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Sample records for a2780 ovarian cancer

  1. Ellagic Acid and Resveratrol Prevent the Development of Cisplatin Resistance in the Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Cell Line A2780

    PubMed Central

    Engelke, Laura H.; Hamacher, Alexandra; Proksch, Peter; Kassack, Matthias U.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Several studies have shown that natural compounds like resveratrol or ellagic acid have anticancer and antioxidant properties and can stimulate apoptosis in many cancer cell lines. The aim of this study was to elucidate if resveratrol or ellagic acid, respectively, could improve the efficacy of cisplatin in ovarian cancer. Methods. As a cellular resistance model, the epithelial ovarian cancer cell line A2780 and its cisplatin-resistant subclone A2780CisR were used. A2780CisR was obtained by intermittent treatment of A2780 with cisplatin for 26 weekly cycles and showed a 4-6-fold increased resistance towards cisplatin compared to A2780. Results. Pretreatment with resveratrol or ellagic acid 48 h prior to treatment with cisplatin showed a moderate enhancement of cisplatin cytotoxicity in A2780CisR cells (shift factors were 1.6 for ellagic acid and 2.5 for resveratrol). However, intermittent treatment of A2780 with cisplatin for 26 weekly cycles in permanent presence of resveratrol or ellagic acid, respectively, completely prevented the development of cisplatin resistance. The generated cell lines named A2780Resv and A2780Ellag displayed functional characteristics (migration, proliferation, apoptosis, activation of ErbB3, ROS generation) similar to the parental cell line A2780. Conclusion. In conclusion, weekly intermittent treatment cycles of cisplatin-sensitive ovarian cancer cells with cisplatin retain cisplatin chemosensitivity in permanent presence of ellagic acid or resveratrol, respectively, whereas clinically relevant cisplatin chemoresistance develops in the absence of ellagic acid or resveratrol. Use of natural phenolic compounds may thus be a promising approach to prevent cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer. PMID:26918049

  2. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester activates pro-apoptotic and epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related genes in ovarian cancer cells A2780 and A2780cis.

    PubMed

    Gherman, Claudia; Braicu, Ovidiu Leonard; Zanoaga, Oana; Jurj, Anca; Pileczki, Valentina; Maralani, Mahafarin; Drigla, Flaviu; Braicu, Cornelia; Budisan, Liviuta; Achimas-Cadariu, Patriciu; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana

    2016-02-01

    Ovarian cancer is a highly aggressive pathology, displaying a poor prognosis and chemoresistance to classical therapy. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) on survival of ovarian cancer cell lines, A2780 (sensitive to cisplatin) and A2780cis (resistant to cisplatin). MTT assay was used to evaluate cell viability, while the apoptotic processes were examined by flow cytometry and qRT-PCR. A reduction of cell proliferation and activation of the apoptosis was observed in both cell lines. qRT-PCR evaluation demonstrated the activation of the pro-apoptotic genes (BAD, CASP8, FAS, FADD, p53) in both cell lines. The limited therapeutic effect in A2780 cells is explained by the activation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related genes (ZEB1, ZEB2, or TGFBB1) as displayed by Ingenuity Network analysis. Overall data suggest that CAPE can be used as an alternative in sensitizing cells to chemotherapy. PMID:26838168

  3. Extracellular matrix proteins expression profiling in chemoresistant variants of the A2780 ovarian cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Januchowski, Radosław; Zawierucha, Piotr; Ruciński, Marcin; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death among gynaecological malignancies. Extracellular matrix (ECM) can affect drug resistance by preventing the penetration of the drug into cancer cells and increased resistance to apoptosis. This study demonstrates alterations in the expression levels of ECM components and related genes in cisplatin-, doxorubicin-, topotecan-, and paclitaxel-resistant variants of the A2780 ovarian cancer cell line. Affymetrix Gene Chip Human Genome Array Strips were used for hybridisations. The genes that had altered expression levels in drug-resistant sublines were selected and filtered by scatter plots. The genes that were up- or downregulated more than fivefold were selected and listed. Among the investigated genes, 28 genes were upregulated, 10 genes were downregulated, and two genes were down- or upregulated depending on the cell line. Between upregulated genes 12 were upregulated very significantly--over 20-fold. These genes included COL1A2, COL12A1, COL21A1, LOX, TGFBI, LAMB1, EFEMP1, GPC3, SDC2, MGP, MMP3, and TIMP3. Four genes were very significantly downregulated: COL11A1, LAMA2, GPC6, and LUM. The expression profiles of investigated genes provide a preliminary insight into the relationship between drug resistance and the expression of ECM components. Identifying correlations between investigated genes and drug resistance will require further analysis. PMID:24804215

  4. Extracellular Matrix Proteins Expression Profiling in Chemoresistant Variants of the A2780 Ovarian Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Januchowski, Radosław; Zawierucha, Piotr; Ruciński, Marcin; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death among gynaecological malignancies. Extracellular matrix (ECM) can affect drug resistance by preventing the penetration of the drug into cancer cells and increased resistance to apoptosis. This study demonstrates alterations in the expression levels of ECM components and related genes in cisplatin-, doxorubicin-, topotecan-, and paclitaxel-resistant variants of the A2780 ovarian cancer cell line. Affymetrix Gene Chip Human Genome Array Strips were used for hybridisations. The genes that had altered expression levels in drug-resistant sublines were selected and filtered by scatter plots. The genes that were up- or downregulated more than fivefold were selected and listed. Among the investigated genes, 28 genes were upregulated, 10 genes were downregulated, and two genes were down- or upregulated depending on the cell line. Between upregulated genes 12 were upregulated very significantly—over 20-fold. These genes included COL1A2, COL12A1, COL21A1, LOX, TGFBI, LAMB1, EFEMP1, GPC3, SDC2, MGP, MMP3, and TIMP3. Four genes were very significantly downregulated: COL11A1, LAMA2, GPC6, and LUM. The expression profiles of investigated genes provide a preliminary insight into the relationship between drug resistance and the expression of ECM components. Identifying correlations between investigated genes and drug resistance will require further analysis. PMID:24804215

  5. Drug transporter expression profiling in chemoresistant variants of the A2780 ovarian cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Januchowski, Radosław; Zawierucha, Piotr; Ruciński, Marcin; Andrzejewska, Małgorzata; Wojtowicz, Karolina; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2014-05-01

    Ovarian cancer is characterized by the higher mortality among gynecological cancers. In results of MDR development during chemotherapy cancer cells become resistant to further treatment. Microarray techniques can provide information about MDR development at gene expression level. ABC and SLC transporters are most important proteins responsible for this phenomenon. In this study changes of ABC and SLC genes expression pattern in drugs resistant sublines of the A2780 ovarian cancer cell line were demonstrated. The cytostatic resistant sublines were generated by culture of A2780 cell line with an increasing concentration of the indicated drugs. As screening methods, we used Affymetrix U219 Human Genome microarrays. Independent t-tests were used to determinate statistical significances of results. Genes that expression levels were higher than assumed threshold (upregulated above threefold and downregulated under -3 fold) were visualized using scatter plot method, selected and listed in table. Between the ABC genes increased expression of seven genes and decreased expression of three genes were observed. Expression of two genes was increased or decreased depending on the cell line. We observed significant (more than tenfold) increase in expression of four ABC genes: ABCA8, ABCB1, ABCB4 and ABCG2 and decreased expression of ABCA3 gene. We also observed changes in expression of 32 SLC genes. Between them we observe increased expression of 17 genes and decreased expression of 15 genes. Expression of four genes was increased or decreased dependent on cell line. The expression of nine SLC genes increased or decreased very significantly (more than tenfold). Five genes were significantly upregulated: SLC2A9, SLC16A3, SLC16A14, SLC38A4 and SLC39A8. Four additional genes were significantly downregulated: SLC2A14, SLC6A15, SLC8A1 and SLC27A2. Expression profiles of these genes give strong arguments for assumption of correlation between expression of ABC and SLC genes and drug

  6. The potassium ion channel opener NS1619 inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in A2780 ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Han Xiaobing; Xi Ling; Wang Hui; Huang Xiaoyuan; Ma Xiangyi; Han Zhiqiang; Wu Peng; Ma Xiaoli; Lu Yunping; Wang, Gang Zhou Jianfeng; Ma Ding

    2008-10-17

    Diverse types of voltage-gated potassium (K{sup +}) channels have been shown to be involved in regulation of cell proliferation. The maxi-conductance Ca{sup 2+}-activated K{sup +} channels (BK channels) may play an important role in the progression of human cancer. To explore the role of BK channels in regulation of apoptosis in human ovarian cancer cells, the effects of the specific BK channel activator NS1619 on induction of apoptosis in A2780 cells were observed. Following treatment with NS1619, cell proliferation was measured by MTT assay. Apoptosis of A2780 cells pretreated with NS1619 was detected by agarose gel electrophoresis of cellular DNA and flow cytometry. Our data demonstrate that NS1619 inhibits the proliferation of A2780 cells in a dosage and time dependent manner IC{sub 50} = 31.1 {mu}M, for 48 h pretreatment and induces apoptosis. Western blot analyses showed that the anti-proliferation effect of NS1619 was associated with increased expression of p53, p21, and Bax. These results indicate that BK channels play an important role in regulating proliferation of human ovarian cancer cells and may induce apoptosis through induction of p21{sup Cip1} expression in a p53-dependent manner.

  7. Macranthoside B Induces Apoptosis and Autophagy Via Reactive Oxygen Species Accumulation in Human Ovarian Cancer A2780 Cells.

    PubMed

    Shan, Yu; Guan, Fuqin; Zhao, Xingzeng; Wang, Ming; Chen, Yu; Wang, Qizhi; Feng, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Macranthoside B (MB), a saponin compound in Lonicera macranthoides, can block cell proliferation and induce cell death in several types of cancer cells; however, the precise mechanisms by which MB exerts its anticancer effects remain poorly understood. MB blocked A2780 human ovarian carcinoma cell proliferation both dose- and time-dependently. MB induced apoptosis, with increased poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and caspase-3/9 cleavage. MB also caused autophagy in A2780 cells, with light chain 3 (LC3)-II elevation. Inhibiting MB-induced autophagy with the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) significantly decreased apoptosis, with a reduction of growth inhibition; inhibiting MB-induced apoptosis with the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK did not decrease autophagy but elevated LC3-II levels, indicating that MB-induced autophagy is cytotoxic and may be upstream of apoptosis. Furthermore, MB increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, with activated 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), decreased mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and P70S6 kinase phosphorylation, and increased PARP and caspase-3/9 cleavage, and LC3-II elevation; treatment with the ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine and the AMPK inhibitor Compound C diminished this effect. Therefore, the ROS/AMPK/mTOR pathway mediates the effect of MB on induction of apoptosis via autophagy in human ovarian carcinoma cells. PMID:26943028

  8. Knockdown of platinum-induced growth differentiation factor 15 abrogates p27-mediated tumor growth delay in the chemoresistant ovarian cancer model A2780cis

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Julia C; Haendler, Bernard; Seidel, Henrik; Groth, Philip; Adams, Robert; Ziegelbauer, Karl; Kreft, Bertolt; Beckmann, Georg; Sommer, Anette; Kopitz, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms underlying the development of resistance to platinum-based treatment in patients with ovarian cancer remain poorly understood. This is mainly due to the lack of appropriate in vivo models allowing the identification of resistance-related factors. In this study, we used human whole-genome microarrays and linear model analysis to identify potential resistance-related genes by comparing the expression profiles of the parental human ovarian cancer model A2780 and its platinum-resistant variant A2780cis before and after carboplatin treatment in vivo. Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) was identified as one of five potential resistance-related genes in the A2780cis tumor model. Although A2780-bearing mice showed a strong carboplatin-induced increase of GDF15 plasma levels, the basal higher GDF15 plasma levels of A2780cis-bearing mice showed no further increase after short-term or long-term carboplatin treatment. This correlated with a decreased DNA damage response, enhanced AKT survival signaling and abrogated cell cycle arrest in the carboplatin-treated A2780cis tumors. Furthermore, knockdown of GDF15 in A2780cis cells did not alter cell proliferation but enhanced cell migration and colony size in vitro. Interestingly, in vivo knockdown of GDF15 in the A2780cis model led to a basal-enhanced tumor growth, but increased sensitivity to carboplatin treatment as compared to the control-transduced A2780cis tumors. This was associated with larger necrotic areas, a lobular tumor structure and increased p53 and p16 expression of the carboplatin-treated shGDF15-A2780cis tumors. Furthermore, shRNA-mediated GDF15 knockdown abrogated p27 expression as compared to control-transduced A2780cis tumors. In conclusion, these data show that GDF15 may contribute to carboplatin resistance by suppressing tumor growth through p27. These data show that GDF15 might serve as a novel treatment target in women with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. PMID:25490861

  9. MiR-130a and MiR-374a Function as Novel Regulators of Cisplatin Resistance in Human Ovarian Cancer A2780 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongjing; Yi, Tao; Jia, Xibiao; Chen, Cen; Xu, Pan

    2015-01-01

    Chemoresistance remains a major obstacle to effective treatment in patients with ovarian cancer, and recently increasing evidences suggest that miRNAs are involved in drug-resistance. In this study, we investigated the role of miRNAs in regulating cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer cell line and analyzed their possible mechanisms. We profiled miRNAs differentially expressed in cisplatin-resistant human ovarian cancer cell line A2780/DDP compared with parental A2780 cells using microarray. Four abnormally expressed miRNAs were selected (miR-146a,-130a, -374a and miR-182) for further studies. Their expression were verified by qRT-PCR. MiRNA mimics or inhibitor were transfected into A2780 and A2780/DDP cells and then drug sensitivity was analyzed by MTS array. RT-PCR and Western blot were carried out to examine the alteration of MDR1, PTEN gene expression. A total of 32 miRNAs were found to be differentially expressed in A2780/DDP cells. Among them, miR-146a was down-regulated and miR-130a,-374a,-182 were upregulated in A2780/DDP cells, which was verified by RT-PCR. MiR-130a and miR-374a mimics decreased the sensitivity of A2780 cells to cisplatin, reversely, their inhibitors could resensitize A2780/DDP cells. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-130a could increase the MDR1 mRNA and P-gp levels in A2780 and A2780/DDP cells, whereas knockdown of miR-130a could inhibit MDR1 gene expression and upregulate the PTEN protein expression .In a conclusion, the deregulation of miR-374a and miR-130a may be involved in the development and regulation of cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer cells. This role of miR-130a may be achieved by regulating the MDR1 and PTEN gene expression. PMID:26043084

  10. Effect of Amino Acids on the Generation of Ginsenoside Rg3 Epimers by Heat Processing and the Anticancer Activities of Epimers in A2780 Human Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jun Yeon; Choi, Pilju; Lee, Dahae; Kim, Taejung; Jung, Eun Bee; Hwang, Buyng-Su; Kang, Ki Sung; Ham, Jungyeob

    2016-01-01

    Ginsenosides are the active components of Panax ginseng. Many research studies indicate that these deglycosylated, less-polar ginsenosides have better bioactivity than the major ginsenosides. In the present study, we sought to verify the enhanced anticancer effect of P. ginseng extract after undergoing the Maillard reaction as well as elucidate the underlying mechanism of action. The effects of 9 amino acids were tested; among them, the content of 20(S)-Rg3 in the ginseng extract increased to more than 30, 20, and 20% when processed with valine, arginine, and alanine, respectively, compared with that after normal heat processing. The ginseng extract that was heat-processed with arginine exhibited the most potent inhibitory effect on A2780 ovarian cancer cell proliferation. Therefore, the generation of 20(S)-Rg3 was suggested to be involved in this effect. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of 20(S)-Rg3 on A2780 cell proliferation was significantly stronger than that of 20(R)-Rg3. Protein expression levels of cleaved caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, and PARP in the A2780 ovarian cancer cells markedly increased, whereas the expression of BID decreased after 20(S)-Rg3 treatment. Therefore, we confirmed that the anticancer effects of the products of ginseng that was heat-processed with arginine are mediated mainly via the generation of the less-polar ginsenoside 20(S)-Rg3. PMID:27051448

  11. Effect of Amino Acids on the Generation of Ginsenoside Rg3 Epimers by Heat Processing and the Anticancer Activities of Epimers in A2780 Human Ovarian Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Yeon; Choi, Pilju; Lee, Dahae; Kim, Taejung; Jung, Eun Bee; Hwang, Buyng-Su; Kang, Ki Sung; Ham, Jungyeob

    2016-01-01

    Ginsenosides are the active components of Panax ginseng. Many research studies indicate that these deglycosylated, less-polar ginsenosides have better bioactivity than the major ginsenosides. In the present study, we sought to verify the enhanced anticancer effect of P. ginseng extract after undergoing the Maillard reaction as well as elucidate the underlying mechanism of action. The effects of 9 amino acids were tested; among them, the content of 20(S)-Rg3 in the ginseng extract increased to more than 30, 20, and 20% when processed with valine, arginine, and alanine, respectively, compared with that after normal heat processing. The ginseng extract that was heat-processed with arginine exhibited the most potent inhibitory effect on A2780 ovarian cancer cell proliferation. Therefore, the generation of 20(S)-Rg3 was suggested to be involved in this effect. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of 20(S)-Rg3 on A2780 cell proliferation was significantly stronger than that of 20(R)-Rg3. Protein expression levels of cleaved caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, and PARP in the A2780 ovarian cancer cells markedly increased, whereas the expression of BID decreased after 20(S)-Rg3 treatment. Therefore, we confirmed that the anticancer effects of the products of ginseng that was heat-processed with arginine are mediated mainly via the generation of the less-polar ginsenoside 20(S)-Rg3. PMID:27051448

  12. Resveratrol analogue 3,4,4′,5-tetramethoxystilbene inhibits growth, arrests cell cycle and induces apoptosis in ovarian SKOV‐3 and A-2780 cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Piotrowska, Hanna; Myszkowski, Krzysztof; Ziółkowska, Alicja; Kulcenty, Katarzyna; Wierzchowski, Marcin; Kaczmarek, Mariusz; Murias, Marek; Kwiatkowska-Borowczyk, Eliza; Jodynis-Liebert, Jadwiga

    2012-08-15

    In the screening studies, cytotoxicity of 12 methylated resveratrol analogues on 11 human cancer cell lines was examined. The most active compound 3,4,4′5-tetramethoxystilbene (DMU-212) and two ovarian cancer cell lines A-2780 (IC{sub 50} = 0.71 μM) and SKOV-3 (IC{sub 50} = 11.51 μM) were selected for further investigation. To determine the mechanism of DMU-212 cytotoxicity, its ability to induce apoptosis was examined. DMU-212 arrested cell cycle in the G2/M or G0/G1 phase which resulted in apoptosis of both cell lines. The expression level of 84 apoptosis-related genes was investigated. In SKOV-3 cells DMU-212 caused up-regulation of pro-apoptotic Bax, Apaf-1 and p53 genes, specific to intrinsic pathway of apoptosis, and a decrease in Bcl-2 and Bcl 2110 mRNA expressions. Conversely, in A-2780 cells an increased expression of pro-apoptotic genes Fas, FasL, TNF, TNFRSF10A, TNFRSF21, TNFRSF16 specific to extracellular mechanism of apoptosis was observed. There are no data published so far regarding the receptor mediated apoptosis induced by DMU-212. The activation of caspase-3/7 was correlated with decreased TRAF-1 and BIRC-2 expression level in A-2780 cells exposed to DMU-212. DMU-212 caused a decrease in CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mRNA levels in A-2780 by 50% and 75%, and in SKOV-3 cells by 15% and 45%, respectively. The protein expression was also reduced in both cell lines. It is noteworthy that the expression of CYP1B1 protein was entirely inhibited in A-2780 cells treated with DMU-212. It can be suggested that different CYP1B1 expression patterns in either ovarian cell line may affect their sensitivity to cytotoxic activity of DMU-212. -- Highlights: ► DMU-212 was the most cytotoxic among 12 O-methylated resveratrol analogues. ► DMU-212 arrested cell cycle at G2/M and G0/G1phase ► DMU-212 triggered mitochondria- and receptor‐mediated apoptosis. ► DMU-212 entirely inhibited CYP1B1 protein expression in A-2780 cells.

  13. Theaflavin-3, 3'-digallate induces apoptosis and G2 cell cycle arrest through the Akt/MDM2/p53 pathway in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer A2780/CP70 cells.

    PubMed

    Tu, Youying; Kim, Eunhye; Gao, Ying; Rankin, Gary O; Li, Bo; Chen, Yi Charlie

    2016-06-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological cancer among women worldwide. Adverse side effects and acquired resistance to conventional platinum based chemotherapy are major impediments in ovarian cancer treatment, and drive the development of more selective anticancer drugs that target cancer-specific defects. In this study, theaflavin-3, 3'-digallate (TF3), the major theaflavin monomer in black tea, exhibited a potent growth inhibitory effect on the cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer A2780/CP70 cells (IC50, 23.81 µM), and was less cytotoxic to a normal ovarian IOSE‑364 cells (IC50, 59.58 µM) than to the cancer cells. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that TF3 induced preferential apoptosis and G2 cell cycle arrest in A2780/CP70 cells with respect to IOSE‑364 cells. TF3 induced apoptosis through both the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways, and caused G2 cell cycle arrest via cyclin B1 in A2780/CP70 cells. The p53 protein played an important role in TF3-induced apoptosis and G2 cell cycle arrest. TF3 might upregulate the p53 expression via the Akt/MDM2 pathway. Our findings help elucidate the mechanisms by which TF3 may contribute to the prevention and treatment of platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. PMID:27082635

  14. Theaflavin-3, 3′-digallate induces apoptosis and G2 cell cycle arrest through the Akt/MDM2/p53 pathway in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer A2780/CP70 cells

    PubMed Central

    TU, YOUYING; KIM, EUNHYE; GAO, YING; RANKIN, GARY O.; LI, BO; CHEN, YI CHARLIE

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological cancer among women worldwide. Adverse side effects and acquired resistance to conventional platinum based chemotherapy are major impediments in ovarian cancer treatment, and drive the development of more selective anticancer drugs that target cancer-specific defects. In this study, theaflavin-3, 3′-digallate (TF3), the major theaflavin monomer in black tea, exhibited a potent growth inhibitory effect on the cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer A2780/CP70 cells (IC50, 23.81 μM), and was less cytotoxic to a normal ovarian IOSE-364 cells (IC50, 59.58 μM) than to the cancer cells. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that TF3 induced preferential apoptosis and G2 cell cycle arrest in A2780/CP70 cells with respect to IOSE-364 cells. TF3 induced apoptosis through both the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways, and caused G2 cell cycle arrest via cyclin B1 in A2780/CP70 cells. The p53 protein played an important role in TF3-induced apoptosis and G2 cell cycle arrest. TF3 might upregulate the p53 expression via the Akt/MDM2 pathway. Our findings help elucidate the mechanisms by which TF3 may contribute to the prevention and treatment of platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. PMID:27082635

  15. Effect of IL-6 and IL-8 on the expression of the complement activation inhibitors MAC-inhibitory protein and decay-accelerating factor in ovarian cancer A2780 cells

    PubMed Central

    Kapka-Skrzypczak, Lucyna; Popek, Sylwia; Sawicki, Krzysztof; Wolińska, Ewa; Czajka, Magdalena; Skrzypczak, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 on the expression of the membrane-bound complement inhibitors membrane attack complex-inhibitory protein (CD59) and decay-accelerating factor (CD55), in the human ovarian carcinoma A2780 cell line, which is a non-producing IL-6 cell line that does exhibit IL-6 responsiveness, due to the presence of IL-6 receptors. Extracellular levels of complement system inhibitors were evaluated by western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Cellular localization of CD55 and CD59 in the ovarian cancer cells was assessed by immunofluorescence. The detection of a soluble form of CD55 and CD59 released by the A2780 cells following stimulation with IL-6 and IL-8 was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The present data revealed that A2780 cells express CD55 and CD59 at the mRNA and protein level, but do not secrete these proteins to the culture medium. Results of western blotting demonstrated that the protein level of CD59 was regulated by IL-6 and IL-8 in a dose-dependent manner. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that the ovarian cancer A2780 cell line expresses the membrane bound form of CD55 protein. The present results indicate that CD55 and CD59 may affect the efficiency of complement-mediated immunotherapies. PMID:27446461

  16. Inhibition of A2780 Human Ovarian Carcinoma Cell Proliferation by a Rubus Component, Sanguiin H-6.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dahae; Ko, Hyeonseok; Kim, Young-Joo; Kim, Su-Nam; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Yamabe, Noriko; Kim, Ki Hyun; Kang, Ki Sung; Kim, Hyun Young; Shibamoto, Takayuki

    2016-02-01

    The effects of a red raspberry component, sanguiin H-6 (SH-6), on the induction of apoptosis and the related signaling pathways in A2780 human ovarian carcinoma cells were investigated. SH-6 caused an antiproliferative effect and a severe morphological change resembling that of apoptotic cell death but no effect on the cancer cell cycle arrest. In addition, SH-6 induced an early apoptotic effect and activation of caspases as well as the cleavage of PARP, which is a hallmark of apoptosis. The early apoptotic percentages of A2780 cells exposed to 20 and 40 μM SH-6 were 35.39 and 41.76, respectively. Also, SH-6 caused the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), especially p38, and the increase of truncated p15/BID. These results in the present study suggest that the apoptosis of A2780 human ovarian carcinoma cells by SH-6 is mediated by the MAPK p38 and a caspase-8-dependent BID cleavage pathway. PMID:26725849

  17. RNA Interference-Mediated Inhibition of Erythropoietin Receptor Expression Suppresses Tumor Growth and Invasiveness in A2780 Human Ovarian Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paragh, Gyorgy; Kumar, Suresh M.; Rakosy, Zsuzsa; Choi, Soek-Choel; Xu, Xiaowei; Acs, Geza

    2009-01-01

    Although recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEpo) has revolutionized the treatment of anemia, recent clinical trials suggested that rHuEpo use may be associated with decreased survival in cancer patients. Although the expression of erythropoietin (Epo) receptor (EpoR) has been demonstrated in various human cancers, the effect of exogenous Epo on the growth and therapy resistance of EpoR-bearing tumor cells is unclear at present. In the current study, we examined the hypothesis that EpoR may contribute to tumor growth independent of Epo in A2780 human ovarian carcinoma cells. A2780 human ovarian carcinoma cells showed high levels of EpoR expression, but lacked expression of Epo mRNA and biologically active Epo protein under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Exogenous Epo did not stimulate EpoR-mediated signaling, proliferation, invasiveness, or resistance to cytotoxic drugs in A2780 cells. In contrast, specific inhibition of EpoR expression using a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression plasmid resulted in markedly reduced proliferation and invasiveness in vitro. In addition, inhibition of EpoR expression led to abrogated in vivo ovarian cancer cell growth in a tumor xenograft system and resulted in decreased EpoR signaling. Our findings suggest that EpoR may be constitutively active in some cancer cells in the absence of Epo and provide the first evidence for a potential role of an Epo-independent, EpoR-mediated pathway in the growth of some human cancers. PMID:19264915

  18. Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Ovarian Cancer There are five main types of cancer that affect a woman’s reproductive organs: cervical, ovarian, uterine, ... rare fallopian tube cancer.) This fact sheet about ovarian cancer is part of the Centers for Disease Control ...

  19. Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... deaths than other female reproductive cancers. The sooner ovarian cancer is found and treated, the better your chance for recovery. But ovarian cancer is hard to detect early. Women with ovarian ...

  20. Modulation of Multidrug Resistance Protein 2 Efflux in the Cisplatin Resistance Human Ovarian Carcinoma Cells A2780/RCIS by Sesquiterpene Coumarins.

    PubMed

    Kasaian, Jamal; Mosaffa, Fatemeh; Behravan, Javad; Masullo, Milena; Piacente, Sonia; Iranshahi, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    Recent in vitro studies showed that sesquiterpene coumarins (SCs) can be used as chemosensitizers. In this study, 14 SCs were isolated and purified from roots of four Ferula species and their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods. The purified SCs were evaluated for multidrug resistance (MDR) reversal properties in A2780/RCIS cells (cisplatin-resistant derivatives of the human ovarian carcinoma cell line A2780P). Among the tested compounds, mogoltacin, mogoltadone, farnesiferol A, farnesiferol B, farnesiferol C, lehmferin, conferdione, and samarcandin showed significant MDR reversing effects. The combination of nontoxic concentrations of SCs (20 μM) with cisplatin enhanced cisplatin cytotoxicity on A2780/RCIS cells significantly. Flow cytometric efflux assay confirmed that the intracellular accumulation of 5-carboxyfluorescein diacetate (5-CFDA) was significantly increased in A2780/RCIS cells when treated with SCs. Our findings revealed that conferdione and samarcandin possessed the highest inhibitory effects on multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 pump efflux, and therefore, these compounds could be considered as lead scaffolds for further structure modifications. PMID:26503061

  1. Ovarian cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - ovaries ... Ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cancer among women. It causes more deaths than any other type of female reproductive organ cancer. The cause of ovarian cancer is unknown. Risk ...

  2. Ovarian cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of ovarian cancer Already been diagnosed with ovarian cancer to determine how well treatment is working Other tests that may be done include: Complete blood count and blood chemistry Pregnancy test (serum HCG) CT or MRI of ...

  3. OVARIAN CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kathleen R.; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Ovarian carcinomas are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms traditionally sub-classified based on type and degree of differentiation. Although current clinical management of ovarian carcinoma largely fails to take this heterogeneity into account, it is becoming evident that each major histological type has characteristic genetic defects that deregulate specific signaling pathways in the tumor cells. Moreover, within the most common histological types, the molecular pathogenesis of low-grade versus high-grade tumors appears to be largely distinct. Mouse models of ovarian carcinoma have been developed that recapitulate many of the morphological features, biological behavior, and gene expression patterns of selected subtypes of ovarian cancer. Such models will likely prove useful for studying ovarian cancer biology and for pre-clinical testing of molecularly targeted therapeutics, which may ultimately lead to better clinical outcomes for women with ovarian cancer. PMID:18842102

  4. The anti-tumor effect of cross-reacting material 197, an inhibitor of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor, in human resistant ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xiao-han; Deng, Suo; Li, Meng; Lu, Mei-song

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HB-EGF over-expression in A2780/Taxol, A2780/CDDP cells and the matched xenografts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CRM197 induces enhanced apoptosis in A2780/Taxol and A2780/CDDP cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CRM197 arrests A2780/Taxol and A2780/CDDP cells at G0/G1 phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CRM197 suppressed the A2780/Taxol and A2780/CDDP growth of xenografts. -- Abstract: Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) is a promising target for ovarian cancer therapy. Cross-reacting material 197 (CRM197), a specific HB-EGF inhibitor, has been proven to represent possible chemotherapeutic agent for ovarian cancer. However, the effect of CRM197 on the resistant ovarian carcinoma cells has not been sufficiently elucidated. Here, we found that HB-EGF was over-expressed in a paclitaxel-resistant human ovarian carcinoma cell line (A2780/Taxol) and a cisplatin-resistant cell line (A2780/CDDP), as well as the xenograft mouse tissue samples with these cells. To investigate the possible significance of the HB-EGF over-expression in A2780/Taxol and A2780/CDDP cells, we inhibited HB-EGF expression by CRM197 to investigate the effect of CRM197 treatment on these cells. We observed that CRM197 significantly induced anti-proliferative activity in a dose-dependent manner with the cell-cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase and enhanced apoptosis in A2780/Taxol and A2780/CDDP cells. The sensitive ovarian carcinoma parental cell line (A2780), A2780/Taxol and A2780/CDDP cells formed tumors in nude mice, and enhanced tumorigenicity was observed in drug-resistant tumors. Furthermore, we observed that CRM197 significantly suppressed the growth of drug-resistant ovarian cancer xenografts in vivo (p < 0.001). These results suggest that CRM197 as an HB-EGF-targeted agent has potent anti-tumor activity in paclitaxel- and cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer which over-express HB-EGF.

  5. Ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Matulonis, Ursula A; Sood, Anil K; Fallowfield, Lesley; Howitt, Brooke E; Sehouli, Jalid; Karlan, Beth Y

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is not a single disease and can be subdivided into at least five different histological subtypes that have different identifiable risk factors, cells of origin, molecular compositions, clinical features and treatments. Ovarian cancer is a global problem, is typically diagnosed at a late stage and has no effective screening strategy. Standard treatments for newly diagnosed cancer consist of cytoreductive surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. In recurrent cancer, chemotherapy, anti-angiogenic agents and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors are used, and immunological therapies are currently being tested. High-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) is the most commonly diagnosed form of ovarian cancer and at diagnosis is typically very responsive to platinum-based chemotherapy. However, in addition to the other histologies, HGSCs frequently relapse and become increasingly resistant to chemotherapy. Consequently, understanding the mechanisms underlying platinum resistance and finding ways to overcome them are active areas of study in ovarian cancer. Substantial progress has been made in identifying genes that are associated with a high risk of ovarian cancer (such as BRCA1 and BRCA2), as well as a precursor lesion of HGSC called serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma, which holds promise for identifying individuals at high risk of developing the disease and for developing prevention strategies. PMID:27558151

  6. Ovarian Cancer FAQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ovarian Cancer Patient Education FAQs Ovarian Cancer Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Ovarian Cancer FAQ096, April 2015 PDF Format Ovarian ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  7. What Is Ovarian Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the key statistics about ovarian cancer? What is ovarian cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... section . Other cancers that are similar to epithelial ovarian cancer Primary peritoneal carcinoma Primary peritoneal carcinoma (PPC) is ...

  8. ARHGAP10, downregulated in ovarian cancer, suppresses tumorigenicity of ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, N; Guo, J; Chen, L; Yang, W; Qu, X; Cheng, Z

    2016-01-01

    Rho GTPase-activating proteins (RhoGAPs) are implicated in the development and progression of ovarian cancer. ARHGAP10 is a member of RhoGAP proteins and inactivates Cdc42 by converting GTP-bound form to GDP-bound form. Here, we aimed to evaluate ARHGAP10 expression profile and functions in ovarian cancer. The decreased expression of ARHGAP10 was found in 77.3% (58/75) of ovarian cancer tissues, compared with their non-tumorous counterparts. Furthermore, overall survival in ovarian cancer patients with higher expression of ARHGAP10 was longer than those with lower expression. Ectopic expression of ARHGAP10 in two ovarian cancer cell lines with lower expression of ARHGAP10 (A2780 and HO-8910) dramatically suppressed cell proliferation in vitro. In nude mice, its stable overexpression significantly inhibited the tumorigenicity of A2780 cells. We further demonstrated that overexpression of ARHGAP10 significantly inhibited cell adhesion, migration and invasion, resulted in cell arrest in G1 phase of cell cycle and a significant increase of apoptosis. Moreover, ARHGAP10 interacted with Cdc42 and overexpression of ARHGAP10 inhibited the activity of Cdc42 in A2780 cells. Gene set enrichment analysis on The Cancer Genome Atlas dataset showed that KEGG cell cycle, replication and base excision repair (BER) pathways were correlatively with the ARHGAP10 expression, which was further confirmed in ovarian cancer cells by western blotting. Hence, ARHGAP10 may serve as a tumor suppressor through inactivating Cdc42, as well as inhibiting cell cycle, replication and BER pathways. Our data suggest an important role of ARHGAP10 in the molecular etiology of cancer and implicate the potential application of ARHGAP10 in cancer therapy. PMID:27010858

  9. NMDA receptors are expressed in human ovarian cancer tissues and human ovarian cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    North, William G; Liu, Fuli; Tian, Ruiyang; Abbasi, Hamza; Akerman, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    We have earlier demonstrated that breast cancer and small-cell lung cancer express functional NMDA receptors that can be targeted to promote cancer cell death. Human ovarian cancer tissues and human ovarian cancer cell lines (SKOV3, A2008, and A2780) have now been shown to also express NMDA-receptor subunit 1 (GluN1) and subunit 2B (GluN2B). Seventeen ovarian cancers in two arrays were screened by immunohistochemistry using polyclonal antibodies that recognize an extracellular moiety on GluN1 and on GluN2B. These specimens comprised malignant tissue with pathology diagnoses of serous papillary cystadenocarcinoma, endometrioid adenocarcinoma, and clear-cell carcinoma. Additionally, archival tissues defined as ovarian adenocarcinoma from ten patients treated at this institute were also evaluated. All of the cancerous tissues demonstrated positive staining patterns with the NMDA-receptor antibodies, while no staining was found for tumor-adjacent normal tissues or sections of normal ovarian tissue. Human ovarian adenocarcinoma cell lines (A2008, A2780, SKOV3) were demonstrated to express GluN1 by Western blotting, but displayed different levels of expression. Through immunocytochemistry utilizing GluN1 antibodies and imaging using a confocal microscope, we were able to demonstrate that GluN1 protein is expressed on the surface of these cells. In addition to these findings, GluN2B protein was demonstrated to be expressed using polyclonal antibodies against this protein. Treatment of all ovarian cell lines with antibodies against GluN1 was found to result in decreased cell viability (P<0.001), with decreases to 10%-25% that of untreated cells. Treatment of control HEK293 cells with various dilutions of GluN1 antibodies had no effect on cell viability. The GluN1 antagonist MK-801 (dizocilpine maleate) and the GluN2B antagonist ifenprodil, like antibodies, dramatically decreased the viability of A2780 ovarian tumor cells (P<0.01). Treatment of A2780 tumor xenografts with

  10. NMDA receptors are expressed in human ovarian cancer tissues and human ovarian cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    North, William G; Liu, Fuli; Tian, Ruiyang; Abbasi, Hamza; Akerman, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    We have earlier demonstrated that breast cancer and small-cell lung cancer express functional NMDA receptors that can be targeted to promote cancer cell death. Human ovarian cancer tissues and human ovarian cancer cell lines (SKOV3, A2008, and A2780) have now been shown to also express NMDA-receptor subunit 1 (GluN1) and subunit 2B (GluN2B). Seventeen ovarian cancers in two arrays were screened by immunohistochemistry using polyclonal antibodies that recognize an extracellular moiety on GluN1 and on GluN2B. These specimens comprised malignant tissue with pathology diagnoses of serous papillary cystadenocarcinoma, endometrioid adenocarcinoma, and clear-cell carcinoma. Additionally, archival tissues defined as ovarian adenocarcinoma from ten patients treated at this institute were also evaluated. All of the cancerous tissues demonstrated positive staining patterns with the NMDA-receptor antibodies, while no staining was found for tumor-adjacent normal tissues or sections of normal ovarian tissue. Human ovarian adenocarcinoma cell lines (A2008, A2780, SKOV3) were demonstrated to express GluN1 by Western blotting, but displayed different levels of expression. Through immunocytochemistry utilizing GluN1 antibodies and imaging using a confocal microscope, we were able to demonstrate that GluN1 protein is expressed on the surface of these cells. In addition to these findings, GluN2B protein was demonstrated to be expressed using polyclonal antibodies against this protein. Treatment of all ovarian cell lines with antibodies against GluN1 was found to result in decreased cell viability (P<0.001), with decreases to 10%–25% that of untreated cells. Treatment of control HEK293 cells with various dilutions of GluN1 antibodies had no effect on cell viability. The GluN1 antagonist MK-801 (dizocilpine maleate) and the GluN2B antagonist ifenprodil, like antibodies, dramatically decreased the viability of A2780 ovarian tumor cells (P<0.01). Treatment of A2780 tumor xenografts with

  11. Antiproliferation effect of Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) on human ovarian cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tai, Joseph; Cheung, Susan; Wu, Matthew; Hasman, David

    2012-03-15

    Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) is a popular culinary/medicinal herb. Recent studies have shown it has pharmacologic activities for cancer chemoprevention and therapy. This study evaluated the antiproliferation activity of rosemary extract (RE) against human ovarian cancer cells, and whether the extract and its three main active ingredients carnosol (CS), carnosic acid (CA) and rosmarinic acid (RA) can enhance the antiproliferation activity of cisplatin (CDDP). Our study showed that RE has significant antiproliferation activity on human ovarian cancer A2780 and its CDDP resistant daughter cell line A2780CP70, with IC(50) (50% inhibitory concentration) estimated at 1/1000 and 1/400 dilutions respectively. RE enhanced the antiproliferation effect with CDDP on both A2780 and A2780CP70 cells. A2780 cells were consistently more sensitive to CS, CA, and RA than A2780CP70 cells between 2.5 and 20μg/ml. CS and RA also showed synergistic antiproliferation effect with CDDP on A2780 cells at some concentrations. RE treated by ultrafiltration, dialysis, and removal of phenolics lost the antiproliferation activity suggested that the activity resides in phenolics with MW<1000Da. Apoptosis array study of A2780 cells treated with RE showed that the expression of a number of genes regulating apoptosis were modulated by the treatment. This study showed that RE inhibited the proliferation of ovarian cancer cell lines by affecting the cell cycle at multiple phases. It induced apoptosis by modifying the expression of multiple genes regulating apoptosis, and holds potential as an adjunct to cancer chemotherapy. PMID:22325591

  12. Migration and invasion is inhibited by silencing ROR1 and ROR2 in chemoresistant ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Henry, C E; Llamosas, E; Djordjevic, A; Hacker, N F; Ford, C E

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer survival remains poor despite recent advances in our understanding of genetic profiles. Unfortunately, the majority of ovarian cancer patients have recurrent disease after chemotherapy and lack other treatment options. Wnt signalling has been extensively implicated in cancer progression and chemoresistance. Therefore, we investigated the previously described Wnt receptors ROR1 and ROR2 as regulators of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in a clinically relevant cell line model. The parental A2780- and cisplatin-resistant A2780-cis cell lines were used as a model of ovarian cancer chemoresistance. Proliferation, adhesion, migration and invasion were measured after transient overexpression of ROR1 and ROR2 in the parental A2780 cell line, and silencing of ROR1 and ROR2 in the A2780-cis cell line. Here we show that ROR1 and ROR2 expression is increased in A2780-cis cells, alongside β-catenin-independent Wnt targets. Knockdown of ROR1 and ROR2 significantly inhibited cell migration and invasion and simultaneous knockdown of ROR1 and ROR2 significantly sensitised cells to cisplatin, whilereas ROR overexpression in the parental cell line increased cell invasion. Therefore, ROR1 and ROR2 have the potential as novel drug targets in metastatic and recurrent ovarian cancer patients. PMID:27239958

  13. EphA2 overexpression promotes ovarian cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chunhua; Shahzad, Mian M.K.; Wang, Hua; Landen, Charles N.; Kim, Seung W.; Allen, Julie; Nick, Alpa M.; Jennings, Nicholas; Kinch, Michael S.; Bar-Eli, Menashe; Sood, Anil K.

    2009-01-01

    Background Silencing EphA2 has been shown to result in anti-tumor efficacy. However, it is not known whether increasing EphA2 expression specifically results in increased tumor growth and progression. We examined the effects of stable EphA2 transfection into poorly invasive ovarian cancer cells with regard to in vitro invasive and in vivo metastatic potential. Results In low cell density, EphA2-overexpressing A2780 cells (A2780-EphA2) displayed less cell-cell contact, increased cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) attachment and anchorage-independent cell growth compared to empty vector controls. There was no significant effect on anchorage-dependent cell proliferation, migration or invasion. Increased expression of EphA2 promoted tumor growth and enhanced the metastatic potential in A2780-EphA2 human ovarian cancer xenografts. The overexpression of EphA2 resulted in enhanced microvessel density (MVD), but had no effect on tumor cell proliferation. Methods EphA2 gene was introduced into A2780 cells by retroviral infection. The effects of increased EphA2 expression were examined on cellular morphology, and anchorage-dependent and independent cell growth. Furthermore, the effect of EphA2 overexpression on metastatic ability was determined using an orthotopic nude mouse model of ovarian carcinoma. Conclusions EphA2 promotes tumor growth by enhancing cell-ECM adhesion, increasing anchorage-independent growth and promoting angiogenesis. PMID:18443431

  14. Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Informed Cancer Home What Are the Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Gynecologic cancer symptoms diaries Ovarian cancer may cause one or more of these signs ...

  15. Cellular Uptake, DNA Binding and Apoptosis Induction of Cytotoxic Trans-[PtCl2(N,N-dimethylamine)(Isopropylamine)] in A2780cisR Ovarian Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, José M.; Montero, Eva I.; Quiroga, Adoración G.; Fuertes, Miguel A; Alonso, Carlos

    2001-01-01

    Trans-[PtCl2(N,N-dimethylamine)(isopropylamine)] is a novel trans-platinum compound that shows cytotoxic activity in several cisplatin resistant cell lines. The aim of this paper was to analyse, by means of molecular cell biology techniques and total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF), the cytotoxic activity, the induction of apoptosis, the cellular uptake and the DNA binding of trans-[PtCl2(N,N-dimethylamine)(isopropylamine)] in the cisplatin resistant cell line A2780cisR. The results show that this drug is more cytotoxic and induces a higher amount of apoptotic cells than cisplatin in A2780cisR cells. However, the intracellular accumulation and extent of binding to DNA of trans-[PtCl2(N,N-dimethylamine)( isopropylamine)] is lower than that of cis-DDP. Moreover, trans-[PtCl2(N,N-dimethylamine)(isopropylaminae)] is partially inactivated by intracellular levels of glulathione. The result suggest that circumvention of ciplatin resistance by trans-[PtCl2(N,N-dimethylamine)(isopropylamine)] in A2780cisR cells might be related with the ability of this drug to induce apoptosis. PMID:18475973

  16. Ovarian Cancer Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... States, ovarian cancer is the eighth most common cancer and the fifth leading cause of cancer death. Around one in every 60 ... States, ovarian cancer is the eighth most common cancer and the fifth leading cause of cancer death. Are some women more at ...

  17. Down-regulation of telomerase activity by anticancer drugs in human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kunifuji, Yasumasa; Gotoh, Sadao; Abe, Tetsuya; Miura, Masayoshi; Karasaki, Yuji

    2002-07-01

    Maintenance of telomere length is crucial for survival of cells. Telomerase, an enzyme that is responsible for elongation of shortened telomeres, is active in human germ cells as well as most tumor tissues and experimentally immortalized cells. In contrast, most mature somatic cells in human tissues express undetectable or low telomerase activity, implying the existence of a stringent and negative regulatory mechanism. In this study we report the effects of anticancer drugs on telomerase activity in human cancer cells. In assaying for telomerase activity, we basically followed the original TRAP assay system, but with some modifications. A down-regulation of telomerase activity was found when cells of a human ovarian cancer cell line, A2780, were treated with;cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (CDDP; cisplatin). However, down-regulation of telomerase activity was not found in cells of a cisplatin-resistant cell line, A2780CP, treated with cisplatin. On the other hand, telomerase activity in both the cell lines A2780 and A2780CP was reduced when A2780 or A2780CP was treated with adriamycin, an anthracycline antibiotic having a broad spectrum of antineoplastic activity. The different effects on the telomerase activity of the two types of anticancer drugs may be due the distinct chemical functions of these drugs. The present results may indicate a positive relationship between anticancer effects and down-regulation of telomerase activity by anticancer drugs. PMID:12172504

  18. Down-regulation of Ras-related Protein Rab 5C-dependent Endocytosis and Glycolysis in Cisplatin-resistant Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines*

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lixu; Huo, Yi; Zheng, Zhiguo; Jiang, Xiaoyong; Deng, Haiyun; Chen, Yuling; Lian, Qingquan; Ge, Renshan; Deng, Haiteng

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance poses a major challenge to ovarian cancer treatment. Understanding mechanisms of drug resistance is important for finding new therapeutic targets. In the present work, a cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell line A2780-DR was established with a resistance index of 6.64. The cellular accumulation of cisplatin was significantly reduced in A2780-DR cells as compared with A2780 cells consistent with the general character of drug resistance. Quantitative proteomic analysis identified 340 differentially expressed proteins between A2780 and A2780-DR cells, which involve in diverse cellular processes, including metabolic process, cellular component biogenesis, cellular processes, and stress responses. Expression levels of Ras-related proteins Rab 5C and Rab 11B in A2780-DR cells were lower than those in A2780 cells as confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR and Western blotting. The short hairpin (sh)RNA-mediated knockdown of Rab 5C in A2780 cells resulted in markedly increased resistance to cisplatin whereas overexpression of Rab 5C in A2780-DR cells increases sensitivity to cisplatin, demonstrating that Rab 5C-dependent endocytosis plays an important role in cisplatin resistance. Our results also showed that expressions of glycolytic enzymes pyruvate kinase, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, lactate dehydrogenase, and phosphoglycerate kinase 1 were down-regulated in drug resistant cells, indicating drug resistance in ovarian cancer is directly associated with a decrease in glycolysis. Furthermore, it was found that glutathione reductase were up-regulated in A2780-DR, whereas vimentin, HSP90, and Annexin A1 and A2 were down-regulated. Taken together, our results suggest that drug resistance in ovarian cancer cell line A2780 is caused by multifactorial traits, including the down-regulation of Rab 5C-dependent endocytosis of cisplatin, glycolytic enzymes, and vimentin, and up-regulation of antioxidant proteins, suggesting Rab 5

  19. Anticancer effect and mechanism of polymer micelle-encapsulated quercetin on ovarian cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang; Wang, Bilan; Wei, Xiawei; Men, Ke; Zheng, Fengjin; Zhou, Yingfeng; Zheng, Yu; Gou, Maling; Huang, Meijuan; Guo, Gang; Huang, Ning; Qian, Zhiyong; Wei, Yuquan

    2012-10-01

    Encapsulation of hydrophobic agents in polymer micelles can improve the water solubility of cargos, contributing to develop novel drugs. Quercetin (QU) is a hydrophobic agent with potential anticancer activity. In this work, we encapsulated QU into biodegradable monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone) (MPEG-PCL) micelles and tried to provide proof-of-principle for treating ovarian cancer with this nano-formulation of quercetin. These QU loaded MPEG-PCL (QU/MPEG-PCL) micelles with drug loading of 6.9% had a mean particle size of 36 nm, rendering the complete dispersion of quercetin in water. QU inhibited the growth of A2780S ovarian cancer cells on a dose dependent manner in vitro. Intravenous administration of QU/MPEG-PCL micelles significantly suppressed the growth of established xenograft A2780S ovarian tumors through causing cancer cell apoptosis and inhibiting angiogenesis in vivo. Furthermore, the anticancer activity of quercetin on ovarian cancer cells was studied in vitro. Quercetin treatment induced the apoptosis of A2780S cells associated with activating caspase-3 and caspase-9. MCL-1 downregulation, Bcl-2 downregulation, Bax upregulation and mitochondrial transmembrane potential change were observed, suggesting that quercetin may induce apoptosis of A2780S cells through the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Otherwise, quercetin treatment decreased phosphorylated p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphorylated Akt, contributing to inhibition of A2780S cell proliferation. Our data suggested that QU/MPEG-PCL micelles were a novel nano-formulation of quercetin with a potential clinical application in ovarian cancer therapy.

  20. Inhibition of epithelial ovarian cancer by Minnelide, a water-soluble pro-drug☆

    PubMed Central

    Rivard, Colleen; Geller, Melissa; Schnettler, Erica; Saluja, Manju; Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; Saluja, Ashok; Ramakrishnan, Sundaram

    2015-01-01

    Objective Minnelide is a water-soluble pro-drug of triptolide, a natural product. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Minnelide on ovarian cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. Methods The effect of Minnelide on ovarian cancer cell proliferation was determined by real time electrical impedance measurements. Multiple mouse models with C200 and A2780 epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines were used to assess the efficacy of Minnelide in inhibiting ovarian cancer growth. Results Minnelide decreased cell viability of both platinum sensitive and resistant epithelial ovarian cancer cells in vitro. Minnelide with carboplatin showed additive effects in vitro. Minnelide monotherapy increased the survival of mice bearing established ovarian tumors. Minnelide, in combination with carboplatin and paclitaxel, improved overall survival of mice. Conclusions Minnelide is a promising pro-drug for the treatment of ovarian cancer, especially when combined with standard chemotherapy. PMID:25172764

  1. MiR181c inhibits ovarian cancer metastasis and progression by targeting PRKCD expression

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Lijuan; Wang, Li; Li, Fengxia; Gao, Xihai; Wei, Xuegong; Liu, Zhihui

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate many important cancer related gene expression in the posttranscriptional process. Dysregulated expression of miRNAs has been observed in numerous human cancers including ovarian cancer. In this study, we found that the expression of the miR-181c was significantly decreased in ovarian cancer tissue and in tissues with lymph node metastasis when compared with their control samples, respectively. Moreover, among pathological stages, the expression of miR-181c was significantly decreased in the tissues with IV stage compared with other stages. In vitro, miR-181c significantly inhibited the proliferation, metastasis of A2780 cell line, and induced G1 phase arrest. Through bioinformatics prediction, protein kinase C delta (PRKCD) was identified as a target gene of miR-181c. Western blot results showed that PRKCD was increased in ovarian cancer tissue, in tissues with lymph node metastasis and IV stage of ovarian cancer pathological samples. After knocking down PRKCD, the cell cycle of A2780 cells was also arrested in G1 phase. The proliferation and the metastasis of A2780 cells were reduced. The dual luciferase reporter experiments showed that miR-181c regulated the expression of PRKCD by combining with its 3’UTR. These results indicate that miR-181c inhibits ovarian cancer metastasis and progression by targeting PRKCD expression. PMID:26629004

  2. Downregulation of BC200 in ovarian cancer contributes to cancer cell proliferation and chemoresistance to carboplatin

    PubMed Central

    WU, DI; WANG, TIANZHEN; REN, CHENGCHENG; LIU, LEI; KONG, DAN; JIN, XIAOMING; LI, XIAOBO; ZHANG, GUANGMEI

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) serve an important role in carcinogenesis. BC200 is a lncRNA that is reportedly associated with ovarian cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate this potential association between BC200 and ovarian cancer, and to subsequently analyze the biological function of BC200 in the disease. BC200 expression was compared in ovarian cancer tissue and normal ovarian tissue samples through the use of quantitative polymerase chain reaction. To allow the biological function of BC200 in ovarian cancer to be analyzed, small interfering RNA was used to knock down the expression of BC200 in SKOV3 and A2780 ovarian cancer cells. The proliferative, invasive and migratory abilities of the cells were identified by means of cell counting kits and Transwell assays. Carboplatin was also used to treat the ovarian cancer cells, and a luminescent cell viability assay was subsequently used to detect the sensitivity of the cells to the carboplatin. The results demonstrated that BC200 expression was reduced in ovarian cancer compared with normal ovarian tissue samples. In the SKOV3 and A2780 cells, BC200 exerted no effect on invasive or migratory ability, however, the inhibition of BC200 was demonstrated to promote cell proliferation. Additionally, it was observed that carboplatin induced BC200 expression in the cell lines, and that the inhibition of BC200 decreased the sensitivity of the cells to the drug. BC200 is therefore likely to have a tumor suppressive function in ovarian cancer by affecting cell proliferation. Furthermore, BC200 appears to serve a role in the mediation of carboplatin-induced ovarian cancer cell death. PMID:26893717

  3. FOXP1 functions as an oncogene in promoting cancer stem cell-like characteristics in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Jung; Seo, Eun Jin; Kim, Dae Kyoung; Lee, Su In; Kwon, Yang Woo; Jang, Il Ho; Kim, Ki-Hyung; Suh, Dong-Soo; Kim, Jae Ho

    2016-01-19

    Ovarian cancer has the highest mortality rate of all gynecological cancers with a high recurrence rate. It is important to understand the nature of recurring cancer cells to terminally eliminate ovarian cancer. The winged helix transcription factor Forkhead box P1 (FOXP1) has been reported to function as either oncogene or tumor-suppressor in various cancers. In the current study, we show that FOXP1 promotes cancer stem cell-like characteristics in ovarian cancer cells. Knockdown of FOXP1 expression in A2780 or SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells decreased spheroid formation, expression of stemness-related genes and epithelial to mesenchymal transition-related genes, cell migration, and resistance to Paclitaxel or Cisplatin treatment, whereas overexpression of FOXP1 in A2780 or SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells increased spheroid formation, expression of stemness-related genes and epithelial to mesenchymal transition-related genes, cell migration, and resistance to Paclitaxel or Cisplatin treatment. In addition, overexpression of FOXP1 increased promoter activity of ABCG2, OCT4, NANOG, and SOX2, among which the increases in ABCG2, OCT4, and SOX2 promoter activity were dependent on the presence of FOXP1-binding site. In xenotransplantation of A2780 ovarian cancer cells into nude mice, knockdown of FOXP1 expression significantly decreased tumor size. These results strongly suggest FOXP1 functions as an oncogene by promoting cancer stem cell-like characteristics in ovarian cancer cells. Targeting FOXP1 may provide a novel therapeutic opportunity for developing a relapse-free treatment for ovarian cancer patients. PMID:26654944

  4. Claudin and ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Chinmoy K.; Mukhopadhyay, Ashis

    2010-01-01

    Claudins are a family of proteins and the most important component of the tight junction. They constitute a paracellular barrier that controls the flow of molecules in the intercellular space of an epithelium. Although it seems that claudin should be down regulated in cancer cell, some claudins are, in fact highly elevated in various human cancers, including ovarian cancer. Whereas the functional significance of claudin overexpression in ovarian carcinoma is unclear, these proteins are important for migration, invasion, and survival of ovarian cancer cells. They clearly represent a general pathway in tumorigenesis, are a novel marker for ovarian cancer and may become a target for therapy or diagnosis of this disease. PMID:24591894

  5. Claudin and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Bose, Chinmoy K; Mukhopadhyay, Ashis

    2010-01-01

    Claudins are a family of proteins and the most important component of the tight junction. They constitute a paracellular barrier that controls the flow of molecules in the intercellular space of an epithelium. Although it seems that claudin should be down regulated in cancer cell, some claudins are, in fact highly elevated in various human cancers, including ovarian cancer. Whereas the functional significance of claudin overexpression in ovarian carcinoma is unclear, these proteins are important for migration, invasion, and survival of ovarian cancer cells. They clearly represent a general pathway in tumorigenesis, are a novel marker for ovarian cancer and may become a target for therapy or diagnosis of this disease. PMID:24591894

  6. Ovarian Cancer Stage IV

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage IV Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1200x1335 View Download Large: 2400x2670 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage IV Description: Drawing of stage IV shows ...

  7. Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIC

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIC Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1530x1350 View Download Large: 3060x2700 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIC Description: Drawing of stage IIIC shows ...

  8. Ovarian Cancer Stage II

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage II Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1650x675 View Download Large: 3300x1350 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage II Description: Three-panel drawing of stage ...

  9. Ovarian Cancer Stage I

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage I Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1650x675 View Download Large: 3300x1350 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage I Description: Three-panel drawing of stage ...

  10. Targeting Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Cancer Stem Cells in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landen, Charles N.; Goodman, Blake; Katre, Ashwini A.; Steg, Adam D.; Nick, Alpa M.; Stone, Rebecca L.; Miller, Lance D.; Mejia, Pablo Vivas; Jennings, Nicolas B.; Gershenson, David M.; Bast, Robert C.; Coleman, Robert L.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Sood, Anil K.

    2010-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1A1) expression characterizes a subpopulation of cells with tumor initiating or cancer stem cell properties in several malignancies. Our goal was to characterize the phenotype of ALDH1A1-positive ovarian cancer cells and examine the biological effects of ALDH1A1 gene silencing. In our analysis of multiple ovarian cancer cell lines, we found that ALDH1A1 expression and activity was significantly higher in taxane and platinum-resistant cell lines. In patient samples, 72.9% of ovarian cancers had ALDH1A1 expression, in whom the percent of ALDH1A1-positive cells correlated negatively with progression-free survival (6.05 v 13.81 months, p<0.035). Subpopulations of A2780cp20 cells with ALDH1A1 activity were isolated for orthotopic tumor initiating studies, where tumorigenicity was approximately 50-fold higher with ALDH1A1-positive cells. Interestingly, tumors derived from ALDH1A1-positive cells gave rise to both ALDH1A1-positive and ALDH1A1-negative populations, but ALDH1A1-negative cells could not generate ALDH1A1-positive cells. In an in vivo orthotopic mouse model of ovarian cancer, ALDH1A1 silencing using nanoliposomal siRNA sensitized both taxane- and platinum-resistant cell lines to chemotherapy, significantly reducing tumor growth in mice compared to chemotherapy alone (a 74–90% reduction, p<0.015). These data demonstrate that the ALDH1A1 subpopulation is associated with chemoresistance and outcome in ovarian cancer patients, and targeting ALDH1A1 sensitizes resistant cells to chemotherapy. ALDH1A1-positive cells have enhanced, but not absolute, tumorigenicity, but do have differentiation capacity lacking in ALDH1A1-negative cells. This enzyme may be important for identification and targeting of chemoresistant cell populations in ovarian cancer. PMID:20889728

  11. Can Ovarian Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer Can ovarian cancer be found early? About 20% of ovarian cancers ... cancer in its earliest stage. Ways to find ovarian cancer early Regular women's health exams During a pelvic ...

  12. Epithelial ovarian cancer: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Arpita; Xu, Jingyao; Aysola, Kartik; Qin, Yunlong; Okoli, Chika; Hariprasad, Ravipati; Chinemerem, Ugorji; Gates, Candace; Reddy, Avinash; Danner, Omar; Franklin, Geary; Ngozi, Anachebe; Cantuaria, Guilherme; Singh, Karan; Grizzle, William; Landen, Charles; Partridge, Edward E; Rice, Valerie Montgomery; Reddy, E Shyam P; Rao, Veena N

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the second most common gynecological cancer and the leading cause of death in the United States. In this article we review the diagnosis and current management of epithelial ovarian cancer which accounts for over 95 percent of the ovarian malignancies. We will present various theories about the potential origin of ovarian malignancies. We will discuss the genetic anomalies and syndromes that may cause ovarian cancers with emphasis on Breast cancer type 1/2 mutations. The pathology and pathogenesis of ovarian carcinoma will also be presented. Lastly, we provide a comprehensive overview of treatment strategies and staging of ovarian cancer, conclusions and future directions. PMID:25525571

  13. RNAi-mediated knockdown of the CLN3 gene inhibits proliferation and promotes apoptosis in drug-resistant ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    MAO, DONGWEI; CHE, JIANHUA; HAN, SHIYU; ZHAO, HONGHUI; ZHU, YUMEI; ZHU, HONG

    2015-01-01

    CLN3 is a recently identified anti-apoptotic gene, which has been demonstrated to be highly expressed in a diverse range of cancer cell lines, including ovarian cancer. In the present study, RNA interference, mediated by a lentivirus expressing CLN3 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) was utilized to knockdown the expression of CLN3 in the A2780 human ovarian cancer cell line, and its cisplatin-resistant and carboplatin-resistant sublines, A2780/DDP and A2780/CBP cells. It was revealed that the mRNA and protein expression levels of CLN3 were significantly reduced in the CLN3-specific shRNA-transduced cells, compared with the untransduced and control shRNA-transduced cells. In addition, specific knockdown of CLN3 in these cells inhibited cell proliferation and led to cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase, with eventual apoptosis. CLN3 knockdown caused increases in the levels of Bax, FAX, cleaved-caspase 3, cleaved-caspase 8 and cleaved-RARP, but decreased the level of Bcl-2. Finally, it was observed that CLN3 depletion markedly reduced the half maximum inhibitory concentration in the A2780/DDP and A2780/CBP cells. Taken together, these data suggested that CLN3 is involved in tumorigenesis and drug resistance in ovarian cancer, and may serve as a promising therapeutic target for its treatment. PMID:26299671

  14. Crucial role of HMGA1 in the self-renewal and drug resistance of ovarian cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Kyoung; Seo, Eun Jin; Choi, Eun J; Lee, Su In; Kwon, Yang Woo; Jang, Il Ho; Kim, Seung-Chul; Kim, Ki-Hyung; Suh, Dong-Soo; Seong-Jang, Kim; Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Jae Ho

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are a subpopulation of cancer cells characterized by self-renewal ability, tumorigenesis and drug resistance. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of HMGA1, a chromatin remodeling factor abundantly expressed in many different cancers, in the regulation of cancer stem cells in ovarian cancer. Spheroid-forming cancer stem cells were isolated from A2780, SKOV3 and PA1 ovarian cancer cells by three-dimensional spheroid culture. Elevated expression of HMGA1 was observed in spheroid cells along with increased expression of stemness-related genes, such as SOX2, KLF4, ALDH, ABCB1 and ABCG2. Furthermore, spheroid A2780 cells, compared with adherent cells, showed higher resistance to chemotherapeutic agents such as paclitaxel and doxorubicin. HMGA1 knockdown in spheroid cells reduced the proliferative advantage and spheroid-forming efficiency of the cells and the expression of stemness-related genes. HMGA1 overexpression in adherent A2780 cells increased cancer stem cell properties, including proliferation, spheroid-forming efficiency and the expression of stemness-related genes. In addition, HMGA1 regulated ABCG2 promoter activity through HMGA1-binding sites. Knockdown of HMGA1 in spheroid cells reduced resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, whereas the overexpression of HMGA1 in adherent ovarian cancer cells increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents in vitro. Furthermore, HMGA1-overexpressing A2780 cells showed a significant survival advantage after chemotherapeutic agent treatment in a xenograft tumorigenicity assay. Together, our results provide novel insights regarding the critical role of HMGA1 in the regulation of the cancer stem cell characteristics of ovarian cancer cells, thus suggesting that HMGA1 may be an important target in the development of therapeutics for ovarian cancer patients. PMID:27561949

  15. Crucial role of HMGA1 in the self-renewal and drug resistance of ovarian cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Kyoung; Seo, Eun Jin; Choi, Eun J; Lee, Su In; Kwon, Yang Woo; Jang, Il Ho; Kim, Seung-Chul; Kim, Ki-Hyung; Suh, Dong-Soo; Seong-Jang, Kim; Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Jae Ho

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are a subpopulation of cancer cells characterized by self-renewal ability, tumorigenesis and drug resistance. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of HMGA1, a chromatin remodeling factor abundantly expressed in many different cancers, in the regulation of cancer stem cells in ovarian cancer. Spheroid-forming cancer stem cells were isolated from A2780, SKOV3 and PA1 ovarian cancer cells by three-dimensional spheroid culture. Elevated expression of HMGA1 was observed in spheroid cells along with increased expression of stemness-related genes, such as SOX2, KLF4, ALDH, ABCB1 and ABCG2. Furthermore, spheroid A2780 cells, compared with adherent cells, showed higher resistance to chemotherapeutic agents such as paclitaxel and doxorubicin. HMGA1 knockdown in spheroid cells reduced the proliferative advantage and spheroid-forming efficiency of the cells and the expression of stemness-related genes. HMGA1 overexpression in adherent A2780 cells increased cancer stem cell properties, including proliferation, spheroid-forming efficiency and the expression of stemness-related genes. In addition, HMGA1 regulated ABCG2 promoter activity through HMGA1-binding sites. Knockdown of HMGA1 in spheroid cells reduced resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, whereas the overexpression of HMGA1 in adherent ovarian cancer cells increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents in vitro. Furthermore, HMGA1-overexpressing A2780 cells showed a significant survival advantage after chemotherapeutic agent treatment in a xenograft tumorigenicity assay. Together, our results provide novel insights regarding the critical role of HMGA1 in the regulation of the cancer stem cell characteristics of ovarian cancer cells, thus suggesting that HMGA1 may be an important target in the development of therapeutics for ovarian cancer patients. PMID:27561949

  16. Ovarian Cancer Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 22,280 % of All New Cancer Cases 1.3% Estimated Deaths in 2016 14,240 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 195,767 women living with ovarian cancer in ...

