely the existence of receptor (hetero)dimers/oligomers of G protein-coupled receptors, a topic currently the focus of intense debate within the scientific community. Dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs) expressed in the striatum are known to form heteromers with A2A adenosine receptors. Thus, the development of heteromer-specific A2A receptor antagonists represents a promising strategy for the identification of more selective and safer drugs. PMID:21810444

  1. Selective adenosine A2A receptor agonists and antagonists protect against spinal cord injury through peripheral and central effects

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Permanent functional deficits following spinal cord injury (SCI) arise both from mechanical injury and from secondary tissue reactions involving inflammation. Enhanced release of adenosine and glutamate soon after SCI represents a component in the sequelae that may be responsible for resulting functional deficits. The role of adenosine A2A receptor in central ischemia/trauma is still to be elucidated. In our previous studies we have demonstrated that the adenosine A2A receptor-selective agonist CGS21680, systemically administered after SCI, protects from tissue damage, locomotor dysfunction and different inflammatory readouts. In this work we studied the effect of the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261, systemically administered after SCI, on the same parameters. We investigated the hypothesis that the main action mechanism of agonists and antagonists is at peripheral or central sites. Methods Spinal trauma was induced by extradural compression of SC exposed via a four-level T5-T8 laminectomy in mouse. Three drug-dosing protocols were utilized: a short-term systemic administration by intraperitoneal injection, a chronic administration via osmotic minipump, and direct injection into the spinal cord. Results SCH58261, systemically administered (0.01 mg/kg intraperitoneal. 1, 6 and 10 hours after SCI), reduced demyelination and levels of TNF-α, Fas-L, PAR, Bax expression and activation of JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) 24 hours after SCI. Chronic SCH58261 administration, by mini-osmotic pump delivery for 10 days, improved the neurological deficit up to 10 days after SCI. Adenosine A2A receptors are physiologically expressed in the spinal cord by astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes. Soon after SCI (24 hours), these receptors showed enhanced expression in neurons. Both the A2A agonist and antagonist, administered intraperitoneally, reduced expression of the A2A receptor, ruling out the possibility that the neuroprotective effects

  2. Adenosine A2B Receptor Deficiency Promotes Host Defenses against Gram-Negative Bacterial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Barletta, Kathryn E.; Cagnina, R. Elaine; Burdick, Marie D.; Linden, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Activation of the adenosine A2B receptor (A2BR) promotes antiinflammatory effects in diverse biological settings, but the role of this receptor in antimicrobial host defense in the lung has not been established. Gram-negative bacillary pneumonia is a common and serious illness associated with high morbidity and mortality, the treatment of which is complicated by increasing rates of antibiotic resistance. Objectives: To test the hypothesis that absence of adenosine A2B receptor signaling promotes host defense against bacterial pneumonia. Methods: We used a model of Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia in wild-type mice and mice with targeted deletion of the A2BR. Host responses were compared in vivo and leukocyte responses to the bacteria were examined in vitro. Measurements and Main Results: A2BR–/– mice demonstrated enhanced bacterial clearance from the lung and improved survival after infection with K. pneumoniae compared with wild-type controls, an effect that was mediated by bone marrow–derived cells. Leukocyte recruitment to the lungs and expression of inflammatory cytokines did not differ between A2BR–/– and wild-type mice, but A2BR–/– neutrophils exhibited sixfold greater bactericidal activity and enhanced production of neutrophil extracellular traps compared with wild-type neutrophils when incubated with K. pneumoniae. Consistent with this finding, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from A2BR–/– mice with Klebsiella pneumonia contained more extracellular DNA compared with wild-type mice with pneumonia. Conclusions: These data suggest that the absence of A2BR signaling enhances antimicrobial activity in gram-negative bacterial pneumonia. PMID:22997203

  3. Role of adenosine A2b receptor overexpression in tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Cesar; Palomo, Iván; Fuentes, Eduardo

    2016-12-01

    The adenosine A2b receptor is a G-protein coupled receptor. Its activation occurs with high extracellular adenosine concentration, for example in inflammation or hypoxia. These conditions are generated in the tumor environment. Studies show that A2b receptor is overexpressed in various tumor lines and biopsies from patients with different cancers. This suggests that A2b receptor can be used by tumor cells to promote progression. Thus A2b participates in different events, such as angiogenesis and metastasis, besides exerting immunomodulatory effects that protect tumor cells. Therefore, adenosine A2b receptor appears as an interesting therapeutic target for cancer treatment.

  4. Melanocortin MC₄ receptor expression sites and local function.

    PubMed

    Siljee-Wong, Jacqueline E

    2011-06-11

    The melanocortin MC(4) receptor plays an important role in energy metabolism, but also affects blood pressure, heart rate and erectile function. Localization of the receptors that fulfill these distinct roles is only partially known. Mapping of the melanocortin MC(4) receptor has been stymied by the absence of a functional antibody. Several groups have examined mRNA expression of the melanocortin MC(4) receptor in the rodent brain and transgenic approaches have also been utilized to visualize melanocortin MC(4) receptor expression sites within the brain. Ligand expression and binding studies have provided additional information on the areas of the brain where this elusive receptor is functionally expressed. Finally, microinjection of melanocortin MC(4) receptor ligands in specific nuclei has further served to elucidate the function of melanocortin MC(4) receptors in these nuclei. These combined approaches have helped link the anatomy and function of this receptor, such as the role of paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus melanocortin MC(4) receptor in the regulation of food intake. Intriguingly, however, numerous expression-sites have been identified that have not been linked to a specific receptor function such as those along the optic tract and olfactory tubercle. Further research is needed to clarify the function of the melanocortin MC(4) receptor at these sites.

  5. Potential therapeutic interest of adenosine A2A receptors in psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Rodrigo A; Ferré, Sergi; Vaugeois, Jean-Marie; Chen, Jiang-Fan

    2008-01-01

    The interest on targeting adenosine A(2A) receptors in the realm of psychiatric diseases first arose based on their tight physical and functional interaction with dopamine D(2) receptors. However, the role of central A(2A) receptors is now viewed as much broader than just controlling D(2) receptor function. Thus, there is currently a major interest in the ability of A(2A) receptors to control synaptic plasticity at glutamatergic synapses. This is due to a combined ability of A(2A) receptors to facilitate the release of glutamate and the activation of NMDA receptors. Therefore, A(2A) receptors are now conceived as a normalizing device promoting adequate adaptive responses in neuronal circuits, a role similar to that fulfilled, in essence, by dopamine. This makes A(2A) receptors particularly attractive targets to manage psychiatric disorders since adenosine may act as go-between glutamate and dopamine, two of the key players in mood processing. Furthermore, A(2A) receptors also control glia function and brain metabolic adaptation, two other emerging mechanisms to understand abnormal processing of mood, and A(2A) receptors are important players in controlling the demise of neurodegeneration, considered an amplificatory loop in psychiatric disorders. Current data only provide an indirect confirmation of this putative role of A(2A) receptors, based on the effects of caffeine (an antagonist of both A(1) and A(2A) receptors) in psychiatric disorders. However, the introduction of A(2A) receptors antagonists in clinics as anti-parkinsonian agents is hoped to bolster our knowledge on the role of A(2A) receptors in mood disorders in the near future.

  6. Hypoxia Selectively Enhances Integrin Receptor Expression to Promote Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ju, Julia A; Godet, Ines; Ye, I Chae; Byun, Jungmin; Jayatilaka, Hasini; Lee, Sun Joo; Xiang, Lisha; Samanta, Debangshu; Lee, Meng Horng; Wu, Pei-Hsun; Wirtz, Denis; Semenza, Gregg L; Gilkes, Daniele M

    2017-02-17

    Metastasis is the leading cause of breast cancer (BCa)mortality. Previous studies have implicated hypoxia-induced changes in the composition and stiffness of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in the metastatic process. Therefore, the contribution of potential ECM binding receptors in this process was explored. Using a bioinformatics approach the expression of all integrin receptor subunits, in two independent BCa patient data sets, were analyzed to determine if integrin status correlates with a validated hypoxiainducible gene signature. Subsequently, a large panel of breast cancer cell lines were used to validate that hypoxia induces the expression of integrin's that bind to collagen (ITGA1, ITGA11, ITGB1) and fibronectin (ITGA5, ITGB1). Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF-1 and HIF-2) are directly required for ITGA5 induction under hypoxic conditions, which leads to enhanced migration and invasion of single cells within a multicellular 3D tumor spheroid but did not affect migration in a 2D microenvironment. ITGB1 expression requires HIF-1alpha, but not HIF-2alpha, for hypoxic induction in breast cancer cells. ITGA5 (alpha5 subunit) is required for metastasis to lymph nodes and lungs in breast cancer models and high ITGA5 expression in clinical biopsies is associated with an increased risk of mortality.

  7. Postsynaptic Adenosine A2A Receptors Modulate Intrinsic Excitability of Pyramidal Cells in the Rat Basolateral Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Andrew R.; Ariwodola, Olusegun J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The basolateral amygdala plays a critical role in the etiology of anxiety disorders and addiction. Pyramidal neurons, the primary output cells of this region, display increased firing following exposure to stressors, and it is thought that this increase in excitability contributes to stress responsivity and the expression of anxiety-like behaviors. However, much remains unknown about the underlying mechanisms that regulate the intrinsic excitability of basolateral amygdala pyramidal neurons. Methods: Ex vivo gramicidin perforated patch recordings were conducted in current clamp mode where hyper- and depolarizing current steps were applied to basolateral amygdala pyramidal neurons to assess the effects of adenosine A2A receptor modulation on intrinsic excitability. Results: Activation of adenosine A2A receptors with the selective A2A receptor agonist CGS-21680 significantly increased the firing rate of basolateral amygdala pyramidal neurons in rat amygdala brain slices, likely via inhibition of the slow afterhyperpolarization potential. Both of these A2A receptor-mediated effects were blocked by preapplication of a selective A2A receptor antagonist (ZM-241385) or by intra-pipette infusion of a protein kinase A inhibitor, suggesting a postsynaptic locus of A2A receptors on basolateral amygdala pyramidal neurons. Interestingly, bath application of the A2A receptor antagonist alone significantly attenuated basolateral amygdala pyramidal cell firing, consistent with a role for tonic adenosine in the regulation of the intrinsic excitability of these neurons. Conclusions: Collectively, these data suggest that adenosine, via activation of A2A receptors, may directly facilitate basolateral amygdala pyramidal cell output, providing a possible balance for the recently described inhibitory effects of adenosine A1 receptor activation on glutamatergic excitation of basolateral amygdala pyramidal cells. PMID:25716780

  8. Past, present and future of A(2A) adenosine receptor antagonists in the therapy of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Armentero, Marie Therese; Pinna, Annalisa; Ferré, Sergi; Lanciego, José Luis; Müller, Christa E; Franco, Rafael

    2011-12-01

    Several selective antagonists for adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)R) are currently under evaluation in clinical trials (phases I to III) to treat Parkinson's disease, and they will probably soon reach the market. The usefulness of these antagonists has been deduced from studies demonstrating functional interactions between dopamine D₂ and adenosine A(2A) receptors in the basal ganglia. At present it is believed that A(2A)R antagonists can be used in combination with the dopamine precursor L-DOPA to minimize the motor symptoms of Parkinson's patients. However, a considerable body of data indicates that in addition to ameliorating motor symptoms, adenosine A(2A)R antagonists may also prevent neurodegeneration. Despite these promising indications, one further issue must be considered in order to develop fully optimized antiparkinsonian drug therapy, namely the existence of (hetero)dimers/oligomers of G protein-coupled receptors, a topic that is currently the focus of intense debate within the scientific community. Dopamine D₂ receptors (D₂Rs) expressed in the striatum are known to form heteromers with A(2A) adenosine receptors. Thus, the development of heteromer-specific A(2A) receptor antagonists represents a promising strategy for the identification of more selective and safer drugs.

  9. Dynamics of nuclear receptor gene expression during Pacific oyster development.

    PubMed

    Vogeler, Susanne; Bean, Tim P; Lyons, Brett P; Galloway, Tamara S

    2016-09-29

    Nuclear receptors are a highly conserved set of ligand binding transcription factors, with essential roles regulating aspects of vertebrate and invertebrate biology alike. Current understanding of nuclear receptor regulated gene expression in invertebrates remains sparse, limiting our ability to elucidate gene function and the conservation of developmental processes across phyla. Here, we studied nuclear receptor expression in the early life stages of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, to identify at which specific key stages nuclear receptors are expressed RESULTS: We used quantitative RT-PCR to determine the expression profiles of 34 nuclear receptors, revealing three developmental key stages, during which nuclear receptor expression is dynamically regulated: embryogenesis, mid development from gastrulation to trochophore larva, and late larval development prior to metamorphosis. Clustering of nuclear receptor expression patterns demonstrated that transcriptional regulation was not directly related to gene phylogeny, suggesting closely related genes may have distinct functions. Expression of gene homologs of vertebrate retinoid receptors suggests participation in organogenesis and shell-formation, as they are highly expressed at the gastrulation and trochophore larval initial shell formation stages. The ecdysone receptor homolog showed high expression just before larval settlement, suggesting a potential role in metamorphosis. Throughout early oyster development nuclear receptors exhibited highly dynamic expression profiles, which were not confined by gene phylogeny. These results provide fundamental information on the presence of nuclear receptors during key developmental stages, which aids elucidation of their function in the developmental process. This understanding is essential as ligand sensing nuclear receptors can be disrupted by xenobiotics, a mode of action through which anthropogenic environmental pollutants have been found to mediate effects.

  10. Adenosine A2B-receptor-mediated cyclic AMP accumulation in primary rat astrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Peakman, M. C.; Hill, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    1. The effects of adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists on the accumulation of cyclic AMP have been investigated in primary cultures of rat astrocytes. 2. Adenosine A2-receptor stimulation caused a concentration-dependent increase in the accumulation of [3H]-cyclic AMP in cells prelabelled with [3H]-adenine. The rank order of agonist potencies was 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA; EC50 = 1 microM) > adenosine (EC50 = 5 microM) > 2-chloroadenosine (EC50 = 20 microM) >> CGS 21680 (EC50 > 10 microM). The presence of 0.5 microM dipyridamole, an adenosine uptake blocker, had no effect on the potency of adenosine. 3. The response to 10 microM NECA was antagonized in a concentration-dependent manner by the non-selective adenosine receptor antagonists, xanthine amine congener (apparent KD = 12 nM), PD 115,199 (apparent KD = 134 nM) and 8-phenyltheophylline (apparent KD = 126 nM). However, the A1-receptor-selective antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, had no significant effect on the responses to NECA or 2-chloroadenosine at concentrations up to 1 microM. 4. Stimulation of A1-receptors with the selective agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine, did not alter the basal accumulation of [3H]-cyclic AMP but inhibited a forskolin-mediated elevation of [3H]-cyclic AMP accumulation by a maximal value of 42%. This inhibition was fully reversed in the presence of 0.1 microM, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine. 5. The time course for NECA-mediated [3H]-cyclic AMP accumulation was investigated. The results suggest that there is a substantial efflux of cyclic AMP from the cells in addition to the rapid and sustained elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP (5 fold over basal) which was also observed. 6. These data indicate that rat astrocytes in primary culture express an A2B-adenosine receptor coupled positively to adenylyl cyclase. Furthermore, the presence of A1-receptors negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase appears to have no significant effect on the A2B-receptor

  11. High expression of SLC34A2 is a favorable prognostic marker in lung adenocarcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaoxuan; Ye, Shan; Zhang, Min; Wu, Jing; Yan, Hong; Li, Xiaojie; He, Jie

    2017-07-01

    Dysregulation of SLC34A2 (NaPi2b) in tumors has attracted wide attention, but its expression and function in non-small cell lung cancer remains unclear. By examining its expression in lung adenocarcinoma and correlation to patient outcome, we aimed to explore its prognostic and therapeutic values in this deadly disease. Overall, 175 cases of lung adenocarcinoma sample were included in this study. Histological subtyping of them was diagnosed according to standards of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society in 2011. Protein expression of SLC34A2 and anaplastic lymphoma kinase in these samples was determined by immunohistochemistry. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutations were examined using amplification refractory mutation system. Statistical analysis was performed using software of Pearson's correlation coefficient. High expression of SLC34A2 was identified in about 2/3 patients and correlated with significantly better patient's overall survival. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutations were detected in about 53% of patients with no statistically significant difference to patient's overall survival. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangement was found in 8 out of 175 patients, harboring this abnormality leads to shorter overall survival. No correlation has been found between SLC34A2 expression and epidermal growth factor receptor mutation or anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangements in lung adenocarcinoma. High expression of SLC34A2 is present in about 3/4 lung adenocarcinoma samples and predicts better outcome. Since it is a membrane protein, antibody-based drugs targeting this marker might bring new resolution to this deadly disease.

  12. The Immunosuppressive Role of Adenosine A2A Receptors in Ischemia Reperfusion Injury and Islet Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Preeti; Linden, Joel; Lobo, Peter; Okusa, Mark Douglas; Brayman, Kenneth Lewis

    2014-01-01

    Activation of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) reduces inflammation by generally inhibiting the activation of pro-inflammatory cells, decreasing endothelial adhesion molecule expression and reducing the release of proinflammatory cytokine mediators. Numerous preclinical studies using selective A2AR agonists, antagonists, A2AR knockout as well as chimeric mice have suggested the therapeutic potential of A2AR agonists for the treatment of ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) and autoimmune diseases. This review summarizes the immunosuppressive actions of A2AR agonists in murine IRI models of liver, kidney, heart, lung and CNS, and gives details on the cellular effects of A2AR activation in neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, natural killer cells, NKT cells, T effector cells and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T regulatory cells. This is discussed in the context of cytokine mediators involved in inflammatory cascades. Whilst the role of adenosine receptor agonists in various models of autoimmune disease has been well-documented, very little information is available regarding the role of A2AR activation in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). An overview of the pathogenesis of T1DM as well as early islet graft rejection in the immediate peri-transplantation period offers insight regarding the use of A2AR agonists as a beneficial intervention in clinical islet transplantation, promoting islet graft survival, minimizing early islet loss and reducing the number of islets required for successful transplantation, thereby increasing the availability of this procedure to a greater number of recipients. In summary, the use of A2AR agonists as a clinical intervention in IRI and as an adjunct to clinical immunesuppressive regimen in islet transplantation is highlighted. PMID:22934547

  13. Calcium-mediated modulation of the quaternary structure and function of adenosine A2A-dopamine D2 receptor heteromers

    PubMed Central

    Ferré, Sergi; Woods, Amina S.; Navarro, Gemma; Aymerich, Marisol; Lluís, Carme; Franco, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    The adenosine A2A-dopamine D2 receptor heteromer is one of the most studied receptor heteromers. It has important implications for basal ganglia function and pathology. Recent studies using Bioluminescence and Sequential Resonance Energy Transfer techniques shed light on the role of Ca2+ in the modulation of the quaternary structure of the A2A-D2 receptor heteromer, which was found to depend on the binding of calmodulin (CaM) to the carboxy terminus of the A2A receptor in the A2A-D2 receptor heteromer. Importantly, the changes in quaternary structure correlate with changes in function. A Ca2+/CaM-dependent modulation of MAPK signaling upon agonist treatment could only be observed in cells expressing A2A-D2 receptor heteromers. These studies provide a first example of a Ca2+-mediated modulation of the quaternary structure and function of a receptor heteromer. PMID:19896897

  14. A novel targeted system to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs to EphA2-expressing cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Si; Placzek, William J.; Stebbins, John L.; Mitra, Sayantan; Noberini, Roberta; Koolpe, Mitchell; Zhang, Ziming; Dahl, Russell; Pasquale, Elena B.; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of anti-cancer drugs is often limited by their systemic toxicities and adverse side effects. We report that the EphA2 receptor is over-expressed preferentially in several human cancer cell lines compared to normal tissues and that an EphA2 targeting peptide (YSAYPDSVPMMS) can be effective in delivering anti-cancer agents to such tumors. Hence, we report on the synthesis and characterizations of a novel EphA2-targeting agent conjugated with the chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel. We found that the peptide-drug conjugate is dramatically more effective than paclitaxel alone at inhibiting tumor growth in a prostate cancer xenograft model, delivering significantly higher levels of drug to the tumor site. We believe these studies open the way to the development of a new class of therapeutic compounds that exploit the EphA2 receptor for drug delivery to cancer cells. PMID:22329578

  15. The importance of the adenosine A(2A) receptor-dopamine D(2) receptor interaction in drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Filip, M; Zaniewska, M; Frankowska, M; Wydra, K; Fuxe, K

    2012-01-01

    Drug addiction is a serious brain disorder with somatic, psychological, psychiatric, socio-economic and legal implications in the developed world. Illegal (e.g., psychostimulants, opioids, cannabinoids) and legal (alcohol, nicotine) drugs of abuse create a complex behavioral pattern composed of drug intake, withdrawal, seeking and relapse. One of the hallmarks of drugs that are abused by humans is that they have different mechanisms of action to increase dopamine (DA) neurotransmission within the mesolimbic circuitry of the brain and indirectly activate DA receptors. Among the DA receptors, D(2) receptors are linked to drug abuse and addiction because their function has been proven to be correlated with drug reinforcement and relapses. The recognition that D(2) receptors exist not only as homomers but also can form heteromers, such as with the adenosine (A)(2A) receptor, that are pharmacologically and functionally distinct from their constituent receptors, has significantly expanded the range of potential drug targets and provided new avenues for drug design in the search for novel drug addiction therapies. The aim of this review is to bring current focus on A(2A) receptors, their physiology and pharmacology in the central nervous system, and to discuss the therapeutic relevance of these receptors to drug addiction. We concentrate on the contribution of A(2A) receptors to the effects of different classes of drugs of abuse examined in preclinical behavioral experiments carried out with pharmacological and genetic tools. The consequences of chronic drug treatment on A(2A) receptor-assigned functions in preclinical studies are also presented. Finally, the neurochemical mechanism of the interaction between A(2A) receptors and drugs of abuse in the context of the heteromeric A(2A)-D(2) receptor complex is discussed. Taken together, a significant amount of experimental analyses provide evidence that targeting A(2A) receptors may offer innovative translational strategies

  16. Altered coronary microvascular serotonin receptor expression after coronary artery bypass grafting utilizing cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Robich, Michael P.; Araujo, Eugenio G.; Feng, Jun; Osipov, Robert M.; Clements, Richard T.; Bianchi, Cesario; Sellke, Frank W.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Evaluate the role of serotonin receptors 1B and 2A, thromboxane synthase and receptor and phospholipases A2 and C in response to cardiopulmonary bypass in patients. Methods Atrial tissue was harvested from patients before and after cardiopulmonary bypass with cardioplegia (n=13). Coronary microvessels were assessed for vasoactive response to serotonin with and without inhibitors of 5-HT1B and 5-HT2A receceptors, phospholipase A2 and C. Expression of 5-HT1B and 5-HT2A mRNA was determined by RT-PCR. Expression of 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, Thromboxane A2 receptor and synthase protein was determined by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. Results Exposure of microvessels to serotonin elicited a 7.3 ± 2% relaxation response pre-bypass, changing to a strong contraction response of -19.2 ± 2% after bypass (p<0.001). Addition of either a specific 5-HT1B antagonist or inhibitor of PLA2 resulted in a significant decrease in the contractile response to -8.6 ±1% (p<0.001) and 2.8 ± 3% (p= 0.001), respectively. 5-HT1B receptor mRNA expression increased 1.82 ± 0.34 fold after bypass (p=0.044), while 5-HT2A mRNA expression did not change. 5-HT1B receptor, but not 5-HT2A, protein expression increased after bypass by 1.35 ± 0.7 fold (p=0.0413). Neither thromboxane synthase nor thromboxane receptor expression changed after bypass. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated 5-HT1B receptor increased mainly in the arterial smooth muscle. There was no appreciable difference in arterial expression of either thromboxane synthase or receptor. Conclusion These data indicate that 5-HT-induced vascular dysfunction after cardiopulmonary bypass with cardioplegia may be mediated by increased expression of 5-HT1B receptor and subsequent PLA2 activation in myocardial coronary smooth muscle. Mini Abstract The expression of 5-HT1B receptor protein and mRNA were increased in the atrial myocardium after cardioplegia and cardiopulmonary bypass (CP-CPB). Serotonin elicited a strong contraction

  17. Spatial pattern of receptor expression in the olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Nef, P; Hermans-Borgmeyer, I; Artières-Pin, H; Beasley, L; Dionne, V E; Heinemann, S F

    1992-01-01

    A PCR-based strategy for amplifying putative receptors involved in murine olfaction was employed to isolate a member (OR3) of the seven-transmembrane-domain receptor superfamily. During development, the first cells that express OR3 appear adjacent to the wall of the telencephalic vesicle at embryonic day 10. The OR3 receptor is uniquely expressed in a subset of olfactory cells that have a characteristic bilateral symmetry in the adult olfactory epithelium. This receptor and its specific pattern of expression may serve a functional role in odor coding or, alternatively, may play a role in the development of the olfactory system. Images PMID:1384038

  18. Glucocorticoid Receptor Expression in Peripheral WBCs of Critically Ill Children.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Audrey R Ogawa; Troster, Eduardo J; Wong, Hector R

    2015-06-01

    To characterize glucocorticoid receptor expression in peripheral WBCs of critically ill children using flow cytometry. Prospective observational cohort. A university-affiliated, tertiary PICU. Fifty-two critically ill children. Samples collected for measurement of glucocorticoid receptor expression and parallel cortisol levels. Subjects with cardiovascular failure had significantly lower glucocorticoid receptor expression both in CD4 lymphocytes (mean fluorescence intensity, 522 [354-787] vs 830 [511-1,219]; p = 0.036) and CD8 lymphocytes (mean fluorescence intensity, 686 [350-835] vs 946 [558-1,511]; p = 0.019) compared with subjects without cardiovascular failure. Subjects in the upper 50th percentile of Pediatric Risk of Mortality III scores and organ failure also had significantly lower glucocorticoid receptor expression in CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes. There was no linear correlation between cortisol concentrations and glucocorticoid receptor expression. Our study suggests that patients with shock and increased severity of illness have lower glucocorticoid receptor expression in CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes. Glucocorticoid receptor expression does not correlate well with cortisol levels. Future studies could focus on studying glucocorticoid receptor expression variability and isoform distribution in the pediatric critically ill population as well as on different strategies to optimize glucocorticoid response.

  19. A1 and A2a receptors mediate inhibitory effects of adenosine on the motor activity of human colon.

    PubMed

    Fornai, M; Antonioli, L; Colucci, R; Ghisu, N; Buccianti, P; Marioni, A; Chiarugi, M; Tuccori, M; Blandizzi, C; Del Tacca, M

    2009-04-01

    Experimental evidence in animal models suggests that adenosine is involved in the regulation of digestive functions. This study examines the influence of adenosine on the contractile activity of human colon. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed A(1) and A(2a) receptor expression in colonic neuromuscular layers. Circular muscle preparations were connected to isotonic transducers to determine the effects of 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX; A(1) receptor antagonist), ZM 241385 (A(2a) receptor antagonist), CCPA (A(1) receptor agonist) and 2-[(p-2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino]-5'-N-ethyl-carboxamide-adenosine (CGS 21680; A(2a) receptor agonist) on motor responses evoked by electrical stimulation or carbachol. Electrically evoked contractions were enhanced by DPCPX and ZM 241385, and reduced by CCPA and CGS 21680. Similar effects were observed when colonic preparations were incubated with guanethidine (noradrenergic blocker), L-732,138, GR-159897 and SB-218795 (NK receptor antagonists). However, in the presence of guanethidine, NK receptor antagonists and N(omega)-propyl-L-arginine (NPA; neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), the effects of DPCPX and CCPA were still evident, while those of ZM 241385 and CGS 21680 no longer occurred. Carbachol-induced contractions were unaffected by A(2a) receptor ligands, but they were enhanced or reduced by DPCPX and CCPA, respectively. When colonic preparations were incubated with guanethidine, NK antagonists and atropine, electrically induced relaxations were partly reduced by ZM 241385 or NPA, but unaffected by DPCPX. Dipyridamole or application of exogenous adenosine reduced electrically and carbachol-evoked contractions, whereas adenosine deaminase enhanced such motor responses. In conclusion, adenosine exerts an inhibitory control on human colonic motility. A(1) receptors mediate direct modulating actions on smooth muscle, whereas A(2a) receptors operate through inhibitory nitrergic nerve pathways.

  20. Modification of the response of olfactory receptors to acetophenone by CYP1a2.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Masashi; Fukutani, Yosuke; Savangsuksa, Aulaphan; Noguchi, Keiich; Matsunami, Hiroaki; Yohda, Masafumi

    2017-08-31

    Olfaction is mediated by the binding of odorant molecules to olfactory receptors (ORs). There are numerous proteins in the nasal mucus, and they contribute to olfaction through various mechanisms. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) family members are known to be present in the olfactory epithelium and are thought to affect olfaction by enzymatic conversion of odorant molecules. In this study, we examined the effects of CYPs on the ligand responses of ORs in heterologous cells. Among the CYPs tested, co-expression of CYP1a2 significantly affected the responses of various ORs, including MOR161-2, to acetophenone. Conversion of acetophenone to methyl salicylate was observed in the medium of CYP1a2-expressing cells. MOR161-2-expressing cells exhibited significantly greater responses to methyl salicylate than to acetophenone. Finally, we analyzed the responses of olfactory neurons expressing MOR161-2 in vivo using the phosphorylated ribosomal protein S6 as a marker. MOR161-2 responded to both acetophenone and methyl salicylate in vivo. When the olfactory mucus was washed out by the injection of PBS to mouse nasal cavity, the response of MOR161-2 to acetophenone was reduced, while that to methyl salicylate did not change. Our data suggest that CYP1a2 affects OR activation by converting acetophenone to methyl salicylate.

  1. Characterization of [125I]ZM 241385 binding to adenosine A2A receptors in the pineal of sheep brain.

    PubMed

    Yan, X; Koos, B J; Kruger, L; Linden, J; Murray, T F

    2006-06-22

    Adenosine is a ubiquitous neuromodulator and homeostatic regulator that exerts its physiologic actions through activation of A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3) adenosine receptor subtypes. In the central nervous system, adenosine's action in neurons is manifested in its modulation of tonic inhibitory control. Adenosine released in the brain during hypoxia has critical depressant effects on breathing in fetal and newborn mammals, an action suggested to be mediated by A(2A) receptors in the posteromedial thalamus. In an effort to more accurately define the spatial distribution of adenosine A(2A) receptors in fetal sheep diencephalon, we have used a receptor autoradiographic technique utilizing an iodinated radioligand [(125)I]ZM 241385, which has greater sensitivity and resolution than the tritiated compound. The distribution of ligand binding sites in the fetal sheep diencephalon indicated that the highest levels of binding were in select thalamic nuclei, including those implicated in hypoxic depression of fetal breathing, and the pineal. Given the high density of labeled A(2A) receptors in the pineal, these sites were characterized more fully in homogenate radioligand binding assays. These data indicate that [(125)I]ZM 241385 binding sites display a pharmacological signature consistent with that of adenosine A(2A) receptors and are expressed at similar levels in fetal, lamb and adult ovine brain. The adenosine A(2A) receptor pharmacologic signature of the [(125)I]ZM 241385 binding site in pineal cell membranes generalized to the site characterized in membranes derived from other portions of the lamb thalamus, including the sector involved in hypoxic inhibition of fetal breathing. These results have important implications for the functional roles of adenosine A(2A) receptors in the thalamus and pineal of sheep brain.

  2. Distribution of cellular HSV-1 receptor expression in human brain.

    PubMed

    Lathe, Richard; Haas, Juergen G

    2016-12-15

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a neurotropic virus linked to a range of acute and chronic neurological disorders affecting distinct regions of the brain. Unusually, HSV-1 entry into cells requires the interaction of viral proteins glycoprotein D (gD) and glycoprotein B (gB) with distinct cellular receptor proteins. Several different gD and gB receptors have been identified, including TNFRSF14/HVEM and PVRL1/nectin 1 as gD receptors and PILRA, MAG, and MYH9 as gB receptors. We investigated the expression of these receptor molecules in different areas of the adult and developing human brain using online transcriptome databases. Whereas all HSV-1 receptors showed distinct expression patterns in different brain areas, the Allan Brain Atlas (ABA) reported increased expression of both gD and gB receptors in the hippocampus. Specifically, for PVRL1, TNFRFS14, and MYH9, the differential z scores for hippocampal expression, a measure of relative levels of increased expression, rose to 2.9, 2.9, and 2.5, respectively, comparable to the z score for the archetypical hippocampus-enriched mineralocorticoid receptor (NR3C2, z = 3.1). These data were confirmed at the Human Brain Transcriptome (HBT) database, but HBT data indicate that MAG expression is also enriched in hippocampus. The HBT database allowed the developmental pattern of expression to be investigated; we report that all HSV1 receptors markedly increase in expression levels between gestation and the postnatal/adult periods. These results suggest that differential receptor expression levels of several HSV-1 gD and gB receptors in the adult hippocampus are likely to underlie the susceptibility of this brain region to HSV-1 infection.

  3. Adenosine A2B receptor modulates intestinal barrier function under hypoxic and ischemia/reperfusion conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Qiu, Yuan; Wang, Wensheng; Xiao, Weidong; Liang, Hongyin; Zhang, Chaojun; Yang, Hanwenbo; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Sun, Li-Hua; Yang, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Background: Intestinal barrier function failure from ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and acute hypoxia has been implicated as a critical determinant in the predisposition to intestinal inflammation and a number of inflammatory disorders. Here, we identified the role of Adenosine A2B receptor (A2BAR) in the regulation of intestinal barrier function under I/R and acute hypoxic conditions. Methods: C57BL/6J mice were used, and were randomized into three groups: Sham, I/R, IR+PSB1115 (a specific A2BAR antagonist) groups. After surgery, the small bowel was harvested for immunohistochemical staining, RNA and protein content, and intestinal permeability analyses. Using an epithelial cell culture model, we investigated the influence of hypoxia on the epithelial function, and the role of A2BAR in the expressions of tight junction and epithelial permeability. The expressions of Claudin-1, occludin and ZO-1 were detected by RT-PCR and Western-Blot. Epithelial barrier function was assessed with transepithelial resistance (TER). Results and conclusions: The A2BAR antagonist, PSB1115, significantly increased tight junction protein expression after intestinal I/R or acute hypoxia conditions. PSB1115 also attenuated the disrupted distribution of TJ proteins. Furthermore, inhibition of A2BAR attenuated the decrease in TER induced by I/R or acute hypoxic conditions, and maintained intestinal barrier function. Antagonism of A2BAR activity improves intestinal epithelial structure and barrier function in a mouse model of intestinal I/R and a cell model of acute hypoxia. These findings support a potentially destructive role for A2BAR under intestinal I/R and acute hypoxic conditions. PMID:24966910

  4. Caffeine induces CYP1A2 expression in rat hepatocytes but not in human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Vaynshteyn, David; Jeong, Hyunyoung

    2012-06-01

    Caffeine is the active constituent in coffee. Continual consumption of caffeine can lead to an attenuated response also known as tolerance. Results from rat studies have shown that caffeine is an inducer of CYP1A2, the enzyme responsible for caffeine's metabolism. This suggests that CYP1A2 induction by caffeine may be in part responsible for caffeine tolerance. However, whether caffeine induces CYP1A2 expression in humans remains unknown. Our results from luciferase assays performed in HepG2 cells showed that caffeine is not an activator of the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a major transcription factor involved in upregulation of CYP1A2. Furthermore, caffeine did not induce CYP1A2 expression in primary human hepatocytes at a concentration attained by ordinary coffee drinking. On the other hand, caffeine enhanced CYP1A2 expression by 9-fold in rat hepatocytes. Our results suggest that caffeine from ordinary coffee drinking does not induce CYP1A2 expression in humans and that factors other than CYP1A2 induction by caffeine likely contribute to development of caffeine tolerance in humans.

  5. Intermolecular cross-talk between the prostaglandin E2 receptor (EP)3 of subtype and thromboxane A(2) receptor signalling in human erythroleukaemic cells.

    PubMed

    Reid, Helen M; Kinsella, B Therese

    2009-10-01

    In previous studies investigating cross-talk of signalling between prostaglandin (PG)E(2) receptor (EP) and the TPalpha and TPbeta isoforms of the human thromboxane (TX)A(2) receptor (TP), 17-phenyl trinor PGE(2)-induced desensitization of TP receptor signalling through activation of the AH6809 and SC19220-sensitive EP(1) subtype of the EP receptor family, in a cell-specific manner. Here, we sought to further investigate that cross-talk in human erythroleukaemic (HEL) 92.1.7 cells. Specificity of 17-phenyl trinor PGE(2) signalling and its possible cross-talk with signalling by TPalpha/TPbeta receptors endogenously expressed in HEL cells was examined through assessment of agonist-induced inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP)(3) generation and intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) mobilization. While 17-Phenyl trinor PGE(2) led to activation of phospholipase (PL)Cbeta to yield increases in IP(3) generation and [Ca(2+)](i), it did not desensitize but rather augmented that signalling in response to subsequent stimulation with the TXA(2) mimetic U46619. Furthermore, the augmentation was reciprocal. Signalling by 17-phenyl trinor PGE(2) was found to occur through AH6809- and SC19920-insensitive, Pertussis toxin-sensitive, G(i)/G(betagamma)-dependent activation of PLCbeta. Further pharmacological investigation using selective EP receptor subtype agonists and antagonists confirmed that 17-phenyl trinor PGE(2)-mediated signalling and reciprocal cross-talk with the TP receptors occurred through the EP(3), rather than the EP(1), EP(2) or EP(4) receptor subtype in HEL cells. The EP(1) and EP(3) subtypes of the EP receptor family mediated intermolecular cross-talk to differentially regulate TP receptor-mediated signalling whereby activation of EP(1) receptors impaired or desensitized, while that of EP(3) receptors augmented signalling through TPalpha/TPbeta receptors, in a cell type-specific manner.

  6. Downstream coding region determinants of bacterio-opsin, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor and adrenergic receptor expression in Halobacterium salinarum.

    PubMed

    Bartus, Cynthia L; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka; Reusch, Regina; Valentine, Helene H; Heikinheimo, Pirkko; Levay, Agata; Potter, Lincoln T; Heimo, Heikki; Goldman, Adrian; Turner, George J

    2003-02-17

    The aim of this work is to develop a prokaryotic system capable of expressing membrane-bound receptors in quantities suitable for biochemical and biophysical studies. Our strategy exploits the endogenous high-level expression of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (BR) in the Archaeon Halobacterium salinarum. We attempted to express the human muscarinic acetylcholine (M(1)) and adrenergic (a2b) receptors by fusing the coding region of the m1 and a2b genes to nucleotide sequences known to direct bacterio-opsin (bop) gene transcription. The fusions included downstream modifications to produce non-native carboxyl-terminal amino acids useful for protein identification and purification. bop mRNA and BR accumulation were found to be tightly coupled and the carboxyl-terminal coding region modifications perturbed both. m1 and a2b mRNA levels were low, and accumulation was sensitive to both the extent of the bop gene fusion and the specific carboxyl-terminal coding sequence modifications included. Functional a2b adrenergic receptor expression was observed to be dependent on the downstream coding region. This work demonstrates that a critical determinant of expression resides in the downstream coding region of the wild-type bop gene and manipulation of the downstream coding region of heterologous genes may affect their potential for expression in H. salinarum. Copyright 2003 Elsevier Science B.V.

  7. Adenosine A(2A)-cannabinoid CB(1) receptor interaction: an integrative mechanism in striatal glutamatergic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Tebano, Maria Teresa; Martire, Alberto; Popoli, Patrizia

    2012-10-02

    The striatum is a subcortical area involved in sensorimotor, cognitive and emotional processes. Adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs) are highly expressed in the striatum, and their ability to establish functional and molecular interactions with many other receptors attributes to a pivotal role in the modulation and integration of striatal neurotransmission. This review will focus on the interaction between A(2A)Rs and cannabinoid CB(1) receptors (CB(1)Rs), taking it as a paradigmatic example of synaptic integration. Indeed, A(2A)Rs can exert an opposite (permissive vs. inhibitory) influence on CB1-dependent synaptic effect. These apparently irreconcilable functions could depend on a different role of pre- vs. postsynaptic A(2A)Rs, on their interaction with other receptors (namely adenosine A(1), metabotropic glutamate 5 and dopamine D2 receptors), and on whether A(2A)Rs form or not heteromers with CB(1)Rs. Besides providing a good example of the intricate pattern of events taking place in striatal synapses, the A(2A)/CB(1)R interaction proves very informative to understand the physiology of the basal ganglia and the mechanisms of related diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Brain Integration.

  8. Adenosine A2A receptor antagonism and neuroprotection: mechanisms, lights, and shadows.

    PubMed

    Popoli, Patrizia; Minghetti, Luisa; Tebano, Maria Teresa; Pintor, Annita; Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Massotti, Marino

    2004-01-01

    Adenosine A2A receptor antagonists are regarded as potential neuroprotective drugs, although the mechanisms underlying their effects remain to be elucidated. In this review, quinolinic acid (QA)-induced striatal toxicity was used as a tool to investigate the mechanisms of the neuroprotective effects of A2A receptor antagonists. After having examined the effects of selective A2A receptor antagonists toward different mechanisms of QA toxicity, we conclude that (1) the effect elicited by A2A receptor blockade on QA-induced glutamate outflow may be one of the mechanisms of the neuroprotective activity of A2A receptor antagonists; (2) A2A receptor antagonists have a potentially worsening influence on QA-dependent NMDA receptor activation; and (3) the ability of A2A receptor antagonists to prevent QA-induced lipid peroxidation does not correlate with the neuroprotective effects. These results suggest that A2A receptor antagonists may have either potentially beneficial or detrimental influence in models of neurodegeneration that are mainly due to increased glutamate levels or enhanced sensitivity of NMDA receptors, respectively.

  9. Striatal adenosine A2A and cannabinoid CB1 receptors form functional heteromeric complexes that mediate the motor effects of cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Carriba, Paulina; Ortiz, Oskar; Patkar, Kshitij; Justinova, Zuzana; Stroik, Jessica; Themann, Andrea; Müller, Christa; Woods, Anima S; Hope, Bruce T; Ciruela, Francisco; Casadó, Vicent; Canela, Enric I; Lluis, Carme; Goldberg, Steven R; Moratalla, Rosario; Franco, Rafael; Ferré, Sergi

    2007-11-01

    The mechanism of action responsible for the motor depressant effects of cannabinoids, which operate through centrally expressed cannabinoid CB1 receptors, is still a matter of debate. In the present study, we report that CB1 and adenosine A2A receptors form heteromeric complexes in co-transfected HEK-293T cells and rat striatum, where they colocalize in fibrilar structures. In a human neuroblastoma cell line, CB1 receptor signaling was found to be completely dependent on A2A receptor activation. Accordingly, blockade of A2A receptors counteracted the motor depressant effects produced by the intrastriatal administration of a cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist. These biochemical and behavioral findings demonstrate that the profound motor effects of cannabinoids depend on physical and functional interactions between striatal A2A and CB1 receptors.

  10. Androgen receptor expression predicts different clinical outcomes for breast cancer patients stratified by hormone receptor status

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan; Zheng, Yi-Zi; Liu, Yi-Rong; Lang, Guan-Tian; Qiao, Feng; Hu, Xin; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In this study we sought to correlate androgen receptor (AR) expression with tumor progression and disease-free survival (DFS) in breast cancer patients. We investigated AR expression in 450 breast cancer patients. We found that breast cancers expressing the estrogen receptor (ER) are more likely to co-express AR compared to ER-negative cancers (56.0% versus 28.1%, P < 0.001). In addition, we found that AR expression is correlated with increased DFS in patients with luminal breast cancer (P < 0.001), and decreased DFS in TNBC (triple negative breast cancer, P = 0.014). In addition, patients with HR+ tumors (Hormone receptor positive tumors) expressing low levels of AR have the lowest DFS among all receptor combinations. We also propose a novel prognostic model using AR receptor status, BRCA1, and present data showing that our model is more predictive of disease free survival compared to the traditional TMN staging system. PMID:27285752

  11. Expression of the Endocannabinoid Receptors in Human Fascial Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Fede, C.; Albertin, G.; Petrelli, L.; Sfriso, M.M.; Biz, C.; Caro, R. De; Stecco, C.

    2016-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptors have been localized in the central and peripheral nervous system as well as on cells of the immune system, but recent studies on animal tissue gave evidence for the presence of cannabinoid receptors in different types of tissues. Their presence was supposed also in myofascial tissue, suggesting that the endocannabinoid system may help resolve myofascial trigger points and relieve symptoms of fibromyalgia. However, until now the expression of CB1 (cannabinoid receptor 1) and CB2 (cannabinoid receptor 2) in fasciae has not yet been established. Small samples of fascia were collected from volunteers patients during orthopedic surgery. For each sample were done a cell isolation, immunohistochemical investigation (CB1 and CB2 antibodies) and real time RT-PCR to detect the expression of CB1 and CB2. Both cannabinoid receptors are expressed in human fascia and in human fascial fibroblasts culture cells, although to a lesser extent than the control gene. We can assume that the expression of mRNA and protein of CB1 and CB2 receptors in fascial tissue are concentrated into the fibroblasts. This is the first demonstration that the fibroblasts of the muscular fasciae express CB1 and CB2. The presence of these receptors could help to provide a description of cannabinoid receptors distribution and to better explain the role of fasciae as pain generator and the efficacy of some fascial treatments. Indeed the endocannabinoid receptors of fascial fibroblasts can contribute to modulate the fascial fibrosis and inflammation. PMID:27349320

  12. Elevated Adenosine Induces Placental DNA Hypomethylation Independent of A2B Receptor Signaling in Preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Aji; Wu, Hongyu; Iriyama, Takayuki; Zhang, Yujin; Sun, Kaiqi; Song, Anren; Liu, Hong; Peng, Zhangzhe; Tang, Lili; Lee, Minjung; Huang, Yun; Ni, Xin; Kellems, Rodney E; Xia, Yang

    2017-07-01

    Preeclampsia is a prevalent pregnancy hypertensive disease with both maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Emerging evidence indicates that global placental DNA hypomethylation is observed in patients with preeclampsia and is linked to altered gene expression and disease development. However, the molecular basis underlying placental epigenetic changes in preeclampsia remains unclear. Using 2 independent experimental models of preeclampsia, adenosine deaminase-deficient mice and a pathogenic autoantibody-induced mouse model of preeclampsia, we demonstrate that elevated placental adenosine not only induces hallmark features of preeclampsia but also causes placental DNA hypomethylation. The use of genetic approaches to express an adenosine deaminase minigene specifically in placentas, or adenosine deaminase enzyme replacement therapy, restored placental adenosine to normal levels, attenuated preeclampsia features, and abolished placental DNA hypomethylation in adenosine deaminase-deficient mice. Genetic deletion of CD73 (an ectonucleotidase that converts AMP to adenosine) prevented the elevation of placental adenosine in the autoantibody-induced preeclampsia mouse model and ameliorated preeclampsia features and placental DNA hypomethylation. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that elevated placental adenosine-mediated DNA hypomethylation predominantly occurs in spongiotrophoblasts and labyrinthine trophoblasts and that this effect is independent of A2B adenosine receptor activation in both preeclampsia models. Extending our mouse findings to humans, we used cultured human trophoblasts to demonstrate that adenosine functions intracellularly and induces DNA hypomethylation without A2B adenosine receptor activation. Altogether, both mouse and human studies reveal novel mechanisms underlying placental DNA hypomethylation and potential therapeutic approaches for preeclampsia. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Human monocytes respond to extracellular cAMP through A2A and A2B adenosine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sciaraffia, Ester; Riccomi, Antonella; Lindstedt, Ragnar; Gesa, Valentina; Cirelli, Elisa; Patrizio, Mario; De Magistris, Maria Teresa; Vendetti, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we test the hypothesis that cAMP, acting as an extracellular mediator, affects the physiology and function of human myeloid cells. The cAMP is a second messenger recognized as a universal regulator of several cellular functions in different organisms. Many studies have shown that extracellular cAMP exerts regulatory functions, acting as first mediator in multiple tissues. However, the impact of extracellular cAMP on cells of the immune system has not been fully investigated. We found that human monocytes exposed to extracellular cAMP exhibit higher expression of CD14 and lower amount of MHC class I and class II molecules. When cAMP-treated monocytes are exposed to proinflammatory stimuli, they exhibit an increased production of IL-6 and IL-10 and a lower amount of TNF-α and IL-12 compared with control cells, resembling the features of the alternative-activated macrophages or M2 macrophages. In addition, we show that extracellular cAMP affects monocyte differentiation into DCs, promoting the induction of cells displaying an activated, macrophage-like phenotype with reduced capacity of polarized, naive CD4+ T cells into IFN-γ-producing lymphocytes compared with control cells. The effects of extracellular cAMP on monocytes are mediated by CD73 ecto-5′-nucleotidase and A2A and A2B adenosine receptors, as selective antagonists could reverse its effects. Of note, the expression of CD73 molecules has been found on the membrane of a small population of CD14+CD16+ monocytes. These findings suggest that an extracellular cAMP-adenosine pathway is active in cells of the immune systems. PMID:24652540

  14. Autoantibodies against the Fibrinolytic Receptor, Annexin A2, in Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Cesarman-Maus, Gabriela; Cantú-Brito, Carlos; Barinagarrementeria, Fernando; Villa, Rosario; Reyes, Elba; Sanchez-Guerrero, Jorge; Hajjar, Katherine A; Latorre, Ethel Garcia

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) may be a manifestation of underlying autoimmune disease. Antibodies against annexin A2 (anti-A2Ab) coincide with the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), in which antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLA) are associated with thrombosis in any vascular bed. Annexin A2, a profibrinolytic receptor and binding site for β2-glycoprotein-I (β2-GPI), the main target for aPLA, is highly expressed on cerebral endothelium. Here we evaluate the prevalence of anti-A2Ab in CVT. Methods Forty individuals with objectively documented CVT (33 women and 7 men) and 145 healthy controls were prospectively studied for hereditary and acquired prothrombotic risk factors, classical aPLA, and anti-A2Ab. Results One or more prothrombotic risk factors were found in 85% of CVT subjects, (pregnancy/puerperium in 57.5%, classical aPLA in 22.5%, and hereditary procoagulant risk factors in 17.5%). Anti-A2Ab (titer >3SD) were significantly more prevalent in patients with CVT (12.5%) than in healthy individuals (2.1%, p<0.01, OR:5.9). Conclusions Anti-A2Ab are significantly associated with CVT, and may define a subset of individuals with immune-mediated cerebral thrombosis. PMID:21193750

  15. Adenosine A2 receptor-mediated regulation of renal hemodynamics and glomerular filtration rate is abolished in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Persson, Patrik; Hansell, Peter; Palm, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) are one of the earliest indications of altered kidney function in diabetes. Adenosine regulates GFR through tubuloglomerular feedback mechanism acting on adenosine A1 receptor. In addition, adenosine can directly regulate vascular tone by acting on A1 and A2 receptors expressed in afferent and efferent arterioles. Opposite to A1 receptors, A2 receptors mediate vasorelaxation. This study investigates the involvement of adenosine A2 receptors in regulation of renal blood flow (RBF) and GFR in control and diabetic kidneys. GFR was measured by inulin clearance and RBF by a transonic flow probe placed around the renal artery. Measurements were performed in isoflurane-anesthetized normoglycemic and alloxan-diabetic C57BL/6 mice during baseline and after acute administration of 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (DMPX), a selective A2 receptor antagonist. GFR and RBF were lower in diabetic mice compared to control (258 ± 61 vs. 443 ± 33 μl min(-1) and 1,083 ± 51 vs. 1,405 ± 78 μl min(-1)). In control animals, DMPX decreased RBF by -6%, whereas GFR increased +44%. DMPX had no effects on GFR and RBF in diabetic mice. Sodium excretion increased in diabetic mice after A2 receptor blockade (+78%). In conclusion, adenosine acting on A2 receptors mediates an efferent arteriolar dilatation which reduces filtration fraction (FF) and maintains GFR within normal range in normoglycemic mice. However, this regulation is absent in diabetic mice, which may contribute to reduced oxygen availability in the diabetic kidney.

