Science.gov

Sample records for a2a receptor a2ar

  1. Macrophage A2A Adenosine Receptors Are Essential to Protect from Progressive Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Truong, Luan D; Trostel, Jessica; McMahan, Rachel; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Garcia, Gabriela E

    2016-10-01

    A2A adenosine receptors (A2ARs) are endogenous inhibitor of inflammation. Macrophages that are key effectors of kidney disease progression express A2ARs. We investigated the role of A2ARs in kidney inflammation in a macrophage-mediated anti-glomerular basement membrane reactive serum-induced immune nephritis in A2AR-deficient mice. Sub-threshold doses of glomerular basement membrane-reactive serum induced more severe and prolonged kidney damage with higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines and greater accumulation of inflammatory cells in A2AR(-/-) mice than wild-type (WT) mice. To investigate the role of macrophage A2AR in progressive kidney injury, glomerulonephritis was induced in CD11b-DTR transgenic mice. Macrophages were selectively depleted in the established phase of the disease and reconstituted with macrophages from WT or A2AR-deficient mice and then treated with an A2AR agonist. In mice receiving WT macrophages and treated with an A2AR agonist, the glomerular cellularity, crescent formation, sclerotic glomeruli, and tubulointerstitial injury were significantly reduced compared with the control group. In contrast, in mice reconstituted with A2AR-deficient macrophages and treated with an A2AR agonist, the kidney injury was more severe with increased deposition of collagen I, III, and IV. These findings suggest that disruption of the protective A2AR amplifies inflammation to accelerate glomerular damage and endogenous macrophage A2ARs are essential to protect from progressive kidney fibrosis.

  2. Binding of the Antagonist Caffeine to the Human Adenosine Receptor hA2AR in Nearly Physiological Conditions.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ruyin; Rossetti, Giulia; Bauer, Andreas; CarIoni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Lipid composition may significantly affect membrane proteins function, yet its impact on the protein structural determinants is not well understood. Here we present a comparative molecular dynamics (MD) study of the human adenosine receptor type 2A (hA(2A)R) in complex with caffeine--a system of high neuro-pharmacological relevance--within different membrane types. These are POPC, mixed POPC/POPE and cholesterol-rich membranes. 0.8-μs MD simulations unambiguously show that the helical folding of the amphipathic helix 8 depends on membrane contents. Most importantly, the distinct cholesterol binding into the cleft between helix 1 and 2 stabilizes a specific caffeine-binding pose against others visited during the simulation. Hence, cholesterol presence (~33%-50% in synaptic membrane in central nervous system), often neglected in X-ray determination of membrane proteins, affects the population of the ligand binding poses. We conclude that including a correct description of neuronal membranes may be very important for computer-aided design of ligands targeting hA(2A)R and possibly other GPCRs. PMID:25992797

  3. Allosteric interactions between agonists and antagonists within the adenosine A2A receptor-dopamine D2 receptor heterotetramer

    PubMed Central

    Bonaventura, Jordi; Navarro, Gemma; Casadó-Anguera, Verònica; Azdad, Karima; Rea, William; Moreno, Estefanía; Brugarolas, Marc; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I.; Lluís, Carme; Cortés, Antoni; Volkow, Nora D.; Schiffmann, Serge N.; Ferré, Sergi; Casadó, Vicent

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR)-dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) heteromers are key modulators of striatal neuronal function. It has been suggested that the psychostimulant effects of caffeine depend on its ability to block an allosteric modulation within the A2AR-D2R heteromer, by which adenosine decreases the affinity and intrinsic efficacy of dopamine at the D2R. We describe novel unsuspected allosteric mechanisms within the heteromer by which not only A2AR agonists, but also A2AR antagonists, decrease the affinity and intrinsic efficacy of D2R agonists and the affinity of D2R antagonists. Strikingly, these allosteric modulations disappear on agonist and antagonist coadministration. This can be explained by a model that considers A2AR-D2R heteromers as heterotetramers, constituted by A2AR and D2R homodimers, as demonstrated by experiments with bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and bimolecular fluorescence and bioluminescence complementation. As predicted by the model, high concentrations of A2AR antagonists behaved as A2AR agonists and decreased D2R function in the brain. PMID:26100888

  4. Stimulation of expression for the adenosine A2A receptor gene by hypoxia in PC12 cells. A potential role in cell protection.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Millhorn, D E

    1999-07-16

    The purpose of this study was to examine the regulation of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) gene expression during hypoxia in pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Northern blot analysis revealed that the A2AR mRNA level was substantially increased after a 3-h exposure to hypoxia (5% O2), which reached a peak at 12 h. Immunoblot analysis showed that the A2AR protein level was also increased during hypoxia. Inhibition of de novo protein synthesis blocked A2AR induction by hypoxia. In addition, removal of extracellular free Ca2+, chelation of intracellular free Ca2+, and pretreatment with protein kinase C inhibitors prevented A2AR induction by hypoxia. Moreover, depletion of protein kinase C activity by prolonged treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate significantly inhibited the hypoxic induction of A2AR. A2AR antagonists led to a significant enhancement of A2AR mRNA levels during hypoxia, whereas A2AR agonists caused down-regulation of A2AR expression during hypoxia. This suggests that A2AR regulates its own expression during hypoxia by feedback mechanisms. We further found that activation of A2AR enhances cell viability during hypoxia and also inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor expression in PC12 cells. Thus, increased expression of A2AR during hypoxia might protect cells against hypoxia and may act to inhibit hypoxia-induced angiogenic activity mediated by vascular endothelial growth factor. PMID:10400659

  5. Adenosine A2A Receptor Up-Regulates Retinal Wave Frequency via Starburst Amacrine Cells in the Developing Rat Retina

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pin-Chien; Hsiao, Yu-Tien; Kao, Shao-Yen; Chen, Ching-Feng; Chen, Yu-Chieh; Chiang, Chung-Wei; Lee, Chien-fei; Lu, Juu-Chin; Chern, Yijuang; Wang, Chih-Tien

    2014-01-01

    Background Developing retinas display retinal waves, the patterned spontaneous activity essential for circuit refinement. During the first postnatal week in rodents, retinal waves are mediated by synaptic transmission between starburst amacrine cells (SACs) and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The neuromodulator adenosine is essential for the generation of retinal waves. However, the cellular basis underlying adenosine's regulation of retinal waves remains elusive. Here, we investigated whether and how the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) regulates retinal waves and whether A2AR regulation of retinal waves acts via presynaptic SACs. Methodology/Principal Findings We showed that A2AR was expressed in the inner plexiform layer and ganglion cell layer of the developing rat retina. Knockdown of A2AR decreased the frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ transients, suggesting that endogenous A2AR may up-regulate wave frequency. To investigate whether A2AR acts via presynaptic SACs, we targeted gene expression to SACs by the metabotropic glutamate receptor type II promoter. Ca2+ transient frequency was increased by expressing wild-type A2AR (A2AR-WT) in SACs, suggesting that A2AR may up-regulate retinal waves via presynaptic SACs. Subsequent patch-clamp recordings on RGCs revealed that presynaptic A2AR-WT increased the frequency of wave-associated postsynaptic currents (PSCs) or depolarizations compared to the control, without changing the RGC's excitability, membrane potentials, or PSC charge. These findings suggest that presynaptic A2AR may not affect the membrane properties of postsynaptic RGCs. In contrast, by expressing the C-terminal truncated A2AR mutant (A2AR-ΔC) in SACs, the wave frequency was reduced compared to the A2AR-WT, but was similar to the control, suggesting that the full-length A2AR in SACs is required for A2AR up-regulation of retinal waves. Conclusions/Significance A2AR up-regulates the frequency of retinal waves via presynaptic SACs, requiring its full

  6. Basal adenosine modulates the functional properties of AMPA receptors in mouse hippocampal neurons through the activation of A1R A2AR and A3R

    PubMed Central

    Di Angelantonio, Silvia; Bertollini, Cristina; Piccinin, Sonia; Rosito, Maria; Trettel, Flavia; Pagani, Francesca; Limatola, Cristina; Ragozzino, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is a widespread neuromodulator within the CNS and its extracellular level is increased during hypoxia or intense synaptic activity, modulating pre- and postsynaptic sites. We studied the neuromodulatory action of adenosine on glutamatergic currents in the hippocampus, showing that activation of multiple adenosine receptors (ARs) by basal adenosine impacts postsynaptic site. Specifically, the stimulation of both A1R and A3R reduces AMPA currents, while A2AR has an opposite potentiating effect. The effect of ARs stimulation on glutamatergic currents in hippocampal cultures was investigated using pharmacological and genetic approaches. A3R inhibition by MRS1523 increased GluR1-Ser845 phosphorylation and potentiated AMPA current amplitude, increasing the apparent affinity for the agonist. A similar effect was observed blocking A1R with DPCPX or by genetic deletion of either A3R or A1R. Conversely, impairment of A2AR reduced AMPA currents, and decreased agonist sensitivity. Consistently, in hippocampal slices, ARs activation by AR agonist NECA modulated glutamatergic current amplitude evoked by AMPA application or afferent fiber stimulation. Opposite effects of AR subtypes stimulation are likely associated to changes in GluR1 phosphorylation and represent a novel mechanism of physiological modulation of glutamatergic transmission by adenosine, likely acting in normal conditions in the brain, depending on the level of extracellular adenosine and the distribution of AR subtypes. PMID:26528137

  7. Selective inactivation of adenosine A2A receptors in striatal neurons enhances working memory and reversal learning

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Catherine J.; Singer, Philipp; Coelho, Joana; Boison, Detlev; Feldon, Joram; Yee, Benjamin K.; Chen, Jiang-Fan

    2011-01-01

    The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) is highly enriched in the striatum where it is uniquely positioned to integrate dopaminergic, glutamatergic, and other signals to modulate cognition. Although previous studies support the hypothesis that A2AR inactivation can be pro-cognitive, analyses of A2AR's effects on cognitive functions have been restricted to a small subset of cognitive domains. Furthermore, the relative contribution of A2ARs in distinct brain regions remains largely unknown. Here, we studied the regulation of multiple memory processes by brain region-specific populations of A2ARs. Specifically, we evaluated the cognitive impacts of conditional A2AR deletion restricted to either the entire forebrain (i.e., cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and striatum, fb-A2AR KO) or to striatum alone (st-A2AR KO) in recognition memory, working memory, reference memory, and reversal learning. This comprehensive, comparative analysis showed for the first time that depletion of A2AR-dependent signaling in either the entire forebrain or striatum alone is associated with two specific phenotypes indicative of cognitive flexibility—enhanced working memory and enhanced reversal learning. These selective pro-cognitive phenotypes seemed largely attributed to inactivation of striatal A2ARs as they were captured by A2AR deletion restricted to striatal neurons. Neither spatial reference memory acquisition nor spatial recognition memory were grossly affected, and no evidence for compensatory changes in striatal or cortical D1, D2, or A1 receptor expression was found. This study provides the first direct demonstration that targeting striatal A2ARs may be an effective, novel strategy to facilitate cognitive flexibility under normal and pathologic conditions. PMID:21693634

  8. Neuroprotection by caffeine in the MPTP model of parkinson's disease and its dependence on adenosine A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Xu, K; Di Luca, D G; Orrú, M; Xu, Y; Chen, J-F; Schwarzschild, M A

    2016-05-13

    Considerable epidemiological and laboratory data have suggested that caffeine, a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist, may protect against the underlying neurodegeneration of parkinson's disease (PD). Although both caffeine and more specific antagonists of the A2A subtype of adenosine receptor (A2AR) have been found to confer protection in animal models of PD, the dependence of caffeine's neuroprotective effects on the A2AR is not known. To definitively determine its A2AR dependence, the effect of caffeine on 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6 tetra-hydropyridine (MPTP) neurotoxicity was compared in wild-type (WT) and A2AR gene global knockout (A2A KO) mice, as well as in central nervous system (CNS) cell type-specific (conditional) A2AR knockout (cKO) mice that lack the receptor either in postnatal forebrain neurons or in astrocytes. In WT and in heterozygous A2AR KO mice caffeine pretreatment (25mg/kgip) significantly attenuated MPTP-induced depletion of striatal dopamine. By contrast in homozygous A2AR global KO mice caffeine had no effect on MPTP toxicity. In forebrain neuron A2AR cKO mice, caffeine lost its locomotor stimulant effect, whereas its neuroprotective effect was mostly preserved. In astrocytic A2AR cKO mice, both caffeine's locomotor stimulant and protective properties were undiminished. Taken together, these results indicate that neuroprotection by caffeine in the MPTP model of PD relies on the A2AR, although the specific cellular localization of these receptors remains to be determined. PMID:26905951

  9. Therapeutic Opportunities for Caffeine and A2A Receptor Antagonists in Retinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Boia, Raquel; Ambrósio, António Francisco; Santiago, Ana Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine, the major component of coffee, is the most consumed psychostimulant in the world. Caffeine is an adenosine analog and acts as a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist. The majority of the effects of caffeine are mainly mediated by the blockade of adenosine receptors, and the proved neuroprotective effects of caffeine in brain disorders have been mimicked by the blockade of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR). A growing body of evidence demonstrates that microglia-mediated neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of brain and retinal diseases. Moreover, the control of microglia reactivity by blocking A2AR has been proposed to be the mechanism underlying the observed protective effects of caffeine. Hence, it is conceivable that caffeine and A2AR antagonists offer therapeutic value for the treatment of retinal diseases, mainly those involving microglia-mediated neuroinflammation.

  10. Therapeutic Opportunities for Caffeine and A2A Receptor Antagonists in Retinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Boia, Raquel; Ambrósio, António Francisco; Santiago, Ana Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine, the major component of coffee, is the most consumed psychostimulant in the world. Caffeine is an adenosine analog and acts as a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist. The majority of the effects of caffeine are mainly mediated by the blockade of adenosine receptors, and the proved neuroprotective effects of caffeine in brain disorders have been mimicked by the blockade of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR). A growing body of evidence demonstrates that microglia-mediated neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of brain and retinal diseases. Moreover, the control of microglia reactivity by blocking A2AR has been proposed to be the mechanism underlying the observed protective effects of caffeine. Hence, it is conceivable that caffeine and A2AR antagonists offer therapeutic value for the treatment of retinal diseases, mainly those involving microglia-mediated neuroinflammation. PMID:26959995

  11. The caffeine-binding adenosine A2A receptor induces age-like HPA-axis dysfunction by targeting glucocorticoid receptor function.

    PubMed

    Batalha, Vânia L; Ferreira, Diana G; Coelho, Joana E; Valadas, Jorge S; Gomes, Rui; Temido-Ferreira, Mariana; Shmidt, Tatiana; Baqi, Younis; Buée, Luc; Müller, Christa E; Hamdane, Malika; Outeiro, Tiago F; Bader, Michael; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H; Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh; Blum, David; Lopes, Luísa V

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is associated with procognitive effects in humans by counteracting overactivation of the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR), which is upregulated in the human forebrain of aged and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. We have previously shown that an anti-A2AR therapy reverts age-like memory deficits, by reestablishment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis feedback and corticosterone circadian levels. These observations suggest that A2AR over-activation and glucocorticoid dysfunction are key events in age-related hippocampal deficits; but their direct connection has never been explored. We now show that inducing A2AR overexpression in an aging-like profile is sufficient to trigger HPA-axis dysfunction, namely loss of plasmatic corticosterone circadian oscillation, and promotes reduction of GR hippocampal levels. The synaptic plasticity and memory deficits triggered by GR in the hippocampus are amplified by A2AR over-activation and were rescued by anti-A2AR therapy; finally, we demonstrate that A2AR act on GR nuclear translocation and GR-dependent transcriptional regulation. We provide the first demonstration that A2AR is a major regulator of GR function and that this functional interconnection may be a trigger to age-related memory deficits. This supports the idea that the procognitive effects of A2AR antagonists, namely caffeine, on Alzheimer's and age-related cognitive impairments may rely on its ability to modulate GR actions.

  12. The caffeine-binding adenosine A2A receptor induces age-like HPA-axis dysfunction by targeting glucocorticoid receptor function.

    PubMed

    Batalha, Vânia L; Ferreira, Diana G; Coelho, Joana E; Valadas, Jorge S; Gomes, Rui; Temido-Ferreira, Mariana; Shmidt, Tatiana; Baqi, Younis; Buée, Luc; Müller, Christa E; Hamdane, Malika; Outeiro, Tiago F; Bader, Michael; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H; Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh; Blum, David; Lopes, Luísa V

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is associated with procognitive effects in humans by counteracting overactivation of the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR), which is upregulated in the human forebrain of aged and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. We have previously shown that an anti-A2AR therapy reverts age-like memory deficits, by reestablishment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis feedback and corticosterone circadian levels. These observations suggest that A2AR over-activation and glucocorticoid dysfunction are key events in age-related hippocampal deficits; but their direct connection has never been explored. We now show that inducing A2AR overexpression in an aging-like profile is sufficient to trigger HPA-axis dysfunction, namely loss of plasmatic corticosterone circadian oscillation, and promotes reduction of GR hippocampal levels. The synaptic plasticity and memory deficits triggered by GR in the hippocampus are amplified by A2AR over-activation and were rescued by anti-A2AR therapy; finally, we demonstrate that A2AR act on GR nuclear translocation and GR-dependent transcriptional regulation. We provide the first demonstration that A2AR is a major regulator of GR function and that this functional interconnection may be a trigger to age-related memory deficits. This supports the idea that the procognitive effects of A2AR antagonists, namely caffeine, on Alzheimer's and age-related cognitive impairments may rely on its ability to modulate GR actions. PMID:27510168

  13. The caffeine-binding adenosine A2A receptor induces age-like HPA-axis dysfunction by targeting glucocorticoid receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Batalha, Vânia L.; Ferreira, Diana G.; Coelho, Joana E.; Valadas, Jorge S.; Gomes, Rui; Temido-Ferreira, Mariana; Shmidt, Tatiana; Baqi, Younis; Buée, Luc; Müller, Christa E.; Hamdane, Malika; Outeiro, Tiago F.; Bader, Michael; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H.; Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh; Blum, David; Lopes, Luísa V.

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is associated with procognitive effects in humans by counteracting overactivation of the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR), which is upregulated in the human forebrain of aged and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients. We have previously shown that an anti-A2AR therapy reverts age-like memory deficits, by reestablishment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis feedback and corticosterone circadian levels. These observations suggest that A2AR over-activation and glucocorticoid dysfunction are key events in age-related hippocampal deficits; but their direct connection has never been explored. We now show that inducing A2AR overexpression in an aging-like profile is sufficient to trigger HPA-axis dysfunction, namely loss of plasmatic corticosterone circadian oscillation, and promotes reduction of GR hippocampal levels. The synaptic plasticity and memory deficits triggered by GR in the hippocampus are amplified by A2AR over-activation and were rescued by anti-A2AR therapy; finally, we demonstrate that A2AR act on GR nuclear translocation and GR-dependent transcriptional regulation. We provide the first demonstration that A2AR is a major regulator of GR function and that this functional interconnection may be a trigger to age-related memory deficits. This supports the idea that the procognitive effects of A2AR antagonists, namely caffeine, on Alzheimer’s and age-related cognitive impairments may rely on its ability to modulate GR actions. PMID:27510168

  14. Striatal Pre- and Postsynaptic Profile of Adenosine A2A Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz, César; Beaumont, Vahri; Goldberg, Steven R.; Lluís, Carme; Cortés, Antoni; Franco, Rafael; Casadó, Vicent; Canela, Enric I.; Ferré, Sergi

    2011-01-01

    Striatal adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) are highly expressed in medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the indirect efferent pathway, where they heteromerize with dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs). A2ARs are also localized presynaptically in cortico-striatal glutamatergic terminals contacting MSNs of the direct efferent pathway, where they heteromerize with adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs). It has been hypothesized that postsynaptic A2AR antagonists should be useful in Parkinson's disease, while presynaptic A2AR antagonists could be beneficial in dyskinetic disorders, such as Huntington's disease, obsessive-compulsive disorders and drug addiction. The aim or this work was to determine whether selective A2AR antagonists may be subdivided according to a preferential pre- versus postsynaptic mechanism of action. The potency at blocking the motor output and striatal glutamate release induced by cortical electrical stimulation and the potency at inducing locomotor activation were used as in vivo measures of pre- and postsynaptic activities, respectively. SCH-442416 and KW-6002 showed a significant preferential pre- and postsynaptic profile, respectively, while the other tested compounds (MSX-2, SCH-420814, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261) showed no clear preference. Radioligand-binding experiments were performed in cells expressing A2AR-D2R and A1R-A2AR heteromers to determine possible differences in the affinity of these compounds for different A2AR heteromers. Heteromerization played a key role in the presynaptic profile of SCH-442416, since it bound with much less affinity to A2AR when co-expressed with D2R than with A1R. KW-6002 showed the best relative affinity for A2AR co-expressed with D2R than co-expressed with A1R, which can at least partially explain the postsynaptic profile of this compound. Also, the in vitro pharmacological profile of MSX-2, SCH-420814, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261 was is in accordance with their mixed pre- and postsynaptic profile. On the basis of their preferential

  15. Caffeine acts through neuronal adenosine A2A receptors to prevent mood and memory dysfunction triggered by chronic stress.

    PubMed

    Kaster, Manuella P; Machado, Nuno J; Silva, Henrique B; Nunes, Ana; Ardais, Ana Paula; Santana, Magda; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; Porciúncula, Lisiane O; Chen, Jiang Fan; Tomé, Ângelo R; Agostinho, Paula; Canas, Paula M; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2015-06-23

    The consumption of caffeine (an adenosine receptor antagonist) correlates inversely with depression and memory deterioration, and adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) antagonists emerge as candidate therapeutic targets because they control aberrant synaptic plasticity and afford neuroprotection. Therefore we tested the ability of A2AR to control the behavioral, electrophysiological, and neurochemical modifications caused by chronic unpredictable stress (CUS), which alters hippocampal circuits, dampens mood and memory performance, and enhances susceptibility to depression. CUS for 3 wk in adult mice induced anxiogenic and helpless-like behavior and decreased memory performance. These behavioral changes were accompanied by synaptic alterations, typified by a decrease in synaptic plasticity and a reduced density of synaptic proteins (synaptosomal-associated protein 25, syntaxin, and vesicular glutamate transporter type 1), together with an increased density of A2AR in glutamatergic terminals in the hippocampus. Except for anxiety, for which results were mixed, CUS-induced behavioral and synaptic alterations were prevented by (i) caffeine (1 g/L in the drinking water, starting 3 wk before and continued throughout CUS); (ii) the selective A2AR antagonist KW6002 (3 mg/kg, p.o.); (iii) global A2AR deletion; and (iv) selective A2AR deletion in forebrain neurons. Notably, A2AR blockade was not only prophylactic but also therapeutically efficacious, because a 3-wk treatment with the A2AR antagonist SCH58261 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed the mood and synaptic dysfunction caused by CUS. These results herald a key role for synaptic A2AR in the control of chronic stress-induced modifications and suggest A2AR as candidate targets to alleviate the consequences of chronic stress on brain function.

  16. Caffeine acts through neuronal adenosine A2A receptors to prevent mood and memory dysfunction triggered by chronic stress.

    PubMed

    Kaster, Manuella P; Machado, Nuno J; Silva, Henrique B; Nunes, Ana; Ardais, Ana Paula; Santana, Magda; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; Porciúncula, Lisiane O; Chen, Jiang Fan; Tomé, Ângelo R; Agostinho, Paula; Canas, Paula M; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2015-06-23

    The consumption of caffeine (an adenosine receptor antagonist) correlates inversely with depression and memory deterioration, and adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) antagonists emerge as candidate therapeutic targets because they control aberrant synaptic plasticity and afford neuroprotection. Therefore we tested the ability of A2AR to control the behavioral, electrophysiological, and neurochemical modifications caused by chronic unpredictable stress (CUS), which alters hippocampal circuits, dampens mood and memory performance, and enhances susceptibility to depression. CUS for 3 wk in adult mice induced anxiogenic and helpless-like behavior and decreased memory performance. These behavioral changes were accompanied by synaptic alterations, typified by a decrease in synaptic plasticity and a reduced density of synaptic proteins (synaptosomal-associated protein 25, syntaxin, and vesicular glutamate transporter type 1), together with an increased density of A2AR in glutamatergic terminals in the hippocampus. Except for anxiety, for which results were mixed, CUS-induced behavioral and synaptic alterations were prevented by (i) caffeine (1 g/L in the drinking water, starting 3 wk before and continued throughout CUS); (ii) the selective A2AR antagonist KW6002 (3 mg/kg, p.o.); (iii) global A2AR deletion; and (iv) selective A2AR deletion in forebrain neurons. Notably, A2AR blockade was not only prophylactic but also therapeutically efficacious, because a 3-wk treatment with the A2AR antagonist SCH58261 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed the mood and synaptic dysfunction caused by CUS. These results herald a key role for synaptic A2AR in the control of chronic stress-induced modifications and suggest A2AR as candidate targets to alleviate the consequences of chronic stress on brain function. PMID:26056314

  17. Hyperactivation of D1 and A2A receptors contributes to cognitive dysfunction in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Tyebji, Shiraz; Saavedra, Ana; Canas, Paula M; Pliassova, Anna; Delgado-García, José M; Alberch, Jordi; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Gruart, Agnès; Pérez-Navarro, Esther

    2015-02-01

    Stimulation of dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) and adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) increases cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity in the brain. In Huntington's disease, by essentially unknown mechanisms, PKA activity is increased in the hippocampus of mouse models and patients and contributes to hippocampal-dependent cognitive impairment in R6 mice. Here, we show for the first time that D1R and A2AR density and functional efficiency are increased in hippocampal nerve terminals from R6/1 mice, which accounts for increased cAMP levels and PKA signaling. In contrast, PKA signaling was not altered in the hippocampus of Hdh(Q7/Q111) mice, a full-length HD model. In line with these findings, chronic (but not acute) combined treatment with D1R plus A2AR antagonists (SCH23390 and SCH58261, respectively) normalizes PKA activity in the hippocampus, facilitates long-term potentiation in behaving R6/1 mice, and ameliorates cognitive dysfunction. By contrast, chronic treatment with either D1R or A2AR antagonist alone does not modify PKA activity or improve cognitive dysfunction in R6/1 mice. Hyperactivation of both D1R and A2AR occurs in HD striatum and chronic treatment with D1R plus A2AR antagonists normalizes striatal PKA activity but it does not affect motor dysfunction in R6/1 mice. In conclusion, we show that parallel alterations in dopaminergic and adenosinergic signaling in the hippocampus contribute to increase PKA activity, which in turn selectively participates in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory deficits in HD. In addition, our results point to the chronic inhibition of both D1R and A2AR as a novel therapeutic strategy to manage early cognitive impairment in this neurodegenerative disease. PMID:25449908

  18. Antagonistic interaction between adenosine A2A receptors and Na+/K+-ATPase-α2 controlling glutamate uptake in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Matos, Marco; Augusto, Elisabete; Agostinho, Paula; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Chen, Jiang-Fan

    2013-11-20

    Astrocytic glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-I) is critical to control the bulk of glutamate uptake and, thus, to regulate synaptic plasticity and excitotoxicity. GLT-I glutamate uptake is driven by the sodium gradient implemented by Na(+)/K(+)-ATPases (NKAs) and the α2 subunit of NKA (NKA-α2) is actually linked to GLT-I to regulate astrocytic glutamate transport. We recently found that adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs), which control synaptic plasticity and neurodegeneration, regulate glutamate uptake through unknown mechanisms. Here we report that A2AR activation decreases NKA activity selectively in astrocytes to inhibit glutamate uptake. Furthermore, we found a physical association of A2ARs with NKA-α2s in astrocytes, as gauged by coimmunoprecipitation and in situ proximity ligation assays, in the cerebral cortex and striatum, two brain regions where A2ARs inhibit the astrocytic glutamate uptake. Moreover, the selective deletion of A2ARs in astrocytes (using Gfa2-A2AR-KO mice) leads to a concurrent increase of both astrocytic glutamate uptake and NKA-α2 levels and activity in the striatum and cortex. This coupling of astrocytic A2ARs to the regulation of glutamate transport through modulation of NKA-α2 activity provides a novel mechanism linking neuronal activity to ion homeostasis controlling glutamatergic activity, all of which are processes intricately associated with the etiology of several brain diseases.

  19. Activation of microglial cells triggers a release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) inducing their proliferation in an adenosine A2A receptor-dependent manner: A2A receptor blockade prevents BDNF release and proliferation of microglia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been shown to control microglial responses in neuropathic pain. Since adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) control neuroinflammation, as well as the production and function of BDNF, we tested to see if A2AR controls the microglia-dependent secretion of BDNF and the proliferation of microglial cells, a crucial event in neuroinflammation. Methods Murine N9 microglial cells were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100 ng/mL) in the absence or in the presence of the A2AR antagonist, SCH58261 (50 nM), as well as other modulators of A2AR signaling. The BDNF cellular content and secretion were quantified by Western blotting and ELISA, A2AR density was probed by Western blotting and immunocytochemistry and cell proliferation was assessed by BrdU incorporation. Additionally, the A2AR modulation of LPS-driven cell proliferation was also tested in primary cultures of mouse microglia. Results LPS induced time-dependent changes of the intra- and extracellular levels of BDNF and increased microglial proliferation. The maximal LPS-induced BDNF release was time-coincident with an LPS-induced increase of the A2AR density. Notably, removing endogenous extracellular adenosine or blocking A2AR prevented the LPS-mediated increase of both BDNF secretion and proliferation, as well as exogenous BDNF-induced proliferation. Conclusions We conclude that A2AR activation plays a mandatory role controlling the release of BDNF from activated microglia, as well as the autocrine/paracrine proliferative role of BDNF. PMID:23363775

  20. Adenosine A2A receptor gene disruption provokes marked changes in melanocortin content and pro-opiomelanocortin gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jégou, S; El Yacoubi, M; Mounien, L; Ledent, C; Parmentier, M; Costentin, J; Vaugeois, J-M; Vaudry, H

    2003-12-01

    A2A receptor knockout (A2AR-/-) mice are more anxious and aggressive, and exhibit reduced exploratory activity than their wild-type littermates (A2AR+/+). Because alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) influences anxiety, aggressiveness and motor activity, we investigated the effect of A2AR gene disruption on alpha-MSH content in discrete brain regions and pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) expression in the hypothalamus and pituitary. No modification in alpha-MSH content was observed in the hypothalamus and medulla oblongata where POMC-expressing perikarya are located. In the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus, POMC mRNA levels were not affected by A2AR disruption. Conversely, in A2AR-/- mice, a significant increase in alpha-MSH content was observed in the amygdala and cerebral cortex, two regions that are innervated by POMC terminals. In the pars intermedia of the pituitary, A2AR disruption provoked a significant reduction of POMC mRNA expression associated with a decrease in alpha-MSH content. By contrast, in the anterior lobe of the pituitary, a substantial increase in POMC mRNA and adrenocorticotropin hormone concentrations was observed, and plasma corticosterone concentration was significantly higher in A2AR-/- mice, revealing hyperactivity of their pituitary-adrenocortical axis. Together, these results suggest that adenosine, acting through A2A receptors, may modulate the release of alpha-MSH in the cerebral cortex and amygdala. The data also indicate that A2A receptors are involved in the control of POMC gene expression and biosynthesis of POMC-derived peptides in pituitary melanotrophs and corticotrophs.

  1. Axonal elongation and dendritic branching is enhanced by adenosine A2A receptors activation in cerebral cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Filipa F; Neves-Tomé, Raquel; Assaife-Lopes, Natália; Santos, Telma E; Silva, Rui F M; Brites, Dora; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Sousa, Mónica M; Sebastião, Ana M

    2016-06-01

    Axon growth and dendrite development are key processes for the establishment of a functional neuronal network. Adenosine, which is released by neurons and glia, is a known modulator of synaptic transmission but its influence over neuronal growth has been much less investigated. We now explored the action of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) upon neurite outgrowth, discriminating actions over the axon or dendrites, and the mechanisms involved. Morphometric analysis of primary cultures of cortical neurons from E18 Sprague-Dawley rats demonstrated that an A2AR agonist, CGS 21680, enhances axonal elongation and dendritic branching, being the former prevented by inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase and phospholipase C, but not of protein kinase A. By testing the influence of a scavenger of BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) over the action of the A2AR agonist and the action of a selective A2AR antagonist over the action of BDNF, we could conclude that while the action of A2ARs upon dendritic branching is dependent on the presence of endogenous BDNF, the influence of A2ARs upon axonal elongation is independent of endogenous BDNF. In consonance with the action over axonal elongation, A2AR activation promoted a decrease in microtubule stability and an increase in microtubule growth speed in axonal growth cones. In conclusion, we disclose a facilitatory action of A2ARs upon axonal elongation and microtubule dynamics, providing new insights for A2ARs regulation of neuronal differentiation and axonal regeneration.

  2. Optogenetic activation of intracellular adenosine A2A receptor signaling in the hippocampus is sufficient to trigger CREB phosphorylation and impair memory.

    PubMed

    Li, P; Rial, D; Canas, P M; Yoo, J-H; Li, W; Zhou, X; Wang, Y; van Westen, G J P; Payen, M-P; Augusto, E; Gonçalves, N; Tomé, A R; Li, Z; Wu, Z; Hou, X; Zhou, Y; IJzerman, A P; PIJzerman, Ad; Boyden, E S; Cunha, R A; Qu, J; Chen, J-F

    2015-11-01

    Human and animal studies have converged to suggest that caffeine consumption prevents memory deficits in aging and Alzheimer's disease through the antagonism of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs). To test if A2AR activation in the hippocampus is actually sufficient to impair memory function and to begin elucidating the intracellular pathways operated by A2AR, we have developed a chimeric rhodopsin-A2AR protein (optoA2AR), which retains the extracellular and transmembrane domains of rhodopsin (conferring light responsiveness and eliminating adenosine-binding pockets) fused to the intracellular loop of A2AR to confer specific A2AR signaling. The specificity of the optoA2AR signaling was confirmed by light-induced selective enhancement of cAMP and phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-MAPK) (but not cGMP) levels in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells, which was abolished by a point mutation at the C terminal of A2AR. Supporting its physiological relevance, optoA2AR activation and the A2AR agonist CGS21680 produced similar activation of cAMP and p-MAPK signaling in HEK293 cells, of p-MAPK in the nucleus accumbens and of c-Fos/phosphorylated-CREB (p-CREB) in the hippocampus, and similarly enhanced long-term potentiation in the hippocampus. Remarkably, optoA2AR activation triggered a preferential p-CREB signaling in the hippocampus and impaired spatial memory performance, while optoA2AR activation in the nucleus accumbens triggered MAPK signaling and modulated locomotor activity. This shows that the recruitment of intracellular A2AR signaling in the hippocampus is sufficient to trigger memory dysfunction. Furthermore, the demonstration that the biased A2AR signaling and functions depend on intracellular A2AR loops prompts the possibility of targeting the intracellular A2AR-interacting partners to selectively control different neuropsychiatric behaviors. PMID:25687775

  3. Reduced striatal adenosine A2A receptor levels define a molecular subgroup in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Villar-Menéndez, Izaskun; Díaz-Sánchez, Sara; Blanch, Marta; Albasanz, José Luis; Pereira-Veiga, Thais; Monje, Alfonso; Planchat, Luis Maria; Ferrer, Isidre; Martín, Mairena; Barrachina, Marta

    2014-04-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is a mental disorder of unknown origin. Some scientific evidence seems to indicate that SZ is not a single disease entity, since there are patient groups with clear symptomatic, course and biomarker differences. SZ is characterized by a hyperdopaminergic state related to high dopamine D2 receptor activity. It has also been proposed that there is a hypoadenosynergic state. Adenosine is a nucleoside widely distributed in the organism with neuromodulative and neuroprotective activity in the central nervous system. In the brain, the most abundant adenosine receptors are A1R and A2AR. In the present report, we characterize the presence of both receptors in human postmortem putamens of patients suffering SZ with real time TaqMan PCR, western blotting and radioligand binding assay. We show that A1R levels remain unchanged with respect to age-matched controls, whereas nearly fifty percent of patients have reduced A2AR, at the transcriptional and translational levels. Moreover, we describe how DNA methylation plays a role in the pathological A2AR levels with the bisulfite-sequencing technique. In fact, an increase in 5-methylcytosine percentage in the 5' UTR region of ADORA2A was found in those SZ patients with reduced A2AR levels. Interestingly, there was a relationship between the A2A/β-actin ratio and motor disturbances as assessed with some items of the PANSS, AIMS and SAS scales. Therefore, there may be a subgroup of SZ patients with reduced striatal A2AR levels accompanied by an altered motor phenotype. PMID:24433848

  4. Critical role of hypoxia and A2A adenosine receptors in liver tissue-protecting physiological anti-inflammatory pathway.

    PubMed

    Choukèr, Alexander; Thiel, Manfred; Lukashev, Dmitriy; Ward, Jerrold M; Kaufmann, Ines; Apasov, Sergey; Sitkovsky, Michail V; Ohta, Akio

    2008-01-01

    Whole body exposure of wild type control littermates and A2A adenosine receptor (A2AR) gene deleted mice to low oxygen containing inspired gas mixture allowed the investigation of the mechanism that controls inflammatory liver damage and protects the liver using a mouse model of T cell-mediated viral and autoimmune hepatitis. We tested the hypothesis that the inflammatory tissue damage-associated hypoxia and extracellular adenosine --> A2AR signaling plays an important role in the physiological anti-inflammatory mechanism that limits liver damage during fulminant hepatitis. After induction of T cell-mediated hepatitis, mice were kept in modular chambers either under normoxic (21% oxygen) or hypoxic (10% oxygen) conditions for 8 h. It was shown that the whole body exposure to hypoxic atmosphere caused tissue hypoxia in healthy animals as evidenced by a decrease in the arterial blood oxygen tension and increase of the plasma adenosine concentration (P < 0.05). This "hypoxic" treatment resulted in significantly reduced hepatocellular damage and attenuated levels of serum cytokines in mice with acute liver inflammation. The anti-inflammatory effects of hypoxia were not observed in the absence of A2AR in studies of A2AR gene-deficient mice or when A2AR have been pharmacologically antagonized with synthetic antagonist. The presented data demonstrate that total body hypoxia-triggered pathway provides protection in acute hepatitis and that hypoxia (upstream) and A2AR (downstream) function in the same immunosuppressive and liver tissue-protecting pathway.

  5. Direct or indirect stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors enhances bone regeneration as well as bone morphogenetic protein-2

    PubMed Central

    Mediero, Aránzazu; Wilder, Tuere; Perez-Aso, Miguel; Cronstein, Bruce N.

    2015-01-01

    Promoting bone regeneration and repair of bone defects is a need that has not been well met to date. We have previously found that adenosine, acting via A2A receptors (A2AR) promotes wound healing and inhibits inflammatory osteolysis and hypothesized that A2AR might be a novel target to promote bone regeneration. Therefore, we determined whether direct A2AR stimulation or increasing endogenous adenosine concentrations via purine transport blockade with dipyridamole regulates bone formation. We determined whether coverage of a 3 mm trephine defect in a mouse skull with a collagen scaffold soaked in saline, bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2; 200 ng), 1 μM CGS21680 (A2AR agonist, EC50 = 160 nM), or 1 μM dipyridamole (EC50 = 32 nM) promoted bone regeneration. Microcomputed tomography examination demonstrated that CGS21680 and dipyridamole markedly enhanced bone regeneration as well as BMP-2 8 wk after surgery (60 ± 2%, 79 ± 2%, and 75 ± 1% bone regeneration, respectively, vs. 32 ± 2% in control, P < 0.001). Blockade by a selective A2AR antagonist (ZM241385, 1 μM) or deletion of A2AR abrogated the effect of CGS21680 and dipyridamole on bone regeneration. Both CGS21680 and dipyridamole treatment increased alkaline phosphatase-positive osteoblasts and diminished tartrate resistance acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts in the defects. In vivo imaging with a fluorescent dye for new bone formation revealed a strong fluorescent signal in treated animals that was equivalent to BMP-2. In conclusion, stimulation of A2AR by specific agonists or by increasing endogenous adenosine levels stimulates new bone formation as well as BMP-2 and represents a novel approach to stimulating bone regeneration.—Mediero, A., Wilder, T., Perez-Aso, M., Cronstein, B. N. Direct or indirect stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors enhances bone regeneration as well as bone morphogenetic protein-2. PMID:25573752

  6. Past, present and future of A2A adenosine receptor antagonists in the therapy of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Armentero, Marie Therese; Pinna, Annalisa; Ferré, Sergi; Lanciego, José Luis; Müller, Christa E.; Franco, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Several selective antagonists for adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) are currently under evaluation in clinical trials (phases I to III) to treat Parkinson’s disease, and they will probably soon reach the market. The usefulness of these antagonists has been deduced from studies demonstrating functional interactions between dopamine D2 and adenosine A2A receptors in the basal ganglia. At present it is believed that A2AR antagonists can be used in combination with the dopamine precursor L-DOPA to minimize the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s patients. However, a considerable body of data indicates that in addition to ameliorating motor symptoms, adenosine A2AR antagonists may also prevent neurodegeneration. Despite these promising indications, one further issue must be considered in order to develop fully optimized anti-parkinsonian drug therapy, namely the existence of receptor (hetero)dimers/oligomers of G protein-coupled receptors, a topic currently the focus of intense debate within the scientific community. Dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs) expressed in the striatum are known to form heteromers with A2A adenosine receptors. Thus, the development of heteromer-specific A2A receptor antagonists represents a promising strategy for the identification of more selective and safer drugs. PMID:21810444

  7. Myocardial blood flow and adenosine A2A receptor density in endurance athletes and untrained men

    PubMed Central

    Heinonen, Ilkka; Nesterov, Sergey V; Liukko, Kaisa; Kemppainen, Jukka; Någren, Kjell; Luotolahti, Matti; Virsu, Pauliina; Oikonen, Vesa; Nuutila, Pirjo; Kujala, Urho M; Kainulainen, Heikki; Boushel, Robert; Knuuti, Juhani; Kalliokoski, Kari K

    2008-01-01

    Previous human studies have shown divergent results concerning the effects of exercise training on myocardial blood flow (MBF) at rest or during adenosine-induced hyperaemia in humans. We studied whether these responses are related to alterations in adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) density in the left-ventricular (LV) myocardium, size and work output of the athlete's heart, or to fitness level. MBF at baseline and during intravenous adenosine infusion, and A2AR density at baseline were measured using positron emission tomography, and by a novel A2AR tracer in 10 healthy male endurance athletes (ET) and 10 healthy untrained (UT) men. Structural LV parameters were measured with echocardiography. LV mass index was 71% higher in ET than UT (193 ± 18 g m−2versus 114 ± 13 g m−2, respectively). MBF per gram of tissue was significantly lower in the ET than UT at baseline, but this was only partly explained by reduced LV work load since MBF corrected for LV work was higher in ET than UT, as well as total MBF. The MBF during adenosine-induced hyperaemia was reduced in ET compared to UT, and the fitter the athlete was, the lower was adenosine-induced MBF. A2AR density was not different between the groups and was not coupled to resting or adenosine-mediated MBF. The novel findings of the present study show that the adaptations in the heart of highly trained endurance athletes lead to relative myocardial ‘overperfusion’ at rest. On the other hand hyperaemic perfusion is reduced, but is not explained by A2AR density. PMID:18772204

  8. Early synaptic deficits in the APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease involve neuronal adenosine A2A receptors

    PubMed Central

    Viana da Silva, Silvia; Haberl, Matthias Georg; Zhang, Pei; Bethge, Philipp; Lemos, Cristina; Gonçalves, Nélio; Gorlewicz, Adam; Malezieux, Meryl; Gonçalves, Francisco Q.; Grosjean, Noëlle; Blanchet, Christophe; Frick, Andreas; Nägerl, U Valentin; Cunha, Rodrigo A.; Mulle, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity in the autoassociative network of recurrent connections among hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells is thought to enable the storage of episodic memory. Impaired episodic memory is an early manifestation of cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the APP/PS1 mouse model of AD amyloidosis, we show that associative long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP) is abolished in CA3 pyramidal cells at an early stage. This is caused by activation of upregulated neuronal adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) rather than by dysregulation of NMDAR signalling or altered dendritic spine morphology. Neutralization of A2AR by acute pharmacological inhibition, or downregulation driven by shRNA interference in a single postsynaptic neuron restore associative CA3 LTP. Accordingly, treatment with A2AR antagonists reverts one-trial memory deficits. These results provide mechanistic support to encourage testing the therapeutic efficacy of A2AR antagonists in early AD patients. PMID:27312972

  9. Activation of the adenosine A2A receptor exacerbates experimental autoimmune neuritis in Lewis rats in association with enhanced humoral immunity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Li, Xiao-Li; Li, Heng; Wang, Shan; Wang, Cong-Cong; Yue, Long-Tao; Xu, Hua; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Hui; Yang, Bing; Duan, Rui-Sheng

    2016-04-15

    Accumulated evidence demonstrated that Adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) is involved in the inflammatory diseases. In the present study, we showed that a selective A2AR agonist, CGS21680, exacerbated experimental autoimmune neuritis in Lewis rats induced with bovine peripheral myelin. The exacerbation was accompanied with reduced CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T cells, increased CD4(+)CXCR5(+) T cells, B cells, dendritic cells and antigen-specific autoantibodies, which is possibly due to the inhibition of IL-2 induced by CGS21680. Combined with previous studies, our data indicate that the effects of A2AR stimulation in vivo are variable in different diseases. Caution should be taken in the use of A2AR agonists. PMID:27049573

  10. Molecular Determinants of CGS21680 Binding to the Human Adenosine A2A Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Patricia C.; Leslie, Andrew G. W.

    2015-01-01

    The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) plays a key role in transmembrane signaling mediated by the endogenous agonist adenosine. Here, we describe the crystal structure of human A2AR thermostabilized in an active-like conformation bound to the selective agonist 2-[p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenylethyl-amino]-5′-N-ethylcarboxamido adenosine (CGS21680) at a resolution of 2.6 Å. Comparison of A2AR structures bound to either CGS21680, 5′-N-ethylcarboxamido adenosine (NECA), UK432097 [6-(2,2-diphenylethylamino)-9-[(2R,3R,4S,5S)-5-(ethylcarbamoyl)-3,4-dihydroxy-tetrahydrofuran-2-yl]-N-[2-[[1-(2-pyridyl)-4-piperidyl]carbamoylamino]ethyl]purine-2-carboxamide], or adenosine shows that the adenosine moiety of the ligands binds to the receptor in an identical fashion. However, an extension in CGS21680 compared with adenosine, the (2-carboxyethyl)phenylethylamino group, binds in an extended vestibule formed from transmembrane regions 2 and 7 (TM2 and TM7) and extracellular loops 2 and 3 (EL2 and EL3). The (2-carboxyethyl)phenylethylamino group makes van der Waals contacts with side chains of amino acid residues Glu169EL2, His264EL3, Leu2677.32, and Ile2747.39, and the amine group forms a hydrogen bond with the side chain of Ser672.65. Of these residues, only Ile2747.39 is absolutely conserved across the human adenosine receptor subfamily. The major difference between the structures of A2AR bound to either adenosine or CGS21680 is that the binding pocket narrows at the extracellular surface when CGS21680 is bound, due to an inward tilt of TM2 in that region. This conformation is stabilized by hydrogen bonds formed by the side chain of Ser672.65 to CGS21680, either directly or via an ordered water molecule. Mutation of amino acid residues Ser672.65, Glu169EL2, and His264EL3, and analysis of receptor activation either in the presence or absence of ligands implicates this region in modulating the level of basal activity of A2AR. PMID:25762024

  11. Impact of purification conditions and history on A2A adenosine receptor activity: The role of CHAPS and lipids

    DOE PAGES

    Naranjo, Andrea N.; McNeely, Patrick M.; Katsaras, John; Skaja Robinson, Anne

    2016-05-27

    The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) is a much-studied class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). For biophysical studies, A2AR is commonly purified in a detergent mixture of dodecylmaltoside (DDM), 3-(3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammoniopropane sulfonate (CHAPS), and cholesteryl hemisuccinate (CHS). Here we studied the effects of CHAPS on the ligand binding activity and stability of wild type, full-length human A2AR. We also tested the cholesterol requirement for maintaining the active conformation of the receptor when solubilized in detergent micelles. To this end, the receptor was purified using DDM, DDM/CHAPS, or the short hydrocarbon chain lipid 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC, di-6:0PC). After solubilization in DDM, DDM/CHAPS, ormore » DHPC micelles, although A2AR was found to retain its native-like fold, its binding ability was significantly compromised compared to DDM or DDM/CHAPS with CHS. It therefore appears that although cholesterol is not needed for A2AR to retain a native-like, α-helical conformation, it may be a critical component for high affinity ligand binding. Further, this result suggests that the conformational differences between the active and inactive protein may be so subtle that commonly used spectroscopic methods are unable to differentiate between the two forms, highlighting the need for activity measurements. Furthermore, the studies presented in this paper also underline the importance of the protein’s purification history; i.e., detergents that interact with the protein during purification affect the ligand binding properties of the receptor in an irreversible manner.« less

  12. Deletion of Adenosine A2A Receptors from Astrocytes Disrupts Glutamate Homeostasis Leading to Psychomotor and Cognitive Impairment: Relevance to Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Matos, Marco; Shen, Hai-Ying; Augusto, Elisabete; Wang, Yumei; Wei, Catherine J.; Wang, Yu Tian; Agostinho, Paula; Boison, Detlev; Cunha, Rodrigo A.; Chen, Jiang-Fan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) modulate dopamine and glutamate signaling and thereby may influence some of the psychomotor and cognitive processes associated with schizophrenia. Because astroglial A2AR regulate the availability of glutamate, we hypothesized that they might play an unprecedented role in some of the processes leading to the development of schizophrenia, which we investigated using a mouse line with a selective deletion of A2AR in astrocytes (Gfa2-A2AR knockout [KO] mice]. METHODS We examined Gfa2-A2AR KO mice for behaviors thought to recapitulate some features of schizophrenia, namely enhanced MK-801 psychomotor response (positive symptoms) and decreased working memory (cognitive symptoms). In addition, we probed for neurochemical alterations in the glutamatergic circuitry, evaluating glutamate uptake and release and the levels of key proteins defining glutamatergic signaling (glutamate transporter-I [GLT-I], N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors [NMDA-R] and α-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors [AMPA-R]) to provide a mechanistic understanding of the phenotype encountered. RESULTS We show that Gfa2-A2AR KO mice exhibited enhanced MK-801 psychomotor response and decreased working memory; this was accompanied by a disruption of glutamate homeostasis characterized by aberrant GLT-I activity, increased presynaptic glutamate release, NMDA-R 2B subunit upregulation, and increased internalization of AMPA-R. Accordingly, selective GLT-I inhibition or blockade of GluR1/2 endocytosis prevented the psychomotor and cognitive phenotypes in Gfa2-A2AR KO mice, namely in the nucleus accumbens. CONCLUSIONS These results show that the dysfunction of astrocytic A2AR, by controlling GLT-I activity, triggers an astrocyte-to-neuron wave of communication resulting in disrupted glutamate homeostasis, thought to underlie several endophenotypes relevant to schizophrenia. PMID:25869810

  13. Cocaine self-administration differentially affects allosteric A2A-D2 receptor-receptor interactions in the striatum. Relevance for cocaine use disorder.

    PubMed

    Pintsuk, Julia; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Pomierny, Bartosz; Wydra, Karolina; Zaniewska, Magdalena; Filip, Malgorzata; Fuxe, Kjell

    2016-05-01

    In the current study behavioral and biochemical experiments were performed to study changes in the allosteric A2AR-D2R interactions in the ventral and dorsal striatum after cocaine self-administration versus corresponding yoked saline control. By using ex vivo [(3)H]-raclopride/quinpirole competition experiments, the effects of the A2AR agonist CGS 21680 (100 nM) on the KiH and KiL values of the D2-like receptor (D2-likeR) were determined. One major result was a significant reduction in the D2-likeR agonist high affinity state observed with CGS 21680 after cocaine self-administration in the ventral striatum compared with the yoked saline group. The results therefore support the hypothesis that A2AR agonists can at least in part counteract the motivational actions of cocaine. This action is mediated via the D2-likeR by targeting the A2AR protomer of A2AR-D2-like R heteroreceptor complexes in the ventral striatum, which leads to the reduction of D2-likeR protomer recognition through the allosteric receptor-receptor interaction. In contrast, in the dorsal striatum the CGS 21680-induced antagonistic modulation in the D2-likeR agonist high affinity state was abolished after cocaine self-administration versus the yoked saline group probably due to a local dysfunction/disruption of the A2AR-D2-like R heteroreceptor complexes. Such a change in the dorsal striatum in cocaine self-administration can contribute to the development of either locomotor sensitization, habit-forming learning and/or the compulsive drug seeking by enhanced D2-likeR protomer signaling. Potential differences in the composition and stoichiometry of the A2AR-D2R heteroreceptor complexes, including differential recruitment of sigma 1 receptor, in the ventral and dorsal striatum may explain the differential regional changes observed in the A2A-D2-likeR interactions after cocaine self-administration. PMID:26987369

  14. Genetic blockade of adenosine A2A receptors induces cognitive impairments and anatomical changes related to psychotic symptoms in mice.

    PubMed

    Moscoso-Castro, Maria; Gracia-Rubio, Irene; Ciruela, Francisco; Valverde, Olga

    2016-07-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic severe mental disorder with a presumed neurodevelopmental origin, and no effective treatment. Schizophrenia is a multifactorial disease with genetic, environmental and neurochemical etiology. The main theories on the pathophysiology of this disorder include alterations in dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission in limbic and cortical areas of the brain. Early hypotheses also suggested that nucleoside adenosine is a putative affected neurotransmitter system, and clinical evidence suggests that adenosine adjuvants improve treatment outcomes, especially in poorly responsive patients. Hence, it is important to elucidate the role of the neuromodulator adenosine in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. A2A adenosine receptor (A2AR) subtypes are expressed in brain areas controlling motivational responses and cognition, including striatum, and in lower levels in hippocampus and cerebral cortex. The aim of this study was to characterize A2AR knockout (KO) mice with complete and specific inactivation of A2AR, as an animal model for schizophrenia. We performed behavioral, anatomical and neurochemical studies to assess psychotic-like symptoms in adult male and female KO and wild-type (WT) littermates. Our results show impairments in inhibitory responses and sensory gating in A2AR KO animals. Hyperlocomotion induced by d-amphetamine and MK-801 was reduced in KO animals when compared to WT littermates. Moreover, A2AR KO animals show motor disturbances, social and cognitive alterations. Finally, behavioral impairments were associated with enlargement of brain lateral ventricles and decreased BDNF levels in the hippocampus. These data highlight the role of adenosine in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and provide new possibilities for the therapeutic management of schizophrenia. PMID:27133030

  15. Adenosine A2A receptors regulate the activity of sleep regulatory GABAergic neurons in the preoptic hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Rai, Seema; Hsieh, Kung-Chiao; McGinty, Dennis; Alam, Md. Noor

    2013-01-01

    The median preoptic nucleus (MnPN) and the ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO) are two hypothalamic regions that have been implicated in sleep regulation, and both nuclei contain sleep-active GABAergic neurons. Adenosine is an endogenous sleep regulatory substance, which promotes sleep via A1 and A2A receptors (A2AR). Infusion of A2AR agonist into the lateral ventricle or into the subarachnoid space underlying the rostral basal forebrain (SS-rBF), has been previously shown to increase sleep. We examined the effects of an A2AR agonist, CGS-21680, administered into the lateral ventricle and the SS-rBF on sleep and c-Fos protein immunoreactivity (Fos-IR) in GABAergic neurons in the MnPN and VLPO. Intracerebroventricular administration of CGS-21680 during the second half of lights-on phase increased sleep and increased the number of MnPN and VLPO GABAergic neurons expressing Fos-IR. Similar effects were found with CGS-21680 microinjection into the SS-rBF. The induction of Fos-IR in preoptic GABAergic neurons was not secondary to drug-induced sleep, since CGS-21680 delivered to the SS-rBF significantly increased Fos-IR in MnPN and VLPO neurons in animals that were not permitted to sleep. Intracerebroventricular infusion of ZM-241385, an A2AR antagonist, during the last 2 h of a 3-h period of sleep deprivation caused suppression of subsequent recovery sleep and reduced Fos-IR in MnPN and VLPO GABAergic neurons. Our findings support a hypothesis that A2AR-mediated activation of MnPN and VLPO GABAergic neurons contributes to adenosinergic regulation of sleep. PMID:23637137

  16. Histamine H3 receptor activation counteracts adenosine A2A receptor-mediated enhancement of depolarization-evoked [3H]-GABA release from rat globus pallidus synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Morales-Figueroa, Guadalupe-Elide; Márquez-Gómez, Ricardo; González-Pantoja, Raúl; Escamilla-Sánchez, Juan; Arias-Montaño, José-Antonio

    2014-08-20

    High levels of histamine H3 receptors (H3Rs) are found in the globus pallidus (GP), a neuronal nucleus in the basal ganglia involved in the control of motor behavior. By using rat GP isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes), we studied whether H3R activation modified the previously reported enhancing action of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) stimulation on depolarization-evoked [(3)H]-GABA release. At 3 and 10 nM, the A2AR agonist CGS-21680 enhanced [(3)H]-GABA release induced by high K(+) (20 mM) and the effect of 3 nM CGS-21680 was prevented by the A2AR antagonist ZM-241385 (100 nM). The presence of presynaptic H3Rs was confirmed by the specific binding of N-α-[methyl-(3)H]-histamine to membranes from GP synaptosomes (maximum binding, Bmax, 1327 ± 79 fmol/mg protein; dissociation constant, Kd, 0.74 nM), which was inhibited by the H3R ligands immepip, clobenpropit, and A-331440 (inhibition constants, Ki, 0.28, 8.53, and 316 nM, respectively). Perfusion of synaptosomes with the H3R agonist immepip (100 nM) had no effect on K(+)-evoked [(3)H]-GABA release, but inhibited the stimulatory action of A2AR activation. In turn, the effect of immepip was blocked by the H3R antagonist clobenpropit, which had no significant effect of its own on K(+)-induced [(3)H]-GABA release. These data indicate that H3R activation selectively counteracts the facilitatory action of A2AR stimulation on GABA release from striato-pallidal projections.

  17. Histamine H3 Receptor Activation Counteracts Adenosine A2A Receptor-Mediated Enhancement of Depolarization-Evoked [3H]-GABA Release from Rat Globus Pallidus Synaptosomes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    High levels of histamine H3 receptors (H3Rs) are found in the globus pallidus (GP), a neuronal nucleus in the basal ganglia involved in the control of motor behavior. By using rat GP isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes), we studied whether H3R activation modified the previously reported enhancing action of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) stimulation on depolarization-evoked [3H]-GABA release. At 3 and 10 nM, the A2AR agonist CGS-21680 enhanced [3H]-GABA release induced by high K+ (20 mM) and the effect of 3 nM CGS-21680 was prevented by the A2AR antagonist ZM-241385 (100 nM). The presence of presynaptic H3Rs was confirmed by the specific binding of N-α-[methyl-3H]-histamine to membranes from GP synaptosomes (maximum binding, Bmax, 1327 ± 79 fmol/mg protein; dissociation constant, Kd, 0.74 nM), which was inhibited by the H3R ligands immepip, clobenpropit, and A-331440 (inhibition constants, Ki, 0.28, 8.53, and 316 nM, respectively). Perfusion of synaptosomes with the H3R agonist immepip (100 nM) had no effect on K+-evoked [3H]-GABA release, but inhibited the stimulatory action of A2AR activation. In turn, the effect of immepip was blocked by the H3R antagonist clobenpropit, which had no significant effect of its own on K+-induced [3H]-GABA release. These data indicate that H3R activation selectively counteracts the facilitatory action of A2AR stimulation on GABA release from striato-pallidal projections. PMID:24884070

  18. Prevention of adenosine A2A receptor activation diminishes beat-to-beat alternation in human atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Molina, Cristina E; Llach, Anna; Herraiz-Martínez, Adela; Tarifa, Carmen; Barriga, Montserrat; Wiegerinck, Rob F; Fernandes, Jacqueline; Cabello, Nuria; Vallmitjana, Alex; Benitéz, Raúl; Montiel, José; Cinca, Juan; Hove-Madsen, Leif

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) has been associated with increased spontaneous calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and linked to increased adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) expression and activation. Here we tested whether this may favor atrial arrhythmogenesis by promoting beat-to-beat alternation and irregularity. Patch-clamp and confocal calcium imaging was used to measure the beat-to-beat response of the calcium current and transient in human atrial myocytes. Responses were classified as uniform, alternating or irregular and stimulation of Gs-protein coupled receptors decreased the frequency where a uniform response could be maintained from 1.0 ± 0.1 to 0.6 ± 0.1 Hz; p < 0.01 for beta-adrenergic receptors and from 1.4 ± 0.1 to 0.5 ± 0.1 Hz; p < 0.05 for A2ARs. The latter was linked to increased spontaneous calcium release and after-depolarizations. Moreover, A2AR activation increased the fraction of non-uniformly responding cells in HL-1 myocyte cultures from 19 ± 3 to 51 ± 9 %; p < 0.02, and electrical mapping in perfused porcine atria revealed that adenosine induced electrical alternans at longer cycle lengths, doubled the fraction of electrodes showing alternation, and increased the amplitude of alternations. Importantly, protein kinase A inhibition increased the highest frequency where uniform responses could be maintained from 0.84 ± 0.12 to 1.86 ± 0.11 Hz; p < 0.001 and prevention of A2AR-activation with exogenous adenosine deaminase selectively increased the threshold from 0.8 ± 0.1 to 1.2 ± 0.1 Hz; p = 0.001 in myocytes from patients with AF. In conclusion, A2AR-activation promotes beat-to-beat irregularities in the calcium transient in human atrial myocytes, and prevention of A2AR activation may be a novel means to maintain uniform beat-to-beat responses at higher beating frequencies in patients with atrial fibrillation.

  19. Adenosine A2A receptor antagonists: blockade of adenosinergic effects and T regulatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Sitkovsky, M; Lukashev, D; Deaglio, S; Dwyer, K; Robson, S C; Ohta, A

    2008-01-01

    The intensity and duration of host responses are determined by protective mechanisms that control tissue injury by dampening down inflammation. Adenosine generation and consequent effects, mediated via A2A adenosine receptors (A2AR) on effector cells, play a critical role in the pathophysiological modulation of these responses in vivo. Adenosine is both released by hypoxic cells/tissues and is also generated from extracellular nucleotides by ecto-enzymes e.g. CD39 (ENTPD1) and CD73 that are expressed by the vasculature and immune cells, in particular by T regulatory cell. In general, these adenosinergic mechanisms minimize the extent of collateral damage to host tissues during the course of inflammatory reactions. However, induction of suppressive pathways might also cause escape of pathogens and permit dissemination. In addition, adenosinergic responses may inhibit immune responses while enhancing vascular angiogenic responses to malignant cells that promote tumor growth. Novel drugs that block A2AR-adenosinergic effects and/or adenosine generation have the potential to boost pathogen destruction and to selectively destroy malignant tissues. In the latter instance, future treatment modalities might include novel ‘anti-adenosinergic' approaches that augment immune clearance of malignant cells and block permissive angiogenesis. This review addresses several possible pharmacological modalities to block adenosinergic pathways and speculates on their future application together with impacts on human disease. PMID:18311159

  20. Continuous adenosine A2A receptor antagonism after focal cerebral ischemia in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Fronz, Ulrike; Deten, Alexander; Baumann, Frank; Kranz, Alexander; Weidlich, Sarah; Härtig, Wolfgang; Nieber, Karen; Boltze, Johannes; Wagner, Daniel-Christoph

    2014-02-01

    Antagonism of the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) has been shown to elicit substantial neuroprotective properties when given immediately after cerebral ischemia. We asked whether the continuous application of a selective A2AR antagonist within a clinically relevant time window will be a feasible and effective approach to treat focal cerebral ischemia. To answer this question, we subjected 20 male spontaneously hypertensive rats to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion and randomized them equally to a verum and a control group. Two hours after stroke onset, the animals received a subcutaneous implantation of an osmotic minipump filled with 5 mg kg(-1) day(-1) 8-(3-chlorostyryl) caffeine (CSC) or vehicle solution. The serum level of CSC was measured twice a day for three consecutive days. The infarct volume was determined at days 1 and 3 using magnetic resonance imaging. We found the serum level of CSC showing a bell-shaped curve with its maximum at 36 h. The infarct volume was not affected by continuous CSC treatment. These results suggest that delayed and continuous CSC application was not sufficient to treat acute ischemic stroke, potentially due to unfavorable hepatic elimination and metabolization of the pharmaceutical. PMID:24170241

  1. Behavioural and biochemical responses to morphine associated with its motivational properties are altered in adenosine A2A receptor knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Castañé, A; Wells, L; Soria, G; Hourani, S; Ledent, C; Kitchen, I; Opacka-Juffry, J; Maldonado, R; Valverde, O

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: The purinergic system through the A2A adenosine receptor regulates addiction induced by different drugs of abuse. The aim of the present study was to investigate the specific role of A2A adenosine receptors (A2ARs) in the behavioural and neurochemical responses to morphine associated with its motivational properties. Experimental approach: Mice lacking A2ARs (A2A knockout (KO) mice) and wild-type littermates were used to evaluate behavioural responses induced by morphine. Antinociception was assessed using the tail-immersion and the hot-plate tests. Place-conditioning paradigms were used to evaluate the rewarding effects of morphine and the dysphoric responses of morphine withdrawal. Microdialysis studies were carried out to evaluate changes in the extracellular levels of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens of A2A KO mice after morphine administration. Key results: The acute administration of morphine induced a similar enhancement of locomotor activity and antinociceptive responses in both genotypes. However, the rewarding effects induced by morphine were completely blocked in A2A KO mice. Also, naloxone did not induce place aversion in animals lacking the A2ARs. Conclusions and implications: Our findings demonstrate that the rewarding and aversive effects associated with morphine abstinence were abolished in A2A KO mice, supporting a differential role of the A2A adenosine receptor in the somatic and motivational effects of morphine addiction. This study provides evidence for the role of A2ARs as general modulators of the motivational properties of drugs of abuse. Pharmacological manipulation of these receptors may represent a new target in the management of drug addiction. PMID:18660831

  2. NF-κB Is Activated in CD4+ iNKT Cells by Sickle Cell Disease and Mediates Rapid Induction of Adenosine A2A Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jennifer C.; Ken, Ruey; Neuberg, Donna; Nathan, David G.; Linden, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Reperfusion injury following tissue ischemia occurs as a consequence of vaso-occlusion that is initiated by activation of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. Sickle cell disease (SDC) results in widely disseminated microvascular ischemia and reperfusion injury as a result of vaso-occlusion by rigid and adhesive sickle red blood cells. In mice, iNKT cell activation requires NF-κB signaling and can be inhibited by the activation of anti-inflammatory adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs). Human iNKT cells are divided into subsets of CD4+ and CD4- cells. In this study we found that human CD4+ iNKT cells, but not CD4- cells undergo rapid NF-κB activation (phosphorylation of NF-κB on p65) and induction of A2ARs (detected with a monoclonal antibody 7F6-G5-A2) during SCD painful vaso-occlusive crises. These findings indicate that SCD primarily activates the CD4+ subset of iNKT cells. Activation of NF-κB and induction of A2ARs is concordant, i.e. only CD4+ iNKT cells with activated NF-κB expressed high levels of A2ARs. iNKT cells that are not activated during pVOC express low levels of A2AR immunoreactivity. These finding suggest that A2AR transcription may be induced in CD4+ iNKT cells as a result of NF-κB activation in SCD. In order to test this hypothesis further we examined cultured human iNKT cells. In cultured cells, blockade of NF-κB with Bay 11–7082 or IKK inhibitor VII prevented rapid induction of A2AR mRNA and protein upon iNKT activation. In conclusion, NF-κB-mediated induction of A2ARs in iNKT cells may serve as a counter-regulatory mechanism to limit the extent and duration of inflammatory immune responses. As activated iNKT cells express high levels of A2ARs following their activation, they may become highly sensitive to inhibition by A2AR agonists. PMID:24124453

  3. A1R-A2AR heteromers coupled to Gs and G i/0 proteins modulate GABA transport into astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Cristóvão-Ferreira, Sofia; Navarro, Gemma; Brugarolas, Marc; Pérez-Capote, Kamil; Vaz, Sandra H; Fattorini, Giorgia; Conti, Fiorenzo; Lluis, Carmen; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; McCormick, Peter J; Casadó, Vicent; Franco, Rafael; Sebastião, Ana M

    2013-09-01

    Astrocytes play a key role in modulating synaptic transmission by controlling extracellular gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels via GAT-1 and GAT-3 GABA transporters (GATs). Using primary cultures of rat astrocytes, we show here that a further level of regulation of GABA uptake occurs via modulation of the GATs by the adenosine A1 (A1R) and A2A (A2AR) receptors. This regulation occurs through A1R-A2AR heteromers that signal via two different G proteins, Gs and Gi/0, and either enhances (A2AR) or inhibits (A1R) GABA uptake. These results provide novel mechanistic insight into how GPCR heteromers signal. Furthermore, we uncover a previously unknown mechanism where adenosine, in a concentration-dependent manner, acts via a heterocomplex of adenosine receptors in astrocytes to significantly contribute to neurotransmission at the tripartite (neuron-glia-neuron) synapse.