  17. Proteomic dataset for altered glycoprotein expression upon GALNT3 knockdown in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sheta, Razan; Roux-Dalvai, Florence; Woo, Christina M; Fournier, Frédéric; Bourassa, Sylvie; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Droit, Arnaud; Bachvarov, Dimcho

    2016-09-01

    This article contains raw and processed data related to research published in "Role of the polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 3 in ovarian cancer progression: possible implications in abnormal mucin O-glycosylation" [1]. The data presented here was obtained with the application of a bioorthogonal chemical reporter strategy analyzing differential glycoprotein expression following the knock-down (KD) of the GALNT3 gene in the epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cell line A2780s. LC-MS/MS mass spectrometry analysis was then performed and the processed data related to the identified glycoproteins show that several hundred proteins are differentially expressed between control and GALNT3 KD A2780s cells. The obtained data also uncover numerous novel glycoproteins; some of which could represent new potential EOC biomarkers and/or therapeutic targets. PMID:27331112

  18. National Ovarian Cancer Coalition

    MedlinePlus

    ... ovarian cancer Read More View More News Upcoming Events Fabric Extravaganza! September 09, 2016 @ 12:00PM Hosted ... Roxy and Dukes Roadhouse View All Our Upcoming Events Latest from the Blog: Hailey's Story How her ...

  19. Overexpression of long non-coding RNA PVT1 in ovarian cancer cells promotes cisplatin resistance by regulating apoptotic pathways.

    PubMed

    Liu, Enling; Liu, Zheng; Zhou, Yuxiu; Mi, Ruoran; Wang, Dehua

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Cisplatin is a very effective cancer chemotherapy drug, but cisplatin resistance is a crucial problem of therapy failure. Overexpression of PVT1 has been demonstrated in ovarian cancer. The mRNA level of PVT1 in ovarian cancer tissues of cisplatin-resistant patients and cisplatin-sensitive patients, cisplatin-resistant cells SKOV-3/DDP and A2780/DDP, cisplatin-sensitive cells SKOV-3 and A2780 were determined by qRT-PCR. The influence of the knockdown or overexpression of PVT1 on cisplatin resistance was measured by measuring the cytotoxicity of cisplatin and the apoptotic rate of ovarian cancer cells was detected by CCK-8 assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The mRNA levels and protein expression of TGF-β1, Smad4, p-Smad4 and Caspase-3 in apoptotic pathways were determined. The mRNA level of PVT1 was significantly higher in ovarian cancer tissues of cisplatin-resistant patients and cisplatin-resistant cells. SKOV-3/DDP and A2780/DDP cell viability and the percentage of apoptotic cells after transfection with PVT-1 siRNA and treated with cisplatin was markedly lower and higher than the control, respectively. Moreover, the overexpression of PVT1 exhibited the anti-apoptotic property in SKOV-3 and A2780 cells after transfection with LV-PVT1-GFP and treated with cisplatin. The mRNA levels and protein expression of TGF-β1, p-Smad4 and Caspase-3 were much higher in cisplatin-resistant cells transfected with siPVT1. Overexpression of LncRNA PVT1 in ovarian cancer promotes cisplatin resistance by regulating apoptotic pathways. PMID:26884974

  20. Anti-proliferative activity and cell cycle arrest induced by evodiamine on paclitaxel-sensitive and -resistant human ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zhang-Feng; Tan, Wen; Wang, Sheng-Peng; Qiang, Wen-An; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Chemo-resistance is the main factor for poor prognosis in human ovarian epithelial cancer. Active constituents derived from Chinese medicine with anti-cancer potential might circumvent this obstacle. In our present study, evodiamine (EVO) derived from Evodia rutaecarpa (Juss.) Benth suppressed the proliferation of human epithelial ovarian cancer, A2780 and the related paclitaxel-resistant cell lines and did not cause cytotoxicity, as confirmed by the significant decline of clone formation and the representative alterations of CFDA-SE fluorescence. Meanwhile, EVO induced cell cycle arrest in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This disturbance might be mediated by the cooperation of Cyclin B1 and Cdc2, including the up-regulation of Cyclin B1, p27, and p21, and activation failure of Cdc2 and pRb. MAPK signaling pathway regulation also assisted in this process. Furthermore, chemo-sensitivity potential was enhanced as indicated in A2780/PTXR cells by the down-regulation of MDR-1 expression, accompanied by MDR-1 function suppression. Taken together, we confirmed initially that EVO exerted an anti-proliferative effect on human epithelial ovarian cancer cells, A2780/WT and A2780/PTXR, induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest, and improved chemo-resistance. Overall, we found that EVO significantly suppressed malignant proliferation in human epithelial ovarian cancer, thus proving to be a potential anti-cancer agent in the future. PMID:26553648

  1. Ixabepilone and Liposomal Doxorubicin in Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-11

    Fallopian Tube Cancer; Female Reproductive Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  2. Immunotherapy in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mantia-Smaldone, Gina M.; Corr, Bradley; Chu, Christina S.

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most deadly gynecologic malignancy, with more than 15,000 deaths anticipated in 2012.1 While approximately 80% of patients will respond to frontline chemotherapy, more than 60% of patients will experience disease recurrence and only 44% will be alive at 5 years.1,2 Host anti-tumor immune responses are associated with a significant improvement in overall survival for women with ovarian cancer.3,4 By bolstering these responses, it may therefore be possible to significantly influence the prognosis of women with this lethal disease. In this review, we will focus on innovative immune-based strategies which are currently being investigated in the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:22906947

  3. Candidate DNA methylation drivers of acquired cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer identified by methylome and expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Zeller, C; Dai, W; Steele, N L; Siddiq, A; Walley, A J; Wilhelm-Benartzi, C S M; Rizzo, S; van der Zee, A; Plumb, J A; Brown, R

    2012-10-18

    Multiple DNA methylation changes in the cancer methylome are associated with the acquisition of drug resistance; however it remains uncertain how many represent critical DNA methylation drivers of chemoresistance. Using isogenic, cisplatin-sensitive/resistant ovarian cancer cell lines and inducing resensitizaton with demethylating agents, we aimed to identify consistent methylation and expression changes associated with chemoresistance. Using genome-wide DNA methylation profiling across 27 578 CpG sites, we identified loci at 4092 genes becoming hypermethylated in chemoresistant A2780/cp70 compared with the parental-sensitive A2780 cell line. Hypermethylation at gene promoter regions is often associated with transcriptional silencing; however, expression of only 245 of these hypermethylated genes becomes downregulated in A2780/cp70 as measured by microarray expression profiling. Treatment of A2780/cp70 with the demethylating agent 2-deoxy-5'-azacytidine induces resensitization to cisplatin and re-expression of 41 of the downregulated genes. A total of 13/41 genes were consistently hypermethylated in further independent cisplatin-resistant A2780 cell derivatives. CpG sites at 9 of the 13 genes (ARHGDIB, ARMCX2, COL1A, FLNA, FLNC, MEST, MLH1, NTS and PSMB9) acquired methylation in ovarian tumours at relapse following chemotherapy or chemoresistant cell lines derived at the time of patient relapse. Furthermore, 5/13 genes (ARMCX2, COL1A1, MDK, MEST and MLH1) acquired methylation in drug-resistant ovarian cancer-sustaining (side population) cells. MLH1 has a direct role in conferring cisplatin sensitivity when reintroduced into cells in vitro. This combined genomics approach has identified further potential key drivers of chemoresistance whose expression is silenced by DNA methylation that should be further evaluated as clinical biomarkers of drug resistance. PMID:22249249

  4. Dasatinib enhances antitumor activity of paclitaxel in ovarian cancer through Src signaling

    PubMed Central

    XIAO, JUAN; XU, MANMAN; HOU, TENG; HUANG, YONGWEN; YANG, CHENLU; LI, JUNDONG

    2015-01-01

    Src family tyrosine kinase (SFK) activation is associated with ovarian cancer progression. Therefore, SFKs are targets for the development of potential treatments of ovarian cancer. Dasatinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that targets SFK activity, and is used for the treatment of B cell and Abelson lymphomas. At the present time, the potential effect of dasatinib on ovarian cancer is not clear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antitumor activity of dasatinib, alone and in combination with paclitaxel, in ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, the expression of Src and phospho-Src-Y416 (p-Src) was measured in six ovarian cancer cell lines using western blotting and immunohistochemistry. In addition, cell viability and apoptosis were measured using an MTT assay and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate staining. An ovarian cancer murine xenograft model was established, in order to evaluate the antitumor effect of dasatinib alone and in combination with paclitaxel in ovarian cancer. High levels of p-Src protein expression were observed in all cell lines, as compared with healthy cells, which indicated activation of the Src signaling pathway. p-Src expression increased in ovarian cancer cells following paclitaxel treatment. Dasatinib treatment demonstrated anti-ovarian cancer properties, by downregulating p-Src expression and by inducing cancer cell apoptosis. Combined treatment with dasatinib and paclitaxel markedly inhibited proliferation and promoted apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells, compared with control cells. Combined dasatinib and paclitaxel treatment exhibited antitumor activities in vivo and in vitro (combination indices, 0.25–0.93 and 0.31–0.75; and tumor growth inhibitory rates, 76.7% and 58.5%, in A2780 and HO8910 cell lines, respectively), compared with paclitaxel treatment alone. Dasatinib monotherapy demonstrated anti-ovarian cancer activities. The effects of dasatinib and paclitaxel treatments on ovarian

  5. Synthesis of tris(quinoline)monochloroplatinum(II) Chloride and its Activity Alone and in Combination with Capsaicin and Curcumin in Human Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Arzuman, Laila; Beale, Philip; Yu, Jun Q; Huq, Fazlul

    2016-06-01

    Currently used platinum drugs fail to provide long-term cure for ovarian cancer mainly because of acquired drug resistance. With the idea that the difference may translate into an altered spectrum of activity, monofunctional planaramineplatinum(II) complex tris(quinoline)monochloro-platinum chloride (coded as LH5) was synthesized and investigated for its activity against human ovarian A2780, cisplatin-resistant A2780 (A2780(cisR)) and ZD0473-resistnat A2780 (A2780(ZD0473R)) cancer cell lines alone and in combination with the phytochemicals capsaicin (Caps) and curcumin (Cur) as a function of concentration and sequence of administration. Cell viability was quantified using the MTT reduction assay, while combination was used as a quantitative measure of the combined drug action. LH5 is found to be more active than cisplatin (CS) against both resistant cell lines. Combination of LH5 with capsaicin showed synergism in all three cell lines, with the bolus being most synergistic. Lack of association between the levels of platinum accumulation and platinum-DNA with cytotoxicity can be seen to indicate that binding with DNA may not be the main determinant of activity of LH5. Greater activity of LH5 compared to cisplatin, especially against the resistant cell lines, indicates that the compound may have the potential for development as a novel anticancer drug and that its combination with phytochemicals can serve to further enhance drug efficacy. PMID:27272792

  6. Denileukin Diftitox Used in Treating Patients With Advanced Refractory Ovarian Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma, or Epithelial Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-02

    Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  7. eIF3a improve cisplatin sensitivity in ovarian cancer by regulating XPC and p27Kip1 translation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Yu, Jing-Jing; Tian, Yan; Li, Zheng-Zheng; Zhang, Cai-Yi; Zhang, Shu-Fen; Cao, Lan-Qin; Zhang, Yi; Qian, Chen-Yue; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Yin, Ji-Ye; Liu, Zhao-Qian

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3a (eIF3a) is one of the core subunits of the translation initiation complex eIF3, responsible for ribosomal subunit joining and mRNA recruitment to the ribosome. Our previous study identified that it was correlated with platinum response in lung cancer. The current study aims to test the hypothesis that eIF3a may affect the drug response and prognosis of ovarian cancer patients receiving platinum-based chemotherapy by regulating xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XPC) and p27Kip1. Immunohistochemistry and western blot was used to determine the expression of eIF3a in 126 human ovarian cancer tissues followed by association analysis of eIF3a expression with patient's response and survival. Ectopic over-expression and RNA interference knockdown of eIF3a were carried out in A2780/cisplatin (DDP) and its parental A2780 cells, respectively, to determine the effect of altered eIF3a expression on cellular response to cisplatin by employing MTT assay. Western Blot analyses were also carried out to determine the regulation of eIF3a on XPC and p27Kip1. eIF3a expression was associated with response of ovarian cancer patients to DDP-based chemotherapy and their survival. Overexpression and knockdown of eIF3a increased and decreased the cellular response to cisplatin in A2780/DDP and A2780 cells, respectively. In addition, XPC and p27Kip1 were down regulated by eIF3a. eIF3a improves ovarian cancer patients' response to DDP-based chemotherapy via down regulating XPC and p27Kip1. PMID:26213845

  8. Do We Know What Causes Ovarian Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... ovarian cancer be prevented? Do we know what causes ovarian cancer? We don’t yet know exactly what causes ... Another theory is that male hormones (androgens) can cause ovarian cancer. Researchers have made great progress in understanding how ...

  9. HOTAIR Interacting with MAPK1 Regulates Ovarian Cancer skov3 Cell Proliferation, Migration, and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Yiwei, Tang; Hua, Huang; Hui, Guo; Mao, Meng; Xiang, Long

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of when silencing HOTAIR in ovarian cancer skov3 cells on proliferation, migration, and invasion, and to elucidate the mechanism by which this occurs. Material/Methods We detected the mRNA level of HOTAIR (HOX antisense intergenic RNA) and MAPK1 (mitogen-activated protein kinase 1) in ovarian cancer SKOV3, ES-2, OVCAR3, A2780, and COC1 cell lines. We detected the mRNA level of HOTAIR and MAPK1 in ovarian SKOV3 when transected with miR-1, miR-214-3p, or miR-330-5p. We detected the mRNA and protein level of MAPK1 when silencing HOTAIR. We detected the expression of HOTAIR when silencing MAPK1. Then we detected the proliferation, migration, and invasion in ovarian cancer skov3 after silencing HOTAIR or MAPK1. Results The expression of HOTAIR and MAPK1 in ovarian SKOV3, ES-2, and OVCAR3 increased compared with A2780 and COC1 cells (P<0.05). The mRNA level of HOTAIR and MAPK1 in ovarian SKOV3 decreased when transected with miR-1, miR-214-3p, or miR-330-5p compared to negative control (p<0.05). The mRNA and protein level of MAPK1 was decreased when silencing HOTAIR and the mRNA level of HOTAIR was decreased when silencing MAPK1 (p<0.05). The proliferation, migration, and invasion was inhibited in ovarian SKOV3 after silencing HOTAIR or MAPK1 (p<0.05). Conclusions HOTAIR can promote proliferation, migration, and invasion in ovarian SKOV3 cells as a competing endogenous RNA. PMID:26117268

  10. The Cancer Genome Atlas ovarian cancer analysis

    Cancer.gov

    An analysis of genomic changes in ovarian cancer has provided the most comprehensive and integrated view of cancer genes for any cancer type to date. Ovarian serous adenocarcinoma tumors from 500 patients were examined by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Re

  11. Synthesis of a monofunctional platinum compound and its activity alone and in combination with phytochemicals in ovarian tumor models.

    PubMed

    Arzuman, Laila; Beale, Philip; Yu, Jun Qing; Proschogo, Nick; Huq, Fazlul

    2014-12-01

    Currently used platinum drugs fail to provide long-term cure for ovarian cancer mainly because of acquired drug resistance. In this study, a new monofunctional planaramineplatinum(II) complex, namely tris(8-hydroxyquinoline)monochloroplatinum(II) chloride (coded as LH3), was synthesised and investigated for its activity against human ovarian A2780, cisplatin-resistant A2780 (A2780(cisR)) and ZD0473-resistant A2780 (A2780(ZD0473R)) cancer cell lines, alone and in combination with the phytochemicals curcumin, genistein and resveratrol. Cellular levels of glutathione in A2780 and A2780(cisR) cell lines before and after treatment with LH3 and its combinations with genistein and curcumin were also determined. Interaction of the compounds with salmon sperm DNA, pBR322 plasmid DNA and damage to DNA in A2780 and A2780(cisR) cells due to interaction with LH3-alone and in combination with phytochemicals were also investigated. LH3 was found to be much more active than cisplatin against the resistant tumor models and greatest synergism in activity was observed when combinations of LH3 with genistein and curcumin were administered as a bolus. For combinations of LH3 with the phytochemicals, platinum accumulation and the level of Pt-DNA binding were found to be greater in the resistant A2780(cisR) cell line than in the parental A2780 cell line. Greater activity of LH3 than cisplatin against the resistant ovarian cell lines indicates that it may have the potential for development as a novel anticancer drug and that its combination with phytochemicals can serve to further enhance drug efficacy. PMID:25503135

  12. Can Ovarian Cancer Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... ovaries removed with your doctor. Prevention strategies for women with a family history of ovarian cancer or BRCA mutation If your ... what the results mean to you. For some women with a strong family history of ovarian cancer, knowing they do not have ...

  13. Oncolytic virotherapy for ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shoudong; Tong, Jessica; Rahman, Masmudur M; Shepherd, Trevor G; McFadden, Grant

    2012-01-01

    In the past two decades, more than 20 viruses with selective tropism for tumor cells have been developed as oncolytic viruses (OVs) for treatments of a variety of malignancies. Of these viruses, eleven have been tested in human ovarian cancer models in preclinical studies. So far, nine phase I or II clinical trials have been conducted or initiated using four different types of OVs in patients with recurrent ovarian cancers. In this article, we summarize the different OVs that are being assessed as therapeutics for ovarian cancer. We also present an overview of recent advances in identification of key genetic or immune-response pathways involved in tumorigenesis of ovarian cancer, which provides a better understanding of the tumor specificities and oncolytic properties of OVs. In addition, we discuss how next-generation OVs could be genetically modified or integrated into multimodality regimens to improve clinical outcomes based on recent advances in ovarian cancer biology. PMID:25977900

  14. MT-4 Suppresses Resistant Ovarian Cancer Growth through Targeting Tubulin and HSP27

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Hui Chen; Kumar, Sunil; Shen, Chien-Chang; Liou, Jing Ping; Pan, Shiow Lin; Teng, Che Ming

    2015-01-01

    Objective In this study, the anticancer mechanisms of MT-4 were examined in A2780 and multidrug-resistant NCI-ADR/res human ovarian cancer cell lines. Methods To evaluate the activity of MT-4, we performed in vitro cell viability and cell cycle assays and in vivo xenograft assays. Immunoblotting analysis was carried out to evaluate the effect of MT-4 on ovarian cancer. Tubulin polymerization was determined using a tubulin binding assay. Results MT-4 (2-Methoxy-5-[2-(3,4,5-trimethoxy-phenyl)-ethyl]-phenol), a derivative of moscatilin, can inhibit both sensitive A2780 and multidrug-resistant NCI-ADR/res cell growth and viability. MT-4 inhibited tubulin polymerization to induce G2/M arrest followed by caspase-mediated apoptosis. Further studies indicated that MT-4 is not a substrate of P-glycoprotein (p-gp). MT-4 also caused G2/M cell cycle arrest, accompanied by the upregulation of cyclin B, p-Thr161 Cdc2/p34, polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), Aurora kinase B, and phospho-Ser10-histone H3 protein levels. In addition, we found that p38 MAPK pathway activation was involved in MT-4-induced apoptosis. Most importantly, MT-4 also decreased heat shock protein 27 expression and reduced its interaction with caspase-3, which inured cancer cells to chemotherapy resistance. Treatment of cells with SB203580 or overexpression of dominant negative (DN)-p38 or wild-type HSP27 reduced PARP cleavage caused by MT-4. MT-4 induced apoptosis through regulation of p38 and HSP27. Our xenograft models also show the in vivo efficacy of MT-4. MT-4 inhibited both A2780 and NCI-ADR/res cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion These findings indicate that MT-4 could be a potential lead compound for the treatment of multidrug-resistant ovarian cancer. PMID:25874627

  15. Combination Chemotherapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Stage III Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  16. 3'-hydroxy-3,4,5,4'-tetramethoxystilbene, the metabolite of resveratrol analogue DMU-212, inhibits ovarian cancer cell growth in vitro and in a mice xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Piotrowska-Kempisty, Hanna; Ruciński, Marcin; Borys, Sylwia; Kucińska, Małgorzata; Kaczmarek, Mariusz; Zawierucha, Piotr; Wierzchowski, Marcin; Łażewski, Dawid; Murias, Marek; Jodynis-Liebert, Jadwiga

    2016-01-01

    In screening studies, the cytotoxic activity of four metabolites of resveratrol analogue 3,4,5,4'-tetramethoxystilbene (DMU-212) against A-2780 and SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells was investigated. The most active metabolite, 3'-hydroxy-3,4,5,4'-tetramethoxystilbene (DMU-214), was chosen for further studies. The cytotoxicity of DMU-214 was shown to be higher than that of the parent compound, DMU-212, in both cell lines tested. Since DMU-212 was supposed to undergo metabolic activation through its conversion to DMU-214, an attempt was made to elucidate the mechanism of its anti-proliferative activity. We found that in SKOV-3 cells lacking p53, DMU-214 induced receptor-mediated apoptosis. In A-2780 cell line with expression of wild-type p53, DMU-214 modulated the expression pattern of p53-target genes driving intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathways, as well as DNA repair and damage prevention. Regardless of the up-regulation of p48, p53R2, sestrins and Gaad45 genes involved in cancer cell DNA repair, we demonstrated the stronger anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of DMU-214 in A-2780 cells when compared to those in SKOV-3. Hence we verified DMU-214 activity in the xenograft model using SCID mice injected with A-2780 cells. The strong anti-proliferative activity of DMU-214 in the in vivo model allowed to suggest the tested compound as a potential therapeutic in ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:27585955

  17. Interleukin 6 Receptor Is an Independent Prognostic Factor and a Potential Therapeutic Target of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Isobe, Aki; Sawada, Kenjiro; Kinose, Yasuto; Ohyagi-Hara, Chifumi; Nakatsuka, Erika; Makino, Hiroshi; Ogura, Tomonori; Mizuno, Tomoko; Suzuki, Noriko; Morii, Eiichi; Nakamura, Koji; Sawada, Ikuko; Toda, Aska; Hashimoto, Kae; Mabuchi, Seiji; Ohta, Tsuyoshi; Morishige, Ken-ichirou; Kurachi, Hirohisa; Kimura, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer remains the most lethal gynecologic cancer and new targeted molecular therapies against this miserable disease continue to be challenging. In this study, we analyzed the expressional patterns of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and its receptor (IL-6R) expression in ovarian cancer tissues, evaluated the impact of these expressions on clinical outcomes of patients, and found that a high-level of IL-6R expression but not IL-6 expression in cancer cells is an independent prognostic factor. In in vitro analyses using ovarian cell lines, while six (RMUG-S, RMG-1, OVISE, A2780, SKOV3ip1 and OVCAR-3) of seven overexpressed IL-6R compared with a primary normal ovarian surface epithelium, only two (RMG-1, OVISE) of seven cell lines overexpressed IL-6, suggesting that IL-6/IL-6R signaling exerts in a paracrine manner in certain types of ovarian cancer cells. Ovarian cancer ascites were collected from patients, and we found that primary CD11b+CD14+ cells, which were predominantly M2-polarized macrophages, are the major source of IL-6 production in an ovarian cancer microenvironment. When CD11b+CD14+ cells were co-cultured with cancer cells, both the invasion and the proliferation of cancer cells were robustly promoted and these promotions were almost completely inhibited by pretreatment with anti-IL-6R antibody (tocilizumab). The data presented herein suggest a rationale for anti-IL-6/IL-6R therapy to suppress the peritoneal spread of ovarian cancer, and represent evidence of the therapeutic potential of anti-IL-6R therapy for ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:25658637

  18. Low molecular weight heparin tinzaparin antagonizes cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pfankuchen, Daniel Bastian; Stölting, Daniel Philipp; Schlesinger, Martin; Royer, Hans-Dieter; Bendas, Gerd

    2015-09-15

    Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is routinely used for antithrombotic treatment of cancer patients. Preclinical- and clinical data suggest that LMWH has beneficial effects for cancer patients beyond the prevention of thrombosis, i.e. by inhibiting metastasis. It is, however, unclear whether heparin has an impact on the efficiency of chemotherapy in cancer patients. Here we show that a therapeutic dosage of LMWH tinzaparin reverses cisplatin resistance of A2780cis human ovarian cancer cells to the level of sensitive cells. This novel activity of tinzaparin is associated with intense transcriptional reprogramming. Our gene expression profiling experiments revealed that 3776 genes responded to tinzaparin treatment. For this reason tinzaparin has a complex impact on diverse biological processes. We discovered that tinzaparin inhibits the expression of genes that mediate cisplatin resistance of A2780cis cells. In contrast tinzaparin induced the expression of genes that antagonize drug resistance. This activity of tinzaparin is mediated by cell surface proteoglycans, since enzymatic cleavage of heparan sulfates prevented the reversal of cisplatin resistance. These data indicate that cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans play an important role for chemotherapy resistance. The results of this study shed a new light on LMWH application in cancer therapy and suggest tinzaparin as promising treatment option of ovarian cancer patients in combination with anticancer drugs. Future clinical trials are needed to validate these findings. PMID:26239805

  19. "Incessant ovulation" and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Casagrande, J T; Louie, E W; Pike, M C; Roy, S; Ross, R K; Henderson, B E

    1979-07-28

    A case-control study of 150 ovarian cancer patients under the age of 50 and individually matched controls was done to study the influence of fertility and oral contraceptive use on the risk of ovarian cancer. The risk decreased with increasing numbers of live births, with increasing numbers of incomplete pregnancies, and with the use of oral contraceptives. These three factors can be amalgamated into a single index of protection--"protected time"--by considering them all as periods of anovulation. The complement of protected time--viz., "ovulatory age", the period between menarche and diagnosis of ovarian cancer (or cessation of menses) minus "protected time"--was strongly related to risk of ovarian cancer. Other factors found to be associated with increased ovarian cancer risk were obesity, cervical polyps, and gallbladder disease. Women who had an "immediate" intolerance to oral contraceptive use had a fourfold increased risk of ovarian cancer. 7 patients, but no controls, could recall a family history of ovarian cancer. PMID:89281

  20. Polyglutamate Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial, Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-07

    Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  1. Combinations of platinums and selected phytochemicals as a means of overcoming resistance in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Huq, Fazlul; Yu, Jun Q; Beale, Philip; Chan, Charles; Arzuman, Lalia; Nessa, Meher U; Mazumder, Mohammed E H

    2014-01-01

    Cancer sufferers are often found to use herbal products along with targeted therapy although not much information (whether beneficial or harmful) is available about the effects of such combinations. In this study, we investigated synergism from the combination of platinum drugs and a number of tumour-active phytochemicals including curcumin, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, thymoquinone, genistein, resveratrol, betulinic acid and ursolic acid in three human ovarian cancer cell lines A2780, A2780(cisR) and A2780(ZD0473R), as a function of concentration and the sequence of administration. Both the dose-effect curves and combination indices show that the binary combinations of platinum drugs with the phytochemicals exert concentration- and sequence-dependent synergism in the cell lines. Generally the degree of synergism is found to be greater in sequenced administration such as 0/2 h, 2/0 h, 0/4 h and 4/0 h than the bolus. The variation in the nature of the combined drug action from being highly synergistic to antagonistic with the change in sequence of administration clearly indicates that the action of one drug modulates that of the other (towards the induction or inhibition of apoptosis). We have also used sequenced combinations of platinum drugs and bortezomib (a proteasome inhibitor that prevents cisplatin-induced proteasomal degration of copper transporter CTR1) to enhance cellular platinum accumulation and the level of platinum-DNA binding especially in the resistant human ovarian tumour models. Proteomic studies to identify the key proteins associated with platinum resistance are ongoing. We have identified 59 proteins associated with platinum resistance in ovarian tumor models. PMID:24403514

  2. What Are the Key Statistics about Ovarian Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... factors for ovarian cancer? What are the key statistics about ovarian cancer? The American Cancer Society estimates ... ovarian cancer is about 1 in 100. (These statistics don’t count low malignant potential ovarian tumors.) ...

  3. Role of glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibitor AZD1080 in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuo; Sun, Kai-Xuan; Feng, Miao-Xiao; Sang, Xiu-Bo; Liu, Bo-Liang; Zhao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) is a multifunctional serine/threonine kinase that plays an important role in cancer tumorigenesis and progression. We investigated the role of the GSK-3β inhibitor AZD1080 in ovarian cancer cell lines. Methods A2780 and OVCAR3 ovarian cancer cell lines were exposed to AZD1080, after which cell proliferation, cell cycle, invasion, and migration assays were performed. Phalloidin staining was used to observe lamellipodia formation. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot were used to assess the respective mRNA and protein expression levels of GSK-3β, CDK2, CDK1, cyclin D1, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9), and Bcl-xL. Results AZD1080 exposure suppressed ovarian cancer cell proliferation, invasion, migration, and lamellipodia formation, and induced G1 arrest, which was concentration dependent. AZD1080 also significantly downregulated GSK-3β, CDK2, CDK1, cyclin D1, MMP9, and Bcl-xL expression at both mRNA and protein levels. Conclusion Taken together, our results demonstrate that the GSK-3β inhibitor AZD1080 suppresses ovarian cancer development and therefore may indicate a new direction for ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:27051274

  4. Inhibition of HDAC1 and DNMT1 Modulate RGS10 Expression and Decrease Ovarian Cancer Chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Cacan, Ercan; Ali, Mourad W.; Boyd, Nathaniel H.; Hooks, Shelley B.; Greer, Susanna F.

    2014-01-01

    RGS10 is an important regulator of cell survival and chemoresistance in ovarian cancer. We recently showed that RGS10 transcript expression is suppressed during acquired chemoresistance in ovarian cancer. The suppression of RGS10 is due to DNA hypermethylation and histone deacetylation, two important mechanisms that contribute to silencing of tumor suppressor genes during cancer progression. Here, we fully investigate the molecular mechanisms of epigenetic silencing of RGS10 expression in chemoresistant A2780-AD ovarian cancer cells. We identify two important epigenetic regulators, HDAC1 and DNMT1, that exhibit aberrant association with RGS10 promoters in chemoresistant ovarian cancer cells. Knockdown of HDAC1 or DNMT1 expression, and pharmacological inhibition of DNMT or HDAC enzymatic activity, significantly increases RGS10 expression and cisplatin-mediated cell death. Finally, DNMT1 knock down also decreases HDAC1 binding to the RGS10 promoter in chemoresistant cells, suggesting HDAC1 recruitment to RGS10 promoters requires DNMT1 activity. Our results suggest that HDAC1 and DNMT1 contribute to the suppression of RGS10 during acquired chemoresistance and support inhibition of HDAC1 and DNMT1 as an adjuvant therapeutic approach to overcome ovarian cancer chemoresistance. PMID:24475290

  5. miR-494 inhibits ovarian cancer cell proliferation and promotes apoptosis by targeting FGFR2

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, XIAOJUAN; ZHOU, YUN; CHEN, YU; YU, FENG

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) have been reported to be key regulators in numerous types of cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of miR-494 in ovarian cancer. Expression of miR-494 was analyzed in ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). miR-494 mimic or negative control was transiently transfected into A2780 and SKOV3 cell lines. A cell counting kit-8 assay was performed to assess the effects of miR-494 on cell proliferation, and flow cytometry was used to evaluate the apoptotic rate. The target gene of miR-494 was detected by luciferase assay. Expression of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) was identified using RT-qPCR and western blotting. In the present study, decreased expression of miR-494 was observed in ovarian cancer samples and cell lines. Overexpression of miR-494 inhibited ovarian cancer cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis. Additional investigation indicated that FGFR2 was a direct target of miR-494. Taken together, the results of the present study suggested that miR-494 suppressed ovarian cancer cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis via targeting FGFR2. PMID:27313773

  6. HOTAIR Promotes Proliferation, Migration, and Invasion of Ovarian Cancer SKOV3 Cells Through Regulating PIK3R3

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lijun; Hu, Lina

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the effect on proliferation, migration, and invasion after silencing HOTAIR in ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells, and to elucidate the potential mechanism. Material/Methods We analyzed the mRNA expression level of HOTAIR and PIK3R3 in ovarian cancer SKOV3, OVCAR3, and A2780 cell lines. We analyzed the mRNA expression level of HOTAIR and PIK3R3 in ovarian SKOV3 after transection with miR-214 or miR-217. We analyzed the mRNA and protein expression level of PIK3R3 when silencing HOTAIR. We analyzed the expression of HOTAIR when silencing PIK3R3. We analyzed the proliferation, migration and invasion in ovarian cancer SKOV3 after silencing HOTAIR or PIK3R3. Results The expression of HOTAIR and PIK3R3 in ovarian SKOV3 and OVCAR3 was increased compared with A2780 cells (P<0.05). The mRNA level of HOTAIR and PIK3R3 in ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells was decreased when transected with miR-214 or miR-217 compared to negative control (p<0.05). The mRNA and protein level of PIK3R3 was decreased when HOTAIR was silenced and the mRNA level of HOTAIR was decreased when PIK3R3 was silenced (p<0.05). The proliferation, migration and invasion was decreased in ovarian SKOV3 when HOTAIR or PIK3R3 was silenced (p<0.05). Conclusions HOTAIR can promote proliferation, migration, and invasion in ovarian SKOV3 cells as a competing endogenous RNA. PMID:26826873

  7. Survivorship Care Planning in Improving Quality of Life in Survivors of Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Cancer Survivor; Stage IA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  8. BRCA1 as a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent metabolic switch in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Da; Chen, Na-Na; Cao, Ji-Min; Sun, Wu-Ping; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Li, Chun-Yan; Wang, Xiu-Xia

    2014-01-01

    Both hereditary factors (e.g., BRCA1) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent metabolic pathways are implicated in the initiation and progression of ovarian cancer. However, whether crosstalk exists between BRCA1 and NAD metabolism remains largely unknown. Here, we showed that: (i) BRCA1 inactivation events (mutation and promoter methylation) were accompanied by elevated levels of NAD; (ii) the knockdown or overexpression of BRCA1 was an effective way to induce an increase or decrease of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt)-related NAD synthesis, respectively; and (iii) BRCA1 expression patterns were inversely correlated with NAD levels in human ovarian cancer specimens. In addition, it is worth noting that: (i) NAD incubation induced increased levels of BRCA1 in a concentration-dependent manner; (ii) Nampt knockdown-mediated reduction in NAD levels was effective at inhibiting BRCA1 expression; and (iii) the overexpression of Nampt led to higher NAD levels and a subsequent increase in BRCA1 levels in primary ovarian cancer cells and A2780, HO-8910 and ES2 ovarian cancer cell lines. These results highlight a novel link between BRCA1 and NAD. Our findings imply that genetic (e.g., BRCA1 inactivation) and NAD-dependent metabolic pathways are jointly involved in the malignant progression of ovarian cancer. PMID:25486197

  9. Gain-of-function microRNA screens identify miR-193a regulating proliferation and apoptosis in epithelial ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    NAKANO, HARUO; YAMADA, YOJI; MIYAZAWA, TATSUYA; YOSHIDA, TETSUO

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a small class of non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression, and are considered as new therapeutic targets for treating cancer. In this study, we performed a gain-of-function screen using miRNA mimic library (319 miRNA species) to identify those affecting cell proliferation in human epithelial ovarian cancer cells (A2780). We discovered a number of miRNAs that increased or decreased the cell viability of A2780 cells. Pro-proliferative and anti-proliferative miRNAs include oncogenic miR-372 and miR-373, and tumor suppressive miR-124a, miR-7, miR-192 and miR-193a, respectively. We found that overexpression of miR-124a, miR-192, miR-193a and miR-193b inhibited BrdU incorporation in A2780 cells, indicating that these miRNAs affected the cell cycle. Overexpression of miR-193a and miR-193b induced an activation of caspase 3/7, and resulted in apoptotic cell death in A2780 cells. A genome-wide gene expression analysis with miR-193a-transfected A2780 cells led to identification of ARHGAP19, CCND1, ERBB4, KRAS and MCL1 as potential miR-193a targets. We demonstrated that miR-193a decreased the amount of MCL1 protein by binding 3′UTR of its mRNA. Our study suggests the potential of miRNA screens to discover miRNAs as therapeutic tools to treat ovarian cancer. PMID:23588298

  10. Kaempferol inhibits angiogenesis and VEGF expression through both HIF dependent and independent pathways in human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Haitao; Rankin, Gary O; Liu, Lingzhi; Daddysman, Matthew K; Jiang, Bing-Hua; Chen, Yi Charlie

    2009-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is 1 of the most significant malignancies in the Western world, and the antiangiogenesis strategy has been postulated for prevention and treatment of ovarian cancers. Kaempferol is a natural flavonoid present in many fruits and vegetables. The antiangiogenesis potential of kaempferol and its underlying mechanisms were investigated in two ovarian cancer cell lines, OVCAR-3 and A2780/CP70. Kaempferol mildly inhibits cell viability but significantly reduces VEGF gene expression at mRNA and protein levels in both ovarian cancer cell lines. In chorioallantoic membranes of chicken embryos, kaempferol significantly inhibits OVCAR-3-induced angiogenesis and tumor growth. HIF-1alpha, a regulator of VEGF, is downregulated by kaempferol treatment in both ovarian cancer cell lines. Kaempferol also represses AKT phosphorylation dose dependently at 5 to 20 muM concentrations. ESRRA is a HIF-independent VEGF regulator, and it is also downregulated by kaempferol in a dose-dependent manner. Overall, this study demonstrated that kaempferol is low in cytotoxicity but inhibits angiogenesis and VEGF expression in human ovarian cancer cells through both HIF-dependent (Akt/HIF) and HIF-independent (ESRRA) pathways and deserves further studies for possible application in angio prevention and treatment of ovarian cancers. PMID:19838928

  11. 8‑bromo‑7‑methoxychrysin induces apoptosis by regulating Akt/FOXO3a pathway in cisplatin‑sensitive and resistant ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qing; Chen, Yi; Zhang, Qing; Guo, Yanling; Huang, Zhi; Dai, Liqing; Cao, Sudan

    2015-10-01

    8‑bromo‑7‑methoxychrysin (BrMC), a novel chrysin analog, was reported to have anti‑cancer activities. The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular mechanism of 8‑bromo‑7‑methoxychrysin (BrMC)‑induced apoptosis via the Akt/forkhead box O3a (FOXO3a) pathway in cisplatin (DDP)‑sensitive and ‑resistant ovarian cancer cells. The human ovarian cancer cell lines A2780 and A2780/DDP were cultured in vitro. Various molecular techniques were used to assess the expression of FOXO3a and B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2)‑interacting mediator of cell death (Bim) in cisplatin‑sensitive and ‑resistant ovarian cancer cells. Different concentrations of BrMC induced apoptosis in cisplatin‑sensitive and ‑resistant ovarian cancer cells. BrMC‑induced apoptotic cell death occurred mainly by the activation of Akt, which was accompanied by the overexpression of transcription factor FOXO3a, with a concomitant increase in the expression levels of Bim. Silencing Bim expression by using small interfering RNA, attenuated the induction of apoptosis by BrMC treatment. The results indicated that BrMC‑induced apoptosis in cisplatin‑sensitive and ‑resistant ovarian cancer cells may occur via the regulation of Akt/FOXO3a, leading to Bim transcription. PMID:26151347

  12. Ovarian Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing ovarian cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  13. Pre-Treatment of platinum resistant ovarian cancer cells with an MMP-9/MMP-2 inhibitor prior to cisplatin enhances cytotoxicity as determined by high content screening.

    PubMed

    Laios, Alexandros; Mohamed, Bashir M; Kelly, Lynn; Flavin, Richard; Finn, Stephen; McEvoy, Lynda; Gallagher, Michael; Martin, Cara; Sheils, Orla; Ring, Martina; Davies, Anthony; Lawson, Margaret; Gleeson, Noreen; D'Arcy, Tom; d'Adhemar, Charles; Norris, Lucy; Langhe, Ream; Saadeh, Feras Abu; O'Leary, John J; O'Toole, Sharon A

    2013-01-01

    Platinum resistance is a major cause of treatment failure in ovarian cancer. We previously identified matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) as a potential therapeutic target of chemoresistant disease. A2780cis (cisplatin-resistant) and A2780 (cisplatin-sensitive) ovarian carcinoma cell lines were used. The cytotoxic effect of MMP-9/MMP-2 inhibitor, (2R)-2-[(4-Biphenylsulfonyl) amino]-3 phenylpropionic acid (C21H19NO4S) alone or in combination with cisplatin was determined using high content screening. Protein expression was examined using immunohistochemistry and ELISA. Co-incubation of cisplatin and an MMP-9/MMP-2 inhibitor, (2R)-2-[(4-Biphenylsulfonyl) amino]-3 phenylpropionic acid (C21H19NO4S) resulted in significantly greater cytotoxicity as compared to either treatment alone in a cisplatin resistant MMP-9 overexpressing cell line; A2780cis. In addition, pre-incubating with MMP-9i prior to cisplatin further enhances the cytotoxic effect. No significant difference was observed in MMP-9 protein in tissue but a trend towards increased MMP-9 was observed in recurrent serum. We propose that MMP-9/MMP-2i may be utilized in the treatment of recurrent/chemoresistant ovarian cancers that overexpress MMP-9 mRNA but its role in vivo remains to be evaluated. PMID:23340649

  14. Potent organo-osmium compound shifts metabolism in epithelial ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hearn, Jessica M.; Romero-Canelón, Isolda; Munro, Alison F.; Fu, Ying; Pizarro, Ana M.; Garnett, Mathew J.; McDermott, Ultan; Carragher, Neil O.; Sadler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    The organometallic “half-sandwich” compound [Os(η6-p-cymene)(4-(2-pyridylazo)-N,N-dimethylaniline)I]PF6 is 49× more potent than the clinical drug cisplatin in the 809 cancer cell lines that we screened and is a candidate drug for cancer therapy. We investigate the mechanism of action of compound 1 in A2780 epithelial ovarian cancer cells. Whole-transcriptome sequencing identified three missense mutations in the mitochondrial genome of this cell line, coding for ND5, a subunit of complex I (NADH dehydrogenase) in the electron transport chain. ND5 is a proton pump, helping to maintain the coupling gradient in mitochondria. The identified mutations correspond to known protein variants (p.I257V, p.N447S, and p.L517P), not reported previously in epithelial ovarian cancer. Time-series RNA sequencing suggested that osmium-exposed A2780 cells undergo a metabolic shunt from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation, where defective machinery, associated with mutations in complex I, could enhance activity. Downstream events, measured by time-series reverse-phase protein microarrays, high-content imaging, and flow cytometry, showed a dramatic increase in mitochondrially produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent DNA damage with up-regulation of ATM, p53, and p21 proteins. In contrast to platinum drugs, exposure to this organo-osmium compound does not cause significant apoptosis within a 72-h period, highlighting a different mechanism of action. Superoxide production in ovarian, lung, colon, breast, and prostate cancer cells exposed to three other structurally related organo-Os(II) compounds correlated with their antiproliferative activity. DNA damage caused indirectly, through selective ROS generation, may provide a more targeted approach to cancer therapy and a concept for next-generation metal-based anticancer drugs that combat platinum resistance. PMID:26162681

  15. Potent organo-osmium compound shifts metabolism in epithelial ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hearn, Jessica M; Romero-Canelón, Isolda; Munro, Alison F; Fu, Ying; Pizarro, Ana M; Garnett, Mathew J; McDermott, Ultan; Carragher, Neil O; Sadler, Peter J

    2015-07-21

    The organometallic "half-sandwich" compound [Os(η(6)-p-cymene)(4-(2-pyridylazo)-N,N-dimethylaniline)I]PF6 is 49× more potent than the clinical drug cisplatin in the 809 cancer cell lines that we screened and is a candidate drug for cancer therapy. We investigate the mechanism of action of compound 1 in A2780 epithelial ovarian cancer cells. Whole-transcriptome sequencing identified three missense mutations in the mitochondrial genome of this cell line, coding for ND5, a subunit of complex I (NADH dehydrogenase) in the electron transport chain. ND5 is a proton pump, helping to maintain the coupling gradient in mitochondria. The identified mutations correspond to known protein variants (p.I257V, p.N447S, and p.L517P), not reported previously in epithelial ovarian cancer. Time-series RNA sequencing suggested that osmium-exposed A2780 cells undergo a metabolic shunt from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation, where defective machinery, associated with mutations in complex I, could enhance activity. Downstream events, measured by time-series reverse-phase protein microarrays, high-content imaging, and flow cytometry, showed a dramatic increase in mitochondrially produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent DNA damage with up-regulation of ATM, p53, and p21 proteins. In contrast to platinum drugs, exposure to this organo-osmium compound does not cause significant apoptosis within a 72-h period, highlighting a different mechanism of action. Superoxide production in ovarian, lung, colon, breast, and prostate cancer cells exposed to three other structurally related organo-Os(II) compounds correlated with their antiproliferative activity. DNA damage caused indirectly, through selective ROS generation, may provide a more targeted approach to cancer therapy and a concept for next-generation metal-based anticancer drugs that combat platinum resistance. PMID:26162681

  16. Ovarian Cancer in Hereditary Cancer Susceptibility Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Nakonechny, Quentin B; Gilks, C Blake

    2016-06-01

    Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome and Lynch syndrome (LS) are associated with increased risk of developing ovarian carcinoma. Patients with HBOC have a lifetime risk of up to 50% of developing high-grade serous carcinoma of tube or ovary; patients with LS have a 10% lifetime risk of developing endometrioid or clear cell carcinoma of the ovary. Testing all patients with tubo-ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma for mutations associated with HBOC syndrome, and all patients presenting with endometrioid or clear cell carcinoma of the ovary for mutations associated with LS can identify patients with undiagnosed underlying hereditary cancer susceptibility syndromes. PMID:27241103

  17. Inflammatory Breast Cancer from Metastatic Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Achariyapota, Vuthinun; Chuangsuwanich, Tuenjai

    2016-01-01

    Metastases to the breast from tumors other than breast carcinomas are extremely rare and represent only 0.2–1.3% of all diagnosed malignant breast tumors. Furthermore, while the most common sites for advanced ovarian cancer metastases are the liver, lung, and pleura, metastasis to the breast from a primary ovarian cancer is uncommon and has only been reported in 0.03–0.6% of all breast cancers. Here we describe a case report of a 50-year-old female patient with a rare case of breast metastases from an advanced ovarian cancer, presenting as inflammatory breast cancer. Our observations emphasize the clinical importance of distinguishing between primary and metastatic breast cancer during diagnosis for the purpose of appropriate prognosis and treatment. PMID:27047697

  18. CASZ1 is a novel promoter of metastasis in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yi-Ying; Chang, Chia-Lin; Chuang, Yuan-Jhe; Wu, Jia-En; Tung, Chia-Hao; Chen, Yeong-Chang; Chen, Yuh-Ling; Hong, Tse-Ming; Hsu, Keng-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) carries the highest mortality rate of all gynecologic malignancies. This high mortality rate is attributed to the fact that most cases of ovarian cancer are detected at late stages when metastases are already present. Through microarray analysis, we previously demonstrated that castor zinc finger 1 (CASZ1) is up-regulated in EOC cells. In contrast to its role in EOC, CASZ1 functions a tumor suppressor in neuroblastoma. Human CASZ1 is predominantly expressed in 2 alternatively spliced isoforms: CASZ1a and CASZ1b. In the present study, we investigated the role of CASZ1 in ovarian cancer cell migration and invasion and assessed the value of CASZ1 expression as a prognostic indicator of metastasis in human ovarian cancer. We used a lentivirus expressing CASZ1-shRNA and a plasmid expressing CASZ1 from a CMV promoter to knockdown and overexpress CASZ1, respectively, in the MCAS, RMUG-S, TOV21G, and A2780CP70 ovarian cancer cell lines. mRNA expression levels in tumor tissues and cell lines were measured using quantitative real-time PCR, and CASZ1 protein expression in EOC and paired metastatic tumor tissues was analyzed using immunohistochemistry. We found that CASZ1 was highly expressed in EOC tissues and ovarian cancer cell lines and that CASZ1 knockdown suppressed cell migration and invasion in EOC cells. CASZ1a and CASZ1b exerted similar effects on cell migration and invasion in EOC cells. In addition, CASZ1 promoted the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in EOC cells, and CASZ1 knockdown suppressed cancer metastasis in vivo. Furthermore, CASZ1 protein levels were elevated in human metastatic ovarian tumor tissues. Together, these results indicate that CASZ1 is a novel promoter of EOC metastasis and is highly up-regulated in metastatic EOC tumors. PMID:27429842

  19. Docosahexaenoic Acid Modulates Invasion and Metastasis of Human Ovarian Cancer via Multiple Molecular Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Chun; Wu, Yi-Nan; Wang, Su-Li; Lin, Qing-Hua; He, Ming-Fang; Liu, Qiao-lin; Wang, Jin-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Objective We investigated the effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on the invasion and metastasis of ovarian cancer cells (A2780, HO8910, and SKOV-3). Methods Cytotoxicity assay was performed to determine the optimal doses of DHA in this experiment. The effects of DHA on invasion ability were assessed by invasion assay. The expressions of messenger RNA and/or proteins associated with invasion or metastasis were detected by quantitative Real Time-Polymerase Chain Reaction or Western blot. The effect of DHA on cell metastasis was assessed in xenograft model of zebrafish. Results Docosahexaenoic acid and α-linolenic acid could reduce the cell vitalities in dose-dependent manner. However, DHA inhibited the invasion and metastasis of ovarian cancer cells, but α-linolenic acid did not (**P < 0.01). Docosahexaenoic acid could downregulate the expressions of WAVE3, vascular endothelial cell growth factor, and MMP-9, and upregulate KISS-1, TIMP-1, and PPAR-γ, which negatively correlated with cell invasion and metastasis (*P < 0.05). Docosahexaenoic acid restrained the development of subintestinal vessels and cancer cell metastasis in xenograft model of zebrafish (**P < 0.01). Conclusions Docosahexaenoic acid inhibited the invasion and metastasis of ovarian cancer cells in vitro and in vivo through the modulation of NF-κB signaling pathway, suggesting that DHA is a promising candidate for ovarian cancer therapy. PMID:27258728

  20. 6 Common Cancers - Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian Past Issues / Spring 2007 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian NCI estimates that endometrial, ...

  1. Molecular imaging in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Reyners, A K L; Broekman, K E; Glaudemans, A W J M; Brouwers, A H; Arts, H J G; van der Zee, A G J; de Vries, E G E; Jalving, M

    2016-04-01

    Ovarian cancer has a high mortality and novel-targeted treatment strategies have not resulted in breakthroughs for this disease. Insight into the molecular characteristics of ovarian tumors may improve diagnosis and selection of patients for treatment with targeted therapies. A potential way to achieve this is by means of molecular imaging. Generic tumor processes, such as glucose metabolism ((18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose) and DNA synthesis ((18)F-fluorodeoxythymidine), can be visualized non-invasively. More specific targets, such as hormone receptors, growth factor receptors, growth factors and targets of immunotherapy, can also be visualized. Molecular imaging can capture data on intra-patient tumor heterogeneity and is of potential value for individualized, target-guided treatment selection. Early changes in molecular characteristics during therapy may serve as early predictors of response. In this review, we describe the current knowledge on molecular imaging in the diagnosis and as an upfront or early predictive biomarker in patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:27141066

  2. Exercise May Help Thwart Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159486.html Exercise May Help Thwart Ovarian Cancer Chronic inactivity linked ... TUESDAY, June 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Lack of exercise is associated with an increased risk of ovarian ...

  3. Exercise May Help Thwart Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159486.html Exercise May Help Thwart Ovarian Cancer Chronic inactivity linked ... TUESDAY, June 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Lack of exercise is associated with an increased risk of ovarian ...

  4. Genital Cancers in Women: Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kuznia, Angela L; Roett, Michelle A

    2015-11-01

    More than 20,000 US women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer each year. The average lifetime risk is 1.3%, but risk increases with BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations (40% and 18% risk, respectively, by age 70 years) or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome (12% lifetime risk). Other risk factors include smoking, possibly past clomiphene use, and more years of ovulation. Symptoms are nonspecific. Abdominal pain is most common; others include pelvic pain, bloating, and early satiety. When ovarian cancer is suspected, evaluation should begin with transvaginal ultrasonography with Doppler studies. Cancer antigen 125 testing can be obtained, but levels are not elevated in all patients. Other biomarkers (eg, OVA1) and scoring systems can be used to help determine if cancer is present. When diagnosed early (stage I), the 5-year survival rate is 90% for epithelial ovarian cancer. However, most patients with epithelial ovarian cancer are diagnosed in stage III or later, with a 5-year survival rate of 17% to 39%. Treatment involves total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, with or without chemotherapy. Fertility-preserving options can be considered in some early-stage cancers, followed by more definitive surgical procedures. There is no evidence that routine screening is beneficial and it is associated with significant harms from unnecessary procedures. Women with genetic syndromes that increase risk should be considered for prophylactic bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. PMID:26569048

  5. Ovarian stimulation in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cakmak, Hakan; Rosen, Mitchell P

    2013-05-01

    The patients referred for fertility preservation owing to a malignant disease do not represent the typical population of subfertile patients treated in IVF units. Cancer may affect multiple tissues throughout the body and can result in a variety of complications during controlled ovarian stimulation. Determination of the controlled ovarian stimulation protocol and gonadotropin dose for oocyte/embryo cryopreservation requires an individualized assessment. This review highlights the new protocols that are emerging to reduce time constraints and emphasizes management considerations to decrease complications. PMID:23635348

  6. Dietary compounds galangin and myricetin suppress ovarian cancer cell angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haizhi; Chen, Allen Y.; Rojanasakul, Yon; Ye, Xingqian; Rankin, Gary O.; Chen, Yi Charlie

    2015-01-01

    Galangin and myricetin are flavonoids isolated from vegetables and fruits which exhibit anti-proliferative activity in human cancer cells. In this study, their anti-angiogenic effects were investigated with in vitro (HUVEC) and in vivo (CAM) models, which showed that galangin and myricetin inhibited angiogenesis induced by OVCAR-3 cells. The molecular mechanisms through which galangin and myricetin suppress angiogenesis were also studied. It was observed that galangin and myricetin inhibited secretion of the key angiogenesis mediator vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and decreased levels of p-Akt, p-70S6K and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) proteins in A2780/CP70 and OVCAR-3 cells. Transient transfection experiments showed that galangin and myricetin inhibited secretion of VEGF by the Akt/p70S6K/ HIF-1α pathway. Moreover, a novel pathway, p21/HIF-1α/VEGF, was found to be involved in the inhibitory effect of myricetin on angiogenesis in OVCAR-3 cells. These data suggest that galangin and myricetin might serve as potential anti-angiogenic agents in the prevention of ovarian cancers dependent on new blood vessel networks. PMID:26113875

  7. Drug discovery in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Chase, Dana M; Mathur, Nidhee; Tewari, Krishnansu S

    2010-11-01

    Drug discovery in the ovarian cancer arena has led to the activation of several important clinical trials. Many biologic agents have come down the pipeline and are being studied in phase II trials for recurrent disease. These agents include antivascular compounds that disrupt angiogenesis through a variety of mechanisms (e.g., prevention of ligand-binding to the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGF-R2), high-affinity VEGF blockade, oral inhibitors of tyrosine kinases stimulated by VEGF, inhibition of alpha5beta1 integrin, neutralization of angioproteins, etc.). Other novel drugs include oral platinum compounds as well as those that antagonize the tumor proliferation genes in the Hedgehog pathway, and that target folic acid receptors which are expressed by ovarian cancer cells. In addition, studies are underway with oral agents that inhibit the tyrosine kinase activity associated with two oncogenes (epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and HER-2/neu). Finally, emerging technologies in clinical trials include nanotechnology to enhance delivery of chemotherapy to ovarian tumors, drug resistance/sensitivity assays to guide therapy, and agents that mobilize and induce proliferation of hematopoetic progenitor cells to aid in red blood cell, white blood cell, and platelet recovery following chemotherapy. The relevant patents in drug discovery of ovarian cancer are discussed. PMID:20524931

  8. [Epidemiologic factors in ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Curie, P; Sussmann, M; Treisser, A; Renaud, R

    1985-05-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is the most severe gynecological cancer with an overall incidence of 12 per 1000 Americans or Europeans developing it over 40 years of age. Only 3 of the 12 cases will receive efficient care because the diagnosis will be made too late. This study reveals the principal risk factors i.e. upper socioeconomic echelon, ovarian function uninterrupted by a pregnancy or usage of oral contraceptives, anamnestic evidence of ovarian carcinoma in the family, some hereditary disorders, external insults (talcum powder). The synthesis of these various risk factors permits a comprehensive review of the hypotheses of pathogenesis concerning recurrence of tumors. But corollary epidemiologic studies are still needed to try to define better the high risk groups whose follow-up systematic detection and testing is a priority. PMID:4023542

  9. Ovarian metastasis from colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Birnkrant, A; Sampson, J; Sugarbaker, P H

    1986-11-01

    Controversies exist regarding the surgical treatment of the ovaries in women with primary colorectal cancer. A review of the authors' experience and the surgical literature reveals an incidence of ovarian metastases from colorectal cancer of approximately 6 percent. This problem may occur somewhat more frequently in premenopausal women. Resection of the ovaries at the time of colectomy is unlikely to affect survival. Removal of the ovaries at the time of bowel resection will prevent repeat laparotomy to resect an ovarian mass in approximately 2 percent of women with large bowel cancer. Oophorectomy should be performed in all postmenopausal females at the time of primary resection. Oophorectomy should be performed in premenopausal women if any gross abnormality of the ovary is detected or if peritoneal implants are seen at the time of primary resection. PMID:3533472

  10. Influence of reducing agents on the cytotoxic activity of platinum(IV) complexes: induction of G2/M arrest, apoptosis and oxidative stress in A2780 and cisplatin resistant A2780cis cell lines.

