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Sample records for a2780 ovarian cancer

  1. Elevated β-catenin activity contributes to carboplatin resistance in A2780cp ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Barghout, Samir H.; Zepeda, Nubia; Xu, Zhihua

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related mortalities in women. Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) represents approximately 90% of all ovarian malignancies. Most EOC patients are diagnosed at advanced stages and current chemotherapy regimens are ineffective against advanced EOC due to the development of chemoresistance. It is important to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying acquired resistance to effectively manage this disease. In this study, we examined the expression of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling components in the paired cisplatin-sensitive (A2780s) and cisplatin-resistant (A2780cp) EOC cell lines. Our results showed that several negative regulators of Wnt signaling are downregulated, whereas amore » few Wnt ligands and known Wnt/β-catenin target genes are upregulated in A2780cp cells compared to A2780s cells, suggesting that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is more active in A2780cp cells. Further analysis revealed nuclear localization of β-catenin and higher β-catenin transcriptional activity in A2780cp cells compared to A2780s cells. Finally, we demonstrated that chemical inhibition of β-catenin transcriptional activity by its inhibitor CCT036477 sensitized A2780cp cells to carboplatin, supporting a role for β-catenin in carboplatin resistance in A2780cp cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that increased Wnt/β-catenin signaling activity contributes to carboplatin resistance in A2780cp cells. - Highlights: • Wnt ligands and target genes are upregulated in cisplatin resistant A2780cp cells. • Negative regulators of Wnt signaling are down-regulated in A2780cp cells. • β-catenin transcriptional activity is higher in A2780cp cells compared to A2780s cells. • Inhibition of β-catenin activity increases carboplatin cytotoxicity in A2780cp cells.« less

  2. Lectin array and glycogene expression analyses of ovarian cancer cell line A2780 and its cisplatin-resistant derivate cell line A2780-cp.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ran; Qin, Wenjun; Qin, Ruihuan; Han, Jing; Li, Can; Wang, Yisheng; Xu, Congjian

    2017-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the most lethal gynecological malignancies, in which platinum resistance is a common cause of its relapse and death. Glycosylation has been reported to be involved in drug resistance, and glycomic analyses of ovarian cancer may improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying cancer cell drug resistance and provide potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. The serous ovarian cancer cell line A2780 and its platinum-resistant counterpart A2780-cp were used in this study. We performed a lectin array analysis to compare the glycosylation patterns of the two cell lines, a gene expression array was employed to probe the differences in glycogenes. Furthermore, the results were verified by lectin blots. A2780-cp cell exhibited stronger intensities of Lens culinaris (LCA) Canavalia ensiformis (ConA), and Lycopersicon esculentum (LEL) and weaker intensities of Sambucus nigra (SNA) lectins. The gene expression array analysis revealed increased expression of Fut8, B3gnt4, B3gnt5, B4galt2 and decreased expression of Fut1 and ST6GalNAc 6 expression were evident in the A2780-cp cells. The lectin blot confirmed the differences in LCA, ConA, SNA and LEL between the A2780 and A2780-cp cells. The combination of the lectin and gene expression analyses showed that the levels of core fucosylation and poly-LacNAc were increased in the A2780-cp cells and the levels of Fuc α1-2(gal β1-4) GlcNAc and α2-6-linked sialic structures were decreased in the A2780-cp cells. These glycans represent potential biomarkers and might be involved in the mechanism of drug resistance in ovarian cancer.

  3. A Specific Mixture of Nutrients Suppresses Ovarian Cancer A-2780 Tumor Incidence, Growth, and Metastasis to Lungs.

    PubMed

    Roomi, Mohd Waheed; Kalinovsky, Tatiana; Rath, Matthias; Niedzwiecki, Aleksandra

    2017-03-18

    Ovarian cancer is the deadliest gynecological malignancy in women, and fifth leading cause of death. Despite advances made in chemotherapy and surgery, the average time of clinical remission is approximately 2 years and the 5-year survival rate is 45%. Thus, there is an urgent need for the development of a novel therapeutic approach to ovarian cancer treatment. We investigated the effect of a specific nutrient mixture (EPQ) containing ascorbic acid, lysine, proline, green tea extract, and quercetin on human ovarian cancer cell A-2780 in vivo and in vitro. Athymic female nude mice (n = 12) were all inoculated intraperitoneally (IP) with 2 × 10⁶ cells in 0.1 mL of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and randomly divided into two groups. Upon injection, the Control group (n = 6) was fed a regular diet and the EPQ group (n = 6) a regular diet supplemented with 0.5% EPQ. Four weeks later, the mice were sacrificed and tumors that developed in the ovary were excised, weighed, and processed for histology. Lungs were inspected for metastasis. In vitro, A-2780 cells were cultured in Dulbecco modified Eagle medium supplemented with 10% FBS and antibiotics. At near confluence, cells were treated with EPQ in triplicate at concentrations between 0 and 1000 μg/mL. Cell proliferation was measured via MTT assay, MMP-9 secretion via gelatinase zymography, invasion through Matrigel and morphology via hematoxylin and eosin (H & E) staining. All Control mice developed large ovarian tumors, whereas 5 out of 6 mice in the EPQ group developed no tumors, and one, a small tumor. Control mice also showed lung metastasis in 6 out of 6 mice, while no lung metastasis was evident in EPQ mice. Zymography demonstrated only MMP-9 expression, which EPQ inhibited in a dose-dependent fashion, with virtual total block at 250 μg/mL concentration. EPQ significantly inhibited invasion through Matrigel with total block at 250 μg/mL concentration. MTT showed dose-dependent inhibition of cell

  4. Ovarian cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zeimet, A G; Reimer, D; Sopper, S; Boesch, M; Martowicz, A; Roessler, J; Wiedemair, A M; Rumpold, H; Untergasser, G; Concin, N; Hofstetter, G; Muller-Holzner, E; Fiegl, H; Marth, C; Wolf, D; Pesta, M; Hatina, J

    2012-01-01

    Because of its semi-solid character in dissemination and growth, advanced ovarian cancer with its hundreds of peritoneal tumor nodules and plaques appears to be an excellent in vivo model for studying the cancer stem cell hypothesis. The most important obstacle, however, is to adequately define and isolate these tumor-initiating cells endowed with the properties of anoikis-resistance and unlimited self-renewal. Until now, no universal single marker or marker constellation has been found to faithfully isolate (ovarian) cancer stem cells. As these multipotent cells are known to possess highly elaborated efflux systems for cytotoxic agents, these pump systems have been exploited to outline putative stem cells as a side-population (SP) via dye exclusion analysis. Furthermore, the cells in question have been isolated via flow cytometry on the basis of cell surface markers thought to be characteristic for stem cells.In the Vienna variant of the ovarian cancer cell line A2780 a proof-of-principle model with both a stable SP and a stable ALDH1A1+ cell population was established. Double staining clearly revealed that both cell fractions were not identical. Of note, A2780V cells were negative for expression of surface markers CD44 and CD117 (c-kit). When cultured on monolayers of healthy human mesothelial cells, green-fluorescence-protein (GFP)-transfected SP of A2780V exhibited spheroid-formation, whereas non-side-population (NSP) developed a spare monolayer growing over the healthy mesothelium. Furthermore, A2780V SP was found to be partially resistant to platinum. However, this resistance could not be explained by over-expression of the "excision repair cross-complementation group 1" (ERCC1) gene, which is essentially involved in the repair of platinated DNA damage. ERCC1 was, nonetheless, over-expressed in A2780V cells grown as spheres under stem cell-selective conditions as compared to adherent monolayers cultured under differentiating conditions. The same was true for

  5. Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... deaths than other female reproductive cancers. The sooner ovarian cancer is found and treated, the better your chance for recovery. But ovarian cancer is hard to detect early. Women with ovarian ...

  6. Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Knowledge is an initiative that supports the Gynecologic Cancer Education and Awareness Act of 2005, or Johanna’s Law, which was unanimously passed by the U.S. House and Senate in December of 2006, and ... and symptoms of ovarian cancer? Ovarian cancer may cause one or more of ...

  7. Cellular glutathione level does not predict ovarian cancer cells' resistance after initial or repeated exposure to cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Nikounezhad, Nastaran; Nakhjavani, Maryam; Shirazi, Farshad H

    2017-05-01

    Cisplatin resistance development is a major obstacle in ovarian cancer treatment. One of the most important mechanisms underlying cisplatin resistance is drug detoxification by glutathione. In the present study, the importance of initial or repeated exposure to cisplatin in glutathione dependent resistance was investigated. To this purpose, some cisplatin sensitive and resistant variants of human ovarian cancer cell lines providing an appropriate range of cisplatin sensitivity were selected. Clonogenic survival assay was performed to evaluate cisplatin resistance and intracellular contents of reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione were analyzed using an HPLC method. Our results indicated that the intracellular GSH and GSSG concentrations were nearly equal in A2780 and A2780CP cells, while the A2780CP cells showed 14 times more resistance than the A2780 cells after initial exposure to cisplatin. A2780-R1 and A2780-R3 cells which have been repeatedly exposed to cisplatin also showed no significant difference in glutathione content, even though A2780-R3 was about two times more resistant than A2780-R1. Moreover, intracellular GSH/GSSG ratio decreased in the resistant cells, reflecting a shift towards a more oxidizing intracellular environment indicative of oxidative stress. As a conclusion, it seems that although the intracellular glutathione concentration increases after repeated exposure to cisplatin, there is no clear correlation between the intracellular GSH content in ovarian cancer cells and their resistance to cisplatin neither after initial nor after repeated exposure to this drug.

  8. MCT1 promotes the cisplatin-resistance by antagonizing Fas in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chunxiao; Yang, Fan; Zhou, Chunxia; Chen, Xuejun; Han, Xuechuan; Liu, Xueqin; Ma, Hongyun; Zheng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of MCT1 in the development of cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer and its possible relationship with Fas. We found the expression of MCT1 was obviously increased both in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer tissue and A2780/CP cells compared with sensitive ovarian cancer tissue and cell lines A2780. And in A2780 cells treated with Cisplatin, the expression of MCT1 increased in a concentration-dependent manner, MCT1 knockdown attenuates cisplatin-induced cell viability. In A2780 and A2780/CP cells transfected with MCT1 siRNA, the activation of several downstream targets of Fas, including FasL and FAP-1 were largely prevented, whereas the expression of Caspase-3 was increased, accompanying with increased abundance of Fas. Coimmunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence showed that there is interaction between endogenous MCT1 with Fas in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, depletion of MCT1 by shRNA reverses cisplatin-resistance and the expression of Fas. This study showed that down regulation of MCT1 promote the sensibility to Cisplatin in ovarian cancer cell line. And this effect appeared to be mediated via antagonizing the effect of Fas.

  9. MCT1 promotes the cisplatin-resistance by antagonizing Fas in epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chunxiao; Yang, Fan; Zhou, Chunxia; Chen, Xuejun; Han, Xuechuan; Liu, Xueqin; Ma, Hongyun; Zheng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of MCT1 in the development of cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer and its possible relationship with Fas. We found the expression of MCT1 was obviously increased both in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer tissue and A2780/CP cells compared with sensitive ovarian cancer tissue and cell lines A2780. And in A2780 cells treated with Cisplatin, the expression of MCT1 increased in a concentration-dependent manner, MCT1 knockdown attenuates cisplatin-induced cell viability. In A2780 and A2780/CP cells transfected with MCT1 siRNA, the activation of several downstream targets of Fas, including FasL and FAP-1 were largely prevented, whereas the expression of Caspase-3 was increased, accompanying with increased abundance of Fas. Coimmunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence showed that there is interaction between endogenous MCT1 with Fas in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, depletion of MCT1 by shRNA reverses cisplatin-resistance and the expression of Fas. This study showed that down regulation of MCT1 promote the sensibility to Cisplatin in ovarian cancer cell line. And this effect appeared to be mediated via antagonizing the effect of Fas. PMID:26045776

  10. Cisplatin-induced caspase activation mediates PTEN cleavage in ovarian cancer cells: a potential mechanism of chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mohan; Chaudhry, Parvesh; Fabi, Francois; Asselin, Eric

    2013-05-10

    The phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) tumor suppressor protein is a central negative regulator of the PI3K/AKT signaling cascade and suppresses cell survival as well as cell proliferation. PTEN is found to be either inactivated or mutated in various human malignancies. In the present study, we have investigated the regulation of PTEN during cisplatin induced apoptosis in A2780, A270-CP (cisplatin resistant), OVCAR-3 and SKOV3 ovarian cancer cell lines. Cells were treated with 10μM of cisplatin for 24h. Transcript and protein levels were analysed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and western blotting, respectively. Immunofluorescence microscopy was used to assess the intracellular localization of PTEN. Proteasome inhibitor and various caspases inhibitors were used to find the mechanism of PTEN degradation. PTEN protein levels were found to be decreased significantly in A2780 cells; however, there was no change in PTEN protein levels in A2780-CP, OVCAR-3 and SKOV3 cells with cisplatin treatment. The decrease in PTEN protein was accompanied with an increase in the levels of AKT phosphorylation (pAKT) in A2780 cells and a decrease of BCL-2. Cisplatin treatment induced the activation/cleavage of caspase-3, -6, -7, -8, -9 in all cell lines tested in this study except the resistant variant A2780-CP cells. In A2780 cells, restoration of PTEN levels was achieved upon pre-treatment with Z-DEVD-FMK (broad range caspases inhibitor) and not with MG132 (proteasome inhibitor) and by overexpression of BCL-2, suggesting that caspases and BCL-2 are involved in the decrease of PTEN protein levels in A2780 cells. The decrease in pro-apoptotic PTEN protein levels and increase in survival factor pAKT in A2780 ovarian cancer cells suggest that cisplatin treatment could further exacerbate drug resistance in A2780 ovarian cancer cells.

  11. Ovarian Autoantibodies Predict Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    2000. 48(10): 541- 549. 10 7. Barua, A., et al., Anti-ovarian and anti-tumor antibodies in women with ovarian cancer. Am J Reprod Immunol, 2007 . 57...Med 2007 . 26: 909-919. 9. Barua, A., et al., Prevalence of anti-tumor antibodies in the laying hen model of human ovarian cancer. International... 2007 ; 25:4159– 4161. 6. Bosse K, Rhiem K, Wappenschmidt B, et al. Screening for ovarian cancer by transvaginal ultrasound and serum CA125 measurement in

  12. Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Informed Cancer Home What Are the Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer? Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Be Brave (:60) Ovarian cancer may cause the following signs and symptoms— Vaginal ...

  13. Dihydroartemisinin induces apoptosis and sensitizes human ovarian cancer cells to carboplatin therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Li, Mian; Zhang, Ruiwen; Wang, Hui

    2009-07-01

    The present study was designed to determine the effects of artemisinin (ARS) and its derivatives on human ovarian cancer cells, to evaluate their potential as novel chemotherapeutic agents used alone or in combination with a conventional cancer chemotherapeutic agent, and to investigate their underlying mechanisms of action. Human ovarian cancer cells (A2780 and OVCAR-3), and immortalized non-tumourigenic human ovarian surface epithelial cells (IOSE144), were exposed to four ARS compounds for cytotoxicity testing. The in vitro and in vivo antitumour effects and possible underlying mechanisms of action of dihydroartemisinin (DHA), the most effective compound, were further determined in ovarian cancer cells. ARS compounds exerted potent cytotoxicity to human ovarian carcinoma cells, with minimal effects on non-tumourigenic ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells. DHA inhibited ovarian cancer cell growth when administered alone or in combination with carboplatin, presumably through the death receptor- and, mitochondrion-mediated caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway. These effects were also observed in in vivo ovarian A2780 and OVCAR-3 xenograft tumour models. In conclusion, ARS derivatives, particularly DHA, exhibit significant anticancer activity against ovarian cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, with minimal toxicity to non-tumourigenic human OSE cells, indicating that they may be promising therapeutic agents for ovarian cancer, either used alone or in combination with conventional chemotherapy.

  14. Dihydroartemisinin induces apoptosis and sensitizes human ovarian cancer cells to carboplatin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tao; Li, Mian; Zhang, Ruiwen; Wang, Hui

    2009-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the effects of artemisinin (ARS) and its derivatives on human ovarian cancer cells, to evaluate their potential as novel chemotherapeutic agents used alone or in combination with a conventional cancer chemotherapeutic agent, and to investigate their underlying mechanisms of action. Human ovarian cancer cells (A2780 and OVCAR-3), and immortalized non-tumourigenic human ovarian surface epithelial cells (IOSE144), were exposed to four ARS compounds for cytotoxicity testing. The in vitro and in vivo antitumour effects and possible underlying mechanisms of action of dihydroartemisinin (DHA), the most effective compound, were further determined in ovarian cancer cells. ARS compounds exerted potent cytotoxicity to human ovarian carcinoma cells, with minimal effects on non-tumourigenic ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells. DHA inhibited ovarian cancer cell growth when administered alone or in combination with carboplatin, presumably through the death receptor- and, mitochondrion-mediated caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway. These effects were also observed in in vivo ovarian A2780 and OVCAR-3 xenograft tumour models. In conclusion, ARS derivatives, particularly DHA, exhibit significant anticancer activity against ovarian cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, with minimal toxicity to non-tumourigenic human OSE cells, indicating that they may be promising therapeutic agents for ovarian cancer, either used alone or in combination with conventional chemotherapy. PMID:18466355

  15. Anticancer effect and mechanism of polymer micelle-encapsulated quercetin on ovarian cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang; Wang, Bilan; Wei, Xiawei; Men, Ke; Zheng, Fengjin; Zhou, Yingfeng; Zheng, Yu; Gou, Maling; Huang, Meijuan; Guo, Gang; Huang, Ning; Qian, Zhiyong; Wei, Yuquan

    2012-10-01

    Encapsulation of hydrophobic agents in polymer micelles can improve the water solubility of cargos, contributing to develop novel drugs. Quercetin (QU) is a hydrophobic agent with potential anticancer activity. In this work, we encapsulated QU into biodegradable monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone) (MPEG-PCL) micelles and tried to provide proof-of-principle for treating ovarian cancer with this nano-formulation of quercetin. These QU loaded MPEG-PCL (QU/MPEG-PCL) micelles with drug loading of 6.9% had a mean particle size of 36 nm, rendering the complete dispersion of quercetin in water. QU inhibited the growth of A2780S ovarian cancer cells on a dose dependent manner in vitro. Intravenous administration of QU/MPEG-PCL micelles significantly suppressed the growth of established xenograft A2780S ovarian tumors through causing cancer cell apoptosis and inhibiting angiogenesis in vivo. Furthermore, the anticancer activity of quercetin on ovarian cancer cells was studied in vitro. Quercetin treatment induced the apoptosis of A2780S cells associated with activating caspase-3 and caspase-9. MCL-1 downregulation, Bcl-2 downregulation, Bax upregulation and mitochondrial transmembrane potential change were observed, suggesting that quercetin may induce apoptosis of A2780S cells through the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Otherwise, quercetin treatment decreased phosphorylated p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphorylated Akt, contributing to inhibition of A2780S cell proliferation. Our data suggested that QU/MPEG-PCL micelles were a novel nano-formulation of quercetin with a potential clinical application in ovarian cancer therapy.

  16. Ovarian Cancer FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... BRCA2 genes Never having had children Infertility Endometriosis Lynch Syndrome What screening tests are available for ovarian cancer? ... It also may be recommended for women with Lynch syndrome. This operation reduces the risk of ovarian cancer. ...

  17. Exosomes as mediators of platinum resistance in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Crow, Jennifer; Atay, Safinur; Banskota, Samagya; Artale, Brittany; Schmitt, Sarah; Godwin, Andrew K

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes have been implicated in the cell-cell transfer of oncogenic proteins and genetic material. We speculated this may be one mechanism by which an intrinsically platinum-resistant population of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells imparts its influence on surrounding tumor cells. To explore this possibility we utilized a platinum-sensitive cell line, A2780 and exosomes derived from its resistant subclones, and an unselected, platinum-resistant EOC line, OVCAR10. A2780 cells demonstrate a ~2-fold increase in viability upon treatment with carboplatin when pre-exposed to exosomes from platinum-resistant cells as compared to controls. This coincided with increased epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). DNA sequencing of EOC cell lines revealed previously unreported somatic mutations in the Mothers Against Decapentaplegic Homolog 4 (SMAD4) within platinum-resistant cells. A2780 cells engineered to exogenously express these SMAD4 mutations demonstrate up-regulation of EMT markers following carboplatin treatment, are more resistant to carboplatin, and release exosomes which impart a ~1.7-fold increase in resistance in naive A2780 recipient cells as compared to controls. These studies provide the first evidence that acquired SMAD4 mutations enhance the chemo-resistance profile of EOC and present a novel mechanism in which exchange of tumor-derived exosomes perpetuates an EMT phenotype, leading to the development of subpopulations of platinum-refractory cells. PMID:28060758

  18. Exosomes as mediators of platinum resistance in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Crow, Jennifer; Atay, Safinur; Banskota, Samagya; Artale, Brittany; Schmitt, Sarah; Godwin, Andrew K

    2017-02-14

    Exosomes have been implicated in the cell-cell transfer of oncogenic proteins and genetic material. We speculated this may be one mechanism by which an intrinsically platinum-resistant population of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells imparts its influence on surrounding tumor cells. To explore this possibility we utilized a platinum-sensitive cell line, A2780 and exosomes derived from its resistant subclones, and an unselected, platinum-resistant EOC line, OVCAR10. A2780 cells demonstrate a ~2-fold increase in viability upon treatment with carboplatin when pre-exposed to exosomes from platinum-resistant cells as compared to controls. This coincided with increased epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). DNA sequencing of EOC cell lines revealed previously unreported somatic mutations in the Mothers Against Decapentaplegic Homolog 4 (SMAD4) within platinum-resistant cells. A2780 cells engineered to exogenously express these SMAD4 mutations demonstrate up-regulation of EMT markers following carboplatin treatment, are more resistant to carboplatin, and release exosomes which impart a ~1.7-fold increase in resistance in naive A2780 recipient cells as compared to controls. These studies provide the first evidence that acquired SMAD4 mutations enhance the chemo-resistance profile of EOC and present a novel mechanism in which exchange of tumor-derived exosomes perpetuates an EMT phenotype, leading to the development of subpopulations of platinum-refractory cells.

  19. Inhibition of epithelial ovarian cancer by Minnelide, a water-soluble pro-drug.

    PubMed

    Rivard, Colleen; Geller, Melissa; Schnettler, Erica; Saluja, Manju; Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; Saluja, Ashok; Ramakrishnan, Sundaram

    2014-11-01

    Minnelide is a water-soluble pro-drug of triptolide, a natural product. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Minnelide on ovarian cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. The effect of Minnelide on ovarian cancer cell proliferation was determined by real time electrical impedance measurements. Multiple mouse models with C200 and A2780 epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines were used to assess the efficacy of Minnelide in inhibiting ovarian cancer growth. Minnelide decreased cell viability of both platinum sensitive and resistant epithelial ovarian cancer cells in vitro. Minnelide with carboplatin showed additive effects in vitro. Minnelide monotherapy increased the survival of mice bearing established ovarian tumors. Minnelide, in combination with carboplatin and paclitaxel, improved overall survival of mice. Minnelide is a promising pro-drug for the treatment of ovarian cancer, especially when combined with standard chemotherapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Preclinical activity of melflufen (J1) in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Viktorsson, Kristina; Velander, Ebba; Nygren, Peter; Uustalu, Maria; Juntti, Therese; Lewensohn, Rolf; Larsson, Rolf; Spira, Jack; De Vlieghere, Elly; Ceelen, Wim P.; Gullbo, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer carries a significant mortality. Since symptoms tend to be minimal, the disease is often diagnosed when peritoneal metastases are already present. The standard of care in advanced ovarian cancer consists of platinum-based chemotherapy combined with cytoreductive surgery. Unfortunately, even after optimal cytoreduction and adjuvant chemotherapy, most patients with stage III disease will develop a recurrence. Intraperitoneal administration of chemotherapy is an alternative treatment for patients with localized disease. The pharmacological and physiochemical properties of melflufen, a peptidase potentiated alkylator, raised the hypothesis that this drug could be useful in ovarian cancer and particularily against peritoneal carcinomatosis. In this study the preclinical effects of melflufen were investigated in different ovarian cancer models. Melflufen was active against ovarian cancer cell lines, primary cultures of patient-derived ovarian cancer cells, and inhibited the growth of subcutaneous A2780 ovarian cancer xenografts alone and when combined with gemcitabine or liposomal doxorubicin when administered intravenously. In addition, an intra- and subperitoneal xenograft model showed activity of intraperitoneal administered melflufen for peritoneal carcinomatosis, with minimal side effects and modest systemic exposure. In conclusion, results from this study support further investigations of melflufen for the treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis from ovarian cancer, both for intravenous and intraperitoneal administration. PMID:27528037

  1. Preclinical activity of melflufen (J1) in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Carlier, Charlotte; Strese, Sara; Viktorsson, Kristina; Velander, Ebba; Nygren, Peter; Uustalu, Maria; Juntti, Therese; Lewensohn, Rolf; Larsson, Rolf; Spira, Jack; De Vlieghere, Elly; Ceelen, Wim P; Gullbo, Joachim

    2016-09-13

    Ovarian cancer carries a significant mortality. Since symptoms tend to be minimal, the disease is often diagnosed when peritoneal metastases are already present. The standard of care in advanced ovarian cancer consists of platinum-based chemotherapy combined with cytoreductive surgery. Unfortunately, even after optimal cytoreduction and adjuvant chemotherapy, most patients with stage III disease will develop a recurrence. Intraperitoneal administration of chemotherapy is an alternative treatment for patients with localized disease. The pharmacological and physiochemical properties of melflufen, a peptidase potentiated alkylator, raised the hypothesis that this drug could be useful in ovarian cancer and particularily against peritoneal carcinomatosis. In this study the preclinical effects of melflufen were investigated in different ovarian cancer models. Melflufen was active against ovarian cancer cell lines, primary cultures of patient-derived ovarian cancer cells, and inhibited the growth of subcutaneous A2780 ovarian cancer xenografts alone and when combined with gemcitabine or liposomal doxorubicin when administered intravenously. In addition, an intra- and subperitoneal xenograft model showed activity of intraperitoneal administered melflufen for peritoneal carcinomatosis, with minimal side effects and modest systemic exposure. In conclusion, results from this study support further investigations of melflufen for the treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis from ovarian cancer, both for intravenous and intraperitoneal administration.

  2. TET1 promotes cisplatin-resistance via demethylating the vimentin promoter in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Han, Xi; Zhou, Yuanyuan; You, Yuanyi; Lu, Jiaojiao; Wang, Lijie; Hou, Huilian; Li, Jing; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Le; Li, Xu

    2017-04-01

    The development of chemo-resistance impairs the outcome of the first line platinum-based chemotherapies for ovarian cancer. Deregulation of DNA methylation/demethylation provides a critical mechanism for the occurrence of chemo-resistance. The ten-eleven translocation (TET) family of dioxygenases including TET1/2/3 plays an important part in DNA demethylation, but their roles in cisplatin resistance have not been elucidated. Using cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell models, we found that TET1 was significantly upregulated in cisplatin-resistant CP70 cells compared with that in cisplatin-sensitive A2780 cells. Ectopic expression of TET1 in A2780 cells promoted cisplatin resistance and decreased cytotoxicity induced by cisplatin, while inhibition of TET1 by siRNA transfection in CP70 cells attenuated cisplatin resistance and enhanced cytotoxicity of cisplatin. Increased TET1 induced re-expression of vimentin through active DNA demethylation, and cause partial epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT) in A2780 cells. Contrarily, knocking down of TET1 in CP70 cells reduced vimentin expression and reversed EMT process. Immunohistochemical analysis of TET1 in human ovarian cancer tissues revealed that TET1 existed in nucleus and cytoplasm in ovarian cancer tissues. And the expression of nuclear TET1 was positively correlated with residual tumor and chemotherapeutic response. Thus, TET1 expression causes resistance to cisplatin and one of the targets of TET1 action is vimentin in ovarian cancer. © 2017 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  3. Epidemiology of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Sellers, Thomas A

    2009-01-01

    Ovarian cancer represents the sixth most commonly diagnosed cancer among women in the world, and causes more deaths per year than any other cancer of the female reproductive system. Despite the high incidence and mortality rates, the etiology of this disease is poorly understood. Established risk factors for ovarian cancer include age and having a family history of the disease, while protective factors include increasing parity, oral contraceptive use, and oophorectomy. Lactation, incomplete pregnancies, and surgeries such as hysterectomy and tubal ligation may confer a weak protective effect against ovarian cancer. Infertility may contribute to ovarian cancer risk among nulliparous women. Other possible risk factors for ovarian cancer include postmenopausal hormone-replacement therapy and lifestyle factors such as cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption. Many of the causes of ovarian cancer are yet to be identified. Additional research is needed to better understand the etiology of this deadly disease.

  4. Metabolomic Profiling of the Synergistic Effects of Melittin in Combination with Cisplatin on Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alonezi, Sanad; Tusiimire, Jonans; Wallace, Jennifer; Dufton, Mark J.; Parkinson, John A.; Young, Louise C.; Clements, Carol J.; Park, Jin-Kyu; Jeon, Jong-Woon; Ferro, Valerie A.; Watson, David G.

    2017-01-01

    Melittin, the main peptide present in bee venom, has been proposed as having potential for anticancer therapy; the addition of melittin to cisplatin, a first line treatment for ovarian cancer, may increase the therapeutic response in cancer treatment via synergy, resulting in improved tolerability, reduced relapse, and decreased drug resistance. Thus, this study was designed to compare the metabolomic effects of melittin in combination with cisplatin in cisplatin-sensitive (A2780) and resistant (A2780CR) ovarian cancer cells. Liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) was applied to identify metabolic changes in A2780 (combination treatment 5 μg/mL melittin + 2 μg/mL cisplatin) and A2780CR (combination treatment 2 μg/mL melittin + 10 μg/mL cisplatin) cells. Principal components analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) multivariate data analysis models were produced using SIMCA-P software. All models displayed good separation between experimental groups and high-quality goodness of fit (R2) and goodness of prediction (Q2), respectively. The combination treatment induced significant changes in both cell lines involving reduction in the levels of metabolites in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, purine and pyrimidine metabolism, and the arginine/proline pathway. The combination of melittin with cisplatin that targets these pathways had a synergistic effect. The melittin-cisplatin combination had a stronger effect on the A2780 cell line in comparison with the A2780CR cell line. The metabolic effects of melittin and cisplatin in combination were very different from those of each agent alone. PMID:28420117

  5. Tetramethoxychalcone, a chalcone derivative, suppresses proliferation, blocks cell cycle progression, and induces apoptosis of human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zihao; Liu, Mingming; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Meiqin; Yang, Gong

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the in vitro antitumor functions of a synthetic chalcone derivative 4,3',4',5'- tetramethoxychalcone (TMOC) in ovarian cancer cells. We found that TMOC inhibited the proliferation and colony formation of cisplatin sensitive cell line A2780 and resistant cell line A2780/CDDP, as well as ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Treatment of A2780 cells with TMOC resulted in G0/G1 cell cycle arrest through the down-regulation of cyclin D1 and CDK4, and the up-regulation of p16, p21 and p27 proteins. We demonstrated that TMOC might induce cell apoptosis through suppressing Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, but enhancing the expression of Bax and the cleavage of PARP-1. Treatment of TMOC also reduced the invasion and migration of A2780 cells. Finally, we found that TMOC inhibited the constitutive activation of STAT3 signaling pathway and induced the expression of the tumor suppressor PTEN regardless of the p53 status in cell lines. These data suggest that TMOC may be developed as a potential chemotherapeutic agent to effectively treat certain cancers including ovarian cancer.

  6. Tetramethoxychalcone, a Chalcone Derivative, Suppresses Proliferation, Blocks Cell Cycle Progression, and Induces Apoptosis of Human Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Meiqin; Yang, Gong

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the in vitro antitumor functions of a synthetic chalcone derivative 4,3′,4′,5′- tetramethoxychalcone (TMOC) in ovarian cancer cells. We found that TMOC inhibited the proliferation and colony formation of cisplatin sensitive cell line A2780 and resistant cell line A2780/CDDP, as well as ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Treatment of A2780 cells with TMOC resulted in G0/G1 cell cycle arrest through the down-regulation of cyclin D1 and CDK4, and the up-regulation of p16, p21 and p27 proteins. We demonstrated that TMOC might induce cell apoptosis through suppressing Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, but enhancing the expression of Bax and the cleavage of PARP-1. Treatment of TMOC also reduced the invasion and migration of A2780 cells. Finally, we found that TMOC inhibited the constitutive activation of STAT3 signaling pathway and induced the expression of the tumor suppressor PTEN regardless of the p53 status in cell lines. These data suggest that TMOC may be developed as a potential chemotherapeutic agent to effectively treat certain cancers including ovarian cancer. PMID:25180593

  7. Preclinical evaluation of olaparib and metformin combination in BRCA1 wildtype ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hijaz, M; Chhina, J; Mert, I; Taylor, M; Dar, S; Al-Wahab, Z; Ali-Fehmi, R; Buekers, T; Munkarah, A R; Rattan, R

    2016-08-01

    BRCA mutated ovarian cancers show increased responsiveness to PARP inhibitors. PARP inhibitors target DNA repair and provide a second hit to BRCA mutated tumors, resulting in "synthetic lethality". We investigated a combination of metformin and olaparib to provide "synthetic lethality" in BRCA intact ovarian cancer cells. Ovarian cancer cell lines (UWB1.289, UWB1.289.BRCA, SKOV3, OVCAR5, A2780 and C200) were treated with a combination of metformin and olaparib. Cell viability was assessed by MTT and colony formation assays. Flow cytometry was used to detect cell cycle events. In vivo studies were performed in SKOV3 or A2780 xenografts in nude mice. Animals were treated with single agent, metformin or olaparib or combination. Molecular downstream effects were examined by immunohistochemistry. Compared to single drug treatment, combination of olaparib and metformin resulted in significant reduction of cell proliferation and colony formation (p<0.001) in ovarian cancer cells. This treatment was associated with a significant S-phase cell cycle arrest (p<0.05). Combination of olaparib and metformin significantly inhibited SKOV3 and A2780 ovarian tumor xenografts which were accompanied with decreased Ki-index (p<0.001). Metformin did not affect DNA damage signaling, while olaparib induced adenosine monophosphate activated kinase activation; that was further potentiated with metformin combination in vivo. Combining PARP inhibitors with metformin enhances its anti-proliferative activity in BRCA mutant ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, the combination showed significant activity in BRCA intact cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. This is a promising treatment regimen for women with epithelial ovarian cancer irrespective of BRCA status. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Innovative T Cell-Targeted Therapy for Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    from co-culture with EL4 -ROR1neg and EL4 -ROR1+ tumor targets. Ovarian cancer cell lines (A2780, EFO21, EFO27, IGROV1, OC314, and UPN251) were...profiled for ROR1 expression in normoxia (20% O2) and hypoxia (1% O2). Four-hour CRA was used to evaluate cytotoxicity against the OvCa and EL4 tumor...loaded aAPC for negative controls. EL4 is a murine T cell lymphoma cell line used to test specificity of CAR+ T cells with limited allo-reactivity

  9. The effect of CA125 on metastasis of ovarian cancer: old marker new function

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weiwei; Wang, Hongyan; Huo, Qianyu; Yang, Jie; Yu, Xiaoxu; Liu, Yunde; Xu, Chen; Bao, Huijing

    2017-01-01

    CA125 has been used extensively to screen for neoplasms, especially in ovarian cancer. The serum CA125 level can be used as a better prognosis evaluation and it may dynamic monitoring the disease progression. We explored the effect of CA125 on ovarian cancer cell migration and its underlying mechanism. Transwell assays showed that exposure to 0.2 μg/ml or 0.4 μg/ml CA125 for 48 h increased migration of A2780 and OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cells. This effect of CA125 was blocked addition of 200 ng/ml DKK-1, a Wnt pathway inhibitor. Conversely, addition of CA125 reversed the inhibitory effect of Wnt inhibition in A2780 cells pretreated with DKK-1. Examination of CA125 levels in serum from 97 ovarian cancer patients revealed no relationship between a patient's age or CA125 level currently used clinically for ovarian cancer diagnosis and metastasis. However, using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, we identified a new cut-off value for the serum CA125 concentration (82.9 U/ml) that is predictive of metastasis. The area under the curve is 0.632. This new cut-off value has the potential to serve as a clinically useful indicator of metastasis in ovarian cancer patients. PMID:28637006

  10. The effect of CA125 on metastasis of ovarian cancer: old marker new function.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qin; Song, Jiayin; Yang, Weiwei; Wang, Hongyan; Huo, Qianyu; Yang, Jie; Yu, Xiaoxu; Liu, Yunde; Xu, Chen; Bao, Huijing

    2017-07-25

    CA125 has been used extensively to screen for neoplasms, especially in ovarian cancer. The serum CA125 level can be used as a better prognosis evaluation and it may dynamic monitoring the disease progression. We explored the effect of CA125 on ovarian cancer cell migration and its underlying mechanism. Transwell assays showed that exposure to 0.2 μg/ml or 0.4 μg/ml CA125 for 48 h increased migration of A2780 and OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cells. This effect of CA125 was blocked addition of 200 ng/ml DKK-1, a Wnt pathway inhibitor. Conversely, addition of CA125 reversed the inhibitory effect of Wnt inhibition in A2780 cells pretreated with DKK-1. Examination of CA125 levels in serum from 97 ovarian cancer patients revealed no relationship between a patient's age or CA125 level currently used clinically for ovarian cancer diagnosis and metastasis. However, using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, we identified a new cut-off value for the serum CA125 concentration (82.9 U/ml) that is predictive of metastasis. The area under the curve is 0.632. This new cut-off value has the potential to serve as a clinically useful indicator of metastasis in ovarian cancer patients.

  11. Metformin suppresses ovarian cancer growth and metastasis with enhancement of cisplatin cytotoxicity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Ramandeep; Graham, Rondell P; Maguire, Jacie L; Giri, Shailendra; Shridhar, Viji

    2011-05-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic cancer in women. Its high mortality rate (68%) reflects the fact that 75% of patients have extensive (>stage III) disease at diagnosis and also the limited efficacy of currently available therapies. Consequently, there is clearly a great need to develop improved upfront and salvage therapies for ovarian cancer. Here, we investigated the efficacy of metformin alone and in combination with cisplatin in vivo. A2780 ovarian cancer cells were injected intraperitoneally in nude mice; A2780-induced tumors in nude mice, when treated with metformin in drinking water, resulted in a significant reduction of tumor growth, accompanied by inhibition of tumor cell proliferation (as assessed by immunohistochemical staining of Ki-67, Cyclin D1) as well as decreased live tumor size and mitotic cell count. Metformin-induced activation of AMPK/mTOR pathway was accompanied by decreased microvessel density and vascular endothelial growth factor expression. More importantly, metformin treatment inhibited the growth of metastatic nodules in the lung and significantly potentiated cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity resulting in approximately 90% reduction in tumor growth compared with treatment by either of the drugs alone. Collectively, our data show for the first time that, in addition to inhibiting tumor cell proliferation, metformin treatment inhibits both angiogenesis and metastatic spread of ovarian cancer. Overall, our study provides a strong rationale for use of metformin in ovarian cancer treatment.

  12. Immunotherapy in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Odunsi, K

    2017-11-01

    Immunological destruction of tumors is a multistep, coordinated process that can be modulated or targeted at several critical points to elicit tumor rejection. These steps in the cancer immunity cycle include: (i) generation of sufficient numbers of effector T cells with high avidity recognition of tumor antigens in vivo; (ii) trafficking and infiltration into the tumor; (iii) overcoming inhibitory networks in the tumor microenvironment; (iv) direct recognition of tumor antigens and generation of an effector anti-tumor response; and (v) persistence of the anti-tumor T cells. In an effort to understand whether the immune system plays a role in controlling ovarian cancer, our group and others demonstrated that the presence of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) is associated with improved clinical outcome in ovarian cancer patients. Recently, we hypothesized that the quality of infiltrating T cells could also be a critical determinant of outcome in ovarian cancer patients. In the past decade, several immune-based interventions have gained regulatory approval in many solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. These interventions include immune checkpoint blockade, cancer vaccines, and adoptive cell therapy. There are currently no approved immune therapies for ovarian cancer. Immunotherapy in ovarian cancer will have to consider the immune suppressive networks within the ovarian tumor microenvironment; therefore, a major direction is to develop biomarkers that would predict responsiveness to different types of immunotherapies, and allow for treatment selection based on the results. Moreover, such biomarkers would allow rational combination of immunotherapies, while minimizing toxicities. In this review, the current understanding of the host immune response in ovarian cancer patients will be briefly reviewed, progress in immune therapies, and future directions for exploiting immune based strategies for long lasting durable cure. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford

  13. MARCH5 RNA promotes autophagy, migration, and invasion of ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianguo; Meng, Ying; Zhang, Zhanqin; Yan, Qiuting; Jiang, Xingwei; Lv, Zilan; Hu, Lina

    2017-02-01

    MARCH5 is a crucial regulator of mitochondrial fission. However, the expression and function of MARCH5 in ovarian cancer have not been determined. This study investigated the expression and function of MARCH5 in ovarian cancer with respect to its potential role in the tumorigenesis of the disease as well as its usefulness as an early diagnostic marker. We found that the expression of MARCH5 was substantially upregulated in ovarian cancer tissue in comparison with the normal control. Silencing MARCH5 in SKOV3 cells decreased TGFB1-induced cell macroautophagy/autophagy, migration, and invasion in vitro and in vivo, whereas the ectopic expression of MARCH5 in A2780 cells had the opposite effect. Mechanistic investigations revealed that MARCH5 RNA may function as a competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) to regulate the expression of SMAD2 and ATG5 by competing for MIR30A. Knocking down SMAD2 or ATG5 can block the effect of MARCH5 in A2780 cells. Also, silencing the expression of MARCH5 in SKOV3 cells can inhibit the TGFB1-SMAD2/3 pathway. In contrast, the ectopic expression of MARCH5 in A2780 cells can activate the TGFB1-SMAD2/3 pathway. In turn, the TGFB1-SMAD2/3 pathway can regulate MARCH5 and ATG5 through MIR30A. Overall, the results of this study identified MARCH5 as a candidate oncogene in ovarian cancer and a potential target for ovarian cancer therapy.

  14. PG545 enhances anti-cancer activity of chemotherapy in ovarian models and increases surrogate biomarkers such as VEGF in preclinical and clinical plasma samples.

    PubMed

    Winterhoff, Boris; Freyer, Luisa; Hammond, Edward; Giri, Shailendra; Mondal, Susmita; Roy, Debarshi; Teoman, Attila; Mullany, Sally A; Hoffmann, Robert; von Bismarck, Antonia; Chien, Jeremy; Block, Matthew S; Millward, Michael; Bampton, Darryn; Dredge, Keith; Shridhar, Viji

    2015-05-01

    Despite the utility of antiangiogenic drugs in ovarian cancer, efficacy remains limited due to resistance linked to alternate angiogenic pathways and metastasis. Therefore, we investigated PG545, an anti-angiogenic and anti-metastatic agent which is currently in Phase I clinical trials, using preclinical models of ovarian cancer. PG545's anti-cancer activity was investigated in vitro and in vivo as a single agent, and in combination with paclitaxel, cisplatin or carboplatin using various ovarian cancer cell lines and tumour models. PG545, alone, or in combination with chemotherapeutics, inhibited proliferation of ovarian cancer cells, demonstrating synergy with paclitaxel in A2780 cells. PG545 inhibited growth factor-mediated cell migration and reduced HB-EGF-induced phosphorylation of ERK, AKT and EGFR in vitro and significantly reduced tumour burden which was enhanced when combined with paclitaxel in an A2780 model or carboplatin in a SKOV-3 model. Moreover, in the immunocompetent ID8 model, PG545 also significantly reduced ascites in vivo. In the A2780 maintenance model, PG545 initiated with, and following paclitaxel and cisplatin treatment, significantly improved overall survival. PG545 increased plasma VEGF levels (and other targets) in preclinical models and in a small cohort of advanced cancer patients which might represent a potential biomarker of response. Our results support clinical testing of PG545, particularly in combination with paclitaxel, as a novel therapeutic strategy for ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ovarian cancer statistics, 2018.

    PubMed

    Torre, Lindsey A; Trabert, Britton; DeSantis, Carol E; Miller, Kimberly D; Samimi, Goli; Runowicz, Carolyn D; Gaudet, Mia M; Jemal, Ahmedin; Siegel, Rebecca L

    2018-05-29

    In 2018, there will be approximately 22,240 new cases of ovarian cancer diagnosed and 14,070 ovarian cancer deaths in the United States. Herein, the American Cancer Society provides an overview of ovarian cancer occurrence based on incidence data from nationwide population-based cancer registries and mortality data from the National Center for Health Statistics. The status of early detection strategies is also reviewed. In the United States, the overall ovarian cancer incidence rate declined from 1985 (16.6 per 100,000) to 2014 (11.8 per 100,000) by 29% and the mortality rate declined between 1976 (10.0 per 100,000) and 2015 (6.7 per 100,000) by 33%. Ovarian cancer encompasses a heterogenous group of malignancies that vary in etiology, molecular biology, and numerous other characteristics. Ninety percent of ovarian cancers are epithelial, the most common being serous carcinoma, for which incidence is highest in non-Hispanic whites (NHWs) (5.2 per 100,000) and lowest in non-Hispanic blacks (NHBs) and Asians/Pacific Islanders (APIs) (3.4 per 100,000). Notably, however, APIs have the highest incidence of endometrioid and clear cell carcinomas, which occur at younger ages and help explain comparable epithelial cancer incidence for APIs and NHWs younger than 55 years. Most serous carcinomas are diagnosed at stage III (51%) or IV (29%), for which the 5-year cause-specific survival for patients diagnosed during 2007 through 2013 was 42% and 26%, respectively. For all stages of epithelial cancer combined, 5-year survival is highest in APIs (57%) and lowest in NHBs (35%), who have the lowest survival for almost every stage of diagnosis across cancer subtypes. Moreover, survival has plateaued in NHBs for decades despite increasing in NHWs, from 40% for cases diagnosed during 1992 through 1994 to 47% during 2007 through 2013. Progress in reducing ovarian cancer incidence and mortality can be accelerated by reducing racial disparities and furthering knowledge of etiology and

  16. Development of EGFR Targeted Nanoemulsion for Imaging and Novel Platinum Therapy of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ganta, Srinivas; Singh, Amit; Patel, Niravkumar R.; Cacaccio, Joseph; Rawal, Yashesh H.; Davis, Barbara J.; Amiji, Mansoor M.; Coleman, Timothy P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Platinum-based chemotherapy is the treatment of choice for malignant epithelial ovarian cancers, but generalized toxicity and platinum resistance limits its use. Theranostic nanoemulsion with a novel platinum prodrug, myrisplatin, and the pro-apoptotic agent, C6-ceramide, were designed to overcome these limitations. Methods The nanoemulsions, including ones with an EGFR binding peptide and gadolinium, were made using generally regarded as safe grade excipients and a high shear microfluidization process. Efficacy was evaluated in ovarian cancer cells, SKOV3, A2780 and A2780CP. Results The nanoemulsion with particle size <150 nm were stable in plasma and parenteral fluids for 24 h. Ovarian cancer cells in vitro efficiently took up the non-targeted and EGFR-targeted nanoemulsions; improved cytotoxicity was observed for the these nanoemulsions with the latter showing a 50-fold drop in the IC50 in SKOV3 cells as compared to cisplatin alone. The addition of gadolinium did not affect cell viability in vitro, but showed relaxation times comparable to Magnevist®. Conclusion The myrisplatin/C6-ceramide nanoemulsion synergistically enhanced in vitro cytotoxicity. An EGFR binding peptide addition further increased in vitro cytotoxicity in EGFR positive cancer cells. The diagnostic version showed MR imaging similar to the clinically relevant Magnevist® and may be suitable as a theranostic for ovarian cancer. PMID:24643932

  17. Anti-tumor effects of osthole on ovarian cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guoqiang; Liu, Jia; Ren, Baoyin; Tang, Yawei; Owusu, Lawrence; Li, Man; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Likun; Li, Weiling

    2016-12-04

    Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cusson is a commonly used traditional Chinese medicine to treat gynecological disease in some countries. Osthole, an active O-methylated coumadin isolated from Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cusson, has been shown to induce various beneficial biochemical effects such as anti-seizure and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the anti-tumor mechanism of osthole is not well known. Here, we show that osthole inhibited the proliferation and migration of two widely used ovarian cancer cell lines, A2780 and OV2008 cells, in a dose-dependent manner. The study investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying ovarian cancer cells proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and migration triggered by osthole. Ovarian cancer cell lines A2780, OV2008 and normal ovarian cell line IOSE80 were used as experimental model. MTT assay was employed to evaluate cell viability. Flow cytometry assays were performed to confirm apoptosis and cell cycle. We employed wound healing and transwell assays to delineate invasive and migratory potential triggered by osthole. MTT assays indicated that cell viability significantly decreased in ovarian cancer cells treated with osthole without effect on normal ovarian cells. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that osthole suppressed cells proliferation by promoting G2/M arrest and inducing apoptosis. The underlying mechanisms involved were regulation of the relative apoptotic protein Bcl-2, Bax and Caspase 3/9. In addition, wound healing and transwell assays revealed that the migratory potential and activity of matrix metalloproteinase MMP-2 and MMP-9 were markedly inhibited when cells were exposed to osthole. Our findings suggested that osthole has the potential to be used in novel anti-cancer therapeutic formulations for ovarian cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Functional Significance of VEGFR-2 on Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Spannuth, Whitney A.; Nick, Alpa M.; Jennings, Nicholas B.; Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo N.; Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Danes, Christopher G.; Lin, Yvonne G.; Merritt, William M.; Thaker, Premal H.; Kamat, Aparna A.; Han, Liz Y.; Tonra, James R.; Coleman, Robert L.; Ellis, Lee M.; Sood, Anil K.

    2009-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) has recently been discovered on ovarian cancer cells, but its functional significance is unknown and is the focus of the current study. By protein analysis, A2780-par and HeyA8 ovarian cancer cell lines expressed VEGFR-1 and HeyA8 and SKOV3ip1 expressed VEGFR-2. By in situ hybridization (ISH), 85% of human ovarian cancer specimens showed moderate to high VEGFR-2 expression while only 15% showed moderate to high VEGFR-1 expression. By immunofluorescence, little or no VEGFR-2 was detected in normal ovarian surface epithelial cells, whereas expression was detected in 75% of invasive ovarian cancer specimens. To differentiate between the effects of tumor versus host expression of VEGFR, nude mice were injected with SKOV3ip1 cells and treated with either human VEGFR-2 specific antibody (1121B), murine VEGFR-2 specific antibody (DC101), or the combination. Treatment with 1121B reduced SKOV3ip1 cell migration by 68% (p < 0.01) and invasion by 72% (p < 0.01), but exposure to VEGFR-1 antibody had no effect. Treatment with 1121B effectively blocked VEGF-induced phosphorylation of p130Cas. In vivo, treatment with either DC101 or 1121B significantly reduced tumor growth alone and in combination in the SKOV3ip1 and A2774 models. Decreased tumor burden after treatment with DC101 or 1121B correlated with increased tumor cell apoptosis, decreased proliferative index, and decreased microvessel density. These effects were significantly greater in the combination group (p<0.001). We show functionally active VEGFR-2 is present on most ovarian cancer cells. The observed anti-tumor activity of VEGF-targeted therapies may be mediated by both anti-angiogenic and direct anti-tumor effects. PMID:19058181

  19. Denileukin Diftitox Used in Treating Patients With Advanced Refractory Ovarian Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma, or Epithelial Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-05-01

    Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  20. Towards prevention of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Ali, Aus Tariq

    2018-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death of all gynaecological cancers. To date, there is no reliable, specific screening procedure for detecting ovarian cancer. The risk factors of ovarian cancer include modifiable and non-modifiable factors. The main goal of the ovarian cancer prevention program is to significantly reduce the risk of development of ovarian cancer and other cancers such as breast and/or peritoneal cancer. The application of non-surgical preventive approaches such as oral contraceptives, parity and breastfeeding has been shown to be highly protective against ovarian cancer development. Targeting inflammation has been also reported to be associated with a protective trend against ovarian cancer and can be achieved through either non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin or lifestyle modifications or both. Lifestyle modification that includes regular exercise, healthy diet supplemented with anti-oxidants and anti-inflammatory elements reduces the risk of the disease even further. Surgical protective approaches include; tubal ligation, hysterectomy and prophylactic bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and the former is the most effective approach to protect against ovarian cancer. A better understanding of the risk factors of ovarian cancer and the current approaches to prevent it may increase the awareness and help to decrease the incidence of ovarian cancer, increase the five-year survival rate and decrease the mortality rate significantly in the general population especially among those at high risk for ovarian cancer. This review is an attempt to outline a potential program of ovarian cancer prevention and the potential challenges. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. NOXA-Induced Alterations in the Bax/Smac Axis Enhance Sensitivity of Ovarian Cancer Cells to Cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chao; Zhao, Xin-yu; Li, Lei; Liu, Huan-yi; Cao, Kang; Wan, Yang; Liu, Xin-yu; Nie, Chun-lai; Liu, Lei; Tong, Ai-ping; Deng, Hong-xin; Li, Jiong; Yuan, Zhu; Wei, Yu-quan

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of death from gynecologic malignancy. Deregulation of p53 and/or p73-associated apoptotic pathways contribute to the platinum-based resistance in ovarian cancer. NOXA, a pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein, is identified as a transcription target of p53 and/or p73. In this study, we found that genetic variants of Bcl-2 proteins exist among cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant ovarian cancer cells, and the responses of NOXA and Bax to cisplatin are regulated mainly by p53. We further evaluated the effect of NOXA on cisplatin. NOXA induced apoptosis and sensitized A2780s and SKOV3 cells to cisplatin in vitro and in vivo. The effects were mediated by elevated Bax expression, enhanced caspase activation, release of Cyt C and Smac into the cytosol. Furthermore, gene silencing of Bax or Smac significantly attenuated NOXA and/or cisplatin-induced apoptosis in chemosensitive A2780s cells, whereas overexpression of Bax or addition of Smac-N7 peptide significantly increased NOXA and/or cisplatin-induced apoptosis in chemoresistant SKOV3 cells. To our knowledge, these data suggest a new mechanism by which NOXA chemosensitized ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin by inducing alterations in the Bax/Smac axis. Taken together, our findings show that NOXA is potentially useful as a chemosensitizer in ovarian cancer therapy. PMID:22590594

  2. EDD enhances cell survival and cisplatin resistance and is a therapeutic target for epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Amber; Zheng, Hui; Eblen, Scott T.

    2014-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase EDD is overexpressed in recurrent, platinum-resistant ovarian cancers, suggesting a role in tumor survival and/or platinum resistance. EDD knockdown by small interfering RNA (siRNA) induced apoptosis in A2780ip2, OVCAR5 and ES-2 ovarian cancer cells, correlating with loss of the prosurvival protein myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 (Mcl-1) through a glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta-independent mechanism. SiRNA to EDD or Mcl-1 induced comparable levels of apoptosis in A2780ip2 and ES-2 cells. Stable overexpression of Mcl-1 protected cells from apoptosis following EDD knockdown, accompanied by a loss of endogenous, but not exogenous, Mcl-1 protein, suggesting that EDD regulated Mcl-1 synthesis. Indeed, EDD knockdown induced a 1.87-fold decrease in Mcl-1 messenger RNA and EDD transfection enhanced murine Mcl-1 promoter-driven luciferase expression 5-fold. To separate EDD survival and potential cisplatin resistance functions, we generated EDD shRNA stable cell lines that could survive initial EDD knockdown and showed that these cells were 4- to 21-fold more sensitive to cisplatin. Moreover, transient EDD overexpression in COS-7 cells was sufficient to promote cisplatin resistance 2.4-fold, dependent upon its E3 ligase activity. In vivo, mouse intraperitoneal ES-2 and A2780ip2 xenograft experiments showed that mice treated with EDD siRNA by nanoliposomal delivery [1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phophatidylcholine (DOPC)] and cisplatin had significantly less tumor burden than those treated with control siRNA/DOPC alone (ES-2, 77.9% reduction, P = 0.004; A2780ip2, 75.9% reduction, P = 0.042) or control siRNA/DOPC with cisplatin in ES-2 (64.4% reduction, P = 0.035), with a trend in A2780ip2 (60.3% reduction, P = 0.168). These results identify EDD as a dual regulator of cell survival and cisplatin resistance and suggest that EDD is a therapeutic target for ovarian cancer. PMID:24379240

  3. MT-4 suppresses resistant ovarian cancer growth through targeting tubulin and HSP27.

    PubMed

    Pai, Hui Chen; Kumar, Sunil; Shen, Chien-Chang; Liou, Jing Ping; Pan, Shiow Lin; Teng, Che Ming

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the anticancer mechanisms of MT-4 were examined in A2780 and multidrug-resistant NCI-ADR/res human ovarian cancer cell lines. To evaluate the activity of MT-4, we performed in vitro cell viability and cell cycle assays and in vivo xenograft assays. Immunoblotting analysis was carried out to evaluate the effect of MT-4 on ovarian cancer. Tubulin polymerization was determined using a tubulin binding assay. MT-4 (2-Methoxy-5-[2-(3,4,5-trimethoxy-phenyl)-ethyl]-phenol), a derivative of moscatilin, can inhibit both sensitive A2780 and multidrug-resistant NCI-ADR/res cell growth and viability. MT-4 inhibited tubulin polymerization to induce G2/M arrest followed by caspase-mediated apoptosis. Further studies indicated that MT-4 is not a substrate of P-glycoprotein (p-gp). MT-4 also caused G2/M cell cycle arrest, accompanied by the upregulation of cyclin B, p-Thr161 Cdc2/p34, polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), Aurora kinase B, and phospho-Ser10-histone H3 protein levels. In addition, we found that p38 MAPK pathway activation was involved in MT-4-induced apoptosis. Most importantly, MT-4 also decreased heat shock protein 27 expression and reduced its interaction with caspase-3, which inured cancer cells to chemotherapy resistance. Treatment of cells with SB203580 or overexpression of dominant negative (DN)-p38 or wild-type HSP27 reduced PARP cleavage caused by MT-4. MT-4 induced apoptosis through regulation of p38 and HSP27. Our xenograft models also show the in vivo efficacy of MT-4. MT-4 inhibited both A2780 and NCI-ADR/res cell growth in vitro and in vivo. These findings indicate that MT-4 could be a potential lead compound for the treatment of multidrug-resistant ovarian cancer.