  4. GPR88 in A2AR Neurons Enhances Anxiety-Like Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Meirsman, Aura Carole; Robé, Anne; de Kerchove d'Exaerde, Alban; Kieffer, Brigitte Lina

    2016-01-01

    GPR88 is an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor highly expressed in striatal dopamine D1 (receptor) R- and D2R-expressing medium spiny neurons. This receptor is involved in activity and motor responses, and we previously showed that this receptor also regulates anxiety-like behaviors. To determine whether GPR88 in D2R-expressing neurons contributes to this emotional phenotype, we generated conditional Gpr88 knock-out mice using adenosine A2AR (A2AR)-Cre-driven recombination, and compared anxiety-related responses in both total and A2AR-Gpr88 KO mice. A2AR-Gpr88 KO mice showed a selective reduction of Gpr88 mRNA in D2R-expressing, but not D1R-expressing, neurons. These mutant mice showed increased locomotor activity and decreased anxiety-like behaviors in light/dark and elevated plus maze tests. These phenotypes were superimposable on those observed in total Gpr88 KO mice, demonstrating that the previously reported anxiogenic activity of GPR88 operates at the level of A2AR-expressing neurons. Further, A2AR-Gpr88 KO mice showed no change in novelty preference and novelty-suppressed feeding, while these responses were increased and decreased, respectively, in the total Gpr88 KO mice. Also, A2AR-Gpr88 KO mice showed intact fear conditioning, while the fear responses were decreased in total Gpr88 KO. We therefore also show for the first time that GPR88 activity regulates approach behaviors and conditional fear; however, these behaviors do not seem mediated by receptors in A2AR neurons. We conclude that Gpr88 expressed in A2AR neurons enhances ethological anxiety-like behaviors without affecting conflict anxiety and fear responses. PMID:27570825

  5. GPR88 in A2AR Neurons Enhances Anxiety-Like Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Meirsman, Aura Carole; Robé, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract GPR88 is an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor highly expressed in striatal dopamine D1 (receptor) R- and D2R-expressing medium spiny neurons. This receptor is involved in activity and motor responses, and we previously showed that this receptor also regulates anxiety-like behaviors. To determine whether GPR88 in D2R-expressing neurons contributes to this emotional phenotype, we generated conditional Gpr88 knock-out mice using adenosine A2AR (A2AR)-Cre-driven recombination, and compared anxiety-related responses in both total and A2AR-Gpr88 KO mice. A2AR-Gpr88 KO mice showed a selective reduction of Gpr88 mRNA in D2R-expressing, but not D1R-expressing, neurons. These mutant mice showed increased locomotor activity and decreased anxiety-like behaviors in light/dark and elevated plus maze tests. These phenotypes were superimposable on those observed in total Gpr88 KO mice, demonstrating that the previously reported anxiogenic activity of GPR88 operates at the level of A2AR-expressing neurons. Further, A2AR-Gpr88 KO mice showed no change in novelty preference and novelty-suppressed feeding, while these responses were increased and decreased, respectively, in the total Gpr88 KO mice. Also, A2AR-Gpr88 KO mice showed intact fear conditioning, while the fear responses were decreased in total Gpr88 KO. We therefore also show for the first time that GPR88 activity regulates approach behaviors and conditional fear; however, these behaviors do not seem mediated by receptors in A2AR neurons. We conclude that Gpr88 expressed in A2AR neurons enhances ethological anxiety-like behaviors without affecting conflict anxiety and fear responses. PMID:27570825

  6. Elucidating the role of the A2A adenosine receptor in neurodegeneration using neurons derived from Huntington's disease iPSCs.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Feng-Lan; Lin, Jun-Tasi; Chuang, Ching-Yu; Chien, Ting; Chen, Chiung-Mei; Chen, Kai-Hsiang; Hsiao, Han-Yun; Lin, Yow-Sien; Chern, Yijuang; Kuo, Hung-Chih

    2015-11-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal-dominant degenerative disease caused by a cytosine-adenine-guanine trinucleotide expansion in the Huntingtin (htt) gene. The most vulnerable brain areas to mutant HTT-evoked toxicity are the striatum and cortex. In spite of the extensive efforts that have been devoted to the characterization of HD pathogenesis, no disease-modifying therapy for HD is currently available. The A2A adenosine receptor (A2AR) is widely distributed in the brain, with the highest level observed in the striatum. We previously reported that stimulation of the A2AR triggers an anti-apoptotic effect in a rat neuron-like cell line (PC12). Using a transgenic mouse model (R6/2) of HD, we demonstrated that A2AR-selective agonists effectively ameliorate several major symptoms of HD. In the present study, we show that human iPSCs can be successfully induced to differentiate into DARPP32-positive, GABAergic neurons which express the A2AR in a similar manner to striatal medium spiny neurons. When compared with those derived from control subjects (CON-iPSCs), these HD-iPSC-derived neurons exhibited a higher DNA damage response, based on the observed expression of γH2AX and elevated oxidative stress. This is a critical observation, because oxidative damage and abnormal DNA damage/repair have been reported in HD patients. Most importantly, stimulation of the A2AR using selective agonists reduced DNA damage and oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in HD-iPSC-derived neurons through a cAMP/PKA-dependent pathway. These findings support our hypothesis that human neurons derived from diseased iPSCs might serve as an important platform to investigate the beneficial effects and underlying mechanisms of A2AR drugs. PMID:26264576

  7. Molecular Basis of Ligand Dissociation from the Adenosine A2A Receptor.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Pan, Albert C; Dror, Ron O; Mocking, Tamara; Liu, Rongfang; Heitman, Laura H; Shaw, David E; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-05-01

    How drugs dissociate from their targets is largely unknown. We investigated the molecular basis of this process in the adenosine A2Areceptor (A2AR), a prototypical G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Through kinetic radioligand binding experiments, we characterized mutant receptors selected based on molecular dynamic simulations of the antagonist ZM241385 dissociating from the A2AR. We discovered mutations that dramatically altered the ligand's dissociation rate despite only marginally influencing its binding affinity, demonstrating that even receptor features with little contribution to affinity may prove critical to the dissociation process. Our results also suggest that ZM241385 follows a multistep dissociation pathway, consecutively interacting with distinct receptor regions, a mechanism that may also be common to many other GPCRs.

  8. Effects of a Proprietary Standardized Orthosiphon stamineus Ethanolic Leaf Extract on Enhancing Memory in Sprague Dawley Rats Possibly via Blockade of Adenosine A 2A Receptors.

    PubMed

    George, Annie; Chinnappan, Sasikala; Choudhary, Yogendra; Choudhary, Vandana Kotak; Bommu, Praveen; Wong, Hoi Jin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore a propriety standardized ethanolic extract from leaves of Orthosiphon stamineus Benth in improving impairments in short-term social memory in vivo, possibly via blockade of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). The ethanolic extract of O. stamineus leaves showed significant in vitro binding activity of A2AR with 74% inhibition at 150 μg/ml and significant A2AR antagonist activity with 98% inhibition at 300 μg/mL. A significant adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) antagonist activity with 100% inhibition was observed at 300 μg/mL. Its effect on learning and memory was assessed via social recognition task using Sprague Dawley rats whereby the ethanolic extract of O. stamineus showed significant (p < 0.001) change in recognition index (RI) at 300 mg/kg and 600 mg/kg p.o and 120 mg/kg i.p., respectively, compared to the vehicle control. In comparison, the ethanolic extract of Polygonum minus aerial parts showed small change in inflexion; however, it remained insignificant in RI at 200 mg/kg p.o. Our findings suggest that the ethanolic extract of O. stamineus leaves improves memory by reversing age-related deficits in short-term social memory and the possible involvement of adenosine A1 and adenosine A2A as a target bioactivity site in the restoration of memory.

  9. Effects of a Proprietary Standardized Orthosiphon stamineus Ethanolic Leaf Extract on Enhancing Memory in Sprague Dawley Rats Possibly via Blockade of Adenosine A 2A Receptors.

    PubMed

    George, Annie; Chinnappan, Sasikala; Choudhary, Yogendra; Choudhary, Vandana Kotak; Bommu, Praveen; Wong, Hoi Jin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore a propriety standardized ethanolic extract from leaves of Orthosiphon stamineus Benth in improving impairments in short-term social memory in vivo, possibly via blockade of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). The ethanolic extract of O. stamineus leaves showed significant in vitro binding activity of A2AR with 74% inhibition at 150 μg/ml and significant A2AR antagonist activity with 98% inhibition at 300 μg/mL. A significant adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) antagonist activity with 100% inhibition was observed at 300 μg/mL. Its effect on learning and memory was assessed via social recognition task using Sprague Dawley rats whereby the ethanolic extract of O. stamineus showed significant (p < 0.001) change in recognition index (RI) at 300 mg/kg and 600 mg/kg p.o and 120 mg/kg i.p., respectively, compared to the vehicle control. In comparison, the ethanolic extract of Polygonum minus aerial parts showed small change in inflexion; however, it remained insignificant in RI at 200 mg/kg p.o. Our findings suggest that the ethanolic extract of O. stamineus leaves improves memory by reversing age-related deficits in short-term social memory and the possible involvement of adenosine A1 and adenosine A2A as a target bioactivity site in the restoration of memory. PMID:26649059

  10. Effects of a Proprietary Standardized Orthosiphon stamineus Ethanolic Leaf Extract on Enhancing Memory in Sprague Dawley Rats Possibly via Blockade of Adenosine A2A Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Yogendra; Choudhary, Vandana Kotak; Bommu, Praveen; Wong, Hoi Jin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore a propriety standardized ethanolic extract from leaves of Orthosiphon stamineus Benth in improving impairments in short-term social memory in vivo, possibly via blockade of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). The ethanolic extract of O. stamineus leaves showed significant in vitro binding activity of A2AR with 74% inhibition at 150 μg/ml and significant A2AR antagonist activity with 98% inhibition at 300 μg/mL. A significant adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) antagonist activity with 100% inhibition was observed at 300 μg/mL. Its effect on learning and memory was assessed via social recognition task using Sprague Dawley rats whereby the ethanolic extract of O. stamineus showed significant (p < 0.001) change in recognition index (RI) at 300 mg/kg and 600 mg/kg p.o and 120 mg/kg i.p., respectively, compared to the vehicle control. In comparison, the ethanolic extract of Polygonum minus aerial parts showed small change in inflexion; however, it remained insignificant in RI at 200 mg/kg p.o. Our findings suggest that the ethanolic extract of O. stamineus leaves improves memory by reversing age-related deficits in short-term social memory and the possible involvement of adenosine A1 and adenosine A2A as a target bioactivity site in the restoration of memory. PMID:26649059

  11. Assessment of exonic single nucleotide polymorphisms in the adenosine A2A receptor gene to high myopia susceptibility in Chinese subjects

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Xue, Anquan; Chen, Wei; Ding, Yang; Yan, Dongsheng; Peng, Jiqing; Zeng, Changqing; Qu, Jia

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) modulates collagen synthesis and extracellular matrix production in ocular tissues that contribute to eye growth and the development of myopia. We aimed to determine if single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in A2AR exons associates with high myopia found in Chinese subjects. Methods DNA samples were prepared from venous lymphocytes of 175 Chinese subjects with high myopia of less than –8.00 diopters (D) correction and 101 ethnically similar controls with between –1.00 D and +1.00 D correction. The coding region sequences of A2AR were amplified by PCR and analyzed by Sanger sequencing. The detected variations were confirmed by reverse sequencing. Allelic frequencies of all detected common SNPs were assessed for Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium. Results Five variations in A2AR exons, 5675 A>G, 5765 C>T, 13325 G>A, 13448 C>T, and 14000 T>A, were detected in controls at a low frequency (<1%). However, one SNP, 13772 T>C (rs5751876), showed its polymorphism in 53.3% of the total study population. The rs5751876 is a synonymous substitution located in a tyrosine codon of exon 2. Despite no significant difference in genotype distribution between cases and controls, the frequency of heterozygotes with the rs5751876 genotype was significantly lower in subjects with high myopia. Conclusions The reduced frequency of the heterozygote rs5751876 genotype in subjects suggests a possible association of A2AR with high myopia in a Chinese population. PMID:22740769

  12. Agonist Derived Molecular Probes for A2A Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Pannell, Lewis K.; Ji, Xiao-duo; Jarvis, Michael F.; Williams, Michael; Hutchison, Alan J.; Barrington, William W.; Stiles, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    The adenosine agonist 2-(4-(2-carboxyethyl)phenylethylamino)-5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS21680) was recently reported to be selective for the A2A adenosine receptor subtype, which mediates its hypotensive action. To investigate structurelactivity relationships at a distal site, CGS21680 was derivatized using a functionalized congener approach. The carboxylic group of CGS21680 has been esterified to form a methyl ester, which was then treated with ethylenediamine to produce an amine congener. The amine congener was an intermediate for acylation reactions, in which the reactive acyl species contained a reported group, or the precursor for such. For radioiodination, derivatives of p-hydroxyphenylpropionic, 2-thiophenylacetic, and p-aminophenylacetic acids were prepared. The latter derivative (PAPA-APEC) was iodinated electrophilically using [125I]iodide resulting in a radioligand which was used for studies of competition of binding to striatal A, adenosine receptors in bovine brain. A biotin conjugate and an aryl sulfonate were at least 350-fold selective for A, receptors. For spectroscopic detection, a derivative of the stable free radical tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) was prepared. For irreversible inhibition of receptors, meta- and para-phenylenediisothiocyanate groups were incorporated in the analogs. We have demonstrated that binding at A2A receptors is relatively insensitive to distal structural changes at the 2-position, and we report high affinity molecular probes for receptor characterization by radioactive, spectroscopic and affinity labelling methodology. PMID:2561548

  13. Effect of Caffeine Chronically Consumed During Pregnancy on Adenosine A1 and A2A Receptors Signaling in Both Maternal and Fetal Heart from Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, Inmaculada; Albasanz, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    Background: Caffeine is the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, even during pregnancy. Its stimulatory effects are mainly due to antagonism of adenosine actions by blocking adenosine A1 and A2A receptors. Previous studies have shown that caffeine can cross the placenta and therefore modulate these receptors not only in the fetal brain but also in the heart. Methods: In the present work, the effect of caffeine chronically consumed during pregnancy on A1 and A2A receptors in Wistar rat heart, from both mothers and their fetuses, were studied using radioligand binding, Western-blotting, and adenylyl cyclase activity assays, as well as reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results: Caffeine did not significantly alter A1R neither at protein nor at gene expression level in both the maternal and fetal heart. On the contrary, A2AR significantly decreased in the maternal heart, although mRNA was not affected. Gi and Gs proteins were also preserved. Finally, A1R-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity did not change in the maternal heart, but A2AR mediated stimulation of this enzymatic activity significantly decreased according to the detected loss of this receptor. Conclusions: Opposite to the downregulation and desensitization of the A1R/AC pathway previously reported in the brain, these results show that this pathway is not affected in rat heart after caffeine exposure during pregnancy. In addition, A2AR is downregulated and desensitized in the maternal heart, suggesting a differential modulation of these receptor-mediated pathways by caffeine. PMID:25538864

  14. Caffeine promotes anti-tumor immune response during tumor initiation: Involvement of the adenosine A2A receptor.

    PubMed

    Eini, Hadar; Frishman, Valeria; Yulzari, Robert; Kachko, Leonid; Lewis, Eli C; Chaimovitz, Cidio; Douvdevani, Amos

    2015-11-01

    Epidemiologic studies depict a negative correlation between caffeine consumption and incidence of tumors in humans. The main pharmacological effects of caffeine are mediated by antagonism of the adenosine receptor, A2AR. Here, we examine whether the targeting of A2AR by caffeine plays a role in anti-tumor immunity. In particular, the effects of caffeine are studied in wild-type and A2AR knockout (A2AR(-/-)) mice. Tumor induction was achieved using the carcinogen 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MCA). Alternatively, tumor cells, comprised of 3-MCA-induced transformed cells or B16 melanoma cells, were inoculated into animal footpads. Cytokine release was determined in a mixed lymphocyte tumor reaction (MLTR). According to our findings, caffeine-consuming mice (0.1% in water) developed tumors at a lower rate compared to water-consuming mice (14% vs. 53%, respectively, p=0.0286, n=15/group). Within the caffeine-consuming mice, tumor-free mice displayed signs of autoimmune alopecia and pronounced leukocyte recruitment intocarcinogen injection sites. Similarly, A2AR(-/-) mice exhibited reduced rates of 3-MCA-induced tumors. In tumor inoculation studies, caffeine treatment resulted in inhibition of tumor growth and elevation in proinflammatory cytokine release over water-consuming mice, as depicted by MLTR. Addition of the adenosine receptor agonist, NECA, to MLTR resulted in a sharp decrease in IFNγ levels; this was reversed by the highly selective A2AR antagonist, ZM241385. Thus, immune response modulation through either caffeine or genetic deletion of A2AR leads to a Th1 immune profile and suppression of carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis. Taken together, our data suggest that the use of pharmacologic A2AR antagonists may hold therapeutic potential in diminishing the rate of cancer development.

  15. Co-inhibition of CD73 and A2AR Adenosine Signaling Improves Anti-tumor Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Young, Arabella; Ngiow, Shin Foong; Barkauskas, Deborah S; Sult, Erin; Hay, Carl; Blake, Stephen J; Huang, Qihui; Liu, Jing; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Teng, Michele W L; Sachsenmeier, Kris; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-09-12

    Preclinical studies targeting the adenosinergic pathway have gained much attention for their clinical potential in overcoming tumor-induced immunosuppression. Here, we have identified that co-blockade of the ectonucleotidase that generates adenosine CD73 and the A2A adenosine receptor (A2AR) that mediates adenosine signaling in leuokocytes, by using compound gene-targeted mice or therapeutics that target these molecules, limits tumor initiation, growth, and metastasis. This tumor control requires effector lymphocytes and interferon-γ, while antibodies targeting CD73 promote an optimal therapeutic response in vivo when engaging activating Fc receptors. In a two-way mixed leukocyte reaction using a fully human anti-CD73, we demonstrated that Fc receptor binding augmented the production of proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:27622332

  16. Biophysical Mapping of the Adenosine A2A Receptor

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A new approach to generating information on ligand receptor interactions within the binding pocket of G protein-coupled receptors has been developed, called Biophysical Mapping (BPM). Starting from a stabilized receptor (StaR), minimally engineered for thermostability, additional single mutations are then added at positions that could be involved in small molecule interactions. The StaR and a panel of binding site mutants are captured onto Biacore chips to enable characterization of the binding of small molecule ligands using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurement. A matrix of binding data for a set of ligands versus each active site mutation is then generated, providing specific affinity and kinetic information (KD, kon, and koff) of receptor–ligand interactions. This data set, in combination with molecular modeling and docking, is used to map the small molecule binding site for each class of compounds. Taken together, the many constraints provided by these data identify key protein–ligand interactions and allow the shape of the site to be refined to produce a high quality three-dimensional picture of ligand binding, thereby facilitating structure based drug design. Results of biophysical mapping of the adenosine A2A receptor are presented. PMID:21661720

  17. Presymptomatic and symptomatic ALS SOD1(G93A) mice differ in adenosine A1 and A2A receptor-mediated tonic modulation of neuromuscular transmission.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Filipe; Sebastião, Ana M; Ribeiro, Joaquim A

    2015-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a disease leading to neuromuscular transmission impairment. A2A adenosine receptor (A2AR) function changes with disease stage, but the role of the A(1) receptors (A1Rs) is unknown and may have a functional cross-talk with A2AR. The role of A1R in the SOD1(G93A) mouse model of ALS in presymptomatic (4-6 weeks old) and symptomatic (12-14 weeks old) phases was investigated by recording endplate potentials (EPPs), miniature endplate potentials (MEPPs), and quantal content (q.c.) of EPPs, from Mg(2+) paralyzed hemidiaphragm preparations. In presymptomatic mice, the A1R agonist, N (6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) (50 nM), decreased mean EPP amplitude, MEPP frequency, and q.c. of EPPs, an effect quantitatively similar to that in age-matched wild-type (WT) mice. However, coactivation of A2AR with CGS 21680 (5 nM) prevented the effects of CPA in WT mice but not in presymptomatic SOD1(G93A) mice, suggestive of A1R/A2AR cross-talk disruption in this phase of ALS. DPCPX (50 nM) impaired CGS 21680 facilitatory action on neuromuscular transmission in WT but not in presymptomatic mice. In symptomatic animals, CPA only inhibited transmission if added in the presence of adenosine deaminase (ADA, 1 U/mL). ADA and DPCPX enhanced more transmission in symptomatic mice than in age-matched WT mice, suggestive of increase in extracellular adenosine during the symptomatic phase of ALS. The data documents that at the neuromuscular junction of presymptomatic SOD1(G93A) mice, there is a loss of A1R-A2AR functional cross-talk, while in symptomatic mice there is increased A1R tonic activation, and that with disease progression, changes in A1R-mediated adenosine modulation may act as aggravating factors during the symptomatic phase of ALS.

  18. Sesamin protects against renal ischemia reperfusion injury by promoting CD39-adenosine-A2AR signal pathway in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Gong, Xia; Kuang, Ge; Jiang, Rong; Wan, Jingyuan; Wang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) is a leading cause of acute kidney injury with high morbidity and mortality due to limited therapy. Here, we examine whether sesamin attenuates renal IRI in an animal model and explore the underlying mechanisms. Male mice were subjected to right renal ischemia for 30 min followed by reperfusion for 24 h with sesamin (100 mg/kg) during which the left kidney was removed. Renal damage and function were assessed subsequently. The results showed that sesamin reduced kidney ischemia reperfusion injury, as assessed by decreased serum creatinine (Scr) and Blood urea nitrogen (BUN), alleviated tubular damage and apoptosis. In addition, sesamin inhibited neutrophils infiltration and pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β production in IR-preformed kidney. Notably, sesamin promoted the expression of CD39, A2A adenosine receptor (A2AAR), and A2BAR mRNA and protein as well as adenosine production. Furthermore, CD39 inhibitor or A2AR antagonist abolished partly the protection of sesamin in kidney IRI. In conclusion, sesamin could effectively protect kidney from IRI by inhibiting inflammatory responses, which might be associated with promoting the adenosine-CD39-A2AR signaling pathway. PMID:27347331

  19. Gene expression and function of adenosine A(2A) receptor in the rat carotid body.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Conforti, L; Millhorn, D E

    2000-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine whether rat carotid bodies express adenosine (Ado) A(2A) receptors and whether this receptor is involved in the cellular response to hypoxia. Our results demonstrate that rat carotid bodies express the A(2A) and A(2B) Ado receptor mRNAs but not the A(1) or A(3) receptor mRNAs as determined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. In situ hybridization confirmed the expression of the A(2A) receptor mRNA. Immunohistochemical studies further showed that the A(2A) receptor is expressed in the carotid body and that it is colocalized with tyrosine hydroxylase in type I cells. Whole cell voltage-clamp studies using isolated type I cells showed that Ado inhibited the voltage-dependent Ca(2+) currents and that this inhibition was abolished by the selective A(2A) receptor antagonist ZM-241385. Ca(2+) imaging studies using fura 2 revealed that exposure to severe hypoxia induced elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in type I cells and that extracellularly applied Ado significantly attenuated the hypoxia-induced elevation of [Ca(2+)](i). Taken together, our findings indicate that A(2A) receptors are present in type I cells and that activation of A(2A) receptors modulates Ca(2+) accumulation during hypoxia. This mechanism may play a role in regulating intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis and cellular excitability during hypoxia. PMID:10926550

  20. Recruitment of a Cytoplasmic Chaperone Relay by the A2A Adenosine Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Bergmayr, Christian; Thurner, Patrick; Keuerleber, Simon; Kudlacek, Oliver; Nanoff, Christian; Freissmuth, Michael; Gruber, Christian W.

    2013-01-01

    The adenosine A2A receptor is a prototypical rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptor but has several unique structural features, in particular a long C terminus (of >120 residues) devoid of a palmitoylation site. It is known to interact with several accessory proteins other than those canonically involved in signaling. However, it is evident that many more proteins must interact with the A2A receptor, if the trafficking trajectory of the receptor is taken into account from its site of synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to its disposal by the lysosome. Affinity-tagged versions of the A2A receptor were expressed in HEK293 cells to identify interacting partners residing in the ER by a proteomics approach based on tandem affinity purification. The receptor-protein complexes were purified in quantities sufficient for analysis by mass spectrometry. We identified molecular chaperones (heat-shock proteins HSP90α and HSP70-1A) that interact with and retain partially folded A2A receptor prior to ER exit. Complex formation between the A2A receptor and HSP90α (but not HSP90β) and HSP70-1A was confirmed by co-affinity precipitation. HSP90 inhibitors also enhanced surface expression of the receptor in PC12 cells, which endogenously express the A2A receptor. Finally, proteins of the HSP relay machinery (e.g. HOP/HSC70-HSP90 organizing protein and P23/HSP90 co-chaperone) were recovered in complexes with the A2A receptor. These observations are consistent with the proposed chaperone/coat protein complex II exchange model. This posits that cytosolic HSP proteins are sequentially recruited to folding intermediates of the A2A receptor. Release of HSP90 is required prior to recruitment of coat protein complex II components. This prevents premature ER export of partially folded receptors. PMID:23965991

  1. Adenosine A2a receptors and O2 sensing in development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Reduced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, via activation of adenylate kinase and the resulting exponential rise in the cellular AMP/ATP ratio, appears to be a critical factor underlying O2 sensing in many chemoreceptive tissues in mammals. The elevated AMP/ATP ratio, in turn, activates key enzymes that are involved in physiologic adjustments that tend to balance ATP supply and demand. An example is the conversion of AMP to adenosine via 5′-nucleotidase and the resulting activation of adenosine A2A receptors, which are involved in acute oxygen sensing by both carotid bodies and the brain. In fetal sheep, A2A receptors associated with carotid bodies trigger hypoxic cardiovascular chemoreflexes, while central A2A receptors mediate hypoxic inhibition of breathing and rapid eye movements. A2A receptors are also involved in hypoxic regulation of fetal endocrine systems, metabolism, and vascular tone. In developing lambs, A2A receptors play virtually no role in O2 sensing by the carotid bodies, but brain A2A receptors remain critically involved in the roll-off ventilatory response to hypoxia. In adult mammals, A2A receptors have been implicated in O2 sensing by carotid glomus cells, while central A2A receptors likely blunt hypoxic hyperventilation. In conclusion, A2A receptors are crucially involved in the transduction mechanisms of O2 sensing in fetal carotid bodies and brains. Postnatally, central A2A receptors remain key mediators of hypoxic respiratory depression, but they are less critical for O2 sensing in carotid chemoreceptors, particularly in developing lambs. PMID:21677265

  2. Nucleus tractus solitarii A(2a) adenosine receptors inhibit cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of sympathetic outputs.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2014-02-01

    Previously we have shown that stimulation of inhibitory A1 adenosine receptors located in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) attenuates cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) evoked inhibition of renal, adrenal and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Activation of facilitatory A2a adenosine receptors, which dominate over A1 receptors in the NTS, contrastingly alters baseline activity of regional sympathetic outputs: it decreases renal, increases adrenal and does not change lumbar nerve activity. Considering that NTS A2a receptors may facilitate release of inhibitory transmitters we hypothesized that A2a receptors will act in concert with A1 receptors differentially inhibiting regional sympathetic CCR responses (adrenal>lumbar>renal). In urethane/chloralose anesthetized rats (n=38) we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of serotonin 5HT3 receptor agonist, phenylbiguanide, (1-8μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation, blockade or combined blockade and stimulation of NTS A2a adenosine receptors (microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 0.2-20pmol/50nl, ZM-241385 40pmol/100nl or ZM-241385+CGS-21680, respectively). We found that stimulation of A2a adenosine receptors uniformly inhibited the regional sympathetic and hemodynamic reflex responses and this effect was abolished by the selective blockade of NTS A2a receptors. This indicates that A2a receptor triggered inhibition of CCR responses and the contrasting shifts in baseline sympathetic activity are mediated via different mechanisms. These data implicate that stimulation of NTS A2a receptors triggers unknown inhibitory mechanism(s) which in turn inhibit transmission in the CCR pathway when adenosine is released into the NTS during severe hypotension. PMID:24216055

  3. Guanosine may increase absence epileptic activity by means of A2A adenosine receptors in Wistar Albino Glaxo Rijswijk rats.

    PubMed

    Lakatos, Renáta Krisztina; Dobolyi, Árpád; Todorov, Mihail Ivilinov; Kékesi, Katalin A; Juhász, Gábor; Aleksza, Magdolna; Kovács, Zsolt

    2016-06-01

    The non-adenosine nucleoside guanosine (Guo) was demonstrated to decrease quinolinic acid(QA)-induced seizures, spontaneously emerged absence epileptic seizures and lipopolysaccharide(LPS)-evoked induction of absence epileptic seizures suggesting its antiepileptic potential. It was also described previously that intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 20 and 50mg/kg Guo decreased the number of spike-wave discharges (SWDs) in a well investigated model of human absence epilepsy, the Wistar Albino Glaxo Rijswijk (WAG/Rij) rats during 4th (20mg/kg Guo) and 3rd as well as 4th (50mg/kg Guo) measuring hours. Guanosine can potentially decrease SWD number by means of its putative receptors but absence epileptic activity changing effects of Guo by means of increased extracellular adenosine (Ado) cannot be excluded. An increase in the dose of i.p. injected Guo is limited by its low solubility in saline, therefore, we addressed in the present study whether higher doses of Guo, diluted in sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution, have more potent antiepileptic effect in WAG/Rij rats. We confirmed that i.p. 50mg/kg Guo decreased but, surprisingly, i.p. 100mg/kg Guo enhanced the number of SWDs in WAG/Rij rats. Combined i.p. injection of a non-selective Ado receptor antagonist theophylline (5mg/kg) or a selective Ado A2A receptor (A2AR) antagonist SCH 58261 (7-(2-phenylethyl)-5-amino-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo-[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine) (1mg/kg) and a cyclooxygenase 1 and 2/COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitor indomethacin (10mg/kg) with 100mg/kg Guo decreased the SWD number compared to i.p. 100mg/kg Guo alone. The results suggest that i.p. 100mg/kg Guo can increase SWD number by means of the adenosinergic system. PMID:27154620

  4. Lack of tolerance to motor stimulant effects of a selective adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Halldner, L; Lozza, G; Lindström, K; Fredholm, B B

    2000-10-20

    It is well known that tolerance develops to the actions of caffeine, which acts as an antagonist on adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors. Since selective adenosine A(2A) antagonists have been proposed as adjuncts to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) therapy in Parkinson's disease we wanted to examine if tolerance also develops to the selective A(2A) receptor antagonist 5-amino-7-(2-phenylethyl)-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo-[4,3-e]-1,2, 4-triazolo [1,5-c]pyrimidine (SCH 58261). SCH 58261 (0.1 and 7.5 mg/kg) increased basal locomotion and the motor stimulation afforded by apomorphine. Neither effect was subject to tolerance following long-term treatment with the same doses given intraperitoneally twice daily. There were no adaptive changes in A(1) and A(2A) adenosine receptors or their corresponding messenger RNA or in dopamine D(1) or D(2) receptors. These results demonstrate that the tolerance that develops to caffeine is not secondary to its inhibition of adenosine A(2A) receptors. The results also offer hope that long-term treatment with an adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist may be possible in man.

  5. Adenosine A2A Receptors Modulate Acute Injury and Neuroinflammation in Brain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Pedata, Felicita; Pugliese, Anna Maria; Coppi, Elisabetta; Dettori, Ilaria; Maraula, Giovanna; Cellai, Lucrezia; Melani, Alessia

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular concentration of adenosine in the brain increases dramatically during ischemia. Adenosine A2A receptor is expressed in neurons and glial cells and in inflammatory cells (lymphocytes and granulocytes). Recently, adenosine A2A receptor emerged as a potential therapeutic attractive target in ischemia. Ischemia is a multifactorial pathology characterized by different events evolving in the time. After ischemia the early massive increase of extracellular glutamate is followed by activation of resident immune cells, that is, microglia, and production or activation of inflammation mediators. Proinflammatory cytokines, which upregulate cell adhesion molecules, exert an important role in promoting recruitment of leukocytes that in turn promote expansion of the inflammatory response in ischemic tissue. Protracted neuroinflammation is now recognized as the predominant mechanism of secondary brain injury progression. A2A receptors present on central cells and on blood cells account for important effects depending on the time-related evolution of the pathological condition. Evidence suggests that A2A receptor antagonists provide early protection via centrally mediated control of excessive excitotoxicity, while A2A receptor agonists provide protracted protection by controlling massive blood cell infiltration in the hours and days after ischemia. Focus on inflammatory responses provides for adenosine A2A receptor agonists a wide therapeutic time-window of hours and even days after stroke. PMID:25165414

  6. Astrocytic adenosine receptor A2A and Gs-coupled signaling regulate memory

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Anna G.; Hsiao, Edward C.; Wang, Max M.; Ho, Kaitlyn; Kim, Daniel H.; Wang, Xin; Guo, Weikun; Kang, Jing; Yu, Gui-Qiu; Adame, Anthony; Devidze, Nino; Dubal, Dena B.; Masliah, Eliezer; Conklin, Bruce R.; Mucke, Lennart

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes express a variety of G protein-coupled receptors and might influence cognitive functions, such as learning and memory. However, the roles of astrocytic Gs-coupled receptors in cognitive function are not known. We found that humans with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) had increased levels of the Gs-coupled adenosine receptor A2A in astrocytes. Conditional genetic removal of these receptors enhanced long-term memory in young and aging mice, and increased the levels of Arc/Arg3.1, an immediate-early gene required for long-term memory. Chemogenetic activation of astrocytic Gs-coupled signaling reduced long-term memory in mice without affecting learning. Similar to humans with AD, aging mice expressing human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP) showed increased levels of astrocytic A2A receptors. Conditional genetic removal of these receptors enhanced memory in aging hAPP mice. Together, these findings establish a regulatory role for astrocytic Gs-coupled receptors in memory and suggest that AD-linked increases in astrocytic A2A receptor levels contribute to memory loss. PMID:25622143

  7. Astrocytic adenosine receptor A2A and Gs-coupled signaling regulate memory.

    PubMed

    Orr, Anna G; Hsiao, Edward C; Wang, Max M; Ho, Kaitlyn; Kim, Daniel H; Wang, Xin; Guo, Weikun; Kang, Jing; Yu, Gui-Qiu; Adame, Anthony; Devidze, Nino; Dubal, Dena B; Masliah, Eliezer; Conklin, Bruce R; Mucke, Lennart

    2015-03-01

    Astrocytes express a variety of G protein-coupled receptors and might influence cognitive functions, such as learning and memory. However, the roles of astrocytic Gs-coupled receptors in cognitive function are not known. We found that humans with Alzheimer's disease (AD) had increased levels of the Gs-coupled adenosine receptor A2A in astrocytes. Conditional genetic removal of these receptors enhanced long-term memory in young and aging mice and increased the levels of Arc (also known as Arg3.1), an immediate-early gene that is required for long-term memory. Chemogenetic activation of astrocytic Gs-coupled signaling reduced long-term memory in mice without affecting learning. Like humans with AD, aging mice expressing human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP) showed increased levels of astrocytic A2A receptors. Conditional genetic removal of these receptors enhanced memory in aging hAPP mice. Together, these findings establish a regulatory role for astrocytic Gs-coupled receptors in memory and suggest that AD-linked increases in astrocytic A2A receptor levels contribute to memory loss. PMID:25622143

  8. Adenosine A2a receptors form distinct oligomers in protein detergent complexes.

    PubMed

    Schonenbach, Nicole S; Rieth, Monica D; Han, Songi; O'Malley, Michelle A

    2016-09-01

    The human adenosine A2a receptor (A2aR) tunes its function by forming homo-oligomers and hetero-oligomers with other G protein-coupled receptors, but the biophysical characterization of these oligomeric species is limited. Here, we show that upon reconstitution into an optimized mixed micelle system, and purification via an antagonist affinity column, full-length A2aR exists as a distribution of oligomers. We isolated the dimer population from the other oligomers via size exclusion chromatography and showed that it is stable upon dilution, thus supporting the hypotheses that the A2aR dimer has a defined structure and function. This study presents a crucial enabling step to a detailed biophysical characterization of A2aR homodimers. PMID:27543907

  9. Adenosine A2A receptors are necessary and sufficient to trigger memory impairment in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Pagnussat, N; Almeida, A S; Marques, D M; Nunes, F; Chenet, G C; Botton, P H S; Mioranzza, S; Loss, C M; Cunha, R A; Porciúncula, L O

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Caffeine (a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist) prevents memory deficits in aging and Alzheimer’s disease, an effect mimicked by adenosine A2A receptor, but not A1 receptor, antagonists. Hence, we investigated the effects of adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists on memory performance and scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice. Experimental Approach We determined whether A2A receptors are necessary for the emergence of memory impairments induced by scopolamine and whether A2A receptor activation triggers memory deficits in naïve mice, using three tests to assess short-term memory, namely the object recognition task, inhibitory avoidance and modified Y-maze. Key Results Scopolamine (1.0 mg·kg−1, i.p.) impaired short-term memory performance in all three tests and this scopolamine-induced amnesia was prevented by the A2A receptor antagonist (SCH 58261, 0.1–1.0 mg·kg−1, i.p.) and by the A1 receptor antagonist (DPCPX, 0.2–5.0 mg·kg−1, i.p.), except in the modified Y-maze where only SCH58261 was effective. Both antagonists were devoid of effects on memory or locomotion in naïve rats. Notably, the activation of A2A receptors with CGS 21680 (0.1–0.5 mg·kg−1, i.p.) before the training session was sufficient to trigger memory impairment in the three tests in naïve mice, and this effect was prevented by SCH 58261 (1.0 mg·kg−1, i.p.). Furthermore, i.c.v. administration of CGS 21680 (50 nmol) also impaired recognition memory in the object recognition task. Conclusions and Implications These results show that A2A receptors are necessary and sufficient to trigger memory impairment and further suggest that A1 receptors might also be selectively engaged to control the cholinergic-driven memory impairment. PMID:25939452

  10. Adenosine A2A receptors modulate glutamate uptake in cultured astrocytes and gliosomes.

    PubMed

    Matos, Marco; Augusto, Elisabete; Santos-Rodrigues, Alexandre Dos; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Agostinho, Paula

    2012-05-01

    Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, where its toxic build-up leads to synaptic dysfunction and excitotoxic cell death that underlies many neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, efforts have been made to understand the regulation of glutamate transporters, which are responsible for the clearance of extracellular glutamate. We now report that adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A) R) control the uptake of D-aspartate in primary cultured astrocytes as well as in an ex vivo preparation enriched in glial plasmalemmal vesicles (gliosomes) from adult rats, whereas A(1) R and A(3) R were devoid of effects. Thus, the acute exposure to the A(2A) R agonist, CGS 21680, inhibited glutamate uptake, an effect prevented by the A(2A) R antagonist, SCH 58261, and abbrogated in cultured astrocytes from A(2A) R knockout mice. Furthermore, the prolonged activation of A(2A) R lead to a cAMP/protein kinase A-dependent reduction of GLT-I and GLAST mRNA and protein levels, which leads to a sustained decrease of glutamate uptake. This dual mechanism of inhibition of glutamate transporters by astrocytic A(2A) R provides a novel candidate mechanism to understand the ability of A(2) (A) R to control synaptic plasticity and neurodegeneration, two conditions tightly associated with the control of extracellular glutamate levels by glutamate transporters.

  11. Striatal pre- and postsynaptic profile of adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Orru, Marco; Bakešová, Jana; Brugarolas, Marc; Quiroz, César; Beaumont, Vahri; Goldberg, Steven R; Lluís, Carme; Cortés, Antoni; Franco, Rafael; Casadó, Vicent; Canela, Enric I; Ferré, Sergi

    2011-01-11

    Striatal adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs) are highly expressed in medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the indirect efferent pathway, where they heteromerize with dopamine D(2) receptors (D(2)Rs). A(2A)Rs are also localized presynaptically in cortico-striatal glutamatergic terminals contacting MSNs of the direct efferent pathway, where they heteromerize with adenosine A(1) receptors (A(1)Rs). It has been hypothesized that postsynaptic A(2A)R antagonists should be useful in Parkinson's disease, while presynaptic A(2A)R antagonists could be beneficial in dyskinetic disorders, such as Huntington's disease, obsessive-compulsive disorders and drug addiction. The aim or this work was to determine whether selective A(2A)R antagonists may be subdivided according to a preferential pre- versus postsynaptic mechanism of action. The potency at blocking the motor output and striatal glutamate release induced by cortical electrical stimulation and the potency at inducing locomotor activation were used as in vivo measures of pre- and postsynaptic activities, respectively. SCH-442416 and KW-6002 showed a significant preferential pre- and postsynaptic profile, respectively, while the other tested compounds (MSX-2, SCH-420814, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261) showed no clear preference. Radioligand-binding experiments were performed in cells expressing A(2A)R-D(2)R and A(1)R-A(2A)R heteromers to determine possible differences in the affinity of these compounds for different A(2A)R heteromers. Heteromerization played a key role in the presynaptic profile of SCH-442416, since it bound with much less affinity to A(2A)R when co-expressed with D(2)R than with A(1)R. KW-6002 showed the best relative affinity for A(2A)R co-expressed with D(2)R than co-expressed with A(1)R, which can at least partially explain the postsynaptic profile of this compound. Also, the in vitro pharmacological profile of MSX-2, SCH-420814, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261 was is in accordance with their mixed pre- and postsynaptic

  12. Ligand Binding and Subtype Selectivity of the Human A2A Adenosine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Jaakola, Veli-Pekka; Lane, J. Robert; Lin, Judy Y.; Katritch, Vsevolod; IJzerman, Adriaan P.; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of the human A2A adenosine receptor bound to the A2A receptor-specific antagonist, ZM241385, was recently determined at 2.6-Å resolution. Surprisingly, the antagonist binds in an extended conformation, perpendicular to the plane of the membrane, and indicates a number of interactions unidentified before in ZM241385 recognition. To further understand the selectivity of ZM241385 for the human A2A adenosine receptor, we examined the effect of mutating amino acid residues within the binding cavity likely to have key interactions and that have not been previously examined. Mutation of Phe-168 to Ala abolishes both agonist and antagonist binding as well as receptor activity, whereas mutation of this residue to Trp or Tyr had only moderate effects. The Met-177 → Ala mutation impeded antagonist but not agonist binding. Finally, the Leu-249 → Ala mutant showed neither agonist nor antagonist binding affinity. From our results and previously published mutagenesis data, we conclude that conserved residues Phe-168(5.29), Glu-169(5.30), Asn-253(6.55), and Leu-249(6.51) play a central role in coordinating the bicyclic core present in both agonists and antagonists. By combining the analysis of the mutagenesis data with a comparison of the sequences of different adenosine receptor subtypes from different species, we predict that the interactions that determine subtype selectivity reside in the more divergent “upper” region of the binding cavity while the “lower” part of the binding cavity is conserved across adenosine receptor subtypes. PMID:20147292

  13. Antagonists of the human A(2A) receptor. Part 6: Further optimization of pyrimidine-4-carboxamides.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Roger J; Bamford, Samantha J; Clay, Alex; Gaur, Suneel; Haymes, Tim; Jackson, Philip S; Jordan, Allan M; Klenke, Burkhard; Leonardi, Stefania; Liu, Jeanette; Mansell, Howard L; Ng, Sean; Saadi, Mona; Simmonite, Heather; Stratton, Gemma C; Todd, Richard S; Williamson, Douglas S; Yule, Ian A

    2009-09-15

    Antagonists of the human A(2A) receptor have been reported to have potential therapeutic benefit in the alleviation of the symptoms associated with neurodegenerative movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. As part of our efforts to discover potent and selective antagonists of this receptor, we herein describe the detailed optimization and structure-activity relationships of a series of pyrimidine-4-carboxamides. These optimized derivatives display desirable physiochemical and pharmacokinetic profiles, which have led to promising oral activity in clinically relevant models of Parkinson's disease.

  14. An efficient route to xanthine based A(2A) adenosine receptor antagonists and functional derivatives.

    PubMed

    Labeaume, Paul; Dong, Ma; Sitkovsky, Michail; Jones, Elizabeth V; Thomas, Rhiannon; Sadler, Sara; Kallmerten, Amy E; Jones, Graham B

    2010-09-21

    A one-pot route to 8-substituted xanthines has been developed from 5,6-diaminouracils and carboxaldehydes. Yields are good and the process applicable to a range of substrates including a family of A(2A) adenosine receptor antagonists. A new route to the KW-6002 family of antagonists is presented including a pro-drug variant, and application to related image contrast agents developed.

  15. Adenosine A2A Receptor Antagonists and Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This Review summarizes and updates the work on adenosine A2A receptor antagonists for Parkinson’s disease from 2006 to the present. There have been numerous publications, patent applications, and press releases within this time frame that highlight new medicinal chemistry approaches to this attractive and promising target to treat Parkinson’s disease. The Review is broken down by scaffold type and will discuss the efforts to optimize particular scaffolds for activity, pharmacokinetics, and other drug discovery parameters. The majority of approaches focus on preparing selective A2A antagonists, but a few approaches to dual A2A/A1 antagonists will also be highlighted. The in vivo profiles of compounds will be highlighted and discussed to compare activities across different chemical series. A clinical report and update will be given on compounds that have entered clinical trials. PMID:22860156

  16. NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via a GABAergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2015-07-01

    Adenosine is a powerful central neuromodulator acting via opposing A1 (inhibitor) and A2a (activator) receptors. However, in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), both adenosine receptor subtypes attenuate cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) sympathoinhibition of renal, adrenal, and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and attenuate reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Adenosine A1 receptors inhibit glutamatergic transmission in the CCR pathway, whereas adenosine A2a receptors most likely facilitate release of an unknown inhibitory neurotransmitter, which, in turn, inhibits the CCR. We hypothesized that adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the CCR via facilitation of GABA release in the NTS. In urethane-chloralose-anesthetized rats (n = 51), we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of the 5-HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (1-8 μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors [microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 (20 pmol/50 nl)] preceded by blockade of GABAA or GABAB receptors in the NTS [bicuculline (10 pmol/100 nl) or SCH-50911 (1 nmol/100 nl)]. Blockade of GABAA receptors virtually abolished adenosine A2a receptor-mediated inhibition of the CCR. GABAB receptors had much weaker but significant effects. These effects were similar for the different sympathetic outputs. We conclude that stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibits CCR-evoked hemodynamic and regional sympathetic reflex responses via a GABA-ergic mechanism.

  17. NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via a GABAergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2015-07-01

    Adenosine is a powerful central neuromodulator acting via opposing A1 (inhibitor) and A2a (activator) receptors. However, in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), both adenosine receptor subtypes attenuate cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) sympathoinhibition of renal, adrenal, and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and attenuate reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Adenosine A1 receptors inhibit glutamatergic transmission in the CCR pathway, whereas adenosine A2a receptors most likely facilitate release of an unknown inhibitory neurotransmitter, which, in turn, inhibits the CCR. We hypothesized that adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the CCR via facilitation of GABA release in the NTS. In urethane-chloralose-anesthetized rats (n = 51), we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of the 5-HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (1-8 μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors [microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 (20 pmol/50 nl)] preceded by blockade of GABAA or GABAB receptors in the NTS [bicuculline (10 pmol/100 nl) or SCH-50911 (1 nmol/100 nl)]. Blockade of GABAA receptors virtually abolished adenosine A2a receptor-mediated inhibition of the CCR. GABAB receptors had much weaker but significant effects. These effects were similar for the different sympathetic outputs. We conclude that stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibits CCR-evoked hemodynamic and regional sympathetic reflex responses via a GABA-ergic mechanism. PMID:25910812

  18. Communication over the Network of Binary Switches Regulates the Activation of A2A Adenosine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoonji; Choi, Sun; Hyeon, Changbong

    2015-01-01

    Dynamics and functions of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are accurately regulated by the type of ligands that bind to the orthosteric or allosteric binding sites. To glean the structural and dynamical origin of ligand-dependent modulation of GPCR activity, we performed total ~ 5 μsec molecular dynamics simulations of A2A adenosine receptor (A2AAR) in its apo, antagonist-bound, and agonist-bound forms in an explicit water and membrane environment, and examined the corresponding dynamics and correlation between the 10 key structural motifs that serve as the allosteric hotspots in intramolecular signaling network. We dubbed these 10 structural motifs “binary switches” as they display molecular interactions that switch between two distinct states. By projecting the receptor dynamics on these binary switches that yield 210 microstates, we show that (i) the receptors in apo, antagonist-bound, and agonist-bound states explore vastly different conformational space; (ii) among the three receptor states the apo state explores the broadest range of microstates; (iii) in the presence of the agonist, the active conformation is maintained through coherent couplings among the binary switches; and (iv) to be most specific, our analysis shows that W246, located deep inside the binding cleft, can serve as both an agonist sensor and actuator of ensuing intramolecular signaling for the receptor activation. Finally, our analysis of multiple trajectories generated by inserting an agonist to the apo state underscores that the transition of the receptor from inactive to active form requires the disruption of ionic-lock in the DRY motif. PMID:25664580

  19. Ultraslow Water-Mediated Transmembrane Interactions Regulate the Activation of A2A Adenosine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoonji; Kim, Songmi; Choi, Sun; Hyeon, Changbong

    2016-09-20

    Water molecules inside a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) have recently been spotlighted in a series of crystal structures. To decipher the dynamics and functional roles of internal water molecules in GPCR activity, we studied the A2A adenosine receptor using microsecond molecular-dynamics simulations. Our study finds that the amount of water flux across the transmembrane (TM) domain varies depending on the receptor state, and that the water molecules of the TM channel in the active state flow three times more slowly than those in the inactive state. Depending on the location in solvent-protein interface as well as the receptor state, the average residence time of water in each residue varies from ∼O(10(2)) ps to ∼O(10(2)) ns. Especially, water molecules, exhibiting ultraslow relaxation (∼O(10(2)) ns) in the active state, are found around the microswitch residues that are considered activity hotspots for GPCR function. A continuous allosteric network spanning the TM domain, arising from water-mediated contacts, is unique in the active state, underscoring the importance of slow water molecules in the activation of GPCRs. PMID:27653477

  20. Early and transient alteration of adenosine A2A receptor signaling in a mouse model of Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Tarditi, Alessia; Camurri, Alessandra; Varani, Katia; Borea, Pier Andrea; Woodman, Ben; Bates, Gillian; Cattaneo, Elena; Abbracchio, Maria P

    2006-07-01

    Huntington Disease (HD) is characterized by choreic involuntary movements and striatal vulnerability. A2A receptors expressed on GABAergic striatal neurons have been suggested to play a pathogenetic role. Previous data demonstrated the presence of an aberrant alteration of A2A receptor-dependent adenylyl cyclase in an in vitro model of the disease (striatal cells expressing mutant huntingtin) and in peripheral circulating cells of HD patients. Here, we investigated whether this dysfunction is present in the R6/2 HD transgenic mouse model, by analyzing striatal A2A receptor-binding and adenylyl cyclase activity at different developmental stages in comparison with age-matched wild type animals. A transient increase in A2A receptor density (Bmax) and A2A receptor-dependent cAMP production at early presymptomatic ages (7-14 postnatal days) was found. Both alterations normalized to control values starting from postnatal day 21. In contrast, A2A receptor mRNA, as detected by real time PCR, dramatically decreased starting from PND21 until late symptomatic stages (12 weeks of age). The discrepancy between A2A receptor expression and density suggests compensatory mechanisms. These data, reproducing ex vivo the previous observations in vitro, support the hypothesis that an alteration of A2A receptor signaling is present in HD and might represent an interesting target for neuroprotective therapies.

  1. Physical origins of remarkable thermostabilization by an octuple mutation for the adenosine A2a receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajiwara, Yuta; Ogino, Takahiro; Yasuda, Satoshi; Takamuku, Yuuki; Murata, Takeshi; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2016-07-01

    It was experimentally showed that the thermal stability of a membrane protein, the adenosine A2a receptor, was remarkably enhanced by an octuple mutation. Here we theoretically prove that the energy decrease arising from the formation of protein intramolecular hydrogen bonds and the solvent-entropy gain upon protein folding are made substantially larger by the mutation, leading to the remarkable enhancement. The solvent is formed by hydrocarbon groups constituting nonpolar chains of the lipid bilayer within a membrane. The mutation modifies geometric characteristics of the structure so that the solvent crowding can be reduced to a larger extent when the protein folds.

  2. Mass spectrometry-based ligand binding assays on adenosine A1 and A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Massink, A; Holzheimer, M; Hölscher, A; Louvel, J; Guo, D; Spijksma, G; Hankemeier, T; IJzerman, A P

    2015-12-01

    Conventional methods to measure ligand-receptor binding parameters typically require radiolabeled ligands as probes. Despite the robustness of radioligand binding assays, they carry inherent disadvantages in terms of safety precautions, expensive synthesis, special lab requirements, and waste disposal. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a method that can selectively detect ligands without the need of a label. The sensitivity of MS equipment increases progressively, and currently, it is possible to detect low ligand quantities that are usually found in ligand binding assays. We developed a label-free MS ligand binding (MS binding) assay on the adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors (A(1)AR and A(2A)AR), which are well-characterized members of the class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Radioligand binding assays for both receptors are well established, and ample data is available to compare and evaluate the performance of an MS binding assay. 1,3-Dipropyl-8-cyclopentyl-xanthine (DPCPX) and 4-(2-((7-amino-2-(furan-2-yl)-[1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]-[1,3,5]triazin-5-yl)amino)ethyl)phenol (ZM-241,385) are high-affinity ligands selective for the A(1)AR and A(2A)AR, respectively. To proof the feasibility of MS binding on the A(1)AR and A(2A)AR, we first developed an MS detection method for unlabeled DPCPX and ZM-241,385. To serve as internal standards, both compounds were also deuterium-labeled. Subsequently, we investigated whether the two unlabeled compounds could substitute for their radiolabeled counterparts as marker ligands in binding experiments, including saturation, displacement, dissociation, and competition association assays. Furthermore, we investigated the accuracy of these assays if the use of internal standards was excluded. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the MS binding assay, even in the absence of a deuterium-labeled internal standard, and provide great promise for the further development of label-free assays based on MS for other GPCRs. PMID

  3. Key modulatory role of presynaptic adenosine A2A receptors in cortical neurotransmission to the striatal direct pathway.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, César; Luján, Rafael; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Simoes, Ana Patrícia; Lerner, Talia N; Borycz, Janusz; Kachroo, Anil; Canas, Paula M; Orru, Marco; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Rosin, Diane L; Kreitzer, Anatol C; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Watanabe, Masahiko; Ferré, Sergi

    2009-11-18

    Basal ganglia processing results from a balanced activation of direct and indirect striatal efferent pathways, which are controlled by dopamine D1 and D2 receptors, respectively. Adenosine A2A receptors are considered novel antiparkinsonian targets, based on their selective postsynaptic localization in the indirect pathway, where they modulate D2 receptor function. The present study provides evidence for the existence of an additional, functionally significant, segregation of A2A receptors at the presynaptic level. Using integrated anatomical, electrophysiological, and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that presynaptic A2A receptors are preferentially localized in cortical glutamatergic terminals that contact striatal neurons of the direct pathway, where they exert a selective modulation of corticostriatal neurotransmission. Presynaptic striatal A2A receptors could provide a new target for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  4. Increased desensitization of dopamine D₂ receptor-mediated response in the ventral tegmental area in the absence of adenosine A(2A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Al-Hasani, R; Foster, J D; Metaxas, A; Ledent, C; Hourani, S M O; Kitchen, I; Chen, Y

    2011-09-01

    G-protein coupled receptors interact to provide additional regulatory mechanisms for neurotransmitter signaling. Adenosine A(2A) receptors are expressed at a high density in striatal neurons, where they closely interact with dopamine D₂ receptors and modulate effects of dopamine and responses to psychostimulants. A(2A) receptors are expressed at much lower densities in other forebrain neurons but play a more prominent yet opposing role to striatal receptors in response to psychostimulants in mice. It is, therefore, possible that A(2A) receptors expressed at low levels elsewhere in the brain may also regulate neurotransmitter systems and modulate neuronal functions. Dopamine D₂ receptors play an important role in autoinhibition of neuronal firing in dopamine neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and dopamine release in other brain areas. Here, we examined the effect of A(2A) receptor deletion on D₂ receptor-mediated inhibition of neuronal firing in dopamine neurons in the VTA. Spontaneous activity of dopamine neurons was recorded in midbrain slices, and concentration-dependent effects of the dopamine D₂ receptor agonist, quinpirole, was compared between wild-type and A(2A) knockout mice. The potency of quinpirole applied in single concentrations and the expression of D₂ receptors were not altered in the VTA of the knockout mice. However, quinpirole applied in stepwise escalating concentrations caused significantly reduced maximal inhibition in A(2A) knockout mice, indicating an enhanced agonist-induced desensitization of D₂ receptors in the absence of A(2A) receptors. The A(2A) receptor agonist, CGS21680, did not exert any effect on dopamine neuron firing or response to quinpirole, revealing a novel non-pharmacological interaction between adenosine A(2A) receptors and dopaminergic neurotransmission in midbrain dopamine neurons. Altered D₂ receptor desensitization may result in changes in dopamine neuron firing rate and pattern and dopamine

  5. Activation of NTS A2a adenosine receptors differentially resets baroreflex control of renal vs. adrenal sympathetic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Tomoko K; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2009-04-01

    The role of nucleus of solitary tract (NTS) A(2a) adenosine receptors in baroreflex mechanisms is controversial. Stimulation of these receptors releases glutamate within the NTS and elicits baroreflex-like decreases in mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), whereas inhibition of these receptors attenuates HR baroreflex responses. In contrast, stimulation of NTS A(2a) adenosine receptors increases preganglionic adrenal sympathetic nerve activity (pre-ASNA), and the depressor and sympathoinhibitory responses are not markedly affected by sinoaortic denervation and blockade of NTS glutamatergic transmission. To elucidate the role of NTS A(2a) adenosine receptors in baroreflex function, we compared full baroreflex stimulus-response curves for HR, RSNA, and pre-ASNA (intravenous nitroprusside/phenylephrine) before and after bilateral NTS microinjections of selective adenosine A(2a) receptor agonist (CGS-21680; 2.0, 20 pmol/50 nl), selective A(2a) receptor antagonist (ZM-241385; 40 pmol/100 nl), and nonselective A(1) + A(2a) receptor antagonist (8-SPT; 1 nmol/100 nl) in urethane/alpha-chloralose anesthetized rats. Activation of A(2a) receptors decreased the range, upper plateau, and gain of baroreflex-response curves for RSNA, whereas these parameters all increased for pre-ASNA, consistent with direct effects of the agonist on regional sympathetic activity. However, no resetting of baroreflex-response curves along the MAP axis occurred despite the marked decreases in baseline MAP. The antagonists had no marked effects on baseline variables or baroreflex-response functions. We conclude that the activation of NTS A(2a) adenosine receptors differentially alters baroreflex control of HR, RSNA, and pre-ASNA mostly via non-baroreflex mechanism(s), and these receptors have virtually no tonic action on baroreflex control of these sympathetic outputs.

  6. Pharmacological Preconditioning by Adenosine A2a Receptor Stimulation: Features of the Protected Liver Cell Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Alchera, Elisa; Imarisio, Chiara; Mandili, Giorgia; Merlin, Simone; Chandrashekar, Bangalore R.; Novelli, Francesco; Follenzi, Antonia; Carini, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IP) of the liver by a brief interruption of the blood flow protects the damage induced by a subsequent ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) preventing parenchymal and nonparenchymal liver cell damage. The discovery of IP has shown the existence of intrinsic systems of cytoprotection whose activation can stave off the progression of irreversible tissue damage. Deciphering the molecular mediators that underlie the cytoprotective effects of preconditioning can pave the way to important therapeutic possibilities. Pharmacological activation of critical mediators of IP would be expected to emulate or even to intensify its salubrious effects. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated the role of the adenosine A2a receptor (A2aR) as a trigger of liver IP. This review will provide insight into the phenotypic changes that underline the resistance to death of liver cells preconditioned by pharmacological activation of A2aR and their implications to develop innovative strategies against liver IR damage. PMID:26539478

  7. Postsynaptic Adenosine A2A Receptors Modulate Intrinsic Excitability of Pyramidal Cells in the Rat Basolateral Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Andrew R.; Ariwodola, Olusegun J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The basolateral amygdala plays a critical role in the etiology of anxiety disorders and addiction. Pyramidal neurons, the primary output cells of this region, display increased firing following exposure to stressors, and it is thought that this increase in excitability contributes to stress responsivity and the expression of anxiety-like behaviors. However, much remains unknown about the underlying mechanisms that regulate the intrinsic excitability of basolateral amygdala pyramidal neurons. Methods: Ex vivo gramicidin perforated patch recordings were conducted in current clamp mode where hyper- and depolarizing current steps were applied to basolateral amygdala pyramidal neurons to assess the effects of adenosine A2A receptor modulation on intrinsic excitability. Results: Activation of adenosine A2A receptors with the selective A2A receptor agonist CGS-21680 significantly increased the firing rate of basolateral amygdala pyramidal neurons in rat amygdala brain slices, likely via inhibition of the slow afterhyperpolarization potential. Both of these A2A receptor-mediated effects were blocked by preapplication of a selective A2A receptor antagonist (ZM-241385) or by intra-pipette infusion of a protein kinase A inhibitor, suggesting a postsynaptic locus of A2A receptors on basolateral amygdala pyramidal neurons. Interestingly, bath application of the A2A receptor antagonist alone significantly attenuated basolateral amygdala pyramidal cell firing, consistent with a role for tonic adenosine in the regulation of the intrinsic excitability of these neurons. Conclusions: Collectively, these data suggest that adenosine, via activation of A2A receptors, may directly facilitate basolateral amygdala pyramidal cell output, providing a possible balance for the recently described inhibitory effects of adenosine A1 receptor activation on glutamatergic excitation of basolateral amygdala pyramidal cells. PMID:25716780

  8. A2A adenosine receptor regulates the human blood brain barrier permeability

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do-Geun; Bynoe, Margaret S.

    2015-01-01

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) symbolically represents the gateway to the central nervous system. It is a single layer of specialized endothelial cells that coats the central nervous system (CNS) vasculature and physically separates the brain environment from the blood constituents, to maintain the homeostasis of the CNS. However, this protective measure is a hindrance to the delivery of therapeutics to treat neurological diseases. Here, we show that activation of A2A adenosine receptor (AR) with an FDA-approved agonist potently permeabilizes an in vitro primary human brain endothelial barrier (hBBB) to the passage of chemotherapeutic drugs and T cells. T cell migration under AR signaling occurs primarily by paracellular transendothelial route. Permeabilization of the hBBB is rapid, time-dependent and reversible and is mediated by morphological changes in actin-cytoskeletal reorganization induced by RhoA signaling and a potent down-regulation of Claudin-5 and VE-Cadherin. Moreover, the kinetics of BBB permeability in mice closely overlaps with the permeability kinetics of the hBBB. These data suggest that activation of A2A AR is an endogenous mechanism that may be used for CNS drug delivery in human. PMID:25262373

  9. Blockade of adenosine A2A receptors prevents protein phosphorylation in the striatum induced by cortical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, César; Gomes, Catarina; Pak, Arlene C; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Goldberg, Steven R; Hope, Bruce T; Ferré, Sergi

    2006-10-18

    Previous studies have shown that cortical stimulation selectively activates extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation and immediate early gene expression in striatal GABAergic enkephalinergic neurons. In the present study, we demonstrate that blockade of adenosine A2A receptors with caffeine or a selective A2A receptor antagonist counteracts the striatal activation of cAMP-protein kinase A cascade (phosphorylation of the Ser845 residue of the glutamate receptor 1 subunit of the AMPA receptor) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK1/2 phosphorylation) induced by the in vivo stimulation of corticostriatal afferents. The results indicate that A2A receptors strongly modulate the efficacy of glutamatergic synapses on striatal enkephalinergic neurons.

  10. A1 and A2a receptors mediate inhibitory effects of adenosine on the motor activity of human colon.

    PubMed

    Fornai, M; Antonioli, L; Colucci, R; Ghisu, N; Buccianti, P; Marioni, A; Chiarugi, M; Tuccori, M; Blandizzi, C; Del Tacca, M

    2009-04-01

    Experimental evidence in animal models suggests that adenosine is involved in the regulation of digestive functions. This study examines the influence of adenosine on the contractile activity of human colon. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed A(1) and A(2a) receptor expression in colonic neuromuscular layers. Circular muscle preparations were connected to isotonic transducers to determine the effects of 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX; A(1) receptor antagonist), ZM 241385 (A(2a) receptor antagonist), CCPA (A(1) receptor agonist) and 2-[(p-2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino]-5'-N-ethyl-carboxamide-adenosine (CGS 21680; A(2a) receptor agonist) on motor responses evoked by electrical stimulation or carbachol. Electrically evoked contractions were enhanced by DPCPX and ZM 241385, and reduced by CCPA and CGS 21680. Similar effects were observed when colonic preparations were incubated with guanethidine (noradrenergic blocker), L-732,138, GR-159897 and SB-218795 (NK receptor antagonists). However, in the presence of guanethidine, NK receptor antagonists and N(omega)-propyl-L-arginine (NPA; neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), the effects of DPCPX and CCPA were still evident, while those of ZM 241385 and CGS 21680 no longer occurred. Carbachol-induced contractions were unaffected by A(2a) receptor ligands, but they were enhanced or reduced by DPCPX and CCPA, respectively. When colonic preparations were incubated with guanethidine, NK antagonists and atropine, electrically induced relaxations were partly reduced by ZM 241385 or NPA, but unaffected by DPCPX. Dipyridamole or application of exogenous adenosine reduced electrically and carbachol-evoked contractions, whereas adenosine deaminase enhanced such motor responses. In conclusion, adenosine exerts an inhibitory control on human colonic motility. A(1) receptors mediate direct modulating actions on smooth muscle, whereas A(2a) receptors operate through inhibitory nitrergic nerve pathways.