  16. 5-HT7 receptor activation promotes an increase in TrkB receptor expression and phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Samarajeewa, Anshula; Goldemann, Lolita; Vasefi, Maryam S.; Ahmed, Nawaz; Gondora, Nyasha; Khanderia, Chandni; Mielke, John G.; Beazely, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) type 7 receptor is expressed throughout the CNS including the cortex and hippocampus. We have previously demonstrated that the application of 5-HT7 receptor agonists to primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells increases platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor expression and promotes neuroprotection against N-methyl-D-aspartate-(NMDA)-induced toxicity. The tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor is one of the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and is associated with neurodevelopmental and neuroprotective effects. Application of LP 12 to primary cerebral cortical cultures, SH-SY5Y cells, as well as the retinal ganglion cell line, RGC-5, increased both the expression of full length TrkB as well as its basal phosphorylation state at tyrosine 816. The increase in TrkB expression and phosphorylation was observed as early as 30 min after 5-HT7 receptor activation. In addition to full-length TrkB, kinase domain-deficient forms may be expressed and act as dominant-negative proteins toward the full length receptor. We have identified distinct patterns of TrkB isoform expression across our cell lines and cortical cultures. Although TrkB receptor expression is regulated by cyclic AMP and Gαs-coupled GPCRs in several systems, we demonstrate that, depending on the model system, pathways downstream of both Gαs and Gα12 are involved in the regulation of TrkB expression by 5-HT7 receptors. Given the number of psychiatric and degenerative diseases associated with TrkB/BDNF deficiency and the current interest in developing 5-HT7 receptor ligands as pharmaceuticals, identifying signaling relationships between these two receptors will aid in our understanding of the potential therapeutic effects of 5-HT7 receptor ligands. PMID:25426041

  17. 5-HT7 receptor activation promotes an increase in TrkB receptor expression and phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Samarajeewa, Anshula; Goldemann, Lolita; Vasefi, Maryam S; Ahmed, Nawaz; Gondora, Nyasha; Khanderia, Chandni; Mielke, John G; Beazely, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) type 7 receptor is expressed throughout the CNS including the cortex and hippocampus. We have previously demonstrated that the application of 5-HT7 receptor agonists to primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells increases platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor expression and promotes neuroprotection against N-methyl-D-aspartate-(NMDA)-induced toxicity. The tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor is one of the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and is associated with neurodevelopmental and neuroprotective effects. Application of LP 12 to primary cerebral cortical cultures, SH-SY5Y cells, as well as the retinal ganglion cell line, RGC-5, increased both the expression of full length TrkB as well as its basal phosphorylation state at tyrosine 816. The increase in TrkB expression and phosphorylation was observed as early as 30 min after 5-HT7 receptor activation. In addition to full-length TrkB, kinase domain-deficient forms may be expressed and act as dominant-negative proteins toward the full length receptor. We have identified distinct patterns of TrkB isoform expression across our cell lines and cortical cultures. Although TrkB receptor expression is regulated by cyclic AMP and Gαs-coupled GPCRs in several systems, we demonstrate that, depending on the model system, pathways downstream of both Gαs and Gα12 are involved in the regulation of TrkB expression by 5-HT7 receptors. Given the number of psychiatric and degenerative diseases associated with TrkB/BDNF deficiency and the current interest in developing 5-HT7 receptor ligands as pharmaceuticals, identifying signaling relationships between these two receptors will aid in our understanding of the potential therapeutic effects of 5-HT7 receptor ligands.

  18. A second trigeminal CGRP receptor: function and expression of the AMY1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Christopher S; Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Bower, Rebekah L; Wilderman, Andrea; Insel, Paul A; Edvinsson, Lars; Waldvogel, Henry J; Jamaluddin, Muhammad A; Russo, Andrew F; Hay, Debbie L

    2015-01-01

    Objective The trigeminovascular system plays a central role in migraine, a condition in need of new treatments. The neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), is proposed as causative in migraine and is the subject of intensive drug discovery efforts. This study explores the expression and functionality of two CGRP receptor candidates in the sensory trigeminal system. Methods Receptor expression was determined using Taqman G protein-coupled receptor arrays and immunohistochemistry in trigeminal ganglia (TG) and the spinal trigeminal complex of the brainstem in rat and human. Receptor pharmacology was quantified using sensitive signaling assays in primary rat TG neurons. Results mRNA and histological expression analysis in rat and human samples revealed the presence of two CGRP-responsive receptors (AMY1: calcitonin receptor/receptor activity-modifying protein 1 [RAMP1]) and the CGRP receptor (calcitonin receptor-like receptor/RAMP1). In support of this finding, quantification of agonist and antagonist potencies revealed a dual population of functional CGRP-responsive receptors in primary rat TG neurons. Interpretation The unexpected presence of a functional non-canonical CGRP receptor (AMY1) at neural sites important for craniofacial pain has important implications for targeting the CGRP axis in migraine. PMID:26125036

  19. Expression of adrenergic and cholinergic receptors in murine renal intercalated cells.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jin-Gon; Maeda, Seishi; Kuwahara-Otani, Sachi; Tanaka, Koichi; Hayakawa, Tetsu; Seki, Makoto

    2014-11-01

    Neurons influence renal function and help to regulate fluid homeostasis, blood pressure and ion excretion. Intercalated cells (ICCs) are distributed throughout the renal collecting ducts and help regulate acid/base equilibration. Because ICCs are located among principal cells, it has been difficult to determine the effects that efferent nerve fibers have on this cell population. In this study, we examined the expression of neurotransmitter receptors on the murine renal epithelial M-1 cell line. We found that M-1 cells express a2 and b2 adrenergic receptor mRNA and the b2 receptor protein. Further, b2 receptor-positive cells in the murine cortical collecting ducts also express AQP6, indicating that these cells are ICCs. M-1 cells were found to express m1, m4 and m5 muscarinic receptor mRNAs and the m1 receptor protein. Cells in the collecting ducts also express the m1 receptor protein, and some m1-positive cells express AQP6. Acetylcholinesterase was detected in cortical collecting duct cells. Interestingly, acetylcholinesterase-positive cells neighbored AQP6-positive cells, suggesting that principal cells may regulate the availability of acetylcholine. In conclusion, our data suggest that ICCs in murine renal collecting ducts may be regulated by the adrenergic and cholinergic systems.

  20. Expression of Adrenergic and Cholinergic Receptors in Murine Renal Intercalated Cells

    PubMed Central

    JUN, Jin-Gon; MAEDA, Seishi; KUWAHARA-OTANI, Sachi; TANAKA, Koichi; HAYAKAWA, Tetsu; SEKI, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neurons influence renal function and help to regulate fluid homeostasis, blood pressure and ion excretion. Intercalated cells (ICCs) are distributed throughout the renal collecting ducts and help regulate acid/base equilibration. Because ICCs are located among principal cells, it has been difficult to determine the effects that efferent nerve fibers have on this cell population. In this study, we examined the expression of neurotransmitter receptors on the murine renal epithelial M-1 cell line. We found that M-1 cells express a2 and b2 adrenergic receptor mRNA and the b2 receptor protein. Further, b2 receptor-positive cells in the murine cortical collecting ducts also express AQP6, indicating that these cells are ICCs. M-1 cells were found to express m1, m4 and m5 muscarinic receptor mRNAs and the m1 receptor protein. Cells in the collecting ducts also express the m1 receptor protein, and some m1-positive cells express AQP6. Acetylcholinesterase was detected in cortical collecting duct cells. Interestingly, acetylcholinesterase-positive cells neighbored AQP6-positive cells, suggesting that principal cells may regulate the availability of acetylcholine. In conclusion, our data suggest that ICCs in murine renal collecting ducts may be regulated by the adrenergic and cholinergic systems. PMID:25069412

  1. Effect of low frequency electromagnetic fields on A2A adenosine receptors in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Varani, Katia; Gessi, Stefania; Merighi, Stefania; Iannotta, Valeria; Cattabriga, Elena; Spisani, Susanna; Cadossi, Ruggero; Borea, Pier Andrea

    2002-01-01

    The present study describes the effect of low frequency, low energy, pulsing electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) on A2A adenosine receptors in human neutrophils.Saturation experiments performed using a high affinity adenosine antagonist [3H]-ZM 241385 revealed a single class of binding sites in control and in PEMF-treated human neutrophils with similar affinity (KD=1.05±0.10 and 1.08±0.12 nM, respectively). Furthermore, after 1 h of exposure to PEMFs the receptor density was statistically increased (P<0.01) (Bmax =126±10 and 215±15 fmol mg−1 protein, respectively).The effect of PEMFs was specific to the A2A adenosine receptors. This effect was also intensity, time and temperature dependent.In the adenylyl cyclase assays the A2A receptor agonists, HE-NECA and NECA, increased cyclic AMP accumulation in untreated human neutrophils with an EC50 value of 43 (40 – 47) and 255 (228 – 284) nM, respectively. The capability of HE-NECA and NECA to stimulate cyclic AMP levels in human neutrophils was increased (P<0.01) after exposure to PEMFs with an EC50 value of 10(8 – 13) and 61(52 – 71) nM, respectively.In the superoxide anion (O2−) production assays HE-NECA and NECA inhibited the generation of O2− in untreated human neutrophils, with an EC50 value of 3.6(3.1 – 4.2) and of 23(20 – 27) nM, respectively. Moreover, in PEMF-treated human neutrophils, the same compounds show an EC50 value of 1.6(1.2 – 2.1) and of 6.0(4.7 – 7.5) nM respectively.These results indicate the presence of significant alterations in the expression and in the functionality of adenosine A2A receptors in human neutrophils treated with PEMFs. PMID:11976268

  2. A2A Adenosine Receptor Antagonism Reverts the Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction Induced by Sleep Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado-Alvarado, Gabriela; Domínguez-Salazar, Emilio; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Chronic sleep restriction induces blood-brain barrier disruption and increases pro-inflammatory mediators in rodents. Those inflammatory mediators may modulate the blood-brain barrier and constitute a link between sleep loss and blood-brain barrier physiology. We propose that adenosine action on its A2A receptor may be modulating the blood-brain barrier dynamics in sleep-restricted rats. We administrated a selective A2A adenosine receptor antagonist (SCH58261) in sleep-restricted rats at the 10th day of sleep restriction and evaluated the blood-brain barrier permeability to dextrans coupled to fluorescein (FITC-dextrans) and Evans blue. In addition, we evaluated by western blot the expression of tight junction proteins (claudin-5, occludin, ZO-1), adherens junction protein (E-cadherin), A2A adenosine receptor, adenosine-synthesizing enzyme (CD73), and neuroinflammatory markers (Iba-1 and GFAP) in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, basal nuclei and cerebellar vermis. Sleep restriction increased blood-brain barrier permeability to FITC-dextrans and Evans blue, and the effect was reverted by the administration of SCH58261 in almost all brain regions, excluding the cerebellum. Sleep restriction increased the expression of A2A adenosine receptor only in the hippocampus and basal nuclei without changing the expression of CD73 in all brain regions. Sleep restriction reduced the expression of tight junction proteins in all brain regions, except in the cerebellum; and SCH58261 restored the levels of tight junction proteins in the cortex, hippocampus and basal nuclei. Finally, sleep restriction induced GFAP and Iba-1 overexpression that was attenuated with the administration of SCH58261. These data suggest that the action of adenosine on its A2A receptor may have a crucial role in blood-brain barrier dysfunction during sleep loss probably by direct modulation of brain endothelial cell permeability or through a mechanism that involves gliosis with subsequent inflammation and

  3. Expression of glutamate receptor subunits in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Stepulak, Andrzej; Luksch, Hella; Gebhardt, Christine; Uckermann, Ortrud; Marzahn, Jenny; Sifringer, Marco; Rzeski, Wojciech; Staufner, Christian; Brocke, Katja S; Turski, Lechoslaw; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy

    2009-10-01

    Emerging evidence suggests a role for glutamate and its receptors in the biology of cancer. This study was designed to systematically analyze the expression of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor subunits in various human cancer cell lines, compare expression levels to those in human brain tissue and, using electrophysiological techniques, explore whether cancer cells respond to glutamate receptor agonists and antagonists. Expression analysis of glutamate receptor subunits NR1-NR3B, GluR1-GluR7, KA1, KA2 and mGluR1-mGluR8 was performed by means of RT-PCR in human rhabdomyosarcoma/medulloblastoma (TE671), neuroblastoma (SK-NA-S), thyroid carcinoma (FTC 238), lung carcinoma (SK-LU-1), astrocytoma (MOGGCCM), multiple myeloma (RPMI 8226), glioma (U87-MG and U343), lung carcinoma (A549), colon adenocarcinoma (HT 29), T cell leukemia cells (Jurkat E6.1), breast carcinoma (T47D) and colon adenocarcinoma (LS180). Analysis revealed that all glutamate receptor subunits were differentially expressed in the tumor cell lines. For the majority of tumors, expression levels of NR2B, GluR4, GluR6 and KA2 were lower compared to human brain tissue. Confocal imaging revealed that selected glutamate receptor subunit proteins were expressed in tumor cells. By means of patch-clamp analysis, it was shown that A549 and TE671 cells depolarized in response to application of glutamate agonists and that this effect was reversed by glutamate receptor antagonists. This study reveals that glutamate receptor subunits are differentially expressed in human tumor cell lines at the mRNA and the protein level, and that their expression is associated with the formation of functional channels. The potential role of glutamate receptor antagonists in cancer therapy is a feasible goal to be explored in clinical trials.

  4. Recent improvements in the development of A2B adenosine receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Tabrizi, Mojgan Aghazadeh; Fruttarolo, Francesca; Romagnoli, Romeo; Preti, Delia

    2008-01-01

    Adenosine is known to exert most of its physiological functions by acting as local modulator at four receptor subtypes named A1, A2A, A2B and A3 (ARs). Principally as a result of the difficulty in identifying potent and selective agonists, the A2B AR is the least extensively characterised of the adenosine receptors family. Despite these limitations, growing understanding of the physiological meaning of this target indicates promising therapeutic perspectives for specific ligands. As A2B AR signalling seems to be associated with pre/postconditioning cardioprotective and anti-inflammatory mechanisms, selective agonists may represent a new therapeutic group for patients suffering from coronary artery disease. Herein we present an overview of the recent advancements in identifying potent and selective A2B AR agonists reported in scientific and patent literature. These compounds can be classified into adenosine-like and nonadenosine ligands. Nucleoside-based agonists are the result of modifying adenosine by substitution at the N6-, C2-positions of the purine heterocycle and/or at the 5′-position of the ribose moiety or combinations of these substitutions. Compounds 1-deoxy-1-{6-[N′-(furan-2-carbonyl)-hydrazino]-9H-purin-9-yl}-N-ethyl-β-D-ribofuranuronamide (19, hA1Ki = 1050 nM, hA2AKi = 1550 nM, hA2B EC50 = 82 nM, hA3Ki > 5 μM) and its 2-chloro analogue 23 (hA1Ki = 3500 nM, hA2AKi = 4950 nM, hA2B EC50 = 210 nM, hA3Ki > 5 μM) were confirmed to be potent and selective full agonists in a cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) functional assay in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing hA2B AR. Nonribose ligands are represented by conveniently substituted dicarbonitrilepyridines, among which 2-[6-amino-3,5-dicyano-4-[4-(cyclopropylmethoxy)phenyl]pyridin-2-ylsulfanyl]acetamide (BAY-60–6583, hA1, hA2A, hA3 EC50 > 10 μM; hA2B EC50 = 3 nM) is currently under preclinical-phase investigation for treating coronary

  5. Recent improvements in the development of A2B adenosine receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Tabrizi, Mojgan Aghazadeh; Fruttarolo, Francesca; Romagnoli, Romeo; Preti, Delia

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine is known to exert most of its physiological functions by acting as local modulator at four receptor subtypes named A1, A2A, A2B and A3 (ARs). Principally as a result of the difficulty in identifying potent and selective agonists, the A2B AR is the least extensively characterised of the adenosine receptors family. Despite these limitations, growing understanding of the physiological meaning of this target indicates promising therapeutic perspectives for specific ligands. As A2B AR signalling seems to be associated with pre/postconditioning cardioprotective and anti-inflammatory mechanisms, selective agonists may represent a new therapeutic group for patients suffering from coronary artery disease. Herein we present an overview of the recent advancements in identifying potent and selective A2B AR agonists reported in scientific and patent literature. These compounds can be classified into adenosine-like and nonadenosine ligands. Nucleoside-based agonists are the result of modifying adenosine by substitution at the N6-, C2-positions of the purine heterocycle and/or at the 5′-position of the ribose moiety or combinations of these substitutions. Compounds 1-deoxy-1-{6-[N′-(furan-2-carbonyl)-hydrazino]-9H-purin-9-yl}-N-ethyl-β-D-ribofuranuronamide (19, hA1Ki = 1050 nM, hA2AKi = 1550 nM, hA2B EC50 = 82 nM, hA3Ki > 5 μM) and its 2-chloro analogue 23 (hA1Ki = 3500 nM, hA2AKi = 4950 nM, hA2B EC50 = 210 nM, hA3Ki > 5 μM) were confirmed to be potent and selective full agonists in a cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) functional assay in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing hA2B AR. Nonribose ligands are represented by conveniently substituted dicarbonitrilepyridines, among which 2-[6-amino-3,5-dicyano-4-[4-(cyclopropylmethoxy)phenyl]pyridin-2-ylsulfanyl]acetamide (BAY-60–6583, hA1, hA2A, hA3 EC50 > 10 μM; hA2B EC50 = 3 nM) is currently under preclinical-phase investigation for treating coronary

  6. Increased non-rapid eye movement sleep by cocaine withdrawal: possible involvement of A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shu-Long; Han, Jin-Yi; Kim, Yun-Bae; Nam, Sang-Yoon; Song, Sukgil; Hong, Jin Tae; Oh, Ki-Wan

    2011-02-01

    This study attempted to clarify whether cocaine withdrawal altered sleep architecture and the role of adenosine receptors in this process. Cocaine (20 mg/kg) was administered subcutaneously once per day for 7 days to rat implanted with sleep/wake recording electrode. Polygraphic signs of undisturbed sleep/wake activities were recorded for 24 h before cocaine administration (basal recording as control); withdrawal-day 1 (after 1 day of repeated cocaine administration), withdrawal-day 8 (after 8 days of repeated cocaine administration), and withdrawal-day 14 (after 14 days of repeated cocaine administration), respectively. On cocaine withdrawal-day 1, wakefulness was significantly increased, total sleep was decreased, non-rapid eye movement sleep was markedly reduced, and rapid eye movement sleep was enhanced. Sleep/wake cycles were also increased on cocaine withdrawal day 1. However, non-rapid eye movement sleep was increased on withdrawal-day 8 and 14, whereas rapid eye movement sleep was decreased and no significant changes were observed in the total sleep and sleep/wake cycles during these periods. Adenosine A(2A) receptors expression was increased on withdrawal-day 8 and 14, whereas A(1) receptors levels were reduced after 14 days of withdrawal and the A(2B) receptors remained unchanged. Our findings suggest that alterations of sleep and sleep architecture during cocaine subacute and subchronic withdrawals after repeated cocaine administration may be partially involved in A(2A) receptors over-expression in the rat hypothalamus.

  7. Hypothyroidism affects D2 receptor-mediated breathing without altering D2 receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Schlenker, Evelyn H; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Schultz, Harold D

    2014-03-01

    Bromocriptine depressed ventilation in air and D2 receptor expression in the nucleus tractus solitaries (NTS) in male hypothyroid hamsters. Here we postulated that in age-matched hypothyroid female hamsters, the pattern of D2 receptor modulation of breathing and D2 receptor expression would differ from those reported in hypothyroid males. In females hypothyroidism did not affect D2 receptor protein levels in the NTS, carotid bodies or striatum. Bromocriptine, but not carmoxirole (a peripheral D2 receptor agonist), increased oxygen consumption and body temperature in awake air-exposed hypothyroid female hamsters and stimulated their ventilation before and following exposure to hypoxia. Carmoxirole depressed frequency of breathing in euthyroid hamsters prior to, during and following hypoxia exposures and stimulated it in the hypothyroid hamsters following hypoxia. Although hypothyroidism did not affect expression of D2 receptors, it influenced central D2 modulation of breathing in a disparate manner relative to euthyroid hamsters.

  8. Hypothyroidism Affects D2 Receptor-mediated Breathing without altering D2 Receptor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Schlenker, Evelyn H.; Rio, Rodrigo Del; Schultz, Harold D.

    2015-01-01

    Bromocriptine depressed ventilation in air and D2 receptor expression in the nucleus tractus solitaries (NTS) in male hypothyroid hamsters. Here we postulated that in age- matched hypothyroid female hamsters, the pattern of D2 receptor modulation of breathing and D2 receptor expression would differ from those reported in hypothyroid males. In females hypothyroidism did not affect D2 receptor protein levels in the NTS, carotid bodies or striatum. Bromocriptine, but not carmoxirole (a peripheral D2 receptor agonist), increased oxygen consumption and body temperature in awake air-exposed hypothyroid female hamsters and stimulated their ventilation before and following exposure to hypoxia. Carmoxirole depressed frequency of breathing in euthyroid hamsters prior to, during and following hypoxia exposures and stimulated it in the hypothyroid hamsters following hypoxia. Although hypothyroidism did not affect expression of D2 receptors, it influenced central D2 modulation of breathing in a disparate manner relative to euthyroid hamsters. PMID:24434437

  9. Probing biased/partial agonism at the G protein-coupled A(2B) adenosine receptor.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhan-Guo; Balasubramanian, Ramachandran; Kiselev, Evgeny; Wei, Qiang; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2014-08-01

    G protein-coupled A(2B) adenosine receptor (AR) regulates numerous important physiological functions, but its activation by diverse A(2B)AR agonists is poorly profiled. We probed potential partial and/or biased agonism in cell lines expressing variable levels of endogenous or recombinant A(2B)AR. In cAMP accumulation assays, both 5'-substituted NECA and C2-substituted MRS3997 are full agonists. However, only 5'-substituted adenosine analogs are full agonists in calcium mobilization, ERK1/2 phosphorylation and β-arrestin translocation. A(2B)AR overexpression in HEK293 cells markedly increased the agonist potency and maximum effect in cAMP accumulation, but less in calcium and ERK1/2. A(2B)AR siRNA silencing was more effective in reducing the maximum cAMP effect of non-nucleoside agonist BAY60-6583 than NECA's. A quantitative 'operational model' characterized C2-substituted MRS3997 as either balanced (cAMP accumulation, ERK1/2) or strongly biased agonist (against calcium, β-arrestin). N⁶-substitution biased against ERK1/2 (weakly) and calcium and β-arrestin (strongly) pathways. BAY60-6583 is ERK1/2-biased, suggesting a mechanism distinct from adenosine derivatives. BAY60-6583, as A(2B)AR antagonist in MIN-6 mouse pancreatic β cells expressing low A(2B)AR levels, induced insulin release. This is the first relatively systematic study of structure-efficacy relationships of this emerging drug target. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Dcc haploinsufficiency regulates dopamine receptor expression across postnatal lifespan.

    PubMed

    Pokinko, Matthew; Grant, Alanna; Shahabi, Florence; Dumont, Yvan; Manitt, Colleen; Flores, Cecilia

    2017-03-27

    Adolescence is a period during which the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) undergoes significant remodeling. The netrin-1 receptor, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC), controls the extent and organization of mPFC dopamine connectivity during adolescence and in turn directs mPFC functional and structural maturation. Dcc haploinsufficiency leads to increased mPFC dopamine input, which causes improved cognitive processing and resilience to behavioral effects of stimulant drugs of abuse. Here we examine the effects of Dcc haploinsufficiency on the dynamic expression of dopamine receptors in forebrain targets of C57BL6 mice. We conducted quantitative receptor autoradiography experiments with [(3)H]SCH-23390 or [(3)H]raclopride to characterize D1 and D2 receptor expression in mPFC and striatal regions in male Dcc haploinsufficient and wild-type mice. We generated autoradiograms at early adolescence (PND21±1), mid-adolescence (PND35±2), and adulthood (PND75±15). C57BL6 mice exhibit overexpression and pruning of D1, but not D2, receptors in striatal regions, and a lack of dopamine receptor pruning in the mPFC. We observed age- and region-specific differences in D1 and D2 receptor density between Dcc haploinsufficient and wild-type mice. Notably, neither group shows the typical pattern of mPFC dopamine receptor pruning in adolescence, but adult haploinsufficient mice show increased D2 receptor density in the mPFC. These results show that DCC receptors contribute to the dynamic refinement of D1 and D2 receptor expression in striatal regions across adolescence. The age-dependent expression of dopamine receptor in C57BL6 mice shows marked differences from previous characterizations in rats.

  11. Diabetes modulates the expression of glomerular kinin receptors.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Julie; Jaffa, Ayad A

    2002-12-01

    The localization of kinin receptors within the kidney implicates this system in the regulation of glomerular hemodynamics. We reported that diabetes alters the activity of the renal kallikrein-kinin system, and that these alterations contribute to the development of microvascular complications of diabetes. The present study examined the influence of diabetes on the expression of glomerular B1 and B2-kinin receptors, and assessed the cellular signaling of kinin receptor activation. Rats made diabetic with streptozocin (85 mg/kg), displayed plasma glucose levels in the range of 350-500 mg/dl. At 3, 7, and 21 days, B1 and B2-kinin receptor mRNA levels were measured in isolated glomeruli from control and diabetic rats by RT-PCR. Glomeruli revealed a differential pattern of expression between the two kinin receptors. The constitutively expressed B2-receptor was increased three-fold at day 3, but returned to normal levels at day 7; whereas, the inducible B1-receptor was maximally expressed (20-fold) at day 7 and remained elevated (10-fold) at day 21. To test whether the induction of kinin receptors by diabetes translates into increased responsiveness, we measured mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation (p42, p44) in glomeruli isolated from control and diabetic rats stimulated with B1-receptor agonist (des-Arg9-bradykinin, 10(-8) M). A three-fold increase in phosphorylation of MAPK was observed in response to B1-receptor agonist challenge in glomeruli isolated form diabetic rats compared to controls. These findings demonstrate for the first time that glomerular kinin receptors are induced by diabetes, and provide a rationale to study the contribution of these receptors to the development of glomerular injury in diabetes.

  12. Human articular chondrocytes express functional leukotriene B4 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Ann Kristin; Indrevik, Jill-Tove; Figenschau, Yngve; Martinez-Zubiaurre, Inigo; Sveinbjörnsson, Baldur

    2015-01-01

    Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) is a potent chemoattractant associated with the development of osteoarthritis (OA), while its receptors BLT1 and BLT2 have been found in synovium and subchondral bone. In this study, we have investigated whether these receptors are also expressed by human cartilage cells and their potential effects on cartilage cells. The expression of LTB4 receptors in native tissue and cultured cells was assessed by immunohistochemistry, immunocytochemistry, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and electron microscopy. The functional significance of the LTB4 receptor expression was studied by Western blotting, using phospho-specific antibodies in the presence or absence of receptor antagonists. In further studies, the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, growth factors and metalloproteinases by LTB4-stimulated chondrocytes was measured by multiplex protein assays. The effects of LTB4 in cartilage signature gene expression in cultured cells were assessed by quantitative PCR, whereas the LTB4-promoted matrix synthesis was determined using 3D pellet cultures. Both receptors were present in cultured chondrocytes, as was confirmed by immunolabelling and PCR. The relative quantification by PCR demonstrated a higher expression of the receptors in cells from healthy joints compared with OA cases. The stimulation of cultured chondrocytes with LTB4 resulted in a phosphorylation of downstream transcription factor Erk 1/2, which was reduced after blocking BLT1 signalling. No alteration in the secretion of cytokine and metalloproteinases was recorded after challenging cultured cells with LTB4; likewise, cartilage matrix gene expression and 3D tissue synthesis were unaffected. Chondrocytes express BLT1 and BLT2 receptors, and LTB4 activates the downstream Erk 1/2 pathway by engaging the high-affinity receptor BLT1. However, any putative role in cartilage biology could not be revealed, and remains to be clarified. PMID:25677035

  13. Expression of luteinizing hormone receptors in the mouse penis.

    PubMed

    Kokk, Kersti; Kuuslahti, Marianne; Keisala, Tiina; Purmonen, Sami; Kaipia, Antti; Tammela, Teuvo; Orro, Helen; Simovart, Helle-Evi; Pöllänen, Pasi

    2011-01-01

    The role of luteinizing hormone (LH) in the regulation of normal reproductive functions in males and females is quite well established. Besides the expression of LH receptors in the target cells in gonads, it has been found in several extragonadal organs. There is no information about the expression of LH receptors in the penis up to now. The aim of the present study is to investigate the expression of the LH receptor in the mouse penis to see if LH effects are possible in the penis. BALB/c mice were used as donors of normal penis and testis tissue. Immunocytochemistry, Western blotting, and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs) were used for the detection of the LH receptor. Positive immunoreaction for LH receptors was present in the nuclei of urethral epithelium and endothelial cells of cavernous spaces in the corpus cavernosum and corpus spongiosum penis. Western blotting experiments demonstrated the presence of LH antigen at M(r) = 97.4 and 78 kd. Quantitative RT-PCRs confirmed the expression of LH receptor in the penis. Our results show that LH receptor is expressed in the body of the mouse penis; thus, it may directly regulate functions of penile tissue.

  14. Adenosine A2a receptors and O2 sensing in development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Reduced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, via activation of adenylate kinase and the resulting exponential rise in the cellular AMP/ATP ratio, appears to be a critical factor underlying O2 sensing in many chemoreceptive tissues in mammals. The elevated AMP/ATP ratio, in turn, activates key enzymes that are involved in physiologic adjustments that tend to balance ATP supply and demand. An example is the conversion of AMP to adenosine via 5′-nucleotidase and the resulting activation of adenosine A2A receptors, which are involved in acute oxygen sensing by both carotid bodies and the brain. In fetal sheep, A2A receptors associated with carotid bodies trigger hypoxic cardiovascular chemoreflexes, while central A2A receptors mediate hypoxic inhibition of breathing and rapid eye movements. A2A receptors are also involved in hypoxic regulation of fetal endocrine systems, metabolism, and vascular tone. In developing lambs, A2A receptors play virtually no role in O2 sensing by the carotid bodies, but brain A2A receptors remain critically involved in the roll-off ventilatory response to hypoxia. In adult mammals, A2A receptors have been implicated in O2 sensing by carotid glomus cells, while central A2A receptors likely blunt hypoxic hyperventilation. In conclusion, A2A receptors are crucially involved in the transduction mechanisms of O2 sensing in fetal carotid bodies and brains. Postnatally, central A2A receptors remain key mediators of hypoxic respiratory depression, but they are less critical for O2 sensing in carotid chemoreceptors, particularly in developing lambs. PMID:21677265

  15. Neuroprotection by adenosine A2A receptor blockade in experimental models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Ken; Kurokawa, Masako; Aoyama, Shiro; Kuwana, Yoshihisa

    2002-01-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors are abundant in the caudate-putamen and involved in the motor control in several species. In MPTP-treated monkeys, A2A receptor-blockade with an antagonist alleviates parkinsonian symptoms without provoking dyskinesia, suggesting this receptor may offer a new target for the antisymptomatic therapy of Parkinson's disease. In the present study, a significant neuroprotective effect of A2A receptor antagonists is shown in experimental models of Parkinson's disease. Oral administration of A2A receptor antagonists protected against the loss of nigral dopaminergic neuronal cells induced by 6-hydroxydopamine in rats. A2A antagonists also prevented the functional loss of dopaminergic nerve terminals in the striatum and the ensuing gliosis caused by MPTP in mice. The neuroprotective property of A2A receptor antagonists may be exerted by altering the packaging of these neurotoxins into vesicles, thus reducing their effective intracellular concentration. We therefore conclude that the adenosine A2A receptor may provide a novel target for the long-term medication of Parkinson's disease, because blockade of this receptor exerts both acutely antisymptomatic and chronically neuroprotective activities.

  16. Nuclear receptor NR5A2 controls neural stem cell fate decisions during development

    PubMed Central

    Stergiopoulos, Athanasios; Politis, Panagiotis K.

    2016-01-01

    The enormous complexity of mammalian central nervous system (CNS) is generated by highly synchronized actions of diverse factors and signalling molecules in neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs). However, the molecular mechanisms that integrate extrinsic and intrinsic signals to control proliferation versus differentiation decisions of NSCs are not well-understood. Here we identify nuclear receptor NR5A2 as a central node in these regulatory networks and key player in neural development. Overexpression and loss-of-function experiments in primary NSCs and mouse embryos suggest that NR5A2 synchronizes cell-cycle exit with induction of neurogenesis and inhibition of astrogliogenesis by direct regulatory effects on Ink4/Arf locus, Prox1, a downstream target of proneural genes, as well as Notch1 and JAK/STAT signalling pathways. Upstream of NR5a2, proneural genes, as well as Notch1 and JAK/STAT pathways control NR5a2 endogenous expression. Collectively, these observations render NR5A2 a critical regulator of neural development and target gene for NSC-based treatments of CNS-related diseases. PMID:27447294

  17. Hormone receptors expression in phyllodes tumors of the breast.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeong-Hui; Kim, Ga-Eon; Lee, Ji Shin; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Nam, Jong Hee; Choi, Chan; Park, Min Ho; Yoon, Jung Han

    2012-02-01

    To ascertain the hormonal receptor profiles of the epithelial and stromal components of phyllodes tumors (PTs) and determine their relationship with stromal proliferation. Eighty-two PTs (50 benign, 22 borderline, and 10 malignant) were studied. Automated immunohistochemical staining for estrogen receptor (ER)-alpha and -beta, progesterone receptor (PR), androgen receptor (AR), and Ki-67 was performed using tissue microarray blocks, and their expression was assessed in both the stromal and epithelial components. The epithelial component demonstrated the expression for ER-alpha (45.6%, 36 of 79), ER-beta (37.2%, 29 of 78), PR (91.1%, 72 of 79), and AR (10.1%, 8 of 79). The stromal component was positive for ER-beta (29.3%, 24 of 82) only. The epithelial expression of ER-beta was found to be significantly correlated with the epithelial expression of AR (r = 0.352, p = 0.002). No association was found between hormone receptor expression and PT tumor grade. Stromal Ki-67 expression was statistically correlated with epithelial ER-beta, epithelial AR, and stromal ER-beta expression. Epithelial and stromal ER-beta and epithelial AR expression in PTs was correlated with the proliferative rate in the stromal component. Immunohistochemical examination of ER-beta and AR may have some impact on the postoperative management of patients with PTs.

  18. Partial separation of platelet and placental adenosine receptors from adenosine A2-like binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zolnierowicz, S.; Work, C.; Hutchison, K.; Fox, I.H. )

    1990-04-01

    The ubiquitous adenosine A2-like binding protein obscures the binding properties of adenosine receptors assayed with 5'-N-({sup 3}H)ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (({sup 3}H)NECA). To solve this problem, we developed a rapid and simple method to separate adenosine receptors from the adenosine A2-like binding protein. Human platelet and placental membranes were solubilized with 1% 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate. The soluble platelet extract was precipitated with polyethylene glycol and the fraction enriched in adenosine receptors was isolated from the precipitate by differential centrifugation. The adenosine A2-like binding protein was removed from the soluble placental extract with hydroxylapatite and adenosine receptors were precipitated with polyethylene glycol. The specificity of the ({sup 3}H)NECA binding is typical of an adenosine A2 receptor for platelets and an adenosine A1 receptor for placenta. This method leads to enrichment of adenosine A2 receptors for platelets and adenosine A1 receptors for placenta. This provides a useful preparation technique for pharmacologic studies of adenosine receptors.

  19. A2B Adenosine Receptor Agonist Improves Erectile Function in Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jiaming; Wang, Bohan; Du, Chuanjun; Xu, Gang; Zhang, Zhewei; Li, Yi; Zhang, Nan

    2015-10-01

    Diabetes is an important risk factor for erectile dysfunction (ED). Recent studies have indicated that A2B adenosine receptor (ADORA2B) signaling is essential for penile erection. Thus, we hypothesize that diabetic ED may be attributed to impaired A2B adenosine signaling. To test this hypothesis, we generated diabetic rats by injecting streptozocin as animal model. After 12 weeks, immunohistochemistry staining was used to localize the expression of ADORA2B. Western Blot and quantitative PCR were employed to determine ADORA2B expression level. Intracavernosal pressure (ICP) measurement was used to evaluate erectile function. Diabetic rats received a single intravenous injection of BAY 60-6583, an ADORA2B agonist, or vehicle solution, at 60 min before the ICP measurement. The results showed that ADORA2B expressed in the nerve bundle, smooth muscle, and endothelium in penile tissue of control mice. Western Blot and quantitative PCR results indicated that the expression levels of ADORA2B protein and mRNA were significantly reduced in penile tissues of diabetic rats. Functional studies showed that the erectile response induced by electrical stimulation was remarkably decreased in diabetic rats, compared with age-matched control rats. However, at 60 min after BAY 60-6583 treatment, the erectile function was improved in diabetic rats, suggesting that enhancement of ADORA2B signaling may improve erectile function in diabetic ED. This preclinical study has revealed a previously unrecognized therapeutic possibility of BAY 60-6583 as an effective and mechanism-based drug to treat diabetic ED. In conclusion, we propose that impaired A2B adenosine signaling is one of the pathological mechanisms of diabetic ED.

  20. Expression of the estrogen receptor α, progesterone receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor in papillary thyroid carcinoma tissues

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, DAN; QI, WENJING; ZHANG, PENGXIN; GUAN, HONGWEI; WANG, LIFEN

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the protein expression, in addition to the clinical value of the expression, of estrogen receptor α (ERα), progesterone receptor (PR) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). The expression of ERα, PR and EGFR was examined immunohistochemically on paraffin-embedded thyroid tissues obtained from 64 patients with PTC and 14 patients with nodular thyroid goiter (NTG). The expression level of ERα, PR and EGFR was found to be significantly elevated in the PTC tissues compared with the NTG tissues. In addition, the expression of ERα was found to be correlated with the size of PTC tumors. However, there was no significant difference between the expression levels of ERα, PR and EGFR in males and females with PTC. Thus, immunohistochemical evaluation of ERα, PR and EGFR expression in patients with PTC may aid in the prediction of the prognosis of patients with PTC. PMID:26171022

  1. Mistargeting hippocampal axons by expression of a truncated Eph receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yong; Chen, Zhi-Yong; Gale, Nick W.; Blair-Flynn, Jan; Hu, Tian-Jing; Yue, Xin; Cooper, Margaret; Crockett, David P.; Yancopoulos, George D.; Tessarollo, Lino; Zhou, Renping

    2002-01-01

    Topographic mapping of axon terminals is a general principle of neural architecture that underlies the interconnections among many neural structures. The Eph family tyrosine kinase receptors and their ligands, the ephrins, have been implicated in the formation of topographic projection maps. We show that multiple Eph receptors and ligands are expressed in the hippocampus and its major subcortical projection target, the lateral septum, and that expression of a truncated Eph receptor in the mouse brain results in a pronounced alteration of the hippocamposeptal topographic map. Our observations provide strong support for a critical role of Eph family guidance factors in regulating ontogeny of hippocampal projections. PMID:12124402

  2. Adenosine A2B receptor: from cell biology to human diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ying; Huang, Pingbo

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular adenosine is a ubiquitous signaling molecule that modulates a wide array of biological processes. Recently, significant advances have been made in our understanding of A2B adenosine receptor (A2BAR). In this review, we first summarize some of the general characteristics of A2BAR, and then we describe the multiple binding partners of the receptor, such as newly identified α-actinin-1 and p105, and discuss how these associated proteins could modulate A2BAR’s functions, including certain seemingly paradoxical functions of the receptor. Growing evidence indicates a critical role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes, in addition to its importance in the regulation of vascular diseases and lung disease. Here, we also discuss the role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes and the potential of the receptor as a target for treating these three diseases.

  3. Adenosine A2B Receptor: From Cell Biology to Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ying; Huang, Pingbo

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine is a ubiquitous signaling molecule that modulates a wide array of biological processes. Recently, significant advances have been made in our understanding of A2B adenosine receptor (A2BAR). In this review, we first summarize some of the general characteristics of A2BAR, and then we describe the multiple binding partners of the receptor, such as newly identified α-actinin-1 and p105, and discuss how these associated proteins could modulate A2BAR's functions, including certain seemingly paradoxical functions of the receptor. Growing evidence indicates a critical role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes, in addition to its importance in the regulation of vascular diseases, and lung disease. Here, we also discuss the role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes and the potential of the receptor as a target for treating these three diseases. PMID:27606311

  4. Expression of human peripheral cannabinoid receptor for structural studies

    PubMed Central

    Yeliseev, Alexei A.; Wong, Karen K.; Soubias, Olivier; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    Human peripheral-type cannabinoid receptor (CB2) was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion with the maltose-binding protein, thioredoxin, and a deca-histidine tag. Functional activity and structural integrity of the receptor in bacterial protoplast membranes was confirmed by extensive binding studies with a variety of natural and synthetic cannabinoid ligands. E. coli membranes expressing CB2 also activated cognate G-proteins in an in vitro coupled assay. Detergent-solubilized receptor was purified to 80%–90% homogeneity by affinity chromatography followed by ion-exchange chromatography. By high-resolution NMR on the receptor in DPC micelles, it was determined that purified CB2 forms 1:1 complexes with the ligands CP-55,940 and anandamide. The receptor was successfully reconstituted into phosphatidylcholine bilayers and the membranes were deposited into a porous substrate as tubular lipid bilayers for structural studies by NMR and scattering techniques. PMID:16195551

  5. Cloning and expression of a novel neuropeptide Y receptor.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, D H; Sirinathsinghji, D J; Tan, C P; Shiao, L L; Morin, N; Rigby, M R; Heavens, R H; Rapoport, D R; Bayne, M L; Cascieri, M A; Strader, C D; Linemeyer, D L; MacNeil, D J

    1996-07-12

    The neuropeptide Y family of peptides, which includes neuropeptide Y (NPY), peptide YY (PYY), and pancreatic polypeptide (PP), are found in the central and peripheral nervous system and display a wide array of biological activities. These actions are believed to be mediated through pharmacologically distinct G protein-coupled receptors, and, to date, three members of the NPY receptor family have been cloned. In this study we describe the cloning and expression of a novel NPY receptor from mouse genomic DNA. This receptor, designated NPY Y5, shares 60% amino acid identity to the murine NPY Y1 receptor. The pharmacology of this novel receptor resembles that of the NPY Y1 receptor and is distinct from that described for the NPY Y2, Y3, and Y4 receptors. In situ hybridization of mouse brain sections reveals expression of this receptor within discrete regions of the hypothalamus including the suprachiasmatic nucleus, anterior hypothalamus, bed nucleus stria terminalis, and the ventromedial nucleus with no localization apparent elsewhere in the brain.

  6. The orphan nuclear receptor NR4A2 is part of a p53–microRNA-34 network

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Jordan A.; Tenga, Alexa; Hills, Justin; Hoyer, Jessica D.; Cherian, Milu T.; Wang, Yong-Dong; Chen, Taosheng

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptor subfamily 4 group A member 2 (NR4A2) is an orphan nuclear receptor that is over-expressed in cancer and promotes cell proliferation, migration, transformation, and chemoresistance. Increased expression and function of NR4A2 have been attributed to various signaling pathways, but little is known about microRNA (miRNA) regulation of NR4A2 in cancer. To investigate the posttranscriptional regulation of NR4A2, we used a 3′ untranslated region (UTR) reporter screen and identified miR-34 as a putative regulator of NR4A2. By using computer predictions, we identified and confirmed an miRNA recognition element in the 3′ UTR of NR4A2 that was responsible for miR-34–mediated suppression. We next demonstrated that overexpression of exogenous miR-34 or activation of the p53 pathway, which regulates endogenous miR-34 expression, decreased NR4A2 expression. Consistent with previous reports, overexpression of NR4A2 blocked the induction of p53 target genes, including mir-34a. This was a phenotypic effect, as NR4A2 overexpression could rescue cells from p53-induced inhibition of proliferation. In summary, our results are the first characterization of a cancer-related miRNA capable of regulating NR4A2 and suggest a network and possible feedback mechanism involving p53, miR-34, and NR4A2. PMID:27121375

  7. Effects of adenosine A2A receptor stimulation on cocaine-seeking behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Bachtell, Ryan K; Self, David W

    2009-10-01

    Dopamine (DA) receptor stimulation in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) plays an important role in regulating cocaine-seeking behavior. Adenosine receptors antagonize the effects of DA receptor stimulation on intracellular signaling, neuronal output, and behavior. The goal of the present study is to determine the effects of adenosine A(2A) receptor stimulation on reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior in rats. Rats were trained to lever press for cocaine in daily self-administration sessions on a fixed-ratio 1 schedule for 3 weeks. After 1 week of abstinence, lever pressing was extinguished in six daily extinction sessions. We subsequently assessed the effects of the adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist, CGS 21680, on cocaine-, quinpirole (D(2) agonist)-, and cue-induced reinstatement to cocaine seeking. We also assessed the effects of CGS 21680 on sucrose seeking in rats extinguished from sucrose self-administration. Pretreatment of CGS 21680 dose-dependently blunted cocaine-induced reinstatement (15 mg/kg, i.p.). Pretreatment with CGS 21680 (0.03 mg/kg, i.p.) also attenuated quinpirole- and cue-induced reinstatement. A minimally effective dose of CGS 21680 failed to alter cocaine-induced locomotor activity or sucrose seeking. Stimulation of adenosine A(2A) receptors antagonizes reinstatement of cocaine seeking elicited by cocaine, DA D(2)-receptor stimulation, and cocaine-conditioned cues. These findings suggest that adenosine A(2A) receptor stimulation may oppose DA D(2) receptor signaling in the NAc that mediates cocaine relapse.

  8. Increased Expression of Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors in Achilles Tendinosis

    PubMed Central

    Björklund, Emmelie; Forsgren, Sture; Alfredson, Håkan; Fowler, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Background The endogenous cannabinoid system is involved in the control of pain. However, little is known as to the integrity of the cannabinoid system in human pain syndromes. Here we investigate the expression of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) in human Achilles tendons from healthy volunteers and from patients with Achilles tendinosis. Methodology Cannabinoid CB1 receptor immunoreactivity (CB1IR) was evaluated in formalin-fixed biopsies from individuals suffering from painful Achilles tendinosis in comparison with healthy human Achilles tendons. Principal Findings CB1IR was seen as a granular pattern in the tenocytes. CB1IR was also observed in the blood vessel wall and in the perineurium of the nerve. Quantification of the immunoreactivity in tenocytes showed an increase of CB1 receptor expression in tendinosis tissue compared to control tissue. Conclusion Expression of cannabinoid receptor 1 is increased in human Achilles tendinosis suggesting that the cannabinoid system may be dysregulated in this disorder. PMID:21931835

  9. Expression of GABA receptor rho subunits in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Boue-Grabot, E; Roudbaraki, M; Bascles, L; Tramu, G; Bloch, B; Garret, M

    1998-03-01

    The GABA receptor rho1, rho2, and rho3 subunits are expressed in the retina where they form bicuculline-insensitive GABA(C) receptors. We used northern blot, in situ hybridization, and RT-PCR analysis to study the expression of rho subunits in rat brains. In situ hybridization allowed us to detect rho-subunit expression in the superficial gray layer of the superior colliculus and in the cerebellar Purkinje cells. RT-PCR experiments indicated that (a) in retina and in domains that may contain functional GABA(C) receptors, rho2 and rho1 subunits are expressed at similar levels; and (b) in domains and in tissues that are unlikely to contain GABA(C) receptors, rho2 mRNA is enriched relative to rho1 mRNA. These results suggest that both rho1 and rho2 subunits are necessary to form a functional GABA(C) receptor. The use of RT-PCR also showed that, except in the superior colliculus, rho3 is expressed along with rho1 and rho2 subunits. We also raised an antibody against a peptide sequence unique to the rho1 subunit. The use of this antibody on cerebellum revealed the rat rho1 subunit in the soma and dendrites of Purkinje neurons. The allocation of GABA(C) receptor subunits to identified neurons paves the way for future electrophysiological studies.

  10. Tissue distribution and differential expression of melanocortin 1 receptor, a malignant melanoma marker

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Onfray, F; López, M; Lundqvist, A; Aguirre, A; Escobar, A; Serrano, A; Korenblit, C; Petersson, M; Chhajlani, V; Larsson, O; Kiessling, R

    2002-01-01

    The melanocortin 1 receptor is a G-protein-coupled receptor, described to be expressed on melanomas and melanocytes. Subsequent RT–PCR studies demonstrated the presence of melanocortin 1 receptor mRNA in other tissues such as pituitary gland and testis. Previously, we have demonstrated that three HLA-A2 binding nonamer peptides derived from melanocortin 1 receptor can elicit peptide-specific CTL which can recognize target cells transfected with the melanocortin 1 receptor gene and MHC class I matched melanoma lines. The potential of targeting melanocortin 1 receptor in therapy and diagnosis will depend on a preferential expression of this receptor in the majority of primary and metastatic melanomas vs normal tissues. We tested a panel of melanomas, carcinomas and other cell lines for the presence of melanocortin 1 receptor, using two monoclonal antibodies. The receptor was detected in 83% of the tested melanoma cell lines but not in other carcinoma lines. Immunohistochemistry revealed a strong expression of melanocortin 1 receptor in all tested primary and metastatic melanomas, but also demonstrated low levels of expression in adrenal medulla, cerebellum, liver and keratinocytes. Flow cytometry studies showed that melanocortin 1 receptor was expressed in in vitro activated monocytes/macrophages and in the THP-1 monocytic leukaemia line at levels of about 1 in 3 to 1 in 5 of that found in melanomas. Peripheral blood-derived dendritic cells, also express melanocortin 1 receptor in vitro. This extensive analysis of melanocortin 1 receptor tissue distribution may be of relevance not only for melanoma immunology, but also for research on the pathogenicity of inflammatory conditions in the skin and neurologic tissues. It remains to be seen if the over-expression of melanocortin 1 receptor in melanomas is sufficiently high to allow a ‘therapeutic window’ to be exploited in cancer immunotherapy. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 87, 414–422. doi:10.1038/sj

  11. Hormone-binding assay using living bacteria expressing eukaryotic receptors.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Georgy A; Lomin, Sergey N

    2009-01-01

    Studies on hormone-receptor interaction include, as a rule, isolation and extensive purification of the receptor protein or a particular receptor-containing fraction. To bypass these time- and resource-consuming procedures, we proposed a live cell-based assay using transgenic bacteria expressing single eukaryotic receptors. We describe here 3H-cytokinin binding to corresponding plant receptors as an example. The method includes procedures of bacteria growing, incubation with labeled hormone, separation of bound from unbound ligand, determination of radioactivity in bacterial precipitates, and mathematical analysis of primary data. The established simple protocol for specific labeling hormone-binding sites in intact bacteria allows determination of the main parameters of the ligand-receptor interaction.