  4. MicroRNA-133b targets glutathione S-transferase π expression to increase ovarian cancer cell sensitivity to chemotherapy drugs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuo; Jiao, Jin-Wen; Sun, Kai-Xuan; Zong, Zhi-Hong; Zhao, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating studies reveal that aberrant microRNA (miRNA) expression can affect the development of chemotherapy drug resistance by modulating the expression of relevant target proteins. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of miR-133b in the development of drug resistance in ovarian cancer cells. We examined the levels of miR-133b expression in ovarian carcinoma tissues and the human ovarian carcinoma cell lines (A2780, A2780/DDP and A2780/Taxol, respectively). We determined the cell viability of these cell lines treated with cisplatin or paclitaxel in the presence or absence of miR-133b or anti-miR-133b transfection using the MTT assay. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting were used to assess the mRNA and protein expression levels of two drug-resistance-related genes: glutathione S-transferase (GST)-π and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1). The dual-luciferase reporter assay was used to detect the promoter activity of GST-π in the presence and absence of miR-133b. The expression of miR-133b was significantly lower in primary resistant ovarian carcinomas than in the chemotherapy-sensitive carcinomas (P<0.05), and the same results were found in primary resistant ovarian cell lines (A2780/Taxol and A2780/DDP) compared to the chemotherapy-sensitive cell line (A2780; P<0.05). Following miR-133b transfection, four cell lines showed increased sensitivity to paclitaxel and cisplatin, while anti-miR-133b transfection reduced cell sensitivity to paclitaxel and cisplatin. Dual-luciferase reporter assay showed that miR-133b interacted with the 3'-untranslated region of GST-π. Compared to controls, the mRNA and protein levels of MDR1 and GST-π were downregulated after miR-133b transfection and upregulated after anti-miR-133b transfection. MicroRNA-133b may reduce ovarian cancer drug resistance by silencing the expression of the drug-resistance-related proteins, GST-π and MDR1. In future, the combination of miR-133b with

  5. Metformin attenuates ovarian cancer cell growth in an AMP-kinase dispensable manner

    PubMed Central

    Rattan, R; Giri, S; Hartmann, LC; Shridhar, V

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Metformin, the most widely used drug for type 2 diabetes activates 59 adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which regulates cellular energy metabolism. Here, we report that ovarian cell lines VOSE, A2780, CP70, C200, OV202, OVCAR3, SKOV3ip, PE01 and PE04 predominantly express -α1, -β1, -γ1 and -γ2 isoforms of AMPK subunits. Our studies show that metformin treatment (1) significantly inhibited proliferation of diverse chemo-responsive and -resistant ovarian cancer cell lines (A2780, CP70, C200, OV202, OVCAR3, SKVO3ip, PE01 and PE04), (2) caused cell cycle arrest accompanied by decreased cyclin D1 and increased p21 protein expression, (3) activated AMPK in various ovarian cancer cell lines as evident from increased phosphorylation of AMPKα and its downstream substrate; acetyl co-carboxylase (ACC) and enhanced β-oxidation of fatty acid and (4) attenuated mTOR-S6RP phosphorylation, inhibited protein translational and lipid biosynthetic pathways, thus implicating metformin as a growth inhibitor of ovarian cancer cells. We also show that metformin-mediated effect on AMPK is dependent on liver kinase B1 (LKB1) as it failed to activate AMPK-ACC pathway and cell cycle arrest in LKB1 null mouse embryo fibroblasts (mefs). This observation was further supported by using siRNA approach to down-regulate LKB1 in ovarian cancer cells. In contrast, met formin inhibited cell proliferation in both wild-type and AMPKα1/2 null mefs as well as in AMPK silenced ovarian cancer cells. Collectively, these results provide evidence on the role of metformin as an anti-proliferative therapeutic that can act through both AMPK-dependent as well as AMPK-independent pathways. PMID:19874425

  6. Sequential combination therapy of ovarian cancer with cisplatin and γ-secretase inhibitor MK-0752.

    PubMed

    Chen, XiuXiu; Gong, LiHua; Ou, RongYing; Zheng, ZhenZhen; Chen, JinYan; Xie, FengFeng; Huang, XiaoXiu; Qiu, JianGe; Zhang, WenJi; Jiang, QiWei; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Hua; Shi, Zhi; Yan, XiaoJian

    2016-03-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the most lethal of women cancers and lack potent therapeutic options. There have many evidences demonstrate the Notch signaling has deregulation in variety of human malignancies.MK-0752 is a novel potent γ-secretase inhibitor and now assessed in clinical trial for treatment of several types of cancer, our objective was to investigate the anticancer effects and mechanisms of MK-0752 alone or combined with cisplatin in ovarian cancer. Cell lines used: A2780, OVCAR3, SKOV3, HO8910PM, the effects of MK-0752 and cisplatin on cell proliferation were measured by MTT assay. The effect of combination treatment was examined by isobologram analysis. The distribution of cell cycle and cell apoptosis were analyzed using PI and Annexin V-FITC/PI staining by flow cytometric analysis. The mechanism in biochemistry was analyzed by using Western blot. Mouse xenograft model of A2780 was established to observe the anti-ovarian cancer effects in vivo setting, nude mice were randomized into four groups (n=6 per group) and treated every 4 days with control (solvent) group, MK-0752(25mg/kg) group, cisplatin (2mg/kg)group, combination group (both of MK-0752 and cisplatin). MK-0752 alone actively induced cell growth inhibition, G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis with down-regulation of Notch1 and its downstream effectors including Hes1, XIAP, c-Myc and MDM2 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, sequential combination of cisplatin prior to MK-0752 significantly promoted cell apoptosis and inhibited the subcutaneous xenograft growth of ovarian cancer in nude mice. Our data supports the sequential combination of cisplatin prior to MK-0752 is a highly promising novel experimental therapeutic strategy against ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Epidemiology of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Webb, Penelope M; Jordan, Susan J

    2017-05-01

    Globally, ovarian cancer is the seventh most common cancer in women and the eighth most common cause of cancer death, with five-year survival rates below 45%. Although age-standardised rates are stable or falling in most high-income countries, they are rising in many low and middle income countries. Furthermore, with increasing life-expectancy, the number of cases diagnosed each year is increasing. To control ovarian cancer we need to understand the causes. This will allow better prediction of those at greatest risk for whom screening might be appropriate, while identification of potentially modifable causes provides an opportunity for intervention to reduce rates. In this paper we will summarise the current state of knowledge regarding the known and possible causes of epithelial ovarian cancer and discuss some of the main theories of ovarian carcinogenesis. We will also briefly review the relationship between lifestyle and survival after a diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Intravital Microscopy in Evaluating Patients With Primary Peritoneal, Fallopian Tube, or Stage IA-IV Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-06-20

    Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer

  9. Combination Chemotherapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Stage III Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-08

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  10. Oncolytic virotherapy for ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shoudong; Tong, Jessica; Rahman, Masmudur M; Shepherd, Trevor G; McFadden, Grant

    2012-01-01

    In the past two decades, more than 20 viruses with selective tropism for tumor cells have been developed as oncolytic viruses (OVs) for treatments of a variety of malignancies. Of these viruses, eleven have been tested in human ovarian cancer models in preclinical studies. So far, nine phase I or II clinical trials have been conducted or initiated using four different types of OVs in patients with recurrent ovarian cancers. In this article, we summarize the different OVs that are being assessed as therapeutics for ovarian cancer. We also present an overview of recent advances in identification of key genetic or immune-response pathways involved in tumorigenesis of ovarian cancer, which provides a better understanding of the tumor specificities and oncolytic properties of OVs. In addition, we discuss how next-generation OVs could be genetically modified or integrated into multimodality regimens to improve clinical outcomes based on recent advances in ovarian cancer biology. PMID:25977900

  11. Fertility drugs and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Ali, Aus Tariq

    2017-06-20

    The aetiology of ovarian cancer is multifactorial with both endogenous and exogenous risk factors playing an important role. The exact pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is still not well understood, despite the number of hypotheses published. Due to an increase in the number of women using fertility drugs, much attention has been focused on the long-term health effects of such drugs. Although fertility drugs facilitate the ovulation process, it is however associated with a significant increase in hormone concentrations, placing exposed women at increased risk of gynaecological cancer. Many clinical and epidemiological studies have examined the association between fertility drugs and ovarian cancer risk. Results from these studies have been contradictory, as some studies have reported an increased risk of ovarian cancer while others reported no increased risk. Nevertheless, recent studies have shown that women who used fertility drugs and did not conceive had a higher risk of developing ovarian cancer, compared to women who used fertility drugs and conceived and delivered successfully. This review discusses the effect of fertility drugs on the risk of developing ovarian cancer, providing details on four possible scenarios associated with fertility treatment. In addition, the limitations of previous studies and their impact on our understanding of the association between fertility drugs and ovarian cancer also have been highlighted. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Silymarin induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Li; Ma, Yalin; Liu, Ying; Zheng, Dongping; Huang, Guangrong

    2014-11-15

    The polyphenolic flavonoid silymarin that is the milk thistle extract has been found to possess an anti-cancer effect against various human epithelial cancers. In this study, to explore the regulative effect of silymarin on human ovarian cancer line A2780s and PA-1 cells, 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and flow cytometry were respectively used to determine the inhibitory effect of silymarin on the both cell lines, and to measure their cell cycle progression. Apoptosis induction and mitochondrial membrane potential damage were separately detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated 2'-deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate nick end labeling assay and 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolylcarbocyanine iodide staining. Additionally, western blotting was applied to determine cytochrome C release and expression levels of p53, p21, p27, p16, CDK2, Bax, Bcl-2, procaspase-9, procaspase-3, cleaved caspase-9 and caspase-3 proteins. The activity of caspase-9 and caspase-3 was measured using Caspase-Glo-9 and Caspase-Glo-3 assay. The results indicated that silymarin effectively suppressed cell growth in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and arrested cell cycle progression at G1/S phase in A2780s and PA-1 cells via up-regulation of p53, p21, and p27 protein expression, and down-regulation of CDK2 protein expression. Additionally, silymarin treatment for 24h at 50 and 100µg/ml resulted in a reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome C release, and significantly induced apoptosis in A2780s and PA-1 cells by increasing Bax and decreasing Bcl-2 protein expression, and activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Therefore, silymarin is a possible potential candidate for the prevention and treatment of ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Polyglutamate Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial, Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-07

    Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  14. Targeting Aurora Kinase with MK-0457 Inhibits Ovarian Cancer Growth

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yvonne G.; Immaneni, Anand; Merritt, William M.; Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Kim, SeungWook; Shahzad, Mian M.K.; Tsang, Yvonne T.M.; Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo N.; Lu, Chunhua; Kamat, Aparna A.; Han, Liz Y.; Spannuth, WhitneyA.; Nick, Alpa M.; Landen, Charles N.; Wong, Kwong K.; Gray, Michael J.; Coleman, Robert L.; Bodurka, Diane C.; Brinkley, William R.; Sood, Anil K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The Aurora kinase family plays pivotal roles in mitotic integrity and cell cycle.We sought to determine the effects of inhibiting Aurora kinase on ovarian cancer growth in an orthotopic mouse model using a small molecule pan-Aurora kinase inhibitor, MK-0457. Experimental Design We examined cell cycle regulatory effects and ascertained the therapeutic efficacy of Aurora kinase inhibition both alone and combined with docetaxel using both in vitro and in vivo ovarian cancer models. Results In vitro cytotoxicity assays with HeyA8 and SKOV3ip1 cells revealed >10-fold greater docetaxel cytotoxicity in combination with MK-0457. After in vivo dose kinetics were determined using phospho-histone H3 status, therapy experiments with the chemosensitive HeyA8 and SKOV3ip1as well as the chemoresistant HeyA8-MDR and A2780-CP20 models showed that Aurora kinase inhibition alone significantly reduced tumor burden compared with controls (P values < 0.01). Combination treatment with docetaxel resulted in significantly improved reduction in tumor growth beyond that afforded by docetaxel alone (P ≤ 0.03). Proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunohistochemistry revealed that MK-0457 alone and in combination with docetaxel significantly reduced cellular proliferation (P values < 0.001). Compared with controls, treatment with MK-0457 alone and in combination with docetaxel also significantly increased tumor cell apoptosis by ∼3-fold (P < 0.01). Remarkably, compared with docetaxel monotherapy, MK-0457 combined with docetaxel resulted in significantly increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions Aurora kinase inhibition significantly reduces tumor burden and cell proliferation and increases tumor cell apoptosis in this preclinical orthotopic model of ovarian cancer. The role of Aurora kinase inhibition in ovarian cancer merits further investigation in clinical trials. PMID:18765535

  15. Anti-tumor and Anti-angiogenic Effects of Aspirin-PC in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Lichtenberger, Lenard M.; Taylor, Morgan; Bottsford-Miller, Justin N.; Haemmerle, Monika; Wagner, Michael J.; Lyons, Yasmin; Pradeep, Sunila; Hu, Wei; Previs, Rebecca A.; Hansen, Jean M.; Fang, Dexing; Dorniak, Piotr L.; Filant, Justyna; Dial, Elizabeth J.; Shen, Fangrong; Hatakeyama, Hiroto; Sood, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of a novel and safer (for gastrointestinal tract) aspirin (aspirin-PC) in preclinical models of ovarian cancer, in vitro dose-response studies were performed to compare the growth-inhibitory effect of aspirin-PC vs. aspirin on 3 human (A2780, SKOV3ip1, HeyA8), and a mouse (ID8) ovarian cancer cell line over an 8-day culture period. In the in vivo studies, the aspirin test drugs were studied alone and in the presence of a VEGF-A inhibitor (bevacizumab or B20), due to an emerging role for platelets in tumor growth following anti-angiogenic therapy, and we examined their underlying mechanisms. Aspirin-PC was more potent (vs. aspirin) in blocking the growth of both human and mouse ovarian cancer cells in monolayer culture. Using in vivo model systems of ovarian cancer, we found that aspirin-PC significantly reduced ovarian cancer growth by 50–90% (depending on the ovarian cell line/density). The efficacy was further enhanced in combination with Bevacizumab or B20. The growth-inhibitory effect on ovarian tumor mass and number of tumor nodules was evident, but less pronounced for aspirin and the VEGF inhibitors alone. There was no detectable gastrointestinal toxicity. Both aspirin and aspirin-PC also inhibited cell proliferation, angiogenesis and increased apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells. In conclusion, PC-associated aspirin markedly inhibits the growth of ovarian cancer cells, which exceeds that of the parent drug, in both cell culture and in mouse model systems. We also found that both aspirin-PC and aspirin have robust anti-neoplastic action in the presence of VEGF blocking drugs. PMID:27638860

  16. MicroRNA-873 mediates multidrug resistance in ovarian cancer cells by targeting ABCB1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di-di; Li, Xue-Song; Meng, Xiao-Na; Yan, Jing; Zong, Zhi-Hong

    2016-08-01

    Ovarian cancer is commonly treated with cisplatin and paclitaxel combination chemotherapy; however, ovarian cancer cells often develop resistance to these drugs. Increasingly, microRNAs (miRNAs) including miR-873 have been implicated in drug resistance in many cancers, but the role of miR-873 in ovarian cancer remains unknown. MTT cell viability assays revealed that the sensitivities of ovarian cancer lines to cisplatin and paclitaxel increased following transfection with miR-873 (P < 0.05). After predicting the miR-873 binding region in the 3'-untranslated region of ABCB1, dual-luciferase reporter assay confirmed this prediction. RT-PCR and Western blotting revealed that MDR1 expression was significantly downregulated after transfection with miR-873 and upregulated after transfection with anti-miR-873 at both mRNA and protein levels compared to negative controls (P < 0.05). Experiments in a mouse xenograft model confirmed that intratumoral administration of miR-873 could enhance the efficacy of cisplatin in inhibiting tumor growth in ovarian cancer in vivo (P < 0.05). ABCB1 overexpression reduced sensitivities of ovarian cancer lines OVCAR3 and A2780 to cisplatin and paclitaxel, which can be reversed by miR-873 mimic transfection (P < 0.05). In summary, we demonstrated that overexpression of miR-873 increased the sensitivity of ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin and paclitaxel by targeting MDR1 expression. Our findings suggest that combination therapies with chemotherapy agents and miR-873 may suppress drug resistance in ovarian cancer.

  17. Hepatitis B X-interacting protein promotes cisplatin resistance and regulates CD147 via Sp1 in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wei; Ma, Xiangdong; Yang, Hong; Hua, Wei; Chen, Biliang; Cai, Guoqing

    2017-03-01

    Ovarian cancer is the highest mortality rate of all female reproductive malignancies. Drug resistance is a major cause of treatment failure in malignant tumors. Hepatitis B X-interacting protein acts as an oncoprotein, regulates cell proliferation, and migration in breast cancer. We aimed to investigate the effects and mechanisms of hepatitis B X-interacting protein on resistance to cisplatin in human ovarian cancer cell lines. The mRNA and protein levels of hepatitis B X-interacting protein were detected using RT-PCR and Western blotting in cisplatin-resistant and cisplatin-sensitive tissues, cisplatin-resistant cell lines A2780/CP and SKOV3/CP, and cisplatin-sensitive cell lines A2780 and SKOV3. Cell viability and apoptosis were measured to evaluate cellular sensitivity to cisplatin in A2780/CP cells. Luciferase reporter gene assay was used to determine the relationship between hepatitis B X-interacting protein and CD147. The in vivo function of hepatitis B X-interacting protein on tumor burden was assessed in cisplatin-resistant xenograft models. The results showed that hepatitis B X-interacting protein was highly expressed in ovarian cancer of cisplatin-resistant tissues and cells. Notably, knockdown of hepatitis B X-interacting protein significantly reduced cell viability in A2780/CP compared with cisplatin treatment alone. Hepatitis B X-interacting protein and cisplatin cooperated to induce apoptosis and increase the expression of c-caspase 3 as well as the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. We confirmed that hepatitis B X-interacting protein up-regulated CD147 at the protein expression and transcriptional levels. Moreover, we found that hepatitis B X-interacting protein was able to activate the CD147 promoter through Sp1. In vivo, depletion of hepatitis B X-interacting protein decreased the tumor volume and weight induced by cisplatin. Taken together, these results indicate that hepatitis B X-interacting protein promotes cisplatin resistance and regulated CD147 via Sp1 in

  18. Misstaging of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    McGowan, L; Lesher, L P; Norris, H J; Barnett, M

    1985-04-01

    The thoroughness of intraoperative evaluation of the extent of disease in 291 women with primary ovarian cancer was investigated. Notable differences among physician specialties but not types of hospitals where initial surgery was performed were observed. A review of medical record documentation revealed that 97% of the cases operated on by gynecologic oncologists had complete staging evaluations performed intraoperatively, but only 52 and 35% of cases operated on by obstetricians/gynecologists and general surgeons, respectfully, were adequately evaluated. Roughly one-half of the cases diagnosed in community hospitals and in hospitals with teaching affiliations were found to be completely studied, and 66% of those operated on in university hospitals received complete intraoperative evaluations.

  19. Genetic Modifiers of Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    samples from many countries. To account for population stratification, the genotyping data in combination with HapMap data (CEU, Yoruban, Han Chinese...Cambridge, we evaluated associations with both breast and ovarian cancer using a retrospective likelihood model. This accounts for the age extremes of...carriers we used a competing risk analysis that accounted for the effects on breast and ovarian cancer in parallel. In this competing risk analysis

  20. Synergistic efficacy in human ovarian cancer cells by histone deacetylase inhibitor TSA and proteasome inhibitor PS-341.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yong; Hu, Yi; Wu, Peng; Wang, Beibei; Tian, Yuan; Xia, Xi; Zhang, Qinghua; Chen, Tong; Jiang, Xuefeng; Ma, Quanfu; Xu, Gang; Wang, Shixuan; Zhou, Jianfeng; Ma, Ding; Meng, Li

    2011-05-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors and proteasome inhibitor are all emerging as new classes of anticancer agents. We chose TSA and PS-341 to identify whether they have a synergistic efficacy on human ovarian cancer cells. After incubated with 500 nM TSA or/and 40 nM PS-341, we found that combined groups resulted in a striking increase of apoptosis and G2/M blocking rates, no matter in A2780, cisplatin-sensitive ovarian cancer cell line OV2008 or its resistant variant C13*. This demonstrated that TSA interacted synergistically with PS-341, which raised the possibility that combined the two drugs may represent a novel strategy in ovarian cancer.

  1. Effect of estradiol on the expression of angiogenic factors in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Valladares, Macarena; Plaza-Parrochia, Francisca; Lépez, Macarena; López, Daniela; Gabler, Fernando; Gayan, Patricio; Selman, Alberto; Vega, Margarita; Romero, Carmen

    2017-11-01

    Ovarian cancer presents a high angiogenesis (formation of new blood vessels) regulated by pro-angiogenic factors, mainly vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF). An association between endogenous levels of estrogen and increased risk of developing ovarian cancer has been reported. Estrogen action is mediated by the binding to its specific receptors (ERα and ERβ), altered ERα/ERβ ratio may constitute a marker of ovarian carcinogenesis progression. To determine the effect of estradiol through ERα on the expression of NGF and VEGF in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Levels of phosphorylated estrogen receptor alpha (pERα) were evaluated in well, moderate and poorly differentiated EOC samples (EOC-I, EOC-II, EOC-III). Additionally, ovarian cancer explants were stimulated with NGF (0, 10 and 100 ng/ml) and ERα, ERβ and pERα levels were detected. Finally, human ovarian surface epithelial (HOSE) and epithelial ovarian cancer (A2780) cell lines were stimulated with estradiol, where NGF and VEGF protein levels were evaluated. In tissues, ERs were detected being pERα levels significantly increased in EOC-III samples compared with EOC-I (p<0.05). Additionally, ovarian explants treated with NGF increased pERα levels meanwhile total ERα and ERβ levels did not change. Cell lines stimulated with estradiol revealed an increase of NGF and VEGF protein levels (p<0.05). Estradiol has a positive effect on pro-angiogenic factors such as NGF and VEGF expression in EOC, probably through the activation of ERα; generating a positive loop induced by NGF increasing pERα levels in epithelial ovarian cells.

  2. Survivorship Care Planning in Improving Quality of Life in Survivors of Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-27

    Cancer Survivor; Stage IA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  3. [Association between obesity and ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Valladares, Macarena; Corsini, Gino; Romero, Carmen

    2014-05-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for cancer. Epidemiological evidences associate ovarian cancer with obesity. Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most common type of ovarian cancer and accounts for a high rate of mortality. The association between ovarian cancer and obesity could be explained by molecular factors secreted by adipose tissue such as leptin. In EOC, leptin increases cell proliferation and inhibits apoptosis. Additionally, adipose tissue synthesizes endogenous estrogens, which increase cell proliferation of epithelial ovarian cells. Also, obesity associated hyperinsulinism could increase ovarian estrogen secretion.

  4. The role of topotecan for extending the platinum-free interval in recurrent ovarian cancer: an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Neil S; Hua, Jun; Gibb, Randall K; Mutch, David G; Herzog, Thomas J

    2004-07-01

    Topotecan, a novel topoisomerase-I inhibitor, is an active agent of second-line chemotherapy for extending the platinum-free interval (PFI) and improving the chances of a response to platinum in recurrent ovarian cancer patients. The aim of this study was to understand the molecular mechanism of topotecan-based second-line chemotherapy through an in vitro cell culture model and to gain clinical insight into sequencing issues for second-line treatment with novel agents versus retreatment with platinum. The human ovarian cancer cell line A2780 and the cisplatin resistance cell line A2780-CR were separately seeded in 6-well cell culture plates and then exposed to multiple concentrations of cisplatin plus paclitaxel or topotecan for 7 days. Surviving cells were recovered and cultured in drug-free media for 3 weeks and then replated in a 96-well microtiter plate. The LD(50) for these cells was determined by a cytotoxic MTT assay after exposure to multiple clinically relevant concentrations of cisplatin or topotecan. Surviving cells were cultured in drug-free media for an additional 4 weeks at which time the LD(50) was reassessed for each cell population by a second MTT assay. Using RT-PCR and Northern blot hybridization to measure mRNA expression, the molecular profile of these cells in terms of resistance was evaluated for the multidrug-resistant gene (MDR-1), multidrug-resistant protein (MRP), Topoisomerase-I, and beta-Actin. The LD(50) to cisplatin was unchanged in A2780-CR cells treated by topotecan. Those A2780-CR cells originally exposed to higher concentrations of cisplatin became more resistant to cisplatin in the MTT assays, while those A2780-CR cell lines treated with a combination of lower cisplatin concentrations and paclitaxel became more sensitive to cisplatin in the MTT assay (P < 0.01). The second MTT assay demonstrated that the LD(50) for cisplatin in every cell line decreased significantly after a 4-week drug-free interval (P < 0.01). There was no

  5. Overcoming chemotherapy resistance of ovarian cancer cells by liposomal cisplatin: molecular mechanisms unveiled by gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Koch, Martin; Krieger, Michaela L; Stölting, Daniel; Brenner, Norbert; Beier, Manfred; Jaehde, Ulrich; Wiese, Michael; Royer, Hans-Dieter; Bendas, Gerd

    2013-04-15

    Previously we reported that liposomal cisplatin (CDDP) overcomes CDDP resistance of ovarian A2780cis cancer cells (Krieger et al., Int. J. Pharm. 389, 2010, 10-17). Here we find that the cytotoxic activity of liposomal CDDP is not associated with detectable DNA platination in resistant ovarian cancer cells. This suggests that the mode of action of liposomal CDDP is different from the free drug. To gain insight into mechanisms of liposomal CDDP activity, we performed a transcriptome analysis of untreated A2780cis cells, and A2780cis cells in response to exposure with IC50 values of free or liposomal CDDP. A process network analysis of upregulated genes showed that liposomal CDDP induced a highly different gene expression profile in comparison to the free drug. p53 was identified as a key player directing transcriptional responses to free or liposomal CDDP. The free drug induced expression of essential genes of the intrinsic (mitochondrial) apoptosis pathway (BAX, BID, CASP9) most likely through p38MAPK activation. In contrast, liposomal CDDP induced expression of genes from DNA damage pathways and several genes of the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis (TNFRSF10B-DR5, CD70-TNFSF7). It thus appears that liposomal CDDP overcomes CDDP resistance by inducing DNA damage and in consequence programmed cell death by the extrinsic pathway. Predictions from gene expression data with respect to apoptosis activation were confirmed at the protein level by an apoptosis antibody array. This sheds new light on liposomal drug carrier approaches in cancer and suggests liposomal CDDP as promising strategy for the treatment of CDDP resistant ovarian carcinomas. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Tangeretin sensitizes cisplatin-resistant human ovarian cancer cells through downregulation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Arafa, El-Shaimaa A; Zhu, Qianzheng; Barakat, Bassant M; Wani, Gulzar; Zhao, Qun; El-Mahdy, Mohamed A; Wani, Altaf A

    2009-12-01

    Combination of innocuous dietary components with anticancer drugs is an emerging new strategy for cancer chemotherapy to increase antitumor responses. Tangeretin is a citrus flavonoid known to inhibit cancer cell proliferation. Here, we show an enhanced response of A2780/CP70 and 2008/C13 cisplatin-resistant human ovarian cancer cells to various combination treatments of cisplatin and tangeretin. Pretreatment of cells with tangeretin before cisplatin treatment synergistically inhibited cancer cell proliferation. This combination was effective in activating apoptosis via caspase cascade as well as arresting cell cycle at G(2)-M phase. Moreover, phospho-Akt and its downstream substrates, e.g., NF-kappaB, phospho-GSK-3beta, and phospho-BAD, were downregulated upon tangeretin-cisplatin treatment. The tangeretin-cisplatin-induced apoptosis in A2780/CP70 cells was increased by phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K) inhibition and siRNA-mediated Akt silencing, but reduced by overexpression of constitutively activated Akt and GSK-3beta inhibition. The overall results indicated that tangeretin exposure preconditions cisplatin-resistant human ovarian cancer cells for a conventional response to low-dose cisplatin-induced cell death occurring through downregulation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Thus, effectiveness of tangeretin combinations, as a promising modality in the treatment of resistant cancers, warrants systematic clinical studies.

  7. Global ovarian cancer health disparities

    PubMed Central

    Chornokur, Ganna; Amankwah, Ernest K.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Phelan, Catherine M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this article is to broadly review the scientific literature and summarize the most up-to-date findings on ovarian cancer health disparities worldwide and in the United States (U.S.). Methods The present literature on disparities in ovarian cancer was reviewed. Original research and relevant review articles were included. Results Ovarian cancer health disparities exist worldwide and in the U.S. Ovarian cancer disproportionately affect African American women at all stages of the disease, from presentation through treatment, and ultimately increased mortality and decreased survival, compared to non-Hispanic White women. Increased mortality is likely to be explained by unequal access to care and non-standard treatment regimens frequently administered to African American women, but may also be attributed to genetic susceptibility, acquired co-morbid conditions and increased frequency of modifiable risk factors, albeit to substantially lesser extent. Unequal access to care is, in turn, largely a consequence of lower socioeconomic status and lack of private health insurance coverage among the African American population. Conclusions Our findings suggest the need for policy changes aimed at facilitating equal access to quality medical care. At the same time, further research is necessary to fully resolve racial disparities in ovarian cancer. PMID:23266352

  8. Ovarian Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing ovarian cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  9. Molybdenum cluster loaded PLGA nanoparticles: An innovative theranostic approach for the treatment of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Brandhonneur, N; Hatahet, T; Amela-Cortes, M; Molard, Y; Cordier, S; Dollo, G

    2018-04-01

    We evaluate poly (d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles embedding inorganic molybdenum octahedral cluster for photodynamic therapy of cancer (PDT). Tetrabutyl ammonium salt of Mo 6 Br 14 cluster unit, (TBA) 2 Mo 6 Br 14 , presents promising photosensitization activity in the destruction of targeted cancer cells. Stable cluster loaded nanoparticles (CNPs) were prepared by solvent displacement method showing spherical shapes, zeta potential values around -30 mV, polydispersity index lower than 0.2 and sizes around 100 nm. FT-IR and DSC analysis revealed the lack of strong chemical interaction between the cluster and the polymer within the nanoparticles. In vitro release study showed that (TBA) 2 Mo 6 Br 14 was totally dissolved in 20 min, while CNPs were able to control the release of encapsulated cluster. In vitro cellular viability studies conducted on A2780 ovarian cancer cell line treated up to 72 h with cluster or CNPs did not show any sign of toxicity in concentrations up to 20 µg/ml. This concentration was selected for photo-activation test on A2780 cells and CNPs were able to generate oxygen singlet resulting in a decrease of the cellular viability up to 50%, respectively compared to non-activated conditions. This work presents (TBA) 2 Mo 6 Br 14 as a novel photosensitizer for PDT and suggests PLGA nanoparticles as an efficient delivery system intended for tumor targeting. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. UCHL1 Is a Putative Tumor Suppressor in Ovarian Cancer Cells and Contributes to Cisplatin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chengmeng; Yu, Wei; Lou, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Fan; Han, Xu; Zhao, Na; Lin, Biaoyang

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquitin carboxyl terminal hydrolase 1 (UCHL1) catalyzes the hydrolysis of COOH-terminal ubiquityl esters and amides. It has been reported as either an oncogene or a tumor suppressor in cancers. However, UCHL1's role in ovarian cancer is still unclear. Therefore, we conducted an analysis to understand the role of UCHL1 in ovarian cancer. Firstly, we detected UCHL1 promoter methylation status in 7 ovarian cancer cell lines. 4 of them with UCHL1 silencing showed heavy promoter methylation while the other 3 with relative high UCHL1 expression showed little promoter methylation. Then we reduced UCHL1 expression in ovarian cancer cell line A2780 and IGROV1 and found that inhibition of UCHL1 promoted cell proliferation by increasing cells in S phases of cell cycle. Knockdown of UCHL1 also reduced cell apoptosis and contributed to cisplatin resistance. Furthermore, the expression level of UCHL1 in several ovarian cancer cell lines correlated negatively with their cisplatin resistance levels. Microarray data revealed that UCHL1 related genes are enriched in apoptosis and cell death gene ontology (GO) terms. Several apoptosis related genes were increased after UCHL1 knockdown, including apoptosis regulator BCL2, BCL11A, AEN and XIAP. Furthermore, we identified up-regulation of Bcl-2 and pAKT as well as down-regulation of Bax in UCHL1 knockdown cells, while no significant alteration of p53 and AKT1 was found. This study provides a new and promising strategy to overcome cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer via UCHL1 mediated pathways. PMID:24155778

  11. Epithelial ovarian cancer: the molecular genetics of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Krzystyniak, J; Ceppi, L; Dizon, D S; Birrer, M J

    2016-04-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) remains one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths among women worldwide, despite gains in diagnostics and treatments made over the last three decades. Existing markers of ovarian cancer possess very limited clinical relevance highlighting the emerging need for identification of novel prognostic biomarkers as well as better predictive factors that might allow the stratification of patients who could benefit from a more targeted approach. A summary of molecular genetics of EOC. Large-scale high-throughput genomic technologies appear to be powerful tools for investigations into the genetic abnormalities in ovarian tumors, including studies on dysregulated genes and aberrantly activated signaling pathways. Such technologies can complement well-established clinical histopathology analysis and tumor grading and will hope to result in better, more tailored treatments in the future. Genomic signatures obtained by gene expression profiling of EOC may be able to predict survival outcomes and other important clinical outcomes, such as the success of surgical treatment. Finally, genomic analyses may allow for the identification of novel predictive biomarkers for purposes of treatment planning. These data combined suggest a pathway to progress in the treatment of advanced ovarian cancer and the promise of fulfilling the objective of providing personalized medicine to women with ovarian cancer. The understanding of basic molecular events in the tumorigenesis and chemoresistance of EOC together with discovery of potential biomarkers may be greatly enhanced through large-scale genomic studies. In order to maximize the impact of these technologies, however, extensive validation studies are required. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. 6 Common Cancers - Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian Past Issues / Spring 2007 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian NCI estimates that endometrial, ...

  13. Chemoprevention of Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    cycle," Endocrinology 123, 2896-905 (1988). 31 31. A. G. Hendrickx , W. R. Dukelow, "Reproductive Biology," Chap. 9 in Nonhuman Primates in Biomedical...100 units/ml penicillin , 2 mM L-glutamine, and 100 to explore the effect of 4-HPR on normal ovarian epithelial [ig/ml streptomycin. Six different NOE

  14. Hereditary association between testicular cancer and familial ovarian cancer: A Familial Ovarian Cancer Registry study.

    PubMed

    Etter, John Lewis; Eng, Kevin; Cannioto, Rikki; Kaur, Jasmine; Almohanna, Hani; Alqassim, Emad; Szender, J Brian; Joseph, Janine M; Lele, Shashikant; Odunsi, Kunle; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2018-04-01

    Although family history of testicular cancer is well-established as a risk factor for testicular cancer, it is unknown whether family history of ovarian cancer is associated with risk of testicular cancer. Using data from the Familial Ovarian Cancer Registry on 2636 families with multiple cases of ovarian cancer, we systematically compared relative frequencies of ovarian cancer among relatives of men with testicular and non-testicular cancers. Thirty-one families with cases of both ovarian and testicular cancer were identified. We observed that, among men with cancer, those with testicular cancer were more likely to have a mother with ovarian cancer than those with non-testicular cancers (OR = 3.32, p = 0.004). Zero paternal grandmothers of men with testicular cancer had ovarian cancer. These observations provide compelling preliminary evidence for a familial association between ovarian and testicular cancers Future studies should be designed to further investigate this association and evaluate X-linkage. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Association of lipid metabolism with ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Tania, M; Khan, M A; Song, Y

    2010-10-01

    Defects in lipid metabolism have been found to be linked to several diseases, among which atherosclerosis, hypertension, obesity, and diabetes are the most important. Although cancer is chiefly a genetic disease, dietary lipid intake and metabolism are related to some cancer risks, including the risk for ovarian cancer. Higher intake of dietary lipids, systemic lipid metabolism malfunction, and abnormal serum lipid levels are somehow related to ovarian cancer. Overexpression of some lipid metabolic enzymes are also found in ovarian cancer. In this review article, we summarize the relationships between lipid intake, lipid metabolism, and ovarian cancer.

  16. Association of lipid metabolism with ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tania, M.; Khan, M.A.; Song, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Defects in lipid metabolism have been found to be linked to several diseases, among which atherosclerosis, hypertension, obesity, and diabetes are the most important. Although cancer is chiefly a genetic disease, dietary lipid intake and metabolism are related to some cancer risks, including the risk for ovarian cancer. Higher intake of dietary lipids, systemic lipid metabolism malfunction, and abnormal serum lipid levels are somehow related to ovarian cancer. Overexpression of some lipid metabolic enzymes are also found in ovarian cancer. In this review article, we summarize the relationships between lipid intake, lipid metabolism, and ovarian cancer. PMID:20975872

  17. Human Leukocyte Antigen-Presented Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor is a Surface Biomarker and Potential Therapeutic Target for Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Andrea M; Kaabinejadian, Saghar; McMurtrey, Curtis P; Bardet, Wilfried; Jackson, Ken W; Zuna, Rosemary E; Husain, Sanam; Adams, Gregory P; MacDonald, Glen; Dillon, Rachelle L.; Ames, Harold; Buchli, Rico; Hawkins, Oriana E; Weidanz, Jon A; Hildebrand, William H

    2015-01-01

    T cells recognize cancer cells via human leukocyte antigen (HLA)/peptide complexes and, when disease overtakes these immune mechanisms, immunotherapy can exogenously target these same HLA/peptide surface markers. We previously identified an HLA-A2-presented peptide derived from macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and generated antibody RL21A against this HLA-A2/MIF complex. The objective of the current study was to assess the potential for targeting the HLA-A2/MIF complex in ovarian cancer. First, MIF peptide FLSELTQQL was eluted from the HLA-A2 of the human cancerous ovarian cell lines SKOV3, A2780, OV90, and FHIOSE118hi and detected by mass spectrometry. By flow cytometry, RL21A was shown to specifically stain these four cell lines in the context of HLA-A2. Next, partially matched HLA-A*02:01+ ovarian cancer (n=27) and normal fallopian tube (n=24) tissues were stained with RL21A by immunohistochemistry to assess differential HLA-A2/MIF complex expression. Ovarian tumor tissues revealed significantly increased RL21A staining compared to normal fallopian tube epithelium (p<0.0001), with minimal staining of normal stroma and blood vessels (p<0.0001 and p<0.001 compared to tumor cells) suggesting a therapeutic window. We then demonstrated the anti-cancer activity of toxin-bound RL21A via the dose-dependent killing of ovarian cancer cells. In summary, MIF-derived peptide FLSELTQQL is HLA-A2-presented and recognized by RL21A on ovarian cancer cell lines and patient tumor tissues, and targeting of this HLA-A2/MIF complex with toxin-bound RL21A can induce ovarian cancer cell death. These results suggest that the HLA-A2/MIF complex should be further explored as a cell-surface target for ovarian cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26719579

  18. Cisplatin and Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Advanced Ovarian Epithelial Cancer or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-06

    Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  19. Ovulation and extra-ovarian origin of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang-Hartwich, Yang; Gurrea-Soteras, Marta; Sumi, Natalia; Joo, Won Duk; Holmberg, Jennie C.; Craveiro, Vinicius; Alvero, Ayesha B.; Mor, Gil

    2014-01-01

    The mortality rate of ovarian cancer remains high due to late diagnosis and recurrence. A fundamental step toward improving detection and treatment of this lethal disease is to understand its origin. A growing number of studies have revealed that ovarian cancer can develop from multiple extra-ovarian origins, including fallopian tube, gastrointestinal tract, cervix and endometriosis. However, the mechanism leading to their ovarian localization is not understood. We utilized in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo models to recapitulate the process of extra-ovarian malignant cells migrating to the ovaries and forming tumors. We provided experimental evidence to support that ovulation, by disrupting the ovarian surface epithelium and releasing chemokines/cytokines, promotes the migration and adhesion of malignant cells to the ovary. We identified the granulosa cell-secreted SDF-1 as a main chemoattractant that recruits malignant cells towards the ovary. Our findings revealed a potential molecular mechanism of how the extra-ovarian cells can be attracted by the ovary, migrate to and form tumors in the ovary. Our data also supports the association between increased ovulation and the risk of ovarian cancer. Understanding this association will lead us to the development of more specific markers for early detection and better prevention strategies. PMID:25135607

  20. Biological Basis for Chemoprevention of Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    potent apoptotic effect on ovarian epithelial cells, the use of levonorgestrel in chemoprevention of ovarian cancer is being explored in chickens and women...A chemoprevention trial is ongoing in chickens and we will begin a trial to determine whether levonorgestrel induces apoptosis in the ovarian epithelium of women undergoing oophorectomy.

  1. Belinostat and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer That Did Not Respond to Carboplatin or Cisplatin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-10-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  2. Models of ovarian cancer metastasis: Murine models

    PubMed Central

    Šale, Sanja; Orsulic, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    Mice have mainly been used in ovarian cancer research as immunodeficient hosts for cell lines derived from the primary tumors and ascites of ovarian cancer patients. These xenograft models have provided a valuable system for pre-clinical trials, however, the genetic complexity of human tumors has precluded the understanding of key events that drive metastatic dissemination. Recently developed immunocompetent, genetically defined mouse models of epithelial ovarian cancer represent significant improvements in the modeling of metastatic disease. PMID:19337569

  3. Immunotherapy targeting folate receptor induces cell death associated with autophagy in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yunfei; Graybill, Whitney S.; Previs, Rebecca A.; Hu, Wei; Ivan, Cristina; Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Zand, Behrouz; Nick, Alpa M.; Jennings, Nicholas B.; Dalton, Heather J.; Sehgal, Vasudha; Ram, Prahlad; Lee, Ju-Seog; Vivas-Mejia, Pablo E.; Coleman, Robert L.; Sood, Anil K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cancer cells are highly dependent on folate metabolism, making them susceptible to drugs that inhibit folate receptor activities. Targeting overexpressed folate receptor alpha (FRα) in cancer cells offers a therapeutic opportunity. We investigated the functional mechanisms of MORAB-003 (farletuzumab), a humanized monoclonal antibody against FRα, in ovarian cancer models. Experimental Design We first examined FRα expression in an array of human ovarian cancer cell lines and then assessed the in vivo effect of MORAB-003 on tumor growth and progression in several orthotopic mouse models of ovarian cancer derived from these cell lines. Molecular mechanisms of tumor cell death induced by MORAB-003 were investigated by cDNA and protein expression profiling analysis. Mechanistic studies were performed to determine the role of autophagy in MORAB-003–induced cell death. Results MORAB-003 significantly decreased tumor growth in the high-FRα IGROV1 and SKOV3ip1 models but not in the low-FRα A2780 model. MORAB-003 reduced proliferation but had no significant effect on apoptosis. Protein expression and cDNA microarray analyses showed that MORAB-003 regulated an array of autophagy-related genes. It also significantly increased expression of LC3 isoform II and enriched autophagic vacuolization. Blocking autophagy with hydroxychloroquine or bafilomycin A1 reversed the growth inhibition induced by MORAB-003. In add, alteration of FOLR1 gene copy number significantly correlated with shorter disease-free survival in patients with ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma. Conclusions MORAB-003 displays prominent antitumor activity in ovarian cancer models expressing FRα at high levels. Blockade of folate receptor by MORAB-003 induced sustained autophagy and suppressed cell proliferation. PMID:25416196

  4. Palliative Care in Improving Quality of Life and Symptoms in Patients With Stage III-IV Pancreatic or Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-18

    Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  5. Formation of stable small cell number three-dimensional ovarian cancer spheroids using hanging drop arrays for preclinical drug sensitivity assays.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Shreya; Ward, Maria R; Rowley, Katelyn R; Wold, Rachel M; Takayama, Shuichi; Buckanovich, Ronald J; Mehta, Geeta

    2015-07-01

    Ovarian cancer grows and metastasizes from multicellular spheroidal aggregates within the ascites fluid. Multicellular tumor spheroids are therefore physiologically significant 3D in vitro models for ovarian cancer research. Conventional hanging drop cultures require high starting cell numbers, and are tedious for long-term maintenance. In this study, we generate stable, uniform multicellular spheroids using very small number of ovarian cancer cells in a novel 384 well hanging drop array platform. We used novel tumor spheroid platform and two ovarian cancer cell lines (A2780 and OVCAR3) to demonstrate the stable incorporation of as few as 10 cells into a single spheroid. Spheroids had uniform geometry, with projected areas (42.60×10(3)μm-475.22×10(3)μm(2) for A2780 spheroids and 37.24×10(3)μm(2)-281.01×10(3)μm(2) for OVCAR3 spheroids) that varied as a function of the initial cell seeding density. Phalloidin and nuclear stains indicated cells formed tightly packed spheroids with demarcated boundaries and cell-cell interaction within spheroids. Cells within spheroids demonstrated over 85% viability. 3D tumor spheroids demonstrated greater resistance (70-80% viability) to cisplatin chemotherapy compared to 2D cultures (30-50% viability). Ovarian cancer spheroids can be generated from limited cell numbers in high throughput 384 well plates with high viability. Spheroids demonstrate therapeutic resistance relative to cells in traditional 2D culture. Stable incorporation of low cell numbers is advantageous when translating this research to rare patient-derived cells. This system can be used to understand ovarian cancer spheroid biology, as well as carry out preclinical drug sensitivity assays. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Formation of stable small cell number three-dimensional ovarian cancer spheroids using hanging drop arrays for preclinical drug sensitivity assays

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Shreya; Ward, Maria R.; Rowley, Katelyn R.; Wold, Rachel M.; Takayama, Shuichi; Buckanovich, Ronald J.; Mehta, Geeta

    2015-01-01

    Background Ovarian cancer grows and metastasizes from multicellular spheroidal aggregates within the ascites fluid. Multicellular tumor spheroids are therefore physiologically significant3Din vitro models for ovarian cancer research. Conventional hanging drop cultures require high starting cell numbers, and are tedious for long-term maintenance. In this study, we generate stable, uniform multicellular spheroids using very small number of ovarian cancer cells in a novel 384 well hanging drop array platform. Methods We used novel tumor spheroid platform and two ovarian cancer cell lines (A2780 and OVCAR3) to demonstrate the stable incorporation of as few as 10 cells into a single spheroid. Results Spheroids had uniform geometry, with projected areas (42.60 × 103 μm–475.22 × 103 μm2 for A2780 spheroids and 37.24 × 103 μm2–281.01 × 103 μm2 for OVCAR3 spheroids) that varied as a function of the initial cell seeding density. Phalloidin and nuclear stains indicated cells formed tightly packed spheroids with demarcated boundaries and cell–cell interaction within spheroids. Cells within spheroids demonstrated over 85% viability. 3D tumor spheroids demonstrated greater resistance (70–80% viability) to cisplatin chemotherapy compared to 2D cultures (30–50% viability). Conclusions Ovarian cancer spheroids can be generated from limited cell numbers in high throughput 384 well plates with high viability. Spheroids demonstrate therapeutic resistance relative to cells in traditional 2D culture. Stable incorporation of low cell numbers is advantageous when translating this research to rare patient-derived cells. This system can be used to understand ovarian cancer spheroid biology, as well as carry out preclinical drug sensitivity assays. PMID:25913133

  7. PARP Inhibitors in Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mittica, Gloria; Ghisoni, Eleonora; Giannone, Gaia; Genta, Sofia; Aglietta, Massimo; Sapino, Anna; Valabrega, Giorgio

    2018-03-05

    Treatment of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC), historically based on surgery and platinum doublet chemotherapy, is associated with high risk of relapse and poor prognosis for recurrent disease. In this landscape, the innovative treatment with PARP inhibitors (PARPis) demonstrated an outstanding activity in EOC, and is currently changing clinical practice in BRCA mutant patients. To highlight the mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, clinical activity, indications and current strategies of development of Olaparib, Niraparib, Rucaparib, Talazoparib and Veliparib, the 5 most relevant PARPis. We performed a review on Pubmed using 'ovarian cancer' and the name of each PARPi (PARP inhibitor) discussed in the review as Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) keywords. The same search was performed on "clinicaltrial.gov" to identify ongoing clinical trials and on "google.com/patents" and "uspto.gov" for recent patents exploring PARPIs in ovarian cancer. Olaparib, Niraparib and Rucaparib are already approved for treatment of recurrent EOC and their indications are partially overlapping. Talazoparib and Veliparib are promising PARPis, but currently under investigation in early phase trials. Several studies are evaluating PARPis in monotherapy or in associations, in a wide range of settings (i.e. first line, neoadjuvant, platinum-sensitive and resistant disease). PARPis are valuable options in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer with promising activity in different stages of this disease. Further studies are required to better define optimal clinical settings, predictors of response beyond BRCA mutations and strategies to overcome secondary resistance of PARPis therapy in EOC. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. [Analysis of familial aggregation of ovarian and breast cancer in patients with ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Y; Nishida, M; Sugita, M; Arisawa, Y; Satoh, T; Oki, A; Kohno, K; Shigemitsu, S; Tsunoda, H; Kubo, T

    1995-09-01

    In 118 patients with common epithelial ovarian tumors (carcinomas and tumors of borderline malignancy) treated at Tsukuba University Hospital and Tsukuba-Gakuen Hospital, family histories of ovarian and breast cancer were obtained from medical records or in interviews, and familial aggregation of these cancers was examined. 1. A positive family history was found in 10 patients (8.5%). The high incidences of familial ovarian cancer and ovarian cancer in patients who were previously affected with breast cancer were statistically significant. 2. Patients with serous adenocarcinoma showed a significantly greater rate of positive family history than those with mucinous adenocarcinoma. 3. No significant correlation was seen between the clinical stage and a positive family history. 4. Every patient except one with a positive family history had onset of ovarian cancer after menopause. The age at onset for familial ovarian cancer cases was younger than that for the patients' relatives who were affected previously. 5. There were 14 healthy women considered to be at high risk for ovarian cancer among 5 familial ovarian and 2 familial ovarian and breast cancer aggregations. These preliminary findings suggest that screening for early ovarian cancer should be conducted in high risk relatives of familial cancer patients and women affected with breast cancer previously. More detailed studies are needed to define the occurrence of familial or hereditary ovarian and breast cancers in Japan.

  9. Potentiation by Tumor Necrosis Factor of Mitoxantrone Cytotoxicity to Human Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Parodi, Silvio; Billi, Giovanna; Oliva, Cristina; Venturing, Marco; Noviello, Elvira; Conte, PierFranco

    1992-01-01

    The cytotoxic activity of human recombinant tumor necrosis factor (rHuTNF) (from 0.01 to 10000 U/ml) was assayed on six human ovarian cancer cell lines and one human cervical carcinoma cell line using a crystal violet assay. rHuTNF was cytotoxic to four cell lines (A2780, A2774, SW626, PAD, while 3 cell lines (IGROV1, SKOV3, Mel80) were marginally sensitive to its activity. However, under the same experimental conditions rHuTNF markedly enhanced the cytotoxicity of mitoxantrone, a chemotherapeutic drug targeted at DNA topoisomerase II, in six cell lines. The potentiation of mitoxantrone cytotoxicity was not caused by increased drug accumulation after rHuTNF treatment. No significant increase in cytotoxicity to Me180 cell line was seen when rHuTNF was added to mitoxantrone. PMID:1517145

  10. DOXIL when combined with Withaferin A (WFA) targets ALDH1 positive cancer stem cells in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Kakar, Sham S; Worth, Christopher A; Wang, Zhenglong; Carter, Kelsey; Ratajczak, Mariusz; Gunjal, Pranesh

    Ovarian cancer is a highly aggressive and deadly disease. Currently, the treatment for ovarian cancer entails cytoreductive surgery followed by chemotherapy, mainly cisplatin or carboplatin combined with paclitaxel. Although this regimen is initially effective in a high percentage of cases, unfortunately, after few months of initial treatment, tumor relapse occurs due to platinum-resistance. DOXIL (liposomal preparation of doxorubicin) is a choice of drug for recurrent ovarian cancer. However, its response rate is very low and is accompanied by myocardial toxicity. Resistance to chemotherapy and recurrence of cancer is primarily attributed to the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a small population of cells present in cancer. Effect of DOXIL and withaferin A (WFA), both alone and in combination, was investigated on cell proliferation of ovarian cancer cell line A2780 and tumor growth in SCID mice bearing i.p. ovarian tumors. ALDH1 cells were isolated from A2780 using cell sorter, and effect of DOXIL and WFA both alone and in combination on tumorigenic function of ALDH1 was studied using spheroids formation assays in vitro. Western blots were performed to examine the expression of ALDH1 and Notch 1 genes. In our studies, we showed, for the first time, that DOXIL when combined with withaferin A (WFA) elicits synergistic effect on inhibition of cell proliferation of ovarian cancer cells and inhibits the expression of ALDH1 protein, a marker for ALDH1 positive cancer stem cells (CSCs), and Notch1, a signaling pathway gene required for self-renewal of CSCs. Inhibition of expression of both ALDH1 and Notch1 genes by WFA was found to be dose dependent, whereas DOXIL (200 nM) was found to be ineffective. SCID mice, bearing i.p. ovarian tumors, were treated with a small dose of DOXIL (2 mg/kg) in combination with a sub-optimal dose of WFA (2 mg/kg) which resulted in a highly significant (60% to 70%) reduction in tumor growth, and complete inhibition of metastasis

  11. Lead, selenium and nickel concentrations in epithelial ovarian cancer, borderline ovarian tumor and healthy ovarian tissues.

    PubMed

    Canaz, Emel; Kilinc, Metin; Sayar, Hamide; Kiran, Gurkan; Ozyurek, Eser

    2017-09-01

    Wide variation exists in ovarian cancer incidence rates suggesting the importance of environmental factors. Due to increasing environmental pollution, trace elements and heavy metals have drawn attention in studies defining the etiology of cancer, but scant data is available for ovarian cancer. Our aim was to compare the tissue concentrations of lead, selenium and nickel in epithelial ovarian cancer, borderline tumor and healthy ovarian tissues. The levels of lead, selenium and nickel were estimated using atomic absorption spectrophotometry in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples. Tests were carried out in 20 malignant epithelial ovarian cancer, 15 epithelial borderline tumor and 20 non-neoplastic healthy ovaries. Two samples were collected for borderline tumors, one from papillary projection and one from the smooth surface of cyst wall. Pb and Ni concentrations were found to be higher both in malignant and borderline tissues than those in healthy ovaries. Concentrations of Pb and Ni in malignant tissues, borderline papillary projections and capsular tissue samples were not different. Comparison of Se concentrations of malignant, borderline and healthy ovarian tissues did not reveal statistical difference. Studied metal levels were not found to be different in either papillary projection or in cyst wall of the borderline tumors. This study revealed the accumulation of lead and nickel in ovarian tissue is associated with borderline and malignant proliferation of the surface epithelium. Accumulation of these metals in epithelial ovarian cancer and borderline ovarian tumor has not been demonstrated before. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Ovarian Cancer Stage I

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stage I Description: Three-panel drawing of stage IA, IB, and IC; the first panel (stage IA) shows cancer inside one ovary. The second panel ( ... fallopian tubes, uterus, cervix, and vagina. In stage IA, cancer is found inside a single ovary or ...

  13. [Chemotherapy in epithelial ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Tazi, Y; Pautier, P; Leary, A; Lhomme, C

    2013-10-01

    Chemotherapy is fundamental in the management of epithelial ovarian carcinomas both for early and advanced stages (rarely surgical treatment alone) and in almost every step of the disease. The reference schema combines carboplatin and paclitaxel intravenously. Intraperitoneal chemotherapy also proved its efficacy after complete surgery for advanced disease and should be reserved to trained teams due to its technical constraints and toxicity issues. Modalities of treatment in relapsed and progressive disease depend mainly on the free interval between this diagnosis and the last dose of platinum. Bevacizumab has proven its effectiveness in prolonging progression-free survival in 1st line setting in association with chemotherapy followed by maintenance and in case of relapse or progression both fore platinum sensitive or resistant disease. Finally, a better understanding of ovarian cancer biology will allow us to consider new molecular-targeted agents guided by the specific characteristics of each patient and each tumor. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. F14512, a polyamine-vectorized inhibitor of topoisomerase II, exhibits a marked anti-tumor activity in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Benoît; Clement, Emily; Zorza, Grégoire; Meignan, Samuel; Delord, Jean-Pierre; Couderc, Bettina; Bailly, Christian; Narducci, Fabrice; Vandenberghe, Isabelle; Kruczynski, Anna; Guilbaud, Nicolas; Ferré, Pierre; Annereau, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the fourth cause of death among cancer-bearing women and frequently associated with carboplatin resistance, underlining the need for more efficient and targeted therapies. F14512 is an epipodophylotoxin-core linked to a spermine chain which enters cells via the polyamine transport system (PTS). Here, we investigate this novel concept of vectorization in ovarian cancer. We compared the effects of etoposide and F14512 on a panel of five carboplatin-sensitive or resistant ovarian cancer models. We assessed the incorporation of F17073, a spermine-linked fluorescent probe, in these cells and in 18 clinical samples. We then showed that F14512 exhibits a high anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activity, particularly in cells with high levels of F17073 incorporation. Consistently, F14512 significantly inhibited tumor growth compared to etoposide, in a cisplatin-resistant A2780R subcutaneous model, at a dose of 1.25 mg/kg. In addition, ex vivo analysis indicated that 15 out of 18 patients presented a higher F17073 incorporation into tumor cells compared to normal cells. Overall, our data suggest that F14512, a targeted drug with a potent anti-tumor efficacy, constitutes a potential new therapy for highly PTS-positive and platinum-resistant ovarian cancer-bearing patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Hereditary breast and ovarian cancers].

    PubMed

    Gevensleben, H; Serçe, N; Büttner, R

    2010-10-01

    Hereditary factors are responsible for 5-10% of all breast cancers and 10% of all ovarian cancer cases and are predominantly caused by mutations in the high risk genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA: breast cancer). Additional moderate and low penetrance gene variants are currently being analyzed via whole genome association studies. Interdisciplinary counseling, quality managed genetic testing and intensified prevention efforts in specialized medical centres are essential for members of high risk families considering the high prevalence of malignant tumors and the early age of onset. Furthermore, the identification of BRCA-deficient carcinomas is of particular clinical interest, especially regarding new specific therapeutic options, e.g. treatment with poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. There are presently no valid surrogate markers verifying the association of BRCA1/BRC2 in tumors. However, breast cancers harboring pathogenic BRCA1 mutations in particular display specific histopathological features.

  16. Rethinking Ovarian Cancer: Recommendations for Improving Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Sebastian; Coward, Jermaine I.; Bast Jr., Robert C.; Berchuck, Andy; Berek, Jonathan S.; Brenton, James D.; Coukos, George; Crum, Christopher C.; Drapkin, Ronny; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; Friedlander, Michael; Gabra, Hani; Kaye, Stan B.; Lord, Chris J.; Lengyel, Ernst; Levine, Douglas A.; McNeish, Iain A.; Menon, Usha; Mills, Gordon B.; Nephew, Kenneth P.; Oza, Amit M.; Sood, Anil K.; Stronach, Euan A.; Walczak, Henning; Bowtell, David D.; Balkwill, Frances R.

    2012-01-01

    There have been major advances in our understanding of the cellular and molecular biology of the human malignancies collectively referred to as ovarian cancer. At a recent Helene Harris Memorial Trust meeting, an international group of researchers considered actions that should be taken to improve the outcome for women with ovarian cancer. Nine major recommendations are outlined in this Perspective. PMID:21941283

  17. Care of elderly women with ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    De Gaetano, Colleen; Lichtman, Stuart M

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this article is to educate nurses about ovarian cancer in older women, its treatment options, and related nursing interventions. This information will enable readers to identify risk factors for ovarian cancer, standard treatment approaches, nursing interventions, and patient care.

  18. Ovarian cancer mortality and industrial pollution.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, Javier; Lope, Virginia; López-Abente, Gonzalo; González-Sánchez, Mario; Fernández-Navarro, Pablo

    2015-10-01

    We investigated whether there might be excess ovarian cancer mortality among women residing near Spanish industries, according to different categories of industrial groups and toxic substances. An ecologic study was designed to examine ovarian cancer mortality at a municipal level (period 1997-2006). Population exposure to pollution was estimated by means of distance from town to facility. Using Poisson regression models, we assessed the relative risk of dying from ovarian cancer in zones around installations, and analyzed the effect of industrial groups and pollutant substances. Excess ovarian cancer mortality was detected in the vicinity of all sectors combined, and, principally, near refineries, fertilizers plants, glass production, paper production, food/beverage sector, waste treatment plants, pharmaceutical industry and ceramic. Insofar as substances were concerned, statistically significant associations were observed for installations releasing metals and polycyclic aromatic chemicals. These results support that residing near industries could be a risk factor for ovarian cancer mortality. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Risk of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer in Relation to Benign Ovarian Conditions and Ovarian Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rossing, Mary Anne; Cushing-Haugen, Kara L.; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Weiss, Noel S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Some forms of ovarian neoplasms may be preventable through the removal of precursor lesions. We assessed risk associated with a prior diagnosis of, and ovarian surgery following, ovarian cysts and endometriosis, with a focus on characterizing risk among tumor subgroups. Methods Information was collected during in-person interviews with 812 women with ovarian cancer diagnosed in western Washington State from 2002–2005 and 1,313 population-based controls. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results The risk of a borderline mucinous ovarian tumor associated with a history of an ovarian cyst was increased (OR=1.7, 95% CI 1.0–2.8) but did not vary notably according to receipt of subsequent ovarian surgery. While risk of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer was slightly increased among women with a cyst who had no subsequent ovarian surgery, it was reduced when a cyst diagnosis was followed by surgery (OR= 0.6, 95% CI 0.4–0.9). This reduction in risk was most evident for serous invasive tumors. Women with a history of endometriosis had a three-fold increased risk of endometrioid and clear cell invasive tumors, with a lesser risk increase among women who underwent subsequent ovarian surgery. Conclusions Our results suggest differences in the relation of ovarian cysts and endometriosis with risk of specific subtypes of ovarian cancer, as well as the possibility that ovarian surgery in women with these conditions may lower the risk of invasive disease. PMID:18704718

  20. Metabolomic Profiling of the Effects of Melittin on Cisplatin Resistant and Cisplatin Sensitive Ovarian Cancer Cells Using Mass Spectrometry and Biolog Microarray Technology

    PubMed Central

    Alonezi, Sanad; Tusiimire, Jonans; Wallace, Jennifer; Dufton, Mark J.; Parkinson, John A.; Young, Louise C.; Clements, Carol J.; Park, Jin Kyu; Jeon, Jong Woon; Ferro, Valerie A.; Watson, David G.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was employed to characterise the metabolic profiles of two human ovarian cancer cell lines A2780 (cisplatin-sensitive) and A2780CR (cisplatin-resistant) in response to their exposure to melittin, a cytotoxic peptide from bee venom. In addition, the metabolomics data were supported by application of Biolog microarray technology to examine the utilisation of carbon sources by the two cell lines. Data extraction with MZmine 2.14 and database searching were applied to provide metabolite lists. Principal component analysis (PCA) gave clear separation between the cisplatin-sensitive and resistant strains and their respective controls. The cisplatin-resistant cells were slightly more sensitive to melittin than the sensitive cells with IC50 values of 4.5 and 6.8 μg/mL respectively, although the latter cell line exhibited the greatest metabolic perturbation upon treatment. The changes induced by melittin in the cisplatin-sensitive cells led mostly to reduced levels of amino acids in the proline/glutamine/arginine pathway, as well as to decreased levels of carnitines, polyamines, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+). The effects on energy metabolism were supported by the data from the Biolog assays. The lipid compositions of the two cell lines were quite different with the A2780 cells having higher levels of several ether lipids than the A2780CR cells. Melittin also had some effect on the lipid composition of the cells. Overall, this study suggests that melittin might have some potential as an adjuvant therapy in cancer treatment. PMID:27754384

  1. Ovarian Cancer Prevention Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    replacement therapy within the last 6 months? Has the participant used non - steroidal anti - inflammatory drugs (NSAED’s) greater than 3 times per month in...contacting of family members, use of specimens for future cancer studies, registry rights, benefits, risks and costs of participation, confidentiality, and...to conduct interviews. Results of the interviews will be used to create a symptom checklist to pilot among 50 women participating in a high risk

  2. Chemosensitizing effects of metformin on cisplatin- and paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos Guimarães, Isabella; Ladislau-Magescky, Taciane; Tessarollo, Nayara Gusmão; Dos Santos, Diandra Zipinotti; Gimba, Etel Rodrigues Pereira; Sternberg, Cinthya; Silva, Ian Victor; Rangel, Leticia Batista Azevedo

    2017-11-21

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) remains the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Primary cytoreductive surgery with adjuvant taxane-platinum chemotherapy is the standard treatment to fight ovarian cancer, however, their side effects are severe, and chemoresistance emerges at high rates. Therefore, EOC clinic urges for novel treatment strategies to reverse chemoresistance and to improve the survival rates. Metformin has been shown to act in synergy with certain anti-cancer agents, overcoming chemoresistance in various types of tumors. This paper aims to investigate the use of metformin as a new treatment option for cisplatin- and paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancer. The effects of metformin alone or in combination with conventional drugs on resistant EOC cell lines were investigated using the MTT assay for cell proliferation; Flow Cytometry analysis for cell cycle and the mRNA expression was analyzed using the real-time PCR technique. We found that metformin exhibited antiproliferative effects in paclitaxel-resistant A2780-PR, and in cisplatin-resistant ACRP cell lines. The combined therapy containing conventional drugs and metformin improved the effect of the treatment in cell proliferation rate, especially in the resistant cells. We found that metformin, in clinical relevant doses, could significantly reduce the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines and NF-κB signaling pathway. Taken together, our observations suggest that metformin inhibits the inflammatory pathway induced by paclitaxel and cisplatin treatment. Furthermore, metformin in combination with paclitaxel or cisplatin improved the sensitivity in drug-resistant ovarian cancer cells. Therefore, metformin may be beneficial treatment strategy, particularly in patients with tumors refractory to platinum and taxanes. Copyright © 2017 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Predictive and therapeutic markers in ovarian cancer

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Guan, Yinghui; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Fridlyand, Jane; Mills, Gordon B.

    2013-03-26

    Cancer markers may be developed to detect diseases characterized by increased expression of apoptosis-suppressing genes, such as aggressive cancers. Genes in the human chromosomal regions, 8q24, 11q13, 20q11-q13, were found to be amplified indicating in vivo drug resistance in diseases such as ovarian cancer. Diagnosis and assessment of amplification levels certain genes shown to be amplified, including PVT1, can be useful in prediction of poor outcome of patient's response and drug resistance in ovarian cancer patients with low survival rates. Certain genes were found to be high priority therapeutic targets by the identification of recurrent aberrations involving genome sequence, copy number and/or gene expression are associated with reduced survival duration in certain diseases and cancers, specifically ovarian cancer. Therapeutics to inhibit amplification and inhibitors of one of these genes, PVT1, target drug resistance in ovarian cancer patients with low survival rates is described.

  4. The nerve growth factor alters calreticulin translocation from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface and its signaling pathway in epithelial ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Vera, Carolina Andrea; Oróstica, Lorena; Gabler, Fernando; Ferreira, Arturo; Selman, Alberto; Vega, Margarita; Romero, Carmen Aurora

    2017-04-01

    Ovarian cancer is the seventh most common cancer among women worldwide, causing approximately 120,000 deaths every year. Immunotherapy, designed to boost the body's natural defenses against cancer, appears to be a promising option against ovarian cancer. Calreticulin (CRT) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident chaperone that, translocated to the cell membrane after ER stress, allows cancer cells to be recognized by the immune system. The nerve growth factor (NGF) is a pro-angiogenic molecule overexpressed in this cancer. In the present study, we aimed to determine weather NGF has an effect in CRT translocation induced by cytotoxic and ER stress. We treated A2780 ovarian cancer cells with NGF, thapsigargin (Tg), an ER stress inducer and mitoxantrone (Mtx), a chemotherapeutic drug; CRT subcellular localization was analyzed by immunofluorescence followed by confocal microscopy. In order to determine NGF effect on Mtx and Tg-induced CRT translocation from the ER to the cell membrane, cells were preincubated with NGF prior to Mtx or Tg treatment and CRT translocation to the cell surface was determined by flow cytometry. In addition, by western blot analyses, we evaluated proteins associated with the CRT translocation pathway, both in A2780 cells and human ovarian samples. We also measured NGF effect on cell apoptosis induced by Mtx. Our results indicate that Mtx and Tg, but not NGF, induce CRT translocation to the cell membrane. NGF, however, inhibited CRT translocation induced by Mtx, while it had no effect on Tg-induced CRT exposure. NGF also diminished cell death induced by Mtx. NGF effect on CRT translocation could have consequences in immunotherapy, potentially lessening the effectiveness of this type of treatment.