  11. An Update on Adenosine A2A-Dopamine D2 receptor interactions. Implications for the Function of G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ferré, S.; Quiroz, C.; Woods, A. S.; Cunha, R.; Popoli, P.; Ciruela, F.; Lluis, C.; Franco, R.; Azdad, K.; Schiffmann, S. N.

    2008-01-01

    Adenosine A2A-dopamine D2 receptor interactions play a very important role in striatal function. A2A-D2 receptor interactions provide an example of the capabilities of information processing by just two different G protein-coupled receptors. Thus, there is evidence for the coexistence of two reciprocal antagonistic interactions between A2A and D2 receptors in the same neurons, the GABAergic enkephalinergic nens. An antagonistic A2A-D2 intramembrane receptor interaction, which depends on A2A-D2 receptor heteromerization and Gq/11-PLC signaling, modulates neuronal excitability and neurotransmitter release. On the other hand, an antagonistic A2A-D2 receptor interaction at the adenylyl-cyclase level, which depends on Gs/olf- and Gi/o- type V adenylyl-cyclase signaling, modulates protein phosphorylation and gene expression. Finally, under conditions of upregulation of an activator of G protein signaling (AGS3), such as during chronic treatment with addictive drugs, a synergistic A2A-D2 receptor interaction can also be demonstrated. AGS3 facilitates a synergistic interaction between Gs/olf- and Gi/o- coupled receptors on the activation of types II/IV adenylyl cyclase, leading to a paradoxical increase in protein phosphorylation and gene expression upon co-activation of A2A and D2 receptors. The analysis of A2-D2 receptor interactions will have implications for the pathophysiology and treatment of basal ganglia disorders and drug addiction. PMID:18537670

  12. Evaluation of neuronal phosphoproteins as effectors of caffeine and mediators of striatal adenosine A2A receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Bogachan; Galdi, Stacey; Hendrick, Joseph; Greene, Robert W.; Snyder, Gretchen L.; Bibb, James A.

    2007-01-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors are predominantly expressed in the dendrites of enkephalin-positive γ-aminobutyric acidergic medium spiny neurons in the striatum. Evidence indicates that these receptors modulate striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission and regulate motor control, vigilance, alertness, and arousal. Although the physiological and behavioral correlates of adenosine A2A receptor signaling have been extensively studied using a combination of pharmacological and genetic tools, relatively little is known about the signal transduction pathways that mediate the diverse biological functions attributed to this adenosine receptor subtype. Using a candidate approach based on the coupling of these receptors to adenylate cyclase-activating G proteins, a number of membranal, cytosolic, and nuclear phosphoproteins regulated by PKA were evaluated as potential mediators of adenosine A2A receptor signaling in the striatum. Specifically, the adenosine A2A receptor agonist, CGS 21680, was used to determine whether the phosphorylation state of each of the following PKA targets is responsive to adenosine A2A receptor stimulation in this tissue: Ser40 of tyrosine hydroxylase, Ser9 of synapsin, Ser897 of the NR1 subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate-type glutamate receptor, Ser845 of the GluR1 subunit of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid-type glutamate receptor, Ser94 of spinophilin, Thr34 of the dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein, Mr32,000, Ser133 of the cAMP-response element-binding protein, Thr286 of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and Thr202/Tyr204 and Thr183/Tyr185 of the p44 and p42 isoforms, respectively, of mitogen-activated protein kinase. Although the substrates studied differed considerably in their responsiveness to selective adenosine A2A receptor activation, the phosphorylation state of all postsynaptic PKA targets was up-regulated in a time- and dose-dependent manner by treatment with CGS 21680, whereas presynaptic PKA

  13. Evaluation of neuronal phosphoproteins as effectors of caffeine and mediators of striatal adenosine A2A receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Bogachan; Galdi, Stacey; Hendrick, Joseph; Greene, Robert W; Snyder, Gretchen L; Bibb, James A

    2007-01-19

    Adenosine A(2A) receptors are predominantly expressed in the dendrites of enkephalin-positive gamma-aminobutyric acidergic medium spiny neurons in the striatum. Evidence indicates that these receptors modulate striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission and regulate motor control, vigilance, alertness, and arousal. Although the physiological and behavioral correlates of adenosine A(2A) receptor signaling have been extensively studied using a combination of pharmacological and genetic tools, relatively little is known about the signal transduction pathways that mediate the diverse biological functions attributed to this adenosine receptor subtype. Using a candidate approach based on the coupling of these receptors to adenylate cyclase-activating G proteins, a number of membranal, cytosolic, and nuclear phosphoproteins regulated by PKA were evaluated as potential mediators of adenosine A(2A) receptor signaling in the striatum. Specifically, the adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist, CGS 21680, was used to determine whether the phosphorylation state of each of the following PKA targets is responsive to adenosine A(2A) receptor stimulation in this tissue: Ser40 of tyrosine hydroxylase, Ser9 of synapsin, Ser897 of the NR1 subunit of the N-methyl-d-aspartate-type glutamate receptor, Ser845 of the GluR1 subunit of the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid-type glutamate receptor, Ser94 of spinophilin, Thr34 of the dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein, M(r) 32,000, Ser133 of the cAMP-response element-binding protein, Thr286 of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and Thr202/Tyr204 and Thr183/Tyr185 of the p44 and p42 isoforms, respectively, of mitogen-activated protein kinase. Although the substrates studied differed considerably in their responsiveness to selective adenosine A(2A) receptor activation, the phosphorylation state of all postsynaptic PKA targets was up-regulated in a time- and dose-dependent manner by treatment with CGS 21680

  14. Characterization of A2A adenosine receptors in human lymphocyte membranes by [3H]-SCH 58261 binding

    PubMed Central

    Varani, Katia; Gessi, Stefania; Dalpiaz, Alessandro; Ongini, Ennio; Andrea Borea, Pier

    1997-01-01

    The present study describes for the first time the characterization of the adenosine A2A receptor in human lymphocyte membranes with the new potent and selective antagonist radioligand, [3H]-5-amino-7-(2-phenylethyl)-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo [4,3-e]-1,2,4 triazolo [1,5-c] pyrimidine, ([3H]-SCH 58261). In addition, both receptor affinity and potency of reference adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists were determined in binding and adenylyl cyclase studies. Saturation experiments revealed a single class of binding sites with Kd and Bmax values of 0.85 nM and 35 fmol mg−1 protein, respectively. A series of adenosine receptor ligands were found to compete for the binding of 0.8 nM [3H]-SCH 58261 to human lymphocyte membranes with a rank order of potency consistent with that typically found for interactions with the A2A-adenosine receptor. In the adenylyl cyclase assay the same compounds exhibited a rank order of potency similar to that observed in binding experiments. Thermodynamic data indicate that [3H]-SCH 58261 binding to human lymphocytes is entropy and enthalpy-driven, a finding in agreement with the thermodynamic behaviour of antagonists for rat striatal A2A-adenosine receptors. It is concluded that in human lymphocyte membranes [3H]-SCH 58261 directly labels binding sites showing the characteristic properties of the adenosine A2A-receptor. The presence of A2A-receptors in peripheral tissue such as human lymphocytes strongly suggests an important role for adenosine in modulating immune and inflammatory responses. PMID:9313951

  15. Adenosine A(2A) receptor stimulation reduces inflammation and neointimal growth in a murine carotid ligation model.

    PubMed

    McPherson, J A; Barringhaus, K G; Bishop, G G; Sanders, J M; Rieger, J M; Hesselbacher, S E; Gimple, L W; Powers, E R; Macdonald, T; Sullivan, G; Linden, J; Sarembock, I J

    2001-05-01

    Endothelial activation and leukocyte recruitment are early events in atherosclerosis and the vascular response to injury. Adenosine has anti-inflammatory effects on leukocytes and endothelial cells mediated through its A(2A) receptor. We tested the hypothesis that A(2A) activation would reduce inflammation and neointimal formation in a murine carotid ligation model. Before injury, mice were randomized to a 7-day subcutaneous infusion of a specific A(2A) receptor agonist (ATL-146e, 0.004 microg/kg per minute), vehicle control, ATL-146e plus ZM241385 (a selective A(2A) antagonist), or ZM241385 alone. Leukocyte recruitment and adhesion molecule expression were assessed at early time points, and the neointimal area was measured at 14 and 28 days after injury. Compared with control mice, ATL-146e-treated mice had significantly less neutrophil and macrophage recruitment and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and P-selectin expression in the first 7 days after injury. Neointimal area was markedly and persistently reduced by 80% at 14 and 28 days, despite termination of ATL infusion at 7 days. ATL-146e+ZM241385-treated and ZM241385-treated animals had neointimal areas similar to those of control animals, confirming that the observed effects of ATL-146e were mediated specifically by the A(2A) receptor. These data demonstrate that novel stimulation of adenosine A(2A) receptors can inhibit early inflammatory processes that are important in neointimal formation after vascular injury.

  16. [3H]-SCH 58261 labelling of functional A2A adenosine receptors in human neutrophil membranes

    PubMed Central

    Varani, Katia; Gessi, Stefania; Dionisotti, Silvio; Ongini, Ennio; Andrea Borea, Pier

    1998-01-01

    The present study describes the direct labelling of A2A adenosine receptors in human neutrophil membranes with the potent and selective antagonist radioligand, [3H]-5-amino-7-(2-phenylethyl)-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo[4,3-e]-1,2,4 triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine, ([3H]-SCH 58261). In addition, both receptor affinity and potency of a number of adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists were determined in binding, adenylyl cyclase and superoxide anion production assays.Saturation experiments revealed a single class of binding sites with Kd and Bmax values of 1.34 nM and 75 fmol mg−1 protein, respectively. Adenosine receptor ligands competed for the binding of 1 nM [3H]-SCH 58261 to human neutrophil membranes, with a rank order of potency consistent with that typically found for interactions with the A2A adenosine receptors. In the adenylyl cyclase and in the superoxide anion production assays the same compounds exhibited a rank order of potency identical to that observed in binding experiments.Thermodynamic data indicated that [3H]-SCH 58261 binding to human neutrophils is entropy and enthalpy-driven. This finding is in agreement with the thermodynamic behaviour of antagonists binding to rat striatal A2A adenosine receptors.It was concluded that in human neutrophil membranes, [3H]-SCH 58261 directly labels binding sites with pharmacological properties similar to those of A2A adenosine receptors of other tissues. The receptors labelled by [3H]-SCH 58261 mediated the effects of adenosine and adenosine receptor agonists to stimulate cyclic AMP accumulation and inhibition of superoxide anion production in human neutrophils. PMID:9605581

  17. Potential role of A2A adenosine receptor in traumatic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saif; Fatteh, Nadeem; El-Sherbiny, Nehal M; Naime, Mohammad; Ibrahim, Ahmed S; El-Sherbini, Ahmed M; El-Shafey, Sally A; Khan, Sohail; Fulzele, Sadanand; Gonzales, Joyce; Liou, Gregory I

    2013-11-15

    In traumatic optic neuropathy (TON), apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells is closely related to the local production of reactive oxygen species and inflammatory mediators from activated microglial cells. Adenosine receptor A2A (A2AAR) has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory properties that have not been studied in TON. In the present study, we examined the role of A2AAR in retinal complications associated with TON. Initial studies in wild-type mice revealed that treatment with the A2AAR agonist resulted in marked decreases in the TON-induced microglial activation, retinal cell death and releases of reactive oxygen species and pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6. To further assess the role of A2AAR in TON, we studied the effects of A2AAR ablation on the TON-induced retinal abnormalities. A2AAR-/- mice with TON showed a significantly higher mRNA level of TNF-α, Iba1-1 in retinal tissue, and ICAM-1 expression in retinal sections compared with wild-type mice with TON. To explore a potential mechanism by which A2AAR-signaling regulates inflammation in TON, we performed additional studies using hypoxia- or LPS-treated microglial cells as an in vitro model for TON. Activation of A2AAR attenuates hypoxia or LPS-induced TNF-α release and significantly repressed the inflammatory signaling, ERK in the activated microglia. Collectively, this work provides pharmacological and genetic evidence for A2AAR signaling as a control point of cell death in TON and suggests that the retinal protective effect of A2AAR is mediated by attenuating the inflammatory response that occurs in microglia via interaction with MAPKinase pathway.

  18. Membrane omega-3 fatty acids modulate the oligomerisation kinetics of adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Guixà-González, Ramon; Javanainen, Matti; Gómez-Soler, Maricel; Cordobilla, Begoña; Domingo, Joan Carles; Sanz, Ferran; Pastor, Manuel; Ciruela, Francisco; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Selent, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Membrane levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an essential omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (ω-3 PUFA), are decreased in common neuropsychiatric disorders. DHA modulates key cell membrane properties like fluidity, thereby affecting the behaviour of transmembrane proteins like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These receptors, which have special relevance for major neuropsychiatric disorders have recently been shown to form dimers or higher order oligomers, and evidence suggests that DHA levels affect GPCR function by modulating oligomerisation. In this study, we assessed the effect of membrane DHA content on the formation of a class of protein complexes with particular relevance for brain disease: adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptor oligomers. Using extensive multiscale computer modelling, we find a marked propensity of DHA for interaction with both A2A and D2 receptors, which leads to an increased rate of receptor oligomerisation. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) experiments performed on living cells suggest that this DHA effect on the oligomerisation of A2A and D2 receptors is purely kinetic. This work reveals for the first time that membrane ω-3 PUFAs play a key role in GPCR oligomerisation kinetics, which may have important implications for neuropsychiatric conditions like schizophrenia or Parkinson’s disease. PMID:26796668

  19. Membrane omega-3 fatty acids modulate the oligomerisation kinetics of adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guixà-González, Ramon; Javanainen, Matti; Gómez-Soler, Maricel; Cordobilla, Begoña; Domingo, Joan Carles; Sanz, Ferran; Pastor, Manuel; Ciruela, Francisco; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Selent, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Membrane levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an essential omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (ω-3 PUFA), are decreased in common neuropsychiatric disorders. DHA modulates key cell membrane properties like fluidity, thereby affecting the behaviour of transmembrane proteins like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These receptors, which have special relevance for major neuropsychiatric disorders have recently been shown to form dimers or higher order oligomers, and evidence suggests that DHA levels affect GPCR function by modulating oligomerisation. In this study, we assessed the effect of membrane DHA content on the formation of a class of protein complexes with particular relevance for brain disease: adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptor oligomers. Using extensive multiscale computer modelling, we find a marked propensity of DHA for interaction with both A2A and D2 receptors, which leads to an increased rate of receptor oligomerisation. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) experiments performed on living cells suggest that this DHA effect on the oligomerisation of A2A and D2 receptors is purely kinetic. This work reveals for the first time that membrane ω-3 PUFAs play a key role in GPCR oligomerisation kinetics, which may have important implications for neuropsychiatric conditions like schizophrenia or Parkinson’s disease.

  20. Adenosine A2(A) receptor modulates the oxidative stress response of primed polymorphonuclear leukocytes after parabolic flight.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Ines; Feuerecker, Matthias; Salam, Alex; Schelling, Gustav; Thiel, Manfred; Choukèr, Alexander

    2011-07-01

    Space flight and gravitational stress can alter innate immune function. Parabolic flights (PFs) as a model for short-term gravitational changes prime the cytotoxic capability of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). In view of the emerging role of adenosine in the regulation of innate immune responses, we examined the potency of adenosine to control the release of cytotoxic H(2)O(2) by primed PMNs via the adenosine receptor system. During PFs, microgravity conditions (<10(-2) G) are generated for approximately 22 seconds, followed by a hypergravity (1.8 G) phase resulting in gravitational stress. We studied the ex vivo effects of adenosine on the production of H(2)O(2) by stimulated PMNs and determined adenosine plasma levels and adenosine A2(A) receptor transcripts of leukocytes of PF participants (n = 15). Increasing concentrations of adenosine dose dependently reduced tissue-toxic H(2)O(2) production by PMNs with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of 19.5 nM before takeoff and 7.6 nM at 48 hours after PF. This increase in the adenosine-mediated inhibition of PMNs' H(2)O(2) production was completely reversed by addition of the A2(A) receptor antagonist ZM241385. PF induced a nonsignificant elevation in adenosine plasma levels; A2(A) receptor mRNA from leukocytes remained almost unchanged. Adenosine limits the oxidative stress response of PMNs after PFs through an upregulation of the adenosine A2(A) receptor function. This stop signal on inflammation is stronger than that under normal physiologic states and may limit further cytotoxic damage. Pharmacologic manipulation of the adenosine A2(A) receptor pathway could be a potential target for control of unwanted exacerbations of cytotoxic PMN functions.

  1. Time-course of protection by the selective A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 after transient focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Melani, Alessia; Dettori, Ilaria; Corti, Francesca; Cellai, Lucrezia; Pedata, Felicita

    2015-08-01

    Evidence indicates that the adenosine A2A receptor subtype is of critical importance in stroke. In previous studies, in the model of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAo), the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, SCH58261, administered soon after ischemia, proved protective against excessive glutamate outflow in the first 4 h after ischemia and against neurological deficit and tissue damage evaluated 24 h after pMCAo. In the present work, we investigated if neuroprotective effect of SCH58261 was maintained 7 days after transient MCAo (tMCAo). SCH58261 (0.01 mg/kg, i.p.), administered twice/day for 7 days, protected from neurological deficit 1 day after tMCAo, but no more after 5 and 7 days. Two days after tMCAo, SCH58261 did not reduce blood cell infiltration, evaluated as HIS-48 positive cells, into ischemic striatal and cortical tissue. Moreover, 7 days after tMCAo, SCH58261 has not protected ischemic areas from damage and has not ameliorated myelin organization into the ischemic striatum. Protection by the A2A receptor antagonist 24 h after ischemia is attributable to reduced excitotoxicity. Seven days after ischemia the early protective effect of the A2A receptor antagonist likely has been overwhelmed by a secondary damage due to blood cell infiltration and neuroinflammation.

  2. Crystal structures of the A2A adenosine receptor and their use in medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2013-12-20

    New insights into drug design are derived from the X-ray crystallographic structures of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), and the adenosine receptors (ARs) are at the forefront of this effort. The 3D knowledge of receptor binding and activation promises to enable drug discovery for GPCRs in general, and specifically for the ARs. The predictability of modeling based on the X-ray structures of the A2AAR has been well demonstrated in the identification, design and modification of both known and novel AR agonists and antagonists. It is expected that structure-based design of drugs acting through ARs will provide new avenues to clinically useful agents.

  3. Differential role of nitric oxide in regional sympathetic responses to stimulation of NTS A2a adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Scislo, Tadeusz J; Tan, Nobusuke; O'Leary, Donal S

    2005-02-01

    Our previous studies showed that preganglionic adrenal (pre-ASNA), renal (RSNA), lumbar, and postganglionic adrenal sympathetic nerve activities (post-ASNA) are inhibited after stimulation of arterial baroreceptors, nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), and glutamatergic and P2x receptors and are activated after stimulation of adenosine A1 receptors. However, stimulation of adenosine A2a receptors inhibited RSNA and post-ASNA, whereas it activated pre-ASNA. Because the effects evoked by NTS A2a receptors may be mediated via activation of nitric oxide (NO) mechanisms in NTS neurons, we tested the hypothesis that NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors would attenuate regional sympathetic responses to NTS A2a receptor stimulation, whereas NO donors would evoke contrasting responses from pre-ASNA versus RSNA and post-ASNA. Therefore, in chloralose/urethane-anesthetized rats, we compared hemodynamic and regional sympathetic responses to microinjections of selective A2a receptor agonist (CGS-21680, 20 pmol/50 nl) after pretreatment with NOS inhibitors Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (10 nmol/100 nl) and 1-[2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]imidazole (100 pmol/100 nl) versus pretreatment with vehicle (100 nl). In addition, responses to microinjections into the NTS of different NO donors [40 and 400 pmol/50 nl sodium nitroprusside (SNP); 0.5 and 5 nmol/50 nl 3,3-bis(aminoethyl)-1-hydroxy-2-oxo-1-triazene (DETA NONOate, also known as NOC-18), and 2 nmol/50 nl 3-(2-hydroxy-2-nitroso-1-propylhydrazino)-1-propanamine (PAPA NONOate, also known as NOC-15)], the NO precursor L-arginine (10-50 nmol/50 nl), and sodium glutamate (500 pmol/50 nl) were evaluated. SNP, DETA NONOate, and PAPA NONOate activated pre-ASNA and inhibited RSNA and post-ASNA, whereas l-arginine and glutamate microinjected into the same site of the NTS inhibited all these sympathetic outputs. Decreases in heart rate and depressor or biphasic responses accompanied the neural responses. Pretreatment with NOS inhibitors

  4. Vasopressin V1 receptors contribute to hemodynamic and sympathoinhibitory responses evoked by stimulation of adenosine A2a receptors in NTS.

    PubMed

    Scislo, Tadeusz J; O'Leary, Donal S

    2006-05-01

    Activation of adenosine A2a receptors in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) decreases mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), whereas increases in preganglionic adrenal sympathetic nerve activity (pre-ASNA) occur, a pattern similar to that observed during hypotensive hemorrhage. Central vasopressin V1 receptors may contribute to posthemorrhagic hypotension and bradycardia. Both V1 and A2a receptors are densely expressed in the NTS, and both of these receptors are involved in cardiovascular control; thus they may interact. The responses elicited by NTS A2a receptors are mediated mostly via nonglutamatergic mechanisms, possibly via release of vasopressin. Therefore, we investigated whether blockade of NTS V1 receptors alters the autonomic response patterns evoked by stimulation of NTS A2a receptors (CGS-21680, 20 pmol/50 nl) in alpha-chloralose-urethane anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats. In addition, we compared the regional sympathetic responses to microinjections of vasopressin (0.1-100 ng/50 nl) into the NTS. Blockade of V1 receptors reversed the normal decreases in MAP into increases (-95.6 +/- 28.3 vs. 51.4 +/- 15.7 integralDelta%), virtually abolished the decreases in HR (-258.3 +/- 54.0 vs. 18.9 +/- 57.8 integralDeltabeats/min) and RSNA (-239.3 +/- 47.4 vs. 15.9 +/- 36.1 integralDelta%), and did not affect the increases in pre-ASNA (279.7 +/- 48.3 vs. 233.1 +/- 54.1 integralDelta%) evoked by A2a receptor stimulation. The responses partially returned toward normal values approximately 90 min after the blockade. Microinjections of vasopressin into the NTS evoked dose-dependent decreases in HR and RSNA and variable MAP and pre-ASNA responses with a tendency toward increases. We conclude that the decreases in MAP, HR, and RSNA in response to NTS A2a receptor stimulation may be mediated via release of vasopressin from neural terminals in the NTS. The differential effects of NTS V1 and A2a receptors on

  5. Astrocytic adenosine A2A receptors control the amyloid-β peptide-induced decrease of glutamate uptake.

    PubMed

    Matos, Marco; Augusto, Elisabete; Machado, Nuno J; dos Santos-Rodrigues, Alexandre; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Agostinho, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by a progressive cognitive impairment tightly correlated with the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides (mainly Aβ(1-42)). There is a precocious disruption of glutamatergic synapses in AD, in line with an ability of Aβ to decrease astrocytic glutamate uptake. Accumulating evidence indicates that caffeine prevents the burden of AD, likely through the antagonism of A(2A) receptors (A(2A)R) which attenuates Aβ-induced memory impairment and synaptotoxicity. Since A(2A)R also modulate astrocytic glutamate uptake, we now tested if A(2A)R blockade could prevent the decrease of astrocytic glutamate uptake caused by Aβ. In cultured astrocytes, Aβ(1-42). (1 μM for 24 hours) triggered an astrogliosis typified by an increased density of GFAP, which was mimicked by the A(2A)R agonist, CGS 26180 (30 nM), and prevented by the A(2A)R antagonist, SCH 58261 (100 nM). Aβ1-42 also decreased D-aspartate uptake by 28 ± 4%, an effect abrogated upon genetic inactivation or pharmacological blockade of A(2A)R. In accordance with the long term control of glutamate transporter expression by A(2A)R, Aβ(1-42). enhanced the expression and density of astrocytic A(2A)R and decreased GLAST and GLT-I expression in astrocytes from wild type, but not from A(2A)R knockout mice. This impact of Aβ(1-42). on glutamate transporters and uptake, dependent on A(2A)R function, was also confirmed in an ex vivo astrocyte preparation (gliosomes) from rats intracerebroventricularly (icv) injected with Aβ(1-42). . These results provide the first demonstration for a direct key role of astrocytic A(2A)R in the ability of Aβ-induced impairment of glutamate uptake, which may underlie glutamatergic synaptic dysfunction and excitotoxicity in AD.

  6. Lipopolysaccharide rapidly modifies adenosine receptor transcripts in murine and human macrophages: role of NF-kappaB in A(2A) adenosine receptor induction.

    PubMed

    Murphree, Lauren J; Sullivan, Gail W; Marshall, Melissa A; Linden, Joel

    2005-11-01

    The A(2A) adenosine receptor (A(2A)AR) mediates anti-inflammatory actions of adenosine in a variety of cell types. LPS (lipopolysaccharide) was reported to induce a small (<2-fold) increase in the expression of A(2A)AR mRNA in human monocytes and monocytic cell lines. We investigated the effects of LPS on the expression of adenosine receptor mRNAs in primary mouse IPMPhi (intraperitoneal macrophages), human macrophages and Wehi-3 cells. Treatment with 10 ng/ml LPS for 4 h produced a >100-fold increase in A(2A)AR mRNA. LPS-induced increases in mRNA for A(2A)AR and TNFalpha (tumour necrosis factor alpha) are reduced by 90% in IPMPhi pretreated with the NF-kappaB (nuclear factor kappaB) inhibitor, BAY 11-7082 {(E)3-[(4-methylphenyl)sulphonyl]-2-propenenitrile; 10 microM}. In Wehi-3 cells exposed to LPS, A(2A)AR and A(2B)AR transcripts are elevated by 290- and 10-fold respectively, the A(1)AR transcript is unchanged and the A(3)AR transcript is decreased by 67%. The induction of A(2A)AR mRNA by LPS is detectable after 1 h, reaches a peak at 6 h at 600 times control and remains elevated beyond 24 h. The ED50 (effective dose) of LPS is 2.3 ng/ml. A(2A)AR receptor number, measured by 125I-ZM241385 binding to whole cells, is undetectable in naïve cells and increases linearly at a rate of 23 receptors x cell(-1) x min(-1) to a B(max) of 348 fmol/mg (28000 receptors/cell) in 20 h. The increase in receptor number is correlated with an increase in the potency of an A(2A) agonist (4-{3-[6-amino-9-(5-ethylcarbamoyl-3,4-dihydroxy-tetrahydro-furan-2-yl)-9H-purin-2-yl]-prop-2-ynyl}-cyclohexanecarboxylic acid methyl ester; referred to as ATL146e) to stimulate cAMP in these cells. After LPS pretreatment, the potency of the A(2A) agonist, ATL146e, to reduce TNFalpha release from IPMPhi was increased by 200-fold. The results support the hypothesis that regulation of adenosine receptor expression, especially up-regulation of the A(2A)AR, is part of a delayed feedback mechanism

  7. Differential expression of adenosine A3 receptors controls adenosine A2A receptor-mediated inhibition of TLR responses in microglia.

    PubMed

    van der Putten, Céline; Zuiderwijk-Sick, Ella A; van Straalen, Linda; de Geus, Eveline D; Boven, Leonie A; Kondova, Ivanela; IJzerman, Ad P; Bajramovic, Jeffrey J

    2009-06-15

    Microglia activation is a prominent feature in many neuroinflammatory disorders. Unrestrained activation can generate a chronic inflammatory environment that might lead to neurodegeneration and autoimmunity. Extracellular adenosine modulates cellular activation through adenosine receptor (ADORA)-mediated signaling. There are four ADORA subtypes that can either increase (A(2A) and A(2B) receptors) or decrease (A(1) and A(3) receptors) intracellular cyclic AMP levels. The expression pattern of the subtypes thus orchestrates the cellular response to extracellular adenosine. We have investigated the expression of ADORA subtypes in unstimulated and TLR-activated primary rhesus monkey microglia. Activation induced an up-regulation of A(2A) and a down-regulation of A(3) receptor (A(3)R) levels. The altered ADORA-expression pattern sensitized microglia to A(2A) receptor (A(2A)R)-mediated inhibition of subsequent TLR-induced cytokine responses. By using combinations of subtype-specific agonists and antagonists, we revealed that in unstimulated microglia, A(2A)R-mediated inhibitory signaling was effectively counteracted by A(3)R-mediated signaling. In activated microglia, the decrease in A(3)R-mediated signaling sensitized them to A(2A)R-mediated inhibitory signaling. We report a differential, activation state-specific expression of ADORA in microglia and uncover a role for A(3)R as dynamically regulated suppressors of A(2A)R-mediated inhibition of TLR-induced responses. This would suggest exploration of combinations of A(2A)R agonists and A(3)R antagonists to dampen microglial activation during chronic neuroinflammatory conditions.

  8. Presynaptic facilitatory adenosine A2A receptors mediate fade induced by neuromuscular relaxants that exhibit anticholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Bornia, Elaine Cs; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo; Alves-Do-Prado, Wilson

    2011-03-01

    1. Pancuronium, cisatracurium and vecuronium are antinicotinic agents that, in contrast with d-tubocurarine and hexamethonium, exhibit anticholinesterase activity. Pancuronium-, cisatracurium- and vecuronium-induced fade results from blockade of facilitatory nicotinic receptors on motor nerves, but fade produced by such agents also depends on the presynaptic activation of inhibitory muscarinic M2 receptors by acetylcholine released from motor nerve terminals and activation of inhibitory adenosine A1 receptors by adenosine released from motor nerves and muscles. The participation of presynaptic facilitatory A2A receptors in fade caused by pancuronium, cisatracurium and vecuronium has not yet been investigated. In the present study, we determined the effects of ZM241385, an antagonist of presynaptic facilitatory A2A receptors, on fade produced by these neuromuscular relaxants in the rat phrenic nerve-diaphragm (PND) preparation. 2. The muscles were stimulated indirectly at 75±3Hz to induce a sustained tetanizing muscular contraction. The lowest concentration at which each antinicotinic agent produced fade without modifying initial tetanic tension (presynaptic action) was determined. 3. d-Tubocurarine-induced fade occurred only at 55 nmol/L, a concentration that also reduced maximal tetanic tension (post-synaptic action). At 10 nmol/L, ZM 241385 alone did not produce fade, but it did attenuate pancuronium (0.32 μmol/L)-, cisatracurium (0.32 μmol/L)- and vecuronium (0.36 μmol/L)-induced fade. 4. The fade induced by the 'pure' antinicotinic agents d-tubocurarine (55 nmol/L) and hexamethonium (413 μmol/L) was not altered by 10 nmol/L ZM 241385, indicating that presynaptic adenosine A2A receptors play a significant role in the fade produced by antinicotinic agents when such agents have anticholinesterase activity.

  9. [3H]SCH 58261, a selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, is a useful ligand in autoradiographic studies.

    PubMed

    Fredholm, B B; Lindström, K; Dionisotti, S; Ongini, E

    1998-03-01

    We have characterized the new potent and selective nonxanthine adenosine A2A receptor antagonist SCH 58261 as a new radioligand for receptor autoradiography. In autoradiographic studies using agonist radioligands for A2A receptors ([3H]CGS 21680) or A1 receptors (N6-[3H]cyclohexyladenosine), it was found that SCH 58261 is close to 800-fold selective for rat brain A2A versus A1 receptors (Ki values of 1.2 nM versus 0.8 microM). Moreover, receptor autoradiography showed that [3H]SCH 58261, in concentrations below 2 nM, binds only to the dopamine-rich regions of the rat brain, with a K(D) value of 1.4 (0.8-1.8) nM. The maximal number of binding sites was 310 fmol/mg of protein in the striatum. Below concentrations of 3 nM, the nonspecific binding was <15%. Three adenosine analogues displaced all specific binding of [3H] SCH 58261 with the following estimated Ki values (nM): 2-hex-1-ynyl-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine, 3.9 (1.8-8.4); CGS 21680, 130 (42-405); N6-cyclohexyladenosine, 9,985 (3,169-31,462). The binding of low concentrations of SCH 58261 was not influenced by either GTP (100 microM) or Mg2+ (10 mM). The present results show that in its tritium-labeled form, SCH 58261 appears to be a good radioligand for autoradiographic studies, because it does not suffer from some of the problems encountered with the currently used agonist radioligand [3H]CGS 21680.

  10. Adenosine is required for sustained inflammasome activation via the A2A receptor and the HIF-1α pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Xinshou; Ghani, Ayaz; Malik, Ahsan; Wilder, Tuere; Colegio, Oscar Rene; Flavell, Richard Anthony; Cronstein, Bruce Neil; Mehal, Wajahat Zafar

    2013-12-01

    Inflammasome pathways are important in chronic diseases; however, it is not known how the signalling is sustained after initiation. Inflammasome activation is dependent on stimuli such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and ATP that provide two distinct signals resulting in rapid production of interleukin (IL)-1β, with the lack of response to repeat stimulation. Here we report that adenosine is a key regulator of inflammasome activity, increasing the duration of the inflammatory response via the A2A receptor. Adenosine does not replace signals provided by stimuli such as LPS or ATP but sustains inflammasome activity via a cAMP/PKA/CREB/HIF-1α pathway. In the setting of the lack of IL-1β responses after previous exposure to LPS, adenosine can supersede this tolerogenic state and drive IL-1β production. These data reveal that inflammasome activity is sustained, after initial activation, by A2A receptor-mediated signalling.

  11. 3D-pharmacophore models for selective A2A and A2B adenosine receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jing; Wang, Songqing; Gao, Shaofen; Dai, Xuedong; Gao, Qingzhi

    2007-01-01

    Three-dimensional pharmacophore models were generated for A2A and A2B adenosine receptors (ARs) based on highly selective A2A and A2B antagonists using the Catalyst program. The best pharmacophore model for selective A2A antagonists (Hypo-A2A) was obtained through a careful validation process. Four features contained in Hypo-A2A (one ring aromatic feature (R), one positively ionizable feature (P), one hydrogen bond acceptor lipid feature (L), and one hydrophobic feature (H)) seem to be essential for antagonists in terms of binding activity and A2A AR selectivity. The best pharmacophore model for selective A2B antagonists (Hypo-A2B) was elaborated by modifying the Catalyst common features (HipHop) hypotheses generated from the selective A2B antagonists training set. Hypo-A2B also consists of four features: one ring aromatic feature (R), one hydrophobic aliphatic feature (Z), and two hydrogen bond acceptor lipid features (L). All features play an important role in A2B AR binding affinity and are essential for A2B selectivity. Both A2A and A2B pharmacophore models have been validated toward a wide set of test molecules containing structurally diverse selective antagonists of all AR subtypes. They are capable of identifying correspondingly high potent antagonists and differentiating antagonists between subtypes. The results of our study will act as a valuable tool for retrieving structurally diverse compounds with desired biological activities and designing novel selective adenosine receptor ligands. PMID:17330954

  12. 3D-pharmacophore models for selective A2A and A2B adenosine receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jing; Wang, Songqing; Gao, Shaofen; Dai, Xuedong; Gao, Qingzhi

    2007-01-01

    Three-dimensional pharmacophore models were generated for A2A and A2B adenosine receptors (ARs) based on highly selective A2A and A2B antagonists using the Catalyst program. The best pharmacophore model for selective A2A antagonists (Hypo-A2A) was obtained through a careful validation process. Four features contained in Hypo-A2A (one ring aromatic feature (R), one positively ionizable feature (P), one hydrogen bond acceptor lipid feature (L), and one hydrophobic feature (H)) seem to be essential for antagonists in terms of binding activity and A2A AR selectivity. The best pharmacophore model for selective A2B antagonists (Hypo-A2B) was elaborated by modifying the Catalyst common features (HipHop) hypotheses generated from the selective A2B antagonists training set. Hypo-A2B also consists of four features: one ring aromatic feature (R), one hydrophobic aliphatic feature (Z), and two hydrogen bond acceptor lipid features (L). All features play an important role in A2B AR binding affinity and are essential for A2B selectivity. Both A2A and A2B pharmacophore models have been validated toward a wide set of test molecules containing structurally diverse selective antagonists of all AR subtypes. They are capable of identifying correspondingly high potent antagonists and differentiating antagonists between subtypes. The results of our study will act as a valuable tool for retrieving structurally diverse compounds with desired biological activities and designing novel selective adenosine receptor ligands.

  13. Promotion of Wound Healing by an Agonist of Adenosine A2A Receptor Is Dependent on Tissue Plasminogen Activator.

    PubMed

    Montesinos, M Carmen; Desai-Merchant, Avani; Cronstein, Bruce N

    2015-12-01

    Impaired wound healing, as it occurs in diabetes mellitus or long-term corticoid treatment, is commonly associated with disability, diminished quality of life, and high economic costs. Selective agonists of the A2A receptor subtype of adenosine, an endogenous regulator of inflammation, promote tissue repair in animal models, both healthy and with impaired healing. Plasmin-mediated proteolysis of fibrin and other matrix proteins is essential for cell migration at sites of injury. Since adenosine A2A receptor activation increases plasminogen activator release from macrophages and mast cells, we studied the effect of a selective agonist, CGS-21680, on full-thickness excisional wound closure in wild-type, urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA)-deficient, and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)-deficient mice. Wound closure was impaired in tPA- and uPA-deficient mice as compared with wild-type mice, and topical application of CGS-21680 significantly increased the rate at which wounds closed in wild-type mice and uPA-deficient mice, but not in tPA-deficient mice. Immunostaining of tissue sections showed that tPA was present in endothelial cells and histiocytes by day 3 post-wound and also by day 6. In contrast, uPA was more prominent in these cell types only by day 6 post-wound. Our results confirm that plasminogen activation contributes to wound repair and are consistent with the hypothesis that adenosine A2A receptor activation promotes wound closure by a mechanism that depends upon tPA, but not uPA. Moreover, our results suggest that topical adenosine A2A receptor agonists may be useful in promotion of wound closure in patients with impaired wound healing.

  14. Functional expression of adenosine A2A and A3 receptors in the mouse dendritic cell line XS-106.

    PubMed

    Dickenson, John M; Reeder, Steve; Rees, Bob; Alexander, Steve; Kendall, Dave

    2003-08-01

    There is increasing evidence to suggest that adenosine receptors can modulate the function of cells involved in the immune system. For example, human dendritic cells derived from blood monocytes have recently been described to express functional adenosine A1, A2A and A3 receptors. Therefore, in the present study, we have investigated whether the recently established murine dendritic cell line XS-106 expresses functional adenosine receptors. The selective adenosine A3 receptor agonist 1-[2-chloro-6[[(3-iodophenyl)methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-1-deoxy-N-methyl-beta-D-ribofuranuronamide (2-Cl-IB-MECA) inhibited forskolin-mediated [3H]cyclic AMP accumulation and stimulated concentration-dependent increases in p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation. The selective adenosine A2A receptor agonist 4-[2-[[-6-amino-9-(N-ethyl-beta-D-ribofuranuronamidosyl)-9H-purin-2-yl]amino]ethyl]benzene-propanoic acid (CGS 21680) stimulated a robust increase in [3H]cyclic AMP accumulation and p42/p44 MAPK phosphorylation. In contrast, the selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist CPA (N6-cyclopentyladenosine) did not inhibit forskolin-mediated [3H]cyclic AMP accumulation or stimulate increases in p42/p44 MAPK phosphorylation. These observations suggest that XS-106 cells express functional adenosine A2A and A3 receptors. The non-selective adenosine receptor agonist 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) release from XS-106 cells in a concentration-dependent fashion. Furthermore, treatment with Cl-IB-MECA (1 microM) or CGS 21680 (1 microM) alone produced a partial inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-alpha release (when compared to NECA), whereas a combination of both agonists resulted in the inhibition of TNF-alpha release comparable to that observed with NECA alone. Treatment of cells with the adenosine A2A receptor selective antagonists 4-(2-[7-amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a

  15. Adenosine A2A-receptor blockade abolishes the roll-off respiratory response to hypoxia in awake lambs.

    PubMed

    Koos, Brian J; Kawasaki, Yoshikazu; Kim, Young-Han; Bohorquez, Fanor

    2005-05-01

    Adenosine (ADO) receptor antagonists (aminophylline, caffeine) blunt the respiratory roll-off response to hypoxia in the newborn. This study was designed to determine the ADO receptor subtype involved in the respiratory depression. Chronically catheterized lambs of 7-16 days of age breathed via face mask a gas mixture with a fraction of inspired O2 of 0.21 (normoxia) or 0.07 (hypoxia), while being infused intravascularly with 9-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX; ADO A1-receptor antagonist, n=8), ZM-241385 (ADO A2A-receptor antagonist, n=7), or vehicle. Ventilation was measured at 20 degrees C by a turbine transducer flowmeter. In normoxia [arterial Po2 (PaO2) of approximately 83 Torr], infusion of vehicle did not alter cardiorespiratory measurements, whereas hypoxia (PaO2 of approximately 31 Torr, 15 min) elicited biphasic effects on mean arterial pressure (transient increase), heart rate (HR; diminishing tachycardia), and minute ventilation. In the latter, hypoxia increased ventilation to a peak value of approximately 2.5 times control within the first 3 min, which was followed by a significant (P<0.05) decline to approximately 50% of the maximum increment over the subsequent 7 min. ZM-241385 abolished the hypoxic ventilatory roll-off and blunted the rate of rise in HR without affecting mean arterial pressure or rectal temperature responses. In normoxia, DPCPX increased ventilation and mean arterial pressure but did not change HR. Compared with vehicle, DPCPX did not significantly affect cardiorespiratory responses to hypoxemia (PaO2 of approximately 31 Torr, 10 min). It is concluded that 1) ADO A2A receptors are critically involved in the ventilatory roll-off and HR responses to hypoxia, and 2) ADO A1 receptors, which are tonically active in cardiorespiratory control in normoxia, appear to have little impact on hypoxic ventilatory depression.

  16. Adenosine A(1), A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) receptors in hematopoiesis. 1. Expression of receptor mRNA in four mouse hematopoietic precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Streitová, D; Sefc, L; Savvulidi, F; Pospísil, M; Holá, J; Hofer, M

    2010-01-01

    Four mouse bone marrow or thymus cell populations, namely granulopoietic/monocytopoietic, erythropoietic, B-lymphopoietic, and T-lymphopoietic precursor cells have been assayed by RT-PCR technique for the presence and relative amounts of adenosine A(1), A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) receptor mRNA. It has been found that (i) all four populations studied express all four adenosine receptor subtypes, (ii) the A(1), receptor is the least expressed in all populations studied, (iii) the A(3) receptor is markedly expressed in the populations of granulopoietic/monocytopoietic and erythropoietic cells, (iv) the A(2a) receptor is markedly expressed in the populations of B-lymphopoietic and T-lymphopoietic cells, and v) the A(2b) receptor does not predominate in any of the precursor cells studied. Our data offer a new possibility for the assessment of the readiness of these cells to respond, by receptor-mediated mechanisms, to adenosine or its analogs present in the tissues as a result of endogenous processes and/or following their administration.

  17. Blockage of A2A and A3 adenosine receptors decreases the desensitization of human GABAA receptors microtransplanted to Xenopus oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Roseti, Cristina; Palma, Eleonora; Martinello, Katiuscia; Fucile, Sergio; Morace, Roberta; Esposito, Vincenzo; Cantore, Gianpaolo; Arcella, Antonietta; Giangaspero, Felice; Aronica, Eleonora; Mascia, Addolorata; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Quarato, Pier Paolo; Manfredi, Mario; Cristalli, Gloria; Lambertucci, Catia; Marucci, Gabriella; Volpini, Rosaria; Limatola, Cristina; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2009-01-01

    We previously found that the endogenous anticonvulsant adenosine, acting through A2A and A3 adenosine receptors (ARs), alters the stability of currents (IGABA) generated by GABAA receptors expressed in the epileptic human mesial temporal lobe (MTLE). Here we examined whether ARs alter the stability (desensitization) of IGABA expressed in focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) and in periglioma epileptic tissues. The experiments were performed with tissues from 23 patients, using voltage-clamp recordings in Xenopus oocytes microinjected with membranes isolated from human MTLE and FCD tissues or using patch-clamp recordings of pyramidal neurons in epileptic tissue slices. On repetitive activation, the epileptic GABAA receptors revealed instability, manifested by a large IGABA rundown, which in most of the oocytes (≈70%) was obviously impaired by the new A2A antagonists ANR82, ANR94, and ANR152. In most MTLE tissue-microtransplanted oocytes, a new A3 receptor antagonist (ANR235) significantly improved IGABA stability. Moreover, patch-clamped pyramidal neurons from human neocortical slices of periglioma epileptic tissues exhibited altered IGABA rundown on ANR94 treatment. Our findings indicate that antagonizing A2A and A3 receptors increases the IGABA stability in different epileptic tissues and suggest that adenosine derivatives may offer therapeutic opportunities in various forms of human epilepsy. PMID:19721003

  18. Adenosine A2A Receptor Blockade Prevents Rotenone-Induced Motor Impairment in a Rat Model of Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Fathalla, Ahmed M.; Soliman, Amira M.; Ali, Mohamed H.; Moustafa, Ahmed A.

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacological studies implicate the blockade of adenosine receptorsas an effective strategy for reducing Parkinson’s disease (PD) symptoms. The objective of this study is to elucidate the possible protective effects of ZM241385 and 8-cyclopentyl-1, 3-dipropylxanthine, two selective A2A and A1 receptor antagonists, on a rotenone rat model of PD. Rats were split into four groups: vehicle control (1 ml/kg/48 h), rotenone (1.5 mg/kg/48 h, s.c.), ZM241385 (3.3 mg/kg/day, i.p) and 8-cyclopentyl-1, 3-dipropylxanthine (5 mg/kg/day, i.p). After that, animals were subjected to behavioral (stride length and grid walking) and biochemical (measuring concentration of dopamine levels using high performance liquid chromatography, HPLC). In the rotenone group, rats displayed a reduced motor activity and disturbed movement coordination in the behavioral tests and a decreased dopamine concentration as foundby HPLC. The effect of rotenone was partially prevented in the ZM241385 group, but not with 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine administration. The administration of ZM241385 improved motor function and movement coordination (partial increase of stride length and partial decrease in the number of foot slips) and an increase in dopamine concentration in the rotenone-injected rats. However, the 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine and rotenone groups were not significantly different. These results indicate that selective A2A receptor blockade by ZM241385, but not A1 receptor blockadeby 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, may treat PD motor symptoms. This reinforces the potential use of A2A receptor antagonists as a treatment strategy for PD patients. PMID:26973484

  19. Induction of murine adenosine A(2A) receptor expression by LPS: analysis of the 5' upstream promoter.

    PubMed

    Elson, G; Eisenberg, M; Garg, C; Outram, S; Ferrante, C J; Hasko, G; Leibovich, S J

    2013-04-01

    Non-activated macrophages express low levels of A(2A)Rs and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) upregulates A(2A)R expression in an NF-κB-dependent manner. The murine A(2A)R gene is encoded by three exons, m1, m2 and m3. Exons m2 and m3 are conserved, while m1 encodes the 5' untranslated UTR. Three m1 variants have been defined, m1A, m1B and m1C, with m1C being farthest from the transcriptional start site. LPS upregulates A(2A)Rs in primary murine peritoneal and bone-marrow-derived macrophages and RAW264.7 cells by selectively splicing m1C to m2, through a promoter located upstream of m1C. We have cloned ∼1.6 kb upstream of m1C into pGL4.16(luc2CP/Hygro) promoterless vector. This construct in RAW 264.7 cells responds to LPS, and adenosine receptor agonists augmented LPS responsiveness. The NF-κB inhibitors BAY-11 and triptolide inhibited LPS-dependent induction. Deletion of a key proximal NF-κB site (402-417) abrogated LPS responsiveness, while deletion of distal NF-κB and C/EBPβ sites did not. Site-directed mutagenesis of CREB (309-320), STAT1 (526-531) and AP2 (566-569) sites had little effect on LPS and adenosine receptor agonist responsiveness; however, mutation of a second STAT1 site (582-588) abrogated this responsiveness. Further analysis of this promoter should provide valuable insights into regulation of A(2A)R expression in macrophages in response to inflammatory stimuli.

  20. Adenosine through the A2A adenosine receptor increases IL-1β in the brain contributing to anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Gabriel S.; Darmody, Patrick T.; Walsh, John P.; Moon, Morgan L.; Kwakwa, Kristin A.; Bray, Julie K.; McCusker, Robert H.; Freund, Gregory G.

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety is one of the most commonly reported psychiatric conditions, but its pathogenesis is poorly understood. Ailments associated with activation of the innate immune system, however, are increasingly linked to anxiety disorders. In adult male mice, we found that adenosine doubled caspase-1 activity in brain by a pathway reliant on ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, protein kinase A (PKA) and the A2A adenosine receptor (AR). In addition, adenosine-dependent activation of caspase-1 increased interleukin (IL)-1β in the brain by two-fold. Peripheral administration of adenosine in wild-type (WT) mice led to a 2.3-fold increase in caspase-1 activity in the amygdala and to a 33% and 42% reduction in spontaneous locomotor activity and food intake, respectively, that were not observed in caspase-1 knockout (KO), IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1) KO and A2A AR KO mice or in mice administered a caspase-1 inhibitor centrally. Finally, adenosine administration increased anxiety-like behaviors in WT mice by 28% in the open field test and by 55% in the elevated zero-maze. Caspase-1 KO mice, IL-1R1 KO mice, A2A AR KO mice and WT mice treated with the KATP channel blocker, glyburide, were resistant to adenosine-induced anxiety-like behaviors. Thus, our results indicate that adenosine can act as an anxiogenic by activating caspase-1 and increasing IL-1β in the brain. PMID:24907587

  1. Mutagenesis Reveals Structure–Activity Parallels between Human A2A Adenosine Receptors and Biogenic Amine G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qiaoling; Lee, Brian X.; Glashofer, Marc; van Rhee, A. Michiel; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Structure–affinity relationships for ligand binding at the human A2A adenosine receptor have been probed using site-directed mutagenesis in the transmembrane helical domains (TMs). The mutant receptors were expressed in COS-7 cells and characterized by binding of the radioligands [3H]CGS21680, [3H]NECA, and [3H]XAC. Three residues, at positions essential for ligand binding in other G protein-coupled receptors, were individually mutated. The residue V(3.32) in the A2A receptor that is homologous to the essential aspartate residue of TM3 in the biogenic amine receptors, i.e., V84(3.32), may be substituted with L (present in the A3 receptor) but not with D (in biogenic amine receptors) or A. H250(6.52), homologous to the critical N507 of rat m3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, may be substituted with other aromatic residues or with N but not with A (Kim et al. J. Biol. Chem. 1995, 270, 13987–13997). H278(7.43), homologous to the covalent ligand anchor site in rhodopsin, may not be substituted with either A, K, or N. Both V84L(3.32) and H250N(6.52) mutant receptors were highly variable in their effect on ligand competition depending on the structural class of the ligand. Adenosine-5′-uronamide derivatives were more potent at the H250N(6.52) mutant receptor than at wild type receptors. Xanthines tended to be close in potency (H250N(6.52)) or less potent (V84L-(3.32)) than at wild type receptors. The affinity of CGS21680 increased as the pH was lowered to 5.5 in both the wild type and H250N(6.52) mutant receptors. Thus, protonation of H250-(6.52) is not involved in this pH dependence. These data are consistent with a molecular model predicting the proximity of bound agonist ligands to TM3, TM5, TM6, and TM7. PMID:9258366

  2. Adenosine A(2A) receptor modulation of hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapse plasticity during associative learning in behaving mice.

    PubMed

    Fontinha, Bruno M; Delgado-García, José M; Madroñal, Noelia; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Sebastião, Ana M; Gruart, Agnès

    2009-06-01

    Previous in vitro studies have characterized the electrophysiological and molecular signaling pathways of adenosine tonic modulation on long-lasting synaptic plasticity events, particularly for hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). However, it remains to be elucidated whether the long-term changes produced by endogenous adenosine in the efficiency of synapses are related to those required for learning and memory formation. Our goal was to understand how endogenous activation of adenosine excitatory A(2A) receptors modulates the associative learning evolution in conscious behaving mice. We have studied here the effects of the application of a highly selective A(2A) receptor antagonist, SCH58261, upon a well-known associative learning paradigm-classical eyeblink conditioning. We used a trace paradigm, with a tone as the conditioned stimulus (CS) and an electric shock presented to the supraorbital nerve as the unconditioned stimulus (US). A single electrical pulse was presented to the Schaffer collateral-commissural pathway to evoke field EPSPs (fEPSPs) in the pyramidal CA1 area during the CS-US interval. In vehicle-injected animals, there was a progressive increase in the percentage of conditioning responses (CRs) and in the slope of fEPSPs through conditioning sessions, an effect that was completely prevented (and lost) in SCH58261 (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) -injected animals. Moreover, experimentally evoked LTP was impaired in SCH58261-injected mice. In conclusion, the endogenous activation of adenosine A(2A) receptors plays a pivotal effect on the associative learning process and its relevant hippocampal circuits, including activity-dependent changes at the CA3-CA1 synapse.

  3. Expression pattern of FOS in orexin neurons during sleep induced by an adenosine A2A receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Shinsuke; Matsumura, Hitoshi; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Yoshida, Yasushi; Urakami, Takahito; Nakajima, Tomoko; Kimura, Nobuko; Nishino, Seiji; Yoneda, Hiroshi

    2006-06-30

    The present study examined the expression pattern of FOS in the hypothalamic peptide neurons during the sleep-dominant state induced by an adenosine A2A receptor agonist. The control rats, those that received the microdialysis-perfusion of their ventral striatum with artificial cerebrospinal fluid in the dark-active phase, spent 24% of the 90-min period prior to sacrifice in non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep and 2.3% of that in REM sleep. These rats exhibited FOS, a transcription factor, in 21% of their orexin neurons and in 1.0% of their melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) neurons in the perifornical/lateral hypothalamic areas. However, the rats perfused with 50 microM CGS21680, an adenosine A2A receptor agonist, spent 60% of the 90-min period prior to sacrifice in non-REM sleep and 11% of that in REM sleep. These rats exhibited FOS in 1.7% of their orexin neurons and FOS in 0.5% of their MCH neurons. When the sleep-dominant state was disturbed by mild stimulation and the rats were kept in the sleepy state by treatment with a sleep-inducing dose of CGS21680, the rats exhibited FOS in 13.3% of their orexin neurons, which percentage was about half of that for the control rats. These results suggest that the sleep-promoting process induced by this adenosine A2A receptor agonist was associated with a decline in the activity of orexin neurons. MCH neurons are not likely to change their activities during this sleep-promoting process.

  4. 5'-Substituted Amiloride Derivatives as Allosteric Modulators Binding in the Sodium Ion Pocket of the Adenosine A2A Receptor.

    PubMed

    Massink, Arnault; Louvel, Julien; Adlere, Ilze; van Veen, Corine; Huisman, Berend J H; Dijksteel, Gabrielle S; Guo, Dong; Lenselink, Eelke B; Buckley, Benjamin J; Matthews, Hayden; Ranson, Marie; Kelso, Michael; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-05-26

    The sodium ion site is an allosteric site conserved among many G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Amiloride 1 and 5-(N,N-hexamethylene)amiloride 2 (HMA) supposedly bind in this sodium ion site and can influence orthosteric ligand binding. The availability of a high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of the human adenosine A2A receptor (hA2AAR), in which the allosteric sodium ion site was elucidated, makes it an appropriate model receptor for investigating the allosteric site. In this study, we report the synthesis and evaluation of novel 5'-substituted amiloride derivatives as hA2AAR allosteric antagonists. The potency of the amiloride derivatives was assessed by their ability to displace orthosteric radioligand [(3)H]4-(2-((7-amino-2-(furan-2-yl)-[1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]-[1,3,5]triazin-5-yl)amino)ethyl)phenol ([(3)H]ZM-241,385) from both the wild-type and sodium ion site W246A mutant hA2AAR. 4-Ethoxyphenethyl-substituted amiloride 12l was found to be more potent than both amiloride and HMA, and the shift in potency between the wild-type and mutated receptor confirmed its likely binding to the sodium ion site. PMID:27124340

  5. Adenosine modulates hypoxia-induced responses in rat PC12 cells via the A2A receptor.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Conforti, L; Pun, R Y; Millhorn, D E

    1998-04-01

    1. The present study was undertaken to determine the role of adenosine in mediating the cellular responses to hypoxia in rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells, an oxygen-sensitive clonal cell line. 2. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction studies revealed that PC12 cells express adenosine deaminase (the first catalysing enzyme of adenosine degradation) and the A2A and A2B adenosine receptors, but not the A1 or A3 adenosine receptors. 3. Whole-cell current- and voltage-clamp experiments showed that adenosine attenuated the hypoxia-induced membrane depolarization. The hypoxia-induced suppression of the voltage-sensitive potassium current (IK(V)) was markedly reduced by adenosine. Furthermore, extracellularly applied adenosine increased the peak amplitudes of IK(V) in a concentration-dependent manner. This increase was blocked by pretreatment not only with a non-specific adenosine receptor antagonist, 8-phenyltheophylline (8-PT), but also with a selective A2A receptor antagonist, ZM241385. 4. Ca2+ imaging studies using fura-2 acetoxymethyl ester (fura-2 AM) revealed that the increase in intracellular free Ca2+ during hypoxic exposure was attenuated significantly by adenosine. Voltage-clamp studies showed that adenosine inhibited the voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents (ICa) in a concentration-dependent fashion. This inhibition was also abolished by both 8-PT and ZM241385. 5. The modulation of both IK(V) and ICa by adenosine was prevented by intracellular application of an inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA), PKA inhibitor fragment (6-22) amide. In addition, the effect of adenosine on either IK(V) or ICa was absent in PKA-deficient PC12 cells. 6. These results indicate that the modulatory effects of adenosine on the hypoxia-induced membrane responses of PC12 cells are likely to be mediated via activation of the A2A receptor, and that the PKA pathway is required for these modulatory actions. We propose that this modulation serves to regulate membrane excitability in

  6. Adenosine modulates hypoxia-induced responses in rat PC12 cells via the A2A receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shuichi; Conforti, Laura; Pun, Raymund Y K; Millhorn, David E

    1998-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the role of adenosine in mediating the cellular responses to hypoxia in rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells, an oxygen-sensitive clonal cell line. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction studies revealed that PC12 cells express adenosine deaminase (the first catalysing enzyme of adenosine degradation) and the A2A and A2B adenosine receptors, but not the A1 or A3 adenosine receptors. Whole-cell current- and voltage-clamp experiments showed that adenosine attenuated the hypoxia-induced membrane depolarization. The hypoxia-induced suppression of the voltage-sensitive potassium current (IK(V)) was markedly reduced by adenosine. Furthermore, extracellularly applied adenosine increased the peak amplitudes of IK(V) in a concentration-dependent manner. This increase was blocked by pretreatment not only with a non-specific adenosine receptor antagonist, 8-phenyltheophylline (8-PT), but also with a selective A2A receptor antagonist, ZM241385. Ca2+ imaging studies using fura-2 acetoxymethyl ester (fura-2 AM) revealed that the increase in intracellular free Ca2+ during hypoxic exposure was attenuated significantly by adenosine. Voltage-clamp studies showed that adenosine inhibited the voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents (ICa) in a concentration-dependent fashion. This inhibition was also abolished by both 8-PT and ZM241385. The modulation of both IK(V) and ICa by adenosine was prevented by intracellular application of an inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA), PKA inhibitor fragment (6–22) amide. In addition, the effect of adenosine on either IK(V) or ICa was absent in PKA-deficient PC12 cells. These results indicate that the modulatory effects of adenosine on the hypoxia-induced membrane responses of PC12 cells are likely to be mediated via activation of the A2A receptor, and that the PKA pathway is required for these modulatory actions. We propose that this modulation serves to regulate membrane excitability in PC12 cells and

  7. Pentoxifylline inhibits pulmonary inflammation induced by infrarenal aorticcross-clamping dependent of adenosine receptor A2A

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hali; Tan, Gang; Tong, Liquan; Han, Peng; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Bing; Sun, Xueying

    2016-01-01

    Infrarenal aortic cross-clamping (IAC) is commonly used during infrarenal vascular operations. Prolonged IAC causes ischemia-reperfusion injury to local tissues, resulting in the release of inflammatory cytokines and acute lung injury (ALI). Pentoxifylline (PTX) is a clinically used drug for chronic occlusive arterial diseases and exerts protective effects against ALI induced by various factors in experimental models. In this study, we evaluated the protective effects of PTX in a rat model of IAC. Wistar rats underwent IAC for 2 h, followed by 4 h reperfusion. PTX alone, or in combination with ZM-241385 (an adenosine receptor A2A antagonist) or CGS-21680 (an A2A agonist), was pre-administered to rats 1 h prior to IAC, and the severity of lung injury and inflammation were examined. Administration of PTX significantly attenuated ALI induced by IAC, evidenced by reduced histological scores and wet lung contents, improved blood gas parameters, decreased cell counts and protein amounts in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, and inhibition of MPO activity and ICAM-1 expression in lung tissues, and lower plasma levels of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and soluble ICAM-1. ZM-241385 significantly abrogated, while CGS-21680 slightly enhanced, the effects of PTX in ameliorating ALI and inhibiting pulmonary inflammation. In exploration of the mechanisms, we found that PTX stimulated IL-10 production through the phosphorylation of STAT3, and A2A receptor participated in this regulation. The study indicates PTX plays a protective role in IAC-induced ALI in rats by inhibiting pulmonary inflammation through A2A signaling pathways. PMID:27347328

  8. Role of adenosine A2A receptor signaling in the nicotine-evoked attenuation of reflex cardiac sympathetic control.

    PubMed

    El-Mas, Mahmoud M; El-Gowilly, Sahar M; Fouda, Mohamed A; Saad, Evan I

    2011-08-01

    Baroreflex dysfunction contributes to increased cardiovascular risk in cigarette smokers. Given the importance of adenosinergic pathways in baroreflex control, the hypothesis was tested that defective central adenosinergic modulation of cardiac autonomic activity mediates the nicotine-baroreflex interaction. Baroreflex curves relating changes in heart rate (HR) to increases or decreases in blood pressure (BP) evoked by i.v. doses (1-16μg/kg) of phenylephrine (PE) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP), respectively, were constructed in conscious rats; slopes of the curves were taken as measures of baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). Nicotine (25 and 100μg/kg i.v.) dose-dependently reduced BRS(SNP) in contrast to no effect on BRS(PE). BRS(SNP) was also attenuated after intracisternal (i.c.) administration of nicotine. Similar reductions in BRS(SNP) were observed in rats pretreated with atropine or propranolol. The combined treatment with nicotine and atropine produced additive inhibitory effects on BRS, an effect that was not demonstrated upon concurrent exposure to nicotine and propranolol. BRS(SNP) was reduced in preparations treated with i.c. 8-phenyltheophylline (8-PT, nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist), 8-(3-Chlorostyryl) caffeine (CSC, A(2A) antagonist), or VUF5574 (A(3) antagonist). In contrast, BRS(SNP) was preserved after blockade of A(1) (DPCPX) or A(2B) (alloxazine) receptors or inhibition of adenosine uptake by dipyridamole. CSC or 8-PT abrogated the BRS(SNP) depressant effect of nicotine whereas other adenosinergic antagonists were without effect. Together, nicotine preferentially impairs reflex tachycardia via disruption of adenosine A(2A) receptor-mediated facilitation of reflex cardiac sympathoexcitation. Clinically, the attenuation by nicotine of compensatory sympathoexcitation may be detrimental in conditions such as hypothalamic defense response, posture changes, and ventricular rhythms. PMID:21550361

  9. Up-regulation of striatal adenosine A(2A) receptors with iron deficiency in rats: effects on locomotion and cortico-striatal neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, César; Pearson, Virginia; Gulyani, Seema; Allen, Richard; Earley, Christopher; Ferré, Sergi

    2010-07-01

    Brain iron deficiency leads to altered dopaminergic function in experimental animals, which can provide a mechanistic explanation for iron deficiency-related human sensory-motor disorders, such as Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS). However, mechanisms linking both conditions have not been determined. Considering the strong modulation exerted by adenosine on dopamine signaling, one connection could involve changes in adenosine receptor expression or function. In the striatum, presynaptic A(2A) receptors are localized in glutamatergic terminals contacting GABAergic dynorphinergic neurons and their function can be analyzed by the ability of A(2A) receptor antagonists to block the motor output induced by cortical electrical stimulation. Postsynaptic A(2A) receptors are localized in the dendritic field of GABAergic enkephalinergic neurons and their function can be analyzed by studying the ability of A(2A) receptor antagonists to produce locomotor activity and to counteract striatal ERK1/2 phosphorylation induced by cortical electrical stimulation. Increased density of striatal A(2A) receptors was found in rats fed during 3 weeks with an iron-deficient diet during the post-weaning period. In iron-deficient rats, the selective A(2A) receptor antagonist MSX-3, at doses of 1 and 3 mg/kg, was more effective at blocking motor output induced by cortical electrical stimulation (presynaptic A(2A) receptor-mediated effect) and at enhancing locomotor activation and blocking striatal ERK phosphorylation induced by cortical electrical stimulation (postsynaptic A(2A) receptor-mediated effects). These results indicate that brain iron deficiency induces a functional up-regulation of both striatal pre- and postsynaptic A(2A) receptor, which could be involved in sensory-motor disorders associated with iron deficiency such as RLS.

  10. Reengineering the collision coupling and diffusion mode of the A2A-adenosine receptor: palmitoylation in helix 8 relieves confinement.

    PubMed

    Keuerleber, Simon; Thurner, Patrick; Gruber, Christian W; Zezula, Jürgen; Freissmuth, Michael

    2012-12-01

    The A(2A)-adenosine receptor undergoes restricted collision coupling with its cognate G protein G(s) and lacks a palmitoylation site at the end of helix 8 in its intracellular C terminus. We explored the hypothesis that there was a causal link between the absence of a palmitoyl moiety and restricted collision coupling by introducing a palmitoylation site. The resulting mutant A(2A)-R309C receptor underwent palmitoylation as verified by both mass spectrometry and metabolic labeling. In contrast to the wild type A(2A) receptor, the concentration-response curve for agonist-induced cAMP accumulation was shifted to the left with increasing expression levels of A(2A)-R309C receptor, an observation consistent with collision coupling. Single particle tracking of quantum dot-labeled receptors confirmed that wild type and mutant A(2A) receptor differed in diffusivity and diffusion mode; agonist activation resulted in a decline in mean square displacement of both receptors, but the drop was substantially more pronounced for the wild type receptor. In addition, in the agonist-bound state, the wild type receptor was frequently subject to confinement events (estimated radius 110 nm). These were rarely seen with the palmitoylated A(2A)-R309C receptor, the preferred diffusion mode of which was a random walk in both the basal and the agonist-activated state. Taken together, the observations link restricted collision coupling to diffusion limits imposed by the absence of a palmitoyl moiety in the C terminus of the A(2A) receptor. The experiments allowed for visualizing local confinement of an agonist-activated G protein-coupled receptor in an area consistent with the dimensions of a lipid raft. PMID:23071116

  11. A2A adenosine receptor modulates drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein at the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do-Geun; Bynoe, Margaret S.