  12. Orphan nuclear receptor NR4A2 inhibits hepatic stellate cell proliferation through MAPK pathway in liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pengguo; Li, Jie; Huo, Yan; Lu, Jin; Wan, Lili; Li, Bin; Gan, Run; Guo, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a crucial role in liver fibrosis, which is a pathological process characterized by extracellular matrix accumulation. NR4A2 is a nuclear receptor belonging to the NR4A subfamily and vital in regulating cell growth, metabolism, inflammation and other biological functions. However, its role in HSCs is unclear. We analyzed NR4A2 expression in fibrotic liver and stimulated HSCs compared with control group and studied the influence on cell proliferation, cell cycle, cell apoptosis and MAPK pathway after NR4A2 knockdown. NR4A2 expression was examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analyses. NR4A2 expression was significantly lower in fibrotic liver tissues and PDGF BB or TGF-β stimulated HSCs compared with control group. After NR4A2 knockdown α-smooth muscle actin and Col1 expression increased. In addition, NR4A2 silencing led to the promotion of cell proliferation, increase of cell percentage in S phase and reduced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, P38 and JNK in HSCs. These results indicate that NR4A2 can inhibit HSC proliferation through MAPK pathway and decrease extracellular matrix in liver fibrogenesis. NR4A2 may be a promising therapeutic target for liver fibrosis.

  13. Molecular Imaging and Quantitation of EphA2 Expression in Xenograft Models with 89Zr-DS-8895a.

    PubMed

    Burvenich, Ingrid J G; Parakh, Sagun; Gan, Hui K; Lee, Fook-Thean; Guo, Nancy; Rigopoulos, Angela; Lee, Sze-Ting; Gong, Sylvia; O'Keefe, Graeme J; Tochon-Danguy, Henri; Kotsuma, Masakatsu; Hasegawa, Jun; Senaldi, Giorgio; Scott, Andrew M

    2016-06-01

    Subtype A2 of the erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular tyrosine kinase (EphA2) cell surface receptor is expressed in a range of epithelial cancers. This study evaluated the molecular imaging of EphA2 expression in vivo in mouse tumor models using SPECT/MR and PET/MR and a humanized anti-EphA2 antibody, DS-8895a. DS-8895a was labeled with (111)In, (125)I, and (89)Zr and assessed for radiochemical purity, immunoreactivity (Lindmo analysis), antigen-binding affinity (Scatchard analysis), and serum stability in vitro. In vivo biodistribution, imaging, and pharmacokinetic studies were performed with SPECT/MR and PET/MR. A dose-escalation study was also performed to determine EphA2 receptor saturability through tissue and imaging quantitative analysis. All conjugates demonstrated good serum stability and specific binding to EphA2-expressing cells in vitro. In vivo biodistribution studies showed high uptake of (111)In-CHX-A″-DTPA-DS-8895a and (89)Zr-Df-Bz-NCS-DS-8895a in EphA2-expressing xenograft models, with no specific uptake in normal tissues. In comparison, retention of (125)I-DS-8895a in tumors was lower because of internalization of the radioconjugate and dehalogenation. These results were confirmed by SPECT/MR and PET/MR. EphA2 receptor saturation was observed at the 30 mg/kg dose. Molecular imaging of tumor uptake of DS-8895a allows noninvasive measurement of EphA2 expression in tumors in vivo and determination of receptor saturation. (89)Zr-Df-Bz-NCS-DS-8895a is suited for human bioimaging trials on the basis of superior imaging characteristics and will inform DS-8895a dose assessment and patient response evaluation in clinical trials. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  14. [Expression of EphA2 in Metastatic and Non-Metastatic Primary Uveal Melanoma].

    PubMed

    Vukoja, V; Brandenbusch, T; Tura, A; Nassar, K; Rohrbach, D J M; Lüke, M; Grisanti, S; Lüke, J

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about how the expression of Ephrin type-A receptor 2 (EphA2) influences cell-cell adhesion, migration, angiogenesis, and the formation of vasculogenic mimicry (VM) channels in uveal melanomas or how this may be related to the rate of metastasis. Paraffin embedded sections of 50 histopathologically well characterised primary uveal melanomas (mean largest tumour diameter: 16.3 mm) were evaluated with respect to the expression of EphA2. Systemic metastasis was detected in 29 patients. The remaining 21 patients were followed for a mean of 10 years. Tumour angiogensis was analysed by endoglin expression (CD105), the activity of the mature vascular system (von Willebrand factor) and the presence of VM (CD31/PAS staining). All uveal melanomas expressed EphA2, with a mean of 95.93 % positive cells ± SD: 6.3 %. There was no significant association between EphA2 and the rate of metastases (p = 0.196), endoglin expression (p = 0.652), VM (p = 0.267) or with any other clinical or histopathological factors (p < 0.05). However, there was significant up-regulation of EphA2 in the nucleus of the metastatic uveal melanoma subgroup, while cytoplasmatic localisation in the subgroup was associated with better prognosis (p = 0.006). There were low levels of EphA2 expression in the specific retinal layers, the ciliary and corneal epithelium, and the choroidal and corneal endothelium. Nuclear expression of EphA2 in this series of large tumours was significantly associated with an increased rate of metastasis. On the other hand, cytoplasmic localisation was associated with a better prognosis. As there was no correlation between EphA2 expression and angiogenesis, the mature vasculature or VM, EphA2 appears to become less important in the advanced stages of the disease. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Homology modelling of the human adenosine A2B receptor based on X-ray structures of bovine rhodopsin, the β2-adrenergic receptor and the human adenosine A2A receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherbiny, Farag F.; Schiedel, Anke C.; Maaß, Astrid; Müller, Christa E.

    2009-11-01

    A three-dimensional model of the human adenosine A2B receptor was generated by means of homology modelling, using the crystal structures of bovine rhodopsin, the β2-adrenergic receptor, and the human adenosine A2A receptor as templates. In order to compare the three resulting models, the binding modes of the adenosine A2B receptor antagonists theophylline, ZM241385, MRS1706, and PSB601 were investigated. The A2A-based model was much better able to stabilize the ligands in the binding site than the other models reflecting the high degree of similarity between A2A and A2B receptors: while the A2B receptor shares about 21% of the residues with rhodopsin, and 31% with the β2-adrenergic receptor, it is 56% identical to the adenosine A2A receptor. The A2A-based model was used for further studies. The model included the transmembrane domains, the extracellular and the intracellular hydrophilic loops as well as the terminal domains. In order to validate the usefulness of this model, a docking analysis of several selective and nonselective agonists and antagonists was carried out including a study of binding affinities and selectivities of these ligands with respect to the adenosine A2A and A2B receptors. A common binding site is proposed for antagonists and agonists based on homology modelling combined with site-directed mutagenesis and a comparison between experimental and calculated affinity data. The new, validated A2B receptor model may serve as a basis for developing more potent and selective drugs.

  16. New chromene scaffolds for adenosine A(2A) receptors: synthesis, pharmacology and structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Areias, Filipe; Costa, Marta; Castro, Marián; Brea, José; Gregori-Puigjané, Elisabet; Proença, M Fernanda; Mestres, Jordi; Loza, María I

    2012-08-01

    In silico screening of a collection of 1584 academic compounds identified a small molecule hit for the human adenosine A(2A) receptor (pK(i) = 6.2) containing a novel chromene scaffold (3a). To explore the structure-activity relationships of this new chemical series for adenosine receptors, a focused library of 43 2H-chromene-3-carboxamide derivatives was synthesized and tested in radioligand binding assays at human adenosine A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3) receptors. The series was found to be enriched with bioactive compounds for adenosine receptors, with 14 molecules showing submicromolar affinity (pK(i) ≥ 6.0) for at least one adenosine receptor subtype. These results provide evidence that the chromene scaffold, a core structure present in natural products from a wide variety of plants, vegetables, and fruits, constitutes a valuable source for novel therapeutic agents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Motoneuron glutamatergic receptor expression following recovery from cervical spinal hemisection.

    PubMed

    Gransee, Heather M; Gonzalez Porras, Maria A; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; Sieck, Gary C; Mantilla, Carlos B

    2017-04-01

    Cervical spinal hemisection at C2 (SH) removes premotor drive to phrenic motoneurons located in segments C3-C5 in rats. Spontaneous recovery of ipsilateral diaphragm muscle activity is associated with increased phrenic motoneuron expression of glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and decreased expression of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-proprionic acid (AMPA) receptors. Glutamatergic receptor expression is regulated by tropomyosin-related kinase receptor subtype B (TrkB) signaling in various neuronal systems, and increased TrkB receptor expression in phrenic motoneurons enhances recovery post-SH. Accordingly, we hypothesize that recovery of ipsilateral diaphragm muscle activity post-SH, whether spontaneous or enhanced by adenoassociated virus (AAV)-mediated upregulation of TrkB receptor expression, is associated with increased expression of glutamatergic NMDA receptors in phrenic motoneurons. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent diaphragm electromyography electrode implantation and SH surgery. Rats were injected intrapleurally with AAV expressing TrkB or GFP 3 weeks before SH. At 14 days post-SH, the proportion of animals displaying recovery of ipsilateral diaphragm activity increased in AAV-TrkB-treated (9/9) compared with untreated (3/5) or AAV-GFP-treated (4/10; P < 0.027) animals. Phrenic motoneuron NMDA NR1 subunit mRNA expression was approximately fourfold greater in AAV-TrkB- vs. AAV-GFP-treated SH animals (P < 0.004) and in animals displaying recovery vs. those not recovering (P < 0.005). Phrenic motoneuron AMPA glutamate receptor 2 (GluR2) subunit mRNA expression decreased after SH, and, albeit increased in animals displaying recovery vs. those not recovering, levels remained lower than control. We conclude that increased phrenic motoneuron expression of glutamatergic NMDA receptors is associated with spontaneous recovery after SH and enhanced recovery after AAV-TrkB treatment. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:1192-1205, 2017.

  18. Profiling neurotransmitter receptor expression in the Ambystoma mexicanum brain.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Limon, Agenor; Korn, Matthew J; Nakamura, Paul A; Shirkey, Nicole J; Wong, Jamie K; Miledi, Ricardo

    2013-03-22

    Ability to regenerate limbs and central nervous system (CNS) is unique to few vertebrates, most notably the axolotl (Ambystoma sp.). However, despite the fact the neurotransmitter receptors are involved in axonal regeneration, little is known regarding its expression profile. In this project, RT-PCR and qPCR were performed to gain insight into the neurotransmitter receptors present in Ambystoma. Its functional ability was studied by expressing axolotl receptors in Xenopus laevis oocytes by either injection of mRNA or by direct microtransplantation of brain membranes. Oocytes injected with axolotl mRNA expressed ionotropic receptors activated by GABA, aspartate+glycine and kainate, as well as metabotropic receptors activated by acetylcholine and glutamate. Interestingly, we did not see responses following the application of serotonin. Membranes from the axolotl brain were efficiently microtransplanted into Xenopus oocytes and two types of native GABA receptors that differed in the temporal course of their responses and affinities to GABA were observed. Results of this study are necessary for further characterization of axolotl neurotransmitter receptors and may be useful for guiding experiments aimed at understanding activity-dependant limb and CNS regeneration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A differential role for the adenosine A2A receptor in opiate reinforcement vs opiate-seeking behavior.

    PubMed

    Brown, Robyn Mary; Short, Jennifer Lynn; Cowen, Michael Scott; Ledent, Catherine; Lawrence, Andrew John

    2009-03-01

    The adenosine A(2A) receptor is specifically enriched in the medium spiny neurons that make up the 'indirect' output pathway from the ventral striatum, a structure known to have a crucial, integrative role in processes such as reward, motivation, and drug-seeking behavior. In the present study we investigated the impact of adenosine A(2A) receptor deletion on behavioral responses to morphine in a number of reward-related paradigms. The acute, rewarding effects of morphine were evaluated using the conditioned place preference paradigm. Operant self-administration of morphine on both fixed and progressive ratio schedules as well as cue-induced drug-seeking was assessed. In addition, the acute locomotor response to morphine as well as sensitization to morphine was evaluated. Decreased morphine self-administration and breakpoint in A(2A) knockout mice was observed. These data support a decrease in motivation to consume the drug, perhaps reflecting diminished rewarding effects of morphine in A(2A) knockout mice. In support of this finding, a place preference to morphine was not observed in A(2A) knockout mice but was present in wild-type mice. In contrast, robust cue-induced morphine-seeking behavior was exhibited by both A(2A) knockout and wild-type mice after a period of withdrawal. The acute locomotor response to morphine in the A(2A) knockout was similar to wild-type mice, yet A(2A) knockout mice did not display tolerance to chronic morphine under the present paradigm. Both genotypes display locomotor sensitization to morphine, implying a lack of a role for the A(2A) receptor in the drug-induced plasticity necessary for the development or expression of sensitization. Collectively, these data suggest a differential role for adenosine A(2A) receptors in opiate reinforcement compared to opiate-seeking.

  20. Kaitocephalin Antagonism of Glutamate Receptors Expressed in Xenopus Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Kaitocephalin is the first discovered natural toxin with protective properties against excitotoxic death of cultured neurons induced by N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) or α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA)/kainic acid (kainate, KA) receptors. Nevertheless, the effects of kaitocephalin on the function of these receptors were unknown. In this work, we report some pharmacological properties of synthetic (−)-kaitocephalin on rat brain glutamate receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and on the homomeric AMPA-type GluR3 and KA-type GluR6 receptors. Kaitocephalin was found to be a more potent antagonist of NMDA receptors (IC50 = 75 ± 9 nM) than of AMPA receptors from cerebral cortex (IC50 = 242 ± 37 nM) and from homomeric GluR3 subunits (IC50 = 502 ± 55 nM). Moreover, kaitocephalin is a weak antagonist of the KA-type receptor GluR6 (IC50 ∼ 100 μM) and of metabotropic (IC50 > 100 μM) glutamate receptors expressed by rat brain mRNA. PMID:20436943

  1. Stable Expression and Characterization of an Optimized Mannose Receptor.

    PubMed

    Vigerust, David J; Vick, Sherell; Shepherd, Virginia L

    2015-06-01

    The mannose receptor (MR) is a macrophage surface receptor that recognizes pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) from a diverse array of bacterial, fungal and viral pathogens. Functional studies of the MR are hampered by the scarcity of human cell lines that express the receptor. Current model systems available for the study of MR biology often demonstrate low levels of expression and do not retain many of the classical MR properties. Although several laboratories have reported transient and stable expression of MR from plasmids, preliminary data from our laboratory suggests that these plasmids produce a protein that lacks critical domains and is often not stable over time. In this current report we describe the generation and characterization of a novel human codon-optimized system for transient and stable MR expression. Rare codons and sequences that contribute to mRNA instability were modified to produce mRNA that is qualitatively and quantitatively improved. Confocal imaging of the transient and stably expressed optimized receptor demonstrates a distribution consistent with previous reports. To demonstrate the functional characteristics of the optimized receptor, we further show that the introduction of codon-optimized MR plasmid can confer MR-associated phagocytosis of S. aureus to non-phagocytic HeLa cells. We show that three molecules participate in the engagement and internalization of S. aureus. MR was found to colocalize with Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and Rab5 following exposure to pHrodo-stained S. aureus, suggesting cooperation among the three molecules to engage and internalize the bacterial particle. This study describes a transfection capable, optimized MR receptor with functional characteristics similar to the wild type receptor and further demonstrates a new system for the continued study of MR biology and function.

  2. Stable Expression and Characterization of an Optimized Mannose Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Vigerust, David J; Vick, Sherell; Shepherd, Virginia L

    2015-01-01

    The mannose receptor (MR) is a macrophage surface receptor that recognizes pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) from a diverse array of bacterial, fungal and viral pathogens. Functional studies of the MR are hampered by the scarcity of human cell lines that express the receptor. Current model systems available for the study of MR biology often demonstrate low levels of expression and do not retain many of the classical MR properties. Although several laboratories have reported transient and stable expression of MR from plasmids, preliminary data from our laboratory suggests that these plasmids produce a protein that lacks critical domains and is often not stable over time. In this current report we describe the generation and characterization of a novel human codon-optimized system for transient and stable MR expression. Rare codons and sequences that contribute to mRNA instability were modified to produce mRNA that is qualitatively and quantitatively improved. Confocal imaging of the transient and stably expressed optimized receptor demonstrates a distribution consistent with previous reports. To demonstrate the functional characteristics of the optimized receptor, we further show that the introduction of codon-optimized MR plasmid can confer MR-associated phagocytosis of S. aureus to non-phagocytic HeLa cells. We show that three molecules participate in the engagement and internalization of S. aureus. MR was found to colocalize with Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and Rab5 following exposure to pHrodo-stained S. aureus, suggesting cooperation among the three molecules to engage and internalize the bacterial particle. This study describes a transfection capable, optimized MR receptor with functional characteristics similar to the wild type receptor and further demonstrates a new system for the continued study of MR biology and function. PMID:26581716

  3. Male genital leiomyomas showing androgen receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Peñaranda, José Manuel; Vieites, Begoña; Evgenyeva, Elena; Vázquez-Veiga, Hugo; Forteza, Jeronimo

    2007-12-01

    Genital leiomyoma in men include those superficial leiomyomas arising in the scrotum and the areola. They are unusual neoplasms: few cases have been reported in the literature and they usually escape clinical diagnosis. Three cases of male genital leiomyomas are reported: two in the scrotum and one in the areola. They were all conservatively excised and the behaviour was completely benign in all cases. Histopathological examination showed the typical findings of superficial leiomyomas, with some minor differences between cases arising in the scrotum and those from the areola. Immunohistochemical findings not only confirmed the smooth muscle nature of all cases but also showed unequivocal immunostaining for androgen receptors in the leiomyomas from the scrotum. Immunostaining for androgen receptors in scrotal leiomyomas is, as far as we are aware, a previously unknown characteristic of male genital leiomyomas. This finding supports the role of steroid hormones in the growth of genital leiomyomas, similar to leiomyomas found in other locations.

  4. Expression pattern of protease activated receptors in lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    López, Mercedes L; Soriano-Sarabia, Natalia; Bruges, Gustavo; Marquez, María Elena; Preissner, Klaus T; Schmitz, M Lienhard; Hackstein, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are a subfamily of four G-protein-coupled receptors mediating multiple functions. PARs expression was studied in subpopulations of human lymphocytes. Our results indicate that natural killer cells expressed mRNA for PAR₁, PAR₂ and PAR₃, CD4+ T cells expressed PAR₁ and PAR₂, while γδ and CD8+ T cells only expressed PAR₁. PAR₄ was absent at mRNA level and B cells did not express any PAR. Analyses of the cell surface PARs expression by flow cytometry were consistent with the mRNA data and also between different donors. PAR₁ is the most abundant member of the PAR family present in lymphocytes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Prolactin receptor antagonism in mouse anterior pituitary: effects on cell turnover and prolactin receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Ferraris, Jimena; Boutillon, Florence; Bernadet, Marie; Seilicovich, Adriana; Goffin, Vincent; Pisera, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    Since anterior pituitary expresses prolactin receptors, prolactin secreted by lactotropes could exert autocrine or paracrine actions on anterior pituitary cells. In fact, it has been observed that prolactin inhibits its own expression by lactotropes. Our hypothesis is that prolactin participates in the control of anterior pituitary cell turnover. In the present study, we explored the action of prolactin on proliferation and apoptosis of anterior pituitary cells and its effect on the expression of the prolactin receptor. To determine the activity of endogenous prolactin, we evaluated the effect of the competitive prolactin receptor antagonist Δ1-9-G129R-hPRL in vivo, using transgenic mice that constitutively and systemically express this antagonist. The weight of the pituitary gland and the anterior pituitary proliferation index, determined by BrdU incorporation, were higher in transgenic mice expressing the antagonist than in wild-type littermates. In addition, blockade of prolactin receptor in vitro by Δ1-9-G129R-hPRL increased proliferation and inhibited apoptosis of somatolactotrope GH3 cells and of primary cultures of male rat anterior pituitary cells, including lactotropes. These results suggest that prolactin acts as an autocrine/paracrine antiproliferative and proapoptotic factor in the anterior pituitary gland. In addition, anterior pituitary expression of the long isoform of the prolactin receptor, measured by real-time PCR, increased about 10-fold in transgenic mice expressing the prolactin receptor antagonist, whereas only a modest increase in the S3 short-isoform expression was observed. These results suggest that endogenous prolactin may regulate its own biological actions in the anterior pituitary by inhibiting the expression of the long isoform of the prolactin receptor. In conclusion, our observations suggest that prolactin is involved in the maintenance of physiological cell renewal in the anterior pituitary. Alterations in this physiological

  6. Behavioral analysis of Drosophila transformants expressing human taste receptor genes in the gustatory receptor neurons.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Ryota; Sasaki, Yuko; Morita, Hiromi; Komai, Michio; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Goto, Tomoko; Furuyama, Akira; Isono, Kunio

    2012-06-01

    Transgenic Drosophila expressing human T2R4 and T2R38 bitter-taste receptors or PKD2L1 sour-taste receptor in the fly gustatory receptor neurons and other tissues were prepared using conventional Gal4/UAS binary system. Molecular analysis showed that the transgene mRNAs are expressed according to the tissue specificity of the Gal4 drivers. Transformants expressing the transgene taste receptors in the fly taste neurons were then studied by a behavioral assay to analyze whether transgene chemoreceptors are functional and coupled to the cell response. Since wild-type flies show strong aversion against the T2R ligands as in mammals, the authors analyzed the transformants where the transgenes are expressed in the fly sugar receptor neurons so that they promote feeding ligand-dependently if they are functional and activate the neurons. Although the feeding preference varied considerably among different strains and individuals, statistical analysis using large numbers of transformants indicated that transformants expressing T2R4 showed a small but significant increase in the preference for denatonium and quinine, the T2R4 ligands, as compared to the control flies, whereas transformants expressing T2R38 did not. Similarly, transformants expressing T2R38 and PKD2L1 also showed a similar preference increase for T2R38-specific ligand phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) and a sour-taste ligand, citric acid, respectively. Taken together, the transformants expressing mammalian taste receptors showed a small but significant increase in the feeding preference that is taste receptor and also ligand dependent. Although future improvements are required to attain performance comparable to the endogenous robust response, Drosophila taste neurons may serve as a potential in vivo heterologous expression system for analyzing chemoreceptor function.

  7. Identification of the A2 adenosine receptor binding subunit by photoaffinity crosslinking

    SciTech Connect

    Barrington, W.W.; Jacobson, K.A.; Hutchison, A.J.; Williams, M.; Stiles, G.L. )

    1989-09-01

    A high-affinity iodinated agonist radioligand for the A2 adenosine receptor has been synthesized to facilitate studies of the A2 adenosine receptor binding subunit. The radioligand 125I-labeled PAPA-APEC (125I-labeled 2-(4-(2-(2-((4- aminophenyl)methylcarbonylamino)ethylaminocarbonyl)- ethyl)phenyl)ethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine) was synthesized and found to bind to the A2 adenosine receptor in bovine striatal membranes with high affinity (Kd = 1.5 nM) and A2 receptor selectivity. Competitive binding studies reveal the appropriate A2 receptor pharmacologic potency order with 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) greater than (-)-N6-((R)-1-methyl- 2-phenylethyl)adenosine (R-PIA) greater than (+)-N6-((S)-1-methyl-2- phenylethyl)adenosine (S-PIA). Adenylate cyclase assays, in human platelet membranes, demonstrate a dose-dependent stimulation of cAMP production. PAPA-APEC (1 microM) produces a 43% increase in cAMP production, which is essentially the same degree of increase produced by 5'-N- ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (the prototypic A2 receptor agonist). These findings combined with the observed guanine nucleotide-mediated decrease in binding suggest that PAPA-APEC is a full A2 agonist. The A2 receptor binding subunit was identified by photoaffinity-crosslinking studies using 125I-labeled PAPA-APEC and the heterobifunctional crosslinking agent N-succinimidyl 6-(4'-azido-2'-nitrophenylamino)hexanoate (SANPAH). After covalent incorporation, a single specifically radiolabeled protein with an apparent molecular mass of 45 kDa was observed on NaDodSO4/PAGE/autoradiography. Incorporation of 125I-labeled PAPA-APEC into this polypeptide is blocked by agonists and antagonists with the expected potency for A2 receptors and is decreased in the presence of 10(-4) M guanosine 5'-(beta, gamma-imido)triphosphate.

  8. GABAergic involvement in motor effects of an adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist in mice.

    PubMed

    Khisti, R T; Chopde, C T; Abraham, E

    2000-04-03

    Adenosine A(2A) agonists are known to induce catalepsy and inhibit dopamine mediated motor hyperactivity. An antagonistic interaction between adenosine A(2A) and dopamine D(2) receptors is known to regulate GABA-mediated neurotransmission in striatopallidal neurons. Stimulation of adenosine A(2A) and dopamine D(2) receptors has been shown to increase and inhibit GABA release respectively in pallidal GABAergic neurons. However, the role of GABAergic neurotransmission in the motor effects of adenosine A(2A) receptors is not yet known. Therefore in the present study the effect of GABAergic agents on adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist (NECA- or CGS 21680) induced catalepsy and inhibition of amphetamine elicited motor hyperactivity was examined. Pretreatment with GABA, the GABA(A) agonist muscimol or the GABA(B) agonist baclofen potentiated whereas the GABA(A) antagonist bicuculline attenuated NECA- or CGS 21680-induced catalepsy. However, the GABA(B) antagonists phaclophen and delta-aminovaleric acid had no effect. Administration of NECA or CGS 21680 not only reduced spontaneous locomotor activity but also antagonized amphetamine elicited motor hyperactivity. These effects of NECA and CGS 21680 were potentiated by GABA or muscimol and antagonized by bicuculline. These findings provide behavioral evidence for the role of GABA in the motor effects of adenosine A(2A) receptor agonists. Activation of adenosine A(2A) receptors increases GABA release which could reduce dopaminergic tone and induce catalepsy or inhibit amphetamine mediated motor hyperactivity.

  9. Functional expression of purinergic P2 receptors and transient receptor potential channels by the human urothelium.

    PubMed

    Shabir, Saqib; Cross, William; Kirkwood, Lisa A; Pearson, Joanna F; Appleby, Peter A; Walker, Dawn; Eardley, Ian; Southgate, Jennifer

    2013-08-01

    In addition to its role as a physical barrier, the urothelium is considered to play an active role in mechanosensation. A key mechanism is the release of transient mediators that activate purinergic P2 receptors and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels to effect changes in intracellular Ca²⁺. Despite the implied importance of these receptors and channels in urothelial tissue homeostasis and dysfunctional bladder disease, little is known about their functional expression by the human urothelium. To evaluate the expression and function of P2X and P2Y receptors and TRP channels, the human ureter and bladder were used to separate urothelial and stromal tissues for RNA isolation and cell culture. RT-PCR using stringently designed primer sets was used to establish which P2 and TRP species were expressed at the transcript level, and selective agonists/antagonists were used to confirm functional expression by monitoring changes in intracellular Ca²⁺ and in a scratch repair assay. The results confirmed the functional expression of P2Y₄ receptors and excluded nonexpressed receptors/channels (P2X₁, P2X₃, P2X₆, P2Y₆, P2Y₁₁, TRPV5, and TRPM8), while a dearth of specific agonists confounded the functional validation of expressed P2X₂, P2X₄, P2Y₁, P2Y₂, TRPV2, TRPV3, TRPV6 and TRPM7 receptors/channels. Although a conventional response was elicited in control stromal-derived cells, the urothelial cell response to well-characterized TRPV1 and TRPV4 agonists/antagonists revealed unexpected anomalies. In addition, agonists that invoked an increase in intracellular Ca²⁺ promoted urothelial scratch repair, presumably through the release of ATP. The study raises important questions about the ligand selectivity of receptor/channel targets expressed by the urothelium. These pathways are important in urothelial tissue homeostasis, and this opens the possibility of selective drug targeting.

  10. Estrogen and Progesterone hormone receptor expression in oral cavity cancer

    PubMed Central

    Biegner, Thorsten; Teriete, Peter; Hoefert, Sebastian; Krimmel, Michael; Munz, Adelheid; Reinert, Siegmar

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown an increase in the incidence of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in younger patients. The hypothesis that tumors could be hormonally induced during pregnancy or in young female patients without the well-known risk factors alcohol or tobacco abuse seems to be plausible. Material and Methods Estrogen Receptor alpha (ERα) and Progesterone Receptor (PR) expression were analyzed in normal oral mucosa (n=5), oral precursor lesions (simple hyperplasia, n=11; squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n=35), and OSCC specimen. OSCCs were stratified in a young female (n=7) study cohort and older patients (n=46). In the young female study cohort three patients (n=3/7) developed OSCC during or shortly after pregnancy. Breast cancer tissues were used as positive control for ERα and PR expression. Results ERα expression was found in four oral precursor lesions (squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n=4/35, 11%) and in five OSCC specimen (n=5/46, 11%). The five ERα positive OSCC samples were older male patients. All patients within the young female study cohort were negatively stained for both ERα and PR. Conclusions ER expression could be regarded as a seldom risk factor for OSCC. PR expression seems to be not relevant for the development of OSCC. Key words:Oral squamous cell carcinoma, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, hormone receptor. PMID:27475696

  11. Distinct nuclear receptor expression in stroma adjacent to breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Knower, Kevin C; Chand, Ashwini L; Eriksson, Natalie; Takagi, Kiyoshi; Miki, Yasuhiro; Sasano, Hironobu; Visvader, Jane E; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Funder, John W; Fuller, Peter J; Simpson, Evan R; Tilley, Wayne D; Leedman, Peter J; Graham, J Dinny; Muscat, George E O; Clarke, Christine L; Clyne, Colin D

    2013-11-01

    The interaction between breast tumor epithelial and stromal cells is vital for initial and recurrent tumor growth. While breast cancer-associated stromal cells provide a favorable environment for proliferation and metastasis, the molecular mechanisms contributing to this process are not fully understood. Nuclear receptors (NRs) are intracellular transcription factors that directly regulate gene expression. Little is known about the status of NRs in cancer-associated stroma. Nuclear Receptor Low-Density Taqman Arrays were used to compare the gene expression profiles of all 48 NR family members in a collection of primary cultured cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) obtained from estrogen receptor (ER)α positive breast cancers (n = 9) and normal breast adipose fibroblasts (NAFs) (n = 7). Thirty-three of 48 NRs were expressed in both the groups, while 11 NRs were not detected in either. Three NRs (dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia critical region, on chromosome X, gene 1 (DAX-1); estrogen-related receptor beta (ERR-β); and RAR-related orphan receptor beta (ROR-β)) were only detected in NAFs, while one NR (liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1)) was unique to CAFs. Of the NRs co-expressed, four were significantly down-regulated in CAFs compared with NAFs (RAR-related orphan receptor-α (ROR-α); Thyroid hormone receptor-β (TR-β); vitamin D receptor (VDR); and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ)). Quantitative immunohistochemistry for LRH-1, TR-β, and PPAR-γ proteins in stromal fibroblasts from an independent panel of breast cancers (ER-positive (n = 15), ER-negative (n = 15), normal (n = 14)) positively correlated with mRNA expression profiles. The differentially expressed NRs identified in tumor stroma are key mediators in aromatase regulation and subsequent estrogen production. Our findings reveal a distinct pattern of NR expression that therefore fits with a sustained and increased local estrogen microenvironment in ER

  12. Functional lysophosphatidic acid receptors expressed in Oryzias latipes.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Yuji; Ishii, Shoichi; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichi; Katoh, Kazutaka; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi; Kagawa, Nao; Fukushima, Nobuyuki

    2014-11-10

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling is known to play biological and pathophysiological roles in many types of animals. Medaka (Oryzias latipes) is an experimental fish that can be easily maintained, propagated, and analyzed, and whose genome has been completely sequenced. However, there is limited information available regarding medaka LPA receptors. Here, using information from the medaka genome database, we examine the genomic structures, expression, and functions of six LPA receptor genes, Lpar1-Lpar6. Our analyses reveal that the genomic structures of Lpar1 and Lpar4 are different from those deduced from the database. Functional analyses using a heterologous expression system demonstrate that all medaka LPA receptors except for LPA5b respond to LPA treatment with cytoskeletal changes. These findings provide useful information on the structure and function of medaka LPA receptor genes, and identify medaka as a useful experimental model for exploration of the biological significance of LPA signaling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Mechanism of GABAB receptor-induced BDNF secretion and promotion of GABAA receptor membrane expression.

    PubMed

    Kuczewski, Nicola; Fuchs, Celine; Ferrand, Nadine; Jovanovic, Jasmina N; Gaiarsa, Jean-Luc; Porcher, Christophe

    2011-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that GABA(B) receptors play more than a classical inhibitory role and can function as an important synaptic maturation signal early in life. In a previous study, we reported that GABA(B) receptor activation triggers secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and promotes the functional maturation of GABAergic synapses in the developing rat hippocampus. To identify the signalling pathway linking GABA(B) receptor activation to BDNF secretion in these cells, we have now used the phosphorylated form of the cAMP response element-binding protein as a biological sensor for endogenous BDNF release. In the present study, we show that GABA(B) receptor-induced secretion of BDNF relies on the activation of phospholipase C, followed by the formation of diacylglycerol, activation of protein kinase C, and the opening of L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels. We further show that once released by GABA(B) receptor activation, BDNF increases the membrane expression of β(2/3) -containing GABA(A) receptors in neuronal cultures. These results reveal a novel function of GABA(B) receptors in regulating the expression of GABA(A) receptor through BDNF-tropomyosin-related kinase B receptor dependent signalling pathway.

  14. Activation of 5-HT7 receptors increases neuronal platelet-derived growth factor β receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Vasefi, Maryam S; Kruk, Jeff S; Liu, Hui; Heikkila, John J; Beazely, Michael A

    2012-03-09

    Several antipsychotics have a high affinity for 5-HT7 receptors yet despite intense interest in the 5-HT7 receptor as a potential drug target to treat psychosis, the function and signaling properties of 5-HT7 receptors in neurons remain largely uncharacterized. In primary mouse hippocampal and cortical neurons, as well as in the SH-SY5Y cell line, incubation with 5-HT, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT), or 5-HT7 receptor-selective agonists increases the expression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)β receptors. The increased PDGFβ receptor expression is cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA)-dependent, suggesting that 5-HT7 receptors couple to Gα(s) in primary neurons. Interestingly, up-regulated PDGFβ receptors display an increased basal phosphorylation state at the phospholipase Cγ-activating tyrosine 1021. This novel linkage between the 5-HT7 receptor and the PDGF system may be an important GPCR-neurotrophic factor signaling pathway in neurons.

  15. Involvement of the TP receptor in TNF-α-induced endothelial tissue factor expression.

    PubMed

    Del Turco, Serena; Basta, Giuseppina; Lazzerini, Guido; Chancharme, Laurent; Lerond, Laurence; De Caterina, Raffaele

    2014-08-01

    Thromboxane (TX) A2, prostaglandin endoperoxides and F2-isoprostanes exert their effects through a TX-prostanoid (TP) receptor, also expressed in endothelial cells. We investigated a role of the TP receptor in the endothelial expression of tissue factor (TF), a key trigger to thrombosis. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) exposed to the TP receptor agonist U46619 featured a concentration-dependent increase in TF surface exposure and procoagulant activity. HUVEC pre-incubation with the TP receptor antagonist S18886, followed by stimulation with either U46619 or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), attenuated TF surface exposure and activity compared with stimulated control. Aspirin or indomethacin, while inhibiting cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and -2 activities, did not mimic this effect. Probing of underlying mechanisms by selective pharmacological and gene silencing experiments showed that S18886 reduced U46619- or TNF-α-induced TF expression inhibiting ROS production, NAD(P)H oxidase and PKC activation. In addition, S18886 also inhibited ERK activation in the presence of both U46619 and TNF-α alone, while inhibition of JNK activation only occurred in the presence of U46619. The endothelial TP receptor contributes to TF surface exposure and activity induced not only by known TP receptor agonists, but also by TNF-α. Such findings expand the therapeutic potential of TP receptor inhibition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Adenosine A2 receptors modulate haloperidol-induced catalepsy in rats.

    PubMed

    Mandhane, S N; Chopde, C T; Ghosh, A K

    1997-06-11

    The effect of adenosine A1 and A2 receptor agonists and antagonists was investigated on haloperidol-induced catalepsy in rats. Pretreatment (i.p.) with the non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist, theophylline, or the selective adenosine A2 receptor antagonist, 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (DMPX), significantly reversed haloperidol-induced catalepsy, whereas the selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonists, 8-phenyltheophylline and 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine produced no effect. Similar administration of the adenosine A2 receptor agonists, 5'-(N-cyclopropyl)-carboxamidoadenosine and 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA), and the mixed agonists with predominantly A1 site of action, N6-(2-phenylisopropyl) adenosine or 2-chloroadenosine, potentiated haloperidol-induced catalepsy. Higher doses of the adenosine agonists produced catalepsy when given alone. However, N6-cyclopentyladenosine, a highly selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist, was ineffective in these respects. The per se cataleptic effect of adenosine agonists was blocked by DMPX and the centrally acting anticholinergic agent, scopolamine. Scopolamine also attenuated the potentiation of haloperidol-induced catalepsy by adenosine agonists. Further, i.c.v. administration of NECA and DMPX produced a similar effect as that produced after their systemic administration. These findings demonstrate the differential influence of adenosine A1 and A2 receptors on haloperidol-induced catalepsy and support the hypothesis that the functional interaction between adenosine and dopamine mechanisms might occur through adenosine A2 receptors at the level of cholinergic neurons. The results suggest that adenosine A2, but not A1, receptor antagonists may be of potential use in the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  17. Adenosine A(2A) receptor activation prevents progressive kidney fibrosis in a model of immune-associated chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Gabriela E; Truong, Luan D; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Johnson, Richard J; Feng, Lili

    2011-08-01

    Crescentic glomerulonephritis (GN) in Wistar-Kyoto rats progresses to lethal kidney failure by macrophage (Mφ)-mediated mechanisms. Mφs in nephritic glomeruli express adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs), the activation of which suppresses inflammation. Here, we pharmacologically activated the A(2A)Rs with a selective agonist, CGS 21680, and inactivated them with a selective antagonist, ZM241385, to test the effects on established GN. When activation was delayed until antiglomerular basement membrane GN and extracellular matrix deposition were established, glomerular Mφ infiltration was reduced by 83%. There was also a marked improvement in glomerular lesion histology, as well as decreased proteinuria. A(2A)R activation significantly reduced type I, III, and IV collagen deposition, and E-cadherin expression was restored in association with a reduction of α-smooth muscle actin-positive myofibroblasts in the interstitium and glomeruli. In contrast, pharmacological inactivation of A(2A)Rs increased glomerular crescent formation, type I, III, and IV collagen expression, and enhanced E-cadherin loss. Activation of A(2A)Rs suppressed the expression of the Mφ-linked glomerular damage mediators, transforming growth factor-β, osteopontin-1, thrombospondin-1, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1. Thus, A(2A)R activation can arrest GN and prevent progressive fibrosis in established pathological lesions.

  18. Tanshinone I increases CYP1A2 protein expression and enzyme activity in primary rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wayne Y W; Zhou, Xuelin; Or, Penelope M Y; Kwan, Yiu Wa; Yeung, John H K

    2012-01-15

    This study investigated the effects of Danshen and its active ingredients on the protein expression and enzymatic activity of CYP1A2 in primary rat hepatocytes. The ethanolic extract of Danshen roots (containing mainly tanshinones) inhibited CYP1A2-catalyzed phenacetin O-deethylation (IC(50)=24.6 μg/ml) in primary rat hepatocytes while the water extract containing mainly salvianolic acid B and danshenshu had no effect. Individual tanshinones such as cryptotanshinone, dihydrotanshinone, tanshinone IIA inhibited the CYP1A2-mediated metabolism with IC(50) values at 12.9, 17.4 and 31.9 μM, respectively. After 4-day treatment of the rat hepatocytes, the ethanolic extract of Danshen and tanshinone I increased rat CYP1A2 activity by 6.8- and 5.2-fold, respectively, with a concomitant up-regulation of CYP1A2 protein level by 13.5- and 6.5-fold, respectively. CYP1A2 induction correlated with the up-regulation of mRNA level of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), which suggested a positive feedback mechanism of tanshinone I-mediated CYP1A2 induction. A formulated Danshen pill (containing mainly danshensu and salvianolic acid B and the tanshinones) up-regulated CYP1A2 protein expression and enzyme activity, but danshensu and salvianolic acid B, when used individually, did not affect CYP1A2 activity. This study was the first report on the Janus action of the tanshinones on rat CYP1A2 activity.

  19. Developmental changes in NMDA receptor expression in the platyfish brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, K. M.; Schreibman, M. P.; Magliulo-Cepriano, L.

    1997-01-01

    We have examined the distribution of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor in the brain of a freshwater teleost using an antibody against the R1 subunit of the receptor (NMDAR1). The primary site of localization was the nucleus olfactoretinalis (NOR), a significant gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH)-containing brain nucleus. The number of cells expressing NMDAR1 in this nucleus was dependent upon developmental stage, with pubescent and mature animals displaying significantly more stained cells than immature and senescent animals. This is the first reported observation of age- and maturity-related NMDA receptor association with GnRH-containing brain areas.

  20. TAM Receptors in Leukemia: Expression, Signaling, and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Brandão, Luis; Migdall-Wilson, Justine; Eisenman, Kristen; Graham, Douglas K.

    2016-01-01

    In the past 30 years there has been remarkable progress in the treatment of leukemia and lymphoma. However, current treatments are largely ineffective against relapsed leukemia and, in the case of pediatric patients, are often associated with severe long-term toxicities. Thus, there continues to be a critical need for the development of effective biologically targeted therapies. The TAM family of receptor tyrosine kinases—Tyro3, Axl, and Mer—plays an important role in normal hematopoiesis, including natural killer cell maturation, macrophage function, and platelet activation and signaling. Furthermore, TAM receptor activation leads to upregulation of pro-survival and proliferation signaling pathways, and aberrant TAM receptor expression contributes to cancer development, including myeloid and lymphoid leukemia. This review summarizes the role of TAM receptors in leukemia. We outline TAM receptor expression patterns in different forms of leukemia, describe potential mechanisms leading to their overexpression, and delineate the signaling pathways downstream of receptor activation that have been implicated in leukemogenesis. Finally, we discuss the current research focused on inhibitors against these receptors in an effort to develop new therapeutic strategies for leukemia. PMID:22150307

  1. Receptor-mediated regulation of neuropeptide gene expression in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, J P; Nishiyama, N; Wilson, D; Taniwaki, T

    1994-06-01

    One of the functions of glial receptors is to regulate synthesis and release of a variety of neuropeptides and growth factor peptides, which in turn act on neurons or other glia. Because of the potential importance of these interactions in injured brain, we have examined the role of two different receptors in the regulation of astrocyte neuropeptide synthesis. Stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors on type 1 astrocytes resulted in increased mRNA and protein for the proenkephalin (PE) and somatostatin genes. This receptor also increased expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). The potential role of opiate receptors was examined in several ways. Treatment of newborn rats for 7 days with the opiate antagonist naltrexone, prior to preparation of astrocytes, had no effect on PE mRNA or met-enkephalin content but resulted in a significant increase in NGF content. However, treatment of astrocytes in culture with met-enkephalin, morphine, or naltrexone had no effect on any of these parameters. No opiate binding could be detected, using either etorphine or bremazocine, to membranes of astrocytes prepared from cortex, cerebellum, striatum, or hippocampus of 1-day, 7-day, or 14-day postnatal rats. Thus we conclude that type 1 astrocytes do not express opiate receptors and that the in vivo effects of naltrexone are mediated indirectly via some other cell type/receptor.

  2. Multiple melanocortin receptors are expressed in bone cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhong, Qing; Sridhar, Supriya; Ruan, Ling; Ding, Ke-Hong; Xie, Ding; Insogna, Karl; Kang, Baolin; Xu, Jianrui; Bollag, Roni J.; Isales, Carlos M.

    2005-01-01

    Melanocortin receptors belong to the seven transmembrane domain, G-protein coupled family of receptors. There are five members of this receptor family labeled MC1R-MC5R. These receptors are activated by fragments derived from a larger molecule, proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and include ACTH, alpha beta and gamma-MSH and beta-endorphin. Because of in vitro and in vivo data suggesting direct effects of these POMC molecules on bone and bone turnover, we examined bone and bone derived cells for the presence of the various members of the melanocortin receptor family. We report that the five known melanocortin receptors are expressed to varying degrees in osteoblast-like and osteoclastic cells. POMC fragments increased proliferation and expression of a variety of genes in osteoblastic cells. Furthermore, POMC mRNA was detected in osteoclastic cells. These data demonstrate that POMC-derived peptide hormones acting through high affinity melanocortin receptors have specific effects on bone cells. Thus, in addition to the indirect effects of POMC-derived hormones on bone turnover through their modulation of steroid hormone secretion, POMC fragments may have direct and specific effects on bone cell subpopulations.

  3. Multiple melanocortin receptors are expressed in bone cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhong, Qing; Sridhar, Supriya; Ruan, Ling; Ding, Ke-Hong; Xie, Ding; Insogna, Karl; Kang, Baolin; Xu, Jianrui; Bollag, Roni J.; Isales, Carlos M.

    2005-01-01

    Melanocortin receptors belong to the seven transmembrane domain, G-protein coupled family of receptors. There are five members of this receptor family labeled MC1R-MC5R. These receptors are activated by fragments derived from a larger molecule, proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and include ACTH, alpha beta and gamma-MSH and beta-endorphin. Because of in vitro and in vivo data suggesting direct effects of these POMC molecules on bone and bone turnover, we examined bone and bone derived cells for the presence of the various members of the melanocortin receptor family. We report that the five known melanocortin receptors are expressed to varying degrees in osteoblast-like and osteoclastic cells. POMC fragments increased proliferation and expression of a variety of genes in osteoblastic cells. Furthermore, POMC mRNA was detected in osteoclastic cells. These data demonstrate that POMC-derived peptide hormones acting through high affinity melanocortin receptors have specific effects on bone cells. Thus, in addition to the indirect effects of POMC-derived hormones on bone turnover through their modulation of steroid hormone secretion, POMC fragments may have direct and specific effects on bone cell subpopulations.

  4. Dopamine receptor gene expression by enkephalin neurons in rat forebrain

    SciTech Connect

    Le Moine, C.; Normand, E.; Guitteny, A.F.; Fouque, B.; Teoule, R.; Bloch, B. )

    1990-01-01

    In situ hybridization experiments were performed with brain sections from normal, control and haloperidol-treated rats to identify and map the cells expressing the D2 dopamine receptor gene. D2 receptor mRNA was detected with radioactive or biotinylated oligonucleotide probes. D2 receptor mRNA was present in glandular cells of the pituitary intermediate lobe and in neurons of the substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, and forebrain, especially in caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, and piriform cortex. Hybridization with D2 and preproenkephalin A probes in adjacent sections, as well as combined hybridization with the two probes in the same sections, demonstrated that all detectable enkephalin neurons in the striatum contained the D2 receptor mRNA. Large neurons in caudate putamen, which were unlabeled with the preproenkephalin A probe and which may have been cholinergic, also expressed the D2 receptor gene. Haloperidol treatment (14 or 21 days) provoked an increase in mRNA content for D2 receptor and preproenkephalin A in the striatum. This suggests that the increase in D2 receptor number observed after haloperidol treatment is due to increased activity of the D2 gene. These results indicate that in the striatum, the enkephalin neurons are direct targets for dopamine liberated from mesostriatal neurons.

  5. Developmentally Regulated Expression of the Nerve Growth Factor Receptor Gene in the Periphery and Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, C. R.; Martinez, Humberto J.; Black, Ira B.; Chao, Moses V.

    1987-05-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) regulates development and maintenance of function of peripheral sympathetic and sensory neurons. A potential role for the trophic factor in brain has been detected only recently. The ability of a cell to respond to NGF is due, in part, to expression of specific receptors on the cell surface. To study tissue-specific expression of the NGF receptor gene, we have used sensitive cRNA probes for detection of NGF receptor mRNA. Our studies indicate that the receptor gene is selectively and specifically expressed in sympathetic (superior cervical) and sensory (dorsal root) ganglia in the periphery, and by the septum-basal forebrain centrally, in the neonatal rat in vivo. Moreover, examination of tissues from neonatal and adult rats reveals a marked reduction in steady-state NGF receptor mRNA levels in sensory ganglia. In contrast, a 2- to 4-fold increase was observed in the basal forebrain and in the sympathetic ganglia over the same time period. Our observations suggest that NGF receptor mRNA expression is developmentally regulated in specific areas of the nervous system in a differential fashion.

  6. Enhancement in gastric mucosal EGF and PDGF receptor expression with ulcer healing by sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, J; Majka, J; Sano, S; Nowak, P; Murty, V L; Slomiany, A; Slomiany, B L

    1995-07-01

    1. The effect of an antiulcer agent, sulglycotide, on mucosal expression of EGF and PDGF receptors with chronic ulcer healing was investigated. 2. Rats with experimentally-induced gastric ulcers were treated twice daily for 14 consecutive days, either with sulglycotide at 200 mg/kg or vehicle, and at different stages of treatment used for quantitation of gastric mucosal EGF and PDGF receptors. 3. The ulcer healing was accompanied by an increase in mucosal expression of both types of receptors. A 1.8-fold increase in EGF and 3.1-fold increase in PDGF receptors occurred by the 4th day following the development of ulcer and reached a maximum of 2.4-3.9-fold increase by the 10-14th day. 4. Treatment with sulglycotide caused accelerated ulcer healing accompanied by a significant enhancement in the receptors expression. A 2.3- and 3.6-fold increase in EGF and PDGF receptor expression occurred by the 4th day of sulglycotide treatment, reaching a 5.5- and 5.6-fold respective increase by the 10th day when the ulcer essentially healed. 5. The results attest to the ability of sulglycotide to stimulate the gastric mucosal proliferative activities associated with ulcer healing.