  5. Metformin, at concentrations corresponding to the treatment of diabetes, potentiates the cytotoxic effects of carboplatin in cultures of ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Erices, Rafaela; Bravo, Maria Loreto; Gonzalez, Pamela; Oliva, Bárbara; Racordon, Dusan; Garrido, Marcelo; Ibañez, Carolina; Kato, Sumie; Brañes, Jorge; Pizarro, Javier; Barriga, Maria Isabel; Barra, Alejandro; Bravo, Erasmo; Alonso, Catalina; Bustamente, Eva; Cuello, Mauricio A; Owen, Gareth I

    2013-12-01

    The use of the type 2 diabetics drug metformin has been correlated with enhanced progression-free survival in ovarian cancer. The literature has speculated that this enhancement is due to the high concentration of metformin directly causing cancer cell death. However, this explanation does not fit with clinical data reporting that the women exposed to constant micromolar concentrations of metformin, as present in the treatment of diabetes, respond better to chemotherapy. Herein, our aim was to examine whether micromolar concentrations of metformin alone could bring about cancer cell death and whether micromolar metformin could increase the cytotoxic effect of commonly used chemotherapies in A2780 and SKOV3 cell lines and primary cultured cancer cells isolated from the peritoneal fluid of patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Our results in cell lines demonstrate that no significant loss of viability or change in cell cycle was observed with micromolar metformin alone; however, we observed cytotoxicity with micromolar metformin in combination with chemotherapy at concentrations where the chemotherapy alone produced no loss in viability. We demonstrate that previous exposure and maintenance of metformin in conjunction with carboplatin produces a synergistic enhancement in cytotoxicity of A2780 and SKOV3 cells (55% and 43%, respectively). Furthermore, in 5 (44%) of the 11 ovarian cancer primary cultures, micromolar metformin improved the cytotoxic response to carboplatin but not paclitaxel or doxorubicin. In conclusion, we present data that support the need for a clinical study to evaluate the adjuvant maintenance or prescription of currently approved doses of metformin during the chemotherapeutic treatment of ovarian cancer.

  6. Biological Basis for Chemoprevention of Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    potent apoptotic effect on ovarian epithelial cells, the use of levonorgestrel in chemoprevention of ovarian cancer is being explored in chickens and...women. A chemoprevention trial is ongoing in chickens and we will begin a trial to determine whether levonorgestrel induces apoptosis in the ovarian...subsequent studies performed in vitro, we have induced apoptosis in epithelial cells treated with the progestin levonorgestrel . Progestin mediated apoptotic

  7. Metformin Hydrochloride, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Ovarian Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  8. Ovarian Cancer Incidence Corrected for Oophorectomy

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Lauren A.; Chen, Quan; Tucker, Thomas C.; White, Connie G.; Ore, Robert N.; Huang, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Current reported incidence rates for ovarian cancer may significantly underestimate the true rate because of the inclusion of women in the calculations who are not at risk for ovarian cancer due to prior benign salpingo-oophorectomy (SO). We have considered prior SO to more realistically estimate risk for ovarian cancer. Kentucky Health Claims Data, International Classification of Disease 9 (ICD-9) codes, Current Procedure Terminology (CPT) codes, and Kentucky Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Data were used to identify women who have undergone SO in Kentucky, and these women were removed from the at-risk pool in order to re-assess incidence rates to more accurately represent ovarian cancer risk. The protective effect of SO on the population was determined on an annual basis for ages 5–80+ using data from the years 2009–2013. The corrected age-adjusted rates of ovarian cancer that considered SO ranged from 33% to 67% higher than age-adjusted rates from the standard population. Correction of incidence rates for ovarian cancer by accounting for women with prior SO gives a better understanding of risk for this disease faced by women. The rates of ovarian cancer were substantially higher when SO was taken into consideration than estimates from the standard population. PMID:28368298

  9. Adoptive immunotherapy against ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Mittica, Gloria; Capellero, Sonia; Genta, Sofia; Cagnazzo, Celeste; Aglietta, Massimo; Sangiolo, Dario; Valabrega, Giorgio

    2016-05-17

    The standard front-line therapy for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is combination of debulking surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. Nevertheless, the majority of patients experience disease recurrence. Although extensive efforts to find new therapeutic options, cancer cells invariably develop drug resistance and disease progression. New therapeutic strategies are needed to improve prognosis of patients with advanced EOC.Recently, several preclinical and clinical studies investigated feasibility and activity of adoptive immunotherapy in EOC. Our aim is to highlight prospective of adoptive immunotherapy in EOC, focusing on HLA-restricted Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes (TILs), and MHC-independent immune effectors such as natural killer (NK), and cytokine-induced killer (CIK). Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) has shown activity in several pre-clinical models. Available preclinical and clinical data suggest that adoptive cell therapy may provide the best benefit in settings of low tumor burden, minimal residual disease, or maintenance therapy. Further studies are needed to better define the optimal clinical setting.

  10. Targeting Ovarian Cancer with Porphysome Nanotechnology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0442 TITLE: Targeting Ovarian Cancer with Porphysome Nanotechnology PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gang Zheng CONTRACTING...Ovarian Cancer with Porphysome Nanotechnology 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0442 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Gang Zheng...the intrinsic multimodal nature of porphyrin-assembled nanoparticles confers high potential for cancer theranostics and clinical translation

  11. Rethinking ovarian cancer II: reducing mortality from high-grade serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bowtell, David D.; Böhm, Steffen; Ahmed, Ahmed A.; Aspuria, Paul-Joseph; Bast, Robert C.; Beral, Valerie; Berek, Jonathan S.; Birrer, Michael J.; Blagden, Sarah; Bookman, Michael A.; Brenton, James; Chiappinelli, Katherine B.; Martins, Filipe Correia; Coukos, George; Drapkin, Ronny; Edmondson, Richard; Fotopoulou, Christina; Gabra, Hani; Galon, Jérôme; Gourley, Charlie; Heong, Valerie; Huntsman, David G.; Iwanicki, Marcin; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kaye, Allyson; Lengyel, Ernst; Levine, Douglas A.; Lu, Karen H.; McNeish, Iain A.; Menon, Usha; Narod, Steve A.; Nelson, Brad H.; Nephew, Kenneth P.; Pharoah, Paul; Powell, Daniel J.; Ramos, Pilar; Romero, Iris L.; Scott, Clare L.; Sood, Anil K.; Stronach, Euan A.; Balkwill, Frances R.

    2016-01-01

    High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) accounts for 70-80% of ovarian cancer deaths, and overall survival has not changed significantly for several decades. In this Opinion article, we outline a set of research priorities that we believe will reduce incidence and improve outcomes for women with this disease. This ‘roadmap’ for HGSOC was determined after extensive discussions at an Ovarian Cancer Action meeting in January 2015. PMID:26493647

  12. Bevacizumab and Intravenous or Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-05-25

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  13. Immunotherapy for Ovarian Cancer: What's Next?

    PubMed Central

    Kandalaft, Lana E.; Powell, Daniel J.; Singh, Nathan; Coukos, George

    2011-01-01

    In the past decade, we have witnessed important gains in the treatment of ovarian cancer; however, additional advances are required to reduce mortality. With compelling evidence that ovarian cancers are immunogenic tumors, immunotherapy should be further pursued and optimized. The dramatic advances in laboratory and clinical procedures in cellular immunotherapy, along with the development of powerful immunomodulatory antibodies, create new opportunities in ovarian cancer therapeutics. Herein, we review current progress and future prospects in vaccine and adoptive T-cell therapy development as well as immunomodulatory therapy tools available for immediate clinical testing. PMID:21079136

  14. Ovarian Cancer Stroma: Pathophysiology and the Roles in Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Mitsuko

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cancer represents one of the cancers with the worst prognostic in adult women. More than half of the patients who present with clinical signs such as abdominal bloating and a feeling of fullness already show advanced stages. The majority of ovarian cancers grow as cystic masses, and cancer cells easily spread into the pelvic cavity once the cysts rupture or leak. When the ovarian cancer cells disseminate into the peritoneal cavity, metastatic nests may grow in the cul-de-sac, and in more advanced stages, the peritoneal surfaces of the upper abdomen become the next largest soil for cancer progression. Ascites is also produced frequently in ovarian cancers, which facilitates distant metastasis. Clinicopathologic, epidemiologic and molecular studies on ovarian cancers have improved our understanding and therapeutic approaches, but still further efforts are required to reduce the risks in the patients who are predisposed to this lethal disease and the mortality of the patients in advanced stages. Among various molecules involved in ovarian carcinogenesis, special genes such as TP53, BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been well investigated. These genes are widely accepted as the predisposing factors that trigger malignant transformation of the epithelial cells of the ovary. In addition, adnexal inflammatory conditions such as chronic salpingitis and ovarian endometriosis have been great research interests in the context of carcinogenic background of ovarian cancers. In this review, I discuss the roles of stromal cells and inflammatory factors in the carcinogenesis and progression of ovarian cancers. PMID:24213462

  15. Genomic similarities between breast and ovarian cancers

    Cancer.gov

    One subtype of breast cancer shares many genetic features with high-grade serous ovarian cancer, a cancer that is very difficult to treat, according to researchers supported by the National Institutes of Health. The findings suggest that the two cancers a

  16. OPT-821 With or Without Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Peritoneal Cancer in Second or Third Complete Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-12

    Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  17. Risk of metachronous ovarian cancer after ovarian conservation in young women with stage I cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Koji; Machida, Hiroko; Horowitz, Max P; Shahzad, Mian M K; Guntupalli, Saketh R; Roman, Lynda D; Wright, Jason D

    2017-11-01

    While there is an increasing trend of ovarian conservation at the time of surgical treatment for young women with stage I cervical cancer, the risk for subsequent ovarian cancer after ovarian conservation has not been well studied. We sought to examine the incidence of and risk factors for metachronous ovarian cancer among young women with stage I cervical cancer who had ovarian conservation at the time of hysterectomy. The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program was used to identify women aged <50 years who underwent hysterectomy with ovarian conservation for stage I cervical cancer from 1983 through 2013 (n = 4365). Time-dependent analysis was performed for ovarian cancer risk after cervical cancer diagnosis. Mean age at cervical cancer diagnosis was 37 years, and the majority of patients had stage IA disease (68.2%) and squamous histology (72.9%). Median follow-up time was 10.8 years, and there were 13 women who developed metachronous ovarian cancer. The 10- and 20-year cumulative incidences of metachronous ovarian cancer were 0.2% (95% confidence interval, 0.1-0.4) and 0.5% (95% confidence interval, 0.2-0.8), respectively. Mean age at the time of diagnosis of metachronous ovarian cancer was 47.5 years, and stage III-IV disease was seen in 55.6%. Age (≥45 vs <45 years, hazard ratio, 4.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-15.4; P = .018), ethnicity (non-white vs white, hazard ratio, 4.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.31-14.0; P = .009), cervical cancer histology (adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous vs squamous, hazard ratio, 3.50; 95% confidence interval, 1.17-10.5; P = .028), and adjuvant radiotherapy use (yes vs no, hazard ratio, 3.69; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-13.4; P = .034) were significantly associated with metachronous ovarian cancer risk. The presence of multiple risk factors was associated with a significantly increased risk of metachronous ovarian cancer compared to the no risk factor group: 1 risk factor (hazard ratio range, 2.96-8.43), 2

  18. Biocompatible Lipid Nanoparticles as Carriers To Improve Curcumin Efficacy in Ovarian Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Bondì, Maria Luisa; Emma, Maria Rita; Botto, Chiara; Augello, Giuseppa; Azzolina, Antonina; Di Gaudio, Francesca; Craparo, Emanuela Fabiola; Cavallaro, Gennara; Bachvarov, Dimcho; Cervello, Melchiorre

    2017-02-22

    Curcumin is a natural molecule with proved anticancer efficacy on several human cancer cell lines. However, its clinical application has been limited due to its poor bioavailability. Nanocarrier-based drug delivery approaches could make curcumin dispersible in aqueous media, thus overtaking the limits of its low solubility. The aim of this study was to increase the bioavailability and the antitumoral activity of curcumin, by entrapping it into nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs). For this purpose here we describe the preparation and characterization of three kinds of curcumin-loaded NLCs. The nanosystems allowed the achievement of a controlled release of curcumin, the amounts of curcumin released after 24 h from Compritol-Captex, Compritol-Miglyol, and Compritol NLCs being, respectively, equal to 33, 28, and 18% w/w on the total entrapped curcumin. Considering the slower curcumin release profile, Compritol NLCs were chosen to perform successive in vitro studies on ovarian cancer cell lines. The results show that curcumin-loaded NLCs maintain anticancer activity, and reduce cell colony survival more effectively than free curcumin. As an example, the ability of A2780S cells to form colonies was decreased after treatment with 5 μM free curcumin by 50% ± 6, whereas, at the same concentration, the delivery of curcumin with NLC significantly (p < 0.05) inhibited colony formation to approximately 88% ± 1, therefore potentiating the activity of curcumin to inhibit A2780S cell growth. The obtained results clearly suggest that the entrapment of curcumin into NLCs increases curcumin efficacy in vitro, indicating the potential use of NLCs as curcumin delivery systems.

  19. IP Chemo for Ovarian Cancer is Underused

    Cancer.gov

    Use of intraperitoneal chemotherapy, along with intravenous chemotherapy, improves survival in some women with advanced ovarian cancer, but its use in clinical practice has been limited, according to a new study.

  20. The Inner Workings of Ovarian Cancer

    ScienceCinema

    Rodland, Karin

    2018-06-12

    New research identifies critical proteins present in the tumors of women with ovarian cancer. Karin Rodland discusses the work led by PNNL and Johns Hopkins researchers, working with collaborators across the nation.

  1. Belinostat in Treating Patients With Advanced Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer or Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-20

    Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Borderline Ovarian Surface Epithelial-Stromal Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Stage III Borderline Ovarian Surface Epithelial-Stromal Tumor; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Borderline Ovarian Surface Epithelial-Stromal Tumor; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer

  2. Bypassing multidrug resistant ovarian cancer using ultrasound responsive doxorubicin/curcumin co-deliver alginate nanodroplets.

    PubMed

    Baghbani, Fatemeh; Moztarzadeh, Fathollah

    2017-05-01

    Ultrasound-responsive perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions are a class of new multifunctional smart nanocarriers which combine diagnostic properties with therapeutic properties and release their drug payload in a controlled manner in response to ultrasound. Therefore, combination therapy using chemotherapeutic and chemosensitizing agents co-entrapped in these nanocarriers seems beneficial for cancer treatment. In the present study, multifunctional smart alginate/perfluorohexane nanodroplets were developed for co-delivery of doxorubicin and curcumin (a strong chemosensitizer). The nanodroplets with the average particle size of 55.1nm were synthesized via nanoemulsion process. The entrapment efficiency of doxorubicin was 92.3%. To improve curcumin entrapment into the alginate shell, Span 60 was added to the formulation as a co-surfactant and finally curcumin entrapment of about 40% was achieved. Ultrasound-mediated drug release kinetic was evaluated at two different frequencies of 28kHz (low frequency) and 1MHz (high frequency). Low frequency ultrasound resulted in higher triggered drug release from nanodroplets. The nanodroplets showed strong ultrasound contrast via droplet to bubble transition as confirmed via B-mode ultrasound imaging. Enhanced cytotoxicity in adriamycin-resistant A2780 ovarian cancer cells was observed for Dox-Cur-NDs compared to Dox-NDs because of the synergistic effects of doxorubicin and curcumin. However, ultrasound irradiation significantly increased the cytotoxicity of Dox-Cur-NDs. Finally, in vivo ovarian cancer treatment using Dox/Cur-NDs combined with ultrasound irradiation resulted in efficient tumor regression. According to the present study, nanotherapy of multidrug resistant human ovarian cancer using ultrasound responsive doxorubicin/curcumin co-loaded alginate-shelled nanodroplets combined with ultrasound irradiation could be a promising modality for the future of cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [The molecular biology of epithelial ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Leary, Alexandra; Pautier, Patricia; Tazi, Youssef; Morice, Philippe; Duvillard, Pierre; Gouy, Sébastien; Uzan, Catherine; Gauthier, Hélène; Balleyguier, Corinne; Lhommé, Catherine

    2012-12-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer frequently presents at an advanced stage where the cornerstone of management remains surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. Unfortunately, despite sometimes dramatic initial responses, advanced ovarian cancer almost invariably relapses. Little progress has been made in the identification of effective targeted-therapies for ovarian cancer. The majority of clinical trials investigating novel agents have been negative and the only approved targeted-therapy is bevacizumab, for which reliable predictive biomarkers still elude us. Ovarian cancer is treated as a uniform disease. Yet, biological studies have highlighted the heterogeneity of this malignancy with marked differences in histology, oncogenesis, prognosis, chemo-responsiveness, and molecular profile. Recent high throughput molecular analyses have identified a huge number of genomic/phenotypic alterations. Broadly speaking, high grade serous carcinomas (type II) display significant genomic instability and numerous amplifications and losses; low grade (type I) tumors are genomically stable but display frequent mutations. Importantly, many of these genomic alterations relate to known oncogenes for which targeted-therapies are available or in development. There is today a real potential for personalized medicine in ovarian cancer. We will review the current literature regarding the molecular characterization of epithelial ovarian cancer and discuss the biological rationale for a number of targeted strategies. In order to translate these biological advances into meaningful clinical improvements for our patients, it is imperative to incorporate translational research in ovarian cancer trials, a number of strategies will be proposed such as the acquisition of quality tumor samples, including sequential pre- and post-treatment biopsies, the potential of liquid biopsies, and novel trial designs more adapted to the molecular era of ovarian cancer research.

  4. Biological Basis for Chemoprevention of Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    epithelial cells treated with the progestin levonorgestrel . Progestin mediated apoptotic effects may be a major mechanism underlying the protection...epithelial ovarian cancer. Initial studies to test the progestin levonorgestrel in an avian model of ovarian cancer have been undertaken and...is receiving 0.05 mg/day Levonorgestrel equivalent (same as first chicken trial demonstrating a chemopreventive effect), and the high progestin dose

  5. Symptoms Relevant to Surveillance for Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ore, Robert M.; Baldwin, Lauren; Woolum, Dylan; Elliott, Erika; Wijers, Christiaan; Chen, Chieh-Yu; Miller, Rachel W.; DeSimone, Christopher P.; Ueland, Frederick R.; Kryscio, Richard J.; van Nagell, John R.; Pavlik, Edward J.

    2017-01-01

    To examine how frequently and confidently healthy women report symptoms during surveillance for ovarian cancer. A symptoms questionnaire was administered to 24,526 women over multiple visits accounting for 70,734 reports. A query of reported confidence was included as a confidence score (CS). Chi square, McNemars test, ANOVA and multivariate analyses were performed. 17,623 women completed the symptoms questionnaire more than one time and >9500 women completed it more than one four times for >43,000 serially completed questionnaires. Reporting ovarian cancer symptoms was ~245 higher than ovarian cancer incidence. The positive predictive value (0.073%) for identifying ovarian cancer based on symptoms alone would predict one malignancy for 1368 cases taken to surgery due to reported symptoms. Confidence on the first questionnaire (83.3%) decreased to 74% when more than five questionnaires were completed. Age-related decreases in confidence were significant (p < 0.0001). Women reporting at least one symptom expressed more confidence (41,984/52,379 = 80.2%) than women reporting no symptoms (11,882/18,355 = 64.7%), p < 0.0001. Confidence was unrelated to history of hormone replacement therapy or abnormal ultrasound findings (p = 0.30 and 0.89). The frequency of symptoms relevant to ovarian cancer was much higher than the occurrence of ovarian cancer. Approximately 80.1% of women expressed confidence in what they reported. PMID:28335512

  6. Symptoms Relevant to Surveillance for Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ore, Robert M; Baldwin, Lauren; Woolum, Dylan; Elliott, Erika; Wijers, Christiaan; Chen, Chieh-Yu; Miller, Rachel W; DeSimone, Christopher P; Ueland, Frederick R; Kryscio, Richard J; Nagell, John R van; Pavlik, Edward J

    2017-03-20

    To examine how frequently and confidently healthy women report symptoms during surveillance for ovarian cancer. A symptoms questionnaire was administered to 24,526 women over multiple visits accounting for 70,734 reports. A query of reported confidence was included as a confidence score (CS). Chi square, McNemars test, ANOVA and multivariate analyses were performed. 17,623 women completed the symptoms questionnaire more than one time and >9500 women completed it more than one four times for >43,000 serially completed questionnaires. Reporting ovarian cancer symptoms was ~245 higher than ovarian cancer incidence. The positive predictive value (0.073%) for identifying ovarian cancer based on symptoms alone would predict one malignancy for 1368 cases taken to surgery due to reported symptoms. Confidence on the first questionnaire (83.3%) decreased to 74% when more than five questionnaires were completed. Age-related decreases in confidence were significant (p < 0.0001). Women reporting at least one symptom expressed more confidence (41,984/52,379 = 80.2%) than women reporting no symptoms (11,882/18,355 = 64.7%), p < 0.0001. Confidence was unrelated to history of hormone replacement therapy or abnormal ultrasound findings (p = 0.30 and 0.89). The frequency of symptoms relevant to ovarian cancer was much higher than the occurrence of ovarian cancer. Approximately 80.1% of women expressed confidence in what they reported.

  7. Paradigm Shift in the Management Strategy for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Keiichi; McAlpine, Jessica N; Lheureux, Stephanie; Matsumura, Noriomi; Oza, Amit M

    2016-01-01

    The hypothesis on the pathogenesis of epithelial ovarian cancer continues to evolve. Although epithelial ovarian cancer had been assumed to arise from the coelomic epithelium of the ovarian surface, it is now becoming clearer that the majority of serous carcinomas arise from epithelium of the distal fallopian tube, whereas clear cell and endometrioid cancers arise from endometriosis. Molecular and genomic characteristics of epithelial ovarian cancer have been extensively investigated. Our understanding of pathogenesis of the various histologic types of ovarian cancer have begun to inform changes to the strategies for management of epithelial ovarian cancer, which represent a paradigm shift not only for treatment but also for prevention, which previously had not been considered achievable. In this article, we will discuss novel attempts at the prevention of high-grade serous ovarian cancer and treatment strategies for two distinct entities in epithelial ovarian cancer: low-grade serous and clear cell ovarian carcinomas, which are relatively rare and resistant to conventional chemotherapy.

  8. Features of ovarian cancer in Lynch syndrome (Review).

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kanako; Banno, Kouji; Yanokura, Megumi; Iida, Miho; Adachi, Masataka; Masuda, Kenta; Ueki, Arisa; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Nomura, Hiroyuki; Hirasawa, Akira; Tominaga, Eiichiro; Aoki, Daisuke

    2014-11-01

    Lynch syndrome is a hereditary ovarian cancer with a prevalence of 0.9-2.7%. Lynch syndrome accounts for 10-15% of hereditary ovarian cancers, while hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome accounts for 65-75% of these cancers. The lifetime risk for ovarian cancer in families with Lynch syndrome is ~8%, which is lower than colorectal and endometrial cancers, and ovarian cancer is not listed in the Amsterdam Criteria II. More than half of sporadic ovarian cancers are diagnosed in stage III or IV, but ≥80% of ovarian cancers in Lynch syndrome are diagnosed in stage I or II. Ovarian cancers in Lynch syndrome mostly have non-serous histology and different properties from those of sporadic ovarian cancers. A screening method for ovarian cancers in Lynch syndrome has yet to be established and clinical studies of prophylactic administration of oral contraceptives are not available. However, molecular profiles at the genetic level indicate that ovarian cancer in Lynch syndrome has a more favorable prognosis than sporadic ovarian cancer. Inhibitors of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mammalian target of the rapamycin pathway and anti-epidermal growth factor antibodies may have efficacy for the disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review focusing on ovarian cancer in Lynch syndrome.

  9. microRNA-137 promotes apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells via the regulation of XIAP

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaodi; Chen, Wei; Zeng, Wenshu; Wan, Chunling; Duan, Shiwei; Jiang, Songshan

    2017-01-01

    Background: microRNAs (miRNAs) have regulatory roles in various cellular processes, including apoptosis. Recently, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) has been reported to be dysregulated in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). However, the mechanism underlying this dysregulation is largely unknown. Methods: Using bioinformatics and a literature analysis, a panel of miRNAs dysregulated in EOC was chosen for further experimental confirmation from hundreds of miRNAs that were predicted to interact with the XIAP 3′UTR. A dual-luciferase reporter assay was employed to detect the interaction by cellular co-transfection of an miRNA expression vector and a reporter vector with the XIAP 3′UTR fused to a Renilla luciferase reporter. DAPI and TUNEL approaches were used to further determine the effects of an miR-137 mimic and inhibitor on cisplatin-induced apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells. Results: We identified eight miRNAs by screening a panel of dysregulated miRNAs that may target the XIAP 3′UTR. The strongest inhibitory miRNA, miR-137, suppressed the activity of a luciferase reporter gene fused with the XIAP 3′UTR and decreased the levels of XIAP protein in SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, forced expression of miR-137 increased cisplatin-induced apoptosis, and the depressed expression of miR-137 decreased cisplatin-induced apoptosis in SKOV3 and primary EOC cells. Consistently, the disruption of miR-137 via CRISPR/Cas9 inhibited apoptosis and upregulated XIAP in A2780 cells. Furthermore, the effect of miR-137 on apoptosis could be rescued by XIAP in SKOV3 cells. In addition, miR-137 expression is inversely correlated with the level of XIAP protein in both ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines. Conclusions: Our data suggest that multiple miRNAs can regulate XIAP via its 3′UTR. miR-137 can sensitise ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis, providing new insight into overcoming drug resistance in ovarian cancer. PMID:27875524

  10. Deoxyschizandrin, Isolated from Schisandra Berries, Induces Cell Cycle Arrest in Ovarian Cancer Cells and Inhibits the Protumoural Activation of Tumour-Associated Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kijun; Ahn, Ji-Hye; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Jang, Dae Sik; Choi, Jung-Hye

    2018-01-15

    Deoxyschizandrin, a major lignan of Schisandra berries, has been demonstrated to have various biological activities such as antioxidant, hepatoprotective, and antidiabetic effects. However, the anti-cancer effects of deoxyschizandrin are poorly characterized. In the present study, we investigated the anti-cancer effect of deoxyschizandrin on human ovarian cancer cell lines and tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs). Deoxyschizandrin induced G₀/G₁ phase cell cycle arrest and inhibited cyclin E expression in human ovarian cancer cells. Overexpression of cyclin E significantly reversed the deoxyschizandrin-induced cell growth inhibition. Interestingly, increased production of reactive oxygen species and decreased activation of Akt were observed in A2780 cells treated with deoxyschizandrin, and the antioxidant compromised the deoxyschizandrin-induced cell growth inhibition and Akt inactivation. Moreover, deoxyschizandrin-induced cell growth inhibition was markedly suppressed by Akt overexpression. In addition, deoxyschizandrin was found to inhibit the expression of the M2 phenotype markers CD163 and CD209 in TAMs, macrophages stimulated by the ovarian cancer cells. Moreover, expression and production of the tumour-promoting factors MMP-9, RANTES, and VEGF, which are highly enhanced in TAMs, was significantly suppressed by deoxyschizandrin treatment. Taken together, these data suggest that deoxyschizandrin exerts anti-cancer effects by inducing G₀/G₁ cell cycle arrest in ovarian cancer cells and reducing the protumoural phenotype of TAMs.

  11. 75 FR 54451 - National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation While we have made great strides in the battle against ovarian cancer, this disease continues to claim more lives than any other gynecologic cancer. During National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, we...

  12. Poly(amido)amine (PAMAM) dendrimer-cisplatin complexes for chemotherapy of cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yellepeddi, Venkata Kashyap; Vangara, Kiran Kumar; Palakurthi, Srinath

    2013-09-01

    Dendrimer-cisplatin complexes were prepared using PAMAM dendrimers with terminal -NH2 and -COOH groups as well as biotin-conjugated dendrimers. Preformulation parameters of dendrimer-cisplatin complexes were studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Cytotoxicity and mechanism of cytotoxicity of dendrimer-cisplatin complexes was investigated in OVCAR-3, SKOV, A2780 and cisplatin-resistant CP70 human ovarian cancer cell lines. The loading of cisplatin in dendrimers was 11 % (w/w). PAMAM G4 dendrimers with amine surface groups (biotinylated and native) have shown 2.5- to 3.0-fold reduction in IC50 values in ovarian cancer cells when compared with carboxylate surface dendrimers ( p < 0.05). A correlation was observed among cytotoxicity of the complexes, cellular uptake, and platinum-DNA adduct formation. Treatment with dendrimer-cisplatin complexes resulted in a 7.0-fold increase ( p < 0.05) in expression of apoptotic genes ( Bcl2, Bax, p53) and 13.2- to 27.1-fold increase ( p < 0.05) in the activity of caspases 3, 8, and 9 in vitro. Results suggest that PAMAM dendrimers can be used as potential carrier for cisplatin chemotherapy of ovarian cancer.

  13. Aberrant DNA Damage Response Pathways May Predict the Outcome of Platinum Chemotherapy in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stefanou, Dimitra T.; Bamias, Aristotelis; Episkopou, Hara; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A.; Likka, Maria; Kalampokas, Theodore; Photiou, Stylianos; Gavalas, Nikos; Sfikakis, Petros P.; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Souliotis, Vassilis L.

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian carcinoma (OC) is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Despite the advances in the treatment of OC with combinatorial regimens, including surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy, patients generally exhibit poor prognosis due to high chemotherapy resistance. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that DNA damage response (DDR) pathways are involved in resistance of OC patients to platinum chemotherapy. Selected DDR signals were evaluated in two human ovarian carcinoma cell lines, one sensitive (A2780) and one resistant (A2780/C30) to platinum treatment as well as in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from OC patients, sensitive (n = 7) or resistant (n = 4) to subsequent chemotherapy. PBMCs from healthy volunteers (n = 9) were studied in parallel. DNA damage was evaluated by immunofluorescence γH2AX staining and comet assay. Higher levels of intrinsic DNA damage were found in A2780 than in A2780/C30 cells. Moreover, the intrinsic DNA damage levels were significantly higher in OC patients relative to healthy volunteers, as well as in platinum-sensitive patients relative to platinum-resistant ones (all P<0.05). Following carboplatin treatment, A2780 cells showed lower DNA repair efficiency than A2780/C30 cells. Also, following carboplatin treatment of PBMCs ex vivo, the DNA repair efficiency was significantly higher in healthy volunteers than in platinum-resistant patients and lowest in platinum-sensitive ones (t1/2 for loss of γH2AX foci: 2.7±0.5h, 8.8±1.9h and 15.4±3.2h, respectively; using comet assay, t1/2 of platinum-induced damage repair: 4.8±1.4h, 12.9±1.9h and 21.4±2.6h, respectively; all P<0.03). Additionally, the carboplatin-induced apoptosis rate was higher in A2780 than in A2780/C30 cells. In PBMCs, apoptosis rates were inversely correlated with DNA repair efficiencies of these cells, being significantly higher in platinum-sensitive than in platinum-resistant patients and lowest in healthy volunteers (all P<0.05). We conclude that

  14. Adenovirus‑mediated overexpression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator enhances invasiveness and motility of serous ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiao; Lin, Liangbo; Yong, Min; Dong, Xiaojing; Yu, Tinghe; Hu, Lina

    2016-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) belongs to the adenosine triphosphate‑binding cassette transporter family, members of which are involved in several types of cancer. Previous studies by our group reported that CFTR was highly expressed in serous ovarian cancer (SOC) tissues, and that knockdown of CFTR suppressed the proliferation of ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo. Thus, the aim of the present study was to construct a recombinant adenoviral vector for the expression of the human CFTR gene in order to study the role of CFTR overexpression in the malignant invasion and migration of SOC cells in vitro. The present study then focused on the mechanisms of the role of CFTR in the migratory and invasive malignant properties of SOC cells. The CFTR gene was inserted into an adenoviral vector by using the AdEasy system in order to obtain the Ad‑CFTR overexpression vector, which was used to transfect the A2780 SOC cell line. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, western blot analysis and immunofluorescence were performed to detect the expression and localization of CFTR. Cell invasion and motility of the transfected cells compared with those of control cells were observed using Transwell and wound healing assays. A ~4,700 bp fragment of the CFTR gene was confirmed to be correctly cloned in the adenoviral vector and amplification of Ad‑CFTR was observed in HEK293 cells during package. After 48 h of transfection with Ad‑CFTR, ~90% of A2780 cells were red fluorescence protein‑positive. Immunofluorescence showed that following transfection, CFTR expression was increased and CFTR was located in the cell membrane and cytoplasm. CFTR overexpression was shown to enhance the invasion and motility of A2780 cells in vitro. Furthermore, the effects of CFTR overexpression on the activation c‑Src signaling were observed by western blot analysis. CFTR overexpressing cells showed the lowest activity of phospho‑Src (Tyr530

  15. Breast and Ovarian Cancer and Family History Risk Categories

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov . Diseases Breast and Ovarian Cancer and Family History Risk Categories Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Preventive Services Task Force. February 2016. Family Health History, Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk, and Women of ...

  16. Granisetron, Aprepitant, and Dexamethasone in Preventing Nausea and Vomiting in Patients Receiving Chemotherapy for Stage II, III, or IV Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-04-24

    Nausea and Vomiting; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  17. Ovarian cancer treatment: The end of empiricism?

    PubMed

    Lheureux, Stephanie; Karakasis, Katherine; Kohn, Elise C; Oza, Amit M

    2015-09-15

    The diagnosis, investigation, and management of ovarian cancer are in a state of flux-balancing ever rapid advances in our understanding of its biology with 3 decades of clinical trials. Clinical trials that started with empirically driven selections have evolved in an evidence-informed manner to gradually improve outcome. Has this improved understanding of the biology and associated calls to action led to appropriate changes in therapy? In this review, the authors discuss incorporating emerging data on biology, combinations, dose, and scheduling of new and existing agents with patient preferences in the management of women with ovarian cancer. © 2015 The Authors. American Cancer Society.

  18. Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santoiemma, Phillip P; Powell, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in ovarian cancer is prognostic for increased survival while increases in immunosuppressive regulatory T-cells (Tregs) are associated with poor outcomes. Approaches that bolster tumor-reactive TILs may limit tumor progression. However, identifying tumor-reactive TILs in ovarian cancer has been challenging, though adoptive TIL therapy in patients has been encouraging. Other forms of TIL immunomodulation remain under investigation including Treg depletion, antibody-based checkpoint modification, activation and amplification using dendritic cells, antigen presenting cells or IL-2 cytokine culture, adjuvant cytokine injections, and gene-engineered T-cells. Many approaches to TIL manipulation inhibit ovarian cancer progression in preclinical or clinical studies as monotherapy. Here, we review the impact of TILs in ovarian cancer and attempts to mobilize TILs to halt tumor progression. We conclude that effective TIL therapy for ovarian cancer is at the brink of translation and optimal TIL activity may require combined methodologies to deliver clinically-relevant treatment. PMID:25894333

  19. Biological Basis for Chemoprevention of Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    2005;16:955-63. 11) Kelemen L, James M, Spurdle A, Campbell I, Chang-Claude J, Peel D, Anton-Culver H, Berchuck A, Schildkraut J, Whittemore A...X., Abbazadegan, M., et al. CYP17 promotor polymorphism and ovarian cancer risk. Intl J Cancer. 2000; 86: 436-9. 23.Menin, C., Banna , G. L., De

  20. Sunitinib Malate in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-15

    Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  1. 77 FR 55095 - National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    ... the disease. Women who are middle-aged or older, who have a family history of ovarian or breast cancer... National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2012 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation This year, thousands of American women will lose their lives to ovarian cancer. They are mothers...

  2. Changes in Brain Function in Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer Who Are Receiving Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-04-11

    Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Malignant Ovarian Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Choriocarcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Dysgerminoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Polyembryoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Teratoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  3. Adjuvant ovarian suppression in premenopausal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Francis, Prudence A; Regan, Meredith M; Fleming, Gini F; Láng, István; Ciruelos, Eva; Bellet, Meritxell; Bonnefoi, Hervé R; Climent, Miguel A; Da Prada, Gian Antonio; Burstein, Harold J; Martino, Silvana; Davidson, Nancy E; Geyer, Charles E; Walley, Barbara A; Coleman, Robert; Kerbrat, Pierre; Buchholz, Stefan; Ingle, James N; Winer, Eric P; Rabaglio-Poretti, Manuela; Maibach, Rudolf; Ruepp, Barbara; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Price, Karen N; Colleoni, Marco; Viale, Giuseppe; Coates, Alan S; Goldhirsch, Aron; Gelber, Richard D

    2015-01-29

    Suppression of ovarian estrogen production reduces the recurrence of hormone-receptor-positive early breast cancer in premenopausal women, but its value when added to tamoxifen is uncertain. We randomly assigned 3066 premenopausal women, stratified according to prior receipt or nonreceipt of chemotherapy, to receive 5 years of tamoxifen, tamoxifen plus ovarian suppression, or exemestane plus ovarian suppression. The primary analysis tested the hypothesis that tamoxifen plus ovarian suppression would improve disease-free survival, as compared with tamoxifen alone. In the primary analysis, 46.7% of the patients had not received chemotherapy previously, and 53.3% had received chemotherapy and remained premenopausal. After a median follow-up of 67 months, the estimated disease-free survival rate at 5 years was 86.6% in the tamoxifen-ovarian suppression group and 84.7% in the tamoxifen group (hazard ratio for disease recurrence, second invasive cancer, or death, 0.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66 to 1.04; P=0.10). Multivariable allowance for prognostic factors suggested a greater treatment effect with tamoxifen plus ovarian suppression than with tamoxifen alone (hazard ratio, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.62 to 0.98). Most recurrences occurred in patients who had received prior chemotherapy, among whom the rate of freedom from breast cancer at 5 years was 82.5% in the tamoxifen-ovarian suppression group and 78.0% in the tamoxifen group (hazard ratio for recurrence, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.60 to 1.02). At 5 years, the rate of freedom from breast cancer was 85.7% in the exemestane-ovarian suppression group (hazard ratio for recurrence vs. tamoxifen, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.49 to 0.87). Adding ovarian suppression to tamoxifen did not provide a significant benefit in the overall study population. However, for women who were at sufficient risk for recurrence to warrant adjuvant chemotherapy and who remained premenopausal, the addition of ovarian suppression improved disease outcomes. Further

  4. Management of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Hideko; Takei, Junko

    2018-02-01

    Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome represents 5-10% of all breast cancers. In Japan, the HBOC syndrome is frequently diagnosed in patients with breast cancer. Therefore, a treatment strategy combining a plan for existing breast cancer and for reduction of future breast and ovarian cancer risk is necessary. Breast cancer risk-reducing management involves three options-surveillance, chemoprevention, and risk-reducing mastectomy (RRM). RRM can prevent >90% of new breast cancers. Ovarian cancer risk management options are more limited, and risk-reduction salpingo-oophorectomy is the only option since there is no proven effective early detection method available. The local recurrence rate following breast-conserving surgery in BRCA1/2 mutation-associated breast cancer is not significantly higher than that in sporadic breast cancer. Furthermore, there is no difference in prognosis between surgical methods. Clinicians should inform patients that there are no data on long-term monitoring and fully discuss risks of re-developing breast cancer with patients when choosing the surgical method. In HBOC, BRCA1/2 mutations lead to failure of double-strand DNA break repair, with poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) playing an important role in single-strand DNA nick repair. Use of PARP inhibitors in HBOC prevents DNA repair (synthetic lethality) leading to cell death. This review summarizes management of the HBOC syndrome based on recent evidence.

  5. Perfluorooctanoic acid stimulates ovarian cancer cell migration, invasion via ERK/NF-κB/MMP-2/-9 pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaozhao; Bao, Chunyu; Ma, Zhinan; Xu, Boqun; Liu, Xiaoqiu; Ying, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xuesen

    2018-05-09

    As widely used in consumer products, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) has become a common environmental pollutant, which has been detected in human serum and associated with cancers. Our previous study showed that PFOA is a carcinogen that promotes endometrial cancer cell migration and invasion through activation of ERK/mTOR signaling. Here, we showed that PFOA (≥100 nM) treatment also stimulated A2780 ovarian cancer cell invasion and migration, which correlated with increased matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2/-9 expression, important proteases associated with tumor invasion and migration. Notably, PFOA treatment induced activation of ERK1/2/ NF-κB signaling. Pre-treatment with U0126, an ERK1/2inhibitor;or JSH-23, a NF-kB inhibitor, can reverse the PFOA-induced cell migration and invasion. Consistent with these results, inhibiting ERK1/2 or NF-κB signaling abolished PFOA-induced up-regulation of MMP-2/-9 expression. These results indicate that PFOA can stimulate ovarian cancer cell migration, invasion and MMP-2/-9 expression by up-regulating ERK/NF-κB pathway. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Tectorigenin sensitizes paclitaxel-resistant human ovarian cancer cells through downregulation of the Akt and NFκB pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yeong-In; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Park, Hee-Juhn; Kim, Tae Jin; Choi, Youn Seok; Shih, Ie-Ming; Choi, Jung-Hye

    2012-12-01

    Paclitaxel (Taxol) is currently used as the front-line chemotherapeutic agent for several cancers including ovarian carcinoma; however, the drug frequently induces drug resistance through multiple mechanisms. The new strategy of using natural compounds in combination therapies is highly attractive because those compounds may enhance the efficacy of chemotherapy. In this study, we found that tectorigenin, an isoflavonoid isolated from flower of Pueraria thunbergiana, enhanced the growth-inhibitory effect of paclitaxel in paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancer cells (MPSC1(TR), A2780(TR) and SKOV3(TR)) as well as their naive counterparts. The combination of tectorigenin with paclitaxel resulted in a synergistic apoptosis compared with either agent alone through activation of caspases-3, -8 and -9. Treatment with tectorigenin inhibited the nuclear translocation of NFκB and the expression of NFκB-dependent genes such as FLIP, XIAP, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and COX-2, which are known to be associated with chemoresistance. In addition, the tectorigenin-paclitaxel combination inhibited the phosphorylation of IκB and IKK and the activation of Akt in paclitaxel-resistant cancer cells. Moreover, tectorigenin-paclitaxel-induced cell growth inhibition was enhanced by pretreatment with the Akt inhibitor LY294002 or overexpression of the dominant negative Akt (Akt-DN), but reduced by overexpression of constitutively activated Akt (Akt-Myr). Furthermore, we found that Akt-Myr, at least in part, reversed tectorigenin-paclitaxel-induced nuclear translocation of NFκB and the phosphorylation of IκB and IKK. These data suggest that tectorigenin could sensitize paclitaxel-resistant human ovarian cancer cells through inactivation of the Akt/IKK/IκB/NFκB signaling pathway, and promise a new intervention to chemosensitize paclitaxel-induced cytotoxicity in ovarian cancer.

  7. Cells of origin of ovarian cancer: ovarian surface epithelium or fallopian tube?

    PubMed

    Klotz, Daniel Martin; Wimberger, Pauline

    2017-12-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cancer in women and one of the leading causes of death from gynecological malignancies. Despite of its clinical importance, ovarian tumorigenesis is poorly understood and prognosis remains poor. This is particularly true for the most common type of ovarian cancer, high-grade serous ovarian cancer. Two models are considered, whether it arises from the ovarian surface epithelium or from the fallopian tube. The first model is based on (1) the pro-inflammatory environment caused by ovulation events, (2) the expression pattern of ovarian inclusion cysts, and (3) biomarkers that are shared by the ovarian surface epithelium and malignant growth. The model suggesting a non-ovarian origin is based on (1) tubal precursor lesions, (2) genetic evidence of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, and (3) recent animal studies. Neither model has clearly demonstrated superiority over the other. Therefore, one can speculate that high-grade serous ovarian cancer may arise from two different sites that undergo similar changes. Both tissues are derived from the same embryologic origin, which may explain how progenitor cells from different sites can respond similar to stimuli within the ovaries. However, distinct molecular drivers, such as BRCA deficiency, may still preferentially arise from one site of origin as precancerous mutations are frequently seen in the fallopian tube. Confirming the origin of ovarian cancer has important clinical implications when deciding on cancer risk-reducing prophylactic surgery. It will be important to identify key biomarker to uncover the sequence of ovarian tumorigenesis.

  8. Right-sided lateralisation of ovarian cancer and right bias asymmetry for involved pelvic lymph nodes by ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dane, Senol; Borekci, Bunyamin; Kadanali, Sedat

    2008-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate if there is a possible lateralisation for ovarian cancers, to re-examine left-right asymmetry in pelvic lymph nodes distribution in patients with ovarian cancer, and to investigate if pelvic lymph node involvement by metastatic invasion of ovarian cancer cells is ipsilateral or contralateral. There was right-sided lateralisation for ovarian cancer. The numbers of external iliac and hypogastric+obturator lymph nodes were higher on the right side in patients with ovarian cancer on the right side; but they were about equal for right and left sides in patients with ovarian cancer in their left side. The numbers of external iliac and hypogastric+obturator lymph nodes involved by metastatic cancer cells were higher on the right side in patients with ovarian cancer on the both right and left sides. This case may result from the stronger cell-mediated immune activity in the left sides of humans.

  9. Evidence of a genetic link between endometriosis and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alice W; Templeman, Claire; Stram, Douglas A; Beesley, Jonathan; Tyrer, Jonathan; Berchuck, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul P; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pearce, Celeste Leigh

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate whether endometriosis-associated genetic variation affects risk of ovarian cancer. Pooled genetic analysis. University hospital. Genetic data from 46,176 participants (15,361 ovarian cancer cases and 30,815 controls) from 41 ovarian cancer studies. None. Endometriosis-associated genetic variation and ovarian cancer. There was significant evidence of an association between endometriosis-related genetic variation and ovarian cancer risk, especially for the high-grade serous and clear cell histotypes. Overall we observed 15 significant burden statistics, which was three times more than expected. By focusing on candidate regions from a phenotype associated with ovarian cancer, we have shown a clear genetic link between endometriosis and ovarian cancer that warrants further follow-up. The functional significance of the identified regions and SNPs is presently uncertain, though future fine mapping and histotype-specific functional analyses may shed light on the etiologies of both gynecologic conditions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Paclitaxel and Carboplatin With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-12-28

    Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinofibroma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  11. Does Breast or Ovarian Cancer Run in Your Family?

    MedlinePlus

    ... receptors, progesterone receptors and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2.) Cancer in both breasts Breast cancer in a male relative Ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer Pancreatic cancer or high grade prostate cancer Breast, ovarian, pancreatic, or high grade prostate ...

  12. Mathematical Models of Breast and Ovarian Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Botesteanu, Dana-Adriana; Lipkowitz, Stanley; Lee, Jung-Min; Levy, Doron

    2016-01-01

    Women constitute the majority of the aging United States (US) population, and this has substantial implications on cancer population patterns and management practices. Breast cancer is the most common women's malignancy, while ovarian cancer is the most fatal gynecological malignancy in the US. In this review we focus on these subsets of women's cancers, seen more commonly in postmenopausal and elderly women. In order to systematically investigate the complexity of cancer progression and response to treatment in breast and ovarian malignancies, we assert that integrated mathematical modeling frameworks viewed from a systems biology perspective are needed. Such integrated frameworks could offer innovative contributions to the clinical women's cancers community, since answers to clinical questions cannot always be reached with contemporary clinical and experimental tools. Here, we recapitulate clinically known data regarding the progression and treatment of the breast and ovarian cancers. We compare and contrast the two malignancies whenever possible, in order to emphasize areas where substantial contributions could be made by clinically inspired and validated mathematical modeling. We show how current paradigms in the mathematical oncology community focusing on the two malignancies do not make comprehensive use of, nor substantially reflect existing clinical data, and we highlight the modeling areas in most critical need of clinical data integration. We emphasize that the primary goal of any mathematical study of women's cancers should be to address clinically relevant questions. PMID:27259061

  13. Targeted Immune Therapy of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, Keith L.; Karyampudi, Lavakumar; Lamichhane, Purushottam; Preston, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Clinical outcomes, such as recurrence free survival and overall survival, in ovarian cancer are quite variable, independent of common characteristics such as stage, response to therapy and grade. This disparity in outcomes warrants further exploration and therapeutic targeting into the interaction between the tumor and host. One compelling host characteristic that contributes both to the initiation and progression of ovarian cancer is the immune system. Hundreds of studies have confirmed a prominent role for the immune system in modifying the clinical course of the disease. Recent studies also show that anti-tumor immunity is often negated by immune regulatory cells present in the tumor microenvironment. Regulatory immune cells also directly enhance the pathogenesis through the release of various cytokines and chemokines, which together form an integrated pathologic network. Thus, in the future, research into immunotherapy targeting ovarian cancer will probably become increasingly focused on combination approaches that simultaneously augment immunity while preventing local immune suppression. In this article, we summarize important immunological targets that influence ovarian cancer outcome as well as include an update on newer immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:25544369

  14. Hawaii natural compounds are promising to reduce ovarian cancer deaths.

    PubMed

    Fei-Zhang, David J; Li, Chunshun; Cao, Shugeng

    2016-07-02

    The low survival rate of patients with ovarian cancer largely results from the advanced ovarian tumors as well as tumor resistance to chemotherapy, leading to metastasis and recurrence. However, it is missing as to an effective therapeutic approach that focuses on these aspects to prolong progression-free survival and to decrease mortality in ovarian cancer patients. Here, based on our cancer drug discovery studies, we provide prospective insights into the development of a future line of drugs to effectively reduce ovarian cancer deaths. Pathways that increase the probability of cancer, such as the defective Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway, may render cancer cells more sensitive to new drug targeting.

  15. Quality of Life and Care Needs of Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-03

    Anxiety; Fatigue; Nausea and Vomiting; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  16. Paclitaxel, Polyglutamate Paclitaxel, or Observation in Treating Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Peritoneal Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-03

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  17. Glutathione in Preventing Peripheral Neuropathy Caused by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Patients With Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, and/or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-05

    Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Neuropathy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Pain; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  18. Sargramostim and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With Advanced Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer That Did Not Respond to Previous Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-24

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  19. Menstrual pain and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer: Results from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium.

    PubMed

    Babic, Ana; Harris, Holly R; Vitonis, Allison F; Titus, Linda J; Jordan, Susan J; Webb, Penelope M; Risch, Harvey A; Rossing, Mary Anne; Doherty, Jennifer A; Wicklund, Kristine; Goodman, Marc T; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Ness, Roberta B; Kjaer, Susanne K; Schildkraut, Joellen; Berchuck, Andrew; Pearce, Celeste L; Wu, Anna H; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L

    2018-02-01

    Menstrual pain, a common gynecological condition, has been associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer in some, but not all studies. Furthermore, potential variations in the association between menstrual pain and ovarian cancer by histologic subtype have not been adequately evaluated due to lack of power. We assessed menstrual pain using either direct questions about having experienced menstrual pain, or indirect questions about menstrual pain as indication for use of hormones or medications. We used multivariate logistic regression to calculate the odds ratio (OR) for the association between severe menstrual pain and ovarian cancer, adjusting for potential confounders and multinomial logistic regression to calculate ORs for specific histologic subtypes. We observed no association between ovarian cancer and menstrual pain assessed by indirect questions. Among studies using direct question, severe pain was associated with a small but significant increase in overall risk of ovarian cancer (OR = 1.07, 95% CI: 1.01-1.13), after adjusting for endometriosis and other potential confounders. The association appeared to be more relevant for clear cell (OR = 1.48, 95% CI: 1.10-1.99) and serous borderline (OR = 1.31, 95% CI: 1.05-1.63) subtypes. In this large international pooled analysis of case-control studies, we observed a small increase in risk of ovarian cancer for women reporting severe menstrual pain. While we observed an increased ovarian cancer risk with severe menstrual pain, the possibility of recall bias and undiagnosed endometriosis cannot be excluded. Future validation in prospective studies with detailed information on endometriosis is needed. © 2017 UICC.

  20. Second primary cancers following borderline ovarian tumors.

    PubMed

    Sanci, Muzaffer; Gultekin, Emre; Cingillioglu, Basak; Gultekin, Ozge Elmastas; Ozvural, Seyfettin; Emirdar, Volkan; Yildirim, Yusuf

    2011-06-01

    Several studies have reported an increased risk of second primary cancers subsequent to invasive epithelial ovarian cancer. However, there is no adequate data regarding such risk in borderline ovarian tumors (BOTs). The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of subsequent second primary cancers among women with BOTs. BOT patients treated in our center between December 1985 and April 2009 were retrospectively screened for developing second primary cancer during follow-up period. There were 96 women diagnosed with BOT. Mean age at the time of diagnosis was 47 ± 14.3, ranging from 19 to 79. Eighty-eight (91.6%) patients had stage I disease, two patients (2.1%) had stage II and six (6.2%) had stage III. Twenty-five (26.0%) patients received platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Mean follow-up time was 96.5 ± 442 months (range: 9-280 months). There were ten (10.4%) recurrences. Only one patient developed second primary cancer. Second primary cancer observed in this case was basal cell carsinoma of the eyelid, which was diagnosed 2 years after primary disease. There were no patients with common women's cancers such as breast and colorectal cancers. These findings do not suggest increased risk of subsequent cancers in patients with BOT. However, population-based studies are needed for evaluating exact risk of developing second primary malignancies in women with BOTs.

  1. Antiproliferative effects of TSA, PXD‑101 and MS‑275 in A2780 and MCF7 cells: Acetylated histone H4 and acetylated tubulin as markers for HDACi potency and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Androutsopoulos, Vasilis P; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2017-12-01

    Inhibition of histone deacetylase enzymes (HDACs) has been well documented as an attractive target for the development of chemotherapeutic drugs. The present study investigated the effects of two prototype hydroxamic acid HDAC inhibitors, namely Trichostatin A (TSA) and Belinostat (PXD‑101) and the benzamide Entinostat (MS‑275) in A2780 ovarian carcinoma and MCF7 breast adenocarcinoma cells. The three HDACi inhibited the proliferation of A2780 and MCF7 cells at comparable levels, below the µM range. Enzyme inhibition assays in a cell‑free system showed that TSA was the most potent inhibitor of total HDAC enzyme activity followed by PXD‑101 and MS‑275. Incubation of A2780 and MCF7 cells with the hydroxamates TSA and PXD‑101 for 24 h resulted in a dramatic increase of acetylated tubulin induction (up to 30‑fold for TSA). In contrast to acetylated tubulin, western blot analysis and flow cytometry indicated that the induction of acetylated histone H4 was considerably smaller. The benzamide MS‑275 exhibited nearly a 2‑fold induction of acetylated histone H4 and an even smaller induction of acetylated tubulin in A2780 and MCF7 cells. Taken together, these data suggest that although the three HDACi were equipotent in inhibiting proliferation of MCF7 and A2780 cells, only the benzamide MS‑275 did not induce acetylated tubulin expression, a marker of class IIb HDACs.

  2. Psychosocial Stress and Ovarian Cancer Risk: Metabolomics and Perceived Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0493 TITLE: Psychosocial Stress and Ovarian Cancer Risk: Metabolomics and Perceived Stress PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Psychosocial Stress and Ovarian Cancer Risk: Metabolomics and Perceived Stress 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0493 5c...TERMS ovarian cancer, psychosocial stress, depression, anxiety, social support, metabolomics 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF

  3. Human umbilical blood mononuclear cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells serve as interleukin-21 gene delivery vehicles for epithelial ovarian cancer therapy in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weihua; Wang, Jing; He, Xiangfeng; Zhang, Hongyi; Yu, Fangliu; Jiang, Longwei; Chen, Dengyu; Chen, Junsong; Dou, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Ovarian cancer causes more deaths than any other cancer of the female reproductive system, and its overall cure rate remains low. The present study investigated human umbilical blood mononuclear cell (UBMC)-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UBMC-MSCs) as interleukin-21 (IL-21) gene delivery vehicles for ovarian cancer therapy in nude mice. MSCs were isolated from UBMCs and the expanded cells were phenotyped by flow cytometry. Cultured UBMCs were differentiated into osteocytes and adipocytes using appropriate media and then the UBMC-MSCs were transfected with recombinant pIRES2-IL-21-enhancement green fluorescent protein. UBMC-MSCs expressing IL-21 were named as UBMC-MSC-IL-21. Mice with A2780 ovarian cancer were treated with UBMC-MSC-IL-21 intravenously, and the therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by the tumor volume and mouse survival. To address the mechanism of UBMC-MSC-IL-21 against ovarian cancer, the expression of IL-21, natural killer glucoprotein 2 domain and major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related molecules A/B were detected in UBMC-MSC-IL-21 and in the tumor sites. Interferon-γ-secreting splenocyte numbers and natural killer cytotoxicity were significantly increased in the UBMC-MSC-IL-21-treated mice as compared with the UBMC-MSCs or the UBMC-MSC-mock plasmid-treated mice. Most notably, tumor growth was delayed and survival was prolonged in ovarian-cancer-bearing mice treated with UBMC-MSC-IL-21. Our data provide important evidence that UBMC-MSCs can serve as vehicles for IL-21 gene delivery and inhibit the established tumor. Copyright © 2011 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. PIPAC Nab-pac for Stomach, Pancreas, Breast and Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-05-31

    Peritoneal Carcinomatosis; Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIB; Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIC; Ovarian Cancer Stage IV; Breast Cancer Stage IIIB; Breast Cancer Stage IIIc; Breast Cancer Stage IV; Stomach Cancer Stage III; Stomach Cancer Stage IV With Metastases; Pancreas Cancer, Stage III; Pancreas Cancer, Stage IV

  5. Obesity and risk of ovarian cancer subtypes: evidence from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Catherine M; Nagle, Christina M; Whiteman, David C; Ness, Roberta; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Pike, Malcolm C; Rossing, Mary Anne; Terry, Kathryn L; Wu, Anna H; Risch, Harvey A; Yu, Herbert; Doherty, Jennifer A; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hein, Rebecca; Nickels, Stefan; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Goodman, Marc T; Carney, Michael E; Matsuno, Rayna K; Lurie, Galina; Moysich, Kirsten; Kjaer, Susanne K; Jensen, Allan; Hogdall, Estrid; Goode, Ellen L; Fridley, Brooke L; Vierkant, Robert A; Larson, Melissa C; Schildkraut, Joellen; Hoyo, Cathrine; Moorman, Patricia; Weber, Rachel P; Cramer, Daniel W; Vitonis, Allison F; Bandera, Elisa V; Olson, Sara H; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; King, Melony; Brinton, Louise A; Yang, Hannah; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Lissowska, Jolanta; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Gayther, Simon A; Ramus, Susan J; Menon, Usha; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Webb, Penelope M

    2013-04-01

    Whilst previous studies have reported that higher BMI increases a woman's risk of developing ovarian cancer, associations for the different histological subtypes have not been well defined. As the prevalence of obesity has increased dramatically, and classification of ovarian histology has improved in the last decade, we sought to examine the association in a pooled analysis of recent studies participating in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. We evaluated the association between BMI (recent, maximum and in young adulthood) and ovarian cancer risk using original data from 15 case-control studies (13 548 cases and 17 913 controls). We combined study-specific adjusted odds ratios (ORs) using a random-effects model. We further examined the associations by histological subtype, menopausal status and post-menopausal hormone use. High BMI (all time-points) was associated with increased risk. This was most pronounced for borderline serous (recent BMI: pooled OR=1.24 per 5 kg/m(2); 95% CI 1.18-1.30), invasive endometrioid (1.17; 1.11-1.23) and invasive mucinous (1.19; 1.06-1.32) tumours. There was no association with serous invasive cancer overall (0.98; 0.94-1.02), but increased risks for low-grade serous invasive tumours (1.13, 1.03-1.25) and in pre-menopausal women (1.11; 1.04-1.18). Among post-menopausal women, the associations did not differ between hormone replacement therapy users and non-users. Whilst obesity appears to increase risk of the less common histological subtypes of ovarian cancer, it does not increase risk of high-grade invasive serous cancers, and reducing BMI is therefore unlikely to prevent the majority of ovarian cancer deaths. Other modifiable factors must be identified to control this disease.

  6. Pathways to Genome-targeted Therapies in Serous Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, Joshua; Delaney, Joe

    2017-07-01

    Genome sequencing technologies and corresponding oncology publications have generated enormous publicly available datasets for many cancer types. While this has enabled new treatments, and in some limited cases lifetime management of the disease, the treatment options for serous ovarian cancer remain dismal. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of ovarian cancer, with a focus on heterogeneity, functional genomics, and actionable data.

  7. 78 FR 54741 - National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ..., women with a family history of breast or ovarian cancer, and those who have had certain types of cancer... Proclamation Each September, America calls attention to a deadly disease that affects thousands of women across our country. This year, over 22,000 women will develop ovarian cancer, and more than half that number...

  8. Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, and Primary Peritoneal Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... decrease the risk of dying from cancer. Scientists study screening tests to find those with the fewest risks and ... of cancer, including ovarian cancer, or other conditions. Studies have also shown that ... Screening tests have risks. The risks of ovarian, fallopian tube, ...

  9. Risks of Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, and Primary Peritoneal Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... decrease the risk of dying from cancer. Scientists study screening tests to find those with the fewest risks and ... of cancer, including ovarian cancer, or other conditions. Studies have also shown that ... Screening tests have risks. The risks of ovarian, fallopian tube, ...

  10. Targeting the tumour microenvironment in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jean M; Coleman, Robert L; Sood, Anil K

    2016-03-01

    The study of cancer initiation, growth, and metastasis has traditionally been focused on cancer cells, and the view that they proliferate due to uncontrolled growth signalling owing to genetic derangements. However, uncontrolled growth in tumours cannot be explained solely by aberrations in cancer cells themselves. To fully understand the biological behaviour of tumours, it is essential to understand the microenvironment in which cancer cells exist, and how they manipulate the surrounding stroma to promote the malignant phenotype. Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynaecologic cancer worldwide. The majority of patients will have objective responses to standard tumour debulking surgery and platinum-taxane doublet chemotherapy, but most will experience disease recurrence and chemotherapy resistance. As such, a great deal of effort has been put forth to develop therapies that target the tumour microenvironment in ovarian cancer. Herein, we review the key components of the tumour microenvironment as they pertain to this disease, outline targeting opportunities and supporting evidence thus far, and discuss resistance to therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Three-photon imaging of ovarian cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Jennifer K.; Amirsolaimani, Babak; Rice, Photini; Hatch, Kenneth; Kieu, Khanh

    2016-02-01

    Optical imaging methods have the potential to detect ovarian cancer at an early, curable stage. Optical imaging has the disadvantage that high resolution techniques require access to the tissue of interest, but miniature endoscopes that traverse the natural orifice of the reproductive tract, or access the ovaries and fallopian tubes through a small incision in the vagina wall, can provide a minimally-invasive solution. We have imaged both rodent and human ovaries and fallopian tubes with a variety of endoscope-compatible modalities. The recent development of fiber-coupled femtosecond lasers will enable endoscopic multiphoton microscopy (MPM). We demonstrated two- and three-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF, 3PEF), and second- and third-harmonic generation microscopy (SHG, THG) in human ovarian and fallopian tube tissue. A study was undertaken to understand the mechanisms of contrast in these images. Six patients (normal, cystadenoma, and ovarian adenocarcinoma) provided ovarian and fallopian tube biopsies. The tissue was imaged with three-dimensional optical coherence tomography, multiphoton microscopy, and frozen for histological sectioning. Tissue sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, Masson's trichrome, and Sudan black. Approximately 1 μm resolution images were obtained with an excitation source at 1550 nm. 2PEF signal was absent. SHG signal was mainly from collagen. 3PEF and THG signal came from a variety of sources, including a strong signal from fatty connective tissue and red blood cells. Adenocarcinoma was characterized by loss of SHG signal, whereas cystic abnormalities showed strong SHG. There was limited overlap of two- and three- photon signals, suggesting that three-photon imaging can provide additional information for early diagnosis of ovarian cancer.