    2016-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) protects the brain from toxic substances within the peripheral circulation. It maintains brain homeostasis and is a hurdle for drug delivery to the CNS to treat neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease and brain tumors. The drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is highly expressed on brain endothelial cells and blocks the entry of most drugs delivered to the brain. Here, we show that activation of the A2A adenosine receptor (AR) with an FDA-approved A2A AR agonist (Lexiscan) rapidly and potently decreased P-gp expression and function in a time-dependent and reversible manner. We demonstrate that downmodulation of P-gp expression and function coincided with chemotherapeutic drug accumulation in brains of WT mice and in primary mouse and human brain endothelial cells, which serve as in vitro BBB models. Lexiscan also potently downregulated the expression of BCRP1, an efflux transporter that is highly expressed in the CNS vasculature and other tissues. Finally, we determined that multiple pathways, including MMP9 cleavage and ubiquitinylation, mediated P-gp downmodulation. Based on these data, we propose that A2A AR activation on BBB endothelial cells offers a therapeutic window that can be fine-tuned for drug delivery to the brain and has potential as a CNS drug-delivery technology. PMID:27043281

  12. Pharmacological and biochemical characterization of purified A2a adenosine receptors in human platelet membranes by [3H]-CGS 21680 binding.

    PubMed Central

    Varani, K.; Gessi, S.; Dalpiaz, A.; Borea, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    1. The binding properties of human platelet A2a adenosine receptors, assayed with the A2a-selective agonist, [3H]-2-[p-(2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino]-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoad enosine ([3H]-CGS 21680), are masked by a non-receptorial component, the adenotin site. In order to separate A2a receptors from adenotin sites, human platelet membranes were solubilized with 1% 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethyl-ammonio]-1-propanesulphonate (CHAPS). The soluble platelet extract was precipitated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and the fraction enriched in adenosine receptors was isolated from the precipitate by differential centrifugation. 2. The present paper describes the binding characteristics of the selective A2a agonist, [3H]-CGS 21680, to this purified platelet membrane preparation. In addition, receptor affinity and potency of several adenosine agonists and antagonists were determined in binding and adenylyl cyclase studies. 3. Saturation experiments revealed a single class of binding site with Kd and Bmax values of 285 nM and 2.07 pmol mg-1 of protein respectively. Adenosine receptor ligands competed for the binding of 50 nM [3H]-CGS 21680 to purified protein, showing a rank order of potency consistent with that typically found for interactions with the A2a adenosine receptors. In the adenylyl cyclase assay the compounds examined exhibited a rank order of potency very close to that observed in binding experiments. 4. Thermodynamic data indicated that [3H]-CGS 21680 binding to the purified receptor is totally entropy-driven in agreement with results obtained in rat striatal A2a adenosine receptors. 5. It is concluded that in the purified platelet membranes there is a CGS 21680 binding site showing the characteristic properties of the A2a receptor. This makes it possible to use this compound for reliable radioligand binding studies on the A2a adenosine receptor of human platelets. PMID:8732278

  13. Expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide, adenosine A2a receptor and adenosine A1 receptor in experiment rat migraine models

    PubMed Central

    LU, WENXIAN; LI, BIN; CHEN, JINBO; SU, YIPENG; DONG, XIAOMENG; SU, XINYANG; GAO, LIXIANG

    2016-01-01

    A migraine is a disabling neurovascular disorder characterized by a unilateral throbbing headache that lasts from 4 to 72 h. The headache is often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, phonophobia and photophobia, and may be worsened by physical exercise. The trigeminovascular system (TVS) is speculated to have an important role in migraines, although the pathophysiology of this disorder remains to be elucidated. Trigeminal ganglion (TG) and spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC) are important components of the TVS. Several clinical cases have provided evidence for the involvement of the brainstem in migraine initiation. Electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion (ESTG) in rats can activate TVS during a migraine attack. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is an important vasoactive compound produced following TVS activation. Numerous studies have revealed that adenosine and its receptors have an important role in pain transmission and regulation process. However, only a few studies have examined whether adenosine A2a receptor (A2aR) and adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) are involved in migraine and nociceptive pathways. In the present study, CGRP, A2aR and A1R expression levels were detected in the TG and TNC of ESTG models through reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. Tianshu capsule (TSC), a type of Chinese medicine, was also used in the ESTG rat models to examine its influence on the three proteins. Results demonstrated that CGRP, A2aR and A1R mediated pain transmission and the regulation process during migraine and the expression of the three proteins was regulated by TSC. PMID:26998280

  14. Homology modelling of the human adenosine A2B receptor based on X-ray structures of bovine rhodopsin, the beta2-adrenergic receptor and the human adenosine A2A receptor.

    PubMed

    Sherbiny, Farag F; Schiedel, Anke C; Maass, Astrid; Müller, Christa E

    2009-11-01

    A three-dimensional model of the human adenosine A2B receptor was generated by means of homology modelling, using the crystal structures of bovine rhodopsin, the beta2-adrenergic receptor, and the human adenosine A2A receptor as templates. In order to compare the three resulting models, the binding modes of the adenosine A2B receptor antagonists theophylline, ZM241385, MRS1706, and PSB601 were investigated. The A2A-based model was much better able to stabilize the ligands in the binding site than the other models reflecting the high degree of similarity between A2A and A2B receptors: while the A2B receptor shares about 21% of the residues with rhodopsin, and 31% with the beta2-adrenergic receptor, it is 56% identical to the adenosine A2A receptor. The A2A-based model was used for further studies. The model included the transmembrane domains, the extracellular and the intracellular hydrophilic loops as well as the terminal domains. In order to validate the usefulness of this model, a docking analysis of several selective and nonselective agonists and antagonists was carried out including a study of binding affinities and selectivities of these ligands with respect to the adenosine A2A and A2B receptors. A common binding site is proposed for antagonists and agonists based on homology modelling combined with site-directed mutagenesis and a comparison between experimental and calculated affinity data. The new, validated A2B receptor model may serve as a basis for developing more potent and selective drugs.

  15. Novel Alexa Fluor-488 labeled antagonist of the A(2A) adenosine receptor: Application to a fluorescence polarization-based receptor binding assay.

    PubMed

    Kecskés, Miklós; Kumar, T Santhosh; Yoo, Lena; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2010-08-15

    Fluorescence polarization (FP) assay has many advantages over the traditional radioreceptor binding studies. We developed an A(2A) adenosine receptor (AR) FP assay using a newly synthesized fluorescent antagonist of the A(2A)AR (MRS5346), a pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-amine derivative conjugated to the fluorescent dye Alexa Fluor-488. MRS5346 displayed a K(i) value of 111+/-16nM in radioligand binding using [(3)H]CGS21680 and membranes prepared from HEK293 cells stably expressing the human A(2A)AR. In a cyclic AMP functional assay, MRS5346 was shown to be an A(2A)AR antagonist. MRS5346 did not show any effect on A(1) and A(3) ARs in binding or the A(2B)AR in a cyclic AMP assay at 10microM. Its suitability as a fluorescent tracer was indicated in an initial observation of an FP signal following A(2A)AR binding. The FP signal was optimal with 20nM MRS5346 and 150microg protein/mL HEK293 membranes. The association and dissociation kinetic parameters were readily determined using this FP assay. The K(d) value of MRS5346 calculated from kinetic parameters was 16.5+/-4.7nM. In FP competition binding experiments using MRS5346 as a tracer, K(i) values of known AR agonists and antagonists consistently agreed with K(i) values from radioligand binding. Thus, this FP assay, which eliminates using radioisotopes, appears to be appropriate for both routine receptor binding and high-throughput screening with respect to speed of analysis, displaceable signal and precision. The approach used in the present study could be generally applicable to other GPCRs.

  16. Use of molecular modeling aided design to dial out hERG liability in adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qiaolin; Lim, Yeon-Hee; Anand, Rajan; Yu, Younong; Kim, Jae-hun; Zhou, Wei; Zheng, Junying; Tempest, Paul; Levorse, Dorothy; Zhang, Xiaoping; Greene, Scott; Mullins, Deborra; Culberson, Chris; Sherborne, Brad; Parker, Eric M; Stamford, Andrew; Ali, Amjad

    2015-08-01

    Molecular modeling was performed on a triazolo quinazoline lead compound to help develop a series of adenosine A2A receptor antagonists with improved hERG profile. Superposition of the lead compound onto MK-499, a benchmark hERG inhibitor, combined with pKa calculations and measurement, identified terminal fluorobenzene to be responsible for hERG activity. Docking of the lead compound into an A2A crystal structure suggested that this group is located at a flexible, spacious, and solvent-exposed opening of the binding pocket, making it possible to tolerate various functional groups. Transformation analysis (MMP, matched molecular pair) of in-house available experimental data on hERG provided suggestions for modifications in order to mitigate this liability. This led to the synthesis of a series of compounds with significantly reduced hERG activity. The strategy used in the modeling work can be applied to other medicinal chemistry programs to help improve hERG profile. PMID:26048804

  17. Adenosine A2A receptor stimulation decreases GAT-1-mediated GABA uptake in the globus pallidus of the rat.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Brenda; Paz, Francisco; Florán, Leonor; Aceves, Jorge; Erlij, David; Florán, Benjamín

    2006-07-01

    We examined modulation of [(3)H]GABA uptake in slices of the rat globus pallidus because stimulation of adenosine A(2A) receptors increases extracellular GABA in this structure. Pharmacological analysis showed that GAT-1 is the main transporter present in these slices. Both adenosine and the A(2A) agonist CGS 21680 reduced GABA uptake. Antagonist ZM 241385 prevented these effects. Agents that increase protein kinase A activity like forskolin and 8-bromo-cAMP also inhibited GABA uptake. The inhibition of uptake produced by these substances and by CGS 21680 was prevented by the protein kinase A blocker H-89. The protein phosphatase blocker okadaic acid reduced uptake; this effect and the response to CGS 21680 were not additive. The effective concentrations of adenosine (EC(50)=15.2microM) are within the range measured in the interstitial fluid under some physiological conditions. Thus, inhibition of uptake may be important in increasing interstitial GABA during endogenous adenosine release.

  18. Adenosine A2A receptor deficiency up-regulates cystatin F expression in white matter lesions induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion.

    PubMed

    Duan, Wei; Ran, Hong; Zhou, Zhujuan; He, Qifen; Zheng, Jian

    2012-01-01

    In previous studies, we have shown that the inactivation of the adenosine A2A receptor exacerbates chronic cerebral hypoperfusion-induced white matter lesions (WMLs) by enhancing neuroinflammatory responses. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the effect of the adenosine A2A receptor remains unknown. Recent studies have demonstrated that cystatin F, a potent endogenous cysteine protease inhibitor, is selectively expressed in immune cells in association with inflammatory demyelination in central nervous system diseases. To understand the expression of cystatin F and its potential role in the effect of A2A receptor on WMLs induced through chronic cerebral hypoperfusion, we investigated cystatin F expression in the WMLs of A2A receptor gene knockout mice, the littermate wild-type mice and wild-type mice treated daily with the A2A receptor agonist CGS21680 or both CGS21680 and A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. The results of quantitative-PCR and western blot analysis revealed that cystatin F mRNA and protein expression were significantly up-regulated in the WMLs after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. In addition, cystatin F expression in the corpus callosum was significantly increased in A2A receptor gene knockout mice and markedly decreased in mice treated with CGS21680 on both the mRNA and protein levels. Additionally, SCH58261 counteracted the attenuation of cystatin F expression produced by CGS21680 after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. Moreover, double immunofluorescence staining revealed that cystatin F was co-localized with the activated microglia marker CD11b. In conclusion, the cystatin F expression in the activated microglia is closely associated with the effect of the A2A receptors, which may be related to the neuroinflammatory responses occurring during the pathological process.

  19. Muscarinic M(3) facilitation of acetylcholine release from rat myenteric neurons depends on adenosine outflow leading to activation of excitatory A(2A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Vieira, C; Duarte-Araújo, M; Adães, S; Magalhães-Cardoso, T; Correia-de-Sá, P

    2009-10-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is a major excitatory neurotransmitter in the myenteric plexus, and it regulates its own release acting via muscarinic autoreceptors. Adenosine released from stimulated myenteric neurons modulates ACh release preferentially via facilitatory A(2A) receptors. In this study, we investigated how muscarinic and adenosine receptors interplay to regulate ACh from the longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus of the rat ileum. Blockade of the muscarinic M(2) receptor with 11-[[2-1[(diethylamino) methyl-1-piperidinyl]- acetyl

  20. Dependence of P2-nucleotide receptor agonist-mediated endothelium-independent relaxation on ectonucleotidase activity and A2A-receptors in rat portal vein.

    PubMed

    Guibert, C; Loirand, G; Vigne, P; Savineau, J P; Pacaud, P

    1998-04-01

    1. The mechanism of action of P2 nucleotide receptor agonists that produce endothelium-independent relaxation and the influence of ecto-ATPase activity on this relaxing effect have been investigated in rat portal vein smooth muscle. 2. At 25 degrees C, ATP, 2-methylthioATP (2-MeSATP) and 2-chloroATP (2-ClATP), dose-dependently inhibited spontaneous contractile activity of endothelium-denuded muscular strips from rat portal vein. The rank order of agonist potency defined from the half-inhibitory concentrations was 2-CIATP (2.7+/-0.5 microM, n=7) >ATP (12.9+/-1.1 microM, n=9) > or =2-MeSATP (21.9+/-4.8 M, n=4). In the presence of alphabeta-methylene ATP (alphabeta-MeATP, 200 microM) which itself produced a transient contractile effect, the relaxing action of ATP and 2-MeSATP was completely abolished and that of 2-ClATP strongly inhibited. 3. The non-selective P2-receptor antagonist pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulphonic acid (PPADS, 100 microM) did not affect the relaxation induced by ATP, 2-MeSATP, and 2-ClATP. 4. The A2A-adenosine receptor antagonist ZM 241385 inhibited the ATP-induced relaxation in a concentration-dependent manner (1-100 nM). In the presence of 100 nM ZM 241385, the relaxing effects of 2-MeSATP and 2-ClATP were also inhibited. 5. ADP, AMP and adenosine also produced concentration-dependent inhibition of spontaneous contractions. The relaxing effects of AMP and adenosine were insensitive to alphabeta-MeATP (200 microM) but were inhibited by ZM 241385 (100 nM). 6. Simultaneous measurements of contraction and ecto-ATPase activity estimated by the degradation of [gamma-32P]-ATP showed that muscular strips rapidly (10-60 s) hydrolyzed ATP. This ecto-ATPase activity was abolished in the presence of EDTA and was inhibited by 57+/-11% (n=3) by 200 microM alphabeta-MeATP. 7. These results suggest that ATP and other P2-receptor agonists are relaxant in rat portal vein smooth muscle, because ectonucleotidase activity leads to the formation of

  1. Deletion of adenosine A1 or A2A receptors reduces L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine-induced dyskinesia in a model of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Danqing; Cassin, Jared J.; Healy, Brian; Burdett, Thomas C.; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Schwarzschild, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine A2A receptor antagonism provides a promising approach to developing nondopaminergic therapy for Parkinson’s disease (PD). Clinical trials of A2A antagonists have targeted PD patients with L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA)-induced dyskinesia (LID) in an effort to improve parkinsonian symptoms. The role of adenosine in the development of LID is little known, especially regarding its actions via A1 receptors. We aimed to examine the effects of genetic deletion and pharmacological blockade of A1 and/or A2A receptors on the development of LID, on the induction of molecular markers of LID including striatal preprodynorphin and preproenkephalin (PPE), and on the integrity of dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons in hemiparkinsonian mice. Following a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion A1, A2A and double A1-A2A knockout (KO) and wild-type littermate mice, and mice pretreated with caffeine (an antagonist of both A1 and A2A receptors) or saline were treated daily for 18–21 days with a low dose of L-DOPA. Total abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs, a measure of LID) were significantly attenuated (p<0.05) in A1 and A2A KOs, but not in A1-A2A KOs and caffeine-pretreated mice. An elevation of PPE mRNA ipsilateral to the lesion in WT mice was reduced in all KO mice. In addition, neuronal integrity assessed by striatal dopamine content was similar in all KOs and caffeine-pretreated mice following 6-hydroxydopamine lesioning. Our findings raise the possibility that A1 or A2A receptors blockade might also confer a disease-modifying benefit of reduced risk of disabling LID, whereas the effect of their combined inactivation is less clear. PMID:20828543

  2. Beneficial effects of a novel agonist of the adenosine A2A receptor on monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats

    PubMed Central

    Alencar, Allan K N; Pereira, Sharlene L; Montagnoli, Tadeu L; Maia, Rodolfo C; Kümmerle, Arthur E; Landgraf, Sharon S; Caruso-Neves, Celso; Ferraz, Emanuelle B; Tesch, Roberta; Nascimento, José H M; de Sant'Anna, Carlos M R; Fraga, Carlos A M; Barreiro, Eliezer J; Sudo, Roberto T; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by enhanced pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy and increased right ventricular systolic pressure. Here, we investigated the effects of a N-acylhydrazone derivative, 3,4-dimethoxyphenyl-N-methyl-benzoylhydrazide (LASSBio-1359), on monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats. Experimental Approach PAH was induced in male Wistar rats by a single i.p. injection of MCT (60 mg·kg−1) and 2 weeks later, oral LASSBio-1359 (50 mg·kg−1) or vehicle was given once daily for 14 days. Echocardiography was used to measure cardiac function and pulmonary artery dimensions, with histological assay of vascular collagen. Studies of binding to human recombinant adenosine receptors (A1, A2A, A3) and of docking with A2A receptors were also performed. Key Results MCT administration induced changes in vascular and ventricular structure and function, characteristic of PAH. These changes were reversed by treatment with LASSBio-1359. MCT also induced endothelial dysfunction in pulmonary artery, as measured by diminished relaxation of pre-contracted arterial rings, and this dysfunction was reversed by LASSBio-1359. In pulmonary artery rings from normal Wistar rats, LASSBio-1359 induced relaxation, which was decreased by the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, ZM 241385. In adenosine receptor binding studies, LASSBio-1359 showed most affinity for the A2A receptor and in the docking analyses, binding modes of LASSBio-1359 and the A2A receptor agonist, CGS21680, were very similar. Conclusion and Implications In rats with MCT-induced PAH, structural and functional changes in heart and pulmonary artery were reversed by treatment with oral LASSBio-1359, most probably through the activation of adenosine A2A receptors. PMID:23530610

  3. Molecular modeling of A1 and A2A adenosine receptors: comparison of rhodopsin- and beta2-adrenergic-based homology models through the docking studies.

    PubMed

    Yuzlenko, Olga; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2009-01-15

    Adenosine receptors (ARs) are members of the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors. The homology models of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors were constructed. The high-resolution X-ray structure of bovine rhodopsin and crystal structure of beta2-adrenergic receptor were used as templates. The binding sites of the A1 and A2A ARs were constructed by using data obtained from mutagenesis experiments as well as docking simulations of the respective AR antagonsists DPCPX and XAC. To compare rhodopsin- and beta2-adrenergic-based models, the binding mode of A1 (KW-3902, LUF-5437) and A2A (KW-6002, ZM-241385) ARs antagonists were also examined. The differences in the binding ability of both models were noted during the study. The beta2-adrenergic-based A2A AR model was much more capable to stabilize the ligand in the binding site cavity than the corresponding rhodopsin-based A2A AR model, however, such differences were not so clear in case of A1 AR models. It was suggested that for the A1 AR it is possible to use the crystal structure of rhodopsin as a template as well as beta2-adrenergic receptor, but for A2A AR, with the now available beta2-adrenergic receptor X-ray structure, docking studies should be avoided on the rhodopsin-based model. However, taking into account that the beta2AR shares about 31% of the residues with the AR in comparison to 21% in case of bRho, we suggest using beta2-adrenergic-based models for the A1 and A2A ARs for further in silico ligand screening also because of their generally better ability to stabilize ligands inside the binding pocket.

  4. Hyperthermia-induced seizures alter adenosine A1 and A2A receptors and 5'-nucleotidase activity in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    León-Navarro, David Agustín; Albasanz, José L; Martín, Mairena

    2015-08-01

    Febrile seizure is one of the most common convulsive disorders in children. The neuromodulator adenosine exerts anticonvulsant actions through binding adenosine receptors. Here, the impact of hyperthermia-induced seizures on adenosine A1 and A2A receptors and 5'-nucleotidase activity has been studied at different periods in the cerebral cortical area by using radioligand binding, real-time PCR, and 5'-nucleotidase activity assays. Hyperthermic seizures were induced in 13-day-old rats using a warmed air stream from a hair dryer. Neonates exhibited rearing and falling over associated with hindlimb clonus seizures (stage 5 on Racine scale criteria) after hyperthermic induction. A significant increase in A1 receptor density was observed using [(3) H]DPCPX as radioligand, and mRNA coding A1 was observed 48 h after hyperthermia-induced seizures. In contrast, a significant decrease in A2A receptor density was detected, using [(3) H]ZM241385 as radioligand, 48 h after hyperthermia-evoked convulsions. These short-term changes in A1 and A2A receptors were also accompanied by a loss of 5'-nucleotidase activity. No significant variations either in A1 or A2A receptor density or 5'-nucleotidase were observed 5 and 20 days after hyperthermic seizures. Taken together, both regulation of A1 and A2A receptors and loss of 5'-nucleotidase in the cerebral cortex suggest the existence of a neuroprotective mechanism against seizures. Febrile seizure is one of the most common convulsive disorders in children. The consequences of hyperthermia-induced seizures (animal model of febrile seizures) on adenosine A1 and A2A receptors and 5'-nucleotidase activity have been studied at different periods in cerebral cortical area. A significant increase in A1 receptor density and mRNA coding A1 was observed 48 h after hyperthermia-induced seizures. In contrast, a significant decrease in A2A receptor density and 5'-nucleotidase activity was detected 48 h after convulsions evoked by hyperthermia

  5. MicroRNA-16 is putatively involved in the NF-κB pathway regulation in ulcerative colitis through adenosine A2a receptor (A2aAR) mRNA targeting

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ting; Zhou, Yu; Feng, Xiao; Ye, Shicai; Wang, Hao; Wu, Weiyun; Tan, Wenkai; Yu, Caiyuan; Hu, Juxiang; Zheng, Rong; Chen, Zonghao; Pei, Xinyu; Luo, Hesheng

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) act as important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression by targeting the 3′-untranslated region of their target genes. Altered expression of miR-16 is reported in human ulcerative colitis (UC), but its role in the development of the disease remains unclear. Adenosine through adenosine A2a receptor (A2aAR) could inhibit nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) signaling pathway in inflammation. Here we identified overexpression of miR-16 and down-regulation of A2aAR in the colonic mucosa of active UC patients. We demonstrated that miR-16 negatively regulated the expression of the A2aAR at the post-transcriptional level. Furthermore, transfection of miR-16 mimics promoted nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 protein and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IFN-γ and IL-8 in colonic epithelial cells. Treatment with miR-16 inhibitor could reverse these effects in cells. The A2aAR-mediated effects of miR-16 on the activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway were confirmed by the A2aAR knockdown assay. Our results suggest that miR-16 regulated the immune and inflammatory responses, at least in part, by suppressing the expression of the A2aAR to control the activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:27476546

  6. Mechanisms involved in increased sensitivity to adenosine A(2A) receptor activation and hypoxia-induced vasodilatation in porcine coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Hedegaard, Elise R; Nielsen, Berit D; Mogensen, Susie; Rembold, Christopher M; Frøbert, Ole; Simonsen, Ulf

    2014-01-15

    Hypoxia-induced coronary vasorelaxation is a compensatory mechanism increasing blood flow. We hypothesized that hypoxia shares pathways with adenosine and causes vasorelaxation through the adenosine A(2A) receptor and force suppression by increasing cAMP and phosphorylated heat shock protein (HSP)20. Adenosine receptors in porcine left anterior descending coronary arteries (LAD) were examined by RT-PCR and isometric tension recording in myographs. Vasorelaxation was induced by adenosine, 1% oxygen, or both in the absence or presence of ZM241385, an adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist. cAMP was determined by ELISA and p-HSP20/HSP20 and p-MLC/MLC were determined by immunoblotting and densitometric analyses. In coronary arteries exposed to 1% oxygen, there was increased sensitivity to adenosine, the adenosine A2 selective agonist NECA, and the adenosine A(2A) selective receptor agonist CGS21680. ZM241385 shifted concentration-response curves for CGS21680 to the right, whereas the adenosine A1 antagonist DPCPX, the adenosine A2B receptor antagonist MRS1754 and the adenosine A3 receptor antagonist MRS1523 failed to reduce vasodilatation induced by CGS21680. 1% oxygen or adenosine increased cAMP accumulation and HSP20 phosphorylation without changing T850-MYPT1 and MLC phosphorylation. ZM241385 failed to change 1% oxygen-induced vasodilation, cAMP accumulation, HSP20 phosphorylation and MLC phosphorylation. The PKA inhibitor Rp-8-CPT-cAMPS significantly reduced vasorelaxation induced by 1% oxygen or CGS21680. Our findings suggest that the increased sensitivity to adenosine, NECA, and CGS21680 at 1% oxygen involves adenosine A(2A) receptors. Adenosine and 1% oxygen induce vasorelaxation in PGF2α-contracted porcine coronary arteries partly by force suppression caused by increased cAMP and phosphorylation of HSP20.

  7. The stimulant effects of caffeine on locomotor behaviour in mice are mediated through its blockade of adenosine A2A receptors

    PubMed Central

    Yacoubi, Malika El; Ledent, Catherine; Ménard, Jean-François; Parmentier, Marc; Costentin, Jean; Vaugeois, Jean-Marie

    2000-01-01

    The locomotor stimulatory effects induced by caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) in rodents have been attributed to antagonism of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors. Little is known about its locomotor depressant effects seen when acutely administered at high doses. The roles of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors in these activities were investigated using a Digiscan actimeter in experiments carried out in mice. Besides caffeine, the A2A antagonist SCH 58261 (5-amino-7-(β-phenylethyl)-2-(8-furyl)pyrazolo[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine), the A1 antagonist DPCPX (8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine), the A1 agonist CPA (N6-cyclopentyladenosine) and A2A receptor knockout mice were used.Caffeine had a biphasic effect on locomotion of wild-type mice not habituated to the open field, stimulating locomotion at 6.25–25 mg kg−1 i.p. doses, while depressing it at 100 mg kg−1. In sharp contrast, caffeine dose-dependently decreased locomotion in A2A receptor knockout mice over the whole range of tested doses.The depressant effects induced by high doses of caffeine were lost in control CD1 mice habituated to the open field.The A1 agonist CPA depressed locomotion at 0.3–1 mg kg−1 i.p. doses.The A1 antagonist DPCPX decreased locomotion of A2A receptor knockouts and CD1 mice at 5 mg kg−1 i.p. and 25 mg kg−1 i.p. respectively.DPCPX (0.2–1 mg kg−1 i.p.) left unaltered or even reduced the stimulant effect of SCH 58261 (1–3 mg kg−1 i.p.) on CD1 mice.These results suggest therefore that the stimulant effect of low doses of caffeine is mediated by A2A receptor blockade while the depressant effect seen at higher doses under some conditions is explained by A1 receptor blockade. PMID:10742303

  8. Differential effects of presynaptic versus postsynaptic adenosine A2A receptor blockade on Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) self-administration in squirrel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Justinová, Zuzana; Redhi, Godfrey H; Goldberg, Steven R; Ferré, Sergi

    2014-05-01

    Different doses of an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist MSX-3 [3,7-dihydro-8-[(1E)-2-(3-ethoxyphenyl)ethenyl]-7 methyl-3-[3-(phosphooxy)propyl-1-(2 propynil)-1H-purine-2,6-dione] were found previously to either decrease or increase self-administration of cannabinoids delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) or anandamide in squirrel monkeys. It was hypothesized that the decrease observed with a relatively low dose of MSX-3 was related to blockade of striatal presynaptic A2A receptors that modulate glutamatergic neurotransmission, whereas the increase observed with a higher dose was related to blockade of postsynaptic A2A receptors localized in striatopallidal neurons. This hypothesis was confirmed in the present study by testing the effects of the preferential presynaptic and postsynaptic A2A receptor antagonists SCH-442416 [2-(2-furanyl)-7-[3-(4-methoxyphenyl)propyl]-7H-pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-amine] and KW-6002 [(E)-1, 3-diethyl-8-(3,4-dimethoxystyryl)-7-methyl-3,7-dihydro-1H-purine-2,6-dione], respectively, in squirrel monkeys trained to intravenously self-administer THC. SCH-442416 produced a significant shift to the right of the THC self-administration dose-response curves, consistent with antagonism of the reinforcing effects of THC. Conversely, KW-6002 produced a significant shift to the left, consistent with potentiation of the reinforcing effects of THC. These results show that selectively blocking presynaptic A2A receptors could provide a new pharmacological approach to the treatment of marijuana dependence and underscore corticostriatal glutamatergic neurotransmission as a possible main mechanism involved in the rewarding effects of THC.

  9. Expression of CD73 and A2A receptors in cells from subjects with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Guzman-Flores, Juan M; Cortez-Espinosa, Nancy; Cortés-Garcia, Juan D; Vargas-Morales, Juan M; Cataño-Cañizalez, Yolanda G; Rodríguez-Rivera, Jaime G; Portales-Perez, Diana P

    2015-08-01

    Regulatory T cells have various mechanisms to suppress the inflammatory response, among these, the modulation of the microenvironment through adenosine and with the participation of CD39, CD73 and A2A. The aim of this study was to assess the expression of CD73 and A2A in immune cells and the effect of activation of A2A by an adenosine analogue on apoptosis in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). CD73 and A2A expression were analyzed by flow cytometry in lymphocyte subpopulations from patients with obesity (n = 22), T2D (n = 22), and healthy subjects (n = 20). Lymphocytes were treated with the selective A2A antagonist (ZM241385) or the selective A2A agonist (CGS21680), and apoptotic cells were detected by Annexin V. We found an increased expression of CD39 coupled to a decrease in CD73 in the patient groups with obesity and T2D compared to the control group in the different studied lymphocyte subpopulations. A2A expression was found to be increased in different subpopulations of lymphocytes from T2D patients. We also detected positive correlations between CD39+ cells and age and BMI. Meanwhile, CD73+ cells showed negative correlations with age, WHR, BMI, FPG, HbAc1, triglycerides and cholesterol. Moreover, an increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells from T2D patients with regard to the groups with obesity and control was observed. In addition, the CD8+ T cells of patients with T2D exhibited decreased apoptosis when treated with the A2A agonist. In conclusion, our data suggest a possible role for CD73 and A2A in inflammation observed in patients with T2D and obesity mediated via apoptosis.

  10. The role of adenosine A2A and A3 receptors on the differential modulation of norepinephrine and neuropeptide Y release from peripheral sympathetic nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Donoso, M Verónica; Aedo, Felipe; Huidobro-Toro, J Pablo

    2006-03-01

    The pre-synaptic sympathetic modulator role of adenosine was assessed by studying transmitter release following electrical depolarization of nerve endings from the rat mesenteric artery. Mesentery perfusion with exogenous adenosine exclusively inhibited the release of norepinephrine (NA) but did not affect the overflow of neuropeptide Y (NPY), establishing the basis for a differential pre-synaptic modulator mechanism. Several adenosine structural analogs mimicked adenosine's effect on NA release and their relative order of potency was: 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine hydrochloride = 1-[2-chloro-6-[[(3-iodophenyl)methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-1-deoxy-N-methyl-beta-d-ribofuranuronamide = 5'-(N-ethylcarboxamido)adenosine > adenosine > N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine. The use of selective receptor subtype antagonists confirmed the involvement of A(2A) and A(3) adenosine receptors. The modulator role of adenosine is probably due to the activation of both receptors; co-application of 1 nM 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine hydrochloride plus 1 nM 1-[2-chloro-6-[[(3-iodophenyl)methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-1-deoxy-N-methyl-beta-D-ribofuranuronamide caused additive reductions in NA released. Furthermore, while 1 nM of an A(2A) or A(3) receptor antagonist only partially reduced the inhibitory action of adenosine, the combined co-application of the two antagonists fully blocked the adenosine-induced inhibition. Only the simultaneous blockade of the adenosine A(2A) plus A(3) receptors with selective antagonists elicited a significant increase in NA overflow. H 89 reduced the release of both NA and NPY. We conclude that pre-synaptic A(2A) and A(3) adenosine receptor activation modulates sympathetic co-transmission by exclusively inhibiting the release of NA without affecting immunoreactive (ir)-NPY and we suggest separate mechanisms for vesicular release modulation.

  11. The adenosine A2A receptor agonist, CGS-21680, blocks excessive rearing, acquisition of wheel running, and increases nucleus accumbens CREB phosphorylation in chronically food-restricted rats.

    PubMed

    Cabeza de Vaca, Soledad; Kannan, Pavitra; Pan, Yan; Jiang, Nancy; Sun, Yanjie; Carr, Kenneth D

    2007-04-20

    Adenosine A(2A) receptors are preferentially expressed in rat striatum, where they are concentrated in dendritic spines of striatopallidal medium spiny neurons and exist in a heteromeric complex with D(2) dopamine (DA) receptors. Behavioral and biochemical studies indicate an antagonistic relationship between A(2A) and D(2) receptors. Previous studies have demonstrated that food-restricted (FR) rats display behavioral and striatal cellular hypersensitivity to D(1) and D(2) DA receptor stimulation. These alterations may underlie adaptive, as well as maladaptive, behaviors characteristic of the FR rat. The present study examined whether FR rats are hypersensitive to the A(2A) receptor agonist, CGS-21680. In Experiment 1, spontaneous horizontal motor activity did not differ between FR and ad libitum fed (AL) rats, while vertical activity was greater in the former. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of CGS-21680 (0.25 and 1.0 nmol) decreased both types of motor activity in FR rats, and returned vertical activity levels to those observed in AL rats. In Experiment 2, FR rats given access to a running wheel for a brief period outside of the home cage rapidly acquired wheel running while AL rats did not. Pretreatment with CGS-21680 (1.0 nmol) blocked the acquisition of wheel running. When administered to FR subjects that had previously acquired wheel running, CGS-21680 suppressed the behavior. In Experiment 3, CGS-21680 (1.0 nmol) activated both ERK 1/2 and CREB in caudate-putamen with no difference between feeding groups. However, in nucleus accumbens (NAc), CGS-21680 failed to activate ERK 1/2 and selectively activated CREB in FR rats. These results indicate that FR subjects are hypersensitive to several effects of an adenosine A(2A) agonist, and suggest the involvement of an upregulated A(2A) receptor-linked signaling pathway in NAc. Medications targeting the A(2A) receptor may have utility in the treatment of maladaptive behaviors associated with FR

  12. 2-(1-Hexyn-1-yl)adenosine-induced intraocular hypertension is mediated via K+ channel opening through adenosine A2A receptor in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Konno, Takashi; Uchibori, Takehiro; Nagai, Akihiko; Kogi, Kentaro; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2005-08-22

    The present study was performed to clarify the mechanism of change in intraocular pressure by 2-(1-hexyn-1-yl)adenosine (2-H-Ado), a selective adenosine A2 receptor agonist, in rabbits. 2-H-Ado (0.1%, 50 microl)-induced ocular hypertension (E(max): 7.7 mm Hg) was inhibited by an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist 1,3,7-trimethyl-8-(3-chlorostyryl)xanthine, ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker glibenclamide or 5-hydroxydecanoic acid, but not by an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, an adenosine A2B receptor antagonist alloxazine or a cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. The outflow facility induced by 2-H-Ado seems to be independent of increase in intraocular pressure or ATP-sensitive K+ channel. In contrast, the recovery rate in intraocular pressure decreased by hypertonic saline was accelerated by 2-H-Ado, and this response was dependent on ATP-sensitive K+ channel. These results suggest that 2-H-Ado-induced ocular hypertension is mediated via K+ channel opening through adenosine A2A receptor, and this is probably due to aqueous formation, but independent of change in outflow facility or prostaglandin production.

  13. H(N), N, C(α), C(β) and C' assignments of the intrinsically disordered C-terminus of human adenosine A2A receptor.

    PubMed

    Tossavainen, Helena; Hellman, Maarit; Piirainen, Henni; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka; Permi, Perttu

    2015-10-01

    The C-terminus of the human adenosine A2A receptor differs from the other human adenosine receptors by its exceptional length and lack of a canonical cysteine residue. We have previously structurally characterized this C-terminal domain and its interaction with calmodulin. It was shown to be structurally disordered and flexible, and to bind calmodulin with high affinity in a calcium-dependent manner. Interaction with calmodulin takes place at the N-terminal end of the A2A C-terminal domain without major conformational changes in the latter. NMR was one of the biophysical methods used in the study. Here we present the H(N), N, C(α), C(β) and C' chemical shift assignments of the free form of the C-terminus residues 293-412, used in the NMR spectroscopic characterization of the domain.

  14. Purification of the human G protein-coupled receptor adenosine A(2a)R in a stable and functional form expressed in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shweta; Zhang, Minghao; Bertheleme, Nicolas; Strange, Philip G; Byrne, Bernadette

    2012-02-01

    The isolation of membrane proteins with the aim of producing highly pure, homogeneous, stable, and functional material remains challenging, and it is often necessary to develop protein-specific purification protocols by trial and error. One key tool that is required in the development of a suitable protocol is a functional assay. This unit describes a range of different protocols for isolation of the human adenosine A2a receptor (A(2a)R). These protocols show the importance of developing a robust method for comparing the quality of protein obtained by a combination of biophysical analyses including SDS-PAGE, analytical size-exclusion chromatography, and functional analysis. One of the keys to isolating and maintaining a functional receptor, found not only in the optimal protocol described here but in other published examples, is that there should be no more than two chromatographic steps.

  15. Physiological roles of A1 and A2A adenosine receptors in regulating heart rate, body temperature, and locomotion as revealed using knockout mice and caffeine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiang-Ning; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Fredholm, Bertil B

    2009-04-01

    Heart rate (HR), body temperature (Temp), locomotor activity (LA), and oxygen consumption (O(2)C) were studied in awake mice lacking one or both of the adenosine A(1) or A(2A) receptors (A(1)R or A(2A)R, respectively) using telemetry and respirometry, before and after caffeine administration. All parameters were lower during day than night and higher in females than males. When compared with wild-type (WT) littermates, HR was higher in male A(1)R knockout (A(1)RKO) mice but lower in A(2A)RKO mice and intermediate in A(1)-A(2A)R double KO mice. A single dose of an unselective beta-blocker (timolol; 1 mg/kg) abolished the HR differences between these genotypes. Deletion of A(1)Rs had little effect on Temp, whereas deletion of A(2A)Rs increased it in females and decreased it in males. A(1)-A(2A)RKO mice had lower Temp than WT mice. LA was unaltered in A(1)RKO mice and lower in A(2A)RKO and A(1)-A(2A)RKO mice than in WT mice. Caffeine injection increased LA but only in mice expressing A(2A)R. Caffeine ingestion also increased LA in an A(2A)R-dependent manner in male mice. Caffeine ingestion significantly increased O(2)C in WT mice, but less in the different KO mice. Injection of 30 mg/kg caffeine decreased Temp, especially in KO mice, and hence in a manner unrelated to A(1)R or A(2A)R blockade. Selective A(2B) antagonism had little or no effect. Thus A(1)R and A(2A)R influence HR, Temp, LA, and O(2)C in mice in a sex-dependent manner, indicating effects of endogenous adenosine. The A(2A)R plays an important role in the modulation of O(2)C and LA by acute and chronic caffeine administration. There is also evidence for effects of higher doses of caffeine being independent of both A(1)R and A(2A)R.

  16. Selective activation of adenosine A2A receptors on immune cells by a CD73-dependent prodrug suppresses joint inflammation in experimental rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Flögel, Ulrich; Burghoff, Sandra; van Lent, Peter L E M; Temme, Sebastian; Galbarz, Lisa; Ding, Zhaoping; El-Tayeb, Ali; Huels, Sandra; Bönner, Florian; Borg, Nadine; Jacoby, Christoph; Müller, Christa E; van den Berg, Wim B; Schrader, Jürgen

    2012-08-01

    Adenosine A(2A) receptor (A(2A)R) agonists are both highly effective anti-inflammatory agents and potent vasodilators. To separate these two activities, we have synthesized phosphorylated A(2A)R agonists (prodrugs) that require the presence of ecto-5'-nucleotidase (CD73) to become activated. In the model of collagen-induced arthritis, 2-(cyclohexylethylthio)adenosine 5'-monophosphate (chet-AMP), but not 2-(cyclohexylethylthio)adenosine (chet-adenosine), potently reduced inflammation as assessed by fluorine-19 ((19)F) magnetic resonance imaging and by histology. The prodrug effect was blunted by inhibition of CD73 and A(2A)R. The selectivity of drug action is due to profound up-regulation of CD73 and adenosine A(2A)R expression in neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes as found in recovered cells from the synovial fluid of arthritic mice. Plasma chet-adenosine was in the subnanomolar range when chet-AMP was applied, whereas concentrations required for vasodilation were about 100 times higher. Thus, chet-AMP is a potent immunosuppressant with negligible vasodilatory activity. These data suggest that phosphorylated A(2A)R agonists may serve as a promising new group of drugs for targeted immunotherapy of inflammation. PMID:22875828

  17. Selective activation of adenosine A2A receptors on immune cells by a CD73-dependent prodrug suppresses joint inflammation in experimental rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Flögel, Ulrich; Burghoff, Sandra; van Lent, Peter L E M; Temme, Sebastian; Galbarz, Lisa; Ding, Zhaoping; El-Tayeb, Ali; Huels, Sandra; Bönner, Florian; Borg, Nadine; Jacoby, Christoph; Müller, Christa E; van den Berg, Wim B; Schrader, Jürgen

    2012-08-01

    Adenosine A(2A) receptor (A(2A)R) agonists are both highly effective anti-inflammatory agents and potent vasodilators. To separate these two activities, we have synthesized phosphorylated A(2A)R agonists (prodrugs) that require the presence of ecto-5'-nucleotidase (CD73) to become activated. In the model of collagen-induced arthritis, 2-(cyclohexylethylthio)adenosine 5'-monophosphate (chet-AMP), but not 2-(cyclohexylethylthio)adenosine (chet-adenosine), potently reduced inflammation as assessed by fluorine-19 ((19)F) magnetic resonance imaging and by histology. The prodrug effect was blunted by inhibition of CD73 and A(2A)R. The selectivity of drug action is due to profound up-regulation of CD73 and adenosine A(2A)R expression in neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes as found in recovered cells from the synovial fluid of arthritic mice. Plasma chet-adenosine was in the subnanomolar range when chet-AMP was applied, whereas concentrations required for vasodilation were about 100 times higher. Thus, chet-AMP is a potent immunosuppressant with negligible vasodilatory activity. These data suggest that phosphorylated A(2A)R agonists may serve as a promising new group of drugs for targeted immunotherapy of inflammation.

  18. The role of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors in the caffeine effect on MDMA-induced DA and 5-HT release in the mouse striatum.

    PubMed

    Górska, A M; Gołembiowska, K

    2015-04-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") popular as a designer drug is often used with caffeine to gain a stronger stimulant effect. MDMA induces 5-HT and DA release by interaction with monoamine transporters. Co-administration of caffeine and MDMA may aggravate MDMA-induced toxic effects on DA and 5-HT terminals. In the present study, we determined whether caffeine influences DA and 5-HT release induced by MDMA. We also tried to find out if adenosine A1 and A2A receptors play a role in the effect of caffeine by investigating the effect of the selective adenosine A1 and A2A receptor antagonists, DPCPX and KW 6002 on DA and 5-HT release induced by MDMA. Mice were treated with caffeine (10 mg/kg) and MDMA (20 or 40 mg/kg) alone or in combination. DA and 5-HT release in the mouse striatum was measured using in vivo microdialysis. Caffeine exacerbated the effect of MDMA on DA and 5-HT release. DPCPX or KW 6002 co-administered with MDMA had similar influence as caffeine, but KW 6002 was more potent than caffeine or DPCPX. To exclude the contribution of MAO inhibition by caffeine in the caffeine effect on MDMA-induced increase in DA and 5-HT, we also tested the effect of the nonxanthine adenosine receptor antagonist CGS 15943A lacking properties of MAO activity modification. Our findings indicate that adenosine A1 and A2A receptor blockade may account for the caffeine-induced exacerbation of the MDMA effect on DA and 5-HT release and may aggravate MDMA toxicity.

  19. Chronic hypoxia reduces adenosine A2A receptor-mediated inhibition of calcium current in rat PC12 cells via downregulation of protein kinase A

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shuichi; Beitner-Johnson, Dana; Conforti, Laura; Millhorn, David E

    1998-01-01

    Adenosine has been shown to decrease Ca2+ current (ICa) and attenuate the hypoxia-induced enhancement of intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) in oxygen-sensitive rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells. These effects are mediated via the adenosine A2A receptor and protein kinase A (PKA). The current study was undertaken to determine the effects of adenosine on Ca2+ current and hypoxia-induced change in [Ca2+]i during chronic hypoxia.Whole cell patch-clamp studies revealed that the effect of adenosine on ICa was significantly reduced when PC12 cells were exposed to hypoxia (10 % O2) for 24 and 48 h.Ca2+ imaging studies using fura-2 revealed that the anoxia-induced increase in [Ca2+]i was significantly enhanced when PC12 cells were exposed to 10 % O2 for up to 48 h. In contrast, the inhibitory effects of adenosine on anoxia-induced elevation of [Ca2+]i was significantly blunted in PC12 cells exposed to hypoxia for 48 h.Northern blot analysis revealed that mRNA for the A2A receptor, which is the only adenosine receptor subtype expressed in PC12 cells, was significantly upregulated by hypoxia. Radioligand binding analysis with [3H]CGS21680, a selective A2A receptor ligand, showed that the number of adenosine A2A receptor binding sites was similarly increased during exposure to 10 % O2 for 48 h.PKA enzyme activity was significantly inhibited when PC12 cells were exposed to 10 % O2 for 24 and 48 h. However, we found that hypoxia failed to induce change in adenosine- and forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase enzyme activity. Chronic hypoxia also did not alter the immunoreactivity level of the G protein Gsα, an effector of the A2 signalling pathway.Whole cell patch-clamp analysis showed that the effect of 8-bromo-cAMP, an activator of PKA, on ICa was significantly attenuated during 48 h exposure to 10 % O2.We conclude therefore that the reduced effect of adenosine on ICa and [Ca2+]i in PC12 cells exposed to chronic hypoxia is due to hypoxia-induced downregulation of PKA. This

  20. Chronic hypoxia reduces adenosine A2A receptor-mediated inhibition of calcium current in rat PC12 cells via downregulation of protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Beitner-Johnson, D; Conforti, L; Millhorn, D E

    1998-10-15

    1. Adenosine has been shown to decrease Ca2+ current (ICa) and attenuate the hypoxia-induced enhancement of intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) in oxygen-sensitive rat phaeochromocytoma (PC12) cells. These effects are mediated via the adenosine A2A receptor and protein kinase A (PKA). The current study was undertaken to determine the effects of adenosine on Ca2+ current and hypoxia-induced change in [Ca2+]i during chronic hypoxia. 2. Whole cell patch-clamp studies revealed that the effect of adenosine on ICa was significantly reduced when PC12 cells were exposed to hypoxia (10 % O2) for 24 and 48 h. 3. Ca2+ imaging studies using fura-2 revealed that the anoxia-induced increase in [Ca2+]i was significantly enhanced when PC12 cells were exposed to 10 % O2 for up to 48 h. In contrast, the inhibitory effects of adenosine on anoxia-induced elevation of [Ca2+]i was significantly blunted in PC12 cells exposed to hypoxia for 48 h. 4. Northern blot analysis revealed that mRNA for the A2A receptor, which is the only adenosine receptor subtype expressed in PC12 cells, was significantly upregulated by hypoxia. Radioligand binding analysis with [3H]CGS21680, a selective A2A receptor ligand, showed that the number of adenosine A2A receptor binding sites was similarly increased during exposure to 10% O2 for 48 h. 5. PKA enzyme activity was significantly inhibited when PC12 cells were exposed to 10% O2 for 24 and 48 h. However, we found that hypoxia failed to induce change in adenosine- and forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase enzyme activity. Chronic hypoxia also did not alter the immunoreactivity level of the G protein Gsalpha, an effector of the A2 signalling pathway. 6. Whole cell patch-clamp analysis showed that the effect of 8-bromo-cAMP, an activator of PKA, on ICa was significantly attenuated during 48 h exposure to 10% O2.7. We conclude therefore that the reduced effect of adenosine on ICa and [Ca2+]i in PC12 cells exposed to chronic hypoxia is due to hypoxia

  1. Spatiotemporal brain dynamics of emotional face processing modulations induced by the serotonin 1A/2A receptor agonist psilocybin.

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, Fosco; Schmidt, André; Pokorny, Thomas; Kometer, Michael; Seifritz, Erich; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2014-12-01

    Emotional face processing is critically modulated by the serotonergic system. For instance, emotional face processing is impaired by acute psilocybin administration, a serotonin (5-HT) 1A and 2A receptor agonist. However, the spatiotemporal brain mechanisms underlying these modulations are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the spatiotemporal brain dynamics underlying psilocybin-induced modulations during emotional face processing. Electrical neuroimaging analyses were applied to visual evoked potentials in response to emotional faces, following psilocybin and placebo administration. Our results indicate a first time period of strength (i.e., Global Field Power) modulation over the 168-189 ms poststimulus interval, induced by psilocybin. A second time period of strength modulation was identified over the 211-242 ms poststimulus interval. Source estimations over these 2 time periods further revealed decreased activity in response to both neutral and fearful faces within limbic areas, including amygdala and parahippocampal gyrus, and the right temporal cortex over the 168-189 ms interval, and reduced activity in response to happy faces within limbic and right temporo-occipital brain areas over the 211-242 ms interval. Our results indicate a selective and temporally dissociable effect of psilocybin on the neuronal correlates of emotional face processing, consistent with a modulation of the top-down control. PMID:23861318

  2. Spatiotemporal brain dynamics of emotional face processing modulations induced by the serotonin 1A/2A receptor agonist psilocybin.

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, Fosco; Schmidt, André; Pokorny, Thomas; Kometer, Michael; Seifritz, Erich; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2014-12-01

    Emotional face processing is critically modulated by the serotonergic system. For instance, emotional face processing is impaired by acute psilocybin administration, a serotonin (5-HT) 1A and 2A receptor agonist. However, the spatiotemporal brain mechanisms underlying these modulations are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the spatiotemporal brain dynamics underlying psilocybin-induced modulations during emotional face processing. Electrical neuroimaging analyses were applied to visual evoked potentials in response to emotional faces, following psilocybin and placebo administration. Our results indicate a first time period of strength (i.e., Global Field Power) modulation over the 168-189 ms poststimulus interval, induced by psilocybin. A second time period of strength modulation was identified over the 211-242 ms poststimulus interval. Source estimations over these 2 time periods further revealed decreased activity in response to both neutral and fearful faces within limbic areas, including amygdala and parahippocampal gyrus, and the right temporal cortex over the 168-189 ms interval, and reduced activity in response to happy faces within limbic and right temporo-occipital brain areas over the 211-242 ms interval. Our results indicate a selective and temporally dissociable effect of psilocybin on the neuronal correlates of emotional face processing, consistent with a modulation of the top-down control.

  3. Adenosine A(1), A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) receptors in hematopoiesis. 2. Expression of receptor mRNA in resting and lipopolysaccharide-activated mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Streitová, D; Hofer, M; Holá, J; Vacek, A; Pospísil, M

    2010-01-01

    Expression of mRNA for adenosine receptor subtypes A(1), A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) in normal and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated murine RAW 264.7 macrophages has been investigated using the method of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results have shown a very low, unquantifiable expression of adenosine A(1) receptor mRNA in both normal and LPS-activated macrophages. The other three adenosine receptor mRNAs have been found to be expressed at various but always quantifiable levels. Activation of the macrophages by LPS induced upregulation of the expression of adenosine receptor A(2a) and A(2b) mRNA, whereas the expression of adenosine receptor A(3) mRNA was downregulated. Unstimulated macrophages exhibited a high expression of the A(2b) adenosine receptor mRNA. The findings are discussed from the point of view of the antiinflammatory and hematopoiesis-stimulating roles of the adenosine receptor signaling.

  4. Cannabidiol, a non-psychotropic plant-derived cannabinoid, decreases inflammation in a murine model of acute lung injury: role for the adenosine A(2A) receptor.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Alison; Ferraz-de-Paula, Viviane; Pinheiro, Milena L; Vitoretti, Luana B; Mariano-Souza, Domenica P; Quinteiro-Filho, Wanderley M; Akamine, Adriana T; Almeida, Vinícius I; Quevedo, João; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Hallak, Jaime E; Zuardi, Antônio W; Crippa, José A; Palermo-Neto, João

    2012-03-01

    Acute lung injury is an inflammatory condition for which treatment is mainly supportive because effective therapies have not been developed. Cannabidiol, a non-psychotropic cannabinoid component of marijuana (Cannabis sativa), has potent immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties. Therefore, we investigated the possible anti-inflammatory effect of cannabidiol in a murine model of acute lung injury. Analysis of total inflammatory cells and differential in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was used to characterize leukocyte migration into the lungs; myeloperoxidase activity of lung tissue and albumin concentration in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were analyzed by colorimetric assays; cytokine/chemokine production in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was also analyzed by Cytometric Bead Arrays and Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). A single dose of cannabidiol (20mg/kg) administered prior to the induction of LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-induced acute lung injury decreases leukocyte (specifically neutrophil) migration into the lungs, albumin concentration in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, myeloperoxidase activity in the lung tissue, and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF and IL-6) and chemokines (MCP-1 and MIP-2) 1, 2, and 4days after the induction of LPS-induced acute lung injury. Additionally, adenosine A(2A) receptor is involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of cannabidiol on LPS-induced acute lung injury because ZM241385 (4-(2-[7-Amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-ylamino]ethyl)phenol) (a highly selective antagonist of adenosine A(2A) receptor) abrogated all of the anti-inflammatory effects of cannabidiol previously described. Thus, we show that cannabidiol has anti-inflammatory effects in a murine model of acute lung injury and that this effect is most likely associated with an increase in the extracellular adenosine offer and signaling through adenosine A(2A) receptor.

  5. Adenosine administration produces an antidepressant-like effect in mice: evidence for the involvement of A1 and A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Kaster, Manuella P; Rosa, Angelo Oscar; Rosso, Matheus M; Goulart, Eduardo C; Santos, Adair R S; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2004-01-23

    This study investigated the effect of adenosine in the forced swimming test (FST) and the tail suspension test (TST) in mice, and the contribution of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors to adenosine's antidepressant-like effect. The immobility time in the FST was reduced by adenosine given either by i.p. (5-10 mg/kg) or i.c.v. (0.01-10 microg/site) route. Adenosine (1-10 mg/kg, i.p.) also produced an antidepressant-like effect in the TST. No treatment affected locomotion in an open-field. The anti-immobility effect of adenosine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) in the FST was prevented by i.p. pretreatment of mice with caffeine (3 mg/kg), DPCPX (2 mg/kg) and ZM241385 (1 mg/kg). CHA (0.05 mg/kg, i.p.) and DPMA (1-5 mg/kg, i.p.) also produced an antidepressant-like effect in the FST. This is the first report of an antidepressant-like effect of adenosine in mice, apparently mediated through an interaction with A1 and A2A receptors.

  6. Genetic deletion of the adenosine A(2A) receptor prevents nicotine-induced upregulation of α7, but not α4β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptor binding in the brain.

    PubMed

    Metaxas, Athanasios; Al-Hasani, Ream; Farshim, Pamela; Tubby, Kristina; Berwick, Amy; Ledent, Catherine; Hourani, Susanna; Kitchen, Ian; Bailey, Alexis

    2013-08-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs) modulate cholinergic neurotransmission, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) function, and nicotine-induced behavioural effects. To explore the interaction between A(2A) and nAChRs, we examined if the complete genetic deletion of adenosine A(2A)Rs in mice induces compensatory alterations in the binding of different nAChR subtypes, and whether the long-term effects of nicotine on nAChR regulation are altered in the absence of the A(2A)R gene. Quantitative autoradiography was used to measure cytisine-sensitive [¹²⁵I]epibatidine and [¹²⁵I]α-bungarotoxin binding to α4β2* and α7 nAChRs, respectively, in brain sections of drug-naïve (n = 6) or nicotine treated (n = 5-7), wild-type and adenosine A(2A)R knockout mice. Saline or nicotine (7.8 mg/kg/day; free-base weight) were administered to male CD1 mice via subcutaneous osmotic minipumps for a period of 14 days. Blood plasma levels of nicotine and cotinine were measured at the end of treatment. There were no compensatory developmental alterations in nAChR subtype distribution or density in drug-naïve A(2A)R knockout mice. In nicotine treated wild-type mice, both α4β2* and α7 nAChR binding sites were increased compared with saline treated controls. The genetic ablation of adenosine A(2A)Rs prevented nicotine-induced upregulation of α7 nAChRs, without affecting α4β2* receptor upregulation. This selective effect was observed at plasma levels of nicotine that were within the range reported for smokers (10-50 ng ml⁻¹). Our data highlight the involvement of adenosine A(2A)Rs in the mechanisms of nicotine-induced α7 nAChR upregulation, and identify A(2A)Rs as novel pharmacological targets for modulating the long-term effects of nicotine on α7 receptors.

  7. Genetic deletion of the adenosine A(2A) receptor prevents nicotine-induced upregulation of α7, but not α4β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptor binding in the brain.

    PubMed

    Metaxas, Athanasios; Al-Hasani, Ream; Farshim, Pamela; Tubby, Kristina; Berwick, Amy; Ledent, Catherine; Hourani, Susanna; Kitchen, Ian; Bailey, Alexis

    2013-08-01

    Considerable evidence indicates that adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs) modulate cholinergic neurotransmission, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) function, and nicotine-induced behavioural effects. To explore the interaction between A(2A) and nAChRs, we examined if the complete genetic deletion of adenosine A(2A)Rs in mice induces compensatory alterations in the binding of different nAChR subtypes, and whether the long-term effects of nicotine on nAChR regulation are altered in the absence of the A(2A)R gene. Quantitative autoradiography was used to measure cytisine-sensitive [¹²⁵I]epibatidine and [¹²⁵I]α-bungarotoxin binding to α4β2* and α7 nAChRs, respectively, in brain sections of drug-naïve (n = 6) or nicotine treated (n = 5-7), wild-type and adenosine A(2A)R knockout mice. Saline or nicotine (7.8 mg/kg/day; free-base weight) were administered to male CD1 mice via subcutaneous osmotic minipumps for a period of 14 days. Blood plasma levels of nicotine and cotinine were measured at the end of treatment. There were no compensatory developmental alterations in nAChR subtype distribution or density in drug-naïve A(2A)R knockout mice. In nicotine treated wild-type mice, both α4β2* and α7 nAChR binding sites were increased compared with saline treated controls. The genetic ablation of adenosine A(2A)Rs prevented nicotine-induced upregulation of α7 nAChRs, without affecting α4β2* receptor upregulation. This selective effect was observed at plasma levels of nicotine that were within the range reported for smokers (10-50 ng ml⁻¹). Our data highlight the involvement of adenosine A(2A)Rs in the mechanisms of nicotine-induced α7 nAChR upregulation, and identify A(2A)Rs as novel pharmacological targets for modulating the long-term effects of nicotine on α7 receptors. PMID:23583933

  8. Adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists are broad facilitators of antinicotinic neuromuscular blockade monitored either with 2 Hz train-of-four or 50 Hz tetanic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Monalisa W; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo; Alves-Do-Prado, Wilson

    2012-10-01

    1. The 2 Hz train-of-four ratio (TOF(ratio)) is used to monitor the degree of patient curarization. Using a rat phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm preparation, we showed that antinicotinic agents, such as hexamethonium, d-tubocurarine and pancuronium, but not cisatracurium, decreased contractions produced by physiological nerve activity patterns (50 Hz) more efficiently than those caused by 2 Hz trains. Uncertainty about the usefulness of the TOF(ratio) to control safe recovery from curarization prompted us to investigate the muscarinic and adenosine neuromodulation of tetanic (50 Hz) fade induced by antinicotinic agents at concentrations that cause a 25% reduction in the TOF(ratio) (TOF(fade)). 2. Tetanic fade caused by d-tubocurarine (1.1 μmol/L), pancuronium (3 μmol/L) and hexamethonium (5.47 mmol/L) was attenuated by blocking presynaptic inhibitory muscarinic M(2) and adenosine A(1) receptors with methoctramine (1 μmol/L) and 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (2.5 nmol/L), respectively. These compounds enhanced rather than decreased tetanic fade induced by cisatracurium (2.2 μmol/L), but they consistently attenuated cisatracurium-induced TOF(fade). The effect of the M(1) receptor antagonist pirenzepine (10 nmol/L) on fade produced by antinicotinic agents at 50 Hz was opposite to that observed with TOF stimulation. Blockade of adenosine A(2A) receptors with ZM 241385 (10 nmol/L) attenuated TOF(fade) caused by all antinicotinic drugs tested, with the exception of the 'pure' presynaptic nicotinic antagonist hexamethonium. ZM 241385 was the only compound tested in this series that facilitated recovery from tetanic fade produced by cisatracurium. 3. The data suggest that distinct antinicotinic relaxants interfere with fine-tuning neuromuscular adaptations to motor nerve stimulation patterns via activation of presynaptic muscarinic and adenosine receptors. These results support the use of A(2A) receptor antagonists together with atropine to facilitate recovery from

  9. Fragment screening of GPCRs using biophysical methods: identification of ligands of the adenosine A(2A) receptor with novel biological activity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dan; Errey, James C; Heitman, Laura H; Marshall, Fiona H; Ijzerman, Adriaan P; Siegal, Gregg

    2012-12-21

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has proven a powerful method to develop novel drugs with excellent oral bioavailability against challenging pharmaceutical targets such as protein-protein interaction targets. Very recently the underlying biophysical techniques have begun to be successfully applied to membrane proteins. Here we show that novel, ligand efficient small molecules with a variety of biological activities can be found by screening a small fragment library using thermostabilized (StaR) G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and target immobilized NMR screening (TINS). Detergent-solubilized StaR adenosine A(2A) receptor was immobilized with retention of functionality, and a screen of 531 fragments was performed. Hits from the screen were thoroughly characterized for biochemical activity using the wild-type receptor. Both orthosteric and allosteric modulatory activity has been demonstrated in biochemical validation assays. Allosteric activity was confirmed in cell-based functional assays. The validated fragment hits make excellent starting points for a subsequent hit-to-lead elaboration program. PMID:23013674

  10. Effect of adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists and L-DOPA on hydroxyl radical, glutamate and dopamine in the striatum of 6-OHDA-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Gołembiowska, Krystyna; Dziubina, Anna

    2012-02-01

    A(2A) adenosine receptor antagonists have been proposed as a new therapy of PD. Since oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of PD, we studied the effect of the selective A(2A) adenosine receptor antagonists 8-(-3-chlorostyryl)caffeine (CSC) and 4-(2-[7-amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-ylamino]ethyl)phenol (ZM 241385) on hydroxyl radical generation, and glutamate (GLU) and dopamine (DA) extracellular level using a microdialysis in the striatum of 6-OHDA-treated rats. CSC (1 mg/kg) and ZM 241385 (3 mg/kg) given repeatedly for 14 days decreased the production of hydroxyl radical and extracellular GLU level, both enhanced by prior 6-OHDA treatment in dialysates from the rat striatum. CSC and ZM 241385 did not affect DA and its metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanilic acid (HVA) extracellular levels in the striatum of 6-OHDA-treated rats. L-DOPA (6 mg/kg) given twice daily for two weeks in the presence of benserazide (3 mg/kg) decreased striatal hydroxyl radical and glutamate extracellular level in 6-OHDA-treated rats. At the same time, L-DOPA slightly but significantly increased the extracellular levels of DOPAC and HVA. A combined repeated administration of L-DOPA and CSC or ZM 241385 did not change the effect of L-DOPA on hydroxyl radical production and glutamate extracellular level in spite of an enhancement of extracellular DA level by CSC and elevation of extracellular level of DOPAC and HVA by ZM 241385. The data suggest that the 6-OHDA-induced damage of nigrostriatal DA-terminals is related to oxidative stress and excessive release of glutamate. Administration of L-DOPA in combination with CSC or ZM 241385, by restoring striatal DA-glutamate balance, suppressed 6-OHDA-induced overproduction of hydroxyl radical.

  11. Photomodulation of G Protein-Coupled Adenosine Receptors by a Novel Light-Switchable Ligand

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The adenosinergic system operates through G protein-coupled adenosine receptors, which have become promising therapeutic targets for a wide range of pathological conditions. However, the ubiquity of adenosine receptors and the eventual lack of selectivity of adenosine-based drugs have frequently diminished their therapeutic potential. Accordingly, here we aimed to develop a new generation of light-switchable adenosine receptor ligands that change their intrinsic activity upon irradiation, thus allowing the spatiotemporal control of receptor functioning (i.e., receptor activation/inactivation dependent on location and timing). Therefore, we synthesized an orthosteric, photoisomerizable, and nonselective adenosine receptor agonist, nucleoside derivative MRS5543 containing an aryl diazo linkage on the N6 substituent, which in the dark (relaxed isomer) behaved as a full adenosine A3 receptor (A3R) and partial adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) agonist. Conversely, upon photoisomerization with blue light (460 nm), it remained a full A3R agonist but became an A2AR antagonist. Interestingly, molecular modeling suggested that structural differences encountered within the third extracellular loop of each receptor could modulate the intrinsic, receptor subtype-dependent, activity. Overall, the development of adenosine receptor ligands with photoswitchable activity expands the pharmacological toolbox in support of research and possibly opens new pharmacotherapeutic opportunities. PMID:25248077

  12. Cannabidiol provides long-lasting protection against the deleterious effects of inflammation in a viral model of multiple sclerosis: a role for A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Mecha, M; Feliú, A; Iñigo, P M; Mestre, L; Carrillo-Salinas, F J; Guaza, C

    2013-11-01

    Inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS) is a complex process that involves a multitude of molecules and effectors, and it requires the transmigration of blood leukocytes across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the activation of resident immune cells. Cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychotropic cannabinoid constituent of Cannabis sativa, has potent anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties. Yet, how this compound modifies the deleterious effects of inflammation in TMEV-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) remains unknown. Using this viral model of multiple sclerosis (MS), we demonstrate that CBD decreases the transmigration of blood leukocytes by downregulating the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), chemokines (CCL2 and CCL5) and the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β, as well as by attenuating the activation of microglia. Moreover, CBD administration at the time of viral infection exerts long-lasting effects, ameliorating motor deficits in the chronic phase of the disease in conjunction with reduced microglial activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Adenosine A2A receptors participate in some of the anti-inflammatory effects of CBD, as the A2A antagonist ZM241385 partially blocks the protective effects of CBD in the initial stages of inflammation. Together, our findings highlight the anti-inflammatory effects of CBD in this viral model of MS and demonstrate the significant therapeutic potential of this compound for the treatment of pathologies with an inflammatory component.

  13. Role of endothelium in ischaemia-induced myocardial dysfunction of isolated working hearts: cardioprotection by activation of adenosine A(2A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Maddock, H L; Broadley, K J; Bril, A; Khandoudi, N

    2001-01-01

    . The A2A adenosine receptor-selective agonist but not the non-selective A2 receptor agonist, NECA, attenuated ischaemia- and reperfusion-induced stunning. This was attributed to increased CF and was independent of the endothelium.