  7. Characterisation of tectal ephrin-A2 expression during optic nerve regeneration in goldfish: implications for restoration of topography.

    PubMed

    King, Carolyn; Lacey, Richard; Rodger, Jennifer; Bartlett, Carole; Dunlop, Sarah; Beazley, Lyn

    2004-06-01

    EphA receptors and their ligands the ephrin-As, expressed as retinal and tectal gradients, are required for the development of retino-tectal topography [Neuron 25 (2000) 563] and its restoration during goldfish optic nerve regeneration [Mol. Cell. Neurosci. 25 (2004) 56]. We have reported previously that, during regeneration, a transient EphA3/A5 gradient is formed by differential expression across the entire retinal ganglion cell (RGC) population [Neurosci. Abs. 33 (2003) 358.2; Exp. Neurol. 183 (2003) 593]. In retino-recipient tectal layers, ephrin-A2 is normally expressed by only a sub-population of cells, but during regeneration, there is a graded increase with more expressing cells caudally than rostrally [Exp. Neurol. 166 (2000) 196]. Here, we examine the characteristics of tectal ephrin-A2 expression during regeneration. We report that the level of ephrin-A2 expression is comparable for all ephrin-A2-positive cells in normal animals and during regeneration. Using double-labelling immunohistochemistry for ephrin-A2 and specific cell markers (NeuN for neurons, GA5 for astrocytes, NN-1 for microglia/endothelial cells and 6D2 for oligodendrocytes), we demonstrate that ephrin-A2-expressing cells, as in normal animals, are exclusively neuronal. Moreover, double labelling with BrdU showed that ephrin-A2 is expressed in resident cells and not those generated during optic nerve regeneration [Brain Res. 854 (2000) 178, 153 (1978) 345].

  8. Pre-synaptic adenosine A2A receptors control cannabinoid CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of striatal glutamatergic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Martire, Alberto; Tebano, Maria Teresa; Chiodi, Valentina; Ferreira, Samira G; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Köfalvi, Attila; Popoli, Patrizia

    2011-01-01

    An interaction between adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A) Rs) and cannabinoid CB(1) receptors (CB(1) Rs) has been consistently reported to occur in the striatum, although the precise mechanisms are not completely understood. As both receptors control striatal glutamatergic transmission, we now probed the putative interaction between pre-synaptic CB(1) R and A(2A) R in the striatum. In extracellular field potentials recordings in corticostriatal slices from Wistar rats, A(2A) R activation by CGS21680 inhibited CB(1) R-mediated effects (depression of synaptic response and increase in paired-pulse facilitation). Moreover, in superfused rat striatal nerve terminals, A(2A) R activation prevented, while A(2A) R inhibition facilitated, the CB(1) R-mediated inhibition of 4-aminopyridine-evoked glutamate release. In summary, the present study provides converging neurochemical and electrophysiological support for the occurrence of a tight control of CB(1) R function by A(2A) Rs in glutamatergic terminals of the striatum. In view of the key role of glutamate to trigger the recruitment of striatal circuits, this pre-synaptic interaction between CB(1) R and A(2A) R may be of relevance for the pathogenesis and the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders affecting the basal ganglia.

  9. Triggering neurotrophic factor actions through adenosine A2A receptor activation: implications for neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Sebastião, Ana M; Ribeiro, Joaquim A

    2009-01-01

    G protein coupled receptors and tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) receptors have distinct structure and transducing mechanisms; therefore, cross-talk among them was unexpected. Evidence has, however, accumulated showing that tonic adenosine A2A receptor activity is a required step to allow synaptic actions of neurotrophic factors, namely upon synaptic transmission at both pre- and post-synaptic level as well as upon synaptic plasticity. An enhancement of A2A receptor tonus upon ageing may partially compensate the loss of TrkB receptors, rescuing to certain degree the facilitatory action of brain derived neurotrophic factor in aged animals, which might prove particularly relevant in the prevention of neurodegeneration upon ageing. A2A receptors also trigger synaptic actions of other neurotrophic factors, such as glial derived neurotrophic factor at dopaminergic striatal nerve endings. The growing evidence that tonic adenosine A2A receptor activity is a crucial step to allow actions of neurotrophic factors in neurones will be reviewed and discussed in the light of therapeutic strategies for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19508402

  10. Morphine upregulates functional expression of neurokinin-1 receptor in neurons.

    PubMed

    Wan, Qi; Douglas, Steven D; Wang, Xu; Kolson, Dennis L; O'Donnell, Lauren A; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2006-11-15

    Neuronkinin-1 receptor (NK-1R), the neuropeptide substance P (SP) preferring receptor, is highly expressed in areas of the central nervous system (CNS) that are especially implicated in depression, anxiety, and stress. Repeated exposure to opioids may sensitize neuronal systems involved in stress response. We examined the effects of morphine, the principal metabolite of heroin, on the functional expression of NK-1R in the cortical neurons. NK-1R and mu-opioid receptor (MOR) are co-expressed in the cortical neurons. Morphine enhanced NK-1R expression in the cortical neurons at both the mRNA and protein levels. The upregulated NK-1R by morphine had functional activity, because morphine-treated cortical neurons had greater SP-induced Ca(2+) mobilization than untreated neurons. Blocking opioid receptors on the cortical neurons by naltrexone or CTAP (a mu-opioid receptor antagonist) abolished the morphine action. Investigation of the mechanism(s) responsible for the morphine action showed that morphine activated NK-1R promoter and induced the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK protein in the cortical neurons. These in vitro data provide a plausible cellular mechanism for opioid-mediated neurological disorders.

  11. Purification of a rat neurotensin receptor expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, J; Grisshammer, R

    1996-01-01

    A truncated rat neurotensin receptor (NTR), expressed in Escherichia coli with the maltose-binding protein fused to its N-terminus and the 13 amino acid Bio tag fused to its C-terminus, was purified to apparent homogeneity in two steps by use of the monomeric avidin system followed by a novel neurotensin column. This purification protocol was developed by engineering a variety of affinity tags on to the C-terminus of NTR. Surprisingly, expression levels varied considerably depending on the C-terminal tag used. Functional expression of NTR was highest (800 receptors/cell) when thioredoxin was placed between the receptor C-terminus and the tag, indicating a stabilizing effect of the thioredoxin moiety. Several affinity chromatography methods were tested for purification. NTR with the in vivo-biotinylated Bio tag was purified with the highest efficiency compared with NTR with the Strep tag or a hexa-histidine tail. Co-expression of biotin ligase improved considerably the in vivo biotinylation of the Bio tag and, therefore, the overall purification yield. Proteolysis of the NTR fusion protein was prevented by removing a protease-sensitive site discovered at the N-terminus of NTR. The ligand binding properties of the purified receptor were similar to those of the membrane-bound protein and the native receptor. The scale-up of this purification scheme, to provide sufficient protein for biophysical studies, is in progress. PMID:8760379

  12. Structure of Liver Receptor Homolog-1 (NR5A2) with PIP3 hormone bound in the ligand binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Sablin, Elena P; Blind, Raymond D; Uthayaruban, Rubatharshini; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Deacon, Ashley M; Das, Debanu; Ingraham, Holly A; Fletterick, Robert J

    2015-12-01

    The nuclear receptor LRH-1 (Liver Receptor Homolog-1, NR5A2) is a transcription factor that regulates gene expression programs critical for many aspects of metabolism and reproduction. Although LRH-1 is able to bind phospholipids, it is still considered an orphan nuclear receptor (NR) with an unknown regulatory hormone. Our prior cellular and structural studies demonstrated that the signaling phosphatidylinositols PI(4,5)P2 (PIP2) and PI(3,4,5)P3 (PIP3) bind and regulate SF-1 (Steroidogenic Factor-1, NR5A1), a close homolog of LRH-1. Here, we describe the crystal structure of human LRH-1 ligand binding domain (LBD) bound by PIP3 - the first phospholipid with a head group endogenous to mammals. We show that the phospholipid hormone binds LRH-1 with high affinity, stabilizing the receptor LBD. While the hydrophobic PIP3 tails (C16/C16) are buried inside the LRH-1 ligand binding pocket, the negatively charged PIP3 head group is presented on the receptor surface, similar to the phosphatidylinositol binding mode observed in the PIP3-SF-1 structure. Thus, data presented in this work reinforce our earlier findings demonstrating that signaling phosphatidylinositols regulate the NR5A receptors LRH-1 and SF-1.

  13. Phospholipase A2-modified low-density lipoprotein activates macrophage peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors.

    PubMed

    Namgaladze, Dmitry; Morbitzer, Daniel; von Knethen, Andreas; Brüne, Bernhard

    2010-02-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-activated transcription factors modulating metabolic and inflammatory responses of phagocytes to stimuli such as fatty acids and their metabolites. We studied the role of PPARs in macrophages exposed to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) modified by secretory phospholipase A(2) (PLA). By analyzing PPAR ligand-binding domain luciferase reporter activation, we observed that PLA-LDL transactivates PPARalpha and PPARdelta, but not PPARgamma. We confirmed that PLA-LDL induced PPAR response element reporter activation by endogenous PPARalpha and PPARdelta in human THP-1 macrophages. By using THP-1 cells with a stable knockdown of PPARalpha and PPARdelta, we showed that PLA-LDL-activated PPARdelta altered macrophage gene expression related to lipid metabolism and lipid droplet formation. Although PPARalpha/delta silencing did not affect cholesterol and triglyceride accumulation in PLA-LDL-treated macrophages, PPARdelta activation by PLA-LDL attenuated macrophage inflammatory gene expression induced by interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharide. PPARdelta activation by PLA-LDL does not influence lipid accumulation in PLA-LDL-treated macrophages. However, it attenuates macrophage inflammatory responses, thus contributing to an anti-inflammatory cell phenotype.

  14. A role of the SAM domain in EphA2 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaojun; Hapiak, Vera; Zheng, Ji; Muller-Greven, Jeannine; Bowman, Deanna; Lingerak, Ryan; Buck, Matthias; Wang, Bing-Cheng; Smith, Adam W

    2017-03-24

    Among the 20 subfamilies of protein receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), Eph receptors are unique in possessing a sterile alpha motif (SAM domain) at their C-terminal ends. However, the functions of SAM domains in Eph receptors remain elusive. Here we report on a combined cell biology and quantitative fluorescence study to investigate the role of the SAM domain in EphA2 function. We observed elevated tyrosine autophosphorylation levels upon deletion of the EphA2 SAM domain (EphA2ΔS) in DU145 and PC3 prostate cancer cells and a skin tumor cell line derived from EphA1/A2 knockout mice. These results suggest that SAM domain deletion induced constitutive activation of EphA2 kinase activity. In order to explain these effects, we applied fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to investigate the lateral molecular organization of EphA2. Our results indicate that SAM domain deletion (EphA2ΔS-GFP) increases oligomerization compared to the full length receptor (EphA2FL-GFP). Stimulation with ephrinA1, a ligand for EphA2, induced further oligomerization and activation of EphA2FL-GFP. The SAM domain deletion mutant, EphA2ΔS-GFP, also underwent further oligomerization upon ephrinA1 stimulation, but the oligomers were larger than those observed for EphA2FL-GFP. Based on these results, we conclude that the EphA2 SAM domain inhibits kinase activity by reducing receptor oligomerization.

  15. A role of the SAM domain in EphA2 receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaojun; Hapiak, Vera; Zheng, Ji; Muller-Greven, Jeannine; Bowman, Deanna; Lingerak, Ryan; Buck, Matthias; Wang, Bing-Cheng; Smith, Adam W.

    2017-01-01

    Among the 20 subfamilies of protein receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), Eph receptors are unique in possessing a sterile alpha motif (SAM domain) at their C-terminal ends. However, the functions of SAM domains in Eph receptors remain elusive. Here we report on a combined cell biology and quantitative fluorescence study to investigate the role of the SAM domain in EphA2 function. We observed elevated tyrosine autophosphorylation levels upon deletion of the EphA2 SAM domain (EphA2ΔS) in DU145 and PC3 prostate cancer cells and a skin tumor cell line derived from EphA1/A2 knockout mice. These results suggest that SAM domain deletion induced constitutive activation of EphA2 kinase activity. In order to explain these effects, we applied fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to investigate the lateral molecular organization of EphA2. Our results indicate that SAM domain deletion (EphA2ΔS-GFP) increases oligomerization compared to the full length receptor (EphA2FL-GFP). Stimulation with ephrinA1, a ligand for EphA2, induced further oligomerization and activation of EphA2FL-GFP. The SAM domain deletion mutant, EphA2ΔS-GFP, also underwent further oligomerization upon ephrinA1 stimulation, but the oligomers were larger than those observed for EphA2FL-GFP. Based on these results, we conclude that the EphA2 SAM domain inhibits kinase activity by reducing receptor oligomerization. PMID:28338017

  16. Characterization of cannabinoid receptor ligands in tissues natively expressing cannabinoid CB2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Marini, Pietro; Cascio, Maria-Grazia; King, Angela; Pertwee, Roger G; Ross, Ruth A

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although cannabinoid CB2 receptor ligands have been widely characterized in recombinant systems in vitro, little pharmacological characterization has been performed in tissues natively expressing CB2 receptors. The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacology of CB2 receptor ligands in tissue natively expressing CB2 receptors (human, rat and mouse spleen) and hCB2-transfected CHO cells. Experimental Approach We tested the ability of well-known cannabinoid CB2 receptor ligands to stimulate or inhibit [35S]GTPγS binding to mouse, rat and human spleen membranes and to hCB2-transfected CHO cell membranes. cAMP assays were also performed in hCB2-CHO cells. Key Results The data presented demonstrate that: (i) CP 55,940, WIN 55,212-2 and JWH 133 behave as CB2 receptor full agonists both in spleen and hCB2-CHO cells, in both [35S]GTPγS and cAMP assays; (ii) JWH 015 behaves as a low-efficacy agonist in spleen as well as in hCB2-CHO cells when tested in the [35S]GTPγS assay, while it displays full agonism when tested in the cAMP assay using hCB2-CHO cells; (iii) (R)-AM 1241 and GW 405833 behave as agonists in the [35S]GTPγS assay using spleen, instead it behaves as a low-efficacy inverse agonist in hCB2-CHO cells; and (iv) SR 144528, AM 630 and JTE 907 behave as CB2 receptor inverse agonists in all the tissues. Conclusion and Implications Our results demonstrate that CB2 receptor ligands can display differential pharmacology when assays are conducted in tissues that natively express CB2 receptors and imply that conclusions from recombinant CB2 receptors should be treated with caution. PMID:23711022

  17. The role of the plexin-A2 receptor in Sema3A and Sema3B signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Sabag, Adi D; Smolkin, Tatyana; Mumblat, Yelena; Ueffing, Marius; Kessler, Ofra; Gloeckner, Christian Johannes; Neufeld, Gera

    2014-12-15

    Class 3 semaphorins are anti-angiogenic and anti-tumorigenic guidance factors that bind to neuropilins, which, in turn, associate with class A plexins to transduce semaphorin signals. To study the role of the plexin-A2 receptor in semaphorin signaling, we silenced its expression in endothelial cells and in glioblastoma cells. The silencing did not affect Sema3A signaling, which depended on neuropilin-1, plexin-A1 and plexin-A4, but completely abolished Sema3B signaling, which also required plexin-A4 and one of the two neuropilins. Interestingly, overexpression of plexin-A2 in plexin-A1- or plexin-A4-silenced cells restored responses to both semaphorins, although it nullified their ability to differentiate between them, suggesting that, when overexpressed, plexin-A2 can functionally replace other class A plexins. By contrast, although plexin-A4 overexpression restored Sema3A signaling in plexin-A1-silenced cells, it failed to restore Sema3B signaling in plexin-A2-silenced cells. It follows that the identity of plexins in functional semaphorin receptors can be flexible depending on their expression level. Our results suggest that changes in the expression of plexins induced by microenvironmental cues can trigger differential responses of different populations of migrating cells to encountered gradients of semaphorins.

  18. Expression of TIR8 receptor in chicken tissues.

    PubMed

    Turin, L; Manarolla, G; Riva, F

    2014-01-01

    The orphan receptor TIR8, also known as SIGIRR, belongs to the TLR/IL-1R (TIR) superfamily and plays an important role in the immune response. The signalling pathways of the receptors belonging to the TIR family are tightly regulated at multiple levels and through different mechanisms. TIR8 negatively modulates innate immunity and inflammatory responses in the areas where it is primarily expressed (gastrointestinal tract, kidney and lung). TIR8 has been well characterized in mouse, humans and in other Mammalian species, but it is still poorly known in chicken. Given the importance of gastrointestinal diseases in chicken, the aim of our study was to investigate the distribution of TIR8 in a wide panel of non-pathologic tissues and organs. TIR8 expression was analyzed in chicken samples at both levels of transcript mRNA and translated protein. The pattern of expression of TIR8 (ubiquitous) was similar to Mammals for some tissues (high levels in kidney and gastrointestinal tract), but it resulted unique for other tissues. High expression was detected in liver, pancreas and female reproductive tract. Interestingly, the receptor was highly expressed also in heterophils, the most common granulocytes of birds. Few isoforms of chicken TIR8 were detected by Western blot, suggesting the occurrence of different post-translational processing in different organs. Immunohistochemistry revealed TIR8 immunolabelling in chicken intestine and thymus. These results demonstrate that the receptor, although evolutionarily conserved, show species-specific peculiarities.

  19. Up-regulation of striatal adenosine A2A receptors with iron deficiency in rats. Effects on locomotion and cortico-striatal neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz, César; Pearson, Virginia; Gulyani, Seema; Allen, Richard; Earley, Christopher; Ferré, Sergi

    2010-01-01

    Brain iron deficiency leads to altered dopaminergic function in experimental animals, which can provide a mechanistic explanation for iron deficiency-related human sensory-motor disorders, such as Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS). However, mechanisms linking both conditions have not been determined. Considering the strong modulation exerted by adenosine on dopamine signaling, one connection could involve changes in adenosine receptor expression or function. In the striatum, presynaptic A2A receptors are localized in glutamatergic terminals contacting GABAergic dynorphinergic neurons and their function can be analyzed by the ability of A2A receptor antagonists to block the motor output induced by cortical electrical stimulation. Postsynaptic A2A receptors are localized in the dendritic field of GABAergic enkephalinergic neurons and their function can be analyzed by studying the ability of A2A receptor antagonists to produce locomotor activity and to counteract striatal ERK1/2 phosphorylation induced by cortical electrical stimulation. Increased density of striatal A2A receptors was found in rats fed during three weeks with an iron-deficient diet during the post-weaning period. In iron-deficient rats, the selective A2A receptor antagonist MSX-3, at doses of 1 and 3 mg/kg, was more effective at blocking motor output induced by cortical electrical stimulation (presynaptic A2A receptor-mediated effect) and at enhancing locomotor activation and blocking striatal ERK phosphorylation induced by cortical electrical stimulation (postsynaptic A2A receptor-mediated effects). These results indicate that brain iron deficiency induces a functional up-regulation of both striatal pre- and postsynaptic A2A receptor, which could be involved in sensory-motor disorders associated with iron deficiency such as RLS. PMID:20385128

  20. Up-regulation of striatal adenosine A(2A) receptors with iron deficiency in rats: effects on locomotion and cortico-striatal neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, César; Pearson, Virginia; Gulyani, Seema; Allen, Richard; Earley, Christopher; Ferré, Sergi

    2010-07-01

    Brain iron deficiency leads to altered dopaminergic function in experimental animals, which can provide a mechanistic explanation for iron deficiency-related human sensory-motor disorders, such as Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS). However, mechanisms linking both conditions have not been determined. Considering the strong modulation exerted by adenosine on dopamine signaling, one connection could involve changes in adenosine receptor expression or function. In the striatum, presynaptic A(2A) receptors are localized in glutamatergic terminals contacting GABAergic dynorphinergic neurons and their function can be analyzed by the ability of A(2A) receptor antagonists to block the motor output induced by cortical electrical stimulation. Postsynaptic A(2A) receptors are localized in the dendritic field of GABAergic enkephalinergic neurons and their function can be analyzed by studying the ability of A(2A) receptor antagonists to produce locomotor activity and to counteract striatal ERK1/2 phosphorylation induced by cortical electrical stimulation. Increased density of striatal A(2A) receptors was found in rats fed during 3 weeks with an iron-deficient diet during the post-weaning period. In iron-deficient rats, the selective A(2A) receptor antagonist MSX-3, at doses of 1 and 3 mg/kg, was more effective at blocking motor output induced by cortical electrical stimulation (presynaptic A(2A) receptor-mediated effect) and at enhancing locomotor activation and blocking striatal ERK phosphorylation induced by cortical electrical stimulation (postsynaptic A(2A) receptor-mediated effects). These results indicate that brain iron deficiency induces a functional up-regulation of both striatal pre- and postsynaptic A(2A) receptor, which could be involved in sensory-motor disorders associated with iron deficiency such as RLS.

  1. A2A Adenosine Receptor Antagonism Enhances Synaptic and Motor Effects of Cocaine via CB1 Cannabinoid Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Tozzi, Alessandro; de Iure, Antonio; Marsili, Valentina; Romano, Rosaria; Tantucci, Michela; Di Filippo, Massimiliano; Costa, Cinzia; Napolitano, Francesco; Mercuri, Nicola Biagio; Borsini, Franco; Giampà, Carmen; Fusco, Francesca Romana; Picconi, Barbara; Usiello, Alessandro; Calabresi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Background Cocaine increases the level of endogenous dopamine (DA) in the striatum by blocking the DA transporter. Endogenous DA modulates glutamatergic inputs to striatal neurons and this modulation influences motor activity. Since D2 DA and A2A-adenosine receptors (A2A-Rs) have antagonistic effects on striatal neurons, drugs targeting adenosine receptors such as caffeine-like compounds, could enhance psychomotor stimulant effects of cocaine. In this study, we analyzed the electrophysiological effects of cocaine and A2A-Rs antagonists in striatal slices and the motor effects produced by this pharmacological modulation in rodents. Principal Findings Concomitant administration of cocaine and A2A-Rs antagonists reduced glutamatergic synaptic transmission in striatal spiny neurons while these drugs failed to produce this effect when given in isolation. This inhibitory effect was dependent on the activation of D2-like receptors and the release of endocannabinoids since it was prevented by L-sulpiride and reduced by a CB1 receptor antagonist. Combined application of cocaine and A2A-R antagonists also reduced the firing frequency of striatal cholinergic interneurons suggesting that changes in cholinergic tone might contribute to this synaptic modulation. Finally, A2A-Rs antagonists, in the presence of a sub-threshold dose of cocaine, enhanced locomotion and, in line with the electrophysiological experiments, this enhanced activity required activation of D2-like and CB1 receptors. Conclusions The present study provides a possible synaptic mechanism explaining how caffeine-like compounds could enhance psychomotor stimulant effects of cocaine. PMID:22715379

  2. Adenosine A2A receptor activation stimulates collagen production in sclerodermic dermal fibroblasts either directly and through a cross-talk with the cannabinoid system.

    PubMed

    Lazzerini, Pietro Enea; Natale, Mariarita; Gianchecchi, Elena; Capecchi, Pier Leopoldo; Montilli, Cinzia; Zimbone, Stefania; Castrichini, Monica; Balistreri, Epifania; Ricci, Gianluca; Selvi, Enrico; Garcia-Gonzalez, Estrella; Galeazzi, Mauro; Laghi-Pasini, Franco

    2012-03-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disease characterised by exaggerated collagen deposition in the skin and visceral organs. Adenosine A2A receptor stimulation (A2Ar) promotes dermal fibrosis, while the cannabinoid system modulates fibrogenesis in vitro and in animal models of SSc. Moreover, evidence in central nervous system suggests that A2A and cannabinoid (CB1) receptors may physically and functionally interact. On this basis, we investigated A2Ar expression and function in modulating collagen biosynthesis from SSc dermal fibroblasts and analysed the cross-talk with cannabinoid receptors. In sclerodermic cells, A2Ar expression (RT-PCR, Western blotting) was evaluated together with the effects of A2A agonists and/or antagonists on collagen biosynthesis (EIA, Western blotting). Putative physical and functional interactions between the A2A and cannabinoid receptors were respectively assessed by co-immuno-precipitation and co-incubating the cells with the unselective cannabinoid agonist WIN55,212-2, and the selective A2A antagonist ZM-241385. In SSc fibroblasts, (1) the A2Ar is overexpressed and its occupancy with the selective agonist CGS-21680 increases collagen production, myofibroblast trans-differentiation, and ERK-1/2 phosphorylation; (2) the A2Ar forms an heteromer with the cannabinoid CB1 receptor; and (3) unselective cannabinoid receptor stimulation with a per se ineffective dose of WIN55,212-2, results in a marked anti-fibrotic effect after A2Ar blockage. In conclusion, A2Ar stimulation induces a pro-fibrotic phenotype in SSc dermal fibroblasts, either directly, and indirectly, by activating the CB1 cannabinoid receptor. These findings increase our knowledge of the pathophysiology of sclerodermic fibrosis also further suggesting a new therapeutic approach to the disease.

  3. Pharmacological evidence for different populations of postsynaptic adenosine A2A receptors in the rat striatum

    PubMed Central

    Orrú, Marco; Quiroz, César; Guitart, Xavier; Ferré, Sergi

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) are highly concentrated in the striatum. Two pharmacological different functional populations of A2ARs have been recently described based on their different affinities for the A2AR antagonist SCH-442416. This compound has high affinity for A2ARs not forming heteromers or forming heteromers with adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs) while showing very low affinity for A2ARs forming heteromers with dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs). It has been widely described that striatal A1R-A2AR heteromers are preferentially localized presynaptically in the glutamatergic terminals that contact GABAergic dynorphinergic neurons, and that A2AR-D2R heteromers are localized postsynaptically in GABAergic enkephalinergic neurons. In the present study we provide evidence suggesting that SCH-442416 also targets postsynaptic A2AR not forming heteromers with D2R, which are involved in the motor depressant effects induced by D2R antagonists. SCH-442416 counteracted motor depression in rats induced by the D2R antagonist raclopride at a dose that did not produce motor activation or that blocked motor depression induced by an A2AR agonist. Furthermore, we re-evaluated the recently suggested key role of cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1Rs) in the effects of A2AR antagonists acting at postsynaptic A2ARs. By recording locomotor activity and monitoring striatal glutamate release induced by cortical electrical stimulation in rats after administration of A2AR and CB1R antagonists, we did not find evidence for any significant role of endocannabinoids in the post- or presynaptic effects of A2AR antagonists. The present results further suggest the existence of at least two functionally and pharmacologically different populations of striatal postsynaptic A2ARs. PMID:21752341

  4. Nicotinic Receptor Alpha7 Expression during Mouse Adrenal Gland Development

    PubMed Central

    Gahring, Lorise C.; Myers, Elizabeth; Palumbos, Sierra; Rogers, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha 7 (α7) is a ligand-activated ion channel that contributes to a diversity of cellular processes involved in development, neurotransmission and inflammation. In this report the expression of α7 was examined in the mouse developing and adult adrenal gland that expresses a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter as a bi-cistronic extension of the endogenous α7 transcript (α7G). At embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) α7G expression was associated with the suprarenal ganglion and precursor cells of the adrenal gland. The α7G cells are catecholaminergic chromaffin cells as reflected by their progressive increase in the co-expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) that is complete by E18.5. In the adult, α7G expression is limited to a subset of chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla that cluster near the border with the adrenal cortex. These chromaffin cells co-express α7G, TH and DBH, but they lack phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) consistent with only norepinephrine (NE) synthesis. These cell groups appear to be preferentially innervated by pre-ganglionic afferents identified by the neurotrophin receptor p75. No afferents identified by beta-III tubulin, neurofilament proteins or p75 co-expressed α7G. Occasional α7G cells in the pre-E14.5 embryos express neuronal markers consistent with intrinsic ganglion cells and in the adult some α7G cells co-express glutamic acid decarboxylase. The transient expression of α7 during adrenal gland development and its prominent co-expression by a subset of NE chromaffin cells in the adult suggests that the α7 receptor contributes to multiple aspects of adrenal gland development and function that persist into adulthood. PMID:25093893

  5. Enhancement of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Surface Expression

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, Jill H.; Hall, Randy A.

    2009-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate physiological responses to a diverse array of stimuli and are the molecular targets for numerous therapeutic drugs. GPCRs primarily signal from the plasma membrane, but when expressed in heterologous cells many GPCRs exhibit poor trafficking to the cell surface. Multiple approaches have been taken to enhance GPCR surface expression in heterologous cells, including addition/deletion of receptor sequences, co-expression with interacting proteins, and treatment with pharmacological chaperones. In addition to allowing for enhanced surface expression of certain GPCRs in heterologous cells, these approaches have also shed light on the control of GPCR trafficking in vivo and in some cases have led to new therapeutic approaches for treating human diseases that result from defects in GPCR trafficking. PMID:19679364

  6. Expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors, AMPA, kainite and NMDA, in the pigeon retina.

    PubMed

    Atoji, Yasuro

    2015-07-01

    Glutamate is an excitatory neurotransmitter in the vertebrate retina. A previous study found vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGluT2) mRNA in the pigeon retina, suggesting that bipolar and ganglion cells are glutamatergic. The present study examined the localization of ionotropic glutamate receptors to identify receptor cells in the pigeon retina using in situ hybridization histochemistry. Nine subunits of AMPA receptor (GluA1, GluA2, GluA3, and GluA4), kainate receptor (GluK1, GluK2, and GluK4), and NMDA receptor (GluN1 and GluN2A) were found to be expressed in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and ganglion cell layers. GluA1, GluA2, GluA3, and GluA4 were primarily expressed in the inner half of INL, and the signal intensity was strong for GluA2, GluA3, and GluA4. GluK1 was intensely expressed in the outer half of INL, whereas GluK2 and GluK4 were mainly localized in the inner half of INL. GluN1 and GluN2A were moderately expressed in the inner half of INL. Horizontal cells expressed GluA3 and GluA4, and ganglion cells expressed all subunits examined. These results suggest that the glutamatergic neurotransmission in the pigeon retina is similar to that in mammals.

  7. Olfactory receptor gene expression in tiger salamander olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Marchand, James E; Yang, Xinhai; Chikaraishi, Dona; Krieger, Jurgen; Breer, Heinz; Kauer, John S

    2004-06-28

    Physiological studies of odor-elicited responses from the olfactory epithelium and bulb in the tiger salamander, Ambystoma tigrinum, have elucidated a number of features of olfactory coding that appear to be conserved across several vertebrate species. This animal model has provided an accessible in vivo system for observing individual and ensemble olfactory responses to odorant stimulation using biochemical, neurophysiological, and behavioral assays. In this paper we have complemented these studies by characterizing 35 candidate odorant receptor genes. These receptor sequences are similar to those of the large families of olfactory receptors found in mammals and fish. In situ hybridization, using RNA probes to 20 of these sequences, demonstrates differential distributions of labeled cells across the extent and within the depth of the olfactory epithelium. The distributions of cells labeled with probes to different receptors show spatially restricted patterns that are generally localized to different degrees in medial-lateral and anterior-posterior directions. The patterns of receptor expression in the ventral olfactory epithelium (OE) are mirrored in the dorsal OE. We present a hypothesis as to how the sensory neuron populations expressing different receptor types responding to a particular odorant may relate to the distribution patterns of epithelial and bulbar responses previously characterized using single-unit and voltage-sensitive dye recording methods. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Active NMDA glutamate receptors are expressed by mammalian osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Leon; Itzstein, Cécile; Cheynel, Hervé; Delmas, Pierre D; Chenu, Chantal

    1999-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor, widely distributed in the mammalian nervous system, has recently been identified in bone. In this study, we have investigated whether NMDA receptors expressed by osteoclasts have an electrophysiological activity. Using the patch clamp technique two agonists of the NMDA receptor, L-glutamate (Glu) and NMDA, were shown to activate whole-cell currents recorded in isolated rabbit osteoclasts. The current-voltage (I-V) relationships of the currents induced by Glu (IGlu) and NMDA (INMDA) were studied using Mg2+-free solutions. The agonist-induced currents had a linear I-V relationship with a reversal potential near 0 mV, as expected for a voltage independent and non-selective cationic current. IGlu and INMDA were sensitive to specific blockers of NMDA subtype glutamate receptors, such as magnesium ions, (5R, 10S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a, d]cyclohepten -5,10-imine (MK-801) and 1-(1,2-diphenylethyl) piperidine (DEP). The block of IGlu and INMDA by these specific antagonists was voltage dependent, strong for negative potentials (inward current) and absent for positive potentials (outward current). These results demonstrate that NMDA receptors are functional in rabbit osteoclasts, and that their electrophysiological and pharmacological properties in these cells are similar to those documented for neuronal cells. Active NMDA receptors expressed by osteoclasts may represent a new target for regulating bone resorption. PMID:10373688

  9. Histamine Receptor Expression in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Dogs.

    PubMed

    Schwittlick, U; Junginger, J; Hahn, K; Habierski, A; Hewicker-Trautwein, M

    2017-02-01

    Histamine is an important mediator of many physiological processes including gastrointestinal function that acts via four different histamine receptors (H1R to H4R). Elevated histamine levels and increased HR messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) have been shown in humans with gastrointestinal disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome or allergic intestinal diseases. As there is limited knowledge concerning the distribution of histamine receptors (HR) in dogs, one aim of this study was to investigate the expression of histamine 1 receptor (H1R), histamine 2 receptor (H2R) and histamine 4 receptor (H4R) in the canine gastrointestinal tract at protein level using immunohistochemistry. Histamine 1 receptor, H2R and H4R were widely expressed throughout the canine gastrointestinal tract including epithelial, mesenchymal, neuronal and immune cells. In addition, in situ hybridisation was established for detecting canine H4R mRNA. Results showed H4R mRNA to be present in enterocytes, lamina propria immune cells and submucosal plexus in the duodenum and colon of nearly all investigated animals. The results elucidate the importance of HR in the canine gut and represent the basis for investigating their possible impact on canine inflammatory gastrointestinal disorders.

  10. Angiotensin II type 1/adenosine A 2A receptor oligomers: a novel target for tardive dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Paulo A de; Dalton, James A R; López-Cano, Marc; Ricarte, Adrià; Morató, Xavier; Matheus, Filipe C; Cunha, Andréia S; Müller, Christa E; Takahashi, Reinaldo N; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Giraldo, Jesús; Prediger, Rui D; Ciruela, Francisco

    2017-05-12

    Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a serious motor side effect that may appear after long-term treatment with neuroleptics and mostly mediated by dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs). Striatal D2R functioning may be finely regulated by either adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) or angiotensin receptor type 1 (AT1R) through putative receptor heteromers. Here, we examined whether A2AR and AT1R may oligomerize in the striatum to synergistically modulate dopaminergic transmission. First, by using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer, we demonstrated a physical AT1R-A2AR interaction in cultured cells. Interestingly, by protein-protein docking and molecular dynamics simulations, we described that a stable heterotetrameric interaction may exist between AT1R and A2AR bound to antagonists (i.e. losartan and istradefylline, respectively). Accordingly, we subsequently ascertained the existence of AT1R/A2AR heteromers in the striatum by proximity ligation in situ assay. Finally, we took advantage of a TD animal model, namely the reserpine-induced vacuous chewing movement (VCM), to evaluate a novel multimodal pharmacological TD treatment approach based on targeting the AT1R/A2AR complex. Thus, reserpinized mice were co-treated with sub-effective losartan and istradefylline doses, which prompted a synergistic reduction in VCM. Overall, our results demonstrated the existence of striatal AT1R/A2AR oligomers with potential usefulness for the therapeutic management of TD.

  11. a2* Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Influence Hippocampus-Dependent Learning and Memory in Adolescent Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotfipour, Shahrdad; Mojica, Celina; Nakauchi, Sakura; Lipovsek, Marcela; Silverstein, Sarah; Cushman, Jesse; Tirtorahardjo, James; Poulos, Andrew; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén; Sumikawa, Katumi; Fanselow, Michael S.; Boulter, Jim

    2017-01-01

    The absence of a2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in oriens lacunosum moleculare (OLM) GABAergic interneurons ablate the facilitation of nicotine-induced hippocampal CA1 long-term potentiation and impair memory. The current study delineated whether genetic mutations of a2* nAChRs ("Chrna2"[superscript L9'S/L9'S] and…

  12. Structure of an agonist-bound human A2A adenosine receptor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Wu, Huixian; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C

    2011-04-15

    Activation of G protein-coupled receptors upon agonist binding is a critical step in the signaling cascade for this family of cell surface proteins. We report the crystal structure of the A(2A) adenosine receptor (A(2A)AR) bound to an agonist UK-432097 at 2.7 angstrom resolution. Relative to inactive, antagonist-bound A(2A)AR, the agonist-bound structure displays an outward tilt and rotation of the cytoplasmic half of helix VI, a movement of helix V, and an axial shift of helix III, resembling the changes associated with the active-state opsin structure. Additionally, a seesaw movement of helix VII and a shift of extracellular loop 3 are likely specific to A(2A)AR and its ligand. The results define the molecule UK-432097 as a "conformationally selective agonist" capable of receptor stabilization in a specific active-state configuration.

  13. Therapeutic Opportunities for Caffeine and A2A Receptor Antagonists in Retinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Boia, Raquel; Ambrósio, António Francisco; Santiago, Ana Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine, the major component of coffee, is the most consumed psychostimulant in the world. Caffeine is an adenosine analog and acts as a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist. The majority of the effects of caffeine are mainly mediated by the blockade of adenosine receptors, and the proved neuroprotective effects of caffeine in brain disorders have been mimicked by the blockade of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR). A growing body of evidence demonstrates that microglia-mediated neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of brain and retinal diseases. Moreover, the control of microglia reactivity by blocking A2AR has been proposed to be the mechanism underlying the observed protective effects of caffeine. Hence, it is conceivable that caffeine and A2AR antagonists offer therapeutic value for the treatment of retinal diseases, mainly those involving microglia-mediated neuroinflammation. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Toll-like receptors, NF-κB, and IL-27 mediate adenosine A2A receptor signaling in BTBR T(+) Itpr3(tf)/J mice.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Sheikh F; Ansari, Mushtaq A; Nadeem, Ahmed; Bakheet, Saleh A; Al-Ayadhi, Laila Yousef; Attia, Sabry M

    2017-10-03

    Autism is a predominant neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impaired communication, social deficits, and repetitive behaviors. Recent research has proposed that the impairment of innate immunity may play an important role in autism. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are potential therapeutic targets against neuroinflammation. The BTBR T(+) Itpr3(tf/)J (BTBR) mouse is a well-known model of autism, showing repetitive behaviors such as cognitive inflexibility and increased grooming as compared to C57BL/6 (B6) mice. Adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) signaling is involved in inflammation, brain injury, and lymphocyte infiltration into the CNS, but the role of A2AR in autism remains unknown. We investigated the effect of A2AR antagonist SCH 5826 (SCH) and agonist CGS 21680 (CGS) on the expression levels of TLRs, IL-27, NF-κB p65, and IκBα in BTBR mice. Treatment of BTBR mice with SCH increased the percentage of splenic CD14(+)TLR2(+) cells, CD14(+)TLR3(+) cells, CD14(+)TLR4(+) cells, and decreased the percentage of CD14(+)IL-27(+) cells, as compared to the untreated BTBR mice. Our results reveal that BTBR mice treated with CGS had reversal of SCH-induced immunological responses. Moreover, mRNA and protein expression analyses confirmed increased expression of TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, and NF-κB p65 in brain tissue, and decreased IL-27 and IκBα expression following SCH treatment, as compared to the untreated-BTBR and CGS-treated BTBR mice. Together, these results suggest that the A2AR agonist corrects neuroimmune dysfunction observed in BTBR mice, and thus has the potential as a therapeutic approach in autism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Allosteric interactions between agonists and antagonists within the adenosine A2A receptor-dopamine D2 receptor heterotetramer.

    PubMed

    Bonaventura, Jordi; Navarro, Gemma; Casadó-Anguera, Verònica; Azdad, Karima; Rea, William; Moreno, Estefanía; Brugarolas, Marc; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I; Lluís, Carme; Cortés, Antoni; Volkow, Nora D; Schiffmann, Serge N; Ferré, Sergi; Casadó, Vicent

    2015-07-07

    Adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR)-dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) heteromers are key modulators of striatal neuronal function. It has been suggested that the psychostimulant effects of caffeine depend on its ability to block an allosteric modulation within the A2AR-D2R heteromer, by which adenosine decreases the affinity and intrinsic efficacy of dopamine at the D2R. We describe novel unsuspected allosteric mechanisms within the heteromer by which not only A2AR agonists, but also A2AR antagonists, decrease the affinity and intrinsic efficacy of D2R agonists and the affinity of D2R antagonists. Strikingly, these allosteric modulations disappear on agonist and antagonist coadministration. This can be explained by a model that considers A2AR-D2R heteromers as heterotetramers, constituted by A2AR and D2R homodimers, as demonstrated by experiments with bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and bimolecular fluorescence and bioluminescence complementation. As predicted by the model, high concentrations of A2AR antagonists behaved as A2AR agonists and decreased D2R function in the brain.

  16. Inhibitory effects of benzodiazepines on the adenosine A(2B) receptor mediated secretion of interleukin-8 in human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Kristina; Xifró, Rosa Altarcheh; Hartweg, Julia Lisa; Spitzlei, Petra; Meis, Kirsten; Molderings, Gerhard J; von Kügelgen, Ivar

    2013-01-30

    The activation of adenosine A(2B) receptors in human mast cells causes pro-inflammatory responses such as the secretion of interleukin-8. There is evidence for an inhibitory effect of benzodiazepines on mast cell mediated symptoms in patients with systemic mast cell activation disease. Therefore, we investigated the effects of benzodiazepines on adenosine A(2B) receptor mediated interleukin-8 production in human mast cell leukaemia (HMC1) cells by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The adenosine analogue N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA, 0.3-3 μM) increased interleukin-8 production about 5-fold above baseline. This effect was attenuated by the adenosine A(2B) receptor antagonist MRS1754 (N-(4-cyanophenyl)-2-{4-(2,3,6,7-tetrahydro-2,6-dioxo-1,3-dipropyl-1H-purin-8-yl)phenoxy}-acetamide) 1 μM. In addition, diazepam, 4'-chlorodiazepam and flunitrazepam (1-30 μM) markedly reduced NECA-induced interleukin-8 production in that order of potency, whereas clonazepam showed only a modest inhibition. The inhibitory effect of diazepam was not altered by flumazenil 10 μM or PK11195 (1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinolinecarboxamide) 10 μM. Diazepam attenuated the NECA-induced expression of mRNA encoding for interleukin-8. Moreover, diazepam and flunitrazepam reduced the increasing effects of NECA on cAMP-response element- and nuclear factor of activated t-cells-driven luciferase reporter gene activities in HMC1 cells. Neither diazepam nor flunitrazepam affected NECA-induced increases in cellular cAMP levels in CHO Flp-In cells stably expressing recombinant human adenosine A(2B) receptors, excluding a direct action of benzodiazepines on human adenosine A(2B) receptors. In conclusion, this is the first study showing an inhibitory action of benzodiazepines on adenosine A(2B) receptor mediated interleukin-8 production in human mast (HMC1) cells. The rank order of potency indicates the involvement of an atypical benzodiazepine binding site.

  17. Cloning, functional expression and characterization of a human olfactory receptor.

    PubMed

    Hatt, H; Gisselmann, G; Wetzel, C H

    1999-05-01

    The human olfactory system can recognize and discriminate a large number of different odorant molecules. The detection of chemically distinct odorants begins with the binding of an odorant ligand to a specific receptor protein on the olfactory neuron cell surface. To address the problem of olfactory perception at a molecular level, we have cloned, functionally expressed and characterized the first human olfactory receptor (OR 17-40). Application of a mixture of hundred different odorants elicited a transient increase in intracellular calcium at HEK 293-cells which were transfected with a plasmid containing the receptor encoding DNA and a membrane import sequence. By subdividing the odorant mixture in smaller groups we could identify a single component which represented the only effective substance: helional. Testing some structurally closely related molecules we found only one other compound which also could activate the receptor: heliotropyl acetone. All other compounds tested were completely ineffective. These findings represent the beginning of molecular understanding of odorant recognition in humans.

  18. Somatostatin receptor expression in non-medullary thyroid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Pazaitou-Panayiotou, Kalliopi; Tiensuu Janson, Eva; Koletsa, Triantafyllia; Kotoula, Vassiliki; Stridsberg, Mats; Karkavelas, Georgios; Karayannopoulou, Georgia

    2012-01-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) is dependent upon binding of radiolabelled peptides to their respective receptor expressing cells. The main objective of this study was to characterize the expression of somatostatin receptor (SSTR) subtypes in non-medullary thyroid cancers in order to be able to recommend the use of PRRT as a treatment option in patients with progressive local or metastatic disease. We constructed tissue microarrays from paraffin blocks prepared from 47 cases of non-medullary thyroid carcinomas and related normal thyroid tissue. Immunohistochemical staining was performed with five different polyclonal SSTR antibodies. SSTR subtypes sst2 and sst3 were expressed in all non-medullary thyroid carcinomas, sst1 and sst5 in 75%, and sst4 in 38%. Coexpression of more than three subtypes was detected in 36 of the 47 cases. The expression of SSTR subtypes in normal thyroid tissue was low or absent. Non-medullary thyroid carcinomas frequently express all SSTR subtypes. This expression provides a basis for further studies with the aim of exploring PRRT as a possible new treatment for iodine-131 refractory metastatic non-medullary thyroid carcinomas.

  19. Adenosine A2A receptors are necessary and sufficient to trigger memory impairment in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Pagnussat, N; Almeida, A S; Marques, D M; Nunes, F; Chenet, G C; Botton, P H S; Mioranzza, S; Loss, C M; Cunha, R A; Porciúncula, L O

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Caffeine (a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist) prevents memory deficits in aging and Alzheimer’s disease, an effect mimicked by adenosine A2A receptor, but not A1 receptor, antagonists. Hence, we investigated the effects of adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists on memory performance and scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice. Experimental Approach We determined whether A2A receptors are necessary for the emergence of memory impairments induced by scopolamine and whether A2A receptor activation triggers memory deficits in naïve mice, using three tests to assess short-term memory, namely the object recognition task, inhibitory avoidance and modified Y-maze. Key Results Scopolamine (1.0 mg·kg−1, i.p.) impaired short-term memory performance in all three tests and this scopolamine-induced amnesia was prevented by the A2A receptor antagonist (SCH 58261, 0.1–1.0 mg·kg−1, i.p.) and by the A1 receptor antagonist (DPCPX, 0.2–5.0 mg·kg−1, i.p.), except in the modified Y-maze where only SCH58261 was effective. Both antagonists were devoid of effects on memory or locomotion in naïve rats. Notably, the activation of A2A receptors with CGS 21680 (0.1–0.5 mg·kg−1, i.p.) before the training session was sufficient to trigger memory impairment in the three tests in naïve mice, and this effect was prevented by SCH 58261 (1.0 mg·kg−1, i.p.). Furthermore, i.c.v. administration of CGS 21680 (50 nmol) also impaired recognition memory in the object recognition task. Conclusions and Implications These results show that A2A receptors are necessary and sufficient to trigger memory impairment and further suggest that A1 receptors might also be selectively engaged to control the cholinergic-driven memory impairment. PMID:25939452

  20. Altered AMPA receptor expression plays an important role in inducing bidirectional synaptic plasticity during contextual fear memory reconsolidation.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Subhrajit; Kimble, Whitney; Buabeid, Manal; Bhattacharya, Dwipayan; Bloemer, Jenna; Alhowail, Ahmad; Reed, Miranda; Dhanasekaran, Muralikrishnan; Escobar, Martha; Suppiramaniam, Vishnu

    2017-03-01

    Retrieval of a memory appears to render it unstable until the memory is once again re-stabilized or reconsolidated. Although the occurrence and consequences of reconsolidation have received much attention in recent years, the specific mechanisms that underlie the process of reconsolidation have not been fully described. Here, we present the first electrophysiological model of the synaptic plasticity changes underlying the different stages of reconsolidation of a conditioned fear memory. In this model, retrieval of a fear memory results in immediate but transient alterations in synaptic plasticity, mediated by modified expression of the glutamate receptor subunits GluA1 and GluA2 in the hippocampus of rodents. Retrieval of a memory results in an immediate impairment in LTP, which is enhanced 6h following memory retrieval. Conversely, memory retrieval results in an immediate enhancement of LTD, which decreases with time. These changes in plasticity are accompanied by decreased expression of GluA2 receptor subunits. Recovery of LTP and LTD correlates with progressive overexpression of GluA2 receptor subunits. The contribution of the GluA2 receptor was confirmed by interfering with receptor expression at the postsynaptic sites. Blocking GluA2 endocytosis restored LTP and attenuated LTD during the initial portion of the reconsolidation period. These findings suggest that altered GluA2 receptor expression is one of the mechanisms that controls different forms of synaptic plasticity during reconsolidation.

  1. Differential expression of laminin receptors in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, I; Yamamoto, K; Mizuta, T; Kajihara, S; Fukushima, N; Setoguchi, Y; Morito, F; Sakai, T

    1998-01-01

    Background—Laminin receptors are involved in cell-extracellular matrix interactions in malignant cells that show invasion and metastasis. Hepatocellular carcinoma frequently shows early invasion into blood vessels, and intrahepatic and extrahepatic metastases. However, the role of laminin receptors in hepatocellular carcinoma is unknown. 
Aims—To examine the expression of mRNA for laminin receptors and their isoforms in hepatocellular carcinoma. 
Methods—The expression of several laminin receptors, including α1 integrin, α6 integrin and its isoforms α6A and α6B, β1 integrin and its isoforms β1A and β1B, and 32kD/67kDa laminin binding protein was examined in human hepatocellular carcinomas and non-cancerous liver tissues using the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. 
Results—α6 Integrin, β1 integrin, and laminin binding protein showed notably increased expression in hepatocellular carcinoma, compared with non-cancerous liver tissue, although the α1 integrin did not show a significant change. Furthermore, β1B integrin, a splicing variant of β1 integrin, was overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma while the β1A integrin isoform did not show significant changes between hepatocellular carcinoma and surrounding non-cancerous liver tissue. 
Conclusions—The differential upregulation of laminin receptors and their splicing isoforms was shown in hepatocellular carcinoma, suggesting that certain laminin receptors and their isoforms may be involved in the development and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma. 