    PubMed

    Pichler, Verena; Göschl, Simone; Schreiber-Brynzak, Ekaterina; Jakupec, Michael A; Galanski, Markus; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2015-07-01

    The concept of Pt(IV) prodrug design is one advanced strategy to increase the selectivity for cancer cells and to reduce systemic toxicity in comparison to established platinum-based chemotherapy. Pt(IV) complexes are thought to be activated by reduction via physiological reductants, such as ascorbic acid or glutathione. Nevertheless, only few investigations on the link between the reduction rate, which is influenced by the reductant, and the ligand sphere of the Pt(IV) metal centre have been performed so far. Herein, we investigated a set of Pt(IV) compounds with varying rates of reduction with respect to their cytotoxicity and drug accumulation in A2780 and A2780cis ovarian cancer cell lines, their influence on the cell cycle, efficiency of triggering apoptosis, and ability to interfere with plasmid DNA (pUC19). The effects caused by Pt(IV) compounds were compared without or with extracellularly added ascorbic acid and glutathione (or its precursor N-acetylcysteine) to gain understanding of the impact of increased levels of the reductant on the activity of such complexes. Our results demonstrate that reduction is required prior to plasmid interaction. Furthermore, the rate of reduction is crucial for the efficiency of this set of Pt(IV) compounds. The substances that are reduced least likely showed similar performances, whereas the fastest reducing substance was negatively affected by an increased extracellular level of reducing agents, with reduced cytotoxicity and lower efficiency in inducing apoptosis and G2/M arrest. These results confirm the connection between reduction and activity, and prove the strong impact of the reduction site on the activity of Pt(IV) complexes. PMID:26073554

  11. Antivascular Therapy for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Duhoux, Francois P.; Machiels, Jean-Pascal

    2010-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth largest cancer killer in women. Improved understanding of the molecular pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer has led to the investigation of novel targeted therapies. Ovarian cancer is characterized by an imbalance between pro- and antiangiogenic factors in favor of angiogenesis activation. Various antivascular strategies are currently under investigation in ovarian cancer. They can schematically be divided into antiangiogenic and vascular-disrupting therapies. This paper provides a comprehensive review of these new treatments targeting the tumor vasculature in this disease. Promising activities have been detected in phase II trials, and results of phase III clinical trials are awaited eagerly. PMID:20072701

  12. The E3 ubiquitin ligase EDD is an adverse prognostic factor for serous epithelial ovarian cancer and modulates cisplatin resistance in vitro.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, P M; Davies, M J; Scurry, J P; Smith, A N; Barton, C A; Henderson, M J; Saunders, D N; Gloss, B S; Patterson, K I; Clancy, J L; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, V A; Murali, Rajmohan; Scolyer, R A; Zeng, Y; Williams, E D; Scurr, L; Defazio, A; Quinn, D I; Watts, C K W; Hacker, N F; Henshall, S M; Sutherland, R L

    2008-03-25

    Despite a high initial response rate to first-line platinum/paclitaxel chemotherapy, most women with epithelial ovarian cancer relapse with recurrent disease that becomes refractory to further cytotoxic treatment. We have previously shown that the E3 ubiquitin ligase, EDD, a regulator of DNA damage responses, is amplified and overexpressed in serous ovarian carcinoma. Given that DNA damage pathways are linked to platinum resistance, the aim of this study was to determine if EDD expression was associated with disease recurrence and platinum sensitivity in serous ovarian cancer. High nuclear EDD expression, as determined by immunohistochemistry in a cohort of 151 women with serous ovarian carcinoma, was associated with an approximately two-fold increased risk of disease recurrence and death in patients who initially responded to first-line chemotherapy, independently of disease stage and suboptimal debulking. Although EDD expression was not directly correlated with relative cisplatin sensitivity of ovarian cancer cell lines, sensitivity to cisplatin was partially restored in platinum-resistant A2780-cp70 ovarian cancer cells following siRNA-mediated knockdown of EDD expression. These results identify EDD as a new independent prognostic marker for outcome in serous ovarian cancer, and suggest that pathways involving EDD, including DNA damage responses, may represent new therapeutic targets for chemoresistant ovarian cancer. PMID:18349819

  13. Belinostat and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer That Did Not Respond to Carboplatin or Cisplatin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  14. Ovulation and extra-ovarian origin of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang-Hartwich, Yang; Gurrea-Soteras, Marta; Sumi, Natalia; Joo, Won Duk; Holmberg, Jennie C; Craveiro, Vinicius; Alvero, Ayesha B; Mor, Gil

    2014-01-01

    The mortality rate of ovarian cancer remains high due to late diagnosis and recurrence. A fundamental step toward improving detection and treatment of this lethal disease is to understand its origin. A growing number of studies have revealed that ovarian cancer can develop from multiple extra-ovarian origins, including fallopian tube, gastrointestinal tract, cervix and endometriosis. However, the mechanism leading to their ovarian localization is not understood. We utilized in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo models to recapitulate the process of extra-ovarian malignant cells migrating to the ovaries and forming tumors. We provided experimental evidence to support that ovulation, by disrupting the ovarian surface epithelium and releasing chemokines/cytokines, promotes the migration and adhesion of malignant cells to the ovary. We identified the granulosa cell-secreted SDF-1 as a main chemoattractant that recruits malignant cells towards the ovary. Our findings revealed a potential molecular mechanism of how the extra-ovarian cells can be attracted by the ovary, migrate to and form tumors in the ovary. Our data also supports the association between increased ovulation and the risk of ovarian cancer. Understanding this association will lead us to the development of more specific markers for early detection and better prevention strategies. PMID:25135607

  15. Early Preinvasive Lesions in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chene, Gautier; Lamblin, Gery; Le Bail-Carval, Karine; Chabert, Philippe; Bakrin, Naoual; Mellier, Georges

    2014-01-01

    Faced with the catastrophic prognosis for ovarian cancer due to the fact that it is most often diagnosed late at the peritoneal carcinomatosis stage, screening and early detection could probably reduce the mortality rate. A better understanding of the molecular characteristics of the different ovarian cancer subtypes and their specific molecular signatures is indispensable prior to development of new screening strategies. We discuss here the early natural history of ovarian cancer and its origins. PMID:24804229

  16. Palliative Care in Improving Quality of Life and Symptoms in Patients With Stage III-IV Pancreatic or Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-18

    Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer

  17. Surgical management of recurrent ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Leitao, Mario M; Chi, Dennis S

    2009-04-01

    Surgery is the cornerstone of treatment for patients with advanced ovarian cancer. The majority of patients with advanced ovarian cancer who experience a clinical remission after initial surgery will develop a recurrence. The optimal management for patients with recurrent ovarian cancer remains to be defined. Chemotherapy is frequently used with varying response rates. Repeat surgical cytoreduction appears to offer a survival benefit for select patients with recurrent ovarian cancer and should be considered. Surgery also plays a role in the palliation of certain patients. Continued investigations, especially randomized trials, are needed to further define the optimal treatment modalities for these patients. PMID:19332245

  18. Expression of GBGT1 is epigenetically regulated by DNA methylation in ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The GBGT1 gene encodes the globoside alpha-1,3-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 1. This enzyme catalyzes the last step in the multi-step biosynthesis of the Forssman (Fs) antigen, a pentaglycosyl ceramide of the globo series glycosphingolipids. While differential GBGT1 mRNA expression has been observed in a variety of human tissues being highest in placenta and ovary, the expression of GBGT1 and the genes encoding the glycosyltransferases and glycosidases involved in the biosynthesis of Fs as well as the possible involvement of DNA methylation in transcriptional regulation of GBGT1 expression have not yet been investigated. Results RT-qPCR profiling showed high GBGT1 expression in normal ovary surface epithelial (HOSE) cell lines and low GBGT1 expression in all (e.g. A2780, SKOV3) except one (OVCAR3) investigated ovarian cancer cell lines, a finding that was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Hierarchical cluster analysis showed that GBGT1 was even the most variably expressed gene of Fs biosynthesis-relevant glycogenes and among the investigated cell lines, whereas NAGA which encodes the alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase hydrolyzing Fs was not differentially expressed. Bisulfite- and COBRA-analysis of the CpG island methylation status in the GBGT1 promoter region demonstrated high or intermediate levels of GBGT1 DNA methylation in all ovarian cancer cell lines (except for OVCAR3) but marginal levels of DNA methylation in the two HOSE cell lines. The extent of DNA methylation inversely correlated with GBGT1 mRNA and protein expression. Bioinformatic analysis of GBGT1 in The Cancer Genome Atlas ovarian cancer dataset demonstrated that this inverse correlation was also found in primary ovarian cancer tissue samples confirming our cell line-based findings. Restoration of GBGT1 mRNA and protein expression in low GBGT1-expressing A2780 cells was achieved by 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine treatment and these treated cells exhibited increased helix pomatia agglutinin

  19. Human Leukocyte Antigen-Presented Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor Is a Surface Biomarker and Potential Therapeutic Target for Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Andrea M; Kaabinejadian, Saghar; McMurtrey, Curtis P; Bardet, Wilfried; Jackson, Ken W; Zuna, Rosemary E; Husain, Sanam; Adams, Gregory P; MacDonald, Glen; Dillon, Rachelle L; Ames, Harold; Buchli, Rico; Hawkins, Oriana E; Weidanz, Jon A; Hildebrand, William H

    2016-02-01

    T cells recognize cancer cells via HLA/peptide complexes, and when disease overtakes these immune mechanisms, immunotherapy can exogenously target these same HLA/peptide surface markers. We previously identified an HLA-A2-presented peptide derived from macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) and generated antibody RL21A against this HLA-A2/MIF complex. The objective of the current study was to assess the potential for targeting the HLA-A2/MIF complex in ovarian cancer. First, MIF peptide FLSELTQQL was eluted from the HLA-A2 of the human cancerous ovarian cell lines SKOV3, A2780, OV90, and FHIOSE118hi and detected by mass spectrometry. By flow cytometry, RL21A was shown to specifically stain these four cell lines in the context of HLA-A2. Next, partially matched HLA-A*02:01+ ovarian cancer (n = 27) and normal fallopian tube (n = 24) tissues were stained with RL21A by immunohistochemistry to assess differential HLA-A2/MIF complex expression. Ovarian tumor tissues revealed significantly increased RL21A staining compared with normal fallopian tube epithelium (P < 0.0001), with minimal staining of normal stroma and blood vessels (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.001 compared with tumor cells) suggesting a therapeutic window. We then demonstrated the anticancer activity of toxin-bound RL21A via the dose-dependent killing of ovarian cancer cells. In summary, MIF-derived peptide FLSELTQQL is HLA-A2-presented and recognized by RL21A on ovarian cancer cell lines and patient tumor tissues, and targeting of this HLA-A2/MIF complex with toxin-bound RL21A can induce ovarian cancer cell death. These results suggest that the HLA-A2/MIF complex should be further explored as a cell-surface target for ovarian cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26719579

  20. Nilotinib reduced the viability of human ovarian cancer cells via mitochondria-dependent apoptosis, independent of JNK activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tze-Chien; Yu, Ming-Chih; Chien, Chih-Chiang; Wu, Ming-Shun; Lee, Yu-Chieh; Chen, Yen-Chou

    2016-03-01

    Nilotinib (AMN) induces apoptosis in various cancer cells; however the effect of AMN on human ovarian cancer cells is still unclear. A reduction in cell viability associated with the occurrence of apoptotic characteristics was observed in human SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells under AMN but not sorafenib (SORA) or imatinib (STI) stimulation. Activation of apoptotic pathway including increased caspase (Casp)-3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) protein cleavage by AMN was detected with disrupted mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) accompanied by decreased Bcl-2 protein and increased cytosolic cytochrome (Cyt) c/cleaved Casp-9 protein expressions was found, and AMN-induced cell death was inhibited by peptidyl Casp inhibitors, VAD, DEVD and LEHD. Increased phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) protein expression was detected in AMN- but not SORA- or STI-treated SKOV-3 cells, and the JNK inhibitors, SP600125 and JNKI, showed slight but significant enhancement of AMN-induced cell death in SKOV-3 cells. The intracellular peroxide level was elevated by AMN and H2O2, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prevented H2O2- but not AMN-induced peroxide production and apoptosis in SKOV-3 cells. AMN induction of apoptosis with increased intracellular peroxide production and JNK protein phosphorylation was also identified in human A2780 ovarian cancer cells, cisplatin-resistant A2780CP cells, and clear ES-2 cells. The evidence supporting AMN effectively reducing the viability of human ovarian cancer cells via mitochondrion-dependent apoptosis is provided. PMID:26549707

  1. Casticin induces ovarian cancer cell apoptosis by repressing FoxM1 through the activation of FOXO3a

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, LING; CAO, XIAO-CHENG; CAO, JIAN-GUO; LIU, FEI; QUAN, MEI-FANG; SHENG, XI-FENG; REN, KAI-QUN

    2013-01-01

    Casticin, a polymethoxyflavone, is reported to have anticancer activities. The aim of the present study was to examine the molecular mechanisms by which casticin induces apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells. The human ovarian cancer cell lines SKOV3 and A2780 were cultured in vitro. Various molecular techniques, including histone/DNA enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blot analysis and gene transfection, were used to assess the expression of FOXO3a and forkhead box protein M1 (FoxM1) in casticin-treated ovarian cancer cell lines. Casticin-induced apoptotic cell death was accompanied by the activation of transcription factor FOXO3a, with a concomitant decrease in the expression levels of FoxM1 and its downstream target factors, namely survivin and polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1), and an increase in p27KIP1. A small inhibitory RNA (siRNA) knockout of FoxM1 potentiated casticin-induced apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells. Silencing FOXO3a expression using siRNA increased FoxM1 expression levels and clearly attenuated the induction of apoptosis by casticin treatment. These results show that casticin-induced apoptosis in ovarian cancer may be caused by the activation of FOXO3a, leading to FoxM1 inhibition. PMID:23761826

  2. Targeting RNA transcription and translation in ovarian cancer cells with pharmacological inhibitor CDKI-73.

    PubMed

    Lam, Frankie; Abbas, Abdullahi Y; Shao, Hao; Teo, Theodosia; Adams, Julian; Li, Peng; Bradshaw, Tracey D; Fischer, Peter M; Walsby, Elisabeth; Pepper, Chris; Chen, Yi; Ding, Jian; Wang, Shudong

    2014-09-15

    Dysregulation of cellular transcription and translation is a fundamental hallmark of cancer. As CDK9 and Mnks play pivotal roles in the regulation of RNA transcription and protein synthesis, respectively, they are important targets for drug development. We herein report the cellular mechanism of a novel CDK9 inhibitor CDKI-73 in an ovarian cancer cell line (A2780). We also used shRNA-mediated CDK9 knockdown to investigate the importance of CDK9 in the maintenance of A2780 cells. This study revealed that CDKI-73 rapidly inhibited cellular CDK9 kinase activity and down-regulated the RNAPII phosphorylation. This subsequently caused a decrease in the eIF4E phosphorylation by blocking Mnk1 kinase activity. Consistently, CDK9 shRNA was also found to down-regulate the Mnk1 expression. Both CDKI-73 and CDK9 shRNA decreased anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1 and Bcl-2 and induced apoptosis. The study confirmed that CDK9 is required for cell survival and that ovarian cancer may be susceptible to CDK9 inhibition strategy. The data also implied a role of CDK9 in eIF4E-mediated translational control, suggesting that CDK9 may have important implication in the Mnk-eIF4E axis, the key determinants of PI3K/Akt/mTOR- and Ras/Raf/MAPK-mediated tumorigenic activity. As such, CDK9 inhibitor drug candidate CDKI-73 should have a major impact on these pathways in human cancers. PMID:25277198

  3. Targeting RNA transcription and translation in ovarian cancer cells with pharmacological inhibitor CDKI-73

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Frankie; Abbas, Abdullahi Y.; Shao, Hao; Teo, Theodosia; Adams, Julian; Li, Peng; Bradshaw, Tracey D.; Fischer, Peter M.; Walsby, Elisabeth; Pepper, Chris; Chen, Yi; Ding, Jian; Wang, Shudong

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation of cellular transcription and translation is a fundamental hallmark of cancer. As CDK9 and Mnks play pivotal roles in the regulation of RNA transcription and protein synthesis, respectively, they are important targets for drug development. We herein report the cellular mechanism of a novel CDK9 inhibitor CDKI-73 in an ovarian cancer cell line (A2780). We also used shRNA-mediated CDK9 knockdown to investigate the importance of CDK9 in the maintenance of A2780 cells. This study revealed that CDKI-73 rapidly inhibited cellular CDK9 kinase activity and down-regulated the RNAPII phosphorylation. This subsequently caused a decrease in the eIF4E phosphorylation by blocking Mnk1 kinase activity. Consistently, CDK9 shRNA was also found to down-regulate the Mnk1 expression. Both CDKI-73 and CDK9 shRNA decreased anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1 and Bcl-2 and induced apoptosis. The study confirmed that CDK9 is required for cell survival and that ovarian cancer may be susceptible to CDK9 inhibition strategy. The data also implied a role of CDK9 in eIF4E-mediated translational control, suggesting that CDK9 may have important implication in the Mnk-eIF4E axis, the key determinants of PI3K/Akt/mTOR- and Ras/Raf/MAPK-mediated tumorigenic activity. As such, CDK9 inhibitor drug candidate CDKI-73 should have a major impact on these pathways in human cancers. PMID:25277198

  4. Belinostat in Treating Patients With Advanced Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer or Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-04-11

    Fallopian Tube Cancer; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Borderline Ovarian Surface Epithelial-stromal Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Borderline Ovarian Surface Epithelial-stromal Tumor; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Borderline Ovarian Surface Epithelial-stromal Tumor; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  5. ALDH1A1 Maintains Ovarian Cancer Stem Cell-Like Properties by Altered Regulation of Cell Cycle Checkpoint and DNA Repair Network Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Erhong; Mitra, Aparna; Tripathi, Kaushlendra; Finan, Michael A.; Scalici, Jennifer; McClellan, Steve; da Silva, Luciana Madeira; Reed, Eddie; Shevde, Lalita A.; Palle, Komaraiah; Rocconi, Rodney P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) expressing cells have been characterized as possessing stem cell-like properties. We evaluated ALDH+ ovarian cancer stem cell-like properties and their role in platinum resistance. Methods Isogenic ovarian cancer cell lines for platinum sensitivity (A2780) and platinum resistant (A2780/CP70) as well as ascites from ovarian cancer patients were analyzed for ALDH+ by flow cytometry to determine its association to platinum resistance, recurrence and survival. A stable shRNA knockdown model for ALDH1A1 was utilized to determine its effect on cancer stem cell-like properties, cell cycle checkpoints, and DNA repair mediators. Results ALDH status directly correlated to platinum resistance in primary ovarian cancer samples obtained from ascites. Patients with ALDHHIGH displayed significantly lower progression free survival than the patients with ALDHLOW cells (9 vs. 3 months, respectively p<0.01). ALDH1A1-knockdown significantly attenuated clonogenic potential, PARP-1 protein levels, and reversed inherent platinum resistance. ALDH1A1-knockdown resulted in dramatic decrease of KLF4 and p21 protein levels thereby leading to S and G2 phase accumulation of cells. Increases in S and G2 cells demonstrated increased expression of replication stress associated Fanconi Anemia DNA repair proteins (FANCD2, FANCJ) and replication checkpoint (pS317 Chk1) were affected. ALDH1A1-knockdown induced DNA damage, evidenced by robust induction of γ-H2AX and BAX mediated apoptosis, with significant increases in BRCA1 expression, suggesting ALDH1A1-dependent regulation of cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair networks in ovarian cancer stem-like cells. Conclusion This data suggests that ovarian cancer cells expressing ALDH1A1 may maintain platinum resistance by altered regulation of cell cycle checkpoint and DNA repair network signaling. PMID:25216266

  6. OVARIAN CANCER: INVOLVEMENT OF THE MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASES

    PubMed Central

    Al-Alem, Linah; Curry, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancies. Reasons for the high mortality rate associated with ovarian cancer include a late diagnosis at which time the cancer has metastasized throughout the peritoneal cavity. Cancer metastasis is facilitated by the remodeling of the extracellular tumor matrix by a family of proteolytic enzymes known as the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). There are 23 members in the MMP family, many of which have been reported to be associated with ovarian cancer. In the current paradigm, ovarian tumor cells and the surrounding stromal cells stimulate the synthesis and/or activation of various MMPs to aid in tumor growth, invasion, and eventual metastasis. This review sheds light on the different MMPs in the various types of ovarian cancer and their impact on the progression of this gynecologic malignancy. PMID:25918438

  7. Targeted Therapies in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Emma; El-Helw, Loaie; Hasan, Jurjees

    2010-01-01

    Molecularly targeted therapy is relatively new to ovarian cancer despite the unquestionable success with these agents in other solid tumours such as breast and colorectal cancer. Advanced ovarian cancer is chemosensitive and patients can survive several years on treatment. However chemotherapy diminishes in efficacy over time whilst toxicities persist. Newer biological agents that target explicit molecular pathways and lack specific chemotherapy toxicities such as myelosuppression offer the advantage of long-term therapy with a manageable toxicity profile enabling patients to enjoy a good quality of life. In this review we appraise the emerging data on novel targeted therapies in ovarian cancer. We discuss the role of these compounds in the front-line treatment of ovarian cancer and in relapsed disease; and describe how the development of predictive clinical, molecular and imaging biomarkers will define the role of biological agents in the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:24281034

  8. Grifolin induces autophagic cell death by inhibiting the Akt/mTOR/S6K pathway in human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Che, Xiaoxia; Yan, Hong; Sun, Hengzi; Dongol, Samina; Wang, Yilin; Lv, Qingtao; Jiang, Jie

    2016-08-01

    Grifolin, a secondary metabolic product isolated from the mushroom Albatrellus confluence, has been reported to possess antitumor activities in various tumors. To date, no report exists on the role of autophagy in grifolin-treated human ovarian cancer cells. In the present study, we investigated the effect and the mechanism of autophagy in ovarian cancer. Ovarian cancer cell lines A2780 and SKOV3 were treated with grifolin. Cell proliferation was assessed by MTT assay and the autophagic effect was determined using flow cytometry, electron microscopy, immunofluorescence staining and GFP-LC3 puncta formation assay. The expression of autophagy markers and the main autophagy-associated Akt/mTOR/S6K pathway proteins were measured by western blot analysis. MTT assay indicated that grifolin inhibits the proliferation of human ovarian cancer cell lines A2780 and SKOV3. Flow cytometry, electron microscopy, immunofluorescence and GFP-LC3 puncta formation assay proved that grifolin induces autophagic cell death in human ovarian cancer. The results of the western blot analysis suggested that grifolin treatment leads to upregulation of autophagy markers LC3B, Atg7, Beclin-1 along with downregulation of P62. In addition, the proteins of the pathways p-Akt, p-mTOR, p-p70S6K and p-4E-BP1 were downregulated while the total of these proteins remained unaffected. The present study indicated that grifolin could induce autophagic cell death in human ovarian cancer by inhibiting the Akt/mTOR/S6K pathway. PMID:27277722

  9. Differential platelet levels affect response to taxane-based therapy in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Choi, Hyun-Jin; Dalton, Heather J.; Stone, Rebecca L.; Cho, Min Soon; Haemmerle, Monika; Nick, Alpa M.; Pradeep, Sunila; Zand, Behrouz; Previs, Rebecca A.; Pecot, Chad V.; Crane, Erin King; Hu, Wei; Lutgendorf, Susan K.; Afshar-Kharghan, Vahid; Sood, Anil K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We hypothesized that platelet levels during therapy could serve as a biomarker for response to therapy and that manipulation of platelet levels could impact responsiveness to chemotherapy. Experimental Design The medical records of patients with recurrent or progressive ovarian cancer were retrospectively queried for changes in platelet and CA-125 levels during primary therapy. In vitro co-culture experiments and in vivo orthotopic models of human ovarian cancer in mice were used to test the effect of modulating platelet levels on tumor growth and responsiveness to docetaxel. Results Thrombocytosis at the diagnosis of ovarian cancer correlated with decreased interval to progression (p = 0.05) and median overall survival (p = 0.007). Mean platelet levels corrected during primary therapy and rose at recurrence. Contrary to treatment-responsive patients, in a cohort of patients refractory to primary therapy, platelet levels did not normalize during therapy. In A2780, HeyA8, and SKOV3-ip1 ovarian cancer cell lines, platelet co-culture protected against apoptosis (p < 0.05). In orthotopic models of human ovarian cancer, platelet depletion resulted in 70% reduced mean tumor weight (p < 0.05). Compared to mice treated with docetaxel, mice treated with both docetaxel and platelet-depleting antibody had a 62% decrease in mean tumor weight (p = 0.04). Platelet transfusion increased mean aggregate tumor weight 2.4-fold (p < 0.05), blocked the effect of docetaxel on tumor growth (p = 0.55) and decreased tumor cell apoptosis. Pre-transfusion aspirinization of the platelets blocked the growth-promoting effects of transfusion. Conclusions Platelet-driven effects of chemotherapy response may explain clinical observations. PMID:25473001

  10. Rethinking Ovarian Cancer: Recommendations for Improving Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, Sebastian; Coward, Jermaine I.; Bast Jr., Robert C.; Berchuck, Andy; Berek, Jonathan S.; Brenton, James D.; Coukos, George; Crum, Christopher C.; Drapkin, Ronny; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; Friedlander, Michael; Gabra, Hani; Kaye, Stan B.; Lord, Chris J.; Lengyel, Ernst; Levine, Douglas A.; McNeish, Iain A.; Menon, Usha; Mills, Gordon B.; Nephew, Kenneth P.; Oza, Amit M.; Sood, Anil K.; Stronach, Euan A.; Walczak, Henning; Bowtell, David D.; Balkwill, Frances R.

    2012-01-01

    There have been major advances in our understanding of the cellular and molecular biology of the human malignancies collectively referred to as ovarian cancer. At a recent Helene Harris Memorial Trust meeting, an international group of researchers considered actions that should be taken to improve the outcome for women with ovarian cancer. Nine major recommendations are outlined in this Perspective. PMID:21941283

  11. Ovarian cancer mortality and industrial pollution.

    PubMed

    García-Pérez, Javier; Lope, Virginia; López-Abente, Gonzalo; González-Sánchez, Mario; Fernández-Navarro, Pablo

    2015-10-01

    We investigated whether there might be excess ovarian cancer mortality among women residing near Spanish industries, according to different categories of industrial groups and toxic substances. An ecologic study was designed to examine ovarian cancer mortality at a municipal level (period 1997-2006). Population exposure to pollution was estimated by means of distance from town to facility. Using Poisson regression models, we assessed the relative risk of dying from ovarian cancer in zones around installations, and analyzed the effect of industrial groups and pollutant substances. Excess ovarian cancer mortality was detected in the vicinity of all sectors combined, and, principally, near refineries, fertilizers plants, glass production, paper production, food/beverage sector, waste treatment plants, pharmaceutical industry and ceramic. Insofar as substances were concerned, statistically significant associations were observed for installations releasing metals and polycyclic aromatic chemicals. These results support that residing near industries could be a risk factor for ovarian cancer mortality. PMID:26046426

  12. Role of PAR-4 in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Meynier, Sonia; Kramer, Marianne; Ribaux, Pascale; Tille, Jean-Christophe; Delie, Florence; Petignat, Patrick; Cohen, Marie

    2015-09-01

    Prostate apoptosis response-4 (PAR-4) is considered as a tumour suppressor due to its ability to selectively induce cell apoptosis in most cancer cells. However little is known about the role of PAR-4 in ovarian cancer. In this study, we investigated for the first time the role of PAR-4 in ovarian carcinogenesis. We showed that PAR-4 mRNA level is not significantly different between healthy and cancer ovarian cells. Immunohistochemistry on ovarian tissue showed that ovarian cancer cells are positive for PAR-4 nuclear and cytoplasmic staining whereas ovarian healthy cells are negative for PAR-4 nuclear staining. We then studied the role of PAR-4 in cell apoptosis. We determined that PAR-4 induces cell apoptosis in response to stimuli, in vitro, but is also involved in the relocation of GRP78 from endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface of ovarian cancer cell line (SKOV-3 cells). In ovo, PAR-4 decreases ovarian tumour development and increases the response to taxol treatment. These observations suggest that PAR-4 is a very interesting therapeutic target against ovarian carcinogenesis. PMID:26246468

  13. Role of PAR-4 in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meynier, Sonia; Kramer, Marianne; Ribaux, Pascale; Tille, Jean-Christophe; Delie, Florence; Petignat, Patrick; Cohen, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Prostate apoptosis response-4 (PAR-4) is considered as a tumour suppressor due to its ability to selectively induce cell apoptosis in most cancer cells. However little is known about the role of PAR-4 in ovarian cancer. In this study, we investigated for the first time the role of PAR-4 in ovarian carcinogenesis. We showed that PAR-4 mRNA level is not significantly different between healthy and cancer ovarian cells. Immunohistochemistry on ovarian tissue showed that ovarian cancer cells are positive for PAR-4 nuclear and cytoplasmic staining whereas ovarian healthy cells are negative for PAR-4 nuclear staining. We then studied the role of PAR-4 in cell apoptosis. We determined that PAR-4 induces cell apoptosis in response to stimuli, in vitro, but is also involved in the relocation of GRP78 from endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface of ovarian cancer cell line (SKOV-3 cells). In ovo, PAR-4 decreases ovarian tumour development and increases the response to taxol treatment. These observations suggest that PAR-4 is a very interesting therapeutic target against ovarian carcinogenesis. PMID:26246468

  14. Predictive and therapeutic markers in ovarian cancer

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Guan, Yinghui; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Fridlyand, Jane; Mills, Gordon B.

    2013-03-26

    Cancer markers may be developed to detect diseases characterized by increased expression of apoptosis-suppressing genes, such as aggressive cancers. Genes in the human chromosomal regions, 8q24, 11q13, 20q11-q13, were found to be amplified indicating in vivo drug resistance in diseases such as ovarian cancer. Diagnosis and assessment of amplification levels certain genes shown to be amplified, including PVT1, can be useful in prediction of poor outcome of patient's response and drug resistance in ovarian cancer patients with low survival rates. Certain genes were found to be high priority therapeutic targets by the identification of recurrent aberrations involving genome sequence, copy number and/or gene expression are associated with reduced survival duration in certain diseases and cancers, specifically ovarian cancer. Therapeutics to inhibit amplification and inhibitors of one of these genes, PVT1, target drug resistance in ovarian cancer patients with low survival rates is described.

  15. EGEN-001 and Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-11

    Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  16. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Ovarian Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer? What should you ask your doctor about ovarian cancer? It is important for you to have honest, ... are some questions to consider: What type of ovarian cancer do I have? Has my cancer spread beyond ...

  17. Therapeutic advances in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Rader, J S

    1992-02-01

    The propensity of ovarian cancer to recur--even after initial chemotherapeutic responses--is a problem that has been given a great deal of attention during the past year in the literature dealing with the treatment of ovarian cancer. Most of the articles address techniques to improve the percent of initial and secondary treatment responses. Several studies have described cytoreductive techniques to decrease the remaining tumor size for improved chemotherapeutic response. Cross-resistance between platinum analogues has been reconfirmed. However, improved secondary responses were seen when repeat treatment with platinum agents were preceded by a longer interval from initial platinum agent therapy. Radiation therapy has been shown to offer little solution to recurrent disease except possibly in a select group of patients with microscopic disease at second-look laparotomy. Reports on the use of carboplatin continue to demonstrate good initial responses, with decreased toxicity compared with cisplatin. Granisetron has been shown to significantly decrease the nausea and vomiting caused by emetogenic chemotherapy like cisplatin. PMID:1543823

  18. Metformin Hydrochloride, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-01

    Ovarian Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  19. Nanoceria: A Rare-Earth Nanoparticle as a Novel Anti-Angiogenic Therapeutic Agent in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Shailendra; Karakoti, Ajay; Graham, Rondell P.; Maguire, Jacie L.; Reilly, Christopher M.; Seal, Sudipta; Rattan, Ramandeep; Shridhar, Viji

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer (OvCa) is the fifth most common cause of death from all cancers among women in United Sates and the leading cause of death from gynecological malignancies. While most OvCa patients initially respond to surgical debulking and chemotherapy, 75% of patients later succumb to the disease. Thus, there is an urgent need to test novel therapeutic agents to counteract the high mortality rate associated with OvCa. In this context, we have developed and engineered Nanoceria (NCe), nanoparticles of cerium oxide, possessing anti-oxidant properties, to be used as a therapeutic agent in OvCa. We show for the first time that NCe significantly inhibited production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in A2780 cells, attenuated growth factor (SDF1, HB-EGF, VEGF165 and HGF) mediated cell migration and invasion of SKOV3 cells, without affecting the cell proliferation. NCe treatment also inhibited VEGF165 induced proliferation, capillary tube formation, activation of VEGFR2 and MMP2 in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC). NCe (0.1 mg/kg body weigh) treatment of A2780 ovarian cancer cells injected intra-peritoneally in nude mice showed significant reduction (p<0.002) in tumor growth accompanied by decreased tumor cell proliferation as evident from reduced tumor size and Ki67 staining. Accumulation of NCe was found in tumors isolated from treated group using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Reduction of the tumor mass was accompanied by attenuation of angiogenesis, as observed by reduced CD31 staining and specific apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells. Collectively, these results indicate that cerium oxide based NCe is a novel nanoparticle that can potentially be used as an anti-angiogenic therapeutic agent in ovarian cancer. PMID:23382918

  20. Bevacizumab and Intravenous or Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-05

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  1. Mechanistic Nanotherapeutic Approach Based on siRNA-Mediated DJ-1 Protein Suppression for Platinum-Resistant Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Canan; Chan, Stephanie; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Khal, Shannon; Moskal, Vitaliya; Shah, Vidhi; Alani, Adam W G; Taratula, Olena; Taratula, Oleh

    2016-06-01

    We report an efficient therapeutic modality for platinum resistant ovarian cancer based on siRNA-mediated suppression of a multifunctional DJ-1 protein that is responsible for the proliferation, growth, invasion, oxidative stress, and overall survival of various cancers. The developed therapeutic strategy can work alone or in concert with a low dose of the first line chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin, to elicit a maximal therapeutic response. To achieve an efficient DJ-1 knockdown, we constructed the polypropylenimine dendrimer-based nanoplatform targeted to LHRH receptors overexpressed on ovarian cancer cells. The quantitative PCR and Western immunoblotting analysis revealed that the delivered DJ-1 siRNA downregulated the expression of targeted mRNA and corresponding protein by more than 80% in various ovarian cancer cells. It was further demonstrated that siRNA-mediated DJ-1 suppression dramatically impaired proliferation, viability, and migration of the employed ovarian cancer cells. Finally, the combinatorial approach led to the most pronounced therapeutic response in all the studied cell lines, outperforming both siRNA-mediated DJ-1 knockdown and cisplatin treatment alone. It is noteworthy that the platinum-resistant cancer cells (A2780/CDDP) with the highest basal level of DJ-1 protein are most susceptible to the developed therapy and this susceptibility declines with decreasing basal levels of DJ-1. Finally, we interrogate the molecular underpinnings of the DJ-1 knockdown effects in the treatment of the ovarian cancer cells. By using various experimental techniques, it was revealed that DJ-1 depletion (1) decreases the activity of the Akt pathway, thereby reducing cellular proliferation and migration and increasing the antiproliferative effect of cisplatin on ovarian cancer cells; (2) enhances the activity of p53 tumor suppressor protein therefore restoring cell cycle arrest functionality and upregulating the Bax-caspase pathway, triggering cell death; and (3

  2. Oncolytic reovirus against ovarian and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, Kensuke; Nishikawa, Sandra G; Norman, Kara L; Alain, Tommy; Kossakowska, Anna; Lee, Patrick W K

    2002-03-15

    Reovirus selectively replicates in and destroys cancer cells with an activated Ras signaling pathway. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of using reovirus (serotype 3, strain Dearing) as an antihuman colon and ovarian cancer agent. In in vitro studies, reovirus infection in human colon and ovarian cell lines was assessed by cytopathic effect as detected by light microscopy, [(35)S]Methionine labeling of infected cells for viral protein synthesis and progeny virus production by plaque assay. We observed that reovirus efficiently infected all five human colon cancer cell lines (Caco-2, DLD-1, HCT-116, HT-29, and SW48) and four human ovarian cancer cell lines (MDAH2774, PA-1, SKOV3, and SW626) which were tested, but not a normal colon cell line (CCD-18Co) or a normal ovarian cell line (NOV-31). We also observed that the Ras activity in the human colon and ovarian cancer cell lines was elevated compared with that in normal colon and ovarian cell lines. In animal models, intraneoplastic as well as i.v. inoculation of reovirus resulted in significant regression of established s.c. human colon and ovarian tumors implanted at the hind flank. Histological studies revealed that reovirus infection in vivo was restricted to tumor cells, whereas the surrounding normal tissue remained uninfected. Additionally, in an i.p. human ovarian cancer xenograft model, inhibition of ascites tumor formation and the survival of animals treated with live reovirus was significantly greater than of control mice treated with UV-inactivated reovirus. Reovirus infection in ex vivo primary human ovarian tumor surgical samples was also confirmed, further demonstrating the potential of reovirus therapy. These results suggest that reovirus holds promise as a novel agent for human colon and ovarian cancer therapy. PMID:11912142

  3. OPT-821 With or Without Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Peritoneal Cancer in Second or Third Complete Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  4. trans-thionate derivatives of Pt(II) and Pd(II) with water-soluble phosphane PTA and DAPTA ligands: antiproliferative activity against human ovarian cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Elena; Miranda, Susana; Lüttenberg, Sebastian; Fröhlich, Nils; Koenen, Jan-Moritz; Mohr, Fabian; Cerrada, Elena; Laguna, Mariano; Mendía, Aránzazu

    2013-06-01

    A series of PTA and DAPTA platinum(II) and palladium(II) thionate complexes of the type trans-[M(SN)2P2] were prepared from the reaction of cis-[MCl2P2] [M = Pt, Pd; P = PTA (1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane), DAPTA (3,7-diacetyl-1,3,7-triaza-5-phosphabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane)] with the in situ generated sodium salts of the heterocyclic thiones S-m-methylpyrimidine-2-thione, S-4,6-dimethylpyrimidine-2-thione, S-4,6-dihydroxypyrimidine-2-thione, benzothiazole-2-thione, benzoxazole-2-thione, S-1,3,4,-thiadiazole-2-thione, S-4,5-H-thiazolan-2-thione, and S-pyrimidine-4(1H)-one-2-thione. The X-ray structures of six of the compounds confirm the trans disposition and, only in the case of [Pd2Cl2(S-pyrimidine-4(1H)-one-2-thionate)2(PTA)2], a dinuclear structure with a Pd-Pd distance of 3.0265(14)Å was observed. In vitro cytotoxicities against human ovarian cancer cell lines A2780 and A2780cisR were evaluated for ten complexes showing a high inhibition of cellular growth with a comparable inhibitory potency (IC50) against A2780 cells to that of cisplatin. Notably, the compounds also show significant (up to 7-fold higher) activity in cisplatin-resistant A2780cisR cell lines. PMID:23692403

  5. Rethinking ovarian cancer II: reducing mortality from high-grade serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Bowtell, David D; Böhm, Steffen; Ahmed, Ahmed A; Aspuria, Paul-Joseph; Bast, Robert C; Beral, Valerie; Berek, Jonathan S; Birrer, Michael J; Blagden, Sarah; Bookman, Michael A; Brenton, James D; Chiappinelli, Katherine B; Martins, Filipe Correia; Coukos, George; Drapkin, Ronny; Edmondson, Richard; Fotopoulou, Christina; Gabra, Hani; Galon, Jérôme; Gourley, Charlie; Heong, Valerie; Huntsman, David G; Iwanicki, Marcin; Karlan, Beth Y; Kaye, Allyson; Lengyel, Ernst; Levine, Douglas A; Lu, Karen H; McNeish, Iain A; Menon, Usha; Narod, Steven A; Nelson, Brad H; Nephew, Kenneth P; Pharoah, Paul; Powell, Daniel J; Ramos, Pilar; Romero, Iris L; Scott, Clare L; Sood, Anil K; Stronach, Euan A; Balkwill, Frances R

    2015-11-01

    High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) accounts for 70-80% of ovarian cancer deaths, and overall survival has not changed significantly for several decades. In this Opinion article, we outline a set of research priorities that we believe will reduce incidence and improve outcomes for women with this disease. This 'roadmap' for HGSOC was determined after extensive discussions at an Ovarian Cancer Action meeting in January 2015. PMID:26493647

  6. Rethinking ovarian cancer II: reducing mortality from high-grade serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bowtell, David D.; Böhm, Steffen; Ahmed, Ahmed A.; Aspuria, Paul-Joseph; Bast, Robert C.; Beral, Valerie; Berek, Jonathan S.; Birrer, Michael J.; Blagden, Sarah; Bookman, Michael A.; Brenton, James; Chiappinelli, Katherine B.; Martins, Filipe Correia; Coukos, George; Drapkin, Ronny; Edmondson, Richard; Fotopoulou, Christina; Gabra, Hani; Galon, Jérôme; Gourley, Charlie; Heong, Valerie; Huntsman, David G.; Iwanicki, Marcin; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kaye, Allyson; Lengyel, Ernst; Levine, Douglas A.; Lu, Karen H.; McNeish, Iain A.; Menon, Usha; Narod, Steve A.; Nelson, Brad H.; Nephew, Kenneth P.; Pharoah, Paul; Powell, Daniel J.; Ramos, Pilar; Romero, Iris L.; Scott, Clare L.; Sood, Anil K.; Stronach, Euan A.; Balkwill, Frances R.

    2016-01-01

    High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) accounts for 70-80% of ovarian cancer deaths, and overall survival has not changed significantly for several decades. In this Opinion article, we outline a set of research priorities that we believe will reduce incidence and improve outcomes for women with this disease. This ‘roadmap’ for HGSOC was determined after extensive discussions at an Ovarian Cancer Action meeting in January 2015. PMID:26493647

  7. Epidemiological characteristics of ovarian cancer in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Boyoung; Park, Sohee; Kim, Tae-Joong; Ma, Seung Hyun; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Kim, Yong-Man; Kim, Jae Weon; Kang, Sokbom; Kim, Jaehoon; Kim, Tae Jin; Yoo, Keun-Young

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to examine recent trends in ovarian cancer incidence and mortality and secular trends in demographic factors in Korea. Methods With the data from Korea Central Cancer Registry, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Korean Death Registry, and World Health Organization's Statistical Information System, we calculated age-standardized incidence and mortality rates for ovarian cancer. Also we estimated future incidence of ovarian and cervical cancer using linear regression model. To assess the demographic trend, data from national surveys in Korea or results from published papers were searched. Results Ovarian cancer incidence rate was similar to that in women worldwide but lower than those in Western countries, and the trend has been increased steadily. Ovarian cancer-related mortality rates have been increasing in Korea, even though those in western and some Asian countries, such as China, have been decreasing. Age-specific incidence rate and mortality rate showed steep increases with advancing age. The incidence rate of ovarian cancer was estimated to surpass that of uterine cervix cancer in 2015. Korea showed rapid changes in nutritional, reproductive, and anthropometric factors. Conclusion These recent trends in ovarian cancer incidence and mortality may be partly attributed to gradual westernizing of life styles and to changes in socio-demographic behavior factors. In particular, the increasing trend in ovarian cancer mortality in Korea may be attributed to a real rise in mortality as well as, in part, a decline in misclassification bias related to an increase in the proportion of deaths confirmed by physician diagnosis. PMID:21278886

  8. Ovarian cancer: emerging molecular-targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Sourbier, Carole

    2012-01-01

    With about 22,000 new cases estimated in 2012 in the US and 15,500 related deaths, ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous and aggressive disease. Even though most of patients are sensitive to chemotherapy treatment following surgery, recurring disease is almost always lethal, and only about 30% of the women affected will be cured. Thanks to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying ovarian cancer malignancy, new therapeutic options with molecular-targeted agents have become available. This review discusses the rationale behind molecular-targeted therapies and examines how newly identified molecular targets may enhance personalized therapies for ovarian cancer patients. PMID:22807625

  9. Olaparib for the treatment of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Bornstein, E; Jimeno, A

    2016-01-01

    Olaparib, an oral poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor, is the first FDA-approved drug in its class for patients with ovarian cancer, specifically in a subset of patients with BRCA mutations and prior chemotherapy treatments. PARP inhibitors have had other implications in different solid tumor types including breast, gastric and pancreatic malignancies. In light of the recent FDA approval of olaparib for the treatment of ovarian cancer, this article aims to outline the mechanisms and implications of the drug. With a favorable adverse event profile and improved outcomes, including progression-free survival, olaparib has demonstrated augmentation to therapeutic options in the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:26937492

  10. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha is required for the tumourigenic and aggressive phenotype associated with Rab25 expression in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Roman, Natividad; Sahasrabudhe, Neha Mohan; McGregor, Fiona; Chalmers, Anthony J.; Cassidy, Jim; Plumb, Jane

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPase Rab25 has been functionally linked to tumour progression and aggressiveness in ovarian cancer and promotes invasion in three-dimensional environments. This type of migration has been shown to require the expression of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α). In this report we demonstrate that Rab25 regulates HIF-1α protein expression in an oxygen independent manner in a panel of cancer cell lines. Regulation of HIF-1α protein expression by Rab25 did not require transcriptional upregulation, but was dependent on de novo protein synthesis through the Erbb2/ERK1/2 and p70S6K/mTOR pathways. Rab25 expression induced HIF-1 transcriptional activity, increased cisplatin resistance, and conferred intraperitoneal growth to the A2780 cell line in immunocompromised mice. Targeting HIF1 activity by silencing HIF-1β re-sensitised cells to cisplatin in vitro and reduced tumour formation of A2780-Rab25 expressing cells in vivo in a mouse ovarian peritoneal carcinomatosis model. Similar effects on cisplatin resistance in vitro and intraperitoneal tumourigenesis in vivo were obtained after HIF1b knockdown in the ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3, which expresses endogenous Rab25 and HIF-1α at atmospheric oxygen concentrations. Our results suggest that Rab25 tumourigenic potential and chemoresistance relies on HIF1 activity in aggressive and metastatic ovarian cancer. Targeting HIF-1 activity may potentially be effective either alone or in combination with standard chemotherapy for aggressive metastatic ovarian cancer. PMID:26967059

  11. Genomic similarities between breast and ovarian cancers

    Cancer.gov

    One subtype of breast cancer shares many genetic features with high-grade serous ovarian cancer, a cancer that is very difficult to treat, according to researchers supported by the National Institutes of Health. The findings suggest that the two cancers a

  12. Mutant p53 promotes ovarian cancer cell adhesion to mesothelial cells via integrin β4 and Akt signals

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Gyu; Ahn, Ji-Hye; Jin Kim, Tae; Ho Lee, Jae; Choi, Jung-Hye

    2015-01-01

    Missense mutations in the TP53 gene resulting in the accumulation of mutant proteins are extremely common in advanced ovarian cancer, which is characterised by peritoneal metastasis. Attachment of cancer cells to the peritoneal mesothelium is regarded as an initial, key step for the metastatic spread of ovarian cancer. In the present study, we investigated the possible role of a p53 mutant in the mesothelial adhesion of ovarian cancer cells. We found that OVCAR-3 cells with the R248 TP53 mutation (p53R248) were more adhesive to mesothelial Met5A cells than were A2780 cells expressing wild-type p53. In addition, ectopic expression of p53R248 in p53-null SKOV-3 cells significantly increased adhesion to Met5A cells. Knockdown of mutant p53 significantly compromised p53R248-induced cell adhesion to Met5A cells. Microarray analysis revealed that several adhesion-related genes, including integrin β4, were markedly up-regulated, and certain signalling pathways, including PI3K/Akt, were activated in p53R248 transfectants of SKOV-3 cells. Inhibition of integrin β4 and Akt signalling using blocking antibody and the inhibitor LY294002, respectively, significantly attenuated p53R248-mediated ovarian cancer-mesothelial adhesion. These data suggest that the p53R248 mutant endows ovarian cancer cells with increased adhesiveness and that integrin β4 and Akt signalling are associated with the mutation-enhanced ovarian cancer-mesothelial cell adhesion. PMID:26223322

  13. Ormeloxifene efficiently inhibits ovarian cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Diane M.; Khan, Sheema; Nordquist, Jordan; Ebeling, Mara C.; Bauer, Nichole A.; Kopel, Lucas; Singh, Man Mohan; Halaweish, Fathi; Bell, Maria C.; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C.

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer continues to be a leading cause of cancer related deaths for women. Anticancer agents effective against chemo-resistant cells are greatly needed for ovarian cancer treatment. Repurposing drugs currently in human use is an attractive strategy for developing novel cancer treatments with expedited translation into clinical trials. Therefore, we examined whether ormeloxifene (ORM), a non-steroidal Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator (SERM) currently used for contraception, is therapeutically effective at inhibiting ovarian cancer growth. We report that ORM treatment inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in ovarian cancer cell lines, including cell lines resistant to cisplatin. Furthermore, ORM treatment decreases Akt phosphorylation, increases p53 phosphorylation, and modulates the expression and localization patterns of p27, cyclin E, cyclin D1, and CDK2. In a pre-clinical xenograft mouse ORM treatment significantly reduces tumorigenesis and metastasis. These results indicate that ORM effectively inhibits the growth of cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer cells. ORM is currently in human use and has an established record of patient safety. Our encouraging in vitro and pre-clinical in vivo findings indicate that ORM is a promising candidate for the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:25306892

  14. Biodegradable multiblock poly(N-2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide gemcitabine and paclitaxel conjugates for ovarian cancer cell combination treatment

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Nate; Yang, Jiyuan; Ray, Abhijit; Cheney, Darwin L.; Ghandehari, Hamidreza; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2013-01-01

    The synthesis, characterization, and in vitro evaluation of a combination delivery of multiblock poly(N-2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA), gemcitabine (GEM) and paclitaxel (PTX) conjugates is described in this study. Multiblock copolymer conjugates of a large molecular weight (Mw > 200 kDa) were studied and compared to traditional, small molecular weight (Mw < 45 kDa) conjugates. Stability of the conjugates in different pH was assessed, and their cytotoxicity in combination toward A2780 human ovarian cancer cells was evaluated by combination index analysis. Treatment duration (4 and 72 h) and sequence of addition were explored. In addition, an HPMA copolymer conjugate with both GEM and PTX in the side chains was evaluated in a similar manner and compared to a physical mixture of individual conjugates. Conjugates with narrow molecular weight distribution (Mw/Mn < 1.1) were obtained via RAFT polymerization, and drug loadings of between 5.5 and 9.2 wt% were achieved. Conjugates demonstrated moderate stability with less than 65% release over 24 h at pH 7.4, and near complete drug release in the presence of the lysosomal enzyme cathepsin B in 3 h. In combination, the cytotoxic effects of a mixture of the conjugates were primarily additive. Synergistic effects were observed when A2780 human ovarian cancer cells were treated simultaneously for 4 h with multiblock conjugates (CI < 0.7). When both GEM and PTX were conjugated to the same copolymer backbone, moderate antagonism (CI 1.3–1.6) was observed. These results demonstrate that multiblock HPMA copolymer–GEM and –PTX conjugates, when delivered as a mixture of individual agents, are promising for the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:23827653

  15. Cyclin Y regulates the proliferation, migration, and invasion of ovarian cancer cells via Wnt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiyuan; Shi, Honghui; Fan, Qingbo; Sun, Xiangxiu

    2016-08-01

    This study is designated to investigate the roles of cyclin Y (CCNY) and Wnt signaling pathway in regulating ovarian cancer (OC) cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), Western blot, MTT assay, cell scratch, and transwell test were used in our study, and transplanted tumor model was constructed on nude mice. C-Myc, cyclin D1, PFTK1, ki67, OGT, and β-catenin protein expressions in tumor tissues were detected. CCNY was significantly upregulated in OC cell lines and tissues (both P < 0.05); significant association was observed between CCNY expression and clinicopathological stage, lymph node metastasis (LNM) (P < 0.05); and the CCNY expression in stages III to IV was higher than that in stages I to II, and patients with LNM had higher CCNY expression when compared with those in patients without LNM (P < 0.05); expressions of c-Myc, cyclin D, PFTK1, ki67, and OGT were upregulated in OC tissues compared with ovarian benign tissues, suggesting that these expressions were significantly different between the two groups (P < 0.05); CCNY significantly exacerbated proliferation, migration, and invasion of A2780 cells; c-Myc and cyclin D1 protein expressions increased as the expression of CCNY increased (P < 0.001); β-catenin expressions in A2780 cells with over-expression of CCNY were significantly increased in the nucleus, but significantly decreased in the cytoplasm (both P < 0.05); high expressions of CCNY exacerbated the proliferation of A2780 cells in nude mice and significantly increased c-Myc, cyclin D1, PFTK1, ki67, and OGT protein expressions in tumor tissues which were transplanted into nude mice (P < 0.01). CCNY might exacerbate the proliferation, migration, and invasion of OC cells via activating the Wnt signaling pathway. Thus, this study provides a theoretical foundation for the development of therapeutic drugs that are able to cure OC by targeting CCNY. PMID:26831658

  16. HOXB13 promotes ovarian cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Jiangyong; Wang, Zuncai; Provencher, Heather; Muir, Beth; Dahiya, Sonika; Carney, Erin; Leong, Chee-Onn; Sgroi, Dennis C.; Orsulic, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    Deregulated expression of HOXB13 in a subset of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen monotherapy is associated with an aggressive clinical course and poor outcome. Because the ovary is another hormone-responsive organ, we investigated whether HOXB13 plays a role in ovarian cancer progression. We show that HOXB13 is expressed in multiple human ovarian cancer cell lines and tumors and that knockdown of endogenous HOXB13 by RNA interference in human ovarian cancer cell lines is associated with reduced cell proliferation. Ectopic expression of HOXB13 is capable of transforming p53−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts and promotes cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth in mouse ovarian cancer cell lines that contain genetic alterations in p53, myc, and ras. In this genetically defined cell line model of ovarian cancer, we demonstrate that HOXB13 collaborates with activated ras to markedly promote tumor growth in vivo and that HOXB13 confers resistance to tamoxifen-mediated apoptosis. Taken together, our results support a pro-proliferative and pro-survival role for HOXB13 in ovarian cancer. PMID:17942676

  17. LHRH-targeted nanogels as delivery system for cisplatin to ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nukolova, Natalia V.; Oberoi, Hardeep S.; Zhao, Yi; Chekhonin, Vladimir P.; Kabanov, Alexander V.; Bronich, Tatiana K.

    2013-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery using multifunctional polymeric nanocarriers is a modern approach for cancer therapy. Our purpose was to prepare targeted nanogels for selective delivery of chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor overexpressing tumor in vivo. Building blocks of such delivery systems consisted of innovative soft block copolymer nanogels with ionic cores serving as a reservoir for cisplatin (loading 35%) and a synthetic analog of LHRH conjugated to the nanogels via poly(ethylene glycol) spacer. Covalent attachment of (D-Lys6)-LHRH to nanogels was shown to be possible without loss in either the ligand binding affinity or the nanogel drug incorporation ability. LHRH-nanogel accumulation was specific to the LHRH-receptor positive A2780 ovarian cancer cells and not towards LHRH-receptor negative SKOV-3 cells. The LHRH-nanogel cisplatin formulation was more effective and less toxic than equimolar doses of free cisplatin or untargeted nanogels in the treatment of receptor-positive ovarian cancer xenografts in mice. Collectively, the study indicates that LHRH mediated nanogel-cisplatin delivery is a promising formulation strategy for therapy of tumors that express the LHRH receptor. PMID:23957812

  18. General Information about Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Primary Peritoneal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, and Primary Peritoneal ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  19. Genetic and molecular changes in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hollis, Robert L; Gourley, Charlie

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer represents the most lethal gynecological malignancy in the developed world, and can be divided into five main histological subtypes: high grade serous, endometrioid, clear cell, mucinous and low grade serous. These subtypes represent distinct disease entities, both clinically and at the molecular level. Molecular analysis has revealed significant genetic heterogeneity in ovarian cancer, particularly within the high grade serous subtype. As such, this subtype has been the focus of much research effort to date, revealing molecular subgroups at both the genomic and transcriptomic level that have clinical implications. However, stratification of ovarian cancer patients based on the underlying biology of their disease remains in its infancy. Here, we summarize the molecular changes that characterize the five main ovarian cancer subtypes, highlight potential opportunities for targeted therapeutic intervention and outline priorities for future research. PMID:27458531

  20. Combination of Genistein and Cisplatin with Two Designed Monofunctional Platinum Agents in Human Ovarian Tumour Models.

    PubMed

    Arzuman, Laila; Beale, Philip; Proschogo, Nick; Yu, Jun Q; Huq, Fazlul

    2015-11-01

    A great amount of research effort has been directed at platinum compounds that bind with DNA differently from cisplatin with the idea that the difference may translate into an altered spectrum of activity. Recently research has also been directed at applying combinations of platinum agents with tumour-active phytochemicals with the aim of providing a means of overcoming platinum resistance in ovarian cancer. Herein we report the synthesis of monofunctional platinum tris(3-hydroxypyridine)chloroplatinum(II) chloride (coded as LH1) and tris(imidazole)chloroplatinum(II) chloride (coded as LH2), and their activity alone and in combination with genistein and cisplatin against human ovarian A2780, cisplatin-resistant A2780(cisR) and picoplatin-resistant A2780(ZD0473R) cancer cell lines. Although both LH1 and LH2 were found to be less active than cisplatin against the tumour models, they produced synergistic outcomes in combination with genistein. Both the level of cellular accumulation of Pt and of Pt-DNA binding resulting from the combination were greater in the A2780(cisR) cell line than in the parental A2780 cell line, irrespective of the sequence of administration. Absence of association between activity of LH1 and LH2 and the level of Pt-DNA binding indicates that the cell death induced by LH1 and LH2 may not be limited to the effect of their binding with DNA. PMID:26504026

  1. Cytogenetic studies in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Whang-Peng, J; Knutsen, T; Douglass, E C; Chu, E; Ozols, R F; Hogan, W M; Young, R C

    1984-01-01

    Cytogenetic studies of ovarian cancer have been conducted in the Medicine Branch, NCI, National Institutes of Health for 5 years. A total of 72 patients were studied by direct preparation and/or 1- to 3-day short-term culture of ascites (86 samples), pleural fluid (4 samples), and tumor (2 samples). Repeat examinations (1-24 months later) were performed in 7 of the 72 patients. Forty-four patients (62%) were successfully analyzed with banding techniques: 6 patients had adenocarcinoma, 7 had serous adenocarcinoma, 13 had serous papillary adenocarcinoma, 7 had serous papillary cystadenocarcinoma, 2 had mucinous adenocarcinoma, 6 had undifferentiated or poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, 1 had clear cell adenocarcinoma, and 2 were not classified. Of these 44 patients, 29 had received prior chemotherapy, 14 were untreated, and in 1 patient the treatment status was unknown. Aneuploidy was observed in all patients and there was considerable variation in the chromosome numbers (even within single samples), often ranging from diploidy to triploidy to tetraploidy. All 44 patients had numerical abnormalities and 39 had structural abnormalities. The chromosomes most frequently involved in structural abnormalities (in decreasing order according to the number of patients involved) were #1, #3, #2, #4, #9, #10, #15, #19, #6, and #11; the least involved chromosomes were #21 and #5. Clone formation and the number of chromosomes involved in structural abnormalities increased with duration of disease and were more extensive in patients treated with chemotherapy than in patients treated with surgery alone. Our data did not show a deletion of chromosome #6 (6q-) to be specific for ovarian cancer. PMID:6690026

  2. Surgical management of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Salani, Ritu; Bristow, Robert E

    2012-03-01

    Ovarian cancer affects approximately 21,880 women and accounts for over 13,000 deaths annually in the United States. Although survival rates have improved over the past several decades, directly as a result of advances in chemotherapy and surgery, ovarian cancer continues to have high mortality rates. Understanding the multiple roles of surgery throughout the disease course is the focus of this review. PMID:22343231

  3. Rethinking ovarian cancer: recommendations for improving outcomes.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Sebastian; Coward, Jermaine I; Bast, Robert C; Berchuck, Andy; Berek, Jonathan S; Brenton, James D; Coukos, George; Crum, Christopher C; Drapkin, Ronny; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; Friedlander, Michael; Gabra, Hani; Kaye, Stan B; Lord, Chris J; Lengyel, Ernst; Levine, Douglas A; McNeish, Iain A; Menon, Usha; Mills, Gordon B; Nephew, Kenneth P; Oza, Amit M; Sood, Anil K; Stronach, Euan A; Walczak, Henning; Bowtell, David D; Balkwill, Frances R

    2011-10-01

    There have been major advances in our understanding of the cellular and molecular biology of the human malignancies that are collectively referred to as ovarian cancer. At a recent Helene Harris Memorial Trust meeting, an international group of researchers considered actions that should be taken to improve the outcome for women with ovarian cancer. Nine major recommendations are outlined in this Opinion article. PMID:21941283

  4. The treatment of early stage ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Young, R C

    1995-10-01

    Approximately one third of women with ovarian cancer present with localized disease. A series of recent studies have identified a population of patients who require only comprehensive surgical staging for optimal results and another group that may benefit from adjuvant therapy. A series of national and international studies are evaluating a variety of adjuvant treatments in prospective randomized trials that may enhance long-term survival in poor-prognosis early ovarian cancer. PMID:7481865

  5. [The molecular biology of epithelial ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Leary, Alexandra; Pautier, Patricia; Tazi, Youssef; Morice, Philippe; Duvillard, Pierre; Gouy, Sébastien; Uzan, Catherine; Gauthier, Hélène; Balleyguier, Corinne; Lhommé, Catherine

    2012-12-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer frequently presents at an advanced stage where the cornerstone of management remains surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. Unfortunately, despite sometimes dramatic initial responses, advanced ovarian cancer almost invariably relapses. Little progress has been made in the identification of effective targeted-therapies for ovarian cancer. The majority of clinical trials investigating novel agents have been negative and the only approved targeted-therapy is bevacizumab, for which reliable predictive biomarkers still elude us. Ovarian cancer is treated as a uniform disease. Yet, biological studies have highlighted the heterogeneity of this malignancy with marked differences in histology, oncogenesis, prognosis, chemo-responsiveness, and molecular profile. Recent high throughput molecular analyses have identified a huge number of genomic/phenotypic alterations. Broadly speaking, high grade serous carcinomas (type II) display significant genomic instability and numerous amplifications and losses; low grade (type I) tumors are genomically stable but display frequent mutations. Importantly, many of these genomic alterations relate to known oncogenes for which targeted-therapies are available or in development. There is today a real potential for personalized medicine in ovarian cancer. We will review the current literature regarding the molecular characterization of epithelial ovarian cancer and discuss the biological rationale for a number of targeted strategies. In order to translate these biological advances into meaningful clinical improvements for our patients, it is imperative to incorporate translational research in ovarian cancer trials, a number of strategies will be proposed such as the acquisition of quality tumor samples, including sequential pre- and post-treatment biopsies, the potential of liquid biopsies, and novel trial designs more adapted to the molecular era of ovarian cancer research. PMID:23238064

  6. Pharmacoprevention for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Cazzaniga, Massimiliano; Bonanni, Bernardo

    2016-10-01

    Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome is an important women's health condition characterized by an increased susceptibility to the development of cancer, in particular breast and ovarian neoplasms, and is caused by an inherited germline genetic mutation in one or both tumor suppressor genes named BRCA1 and BRCA2. This monographic issue provides an update on our knowledge of this syndrome with particular emphasis on the risk reduction strategies through a pharmacopreventive approach. PMID:26928419

  7. Unbalanced estrogen metabolism in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Muhammad; Beseler, Cheryl L; Hall, James B; LeVan, Tricia; Cavalieri, Ercole L; Rogan, Eleanor G

    2014-05-15

    Greater exposure to estrogens is a risk factor for ovarian cancer. To investigate the role of estrogens in ovarian cancer, a spot urine sample and a saliva sample were obtained from 33 women with ovarian cancer and 34 age-matched controls. Thirty-eight estrogen metabolites, conjugates and DNA adducts were analyzed in the urine samples using ultraperformance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, and the ratio of adducts to metabolites and conjugates was calculated for each sample. The ratio of depurinating estrogen-DNA adducts to estrogen metabolites and conjugates was significantly higher in cases compared to controls (p < 0.0001), demonstrating high specificity and sensitivity. DNA was purified from the saliva samples and analyzed for genetic polymorphisms in the genes for two estrogen-metabolizing enzymes. Women with two low-activity alleles of catechol-O-methyltransferase plus one or two high-activity alleles of cytochrome P450 1B1 had higher levels of estrogen-DNA adducts and were more likely to have ovarian cancer. These findings indicate that estrogen metabolism is unbalanced in ovarian cancer and suggest that formation of estrogen-DNA adducts plays a critical role in the initiation of ovarian cancer. PMID:24170413

  8. Homologous recombination deficiency and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Ledermann, Jonathan A; Drew, Yvette; Kristeleit, Rebecca S

    2016-06-01

    The discovery that PARP inhibitors block an essential pathway of DNA repair in cells harbouring a BRCA mutation has opened up a new therapeutic avenue for high-grade ovarian cancers. BRCA1 and BRCA2 proteins are essential for high-fidelity repair of double-strand breaks of DNA through the homologous recombination repair (HRR) pathway. Deficiency in HRR (HRD) is a target for PARP inhibitors. The first PARP inhibitor, olaparib, has now been licensed for BRCA-mutated ovarian cancers. While mutated BRCA genes are individually most commonly associated with HRD other essential HRR proteins may be mutated or functionally deficient potentially widening the therapeutic opportunities for PARP inhibitors. HRD is the first phenotypically defined predictive marker for therapy with PARP inhibitors in ovarian cancer. Several different PARP inhibitors are being trialled in ovarian cancer and this class of drugs has been shown to be a new selective therapy for high-grade ovarian cancer. Around 20% of high-grade serous ovarian cancers harbour germline or somatic BRCA mutations and testing for BRCA mutations should be incorporated into routine clinical practice. The expanded use of PARP inhibitors in HRD deficient (non-BRCA mutant) tumours using a signature of HRD in clinical practice requires validation. PMID:27065456

  9. Diagnosis and Management of Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Doubeni, Chyke A; Doubeni, Anna R; Myers, Allison E

    2016-06-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic cancer. Less than one-half of patients survive for more than five years after diagnosis. Ovarian cancer affects women of all ages but is most commonly diagnosed after menopause. More than 75% of affected women are diagnosed at an advanced stage because early-stage disease is usually asymptomatic and symptoms of late-stage disease are nonspecific. The strongest risk factors are advancing age and family history of ovarian and breast cancer. Women who have symptoms concerning for ovarian cancer should undergo a physical examination, transvaginal ultrasonography, and measurement of biomarkers such as cancer antigen 125. If results are suspicious for ovarian cancer, the patient should be referred to a gynecologic oncologist. Despite the low rate of early diagnosis, guidelines recommend against routine screening for ovarian cancer in average-risk women because screening, including routine pelvic examinations, is ineffective and associated with harm. However, a recent trial found a potential benefit of annual screening using an algorithm based on serial cancer antigen 125 measurements followed by transvaginal ultrasonography for women at increased risk, as determined by the algorithm. Women with an increased-risk family history should be referred for genetic counseling and, if genetic mutations (e.g., BRCA mutations) are identified, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy can be considered for risk reduction. In both average- and high-risk women, long-term hormonal contraceptive use reduces risk by about 50%. The treatment of ovarian cancer usually involves surgery, with or without intraperitoneal and intravenous chemotherapy. Primary care physicians have important roles in posttreatment surveillance and end-of-life care. PMID:27281838

  10. Features of ovarian cancer in Lynch syndrome (Review)

    PubMed Central

    NAKAMURA, KANAKO; BANNO, KOUJI; YANOKURA, MEGUMI; IIDA, MIHO; ADACHI, MASATAKA; MASUDA, KENTA; UEKI, ARISA; KOBAYASHI, YUSUKE; NOMURA, HIROYUKI; HIRASAWA, AKIRA; TOMINAGA, EIICHIRO; AOKI, DAISUKE

    2014-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is a hereditary ovarian cancer with a prevalence of 0.9–2.7%. Lynch syndrome accounts for 10–15% of hereditary ovarian cancers, while hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome accounts for 65–75% of these cancers. The lifetime risk for ovarian cancer in families with Lynch syndrome is ~8%, which is lower than colorectal and endometrial cancers, and ovarian cancer is not listed in the Amsterdam Criteria II. More than half of sporadic ovarian cancers are diagnosed in stage III or IV, but ≥80% of ovarian cancers in Lynch syndrome are diagnosed in stage I or II. Ovarian cancers in Lynch syndrome mostly have non-serous histology and different properties from those of sporadic ovarian cancers. A screening method for ovarian cancers in Lynch syndrome has yet to be established and clinical studies of prophylactic administration of oral contraceptives are not available. However, molecular profiles at the genetic level indicate that ovarian cancer in Lynch syndrome has a more favorable prognosis than sporadic ovarian cancer. Inhibitors of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mammalian target of the rapamycin pathway and anti-epidermal growth factor antibodies may have efficacy for the disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review focusing on ovarian cancer in Lynch syndrome. PMID:25279173

  11. Dual role of LRRC8A-containing transporters on cisplatin resistance in human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Belinda Halling; Dam, Celina Støving; Stürup, Stefan; Lambert, Ian Henry

    2016-07-01

    Acquired resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs in cancer cells can reflect an ability to limit cellular drug availability, to repair drug induced DNA damage, and to limit initiation/progression of cell death (apoptosis). The leucine-rich-repeat-containing 8A (LRRC8A) protein is an essential component of volume sensitive channels for organic osmolytes (VSOAC) and volume regulated anion channels (VRAC), which are activated during the apoptotic process. Here we illustrate that cisplatin resistance in human ovarian cancer cells (A2780) correlates with a reduced expression of LRRC8A and copper transporter receptor 1 (CTR1), as well as a concomitant increased expression of copper-transporting P-type ATPases (ATP7A/ATP7B). We also find that cisplatin (Pt) accumulation correlates with LRRC8A protein expression and channel activity, i.e., the cellular Pt content is high when VSOAC is activated by depolarization of the plasma membrane or hypoosmotic cell swelling, and reduced when channel activity/LRRC8A expression is reduced by genetically silencing/pharmacological inhibition, or the cells have acquired a resistant phenotype with low LRRC8A protein expression. It is suggested that reduced LRRC8A expression in cisplatin-resistant A2780 cells ensures cell survival through limitation in cisplatin accumulation and a concomitant reduction in osmolytes loss via VSOAC/VRAC and hence instigation of the apoptotic process. PMID:27112899

  12. 3′-hydroxy-3,4,5,4′-tetramethoxystilbene, the metabolite of resveratrol analogue DMU-212, inhibits ovarian cancer cell growth in vitro and in a mice xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowska-Kempisty, Hanna; Ruciński, Marcin; Borys, Sylwia; Kucińska, Małgorzata; Kaczmarek, Mariusz; Zawierucha, Piotr; Wierzchowski, Marcin; Łażewski, Dawid; Murias, Marek; Jodynis-Liebert, Jadwiga

    2016-01-01

    In screening studies, the cytotoxic activity of four metabolites of resveratrol analogue 3,4,5,4′-tetramethoxystilbene (DMU-212) against A-2780 and SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells was investigated. The most active metabolite, 3′-hydroxy-3,4,5,4′-tetramethoxystilbene (DMU-214), was chosen for further studies. The cytotoxicity of DMU-214 was shown to be higher than that of the parent compound, DMU-212, in both cell lines tested. Since DMU-212 was supposed to undergo metabolic activation through its conversion to DMU-214, an attempt was made to elucidate the mechanism of its anti-proliferative activity. We found that in SKOV-3 cells lacking p53, DMU-214 induced receptor-mediated apoptosis. In A-2780 cell line with expression of wild-type p53, DMU-214 modulated the expression pattern of p53-target genes driving intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathways, as well as DNA repair and damage prevention. Regardless of the up-regulation of p48, p53R2, sestrins and Gaad45 genes involved in cancer cell DNA repair, we demonstrated the stronger anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of DMU-214 in A-2780 cells when compared to those in SKOV-3. Hence we verified DMU-214 activity in the xenograft model using SCID mice injected with A-2780 cells. The strong anti-proliferative activity of DMU-214 in the in vivo model allowed to suggest the tested compound as a potential therapeutic in ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:27585955

  13. Lost expression of DCC gene in ovarian cancer and its inhibition in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Meimei, Liu; Peiling, Li; Baoxin, Li; Changmin, Li; Rujin, Zhuang; Chunjie, Hu

    2011-03-01

    Ovarian cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related women mortality in China. In recent years, the molecular mechanisms involved in ovarian carcinoma development and/or progression have been intensely studied, and several genes have been identified. Deleted in Colorectal Carcinoma (DCC), is an important tumor suppressor gene, which is inactivated in many kinds of tumors, and its function(s) is not clarified. Even though the lost expression of DCC occurred in later stages of multistep colorectal carcinogenesis, its contribution to the onset or progression of ovarian cancer is not fully understood. To investigate DCC expression in ovarian cancer, we studied 254 clinical samples by RT-PCR. Our results revealed that 52% malignant ovarian cancer did not express DCC gene. By contrast, DCC expression was observed in all normal ovary tissues and 80% benign ovarian tumors. Obviously, there was a significant correlation between DCC expression and ovarian cancer, especially in the epithelial ovarian cancer. The present study also suggested that the loss expression of DCC occurred more frequently in the cases of later clinical stage, higher pathological grade, and poorer prognosis. In the other part of this study, we further explored DCC expression after transfection in two kinds of ovarian cancer cell lines, namely SKOV3 cell and HO-8910 cell, using RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. The results indicated that DCC expressed in SKOV3-DCC and HO-8910-DCC cells, and ultrastructural analysis showed the appearance of apoptotic features in them. Furthermore, cell growth was markedly down-regulated in above groups of cells, indicating that transfection with the DCC constructs can suppress the growth of tumor cells. In conclusion, our results suggest an association of lost expression of DCC with the ovarian cancer, and DCC gene may inhibit the growth of ovarian carcinoma cells. However, this result needs further trials with a larger sample. PMID:20054719

  14. Analysis of microarray-identified genes and microRNAs associated with drug resistance in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jing; Yin, Fuqiang; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Wei; Li, Li

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify potential microRNAs and genes associated with drug resistance in ovarian cancer through web-available microarrays. The drug resistant-related microRNA microarray dataset GS54665 and mRNA dataset GSE33482, GSE28646, and GSE15372 were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Dysregulated microRNAs/genes were screened with GEO2R and were further identified in SKOV3 (SKOV3/DDP) and A2780 (A2780/DDP) cells by real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR), and then their associations with drug resistance was analyzed by comprehensive bioinformatic analyses. Nine microRNAs (microRNA-199a-5p, microRNA-199a-3p, microRNA-199b-3p, microRNA-215, microRNA-335, microRNA-18b, microRNA-363, microRNA-645 and microRNA-141) and 38 genes were identified to be differentially expressed in drug-resistant ovarian cancer cells, with seven genes (NHSL1, EPHA3, USP51, ZSCAN4, EPHA7, SNCA and PI15) exhibited exactly the same expression trends in all three microarrays. Biological process annotation and pathway enrichment analysis of the 9 microRNAs and 38 genes identified several drug resistant-related signaling pathways, and the microRNA-mRNA interaction revealed the existence of a targeted regulatory relationship between the 9 microRNAs and most of the 38 genes. The expression of 9 microRNAs and the 7 genes by qRT-PCR in SKOV3/DDP and A2780/DDP cells indicating a consistent expression profile with the microarrays. Among those, the expression of EPHA7 and PI15 were negatively correlated with that of microRNA-141, and they were also identified as potential targets of this microRNA via microRNA-mRNA interaction. We thus concluded that microRNA-141, EPHA7, and PI15 might jointly participate in the regulation of drug resistance in ovarian cancer and serve as potential targets in targeted therapies. PMID:26261572

  15. Three-dimensional modeling of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Erin, White; Hilary, Kenny; Ernst, Lengyel

    2015-01-01

    New models for epithelial ovarian cancer initiation and metastasis are required to obtain a mechanistic understanding of the disease and to develop new therapeutics. Modeling ovarian cancer however is challenging as a result of the genetic heterogeneity of the malignancy, the diverse pathology, the limited availability of human tissue for research, the atypical mechanisms of metastasis, and because the origin is unclear. Insights into the origin of high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas and mechanisms of metastasis have resulted in the generation of novel three-dimensional (3D) culture models that better approximate the behavior of the tumor cells in vivo than prior two-dimensional models. The 3D models aim to recapitulate the tumor microenvironment, which has a critical role in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer. Ultimately, findings using models that accurately reflect human ovarian cancer biology are likely to translate into improved clinical outcomes. In this review we discuss the design of new 3D culture models of ovarian cancer primarily using human cells, key studies in which these models have been applied, current limitations, and future applications. PMID:25034878

  16. Cisplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Stage IIB, Stage IIC, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Endometrial Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Gastrointestinal Complication; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  17. Genetic heterogeneity of breast-ovarian cancer revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Narod, S.; Ford, D.; Easton, D.