  12. Validating a mouse model of ovarian cancer for early detection through imaging | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Despite advances in treatment strategies, ovarian cancer remains the deadliest gynecological malignancy and the 5th largest cancer killer in women. Located deep in the body, with few early symptoms and no effective screening technique, ovarian cancer has remained stubbornly difficult to understand, much less effectively combat. Ovarian cancer is almost always discovered at an

  13. Metformin and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-04-17

    Brenner Tumor; Malignant Ascites; Malignant Pleural Effusion; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  14. Sirolimus and Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-04-27

    Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  15. [Clinicopathological characteristics of hereditary ovarian cancer syndrome].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yan; Sheng, Xiu-gui; Ma, Zhi-fang; Ma, Yue-bing; Liu, Nai-fu; Chen, Yue-ting; Gao, Rong; Wang, Ying-ying; Sun, Li

    2009-09-01

    To explore the clinicopathological characteristics of hereditary ovarian cancer syndrome (HOCS). From Jan. 2000 to Jan. 2007, among 580 cases of primary ovarian cancer, 42 cases (hereditary group), who had a positive family history of ovarian cancer and met the diagnostic criteria of HOCS, were analyzed retrospectively. One hundred cases without a family history of ovarian cancer were enrolled randomizely as control group (sporadic group). The incidence of HOCS was 7.2% (42/580). Forty-two cases associated tumors affected at least 2 successive generations in 31 families and affected 1 generation in 8 families. Eighty-seven percent (27/31) was from maternal lineage, while 13% (4/31) from paternal lineage. Earlier age of onset was significantly difference between two groups [(49 +/- 10) years vs. (55 +/- 10) years, P < 0.05]. There were 90% belong to serous adenocarcinoma in the hereditary group, while 84% in the sporadic group. There was statistical difference in the proportion of mucinous adenocarcinoma (0 vs. 11%, P < 0.05). The most common clinical manifestations were abdominal distention and anorexia (64% vs. 70%, P > 0.05), International Federational of Gynecology Obstetrics (FIGO) stage III (62% vs. 63%, P > 0.05) between two groups. Fourteen cases (33%,14/42) were previously untreated in the hereditary group, while 40 cases (40%, 40/100) in the sporadic group. There were 15 cases (36%, 15/42) underwent secondary surgery and 15 cases (36%, 15/42) underwent third surgery or more in hereditary group, while 50 cases (50%,50/100) and 27 cases (27%, 27/100) in the sporadic group. The mean number of chemotherapy cycles received in two groups was 13.3 and 11.8 (P > 0.05). The 3-year and 5-year survival rate in hereditary group were 73.6% and 54.9% respectively, compared with 47.4% and 21.2% (P < 0.05) in sporadic group. Hereditary ovarian cancer mostly from maternal lineage are featuring in early age of onset, serous adenocarcinoma, advanced stage (stage III), and

  16. Ovarian Cancer Risk Factors by Histologic Subtype: An Analysis From the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium.

    PubMed

    Wentzensen, Nicolas; Poole, Elizabeth M; Trabert, Britton; White, Emily; Arslan, Alan A; Patel, Alpa V; Setiawan, V Wendy; Visvanathan, Kala; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Adami, Hans-Olov; Black, Amanda; Bernstein, Leslie; Brinton, Louise A; Buring, Julie; Butler, Lesley M; Chamosa, Saioa; Clendenen, Tess V; Dossus, Laure; Fortner, Renee; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Gram, Inger T; Hartge, Patricia; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Idahl, Annika; Jones, Michael; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kirsh, Victoria; Koh, Woon-Puay; Lacey, James V; Lee, I-Min; Lundin, Eva; Merritt, Melissa A; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Peters, Ulrike; Poynter, Jenny N; Rinaldi, Sabina; Robien, Kim; Rohan, Thomas; Sandler, Dale P; Schairer, Catherine; Schouten, Leo J; Sjöholm, Louise K; Sieri, Sabina; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tjonneland, Anna; Travis, Ruth; Trichopoulou, Antonia; van den Brandt, Piet A; Wilkens, Lynne; Wolk, Alicja; Yang, Hannah P; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Tworoger, Shelley S

    2016-08-20

    An understanding of the etiologic heterogeneity of ovarian cancer is important for improving prevention, early detection, and therapeutic approaches. We evaluated 14 hormonal, reproductive, and lifestyle factors by histologic subtype in the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium (OC3). Among 1.3 million women from 21 studies, 5,584 invasive epithelial ovarian cancers were identified (3,378 serous, 606 endometrioid, 331 mucinous, 269 clear cell, 1,000 other). By using competing-risks Cox proportional hazards regression stratified by study and birth year and adjusted for age, parity, and oral contraceptive use, we assessed associations for all invasive cancers by histology. Heterogeneity was evaluated by likelihood ratio test. Most risk factors exhibited significant heterogeneity by histology. Higher parity was most strongly associated with endometrioid (relative risk [RR] per birth, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.74 to 0.83) and clear cell (RR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.61 to 0.76) carcinomas (P value for heterogeneity [P-het] < .001). Similarly, age at menopause, endometriosis, and tubal ligation were only associated with endometrioid and clear cell tumors (P-het ≤ .01). Family history of breast cancer (P-het = .008) had modest heterogeneity. Smoking was associated with an increased risk of mucinous (RR per 20 pack-years, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.46) but a decreased risk of clear cell (RR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.55 to 0.94) tumors (P-het = .004). Unsupervised clustering by risk factors separated endometrioid, clear cell, and low-grade serous carcinomas from high-grade serous and mucinous carcinomas. The heterogeneous associations of risk factors with ovarian cancer subtypes emphasize the importance of conducting etiologic studies by ovarian cancer subtypes. Most established risk factors were more strongly associated with nonserous carcinomas, which demonstrate challenges for risk prediction of serous cancers, the most fatal subtype. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  17. Ovarian Cancer Risk Factors by Histologic Subtype: An Analysis From the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Elizabeth M.; Trabert, Britton; White, Emily; Arslan, Alan A.; Patel, Alpa V.; Setiawan, V. Wendy; Visvanathan, Kala; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Adami, Hans-Olov; Black, Amanda; Bernstein, Leslie; Brinton, Louise A.; Buring, Julie; Butler, Lesley M.; Chamosa, Saioa; Clendenen, Tess V.; Dossus, Laure; Fortner, Renee; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gaudet, Mia M.; Gram, Inger T.; Hartge, Patricia; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Idahl, Annika; Jones, Michael; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kirsh, Victoria; Koh, Woon-Puay; Lacey, James V.; Lee, I-Min; Lundin, Eva; Merritt, Melissa A.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Peters, Ulrike; Poynter, Jenny N.; Rinaldi, Sabina; Robien, Kim; Rohan, Thomas; Sandler, Dale P.; Schairer, Catherine; Schouten, Leo J.; Sjöholm, Louise K.; Sieri, Sabina; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tjonneland, Anna; Travis, Ruth; Trichopoulou, Antonia; van den Brandt, Piet A.; Wilkens, Lynne; Wolk, Alicja; Yang, Hannah P.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Tworoger, Shelley S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose An understanding of the etiologic heterogeneity of ovarian cancer is important for improving prevention, early detection, and therapeutic approaches. We evaluated 14 hormonal, reproductive, and lifestyle factors by histologic subtype in the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium (OC3). Patients and Methods Among 1.3 million women from 21 studies, 5,584 invasive epithelial ovarian cancers were identified (3,378 serous, 606 endometrioid, 331 mucinous, 269 clear cell, 1,000 other). By using competing-risks Cox proportional hazards regression stratified by study and birth year and adjusted for age, parity, and oral contraceptive use, we assessed associations for all invasive cancers by histology. Heterogeneity was evaluated by likelihood ratio test. Results Most risk factors exhibited significant heterogeneity by histology. Higher parity was most strongly associated with endometrioid (relative risk [RR] per birth, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.74 to 0.83) and clear cell (RR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.61 to 0.76) carcinomas (P value for heterogeneity [P-het] < .001). Similarly, age at menopause, endometriosis, and tubal ligation were only associated with endometrioid and clear cell tumors (P-het ≤ .01). Family history of breast cancer (P-het = .008) had modest heterogeneity. Smoking was associated with an increased risk of mucinous (RR per 20 pack-years, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.46) but a decreased risk of clear cell (RR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.55 to 0.94) tumors (P-het = .004). Unsupervised clustering by risk factors separated endometrioid, clear cell, and low-grade serous carcinomas from high-grade serous and mucinous carcinomas. Conclusion The heterogeneous associations of risk factors with ovarian cancer subtypes emphasize the importance of conducting etiologic studies by ovarian cancer subtypes. Most established risk factors were more strongly associated with nonserous carcinomas, which demonstrate challenges for risk prediction of serous cancers, the most fatal subtype. PMID:27325851

  18. Biological Basis for Chemoprevention of Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-10-01

    birth control pill use are strongly protective. To achieve a better understanding of the etiology of ovarian cancer, which can then be translated into effective prevention strategies, we have initiated a case-control study that considers genetic susceptibility, epidemiologic risk factors and acquired genetic alterations. Subjects are interviewed in their homes and about 650 cases and 650 controls have been accrued thus far. Blood and cancer samples have been collected and molecular analyses of genetic polymorphisms (BRCA1/2, progesterone receptor) have been performed. An

  19. Biological Basis for Chemoprevention of Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    birth control pill use are strongly protective. To achieve a better understanding of the etiology of ovarian cancer, which can then be translated into effective prevention strategies, we have initiated a case-control study that considers genetic susceptibility, epidemiologic risk factors and acquired genetic alterations. Subjects are interviewed in their homes and about 750 cases and 750 controls have been accrued thus far. Blood and cancer samples have been collected and molecular analyses of genetic polymorphisms (BRCA1/2, progesterone receptor, vitamin D receptor,

  20. Comparison of Expression Profiles in Ovarian Epithelium In Vivo and Ovarian Cancer Identifies Novel Candidate Genes Involved in Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Emmanuel, Catherine; Gava, Natalie; Kennedy, Catherine; Balleine, Rosemary L.; Sharma, Raghwa; Wain, Gerard; Brand, Alison; Hogg, Russell; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; George, Joshy; Birrer, Michael J.; Clarke, Christine L.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Bowtell, David D. L.; Harnett, Paul R.; deFazio, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Molecular events leading to epithelial ovarian cancer are poorly understood but ovulatory hormones and a high number of life-time ovulations with concomitant proliferation, apoptosis, and inflammation, increases risk. We identified genes that are regulated during the estrous cycle in murine ovarian surface epithelium and analysed these profiles to identify genes dysregulated in human ovarian cancer, using publically available datasets. We identified 338 genes that are regulated in murine ovarian surface epithelium during the estrous cycle and dysregulated in ovarian cancer. Six of seven candidates selected for immunohistochemical validation were expressed in serous ovarian cancer, inclusion cysts, ovarian surface epithelium and in fallopian tube epithelium. Most were overexpressed in ovarian cancer compared with ovarian surface epithelium and/or inclusion cysts (EpCAM, EZH2, BIRC5) although BIRC5 and EZH2 were expressed as highly in fallopian tube epithelium as in ovarian cancer. We prioritised the 338 genes for those likely to be important for ovarian cancer development by in silico analyses of copy number aberration and mutation using publically available datasets and identified genes with established roles in ovarian cancer as well as novel genes for which we have evidence for involvement in ovarian cancer. Chromosome segregation emerged as an important process in which genes from our list of 338 were over-represented including two (BUB1, NCAPD2) for which there is evidence of amplification and mutation. NUAK2, upregulated in ovarian surface epithelium in proestrus and predicted to have a driver mutation in ovarian cancer, was examined in a larger cohort of serous ovarian cancer where patients with lower NUAK2 expression had shorter overall survival. In conclusion, defining genes that are activated in normal epithelium in the course of ovulation that are also dysregulated in cancer has identified a number of pathways and novel candidate genes that may contribute

  1. Psychosocial Stress and Ovarian Cancer Risk: Metabolomics and Perceived Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0493 TITLE: Psychosocial Stress and Ovarian Cancer Risk: Metabolomics and Perceived Stress PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...CONTRACT NUMBER Psychosocial Stress and Ovarian Cancer Risk: Metabolomics and Perceived Stress 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0493 5c. PROGRAM...Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Mouse models suggest that chronic stress promotes ovarian tumorigenesis, but the relationship

  2. Development of a Mouse Model of Menopausal Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Elizabeth R.; Wang, Ying; Xu, Xiang-Xi

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant understanding of the genetic mutations involved in ovarian epithelial cancer and advances in genomic approaches for expression and mutation profiling of tumor tissues, several key questions in ovarian cancer biology remain enigmatic: the mechanism for the well-established impact of reproductive factors on ovarian cancer risk remains obscure; cell of origin of ovarian cancer continue to be debated; and the precursor lesion, sequence, or events in progression remain to be defined. Suitable mouse models should complement the analysis of human tumor tissues and may provide clues to these questions currently perplexing ovarian cancer biology. A potentially useful model is the germ cell-deficient Wv (white spotting variant) mutant mouse line, which may be used to study the impact of menopausal physiology on the increased risk of ovarian cancer. The Wv mice harbor a point mutation in c-Kit that reduces the receptor tyrosine kinase activity to about 1–5% (it is not a null mutation). Homozygous Wv mutant females have a reduced ovarian germ cell reservoir at birth and the follicles are rapidly depleted upon reaching reproductive maturity, but other biological phenotypes are minimal and the mice have a normal life span. The loss of ovarian function precipitates changes in hormonal and metabolic activity that model features of menopause in humans. As a consequence of follicle depletion, the Wv ovaries develop ovarian tubular adenomas, a benign epithelial tumor corresponding to surface epithelial invaginations and papillomatosis that mark human ovarian aging. Ongoing work will test the possibility of converting the benign epithelial tubular adenomas into neoplastic tumors by addition of an oncogenic mutation, such as of Tp53, to model the genotype and biology of serous ovarian cancer. Model based on the Wv mice may have the potential to gain biological and etiological insights into ovarian cancer development and prevention. PMID:24616881

  3. Aurora-A Oncogene in Human Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-05-1-0021 TITLE: Aurora-A Oncogene in Human Ovarian... in Human Ovarian Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-05-1-0021 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Jin Q. Cheng, M.D...is frequently altered in human ovarian cancer (1). Overexpressing Aurora-A induces centrosome amplification and G2/M cell cycle progression

  4. Anthropometric characteristics and ovarian cancer risk and survival.

    PubMed

    Minlikeeva, Albina N; Moysich, Kirsten B; Mayor, Paul C; Etter, John L; Cannioto, Rikki A; Ness, Roberta B; Starbuck, Kristen; Edwards, Robert P; Segal, Brahm H; Lele, Sashikant; Odunsi, Kunle; Diergaarde, Brenda; Modugno, Francesmary

    2018-02-01

    Multiple studies have examined the role of anthropometric characteristics in ovarian cancer risk and survival; however, their results have been conflicting. We investigated the associations between weight change, height and height change and risk and outcome of ovarian cancer using data from a large population-based case-control study. Data from 699 ovarian cancer cases and 1,802 controls who participated in the HOPE study were included. We used unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, race, number of pregnancies, use of oral contraceptives, and family history of breast or ovarian cancer to examine the associations between self-reported height and weight and height change with ovarian cancer risk. Cox proportional hazards regression models adjusted for age and stage were used to examine the association between the exposure variables and overall and progression-free survival among ovarian cancer cases. We observed an increased risk of ovarian cancer mortality and progression for gaining more than 20 pounds between ages 18-30, HR 1.36; 95% CI 1.05-1.76, and HR 1.31; 95% CI 1.04-1.66, respectively. Losing weight and gaining it back multiple times was inversely associated with both ovarian cancer risk, OR 0.78; 95% CI 0.63-0.97 for 1-4 times and OR 0.73; 95% CI 0.54-0.99 for 5-9 times, and mortality, HR 0.63; 95% CI 0.40-0.99 for 10-14 times. Finally, being taller during adolescence and adulthood was associated with increased risk of mortality. Taller stature and weight gain over lifetime were not related to ovarian cancer risk. Our results suggest that height and weight and their change over time may influence ovarian cancer risk and survival. These findings suggest that biological mechanisms underlying these associations may be hormone driven and may play an important role in relation to ovarian carcinogenesis and tumor progression.

  5. Platinum resistance in breast and ovarian cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Niels

    2011-10-04

    Breast and ovarian cancers are among the 10 leading cancer types in females with mortalities of 15% and 6%, respectively. Despite tremendous efforts to conquer malignant diseases, the war on cancer declared by Richard Nixon four decades ago seems to be lost. Approximately 21,800 women in the US will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2011. Therefore, its incidence is relatively low compared to breast cancer with 207.090 prognosed cases in 2011. However, overall survival unmasks ovarian cancer as the most deadly gynecological neoplasia. Platinum-based chemotherapy is emerging as an upcoming treatment modality especially in triple negative breast cancer. However, in ovarian cancer Platinum-complexes for a long time are established as first line treatment. Emergence of a resistant phenotype is a major hurdle in curative cancer therapy approaches and many scientists around the world are focussing on this issue. This review covers new findings in this field during the past decade.

  6. Body mass index and risk of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Leitzmann, Michael F; Koebnick, Corinna; Danforth, Kim N; Brinton, Louise A; Moore, Steven C; Hollenbeck, Albert R; Schatzkin, Arthur; Lacey, James V

    2009-02-15

    Convincing epidemiologic evidence links excess body mass to increased risks of endometrial and postmenopausal breast cancers, but the relation between body mass index (BMI) and ovarian cancer risk remains inconclusive. Potential similarities regarding a hormonal mechanism in the etiology of female cancers highlight the importance of investigating associations according to menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) use. However, to the authors' knowledge, data addressing whether the relation between BMI and ovarian cancer differs by MHT use are very sparse. The authors prospectively investigated the association between BMI and ovarian cancer among 94,525 US women who were followed between 1996 through 1997 to December 31, 2003. During 7 years of follow-up, 303 epithelial ovarian cancer cases were documented. Compared with normal weight women (BMI of 18.5-24.9 kg/m(2)), the multivariate relative risk (MVRR) of ovarian cancer for obese women (BMI of >or=30 kg/m(2)) in the cohort as a whole was 1.26 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.94-1.68). Among women who never used MHT, the MVRR for obese versus normal weight women was 1.83 (95% CI, 1.18-2.84). In contrast, no relation between BMI and ovarian cancer was apparent among women who ever used MHT (MVRR = 0.96; 95% CI, 0.65-1.43; P interaction = 0.02). Exploratory analyses also suggested a positive association between BMI and ovarian cancer among women without a family history of ovarian cancer (MVRR comparing obese vs normal weight women = 1.36; 95% CI, 1.00-1.86), but no relation with BMI was apparent among women with a positive family history of ovarian cancer (MVRR = 0.74; 95% CI, 0.34-1.62 [P interaction = .02]). Based on the results of the current study, the authors suspect that obesity is associated with enhanced ovarian cancer risk through a hormonal mechanism.

  7. Origins based clinical and molecular complexities of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Muinao, Thingreila; Pal, Mintu; Boruah, Hari Prasanna Deka

    2018-06-08

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal of all common gynaecological malignancies in women worldwide. Ovarian cancer comprises of >15 distinct tumor types and subtypes characterized by histopathological features, environmental and genetic risk factors, precursor lesions and molecular events during oncogenesis. Recent studies on gene signatures profiling of different subtypes of ovarian cancer have revealed significant genetic heterogeneity between and within each ovarian cancer histological subtype. Thus, an immense interest have shown towards a more personalized medicine for understanding the clinical and molecular complexities of four major types of epithelial ovarian cancer (serous, endometrioid, clear cell, and mucinous). As such, further in depth studies are needed for identification of molecular signalling network complexities associated with effective prognostication and targeted therapies to prevent or treat metastasis. Therefore, understanding the metastatic potential of primary ovarian cancer and therapeutic interventions against lethal ovarian cancer for the development of personalized therapies is very much indispensable. Consequently, in this review we have updated the key dysregulated genes of four major subtypes of epithelial carcinomas. We have also highlighted the recent advances and current challenges in unravelling the complexities of the origin of tumor as well as genetic heterogeneity of ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Paclitaxel targets VEGF-mediated angiogenesis in ovarian cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Bin; Bie, Zhixin; Zhang, Shuai; Li, Ailing

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the gynecologic cancers with the highest mortality, wherein vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is involved in regulating tumor vascularization, growth, migration, and invasion. VEGF-mediated angiogenesis in tumors has been targeted in various cancer treatments, and anti-VEGF therapy has been used clinically for treatment of several types of cancer. Paclitaxel is a natural antitumor agent in the standard front-line treatment that has significant efficiency to treat advanced cancers, including ovarian cancer. Although platinum/paclitaxel-based chemotherapy has good response rates, most patients eventually relapse because the disease develops drug resistance. We aim to review the recent advances in paclitaxel treatment of ovarian cancer via antiangiogenesis. Single-agent therapy may be used in selected cases of ovarian cancer. However, to prevent drug resistance, drug combinations should be identified for optimal effectiveness and existing therapies should be improved. PMID:27648354

  9. General Information About Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, and Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... condition or to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, and Primary Peritoneal Cancer ... PDQ Screening and Prevention Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  10. Combining Drugs to Treat Ovarian Cancer - Annual Plan

    Cancer.gov

    Approximately 70 percent of women diagnosed with ovarian cancer will die from the disease. Read about the NCI-funded combination drug trial that has successfully treated Betsy Brauser's recurrent cancer.

  11. Dihydroartemisinin is an inhibitor of ovarian cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yang; Ge, Chun-min; Meng, Qing-hui; Cao, Jian-ping; Tong, Jian; Fan, Sai-jun

    2007-07-01

    To investigate the anticancer activity of dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a derivative of antimalaria drug artemisinin in a panel of human ovarian cancer cell lines. Cell growth was determined by the MTT viability assay. Apoptosis and cell cycle progression were evaluated by a DNA fragmentation gel electro-phoresis, flow cytometry assay, and TUNEL assay; protein and mRNA expression were analyzed by Western blotting and RT-PCR assay. Artemisinin and its derivatives, including artesunate, arteether, artemether, arteannuin, and DHA, exhibit anticancer growth activities in human ovarian cancer cells. Among them, DHA is the most effective in inhibiting cell growth. Ovarian cancer cell lines are more sensitive (5-10-fold) to DHA treatment compared to normal ovarian cell lines. DHA at micromolar dose levels exhibits a dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity in ovarian cancer cell lines. Furthermore, DHA induced apoptosis and G2 cell cycle arrest, accompanied by a decrease of Bcl-xL and Bcl-2 and an increase of Bax and Bad. The promising results show for the first time that DHA inhibits the growth of human ovarian cancer cells. The selective inhibition of ovarian cancer cell growth, apoptosis induction, and G2 arrest provide in vitro evidence for further studies of DHA as a possible anticancer drug in the clinical treatment of ovarian cancer.

  12. Paternal lineage early onset hereditary ovarian cancers: A Familial Ovarian Cancer Registry study.

    PubMed

    Eng, Kevin H; Szender, J Brian; Etter, John Lewis; Kaur, Jasmine; Poblete, Samantha; Huang, Ruea-Yea; Zhu, Qianqian; Grzesik, Katherine A; Battaglia, Sebastiano; Cannioto, Rikki; Krolewski, John J; Zsiros, Emese; Frederick, Peter J; Lele, Shashikant B; Moysich, Kirsten B; Odunsi, Kunle O

    2018-02-01

    Given prior evidence that an affected woman conveys a higher risk of ovarian cancer to her sister than to her mother, we hypothesized that there exists an X-linked variant evidenced by transmission to a woman from her paternal grandmother via her father. We ascertained 3,499 grandmother/granddaughter pairs from the Familial Ovarian Cancer Registry at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute observing 892 informative pairs with 157 affected granddaughters. We performed germline X-chromosome exome sequencing on 186 women with ovarian cancer from the registry. The rate of cancers was 28.4% in paternal grandmother/granddaughter pairs and 13.9% in maternal pairs consistent with an X-linked dominant model (Chi-square test X2 = 0.02, p = 0.89) and inconsistent with an autosomal dominant model (X2 = 20.4, p<0.001). Paternal grandmother cases had an earlier age-of-onset versus maternal cases (hazard ratio HR = 1.59, 95%CI: 1.12-2.25) independent of BRCA1/2 status. Reinforcing the X-linked hypothesis, we observed an association between prostate cancer in men and ovarian cancer in his mother and daughters (odds ratio, OR = 2.34, p = 0.034). Unaffected mothers with affected daughters produced significantly more daughters than sons (ratio = 1.96, p<0.005). We performed exome sequencing in reported BRCA negative cases from the registry. Considering age-of-onset, one missense variant (rs176026 in MAGEC3) reached chromosome-wide significance (Hazard ratio HR = 2.85, 95%CI: 1.75-4.65) advancing the age of onset by 6.7 years. In addition to the well-known contribution of BRCA, we demonstrate that a genetic locus on the X-chromosome contributes to ovarian cancer risk. An X-linked pattern of inheritance has implications for genetic risk stratification. Women with an affected paternal grandmother and sisters of affected women are at increased risk for ovarian cancer. Further work is required to validate this variant and to characterize carrier families.

  13. Paternal lineage early onset hereditary ovarian cancers: A Familial Ovarian Cancer Registry study

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Kevin H.; Szender, J. Brian; Etter, John Lewis; Kaur, Jasmine; Poblete, Samantha; Huang, Ruea-Yea; Zhu, Qianqian; Battaglia, Sebastiano; Cannioto, Rikki; Krolewski, John J.; Zsiros, Emese; Frederick, Peter J.; Lele, Shashikant B.; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Odunsi, Kunle O.

    2018-01-01

    Given prior evidence that an affected woman conveys a higher risk of ovarian cancer to her sister than to her mother, we hypothesized that there exists an X-linked variant evidenced by transmission to a woman from her paternal grandmother via her father. We ascertained 3,499 grandmother/granddaughter pairs from the Familial Ovarian Cancer Registry at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute observing 892 informative pairs with 157 affected granddaughters. We performed germline X-chromosome exome sequencing on 186 women with ovarian cancer from the registry. The rate of cancers was 28.4% in paternal grandmother/granddaughter pairs and 13.9% in maternal pairs consistent with an X-linked dominant model (Chi-square test X2 = 0.02, p = 0.89) and inconsistent with an autosomal dominant model (X2 = 20.4, p<0.001). Paternal grandmother cases had an earlier age-of-onset versus maternal cases (hazard ratio HR = 1.59, 95%CI: 1.12–2.25) independent of BRCA1/2 status. Reinforcing the X-linked hypothesis, we observed an association between prostate cancer in men and ovarian cancer in his mother and daughters (odds ratio, OR = 2.34, p = 0.034). Unaffected mothers with affected daughters produced significantly more daughters than sons (ratio = 1.96, p<0.005). We performed exome sequencing in reported BRCA negative cases from the registry. Considering age-of-onset, one missense variant (rs176026 in MAGEC3) reached chromosome-wide significance (Hazard ratio HR = 2.85, 95%CI: 1.75–4.65) advancing the age of onset by 6.7 years. In addition to the well-known contribution of BRCA, we demonstrate that a genetic locus on the X-chromosome contributes to ovarian cancer risk. An X-linked pattern of inheritance has implications for genetic risk stratification. Women with an affected paternal grandmother and sisters of affected women are at increased risk for ovarian cancer. Further work is required to validate this variant and to characterize carrier families. PMID:29447163

  14. GPER-1 acts as a tumor suppressor in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It is known that the new membrane-bound estrogen receptor GPER-1 acts suppressive in breast cancer cells and its expression decreases during disease progression. This study was conducted to evaluate the GPER-1 expression in ovarian cancer and its correlation with progression. Its function was tested in vitro in ovarian cancer cells. Patients and methods GPER-1 expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 35 benign ovarian tumors, 35 tumors of low-malignant potential and in 124 ovarian cancers. GPER-1 expression was correlated to the prospectively evaluated disease-free survival of ovarian cancer patients. We also tested GPER-1 expression in ovarian cancer cells and the effect of GPER-1 stimulation on cell growth. Results GPER-1 expression was significantly lower in ovarian cancer tissue than in benign and low-malignant ovarian tumors. GPER-1 expression was observed in 83.1% of malignant tumors and was higher in early stage cancers and tumors with high histological differentiation. GPER-1 expression was associated with favourable clinical outcome. The difference in 2-year disease-free survival by GPER-1 expression was significant, 28.6% for GPER-1 negative and 59.2% for GPER-1 positive cases (p = 0.002). GPER-1 expression was observed in SKOV-3 and OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cell lines. G-1, a selective GPER-1 agonist, suppressed proliferation of the two cell types via inhibition of cell cycle progression in G2/M phase and stimulation of caspase-dependent apoptosis. The blockade in G2/M phase was associated with increased expression of cyclin B1 and Cdc2 and phosphorylation of histone 3. Conclusion GPER-1 emerges as a new tumor suppressor with unsuspected therapeutic potential for ovarian cancer. PMID:23849542

  15. Surgery for advanced epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Neville F; Rao, Archana

    2017-05-01

    Cytoreductive surgery for patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer has been practised since the pioneering work of Tom Griffiths in 1975. Further research has demonstrated the prognostic significance of the extent of metastatic disease pre-operatively, and of complete cytoreduction post-operatively. Patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer should be referred to high volume cancer units, and managed by multidisciplinary teams. The role of thoracoscopy and resection of intrathoracic disease is presently investigational. In recent years, there has been increasing use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and interval cytoreductive surgery in patients with poor performance status, which is usually due to large volume ascites and/or large pleural effusions. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy reduces the post-operative morbidity, but if the tumour responds well to the chemotherapy, the inflammatory response makes the surgery more difficult. Post-operative morbidity is generally tolerable, but increases in older patients, and in those having multiple, aggressive surgical procedures, such as bowel resection or diaphragmatic stripping. Primary cytoreductive surgery should be regarded as the gold standard for most patients until a test is developed which would allow the prediction of platinum resistance pre-operatively. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Molecular Epidemiology of Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    Testing of hypotheses relating to androgen exposure ( polycystic ovary syndrome, hirsutism, acne etc): (a) Analysis by histologic subtype (b) Analysis by...having primary epithelial cancer of the ovary , peritoneum or fallopian tube, of whom 1092 returned a questionnaire, 1022 gave a blood sample and we...increasing recognition that invasive mucinous tumours of the ovary are usually secondary neoplasms (Lee et al). Table 4: Total number of AOCS frozen tissue

  17. Molecular Epidemiology of Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Task 5: Testing of hypotheses relating to androgen exposure ( polycystic ovary syndrome , hirsutism, acne etc): (a) Analysis by histologic subtype (b...eg omentum or ovary ). Samples are processed using Trizol and RNeasy and RNA quality accessed using a BioAnalyser, degradometer software, and a NanoDrop...or histological information separates groups, such as a comparison of LMP and invasive cancer or relating expression profiles to treatment response or

  18. JNK-1 Inhibition Leads to Antitumor Activity in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vivas-Mejia, Pablo; Benito, Juliana Maria; Fernandez, Ariel; Han, Hee-Dong; Mangala, Lingegowda; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Chavez-Reyes, Arturo; Lin, Yvonne G.; Nick, Alpa M.; Stone, Rebecca L.; Kim, Hye Sun; Claret, Francois-Xavier; Bornmann, William; Hennessy, Bryan TJ.; Sanguino, Angela; Peng, Zhengong; Sood, Anil K.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the functional, clinical and biological significance of JNK-1 in ovarian carcinoma. Experimental Design Analysis of the impact of JNK on 116 epithelial ovarian cancers was conducted. The role of JNK in vitro and in experimental models of ovarian cancer was assessed. We studied the role of WBZ_4, a novel JNK inhibitor redesigned from imatinib based on targeting wrapping defects, in cell lines and in experimental models of ovarian cancer. Results We found a significant association of pJNK with progression free survival in the 116 epithelial ovarian cancers obtained at primary debulking therapy. WBZ_4 led to cell growth inhibition and increased apoptosis in a dose dependent fashion in four ovarian cancer cell lines. In vivo, while imatinib had no effect on tumor growth, WBZ_4 inhibited tumor growth in orthotopic murine models of ovarian cancer. The anti-tumor effect was further increased in combination with docetaxel. Silencing of JNK-1 with systemically administered siRNA led to significantly reduced tumor weights as compared to non-silencing siRNA controls, indicating that indeed the antitumor effects observed were due to JNK-1 inhibition. Conclusions These studies identify JNK-1 as an attractive therapeutic target in ovarian carcinoma and that the re-designed WBZ_4 compound should be considered for further clinical development. PMID:20028751

  19. The bimanual ovarian palpation examination in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian cancer screening trial: Performance and complications.

    PubMed

    Doroudi, Maryam; Kramer, Barnett S; Pinsky, Paul F

    2017-12-01

    Objective To provide evidence about the performance characteristics and consequences of bimanual ovarian palpation. Setting and methods The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian cancer screening trial randomized 154,900 individuals to either an intervention or control arm. Enrolled eligible participants were aged 55-74, had no history of trial cancers, and no current treatment for cancer. Intervention arm women received CA-125 tests and transvaginal ultrasound. Bimanual ovarian palpation was offered annually during the first four years of the trial. Bimanual ovarian palpation-specific sensitivity and specificity were calculated, as were rates of diagnostic procedures and resulting complications following positive bimanual ovarian palpation screens. Results A total of 20,872 women received at least one bimanual ovarian palpation, with 50,498 total bimanual ovarian palpation examinations performed. The sensitivity and specificity of bimanual ovarian palpation were 5.1% (2/39) and 99.0% (49,957/50,459), respectively; no cases were detected by bimanual ovarian palpation alone. Rates for most follow-up procedures for abnormal results in women without ovarian cancer were higher among the group with another screening test positive, except for pelvic exam, where rates were similar. No complications were reported in the bimanual ovarian palpation-only positive group. Conclusion Low sensitivity of bimanual ovarian palpation alone and in combination with other tests argue against using bimanual ovarian palpation as a screening test for ovarian cancer in asymptomatic women.

  20. Incidence and mortality in epithelial ovarian cancer by family history of any cancer.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, Kari; Sundquist, Jan; Brandt, Andreas

    2011-09-01

    Practically all data on familial risk in ovarian and other cancers are based on incident cancer, whereas familiality in cancer mortality is largely unknown. If fatal forms of cancer are a highly familial subtype, then familial risk for mortality may exceed that of incidence, which is relevant for clinical decision making and counseling. Ovarian cancer patients in the nationwide Swedish Family Cancer Database were classified according to fatal and nonfatal (incident) family history. Familial risks for incident and fatal ovarian cancer were calculated for offspring based on their parental or sibling family history of any cancer using standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for incidence and standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for mortality. Offspring without family history were referents. The database included 24,757 mothers and 8138 daughters with ovarian cancer. When a mother had ovarian cancer, the SIR for incident ovarian cancer in daughters was 2.69, and when a sister had ovarian cancer it was 3.49. The SMRs for fatal cancer by fatal cancer in probands were 3.39 and 5.80, respectively. For fatal serous cancers among siblings, the SMR was 6.16, compared with 10.01 for the endometrioid type. Ovarian cancer was associated with maternal (SIR, 1.22; SMR, 1.56) and sororal breast cancer (SIR, 1.27). Another discordant association was between ovarian and paternal prostate cancer (SIR, 1.12; SMR, 1.66). Fatal familial risks were higher for concordant ovarian, ovarian-breast, and ovarian-prostate cancers than the corresponding incident risks. This may suggest that highly fatal subtypes exist for these cancers, calling for genetic dissection. Cancer 2011 © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  1. Ovarian cancer stem cells more questions than answers.

    PubMed

    Ottevanger, Petronella Beatrix

    2017-06-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is a highly lethal disease, which is usually diagnosed at a late stage with extensive metastases in the abdominal cavity. Ovarian cancer either develops from the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE) or from serous intra-epithelial carcinoma (STIC). Primary therapy consists of debulking surgery and platinum based chemotherapy. The success of debulking surgery depends on surgical skills but also on the gene signature of the tumour. Debulking surgery combined with first line platinum based chemotherapy, frequently leads to complete remission. However, most ovarian cancers relapse. Once the disease has relapsed, the interval between subsequent therapies decreases steadily due to rapid progression and therapy resistance. Research on therapy resistance of ovarian cancer is frequently devoted to genetic alterations in cancer cells, leading to drug inactivation, enhanced DNA repair mechanisms and intracellular pathway derangements. However the knowledge of ovarian cancer stem cells (OCSC) and the role they play in the development of cancer and therapy resistance is sparse. In this review current knowledge on the characteristics of OCSCs and the micro environmental mechanisms leading to the development or activation of OCSCs resulting in ovarian cancer is reviewed. Moreover the role of OCSC in both surgical and systemic therapy resistance and the relation with epithelial mesenchymal transformation (EMT) is discussed, as are micro-environmental signals leading to OCSC or EMT activation. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. FRET Imaging Trackable Long Circulating Biodegradable Nanomedicines for Ovarian Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    difference between treatment with 2P-EPI and P- EPI until day 35 when tumor started regrowth in P-EPI group , and four of the tumors grew back to ~1200...A2780 ovarian tumors were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 5 for each group ). P-EPI and 2P-EPIwere administered via tail veinwith dose 5mg/kg...and P-EPI until day 35 when tumor started re- growth in P-EPI group , and four of the tumors grew back to ~1200% at day 80 (p b 0.01) (Fig. 3). On the

  3. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel or Oxaliplatin and Capecitabine With or Without Bevacizumab as First-Line Therapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV or Recurrent Stage I Epithelial Ovarian or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-21

    Borderline Ovarian Mucinous Tumor; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer

  4. Ovarian Cancer Treatment | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  5. Nedd4L expression is decreased in ovarian epithelial cancer tissues compared to ovarian non-cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiuyun; Zhao, Jinghe; Cui, Manhua; Gi, Shuting; Wang, Wei; Han, Xiaole

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated 4-like (Nedd4L) gene plays a role in the progression of various cancers. However, reports describing Nedd4L expression in ovarian cancer tissues are limited. A cohort (n = 117) of archival formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded resected normal ovarian epithelial tissues (n = 10), benign ovarian epithelial tumor tissues (n = 10), serous borderline ovarian epithelial tumor tissues (n = 14), mucous borderline ovarian epithelial tumor tissues (n = 11), and invasive ovarian epithelial cancer tissues (n = 72) were assessed for Nedd4L protein expression using immunohistochemistry. Nedd4L protein expression was significantly decreased in invasive ovarian epithelial cancer tissues compared to non-cancer tissues (P < 0.05). Decreased Nedd4L protein expression correlated with clinical stage, pathological grade, lymph node metastasis and survival (P < 0.05). Nedd4L protein expression may be an independent prognostic marker of ovarian cancer development. © 2015 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  6. Distinct metabolic responses of an ovarian cancer stem cell line.

    PubMed

    Vermeersch, Kathleen A; Wang, Lijuan; McDonald, John F; Styczynski, Mark P

    2014-12-18

    Cancer metabolism is emerging as an important focus area in cancer research. However, the in vitro cell culture conditions under which much cellular metabolism research is performed differ drastically from in vivo tumor conditions, which are characterized by variations in the levels of oxygen, nutrients like glucose, and other molecules like chemotherapeutics. Moreover, it is important to know how the diverse cell types in a tumor, including cancer stem cells that are believed to be a major cause of cancer recurrence, respond to these variations. Here, in vitro environmental perturbations designed to mimic different aspects of the in vivo environment were used to characterize how an ovarian cancer cell line and its derived, isogenic cancer stem cells metabolically respond to environmental cues. Mass spectrometry was used to profile metabolite levels in response to in vitro environmental perturbations. Docetaxel, the chemotherapeutic used for this experiment, caused significant metabolic changes in amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism in ovarian cancer cells, but had virtually no metabolic effect on isogenic ovarian cancer stem cells. Glucose deprivation, hypoxia, and the combination thereof altered ovarian cancer cell and cancer stem cell metabolism to varying extents for the two cell types. Hypoxia had a much larger effect on ovarian cancer cell metabolism, while glucose deprivation had a greater effect on ovarian cancer stem cell metabolism. Core metabolites and pathways affected by these perturbations were identified, along with pathways that were unique to cell types or perturbations. The metabolic responses of an ovarian cancer cell line and its derived isogenic cancer stem cells differ greatly under most conditions, suggesting that these two cell types may behave quite differently in an in vivo tumor microenvironment. While cancer metabolism and cancer stem cells are each promising potential therapeutic targets, such varied behaviors in vivo would need to

  7. Risk factors for ovarian cancers with and without microsatellite instability.

    PubMed

    Segev, Yakir; Pal, Tuya; Rosen, Barry; McLaughlin, John R; Sellers, Thomas A; Risch, Harvey A; Zhang, Shiyu; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A; Schildkraut, Joellen

    2014-05-01

    In a population-based sample of epithelial ovarian cancers, the objective of this study was to evaluate the association between microsatellite instability (MSI) status and the following factors: (1) ovarian cancer risk factors and (2) the distribution of the specific histologic subtypes. Participants were drawn from 3 population-based studies of primary epithelial ovarian cancer; tumor DNA was analyzed using 5 standardized microsatellite markers to assess the MSI status. Patients were divided into 3 groups (MSI-high, MSI-low, and MSI-stable) according to the National Cancer Institute criteria. We compared the prevalence of specific known risk and protective factors among the 3 subgroups, including body mass index, smoking history, parity, BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status, past oral contraceptive use, and tubal ligation. Similarly, we compared the distribution of the histologic subtypes among the 3 subgroups. A total of 917 ovarian cancer patients were included. One hundred twenty-seven cases of cancer (13.8%) were MSI-high. Subgroup analyses according to smoking, body mass index, parity, past oral contraceptive use, and past tubal ligation did not reveal any statistically significance differences among the groups. Among the 29 patients with BRCA1 mutations, 20.7% had MSI-high cancers compared with 5.9% among 17 patients with BRCA2 mutations. The proportions of different ovarian cancer histologies among the various MSI subgroups were similar. The prevalence of risk and protective factors among ovarian cancer patients is similar for cancers with and without MSI. The distributions of MSI do not differ significantly among ovarian cancers with different histologies. Ovarian cancer patients with BRCA1 mutations had a 21% rate of MSI-high tumors compared with 6% among patients with BRCA2 mutations, but this difference was not statistically significant.

  8. Risk factors for ovarian cancers with and without microsatellite instability.

    PubMed

    Segev, Yakir; Pal, Tuya; Rosen, Barry; McLaughlin, John R; Sellers, Thomas A; Risch, Harvey A; Zhang, Shiyu; Ping, Sun; Narod, Steven A; Schildkraut, Joellen

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between microsatellite instability (MSI) status and (1) ovarian cancer risk factors and (2) the distribution of the specific histologic subtypes in a population-based sample of epithelial ovarian cancers. Participants were drawn from 3 population-based studies of primary epithelial ovarian cancer. Tumor DNA was analyzed using 5 standardized microsatellite markers to assess MSI status. Patients were divided into 3 groups (MSI-high, MSI-low, and MSI-stable) according to National Cancer Institute criteria. We compared the prevalence of specific known risk and protective factors among the 3 subgroups, including body mass index, smoking history, parity, BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status, past oral contraceptive use, and tubal ligation. Similarly, we compared the distribution of the histologic subtypes among the 3 subgroups. A total of 917 ovarian cancer patients were included. One hundred twenty-seven (13.8%) cancers were MSI-high. Subgroup analyses according to smoking, body mass index, parity, past oral contraceptive use, and past tubal ligation did not reveal any statistically significant differences among the groups. Among the 29 patients with BRCA1 mutations, 20.7% had MSI-high cancers compared with 5.9% among 17 BRCA2-mutation patients. The proportions of different ovarian cancer histologic findings among the various MSI subgroups were similar. The prevalence of risk and protective factors among ovarian cancer patients is similar for cancers with and without MSI. The distributions of MSI do not differ significantly among ovarian cancers with different histologic findings. Ovarian cancer patients with BRCA1 mutations had a 21% rate of MSI-high tumors, compared with 6% among patients with BRCA2 mutations, but this difference was not statistically significant.

  9. Identifying Determinants of PARP Inhibitor Sensitivity in Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    inhibitors. Ovarian cancer patients that harbored germ- line BRCA1 mutations treated with PARP inhibitors exhibited meaningful responses in early phase...hypothesized that a range of common ovarian cancer predisposing germ- line BRCA1 gene mutations produce semi-functional proteins that are capable of...we have started our work examining exome sequences and gene expression in PARPi sensitive and resistance cancer cell lines . I attended and presented

  10. ETV5 transcription factor is overexpressed in ovarian cancer and regulates cell adhesion in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Llauradó, Marta; Abal, Miguel; Castellví, Josep; Cabrera, Sílvia; Gil-Moreno, Antonio; Pérez-Benavente, Asumpció; Colás, Eva; Doll, Andreas; Dolcet, Xavier; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Vazquez-Levin, Mónica; Reventós, Jaume; Ruiz, Anna

    2012-04-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy and the fifth leading cause of cancer deaths in women in the Western world. ETS transcription factors are known to act as positive or negative regulators of the expression of genes that are involved in various biological processes, including those that control cellular proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, tissue remodeling, angiogenesis and transformation. ETV5 belongs to the PEA3 subfamily. PEA3 subfamily members are able to activate the transcription of proteases, matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteases, which is central to both tumor invasion and angiogenesis. Here, we examined the role of the ETV5 transcription factor in epithelial ovarian cancer and we found ETV5 was upregulated in ovarian tumor samples compared to ovarian tissue controls. The in vitro inhibition of ETV5 decreased cell proliferation in serum-deprived conditions, induced EMT and cell migration and decreased cell adhesion to extracellular matrix components. ETV5 inhibition also decreased cell-cell adhesion and induced apoptosis in anchorage-independent conditions. Accordingly, upregulation of ETV5 induced the expression of cell adhesion molecules and enhanced cell survival in a spheroid model. Our findings suggest that the overexpression of ETV5 detected in ovarian cancer cells may contribute to ovarian tumor progression through the ability of ETV5 to enhance proliferation of ovarian cancer cells. In addition, upregulation of ETV5 would play a role in ovarian cancer cell dissemination and metastasis into the peritoneal cavity by protecting ovarian cancer cells from apoptosis and by increasing the adhesion of ovarian cancer cells to the peritoneal wall through the regulation of cell adhesion molecules. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  11. 3 CFR 9008 - Proclamation 9008 of August 30, 2013. National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2013

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2013 9008 Proclamation 9008 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 9008 of August 30, 2013 Proc. 9008 National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2013By the President... ovarian cancer, and more than half that number of women will die of this disease. During National Ovarian...

  12. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, Oligomenorrhea, and Risk of Ovarian Cancer Histotypes: Evidence from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium.

    PubMed

    Harris, Holly R; Babic, Ana; Webb, Penelope M; Nagle, Christina M; Jordan, Susan J; Risch, Harvey A; Rossing, Mary Anne; Doherty, Jennifer A; Goodman, Marc T; Modugno, Francesmary; Ness, Roberta B; Moysich, Kirsten B; Kjær, Susanne K; Høgdall, Estrid; Jensen, Allan; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Berchuck, Andrew; Cramer, Daniel W; Bandera, Elisa V; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Kotsopoulos, Joanne; Narod, Steven A; Phelan, Catherine M; McLaughlin, John R; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Pearce, Celeste L; Wu, Anna H; Terry, Kathryn L

    2018-02-01

    Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and one of its distinguishing characteristics, oligomenorrhea, have both been associated with ovarian cancer risk in some but not all studies. However, these associations have been rarely examined by ovarian cancer histotypes, which may explain the lack of clear associations reported in previous studies. Methods: We analyzed data from 14 case-control studies including 16,594 women with invasive ovarian cancer ( n = 13,719) or borderline ovarian disease ( n = 2,875) and 17,718 controls. Adjusted study-specific ORs were calculated using logistic regression and combined using random-effects meta-analysis. Pooled histotype-specific ORs were calculated using polytomous logistic regression. Results: Women reporting menstrual cycle length >35 days had decreased risk of invasive ovarian cancer compared with women reporting cycle length ≤35 days [OR = 0.70; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.58-0.84]. Decreased risk of invasive ovarian cancer was also observed among women who reported irregular menstrual cycles compared with women with regular cycles (OR = 0.83; 95% CI = 0.76-0.89). No significant association was observed between self-reported PCOS and invasive ovarian cancer risk (OR = 0.87; 95% CI = 0.65-1.15). There was a decreased risk of all individual invasive histotypes for women with menstrual cycle length >35 days, but no association with serous borderline tumors ( P heterogeneity = 0.006). Similarly, we observed decreased risks of most invasive histotypes among women with irregular cycles, but an increased risk of borderline serous and mucinous tumors ( P heterogeneity < 0.0001). Conclusions: Our results suggest that menstrual cycle characteristics influence ovarian cancer risk differentially based on histotype. Impact: These results highlight the importance of examining ovarian cancer risk factors associations by histologic subtype. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 27(2); 174-82. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American

  13. Successful treatment of ovarian cancer with apatinib combined with chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingzi; Tian, Zhongkai; Sun, Yehong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: The standard treatment for ovarian cancer is chemotherapy with 2 drugs (taxanes and platinum drugs). However, the traditional combination of the 2 drugs has many adverse effects (AEs) and the cancer cells will quickly become resistant to the drugs. Apatinib is a small-molecule antiangiogenic agent which has shown promising therapeutic effects against diverse tumor types, but it still remains unknown whether apatinib has an antitumor effect in patients with ovarian cancer. Herein, we present a successfully treated case of ovarian cancer using chemotherapy and apatinib, in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of this new combined regimen in ovarian cancer. Patients concerns: A 51-year-old Chinese woman presented with ovarian cancer >4.5 years. The disease and the cancer antigen 125 (CA-125) had been controlled well by surgical treatment and following chemotherapy. However, the drugs could not control the disease anymore as the CA-125 level was significantly increasing. Diagnosis: Ovarian cancer. Interventions: The patient was treated with apatinib combined with epirubicin. Apatinib was administered orally, at an initial daily dose of 500 mg, and was then reduced to 250 mg qd after the appearance of intolerable hand–foot syndrome (HFS) and oral ulcer. Then, the oral ulcer disappeared and the HFS was controlled by dose adjustment, oral vitamin B6, and hand cream application. Outcomes: The CA-125 reverted to the normal value after treatment with the new regimen. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that the original tumor lesions had disappeared. Apatinib monotherapy as maintenance therapy was then used to successfully control the cancer with a complete response. Our study is the first, to our knowledge, to report the therapeutic effects of apatinib and epirubicin on ovarian cancer. Lessons: Apatinib combined with chemotherapy and apatinib monotherapy as maintenance therapy could be a new therapeutic strategy for ovarian cancer, especially

  14. Preserved foods associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andy H; Su, Dada; Pasalich, Maria; Binns, Colin W

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the association between consumption of preserved foods and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in southern Chinese women. A hospital-based case-control study was undertaken in Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, from 2006 to 2008. Participants were 500 incident epithelial ovarian cancer patients and 500 controls, with a mean age 59 years. Information on habitual food consumption was obtained by face-to-face interview using a validated and reliable food frequency questionnaire. Logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the association between preserved foods intake and the ovarian cancer risk. The ovarian cancer patients consumed more preserved foods (median 15.5, interquartile range (IQR) 18.2g/day) than controls (median 13.8, IQR 20.5 g/day), p<0.001. The adjusted odds ratios of ovarian cancer was 1.78 (95% confidence interval 1.35 to 2.34) for women consuming more than 13.5 g of preserved vegetables and preserved meats per day relative to those below. Similar two-fold increases in risk at high level of intake were also evident for serous and mucinous subtypes of epithelial ovarian tumours. Intake of preserved foods was positively associated with the incidence of epithelial ovarian cancer in southern Chinese women. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of Fallopian Tubes in the Development of Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Camila; Iniesta, Maria D; Patrono, Maria Guadalupe; Lu, Karen H; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2017-02-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy and the fifth cause of cancer death in women in the United States. The most common and lethal histologic subtype of epithelial ovarian cancer is high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC), which generally presents at an advanced stage. HGSC may be associated with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Historically, HGSC was believed to originate from the ovarian epithelial cells. However, more recent evidence supports the idea that most ovarian cancers originate in the fallopian tube epithelium in both high-risk women and in the general population. Serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas may ultimately evolve into ovarian or peritoneal cancer. As a result, prophylactic salpingectomy with conservation of the ovaries has become an increasingly more common practice for premenopausal women undergoing risk-reducing surgery. Because the fallopian tube is now recognized as the most common potential site of origin of ovarian carcinoma, there is ongoing research to explore molecular and genetic factors that may be critical in the development of this disease. Further research is needed to identify novel opportunities for early detection and screening of ovarian cancer with the ultimate goal of increasing overall survival. Copyright © 2016 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ovarian cancer-related hypophosphatemic osteomalacia--a case report.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hung-An; Shih, Shyang-Rong; Tseng, Yu-Ting; Chen, Chi-Hau; Chiu, Wei-Yih; Hsu, Chih-Yao; Tsai, Keh-Sung

    2014-12-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome caused primarily by benign mesenchymal tumors. It has been associated with malignancies in rare cases. High serum levels of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 23 reported in a group of patients with ovarian cancer had normal serum phosphate levels. There had been no ovarian cancer-related hypophosphatemic osteomalacia in a search of the literature. We investigated a 57-year-old woman with progressive low back pain. Clinical, biochemical, and radiological assessments were performed. The patient's serum phosphate and FGF23 levels were evaluated at baseline and after treatment for ovarian cancer. The patient presented with progressive low back pain and weight loss during the previous 6 months. Imaging studies revealed low bone mineral density and multiple suspicious spinal metastatic lesions. Laboratory examination showed hypophosphatemia, hyperphosphaturia, normocalcemia, an elevated serum alkaline phosphatase level, and an elevated serum FGF23 level. Because TIO was suspected, a tumor survey was performed, and ovarian carcinoma with multiple metastasis was detected. After surgery and chemotherapy treatments for ovarian cancer, the serum phosphate and FGF23 levels returned to normal, and the low back pain improved. To our knowledge, this is the first case of ovarian cancer-related hypophosphatemic osteomalacia reported in the literature. TIO should be considered in patients with ovarian cancer presenting with weakness, bone pain, and fractures. Investigation of TIO is appropriate when these patients present hypophosphatemia.

  17. Ovarian Cancer-Related Hypophosphatemic Osteomalacia—A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hung-An; Shih, Shyang-Rong; Tseng, Yu-Ting; Chen, Chi-Hau; Chiu, Wei-Yih; Hsu, Chih-Yao

    2014-01-01

    Context: Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome caused primarily by benign mesenchymal tumors. It has been associated with malignancies in rare cases. High serum levels of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 23 reported in a group of patients with ovarian cancer had normal serum phosphate levels. There had been no ovarian cancer-related hypophosphatemic osteomalacia in a search of the literature. Objective: We investigated a 57-year-old woman with progressive low back pain. Design and Intervention: Clinical, biochemical, and radiological assessments were performed. The patient's serum phosphate and FGF23 levels were evaluated at baseline and after treatment for ovarian cancer. Results: The patient presented with progressive low back pain and weight loss during the previous 6 months. Imaging studies revealed low bone mineral density and multiple suspicious spinal metastatic lesions. Laboratory examination showed hypophosphatemia, hyperphosphaturia, normocalcemia, an elevated serum alkaline phosphatase level, and an elevated serum FGF23 level. Because TIO was suspected, a tumor survey was performed, and ovarian carcinoma with multiple metastasis was detected. After surgery and chemotherapy treatments for ovarian cancer, the serum phosphate and FGF23 levels returned to normal, and the low back pain improved. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first case of ovarian cancer-related hypophosphatemic osteomalacia reported in the literature. TIO should be considered in patients with ovarian cancer presenting with weakness, bone pain, and fractures. Investigation of TIO is appropriate when these patients present hypophosphatemia. PMID:25181387

  18. Cigarette smoking and the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Franks, A L; Lee, N C; Kendrick, J S; Rubin, G L; Layde, P M

    1987-07-01

    Cigarette smoking may affect each of the currently proposed mechanisms of ovarian carcinogenesis. Whether cigarette smoking has any effect on the development of ovarian cancer has not been adequately evaluated. To study this issue, the authors examined data from the Cancer and Steroid Hormone Study, a multicenter, case-control study of gynecologic cancers conducted between December 1, 1980, and December 31, 1982, in eight geographic areas of the United States. This analysis utilized data on 494 women with newly diagnosed epithelial ovarian cancer and 4,238 population-based control women 20-54 years of age. There was no association of epithelial ovarian cancer with dose of cigarette smoking, age smoking started, time since smoking started, or time since smoking last occurred. Simultaneous adjustment for age, parity, history of oral contraceptive use, and other potentially confounding factors did not alter these results.

  19. Identifying symptoms of ovarian cancer: a qualitative and quantitative study.

    PubMed

    Bankhead, C R; Collins, C; Stokes-Lampard, H; Rose, P; Wilson, S; Clements, A; Mant, D; Kehoe, S T; Austoker, J

    2008-07-01

    Symptoms of ovarian cancer are often vague and consequently a high proportion of women with ovarian cancer are not referred to the appropriate clinic. To identify diagnostic factors for ovarian cancer. A qualitative and quantitative study. Four UK hospitals. One hundred and twenty-four women referred to hospital with suspected ovarian malignancy. Women were interviewed prior to diagnosis (n = 63), or soon after. A thematic analysis was conducted. Emergent symptoms were quantitatively analysed to identify distinguishing features of ovarian cancer. Symptoms in women with and without ovarian cancer. Diagnoses comprised 44 malignancies, 59 benign gynaecological pathologies and 21 normal findings. Of the malignancies, 25 women had stage III or more disease, with an average age of 59 years. The benign/normal cohort was significantly younger (48 years). Multivariate analysis revealed persistent abdominal distension (OR 5.2, 95% CI 1.3-20.5), postmenopausal bleeding (OR 9.2, 95% CI 1.1-76.1), appetite loss (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.1-9.2), early satiety (OR 5.0, 95% CI 1.6-15.7) and progressive symptoms (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.3-9.8) as independent, statistically significant variables associated with ovarian cancer. Fluctuating distension was not associated with ovarian cancer (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0-4.1). Women frequently used the term bloating, but this represented two distinct events: persistent abdominal distension and fluctuating distension/discomfort. Ovarian cancer is not a silent killer. Clinicians should distinguish between persistent and fluctuating distension. Recognition of the significance of symptoms described by women could lead to earlier and more appropriate referral.

  20. Quantitative analysis of cell-free DNA in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xuefeng; He, Yan; Ji, Min; Chen, Xiaofang; Qi, Jing; Shi, Wei; Hao, Tianbo; Ju, Shaoqing

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between cell-free DNA (cf-DNA) levels and clinicopathological characteristics of patients with ovarian cancer using a branched DNA (bDNA) technique, and to determine the value of quantitative cf-DNA detection in assisting with the diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Serum specimens were collected from 36 patients with ovarian cancer on days 1, 3 and 7 following surgery, and additional serum samples were also collected from 22 benign ovarian tumor cases, and 19 healthy, non-cancerous ovaries. bDNA techniques were used to detect serum cf-DNA concentrations. All data were analyzed using SPSS version 18.0. The cf-DNA levels were significantly increased in the ovarian cancer group compared with those of the benign ovarian tumor group and healthy ovarian group (P<0.01). Furthermore, cf-DNA levels were significantly increased in stage III and IV ovarian cancer compared with those of stages I and II (P<0.01). In addition, cf-DNA levels were significantly increased on the first day post-surgery (P<0.01), and subsequently demonstrated a gradual decrease. In the ovarian cancer group, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of cf-DNA and the sensitivity were 0.917 and 88.9%, respectively, which was higher than those of cancer antigen 125 (0.724, 75%) and human epididymis protein 4 (0.743, 80.6%). There was a correlation between the levels of serum cf-DNA and the occurrence and development of ovarian cancer in the patients evaluated. bDNA techniques possessed higher sensitivity and specificity than other methods for the detection of serum cf-DNA in patients exhibiting ovarian cancer, and bDNA techniques are more useful for detecting cf-DNA than other factors. Thus, the present study demonstrated the potential value for the use of bDNA as an adjuvant diagnostic method for ovarian cancer.

  1. Recent Progress in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jelovac, Danijela; Armstrong, Deborah K.

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most lethal of the gynecologic malignancies, largely due to the advanced stage at diagnosis in most patients. Screening strategies using ultrasound and the cancer antigen (CA) 125 tumor marker are currently under study and may lower stage at diagnosis but have not yet been shown to improve survival. Women who have inherited a deleterious mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene and those with the Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer) have the highest risk of developing ovarian cancer but account for only approximately 10% of those with the disease. Other less common and less well-defined genetic syndromes may increase the risk of ovarian cancer, but their contribution to genetic risk is small. A clear etiology for sporadic ovarian cancer has not been identified, but risk is affected by reproductive and hormonal factors. Surgery has a unique role in ovarian cancer, as it is used not only for diagnosis and staging but also therapeutically, even in patients with widely disseminated, advanced disease. Ovarian cancer is highly sensitive to chemotherapy drugs, particularly the platinum agents, and most patients will attain a remission with initial treatment. Recent advances in the delivery of chemotherapy using the intraperitoneal route have further improved survival after initial therapy. Although the majority of ovarian cancer patients will respond to initial chemotherapy, most will ultimately develop disease recurrence. Chemotherapy for recurrent disease includes platinum-based, multiagent regimens for women whose disease recurs more than 6 to 12 months after the completion of initial therapy and sequential single agents for those whose disease recurs earlier. New targeted biologic agents, particularly those involved with the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway and those targeting the poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) enzyme, hold great promise for improving the outcome of ovarian cancer. PMID:21521830

  2. Occupational exposure and ovarian cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Le, Nhu D; Leung, Andy; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Gallagher, Richard P; Swenerton, Kenneth D; Demers, Paul A; Cook, Linda S

    2014-07-01

    Relatively little work has been done concerning occupational risk factors in ovarian cancer. Although studies conducted in occupational settings have reported positive associations, their usefulness is generally limited by the lack of information on important confounders. In a population-based case-control study, we assessed risk for developing epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) associated with occupational exposure while accounting for important confounders. Participants were identified through provincial population-based registries. Lifetime occupational history and information on potential confounding factors were obtained through a self-administered questionnaire. Unconditional logistic regression and the likelihood ratio test were used to assess EOC risk with each occupation (or industry), relative to all other occupations (or industries), adjusting for potential confounders including body mass index, oral contraceptive use, menopausal hormone therapy, parity, age at first childbirth, age at menarche, age at menopause, family history of breast and ovarian cancer in mother and sister(s), tubal ligation, partial oophorectomy, and hysterectomy. Occupations and industries were coded according to the Canadian Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) and Standard Industrial Classification (SIC). Significant excess risk was observed for several groups of teaching occupations, including SOC 27, teaching and related (adjusted OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.15-2.81) and SOC 279, other teaching and related (adjusted OR 3.11, 95% CI 1.35-8.49). Significant excess was also seen for a four-digit occupational group SOC 4131, bookkeepers and accounting clerks (adjusted OR 2.80, 95% CI 1.30-6.80). Industrial sub-groups showing significant excess risk included SIC 65, other retail stores (adjusted OR 2.19, 95 % CI 1.16-4.38); SIC 85, educational service (adjusted OR 1.45, 95% CI 1.00-2.13); and SIC 863, non-institutional health services (adjusted OR 2.54, 95% CI 1.13-6.52). Our study found

  3. Computed tomography findings of ovarian metastases from colon cancer: comparison with primary malignant ovarian tumors.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyuck Jae; Lee, Joo-Hyuk; Seo, Sang-Soo; Lee, Sun; Kim, Seok Ki; Kim, Joo-Young; Lee, Jong Seok; Park, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Young Hoon

    2005-01-01

    The computed tomography (CT) findings of ovarian metastases from colon cancer were evaluated and were compared with those of primary malignant ovarian tumors. Sixteen patients with 21 masses from colon cancer and 20 patients with 31 primary malignant ovarian tumors were included in this study. The CT findings (laterality, size, margin, shape, mass characteristic, strong enhancement of cyst wall, enhancement of solid portion, amount of ascites, peritoneal seeding, lymph node enlargement, and metastasis) and ages of the patients in both groups were compared. Univariate analysis, the Pearson chi test, and the independent-samples t test were used to distinguish them. A smooth margin of the tumor (odds ratio=24.3, 95% confidence interval: 2.9-204.2) and cystic nature of the mass (Pearson chi=12.96, P=0.005) were strong predictors of ovarian metastasis from colon cancer. Ovarian metastases from colon cancer show a smooth margin and more cystic nature on CT compared with primary malignant ovarian tumors.