 Keywords: laminin receptor; integrin α6β1; hepatocellular carcinoma PMID:9824613

  2. Adenosine A1, but not A2, receptor blockade increases anxiety and arousal in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Maximino, Caio; Lima, Monica G; Olivera, Karen R M; Picanço-Diniz, Domingos L W; Herculano, Anderson M

    2011-09-01

    Adenosinergic systems have been implicated in anxiety-like states, as caffeine can induce a state of anxiety in human beings. Caffeine is an antagonist at A(1) and A(2) adenosine receptors but it remains unclear whether anxiety is mediated by one or both of these. As the adenosinergic system is rather conserved, we opted to pursue these questions using zebrafish, a widely used model organism in genetics and developmental biology. Zebrafish adenosine 1. 2A.1 and 2A.2 receptors conserve histidine residues in TM6 and TM7 that are responsible for affinity in bovine A1 receptor. We investigated the effects of caffeine, PACPX (an A(1) receptor antagonist) and 1,3-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (DMPX) (an A(2) receptor antagonist) on anxiety-like behaviour and locomotor activity of zebrafish in the scototaxis test as well as evaluated the effects of these drugs on pigment aggregation. Caffeine increased anxiety at the dose of 100 mg/kg, while locomotion at the dose of 10 mg/kg was increased. Both doses of 10 and 100 mg/kg induced pigment aggregation. PACPX, on the other hand, increased anxiety at a dose of 6 mg/kg and induced pigment aggregation at the doses of 0.6 and 6 mg/kg, but did not produce a locomotor effect. DMPX, in turn, increased locomotion at the dose of 6 mg/kg but did not produce any effect on pigment aggregation or anxiety-like behaviour. These results indicate that blockade of A(1)-R, but not A(2)-R, induces anxiety and autonomic arousal, while the blockade of A(2)-R induces hyperlocomotion. Thus, as in rodents, caffeine's anxiogenic and arousing effects are probably mediated by A(1) receptors in zebrafish and its locomotor activating effect is probably mediated by A(2) receptors. © 2011 The Authors. Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology © 2011 Nordic Pharmacological Society.

  3. Problem-Solving Test: Expression Cloning of the Erythropoietin Receptor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2008-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: cytokines, cytokine receptors, cDNA library, cDNA synthesis, poly(A)[superscript +] RNA, primer, template, reverse transcriptase, restriction endonucleases, cohesive ends, expression vector, promoter, Shine-Dalgarno sequence, poly(A) signal, DNA helicase, DNA ligase, topoisomerases,…

  4. Problem-Solving Test: Expression Cloning of the Erythropoietin Receptor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2008-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: cytokines, cytokine receptors, cDNA library, cDNA synthesis, poly(A)[superscript +] RNA, primer, template, reverse transcriptase, restriction endonucleases, cohesive ends, expression vector, promoter, Shine-Dalgarno sequence, poly(A) signal, DNA helicase, DNA ligase, topoisomerases,…

  5. Finding Balance: T cell Regulatory Receptor Expression during Aging.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Mary M; Qi, Qian; Weyand, Cornelia M; Goronzy, Jörg J

    2011-10-01

    Aging is associated with a variety of changes to immune responsiveness. Reduced protection against infection, reduced responses to vaccination and increased risk of autoimmunity are all hallmarks of advanced age. Here we consider how changes in the expression of regulatory receptors on the T cell surface contribute to altered immunity during aging.

  6. Metabotropic glutamate receptor expression in olfactory receptor neurons from the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus.

    PubMed

    Medler, K F; Tran, H N; Parker, J M; Caprio, J; Bruch, R C

    1998-04-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) were identified in olfactory receptor neurons of the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, by polymerase chain reaction. DNA sequence analysis confirmed the presence of two subtypes, mGluR1 and mGluR3, that were coexpressed with each other and with the putative odorant receptors within single olfactory receptor neurons. Immunocytochemical data showed that both mGluR subtypes were expressed in the apical dendrites and some cilia of olfactory neurons. Pharmacological analysis showed that antagonists to each mGluR subtype significantly decreased the electrophysiological response to odorant amino acids. alpha-Methyl-L-CCG1/(2S,3S,4S)-2-methyl-2-(carboxycyclopropyl++ +)glycine (MCCG), a known antagonist to mGluR3, and (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine (S-4CPG), a specific antagonist to mGluR1, each significantly reduced olfactory receptor responses to L-glutamate. S-4CPG and MCCG reduced the glutamate response to 54% and 56% of control, respectively, which was significantly greater than their effect on a neutral amino acid odorant, methionine. These significant reductions of odorant response by the antagonists, taken with the expression of these receptors throughout the dendritic and ciliated portions of some olfactory receptor neurons, suggest that these mGluRs may be involved in olfactory reception and signal transduction.

  7. Modulation of murine dendritic cell function by adenine nucleotides and adenosine: involvement of the A(2B) receptor.

    PubMed

    Ben Addi, Abduelhakem; Lefort, Anne; Hua, Xiaoyang; Libert, Frédérick; Communi, Didier; Ledent, Catherine; Macours, Pascale; Tilley, Stephen L; Boeynaems, Jean-Marie; Robaye, Bernard

    2008-06-01

    Adenosine triphosphate has previously been shown to induce semi-mature human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC). These are characterized by the up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules, the inhibition of IL-12 and the up-regulation of some genes involved in immune tolerance, such as thrombospondin-1 and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase. The actions of adenosine triphosphate are mediated by the P2Y(11) receptor; since there is no functional P2Y(11) gene in the murine genome, we investigated the action of adenine nucleotides on murine DC. Adenosine 5'-(3-thiotriphosphate) and adenosine inhibited the production of IL-12p70 by bone marrow-derived DC (BMDC). These inhibitions were relieved by 8-p-sulfophenyltheophylline, an adenosine receptor antagonist. The use of selective ligands and A(2B) (-/-) BMDC indicated the involvement of the A(2B) receptor. A microarray experiment, confirmed by quantitative PCR, showed that, in presence of LPS, 5'-(N-ethylcarboxamido) adenosine (NECA, the most potent A(2B) receptor agonist) regulated the expression of several genes: arginase I and II, thrombospondin-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor were up-regulated whereas CCL2 and CCL12 were down-regulated. We further showed that NECA, in combination with LPS, increased the arginase I enzymatic activity. In conclusion, the described actions of adenine nucleotides on BMDC are mediated by their degradation product, adenosine, acting on the A(2B) receptor, and will possibly lead to an impairment of Th1 response or tolerance.

  8. Involvement of adenosine A2A receptors in depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Koji; Kobayashi, Minoru; Kanda, Tomoyuki

    2014-01-01

    When administered to normal healthy patients, a nonselective adenosine A1/A2A antagonist, caffeine, tended to improve anxiety and depression at low doses and to exacerbate anxiety at high doses. Caffeine also appears to enhance anxiety-related symptoms in patients with panic disorder, and A2A receptor-deficient mice have been reported to exhibit higher anxiety-like behaviors, as well as a lower incidence of depression-like behaviors. Some selective A2A antagonists were reported to ameliorate anxiety-like behaviors in rodents, while others did not affect these behaviors. In addition, most A2A antagonists showed inhibitory effects on depression-like behaviors. The mechanisms underlying the relationship between A2A receptor antagonists and anxiety and depression remain unclear at the present time, although many studies have produced hypotheses. Given that a selective A2A receptor antagonist has recently become available for use in humans, research on the role of A2A receptors in the treatment of mental illness should progress in the near future. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Crystal structures of the A2A adenosine receptor and their use in medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2013-12-20

    New insights into drug design are derived from the X-ray crystallographic structures of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), and the adenosine receptors (ARs) are at the forefront of this effort. The 3D knowledge of receptor binding and activation promises to enable drug discovery for GPCRs in general, and specifically for the ARs. The predictability of modeling based on the X-ray structures of the A2AAR has been well demonstrated in the identification, design and modification of both known and novel AR agonists and antagonists. It is expected that structure-based design of drugs acting through ARs will provide new avenues to clinically useful agents.

  10. Expression of androgen receptor in breast cancer & its correlation with other steroid receptors & growth factors

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Ashwani K.; Agrawal, Usha; Negi, Shivani; Bansal, Anju; Mohil, R.; Chintamani, Chintamani; Bhatnagar, Amar; Bhatnagar, Dinesh; Saxena, Sunita

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Breast cancer is the second most common malignancy in Indian women. Among the members of the steroid receptor superfamily the role of estrogen and progesterone receptors (ER and PR) is well established in breast cancer in predicting the prognosis and management of therapy, however, little is known about the clinical significance of androgen receptor (AR) in breast carcinogenesis. The present study was aimed to evaluate the expression of AR in breast cancer and to elucidate its clinical significance by correlating it with clinicopathological parameters, other steroid receptors (ER and PR) and growth factors receptors (EGFR and CD105). Methods: Expression of AR, ER, PR, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and endoglin (CD105) was studied in 100 cases of breast cancer by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Risk ratio (RR) along with 95% confidence interval (CI) was estimated to assess the strength of association between the markers and clinicopathological characteristics. Categorical principal component analysis (CATPCA) was applied to obtain new sets of linearly combined expression, for their further evaluation with clinicopathological characteristics (n=100). Results: In 31 cases presenting with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC), the expression of AR, ER, PR, EGFR and CD105 was associated with response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT). The results indicated the association of AR+ (P=0.001) and AR+/EGFR- (P=0.001) with the therapeutic response to NACT in LABC patients. The AR expression exhibited maximum sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratio of positive and negative test. The present results showed the benefit of adding AR, EGFR and CD105 to the existing panel of markers to be able to predict response to therapy. Interpretation & conclusions: More studies on the expression profiles of AR+, AR+/CD105+ and AR+/EGFR- in larger set of breast cancer patients may possibly help in confirming their predictive role for therapeutic response

  11. Glycine receptor subunits expression in the developing rat retina.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Chávez, Gustavo; Velázquez-Flores, Miguel Ángel; Ruiz Esparza-Garrido, Ruth; Salceda, Rocío

    2017-09-01

    Glycine receptor (GlyR) consists of two α (1-4) and three β subunits. Considerable evidence indicates that the adult retina expresses the four types of α subunits; however, the proportion of these subunits in adult and immature retina is almost unknown. In this report we have studied mRNA and the protein expression of GlyR subunits in the retina during postnatal rat development by Real-Time qRT-PCR and western blot. mRNA and protein expression indicated a gradual increase of the α1, α3, α4 and β GlyR subunits during postnatal ages tested. The mRNA β subunit showed higher expression levels (∼3 fold) than those observed for the α1 and α3 subunits. Very interestingly, the α2 GlyR subunit had the highest expression in the retina, even in the adult. These results revealed the expression of GlyR at early postnatal ages, supporting its role in retina development. In addition, our results indicated that the adult retina expressed a high proportion of the α2 subunit, suggesting the expression of monomeric and/or heteromeric receptors. A variety of studies are needed to further characterize the role of the specific subunits in both adult and immature retina. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Macrophage A2A Adenosinergic Receptor Modulates Oxygen-Induced Augmentation of Murine Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    D’Alessio, Franco R.; Eto, Yoshiki; Chau, Eric; Avalos, Claudia; Waickman, Adam T.; Garibaldi, Brian T.; Mock, Jason R.; Files, Daniel C.; Sidhaye, Venkataramana; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.; Powell, Jonathan; Horton, Maureen; King, Landon S.

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) causes significant morbidity and mortality. Exacerbating factors increasing the risk of ARDS remain unknown. Supplemental oxygen is often necessary in both mild and severe lung disease. The potential effects of supplemental oxygen may include augmentation of lung inflammation by inhibiting anti-inflammatory pathways in alveolar macrophages. We sought to determine oxygen-derived effects on the anti-inflammatory A2A adenosinergic (ADORA2A) receptor in macrophages, and the role of the ADORA2A receptor in lung injury. Wild-type (WT) and ADORA2A−/− mice received intratracheal lipopolysaccharide (IT LPS), followed 12 hours later by continuous exposure to 21% oxygen (control mice) or 60% oxygen for 1 to 3 days. We measured the phenotypic endpoints of lung injury and the alveolar macrophage inflammatory state. We tested an ADORA2A-specific agonist, CGS-21680 hydrochloride, in LPS plus oxygen-exposed WT and ADORA2A−/− mice. We determined the specific effects of myeloid ADORA2A, using chimera experiments. Compared with WT mice, ADORA2A−/− mice exposed to IT LPS and 60% oxygen demonstrated significantly more histologic lung injury, alveolar neutrophils, and protein. Macrophages from ADORA2A−/− mice exposed to LPS plus oxygen expressed higher concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines and cosignaling molecules. CGS-21680 prevented the oxygen-induced augmentation of lung injury after LPS only in WT mice. Chimera experiments demonstrated that the transfer of WT but not ADORA2A−/− bone marrow cells into irradiated ADORA2A−/− mice reduced lung injury after LPS plus oxygen, demonstrating myeloid ADORA2A protection. ADORA2A is protective against lung injury after LPS and oxygen. Oxygen after LPS increases macrophage activation to augment lung injury by inhibiting the ADORA2A pathway. PMID:23349051

  13. Expression of oxytocin receptor in diabetic rat penis.

    PubMed

    Li, M; Wang, T; Guo, S; Rao, K; Liu, J; Ye, Z

    2012-05-01

    Oxytocin receptor (OTR) expressed in the rat penis and mediated the contractility of the corpus cavernosum smooth muscle both in vitro and in vivo, and OTR could maintain penile detumescence; however, the expression of OTR in diabetic rat penis remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated the expression of OTR in diabetic rat penis. The experimental rats were randomly divided into control group and STZ-diabetic rats group. The expressions of mRNA and protein were examined by real-time quantitative PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry respectively. Erectile function was evaluated by measuring intracavernous pressure following electrostimulation of the cavernous nerves. mRNA and protein expression of OTR significantly increased in diabetic rats group compared with the control group. Erectile function of diabetic rats group significantly decreased compared with the control group. Our data showed that the expression of OTR significantly increased in diabetic rats group and OTR may involve in the development of diabetic erectile dysfunction.

  14. Reconstitution of homomeric GluA2(flop) receptors in supported lipid membranes: functional and structural properties.

    PubMed

    Baranovic, Jelena; Ramanujan, Chandra S; Kasai, Nahoko; Midgett, Charles R; Madden, Dean R; Torimitsu, Keiichi; Ryan, John F

    2013-03-22

    AMPA receptors (AMPARs) are glutamate-gated ion channels ubiquitous in the vertebrate central nervous system, where they mediate fast excitatory neurotransmission and act as molecular determinants of memory formation and learning. Together with detailed analyses of individual AMPAR domains, structural studies of full-length AMPARs by electron microscopy and x-ray crystallography have provided important insights into channel assembly and function. However, the correlation between the structure and functional states of the channel remains ambiguous particularly because these functional states can be assessed only with the receptor bound within an intact lipid bilayer. To provide a basis for investigating AMPAR structure in a membrane environment, we developed an optimized reconstitution protocol using a receptor whose structure has previously been characterized by electron microscopy. Single-channel recordings of reconstituted homomeric GluA2(flop) receptors recapitulate key electrophysiological parameters of the channels expressed in native cellular membranes. Atomic force microscopy studies of the reconstituted samples provide high-resolution images of membrane-embedded full-length AMPARs at densities comparable to those in postsynaptic membranes. The data demonstrate the effect of protein density on conformational flexibility and dimensions of the receptors and provide the first structural characterization of functional membrane-embedded AMPARs, thus laying the foundation for correlated structure-function analyses of the predominant mediators of excitatory synaptic signals in the brain.

  15. Chemical Modification and Irreversible Inhibition of Striatal A2a Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    JACOBSON, KENNETH A.; STILES, GARY L.; JI, XIAO-DUO

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The ligand recognition site of A2a-adenosine receptors in rabbit striatal membranes was probed using non-site-directed labeling reagents and specific affinity labels. Exposure of membranes to diethylpyrocarbonate at a concentration of 2.5 mm, followed by washing, was found to inhibit the binding of [3H]CGS 21680 and [3H]xanthine amine congener to A2a receptors, by 86 and 30%, respectively. Protection from diethylpyrocarbonate inactivation by an adenosine receptor agonist, 5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine, and an antagonist, theophylline, suggested the presence of two histidyl residues on the receptor, one associated with agonist binding and the other with antagonist binding. Binding of [3H]CGS 21680 or [3H]xanthine amine congener was partially restored after incubation with 250 mm hydroxylamine, further supporting histidine as the modification site. Preincubation with disulfide-reactive reagents, dithiothreitol or sodium dithionite, at >5 mm inhibited radioligand binding, indicating the presence of essential disulfide bridges in A2a receptors, whereas the concentration of mercaptoethanol required to inhibit binding was >50 mm. A number of isothiocyanate-bearing affinity labels derived from the A2a-selective agonist 2-[(2-aminoethylamino)carbonylethylphenylethylamino]-5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (APEC) were synthesized and found to inhibit A2a receptor binding in rabbit and bovine striatal membranes. Binding to rabbit A1 receptors was not inhibited. Preincubation with the affinity label 4-isothiocyanatophenylaminothiocarbonyl-APEC (100 nm) diminished the Bmax for [3H]CGS 21680 binding by 71%, and the Kd was unaffected, suggesting a direct modification of the ligand binding site. Reversal of 4-isothiocyanatophenylaminothiocarbonyl-APEC inhibition of [3H]CGS 21680 binding with hydroxylamine suggested that the site of modification by the isothiocyanate is a cysteine residue. A bromoacetyl derivative of APEC was ineffective as an affinity label at

  16. Regulation of Tissue Factor Gene Expression in Monocytes and Endothelial Cells: Thromboxane A2 as a New Player

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Michael; Mackman, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is the primary activator of the coagulation cascade. Under normal conditions, endothelial cells (ECs) and blood cells, such as monocytes, do not express TF. However, bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces TF expression in monocytes and this leads to disseminated intravascular coagulation during endotoxemia and sepsis. A variety of stimuli induce TF expression in ECs in vitro, although it is unclear how much TF is expressed by the endothelium in vivo. LPS induction of TF gene expression in monocytic cells and ECs is mediated by various intracellular signaling pathways and the transcription factors NF-κB, AP-1 and Egr-1. In contrast, vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) induces TF gene expression in ECs via the transcription factors NFAT and Egr-1. Similarly, oxidized phospholipids (oxPAPC) induce TF expression in ECs and possibly monocytes via NFAT and Egr-1. Thromboxane (TX) A2 can now be added to the list of stimuli that induce TF gene expression in both monocytes and ECs. Interestingly, inhibition of the TX-prostanoid (TP) receptor also reduces TF expression in ECs stimulated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and monocytes stimulated with LPS, which suggests that TP receptor antagonist may be useful in reducing pathologic TF expression in the vasculature. PMID:24858575

  17. Modulation of Ca2+-currents by sequential and simultaneous activation of adenosine A1 and A 2A receptors in striatal projection neurons.

    PubMed

    Hernández-González, O; Hernández-Flores, T; Prieto, G A; Pérez-Burgos, A; Arias-García, M A; Galarraga, E; Bargas, J

    2014-01-01

    D(1)- and D(2)-types of dopamine receptors are located separately in direct and indirect pathway striatal projection neurons (dSPNs and iSPNs). In comparison, adenosine A(1)-type receptors are located in both neuron classes, and adenosine A(2A)-type receptors show a preferential expression in iSPNs. Due to their importance for neuronal excitability, Ca(2+)-currents have been used as final effectors to see the function of signaling cascades associated with different G protein-coupled receptors. For example, among many other actions, D(1)-type receptors increase, while D(2)-type receptors decrease neuronal excitability by either enhancing or reducing, respectively, CaV1 Ca(2+)-currents. These actions occur separately in dSPNs and iSPNs. In the case of purinergic signaling, the actions of A(1)- and A(2A)-receptors have not been compared observing their actions on Ca(2+)-channels of SPNs as final effectors. Our hypotheses are that modulation of Ca(2+)-currents by A(1)-receptors occurs in both dSPNs and iSPNs. In contrast, iSPNs would exhibit modulation by both A(1)- and A2A-receptors. We demonstrate that A(1)-type receptors reduced Ca(2+)-currents in all SPNs tested. However, A(2A)-type receptors enhanced Ca(2+)-currents only in half tested neurons. Intriguingly, to observe the actions of A(2A)-type receptors, occupation of A(1)-type receptors had to occur first. However, A(1)-receptors decreased Ca(V)2 Ca(2+)-currents, while A(2A)-type receptors enhanced current through Ca(V)1 channels. Because these channels have opposing actions on cell discharge, these differences explain in part why iSPNs may be more excitable than dSPNs. It is demonstrated that intrinsic voltage-gated currents expressed in SPNs are effectors of purinergic signaling that therefore play a role in excitability.

  18. Expression Profile of Ectopic Olfactory Receptors Determined by Deep Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Flegel, Caroline; Manteniotis, Stavros; Osthold, Sandra; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2013-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) provide the molecular basis for the detection of volatile odorant molecules by olfactory sensory neurons. The OR supergene family encodes G-protein coupled proteins that belong to the seven-transmembrane-domain receptor family. It was initially postulated that ORs are exclusively expressed in the olfactory epithelium. However, recent studies have demonstrated ectopic expression of some ORs in a variety of other tissues. In the present study, we conducted a comprehensive expression analysis of ORs using an extended panel of human tissues. This analysis made use of recent dramatic technical developments of the so-called Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technique, which encouraged us to use open access data for the first comprehensive RNA-Seq expression analysis of ectopically expressed ORs in multiple human tissues. We analyzed mRNA-Seq data obtained by Illumina sequencing of 16 human tissues available from Illumina Body Map project 2.0 and from an additional study of OR expression in testis. At least some ORs were expressed in all the tissues analyzed. In several tissues, we could detect broadly expressed ORs such as OR2W3 and OR51E1. We also identified ORs that showed exclusive expression in one investigated tissue, such as OR4N4 in testis. For some ORs, the coding exon was found to be part of a transcript of upstream genes. In total, 111 of 400 OR genes were expressed with an FPKM (fragments per kilobase of exon per million fragments mapped) higher than 0.1 in at least one tissue. For several ORs, mRNA expression was verified by RT-PCR. Our results support the idea that ORs are broadly expressed in a variety of tissues and provide the basis for further functional studies. PMID:23405139

  19. Expression of Arginine Vasotocin Receptors in the Developing Zebrafish CNS

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Kenichi; Taguchi, Meari; Bonkowsky, Joshua L.; Kuwada, John Y.

    2013-01-01

    Vasotocin/vasopressin is a neuropeptide that regulates social and reproductive behaviors in a variety of animals including fish. Arginine vasotocin (AVT) is expressed by cells in the ventral hypothalamic and preoptic areas in the diencephalon during embryogenesis in zebrafish suggesting that vasotocin might mediate other functions within the CNS prior to the development of social and reproductive behaviors. In order to examine potential early roles for vasotocin we cloned two zebrafish vasotocin receptors homologous to AVPR1a. The receptors are expressed primarily in the CNS in similar but generally non-overlapping patterns. Both receptors are expressed in the forebrain, midbrain and hindbrain by larval stage. Of note, AVTR1a-expressing neurons in the hindbrain appear to be contacted by the axons of preoptic neurons in the forebrain that include avt+ neurons and from sensory axons in the lateral longitudinal fasciculus (LLF). Furthermore, AVTR1a-expressing hindbrain neurons extend axons into the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF) that contains axons of many neurons thought to be involved in locomotor responses to sensory stimulation. One hypothesis consistent with this anatomy is that AVT signaling mediates or gates sensory input to motor circuits in the hindbrain and spinal cord. PMID:23830982

  20. Differential expression of pancreatic protein and chemosensing receptor mRNAs in NKCC1-null intestine

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Emily M; Vairamani, Kanimozhi; Shull, Gary E

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the intestinal functions of the NKCC1 Na+-K+-2Cl cotransporter (SLC12a2 gene), differential mRNA expression changes in NKCC1-null intestine were analyzed. METHODS: Microarray analysis of mRNA from intestines of adult wild-type mice and gene-targeted NKCC1-null mice (n = 6 of each genotype) was performed to identify patterns of differential gene expression changes. Differential expression patterns were further examined by Gene Ontology analysis using the online Gorilla program, and expression changes of selected genes were verified using northern blot analysis and quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction. Histological staining and immunofluorescence were performed to identify cell types in which upregulated pancreatic digestive enzymes were expressed. RESULTS: Genes typically associated with pancreatic function were upregulated. These included lipase, amylase, elastase, and serine proteases indicative of pancreatic exocrine function, as well as insulin and regenerating islet genes, representative of endocrine function. Northern blot analysis and immunohistochemistry showed that differential expression of exocrine pancreas mRNAs was specific to the duodenum and localized to a subset of goblet cells. In addition, a major pattern of changes involving differential expression of olfactory receptors that function in chemical sensing, as well as other chemosensing G-protein coupled receptors, was observed. These changes in chemosensory receptor expression may be related to the failure of intestinal function and dependency on parenteral nutrition observed in humans with SLC12a2 mutations. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that loss of NKCC1 affects not only secretion, but also goblet cell function and chemosensing of intestinal contents via G-protein coupled chemosensory receptors. PMID:26909237

  1. Differential expression of pancreatic protein and chemosensing receptor mRNAs in NKCC1-null intestine.

    PubMed

    Bradford, Emily M; Vairamani, Kanimozhi; Shull, Gary E

    2016-02-15

    To investigate the intestinal functions of the NKCC1 Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl cotransporter (SLC12a2 gene), differential mRNA expression changes in NKCC1-null intestine were analyzed. Microarray analysis of mRNA from intestines of adult wild-type mice and gene-targeted NKCC1-null mice (n = 6 of each genotype) was performed to identify patterns of differential gene expression changes. Differential expression patterns were further examined by Gene Ontology analysis using the online Gorilla program, and expression changes of selected genes were verified using northern blot analysis and quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction. Histological staining and immunofluorescence were performed to identify cell types in which upregulated pancreatic digestive enzymes were expressed. Genes typically associated with pancreatic function were upregulated. These included lipase, amylase, elastase, and serine proteases indicative of pancreatic exocrine function, as well as insulin and regenerating islet genes, representative of endocrine function. Northern blot analysis and immunohistochemistry showed that differential expression of exocrine pancreas mRNAs was specific to the duodenum and localized to a subset of goblet cells. In addition, a major pattern of changes involving differential expression of olfactory receptors that function in chemical sensing, as well as other chemosensing G-protein coupled receptors, was observed. These changes in chemosensory receptor expression may be related to the failure of intestinal function and dependency on parenteral nutrition observed in humans with SLC12a2 mutations. The results suggest that loss of NKCC1 affects not only secretion, but also goblet cell function and chemosensing of intestinal contents via G-protein coupled chemosensory receptors.

  2. mGlu5, Dopamine D2 and Adenosine A2A Receptors in L-DOPA-induced Dyskinesias.

    PubMed

    Morin, Nicolas; Morissette, Marc; Grégoire, Laurent; Di Paolo, Thérèse

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) receiving L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA, the gold-standard treatment for this disease) frequently develop abnormal involuntary movements, termed L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias (LID). Glutamate overactivity is well documented in PD and LID. An approach to manage LID is to add to L-DOPA specific agents to reduce dyskinesias such as metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGlu receptor) drugs. This article reviews the contribution of mGlu type 5 (mGlu5) receptors in animal models of PD. Several mGlu5 negative allosteric modulators acutely attenuate LID in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6- tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) monkeys and 6-hydroxydopamine(6-OHDA)-lesioned rats. Chronic administration of mGlu5 negative allosteric modulators to MPTP monkeys and 6-OHDA rats also attenuates LID while maintaining the antiparkinsonian effect of L-DOPA. Radioligand autoradiography shows an elevation of striatal mGlu5 receptors of dyskinetic L-DOPA-treated MPTP monkeys but not in those without LID. The brain molecular correlates of the long-term effect of mGlu5 negative allosteric modulators treatments with L-DOPA attenuating development of LID was shown to extend beyond mGlu5 receptors with normalization of glutamate activity in the basal ganglia of L-DOPA-induced changes of NMDA, AMPA, mGlu2/3 receptors and VGlut2 transporter. In the basal ganglia, mGlu5 receptor negative allosteric modulators also normalize the L-DOPA-induced changes of dopamine D2receptors, their associated signaling proteins (ERK1/2 and Akt/GSK3β) and neuropeptides (preproenkephalin, preprodynorphin) as well as the adenosine A2A receptors expression. These results show in animal models of PD reduction of LID with mGlu5 negative allosteric modulation associated with normalization of glutamate, dopamine and adenosine receptors suggesting a functional link of these receptors in chronic treatment with L-DOPA.

  3. mGlu5, Dopamine D2 and Adenosine A2A Receptors in L-DOPA-induced Dyskinesias

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Nicolas; Morissette, Marc; Grégoire, Laurent; Di Paolo, Thérèse

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) receiving L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA, the gold-standard treatment for this disease) frequently develop abnormal involuntary movements, termed L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias (LID). Glutamate overactivity is well documented in PD and LID. An approach to manage LID is to add to L-DOPA specific agents to reduce dyskinesias such as metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGlu receptor) drugs. This article reviews the contribution of mGlu type 5 (mGlu5) receptors in animal models of PD. Several mGlu5 negative allosteric modulators acutely attenuate LID in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) monkeys and 6-hydroxydopamine(6-OHDA)-lesioned rats. Chronic administration of mGlu5 negative allosteric modulators to MPTP monkeys and 6-OHDA rats also attenuates LID while maintaining the anti-parkinsonian effect of L-DOPA. Radioligand autoradiography shows an elevation of striatal mGlu5 receptors of dyskinetic L-DOPA-treated MPTP monkeys but not in those without LID. The brain molecular correlates of the long-term effect of mGlu5 negative allosteric modulators treatments with L-DOPA attenuating development of LID was shown to extend beyond mGlu5 receptors with normalization of glutamate activity in the basal ganglia of L-DOPA-induced changes of NMDA, AMPA, mGlu2/3 receptors and VGlut2 transporter. In the basal ganglia, mGlu5 receptor negative allosteric modulators also normalize the L-DOPA-induced changes of dopamine D2 receptors, their associated signaling proteins (ERK1/2 and Akt/GSK3β) and neuropeptides (preproenkephalin, preprodynorphin) as well as the adenosine A2A receptors expression. These results show in animal models of PD reduction of LID with mGlu5 negative allosteric modulation associated with normalization of glutamate, dopamine and adenosine receptors suggesting a functional link of these receptors in chronic treatment with L-DOPA. PMID:26639458

  4. Sex Steroid Receptor Expression in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mehrad, Mitra; Trejo Bittar, Humberto E; Yousem, Samuel A

    2017-03-11

    Usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) is characterized by progressive scarring of the lungs and is associated with high morbidity and mortality despite therapeutic interventions. Sex steroid receptors have been demonstrated to play an important role in chronic lung conditions; however, their significance is unknown in patients with UIP. We retrospectively reviewed 40 idiopathic UIP cases for the expression of hormonal receptors. Forty cases including 10 normal lung, 10 cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP), 10 idiopathic organizing diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), 7 hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) and 3 nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis (NSIP) served as controls. Immunohistochemistry for estrogen receptor alpha (ER-α), progesterone receptor (PR) and androgen receptor (AR) was performed in all groups. Expression of these receptors was assessed in four anatomic/pathologic compartments: alveolar and bronchiolar epithelium, arteries/veins, fibroblastic foci/airspace organization, and old scar. All UIPs (100%) stained positive for PR in myofibroblasts in the scarred areas, while among the control cases only one NSIP case stained focally positive and the rest were negative. PR was positive in myocytes of the large-sized arteries within the fibrotic areas in 31 cases (77.5%). PR was negative within the alveolar and bronchial epithelium, airspace organization and center of fibroblastic foci, however, weak PR positivity was noted in the peripheral fibroblasts of the fibroblastic foci where they merged with dense fibrous connective tissue scar. All UIP and control cases were negative for AR and ER-α. This is the first study to show the expression of PR within the established fibrotic areas of UIP, indicating that progesterone may have profibrotic effects in UIP patients. Hormonal therapy by targeting PR could be of potential benefit in patients with UIP/IPF.

  5. Arousal effect of caffeine depends on adenosine A2A receptors in the shell of the nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Lazarus, Michael; Shen, Hai-Ying; Cherasse, Yoan; Qu, Wei-Min; Huang, Zhi-Li; Bass, Caroline E.; Winsky-Sommerer, Raphaelle; Semba, Kazue; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Boison, Detlev; Hayaishi, Osamu; Urade, Yoshihiro; Chen, Jiang-Fan

    2011-01-01

    Caffeine, the most widely used psychoactive compound, is an adenosine receptor antagonist. It promotes wakefulness by blocking adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) in the brain, but the specific neurons on which caffeine acts to produce arousal have not been identified. Using selective gene deletion strategies based on the Cre/loxP technology in mice and focal RNA interference to silence the expression of A2ARs in rats by local infection with adeno-associated virus carrying short-hairpin RNA, we report that the A2ARs in the shell region of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) are responsible for the effect of caffeine on wakefulness. Caffeine-induced arousal was not affected in rats when A2ARs were focally removed from the NAc core or other A2AR-positive areas of the basal ganglia. Our observations suggest that caffeine promotes arousal by activating pathways that traditionally have been associated with motivational and motor responses in the brain. PMID:21734299

  6. Alterations in ventral and dorsal striatal allosteric A2AR-D2R receptor-receptor interactions after amphetamine challenge: Relevance for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Pintsuk, Julia; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Lai, Terence K Y; Liu, Fang; Fuxe, Kjell

    2016-10-29

    Striatal dopamine D2R homodimerization is increased in the dorsal striatum after acute amphetamine challenge and in the amphetamine-induced sensitized state, a well-known animal model of schizophrenia. Therefore, it was tested if the increase in D2R homoreceptor complexes found after acute amphetamine challenge in the saline or the amphetamine sensitized state leads to changes in the antagonistic adenosine A2AR-D2R interactions in the striatum. [(3)H]-raclopride binding was performed in membrane preparations from the ventral and dorsal striatum involving competition with the D2R like agonist quinpirole. In the ventral striatum CGS 21680 produced a significant increase of the KiH values (p<0.05) in the amphetamine sensitized group when expressed in percent versus the corresponding values in saline sensitized rats after amphetamine challenge. However, in the dorsal striatum a significant change did not develop in the KiH values when expressed in percent of the corresponding values in saline sensitized rats after amphetamine challenge. In fact, the non-significant change was in the opposite direction towards a reduction of the KiH values. Taken together, a reduced affinity of the high affinity D2 agonist binding site (KiH value) developed in the ventral but not in the dorsal striatum as a result of increased antagonistic allosteric A2AR-D2R interactions in the amphetamine-induced sensitized state versus the saline sensitized state after an acute amphetamine challenge. The selective reappearance of antagonistic A2AR-D2R receptor-receptor interactions in the ventral striatum after amphetamine challenge in the amphetamine sensitized rat may give one possible mechanism for the atypical antipsychotic-like actions of A2AR receptor agonists.

  7. Adenosine A2A receptor and ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 are upregulated in hippocampal astrocytes of human patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE).

    PubMed

    Barros-Barbosa, Aurora R; Ferreirinha, Fátima; Oliveira, Ângela; Mendes, Marina; Lobo, M Graça; Santos, Agostinho; Rangel, Rui; Pelletier, Julie; Sévigny, Jean; Cordeiro, J Miguel; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo

    2016-12-01

    Refractoriness to existing medications of up to 80 % of the patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) prompts for finding new antiepileptic drug targets. The adenosine A2A receptor emerges as an interesting pharmacological target since its excitatory nature partially counteracts the dominant antiepileptic role of endogenous adenosine acting via inhibitory A1 receptors. Gain of function of the excitatory A2A receptor has been implicated in a significant number of brain pathologies commonly characterized by neuronal excitotoxicity. Here, we investigated changes in the expression and cellular localization of the A2A receptor and of the adenosine-generating enzyme, ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73, in the hippocampus of control individuals and MTLE human patients. Western blot analysis indicates that the A2A receptor is more abundant in the hippocampus of MTLE patients compared to control individuals. Immunoreactivity against the A2A receptor predominates in astrocytes staining positively for the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). No co-localization was observed between the A2A receptor and neuronal cell markers, like synaptotagmin 1/2 (nerve terminals) and neurofilament 200 (axon fibers). Hippocampal astrogliosis observed in MTLE patients was accompanied by a proportionate increase in A2A receptor and ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 immunoreactivities. Given our data, we hypothesize that selective blockade of excessive activation of astrocytic A2A receptors and/or inhibition of surplus adenosine formation by membrane-bound ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 may reduce neuronal excitability, thus providing a novel therapeutic target for drug-refractory seizures in MTLE patients.

  8. Transgenic silkworms expressing human insulin receptors for evaluation of therapeutically active insulin receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yasuhiko; Ishii, Masaki; Ishii, Kenichi; Miyaguchi, Wataru; Horie, Ryo; Inagaki, Yoshinori; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Tatematsu, Ken-ichiro; Uchino, Keiro; Tamura, Toshiki; Sezutsu, Hideki; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2014-12-12

    We established a transgenic silkworm strain expressing the human insulin receptor (hIR) using the GAL4/UAS system. Administration of human insulin to transgenic silkworms expressing hIR decreased hemolymph sugar levels and facilitated Akt phosphorylation in the fat body. The decrease in hemolymph sugar levels induced by injection of human insulin in the transgenic silkworms expressing hIR was blocked by co-injection of wortmannin, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor. Administration of bovine insulin, an hIR ligand, also effectively decreased sugar levels in the transgenic silkworms. These findings indicate that functional hIRs that respond to human insulin were successfully induced in the transgenic silkworms. We propose that the humanized silkworm expressing hIR is useful for in vivo evaluation of the therapeutic activities of insulin receptor agonists.

  9. Transient Receptor Potential Canonical 1 (TRPC1) Channels as Regulators of Sphingolipid and VEGF Receptor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Muhammad Yasir; Magnusson, Melissa; Kemppainen, Kati; Sukumaran, Pramod; Löf, Christoffer; Pulli, Ilari; Kalhori, Veronica; Törnquist, Kid

    2015-01-01

    The identity of calcium channels in the thyroid is unclear. In human follicular thyroid ML-1 cancer cells, sphingolipid sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), through S1P receptors 1 and 3 (S1P1/S1P3), and VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) stimulates migration. We show that human thyroid cells express several forms of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels, including TRPC1. In TRPC1 knockdown (TRPC1-KD) ML-1 cells, the basal and S1P-evoked invasion and migration was attenuated. Furthermore, the expression of S1P3 and VEGFR2 was significantly down-regulated. Transfecting wild-type ML-1 cells with a nonconducting TRPC1 mutant decreased S1P3 and VEGFR2 expression. In TRPC1-KD cells, receptor-operated calcium entry was decreased. To investigate whether the decreased receptor expression was due to attenuated calcium entry, cells were incubated with the calcium chelator BAPTA-AM (1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid). In these cells, and in cells where calmodulin and calmodulin-dependent kinase were blocked pharmacologically, S1P3 and VEGFR2 expression was decreased. In TRPC1-KD cells, both hypoxia-inducible factor 1α expression and the secretion and activity of MMP2 and MMP9 were attenuated, and proliferation was decreased in TRPC1-KD cells. This was due to a prolonged G1 phase of the cell cycle, a significant increase in the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 and p27, and a decrease in the expression of cyclin D2, cyclin D3, and CDK6. Transfecting TRPC1 to TRPC1-KD cells rescued receptor expression, migration, and proliferation. Thus, the expression of S1P3 and VEGFR2 is mediated by a calcium-dependent mechanism. TRPC1 has a crucial role in this process. This regulation is important for the invasion, migration, and proliferation of thyroid cancer cells. PMID:25971967

  10. Growing vascular endothelial cells express somatostatin subtype 2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Watson, J C; Balster, D A; Gebhardt, B M; O'Dorisio, T M; O'Dorisio, M S; Espenan, G D; Drouant, G J; Woltering, E A

    2001-01-01

    We hypothesized that non-proliferating (quiescent) human vascular endothelial cells would not express somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (sst 2) and that this receptor would be expressed when the endothelial cells begin to grow. To test this hypothesis, placental veins were harvested from 6 human placentas and 2 mm vein disks were cultured in 0.3% fibrin gels. Morphometric analysis confirmed that 50–75% of cultured vein disks developed radial capillary growth within 15 days. Sst 2 gene expression was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of the RNA from veins before culture and from tissue-matched vein disks that exhibited an angiogenic response. The sst 2 gene was expressed in the proliferating angiogenic sprouts of human vascular endothelium. The presence of sst 2 receptors on proliferating angiogenic vessels was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining and in vivo scintigraphy. These results suggest that sst 2 may be a unique target for antiangiogenic therapy with sst 2 preferring somatostatin analogues conjugated to radioisotopes or cytotoxic agents. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11461088

  11. The impact of adenosine and A(2B) receptors on glucose homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Rüsing, D; Müller, C E; Verspohl, E J

    2006-12-01

    Adenosine and adenosine receptor antagonists are involved in glucose homoeostasis. The participating receptors are not known, mainly due to a lack of specific agonists and antagonists, but are reasonable targets for anti-diabetic therapy. The stable, albeit nonselective, adenosine analogue NECA (5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine) (10 microM) reduced glucose-stimulated insulin release from INS-1 cells. This was mimicked by A(1)-(CHA), A(2A)-(CGS-21680) and A(3)-receptor agonists (Cl-IB-MECA). Two newly synthesized A(2B)-receptor antagonists, PSB-53 and PSB-1115, counteracted the inhibitory effect of NECA. These in-vitro effects were mirrored by in-vivo data with respect to CHA, CGS and Cl-IB-MECA. Distinct concentrations of either PSB-53 or PSB-1115 reversed the decrease in plasma insulin induced by NECA. This was not mimicked by a corresponding change in blood glucose. The effect of PSB-1115 was also obvious in diabetic GotoKakizaki rats: plasma insulin was increased whereas blood glucose was unchanged. During most experiments the effects on blood glucose were not impressive probably because of the physiologically necessary homoeostasis. The adenosine levels were not different in normal Wistar rats and in diabetic GotoKakzaki rats. Altogether the A(2B)-receptor antagonists showed an anti-diabetic potential mainly by increasing plasma insulin levels under conditions when the adenosine tonus was elevated in-vivo and increased insulin release in-vitro.

  12. GABAA receptor-expressing neurons promote consumption in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Samantha K.

    2017-01-01

    Feeding decisions are highly plastic and bidirectionally regulated by neurons that either promote or inhibit feeding. In Drosophila melanogaster, recent studies have identified four GABAergic interneurons that act as critical brakes to prevent incessant feeding. These GABAergic neurons may inhibit target neurons that drive consumption. Here, we tested this hypothesis by examining GABA receptors and neurons that promote consumption. We find that Resistance to dieldrin (RDL), a GABAA type receptor, is required for proper control of ingestion. Knockdown of Rdl in a subset of neurons causes overconsumption of tastants. Acute activation of these neurons is sufficient to drive consumption of appetitive substances and non-appetitive substances and acute silencing of these neurons decreases consumption. Taken together, these studies identify GABAA receptor-expressing neurons that promote Drosophila ingestive behavior and provide insight into feeding regulation. PMID:28362856

  13. GABAA receptor-expressing neurons promote consumption in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Samantha K; Scott, Kristin

    2017-01-01

    Feeding decisions are highly plastic and bidirectionally regulated by neurons that either promote or inhibit feeding. In Drosophila melanogaster, recent studies have identified four GABAergic interneurons that act as critical brakes to prevent incessant feeding. These GABAergic neurons may inhibit target neurons that drive consumption. Here, we tested this hypothesis by examining GABA receptors and neurons that promote consumption. We find that Resistance to dieldrin (RDL), a GABAA type receptor, is required for proper control of ingestion. Knockdown of Rdl in a subset of neurons causes overconsumption of tastants. Acute activation of these neurons is sufficient to drive consumption of appetitive substances and non-appetitive substances and acute silencing of these neurons decreases consumption. Taken together, these studies identify GABAA receptor-expressing neurons that promote Drosophila ingestive behavior and provide insight into feeding regulation.

  14. Cloning and expression of the human vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Sreedharan, S P; Robichon, A; Peterson, K E; Goetzl, E J

    1991-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a neuroendocrine mediator found in the central and peripheral nervous system. Distinct subsets of neural, respiratory, gastrointestinal, and immune cells bear specific high-affinity receptors for VIP, which are associated with a guanine nucleotide-binding (G) protein capable of activating adenylate cyclase. A cDNA clone (GPRN1) encoding the human VIP receptor was identified in libraries prepared from the Nalm 6 line of leukemic pre-B lymphoblasts and the HT-29 line of colon carcinoma cells. The deduced 362-amino acid polypeptide sequence encoded by GPRN1 shares a seven-transmembrane-segment hydropathicity profile with other G protein-coupled receptors. Northern blot analyses identified a 2.7-kilobase transcript of the VIP receptor in Nalm 6 and HT-29 cells as well as in tissues from rat brain, colon, heart, lung, kidney, spleen, and small intestine. COS-6 cells transfected with GPRN1 bound 125I-labeled VIP specifically with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 2.5 nM. VIP--and less effectively secretin, peptide histidine isoleucine (PHI), and glucagon competitively displaced bound 125I-VIP from transfected COS-6 cells, with potencies in the order VIP greater than secretin = PHI much greater than glucagon. VIP stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary K1 cells, inducing a 3-fold increase in the intracellular level of cAMP. When the antisense orientation of the VIP receptor clone was introduced into HT-29 cells, there was a 50% suppression of the specific binding of 125I-VIP and of the VIP-induced increase in cAMP level, relative to untransfected cells. The VIP receptor cloned exhibits less than or equal to 24% homology with other receptors in the same superfamily and thus represents a subset of G protein-coupled receptors for peptide ligands. Images PMID:1675791

  15. Canine pulmonary adenocarcinoma tyrosine kinase receptor expression and phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study evaluated tyrosine kinase receptor (TKR) expression and activation in canine pulmonary adenocarcinoma (cpAC) biospecimens. As histological similarities exist between human and cpAC, we hypothesized that cpACs will have increased TKR mRNA and protein expression as well as TKR phosphorylation. The molecular profile of cpAC has not been well characterized making the selection of therapeutic targets that would potentially have relevant biological activity impossible. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to define TKR expression and their phosphorylation state in cpAC as well as to evaluate the tumors for the presence of potential epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase activating mutations in exons 18–21. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for TKR expression was performed using a tissue microarray (TMA) constructed from twelve canine tumors and companion normal lung samples. Staining intensities of the IHC were quantified by a veterinary pathologist as well as by two different digitalized algorithm image analyses software programs. An antibody array was used to evaluate TKR phosphorylation of the tumor relative to the TKR phosphorylation of normal tissues with the resulting spot intensities quantified using array analysis software. Each EGFR exon PCR product from all of the tumors and non-affected lung tissues were sequenced using sequencing chemistry and the sequencing reactions were run on automated sequencer. Sequence alignments were made to the National Center for Biotechnology Information canine EGFR reference sequence. Results The pro-angiogenic growth factor receptor, PDGFRα, had increased cpAC tumor mRNA, protein expression and phosphorylation when compared to the normal lung tissue biospecimens. Similar to human pulmonary adenocarcinoma, significant increases in cpAC tumor mRNA expression and receptor phosphorylation of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tyrosine receptor were present when compared to the

  16. Adenosine enhances sweet taste through A2B receptors in the taste bud.

    PubMed

    Dando, Robin; Dvoryanchikov, Gennady; Pereira, Elizabeth; Chaudhari, Nirupa; Roper, Stephen D

    2012-01-04

    Mammalian taste buds use ATP as a neurotransmitter. Taste Receptor (type II) cells secrete ATP via gap junction hemichannels into the narrow extracellular spaces within a taste bud. This ATP excites primary sensory afferent fibers and also stimulates neighboring taste bud cells. Here we show that extracellular ATP is enzymatically degraded to adenosine within mouse vallate taste buds and that this nucleoside acts as an autocrine neuromodulator to selectively enhance sweet taste. In Receptor cells in a lingual slice preparation, Ca(2+) mobilization evoked by focally applied artificial sweeteners was significantly enhanced by adenosine (50 μM). Adenosine had no effect on bitter or umami taste responses, and the nucleoside did not affect Presynaptic (type III) taste cells. We also used biosensor cells to measure transmitter release from isolated taste buds. Adenosine (5 μM) enhanced ATP release evoked by sweet but not bitter taste stimuli. Using single-cell reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR on isolated vallate taste cells, we show that many Receptor cells express the adenosine receptor, Adora2b, while Presynaptic (type III) and Glial-like (type I) cells seldom do. Furthermore, Adora2b receptors are significantly associated with expression of the sweet taste receptor subunit, Tas1r2. Adenosine is generated during taste stimulation mainly by the action of the ecto-5'-nucleotidase, NT5E, and to a lesser extent, prostatic acid phosphatase. Both these ecto-nucleotidases are expressed by Presynaptic cells, as shown by single-cell RT-PCR, enzyme histochemistry, and immunofluorescence. Our findings suggest that ATP released during taste reception is degraded to adenosine to exert positive modulation particularly on sweet taste.

  17. Adenosine enhances sweet taste through A2B receptors in the taste bud

    PubMed Central

    Dando, Robin; Dvoryanchikov, Gennady; Pereira, Elizabeth; Chaudhari, Nirupa; Roper, Stephen D.