    1995-10-01

    We have recently reported the results of a linkage analysis of 145 breast-ovarian cancer families. Each family has three or more cases of early-onset breast cancer (age {le}60) or of ovarian cancer, and all families have at least one case of ovarian cancer (there were nine site-specific ovarian cancer families). Overall, we estimated that 76% of the families were linked to the BRCA1 locus. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  18. Adoptive immunotherapy against ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Mittica, Gloria; Capellero, Sonia; Genta, Sofia; Cagnazzo, Celeste; Aglietta, Massimo; Sangiolo, Dario; Valabrega, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    The standard front-line therapy for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is combination of debulking surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. Nevertheless, the majority of patients experience disease recurrence. Although extensive efforts to find new therapeutic options, cancer cells invariably develop drug resistance and disease progression. New therapeutic strategies are needed to improve prognosis of patients with advanced EOC.Recently, several preclinical and clinical studies investigated feasibility and activity of adoptive immunotherapy in EOC. Our aim is to highlight prospective of adoptive immunotherapy in EOC, focusing on HLA-restricted Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes (TILs), and MHC-independent immune effectors such as natural killer (NK), and cytokine-induced killer (CIK). Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) has shown activity in several pre-clinical models. Available preclinical and clinical data suggest that adoptive cell therapy may provide the best benefit in settings of low tumor burden, minimal residual disease, or maintenance therapy. Further studies are needed to better define the optimal clinical setting. PMID:27188274

  19. Ovarian stimulation in patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Elkin; González, Naira; Muñoz, Luis; Aguilar, Jesús; Velasco, Juan A García

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent malignancy among women under 50. Improvements in diagnosis and treatment have yielded an important decrease in mortality in the last 20 years. In many cases, chemotherapy and radiotherapy develop side effects on the reproductive function. Therefore, before the anti-cancer treatment impairs fertility, clinicians should offer some techniques for fertility preservation for women planning motherhood in the future. In order to obtain more available oocytes for IVF, the ovary must be stimulated. New protocols which prevent exposure to increased estrogen during gonadotropin stimulation, measurements to avoid the delay in starting anti-cancer treatment or the outcome of ovarian stimulation have been addressed in this review. There is no evidence of association between ovarian stimulation and breast cancer. It seems that there are more relevant other confluent factors than ovarian stimulation. Factors that can modify the risk of breast cancer include: parity, age at full-term birth, age of menarche, and family history. There is an association between breast cancer and exogenous estrogen. Therefore, specific protocols to stimulate patients with breast cancer include anti-estrogen agents such as letrozole. By using letrozole plus recombinant follicular stimulating hormone, patients develop a multifollicular growth with only a mild increase in estradiol serum levels. Controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) takes around 10 days, and we discuss new strategies to start COS as soon as possible. Protocols starting during the luteal phase or after inducing the menses currently prevent a delay in starting ovarian stimulation. Patients with breast cancer have a poorer response to COS compared with patients without cancer who are stimulated with conventional protocols of gonadotropins. Although many centres offer fertility preservation and many patients undergo ovarian stimulation, there are not enough studies to evaluate the recurrence, breast cancer

  20. Paclitaxel, Cisplatin, and Topotecan With or Without Filgrastim in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III or Stage IV Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  1. Breast and Ovarian Cancer and Family History Risk Categories

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diseases Genomic Resources Breast and Ovarian Cancer and Family History Risk Categories Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... Screening. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. February 2016. Family Health History, Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk, and ...

  2. Does Breast or Ovarian Cancer Run in Your Family?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Does Breast or Ovarian Cancer Run in Your Family? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... get ovarian cancer by age 70. Does Your Family Health History Put You At Risk? Tell your ...

  3. Two-Pronged Chemo Helps Some with Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Two-Pronged Chemo Helps Some With Advanced Ovarian Cancer Study found using both abdomen drip and ... 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Some women with advanced ovarian cancer may fare better if chemotherapy is dripped ...

  4. Epigenetic targeting of ovarian cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinu; Cardenas, Horacio; Fang, Fang; Condello, Salvatore; Taverna, Pietro; Segar, Matthew; Liu, Yunlong; Nephew, Kenneth P; Matei, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    Emerging results indicate that cancer stem-like cells contribute to chemoresistance and poor clinical outcomes in many cancers, including ovarian cancer. As epigenetic regulators play a major role in the control of normal stem cell differentiation, epigenetics may offer a useful arena to develop strategies to target cancer stem-like cells. Epigenetic aberrations, especially DNA methylation, silence tumor-suppressor and differentiation-associated genes that regulate the survival of ovarian cancer stem-like cells (OCSC). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA-hypomethylating agents may be able to reset OCSC toward a differentiated phenotype by evaluating the effects of the new DNA methytransferase inhibitor SGI-110 on OCSC phenotype, as defined by expression of the cancer stem-like marker aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We demonstrated that ALDH(+) ovarian cancer cells possess multiple stem cell characteristics, were highly chemoresistant, and were enriched in xenografts residual after platinum therapy. Low-dose SGI-110 reduced the stem-like properties of ALDH(+) cells, including their tumor-initiating capacity, resensitized these OCSCs to platinum, and induced reexpression of differentiation-associated genes. Maintenance treatment with SGI-110 after carboplatin inhibited OCSC growth, causing global tumor hypomethylation and decreased tumor progression. Our work offers preclinical evidence that epigenome-targeting strategies have the potential to delay tumor progression by reprogramming residual cancer stem-like cells. Furthermore, the results suggest that SGI-110 might be administered in combination with platinum to prevent the development of recurrent and chemoresistant ovarian cancer. PMID:25035395

  5. Mucinous ovarian cancer: A therapeutic review.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; Rush, Jack; Rickett, Kirsty; Coward, Jermaine I G

    2016-06-01

    Mucinous ovarian cancer represents approximately 3% of epithelial ovarian cancers (EOC). Despite this seemingly low prevalence, it remains a diagnostic and therapeutic conundrum that has resulted in numerous attempts to adopt novel strategies in managing this disease. Anecdotally, there has been a prevailing notion that established gold standard systemic regimens should be substituted for those utilised in cancers such as gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies; tumours that share more biological similarities than other EOC subtypes. This review summarises the plethora of small studies which have adopted this philosophy and influenced the design of the multinational GOG142 study, which was ultimately terminated due to poor accrual. To date, there is a paucity of evidence to support delivering 'GI style' chemotherapy for mucinous ovarian cancer over and above carboplatin-paclitaxel doublet therapy. Hence there is an urge to develop studies focused on targeted therapeutic agents driven by refined mutational analysis and conducted within the context of harmonised international collaborations. PMID:27083591

  6. Olaparib in the management of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bixel, Kristin; Hays, John L

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in the homologous repair pathway are thought to occur in 30%–50% of epithelial ovarian cancers. Cells deficient in homologous recombination rely on alternative pathways for DNA repair in order to survive, thereby providing a potential target for therapy. Olaparib, a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor, capitalizes on this concept and is the first drug in its class approved for patients with ovarian cancer. This review article will provide an overview of the BRCA genes and homologous recombination, the role of PARP in DNA repair and the biological rationale for the use of PARP inhibitors as cancer therapy, and ultimately will focus on the use of olaparib in the management of ovarian cancer. PMID:26309417

  7. Sunitinib Malate in Treating Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-15

    Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  8. CA125 in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Summary Twenty five years after its discovery, circulating CA125 antigen is recommended for clinical use in the US for ovarian cancer (OC) screening of high risk women with ovaries despite its limited sensitivity and specificity. Recent findings suggest that CA125 might also serve as a predictive marker for pre-invasive OC. Methods to quantify circulating CA125 evolved towards sensitive and reliable double determinant ELISA assays. The CA125 gene, MUC16, was cloned 20 years after the protein discovery and revealed a very complex and unusual glycoprotein structure suggesting an immunological role. Recent evidence points toward CA125 function in the induction of materno-fetal tolerance through the alteration of NK phenotype. Two receptors for CA125 have been described: mesothelin and galectin-1. The specific location and functional proprieties of CA125 make it a therapeutic target of choice; clinical trials have demonstrated that anti-CA125 injections are well tolerated and suggest a potential survival benefit. PMID:20477371

  9. Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Santoiemma, Phillip P; Powell, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in ovarian cancer is prognostic for increased survival while increases in immunosuppressive regulatory T-cells (Tregs) are associated with poor outcomes. Approaches that bolster tumor-reactive TILs may limit tumor progression. However, identifying tumor-reactive TILs in ovarian cancer has been challenging, though adoptive TIL therapy in patients has been encouraging. Other forms of TIL immunomodulation remain under investigation including Treg depletion, antibody-based checkpoint modification, activation and amplification using dendritic cells, antigen presenting cells or IL-2 cytokine culture, adjuvant cytokine injections, and gene-engineered T-cells. Many approaches to TIL manipulation inhibit ovarian cancer progression in preclinical or clinical studies as monotherapy. Here, we review the impact of TILs in ovarian cancer and attempts to mobilize TILs to halt tumor progression. We conclude that effective TIL therapy for ovarian cancer is at the brink of translation and optimal TIL activity may require combined methodologies to deliver clinically-relevant treatment. PMID:25894333

  10. Specific Glycosylation of Membrane Proteins in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines: Glycan Structures Reflect Gene Expression and DNA Methylation Status *

    PubMed Central

    Anugraham, Merrina; Jacob, Francis; Nixdorf, Sheri; Everest-Dass, Arun Vijay; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola; Packer, Nicolle H.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cause of cancer in women worldwide bearing the highest mortality rate among all gynecological cancers. Cell membrane glycans mediate various cellular processes such as cell signaling and become altered during carcinogenesis. The extent to which glycosylation changes are influenced by aberrant regulation of gene expression is nearly unknown for ovarian cancer and remains crucial in understanding the development and progression of this disease. To address this effect, we analyzed the membrane glycosylation of non-cancerous ovarian surface epithelial (HOSE 6.3 and HOSE 17.1) and serous ovarian cancer cell lines (SKOV 3, IGROV1, A2780, and OVCAR 3), the most common histotype among epithelial ovarian cancers. N-glycans were released from membrane glycoproteins by PNGase F and analyzed using nano-liquid chromatography on porous graphitized carbon and negative-ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Glycan structures were characterized based on their molecular masses and tandem MS fragmentation patterns. We identified characteristic glycan features that were unique to the ovarian cancer membrane proteins, namely the “bisecting N-acetyl-glucosamine” type N-glycans, increased levels of α 2–6 sialylated N-glycans and “N,N′-diacetyl-lactosamine” type N-glycans. These N-glycan changes were verified by examining gene transcript levels of the enzymes specific for their synthesis (MGAT3, ST6GAL1, and B4GALNT3) using qRT-PCR. We further evaluated the potential epigenetic influence on MGAT3 expression by treating the cell lines with 5-azacytidine, a DNA methylation inhibitor. For the first time, we provide evidence that MGAT3 expression may be epigenetically regulated by DNA hypomethylation, leading to the synthesis of the unique “bisecting GlcNAc” type N-glycans on the membrane proteins of ovarian cancer cells. Linking the observation of specific N-glycan substructures and their complex association

  11. Specific glycosylation of membrane proteins in epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines: glycan structures reflect gene expression and DNA methylation status.

    PubMed

    Anugraham, Merrina; Jacob, Francis; Nixdorf, Sheri; Everest-Dass, Arun Vijay; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola; Packer, Nicolle H

    2014-09-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cause of cancer in women worldwide bearing the highest mortality rate among all gynecological cancers. Cell membrane glycans mediate various cellular processes such as cell signaling and become altered during carcinogenesis. The extent to which glycosylation changes are influenced by aberrant regulation of gene expression is nearly unknown for ovarian cancer and remains crucial in understanding the development and progression of this disease. To address this effect, we analyzed the membrane glycosylation of non-cancerous ovarian surface epithelial (HOSE 6.3 and HOSE 17.1) and serous ovarian cancer cell lines (SKOV 3, IGROV1, A2780, and OVCAR 3), the most common histotype among epithelial ovarian cancers. N-glycans were released from membrane glycoproteins by PNGase F and analyzed using nano-liquid chromatography on porous graphitized carbon and negative-ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Glycan structures were characterized based on their molecular masses and tandem MS fragmentation patterns. We identified characteristic glycan features that were unique to the ovarian cancer membrane proteins, namely the "bisecting N-acetyl-glucosamine" type N-glycans, increased levels of α 2-6 sialylated N-glycans and "N,N'-diacetyl-lactosamine" type N-glycans. These N-glycan changes were verified by examining gene transcript levels of the enzymes specific for their synthesis (MGAT3, ST6GAL1, and B4GALNT3) using qRT-PCR. We further evaluated the potential epigenetic influence on MGAT3 expression by treating the cell lines with 5-azacytidine, a DNA methylation inhibitor. For the first time, we provide evidence that MGAT3 expression may be epigenetically regulated by DNA hypomethylation, leading to the synthesis of the unique "bisecting GlcNAc" type N-glycans on the membrane proteins of ovarian cancer cells. Linking the observation of specific N-glycan substructures and their complex association with epigenetic

  12. Afatinib reverses multidrug resistance in ovarian cancer via dually inhibiting ATP binding cassette subfamily B member 1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sheng-qi; Liu, Shi-ting; Zhao, Bo-xin; Yang, Fu-heng; Wang, Ya-tian; Liang, Qian-ying; Sun, Ya-bin; Liu, Yuan; Song, Zhi-hua; Cai, Yun; Li, Guo-feng

    2015-01-01

    ABCB1-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a major obstacle to successful chemotherapy in ovarian cancer. Herein, afatinib at nontoxic concentrations significantly reversed ABCB1-mediated MDR in ovarian cancer cells in vitro (p < 0.05). Combining paclitaxel and afatinib caused tumor regressions and tumor necrosis in A2780T xenografts in vivo. More interestingly, unlike reversible TKIs, afatinib had a distinctive dual-mode action. Afatinib not only inhibited the efflux function of ABCB1, but also attenuated its expression transcriptionally via down-regulation of PI3K/AKT and MAPK/p38-dependent activation of NF-κB. Furthermore, apart from a substrate binding domain, afatinib could also bind to an ATP binding domain of ABCB1 through forming hydrogen bonds with Gly533, Gly534, Lys536 and Ala560 sites. Importantly, mutations in these four binding sites of ABCB1 and the tyrosine kinase domain of EGFR were not correlated with the reversal activity of afatinib on MDR. Given that afatinib is a clinically approved drug, our results suggest combining afatinib with chemotherapeutic drugs in ovarian cancer. This study can facilitate the rediscovery of superior MDR reversal agents from molecular targeted drugs to provide a more effective and safer way of resensitizing MDR. PMID:26317651

  13. Solanum Incanum Extract Downregulates Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1-Mediated Stemness and Inhibits Tumor Formation in Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yi-Hui; Chiu, Wen-Tai; Young, Ming-Jer; Chang, Tzu-Hao; Huang, Yu-Fang; Chou, Cheng-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Solanum incanum extract (SR-T100), containing the active ingredient solamargine, can induce apoptosis via upregulation of tumor necrosis factor receptor expression and activation of the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway, and has therapeutic effects in patients with actinic keratosis. Here, we evaluate the novel molecular mechanisms underlying SR-T100-regulated stemness and chemoresistance. The concentration of SR-T100 that inhibited 50% cell viability (IC50) was lower in ovarian cancer cells than in nonmalignant cells. Furthermore, the SR-T100 IC50 in chemoresistant cells was similar to the IC50 in chemosensitive cells. Additionally, SR-T100 increased cisplatin and paclitaxel sensitivity in chemoresistant cells. SR-T100 downregulated the expression of stem cell markers, including aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), Notch1, and FoxM1, and reduced sphere formation in ovarian cancer cells. Using microarray analyses, immunoblotting, luciferase activity, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, we showed that SR-T100 suppressed the expression of c/EBPβ and COL11A1, and its promoter activity, in resistant cells, but not sensitive cells. SR-T100, paclitaxel, and cisplatin inhibited the growth of A2780CP70 cells in mouse xenografts, as compared to the vehicle control, and the combination of cisplatin and SR-T100 was more effective than either treatment alone. SR-T100 may represent a potential therapeutic adjunct to chemotherapy for ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:26366215

  14. Changes in Brain Function in Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer Who Are Receiving Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Malignant Ovarian Epithelial Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Choriocarcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Dysgerminoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Polyembryoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Teratoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  15. Autocrine production of interleukin-8 confers cisplatin and paclitaxel resistance in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Qu, Ye; Niu, Xiu Long; Sun, Wei Jia; Zhang, Xiao Lei; Li, Ling Zhi

    2011-11-01

    It has been widely reported that interleukin-8 (IL-8) is overexpressed in ovarian cyst fluid, ascites, serum, and tumor tissue from ovarian cancer (OVCA) patients, and elevated IL-8 expression correlates with a poor final outcome and chemosensitivity. However, the role of IL-8 expression in the acquisition of the chemoresistance phenotype and the underlining mechanisms of drug resistance in OVCA cells are not yet fully understood. Here we show that both exogenous (a relatively short period of treatment with recombination IL-8) and endogenous IL-8 (by transfecting with plasmid encoding for sense IL-8) induce cisplatin and paclitaxel resistance in non-IL-8-expressing A2780 cells, while deleting of endogenous IL-8 expression in IL-8-overexpressing SKOV-3 cells (by transfecting with plasmid encoding for antisense IL-8) promotes the sensitivity of these cells to anticancer drugs. IL-8-mediated resistance of OVCA cells exhibits decreased proteolytic activation of caspase-3. Meanwhile, the further study demonstrates that the chemoresistance caused by IL-8 is associated with increased expression of both multidrug resistance-related genes (MDR1) and apoptosis inhibitory proteins (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and XIAP), as well as activation of PI3K/Akt and Ras/MEK/ERK signaling. Therefore, modulation of IL-8 expression or its related signaling pathway may be a promising strategy of treatment for drug-resistant OVCA. PMID:21742513

  16. Expression of the RNA-binding protein RBM3 is associated with a favourable prognosis and cisplatin sensitivity in epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background We recently demonstrated that increased expression of the RNA-binding protein RBM3 is associated with a favourable prognosis in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the prognostic value of RBM3 mRNA and protein expression in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and the cisplatin response upon RBM3 depletion in a cisplatin-sensitive ovarian cancer cell line. Methods RBM3 mRNA expression was analysed in tumors from a cohort of 267 EOC cases (Cohort I) and RBM3 protein expression was analysed using immunohistochemistry (IHC) in an independent cohort of 154 prospectively collected EOC cases (Cohort II). Kaplan Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modelling were applied to assess the relationship between RBM3 and recurrence free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS). Immunoblotting and IHC were used to examine the expression of RBM3 in a cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell line A2780-Cp70 and its cisplatin-responsive parental cell line A2780. The impact of RBM3 on cisplatin response in EOC was assessed using siRNA-mediated silencing of RBM3 in A2780 cells followed by cell viability assay and cell cycle analysis. Results Increased RBM3 mRNA expression was associated with a prolonged RFS (HR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.47-0.86, p = 0.003) and OS (HR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.44-0.95, p = 0.024) in Cohort I. Multivariate analysis confirmed that RBM3 mRNA expression was an independent predictor of a prolonged RFS, (HR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.44-0.84, p = 0.003) and OS (HR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.41-0.95; p = 0.028) in Cohort I. In Cohort II, RBM3 protein expression was associated with a prolonged OS (HR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.35-0.79, p = 0.002) confirmed by multivariate analysis (HR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.40-0.92, p = 0.017). RBM3 mRNA and protein expression levels were significantly higher in the cisplatin sensitive A2780 cell line compared to the cisplatin resistant A2780-Cp70 derivative. siRNA-mediated silencing of RBM3 expression in the A2780 cells resulted in a

  17. Adenovirus‑mediated overexpression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator enhances invasiveness and motility of serous ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiao; Lin, Liangbo; Yong, Min; Dong, Xiaojing; Yu, Tinghe; Hu, Lina

    2016-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) belongs to the adenosine triphosphate‑binding cassette transporter family, members of which are involved in several types of cancer. Previous studies by our group reported that CFTR was highly expressed in serous ovarian cancer (SOC) tissues, and that knockdown of CFTR suppressed the proliferation of ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo. Thus, the aim of the present study was to construct a recombinant adenoviral vector for the expression of the human CFTR gene in order to study the role of CFTR overexpression in the malignant invasion and migration of SOC cells in vitro. The present study then focused on the mechanisms of the role of CFTR in the migratory and invasive malignant properties of SOC cells. The CFTR gene was inserted into an adenoviral vector by using the AdEasy system in order to obtain the Ad‑CFTR overexpression vector, which was used to transfect the A2780 SOC cell line. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, western blot analysis and immunofluorescence were performed to detect the expression and localization of CFTR. Cell invasion and motility of the transfected cells compared with those of control cells were observed using Transwell and wound healing assays. A ~4,700 bp fragment of the CFTR gene was confirmed to be correctly cloned in the adenoviral vector and amplification of Ad‑CFTR was observed in HEK293 cells during package. After 48 h of transfection with Ad‑CFTR, ~90% of A2780 cells were red fluorescence protein‑positive. Immunofluorescence showed that following transfection, CFTR expression was increased and CFTR was located in the cell membrane and cytoplasm. CFTR overexpression was shown to enhance the invasion and motility of A2780 cells in vitro. Furthermore, the effects of CFTR overexpression on the activation c‑Src signaling were observed by western blot analysis. CFTR overexpressing cells showed the lowest activity of phospho‑Src (Tyr530

  18. Aberrant DNA Damage Response Pathways May Predict the Outcome of Platinum Chemotherapy in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stefanou, Dimitra T.; Bamias, Aristotelis; Episkopou, Hara; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A.; Likka, Maria; Kalampokas, Theodore; Photiou, Stylianos; Gavalas, Nikos; Sfikakis, Petros P.; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Souliotis, Vassilis L.

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian carcinoma (OC) is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Despite the advances in the treatment of OC with combinatorial regimens, including surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy, patients generally exhibit poor prognosis due to high chemotherapy resistance. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that DNA damage response (DDR) pathways are involved in resistance of OC patients to platinum chemotherapy. Selected DDR signals were evaluated in two human ovarian carcinoma cell lines, one sensitive (A2780) and one resistant (A2780/C30) to platinum treatment as well as in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from OC patients, sensitive (n = 7) or resistant (n = 4) to subsequent chemotherapy. PBMCs from healthy volunteers (n = 9) were studied in parallel. DNA damage was evaluated by immunofluorescence γH2AX staining and comet assay. Higher levels of intrinsic DNA damage were found in A2780 than in A2780/C30 cells. Moreover, the intrinsic DNA damage levels were significantly higher in OC patients relative to healthy volunteers, as well as in platinum-sensitive patients relative to platinum-resistant ones (all P<0.05). Following carboplatin treatment, A2780 cells showed lower DNA repair efficiency than A2780/C30 cells. Also, following carboplatin treatment of PBMCs ex vivo, the DNA repair efficiency was significantly higher in healthy volunteers than in platinum-resistant patients and lowest in platinum-sensitive ones (t1/2 for loss of γH2AX foci: 2.7±0.5h, 8.8±1.9h and 15.4±3.2h, respectively; using comet assay, t1/2 of platinum-induced damage repair: 4.8±1.4h, 12.9±1.9h and 21.4±2.6h, respectively; all P<0.03). Additionally, the carboplatin-induced apoptosis rate was higher in A2780 than in A2780/C30 cells. In PBMCs, apoptosis rates were inversely correlated with DNA repair efficiencies of these cells, being significantly higher in platinum-sensitive than in platinum-resistant patients and lowest in healthy volunteers (all P<0.05). We conclude that

  19. Downregulation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Expression Contributes to α-TEA's Proapoptotic Effects in Human Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Shun, Ming-Chieh; Yu, Weiping; Park, Sook-Kyung; Sanders, Bob G.; Kline, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    RRR-α-tocopherol derivative α-TEA (RRR-α-tocopherol ether-linked acetic acid analog) has been shown to be a potent antitumor agent both in vivo and in vitro. In this study, we investigated the effects of α-TEA on the expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family members, ErbB1, 2 and 3, and the role of ErbB 2 and 3 in α-TEA-induced apoptosis and suppression of Akt, FLIP and survivin in the cisplatin-sensitive (A2780S) and -resistant (A2780/CP70R) human ovarian cancer cell lines. Data show that α-TEA's ability to induced apoptosis was associated with reduced expression of ErbB1 (cisplatin-resistant cells), 2 and 3 (both cell types) and reduced levels of the phosphorylated (active) form of Akt; as well as, reduced levels of FLIP and survivin proteins in both cell types. Ectopic overexpression and siRNA knockdown studies showed that ErbB2, ErbB3, Akt, FLIP and survivin are involved in α-TEA-induce apoptosis and that α-TEA downregulates FLIP and survivin via suppression of pAkt, which is mediated by ErbB2 and ErB3. Thus, α-TEA is a potent pro-apoptotic agent for both cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant ovarian cancer cell lines in cell culture and it produces cell death, at least in part, by downregulation of members of the EGFR family. PMID:20224651

  20. Ovarian cancer treatment: The end of empiricism?

    PubMed

    Lheureux, Stephanie; Karakasis, Katherine; Kohn, Elise C; Oza, Amit M

    2015-09-15

    The diagnosis, investigation, and management of ovarian cancer are in a state of flux-balancing ever rapid advances in our understanding of its biology with 3 decades of clinical trials. Clinical trials that started with empirically driven selections have evolved in an evidence-informed manner to gradually improve outcome. Has this improved understanding of the biology and associated calls to action led to appropriate changes in therapy? In this review, the authors discuss incorporating emerging data on biology, combinations, dose, and scheduling of new and existing agents with patient preferences in the management of women with ovarian cancer. PMID:26096019

  1. Paclitaxel and Carboplatin With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-21

    Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinofibroma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  2. Ovarian Cancer Biomarker Performance in Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Daniel W.; Bast, Robert C.; Berg, Christine D.; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Hartge, Patricia; Lokshin, Anna E.; Lu, Karen H.; McIntosh, Martin W.; Mor, Gil; Patriotis, Christos; Pinsky, Paul F.; Thornquist, Mark D.; Scholler, Nathalie; Skates, Steven J.; Sluss, Patrick M.; Srivastava, Sudhir; Ward, David C.; Zhang, Zhen; Zhu, Claire S.; Urban, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Establishing a cancer screening biomarker’s intended performance requires “phase III” specimens obtained in asymptomatic individuals before clinical diagnosis rather than “phase II” specimens obtained from symptomatic individuals at diagnosis. We used specimens from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) cancer screening trial to evaluate ovarian cancer biomarkers previously assessed in phase II sets. Phase II specimens from 180 ovarian cancer cases and 660 benign disease or general population controls were assembled from four Early Detection Research Network (EDRN) or Ovarian Cancer Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) sites and used to rank 49 biomarkers. Thirty-five markers, including 6 additional markers from a fifth site, were then evaluated in PLCO proximate specimens from 118 women with ovarian cancer and 474 matched controls. Top markers in phase II specimens included CA125, HE4, transthyretin, CA15.3, and CA72.4 with sensitivity at 95% specificity ranging from 0.73 to 0.40. Except for transthyretin, these markers had similar or better sensitivity when moving to phase III specimens that had been drawn within six months of the clinical diagnosis. Performance of all markers declined in phase III specimens more remote than 6 months from diagnosis. Despite many promising new markers for ovarian cancer, CA125 remains the single-best biomarker in the phase II and phase III specimens tested in this study. PMID:21372036

  3. Hypodontia and ovarian cancer: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Iavazzo, Christos; Papakiritsis, Matthaios; Gkegkes, Ioannis D.

    2016-01-01

    Hypodontia can be defined as the non-formation of one or more teeth during the developmental period. Mutation in several genes related to tooth formation has previously been correlated with cancer. Regarding the ovarian cancer, there are few studies that associate the presence of hypodontia with ovarian cancer. A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed and Scopus. In total, 385 patients were included in this study. Control group was present in 3 out of 4 studies (340 patients). Hypodontia was present in 56 out of 290 patients (incidence of 19.3%). Only in 2 out of 4 studies, the number of missing teeth was mentioned (47 teeth), while the majority of them were either maxillary second premolars or maxillary lateral incisors. Unilateral distribution of the missing teeth was present in 28 out of 46 patients, while bilateral distribution of the missing teeth was present in 18 out of 46 patients. The presence of ovarian cancer in the family medical history occurred in 12 out of 33 patients. Only 1 out of 4 studies examined the presence of genes with mutations in the included patients. Based on our findings, the lack of clinical studies was the principal obstacle to clarify the possible predictive value of hypodontia in the early prediction of patients with higher risk of ovarian cancer. PMID:27026778

  4. [Immunological analogies between ovarian cancer and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Hanssen, S; Collinet, P; Leblanc, E; Salzet, M; Vinatier, D

    2013-05-01

    During pregnancy an environment allowing installation of tolerance toward the fetus is set up locally at the materno-fetal interface. Numerous effectors of immunity are involved in this tolerance (NK cell, T cell, Macrophages, dendritic cell). Specific mechanisms during pregnancy attract locally these immunological cells. In the decidua, they are educated toward tolerance. These mechanisms evolve during the pregnancy because at the end of the pregnancy, tolerance is broken to prepare and activate the labor. Ovarian tumors, after having surmounted the immunosurveillance, like trophoblast, chair the installation of a tolerance of their host facilitating the development of the disease. The blocking of these mechanisms of tolerance coupled with activation of mechanisms of defenses offer new perspectives in the treatment of the ovarian cancer. The authors suggest showing the analogies of the tolerance observed during ovarian cancer and pregnancy. The knowledge of the orchestration of the physiological mechanisms observed during pregnancy will offer new therapeutic targets. PMID:23182791

  5. Quality of Life and Care Needs of Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Anxiety; Fatigue; Nausea and Vomiting; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  6. Targeting the EGF Receptor for Ovarian Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zeineldin, Reema; Muller, Carolyn Y.; Stack, M. Sharon; Hudson, Laurie G.

    2010-01-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy in the US. Factors such as the molecular heterogeneity of ovarian tumors and frequent diagnosis at advanced stages hamper effective disease treatment. There is growing emphasis on the identification and development of targeted therapies to disrupt molecular pathways in cancer. The epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is one such protein target with potential utility in the management of ovarian cancer. This paper will discuss contributions of EGF receptor activation to ovarian cancer pathogenesis and the status of EGF receptor inhibitors and EGF receptor targeted therapies in ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:20066160

  7. Ultrasound-Mediated Destruction of LHRHa Targeted and Paclitaxel Loaded Lipid Microbubbles for the Treatment of Intraperitoneal Ovarian Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shufang; Liu, Hongxia; Zhu, Yi; Wang, Zhigang; Xu, Ronald X.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) is a promising technique to facilitate the delivery of chemotherapy in cancer treatment. However, the process typically uses non-specific microbubbles, leading to low tumor-to-normal tissue uptake ratio and adverse side effects. In this study, we synthesized the LHRH receptor targeted and paclitaxel (PTX) loaded lipid microbubbles (TPLMBs) for tumor-specific binding and enhanced therapeutic effect at the tumor site. An ovarian cancer xenograft model was established by injecting A2780/DDP cells intraperitoneally in BALB/c nude mice. Microscopic imaging of tumor sections after intraperitoneal injection of TPLMBs showed effective binding of the microbubbles with cancer cells. Ultrasound mediated destruction of the intraperitoneally injected TPLMBs yielded a superior therapeutic outcome in comparison with other treatment options. Immunohistochemical analyses of the dissected tumor tissue further confirmed the increased tumor apoptosis and reduced angiogenesis. Our experiment suggests that ultrasound mediated intraperitoneal administration of the targeted drug-loaded microbubbles may be a useful method for the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:24237050

  8. Microvesicles as Potential Ovarian Cancer Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Giusti, Ilaria; D'Ascenzo, Sandra; Dolo, Vincenza

    2013-01-01

    Although the incidence of ovarian cancer is low (i.e., less than 5% in European countries), it is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy and typically has a poor prognosis. To ensure optimal survival, it is important to diagnose this condition when the pathology is confined to the ovary. However, this is difficult to achieve because the first specific symptoms appear only during advanced disease stages. To date, the biomarker mainly used for the diagnosis and prognosis of ovarian cancer is CA125; however, this marker has a low sensitivity and specificity and is associated with several other physiological and pathological conditions. No other serum ovarian cancer markers appear to be able to replace or complement CA125, and the current challenge is therefore to identify novel markers for the early diagnosis of this disease. For this purpose, studies have focused on the microvesicles (MVs) released from tumor cells. MVs may represent an ideal biomarker because they can be easily isolated from blood, and they have particular features (mainly regarding microRNA profiles) that strongly correlate with ovarian cancer stage and may be effective for early diagnosis. PMID:23484144

  9. Surgical management of recurrent ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Hee Seung; Chang, Suk-Joon; Bristow, Robert E

    2016-08-01

    Most patients with advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancer will experience a relapse of disease despite a complete response after surgical cytoreduction and platinum-based chemotherapy. Treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer mainly comprises various combinations of systemic chemotherapy with or without targeted agents. The role of cytoreductive surgery for recurrent ovarian cancer is not well established. Although the literature on survival benefit of cytoreductive surgery for recurrent disease has expanded steadily over the past decade, most studies were retrospective, single-institution series with small numbers of patients. Given the balance between survival benefit and surgery-related morbidity during maximum cytoreductive surgical effort, it is essential to establish the optimal selection criteria for identifying appropriate candidates who will benefit from surgery without worsening quality of life. Three phase III randomized trials for this issue are currently underway. Herein, we present contemporary evidence supporting the positive role of cytoreductive surgery and offer selection criteria for optimal candidates for surgery in the treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer. PMID:27130407

  10. Targeted Immune Therapy of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, Keith L.; Karyampudi, Lavakumar; Lamichhane, Purushottam; Preston, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Clinical outcomes, such as recurrence free survival and overall survival, in ovarian cancer are quite variable, independent of common characteristics such as stage, response to therapy and grade. This disparity in outcomes warrants further exploration and therapeutic targeting into the interaction between the tumor and host. One compelling host characteristic that contributes both to the initiation and progression of ovarian cancer is the immune system. Hundreds of studies have confirmed a prominent role for the immune system in modifying the clinical course of the disease. Recent studies also show that anti-tumor immunity is often negated by immune regulatory cells present in the tumor microenvironment. Regulatory immune cells also directly enhance the pathogenesis through the release of various cytokines and chemokines, which together form an integrated pathologic network. Thus, in the future, research into immunotherapy targeting ovarian cancer will probably become increasingly focused on combination approaches that simultaneously augment immunity while preventing local immune suppression. In this article, we summarize important immunological targets that influence ovarian cancer outcome as well as include an update on newer immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:25544369

  11. Ovarian Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... any other group, followed by black, Hispanic, American Indian/Alaska Native, and Asian/Pacific Islander women. Ovarian Cancer Death Rates* by Race and Ethnicity, U.S., 1999–2012 Mortality source: U.S. Mortality Files, National Center for Health ...

  12. Ampelopsin reduces the migration and invasion of ovarian cancer cells via inhibition of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianfeng; Liu, Peishu; Ding, Feng; Yu, Nina; Li, Shihong; Wang, Surong; Zhang, Xiaofei; Sun, Xiangxiu; Chen, Ying; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Yunhe; Li, Bo

    2015-02-01

    Ampelopsin has displayed anticancer activity in several types of cancers. However, no evidence has been reported for the direct effect of ampelopsin on ovarian cancer cell migration and invasion, and the underling mechanisms have not yet been clearly established. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of ampelopsin on the migration and invasion of ovarian cancer. Proliferation and viability of the ovarian cancer cells were detected by MTT assay. Migration and invasion of the cells were detected, respectively, by scratch wound healing assay and Transwell assay. The expression levels of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers were detected at the protein level after stimulation with ampelopsin. Then, the expression levels of NF-κB and p-IκBα were detected with western blot analysis. Meanwhile, an inhibitor of NF-κB was used to investigate the effect of ampelopsin. Finally, the expression of Snail was also detected. Proliferation, migration and invasion of the A2780 cells were all inhibited following the application of ampelopsin. Ampelopsin upregulated E-cadherin and downregulated N-cadherin and vimentin in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Ampelopsin also exerted its ability to suppress the nuclear translocation of the NF-κB pathway. Administration of the inhibitor BAY11-7082 confirmed the roles of NF-κB in the expression of EMT markers and its transcription factor. These results demonstrated that ampelopsin inhibited EMT and reduced the invasion of ovarian cancer cells via the NF-κB/Snail pathway. PMID:25502786

  13. Drugs Approved for Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal ... primary peritoneal cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal ...

  14. Ovarian cancer treatment: The end of empiricism?

    PubMed Central

    Lheureux, Stephanie; Karakasis, Katherine; Kohn, Elise C.

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis, investigation, and management of ovarian cancer are in a state of flux—balancing ever rapid advances in our understanding of its biology with 3 decades of clinical trials. Clinical trials that started with empirically driven selections have evolved in an evidence‐informed manner to gradually improve outcome. Has this improved understanding of the biology and associated calls to action led to appropriate changes in therapy? In this review, the authors discuss incorporating emerging data on biology, combinations, dose, and scheduling of new and existing agents with patient preferences in the management of women with ovarian cancer. Cancer 2015;121:3203–3211. © 2015 American Cancer Society. PMID:26096019

  15. Type-Specific Cell Line Models for Type-Specific Ovarian Cancer Research

    PubMed Central

    Anglesio, Michael S.; Wiegand, Kimberly C.; Melnyk, Nataliya; Chow, Christine; Salamanca, Clara; Prentice, Leah M.; Senz, Janine; Yang, Winnie; Spillman, Monique A.; Cochrane, Dawn R.; Shumansky, Karey; Shah, Sohrab P.; Kalloger, Steve E.; Huntsman, David G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Ovarian carcinomas consist of at least five distinct diseases: high-grade serous, low-grade serous, clear cell, endometrioid, and mucinous. Biomarker and molecular characterization may represent a more biologically relevant basis for grouping and treating this family of tumors, rather than site of origin. Molecular characteristics have become the new standard for clinical pathology, however development of tailored type-specific therapies is hampered by a failure of basic research to recognize that model systems used to study these diseases must also be stratified. Unrelated model systems do offer value for study of biochemical processes but specific cellular context needs to be applied to assess relevant therapeutic strategies. Methods We have focused on the identification of clear cell carcinoma cell line models. A panel of 32 “ovarian cancer” cell lines has been classified into histotypes using a combination of mutation profiles, IHC mutation-surrogates, and a validated immunohistochemical model. All cell lines were identity verified using STR analysis. Results Many described ovarian clear cell lines have characteristic mutations (including ARID1A and PIK3CA) and an overall molecular/immuno-profile typical of primary tumors. Mutations in TP53 were present in the majority of high-grade serous cell lines. Advanced genomic analysis of bona-fide clear cell carcinoma cell lines also support copy number changes in typical biomarkers such at MET and HNF1B and a lack of any recurrent expressed re-arrangements. Conclusions: As with primary ovarian tumors, mutation status of cancer genes like ARID1A and TP53 and a general immuno-profile serve well for establishing histotype of ovarian cancer cell We describe specific biomarkers and molecular features to re-classify generic “ovarian carcinoma” cell lines into type specific categories. Our data supports the use of prototype clear cell lines, such as TOV21G and JHOC-5, and questions the use of SKOV3 and A

  16. Targeting CD133 in an in vivo ovarian cancer model reduces ovarian cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Skubitz, Amy P.N.; Taras, Elizabeth P.; Boylan, Kristin L.M.; Waldron, Nate N.; Oh, Seunguk; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Vallera, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives While most women with ovarian cancer will achieve complete remission after treatment, the majority will relapse within two years, highlighting the need for novel therapies. Cancer stem cells (CSC) have been identified in ovarian cancer and most other carcinomas as a small population of cells that can self-renew. CSC are more chemoresistant and radio-resistant than the bulk tumor cells; it is likely that CSC are responsible for relapse, the major problem in cancer treatment. CD133 has emerged as one of the most promising markers for CSC in ovarian cancer. The hypothesis driving this study is that despite their low numbers in ovarian cancer tumors, CSC can be eradicated using CD133 targeted therapy and tumor growth can be inhibited. Methods Ovarian cancer cell lines were evaluated using flow cytometry for expression of CD133. In vitro viability studies with an anti-CD133 targeted toxin were performed on one of the cell lines, NIH:OVCAR5. The drug was tested in vivo using a stably transfected luciferase-expressing NIH:OVCAR5 subline in nude mice, so that tumor growth could be monitored by digital imaging in real time. Results Ovarian cancer cell lines showed 5.6% to 16.0% CD133 expression. dCD133KDEL inhibited the in vitro growth of NIH:OVCAR5 cells. Despite low numbers of CD133-expressing cells in the tumor population, intraperitoneal drug therapy caused a selective decrease in tumor progression in intraperitoneal NIH: OVCAR5-luc tumors. Conclusions Directly targeting CSC that are a major cause of drug resistant tumor relapse with an anti-CD133 targeted toxin shows promise for ovarian cancer therapy. PMID:23721800

  17. Glutathione in Preventing Peripheral Neuropathy Caused by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Patients With Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, and/or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-22

    Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Neuropathy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Pain; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  18. MPT0G066, a novel anti-mitotic drug, induces JNK-independent mitotic arrest, JNK-mediated apoptosis, and potentiates antineoplastic effect of cisplatin in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Han-Li; Chao, Min-Wu; Li, Ya-Chi; Chang, Li-Hsun; Chen, Chun-Han; Chen, Mei-Chuan; Cheng, Chun-Chun; Liou, Jing-Ping; Teng, Che-Ming; Pan, Shiow-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Developing new anticancer agents against ovarian cancer is an urgent medical need. MPT0G066, a novel synthetic arylsulfonamide compound, was shown to inhibit cell growth and decrease viability in human ovarian cancer cells. MPT0G066 induced arrest of the cell cycle at the multipolyploidy (MP) phase in SKOV3 and at the G2/M phase in A2780 cells, while increasing the proportion of cells in the subG1. Additionally, MPT0G066 induced c-Jun-NH2 terminal kinase (JNK) activation, influenced cell cycle regulatory and Bcl-2 family proteins, which triggered intrinsic apoptotic pathways through cleavage of caspase-3, -7, -9, and poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Flow cytometry analysis of p-glycoprotein (p-gp) function showed that MPT0G066 was not a substrate of p-gp. Additionally, it was shown that MPT0G066 could decrease cell viability in multiple-drug-resistant human ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, the combination of MPT0G066 and cisplatin presented a synergistic cytotoxic effect against ovarian cancer cell lines in vitro. MPT0G066 also significantly suppressed the growth of ovarian carcinoma and potentiated the antineoplastic effects of cisplatin in vivo. In conclusion, these findings indicate that MPT0G066 can be a potential anticancer agent against ovarian cancer that worthy of further development. PMID:27526962

  19. MPT0G066, a novel anti-mitotic drug, induces JNK-independent mitotic arrest, JNK-mediated apoptosis, and potentiates antineoplastic effect of cisplatin in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Han-Li; Chao, Min-Wu; Li, Ya-Chi; Chang, Li-Hsun; Chen, Chun-Han; Chen, Mei-Chuan; Cheng, Chun-Chun; Liou, Jing-Ping; Teng, Che-Ming; Pan, Shiow-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Developing new anticancer agents against ovarian cancer is an urgent medical need. MPT0G066, a novel synthetic arylsulfonamide compound, was shown to inhibit cell growth and decrease viability in human ovarian cancer cells. MPT0G066 induced arrest of the cell cycle at the multipolyploidy (MP) phase in SKOV3 and at the G2/M phase in A2780 cells, while increasing the proportion of cells in the subG1. Additionally, MPT0G066 induced c-Jun-NH2 terminal kinase (JNK) activation, influenced cell cycle regulatory and Bcl-2 family proteins, which triggered intrinsic apoptotic pathways through cleavage of caspase-3, -7, -9, and poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Flow cytometry analysis of p-glycoprotein (p-gp) function showed that MPT0G066 was not a substrate of p-gp. Additionally, it was shown that MPT0G066 could decrease cell viability in multiple-drug-resistant human ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, the combination of MPT0G066 and cisplatin presented a synergistic cytotoxic effect against ovarian cancer cell lines in vitro. MPT0G066 also significantly suppressed the growth of ovarian carcinoma and potentiated the antineoplastic effects of cisplatin in vivo. In conclusion, these findings indicate that MPT0G066 can be a potential anticancer agent against ovarian cancer that worthy of further development. PMID:27526962

  20. Gene expression profiling analysis of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    YIN, JI-GANG; LIU, XIAN-YING; WANG, BIN; WANG, DAN-YANG; WEI, MAN; FANG, HUA; XIANG, MEI

    2016-01-01

    As a gynecological oncology, ovarian cancer has high incidence and mortality. To study the mechanisms of ovarian cancer, the present study analyzed the GSE37582 microarray. GSE37582 was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus and included data from 74 ovarian cancer cases and 47 healthy controls. The differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) were screened using linear models for microarray data package in R and were further screened for functional annotation. Next, Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analysis of the DEGs was conducted. The interaction associations of the proteins encoded by the DEGs were searched using the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes, and the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was visualized by Cytoscape. Moreover, module analysis of the PPI network was performed using the BioNet analysis tool in R. A total of 284 DEGs were screened, consisting of 145 upregulated genes and 139 downregulated genes. In particular, downregulated FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS) was an oncogene, while downregulated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A) was a tumor suppressor gene and upregulated cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44) was classed as an ‘other’ gene. The enriched functions included collagen catabolic process, stress-activated mitogen-activated protein kinases cascade and insulin receptor signaling pathway. Meanwhile, FOS (degree, 15), CD44 (degree, 9), B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2; degree, 7), CDKN1A (degree, 7) and matrix metallopeptidase 3 (MMP3; degree, 6) had higher connectivity degrees in the PPI network for the DEGs. These genes may be involved in ovarian cancer by interacting with other genes in the module of the PPI network (e.g., BCL2-FOS, BCL2-CDKN1A, FOS-CDKN1A, FOS-CD44, MMP3-MMP7 and MMP7-CD44). Overall, BCL2, FOS, CDKN1A, CD44, MMP3 and MMP7 may be correlated with ovarian cancer. PMID:27347159

  1. Cisplatin induces stemness in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Wiechert, Andrew; Saygin, Caner; Thiagarajan, Praveena S; Rao, Vinay S; Hale, James S; Gupta, Nikhil; Hitomi, Masahiro; Nagaraj, Anil Belur; DiFeo, Analisa; Lathia, Justin D; Reizes, Ofer

    2016-05-24

    The mainstay of treatment for ovarian cancer is platinum-based cytotoxic chemotherapy. However, therapeutic resistance and recurrence is a common eventuality for nearly all ovarian cancer patients, resulting in poor median survival. Recurrence is postulated to be driven by a population of self-renewing, therapeutically resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs). A current limitation in CSC studies is the inability to interrogate their dynamic changes in real time. Here we utilized a GFP reporter driven by the NANOG-promoter to enrich and track ovarian CSCs. Using this approach, we identified a population of cells with CSC properties including enhanced expression of stem cell transcription factors, self-renewal, and tumor initiation. We also observed elevations in CSC properties in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells as compared to cisplatin-naïve ovarian cancer cells. CD49f, a marker for CSCs in other solid tumors, enriched CSCs in cisplatin-resistant and -naïve cells. NANOG-GFP enriched CSCs (GFP+ cells) were more resistant to cisplatin as compared to GFP-negative cells. Moreover, upon cisplatin treatment, the GFP signal intensity and NANOG expression increased in GFP-negative cells, indicating that cisplatin was able to induce the CSC state. Taken together, we describe a reporter-based strategy that allows for determination of the CSC state in real time and can be used to detect the induction of the CSC state upon cisplatin treatment. As cisplatin may provide an inductive stress for the stem cell state, future efforts should focus on combining cytotoxic chemotherapy with a CSC targeted therapy for greater clinical utility. PMID:27105520

  2. The Essential Role of H19 Contributing to Cisplatin Resistance by Regulating Glutathione Metabolism in High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhi-Guo; Xu, Hong; Suo, Sha-Sha; Xu, Xiao-Li; Ni, Mao-Wei; Gu, Lin-Hui; Chen, Wei; Wang, Liang-Yan; Zhao, Ye; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yue-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Primary and acquired drug resistance is one of the main obstacles encountered in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC) chemotherapy. Cisplatin induces DNA damage through cross-linking and long integrated non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) play an important role in chemical induced DNA-damage response, which suggests that lincRNAs may be also associated with cisplatin resistance. However, the mechanism of long integrated non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) acting on cisplatin resistance is not well understood. Here, we showed that expression of lin-RECK-3, H19, LUCAT1, LINC00961, and linc-CARS2-2 was enhanced in cisplatin-resistant A2780-DR cells, while transcriptome sequencing showed decreased Linc-TNFRSF19-1 and LINC00515 expression. Additionally, we verified that different H19 expression levels in HGSC tissues showed strong correlation with cancer recurrence. H19 knockdown in A2780-DR cells resulted in recovery of cisplatin sensitivity in vitro and in vivo. Quantitative proteomics analysis indicated that six NRF2-targeted proteins, including NQO1, GSR, G6PD, GCLC, GCLM and GSTP1 involved in the glutathione metabolism pathway, were reduced in H19-knockdown cells. Furthermore, H19-knockdown cells were markedly more sensitive to hydrogen-peroxide treatment and exhibited lower glutathione levels. Our results reveal a previously unknown link between H19 and glutathione metabolism in the regulation of cancer-drug resistance. PMID:27193186

  3. The Essential Role of H19 Contributing to Cisplatin Resistance by Regulating Glutathione Metabolism in High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhi-Guo; Xu, Hong; Suo, Sha-Sha; Xu, Xiao-Li; Ni, Mao-Wei; Gu, Lin-Hui; Chen, Wei; Wang, Liang-Yan; Zhao, Ye; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yue-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Primary and acquired drug resistance is one of the main obstacles encountered in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC) chemotherapy. Cisplatin induces DNA damage through cross-linking and long integrated non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) play an important role in chemical induced DNA-damage response, which suggests that lincRNAs may be also associated with cisplatin resistance. However, the mechanism of long integrated non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) acting on cisplatin resistance is not well understood. Here, we showed that expression of lin-RECK-3, H19, LUCAT1, LINC00961, and linc-CARS2-2 was enhanced in cisplatin-resistant A2780-DR cells, while transcriptome sequencing showed decreased Linc-TNFRSF19-1 and LINC00515 expression. Additionally, we verified that different H19 expression levels in HGSC tissues showed strong correlation with cancer recurrence. H19 knockdown in A2780-DR cells resulted in recovery of cisplatin sensitivity in vitro and in vivo. Quantitative proteomics analysis indicated that six NRF2-targeted proteins, including NQO1, GSR, G6PD, GCLC, GCLM and GSTP1 involved in the glutathione metabolism pathway, were reduced in H19-knockdown cells. Furthermore, H19-knockdown cells were markedly more sensitive to hydrogen-peroxide treatment and exhibited lower glutathione levels. Our results reveal a previously unknown link between H19 and glutathione metabolism in the regulation of cancer-drug resistance. PMID:27193186

  4. miR-339-5p inhibits migration and invasion in ovarian cancer cell lines by targeting NACC1 and BCL6.

    PubMed

    Shan, Weiwei; Li, Jun; Bai, Yang; Lu, Xin

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to explore the role of miR-339-5p in ovarian cancer. The expression of miR-339-5p in seven ovarian cancer cell lines (Hey, SKOV3, OVCAR5, SKOV3-IP, A2780, CAOV3, and OVCA433) was detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The miR-339-5p mimic and inhibitor were used to regulate its expression. Migration, invasion, and proliferation were examined. A bioinformatics analysis was used to predict targets, and a dual-luciferase reporter system was applied for validation, along with Western blot verification. Additionally, the association of miR-339-5p and its target genes with ovarian cancer was analyzed based on The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. OVCAR5 and SKOV3 had the highest and lowest miR-339-5p expression, respectively. Inhibition of miR-339-5p expression increased the migration and invasion of OVCAR5 cells, while in SKOV3 cells, upregulated miR-339-5p attenuated the migration and invasion ability. Modulation of miR-339-5p had no effect on proliferation. The genes nucleus accumbens associated 1(BEN and BTB (POZ) domain containing) (NACC1) and B cell lymphoma-6 (bcl6) were validated to be targets of miR-339-5p. Clinically, patients with a high expression of NACC1 had a high risk in the survival analysis. miR-339-5p inhibits migration and invasion in ovarian cancer by targeting NACC1 and BCL6. miR-339-5p may be a biomarker of metastasis in ovarian cancer; NACC1 had a predictive value for ovarian cancer progression. PMID:26553360

  5. Familial ovarian cancer: a study of 11 families.

    PubMed

    Villani, C; Ficorella, C; Tomao, S

    1989-01-01

    In a group of 152 ovarian cancer patients, 11 cases with familial recurrence were investigated (7.23%). Of the families evaluated we found 26 patients with ovarian cancer and twenty two with different cancers in other sites. In ovarian cancer the familial aspect, despite its relatively low frequency, is one of the few factors for identifying "high risk" patients, thus allowing effective secondary prevention. PMID:2776785

  6. [Treatment of brain metastasis from ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Bondiau, P-Y; Largillier, R; Foa, C; Rasendrarijao, D; Frenay, M; Gérard, J-P

    2003-06-01

    Systemic metastases from ovarian carcinoma are frequent, but they seldom affect the central nervous system. We present here the case of a patient treated for an ovarian cancer by surgery and chemotherapy. Three months after the end of chemotherapy, the patient developed cerebral metastases from ovarian carcinoma (CMOC) treated by iterative surgery and and whole brain irradiation. As the frequency of solitary cerebral metastasis of ovarian cancer is higher than with other cancers, it is likely that they behave slightly differently. Literature analysis reveals an increase in the incidence of CMOC since the middle of the nineties. CMOC can occur during or after adjuvant chemotherapy and the best management strategies to better define determinants of survival for patients are not well known. It appears that a better outcome of CMOC may be obtained by an aggressive treatment, if possible, including surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Taking into account the increase in the incidence of the CMOC and their early occurrence, some authors have proposed a prophylactic brain radiotherapy in patients who receive adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:12834774

  7. Sargramostim and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With Advanced Ovarian Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer That Did Not Respond to Previous Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-01-15

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  8. Overexpression of DDB2 enhances the sensitivity of human ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin by augmenting cellular apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Bassant M.; Wang, Qi-En; Han, Chunhua; Milum, Keisha; Yin, De-Tao; Zhao, Qun; Wani, Gulzar; Arafa, El-Shaimaa A.; El-Mahdy, Mohamed A.; Wani, Altaf A.

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most widely used anticancer agents, displaying activity against a wide variety of tumors. However, development of drug resistance presents a challenging barrier to successful cancer treatment by cisplatin. To understand the mechanism of cisplatin resistance, we investigated the role of damaged DNA binding protein complex subunit 2 (DDB2) in cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis. We show that DDB2 is not required for the repair of cisplatin-induced DNA damage, but can be induced by cisplatin treatment. DDB2-deficient noncancer cells exhibit enhanced resistance to cell growth inhibition and apoptosis induced by cisplatin than cells with fully restored DDB2 function. Moreover, DDB2 expression in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell line CP70 and MCP2 was lower than their cisplatin-sensitive parental A2780 cells. Overexpression of DDB2 sensitized CP70 cells to cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis via activation of the caspase pathway and downregulation of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein. Further analysis indicates that the overexpression of DDB2 in CP70 cells downregulates Bcl-2 expression through decreasing Bcl-2 mRNA level. These results suggest that ovarian cancer cells containing high level of DDB2 become susceptible to cisplatin by undergoing enhanced apoptosis. PMID:20013802

  9. Second-look laparoscopy in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Xygakis, A M; Politis, G S; Michalas, S P; Kaskarelis, D B

    1984-08-01

    Forty-six patients with epithelial ovarian cancer previously treated with surgery, chemotherapy or external radiation underwent second-look laparoscopy to evaluate management. Twenty of the patients had positive laparoscopic findings and were not subjected to further laparotomy. The frequency of positive findings was related to the stage of the disease. Laparoscopic examination revealed no evidence of cancer in the remaining 26 patients. Three of the patients in this group were found to have additional disease at subsequent laparotomy. The laparoscopic procedures were not associated with major complications. Although second-look laparoscopy cannot replace repeat laparotomy, it does have a role in the follow-up of patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:6237197

  10. Clinical Efficacy of Ovarian Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Koshiyama, Masafumi; Matsumura, Noriomi; Konishi, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    Various trials of ovarian cancer screening programs have been reported worldwide. In 2011, one of the most famous papers indicated that annual screening using CA125/transvaginal sonography (TVS) did not reduce ovarian cancer mortality in the United States of America (USA). To investigate the validity of ovarian cancer screening, we verified the analyses of previous reports. At first, we obtained the USA datasets that were used for the analyses and identified many patients in whom cancers were accidentally detected several years after the screening period. We thus performed a new prognostic comparison between the screening group (cancers that were detected through screening or within one year after screening) and the control group (cancers that were found more than one year after screening, without screening, or in the original control group). The results showed that the prognoses of the screening group were significantly better than those of the control group (p=0.0017). In addition, the screening group contained significantly fewer stage IV cases than the control group (p=0.005). In another screening in the United Kingdom, ovarian cancer was detected at a relatively earlier stage (stage I/II: 44%), while the rate of stage IV detection was low (4%). Very recently, this team showed significant difference in the rates with and without screening (p=0.021) when prevalent cases were excluded and indicated the delayed effect of screening. These results contrasted with the USA data. In other studies in the USA and Japan, annual screening was also associated with a decreased stage at detection. New histopathological, molecular and genetic studies have recently provided two categories of ovarian carcinogenesis. Type I carcinomas are slow-growing neoplasms that often develop from benign ovarian cysts. Type II carcinomas are high-grade clinically aggressive neoplasms. The rate of type II carcinomas is significantly higher in Europe and the USA than in Asia (p<0

  11. Ovarian cancer proteomics: Many technologies one goal.

    PubMed

    Narasimhan, Kothandaraman; Changqing, Zhao; Choolani, Mahesh

    2008-02-01

    The last decade has seen major changes in the technologies used to identify markers for diagnosing cancer. This review focuses on recent developments on the evolving field of biomarker discovery, and validation techniques using proteomics platforms for ovarian cancer. It is possible now to diagnose various disease conditions using microliter quantities of body fluids. Currently the major developments were made in three distinct areas: (i) protein profiling, (ii) high-throughput validation techniques, and (iii) solid and liquid phase protein microarray platforms for analyzing candidate markers across subclasses and stages of cancers. The recent addition to the long list of technologies is metabolomics using metabolite profiling and informatics-based filtering of information for biomarker discovery of ovarian cancer. Emerging technologies need to address ways to eliminate the limitations posed by the complex dynamic nature of body fluids as well as ways to enrich low-abundance tumor markers if they were to become a successful biomarker discovery tool. These new technologies hold significant promise in identifying more robust markers for ovarian cancer. Since the prevalence of this disease in the population is low, the test must have a high specificity. PMID:21136825

  12. Ovarian Cancer Rates by State

    MedlinePlus

    ... Controls Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Gynecologic Cancers Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... about this message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Gynecologic Cancers Basic Information What Is Gynecologic Cancer? What Are ...