  4. CPTAC Releases Cancer Proteome Confirmatory Ovarian Study Data | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    A catalogue of molecular aberrations that cause ovarian cancer is critical for developing and deploying diagnostics and therapies that will improve patients’ lives. Because a comprehensive molecular view of cancer is important for ultimately guiding treatment, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) has released the cancer proteome confirmatory ovarian study data sets.

  5. Ovarian Cancer Is an Imported Disease: Fact or Fiction?

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Elisabetta; Kurman, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    The cell of origin of ovarian cancer has been long debated. The current paradigm is that epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) arises from the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE). OSE is composed of flat, nondescript cells more closely resembling the mesothelium lining the peritoneal cavity, with which it is continuous, rather than the various histologic types of ovarian carcinoma (serous, endometrioid, and clear cell carcinoma), which have a Müllerian phenotype. Accordingly, it has been argued that the OSE undergoes a process termed “metaplasia” to account for this profound morphologic transformation. Recent molecular and clinicopathologic studies not only have failed to support this hypothesis but also have provided evidence that EOC stems from Müllerian-derived extraovarian cells that involve the ovary secondarily, thereby calling into question the very existence of primary EOC. This new model of ovarian carcinogenesis proposes that fallopian tube epithelium (benign or malignant) implants on the ovary to give rise to both high-grade and low-grade serous carcinomas, and that endometrial tissue implants on the ovary and produces endometriosis, which can undergo malignant transformation into endometrioid and clear cell carcinoma. Thus, ultimately EOC is not ovarian in origin but rather is secondary, and it is logical to conclude that the only true primary ovarian neoplasms are germ cell and gonadal stromal tumors analogous to tumors in the testis. If this new model is confirmed, it has profound implications for the early detection and treatment of “ovarian cancer.” PMID:22506137

  6. Impact of Chemotherapy on Retroperitoneal Lymph Nodes in Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Keyver-Paik, Mignon-Denise; Arden, Janne Myriam; Lüders, Christine; Thiesler, Thore; Abramian, Alina; Hoeller, Tobias; Hecking, Thomas; Ayub, Tiyasha Hosne; Doeser, Anna; Kaiser, Christina; Kuhn, Walther

    2016-04-01

    Complete cytoreduction is the most important prognostic factor in ovarian cancer. However, there exist conflicting data on whether the removal of microscopic tumor metastasis in macroscopically unsuspicious retroperitoneal lymph nodes is beneficial. Ovarian cancer tissues and tissues from lymph node metastasis of 30 patients with FIGO IIIC or IV disease undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) were obtained and assessed using a validated regression score. Histopathological markers, size of largest tumor focus, and overall score were evaluated in lymph node and ovarian tissue. Regression and known prognostic factors were analyzed for influence on survival. No difference in the overall score between lymph nodes and ovarian tissue was shown, however, single parameters such as fibrosis and pattern of tumor infiltration, were significantly different. The pattern of tumor regression in lymph nodes and ovarian tissue are of prognostic value. Lymph node dissection even of unsuspicious nodes should, therefore, be performed. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  7. Combining Chemotherapy with Bevacizumab Improves Outcomes for Ovarian Cancer Patients

    Cancer.gov

    Results from two phase III randomized clinical trials suggest that, at least for some patients with ovarian cancer, adding the antiangiogenesis agent bevacizumab to chemotherapy increases the time to disease progression and may improve survival.

  8. The rise of genomic profiling in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Previs, Rebecca A.; Sood, Anil K.; Mills, Gordon B.; Westin, Shannon N.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Next-generation sequencing and advances in ‘omics technology have rapidly increased our understanding of the molecular landscape of epithelial ovarian cancers. Areas covered Once characterized only by histologic appearance and clinical behavior, we now understand many of the molecular phenotypes that underlie the different ovarian cancer subtypes. While the current approach to treatment involves standard cytotoxic therapies after cytoreductive surgery for all ovarian cancers regardless of histologic or molecular characteristics, focus has shifted beyond a ‘one size fits all’ approach to ovarian cancer. Expert commentary Genomic profiling offers potentially ‘actionable’ opportunities for development of targeted therapies and a more individualized approach to treatment with concomitant improved outcomes and decreased toxicity. PMID:27828713

  9. Discovery – BRCA Connection to Breast and Ovarian Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    NCI-funded research helped identify inherited BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic mutations and their connection to breast and ovarian cancer. From this research, a screening test was also developed to help patients make informed decisions about their health.

  10. Clinical potential of proteomics in the diagnosis of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Ardekani, Ali M; Liotta, Lance A; Petricoin, Emanuel F

    2002-07-01

    The need for specific and sensitive markers of ovarian cancer is critical. Finding a sensitive and specific test for its detection has an important public health impact. Currently, there are no effective screening options available for patients with ovarian cancer. CA-125, the most widely used biomarker for ovarian cancer, does not have a high positive predictive value and it is only effective when used in combination with other diagnostic tests. However, pathologic changes taking place within the ovary may be reflected in biomarker patterns in the serum. Combination of mass spectra generated by new proteomic technologies, such as surface-enhanced laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (SELDI-TOF) and artificial-intelligence-based informatic algorithms, have been used to discover a small set of key protein values and discriminate normal from ovarian cancer patients. Serum proteomic pattern analysis might be applied ultimately in medical screening clinics, as a supplement to the diagnostic work-up and evaluation.

  11. 76 FR 55209 - National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... and Prevention and the Department of Health and Human Services have started a campaign to educate... their battle. In the memory of all the brave women who have lost their lives to ovarian cancer, and in...

  12. General Characteristics and Cytotoxic Effects of Nano-Poly (Butyl Cyanoacrylate) Containing Carboplatin on Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kanaani, Leila; Far, Meysam Ebrahimi; Kazemi, S Maryam; Choupani, Edris; Tabrizi, Maral Mazloumi; Shahmabadi, Hasan Ebrahimi; Khiyavi, Azim Akbarzadeh

    2017-01-01

    The initial response to treatment and subsequent development of resistance to carboplatin are very important challenges. Use of nano drug delivery is a new method to replace standard chemotherapy. In this research, both non-PEGylated and PEGylated nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by mini-emulsion polymerization of poly (butyl cyanoacrylate) (PBCA) NPs. Characteristics such as size, polydispersity index (PDI), zeta potential, drug release, and stability were examined. In addition, infrared spectroscopy was used for description of the produced NPs. Then, cytotoxicity effects of both formulations were studied on the A2780CIS ovarian cancer cell line with incubation for 24, 48, and 72h. Examination of characteristics of loaded carboplatin on the PBCA NPs under suitable laboratory conditions showed a positive effect of PEG on their properties. Cytotoxicity studies demonstrated greater toxicity with both formulations of nano-drugs than the free drug. The results indicated that PBCA NPs can be considered as suitable candidates for nano-drugs in chemotherapy. PMID:28240014

  13. Progesterone signaling mediated through progesterone receptor membrane component-1 in ovarian cells with special emphasis on ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Peluso, John J

    2011-08-01

    Various ovarian cell types including granulosa cells and ovarian surface epithelial cells express the progesterone (P4) binding protein, progesterone receptor membrane component-1 (PGRMC1). PGRMC1 is also expressed in ovarian tumors. PGRMC1 plays an essential role in promoting the survival of both normal and cancerous ovarian cell in vitro. Given the clinical significance of factors that regulate the viability of ovarian cancer, this review will focus on the role of PGRMC1 in ovarian cancer, while drawing insights into the mechanism of PGRMC1's action from cell lines derived from healthy ovaries as well as ovarian tumors. Studies using PGRMC1siRNA demonstrated that P4's ability to inhibit ovarian cells from undergoing apoptosis in vitro is dependent on PGRMC1. To confirm the importance of PGRMC1, the ability of PGRMC1-deplete ovarian cancer cell lines to form tumors in intact nude mice was assessed. Compared to PGRMC1-expressing ovarian cancer cells, PGRMC1-deplete ovarian cancer cells formed tumors in fewer mice (80% compared to 100% for controls). Moreover, the number of tumors derived from PGRMC1-deplete ovarian cancer cells was 50% of that observed in controls. Finally, the tumors that formed from PGRMC1-deplete ovarian cancer cells were about a fourth the size of tumors derived from ovarian cancer cells with normal levels of PGRMC1. One reason for PGRMC1-deplete tumors being smaller is that they had a poorly developed microvasculature system. How PGRMC1 regulates cell viability and in turn tumor growth is not known but part of the mechanism likely involves the regulation of genes that promote cell survival and inhibit apoptosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Sulforaphane reduces molecular response to hypoxia in ovarian tumor cells independently of their resistance to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pastorek, Michal; Simko, Veronika; Takacova, Martina; Barathova, Monika; Bartosova, Maria; Hunakova, Luba; Sedlakova, Olga; Hudecova, Sona; Krizanova, Olga; Dequiedt, Franck; Pastorekova, Silvia; Sedlak, Jan

    2015-07-01

    One of the recently emerging anticancer strategies is the use of natural dietary compounds, such as sulforaphane, a cancer-chemopreventive isothiocyanate found in broccoli. Based on the growing evidence, sulforaphane acts through molecular mechanisms that interfere with multiple oncogenic pathways in diverse tumor cell types. Herein, we investigated the anticancer effects of bioavailable concentrations of sulforaphane in ovarian carcinoma cell line A2780 and its two derivatives, adriamycin-resistant A2780/ADR and cisplatin-resistant A2780/CP cell lines. Since tumor microenvironment is characterized by reduced oxygenation that induces aggressive tumor phenotype (such as increased invasiveness and resistance to chemotherapy), we evaluated the effects of sulforaphane in ovarian cancer cells exposed to hypoxia (2% O2). Using the cell-based reporter assay, we identified several oncogenic pathways modulated by sulforaphane in hypoxia by activating anticancer responses (p53, ARE, IRF-1, Pax-6 and XRE) and suppressing responses supporting tumor progression (AP-1 and HIF-1). We further showed that sulforaphane decreases the level of HIF-1α protein without affecting its transcription and stability. It can also diminish transcription and protein level of the HIF-1 target, CA IX, which protects tumor cells from hypoxia-induced pH imbalance and facilitates their migration/invasion. Accordingly, sulforaphane treatment leads to diminished pH regulation and reduced migration of ovarian carcinoma cells. These effects occur in all three ovarian cell lines suggesting that sulforaphane can overcome the chemoresistance of cancer cells. This offers a path potentially exploitable in sensitizing resistant cancer cells to therapy, and opens a window for the combined treatments of sulforaphane either with conventional chemotherapy, natural compounds, or with other small molecules.

  15. Fertility drugs, reproductive strategies and ovarian cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Tomao, Federica; Lo Russo, Giuseppe; Spinelli, Gian Paolo; Stati, Valeria; Prete, Alessandra Anna; Prinzi, Natalie; Sinjari, Marsela; Vici, Patrizia; Papa, Anselmo; Chiotti, Maria Stefania; Benedetti Panici, Pierluigi; Tomao, Silverio

    2014-01-01

    Several adverse effects have been related to infertility treatments, such as cancer development. In particular, the relationship between infertility, reproductive strategies, and risk of gynecological cancers has aroused much interest in recent years. The evaluation of cancer risk among women treated for infertility is very complex, mainly because of many factors that can contribute to occurrence of cancer in these patients (including parity status). This article addresses the possible association between the use of fertility treatments and the risk of ovarian cancer, through a scrupulous search of the literature published thus far in this field. Our principal objective was to give more conclusive answers on the question whether the use of fertility drug significantly increases ovarian cancer risk. Our analysis focused on the different types of drugs and different treatment schedules used. This study provides additional insights regarding the long-term relationships between fertility drugs and risk of ovarian cancer.

  16. Lycopene Protects Against Spontaneous Ovarian Cancer Formation in Laying Hens

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Kazim; Yenice, Engin; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Orhan, Cemal; Mizrak, Cengizhan; Ozercan, Ibrahim H.; Sahin, Nurhan; Yilmaz, Bahiddin; Bilir, Birdal; Ozpolat, Bulent

    2018-01-01

    Background Dietary intake of lycopene has been associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer, suggesting its chemopreventive potential against ovarian carcinogenesis. Lycopene’s molecular mechanisms of action in ovarian cancer have not been fully understood. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effects of lycopene on the ovarian cancer formation using the laying hen model, a biologically relevant animal model of spontaneous ovarian carcinogenesis due to high incidence rates similar to humans. Methods In this study, a total of 150 laying hens at age of 102 weeks were randomized into groups of 50: a control group (0 mg of lycopene per kg of diet) and two treatment groups (200 mg or 400 mg of lycopene per kg of diet, or ~26 and 52 mg/d/hen, respectively). At the end of 12 months, blood, ovarian tissues and tumors were collected. Results We observed that lycopene supplementation significantly reduced the overall ovarian tumor incidence (P < 0.01) as well as the number and the size of the tumors (P < 0.004 and P < 0.005, respectively). Lycopene also significantly decreased the rate of adenocarcinoma, including serous and mucinous subtypes (P < 0.006). Moreover, we also found that the serum level of oxidative stress marker malondialdehyde was significantly lower in lycopene-fed hens compared to control birds (P < 0.001). Molecular analysis of the ovarian tumors revealed that lycopene reduced the expression of NF-κB while increasing the expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2 and its major target protein, heme oxygenase 1. In addition, lycopene supplementation decreased the expression of STAT3 by inducing the protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 expression in the ovarian tissues. Conclusions Taken together, our findings strongly support the potential of lycopene in the chemoprevention of ovarian cancer through antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. PMID:29629346

  17. Lycopene Protects Against Spontaneous Ovarian Cancer Formation in Laying Hens.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Kazim; Yenice, Engin; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Orhan, Cemal; Mizrak, Cengizhan; Ozercan, Ibrahim H; Sahin, Nurhan; Yilmaz, Bahiddin; Bilir, Birdal; Ozpolat, Bulent; Kucuk, Omer

    2018-03-01

    Dietary intake of lycopene has been associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer, suggesting its chemopreventive potential against ovarian carcinogenesis. Lycopene's molecular mechanisms of action in ovarian cancer have not been fully understood. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effects of lycopene on the ovarian cancer formation using the laying hen model, a biologically relevant animal model of spontaneous ovarian carcinogenesis due to high incidence rates similar to humans. In this study, a total of 150 laying hens at age of 102 weeks were randomized into groups of 50: a control group (0 mg of lycopene per kg of diet) and two treatment groups (200 mg or 400 mg of lycopene per kg of diet, or ~26 and 52 mg/d/hen, respectively). At the end of 12 months, blood, ovarian tissues and tumors were collected. We observed that lycopene supplementation significantly reduced the overall ovarian tumor incidence ( P < 0.01) as well as the number and the size of the tumors ( P < 0.004 and P < 0.005, respectively). Lycopene also significantly decreased the rate of adenocarcinoma, including serous and mucinous subtypes ( P < 0.006). Moreover, we also found that the serum level of oxidative stress marker malondialdehyde was significantly lower in lycopene-fed hens compared to control birds ( P < 0.001). Molecular analysis of the ovarian tumors revealed that lycopene reduced the expression of NF-κB while increasing the expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2 and its major target protein, heme oxygenase 1. In addition, lycopene supplementation decreased the expression of STAT3 by inducing the protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 expression in the ovarian tissues. Taken together, our findings strongly support the potential of lycopene in the chemoprevention of ovarian cancer through antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms.

  18. A Molecularly Targeted Theranostic Probe for Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenxue; Bardhan, Rizia; Bartels, Marc; Perez-Torres, Carlos; Pautler, Robia G.; Halas, Naomi J.; Joshi, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) family has been implicated in ovarian cancer because of its participation in signaling pathway regulating cellular proliferation, differentiation, motility, and survival. Currently, effective diagnostic and therapeutic schemes are lacking for treating ovarian cancer and consequently ovarian cancer has a high mortality rate. While HER2 receptor expression does not usually affect the survival rates of ovarian cancer to the same extent as in breast cancer, it can be employed as a docking site for directed nanotherapies in cases with de novo or acquired chemotherapy resistance. In this study, we have exploited a novel gold nanoshell-based complex (nanocomplex) for targeting, dual modal imaging, and photothermal therapy of HER2 overexpressing and drug resistant ovarian cancer OVCAR3 cells in vitro. The nanocomplexes are engineered to simultaneously provide contrast as fluorescence optical imaging probe and a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agent. Both immunofluorescence staining and MRI successfully demonstrate that nanocomplex-anti-HER2 conjugates specifically bind to OVCAR3 cells as opposed to the control, MDA-MB-231 cells, which have low HER2 expression. In addition, nanocomplexes targeted to OVCAR3 cells, when irradiated with near infrared (NIR) laser result in selective destruction of cancer cells through photothermal ablation. We also demonstrate that NIR light therapy and the nanocomplexes by themselves are non-cytotoxic in vitro. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a successful integration of dual modal bioimaging with photothermal cancer therapy for treatment of ovarian cancer. Based on their efficacy in vitro, these nanocomplexes are highly promising for image guided photo-thermal therapy of ovarian cancer as well as other HER2 overexpressing cancers. PMID:20371708

  19. Surgery and Chemotherapy With or Without Chemotherapy After Surgery in Treating Patients With Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, Uterine, or Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-04-26

    Recurrent Uterine Corpus Cancer; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  20. Psychosocial Stress and Ovarian Cancer Risk: Metabolomics and Perceived Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    noted that phobic anxiety and social isolation were suggestively associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer (hazard ratios of 1.14 and 1.24...SUBJECT TERMS ovarian cancer, psychosocial stress, depression, anxiety , social support, metabolomics 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION...application is to examine whether self-reported stress exposures (depressive symptoms, phobic anxiety , social support, job strain, care-giving stress) are

  1. Ovarian cancer in Lynch syndrome; a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Helder-Woolderink, J M; Blok, E A; Vasen, H F A; Hollema, H; Mourits, M J; De Bock, G H

    2016-03-01

    The aim was to systematically review the characteristics of ovarian cancer in women with Lynch syndrome (LS) and evaluate the role of surveillance in detection of ovarian cancer in LS. All studies between 1979 and 2015 of women with ovarian cancer and LS or at 50% risk of LS were evaluated. Two reviewers independently evaluated eligible studies and extracted data on age at diagnosis, histological type, FIGO stage, and way of detection according to pre-specified criteria. The studies were assessed for quality using the Newcastle-Ottawa quality assessment scales. The quality score of the 49 identified studies was at least 6 out of 8 and provide clinical information on 747 LS women with ovarian cancer. The mean age at diagnosis was 45.3 (range 19-82) years. Most frequent mutations were MSH2 (47%) and MLH1 (38%). Histopathological data were available for 445 women. The most frequently reported histological type was mixed type (mucinous/endometrioid/clear cell carcinomas) (n = 136; 31%). Most tumours (281, 65%) were diagnosed at an early stage (FIGO I/II). Six studies evaluating the effect of surveillance of ovarian cancer, reported that seven of 22 (32%) ovarian cancers were found during surveillance, 6/7 (86%) were detected at an early stage. This systematic review describes that ovarian cancer in women with LS has a wide age-range of onset, is often diagnosed at an early stage with frequently endometrioid/clear cell histology. Data about the role of surveillance in detection of ovarian cancer in women with LS are scarce however detection at an early stage seems possible. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Obesity Exposure Across the Lifespan on Ovarian Cancer Pathogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    exposure to the HFD or LFD, obese mice weighed significantly greater than lean mice (p=0.003, Table 1). There was no effect of HFD on non- fasted blood...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0164 TITLE: Obesity Exposure Across the Lifespan on Ovarian Cancer Pathogenesis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Victoria Bae...31 May 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Obesity Exposure Across the Lifespan on Ovarian Cancer Pathogenesis 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  3. Therapeutic Strategies against Cyclin E1-Amplified Ovarian Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0564 TITLE : Therapeutic Strategies against Cyclin E1-Amplified Ovarian Cancers PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Panagiotis A...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Therapeutic Strategies against Cyclin E1-Amplified Ovarian Cancers 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0564 5c... box protein M1, Retinoblastoma 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON

  4. Cyclin Dependent Kinase Inhibitors as Targets in Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The objective of this proposal is to develop gene ...have identified key genes that may be effective targets in ovarian cancer therapy. The first three projects seek to identify alterations in these genes ...that allow for high expression of our key gene (s) in ovarian cancer cells but minimal expression in normal tissues. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Cell cycle control

  5. [Expression and clinical significance of Xiap and Caspase-3 protien in primary epithelia ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Peng, Ping

    2010-07-01

    To study the expression and clinical significance of Xiap, Caspase-3 protein in primary epithelia ovarian cancer. The Xiap and Caspase-3 were detected by immunohistochemical in 40 cases of epithelial ovarian cancer 20 cases of borderline ovarian tumor, 15 cases of benign ovarian tumor, and 15 normal ovarian tissues. There were significantly different between the expression of Xiap in epithelial ovarian cancer, borderline ovarian tumor, benign ovarian tumor and normal ovarian tissues. The expression of Caspase-3 in epithelial ovarian cancer and borderline ovarian tumor was significantly lower than that in benign ovarian tumor and normal ovarian tissue (P<0.01). The expression of Xiap in epithelial ovarian cancer was related to clinc stage, pathological grade and living. The expression of caspase-3 in epithelial ovarian cancer was related to clinc stage and living (P<0.01). The expressions of Xiap and Caspase-3 may be important roles for the formation and development of epithelia ovarian cancer. The expressions of Xiap and Caspase-3 are the poor prognostic factors in epithelial ovarian carcinomas.

  6. Paclitaxel, Bevacizumab And Adjuvant Intraperitoneal Carboplatin in Treating Patients Who Had Initial Debulking Surgery for Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  7. Quercetin induces the apoptosis of human ovarian carcinoma cells by upregulating the expression of microRNA-145.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junbo; Gong, Jian; Ding, Chun; Chen, Guiqin

    2015-08-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the most malignant types of cancer of the female human reproductive track, posing a severe threat to the health of the female population. Numerous previous studies have demonstrated that microRNA (miR)-145 is downregulated in ovarian cancer, and that quercetin can inhibit the growth of cancer cells via regulating the expression of miRs. Therefore, the present study investigated the effect of quercetin on the expression of miR-145 in SKOV-3 and A2780 human ovarian cancer cell lines. The results revealed that the expression levels of cleaved caspase-3 in the SKOV-3 and A2780 cells were significantly increased following treatment to induce overexpression of miR-145 compared with treatment with quercetin alone (P<0.01). However, the expression of cleaved caspase-3 in the anti-miR-145 (miR-145 inhibitor) group of cells was markedly decreased compared with that in the miR-145 overexpression group (P<0.01). Taken together, the results suggested that treatment with quercetin induced the apoptosis of human ovarian carcinoma cells through activation of the extrinsic death receptor mediated and intrinsic mitochondrial apoptotic pathways.

  8. Proteomics of ovarian cancer: functional insights and clinical applications

    DOE PAGES

    Elzek, Mohamed A.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2015-03-04

    In the past decade, there has been an increasing interest in applying proteomics to assist in understanding the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer, elucidating the mechanism of drug resistance, and in the development of biomarkers for early detection of ovarian cancer. Although ovarian cancer is a spectrum of different diseases, the strategies for diagnosis and treatment with surgery and adjuvant therapy are similar across ovarian cancer types, increasing the general applicability of discoveries made through proteomics research. While proteomic experiments face many difficulties which slow the pace of clinical applications, recent advances in proteomic technology contribute significantly to the identification ofmore » aberrant proteins and networks which can serve as targets for biomarker development and individualized therapies. This review provides a summary of the literature on proteomics’ contributions to ovarian cancer research and highlights the current issues, future directions, and challenges. In conclusion, we propose that protein-level characterization of primary lesion in ovarian cancer can decipher the mystery of this disease, improve diagnostic tools, and lead to more effective screening programs.« less

  9. Iron addiction: a novel therapeutic target in ovarian cancer

    DOE PAGES

    Basuli, D.; Tesfay, L.; Deng, Z.; ...

    2017-03-20

    Ovarian cancer is a lethal malignancy that has not seen a major therapeutic advance in over 30 years. We demonstrate that ovarian cancer exhibits a targetable alteration in iron metabolism. Ferroportin (FPN), the iron efflux pump, is decreased, and transferrin receptor (TFR1), the iron importer, is increased in tumor tissue from patients with high grade but not low grade serous ovarian cancer. A similar profile of decreased FPN and increased TFR1 is observed in a genetic model of ovarian cancer tumor-initiating cells (TICs). The net result of these changes is an accumulation of excess intracellular iron and an augmented dependencemore » on iron for proliferation. A forced reduction in intracellular iron reduces the proliferation of ovarian cancer TICs in vitro, and inhibits both tumor growth and intraperitoneal dissemination of tumor cells in vivo. Some mechanistic studies demonstrate that iron increases metastatic spread by facilitating invasion through expression of matrix metalloproteases and synthesis of interleukin 6 (IL-6). Here, we show that the iron dependence of ovarian cancer TICs renders them exquisitely sensitive in vivo to agents that induce iron-dependent cell death (ferroptosis) as well as iron chelators, and thus creates a metabolic vulnerability that can be exploited therapeutically.« less

  10. Coffee and caffeine intake and the risk of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lueth, Natalie A.; Anderson, Kristin E.; Harnack, Lisa J.; Fulkerson, Jayne A.; Robien, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Laboratory data suggests that caffeine or some components of coffee may cause DNA mutations and inhibit tumor suppressor mechanisms, leading to neoplastic growth. However, coffee consumption has not been clearly implicated in the etiology of human post-menopausal ovarian cancer. This study evaluated the relationship of coffee and caffeine intake with risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in a prospective cohort study of 29,060 postmenopausal women. The participants completed a mailed questionnaire that assessed diet and health history and were followed for ovarian cancer incidence from 1986 to 2004. Age-adjusted and multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios were calculated for four exposure variables: caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, total coffee and total caffeine to assess whether or not coffee or caffeine influences the risk of ovarian cancer. An increased risk was observed in the multivariate model for women who reported drinking five or more cups/day of caffeinated coffee compared to women who reported drinking none (HR=1.81, 95% CI: 1.10-2.95). Decaffeinated coffee, total coffee and caffeine were not statistically significantly associated with ovarian cancer incidence. Our results suggest that a component of coffee other than caffeine, or in combination with caffeine, may be associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer in postmenopausal women who drink five or more cups of coffee a day. PMID:18704717

  11. Iron addiction: a novel therapeutic target in ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Basuli, D.; Tesfay, L.; Deng, Z.

    Ovarian cancer is a lethal malignancy that has not seen a major therapeutic advance in over 30 years. We demonstrate that ovarian cancer exhibits a targetable alteration in iron metabolism. Ferroportin (FPN), the iron efflux pump, is decreased, and transferrin receptor (TFR1), the iron importer, is increased in tumor tissue from patients with high grade but not low grade serous ovarian cancer. A similar profile of decreased FPN and increased TFR1 is observed in a genetic model of ovarian cancer tumor-initiating cells (TICs). The net result of these changes is an accumulation of excess intracellular iron and an augmented dependencemore » on iron for proliferation. A forced reduction in intracellular iron reduces the proliferation of ovarian cancer TICs in vitro, and inhibits both tumor growth and intraperitoneal dissemination of tumor cells in vivo. Some mechanistic studies demonstrate that iron increases metastatic spread by facilitating invasion through expression of matrix metalloproteases and synthesis of interleukin 6 (IL-6). Here, we show that the iron dependence of ovarian cancer TICs renders them exquisitely sensitive in vivo to agents that induce iron-dependent cell death (ferroptosis) as well as iron chelators, and thus creates a metabolic vulnerability that can be exploited therapeutically.« less

  12. PTN Signaling: Components and Mechanistic Insights in Human Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Geetika; Kwon, Youngjoo; Burkhalter, Rebecca J; Pathak, Harsh B.; Madan, Rashna; McHugh, Sarah; Atay, Safinur; Murthy, Smruthi; Tawfik, Ossama W.; Godwin, Andrew K.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular vulnerabilities represent promising candidates for the development of targeted therapies that hold the promise to overcome the challenges encountered with non-targeted chemotherapy for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Through a synthetic lethality screen, we previously identified pleiotrophin (PTN) as a molecular vulnerability in ovarian cancer and showed that siRNA mediated PTN knockdown induced apoptotic cell death in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells. Although it is well known that PTN elicits its pro-tumorigenic effects through its receptor, protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor Z1 (PTPRZ1), little is known about the potential importance of this pathway in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer. In this study we show that PTN is expressed, produced, and secreted in a panel of EOC cell lines. PTN levels in serous ovarian tumor tissues are on average 3.5-fold higher relative to normal tissue and PTN is detectable in serum samples of patients with EOC. PTPRZ1 is also expressed and produced by EOC cells and is found to be up-regulated in serous ovarian tumor tissue relative to normal ovarian surface epithelial tissue (p<0.05). Gene silencing of PTPRZ1 in EOC cell lines using siRNA mediated knockdown shows that PTPRZ1 is essential for viability and results in significant apoptosis with no effect on the cell cycle phase distribution. In order to determine how PTN mediates survival, we silenced the gene using siRNA mediated knockdown and performed expression profiling of 36 survival-related genes. Through computational mapping of the differentially expressed genes, members of the MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) family were found to be likely effectors of PTN signaling in EOC cells. Our results provide the first experimental evidence that PTN and its signaling components may be of significance in the pathogenesis of epithelial ovarian cancer and provide a rationale for clinical evaluation of MAPK inhibitors in PTN and/or PTPRZ1 expressing ovarian

  13. Investigate the Role of Obesity in Ovarian Cancer Initiation and Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-07-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0095 TITLE: Investigate the Role of Obesity in Ovarian Cancer Initiation and Progression PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Investigate the Role of Obesity in Ovarian Cancer Initiation and Progression 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1...cells and in transformed ovarian cells affected by obesity that lead to ovarian cancer initiation and progression. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Obesity , Ovarian

  14. Investigate the Role of Obesity in Ovarian Cancer Initiation and Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0095 TITLE: Investigate the Role of Obesity in Ovarian Cancer Initiation and Progression PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Investigate the Role of Obesity in Ovarian Cancer Initiation and Progression 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1...pathways in ovarian stem cells and in transformed ovarian cells affected by obesity that lead to ovarian cancer initiation and progression. 15. SUBJECT

  15. Adjuvant Exemestane with Ovarian Suppression in Premenopausal Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pagani, Olivia; Regan, Meredith M.; Walley, Barbara A.; Fleming, Gini F.; Colleoni, Marco; Láng, István; Gomez, Henry L.; Tondini, Carlo; Burstein, Harold J.; Perez, Edith A.; Ciruelos, Eva; Stearns, Vered; Bonnefoi, Hervé R.; Martino, Silvana; Geyer, Charles E.; Pinotti, Graziella; Puglisi, Fabio; Crivellari, Diana; Ruhstaller, Thomas; Winer, Eric P.; Rabaglio-Poretti, Manuela; Maibach, Rudolf; Ruepp, Barbara; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Price, Karen N.; Bernhard, Jürg; Luo, Weixiu; Ribi, Karin; Viale, Giuseppe; Coates, Alan S.; Gelber, Richard D.; Goldhirsch, Aron; Francis, Prudence A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Adjuvant therapy with an aromatase inhibitor improves outcomes, as compared with tamoxifen, in postmenopausal women with hormone-receptor–positive breast cancer. METHODS In two phase 3 trials, we randomly assigned premenopausal women with hormone-receptor–positive early breast cancer to the aromatase inhibitor exemestane plus ovarian suppression or tamoxifen plus ovarian suppression for a period of 5 years. Suppression of ovarian estrogen production was achieved with the use of the gonadotropin-releasing-hormone agonist triptorelin, oophorectomy, or ovarian irradiation. The primary analysis combined data from 4690 patients in the two trials. RESULTS After a median follow-up of 68 months, disease-free survival at 5 years was 91.1% in the exemestane–ovarian suppression group and 87.3% in the tamoxifen–ovarian suppression group (hazard ratio for disease recurrence, second invasive cancer, or death, 0.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.60 to 0.85; P<0.001). The rate of freedom from breast cancer at 5 years was 92.8% in the exemestane–ovarian suppression group, as compared with 88.8% in the tamoxifen–ovarian suppression group (hazard ratio for recurrence, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.55 to 0.80; P<0.001). With 194 deaths (4.1% of the patients), overall survival did not differ significantly between the two groups (hazard ratio for death in the exemestane–ovarian suppression group, 1.14; 95% CI, 0.86 to 1.51; P = 0.37). Selected adverse events of grade 3 or 4 were reported for 30.6% of the patients in the exemestane–ovarian suppression group and 29.4% of those in the tamoxifen–ovarian suppression group, with profiles similar to those for postmenopausal women. CONCLUSIONS In premenopausal women with hormone-receptor–positive early breast cancer, adjuvant treatment with exemestane plus ovarian suppression, as compared with tamoxifen plus ovarian suppression, significantly reduced recurrence. (Funded by Pfizer and others; TEXT and SOFT Clinical

  16. Adjuvant exemestane with ovarian suppression in premenopausal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Olivia; Regan, Meredith M; Walley, Barbara A; Fleming, Gini F; Colleoni, Marco; Láng, István; Gomez, Henry L; Tondini, Carlo; Burstein, Harold J; Perez, Edith A; Ciruelos, Eva; Stearns, Vered; Bonnefoi, Hervé R; Martino, Silvana; Geyer, Charles E; Pinotti, Graziella; Puglisi, Fabio; Crivellari, Diana; Ruhstaller, Thomas; Winer, Eric P; Rabaglio-Poretti, Manuela; Maibach, Rudolf; Ruepp, Barbara; Giobbie-Hurder, Anita; Price, Karen N; Bernhard, Jürg; Luo, Weixiu; Ribi, Karin; Viale, Giuseppe; Coates, Alan S; Gelber, Richard D; Goldhirsch, Aron; Francis, Prudence A

    2014-07-10

    Adjuvant therapy with an aromatase inhibitor improves outcomes, as compared with tamoxifen, in postmenopausal women with hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer. In two phase 3 trials, we randomly assigned premenopausal women with hormone-receptor-positive early breast cancer to the aromatase inhibitor exemestane plus ovarian suppression or tamoxifen plus ovarian suppression for a period of 5 years. Suppression of ovarian estrogen production was achieved with the use of the gonadotropin-releasing-hormone agonist triptorelin, oophorectomy, or ovarian irradiation. The primary analysis combined data from 4690 patients in the two trials. After a median follow-up of 68 months, disease-free survival at 5 years was 91.1% in the exemestane-ovarian suppression group and 87.3% in the tamoxifen-ovarian suppression group (hazard ratio for disease recurrence, second invasive cancer, or death, 0.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.60 to 0.85; P<0.001). The rate of freedom from breast cancer at 5 years was 92.8% in the exemestane-ovarian suppression group, as compared with 88.8% in the tamoxifen-ovarian suppression group (hazard ratio for recurrence, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.55 to 0.80; P<0.001). With 194 deaths (4.1% of the patients), overall survival did not differ significantly between the two groups (hazard ratio for death in the exemestane-ovarian suppression group, 1.14; 95% CI, 0.86 to 1.51; P=0.37). Selected adverse events of grade 3 or 4 were reported for 30.6% of the patients in the exemestane-ovarian suppression group and 29.4% of those in the tamoxifen-ovarian suppression group, with profiles similar to those for postmenopausal women. In premenopausal women with hormone-receptor-positive early breast cancer, adjuvant treatment with exemestane plus ovarian suppression, as compared with tamoxifen plus ovarian suppression, significantly reduced recurrence. (Funded by Pfizer and others; TEXT and SOFT ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT00066703 and NCT00066690, respectively.).

  17. Ovarian cancer susceptibility alleles and risk of ovarian cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Ramus, Susan J; Antoniou, Antonis C; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Soucy, Penny; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Aalfs, Cora M; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; van Asperen, Christi J; van Roozendaal, K E P; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J Margriet; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Jacobs, Chris; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Douglas, Fiona; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E; Kennedy, M John; Pathak, Harsh; Godwin, Andrew K; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Calender, Alain; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Faivre, Laurence; Loustalot, Catherine; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v O; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gaudet, Mia M; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Van Le, Linda; Hoffman, James S; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Issacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Iganacio; Tornero, Eva; Navarro, Matilde; Moysich, Kirsten B; Karlan, Beth Y; Gross, Jenny; Olah, Edith; Vaszko, Tibor; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A; Beattie, Mary S; Dorfling, Cecelia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Diez, Orland; Kwong, Ava; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Fiebig, Britta; Schäfer, Dieter; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Plante, Marie; Spurdle, Amanda B; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V Shane; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Pharoah, Paul D P; Gayther, Simon A; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F; Couch, Fergus J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2012-04-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified six alleles associated with risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated four of these loci as potential modifiers of ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs10088218 (at 8q24), rs2665390 (at 3q25), rs717852 (at 2q31), and rs9303542 (at 17q21), were genotyped in 12,599 BRCA1 and 7,132 BRCA2 carriers, including 2,678 ovarian cancer cases. Associations were evaluated within a retrospective cohort approach. All four loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 0.81 (95% CI: 0.67-0.98) P-trend = 0.033, rs2665390 HR = 1.48 (95% CI: 1.21-1.83) P-trend = 1.8 × 10(-4), rs717852 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10-1.42) P-trend = 6.6 × 10(-4), rs9303542 HR = 1.16 (95% CI: 1.02-1.33) P-trend = 0.026. Two loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele HR = 0.89 (95% CI: 0.81-0.99) P-trend = 0.029, rs2665390 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10-1.42) P-trend = 6.1 × 10(-4). The HR estimates for the remaining loci were consistent with odds ratio estimates for the general population. The identification of multiple loci modifying ovarian cancer risk may be useful for counseling women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations regarding their risk of ovarian cancer. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Drugs Approved for Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for ovarian cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  19. PapSEEK Test for Endometrial and Ovarian Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Finding a way to detect endometrial and ovarian cancers early, when they are most likely to respond to treatment, has been a challenge for cancer researchers. An experimental liquid biopsy test called PapSEEK may help to change that, this Cancer Currents post explains.

  20. Reliable in vitro studies require appropriate ovarian cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cause of cancer death in women and the leading cause of death from gynaecological malignancies. Of the 75% women diagnosed with locally advanced or disseminated disease, only 30% will survive five years following treatment. This poor prognosis is due to the following reasons: limited understanding of the tumor origin, unclear initiating events and early developmental stages of ovarian cancer, lack of reliable ovarian cancer-specific biomarkers, and drug resistance in advanced cases. In the past, in vitro studies using cell line models have been an invaluable tool for basic, discovery-driven cancer research. However, numerous issues including misidentification and cross-contamination of cell lines have hindered research efforts. In this study we examined all ovarian cancer cell lines available from cell banks. Hereby, we identified inconsistencies in the reporting, difficulties in the identification of cell origin or clinical data of the donor patients, restricted ethnic and histological type representation, and a lack of tubal and peritoneal cancer cell lines. We recommend that all cell lines should be distributed via official cell banks only with strict guidelines regarding the minimal available information required to improve the quality of ovarian cancer research in future. PMID:24936210

  1. Second neoplasms after invasive and borderline ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Levi, Fabio; Randimbison, Lalao; Blanc-Moya, Rafael; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2009-06-01

    Excess risk of subsequent cancers has been documented in women diagnosed with ovarian cancer. We updated to 2006 data on second cancers in women diagnosed with invasive and borderline ovarian cancer in the Swiss canton of Vaud. Between 1974 and 2006, 304 borderline and 1530 invasive first ovarian tumours were abstracted from the Vaud Cancer Registry database and followed up till the end of 2006. Calculation of expected numbers of tumours in the cohorts was based on site-specific, age-specific and calendar-year-specific incidence rates. We computed the standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of second cancers, and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). There was no change in the incidence of malignant cancers, but that of borderline tumours increased over more recent years. Overall, 110 second neoplasms were observed versus 49.7 expected after invasive ovarian cancer (SIR 2.21; 95% CI: 1.82-2.67). Significant excess risks were observed for cancers of the breast, corpus uteri and leukaemias. When synchronous cancers were excluded, the overall SIR for all sites declined to 1.05. Thirty-one second neoplasms were observed after borderline tumours compared with 21.1 expected (SIR=1.47; 95% CI: 1.00-2.09). SIRs were above unity for ovary, colorectum and uterus. After exclusion of synchronous neoplasms, SIR for all neoplasms declined to 1.09, and remained significant only for second ovarian cancers (SIR=4.93). The present record linkage cohort study shows an excess risk for selected synchronous neoplasms in women diagnosed with both borderline and invasive ovarian cancer, likely because of shared genetic and perhaps environmental factors.

  2. Use of fertility drugs and risk of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Diergaarde, Brenda; Kurta, Michelle L

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight recent research and insights into the relationship between fertility drug use and ovarian cancer risk. Results from two large case-control studies provided further evidence that fertility drug use does not significantly contribute to risk of ovarian cancer among the majority of women when adjusting for known confounding factors. However, questions regarding the effect on certain subgroups, including long-term fertility drug users, women who remain nulligravid after fertility treatment, women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations and borderline ovarian tumours, still remain. In addition, it may currently just be too early to determine whether there is an association between fertility drug use and ovarian cancer risk given that many of the exposed women are only now beginning to reach the ovarian cancer age range. Whether use of fertility drugs increases the risk of ovarian cancer is an important question that requires further investigation, in particular given the large number of women utilizing fertility treatments. Fortunately, results from recent studies have been mainly reassuring. Large well designed studies with sufficient follow-up time are needed to further evaluate the effects of fertility treatments within subgroups defined by patient and tumour characteristics.

  3. Prognosis of women with stage I endometrioid endometrial cancer and synchronous stage I endometrioid ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Koji; Machida, Hiroko; Frimer, Marina; Marcus, Jenna Z; Pejovic, Tanja; Roman, Lynda D; Wright, Jason D

    2017-12-01

    Synchronous endometrial and ovarian cancer with endometrioid histology at two cancer sites typically presents with early-stage disease and is thought to have a good prognosis. We examined the survival of women with early-stage endometrioid endometrial cancer who had synchronous early-stage endometrioid ovarian cancer. This is a retrospective case-control study examining the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Result Program between 1973 and 2013. Survival of women with stage I endometrioid endometrial cancer with stage I endometrioid ovarian cancer (n=839) were compared to women with stage I endometrioid endometrial cancer without synchronous ovarian cancer (n=123,692) after propensity score matching. Women with synchronous stage I endometrioid ovarian cancer were more likely to be diagnosed recently, be younger, have stage IA disease, grade 1 tumors, to have undergone lymphadenectomy, and were less likely to receive radiotherapy compared to those without synchronous ovarian cancer (all, P<0.001). In a propensity score matched model, the presence of synchronous ovarian cancer was not associated with endometrial cancer-specific survival (10-year rates 96.0% versus 95.3%, P=0.97) or overall survival (85.6% versus 87.2%, P=0.10). Among tumors with concordant grades at the two cancer sites, survival was similar regardless of presence of synchronous ovarian tumors (grade 1 tumors, 10-year rate for overall survival, 88.2% versus 89.1%, P=0.40; and grade 2 tumors, 84.0% versus 85.8%, P=0.78). Women with stage I endometrioid endometrial cancer with synchronous stage I endometrioid ovarian cancer have a survival outcome similar to those with stage I endometrioid endometrial cancer without synchronous ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. 3 CFR 8551 - Proclamation 8551 of August 31, 2010. National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2010

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2010 8551 Proclamation 8551 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8551 of August 31, 2010 Proc. 8551 National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2010By the President... ovarian cancer, this disease continues to claim more lives than any other gynecologic cancer. During...

  5. Association of Ovarian Tumor β2-Adrenergic Receptor Status with Ovarian Cancer Risk Factors and Survival.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tianyi; Tworoger, Shelley S; Hecht, Jonathan L; Rice, Megan S; Sood, Anil K; Kubzansky, Laura D; Poole, Elizabeth M

    2016-12-01

    The β 2 -adrenergic signaling pathway mediates the effects of chronic stress on ovarian cancer progression in mouse models. The relevance of this pathway to human ovarian cancer remains unknown. We assessed tumor expression of β 2 -adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) using tissue microarrays in 237 ovarian cancer cases from the Nurses' Health Studies (NHS/NHSII). Competing risks Cox regression was used to evaluate whether associations of reproductive, hormonal, and psychosocial factors with ovarian cancer risk differed by ADRB2. We also examined the association between tumor ADRB2 expression and ovarian cancer survival. Forty-five (19%) cases were positive for ADRB2 staining. High levels of anxiety symptoms were positively associated with ADRB2-positive tumors (HR, 2.59; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15-5.84) but not with ADRB2-negative tumors (HR, 1.16; 95% CI, 0.81-1.66; P heterogeneity = 0.07). We observed similar results for depression. No associations were observed for job strain, caregiving stress, or widowhood for either positive or negative ADRB2 status. Lifetime ovulatory years were more strongly associated with ADRB2-positive tumors (HR per 5 years, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.15-2.21) compared with ADRB2-negative tumors (HR, 1.11; 95% CI, 0.96-1.27; P heterogeneity = 0.04). Significant heterogeneity by ADRB2 was also observed for parity (P heterogeneity = 0.01), oral contraceptive use (P heterogeneity = 0.03), and age at menopause (P heterogeneity = 0.04). Tumor expression of ADRB2 was not associated with ovarian cancer mortality (HR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.69-1.59). Several stress- and ovulation-related factors were differentially associated with ovarian tumors responsive to β 2 -adrenergic signaling. Replication in larger studies is warranted to confirm the role of β 2 -adrenergic signaling in ovarian cancer etiology. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(12); 1587-94. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Plasma and ovarian tissue sphingolipids profiling in patients with advanced ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Paweł; Bodnar, Lubomir; Błachnio-Zabielska, Agnieszka; Świderska, Magdalena; Chabowski, Adrian

    2017-10-01

    The role of lipids in carcinogenesis through induction of abnormal cell lines in the human body is currently undisputable. Based on the literature, bioactive sphingolipids play an essential role in the development and progression of cancer and are involved in the metastatic process. The aim of this study was to determine the concentration of selected sphingolipids in patients with advanced ovarian cancer (AOC, FIGO III/IV, high grade ovarian cancer). Seventy-four patients with ovarian cancer were enrolled. Plasma concentrations of C16-Cer, C18:1-Cer and C18-Cer were assessed by LC/MS/MS. The content of tissue sphingolipids was measured using a UHPLC/MS/MS. Plasma concentration of 3 ceramides: C16-Cer, C18:1-Cer and C18-Cer was significantly elevated in women with advanced ovarian cancer compared to control group (P=0.031; 0.022; 0.020; respectively). There were increases in concentration of 5 ceramides: C16-Cer, C18:1-Cer, C18-Cer, C24:1-Cer, C24-Cer (P=0.025; 0.049; 0.032; 0.005; 0.013, respectively) and S1P (P=0.004) in ovarian tissue of women with advanced ovarian cancer compared to healthy individuals. Importantly, significantly higher risk of ovarian cancer when the plasma concentration of C16-Cer>311.88ng/100μl (AUC: 0.76, P=0.0261); C18:1-Cer>4.75ng/100μl (AUC: 0.77, P=0.0160) and C18-Cer>100.76ng/100μl (AUC:0.77, P=0.0136) was noticed. Bioactive sphingolipids play an essential role in the development and progression of cancer and they also take part in the process of metastasizing. This study suggests that some sphingolipids can be used as potential biomarkers of advanced ovarian cancer and that they can play an important role in the pathogenesis of this disease. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. BRCA2 Arg372Hispolymorphism and epithelial ovarian cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Auranen, Annika; Spurdle, Amanda B; Chen, Xiaoqing; Lipscombe, Julian; Purdie, David M; Hopper, John L; Green, Adele; Healey, Catherine S; Redman, Karen; Dunning, Alison M; Pharoah, Paul D; Easton, Douglas F; Ponder, Bruce A J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Novik, Karen L

    2003-01-20

    The BRCA2 372 HH genotype defined by the BRCA2 N372H nonconservative amino acid substitution polymorphism was recently reported to be associated with a small increased risk of breast cancer. We investigated whether this polymorphism was associated with ovarian cancer risk by conducting British and Australian case-control comparisons in parallel, including a total sample of 1,121 ovarian cancer cases and 2,643 controls. There was no difference in genotype frequency between control groups from the 2 studies (p = 0.9). The HH genotype was associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer in both studies, and the risk estimate for the pooled studies was 1.36 (95% CI 1.04-1.77, p = 0.03). There was also a suggestion that this risk may be greater for ovarian cancers of the serous subtype for both studies, with an OR (95% CI) of 1.66 (1.17-2.54) for the 2 studies combined (p = 0.005). The BRCA2 372 HH genotype appears to be associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer of a similar magnitude to that reported for breast cancer. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Low-grade serous ovarian cancer: A review.

    PubMed

    Kaldawy, Anis; Segev, Yakir; Lavie, Ofer; Auslender, Ron; Sopik, Victoria; Narod, Steven A

    2016-11-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancers can be divided into the more common, aggressive type II cancers and the less common, slow-growing type I cancers. Under this model, serous ovarian carcinomas can be subdivided into high-grade (type II) and low-grade (type I) tumours. The two-tier system for grading serous ovarian carcinomas is superior to more detailed grading systems in terms of predicting survival. Low-grade serous carcinomas typically present in young women and have a relatively good prognosis, despite being resistant to chemotherapy. Low-grade serous cancers have a high prevalence of KRAS and BRAF mutations, but a low prevalence of TP53 mutations (which are characteristic of high-grade serous cancers). Among women with low-grade serous ovarian cancer, the presence of a KRAS/BRAF mutation is a favorable prognostic factor. Studies of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor in low-grade serous ovarian cancer suggest that identifying MAPK mutations might eventually be useful in guiding treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Role of epigenomics in ovarian and endometrial cancers.

    PubMed

    Balch, Curtis; Matei, Daniela E; Huang, Tim H-M; Nephew, Kenneth P

    2010-06-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy and while constituting only 3% of all female cancers, it causes 14,600 deaths in the USA annually. Endometrial cancer, the most diagnosed and second-most fatal gynecologic cancer, afflicts over 40,000 US women annually, causing an estimated 7780 deaths in 2009. In both advanced ovarian and endometrial carcinomas, the majority of initially therapy-responsive tumors eventually evolve to a fully drug-resistant phenotype. In addition to genetic mutations, epigenetic anomalies are frequent in both gynecologic malignancies, including aberrant DNA methylation, atypical histone modifications and dysregulated expression of distinct microRNAs, resulting in altered gene-expression patterns favoring cell survival. In this article, we summarize the most recent hypotheses regarding the role of epigenetics in ovarian and endometrial cancers, including a possible role in tumor 'stemness' and also evaluate the possible therapeutic benefits of reversal of these oncogenic chromatin aberrations.

  10. Regulatory considerations on endpoints in ovarian cancer drug development.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, Sanjeeve; Kim, Geoffrey S; McKee, Amy E; Pazdur, Richard

    2017-07-15

    Ovarian cancer remains a disease entity that is responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality among women worldwide. Modern drug research pipelines and accelerated drug development timelines applied to other disease entities have begun to make an impact on treatment options for patients with advanced ovarian cancer, as exemplified by the recent accelerated approval of 2 agents for this disease as the forerunners of a growing number of registrational trials. Regulatory flexibility for this serious and life-threatening condition spurs the consideration of intermediate endpoints for regulatory trial design, including potential applications in the development of newer therapeutic classes such as targeted therapies and immunotherapies for patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Cancer 2017;123:2604-8. © 2017 American Cancer Society. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  11. Vaccine Therapy With Sargramostim (GM-CSF) in Treating Patients With Her-2 Positive Stage III-IV Breast Cancer or Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-05-01

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor

  12. Are ovarian cancer stem cells the target for innovative immunotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liang; Xu, Tianmin; Cui, Manhua

    2018-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), a subpopulation of cancer cells with the ability of self-renewal and differentiation, are believed to be responsible for tumor generation, progression, metastasis, and relapse. Ovarian cancer, the most malignant gynecological cancer, has consistent pathology behavior with CSC model, which suggests that therapies based on ovarian cancer stem cells (OCSCs) can gain a more successful prognosis. Much evidence has proved that epigenetic mechanism played an important role in tumor formation and sustainment. Since CSCs are generally resistant to conventional therapies (chemotherapy and radiotherapy), immunotherapy is a more effective method that has been implemented in the clinic. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cell, an adoptive cellular immunotherapy, which results in apparent elimination of tumor in both hematologic and solid cancers, could be used for ovarian cancer. This review covers the basic conception of CSCs and OCSCs, the implication of epigenetic mechanism underlying cancer evolution considering CSC model, the immunotherapies reported for ovarian cancer targeting OCSCs currently, and the relationship between immune system and hierarchy cancer organized by CSCs. Particularly, the promising prospects and potential pitfalls of targeting OCSC surface markers to design CAR-T cellular immunotherapy are discussed here. PMID:29780254

  13. Genomic tests for ovarian cancer detection and management.

    PubMed

    Myers, Evan R; Havrilesky, Laura J; Kulasingam, Shalini L; Sanders, Gillian D; Cline, Kathryn E; Gray, Rebecca N; Berchuck, Andrew; McCrory, Douglas C

    2006-10-01

    To assess the evidence that the use of genomic tests for ovarian cancer screening, diagnosis, and treatment leads to improved outcomes. PubMed and reference lists of recent reviews. We evaluated tests for: (a) single gene products; (b) genetic variations affecting risk of ovarian cancer; (c) gene expression; and (d) proteomics. For tests covered in recent evidence reports (cancer antigen 125 [CA-125] and breast cancer genes 1 and 2 [BRCA1/2]), we added studies published subsequent to the reports. We sought evidence on: (a) the analytic performance of tests in clinical laboratories; (b) the sensitivity and specificity of tests in different patient populations; (c) the clinical impact of testing in asymptomatic women, women with suspected ovarian cancer, and women with diagnosed ovarian cancer; (d) the harms of genomic testing; and (e) the impact of direct-to-consumer and direct-to-physician advertising on appropriate use of tests. We also constructed a computer simulation model to test the impact of different assumptions about ovarian cancer natural history on the relative effectiveness of different strategies. There are reasonable data on the clinical laboratory performance of most radioimmunoassays, but the majority of the data on other genomic tests comes from research laboratories. Genomic test sensitivity/specificity estimates are limited by small sample sizes, spectrum bias, and unrealistically large prevalences of ovarian cancer; in particular, estimates of positive predictive values derived from most of the studies are substantially higher than would be expected in most screening or diagnostic settings. We found no evidence relevant to the question of the impact of genomic tests on health outcomes in asymptomatic women. Although there is a relatively large literature on the association of test results and various clinical outcomes, the clinical utility of changing management based on these results has not been evaluated. We found no evidence that genomic

  14. Dihydroartiminisin inhibits the growth and metastasis of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Buchu; Hu, Ke; Li, Shu; Zhu, Jing; Gu, Liying; Shen, Haoran; Hambly, Brett D; Bao, Shisan; Di, Wen

    2012-01-01

    Dihydroartiminisin (DHA), the active component of a Chinese herb (Artemisia annua), has been utilised as an anti-malarial drug since ancient China. DHA has also been shown to inhibit proliferation of cancer in vitro. However, the capacity of DHA to inhibit the development of ovarian cancer is still unclear. The adhesion, invasion, and migration of human ovarian cancer cell line (HO8910PM) was determined following DHA treatment in vitro, using Matrigel coated plate, transwell membrane chamber, and wound healing models, respectively. A mouse ovarian cancer model was established by orthotopic inoculation of HO8910PM cell line in nude mice. The growth and metastasis in vivo was determined 8 weeks post-implantation in response to DHA treatment. The expression of phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (pFAK) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) was evaluated using Western blotting. The expression of Von Willebrand factor (vWF) and infiltration of macrophages were determined, using immunohistochemistry. DHA inhibits ovarian cancer cell proliferation, adhesion, migration and invasion in vitro in a dose-dependent manner, consistent with decreased expression of pFAK and MMP-2, but not MMP-9. DHA inhibited metastasis significantly in vivo, associated with reduced vWF expression and macrophage infiltration. In conclusion, DHA inhibits the development of ovarian cancer, in part via down-regulating pFAK, MMP-2, vWF and macrophage infiltration.

  15. Identification of Novel Ovarian Cancer Oncogenes that Function by Regulating Exosome Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-09-01

    Novel Ovarian Cancer Oncogenes that Function by Regulating Exosome Function September 2017 x 1Sep2016...31Aug2017 Email: mbirrer@partners.org 6 Identification of Novel Ovarian Cancer Oncogenes that Function by Regulating Exosome Function xx

  16. Effect of screening on ovarian cancer mortality: the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Buys, Saundra S; Partridge, Edward; Black, Amanda; Johnson, Christine C; Lamerato, Lois; Isaacs, Claudine; Reding, Douglas J; Greenlee, Robert T; Yokochi, Lance A; Kessel, Bruce; Crawford, E David; Church, Timothy R; Andriole, Gerald L; Weissfeld, Joel L; Fouad, Mona N; Chia, David; O'Brien, Barbara; Ragard, Lawrence R; Clapp, Jonathan D; Rathmell, Joshua M; Riley, Thomas L; Hartge, Patricia; Pinsky, Paul F; Zhu, Claire S; Izmirlian, Grant; Kramer, Barnett S; Miller, Anthony B; Xu, Jian-Lun; Prorok, Philip C; Gohagan, John K; Berg, Christine D

    2011-06-08

    Screening for ovarian cancer with cancer antigen 125 (CA-125) and transvaginal ultrasound has an unknown effect on mortality. To evaluate the effect of screening for ovarian cancer on mortality in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. Randomized controlled trial of 78,216 women aged 55 to 74 years assigned to undergo either annual screening (n = 39,105) or usual care (n = 39,111) at 10 screening centers across the United States between November 1993 and July 2001. Intervention The intervention group was offered annual screening with CA-125 for 6 years and transvaginal ultrasound for 4 years. Participants and their health care practitioners received the screening test results and managed evaluation of abnormal results. The usual care group was not offered annual screening with CA-125 for 6 years or transvaginal ultrasound but received their usual medical care. Participants were followed up for a maximum of 13 years (median [range], 12.4 years [10.9-13.0 years]) for cancer diagnoses and death until February 28, 2010. Mortality from ovarian cancer, including primary peritoneal and fallopian tube cancers. Secondary outcomes included ovarian cancer incidence and complications associated with screening examinations and diagnostic procedures. Ovarian cancer was diagnosed in 212 women (5.7 per 10,000 person-years) in the intervention group and 176 (4.7 per 10,000 person-years) in the usual care group (rate ratio [RR], 1.21; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.99-1.48). There were 118 deaths caused by ovarian cancer (3.1 per 10,000 person-years) in the intervention group and 100 deaths (2.6 per 10,000 person-years) in the usual care group (mortality RR, 1.18; 95% CI, 0.82-1.71). Of 3285 women with false-positive results, 1080 underwent surgical follow-up; of whom, 163 women experienced at least 1 serious complication (15%). There were 2924 deaths due to other causes (excluding ovarian, colorectal, and lung cancer) (76.6 per 10,000 person

  17. Pro-Lipogenic Action of Lysophosphatidic Acid in Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    One of the key mediators of fatty acid b-oxidation is carnitine pamitoyl transferase 1A (CPT1A), which is overexpressed in malignant ovarian...MAGL, inhibits growth of ovarian cancer cell lines. Most interestingly, inhibition of carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 (CPT1), the rate-limiting...Manuscript in preparation: Shao H, Mukherjee A, Jing K, Yuan F, and Fang X. Carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1A mediates proliferation and survival of

  18. Polymorphisms in the FGF2 gene and risk of serous ovarian cancer: results from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Johnatty, Sharon E.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Spurdle, Amanda B.; deFazio, Anna; Webb, Penelope M; Goode, Ellen L.; Rider, David N.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Anderson, Stephanie; Wu, Anna H.; Pike, Malcolm; Van Den Berg, David; Moysich, Kirsten; Ness, Roberta; Doherty, Jennifer; Rossing, Mary-Anne; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2009-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 (basic) is a potent angiogenic molecule involved in tumour progression, and is one of several growth factors with a central role in ovarian carcinogenesis. We hypothesised that common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the FGF2 gene may alter angiogenic potential and thereby susceptibility to ovarian cancer. We analysed 25 FGF2 tgSNPs using five independent study populations from the United States and Australia. Analysis was restricted to non-Hispanic White women with serous ovarian carcinoma (1269 cases and 2829 controls). There were no statistically significant associations between any FGF2 SNPs and ovarian cancer risk. There were two nominally statistically significant associations between heterozygosity for two FGF2 SNPs (rs308379 and rs308447; p<0.05) and serous ovarian cancer risk in the combined dataset, but rare homozygous estimates did not achieve statistical significance, nor were they consistent with the log additive model of inheritance. Overall genetic variation in FGF2 does not appear to play a role in susceptibility to ovarian cancer. PMID:19456219

  19. Past, present and future targets for immunotherapy in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Carlton L; English, Diana P; Roque, Dana M; Pasternak, Monica; Santin, Alessandro D

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy in the US. Treatments have improved with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy and advanced surgical techniques but disease recurrence is common and fatal in nearly all cases. Current evidence suggests that the immune system and its ability to recognize and eliminate microscopic disease is paramount in preventing recurrence. Ovarian cancer immunotherapy is targeting tumors through active, passive and adoptive approaches. The goal of immunotherapy is to balance the activation of the immune system against cancer while preventing the potential for tremendous toxicity elicited by immune modulation. In this paper we will review the different immunotherapies available for ovarian cancer as well as current ongoing studies and potential future directions. PMID:25524384

  20. Chronic Recreational Physical Inactivity and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Risk: Evidence from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium.