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian taste buds use ATP as a neurotransmitter. Taste Receptor (Type II) cells secrete ATP via gap junction hemichannels into the narrow extracellular spaces within a taste bud. This ATP excites primary sensory afferent fibers and also stimulates neighboring taste bud cells. Here we show that extracellular ATP is enzymatically degraded to adenosine within mouse vallate taste buds and that this nucleoside acts as an autocrine neuromodulator to selectively enhance sweet taste. In Receptor cells in a lingual slice preparation, Ca2+ mobilization evoked by focally applied artificial sweeteners was significantly enhanced by adenosine (50 µM). Adenosine had no effect on bitter or umami taste responses, and the nucleoside did not affect Presynaptic (Type III) taste cells. We also used biosensor cells to measure transmitter release from isolated taste buds. Adenosine (5 µM) enhanced ATP release evoked by sweet but not bitter taste stimuli. Using single-cell RT-PCR on isolated vallate taste cells, we show that many Receptor cells express adenosine receptors, Adora2b, while Presynaptic (Type III) and Glial-like (Type I) cells seldom do. Furthermore, Adora2b receptors are significantly associated with expression of the sweet taste receptor subunit, Tas1r2. Adenosine is generated during taste stimulation mainly by the action of the ecto-5′-nucleotidase, NT5E, and to a lesser extent, prostatic acid phosphatase (ACPP). Both these ecto-nucleotidases are expressed by Presynaptic cells, as shown by single-cell RT-PCR, enzyme histochemistry and immunofluorescence. Our findings suggest that ATP released during taste reception is degraded to adenosine to exert positive modulation particularly on sweet taste. PMID:22219293

  18. Regulation of bradykinin B2-receptor expression by oestrogen

    PubMed Central

    Madeddu, Paolo; Emanueli, Costanza; Varoni, Maria Vittoria; Demontis, Maria Piera; Anania, Vittorio; Gorioso, Nicola; Chao, Julie

    1997-01-01

    Tissue kallikrein is overexpressed in the kidney of female rats, this sexual dimorphism being associated with a greater effect of early blockade of bradykinin B2-receptors on female blood pressure phenotype. We evaluated the effect of ovariectomy and oestradiol benzoate (50 μg kg−1 every two days for two weeks) on the vasodepressor response to intra-arterial injection of bradykinin (150–900 ng kg−1) and on the expression of bradykinin B2-receptors.Ovariectomy reduced the magnitude of the vasodepressor response to bradykinin and unmasked a secondary vasopressor effect. Oestrogen replacement restored the vasodepressor response to bradykinin in ovariectomized rats.The vasodepressor responses to sodium nitroprusside (3–18 μg kg−1), acetylcholine (30–600 ng kg−1), desArg9-bradykinin (150–900 ng kg−1) or prostaglandin E2 (30–600 ng kg−1) were significantly reduced by ovariectomy. Oestrogen restored to normal the responses to desArg9-bradykinin, acetylcholine and prostaglandin E2, but not that to sodium nitroprusside.B2-receptor mRNA levels were decreased by ovariectomy in the aorta and kidney and they were restored to normal levels by oestrogen. Neither ovariectomy nor oestradiol affected receptor expression in the heart and uterus.These results indicate that oestrogen regulates B2-receptor gene expression and function. Since kinins exert a cardiovascular protective action, reduction in their vasodilator activity after menopause might contribute to the increased risk of pathological cardiovascular events. Conversely, the cardioprotective effects of oestrogen replacement might be, at least in part, mediated by activation of the kallikrein-kinin system. PMID:9283715

  19. Vitamin D Receptor, Retinoid X Receptor, Ki-67, Survivin, and Ezrin Expression in Canine Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Davies, John; Heeb, Heather; Garimella, Rama; Templeton, Kimberly; Pinson, David; Tawfik, Ossama

    2012-01-01

    Canine osteosarcoma (OS) is an aggressive malignant bone tumor. Prognosis is primarily determined by clinical parameters. Vitamin D has been postulated as a novel therapeutic option for many malignancies. Upon activation, vitamin D receptors (VDRs) combine with retinoid receptor (RXR) forming a heterodimer initiating a cascade of events. Vitamin D's antineoplastic activity and its mechanism of action in OS remain to be clearly established. Expression of VDR, RXR, Ki-67, survivin, and ezrin was studied in 33 archived, canine OS specimens. VDR, RXR, survivin, and ezrin were expressed in the majority of cases. There was no statistically significant difference in VDR expression in relationship with tumor grade, type, or locations or animal breed, age, and/or sex. No significant association (p = 0.316) between tumor grade and Ki-67 expression was found; in particular, no difference in Ki-67 expression between grades 2 and 3 OSs was found, while a negative correlation was noted between Ki-67 and VDR expression (ρ = −0.466), a positive correlation between survivin and RXR expression was found (p = 0.374). A significant relationship exists between VDR and RXR expression in OSs and proliferative/apoptosis markers. These results establish a foundation for elucidating mechanisms by which vitamin D induces antineoplastic activity in OS. PMID:23346460

  20. A2A adenosine receptors are up-regulated in lymphocytes from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Corciulo, Carmen; Targa, Martina; Casetta, Ilaria; Gentile, Mauro; Granieri, Enrico; Borea, Pier Andrea; Popoli, Patrizia; Varani, Katia

    2013-09-01

    Adenosine, a purine nucleoside interacting with A1, A2A, A2B and A3 adenosine receptors (ARs), is a potent endogenous modulator of inflammatory and neuronal processes involved in the pathophysiology of several neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, ARs were investigated in lymphocytes from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and compared with age-matched healthy subjects. In ALS patients A2AARs were analysed by using RT-PCR, Western blotting and saturation binding experiments. The effect of A2AAR stimulation on cyclic AMP levels was evaluated in lymphocytes from ALS patients and healthy subjects. An up-regulation of A2AARs was observed in ALS patients with respect to healthy subjects while A1, A2B and A3AR affinity and density did not change. In ALS patients, the A2AAR density values correlated with the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ALSFRS-R) scores. Furthermore, the stimulation of A2AARs mediated a significant increase in cyclic AMP levels in lymphocytes from ALS patients, with a higher potency than in lymphocytes from healthy subjects. In conclusion, the positive correlation between A2AAR density and ALSFRS-R scores could indicate a possible protective effect of this receptor subtype, representing an interesting starting point for the study of alternative therapeutic approaches for ALS based on A2AAR modulation.

  1. Characterization of purinergic receptors and receptor-channels expressed in anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Koshimizu, T A; Tomić, M; Wong, A O; Zivadinovic, D; Stojilkovic, S S

    2000-11-01

    Purinergic G protein-coupled receptors (P2YR) and ion-conducting receptor-channels (P2XR) are present in the pituitary. However, their identification, expression within pituitary cell subpopulations, and the ability to elevate intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in response to ATP stimulation were incompletely characterized. Here we show that mixed populations of rat anterior pituitary cells express messenger RNA transcripts for P2Y2R, P2X2aR, P2X2bR, P2X3R, P2X4R, and P2X7R. The transcripts and functional P2Y2R were identified in lactotrophs and GH3 cells, but not in somatotrophs and gonadotrophs, and their activation by ATP led to an extracellular Ca2+-independent rise in [Ca2+]i in about 40% of cells tested. Lactotrophs and GH3 cells, but not somatotrophs, also express transcripts for P2X7R, P2X3R, and P2X4R. Functional P2X7R were identified in 74% of lactotrophs, whereas 50% of these cells expressed P2X3R and 33% expressed P2X4R. Coexpression of these receptor subtypes in single lactotrophs was frequently observed. Purified somatotrophs expressed transcripts for P2X2aR and P2X2bR, and functional receptors were identified in somatotrophs and gonadotrophs, but not in lactotrophs. Consistent with the cell-specific expression of transcripts for P2X2R and P2X3R, the expression of their functional heteromers was not evident in pituitary cells. Receptors differed in their capacities to elevate and sustain Ca2+ influx-dependent rise in [Ca2+]i during the prolonged ATP stimulation. These results indicate that the purinergic system of anterior pituitary is extremely complex and provides an effective mechanism for generating a cell- and receptor-specific Ca2+ signaling pattern in response to a common agonist.

  2. Neuroprotection by caffeine and A(2A) adenosine receptor inactivation in a model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, J F; Xu, K; Petzer, J P; Staal, R; Xu, Y H; Beilstein, M; Sonsalla, P K; Castagnoli, K; Castagnoli, N; Schwarzschild, M A

    2001-05-15

    Recent epidemiological studies have established an association between the common consumption of coffee or other caffeinated beverages and a reduced risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD). To explore the possibility that caffeine helps prevent the dopaminergic deficits characteristic of PD, we investigated the effects of caffeine and the adenosine receptor subtypes through which it may act in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) neurotoxin model of PD. Caffeine, at doses comparable to those of typical human exposure, attenuated MPTP-induced loss of striatal dopamine and dopamine transporter binding sites. The effects of caffeine were mimicked by several A(2A) antagonists (7-(2-phenylethyl)-5-amino-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo-[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine (SCH 58261), 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine, and (E)-1,3-diethyl-8 (KW-6002)-(3,4-dimethoxystyryl)-7-methyl-3,7-dihydro-1H-purine-2,6-dione) (KW-6002) and by genetic inactivation of the A(2A) receptor, but not by A(1) receptor blockade with 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, suggesting that caffeine attenuates MPTP toxicity by A(2A) receptor blockade. These data establish a potential neural basis for the inverse association of caffeine with the development of PD, and they enhance the potential of A(2A) antagonists as a novel treatment for this neurodegenerative disease.

  3. Synthesis and SAR evaluation of 1,2,4-triazoles as A(2A) receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Alanine, Alexander; Anselm, Lilli; Steward, Lucinda; Thomi, Stefan; Vifian, Walter; Groaning, Michael D

    2004-02-09

    The synthesis and in vitro structure-activity relationships (SAR) of a series of triazoles as A(2A) receptor antagonists is reported. This resulted in the identification of potent, selective and permeable 1,2,4-triazoles such as 42 for further optimization and evaluation in vivo.

  4. Effects of Repeated Ethanol Exposures on NMDA Receptor Expression and Locomotor Sensitization in Mice Expressing Ethanol Resistant NMDA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    den Hartog, Carolina R.; Gilstrap, Meghin; Eaton, Bethany; Lench, Daniel H.; Mulholland, Patrick J.; Homanics, Gregg. E.; Woodward, John J.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence from a large number of preclinical studies suggests that chronic exposure to drugs of abuse, such as psychostimulants or ethanol induces changes in glutamatergic transmission in key brain areas associated with reward and control of behavior. These changes include alterations in the expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors including N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) that are important for regulating neuronal activity and synaptic plasticity. NMDA receptors are inhibited by ethanol and reductions in NMDA-mediated signaling are thought to trigger homestatic responses that limit ethanol's effects on glutamatergic transmission. Following repeated exposures to ethanol, these homeostatic responses may become unstable leading to an altered glutamatergic state that contributes to the escalations in drinking and cognitive deficits observed in alcohol-dependent subjects. An important unanswered question is whether ethanol-induced changes in NMDAR expression are modulated by the intrinsic sensitivity of the receptor to ethanol. In this study, we examined the effects of ethanol on NMDAR subunit expression in cortical (orbitofrontal, medial prefrontal), striatal (dorsal and ventral striatum) and limbic (dorsal hippocampus, basolateral amygdala) areas in mice genetically modified to express ethanol-resistant receptors (F639A mice). These mice have been previously shown to drink more ethanol than their wild-type counterparts and have altered behavioral responses to certain actions of ethanol. Following long-term voluntary drinking, F639A mice showed elevations in GluN2A but not GluN1 or GluN2B expression as compared to wild-type mice. Mice treated with repeated injections with ethanol (2–3.5 g/kg; i.p.) showed changes in NMDAR expression that varied in a complex manner with genotype, brain region, subunit type and exposure protocol all contributing to the observed response. F639A mice, but not wild-type mice, showed enhanced motor activity following repeated

  5. Sinomenine Protects against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice via Adenosine A2A Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Zhao, Li; He, Xie; Zeng, Yi-Jun; Dai, Shuang-Shuang

    2013-01-01

    Sinomenine (SIN) is a bioactive alkaloid extracted from the Chinese medicinal plant Sinomenium acutum, which is widely used in the clinical treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, its role in acute lung injury (ALI) is unclear. In this study, we investigate the role of SIN in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI in mice. After ALI, lung water content and histological signs of pulmonary injury were attenuated, whereas the PaO2/FIO2 (P/F) ratios were elevated significantly in the mice pretreated with SIN. Additionally, SIN markedly inhibited inflammatory cytokine TNF-α and IL-1β expression levels as well as neutrophil infiltration in the lung tissues of the mice. Microarray analysis and real-time PCR showed that SIN treatment upregulated adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) expression, and the protective effect of SIN was abolished in A2AR knockout mice. Further investigation in isolated mouse neutrophils confirmed the upregulation of A2AR by SIN and showed that A2AR-cAMP-PKA signaling was involved in the anti-inflammatory effect of SIN. Taken together, these findings demonstrate an A2AR-associated anti-inflammatory effect and the protective role of SIN in ALI, which suggests a potential novel approach to treat ALI. PMID:23555007

  6. Sinomenine protects against lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice via adenosine A(2A) receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Zhao, Li; He, Xie; Zeng, Yi-Jun; Dai, Shuang-Shuang

    2013-01-01

    Sinomenine (SIN) is a bioactive alkaloid extracted from the Chinese medicinal plant Sinomenium acutum, which is widely used in the clinical treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, its role in acute lung injury (ALI) is unclear. In this study, we investigate the role of SIN in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI in mice. After ALI, lung water content and histological signs of pulmonary injury were attenuated, whereas the PaO2/FIO2 (P/F) ratios were elevated significantly in the mice pretreated with SIN. Additionally, SIN markedly inhibited inflammatory cytokine TNF-α and IL-1β expression levels as well as neutrophil infiltration in the lung tissues of the mice. Microarray analysis and real-time PCR showed that SIN treatment upregulated adenosine A(2A) receptor (A(2A)R) expression, and the protective effect of SIN was abolished in A(2A)R knockout mice. Further investigation in isolated mouse neutrophils confirmed the upregulation of A(2A)R by SIN and showed that A(2A)R-cAMP-PKA signaling was involved in the anti-inflammatory effect of SIN. Taken together, these findings demonstrate an A(2A)R-associated anti-inflammatory effect and the protective role of SIN in ALI, which suggests a potential novel approach to treat ALI.

  7. Progesterone receptors A and B and estrogen receptor alpha expression in normal breast tissue and fibroadenomas.

    PubMed

    Branchini, Gisele; Schneider, Lolita; Cericatto, Rodrigo; Capp, Edison; Brum, Ilma Simoni

    2009-06-01

    Fibroadenomas are the most common benign breast tumors, occurring mainly in young women. Their responses to the hormonal environment are similar to those of normal breast tissue, which suggests that steroid receptors may play a role in tumor development. We evaluated the gene and protein expression of progesterone receptors A and B (PRA and PRB) and the protein expression of estrogen receptor alpha (ER-alpha) in fibroadenoma samples, comparing with adjacent normal breast tissue, from 11 premenopausal women. Progesterone and estradiol levels were determined. No alterations in the PRs gene and protein expression and the ER-alpha protein expression were observed between the follicular and luteal phases, in normal breast versus fibroadenomas. Protein levels of PRA and PRB were higher in fibroadenomas compared to normal breast tissue (P = 0.038 and P = 0.031), while the PRs mRNA levels were similar in both tissues (P = 0.721 and P = 0.139). There were no differences in ER-alpha protein expression between normal breast tissue and fibroadenomas (P = 0.508). The PRA:PRB ratio was similar in the tissues, and also showed a strong correlation in both (r = 0.964, P = 0.0001). Our data suggest a role of PRs in the growth and development of fibroadenomas, although without alterations of the PRA:PRB ratio in these tumors. The absence of alterations in ER-alpha protein levels could be a characteristic behavior of fibroadenomas, unlike breast cancer.

  8. BMP and BMP receptor expression during murine organogenesis.

    PubMed

    Danesh, Shahab M; Villasenor, Alethia; Chong, Diana; Soukup, Carrie; Cleaver, Ondine

    2009-06-01

    Cell-cell communication is critical for regulating embryonic organ growth and differentiation. The Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) family of transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) molecules represents one class of such cell-cell signaling molecules that regulate the morphogenesis of several organs. Due to high redundancy between the myriad BMP ligands and receptors in certain tissues, it has been challenging to address the role of BMP signaling using targeting of single Bmp genes in mouse models. Here, we present a detailed study of the developmental expression profiles of three BMP ligands (Bmp2, Bmp4, Bmp7) and three BMP receptors (Bmpr1a, Bmpr1b, and BmprII), as well as their molecular antagonist (noggin), in the early embryo during the initial steps of murine organogenesis. In particular, we focus on the expression of Bmp family members in the first organs and tissues that take shape during embryogenesis, such as the heart, vascular system, lungs, liver, stomach, nervous system, somites and limbs. Using in situ hybridization, we identify domains where ligand(s) and receptor(s) are either singly or co-expressed in specific tissues. In addition, we identify a previously unnoticed asymmetric expression of Bmp4 in the gut mesogastrium, which initiates just prior to gut turning and the establishment of organ asymmetry in the gastrointestinal tract. Our studies will aid in the future design and/or interpretation of targeted deletion of individual Bmp or Bmpr genes, since this study identifies organs and tissues where redundant BMP signaling pathways are likely to occur.

  9. BMP and BMP receptor expression during murine organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Danesh, Shahab M.; Villasenor, Alethia; Chong, Diana; Soukup, Carrie; Cleaver, Ondine

    2009-01-01

    Cell-cell communication is critical for regulating embryonic organ growth and differentiation. The Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) family of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) molecules represents one class of such cell-cell signaling molecules that regulate the morphogenesis of several organs. Due to high redundancy between the myriad BMP ligands and receptors in certain tissues, it has been challenging to address the role of BMP signaling using targeting of single Bmp genes in mouse models. Here, we present a detailed study of the developmental expression profiles of three BMP ligands (Bmp2, Bmp4, Bmp7) and three BMP receptors (Bmpr1a, Bmpr1b, and BmprII), as well as their molecular antagonist (noggin), in the early embryo during the initial steps of murine organogenesis. In particular, we focus on the expression of Bmp family members in the first organs and tissues that take shape during embryogenesis, such as the heart, vascular system, lungs, liver, stomach, nervous system, somites and limbs. Using in situ hybridization, we identify domains where ligand(s) and receptor(s) are either singly or co-expressed in specific tissues. In addition, we identify a previously unnoticed asymmetric expression of Bmp4 in the gut mesogastrium, which initiates just prior to gut turning and the establishment of organ asymmetry in the gastrointestinal tract. Our studies will aid in the future design and/or interpretation of targeted deletion of individual Bmp or Bmpr genes, since this study identifies organs and tissues where redundant BMP signaling pathways are likely to occur. PMID:19393343

  10. Expression of growth hormone receptor in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Castro, J R; Costoya, J A; Gallego, R; Prieto, A; Arce, V M; Señarís, R

    2000-03-10

    This study was designed to investigate the presence of growth hormone receptor (GHR) expression in the human brain tissue, both normal and tumoral, as well as in the human glioblastoma cell line U87MG. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed the presence of GHR mRNA in all brain samples investigated and in U87MG cells. GHR immunoreactivity was also detected in this cell line using both immunocytochemistry and western blotting. All together, our data demonstrate the existence of GHR expression within the central nervous system (CNS), thus supporting a possible role for GH in the CNS physiology.

  11. Inhibition of D4 Dopamine Receptors on Insulin Receptor Expression and Effect in Renal Proximal Tubule Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Ren, Hongmei; Lu, Xi; He, Duofen; Han, Yu; Wang, Hongyong; Zeng, Chunyu; Shi, Weibin

    2016-04-22

    Ion transport in the renal proximal tubule (RPT), which is increased in essential hypertension, is regulated by numerous hormones and humoral factors, including insulin and dopamine. Activation of dopamine receptor inhibits sodium reabsorption, whereas activation of insulin receptor increases sodium reabsorption in RPTs, and hyperinsulinemic animals and patients have defective renal dopaminergic system. We presume that there is an inhibition of D4 receptor on insulin receptor expression and effect, and the regulation is lost in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Insulin receptor expression was determined by immunoblotting, and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity was detected in both Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and SHR RPT cells. Stimulation of D4 receptor with PD168077 decreased expression of insulin receptors, which was blocked in the presence of the calcium-channel blocker, nicardipine (10(-6) mol/L per 24 hours), in cell culture medium without calcium or in the presence of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor blocker (2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate [2-ADB]; 10(-6) mol/L per 24 hours), indicating that extracellular calcium entry and calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum were involved in the signal pathway. Stimulation of the insulin receptor stimulated Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity, whereas pretreatment with PD168077 for 24 hours decreased the inhibitory effects of insulin receptor on Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity in WKY cells. However, in SHR cells, inhibition of D4 receptor on insulin receptor expression and effect were lost. Activation of D4 receptor inhibits insulin receptor expression in RPT cells from WKY rats. The aberrant inhibition of D4 receptor on insulin receptor expression and effect might be involved in the pathogenesis of essential hypertension. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  12. Cell-free expression of G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Orbán, Erika; Proverbio, Davide; Haberstock, Stefan; Dötsch, Volker; Bernhard, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Cell-free expression has emerged as a new standard for the production of membrane proteins. The reduction of expression complexity in cell-free systems eliminates central bottlenecks and allows the reliable and efficient synthesis of many different types of membrane proteins. Furthermore, the open accessibility of cell-free reactions enables the co-translational solubilization of cell-free expressed membrane proteins in a large variety of supplied additives. Hydrophobic environments can therefore be adjusted according to the requirements of individual membrane protein targets. We present different approaches for the preparative scale cell-free production of G-protein-coupled receptors using the extracts of Escherichia coli cells. We exemplify expression conditions implementing detergents, nanodiscs, or liposomes. The generated protein samples could be directly used for further functional characterization.

  13. Estrogen and Progesterone hormone receptor expression in oral cavity cancer.

    PubMed

    Grimm, M; Biegner, T; Teriete, P; Hoefert, S; Krimmel, M; Munz, A; Reinert, S

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have shown an increase in the incidence of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) in younger patients. The hypothesis that tumors could be hormonally induced during pregnancy or in young female patients without the well-known risk factors alcohol or tobacco abuse seems to be plausible. Estrogen Receptor alpha (ERα) and Progesterone Receptor (PR) expression were analyzed in normal oral mucosa (n=5), oral precursor lesions (simple hyperplasia, n=11; squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n=35), and OSCC specimen. OSCCs were stratified in a young female (n=7) study cohort and older patients (n=46). In the young female study cohort three patients (n=3/7) developed OSCC during or shortly after pregnancy. Breast cancer tissues were used as positive control for ERα and PR expression. ERα expression was found in four oral precursor lesions (squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n=4/35, 11%) and in five OSCC specimen (n=5/46, 11%). The five ERα positive OSCC samples were older male patients. All patients within the young female study cohort were negatively stained for both ERα and PR. ER expression could be regarded as a seldom risk factor for OSCC. PR expression seems to be not relevant for the development of OSCC.

  14. Allosteric mechanisms within the adenosine A2A-dopamine D2 receptor heterotetramer.

    PubMed

    Ferré, Sergi; Bonaventura, Jordi; Tomasi, Dardo; Navarro, Gemma; Moreno, Estefanía; Cortés, Antonio; Lluís, Carme; Casadó, Vicent; Volkow, Nora D

    2016-05-01

    The structure constituted by a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) homodimer and a G protein provides a main functional unit and oligomeric entities can be viewed as multiples of dimers. For GPCR heteromers, experimental evidence supports a tetrameric structure, comprised of two different homodimers, each able to signal with its preferred G protein. GPCR homomers and heteromers can act as the conduit of allosteric interactions between orthosteric ligands. The well-known agonist/agonist allosteric interaction in the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR)-dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) heteromer, by which A2AR agonists decrease the affinity of D2R agonists, gave the first rationale for the use of A2AR antagonists in Parkinson's disease. We review new pharmacological findings that can be explained in the frame of a tetrameric structure of the A2AR-D2R heteromer: first, ligand-independent allosteric modulations by the D2R that result in changes of the binding properties of A2AR ligands; second, differential modulation of the intrinsic efficacy of D2R ligands for G protein-dependent and independent signaling; third, the canonical antagonistic Gs-Gi interaction within the frame of the heteromer; and fourth, the ability of A2AR antagonists, including caffeine, to also exert the same allosteric modulations of D2R ligands than A2AR agonists, while A2AR agonists and antagonists counteract each other's effects. These findings can have important clinical implications when evaluating the use of A2AR antagonists. They also call for the need of monitoring caffeine intake when evaluating the effect of D2R ligands, when used as therapeutic agents in neuropsychiatric disorders or as probes in imaging studies. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Purines in Neurodegeneration and Neuroregeneration'. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Spatiotemporal expression of Nogo-66 receptor after focal cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yue; Dong, Ya-xian; Xu, Jie; Chu, Guo-liang; Yang, Zhi-hua; Liu, Yan-ming

    2016-01-01

    NgR, the receptor for the neurite outgrowth inhibitor Nogo-66, plays a critical role in the plasticity and regeneration of the nervous system after injury such as ischemic stroke. In the present study, we used immunohistochemistry to investigate the regional expression of NgR in rat brain following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). NgR protein expression was not observed in the center of the lesion, but was elevated in the marginal zone compared with control and sham-operated rats. The cerebral cortex and hippocampus (CA1, CA2, and CA3) showed the greatest expression of NgR. Furthermore, NgR expression was higher in the ipsilesional hemisphere than on the control side in the same coronal section. Although time-dependent changes in NgR expression across brain regions had their own characteristics, the overall trend complied with the following rules: NgR expression changes with time showed two peaks and one trough; the first peak in expression appeared between 1 and 3 days after MCAO; expression declined at 5 days; and the second peak occurred at 28 days. PMID:26981102

  16. Estrogen receptor-related receptors in the killifish Fundulus heteroclitus: diversity, expression, and estrogen responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Tarrant, A M; Greytak, S R; Callard, G V; Hahn, M E

    2006-08-01

    The estrogen receptor-related receptors (ERRs) are a group of nuclear receptors that were originally identified on the basis of sequence similarity to the estrogen receptors. The three mammalian ERR genes have been implicated in diverse physiological processes ranging from placental development to maintenance of bone density, but the diversity, function, and regulation of ERRs in non-mammalian species are not well understood. In this study, we report the cloning of four ERR cDNAs from the Atlantic killifish, Fundulus heteroclitus, along with adult tissue expression and estrogen responsiveness. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that F. heteroclitus (Fh)ERRalpha is an ortholog of the single ERRalpha identified in mammals, pufferfish, and zebrafish. FhERRbetaa and FhERRbetab are co-orthologs of the mammalian ERRbeta. Phylogenetic placement of the fourth killifish ERR gene, tentatively identified as FhERRgammab, is less clear. The four ERRs showed distinct, partially overlapping mRNA expression patterns in adult tissues. FhERRalpha was broadly expressed. FhERRbetaa was expressed at apparently low levels in eye, brain, and ovary. FhERRbetab was expressed more broadly in liver, gonad, eye, brain, and kidney. FhERRgammab was expressed in multiple tissues including gill, heart, kidney, and eye. Distinct expression patterns of FhERRbetaa and FhERRbetab are consistent with subfunctionalization of the ERRbeta paralogs. Induction of ERRalpha mRNA by exogenous estrogen exposure has been reported in some mammalian tissues. In adult male killifish, ERR expression did not significantly change following estradiol injection, but showed a trend toward a slight induction (three- to five-fold) of ERRalpha expression in heart. In a second, more targeted experiment, expression of ERRalpha in adult female killifish was downregulated 2.5-fold in the heart following estradiol injection. In summary, our results indicate that killifish contain additional ERR genes relative to mammals, including

  17. Secreted phospholipase A2 inhibitors are also potent blockers of binding to the M-type receptor.

    PubMed

    Boilard, Eric; Rouault, Morgane; Surrel, Fanny; Le Calvez, Catherine; Bezzine, Sofiane; Singer, Alan; Gelb, Michael H; Lambeau, Gérard

    2006-11-07

    Mammalian secreted phospholipases A(2) (sPLA(2)s) constitute a family of structurally related enzymes that are likely to play numerous biological roles because of their phospholipid hydrolyzing activity and binding to soluble and membrane-bound proteins, including the M-type receptor. Over the past decade, a number of competitive inhibitors have been developed against the inflammatory-type human group IIA (hGIIA) sPLA(2) with the aim of specifically blocking its catalytic activity and pathophysiological functions. The fact that many of these inhibitors, including the indole analogue Me-Indoxam, inhibit several other sPLA(2)s that bind to the M-type receptor prompted us to investigate the impact of Me-Indoxam and other inhibitors on the sPLA(2)-receptor interaction. By using a Ca(2+) loop mutant derived from a venom sPLA(2) which is insensitive to hGIIA inhibitors but still binds to the M-type receptor, we demonstrate that Me-Indoxam dramatically decreases the affinity of various sPLA(2)s for the receptor, yet an sPLA(2)-Me-Indoxam-receptor complex can form at very high sPLA(2) concentrations. Me-Indoxam inhibits the binding of iodinated mouse sPLA(2)s to the mouse M-type receptor expressed on live cells but also enhances binding of sPLA(2) to phospholipids. Because Me-Indoxam and other competitive inhibitors protrude out of the sPLA(2) catalytic groove, it is likely that the inhibitors interfere with the sPLA(2)-receptor interaction by steric hindrance and to different extents that depend on the type of sPLA(2) and inhibitor. Our finding suggests that the various anti-inflammatory therapeutic effects of sPLA(2) inhibitors may be due not only to inhibition of enzymatic activity but also to modulation of binding of sPLA(2) to the M-type receptor or other as yet unknown protein targets.

  18. Behavioral meaningful opioidergic stimulation activates kappa receptor gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Teodorov, E.; Ferrari, M.F.R.; Fior-Chadi, D.R.; Camarini, R.; Felício, L.F.

    2012-01-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG) has been reported to be a location for opioid regulation of pain and a potential site for behavioral selection in females. Opioid-mediated behavioral and physiological responses differ according to the activity of opioid receptor subtypes. The present study investigated the effects of the peripheral injection of the kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69593 into the dorsal subcutaneous region of animals on maternal behavior and on Oprk1 gene activity in the PAG of female rats. Female Wistar rats weighing 200-250 g at the beginning of the study were randomly divided into 2 groups for maternal behavior and gene expression experiments. On day 5, pups were removed at 7:00 am and placed in another home cage that was distant from their mother. Thirty minutes after removing the pups, the dams were treated with U69593 (0.15 mg/kg, sc) or 0.9% saline (up to 1 mL/kg) and after 30 min were evaluated in the maternal behavior test. Latencies in seconds for pup retrieval, grouping, crouching, and full maternal behavior were scored. The results showed that U69593 administration inhibited maternal behavior (P < 0.05) because a lower percentage of U69593 group dams showed retrieval of first pup, retrieving all pups, grouping, crouching and displaying full maternal behavior compared to the saline group. Opioid gene expression was evaluated using real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A single injection of U69593 increased Oprk1 PAG expression in both virgin (P < 0.05) and lactating female rats (P < 0.01), with no significant effect on Oprm1 or Oprd1 gene activity. Thus, the expression of kappa-opioid receptors in the PAG may be modulated by single opioid receptor stimulation and behavioral meaningful opioidergic transmission in the adult female might occur simultaneously to specific changes in gene expression of kappa-opioid receptor subtype. This is yet another alert for the complex role of the opioid system in female

  19. The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Uses its C-Terminus to Regulate the A2B Adenosine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Michael J.; Lee, Shernita L.; Marklew, Abigail J.; Gilmore, Rodney C.; Gentzsch, Martina; Sassano, Maria F.; Gray, Michael A.; Tarran, Robert

    2016-01-01

    CFTR is an apical membrane anion channel that regulates fluid homeostasis in many organs including the airways, colon, pancreas and sweat glands. In cystic fibrosis, CFTR dysfunction causes significant morbidity/mortality. Whilst CFTR’s function as an ion channel has been well described, its ability to regulate other proteins is less understood. We have previously shown that plasma membrane CFTR increases the surface density of the adenosine 2B receptor (A2BR), but not of the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR), leading to an enhanced, adenosine-induced cAMP response in the presence of CFTR. In this study, we have found that the C-terminal PDZ-domain of both A2BR and CFTR were crucial for this interaction, and that replacing the C-terminus of A2BR with that of β2AR removed this CFTR-dependency. This observation extended to intact epithelia and disruption of the actin cytoskeleton prevented A2BR-induced but not β2AR-induced airway surface liquid (ASL) secretion. We also found that CFTR expression altered the organization of the actin cytoskeleton and PDZ-binding proteins in both HEK293T cells and in well-differentiated human bronchial epithelia. Furthermore, removal of CFTR’s PDZ binding motif (ΔTRL) prevented actin rearrangement, suggesting that CFTR insertion in the plasma membrane results in local reorganization of actin, PDZ binding proteins and certain GPCRs. PMID:27278076

  20. Structure-Activity Relationships of the Sustained Effects of Adenosine A2A Receptor Agonists Driven by Slow Dissociation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Hothersall, J. Daniel; Guo, Dong; Sarda, Sunil; Sheppard, Robert J.; Chen, Hongming; Keur, Wesley; Waring, Michael J.; IJzerman, Adriaan P.; Hill, Stephen J.; Dale, Ian L.

    2017-01-01

    The duration of action of adenosine A2A receptor (A2A) agonists is critical for their clinical efficacy, and we sought to better understand how this can be optimized. The in vitro temporal response profiles of a panel of A2A agonists were studied using cAMP assays in recombinantly (CHO) and endogenously (SH-SY5Y) expressing cells. Some agonists (e.g., 3cd; UK-432,097) but not others (e.g., 3ac; CGS-21680) demonstrated sustained wash-resistant agonism, where residual receptor activation continued after washout. The ability of an antagonist to reverse pre-established agonist responses was used as a surrogate read-out for agonist dissociation kinetics, and together with radioligand binding studies suggested a role for slow off-rate in driving sustained effects. One compound, 3ch, showed particularly marked sustained effects, with a reversal t1/2 > 6 hours and close to maximal effects that remained for at least 5 hours after washing. Based on the structure-activity relationship of these compounds, we suggest that lipophilic N6 and bulky C2 substituents can promote stable and long-lived binding events leading to sustained agonist responses, although a high compound logD is not necessary. This provides new insight into the binding interactions of these ligands and we anticipate that this information could facilitate the rational design of novel long-acting A2A agonists with improved clinical efficacy. PMID:27803241

  1. The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Uses its C-Terminus to Regulate the A2B Adenosine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Watson, Michael J; Lee, Shernita L; Marklew, Abigail J; Gilmore, Rodney C; Gentzsch, Martina; Sassano, Maria F; Gray, Michael A; Tarran, Robert

    2016-06-09

    CFTR is an apical membrane anion channel that regulates fluid homeostasis in many organs including the airways, colon, pancreas and sweat glands. In cystic fibrosis, CFTR dysfunction causes significant morbidity/mortality. Whilst CFTR's function as an ion channel has been well described, its ability to regulate other proteins is less understood. We have previously shown that plasma membrane CFTR increases the surface density of the adenosine 2B receptor (A2BR), but not of the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR), leading to an enhanced, adenosine-induced cAMP response in the presence of CFTR. In this study, we have found that the C-terminal PDZ-domain of both A2BR and CFTR were crucial for this interaction, and that replacing the C-terminus of A2BR with that of β2AR removed this CFTR-dependency. This observation extended to intact epithelia and disruption of the actin cytoskeleton prevented A2BR-induced but not β2AR-induced airway surface liquid (ASL) secretion. We also found that CFTR expression altered the organization of the actin cytoskeleton and PDZ-binding proteins in both HEK293T cells and in well-differentiated human bronchial epithelia. Furthermore, removal of CFTR's PDZ binding motif (ΔTRL) prevented actin rearrangement, suggesting that CFTR insertion in the plasma membrane results in local reorganization of actin, PDZ binding proteins and certain GPCRs.

  2. Overexpressed Ly-6A.2 mediates cell-cell adhesion by binding a ligand expressed on lymphoid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bamezai, A; Rock, K L

    1995-01-01

    The Ly-6 locus encodes several cell surface proteins whose functions are unknown. Although it is hypothesized that these proteins may be receptors, there is no direct evidence that they bind a ligand. Herein we present evidence that Ly-6A.2, a Ly-6 protein expressed on T lymphocytes, binds a ligand expressed on normal thymocytes and splenic B and T cells. We find that transgenic thymocytes that overexpress Ly-6A.2 spontaneously aggregate in culture. This homotypic adhesion requires the overexpression of Ly-6A.2 because it is not observed in cultures of nontransgenic thymocytes. The aggregation of Ly-6A.2 transgenic thymocytes is inhibited by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (which removes Ly-6A.2 and other glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins from the membrane). Some anti-Ly-6A.2 monoclonal antibodies, including nonactivating ones and Fab' fragments, inhibit this aggregation. In contrast, other anti-Ly-6A.2 monoclonal antibodies increase the aggregation of transgenic but not nontransgenic thymocytes. To further examine whether Ly-6A.2 mediates adhesion (versus inducing another adhesion pathway) reaggregation assays were performed with paraformaldehyde-fixed Tg+ thymocytes. Paraformaldehyde-fixed Tg+ thymocytes reaggregate in culture and this aggregation is also blocked by phosphatidyl-inositol-specific phospholipase C and anti-Ly-6A.2 monoclonal antibodies. These results indicate that the homotypic adhesion of cultured Ly-6A.2 transgenic thymocytes is directly mediated by Ly-6A.2 and, more importantly, strongly suggests that Ly-6A.2 binds a ligand that is expressed on thymocytes. Tg+ thymocytes also bind to nontransgenic thymocytes, B cells, and T cells, indicating that normal cells naturally express the Ly-6A.2 ligand. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:7753800

  3. Endothelin-1 downregulates Mas receptor expression in human cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiheng; Tang, Yamei; Yang, Zuocheng; Liu, Shaojun; Liu, Yong; Li, Yan; He, Wei

    2013-09-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are involved in the pathogenesis of cardiac dysfunction. The Mas receptor is a functional binding site for angiotensin (Ang)‑(1-7), which is now considered a critical component of the RAS and exerts cardioprotective effects. To the best of our knowledge, the present study aimed to examine, for the first time, the effects of ET-1 on Mas expression in cultured human cardiomyocytes. Human cardiomyocytes were treated with ET-1 at different concentrations (1, 5, 10, 20 and 30 nM) for varied time periods (0.5, 1.5, 3, 4.5 or 6 h) with or without the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D, endothelin A (ETA) receptor blocker BQ123 and ETB receptor blocker BQ788, or different kinase inhibitors. ET-1 decreased the Mas mRNA level in a statistically significant dose- and time-dependent manner within 4.5 h, which was reflected in the dose-dependent downregulation of Mas promoter activity, Mas protein levels and Ang-(1-7) binding on the cell membrane. Actinomycin D (1 mg/ml), BQ123 (1 µM), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) siRNA and inhibitor PD169316 (25 µM), completely eliminated the inhibitory effects of ET-1 on Mas expression in human cardiomyocytes. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that ET-1 downregulates Mas expression at the transcription level in human cardiomyocytes via the ETA receptor by a p38 MAPK‑dependent mechanism. This study provides novel insights into the function of ET-1 and the Ang‑(1-7)/Mas axis in cardiac pathophysiology.

  4. Anxious behavior induces elevated hippocampal Cb2 receptor gene expression.

    PubMed

    Robertson, James M; Achua, Justin K; Smith, Justin P; Prince, Melissa A; Staton, Clarissa D; Ronan, Patrick J; Summers, Tangi R; Summers, Cliff H

    2017-04-07

    Anxiety is differentially expressed across a continuum of stressful/fearful intensity, influenced endocannabinoid systems and receptors. The hippocampus plays important roles in the regulation of affective behavior, emotion, and anxiety, as well as memory. Location of Cb1/Cb2 receptor action could be important in determining emotional valence, because while the dorsal hippocampus is involved in spatial memory and cognition, the ventral hippocampus has projections to the PFC, BNST, amygdala, and HPA axis, and is important for emotional responses to stress. During repeated social defeat in a Stress-Alternatives Model arena (SAM; an oval open field with escape portals only large enough for smaller mice), smaller C57BL6/N mice are subject to fear conditioning (tone=CS), and attacked by novel larger aggressive CD1 mice (US) over four daily (5min) trials. Each SAM trial presents an opportunity for escape or submission, with stable behavioral responses established by the second day of interaction. Additional groups had access to a running wheel. Social aggression plus fear conditioning stimulates enhanced Cb2 receptor gene expression in the dorsal CA1, dorsal and ventral dentate gyrus subregions in animals displaying a submissive behavioral phenotype. Escape behavior is associated with reduced Cb2 expression in the dorsal CA1 region, with freezing and escape latency correlated with mRNA levels. Escaping and submitting animals with access to running wheels had increased Cb2 mRNA in dorsal DG/CA1. These results suggest that the Cb2 receptor system is rapidly induced during anxiogenic social interactions plus fear conditioning or exercise; with responses potentially adaptive for coping mechanisms.

  5. Expression of alpha 2-macroglobulin receptor/low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and scavenger receptor in human atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Luoma, J; Hiltunen, T; Särkioja, T; Moestrup, S K; Gliemann, J; Kodama, T; Nikkari, T; Ylä-Herttuala, S

    1994-01-01

    Macrophage- and smooth muscle cell (SMC)-derived foam cells are typical constituents of human atherosclerotic lesions. At least three receptor systems have been characterized that could be involved in the development of foam cells: alpha 2-macroglobulin receptor/LDL receptor-related protein (alpha 2 MR/LRP), scavenger receptor, and LDL receptor. We studied the expression of these receptors in human atherosclerotic lesions with in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry. An abundant expression of alpha 2MR/LRP mRNA and protein was found in SMC and macrophages in both early and advanced lesions in human aortas. alpha 2MR/LRP was also present in SMC in normal aortas. Scavenger receptor mRNA and protein were expressed in lesion macrophages but no expression was found in lesion SMC. LDL receptor was absent from the lesion area but was expressed in some aortas in medial SMC located near the adventitial border. The results demonstrate that (a) alpha 2MR/LRP is, so far, the only lipoprotein receptor expressed in lesions SMC in vivo; (b) scavenger receptors are expressed only in lesion macrophages; and (c) both receptors may play important roles in the development of human atherosclerotic lesions. Images PMID:8182133

  6. A covalent antagonist for the human adenosine A2A receptor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xue; Dong, Guo; Michiels, Thomas J M; Lenselink, Eelke B; Heitman, Laura; Louvel, Julien; IJzerman, Ad P

    2016-12-03

    The structure of the human A2A adenosine receptor has been elucidated by X-ray crystallography with a high affinity non-xanthine antagonist, ZM241385, bound to it. This template molecule served as a starting point for the incorporation of reactive moieties that cause the ligand to covalently bind to the receptor. In particular, we incorporated a fluorosulfonyl moiety onto ZM241385, which yielded LUF7445 (4-((3-((7-amino-2-(furan-2-yl)-[1, 2, 4]triazolo[1,5-a][1, 3, 5]triazin-5-yl)amino)propyl)carbamoyl)benzene sulfonyl fluoride). In a radioligand binding assay, LUF7445 acted as a potent antagonist, with an apparent affinity for the hA2A receptor in the nanomolar range. Its apparent affinity increased with longer incubation time, suggesting an increasing level of covalent binding over time. An in silico A2A-structure-based docking model was used to study the binding mode of LUF7445. This led us to perform site-directed mutagenesis of the A2A receptor to probe and validate the target lysine amino acid K153 for covalent binding. Meanwhile, a functional assay combined with wash-out experiments was set up to investigate the efficacy of covalent binding of LUF7445. All these experiments led us to conclude LUF7445 is a valuable molecular tool for further investigating covalent interactions at this receptor. It may also serve as a prototype for a therapeutic approach in which a covalent antagonist may be needed to counteract prolonged and persistent presence of the endogenous ligand adenosine.

  7. Leptin receptor expression during the progression of endometrial carcinoma is correlated with estrogen and progesterone receptors

    PubMed Central

    Méndez-López, Luis Fernando; Zavala-Pompa, Angel; Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I.; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The hormone leptin, which is produced in the adipose tissue, may influence tumorigenesis directly via its receptor (Ob-R). Thus, a role for Ob-R in endometrial carcinogenesis has been proposed. However, most studies neither included samples of the entire histological progression of endometrial carcinoma nor examined Ob-R jointly with the estrogen and progesterone receptors (ER and PR, respectively). Material and methods To determine the fluctuations of Ob-R, ER, and PR during the histological progression of endometrial carcinoma, we assessed their expression via immunohistochemistry (IHC) in six histological types of endometrium (proliferative, secretory, nonatypical and atypical hyperplasia, and endometrioid and nonendometrioid endometrial carcinoma), in which we performed histopathological and digital scoring for the quantification of receptors. Results We found that Ob-R expression was positively correlated with that of ER and PR (r = 1, p < 0.001; r = 0.943, p < 0.005, respectively), and there was a significant difference in Ob-R expression among proliferative normal endometrium, hyperplasias, and carcinomas, according to their relative digitally scored Ob-R expression (p < 0.001). In addition, we observed that Ob-R expression in the secretory endometrium was more similar to that of carcinomas than to its proliferative counterpart. Conclusions These results indicate that Ob-R expression fluctuates during endometrial carcinogenesis in correlation with ER and PR, suggesting that Ob-R expression in vivo is highly dependent on estrogen and progesterone activities in the endometrium and on its ER and PR status, as suggested previously by in vitro studies. PMID:28144276

  8. Abnormally increased surface expression of AMPA receptors in the cerebellum, cortex and striatum of Cln3(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Attila D; Hof, Caitlin; Pearce, David A

    2015-10-21

    Mutations in the CLN3 gene cause a fatal neurodegenerative disorder, juvenile CLN3 disease. Exploring the cause of the motor coordination deficit in the Cln3(-/-) mouse model of the disease we have previously found that attenuation of AMPA receptor activity in 1-month-old Cln3(-/-) mice significantly improves their motor coordination [20]. To elucidate the mechanism of the abnormally increased AMPA receptor function in Cln3(-/-) mice, we examined the surface expression of AMPA receptors using surface cross-linking in brain slices from 1-month-old wild type (WT) and Cln3(-/-) mice. In surface cross-linked brain samples, Western blotting for AMPA receptor subunits revealed significantly increased surface levels of GluA1 and GluA2 in the cerebellum, and of GluA2 in the cortex and striatum of Cln3(-/-) mice as compared to WT mice. Expression levels of the GluA4 subunit were similar in the cerebellum of WT and Cln3(-/-) mice. While intracellular GluA1 levels in the WT and Cln3(-/-) cerebellum or cortex were similar, the intracellular expression of GluA1 in the Cln3(-/-) striatum was decreased to 56% of the WT level. Our results show a prominent increase in AMPA receptor surface expression in the brain of Cln3(-/-) mice and suggest that CLN3 is involved in the regulation of AMPA receptor surface expression. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Expression of Estrogen Receptor Alpha in Malignant Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, Parvin; Bagheri, Marzieh; Hani, Mohsen

    2017-01-01

    Background: Features of malignant melanoma (MM) vary in the different geographic regions of the world. This may be attributable to environmental, ethnic, and genetic factors. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of estrogen receptor alpha (ER-α) in MM in Isfahan, Iran. Materials and Methods: This study was planned as a descriptive, analytical, cross-sectional investigation. During this study, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of patients with a histopathologic diagnosis of MM was studied for ER-α using immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results: In this study, 38 patients (female/male; 20/18) with a definite diagnosis of malignant cutaneous melanoma and mean age of 52.4 ± 11.2 years were investigated. Using envision IHC staining, there were not any cases with ER-α expression. Conclusion: In confirmation to the most previous studies, expression of ER-α was negative in MM. It is recommended to investigate the expression of estrogen receptor beta and other markers in MM. PMID:28299306

  10. Brain cannabinoid receptor 2: expression, function and modulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, De-Jie; Gao, Ming; Gao, Fen-Fei; Su, Quan-Xi; Wu, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Cannabis sativa (marijuana) is a fibrous flowering plant that produces an abundant variety of molecules, some with psychoactive effects. At least 4% of the world's adult population uses cannabis annually, making it one of the most frequently used illicit drugs in the world. The psychoactive effects of cannabis are mediated primarily through cannabinoid receptor (CBR) subtypes. The prevailing view is that CB1Rs are mainly expressed in the central neurons, whereas CB2Rs are predominantly expressed in peripheral immune cells. However, this traditional view has been challenged by emerging strong evidence that shows CB2Rs are moderately expressed and function in specific brain areas. New evidence has demonstrated that brain CB2Rs modulate animal drug-seeking behaviors, suggesting that these receptors may exist in brain regions that regulate drug addiction. Recently, we further confirmed that functional CB2Rs are expressed in mouse ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons and that the activation of VTA CB2Rs reduces neuronal excitability and cocaine-seeking behavior. In addition, CB2R-mediated modulation of hippocampal CA3 neuronal excitability and network synchronization has been reported. Here, we briefly summarize recent lines of evidence showing how CB2Rs modulate function and pathophysiology in the CNS.

  11. Expression of cloned α6* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyi; Kuryatov, Alexander; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-09-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) are ACh-gated ion channels formed from five homologous subunits in subtypes defined by their subunit composition and stoichiometry. Some subtypes readily produce functional AChRs in Xenopus oocytes and transfected cell lines. α6β2β3* AChRs (subtypes formed from these subunits and perhaps others) are not easily expressed. This may be because the types of neurons in which they are expressed (typically dopaminergic neurons) have unique chaperones for assembling α6β2β3* AChRs, especially in the presence of the other AChR subtypes. Because these relatively minor brain AChR subtypes are of major importance in addiction to nicotine, it is important for drug development as well as investigation of their functional properties to be able to efficiently express human α6β2β3* AChRs. We review the issues and progress in expressing α6* AChRs. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor: From Molecular Biology to Cognition'.

  12. Brain cannabinoid receptor 2: expression, function and modulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, De-jie; Gao, Ming; Gao, Fen-fei; Su, Quan-xi; Wu, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Cannabis sativa (marijuana) is a fibrous flowering plant that produces an abundant variety of molecules, some with psychoactive effects. At least 4% of the world's adult population uses cannabis annually, making it one of the most frequently used illicit drugs in the world. The psychoactive effects of cannabis are mediated primarily through cannabinoid receptor (CBR) subtypes. The prevailing view is that CB1Rs are mainly expressed in the central neurons, whereas CB2Rs are predominantly expressed in peripheral immune cells. However, this traditional view has been challenged by emerging strong evidence that shows CB2Rs are moderately expressed and function in specific brain areas. New evidence has demonstrated that brain CB2Rs modulate animal drug-seeking behaviors, suggesting that these receptors may exist in brain regions that regulate drug addiction. Recently, we further confirmed that functional CB2Rs are expressed in mouse ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons and that the activation of VTA CB2Rs reduces neuronal excitability and cocaine-seeking behavior. In addition, CB2R-mediated modulation of hippocampal CA3 neuronal excitability and network synchronization has been reported. Here, we briefly summarize recent lines of evidence showing how CB2Rs modulate function and pathophysiology in the CNS. PMID:28065934

  13. Cyclic AMP-receptor protein activates aerobactin receptor IutA expression in Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Choon-Mee; Kim, Seong-Jung; Shin, Sung-Heui

    2012-04-01

    The ferrophilic bacterium Vibrio vulnificus can utilize the siderophore aerobactin of Escherichia coli for iron acquisition via its specific receptor IutA. This siderophore piracy by V. vulnificus may contribute to its survival and proliferation, especially in mixed bacterial environments. In this study, we examined the effects of glucose, cyclic AMP (cAMP), and cAMP-receptor protein (Crp) on iutA expression in V. vulnificus. Glucose dose-dependently repressed iutA expression. A mutation in cya encoding adenylate cyclase required for cAMP synthesis severely repressed iutA expression, and this change was recovered by in trans complementing cya or the addition of exogenous cAMP. Furthermore, a mutation in crp encoding Crp severely repressed iutA expression, and this change was recovered by complementing crp. Accordingly, glucose deprivation under iron-limited conditions is an environmental signal for iutA expression, and Crp functions as an activator that regulates iutA expression in response to glucose availability.