  13. Identification and evaluation of a potent novel ATR inhibitor, NU6027, in breast and ovarian cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Peasland, A; Wang, L-Z; Rowling, E; Kyle, S; Chen, T; Hopkins, A; Cliby, W A; Sarkaria, J; Beale, G; Edmondson, R J; Curtin, N J

    2011-01-01

    Background: The ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related kinase (ATR) has a key role in the signalling of stalled replication forks and DNA damage to cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair. It has long been recognised as an important target for cancer therapy but inhibitors have proved elusive. As NU6027, originally developed as a CDK2 inhibitor, potentiated cisplatin in a CDK2-independent manner we postulated that it may inhibit ATR. Methods: Cellular ATR kinase activity was determined by CHK1 phosphorylation in human fibroblasts with inducible dominant-negative ATR-kinase dead expression and human breast cancer MCF7 cells. Cell cycle effects and chemo- and radiopotentiation by NU6027 were determined in MCF7 cells and the role of mismatch repair and p53 was determined in isogenically matched ovarian cancer A2780 cells. Results: NU6027 is a potent inhibitor of cellular ATR activity (IC50=6.7 μ) and enhanced hydroxyurea and cisplatin cytotoxicity in an ATR-dependent manner. NU6027 attenuated G2/M arrest following DNA damage, inhibited RAD51 focus formation and increased the cytotoxicity of the major classes of DNA-damaging anticancer cytotoxic therapy but not the antimitotic, paclitaxel. In A2780 cells sensitisation to cisplatin was greatest in cells with functional p53 and mismatch repair (MMR) and sensitisation to temozolomide was greatest in p53 mutant cells with functional MMR. Importantly, NU6027 was synthetically lethal when DNA single-strand break repair is impaired either through poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibition or defects in XRCC1. Conclusion: NU6027 inhibits ATR, impairing G2/M arrest and homologous recombination thus increasing sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents and PARP inhibitors. It provides proof of concept data for clinical development of ATR inhibitors. PMID:21730979

  14. MicroRNAs in Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Katz, Betina; Tropé, Claes G; Reich, Reuven; Davidson, Ben

    2015-09-01

    Ovarian cancer, consisting predominantly of ovarian carcinoma, is the eighth most common cancer in women and the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Efforts focus on identifying biomarkers which may aid in early diagnosis and reduce mortality, as well as on characterizing therapeutic targets with the aim of circumventing chemoresistance and prolonging survival at advanced-stage disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression, and have been found to play an important role in ovarian carcinoma. Recent research has identified multiple miRNAs involved in the biology and progression of the disease, and supports a role for miRNAs as potential biomarkers, predictive markers and prognostic factors. Many of the studies published to date nevertheless suffer from critical weaknesses which affect data quality and reproducibility, including the comparison of normal ovaries to tumor tissue without compensation for the highly discrepant target cell fraction in these two specimen types and the inclusion of carcinomas of different histotypes, non-epithelial tumors or tumors of non-specified histology. These shortcomings highlight the critical role of pathologists as part of the team in the setting of such research. This review summarizes current knowledge in this area and discusses the potential clinical relevance of miRNAs in ovarian carcinoma, with focus on studies of clinical specimens in which tissue selection has been deemed adequate. PMID:26216350

  15. Hormone Therapy and Ovarian Cancer: Incidence and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Wernli, Karen J.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Hampton, John; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Egan, Kathleen M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective We conducted a population-based case-control study to investigate the association between hormone therapy (HT) and ovarian cancer incidence, and followed all these cancer cases to determine the association of HT use with ovarian cancer mortality. Methods Seven hundred fifty-one incident cases of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer aged 40–79 years were diagnosed in Wisconsin and Massachusetts between 1993–1995 and 1998–2001 and matched to similarly-aged controls (n=5808). Study subjects were interviewed by telephone, which ascertained information on HT use and specific preparation, estrogen alone (E-alone) or estrogen plus progestin (EP). Ovarian cancer cases were followed-up for mortality through December 2005. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for ovarian cancer incidence, and Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to estimate hazard ratios and corresponding confidence intervals for ovarian cancer mortality. Results Ever use of HT was significantly associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer (odds ratio 1.57, 95% CI 1.31–1.87). The excess risk was confined to women who used E-alone preparations (OR 2.33, 95% CI 1.85–2.95). No significant associations were detected between pre-diagnosis HT use and ovarian cancer survival. Conclusions Hormone therapy increases risk of ovarian cancer among E-alone users, but there is no substantial impact on survival after diagnosis. PMID:18264784

  16. Mathematical models of breast and ovarian cancers.

    PubMed

    Botesteanu, Dana-Adriana; Lipkowitz, Stanley; Lee, Jung-Min; Levy, Doron

    2016-07-01

    Women constitute the majority of the aging United States (US) population, and this has substantial implications on cancer population patterns and management practices. Breast cancer is the most common women's malignancy, while ovarian cancer is the most fatal gynecological malignancy in the US. In this review, we focus on these subsets of women's cancers, seen more commonly in postmenopausal and elderly women. In order to systematically investigate the complexity of cancer progression and response to treatment in breast and ovarian malignancies, we assert that integrated mathematical modeling frameworks viewed from a systems biology perspective are needed. Such integrated frameworks could offer innovative contributions to the clinical women's cancers community, as answers to clinical questions cannot always be reached with contemporary clinical and experimental tools. Here, we recapitulate clinically known data regarding the progression and treatment of the breast and ovarian cancers. We compare and contrast the two malignancies whenever possible in order to emphasize areas where substantial contributions could be made by clinically inspired and validated mathematical modeling. We show how current paradigms in the mathematical oncology community focusing on the two malignancies do not make comprehensive use of, nor substantially reflect existing clinical data, and we highlight the modeling areas in most critical need of clinical data integration. We emphasize that the primary goal of any mathematical study of women's cancers should be to address clinically relevant questions. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:337-362. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1343 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27259061

  17. Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, and Primary Peritoneal Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... lifestyle or eating habits. Avoiding things known to cause cancer. Taking medicines to treat a precancerous condition or ... called the endometrium. Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer of the female reproductive system. In recent years, ...

  18. Targeting the tumour microenvironment in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jean M; Coleman, Robert L; Sood, Anil K

    2016-03-01

    The study of cancer initiation, growth, and metastasis has traditionally been focused on cancer cells, and the view that they proliferate due to uncontrolled growth signalling owing to genetic derangements. However, uncontrolled growth in tumours cannot be explained solely by aberrations in cancer cells themselves. To fully understand the biological behaviour of tumours, it is essential to understand the microenvironment in which cancer cells exist, and how they manipulate the surrounding stroma to promote the malignant phenotype. Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynaecologic cancer worldwide. The majority of patients will have objective responses to standard tumour debulking surgery and platinum-taxane doublet chemotherapy, but most will experience disease recurrence and chemotherapy resistance. As such, a great deal of effort has been put forth to develop therapies that target the tumour microenvironment in ovarian cancer. Herein, we review the key components of the tumour microenvironment as they pertain to this disease, outline targeting opportunities and supporting evidence thus far, and discuss resistance to therapy. PMID:26849037

  19. Ovarian cysts and cancer in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Asima; Shinde, Aditi; Naik, Raj

    2016-05-01

    Adnexal masses are diagnosed in 5% pregnancies and pose diagnostic and management challenges. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the mainstay as an evaluation procedure; surgery is warranted for persistent masses with a diameter of >5 cm and sonographic signs of possible malignancy. Optimal timing for a planned surgery is the second trimester and does not adversely affect neonatal outcome. Laparoscopy is safe in pregnancy. Management for ovarian cancer during pregnancy should be individualised and formulated by a multidisciplinary team in a specialised centre while also considering the patients' wishes to preserve pregnancy. The following options can be considered: (i) induced abortion followed by standard management of ovarian cancer, (ii) pregnancy-preserving surgery followed by chemotherapy, planned delivery and secondary surgical completion or (iii) neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery during the postpartum period. Standard chemotherapy administered in non-pregnant population can only be used during the first trimester of pregnancy. PMID:26707193

  20. Identification of genes associated with platinum drug sensitivity and resistance in human ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, D; Schick, J; Conway, S; Biade, S; Laub, P B; Stevenson, J P; Hamilton, T C; O'Dwyer, P J; Johnson, S W

    2005-01-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapeutic regimens are ultimately unsuccessful due to intrinsic or acquired drug resistance. Understanding the molecular basis for platinum drug sensitivity/resistance is necessary for the development of new drugs and therapeutic regimens. In an effort to identify such determinants, we evaluated the expression of approximately 4000 genes using cDNA microarray screening in a panel of 14 unrelated human ovarian cancer cell lines derived from patients who were either untreated or treated with platinum-based chemotherapy. These data were analysed relative to the sensitivities of the cells to four platinum drugs (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (cisplatin), carboplatin, DACH-(oxalato)platinum (II) (oxaliplatin) and cis-diamminedichloro (2-methylpyridine) platinum (II) (AMD473)) as well as the proliferation rate of the cells. Correlation analysis of the microarray data with respect to drug sensitivity and resistance revealed a significant association of Stat1 expression with decreased sensitivity to cisplatin (r=0.65) and AMD473 (r=0.76). These results were confirmed by quantitative RT–PCR and Western blot analyses. To study the functional significance of these findings, the full-length Stat1 cDNA was transfected into drug-sensitive A2780 human ovarian cancer cells. The resulting clones that exhibited increased Stat1 expression were three- to five-fold resistant to cisplatin and AMD473 as compared to the parental cells. The effect of inhibiting Jak/Stat signalling on platinum drug sensitivity was investigated using the Janus kinase inhibitor, AG490. Pretreatment of platinum-resistant cells with AG490 resulted in significant increased sensitivity to AMD473, but not to cisplatin or oxaliplatin. Overall, the results indicate that cDNA microarray analysis may be used successfully to identify determinants of drug sensitivity/resistance and future functional studies of other candidate genes from this database may lead to an increased understanding of the

  1. Knockdown of cathepsin L sensitizes ovarian cancer cells to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, HONGMEI; ZHANG, LUOSHENG; WEI, LIXIA; GAO, XINGWANG; TANG, LI; GONG, WEI; MIN, NA; ZHANG, LI; YUAN, YAWEI

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a leading gynecological malignancy associated with high mortality. The development of acquired drug resistance is the primary cause of chemotherapy failure in the treatment of ovarian cancer. To examine the mechanism underlying paclitaxel resistance in ovarian cancer and attempt to reverse it, the present study induced a TAX-resistant ovarian cancer cell line, SKOV3/TAX. Cathepsin L (CTSL) has been found to be overexpressed in ovarian cancer. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible involvement of CTSL in the development of TAX resistance in ovarian cancer. CTSL expression was knocked down in SKOV3 ovarian cancer cells and their phenotypic changes were analyzed. The effects of silenced CTSL on the resistant cell line were investigated by proliferation and apoptosis analysis compared with control SKOV3 cells. CTSL was more highly expressed in SKOV3/TAX cells compared with SKOV3 cells. Paclitaxel treatment downregulated the expression of CTSL in SKOV-3 but not in the paclitaxel-resistant SKOV3/TAX cells. CTSL small hairpin RNA (shRNA) knockdown significantly potentiated apoptosis induced by paclitaxel compared with SKOV3/TAX cells transfected with control shRNA, suggesting that CTSL contributes to paclitaxel resistance in ovarian cancer cells and that CTSL silencing can enhance paclitaxel-mediated cell apoptosis. Thus, CTSL should be explored as a candidate of therapeutic target for modulating paclitaxel sensitivity in ovarian cancer. PMID:27313771

  2. Transcriptional regulation of chemokine expression in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Singha, Bipradeb; Gatla, Himavanth R; Vancurova, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    The increased expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic chemokines contributes to ovarian cancer progression through the induction of tumor cell proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, and metastasis. The substantial potential of these chemokines to facilitate the progression and metastasis of ovarian cancer underscores the need for their stringent transcriptional regulation. In this Review, we highlight the key mechanisms that regulate the transcription of pro-inflammatory chemokines in ovarian cancer cells, and that have important roles in controlling ovarian cancer progression. We further discuss the potential mechanisms underlying the increased chemokine expression in drug resistance, along with our perspective for future studies. PMID:25790431

  3. Sirolimus and Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-15

    Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  4. Three-photon imaging of ovarian cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Jennifer K.; Amirsolaimani, Babak; Rice, Photini; Hatch, Kenneth; Kieu, Khanh

    2016-02-01

    Optical imaging methods have the potential to detect ovarian cancer at an early, curable stage. Optical imaging has the disadvantage that high resolution techniques require access to the tissue of interest, but miniature endoscopes that traverse the natural orifice of the reproductive tract, or access the ovaries and fallopian tubes through a small incision in the vagina wall, can provide a minimally-invasive solution. We have imaged both rodent and human ovaries and fallopian tubes with a variety of endoscope-compatible modalities. The recent development of fiber-coupled femtosecond lasers will enable endoscopic multiphoton microscopy (MPM). We demonstrated two- and three-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF, 3PEF), and second- and third-harmonic generation microscopy (SHG, THG) in human ovarian and fallopian tube tissue. A study was undertaken to understand the mechanisms of contrast in these images. Six patients (normal, cystadenoma, and ovarian adenocarcinoma) provided ovarian and fallopian tube biopsies. The tissue was imaged with three-dimensional optical coherence tomography, multiphoton microscopy, and frozen for histological sectioning. Tissue sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, Masson's trichrome, and Sudan black. Approximately 1 μm resolution images were obtained with an excitation source at 1550 nm. 2PEF signal was absent. SHG signal was mainly from collagen. 3PEF and THG signal came from a variety of sources, including a strong signal from fatty connective tissue and red blood cells. Adenocarcinoma was characterized by loss of SHG signal, whereas cystic abnormalities showed strong SHG. There was limited overlap of two- and three- photon signals, suggesting that three-photon imaging can provide additional information for early diagnosis of ovarian cancer.

  5. Salpingectomy as a Means to Reduce Ovarian Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Mary B.; Dresher, Charles W.; Yates, Melinda S.; Jeter, Joanne M.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Alberts, David S.; Lu, Karen H.

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO) has become the standard of care for risk reduction in women at hereditary risk of ovarian cancer. While this procedure significantly decreases both the incidence of and mortality from ovarian cancer, it impacts quality of life, and the premature cessation of ovarian function may have long term health hazards. Recent advances in our understanding of the molecular pathways of ovarian cancer point to the fallopian tube epithelium as the origin of most high grade serous cancers (HGSC). This evolving appreciation of the role of the fallopian tube in HGSC has led to the consideration of salpingectomy alone as an option for risk management, especially in premenopausal women. In addition, it is postulated that bilateral salpingectomy with ovarian retention (BSOR), may have a public health benefit for women undergoing benign gynecologic surgery. In this review we provide the rationale for salpingectomy as an ovarian cancer risk reduction strategy. PMID:25586903

  6. MicroRNAs and Recent Insights into Pediatric Ovarian Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Jessica C.; Kolomeyevskaya, Nonna; Mach, Claire M.; Dietrich, Jennifer E.; Anderson, Matthew L.

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most common pediatric gynecologic malignancy. When diagnosed in children, ovarian cancers present unique challenges that differ dramatically from those faced by adults. Here, we review the spectrum of ovarian cancers found in young women and girls and discuss the biology of these diseases. A number of advances have recently shed significant new understanding on the potential causes of ovarian cancer in this unique population. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding how altered expression of non-coding RNA transcripts known as microRNAs play a key role in the etiology of ovarian germ cell and sex cord-stromal tumors. Emerging transgenic models for these diseases are also reviewed. Lastly, future challenges and opportunities for understanding pediatric ovarian cancers, delineating clinically useful biomarkers, and developing targeted therapies are discussed. PMID:23641362

  7. Ovarian Cancer Biomarker Discovery Based on Genomic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Yun; Kim, Hee Seung; Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Song, Yong-Sang

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer presents at an advanced stage in more than 75% of patients. Early detection has great promise to improve clinical outcomes. Although the advancing proteomic technologies led to the discovery of numerous ovarian cancer biomarkers, no screening method has been recommended for early detection of ovarian cancer. Complexity and heterogeneity of ovarian carcinogenesis is a major obstacle to discover biomarkers. As cancer arises due to accumulation of genetic change, understanding the close connection between genetic changes and ovarian carcinogenesis would provide the opportunity to find novel gene-level ovarian cancer biomarkers. In this review, we summarize the various gene-based biomarkers by genomic technologies, including inherited gene mutations, epigenetic changes, and differential gene expression. In addition, we suggest the strategy to discover novel gene-based biomarkers with recently introduced next generation sequencing. PMID:25337559

  8. Metformin Hydrochloride and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Brenner Tumor; Malignant Ascites; Malignant Pleural Effusion; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  9. Clinical tumour markers in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, A; Nikliński, J; Laudański, T; Pluygers, E

    1998-02-01

    Within past few years, the measurement of serological, histochemical and molecular genetic markers has had an increasing influence on clinical decisions about initial treatment and follow-up. This review presents data concerning the most studied and interesting markers in ovarian cancer. CA 125, CA 19.9, TATI, CASA, CEA, TPA, TPS and CYFRA21-1 are now the most widely used serological tumour markers for management of ovarian cancer patients. Ras oncogenes, C-erb2 proto-oncogene, p53 suppressor gene and Bcl-2 oncogene are examples of currently used molecular genetic markers. As histochemical markers-proliferation markers, flow cytometric analysis, thymidine labelling index, Ki-67 nuclear antigen or differentiation markers are nowadays the ones most often determined. Some of these markers might be useful adjuncts for monitoring response to therapy, including early detection of tumour reactivation to allow curative therapy and rapid detection of treatment failure. The study of these markers may also lead to a better understanding of the biological characteristics of ovarian cancer. Numerous tumour markers characterized in this paper have been recognized as promising prognostic factors. The information derived from studies of these markers also represents the most promising avenue towards new treatment strategies; nevertheless to validate these factors, prospective studies of a large patient population are needed. PMID:9511849

  10. [Hope for improvement of survival in ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Högberg, Thomas; Bergfeldt, Kjell; Borgfeldt, Christer; Holmberg, Erik; Åvall Lundqvist, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of death from a gynecologic cancer. Every year around 700 women contracts ovarian cancer in Sweden. The overall survival is among the highest in Europe, but still long term relative survival is only 46%. It is a long-held myth that ovarian cancer is a disease without symptoms. Almost 90% of women have symptoms, even in the early stages. Symptoms that should arise suspicion of ovarian cancer and initiate diagnostic work-up are continuous abdominal extension, early feeling of satiety, pelvic or abdominal pain, urinary urge and postmenopausal bleeding. Women's awareness of symptoms and willingness to seek medical advice and the organization of the health care system are important factors determining cancer survival. Ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous group of diseases with different tumor traits and prognosis. Personalized medicine and preventive measures recognizing recent knowledge about tumor biology will positively affect survival. PMID:26646961

  11. Management of relapsed ovarian cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Giornelli, Gonzalo H

    2016-01-01

    Around 70 % of ovarian cancer patients relapse after primary cytoreductive surgery and standard first-line chemotherapy. The biology of relapse remains unclear, but cancer stem cells seem to play an important role. There are still some areas of controversy on how to manage these relapses and or progressions that occur almost unavoidably in the course of this disease with shorter intervals between them as the natural history of this disease develops. The goal of treatments investigated in this neoplasm has shifted to maintenance therapy, trying to extend the progression free intervals in a disease that is becoming more and more protracted. PMID:27516935

  12. Noncontraceptive estrogen use and epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, D W; Kelly, J P; Welch, W R; Rosenberg, L; Stolley, P D; Warshauer, M E; Lewis, J; Woodruff, J; Shapiro, S

    1989-12-01

    The relation of noncontraceptive estrogen use to epithelial ovarian cancer was evaluated in a case-control study conducted in hospitals mainly in the northeastern United States. There were 377 cases diagnosed within the year before hospital admission and 2,030 hospital controls; data were collected by interview in the hospital. Compared with women who never took noncontraceptive estrogens, the overall relative risk estimate for women whose estrogen use lasted at least one year and was not combined with progestogens or testosterone was 1.2 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.8-1.9), after taking into account risk factors for ovarian cancer. There were 55 cases of the endometrioid, clear cell, or malignant mixed mesodermal cell type; the corresponding relative risk estimate was 0.9 (95% CI 0.3-3.0). There were 26 cases of undifferentiated cell type, with a relative risk estimate of 3.6 (95% CI 1.2-11). Relative risk estimates were similar in a subset of the cases (57%) for which pathology slides were reviewed. For estrogen use of long duration, use of high-dose preparations, or use in the distant past, the relative risk estimates were not significantly different from 1.0. The estimates were elevated for some categories of use, but not consistently--for example, for an interval of 5-9 years since estrogen use began (relative risk (RR) = 2.7), but not after shorter or longer intervals, and for use of conjugated estrogens with a dose of 0.3 mg (RR = 3.2) or 1.25 mg (RR = 2.4), but not for doses of 0.625 mg or 2.5 mg. The relative risk estimate was also elevated for use by nulliparous women (RR = 2.4). The results suggest that, overall, noncontraceptive estrogen use is not associated with the risk of epithelial ovarian cancer. Furthermore, our data do not support the hypothesis that estrogens increase the risk of endometrioid ovarian cancer. The elevated estimates could be due to multiple stratification of the data, but they should be explored in further studies, given the

  13. Organometallic Half-Sandwich Dichloridoruthenium(II) Complexes with 7-Azaindoles: Synthesis, Characterization and Elucidation of Their Anticancer Inactivity against A2780 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Štarha, Pavel; Hanousková, Lucie; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    A series of organometallic half-sandwich dichloridoruthenium(II) complexes of the general formula [Ru(η6-p-cym)(naza)Cl2] (1–8; p-cym = p-cymene; naza = 7-azaindole or its derivatives) was synthesised and fully characterized by elemental analysis, mass spectrometry, and infrared and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. A single-crystal X-ray structural analysis of [Ru(η6-p-cym)(2Me4Claza)Cl2] (6) revealed a typical piano-stool geometry with an N7-coordination mode of 2-methyl-4-chloro-7-azaindole (2Me4Claza). The complexes have been found to be inactive against human ovarian cancer cell line A2780 up to the highest applied concentration (IC50 > 50.0 μM). An inactivity of the complexes is caused by their instability in water-containing solvents connected with a release of the naza N-donor ligand, as proved by the detailed 1H NMR, mass spectrometry and fluorescence experiments. PMID:26606245

  14. Organometallic Half-Sandwich Dichloridoruthenium(II) Complexes with 7-Azaindoles: Synthesis, Characterization and Elucidation of Their Anticancer Inactivity against A2780 Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Štarha, Pavel; Hanousková, Lucie; Trávníček, Zdeněk

    2015-01-01

    A series of organometallic half-sandwich dichloridoruthenium(II) complexes of the general formula [Ru(η6-p-cym)(naza)Cl2] (1-8; p-cym = p-cymene; naza = 7-azaindole or its derivatives) was synthesised and fully characterized by elemental analysis, mass spectrometry, and infrared and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. A single-crystal X-ray structural analysis of [Ru(η6-p-cym)(2Me4Claza)Cl2] (6) revealed a typical piano-stool geometry with an N7-coordination mode of 2-methyl-4-chloro-7-azaindole (2Me4Claza). The complexes have been found to be inactive against human ovarian cancer cell line A2780 up to the highest applied concentration (IC50 > 50.0 μM). An inactivity of the complexes is caused by their instability in water-containing solvents connected with a release of the naza N-donor ligand, as proved by the detailed 1H NMR, mass spectrometry and fluorescence experiments. PMID:26606245

  15. Tumor microenvironment: The culprit for ovarian cancer metastasis?

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhongyue; Wang, Qiu; Lau, Wayne Bond; Lau, Bonnie; Xu, Lian; Zhao, Linjie; Yang, Huiliang; Feng, Min; Xuan, Yu; Yang, Yanfei; Lei, Lingzi; Wang, Chenlu; Yi, Tao; Zhao, Xia; Wei, Yuquan; Zhou, Shengtao

    2016-07-28

    Despite chemotherapy and surgical debulking options, ovarian cancer recurs and disseminates frequently, with poor prognosis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying ovarian cancer metastasis still remain unelucidated. The tumor microenvironment, consisting of stromal cells (including fibroblasts, macrophages, regulatory T cells, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, endothelial cells, pericytes and platelets), the extracellular matrix component (EMC) (including inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, matrix metalloproteinases, integrins, and other secreted molecules) and exosomes (small extracellular vesicles loaded with molecules), establishes an autocrine-paracrine communication circuit that reinforces invasion and cancer cell metastasis via reciprocal signaling. Recent evidences have unraveled the significant contribution of tumor microenvironment to ovarian cancer metastasis. In this review, we provide a comprehensive landscape of the reciprocity between tumor stroma and ovarian cancer cells upon metastasis, aiming to offer novel clues on the development of novel diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for ovarian cancer in future clinical practice. PMID:27131957

  16. Development of a Mouse Model of Menopausal Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Elizabeth R.; Wang, Ying; Xu, Xiang-Xi

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant understanding of the genetic mutations involved in ovarian epithelial cancer and advances in genomic approaches for expression and mutation profiling of tumor tissues, several key questions in ovarian cancer biology remain enigmatic: the mechanism for the well-established impact of reproductive factors on ovarian cancer risk remains obscure; cell of origin of ovarian cancer continue to be debated; and the precursor lesion, sequence, or events in progression remain to be defined. Suitable mouse models should complement the analysis of human tumor tissues and may provide clues to these questions currently perplexing ovarian cancer biology. A potentially useful model is the germ cell-deficient Wv (white spotting variant) mutant mouse line, which may be used to study the impact of menopausal physiology on the increased risk of ovarian cancer. The Wv mice harbor a point mutation in c-Kit that reduces the receptor tyrosine kinase activity to about 1–5% (it is not a null mutation). Homozygous Wv mutant females have a reduced ovarian germ cell reservoir at birth and the follicles are rapidly depleted upon reaching reproductive maturity, but other biological phenotypes are minimal and the mice have a normal life span. The loss of ovarian function precipitates changes in hormonal and metabolic activity that model features of menopause in humans. As a consequence of follicle depletion, the Wv ovaries develop ovarian tubular adenomas, a benign epithelial tumor corresponding to surface epithelial invaginations and papillomatosis that mark human ovarian aging. Ongoing work will test the possibility of converting the benign epithelial tubular adenomas into neoplastic tumors by addition of an oncogenic mutation, such as of Tp53, to model the genotype and biology of serous ovarian cancer. Model based on the Wv mice may have the potential to gain biological and etiological insights into ovarian cancer development and prevention. PMID:24616881

  17. Comparison of Expression Profiles in Ovarian Epithelium In Vivo and Ovarian Cancer Identifies Novel Candidate Genes Involved in Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Emmanuel, Catherine; Gava, Natalie; Kennedy, Catherine; Balleine, Rosemary L.; Sharma, Raghwa; Wain, Gerard; Brand, Alison; Hogg, Russell; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; George, Joshy; Birrer, Michael J.; Clarke, Christine L.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Bowtell, David D. L.; Harnett, Paul R.; deFazio, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Molecular events leading to epithelial ovarian cancer are poorly understood but ovulatory hormones and a high number of life-time ovulations with concomitant proliferation, apoptosis, and inflammation, increases risk. We identified genes that are regulated during the estrous cycle in murine ovarian surface epithelium and analysed these profiles to identify genes dysregulated in human ovarian cancer, using publically available datasets. We identified 338 genes that are regulated in murine ovarian surface epithelium during the estrous cycle and dysregulated in ovarian cancer. Six of seven candidates selected for immunohistochemical validation were expressed in serous ovarian cancer, inclusion cysts, ovarian surface epithelium and in fallopian tube epithelium. Most were overexpressed in ovarian cancer compared with ovarian surface epithelium and/or inclusion cysts (EpCAM, EZH2, BIRC5) although BIRC5 and EZH2 were expressed as highly in fallopian tube epithelium as in ovarian cancer. We prioritised the 338 genes for those likely to be important for ovarian cancer development by in silico analyses of copy number aberration and mutation using publically available datasets and identified genes with established roles in ovarian cancer as well as novel genes for which we have evidence for involvement in ovarian cancer. Chromosome segregation emerged as an important process in which genes from our list of 338 were over-represented including two (BUB1, NCAPD2) for which there is evidence of amplification and mutation. NUAK2, upregulated in ovarian surface epithelium in proestrus and predicted to have a driver mutation in ovarian cancer, was examined in a larger cohort of serous ovarian cancer where patients with lower NUAK2 expression had shorter overall survival. In conclusion, defining genes that are activated in normal epithelium in the course of ovulation that are also dysregulated in cancer has identified a number of pathways and novel candidate genes that may contribute

  18. Overexpression of CD157 Contributes to Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Progression by Promoting Mesenchymal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Morone, Simona; Lo-Buono, Nicola; Parrotta, Rossella; Giacomino, Alice; Nacci, Giulia; Brusco, Alfredo; Larionov, Alexey; Ostano, Paola; Mello-Grand, Maurizia; Chiorino, Giovanna; Ortolan, Erika; Funaro, Ada

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) is an aggressive tumor often diagnosed at an advanced stage, when there is little or no prospect of cure. Despite advances in surgical and chemotherapeutic strategies, only marginal improvements in patient outcome have been obtained. Hence, unraveling the biological mechanisms underpinning EOC progression is critical for improving patients’ survival. Recently, we reported that CD157 (an ectoenzyme regulating leukocyte diapedesis) is expressed in EOC and that high expression of the molecule is negatively correlated with the disease outcome in patients. Here, we demonstrate that forced overexpression of CD157 in OVCAR-3, TOV-21G, A2780 and OV-90 ovarian cancer cell lines promotes morphological and phenotypic changes characterized by disruption of intercellular junctions, downregulation of epithelial markers and upregulation of mesenchymal ones. These changes in cell shape and phenotype bring to reduced sensitivity to anoikis, increased anchorage-independent growth, cell motility and mesothelial invasion. Conversely, knockdown of CD157 in OV-90 and OC314 cells reverts the mesenchymal phenotype and reduces the cells’ migratory potential. Transcriptome profiling analysis highlighted 378 significantly differentially expressed genes, representing the signature of CD157-overexpressing OVCAR-3 and OV-90 cells. The modulation of selected genes translates into alteration of protein expression that give cells a highly malignant phenotype. The overall picture deduced from the analysis of the modulated transcripts is that high expression of CD157 strengthens a number of biological processes favoring tumor progression (including development and cell motility), and weakens several biological processes hindering tumor progression (such as apoptosis, cell death and response to stress). Together, these findings implicate CD157 in the progression of EOC to metastatic disease and suggest that CD157 may represent a valuable therapeutic target. PMID

  19. 78 FR 54741 - National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... America the two hundred and thirty- eighth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2013-21821 Filed 9-5-13; 8:45 am... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 9008 of August 30, 2013 National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2013 By the... ovarian cancer, and more than half that number of women will die of this disease. During National...

  20. 77 FR 55095 - National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-22148 Filed 9-5-12; 11:15 am] Billing code 3295-F2-P ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8853 of August 31, 2012 National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2012 By the... their lives to ovarian cancer. They are mothers and daughters, sisters and grandmothers,...

  1. [Tardive cecal metastasis from ovarian cancer: a case report].

    PubMed

    Talarico, C; Casella, C; Gambarotti, M

    2004-01-01

    Intestinal insolvement is a frequent sequela of metastatic ovarian cancer may be syncronous or following ovaric resection, after several years of disease free condition. The authors herein describe a clinical report of a case of cecal metastatic neoplasm due to ovarian cancer treated with surgical resection 24 years before. PMID:15960367

  2. Recreational Physical Activity and Ovarian Cancer Risk and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Moorman, Patricia G.; Jones, Lee W.; Akushevich, Lucy; Schildkraut, Joellen M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Physical activity may influence ovarian cancer risk and outcomes through effects on ovulation, inflammatory markers and other processes. We examined associations between self-reported physical activity and ovarian cancer risk and survival in a population-based, case-control study in North Carolina. Methods The analyses involved 638 epithelial ovarian cancer cases and 683 controls recruited between 1999-2008. Logistic regression analyses were used to assess ovarian cancer risk in relation to reported average physical activity at various time periods. Kaplan-Meier analyses and proportional hazards modeling were used to assess associations between physical activity and survival among ovarian cancer cases. Results Modestly reduced risks for ovarian cancer were observed in some categories of physical activity, but there were no consistent patterns of greater reductions in risk with higher activity levels. Physical activity prior to diagnosis was not significantly related to ovarian cancer survival overall, but survival was better for women who reported >2 hours of activity/week as compared to those reporting <1 hour/week among women who were non-obese (multivariable hazard ratio=0.69, 95% CI 0.47 – 1.00) Conclusions Our data provide weak evidence in support of beneficial effects of physical activity on ovarian cancer risk and survival, but results should be interpreted cautiously because of the lack of a clear dose response relation with higher levels of exercise and the likely misclassification of self-reported activity. PMID:21296269

  3. 75 FR 54451 - National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-22427 Filed 9-3-10; 11:15 am] Billing code 3195-W0-P ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8551 of August 31, 2010 National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2010 By the... against ovarian cancer, this disease continues to claim more lives than any other gynecologic...

  4. Risk of Ovarian Cancer Relapse Score

    PubMed Central

    Rizzuto, Ivana; Stavraka, Chara; Chatterjee, Jayanta; Borley, Jane; Hopkins, Thomas Glass; Gabra, Hani; Ghaem-Maghami, Sadaf; Huson, Les; Blagden, Sarah P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to construct a prognostic index that predicts risk of relapse in women who have completed first-line treatment for ovarian cancer (OC). Methods A database of OC cases from 2000 to 2010 was interrogated for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, grade and histological subtype of cancer, preoperative and posttreatment CA-125 level, presence or absence of residual disease after cytoreductive surgery and on postchemotherapy computed tomography scan, and time to progression and death. The strongest predictors of relapse were included into an algorithm, the Risk of Ovarian Cancer Relapse (ROVAR) score. Results Three hundred fifty-four cases of OC were analyzed to generate the ROVAR score. Factors selected were preoperative serum CA-125, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage and grade of cancer, and presence of residual disease at posttreatment computed tomography scan. In the validation data set, the ROVAR score had a sensitivity and specificity of 94% and 61%, respectively. The concordance index for the validation data set was 0.91 (95% confidence interval, 0.85-0.96). The score allows patient stratification into low (<0.33), intermediate (0.34–0.67), and high (>0.67) probability of relapse. Conclusions The ROVAR score stratifies patients according to their risk of relapse following first-line treatment for OC. This can broadly facilitate the appropriate tailoring of posttreatment care and support. PMID:25647256

  5. General Information About Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, and Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... condition or to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, and Primary Peritoneal Cancer ... PDQ Screening and Prevention Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  6. [Individualized therapy of synchronous ovarian and colon cancers with lymph].

    PubMed

    Deme, Dániel; Bishr, Abdulfatah M; Nizar, Jamool; Telekes, András

    2015-06-01

    A 71-year-old female patient underwent urgent laparotomy due to severe right lower quadrant abdominal pain and fever. Macroscopically duplex coecal and transverse colon cancer as well as a sigmoid or left ovarian cancer were suspected. Pathological findings revealed synchronous left ovarian and transverse colonic neoplasms. Both primaries metastatized to their regional lymph nodes. Furthermore, the ovarian cancer infiltrating the sigmoid colon gave distant metastasis in the coecum, too. Ovarian cancer histology showed papillary adenocarcinoma, and transverse colon cancer was a tubular adenocarcinoma. The affected lymph nodes were clearly distinguished by immunohistochemistry staining: ovarian metastases were CK7 positive, and colonic metastases were CK20 and CEA positive. The patient was treated with combinated chemotherapy: FOLFOX-4 two weekly and paclitaxel monotherapy every other week. The patient tolerated this combined treatment well. The authors conclude that multiple synchronous neoplasms can be treated with individualized chemotherapeutic protocol with good efficacy and few adverse reactions. PMID:26027602

  7. DNA methylation changes in epithelial ovarian cancer histotypes

    PubMed Central

    Earp, Madalene A.; Cunningham, Julie M.

    2016-01-01

    Survival after a diagnosis of ovarian cancer has not improved, and despite histological differences, treatment is similar for all cases. Understanding the molecular basis for ovarian cancer risk and prognosis is fundamental, and to this end much has been gleaned about genetic changes contributing to risk, and to a lesser extent, survival. There’s considerable evidence for genetic differences between the four pathologically defined histological subtypes; however, the contribution of epigenetics is less well documented. In this report, we review alterations in DNA methylation in ovarian cancer, focusing on histological subtypes, and studies examining the roles of methylation in determining therapy response. As epigenetics is making its way into clinical care, we review the application of cell free DNA methylation to ovarian cancer diagnosis and care. Finally, we comment on recurrent limitations in the DNA methylation literature for ovarian cancer, which can and should be addressed to mature this field. PMID:26363302

  8. Emerging and Evolving Ovarian Cancer Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Bobbs, Alexander S; Cole, Jennifer M; Cowden Dahl, Karen D

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the leading cause of death from a gynecological malignancy in the United States. By the time a woman is diagnosed with OC, the tumor has usually metastasized. Mouse models that are used to recapitulate different aspects of human OC have been evolving for nearly 40 years. Xenograft studies in immunocompromised and immunocompetent mice have enhanced our knowledge of metastasis and immune cell involvement in cancer. Patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) can accurately reflect metastasis, response to therapy, and diverse genetics found in patients. Additionally, multiple genetically engineered mouse models have increased our understanding of possible tissues of origin for OC and what role individual mutations play in establishing ovarian tumors. Many of these models are used to test novel therapeutics. As no single model perfectly copies the human disease, we can use a variety of OC animal models in hypothesis testing that will lead to novel treatment options. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the utility of different mouse models in the study of OC and their suitability for cancer research. PMID:26380555

  9. An antimitotic and antivascular agent BPR0L075 overcomes multidrug resistance and induces mitotic catastrophe in paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolei; Wu, Erxi; Wu, Jun; Wang, Tian-Li; Hsieh, Hsing-Pang; Liu, Xinli

    2013-01-01

    Paclitaxel plays a major role in the treatment of ovarian cancer; however, resistance to paclitaxel is frequently observed. Thus, new therapy that can overcome paclitaxel resistance will be of significant clinical importance. We evaluated antiproliferative effects of an antimitotic and antivascular agent BPR0L075 in paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancer cells. BPR0L075 displays potent and broad-spectrum cytotoxicity at low nanomolar concentrations (IC50 = 2-7 nM) against both parental ovarian cancer cells (OVCAR-3, SKOV-3, and A2780-1A9) and paclitaxel-resistant sublines (OVCAR-3-TR, SKOV-3-TR, 1A9-PTX10), regardless of the expression levels of the multidrug resistance transporter P-gp and class III β-tubulin or mutation of β-tubulin. BPR0L075 blocks cell cycle at the G2/M phase in paclitaxel-resistant cells while equal concentration of paclitaxel treatment was ineffective. BPR0L075 induces cell death by a dual mechanism in parental and paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancer cells. In the parental cells (OVCAR-3 and SKOV-3), BPR0L075 induced apoptosis, evidenced by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage and DNA ladder formation. BPR0L075 induced cell death in paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancer cells (OVCAR-3-TR and SKOV-3-TR) is primarily due to mitotic catastrophe, evidenced by formation of giant, multinucleated cells and absence of PARP cleavage. Immunoblotting analysis shows that BPR0L075 treatment induced up-regulation of cyclin B1, BubR1, MPM-2, and survivin protein levels and Bcl-XL phosphorylation in parental cells; however, in resistant cells, the endogenous expressions of BubR1 and survivin were depleted, BPR0L075 treatment failed to induce MPM-2 expression and phosphorylation of Bcl-XL. BPR0L075 induced cell death in both parental and paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancer cells proceed through caspase-3 independent mechanisms. In conclusion, BPR0L075 displays potent cytotoxic effects in ovarian cancer cells with a potential to overcome paclitaxel

  10. Safety of Ovarian Tissue Autotransplantation for Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bockstaele, Laurence; Tsepelidis, Sophie; Dechene, Julie; Englert, Yvon; Demeestere, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Cancer treatments can induce premature ovarian failure in almost half of young women suffering from invasive neoplasia. Cryopreservation of ovarian cortex and subsequent autotransplantation of frozen-thawed tissue have emerged as promising alternatives to conventional fertility preservation technologies. However, human ovarian tissue is generally harvested before the administration of gonadotoxic treatment and could be contaminated with malignant cells. The safety of autotransplantation of ovarian cortex remains a major concern for fertility preservation units worldwide. This paper discusses the main tools for detecting disseminated cancer cells currently available, their limitations, and clinical relevance. PMID:22253631

  11. Inhibitory Effect of Baicalin and Baicalein on Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianchu; Li, Zhaoliang; Chen, Allen Y.; Ye, Xingqian; Luo, Haitao; Rankin, Gary O.; Chen, Yi Charlie

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the primary causes of death for women all through the Western world. Baicalin and baicalein are naturally occurring flavonoids that are found in the roots and leaves of some Chinese medicinal plants and are thought to have antioxidant activity and possible anti-angiogenic, anti-cancer, anxiolytic, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective activities. Two kinds of ovarian cancer (OVCAR-3 and CP-70) cell lines and a normal ovarian cell line (IOSE-364) were selected to be investigated in the inhibitory effect of baicalin and baicalein on cancer cells. Largely, baicalin and baicalein inhibited ovarian cancer cell viability in both ovarian cancer cell lines with LD50 values in the range of 45–55 μM for baicalin and 25–40 μM for baicalein. On the other hand, both compounds had fewer inhibitory effects on normal ovarian cells viability with LD50 values of 177 μM for baicalin and 68 μM for baicalein. Baicalin decreased expression of VEGF (20 μM), cMyc (80 μM), and NFkB (20 μM); baicalein decreased expression of VEGF (10 μM), HIF-1α (20 μM), cMyc (20 μM), and NFkB (40 μM). Therefore baicalein is more effective in inhibiting cancer cell viability and expression of VEGF, HIF-1α, cMyc, and NFκB in both ovarian cancer cell lines. It seems that baicalein inhibited cancer cell viability through the inhibition of cancer promoting genes expression including VEGF, HIF-1α, cMyc, and NFκB. Overall, this study showed that baicalein and baicalin significantly inhibited the viability of ovarian cancer cells, while generally exerting less of an effect on normal cells. They have potential for chemoprevention and treatment of ovarian cancers. PMID:23502466

  12. Histone deacetylase inhibitors and aspirin interact synergistically to induce cell death in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sonnemann, Jürgen; Hüls, Isabel; Sigler, Michael; Palani, Chithra D; Hong, Le Thi Thu; Völker, Uwe; Kroemer, Heyo K; Beck, James F

    2008-07-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs) as well as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including aspirin show promise as antineoplastic agents. The treatment with both HDIs and aspirin can result in hyperacetylation of proteins. In this study, we investigated whether HDIs and aspirin interacted in inducing anticancer activity and histone acetylation. We found that the HDIs, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and sodium butyrate, and aspirin cooperated to induce cell death in the ovarian cancer cell line, A2780. The effect was synergistic, as evidenced by CI-isobologram analysis. However, aspirin had no effect on histone acetylation, neither in the absence nor presence of HDIs. To gain insight into the mechanism underlying the synergistic action of HDIs and aspirin, we employed the deacetylated metabolite of aspirin, salicylic acid, and the cyclooxygenase-1- and -2-selective inhibitors, SC-560 and NS-398, respectively. We found that HDIs and salicylic acid interacted synergistically, albeit less efficiently than HDIs and aspirin, to induce cancer cell death, suggesting that the acetyl and the salicyl moiety contributed to the cooperative interaction of aspirin with HDIs. SC-560 and NS-398 had little effect both when applied alone or in conjunction with HDIs, indicating that the combinatorial effect of HDIs and aspirin was not the result of cyclo-oxygenase inhibition. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that HDIs and aspirin synergize to induce cancer cell death and, thus, provides a rationale for a more in-depth exploration into the potential of combining HDIs and aspirin as a strategy for anticancer therapy. PMID:18575740

  13. Chromosome abnormalities in primary ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yonescu, R.; Currie, J.; Griffin, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    Chromosome abnormalities that are specific and recurrent may occur in regions of the genome that are involved in the conversion of normal cells to those with tumorigenic potential. Ovarian cancer is the primary cause of death among patients with gynecological malignancies. We have performed cytogenetic analysis of 16 ovarian tumors from women age 28-82. Three tumors of low malignant potential and three granulosa cell tumors had normal karyotypes. To look for the presence of trisomy 12, which has been suggested to be a common aberration in this group of tumors, interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed on direct preparations from three of these tumors using a probe for alpha satellite sequences of chromosome 12. In the 3 preparations, 92-98 percent of the cells contained two copies of chromosome 12, indicating that trisomy 12 is not a universal finding in low grade ovarian tumors. Endometrioid carcinoma of the ovary is histologically indistinguishable from endometial carcinoma of the uterus. We studied 10 endometrioid tumors to determine the degree of genetic similarity between these two carcinomas. Six out of ten endometrioid tumors showed a near-triploid modal number, and one presented with a tetraploid modal number. Eight of the ten contained structural chromosome abnormalities, of which the most frequent were 1p- (5 tumors), 19q+ (3 tumors), 6q- or ins(6) (4 tumors), 3q- or 3q+ (4 tumors). These cytogenetic results resemble those reported for papillary ovarian tumors and differ from those of endometrial carcinoma of the uterus. We conclude that despite the histologic similarities between the endometrioid and endometrial carcinomas, the genetic abnormalities in the genesis of these tumors differ significantly.

  14. Validating genetic risk associations for ovarian cancer through the international Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, C L; Near, A M; Van Den Berg, D J; Ramus, S J; Gentry-Maharaj, A; Menon, U; Gayther, S A; Anderson, A R; Edlund, C K; Wu, A H; Chen, X; Beesley, J; Webb, P M; Holt, S K; Chen, C; Doherty, J A; Rossing, M A; Whittemore, A S; McGuire, V; DiCioccio, R A; Goodman, M T; Lurie, G; Carney, M E; Wilkens, L R; Ness, R B; Moysich, K B; Edwards, R; Jennison, E; Kjaer, S K; Hogdall, E; Hogdall, C K; Goode, E L; Sellers, T A; Vierkant, R A; Cunningham, J C; Schildkraut, J M; Berchuck, A; Moorman, P G; Iversen, E S; Cramer, D W; Terry, K L; Vitonis, A F; Titus-Ernstoff, L; Song, H; Pharoah, P D P; Spurdle, A B; Anton-Culver, H; Ziogas, A; Brewster, W; Galitovskiy, V; Chenevix-Trench, G

    2009-01-01

    The search for genetic variants associated with ovarian cancer risk has focused on pathways including sex steroid hormones, DNA repair, and cell cycle control. The Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC) identified 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes in these pathways, which had been genotyped by Consortium members and a pooled analysis of these data was conducted. Three of the 10 SNPs showed evidence of an association with ovarian cancer at P⩽0.10 in a log-additive model: rs2740574 in CYP3A4 (P=0.011), rs1805386 in LIG4 (P=0.007), and rs3218536 in XRCC2 (P=0.095). Additional genotyping in other OCAC studies was undertaken and only the variant in CYP3A4, rs2740574, continued to show an association in the replication data among homozygous carriers: ORhomozygous(hom)=2.50 (95% CI 0.54-11.57, P=0.24) with 1406 cases and 2827 controls. Overall, in the combined data the odds ratio was 2.81 among carriers of two copies of the minor allele (95% CI 1.20–6.56, P=0.017, phet across studies=0.42) with 1969 cases and 3491 controls. There was no association among heterozygous carriers. CYP3A4 encodes a key enzyme in oestrogen metabolism and our finding between rs2740574 and risk of ovarian cancer suggests that this pathway may be involved in ovarian carcinogenesis. Additional follow-up is warranted. PMID:19127255

  15. Why have ovarian cancer mortality rates declined? Part I. Incidence.

    PubMed

    Sopik, Victoria; Iqbal, Javaid; Rosen, Barry; Narod, Steven A

    2015-09-01

    The age-adjusted mortality rate from ovarian cancer in the United States has declined over the past several decades. The decline in mortality might be the consequence of a reduced number of cases (incidence) or a reduction in the proportion of patients who die from their cancer (case-fatality). In part I of this three-part series, we examine rates of ovarian cancer incidence and mortality from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) registry database and we explore to what extent the observed decline in mortality can be explained by a downward shift in the stage distribution of ovarian cancer (i.e. due to early detection) or by fewer cases of ovarian cancer (i.e. due to a change in risk factors). The proportion of localized ovarian cancers did not increase, suggesting that a stage-shift did not contribute to the decline in mortality. The observed decline in mortality paralleled a decline in incidence. The trends in ovarian cancer incidence coincided with temporal changes in the exposure of women from different birth cohorts to various reproductive risk factors, in particular, to changes in the use of the oral contraceptive pill and to declining parity. Based on recent changes in risk factor propensity, we predict that the trend of the declining age-adjusted incidence rate of ovarian cancer in the United States will reverse and rates will increase in coming years. PMID:26080287

  16. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel or Oxaliplatin and Capecitabine With or Without Bevacizumab as First-Line Therapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV or Recurrent Stage I Epithelial Ovarian or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-29

    Borderline Ovarian Mucinous Tumor; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer

  17. Intraoperative radiation therapy in recurrent ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, O.W. Stephanie . E-mail: stbeast@stanford.edu; Kapp, Daniel S.; Teng, Nelson N.H.; Husain, Amreen

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate disease outcomes and complications in patients with recurrent ovarian cancer treated with cytoreductive surgery and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). Methods and Materials: A retrospective study of 24 consecutive patients with ovarian carcinoma who underwent secondary cytoreduction and intraoperative radiation therapy at our institution between 1994 and 2002 was conducted. After optimal cytoreductive surgery, IORT was delivered with orthovoltage X-rays (200 kVp) using individually sized and beveled cone applications. Outcomes measures were local control of disease, progression-free interval, overall survival, and treatment-related complications. Results: Of these 24 patients, 22 were available for follow-up analysis. Additional treatment at the time of and after IORT included whole abdominopelvic radiation, 9; pelvic or locoregional radiation, 5; chemotherapy, 6; and no adjuvant treatment, 2. IORT doses ranged from 9-14 Gy (median, 12 Gy). The anatomic sites treated were pelvis (sidewalls, vaginal cuff, presacral area, anterior pubis), para-aortic and paracaval lymph node beds, inguinal region, or porta hepatitis. At a median follow-up of 24 months, 5 patients remain free of disease, whereas 17 patients have recurred, of whom 4 are alive with disease and 13 died from disease. Five patients recurred within the radiation fields for a locoregional relapse rate of 32% and 12 patients recurred at distant sites with a median time to recurrence of 13.7 months. Five-year overall survival was 22% with a median survival of 26 months from time of IORT. Nine patients (41%) experienced Grade 3 toxicities from their treatments. Conclusion: In carefully selected patients with locally recurrent ovarian cancer, combined IORT and tumor reductive surgery is reasonably tolerated and may contribute to achieving local control and disease palliation.

  18. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Bevacizumab Compared to Docetaxel, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Carcinoma (Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  19. Value of Symptom-Triggered Diagnostic Evaluation for Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, M. Robyn; Lowe, Kimberly A.; Goff, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the potential harms and ovarian cancer outcomes associated with symptom-triggered diagnostic evaluation of all women with symptoms of ovarian cancer. Methods Five thousand-twelve women over age 40 were prospectively enrolled in a cohort study of proactive symptom-triggered diagnostic evaluation. Women who tested positive on a Symptom Index were offered testing with CA125 and transvaginal ultrasound. Results of these tests and any subsequent procedures were recorded. Assessment of ovarian cancer outcomes for all participants through Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) was performed a year after enrollment was complete. Results A positive Symptom Index was found in 241 (4.8%) of participating patients and 211 (88%) participated in CA125, transvaginal ultrasound, or both CA125 and transvaginal ultrasound. Twenty surgical procedures (laparoscopy, laparotomy, vaginal) were performed in the study population (0.4% of participating women). However, only six (0.12%) were performed for a suspicious ovarian mass and only 4 (0.08%) were performed solely due to study participation. A total of eight ovarian cancers were diagnosed, 31–843days after symptom assessment (50% distant, 50% local or regional). Of the two cancers diagnosed within 6 months, one was Symptom Index-positive. Conclusions Proactive symptom-triggered diagnostic evaluation for ovarian cancer results in minimal unindicated surgery. A small number of ovarian cancers were identified solely on the basis of symptom-triggered diagnostic testing. PMID:24463666

  20. Grape Seed Procyanidin Reversal of P-glycoprotein Associated Multi-Drug Resistance via Down-regulation of NF-κB and MAPK/ERK Mediated YB-1 Activity in A2780/T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sheng-qi; Duan, Lian; Huo, Qi-lu; Ren, Fei; Li, Guo-feng

    2013-01-01

    The expression and function of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is associated with the phenotype of multi-drug resistance (MDR), leading chemotherapy failure of patients suffered with cancer. Grape seed procyanidin(GSP) is a natural polyphenol supplement with anti-inflammatory effect. Present study assessed a new use of GSP on the MDR reversal activity and its possible molecular mechanisms in MDR1-overpressing paclitaxel resistant ovarian cancer cells. Our results showed GSP significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel and adriamycin in paclitaxel resistant A2780/T cells but its parental A2780 cells. Furthermore, GSP strongly inhibited P-gp expression by blocking MDR1 gene transcription, as well as, increased the intracellular accumulation of the P-gp substrate rhodamine-123 in A2780/T cells. Nuclear factor-κB(NF-κB) activity, IκB degradation level and NF-κB/p65 nuclear translocation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and receptor activator for nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) were markedly inhibited by pre-treatment with GSP. Meanwhile, GSP inhibited MAPK/ERK pathway by decreasing the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, resulting in reduced the Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1) activation with blocking its nuclear translocation. Moreover, the up-regulation of P-gp expression, the activation of AKT/NF-κB and MAPK/ERK pathway induced by LPS was attenuated by GSP administration. Compared with PDTC and U1026, inhibitor of NF-κB and MAPK/ERK respectively, GSP showed the same tendency of down-regulating NF-κB and MAPK/ERK mediated YB-1 activities. Thus, GSP reverses P-gp associated MDR by inhibiting the function and expression of P-gp through down-regulation of NF-κB activity and MAPK/ERK pathway mediated YB-1 nuclear translocation, offering insight into the mechanism of reversing MDR by natural polyphenol supplement compounds. GSP could be a new potential MDR reversal agent used for combination therapy with chemotherapeutics in clinic. PMID:23967153

  1. Other Gynecologic Cancers: endometrial, ovarian, vulvar and vaginal cancers.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Franco, Eliane; Franco, Eduardo L

    2004-08-25

    HEALTH ISSUE: In Canada, cancers of the endometrium, ovaries, vulva, vagina, placenta and adnexa account for 11% of all malignant neoplasms in women and 81% of all genital cancers. Although the incidence and mortality from vulvar and vaginal cancers are very low, endometrium and ovarian cancer are important public health problems. KEY FINDINGS: In Canada, there has been no appreciable improvement in survival for women with advanced endometrial (EC) or ovarian cancer (OC) over the past 30 years. The prognosis of EC is good for most patients because diagnosis is made at early stages. However, survival of OC is poor; more than 70% of cases are diagnosed at late stages. Up to 10% of OCs is linked to familial aggregation. Cancers of the vulva and of the vagina are very rare. The survival experience for women with the latter is worse than for those with the former. Both share many risk factors with cervical cancer and the recent developments in the study of HPV infection should be applicable to these diseases as well. Of particular interest will be the advent of vaccines for the primary prevention of HPV infection. DATA GAPS AND RECOMMENDATIONS: At present, the best available means to diagnose gynecologic malignancies is a detailed clinical examination, considering the totality of information on potential and proven risk factors, such as age, reproductive health, sexual practices, use unopposed estrogens or of oral contraceptives or tubal ligation, obesity, diet, smoking, and the familial clustering of some of these cancers. PMID:15345077

  2. Clinical Use of Cancer Biomarkers in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sölétormos, György; Duffy, Michael J.; Othman Abu Hassan, Suher; Verheijen, René H.M.; Tholander, Bengt; Bast, Robert C.; Gaarenstroom, Katja N.; Sturgeon, Catharine M.; Bonfrer, Johannes M.; Petersen, Per Hyltoft; Troonen, Hugo; CarloTorre, Gian; Kanty Kulpa, Jan; Tuxen, Malgorzata K.; Molina, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Objective To present an update of the European Group on Tumor Markers guidelines for serum markers in epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods Systematic literature survey from 2008 to 2013. The articles were evaluated by level of evidence and strength of recommendation. Results Because of its low sensitivity (50–62% for early stage epithelial ovarian cancer) and limited specificity (94–98.5%), cancer antigen (CA) 125 (CA125) is not recommended as a screening test in asymptomatic women. The Risk of Malignancy Index, which includes CA125, transvaginal ultrasound, and menopausal status, is recommended for the differential diagnosis of a pelvic mass. Because human epididymis protein 4 has been reported to have superior specificity to CA125, especially in premenopausal women, it may be considered either alone or as part of the risk of ovarian malignancy algorithm, in the differential diagnosis of pelvic masses, especially in such women. CA125 should be used to monitor response to first-line chemotherapy using the previously published criteria of the Gynecological Cancer Intergroup, that is, at least a 50% reduction of a pretreatment sample of 70 kU/L or greater. The value of CA125 in posttherapy surveillance is less clear. Although a prospective randomized trial concluded that early administration of chemotherapy based on increasing CA125 levels had no effect on survival, European Group on Tumor Markers state that monitoring with CA125 in this situation should occur, especially if the patient is a candidate for secondary cytoreductive surgery. Conclusions At present, CA125 remains the most important biomarker for epithelial ovarian cancer, excluding tumors of mucinous origin. PMID:26588231

  3. Data Mining for Identification of Molecular Targets in Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Villegas-Ruiz, Vanessa; Juarez-Mendez, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is possibly the sixth most common malignancy worldwide, in Mexico representing the fourth leading cause of gynecological cancer death more than 70% being diagnosed at an advanced stage and the survival being very poor. Ovarian tumors are classified according to histological characteristics, epithelial ovarian cancer as the most common (~80%). We here used high-density microarrays and a systems biology approach to identify tissue-associated deregulated genes. Non-malignant ovarian tumors showed a gene expression profile associated with immune mediated inflammatory responses (28 genes), whereas malignant tumors had a gene expression profile related to cell cycle regulation (1,329 genes) and ovarian cell lines to cell cycling and metabolism (1,664 genes). PMID:27221839

  4. Prognostic values of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 isoenzymes in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yu-mei; Zhao, Shan

    2016-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) activity has been used as a functional stem cell marker to isolate cancer stem cells in different cancer types, including ovarian cancer. However, which ALDH1’s isoenzymes are contributing to ALDH1 activity in ovarian cancer remains elusive. In addition, the prognostic value of an individual ALDH1 isoenzyme in ovarian cancer is not clear. Thus, we accessed the prognostic value of ALDH1 isoenzymes in ovarian cancer patients through the “Kaplan–Meier plotter” online database, which can be used to determine the effect of the genes on ovarian cancer prognosis. We found that high mRNA expression of five ALDH1 isoenzymes, such as ALDH1A1, ALDH1A2, ALDH1A3, ALDH1B1, and ALDH1L1, was not correlated with overall survival (OS) for all 1,306 ovarian cancer patients. In addition, all five of the ALDH1 isoenzymes’ high mRNA expression was found to be uncorrelated with OS in serous cancer or endometrioid cancer patients. However, ALDH1A3’s high mRNA expression is associated with worse OS in grade II ovarian cancer patients, hazard ratio (HR) 1.53 (1.14–2.07), P=0.005. ALDH1A2’s high mRNA expression is significantly associated with worse OS in TP53 wild-type ovarian cancer patients, HR 2.86 (1.56–5.08), P=0.00036. In addition, ALDH1A3’s high mRNA expression is significantly associated with better OS in TP53 wild-type ovarian cancer patients, HR 0.56 (0.32–1.00), P=0.04. Our results indicate that although ALDH1 isoenzyme mRNA might not be a prognostic marker for overall ovarian cancer patients, some isoenzymes, such as ALDH1A2 and ALDH1A3, might be a good prognostic marker for some types of ovarian cancer patients. PMID:27110126

  5. Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, Bevacizumab, and Veliparib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-03

    Fallopian Tube Carcinosarcoma; Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Neoplasm; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Tumor; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  6. Role of minimally invasive surgery in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Nezhat, Farr R; Pejovic, Tanja; Finger, Tamara N; Khalil, Susan S

    2013-01-01

    The standard treatment of ovarian cancer includes upfront surgery with intent to accurately diagnose and stage the disease and to perform maximal cytoreduction, followed by chemotherapy in most cases. Surgical staging of ovarian cancer traditionally has included exploratory laparotomy with peritoneal washings, hysterectomy, salpingo-oophorectomy, omentectomy, multiple peritoneal biopsies, and possible pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy. In the early 1990s, pioneers in laparoscopic surgery used minimally invasive techniques to treat gynecologic cancers, including laparoscopic staging of early ovarian cancer and primary and secondary cytoreduction in advanced and recurrent disease in selected cases. Since then, the role of minimally invasive surgery in gynecologic oncology has been continually expanding, and today advanced laparoscopic and robotic-assisted laparoscopic techniques are used to evaluate and treat cervical and endometrial cancer. However, the important question about the place of the minimally invasive approach in surgical treatment of ovarian cancer remains to be evaluated and answered. Overall, the potential role of minimally invasive surgery in treatment of ovarian cancer is as follows: i) laparoscopic evaluation, diagnosis, and staging of apparent early ovarian cancer; ii) laparoscopic assessment of feasibility of upfront surgical cytoreduction to no visible disease; iii) laparoscopic debulking of advanced ovarian cancer; iv) laparoscopic reassessment in patients with complete remission after primary treatment; and v) laparoscopic assessment and cytoreduction of recurrent disease. The accurate diagnosis of suspect adnexal masses, the safety and feasibility of this surgical approach in early ovarian cancer, the promise of laparoscopy as the most accurate tool for triaging patients with advanced disease for surgery vs upfront chemotherapy or neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and its potential in treatment of advanced cancer have been documented and

  7. Quantitative analysis of cell-free DNA in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    SHAO, XUEFENG; He, YAN; JI, MIN; CHEN, XIAOFANG; QI, JING; SHI, WEI; HAO, TIANBO; JU, SHAOQING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between cell-free DNA (cf-DNA) levels and clinicopathological characteristics of patients with ovarian cancer using a branched DNA (bDNA) technique, and to determine the value of quantitative cf-DNA detection in assisting with the diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Serum specimens were collected from 36 patients with ovarian cancer on days 1, 3 and 7 following surgery, and additional serum samples were also collected from 22 benign ovarian tumor cases, and 19 healthy, non-cancerous ovaries. bDNA techniques were used to detect serum cf-DNA concentrations. All data were analyzed using SPSS version 18.0. The cf-DNA levels were significantly increased in the ovarian cancer group compared with those of the benign ovarian tumor group and healthy ovarian group (P<0.01). Furthermore, cf-DNA levels were significantly increased in stage III and IV ovarian cancer compared with those of stages I and II (P<0.01). In addition, cf-DNA levels were significantly increased on the first day post-surgery (P<0.01), and subsequently demonstrated a gradual decrease. In the ovarian cancer group, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of cf-DNA and the sensitivity were 0.917 and 88.9%, respectively, which was higher than those of cancer antigen 125 (0.724, 75%) and human epididymis protein 4 (0.743, 80.6%). There was a correlation between the levels of serum cf-DNA and the occurrence and development of ovarian cancer in the patients evaluated. bDNA techniques possessed higher sensitivity and specificity than other methods for the detection of serum cf-DNA in patients exhibiting ovarian cancer, and bDNA techniques are more useful for detecting cf-DNA than other factors. Thus, the present study demonstrated the potential value for the use of bDNA as an adjuvant diagnostic method for ovarian cancer. PMID:26788153

  8. Antigen-specific immunotherapy of cervical and ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chien-fu; Wu, TC; Monie, Archana; Roden, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Summary We contrast the efforts to treat ovarian cancer and cervical cancer through vaccination because of their different pathobiology. A plethora of approaches have been developed for therapeutic vaccination against cancer, many of which target defined tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). Persistent infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types is necessary cause of cervical cancer. Furthermore, cervical cancer patients frequently mount both humoral and T cell immune responses to the HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins, whose expression is required for the transformed phenotype. Numerous vaccine studies target these viral TAAs, including recent trials that may enhance clearance of pre-malignant disease. By contrast little is known about the etiology of epithelial ovarian cancer. Although it is clear that p53 mutation or loss is a critical early event in the development of epithelial ovarian cancer, no precursor lesion has been described for the most common serous histotype, and even the location of its origin is debated. These issues have complicated the selection of appropriate ovarian TAAs and the design of vaccines. Here we focus on mesothelin as a promising ovarian TAA because it is overexpressed and immunogenic at high frequency in patients, is displayed on the cell surface and potentially contributes to ovarian cancer biology. PMID:18363994

  9. Granisetron, Aprepitant, and Dexamethasone in Preventing Nausea and Vomiting in Patients Receiving Chemotherapy for Stage II, III, or IV Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Nausea and Vomiting; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  10. Nectin 4 Overexpression in Ovarian Cancer Tissues and Serum

    PubMed Central

    DeRycke, Melissa S.; Pambuccian, Stefan E.; Gilks, C. Blake; Kalloger, Steve E.; Ghidouche, Abderrezak; Lopez, Marc; Bliss, Robin L.; Geller, Melissa A.; Argenta, Peter A.; Harrington, Katherine M.; Skubitz, Amy P.N.