    PubMed

    Cannioto, Rikki; LaMonte, Michael J; Risch, Harvey A; Hong, Chi-Chen; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara E; Eng, Kevin H; Brian Szender, J; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Klapdor, Ruediger; Gower, Emily; Minlikeeva, Albina N; Zirpoli, Gary R; Bandera, Elisa V; Berchuck, Andrew; Cramer, Daniel; Doherty, Jennifer A; Edwards, Robert P; Fridley, Brooke L; Goode, Ellen L; Goodman, Marc T; Hogdall, Estrid; Hosono, Satoyo; Jensen, Allan; Jordan, Susan; Kjaer, Susanne K; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ness, Roberta B; Olsen, Catherine M; Olson, Sara H; Leigh Pearce, Celeste; Pike, Malcolm C; Anne Rossing, Mary; Szamreta, Elizabeth A; Thompson, Pamela J; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Vierkant, Robert A; Webb, Penelope M; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wicklund, Kristine G; Winham, Stacey J; Wu, Anna H; Modugno, Francesmary; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Terry, Kathryn L; Kelemen, Linda E; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2016-07-01

    Despite a large body of literature evaluating the association between recreational physical activity and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk, the extant evidence is inconclusive, and little is known about the independent association between recreational physical inactivity and EOC risk. We conducted a pooled analysis of nine studies from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium to investigate the association between chronic recreational physical inactivity and EOC risk. In accordance with the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, women reporting no regular, weekly recreational physical activity were classified as inactive. Multivariable logistic regression was utilized to estimate the ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between inactivity and EOC risk overall and by subgroups based upon histotype, menopausal status, race, and body mass index. The current analysis included data from 8,309 EOC patients and 12,612 controls. We observed a significant positive association between inactivity and EOC risk (OR = 1.34; 95% CI, 1.14-1.57), and similar associations were observed for each histotype. In this large pooled analysis examining the association between recreational physical inactivity and EOC risk, we observed consistent evidence of an association between chronic inactivity and all EOC histotypes. These data add to the growing body of evidence suggesting that inactivity is an independent risk factor for cancer. If the apparent association between inactivity and EOC risk is substantiated, additional work via targeted interventions should be pursued to characterize the dose of activity required to mitigate the risk of this highly fatal disease. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(7); 1114-24. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Androgens are differentially associated with ovarian cancer subtypes in the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Ose, Jennifer; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Schock, Helena; Lehtinen, Matti; Arslan, Alan A.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Visvanathan, Kala; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Buring, Julie E.; Lee, I-Min; Tjønneland, Anne; Dossus, Laure; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Masala, Giovanna; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Duell, Eric J.; Idahl, Annika; Travis, Ruth C.; Rinaldi, Sabina; Merritt, Melissa A.; Trabert, Britton; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Kaaks, Rudolf; Fortner, Renée T.

    2017-01-01

    Invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. The etiology of EOC remains elusive; however, experimental and epidemiologic data suggest a role for hormone-related exposures in ovarian carcinogenesis and risk factor differences by histologic phenotypes and developmental pathways. Research on pre-diagnosis androgen concentrations and EOC risk has yielded inconclusive results, and analyses incorporating EOC subtypes are sparse. We conducted a pooled analysis of 7 nested case-control studies in the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium to investigate the association between pre-diagnosis circulating androgens (testosterone, free testosterone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS)), sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), and EOC risk by tumor characteristics (i.e. histology, grade, and stage). The final study population included 1,331 EOC cases and 3,017 matched controls. Multivariable conditional logistic regression was used to assess risk associations in pooled individual data. Testosterone was positively associated with EOC risk (all subtypes combined, Odds Ratio (OR)log2=1.12 [95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.02–1.24]); other endogenous androgens and SHBG were not associated with overall risk. Higher concentrations of testosterone and androstenedione associated with an increased risk in endometrioid and mucinous tumors (e.g., testosterone, endometrioid tumors, ORlog2=1.40 [1.03–1.91]), but not serous or clear cell. An inverse association was observed between androstenedione and high grade serous tumors (ORlog2=0.76 [0.60–0.96]). Our analyses provide further evidence for a role of hormone-related pathways in EOC risk, with differences in associations between androgens and histologic subtypes of EOC. PMID:28381542

  2. Postmenopausal palpable ovary and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Gojnić, M; Branković, M; Maksimović, M; Parapid, B; Dugalić, V; Jeremić, K; Gutić, B

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) examination is a much more reliable method for evaluation of potential ovarian cancer risk than gynecologic palpation. The aim of our study was to analyze the US characteristics of patients with palpable ovaries in light of potential for malignancy. We analyzed 70 women ten years after menopause without increased CA 125 values. They underwent clinical and US exams (abdominal and transvaginal ultrasound), with special emphasis on US Doppler exam. Bimanuel gynecological examination showed palpable ovaries in 14 patients (palpable ovary group), and the remaining 56 patients were defined as the control group. US showed increased dimensions of palpable ovaries. Atypical follicular activity, deviation from verticalization, atypical ovaries and hyperechogenic punctations classified under germ cell cysts occurred statistically significantly more often in the palpable ovary group. Doppler flow showed pathological vascularization in five patients with palpable ovaries and the estrogen level was increased. After four to six months in these five patients we found a mild increase of estrogen levels and higher Doppler abnormality. Six months later, two patients had irregular bleeding and underwent surgical treatment. Every adnexal mass after menopausis demands special attention. Bimanuel gynecological exams should be used liberally. It is necessary to follow the dimensions of the ovary, describe the echostructure, as well as the edges of the ovary and other anatomical structures. Doppler flow measurement and estrogen levels are predictive and give more information. Controls should be in three to six month intervals in order to make a decision for surgical treatment.

  3. Biodegradable nanoparticles as theranostics of ovarian cancer: an overview.

    PubMed

    Chaurasiya, Swati; Mishra, Vijay

    2018-04-01

    Above 10 million people are suffering from cancers every year. As per American Cancer Society, more than 22 440 new cases and 14 080 deaths were reported from ovarian cancer yearly worldwide. This review explores the current status, challenges and future perspectives of tumour-targeted theranostic nanoparticles (NPs). Most of the ovarian malignancy cases are uncovered after the disease is in a difficult state due to poor screening techniques and non-specific symptoms. In this manner, forceful and fruitful treatment is required that will indicate insignificant lethal impacts to solid tissue. In the current research, stealth biodegradable NPs are produced as vehicles for imaging and treatment of ovarian cancer as the controlled and targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic as well as imaging agents. To enhance the dependability of the colloidal suspension as well as to increase their circulation lifetime, NPs are introduced by incorporating the functional poly(ethylene glycol) on their surface, which also provides a site to conjugation of focusing on agents to ovarian tissue. Biodegradable theranostic NPs can be fabricated and surface engineered without any alteration in drug-loading capacity, safety and efficacy. These NPs have shown promising results in imaging as well as treatment of ovarian cancer. © 2018 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  4. Cellular and molecular processes in ovarian cancer metastasis. A Review in the Theme: Cell and Molecular Processes in Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Tsz-Lun; Leung, Cecilia S.; Yip, Kay-Pong; Au Yeung, Chi Lam; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. It is usually diagnosed at a late stage, with a 5-yr survival rate of <30%. The majority of ovarian cancer cases are diagnosed after tumors have widely spread within the peritoneal cavity, limiting the effectiveness of debulking surgery and chemotherapy. Owing to a substantially lower survival rate at late stages of disease than at earlier stages, the major cause of ovarian cancer deaths is believed to be therapy-resistant metastasis. Although metastasis plays a crucial role in promoting ovarian tumor progression and decreasing patient survival rates, the underlying mechanisms of ovarian cancer spread have yet to be thoroughly explored. For many years, researchers have believed that ovarian cancer metastasizes via a passive mechanism by which ovarian cancer cells are shed from the primary tumor and carried by the physiological movement of peritoneal fluid to the peritoneum and omentum. However, the recent discovery of hematogenous metastasis of ovarian cancer to the omentum via circulating tumor cells instigated rethinking of the mode of ovarian cancer metastasis and the importance of the “seed-and-soil” hypothesis for ovarian cancer metastasis. In this review we discuss the possible mechanisms by which ovarian cancer cells metastasize from the primary tumor to the omentum, the cross-talk signaling events between ovarian cancer cells and various stromal cells that play crucial roles in ovarian cancer metastasis, and the possible clinical implications of these findings in the management of this deadly, highly metastatic disease. PMID:26224579

  5. ADH1B promotes mesothelial clearance and ovarian cancer infiltration.

    PubMed

    Gharpure, Kshipra M; Lara, Olivia D; Wen, Yunfei; Pradeep, Sunila; LaFargue, Chris; Ivan, Cristina; Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Hu, Wei; Mangala, Lingegowda S; Wu, Sherry Y; Nagaraja, Archana S; Baggerly, Keith; Sood, Anil K

    2018-05-18

    Primary debulking surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy is the standard treatment for ovarian cancer. Residual disease after primary surgery is associated with poor patient outcome. Previously, we discovered ADH1B to be a molecular biomarker of residual disease. In the current study, we investigated the functional role of ADH1B in promoting ovarian cancer cell invasiveness and contributing to residual disease. We discovered that ADH1B overexpression leads to a more infiltrative cancer cell phenotype, promotes metastasis, increases the adhesion of cancer cells to mesothelial cells, and increases extracellular matrix degradation. Live cell imaging revealed that ADH1B-overexpressing cancer cells efficiently cleared the mesothelial cell layer compared to control cells. Moreover, gene array analysis revealed that ADH1B affects several pathways related to the migration and invasion of cancer cells. We also discovered that hypoxia increases ADH1B expression in ovarian cancer cells. Collectively, these findings indicate that ADH1B plays an important role in the pathways that promote ovarian cancer cell infiltration and may increase the likelihood of residual disease following surgery.

  6. The Role of Lifestyle Factors in Ovarian Cancer Prognosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    cancer (while the rest would be low grade or borderline ). We have now reviewed the pathology reports of all the participants in the case-control study...and, in fact, ~50% are high-grade ovarian cancers (25% are low-grade and 25% are borderline ), which is much lower than expected based on the

  7. Biological Basis for Chemoprevention of Ovarian Cancer. Addendum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    Campbell I, Chang-Claude J, Peel D, Anton-Culver H, Berchuck A, Schildkraut J, Whittemore A, McGuire V, DiCioccio RA, Duffy D, Chenevix-Trench G...promotor polymorphism and ovarian cancer risk. Int J Cancer 2000;86:436–9. 23. Menin C, Banna GL, De Salvo G, et al. Lack of association between

  8. Rucaparib Approved as Maintenance Therapy for Ovarian Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    FDA has expanded its approval of rucaparib for women with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer. As this Cancer Currents blog post explains, it can now be used to treat women with recurrent disease whose tumors shrank after subsequent treatment with a platinum-based chemotherapy.

  9. Study examines outcomes from surgery to prevent ovarian cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A new study looked at women at high risk of ovarian cancer who had no clinical signs of the disease and who underwent risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO). The study results showed cancer in the removed tissues of 2.6 percent (25 of 966) of the par

  10. IGFBP-2 Vaccine and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-05-01

    Stage III Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  11. 3 CFR 8407 - Proclamation 8407 of August 31, 2009. National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2009

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2009 8407 Proclamation 8407 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8407 of August 31, 2009 Proc. 8407 National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2009By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Ovarian cancer remains the leading cause of death from...

  12. CYP1B1, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation in the Etiology of Ovarian Epithelial Cancer Using an Avian Model of Ovarian Carcinoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    information, including suggestions for reducing this burden to Department of Defense, Washington Headquarters Services , Directorate for Information...ovarian cancer in Women and Hens”. First AACR International Conference on Molecular Diagnostics in Cancer Therapeutic Development, Sep 12-15, 2006...associated with ovarian cancer in humans and hens“ Presented at the 1st International Aegean conference on Ovarian Cancer, June 2006,Crete, Greece 4

  13. Identifying prognostic signature in ovarian cancer using DirGenerank

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian-Yong; Chen, Ling-Ling; Zhou, Xiong-Hui

    2017-01-01

    Identifying the prognostic genes in cancer is essential not only for the treatment of cancer patients, but also for drug discovery. However, it's still a big challenge to select the prognostic genes that can distinguish the risk of cancer patients across various data sets because of tumor heterogeneity. In this situation, the selected genes whose expression levels are statistically related to prognostic risks may be passengers. In this paper, based on gene expression data and prognostic data of ovarian cancer patients, we used conditional mutual information to construct gene dependency network in which the nodes (genes) with more out-degrees have more chances to be the modulators of cancer prognosis. After that, we proposed DirGenerank (Generank in direct netowrk) algorithm, which concerns both the gene dependency network and genes’ correlations to prognostic risks, to identify the gene signature that can predict the prognostic risks of ovarian cancer patients. Using ovarian cancer data set from TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) as training data set, 40 genes with the highest importance were selected as prognostic signature. Survival analysis of these patients divided by the prognostic signature in testing data set and four independent data sets showed the signature can distinguish the prognostic risks of cancer patients significantly. Enrichment analysis of the signature with curated cancer genes and the drugs selected by CMAP showed the genes in the signature may be drug targets for therapy. In summary, we have proposed a useful pipeline to identify prognostic genes of cancer patients. PMID:28615526

  14. Interaction of E3 Ubiquitin Ligase MARCH7 with Long Noncoding RNA MALAT1 and Autophagy-Related Protein ATG7 Promotes Autophagy and Invasion in Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianguo; Zhang, Luo; Mei, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Yuan; Yi, Yuan; Liu, Li; Meng, Ying; Zhou, Lili; Zeng, Jianhua; Wu, Huan; Jiang, Xingwei

    2018-05-22

    Ubiquitin E3 ligase MARCH7 plays an important role in T cell proliferation and neuronal development. But its role in ovarian cancer remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the role of Ubiquitin E3 ligase MARCH7 in ovarian cancer. Real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry and western blotting analysis were performed to determine the expression of MARCH7, MALAT1 and ATG7 in ovarian cancer cell lines and clinical specimens. The role of MARCH7 in maintaining ovarian cancer malignant phenotype was examined by Wound healing assay, Matrigel invasion assays and Mouse orthotopic xenograft model. Luciferase reporter assay, western blot analysis and ChIP assay were used to determine whether MARCH7 activates TGF-β-smad2/3 pathway by interacting with TGFβR2. MARCH7 interacted with MALAT1 by miR-200a (microRNA-200a). MARCH7 may function as a competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) to regulate the expression of ATG7 by competing with miR-200a. MARCH7 regulated TGF-β-smad2/3 pathway by interacting with TGFβR2. Inhibition of TGF-β-smad2/3 pathway downregulated MARCH7, MALAT1 and ATG7. MiR-200a regulated TGF-β induced autophagy, invasion and metastasis of SKOV3 cells by targeting MARCH7. MARCH7 silencing inhibited autophagy invasion and metastasis of SKOV3 cells both in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, MARCH7 overexpression promoted TGF-β induced autophagy, invasion and metastasis of A2780 cells in vitro by depending on MALAT1 and ATG7. We also found that TGF-β-smad2/3 pathway regulated MARCH7 and ATG7 through MALAT1. These findings suggested that TGFβR2-Smad2/3-MALAT1/MARCH7/ATG7 feedback loop mediated autophagy, migration and invasion in ovarian cancer. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Role of Diet Modulation and AMPK in Ovarian Cancer Progression and Outcome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    preventive agent in not only preventing or delaying ovarian cancer growth but also cancers. It can be the ‘ aspirin ’ for cancers...preventive agent in not only preventing or delaying ovarian cancer growth but also cancers. It can be the ‘ aspirin ’ for cancers

  16. The Immune System in the Pathogenesis of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Charbonneau, Bridget; Goode, Ellen L.; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Knutson, Keith L.; DeRycke, Melissa S.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical outcomes in ovarian cancer are heterogeneous even when considering common features such as stage, response to therapy, and grade. This disparity in outcomes warrants further exploration into tumor and host characteristics. One compelling host characteristic is the immune response to ovarian cancer. While several studies have confirmed a prominent role for the immune system in modifying the clinical course of the disease, recent genetic and protein analyses also suggest a role in disease incidence. Recent studies also show that anti-tumor immunity is often negated by immune suppressive cells present in the tumor microenvironment. These suppressive immune cells also directly enhance the pathogenesis through the release of various cytokines and chemokines, which together form an integrated pathologic network. Thus, future research into immunotherapy targeting ovarian cancer will likely become increasingly focused on combination approaches that simultaneously augment immunity while preventing local immune suppression or by disrupting critical cytokine networks. PMID:23582060

  17. Stages of Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, and Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors Symptoms, Tests, Prognosis, & Stages Treatment of Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors Prevention of Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, & Primary Peritoneal ...

  18. Targeting Ovarian Cancer with Porphysome Nanotechnology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    ORGANIZATION: University Health Network Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 2C4 REPORT DATE : October 2016 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army...THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) October 2016 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting...non-targeted Porphysomes for the detection of orthotopic ovarian lesions. Methods : Two ovarian tumour xenograft models are established with human SK

  19. Chronic Recreational Physical Inactivity and Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Risk: Evidence from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Cannioto, Rikki; LaMonte, Michael J.; Risch, Harvey A.; Hong, Chi-Chen; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara E.; Eng, Kevin H.; Szender, J. Brian; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Klapdor, Ruediger; Gower, Emily; Minlikeeva, Albina N.; Zirpoli, Gary; Bandera, Elisa V.; Berchuck, Andrew; Cramer, Daniel; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Edwards, Robert P.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Goode, Ellen L.; Goodman, Marc T.; Hogdall, Estrid; Hosono, Satoyo; Jensen, Allan; Jordan, Susan; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ness, Roberta B.; Olsen, Catherine M.; Olson, Sara H.; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Pike, Malcolm C.; Rossing, Mary Anne; Szamreta, Elizabeth A.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Vierkant, Robert A.; Webb, Penelope M.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Winham, Stacey J.; Wu, Anna H.; Modugno, Francesmary; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Moysich, Kirsten B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite a large body of literature evaluating the association between recreational physical activity and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) risk, the extant evidence is inconclusive and little is known about the independent association between recreational physical inactivity and EOC risk. We conducted a pooled analysis of nine studies from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC) to investigate the association between chronic recreational physical inactivity and EOC risk. Methods In accordance with the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, women reporting no regular, weekly recreational physical activity were classified as inactive. Multivariable logistic regression was utilized to estimate the odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between inactivity and EOC risk overall and by subgroups based upon histotype, menopausal status, race and body mass index (BMI). Results The current analysis included data from 8,309 EOC patients and 12,612 controls. We observed a significant positive association between inactivity and EOC risk (OR=1.34, 95% CI: 1.14-1.57) and similar associations were observed for each histotype. Conclusions In this large pooled analysis examining the association between recreational physical inactivity and EOC risk, we observed consistent evidence of an association between chronic inactivity and all EOC histotypes. Impact These data add to the growing body of evidence suggesting that inactivity is an independent risk factor for cancer. If the apparent association between inactivity and EOC risk is substantiated, additional work via targeted interventions should be pursued to characterize the dose of activity required to mitigate the risk of this highly fatal disease. PMID:27197285

  20. Evaluating the progenitor cells of ovarian cancer: analysis of current animal models.

    PubMed

    King, Shelby M; Burdette, Joanna E

    2011-07-01

    Serous ovarian cancer is one of the most lethal gynecological malignancies. Progress on effective diagnostics and therapeutics for this disease are hampered by ambiguity as to the cellular origins of this histotype of ovarian cancer, as well as limited suitable animal models to analyze early stages of disease. In this report, we will review current animal models with respect to the two proposed progenitor cells for serous ovarian cancer, the ovarian surface epithelium and the fallopian tube epithelium.

  1. Psychosocial Stress and Ovarian Cancer Risk: Metabolomics and Perceived Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    ovarian cancer, psychosocial stress, depression , anxiety, social support, metabolomics 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18...Changes/ Problems ...….………………………………………………3 6. Products…………………………………….……….….…………….3 7. Participants & Other Collaborating Organizations……………3 8. Special...reported stress exposures ( depressive symptoms, phobic anxiety, social support, job strain, care-giving stress) are associated with ovarian cancer risk

  2. Identifying Determinants of PARP Inhibitor Sensitivity in Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-10-01

    Cancer Center Philadelphia, PA 19111 REPORT DATE: TYPE OF REPORT: Annual PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Fort Detrick...in Ovarian Cancer October 2017 The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not be construed...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER The Research Institute of Fox Chase Cancer Center 333 Cottman Avenue Philadelphia

  3. Markers of Ovarian Cancer Using a Glycoprotein/Antibody Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    hepatocellular carcinoma based on altered profiles of alpha - fetoprotein . N. Engl. J. Med. 1993, 328 (25), 1802−6. (24) Hernandez, J.; Thompson, I. M...include HER2/NEU in breast cancer,22 α- fetoprotein (AFP) in hepatocellular carcinoma,23 prostate- specific antigen (PSA) in prostate cancer,24 and CA125...have already been found up- regulated in ovarian cancer, which include alpha -1-antitrypsin,36 haptoglobin,37 and alpha -1-proteinase inhibitor.38 In the

  4. Selective killing of ovarian cancer cells through induction of apoptosis by nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Iseki, Sachiko; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Kondo, Hiroki

    2012-03-12

    Two independent ovarian cancer cell lines and fibroblast controls were treated with nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP). Most ovarian cancer cells were detached from the culture dish by continuous plasma treatment to a single spot on the dish. Next, the plasma source was applied over the whole dish using a robot arm. In vitro cell proliferation assays showed that plasma treatments significantly decreased proliferation rates of ovarian cancer cells compared to fibroblast cells. Flow cytometry and western blot analysis showed that plasma treatment of ovarian cancer cells induced apoptosis. NEAPP could be a promising tool for therapy for ovarian cancers.

  5. History of thyroid disease and survival of ovarian cancer patients: results from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium, a brief report.

    PubMed

    Minlikeeva, Albina N; Freudenheim, Jo L; Cannioto, Rikki A; Eng, Kevin H; Szender, J Brian; Mayor, Paul; Etter, John L; Cramer, Daniel W; Diergaarde, Brenda; Doherty, Jennifer A; Dörk, Thilo; Edwards, Robert; deFazio, Anna; Friel, Grace; Goodman, Marc T; Hillemanns, Peter; Høgdall, Estrid; Jensen, Allan; Jordan, Susan J; Karlan, Beth Y; Kjær, Susanne K; Klapdor, Rüdiger; Matsuo, Keitaro; Mizuno, Mika; Nagle, Christina M; Odunsi, Kunle; Paddock, Lisa; Rossing, Mary Anne; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Segal, Brahm H; Starbuck, Kristen; Terry, Kathryn L; Webb, Penelope M; Zsiros, Emese; Ness, Roberta B; Modugno, Francesmary; Bandera, Elisa V; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2017-09-26

    Findings from in vitro studies suggest that increased exposure to thyroid hormones can influence progression of ovarian tumours. However, epidemiologic evidence on this topic is limited. We pooled data from 11 studies from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. Using multivariate Cox proportional hazards models, we estimated associations between hyper- and hypothyroidism and medications prescribed for these conditions with 5-year all-cause survival among women diagnosed with invasive ovarian cancer. Overall, there was a nonsignificant association with history of hyperthyroidism (n=160 cases) and mortality (HR=1.22; 95% CI=0.97-1.53). Furthermore, diagnosis of hyperthyroidism within the 5 years before ovarian cancer diagnosis was associated with an increased risk of death (HR=1.94; 95% CI=1.19-3.18). A more modest association was observed with history of hypothyroidism (n=624 cases) and mortality (HR=1.16; 95% CI=1.03-1.31). Neither duration of hypothyroidism nor use of thyroid medications was associated with survival. In this large study of women with ovarian cancer, we found that recent history of hyperthyroidism and overall history of hypothyroidism were associated with worse 5-year survival.

  6. The Anti-Mullerian hormone and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    La Marca, Antonio; Volpe, Annibale

    2007-01-01

    The Anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH), which is produced by fetal Sertoli cells, is responsible for regression of Mullerian ducts, the anlagen for uterus and Fallopian tubes, during male sex differentiation. Ovarian granulosa cells also secrete AMH from late in fetal life. The patterns of expression of AMH and its type II receptor in the post-natal ovary indicate that AMH may play an important role in ovarian folliculogenesis. Recent advances in the physiological role of AMH has stimulated interest in the significance of AMH as a diagnostic marker and therapeutic agent for ovarian cancer. Currently, AMH has been shown to be a circulating marker specifically for granulosa cell tumour (GCT). Its diagnostic performance seems to be very good, with a sensitivity ranging between 76 and 93%. In patients treated for GCT, AMH may be used post-operatively as marker for the efficacy of surgery and for disease recurrence. Based on the physiological inhibitory role of AMH in the Mullerian ducts, it has been proposed that AMH may inhibit epithelial ovarian cancer cell both in vitro and in vivo. These observations will be the basis for future research aiming to investigate the possible clinical role of AMH as neo-adjuvant, or most probably adjuvant, therapy for ovarian cancer.

  7. YKL-40 in Serum Samples From Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III-IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal Cavity, or Fallopian Tube Cancer Receiving Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-05-21

    Fallopian Tube Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Clear Cell Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Endometrioid Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Mucinous Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Neoplasm; Malignant Ovarian Serous Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Transitional Cell Tumor; Ovarian Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  8. Temsirolimus and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Endometrial, Ovarian, Liver, Carcinoid, or Islet Cell Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-10

    Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Malignant Pancreatic Gastrinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Malignant Pancreatic Insulinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Somatostatinoma; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Surface Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Alpha Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Beta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Delta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic G-Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Carcinosarcoma

  9. ATP11B mediates platinum resistance in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Smith, Myrthala; Halder, J.B.; Meltzer, Paul S.; Gonda, Tamas A.; Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Lu, Chunhua; Nagaraja, Archana S.; Gharpure, Kshipra M.; Kang, Yu; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Vivas-Mejia, Pablo E.; Zand, Behrouz; Schmandt, Rosemarie; Wang, Hua; Langley, Robert R.; Jennings, Nicholas B.; Ivan, Cristina; Coffin, Jeremy E.; Armaiz, Guillermo N.; Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Kim, Sang Bae; Halleck, Margaret S.; Hendrix, Mary J.C.; Bornman, William; Bar-Eli, Menashe; Lee, Ju-Seog; Siddik, Zahid H.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Sood, Anil K.

    2013-01-01

    Platinum compounds display clinical activity against a wide variety of solid tumors; however, resistance to these agents is a major limitation in cancer therapy. Reduced platinum uptake and increased platinum export are examples of resistance mechanisms that limit the extent of DNA damage. Here, we report the discovery and characterization of the role of ATP11B, a P-type ATPase membrane protein, in cisplatin resistance. We found that ATP11B expression was correlated with higher tumor grade in human ovarian cancer samples and with cisplatin resistance in human ovarian cancer cell lines. ATP11B gene silencing restored the sensitivity of ovarian cancer cell lines to cisplatin in vitro. Combined therapy of cisplatin and ATP11B-targeted siRNA significantly decreased cancer growth in mice bearing ovarian tumors derived from cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant cells. In vitro mechanistic studies on cellular platinum content and cisplatin efflux kinetics indicated that ATP11B enhances the export of cisplatin from cells. The colocalization of ATP11B with fluorescent cisplatin and with vesicular trafficking proteins, such as syntaxin-6 (STX6) and vesicular-associated membrane protein 4 (VAMP4), strongly suggests that ATP11B contributes to secretory vesicular transport of cisplatin from Golgi to plasma membrane. In conclusion, inhibition of ATP11B expression could serve as a therapeutic strategy to overcome cisplatin resistance. PMID:23585472

  10. Ovarian Cancer Susceptibility Alleles and Risk of Ovarian Cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Ramus, Susan J.; Antoniou, Antonis C; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; van Asperen, Christi J.; van Roozendaal, K.E.P.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J. Margriet; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Jacobs, Chris; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Douglas, Fiona; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E.; Kennedy, M. John; Pathak, Harsh; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Calender, Alain; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Faivre, Laurence; Loustalot, Catherine; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th.; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Van Le, Linda; Hoffman, James S; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Tornero, Eva; Navarro, Matilde; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Olah, Edith; Vaszko, Tibor; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Dorfling, Cecelia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Diez, Orland; Kwong, Ava; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Fiebig, Britta; Schäfer, Dieter; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Plante, Marie; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V. Shane; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Gayther, Simon A.; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified six alleles associated with risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated four of these loci as potential modifiers of ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs10088218 (at 8q24), rs2665390 (at 3q25), rs717852 (at 2q31), and rs9303542 (at 17q21), were genotyped in 12,599 BRCA1 and 7,132 BRCA2 carriers, including 2,678 ovarian cancer cases. Associations were evaluated within a retrospective cohort approach. All four loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 0.81 (95% CI: 0.67–0.98) P-trend = 0.033, rs2665390 HR = 1.48 (95% CI: 1.21–1.83) P-trend = 1.8 × 10−4, rs717852 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10–1.42) P-trend = 6.6 × 10−4, rs9303542 HR = 1.16 (95% CI: 1.02–1.33) P-trend = 0.026. Two loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele HR = 0.89 (95% CI: 0.81–0.99) P-trend = 0.029, rs2665390 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10–1.42) P-trend = 6.1 × 10−4. The HR estimates for the remaining loci were consistent with odds ratio estimates for the general population. The identification of multiple loci modifying ovarian cancer risk may be useful for counseling women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations regarding their risk of ovarian cancer. PMID:22253144

  11. Use of multiple imaging modalities to detect ovarian cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanter, Elizabeth; Walker, Ross; Marion, Sam; Hoyer, Patricia; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2005-04-01

    Ovarian cancer is not a common cancer-approximately 25,000 new cases in 2004-but it is the fifth leading cause of death from cancer in women (over 16,000 in 2004). Little is known about the precursors and early stages of ovarian cancer partially due to the lack of human samples at the early stages. A cohesive model that incorporates ovarian cancer induction into a menopausal rodent would be well suited for comprehensive studies of ovarian cancer. Non-destructive imaging would allow carcinogenesis to be followed. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM) and Light-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) are minimally invasive optical modalities that allow both structural and biochemical changes to be noted. Rat ovaries were exposed to 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) for 20 days in order to destroy the primordial follicles. Plain sutures and sutures coated with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) were implanted in the right ovary, in order to produce epithelial based ovarian cancers (a plain suture was inserted in the control). Rats were sacrificed at 4 weeks and ovaries were harvested and imaged with a combined OCT/LIF system and with the OCM. Histology was preformed on the harvested ovaries and any pathology determined. Two of the ovaries were visually abnormal; the OCT/LIF imaging confirmed these abnormalities. The normal ovary OCM and OCT images show the organized structure of the ovary, the follicles, bursa and corpus lutea are visible. The OCM images show the disorganized structure of one of the abnormal ovaries. Overall this pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of both the animal model and optical imaging.

  12. The long non-coding RNA HOTAIR promotes the proliferation of serous ovarian cancer cells through the regulation of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Jun-jun; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 138 Yixueyuan Road, Shanghai 200032; Shanghai Key Laboratory of Female Reproductive Endocrine-Related Diseases, 413 Zhaozhou Road, Shanghai 200011

    HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR) is a well-known long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) whose dysregulation correlates with poor prognosis and malignant progression in many forms of cancer. Here, we investigate the expression pattern, clinical significance, and biological function of HOTAIR in serous ovarian cancer (SOC). Clinically, we found that HOTAIR levels were overexpressed in SOC tissues compared with normal controls and that HOTAIR overexpression was correlated with an advanced FIGO stage and a high histological grade. Multivariate analysis revealed that HOTAIR is an independent prognostic factor for predicting overall survival in SOC patients. We demonstrated that HOTAIR silencing inhibited A2780 andmore » OVCA429 SOC cell proliferation in vitro and that the anti-proliferative effects of HOTAIR silencing also occurred in vivo. Further investigation into the mechanisms responsible for the growth inhibitory effects by HOTAIR silencing revealed that its knockdown resulted in the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through certain cell cycle-related and apoptosis-related proteins. Together, these results highlight a critical role of HOTAIR in SOC cell proliferation and contribute to a better understanding of the importance of dysregulated lncRNAs in SOC progression. - Highlights: • HOTAIR overexpression correlates with an aggressive tumour phenotype and a poor prognosis in SOC. • HOTAIR promotes SOC cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. • The proliferative role of HOTAIR is associated with regulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis.« less

  13. Emodin Inhibits the Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Cells via ILK/GSK-3β/Slug Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jingjing; Xu, Ying; Wei, Xuan; Zhao, Zhe; Xue, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Despite the anticancer capabilities of emodin observed in many cancers, including EOC, the underlying molecular mechanism remains to be elucidated. A crucial link has been discovered between the acquisition of metastatic traits and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The present study aimed to determine whether emodin could inhibit the EMT of EOC cells and explore the underlying mechanism. The CCK-8 assay and transwell assay showed that emodin effectively repressed the abilities of proliferation, invasion, and migration in A2780 and SK-OV-3 cells. The Western blot showed that emodin upregulated epithelial markers (E-cadherin and Claudin) while it downregulated mesenchymal markers (N-cadherin and Vimentin) and transcription factor (Slug) in a dose-dependent fashion. After transfection of siRNA-Slug, both Slug and N-cadherin were downregulated in EOC cells while E-cadherin was upregulated, which was intensified by emodin. Besides, emodin decreased the expression of ILK, p-GSK-3β, β-catenin, and Slug. Transfection of siRNA-ILK also achieved the same effects, which was further strengthened by following emodin treatment. Nevertheless, SB216763, an inhibitor of GSK-3β, could reverse the effects of emodin except for ILK expression. These findings suggest that emodin inhibited the EMT of EOC cells via ILK/GSK-3β/Slug signaling pathway. PMID:28097141

  14. Emodin Inhibits the Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Cells via ILK/GSK-3β/Slug Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jingjing; Xu, Ying; Wei, Xuan; Zhao, Zhe; Xue, Jing; Liu, Peishu

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Despite the anticancer capabilities of emodin observed in many cancers, including EOC, the underlying molecular mechanism remains to be elucidated. A crucial link has been discovered between the acquisition of metastatic traits and the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The present study aimed to determine whether emodin could inhibit the EMT of EOC cells and explore the underlying mechanism. The CCK-8 assay and transwell assay showed that emodin effectively repressed the abilities of proliferation, invasion, and migration in A2780 and SK-OV-3 cells. The Western blot showed that emodin upregulated epithelial markers (E-cadherin and Claudin) while it downregulated mesenchymal markers (N-cadherin and Vimentin) and transcription factor (Slug) in a dose-dependent fashion. After transfection of siRNA-Slug, both Slug and N-cadherin were downregulated in EOC cells while E-cadherin was upregulated, which was intensified by emodin. Besides, emodin decreased the expression of ILK, p-GSK-3 β , β -catenin, and Slug. Transfection of siRNA-ILK also achieved the same effects, which was further strengthened by following emodin treatment. Nevertheless, SB216763, an inhibitor of GSK-3 β , could reverse the effects of emodin except for ILK expression. These findings suggest that emodin inhibited the EMT of EOC cells via ILK/GSK-3 β /Slug signaling pathway.

  15. Cognitive and affective influences on perceived risk of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Peipins, Lucy A; McCarty, Frances; Hawkins, Nikki A; Rodriguez, Juan L; Scholl, Lawrence E; Leadbetter, Steven

    2015-03-01

    Studies suggest that both affective and cognitive processes are involved in the perception of vulnerability to cancer and that affect has an early influence in this assessment of risk. We constructed a path model based on a conceptual framework of heuristic reasoning (affect, resemblance, and availability) coupled with cognitive processes involved in developing personal models of cancer causation. From an eligible cohort of 16 700 women in a managed care organization, we randomly selected 2524 women at high, elevated, and average risk of ovarian cancer and administered a questionnaire to test our model (response rate 76.3%). Path analysis delineated the relationships between personal and cognitive characteristics (number of relatives with cancer, age, ideas about cancer causation, perceived resemblance to an affected friend or relative, and ovarian cancer knowledge) and emotional constructs (closeness to an affected relative or friend, time spent processing the cancer experience, and cancer worry) on perceived risk of ovarian cancer. Our final model fit the data well (root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA) = 0.028, comparative fit index (CFI) = 0.99, normed fit index (NFI) = 0.98). This final model (1) demonstrated the nature and direction of relationships between cognitive characteristics and perceived risk; (2) showed that time spent processing the cancer experience was associated with cancer worry; and (3) showed that cancer worry moderately influenced perceived risk. Our results highlight the important role that family cancer experience has on cancer worry and shows how cancer experience translates into personal risk perceptions. This understanding informs the discordance between medical or objective risk assessment and personal risk assessment. Published in 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Published in 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  16. Targeting AMPK signaling in combating ovarian cancers: opportunities and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Yung, Mingo M.H.; Ngan, Hextan Y.S.; Chan, David W.

    2016-01-01

    The development and strategic application of effective anticancer therapies have turned out to be one of the most critical approaches of managing human cancers. Nevertheless, drug resistance is the major obstacle for clinical management of these diseases especially ovarian cancer. In the past years, substantial studies have been carried out with the aim of exploring alternative therapeutic approaches to enhance efficacy of current chemotherapeutic regimes and reduce the side effects caused in order to produce significant advantages in overall survival and to improve patients' quality of life. Targeting cancer cell metabolism by the application of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-activating agents is believed to be one of the most plausible attempts. AMPK activators such as 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-d-ribofuranoside, A23187, metformin, and bitter melon extract not only prevent cancer progression and metastasis but can also be applied as a supplement to enhance the efficacy of cisplatin-based chemotherapy in human cancers such as ovarian cancer. However, because of the undesirable outcomes along with the frequent toxic side effects of most pharmaceutical AMPK activators that have been utilized in clinical trials, attentions of current studies have been aimed at the identification of replaceable reagents from nutraceuticals or traditional medicines. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of many nutraceuticals in anticancer still remain obscure. Therefore, better understanding of the functional characterization and regulatory mechanism of natural AMPK activators would help pharmaceutical development in opening an area to intervene ovarian cancer and other human cancers. PMID:26764240

  17. Differential co-expression analysis reveals a novel prognostic gene module in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Gov, Esra; Arga, Kazim Yalcin

    2017-07-10

    Ovarian cancer is one of the most significant disease among gynecological disorders that women suffered from over the centuries. However, disease-specific and effective biomarkers were still not available, since studies have focused on individual genes associated with ovarian cancer, ignoring the interactions and associations among the gene products. Here, ovarian cancer differential co-expression networks were reconstructed via meta-analysis of gene expression data and co-expressed gene modules were identified in epithelial cells from ovarian tumor and healthy ovarian surface epithelial samples to propose ovarian cancer associated genes and their interactions. We propose a novel, highly interconnected, differentially co-expressed, and co-regulated gene module in ovarian cancer consisting of 84 prognostic genes. Furthermore, the specificity of the module to ovarian cancer was shown through analyses of datasets in nine other cancers. These observations underscore the importance of transcriptome based systems biomarkers research in deciphering the elusive pathophysiology of ovarian cancer, and here, we present reciprocal interplay between candidate ovarian cancer genes and their transcriptional regulatory dynamics. The corresponding gene module might provide new insights on ovarian cancer prognosis and treatment strategies that continue to place a significant burden on global health.

  18. Brain metastasis from ovarian cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pakneshan, Shabnam; Safarpour, Damoun; Tavassoli, Fattaneh; Jabbari, Bahman

    2014-08-01

    To review the existing literature on brain metastasis (BM) from ovarian cancer and to assess the frequency, anatomical, clinical and paraclinical information and factors associated with prognosis. Ovarian cancer is a rare cause of brain metastasis with a recently reported increasing prevalence. Progressive neurologic disability and poor prognosis is common. A comprehensive review on this subject has not been published previously. This systematic literature search used the Pubmed and Yale library. A total of 66 publications were found, 57 of which were used representing 591 patients with BM from ovarian cancer. The median age of the patients was 54.3 years (range 20-81). A majority of patients (57.3 %) had multiple brain lesions. The location of the lesion was cerebellar (30 %), frontal (20 %), parietal (18 %) and occipital (11 %). Extracranial metastasis was present in 49.8 % of cases involving liver (20.7 %), lung (20.4 %), lymph nodes (12.6 %), bones (6.6 %) and pelvic organs (4.3 %). The most common symptoms were weakness (16 %), seizures (11 %), altered mentality (11 %) visual disturbances (9 %) and dizziness (8 %). The interval from diagnosis of breast cancer to BM ranged from 0 to 133 months (median 24 months) and median survival was 8.2 months. Local radiation, surgical resection, stereotactic radiosurgery and medical therapy were used. Factors that significantly increased the survival were younger age at the time of ovarian cancer diagnosis and brain metastasis diagnosis, lower grade of the primary tumor, higher KPS score and multimodality treatment for the brain metastases. Ovarian cancer is a rare cause of brain metastasis. Development of brain metastasis among older patients and lower KPS score correlate with less favorable prognosis. The more prolonged survival after using multimodality treatment for brain metastasis is important due to potential impact on management of brain metastasis in future.

  19. Hopelessness and complementary therapy use in patients with ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Gross, Anne H; Cromwell, Jerry; Fonteyn, Marsha; Matulonis, Ursula A; Hayman, Laura L

    2013-01-01

    Hopelessness negatively affects ovarian cancer patients' quality of life (QOL). Research validating the effects of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use on QOL and hope is scarce, even though QOL and hope are reasons that patients cite for using CAM therapy. Clinicians need effective, evidence-based interventions to improve QOL and reduce hopelessness. The objectives of this study were to examine factors influencing hopelessness in patients with newly diagnosed disease, long-term survivors, and patients experiencing ovarian cancer recurrence and to examine the effects of CAM on hopelessness in the same population. Surveys of ovarian cancer patients (N = 219) undergoing treatment at a comprehensive cancer center in the United States were analyzed. Descriptive, correlation, and multivariate analyses described variables and demonstrated the effects of sociodemographics, disease state, psychological distress, QOL, CAM use, and faith on hopelessness. Patients ages 65 years or older (-0.95, P = .03), with strong faith (-0.28, P = .00), and good QOL (0.11, P = .00) directly reduced hopelessness scores (mean, 3.37). Massage therapy substantially reduced hopelessness scores (-1.07, P = .02); holding age constant, employed patients were twice as likely to use massage (odds ratio, 2.09; P = .04). Patients who had newly diagnosed and recurrent ovarian cancer were more hopeless because of greater distress from symptoms and adverse effects of treatment. Patients who used massage therapy were significantly less hopeless, as were those with strong faith and well-controlled disease symptoms and treatment for adverse effects. Support of spiritual needs and symptom management are important interventions to prevent and/or reduce hopelessness, especially for patients with newly diagnosed and recurrent ovarian cancer. Further research testing the positive effect of massage interventions on hopelessness is needed.

  20. DDX4 (DEAD box polypeptide 4) colocalizes with cancer stem cell marker CD133 in ovarian cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ki Hyung; Biomedical Research Institute and Pusan Cancer Center, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan; Kang, Yun-Jeong

    Highlights: • Germ cell marker DDX4 was significantly increased in ovarian cancer. • Ovarian cancer stem cell marker CD133 was significantly increased in ovarian cancer. • DDX4 and CD133 were mostly colocalized in various types of ovarian cancer tissues. • CD133 positive ovarian cancer cells also express DDX4 whereas CD133-negative cells did not possess DDX4. • Germ cell marker DDX4 has the potential of ovarian cancer stem cell marker. - Abstract: DDX4 (DEAD box polypeptide 4), characterized by the conserved motif Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp (DEAD), is an RNA helicase which is implicated in various cellular processes involving the alteration of RNA secondarymore » structure, such as translation initiation, nuclear and mitochondrial splicing, and ribosome and spliceosome assembly. DDX4 is known to be a germ cell-specific protein and is used as a sorting marker of germline stem cells for the production of oocytes. A recent report about DDX4 in ovarian cancer showed that DDX4 is overexpressed in epithelial ovarian cancer and disrupts a DNA damage-induced G2 checkpoint. We investigated the relationship between DDX4 and ovarian cancer stem cells by analyzing the expression patterns of DDX4 and the cancer stem cell marker CD133 in ovarian cancers via tissue microarray. Both DDX4 and CD133 were significantly increased in ovarian cancer compared to benign tumors, and showed similar patterns of expression. In addition, DDX4 and CD133 were mostly colocalized in various types of ovarian cancer tissues. Furthermore, almost all CD133 positive ovarian cancer cells also express DDX4 whereas CD133-negative cells did not possess DDX4, suggesting a strong possibility that DDX4 plays an important role in cancer stem cells, and/or can be used as an ovarian cancer stem cell marker.« less

  1. Use of common analgesic medications and ovarian cancer survival: results from a pooled analysis in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Suzanne C; Nagle, Christina M; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Trabert, Britton; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Moysich, Kirsten B; deFazio, Anna; Risch, Harvey A; Rossing, Mary Anne; Doherty, Jennifer A; Wicklund, Kristine G; Goodman, Marc T; Modugno, Francesmary; Ness, Roberta B; Edwards, Robert P; Jensen, Allan; Kjær, Susanne K; Høgdall, Estrid; Berchuck, Andrew; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L; Poole, Elizabeth M; Bandera, Elisa V; Paddock, Lisa E; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Menon, Usha; Gayther, Simon A; Ramus, Susan J; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Wu, Anna H; Pike, Malcolm C; Webb, Penelope M

    2017-01-01

    Background: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been associated with improved survival in some cancers, but evidence for ovarian cancer is limited. Methods: Pooling individual-level data from 12 Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium studies, we evaluated the association between self-reported, pre-diagnosis use of common analgesics and overall/progression-free/disease-specific survival among 7694 women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (4273 deaths). Results: Regular analgesic use (at least once per week) was not associated with overall survival (pooled hazard ratios, pHRs (95% confidence intervals): aspirin 0.96 (0.88–1.04); non-aspirin NSAIDs 0.97 (0.89–1.05); acetaminophen 1.01 (0.93–1.10)), nor with progression-free/disease-specific survival. There was however a survival advantage for users of any NSAIDs in studies clearly defining non-use as less than once per week (pHR=0.89 (0.82–0.98)). Conclusions: Although this study did not show a clear association between analgesic use and ovarian cancer survival, further investigation with clearer definitions of use and information about post-diagnosis use is warranted. PMID:28350790

  2. Use of common analgesic medications and ovarian cancer survival: results from a pooled analysis in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Suzanne C; Nagle, Christina M; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Trabert, Britton; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Moysich, Kirsten B; deFazio, Anna; Risch, Harvey A; Rossing, Mary Anne; Doherty, Jennifer A; Wicklund, Kristine G; Goodman, Marc T; Modugno, Francesmary; Ness, Roberta B; Edwards, Robert P; Jensen, Allan; Kjær, Susanne K; Høgdall, Estrid; Berchuck, Andrew; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L; Poole, Elizabeth M; Bandera, Elisa V; Paddock, Lisa E; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Menon, Usha; Gayther, Simon A; Ramus, Susan J; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Wu, Anna H; Pike, Malcolm C; Webb, Penelope M

    2017-04-25

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been associated with improved survival in some cancers, but evidence for ovarian cancer is limited. Pooling individual-level data from 12 Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium studies, we evaluated the association between self-reported, pre-diagnosis use of common analgesics and overall/progression-free/disease-specific survival among 7694 women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (4273 deaths). Regular analgesic use (at least once per week) was not associated with overall survival (pooled hazard ratios, pHRs (95% confidence intervals): aspirin 0.96 (0.88-1.04); non-aspirin NSAIDs 0.97 (0.89-1.05); acetaminophen 1.01 (0.93-1.10)), nor with progression-free/disease-specific survival. There was however a survival advantage for users of any NSAIDs in studies clearly defining non-use as less than once per week (pHR=0.89 (0.82-0.98)). Although this study did not show a clear association between analgesic use and ovarian cancer survival, further investigation with clearer definitions of use and information about post-diagnosis use is warranted.

  3. Identifying Determinants of PARP Inhibitor Sensitivity in Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    such as those lacking functional BRCA1 are highly sensitive to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. Ovarian cancer patients that harbored...Principal Investigator (Last, first, middle): Johnson, Neil  Dr. Johnson’s mentor, Dr. Jeffrey Boyd, left Fox Chase for Florida International

  4. Endometriosis and ovarian cancer: links, risks, and challenges faced.

    PubMed

    Pavone, Mary Ellen; Lyttle, Brianna M

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis is a benign gynecological condition characterized by specific histological, molecular, and clinical findings. It affects 5%-10% of premenopausal women, is a cause of infertility, and has been implicated as a precursor for certain types of ovarian cancer. Advances in technology, primarily the ability for whole genome sequencing, have led to the discovery of new mutations and a better understanding of the function of previously identified genes and pathways associated with endometriosis associated ovarian cancers (EAOCs) that include PTEN, CTNNB1 (β-catenin), KRAS, microsatellite instability, ARID1A, and the unique role of inflammation in the development of EAOC. Clinically, EAOCs are associated with a younger age at diagnosis, lower stage and grade of tumor, and are more likely to occur in premenopausal women when compared with other ovarian cancers. A shift from screening strategies adopted to prevent EAOCs has resulted in new recommendations for clinical practice by national and international governing bodies. In this paper, we review the common histologic and molecular characteristics of endometriosis and ovarian cancer, risks associated with EAOCs, clinical challenges and give recommendations for providers.

  5. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Ovarian Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Pandharipande, Pari V; Lowry, Kathryn P; Reinhold, Caroline; Atri, Mostafa; Benson, Carol B; Bhosale, Priyadarshani R; Green, Edward D; Kang, Stella K; Lakhman, Yulia; Maturen, Katherine E; Nicola, Refky; Salazar, Gloria M; Shipp, Thomas D; Simpson, Lynn; Sussman, Betsy L; Uyeda, Jennifer; Wall, Darci J; Whitcomb, Bradford; Zelop, Carolyn M; Glanc, Phyllis

    2017-11-01

    There has been much interest in the identification of a successful ovarian cancer screening test, in particular, one that can detect ovarian cancer at an early stage and improve survival. We reviewed the currently available data from randomized and observational trials that examine the role of imaging for ovarian cancer screening in average-risk and high-risk women. We found insufficient evidence to recommend ovarian cancer screening, when considering the imaging modality (pelvic ultrasound) and population (average-risk postmenopausal women) for which there is the greatest available published evidence; randomized controlled trials have not demonstrated a mortality benefit in this setting. Screening high-risk women using pelvic ultrasound may be appropriate in some clinical situations; however, related data are limited because large, randomized trials have not been performed in this setting. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Bone metastasis from ovarian cancer. Clinical analysis of 26 cases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Sun, Jimei

    2013-12-01

    To study the clinical characteristics of bone metastasis from ovarian cancer, and facilitate physicians to develop treatment strategies. This retrospective study was carried out in the Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Shandong, China. Twenty-six cases of bone metastasis from ovarian cancer treated between January 2002 and May 2008 were reviewed, and the clinical data were collected. In the current study, the incidence of bone metastasis is 0.82%. Twelve cases of bone metastasis occurred in the cervical vertebra, 10 in the lumbar vertebra, 8 in the pelvis, 7 in the thoracic vertebra, 5 in the limbs, one in the ribs, and 2 in the sternum. Lung metastasis occurred concomitantly in 9 cases, liver metastasis in 5 cases, brain metastasis in 4 cases, splenic metastasis in 3 cases, adrenal metastasis in 2 cases, and lymphatic metastasis in 12 cases. Twenty-three cases (88.5%) of bone metastasis were detected in stage III-IV, and 3 (11.5%) in stage II (p=0.000). The survival time in cases treated using comprehensive therapy was longer than those using radiotherapy or chemotherapy alone (p=0.047). Bone metastasis from ovarian cancer is rare, however, the increasing pathological stage of ovarian cancer may add to the risk of bone metastasis, especially in the cases with lung or lymphatic metastasis. The pelvis and vertebral bone are the most common location of bone metastasis, and comprehensive treatment may improve the survival time of patients.

  7. Analgesic drug use and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Charlotte G; Rossing, Mary Anne; Wicklund, Kristine G; Cushing-Haugen, Kara L

    2008-06-15

    Analgesic use may reduce ovarian cancer risk, possibly through antiinflammatory or antigonadotropic effects. The authors conducted a population-based, case-control study in Washington State that included 812 women aged 35-74 years who were diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer between 2002 and 2005 and 1,313 controls. Use of analgesics, excluding use within the previous year, was assessed via in-person interviews. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Overall, acetaminophen and aspirin were associated with weakly increased risks of ovarian cancer. These associations were stronger after more than 10 years of use (acetaminophen: odds ratio (OR) = 1.8, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3, 2.6; aspirin: OR = 1.6, 95% CI: 1.1, 2.2) and were present for indications of headache, menstrual pain, and other pain/injury. Reduced risk was observed among aspirin users who began regular use within the previous 5 years (OR = 0.6, 95% CI: 0.4, 1.0) or used this drug for prevention of heart disease (OR = 0.7, 95% CI: 0.5, 1.0). These results, in the context of prior findings, do not provide compelling evidence of a true increase in risk of ovarian cancer among women who use these drugs. However, they add to the weight of evidence that, in the aggregate, provides little support for the use of analgesic drugs as chemoprevention for this disease.

  8. Drug combination may be highly effective in recurrent ovarian cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Significant improvement with the use of a combination drug therapy for recurrent ovarian cancer was reported at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting in Chicago. The trial compared the activity of a combination of the dru

  9. Rucaparib: a new treatment option for ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Sabatucci, Ilaria; Maltese, Giuseppa; Lepori, Stefano; Tripodi, Elisa; Bogani, Giorgio; Lorusso, Domenica

    2018-05-01

    Approximately 50% of high-grade serous ovarian cancers present a deficiency in the pathways involved in homologous recombination (HR). PARP inhibitors prevent single-strand DNA damage repair and determine a progression of the defect towards double-strand breaks, which results in a process known as 'synthetic lethality'. Areas covered: In this review, the authors discuss the efficacy and toxicity of rucaparib either as a single agent or as a maintenance treatment for ovarian cancer. This includes the NGS Foundation Medicine evaluation of the role of this drug in the treatment algorithm of ovarian cancer. Moreover, perspectives on the future development of this drug are presented. Expert opinion: The FDA has approved this drug for the treatment of recurrent BRCA-mutated ovarian cancers, which were previously treated with at least two chemotherapies and has accepted the supplemental new drug application for maintenance use in patients who respond to platinum-based chemotherapy via the Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA) on 6 April 2018. European Medicines Agency (EMA) approval in the same setting is awaited. The possibility of using PARP inhibitors as a maintenance therapy, as a front-line therapy to combat recurrence, and in combination with anti-angiogenic agents and immune-therapies appears to be of particular interest.

  10. Glycomics Laboratory for the Development of Ovarian Cancer Biomarkers | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Ovarian cancer is a silent killer with few early symptoms and advanced disease often present at the time of diagnosis. This cancer is the most lethal of all gynecologic malignancies with over 20,000 new cases diagnosed each year. The 5 year survival rates for ovarian cancer dramatically improve when the disease is diagnosed at an earlier stage. Therefore, the long term goal of

  11. CPTAC Team Releases Targeted Proteomic Assays for Ovarian Cancer | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) investigators in the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), announces the public release of 98 targeted mass spectrometry-based assays for ovarian cancer research studies.  Chosen based on proteogenomic observations from the recently published multi-institutional collaborative project between PNNL and Johns Hopkins University that comprehensively examined the collections of proteins in the tumors of ovarian cancer patients (highlighted in a paper in

  12. Glycomics Laboratory for the Early Detection of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Ovarian cancer is a silent killer with few early symptoms and advanced disease present at the time of diagnosis. This cancer is the most lethal of all gynecologic malignancies with over 20,000 new cases diagnosed each year. The 5 year survival rates for ovarian cancer dramatically improve when the disease is diagnosed at an early stage. Therefore, the long term goal of the

  13. Chemotherapy Toxicity On Quality of Life in Older Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal Cavity, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-03

    Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  14. Identifying supportive care needs of women with ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Margaret I; Steele, Rose

    2010-01-01

    Women diagnosed with ovarian cancer may experience many shortterm and long-term effects from cancer and its treatment. Cancer has more than a physical impact, yet there is a lack of information about the types of needs these women have and whether they want help in meeting their needs. The main purpose of this cross-sectional, descriptive study was to identify the supportive care needs (physical, emotional, social, informational, spiritual, psychological and practical) of women with ovarian cancer who attended a comprehensive, outpatient cancer centre. A further purpose was to determine if women wanted assistance in meeting those needs. A total of 50 women diagnosed with ovarian cancer participated in this study by completing a self-report questionnaire (The Supportive Care Needs Survey). The data indicated that a range of supportive care needs remained unmet for this patient group. Eight of the top 10 most frequently reported needs were psychosocial, such as fears about the cancer returning or spreading. The women also expressed a range of difficulty in managing their needs. However, despite this reality, significant numbers of women indicated they did not wish to have assistance from the clinic staff with some needs. Suggestions for practice and future research are offered to assist oncology nurses in providing care to these women.

  15. Transferrin facilitates the formation of DNA double-strand breaks via transferrin receptor 1: the possible involvement of transferrin in carcinogenesis of high-grade serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Shigeta, S; Toyoshima, M; Kitatani, K; Ishibashi, M; Usui, T; Yaegashi, N

    2016-07-07

    Fallopian tubal epithelium is a candidate for the origin of high-grade serous ovarian cancer. Transferrin-containing follicular fluid and/or retrograde menstrual blood are possible risk factors for carcinogenesis. Accumulation of DNA double-strand breaks (DNA-DSBs) in the fallopian tubal epithelium is considered to play an important role in the development of cancer. However, the mechanisms by which DNA-DSBs accumulate have not yet been fully elucidated. The hydroxyl radical, which is produced in a Fenton reaction catalyzed by an iron ion, serves as a potent DNA-DSB-inducing molecule, raising the potential of an iron ion transporter of transferrin in the formation of DNA-DSBs. We studied the potential involvement of transferrin in DNA damage and the development of ovarian cancer. Treatment with transferrin facilitated the formation of histone 2AX phosphorylated at Serine 139 (γH2AX), which is known as a DNA-DSB marker, in human fallopian tube secretory epithelial cells and A2780 ovarian cancer cells. Knockdown of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1), but not transferrin receptor 2, suppressed the transferrin uptake and consequent formation of γH2AX. As hydroxyl radicals in reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in DNA-DSBs, the formation of ROS was determined. Treatment with TfR1-specific small interference RNAs significantly diminished transferrin-induced formation of ROS. Moreover, TfR1-dependent uptake of transferrin was revealed to augment the formation of DNA-DSBs in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, which served as a substrate for the Fenton reaction. An ex vivo study with murine fallopian tubes further demonstrated that transferrin treatment introduced DNA-DSBs in the fallopian tubal epithelium. Collectively, these data suggested that the transferrin-TfR1 axis accounts for the induction of DNA-DSBs that potentially lead to DNA damage/genome instability. These findings also suggested that exposure to transferrin initiates and promotes the development of

  16. MALAT1 affects ovarian cancer cell behavior and patient survival

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qunbo; Guan, Wencai; Ren, Weimin; Zhang, Lingyun; Zhang, Jinguo; Xu, Guoxiong

    2018-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is one of the most lethal malignancies of the female reproductive organs. Increasing evidence has revealed that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) participate in tumorigenesis. Metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is an lncRNA and plays a role in various types of tumors. However, the function of MALAT1 on cellular behavior in EOC remains unclear. The current study explored the expression of MALAT1 in ovarian cancer tissues and in EOC cell lines. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that the expression of MALAT1 was higher in human ovarian malignant tumor tissues and EOC cells than in normal ovarian tissues and non-tumorous human ovarian surface epithelial cells, respectively. By analyzing the online database Kaplan-Meier Plotter, MALAT1 was identified to be correlated with the overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) of patients with ovarian cancer. Furthermore, knockdown of MALAT1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly decreased EOC cell viability, migration, and invasion. Finally, dual-luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that MALAT1 interacted with miR-143-3p, a miRNA that plays a role in EOC as demonstrated in our previous study. Inhibition of MALAT1 resulted in an increase of miR-143-3p expression, leading to a decrease of CMPK protein expression. In conclusion, our results indicated that MALAT1 was overexpressed in EOC. Silencing of MALAT1 decreased EOC cell viability and inhibited EOC cell migration and invasion. These data revealed that MALAT1 may serve as a new therapeutic target of human EOC. PMID:29693187

  17. Overcoming cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer cells by targeting HIF-1-regulated cancer metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Zhihong; Lu, Yang; Qiu, Songbo; Fan, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is currently one of the most effective chemotherapeutic drugs used for treating ovarian cancer; however, resistance to cisplatin is common. In this study, we explored an experimental strategy for overcoming cisplatin resistance of human ovarian cancer from the new perspective of cancer cell metabolism. By using two pairs of genetically matched cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines, we tested the hypothesis that downregulating hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), which regulates metabolic enzymes involved in glycolysis, is a promising strategy for overcoming cisplatin resistance of human ovarian cancer cells. We found that cisplatin downregulated the level of the regulatable α subunit of HIF-1, HIF-1α, in cisplatin-sensitive ovarian cancer cells through enhancing HIF-1α degradation but did not downregulate HIF-1α in their cisplatin-resistant counterparts. Overexpression of a degradation-resistant HIF-1α (HIF-1α ΔODD) reduced cisplatin-induced apoptosis in cisplatin-sensitive cells, whereas genetic knockdown of HIF-1α or pharmacological promotion of HIF-1α degradation enhanced response to cisplatin in both cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells. We further demonstrated that knockdown of HIF-1α improved the response of cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin by redirecting the aerobic glycolysis in the resistant cancer cells towards mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, leading to cell death through overproduction of reactive oxygen species. Our findings suggest that the HIF-1α-regulated cancer metabolism pathway could be a novel target for overcoming cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer. PMID:26801746

  18. Circulating 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Risk of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wei; Danforth, Kim N.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Goodman, Marc T.; Arslan, Alan A.; Patel, Alpa V.; McCullough, Marjorie L.; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Purdue, Mark P.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Snyder, Kirk; Steplowski, Emily; Visvanathan, Kala; Yu, Kai; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Gao, Yu-Tang; Hankinson, Susan E.; Harvey, Chinonye; Hayes, Richard B.; Henderson, Brian E.; Horst, Ronald L.; Helzlsouer, Kathy J.