  14. Modulation of GABA transport by adenosine A1R-A2AR heteromers, which are coupled to both Gs- and G(i/o)-proteins.

    PubMed

    Cristóvão-Ferreira, Sofia; Navarro, Gemma; Brugarolas, Marc; Pérez-Capote, Kamil; Vaz, Sandra H; Fattorini, Giorgia; Conti, Fiorenzo; Lluis, Carmen; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; McCormick, Peter J; Casadó, Vicent; Franco, Rafael; Sebastião, Ana M

    2011-11-01

    Astrocytes play a key role in modulating synaptic transmission by controlling the available extracellular GABA via the GAT-1 and GAT-3 GABA transporters (GATs). Using primary cultures of rat astrocytes, we show here that an additional level of regulation of GABA uptake occurs via modulation of the GATs by the adenosine A(1) (A(1)R) and A(2A) (A(2A)R) receptors. This regulation occurs through a complex of heterotetramers (two interacting homodimers) of A(1)R-A(2A)R that signal via two different G-proteins, G(s) and G(i/o), and either enhances (A(2A)R) or inhibits (A(1)R) GABA uptake. These results provide novel mechanistic insight into how G-protein-coupled receptor heteromers signal. Furthermore, we uncover a previously unknown mechanism in which adenosine, in a concentration-dependent manner, acts via a heterocomplex of adenosine receptors in astrocytes to significantly contribute to neurotransmission at the tripartite (neuron-glia-neuron) synapse.

  15. Adenosine Type A2A Receptor in Peripheral Cell from Patients with Alzheimer's Disease, Vascular Dementia, and Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus: A New/Old Potential Target.

    PubMed

    Arosio, Beatrice; Casati, Martina; Gussago, Cristina; Ferri, Evelyn; Abbate, Carlo; Scortichini, Valeria; Colombo, Elena; Rossi, Paolo Dionigi; Mari, Daniela

    2016-09-01

    As the European population gets older, the incidence of neurological disorders increases with significant impact on social costs. Despite differences in disease etiology, several brain disorders in the elderly (e.g., Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, normal pressure hydrocephalus) share dementia as a common clinical feature. The current treatment for the majority of these diseases is merely symptomatic and does not modify the course of the illness. Symptoms of normal pressure hydrocephalus are the only ones that can be modified if they are recognized in time and treated appropriately. Therefore, an important clinical strategy may be disclosed by pathogenic pathways that can be modified and to find drugs that can slow down or even arrest disease progression. Possibly a way to answer this question could be by re-examining all the molecules which have so far succeeded in improving many aspects of cognitive deterioration in some neurodegenerative conditions, that were not considered because of controversial opinions. The main purpose of this summary is to further substantiate the hypothesis that the pathway of adenosine type A2A receptor could be used as a potential target to develop new/old therapeutic strategies.

  16. A2A adenosine-receptor-mediated facilitation of noradrenaline release in rat tail artery involves protein kinase C activation and betagamma subunits formed after alpha2-adrenoceptor activation.

    PubMed

    Fresco, Paula; Oliveira, Jorge M A; Kunc, Filip; Soares, Ana Sofia; Rocha-Pereira, Carolina; Gonçalves, Jorge; Diniz, Carmen

    2007-07-01

    This work aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in the interaction of alpha2-adrenoceptors and adenosine A2A-receptor-mediated facilitation of noradrenaline release in rat tail artery, namely the type of G-protein involved in this effect and the step or steps where the signalling cascades triggered by alpha2-adrenoceptors and A2A-receptors interact. The selective adenosine A2A-receptor agonist 2-p-(2-carboxy ethyl) phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (CGS 21680; 100 nM) enhanced tritium overflow evoked by trains of 100 pulses at 5 Hz. This effect was abolished by the selective adenosine A2A-receptor antagonist 5-amino-7-(2-phenyl ethyl)-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo-[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo [1,5-c]pyrimidine (SCH 58261; 20 nM) and by yohimbine (1 microM). CGS 21680-mediated effects were also abolished by drugs that disrupted G(i/o)-protein coupling with receptors, PTX (2 microg/ml) or NEM (40 microM), by the anti-G(salpha) peptide (2 microg/ml) anti-G(betagamma) peptide (10 microg/ml) indicating coupling of A2A-receptors to G(salpha) and suggesting a crucial role for G(betagamma) subunits in the A(2A)-receptor-mediated enhancement of tritium overflow. Furthermore, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA; 1 microM) or forskolin (1 microM), direct activators of protein kinase C and of adenylyl cyclase, respectively, also enhanced tritium overflow. In addition, PMA-mediated effects were not observed in the presence of either yohimbine or PTX. Results indicate that facilitatory adenosine A2A-receptors couple to G(salpha) subunits which is essential, but not sufficient, for the release facilitation to occur, requiring the involvement of G(i/o)-protein coupling (it disappears after disruption of G(i/o)-protein coupling, PTX or NEM) and/or G(betagamma) subunits (anti-G(betagamma)). We propose a mechanism for the interaction in study suggesting group 2 AC isoforms as a plausible candidate for the interaction site, as these isoforms can integrate inputs from G

  17. Topical application of the adenosine A2A receptor agonist CGS-21680 prevents phorbol-induced epidermal hyperplasia and inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Arasa, Jorge; Martos, Patricio; Terencio, María Carmen; Valcuende-Cavero, Francisca; Montesinos, María Carmen

    2014-08-01

    The nucleoside adenosine is a known regulator of immunity and inflammation that mediates, at least in part, the anti-inflammatory effect of methotrexate, an immunosuppressive agent widely used to treat autoimmune inflammatory diseases. Adenosine A2A receptors play a key role in the inhibition of the inflammatory process besides promoting wound healing. Therefore, we aimed to determine the topical effect of a selective agonist, CGS-21680, on a murine model of skin hyperplasia with a marked inflammatory component. Pretreatment with either CGS-21680 (5 μg per site) or the reference agent dexamethasone (200 μg/site) prevented the epidermal hyperplasia and inflammatory response induced by topical application of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA, 2 nmol/site) for three consecutive days. The histological analysis showed that both CGS-21680 and dexamethasone produced a marked reduction of inflammatory cell infiltrate, which correlated with diminished myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in skin homogenates. Both treatments reduced the levels of the chemotactic mediators LTB4 and CXCL-1, and the inflammatory cytokine TNF-α, through the suppression of NFκB phosphorylation. The immunohistochemical analysis of the hyperproliferative markers cytokeratin 6 (CK6) and Ki67 revealed that while both agents inhibit the number of proliferating cells in the epidermis, CGS-21680 treatment promoted dermal fibroblasts proliferation. Consistently, increased collagen deposition in dermis was observed in tissue sections from agonist-treated mice. Our results showed that CGS 21680 efficiently prevents phorbol-induced epidermal hyperplasia and inflammation in mice without the deleterious atrophic effect of topical corticosteroids. PMID:24889129

  18. The adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, istradefylline enhances the anti-parkinsonian activity of low doses of dopamine agonists in MPTP-treated common marmosets.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Shin-ichi; Soshiroda, Kazuhiro; Okita, Eri; Kawai-Uchida, Mika; Mori, Akihisa; Jenner, Peter; Kanda, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-15

    The adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, istradefylline, enhances anti-parkinsonian activity in patients with advanced Parkinson׳s disease (PD) already treated with combinations of L-DOPA and dopamine agonist drugs but who are still exhibiting prolonged 'OFF' periods. In contrast, the effects of istradefylline on motor function when administered in combination with low dose dopamine agonist therapy in early PD are unknown. We now investigate whether istradefylline administered with a threshold dose of either the non-ergot dopamine agonist, ropinirole or the ergot dopamine agonist, pergolide enhances anti-parkinsonian activity in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated common marmoset. Both ropinirole (0.01-0.1mg/kg p.o.) and pergolide (0.003-0.1mg/kg p.o.) administered alone produced dose dependent increases in locomotor activity, a reduction in motor disability. Threshold doses of ropinirole (0.025-0.075mg/kg p.o.) and pergolide (0.01-0.075mg/kg p.o.) were then selected that in individual animals caused a small but non-significant anti-parkinsonian effect. Administration of istradefylline (10mg/kg p.o.) alone resulted in a decrease in motor disability and increase in 'ON' time but dyskinesia was not observed. Combined administration of pergolide or ropinirole with istradefylline resulted in an increase in the reversal of motor disability and increase in 'ON' time compared to that produced by either treatment alone but dyskinesia was still not observed. These results show that istradefylline is effective in improving motor function when combined with low dose dopamine agonist treatment. In early PD, this may avoid dose escalation or allow a reduction in dopamine agonist dosage without a loss of efficacy and prevent dopaminergic side-effects from becoming treatment limiting. PMID:25499739

  19. Synthesis and in vivo Evaluation of Fluorine-18 and Iodine-123 Pyrazolo[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine Derivatives as PET and SPECT Radiotracers for Mapping A2A Receptors.

    PubMed

    Vala, Christine; Morley, Thomas J; Zhang, Xuechun; Papin, Caroline; Tavares, Adriana Alexandre S; Lee, H Sharon; Constantinescu, Cristian; Barret, Olivier; Carroll, Vincent M; Baldwin, Ronald M; Tamagnan, Gilles D; Alagille, David

    2016-09-01

    Imaging agents that target adenosine type 2A (A2A ) receptors play an important role in evaluating new pharmaceuticals targeting these receptors, such as those currently being developed for the treatment of movement disorders like Parkinson's disease. They are also useful for monitoring progression and treatment efficacy by providing a noninvasive tool to map changes in A2A receptor density and function in neurodegenerative diseases. We previously described the successful evaluation of two A2A -specific radiotracers in both nonhuman primates and in subsequent human clinical trials: [(123) I]MNI-420 and [(18) F]MNI-444. Herein we describe the development of both of these radiotracers by selection from a series of A2A ligands, based on the pyrazolo[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine core of preladenant. Each of this series of 16 ligands was found to bind to recombinant human A2A receptor in the low nanomolar range, and of these 16, six were radiolabeled with either fluorine-18 or iodine-123 and evaluated in nonhuman primates. These initial in vivo results resulted in the identification of 7-(2-(4-(4-(2-[(18) F]fluoroethoxy)phenyl)piperazin-1-yl)ethyl)-2-(furan-2-yl)-7H-pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-amine ([(18) F]MNI-444) and 7-(2-(4-(2-fluoro-4-[(123) I]iodophenyl)piperazin-1-yl)ethyl)-2-(furan-2-yl)-7H-imidazo[1,2-c]pyrazolo[4,3-e]pyrimidin-5-amine ([(123) I]MNI-420) as PET and SPECT radiopharmaceuticals for mapping A2A receptors in brain.

  20. Synthesis and in vivo Evaluation of Fluorine-18 and Iodine-123 Pyrazolo[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine Derivatives as PET and SPECT Radiotracers for Mapping A2A Receptors.

    PubMed

    Vala, Christine; Morley, Thomas J; Zhang, Xuechun; Papin, Caroline; Tavares, Adriana Alexandre S; Lee, H Sharon; Constantinescu, Cristian; Barret, Olivier; Carroll, Vincent M; Baldwin, Ronald M; Tamagnan, Gilles D; Alagille, David

    2016-09-01

    Imaging agents that target adenosine type 2A (A2A ) receptors play an important role in evaluating new pharmaceuticals targeting these receptors, such as those currently being developed for the treatment of movement disorders like Parkinson's disease. They are also useful for monitoring progression and treatment efficacy by providing a noninvasive tool to map changes in A2A receptor density and function in neurodegenerative diseases. We previously described the successful evaluation of two A2A -specific radiotracers in both nonhuman primates and in subsequent human clinical trials: [(123) I]MNI-420 and [(18) F]MNI-444. Herein we describe the development of both of these radiotracers by selection from a series of A2A ligands, based on the pyrazolo[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine core of preladenant. Each of this series of 16 ligands was found to bind to recombinant human A2A receptor in the low nanomolar range, and of these 16, six were radiolabeled with either fluorine-18 or iodine-123 and evaluated in nonhuman primates. These initial in vivo results resulted in the identification of 7-(2-(4-(4-(2-[(18) F]fluoroethoxy)phenyl)piperazin-1-yl)ethyl)-2-(furan-2-yl)-7H-pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-amine ([(18) F]MNI-444) and 7-(2-(4-(2-fluoro-4-[(123) I]iodophenyl)piperazin-1-yl)ethyl)-2-(furan-2-yl)-7H-imidazo[1,2-c]pyrazolo[4,3-e]pyrimidin-5-amine ([(123) I]MNI-420) as PET and SPECT radiopharmaceuticals for mapping A2A receptors in brain. PMID:27407017

  1. Involvement of adenosine A2a receptor in intraocular pressure decrease induced by 2-(1-octyn-1-yl)adenosine or 2-(6-cyano-1-hexyn-1-yl)adenosine.

    PubMed

    Konno, Takashi; Murakami, Akira; Uchibori, Takehiro; Nagai, Akihiko; Kogi, Kentaro; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2005-04-01

    The aim of the present study is to clarify the mechanism for the decrease in intraocular pressure by 2-alkynyladenosine derivatives in rabbits. The receptor binding analysis revealed that 2-(1-octyn-1-yl)adenosine (2-O-Ado) and 2-(6-cyano-1-hexyn-1-yl)adenosine (2-CN-Ado) selectively bound to the A(2a) receptor with a high affinity. Ocular hypotensive responses to 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado were inhibited by the adenosine A(2a)-receptor antagonist 1,3,7-trimethyl-8-(3-chlorostyryl)xanthine (CSC), but not by the adenosine A(1)-receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) or the adenosine A(2b)-receptor antagonist alloxazine. In addition, 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado caused an increase in outflow facility, which was inhibited by CSC, but not by DPCPX or alloxazine. Moreover, 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado increased cAMP in the aqueous humor, and the 2-O-Ado-induced an increase in cAMP was inhibited by CSC. These results suggest that 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado reduced intraocular pressure via an increase in outflow facility. The ocular hypotension may be mainly mediated through the activation of adenosine A(2a) receptor, although a possible involvement of adenosine A(1) receptor cannot be completely ruled out. 2-O-Ado and 2-CN-Ado are useful lead compounds for the treatment of glaucoma.

  2. Altered distribution and function of A2A adenosine receptors in the brain of WAG/Rij rats with genetic absence epilepsy, before and after appearance of the disease.

    PubMed

    D'Alimonte, Iolanda; D'Auro, Mariagrazia; Citraro, Rita; Biagioni, Francesca; Jiang, Shucui; Nargi, Eleonora; Buccella, Silvana; Di Iorio, Patrizia; Giuliani, Patricia; Ballerini, Patrizia; Caciagli, Francesco; Russo, Emilio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Ciccarelli, Renata

    2009-09-01

    The involvement of excitatory adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs), which probably contribute to the pathophysiology of convulsive seizures, has never been investigated in absence epilepsy. Here, we examined the distribution and function of A(2A)Rs in the brain of Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk (WAG/Rij) rats, a model of human absence epilepsy in which disease onset occurs 2-3 months after birth. In the cerebral areas that are mostly involved in the generation of absence seizures (somatosensory cortex, reticular and ventrobasal thalamic nuclei), A(2A)R density was lower in presymptomatic WAG/Rij rats than in control rats, as evaluated by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. Accordingly, in cortical/thalamic slices prepared from the brain of these rats, A(2A)R stimulation with the agonist 2-[4-(-2-carboxyethyl)-phenylamino]-5'-N-ethylcarboxamido-adenosine failed to modulate either cAMP formation, mitogen-activated protein kinase system, or K(+)-evoked glutamate release. In contrast, A(2A)R expression, signalling and function were significantly enhanced in brain slices from epileptic WAG/Rij rats as compared with matched control animals. Additionally, the in vivo injection of the A(2A)R agonist CGS21680, or the antagonist 5-amino-7-(2-phenylethyl)-2-(2-fuyl)-pyrazolo-(4,3-c)1,2,4-triazolo(1,5-c)-pyrimidine, in the examined brain areas of epileptic rats, increased and decreased, respectively, the number/duration of recorded spontaneous spike-wave discharges in a dose-dependent manner during a 1-5 h post-treatment period. Our results support the hypothesis that alteration of excitatory A(2A)R is involved in the pathogenesis of absence seizures and might represent a new interesting target for the therapeutic management of this disease. PMID:19723291

  3. Culture as a mediator of gene-environment interaction: Cultural consonance, childhood adversity, a 2A serotonin receptor polymorphism, and depression in urban Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dressler, William W; Balieiro, Mauro C; Ferreira de Araújo, Luiza; Silva, Wilson A; Ernesto Dos Santos, José

    2016-07-01

    Research on gene-environment interaction was facilitated by breakthroughs in molecular biology in the late 20th century, especially in the study of mental health. There is a reliable interaction between candidate genes for depression and childhood adversity in relation to mental health outcomes. The aim of this paper is to explore the role of culture in this process in an urban community in Brazil. The specific cultural factor examined is cultural consonance, or the degree to which individuals are able to successfully incorporate salient cultural models into their own beliefs and behaviors. It was hypothesized that cultural consonance in family life would mediate the interaction of genotype and childhood adversity. In a study of 402 adult Brazilians from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds, conducted from 2011 to 2014, the interaction of reported childhood adversity and a polymorphism in the 2A serotonin receptor was associated with higher depressive symptoms. Further analysis showed that the gene-environment interaction was mediated by cultural consonance in family life, and that these effects were more pronounced in lower social class neighborhoods. The findings reinforce the role of the serotonergic system in the regulation of stress response and learning and memory, and how these processes in turn interact with environmental events and circumstances. Furthermore, these results suggest that gene-environment interaction models should incorporate a wider range of environmental experience and more complex pathways to better understand how genes and the environment combine to influence mental health outcomes.

  4. Culture as a mediator of gene-environment interaction: Cultural consonance, childhood adversity, a 2A serotonin receptor polymorphism, and depression in urban Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dressler, William W; Balieiro, Mauro C; Ferreira de Araújo, Luiza; Silva, Wilson A; Ernesto Dos Santos, José

    2016-07-01

    Research on gene-environment interaction was facilitated by breakthroughs in molecular biology in the late 20th century, especially in the study of mental health. There is a reliable interaction between candidate genes for depression and childhood adversity in relation to mental health outcomes. The aim of this paper is to explore the role of culture in this process in an urban community in Brazil. The specific cultural factor examined is cultural consonance, or the degree to which individuals are able to successfully incorporate salient cultural models into their own beliefs and behaviors. It was hypothesized that cultural consonance in family life would mediate the interaction of genotype and childhood adversity. In a study of 402 adult Brazilians from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds, conducted from 2011 to 2014, the interaction of reported childhood adversity and a polymorphism in the 2A serotonin receptor was associated with higher depressive symptoms. Further analysis showed that the gene-environment interaction was mediated by cultural consonance in family life, and that these effects were more pronounced in lower social class neighborhoods. The findings reinforce the role of the serotonergic system in the regulation of stress response and learning and memory, and how these processes in turn interact with environmental events and circumstances. Furthermore, these results suggest that gene-environment interaction models should incorporate a wider range of environmental experience and more complex pathways to better understand how genes and the environment combine to influence mental health outcomes. PMID:27270123

  5. 3-(Fur-2-yl)-10-(2-phenylethyl)-[1,2,4]triazino[4,3-a]benzimidazol-4(10H)-one, a Novel Adenosine Receptor Antagonist with A2A-Mediated Neuroprotective Effects

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In this study, compound FTBI (3-(2-furyl)-10-(2-phenylethyl)[1,2,4]triazino[4,3-a]benzimidazol-4(10H)-one) was selected from a small library of triazinobenzimidazole derivatives as a potent A2A adenosine receptor (AR) antagonist and tested for its neuroprotective effects against two different kinds of dopaminergic neurotoxins, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) and methamphetamine (METH), in rat PC12 and in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell lines. FTBI, in a concentration range corresponding to its affinity for A2A AR subtype, significantly increased the number of viable PC12 cells after their exposure to METH and, to a similar extent, to MPP+, as demonstrated in both trypan blue exclusion assay and in cytological staining. These neuroprotective effects were also observed with a classical A2A AR antagonist, ZM241385, and appeared to be completely counteracted by the AR agonist, NECA, supporting A2A ARs are directly involved in FTBI-mediated effects. Similarly, in human SH-SY5Y cells, FTBI was able to prevent cell toxicity induced by MPP+ and METH, showing that this A2A AR antagonist has a neuroprotective effect independently by the specific cell model. Altogether these results demonstrate that the A2A AR blockade mediates cell protection against neurotoxicity induced by dopaminergic neurotoxins in dopamine containing cells, supporting the potential use of A2A AR antagonists in dopaminergic degenerative diseases including Parkinson’s disease. PMID:22860174

  6. The impact of adenosine and an A2A adenosine receptor agonist on the ACh-induced increase in intracellular calcium of the glomus cells of the cat carotid body.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Robert S; Shirahata, Machiko; Chang, Irene

    2009-12-01

    The carotid body (CB) is a polymodal chemosensor of arterial blood located next to the internal carotid artery. The basic chemosensing unit is composed of the neurotransmitter (NT)-containing glomus cells (GCs) and the sensory afferent fibers synapsing onto the GCs. Nicotinic and muscarinic receptors have been found on both the sensory afferent fibers and on the GCs. Neural output from the CB (CBNO) increases when arterial blood perfusing it is hypoxic, hypoglycemic, hypercapnic, or acidic. The increased CBNO due to GC release of excitatory NTs must be preceded by an entrance of calcium into the GCs. With repeated release of ACh from the GCs, cholinergic receptors could become desensitized, particularly nicotinic receptors which function as calcium channels. The purpose of the present study was to see if adenosine (ADO), known to alter receptor sensitivities, could attenuate or eliminate any desensitization of the nicotinic receptors occurring during the repeated application of ACh. Cat CBs were harvested with techniques approved by the University's Animal Care/Use Committee. The GCs were cultured and prepared for detecting [Ca(++)](i) with standard techniques. Repeated application of ACh produced a progressively decreasing increase in [Ca(++)](i). With the use of ADO or an A2(A) ADO receptor agonist the decrease was avoided. Though ADO also increased GC [Ca(++)](i), the sum of ADO increase and ACh increase, when superfused separately, was less than the increase when they were both included in the same superfusion. This suggested the possible involvement of a new path in the action. Potential mechanisms to explain the phenomena are discussed. PMID:19761761

  7. Specific Activation of A3, A2A and A1 Adenosine Receptors in CD73-Knockout Mice Affects B16F10 Melanoma Growth, Neovascularization, Angiogenesis and Macrophage Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Koszałka, Patrycja; Gołuńska, Monika; Urban, Aleksandra; Stasiłojć, Grzegorz; Stanisławowski, Marcin; Majewski, Marceli; Składanowski, Andrzej C.; Bigda, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    CD73 (ecto-5'-nucleotidase), a cell surface enzyme hydrolyzing AMP to adenosine, was lately demonstrated to play a direct role in tumor progression including regulation of tumor vascularization. It was also shown to stimulate tumor macrophage infiltration. Interstitial adenosine, accumulating in solid tumors due to CD73 enzymatic activity, is recognized as a main mediator regulating the production of pro- and anti-angiogenic factors, but the engagement of specific adenosine receptors in tumor progression in vivo is still poorly researched. We have analyzed the role of high affinity adenosine receptors A1, A2A, and A3 in B16F10 melanoma progression using specific agonists (CCPA, CGS-21680 and IB-MECA, respectively). We limited endogenous extracellular adenosine background using CD73 knockout mice treated with CD73 chemical inhibitor, AOPCP (adenosine α,β-methylene 5’-diphosphate). Activation of any adenosine receptor significantly inhibited B16F10 melanoma growth but only at its early stage. At 14th day of growth, the decrease in tumor neovascularization and MAPK pathway activation induced by CD73 depletion was reversed by all agonists. Activation of A1AR primarily increased angiogenic activation measured by expression of VEGF-R2 on tumor blood vessels. However, mainly A3AR activation increased both the microvessel density and expression of pro-angiogenic factors. All agonists induced significant increase in macrophage tumor infiltration, with IB-MECA being most effective. This effect was accompanied by substantial changes in cytokines regulating macrophage polarization between pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic phenotype. Our results demonstrate an evidence that each of the analyzed receptors has a specific role in the stimulation of tumor angiogenesis and confirm significantly more multifaceted role of adenosine in its regulation than was already observed. They also reveal previously unexplored consequences to extracellular adenosine signaling depletion in

  8. Heterologous expression of functional G-protein-coupled receptors in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Salom, David; Cao, Pengxiu; Sun, Wenyu; Kramp, Kristopher; Jastrzebska, Beata; Jin, Hui; Feng, Zhaoyang; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    New strategies for expression, purification, functional characterization, and structural determination of membrane-spanning G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are constantly being developed because of their importance to human health. Here, we report a Caenorhabditis elegans heterologous expression system able to produce milligram amounts of functional native and engineered GPCRs. Both bovine opsin [(b)opsin] and human adenosine A2A subtype receptor [(h)A2AR] expressed in neurons or muscles of C. elegans were localized to cell membranes. Worms expressing these GPCRs manifested changes in motor behavior in response to light and ligands, respectively. With a newly devised protocol, 0.6–1 mg of purified homogenous 9-cis-retinal-bound bovine isorhodopsin [(b)isoRho] and ligand-bound (h)A2AR were obtained from C. elegans from one 10-L fermentation at low cost. Purified recombinant (b)isoRho exhibited its signature absorbance spectrum and activated its cognate G-protein transducin in vitro at a rate similar to native rhodopsin (Rho) obtained from bovine retina. Generally high expression levels of 11 native and mutant GPCRs demonstrated the potential of this C. elegans system to produce milligram quantities of high-quality GPCRs and possibly other membrane proteins suitable for detailed characterization.—Salom, D., Cao, P., Sun, W., Kramp, K., Jastrzebska, B., Jin, H., Feng, Z., Palczewski, K. Heterologous expression of functional G-protein-coupled receptors in Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:22090314

  9. A novel adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptor antagonist ASP5854 ameliorates motor impairment in MPTP-treated marmosets: comparison with existing anti-Parkinson's disease drugs.

    PubMed

    Mihara, Takuma; Iwashita, Akinori; Matsuoka, Nobuya

    2008-12-12

    Recent evidence indicates that adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists hold therapeutic potential for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). A study on the novel adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptor dual antagonist 5-[5-amino-3-(4-fluorophenyl)pyrazin-2-yl]-1-isopropylpyridine-2(1H)-one (ASP5854) showed it to be effective in various rodents models of PD and cognition. In the present study, we further investigated the potential of ASP5854 as an anti-PD drug using 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated common marmosets, which is a highly predictive model of clinical efficacy in PD, and compared its effect with those of existing anti-PD drugs. ASP5854 significantly and dose-dependently improved the total motor disability score for 7h at doses higher than 1mg/kg, and significantly increased total locomotor activity at doses higher than 0.1mg/kg without adverse effects. l-3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine+benserazide and bromocriptine also significantly improved the motor disability score and the hypolocomotion caused by MPTP treatment in a dose-dependent fashion. This amelioration was significant at 32+8 and 10-32 mg/kg, respectively, although bromocriptine induced severe emesis. Trihexiphenidyl also significantly improved the total motor disability score at doses of 10-32 mg/kg; however, while a significant increase in the total locomotor activity was observed at 10mg/kg, the drug induced ataxia-like behavior at 32 mg/kg. On the other hand, neither selegiline nor amantadine improved the total motor disability and hypolocomotion. These data substantiate the evidence that the novel adenosine antagonist ASP5854 exerts comparable anti-PD activity with existing anti-PD drugs, which indicates that ASP5854 might have potential to ameliorate motor deficits in PD.

  10. The adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, istradefylline enhances anti-parkinsonian activity induced by combined treatment with low doses of L-DOPA and dopamine agonists in MPTP-treated common marmosets.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Shin-ichi; Soshiroda, Kazuhiro; Okita, Eri; Kawai-Uchida, Mika; Mori, Akihisa; Jenner, Peter; Kanda, Tomoyuki

    2015-11-01

    The adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, istradefylline improves motor function in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) optimally treated with a combination of L-DOPA and a dopamine agonist without increasing the risk of troublesome dyskinesia. However, the effects of istradefylline on motor function when administered in combination with low dose of L-DOPA and dopamine agonists as occurs in early PD are unknown. We investigated whether istradefylline enhances the combined anti-parkinsonian effects of a suboptimal dose of L-DOPA and a threshold dose of either the non-ergot dopamine agonist, ropinirole or the ergot dopamine agonist, pergolide in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated common marmoset. Threshold doses of ropinirole (0.025-0.075 mg/kg p.o.) and pergolide (0.01 mg/kg p.o.) produced a weak anti-parkinsonian effect. Co-administration of a suboptimal dose of L-DOPA (2.5mg/kg p.o.) with threshold doses of the dopamine agonists enhanced their anti-parkinsonian effect that led to increased 'ON' time without dyskinesia appearing. Administering istradefylline (10mg/kg p.o.) with the threshold doses of dopamine agonists and the suboptimal dose of L-DOPA in a triple combination caused a further enhancement of the anti-parkinsonian response but dyskinesia was still absent. In early PD, dopamine agonists are often used as first-line monotherapy, but efficacy is usually lost within a few years, at which time L-DOPA is added but with the risk of dyskinesia appearance. These results show that istradefylline is effective in improving motor function in combination with low dose dopaminergic drug treatment without provoking dyskinesia. PMID:26415982

  11. 2-[2-[4-[2-[2-[ 1,3-Dihydro- 1,1-bis (4-hydroxyphenyl)-3-oxo-5-isobenzofuranthioureidyl]ethylaminocarbonyl]ethyl]phenyl] ethylamino]-5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (FITC-APEC): A Fluorescent Ligand For A2a-Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, R. Tyler; Skolnick, Phil; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2011-01-01

    The fluorescein conjugate, FITC-APEC (2-[2-[4-[2-[2-[1,3-dihydro-l,l-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-3-oxo-5-isobenzofuranthioureidyl]ethylaminocarbonyl]ethyl]phenyl]ethylamino]-5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine), is a novel ligand derived from a series of functionalized congeners that act as selective A2a-adenosine receptor agonists. The binding of FITC-APEC to bovine striatal A2a,-adenosine receptors measured by fluorescence techniques was saturable and of a high affinity, with a Bmax, of 2.3 ± 0.3 pmol/mg protein and KD of 57 ± 2 nM. The KD value estimated by fluorescence was consistent with the Ki (11 ± 0.3 nM) obtained by competition studies with [3H]CGS 21680. Additionally, the Bmax, value found by FITC-APEC measurement was in agreement with Bmax, values obtained using radioligand binding. FITC-APEC exhibited rapid and reversible binding to bovine striatum. The potencies of chemically diverse A2a-adenosine receptor ligands estimated by inhibition of FITC-APEC binding were in good agreement with their potencies determined using radioligand binding techniques (r = 0.97, P = 0.0003). FITC-APEC binding was not altered by purine derivatives that do not recognize A2a-adenosine receptors. These findings demonstrate that the novel fluorescent ligand FITC-APEC can be used in the quantitative characterization of ligand binding to A2a-adenosine receptors. PMID:23772170

  12. Caffeine increases striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the human brain

    DOE PAGES

    Volkow, N. D.; Wang, G. -J.; Logan, J.; Alexoff, D.; Fowler, J. S.; Thanos, P. K.; Wong, C.; Casado, V.; Ferre, S.; Tomasi, D.

    2015-04-14

    Caffeine, the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, is used to promote wakefulness and enhance alertness. Like other wake-promoting drugs (stimulants and modafinil), caffeine enhances dopamine (DA) signaling in the brain, which it does predominantly by antagonizing adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). However, it is unclear if caffeine, at the doses consumed by humans, increases DA release or whether it modulates the functions of postsynaptic DA receptors through its interaction with adenosine receptors, which modulate them. We used positron emission tomography and [11C]raclopride (DA D2/D3 receptor radioligand sensitive to endogenous DA) to assess if caffeine increased DA release inmore » striatum in 20 healthy controls. Caffeine (300mg p.o.) significantly increased the availability of D2/D3 receptors in putamen and ventral striatum, but not in caudate, when compared with placebo. In addition, caffeine-induced increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum were associated with caffeine-induced increases in alertness. Our findings indicate that in the human brain, caffeine, at doses typically consumed, increases the availability of DA D2/D3 receptors, which indicates that caffeine does not increase DA in the striatum for this would have decreased D2/D3 receptor availability. Instead, we interpret our findings to reflect an increase in D2/D3 receptor levels in striatum with caffeine (or changes in affinity). Furthermore, the association between increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in ventral striatum and alertness suggests that caffeine might enhance arousal, in part, by upregulating D2/D3 receptors.« less

  13. Caffeine increases striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Volkow, N D; Wang, G-J; Logan, J; Alexoff, D; Fowler, J S; Thanos, P K; Wong, C; Casado, V; Ferre, S; Tomasi, D

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine, the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, is used to promote wakefulness and enhance alertness. Like other wake-promoting drugs (stimulants and modafinil), caffeine enhances dopamine (DA) signaling in the brain, which it does predominantly by antagonizing adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). However, it is unclear if caffeine, at the doses consumed by humans, increases DA release or whether it modulates the functions of postsynaptic DA receptors through its interaction with adenosine receptors, which modulate them. We used positron emission tomography and [(11)C]raclopride (DA D2/D3 receptor radioligand sensitive to endogenous DA) to assess if caffeine increased DA release in striatum in 20 healthy controls. Caffeine (300 mg p.o.) significantly increased the availability of D2/D3 receptors in putamen and ventral striatum, but not in caudate, when compared with placebo. In addition, caffeine-induced increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum were associated with caffeine-induced increases in alertness. Our findings indicate that in the human brain, caffeine, at doses typically consumed, increases the availability of DA D2/D3 receptors, which indicates that caffeine does not increase DA in the striatum for this would have decreased D2/D3 receptor availability. Instead, we interpret our findings to reflect an increase in D2/D3 receptor levels in striatum with caffeine (or changes in affinity). The association between increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in ventral striatum and alertness suggests that caffeine might enhance arousal, in part, by upregulating D2/D3 receptors. PMID:25871974

  14. Caffeine increases striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Volkow, N D; Wang, G-J; Logan, J; Alexoff, D; Fowler, J S; Thanos, P K; Wong, C; Casado, V; Ferre, S; Tomasi, D

    2015-04-14

    Caffeine, the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, is used to promote wakefulness and enhance alertness. Like other wake-promoting drugs (stimulants and modafinil), caffeine enhances dopamine (DA) signaling in the brain, which it does predominantly by antagonizing adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). However, it is unclear if caffeine, at the doses consumed by humans, increases DA release or whether it modulates the functions of postsynaptic DA receptors through its interaction with adenosine receptors, which modulate them. We used positron emission tomography and [(11)C]raclopride (DA D2/D3 receptor radioligand sensitive to endogenous DA) to assess if caffeine increased DA release in striatum in 20 healthy controls. Caffeine (300 mg p.o.) significantly increased the availability of D2/D3 receptors in putamen and ventral striatum, but not in caudate, when compared with placebo. In addition, caffeine-induced increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum were associated with caffeine-induced increases in alertness. Our findings indicate that in the human brain, caffeine, at doses typically consumed, increases the availability of DA D2/D3 receptors, which indicates that caffeine does not increase DA in the striatum for this would have decreased D2/D3 receptor availability. Instead, we interpret our findings to reflect an increase in D2/D3 receptor levels in striatum with caffeine (or changes in affinity). The association between increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in ventral striatum and alertness suggests that caffeine might enhance arousal, in part, by upregulating D2/D3 receptors.

  15. Activation of Adenosine 2A receptor inhibits neutrophil apoptosis in an autophagy-dependent manner in mice with systemic inflammatory response syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang-Wuyue; Yang, Ting; Zhao, Li; Ni, Zhenhong; Yang, Nan; He, Fengtian; Dai, Shuang-Shuang

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is an overwhelming whole body inflammation caused by infectious diseases or sterile insults. Neutrophils are the dominant participants during inflammation, and their survival and death determine the initiation as well as resolution of SIRS. Apoptosis and autophagy are two fundamental cellular processes that modulating cell fate, but their correlation and regulators in neutrophils under SIRS condition have not been elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that high dose of LPS induced both apoptosis and autophagy of neutrophils in a mouse SIRS model and LPS-stimulated neutrophils in vitro. Moreover, we found that the adenosine 2A receptor (A2AR), a known anti-inflammatory G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), could inhibit LPS-induced neutrophil apoptosis by suppressing the LPS-induced autophagy. Activation of A2AR suppressed LPS-induced autophagy by inhibiting the ROS-JNK pathway as well as promoting GPCR βϒ subunit–AKT signaling. The A2AR-inhibited autophagy suppressed apoptosis of neutrophils by blocking caspase8, caspase3 and PARP signaling. These findings not only increase our understandings of neutrophils’ fate and function in response to systemic inflammation, but also identify a novel anti-inflammatory role of A2AR in modulating neutrophils’ survival during inflammation. PMID:27647162

  16. Activation of Adenosine 2A receptor inhibits neutrophil apoptosis in an autophagy-dependent manner in mice with systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang-Wuyue; Yang, Ting; Zhao, Li; Ni, Zhenhong; Yang, Nan; He, Fengtian; Dai, Shuang-Shuang

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is an overwhelming whole body inflammation caused by infectious diseases or sterile insults. Neutrophils are the dominant participants during inflammation, and their survival and death determine the initiation as well as resolution of SIRS. Apoptosis and autophagy are two fundamental cellular processes that modulating cell fate, but their correlation and regulators in neutrophils under SIRS condition have not been elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that high dose of LPS induced both apoptosis and autophagy of neutrophils in a mouse SIRS model and LPS-stimulated neutrophils in vitro. Moreover, we found that the adenosine 2A receptor (A2AR), a known anti-inflammatory G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), could inhibit LPS-induced neutrophil apoptosis by suppressing the LPS-induced autophagy. Activation of A2AR suppressed LPS-induced autophagy by inhibiting the ROS-JNK pathway as well as promoting GPCR βϒ subunit-AKT signaling. The A2AR-inhibited autophagy suppressed apoptosis of neutrophils by blocking caspase8, caspase3 and PARP signaling. These findings not only increase our understandings of neutrophils' fate and function in response to systemic inflammation, but also identify a novel anti-inflammatory role of A2AR in modulating neutrophils' survival during inflammation. PMID:27647162

  17. Prolonged adenosine A1 receptor activation in hypoxia and pial vessel disruption focal cortical ischemia facilitates clathrin-mediated AMPA receptor endocytosis and long-lasting synaptic inhibition in rat hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses: differential regulation of GluA2 and GluA1 subunits by p38 MAPK and JNK.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhicheng; Xiong, Cherry; Pancyr, Cassandra; Stockwell, Jocelyn; Walz, Wolfgang; Cayabyab, Francisco S

    2014-07-16

    Activation of presynaptic adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs) causes substantial synaptic depression during hypoxia/cerebral ischemia, but postsynaptic actions of A1Rs are less clear. We found that A1Rs and GluA2-containing AMPA receptors (AMPARs) form stable protein complexes from hippocampal brain homogenates and cultured hippocampal neurons from Sprague Dawley rats. In contrast, adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) did not coprecipitate or colocalize with GluA2-containing AMPARs. Prolonged stimulation of A1Rs with the agonist N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) caused adenosine-induced persistent synaptic depression (APSD) in hippocampal brain slices, and APSD levels were blunted by inhibiting clathrin-mediated endocytosis of GluA2 subunits with the Tat-GluA2-3Y peptide. Using biotinylation and membrane fractionation assays, prolonged CPA incubation showed significant depletion of GluA2/GluA1 surface expression from hippocampal brain slices and cultured neurons. Tat-GluA2-3Y peptide or dynamin inhibitor Dynasore prevented CPA-induced GluA2/GluA1 internalization. Confocal imaging analysis confirmed that functional A1Rs, but not A2ARs, are required for clathrin-mediated AMPAR endocytosis in hippocampal neurons. Pharmacological inhibitors or shRNA knockdown of p38 MAPK and JNK prevented A1R-mediated internalization of GluA2 but not GluA1 subunits. Tat-GluA2-3Y peptide or A1R antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine also prevented hypoxia-mediated GluA2/GluA1 internalization. Finally, in a pial vessel disruption cortical stroke model, a unilateral cortical lesion compared with sham surgery reduced hippocampal GluA2, GluA1, and A1R surface expression and also caused synaptic depression in hippocampal slices that was consistent with AMPAR downregulation and decreased probability of transmitter release. Together, these results indicate a previously unknown mechanism for A1R-induced persistent synaptic depression involving clathrin-mediated GluA2 and GluA1 internalization that

  18. Lighting up G protein-coupled purinergic receptors with engineered fluorescent ligands

    PubMed Central

    Ciruela, Francisco; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    The use of G protein-coupled receptors fluorescent ligands is undergoing continuous expansion. In line with this, fluorescent agonists and antagonists of high affinity for G protein-coupled adenosine and P2Y receptors have been shown to be useful pharmacological probe compounds. Fluorescent ligands for A1R, A2AR, and A3R (adenosine receptors) and P2Y2R, P2Y4R, P2Y6R, and P2Y14R (nucleotide receptors) have been reported. Such ligands have been successfully applied to drug discovery and to GPCR characterization by flow cytometry, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence polarization, fluorescence resonance energy transfer and scanning confocal microscopy. Here we summarize recently reported and readily available representative fluorescent ligands of purinergic receptors. In addition, we pay special attention on the use of this family of fluorescent ligands revealing two main aspects of purinergic receptor biology, namely ligand binding and receptor oligomerization. PMID:25890205

  19. Adenosine A2A Agonist Improves Lung Function During Ex-vivo Lung Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Emaminia, Abbas; LaPar, Damien J.; Zhao, Yunge; Steidle, John F.; Harris, David A.; Linden, Joel; Kron, Irving L.; Lau, Christine L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Ex-vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is a novel technique to assess, and potentially repair marginal lungs that may otherwise be rejected for transplantation. Adenosine has been shown to protect against lung ischemia-reperfusion injury through its A2A receptor. We hypothesized that combining EVLP with adenosine A2A receptor agonist treatment would enhance lung functional quality and increase donor lung usage. Methods Eight bilateral pig lungs were harvested and flushed with cold Perfadex. After 14 hours storage at 4°C, EVLP was performed for 5 hours on two explanted lung groups: 1) Control group lungs (n=4), were perfused with Steen Solution and Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and 2) treated group lungs (n=4) received 10μM CGS21680, a selective A2A receptor agonist, in a Steen Solution-primed circuit. Lung histology, tissue cytokines, gas analysis and pulmonary function were compared between groups. Results Treated lungs demonstrated significantly less edema as reflected by wet-dry weight ratio (6.6 vs. 5.2, p<0.03) and confirmed by histology. In addition, treated lung demonstrated significantly lower levels of interferon gamma (45.1 vs. 88.5, p<0.05). Other measured tissue cytokines (interleukin (IL) 1 beta, IL-6, and IL-8) were lower in treatment group, but values failed to reach statistical significance. Oxygenation index was improved in the treated group (1.5 vs. 2.3, p<0.01) as well as mean airway pressure (10.3 vs. 13 p<0.009). Conclusions EVLP is a novel and efficient way to assess and optimize lung function and oxygen exchange within donor lungs, and the use of adenosine A2A agonist potentiates its potential. EVLP with the concomitant administration of A2A agonist may enhance donor lung quality and could increase the donor lung pool for transplantation. PMID:22051279

  20. Increased Orbitofrontal Brain Activation after Administration of a Selective Adenosine A2A Antagonist in Cocaine Dependent Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, F. Gerard; Steinberg, Joel L.; Lane, Scott D.; Kjome, Kimberly L.; Ma, Liangsuo; Ferre, Sergi; Schmitz, Joy M.; Green, Charles E.; Bandak, Stephen I.; Renshaw, Perry F.; Kramer, Larry A.; Narayana, Ponnada A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Positron Emission Tomography imaging studies provide evidence of reduced dopamine function in cocaine dependent subjects in the striatum, which is correlated with prefrontal cortical glucose metabolism, particularly in the orbitofrontal cortex. However, whether enhancement of dopamine in the striatum in cocaine dependent subjects would be associated with changes in prefrontal cortical brain activation is unknown. One novel class of medications that enhance dopamine function via heteromer formation with dopamine receptors in the striatum is the selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonists. This study sought to determine the effects administration of the selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonist SYN115 on brain function in cocaine dependent subjects. Methodology/Principle Findings: Twelve cocaine dependent subjects underwent two fMRI scans (one after a dose of placebo and one after a dose of 100 mg of SYN115) while performing a working memory task with three levels of difficulty (3, 5, and 7 digits). fMRI results showed that for 7-digit working memory activation there was significantly greater activation from SYN115 compared to placebo in portions of left (L) lateral orbitofrontal cortex, L insula, and L superior and middle temporal pole. Conclusion/Significance: These findings are consistent with enhanced dopamine function in the striatum in cocaine dependent subjects via blockade of adenosine A2A receptors producing increased brain activation in the orbitofrontal cortex and other cortical regions. This suggests that at least some of the changes in brain activation in prefrontal cortical regions in cocaine dependent subjects may be related to altered striatal dopamine function, and that enhancement of dopamine function via adenosine A2A receptor blockade could be explored further for amelioration of neurobehavioral deficits associated with chronic cocaine use. PMID:22654774

  1. An adenosine A(2A) antagonist injected in the NTS reverses thermal prolongation of the LCR in decerebrate piglets.

    PubMed

    Xia, Luxi; Bartlett, Donald; Leiter, J C

    2008-12-31

    Hyperthermia prolongs the laryngeal chemoreflex (LCR). Under normothermic conditions, adenosine antagonists shorten and adenosine A(2A) (Ad-A(2A)) agonists prolong the LCR. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that SCH-58261, an Ad-A(2A) receptor antagonist, would prevent thermal prolongation of the LCR when injected unilaterally within the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). We studied decerebrate piglets aged 4-13 days. We elicited the LCR by injecting 0.1ml of water into the larynx and recorded integrated phrenic nerve activity. The laryngeal chemoreflex was prolonged when the body temperature of each piglet was raised approximately 2.5 degrees C, and SCH-58261 reversed the thermal prolongation of the LCR when injected into the NTS (n=13), but not when injected in the nucleus ambiguus (n=9). Injections of vehicle alone into the NTS did not alter the thermal prolongation of the LCR (n=9). We conclude that activation of adenosine receptors, perhaps located on GABAergic neurons in the NTS, contributes to thermal prolongation of the LCR.

  2. Discovery of 1,2,4-Triazine Derivatives as Adenosine A2A Antagonists using Structure Based Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Potent, ligand efficient, selective, and orally efficacious 1,2,4-triazine derivatives have been identified using structure based drug design approaches as antagonists of the adenosine A2A receptor. The X-ray crystal structures of compounds 4e and 4g bound to the GPCR illustrate that the molecules bind deeply inside the orthosteric binding cavity. In vivo pharmacokinetic and efficacy data for compound 4k are presented, demonstrating the potential of this series of compounds for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:22220592

  3. Radioligand binding analysis as a tool for quality control of GPCR production for structural characterization: adenosine A(2a)R as a template for study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shweta; Zhang, Minghao; Bertheleme, Nicolas; Kara, Elodie; Strange, Philip G; Byrne, Bernadette

    2012-02-01

    Functional characterization of G protein-coupled receptors is essential to ascertain the suitability of a protein target for downstream studies and to help develop optimal expression and isolation procedures. Radioligand binding analysis is a well-established technique, which allows direct measurement of the amount of functional receptor in a sample. It can be readily applied to both membrane-bound and soluble receptor samples and is an ideal method for monitoring the amount of functional protein at each stage in the expression and isolation process. This unit presents protocols for the radioligand binding analysis of the human adenosine A(2a) receptor and provides examples of how these assays can be used at several stages to help optimize expression, solubilization, and isolation procedures.

  4. The efficacy of oral adenosine A(2A) antagonist istradefylline for the treatment of moderate to severe Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Vorovenci, Ruxandra Julia; Antonini, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    The moderate and severe stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) are marked by motor and non-motor complications that still remain difficult to control with the currently available therapy. Adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists target non-dopaminergic systems, and have emerged as promising add-on therapy in the management of PD, a little more than a decade ago. While the development of this new drug class was slower than initially expected, istradefylline was recently registered in Japan, because it provides reduction of the off-time, when given in association with levodopa. Effects on some non-motor features have also been suggested, and preliminary studies further suggest a potential neuroprotective effect. Associations of A(2A) receptor antagonists with dopaminergic agents, as well as enzyme blockers like catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) and monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B) inhibitors, should provide even greater benefit in advanced PD patients, and, thus, a more individualized treatment approach would be at hand. PMID:26630457

  5. Somatostatin receptors.

    PubMed

    Srikant, C B; Patel, Y C

    1985-01-01

    It is now well established that the biological actions of tetradecapeptide somatostatin (somatostatin-14, S-14) are receptor-mediated. These receptors were first quantified in GH4C pituitary tumor cells using [125I-Tyr1] S-14 as radioligand which was found to exhibit high non-specific binding to membrane receptor preparations from normal tissues. Our studies have shown that [125I-Tyr11] S-14 in which the radiolabel is situated away from the N-terminus exhibits significantly lower non-specific binding and therefore is more suitable for S-14 receptor studies. In the CNS, highest concentration of S-14 receptors was found in the cerebral cortex, followed by thalamus, hypothalamus, striatum, amygdala and hippocampus while medulla-pons, cerebellum and spinal cord exhibited negligible binding. Outside the CNS membrane receptors for S-14 have been characterized in pituitary, adrenal cortex and pancreatic acini. In all these tissues a single class of high affinity binding sites for S-14 were present, the receptors in pancreatic acinar cells exhibiting significantly greater affinity for binding S-14 than in other tissues.

  6. Adenosine receptor antagonists alter the stability of human epileptic GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Roseti, Cristina; Martinello, Katiuscia; Fucile, Sergio; Piccari, Vanessa; Mascia, Addolorata; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Quarato, Pier Paolo; Manfredi, Mario; Esposito, Vincenzo; Cantore, Gianpaolo; Arcella, Antonella; Simonato, Michele; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Limatola, Cristina; Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    We examined how the endogenous anticonvulsant adenosine might influence γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor stability and which adenosine receptors (ARs) were involved. Upon repetitive activation (GABA 500 μM), GABAA receptors, microtransplanted into Xenopus oocytes from neurosurgically resected epileptic human nervous tissues, exhibited an obvious GABAA-current (IGABA) run-down, which was consistently and significantly reduced by treatment with the nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist CGS15943 (100 nM) or with adenosine deaminase (ADA) (1 units/ml), that inactivates adenosine. It was also found that selective antagonists of A2B (MRS1706, 10 nM) or A3 (MRS1334, 30 nM) receptors reduced IGABA run-down, whereas treatment with the specific A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX (10 nM) was ineffective. The selective A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 (10 nM) reduced or potentiated IGABA run-down in ≈40% and ≈20% of tested oocytes, respectively. The ADA-resistant, AR agonist 2-chloroadenosine (2-CA) (10 μM) potentiated IGABA run-down but only in ≈20% of tested oocytes. CGS15943 administration again decreased IGABA run-down in patch-clamped neurons from either human or rat neocortex slices. IGABA run-down in pyramidal neurons was equivalent in A1 receptor-deficient and wt neurons but much larger in neurons from A2A receptor-deficient mice, indicating that, in mouse cortex, GABAA-receptor stability is tonically influenced by A2A but not by A1 receptors. IGABA run-down from wt mice was not affected by 2-CA, suggesting maximal ARs activity by endogenous adenosine. Our findings strongly suggest that cortical A2–A3 receptors alter the stability of GABAA receptors, which could offer therapeutic opportunities. PMID:18809912

  7. Role of adenosine receptor subtypes in methamphetamine reward and reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Kevin A; Schreiner, Drew C; Levis, Sophia C; O'Neill, Casey E; Bachtell, Ryan K

    2015-02-01

    The neurobiology of methamphetamine (MA) remains largely unknown despite its high abuse liability. The present series of studies explored the role of adenosine receptors on MA reward and reinforcement and identified alterations in the expression of adenosine receptors in dopamine terminal areas following MA administration in rats. We tested whether stimulating adenosine A1 or A2A receptor subtypes would influence MA-induced place preference or MA self-administration on fixed and progressive ratio schedules in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Stimulation of either adenosine A1 or A2A receptors significantly reduced the development of MA-induced place preference. Stimulating adenosine A1, but not A2A, receptors reduced MA self-administration responding. We next tested whether repeated experimenter-delivered MA administration would alter the expression of adenosine receptors in the striatal areas using immunoblotting. We observed no change in the expression of adenosine receptors. Lastly, rats were trained to self-administer MA or saline for 14 days and we detected changes in adenosine A1 and A2A receptor expression using immunoblotting. MA self-administration significantly increased adenosine A1 in the nucleus accumbens shell, caudate-putamen and prefrontal cortex. MA self-administration significantly decreased adenosine A2A receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens shell, but increased A2A receptor expression in the amygdala. These findings demonstrate that MA self-administration produces selective alterations in adenosine receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens shell and that stimulation of adenosine receptors reduces several behavioral indices of MA addiction. Together, these studies shed light onto the neurobiological alterations incurred through chronic MA use that may aid in the development of treatments for MA addiction.

  8. Somatostatin receptors.

    PubMed

    Patel, Y C; Srikant, C B

    1997-12-01

    The diverse biological effects of somatostatin (SRIF) are mediated by a family of G protein-coupled receptors (termed sst) that are encoded by five nonallelic genes located on separate chromosomes. The receptors can be further divided into two subfamilies: sst(2,3,5) react with octapeptide and hexapeptide SRIF analogues and belong to one subclass; sst(1,4) react poorly with these compounds and fall into another subclass. This review focuses on the molecular pharmacology and function of these receptors, with particular emphasis on the ligand-binding domain, subtype-selective analogues, agonist-dependent receptor regulation and desensitization responses, subtype-specific effector coupling, and signal transduction pathways responsible for inhibiting cell secretion and cell growth or induction of apoptosis.

  9. Lipoxin receptors.

    PubMed

    Romano, Mario; Recchia, Irene; Recchiuti, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Lipoxins (LXs) represent a class of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites that carry potent immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory properties, LXA4 and LXB4 being the main components of this series. LXs are generated by cooperation between 5-lipoxygenase (LO) and 12- or 15-LO during cell-cell interactions or by single cell types. LX epimers at carbon 15, the 15-epi-LXs, are formed by aspirin-acetylated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in cooperation with 5-LO. 15-epi-LXA4 is also termed aspirin-triggered LX (ATL). In vivo studies with stable LX and ATL analogs have established that these eicosanoids possess potent anti-inflammatory activities. A LXA4 receptor has been cloned. It belongs to the family of chemotactic receptors and clusters with formyl peptide receptors on chromosome 19. Therefore, it was initially denominated formyl peptide receptor like 1 (FPRL1). This receptor binds with high affinity and stereoselectivity LXA4 and ATL. It also recognizes a variety of peptides, synthetic, endogenously generated, or disease associated, but with lower affinity compared to LXA4. For this reason, this receptor has been renamed ALX. This review summarizes the current knowledge on ALX expression, signaling, and potential pathophysiological role. The involvement of additional recognition sites in LX bioactions is also discussed. PMID:17767357

  10. Discovery of potent adenosine A2a antagonists as potential anti-Parkinson disease agents. Non-linear QSAR analyses integrated with pharmacophore modeling.

    PubMed

    Khanfar, Mohammad A; Al-Qtaishat, Saja; Habash, Maha; Taha, Mutasem O

    2016-07-25

    Adenosine A2A receptor antagonists are of great interest in the treatment for Parkinson's disease. In this study, we combined extensive pharmacophore modeling and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis to explore the structural requirements for potent Adenosine A2A antagonists. Genetic function algorithm (GFA) joined with k nearest neighbor (kNN) analyses were applied to build predictive QSAR models. Successful pharmacophores were complemented with exclusion spheres to improve their receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) profiles. Best QSAR models and their associated pharmacophore hypotheses were validated by identification of several novel Adenosine A2A antagonist leads retrieved from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) structural database. The most potent hit illustrated IC50 value of 545.7 nM. PMID:27216633

  11. Thermostabilisation of the neurotensin receptor NTS1

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Yoko; White, Jim F.; Serrano-Vega, Maria J.; Magnani, Francesca; Aloia, Amanda L.; Grisshammer, Reinhard; Tate, Christopher G.

    2009-01-01

    Structural studies on G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been hampered for many years by their instability in detergent solution and by the number of potential conformations that receptors can adopt. Recently, the structures of the β1 and β2 adrenergic receptors and the adenosine A2a receptor were determined with antagonist bound, a receptor conformation that is thought to be more stable than the agonist-bound state. In contrast to these receptors, the neurotensin receptor NTS1 is much less stable in detergent solution. We have therefore used a systematic mutational approach coupled to activity assays to identify receptor mutants suitable for crystallisation, both alone and in complex with the peptide agonist, neurotensin. The best receptor mutant, NTS1-7m, contained 4 point mutations. It showed increased stability compared to the wild type receptor, in the absence of ligand, after solubilisation with a variety of detergents. In addition, NTS1-7m bound to neurotensin was more stable than unliganded NTS1-7m. Of the four thermostabilising mutations, only one residue (A86L) is predicted to be in the lipid environment. In contrast, I260A appears to be buried within the transmembrane helix bundle, F342A may form a distant part of the putative ligand binding site, whereas F358A is likely to be in a region important for receptor activation. NTS1-7m binds neurotensin with a similar affinity to the wild-type receptor. However, agonist dissociation was slower, and NTS1-7m activated G proteins poorly. The affinity of NTS1-7m for the antagonist SR48692 was also lower than that of the wild-type receptor. Thus we have successfully stabilised NTS1 in an agonist-binding conformation that does not efficiently couple to G proteins. PMID:19422831

  12. Purinergic Receptors in Ocular Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Guzman-Aranguez, Ana; Gasull, Xavier; Diebold, Yolanda; Pintor, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex process that implies the interaction between cells and molecular mediators, which, when not properly “tuned,” can lead to disease. When inflammation affects the eye, it can produce severe disorders affecting the superficial and internal parts of the visual organ. The nucleoside adenosine and nucleotides including adenine mononucleotides like ADP and ATP and dinucleotides such as P1,P4-diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A), and P1,P5-diadenosine pentaphosphate (Ap5A) are present in different ocular locations and therefore they may contribute/modulate inflammatory processes. Adenosine receptors, in particular A2A adenosine receptors, present anti-inflammatory action in acute and chronic retinal inflammation. Regarding the A3 receptor, selective agonists like N6-(3-iodobenzyl)-5′-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine (CF101) have been used for the treatment of inflammatory ophthalmic diseases such as dry eye and uveoretinitis. Sideways, diverse stimuli (sensory stimulation, large intraocular pressure increases) can produce a release of ATP from ocular sensory innervation or after injury to ocular tissues. Then, ATP will activate purinergic P2 receptors present in sensory nerve endings, the iris, the ciliary body, or other tissues surrounding the anterior chamber of the eye to produce uveitis/endophthalmitis. In summary, adenosine and nucleotides can activate receptors in ocular structures susceptible to suffer from inflammatory processes. This involvement suggests the possible use of purinergic agonists and antagonists as therapeutic targets for ocular inflammation. PMID:25132732

  13. Equilibrium and kinetic selectivity profiling on the human adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Dijksteel, Gabrielle S; van Duijl, Tirsa; Heezen, Maxime; Heitman, Laura H; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-04-01

    Classical evaluation of target selectivity is usually undertaken by measuring the binding affinity of lead compounds against a number of potential targets under equilibrium conditions, without considering the kinetics of the ligand-receptor interaction. In the present study we propose a combined strategy including both equilibrium- and kinetics-based selectivity profiling. The adenosine receptor (AR) was chosen as a prototypical drug target. Six in-house AR antagonists were evaluated in a radioligand displacement assay for their affinity and in a competition association assay for their binding kinetics on three AR subtypes. One of the compounds with a promising kinetic selectivity profile was also examined in a [(35)S]-GTPγS binding assay for functional activity. We found that XAC and LUF5964 were kinetically more selective for the A1R and A3R, respectively, although they are non-selective in terms of their affinity. In comparison, LUF5967 displayed a strong equilibrium-based selectivity for the A1R over the A2AR, yet its kinetic selectivity thereon was less pronounced. In a GTPγS assay, LUF5964 exhibited insurmountable antagonism on the A3R while having a surmountable effect on the A1R, consistent with its kinetic selectivity profile. This study provides evidence that equilibrium and kinetic selectivity profiling can both be important in the early phases of the drug discovery process. Our proposed combinational strategy could be considered for future medicinal chemistry efforts and aid the design and discovery of different or even better leads for clinical applications.

  14. Equilibrium and kinetic selectivity profiling on the human adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong; Dijksteel, Gabrielle S; van Duijl, Tirsa; Heezen, Maxime; Heitman, Laura H; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-04-01

    Classical evaluation of target selectivity is usually undertaken by measuring the binding affinity of lead compounds against a number of potential targets under equilibrium conditions, without considering the kinetics of the ligand-receptor interaction. In the present study we propose a combined strategy including both equilibrium- and kinetics-based selectivity profiling. The adenosine receptor (AR) was chosen as a prototypical drug target. Six in-house AR antagonists were evaluated in a radioligand displacement assay for their affinity and in a competition association assay for their binding kinetics on three AR subtypes. One of the compounds with a promising kinetic selectivity profile was also examined in a [(35)S]-GTPγS binding assay for functional activity. We found that XAC and LUF5964 were kinetically more selective for the A1R and A3R, respectively, although they are non-selective in terms of their affinity. In comparison, LUF5967 displayed a strong equilibrium-based selectivity for the A1R over the A2AR, yet its kinetic selectivity thereon was less pronounced. In a GTPγS assay, LUF5964 exhibited insurmountable antagonism on the A3R while having a surmountable effect on the A1R, consistent with its kinetic selectivity profile. This study provides evidence that equilibrium and kinetic selectivity profiling can both be important in the early phases of the drug discovery process. Our proposed combinational strategy could be considered for future medicinal chemistry efforts and aid the design and discovery of different or even better leads for clinical applications. PMID:26930564

  15. Allelic association of the D2 dopamine receptor gene with receptor-binding characteristics in alcoholism

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, E.P.; Blum, K.; Ritchie, T.; Montgomery, A.; Sheridan, P.J. )

    1991-07-01

    The allelic association of the human D2 dopamine receptor gene with the binding characteristics of the D2 dopamine receptor was determined in 66 brains of alcoholic and non-alcoholic subjects. In a blinded experiment, DNA from the cerebral cortex was treated with the restriction endonuclease Taql and probed with a 1.5-kilobase (kb) digest of a clone (lambda hD2G1) of the human D2 dopamine receptor gene. The binding characteristics (Kd (binding affinity) and Bmax (number of binding sites)) of the D2 dopamine receptor were determined in the caudate nuclei of these brains using tritiated spiperone as the ligand. The adjusted Kd was significantly lower in alcoholic than in nonalcoholic subjects. In subjects with the A1 allele, in whom a high association with alcoholism was found, the Bmax was significantly reduced compared with the Bmax of subjects with the A2 allele. Moreover, a progressively reduced Bmax was found in subjects with A2/A2, A1/A2, and A1/A1 alleles, with subjects with A2/A2 having the highest mean values, and subjects with A1/A1, the lowest. The polymorphic pattern of the D2 dopamine receptor gene and its differential expression of receptors suggests the involvement of the dopaminergic system in conferring susceptibility to at least one subtype of severe alcoholism.

  16. An adenosine A2A agonist injected in the nucleus of the solitary tract prolongs the laryngeal chemoreflex by a GABAergic mechanism in decerebrate piglets

    PubMed Central

    Duy, Philip M.; Xia, Luxi; Bartlett, Donald; Leiter, J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperthermic prolongation of the laryngeal chemoreflex (LCR) in decerebrate piglets is prevented or reversed by gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptor antagonists and adenosine A2A (Ad-A2A) receptor antagonists administered in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that enhanced GABAA activity and administration of the Ad-A2A agonist, CGS-21680, would prolong the LCR under normothermic conditions. We studied 46 decerebrate piglets ranging from 3 to 8 post-natal days of age. Focal injection into the NTS of 100 nl of 0.5 M nipecotic acid, a GABA reuptake inhibitor, significantly (P < 0.05) prolonged the LCR under normothermic conditions in 10 of 11 animals tested. Injecting 100 nl of 5–12.5 microM CGS-21680 unilaterally or bilaterally into the NTS also prolonged the LCR under normothermic conditions (n=15), but the effect was smaller than the effect of unilateral injection of nipecotic acid. Systemic administration of the GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline, prevented the CGS-21680-dependent prolongation of the LCR in normothermic animals (n = 11). We conclude that thermal prolongation of the LCR depends on a thermally sensitive process or set of neurons in the NTS, which, when activated by elevated brain temperature, enhance adenosinergic and GABAergic function in the region of the NTS. These results emphasize the importance of a thermally sensitive integrative site in the dorsal medulla that, along with sites in the ventral medulla, determine the response to laryngeal chemoreflex stimulation. PMID:20418346

  17. The role of adenosine receptors in regulating production of tumour necrosis factor-α and chemokines by human lung macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Buenestado, A; Delyle, S Grassin; Arnould, I; Besnard, F; Naline, E; Blouquit-Laye, S; Chapelier, A; Bellamy, JF; Devillier, P

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Adenosine is a major endogenous regulator of macrophage function, and activates four specific adenosine receptors (A1, A2A, A2B and A3). Here, we have assessed in human lung macrophages the modulation of the expression of adenosine receptor mRNA by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and the relative contributions of the different adenosine receptors to LPS-induced production of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and chemokines. Experimental approach: Lung macrophages isolated from resected lungs were stimulated with LPS and treated with adenosine receptor agonists or/and antagonists. Adenosine receptor expression was assessed with qRT-PCR. Cytokines were measured in lung macrophage supernatants with elisa. Key results: LPS increased (about 400-fold) mRNA for A2A adenosine receptors, decreased mRNA for A1 and A2B, but had no effect on A3 adenosine receptor mRNA. The adenosine receptor agonist NECA inhibited TNF-α production concentration dependently, whereas the A1 receptor agonist, CCPA, and the A3 receptor agonist, AB-MECA, inhibited TNF-α production only at concentrations affecting A2A receptors. NECA also inhibited the production of CCL chemokines (CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, CCL5) and CXCL chemokines (CXCL9 and CXCL10), but not that of CXCL1, CXCL8 and CXCL5. Reversal of NECA-induced inhibition of TNF-α and chemokine production by the selective A2A adenosine receptor antagonist ZM 241385, but not the A2B receptor antagonist, MRS 1754, or the A3 receptor antagonist, MRS 1220, indicated involvement of A2A receptors. Conclusions and implications: LPS up-regulated A2A adenosine receptor gene transcription, and this receptor subtype mediated inhibition of the LPS-induced production of TNF-α and of a subset of chemokines in human lung macrophages. PMID:20136829

  18. The LDL receptor.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Joseph L; Brown, Michael S

    2009-04-01

    In this article, the history of the LDL receptor is recounted by its codiscoverers. Their early work on the LDL receptor explained a genetic cause of heart attacks and led to new ways of thinking about cholesterol metabolism. The LDL receptor discovery also introduced three general concepts to cell biology: receptor-mediated endocytosis, receptor recycling, and feedback regulation of receptors. The latter concept provides the mechanism by which statins selectively lower plasma LDL, reducing heart attacks and prolonging life. PMID:19299327

  19. Adenosine receptors as drug targets — what are the challenges?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiang-Fan; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Fredholm, Bertil B.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine signalling has long been a target for drug development, with adenosine itself or its derivatives being used clinically since the 1940s. In addition, methylxanthines such as caffeine have profound biological effects as antagonists at adenosine receptors. Moreover, drugs such as dipyridamole and methotrexate act by enhancing the activation of adenosine receptors. There is strong evidence that adenosine has a functional role in many diseases, and several pharmacological compounds specifically targeting individual adenosine receptors — either directly or indirectly — have now entered the clinic. However, only one adenosine receptor-specific agent — the adenosine A2A receptor agonist regadenoson (Lexiscan; Astellas Pharma) — has so far gained approval from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Here, we focus on the biology of adenosine signalling to identify hurdles in the development of additional pharmacological compounds targeting adenosine receptors and discuss strategies to overcome these challenges. PMID:23535933

  20. Pain-relieving prospects for adenosine receptors and ectonucleotidases

    PubMed Central

    Zylka, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine receptor agonists have potent antinociceptive effects in diverse preclinical models of chronic pain. In contrast, the efficacy of adenosine or adenosine receptor agonists at treating pain in humans is unclear. Two ectonucleotidases that generate adenosine in nociceptive neurons were recently identified. When injected spinally, these enzymes have long-lasting adenosine A1 receptor (A1R)-dependent antinociceptive effects in inflammatory and neuropathic pain models. Furthermore, recent findings indicate that spinal adenosine A2A receptor activation can enduringly inhibit neuropathic pain symptoms. Collectively, these studies suggest the possibility of treating chronic pain in humans by targeting specific adenosine receptor subtypes in anatomically defined regions with agonists or with ectonucleotidases that generate adenosine. PMID:21236731

  1. Historical overview of nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Jan-Ake

    2016-03-01

    This review summarizes the birth of the field of nuclear receptors, from Jensen's discovery of estrogen receptor alpha, Gustafsson's discovery of the three-domain structure of the glucocorticoid receptor, the discovery of the glucocorticoid response element and the first partial cloning of the glucocorticoid receptor. Furthermore the discovery of the novel receptors called orphan receptors is described.