    2011-01-01

    Early detection of ovarian cancer is difficult owing to the lack of specific and sensitive tests available. Previously, we found expression of nectin 4 to be increased in ovarian cancer compared with normal ovaries. Reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and quantitative RT-PCR validated the overexpression of nectin 4 messenger RNA in ovarian cancer compared with normal ovarian cell lines and tissues. Protein levels of nectin 4 were elevated in ovarian cancer cell lines and tissue compared with normal ovarian cell lines as demonstrated by Western immunoblotting, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemical staining of tissue microarray slides. Cleaved nectin 4 was detectable in a number of patient serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In patients with benign gynecologic diseases with high serum CA125 levels, nectin 4 was not detected in the majority of cases, suggesting that nectin 4 may serve as a potential biomarker that helps discriminate benign gynecologic diseases from ovarian cancer in a panel with CA125. PMID:20959669

  11. Surgery and Chemotherapy With or Without Chemotherapy After Surgery in Treating Patients With Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, Uterine, or Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-18

    Recurrent Uterine Corpus Cancer; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  12. Municipal distribution of ovarian cancer mortality in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Lope, Virginia; Pollán, Marina; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Aragonés, Nuria; Vidal, Enrique; Gómez-Barroso, Diana; Ramis, Rebeca; García-Pérez, Javier; Cabanes, Anna; López-Abente, Gonzalo

    2008-01-01

    Background Spain was the country that registered the greatest increases in ovarian cancer mortality in Europe. This study describes the municipal distribution of ovarian cancer mortality in Spain using spatial models for small-area analysis. Methods Smoothed relative risks of ovarian cancer mortality were obtained, using the Besag, York and Molliè autoregressive spatial model. Standardised mortality ratios, smoothed relative risks, and distribution of the posterior probability of relative risks being greater than 1 were depicted on municipal maps. Results During the study period (1989–1998), 13,869 ovarian cancer deaths were registered in 2,718 Spanish towns, accounting for 4% of all cancer-related deaths among women. The highest relative risks were mainly concentrated in three areas, i.e., the interior of Barcelona and Gerona (north-east Spain), the north of Lugo and Asturias (north-west Spain) and along the Seville-Huelva boundary (in the south-west). Eivissa (Balearic Islands) and El Hierro (Canary Islands) also registered increased risks. Conclusion Well established ovarian cancer risk factors might not contribute significantly to the municipal distribution of ovarian cancer mortality. Environmental and occupational exposures possibly linked to this pattern and prevalent in specific regions, are discussed in this paper. Small-area geographical studies are effective instruments for detecting risk areas that may otherwise remain concealed on a more reduced scale. PMID:18789142

  13. The mannose receptor LY75 (DEC205/CD205) modulates cellular phenotype and metastatic potential of ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Faddaoui, Adnen; Bachvarova, Magdalena; Plante, Marie; Gregoire, Jean; Renaud, Marie-Claude; Sebastianelli, Alexandra; Gobeil, Stephane; Morin, Chantale; Macdonald, Elizabeth; Vanderhyden, Barbara; Bachvarov, Dimcho

    2016-03-22

    The molecular basis of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) dissemination is still poorly understood. Previously, we identified the mannose receptor LY75 gene as hypomethylated in high-grade (HG) serous EOC tumors, compared to normal ovarian tissues. LY75 represents endocytic receptor expressed on dendritic cells and so far, has been primarily studied for its role in antigen processing and presentation. Here we demonstrate that LY75 is overexpressed in advanced EOC and that LY75 suppression induces mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) in EOC cell lines with mesenchymal morphology (SKOV3 and TOV112), accompanied by reduction of their migratory and invasive capacity in vitro and enhanced tumor cell colonization and metastatic growth in vivo. LY75 knockdown in SKOV3 cells also resulted in predominant upregulation of functional pathways implicated in cell proliferation and metabolism, while pathways associated with cell signaling and adhesion, complement activation and immune response were mostly suppressed. Moreover, LY75 suppression had an opposite effect on EOC cell lines with epithelial phenotype (A2780s and OV2008), by directing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) associated with reduced capacity for in vivo EOC cell colonization, as similar/identical signaling pathways were reversely regulated, when compared to mesenchymal LY75 knockdown EOC cells.To our knowledge, this is the first report of a gene displaying such pleiotropic effects in sustaining the cellular phenotype of EOC cells and points to novel functions of this receptor in modulating EOC dissemination. Our data also support previous findings regarding the superior capacity of epithelial cancer cells in metastatic colonization of distant sites, compared to cancer cells with mesenchymal-like morphology. PMID:26871602

  14. The mannose receptor LY75 (DEC205/CD205) modulates cellular phenotype and metastatic potential of ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Faddaoui, Adnen; Bachvarova, Magdalena; Plante, Marie; Gregoire, Jean; Renaud, Marie-Claude; Sebastianelli, Alexandra; Gobeil, Stephane; Morin, Chantale; Macdonald, Elizabeth; Vanderhyden, Barbara; Bachvarov, Dimcho

    2016-01-01

    The molecular basis of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) dissemination is still poorly understood. Previously, we identified the mannose receptor LY75 gene as hypomethylated in high-grade (HG) serous EOC tumors, compared to normal ovarian tissues. LY75 represents endocytic receptor expressed on dendritic cells and so far, has been primarily studied for its role in antigen processing and presentation. Here we demonstrate that LY75 is overexpressed in advanced EOC and that LY75 suppression induces mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) in EOC cell lines with mesenchymal morphology (SKOV3 and TOV112), accompanied by reduction of their migratory and invasive capacity in vitro and enhanced tumor cell colonization and metastatic growth in vivo. LY75 knockdown in SKOV3 cells also resulted in predominant upregulation of functional pathways implicated in cell proliferation and metabolism, while pathways associated with cell signaling and adhesion, complement activation and immune response were mostly suppressed. Moreover, LY75 suppression had an opposite effect on EOC cell lines with epithelial phenotype (A2780s and OV2008), by directing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) associated with reduced capacity for in vivo EOC cell colonization, as similar/identical signaling pathways were reversely regulated, when compared to mesenchymal LY75 knockdown EOC cells. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a gene displaying such pleiotropic effects in sustaining the cellular phenotype of EOC cells and points to novel functions of this receptor in modulating EOC dissemination. Our data also support previous findings regarding the superior capacity of epithelial cancer cells in metastatic colonization of distant sites, compared to cancer cells with mesenchymal-like morphology. PMID:26871602

  15. Defining Therapy for Recurrent Platinum-sensitive Ovarian Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this phase III clinical trial, women with platinum-sensitive, recurrent ovarian epithelial, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer will be randomly assigned to undergo secondary cytoreductive surgery, if they are candidates for such surgery, and

  16. Discovery – BRCA Connection to Breast and Ovarian Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    NCI-funded research helped identify inherited BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic mutations and their connection to breast and ovarian cancer. From this research, a screening test was also developed to help patients make informed decisions about their health.

  17. What Will Happen After Treatment for Ovarian Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... general physical exam and blood tests for tumor markers that help recognize recurrence. For epithelial ovarian cancer, ... with your doctor. The choice of which tumor marker blood tests to check depends on the type ...

  18. Combining Chemotherapy with Bevacizumab Improves Outcomes for Ovarian Cancer Patients

    Cancer.gov

    Results from two phase III randomized clinical trials suggest that, at least for some patients with ovarian cancer, adding the antiangiogenesis agent bevacizumab to chemotherapy increases the time to disease progression and may improve survival.

  19. Fertility drugs, reproductive strategies and ovarian cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Tomao, Federica; Lo Russo, Giuseppe; Spinelli, Gian Paolo; Stati, Valeria; Prete, Alessandra Anna; Prinzi, Natalie; Sinjari, Marsela; Vici, Patrizia; Papa, Anselmo; Chiotti, Maria Stefania; Benedetti Panici, Pierluigi; Tomao, Silverio

    2014-01-01

    Several adverse effects have been related to infertility treatments, such as cancer development. In particular, the relationship between infertility, reproductive strategies, and risk of gynecological cancers has aroused much interest in recent years. The evaluation of cancer risk among women treated for infertility is very complex, mainly because of many factors that can contribute to occurrence of cancer in these patients (including parity status). This article addresses the possible association between the use of fertility treatments and the risk of ovarian cancer, through a scrupulous search of the literature published thus far in this field. Our principal objective was to give more conclusive answers on the question whether the use of fertility drug significantly increases ovarian cancer risk. Our analysis focused on the different types of drugs and different treatment schedules used. This study provides additional insights regarding the long-term relationships between fertility drugs and risk of ovarian cancer. PMID:24829615

  20. [Bone marrow involvement in ovarian cancer determined by immunohistochemical methods].

    PubMed

    Gabriel, M; Obrebowska, A; Spaczyński, M

    2000-01-01

    Atypical epithelial cells in the bone marrow of patients with ovarian cancer were evaluated using immunohistochemical techniques. We investigated cytospin preparations of bone marrow taken from 9 women with benign ovarian tumors and 59 women with malignant ovarian tumors. Two monoclonal antibodies (NCL-C11 and NCL-CA 125) were used. With both antibodies we were able to detect keratin and CA 125 antigen expression in the bone marrow of 9 (18.4%) of the patients with ovarian cancer. With regard to the wide histological differentiation of ovarian carcinomas, the presence of atypical epithelial cells in the bone marrow was required as a prognostic factor for survival and relapses. This should be investigated in a larger study group. PMID:11326158

  1. A Molecularly Targeted Theranostic Probe for Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenxue; Bardhan, Rizia; Bartels, Marc; Perez-Torres, Carlos; Pautler, Robia G.; Halas, Naomi J.; Joshi, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) family has been implicated in ovarian cancer because of its participation in signaling pathway regulating cellular proliferation, differentiation, motility, and survival. Currently, effective diagnostic and therapeutic schemes are lacking for treating ovarian cancer and consequently ovarian cancer has a high mortality rate. While HER2 receptor expression does not usually affect the survival rates of ovarian cancer to the same extent as in breast cancer, it can be employed as a docking site for directed nanotherapies in cases with de novo or acquired chemotherapy resistance. In this study, we have exploited a novel gold nanoshell-based complex (nanocomplex) for targeting, dual modal imaging, and photothermal therapy of HER2 overexpressing and drug resistant ovarian cancer OVCAR3 cells in vitro. The nanocomplexes are engineered to simultaneously provide contrast as fluorescence optical imaging probe and a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agent. Both immunofluorescence staining and MRI successfully demonstrate that nanocomplex-anti-HER2 conjugates specifically bind to OVCAR3 cells as opposed to the control, MDA-MB-231 cells, which have low HER2 expression. In addition, nanocomplexes targeted to OVCAR3 cells, when irradiated with near infrared (NIR) laser result in selective destruction of cancer cells through photothermal ablation. We also demonstrate that NIR light therapy and the nanocomplexes by themselves are non-cytotoxic in vitro. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a successful integration of dual modal bioimaging with photothermal cancer therapy for treatment of ovarian cancer. Based on their efficacy in vitro, these nanocomplexes are highly promising for image guided photo-thermal therapy of ovarian cancer as well as other HER2 overexpressing cancers. PMID:20371708

  2. Nuclear medicine for imaging of epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Abedi, Seyed Mohammad; Mardanshahi, Alireza; Shahhosseini, Roza; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal

    2016-05-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. Usually, the diagnosis of cancer at an early stage is important to facilitate proper treatment and survival. Nuclear medicine has been successfully used in the diagnosis, staging, therapy and monitoring of cancers. Single-photon emission computed tomography and PET-based companion imaging agents are in development for use as a companion diagnostic tool for patients with ovarian cancer. The present review discusses the basic and clinical studies related to the use of radiopharmaceuticals in the diagnosis and management of ovarian cancer, focusing on their utility and comparing them with other imaging techniques such as computed tomography and MRI. PMID:26984362

  3. Profile of olaparib in the treatment of advanced ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chase, Dana M; Patel, Shreya; Shields, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Olaparib is a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor that received accelerated approval from the US Food and Drug Administration as monotherapy for patients with germline BRCA mutations and ovarian cancer treated with three or more prior lines of chemotherapy. This article summarizes the mechanism of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibition, therapeutic profile and uses of olaparib, and current and ongoing literature pertaining to olaparib in advanced ovarian cancer. PMID:27186080

  4. Recently identified drug resistance biomarkers in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Ben

    2016-05-01

    Ovarian cancer, consisting mainly of ovarian carcinoma, is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Improvements in outcome for patients with advanced-stage disease are limited by intrinsic and acquired chemoresistance and by tumor heterogeneity at different anatomic sites and along disease progression. Molecules and cellular pathways mediating chemoresistance appear to be different for the different histological types of ovarian carcinoma, with most recent research focusing on serous and clear cell carcinoma. This review discusses recent data implicating various biomarkers in chemoresistance in this cancer, with focus on studies in which clinical specimens have been central. PMID:26895188

  5. Proteomics of ovarian cancer: functional insights and clinical applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Elzek, Mohamed A.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2015-03-04

    In the past decade, there has been an increasing interest in applying proteomics to assist in understanding the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer, elucidating the mechanism of drug resistance, and in the development of biomarkers for early detection of ovarian cancer. Although ovarian cancer is a spectrum of different diseases, the strategies for diagnosis and treatment with surgery and adjuvant therapy are similar across ovarian cancer types, increasing the general applicability of discoveries made through proteomics research. While proteomic experiments face many difficulties which slow the pace of clinical applications, recent advances in proteomic technology contribute significantly to the identification ofmore » aberrant proteins and networks which can serve as targets for biomarker development and individualized therapies. This review provides a summary of the literature on proteomics’ contributions to ovarian cancer research and highlights the current issues, future directions, and challenges. In conclusion, we propose that protein-level characterization of primary lesion in ovarian cancer can decipher the mystery of this disease, improve diagnostic tools, and lead to more effective screening programs.« less

  6. Proteomics of ovarian cancer: functional insights and clinical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Elzek, Mohamed A.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2015-03-04

    In the past decade, there has been an increasing interest in applying proteomics to assist in understanding the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer, elucidating the mechanism of drug resistance, and in the development of biomarkers for early detection of ovarian cancer. Although ovarian cancer is a spectrum of different diseases, the strategies for diagnosis and treatment with surgery and adjuvant therapy are similar across ovarian cancer types, increasing the general applicability of discoveries made through proteomics research. While proteomic experiments face many difficulties which slow the pace of clinical applications, recent advances in proteomic technology contribute significantly to the identification of aberrant proteins and networks which can serve as targets for biomarker development and individualized therapies. This review provides a summary of the literature on proteomics’ contributions to ovarian cancer research and highlights the current issues, future directions, and challenges. In conclusion, we propose that protein-level characterization of primary lesion in ovarian cancer can decipher the mystery of this disease, improve diagnostic tools, and lead to more effective screening programs.

  7. Proteomics of ovarian cancer: functional insights and clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Rodland, Karin D.

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, there has been an increasing interest in applying proteomics to assist in understanding the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer, elucidating the mechanism of drug resistance, and in the development of biomarkers for early detection of ovarian cancer. Although ovarian cancer is a spectrum of different diseases, the strategies for diagnosis and treatment with surgery and adjuvant therapy are similar across ovarian cancer types, increasing the general applicability of discoveries made through proteomics research. While proteomic experiments face many difficulties which slow the pace of clinical applications, recent advances in proteomic technology contribute significantly to the identification of aberrant proteins and networks which can serve as targets for biomarker development and individualized therapies. This review provides a summary of the literature on proteomics’ contributions to ovarian cancer research and highlights the current issues, future directions, and challenges. We propose that protein-level characterization of primary lesion in ovarian cancer can decipher the mystery of this disease, improve diagnostic tools, and lead to more effective screening programs. PMID:25736266

  8. Synergy between angiostatin and endostatin: inhibition of ovarian cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Y; Dhanabal, M; Griffioen, A W; Sukhatme, V P; Ramakrishnan, S

    2000-04-15

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of fatality among gynecological malignancies. Ovarian cancer growth is angiogenesis-dependent, and an increased production of angiogenic growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor is prognostically significant even during early stages of the disease. Therefore, we investigated whether antiangiogenic treatment can be used to inhibit the growth of ovarian cancer in an experimental model system. Mouse angiostatin (kringle 1-4) and endostatin were expressed in yeast. Purified angiostatin and endostatin were then used to treat established ovarian cancers in athymic mice. These studies showed that both angiostatin and endostatin inhibited tumor growth. However, angiostatin treatment was more effective in inhibiting ovarian cancer growth when compared with endostatin in parallel experiments. Residual tumors obtained from angiostatin- and endostatin-treated animals showed decreased number of blood vessels and, as a consequence, increased apoptosis of tumor cells. Subsequently, the efficacy of a combined treatment with angiostatin and endostatin was investigated. In the presence of both angiostatic proteins, endothelial cell proliferation was synergistically inhibited. Similarly, a combination regimen using equal amounts of angiostatin and endostatin showed more than additive effect in tumor growth inhibition when compared with treatment with individual angiostatic protein. These studies demonstrate synergism between two angiostatic molecules and that antiangiogenic therapy can be used to inhibit ovarian cancer growth. PMID:10786683

  9. Proteomics of ovarian cancer: functional insights and clinical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Elzek, Mohamed A.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2015-03-01

    In the past decade, there has been an increasing interest in applying proteomics to assist in understanding the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer, elucidating the mechanism of drug resistance, and in the development of biomarkers for early detection of ovarian cancer. Although ovarian cancer is a spectrum of different diseases, the strategies for diagnosis and treatment with surgery and adjuvant therapy are similar across ovarian cancer types, increasing the general applicabil- ity of discoveries made through proteomics research. While proteomic experiments face many difficulties which slow the pace of clinical applications, recent advances in proteomic technology contribute significantly to the identification of aberrant proteins and networks which can serve as targets for biomarker development and individualized therapies. This review provides a summary of the literature on proteomics’ contributions to ovarian cancer research and highlights the current issues, future directions, and challenges. We propose that protein-level characterization of primary lesion in ovarian cancer can decipher the mystery of this disease, improve diagnostic tools, and lead to more effective screening programs.

  10. LY2109761 enhances cisplatin antitumor activity in ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yuxiu; Shan, Ning; Zhao, Cheng; Wang, Yunhai; Xu, Fuliang; Li, Jiacun; Yu, Xiaoqian; Gao, Lifeng; Yi, Zhengjun

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Ovarian cancer is among the most lethal of all malignancies in women. While chemotherapy is the preferred treatment modality, chemoresistance severely limits treatment success. Because transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) could increase survival of ovarian cancer cells in the presence of cisplatin, we conducted a preclinical study of the antitumor effects of the TGF-β type I (TβRI) and type II (TβRII) kinase inhibitor LY2109761 in combination with cisplatin. Methods: SKOV3, OV-90 and SKOV3DDP cells were treated with LY2109761, and/or cisplatin, and cell viability, apoptosis mRNA and protein expression levels were then evaluated. Furthermore, the efficacy of LY2109761 combined with cisplatin was further examined in established xenograft models. Results: LY2109761 was sufficient to induce spontaneous apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells. Combination with LY2109761 significantly augmented the cytotoxicity of cisplatin in both parental and cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer cells. LY2109761 significantly increased apoptotic cell death in cisplatin-resistant cells. Combination treatment of LY2109761 and cisplatin showed antiproliferative effects and induced a greater rate of apoptosis than the sum of the single-treatment rates and promoted tumor regression in established parental and cisplatin resistant ovarian cancer xenograft models. Conclusions: Chemotherapeutic approaches using LY2109761 might enhance the treatment benefit of the cisplatin in the treatment of ovarian cancer patients. PMID:26191185

  11. Paclitaxel, Bevacizumab And Adjuvant Intraperitoneal Carboplatin in Treating Patients Who Had Initial Debulking Surgery for Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  12. Breast cancer and ovarian cancer genetics: an update.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Cross, Catherine L; Wack, Courtney A; Chase, Margot E; Lin, Kant Y; Long, William B

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this report on breast cancer and ovarian cancer genetics is to review the evidence for the efficacy of surveillance for early detection, bilateral prophylactic mastectomy, prophylactic oophorectomy, and chemoprevention in preventing breast cancer and improving survival of BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. This collective review highlights radiologic screening of patients with this genetic predisposition for cancer as well as discusses cancer risk reduction strategies and reproductive concerns in female BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. It has now been well documented that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast has a higher sensitivity than mammography for the diagnosis of breast cancer in patients predisposed to breast cancer. We also emphasize that a new diagnostic device, molecular breast imaging (MBI), is now available and may be as sensitive as MRI. To date, this exciting technology, MBI, has not been used in studies of patients with BRCA1/2 genes. We also discuss in more detail the unique psychological ramifications of female BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. These women face unique choices regarding management of their high risk for breast and ovarian cancer that impact their reproductive options. Despite their high levels of concern, few female BRCA1/2 mutation carriers consider assisted reproduction technologies such as pregnancy surrogate, cryopreservation of oocytes or embryos, or implantation genetic diagnosis to select embryos without BCRA1/2 mutation. Further research must be undertaken to explore the risk management of patients with inherited cancer predisposition and to incorporate these preferences into clinical care. PMID:19105530

  13. Task Force Reaffirms Recommendation against Ovarian Cancer Screening | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Women at average risk of ovarian cancer should not be screened for the disease, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has reaffirmed. Published in the Annals of Internal Medicine on September 11, the latest USPSTF clinical guideline does not apply to women who have symptoms of ovarian cancer or who have genetic mutations that increase their risk of ovarian cancer. |

  14. PTN signaling: Components and mechanistic insights in human ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Geetika; Kwon, Youngjoo; Burkhalter, Rebecca J; Pathak, Harsh B; Madan, Rashna; McHugh, Sarah; Atay, Safinur; Murthy, Smruthi; Tawfik, Ossama W; Godwin, Andrew K

    2015-12-01

    Molecular vulnerabilities represent promising candidates for the development of targeted therapies that hold the promise to overcome the challenges encountered with non-targeted chemotherapy for the treatment of ovarian cancer. Through a synthetic lethality screen, we previously identified pleiotrophin (PTN) as a molecular vulnerability in ovarian cancer and showed that siRNA-mediated PTN knockdown induced apoptotic cell death in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells. Although, it is well known that PTN elicits its pro-tumorigenic effects through its receptor, protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor Z1 (PTPRZ1), little is known about the potential importance of this pathway in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer. In this study, we show that PTN is expressed, produced, and secreted in a panel of EOC cell lines. PTN levels in serous ovarian tumor tissues are on average 3.5-fold higher relative to normal tissue and PTN is detectable in serum samples of patients with EOC. PTPRZ1 is also expressed and produced by EOC cells and is found to be up-regulated in serous ovarian tumor tissue relative to normal ovarian surface epithelial tissue (P < 0.05). Gene silencing of PTPRZ1 in EOC cell lines using siRNA-mediated knockdown shows that PTPRZ1 is essential for viability and results in significant apoptosis with no effect on the cell cycle phase distribution. In order to determine how PTN mediates survival, we silenced the gene using siRNA mediated knockdown and performed expression profiling of 36 survival-related genes. Through computational mapping of the differentially expressed genes, members of the MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) family were found to be likely effectors of PTN signaling in EOC cells. Our results provide the first experimental evidence that PTN and its signaling components may be of significance in the pathogenesis of epithelial ovarian cancer and provide a rationale for clinical evaluation of MAPK inhibitors in PTN and/or PTPRZ1 expressing ovarian

  15. Measurement of Phospholipids May Improve Diagnostic Accuracy in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Lorelei; Han, Gang; Zhu, Weiwei; Molina, Ashley D.; Arango, Hector; LaPolla, James P.; Hoffman, Mitchell S.; Sellers, Thomas; Kirby, Tyler; Nicosia, Santo V.; Sutphen, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Background More than two-thirds of women who undergo surgery for suspected ovarian neoplasm do not have cancer. Our previous results suggest phospholipids as potential biomarkers of ovarian cancer. In this study, we measured the serum levels of multiple phospholipids among women undergoing surgery for suspected ovarian cancer to identify biomarkers that better predict whether an ovarian mass is malignant. Methodology/Principal Findings We obtained serum samples preoperatively from women with suspected ovarian cancer enrolled through a prospective, population-based rapid ascertainment system. Samples were analyzed from all women in whom a diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) was confirmed and from benign disease cases randomly selected from the remaining (non-EOC) samples. We measured biologically relevant phospholipids using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. We applied a powerful statistical and machine learning approach, Hybrid huberized support vector machine (HH-SVM) to prioritize phospholipids to enter the biomarker models, and used cross-validation to obtain conservative estimates of classification error rates. Results The HH-SVM model using the measurements of specific combinations of phospholipids supplements clinical CA125 measurement and improves diagnostic accuracy. Specifically, the measurement of phospholipids improved sensitivity (identification of cases with preoperative CA125 levels below 35) among two types of cases in which CA125 performance is historically poor - early stage cases and those of mucinous histology. Measurement of phospholipids improved the identification of early stage cases from 65% (based on CA125) to 82%, and mucinous cases from 44% to 88%. Conclusions/Significance Levels of specific serum phospholipids differ between women with ovarian cancer and those with benign conditions. If validated by independent studies in the future, these biomarkers may serve as an adjunct at the time of clinical

  16. Drugs Approved for Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for ovarian cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  17. 76 FR 55209 - National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... Cancer Awareness Month, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Ovarian cancer continues to have one of the highest mortality rates of any cancer, and it is a leading cause of.... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-22937 Filed 9-6-11; 8:45 am] Billing code 3195-W1-P...

  18. Vitamin A Metabolism is Impaired in Human Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Stephen J.; Cvetkovic, Dusica; Hamilton, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives We have previously reported that loss in expression of a protein considered critical for vitamin A homeostasis, cellular retinol-binding protein 1 (CRBP1), is an early event in ovarian carcinogenesis. The aim of the present study was to determine if loss of vitamin A metabolism also occurs early in ovarian oncogenesis. Methods We assessed CRBP1 expression by immunohistochemistry in ovaries prophylactically removed from women with a genetic risk for ovarian cancer. Furthermore, we investigated the ability of normal, immortalized but nontumorigenic, and tumorigenic human ovarian epithelial cells to synthesize retinoic acid and retinaldehyde when challenged with a physiological dose of retinol, and determined expression levels of the retinoid-related genes, RARα, RXRα, CRABP1, CRABP2, RALDH1 and RALDH2 in these cells. Results Immunohistochemistry revealed loss of CRBP1 expression in potentially preneoplastic lesions in prophylactic oophorectomies. HPLC analysis of vitamin A metabolism showed production of retinoic acid in four independent, normal human ovarian surface epithelial (HOSE) cell culture upon exposure to retinol. However, only one of two SV40-immortalized HOSE cell lines made RA, while none of the ovarian carcinoma cell lines produced detectable RA due to complete loss of RALDH2. Conclusions The impaired conversion of retinol to RA in ovarian cancer cells, and decreased CRBP1 protein expression in prophylactic oophorectomies support our hypothesis that concomitant losses of vitamin A metabolism and CRBP1 expression contribute to ovarian oncogenesis. PMID:19110304

  19. Glycomics Laboratory for the Early Detection of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Ovarian cancer is a silent killer with few early symptoms and advanced disease present at the time of diagnosis. This cancer is the most lethal of all gynecologic malignancies with over 20,000 new cases diagnosed each year. The 5 year survival rates for ovarian cancer dramatically improve when the disease is diagnosed at an early stage. |

  20. Ovarian cancer susceptibility alleles and risk of ovarian cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Ramus, Susan J; Antoniou, Antonis C; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Soucy, Penny; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M; Nathanson, Katherine L; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Aalfs, Cora M; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; van Asperen, Christi J; van Roozendaal, K E P; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J Margriet; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Jacobs, Chris; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Douglas, Fiona; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E; Kennedy, M John; Pathak, Harsh; Godwin, Andrew K; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Calender, Alain; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Faivre, Laurence; Loustalot, Catherine; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v O; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gaudet, Mia M; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Van Le, Linda; Hoffman, James S; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Issacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Iganacio; Tornero, Eva; Navarro, Matilde; Moysich, Kirsten B; Karlan, Beth Y; Gross, Jenny; Olah, Edith; Vaszko, Tibor; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A; Beattie, Mary S; Dorfling, Cecelia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Diez, Orland; Kwong, Ava; Schmutzler, Rita K; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Fiebig, Britta; Schäfer, Dieter; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Plante, Marie; Spurdle, Amanda B; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V Shane; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Pharoah, Paul D P; Gayther, Simon A; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F; Couch, Fergus J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2012-04-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified six alleles associated with risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated four of these loci as potential modifiers of ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs10088218 (at 8q24), rs2665390 (at 3q25), rs717852 (at 2q31), and rs9303542 (at 17q21), were genotyped in 12,599 BRCA1 and 7,132 BRCA2 carriers, including 2,678 ovarian cancer cases. Associations were evaluated within a retrospective cohort approach. All four loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 0.81 (95% CI: 0.67-0.98) P-trend = 0.033, rs2665390 HR = 1.48 (95% CI: 1.21-1.83) P-trend = 1.8 × 10(-4), rs717852 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10-1.42) P-trend = 6.6 × 10(-4), rs9303542 HR = 1.16 (95% CI: 1.02-1.33) P-trend = 0.026. Two loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele HR = 0.89 (95% CI: 0.81-0.99) P-trend = 0.029, rs2665390 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10-1.42) P-trend = 6.1 × 10(-4). The HR estimates for the remaining loci were consistent with odds ratio estimates for the general population. The identification of multiple loci modifying ovarian cancer risk may be useful for counseling women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations regarding their risk of ovarian cancer. PMID:22253144

  1. Reliable in vitro studies require appropriate ovarian cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Francis; Nixdorf, Sheri; Hacker, Neville F; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola A

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cause of cancer death in women and the leading cause of death from gynaecological malignancies. Of the 75% women diagnosed with locally advanced or disseminated disease, only 30% will survive five years following treatment. This poor prognosis is due to the following reasons: limited understanding of the tumor origin, unclear initiating events and early developmental stages of ovarian cancer, lack of reliable ovarian cancer-specific biomarkers, and drug resistance in advanced cases. In the past, in vitro studies using cell line models have been an invaluable tool for basic, discovery-driven cancer research. However, numerous issues including misidentification and cross-contamination of cell lines have hindered research efforts. In this study we examined all ovarian cancer cell lines available from cell banks. Hereby, we identified inconsistencies in the reporting, difficulties in the identification of cell origin or clinical data of the donor patients, restricted ethnic and histological type representation, and a lack of tubal and peritoneal cancer cell lines. We recommend that all cell lines should be distributed via official cell banks only with strict guidelines regarding the minimal available information required to improve the quality of ovarian cancer research in future. PMID:24936210

  2. Reliable in vitro studies require appropriate ovarian cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cause of cancer death in women and the leading cause of death from gynaecological malignancies. Of the 75% women diagnosed with locally advanced or disseminated disease, only 30% will survive five years following treatment. This poor prognosis is due to the following reasons: limited understanding of the tumor origin, unclear initiating events and early developmental stages of ovarian cancer, lack of reliable ovarian cancer-specific biomarkers, and drug resistance in advanced cases. In the past, in vitro studies using cell line models have been an invaluable tool for basic, discovery-driven cancer research. However, numerous issues including misidentification and cross-contamination of cell lines have hindered research efforts. In this study we examined all ovarian cancer cell lines available from cell banks. Hereby, we identified inconsistencies in the reporting, difficulties in the identification of cell origin or clinical data of the donor patients, restricted ethnic and histological type representation, and a lack of tubal and peritoneal cancer cell lines. We recommend that all cell lines should be distributed via official cell banks only with strict guidelines regarding the minimal available information required to improve the quality of ovarian cancer research in future. PMID:24936210

  3. Prevalence and contribution of BRCA1 mutations in breast cancer and ovarian cancer: Results from three US population-based case-control studies of ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Whittemore, A.S.; Gong, G.; Itnyre, J.

    1997-03-01

    We investigate the familial risks of cancers of the breast and ovary, using data pooled from three population-based case-control studies of ovarian cancer that were conducted in the United States. We base estimates of the frequency of mutations of BRCA1 (and possibly other genes) on the reported occurrence of breast cancer and ovarian cancer in the mothers and sisters of 922 women with incident ovarian cancer (cases) and in 922 women with no history of ovarian cancer (controls). Segregation analysis and goodness-of-fit testing of genetic models suggest that rare mutations (frequency .0014; 95% confidence interval .0002-.011) account for all the observed aggregation of breast cancer and ovarian cancer in these families. The estimated risk of breast cancer by age 80 years is 73.5% in mutation carriers and 6.8% in noncarriers. The corresponding estimates for ovarian cancer are 27.8% in carriers and 1.8% in noncarriers. For cancer risk in carriers, these estimates are lower than those obtained from families selected for high cancer prevalence. The estimated proportion of all U.S. cancer diagnoses, by age 80 years, that are due to germ-line BRCA1 mutations is 3.0% for breast cancer and 4.4% for ovarian cancer. Aggregation of breast cancer and ovarian cancer was less evident in the families of 169 cases with borderline ovarian cancers than in the families of cases with invasive cancers. Familial aggregation did not differ by the ethnicity of the probands, although the number of non-White and Hispanic cases (N = 99) was sparse. 14 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Ovarian Cancer Proteomic, Phosphoproteomic, and Glycoproteomic Data Released - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) scientists have just released a comprehensive dataset of the proteomic analysis of high grade serous ovarian tumor samples,

  5. Use of fertility drugs and risk of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Diergaarde, Brenda; Kurta, Michelle L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To highlight recent research and insights into the relationship between fertility drug use and ovarian cancer risk. Recent findings Results from two large case-control studies provided further evidence that fertility drug use does not significantly contribute to risk of ovarian cancer among the majority of women when adjusting for known confounding factors. However, questions regarding the effect on certain subgroups, including long-term fertility drug users, women who remain nulligravid after fertility treatment, women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, and borderline ovarian tumors, still remain. In addition, it may currently just be too early to determine whether there is an association between fertility drug use and ovarian cancer risk given that many of the exposed women are only now beginning to reach the ovarian cancer age range. Summary Whether use of fertility drugs increases the risk of ovarian cancer is an important question that requires further investigation, in particular given the large number of women utilizing fertility treatments. Fortunately, results from recent studies have been mainly reassuring. Large well-designed studies with sufficient follow-up time are needed to further evaluate the effects of fertility treatments within subgroups defined by patient and tumor characteristics. PMID:24752005

  6. Effects of the GSK-3β inhibitor (2Z,3E)-6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime upon ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ai-Song; Zhao, Lin

    2016-04-01

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is a deadly disease, and despite improvements in treatment, overall 5-year survival is low. Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β is a multifunctional serine/threonine kinase. We wished to ascertain if the GSK-3β inhibitor (2Z,3E)-6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime, known as "BIO," can suppress OC development. The OC cell lines A2780 and OVCAR3 were exposed to BIO. At different time points, cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, and cell invasion/cell migration assays were carried out. Phalloidin staining was undertaken to observe lamellipodia formation. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting were used to assess expression of messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein of GSK-3β, cyclin D1, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and p21. BIO suppressed the proliferation, invasion, and migration of OC cells; reduced lamellipodia formation; and induced G1 arrest of the cell cycle. BIO exposure led to a significant downregulation of mRNA and protein expression of cyclin D1 and MMP9 in comparison with untreated control cells. In contrast, BIO exposure upregulated mRNA and protein expression of p21 in comparison with untreated control cells. Besides, GSK-3β small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection in ovarian cancer cells also downregulated GSK-3β, cyclin D1, and MMP9 protein expression while upregulated p21 expression. These data suggest that BIO, as an inhibitor of GSK-3β, can suppress OC development. Therefore, BIO could be a candidate drug for the treatment of OC. PMID:26526575

  7. Coordinately up-regulated genes in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hough, C D; Cho, K R; Zonderman, A B; Schwartz, D R; Morin, P J

    2001-05-15

    A better understanding of the molecular circuitry in normal ovarian tissues and in ovarian cancer will likely provide new targets for diagnosis and therapy. Recently, much has been learned about the genes expressed in ovarian cancer through studies with cDNA arrays and serial analysis of gene expression. However, these methods do not allow highly quantitative analysis of gene expression on a large number of specimens. Here, we have used quantitative real-time RT-PCR in a panel of 39 microdissected ovarian carcinomas of various subtypes to systematically analyze the expression of 13 genes, many of which were previously identified as up-regulated in a subset of ovarian cancers by serial analyses of gene expression. The genes analyzed are glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPX3), apolipoprotein J/clusterin, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2, epithelial cell adhesion molecule/GA733-2, Kop protease inhibitor, matrix gla protein, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3, folate receptor 1, S100A2, signal transducer and activator of transcription 1, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor, apolipoprotein E, and ceruloplasmin. All of the genes were found overexpressed, some at extremely high levels, in the vast majority of ovarian carcinomas irrespective of the subtype. Interestingly, GPX3 was found at much higher levels in tumors with clear cell histology and may represent a biomarker for this subtype. Some of the genes studied here may thus represent targets for early detection ovarian cancer. The gene expression patterns were not associated with age at diagnosis, stage, or K-ras mutation status in ovarian cancer. We find that several genes are coordinately regulated in ovarian cancer, likely representing the fact that many genes are activated as part of common signaling pathways or that extensive cross-talk exists between several pathways in ovarian cancer. A statistical analysis shows that genes commonly up-regulated in ovarian cancer may result from the aberrant

  8. 3 CFR 8551 - Proclamation 8551 of August 31, 2010. National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2010

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2010 8551 Proclamation 8551 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8551 of August 31, 2010 Proc. 8551 National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2010By the President... ovarian cancer, this disease continues to claim more lives than any other gynecologic cancer....

  9. Genetic changes in nonepithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Lambrechts, Diether; Leunen, Karin; Amant, Frédéric; Vergote, Ignace

    2013-07-01

    Nonepithelial ovarian cancers (OCs), including sex cord-stromal tumors (SCSTs) and germ cell tumors (GCTs), are an uncommon subset of OC, together accounting for 10% of all OCs. The etiology of these tumors remains largely unresolved. It is well established that tumorigenesis is the result of multiple genetic alterations driving a normal cell toward a malignant state. Much effort has been made into researching the molecular mechanisms underlying epithelial OC, but far less is known about the genetic changes in SCSTs and GCTs. Recently, a single point missense mutation (C134W) was found in the FOXL2 gene in approximately 95% of adult-type granulosa cell tumors, suggesting a key role for FOXL2 in these tumors. By contrast, the FOXL2 mutation was not found in the juvenile type. DICER1 somatic missense mutations were found in approximately 60% of Sertoli-Leydig tumors. Ovarian GCTs share many morphological features and a similar pattern of chromosomal alterations with testicular GCTs. In the latter, recent genome-wide association studies have identified seven susceptibility loci near KITLG, SPRY4, UKC2, BAK1, DMRT1, TERT and ATF7IP. All of the susceptibility loci detected thus far are all involved in primordial germ cell function or sex determination. TGF-β/BMP and Wnt/β-catenin signaling was absent in dysgerminomas, but present in yolk sac tumors, suggesting intertumoral heterogeneity. In this article, the authors aim to provide an overview of the current knowledge on the possible molecular changes in SCSTs and GCTs of the ovary. PMID:23875665

  10. Vaccine Therapy With Sargramostim (GM-CSF) in Treating Patients With Her-2 Positive Stage III-IV Breast Cancer or Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-02

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor

  11. Phosphonooxymethyl Prodrug of Triptolide: Synthesis, Physicochemical Characterization, and Efficacy in Human Colon Adenocarcinoma and Ovarian Cancer Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Patil, Satish; Lis, Lev G; Schumacher, Robert J; Norris, Beverly J; Morgan, Monique L; Cuellar, Rebecca A D; Blazar, Bruce R; Suryanarayanan, Raj; Gurvich, Vadim J; Georg, Gunda I

    2015-12-10

    A disodium phosphonooxymethyl prodrug of the antitumor agent triptolide was prepared from the natural product in three steps (39% yield) and displayed excellent aqueous solubility at pH 7.4 (61 mg/mL) compared to the natural product (17 μg/mL). The estimated shelf life (t90) for hydrolysis of the prodrug at 4 °C and pH 7.4 was found to be two years. In a mouse model of human colon adenocarcinoma (HT-29), the prodrug administered intraperitoneally was effective in reducing or eliminating xenograft tumors at dose levels as low as 0.3 mg/kg when given daily and at 0.9 mg/kg when given less frequently. When given via intraperitoneal and oral routes at daily doses of 0.6 and 0.9 mg/kg, the prodrug was also effective and well tolerated in a mouse model of human ovarian cancer (A2780). PMID:26596892

  12. Phosphonooxymethyl Prodrug of Triptolide: Synthesis, Physicochemical Characterization, and Efficacy in Human Colon Adenocarcinoma and Ovarian Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A disodium phosphonooxymethyl prodrug of the antitumor agent triptolide was prepared from the natural product in three steps (39% yield) and displayed excellent aqueous solubility at pH 7.4 (61 mg/mL) compared to the natural product (17 μg/mL). The estimated shelf life (t90) for hydrolysis of the prodrug at 4 °C and pH 7.4 was found to be two years. In a mouse model of human colon adenocarcinoma (HT-29), the prodrug administered intraperitoneally was effective in reducing or eliminating xenograft tumors at dose levels as low as 0.3 mg/kg when given daily and at 0.9 mg/kg when given less frequently. When given via intraperitoneal and oral routes at daily doses of 0.6 and 0.9 mg/kg, the prodrug was also effective and well tolerated in a mouse model of human ovarian cancer (A2780). PMID:26596892

  13. Epacadostat Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III-IV Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-09

    Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  14. Metabolic phenotyping for monitoring ovarian cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Chaofu; Li, Ang; Hou, Yan; Sun, Meng; Yang, Kai; Cheng, Jinlong; Wang, Jingtao; Ge, Tingting; Zhang, Fan; Li, Qiang; Li, Junnan; Wu, Ying; Lou, Ge; Li, Kang

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most deadly of the gynecological cancers. New approaches and better tools for monitoring treatment efficacy and disease progression of EOC are required. In this study, metabolomics using rapid resolution liquid chromatography mass spectrometry was applied to a systematic investigation of metabolic changes in response to advanced EOC, surgery and recurrence. The results revealed considerable metabolic differences between groups. Moreover, 37, 30, and 26 metabolites were identified as potential biomarkers for primary, surgical and recurrent EOC, respectively. Primary EOC was characterized by abnormal lipid metabolism and energy disorders. Oxidative stress and surgical efficacy were clear in the post-operative EOC patients. Recurrent EOC patients showed increased amino acid and lipid metabolism compared with primary EOC patients. After cytoreductive surgery, eight metabolites (e.g. l-kynurenine, retinol, hydroxyphenyllactic acid, 2-octenoic acid) corrected towards levels of the control group, and four (e.g. hydroxyphenyllactic acid, 2-octenoic acid) went back again to primary EOC levels after disease relapse. In conclusion, this study delineated metabolic changes in response to advanced EOC, surgery and recurrence, and identified biomarkers that could facilitate both understanding and monitoring of EOC development and progression. PMID:26996990

  15. Evaluating the ovarian cancer gonadotropin hypothesis: A candidate gene study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Alice W.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Stram, Douglas A.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Plisiecka-Halasa, Joanna; Spiewankiewicz, Beata; Myers, Emily J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Hein, Alexander; Vergote, Ignace; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Lambrechts, Diether; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Eilber, Ursula; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Odunsi, Kunle; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Goodman, Marc T.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Dörk, Thilo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Leminen, Arto; Edwards, Robert P.; Kelley, Joseph L.; Harter, Philipp; Schwaab, Ira; Heitz, Florian; du Bois, Andreas; Orsulic, Sandra; Lester, Jenny; Walsh, Christine; Karlan, Beth Y.; Hogdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Jensen, Allan; Vierkant, Robert A.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Goode, Ellen L.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Giles, Graham G.; Bruinsma, Fiona; Wu, Xifeng; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Lu, Karen; Liang, Dong; Bisogna, Maria; Levine, Douglas A.; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Iversen, Edwin S.; Berchuck, Andrew; Terry, Kathryn L.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bjorge, Line; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Krakstad, Camilla; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Aben, Katja K.H.; van Altena, Anne M.; Bean, Yukie; Pejovic, Tanja; Kellar, Melissa; Le, Nhu D.; Cook, Linda S.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Lubinski, Jan; Gronwald, Jacek; Cybulski, Cezary; Jakubowska, Anna; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Yang, Hannah; Nedergaard, Lotte; Lundvall, Lene; Hogdall, Claus; Song, Honglin; Campbell, Ian G.; Eccles, Diana; Glasspool, Rosalind; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Carty, Karen; Paul, James; McNeish, Iain A.; Sieh, Weiva; McGuire, Valerie; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Whittemore, Alice S.; McLaughlin, John R.; Risch, Harvey A.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Menon, Usha; Ramus, Susan J.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Harrington, Patricia; Pike, Malcolm C.; Modugno, Francesmary; Rossing, Mary Anne; Ness, Roberta B.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Stram, Daniel O.; Wu, Anna H.; Pearce, Celeste Leigh

    2016-01-01

    Objective Ovarian cancer is a hormone-related disease with a strong genetic basis. However, none of its high-penetrance susceptibility genes and GWAS-identified variants to date are known to be involved in hormonal pathways. Given the hypothesized etiologic role of gonadotropins, an assessment of how variability in genes involved in the gonadotropin signaling pathway impacts disease risk is warranted. Methods Genetic data from 41 ovarian cancer study sites were pooled and unconditional logistic regression was used to evaluate whether any of the 2185 SNPs from 11 gonadotropin signaling pathway genes was associated with ovarian cancer risk. A burden test using the admixture likelihood (AML) method was also used to evaluate gene-level associations. Results We did not find any genome-wide significant associations between individual SNPs and ovarian cancer risk. However, there was some suggestion of gene-level associations for four gonadotropin signaling pathway genes: INHBB (p = 0.045, mucinous), LHCGR (p = 0.046, high-grade serous), GNRH (p = 0.041, high-grade serous), and FSHB (p = 0.036, overall invasive). There was also suggestive evidence for INHA (p = 0.060, overall invasive). Conclusions Ovarian cancer studies have limited sample numbers, thus fewer genome-wide susceptibility alleles, with only modest associations, have been identified relative to breast and prostate cancers. We have evaluated the majority of ovarian cancer studies with biological samples, to our knowledge, leaving no opportunity for replication. Using both our understanding of biology and powerful gene-level tests, we have identified four putative ovarian cancer loci near INHBB, LHCGR, GNRH, and FSHB that warrant a second look if larger sample sizes and denser genotype chips become available. PMID:25528498

  16. Geranylgeranylacetone inhibits ovarian cancer progression in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Kae; Morishige, Ken-ichirou . E-mail: mken@gyne.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Sawada, Kenjiro; Ogata, Seiji; Tahara, Masahiro; Shimizu, Shoko; Sakata, Masahiro; Tasaka, Keiichi; Kimura, Tadashi

    2007-04-27

    Geranylgeranylacetone (GGA), an isoprenoid compound, is an anti-ulcer drug developed in Japan. In our previous study, GGA was shown to inhibit ovarian cancer invasion by attenuating Rho activation [K. Hashimoto, K. Morishige, K. Sawada, M. Tahara, S. Shimizu, M. Sakata, K. Tasaka, Y. Murata, Geranylgeranylacetone inhibits lysophosphatidic acid-induced invasion of human ovarian carcinoma cells in vitro. Cancer 103 (2005) 1529-1536.]. In the present study, GGA treatment inhibited ovarian cancer progression in vitro and suppressed the tumor growth and ascites in the in vivo ovarian cancer model. In vitro analysis, treatment of cancer cells by GGA resulted in the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, the inactivation of Ras, and the suppression of tyrosine phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). In conclusion, this is the first report that GGA inhibited ovarian cancer progression and the anti-tumor effect by GGA is, at least in part, derived not only from the suppression of Rho activation but also Ras-MAPK activation.

  17. Targeted anti-vascular therapies for ovarian cancer: current evidence.

    PubMed

    Hall, M; Gourley, C; McNeish, I; Ledermann, J; Gore, M; Jayson, G; Perren, T; Rustin, G; Kaye, S

    2013-02-01

    Ovarian cancer presents at advanced stage in around 75% of women, and despite improvements in treatments such as chemotherapy, the 5-year survival from the disease in women diagnosed between 1996 and 1999 in England and Wales was only 36%. Over 80% of patients with advanced ovarian cancer will relapse and despite a good chance of remission from further chemotherapy, they will usually die from their disease. Sequential treatment strategies are employed to maximise quality and length of life but patients eventually become resistant to cytotoxic agents. The expansion in understanding of the molecular biology that characterises cancer cells has led to the rapid development of new agents to target important pathways but the heterogeneity of ovarian cancer biology means that there is no predominant defect. This review attempts to discuss progress to date in tackling a more general target applicable to ovary cancer-angiogenesis. PMID:23385789

  18. Paclitaxel, Polyglutamate Paclitaxel, or Observation in Treating Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Peritoneal Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  19. Prediagnostic circulating follicle stimulating hormone concentrations and ovarian cancer risk.

    PubMed

    McSorley, Meghan A; Alberg, Anthony J; Allen, Diane S; Allen, Naomi E; Brinton, Louise A; Dorgan, Joanne F; Kaaks, Rudolf; Rinaldi, Sabina; Helzlsouer, Kathy J

    2009-08-01

    Gonadotropins have been indicted in ovarian carcinogenesis but direct evidence has been limited and inconsistent. The aim of this study was to determine the association between prediagnostic levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and subsequent development of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer. A nested case-control study was conducted using cases and controls drawn from three cohorts: CLUE I and CLUE II of Washington County, MD, and the Island of Guernsey Study, United Kingdom. In total, 67 incident invasive epithelial ovarian cancer cases were each matched to 1 to 2 controls on age, menopausal status, time since last menstrual period, current hormone use and other relevant factors. FSH concentrations were classified into ranked thirds of low, medium or high based on the distribution among controls. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) across increasing thirds of FSH concentrations. Results of the analysis showed that ovarian cancer risk decreased with higher FSH concentrations (p-trend = 0.005). Compared with the lowest third of FSH concentrations, the OR among those in the middle and highest thirds were 0.45 [95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.20-1.00] and 0.26 (95% CI: 0.10-0.70), respectively. Associations persisted after excluding cases diagnosed within 5 years of follow-up. In conclusion, a reduction in subsequent risk of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer was observed among women with higher circulating FSH concentrations. These findings contradict the hypothesized role of FSH as a risk factor in ovarian carcinogenesis. PMID:19444906

  20. IKK inhibition increases bortezomib effectiveness in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Singha, Bipradeb; Gatla, Himavanth Reddy; Phyo, Sai; Patel, Atish; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Vancurova, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is associated with increased expression of the pro-angiogenic chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8, CXCL8), which induces tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Even though bortezomib (BZ) has shown remarkable anti-tumor activity in hematological malignancies, it has been less effective in ovarian cancer; however, the mechanisms are not understood. We have recently shown that BZ unexpectedly induces the expression of IL-8 in ovarian cancer cells in vitro, by IκB kinase (IKK)-dependent mechanism. Here, we tested the hypothesis that IKK inhibition reduces the IL-8 production and increases BZ effectiveness in reducing ovarian tumor growth in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the combination of BZ and the IKK inhibitor Bay 117085 significantly reduces the growth of ovarian tumor xenografts in nude mice when compared to either drug alone. Mice treated with the BZ/Bay 117085 combination exhibit smallest tumors, and lowest levels of IL-8. Furthermore, the reduced tumor growth in the combination group is associated with decreased tumor levels of S536P-p65 NFκB and its decreased recruitment to IL-8 promoter in tumor tissues. These data provide the first in vivo evidence that combining BZ with IKK inhibitor is effective, and suggest that using IKK inhibitors may increase BZ effectiveness in ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:26267322

  1. Carboplatin and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride With or Without ATR Kinase Inhibitor VX-970 in Treating Patients With Recurrent and Metastatic Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-21

    High Grade Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Tumor; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  2. Molecular Profiling of Clear Cell Ovarian Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Friedlander, Michael L.; Russell, Kenneth; Millis, Sherri; Gatalica, Zoran; Bender, Ryan; Voss, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Advanced stage/recurrent clear cell ovarian cancers (CCOCs) are characterized by a low response to chemotherapy and a poor prognosis. There is growing interest in investigating novel/molecular targeted therapies in patients with CCOC in histotype-specific trials. However, CCOCs are not a uniform entity and comprise a number of molecular subtypes and it is unlikely that a single approach to treatment will be appropriate for all patients. The aim of this study was to analyze the results of a multiplatform profiling panel in CCOCs to identify potential therapeutic targets. Patients and Methods Tumor profiling was performed on 521 CCOCs. They were grouped into pure (n = 422) and mixed (n = 99) CCOC for analysis. Testing included a combination of DNA sequencing (including next-generation sequencing) using a 46-gene panel, immunohistochemistry, fluorescent or chromogenic in situ hybridization, and RNA fragment analysis. Results The most common findings were in the PIK3CA/Akt/mTOR pathway, with 61% of all CCOCs showing a molecular alteration in one of these pathway components. Next-generation sequencing revealed PIK3CA mutations in 50% of pure CCOCs. Significant differences were observed between pure and mixed CCOCs with respect to hormone receptor expression (9% vs 34.7% for ER, 13.45 vs 26.4% for PR), cMET (24.1% vs 11.6%), PD-1 tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (48.1% vs 100%), expression of PD-L1 (7.4% vs 25%), and TOPO1 (41% vs 27.1%) on immunohistochemistry, whereas next-generation sequencing revealed significant differences in mutation frequency in PIK3CA (50% vs 18.5%), TP53 (18.1% vs 57.7%), KRAS (12.4% vs 3.7%), and cMET (1.9% vs 11.1%). Conclusions This large study confirms that the PIK3CA/Akt/mTOR pathway is commonly altered in CCOCs, and highlights the significant differences between pure and mixed CCOCs. Clear cell ovarian cancers are molecularly heterogeneous and there are a number of potential therapeutic targets which could be tested in clinical

  3. Gedunin, a novel natural substance, inhibits ovarian cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Siddharth G; Chen, Ning; Xiong, Yin; Wenham, Robert; Apte, Sachin; Humphrey, Marcia; Cragun, Janiel; Lancaster, Johnathan M

    2009-12-01

    The discovery of more active therapeutic compounds is essential if the outcome for patients with advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancer is to be improved. Gedunin, an extract of the neem tree, has been used as a natural remedy for centuries in Asia. Recently, gedunin has been shown to have potential in vitro antineoplastic properties; however, its effect on ovarian cancer cells is unknown. We evaluated the in vitro effect of gedunin on SKOV3, OVCAR4, and OVCAR8 ovarian cancer cell lines proliferation, alone and in the presence of cisplatin. Furthermore, we analyzed in vitro gedunin sensitivity data, integrated with genome-wide expression data from 54 cancer cell lines in an effort to identify genes and molecular pathways that underlie the mechanism of gedunin action. In vitro treatment of ovarian cancer cell lines with gedunin alone produced up to an 80% decrease in cell proliferation (P < 0.01) and, combining gedunin with cisplatin, demonstrated up to a 47% (P < 0.01) decrease in cell proliferation compared with cisplatin treatment alone. Bioinformatic analysis of integrated gedunin sensitivity and gene expression data identified 52 genes to be associated with gedunin sensitivity. These genes are involved in molecular functions related to cell cycle control, carcinogenesis, lipid metabolism, and molecular transportation. We conclude that gedunin has in vitro activity against ovarian cancer cells and, further, may enhance the antiproliferative effect of cisplatin. The molecular determinants of in vitro gedunin response are complex and may include modulation of cell survival and apoptosis pathways. PMID:19955938

  4. Targeting c-MYC in Platinum-Resistant Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Reyes-González, Jeyshka M; Armaiz-Peña, Guillermo N; Mangala, Lingegowda S; Valiyeva, Fatma; Ivan, Cristina; Pradeep, Sunila; Echevarría-Vargas, Ileabett M; Rivera-Reyes, Adrian; Sood, Anil K; Vivas-Mejía, Pablo E

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the molecular and therapeutic effects of siRNA-mediated c-MYC silencing in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer. Statistical analysis of patient's data extracted from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) portal showed that the disease-free (DFS) and the overall (OS) survival were decreased in ovarian cancer patients with high c-MYC mRNA levels. Furthermore, analysis of a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines showed that c-MYC protein levels were higher in cisplatin-resistant cells when compared with their cisplatin-sensitive counterparts. In vitro cell viability, growth, cell-cycle progression, and apoptosis, as well as in vivo therapeutic effectiveness in murine xenograft models, were also assessed following siRNA-mediated c-MYC silencing in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells. Significant inhibition of cell growth and viability, cell-cycle arrest, and activation of apoptosis were observed upon siRNA-mediated c-MYC depletion. In addition, single weekly doses of c-MYC-siRNA incorporated into 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethylene glycol)-2000] (DSPE-PEG-2000)-based nanoliposomes resulted in significant reduction in tumor growth. These findings identify c-MYC as a potential therapeutic target for ovarian cancers expressing high levels of this oncoprotein. PMID:26227489

  5. 1 in 5 Ovarian Cancer Patients Doesn't Get Life-Extending Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159190.html 1 in 5 Ovarian Cancer Patients Doesn't Get Life-Extending ... extend ovarian cancer patients' lives, but one in five women does not have the procedure, a new ...

  6. Are Birth Control Pills Tied to Decline in Ovarian Cancer Deaths?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Control Pills Tied to Decline in Ovarian Cancer Deaths? Rates down 16 percent in U.S., 8 percent ... WEDNESDAY, Sept. 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Ovarian cancer deaths are down dramatically in many parts of the ...

  7. 1 in 5 Ovarian Cancer Patients Doesn't Get Life-Extending Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159190.html 1 in 5 Ovarian Cancer Patients Doesn't Get ... may significantly extend ovarian cancer patients' lives, but one in five women does not have the procedure, ...

  8. Targeting Stromal-Cancer Cell Crosstalk Networks in Ovarian Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Tsz-Lun; Leung, Cecilia S.; Li, Fuhai; Wong, Stephen T. C.; Mok, Samuel C.

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a histologically, clinically, and molecularly diverse disease with a five-year survival rate of less than 30%. It has been estimated that approximately 21,980 new cases of epithelial ovarian cancer will be diagnosed and 14,270 deaths will occur in the United States in 2015, making it the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Ovarian tumor tissue is composed of cancer cells and a collection of different stromal cells. There is increasing evidence that demonstrates that stromal involvement is important in ovarian cancer pathogenesis. Therefore, stroma-specific signaling pathways, stroma-derived factors, and genetic changes in the tumor stroma present unique opportunities for improving the diagnosis and treatment of ovarian cancer. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are one of the major components of the tumor stroma that have demonstrated supportive roles in tumor progression. In this review, we highlight various types of signaling crosstalk between ovarian cancer cells and stromal cells, particularly with CAFs. In addition to evaluating the importance of signaling crosstalk in ovarian cancer progression, we discuss approaches that can be used to target tumor-promoting signaling crosstalk and how these approaches can be translated into potential ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:26751490

  9. Sulforaphane reduces molecular response to hypoxia in ovarian tumor cells independently of their resistance to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    PASTOREK, MICHAL; SIMKO, VERONIKA; TAKACOVA, MARTINA; BARATHOVA, MONIKA; BARTOSOVA, MARIA; HUNAKOVA, LUBA; SEDLAKOVA, OLGA; HUDECOVA, SONA; KRIZANOVA, OLGA; DEQUIEDT, FRANCK; PASTOREKOVA, SILVIA; SEDLAK, JAN

    2015-01-01

    One of the recently emerging anticancer strategies is the use of natural dietary compounds, such as sulforaphane, a cancer-chemopreventive isothiocyanate found in broccoli. Based on the growing evidence, sulforaphane acts through molecular mechanisms that interfere with multiple oncogenic pathways in diverse tumor cell types. Herein, we investigated the anticancer effects of bioavailable concentrations of sulforaphane in ovarian carcinoma cell line A2780 and its two derivatives, adriamycin-resistant A2780/ADR and cisplatin-resistant A2780/CP cell lines. Since tumor microenvironment is characterized by reduced oxygenation that induces aggressive tumor phenotype (such as increased invasiveness and resistance to chemotherapy), we evaluated the effects of sulforaphane in ovarian cancer cells exposed to hypoxia (2% O2). Using the cell-based reporter assay, we identified several oncogenic pathways modulated by sulforaphane in hypoxia by activating anticancer responses (p53, ARE, IRF-1, Pax-6 and XRE) and suppressing responses supporting tumor progression (AP-1 and HIF-1). We further showed that sulforaphane decreases the level of HIF-1α protein without affecting its transcription and stability. It can also diminish transcription and protein level of the HIF-1 target, CA IX, which protects tumor cells from hypoxia-induced pH imbalance and facilitates their migration/invasion. Accordingly, sulforaphane treatment leads to diminished pH regulation and reduced migration of ovarian carcinoma cells. These effects occur in all three ovarian cell lines suggesting that sulforaphane can overcome the chemoresistance of cancer cells. This offers a path potentially exploitable in sensitizing resistant cancer cells to therapy, and opens a window for the combined treatments of sulforaphane either with conventional chemotherapy, natural compounds, or with other small molecules. PMID:25955133

  10. The Chicken Model of Spontaneous Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hawkridge, Adam M.

    2014-01-01

    The chicken is a unique experimental model for studying the spontaneous onset and progression of ovarian cancer (OVC). The prevalence of OVC in chickens can range from 10–35% depending on age, genetic strain, reproductive history, and diet. Furthermore, the chicken presents epidemiological, morphological, and molecular traits that are similar to human OVC making it a relevant experimental model for translation research. Similarities to humans include associated increased risk of OVC with the number of ovulations, common histopathological sub-types including high-grade serous, and molecular-level markers or pathways such as CA-125 expression and p53 mutation frequency. Collectively, the similarities between chicken and human OVC combined with a tightly controlled genetic background and predictable onset window provides an outstanding experimental model for studying the early events and progression of spontaneous OVC tumors under controlled environmental conditions. This review will cover the existing literature on OVC in the chicken and highlight potential opportunities for further exploitation (e.g, biomarkers, prevention, treatment, and genomics). PMID:25130871

  11. Gemcitabine in patients with ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Poveda, Andres

    2005-01-01

    Standard first-line treatment of ovarian cancer (OC) consists of platinum-taxane combined chemotherapy. However, this regimen only cures about 25% of women with OC. Phase II studies have shown that platinum-gemcitabine doublet and platinum-taxane-gemcitabine triplet regimens are active first-line chemotherapy in advanced OC, with overall response rates (ORR) above 55%. Several phase III studies of gemcitabine-based doublet and triplet chemotherapy in OC are currently underway. Preliminary data show that these regimens are well-tolerated, with manageable haematological toxicity, and the efficacy results are eagerly awaited. Gemcitabine is also active as second-line monotherapy in women with recurrent OC, and studies combining gemcitabine with paclitaxel, docetaxel, liposomal doxorubicin or topotecan resulted in higher ORR than gemcitabine alone. Gemcitabine-cisplatin and gemcitabine-carboplatin are active in women with platinum-resistant recurrent OC suggesting in vivo synergy between these two classes of drug. These studies show that gemcitabine-based chemotherapy may have an important role as second-line treatment in women with platinum-resistant OC. Gemcitabine combinations are also highly recommended as they avoid the problems of neurotoxicity and alopecia seen with other regimens. In order to respect the quality of life of women with recurrent OC, assessment of prognostic factors is recommended so that the most appropriate chemotherapy can be administered. PMID:16360545

  12. Postoperative abdominopelvic radiation therapy for ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, N.; Peschel, R.E.

    1988-03-01

    From 1963 through 1984, 74 patients with Stage I, II, or III epithelial ovarian cancer who completed a total hysterectomy and debulking procedure and had less than 2 cm residual disease were treated with whole abdominal and pelvic boost radiation therapy (WAP) at Yale-New Haven Hospital. WAP consisted of a whole abdominal dose of 1750 to 2500 cGy (at 100-160 cGy per fraction) and a total pelvic dose of 4000-4600 cGy. Based on stage, amount of residual disease, pathologic type, and grade of tumor, the 74 patients were classified into a favorable group (FG) and an unfavorable group (UG) using the classification scheme developed at the Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH). The actuarial survival at 10 years for the FG patients was 77% (+/- 10%, 95% confidence limits) and for the UG patients was only 7% (+/- 13%). Local control of disease in the abdomen and pelvis was 87% in the FG and only 36% in the UG. Severe long-term complications occurred in 7% of the patients and consisted of small bowel obstruction. Our results strongly indicate that the PMH classification of FG and UG is useful in our patient population in determining which subgroup of patients should be offered WAP.

  13. Better Therapeutic Trials in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The Ovarian Task Force of the Gynecologic Cancer Steering Committee convened a clinical trials planning meeting on October 28–29, 2011, with the goals to identify key tumor types, associated molecular pathways, and biomarkers for targeted drug intervention; review strategies to improve early-phase screening, therapeutic evaluation, and comparison of new agents; and optimize design of randomized trials in response to an evolving landscape of scientific, regulatory, and funding priorities. The meeting was attended by international clinical and translational investigators, pharmaceutical industry representatives, government regulators, and patient advocates. Panel discussions focused on disease types, early-phase trials, and randomized trials. A manuscript team summarized the discussions and assisted with formulating key recommendations. A more integrated and efficient approach for screening new agents using smaller selective randomized trials in specific disease-type settings was endorsed, together with collaborative funding models between industry and the evolving national clinical trials network, as well as efforts to enhance public awareness and study enrollment through advocacy. PMID:24627272

  14. Study examines outcomes from surgery to prevent ovarian cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A new study looked at women at high risk of ovarian cancer who had no clinical signs of the disease and who underwent risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO). The study results showed cancer in the removed tissues of 2.6 percent (25 of 966) of the par

  15. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer: A survival study

    PubMed Central

    Baruah, Upasana; Barmon, Debabrata; Kataki, Amal Chandra; Deka, Pankaj; Hazarika, Munlima; Saikia, Bhargab J.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Patients with advanced ovarian cancer have a poor prognosis in spite of the best possible care. Primary debulking surgery has been the standard of care in advanced ovarian cancer; however, it is associated with high mortality and morbidity rates as shown in various studies. Several studies have discussed the benefit of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Aims: This study aims to evaluate the survival statistics of the patients who have been managed with interval debulking surgery (IDS) from January 2007 to December 2009. Materials and Methods: During the period from January 2007 to December 2009, a retrospective analysis of 104 patients who underwent IDS for stage IIIC or IV advanced epithelial ovarian cancer at our institute were selected for the study. IDS was attempted after three to five courses of chemotherapy with paclitaxal (175 mg/m2 ) and carboplatin (5-6 of area under curve). Overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) were compared with results of primary debulking study from existing literature. OS and PFS rates were estimated by means of the Kaplan-Meier method. Results were statistically analyzed by IBM SPSS Statistics 19. Results: The median OS was 26 months and the median PFS was 18 months. In multivariate analysis it was found that both OS and PFS was affected by the stage, and extent of debulking. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant chemotherapy, followed by surgical cytoreduction is a promising treatment strategy for the management of advanced epithelial ovarian cancers. PMID:25810573

  16. Hereditary Ovarian Cancer: Not Only BRCA 1 and 2 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Toss, Angela; Tomasello, Chiara; Razzaboni, Elisabetta; Contu, Giannina; Grandi, Giovanni; Cagnacci, Angelo; Schilder, Russell J.; Cortesi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    More than one-fifth of ovarian tumors have hereditary susceptibility and, in about 65–85% of these cases, the genetic abnormality is a germline mutation in BRCA genes. Nevertheless, several other suppressor genes and oncogenes have been associated with hereditary ovarian cancers, including the mismatch repair (MMR) genes in Lynch syndrome, the tumor suppressor gene, TP53, in the Li-Fraumeni syndrome, and several other genes involved in the double-strand breaks repair system, such as CHEK2, RAD51, BRIP1, and PALB2. The study of genetic discriminators and deregulated pathways involved in hereditary ovarian syndromes is relevant for the future development of molecular diagnostic strategies and targeted therapeutic approaches. The recent development and implementation of next-generation sequencing technologies have provided the opportunity to simultaneously analyze multiple cancer susceptibility genes, reduce the delay and costs, and optimize the molecular diagnosis of hereditary tumors. Particularly, the identification of mutations in ovarian cancer susceptibility genes in healthy women may result in a more personalized cancer risk management with tailored clinical and radiological surveillance, chemopreventive approaches, and/or prophylactic surgeries. On the other hand, for ovarian cancer patients, the identification of mutations may provide potential targets for biologic agents and guide treatment decision-making. PMID:26075229

  17. Hereditary ovarian cancer: not only BRCA 1 and 2 genes.

    PubMed

    Toss, Angela; Tomasello, Chiara; Razzaboni, Elisabetta; Contu, Giannina; Grandi, Giovanni; Cagnacci, Angelo; Schilder, Russell J; Cortesi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    More than one-fifth of ovarian tumors have hereditary susceptibility and, in about 65-85% of these cases, the genetic abnormality is a germline mutation in BRCA genes. Nevertheless, several other suppressor genes and oncogenes have been associated with hereditary ovarian cancers, including the mismatch repair (MMR) genes in Lynch syndrome, the tumor suppressor gene, TP53, in the Li-Fraumeni syndrome, and several other genes involved in the double-strand breaks repair system, such as CHEK2, RAD51, BRIP1, and PALB2. The study of genetic discriminators and deregulated pathways involved in hereditary ovarian syndromes is relevant for the future development of molecular diagnostic strategies and targeted therapeutic approaches. The recent development and implementation of next-generation sequencing technologies have provided the opportunity to simultaneously analyze multiple cancer susceptibility genes, reduce the delay and costs, and optimize the molecular diagnosis of hereditary tumors. Particularly, the identification of mutations in ovarian cancer susceptibility genes in healthy women may result in a more personalized cancer risk management with tailored clinical and radiological surveillance, chemopreventive approaches, and/or prophylactic surgeries. On the other hand, for ovarian cancer patients, the identification of mutations may provide potential targets for biologic agents and guide treatment decision-making. PMID:26075229

  18. A distinct molecular profile associated with mucinous epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heinzelmann-Schwarz, V A; Gardiner-Garden, M; Henshall, S M; Scurry, J P; Scolyer, R A; Smith, A N; Bali, A; Bergh, P Vanden; Baron-Hay, S; Scott, C; Fink, D; Hacker, N F; Sutherland, R L; O'Brien, P M

    2006-01-01

    Mucinous epithelial ovarian cancers (MOC) are clinically and morphologically distinct from the other histological subtypes of ovarian cancer. To determine the genetic basis of MOC and to identify potential tumour markers, gene expression profiling of 49 primary ovarian cancers of different histological subtypes was performed using a customised oligonucleotide microarray containing >59 000 probesets. The results show that MOC express a genetic profile that both differs and overlaps with other subtypes of epithelial ovarian cancer. Concordant with its histological phenotype, MOC express genes characteristic of mucinous carcinomas of varying epithelial origin, including intestinal carcinomas. Differences in gene expression between MOC and other histological subtypes of ovarian cancer were confirmed by RT–PCR and/or immunohistochemistry. In particular, galectin 4 (LGALS4) was highly and specifically expressed in MOC, but expressed at lower levels in benign mucinous cysts and borderline (atypical proliferative) tumours, supporting a malignant progression model of MOC. Hence LGALS4 may have application as an early and differential diagnostic marker of MOC. PMID:16508639

  19. Ovarian Cancer Screening Method Fails to Reduce Deaths from the Disease | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    New results from the NCI-sponsored Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial show that screening for ovarian cancer with transvaginal ultrasound (TVU) and the CA-125 blood test did not result in fewer deaths from the disease compared with usual care. |

  20. 3 CFR 8853 - Proclamation 8853 of August 31, 2012. National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2012

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2012 8853 Proclamation 8853 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8853 of August 31, 2012 Proc. 8853 National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2012By the President... lives to ovarian cancer. They are mothers and daughters, sisters and grandmothers, community members...