  14. The regulation of oxytocin receptor gene expression during adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yi, K J; So, K H; Hata, Y; Suzuki, Y; Kato, D; Watanabe, K; Aso, H; Kasahara, Y; Nishimori, K; Chen, C; Katoh, K; Roh, S G

    2015-05-01

    Although it has been reported that oxytocin stimulates lipolysis in adipocytes, changes in the expression of oxytocin receptor (OTR) mRNA in adipogenesis are still unknown. The present study aimed to investigate the expression of OTR mRNA during adipocyte differentiation and fat accumulation in adipocytes. OTR mRNA was highly expressed in adipocytes prepared from mouse adipose tissues compared to stromal-vascular cells. OTR mRNA expression was increased during the adipocyte differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells. OTR expression levels were higher in subcutaneous and epididymal adipose tissues of 14-week-old male mice compared to 7-week-old male mice. Levels of OTR mRNA expression were higher in adipose tissues at four different sites of mice fed a high-fat diet than in those of mice fed a normal diet. The OTR expression level was also increased by refeeding for 4 h after fasting for 16 h. Oxytocin significantly induced lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In conclusion, a new regulatory mechanism is demonstrated for oxytocin to control the differentiation and fat accumulation in adipocytes via activation of OTR as a part of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adipose axis.

  15. Adenosine A(2A) receptor gene (ADORA2A) variants may increase autistic symptoms and anxiety in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Christine M; Agelopoulos, Konstantin; Huy, Ellen; Rothermundt, Matthias; Krakowitzky, Petra; Meyer, Jobst; Deckert, Jürgen; von Gontard, Alexander; Hohoff, Christa

    2010-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are heterogeneous disorders presenting with increased rates of anxiety. The adenosine A(2A) receptor gene (ADORA2A) is associated with panic disorder and is located on chromosome 22q11.23. Its gene product, the adenosine A(2A) receptor, is strongly expressed in the caudate nucleus, which also is involved in ASD. As autistic symptoms are increased in individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, and large 22q11.2 deletions and duplications have been observed in ASD individuals, in this study, 98 individuals with ASD and 234 control individuals were genotyped for eight single-nucleotide polymorphisms in ADORA2A. Nominal association with the disorder was observed for rs2236624-CC, and phenotypic variability in ASD symptoms was influenced by rs3761422, rs5751876 and rs35320474. In addition, association of ADORA2A variants with anxiety was replicated for individuals with ASD. Findings point toward a possible mediating role of ADORA2A variants on phenotypic expression in ASD that need to be replicated in a larger sample.

  16. Regulation of fear responses by striatal and extrastriatal adenosine A2A receptors in forebrain.

    PubMed

    Wei, Catherine J; Augusto, Elisabete; Gomes, Catarina A; Singer, Philipp; Wang, Yumei; Boison, Detlev; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Yee, Benjamin K; Chen, Jiang-Fan

    2014-06-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) are enriched in the striatum but are also present at lower levels in the extrastriatal forebrain (i.e., hippocampus, cortex), integrating dopamine, glutamate, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling, and are thus essential for striatal neuroplasticity and fear and anxiety behavior. We tested two brain region-specific A2AR knockout lines with A2ARs selectively deleted either in the striatum (st-A2AR KO) or the entire forebrain (striatum, hippocampus, and cortex [fb-A2AR KO]) on fear and anxiety-related responses. We also examined the effect of hippocampus-specific A2AR deletion by local injection of adeno-associated virus type 5 (AAV5)-Cre into floxed-A2AR knockout mice. Selectively deleting A2ARs in the striatum increased Pavlovian fear conditioning (both context and tone) in st-A2AR KO mice, but extending the deletion to the rest of the forebrain apparently spared context fear conditioning and attenuated tone fear conditioning in fb-A2AR KO mice. Moreover, focal deletion of hippocampal A2ARs by AAV5-Cre injection selectively attenuated context (but not tone) fear conditioning. Deletion of A2ARs in the entire forebrain in fb-A2AR KO mice also produced an anxiolytic phenotype in both the elevated plus maze and open field tests, and increased the startle response. These extrastriatal forebrain A2AR behavioral effects were associated with reduced BDNF levels in the fb-A2AR KO hippocampus. This study provides evidence that inactivation of striatal A2ARs facilitates Pavlovian fear conditioning, while inactivation of extrastriatal A2ARs in the forebrain inhibits fear conditioning and also affects anxiety-related behavior. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. M-Type Phospholipase A2 Receptor as Target Antigen in Idiopathic Membranous Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Laurence H.; Bonegio, Ramon G.B.; Lambeau, Gérard; Beck, David M.; Powell, David W.; Cummins, Timothy D.; Klein, Jon B.; Salant, David J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Idiopathic membranous nephropathy, a common form of the nephrotic syndrome, is an antibody-mediated autoimmune glomerular disease. Serologic diagnosis has been elusive because the target antigen is unknown. METHODS We performed Western blotting of protein extracts from normal human glomeruli with serum samples from patients with idiopathic or secondary membranous nephropathy or other proteinuric or autoimmune diseases and from normal controls. We used mass spectrometry to analyze the reactive protein bands and confirmed the identity and location of the target antigen with a monospecific antibody. RESULTS Serum samples from 26 of 37 patients (70%) with idiopathic but not secondary membranous nephropathy specifically identified a 185-kD glycoprotein in non-reduced glomerular extract. Mass spectrometry of the reactive protein band detected the M-type phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R). Reactive serum specimens recognized recombinant PLA2R and bound the same 185-kD glomerular protein as did the monospecific anti-PLA2R antibody. Anti-PLA2R autoantibodies in serum samples from patients with membranous nephropathy were mainly IgG4, the predominant immunoglobulin subclass in glomerular deposits. PLA2R was expressed in podocytes in normal human glomeruli and colocalized with IgG4 in immune deposits in glomeruli of patients with membranous nephropathy. IgG eluted from such deposits in patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy, but not in those with lupus membranous or IgA nephropathy, recognized PLA2R. CONCLUSIONS A majority of patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy have antibodies against a conformation-dependent epitope in PLA2R. PLA2R is present in normal podocytes and in immune deposits in patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy, indicating that PLA2R is a major antigen in this disease. PMID:19571279

  18. The A2B adenosine receptor modulates pulmonary hypertension associated with interstitial lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Zhong, Hongyan; Acero, Luis; Weng, Tingting; Melicoff, Ernestina; West, James D.; Hemnes, Anna; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Xia, Yang; Johnston, Richard A.; Zeng, Dewan; Belardinelli, Luiz; Blackburn, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Development of pulmonary hypertension is a common and deadly complication of interstitial lung disease. Little is known regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to pulmonary hypertension in patients with interstitial lung disease, and effective treatment options are lacking. The purpose of this study was to examine the adenosine 2B receptor (A2BR) as a regulator of vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary fibrosis. To accomplish this, cellular and molecular changes in vascular remodeling were monitored in mice exposed to bleomycin in conjunction with genetic removal of the A2BR or treatment with the A2BR antagonist GS-6201. Results demonstrated that GS-6201 treatment or genetic removal of the A2BR attenuated vascular remodeling and hypertension in our model. Furthermore, direct A2BR activation on vascular cells promoted interleukin-6 and endothelin-1 release. These studies identify a novel mechanism of disease progression to pulmonary hypertension and support the development of A2BR antagonists for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension secondary to interstitial lung disease.—Karmouty-Quintana, H., Zhong, H., Acero, L., Weng, T., Melicoff, E., West, J. D., Hemnes, A., Grenz, A., Eltzschig, H. K., Blackwell, T. S., Xia, Y., Johnston, R. A., Zeng, D., Belardinelli, L., Blackburn, M. R. The A2B adenosine receptor modulates pulmonary hypertension associated with interstitial lung disease. PMID:22415303

  19. Human platelets express authentic CB₁ and CB₂ receptors.

    PubMed

    Catani, M V; Gasperi, V; Catanzaro, G; Baldassarri, S; Bertoni, A; Sinigaglia, F; Avigliano, L; Maccarrone, M

    2010-11-01

    In the last decade, the neurovascular effects exerted by endocannabinoids (eCBs) have attracted growing interest, because they hold the promise to open new avenues of therapeutic intervention against major causes of death in Western society. Several actions of eCBs are mediated by type-1 (CB₁) or type-2 (CB₂) cannabinoid receptors, yet there is no clear evidence of the presence of these proteins in platelets. To demonstrate that CB₁ and CB₂ are expressed in human platelets, we analyzed their protein level by Western blotting and ELISA, visualized their cellular localization by confocal microscopy, and ascertained their functionality by binding assays. We found that CB₁, and to a lesser extent CB₂, are expressed in highly purified human platelets. Both receptor subtypes were predominantly localized inside the cell, thus explaining why they might remain undetected in preparations of plasma membranes. The identification of authentic CB₁ and CB₂ in human platelets supports the potential exploitation of selective agonists or antagonists of these receptors as novel therapeutics to combat neurovascular disorders. It seems remarkable that some of these substances have been already used in humans to treat disease states.

  20. Aberrant adenosine A2A receptor signaling contributes to neurodegeneration and cognitive impairments in a mouse model of synucleinopathy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qidi; Ren, Xiangpeng; Liu, Ya; Li, Zhihui; Zhang, Liping; Chen, Xingjun; He, Chaoxiang; Chen, Jiang-Fan

    2016-09-01

    Synucleinopathy is characterized by abnormal accumulation of misfolded α-synuclein (α-Syn)-positive cytoplasmic inclusions and by neurodegeneration and cognitive impairments, but the pathogenesis mechanism of synucleinopathy remains to be defined. Using a transmission model of synucleinopathy by intracerebral injection of preformed A53T α-Syn fibrils, we investigated whether aberrant adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) signaling contributed to pathogenesis of synucleinopathy. We demonstrated that intra-hippocampal injection of preformed mutant α-Syn fibrils triggered a striking and selective induction of A2AR expression which was closely co-localized with pSer129 α-Syn-rich inclusions in neurons and glial cells of hippocampus. Importantly, by abolishing aberrant A2AR signaling triggered by mutant α-Syn, genetic deletion of A2ARs blunted a cascade of pathological events leading to synucleinopathy, including pSer129 α-Syn-rich and p62-positive aggregates, NF-κB activation and astrogliosis, apoptotic neuronal cell death and working memory deficits without affecting motor activity. These findings define α-Syn-triggered aberrant A2AR signaling as a critical pathogenesis mechanism of synucleinopathy with dual controls of cognition and neurodegeneration by modulating α-Syn aggregates. Thus, aberrant A2AR signaling represents a useful biomarker as well as a therapeutic target of synucleinopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Novel Alexa Fluor-488 labeled antagonist of the A(2A) adenosine receptor: Application to a fluorescence polarization-based receptor binding assay.

    PubMed

    Kecskés, Miklós; Kumar, T Santhosh; Yoo, Lena; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2010-08-15

    Fluorescence polarization (FP) assay has many advantages over the traditional radioreceptor binding studies. We developed an A(2A) adenosine receptor (AR) FP assay using a newly synthesized fluorescent antagonist of the A(2A)AR (MRS5346), a pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-amine derivative conjugated to the fluorescent dye Alexa Fluor-488. MRS5346 displayed a K(i) value of 111+/-16nM in radioligand binding using [(3)H]CGS21680 and membranes prepared from HEK293 cells stably expressing the human A(2A)AR. In a cyclic AMP functional assay, MRS5346 was shown to be an A(2A)AR antagonist. MRS5346 did not show any effect on A(1) and A(3) ARs in binding or the A(2B)AR in a cyclic AMP assay at 10microM. Its suitability as a fluorescent tracer was indicated in an initial observation of an FP signal following A(2A)AR binding. The FP signal was optimal with 20nM MRS5346 and 150microg protein/mL HEK293 membranes. The association and dissociation kinetic parameters were readily determined using this FP assay. The K(d) value of MRS5346 calculated from kinetic parameters was 16.5+/-4.7nM. In FP competition binding experiments using MRS5346 as a tracer, K(i) values of known AR agonists and antagonists consistently agreed with K(i) values from radioligand binding. Thus, this FP assay, which eliminates using radioisotopes, appears to be appropriate for both routine receptor binding and high-throughput screening with respect to speed of analysis, displaceable signal and precision. The approach used in the present study could be generally applicable to other GPCRs.

  2. Acromegaly: molecular expression of somatostatin receptor subtypes and treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Bronstein, Marcello D

    2006-01-01

    About a third of acromegalic patients are resistant to the currently commercially available somatostatin analogs (SA) octreotide and lanreotide. Such resistance is related to an overall reduction of somatostatin receptor (SSTR) density or to a differentiated expression of SSTR subtypes. There are five known SSTR subtypes. SSTR2 and SSTR5 are usually expressed in GH-secreting pituitary tumors, and both octreotide and lanreotide bind preferentially to SSTR2 and, to a lesser extent, to SSTR5. SA inhibitory effects on GH secretion and tumor cell proliferation can occur together or be dissociated events, depending on the tumor expression of SSTR subtypes involved in each mechanism. The development of specific somatostatin subtypes analogs, mainly for SSTR5, of a SSTR2-SSTR5 bispecific compound, and of a "universal" analog with high affinity to SSTR1, 2, 3, and 5 showed preliminary, albeit promising results for the treatment of resistant somatotropic adenomas.

  3. Iterative use of nuclear receptor Nr5a2 regulates multiple stages of liver and pancreas development

    PubMed Central

    Nissim, Sahar; Weeks, Olivia; Talbot, Jared C.; Hedgepeth, John W.; Wucherpfennig, Julia; Schatzman-Bone, Stephanie; Swinburne, Ian; Cortes, Mauricio; Alexa, Kristen; Megason, Sean; North, Trista E.; Amacher, Sharon L.; Goessling, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    The stepwise progression of common endoderm progenitors into differentiated liver and pancreas organs is regulated by a dynamic array of signals that are not well understood. The nuclear receptor subfamily 5, group A, member 2 gene nr5a2, also known as Liver receptor homolog-1 (Lrh-1) is expressed in several tissues including the developing liver and pancreas. Here, we interrogate the role of Nr5a2 at multiple developmental stages using genetic and chemical approaches and uncover novel pleiotropic requirements during zebrafish liver and pancreas development. Zygotic loss of nr5a2 in a targeted genetic null mutant disrupted the development of the exocrine pancreas and liver, while leaving the endocrine pancreas intact. Loss of nr5a2 abrogated exocrine pancreas markers such as trypsin, while pancreas progenitors marked by ptf1a or pdx1 remained unaffected, suggesting a role for Nr5a2 in regulating pancreatic acinar cell differentiation. In the developing liver, Nr5a2 regulates hepatic progenitor outgrowth and differentiation, as nr5a2 mutants exhibited reduced hepatoblast markers hnf4α and prox1 as well as differentiated hepatocyte marker fabp10a. Through the first in vivo use of Nr5a2 chemical antagonist Cpd3, the iterative requirement for Nr5a2 for exocrine pancreas and liver differentiation was temporally elucidated: chemical inhibition of Nr5a2 function during hepatopancreas progenitor specification was sufficient to disrupt exocrine pancreas formation and enhance the size of the embryonic liver, suggesting that Nr5a2 regulates hepatic versus pancreatic progenitor fate choice. Chemical inhibition of Nr5a2 at a later time during pancreas and liver differentiation was sufficient to block the formation of mature acinar cells and hepatocytes. These findings define critical iterative and pleiotropic roles for Nr5a2 at distinct stages of pancreas and liver organogenesis, and provide novel perspectives for interpreting the role of Nr5a2 in disease. PMID:27474396

  4. Iterative use of nuclear receptor Nr5a2 regulates multiple stages of liver and pancreas development.

    PubMed

    Nissim, Sahar; Weeks, Olivia; Talbot, Jared C; Hedgepeth, John W; Wucherpfennig, Julia; Schatzman-Bone, Stephanie; Swinburne, Ian; Cortes, Mauricio; Alexa, Kristen; Megason, Sean; North, Trista E; Amacher, Sharon L; Goessling, Wolfram

    2016-10-01

    The stepwise progression of common endoderm progenitors into differentiated liver and pancreas organs is regulated by a dynamic array of signals that are not well understood. The nuclear receptor subfamily 5, group A, member 2 gene nr5a2, also known as Liver receptor homolog-1 (Lrh-1) is expressed in several tissues including the developing liver and pancreas. Here, we interrogate the role of Nr5a2 at multiple developmental stages using genetic and chemical approaches and uncover novel pleiotropic requirements during zebrafish liver and pancreas development. Zygotic loss of nr5a2 in a targeted genetic null mutant disrupted the development of the exocrine pancreas and liver, while leaving the endocrine pancreas intact. Loss of nr5a2 abrogated exocrine pancreas markers such as trypsin, while pancreas progenitors marked by ptf1a or pdx1 remained unaffected, suggesting a role for Nr5a2 in regulating pancreatic acinar cell differentiation. In the developing liver, Nr5a2 regulates hepatic progenitor outgrowth and differentiation, as nr5a2 mutants exhibited reduced hepatoblast markers hnf4α and prox1 as well as differentiated hepatocyte marker fabp10a. Through the first in vivo use of Nr5a2 chemical antagonist Cpd3, the iterative requirement for Nr5a2 for exocrine pancreas and liver differentiation was temporally elucidated: chemical inhibition of Nr5a2 function during hepatopancreas progenitor specification was sufficient to disrupt exocrine pancreas formation and enhance the size of the embryonic liver, suggesting that Nr5a2 regulates hepatic vs. pancreatic progenitor fate choice. Chemical inhibition of Nr5a2 at a later time during pancreas and liver differentiation was sufficient to block the formation of mature acinar cells and hepatocytes. These findings define critical iterative and pleiotropic roles for Nr5a2 at distinct stages of pancreas and liver organogenesis, and provide novel perspectives for interpreting the role of Nr5a2 in disease. Copyright © 2016

  5. [Adenosine A2A receptor as a drug target for treatment of sepsis].

    PubMed

    Sivak, K V; Vasin, A V; Egorov, V V; Tsevtkov, V B; Kuzmich, N N; Savina, V A; Kiselev, O I

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a generalized infection accompanied by response of the body that manifests in a clinical and laboratory syndrome, namely, in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) from the organism to the infection. Although sepsis is a widespread and life-threatening disease, the assortment of drugs for its treatment is mostly limited by antibiotics. Therefore, the search for new cellular targets for drug therapy of sepsis is an urgent task of modern medicine and pharmacology. One of the most promising targets is the adenosine A(2A) receptor (A(2A)AR). The activation of this receptor, which is mediated by extracellular adenosine, manifests in almost all types of immune cells (lymphocytes, monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells) and results in reducing the severity of inflammation and reperfusion injury in various tissues. The activation of adenosine A(2A) receptor inhibits the proliferation of T cells and production of proinflammatory cytokines, which contributes to the activation of the synthesis of anti-inflammatory cytokines, thereby suppressing the systemic response. For this reason, various selective A(2A)AR agonists and antagonists may be considered to be drug candidates for sepsis pharmacotherapy. Nevertheless, they remain only efficient ligands and objects of pre-clinical and clinical trials. This review examines the molecular mechanisms of inflammatory response in sepsis and the structure and functions of A(2A)AR and its role in the pathogenesis of sepsis, as well as examples of using agonists and antagonists of this receptor for the treatment of SIRS and sepsis.

  6. Coagulation defects and altered hemodynamic responses in mice lacking receptors for thromboxane A2.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D W; Mannon, R B; Mannon, P J; Latour, A; Oliver, J A; Hoffman, M; Smithies, O; Koller, B H; Coffman, T M

    1998-01-01

    Thromboxane A2 (TXA2) is a labile metabolite of arachidonic acid that has potent biological effects. Its actions are mediated by G protein-coupled thromboxane-prostanoid (TP) receptors. TP receptors have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. To investigate the physiological functions of TP receptors, we generated TP receptor-deficient mice by gene targeting. Tp-/- animals reproduce and survive in expected numbers, and their major organ systems are normal. Thromboxane agonist binding cannot be detected in tissues from Tp-/- mice. Bleeding times are prolonged in Tp-/- mice and their platelets do not aggregate after exposure to TXA2 agonists. Aggregation responses after collagen stimulation are also delayed, although ADP-stimulated aggregation is normal. Infusion of the TP receptor agonist U-46619 causes transient increases in blood pressure followed by cardiovascular collapse in wild-type mice, but U-46619 caused no hemodynamic effect in Tp-/- mice. Tp-/- mice are also resistant to arachidonic acid-induced shock, although arachidonic acid signifi-cantly reduced blood pressure in Tp-/- mice. In summary, Tp-/- mice have a mild bleeding disorder and altered vascular responses to TXA2 and arachidonic acid. Our studies suggest that most of the recognized functions of TXA2 are mediated by the single known Tp gene locus. PMID:9835625

  7. NMDA receptor subunit expression and PAR2 receptor activation in colospinal afferent neurons (CANs) during inflammation induced visceral hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Suckow, Shelby K; Caudle, Robert M

    2009-01-01

    Background Visceral hypersensitivity is a clinical observation made when diagnosing patients with functional bowel disorders. The cause of visceral hypersensitivity is unknown but is thought to be attributed to inflammation. Previously we demonstrated that a unique set of enteric neurons, colospinal afferent neurons (CANs), co-localize with the NR1 and NR2D subunits of the NMDA receptor as well as with the PAR2 receptor. The aim of this study was to determine if NMDA and PAR2 receptors expressed on CANs contribute to visceral hypersensitivity following inflammation. Recently, work has suggested that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons expressing the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptor mediate inflammation induced visceral hypersensitivity. Therefore, in order to study CAN involvement in visceral hypersensitivity, DRG neurons expressing the TRPV1 receptor were lesioned with resiniferatoxin (RTX) prior to inflammation and behavioural testing. Results CANs do not express the TRPV1 receptor; therefore, they survive following RTX injection. RTX treatment resulted in a significant decrease in TRPV1 expressing neurons in the colon and immunohistochemical analysis revealed no change in peptide or receptor expression in CANs following RTX lesioning as compared to control data. Behavioral studies determined that both inflamed non-RTX and RTX animals showed a decrease in balloon pressure threshold as compared to controls. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the NR1 cassettes, N1 and C1, of the NMDA receptor on CANs were up-regulated following inflammation. Furthermore, inflammation resulted in the activation of the PAR2 receptors expressed on CANs. Conclusion Our data show that inflammation causes an up-regulation of the NMDA receptor and the activation of the PAR2 receptor expressed on CANs. These changes are associated with a decrease in balloon pressure in response to colorectal distension in non-RTX and RTX lesioned animals. Therefore

  8. NMDA receptor subunit expression and PAR2 receptor activation in colospinal afferent neurons (CANs) during inflammation induced visceral hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Suckow, Shelby K; Caudle, Robert M

    2009-09-22

    Visceral hypersensitivity is a clinical observation made when diagnosing patients with functional bowel disorders. The cause of visceral hypersensitivity is unknown but is thought to be attributed to inflammation. Previously we demonstrated that a unique set of enteric neurons, colospinal afferent neurons (CANs), co-localize with the NR1 and NR2D subunits of the NMDA receptor as well as with the PAR2 receptor. The aim of this study was to determine if NMDA and PAR2 receptors expressed on CANs contribute to visceral hypersensitivity following inflammation. Recently, work has suggested that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons expressing the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptor mediate inflammation induced visceral hypersensitivity. Therefore, in order to study CAN involvement in visceral hypersensitivity, DRG neurons expressing the TRPV1 receptor were lesioned with resiniferatoxin (RTX) prior to inflammation and behavioural testing. CANs do not express the TRPV1 receptor; therefore, they survive following RTX injection. RTX treatment resulted in a significant decrease in TRPV1 expressing neurons in the colon and immunohistochemical analysis revealed no change in peptide or receptor expression in CANs following RTX lesioning as compared to control data. Behavioral studies determined that both inflamed non-RTX and RTX animals showed a decrease in balloon pressure threshold as compared to controls. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the NR1 cassettes, N1 and C1, of the NMDA receptor on CANs were up-regulated following inflammation. Furthermore, inflammation resulted in the activation of the PAR2 receptors expressed on CANs. Our data show that inflammation causes an up-regulation of the NMDA receptor and the activation of the PAR2 receptor expressed on CANs. These changes are associated with a decrease in balloon pressure in response to colorectal distension in non-RTX and RTX lesioned animals. Therefore, these data suggest that CANs

  9. Association between A2a receptor gene polymorphisms and caffeine-induced anxiety.

    PubMed

    Alsene, Karen; Deckert, Jürgen; Sand, Philipp; de Wit, Harriet

    2003-09-01

    The adenosine receptor system, which mediates the psychoactive effects of caffeine, is also thought to be involved in the regulation of anxiety. In this study, we examined the association between variations in anxiogenic responses to caffeine and polymorphisms in the A1 and A2a adenosine receptor genes. Healthy, infrequent caffeine users (N=94) recorded their subjective mood states following a 150 mg oral dose of caffeine freebase or placebo in a double-blind study. We found a significant association between self-reported anxiety after caffeine administration and two linked polymorphisms on the A2a receptor gene, the 1976C>T and 2592C>Tins polymorphisms. Individuals with the 1976T/T and the 2592Tins/Tins genotypes reported greater increases in anxiety after caffeine administration than the other genotypic groups. The study shows that an adenosine receptor gene polymorphism that has been associated with Panic Disorder is also associated with anxiogenic responses to an acute dose of caffeine.

  10. Investigation of the conformational dynamics of the apo A2A adenosine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Caliman, Alisha D; Swift, Sara E; Wang, Yi; Miao, Yinglong; McCammon, J Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The activation/deactivation processes for G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been computationally studied for several different classes, including rhodopsin, the β2 adrenergic receptor, and the M2 muscarinic receptor. Despite determined cocrystal structures of the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AAR) in complex with antagonists, agonists and an antibody, the deactivation process of this GPCR is not completely understood. In this study, we investigate the convergence of two apo simulations, one starting with an agonist-bound conformation (PDB: 3QAK)14 and the other starting with an antagonist-bound conformation (PDB: 3EML)11. Despite the two simulations not completely converging, we were able to identify distinct intermediate steps of the deactivation process characterized by the movement of Y2887.53 in the NPxxY motif. We find that Y2887.53 contributes to the process by forming hydrogen bonds to residues in transmembrane helices 2 and 7 and losing these interactions upon full deactivation. Y1975.58 also plays a role in the process by forming a hydrogen bond only once the side chain moves from the lipid interface to the middle of the helical bundle. PMID:25761901

  11. Anatomical profiling of G protein-coupled receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Regard, Jean B.; Sato, Isaac T.; Coughlin, Shaun R.

    2008-01-01

    Summary G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise the largest family of transmembrane signaling molecules and regulate a host of physiological and disease processes. To better understand the functions of GPCRs in vivo, we quantified transcript levels of 353 non-odorant GPCRs in 41 adult mouse tissues. Cluster analysis placed many GPCRs into anticipated anatomical and functional groups and predicted novel roles for less studied receptors. From one such prediction, we showed that the Gpr91 ligand succinate can regulate lipolysis in white adipose tissue suggesting that signaling by this citric acid cycle intermediate may regulate energy homeostasis. We also showed that pairwise analysis of GPCR expression across tissues may help predict drug side effects. This resource will aid studies to understand GPCR function in vivo and may assist in the identification of therapeutic targets. PMID:18984166

  12. Molecular Cooperativity Governs Diverse and Monoallelic Olfactory Receptor Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Jianhua; Tian, Xiaojun; Zhang, Hang; Sannerud, Jens

    Multiple-objective optimization is common in biological systems. In the mammalian olfactory system, each sensory neuron stochastically expresses only one out of up to thousands of olfactory receptor (OR) gene alleles; at organism level the types of expressed ORs need to be maximized. The molecular mechanism of this Nobel-Prize winning puzzle remains unresolved after decades of extensive studies. Existing models focus only on monoallele activation, and cannot explain recent observations in mutants, especially the reduced global diversity of expressed ORs in G9a/GLP knockouts. In this work we integrated existing information on OR expression, and proposed an evolutionarily optimized three-layer regulation mechanism, which includes zonal segregation, epigenetic and enhancer competition coupled to a negative feedback loop. This model not only recapitulates monoallelic OR expression, but also elucidates how the olfactory system maximizes and maintains the diversity of OR expression. The model is validated by several experimental results, and particularly underscores cooperativity and synergy as a general design principle of multi-objective optimization in biology. The work is supported by the NIGMS/DMS Mathematical Biology program.

  13. Downregulation of transferrin receptor surface expression by intracellular antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Jilin; Wu Sha; Zhao Xiaoping; Wang Min; Li Wenhan; Shen Xin; Liu Jing; Lei Ping; Zhu Huifen; Shen Guanxin . E-mail: guanxin_shen@yahoo.com.cn

    2007-03-23

    To deplete cellular iron uptake, and consequently inhibit the proliferation of tumor cells, we attempt to block surface expression of transferrin receptor (TfR) by intracellular antibody technology. We constructed two expression plasmids (scFv-HAK and scFv-HA) coding for intracellular single-chain antibody against TfR with or without endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal, respectively. Then they were transfected tumor cells MCF-7 by liposome. Applying RT-PCR, Western blotting, immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoelectron microscope experiments, we insure that scFv-HAK intrabody was successfully expressed and retained in ER contrasted to the secreted expression of scFv-HA. Flow cytometric analysis confirmed that the TfR surface expression was markedly decreased approximately 83.4 {+-} 2.5% in scFv-HAK transfected cells, while there was not significantly decrease in scFv-HA transfected cells. Further cell growth and apoptosis characteristics were evaluated by cell cycle analysis, nuclei staining and MTT assay. Results indicated that expression of scFv-HAK can dramatically induce cell cycle G1 phase arrest and apoptosis of tumor cells, and consequently significantly suppress proliferation of tumor cells compared with other control groups. For First time this study demonstrates the potential usage of anti-TfR scFv-intrabody as a growth inhibitor of TfR overexpressing tumors.

  14. Expression of T cell antigen receptor during differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, J.P.; Lanier, L.L.; Guyden, J.; Richie, E.R.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have used flow cytometry with monoclonal antibodies, radioimmuneprecipitation with a rabbit antiserum to common epitopes of the TCR, and Northern and Southern blot analysis with cloned TCR genes to study antigen receptor (TCR) expression by normal murine and human thymocytes and by primary murine thymomas. L3T4-,Lyt2- murine thymomas corresponding to the earliest stage of thymic differentiation, were found to have rearranged TCR beta genes, and to express low levels of beta transcript, but lacked alpha gene transcript and failed to express TCR on the cell surface. L3T4+,Lyt2+ thymomas were variable, but the majority were found to contain significant levels of both alpha and beta transcripts and to express TCR at the cell surface. Similarly, alpha and beta transcripts and TCR protein were detected in sorted L3T4+,Lyt2+ murine thymocytes. Using three color fluorescence, the authors determined that app. 70% of human T4+T8+ thymocytes also expressed T3, a component of the TCR complex. These data indicate that in mouse and man expression of TCR occurs in the immature, or cortical, thymic population.

  15. Cooperation of Adenosine with Macrophage Toll-4 Receptor Agonists Leads to Increased Glycolytic Flux through the Enhanced Expression of PFKFB3 Gene*

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-García, Almudena; Monsalve, Eva; Novellasdemunt, Laura; Navarro-Sabaté, Àurea; Manzano, Anna; Rivero, Samuel; Castrillo, Antonio; Casado, Marta; Laborda, Jorge; Bartrons, Ramón; Díaz-Guerra, María José M.

    2011-01-01

    Macrophages activated through Toll receptor triggering increase the expression of the A2A and A2B adenosine receptors. In this study, we show that adenosine receptor activation enhances LPS-induced pfkfb3 expression, resulting in an increase of the key glycolytic allosteric regulator fructose 2,6-bisphosphate and the glycolytic flux. Using shRNA and differential expression of A2A and A2B receptors, we demonstrate that the A2A receptor mediates, in part, the induction of pfkfb3 by LPS, whereas the A2B receptor, with lower adenosine affinity, cooperates when high adenosine levels are present. pfkfb3 promoter sequence deletion analysis, site-directed mutagenesis, and inhibition by shRNAs demonstrated that HIF1α is a key transcription factor driving pfkfb3 expression following macrophage activation by LPS, whereas synergic induction of pfkfb3 expression observed with the A2 receptor agonists seems to depend on Sp1 activity. Furthermore, levels of phospho-AMP kinase also increase, arguing for increased PFKFB3 activity by phosphorylation in long term LPS-activated macrophages. Taken together, our results show that, in macrophages, endogenously generated adenosine cooperates with bacterial components to increase PFKFB3 isozyme activity, resulting in greater fructose 2,6-bisphosphate accumulation. This process enhances the glycolytic flux and favors ATP generation helping to develop and maintain the long term defensive and reparative functions of the macrophages. PMID:21464136

  16. Modulation of Progesterone Receptor Isoform Expression in Pregnant Human Myometrium

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background. Regulation of myometrial progesterone receptor (PR) expression is an unresolved issue central to understanding the mechanism of functional progesterone withdrawal and initiation of labor in women. Objectives. To determine whether pregnant human myometrium undergoes culture-induced changes in PR isoform expression ex situ and, further, to determine if conditions approaching the in vivo environment stabilise PR isoform expression in culture. Methods. Term nonlaboring human myometrial tissues were cultured under specific conditions: serum supplementation, steroids, stretch, cAMP, PMA, PGF2α, NF-κB inhibitors, or TSA. Following 48 h culture, PR-T, PR-A, and PR-B mRNA levels were determined using qRT-PCR. PR-A/PR-B ratios were calculated. Results. PR-T and PR-A expression and the PR-A/PR-B ratio significantly increased in culture. Steroids prevented the culture-induced increase in PR-T and PR-A expression. Stretch blocked the effects of steroids on PR-T and PR-A expression. PMA further increased the PR-A/PR-B ratio, while TSA blocked culture-induced increases of PR-A expression and the PR-A/PR-B ratio. Conclusion. Human myometrial tissue in culture undergoes changes in PR gene expression consistent with transition toward a laboring phenotype. TSA maintained the nonlaboring PR isoform expression pattern. This suggests that preserving histone and/or nonhistone protein acetylation is critical for maintaining the progesterone dependent quiescent phenotype of human myometrium in culture. PMID:28540297

  17. G-protein coupled receptor expression patterns delineate medulloblastoma subgroups

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Genetic profiling has identified four principle tumor subgroups; each subgroup is characterized by different initiating mutations, genetic and clinical profiles, and prognoses. The two most well-defined subgroups are caused by overactive signaling in the WNT and SHH mitogenic pathways; less is understood about Groups 3 and 4 medulloblastoma. Identification of tumor subgroup using molecular classification is set to become an important component of medulloblastoma diagnosis and staging, and will likely guide therapeutic options. However, thus far, few druggable targets have emerged. G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) possess characteristics that make them ideal targets for molecular imaging and therapeutics; drugs targeting GPCRs account for 30-40% of all current pharmaceuticals. While expression patterns of many proteins in human medulloblastoma subgroups have been discerned, the expression pattern of GPCRs in medulloblastoma has not been investigated. We hypothesized that analysis of GPCR expression would identify clear subsets of medulloblastoma and suggest distinct GPCRs that might serve as molecular targets for both imaging and therapy. Results Our study found that medulloblastoma tumors fall into distinct clusters based solely on GPCR expression patterns. Normal cerebellum clustered separately from the tumor samples. Further, two of the tumor clusters correspond with high fidelity to the WNT and SHH subgroups of medulloblastoma. Distinct over-expressed GPCRs emerge; for example, LGR5 and GPR64 are significantly and uniquely over-expressed in the WNT subgroup of tumors, while PTGER4 is over-expressed in the SHH subgroup. Uniquely under-expressed GPCRs were also observed. Our key findings were independently validated using a large international dataset. Conclusions Our results identify GPCRs with potential to act as imaging and therapeutic targets. Elucidating tumorigenic pathways

  18. Simvastatin enhances bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Hong; Sung, Arthur; Zhao, Guohua; Shi, Lingfang; Qiu Daoming; Nishimura, Toshihiko; Kao, Peter N. . E-mail: peterkao@stanford.edu

    2006-01-06

    Statins confer therapeutic benefits in systemic and pulmonary vascular diseases. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptors serve essential signaling functions in cardiovascular development and skeletal morphogenesis. Mutations in BMP receptor type II (BMPR2) are associated with human familial and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and pathologic neointimal proliferation of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells within small pulmonary arteries. In severe experimental pulmonary hypertension, simvastatin reversed disease and conferred a 100% survival advantage. Here, modulation of BMPR2 gene expression by simvastatin is characterized in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T, pulmonary artery smooth muscle, and lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVECs). A 1.4 kb BMPR2 promoter containing Egr-1 binding sites confers reporter gene activation in 293T cells which is partially inhibited by simvastatin. Simvastatin enhances steady-state BMPR2 mRNA and protein expression in HLMVEC, through posttranscriptional mRNA stabilization. Simvastatin induction of BMPR2 expression may improve BMP-BMPR2 signaling thereby enhancing endothelial differentiation and function.

  19. Role of Adenosine Receptor A2A in Traumatic Optic Neuropathies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    in Traumatic Optic Neuropathies ” PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gregory I. Liou, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Georgia Health Sciences...Adenosine Receptor A2A in Traumatic Optic Neuropathies 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-2-0046 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...ABSTRACT Our goal is to develop an early therapeutic intervention before the progression of traumatic optic neuropathy (TON), a vision-threatening

  20. Regulation of GIP and GLP1 receptor cell surface expression by N-glycosylation and receptor heteromerization.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Gina M; Lynn, Francis C; McIntosh, Christopher H S; Accili, Eric A

    2012-01-01

    In response to a meal, Glucose-dependent Insulinotropic Polypeptide (GIP) and Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) are released from gut endocrine cells into the circulation and interact with their cognate G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Receptor activation results in tissue-selective pleiotropic responses that include augmentation of glucose-induced insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells. N-glycosylation and receptor oligomerization are co-translational processes that are thought to regulate the exit of functional GPCRs from the ER and their maintenance at the plasma membrane. Despite the importance of these regulatory processes, their impact on functional expression of GIP and GLP-1 receptors has not been well studied. Like many family B GPCRs, both the GIP and GLP-1 receptors possess a large extracellular N-terminus with multiple consensus sites for Asn-linked (N)-glycosylation. Here, we show that each of these Asn residues is glycosylated when either human receptor is expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. N-glycosylation enhances cell surface expression and function in parallel but exerts stronger control over the GIP receptor than the GLP-1 receptor. N-glycosylation mainly lengthens receptor half-life by reducing degradation in the endoplasmic reticulum. N-glycosylation is also required for expression of the GIP receptor at the plasma membrane and efficient GIP potentiation of glucose-induced insulin secretion from the INS-1 pancreatic beta cell line. Functional expression of a GIP receptor mutant lacking N-glycosylation is rescued by co-expressed wild type GLP1 receptor, which, together with data obtained using Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer, suggests formation of a GIP-GLP1 receptor heteromer.

  1. Amylase expression in taste receptor cells of rat circumvallate papillae.

    PubMed

    Merigo, Flavia; Benati, Donatella; Cecchini, Maria Paola; Cristofoletti, Mirko; Osculati, Francesco; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2009-06-01

    The chemical composition of the luminal content is now accepted to have a profound influence on the performance of chemosensory receptors. Gustatory and intestinal chemoreceptors have in common their expression of molecules involved in taste sensing and signal transduction pathways. The recent finding that enterocytes of the duodenal epithelium are capable of expressing luminal pancreatic amylase suggests that taste cells of the gustatory epithelium might, in the same way, express salivary amylase in the oral cavity. Therefore, we investigated amylase expression in rat circumvallate papillae by using analyses involving immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and reverse transcription with the polymerase chain reaction. In addition, we used double-labeling confocal laser microscopy to compare amylase immunolabeling with that of the following markers: protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5) and chromogranin A (CgA) for endocrine cells, alpha-gustducin and phospholipase C beta 2 (PLC beta 2) as taste-signaling molecules, and cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) and Clara-cell-specific secretory protein of 10-kDa (CC10) as secretory markers. The results showed that amylase was present in some taste bud cells; its immunoreactivity was observed in subsets of cells that expressed CgA, alpha-gustducin, PLC beta 2, CFTR, or CC10. PGP 9.5 immunoreactivity was never colocalized with amylase. The data suggest that amylase-positive cells constitute an additional subset of taste receptor cells also associated with chemoreceptorial and/or secretory molecules, confirming the occurrence of various pathways in taste buds.

  2. Reduced striatal adenosine A2A receptor levels define a molecular subgroup in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Villar-Menéndez, Izaskun; Díaz-Sánchez, Sara; Blanch, Marta; Albasanz, José Luis; Pereira-Veiga, Thais; Monje, Alfonso; Planchat, Luis Maria; Ferrer, Isidre; Martín, Mairena; Barrachina, Marta

    2014-04-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is a mental disorder of unknown origin. Some scientific evidence seems to indicate that SZ is not a single disease entity, since there are patient groups with clear symptomatic, course and biomarker differences. SZ is characterized by a hyperdopaminergic state related to high dopamine D2 receptor activity. It has also been proposed that there is a hypoadenosynergic state. Adenosine is a nucleoside widely distributed in the organism with neuromodulative and neuroprotective activity in the central nervous system. In the brain, the most abundant adenosine receptors are A1R and A2AR. In the present report, we characterize the presence of both receptors in human postmortem putamens of patients suffering SZ with real time TaqMan PCR, western blotting and radioligand binding assay. We show that A1R levels remain unchanged with respect to age-matched controls, whereas nearly fifty percent of patients have reduced A2AR, at the transcriptional and translational levels. Moreover, we describe how DNA methylation plays a role in the pathological A2AR levels with the bisulfite-sequencing technique. In fact, an increase in 5-methylcytosine percentage in the 5' UTR region of ADORA2A was found in those SZ patients with reduced A2AR levels. Interestingly, there was a relationship between the A2A/β-actin ratio and motor disturbances as assessed with some items of the PANSS, AIMS and SAS scales. Therefore, there may be a subgroup of SZ patients with reduced striatal A2AR levels accompanied by an altered motor phenotype.

  3. AMPA receptor subunits expression and phosphorylation in cingulate cortex in rats following esophageal acid exposure

    PubMed Central

    BANERJEE, B.; MEDDA, B. K.; POCHIRAJU, S.; KANNAMPALLI, P.; LANG, I. M.; SENGUPTA, J. N.; SHAKER, R.

    2014-01-01

    Background We recently reported an increase in N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit expression and CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation of NR2B in the rostral cingulate cortical (rCC) neurons following esophageal acid exposure in rats. As α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors mediate the fast excitatory transmission and play a critical role in synaptic plasticity, in this study, we investigated the effect of esophageal acid exposure in rats on the expression of AMPA receptor subunits and the involvement of these molecular alterations in acid-induced sensitization of neurons in the anterior cingulate (ACC) and midcingulate (MCC) cortices. Methods In molecular study, we examined GluA1 and GluA2 expression and phosphorylation in membrane preparations and in the isolated postsynaptic densities (PSDs) from rats receiving acute esophageal exposure of either saline (control group) or 0.1 NHCl (experimental group). In electrophysiological study, the effect of selective AMPA receptor (Ca2+ permeable) antagonist IEM-1460 and CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 was tested on responses of cortical neurons during acid infusion to address the underlying molecular mechanism of acid-induced sensitization. Key Results The acid exposure significantly increased expression of GluA1, pGluA1Ser831, and phosphorylated CaMKIIThr286, in the cortical membrane preparations. In isolated PSDs, a significant increase in pGluA1Ser831 was observed in acid-treated rats compared with controls. Microinjection of IEM-1460 or KN-93 near the recording site significantly attenuated acid-induced sensitization of cortical neurons. Conclusions & Inferences The underlying mechanism of acid-induced cortical sensitization involves upregulation and CaMKII-mediated phosphorylation of GluA1. These molecular changes of AMPA receptors subunit GluA1 in the cortical neurons might play an important role in acid-induced esophageal hypersensitivity. PMID:24118589

  4. Key Modulatory Role of Presynaptic Adenosine A2A Receptors in Cortical Neurotransmission to the Striatal Direct Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz, César; Luján, Rafael; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Simoes, Ana Patrícia; Lerner, Talia N.; Borycz, Janusz; Kachroo, Anil; Canas, Paula M.; Orru, Marco; Schwarzschild, Michael A.; Rosin, Diane L.; Kreitzer, Anatol C.; Cunha, Rodrigo A.; Watanabe, Masahiko; Ferré, Sergi

    2010-01-01

    Basal ganglia processing results from a balanced activation of direct and indirect striatal efferent pathways, which are controlled by dopamine D1 and D2 receptors, respectively. Adenosine A2A receptors are considered novel anti-parkinsonian targets, based on their selective postsynaptic localization in the indirect pathway, where they modulate D2 receptor function. The present study provides evidence for the existence of an additional functionally significant segregation of A2A receptors at the presynaptic level. Using integrated anatomical, electrophysiological and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that presynaptic A2A receptors are preferentially localized in cortical glutamatergic terminals that contact striatal neurons of the direct pathway, where they exert a selective modulation of cortico-striatal neurotransmission. Presynaptic striatal A2A receptors could provide a new target for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:19936569

  5. Key modulatory role of presynaptic adenosine A2A receptors in cortical neurotransmission to the striatal direct pathway.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, César; Luján, Rafael; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Simoes, Ana Patrícia; Lerner, Talia N; Borycz, Janusz; Kachroo, Anil; Canas, Paula M; Orru, Marco; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Rosin, Diane L; Kreitzer, Anatol C; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Watanabe, Masahiko; Ferré, Sergi

    2009-11-18

    Basal ganglia processing results from a balanced activation of direct and indirect striatal efferent pathways, which are controlled by dopamine D1 and D2 receptors, respectively. Adenosine A2A receptors are considered novel antiparkinsonian targets, based on their selective postsynaptic localization in the indirect pathway, where they modulate D2 receptor function. The present study provides evidence for the existence of an additional, functionally significant, segregation of A2A receptors at the presynaptic level. Using integrated anatomical, electrophysiological, and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that presynaptic A2A receptors are preferentially localized in cortical glutamatergic terminals that contact striatal neurons of the direct pathway, where they exert a selective modulation of corticostriatal neurotransmission. Presynaptic striatal A2A receptors could provide a new target for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  6. Caffeine consumption prevents memory impairment, neuronal damage, and adenosine A2A receptors upregulation in the hippocampus of a rat model of sporadic dementia.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Janaína; Rocha, Andreia; Nunes, Fernanda; Costa, Marcelo S; Schein, Vanessa; Kazlauckas, Vanessa; Kalinine, Eduardo; Souza, Diogo O; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Porciúncula, Lisiane O

    2013-01-01

    Intracerebroventricular (icv) streptozotocin (STZ) administration induces pathological and behavioral alterations similar to those observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is thus considered an experimental model of sporadic AD. Since caffeine (an adenosine receptor antagonist) and selective antagonists of adenosine A2A receptors modify the course of memory impairment in different amyloid-β-based experimental models of AD, we now tested the impact of caffeine on STZ-induced dementia and associated neurodegeneration in the hippocampus as well as on the expression and density of adenosine receptors. Adult male rats received a bilateral infusion of saline or STZ (3 mg/kg, icv), which triggered memory deficits after four weeks, as gauged by impaired object recognition memory. This was accompanied by a reduced NeuN immunoreactivity in the hippocampal CA1 region and an increased expression and density of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR), but not A1R, in the hippocampus. Caffeine consumption (1 g/L in the drinking water starting 2 weeks before the STZ challenge) prevented the STZ-induced memory impairment and neurodegeneration as well as the upregulation of A2AR. These findings provide the first demonstration that caffeine prevents sporadic dementia and implicate the control of central A2AR as its likely mechanism of action.

  7. Functional Erythropoietin Receptors Expressed by Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    carcinoma cell line (PC-3). Invest Urol, 1979. 17(1): p. 16-23. 11. Yoshimura, A., A.D. D’Andrea, and H.F. Lodish , Friend spleen focus-forming virus...receptor expression in human prostate cancer. Mod Pathol, 2004. 13. Socolovsky, M., A.E. Fallon, S. Wang, C. Brugnara, and H.F. Lodish , Fetal anemia and...Socolovsky, M., H. Nam, M.D. Fleming, V.H. Haase, C. Brugnara, and H.F. Lodish , Ineffective erythropoiesis in Stat5a(-/-)5b(-/-) mice due to decreased

  8. Progress toward heterologous expression of active G-protein-coupled receptors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Linking cellular stress response with translocation and trafficking

    PubMed Central

    O'Malley, Michelle A; Mancini, J Dominic; Young, Carissa L; McCusker, Emily C; Raden, David; Robinson, Anne S

    2009-01-01

    High-level expression of mammalian G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is a necessary step toward biophysical characterization and high-resolution structure determination. Even though many heterologous expression systems have been used to express mammalian GPCRs at high levels, many receptors are improperly trafficked or are inactive in these systems. En route to engineering a robust microbial host for GPCR expression, we have investigated the expression of 12 GPCRs in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where all receptors are expressed at the mg/L scale. However, only the human adenosine A2a (hA2aR) receptor is active for ligand-binding and located primarily at the plasma membrane, whereas other tested GPCRs are mainly retained within the cell. Selective receptors associate with BiP, an ER-resident chaperone, and activated the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway, which suggests that a pool of receptors may be folded incorrectly. Leader sequence cleavage of the expressed receptors was complete for the hA2aR, as expected, and partially cleaved for hA2bR, hCCR5R, and hD2LR. Ligand-binding assays conducted on the adenosine family (hA1R, hA2aR, hA2bR, and hA3R) of receptors show that hA2aR and hA2bR, the only adenosine receptors that demonstrate leader sequence processing, display activity. Taken together, these studies point to translocation as a critical limiting step in the production of active mammalian GPCRs in S. cerevisiae. PMID:19760666

  9. Adenosine A2A receptors in ventral striatum, hypothalamus and nociceptive circuitry. Implications for drug addiction, sleep and pain

    PubMed Central

    Ferré, S.; Diamond, I.; Goldberg, S.R.; Yao, L.; Hourani, S.M.O.; Huang, Z.L.; Urade, Y.; Kitchen, I.