  2. Diversity and Bias through Receptor-Receptor Interactions in GPCR Heteroreceptor Complexes. Focus on Examples from Dopamine D2 Receptor Heteromerization.

    PubMed

    Fuxe, Kjell; Tarakanov, Alexander; Romero Fernandez, Wilber; Ferraro, Luca; Tanganelli, Sergio; Filip, Malgorzata; Agnati, Luigi F; Garriga, Pere; Diaz-Cabiale, Zaida; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in GPCR heteromers appeared to introduce an intermolecular allosteric mechanism contributing to the diversity and bias in the protomers. Examples of dopamine D2R heteromerization are given to show how such allosteric mechanisms significantly change the receptor protomer repertoire leading to diversity and biased recognition and signaling. In 1980s and 1990s, it was shown that neurotensin (NT) through selective antagonistic NTR-D2 like receptor interactions increased the diversity of DA signaling by reducing D2R-mediated dopamine signaling over D1R-mediated dopamine signaling. Furthermore, D2R protomer appeared to bias the specificity of the NTR orthosteric binding site toward neuromedin N vs. NT in the heteroreceptor complex. Complex CCK2R-D1R-D2R interactions in possible heteroreceptor complexes were also demonstrated further increasing receptor diversity. In D2R-5-HT2AR heteroreceptor complexes, the hallucinogenic 5-HT2AR agonists LSD and DOI were recently found to exert a biased agonist action on the orthosteric site of the 5-HT2AR protomer leading to the development of an active conformational state different from the one produced by 5-HT. Furthermore, as recently demonstrated allosteric A2A-D2R receptor-receptor interaction brought about not only a reduced affinity of the D2R agonist binding site but also a biased modulation of the D2R protomer signaling in A2A-D2R heteroreceptor complexes. A conformational state of the D2R was induced, which moved away from Gi/o signaling and instead favored β-arrestin2-mediated signaling. These examples on allosteric receptor-receptor interactions obtained over several decades serve to illustrate the significant increase in diversity and biased recognition and signaling that develop through such mechanisms.

  3. Standardizing Scavenger Receptor Nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    PrabhuDas, Mercy; Bowdish, Dawn; Drickamer, Kurt; Febbraio, Maria; Herz, Joachim; Kobzik, Lester; Krieger, Monty; Loike, John; Means, Terry K.; Moestrup, Soren K.; Post, Steven; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Silverstein, Samuel; Wang, Xiang-Yang; El Khoury, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Scavenger receptors constitute a large family of proteins that are structurally diverse and participate in a wide range of biological functions. These receptors are expressed predominantly by myeloid cells and recognize a variety of ligands, including endogenous and modified host-derived molecules and microbial pathogens. There are currently eight classes of scavenger receptors, many of which have multiple names, leading to inconsistencies and confusion in the literature. To address this problem, a workshop was organized by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health to help develop a clear definition of scavenger receptors and a standardized nomenclature based on that definition. Fifteen experts in the scavenger receptor field attended the workshop and, after extensive discussion, reached a consensus regarding the definition of scavenger receptors and a proposed scavenger receptor nomenclature. Scavenger receptors were defined as cell surface receptors that typically bind multiple ligands and promote the removal of non-self or altered-self targets. They often function by mechanisms that include endocytosis, phagocytosis, adhesion, and signaling that ultimately lead to the elimination of degraded or harmful substances. Based on this definition, nomenclature and classification of these receptors into 10 classes were proposed. The discussion and nomenclature recommendations described in this report only refer to mammalian scavenger receptors. The purpose of this article is to describe the proposed mammalian nomenclature and classification developed at the workshop and to solicit additional feedback from the broader research community. PMID:24563502

  4. Behavioural Assessment of the A2a/NR2B Combination in the Unilateral 6-OHDA-Lesioned Rat Model: A New Method to Examine the Therapeutic Potential of Non-Dopaminergic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Anne; Downey, Patrick; Van Damme, Xavier; De Wolf, Catherine; Schwarting, Rainer; Scheller, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    In Parkinson’s disease (PD), dopaminergic therapies are often associated with the development of motor complications. Attention has therefore been focused on the use of non-dopaminergic drugs. This study developed a new behavioural method capable of demonstrating the added value of combining adenosinergic and glutamatergic receptor antagonists in unilateral 6-OHDA lesioned rats. Rats were dosed orally with Tozadenant, a selective A2A receptor antagonist, and three different doses of Radiprodil, an NR2B-selective NMDA receptor antagonist. The drugs were given alone or in combination and rats were placed in an open-field for behavioural monitoring. Video recordings were automatically analysed. Five different behaviours were scored: distance traveled, ipsi- and contraversive turns, body position, and space occupancy. The results show that A2A or NR2B receptor antagonists given alone or in combination did not produce enhanced turning as observed with an active dose of L-Dopa/benserazide. Instead the treated rats maintained a straight body position, were able to shift from one direction to the other and occupied a significantly larger space in the arena. The highest “Tozadenant/Radiprodil” dose combination significantly increased all five behavioural parameters recorded compared to rats treated with vehicle or the same doses of the drugs alone. Our data suggest that the A2A/NR2B antagonist combination may be able to stimulate motor activity to a similar level as that achieved by L-Dopa but in the absence of the side-effects that are associated with dopaminergic hyperstimulation. If these results translate into the clinic, this combination could represent an alternative symptomatic treatment option for PD. PMID:26322641

  5. Activation of adenosine A2A receptors by polydeoxyribonucleotide increases vascular endothelial growth factor and protects against testicular damage induced by experimental varicocele in rats.

    PubMed

    Minutoli, Letteria; Arena, Salvatore; Bonvissuto, Giulio; Bitto, Alessandra; Polito, Francesca; Irrera, Natasha; Arena, Francesco; Fragalà, Eugenia; Romeo, Carmelo; Nicotina, Piero Antonio; Fazzari, Carmine; Marini, Herbert; Implatini, Alessandra; Grimaldi, Silvia; Cantone, Noemi; Di Benedetto, Vincenzo; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica; Morgia, Giuseppe

    2011-03-15

    In rat experimental varicocele, polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN) induces vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production, thereby enhancing testicular function. This may point to a new therapeutic approach in human varicocele.

  6. P2X receptors.

    PubMed

    North, R Alan

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) activates cell surface P2X and P2Y receptors. P2X receptors are membrane ion channels preferably permeable to sodium, potassium and calcium that open within milliseconds of the binding of ATP. In molecular architecture, they form a unique structural family. The receptor is a trimer, the binding of ATP between subunits causes them to flex together within the ectodomain and separate in the membrane-spanning region so as to open a central channel. P2X receptors have a widespread tissue distribution. On some smooth muscle cells, P2X receptors mediate the fast excitatory junction potential that leads to depolarization and contraction. In the central nervous system, activation of P2X receptors allows calcium to enter neurons and this can evoke slower neuromodulatory responses such as the trafficking of receptors for the neurotransmitter glutamate. In primary afferent nerves, P2X receptors are critical for the initiation of action potentials when they respond to ATP released from sensory cells such as taste buds, chemoreceptors or urothelium. In immune cells, activation of P2X receptors triggers the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin 1β. The development of selective blockers of different P2X receptors has led to clinical trials of their effectiveness in the management of cough, pain, inflammation and certain neurodegenerative diseases.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. PMID:27377721

  7. Heterologous expression of G-protein-coupled receptors in yeast.

    PubMed

    Bertheleme, Nicolas; Singh, Shweta; Dowell, Simon; Byrne, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    Heterologous yeast expression systems have been successfully used for the production of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) for both structural and functional studies. Yeast combine comparatively low cost and short culture times with straightforward generation of expression clones. They also perform some key posttranslational modifications not possible in bacterial systems. There are two major yeast expression systems, Pichia pastoris and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, both of which have been used for the production of GPCRs. P. pastoris has a proven track record for the production of large amounts of GPCR for structural studies. High-resolution crystal structures of both the adenosine A2A and the histamine H1 receptors have been obtained using protein expressed in this system. S. cerevisiae is relatively easy to engineer and this has resulted in the development of sophisticated tools for the functional characterization of GPCRs. In this chapter, we provide protocols for both large-scale receptor expression in P. pastoris for structural studies and small-scale receptor expression in S. cerevisiae for functional characterization. In both cases, the receptor used is the human adenosine A2A receptor. The results that both we and others have obtained using these protocols show the wide utility of the yeast expression systems for the production of GPCRs.

  8. Modulatory effect of the 5-HT1A agonist buspirone and the mixed non-hallucinogenic 5-HT1A/2A agonist ergotamine on psilocybin-induced psychedelic experience.

    PubMed

    Pokorny, Thomas; Preller, Katrin H; Kraehenmann, Rainer; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2016-04-01

    The mixed serotonin (5-HT) 1A/2A/2B/2C/6/7 receptor agonist psilocybin dose-dependently induces an altered state of consciousness (ASC) that is characterized by changes in sensory perception, mood, thought, and the sense of self. The psychological effects of psilocybin are primarily mediated by 5-HT2A receptor activation. However, accumulating evidence suggests that 5-HT1A or an interaction between 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors may contribute to the overall effects of psilocybin. Therefore, we used a double-blind, counterbalanced, within-subject design to investigate the modulatory effects of the partial 5-HT1A agonist buspirone (20mg p.o.) and the non-hallucinogenic 5-HT2A/1A agonist ergotamine (3mg p.o.) on psilocybin-induced (170 µg/kg p.o.) psychological effects in two groups (n=19, n=17) of healthy human subjects. Psychological effects were assessed using the Altered State of Consciousness (5D-ASC) rating scale. Buspirone significantly reduced the 5D-ASC main scale score for Visionary Restructuralization (VR) (p<0.001), which was mostly driven by a reduction of the VR item cluster scores for elementary and complex visual hallucinations. Further, buspirone also reduced the main scale score for Oceanic Boundlessness (OB) including derealisation and depersonalisation phenomena at a trend level (p=0.062), whereas ergotamine did not show any effects on the psilocybin-induced 5D-ASC main scale scores. The present finding demonstrates that buspirone exerts inhibitory effects on psilocybin-induced effects, presumably via 5-HT1A receptor activation, an interaction between 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors, or both. The data suggest that the modulation of 5-HT1A receptor activity may be a useful target in the treatment of visual hallucinations in different psychiatric and neurological diseases. PMID:26875114

  9. Modulatory effect of the 5-HT1A agonist buspirone and the mixed non-hallucinogenic 5-HT1A/2A agonist ergotamine on psilocybin-induced psychedelic experience.

    PubMed

    Pokorny, Thomas; Preller, Katrin H; Kraehenmann, Rainer; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2016-04-01

    The mixed serotonin (5-HT) 1A/2A/2B/2C/6/7 receptor agonist psilocybin dose-dependently induces an altered state of consciousness (ASC) that is characterized by changes in sensory perception, mood, thought, and the sense of self. The psychological effects of psilocybin are primarily mediated by 5-HT2A receptor activation. However, accumulating evidence suggests that 5-HT1A or an interaction between 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors may contribute to the overall effects of psilocybin. Therefore, we used a double-blind, counterbalanced, within-subject design to investigate the modulatory effects of the partial 5-HT1A agonist buspirone (20mg p.o.) and the non-hallucinogenic 5-HT2A/1A agonist ergotamine (3mg p.o.) on psilocybin-induced (170 µg/kg p.o.) psychological effects in two groups (n=19, n=17) of healthy human subjects. Psychological effects were assessed using the Altered State of Consciousness (5D-ASC) rating scale. Buspirone significantly reduced the 5D-ASC main scale score for Visionary Restructuralization (VR) (p<0.001), which was mostly driven by a reduction of the VR item cluster scores for elementary and complex visual hallucinations. Further, buspirone also reduced the main scale score for Oceanic Boundlessness (OB) including derealisation and depersonalisation phenomena at a trend level (p=0.062), whereas ergotamine did not show any effects on the psilocybin-induced 5D-ASC main scale scores. The present finding demonstrates that buspirone exerts inhibitory effects on psilocybin-induced effects, presumably via 5-HT1A receptor activation, an interaction between 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors, or both. The data suggest that the modulation of 5-HT1A receptor activity may be a useful target in the treatment of visual hallucinations in different psychiatric and neurological diseases.

  10. Mast Cell Adenosine Receptors Function: A Focus on the A3 Adenosine Receptor and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rudich, Noam; Ravid, Katya; Sagi-Eisenberg, Ronit

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine is a metabolite, which has long been implicated in a variety of inflammatory processes. Inhaled adenosine provokes bronchoconstriction in asthmatics or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients, but not in non-asthmatics. This hyper responsiveness to adenosine appears to be mediated by mast cell activation. These observations have marked the receptor that mediates the bronchoconstrictor effect of adenosine on mast cells (MCs), as an attractive drug candidate. Four subtypes (A1, A2a, A2b, and A3) of adenosine receptors have been cloned and shown to display distinct tissue distributions and functions. Animal models have firmly established the ultimate role of the A3 adenosine receptor (A3R) in mediating hyper responsiveness to adenosine in MCs, although the influence of the A2b adenosine receptor was confirmed as well. In contrast, studies of the A3R in humans have been controversial. In this review, we summarize data on the role of different adenosine receptors in mast cell regulation of inflammation and pathology, with a focus on the common and distinct functions of the A3R in rodent and human MCs. The relevance of mouse studies to the human is discussed. PMID:22675325

  11. Signals and Receptors.

    PubMed

    Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Lu, Benson; Evans, Ron; Gutkind, J Silvio

    2016-04-01

    Communication between cells in a multicellular organism occurs by the production of ligands (proteins, peptides, fatty acids, steroids, gases, and other low-molecular-weight compounds) that are either secreted by cells or presented on their surface, and act on receptors on, or in, other target cells. Such signals control cell growth, migration, survival, and differentiation. Signaling receptors can be single-span plasma membrane receptors associated with tyrosine or serine/threonine kinase activities, proteins with seven transmembrane domains, or intracellular receptors. Ligand-activated receptors convey signals into the cell by activating signaling pathways that ultimately affect cytosolic machineries or nuclear transcriptional programs or by directly translocating to the nucleus to regulate transcription. PMID:27037414

  12. Signaling by Sensory Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Julius, David; Nathans, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Sensory systems detect small molecules, mechanical perturbations, or radiation via the activation of receptor proteins and downstream signaling cascades in specialized sensory cells. In vertebrates, the two principal categories of sensory receptors are ion channels, which mediate mechanosensation, thermosensation, and acid and salt taste; and G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which mediate vision, olfaction, and sweet, bitter, and umami tastes. GPCR-based signaling in rods and cones illustrates the fundamental principles of rapid activation and inactivation, signal amplification, and gain control. Channel-based sensory systems illustrate the integration of diverse modulatory signals at the receptor, as seen in the thermosensory/pain system, and the rapid response kinetics that are possible with direct mechanical gating of a channel. Comparisons of sensory receptor gene sequences reveal numerous examples in which gene duplication and sequence divergence have created novel sensory specificities. This is the evolutionary basis for the observed diversity in temperature- and ligand-dependent gating among thermosensory channels, spectral tuning among visual pigments, and odorant binding among olfactory receptors. The coding of complex external stimuli by a limited number of sensory receptor types has led to the evolution of modality-specific and species-specific patterns of retention or loss of sensory information, a filtering operation that selectively emphasizes features in the stimulus that enhance survival in a particular ecological niche. The many specialized anatomic structures, such as the eye and ear, that house primary sensory neurons further enhance the detection of relevant stimuli. PMID:22110046

  13. Leukotriene receptor antagonist therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dempsey, O

    2000-01-01

    Leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRA) are a new class of drugs for asthma treatment, available in tablet form. Their unique mechanism of action results in a combination of both bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory effects. While their optimal place in asthma management is still under review, LTRA represent an important advance in asthma pharmacotherapy.


Keywords: leukotriene receptor antagonist; asthma; montelukast; zafirlukast PMID:11085767

  14. Genetics of Taste Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Bosak, Natalia P.; Lin, Cailu; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Ohmoto, Makoto; Reed, Danielle R.; Nelson, Theodore M.

    2016-01-01

    Taste receptors function as one of the interfaces between internal and external milieus. Taste receptors for sweet and umami (T1R [taste receptor, type 1]), bitter (T2R [taste receptor, type 2]), and salty (ENaC [epithelial sodium channel]) have been discovered in the recent years, but transduction mechanisms of sour taste and ENaC-independent salt taste are still poorly understood. In addition to these five main taste qualities, the taste system detects such noncanonical “tastes” as water, fat, and complex carbohydrates, but their reception mechanisms require further research. Variations in taste receptor genes between and within vertebrate species contribute to individual and species differences in taste-related behaviors. These variations are shaped by evolutionary forces and reflect species adaptations to their chemical environments and feeding ecology. Principles of drug discovery can be applied to taste receptors as targets in order to develop novel taste compounds to satisfy demand in better artificial sweeteners, enhancers of sugar and sodium taste, and blockers of bitterness of food ingredients and oral medications. PMID:23886383

  15. Genetics of taste receptors.

    PubMed

    Bachmanov, Alexander A; Bosak, Natalia P; Lin, Cailu; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Ohmoto, Makoto; Reed, Danielle R; Nelson, Theodore M

    2014-01-01

    Taste receptors function as one of the interfaces between internal and external milieus. Taste receptors for sweet and umami (T1R [taste receptor, type 1]), bitter (T2R [taste receptor, type 2]), and salty (ENaC [epithelial sodium channel]) have been discovered in the recent years, but transduction mechanisms of sour taste and ENaC-independent salt taste are still poorly understood. In addition to these five main taste qualities, the taste system detects such noncanonical "tastes" as water, fat, and complex carbohydrates, but their reception mechanisms require further research. Variations in taste receptor genes between and within vertebrate species contribute to individual and species differences in taste-related behaviors. These variations are shaped by evolutionary forces and reflect species adaptations to their chemical environments and feeding ecology. Principles of drug discovery can be applied to taste receptors as targets in order to develop novel taste compounds to satisfy demand in better artificial sweeteners, enhancers of sugar and sodium taste, and blockers of bitterness of food ingredients and oral medications. PMID:23886383

  16. Dopamine Receptors and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Coronel, Israel; Florán, Benjamín

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is one of the major neurotransmitters and participates in a number of functions such as motor coordination, emotions, memory, reward mechanism, neuroendocrine regulation etc. DA exerts its effects through five DA receptors that are subdivided in 2 families: D1-like DA receptors (D1 and D5) and the D2-like (D2, D3 and D4). All DA receptors are widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) and play an important role in not only in physiological conditions but also pathological scenarios. Abnormalities in the DAergic system and its receptors in the basal ganglia structures are the basis Parkinson’s disease (PD), however DA also participates in other neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington disease (HD) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Under pathological conditions reorganization of DAergic system has been observed and most of the times, those changes occur as a mechanism of compensation, but in some cases contributes to worsening the alterations. Here we review the changes that occur on DA transmission and DA receptors (DARs) at both levels expression and signals transduction pathways as a result of neurotoxicity, inflammation and in neurodegenerative processes. The better understanding of the role of DA receptors in neuropathological conditions is crucial for development of novel therapeutic approaches to treat alterations related to neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26425390

  17. 47 CFR 80.1093 - Ship radio equipment-Sea areas A1, A2, A3, and A4.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ship radio equipment-Sea areas A1, A2, A3, and... AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) Equipment Requirements for Ship Stations § 80.1093 Ship radio equipment—Sea areas A1,...

  18. 47 CFR 80.1093 - Ship radio equipment-Sea areas A1, A2, A3, and A4.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ship radio equipment-Sea areas A1, A2, A3, and... AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) Equipment Requirements for Ship Stations § 80.1093 Ship radio equipment—Sea areas A1,...

  19. Incorporation of rare earth elements in titanite: Stabilization of the A2/a dimorph by creation of antiphase boundaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, J.M.; Bloodaxe, E.S.; Hanchar, J.M.; Foord, E.E.

    1997-01-01

    The atomic arrangement of a natural rare-earth-rich titanite and two synthetic rare-earth-doped titanites have been refined in space group A2/a, and the atomic arrangement of an undoped P21/a synthetic titanite was also refined for comparison. Previous work has shown that titanite possesses a domain structure, with domains formed of like-displaced Ti atoms in the [100] octahedral chains. P21/a titanite results when the crystal is formed of a single domain, but as Ti-reversal sites occur in the octahedral chain the apparent A2/a structure results from the average of antiphase domains. Antiphase boundaries occur at O1, which is alternately overbonded or underbonded at the boundaries, depending on the displacement of the neighboring Ti atoms. Type 2 antiphase boundaries exist where two Ti atoms are displaced away from the intervening O1 atom and are energetically unfavorable because of underbonding of that O1 atom. However, substitution of a trivalent rare earth element in the adjacent Ca2+ site relieves that underbonding, favoring the creation of type 2 antiphase boundaries and stabilization of the A2/a dimorph. The results of high-precision crystal structure analyses demonstrate that rare earth substituents for Ca stabilize the A2/a dimorph at lower substitution levels than required for octahedral substitutions.

  20. 47 CFR 80.1093 - Ship radio equipment-Sea areas A1, A2, A3, and A4.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ship radio equipment-Sea areas A1, A2, A3, and... AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) Equipment Requirements for Ship Stations § 80.1093 Ship radio equipment—Sea areas A1,...

  1. 47 CFR 80.1093 - Ship radio equipment-Sea areas A1, A2, A3, and A4.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ship radio equipment-Sea areas A1, A2, A3, and... AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) Equipment Requirements for Ship Stations § 80.1093 Ship radio equipment—Sea areas A1,...

  2. 47 CFR 80.1093 - Ship radio equipment-Sea areas A1, A2, A3, and A4.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ship radio equipment-Sea areas A1, A2, A3, and... AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) Equipment Requirements for Ship Stations § 80.1093 Ship radio equipment—Sea areas A1,...

  3. Discovery of Potent and Highly Selective A2B Adenosine Receptor Antagonist Chemotypes.

    PubMed

    El Maatougui, Abdelaziz; Azuaje, Jhonny; González-Gómez, Manuel; Miguez, Gabriel; Crespo, Abel; Carbajales, Carlos; Escalante, Luz; García-Mera, Xerardo; Gutiérrez-de-Terán, Hugo; Sotelo, Eddy

    2016-03-10

    Three novel families of A2B adenosine receptor antagonists were identified in the context of the structural exploration of the 3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2(1H)-one chemotype. The most appealing series contain imidazole, 1,2,4-triazole, or benzimidazole rings fused to the 2,3-positions of the parent diazinone core. The optimization process enabled identification of a highly potent (3.49 nM) A2B ligand that exhibits complete selectivity toward A1, A2A, and A3 receptors. The results of functional cAMP experiments confirmed the antagonistic behavior of representative ligands. The main SAR trends identified within the series were substantiated by a molecular modeling study based on a receptor-driven docking model constructed on the basis of the crystal structure of the human A2A receptor.

  4. Ionotropic Crustacean Olfactory Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Elizabeth A.; Bobkov, Yuriy; Ukhanov, Kirill; Ache, Barry W.

    2013-01-01

    The nature of the olfactory receptor in crustaceans, a major group of arthropods, has remained elusive. We report that spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus, express ionotropic receptors (IRs), the insect chemosensory variants of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Unlike insects IRs, which are expressed in a specific subset of olfactory cells, two lobster IR subunits are expressed in most, if not all, lobster olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), as confirmed by antibody labeling and in situ hybridization. Ligand-specific ORN responses visualized by calcium imaging are consistent with a restricted expression pattern found for other potential subunits, suggesting that cell-specific expression of uncommon IR subunits determines the ligand sensitivity of individual cells. IRs are the only type of olfactory receptor that we have detected in spiny lobster olfactory tissue, suggesting that they likely mediate olfactory signaling. Given long-standing evidence for G protein-mediated signaling in activation of lobster ORNs, this finding raises the interesting specter that IRs act in concert with second messenger-mediated signaling. PMID:23573266

  5. Taste Receptors in Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Taste receptors were first identified on the tongue, where they initiate a signaling pathway that communicates information to the brain about the nutrient content or potential toxicity of ingested foods. However, recent research has shown that taste receptors are also expressed in a myriad of other tissues, from the airway and gastrointestinal epithelia to the pancreas and brain. The functions of many of these extraoral taste receptors remain unknown, but emerging evidence suggests that bitter and sweet taste receptors in the airway are important sentinels of innate immunity. This review discusses taste receptor signaling, focusing on the G-protein coupled–receptors that detect bitter, sweet, and savory tastes, followed by an overview of extraoral taste receptors and in-depth discussion of studies demonstrating the roles of taste receptors in airway innate immunity. Future research on extraoral taste receptors has significant potential for identification of novel immune mechanisms and insights into host-pathogen interactions. PMID:25323130

  6. New insights into receptor regulation.

    PubMed

    Poste, G

    1984-11-01

    This review provides a brief summary of certain recent advances in our understanding of receptor regulation, signal transduction, and the diverse pathways by which receptor-ligand complexes are internalized and delivered to specific organelles, together with recycling of receptors back to the cell surface. Emphasis is also given to the importance of methodological advances in receptor isolation, immunologic analysis of receptor structure and function, the development of new instrumentation for microchemical characterization of very small amounts of receptor material, and the increasing use of genetic engineering techniques to isolate the genes for receptors and their regulatory subunits, to transfer such genes between cells, and to study receptor function by creating structurally modified receptors via subtle changes in gene structure. PMID:6151557

  7. Olfactory receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Gabriela; Simoes de Souza, Fabio Marques

    2016-01-01

    The guanine nucleotide protein (G protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) superfamily represents the largest class of membrane protein in the human genome. More than a half of all GPCRs are dedicated to interact with odorants and are termed odorant-receptors (ORs). Linda Buck and Richard Axel, the Nobel Prize laureates in physiology or medicine in 2004, first cloned and characterized the gene family that encode ORs, establishing the foundations to the understanding of the molecular basis for odor recognition. In the last decades, a lot of progress has been done to unravel the functioning of the sense of smell. This chapter gives a general overview of the topic of olfactory receptor signaling and reviews recent advances in this field. PMID:26928542

  8. Progesterone Receptor Signaling Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Sandra L; Hartig, Sean M; Edwards, Dean P

    2016-09-25

    Progesterone receptor (PR) is a master regulator in female reproductive tissues that controls developmental processes and proliferation and differentiation during the reproductive cycle and pregnancy. PR also plays a role in progression of endocrine-dependent breast cancer. As a member of the nuclear receptor family of ligand-dependent transcription factors, the main action of PR is to regulate networks of target gene expression in response to binding its cognate steroid hormone, progesterone. This paper summarizes recent advances in understanding the structure-function properties of the receptor protein and the tissue/cell-type-specific PR signaling pathways that contribute to the biological actions of progesterone in the normal breast and in breast cancer. PMID:27380738

  9. Adenosine receptor agonists for promotion of dermal wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Valls, María D.; Cronstein, Bruce N.; Montesinos, M. Carmen

    2009-01-01

    Wound healing is a dynamic and complex process that involves a well coordinated, highly regulated series of events including inflammation, tissue formation, revascularization and tissue remodeling. However, this orderly sequence is impaired in certain pathophysiological conditions such as diabetes mellitus, venous insufficiency, chronic glucocorticoid use, aging and malnutrition. Together with proper wound care, promotion of the healing process is the primary objective in the management of chronic poorly healing wounds. Recent studies have demonstrated that A2A adenosine receptor agonists promote wound healing in normal and diabetic animals and one such agonist, Sonedenoson, is currently being evaluated as a prospective new therapy of diabetic foot ulcers. We will review the mechanisms by which adenosine receptor activation affects the function of the cells and tissues that participate in wound healing, emphasizing the potential beneficial impact of adenosine receptor agonists in diabetic impaired healing. PMID:19041853

  10. CONTAMINANT INTERACTIONS WITH STEROID RECEPTORS: EVIDENCE FOR RECEPTOR BINDING.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Steroid receptors are important determinants of endocrine disrupter consequences. As the most frequently proposed mechanism of endocrine-disrupting contaminant (EDC) action, steroid receptors are not only targets of natural steroids but are also commonly sites of nonsteroidal com...

  11. Vasopressin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Biff F

    2015-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) is the principal hormone involved in regulating the tonicity of body fluids. Less appreciated is the role that AVP plays in a variety of other physiologic functions including glucose metabolism, cardiovascular homeostasis, bone metabolism, and cognitive behavior. AVP receptor antagonists are now available and currently approved to treat hyponatremia. There is a great deal of interest in exploring the potential benefits that these drugs may play in blocking AVP-mediated effects in other organ systems. The purpose of this report is to provide an update on the expanding role of AVP receptor antagonists and what disease states these drugs may eventually be used for.

  12. Vasopressin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Biff F

    2015-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) is the principal hormone involved in regulating the tonicity of body fluids. Less appreciated is the role that AVP plays in a variety of other physiologic functions including glucose metabolism, cardiovascular homeostasis, bone metabolism, and cognitive behavior. AVP receptor antagonists are now available and currently approved to treat hyponatremia. There is a great deal of interest in exploring the potential benefits that these drugs may play in blocking AVP-mediated effects in other organ systems. The purpose of this report is to provide an update on the expanding role of AVP receptor antagonists and what disease states these drugs may eventually be used for. PMID:25604388

  13. Biomimetic Receptors and Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Dickert, Franz L.

    2014-01-01

    In biomimetics, living systems are imitated to develop receptors for ions, molecules and bioparticles. The most pertinent idea is self-organization in analogy to evolution in nature, which created the key-lock principle. Today, modern science has been developing host-guest chemistry, a strategy of supramolecular chemistry for designing interactions of analytes with synthetic receptors. This can be realized, e.g., by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) or molecular imprinting. The strategies are used for solid phase extraction (SPE), but preferably in developing recognition layers of chemical sensors. PMID:25436653

  14. Adenosinergic modulation of the imidazoline I₁-receptor-dependent hypotensive effect of ethanol in acute renal failure.

    PubMed

    Harraz, Osama F; El-Gowelli, Hanan M; Mohy El-Din, Mahmoud M; Ghazal, Abdel-Rheem M; El-Mas, Mahmoud M

    2012-08-01

    We reported that inhibition of central sympathetic pools of imidazoline I(1) receptors abolishes the hypotensive effect of ethanol in rats with glycerol-induced acute renal failure (ARF). This study investigated whether adenosine receptors modulate the ethanol-I(1)-receptor interaction. The effect of selective blockade of adenosine A(1), A(2A), or A(2B) receptors on hemodynamic responses to ethanol in the absence and presence of the I(1)-receptor agonist moxonidine was determined in ARF rats. Ethanol (1g/kg i.v.) decreased and increased blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR), respectively. Pretreatment with moxonidine abolished the hypotensive but not the tachycardic effect of ethanol. The hypotensive effect of ethanol remained unaltered after selective blockade of A(1), A(2A), or A(2B) receptors with 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) and 8-(3-chlorostyryl) caffeine (CSC) and alloxazine, respectively. Neither was ethanol hypotension affected after inhibition of adenosine uptake by dipyridamole (DPY). Alternatively, the ability of moxonidine to abolish ethanol hypotension was still evident in presence of alloxazine whereas it disappeared or weakened in rats pretreated with CSC and DPCPX, respectively. These findings implicate adenosine A(2A) receptors in the moxonidine-evoked inhibition of the hypotensive action of ethanol. A modulatory role for adenosine A(1) site in the ethanol-I(1)-receptor interaction is also possible through as yet unidentified mechanism. PMID:22613216

  15. Programmable Nanoscaffolds That Control Ligand Display to a G-Protein-Coupled Receptor in Membranes To Allow Dissection of Multivalent Effects

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A programmable ligand display system can be used to dissect the multivalent effects of ligand binding to a membrane receptor. An antagonist of the A2A adenosine receptor, a G-protein-coupled receptor that is a drug target for neurodegenerative conditions, was displayed in 35 different multivalent configurations, and binding to A2A was determined. A theoretical model based on statistical mechanics was developed to interpret the binding data, suggesting the importance of receptor dimers. Using this model, extended multivalent arrangements of ligands were constructed with progressive improvements in binding to A2A. The results highlight the ability to use a highly controllable multivalent approach to determine optimal ligand valency and spacing that can be subsequently optimized for binding to a membrane receptor. Models explaining the multivalent binding data are also presented. PMID:25116377

  16. Programmable nanoscaffolds that control ligand display to a G-protein-coupled receptor in membranes to allow dissection of multivalent effects.

    PubMed

    Dix, Andrew V; Moss, Steven M; Phan, Khai; Hoppe, Travis; Paoletta, Silvia; Kozma, Eszter; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Durell, Stewart R; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Appella, Daniel H

    2014-09-01

    A programmable ligand display system can be used to dissect the multivalent effects of ligand binding to a membrane receptor. An antagonist of the A2A adenosine receptor, a G-protein-coupled receptor that is a drug target for neurodegenerative conditions, was displayed in 35 different multivalent configurations, and binding to A2A was determined. A theoretical model based on statistical mechanics was developed to interpret the binding data, suggesting the importance of receptor dimers. Using this model, extended multivalent arrangements of ligands were constructed with progressive improvements in binding to A2A. The results highlight the ability to use a highly controllable multivalent approach to determine optimal ligand valency and spacing that can be subsequently optimized for binding to a membrane receptor. Models explaining the multivalent binding data are also presented.

  17. Introduction to Adenosine Receptors as Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine acts as a cytoprotective modulator in response to stress to an organ or tissue. Although short-lived in the circulation, it can activate four sub-types of G protein-coupled adenosine receptors (ARs): A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. The alkylxanthines caffeine and theophylline are the prototypical antagonists of ARs, and their stimulant actions occur primarily through this mechanism. For each of the four AR subtypes, selective agonists and antagonists have been introduced and used to develop new therapeutic drug concepts. ARs are notable among the GPCR family in the number and variety of agonist therapeutic candidates that have been proposed. The selective and potent synthetic AR agonists, which are typically much longer lasting in the body than adenosine, have potential therapeutic applications based on their anti-inflammatory (A2A and A3), cardioprotective (preconditioning by A1 and A3 and postconditioning by A2B), cerebroprotective (A1 and A3), and antinociceptive (A1) properties. Potent and selective AR antagonists display therapeutic potential as kidney protective (A1), antifibrotic (A2A), neuroprotective (A2A), and antiglaucoma (A3) agents. AR agonists for cardiac imaging and positron-emitting AR antagonists are in development for diagnostic applications. Allosteric modulators of A1 and A3 ARs have been described. In addition to the use of selective agonists/antagonists as pharmacological tools, mouse strains in which an AR has been genetically deleted have aided in developing novel drug concepts based on the modulation of ARs. PMID:19639277

  18. Computational Biology of Olfactory Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Crasto, Chiquito J.

    2011-01-01

    Olfactory receptors, in addition to being involved in first step of the physiological processes that leads to olfaction, occupy an important place in mammalian genomes. ORs constitute super families in these genomes. Elucidating ol-factory receptor function at a molecular level can be aided by a computationally derived structure and an understanding of its interactions with odor molecules. Experimental functional analyses of olfactory receptors in conjunction with computational studies serve to validate findings and generate hypotheses. We present here a review of the research efforts in: creating computational models of olfactory receptors, identifying binding strategies for these receptors with odorant molecules, performing medium to long range simulation studies of odor ligands in the receptor binding region, and identifying amino acid positions within the receptor that are responsible for ligand-binding and olfactory receptor activation. Written as a primer and a teaching tool, this review will help researchers extend the methodologies described herein to other GPCRs. PMID:21984880

  19. Synaptic Neurotransmitter-Gated Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Smart, Trevor G.; Paoletti, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of the major excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters and their receptors in the brain, many have deliberated over their likely structures and how these may relate to function. This was initially satisfied by the determination of the first amino acid sequences of the Cys-loop receptors that recognized acetylcholine, serotonin, GABA, and glycine, followed later by similar determinations for the glutamate receptors, comprising non-NMDA and NMDA subtypes. The last decade has seen a rapid advance resulting in the first structures of Cys-loop receptors, related bacterial and molluscan homologs, and glutamate receptors, determined down to atomic resolution. This now provides a basis for determining not just the complete structures of these important receptor classes, but also for understanding how various domains and residues interact during agonist binding, receptor activation, and channel opening, including allosteric modulation. This article reviews our current understanding of these mechanisms for the Cys-loop and glutamate receptor families. PMID:22233560

  20. Human placental calcitonin receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, G C; D'Santos, C S; Evans, T; Moseley, J M; Kemp, B E; Michelangeli, V P; Martin, T J

    1988-01-01

    Receptors for the hypocalcaemic hormone, calcitonin (CT), have been identified in a membrane fraction prepared from term human placentae. Binding of 125I-labelled salmon CT (125I-sCT) to the membranes was time- and temperature-dependent, saturable (Bmax. 58 +/- 11 fmol/mg of protein), of high affinity (Kd 80 +/- 21 pM) and poorly reversible. Species-specific CTs and CT analogues competed for 125I-sCT binding with potencies proportional to their known biological potencies. Various unrelated peptide hormones did not compete, indicating that receptor binding was specific for CT. Photoaffinity labelling using a derivatized biologically active sCT analogue, [Arg11,18,3-nitrophenylazide-Lys14]sCT, identified a receptor component of Mr approximately 85,000, comparable with findings in osteoclasts and other target cells. The presence of CT receptors in the human placenta supports other evidence that CT may have a role in the regulation of placental function. PMID:2839149

  1. Nicotinic Receptors in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Posadas, Inmaculada; López-Hernández, Beatriz; Ceña, Valentín

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have focused on expanding our knowledge of the structure and diversity of peripheral and central nicotinic receptors. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are members of the Cys-loop superfamily of pentameric ligand-gated ion channels, which include GABA (A and C), serotonin, and glycine receptors. Currently, 9 alpha (α2-α10) and 3 beta (β2-β4) subunits have been identified in the central nervous system (CNS), and these subunits assemble to form a variety of functional nAChRs. The pentameric combination of several alpha and beta subunits leads to a great number of nicotinic receptors that vary in their properties, including their sensitivity to nicotine, permeability to calcium and propensity to desensitize. In the CNS, nAChRs play crucial roles in modulating presynaptic, postsynaptic, and extrasynaptic signaling, and have been found to be involved in a complex range of CNS disorders including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), schizophrenia, Tourette´s syndrome, anxiety, depression and epilepsy. Therefore, there is growing interest in the development of drugs that modulate nAChR functions with optimal benefits and minimal adverse effects. The present review describes the main characteristics of nAChRs in the CNS and focuses on the various compounds that have been tested and are currently in phase I and phase II trials for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases including PD, AD and age-associated memory and mild cognitive impairment. PMID:24179465

  2. Induction of oral tremor in mice by the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor galantamine: Reversal with adenosine A2A antagonism.

    PubMed

    Podurgiel, Samantha J; Spencer, Tiahna; Kovner, Rotem; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E; Correa, Merce; Salamone, John D

    2016-01-01

    Tremulous jaw movements (TJMs) have become a commonly used rat model of Parkinsonian tremor. TJMs can be induced by a number of neurochemical conditions that parallel those seen in human Parkinsonism, including DA depletion, DA antagonism, and cholinomimetic administration, and can be reduced by various antiparkinsonian agents. TJMs typically occur in bursts with the peak frequency in the range of 3-7.5 Hz, which is similar to the Parkinsonian tremor frequency range. While the vast majority of this work has been done using rats, current efforts have focused on extending the TJM model to mice. The aim of the present studies was to establish a mouse model of Parkinsonian resting tremor using the anticholinesterase galantamine, and to investigate the effects of adenosine A2A antagonism on galantamine-induced TJMs. Galantamine significantly induced TJMs in a dose-dependent manner (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 mg/kg IP). The TJMs tended to occur in bursts in the 3-7.5 Hz frequency range, with a peak frequency of approximately 6 Hz. Systemic administration of the adenosine A2A antagonist MSX-3 (2.5, 5.0, 10.0 mg/kg) significantly attenuated galantamine-induced TJMs. Co-administration of MSX-3 also altered the local frequency of galantamine-induced TJMs, decreasing the peak frequency from approximately 6 Hz to 5 Hz, though the vast majority of TJMs remained in the frequency range characteristic of Parkinsonian resting tremor. These results indicate that adenosine A2A antagonism is capable of reducing anticholinesterase-induced TJMs in mice. Extending the TJM model to mice gives researchers an additional avenue for investigating drug-induced Parkinsonism and tremorogenesis, and could be a useful addition to the study of motor abnormalities observed in mouse genetic models of Parkinsonism. PMID:26459156

  3. Impaired inhibitory function of presynaptic A1-adenosine receptors in SHR mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Pereira, Carolina; Arribas, Silvia Magdalena; Fresco, Paula; González, Maria Carmen; Gonçalves, Jorge; Diniz, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    In hypertension, vascular reactivity alterations have been attributed to numerous factors, including higher sympathetic innervation/adenosine. This study examined the modulation of adenosine receptors on vascular sympathetic nerves and their putative contribution to higher noradrenaline spillover in hypertension. We assessed adenosine receptors distribution in the adventitia through confocal microscopy, histomorphometry, and their regulatory function on electrically-evoked [(3)H]-noradrenaline overflow, using selective agonists/antagonists. We found that: i) A1-adenosine receptor agonist (CPA: 100 nM) inhibited tritium overflow to a lower extent in SHR (25% ± 3%, n = 14) compared to WKY (38% ± 3%, n = 14) mesenteric arteries; ii) A2A-adenosine receptor agonist (CGS 21680: 100 nM) induced a slight increase of tritium overflow that was similar in SHR (22% ± 8%, n = 8) and WKY (24% ± 5%, n = 8) mesenteric arteries; iii) A2B- and A3-adenosine receptors did not alter tritium overflow in either strain; iv) all adenosine receptors were present on mesenteric artery sympathetic nerves and/or some adventitial cells of both strains; and v) A1-adenosine receptor staining fractional area was lower in SHR than in WKY mesenteric arteries. We conclude that there is an impaired inhibitory function of vascular presynaptic A1-adenosine receptors in SHR, likely related to a reduced presence of these receptors on sympathetic innervation, which might lead to higher levels of noradrenaline in the synaptic cleft and contribute to hypertension in this strain.

  4. Diversification of TAM receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Zagórska, Anna; Través, Paqui G.; Lew, Erin D.; Dransfield, Ian; Lemke, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Apoptotic cell clearance is critical for both tissue homeostasis and the resolution of inflammation. We found that the TAM receptor tyrosine kinases Axl and Mer played distinct roles as phagocytic receptors in these two settings, where they exhibited divergent expression, regulation, and activity. Mer acted as a tolerogenic receptor in resting macrophages and in settings of immune suppression. Conversely, Axl was an inflammatory response receptor whose expression was induced by pro-inflammatory stimuli. Axl and Mer displayed distinct ligand specificities, ligand-receptor complex formation in tissues, and receptor shedding upon activation. These differences notwithstanding, phagocytosis by either protein was strictly dependent on receptor activation that was triggered by bridging TAM receptor–ligand complexes to the ‘eat-me’ signal phosphatidylserine on apoptotic cell surfaces. PMID:25194421

  5. Taste Receptor Genes

    PubMed Central

    Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Beauchamp, Gary K.

    2009-01-01

    In the past several years, tremendous progress has been achieved with the discovery and characterization of vertebrate taste receptors from the T1R and T2R families, which are involved in recognition of bitter, sweet, and umami taste stimuli. Individual differences in taste, at least in some cases, can be attributed to allelic variants of the T1R and T2R genes. Progress with understanding how T1R and T2R receptors interact with taste stimuli and with identifying their patterns of expression in taste cells sheds light on coding of taste information by the nervous system. Candidate mechanisms for detection of salts, acids, fat, complex carbohydrates, and water have also been proposed, but further studies are needed to prove their identity. PMID:17444812

  6. TSH RECEPTOR AUTOANTIBODIES

    PubMed Central

    Michalek, Krzysztof; Morshed, Syed A.; Latif, Rauf; Davies, Terry F.

    2009-01-01

    Thyrotropin receptor autoantibodies (TSHR-Abs) of the stimulating variety are the hallmark of Graves’ disease. The presence of immune defects leading to synthesis of TSHR-Abs causes hyperthyroidism and is associated with other extrathyroidal manifestations. Further characterization of these antibodies has now been made possible by the generation of monoclonal antibodies with this unique stimulating capacity as well as similar TSHR-Abs not associated with hyperthyroidism. Their present classification divides TSHR-Abs into stimulating, blocking (competing with TSH binding) and neutral (no signaling). Recent studies using monoclonal TSHR-Abs has revealed that stimulating and blocking antibodies bind to the receptor using mostly conformational epitopes, whilst neutral antibodies utilize exclusively linear peptides. Subtle differences in epitopes for stimulating and blocking antibodies account for the diversity of their biological actions. Recently non-classical signaling elicited by neutral antibodies has also been described, raising the need for a new classification of TSHR-Abs. PMID:19332151

  7. The interleukin-4 receptor: signal transduction by a hematopoietin receptor.

    PubMed

    Keegan, A D; Pierce, J H

    1994-02-01

    Over the last several years, the receptors for numerous cytokines have been molecularly characterized. Analysis of their amino acid sequences shows that some of these receptors bear certain motifs in their extracellular domains that define a family of receptors called the Hematopoietin receptor superfamily. Significant advances in characterizing the structure, function, and mechanisms of signal transduction have been made for several members of this family. The purpose of this review is to discuss the recent advances made for one of the family members, the interleukin (IL) 4 receptor. Other receptor systems have recently been reviewed elsewhere. The IL-4 receptor consists of, at the minimum, the cloned 140 kDa IL-4-binding chain with the potential for associating with other chains. The IL-4 receptor transduces its signal by activating a tyrosine kinase that phosphorylates cellular substrates, including the receptor itself, and the 170 kDa substrate called 4PS. Phosphorylated 4PS interacts with the SH2 domain of the enzyme PI-3'-kinase and increases its enzymatic activity. These early events in the IL-4 receptor initiated signaling pathway may trigger a series of signals that will ultimately lead to an IL-4 specific biologic outcome.

  8. Quantitative receptor autoradiography

    SciTech Connect

    Boast, C.A.; Snowhill, E.W.; Altar, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    Quantitative receptor autoradiography addresses the topic of technical and scientific advances in the sphere of quantitative autoradiography. The volume opens with a overview of the field from a historical and critical perspective. Following is a detailed discussion of in vitro data obtained from a variety of neurotransmitter systems. The next section explores applications of autoradiography, and the final two chapters consider experimental models. Methodological considerations are emphasized, including the use of computers for image analysis.

  9. Receptors for enterovirus 71

    PubMed Central

    Yamayoshi, Seiya; Fujii, Ken; Koike, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is one of the major causative agents of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Occasionally, EV71 infection is associated with severe neurological diseases, such as acute encephalitis, acute flaccid paralysis and cardiopulmonary failure. Several molecules act as cell surface receptors that stimulate EV71 infection, including scavenger receptor B2 (SCARB2), P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), sialylated glycan, heparan sulfate and annexin II (Anx2). SCARB2 plays critical roles in attachment, viral entry and uncoating, and it can facilitate efficient EV71 infection. The three-dimensional structures of the mature EV71 virion, procapsid and empty capsid, as well as the exofacial domain of SCARB2, have been elucidated. This structural information has greatly increased our understanding of the early steps of EV71 infection. Furthermore, SCARB2 plays essential roles in the development of EV71 neurological disease in vivo. Adult mice are not susceptible to infection by EV71, but transgenic mice that express human SCARB2 become susceptible to EV71 infection and develop similar neurological diseases to those found in humans. This mouse model facilitates the in vivo investigation of many issues related to EV71. PSGL-1, sialylated glycan, heparan sulfate and Anx2 are attachment receptors, which enhance viral infection by retaining the virus on the cell surface. These molecules also contribute to viral infection in vitro either by interacting with SCARB2 or independently of SCARB2. However, the cooperative effects of these receptors, and their contribution to EV71 pathogenicity in vivo, remain to be elucidated. PMID:26038749

  10. Role of A3 adenosine receptor in diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Heng; Zhang, Enshui; Feng, Chang; Zhao, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Neuropathy is the most common diabetic complication. Although the A1 and A2A adenosine receptors are important pharmacological targets in alleviating diabetic neuropathy, the role of the A3 adenosine receptor remains unknown. Because the A3 adenosine receptor regulates pain induced by chronic constriction injury or chemotherapy, its stimulation might also attenuate diabetic neuropathy. This study examines the effects of systemic treatment with the A3 adenosine receptor agonist 1-deoxy-1-[6-[[(3-iodophenyl)methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-N-methyl-β-d-ribofuranuronamide (IB-MECA) on diabetic neuropathy and explores the putative mechanisms underlying its pharmacological effects. We show that IB-MECA alleviated mechanical hyperalgesia and thermal hypoalgesia in mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after streptozocin (STZ) treatment. Furthermore, IB-MECA prevented the reduction in sciatic motor nerve conduction velocity and sensory nerve conduction velocity in diabetic mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after STZ treatment. Similarly, IB-MECA inhibited the activation of nuclear factor-κB and decreased the generation of tumor necrosis factor-α in the spinal cord of mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after STZ treatment. These phenomena were associated with reduction of A3 adenosine receptor expression in the spinal cord after long-term diabetes. Our results suggest that the A3 adenosine receptor plays a critical role in regulating diabetic neuropathy and that reduction in A3 adenosine receptor expression/function might contribute to the progression of diabetic neuropathy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. [Lipoprotein receptors. Old acquaintances and newcomers].

    PubMed

    Ducobu, J

    1997-02-01

    Lipoprotein receptors are plasma membrane proteins of high affinity which interact with circulating lipoprotein particles. The well characterized LDL receptor continues to be analysed and some new findings on its intracellular mechanisms of action have emerged. New lipoprotein receptors have recently been described: the chylomicron remnant receptor or LDL-related protein (LRP), the lipolysis stimulated receptor (LSR), the very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR), the HDL receptor (HDLR) and the scavenger receptor (SR). The molecular details of the receptors will facilitate the development of new therapeutic means to improve receptor-mediated clearance of lipoproteins.

  12. Melatonin Receptor Genes in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Li, Di Yan; Smith, David Glenn; Hardeland, Rüdiger; Yang, Ming Yao; Xu, Huai Liang; Zhang, Long; Yin, Hua Dong; Zhu, Qing

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family. Three genes for melatonin receptors have been cloned. The MT1 (or Mel1a or MTNR1A) and MT2 (or Mel1b or MTNR1B) receptor subtypes are present in humans and other mammals, while an additional melatonin receptor subtype, Mel1c (or MTNR1C), has been identified in fish, amphibians and birds. Another melatonin related orphan receptor, GPR50, which does not bind melatonin, is found exclusively in mammals. The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily by the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. This hormone acts systemically in numerous organs. In the brain, it is involved in the regulation of various neural and endocrine processes, and it readjusts the circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This article reviews recent studies of gene organization, expression, evolution and mutations of melatonin receptor genes of vertebrates. Gene polymorphisms reveal that numerous mutations are associated with diseases and disorders. The phylogenetic analysis of receptor genes indicates that GPR50 is an outgroup to all other melatonin receptor sequences. GPR50 may have separated from a melatonin receptor ancestor before the split between MTNR1C and the MTNR1A/B ancestor. PMID:23712359

  13. Receptor binding properties of amperozide.

    PubMed

    Svartengren, J; Simonsson, P

    1990-01-01

    The receptor pharmacology of amperozide was investigated with in vitro radioligand binding technique. Amperozide possessed a high affinity to the 5-HT2 receptors (Ki = 16.5 +/- 2.1 nM) and a moderate affinity to alpha 1-adrenergic receptors of rat cerebral cortical membranes (Ki = 172 +/- 14 nM). The affinity of amperozide for striatal and limbic dopamine D2 receptors was low and not significantly different (Ki +/- S.E.M. = 540 +/- 59 nM vs 403 +/- 42 nM; p less than 0.11, n = 4). The affinity for striatal and limbic 5-HT2 receptors was measured as well and found to be very close to the affinity to the cerebral cortical 5-HT2 receptor. The drug affinity for D2 and 5-HT2 receptors seems thus not to be influenced by the location of the receptor moiety. The affinity for several other rat brain receptors such as 5-HT1A, alpha 2-adrenergic, dopamine D1, muscarinic M1 and M2, opiate sigma and beta 2-adrenergic was low. The pseudo-Hill coefficient of the amperozide competition binding curve was consistently higher than one indicating antagonistic and complex interactions with the 5-HT2 receptor or with alpha 1-adrenergic and dopamine D2 receptors. The antagonistic properties of amperozide were investigated by its ability to antagonize the serotonin-induced formation of inositol-1-phosphate in human blood platelets. Amperozide inhibited this 5-HT2 receptor-mediated intracellular response with similar potency as ketanserin. These results suggest that amperozide is a selective 5-HT2 receptor antagonist.

  14. KW-3902, a selective high affinity antagonist for adenosine A1 receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, H.; Ichimura, M.; Takeda, M.; Kanda, T.; Shimada, J.; Suzuki, F.; Kase, H.

    1996-01-01

    1. We demonstrate that 8-(noradamantan-3-yl)-1,3-dipropylxanthine (KW-3902) is a very potent and selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, assessed by radioligand binding and cyclic AMP response in cells. 2. In rat forebrain adenosine A1 receptors labelled with [3H]-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA), KW-3902 had a Ki value of 0.19 nM, whereas it showed a Ki value of 170 nM in rat striatal A2A receptors labelled with [3H]-2-[p-(2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino]-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoad enosine (CGS21680), indicating 890 fold A1 receptor selectivity versus the A2A receptor. KW-3902 at 10 microM showed no effect on recombinant rat A3 receptors expressed on CHO cells. 3. Saturation studies with [3H]-KW-3902 revealed that it bound with high affinity (Kd = 77 pM) and limited capacity (Bmax = 470 fmol mg-1 of protein) to a single class of recognition sites. A high positive correlation was observed between the pharmacological profile of adenosine ligands inhibiting the binding of [3H]-KW-3902 and that of [3H]-CHA. 4. KW-3902 showed potent A1 antagonism against the inhibition of forskolin-induced cyclic AMP accumulation in DDT1 MF-2 cells by the A1-selective agonist, cyclopentyladenosine with a dissociation constant (KB value) of 0.34 nM. KW-3902 antagonized 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine-elicited cyclic AMP accumulation via A2B receptors with a KB value of 52 nM. 5. KW-3902 exhibited marked species-dependent differences in the binding affinities. The highest affinity was for the rat A1 receptor (ki = 0.19 nM) and these values for guinea-pig and dog A1 receptors were 1.3 and 10 nM, respectively. PMID:8732272

  15. Angiotensin II receptors in testes

    SciTech Connect

    Millan, M.A.; Aguilera, G.

    1988-05-01

    Receptors for angiotensin II (AII) were identified and characterized in testes of rats and several primate species. Autoradiographic analysis of the binding of 125I-labeled (Sar1,Ile8)AII to rat, rhesus monkey, cebus monkey, and human testicular slide-mounted frozen sections indicated specific binding to Leydig cells in the interstitium. In rat collagenase-dispersed interstitial cells fractionated by Percoll gradient, AII receptor content was parallel to that of hCG receptors, confirming that the AII receptors are in the Leydig cells. In rat dispersed Leydig cells, binding was specific for AII and its analogs and of high affinity (Kd, 4.8 nM), with a receptor concentration of 15 fmol/10(6) cells. Studies of AII receptors in rat testes during development reveals the presence of high receptor density in newborn rats which decreases toward the adult age (4934 +/- 309, 1460 +/- 228, 772 +/- 169, and 82 +/- 12 fmol/mg protein at 5, 15, 20, and 30 days of age, respectively) with no change in affinity. At all ages receptors were located in the interstitium, and the decrease in binding was parallel to the decrease in the interstitial to tubular ratio observed with age. AII receptor properties in membrane-rich fractions from prepuberal testes were similar in the rat and rhesus monkey. Binding was time and temperature dependent, reaching a plateau at 60 min at 37 C, and was increased by divalent cations, EGTA, and dithiothreitol up to 0.5 mM. In membranes from prepuberal monkey testes, AII receptors were specific for AII analogs and of high affinity (Kd, 4.2 nM) with a receptor concentration of 7599 +/- 1342 fmol/mg protein. The presence of AII receptors in Leydig cells in rat and primate testes in conjunction with reports of the presence of other components of the renin-angiotensin system in the testes suggests that the peptide has a physiological role in testicular function.

  16. Angiotensin II receptor signalling.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Derek; Yee, Daniel K; Fluharty, Steven J

    2007-05-01

    Angiotensin II plays a key role in the regulation of body fluid homeostasis. To correct body fluid deficits that occur during hypovolaemia, an animal needs to ingest both water and electrolytes. Thus, it is not surprising that angiotensin II, which is synthesized in response to hypovolaemia, acts centrally to increase both water and NaCl intake. Here, we review findings relating to the properties of angiotensin II receptors that give rise to changes in behaviour. Data are described to suggest that divergent signal transduction pathways are responsible for separable behavioural responses to angiotensin II, and a hypothesis is proposed to explain how this divergence may map onto neural circuits in the brain.

  17. The human olfactory receptor repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Zozulya, Sergey; Echeverri, Fernando; Nguyen, Trieu

    2001-01-01

    Background The mammalian olfactory apparatus is able to recognize and distinguish thousands of structurally diverse volatile chemicals. This chemosensory function is mediated by a very large family of seven-transmembrane olfactory (odorant) receptors encoded by approximately 1,000 genes, the majority of which are believed to be pseudogenes in humans. Results The strategy of our sequence database mining for full-length, functional candidate odorant receptor genes was based on the high overall sequence similarity and presence of a number of conserved sequence motifs in all known mammalian odorant receptors as well as the absence of introns in their coding sequences. We report here the identification and physical cloning of 347 putative human full-length odorant receptor genes. Comparative sequence analysis of the predicted gene products allowed us to identify and define a number of consensus sequence motifs and structural features of this vast family of receptors. A new nomenclature for human odorant receptors based on their chromosomal localization and phylogenetic analysis is proposed. We believe that these sequences represent the essentially complete repertoire of functional human odorant receptors. Conclusions The identification and cloning of all functional human odorant receptor genes is an important initial step in understanding receptor-ligand specificity and combinatorial encoding of odorant stimuli in human olfaction. PMID:11423007

  18. In silico binding characteristics between human histamine H1 receptor and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojian; Yang, Qian; Li, Minyong; Yin, Dali; You, Qidong

    2010-09-01

    It is widely acknowledged that the H(1) receptor antagonists have important therapeutic significance in the treatment of various allergic disorders, but little was known about the binding mode between the receptor and antagonists since the crystal structure of G-protein coupling receptors (GPCRs) were hard to obtain. In this paper, a theoretical three-dimensional model of human histamine H(1) receptor (HHR1) was developed on the basis of recently reported high resolution structures of human A(2A) adenosine receptor, human beta(2)-adrenoceptor and turkey beta(1)-adrenoceptor. Furthermore, three representative H(1) receptor antagonists were chosen for docking studies. Subsequently, a qualitative pharmacophore model was developed by Hiphop algorithm based on the docking conformations of these three antagonists. In this paper, active environment, certain key residues, and the corresponding pharmacophore features of H(1) receptor were identified by such combinations of receptor-based and ligand-based approaches, which would give sufficient guidance for the rational design of novel antihistamine agents. PMID:20179978

  19. In silico binding characteristics between human histamine H1 receptor and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojian; Yang, Qian; Li, Minyong; Yin, Dali; You, Qidong

    2010-09-01

    It is widely acknowledged that the H(1) receptor antagonists have important therapeutic significance in the treatment of various allergic disorders, but little was known about the binding mode between the receptor and antagonists since the crystal structure of G-protein coupling receptors (GPCRs) were hard to obtain. In this paper, a theoretical three-dimensional model of human histamine H(1) receptor (HHR1) was developed on the basis of recently reported high resolution structures of human A(2A) adenosine receptor, human beta(2)-adrenoceptor and turkey beta(1)-adrenoceptor. Furthermore, three representative H(1) receptor antagonists were chosen for docking studies. Subsequently, a qualitative pharmacophore model was developed by Hiphop algorithm based on the docking conformations of these three antagonists. In this paper, active environment, certain key residues, and the corresponding pharmacophore features of H(1) receptor were identified by such combinations of receptor-based and ligand-based approaches, which would give sufficient guidance for the rational design of novel antihistamine agents.

  20. Chemokine receptors in airway disease: which receptors to target?

    PubMed

    Owen, C

    2001-01-01

    Many disease states within the airway result in the co-ordinated infiltration of key inflammatory cells. The cellular influx is choreographed through the temporal and spatially-regulated expression of chemokines, which potentiate the migration of cells along gradients of chemotactic ligands. Chemokines act as ligands for the chemokine receptors; a distinct class of G-protein-coupled receptor. Over 40 chemokine ligands and 18 chemokine receptors have been identified on human cells. Chemokine receptors are divided into several classes; the two most prominent of which are the CC- and CXC-chemokine receptors, classified through the spatial arrangement of two conserved cysteine residues. The role of chemokine receptors such as CCR2, CCR3, CCR4, CCR8 and the CXC chemokine receptors; CXCR1 and CXCR2 on cell types of relevance to respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic bronchitis will be explored in this review. Chemokines have proven to be amenable drug targets for the development of low molecular weight antagonists by the pharmaceutical industry. So far, no chemokine receptor antagonist has entered the clinic in trials for respiratory disease, but over the next few years it is expected that many will do so, at which time the potential of these exciting new targets will be fully realised.

  1. GABAB receptors modulate NMDA receptor calcium signals in dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Chalifoux, Jason R; Carter, Adam G

    2010-04-15

    Metabotropic GABA(B) receptors play a fundamental role in modulating the excitability of neurons and circuits throughout the brain. These receptors influence synaptic transmission by inhibiting presynaptic release or activating postsynaptic potassium channels. However, their ability to directly influence different types of postsynaptic glutamate receptors remains unresolved. Here we examine GABA(B) receptor modulation in layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons from the mouse prefrontal cortex. We use two-photon laser-scanning microscopy to study synaptic modulation at individual dendritic spines. Using two-photon optical quantal analysis, we first demonstrate robust presynaptic modulation of multivesicular release at single synapses. Using two-photon glutamate uncaging, we then reveal that GABA(B) receptors strongly inhibit NMDA receptor calcium signals. This postsynaptic modulation occurs via the PKA pathway and does not affect synaptic currents mediated by AMPA or NMDA receptors. This form of GABA(B) receptor modulation has widespread implications for the control of calcium-dependent neuronal function.

  2. Axonal GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Federico F; Marty, Alain; Stell, Brandon M

    2008-09-01

    Type A GABA receptors (GABA(A)Rs) are well established as the main inhibitory receptors in the mature mammalian forebrain. In recent years, evidence has accumulated showing that GABA(A)Rs are prevalent not only in the somatodendritic compartment of CNS neurons, but also in their axonal compartment. Evidence for axonal GABA(A)Rs includes new immunohistochemical and immunogold data: direct recording from single axonal terminals; and effects of local applications of GABA(A)R modulators on action potential generation, on axonal calcium signalling, and on neurotransmitter release. Strikingly, whereas presynaptic GABA(A)Rs have long been considered inhibitory, the new studies in the mammalian brain mostly indicate an excitatory action. Depending on the neuron that is under study, axonal GABA(A)Rs can be activated by ambient GABA, by GABA spillover, or by an autocrine action, to increase either action potential firing and/or transmitter release. In certain neurons, the excitatory effects of axonal GABA(A)Rs persist into adulthood. Altogether, axonal GABA(A)Rs appear as potent neuronal modulators of the mammalian CNS.

  3. The Multifaceted Mineralocorticoid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Sanchez, Elise; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E.

    2015-01-01

    The primary adrenal cortical steroid hormones, aldosterone, and the glucocorticoids cortisol and corticosterone, act through the structurally similar mineralocorticoid (MR) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). Aldosterone is crucial for fluid, electrolyte, and hemodynamic homeostasis and tissue repair; the significantly more abundant glucocorticoids are indispensable for energy homeostasis, appropriate responses to stress, and limiting inflammation. Steroid receptors initiate gene transcription for proteins that effect their actions as well as rapid non-genomic effects through classical cell signaling pathways. GR and MR are expressed in many tissues types, often in the same cells, where they interact at molecular and functional levels, at times in synergy, others in opposition. Thus the appropriate balance of MR and GR activation is crucial for homeostasis. MR has the same binding affinity for aldosterone, cortisol, and corticosterone. Glucocorticoids activate MR in most tissues at basal levels and GR at stress levels. Inactivation of cortisol and corticosterone by 11β-HSD2 allows aldosterone to activate MR within aldosterone target cells and limits activation of the GR. Under most conditions, 11β-HSD1 acts as a reductase and activates cortisol/corticosterone, amplifying circulating levels. 11β-HSD1 and MR antagonists mitigate inappropriate activation of MR under conditions of oxidative stress that contributes to the pathophysiology of the cardiometabolic syndrome; however, MR antagonists decrease normal MR/GR functional interactions, a particular concern for neurons mediating cognition, memory, and affect. PMID:24944027

  4. Kinins and peptide receptors.

    PubMed

    Regoli, Domenico; Gobeil, Fernand

    2016-04-01

    This paper is divided into two sections: the first contains the essential elements of the opening lecture presented by Pr. Regoli to the 2015 International Kinin Symposium in S. Paulo, Brazil on June 28th and the second is the celebration of Dr. Regoli's 60 years of research on vasoactive peptides. The cardiovascular homeostasis derives from a balance of two systems, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS). The biologically active effector entity of RAS is angiotensin receptor-1 (AT-1R), and that of KKS is bradykinin B2 receptor (B2R). The first mediates vasoconstriction, the second is the most potent and efficient vasodilator. Thanks to its complex and multi-functional mechanism of action, involving nitric oxide (NO), prostacyclin and endothelial hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). B2R is instrumental for the supply of blood, oxygen and nutrition to tissues. KKS is present on the vascular endothelium and functions as an autacoid playing major roles in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and diabetes. KKS exerts a paramount role in the prevention of thrombosis and atherosclerosis. Such knowledge emphasizes the already prominent value of the ACE-inhibitors (ACEIs) for the treatment of CVDs and diabetes. Indeed, the ACEIs, thanks to their double action (block of the RAS and potentiation of the KKS) are the ideal agents for a rational treatment of these diseases. PMID:26408609

  5. Leptin and its receptors.

    PubMed

    Wada, Nobuhiro; Hirako, Satoshi; Takenoya, Fumiko; Kageyama, Haruaki; Okabe, Mai; Shioda, Seiji

    2014-11-01

    Leptin is mainly produced in the white adipose tissue before being secreted into the blood and transported across the blood-brain barrier. Leptin binds to a specific receptor (LepR) that has numerous subtypes (LepRa, LepRb, LepRc, LepRd, LepRe, and LepRf). LepRb, in particular, is expressed in several brain nuclei, including the arcuate nucleus, the paraventricular nucleus, and the dorsomedial, lateral and ventromedial regions of the hypothalamus. LepRb is also co-expressed with several neuropeptides, including proopiomelanocortin, neuropeptide Y, galanin, galanin-like peptide, gonadotropin-releasing hormone, tyrosine hydroxylase and neuropeptide W. Functionally, LepRb induces activation of the JAK2/ERK, /STAT3, /STAT5 and IRS/PI3 kinase signaling cascades, which are important for the regulation of energy homeostasis and appetite in mammals. In this review, we discuss the structure, genetics and distribution of the leptin receptors, and their role in cell signaling mechanisms. PMID:25218975

  6. Angiotensin II receptor heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Herblin, W.F.; Chiu, A.T.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L. )

    1991-04-01

    The possibility of receptor heterogeneity in the angiotensin II (AII) system has been suggested previously, based on differences in Kd values or sensitivity to thiol reagents. One of the authors earliest indications was the frequent observation of incomplete inhibition of the binding of AII to adrenal cortical membranes. Autoradiographic studies demonstrated that all of the labeling of the rat adrenal was blocked by unlabeled AII or saralasin, but not by DuP 753. The predominant receptor in the rat adrenal cortex (80%) is sensitive to dithiothreitol (DTT) and DuP 753, and is designated AII-1. The residual sites in the adrenal cortex and almost all of the sites in the rat adrenal medulla are insensitive to both DTT and DuP 753, but were blocked by EXP655. These sites have been confirmed by ligand binding studies and are designated AII-2. The rabbit adrenal cortex is unique in yielding a nonuniform distribution of AII-2 sites around the outer layer of glomerulosa cells. In the rabbit kidney, the sites on the glomeruli are AII-1, but the sites on the kidney capsule are AII-2. Angiotensin III appears to have a higher affinity for AII-2 sites since it inhibits the binding to the rabbit kidney capsule but not the glomeruli. Elucidation of the distribution and function of these diverse sites should permit the development of more selective and specific therapeutic strategies.