    2010-01-01

    A role for vitamin D in ovarian cancer etiology is supported by ecologic studies of sunlight exposure, experimental mechanism studies, and some studies of dietary vitamin D intake and genetic polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor. However, few studies have examined the association of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D), an integrated measure of vitamin D status, with ovarian cancer risk. A nested case-control study was conducted among 7 prospective studies to evaluate the circulating 25(OH)D concentration in relation to epithelial ovarian cancer risk. Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals among 516 cases and 770 matched controls. Compared with 25(OH)D concentrations of 50–<75 nmol/L, no statistically significant associations were observed for <37.5 (odds ratio (OR) = 1.21, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.87, 1.70), 37.5–<50 (OR = 1.03, 95% CI: 0.75, 1.41), or ≥75 (OR = 1.11, 95% CI: 0.79, 1.55) nmol/L. Analyses stratified by tumor subtype, age, body mass index, and other variables were generally null but suggested an inverse association between 25(OH)D and ovarian cancer risk among women with a body mass index of ≥25 kg/m2 (Pinteraction < 0.01). In conclusion, this large pooled analysis did not support an overall association between circulating 25(OH)D and ovarian cancer risk, except possibly among overweight women. PMID:20562186

  19. Markers of Ovarian Cancer Using a Glycoprotein/Antibody Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    Article dx.doi.org/10.1021/pr400169n | J. Proteome Res. 2013, 12, 3342−33523350 osteopontin fragments for ovarian cancer in urine . Clin. Cancer Res. 2006...absorbent under urea /dithiothreitol denatured environment. Anal. Biochem. 2010, 398 (1), 34−44. (26) Chiu, P. C.; Chung, M. K.; Koistinen, R.; Koistinen... Synthesis and functional analyses of nuclear clusterin, a cell death protein. J. Biol. Chem. 2003, 278 (13), 11590−600. (60) Hassan, M. K.; Watari, H

  20. Clinical Significance and Mechanistic Insights into Ovarian Cancer Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-01

    during the reporting period. If there is nothing to report under a particular item, state “Nothing to Report.” • Publications, conference papers , and...yes Books or other non-periodical, one-time publications. Nothing to Report Other publications, conference papers , and presentations...scites w ere obtained from stage III-IV ovarian cancer patients (S U N Y / P enn S tate H ershey IR B approved study). O varian cancer cells w ere

  1. Cell of Origin: Exploring an Alternative Contributor to Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    previously shown that DDX4 is expressed in ovarian carcinomas and its expression is associated with age and the serous histophenotype. Thus, we analyzed...oncogenic alleles of human TP53, AKT1, KRAS, and PIK3CA were constructed and initially validated in both a human endometrial cancer cell line and mouse...AKT1, KRAS, or PIK3CA were successfully constructed. 9. The viral constructs were initially validated in a human endometrial cancer cell line and

  2. Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IIIC-IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer Following Surgery and Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-10-12

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Tumor; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Neoplasm; Fallopian Tube Serous Neoplasm; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  3. Screening for Ovarian Cancer: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

    PubMed

    Grossman, David C; Curry, Susan J; Owens, Douglas K; Barry, Michael J; Davidson, Karina W; Doubeni, Chyke A; Epling, John W; Kemper, Alex R; Krist, Alex H; Kurth, Ann E; Landefeld, C Seth; Mangione, Carol M; Phipps, Maureen G; Silverstein, Michael; Simon, Melissa A; Tseng, Chien-Wen

    2018-02-13

    With approximately 14 000 deaths per year, ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cause of cancer death among US women and the leading cause of death from gynecologic cancer. More than 95% of ovarian cancer deaths occur among women 45 years and older. To update the 2012 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for ovarian cancer. The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the benefits and harms of screening for ovarian cancer in asymptomatic women not known to be at high risk for ovarian cancer (ie, high risk includes women with certain hereditary cancer syndromes that increase their risk for ovarian cancer). Outcomes of interest included ovarian cancer mortality, quality of life, false-positive rate, surgery and surgical complication rates, and psychological effects of screening. The USPSTF found adequate evidence that screening for ovarian cancer does not reduce ovarian cancer mortality. The USPSTF found adequate evidence that the harms from screening for ovarian cancer are at least moderate and may be substantial in some cases, and include unnecessary surgery for women who do not have cancer. Given the lack of mortality benefit of screening, and the moderate to substantial harms that could result from false-positive screening test results and subsequent surgery, the USPSTF concludes with moderate certainty that the harms of screening for ovarian cancer outweigh the benefit, and the net balance of the benefit and harms of screening is negative. The USPSTF recommends against screening for ovarian cancer in asymptomatic women. (D recommendation) This recommendation applies to asymptomatic women who are not known to have a high-risk hereditary cancer syndrome.

  4. Oxidized macrophage migration inhibitory factor is a potential new tissue marker and drug target in cancer.

    PubMed

    Schinagl, Alexander; Thiele, Michael; Douillard, Patrice; Völkel, Dirk; Kenner, Lukas; Kazemi, Zahra; Freissmuth, Michael; Scheiflinger, Friedrich; Kerschbaumer, Randolf J

    2016-11-08

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a pleiotropic cytokine, which was shown to be upregulated in cancers and to exhibit tumor promoting properties. Unlike other cytokines, MIF is ubiquitously present in the circulation and tissue of healthy subjects. We recently described a previously unrecognized, disease-related isoform of MIF, designated oxMIF, which is present in the circulation of patients with different inflammatory diseases. In this article, we report that oxMIF is also linked to different solid tumors as it is specifically expressed in tumor tissue from patients with colorectal, pancreatic, ovarian and lung cancer. Furthermore, oxMIF can be specifically targeted by a subset of phage display-derived fully human, monoclonal anti-MIF antibodies (mAbs) that were shown to neutralize pro-tumorigenic activities of MIF in vivo. We further demonstrate that anti-oxMIF mAbs sensitize human cancer cell lines (LNCaP, PC3, A2780 and A2780ADR) to the action of cytotoxic drugs (mitoxantrone, cisplatin and doxorubicin) in vitro and in an A2780 xenograft mouse model of ovarian cancer. We conclude that oxMIF is the disease related isoform of MIF in solid tumors and a potential new diagnostic marker and drug target in cancer.

  5. Stomatin-like protein 2 is overexpressed in epithelial ovarian cancer and predicts poor patient survival.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fei; Ding, Wen; He, Jie-Hua; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Ma, Ze-Biao; Li, Yan-Fang

    2015-10-20

    Stomatin-like protein 2 (SLP-2, also known as STOML2) is a stomatin homologue of uncertain function. SLP-2 overexpression has been suggested to be associated with cancer progression, resulting in adverse clinical outcomes in patients. Our study aim to investigate SLP-2 expression in epithelial ovarian cancer cells and its correlation with patient survival. SLP-2 mRNA and protein expression levels were analysed in five epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines and normal ovarian epithelial cells using real-time PCR and western blotting analysis. SLP-2 expression was investigated in eight matched-pair samples of epithelial ovarian cancer and adjacent noncancerous tissues from the same patients. Using immunohistochemistry, we examined the protein expression of paraffin-embedded specimens from 140 patients with epithelial ovarian cancer, 20 cases with borderline ovarian tumours, 20 cases with benign ovarian tumours, and 20 cases with normal ovarian tissues. Statistical analyses were applied to evaluate the clinicopathological significance of SLP-2 expression. SLP-2 mRNA and protein expression levels were significantly up-regulated in epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines and cancer tissues compared with normal ovarian epithelial cells and adjacent noncancerous ovarian tissues. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that the relative overexpression of SLP-2 was detected in 73.6 % (103/140) of the epithelial ovarian cancer specimens, 45.0 % (9/20) of the borderline ovarian specimens, 30.0 % (6/20) of the benign ovarian specimens and none of the normal ovarian specimens. SLP-2 protein expression in epithelial ovarian cancer was significantly correlated with the tumour stage (P < 0.001). Epithelial ovarian cancer patients with higher SLP-2 protein expression levels had shorter progress free survival and overall survival times compared to patients with lower SLP-2 protein expression levels. Multivariate analyses showed that SLP-2 expression levels were an independent

  6. Low 25-OH vitamin D levels at time of diagnosis and recurrence of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Granato, Teresa; Manganaro, Lucia; Petri, Luca; Porpora, Maria Grazia; Viggiani, Valentina; Angeloni, Antonio; Anastasi, Emanuela

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation between 25-OH vitamin D and ovarian cancer as a diagnostic marker or recurrence disease marker. We studied the following: (1) 61 women without gynecologic diseases, (2) 45 women affected by benign ovarian disease, (3) 46 women with recent diagnosis of ovarian cancer, (4) 26 follow-up women with recurrent ovarian cancer, and (5) 32 follow-up women with stable ovarian cancer. The 25-OH vitamin D was quantified with LUMIPULSE® G 25-OH vitamin D on LUMIPULSE® G 1200 (Fujirebio, Japan). As a threshold value, identified by ROC curve analysis, 20.2 ng/mL (sensitivity 73.3 %, specificity 84 %) was chosen corresponding to the limit between sufficient and insufficient 25-OH vitamin D according to the WHO. Low 25-OH vitamin D levels were observed in 26 % of women without gynecologic diseases, in 80 % of women with recent diagnosis of ovarian cancer and in 24 % women affected by benign ovarian diseases (p < 0.001). The follow-up study showed an insufficient level of 25-OH vitamin D in 73 % women with recurrent ovarian cancer and in 47 % women with stable ovarian cancer (p < 0.0003). This study showed that patients with ovarian cancer are often insufficient in 25-OH vitamin D compared to women with benign ovarian diseases. The women with recurrent ovarian cancer presented more often low levels compared to women with stable ovarian cancer. This study suggests that 25-OH vitamin D, due to its antiproliferative properties, can be a good marker for ovarian cancer also.

  7. Impact of doxorubicin on survival in advanced ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    A'Hern, R P; Gore, M E

    1995-03-01

    Our study examined the impact of the addition of doxorubicin to ovarian cancer regimens in general, while removing the confounding influence of other drugs. We performed an overview using the data from two large analyses, the Advanced Ovarian Cancer Trialists Group (AOCTG [Br Med J 303:884-893, 1991] and Williams et al [Seminars in Oncol 19:120-128, 1992 (suppl 2)]) and the Ovarian Cancer Meta-Analysis Project (OCMP [J Clin Oncol 9:1668-1674, 1991]). Our data suggest that the addition of doxorubicin significantly improves survival (hazards ratio, 0.85; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.76 to 0.95; P = .003) and that the size of this benefit is of a similar magnitude to that of platinum. The implication of our results is that the basic drugs for the standard treatment of advanced ovarian should be a combination of platinum and doxorubicin. The addition of an alkylating agent may add toxicity and lead to a dose reduction of these two drugs. In view of recent data on combination therapy with paclitaxel and platinum, it would be appropriate to compare this regimen with a combination of doxorubicin and platinum.

  8. The role of mTOR in ovarian cancer, polycystic ovary syndrome and ovarian aging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Wu, Dai-Chao; Qu, Li-Hua; Liao, Hong-Qing; Li, Mei-Xiang

    2018-05-12

    The mammalian target of rapamycin, mTOR, is a serine-threonine protein kinase downstream of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT axis. The pathway can regulate cell growth, proliferation, and survival by activating ribosomal kinases. Recent studies have implicated the mTOR signaling pathway in ovarian neoplasms, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and premature ovarian failure (POF). Preclinical investigations have demonstrated that the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway is frequently activated in the control of various ovarian functions. mTOR allows cancer cells to escape the normal biochemical system and regulates the balance between apoptosis and survival. Some recent studies have suggested that involvement of the mTOR signaling system is an important pathophysiological basis of PCOS. Overexpression of the mTOR pathway can impair the interaction of cumulus cells, lead to insulin resistance, and affect the growth of follicles directly. The roles of mTOR signaling in follicular development have been extensively studied in recent years; abnormalities in this process lead to a series of pathologies such as POF and infertility. To improve understanding of the role of the mTOR signaling pathway in the pathogenesis and development of ovarian diseases, here we review the roles of mTOR signaling in such diseases and discuss the corresponding therapeutic strategies that target this pathway. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Activated T-cell Therapy, Low-Dose Aldesleukin, and Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer That is Stage III-IV, Refractory, or Recurrent

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-15

    Malignant Ovarian Clear Cell Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Serous Tumor; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  10. Application of Nanotechnology in the Targeted Release of Anticancer Drugs in Ovarian Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    used in detection, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer . When loaded with chemotherapeutic agents, nanoparticle delivery to cancerous tissues...Targeted Release of Anticancer Drugs in Ovarian Cancer Treatment PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Colleen Feltmate, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Application of Nanotechnology in the Targeted Release of Anticancer Drugs in Ovarian Cancer Treatment 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  11. Glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) directly influences platinum drug chemosensitivity in ovarian tumour cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sawers, L; Ferguson, M J; Ihrig, B R; Young, H C; Chakravarty, P; Wolf, C R; Smith, G

    2014-09-09

    Chemotherapy response in ovarian cancer patients is frequently compromised by drug resistance, possibly due to altered drug metabolism. Platinum drugs are metabolised by glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1), which is abundantly, but variably expressed in ovarian tumours. We have created novel ovarian tumour cell line models to investigate the extent to which differential GSTP1 expression influences chemosensitivity. Glutathione S-transferase P1 was stably deleted in A2780 and expression significantly reduced in cisplatin-resistant A2780DPP cells using Mission shRNA constructs, and MTT assays used to compare chemosensitivity to chemotherapy drugs used to treat ovarian cancer. Differentially expressed genes in GSTP1 knockdown cells were identified by Illumina HT-12 expression arrays and qRT-PCR analysis, and altered pathways predicted by MetaCore (GeneGo) analysis. Cell cycle changes were assessed by FACS analysis of PI-labelled cells and invasion and migration compared in quantitative Boyden chamber-based assays. Glutathione S-transferase P1 knockdown selectively influenced cisplatin and carboplatin chemosensitivity (2.3- and 4.83-fold change in IC50, respectively). Cell cycle progression was unaffected, but cell invasion and migration was significantly reduced. We identified several novel GSTP1 target genes and candidate platinum chemotherapy response biomarkers. Glutathione S-transferase P1 has an important role in cisplatin and carboplatin metabolism in ovarian cancer cells. Inter-tumour differences in GSTP1 expression may therefore influence response to platinum-based chemotherapy in ovarian cancer patients.

  12. Glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) directly influences platinum drug chemosensitivity in ovarian tumour cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Sawers, L; Ferguson, M J; Ihrig, B R; Young, H C; Chakravarty, P; Wolf, C R; Smith, G

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chemotherapy response in ovarian cancer patients is frequently compromised by drug resistance, possibly due to altered drug metabolism. Platinum drugs are metabolised by glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1), which is abundantly, but variably expressed in ovarian tumours. We have created novel ovarian tumour cell line models to investigate the extent to which differential GSTP1 expression influences chemosensitivity. Methods: Glutathione S-transferase P1 was stably deleted in A2780 and expression significantly reduced in cisplatin-resistant A2780DPP cells using Mission shRNA constructs, and MTT assays used to compare chemosensitivity to chemotherapy drugs used to treat ovarian cancer. Differentially expressed genes in GSTP1 knockdown cells were identified by Illumina HT-12 expression arrays and qRT–PCR analysis, and altered pathways predicted by MetaCore (GeneGo) analysis. Cell cycle changes were assessed by FACS analysis of PI-labelled cells and invasion and migration compared in quantitative Boyden chamber-based assays. Results: Glutathione S-transferase P1 knockdown selectively influenced cisplatin and carboplatin chemosensitivity (2.3- and 4.83-fold change in IC50, respectively). Cell cycle progression was unaffected, but cell invasion and migration was significantly reduced. We identified several novel GSTP1 target genes and candidate platinum chemotherapy response biomarkers. Conclusions: Glutathione S-transferase P1 has an important role in cisplatin and carboplatin metabolism in ovarian cancer cells. Inter-tumour differences in GSTP1 expression may therefore influence response to platinum-based chemotherapy in ovarian cancer patients. PMID:25010864

  13. Assessing The Impact Of Cancer Therapies On Ovarian Reserve

    PubMed Central

    Gracia, Clarisa R.; Sammel, Mary D.; Freeman, Ellen; Prewitt, Maureen; Carlson, Claire; Ray, Anushree; Vance, Ashley; Ginsberg, Jill P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether measures of ovarian reserve differ between females exposed to cancer therapies in a dose-dependent manner as compared to healthy controls of similar age and late-reproductive age. Design Cross-sectional analysis of data from a prospective cohort study Setting University Medical Center Patients 71 cancer survivors age 15-39; 67 healthy, similarly aged unexposed subjects; 69 regularly menstruating women of late-reproductive age (40-52 years). Interventions: None Main Outcome measures Early follicular phase hormones (FSH, Estradiol, Inhibin B, AMH) and ovarian ultrasound measurements (ovarian volume and Antral Follicle Counts) were compared using multivariable linear regression. Results In adjusted models, FSH, AMH and AFC differed between exposed vs. unexposed (FSH 11.12mIU/ml vs. 7.25mIU/ml, p=0.001; AMH 0.81ng/ml vs. 2.85ng/ml, p<0.001; AFC: 14.55 vs. 27.20, p<0.001. In participants with an FSH<10, survivors had lower levels of AMH and AFC compared to controls. Alkylating agent dose score was associated with increased levels of FSH (p= 0.016) and decreased levels of AMH (p=0.003). Exposure to pelvic radiation was associated with impairment in FSH, AMH, AFC and ovarian volume. AMH was similar in women previously exposed to high-dose cancer therapy and 40-42 year old controls. Conclusions Measures of ovarian reserve are impaired in a dose-dependent manner among cancer survivors compared to unexposed females of similar age. Reproductive hormone levels in menstruating survivors exposed to high-dose therapy are similar to late-reproductive women. The predictive value of measures for pregnancy and menopause must be studied. PMID:22137491

  14. Enhanced anti-cancer activities of a gold(III) pyrrolidinedithiocarbamato complex incorporated in a biodegradable metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Sun, Raymond Wai-Yin; Zhang, Ming; Li, Dan; Li, Mian; Wong, Alice Sze-Tsai

    2016-10-01

    An anti-cancer active gold(III) pyrrolidinedithiocarbamato complex [(PDTC)Au III Cl 2 ] (1) has been synthesized and characterized by means of X-ray crystallography. Compared to the pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate ligand itself, this gold(III) complex displays an up to 33-fold higher anti-cancer potency towards a panel of cancer cell lines including the cisplatin-resistant ovarian carcinoma cell line (A2780cis). As demonstrated by a set of Transwell® assay-based cytotoxicity experiments, incorporating this gold(III) complex in a zinc-based biodegradable metal-organic framework (MOF) displays a significant enhancement in anti-cancer activity towards A2780cis than the gold(III) complex alone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Integrated proteogenomic characterization of human high grade serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bai; McDermott, Jason E; Zhou, Jian-Ying; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Chen, Li; Ray, Debjit; Sun, Shisheng; Yang, Feng; Chen, Lijun; Wang, Jing; Shah, Punit; Cha, Seong Won; Aiyetan, Paul; Woo, Sunghee; Tian, Yuan; Gritsenko, Marina A; Clauss, Therese R; Choi, Caitlin; Monroe, Matthew E; Thomas, Stefani; Nie, Song; Wu, Chaochao; Moore, Ronald J; Yu, Kun-Hsing; Tabb, David L; Fenyö, David; Bafna, Vineet; Wang, Yue; Rodriguez, Henry; Boja, Emily S; Hiltke, Tara; Rivers, Robert C; Sokoll, Lori; Zhu, Heng; Shih, Ie-Ming; Cope, Leslie; Pandey, Akhilesh; Zhang, Bing; Snyder, Michael P; Levine, Douglas A; Smith, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY To provide a detailed analysis of the molecular components and underlying mechanisms associated with ovarian cancer, we performed a comprehensive mass spectrometry-based proteomic characterization of 174 ovarian tumors previously analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), of which 169 were high-grade serous carcinomas (HGSC). Integrating our proteomic measurements with the genomic data yielded a number of insights into disease such as how different copy number alternations influence the proteome, the proteins associated with chromosomal instability, the sets of signaling pathways that diverse genome rearrangements converge on, as well as the ones most associated with short overall survival. Specific protein acetylations associated with homologous recombination deficiency suggest a potential means for stratifying patients for therapy. In addition to providing a valuable resource, these findings provide a view of how the somatic genome drives the cancer proteome and associations between protein and post-translational modification levels and clinical outcomes in HGSC. PMID:27372738

  16. Development of Nanoscale Approaches for Ovarian Cancer Therapeutics and Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Engelberth, Sarah A.; Hempel, Nadine; Bergkvist, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the deadliest of all gynecological cancers and the fifth leading cause of death due to cancer in women. This is largely due to late-stage diagnosis, poor prognosis related to advanced-stage disease, and the high recurrence rate associated with development of chemoresistance. Survival statistics have not improved significantly over the last three decades, highlighting the fact that improved therapeutic strategies and early detection require substantial improvements. Here, we review and highlight nanotechnology-based approaches that seek to address this need. The success of Doxil, a PEGylated liposomal nanoencapsulation of doxorubicin, which was approved by the FDA for use on recurrent ovarian cancer, has paved the way for the current wave of nanoparticle formulations in drug discovery and clinical trials. We discuss and summarize new nanoformulations that are currently moving into clinical trials and highlight novel nanotherapeutic strategies that have shown promising results in preclinical in vivo studies. Further, the potential for nanomaterials in diagnostic imaging techniques and the ability to leverage nanotechnology for early detection of ovarian cancer are also discussed. PMID:25271436

  17. Ovarian Cancers: Genetic Abnormalities, Tumor Heterogeneity and Progression, Clonal Evolution and Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Testa, Ugo; Petrucci, Eleonora; Pasquini, Luca; Castelli, Germana; Pelosi, Elvira

    2018-02-01

    Four main histological subtypes of ovarian cancer exist: serous (the most frequent), endometrioid, mucinous and clear cell; in each subtype, low and high grade. The large majority of ovarian cancers are diagnosed as high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGS-OvCas). TP53 is the most frequently mutated gene in HGS-OvCas; about 50% of these tumors displayed defective homologous recombination due to germline and somatic BRCA mutations, epigenetic inactivation of BRCA and abnormalities of DNA repair genes; somatic copy number alterations are frequent in these tumors and some of them are associated with prognosis; defective NOTCH, RAS/MEK, PI3K and FOXM1 pathway signaling is frequent. Other histological subtypes were characterized by a different mutational spectrum: LGS-OvCas have increased frequency of BRAF and RAS mutations; mucinous cancers have mutation in ARID1A , PIK3CA , PTEN , CTNNB1 and RAS . Intensive research was focused to characterize ovarian cancer stem cells, based on positivity for some markers, including CD133, CD44, CD117, CD24, EpCAM, LY6A, ALDH1. Ovarian cancer cells have an intrinsic plasticity, thus explaining that in a single tumor more than one cell subpopulation, may exhibit tumor-initiating capacity. The improvements in our understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of ovarian cancers should lead to more efficacious treatments.

  18. Ovarian Cancers: Genetic Abnormalities, Tumor Heterogeneity and Progression, Clonal Evolution and Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Germana; Pelosi, Elvira

    2018-01-01

    Four main histological subtypes of ovarian cancer exist: serous (the most frequent), endometrioid, mucinous and clear cell; in each subtype, low and high grade. The large majority of ovarian cancers are diagnosed as high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGS-OvCas). TP53 is the most frequently mutated gene in HGS-OvCas; about 50% of these tumors displayed defective homologous recombination due to germline and somatic BRCA mutations, epigenetic inactivation of BRCA and abnormalities of DNA repair genes; somatic copy number alterations are frequent in these tumors and some of them are associated with prognosis; defective NOTCH, RAS/MEK, PI3K and FOXM1 pathway signaling is frequent. Other histological subtypes were characterized by a different mutational spectrum: LGS-OvCas have increased frequency of BRAF and RAS mutations; mucinous cancers have mutation in ARID1A, PIK3CA, PTEN, CTNNB1 and RAS. Intensive research was focused to characterize ovarian cancer stem cells, based on positivity for some markers, including CD133, CD44, CD117, CD24, EpCAM, LY6A, ALDH1. Ovarian cancer cells have an intrinsic plasticity, thus explaining that in a single tumor more than one cell subpopulation, may exhibit tumor-initiating capacity. The improvements in our understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of ovarian cancers should lead to more efficacious treatments. PMID:29389895

  19. Monepantel induces autophagy in human ovarian cancer cells through disruption of the mTOR/p70S6K signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami, Farnaz; Pourgholami, Mohammad H; Mekkawy, Ahmed H; Rufener, Lucien; Morris, David L

    2014-01-01

    We have recently shown that the novel anthelmintic drug monepantel (MPL) inhibits growth, proliferation and colony formation, arrests the cell cycle and induces cleavage of PARP-1 in ovarian cancer cell lines. Here we report on the mechanism behind the anticancer properties of MPL. The cytotoxic effect of MPL on ovarian cancer cells (OVCAR-3 and A2780) was investigated employing a panel of tests used for the detection of apoptosis and autophagy. Apoptosis and autophagy were defined by caspase activity, DNA-laddering, Annexin-V and acridine orange (AO) staining. Autophagy markers such as LC3B, SQSTM1/p62 and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway related proteins were assessed by western blotting and ELISA techniques. MPL did not activate caspases 3 or 8, nor did it alter the percentage of Annexin V positive stained cells. Failure to cause DNA laddering and the inability of z-VAD-fmk to block the MPL antiproliferative effects led to the ruling out of apoptosis as the mechanism behind MPL-induced cell death. On the other hand, accumulation of acidic vacuoles with distinct chromatin morphology and an increase in punctuate localization of green fluorescent protein-LC3B, and MPL-induced changes in the expression of SQSTM1/p62 were all indicative of MPL-induced autophagy. Consistent with this, we found inhibition of mTOR phosphorylation leading to suppression of the mTOR/p70S6K signalling pathway. Our findings provide the first evidence to show that MPL triggers autophagy through the deactivation of mTOR/p70S6K signalling pathway. PMID:25232497

  20. Risk of breast cancer after a diagnosis of ovarian cancer in BRCA mutation carriers: Is preventive mastectomy warranted?

    PubMed

    McGee, Jacob; Giannakeas, Vasily; Karlan, Beth; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Rosen, Barry; McLaughlin, John; Risch, Harvey; Sun, Ping; Foulkes, William D; Neuhausen, Susan L; Kotsopoulos, Joanne; Narod, Steven A

    2017-05-01

    Preventive breast surgery and MRI screening are offered to unaffected BRCA mutation carriers. The clinical benefit of these two modalities has not been evaluated among mutation carriers with a history of ovarian cancer. Thus, we sought to determine whether or not BRCA mutation carriers with ovarian cancer would benefit from preventive mastectomy or from MRI screening. First, the annual mortality rate for ovarian cancer patients was estimated for a cohort of 178 BRCA mutation carriers from Ontario, Canada. Next, the actuarial risk of developing breast cancer was estimated using an international registry of 509 BRCA mutation carriers with ovarian cancer. A series of simulations was conducted to evaluate the reduction in the probability of death (from all causes) associated with mastectomy and with MRI-based breast surveillance. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the impacts of mastectomy and MRI screening on breast cancer incidence as well as on all-cause mortality. Twenty (3.9%) of the 509 patients developed breast cancer within ten years following ovarian cancer diagnosis. The actuarial risk of developing breast cancer at ten years post-diagnosis, conditional on survival from ovarian cancer and other causes of mortality was 7.8%. Based on our simulation results, among all BRCA mutation-carrying patients diagnosed with stage III/IV ovarian cancer at age 50, the chance of dying before age 80 was reduced by less than 1% with MRI and by less than 2% with mastectomy. Greater improvements in survival with MRI or mastectomy were observed for women who had already survived 10years after ovarian cancer, and for women with stage I or II ovarian cancer. Among BRCA mutation-carrying ovarian cancer patients without a personal history of breast cancer, neither preventive mastectomy nor MRI screening is warranted, except for those who have survived ovarian cancer without recurrence for ten years and for those with early stage ovarian cancer. Copyright © 2017

  1. Rural-metropolitan disparities in ovarian cancer survival: a statewide population-based study.

    PubMed

    Park, Jihye; Blackburn, Brenna E; Rowe, Kerry; Snyder, John; Wan, Yuan; Deshmukh, Vikrant; Newman, Michael; Fraser, Alison; Smith, Ken; Herget, Kim; Burt, Lindsay; Werner, Theresa; Gaffney, David K; Lopez, Ana Maria; Mooney, Kathi; Hashibe, Mia

    2018-06-01

    To investigate rural-metropolitan disparities in ovarian cancer survival, we assessed ovarian cancer mortality and differences in prognostic factors by rural-metropolitan residence. The Utah Population Database was used to identify ovarian cancer cases diagnosed between 1997 and 2012. Residential location information at the time of cancer diagnosis was used to stratify rural-metropolitan residence. All-cause death and ovarian cancer death risks were estimated using Cox proportional hazard regression models. Among 1661 patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer, 11.8% were living in rural counties of Utah. Although ovarian cancer patients residing in rural counties had different characteristics compared with metropolitan residents, we did not observe an association between rural residence and risk of all-cause nor ovarian cancer-specific death after adjusting for confounders. However, among rural residents, ovarian cancer mortality risk was very high in older age at diagnosis and for mucinous carcinoma, and low in overweight at baseline. Rural residence was not significantly associated with the risk of ovarian cancer death. Nevertheless, patients residing in rural-metropolitan areas had different factors affecting the risk of all-cause mortality and cancer-specific death. Further research is needed to quantify how mortality risk can differ by residential location accounting for degree of health care access and lifestyle-related factors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-10-23

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  3. Recurrence of Ovarian Cancer with Placental Metastasis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Michiko; Yamada, Manabu; Kumasaka, Toshio; Samejima, Taiki; Satoh, Hirohisa; Sugimoto, Mitsuhiro

    2017-01-01

    A 39-year-old primiparous Japanese female was admitted to the obstetrical emergency department of our hospital because of respiratory distress resulting from a large amount of pleural effusion, soon after a caesarean delivery (CD) at another hospital. While she was undergoing the CD, a giant ovarian tumour was identified. However, the tumour could not be removed at that facility and she was transferred to our hospital. Three days after the CD, a left salpingo-oophorectomy was performed with the purpose of controlling pleural and peritoneal effusions. Based on her past treatment history and the information gathered from this surgery, recurrence of ovarian cancer was considered the final diagnosis. Earlier, at the age of 37 years, she had been diagnosed with stage IC ovarian adenocarcinoma arising from a mature cystic teratoma detected after a right salpingo-oophorectomy. These kinds of situations of accidental detection of recurrent advanced ovarian cancer in a newly pregnant patient in the emergency department are rare. Amongst them, we have identified an extremely rare case showing placental metastasis. The important lesson learnt from this case report is that detailed medical interviews and physical examinations are crucial when a pregnant woman visits a hospital without a letter of referral, especially in the third trimester of pregnancy. PMID:29070997

  4. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 is an independent prognostic factor of ovarian cancer and IMD-4482, a novel plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 inhibitor, inhibits ovarian cancer peritoneal dissemination.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuka, Erika; Sawada, Kenjiro; Nakamura, Koji; Yoshimura, Akihito; Kinose, Yasuto; Kodama, Michiko; Hashimoto, Kae; Mabuchi, Seiji; Makino, Hiroshi; Morii, Eiichi; Yamaguchi, Yoichi; Yanase, Takeshi; Itai, Akiko; Morishige, Ken-Ichirou; Kimura, Tadashi

    2017-10-27

    In the present study, the therapeutic potential of targeting plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in ovarian cancer was tested. Tissues samples from 154 cases of ovarian carcinoma were immunostained with anti-PAI-1 antibody, and the prognostic value was analyzed. Among the samples, 67% (104/154) showed strong PAI-1 expression; this was significantly associated with poor prognosis (progression-free survival: 20 vs. 31 months, P = 0.0033). In particular, among patients with stage II-IV serous adenocarcinoma, PAI-1 expression was an independent prognostic factor. The effect of a novel PAI-1 inhibitor, IMD-4482, on ovarian cancer cell lines was assessed and its therapeutic potential was examined using a xenograft mouse model of ovarian cancer. IMD-4482 inhibited in vitro cell adhesion to vitronectin in PAI-1-positive ovarian cancer cells, followed by the inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation through dissociation of the PAI-urokinase receptor complex from integrin αVβ3. IMD-4482 caused G0/G1 cell arrest and inhibited the proliferation of PAI-1-positive ovarian cancer cells. In the xenograft model, IMD-4482 significantly inhibited peritoneal dissemination with the reduction of PAI-1 expression and the inhibition of focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation. Collectively, the functional inhibition of PAI-1 significantly inhibited ovarian cancer progression, and targeting PAI-1 may be a potential therapeutic strategy in ovarian cancer.

  5. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 is an independent prognostic factor of ovarian cancer and IMD-4482, a novel plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 inhibitor, inhibits ovarian cancer peritoneal dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Nakatsuka, Erika; Sawada, Kenjiro; Nakamura, Koji; Yoshimura, Akihito; Kinose, Yasuto; Kodama, Michiko; Hashimoto, Kae; Mabuchi, Seiji; Makino, Hiroshi; Morii, Eiichi; Yamaguchi, Yoichi; Yanase, Takeshi; Itai, Akiko; Morishige, Ken-ichirou; Kimura, Tadashi

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, the therapeutic potential of targeting plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in ovarian cancer was tested. Tissues samples from 154 cases of ovarian carcinoma were immunostained with anti-PAI-1 antibody, and the prognostic value was analyzed. Among the samples, 67% (104/154) showed strong PAI-1 expression; this was significantly associated with poor prognosis (progression-free survival: 20 vs. 31 months, P = 0.0033). In particular, among patients with stage II-IV serous adenocarcinoma, PAI-1 expression was an independent prognostic factor. The effect of a novel PAI-1 inhibitor, IMD-4482, on ovarian cancer cell lines was assessed and its therapeutic potential was examined using a xenograft mouse model of ovarian cancer. IMD-4482 inhibited in vitro cell adhesion to vitronectin in PAI-1-positive ovarian cancer cells, followed by the inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation through dissociation of the PAI-urokinase receptor complex from integrin αVβ3. IMD-4482 caused G0/G1 cell arrest and inhibited the proliferation of PAI-1-positive ovarian cancer cells. In the xenograft model, IMD-4482 significantly inhibited peritoneal dissemination with the reduction of PAI-1 expression and the inhibition of focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation. Collectively, the functional inhibition of PAI-1 significantly inhibited ovarian cancer progression, and targeting PAI-1 may be a potential therapeutic strategy in ovarian cancer. PMID:29163796

  6. Regulation and Impact of Cytoplasmic ARID1A in Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    verified in a xenograft murine model . Immunohistochemistry studies in OCCC showed that loss of nuclear ARID1A was associated with shorter progression-free...protein 1A; tumor suppressor; ovarian cancer; SWI/SNF – switch/sucrose non- fermentable complex; ovarian clear cell carcinoma; endometrioid ovarian

  7. Cells of Origin of Epithelial Ovarian Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    cells in oral squamous cell carcinomas by a novel pathway-based lineage tracing approach in a murine model. ! 13! Specific aims: 1. Determine...SUNDARESAN Lineage tracing and clonal analysis of oral cancer initiating cells The goal of this project is to study cancer stem cells /cancer initiating...whether oral cancer cells genetically marked based on their activities for stem cell -related pathways exhibit cancer stem cell properties in vivo by

  8. Functional Assessment of Synoptic Pathology Reporting for Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Słodkowska, Janina; Cierniak, Szczepan; Patera, Janusz; Kopik, Jarosław; Baranowski, Włodzimierz; Markiewicz, Tomasz; Murawski, Piotr; Buda, Irmina; Kozłowski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer has one of the highest death/incidence rates and is commonly diagnosed at an advanced stage. In the recent WHO classification, new histotypes were classified which respond differently to chemotherapy. The e-standardized synoptic cancer pathology reports offer the clinicians essential and reliable information. The aim of our project was to develop an e-template for the standardized synoptic pathology reporting of ovarian carcinoma [based on the checklist of the College of American Pathologists (CAP) and the recent WHO/FIGO classification] to introduce a uniform and improved quality of cancer pathology reports. A functional and qualitative evaluation of the synoptic reporting was performed. An indispensable module for e-synoptic reporting was developed and integrated into the Hospital Information System (HIS). The electronic pathology system used a standardized structure with drop-down lists of defined elements to ensure completeness and consistency of reporting practices with the required guidelines. All ovarian cancer pathology reports (partial and final) with the corresponding glass slides selected from a 1-year current workflow were revised for the standard structured reports, and 42 tumors [13 borderline tumors and 29 carcinomas (mainly serous)] were included in the study. Analysis of the reports for completeness against the CAP checklist standard showed a lack of pTNM staging in 80% of the partial or final unstructured reports; ICD-O coding was missing in 83%. Much less frequently missed or unstated data were: ovarian capsule infiltration, angioinvasion and implant evaluation. The e-records of ovarian tumors were supplemented with digital macro- and micro-images and whole-slide images. The e-module developed for synoptic ovarian cancer pathology reporting was easily incorporated into HIS.CGM CliniNet and facilitated comprehensive reporting; it also provided open access to the database for concerned recipients. The e-synoptic pathology reports

  9. Development of the Ovarian Cancer Cohort Consortium: Risk Factor Associations by Heterogeneity of Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    we have received data. Analyses of primary ovarian cancer risk factors (e.g., oral contraceptive use, parity) by histology are complete and a...including (but not limited to) age, oral contraceptive use, tubal ligation, parity, postmenopausal hormone use, family history of ovarian cancer, body mass...of ovarian or breast cancers, menopausal status, postmenopausal hormone use (ever/never, duration, and type), use of oral contraceptives (ever/never

  10. Role of PELP1 in EGFR-ER Signaling Crosstalk in Ovarian Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    IHC studies using human ovarian cancer tissue arrays (n=123) showed that PELP1/MNAR is 2 to 3 fold over expressed in 60% of ovarian tumors To...cancers, however little is known about PELP1 role in ovarian cancer progression. Analysis of human genome databases and SAGE data suggested...PELP1/MNAR can facilitate ER nonge- nomic signaling via Src kinase, PI3K, and STAT3 in the cytosol. PELP1/MNAR regulates meiosis via its interactions

  11. IL-6 Receptor Isoforms and Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    previously de- cribed.27 Groups of mice (n 6) were dministered acetyl salicylic acid (ASA; 00 mg/kg; Sigma, St Louis, MO), phos- hate-buffered saline...indicates P .05. SA, acetyl salicylic acid ; IL6R, interleukin-6 receptor. ath. IL-6 receptor in ovarian tumors. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2010. ause they are...tumor cell proper to increase this effect . Published studies examining IL6-/- and IL6R-/- mice demonstrated a complexity of IL6 signaling for wound

  12. Induction of a menopausal state alters the growth and histology of ovarian tumors in a mouse model of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Laviolette, Laura A; Ethier, Jean-François; Senterman, Mary K; Devine, Patrick J; Vanderhyden, Barbara C

    2011-05-01

    Ovarian cancer is often diagnosed in women after menopause when the levels of the serum gonadotropins follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) are increased because of the depletion of growing follicles within the ovary. The ability of FSH and LH to modulate the disease has not been well studied owing to a lack of physiologically relevant models of ovarian cancer. In this study, 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) was used to deplete ovarian follicles and increase the levels of circulating FSH and LH in the tgCAG-LS-TAg mouse model of ovarian cancer. VCD-induced follicle depletion was performed either before or after induction of the oncogene SV40 large and small T-antigens in the ovarian surface epithelial cells of tgCAG-LS-TAg mice, which was mediated by the intrabursal delivery of an adenovirus expressing Cre recombinase (AdCre). tgCAG-LS-TAg mice injected with AdCre developed undifferentiated ovarian tumors with mixed epithelial and stromal components and some features of sex cord stromal tumors. Treatment with VCD before or after AdCre injection yielded tumors of similar histology, but with the unique appearance of Sertoli cell nests. In mice treated with VCD before the induction of tumorigenesis, the ovarian tumors tended to grow more slowly. The human ovarian cancer cell lines SKOV3 and OVCAR3 responded similarly to increased levels of gonadotropins in a second model of menopause, growing more slowly in ovariectomized mice compared with cycling controls. These results suggest that follicle depletion and increased gonadotropin levels can alter the histology and the rate of growth of ovarian tumors.

  13. Sirolimus and Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-03-28

    Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  14. Epithelial Membrane Protein-2 is a Novel Therapeutic Target in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Maoyong; Maresh, Erin L.; Soslow, Robert A.; Alavi, Mohammad; Mah, Vei; Zhou, Qin; Iasonos, Alexia; Goodglick, Lee; Gordon, Lynn K.; Braun, Jonathan; Wadehra, Madhuri

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The tetraspan protein epithelial membrane protein-2 (EMP2) has been shown to regulate the surface display and signaling from select integrin pairs, and it was recently identified as a prognostic biomarker in human endometrial cancer. In this study, we assessed the role of EMP2 in human ovarian cancer. Experimental Design We examined the expression of EMP2 within a population of women with ovarian cancer using tissue microarray assay technology. We evaluated the efficacy of EMP2-directed antibody therapy using a fully human recombinant bivalent antibody fragment (diabody) in vitro and ovarian cancer xenograft models in vivo. Results EMP2 was found to be highly expressed in over 70% of serous and endometrioid ovarian tumors compared to non-malignant ovarian epithelium using a human ovarian cancer tissue microarray. Using anti-EMP2 diabody, we evaluated the in vitro response of 9 human ovarian cancer cell lines with detectable EMP2 expression. Treatment of human ovarian cancer cell lines with anti-EMP2 diabodies induced cell death and retarded cell growth, and these response rates correlated with cellular EMP2 expression. We next assessed the effects of anti-EMP2 diabodies in mice bearing xenografts from the ovarian endometrioid carcinoma cell line OVCAR5. Anti-EMP2 diabodies significantly suppressed tumor growth and induced cell death in OVCAR5 xenografts. Conclusions These findings indicate that EMP2 is expressed in the majority of ovarian tumors and it may be a feasible target in vivo. PMID:20670949

  15. Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, and Primary Peritoneal Cancer Screening (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Ovarian, fallopian tube, and primary peritoneal cancer screening is not currently recommended as part of routine cancer screening. Get detailed information about the potential benefits and harms of screening tests used in these cancers in this summary for clinicians.

  16. Complex Determinants of Epithelial: Mesenchymal Phenotypic Plasticity in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Klymenko, Yuliya; Kim, Oleg; Stack, M. Sharon

    2017-01-01

    Unlike most epithelial malignancies which metastasize hematogenously, metastasis of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) occurs primarily via transcoelomic dissemination, characterized by exfoliation of cells from the primary tumor, avoidance of detachment-induced cell death (anoikis), movement throughout the peritoneal cavity as individual cells and multi-cellular aggregates (MCAs), adhesion to and disruption of the mesothelial lining of the peritoneum, and submesothelial matrix anchoring and proliferation to generate widely disseminated metastases. This exceptional microenvironment is highly permissive for phenotypic plasticity, enabling mesenchymal-to-epithelial (MET) and epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT) transitions. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on EOC heterogeneity in an EMT context, outline major regulators of EMT in ovarian cancer, address controversies in EMT and EOC chemoresistance, and highlight computational modeling approaches toward understanding EMT/MET in EOC. PMID:28792442

  17. [Ultrasound semiotics in recurrent ovarian cancer after optimal cytoreductive surgery].

    PubMed

    Baklanova, N S; Kolomiets, L A; Frolova, I G; Viatkina, N V; Krasil'nikov, S É

    2014-01-01

    Features of ultrasound picture of morphologically verified recurrence of ovarian cancer in 21 patients are presented, who received combined treatment including cytoreductive surgery in the form of hysterectomy with oophorectomy, resection of the greater omentum and 6 courses of chemotherapy CAP for ovarian cancer stage III (FIGO). In all patients cytoreductive surgery was optimal--without residual tumor. Recurrence of the disease was detected in 12-48 months in 80.9% of the cases. Three variants of recurrence was revealed by ultrasonography: isolated peritoneal dissemination, in 14.2% of the cases, which was mainly detected during the first 12 months; single entities in the projection of the small pelvis (61.9%) and mixed form (local lesions of small pelvis and peritoneal dissemination) in 23.8% of the cases.

  18. Ginsenoside 20(S)-Rg3 Inhibits the Warburg Effect Via Modulating DNMT3A/ MiR-532-3p/HK2 Pathway in Ovarian Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuanyuan; Zheng, Xia; Lu, Jiaojiao; Chen, Wei; Li, Xu; Zhao, Le

    2018-01-01

    The Warburg effect is one of the main energy metabolism features supporting cancer cell growth. 20(S)-Rg3 exerts anti-tumor effect on ovarian cancer partly by inhibiting the Warburg effect. microRNAs are important regulators of the Warburg effect. However, the microRNA regulatory network mediating the anti-Warburg effect of 20(S)-Rg3 was largely unknown. microRNA deep sequencing was performed to identify the 20(S)-Rg3-influenced microRNAs in SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells. miR-532-3p was overexpressed by mimic532-3p transfection in SKOV3 and A2780 cells or inhibited by inhibitor532-3p transfection in 20(S)-Rg3-treated cells to examine the changes in HK2 and PKM2 expression, glucose consumption, lactate production and cell growth. Dual-luciferase reporter assay was conducted to verify the direct binding of miR-532-3p to HK2. The methylation status in the promoter region of pre-miR-532-3p gene was examined by methylation-specific PCR. Expression changes of key molecules controlling DNA methylation including DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, and TET1-3 were examined in 20(S)-Rg3-treated cells. DNMT3A was overexpressed in 20(S)-Rg3-treated cells to examine its influence on miR-532-3p level, HK2 and PKM2 expression, glucose consumption and lactate production. Deep sequencing results showed that 11 microRNAs were increased and 9 microRNAs were decreased by 20(S)-Rg3 in SKOV3 cells, which were verified by qPCR. More than 2-fold increase of miR-532-3p was found in 20(S)-Rg3-treated SKOV3 cells. Forced expression of miR-532-3p reduced HK2 and PKM2 expression, glucose consumption and lactate production in SKOV3 and A2780 ovarian cancer cells. Inhibition of miR-532-3p antagonized the suppressive effect of 20(S)-Rg3 on HK2 and PKM2 expression, glucose consumption and lactate production in ovarian cancer cells. Dual-luciferase reporter assay showed that miR-532-3p directly suppressed HK2 rather than PKM2. miR-532-3p level was controlled by the methylation in the promoter region of its host

  19. Hippocampal and Cognitive Function, Exercise, and Ovarian Cancer: A Pilot Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    the hippocampus and subsequently offset memory decline. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF... hippocampus and subsequently offset memory decline. 2 KEYWORDS: Physical activity interventions, ovarian cancer treatment, chemotherapy-induced...chemotherapy complaint in a single cancer: problems with memory in patients with ovarian cancer. We focus on this problem for three reasons: 1

  20. 3 CFR 8853 - Proclamation 8853 of August 31, 2012. National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2012

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... lives to ovarian cancer. They are mothers and daughters, sisters and grandmothers, community members and... provider. To learn more, visit www.Cancer.gov. Ongoing progress in science and medicine is moving us... condition. Ovarian cancer affects the lives of far too many women every year, and the tragedy it leaves in...

  1. Methylseleninic acid sensitizes Notch3-activated OVCA429 ovarian cancer cells to carboplatin

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ovarian cancer, the deadliest of gynecologic cancers, is usually diagnosed at advanced stage due to invalidated screening test and non-specific symptoms presented. Although carboplatin has been popular for treating ovarian cancer for decades, patients eventually develop resistance to this platinum-c...

  2. Apolipoprotein concentrations are elevated in malignant ovarian cyst fluids suggesting that lipoprotein metabolism is dysregulated in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Podzielinski, Iwona; Saunders, Brook A; Kimbler, Kimberly D; Branscum, Adam J; Fung, Eric T; DePriest, Paul D; van Nagell, John R; Ueland, Frederick R; Baron, Andre T

    2013-05-01

    SELDI-TOF MS analysis of ovarian cyst fluids revealed that peaks m/z 8696 and 8825 discriminate malignant, borderline, and benign tumors. These peaks correspond to isoforms of apoA2. ELISA demonstrates that apoA1, A2, B, C2, C3, and E cyst fluid concentrations are uncorrelated and higher in malignant ovarian tumors, but only apoA2, apoE, and age are independent classifiers of malignant ovarian tumors, yielding 55.1% sensitivity, 95% specificity, and 88.1% accuracy to discern malignant from benign and borderline tumors. These data suggest that lipoprotein metabolism is dysregulated in ovarian cancer and that apoA2 and apoE warrant further investigation as ovarian tumor biomarkers.

  3. The latest animal models of ovarian cancer for novel drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Magnotti, Elizabeth; Marasco, Wayne A

    2018-03-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous disease classified into five subtypes, each with a different molecular profile. Most cases of ovarian cancer are diagnosed after metastasis of the primary tumor and are resistant to traditional platinum-based chemotherapeutics. Mouse models of ovarian cancer have been utilized to discern ovarian cancer tumorigenesis and the tumor's response to therapeutics. Areas covered: The authors provide a review of mouse models currently employed to understand ovarian cancer. This article focuses on advances in the development of orthotopic and patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDX) mouse models of ovarian cancer and discusses current humanized mouse models of ovarian cancer. Expert opinion: The authors suggest that humanized mouse models of ovarian cancer will provide new insight into the role of the human immune system in combating and augmenting ovarian cancer and aid in the development of novel therapeutics. Development of humanized mouse models will take advantage of the NSG and NSG-SGM3 strains of mice as well as new strains that are actively being derived.

  4. Genetically engineered mouse models for epithelial ovarian cancer: are we there yet?

    PubMed

    Howell, Viive M

    2014-03-01

    The development of preclinical spontaneous genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) requires an understanding of the genetic basis of the human disease. Such robust models have proven invaluable for increasing understanding of human malignancies as well as identifying new biomarkers and testing new therapies for these diseases. While GEMMs have been reported for ovarian cancer, the majority have proven disappointing overall in their recapitulation of paired genetic and histological features especially for serous ovarian epithelial cancer. This review describes GEMMs for ovarian cancer, in particular, high grade serous ovarian cancer and assesses these in light of recent changes in our understanding of the human malignancy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. IL-15 super-agonist (ALT-803) enhances natural killer (NK) cell function against ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Felices, M.; Chu, S.; Kodal, B.; Bendzick, L.; Ryan, C.; Lenvik, A.J.; Boylan, K.L.M.; Wong, H.C.; Skubitz, A.P.N.; Miller, J.S.; Geller, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Natural killer (NK) cells represent a powerful immunotherapeutic target as they lyse tumors directly, do not require differentiation, and can elicit potent inflammatory responses. The objective of these studies was to use an IL-15 super-agonist complex, ALT-803 (Altor BioScience Corporation), to enhance the function of both normal and ovarian cancer patient derived NK cells by increasing cytotoxicity and cytokine production. Methods NK cell function from normal donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and ovarian cancer patient ascites was assessed using flow cytometry and chromium release assays +/− ALT-803 stimulation. To evaluate the ability of ALT-803 to enhance NK cell function in vivo against ovarian cancer, we used a MA148-luc ovarian cancer NOD scid gamma (NSG) xenogeneic mouse model with transferred human NK cells. Results ALT-803 potently enhanced functionality of NK cells against all ovarian cancer cell lines with significant increases seen in CD107a, IFNγ and TNFα expression depending on target cell line. Function was also rescued in NK cells derived from ovarian cancer patient ascites. Finally, only animals treated with intraperitoneal ALT-803 displayed an NK dependent significant decrease in tumor. Conclusions ALT-803 enhances NK cell cytotoxicity against ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo and is able to rescue functionality of NK cells derived from ovarian cancer patient ascites. These findings suggest that ALT-803 has the potential to enhance NK-cell-based immunotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:28236454

  6. A prospective study of phobic anxiety, risk of ovarian cancer, and survival among patients.

    PubMed

    Poole, Elizabeth M; Kubzansky, Laura D; Sood, Anil K; Okereke, Olivia I; Tworoger, Shelley S

    2016-05-01

    In ovarian cancer patients and mouse models, psychosocial stress is associated with higher circulating markers of angiogenesis and cell migration, impaired immune response, and increasing tumor burden and aggressiveness. In the Nurses' Health Studies (NHS/NHSII), we assessed whether phobic anxiety, a marker of chronic distress, was associated with risk of incident ovarian cancer as well as survival among ovarian cancer patients. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to model the relative risks (RRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) of ovarian cancer incidence and survival by categories of the Crown-Crisp phobic anxiety index (CCI). We identified 779 cases of ovarian cancer during 2,497,892 person-years of follow-up. For baseline CCI (NHS: 1988; NHSII: 1993), we observed a statistically nonsignificant increased risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (RR for CCI ≥ 4 vs. 0 or 1: 1.14; 95 % CI 0.96-1.36). However, when we updated CCI (NHS: 2004; NHSII: 2005), the associations were attenuated. Pre-diagnosis CCI was not associated with ovarian cancer survival (RR for ≥4 vs. 0 or 1: 1.00; 95 % CI 0.77-1.31); results were similar for post-diagnosis CCI. Distress, as measured by phobic anxiety symptoms, was not associated with ovarian cancer risk, although we cannot rule out a modest association. Future research should explore the role of phobic anxiety and other forms of psychological distress and ovarian cancer risk and survival.

  7. The Role of Lifestyle Factors in Ovarian Cancer Prognosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-10-01

    each of the following: (1) physical activity, (2) healthy diet, (3) vitamin D exposure, (4) smoking, and (5) alcohol intake, as well as to estimate...ovarian cancer recurrence and of each of the following: (1) physical activity, (2) healthy diet, (3) vitamin D exposure, (4) smoking, and (5...Cohort, epidemiology, survivorship, lifestyle, diet, exercise, physical activity, vitamin D, smoking, alcohol, sun exposure, post-diagnosis exposure

  8. Innovative T Cell-Targeted Therapy for Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    curative.23 In contrast, long term survivorship of patients following allogeneic TCRαβ-depleted hematopoietic stem -cell transplantation (HSCT) was...receptors and steroid receptors. Stem cells 1996; 14(6): 632-41. 40. Lai D, Wang F, Chen Y, Wang C, Liu S, Lu B et al. Human ovarian cancer stem ...leukemia stem cells and eliminate AML. Manuscript in preparation. 46. Zhang M, Maiti S, Bernatchez C, Huls H, Rabinovich B, Champlin RE, Vence LM, Hwu P

  9. Therapeutic Strategies Against Cyclin E1 Amplified Ovarian Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-10-01

    interaction and suppression of E2F- dependent oncogenic activity resulting in activity against CCNE1-amplified cells. In the third aim, we hypothesize...tumors which are dependent on hyperactive HR and are sensitive to suppression of BRCA1. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Ovarian Cancer, CCNE1 amplification...suppression of E2F- dependent oncogenic activity resulting in activity against CCNE1-amplified cells. In the third aim, we hypothesize that miR-1255b, miR

  10. Pro-lipogenic Action of Lysophosphatidic Acid in Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0541 TITLE: Pro -lipogenic action of lysophosphatidic...DATE July 2012 2. REPORT TYPE Revised Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 July 2011-30 June 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Pro -lipogenic action of...cancer pilot research project titled “ Pro -lipogenic action of lysophosphatidic acid in ovarian cancer” is to determine the role of endogenous

  11. Impact of the Ovarian Microenvironment on Serous Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    Collagen is a well-established matrix utilized by serous cancer cells, of unknown origin, to seed metastatic sites, such as the mesothelium. An RNAseq...analysis will be performed between human TEC adhered to collagen matrix compared to tissue culture plastic and used to identify gene expression...changes responsible for adhesion on collagen . Ovarian conditioned medium (OCM) with and without H2O2 treatment will be added to normal and our series of

  12. Therapeutic Strategies against Cyclin E1-Amplified Ovarian Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-10-01

    Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The Wistar Institute of Anatomy & Biology Philadelphia, PA 19104 REPORT DATE: October 2017 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER The Wistar Institute of Anatomy & Biology 3601 Spruce Street Philadelphia, PA...ovarian cancers that address different aspects of CCNE1 biology . In the first aim, based on our preliminary data, we hypothesize that HSP90

  13. Laparoscopic optical coherence tomography imaging of human ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hariri, Lida P.; Bonnema, Garret T.; Schmidt, Kathy; Winkler, Amy M.; Korde, Vrushali; Hatch, Kenneth D.; Davis, John R.; Brewer, Molly A.; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Ovarian cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death among women in the US largely due to late detection secondary to unreliable symptomology and screening tools without adequate resolution. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a recently emerging imaging modality with promise in ovarian cancer diagnostics, providing non-destructive subsurface imaging at imaging depths up to 2 mm with near-histological grade resolution (10–20 μm). In this study, we developed the first ever laparoscopic OCT (LOCT) device, evaluated the safety and feasibility of LOCT, and characterized the microstructural features of human ovaries in vivo. Methods A custom LOCT device was fabricated specifically for laparoscopic imaging of the ovaries in patients undergoing oophorectomy. OCT images were compared with histopathology to identify preliminary architectural imaging features of normal and pathologic ovarian tissue. Results Thirty ovaries in 17 primarily peri or post-menopausal women were successfully imaged with LOCT: 16 normal, 5 endometriosis, 3 serous cystadenoma, and 4 adenocarcinoma. Preliminary imaging features developed for each category reveal qualitative differences in the homogeneous character of normal post-menopausal ovary, the ability to image small subsurface inclusion cysts, and distinguishable features for endometriosis, cystadenoma, and adenocarcinoma. Conclusions We present the development and successful implementation of the first laparoscopic OCT probe. Comparison of OCT images and corresponding histopathology allowed for the description of preliminary microstructural features for normal ovary, endometriosis, and benign and malignant surface epithelial neoplasms. These results support the potential of OCT both as a diagnostic tool and imaging modality for further evaluation of ovarian cancer pathogenesis. PMID:19481241

  14. Therapeutic Strategies against Cyclin E1-Amplified Ovarian Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0566 TITLE : Therapeutic Strategies against Cyclin E1-Amplified Ovarian Cancers PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dipanjan...RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE October 2016 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 30 Sep 2015 - 29 Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND...amplification, Homologous Recombination, Platinum analogues, MicroRNAs, Heat shock protein 90 inhibitors, Forkhead box protein M1, Retinoblastoma 16

  15. Cell Cycle Target-based Therapy for Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    induces apoptosis in quiescent ovarian cancer cells. Strong inducers of apoptosis included flufenamic acid, flurbiprofen, celebrex and finasteride ...Thus, a whole panel of NSAIDs including Aspirin, Ibuprofen, Exisulind, Acetaminophen, Naproxen, NS-398, Celecoxib, Diclofenac, Finasteride ...Naproxen, 200µM NS-398, 50µM Celecoxib, 200µM Diclofenac, 50µM Finasteride , 200µM Flufenamic acid, 40µM Meloxican, 50µM Ebselen, 20nM Flurbiprofen or

  16. Selective inhibition of tumor cell associated Vacuolar-ATPase 'a2' isoform overcomes cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kulshrestha, Arpita; Katara, Gajendra K; Ginter, Jordyn; Pamarthy, Sahithi; Ibrahim, Safaa A; Jaiswal, Mukesh K; Sandulescu, Corina; Periakaruppan, Ramayee; Dolan, James; Gilman-Sachs, Alice; Beaman, Kenneth D

    2016-06-01

    Development of resistance to platinum compounds significantly hinders successful ovarian cancer (OVCA) treatment. In tumor cells, dysregulated pH gradient across cell membranes is a key physiological mechanism of metastasis/chemo-resistance. These pH alterations are mediated by aberrant activation of key multi-subunit proton pumps, Vacuolar-ATPases (V-ATPases). In tumor cells, its 'a2' isoform (V-ATPase-V0a2) is a component of functional plasma-membrane complex and promotes tumor invasion through tumor-acidification and immuno-modulation. Its involvement in chemo-resistance has not been studied. Here, we show that V-ATPase-V0a2 is over-expressed in acquired-cisplatin resistant OVCA cells (cis-A2780/cis-TOV112D). Of all the 'a' subunit isoforms, V-ATPase-V0a2 exhibited an elevated expression on plasma membrane of cisplatin-resistant cells compared to sensitive counterparts. Immuno-histochemistry revealed V-ATPase-V0a2 expression in both low grade (highly drug-resistant) and high grade (highly recurrent) human OVCA tissues indicating its role in a centralized mechanism of tumor resistance. In cisplatin resistant cells, shRNA mediated inhibition of V-ATPase-V0a2 enhanced sensitivity towards both cisplatin and carboplatin. This improved cytotoxicity was mediated by enhanced cisplatin-DNA-adduct formation and suppressed DNA-repair pathway, leading to enhanced apoptosis. Suppression of V0a2 activity strongly reduced cytosolic pH in resistant tumor cells, which is known to enhance platinum-associated DNA-damage. As an indicator of reduced metastasis and chemo-resistance, in contrast to plasma membrane localization, a diffused cytoplasmic localization of acidic vacuoles was observed in V0a2-knockdown resistant cells. Interestingly, pre-treatment with monoclonal V0a2-inhibitory antibody enhanced cisplatin cytotoxicity in resistant cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that the isoform specific inhibition of V-ATPase-V0a2 could serve as a therapeutic strategy for chemo

  17. Vaccine Therapy and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Breast or Stage II-IV Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-28

    Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  18. EF5 in Finding Oxygen in Tumor Cells of Patients Who Are Undergoing Surgery or Biopsy for Cervical, Endometrial, or Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage I Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage I Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  19. BAX protein expression and clinical outcome in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Tai, Y T; Lee, S; Niloff, E; Weisman, C; Strobel, T; Cannistra, S A

    1998-08-01

    Expression of the pro-apoptotic protein BAX sensitizes ovarian cancer cell lines to paclitaxel in vitro by enhancing the pathway of programmed cell death. The present study was performed to determine the relationship between BAX expression and clinical outcome in 45 patients with newly diagnosed ovarian cancer. BAX protein expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry, and its relationship with clinical outcome was determined. Assessment of BAX mRNA transcript levels and mutational analysis of the BAX coding region were also performed. BAX protein was expressed at high levels (defined as > or = 50% of tumor cells positive) in tumor tissue from 60% of newly diagnosed patients. All patients whose tumors expressed high levels of BAX achieved a complete response (CR) to first-line chemotherapy that contained paclitaxel plus a platinum analogue, compared with 57% of patients in the low-BAX group (P = .036). After a median follow-up of 1.9 years, the median disease-free survival (DFS) of patients in the high-BAX group has not been reached, compared with a median DFS of 1.1 years for low-BAX expressors (P = .0061). BAX retained independent prognostic significance in multivariate analysis when corrected for stage and histology. BAX mRNA transcripts were easily detected in samples with low BAX protein expression, and no BAX mutations were identified. The correlation between high BAX levels and improved clinical outcome suggests that an intact apoptotic pathway is an important determinant of chemoresponsiveness in ovarian cancer patients who receive paclitaxel.

  20. IGF system targeted therapy: Therapeutic opportunities for ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Liefers-Visser, J A L; Meijering, R A M; Reyners, A K L; van der Zee, A G J; de Jong, S

    2017-11-01

    The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system comprises multiple growth factor receptors, including insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R), insulin receptor (IR) -A and -B. These receptors are activated upon binding to their respective growth factor ligands, IGF-I, IGF-II and insulin, and play an important role in development, maintenance, progression, survival and chemotherapeutic response of ovarian cancer. In many pre-clinical studies anti-IGF-1R/IR targeted strategies proved effective in reducing growth of ovarian cancer models. In addition, anti-IGF-1R targeted strategies potentiated the efficacy of platinum based chemotherapy. Despite the vast amount of encouraging and promising pre-clinical data, anti-IGF-1R/IR targeted strategies lacked efficacy in the clinic. The question is whether targeting the IGF-1R/IR signaling pathway still holds therapeutic potential. In this review we address the complexity of the IGF-1R/IR signaling pathway, including receptor heterodimerization within and outside the IGF system and downstream signaling. Further, we discuss the implications of this complexity on current targeted strategies and indicate therapeutic opportunities for successful targeting of the IGF-1R/IR signaling pathway in ovarian cancer. Multiple-targeted approaches circumventing bidirectional receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) compensation and prevention of system rewiring are expected to have more therapeutic potential. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Dietary aspirin decreases the stage of ovarian cancer in the hen.

    PubMed

    Urick, M E; Giles, J R; Johnson, P A

    2009-01-01

    We aimed to determine the effects of dietary aspirin treatment on ovarian cancer incidence and progression in the hen as a model for the human disease. Hens were fed a standard layer diet (control) or the same diet containing 0.1% aspirin for 1 year. Liver prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) was measured using an enzyme immunoassay. Incidence and stage of ovarian cancer were determined through necropsy and immunohistochemical analysis of ovarian sections for each hen. Aspirin treatment decreased liver PGE(2) in treated hens as compared to control hens. Treatment with aspirin did not decrease ovarian cancer incidence. Significantly more control hens developed late stage ovarian cancer than early stage, while the same was not true for aspirin-treated hens. Hens that developed ovarian cancer, even early ovarian cancer, produced significantly fewer eggs in the year prior to diagnosis than hens without ovarian cancer. Aspirin treatment may inhibit the progression of ovarian cancer in the hen and egg production may be used to identify hens with early stages of the disease.