  1. 3 CFR 8703 - Proclamation 8703 of September 1, 2011. National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2011

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2011 8703 Proclamation 8703 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8703 of September 1, 2011 Proc. 8703 National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2011By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Ovarian cancer continues to have one of the...

  2. 3 CFR 9008 - Proclamation 9008 of August 30, 2013. National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2013

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2013 9008 Proclamation 9008 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 9008 of August 30, 2013 Proc. 9008 National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2013By the President... ovarian cancer, and more than half that number of women will die of this disease. During National...

  3. 3 CFR 8407 - Proclamation 8407 of August 31, 2009. National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2009

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2009 8407 Proclamation 8407 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8407 of August 31, 2009 Proc. 8407 National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month, 2009By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Ovarian cancer remains the leading cause of death...

  4. Clear cell ovarian cancer and endometriosis: is there a relationship?

    PubMed Central

    Suzin, Jacek; Obirek, Katarzyna; Sochacka, Amanda; Łoszakiewicz, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ovarian clear cell carcinoma is a rare type of ovarian cancer. In recent years, issues of the common genetic origin of endometriosis and ovarian clear cell carcinoma have been raised. Aim of this study Aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of this type of cancer, risk factors, prognosis and its potential aetiological association with endometriosis. Material and methods In a retrospective study, we analysed histopathological data of patients operated in the First Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (MU, Lodz) due to ovarian cancer in 2004-2014. Among the 394 patients operated on for ovarian cancer, clear cell carcinoma was found in 0.02% (9/394). Menstrual history, parity, comorbidities, data from physical examination, operational protocols and histopathological diagnoses were analysed. Follow-up was obtained from 77.8% of patients. Statistical analysis was performed using Microsoft Excel 2013. Results The mean age of patients at diagnosis was 57.6 years; the BMI in the study group was 27.2; the majority of patients were multiparous (77.8%). Clear cell carcinoma was detected mostly at stage Ia (n = 4). The concentration of Ca125 in the study group had an average of 142.75 U/ml and a median of 69.3 U/ml. The coexistence of endometriosis could not be clinically or histologically confirmed amongst our patients. The most common comorbidity in the study group was hypertension. Conclusions In our clinical material, ovarian clear cell carcinoma is a rare histopathological specimen with a prognostic value comparable to that of serous ovarian cancer. Due to the rarity of this histopathological subtype, proving a cause-and-effect relationship between it and endometriosis can only be elucidated through statistical studies of the entire population. PMID:27582682

  5. Harnessing Pandemonium: The Clinical Implications of Tumor Heterogeneity in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Blagden, Sarah P.

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneity has emerged as a key feature of ovarian cancer between different ovarian cancer subtypes; within single ovarian cancer subtypes; and within individual patient tumors. At the genomic level, with the advent of ultra-deep sequencing technologies alongside RNA-Seq, epigenomics, and proteomics, the complexity surrounding heterogeneity has deepened. Here, we summarize the emerging understanding of heterogeneity in cancer as a whole and the key discoveries in this area relating to ovarian cancer. We explore the therapeutic limitations and possibilities posed by heterogeneity and how these will influence the future of ovarian cancer treatment and research. PMID:26175968

  6. Dietary energy balance modulates ovarian cancer progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Wahab, Zaid; Tebbe, Calvin; Chhina, Jasdeep; Dar, Sajad A.; Morris, Robert T.; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Giri, Shailendra; Munkarah, Adnan R.; Rattan, Ramandeep

    2014-01-01

    A high energy balance, or caloric excess, accounts as a tumor promoting factor, while a negative energy balance via caloric restriction, has been shown to delay cancer progression. The effect of energy balance on ovarian cancer progression was investigated in an isogeneic immunocompetent mouse model of epithelial ovarian cancer kept on a regimen of regular diet, high energy diet (HED) and calorie restricted diet (CRD), prior to inoculating the animals intraperitoneally with the mouse ovarian surface epithelial ID8 cancer cells. Tumor evaluation revealed that mice group on HED displayed the most extensive tumor formation with the highest tumor score at all organ sites (diaphragm, peritoneum, bowel, liver, kidney, spleen), accompanied with increased levels of insulin, leptin, insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), VEGF and interleukin 6 (IL-6). On the other hand, the mice group on CRD exhibited the least tumor burden associated with a significant reduction in levels of insulin, IGF-1, leptin, MCP-1, VEGF and IL-6. Immunohistochemistry analysis of tumors from HED mice showed higher activation of Akt and mTOR with decreased adenosine monophosphate activated kinase (AMPK) and SIRT1 activation, while tumors from the CRD group exhibited the reverse profile. In conclusion, ovarian cancer growth and metastasis occurred more aggressively under HED conditions and was significantly curtailed under CRD. The suggested mechanism involves modulated secretion of growth factors, cytokines and altered regulation of AMPK and SIRT1 that converges on mTOR inhibition. While the role of a high energy state in ovarian cancer has not been confirnmed in the literature, the current findings support investigating the potential impact of diet modulation as adjunct to other anticancer therapies and as possible individualized treatment strategy of epithelial ovarian cancer. PMID:25026276

  7. Imaging of peritoneal deposits in ovarian cancer: A pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekhara, Sheragaru Hanumanthappa; Triveni, Gowramma Sannanaik; Kumar, Rahul

    2016-05-28

    As per incidence, ovarian carcinoma is the second most common gynaecological malignancy in women. In spite of advanced technology, patient awareness and effective screening methods, epithelial ovarian cancer is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage (stage III). Surgical debulking of disease is mainstay of improving the patient survival even in advanced stages. Thus exact delineation of cancer spread in the abdominal cavity guides the surgeon prior to the surgery, help them to decide resectability of lesion and plan for further need of other surgical speciality or need of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Imaging particularly well-planned contrast-enhanced computed tomography answers most of the queries raised by the treating surgeon. The aim of this article is to review the way ovarian carcinoma spread in the peritoneal cavity and to stress the accurate interpretation of cancer deposits on imaging which can help the treating team to reach optimal management of patients. PMID:27247717

  8. Imaging of peritoneal deposits in ovarian cancer: A pictorial review

    PubMed Central

    Chandrashekhara, Sheragaru Hanumanthappa; Triveni, Gowramma Sannanaik; Kumar, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    As per incidence, ovarian carcinoma is the second most common gynaecological malignancy in women. In spite of advanced technology, patient awareness and effective screening methods, epithelial ovarian cancer is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage (stage III). Surgical debulking of disease is mainstay of improving the patient survival even in advanced stages. Thus exact delineation of cancer spread in the abdominal cavity guides the surgeon prior to the surgery, help them to decide resectability of lesion and plan for further need of other surgical speciality or need of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Imaging particularly well-planned contrast-enhanced computed tomography answers most of the queries raised by the treating surgeon. The aim of this article is to review the way ovarian carcinoma spread in the peritoneal cavity and to stress the accurate interpretation of cancer deposits on imaging which can help the treating team to reach optimal management of patients. PMID:27247717

  9. Searching for a system: The quest for ovarian cancer biomarkers

    SciTech Connect

    Rodland, Karin D.; Maihle, Nita J.

    2011-11-01

    The stark difference in clinical outcome for patients with ovarian cancer diagnosed at early stages (95% at 5 years) versus late stages (27.6% at 5 years) has driven a decades-long quest for effective biomarkers that will enable earlier detection of ovarian cancer. Yet despite intense efforts, including the application of modern high throughput technologies such as transcriptomics and proteomics, there has been little improvement in performance compared to the gold standard of quantifying serum CA125 immunoreactivity paired with transvaginal ultrasound. This review describes the strategies that have been used for identification of ovarian cancer biomarkers, including the recent introduction of novel bioinformatic approaches. Results obtained using high throughput-based vs. biologically rational approaches for the discovery of diagnostic early detection biomarkers are compared and analyzed for functional enrichment.

  10. Cytokines and Prognostic Factors in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jammal, Millena Prata; Martins-Filho, Agrimaldo; Silveira, Thales Parenti; Murta, Eddie Fernando Candido; Nomelini, Rosekeila Simões

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Ovarian cancer has a high mortality and delayed diagnosis. Inflammation is a risk factor for ovarian cancer, and the inflammatory response is involved in almost all stages of tumor development. Immunohistochemical staining in stroma and epithelium of a panel of cytokines in benign and malignant ovarian neoplasm was evaluated. In addition, immunostaining was related to prognostic factors in malignant tumors. METHOD The study group comprised 28 ovarian benign neoplasias and 28 ovarian malignant neoplasms. A panel of cytokines was evaluated by immunohistochemistry (Th1: IL-2 and IL-8; Th2: IL-5, IL-6, and IL-10; and TNFR1). Chi-square test with Yates’ correction was used, which was considered significant if less than 0.05. RESULTS TNFR1, IL-5, and IL-10 had more frequent immunostaining 2/3 in benign neoplasms compared with malignant tumors. Malignant tumors had more frequent immunostaining 2/3 for IL-2 in relation to benign tumors. The immunostaining 0/1 of IL 8 was more frequent in the stroma of benign neoplasms compared with malignant neoplasms. Evaluation of the ovarian cancer stroma showed that histological grade 3 was significantly correlated with staining 2/3 for IL-2 (P = 0.004). Women whose disease-free survival was less than 2.5 years had TNFR1 stromal staining 2/3 (P = 0.03) more frequently. CONCLUSION IL-2 and TNFR1 stromal immunostaining are related prognostic factors in ovarian cancer and can be the target of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:27512342

  11. The promise and challenge of ovarian cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Noor; Ohman, Anders W.; Dinulescu, Daniela M.

    2015-01-01

    The complexity and heterogeneity of ovarian cancer cases are difficult to reproduce in in vitro studies, which cannot adequately elucidate the molecular events involved in tumor initiation and disease metastasis. It has now become clear that, although the multiple histological subtypes of ovarian cancer are being treated with similar surgical and therapeutic approaches, they are in fact characterized by distinct phenotypes, cell of origin, and underlying key genetic and genomic alterations. Consequently, the development of more personalized treatment methodologies, which are aimed at improving patient care and prognosis, will greatly benefit from a better understanding of the key differences between various subtypes. To accomplish this, animal models of all histotypes need to be generated in order to provide accurate in vivo platforms for research and the testing of targeted treatments and immune therapies. Both genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) and xenograft models have the ability to further our understanding of key mechanisms facilitating tumorigenesis, and at the same time offer insight into enhanced imaging and treatment modalities. While genetic models may be better suited to examine oncogenic functions and interactions during tumorigenesis, patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) are likely a superior model to assess drug efficacy, especially in concurrent clinical trials, due to their similarity to the tumors from which they are derived. Genetic and avatar models possess great clinical utility and have both benefits and limitations. Additionally, the laying hen model, which spontaneously develops ovarian tumors, has inherent advantages for the study of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and recent work champions this model especially when assessing chemoprevention strategies. While high-grade ovarian serous tumors are the most prevalent form of EOC, rarer ovarian cancer variants, such as small cell ovarian carcinoma of the hypercalcemic type and

  12. Sex Steroid Hormone Receptor Expression Affects Ovarian Cancer Survival12

    PubMed Central

    Jönsson, Jenny-Maria; Skovbjerg Arildsen, Nicolai; Malander, Susanne; Måsbäck, Anna; Hartman, Linda; Nilbert, Mef; Hedenfalk, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Although most ovarian cancers express estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), and androgen (AR) receptors, they are currently not applied in clinical decision making. We explored the prognostic impact of sex steroid hormone receptor protein and mRNA expression on survival in epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods: Immunohistochemical stainings for ERα, ERβ, PR, and AR were assessed in relation to survival in 118 serous and endometrioid ovarian cancers. Expression of the genes encoding the four receptors was studied in relation to prognosis in the molecular subtypes of ovarian cancer in an independent data set, hypothesizing that the expression levels and prognostic impact may differ between the subtypes. Results: Expression of PR or AR protein was associated with improved 5-year progression-free (P = .001 for both) and overall survival (P < .001 for both, log-rank test). ERα and ERβ did not provide prognostic information. Patients whose tumors coexpressed PR and AR had the most favorable prognosis, and this effect was retained in multivariable analyses. Analyses of the corresponding genes using an independent data set revealed differences among the molecular subtypes, but no clear relationship between high coexpression of PGR and AR and prognosis. Conclusions: A favorable outcome was seen for patients whose tumors coexpressed PR and AR. Gene expression data suggested variable effects in the different molecular subtypes. These findings demonstrate a prognostic role for PR and AR in ovarian cancer and support that tumors should be stratified based on molecular as well as histological subtypes in future studies investigating the role of endocrine treatment in ovarian cancer. PMID:26500033

  13. Irisin immunostaining characteristics of breast and ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kuloglu, T; Celik, O; Aydin, S; Hanifi Ozercan, I; Acet, M; Aydin, Y; Artas, G; Turk, A; Yardim, M; Ozan, G; Hanifi Yalcin, M; Kocaman, N

    2016-01-01

    To determine expression pattern of irisin in tissues obtained from human ovarian cancer, breast cancer, and cervix cancer. Tissue samples obtained from subjects with breast cancer, ovarian cancer cervix cancer, simple endometrial hyperplasia, complex atypical endometrial hyperplasia. At least five sections from each subject were immunohistochemically stained with irisin antibody, and H-score method was used to evaluate irisin intensity. Tissues obtained from healthy breast tissues, proliferative phase endometrium adenomyosis and benign ovarian tumors were accepted as control. Irisin activity was not detected in control breast tissues significantly increased irisin staining was detected in invasive lobular, intraductal papillary, invasive ductal, invasive papillary, and mucinous carcinomas compared to control tissues. Also, significantly increased irisin immunoreactivity was detected in both ovarian endometriosis and mucinous carcinomas compared to benign tumors. However irisin staining was not observed at the papillary carcinoma of the ovary while sections obtained from simple and complex atypical endometrial hyperplasia, and cervix carcinoma demonstrated irisin immunoreactivity. Increased irisin immunoreactivity in tissues obtained from breast, ovary, cervix carcinomas, and endometrial hyperplasia suggest critical role of this peptide during carcinogenesis. PMID:27545213

  14. [Erythropoietin and drug resistance in breast and ovarian cancers].

    PubMed

    Szenajch, Jolanta M; Synowiec, Agnieszka E

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) is used in breast and ovarian cancer patients to alleviate cancer- and chemotherapy-related anemia. Some clinical trials have reported that rhEPO may adversely impact survival and increase the risk of thrombovascular events in patients with breast cancer but not with ovarian cancer. The latter may potentially benefit the most from rhEPO treatment due to the nephrotoxic and myelosuppresive effects of standard platinum-based chemotherapy used in ovarian cancer disease. However, over the last decade the preclinical data have revealed that EPO is not only the principal growth factor and the hormone which regulates erythropoiesis, but also a cytokine with a pleiotropic activity which also can affect cancer cells. EPO can stimulate survival, ability to form metastases and drug resistance not only in continuous breast- and ovarian cancer cell lines but also in breast cancer stem-like cells. EPO receptor (EPOR) can also be constitutively active in both these cancers and, in breast cancer cells, may act in an interaction with estrogen receptor (ER) and epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2). EPOR, by an EPO-independent mechanism, promotes proliferation of breast cancer cells in cooperation with estrogen receptor, resulting in decreased effectiveness of tamoxifen treatment. In another interaction, as a result of the molecular antagonism between EPOR and HER2, rhEPO protects breast cancer cells against trastuzumab. Both clinical and preclinical evidence strongly suggest the urgent need to reevaluate the traditional use of rhEPO in the oncology setting. PMID:27321103

  15. Diagnosis and management of peritoneal metastases from ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Halkia, Evgenia; Spiliotis, John; Sugarbaker, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The management and the outcome of peritoneal metastases or recurrence from epithelial ovarian cancer are presented. The biology and the diagnostic tools of EOC peritoneal metastasis with a comprehensive approach and the most recent literatures data are discussed. The definition and the role of surgery and chemotherapy are presented in order to focuse on the controversial points. Finally, the paper discusses the new data about the introduction of cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) in the treatment of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer. PMID:22888339

  16. Evaluating the Progenitor Cells of Ovarian Cancer: Analysis of Current Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    King, Shelby M.; Burdette, Joanna E.

    2013-01-01

    Serous ovarian cancer is one of the most lethal gynecological malignancies. Progress on effective diagnostics and therapeutics for this disease are hampered by ambiguity as to the cellular origins of this histotype of ovarian cancer, as well as limited suitable animal models to analyze early stages of disease. In this report, we will review current animal models with respect to the two proposed progenitor cells for serous ovarian cancer, the ovarian surface epithelium and the fallopian tube epithelium. PMID:21777513

  17. Overexpression of TAZ promotes cell proliferation, migration and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guangyuan; Xie, Jiabin; Huang, Ping; Yang, Zhihong

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo pathway is dysregulated in multiple types of human cancer, including ovarian cancer. Nuclear expression of yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1), a downstream transcription coactivator of the Hippo pathway, has been demonstrated to promote tumorigenesis in ovarian cancer and may serve as a poor prognostic indicator. However, transcriptional coactivator with PDZ binding motif (TAZ), a downstream target of the Hippo pathway and paralog of YAP in mammalian cells, has not been fully investigated in ovarian cancer. The present study aimed to investigate the dysregulation and biological function of TAZ in ovarian cancer. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting revealed that TAZ mRNA and protein levels, respectively, were upregulated in ovarian cancer, and a meta-analysis of ovarian cancer microarray datasets identified that increased expression of TAZ mRNA is correlated with poor prognosis in patients with ovarian cancer. In addition, TAZ-knockdown in ovarian cancer cells demonstrated that TAZ regulates the migration, proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition of ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, pharmacological disruption of the YAP/TAZ/TEA domain protein complex resulted in a decrease in ovarian cancer cell migration, proliferation and vimentin expression. The results of the present study indicate that the overexpression of TAZ is important in the development and progression of ovarian cancer, and may function as a potential drug target for treatment of this disease entity.

  18. Selective killing of ovarian cancer cells through induction of apoptosis by nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iseki, Sachiko; Nakamura, Kae; Hayashi, Moemi; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Kondo, Hiroki; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kano, Hiroyuki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2012-03-01

    Two independent ovarian cancer cell lines and fibroblast controls were treated with nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP). Most ovarian cancer cells were detached from the culture dish by continuous plasma treatment to a single spot on the dish. Next, the plasma source was applied over the whole dish using a robot arm. In vitro cell proliferation assays showed that plasma treatments significantly decreased proliferation rates of ovarian cancer cells compared to fibroblast cells. Flow cytometry and western blot analysis showed that plasma treatment of ovarian cancer cells induced apoptosis. NEAPP could be a promising tool for therapy for ovarian cancers.

  19. Selective killing of ovarian cancer cells through induction of apoptosis by nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Iseki, Sachiko; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Kondo, Hiroki; Hori, Masaru; Nakamura, Kae; Hayashi, Moemi; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Kano, Hiroyuki

    2012-03-12

    Two independent ovarian cancer cell lines and fibroblast controls were treated with nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP). Most ovarian cancer cells were detached from the culture dish by continuous plasma treatment to a single spot on the dish. Next, the plasma source was applied over the whole dish using a robot arm. In vitro cell proliferation assays showed that plasma treatments significantly decreased proliferation rates of ovarian cancer cells compared to fibroblast cells. Flow cytometry and western blot analysis showed that plasma treatment of ovarian cancer cells induced apoptosis. NEAPP could be a promising tool for therapy for ovarian cancers.

  20. Can advanced-stage ovarian cancer be cured?

    PubMed

    Narod, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Approximately 20% of women with advanced-stage ovarian cancer survive beyond 12 years after treatment and are effectively cured. Initial therapy for ovarian cancer comprises surgery and chemotherapy, and is given with the goal of eradicating as many cancer cells as possible. Indeed, the three phases of therapy are as follows: debulking surgery to remove as much of the cancer as possible, preferably to a state of no visible residual disease; chemotherapy to eradicate any microscopic disease that remains present after surgery; and second-line or maintenance therapy, which is given to delay disease progression among patients with tumour recurrence. If no cancer cells remain after initial therapy is completed, a cure is expected. By contrast, if residual cancer cells are present after initial treatment, then disease recurrence is likely. Thus, the probability of cure is contingent on the combination of surgery and chemotherapy effectively eliminating all cancer cells. In this Perspectives article, I present the case that the probability of achieving a cancer-free state is maximized through a combination of maximal debulking surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy. I discuss the evidence indicating that by taking this approach, cures could be achieved in up to 50% of women with advanced-stage ovarian cancer. PMID:26787282

  1. Ascites Increases Expression/Function of Multidrug Resistance Proteins in Ovarian Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Mo, Lihong; Pospichalova, Vendula; Huang, Zhiqing; Murphy, Susan K; Payne, Sturgis; Wang, Fang; Kennedy, Margaret; Cianciolo, George J; Bryja, Vitezslav; Pizzo, Salvatore V; Bachelder, Robin E

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy resistance is the major reason for the failure of ovarian cancer treatment. One mechanism behind chemo-resistance involves the upregulation of multidrug resistance (MDR) genes (ABC transporters) that effectively transport (efflux) drugs out of the tumor cells. As a common symptom in stage III/IV ovarian cancer patients, ascites is associated with cancer progression. However, whether ascites drives multidrug resistance in ovarian cancer cells awaits elucidation. Here, we demonstrate that when cultured with ascites derived from ovarian cancer-bearing mice, a murine ovarian cancer cell line became less sensitive to paclitaxel, a first line chemotherapeutic agent for ovarian cancer patients. Moreover, incubation of murine ovarian cancer cells in vitro with ascites drives efflux function in these cells. Functional studies show ascites-driven efflux is suppressible by specific inhibitors of either of two ABC transporters [Multidrug Related Protein (MRP1); Breast Cancer Related Protein (BCRP)]. To demonstrate relevance of our findings to ovarian cancer patients, we studied relative efflux in human ovarian cancer cells obtained from either patient ascites or from primary tumor. Immortalized cell lines developed from human ascites show increased susceptibility to efflux inhibitors (MRP1, BCRP) compared to a cell line derived from a primary ovarian cancer, suggesting an association between ascites and efflux function in human ovarian cancer. Efflux in ascites-derived human ovarian cancer cells is associated with increased expression of ABC transporters compared to that in primary tumor-derived human ovarian cancer cells. Collectively, our findings identify a novel activity for ascites in promoting ovarian cancer multidrug resistance. PMID:26148191

  2. Evaluation of FHIT gene alterations in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Buttitta, F.; Marchetti, A.; Radi, O.; Bertacca, G.; Pellegrini, S.; Gadducci, A.; Genazzani, A. R.; Bevilacqua, G.

    1998-01-01

    The FHIT gene, recently cloned and mapped on chromosome 3p14.2, has frequently been found to be abnormal in several established cancer cell lines and primary tumours. As alterations of chromosome 3p are common events in ovarian cancers with breakpoint sites at 3p14.2, we decided to investigate the role of FHIT in human ovarian tumorigenesis. Fifty-four primary ovarian carcinomas were studied by reverse transcription of FHIT mRNA followed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and sequencing of products. The same tumours and matched normal tissues were also investigated for loss of heterozygosity using three microsatellite markers located inside the gene. We found an abnormal transcript of the FHIT gene in two cases (4%) and allelic losses in eight cases (15%). Twelve (22%) of the 54 tumours investigated belonged to young patients with a family history of breast/ovarian cancer. In none of these cases was the FHITgene found to be altered. Our results indicate that FHITplays a role in a small proportion of ovarian carcinomas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9569038

  3. YKL-40 in Serum Samples From Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III-IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal Cavity, or Fallopian Tube Cancer Receiving Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-19

    Fallopian Tube Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Clear Cell Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Endometrioid Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Mucinous Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Neoplasm; Malignant Ovarian Serous Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Transitional Cell Tumor; Ovarian Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  4. Tubal ligation, hysterectomy and ovarian cancer: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this meta-analysis was to determine the strength of the association between gynecologic surgeries, tubal ligation and hysterectomy, and ovarian cancer. Methods We searched the PubMed, Web of Science, and Embase databases for all English-language articles dated between 1969 through March 2011 using the keywords “ovarian cancer” and “tubal ligation” or “tubal sterilization” or “hysterectomy.” We identified 30 studies on tubal ligation and 24 studies on hysterectomy that provided relative risks for ovarian cancer and a p-value or 95% confidence interval (CI) to include in the meta-analysis. Summary RRs and 95% CIs were calculated using a random-effects model. Results The summary RR for women with vs. without tubal ligation was 0.70 (95%CI: 0.64, 0.75). Similarly, the summary RR for women with vs. without hysterectomy was 0.74 (95%CI: 0.65, 0.84). Simple hysterectomy and hysterectomy with unilateral oophorectomy were associated with a similar decrease in risk (summery RR = 0.62, 95%CI: 0.49-0.79 and 0.60, 95%CI: 0.47-0.78, respectively). In secondary analyses, the association between tubal ligation and ovarian cancer risk was stronger for endometrioid tumors (summary RR = 0.45, 95%CI: 0.33, 0.61) compared to serous tumors. Conclusion Observational epidemiologic evidence strongly supports that tubal ligation and hysterectomy are associated with a decrease in the risk of ovarian cancer, by approximately 26-30%. Additional research is needed to determine whether the association between tubal ligation and hysterectomy on ovarian cancer risk differs by individual, surgical, and tumor characteristics. PMID:22587442

  5. Shared genetics underlying epidemiological association between endometriosis and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Painter, Jodie N; Nyholt, Dale R; Morris, Andrew P; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Burghaus, Stefanie; Beckmann, Matthias W; Lambrechts, Diether; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vanderstichele, Adriaan; Doherty, Jennifer Anne; Rossing, Mary Anne; Wicklund, Kristine G; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Eilber, Ursula; Rudolph, Anja; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Goodman, Marc T; Bogdanova, Natalia; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Antonenkova, Natalia; Butzow, Ralf; Leminen, Arto; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa M; Edwards, Robert P; Kelley, Joseph L; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten B; Ness, Roberta B; Cannioto, Rikki; Høgdall, Estrid; Jensen, Allan; Giles, Graham G; Bruinsma, Fiona; Kjaer, Susanne K; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Liang, Dong; Lu, Karen H; Wu, Xifeng; Bisogna, Maria; Dao, Fanny; Levine, Douglas A; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L; Tworoger, Shelley S; Missmer, Stacey; Bjorge, Line; Salvesen, Helga B; Kopperud, Reidun K; Bischof, Katharina; Aben, Katja K H; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Massuger, Leon F A G; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Olson, Sara H; McGuire, Valerie; Rothstein, Joseph H; Sieh, Weiva; Whittemore, Alice S; Cook, Linda S; Le, Nhu D; Gilks, C Blake; Gronwald, Jacek; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubiński, Jan; Gawełko, Jan; Song, Honglin; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise; Trabert, Britton; Lissowska, Jolanta; Mclaughlin, John R; Narod, Steven A; Phelan, Catherine; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Eccles, Diana; Gayther, Simon A; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Ramus, Susan J; Wu, Anna H; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Timorek, Agnieszka; Szafron, Lukasz; Cunningham, Julie M; Fridley, Brooke L; Winham, Stacey J; Bandera, Elisa V; Poole, Elizabeth M; Morgan, Terry K; Risch, Harvey A; Goode, Ellen L; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Webb, Penelope M; Pearce, Celeste L; Berchuck, Andrew; Pharoah, Paul D P; Montgomery, Grant W; Zondervan, Krina T; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; MacGregor, Stuart

    2015-10-15

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated associations between endometriosis and certain histotypes of ovarian cancer, including clear cell, low-grade serous and endometrioid carcinomas. We aimed to determine whether the observed associations might be due to shared genetic aetiology. To address this, we used two endometriosis datasets genotyped on common arrays with full-genome coverage (3194 cases and 7060 controls) and a large ovarian cancer dataset genotyped on the customized Illumina Infinium iSelect (iCOGS) arrays (10 065 cases and 21 663 controls). Previous work has suggested that a large number of genetic variants contribute to endometriosis and ovarian cancer (all histotypes combined) susceptibility. Here, using the iCOGS data, we confirmed polygenic architecture for most histotypes of ovarian cancer. This led us to evaluate if the polygenic effects are shared across diseases. We found evidence for shared genetic risks between endometriosis and all histotypes of ovarian cancer, except for the intestinal mucinous type. Clear cell carcinoma showed the strongest genetic correlation with endometriosis (0.51, 95% CI = 0.18-0.84). Endometrioid and low-grade serous carcinomas had similar correlation coefficients (0.48, 95% CI = 0.07-0.89 and 0.40, 95% CI = 0.05-0.75, respectively). High-grade serous carcinoma, which often arises from the fallopian tubes, showed a weaker genetic correlation with endometriosis (0.25, 95% CI = 0.11-0.39), despite the absence of a known epidemiological association. These results suggest that the epidemiological association between endometriosis and ovarian adenocarcinoma may be attributable to shared genetic susceptibility loci. PMID:26231222

  6. Temsirolimus and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Endometrial, Ovarian, Liver, Carcinoid, or Islet Cell Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-05

    Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Advanced Adult Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Localized Non-Resectable Adult Liver Carcinoma; Lung Carcinoid Tumor; Malignant Pancreatic Gastrinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Malignant Pancreatic Insulinoma; Malignant Pancreatic Somatostatinoma; Metastatic Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Surface Papillary Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Alpha Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Beta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Delta Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic G-Cell Adenoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Adult Liver Carcinoma; Recurrent Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Regional Digestive System Neuroendocrine Tumor G1; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Uterine Carcinosarcoma

  7. The thyroid hormone-αvβ3 integrin axis in ovarian cancer: regulation of gene transcription and MAPK-dependent proliferation.

    PubMed

    Shinderman-Maman, E; Cohen, K; Weingarten, C; Nabriski, D; Twito, O; Baraf, L; Hercbergs, A; Davis, P J; Werner, H; Ellis, M; Ashur-Fabian, O

    2016-04-14

    Ovarian carcinoma is the fifth common cause of cancer death in women, despite advanced therapeutic approaches. αvβ3 integrin, a plasma membrane receptor, binds thyroid hormones (L-thyroxine, T4; 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine, T3) and is overexpressed in ovarian cancer. We have demonstrated selective binding of fluorescently labeled hormones to αvβ3-positive ovarian cancer cells but not to integrin-negative cells. Physiologically relevant T3 (1 nM) and T4 (100 nM) concentrations in OVCAR-3 (high αvβ3) and A2780 (low αvβ3) cells promoted αv and β3 transcription in association with basal integrin levels. This transcription was effectively blocked by RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) peptide and neutralizing αvβ3 antibodies, excluding T3-induced β3 messenger RNA, suggesting subspecialization of T3 and T4 binding to the integrin receptor pocket. We have provided support for extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)-mediated transcriptional regulation of the αv monomer by T3 and of β3 monomer by both hormones and documented a rapid (30-120 min) and dose-dependent (0.1-1000 nM) ERK activation. OVCAR-3 cells and αvβ3-deficient HEK293 cells treated with αvβ3 blockers confirmed the requirement for an intact thyroid hormone-integrin interaction in ERK activation. In addition, novel data indicated that T4, but not T3, controls integrin's outside-in signaling by phosphorylating tyrosine 759 in the β3 subunit. Both hormones induced cell proliferation (cell counts), survival (Annexin-PI), viability (WST-1) and significantly reduced the expression of genes that inhibit cell cycle (p21, p16), promote mitochondrial apoptosis (Nix, PUMA) and tumor suppression (GDF-15, IGFBP-6), particularly in cells with high integrin expression. At last, we have confirmed that hypothyroid environment attenuated ovarian cancer growth using a novel experimental platform that exploited paired euthyroid and severe hypothyroid serum samples from human subjects. To conclude, our data define a critical

  8. Ovarian hemangioma with elevated CA125 and ascites mimicking ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Erdemoglu, E; Kamaci, M; Ozen, S; Sahin, H G; Kolusari, A

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of a very rare tumor of the ovary with an unusual presentation; an ovarian hemangioma with massive ascites and elevated CA125. A 57-year-old woman presenting with elevated CA125, massive ascites and a left solid adnexal mass of 60 x 47 mm, with calcification and increased blood flow at Doppler examination, was submitted to laparotomy. Frozen section was inconclusive and a staging procedure which complicated the patient was performed. Pathologic examination revealed cavernous hemangioma which is an extremely rare tumor of the ovary. Although it is very unusual, an ovarian hemangioma may present with ascites and elevated CA125 and the differential diagnosis from ovarian cancer should be considered. PMID:16620071

  9. Preclinical evaluation of a nanoformulated antihelminthic, niclosamide, in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chi-Kang; Bai, Meng-Yi; Hu, Teh-Min; Wang, Yu-Chi; Chao, Tai-Kuang; Weng, Shao-Ju; Huang, Rui-Lan; Su, Po-Hsuan; Lai, Hung-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer treatment remains a challenge and targeting cancer stem cells presents a promising strategy. Niclosamide is an “old” antihelminthic drug that uncouples mitochondria of intestinal parasites. Although recent studies demonstrated that niclosamide could be a potential anticancer agent, its poor water solubility needs to be overcome before further preclinical and clinical investigations can be conducted. Therefore, we evaluated a novel nanosuspension of niclosamide (nano-NI) for its effect against ovarian cancer. Nano-NI effectively inhibited the growth of ovarian cancer cells in which it induced a metabolic shift to glycolysis at a concentration of less than 3 μM in vitro and suppressed tumor growth without obvious toxicity at an oral dose of 100 mg/kg in vivo. In a pharmacokinetic study after oral administration, nano-NI showed rapid absorption (reaching the maximum plasma concentration within 5 min) and improved the bioavailability (the estimated bioavailability for oral nano-NI was 25%). In conclusion, nano-NI has the potential to be a new treatment modality for ovarian cancer and, therefore, further clinical trials are warranted. PMID:26848771

  10. Use of multiple imaging modalities to detect ovarian cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanter, Elizabeth; Walker, Ross; Marion, Sam; Hoyer, Patricia; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2005-04-01

    Ovarian cancer is not a common cancer-approximately 25,000 new cases in 2004-but it is the fifth leading cause of death from cancer in women (over 16,000 in 2004). Little is known about the precursors and early stages of ovarian cancer partially due to the lack of human samples at the early stages. A cohesive model that incorporates ovarian cancer induction into a menopausal rodent would be well suited for comprehensive studies of ovarian cancer. Non-destructive imaging would allow carcinogenesis to be followed. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM) and Light-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) are minimally invasive optical modalities that allow both structural and biochemical changes to be noted. Rat ovaries were exposed to 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) for 20 days in order to destroy the primordial follicles. Plain sutures and sutures coated with 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) were implanted in the right ovary, in order to produce epithelial based ovarian cancers (a plain suture was inserted in the control). Rats were sacrificed at 4 weeks and ovaries were harvested and imaged with a combined OCT/LIF system and with the OCM. Histology was preformed on the harvested ovaries and any pathology determined. Two of the ovaries were visually abnormal; the OCT/LIF imaging confirmed these abnormalities. The normal ovary OCM and OCT images show the organized structure of the ovary, the follicles, bursa and corpus lutea are visible. The OCM images show the disorganized structure of one of the abnormal ovaries. Overall this pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of both the animal model and optical imaging.

  11. Microsatellite instability is rare in sporadic ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.S.; Han, H.; Schwartz, P.E.

    1994-09-01

    Microsatellite instability was first demonstrated to be a common underlying mechanism in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) and has recently been implicated in the development of several other human cancers. Although numerous genetic changes have been documented in ovarian cancer, their molecular bases are poorly understood. In investigating the molecular genetics of ovarian cancer, we analyzed twelve short tandem repeats that were amplified by PCR from DNA of 48 tumors and their corresponding lymphocyte samples. All of the 48 cases studied have no noticeable family history and, of them, 42 are epithelial (benign/borderline, 5; grade I, 4; GII, 4; GIII, 29) and 6 are nonepithelial. A microsatellite instability has been shown to be inversely correlated with the occurrence of allelic losses, half of those cases chosen have a fractional allele loss of {le}15 (median = .18 of 50 tumors tested for 86 loci from every chromosomal arm). The loci examined included eight dinucleotide repeats (D2S123, D9S104, D10S197, D11S904, D16S408, D16S421, D17S250, and D17S579), two trinucleotide repeats (DM and AR) and two tetranucleotide repeats (DXS981 and VWF). Despite the fact that HNPCC phenotype includes ovarian cancer and that microsatellite instability has been shown in one ovarian cancer from an HNPCC family, the allele sizes of 12 loci were found to be identical in all paired tumor and normal samples we studied except for one tumor at a single locus. The band shift displayed on polyacrylamide gel representing an additional allele of VWF was only observed in one grade III tumor. Our results are thus a strong indication that the alteration of microsatellite repeats may not play a major role in the development of sporadic ovarian cancer.

  12. Ovarian Cancer Susceptibility Alleles and Risk of Ovarian Cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Ramus, Susan J.; Antoniou, Antonis C; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; McGuffog, Lesley; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Caligo, Maria A.; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Złowocka, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Toloczko-Grabarek, Aleksandra; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Duran, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Hamann, Ute; Rookus, Matti; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E.J.; van Asperen, Christi J.; van Roozendaal, K.E.P.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Collée, J. Margriet; Kriege, Mieke; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Peock, Susan; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve D.; Platte, Radka; Fineberg, Elena; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Jacobs, Chris; Eeles, Ros; Adlard, Julian; Davidson, Rosemarie; Eccles, Diana; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Douglas, Fiona; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Walker, Lisa; Porteous, Mary E.; Kennedy, M. John; Pathak, Harsh; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; de Pauw, Antoine; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Léoné, Mélanie; Calender, Alain; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Faivre, Laurence; Loustalot, Catherine; Buys, Saundra; Daly, Mary; Miron, Alex; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; John, Esther M; Southey, Melissa; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Pfeiler, Georg; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Ejlertsen, Bent; Johannsson, Oskar Th.; Offit, Kenneth; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Gaudet, Mia M.; Vijai, Joseph; Robson, Mark; Piedmonte, Marion; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Van Le, Linda; Hoffman, James S; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Tognazzo, Silvia; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Isaacs, Claudine; Janavicius, Ramunas; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Tornero, Eva; Navarro, Matilde; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Olah, Edith; Vaszko, Tibor; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Beattie, Mary S.; Dorfling, Cecelia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Diez, Orland; Kwong, Ava; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Niederacher, Dieter; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Gadzicki, Dorotehea; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Deissler, Helmut; Gehrig, Andrea; Sutter, Christian; Kast, Karin; Fiebig, Britta; Schäfer, Dieter; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Plante, Marie; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane; Fredericksen, Zachary; Pankratz, V. Shane; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Radice, Paolo; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Gayther, Simon A.; Simard, Jacques; Easton, Douglas F.; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with increased risks of breast and ovarian cancer. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified six alleles associated with risk of ovarian cancer for women in the general population. We evaluated four of these loci as potential modifiers of ovarian cancer risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs10088218 (at 8q24), rs2665390 (at 3q25), rs717852 (at 2q31), and rs9303542 (at 17q21), were genotyped in 12,599 BRCA1 and 7,132 BRCA2 carriers, including 2,678 ovarian cancer cases. Associations were evaluated within a retrospective cohort approach. All four loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 0.81 (95% CI: 0.67–0.98) P-trend = 0.033, rs2665390 HR = 1.48 (95% CI: 1.21–1.83) P-trend = 1.8 × 10−4, rs717852 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10–1.42) P-trend = 6.6 × 10−4, rs9303542 HR = 1.16 (95% CI: 1.02–1.33) P-trend = 0.026. Two loci were associated with ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 carriers; rs10088218 per-allele HR = 0.89 (95% CI: 0.81–0.99) P-trend = 0.029, rs2665390 HR = 1.25 (95% CI: 1.10–1.42) P-trend = 6.1 × 10−4. The HR estimates for the remaining loci were consistent with odds ratio estimates for the general population. The identification of multiple loci modifying ovarian cancer risk may be useful for counseling women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations regarding their risk of ovarian cancer. PMID:22253144

  13. DDX4 (DEAD box polypeptide 4) colocalizes with cancer stem cell marker CD133 in ovarian cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ki Hyung; Kang, Yun-Jeong; Jo, Jin-Ok; Ock, Mee Sun; Moon, Soo Hyun; Suh, Dong Soo; Yoon, Man Soo; Park, Eun-Sil; Jeong, Namkung; Eo, Wan-Kyu; Kim, Heung Yeol; Cha, Hee-Jae

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • Germ cell marker DDX4 was significantly increased in ovarian cancer. • Ovarian cancer stem cell marker CD133 was significantly increased in ovarian cancer. • DDX4 and CD133 were mostly colocalized in various types of ovarian cancer tissues. • CD133 positive ovarian cancer cells also express DDX4 whereas CD133-negative cells did not possess DDX4. • Germ cell marker DDX4 has the potential of ovarian cancer stem cell marker. - Abstract: DDX4 (DEAD box polypeptide 4), characterized by the conserved motif Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp (DEAD), is an RNA helicase which is implicated in various cellular processes involving the alteration of RNA secondary structure, such as translation initiation, nuclear and mitochondrial splicing, and ribosome and spliceosome assembly. DDX4 is known to be a germ cell-specific protein and is used as a sorting marker of germline stem cells for the production of oocytes. A recent report about DDX4 in ovarian cancer showed that DDX4 is overexpressed in epithelial ovarian cancer and disrupts a DNA damage-induced G2 checkpoint. We investigated the relationship between DDX4 and ovarian cancer stem cells by analyzing the expression patterns of DDX4 and the cancer stem cell marker CD133 in ovarian cancers via tissue microarray. Both DDX4 and CD133 were significantly increased in ovarian cancer compared to benign tumors, and showed similar patterns of expression. In addition, DDX4 and CD133 were mostly colocalized in various types of ovarian cancer tissues. Furthermore, almost all CD133 positive ovarian cancer cells also express DDX4 whereas CD133-negative cells did not possess DDX4, suggesting a strong possibility that DDX4 plays an important role in cancer stem cells, and/or can be used as an ovarian cancer stem cell marker.

  14. Ruxolitinib Phosphate, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Epithelial Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-21

    Fallopian Tube Carcinosarcoma; Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Neoplasm; High Grade Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  15. Chemotherapy Toxicity On Quality of Life in Older Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal Cavity, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage III Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  16. Ovarian tumors in postmenopausal breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Cohen, I; Beyth, Y; Tepper, R; Shapira, J; Zalel, Y; Figer, A; Cordoba, M; Yigael, D; Altaras, M M

    1996-01-01

    From September 1, 1989, to November 30, 1994, 175 menopausal breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen were followed at the authors' institutions. During this period. 16 (9.1%) underwent total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, for various indications. Of these, 10 (62.5%) had either uni- or bilateral ovarian tumors. The analysis of surgical findings showed an incidence of 5.7% (10/175) ovarian tumors among all the patients. In 2 (20%), the ovarian masses displayed enlargement over a relatively short period while on treatment. In 5 (50%) patients, the findings were bilateral. All tumors were detectable by ultrasonography, except four serous cystadenomas found in 3 women. The mean duration of tamoxifen treatment was 36.6 +/- 24.9 (range 9-86) months. The rate of 5.7% for ovarian tumors, in this selected group of patients, is four to five times higher than that reported for similar pathologic conditions detected by general screening with ultrasonographic scans among nonselected, asymptomatic, and untreated postmenopausal women. Two possibilities should be considered in the development of ovarian tumors coinciding with tamoxifen treatment; (1) women with breast malignancy are prone to develop benign or malignant ovarian tumors in relation to genetic factors, regardless of tamoxifen treatment; and (2) tamoxifen may stimulate enlargement of such tumors and may even cause them. PMID:8557228

  17. Connecting Prognostic Ligand Receptor Signaling Loops in Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Kevin H.; Ruggeri, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Understanding cancer cell signal transduction is a promising lead for uncovering therapeutic targets and building treatment-specific markers for epithelial ovarian cancer. To brodaly assay the many known transmembrane receptor systems, previous studies have employed gene expression data measured on high-throughput microarrays. Starting with the knowledge of validated ligand-receptor pairs (LRPs), these studies postulate that correlation of the two genes implies functional autocrine signaling. It is our goal to consider the additional weight of evidence that prognosis (progression-free survival) can bring to prioritize ovarian cancer specific signaling mechanism. We survey three large studies of epithelial ovarian cancers, with gene expression measurements and clinical information, by modeling survival times both categorically (long/short survival) and continuously. We use differential correlation and proportional hazards regression to identify sets of LRPs that are both prognostic and correlated. Of 475 candidate LRPs, 77 show reproducible evidence of correlation; 55 show differential correlation. Survival models identify 16 LRPs with reproduced, significant interactions. Only two pairs show both interactions and correlation (PDGFAPDGFRA and COL1A1CD44) suggesting that the majority of prognostically useful LRPs act without positive feedback. We further assess the connectivity of receptors using a Gaussian graphical model finding one large graph and a number of smaller disconnected networks. These LRPs can be organized into mutually exclusive signaling clusters suggesting different mechanisms apply to different patients. We conclude that a mix of autocrine and endocrine LRPs influence prognosis in ovarian cancer, there exists a heterogenous mix of signaling themes across patients, and we point to a number of novel applications of existing targeted therapies which may benefit ovarian cancer. PMID:25244152

  18. Association of HER2 codon 655 polymorphism with ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Watrowski, Rafał; Castillo-Tong, Dan Cacsire; Schuster, Eva; Fischer, Michael B; Speiser, Paul; Zeillinger, Robert

    2016-06-01

    The role of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) codon 655 (Ile655Val) polymorphism in ovarian cancer is not fully understood. Two studies indicated a possible association between the Val allele and elevated risk or reduced prognosis of ovarian cancer. We investigated the HER2 codon 655 (rs1136201) polymorphism in 242 Austrian women-142 ovarian cancer patients and 100 healthy controls-by polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing. Associations between Ile655Val polymorphism and clinicopathological variables (e.g., age, FIGO stage, grading, serous vs. non-serous histology) were evaluated. The genotype distributions in ovarian cancer patients and controls were: AA; 66.2 %, AG; 25.35 %, GG; 8.45 %, and AA; 63 %, AG; 34 %, GG; 3.7 %, respectively (OR 1.15, CI 95 % 0.67-1.96). We observed a non-significant trend toward elevated cancer risk in Val/Val genotype (OR 2.98, CI 95 % 0.82-10.87, p = 0.10). Of note, 11 out of 12 Val/Val homozygotes were postmenopausal. The link between the Val/Val homozygosity and age over 50 years at diagnosis (OR 0.15, CI 95 % 0.02-1.2) was barely significant (p = 0.056). Summarizing, our data indicated a non-significant trend toward increased ovarian cancer risk in the Val/Val homozygosity, especially in women aged above 50 years. Further large-cohort studies focusing on the role of the HER2 codon 655 Val allele are needed. PMID:26666819

  19. Low MAD2 expression levels associate with reduced progression-free survival in patients with high-grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Furlong, Fiona; Fitzpatrick, Patricia; O'Toole, Sharon; Phelan, Sine; McGrogan, Barbara; Maguire, Aoife; O'Grady, Anthony; Gallagher, Michael; Prencipe, Maria; McGoldrick, Aloysius; McGettigan, Paul; Brennan, Donal; Sheils, Orla; Martin, Cara; W Kay, Elaine; O'Leary, John; McCann, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) has an innate susceptibility to become chemoresistant. Up to 30% of patients do not respond to conventional chemotherapy [paclitaxel (Taxol®) in combination with carboplatin] and, of those who have an initial response, many patients relapse. Therefore, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate cellular chemotherapeutic responses in EOC cells has the potential to impact significantly on patient outcome. The mitotic arrest deficiency protein 2 (MAD2), is a centrally important mediator of the cellular response to paclitaxel. MAD2 immunohistochemical analysis was performed on 82 high-grade serous EOC samples. A multivariate Cox regression analysis of nuclear MAD2 IHC intensity adjusting for stage, tumour grade and optimum surgical debulking revealed that low MAD2 IHC staining intensity was significantly associated with reduced progression-free survival (PFS) (p = 0.0003), with a hazard ratio of 4.689. The in vitro analyses of five ovarian cancer cell lines demonstrated that cells with low MAD2 expression were less sensitive to paclitaxel. Furthermore, paclitaxel-induced activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) and apoptotic cell death was abrogated in cells transfected with MAD2 siRNA. In silico analysis identified a miR-433 binding domain in the MAD2 3′ UTR, which was verified in a series of experiments. Firstly, MAD2 protein expression levels were down-regulated in pre-miR-433 transfected A2780 cells. Secondly, pre-miR-433 suppressed the activity of a reporter construct containing the 3′-UTR of MAD2. Thirdly, blocking miR-433 binding to the MAD2 3′ UTR protected MAD2 from miR-433 induced protein down-regulation. Importantly, reduced MAD2 protein expression in pre-miR-433-transfected A2780 cells rendered these cells less sensitive to paclitaxel. In conclusion, loss of MAD2 protein expression results in increased resistance to paclitaxel in EOC cells. Measuring MAD2 IHC staining intensity may predict

  20. Endometriosis and ovarian cancer: links, risks, and challenges faced

    PubMed Central

    Pavone, Mary Ellen; Lyttle, Brianna M

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis is a benign gynecological condition characterized by specific histological, molecular, and clinical findings. It affects 5%–10% of premenopausal women, is a cause of infertility, and has been implicated as a precursor for certain types of ovarian cancer. Advances in technology, primarily the ability for whole genome sequencing, have led to the discovery of new mutations and a better understanding of the function of previously identified genes and pathways associated with endometriosis associated ovarian cancers (EAOCs) that include PTEN, CTNNB1 (β-catenin), KRAS, microsatellite instability, ARID1A, and the unique role of inflammation in the development of EAOC. Clinically, EAOCs are associated with a younger age at diagnosis, lower stage and grade of tumor, and are more likely to occur in premenopausal women when compared with other ovarian cancers. A shift from screening strategies adopted to prevent EAOCs has resulted in new recommendations for clinical practice by national and international governing bodies. In this paper, we review the common histologic and molecular characteristics of endometriosis and ovarian cancer, risks associated with EAOCs, clinical challenges and give recommendations for providers. PMID:26170722

  1. Ovarian cancer: the clinical role of US, CT, and MRI.

    PubMed

    Togashi, Kaori

    2003-12-01

    This article presents an overview of ovarian cancer, which addresses the clinical roles of imaging studies, including US, CT, and MR imaging in the course of diagnosis and treatment of this important disease. US is the modality of choice in the evaluation of patients with suspected adnexal masses. Although its accuracy is not sufficient to avert surgery, morphological analysis of adnexal masses with US helps narrow the differential diagnosis, determining the degree of suspicion for malignancy, usually in concert with a serum CA-125 level. Combined morphological and vascular imaging obtained by US appear to further improve the preoperative assessment of adnexal masses. For uncertain or problematic cases, MR imaging helps to distinguish benign from malignant, with an overall accuracy for the diagnosis of malignancy of 93%. The accuracy of MR imaging in the confident diagnosis of mature cystic teratoma, endometrial cysts, and leiomayomas is very high. CT is not indicated for differential diagnosis of adnexal masses because of poor soft tissue discrimination, except for fatty tissue and for calcification, and the disadvantages of irradiation. In the staging of ovarian cancer, CT, US, and MR imaging all have a similarly high accuracy. Although it is difficult to suggest a simple algorithm for evaluating the state of women with adnexal masses, the correct preoperative diagnosis and staging of ovarian cancer with the use of any of these imaging studies will lead to an appropriate referral to a specialist in gynecologic oncology and offer a significant survival advantage for patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:15018172

  2. Cigarette smoking and survival after ovarian cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Nagle, Christina M; Bain, Christopher J; Webb, Penelope M

    2006-12-01

    We have examined the association between cigarette smoking and ovarian cancer survival in 676 women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer, recruited into a case-control study in the early 1990s. Information about cigarette smoking and other personal and reproductive factors was obtained from a personal interview at the time of diagnosis. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the association between cigarette smoking and time to ovarian cancer death. Current smokers at diagnosis were more likely to die early than women who had never smoked [adjusted hazard ratio (HR), 1.36; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.01-1.84]. Increased risks of dying were greater among those who had accumulated more pack-years of smoking (HR for 30+ pack-years compared with never smokers, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.41-2.66) and smoked more cigarettes per day (HR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.37-2.73). All these associations were stronger among women with late-stage disease (HR for current versus never smokers, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.15-2.18). Time since quitting had little effect on survival after adjusting for lifetime smoking exposure. These results validate and extend recent findings and suggest that premorbid cigarette smoking is related to worse outcome in ovarian cancer patients. PMID:17164386

  3. CHEMOTHERAPY: A new standard combination for recurrent ovarian cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Bast, Robert C.; Markman, Maurie

    2010-01-01

    Ovarian cancer that recurs more than 6 months following primary chemotherapy can respond to many different drugs, but retreatment with a combination of carboplatin and paclitaxel has become a standard of care. A combination of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin and carboplatin may provide a slightly but significantly greater therapeutic index than carboplatin and paclitaxel. PMID:20877420

  4. Drug combination may be highly effective in recurrent ovarian cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Significant improvement with the use of a combination drug therapy for recurrent ovarian cancer was reported at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting in Chicago. The trial compared the activity of a combination of the dru

  5. Autoantibody Signature for the Serologic Detection of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Sera from patients with ovarian cancer contain autoantibodies (AAb) to tumor-derived proteins that are potential biomarkers for early detection. To detect AAb, we probed high-density programmable protein microarrays (NAPPA) expressing 5177 candidate tumor antigens with sera from patients with serous ovarian cancer (n = 34 cases/30 controls) and measured bound IgG. Of these, 741 antigens were selected and probed with an independent set of ovarian cancer sera (n = 60 cases/60 controls). Twelve potential autoantigens were identified with sensitivities ranging from 13 to 22% at >93% specificity. These were retested using a Luminex bead array using 60 cases and 60 controls, with sensitivities ranging from 0 to 31.7% at 95% specificity. Three AAb (p53, PTPRA, and PTGFR) had area under the curve (AUC) levels >60% (p < 0.01), with the partial AUC (SPAUC) over 5 times greater than for a nondiscriminating test (p < 0.01). Using a panel of the top three AAb (p53, PTPRA, and PTGFR), if at least two AAb were positive, then the sensitivity was 23.3% at 98.3% specificity. AAb to at least one of these top three antigens were also detected in 7/20 sera (35%) of patients with low CA 125 levels and 0/15 controls. AAb to p53, PTPRA, and PTGFR are potential biomarkers for the early detection of ovarian cancer. PMID:25365139

  6. Characteristics of Long-Term Survivors of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cress, Rosemary D.; Chen, Yingjia S.; Morris, Cyllene R.; Petersen, Megan; Leiserowitz, Gary S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify characteristics associated with long-term survival forepithelial ovarian cancer patients using the California Cancer Registry. Methods A descriptive analysis of survival of all California residents diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer between 1994 and 2001 was conducted using patients identified through the cancer registry with follow up through 2011. Characteristics of the patients who survived more than 10 years (long-term survivors) were compared to three other cohorts: patients who survived less than 2 years, those who survived at least 2 but no more than 5 years, and those who survived at least 5 but no more than 10 years. Results A total of 3,582 out of 11,541 (31% CI=30.2%, 31.8%) of the patients survived more than 10 years. Younger age, early stage, low-grade, and non-serous histology were significant predictors of long-term survival, but long-term survivors also included women with high-risk cancer. Conclusion Long-term survival is not unusual in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer, even in those with high-risk disease. Many of the prognostic factors are well known, but it remains to be determined why some patients with advanced stage high-grade cancers survive longer than others with the same histology. These findings are important for patient counseling. PMID:26244529

  7. Differential hRad17 expression by histologic subtype of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In the search for unique ovarian cancer biomarkers, ovarian specific cDNA microarray analysis identified hRad17, a cell cycle checkpoint protein, as over-expressed in ovarian cancer. The aim of this study was to validate this expression. Methods Immunohistochemistry was performed on 72 serous, 19 endometrioid, 10 clear cell, and 6 mucinous ovarian cancers, 9 benign ovarian tumors, and 6 normal ovarian tissue sections using an anti-hRad17 antibody. Western blot analysis and quantitative PCR were performed using cell lysates and total RNA prepared from 17 ovarian cancer cell lines and 6 normal ovarian epithelial cell cultures (HOSE). Results Antibody staining confirmed upregulation of hRad17 in 49.5% of ovarian cancer cases. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that only 42% of serous and 47% of endometrioid subtypes showed overexpression compared to 80% of clear cell and 100% of mucinous cancers. Western blot confirmed overexpression of hRad17 in cancer cell lines compared to HOSE. Quantitative PCR demonstrated an upregulation of hRad17 RNA by 1.5-7 fold. hRad17 RNA expression differed by subtype. Conclusions hRad17 is over-expressed in ovarian cancer. This over-expression varies by subtype suggesting a role in the pathogenesis of these types. Functional studies are needed to determine the potential role of this protein in ovarian cancer. PMID:21450056

  8. Introduction to managing patients with recurrent ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gabra, Hani

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the 5th most common cancer found in women in the UK. It is the leading cause of death from gynaecological cancer, and is the 4th most common cause of cancer death among UK women. Similar to the majority of other cancers, relative survival rates for ovarian cancer are improving, although 5-year mortality rates remain stubbornly low. The stage of the disease at diagnosis is the single most important determinant of ovarian cancer survival, as many patients first present with advanced disease. Treatment of ovarian cancer involves a combination of ‘upfront’ primary surgery followed by chemotherapy. Platinum/taxane-based chemotherapy is the recommended standard-of-care first-line chemotherapy, but the majority of patients will relapse with drug-resistant disease within 3-5 years. However, not all patients can continue with platinum combination therapies due to loss of activity or toxicity-related issues, including hypersensitivity, neurotoxicity, alopecia and ototoxicity. Therefore the choice of second-line chemotherapy must take into account factors such as platinum-free treatment interval (PFI); patient's performance status; current symptoms; history of and likely future toxicities while on chemotherapy; dosing schedule requirement; and cost of treatment. A consensus in 2010 established 4 distinct subgroups within the ROC patient population based on the PFI: (platinum sensitive <12 months, partially platinum sensitive 6-12 months, platinum resistant <6 months, and refractory disease ≤4 weeks). Within patients with platinum sensitive disease, those with partially platinum sensitive disease remain the most clinically challenging to manage effectively. Non-platinum based combination therapies, in particular trabectedin with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD), offers new options together with a significant survival advantage relative to PLD alone for these patients. PMID:26759525

  9. Introduction to managing patients with recurrent ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Gabra, Hani

    2014-12-01

    Ovarian cancer is the 5th most common cancer found in women in the UK. It is the leading cause of death from gynaecological cancer, and is the 4th most common cause of cancer death among UK women. Similar to the majority of other cancers, relative survival rates for ovarian cancer are improving, although 5-year mortality rates remain stubbornly low. The stage of the disease at diagnosis is the single most important determinant of ovarian cancer survival, as many patients first present with advanced disease. Treatment of ovarian cancer involves a combination of 'upfront' primary surgery followed by chemotherapy. Platinum/taxane-based chemotherapy is the recommended standard-of-care first-line chemotherapy, but the majority of patients will relapse with drug-resistant disease within 3-5 years. However, not all patients can continue with platinum combination therapies due to loss of activity or toxicity-related issues, including hypersensitivity, neurotoxicity, alopecia and ototoxicity. Therefore the choice of second-line chemotherapy must take into account factors such as platinum-free treatment interval (PFI); patient's performance status; current symptoms; history of and likely future toxicities while on chemotherapy; dosing schedule requirement; and cost of treatment. A consensus in 2010 established 4 distinct subgroups within the ROC patient population based on the PFI: (platinum sensitive <12 months, partially platinum sensitive 6-12 months, platinum resistant <6 months, and refractory disease ≤4 weeks). Within patients with platinum sensitive disease, those with partially platinum sensitive disease remain the most clinically challenging to manage effectively. Non-platinum based combination therapies, in particular trabectedin with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD), offers new options together with a significant survival advantage relative to PLD alone for these patients. PMID:26759525

  10. Genetic instability in human ovarian cancer cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Orth, K; Hung, J; Gazdar, A; Bowcock, A; Mathis, J M; Sambrook, J

    1994-01-01

    We have analyzed the stability of microsatellites in cell lines derived from human ovarian cancers and found that 5 out of 10 of the ovarian tumor cell lines are genetically unstable at the majority of the loci analyzed. In clones and subclones derived serially from one of these cell lines (2774; serous cystadenocarcinoma), a very high proportion of microsatellites distributed in many different regions of the genome change their size in a mercurial fashion. We conclude that genomic instability in ovarian tumors is a dynamic and ongoing process whose high frequency may have been previously underestimated by PCR-based allelotyping of bulk tumor tissue. We have identified the source of the genetic instability in one ovarian tumor as a point mutation (R524P) in the human mismatch-repair gene MSH2 (Salmonella MutS homologue), which has recently been shown to be involved in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. Patient 2774 was a 38-year-old heterozygote, and her normal tissue carried both mutant and wild-type alleles of the human MSH2 gene. However the wild-type allele was lost at some point early during tumorigenesis so that DNA isolated either from the patient's ovarian tumor or from the 2774 cell line carries only the mutant allele of the human MSH2 gene. The genetic instability observed in the tumor and cell line DNA, together with the germ-line mutation in a mismatch-repair gene, suggest that the MSH2 gene is involved in the onset and/or progression in a subset of ovarian cancer. Images PMID:7937795

  11. ARID3B Directly Regulates Ovarian Cancer Promoting Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bobbs, Alexander; Gellerman, Katrina; Hallas, William Morgan; Joseph, Stancy; Yang, Chao; Kurkewich, Jeffrey; Cowden Dahl, Karen D.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA-binding protein AT-Rich Interactive Domain 3B (ARID3B) is elevated in ovarian cancer and increases tumor growth in a xenograft model of ovarian cancer. However, relatively little is known about ARID3B's function. In this study we perform the first genome wide screen for ARID3B direct target genes and ARID3B regulated pathways. We identified and confirmed numerous ARID3B target genes by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by microarray and quantitative RT-PCR. Using motif-finding algorithms, we characterized a binding site for ARID3B, which is similar to the previously known site for the ARID3B paralogue ARID3A. Functionality of this predicted site was demonstrated by ChIP analysis. We next demonstrated that ARID3B induces expression of its targets in ovarian cancer cell lines. We validated that ARID3B binds to an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) enhancer and increases mRNA expression. ARID3B also binds to the promoter of Wnt5A and its receptor FZD5. FZD5 is highly expressed in ovarian cancer cell lines, and is upregulated by exogenous ARID3B. Both ARID3B and FZD5 expression increase adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) components including collagen IV, fibronectin and vitronectin. ARID3B-increased adhesion to collagens II and IV require FZD5. This study directly demonstrates that ARID3B binds target genes in a sequence-specific manner, resulting in increased gene expression. Furthermore, our data indicate that ARID3B regulation of direct target genes in the Wnt pathway promotes adhesion of ovarian cancer cells. PMID:26121572

  12. The Association Between Talc Use and Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vitonis, Allison F.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Welch, William R.; Titus, Linda J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multiple studies of ovarian cancer and genital talc use have led only to consensus about possible carcinogenicity. Seeking greater clarity, we examined this association in 2,041 cases with epithelial ovarian cancer and 2,100 age- and-residence-matched controls. Methods: We defined genital talc use as regular application to the genital/rectal area directly, on sanitary napkins, tampons, or underwear. To estimate “talc-years,” we multiplied applications per year by years used. Unconditional logistic regression, Wald statistics, likelihood-ratio tests, and polytomous logistic regression were used to calculate adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), trends, effect-modification, and heterogeneity by ovarian cancer histologic subtype. Results: Overall, genital talc use was associated with an OR (95% CI) of 1.33 (1.16, 1.52), with a trend for increasing risk by talc-years. Women who used talc were more likely to be older, heavier, asthma sufferers, and regular analgesic users—none of which was a confounder. Dose–responses were more apparent for premenopausal women, especially nonsmokers and those heavier or postmenopausal users of menopausal hormones (hormone therapy [HT]). Subtypes of ovarian cancer more likely to be associated with talc included invasive serous and endometrioid tumors and borderline serous and mucinous tumors. Premenopausal women and postmenopausal HT users with these subtypes who had accumulated >24 talc-years had ORs (95% CI) of 2.33 (1.32, 4.12) and 2.57 (1.51, 4.36), respectively. Conclusion: Risks for epithelial ovarian cancer from genital talc use vary by histologic subtype, menopausal status at diagnosis, HT use, weight, and smoking. These observations suggest that estrogen and/or prolactin may play a role via macrophage activity and inflammatory response to talc. PMID:26689397

  13. Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IIIC-IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer Following Surgery and Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-13

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Tumor; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Neoplasm; Fallopian Tube Serous Neoplasm; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  14. [Ovarian preservation during treatment of early stage endometrial cancer].