  7. Pressure Modulation of the Enzymatic Activity of Phospholipase A2, A Putative Membrane-Associated Pressure Sensor.

    PubMed

    Suladze, Saba; Cinar, Suleyman; Sperlich, Benjamin; Winter, Roland

    2015-10-01

    Phospholipases A2 (PLA2) catalyze the hydrolysis reaction of sn-2 fatty acids of membrane phospholipids and are also involved in receptor signaling and transcriptional pathways. Here, we used pressure modulation of the PLA2 activity and of the membrane's physical-chemical properties to reveal new mechanistic information about the membrane association and subsequent enzymatic reaction of PLA2. Although the effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on aqueous soluble and integral membrane proteins has been investigated to some extent, its effect on enzymatic reactions operating at the water/lipid interface has not been explored, yet. This study focuses on the effect of HHP on the structure, membrane binding and enzymatic activity of membrane-associated bee venom PLA2, covering a pressure range up to 2 kbar. To this end, high-pressure Fourier-transform infrared and high-pressure stopped-flow fluorescence spectroscopies were applied. The results show that PLA2 binding to model biomembranes is not significantly affected by pressure and occurs in at least two kinetically distinct steps. Followed by fast initial membrane association, structural reorganization of α-helical segments of PLA2 takes place at the lipid water interface. FRET-based activity measurements reveal that pressure has a marked inhibitory effect on the lipid hydrolysis rate, which decreases by 75% upon compression up to 2 kbar. Lipid hydrolysis under extreme environmental conditions, such as those encountered in the deep sea where pressures up to the kbar-level are encountered, is hence markedly affected by HHP, rendering PLA2, next to being a primary osmosensor, a good candidate for a sensitive pressure sensor in vivo.

  8. 26 CFR 1.404(a)-2A - Information to be furnished by employer; taxable years ending on or after December 31, 1971, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Information to be furnished by employer; taxable years ending on or after December 31, 1971, and before December 31, 1975. 1.404(a)-2A Section 1.404(a)-2A Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Pension,...

  9. Evidence for an atypical receptor mediating the augmented bronchoconstrictor response to adenosine induced by allergen challenge in actively sensitized Brown Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Hannon, J P; Tigani, B; Wolber, C; Williams, I; Mazzoni, L; Howes, C; Fozard, J R

    2002-02-01

    The bronchoconstrictor response to adenosine is markedly and selectively increased following ovalbumin (OA) challenge in actively sensitized, Brown Norway rats. We present a pharmacological analysis of the receptor mediating this response. Like adenosine, the broad-spectrum adenosine receptor agonist, NECA, induced dose-related bronchoconstriction in actively sensitized, OA-challenged animals. In contrast, CPA, CGS 21680 and 2-Cl-IB-MECA, agonists selective for A(1) A(2A) and A(3) receptors, respectively, induced no, or minimal, bronchoconstriction. Neither the selective A(1) receptor antagonist, DPCPX, nor the selective A(2A) receptor antagonist, ZM 241385, blocked the bronchoconstrictor response to adenosine. MRS 1754, which has similar affinity for rat A(2B) and A(1) receptors, failed to block the bronchoconstrictor response to adenosine despite blockade of the A(1) receptor-mediated bradycardia induced by NECA. 8-SPT and CGS 15943, antagonists at A(1), A(2A), and A(2B) but not A(3) receptors, inhibited the bronchoconstrictor response to adenosine. However, the degree of blockade (approximately 3 fold) did not reflect the plasma concentrations, which were 139 and 21 times greater than the K(B) value at the rat A(2B) receptor, respectively. Adenosine and NECA, but not CPA, CGS 21680 or 2-Cl-IB-MECA, induced contraction of parenchymal strip preparations from actively sensitized OA-challenged animals. Responses to adenosine could not be antagonized by 8-SPT or MRS 1754 at concentrations >50 times their affinities at the rat A(2B) receptor. The receptor mediating the bronchoconstrictor response to adenosine augmented following allergen challenge in actively sensitized BN rats cannot be categorized as one of the four recognized adenosine receptor subtypes.

  10. [Adrenergic receptors of blood platelets].

    PubMed

    Lanza, F; Cazenave, J P

    1987-01-01

    Blood platelets possess adrenergic receptors and are stimulated by adrenaline in the circulation. This review summarizes the state of knowledge of the pharmacology of adrenergic receptors and the biochemical mechanisms of platelet activation by adrenaline in various physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:2837727

  11. Sensory receptors in monotremes.

    PubMed

    Proske, U; Gregory, J E; Iggo, A

    1998-07-29

    This is a summary of the current knowledge of sensory receptors in skin of the bill of the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, and the snout of the echidna, Tachyglossus aculeatus. Brief mention is also made of the third living member of the monotremes, the long-nosed echidna, Zaglossus bruijnii. The monotremes are the only group of mammals known to have evolved electroreception. The structures in the skin responsible for the electric sense have been identified as sensory mucous glands with an expanded epidermal portion that is innervated by large-diameter nerve fibres. Afferent recordings have shown that in both platypuses and echidnas the receptors excited by cathodal (negative) pulses and inhibited by anodal (positive) pulses. Estimates give a total of 40,000 mucous sensory glands in the upper and lower bill of the platypus, whereas there are only about 100 in the tip of the echidna snout. Recording of electroreceptor-evoked activity from the brain of the platypus have shown that the largest area dedicated to somatosensory input from the bill, S1, shows alternating rows of mechanosensory and bimodal neurons. The bimodal neurons respond to both electrosensory and mechanical inputs. In skin of the platypus bill and echidna snout, apart from the electroreceptors, there are structures called push rods, which consist of a column of compacted cells that is able to move relatively independently of adjacent regions of skin. At the base of the column are Merkel cell complexes, known to be type I slowly adapting mechanoreceptors, and lamellated corpuscles, probably vibration receptors. It has been speculated that the platypus uses its electric sense to detect the electromyographic activity from moving prey in the water and for obstacle avoidance. Mechanoreceptors signal contact with the prey. For the echidna, a role for the electrosensory system has not yet been established during normal foraging behaviour, although it has been shown that it is able to detect the presence

  12. Allosteric Modulation of Chemoattractant Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Allegretti, Marcello; Cesta, Maria Candida; Locati, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Chemoattractants control selective leukocyte homing via interactions with a dedicated family of related G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Emerging evidence indicates that the signaling activity of these receptors, as for other GPCR, is influenced by allosteric modulators, which interact with the receptor in a binding site distinct from the binding site of the agonist and modulate the receptor signaling activity in response to the orthosteric ligand. Allosteric modulators have a number of potential advantages over orthosteric agonists/antagonists as therapeutic agents and offer unprecedented opportunities to identify extremely selective drug leads. Here, we resume evidence of allosterism in the context of chemoattractant receptors, discussing in particular its functional impact on functional selectivity and probe/concentration dependence of orthosteric ligands activities. PMID:27199992

  13. Nicotinic receptors and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ripoll, Nadège; Bronnec, Marie; Bourin, Michel

    2004-07-01

    The incidence of smoking is very high in non-schizophrenic subjects presenting various psychiatric disorders (35 to 54%). However, the incidence of smoking is extremely high in schizophrenic patients: 80% to 90%, versus 25% to 30% of the general population. Various studies have demonstrated that the use of tobacco transiently restores the schizophrenic patient's cognitive and sensory deficits. Smoking cessation also appears to exacerbate the symptoms of the disease. Post-mortem binding studies have revealed a disturbance of nicotinic receptor expression, affecting the alpha(7) and alpha(4)beta(2) subunits, in various cerebral areas. Genetic linkage studies have also shown that the alpha(7) subunit is involved in schizophrenia. This review assesses the involvement of the nicotinic system in schizophrenia and suggests ways in which this system may participate in the pathophysiology of this disease.

  14. Androgen receptor genomic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hong-Jian; Kim, Jung

    2013-01-01

    The transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor (AR) is not only critical for the normal development and function of the prostate but also pivotal to the onset and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). The studies of AR transcriptional regulation were previously limited to a handful of AR-target genes. Owing to the development of various high-throughput genomic technologies, significant advances have been made in recent years. Here we discuss the discoveries of genome-wide androgen-regulated genes in PCa cell lines, animal models and tissues using expression microarray and sequencing, the mapping of genomic landscapes of AR using Combining Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-on-chip and ChIP-seq assays, the interplay of transcriptional cofactors in defining AR binding profiles, and the genomic regulation and AR reprogramming in advanced PCa. PMID:25237629

  15. Elucidation of the Molecular Basis of Cholecystokinin Peptide Docking to Its Receptor Using Site-Specific Intrinsic Photoaffinity Labeling and Molecular Modeling†

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Maoqing; Lam, Polo C.-H.; Pino, Delia I.; Abagyan, Ruben; Miller, Laurence J.

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors represent the largest family of receptors and the major target of current drug development efforts. Understanding of the mechanisms of ligand binding and activation of these receptors remains limited, despite recent advances in structural determination of family members. This work focuses on the use of photoaffinity labeling and molecular modeling to elucidate the structural basis of binding a natural peptide ligand to a family A G protein-coupled receptor, the type 1 cholecystokinin receptor. Two photolabile cholecystokinin analogues were developed and characterized as representing high-affinity, fully biologically active probes with sites of covalent attachment at positions 28 and 31. The sites of receptor labeling were identified by purification, proteolytic peptide mapping, and radiochemical sequencing of labeled wild-type and mutant cholecystokinin receptors. The position 28 probe labeled second extracellular loop residue Leu199, while the position 31 probe labeled first extracellular loop residue Phe107. Along with five additional spatial approximation constraints coming from previous photoaffinity labeling studies and 12 distance restraints from fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies, these were built into two homology models of the cholecystokinin receptor, based on the recent crystal structures of the β2-adrenergic receptor and A2a-adenosine receptor. The resultant agonist ligand-occupied receptor models fully accommodate all existing experimental data and represent the best refined models of a peptide hormone receptor in this important family. PMID:19441839

  16. The somatostatin receptor family.

    PubMed

    Patel, Y C; Greenwood, M T; Panetta, R; Demchyshyn, L; Niznik, H; Srikant, C B

    1995-01-01

    The diverse biological effects of somatostatin (SST) are mediated through a family of G protein coupled receptors of which 5 members have been recently identified by molecular cloning. This review focuses on the molecular biology, pharmacology, expression, and function of these receptors with particular emphasis on the human (h) homologs. hSSTRs are encoded by a family of 5 genes which map to separate chromosomes and which, with one exception, are intronless. SSTR2 gives rise to spliced variants, SSTR2A and 2B. hSSTR1-4 display weak selectivity for SST-14 binding whereas hSSTR5 is SST-28 selective. Based on structural similarity and reactivity for octapeptide and hexapeptide SST analogs, hSSTR2,3, and 5 belong to a similar SSTR subclass. hSSTR1 and 4 react poorly with these analogs and belong to a separate subclass. All 5 hSSTRs are functionally coupled to inhibition of adenylyl cyclase via pertussis toxin sensitive GTP binding proteins. Some of the subtypes are also coupled to tyrosine phosphatase (SSTR1,2), Ca2+ channels (SSTR2), Na+/H+ exchanger (SSTR1), PLA-2 (SSTR4), and MAP kinase (SSTR4). mRNA for SSTR1-5 is widely expressed in brain and peripheral organs and displays an overlapping but characteristic pattern that is subtype-selective, and tissue- and species-specific. Pituitary and islet tumors express several SSTR genes suggesting that multiple SSTR subtypes are coexpressed in the same cell. Structure-function studies indicate that the core residues in SST-14 ligand Phe6-Phe11 dock within a ligand binding pocket located in TMDs 3-7 which is lined by hydrophobic and charged amino acid residues.

  17. Caffeine stimulates locomotor activity in the mammalian spinal cord via adenosine A1 receptor-dopamine D1 receptor interaction and PKA-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, JeanMarie; Santana-Almansa, Alexandra; Matos-Vergara, Nikol; Marrero-Cordero, Luis René; Cabezas-Bou, Ernesto; Díaz-Ríos, Manuel

    2016-02-01

    Caffeine is a potent psychostimulant that can have significant and widely variable effects on the activity of multiple neuronal pathways. The most pronounced caffeine-induced behavioral effect seen in rodents is to increase locomotor activity which has been linked to a dose-dependent inhibition of A1 and A(2A) receptors. The effects of caffeine at the level of the lumbar spinal central pattern generator (CPG) network for hindlimb locomotion are lacking. We assessed the effects of caffeine to the locomotor function of the spinal CPG network via extracellular ventral root recordings using the isolated neonatal mouse spinal cord preparation. Addition of caffeine and of an A1 receptor antagonist significantly decreased the cycle period accelerating the ongoing locomotor rhythm, while decreasing burst duration reversibly in most preparations suggesting the role of A1 receptors as the primary target of caffeine. Caffeine and an A1 receptor antagonist failed to stimulate ongoing locomotor activity in the absence of dopamine or in the presence of a D1 receptor antagonist supporting A1/D1 receptor-dependent mechanism of action. The use of caffeine or an A1 receptor blocker failed to stimulate an ongoing locomotor rhythm in the presence of a blocker of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) supporting the need of this intracellular pathway for the modulatory effects of caffeine to occur. These results support a stimulant effect of caffeine on the lumbar spinal network controlling hindlimb locomotion through the inhibition of A1 receptors and subsequent activation of D1 receptors via a PKA-dependent intracellular mechanism.

  18. Estrogen-related receptor β (ERRβ) – renaissance receptor or receptor renaissance?

    PubMed Central

    Divekar, Shailaja D.; Tiek, Deanna M.; Fernandez, Aileen; Riggins, Rebecca B.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptors (ERRs) are founding members of the orphan nuclear receptor (ONR) subgroup of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Twenty-seven years of study have yet to identify cognate ligands for the ERRs, though they have firmly placed ERRα and ERRγ at the intersection of cellular metabolism and oncogenesis. The pace of discovery for novel functions of ERRβ, however, has until recently been somewhat slower than that of its family members. ERRβ has also been largely ignored in summaries and perspectives of the ONR literature. Here, we provide an overview of established and emerging knowledge of ERRβ in mouse, man, and other species, highlighting unique aspects of ERRβ biology that set it apart from the other two estrogen-related receptors, with a focus on the impact of alternative splicing on the structure and function of this receptor. PMID:27507929

  19. Estrogen-related receptor β (ERRβ) - renaissance receptor or receptor renaissance?

    PubMed

    Divekar, Shailaja D; Tiek, Deanna M; Fernandez, Aileen; Riggins, Rebecca B

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptors (ERRs) are founding members of the orphan nuclear receptor (ONR) subgroup of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Twenty-seven years of study have yet to identify cognate ligands for the ERRs, though they have firmly placed ERRα and ERRγ at the intersection of cellular metabolism and oncogenesis. The pace of discovery for novel functions of ERRβ, however, has until recently been somewhat slower than that of its family members. ERRβ has also been largely ignored in summaries and perspectives of the ONR literature. Here, we provide an overview of established and emerging knowledge of ERRβ in mouse, man, and other species, highlighting unique aspects of ERRβ biology that set it apart from the other two estrogen-related receptors, with a focus on the impact of alternative splicing on the structure and function of this receptor.

  20. Estrogen-related receptor β (ERRβ) - renaissance receptor or receptor renaissance?

    PubMed

    Divekar, Shailaja D; Tiek, Deanna M; Fernandez, Aileen; Riggins, Rebecca B

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptors (ERRs) are founding members of the orphan nuclear receptor (ONR) subgroup of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Twenty-seven years of study have yet to identify cognate ligands for the ERRs, though they have firmly placed ERRα and ERRγ at the intersection of cellular metabolism and oncogenesis. The pace of discovery for novel functions of ERRβ, however, has until recently been somewhat slower than that of its family members. ERRβ has also been largely ignored in summaries and perspectives of the ONR literature. Here, we provide an overview of established and emerging knowledge of ERRβ in mouse, man, and other species, highlighting unique aspects of ERRβ biology that set it apart from the other two estrogen-related receptors, with a focus on the impact of alternative splicing on the structure and function of this receptor. PMID:27507929

  1. Regulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated synaptic responses by adenosine receptors in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Morton, R A; Davies, C H

    1997-01-01

    1. Intracellular current clamp recordings were made from CA1 pyramidal neurones in rat hippocampal slices. Experiments were performed in the presence of ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor antagonists to block all fast excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission. A single stimulus, delivered extracellularly in the stratum oriens, caused a reduction in spike frequency adaptation in response to a depolarizing current step delivered 2 s after the stimulus. A 2- to 10-fold increase in stimulus intensity evoked a slow excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) which was associated with a small increase in input resistance. The peak amplitude of the EPSP occurred approximately 2.5 s after the stimulus and its magnitude (up to 30 mV) and duration (10-50 s) increased with increasing stimulus intensity. 2. The slow EPSP was unaffected by the metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist (+)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine ((+)-MCPG; 1000 microM) but was greatly enhanced by the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine (1-5 microM). Both the slow EPSP and the stimulus-evoked reduction in spike frequency adaptation were inhibited by the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) antagonist atropine (1-5 microM). These results are consistent with these effects being mediated by mAChRs. 3. Both the mAChR-mediated EPSP (EPSPm) and the associated reduction in spike frequency adaptation were reversibly depressed (up to 97%) by either adenosine (100 microM) or its non-hydrolysable analogue 2-chloroadenosine (CADO; 0.1-5.0 microM). These effects were often accompanied by postsynaptic hyperpolarization (up to 8 mV) and a reduction in input resistance (up to 11%). The selective adenosine A1 receptor agonists 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA; 0.1-0.4 microM) and R(-)N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)-adenosine (R-PIA; 1 microM) both depressed the EPSPm. In contrast, the adenosine A2A receptor agonist 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino-5

  2. 1-, 3- and 8-substituted-9-deazaxanthines as potent and selective antagonists at the human A2B adenosine receptor.

    PubMed

    Stefanachi, Angela; Brea, Jose Manuel; Cadavid, Maria Isabel; Centeno, Nuria B; Esteve, Cristina; Loza, Maria Isabel; Martinez, Ana; Nieto, Rosa; Raviña, Enrique; Sanz, Ferran; Segarra, Victor; Sotelo, Eddy; Vidal, Bernat; Carotti, Angelo

    2008-03-15

    A large series of piperazin-, piperidin- and tetrahydroisoquinolinamides of 4-(1,3-dialkyl-9-deazaxanthin-8-yl)phenoxyacetic acid were prepared through conventional or multiple parallel syntheses and evaluated for their binding affinity at the recombinant human adenosine receptors, chiefly at the hA(2B) and hA(2A) receptor subtypes. Several ligands endowed with high binding affinity at hA(2B) receptors, excellent selectivity over hA(2A) and hA(3) and a significant, but lower, selectivity over hA(1) were identified. Among them, piperazinamide derivatives 23 and 52, and piperidinamide derivative 69 proved highly potent at hA(2B) (K(i)=11, 2 and 5.5 nM, respectively) and selective towards hA(2A) (hA(2A)/hA(2B) SI=912, 159 and 630, respectively), hA(3) (hA(3)/hA(2B) SI=>100, 3090 and >180, respectively) and hA(1) (hA(1)/hA(2B) SI=>100, 44 and 120, respectively), SI being the selectivity index. A number of selected ligands tested in functional assays in vitro showed very interesting antagonist activities and efficacies at both A(2A) and A(2B) receptor subtypes, with pA(2) values close to the corresponding pK(i)s. Structure-affinity and structure-selectivity relationships suggested that the binding potency at the hA(2B) receptor may be increased by lipophilic substituents at the N4-position of piperazinamides and that an ortho-methoxy substituent at the 8-phenyl ring and alkyl groups at N1 larger than the ones at N3, in the 9-deazaxanthine ring, may strongly enhance the hA(2A)/hA(2B) SI. PMID:18226909

  3. Activation of G-protein-coupled receptors correlates with the formation of a continuous internal water pathway.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuguang; Filipek, Slawomir; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Vogel, Horst

    2014-09-09

    Recent crystal structures of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have revealed ordered internal water molecules, raising questions about the functional role of those waters for receptor activation that could not be answered by the static structures. Here, we used molecular dynamics simulations to monitor--at atomic and high temporal resolution--conformational changes of central importance for the activation of three prototypical GPCRs with known crystal structures: the adenosine A2A receptor, the β2-adrenergic receptor and rhodopsin. Our simulations reveal that a hydrophobic layer of amino acid residues next to the characteristic NPxxY motif forms a gate that opens to form a continuous water channel only upon receptor activation. The highly conserved tyrosine residue Y(7.53) undergoes transitions between three distinct conformations representative of inactive, G-protein activated and GPCR metastates. Additional analysis of the available GPCR crystal structures reveals general principles governing the functional roles of internal waters in GPCRs.

  4. Lysophospholipid receptors in drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Kihara, Yasuyuki; Mizuno, Hirotaka; Chun, Jerold

    2014-01-01

    Lysophospholipids (LPs), including lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), sphingosine 1-phospate (S1P), lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), and lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS), are bioactive lipids that transduce signals through their specific cell-surface G protein-coupled receptors, LPA1–6, S1P1–5, LPI1, and LysoPS1–3, respectively. These LPs and their receptors have been implicated in both physiological and pathophysiological processes such as autoimmune diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, fibrosis, pain, cancer, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, bone formation, fertility, organismal development, and other effects on most organ systems. Advances in the LP receptor field have enabled the development of novel small molecules targeting LP receptors for several diseases. Most notably, fingolimod (FTY720, Gilenya, Novartis), an S1P receptor modulator, became the first FDA-approved medicine as an orally bioavailable drug for treating relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. This success is currently being followed by multiple, mechanistically related compounds targeting S1P receptor subtypes, which are in various stages of clinical development. In addition, an LPA1 antagonist, BMS-986020 (Bristol-Myers Squibb), is in Phase 2 clinical development for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, as is a distinct compound, SAR100842 (Sanofi) for the treatment of systemic sclerosis and related fibrotic diseases. This review summarizes the current state of drug discovery in the LP receptor field. PMID:25499971

  5. Hot receptors in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Steenland, Hendrik W; Ko, Shanelle W; Wu, Long-Jun; Zhuo, Min

    2006-01-01

    Two major approaches have been employed for the development of novel drugs to treat chronic pain. The most traditional approach identifies molecules involved in pain as potential therapeutic targets and has focused mainly on the periphery and spinal cord. A more recent approach identifies molecules that are involved in long-term plasticity. Drugs developed through the latter approach are predicted to treat chronic, but not physiological or acute, pain. The TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid-1) receptor is involved in nociceptive processing, and is a candidate therapeutic target for pain. While most research on TRPV1 receptors has been conducted at the level of the spinal cord and peripheral structures, considerably less research has focused on supraspinal structures. This short paper summarizes progress made on TRPV1 receptors, and reviews research on the expression and function of TRPV1 receptors in supraspinal structures. We suggest that the TRPV1 receptor may be involved in pain processing in higher brain structures, such as the anterior cingulate cortex. In addition, some regions of the brain utilize the TRPV1 receptor for functions apparently unrelated to pain. PMID:17092351

  6. The growth hormone secretagogue receptor.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Conrad Russell Young; Smith, Roy G

    2008-01-01

    The neuroendocrine hormone ghrelin, a recently discovered acylated peptide with numerous activities in various organ systems, exerts most of its known effects on the body through a highly conserved G-protein-coupled receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR) type 1a. The GHSR's wide expression in different tissues reflects activity of its ligands in the hypothalamic-pituitary, cardiovascular, immune, gastrointestinal, and reproductive systems. Its extensive cellular distribution along with its important actions on the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) axis and other neuroendocrine and metabolic systems suggest a pivotal role in governing the mechanisms of aging. A more comprehensive characterization of the receptor, and a more thorough identification of its various agonists and antagonists, will undoubtedly introduce important clinical applications in age-related states like anorexia, cardiovascular pathology, cancer, impaired energy balance, and immune dysfunction. Although present knowledge points to a single functional receptor and a single endogenous ligand, recent investigations suggest the existence of additional GHSR subtypes, as well as other endogenous agonists. It has been more than a decade since the landmark cloning of this ubiquitous, highly conserved receptor, and the considerable extent of its effects on normal physiology and disease states have filled the literature with incredible insights on how organisms regulate various functions through subtle signaling processes. But science has barely scratched the surface, and we can be assured that the mysteries surrounding the precise nature of ghrelin and its receptor(s) are only beginning to unravel. PMID:17983853

  7. Evolution of vertebrate opioid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Dreborg, Susanne; Sundström, Görel; Larsson, Tomas A.; Larhammar, Dan

    2008-01-01

    The opioid peptides and receptors have prominent roles in pain transmission and reward mechanisms in mammals. The evolution of the opioid receptors has so far been little studied, with only a few reports on species other than tetrapods. We have investigated species representing a broader range of vertebrates and found that the four opioid receptor types (delta, kappa, mu, and NOP) are present in most of the species. The gene relationships were deduced by using both phylogenetic analyses and chromosomal location relative to 20 neighboring gene families in databases of assembled genomes. The combined results show that the vertebrate opioid receptor gene family arose by quadruplication of a large chromosomal block containing at least 14 other gene families. The quadruplication seems to coincide with, and, therefore, probably resulted from, the two proposed genome duplications in early vertebrate evolution. We conclude that the quartet of opioid receptors was already present at the origin of jawed vertebrates ≈450 million years ago. A few additional opioid receptor gene duplications have occurred in bony fishes. Interestingly, the ancestral receptor gene duplications coincide with the origin of the four opioid peptide precursor genes. Thus, the complete vertebrate opioid system was already established in the first jawed vertebrates. PMID:18832151

  8. Lysophospholipid receptors in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Kihara, Yasuyuki; Mizuno, Hirotaka; Chun, Jerold

    2015-05-01

    Lysophospholipids (LPs), including lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), sphingosine 1-phospate (S1P), lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), and lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS), are bioactive lipids that transduce signals through their specific cell-surface G protein-coupled receptors, LPA1-6, S1P1-5, LPI1, and LysoPS1-3, respectively. These LPs and their receptors have been implicated in both physiological and pathophysiological processes such as autoimmune diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, fibrosis, pain, cancer, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, bone formation, fertility, organismal development, and other effects on most organ systems. Advances in the LP receptor field have enabled the development of novel small molecules targeting LP receptors for several diseases. Most notably, fingolimod (FTY720, Gilenya, Novartis), an S1P receptor modulator, became the first FDA-approved medicine as an orally bioavailable drug for treating relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. This success is currently being followed by multiple, mechanistically related compounds targeting S1P receptor subtypes, which are in various stages of clinical development. In addition, an LPA1 antagonist, BMS-986020 (Bristol-Myers Squibb), is in Phase 2 clinical development for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, as a distinct compound, SAR100842 (Sanofi) for the treatment of systemic sclerosis and related fibrotic diseases. This review summarizes the current state of drug discovery in the LP receptor field. PMID:25499971

  9. Sigma receptors and cocaine abuse.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Sanju; Mesangeau, Christophe; Poupaert, Jacques H; McCurdy, Christopher R

    2011-01-01

    Sigma receptors have been well documented as a protein target for cocaine and have been shown to be involved in the toxic and stimulant actions of cocaine. Strategies to reduce the access of cocaine to sigma receptors have included antisense oligonucleotides to the sigma-1 receptor protein as well as small molecule ligand with affinity for sigma receptor sites. These results have been encouraging as novel protein targets that can attenuate the actions of cocaine are desperately needed as there are currently no medications approved for treatment of cocaine toxicity or addiction. Many years of research in this area have yet to produce an effective treatment and much focus was on dopamine systems. A flurry of research has been carried out to elucidate the role of sigma receptors in the blockade of cocaine effects but this research has yet to yield a clinical agent. This review summarizes the work to date on the linkage of sigma receptors and the actions of cocaine and the progress that has been made with regard to small molecules. Although there is still a lack of an agent in clinical trials with a sigma receptor mechanism of action, work is progressing and the ligands are becoming more selective for sigma systems and the potential remains high. PMID:21050176

  10. Nuclear hormone receptors in podocytes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear receptors are a family of ligand-activated, DNA sequence-specific transcription factors that regulate various aspects of animal development, cell proliferation, differentiation, and homeostasis. The physiological roles of nuclear receptors and their ligands have been intensively studied in cancer and metabolic syndrome. However, their role in kidney diseases is still evolving, despite their ligands being used clinically to treat renal diseases for decades. This review will discuss the progress of our understanding of the role of nuclear receptors and their ligands in kidney physiology with emphasis on their roles in treating glomerular disorders and podocyte injury repair responses. PMID:22995171

  11. Mechanisms mediating regional sympathoactivatory responses to stimulation of NTS A(1) adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Scislo, Tadeusz J; O'Leary, Donal S

    2002-10-01

    Selective activation of adenosine A(1) and A(2a) receptors in the subpostremal nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) increases and decreases mean arterial pressure (MAP), respectively, and decreases heart rate (HR). We have previously shown that the decreases in MAP evoked by NTS A(2a) receptor stimulation were accompanied with differential sympathetic responses in renal (RSNA), lumbar (LSNA), and preganglionic adrenal sympathetic nerve activity (pre-ASNA). Therefore, now we investigated whether stimulation of NTS A(1) receptors via unilateral microinjection of N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) elicits differential activation of the same sympathetic outputs in alpha-chloralose-urethane-anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats. CPA (0.33-330.0 pmol in 50 nl) evoked dose-dependent increases in MAP, variable decreases in HR, and differential increases in all recorded sympathetic outputs: upward arrow pre-ASNA > upward arrow RSNA > or = upward arrow LSNA. Sinoaortic denervation + vagotomy abolished the MAP and LSNA responses, reversed the normal increases in RSNA into decreases, and significantly attenuated increases in pre-ASNA. NTS ionotropic glutamatergic receptor blockade with kynurenate sodium (4.4 nmol/100 nl) reversed the responses in MAP, LSNA, and RSNA and attenuated the responses in pre-ASNA. We conclude that afferent inputs and intact glutamatergic transmission in the NTS are necessary to mediate the pressor and differential sympathoactivatory responses to stimulation of NTS A(1) receptors.

  12. A 2A2<--X 2B1 absorption and Raman spectra of the OClO molecule: A three-dimensional time-dependent wave packet study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhigang; Lou, Nanquan; Nyman, Gunnar

    2005-02-01

    Time-dependent wave packet calculations of the (A 2A2←X 2B1) absorption and Raman spectra of the OClO molecule are reported. The Fourier grid Hamiltonian method in three dimensions is employed. The X 2B1 ground state ab initio potential energy surface reported by Peterson [J. Chem. Phys. 109, 8864 (1998)] is used together with his corresponding A 2A2 state surface or the revised surface of the A 2A2 state by Xie and Guo [Chem. Phys. Lett. 307, 109 (1999)]. Radau coordinates are used to describe the vibrations of a nonrotating OClO molecule. The split-operator method combined with fast Fourier transform is applied to propagate the wave function. We find that the ab initio A 2A2 potential energy surface better reproduces the detailed structures of the absorption spectrum at long wavelength, while the revised surface of the A 2A2 state, consistent with the work of Xie and Guo, better reproduces the overall shape and the energies of the vibrational levels. Both surfaces of the A 2A2 state can reasonably reproduce the experimental Raman spectra but neither does so in detail for the numerical model employed in the present work.

  13. Quantitative receptor radioautography in the study of receptor-receptor interactions in the nucleus tractus solitarii.

    PubMed

    Fior-Chadi, D R; Fuxe, K

    1998-02-01

    The nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) in the dorsomedial medulla comprises a wide range of neuropeptides and biogenic amines. Several of them are related to mechanisms of central blood pressure control. Angiotensin II (Ang II), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and noradrenaline (NA) are found in the NTS cells, as well as their receptors. Based on this observation we have evaluated the modulatory effect of these peptide receptors on alpha 2-adrenoceptors in the NTS. Using quantitative receptor radioautography, we observed that NPY and Ang II receptors decreased the affinity of alpha 2-adrenoceptors for their agonists in the NTS of the rat. Cardiovascular experiments agreed with the in vitro data. Coinjection of a threshold dose of Ang II or of the NPY agonists together with an ED50 dose of adrenergic agonists such as NA, adrenaline and clonidine counteracted the depressor effect produced by the alpha 2-agonist in the NTS. The results provide evidence for the existence of an antagonistic interaction between Ang II AT1 receptors and NPY receptor subtypes with the alpha 2-adrenoceptors in the NTS. This receptor interaction may reduce the transduction over the alpha 2-adrenoceptors which can be important in central cardiovascular regulation and in the development of hypertension.

  14. Recombinant soluble adenovirus receptor

    DOEpatents

    Freimuth, Paul I.

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed are isolated polypeptides from human CAR (coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor) protein which bind adenovirus. Specifically disclosed are amino acid sequences which corresponds to adenovirus binding domain D1 and the entire extracellular domain of human CAR protein comprising D1 and D2. In other aspects, the disclosure relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding these domains as well as expression vectors which encode the domains and bacterial cells containing such vectors. Also disclosed is an isolated fusion protein comprised of the D1 polypeptide sequence fused to a polypeptide sequence which facilitates folding of D1 into a functional, soluble domain when expressed in bacteria. The functional D1 domain finds application for example in a therapeutic method for treating a patient infected with a virus which binds to D1, and also in a method for identifying an antiviral compound which interferes with viral attachment. Also included is a method for specifically targeting a cell for infection by a virus which binds to D1.

  15. Receptor-mediated mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Osamu; Murakawa, Tomokazu; Nishida, Kazuhiko; Otsu, Kinya

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria are essential organelles that supply ATP through oxidative phosphorylation to maintain cellular homeostasis. Extrinsic or intrinsic agents can impair mitochondria, and these impaired mitochondria can generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) as byproducts, inducing cellular damage and cell death. The quality control of mitochondria is essential for the maintenance of normal cellular functions, particularly in cardiomyocytes, because they are terminally differentiated. Accumulation of damaged mitochondria is characteristic of various diseases, including heart failure, neurodegenerative disease, and aging-related diseases. Mitochondria are generally degraded through autophagy, an intracellular degradation system that is conserved from yeast to mammals. Autophagy is thought to be a nonselective degradation process in which cytoplasmic proteins and organelles are engulfed by isolation membrane to form autophagosomes in eukaryotic cells. However, recent studies have described the process of selective autophagy, which targets specific proteins or organelles such as mitochondria. Mitochondria-specific autophagy is called mitophagy. Dysregulation of mitophagy is implicated in the development of chronic diseases including neurodegenerative diseases, metabolic diseases, and heart failure. In this review, we discuss recent progress in research on mitophagy receptors. PMID:27021519

  16. Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators.

    PubMed

    An, Ki-Chan

    2016-08-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are now being used as a treatment for breast cancer, osteoporosis and postmenopausal symptoms, as these drugs have features that can act as an estrogen agonist and an antagonist, depending on the target tissue. After tamoxifen, raloxifene, lasofoxifene and bazedoxifene SERMs have been developed and used for treatment. The clinically decisive difference among these drugs (i.e., the key difference) is their endometrial safety. Compared to bisphosphonate drug formulations for osteoporosis, SERMs are to be used primarily in postmenopausal women of younger age and are particularly recommended if there is a family history of invasive breast cancer, as their use greatly reduces the incidence of this type of cancer in women. Among the above mentioned SERMs, raloxifene has been widely used in prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis and vertebral compression fractures, and clinical studies are now underway to test the comparative advantages of raloxifene with those of bazedoxifene, a more recently developed SERM. Research on a number of adverse side effects of SERM agents is being performed to determine the long-term safety of this class of compouds for treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:27559463

  17. Purinergic nerves and receptors.

    PubMed

    Burnstock, G

    1980-01-01

    The presence of a non-cholinergic, non-adrenergic component in the vertebrate autonomic nervous system is now well established. Evidence that ATP is the transmitter released from some of these nerves (called "purinergic') includes: (a) synthesis and storage of ATP in nerves: (b) release of ATP from the nerves when they are stimulated; (c) exogenously applied ATP mimicking the action of nerve-released transmitter; (d) the presence of ectoenzymes which inactivate ATP; (e) drugs which produce similar blocking or potentiating effects on the response to exogenously applied ATP and nerve stimulation. A basis for distinguishing two types of purinergic receptors has been proposed according to four criteria: relative potencies of agonists, competitive antagonists, changes in levels of cAMP and induction of prostaglandin synthesis. Thus P1 purinoceptors are most sensitive to adenosine, are competitively blocked by methylxanthines and their occupation leads to changes in cAMP accumulation; while P2 purinoceptors are most sensitive to ATP, are blocked (although not competitively) by quinidine, 2-substituted imidazolines, 2,2'-pyridylisatogen and apamin, and their occupation leads to production of prostaglandin. P2 purinoceptors mediate responses of smooth muscle to ATP released from purinergic nerves, while P1 purinoceptors mediate the presynaptic actions of adenosine on adrenergic, cholinergic and purinergic nerve terminals. PMID:6108568

  18. NMDA receptor antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ramberger, Melanie; Bsteh, Gabriel; Schanda, Kathrin; Höftberger, Romana; Rostásy, Kevin; Baumann, Matthias; Aboulenein-Djamshidian, Fahmy; Lutterotti, Andreas; Deisenhammer, Florian; Berger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the frequency of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies in patients with various inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the CNS and to determine their clinical correlates. Methods: Retrospective case-control study from 2005 to 2014 with the detection of serum IgG antibodies to NMDAR, aquaporin-4, and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein by recombinant live cell-based immunofluorescence assays. Fifty-one patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, 41 with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders, 34 with clinically isolated syndrome, and 89 with multiple sclerosis (MS) were included. Due to a known association of NMDAR antibodies with seizures and behavioral symptoms, patients with those clinical manifestations were preferentially included and are therefore overrepresented in our cohort. Nine patients with NMDAR encephalitis, 94 patients with other neurologic diseases, and 48 healthy individuals were used as controls. Results: NMDAR antibodies were found in all 9 patients with NMDAR encephalitis but in only 1 of 215 (0.5%) patients with inflammatory demyelination and in none of the controls. This patient had relapsing-remitting MS with NMDAR antibodies present at disease onset, with an increase in NMDAR antibody titer with the onset of psychiatric symptoms and cognitive deficits. Conclusion: In demyelinating disorders, NMDAR antibodies are uncommon, even in those with symptoms seen in NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:26309901

  19. Estrogen receptors and endothelium.

    PubMed

    Arnal, Jean-François; Fontaine, Coralie; Billon-Galés, Audrey; Favre, Julie; Laurell, Henrik; Lenfant, Françoise; Gourdy, Pierre

    2010-08-01

    Estrogens, and in particular 17beta-estradiol (E2), play a pivotal role in sexual development and reproduction and are also implicated in a large number of physiological processes, including the cardiovascular system. Both acetylcholine-induced and flow-dependent vasodilation are preserved or potentiated by estrogen treatment in both animal models and humans. Indeed, E2 increases the endothelial production of nitric oxide and prostacyclin and prevents early atheroma through endothelial-mediated mechanisms. Furthermore, whereas it prevents endothelial activation, E2 potentiates the ability of several subpopulations of the circulating or resident immune cells to produce proinflammatory cytokines. The balance between these 2 actions could determine the final effect in a given pathophysiological process. E2 also promotes endothelial healing, as well as angiogenesis. Estrogen actions are essentially mediated by 2 molecular targets: estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha) and ERbeta. The analysis of mouse models targeted for ERalpha or ERbeta demonstrated a prominent role of ERalpha in vascular biology. ERalpha directly modulates transcription of target genes through 2 activation functions (AFs), AF-1 and AF-2. Interestingly, an AF-1-deficient ERalpha isoform can be physiologically expressed in the endothelium and appears sufficient to mediate most of the vasculoprotective actions of E2. In contrast, AF-1 is necessary for the E2 actions in reproductive targets. Thus, it appears conceivable to uncouple the vasculoprotective and sexual actions with appropriate selective ER modulators. PMID:20631350

  20. Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are now being used as a treatment for breast cancer, osteoporosis and postmenopausal symptoms, as these drugs have features that can act as an estrogen agonist and an antagonist, depending on the target tissue. After tamoxifen, raloxifene, lasofoxifene and bazedoxifene SERMs have been developed and used for treatment. The clinically decisive difference among these drugs (i.e., the key difference) is their endometrial safety. Compared to bisphosphonate drug formulations for osteoporosis, SERMs are to be used primarily in postmenopausal women of younger age and are particularly recommended if there is a family history of invasive breast cancer, as their use greatly reduces the incidence of this type of cancer in women. Among the above mentioned SERMs, raloxifene has been widely used in prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis and vertebral compression fractures, and clinical studies are now underway to test the comparative advantages of raloxifene with those of bazedoxifene, a more recently developed SERM. Research on a number of adverse side effects of SERM agents is being performed to determine the long-term safety of this class of compouds for treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:27559463

  1. Nicotinic receptors and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Bourin, Michel; Ripoll, Nadège; Dailly, Eric

    2003-01-01

    Nicotinic receptors (NRs) belong to the group of polymeric receptors of the cell membrane and are key elements of cholinergic transmission. Numerous subtypes of NRs exist with the alpha 4 beta 2 and alpha 7 types being encountered most frequently. Deficiencies in NRs seem to play a role in Alzheimer's disease, which is characterised by accumulation of senile plaques, mainly composed of beta-amyloid peptide (beta A). Although the aetiology of this disease is unknown, different pathogenesis hypotheses implicating alpha 7 NRs have been proposed, with the receptors exerting a direct or indirect action on the mechanism of beta A toxicity. Allosteric modulators of NRs, such as the cholinesterase inhibitor galantamine, that facilitate the action of acetylcholine on these receptors may provide therapeutic benefits in the areas of cognition, attention and antineurodegenerative activity.

  2. Receptor-targeted metalloradiopharmaceuticals. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Mark A.

    2000-03-22

    Copper (II) and platinum (II) coordination complexes were prepared and characterized. These complexes were designed to afford structural homology with steroidal and non-steroidal estrogens for possible use as receptor-targeted radiopharmaceuticals. While weak affinity for the estrogen receptor was detectable, none would appear to have sufficient receptor-affinity for estrogen-receptor-targeted imaging or therapy.

  3. L-glutamate Receptor In Paramecium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal-Martínez, Juan; Ortega-Soto, Arturo

    2004-09-01

    Behavioral, electrophysiological and biochemical experiments were performed in order to establish the presence of a glutamate receptor in the ciliate Paramecium. It was found that an AMPA/KA receptor is functionally expressed in Paramecium and that this receptor is immunologically and fillogenetically related to the AMPA/KA receptor present in vertebrates.

  4. Cellular receptors and HCV entry.

    PubMed

    Flint, Mike; Tscherne, Donna M

    2009-01-01

    After attachment to specific receptors on the surfaces of target cells, hepatitis C virus (HCV) particles are thought to be internalized to endosomes, where low pH induces fusion between the viral and cellular membranes, delivering the HCV genome into the cytoplasm. Here, we describe methods to study the early events in HCV infection; the interactions with cellular receptors and the mechanism of entry.

  5. [Pathologic manifestations of hormonal receptor mutations].

    PubMed

    Milgrom, E

    2000-01-01

    Mutations of receptor genes are involved in various aspects of thyroid and gonadal pathology. Activating mutations of TSH and LH receptors are associated with hyperthyroidism and premature puberty. These mutations are dominant and lead to the synthesis of a constitutive receptor, i.e. a receptor active even in the absence of hormone. Inactivating mutations of TSH, gonadotropin and GnRH receptors are recessive. They determine either a hypothyroidism or a hypogonadism. In the case of alterations of gonadotropin receptors the hypogonadism is hypergonadotrophic. It is hypogonadotrophic in the case of mutations of the GnRH receptor. PMID:10989556

  6. Nuclear Receptors, RXR, and the Big Bang.

    PubMed

    Evans, Ronald M; Mangelsdorf, David J

    2014-03-27

    Isolation of genes encoding the receptors for steroids, retinoids, vitamin D, and thyroid hormone and their structural and functional analysis revealed an evolutionarily conserved template for nuclear hormone receptors. This discovery sparked identification of numerous genes encoding related proteins, termed orphan receptors. Characterization of these orphan receptors and, in particular, of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) positioned nuclear receptors at the epicenter of the "Big Bang" of molecular endocrinology. This Review provides a personal perspective on nuclear receptors and explores their integrated and coordinated signaling networks that are essential for multicellular life, highlighting the RXR heterodimer and its associated ligands and transcriptional mechanism.

  7. Nuclear Receptors, RXR & the Big Bang

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Ronald M.; Mangelsdorf, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Isolation of genes encoding the receptors for steroids, retinoids, vitamin D and thyroid hormone, and their structural and functional analysis revealed an evolutionarily conserved template for nuclear hormone receptors. This discovery sparked identification of numerous genes encoding related proteins, termed orphan receptors. Characterization of these orphan receptors, and in particular of the retinoid X receptor (RXR), positioned nuclear receptors at the epicenter of the “Big Bang” of molecular endocrinology. This review provides a personal perspective on nuclear receptors and explores their integrated and coordinated signaling networks that are essential for multi-cellular life, highlighting the RXR heterodimer and its associated ligands and transcriptional mechanism. PMID:24679540

  8. Nuclear Receptors, RXR, and the Big Bang.

    PubMed

    Evans, Ronald M; Mangelsdorf, David J

    2014-03-27

    Isolation of genes encoding the receptors for steroids, retinoids, vitamin D, and thyroid hormone and their structural and functional analysis revealed an evolutionarily conserved template for nuclear hormone receptors. This discovery sparked identification of numerous genes encoding related proteins, termed orphan receptors. Characterization of these orphan receptors and, in particular, of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) positioned nuclear receptors at the epicenter of the "Big Bang" of molecular endocrinology. This Review provides a personal perspective on nuclear receptors and explores their integrated and coordinated signaling networks that are essential for multicellular life, highlighting the RXR heterodimer and its associated ligands and transcriptional mechanism. PMID:24679540

  9. The adenosine receptor affinities and monoamine oxidase B inhibitory properties of sulfanylphthalimide analogues.

    PubMed

    Van der Walt, Mietha M; Terre'Blanche, Gisella; Petzer, Anél; Petzer, Jacobus P

    2015-04-01

    Based on a report that sulfanylphthalimides are highly potent monoamine oxidase (MAO) B selective inhibitors, the present study examines the adenosine receptor affinities and MAO-B inhibitory properties of a series of 4- and 5-sulfanylphthalimide analogues. Since adenosine antagonists (A1 and A2A subtypes) and MAO-B inhibitors are considered agents for the therapy of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, dual-target-directed drugs that antagonize adenosine receptors and inhibit MAO-B may have enhanced therapeutic value. The results document that the sulfanylphthalimide analogues are selective for the adenosine A1 receptor over the A2A receptor subtype, with a number of compounds also possessing MAO-B inhibitory properties. Among the compounds evaluated, 5-[(4-methoxybenzyl)sulfanyl]phthalimide was found to possess the highest binding affinity to adenosine A1 receptors with a Ki value of 0.369 μM. This compound is reported to also inhibit MAO-B with an IC50 value of 0.020 μM. Such dual-target-directed compounds may act synergistic in the treatment of Parkinson's disease: antagonism of the A1 receptor may facilitate dopamine release, while MAO-B inhibition may reduce dopamine metabolism. Additionally, dual-target-directed compounds may find therapeutic value in Alzheimer's disease: antagonism of the A1 receptor may be beneficial in the treatment of cognitive dysfunction, while MAO-B inhibition may exhibit neuroprotective properties. In neurological diseases, such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, dual-target-directed drugs are expected to be advantageous over single-target treatments.

  10. Nicotinic receptors and attention.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Facilitation of different attentional functions by nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists may be of therapeutic potential in disease conditions such as Alzheimer's disease or schizophrenia. For this reason, the neuronal mechanisms underlying these effects have been the focus of research in humans and in preclinical models. Attention-enhancing effects of the nonselective nAChR agonist nicotine can be observed in human nonsmokers and in laboratory animals, suggesting that benefits go beyond a reversal of withdrawal deficits in smokers. The ultimate aim is to develop compounds acting with greater selectivity than nicotine at a subset of nAChRs, with an effects profile narrowly matching the targeted cognitive deficits and minimizing unwanted effects. To date, compounds tested clinically target the nAChR subtypes most abundant in the brain. To help pinpoint more selectively expressed subtypes critical for attention, studies have aimed at identifying the secondary neurotransmitter systems whose stimulation mediates the attention-enhancing properties of nicotine. Evidence indicates that noradrenaline and glutamate, but not dopamine release, are critical mediators. Thus, attention-enhancing nAChR agents could spare the system central to nicotine dependence. Neuroimaging studies suggest that nAChR agonists act on a variety of brain systems by enhancing activation, reducing activation, and enhancing deactivation by attention tasks. This supports the notion that effects on different attentional functions may be mediated by distinct central mechanisms, consistent with the fact that nAChRs interact with a multitude of brain sites and neurotransmitter systems. The challenge will be to achieve the optimal tone at the right subset of nAChR subtypes to modulate specific attentional functions, employing not just direct agonist properties, but also positive allosteric modulation and low-dose antagonism.

  11. Gravity receptors and responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Allan H.

    1989-01-01

    The overall process of gravity sensing and response processes in plants may be divided conveniently into at least four components or stages: Stimulus susception (a physical event, characteristically the input to the G receptor system of environmental information about the G force magnitude, its vector direction, or both); information perception (an influence of susception on some biological structure or process that can be described as the transformation of environmental information into a biologicallly meaningful change); information transport (the export, if required, of an influence (often chemical) to cells and organs other than those at the sensor location); and biological response (almost always (in plants) a growth change of some kind). Some analysts of the process identify, between information perception and information transport, an additional stage, transduction, which would emphasize the importance of a transformation from one form of information to another, for example from mechanical statolith displacement to an electric, chemical, or other alteration that was its indirect result. These four (or five) stages are temporally sequential. Even if all that occurs at each stage can not be confidently identified, it seems evident that during transduction and transport, matters dealt with are found relatively late in the information flow rather than at the perception stage. As more and more is learned about the roles played by plant hormones which condition the G responses, the mechanism(s) of perception which should be are not necessarily better understood. However, if by asking the right questions and being lucky with experiments perhaps the discovery of how some process (such as sedimentation of protoplasmic organelles) dictates what happens down stream in the information flow sequence may be made.

  12. Selective ligands for rat A3 adenosine receptors: structure-activity relationships of 1,3-dialkylxanthine 7-riboside derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kim, H O; Ji, X D; Melman, N; Olah, M E; Stiles, G L; Jacobson, K A

    1994-11-11

    1,3-Dibutylxanthine 7-riboside has been found to be a partial agonist at A3 adenosine receptors (van Galen et al. Mol. Pharmacol. 1994, 45, 1101-1111). 1,3-Dialkylxanthine 7-riboside analogues modified at the 1-, 3-, and 8-purine positions and at the ribose 5'-position were synthesized. The nucleoside analogues were examined for affinity in radioligand binding assays at rat brain A3 adenosine receptors stably expressed in CHO cells, using the radioligand [[125I]-4-amino-3-iodobenzyl]adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (AB-MECA). Affinity was assayed at rat brain A1 and A2a receptors using [3H]PIA and [3H]CGS 21680, respectively. The affinity of xanthine 7-ribosides at A3 receptors depended on the 1,3-dialkyl substituents in the order: Pent > or = Bu > Hx > Pr approximately Me. 1,3-Dipentylxanthine 7-riboside was slightly selective for A3 receptors (2-fold vs A1 and 10-fold vs A2a). 8-Methoxy substitution was tolerated at A3 receptors. 2-Thio vs 2-oxo substitution increased potency at all three subtypes and slightly increased A3 vs A1 selectivity. The 5'-uronamide modification, which was previously found to enhance A3 selectivity in N6-benzyladenosine derivatives, was also incorporated into the xanthine 7-ribosides, with similar results. The affinity of 1,3-dialkylxanthine 7-riboside 5'-uronamides at A3 receptors depended on the N-alkyluronamide substituent in the order: MeNH > EtNH > NH2 > Me2N. Affinity of the 5'-uronamides at A3 receptors was dependent on the 1,3-dialkyl substitution in the order: Bu > Pent > Hex. 1,3-Dibutylxanthine 7-riboside 5'-N-methylcarboxamide, with a Ki value of 229 nM at A3 receptors, was 160-fold selective for rat A3 vs A1 receptors and > 400-fold selective vs A2a receptors. This derivative acted as a full agonist in the A3 receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase.

  13. Phenobarbital and Insulin Reciprocate Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor through the Insulin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yasujima, Tomoya; Saito, Kosuke; Moore, Rick

    2016-01-01

    Phenobarbital (PB) antagonized insulin to inactivate the insulin receptor and attenuated the insulin receptor downstream protein kinase B (AKT)–forkhead box protein O1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signals in mouse primary hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. Hepatic AKT began dephosphorylation in an early stage of PB treatment, and blood glucose levels transiently increased in both wild-type and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) knockout (KO) mice. On the other hand, blood glucose levels increased in wild-type mice, but not KO mice, in later stages of PB treatment. As a result, PB, acting as an insulin receptor antagonist, elicited CAR-independent increases and CAR-dependent decreases of blood glucose levels at these different stages of treatment, respectively. Reciprocally, insulin activation of the insulin receptor repressed CAR activation and induction of its target CYP2B6 gene in HepG2 cells. Thus, PB and insulin cross-talk through the insulin receptor to regulate glucose and drug metabolism reciprocally. PMID:26994072

  14. Phenobarbital and Insulin Reciprocate Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor through the Insulin Receptor.

    PubMed

    Yasujima, Tomoya; Saito, Kosuke; Moore, Rick; Negishi, Masahiko

    2016-05-01

    Phenobarbital (PB) antagonized insulin to inactivate the insulin receptor and attenuated the insulin receptor downstream protein kinase B (AKT)-forkhead box protein O1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signals in mouse primary hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. Hepatic AKT began dephosphorylation in an early stage of PB treatment, and blood glucose levels transiently increased in both wild-type and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) knockout (KO) mice. On the other hand, blood glucose levels increased in wild-type mice, but not KO mice, in later stages of PB treatment. As a result, PB, acting as an insulin receptor antagonist, elicited CAR-independent increases and CAR-dependent decreases of blood glucose levels at these different stages of treatment, respectively. Reciprocally, insulin activation of the insulin receptor repressed CAR activation and induction of its target CYP2B6 gene in HepG2 cells. Thus, PB and insulin cross-talk through the insulin receptor to regulate glucose and drug metabolism reciprocally.

  15. Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) – focus on receptor-receptor-interactions and their physiological and pathophysiological impact

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) are a subfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with four members, PAR1, PAR2, PAR3 and PAR4, playing critical functions in hemostasis, thrombosis, embryonic development, wound healing, inflammation and cancer progression. PARs are characterized by a unique activation mechanism involving receptor cleavage by different proteinases at specific sites within the extracellular amino-terminus and the exposure of amino-terminal “tethered ligand“ domains that bind to and activate the cleaved receptors. After activation, the PAR family members are able to stimulate complex intracellular signalling networks via classical G protein-mediated pathways and beta-arrestin signalling. In addition, different receptor crosstalk mechanisms critically contribute to a high diversity of PAR signal transduction and receptor-trafficking processes that result in multiple physiological effects. In this review, we summarize current information about PAR-initiated physical and functional receptor interactions and their physiological and pathological roles. We focus especially on PAR homo- and heterodimerization, transactivation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and receptor serine/threonine kinases (RSTKs), communication with other GPCRs, toll-like receptors and NOD-like receptors, ion channel receptors, and on PAR association with cargo receptors. In addition, we discuss the suitability of these receptor interaction mechanisms as targets for modulating PAR signalling in disease. PMID:24215724

  16. Radiopharmaceuticals for somatostatin receptor imaging.

    PubMed

    Mikołajczak, Renata; Maecke, Helmut R

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the developments and briefly characterize the somatostatin analogs which are currently used for somatostatin receptor imaging in clinical routine or in early phase clinical trials. Somatostatin (sst) receptor targeting with radiolabeled peptides has become an integral part in nuclear oncology during the last 20 years. This integration process has been initiated in Europe with the introduction to the market of 111In-DTPA-DPhe1-octreotide [111In-pentetreotide]. Introducing 99mTc in somatostatin receptor targeting radiopeptides resulted in much better image quality, higher sensitivity of tumor detection and lower mean effective dose for the examined patient. The next generation are 68Ga labeled somatostatin analogs. Due to the spatial resolution of PET technique and increasing number of PET scanners, the PET or PET/CT technique became very important in somatostatin receptor imaging. Until up to a couple of years ago the analogs of somatostatin were constructed aiming at their agonistic behavior, expecting that their internalization with the receptor acti-vated by the radiolabeled ligand and its retention within the tumor cell are crucial for efficient imaging and therapy. Recently it has been shown that the antagonists recognize more binding sites at the tumor cell membrane and hence offer an improved diagnostic efficacy, especially when the density of sst receptors is low. This approach may in future improve diagnostic value of somatostatin receptor imaging techniques. The developments in tracer design are followed by the improvements in imaging techniques. The new SPECT scanners offer resolution close to that of PET, which might open a new era for 99mTc and other SPECT radiotracers. PMID:27479790

  17. Scavenger receptor class B type I: a multifunctional receptor.

    PubMed

    Valacchi, Giuseppe; Sticozzi, Claudia; Lim, Yunsook; Pecorelli, Alessandra

    2011-07-01

    The scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-B1) plays an important role in meditating the uptake of HDL-derived cholesterol and cholesteryl ester in the liver and steroidogenic tissues. In addition to being ubiquitous, SR-B1 is a high-density lipoprotein (HDL) receptor in many tissues, though the mechanism by which SR-B1 does this is unclear. Other than its role as an HDL receptor, SR-B1 is also involved in pathogen recognition; its expression can be modulated by lipopolysaccharide and oxidative stress; and it plays a significant role in the uptake of lipid soluble vitamins, such as vitamin E and carotenoids. In this short review, we have summarized the biological aspects to which SR-B1 has been thus far associated.

  18. Transferrin Receptor Controls AMPA Receptor Trafficking Efficiency and Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ke; Lei, Run; Li, Qiong; Wang, Xin-Xin; Wu, Qian; An, Peng; Zhang, Jianchao; Zhu, Minyan; Xu, Zhiheng; Hong, Yang; Wang, Fudi; Shen, Ying; Li, Hongchang; Li, Huashun

    2016-01-01

    Transferrin receptor (TFR) is an important iron transporter regulating iron homeostasis and has long been used as a marker for clathrin mediated endocytosis. However, little is known about its additional function other than iron transport in the development of central nervous system (CNS). Here we demonstrate that TFR functions as a regulator to control AMPA receptor trafficking efficiency and synaptic plasticity. The conditional knockout (KO) of TFR in neural progenitor cells causes mice to develop progressive epileptic seizure, and dramatically reduces basal synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation (LTP). We further demonstrate that TFR KO remarkably reduces the binding efficiency of GluR2 to AP2 and subsequently decreases AMPA receptor endocytosis and recycling. Thus, our study reveals that TFR functions as a novel regulator to control AMPA trafficking efficiency and synaptic plasticity. PMID:26880306

  19. Design and evaluation of xanthine based adenosine receptor antagonists: Potential hypoxia targeted immunotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Rhiannon; Lee, Joslynn; Chevalier, Vincent; Sadler, Sara; Selesniemi, Kaisa; Hatfield, Stephen; Sitkovsky, Michail; Ondrechen, Mary Jo; Jones, Graham B.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular modeling techniques were applied to the design, synthesis and optimization of a new series of xanthine based adenosine A2A receptor antagonists. The optimized lead compound was converted to a PEG derivative and a functional in vitro bioassay used to confirm efficacy. Additionally, the PEGylated version showed enhanced aqueous solubility and was inert to photoisomerization, a known limitation of existing antagonists of this class. PMID:24126093

  20. Structure Based Prediction of Subtype-Selectivity for Adenosine Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Katritch, Vsevolod; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben

    2010-01-01

    One of the major hurdles in the development of safe and effective drugs targeting G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) is finding ligands that are highly selective for a specific receptor subtype. Structural understanding of subtype-specific binding pocket variations and ligand-receptor interactions may greatly facilitate design of selective ligands. To gain insights into the structural basis of ligand subtype selectivity within the family of adenosine receptors (AR: A1, A2A, A2B, and A3) we generated 3D models of all four subtypes using the recently determined crystal structure of the AA2AR as a template, and employing the methodology of ligand-guided receptor optimization for refinement. This approach produced 3D conformational models of AR subtypes that effectively explain binding modes and subtype selectivity for a diverse set of known AR antagonists. Analysis of the subtype-specific ligand-receptor interactions allowed identification of the major determinants of ligand selectivity, which may facilitate discovery of more efficient drug candidates. PMID:20637786

  1. Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors & CNS Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, Derek

    2008-01-01

    Disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) are complex disease states that represent a major challenge for modern medicine. Although etiology is often unknown, it is established that multiple factors such as defects in genetics and/or epigenetics, the environment as well as imbalance in neurotransmitter receptor systems are all at play in determining an individual’s susceptibility to disease. Gene therapy is currently not available and therefore, most conditions are treated with pharmacological agents that modify neurotransmitter receptor signaling. Here, I provide a review of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) and the roles they fulfill in numerous CNS disorders. Specifically, I argue that our understanding of iGluRs has reached a critical turning point to permit, for the first time, a comprehensive re-evaluation of their role in the cause of disease. I illustrate this by highlighting how defects in AMPA receptor trafficking are important to Fragile X mental retardation and ectopic expression of kainate (KA) receptor synapses contributes to the pathology of temporal lobe epilepsy. Finally, I discuss how parallel advances in studies of other neurotransmitter systems may allow pharmacologists to work towards a cure for many CNS disorders rather than developing drugs to treat their symptoms. PMID:18537642

  2. Biased signaling at chemokine receptors.

    PubMed

    Corbisier, Jenny; Galès, Céline; Huszagh, Alexandre; Parmentier, Marc; Springael, Jean-Yves

    2015-04-10

    The ability of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to activate selective signaling pathways according to the conformation stabilized by bound ligands (signaling bias) is a challenging concept in the GPCR field. Signaling bias has been documented for several GPCRs, including chemokine receptors. However, most of these studies examined the global signaling bias between G protein- and arrestin-dependent pathways, leaving unaddressed the potential bias between particular G protein subtypes. Here, we investigated the coupling selectivity of chemokine receptors CCR2, CCR5, and CCR7 in response to various ligands with G protein subtypes by using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer biosensors monitoring directly the activation of G proteins. We also compared data obtained with the G protein biosensors with those obtained with other functional readouts, such as β-arrestin-2 recruitment, cAMP accumulation, and calcium mobilization assays. We showed that the binding of chemokines to CCR2, CCR5, and CCR7 activated the three Gαi subtypes (Gαi1, Gαi2, and Gαi3) and the two Gαo isoforms (Gαoa and Gαob) with potencies that generally correlate to their binding affinities. In addition, we showed that the binding of chemokines to CCR5 and CCR2 also activated Gα12, but not Gα13. For each receptor, we showed that the relative potency of various agonist chemokines was not identical in all assays, supporting the notion that signaling bias exists at chemokine receptors.

  3. Identification and mechanism of ABA receptor antagonism

    SciTech Connect

    Melcher, Karsten; Xu, Yong; Ng, Ley-Moy; Zhou, X. Edward; Soon, Fen-Fen; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Suino-Powell, Kelly M; Kovach, Amanda; Tham, Fook S.; Cutler, Sean R.; Li, Jun; Yong, Eu-Leong; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Xu, H. Eric

    2010-11-11

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) functions through a family of fourteen PYR/PYL receptors, which were identified by resistance to pyrabactin, a synthetic inhibitor of seed germination. ABA activates these receptors to inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases, such as ABI1, yet it remains unclear whether these receptors can be antagonized. Here we demonstrate that pyrabactin is an agonist of PYR1 and PYL1 but is unexpectedly an antagonist of PYL2. Crystal structures of the PYL2-pyrabactin and PYL1-pyrabactin-ABI1 complexes reveal the mechanism responsible for receptor-selective activation and inhibition, which enables us to design mutations that convert PYL1 to a pyrabactin-inhibited receptor and PYL2 to a pyrabactin-activated receptor and to identify new pyrabactin-based ABA receptor agonists. Together, our results establish a new concept of ABA receptor antagonism, illustrate its underlying mechanisms and provide a rational framework for discovering novel ABA receptor ligands.

  4. Chimeric, mutant orexin receptors show key interactions between orexin receptors, peptides and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Tran, Da-Thao; Bonaventure, Pascal; Hack, Michael; Mirzadegan, Taraneh; Dvorak, Curt; Letavic, Michael; Carruthers, Nicholas; Lovenberg, Timothy; Sutton, Steven W

    2011-09-30

    Orexin receptor antagonists are being investigated as therapeutic agents for insomnia and addictive disorders. In this study the interactions between the orexin receptors (orexin 1 receptor and orexin 2 receptor), orexin peptides, and small molecule orexin antagonists were explored. To study these phenomena, a variety of mutant orexin receptors was made and tested using receptor binding and functional assays. Domains of the two orexin receptors were exchanged to show the critical ligand binding domains for orexin peptides and representative selective orexin receptor antagonists. Results from domain exchanges between the orexin receptors suggest that transmembrane domain 3 is crucially important for receptor interactions with small molecule antagonists. These data also suggest that the orexin peptides occupy a larger footprint, interacting with transmembrane domain 1, the amino terminus and transmembrane domain 5 as well as transmembrane domain 3. Transmembrane domain 3 has been shown to be an important part of the small molecule binding pocket common to rhodopsin and β2-adrenergic receptors. Additional orexin receptor 2 point mutations were made based on the common arrangement of receptor transmembrane domains shown in the G-protein coupled receptor crystal structure literature and the impact of orexin 2 receptor residue threonine 135 on the ligand selectivity of the 2 orexin receptors. These data support a model of the orexin receptor binding pocket in which transmembrane domains 3 and 5 are prominent contributors to ligand binding and functional activity. The data also illustrate key contact points for ligand interactions in the consensus small molecule pocket of these receptors.