  2. Prevention and Screening in Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zeichner, Simon B; Stanislaw, Christine; Meisel, Jane L

    2016-10-15

    In recent years, we have learned a great deal about pathogenic mutations that increase the risk of breast and ovarian cancer, particularly mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Here we review current guidelines on breast and ovarian cancer screening, prophylactic surgery, and other risk-reduction strategies in patients with these mutations, and we detail the data that drive these recommendations. We also discuss guidelines on screening and management for other cancers associated with BRCA1 and BRCA2, such as male breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, and prostate cancer. Discussions about genetic testing have become more complex with the advent of panel testing, which often allows for testing of a more comprehensive panel of genes than traditional BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing, but which is also associated with a higher likelihood of obtaining results with less clear data to inform management. It is difficult to come to a consensus on how best to address the varied and potentially challenging situations that may arise from genetic testing. The complexity inherent in managing these cases makes a multidisciplinary team-including medical oncologists, surgical oncologists, genetic counselors, reproductive endocrinologists, and medical ethicists-critical to optimization of care.

  3. Chemoresistance and targeted therapies in ovarian and endometrial cancers

    PubMed Central

    Brasseur, Kevin; Gévry, Nicolas; Asselin, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Gynecological cancers are known for being very aggressive at their advanced stages. Indeed, the survival rate of both ovarian and endometrial cancers is very low when diagnosed lately and the success rate of current chemotherapy regimens is not very efficient. One of the main reasons for this low success rate is the acquired chemoresistance of these cancers during their progression. The mechanisms responsible for this acquired chemoresistance are numerous, including efflux pumps, repair mechanisms, survival pathways (PI3K/AKT, MAPK, EGFR, mTOR, estrogen signaling) and tumor suppressors (P53 and Par-4). To overcome these resistances, a new type of therapy has emerged named targeted therapy. The principle of targeted therapy is simple, taking advantage of changes acquired in malignant cancer cells (receptors, proteins, mechanisms) by using compounds specifically targeting these, thus limiting their action on healthy cells. Targeted therapies are emerging and many clinical trials targeting these pathways, frequently involved in chemoresistance, have been tested on gynecological cancers. Despite some targets being less efficient than expected as mono-therapies, the combination of compounds seems to be the promising avenue. For instance, we demonstrate using ChIP-seq analysis that estrogen downregulate tumor suppressor Par-4 in hormone-dependent cells by directly binding to its DNA regulatory elements and inhibiting estrogen signaling could reinstate Par-4 apoptosis-inducing abilities. This review will focus on the chemoresistance mechanisms and the clinical trials of targeted therapies associated with these, specifically for endometrial and ovarian cancers. PMID:28008141

  4. Molecular and clinical implementations of ovarian cancer mouse avatar models.

    PubMed

    Zayed, Amira A; Mandrekar, Sumithra J; Haluska, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Innovation in oncology drug development has been hindered by lack of preclinical models that reliably predict clinical activity of novel therapies in cancer patients. Increasing desire for individualize treatment of patients with cancer has led to an increase in the use of patient-derived xenografts (PDX) engrafted into immune-compromised mice for preclinical modeling. Large numbers of tumor-specific PDX models have been established and proved to be powerful tools in pre-clinical testing. A subset of PDXs, referred to as Avatars, establish tumors in an orthotopic and treatment naïve fashion that may represent the most clinical relevant model of individual human cancers. This review will discuss ovarian cancer (OC) PDX models demonstrating the opportunities and limitations of these models in cancer drug development, and describe concepts of clinical trials design in Avatar guided therapy.

  5. Identification of a distinct population of CD133+CXCR4+ cancer stem cells in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cioffi, Michele; D’Alterio, Crescenzo; Camerlingo, Rosalba; Tirino, Virginia; Consales, Claudia; Riccio, Anna; Ieranò, Caterina; Cecere, Sabrina Chiara; Losito, Nunzia Simona; Greggi, Stefano; Pignata, Sandro; Pirozzi, Giuseppe; Scala, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    CD133 and CXCR4 were evaluated in the NCI-60 cell lines to identify cancer stem cell rich populations. Screening revealed that, ovarian OVCAR-3, -4 and -5 and colon cancer HT-29, HCT-116 and SW620 over expressed both proteins. We aimed to isolate cells with stem cell features sorting the cells expressing CXCR4+CD133+ within ovarian cancer cell lines. The sorted population CD133+CXCR4+ demonstrated the highest efficiency in sphere formation in OVCAR-3, OVCAR-4 and OVCAR-5 cells. Moreover OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and NANOG were highly expressed in CD133+CXCR4+ sorted OVCAR-5 cells. Most strikingly CXCR4+CD133+ sorted OVCAR-5 and -4 cells formed the highest number of tumors when inoculated in nude mice compared to CD133−CXCR4−, CD133+CXCR4−, CD133−CXCR4+ cells. CXCR4+CD133+ OVCAR-5 cells were resistant to cisplatin, overexpressed the ABCG2 surface drug transporter and migrated toward the CXCR4 ligand, CXCL12. Moreover, when human ovarian cancer cells were isolated from 37 primary ovarian cancer, an extremely variable level of CXCR4 and CD133 expression was detected. Thus, in human ovarian cancer cells CXCR4 and CD133 expression identified a discrete population with stem cell properties that regulated tumor development and chemo resistance. This cell population represents a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26020117

  6. Update on fertility preservation in young women undergoing breast cancer and ovarian cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Lambertini, Matteo; Ginsburg, Elizabeth S; Partridge, Ann H

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of the article is to review the available options for fertility preservation in patients with breast and ovarian cancer, and the special issues faced by BRCA mutation carriers. Future fertility is an important consideration for many young patients with cancer. There are both experimental and standard available strategies for patients with breast and ovarian cancer to preserve fertility, and each has potential advantages and disadvantages. Embryo cryopreservation is widely available with a highly successful track record. Improvements in laboratory techniques have led to oocyte cryopreservation recently being recategorized as nonexperimental. Conservative gynecologic surgery is a standard consideration for patients with stage I ovarian cancer who desire future fertility. Ovarian tissue cryopreservation as well as ovarian suppression with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogs during chemotherapy are considered experimental methods at this time, although recent data suggest both safety and efficacy for the use of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogs in women receiving (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. Special issues should be considered for women with BRCA mutations because of the need to undergo preventive surgery at young age. Multidisciplinary teams and well functioning relationships between the oncology and reproductive units are crucial to manage the fertility issues of young women with cancer.

  7. Expanded metabolomics approach to profiling endogenous carbohydrates in the serum of ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu; Li, Li; Zhu, Bangjie; Liu, Feng; Wang, Yan; Gu, Xue; Yan, Chao

    2016-01-01

    We applied hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry to the quantitative analysis of serum from 58 women, including ovarian cancer patients, ovarian benign tumor patients, and healthy controls. All of these ovarian cancer and ovarian benign tumor patients have elevated cancer antigen 125, which makes them clinically difficult to differentiate the malignant from the benign. All of the 16 endogenous carbohydrates were quantitatively detected in the human sera, of which, eight endogenous carbohydrates were significantly different (P-value < 0.05) between the ovarian cancer and healthy control. According to the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, arabitol was the most potentially specific biomarker for discriminating ovarian cancer from healthy control, having an area under the curve of 0.911. A panel of metabolite markers composed of maltose, maltotriose, raffinose, and mannitol was selected, which was able to discriminate the ovarian cancer from the benign ovarian tumor counterparts, with an area under concentration-time curve value of 0.832. Endogenous carbohydrates in the expanded metabolomics approach after the global metabolic profiling are characterized and are potential biomarkers for the early diagnosis of ovarian cancer. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Ovarian cancer screening and mortality in the UK Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening (UKCTOCS): a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Ian J; Menon, Usha; Ryan, Andy; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Burnell, Matthew; Kalsi, Jatinderpal K; Amso, Nazar N; Apostolidou, Sophia; Benjamin, Elizabeth; Cruickshank, Derek; Crump, Danielle N; Davies, Susan K; Dawnay, Anne; Dobbs, Stephen; Fletcher, Gwendolen; Ford, Jeremy; Godfrey, Keith; Gunu, Richard; Habib, Mariam; Hallett, Rachel; Herod, Jonathan; Jenkins, Howard; Karpinskyj, Chloe; Leeson, Simon; Lewis, Sara J; Liston, William R; Lopes, Alberto; Mould, Tim; Murdoch, John; Oram, David; Rabideau, Dustin J; Reynolds, Karina; Scott, Ian; Seif, Mourad W; Sharma, Aarti; Singh, Naveena; Taylor, Julie; Warburton, Fiona; Widschwendter, Martin; Williamson, Karin; Woolas, Robert; Fallowfield, Lesley; McGuire, Alistair J; Campbell, Stuart; Parmar, Mahesh; Skates, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Ovarian cancer has a poor prognosis, with just 40% of patients surviving 5 years. We designed this trial to establish the effect of early detection by screening on ovarian cancer mortality. Methods In this randomised controlled trial, we recruited postmenopausal women aged 50–74 years from 13 centres in National Health Service Trusts in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland. Exclusion criteria were previous bilateral oophorectomy or ovarian malignancy, increased risk of familial ovarian cancer, and active non-ovarian malignancy. The trial management system confirmed eligibility and randomly allocated participants in blocks of 32 using computer-generated random numbers to annual multimodal screening (MMS) with serum CA125 interpreted with use of the risk of ovarian cancer algorithm, annual transvaginal ultrasound screening (USS), or no screening, in a 1:1:2 ratio. The primary outcome was death due to ovarian cancer by Dec 31, 2014, comparing MMS and USS separately with no screening, ascertained by an outcomes committee masked to randomisation group. All analyses were by modified intention to screen, excluding the small number of women we discovered after randomisation to have a bilateral oophorectomy, have ovarian cancer, or had exited the registry before recruitment. Investigators and participants were aware of screening type. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00058032. Findings Between June 1, 2001, and Oct 21, 2005, we randomly allocated 202 638 women: 50 640 (25·0%) to MMS, 50 639 (25·0%) to USS, and 101 359 (50·0%) to no screening. 202 546 (>99·9%) women were eligible for analysis: 50 624 (>99·9%) women in the MMS group, 50 623 (>99·9%) in the USS group, and 101 299 (>99·9%) in the no screening group. Screening ended on Dec 31, 2011, and included 345 570 MMS and 327 775 USS annual screening episodes. At a median follow-up of 11·1 years (IQR 10·0–12·0), we diagnosed ovarian cancer in

  9. Integrated analysis of germline and somatic variants in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Kanchi, Krishna L; Johnson, Kimberly J; Lu, Charles; McLellan, Michael D; Leiserson, Mark D M; Wendl, Michael C; Zhang, Qunyuan; Koboldt, Daniel C; Xie, Mingchao; Kandoth, Cyriac; McMichael, Joshua F; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A; Larson, David E; Schmidt, Heather K; Miller, Christopher A; Fulton, Robert S; Spellman, Paul T; Mardis, Elaine R; Druley, Todd E; Graubert, Timothy A; Goodfellow, Paul J; Raphael, Benjamin J; Wilson, Richard K; Ding, Li

    2014-01-01

    We report the first large-scale exome-wide analysis of the combined germline-somatic landscape in ovarian cancer. Here we analyse germline and somatic alterations in 429 ovarian carcinoma cases and 557 controls. We identify 3,635 high confidence, rare truncation and 22,953 missense variants with predicted functional impact. We find germline truncation variants and large deletions across Fanconi pathway genes in 20% of cases. Enrichment of rare truncations is shown in BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2. In addition, we observe germline truncation variants in genes not previously associated with ovarian cancer susceptibility (NF1, MAP3K4, CDKN2B and MLL3). Evidence for loss of heterozygosity was found in 100 and 76% of cases with germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 truncations, respectively. Germline-somatic interaction analysis combined with extensive bioinformatics annotation identifies 222 candidate functional germline truncation and missense variants, including two pathogenic BRCA1 and 1 TP53 deleterious variants. Finally, integrated analyses of germline and somatic variants identify significantly altered pathways, including the Fanconi, MAPK and MLL pathways.

  10. New perspectives on targeted therapy in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Coward, Jermaine IG; Middleton, Kathryn; Murphy, Felicity

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer remains the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. During the last 15 years, there has been only marginal improvement in 5 year overall survival. These daunting statistics are compounded by the fact that despite all subtypes exhibiting striking heterogeneity, their systemic management remains identical. Although changes to the scheduling and administration of chemotherapy have improved outcomes to a degree, a therapeutic ceiling is being reached with this approach, resulting in a number of trials investigating the efficacy of targeted therapies alongside standard treatment algorithms. Furthermore, there is an urge to develop subtype-specific studies in an attempt to improve outcomes, which currently remain poor. This review summarizes the key studies with antiangiogenic agents, poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) inhibitors, and epidermal growth factor receptor/human epidermal growth factor receptor family targeting, in addition to folate receptor antagonists and insulin growth factor receptor inhibitors. The efficacy of treatment paradigms used in non-ovarian malignancies for type I tumors is also highlighted, in addition to recent advances in appropriate patient stratification for targeted therapies in epithelial ovarian cancer. PMID:25678824

  11. Exosomal DNMT1 mediates cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ya-Lei; Zhuang, Ting; Xing, Bao-Heng; Li, Na; Li, Qin

    2017-08-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most common malignancy in women. Owing to late syndromic presentation and lack of efficient early detection, most cases are diagnosed at advanced stages. Surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy are still the standard care currently. However, resistance invoked often compromises the clinical value of the latter. Expression of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) was analysed by gene array. Protein was determined by immunoblotting. Exosome was isolated with commercial kit. Cell proliferation was measured by CCK8 method. Annexin V-PI double staining was performed for apoptosis evaluation. Xenograft model was established and administrated with exosome. Tumour growth and overall survival were monitored. We demonstrated the upregulation of DNMT1 in both tumour and derived cell line. DNMT1 transcripts were highly enriched in exosomes from conditioned medium of ovarian cells. Co-incubation with exosomes stimulated endogenous expression and rendered host cell the resistance to cytotoxicity of cisplatin. In vivo administration of DNMT1-containing exosomes exacerbated xenograft progression and reduced overall survival significantly. Moreover, treatment with exosome inhibitor GW4869 almost completely restored sensitivity in resistant cells. Our data elucidated an unappreciated mechanism of exosomal DNMT1 in cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer, also indicating the potential of the combination of exosome inhibitor with cisplatin in resistant patients. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. The effect of celecoxib on tumor growth in ovarian cancer cells and a genetically engineered mouse model of serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Suri, Anuj; Sheng, Xiugui; Schuler, Kevin M; Zhong, Yan; Han, Xiaoyun; Jones, Hannah M; Gehrig, Paola A; Zhou, Chunxiao; Bae-Jump, Victoria L

    2016-06-28

    Our objective was to evaluate the effect of the COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, on (1) proliferation and apoptosis in human ovarian cancer cell lines and primary cultures of ovarian cancer cells, and (2) inhibition of tumor growth in a genetically engineered mouse model of serous ovarian cancer under obese and non-obese conditions. Celecoxib inhibited cell proliferation in three ovarian cancer cell lines and five primary cultures of human ovarian cancer after 72 hours of exposure. Treatment with celecoxib resulted in G1 cell cycle arrest, induction of apoptosis, inhibition of cellular adhesion and invasion and reduction of expression of hTERT mRNA and COX-2 protein in all of the ovarian cancer cell lines. In the KpB mice fed a high fat diet (obese) and treated with celecoxib, tumor weight decreased by 66% when compared with control animals. Among KpB mice fed a low fat diet (non-obese), tumor weight decreased by 46% after treatment with celecoxib. In the ovarian tumors from obese and non-obese KpB mice, treatment with celecoxib as compared to control resulted in decreased proliferation, increased apoptosis and reduced COX-2 and MMP9 protein expression, as assessed by immunohistochemistry. Celecoxib strongly decreased the serum level of VEGF and blood vessel density in the tumors from the KpB ovarian cancer mouse model under obese and non-obese conditions. This work suggests that celecoxib may be a novel chemotherapeutic agent for ovarian cancer prevention and treatment and be potentially beneficial in both obese and non-obese women.

  13. The effect of celecoxib on tumor growth in ovarian cancer cells and a genetically engineered mouse model of serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suri, Anuj; Sheng, Xiugui; Schuler, Kevin M.; Zhong, Yan; Han, Xiaoyun; Jones, Hannah M.; Gehrig, Paola A.; Zhou, Chunxiao; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the effect of the COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, on (1) proliferation and apoptosis in human ovarian cancer cell lines and primary cultures of ovarian cancer cells, and (2) inhibition of tumor growth in a genetically engineered mouse model of serous ovarian cancer under obese and non-obese conditions. Celecoxib inhibited cell proliferation in three ovarian cancer cell lines and five primary cultures of human ovarian cancer after 72 hours of exposure. Treatment with celecoxib resulted in G1 cell cycle arrest, induction of apoptosis, inhibition of cellular adhesion and invasion and reduction of expression of hTERT mRNA and COX-2 protein in all of the ovarian cancer cell lines. In the KpB mice fed a high fat diet (obese) and treated with celecoxib, tumor weight decreased by 66% when compared with control animals. Among KpB mice fed a low fat diet (non-obese), tumor weight decreased by 46% after treatment with celecoxib. In the ovarian tumors from obese and non-obese KpB mice, treatment with celecoxib as compared to control resulted in decreased proliferation, increased apoptosis and reduced COX-2 and MMP9 protein expression, as assessed by immunohistochemistry. Celecoxib strongly decreased the serum level of VEGF and blood vessel density in the tumors from the KpB ovarian cancer mouse model under obese and non-obese conditions. This work suggests that celecoxib may be a novel chemotherapeutic agent for ovarian cancer prevention and treatment and be potentially beneficial in both obese and non-obese women. PMID:27074576

  14. Paclitaxel and Carboplatin or Ifosfamide in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Persistent or Recurrent Uterine, Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-01-09

    Mixed Mesodermal (Mullerian) Tumor; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Uterine Sarcoma AJCC v7; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Sarcoma AJCC v7; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Uterine Sarcoma AJCC v7; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Uterine Sarcoma AJCC v7; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Uterine Sarcoma AJCC v7; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Sarcoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Sarcoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Sarcoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Sarcoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Uterine Sarcoma AJCC v7; Uterine Carcinosarcoma

  15. Self-production of tissue factor-coagulation factor VII complex by ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yokota, N; Koizume, S; Miyagi, E; Hirahara, F; Nakamura, Y; Kikuchi, K; Ruf, W; Sakuma, Y; Tsuchiya, E; Miyagi, Y

    2009-12-15

    Thromboembolic events are a major complication in ovarian cancer patients. Tissue factor (TF) is frequently overexpressed in ovarian cancer tissue and correlates with intravascular thrombosis. TF binds to coagulation factor VII (fVII), changing it to its active form, fVIIa. This leads to activation of the extrinsic coagulation cascade. fVII is produced by the liver and believed to be supplied from blood plasma at the site of coagulation. However, we recently showed that ovarian cancer cells express fVII transcripts under normoxia and that this transcription is inducible under hypoxia. These findings led us to hypothesise that ovarian cancer cells are intrinsically associated with TF-fVIIa coagulation activity, which could result in thrombosis. In this study, we examined whether ectopically expressed fVII could cause thrombosis by means of immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, western blotting and flow cytometry. Ectopic fVII expression occurs frequently in ovarian cancers, particularly in clear cell carcinoma. We further showed that ovarian cancer cells express TF-fVIIa on the cell surface under normoxia and that this procoagulant activity is enhanced by hypoxic stimuli. Moreover, we showed that ovarian cancer cells secrete microparticles (MPs) with TF-fVIIa activity. Production of this procoagulant secretion is enhanced under hypoxia. These results raise the possibility that cancer cell-derived TF-fVIIa could cause thrombotic events in ovarian cancer patients.

  16. Ovarian Cancer: Deaf and Hearing Women’s Knowledge Before and After an Educational Video

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Lindsay G.; Nakaji, Melanie; Harry, Kadie M.; Gallegos, Nick; Malcarne, Vanessa L.; Sadler, Georgia Robins

    2013-01-01

    Members of the Deaf community report language and cultural barriers to accessing health information and care. This study evaluated whether an ovarian cancer education video in American Sign Language with English captioning and voiceover could close the anticipated knowledge gap between Deaf and hearing women’s cancer knowledge. Consented Deaf (n = 55) and hearing (n = 52) women’s General, Ovarian, and Total Cancer Knowledge were assessed before and after viewing the video. At baseline, hearing women demonstrated significantly higher General, Ovarian, and Total Cancer Knowledge scores than Deaf women. By the post-test, all of Deaf women’s knowledge scores had increased, closing the baseline gap. However, hearing women’s post-video knowledge had also increased, thereby creating a new knowledge gap. The ovarian cancer education video offers an effective method to increase ovarian and general cancer knowledge for Deaf and hearing women. PMID:23975658

  17. KRAS Genomic Status Predicts the Sensitivity of Ovarian Cancer Cells to Decitabine | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Decitabine, a cancer therapeutic that inhibits DNA methylation, produces variable antitumor response rates in patients with solid tumors that might be leveraged clinically with identification of a predictive biomarker. In this study, we profiled the response of human ovarian, melanoma, and breast cancer cells treated with decitabine, finding that RAS/MEK/ERK pathway activation and DNMT1 expression correlated with cytotoxic activity. Further, we showed that KRAS genomic status predicted decitabine sensitivity in low-grade and high-grade serous ovarian cancer cells.

  18. Inflammatory breast metastases of ovarian cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kayikçioğlu, F; Boran, N; Ayhan, A; Güler, N

    2001-12-01

    Metastasis to the breast from extramammary malignancies is rare. A 35-year-old woman presented with bilaterally inflammatory breast involvement, 2 years after the diagnosis of stage IIIC epithelial ovarian cancer. Neoplastic tissue was immunohistochemically positive using antibodies against OC125 and negative for gross cystic disease fluid protein-15 (BRST-2) and estrogen receptor in biopsy material in the breast. Combination chemotherapy consisting of paclitaxel, cisplatin, and anthracycline was started. She died 18 months after the breast metastasis. Ovarian carcinoma usually presents with signs and symptoms related to the tumor burden within the abdominal cavity. The finding of isolated, distant metastases such as breast involvement without intraabdominal disease is extremely rare. Determining the origin of the primary tumor is important in directing the actual therapy. (c)2001 Elsevier Science.

  19. A6 in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-27

    Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  20. Keratin 5 overexpression is associated with serous ovarian cancer recurrence and chemotherapy resistance.

    PubMed

    Ricciardelli, Carmela; Lokman, Noor A; Pyragius, Carmen E; Ween, Miranda P; Macpherson, Anne M; Ruszkiewicz, Andrew; Hoffmann, Peter; Oehler, Martin K

    2017-03-14

    This study investigated the clinical significance of keratin 5 and 6 expression in serous ovarian cancer progression and chemotherapy resistance. KRT5 and KRT6 (KRT6A, KRT6B & KRT6C) gene expression was assessed in publically available serous ovarian cancer data sets, ovarian cancer cell lines and primary serous ovarian cancer cells. Monoclonal antibodies which detect both K5/6 or only K5 were used to assess protein expression in ovarian cancer cell lines and a cohort of high grade serous ovarian carcinomas at surgery (n = 117) and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (n = 21). Survival analyses showed that high KRT5 mRNA in stage III/IV serous ovarian cancers was significantly associated with reduced progression-free (HR 1.38, P < 0.0001) and overall survival (HR 1.28, P = 0.013) whilst high KRT6 mRNA was only associated with reduced progression-free survival (HR 1.2, P = 0.031). Both high K5/6 (≥ 10%, HR 1.78 95% CI; 1.03-2.65, P = 0.017) and high K5 (≥ 10%, HR 1.90, 95% CI; 1.12-3.19, P = 0.017) were associated with an increased risk of disease recurrence. KRT5 but not KRT6C mRNA expression was increased in chemotherapy resistant primary serous ovarian cancer cells compared to chemotherapy sensitive cells. The proportion of serous ovarian carcinomas with high K5/6 or high K5 immunostaining was significantly increased following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. K5 can be used to predict serous ovarian cancer prognosis and identify cancer cells that are resistant to chemotherapy. Developing strategies to target K5 may therefore improve serous ovarian cancer survival.

  1. Ovarian cancer and smoking: individual participant meta-analysis including 28 114 women with ovarian cancer from 51 epidemiological studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Smoking has been linked to mucinous ovarian cancer, but its effects on other ovarian cancer subtypes and on overall ovarian cancer risk are unclear, and the findings from most studies with relevant data are unpublished. To assess these associations, we review the published and unpublished evidence. Methods Eligible epidemiological studies were identified by electronic searches, review articles, and discussions with colleagues. Individual participant data for 28 114 women with and 94 942 without ovarian cancer from 51 epidemiological studies were analysed centrally, yielding adjusted relative risks (RRs) of ovarian cancer in smokers compared with never smokers. Findings After exclusion of studies with hospital controls, in which smoking could have affected recruitment, overall ovarian cancer incidence was only slightly increased in current smokers compared with women who had never smoked (RR 1·06, 95% CI 1·01–1·11, p=0·01). Of 17 641 epithelial cancers with specified histology, 2314 (13%) were mucinous, 2360 (13%) endometrioid, 969 (5%) clear-cell, and 9086 (52%) serous. Smoking-related risks varied substantially across these subtypes (pheterogeneity<0·0001). For mucinous cancers, incidence was increased in current versus never smokers (1·79, 95% CI 1·60–2·00, p<0·0001), but the increase was mainly in borderline malignant rather than in fully malignant tumours (2·25, 95% CI 1·91–2·65 vs 1·49, 1·28–1·73; pheterogeneity=0·01; almost half the mucinous tumours were only borderline malignant). Both endometrioid (0·81, 95% CI 0·72–0·92, p=0·001) and clear-cell ovarian cancer risks (0·80, 95% CI 0·65–0·97, p=0·03) were reduced in current smokers, and there was no significant association for serous ovarian cancers (0·99, 95% CI 0·93–1·06, p=0·8). These associations did not vary significantly by 13 sociodemographic and personal characteristics of women including their body-mass index, parity, and use of

  2. Cancer-testis antigen expression is shared between epithelial ovarian cancer tumors.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Soto, Arlene E; Schreiber, Taylor; Strbo, Natasa; Ganjei-Azar, Parvin; Miao, Feng; Koru-Sengul, Tulay; Simpkins, Fiona; Nieves-Neira, Wilberto; Lucci, Joseph; Podack, Eckhard R

    2017-06-01

    Cancer-testis (CT) antigens have been proposed as potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. Our objective was to evaluate the expression of a panel of CT antigens in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) tumor specimens, and to determine if antigen sharing occurs between tumors. RNA was isolated from EOC tumor specimens, EOC cell lines and benign ovarian tissue specimens. Real time-PCR analysis was performed to determine the expression level of 20 CT antigens. A total of 62 EOC specimens, 8 ovarian cancer cell lines and 3 benign ovarian tissues were evaluated for CT antigen expression. The majority of the specimens were: high grade (62%), serous (68%) and advanced stage (74%). 58 (95%) of the EOC tumors analyzed expressed at least one of the CT antigens evaluated. The mean number of CT antigen expressed was 4.5 (0-17). The most frequently expressed CT antigen was MAGE A4 (65%). Antigen sharing analysis showed the following: 9 tumors shared only one antigen with 62% of the evaluated specimens, while 37 tumors shared 4 or more antigens with 82%. 5 tumors expressed over 10 CT antigens, which were shared with 90% of the tumor panel. CT antigens are expressed in 95% of EOC tumor specimens. However, not a single antigen was universally expressed across all samples. The degree of antigen sharing between tumors increased with the total number of antigens expressed. These data suggest a multi-epitope approach for development of immunotherapy for ovarian cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. New clinical trial studies drug combination for recurring ovarian cancer | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    A new clinical trial is studying the effectiveness of an investigational drug combination that looks to see whether reducing the supply of oxygen to the cancer cells can make ovarian cancer shrink or slow its growth in association with an enzyme that repairs DNA damage.

  4. Elevated serum CXCL16 is an independent predictor of poor survival in ovarian cancer and may reflect pro-metastatic ADAM protease activity

    PubMed Central

    Gooden, M J M; Wiersma, V R; Boerma, A; Leffers, N; Boezen, H M; ten Hoor, K A; Hollema, H; Walenkamp, A M E; Daemen, T; Nijman, H W; Bremer, E

    2014-01-01

    Background: In certain cancers, expression of CXCL16 and its receptor CXCR6 associate with lymphocyte infiltration, possibly aiding anti-tumour immune response. In other cancers, CXCL16 and CXCR6 associate with pro-metastatic activity. In the current study, we aimed to characterise the role of CXCL16, sCXCL16, and CXCR6 in ovarian cancer (OC). Methods: CXCL16/CXCR6 expression was analysed on tissue microarray containing 306 OC patient samples. Pre-treatment serum sCXCL16 was determined in 118 patients using ELISA. In vitro, (primary) OC cells were treated with an ADAM-10/ADAM-17 inhibitor (TAPI-2) and an ADAM-10-specific inhibitor (GI254023x), whereupon CXCL16 levels were evaluated on the cell membrane (immunofluorescent analysis, western blots) and in culture supernatants (ELISA). In addition, cell migration was assessed using scratch assays. Results: sCXCL16 independently predicted for poor survival (hazard ratio=2.28, 95% confidence interval=1.29–4.02, P=0.005), whereas neither CXCL16 nor CXCR6 expression correlated with survival. Further, CXCL16/CXCR6 expression and serum sCXCL16 levels did not associate with lymphocyte infiltration. In vitro inhibition of both ADAM-17 and ADAM-10, but especially the latter, decreased CXCL16 membrane shedding and strongly reduced cell migration of A2780 and cultured primary OC-derived malignant cells. Conclusions: High serum sCXCL16 is a prognostic marker for poor survival of OC patients, possibly reflecting ADAM-10 and ADAM-17 pro-metastatic activity. Therefore, serum sCXCL16 levels may be a pseudomarker that identifies patients with highly metastatic tumours. PMID:24518602

  5. Milk, yogurt, and lactose intake and ovarian cancer risk: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Tang, Wenru; Sang, Lei; Dai, Xiaoli; Wei, Danping; Luo, Ying; Zhang, Jihong

    2015-01-01

    Inconclusive information for the role of dairy food intake in relation to ovarian cancer risk may associate with adverse effects of lactose, which has been hypothesized to increase gonadotropin levels in animal models and ecological studies. Up to now, several studies have indicated the association between dairy food intake and risk of ovarian cancer, but no identified founding was reported. We performed this meta-analysis to derive a more precise estimation of the association between dairy food intake and ovarian cancer risk. Using the data from 19 available publications, we examined dairy food including low-fat/skim milk, whole milk, yogurt and lactose in relation to risk of ovarian cancer by meta-analysis. Pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to assess the association. We observed a slightly increased risk of ovarian cancer with high intake of whole milk, but has no statistical significance (OR = 1.228, 95% CI = 1.031-1.464, P = 0.022). The results of other milk models did not provide evidence of positive association with ovarian cancer risk. This meta-analysis suggests that low-fat/skim milk, whole milk, yogurt and lactose intake has no associated with increased risk of ovarian cancer. Further studies with larger participants worldwide are needed to validate the association between dairy food intake and ovarian cancer.

  6. Treatment of Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian, & Peritoneal Cancer (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    Treatment of ovarian epithelial, fallopian tube, and primary peritoneal cancers depend on the stage. Most patients have surgery to remove as much of the tumor as possible. Learn about the different types of surgery, including hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and other ovarian cancer treatment options.

  7. IGF-II promoter methylation and ovarian cancer prognosis.

    PubMed

    Beeghly, A C; Katsaros, D; Wiley, A L; Rigault de la Longrais, I A; Prescott, A T; Chen, H; Puopolo, M; Rutherford, T J; Yu, H

    2007-10-01

    The insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) gene has four promoters that produce distinct transcripts which vary by tissue type and developmental stage. Dysregulation of normal promoter usage has been shown to occur in cancer; DNA methylation regulates promoter use. Thus, we sought to examine if DNA methylation varies among IGF-II promoters in ovarian cancer and if methylation patterns are related to clinical features of the disease. Tumor tissue, clinical data, and follow-up information were collected from 215 patients diagnosed with primary epithelial ovarian cancer. DNA extracted from tumor tissues was analyzed for IGF-II promoter methylation with seven methylation specific PCR (MSP) assays: three for promoter 2 (P2) and two assays each for promoters 3 and 4 (P3 and P4). Methylation was found to vary among the seven assays: 19.3% in P2A, 45.6% in P2B, 50.9% in P2C, 48.4% in P3A, 13.1% in P3B, 5.1% in P4A, and 6.1% in P4B. Methylation in any of the three P2 assays was associated with high tumor grade (P = 0.043), suboptimal debulking (P = 0.036), and disease progression [hazards ratio (HR) = 1.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09-2.74]. When comparing promoter methylation patterns, differential methylation of P2 and P3 was found to be associated with disease prognosis; patients with P3 but not P2 methylation were less likely to have disease progression (HR = 0.39, 95% CI 0.17-0.91) compared to patients with P2 but not P3 methylation. This study shows that methylation varies among three IGF-II promoters in ovarian cancer and that this variation seems to have biologic implications as it relates to clinical features and prognosis of the disease.

  8. Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, Bevacizumab, and Veliparib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-03-22

    Fallopian Tube Carcinosarcoma; Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Neoplasm; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Tumor; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer AJCC V6 and v7; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer AJCC v7; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  9. Ovarian and cervical cancer awareness: development of two validated measurement tools.

    PubMed

    Simon, Alice E; Wardle, Jane; Grimmett, Chloe; Power, Emily; Corker, Elizabeth; Menon, Usha; Matheson, Lauren; Waller, Jo

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the study was to develop and validate measures of awareness of symptoms and risk factors for ovarian and cervical cancer (Ovarian and Cervical Cancer Awareness Measures). Potentially relevant items were extracted from the literature and generated by experts. Four validation studies were carried out to establish reliability and validity. Women aged 21-67 years (n=146) and ovarian and cervical cancer experts (n=32) were included in the studies. Internal reliability was assessed psychometrically. Test-retest reliability was assessed over a 1-week interval. To establish construct validity, Cancer Awareness Measure (CAM) scores of cancer experts were compared with equally well-educated comparison groups. Sensitivity to change was tested by randomly assigning participants to read either a leaflet giving information about ovarian/cervical cancer or a leaflet with control information, and then completing the ovarian/cervical CAM. Internal reliability (Cronbach's α=0.88 for the ovarian CAM and α=0.84 for the cervical CAM) and test-retest reliability (r=0.84 and r=0.77 for the ovarian and cervical CAMs, respectively) were both high. Validity was demonstrated with cancer experts achieving higher scores than controls [ovarian CAM: t(36)= -5.6, p<0.001; cervical CAM: t(38)= -3.7, p=0.001], and volunteers who were randomised to read a cancer leaflet scored higher than those who received a control leaflet [ovarian CAM: t(49)=7.5, p<0.001; cervical CAM: t(48)= -5.5, p<0.001]. This study demonstrates the psychometric properties of the ovarian and cervical CAMs and supports their utility in assessing ovarian and cervical cancer awareness in the general population.

  10. Ovarian and cervical cancer awareness: development of two validated measurement tools

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Alice E; Wardle, Jane; Grimmett, Chloe; Power, Emily; Corker, Elizabeth; Menon, Usha; Matheson, Lauren; Waller, Jo

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to develop and validate measures of awareness of symptoms and risk factors for ovarian and cervical cancer (Ovarian and Cervical Cancer Awareness Measures). Methods Potentially relevant items were extracted from the literature and generated by experts. Four validation studies were carried out to establish reliability and validity. Women aged 21–67 years (n=146) and ovarian and cervical cancer experts (n=32) were included in the studies. Internal reliability was assessed psychometrically. Test-retest reliability was assessed over a 1-week interval. To establish construct validity, Cancer Awareness Measure (CAM) scores of cancer experts were compared with equally well-educated comparison groups. Sensitivity to change was tested by randomly assigning participants to read either a leaflet giving information about ovarian/cervical cancer or a leaflet with control information, and then completing the ovarian/cervical CAM. Results Internal reliability (Cronbach's α=0.88 for the ovarian CAM and α=0.84 for the cervical CAM) and test-retest reliability (r=0.84 and r=0.77 for the ovarian and cervical CAMs, respectively) were both high. Validity was demonstrated with cancer experts achieving higher scores than controls [ovarian CAM: t(36)= –5.6, p<0.001; cervical CAM: t(38)= –3.7, p=0.001], and volunteers who were randomised to read a cancer leaflet scored higher than those who received a control leaflet [ovarian CAM: t(49)=7.5, p<0.001; cervical CAM: t(48)= –5.5, p<0.001]. Conclusions This study demonstrates the psychometric properties of the ovarian and cervical CAMs and supports their utility in assessing ovarian and cervical cancer awareness in the general population. PMID:21933805

  11. miRNAs and ovarian cancer: An overview.

    PubMed

    Deb, Bornali; Uddin, Arif; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2018-05-01

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the sixth most common cancer in women globally. However, even with the advances in detection and therapeutics it still represents the most dangerous gynecologic malignancy in women of the industrialized countries. The discovery of micro-RNAs (miRNA), a small noncoding RNA molecule targeting multiple mRNAs and regulation of gene expression by triggering translation repression and/or RNA degradation, has revealed the existence of a new array for regulation of genes involved in cancer. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding the role of miRNAs expression in OC. It also provides information about potential clinical relevance of circulating miRNAs for OC diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutics. The identification of functional targets for miRNAs represents a major obstacle in our understanding of microRNA function in OC, but significant progress is being made. The better understanding of the role of microRNA expression in ovarian cancer may provide new array for the detection, diagnosis, and therapy of the OC. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Ovarian cancer risk, ALDH2 polymorphism and alcohol drinking: Asian data from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium.

    PubMed

    Ugai, Tomotaka; Kelemen, Linda E; Mizuno, Mika; Ong, Jue-Sheng; Webb, Penelope M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Wicklund, Kristine G; Doherty, Jennifer Anne; Rossing, Mary Anne; Thompson, Pamela J; Wilkens, Lynne R; Carney, Michael E; Goodman, Marc T; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Berchuck, Andrew; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L; Cai, Hui; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Gao, Yu-Tang; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Van Den Berg, David; Pike, Malcom C; Wu, Anna H; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Matsuo, Keitaro

    2018-02-01

    The aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) polymorphism rs671 (Glu504Lys) causes ALDH2 inactivation and adverse acetaldehyde exposure among Asians, but little is known of the association between alcohol consumption and rs671 and ovarian cancer (OvCa) in Asians. We conducted a pooled analysis of Asian ancestry participants in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. We included seven case-control studies and one cohort study comprising 460 invasive OvCa cases, 37 borderline mucinous OvCa and 1274 controls of Asian descent with information on recent alcohol consumption. Pooled odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for OvCa risk associated with alcohol consumption, rs671 and their interaction were estimated using logistic regression models adjusted for potential confounders. No significant association was observed for daily alcohol intake with invasive OvCa (OR comparing any consumption to none = 0.83; 95% CI = 0.58-1.18) or with individual histotypes. A significant decreased risk was seen for carriers of one or both Lys alleles of rs671 for invasive mucinous OvCa (OR = 0.44; 95% CI = 0.20-0.97) and for invasive and borderline mucinous tumors combined (OR = 0.48; 95% CI = 0.26-0.89). No significant interaction was observed between alcohol consumption and rs671 genotypes. In conclusion, self-reported alcohol consumption at the quantities estimated was not associated with OvCa risk among Asians. Because the rs671 Lys allele causes ALDH2 inactivation leading to increased acetaldehyde exposure, the observed inverse genetic association with mucinous ovarian cancer is inferred to mean that alcohol intake may be a risk factor for this histotype. This association will require replication in a larger sample. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  13. [Clinical validation of multiple biomarkers suspension array technology for ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Zhao, B B; Yang, Z J; Wang, Q; Pan, Z M; Zhang, W; Li, L

    2017-01-25

    Objective: To investigates the diagnostic value of combined detection serum CCL18, CXCL1 antigen, C1D, TM4SF1, FXR1, TIZ IgG autoantibody by suspension array for ovarian cancer. Methods: Suspension array was used to detect CCL18, CXCL1 antigen, C1D, TM4SF1, FXR1, TIZ IgG autoantibody in 120 cases of healthy women, 204 cases of patients with benign pelvic tumors, 119 cases of pelvic malignant tumor patients, and 40 cases with breast cancer, lung cancer oroliver cancer, respectively. Constructed diagnosis model of combined detection six biomarkers for diagnosis of ovarian malignant tumor. Constructed diagnosis model of combined detection autoantibodies to diagnose epithelial ovarian cancer. Analysed the value of detecting six biomarkers for diagnosis of ovarian malignant tumor and detecting autoantibodies for diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer. Analysed diagnostic value of detecting six biomarkers to diagnose stage Ⅰ and Ⅱepithelial ovarian cancer. Compared diagnostic value of detecting six biomarkers in diagnosis of tissue types and pathologic grading with that of CA(125). Results: Model of combined detecting six biomarkers to diagnose ovarian malignant tumor was logit ( P ) =-11.151+0.008×C1D+0.011×TM4SF1+0.011×TIZ-0.008×FXR1+0.021×CCL18+0.200×CXCL1. Model of combined detection autoantibodies to diagnose epithelial ovarian cancer was logit ( P ) =-5.137+0.013×C1D+0.014×TM4SF1+0.060×TIZ-0.060×FXR1. Sensitivity and specificity of detecting six biomarker to diagnose ovarian malignant tumor was 90.6% and 98.7%. Sensitivity and specificity of detecting autoantibodies to diagnose epithelial ovarian cancer was 75.8% and 96.7%. Combined detection for six biomarkers to diagnose serous and mucinous ovarian cancer was statistically no better than those of CA(125) ( P =0.196 and P =0.602, respectively); there was significantly difference in diagnosis of ovarian cancer ( P =0.023), and there was no significantly difference in diagnosis of different

  14. Flutamide and biomarkers in women at high risk for ovarian cancer: preclinical and clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Gruessner, Christine; Gruessner, Angelika; Glaser, Katherine; AbuShahin, Nisreen; Zhou, Yi; Laughren, Cynthia; Wright, Heather; Pinkerton, Samantha; Yi, Xiaofang; Stoffer, Jha'nae; Azodi, Masoud; Zheng, Wenxin; Chambers, Setsuko K

    2014-09-01

    We hypothesized that (i) preclinical biologic evidence exists for the role of androgens in ovarian cancer development and (ii) flutamide treatment of women at high risk for ovarian cancer may identify meaningful tissue biomarkers of androgen action and of ovarian cancer initiation. We showed that androgen ablation of male mice led to a 24-fold decrease in tumor burden from serous ovarian cells. In a phase II study, we studied the effect of preoperative flutamide treatment (125 mg/day × 6 weeks) in 12 women versus 47 controls, 47% with BRCA mutation. We analyzed immunohistochemical scores of candidate proteins CSF-1, CSF-1R, and ErbB4 in the epithelium and stroma of fallopian tube, ovary, and ovarian endosalpingiosis. Flutamide decreased the levels, notably, of CSF-1 and ErbB4 in ovarian stroma (P ≤ 0.0006) and ovarian endosalpingiosis (P ≤ 0.01), ErbB4 in ovarian epithelium (P = 0.006), and CSF-1R in ovarian endosalpingiosis (P = 0.009). Our logistic regression model clearly distinguished the flutamide patients from controls (P ≤ 0.0001). Our analysis of the precision of this model of CSF-1 and ErbB4 expression in ovarian stroma achieved 100% sensitivity and 97% specificity (AUC = 0.99). Thus, our data suggest that a short 6-week exposure of flutamide reversed elevated levels of CSF-1 and ErbB4 (both of which we had previously found correlated with high risk status). CSF-1 and ErbB4 in ovarian stroma led to a model with high predictive value for flutamide sensitivity. The effect of flutamide on marker expression in ovarian endosalpingiosis, previously associated with BRCA carrier status, suggests that ovarian endosalpingiosis may be a latent precursor to pelvic serous cancers. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. History of hypertension, heart disease, and diabetes and ovarian cancer patient survival: evidence from the ovarian cancer association consortium

    PubMed Central

    Minlikeeva, Albina N.; Freudenheim, Jo L.; Cannioto, Rikki A.; Szender, J. Brian; Eng, Kevin H.; Modugno, Francesmary; Ness, Roberta B.; LaMonte, Michael J.; Friel, Grace; Segal, Brahm H.; Odunsi, Kunle; Mayor, Paul; Zsiros, Emese; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Klapdor, Rüdiger; Dörk, Thilo; Hillemanns, Peter; Kelemen, Linda E.; Köbel, Martin; Steed, Helen; de Fazio, Anna; Jordan, Susan J.; Nagle, Christina M.; Risch, Harvey A.; Rossing, Mary Anne; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Goodman, Marc T.; Edwards, Robert; Matsuo, Keitaro; Mizuno, Mika; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kjær, Susanne K.; Høgdall, Estrid; Jensen, Allan; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Paddock, Lisa E.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Massuger, Leon F.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Berchuck, Andrew; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Diergaarde, Brenda; Webb, Penelope M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Survival following ovarian cancer diagnosis is generally low; understanding factors related to prognosis could be important to optimize treatment. The role of previously diagnosed comorbidities and use of medications for those conditions in relation to prognosis for ovarian cancer patients has not been studied extensively, particularly according to histological subtype. Methods Using pooled data from fifteen studies participating in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium, we examined the associations between history of hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, and medications taken for these conditions and overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) among patients diagnosed with invasive epithelial ovarian carcinoma. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models adjusted for age and stage to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) overall and within strata of histological subtypes. Results History of diabetes was associated with increased risk of mortality (n = 7,674; HR = 1.12; 95% CI = 1.01–1.25). No significant mortality associations were observed for hypertension (n = 6,482; HR = 0.95; 95% CI = 0.88–1.02) or heart disease (n = 4,252; HR = 1.05; 95% CI = 0.87–1.27). No association of these comorbidities was found with PFS in the overall study population. However, among patients with endometrioid tumors, hypertension was associated with lower risk of progression (n = 339, HR = 0.54; 95% CI = 0.35–0.84). Comorbidity was not associated with OS or PFS for any of the other histological subtypes. Ever use of beta blockers, oral antidiabetic medications, and insulin was associated with increased mortality, HR = 1.20; 95% CI = 1.03–1.40, HR = 1.28; 95% CI = 1.05–1.55, and HR = 1.63; 95% CI = 1.20–2.20, respectively. Ever use of diuretics was inversely associated with mortality, HR = 0.71; 95% CI = 0.53–0.94. Conclusions Histories of hypertension, diabetes, and use of diuretics, beta blockers, insulin

  16. History of hypertension, heart disease, and diabetes and ovarian cancer patient survival: evidence from the ovarian cancer association consortium.

    PubMed

    Minlikeeva, Albina N; Freudenheim, Jo L; Cannioto, Rikki A; Szender, J Brian; Eng, Kevin H; Modugno, Francesmary; Ness, Roberta B; LaMonte, Michael J; Friel, Grace; Segal, Brahm H; Odunsi, Kunle; Mayor, Paul; Zsiros, Emese; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Klapdor, Rüdiger; Dӧrk, Thilo; Hillemanns, Peter; Kelemen, Linda E; Kӧbel, Martin; Steed, Helen; de Fazio, Anna; Jordan, Susan J; Nagle, Christina M; Risch, Harvey A; Rossing, Mary Anne; Doherty, Jennifer A; Goodman, Marc T; Edwards, Robert; Matsuo, Keitaro; Mizuno, Mika; Karlan, Beth Y; Kjær, Susanne K; Høgdall, Estrid; Jensen, Allan; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Terry, Kathryn L; Cramer, Daniel W; Bandera, Elisa V; Paddock, Lisa E; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Massuger, Leon F; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Berchuck, Andrew; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Diergaarde, Brenda; Webb, Penelope M; Moysich, Kirsten B

    2017-05-01

    Survival following ovarian cancer diagnosis is generally low; understanding factors related to prognosis could be important to optimize treatment. The role of previously diagnosed comorbidities and use of medications for those conditions in relation to prognosis for ovarian cancer patients has not been studied extensively, particularly according to histological subtype. Using pooled data from fifteen studies participating in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium, we examined the associations between history of hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, and medications taken for these conditions and overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) among patients diagnosed with invasive epithelial ovarian carcinoma. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models adjusted for age and stage to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) overall and within strata of histological subtypes. History of diabetes was associated with increased risk of mortality (n = 7,674; HR = 1.12; 95% CI = 1.01-1.25). No significant mortality associations were observed for hypertension (n = 6,482; HR = 0.95; 95% CI = 0.88-1.02) or heart disease (n = 4,252; HR = 1.05; 95% CI = 0.87-1.27). No association of these comorbidities was found with PFS in the overall study population. However, among patients with endometrioid tumors, hypertension was associated with lower risk of progression (n = 339, HR = 0.54; 95% CI = 0.35-0.84). Comorbidity was not associated with OS or PFS for any of the other histological subtypes. Ever use of beta blockers, oral antidiabetic medications, and insulin was associated with increased mortality, HR = 1.20; 95% CI = 1.03-1.40, HR = 1.28; 95% CI = 1.05-1.55, and HR = 1.63; 95% CI = 1.20-2.20, respectively. Ever use of diuretics was inversely associated with mortality, HR = 0.71; 95% CI = 0.53-0.94. Histories of hypertension, diabetes, and use of diuretics

  17. Ultrasound Monitoring of Extant Adnexal Masses in the Era of Type 1 and Type 2 Ovarian Cancers: Lessons Learned From Ovarian Cancer Screening Trials

    PubMed Central

    Ormsby, Eleanor L.; Pavlik, Edward J.; McGahan, John P.

    2017-01-01

    Women that are positive for an ovarian abnormality in a clinical setting can have either a malignancy or a benign tumor with probability favoring the benign alternative. Accelerating the abnormality to surgery will result in a high number of unnecessary procedures that will place cost burdens on the individual and the health delivery system. Surveillance using serial ultrasonography is a reasonable alternative that can be used to discover if changes in the ovarian abnormality will occur that favor either a malignant or benign interpretation. Several ovarian cancer screening trials have had extensive experiences with changes in subclinical ovarian abnormalities in normal women that can define growth, stability or resolution and give some idea of the time frame over which changes occur. The present report examines these experiences and relates them to the current understanding of ovarian cancer ontology, presenting arguments related to the benefits of surveillance. PMID:28452952

  18. Immunotherapy for recurrent ovarian cancer: a further piece of the puzzle or a striking strategy?

    PubMed

    Bronte, Giuseppe; Cicero, Giuseppe; Sortino, Giovanni; Pernice, Gianfranco; Catarella, Maria Teresa; D'Alia, Paolo; Cusenza, Stefania; Lo Dico, Silvia; Bronte, Enrico; Sprini, Delia; Midiri, Massimo; Firenze, Alberto; Fiorentino, Eugenio; Bazan, Viviana; Rolfo, Christian; Russo, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of ovarian cancer has been long standardized with the inclusion of surgery and chemotherapy based on platinum and taxanes, this strategy reaching high remission rates. However, when this treatment fails, further options are available with little benefit. Since ovarian cancer has specific immunologic features, actually immunotherapy is under evaluation to overcome treatment failure in patients experiencing recurrence. Immunogenicity of ovarian cancer and its relationship with clinical outcomes is briefly reviewed. The kinds of immunotherapeutic strategies are summarized. The clinical trials investigating immunotherapy in recurrent ovarian cancer patients are reported. The results of these clinical trials about immunotherapy are interesting, but little clinical benefit has been achieved until now. For this reason, we could conclude that immunotherapy is quite different from other treatment options and it could change the global approach for recurrent ovarian cancer treatment. However, to date only fragmentary findings are available to define the real role of immunotherapy in this setting.

  19. Multi-modality optical imaging of ovarian cancer in a post-menopausal mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Jennifer M.; Rice, Photini Faith; Marion, Samuel L.; Bentley, David L.; Brewer, Molly A.; Utzinger, Urs; Hoyer, Patricia B.; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2011-03-01

    Our goal is to use optical imaging to detect cancer development on the sub cellular scale. By determining the microscopic changes that precede ovarian cancer we hope to develop a minimally invasive screening test for high risk patients. A mouse ovarian cancer model has been developed by treating mice with 4-Vinylcyclohexene Diepoxide to induce ovarian failure and 7, 12-Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) to induce ovarian cancer. Using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and multiphoton microscopy (MPM) we have obtained co-registered en face images of sixty-seven mouse ovaries ex vivo and forty-two ovaries in vivo. Preliminary analysis indicates that OCT and MPM can visualize ovarian microstructure. During the next year we will be completing a long term survival study using post-menopausal mice that have been treated with DMBA to induce cancer and imaged in vivo at time points before and after treatment.

  20. Cell stiffness is a biomarker of the metastatic potential of ovarian cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenwei; Mezencev, Roman; Kim, Byungkyu; Wang, Lijuan; McDonald, John; Sulchek, Todd; Sulchek Team; McDonald Team

    2013-03-01

    The metastatic potential of cells is an important parameter in the design of optimal strategies for the personalized treatment of cancer. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we show that ovarian cancer cells are generally softer and display lower intrinsic variability in cell stiffness than non-malignant ovarian epithelial cells. A detailed study of highly invasive ovarian cancer cells (HEY A8) and their less invasive parental cells (HEY), demonstrates that deformability can serve as an accurate biomarker of metastatic potential. Comparative gene expression profiling indicate that the reduced stiffness of highly metastatic HEY A8 cells is associated with actin cytoskeleton remodeling, microscopic examination of actin fiber structure in these cell lines is consistent with this prediction. Our results indicate that cell stiffness not only distinguishes ovarian cancer cells from non-malignant cells, but may also be a useful biomarker to evaluate the relative metastatic potential of ovarian and perhaps other types of cancer cells.

  1. Completeness of pedigree and family cancer history for ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Son, Yedong; Lim, Myong Cheol; Seo, Sang Soo; Kang, Sokbom; Park, Sang Yoon

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the completeness of pedigree and of number of pedigree analysis to know the acceptable familial history in Korean women with ovarian cancer. Interview was conducted in 50 ovarian cancer patients for obtaining familial history three times over the 6 weeks. The completeness of pedigree is estimated in terms of familial history of disease (cancer), health status (health living, disease and death), and onset age of disease and death. The completion of pedigree was 79.3, 85.1, and 85.6% at the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd time of interview and the time for pedigree analysis was 34.3, 10.8, and 3.1 minutes, respectively. The factors limiting pedigree analysis were as follows: out of contact with their relatives (38%), no living ancestors who know the family history (34%), dispersed family member because of the Korean War (16%), unknown cause of death (12%), reluctance to ask medical history of relatives (10%), and concealing their ovarian cancer (10%). The percentage of cancers revealed in 1st (2%) and 2nd degree (8%) relatives were increasing through surveys, especially colorectal cancer related with Lynch syndrome (4%). Analysis of pedigree at least two times is acceptable in Korean woman with ovarian cancer from the first study. The completion of pedigree is increasing, while time to take family history is decreasing during three time survey.

  2. Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, & Primary Peritoneal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    Ovarian, fallopian tube, and primary peritoneal cancer prevention includes reducing known risk factors and increasing protective factors. Some risk factors can be avoided, others cannot. Learn more about preventing these cancers in this expert-reviewed summary.

  3. Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, & Primary Peritoneal Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Ovarian, fallopian tube, and primary peritoneal cancer prevention involves understanding risk and protective factors, and the evidence behind them. Get detailed information about specific risk and protective factors and prevention strategies for these cancer types in this clinician summary.

  4. Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian, & Peritoneal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Ovarian epithelial, fallopian tube, and primary peritoneal cancer treatments include surgery, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, and PARP inhibitors. Get detailed information about these cancers, (newly diagnosed or recurrent) and how they are treated in this summary for clinicians.

  5. Women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations survive ovarian cancer at higher rates

    Cancer.gov

    Results from a National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored multicenter study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association on January 25, 2012, provides strong evidence that BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutation carriers with ovarian cancer were more

  6. ASK1-dependent endothelial cell activation is critical in ovarian cancer growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Mingzhu; Zhou, Huanjiao Jenny; Zhang, Jiqin; Lin, Caixia; Li, Hongmei; Li, Xia; Li, Yonghao; Zhang, Haifeng; Breckenridge, David G.; Ji, Weidong

    2017-01-01

    We have recently reported that tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) promote early transcoelomic metastasis of ovarian cancer by facilitating TAM–ovarian cancer cell spheroid formation. ASK1 is known to be important for macrophage activation and inflammation-mediated tumorigenesis. In the present study, we show that ASK1 deficiency attenuates TAM-spheroid formation and ovarian cancer progression in an orthotopic ovarian cancer model. Interestingly, ASK1 in stroma, but not in TAMs, is critical for peritoneal tumor growth of ovarian cancer. Moreover, overexpression of an ASK1 inhibitory protein (suppressor of cytokine signaling-1; SOCS1) in vascular endothelium attenuates vascular permeability, TAM infiltration, and ovarian cancer growth. Mechanistically, we show that ASK1 mediates degradation of endothelial junction protein VE-cadherin via a lysosomal pathway to promote macrophage transmigration. Importantly, a pharmacological ASK1 inhibitor prevents tumor-induced vascular leakage, macrophage infiltration, and tumor growth in two mouse models. Since transcoelomic metastasis is also associated with many other cancers, such as pancreatic and colon cancers, our study provides ASK1 as a therapeutic target for the treatment of ovarian cancer and other transcoelomic metastasis cancers. PMID:28931753

  7. Tumor-associated macrophages drive spheroid formation during early transcoelomic metastasis of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Mingzhu; Li, Xia; Tan, Shu; Zhou, Huanjiao Jenny; Ji, Weidong; Bellone, Stefania; Xu, Xiaocao; Zhang, Haifeng; Santin, Alessandro D.; Lou, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) can influence ovarian cancer growth, migration, and metastasis, but the detailed mechanisms underlying ovarian cancer metastasis remain unclear. Here, we have shown a strong correlation between TAM-associated spheroids and the clinical pathology of ovarian cancer. Further, we have determined that TAMs promote spheroid formation and tumor growth at early stages of transcoelomic metastasis in an established mouse model for epithelial ovarian cancer. M2 macrophage–like TAMs were localized in the center of spheroids and secreted EGF, which upregulated αMβ2 integrin on TAMs and ICAM-1 on tumor cells to promote association between tumor cells and TAM. Moreover, EGF secreted by TAMs activated EGFR on tumor cells, which in turn upregulated VEGF/VEGFR signaling in surrounding tumor cells to support tumor cell proliferation and migration. Pharmacological blockade of EGFR or antibody neutralization of ICAM-1 in TAMs blunted spheroid formation and ovarian cancer progression in mouse models. These findings suggest that EGF secreted from TAMs plays a critical role in promoting early transcoelomic metastasis of ovarian cancer. As transcoelomic metastasis is also associated with many other cancers, such as pancreatic and colon cancers, our findings uncover a mechanism for TAM-mediated spheroid formation and provide a potential target for the treatment of ovarian cancer and other transcoelomic metastatic cancers. PMID:27721235

  8. Benefits and risks of ovarian function and reproduction for cancer development and prevention.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Adolf E

    2011-12-01

    Ovarian function and menstrual cycle disturbances, pregnancy, and reproductive medicine procedures can either increase gynecological cancer risk or prevent cancer development. For ovarian cancer development, there are two hypotheses, which are connected with ovulation and gonadotropin secretion. Most of the ovarian cancers seem to be derived from displaced ovarian surfice epithelial cells. One year of ovulatory cycles increases the ovarian cancer risk by 6%. Ovulation between 22 and 29 years of age causes the highest risk increase per year. In contrast, progesterone or progestins appear to create protection. Lifestyle can affect or modify ovarian cancer risk. Breast cancer risk is very much related to age of menarche and menopause, pregnancy, and breast feeding. All of which are related to ovarian function and progestogenic impact that translates either into breast cancer risk increase or decrease. This is modified by body mass index, physical activity, and lifestyle in general. The risk of endometrial cancer is most closely related to endogenous progesterone during the menstrual cycle and pregnancy or by exogenous progestogens as in oral contraceptives. These effects are progestogen dose and time dependent. Endometrial cancer risk can also be increased by estrogen-producing tumors or long-term estrogen treatment.

  9. The relationship between ovarian function and ovarian limited dose in radiotherapy postoperation of ovarian transposition in young patients with cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhenhua; Qu, Hui

    2017-03-01

    In this study, the relationship between ovarian function and ovarian limited dose in radiotherapy was evaluated in young patients with cervical cancer who underwent ovarian transposition (Fig1B). Moreover, the novel ovarian dose limit for a better preservation of ovarian function in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) was determined. We retrospectively analyzed data from 86 patients with cervical cancer who received radical hysterectomy and ovarian transposition from January 2013 to June 2015. In agreement with the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Guidelines (NCCN) for Cervical Cancer Version 2.2015, 65 patients with pathological high-risk factors were administered adjuvant radiotherapy-20 of them received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (Observation Group A), 24 patients received IMRT with no limitation on radiation dose to ovaries (Observation Group B), and 21 patients underwent IMRT with limited radiation dose(V 10 <20%) to ovaries (Observation Group C). Twenty-one patients without any predetermined high-risk factors did not received radiation therapy (Control Group D). Patients from all four groups were followed up, and sex hormone levels (E 2 , P, follicle-stimulating hormone [FSH], LH) before radiation, postradiation, 3 month, and 6 month after the radiation therapy were measured by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. Subsequently, changes in sex hormone levels in all four groups of patients at various time points were analyzed. The levels of sexual hormones (E 2 , P, FSH, LH) before radiation, postradiation, 3 month, and 6 month after the radiation therapy in patients from all three observation groups were significantly lower than those in patients of the control group (P < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference in the levels of sex hormones in patients of the control group at different time points (P > 0.05). Within each observation group, there was a statistically significant difference in the sex hormone

  10. Connective tissue growth factor as a novel therapeutic target in high grade serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Moran-Jones, Kim; Gloss, Brian S; Murali, Rajmohan; Chang, David K; Colvin, Emily K; Jones, Marc D; Yuen, Samuel; Howell, Viive M; Brown, Laura M; Wong, Carol W; Spong, Suzanne M; Scarlett, Christopher J; Hacker, Neville F; Ghosh, Sue; Mok, Samuel C; Birrer, Michael J; Samimi, Goli

    2015-12-29

    Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of death among women with gynecologic cancer. We examined molecular profiles of fibroblasts from normal ovary and high-grade serous ovarian tumors to identify novel therapeutic targets involved in tumor progression. We identified 2,300 genes that are significantly differentially expressed in tumor-associated fibroblasts. Fibroblast expression of one of these genes, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. CTGF protein expression in ovarian tumor fibroblasts significantly correlated with gene expression levels. CTGF is a secreted component of the tumor microenvironment and is being pursued as a therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer. We examined its effect in in vitro and ex vivo ovarian cancer models, and examined associations between CTGF expression and clinico-pathologic characteristics in patients. CTGF promotes migration and peritoneal adhesion of ovarian cancer cells. These effects are abrogated by FG-3019, a human monoclonal antibody against CTGF, currently under clinical investigation as a therapeutic agent. Immunohistochemical analyses of high-grade serous ovarian tumors reveal that the highest level of tumor stromal CTGF expression was correlated with the poorest prognosis. Our findings identify CTGF as a promoter of peritoneal adhesion, likely to mediate metastasis, and a potential therapeutic target in high-grade serous ovarian cancer. These results warrant further studies into the therapeutic efficacy of FG-3019 in high-grade serous ovarian cancer.

  11. Connective tissue growth factor as a novel therapeutic targe