    PubMed

    Poilblanc, Mathieu; Samouelian, Vanessa; Querleu, Denis

    2012-01-01

    Endometrial cancer staging is based on surgery. No matter the age of the patient, the surgical staging includes at least a total hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Twenty to 25% of the patients diagnosed with endometrial cancer are younger than 45  years. Although some discrepancies among series may be observed, in this population, endometrial cancers are mainly of lower grade, confined to the uterus (without ovarian involvement) and of better prognosis compared to older patients. The impact of premature menopause on the quality of life, cardiovascular and bone systems should not be neglected. This raises the issue of the systematic bilateral oophorectomy legitimacy while staging endometrial cancer staging in young patient. Considering the literature, eligibility criteria to ovarian preservation in endometrial cancer would be: young patients, low-grade endometrioid tumor, disease limited to the uterus (absence of any extrauterine disease). The risk of occult ovarian lesions, either synchronous or metastatic, would than be close to 1%. The effects of residual hormonal stimulation are considered low. Nevertheless, bilateral oophorectomy should remain the standard. Oophorectomy preservation in endometrial cancer should be considered as an exception, and proposed as an individualized plan of care for patients with strict eligibility criteria. PMID:22198406

  15. Activated T-cell Therapy, Low-Dose Aldesleukin, and Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer That is Stage III-IV, Refractory, or Recurrent

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-15

    Malignant Ovarian Clear Cell Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Serous Tumor; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  16. The long non-coding RNA HOTAIR promotes the proliferation of serous ovarian cancer cells through the regulation of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Jun-jun; Wang, Yan; Ding, Jing-xin; Jin, Hong-yan; Yang, Gong; Hua, Ke-qin

    2015-05-01

    HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR) is a well-known long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) whose dysregulation correlates with poor prognosis and malignant progression in many forms of cancer. Here, we investigate the expression pattern, clinical significance, and biological function of HOTAIR in serous ovarian cancer (SOC). Clinically, we found that HOTAIR levels were overexpressed in SOC tissues compared with normal controls and that HOTAIR overexpression was correlated with an advanced FIGO stage and a high histological grade. Multivariate analysis revealed that HOTAIR is an independent prognostic factor for predicting overall survival in SOC patients. We demonstrated that HOTAIR silencing inhibited A2780 and OVCA429 SOC cell proliferation in vitro and that the anti-proliferative effects of HOTAIR silencing also occurred in vivo. Further investigation into the mechanisms responsible for the growth inhibitory effects by HOTAIR silencing revealed that its knockdown resulted in the induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through certain cell cycle-related and apoptosis-related proteins. Together, these results highlight a critical role of HOTAIR in SOC cell proliferation and contribute to a better understanding of the importance of dysregulated lncRNAs in SOC progression. - Highlights: • HOTAIR overexpression correlates with an aggressive tumour phenotype and a poor prognosis in SOC. • HOTAIR promotes SOC cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. • The proliferative role of HOTAIR is associated with regulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis.

  17. A novel biomarker ARMc8 promotes the malignant progression of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guiyang; Yang, Dalei; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Xiupeng; Xu, Hongtao; Miao, Yuan; Wang, Enhua; Zhang, Yong

    2015-10-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy worldwide, and the survival rates have remained low in spite of medical advancements. More research is dedicated to the identification of novel biomarkers for this deadly disease. The association between ARMc8 and ovarian cancer remained unraveled. In this study, immunohistochemical staining was used to examine ARMc8 expression in 247 cases of ovarian cancer, 19 cases of borderline ovarian tumors, 41 cases of benign ovarian tumors, and 9 cases of normal ovarian tissues. It was shown that ARMc8 was predominantly located in the cytoplasm of tumor cells, and its expression was up-regulated in the ovarian cancer (61.9%) and the borderline ovarian tumor tissues (57.9%), in comparison with the benign ovarian tumors (12.2%; P < .05) and the normal ovarian tissues (11.1%; P < .05). In ovarian cancer, ARMc8 expression was closely related to International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages (P = .002), histology grade (P < .001), lymph node metastasis (P = .008), and poor prognosis (P < .001). Univariate and multivariate Cox analyses revealed that ARMc8 expression was an independent prognostic factor for ovarian cancer (P = .039 and P = .005). In addition, ARMc8 could promote the invasion and migration of ovarian cancer cells. Overexpressing ARMc8 enhanced the invasion and metastasis capacity of ARMc8-low Cavo-3 cells (P < .001), whereas interfering ARMc8 significantly reduced cell invasion and metastasis in ARMc8-high SK-OV-3 cells (P < .001). Furthermore, ARMc8 could up-regulate matrix metalloproteinase-7 and snail and down-regulate α-catenin, p120ctn, and E-cadherin. Collectively, ARMc8 may enhance the invasion and metastasis of ovarian cancer cells and likely to become a potential therapeutic target for ovarian cancer. PMID:26232863

  18. The role of surgery in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Cameán, María; Delgado-Sánchez, Elsa; Piñera, Antonio; Diestro, Maria Dolores; De Santiago, Javier; Zapardiel, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the standard management of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer is correct surgical staging and optimal tumour cytoreduction followed by platinum and taxane-based chemotherapy. Standard surgical staging consists of peritoneal washings, total hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, inspection of all abdominal organs and the peritoneal surface, biopsies of suspicious areas or randomised biopsies if they are not present, omentectomy and para-aortic lymphadenectomy. After this complete surgical staging, the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging system for ovarian cancer is applied to determine the management and prognosis of the patient. Complete tumour cytoreduction has shown an improvement in survival. There are some criteria to predict cytoreduction outcomes based on serum biomarkers levels, preoperative imaging techniques, and laparoscopic-based scores. Optimised patient selection for primary cytoreduction would determine patients who could benefit from an optimal cytoreduction and might benefit from interval surgery. The administration of intraperitoneal chemotherapy after debulking surgery has shown an increase in progression-free survival and overall survival, especially in patients with no residual disease after surgery. It is considered that 3–17% of all epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) occur in young women that have not fulfilled their reproductive desires. In these patients, fertility-sparing surgery is a worthy option in early ovarian cancer. PMID:27594911

  19. [Multiple cavitary pulmonary metastases from ovarian cancer: a case report].

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, S; Takechi, A; Kashiyama, T

    2001-06-01

    Cavitation in pulmonary metastases is thought to be uncommon. To date, few cases of pulmonary metastases originating from ovarian cancer and showing cavitation have been reported. We report a patient with multiple cavitation in pulmonary metastases from ovarian mucinous cystadenocarcinoma. A 28-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital presenting with cough and fever. The patient had undergone right ovariectomy for ovarian mucinous cystadenocarcinoma at the age of 23 years. Her chest radiograph on admission showed multiple cavities associated with infiltration in both lungs. Histological sections obtained by transbronchial lung biopsy revealed mucus-secreting adenocarcinoma, and a diagnosis of metastatic lung cancer from the ovary was made. Computed tomographic (CT) scans of the chest demonstrated various findings, including multiple thick-walled cavities, thin-walled cavities, air-space consolidations, ground glass opacities, and centrilobular nodular shadows formed by aspiration of the mucinous secretions. It is important to recognize that cavitation can occur in pulmonary metastases from ovarian cancer. PMID:11530393

  20. The role of surgery in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Martín-Cameán, María; Delgado-Sánchez, Elsa; Piñera, Antonio; Diestro, Maria Dolores; De Santiago, Javier; Zapardiel, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the standard management of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer is correct surgical staging and optimal tumour cytoreduction followed by platinum and taxane-based chemotherapy. Standard surgical staging consists of peritoneal washings, total hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, inspection of all abdominal organs and the peritoneal surface, biopsies of suspicious areas or randomised biopsies if they are not present, omentectomy and para-aortic lymphadenectomy. After this complete surgical staging, the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging system for ovarian cancer is applied to determine the management and prognosis of the patient. Complete tumour cytoreduction has shown an improvement in survival. There are some criteria to predict cytoreduction outcomes based on serum biomarkers levels, preoperative imaging techniques, and laparoscopic-based scores. Optimised patient selection for primary cytoreduction would determine patients who could benefit from an optimal cytoreduction and might benefit from interval surgery. The administration of intraperitoneal chemotherapy after debulking surgery has shown an increase in progression-free survival and overall survival, especially in patients with no residual disease after surgery. It is considered that 3-17% of all epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) occur in young women that have not fulfilled their reproductive desires. In these patients, fertility-sparing surgery is a worthy option in early ovarian cancer. PMID:27594911

  1. GSTP1-1 in ovarian cyst fluid and disease outcome of patients with ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Kolwijck, Eva; Zusterzeel, Petra L M; Roelofs, Hennie M J; Hendriks, Jan C; Peters, Wilbert H M; Massuger, Leon F A G

    2009-08-01

    Detoxification enzymes, especially glutathione S-transferase P1-1 (GSTP1-1), have been implicated in resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy. We studied GSTP1-1 levels in ovarian cyst fluid (oCF), obtained during surgery before chemotherapy, of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer and clinical outcomes were correlated. GSTP1-1 was determined by ELISA in oCF of 56 patients with epithelial ovarian cancer and 109 noncancer controls (21 borderline and 88 benign ovarian tumors). Differences in median GSTP1-1 between clinicopathologic subgroups were studied using Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal Wallis tests. Differences in disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS) between groups were analyzed by applying Kaplan-Meyer estimates and log-rank tests. Univariate and multivariate analysis were done using Cox proportional hazard model. Significantly higher levels of GSTP1-1 were found in the oCF of malignant (median, 383; range, 10-32,695 ng/mL) compared with benign (median, 20; range, 0-1,128 ng/mL) ovarian tumors (P < 0.01). Significantly higher GSTP1-1 levels were found in patients with advanced International Federation of Gynaecologists and Obstetricians stage (P = 0.01), high-grade tumors (P = 0.44), and/or high levels of preoperative CA 125 (P = 0.01). Of patients who received chemotherapy (stage, >or=Ic; n = 30), high GSTP1-1 levels were significantly associated with a poor DFS and OS (log-rank P = 0.047 and P = 0.033, respectively). International Federation of Gynaecologists and Obstetricians stage was the only independent predictor for DFS. GSTP1-1 was the only independent predictor for OS. PMID:19661073

  2. YY1 modulates taxane response in epithelial ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Noriomi; Huang, Zhiqing; Baba, Tsukasa; Lee, Paula S.; Barnett, Jason C.; Mori, Seiichi; Chang, Jeffrey T.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Gusberg, Alison H.; Whitaker, Regina S.; Gray, JoeW.; Fujii, Shingo; Berchuck, Andrew; Murphy, Susan K.

    2008-10-10

    The results of this study show that a high YY1 gene signature (characterized by coordinate elevated expression of transcription factor YY1 and putative YY1 target genes) within serous epithelial ovarian cancers is associated with enhanced response to taxane-based chemotherapy and improved survival. If confirmed in a prospective study, these results have important implications for the potential future use of individualized therapy in treating patients with ovarian cancer. Identification of the YY1 gene signature profile within a tumor prior to initiation of chemotherapy may provide valuable information about the anticipated response of these tumors to taxane-based drugs, leading to better informed decisions regarding chemotherapeutic choice. Survival of ovarian cancer patients is largely dictated by their response to chemotherapy, which depends on underlying molecular features of the malignancy. We previously identified YIN YANG 1 (YY1) as a gene whose expression is positively correlated with ovarian cancer survival. Herein we investigated the mechanistic basis of this association. Epigenetic and genetic characteristics of YY1 in serous epithelial ovarian cancer (SEOC) were analyzed along with YY1 mRNA and protein. Patterns of gene expression in primary SEOC and in the NCI60 database were investigated using computational methods. YY1 function and modulation of chemotherapeutic response in vitro was studied using siRNA knockdown. Microarray analysis showed strong positive correlation between expression of YY1 and genes with YY1 and transcription factor E2F binding motifs in SEOC and in the NCI60 cancer cell lines. Clustering of microarray data for these genes revealed that high YY1/E2F3 activity positively correlates with survival of patients treated with the microtubule stabilizing drug paclitaxel. Increased sensitivity to taxanes, but not to DNA crosslinking platinum agents, was also characteristic of NCI60 cancer cell lines with a high YY1/E2F signature. YY1

  3. Contrary to Evidence, Some Doctors Recommend Ovarian Cancer Screening | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    One in three doctors believes that screening for ovarian cancer is effective, according to a recently published survey of practicing physicians, even though substantial evidence to the contrary exists. |

  4. [Dualistic classification of epithelial ovarian cancer: Is it clinically relevant?].

    PubMed

    Devouassoux-Shisheboran, Mojgan; Genestie, Catherine; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle

    2016-03-01

    Malignant epithelial tumors (carcinomas) are the most common ovarian cancers and the most lethal gynecological malignancies. Based on their heterogeneous morphology, a dualistic model of carcinogenesis was proposed in 2004. Type I carcinomas, composed of low grade serous, endometrioid, mucinous, clear cell carcinomas and malignant Brenner tumors, were distinct from type II carcinomas (high grade serous, undifferentiated carcinomas and carcinosarcomas). However, clinical studies failed to demonstrate the prognostic value of such a classification. The main reproach to this dualistic model was that it lumped together in type I tumors, heterogeneous lesions such as clear cell and mucinous carcinomas. Recent advances on molecular genetic alterations and precursor lesions favor the classification of ovarian carcinomas as five distinct diseases. The dualistic model of carcinogenesis in type I and II can finally be applied only to serous ovarian carcinomas (low grade and high grade). PMID:26853278

  5. Targeting TBP-Associated Factors in Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Jennifer R; Lovasco, Lindsay A; Vanderhyden, Barbara C; Freiman, Richard N

    2014-01-01

    As ovarian tumors progress, they undergo a process of dedifferentiation, allowing adaptive changes in growth and morphology that promote metastasis and chemoresistance. Herein, we outline a hypothesis that TATA-box binding protein associated factors (TAFs), which compose the RNA Polymerase II initiation factor, TFIID, contribute to regulation of dedifferentiation states in ovarian cancer. Numerous studies demonstrate that TAFs regulate differentiation and proliferation states; their expression is typically high in pluripotent cells and reduced upon differentiation. Strikingly, TAF2 exhibits copy number increases or mRNA overexpression in 73% of high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSC). At the biochemical level, TAF2 directs TFIID to TATA-less promoters by contact with an Initiator element, which may lead to the deregulation of the transcriptional output of these tumor cells. TAF4, which is altered in 66% of HGSC, is crucial for the stability of the TFIID complex and helps drive dedifferentiation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts to induced pluripotent stem cells. Its ovary-enriched paralog, TAF4B, is altered in 26% of HGSC. Here, we show that TAF4B mRNA correlates with Cyclin D2 mRNA expression in human granulosa cell tumors. TAF4B may also contribute to regulation of tumor microenvironment due to its estrogen-responsiveness and ability to act as a cofactor for NFκB. Conversely, TAF9, a cofactor for p53 in regulating apoptosis, may act as a tumor suppressor in ovarian cancer, since it is downregulated or deleted in 98% of HGSC. We conclude that a greater understanding of mechanisms of transcriptional regulation that execute signals from oncogenic signaling cascades is needed in order to expand our understanding of the etiology and progression of ovarian cancer, and most importantly to identify novel targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24653979

  6. Prophylactic Oophorectomy: Reducing the U.S. Death Rate from Epithelial Ovarian Cancer. A Continuing Debate.

    PubMed

    Piver

    1996-01-01

    If instead of the title "Prophylactic Oophorectomy: Reducing the U.S. Death Rate from Epithelial Ovarian Cancer," the title were "Drug X Reducing the U.S. Death Rate from Epithelial Ovarian Cancer," there would be great media and medical attention worldwide to such a report. Correctly so. Regrettably, there probably is no new Drug X in the foreseeable future that will significantly reduce the death rate from ovarian cancer, be it Taxol®, taxotere, topotecan, gemcitabine, or liposomal doxorubicin-although each may result in significant responses and some prolongation of median survival. Epithelial ovarian cancer is a much more complex disease than anyone envisioned, when it was believed that extensive debulking surgery and the newest cytotoxic chemotherapy would radically reduce the death rate from ovarian cancer in the United States. Over 20 years after the first patient was treated with cisplatin for epithelial ovarian cancer, the annual death rate from ovarian cancer continued to increase. Just in the past decade, the number of women in the United States dying from ovarian cancer has increased 18% (Fig. 1) [1]. Although ovarian cancer is estimated to account for 26,700 cases and 14,800 deaths in 1996, it is a low-prevalence disease in comparison with breast cancer, which in 1996 is estimated to account for 185,700 cases and 44,560 deaths. Inexplicably, similar to breast cancer, the lifetime risk for ovarian cancer in the United States continues to increase. The most recent Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) calculations of lifetime risk for ovarian cancer are that 1 in 55 women will develop ovarian cancer over their lifetime, or 1.8%, up from the 1970 figures of 1 in 70, or 1.4% [2]. The 1.8% baseline lifetime risk for the general population is used to estimate the lifetime risk of known ovarian cancer risk factors (Table 1). Even utilizing what are now believed to be two of the most effective cytotoxic drugs against stage III and IV epithelial

  7. Transferrin facilitates the formation of DNA double-strand breaks via transferrin receptor 1: the possible involvement of transferrin in carcinogenesis of high-grade serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Shigeta, S; Toyoshima, M; Kitatani, K; Ishibashi, M; Usui, T; Yaegashi, N

    2016-07-01

    Fallopian tubal epithelium is a candidate for the origin of high-grade serous ovarian cancer. Transferrin-containing follicular fluid and/or retrograde menstrual blood are possible risk factors for carcinogenesis. Accumulation of DNA double-strand breaks (DNA-DSBs) in the fallopian tubal epithelium is considered to play an important role in the development of cancer. However, the mechanisms by which DNA-DSBs accumulate have not yet been fully elucidated. The hydroxyl radical, which is produced in a Fenton reaction catalyzed by an iron ion, serves as a potent DNA-DSB-inducing molecule, raising the potential of an iron ion transporter of transferrin in the formation of DNA-DSBs. We studied the potential involvement of transferrin in DNA damage and the development of ovarian cancer. Treatment with transferrin facilitated the formation of histone 2AX phosphorylated at Serine 139 (γH2AX), which is known as a DNA-DSB marker, in human fallopian tube secretory epithelial cells and A2780 ovarian cancer cells. Knockdown of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1), but not transferrin receptor 2, suppressed the transferrin uptake and consequent formation of γH2AX. As hydroxyl radicals in reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in DNA-DSBs, the formation of ROS was determined. Treatment with TfR1-specific small interference RNAs significantly diminished transferrin-induced formation of ROS. Moreover, TfR1-dependent uptake of transferrin was revealed to augment the formation of DNA-DSBs in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, which served as a substrate for the Fenton reaction. An ex vivo study with murine fallopian tubes further demonstrated that transferrin treatment introduced DNA-DSBs in the fallopian tubal epithelium. Collectively, these data suggested that the transferrin-TfR1 axis accounts for the induction of DNA-DSBs that potentially lead to DNA damage/genome instability. These findings also suggested that exposure to transferrin initiates and promotes the development of

  8. High Potency of a Novel Resveratrol Derivative, 3,3',4,4'-Tetrahydroxy-trans-stilbene, against Ovarian Cancer Is Associated with an Oxidative Stress-Mediated Imbalance between DNA Damage Accumulation and Repair.

    PubMed

    Mikuła-Pietrasik, Justyna; Sosińska, Patrycja; Murias, Marek; Wierzchowski, Marcin; Brewińska-Olchowik, Marta; Piwocka, Katarzyna; Szpurek, Dariusz; Książek, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    We explored the effect of a new resveratrol (RVT) derivative, 3,3',4,4'-tetrahydroxy-trans-stilbene (3,3',4,4'-THS), on viability, apoptosis, proliferation, and senescence of three representative lines of ovarian cancer cells, that is, A2780, OVCAR-3, and SKOV-3, in vitro. In addition, the mechanistic aspects of 3,3',4,4'-THS activity, including cell redox homeostasis (the production of reactive oxygen species, activity of enzymatic antioxidants, and magnitude of DNA damage accumulation and repair), and the activity of caspases (3, 8, and 9) and p38 MAPK were examined. The study showed that 3,3',4,4'-THS affects cancer cell viability much more efficiently than its parent drug. This effect coincided with increased generation of reactive oxygen species, downregulated activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase, and excessive accumulation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and its insufficient repair due to decreased expression of DNA glycosylase I. Cytotoxicity elicited by 3,3',4,4'-THS was related to increased incidence of apoptosis, which was mediated by caspases 3 and 9. Moreover, 3,3',4,4'-THS inhibited cancer cell proliferation and accelerated senescence, which was accompanied by the activation of p38 MAPK. Collectively, our findings indicate that 3,3',4,4'-THS may constitute a valuable tool in the fight against ovarian malignancy and that the anticancer capabilities of this stilbene proceed in an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism. PMID:26229578

  9. Perineal talc use and ovarian cancer: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Muscat, Joshua E; Huncharek, Michael S

    2008-04-01

    Talc, like asbestos, is a silicate that has been studied in relation to cancer risk. Several studies conducted over the past 25 years found an association between perineal talc powders and ovarian cancer. The summary relative risk is about 1.3 (95% confidence intervals 1.2-1.5) and these data have been interpreted as supporting a causal role. In this review article, we discuss the chemical and morphological features of talc and asbestos, and explain why despite their similar chemical classification talc does not possess asbestos-like carcinogenic properties. The heterogeneity in the perineal dusting studies has raised important concerns over the validity of the exposure measurements, and the lack of a consistent dose-response effect limits making causal inferences. Perhaps more importantly, whereas it is unknown whether external talc dust enters the female reproductive tract, measures of internal talc exposure such as talc-dusted diaphragms and latex condoms show no relationship with ovarian cancer risk. In addition, the therapeutic use of high dose cosmetic grade talc for pleurodesis has not been shown to cause cancer in patients receiving these treatment modalities. Talc is not genotoxic. Mechanistic, pathology and animal model studies have not found evidence for a carcinogenic effect. In summary, these data collectively do not indicate that cosmetic talc causes ovarian cancer. PMID:18287871

  10. Zinc is a potential therapeutic for chemoresistant ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Bastow, Max; Kriedt, Christopher L; Baldassare, Joseph; Shah, Maulik; Klein, Claudette

    2011-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecological cancer. The high mortality rate reflets the lack of early diagnosis and limited treatment alternatives. We have observed a number of properties of zinc cytotoxicity that make it attractive from a therapeutic standpoint. Using SKOV3 and ES2 cells, ovarian cancer cell lines that demonstrate varied degrees of resistance to known therapeutics, we show that zinc killing is time and concentration dependent. Death is preceded by distinct changes in cell shape and size. The effects of zinc are additive with cisplatin or doxorubicin, whose morphological effects are distinct from those of zinc. Cytotoxicity of paclitaxel is minimal, making it difficult to determine additivity with zinc. Paclitaxel results in changes in cell shape and size similar to those of zinc but has different effects on cell cycle progression and cyclin expression. The data indicate that the means by which zinc kills ovarian cancer cells is distinct from currently used chemotherapeutics. Based on the properties reported here, zinc has the potential to be developed as either a primary treatment or as a second line of defense against cancers that have developed resistance to currently used chemotherapeutics. PMID:22070048

  11. Perineal Talc Use and Ovarian Cancer: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Muscat, Joshua E.; Huncharek, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Talc, like asbestos, is a silicate that has been studied in relation to cancer risk. Several studies conducted over the past 25 years found an association between perineal talc powders and ovarian cancer. The summary relative risk is about 1.3 (95 percent confidence intervals 1.2–1.5) and these data have been interpreted as supporting a causal role. In this review article, we discuss the chemical and morphological features of talc and asbestos, and explain why despite their similar chemical classification talc does not possess asbestos like carcinogenic properties. The heterogeneity in the perineal dusting studies has raised important concerns over the validity of the exposure measurements, and the lack of a consistent dose-response effect limits making causal inferences. Perhaps more importantly, whereas it is unknown whether external talc dust enters the female reproductive tract, measures of internal talc exposure such as talc-dusted diaphragms and latex condoms show no relationship with ovarian cancer risk. In addition, the therapeutic use of high dose cosmetic grade talc for pleurodesis has not been shown to cause cancer in patients receiving these treatment modalities. Talc is not genotoxic. Mechanistic, pathology and animal model studies have not found evidence for a carcinogenic effect. In summary, these data collectively do not indicate that cosmetic talc causes ovarian cancer. PMID:18287871

  12. Development of Nanoscale Approaches for Ovarian Cancer Therapeutics and Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Engelberth, Sarah A.; Hempel, Nadine; Bergkvist, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the deadliest of all gynecological cancers and the fifth leading cause of death due to cancer in women. This is largely due to late-stage diagnosis, poor prognosis related to advanced-stage disease, and the high recurrence rate associated with development of chemoresistance. Survival statistics have not improved significantly over the last three decades, highlighting the fact that improved therapeutic strategies and early detection require substantial improvements. Here, we review and highlight nanotechnology-based approaches that seek to address this need. The success of Doxil, a PEGylated liposomal nanoencapsulation of doxorubicin, which was approved by the FDA for use on recurrent ovarian cancer, has paved the way for the current wave of nanoparticle formulations in drug discovery and clinical trials. We discuss and summarize new nanoformulations that are currently moving into clinical trials and highlight novel nanotherapeutic strategies that have shown promising results in preclinical in vivo studies. Further, the potential for nanomaterials in diagnostic imaging techniques and the ability to leverage nanotechnology for early detection of ovarian cancer are also discussed. PMID:25271436

  13. TRPM7 is required for ovarian cancer cell growth, migration and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Liao, Qian-jin; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Hui; Luo, Chen-hui; Tang, Jie; Wang, Ying; Tang, Yan; Zhao, Min; Zhao, Xue-heng; Zhang, Qiong-yu; Xiao, Ling

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Silence of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer cells inhibits cell proliferation, migration and invasion. • Silence of TRPM7 decreases phosphorylation levels of Akt, Src and p38 in ovarian cancer cells. • Silence of TRPM7 increases expression of filamentous actin and number of focal adhesions in ovarian cancer cells. - Abstract: Our previous study demonstrated that the melastatin-related transient receptor potential channel 7 (TRPM7) was highly expressed in ovarian carcinomas and its overexpression was significantly associated with poor prognosis in ovarian cancer patients. However, the function of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer is mostly unknown. In this study, we examined the roles of TRPM7 in ovarian cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion. We found that short hairpin RNA interference-mediated silence of TRPM7 significantly inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in multiple ovarian cancer cell lines. Mechanistic investigation revealed that silence of TRPM7 decreased phosphorylation levels of Akt, Src and p38 and increased filamentous actin and focal adhesion number in ovarian cancer cells. Thus, our results suggest that TRPM7 is required for proliferation, migration and invasion of ovarian cancer cells through regulating multiple signaling transduction pathways and the formation of focal adhesions.

  14. Erlotinib Plus Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Ovarian Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-29

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  15. Markers of Angiogenesis in Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Merritt, William M.; Sood, Anil K.

    2007-01-01

    Tumor development and progression are inherently dependent on the process of angiogenesis. Recently, anti-angiogenic therapy has started to show promise as an effective treatment strategy in many solid tumors including ovarian carcinoma. Unfortunately, lack of effective biomarkers presents a challenge for oncologists in treatment planning as well as monitoring response of new anti-vascular agents. Previously, quantification of angiogenesis by microvessel density analysis provided useful prognostic information, however, its utility following anti-angiogenic therapy remains to be determined. Moreover, since secreted cytokines play an active part in angiogenesis by mediating neovascularization in tumors, investigations have focused on their potential role to serve as candidate biomarkers of disease detection, prognosis, and treatment response. In this article, we review the role of key angiogenesis markers as potential biomarkers in ovarian carcinoma. PMID:18057525

  16. Diet and Physical Activity Change or Usual Care in Improving Progression-Free Survival in Patients With Previously Treated Stage II, III, or IV Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  17. YY1 modulates taxane response in epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Noriomi; Huang, Zhiqing; Baba, Tsukasa; Lee, Paula S.; Barnett, Jason C.; Mori, Seiichi; Chang, Jeffrey T.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Gusberg, Alison H.; Whitaker, Regina S.; Gray, Joe W.; Fujii, Shingo; Berchuck, Andrew; Murphy, Susan K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Survival of ovarian cancer patients is largely dictated by their response to chemotherapy, which depends on underlying molecular features of the malignancy. We previously identified YIN YANG 1 (YY1) as a gene whose expression is positively correlated with ovarian cancer survival. Herein we investigated the mechanistic basis of this association. Experimental design Epigenetic and genetic characteristics of YY1 in serous epithelial ovarian cancer (SEOC) were analyzed along with YY1 mRNA and protein. Patterns of gene expression in primary SEOC and in the NCI60 database were investigated using computational methods. YY1 function and modulation of chemotherapeutic response in vitro was studied using siRNA knockdown. Results Microarray analysis showed strong positive correlation between expression of YY1 and genes with YY1 and transcription factor E2F binding motifs in SEOC and in the NCI60 cancer cell lines. Clustering of microarray data for these genes revealed that high YY1/E2F3 activity positively correlates with survival of patients treated with the microtubule stabilizing drug paclitaxel. Increased sensitivity to taxanes, but not to DNA crosslinking platinum agents, was also characteristic of NCI60 cancer cell lines with a high YY1/E2F signature. YY1 knockdown in ovarian cancer cell lines results in inhibition of anchorage-independent growth, motility and proliferation, but also increases resistance to taxanes, with no effect on cisplatin sensitivity. Conclusions These results, together with the prior demonstration of augmentation of microtubule-related genes by E2F3, suggest that enhanced taxane sensitivity in tumors with high YY1/E2F activity may be mediated by modulation of putative target genes with microtubule function. PMID:19208743

  18. Does ovarian stimulation for IVF increase gynaecological cancer risk? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Li, Yanping; Zhang, Qiong; Wang, Yonggang

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether ovarian stimulation for IVF increases the risk of gynaecological cancer, including ovarian, endometrial, cervical and breast cancers, as an independent risk factor. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted. Clinical trials that examined the association between ovarian stimulation for IVF and gynaecologic cancers were included. The outcomes of interest were incidence rate of gynaecologic cancers. Twelve cohort studies with 178,396 women exposed to IVF were included; 10 studies were used to analyse ovarian (167,640 women) and breast (151,702 women) cancers, and six studies were identified in the analysis of endometrial (116,672 women) and cervical cancer (114,799 women). Among these studies, 175 ovarian, 48 endometrial, 502 cervical and 866 cases of breast cancer were reported. The meta-analysis found no significant association between ovarian stimulation for IVF and increased ovarian, endometrial, cervical and breast cancer risk (odds ratio [OR] 1.06, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.85 to 1.32; OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.58 to 1.63; OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.60; OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.63 to 0.76, respectively). Ovarian stimulation for IVF, therefore, does not increase the gynaecologic cancer risk, whether hormone-dependent endometrial and breast cancer or non-hormone-dependent ovarian and cervical cancer. PMID:26003452

  19. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-18

    Fallopian Tube Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Transitional Cell Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Serous Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  20. Association between invasive ovarian cancer susceptibility and 11 best candidate SNPs from breast cancer genome-wide association study

    PubMed Central

    Song, Honglin; Ramus, Susan J.; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; DiCioccio, Richard A.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Hogdall, Estrid; Whittemore, Alice S.; McGuire, Valerie; Hogdall, Claus; Blaakaer, Jan; Wu, Anna H.; Van Den Berg, David J.; Stram, Daniel O.; Menon, Usha; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Jacobs, Ian J.; Webb, Penny M.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Rossing, Mary Anne; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Goodman, Marc T.; Lurie, Galina; Thompson, Pamela J.; Carney, Michael E.; Ness, Roberta B.; Moysich, Kirsten; Goode, Ellen L.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Anderson, Stephanie; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Berchuck, Andrew; Iversen, Edwin S.; Moorman, Patricia G.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chanock, Stephen; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Brewster, Wendy R.; Ponder, Bruce A.J.; Easton, Douglas F.; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.

    2009-01-01

    Because both ovarian and breast cancer are hormone-related and are known to have some predisposition genes in common, we evaluated 11 of the most significant hits (six with confirmed associations with breast cancer) from the breast cancer genome-wide association study for association with invasive ovarian cancer. Eleven SNPs were initially genotyped in 2927 invasive ovarian cancer cases and 4143 controls from six ovarian cancer case–control studies. Genotype frequencies in cases and controls were compared using a likelihood ratio test in a logistic regression model stratified by study. Initially, three SNPs (rs2107425 in MRPL23, rs7313833 in PTHLH, rs3803662 in TNRC9) were weakly associated with ovarian cancer risk and one SNP (rs4954956 in NXPH2) was associated with serous ovarian cancer in non-Hispanic white subjects (P-trend < 0.1). These four SNPs were then genotyped in an additional 4060 cases and 6308 controls from eight independent studies. Only rs4954956 was significantly associated with ovarian cancer risk both in the replication study and in combined analyses. This association was stronger for the serous histological subtype [per minor allele odds ratio (OR) 1.07 95% CI 1.01–1.13, P-trend = 0.02 for all types of ovarian cancer and OR 1.14 95% CI 1.07–1.22, P-trend = 0.00017 for serous ovarian cancer]. In conclusion, we found that rs4954956 was associated with increased ovarian cancer risk, particularly for serous ovarian cancer. However, none of the six confirmed breast cancer susceptibility variants we tested was associated with ovarian cancer risk. Further work will be needed to identify the causal variant associated with rs4954956 or elucidate its function. PMID:19304784

  1. The immunomodulating roles of glycoproteins in epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patankar, Manish S.; Gubbels, Jennifer A.A.; Felder, Mildred; Connor, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    The complexity of the immune system demands an intricate defense mechanism by tumors. Ovarian and other tumors employ specific glycoproteins and the associated glycan sequences to modulate immune responses. Glycoproteins enable tumor cells that express or secrete these molecules to evade immune cell attack and induce the immune system to promote tumor growth. This review focuses first on the immune environment in ovarian cancer, and the mechanisms of activation and inhibition that immune cells undergo in order to either attack or ignore a target cell. Next we illustrate the immunomodulatory roles of ovarian cancer-associated glycans and glycoproteins in 1. preventing immune synapse formation, 2. serving as ligands of immune cell receptors, 3. scavenging cytokines and chemokines, and 4. participating in the formation of autoantibodies against the tumor. The importance of these immunomodulating strategies from the view points of understanding the tumor immunology of ovarian tumors, potential origin of such mechanisms, and specific strategies to circumvent the glycoconjugate-mediated suppression of immune responses is discussed in this review. PMID:22201900

  2. Carboplatin, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Mifepristone in Treating Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer or Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-31

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  3. Fertility preservation with ovarian stimulation protocols prior to cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Kasum, Miro; Šimunić, Velimir; Orešković, Slavko; Beketić-Orešković, Lidija

    2014-03-01

    An increasing trend towards later childbearing has been reported recently in many developed countries. Although the incidence of reproductive age in women who have delayed pregnancy with cancer is 10%, they may be concerned regarding the preservation of ovarian function due to advanced fertile age and with the impact of cancer treatment on later fertility. Among multiple strategies controlled, ovarian stimulation for embryo or oocyte cryopreservation is currently the most established method for fertility preservation. It is important to choose the appropriate ovulation induction protocol prior to oncologic treatment, because most of these patients have only the chance of a single cycle to conceive. Current treatment protocols offer a minimal time delay until oncologic treatment is commenced. In urgent settings, random-start ovarian stimulation represents a new technique which provides a significant advantage by decreasing the total time of the treatment, because it may be started irrespective of the phase of the cycle without compromising oocyte yield and maturity before cancer treatment. However, in patients with oestrogen-sensitive cancers stimulation, protocols using letrozole are currently preferred over tamoxifen regimens, and therefore, it may be highly advisable to use letrozole with gonadotrophins routinely as a safe, effective and novel protocol of ovulation induction. PMID:24256369

  4. Possible angiogenic roles for claudin-4 in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianghong; Chigurupati, Srinivasulu; Agarwal, Rachana; Mughal, Mohamed R.; Mattson, Mark P.; Becker, Kevin G.; Wood, William H.; Zhang, Yongqing; Morin, Patrice J.

    2009-01-01

    Claudin proteins are frequently overexpressed in various tumors such as breast, prostate and ovarian cancer. While their functions in cancer have not been completely elucidated, roles in survival, adhesion, and invasion have been suggested. In order to clarify the roles of claudins in ovarian cancer, we have performed gene expression profiling of ovarian surface epithelial cells overexpressing claudin-4 and compared the expression patterns to the parental, non-expressing cells. Claudin-4 expression leads to the differential expression of several genes, including many that have previously been implicated in angiogenesis. In particular, angiogenic cytokines, such as IL-8, were found elevated while genes of the angiostatic interferon pathway were found down-regulated. In vitro assays show that claudin-4-expressing cells produce factors that can stimulate angiogenesis as measured by tube formation and migration in HUVEC cells. In addition, an in vivo mouse dorsal skinfold assay confirms that cells expressing claudin-4 secrete factors that can mediate angiogenesis in the dorsal skin of mice. Our data suggest a novel function for claudin-4 in cancer and provide an additional rationale for its common overexpression in human tumors. PMID:19657234

  5. Sirolimus and Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-25

    Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  6. Expression of IL-10 in human normal and cancerous ovarian tissues and cells.

    PubMed

    Rabinovich, Alex; Medina, Liat; Piura, Benjamin; Huleihel, Mahmoud

    2010-06-01

    IL-10 is an 18-kd polypeptide that has been shown to be secreted by multiple cell types, including T and B cells, monocytes and some human tumors. However, which cell population is responsible for the elevated IL-10 levels in the serum and ascites of ovarian cancer patients, whether ovarian carcinoma cells produce IL-10, and how IL-10 influences the development and progression of ovarian carcinoma are issues that remain unclear. The aim of our study was to examine IL-10 production and secretion by ovarian carcinoma tissues and cells, and to determine its possible role in the cell and tumor micro-environment. The mean IL-10 protein levels expressed in normal ovarian tissue homogenates were significantly higher compared to cancerous ovarian tissue (p = 0.002). Yet, the IL-10 mRNA expression was significantly higher in cancerous ovarian tissues as compared to normal tissues (p = 0.021). The IL-10 receptor mRNA expression levels of the cancerous ovarian tissue homogenates were slightly, but not significantly, higher than the normal tissues. IL-10 immunostaining revealed that in both normal and cancerous ovarian tissues, IL-10 expression could be detected mainly in epithelial cells. In normal ovarian tissues, similar levels of IL-10R were demonstrated in epithelial and stromal cells. However, in cancerous ovarian tissues, epithelial cells expressed higher levels of IL-10R than the stroma. Primary normal and cancerous ovarian cell cultures and SKOV-3 cells secreted similar amounts of IL-10 after 24 hours of incubation. Our results suggest that epithelial cells are the main source of IL-10 in the ovary. Nevertheless, the target cells for IL-10 are different in normal and cancerous ovarian cells. Thus, IL-10 and its receptor could be involved in the pathogenesis of ovarian carcinoma. PMID:20430716

  7. The immunobiology and immunotherapy of ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bookman, M.A.; Bast, R.C. Jr. )

    1991-06-01

    Small volume residual peritoneal disease in patients undergoing therapy for ovarian carcinoma remains an attractive, but elusive, target for immunobiological therapy. Hypothetical advantages and disadvantages of regional peritoneal therapy are being better defined through increased clinical experience and more sophisticated animal models. Developments in cytokine biology, adoptive cellular therapy, monoclonal antibody conjugation, and molecular biology continue to provide an exciting, and nearly overwhelming, array of reagents for clinical evaluation. Ongoing and anticipated investigational trials should provide intriguing data in years to follow.198 references.

  8. ESR1/SYNE1 polymorphism and invasive epithelial ovarian cancer risk: an Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium study

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Jennifer A.; Rossing, Mary Anne; Cushing-Haugen, Kara L.; Chen, Chu; Van Den Berg, David J.; Wu, Anna H.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Ness, Roberta B.; Moysich, Kirsten; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Webb, Penelope M.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Goodman, Marc T.; Lurie, Galina; Thompson, Pamela J.; Carney, Michael E.; Hogdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Hogdall, Claus; Goode, Ellen L.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Berchuck, Andrew; Moorman, Patricia G.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Palmieri, Rachel T.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Yang, Hannah P.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Chanock, Stephen; Lissowska, Jolanta; Song, Honglin; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Shah, Mitul; Perkins, Barbara; McGuire, Valerie; Whittemore, Alice S.; Di Cioccio, Richard A.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Gayther, Simon A.; Ramus, Susan J.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Brewster, Wendy; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Pearce, Celeste Leigh

    2010-01-01

    We genotyped 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the estrogen receptor alpha gene (ESR1) region in three population-based case-control studies of epithelial ovarian cancer conducted in the United States, comprising a total of 1,128 and 1,866 non-Hispanic white invasive cases and controls, respectively. A SNP 19 kb downstream of ESR1 (rs2295190, G-to-T change) was associated with invasive ovarian cancer risk, with a per-T-allele odds ratio (OR) of 1.24 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.06–1.44, p=0.006). rs2295190 is a non-synonymous coding SNP in a neighboring gene called spectrin repeat containing, nuclear envelope 1 (SYNE1) which is involved in nuclear organization and structural integrity, function of the Golgi apparatus, and cytokinesis. An isoform encoded by SYNE1 has been reported to be downregulated in ovarian and other cancers. rs2295190 was genotyped in an additional 12 studies through the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium, with 5,279 invasive epithelial cases and 7,450 controls. The per-T-allele OR for this 12-study set was 1.09 (95% CI, 1.02–1.17, p=0.017). Results for the serous subtype in the 15 combined studies were similar to those overall (n=3,545; OR=1.09, 95% CI, 1.01–1.18, p=0.025), and our findings were strongest for the mucinous subtype (n=447; OR=1.32, 95% CI, 1.11–1.58, p=0.002). No association was observed for the endometrioid subtype. In an additional analysis of 1,459 borderline ovarian cancer cases and 7,370 controls, rs2295190 was not associated with risk. These data provide suggestive evidence that the rs2295190 T allele, or another allele in linkage disequilibrium with it, may be associated with increased risk of invasive ovarian cancer. PMID:20056644

  9. Methylseleninic acid sensitizes Notch3-activated OVCA429 ovarian cancer cells to carboplatin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ovarian cancer, the deadliest of gynecologic cancers, is usually diagnosed at advanced stage due to invalidated screening test and non-specific symptoms presented. Although carboplatin has been popular for treating ovarian cancer for decades, patients eventually develop resistance to this platinum-c...

  10. Epidemiology and etiology of ovarian cancer: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Heintz, A.P.; Hacker, N.F.; Lagasse, L.D.

    1985-07-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most frequent cause of death from gynecologic malignancies in the western world. Much effort has been put into attempts to correlate differences in incidence rates with environmental, endocrinologic, and genetic factors. A review of the literature reveals that there is currently no evidence to incriminate any single etiologic factor for this group of tumors. There is growing evidence of familial predisposition in a small group of patients and of a relationship with reproductive history. If current knowledge of the epidemiology of ovarian cancer is to be translated into disease prevention, more attention should be paid to women at risk because of their family history, and more awareness should be made of the protective effect of oral contraceptives. 79 references.

  11. Dermatomyositis as a paraneoplastic phenomenon in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Ilyas; Barton, Desmond

    2016-01-01

    A 60-year-old woman diagnosed with papillary serous ovarian cancer had Klean-Prep and MRI contrast preoperatively. Afterwards, she developed swelling and an urticarial rash around her eye as she proceeded to have planned debulking surgery. Postoperatively the swelling and rash had spread over her face, neck, back and chest. Dermatology advised a possible allergy to Klean-Prep and MRI contrast. Subsequently over the next few months, the patient became severely debilitated from proximal myopathy of the upper and lower limbs, suffered severe pain restricting mobility and small bowel obstruction. Medical oncologist reviewed the patient, clinically diagnosed dermatomyositis and initiated treatment with high-dose intravenous steroids, resulting in remission of the patient's condition. The main purpose of this study is to describe the severity, diagnostic challenges and underline the clinical significance of dermatomyositis manifestations as a paraneoplastic effect in patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:27402586

  12. Ovarian Cancer During Pregnancy: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hummeida, Moawia E; Hamad, Kamal; Gadir, Abdel Fatah Abdel; Ali, AbdelAziem A

    2015-04-24

    Ovarian cancer during pregnancy is a rare event. Little is known about the treatment of this condition due to lack of prospective randomized trials and cohort studies. In this paper the authors reported a rare case of small cells ovarian cancer, diagnosed at 16 weeks of gestation, treated with conservative surgery at 18 weeks and chemotherapy. At week 38, the patient underwent caesarean section and delivered a healthy baby girl. Staging surgery was then carried out followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. Thus the findings from this case concluded that prognosis and quality of the patient's life should be a priority, chemotherapy during the second trimester seems to be safe however, potential risks of this interventions still has to be considered. PMID:26236450

  13. New ways to successfully target tumor vasculature in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoyun; Shen, Fangrong; Hu, Wei; Coleman, Robert L.; Sood, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review The aim of this paper was to review the recent literature on potential therapeutic strategies for overcoming resistance to anti-VEGF drugs in ovarian cancer. Recent findings Although clinical benefits of anti-VEGF therapy were observed in ovarian cancer treatment trials, this use yielded only modest improvement in progression-free survival, and with the exception of cediranib no effect on overall survival. Adaptive resistance and escape from anti-angiogenesis therapy is likely a multifactorial process, including induction of hypoxia, vascular modulators and the immune response. New drugs targeting the tumor vasculature or other components of the surrounding microenvironment have shown promising results. Summary When to start and end antiangiogenesis therapy and the choice of optimal treatment combinations remain controversial. Further evaluation of personalized novel angiogenesis-based therapy is warranted. Defining the critical interaction of these agents and pathways and the appropriate predictive markers will become an increasingly important objective for effective treatment. PMID:25502429

  14. [Ultrasound semiotics in recurrent ovarian cancer after optimal cytoreductive surgery].

    PubMed

    Baklanova, N S; Kolomiets, L A; Frolova, I G; Viatkina, N V; Krasil'nikov, S É

    2014-01-01

    Features of ultrasound picture of morphologically verified recurrence of ovarian cancer in 21 patients are presented, who received combined treatment including cytoreductive surgery in the form of hysterectomy with oophorectomy, resection of the greater omentum and 6 courses of chemotherapy CAP for ovarian cancer stage III (FIGO). In all patients cytoreductive surgery was optimal--without residual tumor. Recurrence of the disease was detected in 12-48 months in 80.9% of the cases. Three variants of recurrence was revealed by ultrasonography: isolated peritoneal dissemination, in 14.2% of the cases, which was mainly detected during the first 12 months; single entities in the projection of the small pelvis (61.9%) and mixed form (local lesions of small pelvis and peritoneal dissemination) in 23.8% of the cases. PMID:25033684

  15. Distinct prognostic values of four-Notch-receptor mRNA expression in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xinling; Teng, Lingling; Wang, Min

    2016-05-01

    Notch signaling pathway includes ligands and Notch receptors, which are frequently deregulated in several human malignancies including ovarian cancer. Aberrant activation of Notch signaling has been linked to ovarian carcinogenesis and progression. In the current study, we used the "Kaplan-Meier plotter" (KM plotter) database, in which updated gene expression data and survival information from a total of 1306 ovarian cancer patients were used to access the prognostic value of four Notch receptors in ovarian cancer patients. Hazard ratio (HR), 95 % confidence intervals, and log-rank P were calculated. Notch1 messenger RNA (mRNA) high expression was not found to be correlated to overall survival (OS) for all ovarian cancer, as well as in serous and endometrioid cancer patients followed for 20 years. However, Notch1 mRNA high expression is significantly associated with worsen OS in TP53 wild-type ovarian cancer patients, while it is significantly associated with better OS in TP53 mutation-type ovarian cancer patients. Notch2 mRNA high expression was found to be significantly correlated to worsen OS for all ovarian cancer patients, as well as in grade II ovarian cancer patients. Notch3 mRNA high expression was found to be significantly correlated to better OS for all ovarian cancer patients, but not in serous cancer patients and endometrioid cancer patients. Notch4 mRNA high expression was not found to be significantly correlated to OS for all ovarian cancer patients, serous cancer patients, and endometrioid cancer patients. These results indicate that there are distinct prognostic values of four Notch receptors in ovarian cancer. This information will be useful for better understanding of the heterogeneity and complexity in the molecular biology of ovarian cancer and for developing tools to more accurately predict their prognosis. Based on our results, Notch1 could be a potential drug target of TP53 wild-type ovarian cancer and Notch2 could be a potential drug

  16. Vaccine Therapy and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Breast or Stage II-IV Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-07

    Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer

  17. Nek6 and Hif-1α cooperate with the cytoskeletal gateway of drug resistance to drive outcome in serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Donato, Marta De; Fanelli, Mara; Mariani, Marisa; Raspaglio, Giuseppina; Pandya, Deep; He, Shiquan; Fiedler, Paul; Petrillo, Marco; Scambia, Giovanni; Ferlini, Cristiano

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia selects the most aggressive and drug-resistant clones in solid malignancies. One of the pivotal transcription factors induced by hypoxia is Hif-1α. However, in serous ovarian cancer (SEOC), Hif-1α expression is not a prognostic biomarker. This study aims to assess the hypothesis that the serine-threonine kinase Nek6 functions as a downstream effector cooperating with Hif-1α in driving ovarian cancer aggressiveness. Nek6 was overexpressed and Hif-1α was silenced in A2780 cells. Nek6 was also stably silenced in Hey cells. The dependence of Nek6 expression on Hif-1α was assayed as a function of hypoxic growth conditions. Nek6 interaction with the cytoskeletal gateway of drug resistance was investigated with far western blot. The co-expression of NEK6, HIF1A, TUBB3 and GBP1 transcripts was quantified with qPCR in two cohorts of SEOC patients (346 locally treated patients and 344 from the TCGA dataset). Nek6 expression is induced by hypoxia in a Hif-1α dependent fashion. Nek6 directly interacts with GBP-1, thus being a component of the cytoskeletal gateway of drug resistance. Nek6 overexpression increases and silencing decreases the anchorage-independent growth of cultured cells. In SEOC patients, NEK6 expression is significantly correlated with HIF1A. Co-expression of NEK6, HIF1A, TUBB3 and GBP1 transcripts identifies a subset of SEOC patients characterized by poor outcome and drug resistance. This study demonstrates the functional relevance of Nek6 in the context of the adaptive response to hypoxia in SEOC. This finding may help identify a sub-population of patients at high risk of relapse to standard first-line chemotherapy. PMID:26269749

  18. Knockdown of EHF inhibited the proliferation, invasion and tumorigenesis of ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhongping; Guo, Jing; Chen, Li; Luo, Ning; Yang, Weihong; Qu, Xiaoyan

    2016-06-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy worldwide. ETS homologous factor (EHF), a member of E26 transformation specific (ETS) transcription factors, has been reported overexpressed in ovarian cancer. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the biological function of EHF in ovarian cancer is still unclear. Here, we found that EHF was elevated in ovarian cancer tissues compared with non-tumorous tissues. Moreover, high EHF expression level was correlated with short survival time of patients with ovarian cancer. Knockdown of EHF in ovarian cancer cells, SKOV3 and OVCAR3, significantly inhibited cell proliferation and increased cells population in G1 phase. The proteins promoting cell cycles (Cyclin B1, Cyclin D1, and PCNA) were down-regulated and the protein negatively regulating cell cycle progression (P21) was up-regulated after EHF knockdown. Moreover, inhibition of EHF in ovarian cancer cells dramatically induced cell apoptosis, but impaired cell adhesion and cell invasion. Furthermore, phosphorylation levels of ERK and AKT were notably reduced in EHF knockdown cells. Finally, in vivo data showed that knockdown of EHF inhibited tumor growth in nude mice. Our data indicates that EHF could be a potential prognosis marker for ovarian cancer and work as an oncogene by targeting ERK and AKT signaling, which can serve as a new target for ovarian cancer treatment. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26258986

  19. Effect of taxol on the expression of FoxM1 ovarian cancer-associated gene

    PubMed Central

    LIU, ZENG; XIAO, YU; NING, SIQING; LI, ZHAO YUAN; ZHU, YUANYUAN; HU, GANG

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of ovarian cancer in women has been on the increase in recent years. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of taxol on the expression of ovarian cancer-associated gene forkhead box transcription factor M1 (FoxM1) and its therapeutic effects for ovarian cancer. The expression of FoxM1 gene was examined in patients with or without ovarian cancer. RNA and protein levels of FoxM1 gene of ovarian cancer patients were detected at different time periods (1, 3, 6, 8, 12 and 24 months) after treatment with taxol. The results showed that the mRNA level of FoxM1 gene in patients with ovarian cancer was significantly higher than that in normal women (P<0.05). With time and progression of the disease, the expression of FoxM1 gene significantly increased in the patients not being administered taxol, whereas the expression of FoxM1 in the patients administered taxol was significantly lower comparatively (P<0.05). In conclusion, an asssociation was identified between the FoxM1 gene and ovarian cancer. The FoxM1 gene therefore promotes the generation and deterioration of ovarian cancer, whereas taxol reduces it. These findings provide a certain theoretical basis for the later treatment of ovarian cancer disease.

  20. Investigation of ovarian cancer associated sialylation changes in N-linked glycopeptides by quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In approximately 80% of patients, ovarian cancer is diagnosed when the patient is already in the advanced stages of the disease. CA125 is currently used as the marker for ovarian cancer; however, it lacks specificity and sensitivity for detecting early stage disease. There is a critical unmet need for sensitive and specific routine screening tests for early diagnosis that can reduce ovarian cancer lethality by reliably detecting the disease at its earliest and treatable stages. Results In this study, we investigated the N-linked sialylated glycopeptides in serum samples from healthy and ovarian cancer patients using Lectin-directed Tandem Labeling (LTL) and iTRAQ quantitative proteomics methods. We identified 45 N-linked sialylated glycopeptides containing 46 glycosylation sites. Among those, ten sialylated glycopeptides were significantly up-regulated in ovarian cancer patients’ serum samples. LC-MS/MS analysis of the non-glycosylated peptides from the same samples, western blot data using lectin enriched glycoproteins of various ovarian cancer type samples, and PNGase F (+/−) treatment confirmed the sialylation changes in the ovarian cancer samples. Conclusion Herein, we demonstrated that several proteins are aberrantly sialylated in N-linked glycopeptides in ovarian cancer and detection of glycopeptides with abnormal sialylation changes may have the potential to serve as biomarkers for ovarian cancer. PMID:22856521

  1. Early detection of ovarian cancer: background, rationale, and structure of the Yale Early Detection Program.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, P. E.; Chambers, J. T.; Taylor, K. J.; Pellerito, J.; Hammers, L.; Cole, L. A.; Yang-Feng, T. L.; Smith, P.; Mayne, S. T.; Makuch, R.

    1991-01-01

    Ovarian cancer has received national attention as a highly virulent disease. Its lack of early warning symptoms and the failure to develop highly sensitive screening tests have led some physicians to recommend prophylactic oophorectomies to women with relatives who have had ovarian cancer. Others have recommended routine screening of otherwise normal women for CA 125, a circulating tumor marker, and ultrasound examinations. Each of these techniques is associated with substantial false-positive rates that could lead to unnecessary surgery. A review of epidemiologic data suggests that familial ovarian cancer kindreds are rare, but women with first-degree relatives who have had ovarian cancer have a significant risk themselves for developing ovarian cancer. In addition, women with a great number of ovulatory cycles are at an increased risk for the disease. Circulating tumor markers are frequently elevated in women with advanced ovarian cancer, but their value in early detection of ovarian cancer has yet to be established. Advances in endovaginal ultrasound and color Doppler flow technology have significantly improved our ability to assess pelvic organs. This article presents the background, rationale, and structure of the Yale Early Detection Program for ovarian cancer, whose goals are to identify the best techniques for diagnosing ovarian cancer in an early stage, to determine the frequency with which such tests should be employed, to assess false-positive results, and to identify women who might benefit from prophylactic oophorectomies. PMID:1810100

  2. Laparoscopic optical coherence tomography imaging of human ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hariri, Lida P.; Bonnema, Garret T.; Schmidt, Kathy; Winkler, Amy M.; Korde, Vrushali; Hatch, Kenneth D.; Davis, John R.; Brewer, Molly A.; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Ovarian cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death among women in the US largely due to late detection secondary to unreliable symptomology and screening tools without adequate resolution. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a recently emerging imaging modality with promise in ovarian cancer diagnostics, providing non-destructive subsurface imaging at imaging depths up to 2 mm with near-histological grade resolution (10–20 μm). In this study, we developed the first ever laparoscopic OCT (LOCT) device, evaluated the safety and feasibility of LOCT, and characterized the microstructural features of human ovaries in vivo. Methods A custom LOCT device was fabricated specifically for laparoscopic imaging of the ovaries in patients undergoing oophorectomy. OCT images were compared with histopathology to identify preliminary architectural imaging features of normal and pathologic ovarian tissue. Results Thirty ovaries in 17 primarily peri or post-menopausal women were successfully imaged with LOCT: 16 normal, 5 endometriosis, 3 serous cystadenoma, and 4 adenocarcinoma. Preliminary imaging features developed for each category reveal qualitative differences in the homogeneous character of normal post-menopausal ovary, the ability to image small subsurface inclusion cysts, and distinguishable features for endometriosis, cystadenoma, and adenocarcinoma. Conclusions We present the development and successful implementation of the first laparoscopic OCT probe. Comparison of OCT images and corresponding histopathology allowed for the description of preliminary microstructural features for normal ovary, endometriosis, and benign and malignant surface epithelial neoplasms. These results support the potential of OCT both as a diagnostic tool and imaging modality for further evaluation of ovarian cancer pathogenesis. PMID:19481241

  3. Pentamethylpyrromethene boron difluoride complexes in human ovarian cancer photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Lee R.; Chaudhuri, Aulena; Gillen, Laura E.; Boyer, Joseph H.; Wolford, Lionel T.

    1990-07-01

    Quasiaromatic heterocycles (QAM) such as substituted 1 , 3 , 5 , 7 , 8-pentamethylpyrromethene boron difluorides (PMP-BF2) and - (dimethoxyphosphinylmethyl, methyl) bimane have been evaluated for their abilities to produce cellular toxicities when used in photodynamic therapy (PDT) for ovarian cancer. The most active QAH tested to date has been the disodiuxn salt of PMP-2,6-disulfonate--BF2 (PMPDS-BF2). Human ovarian cancer cells from fifteen different patients have been grown in culture. Cells were obtained from biopsy material and grown in RPMI medium with 10% FBA plus penicillin and streptomycin. Cells were harvested and as single cell suspensions exposed to PMP-BF2 complexes or bimanes in concentrations of 0.004-0.4 ug/106 cells/ml of medium. Initially the cells were exposed to the chemicals for 30 minutes in a 5% CO2 incubator (37°C) with gentle shaking. The cells were washed with plain RPMI medium, then resuspended in the enriched RPMI medium and exposed to a sunlamp for 10-20 minutes. Cells were then allowed to grow in an soft agar culture media at 37°C (5% C02) for 14 days. When compared to controls (only light or only chemicals) there was 100% inhibition of all cellular growth for PMPDSBF2 at the 0.4 ug/mi concentrations. There was variations in concentrations of the chemical needed to produce 100% inhibition when the 15 different ovarian cancer cell specimens were compared at all concentrations. PMP-BF2 complexes are characterized by extremely high extinction coefficients, superior laser activity and little if any triplet-triplet absorption. The biamanes share these properties however are less active in ovarian cancer cell The lasing properties of PMP-BF2, and bimanes will be compared to their PDT effectiveness.

  4. In vitro Enrichment of Ovarian Cancer Tumor-initiating Cells

    PubMed Central

    House, Carrie D.; Hernandez, Lidia; Annunziata, Christina M.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that small subpopulations of tumor cells maintain a unique self-renewing and differentiation capacity and may be responsible for tumor initiation and/or relapse. Clarifying the mechanisms by which these tumor-initiating cells (TICs) support tumor formation and progression could lead to the development of clinically favorable therapies. Ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous and highly recurrent disease. Recent studies suggest TICs may play an important role in disease biology. We have identified culture conditions that enrich for TICs from ovarian cancer cell lines. Growing either adherent cells or non-adherent ‘floater’ cells in a low attachment plate with serum free media in the presence of growth factors supports the propagation of ovarian cancer TICs with stem cell markers (CD133 and ALDH activity) and increased tumorigenicity without the need to physically separate the TICs from other cell types within the culture. Although the presence of floater cells is not common for all cell lines, this population of cells with innate low adherence may have high tumorigenic potential.Compared to adherent cells grown in the presence of serum, TICs readily form spheres, are significantly more tumorigenic in mice, and express putative stem cell markers. The conditions are easy to establish in a timely manner and can be used to study signaling pathways important for maintaining stem characteristics, and to identify drugs or combinations of drugs targeting TICs. The culture conditions described herein are applicable for a variety of ovarian cancer cells of epithelial origin and will be critical in providing new information about the role of TICs in tumor initiation, progression, and relapse. PMID:25742116

  5. First experiences with intraperitoneal chemotherapy in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Gitsch, E; Sevelda, P; Schmidl, S; Salzer, H

    1990-01-01

    The Authors report their experience with intraperitoneal chemotherapy in post surgical management of ovarian cancer. 24 patients were evaluable for the study and the results indicate that in patients with bulky disease the complication rate was high and the therapeutical outcome very poor. Only in patients with microscopic disease and residual tumor smaller than 2 cm seemed to benefit from intraperitoneal chemotherapy. Despite pharmacological advantages, Mitoxantrone causes local discomfort up to peritonitis. PMID:2347331

  6. Ursolic acid inhibits proliferation and reverses drug resistance of ovarian cancer stem cells by downregulating ABCG2 through suppressing the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Jing; Sui, Hua; Qi, Cong; Li, Qi; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Shao-Fei; Mei, Ming-Zhu; Lu, Ying-Yu; Wan, Yi-Ting; Chang, Hannah; Guo, Piao-Ting

    2016-07-01

    Hypoxia in tumors is closely related to drug resistance. It has not been verified whether hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) or ABCG2 is related to hypoxia-induced resistance. Ursolic acid (UA), when used in combination with cisplatin can significantly increase the sensitivity of ovarian cancer stem cells (CSCs) to cisplatin, but the exact mechanism is unknown. The cell growth inhibitory rate of cisplatin under different conditions was evaluated using Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) in adherence and sphere cells (SKOV3, A2780, and HEY). The expression of HIF-1α and ABCG2 was tested using quantitative PCR, western blotting, and immuno-fluorescence under different culture conditions and treated with UA. Knockdown of HIF-1α by shRNA and LY294002 was used to inhibit the activity of PI3K/Akt pathway. Ovarian CSCs express stemness-related genes and drug resistance significantly higher than normal adherent cells. Under hypoxic conditions, the ovarian CSCs grew faster and were more drug resistant than under normoxia. UA could inhibit proliferation and reverse the drug resistance of ovarian CSC by suppressing ABCG2 and HIF-1α under different culture conditions. HIF-1α inhibitor YC-1 combined with UA suppressed the stemness genes and ABCG2 under hypoxic condition. The PI3K/Akt signaling pathway activation plays an important functional role in UA-induced downregulation of HIF-1α and reduction of ABCG2. UA inhibits the proliferation and reversal of drug resistance in ovarian CSCs by suppressing the expression of downregulation of HIF-1α and ABCG2. PMID:27221674

  7. Targeting Signaling Pathways in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smolle, Elisabeth; Taucher, Valentin; Pichler, Martin; Petru, Edgar; Lax, Sigurd; Haybaeck, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian carcinoma (OC) is the most lethal gynecological malignancy. Response to platinum-based chemotherapy is poor in some patients and, thus, current research is focusing on new therapy options. The various histological types of OC are characterized by distinctive molecular genetic alterations that are relevant for ovarian tumorigenesis. The understanding of these molecular pathways is essential for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Purpose We want to give an overview on the molecular genetic changes of the histopathological types of OC and their role as putative therapeutic targets. In Depth Review of Existing Data In 2012, the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitor, bevacizumab, was approved for OC treatment. Bevacizumab has shown promising results as single agent and in combination with conventional chemotherapy, but its target is not distinctive when analyzed before treatment. At present, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors and components of the EGFR pathway are in the focus o