    2007-01-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors localized in the dorsal striatum are considered as a new target for the development of antiparkinsonian drugs. Co-administration of A2A receptor antagonists has shown a significant improvement of the effects of L-DOPA. The present review emphasizes the possible application of A2A receptor antagonists in pathological conditions other than parkinsonism, including drug addiction, sleep disorders and pain. In addition to the dorsal striatum, the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens) contains a high density of A2A receptors, which presynaptically and postsynaptically regulate glutamatergic transmission in the cortical glutamatergic projections to the nucleus accumbens. It is currently believed that molecular adaptations of the cortico-accumbens glutamatergic synapses are involved in compulsive drug seeking and relapse. Here we review recent experimental evidence suggesting that A2A antagonists could become new therapeutic agents for drug addiction. Morphological and functional studies have identified lower levels of A2A receptors in brain areas other than the striatum, such as the ventrolateral preoptic area of the hypothalamus, where adenosine plays an important role in sleep regulation. Although initially believed to be mostly dependent on A1 receptors, here we review recent studies that demonstrate that the somnogenic effects of adenosine are largely mediated by hypothalamic A2A receptors. A2A receptor antagonists could therefore be considered as a possible treatment for narcolepsy and other sleep-related disorders. Finally, nociception is another adenosine-regulated neural function previously thought to mostly involve A1 receptors. Although there is some conflicting literature on the effects of agonists and antagonists, which may partly be due to the lack of selectivity of available drugs, the studies in A2A receptor knockout mice suggest that A2A receptor antagonists might have some therapeutic potential in pain states, in particular where

  10. Tumor expression of adiponectin receptor 2 and lethal prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Kelly, Rachel; Gerke, Travis; Jordahl, Kristina; Sinnott, Jennifer A.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Loda, Massimo; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Finn, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the role of adiponectin receptor 2 (AdipoR2) in aggressive prostate cancer we used immunohistochemistry to characterize AdipoR2 protein expression in tumor tissue for 866 men with prostate cancer from the Physicians’ Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. AdipoR2 tumor expression was not associated with measures of obesity, pathological tumor stage or prostate-specific antigen (PSA) at diagnosis. However, AdipoR2 expression was positively associated with proliferation as measured by Ki-67 expression quartiles (P-trend < 0.0001), with expression of fatty acid synthase (P-trend = 0.001), and with two measures of angiogenesis (P-trend < 0.1). An inverse association was observed with apoptosis as assessed by the TUNEL assay (P-trend = 0.006). Using Cox proportional hazards regression and controlling for age at diagnosis, Gleason score, year of diagnosis category, cohort and baseline BMI, we identified a statistically significant trend for the association between quartile of AdipoR2 expression and lethal prostate cancer (P-trend = 0.02). The hazard ratio for lethal prostate cancer for the two highest quartiles, as compared to the two lowest quartiles, of AdipoR2 expression was 1.9 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2–3.0). Results were similar when additionally controlling for categories of PSA at diagnosis and Ki-67 expression quartiles. These results strengthen the evidence for the role of AdipoR2 in prostate cancer progression. PMID:25863129

  11. The collagen receptor DDR2 is expressed during early cardiac development.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Edie C; Zhang, Xiadong; Watson, James; Hastings, Josh; Potts, Jay D

    2010-05-01

    Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) is a receptor tyrosine kinase which has been shown to regulate cell migration upon binding its ligand, collagen. Expression studies determined that DDR2 mRNA and protein are present in the atrioventricular canal during epithelial-mesenchymal transformation (EMT) and the receptor is expressed in both activated endothelial and migrating mesenchymal cells in vivo.

  12. Cloning and recombinant expression of a novel mouse-secreted phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Valentin, E; Koduri, R S; Scimeca, J C; Carle, G; Gelb, M H; Lazdunski, M; Lambeau, G

    1999-07-02

    Secreted phospholipases A2 (sPLA2s) form a class of structurally related enzymes that are involved in a variety of physiological and pathological effects including inflammation and associated diseases, cell proliferation, cell adhesion, and cancer, and are now known to bind to specific membrane receptors. Here, we report the cloning and expression of a novel sPLA2 isolated from mouse thymus. Based on its structural features, this sPLA2 is most similar to the previously cloned mouse group IIA sPLA2 (mGIIA sPLA2). As for mGIIA sPLA2, the novel sPLA2 is made up of 125 amino acids with 14 cysteines, is basic (pI = 8.71) and its gene has been mapped to mouse chromosome 4. However, the novel sPLA2 has only 48% identity with mGIIA and displays similar levels of identity with the other mouse group IIC and V sPLA2s, indicating that the novel sPLA2 is not an isoform of mGIIA sPLA2. This novel sPLA2 has thus been called mouse group IID (mGIID) sPLA2. In further contrast with mGIIA, which is found mainly in intestine, transcripts coding for mGIID sPLA2 are found in several tissues including pancreas, spleen, thymus, skin, lung, and ovary, suggesting distinct functions for the two enzymes. Recombinant expression of mGIID sPLA2 in Escherichia coli indicates that the cloned sPLA2 is an active enzyme that has much lower specific activity than mGIIA and displays a distinct specificity for binding to various phospholipid vesicles. Finally, recombinant mGIID sPLA2 did not bind to the mouse M-type sPLA2 receptor, while mGIIA was previously found to bind to this receptor with high affinity.

  13. Transactivation of the Receptor-tyrosine Kinase Ephrin Receptor A2 Is Required for the Low Molecular Weight Hyaluronan-mediated Angiogenesis That Is implicated in Tumor Progression*

    PubMed Central

    Lennon, Frances E; Mirzapoiazova, Tamara; Mambetsariev, Nurbek; Mambetsariev, Bolot; Salgia, Ravi; Singleton, Patrick A.

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis or the formation of new blood vessels is important in the growth and metastatic potential of various cancers. Therefore, understanding the mechanism(s) by which angiogenesis occurs can have important therapeutic implications in numerous malignancies. We and others have demonstrated that low molecular weight hyaluronan (LMW-HA, ∼2500 Da) promotes endothelial cell (EC) barrier disruption and angiogenesis. However, the mechanism(s) by which this occurs is poorly defined. Our data indicate that treatment of human EC with LMW-HA induced CD44v10 association with the receptor-tyrosine kinase, EphA2, transactivation (tyrosine phosphorylation) of EphA2, and recruitment of the PDZ domain scaffolding protein, PATJ, to the cell periphery. Silencing (siRNA) CD44, EphA2, PATJ, or Dbs (RhoGEF) expression blocked LMW-HA-mediated angiogenesis (EC proliferation, migration, and tubule formation). In addition, silencing EphA2, PATJ, Src, or Dbs expression blocked LMW-HA-mediated RhoA activation. To translate our in vitro findings, we utilized a novel anginex/liposomal targeting of murine angiogenic endothelium with either CD44 or EphA2 siRNA and observed inhibition of LMW-HA-induced angiogenesis in implanted Matrigel plugs. Taken together, these results indicate LMW-HA-mediated transactivation of EphA2 is required for PATJ and Dbs membrane recruitment and subsequent RhoA activation required for angiogenesis. These results suggest that targeting downstream effectors of LMW-HA could be a useful therapeutic intervention for angiogenesis-associated diseases including tumor progression. PMID:25023279

  14. Constitutive androstane receptor activation evokes the expression of glycolytic genes.

    PubMed

    Yarushkin, Andrei A; Kazantseva, Yuliya A; Prokopyeva, Elena A; Markova, Diana N; Pustylnyak, Yuliya A; Pustylnyak, Vladimir O

    2016-09-23

    It is well-known that constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activation by 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)]benzene (TCPOBOP) increases the liver-to-body weight ratio. CAR-mediated liver growth is correlated with increased expression of the pleiotropic transcription factor cMyc, which stimulates cell cycle regulatory genes and drives proliferating cells into S phase. Because glycolysis supports cell proliferation and cMyc is essential for the activation of glycolytic genes, we hypothesized that CAR-mediated up-regulation of cMyc in mouse livers might play a role in inducing the expression of glycolytic genes. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of long-term CAR activation on glycolytic genes in a mouse model not subjected to metabolic stress. We demonstrated that long-term CAR activation by TCPOBOP increases expression of cMyc, which was correlated with reduced expression of gluconeogenic genes and up-regulation of glucose transporter, glycolytic and mitochondrial pyruvate metabolising genes. These changes in gene expression after TCPOBOP treatment were strongly correlated with changes in levels of glycolytic intermediates in mouse livers. Moreover, we demonstrated a significant positive regulatory effect of TCPOBOP-activated CAR on both mRNA and protein levels of Pkm2, a master regulator of glucose metabolism and cell proliferation. Thus, our findings provide evidence to support the conclusion that CAR activation initiates a transcriptional program that facilitates the coordinated metabolic activities required for cell proliferation.

  15. Lysophosphatidic Acid Synthesis and its Receptors' Expression in the Bovine Oviduct During the Oestrous Cycle.

    PubMed

    Sinderewicz, E; Grycmacher, K; Boruszewska, D; Kowalczyk-Zięba, I; Yamamoto, Y; Yoshimoto, Y; Woclawek-Potocka, I

    2016-08-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a naturally occurring simple phospholipid which in the bovine reproductive system can be produced in the endometrium, corpus luteum, ovarian follicle and embryo. In this study, we examined the possibility that LPA receptors are expressed, and LPA synthesized, in the bovine oviduct. We found that the concentration of LPA was highest in infundibulum in the follicular phase of the oestrous cycle and was relatively high during the early-luteal phase in all examined parts of the oviduct. We also documented that LPA synthesis engages both available pathways for LPA production. The autotaxin (ATX) protein expression was significantly higher in the infundibulum compared to the isthmus during the follicular phase of the oestrous cycle. During the early-luteal phase of the oestrous cycle, ATX and phospholipase A2 (PLA2) protein expression was highest in ampulla, although the expression of LPARs was not as dynamic as LPA concentration in the oviduct tissue, and we presume that in the bovine oviduct, the most abundantly expressed receptor is LPAR2. In conclusion, our results indicate that the bovine oviduct is a site of LPA synthesis and a target for LPA action in the bovine reproductive tract. We documented that LPAR2 is the most abundantly expressed in the bovine oviduct. We hypothesize that in the bovine oviduct, LPA may be involved in the transport of gametes, fertilization and cellular signalling between the oviduct and cumulus-oocyte complex. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Cloning and expression of an A1 adenosine receptor from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, L.C.; McVittie, L.D.; Smyk-Randall, E.M.; Nakata, H.; Monsma, F.J. Jr.; Gerfen, C.R.; Sibley, D.R. )

    1991-07-01

    The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction technique to selectively amplify guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G protein)-coupled receptor cDNA sequences from rat striatal mRNA, using sets of highly degenerate primers derived from transmembrane sequences of previously cloned G protein-coupled receptors. A novel cDNA fragment was identified, which exhibits considerable homology to various members of the G protein-coupled receptor family. This fragment was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from a rat striatal library. A 2.2-kilobase clone was obtained that encodes a protein of 326 amino acids with seven transmembrane domains, as predicted by hydropathy analysis. Stably transfected mouse A9-L cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells that expressed mRNA for this clone were screened with putative receptor ligands. Saturable and specific binding sites for the A1 adenosine antagonist (3H)-1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine were identified on membranes from transfected cells. The rank order of potency and affinities of various adenosine agonist and antagonist ligands confirmed the identity of this cDNA clone as an A1 adenosine receptor. The high affinity binding of A1 adenosine agonists was shown to be sensitive to the nonhydrolyzable GTP analog guanylyl-5{prime}-imidodiphosphate. In adenylyl cyclase assays, adenosine agonists inhibited forskolin-stimulated cAMP production by greater than 50%, in a pharmacologically specific fashion. Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses of receptor mRNA in brain tissues revealed two transcripts of 5.6 and 3.1 kilobases, both of which were abundant in cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, and thalamus, with lower levels in olfactory bulb, striatum, mesencephalon, and retina. These regional distribution data are in good agreement with previous receptor autoradiographic studies involving the A1 adenosine receptor.

  17. Functional expression of the serotonin 5-HT7 receptor in human glioblastoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Mahé, Cécile; Bernhard, Michel; Bobirnac, Ionel; Keser, Corinna; Loetscher, Erika; Feuerbach, Dominik; Dev, Kumlesh K; Schoeffter, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    Serotonin 5-HT7 receptors are present in astrocytes. Understanding their role in this type of cell would greatly benefit from the identification of astroglial cell lines expressing this receptor type. The aim of the present study was to assess the expression of native 5-HT7 receptors and 5-HT7 receptor mRNA in a number of human glioblastoma cell lines, by means of cAMP measurements, Western blot analysis and reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR) analysis. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT), 5-methoxytryptamine (5-MeOT) and 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) induced concentration-dependent stimulations of cAMP accumulation in the human glioblastoma cell lines, U-373 MG, U-138 MG, U-87 MG, DBTRG-05MG, T98G, H4, CCF-STTG1 and Hs 683. The rank order of potency was 5-CT>5-HT=5-MeOT≫8-OH-DPAT. The effect of 5-CT was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by the selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist SB-269970 in all human glioblastoma cells. Schild analyses yielded slope factors close to unity (0.89–1.13) and pA2 values of 8.69–9.05. Western blot analysis revealed the presence of immunoreactive bands corresponding to the human 5-HT7 receptor in extracts of all human glioblastoma cell lines. The presence of the three splice variants of the 5-HT7 receptor (5-HT7(a/b/d)) was visualized by RT–PCR analysis with specific primers in all human glioblastoma cell lines. In conclusion, human glioblastoma cell lines express functional 5-HT7 receptors and the three splice variants of the corresponding mRNA. These cell lines could serve as model systems of native 5-HT7 receptors in glial cells to investigate their putative role in processes like release of neurotrophic factors or inflammatory cytokines. PMID:15339860

  18. Clinical/pharmacological aspect of adenosine A2A receptor antagonist for dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Tomoyuki; Uchida, Shin-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine replacement therapy using the dopamine precursor, l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA), with a peripheral dopa decarboxylase inhibitor is the most effective treatment currently available for the symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the long-term use of dopaminergic therapies for PD is often limited by the development of motor response complications, such as dyskinesia. Adenosine A2A receptors are a promising nondopaminergic target for the treatment of PD. The treatment of motor response complications involves combinations of regular and controlled release L-DOPA, perhaps with the addition of a COMT inhibitor or the use of a longer-acting dopamine agonist. However, when dyskinesia is already established, the increase in dopaminergic load produced by the addition of a dopamine agonist can result in an increase in the severity and duration of dyskinesia. Currently, there are no well-tolerated antidyskinesia agents available. Amantadine, which may exert its effects through the inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, shows some effects on established dyskinesia. Dyskinesia has a negative impact on the quality of life of patients, sometimes being more disabling than PD itself. Although some patients prefer experiencing dyskinesia than being in the OFF state and unable to move, alternative, more effective therapies are still required for severe disabling dyskinesia to afford patients an improved quality of life while in the ON state. The mechanisms causing and maintaining the dyskinesia have not been clarified. The application of a nondopaminergic approach to modify the basal ganglial activity would be helpful to better understand and treat dyskinesia. The use of an adenosine A2A receptor may provide one such approach. In this literature review, we will summarize the current knowledge from both clinical and nonclinical studies on the effects of adenosine A2A receptor blockade on dyskinesia.

  19. Cultured rat microglia express functional beta-chemokine receptors.

    PubMed

    Boddeke, E W; Meigel, I; Frentzel, S; Gourmala, N G; Harrison, J K; Buttini, M; Spleiss, O; Gebicke-Härter, P

    1999-08-03

    We have investigated the functional expression of the beta-chemokine receptors CCR1 to 5 in cultured rat microglia. RT-PCR analysis revealed constitutive expression of CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 mRNA. The beta-chemokines MCP-1 (1-30 nM) as well as RANTES and MIP-1alpha (100-1000 nM) evoked calcium transients in control and LPS-treated microglia. Whereas, the response to MCP-1 was dependent on extracellular calcium the response to RANTES was not. The effect of MCP-1 but not that of RANTES was inhibited by the calcium-induced calcium release inhibitor ryanodine. Calcium responses to MCP-1- and RANTES were observed in distinct populations of microglia.

  20. Transferrin receptor expression by stimulated cells in mixed lymphocyte culture.

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, M; Bacon, P A; Symmons, D P; Walton, K W

    1985-01-01

    Transferrin receptor (TRFr) expression by cells in mixed lymphocyte culture increases steadily for the first 5 days, but then reaches a plateau. By the sixth day in culture, about 20% of viable cells express TRFr in two-way mixed lymphocyte reactions. This subpopulation of TRFr-positive cells represents the proliferating population; it is heterogeneous, containing T-cell blasts and smaller cells which are a mixture of T and non-T cells. A small group of non-T cells have phenotypic similarity to natural killer (NK) cells. T cells appear to divide earlier in the course of the response than non-T cells. The biphasic nature of this response and the slower non-T reactivity may be due to a secondary stimulation of non-T cells by factors released from activated T cells (such as interleukin-2). PMID:2982734

  1. An Epigenetic Signature for Monoallelic Olfactory Receptor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Magklara, Angeliki; Yen, Angela; Colquitt, Bradley M.; Clowney, E. Josephine; Allen, William; Markenscoff-Papadimitriou, Eirene; Evans, Zoe A.; Kheradpour, Pouya; Mountoufaris, George; Carey, Catriona; Barnea, Gilad; Kellis, Manolis; Lomvardas, Stavros

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Constitutive heterochromatin is traditionally viewed as the static form of heterochromatin that silences pericentromeric and telomeric repeats in a cell cycle and differentiation independent manner. Here, we show that in the mouse olfactory epithelium, olfactory receptor (OR) genes are marked, in a highly dynamic fashion, with the molecular hallmarks of constitutive heterochromatin, H3K9me3 and H4K20me3. The cell-type and developmentally dependent deposition of these marks along the OR clusters is, most likely, reversed during the process of OR choice to allow for monogenic and monoallelic OR expression. In contrast to the current view of OR choice, our data suggest that OR silencing takes place before OR expression, indicating that it is not the product of an OR-elicited feedback signal. This suggests a new role for chromatin-mediated silencing as the molecular foundation upon which singular and stochastic selection can be applied. PMID:21529909

  2. Adenosine A2A Receptors in the Amygdala Control Synaptic Plasticity and Contextual Fear Memory.

    PubMed

    Simões, Ana Patrícia; Machado, Nuno J; Gonçalves, Nélio; Kaster, Manuella P; Simões, Ana T; Nunes, Ana; Pereira de Almeida, Luís; Goosens, Ki Ann; Rial, Daniel; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2016-11-01

    The consumption of caffeine modulates working and reference memory through the antagonism of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) controlling synaptic plasticity processes in hippocampal excitatory synapses. Fear memory essentially involves plastic changes in amygdala circuits. However, it is unknown if A2ARs in the amygdala regulate synaptic plasticity and fear memory. We report that A2ARs in the amygdala are enriched in synapses and located to glutamatergic synapses, where they selectively control synaptic plasticity rather than synaptic transmission at a major afferent pathway to the amygdala. Notably, the downregulation of A2ARs selectively in the basolateral complex of the amygdala, using a lentivirus with a silencing shRNA (small hairpin RNA targeting A2AR (shA2AR)), impaired fear acquisition as well as Pavlovian fear retrieval. This is probably associated with the upregulation and gain of function of A2ARs in the amygdala after fear acquisition. The importance of A2ARs to control fear memory was further confirmed by the ability of SCH58261 (0.1 mg/kg; A2AR antagonist), caffeine (5 mg/kg), but not DPCPX (0.5 mg/kg; A1R antagonist), treatment for 7 days before fear conditioning onwards, to attenuate the retrieval of context fear after 24-48 h and after 7-8 days. These results demonstrate that amygdala A2ARs control fear memory and the underlying process of synaptic plasticity in this brain region. This provides a neurophysiological basis for the association between A2AR polymorphisms and phobia or panic attacks in humans and prompts a therapeutic interest in A2ARs to manage fear-related pathologies.

  3. Upregulated thymic stromal lymphopoietin receptor expression in children with asthma.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sheng-Chieh; Huang, Jian-Jhang; Wang, Jiu-Yao; Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Chiang, Bor-Luen; Ye, Yi-Ling

    2016-06-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) plays an important role in pathogenesis in patients with asthma. However, the role of thymic stromal lymphopoietin receptor (TSLPR) and correlation with IL-7Rα and clinical severity in asthmatic or nonasthmatic children remain unclear. We investigated TSLPR and IL-7Rα mRΝΑ levels in asthma and nonasthma and assessed TSLPR expression in children who were sensitive to mites. We enrolled asthmatic and nonasthmatic children. To minimize the influence of allergy, we also divided participants into following 4 groups: nonallergic and nonasthmatic group (NN) (healthy children), allergic but nonasthmatic group (AN), nonallergic but asthmatic group (NA) and allergic asthmatic group (AA). We drew blood samples to check total IgE, allergen-specific IgE and TSLP and measured the expression of the TSLPR and IL-7Rα genes using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and real-time PCR. Asthma symptom score was also recorded. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin and TSLPR levels were found to be significantly higher in asthmatic than in nonasthmatic children. The levels of TSLP were found to be significantly different between AA and NN groups (P < 0·05). TSLPR expression in NA and AA groups was found to be significantly higher than in NN group (P < 0·05). TSLPR did not differ significantly between NA and AA groups. The TSLPR expression correlated strongly with IL-7Rα and weakly with mite-specific IgE. Clinical asthmatic severity of children was found to exert no influence on TSLPR level. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin receptor might be a significant disease biomarker for asthma. The levels of TSLPR were found to be higher in asthmatic patients than in healthy children, but were found to be not different between allergic and nonallergic asthmatic patients. © 2016 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  4. Urokinase type plasminogen activator receptor expression in colorectal neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, S; Hayashi, Y; Wang, Y; Nakamura, T; Morita, Y; Kawasaki, K; Ohta, K; Aoyama, N; Kim, S; Itoh, H; Kuroda, Y; Doe, W

    1998-01-01

    Background—The urokinase type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) may play a critical role in cancer invasion and metastasis. 
Aims—To study the involvement of uPAR in colorectal carcinogenesis. 
Methods—The cellular expression and localisation of uPAR were investigated in colorectal adenomas and invasive carcinomas by in situ hybridisation, immunohistochemistry, and northern and western blot analyses. 
Results—uPAR mRNA expression was found mainly in the cytoplasm of dysplastic epithelial cells of 30% of adenomas with mild (19%), moderate (21%), and severe (47%) dysplasia, and in that of carcinomatous cells of 85% of invasive carcinomas: Dukes' stages A (72%), B (93%), and C (91%). Some stromal cells in the adjacent neoplastic epithelium were faintly positive. Immunoreactivity for uPAR was detected in dysplastic epithelial cells of 14% of adenomas and in carcinomatous cells of 49% of invasive carcinomas. uPAR mRNA and protein concentrations were significantly higher in severe than in mild or moderate dysplasia (p<0.05); they were notably higher in Dukes' stage A than in severe dysplasia (p<0.05), and significantly higher in Dukes' stage B than in stage A (p<0.05), but those in stage B were not different from those in stage C or in metastatic colorectal carcinomas of the liver. 
Conclusions—Colorectal adenoma uPAR, expressed essentially in dysplastic epithelial cells, was upregulated with increasing severity of atypia, and increased notably during the critical transition from severe dysplasic adenoma to invasive carcinoma. These findings implicate uPAR expression in the invasive and metastatic processes of colorectal cancer. 

 Keywords: urokinase type plasminogen activator receptor; colorectal adenoma; colorectal cancer; adenoma-carcinoma sequence PMID:9824607

  5. Enteroendocrine cells express functional Toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Bogunovic, Milena; Davé, Shaival H; Tilstra, Jeremy S; Chang, Diane T W; Harpaz, Noam; Xiong, Huabao; Mayer, Lloyd F; Plevy, Scott E

    2007-06-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) provide a physical and immunological barrier against enteric microbial flora. Toll-like receptors (TLRs), through interactions with conserved microbial patterns, activate inflammatory gene expression in cells of the innate immune system. Previous studies of the expression and function of TLRs in IECs have reported varying results. Therefore, TLR expression was characterized in human and murine intestinal sections, and TLR function was tested in an IEC line. TLR1, TLR2, and TLR4 are coexpressed on a subpopulation of human and murine IECs that reside predominantly in the intestinal crypt and belong to the enteroendocrine lineage. An enteroendocrine cell (EEC) line demonstrated a similar expression pattern of TLRs as primary cells. The murine EEC line STC-1 was activated with specific TLR ligands: LPS or synthetic bacterial lipoprotein. In STC-1 cells stimulated with bacterial ligands, NF-kappaB and MAPK activation was demonstrated. Furthermore, the expression of TNF and macrophage inhibitory protein-2 were induced. Additionally, bacterial ligands induced the expression of the anti-inflammatory gene transforming growth factor-beta. LPS triggered a calcium flux in STC-1 cells, resulting in a rapid increase in CCK secretion. Finally, conditioned media from STC-1 cells inhibited the production of nitric oxide and IL-12 p40 by activated macrophages. In conclusion, human and murine IECs that express TLRs belong to the enteroendocrine lineage. Using a murine EEC model, a broad range of functional effects of TLR activation was demonstrated. This study suggests a potential role for EECs in innate immune responses.

  6. Enteroendocrine cells express functional Toll-like receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bogunovic, Milena; Davé, Shaival H.; Tilstra, Jeremy S.; Chang, Diane T. W.; Harpaz, Noam; Xiong, Huabao; Mayer, Lloyd F.; Plevy, Scott E.

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) provide a physical and immunological barrier against enteric microbial flora. Toll-like receptors (TLRs), through interactions with conserved microbial patterns, activate inflammatory gene expression in cells of the innate immune system. Previous studies of the expression and function of TLRs in IECs have reported varying results. Therefore, TLR expression was characterized in human and murine intestinal sections, and TLR function was tested in an IEC line. TLR1, TLR2, and TLR4 are coexpressed on a subpopulation of human and murine IECs that reside predominantly in the intestinal crypt and belong to the enteroendocrine lineage. An enteroendocrine cell (EEC) line demonstrated a similar expression pattern of TLRs as primary cells. The murine EEC line STC-1 was activated with specific TLR ligands: LPS or synthetic bacterial lipoprotein. In STC-1 cells stimulated with bacterial ligands, NF-κB and MAPK activation was demonstrated. Furthermore, the expression of TNF and macrophage inhibitory protein-2 were induced. Additionally, bacterial ligands induced the expression of the anti-inflammatory gene transforming growth factor-β. LPS triggered a calcium flux in STC-1 cells, resulting in a rapid increase in CCK secretion. Finally, conditioned media from STC-1 cells inhibited the production of nitric oxide and IL-12 p40 by activated macrophages. In conclusion, human and murine IECs that express TLRs belong to the enteroendocrine lineage. Using a murine EEC model, a broad range of functional effects of TLR activation was demonstrated. This study suggests a potential role for EECs in innate immune responses. PMID:17395901

  7. The immunohistochemical expression of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) in human gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Benes, L; Kappus, C; McGregor, G P; Bertalanffy, H; Mennel, H D; Hagner, S

    2004-01-01

    Background: Gliomas are the most common primary tumours of the central nervous system and exhibit rapid growth that is associated with neovascularisation. Adrenomedullin is an important tumour survival factor in human carcinogenesis. It has growth promoting effects on gliomas, and blockade of its actions has been experimentally shown to reduce the growth of glioma tissues and cell lines. There is some evidence that the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) mediates the tumorigenic actions of adrenomedullin. Aim: To determine whether CRLR is expressed in human gliomas and the probable cellular targets of adrenomedullin. Methods: Biopsies from 95 human gliomas of varying grade were processed for immunohistochemical analysis using a previously developed and characterised antibody to CRLR. Results: All tumour specimens were positive for CRLR. As previously found in normal peripheral tissues, CRLR immunostaining was particularly intense in the endothelial cells. This was evident in all the various vascular conformations that were observed, and which are typical of gliomas. In addition, clear immunostaining of tumour cells with astrocyte morphology was observed. These were preferentially localised around vessels. Conclusions: This study has shown for the first time that the CRLR protein is present in human glioma tissue. The expression of the receptor in endothelial cells and in astrocytic tumour cells is consistent with the evidence that its endogenous ligand, adrenomedullin, may influence glioma growth by means of both direct mitogenic and indirect angiogenic effects. CRLR may be a valuable target for effective therapeutic intervention in these malignant tumours. PMID:14747444

  8. Expression and nuclear translocation of glucocorticoid receptors in type 2 taste receptor cells.

    PubMed

    Parker, M Rockwell; Feng, Dianna; Chamuris, Brianna; Margolskee, Robert F

    2014-06-13

    Stress increases the secretion of glucocorticoids (GCs), potent steroid hormones that exert their effects on numerous target tissues by acting through glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). GC signaling significantly affects ingestive behavior and taste preferences in humans and rodent models, but far less is known about the hormonal modulation of the peripheral sensory system that detects and assesses nutrient content of foods. A previous study linked restraint stress in rats to diminished expression of mRNA for one subunit of the sweet taste receptor (Tas1r3) in taste tissue and reduced gustatory nerve excitation by sweet compounds. Using RT-PCR, we detected mRNAs for GRα in circumvallate taste papillae and in oral epithelium devoid of taste buds ("non-taste" tissue). Further, circumvallate tissue was significantly enriched in GR mRNA compared to non-taste tissue based on quantitative PCR. Histologically, GR protein was expressed in all taste bud populations examined (circumvallate, foliate and fungiform papillae). Using transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein, almost all (97%) Tas1r3-positive taste cells (sweet-/umami-sensitive) expressed GR compared to a significantly smaller percentage (89%) of TrpM5-positive taste cells (sweet-, umami- and bitter-sensitive). When mice (n=4) were restrain stressed, GR protein mobilized to the nucleus in Tas1r3-GFP taste cells (1.7-fold over controls). Our results suggest that GR can be activated in taste receptor cells and may play a role in specific taste qualities (e.g., sweet, umami, and bitter) to shape how the taste system responds to stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Osmotic regulation of NFAT5 expression in RPE cells: The involvement of purinergic receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Sarah; Kuhrt, Heidrun; Wiedemann, Peter; Bringmann, Andreas; Kohen, Leon

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Systemic hypertension is a risk factor for age-related neovascular retinal diseases. The major condition that induces hypertension is the intake of dietary salt (NaCl) resulting in increased extracellular osmolarity. High extracellular NaCl was has been shown to induce angiogenic factor production in RPE cells, in part via the transcriptional activity of nuclear factor of activated T cell 5 (NFAT5). Here, we determined the signaling pathways that mediate the osmotic expression of the NFAT5 gene in RPE cells. Methods Cultured human RPE cells were stimulated with high (+100 mM) NaCl. Alterations in gene and protein expression were determined with real-time reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR and western blot analysis, respectively. Results NaCl-induced NFAT5 gene expression was fully inhibited by calcium chelation and blockers of inositol triphosphate (IP3) receptors and phospholipases C and A2. Blockers of phospholipases C and A2 also prevented the NaCl-induced increase of the cellular NFAT5 protein level. Inhibitors of multiple intracellular signaling transduction pathways and kinases, including p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), extracellular signal–regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), protein kinases A and C, Src tyrosine kinases, and calpains, as well as cyclooxygenase inhibitors, decreased the NaCl-induced expression of the NFAT5 gene. In addition, autocrine purinergic signaling mediated by a release of ATP and a nucleoside transporter-mediated release of adenosine, activation of P2X7, P2Y1, P2Y2, and adenosine A1 receptors, but not adenosine A2A receptors, is required for the full expression of the NFAT5 gene under hyperosmotic conditions. NaCl-induced NFAT5 gene expression is in part dependent on the activity of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). The NaCl-induced expression of NFAT5 protein was prevented by inhibitors of phospholipases C and A2 and an inhibitor of NF-κB, but it

  10. Small expression tags enhance bacterial expression of the first three transmembrane segments of the apelin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Aditya; Sarker, Muzaddid; Liu, Xiang-Qin; Rainey, Jan K.

    2014-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are inherently dynamic membrane protein modulators of various important cellular signaling cascades. The apelin receptor (AR or APJ) is a class A GPCR involved in numerous physiological processes, implicated in angiogenesis during tumour formation and as a CD4 co-receptor for entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to cells. Due to the lack of efficient methods to produce full-length GPCRs enriched with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) active 15N, 13C and/or 2H isotopes, small GPCR fragments typically comprising 1-2 transmembrane segments are frequently studied using NMR spectroscopy. Here, we report successful overexpression of transmembrane segments 1-3 of AR (AR_TM1-3) in the C41(DE3) strain of Escherichia coli using an AT-rich gene tag previously reported to enhance cell-free expression yields. The resulting protein, with 6 additional N-terminal residues due to the expression tag, was purified using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Far-ultraviolet circular dichroism spectropolarimetry demonstrates that AR_TM1-3 has the predicted ~40% α-helical character in membrane-mimetic environments. 1H-15N HSQC NMR experiments imply amenability to high-resolution NMR structural characterization and stability in solution for weeks. Notably, this small expression tag approach may also be generally applicable to other membrane proteins that are difficult to express in E. coli. PMID:24943103

  11. Small expression tags enhance bacterial expression of the first three transmembrane segments of the apelin receptor.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Aditya; Sarker, Muzaddid; Liu, Xiang-Qin; Rainey, Jan K

    2014-08-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are inherently dynamic membrane protein modulators of various important cellular signaling cascades. The apelin receptor (AR or APJ) is a class A GPCR involved in numerous physiological processes, implicated in angiogenesis during tumour formation and as a CD4 co-receptor for entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to cells. Due to the lack of efficient methods to produce full-length GPCRs enriched with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) active (15)N, (13)C, and (or) (2)H isotopes, small GPCR fragments typically comprising 1-2 transmembrane segments are frequently studied using NMR spectroscopy. Here, we report successful overexpression of transmembrane segments 1-3 of AR (AR_TM1-3) in the C41(DE3) strain of Escherichia coli using an AT-rich gene tag previously reported to enhance cell-free expression yields. The resulting protein, with 6 additional N-terminal residues due to the expression tag, was purified using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Far UV circular dichroism spectropolarimetry demonstrates that AR_TM1-3 has the predicted ~40% α-helical character in membrane-mimetic environments. (1)H-(15)N HSQC NMR experiments imply amenability to high-resolution NMR structural characterization and stability in solution for weeks. Notably, this small expression tag approach may also be generally applicable to other membrane proteins that are difficult to express in E. coli.

  12. Cardiac microvascular endothelial cells express a functional Ca+ -sensing receptor.

    PubMed

    Berra Romani, Roberto; Raqeeb, Abdul; Laforenza, Umberto; Scaffino, Manuela Federica; Moccia, Francesco; Avelino-Cruz, Josè Everardo; Oldani, Amanda; Coltrini, Daniela; Milesi, Veronica; Taglietti, Vanni; Tanzi, Franco

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism whereby extracellular Ca(2+) exerts the endothelium-dependent control of vascular tone is still unclear. In this study, we assessed whether cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMEC) express a functional extracellular Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaSR) using a variety of techniques. CaSR mRNA was detected using RT-PCR, and CaSR protein was identified by immunocytochemical analysis. In order to assess the functionality of the receptor, CMEC were loaded with the Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorochrome, Fura-2/AM. A number of CaSR agonists, such as spermine, Gd(3+), La(3+) and neomycin, elicited a heterogeneous intracellular Ca(2+) signal, which was abolished by disruption of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP(3)) signaling and by depletion of intracellular stores with cyclopiazonic acid. The inhibition of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger upon substitution of extracellular Na(+) unmasked the Ca(2+) signal triggered by an increase in extracellular Ca(2+) levels. Finally, aromatic amino acids, which function as allosteric activators of CaSR, potentiated the Ca(2+) response to the CaSR agonist La(3+). These data provide evidence that CMEC express CaSR, which is able to respond to physiological agonists by mobilizing Ca(2+) from intracellular InsP(3)-sensitive stores. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. [Innate immunity: cutaneous expression of Toll-like receptors].

    PubMed

    Musette, Philippe; Auquit Auckbur, Isabelle; Begon, Edouard

    2006-02-01

    Toll receptors were first identified as an essential molecule for embryonic patterning in Drosophila and were subsequently shown to be a key in antibacterial and antifungal immunity in adult flies. Toll receptors have been conserved throughout evolution. In mammals, TLRs have been implicated in both inflammatory responses and innate host defense to pathogens. The 11 different TLRs recognize conserved molecular patterns of microbial pathogens termed pathogen-specific molecular patterns (PAMPs), that permit to confer responsiveness to a wide variety of pathogens. Endogenous ligands are also able to activate TLRs. All adult tissue is capable to express at least one of member of TLR family, but a largest repertoire of TLRs is found in tissues exposed to the external environment. The TLR activation induce the NF-kappaB translocation to the nucleus and cytokine secretion. Since the primary function of skin is to provide an effective barrier against outside agression, it is likely that keratinocytes may play a role in a rapid and efficient host defence system, and the fact that keratinocytes are capable of expressing a wide variety of TLRs is subsequently not surprising.

  14. Heterogeneous expression of Drosophila gustatory receptors in enteroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong-Ho; Kwon, Jae Young

    2011-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is emerging as a major site of chemosensation in mammalian studies. Enteroendocrine cells are chemosensory cells in the gut which produce regulatory peptides in response to luminal contents to regulate gut physiology, food intake, and glucose homeostasis, among other possible functions. Increasing evidence shows that mammalian taste receptors and taste signaling molecules are expressed in enteroendocrine cells in the gut. Invertebrate models such as Drosophila can provide a simple and genetically tractable system to study the chemosensory functions of enteroendocrine cells in vivo. To establish Drosophila enteroendocrine cells as a model for studying gut chemosensation, we used the GAL4/UAS system to examine the expression of all 68 Gustatory receptors (Grs) in the intestine. We find that 12 Gr-GAL4 drivers label subsets of enteroendocrine cells in the midgut, and examine colocalization of these drivers with the regulatory peptides neuropeptide F (NPF), locustatachykinin (LTK), and diuretic hormone 31 (DH31). RT-PCR analysis provides additional evidence for the presence of Gr transcripts in the gut. Our results suggest that the Drosophila Grs have chemosensory roles in the intestine to regulate physiological functions such as food uptake, nutrient absorption, or sugar homeostasis.

  15. Hydration Site Thermodynamics Explain SARs for Triazolylpurines Analogues Binding to the A2A Receptor

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A series of triazolylpurine analogues show interesting and unintuitive structure−activity relationships against the A2A adenosine receptor. As the 2-substituted aliphatic group is initially increased to methyl and isopropyl, there is a decrease in potency; however, extending the substituent to n-butyl and n-pentyl results in a significant gain in potency. This trend cannot be readily explained by ligand−receptor interactions, steric effects, or differences in ligand desolvation. Here, we show that a novel method for characterizing solvent thermodynamics in protein binding sites correctly predicts the trend in binding affinity for this series based on the differential water displacement patterns. In brief, small unfavorable substituents occupy a region in the A2A adenosine receptor binding site predicted to contain stable waters, while the longer favorable substituents extend to a region that contains several unstable waters. The predicted binding energies associated with displacing water within these hydration sites correlate well with the experimental activities. PMID:24900189

  16. Modification of the tetrodotoxin receptor in Electrophorus electricus by phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Reed, J K

    1981-08-06

    The effects of phospholipase A2 treatment on the tetrodotoxin receptors in Electrophorus electricus was studied. (1) The binding of [3H]tetrodotoxin to electroplaque membranes was substantially reduced by treatment of the membranes with low concentrations of phospholipase A2 from a number of sources, including bee venom, Vipera russelli and Crotalus adamanteus and by beta-bungarotoxin. (2) Phospholipase A2 from bee venom and from C. adamanteus both caused extensive hydrolysis of electroplaque membrane phospholipids although the substrate specificity differed. Analysis of the phospholipid classes hydrolyzed revealed a striking correlation between loss of toxin binding and hydrolysis of phosphatidylethanolamine but not of phosphatidylserine. (3) The loss of toxin binding could be partially reversed by treatment of the membranes with bovine serum albumin, conditions which are known to remove hydrolysis products from the membrane. (4) Equilibrium binding studies on the effects of phospholipase A2 treatment of [3H]tetrodotoxin binding showed that the reduction reflected loss of binding sites and not a change in affinity. (5) These results are interpreted in terms of multiple equilibrium states of the tetrodotoxin-receptors with conformations determined by the phospholipid environment.

  17. Molecular Determinants of CGS21680 Binding to the Human Adenosine A2A Receptor.

    PubMed

    Lebon, Guillaume; Edwards, Patricia C; Leslie, Andrew G W; Tate, Christopher G

    2015-06-01

    The adenosine A2A receptor (A(2A)R) plays a key role in transmembrane signaling mediated by the endogenous agonist adenosine. Here, we describe the crystal structure of human A2AR thermostabilized in an active-like conformation bound to the selective agonist 2-[p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenylethyl-amino]-5'-N-ethylcarboxamido adenosine (CGS21680) at a resolution of 2.6 Å. Comparison of A(2A)R structures bound to either CGS21680, 5'-N-ethylcarboxamido adenosine (NECA), UK432097 [6-(2,2-diphenylethylamino)-9-[(2R,3R,4S,5S)-5-(ethylcarbamoyl)-3,4-dihydroxy-tetrahydrofuran-2-yl]-N-[2-[[1-(2-pyridyl)-4-piperidyl]carbamoylamino]ethyl]purine-2-carboxamide], or adenosine shows that the adenosine moiety of the ligands binds to the receptor in an identical fashion. However, an extension in CGS21680 compared with adenosine, the (2-carboxyethyl)phenylethylamino group, binds in an extended vestibule formed from transmembrane regions 2 and 7 (TM2 and TM7) and extracellular loops 2 and 3 (EL2 and EL3). The (2-carboxyethyl)phenylethylamino group makes van der Waals contacts with side chains of amino acid residues Glu169(EL2), His264(EL3), Leu267(7.32), and Ile274(7.39), and the amine group forms a hydrogen bond with the side chain of Ser67(2.65). Of these residues, only Ile274(7.39) is absolutely conserved across the human adenosine receptor subfamily. The major difference between the structures of A(2A)R bound to either adenosine or CGS21680 is that the binding pocket narrows at the extracellular surface when CGS21680 is bound, due to an inward tilt of TM2 in that region. This conformation is stabilized by hydrogen bonds formed by the side chain of Ser67(2.65) to CGS21680, either directly or via an ordered water molecule. Mutation of amino acid residues Ser67(2.65), Glu169(EL2), and His264(EL3), and analysis of receptor activation either in the presence or absence of ligands implicates this region in modulating the level of basal activity of A(2A)R.

  18. Effect of subtype-selective adenosine receptor antagonists on basal or haloperidol-regulated striatal function: studies of exploratory locomotion and c-Fos immunoreactivity in outbred and A(2A)R KO mice.

    PubMed

    Pardo, M; López-Cruz, L; Valverde, O; Ledent, C; Baqi, Y; Müller, C E; Salamone, J D; Correa, M

    2013-06-15

    Behavioral activation is regulated by dopamine (DA) in striatal areas. At low doses, while typical antipsychotic drugs produce psychomotor slowing, psychostimulants promote exploration. Minor stimulants such as caffeine, which act as adenosine receptor antagonists, can also potentiate behavioral activation. Striatal areas are rich in adenosine and DA receptors, and adenosine A2A receptors are mainly expressed in the striatum where they are co-localized with DA D2 receptors. Adenosine antagonists with different receptor-selectivity profiles were used to study spontaneous or haloperidol-impaired exploration and c-Fos expression in different striatal areas. Because A2A antagonists were expected to be more selective for reversing the effects of the D2 antagonist haloperidol, A2A receptor knockout (A2ARKO) mice were also assessed. CD1 and A2ARKO male mice were tested in an open field and in a running wheel. Only the A1/A2A receptor antagonist theophylline (5.0-15.0 mg/kg) and the A2A antagonist MSX-3 (2.0 mg/kg) increased spontaneous locomotion and rearing. Co-administration of theophylline (10.0-15.0 mg/kg), and MSX-3 (1.0-3.0 mg/kg) reversed haloperidol-induced suppression of locomotion. The A1 antagonist CPT was only marginally effective in reversing the effects of haloperidol. Although adenosine antagonists did not affect c-Fos expression on their own, theophylline and MSX-3, but not CPT, attenuated haloperidol induction of c-Fos expression. A2ARKO mice were resistant to the behavioral effects of haloperidol at intermediate doses (0.1 mg/kg) in the open field and in the running wheel. A2A receptors are important for regulating behavioral activation, and interact with D2 receptors in striatal areas to regulate neural processes involved in exploratory activity.

  19. Linking estrogen receptor β expression with inflammatory bowel disease activity

    PubMed Central

    Pierdominici, Marina; Maselli, Angela; Varano, Barbara; Barbati, Cristiana; Cesaro, Paola; Spada, Cristiano; Zullo, Angelo; Lorenzetti, Roberto; Rosati, Marco; Rainaldi, Gabriella; Limiti, Maria Rosaria; Guidi, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) whose pathogenesis is only poorly understood. Estrogens have a complex role in inflammation and growing evidence suggests that these hormones may impact IBD pathogenesis. Here, we demonstrated a significant reduction (p < 0.05) of estrogen receptor (ER)β expression in peripheral blood T lymphocytes from CD/UC patients with active disease (n = 27) as compared to those in remission (n = 21) and healthy controls (n = 29). Accordingly, in a subgroup of CD/UC patients undergoing to anti-TNF-α therapy and responsive to treatment, ERβ expression was higher (p < 0.01) than that observed in not responsive patients and comparable to that of control subjects. Notably, ERβ expression was markedly decreased in colonic mucosa of CD/UC patients with active disease, reflecting the alterations observed in peripheral blood T cells. ERβ expression inversely correlated with interleukin (IL)-6 serum levels and exogenous exposure of both T lymphocytes and intestinal epithelial cells to this cytokine resulted in ERβ downregulation. These results demonstrate that the ER profile is altered in active IBD patients at both mucosal and systemic levels, at least in part due to IL-6 dysregulation, and highlight the potential exploitation of T cell-associated ERβ as a biomarker of endoscopic disease activity. PMID:26497217

  20. Expression of Formyl-peptide Receptors in Human Lung Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Fabio; Guerra, Germano; Parisi, Melania; Lucariello, Angela; De Luca, Antonio; De Rosa, Nicolina; Mazzarella, Gennaro; Bianco, Andrea; Ammendola, Rosario

    2015-05-01

    Formyl-peptide receptors (FPRs) are expressed in several tissues and cell types. The identification of markers involved in cell growth may further allow for molecular profiling of lung cancer. We investigated the possible role of FPRs as molecular markers in several types of lung carcinomas which is the main cause of cancer death worldwide. Tumor tissue samples were collected from six patients affected by lung cancer. Biopsies were analyzed for expression of FPR isoforms both in tumoral and peritumoral tissue by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), western blot and immunofluorescence. Real-time PCR, western blot and immunofluorescence analyses showed that FPR expression is lower in types of human lung cancer tissues when compared to the surrounding peritumoral tissues. The study of the mechanistic basis for the control of FPR expression in normal peritumoral versus tumoral tissues could provide the basis for new diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  1. Expression of androgen receptor target genes in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Rana, Kesha; Lee, Nicole K L; Zajac, Jeffrey D; MacLean, Helen E

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the mechanisms of the anabolic actions of androgens in skeletal muscle by investigating potential androgen receptor (AR)-regulated genes in in vitro and in vivo models. The expression of the myogenic regulatory factor myogenin was significantly decreased in skeletal muscle from testosterone-treated orchidectomized male mice compared to control orchidectomized males, and was increased in muscle from male AR knockout mice that lacked DNA binding activity (AR(ΔZF2)) versus wildtype mice, demonstrating that myogenin is repressed by the androgen/AR pathway. The ubiquitin ligase Fbxo32 was repressed by 12 h dihydrotestosterone treatment in human skeletal muscle cell myoblasts, and c-Myc expression was decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle, and increased in AR(∆ZF2) muscle. The expression of a group of genes that regulate the transition from myoblast proliferation to differentiation, Tceal7 , p57(Kip2), Igf2 and calcineurin Aa, was increased in AR(∆ZF2) muscle, and the expression of all but p57(Kip2) was also decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle. We conclude that in males, androgens act via the AR in part to promote peak muscle mass by maintaining myoblasts in the proliferative state and delaying the transition to differentiation during muscle growth and development, and by suppressing ubiquitin ligase-mediated atrophy pathways to preserve muscle mass in adult muscle.

  2. The Estrogen ReceptorExpression in De Quervain's Disease.

    PubMed

    Shen, Po-Chuan; Wang, Ping-Hui; Wu, Po-Ting; Wu, Kuo-Chen; Hsieh, Jeng-Long; Jou, I-Ming

    2015-11-04

    Stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal compartment of the wrist (a.k.a. de Quervain's disease) is common but how estrogen is involved is still unknown. We previously reported that inflammation was involved in the pathogenesis of this ailment. In the present study, we extended our investigation of estrogen receptor (ER)-β expression to determine whether estrogen is involved in the pathogenesis of de Quervain's. Intraoperative retinaculum samples were collected from 16 patients with the ailment. Specimens were histologically graded by collagen structure and immunohistochemically evaluated by quantifying the expression of ER-β, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 (inflammatory cytokines), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 (an inflammatory enzyme), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and Von Willebrand's factor (vWF). De Quervain's occurs primarily in women. The female:male ratio in our study was 7:1. We found that ER-β expression in the retinaculum was positively correlated with disease grade and patient age. Additionally, disease severity was associated with inflammatory factors--IL-1β and IL-6, COX-2, and VEGF and vWF in tenosynovial tissue. The greater the levels of ER-β expression, tissue inflammation, and angiogenesis are, the more severe de Quervain's disease is. ER-β might be a useful target for novel de Quervain's disease therapy.

  3. The effects of adenosine A2B receptor inhibition on VEGF and nitric oxide axis-mediated renal function in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Leena; Thaker, Aswin

    2014-07-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide. The pathophysiologic mechanisms of diabetic nephropathy are incompletely understood but include overproduction of various growth factors and cytokines. Upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a pathogenic event occurring in most forms of podocytopathy; however, the mechanisms that regulate this growth factor induction are not clearly identified. A2B receptors have been found to regulate VEGF expression under hypoxic environment in different tissues. One proposed hypothesis in mediating diabetic nephropathy is the modulation of VEGF-NO balance in renal tissue. We determined the role of adenosine A2B receptor in mediating VEGF overproduction and nitrite in diabetic nephropathy. The renal content of A2B receptors and VEGF was increased after 8 weeks of diabetes induction. The renal and plasma nitrite levels were also reduced in these animals. In vivo administration of A2B adenosine receptor antagonist (MRS1754) inhibited the renal over expression of VEGF and adverse renal function parameters. The antagonist administration also improved the kidney tissue nitrite levels. In conclusion, we demonstrated that VEGF induction via adenosine signaling might be the critical event in regulating VEGF-NO axis in diabetic nephropathy.

  4. Expression of the PlA2 allele of glycoprotein IIIa and its impact on platelet function

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Albert; Warner, Timothy D

    2015-01-01

    Background The platelet fibrinogen receptor represents the final common pathway of platelet activation, and is formed from two glycoprotein (GP) subunits (GPIIb/IIIa). Carriage of the mutant PlA2 allele of GPIIIa has been shown to confer an increased risk of cardiovascular events, but published studies have disagreed as to the mechanism for this association. Objectives To assess whether carriage of the PlA2 allele conforms to Mendelian patterns of expression and to identify whether carriage of the mutant allele modulates platelet function. Methods Expression of the PlA2 allele was assessed in both healthy subjects (n = 25) and patients with known coronary artery disease (n = 90) through the development and validation of a liquid chromatography, tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) assay. Platelet function was assessed in the patient cohort in response to multiple agonists, and these data were analysed in the context of the proteomic data. Results Expression of the wild-type PlA1 allele and mutant PlA