  5. 5-Hydroxytryptamine type 7 receptor neuroprotection against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity is PDGFβ receptor dependent.

    PubMed

    Vasefi, Maryam S; Kruk, Jeff S; Heikkila, John J; Beazely, Michael A

    2013-04-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) type 7 receptor is expressed throughout the CNS including the hippocampus. Long-term (2-24 h) activation of 5-HT7 receptors regulates growth factor receptor expression, including the expression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) β receptors. Direct activation of PDGFβ receptors in primary hippocampal and cortical neurons inhibits NMDA receptor activity and attenuates NMDA receptor-induced neurotoxicity. Our objective was to investigate whether the 5-HT7 receptor-induced increase in PDGFβ receptor expression would be similarly neuroprotective. We demonstrate that 5-HT7 receptor agonist treatment in primary hippocampal neurons also increases the expression of phospholipase C (PLC) γ, a downstream effector of PDGFβ receptors associated with the inhibition of NMDA receptor activity. To determine if the up-regulation of PDGFβ receptors is neuroprotective, primary hippocampal neurons were incubated with the 5-HT7 receptor agonist, LP 12, for 24 h. Indeed, LP 12 treatment prevented NMDA-induced neurotoxicity and this effect was dependent on PDGFβ receptor kinase activity. Treatment of primary neurons with LP 12 also differentially altered NMDA receptor subunit expression, reducing the expression of NR1 and NR2B, but not NR2A. These findings demonstrate the potential for providing growth factor receptor-dependent neuroprotective effects using small-molecule ligands of G protein-coupled receptors.

  6. Large-scale production of membrane proteins in Pichia pastoris: the production of G protein-coupled receptors as a case study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shweta; Gras, Adrien; Fiez-Vandal, Cedric; Martinez, Magdalena; Wagner, Renaud; Byrne, Bernadette

    2012-01-01

    One of the major advantages of using Pichia pastoris is that it is readily adapted to large-scale culture in bioreactors. Bioreactors allow precise regulation of cell growth parameters increasing both yields and reproducibility of the culture. P. pastoris cultures grow to very high cell densities which helps minimise culture volume and facilitates downstream processing of the sample. Here, we provide protocols for the large-scale production of the human adenosine A(2A) receptor (A(2A)R) and provide some details of how bioreactor cultures can be used for optimisation of expression of the human dopamine D2 receptor (D2DR).

  7. Signaling from Axon Guidance Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bashaw, Greg J.; Klein, Rüdiger

    2010-01-01

    Determining how axon guidance receptors transmit signals to allow precise pathfinding decisions is fundamental to our understanding of nervous system development and may suggest new strategies to promote axon regeneration after injury or disease. Signaling mechanisms that act downstream of four prominent families of axon guidance cues—netrins, semaphorins, ephrins, and slits—have been extensively studied in both invertebrate and vertebrate model systems. Although details of these signaling mechanisms are still fragmentary and there appears to be considerable diversity in how different guidance receptors regulate the motility of the axonal growth cone, a number of common themes have emerged. Here, we review recent insights into how specific receptors for each of these guidance cues engage downstream regulators of the growth cone cytoskeleton to control axon guidance. PMID:20452961

  8. Monoallelic Expression of Olfactory Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Monahan, Kevin; Lomvardas, Stavros

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell collects vital information about the environment by detecting a multitude of chemical odorants. Breadth and sensitivity are provided by a huge number of chemosensory receptor proteins, including more than 1,400 olfactory receptors (ORs). Organizing the sensory information generated by these receptors so that it can be processed and evaluated by the central nervous system is a major challenge. This challenge is overcome by monogenic and monoallelic expression of OR genes. The single OR expressed by each olfactory sensory neuron determines the neuron’s odor sensitivity and the axonal connections it will make to downstream neurons in the olfactory bulb. The expression of a single OR per neuron is accomplished by coupling a slow chromatin-mediated activation process to a fast negative-feedback signal that prevents activation of additional ORs. Singular OR activation is likely orchestrated by a network of interchromosomal enhancer interactions and large-scale changes in nuclear architecture. PMID:26359778

  9. Cannabinoids, cannabinoid receptors and tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Smith, Paul F; Zheng, Yiwen

    2016-02-01

    One hypothesis suggests that tinnitus is a form of sensory epilepsy, arising partly from neuronal hyperactivity in auditory regions of the brain such as the cochlear nucleus and inferior colliculus. Although there is currently no effective drug treatment for tinnitus, anti-epileptic drugs are used in some cases as a potential treatment option. There is increasing evidence to suggest that cannabinoid drugs, i.e. cannabinoid receptor agonists, can also have anti-epileptic effects, at least in some cases and in some parts of the brain. It has been reported that cannabinoid CB1 receptors and the endogenous cannabinoid, 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), are expressed in the cochlear nucleus and that they are involved in the regulation of plasticity. This review explores the question of whether cannabinoid receptor agonists are likely to be pro- or anti-epileptic in the cochlear nucleus and therefore whether cannabinoids and Cannabis itself are likely to make tinnitus better or worse.

  10. Plant pattern-recognition receptors.

    PubMed

    Zipfel, Cyril

    2014-07-01

    Plants are constantly exposed to would-be pathogens in their immediate environment. Yet, despite relying on innate immunity only, plants are resistant to most microbes. They employ pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) for sensitive and rapid detection of the potential danger caused by microbes and pests. Plant PRRs are either surface-localized receptor kinases (RKs) or receptor-like proteins (RLPs) containing various ligand-binding ectodomains that perceive pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) or damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). In this review, I summarize our current knowledge of plant PRRs and their ligands, illustrating the multiple molecular strategies employed by plant PRRs to activate innate immune signaling to survive.

  11. Host receptors for bacteriophage adsorption.

    PubMed

    Bertozzi Silva, Juliano; Storms, Zachary; Sauvageau, Dominic

    2016-02-01

    The adsorption of bacteriophages (phages) onto host cells is, in all but a few rare cases, a sine qua non condition for the onset of the infection process. Understanding the mechanisms involved and the factors affecting it is, thus, crucial for the investigation of host-phage interactions. This review provides a survey of the phage host receptors involved in recognition and adsorption and their interactions during attachment. Comprehension of the whole infection process, starting with the adsorption step, can enable and accelerate our understanding of phage ecology and the development of phage-based technologies. To assist in this effort, we have established an open-access resource--the Phage Receptor Database (PhReD)--to serve as a repository for information on known and newly identified phage receptors. PMID:26755501

  12. Signaling from axon guidance receptors.

    PubMed

    Bashaw, Greg J; Klein, Rüdiger

    2010-05-01

    Determining how axon guidance receptors transmit signals to allow precise pathfinding decisions is fundamental to our understanding of nervous system development and may suggest new strategies to promote axon regeneration after injury or disease. Signaling mechanisms that act downstream of four prominent families of axon guidance cues--netrins, semaphorins, ephrins, and slits--have been extensively studied in both invertebrate and vertebrate model systems. Although details of these signaling mechanisms are still fragmentary and there appears to be considerable diversity in how different guidance receptors regulate the motility of the axonal growth cone, a number of common themes have emerged. Here, we review recent insights into how specific receptors for each of these guidance cues engage downstream regulators of the growth cone cytoskeleton to control axon guidance. PMID:20452961

  13. Receptor use by pathogenic arenaviruses.

    PubMed

    Reignier, Therese; Oldenburg, Jill; Noble, Beth; Lamb, Erika; Romanowski, Victor; Buchmeier, Michael J; Cannon, Paula M

    2006-09-15

    The arenavirus family contains several important human pathogens including Lassa fever virus (LASV), lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and the New World clade B viruses Junin (JUNV) and Machupo (MACV). Previously, alpha-dystroglycan (alpha-DG) was identified as a receptor recognized by LASV and certain strains of LCMV. However, other studies have suggested that alpha-DG is probably not used by the clade B viruses, and the receptor(s) for these pathogens is currently unknown. Using pseudotyped retroviral vectors displaying arenavirus glycoproteins (GPs), we are able to explore the role played by the GP in viral entry in the absence of other viral proteins. By examining the ability of the vectors to transduce DG knockout murine embryonic stem (ES) cells, we have confirmed that LASV has an absolute requirement for alpha-DG in these cells. However, the LCMV GP can still direct substantial entry into murine ES cells in the absence of alpha-DG, even when the GP from the clone 13 variant is used that has previously been reported to be highly dependent on alpha-DG for entry. We also found that neither LASV or LCMV pseudotyped vectors were able to transduce human or murine lymphocytes, presumably due to the glycosylation state of alpha-DG in these cells. In contrast, the JUNV and MACV GPs displayed broad tropism on human, murine and avian cell types, including lymphocytes, and showed no requirement for alpha-DG in murine ES cells. These findings highlight the importance of molecules other than alpha-DG for arenavirus entry. An alternate receptor is present on murine ES cells that can be used by LCMV but not by LASV, and which is not available on human or murine lymphocytes, while a distinct and widely expressed receptor(s) is used by the clade B viruses.

  14. Nuclear receptors constitutive androstane receptor and pregnane X receptor ameliorate cholestatic liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Stedman, Catherine A. M.; Liddle, Christopher; Coulter, Sally A.; Sonoda, Junichiro; Alvarez, Jacqueline G. A.; Moore, David D.; Evans, Ronald M.; Downes, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Cholestasis is associated with accumulation of bile acids and lipids, and liver injury. The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are xenobiotic nuclear receptors that coordinate protective hepatic responses to potentially toxic stimuli, including bile acids. We investigated the role of these receptors in the regulation of bile acid and lipid metabolism in a bile duct ligation (BDL) model of cholestasis applied to receptor knockout mice. Hepatic damage from bile acid accumulation was increased in both CAR knockout (CARKO) and PXR knockout mice, but bile acid concentrations were lower in CARKO mice. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol was elevated in CARKO mice, and serum total cholesterol increased less in CARKO or PXR knockout mice than WT mice after BDL. Gene expression analysis of the BDL knockout animals demonstrated that, in response to cholestasis, PXR and CAR both repressed and induced the specific hepatic membrane transporters Oatp-c (organic anion transporting polypeptide C) and Oatp2 (Na+-dependent organic anion transporter 2), respectively. Induction of the xenobiotic transporter multidrug resistance protein 1 in cholestasis was independent of either PXR or CAR, in contrast to the known pattern of induction of multidrug resistance protein 1 by xenobiotics. These results demonstrate that CAR and PXR influence cholesterol metabolism and bile acid synthesis, as well as multiple detoxification pathways, and suggest their potential role as therapeutic targets for the treatment of cholestasis and lipid disorders. PMID:15684063

  15. Adenosine modulation of [Ca2+]i in cerebellar granular cells: multiple adenosine receptors involved.

    PubMed

    Vacas, Javier; Fernández, Mercedes; Ros, Manuel; Blanco, Pablo

    2003-12-01

    Elimination of adenosine by addition of adenosine deaminase (ADA) to the media leads to alterations in intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in cerebellar granular cells. Adenosine deaminase brings about increases or decreases in [Ca(2+)](i) depending on the previous activation state of the cell. These effects are dependent on the catalytic activity of adenosine deaminase, since its previous catalytic inactivation with Hg(2+) prevents the above-mentioned changes in intracellular calcium. Extracellular calcium is required for the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) promoted by ADA. This rise is insensitive to thapsigargin, but sensitive to micromolar concentrations of Ni(2+). Toxins specific for L, N and P/Q calcium channels do not overtly reduce this effect. N(6)-Cyclopentyl adenosine (CPA), an A(1) receptor agonist, produces a partial reversion of ADA effects, while CGS21680, A(2A)/A(2B) receptor agonist, slightly enhances them. Expression of A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3) adenosine receptor mRNAs was detected in cerebellar granular cell cultures. These results suggest that adenosine modulate [Ca(2+)](i) in cerebellar granule cells through different adenosine receptor subtypes which, at least in part, seem to act through R-type calcium channels.

  16. Beta Adrenergic Receptors in Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sivamani, Raja K.; Lam, Susanne T.; Isseroff, R. Rivkah

    2007-01-01

    Synopsis Beta2 adrenergic receptors were identified in keratinocytes more than 30 years ago, but their function in the epidermis continues to be elucidated. Abnormalities in their expression, signaling pathway, or in the generation of endogenous catecholamine agonists by keratinocytes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cutaneous diseases such as atopic dermatitis, vitiligo and psoriasis. New studies also indicate that the beta2AR also modulates keratinocyte migration, and thus can function to regulate wound re-epithelialization. This review focuses on the function of these receptors in keratinocytes and their contribution to cutaneous physiology and disease. PMID:17903623

  17. Glutamate receptors at atomic resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Mark L.

    2010-12-03

    At synapses throughout the brain and spinal cord, the amino-acid glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter. During evolution, a family of glutamate-receptor ion channels seems to have been assembled from a kit consisting of discrete ligand-binding, ion-channel, modulatory and cytoplasmic domains. Crystallographic studies that exploit this unique architecture have greatly aided structural analysis of the ligand-binding core, but the results also pose a formidable challenge, namely that of resolving the allosteric mechanisms by which individual domains communicate and function in an intact receptor.

  18. Technical note: use of PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis for detection of bovine beta-casein variants A1, A2, A3, and B.

    PubMed

    Barroso, A; Dunner, S; Cañón, J

    1999-10-01

    We have optimized the polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) technique to screen the most frequent variants (A1, A2, A3, and B) of the bovine beta-casein gene. Five partly overlapping PCR products (233, 234, 265, 466, and 498 bp) of Exon VII of the beta-casein gene that encompass the target point mutations were heat-denatured, separated on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels, and silver-stained. Simultaneous detection of all variants in reference samples of known genotypes (A1A2, A2A2, A1A3, A1B, and A2B) was best achieved on 17% polyacrylamide (100:1 acrylamide:bis-acrylamide ratio) gels with the PCR product of 234 bp. These results were confirmed by sequencing the allele-specific SSCP bands directly excised from polyacrylamide gels. A population of 65 anonymous samples belonging to various breeds was then analyzed twice, without discrepancies in a blind trial. Routine beta-casein genotyping using PCR-SSCP is proposed as a cost-effective, fast, and sensitive technique.

  19. Olfactory receptors: G protein-coupled receptors and beyond.

    PubMed

    Spehr, Marc; Munger, Steven D

    2009-06-01

    Sensing the chemical environment is critical for all organisms. Diverse animals from insects to mammals utilize highly organized olfactory system to detect, encode, and process chemostimuli that may carry important information critical for health, survival, social interactions and reproduction. Therefore, for animals to properly interpret and react to their environment it is imperative that the olfactory system recognizes chemical stimuli with appropriate selectivity and sensitivity. Because olfactory receptor proteins play such an essential role in the specific recognition of diverse stimuli, understanding how they interact with and transduce their cognate ligands is a high priority. In the nearly two decades since the discovery that the mammalian odorant receptor gene family constitutes the largest group of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes, much attention has been focused on the roles of GPCRs in vertebrate and invertebrate olfaction. However, is has become clear that the 'family' of olfactory receptors is highly diverse, with roles for enzymes and ligand-gated ion channels as well as GPCRs in the primary detection of olfactory stimuli. PMID:19383089

  20. Nuclear receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Cave, Matthew C; Clair, Heather B; Hardesty, Josiah E; Falkner, K Cameron; Feng, Wenke; Clark, Barbara J; Sidey, Jennifer; Shi, Hongxue; Aqel, Bashar A; McClain, Craig J; Prough, Russell A

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors which sense changing environmental or hormonal signals and effect transcriptional changes to regulate core life functions including growth, development, and reproduction. To support this function, following ligand-activation by xenobiotics, members of subfamily 1 nuclear receptors (NR1s) may heterodimerize with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) to regulate transcription of genes involved in energy and xenobiotic metabolism and inflammation. Several of these receptors including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), the pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR), the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), the liver X receptor (LXR) and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) are key regulators of the gut:liver:adipose axis and serve to coordinate metabolic responses across organ systems between the fed and fasting states. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease and may progress to cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is associated with inappropriate nuclear receptor function and perturbations along the gut:liver:adipose axis including obesity, increased intestinal permeability with systemic inflammation, abnormal hepatic lipid metabolism, and insulin resistance. Environmental chemicals may compound the problem by directly interacting with nuclear receptors leading to metabolic confusion and the inability to differentiate fed from fasting conditions. This review focuses on the impact of nuclear receptors in the pathogenesis and treatment of NAFLD. Clinical trials including PIVENS and FLINT demonstrate that nuclear receptor targeted therapies may lead to the paradoxical dissociation of steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and obesity. Novel strategies currently under development (including tissue-specific ligands and dual receptor agonists) may be required to separate the beneficial effects of nuclear receptor activation from unwanted metabolic

  1. Nuclear receptors and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Cave, Matthew C; Clair, Heather B; Hardesty, Josiah E; Falkner, K Cameron; Feng, Wenke; Clark, Barbara J; Sidey, Jennifer; Shi, Hongxue; Aqel, Bashar A; McClain, Craig J; Prough, Russell A

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors which sense changing environmental or hormonal signals and effect transcriptional changes to regulate core life functions including growth, development, and reproduction. To support this function, following ligand-activation by xenobiotics, members of subfamily 1 nuclear receptors (NR1s) may heterodimerize with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) to regulate transcription of genes involved in energy and xenobiotic metabolism and inflammation. Several of these receptors including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), the pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR), the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), the liver X receptor (LXR) and the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) are key regulators of the gut:liver:adipose axis and serve to coordinate metabolic responses across organ systems between the fed and fasting states. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disease and may progress to cirrhosis and even hepatocellular carcinoma. NAFLD is associated with inappropriate nuclear receptor function and perturbations along the gut:liver:adipose axis including obesity, increased intestinal permeability with systemic inflammation, abnormal hepatic lipid metabolism, and insulin resistance. Environmental chemicals may compound the problem by directly interacting with nuclear receptors leading to metabolic confusion and the inability to differentiate fed from fasting conditions. This review focuses on the impact of nuclear receptors in the pathogenesis and treatment of NAFLD. Clinical trials including PIVENS and FLINT demonstrate that nuclear receptor targeted therapies may lead to the paradoxical dissociation of steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and obesity. Novel strategies currently under development (including tissue-specific ligands and dual receptor agonists) may be required to separate the beneficial effects of nuclear receptor activation from unwanted metabolic

  2. Severe hemorrhage attenuates cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via NTS adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; Li, Cailian; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2014-09-15

    Selective stimulation of inhibitory A1 and facilitatory A2a adenosine receptor subtypes located in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) powerfully inhibits cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) control of regional sympathetic outputs via different mechanisms: direct inhibition of glutamate release and facilitation of an inhibitory neurotransmitter release, respectively. However, it remains unknown whether adenosine naturally released into the NTS has similar inhibitory effects on the CCR as the exogenous agonists do. Our previous study showed that adenosine is released into the NTS during severe hemorrhage and contributes to reciprocal changes of renal (decreases) and adrenal (increases) sympathetic nerve activity observed in this setting. Both A1 and A2a adenosine receptors are involved. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that, during severe hemorrhage, CCR control of the two sympathetic outputs is attenuated by adenosine naturally released into the NTS. We compared renal and adrenal sympathoinhibitory responses evoked by right atrial injections of 5HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (2-8 μg/kg) under control conditions, during hemorrhage, and during hemorrhage preceded by blockade of NTS adenosine receptors with bilateral microinjections of 8-(p-sulfophenyl) theophylline (1 nmol/100 nl) in urethane/chloralose anesthetized rats. CCR-mediated inhibition of renal and adrenal sympathetic activity was significantly attenuated during severe hemorrhage despite reciprocal changes in the baseline activity levels, and this attenuation was removed by bilateral blockade of adenosine receptors in the caudal NTS. This confirmed that adenosine endogenously released into the NTS has a similar modulatory effect on integration of cardiovascular reflexes as stimulation of NTS adenosine receptors with exogenous agonists.

  3. Severe hemorrhage attenuates cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via NTS adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; Li, Cailian; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2014-09-15

    Selective stimulation of inhibitory A1 and facilitatory A2a adenosine receptor subtypes located in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) powerfully inhibits cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) control of regional sympathetic outputs via different mechanisms: direct inhibition of glutamate release and facilitation of an inhibitory neurotransmitter release, respectively. However, it remains unknown whether adenosine naturally released into the NTS has similar inhibitory effects on the CCR as the exogenous agonists do. Our previous study showed that adenosine is released into the NTS during severe hemorrhage and contributes to reciprocal changes of renal (decreases) and adrenal (increases) sympathetic nerve activity observed in this setting. Both A1 and A2a adenosine receptors are involved. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that, during severe hemorrhage, CCR control of the two sympathetic outputs is attenuated by adenosine naturally released into the NTS. We compared renal and adrenal sympathoinhibitory responses evoked by right atrial injections of 5HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (2-8 μg/kg) under control conditions, during hemorrhage, and during hemorrhage preceded by blockade of NTS adenosine receptors with bilateral microinjections of 8-(p-sulfophenyl) theophylline (1 nmol/100 nl) in urethane/chloralose anesthetized rats. CCR-mediated inhibition of renal and adrenal sympathetic activity was significantly attenuated during severe hemorrhage despite reciprocal changes in the baseline activity levels, and this attenuation was removed by bilateral blockade of adenosine receptors in the caudal NTS. This confirmed that adenosine endogenously released into the NTS has a similar modulatory effect on integration of cardiovascular reflexes as stimulation of NTS adenosine receptors with exogenous agonists. PMID:25063794

  4. Adenosine receptors located in the NTS contribute to renal sympathoinhibition during hypotensive phase of severe hemorrhage in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Scislo, Tadeusz J; O'Leary, Donal S

    2006-11-01

    Stimulation of nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) A(2a)-adenosine receptors elicits cardiovascular responses quite similar to those observed with rapid, severe hemorrhage, including bradycardia, hypotension, and inhibition of renal but activation of preganglionic adrenal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA and pre-ASNA, respectively). Because adenosine levels in the central nervous system increase during severe hemorrhage, we investigated to what extent these responses to hemorrhage may be due to activation of NTS adenosine receptors. In urethane- and alpha-chloralose-anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats, rapid hemorrhage was performed before and after bilateral nonselective or selective blockade of NTS adenosine-receptor subtypes [A(1)- and A(2a)-adenosine-receptor antagonist 8-(p-sulfophenyl)theophylline (1 nmol/100 nl) and A(2a)-receptor antagonist ZM-241385 (40 pmol/100 nl)]. The nonselective blockade reversed the response in RSNA (-21.0 +/- 9.6 Delta% vs. +7.3 +/- 5.7 Delta%) (where Delta% is averaged percent change from baseline) and attenuated the average heart rate response (change of -14.8 +/- 4.8 vs. -4.4 +/- 3.4 beats/min). The selective blockade attenuated the RSNA response (-30.4 +/- 5.2 Delta% vs. -11.1 +/- 7.7 Delta%) and tended to attenuate heart rate response (change of -27.5 +/- 5.3 vs. -15.8 +/- 8.2 beats/min). Microinjection of vehicle (100 nl) had no significant effect on the responses. The hemorrhage-induced increases in pre-ASNA remained unchanged with either adenosine-receptor antagonist. We conclude that adenosine operating in the NTS via A(2a) and possibly A(1) receptors may contribute to posthemorrhagic sympathoinhibition of RSNA but not to the sympathoactivation of pre-ASNA. The differential effects of NTS adenosine receptors on RSNA vs. pre-ASNA responses to hemorrhage supports the hypothesis that these receptors are differentially located/expressed on NTS neurons/synaptic terminals controlling different sympathetic outputs.

  5. [Intracellular traffic of the progesterone receptor].

    PubMed

    Guiochon-Mantel, A; Lescop, P; Christin-Maitre, S; Perrot-Applanat, M; Milgrom, E

    1992-01-01

    The nuclear localization of the progesterone receptor is mediated by two signal sequences: one is constitutive and lies in the hinge region (between the DNA and steroid binding domains), the other is hormone-dependent and is localized in the second zinc finger of the DNA binding domain. The use of various inhibitors of energy synthesis in cells expressing permanently or transiently the wild-type receptor or a receptor mutated within the nuclear localization signals, demonstrated that the nuclear residency of the receptor reflects a dynamic situation: the receptor diffusing into the cytoplasm and being constantly and actively transported back into the nucleus. The existence of this nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttle mechanism was confirmed by receptor transfer from one nucleus to the other in heterokaryons. Preliminary evidence was obtained, using oestrogen receptor, that this phenomenon may be of general significance for steroid receptors. PMID:1492716

  6. Marijuana: interaction with the estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Sauer, M A; Rifka, S M; Hawks, R L; Cutler, G B; Loriaux, D L

    1983-02-01

    Crude marijuana extract competed with estradiol for binding to the estrogen receptor of rat uterine cytosol. Condensed marijuana smoke also competed with estradiol for its receptor. Pure delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, however, did not interact with the estrogen receptor. Ten delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol metabolites also failed to compete with estradiol for its receptor. Of several other common cannabinoids tested, only cannabidiol showed any estrogen receptor binding. This was evident only at very high concentrations of cannabidiol. Apigenin, the aglycone of a flavinoid phytoestrogen found in cannabis, displayed high affinity for the estrogen receptor. To assess the biological significance of these receptor data, estrogen activity was measured in vivo with the uterine growth bioassay, using immature rats. Cannabis extract in large doses exhibited neither estrogenic nor antiestrogenic effects. Thus, although estrogen receptor binding activity was observed in crude marijuana extract, marijuana smoke condensate and several known components of cannabis, direct estrogenic activity of cannabis extract could not be demonstrated in vivo.

  7. Assessment of receptor internalization and recycling.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Jennifer A

    2004-01-01

    Internalization of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) occurs in response to agonist activation of the receptors and causes a redistribution of receptors away from the plasma membrane toward endosomes. Internalization of lower-affinity small molecule GPCRs such as muscarinic acetylcholine and adrenergic receptors has been measured using hydrophilic antagonist radioligands that are membrane impermeant. In contrast, internalization of peptide hormone receptors is assessed by measuring the internalization of a radiolabeled- or fluorescently labeled peptide hormone. More recently, the use of epitope-tagged receptors has allowed the measurement of changes in receptor subcellular distribution by the use of immunoassay and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. This chapter describes each of these approaches to the measurement of receptor internalization and describes the advantages and disadvantages of each method.

  8. Lectins in the investigation of receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhtin, V. M.; Yamskov, Igor A.

    1991-08-01

    Problems of the purification and characterisation are considered for approximately 270 receptors (including cell surface and organelle enzymes), which are glycoconjugates (mainly glycoproteins) from animals, plants and microorganisms, using various lectins (mainly lectin sorbents). An analysis has been carried out of the stages of lectin affinity chromatography of receptors (choice of detergent, use of organic solvents, elution with carbohydrates, etc.). Examples are given of procedures for the purification of receptors, including the use of paired columns and combination chromatography on lectins. The possibility of separating sub-populations of receptors using lectins has been demonstrated. Examples are given of the use of lectins in the analysis of the oligosaccharide structure of receptors. Cases are recorded of the interaction of receptors with endogenous lectins and of receptor lectins with endogenous glycoconjugates. It has been shown that lectins, in combination with glycosidases and antibodies, may be useful in the investigation of receptors. The bibliography contains 406 references.

  9. Mechanism for the activation of glutamate receptors

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at the NIH have used a technique called cryo-electron microscopy to determine a molecular mechanism for the activation and desensitization of ionotropic glutamate receptors, a prominent class of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and spina

  10. Adenosine Receptors: Expression, Function and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, Sandeep; Brito, Rafael; Mukherjea, Debashree; Rybak, Leonard P.; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine receptors (ARs) comprise a group of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) which mediate the physiological actions of adenosine. To date, four AR subtypes have been cloned and identified in different tissues. These receptors have distinct localization, signal transduction pathways and different means of regulation upon exposure to agonists. This review will describe the biochemical characteristics and signaling cascade associated with each receptor and provide insight into how these receptors are regulated in response to agonists. A key property of some of these receptors is their ability to serve as sensors of cellular oxidative stress, which is transmitted by transcription factors, such as nuclear factor (NF)-κB, to regulate the expression of ARs. Recent observations of oligomerization of these receptors into homo- and heterodimers will be discussed. In addition, the importance of these receptors in the regulation of normal and pathological processes such as sleep, the development of cancers and in protection against hearing loss will be examined. PMID:24477263

  11. Allosteric modulation of glycine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Yevenes, Gonzalo E; Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Inhibitory (or strychnine sensitive) glycine receptors (GlyRs) are anion-selective transmitter-gated ion channels of the cys-loop superfamily, which includes among others also the inhibitory γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAA receptors). While GABA mediates fast inhibitory neurotransmission throughout the CNS, the action of glycine as a fast inhibitory neurotransmitter is more restricted. This probably explains why GABAA receptors constitute a group of extremely successful drug targets in the treatment of a wide variety of CNS diseases, including anxiety, sleep disorders and epilepsy, while drugs specifically targeting GlyRs are virtually lacking. However, the spatially more restricted distribution of glycinergic inhibition may be advantageous in situations when a more localized enhancement of inhibition is sought. Inhibitory GlyRs are particularly relevant for the control of excitability in the mammalian spinal cord, brain stem and a few selected brain areas, such as the cerebellum and the retina. At these sites, GlyRs regulate important physiological functions, including respiratory rhythms, motor control, muscle tone and sensory as well as pain processing. In the hippocampus, RNA-edited high affinity extrasynaptic GlyRs may contribute to the pathology of temporal lobe epilepsy. Although specific modulators have not yet been identified, GlyRs still possess sites for allosteric modulation by a number of structurally diverse molecules, including alcohols, neurosteroids, cannabinoids, tropeines, general anaesthetics, certain neurotransmitters and cations. This review summarizes the present knowledge about this modulation and the molecular bases of the interactions involved. PMID:21557733

  12. Laminin receptors for neurite formation

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinman, H.K.; Ogle, R.C.; Cannon, F.B.; Little, C.D.; Sweeney, T.M.; Luckenbill-Edds, L.

    1988-02-01

    Laminin, a basement membrane glycoprotein promotes both cell attachment and neurite outgrowth. Separate domains on laminin elicit these responses, suggesting that distinct receptors occur on the surface of cells. NG108-15 neuroblastoma-glioma cells rapidly extend long processes in the presence of laminin. The authors report here that /sup 125/I-labeled laminin specifically binds to these cells and to three membrane proteins of 67, 110, and 180 kDa. These proteins were isolated by affinity chromatography on laminin-Sepharose. The 67-kDa protein reacted with antibody to the previously characterized receptor for cell attachment to laminin. Antibodies to the 110-kDa and 180-kDa bands demonstrated that the 110-kDa protein was found in a variety of epithelial cell lines and in brain, whereas the 180-kDa protein was neural specific. Antibodies prepared against the 110-kDa and 180-kDa proteins inhibited neurite outgrowth induced by the neurite-promoting domain of laminin, whereas antibodies to the 67-kDa laminin receptor had no effect on neurite outgrowth. They conclude that neuronal cells have multiple cell-surface laminin receptors and that the 110-kDa and 180-kDa proteins are involved in neurite formation.

  13. Histamine receptors and cancer pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Vanina A; Rivera, Elena S

    2010-01-01

    Considerable evidence has been collected indicating that histamine can modulate proliferation of different normal and malignant cells. High histamine biosynthesis and content together with histamine receptors have been reported in different human neoplasias including melanoma, colon and breast cancer, as well as in experimental tumours in which histamine has been postulated to behave as an important paracrine and autocrine regulator of proliferation. The discovery of the human histamine H4 receptor in different tissues has contributed to our understanding of histamine role in numerous physiological and pathological conditions revealing novel functions for histamine and opening new perspectives in histamine pharmacology research. In the present review we aimed to briefly summarize current knowledge on histamine and histamine receptor involvement in cancer before focusing on some recent evidence supporting the novel role of histamine H4 receptor in cancer progression representing a promising molecular target and avenue for cancer drug development. LINKED ARTICLES BJP has previously published a Histamine themed issue (2009). To view this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2009.157.issue-1 PMID:20636392

  14. Polypharmacology of dopamine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Butini, S; Nikolic, K; Kassel, S; Brückmann, H; Filipic, S; Agbaba, D; Gemma, S; Brogi, S; Brindisi, M; Campiani, G; Stark, H

    2016-07-01

    Most neurological diseases have a multifactorial nature and the number of molecular mechanisms discovered as underpinning these diseases is continuously evolving. The old concept of developing selective agents for a single target does not fit with the medical need of most neurological diseases. The development of designed multiple ligands holds great promises and appears as the next step in drug development for the treatment of these multifactorial diseases. Dopamine and its five receptor subtypes are intimately involved in numerous neurological disorders. Dopamine receptor ligands display a high degree of cross interactions with many other targets including G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes and ion channels. For brain disorders like Parkinsońs disease, schizophrenia and depression the dopaminergic system, being intertwined with many other signaling systems, plays a key role in pathogenesis and therapy. The concept of designed multiple ligands and polypharmacology, which perfectly meets the therapeutic needs for these brain disorders, is herein discussed as a general ligand-based concept while focusing on dopaminergic agents and receptor subtypes in particular. PMID:27234980

  15. Cannabinoid receptor localization in brain

    SciTech Connect

    Herkenham, M.; Lynn, A.B.; Little, M.D.; Johnson, M.R.; Melvin, L.S.; de Costa, B.R.; Rice, K.C. )

    1990-03-01

    (3H)CP 55,940, a radiolabeled synthetic cannabinoid, which is 10-100 times more potent in vivo than delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, was used to characterize and localize a specific cannabinoid receptor in brain sections. The potencies of a series of natural and synthetic cannabinoids as competitors of (3H)CP 55,940 binding correlated closely with their relative potencies in several biological assays, suggesting that the receptor characterized in our in vitro assay is the same receptor that mediates behavioral and pharmacological effects of cannabinoids, including human subjective experience. Autoradiography of cannabinoid receptors in brain sections from several mammalian species, including human, reveals a unique and conserved distribution; binding is most dense in outflow nuclei of the basal ganglia--the substantia nigra pars reticulata and globus pallidus--and in the hippocampus and cerebellum. Generally high densities in forebrain and cerebellum implicate roles for cannabinoids in cognition and movement. Sparse densities in lower brainstem areas controlling cardiovascular and respiratory functions may explain why high doses of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol are not lethal.

  16. Receptor sensitivity in bacterial chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sourjik, Victor; Berg, Howard C.

    2002-01-01

    Chemoreceptors in Escherichia coli are coupled to the flagella by a labile phosphorylated intermediate, CheY~P. Its activity can be inferred from the rotational bias of flagellar motors, but motor response is stochastic and limited to a narrow physiological range. Here we use fluorescence resonance energy transfer to monitor interactions of CheY~P with its phosphatase, CheZ, that reveal changes in the activity of the receptor kinase, CheA, resulting from the addition of attractants or repellents. Analyses of cheR and/or cheB mutants, defective in receptor methylation/demethylation, show that response sensitivity depends on the activity of CheB and the level of receptor modification. In cheRcheB mutants, the concentration of attractant that generates a half-maximal response is equal to the dissociation constant of the receptor. In wild-type cells, it is 35 times smaller. This amplification, together with the ultrasensitivity of the flagellar motor, explains previous observations of high chemotactic gain.

  17. Dependence receptors and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mehlen, Patrick; Tauszig-Delamasure, Servane

    2014-11-01

    The research on colorectal cancer (CRC) biology has been leading the oncology field since the early 1990s. The search for genetic alterations has allowed the identification of the main tumour suppressors or oncogenes. Recent work obtained in CRC has unexpectedly proposed the existence of novel category of tumour suppressors, the so-called 'dependence receptors'. These transmembrane receptors behave as Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde with two opposite sides: they induce a positive signalling (survival, proliferation, differentiation) in presence of their ligand, but are not inactive in the absence of their ligand and rather trigger apoptosis when unbound. This trait confers them a conditional tumour suppressor activity: they eliminate cells that grow abnormally in an environment offering a limited quantity of ligand. This review will describe how receptors such as deleted in colorectal carcinoma (DCC), uncoordinated 5 (UNC5), rearranged during transfection (RET) or TrkC constrain CRC progression and how this dependence receptor paradigm may open up therapeutical perspectives. PMID:25163468

  18. Recombinant lymphokines and their receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Gillis, S.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 15 selections. Some of the chapter titles are: Human Interleukin-2, Molecular Analysis of the Murine Interleukin-2 Receptor, Bovine Interleukin-2, Molecular Organization and Expression of the Prointerleukin-1..beta.. Gene, Human Erythroid-Portentiating Activity, and Tumor Necrosis Factors Alpha and Beta.

  19. Endogenous ion channel complexes: the NMDA receptor.

    PubMed

    Frank, René A W

    2011-06-01

    Ionotropic receptors, including the NMDAR (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor) mediate fast neurotransmission, neurodevelopment, neuronal excitability and learning. In the present article, the structure and function of the NMDAR is reviewed with the aim to condense our current understanding and highlight frontiers where important questions regarding the biology of this receptor remain unanswered. In the second part of the present review, new biochemical and genetic approaches for the investigation of ion channel receptor complexes will be discussed.

  20. NMDA receptors and memory encoding.

    PubMed

    Morris, Richard G M

    2013-11-01

    It is humbling to think that 30 years have passed since the paper by Collingridge, Kehl and McLennan showing that one of Jeff Watkins most interesting compounds, R-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (d-AP5), blocked the induction of long-term potentiation in vitro at synapses from area CA3 of the hippocampus to CA1 without apparent effect on baseline synaptic transmission (Collingridge et al., 1983). This dissociation was one of the key triggers for an explosion of interest in glutamate receptors, and much has been discovered since that collectively contributes to our contemporary understanding of glutamatergic synapses - their biophysics and subunit composition, of the agonists and antagonists acting on them, and their diverse functions in different networks of the brain and spinal cord. It can be fairly said that Collingridge et al.'s (1983) observation was the stimulus that has led, on the one hand, to structural biological work at the atomic scale describing the key features of NMDA receptors that enables their coincidence function to happen; and, on the other, to work with whole animals investigating the contributions that calcium signalling via this receptor can have on rhythmical activities controlled by spinal circuits, memory encoding in the hippocampus (the topic of this article), visual cortical plasticity, sensitization in pain, and other functions. In this article, I lay out how my then interest in long-term potentiation (LTP) as a model of memory enabled me to recognise the importance of Collingridge et al.'s discovery - and how I and my colleagues endeavoured to take things forward in the area of learning and memory. This is in some respects a personal story, and I tell it as such. The idea that NMDA receptor activation is essential for memory encoding, though not for storage, took time to develop and to be accepted. Along the way, there have been confusions, challenges, and surprises surrounding the idea that activation of NMDA receptors can

  1. Serotonin receptors in parasitic worms.

    PubMed

    Mansour, T E

    1984-01-01

    It is evident from the above review that during the last two decades a great deal of interest in investigating the action of serotonin in parasitic worms has been shown by parasitologists as well as by scientists from several other disciplines. What we have initially reported concerning the effect of serotonin on motility and carbohydrate metabolism of F. hepatica has been pursued on several other parasitic worms. The studies so far indicate that serotonin stimulates motility of every species tested among the phylum Platyhelminthes. The indoleamine also stimulates glycogenolysis in the few flatworm parasites that have been investigated. The information in nematodes is scanty and the role of serotonin in these parasites is still open for experimentation. Recent biochemical investigations on F. hepatica and S. mansoni demonstrated that serotonin and related compounds utilize a common class of receptors in plasma membrane particles which I designate as 'serotonin receptors'. These receptors are linked to an adenylate cyclase that catalyses the synthesis of the second messenger, cyclic 3',5'-AMP. Serotonin and its congeners increase the concentration of cyclic AMP in intact parasites whereas antagonists inhibit such an effect. Cyclic AMP stimulates glycogenolysis, glycolysis and some rate-limiting glycolytic enzymes. It activates a protein kinase that may be involved in activation of glycogen phosphorylase and phosphofructokinase. Serotonin-activated adenylate cyclase in S. mansoni is activated early in the life of the schistosomule. The possibility is discussed that the availability of cyclic AMP through serotonin activation in these parasites may be a prelude to the development processes that take place in the parasite. The different components of the serotonin-activated adenylate cyclase in the parasite are the same as those that have been previously described for the host. Binding characteristics of the receptors indicate that the receptors in F. hepatica appear to

  2. Activation of adenosine A1 receptors reduces anxiety-like behavior during acute ethanol withdrawal (hangover) in mice.

    PubMed

    Prediger, Rui D S; da Silva, George E; Batista, Luciano C; Bittencourt, Alvorita L; Takahashi, Reinaldo N

    2006-10-01

    Elevated signs of anxiety are observed in both humans and rodents during withdrawal from chronic as well as acute ethanol exposure, and it represents an important motivational factor for ethanol relapse. Several reports have suggested the involvement of brain adenosine receptors in different actions produced by ethanol such as motor incoordination and hypnotic effects. In addition, we have recently demonstrated that adenosine A1 receptors modulate the anxiolytic-like effect induced by ethanol in mice. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of adenosine A1 and A2A receptor agonists in reducing the anxiety-like behavior during acute ethanol withdrawal (hangover) in mice. Animals received a single intraperitoneal administration of saline or ethanol (4 g/kg) and were tested in the elevated plus maze after an interval of 0.5-24 h. The results indicated that hangover-induced anxiety was most pronounced between 12 and 18 h after ethanol administration, as indicated by a significant reduction in the exploration of the open arms of the maze. At this time interval, ethanol was completely cleared. The acute administration of 'nonanxiolytic' doses of adenosine and the selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA), but not the adenosine A2A receptor agonist N6-[2-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-(2-methylphenyl)ethyl]adenosine (DPMA), at the onset of peak withdrawal (18 h), reduced this anxiogenic-like response. In addition, the effect of CCPA on the anxiety-like behavior of ethanol hangover was reversed by pretreatment with the selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX). These results reinforce the notion of the involvement of adenosine receptors in the anxiety-like responses and indicate the potential of adenosine A1 receptor agonists to reduce the anxiogenic effects during ethanol withdrawal.

  3. Molecular properties of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    HAGA, Tatsuya

    2013-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, which comprise five subtypes (M1-M5 receptors), are expressed in both the CNS and PNS (particularly the target organs of parasympathetic neurons). M1-M5 receptors are integral membrane proteins with seven transmembrane segments, bind with acetylcholine (ACh) in the extracellular phase, and thereafter interact with and activate GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) in the intracellular phase: M1, M3, and M5 receptors interact with Gq-type G proteins, and M2 and M4 receptors with Gi/Go-type G proteins. Activated G proteins initiate a number of intracellular signal transduction systems. Agonist-bound muscarinic receptors are phosphorylated by G protein-coupled receptor kinases, which initiate their desensitization through uncoupling from G proteins, receptor internalization, and receptor breakdown (down regulation). Recently the crystal structures of M2 and M3 receptors were determined and are expected to contribute to the development of drugs targeted to muscarinic receptors. This paper summarizes the molecular properties of muscarinic receptors with reference to the historical background and bias to studies performed in our laboratories. PMID:23759942

  4. Cholinergic nicotinic receptors in the vestibular epithelia.

    PubMed

    Thornhill, R A

    1991-10-01

    Receptor binding studies specific for nicotinic cholinergic receptors have been carried out on isolated vestibular epithelia of the frogs Rana catesbiana and Rana temporaria. Evidence is presented for the presence of nicotinic-like cholinergic receptors specifically associated with the sensory areas. PMID:1797345

  5. Molecular pharmacology of human NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hedegaard, Maiken K.; Hansen, Kasper B.; Andersen, Karen T.; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Traynelis, Stephen F.

    2012-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are ionotropic glutamate receptors that mediate excitatory neurotransmission. NMDA receptors are also important drug targets that are implicated in a number of pathophysiological conditions. To facilitate the transition from lead compounds in pre-clinical animal models to drug candidates for human use, it is important to establish whether NMDA receptor ligands have similar properties at rodent and human NMDA receptors. Here, we compare amino acid sequences for human and rat NMDA receptor subunits and discuss inter-species variation in the context of our current knowledge of the relationship between NMDA receptor structure and function. We summarize studies on the biophysical properties of human NMDA receptors and compare these properties to those of rat orthologs. Finally, we provide a comprehensive pharmacological characterization that allows side-by-side comparison of agonists, un-competitive antagonists, GluN2B-selective non-competitive antagonists, and GluN2C/D-selective modulators at recombinant human and rat NMDA receptors. The evaluation of biophysical properties and pharmacological probes acting at different sites on the receptor suggest that the binding sites and conformational changes leading to channel gating in response to agonist binding are highly conserved between human and rat NMDA receptors. In summary, the results of this study suggest that no major detectable differences exist in the pharmacological and functional properties of human and rat NMDA receptors. PMID:22197913

  6. Neurotransmitter Receptor Binding in Bovine Cerebral Microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peroutka, Stephen J.; Moskowitz, Michael A.; Reinhard, John F.; Synder, Solomon H.

    1980-05-01

    Purified preparations of microvessels from bovine cerebral cortex contain substantial levels of alpha-adrenergic, beta-adrenergic, and histamine 1 receptor binding sites but only negligible serotonin, muscarinic cholinergic, opiate, and benzodiazepine receptor binding. Norepinephrine and histamine may be endogenous regulators of the cerebral microcirculation at the observed receptors.

  7. The Physiology and Biochemistry of Receptors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitzer, Judy A., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    The syllabus for a refresher course on the physiology and biochemistry of receptors (presented at the 1983 American Physiological Society meeting) is provided. Topics considered include receptor regulation, structural/functional aspects of receptors for insulin and insulin-like growth factors, calcium channel inhibitors, and role of lipoprotein…

  8. Cell surface receptors for CCN proteins.

    PubMed

    Lau, Lester F

    2016-06-01

    The CCN family (CYR61; CTGF; NOV; CCN1-6; WISP1-3) of matricellular proteins in mammals is comprised of six homologous members that play important roles in development, inflammation, tissue repair, and a broad range of pathological processes including fibrosis and cancer. Despite considerable effort to search for a high affinity CCN-specific receptor akin to growth factor receptors, no such receptor has been found. Rather, CCNs bind several groups of multi-ligand receptors as characteristic of other matricellular proteins. The most extensively documented among CCN-binding receptors are integrins, including αvβ3, αvβ5, α5β1, α6β1, αIIbβ3, αMβ2, and αDβ2, which mediate diverse CCN functions in various cell types. CCNs also bind cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), low density liproprotein receptor-related proteins (LRPs), and the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate (M6P) receptor, which are endocytic receptors that may also serve as co-receptors in cooperation with other cell surface receptors. CCNs have also been reported to bind FGFR-2, Notch, RANK, and TrkA, potentially altering the affinities of these receptors for their ligands. The ability of CCNs to bind a multitude of receptors in various cell types may account for the remarkable versatility of their functions, and underscore the diverse signaling pathways that mediate their activities.

  9. General Anesthetic Actions on GABAA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Paul S; Kolesky, Scott E; Jenkins, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    General anesthetic drugs interact with many receptors in the nervous system, but only a handful of these interactions are critical for producing anesthesia. Over the last 20 years, neuropharmacologists have revealed that one of the most important target sites for general anesthetics is the GABAA receptor. In this review we will discuss what is known about anesthetic – GABAA receptor interactions. PMID:20808541

  10. The imbalanced expression of adenosine receptors in an epilepsy model corrected using targeted mesenchymal stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Huicong, Kang; Zheng, Xue; Furong, Wang; Zhouping, Tang; Feng, Xu; Qi, Hu; Xiaoyan, Liu; Xiaojiang, Huang; Na, Zhang; Ke, Xu; Zheng, Zeng; Suiqiang, Zhu

    2013-12-01

    Adenosine inhibits epileptic episodes by interacting with G-protein-coupled receptors. This study examined the mechanism by which the inhibitory effect of adenosine becomes impaired during epileptogenesis. Dynamic changes in adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs) and A2a receptors (A2aRs) were investigated in a kindling model of epilepsy. RT-PCR, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence results indicated that expression of A1Rs was increased in the hippocampus 24 h after kindling, but progressively decreased 1 and 6 months after kindling. Opposite changes were seen in the expression of A2aRs. This bidirectional change resulted in an imbalance between A1Rs and A2aRs and dysregulation of the adenosine system. Autologous mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation was used to correct this disorder and avoid side effects of systematic adenosine therapy. Paramagnetic iron oxide particles were used to mark and track the MSCs in vivo using MRI. The results indicated that the transplanted cells migrated along the callosum and settled at the ependymal layer. The MSCs displayed a relatively long survival time, at least 3 months. The improved AR expression and EEG findings suggested that MSC transplantation was a potentially effective means of treating refractory epilepsy.

  11. Guest-induced organization of an optimal receptor from a dynamic receptor library: Spectroscopic screening

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Yasuo; Sakamoto, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Kentaro; Fujita, Makoto

    2002-01-01

    Complexation of a cis-protected palladium ion and a family of exo-bidentate and -tridentate ligands results in the formation of an equilibrium mixture of numerous metal-linked receptors that are referred to as a dynamic receptor library. We found that a guest induced the selective formation of the optimal receptor of its own. Screening of the library by using difference NMR facilitates the search for new receptors because in difference NMR only receptors interacting with the guest can be observed. An unpredictable heterotopic receptor was discovered by this screening method. Interestingly, the new receptor thus found was assembled quantitatively only in the presence of its optimal guest. PMID:11959936

  12. The Human Laminin Receptor is a Member of the Integrin Family of Cell Adhesion Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehlsen, Kurt R.; Dillner, Lena; Engvall, Eva; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    1988-09-01

    A receptor for the adhesive basement membrane protein, laminin, was isolated from human glioblastoma cells by affinity chromatography on laminin. This receptor has a heterodimeric structure similar to that of receptors for other extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin and vitronectin. Incorporation of the laminin receptor into liposomal membranes makes it possible for liposomes to attach to surfaces coated with laminin. The receptor liposomes also attached to some extent to surfaces coated with fibronectin, but not with other matrix proteins. These properties identify the laminin receptor as a member of the integrin family of cell adhesion receptors.

  13. An orphan nuclear hormone receptor that lacks a DNA binding domain and heterodimerizes with other receptors.

    PubMed

    Seol, W; Choi, H S; Moore, D D

    1996-05-31

    SHP is an orphan member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily that contains the dimerization and ligand-binding domain found in other family members but lacks the conserved DNA binding domain. In the yeast two-hybrid system, SHP interacted with several conventional and orphan members of the receptor superfamily, including retinoid receptors, the thyroid hormone receptor, and the orphan receptor MB67. SHP also interacted directly with these receptors in vitro. In mammalian cells, SHP specifically inhibited transactivation by the superfamily members with which it interacted. These results suggest that SHP functions as a negative regulator of receptor-dependent signaling pathways. PMID:8650544

  14. Endosome acidification and receptor trafficking: bafilomycin A1 slows receptor externalization by a mechanism involving the receptor's internalization motif.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, L S; Dunn, K W; Pytowski, B; McGraw, T E

    1993-01-01

    To examine the relationship between endosome acidification and receptor trafficking, transferrin receptor trafficking was characterized in Chinese hamster ovary cells in which endosome acidification was blocked by treatment with the specific inhibitor of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase, bafilomycin A1. Elevating endosome pH slowed the receptor externalization rate to approximately one-half of control but did not affect receptor internalization kinetics. The slowed receptor externalization required the receptor's cytoplasmic domain and was largely eliminated by substitutions replacing either of two aromatic amino acids within the receptor's cytoplasmic YTRF internalization motif. These results confirm, using a specific inhibitor of the vacuolar proton pump, that proper endosome acidification is necessary to maintain rapid recycling of intracellular receptors back to the plasma membrane. Moreover, receptor return to the plasma membrane is slowed in the absence of proper endosome acidification by a signal-dependent mechanism involving the receptor's cytoplasmic tyrosine-containing internalization motif. These results, in conjunction with results from other studies, suggest that the mechanism for clustering receptors in plasma membrane clathrin-coated pits may be an example of a more general mechanism that determines the dynamic distribution of membrane proteins among various compartments with luminal acidification playing a crucial role in this process. Images PMID:8167408

  15. Characterization of the A2-A2rel gene cluster in Leishmania donovani: involvement of A2 in visceralization during infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W W; Matlashewski, G

    2001-02-01

    The A2 gene family is present in Leishmania donovani, which causes fatal visceral leishmaniasis in human patients, but is not present in Leishmania major, which causes cutaneous leishmaniasis infections. The A2 genes in L. donovani are stage specific and are expressed at high levels in the amastigote stage in the mammalian host, but are not expressed in the promastigote stage in the insect sandfly vector. The A2 genes are tandem repeated with a distinct gene family termed the A2rel genes. In order to characterize the structure and function of the A2-A2rel gene clusters, the 5' and 3' DNA sequences flanking the A2-A2rel cluster were isolated, sequenced and used to generate mutants through gene targeting. Although it was possible to generate partial A2-A2rel gene clusters knock-out mutants, it was not possible to delete all the A2-A2rel gene clusters completely from the L. donovani genome, suggesting that, within this cluster, there are genes that are essential for survival in culture. Characterization of these mutants revealed that A2 and A2rel gene expression was compensated by amplifying the remaining intact A2 and A2rel genes, and the proliferation of these mutants in culture and their virulence in BALB/c mice were compromised. In order to explore further the biological role of A2, the L. donovani A2 gene was introduced into L. major. In comparison with the control L. major, the A2-expressing L. major parasites demonstrated an increased ability to survive in the spleen of BALB/c mice. These data suggest that A2 plays a role in the visceralization of infection associated with L. donovani. PMID:11251814

  16. Lattice equations arising from discrete Painlevé systems. I. (A2 + A1)(1) and ( A 1 + A1 ' ) ( 1 ) cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Nalini; Nakazono, Nobutaka; Shi, Yang

    2015-09-01

    We introduce the concept of ω-lattice, constructed from τ functions of Painlevé systems, on which quad-equations of ABS (Adler-Bobenko-Suris) type appear. In particular, we consider the A5 ( 1 ) - and A6 ( 1 ) -surface q-Painlevé systems corresponding affine Weyl group symmetries are of (A2 + A1)(1)- and (A1 + A1)(1)-types, respectively.

  17. Activation of Neuropeptide FF Receptors by Kisspeptin Receptor Ligands.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Shinya; Misu, Ryosuke; Tomita, Kenji; Setsuda, Shohei; Masuda, Ryo; Ohno, Hiroaki; Naniwa, Yousuke; Ieda, Nahoko; Inoue, Naoko; Ohkura, Satoshi; Uenoyama, Yoshihisa; Tsukamura, Hiroko; Maeda, Kei-Ichiro; Hirasawa, Akira; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Fujii, Nobutaka

    2011-01-13

    Kisspeptin is a member of the RFamide neuropeptide family that is implicated in gonadotropin secretion. Because kisspeptin-GPR54 signaling is implicated in the neuroendocrine regulation of reproduction, GPR54 ligands represent promising therapeutic agents against endocrine secretion disorders. In the present study, the selectivity profiles of GPR54 agonist peptides were investigated for several GPCRs, including RFamide receptors. Kisspeptin-10 exhibited potent binding and activation of neuropeptide FF receptors (NPFFR1 and NPFFR2). In contrast, short peptide agonists bound with much lower affinity to NPFFRs while showing relatively high selectivity toward GPR54. The possible localization of secondary kisspeptin targets was also demonstrated by variation in the levels of GnRH release from the median eminence and the type of GPR54 agonists used. Negligible affinity of the reported NPFFR ligands to GPR54 was observed and indicates the unidirectional cross-reactivity between both ligands.

  18. Vibronic Coupling of tilde{B}^2A' Electronic State with the tilde{X}^2A', tilde{A}^2 a" Twofold of Isopropoxy Radical.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roudjane, Mourad; Chhantyal-Pun, Rabi; Melnik, Dmitry G.; Miller, Terry A.; Liu, Jinjun

    2014-06-01

    We performed rotational analyses of previously reported tilde{B}^2A' ← tilde{X}^2A' and tilde{B}^2A' ← tilde{A}^2A" electronic transitions of isopropoxy radical. It is noted that certain vibronic bands belonging to both tilde{B}^2A' ← tilde{X}^2A' and tilde{B}^2A' ← tilde{A}^2A" electronic transitions exhibit unusual rotational contours inconsistent with the electronic symmetry designation of the connecting levels, and the orientation of the electronic transition dipole moment with respect to the principal axis system of the molecule is inconsistent with expectations from the molecule's electronic structure. A coupled, three-electronic-state, vibronic Hamiltonian has been used to account for vibronic interactions between the tilde{B} electronic state and the tilde{X}/ tilde{A} states, whereas an effective rotational Hamiltonian developed earlier has been used to describe the rovibronic eigenstates within the tilde{X}^2A' and tilde{A}^2 A" twofold. We show that inclusion of the vibronic coupling of the ground twofold to the upper electronic tilde{B} state is necessary to account for the observed rotational structure anomalies and present molecular parameters resulting from the rotational analysis of the vibronic spectra. R. Chhantyal-Pun and T. A. Miller, TD03, 68^th Molecular Spectroscopy Symposium, Columbus, 2013 J. Liu, D. Melnik and T. A. Miller, J. Chem. Phys., 139, 094308, (2013)

  19. Functional and pharmacological characterization of two different ASIC1a/2a heteromers reveals their sensitivity to the spider toxin PcTx1

    PubMed Central

    Joeres, Niko; Augustinowski, Katrin; Neuhof, Andreas; Assmann, Marc; Gründer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Acid Sensing Ion Channels (ASICs) detect extracellular proton signals and are involved in synaptic transmission and pain sensation. ASIC subunits assemble into homo- and heteromeric channels composed of three subunits. Single molecule imaging revealed that heteromers composed of ASIC1a and ASIC2a, which are widely expressed in the central nervous system, have a flexible 2:1/1:2 stoichiometry. It was hitherto not possible, however, to functionally differentiate these two heteromers. To have a homogenous population of ASIC1a/2a heteromers with either 2:1 or 1:2 stoichiometry, we covalently linked subunits in the desired configuration and characterized their functional properties in Xenopus oocytes. We show that the two heteromers have slightly different proton affinity, with an additional ASIC1a subunit increasing apparent affinity. Moreover, we found that zinc, which potentiates ASIC2a-containing ASICs but not homomeric ASIC1a, potentiates both heteromers. Finally, we show that PcTx1, which binds at subunit-subunit interfaces of homomeric ASIC1a, inhibits both heteromers suggesting that ASIC2a can also contribute to a PcTx1 binding site. Using this functional fingerprint, we show that rat cortical neurons predominantly express the ASIC1a/2a heteromer with a 2:1 stoichiometry. Collectively, our results reveal the contribution of individual subunits to the functional properties of ASIC1a/2a heteromers. PMID:27277303

  20. Functional and pharmacological characterization of two different ASIC1a/2a heteromers reveals their sensitivity to the spider toxin PcTx1.

    PubMed

    Joeres, Niko; Augustinowski, Katrin; Neuhof, Andreas; Assmann, Marc; Gründer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Acid Sensing Ion Channels (ASICs) detect extracellular proton signals and are involved in synaptic transmission and pain sensation. ASIC subunits assemble into homo- and heteromeric channels composed of three subunits. Single molecule imaging revealed that heteromers composed of ASIC1a and ASIC2a, which are widely expressed in the central nervous system, have a flexible 2:1/1:2 stoichiometry. It was hitherto not possible, however, to functionally differentiate these two heteromers. To have a homogenous population of ASIC1a/2a heteromers with either 2:1 or 1:2 stoichiometry, we covalently linked subunits in the desired configuration and characterized their functional properties in Xenopus oocytes. We show that the two heteromers have slightly different proton affinity, with an additional ASIC1a subunit increasing apparent affinity. Moreover, we found that zinc, which potentiates ASIC2a-containing ASICs but not homomeric ASIC1a, potentiates both heteromers. Finally, we show that PcTx1, which binds at subunit-subunit interfaces of homomeric ASIC1a, inhibits both heteromers suggesting that ASIC2a can also contribute to a PcTx1 binding site. Using this functional fingerprint, we show that rat cortical neurons predominantly express the ASIC1a/2a heteromer with a 2:1 stoichiometry. Collectively, our results reveal the contribution of individual subunits to the functional properties of ASIC1a/2a heteromers. PMID:27277303

  1. Pregnane X receptor is a target of farnesoid X receptor.

    PubMed

    Jung, Diana; Mangelsdorf, David J; Meyer, Urs A

    2006-07-14

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR) is an essential component of the body's detoxification system. PXR is activated by a broad spectrum of xenobiotics and endobiotics, including bile acids and their precursors. Bile acids in high concentrations are toxic; therefore, their synthesis is tightly regulated by the farnesoid X receptor, and their catabolism involves several enzymes regulated by PXR. Here we demonstrate that the expression of PXR is regulated by farnesoid X receptor. Feeding mice with cholic acid or the synthetic farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonist GW4064 resulted in a robust PXR induction. This effect was abolished in FXR knock-out mice. Long time bile acid treatment resulted in an increase of PXR target genes in wild type mice. A region containing four FXR binding sites (IR1) was identified in the mouse Pxr gene. This region was able to trigger an 8-fold induction after GW4064 treatment in transactivation studies. Deletion or mutation of single IR1 sites caused a weakened response. The importance of each individual IR1 element was assessed by cloning a triple or a single copy and was tested in transactivation studies. Two elements were able to trigger a strong response, one a moderate response, and one no response to GW4064 treatment. Mobility shift assays demonstrated that the two stronger responding elements were able to bind FXR protein. This result was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation. These results strongly suggest that PXR is regulated by FXR. Bile acids activate FXR, which blocks synthesis of bile acids and also leads to the transcriptional activation of PXR, promoting breakdown of bile acids. The combination of the two mechanisms leads to an efficient protection of the liver against bile acid induced toxicity.

  2. Treadmill running frequency on anxiety and hippocampal adenosine receptors density in adult and middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Costa, Marcelo S; Ardais, Ana Paula; Fioreze, Gabriela T; Mioranzza, Sabrina; Botton, Paulo Henrique S; Portela, Luis Valmor; Souza, Diogo O; Porciúncula, Lisiane O

    2012-01-10

    Physical exercise protocols have varied widely across studies raising the question of whether there is an optimal intensity, duration and frequency that would produce maximal benefits in attenuating symptoms related to anxiety disorders. Although physical exercise causes modifications in neurotransmission systems, the involvement of neuromodulators such as adenosine has not been investigated after chronic exercise training. Anxiety-related behavior was assessed in the elevated plus-maze in adult and middle-aged rats submitted to 8 weeks of treadmill running 1, 3 or 7 days/week. The speed of running was weekly adjusted to maintain moderate intensity. The hippocampal adenosine A1 and A2A receptors densities were also assessed. Treadmill running protocol was efficient in increasing physical exercise capacity in adult and middle-aged rats. All frequencies of treadmill running equally decreased the time spent in the open arms in adult animals. Middle-aged treadmill control rats presented lower time spent in the open arms than adult treadmill control rats. However, treadmill running one day/week reversed this age effect. Adenosine A1 receptor was not changed between groups, but treadmill running counteracted the age-related increase in adenosine A2A receptors. Although treadmill running, independent from frequency, triggered anxiety in adult rats and treadmill running one day/week reversed the age-related anxiety, no consistent relationship was found with hippocampal adenosine receptors densities. Thus, our data suggest that as a complementary therapy in the management of mental disturbances, the frequency and intensity of physical exercise should be taken into account according to age. Besides, this is the first study reporting the modulation of adenosine receptors after chronic physical exercise, which could be important to prevent neurological disorders associated to increase in adenosine A2A receptors.

  3. Novel receptors for bacterial protein toxins.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Gudula; Papatheodorou, Panagiotis; Aktories, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    While bacterial effectors are often directly introduced into eukaryotic target cells by various types of injection machines, toxins enter the cytosol of host cells from endosomal compartments or after retrograde transport via Golgi from the ER. A first crucial step of toxin-host interaction is receptor binding. Using optimized protocols and new methods novel toxin receptors have been identified, including metalloprotease ADAM 10 for Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin, laminin receptor Lu/BCAM for Escherichia coli cytotoxic necrotizing factor CNF1, lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) for Clostridium difficile transferase CDT and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) 1 for Clostridium perfringens TpeL toxin.

  4. Crustacean retinoid-X receptor isoforms: distinctive DNA binding and receptor-receptor interaction with a cognate ecdysteroid receptor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaohui; Hopkins, Penny M; Palli, Subba R; Durica, David S

    2004-04-15

    We have identified cDNA clones that encode homologs of the ecdysteroid receptor (EcR) and retinoid-X receptor (RXR)/USP classes of nuclear receptors from the fiddler crab Uca pugilator (UpEcR and UpRXR). Several UpRXR cDNA splicing variants were found in coding regions that could potentially influence function. A five-amino acid (aa) insertion/deletion is located in the "T" box in the hinge region. Another 33-aa insertion/deletion is found inside the ligand-binding domain (LBD), between helix 1 and helix 3. Ribonuclease protection assays (RPA) showed that four UpRXR transcripts [UpRXR(+5+33), UpRXR(-5+33), UpRXR(+5-33) and UpRXR(-5-33)] were present in regenerating limb buds. UpRXR(-5+33) was the most abundant transcript present in regenerating limb buds in both early blastema and late premolt growth stages. Expression vectors for these UpRXR variants and UpEcR were constructed, and the proteins expressed in E. coli and in vitro expression systems. The expressed crab nuclear receptors were then characterized by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull down experiments. EMSA results showed that UpEcR/UpRXR(-5+33) heterocomplexes bound with a series of hormone response elements (HREs) including eip28/29, IRper-1, DR-4, and IRhsp-1 with appreciable affinity. Competition EMSA also showed that the affinity decreased as sequence composition deviated from a perfect consensus element. Binding to IRper-1 HREs occurred only if the heterodimer partner UpRXR contained the 33-aa LBD insertion. UpRXR lacking both the 5-aa and 33-aa insertion bound to a DR-1G HRE in the absence of UpEcR. The results of GST-pull down experiments showed that UpEcR interacted only with UpRXR variants containing the 33-aa insertion, and not with those lacking the 33-aa insertion. These in vitro receptor protein-DNA and receptor protein-protein interactions occurred in the absence of hormone (20-hydroxyecdysone and 9-cis retinoid acid, 9-cis RA

  5. Brain stem adenosine receptors modulate centrally mediated hypotensive responses in conscious rats: A review.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Noha N; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A

    2015-05-01

    Adenosine is implicated in the modulation of cardiovascular responses either at the peripheral or at central level in experimental animals. However, there are no dedicated reviews on the involvement of adenosine in mediating the hypotensive response of centrally administered clonidine in general and specifically in aortically barodenervated rats (ABD). The conscious ABD rat model exhibits surgically induced baroreflex dysfunction and exaggerated hypotensive response, compared with conscious sham-operated (SO) rats. The current review focuses on, the role of adenosine receptors in blood pressure (BP) regulation and their possible crosstalk with other receptors e.g. imidazoline (I1) and alpha (α2A) adrenergic receptor (AR). The former receptor is a molecular target for clonidine, whose hypotensive effect is enhanced approx. 3-fold in conscious ABD rats. We also discussed how the balance between the brain stem adenosine A1 and A2A receptors is regulated by baroreceptors and how such balance influences the centrally mediated hypotensive responses. The use of the ABD rat model yielded insight into the downstream signaling cascades following clonidine-evoked hypotension in a surgical model of baroreflex dysfunction. PMID:26257930

  6. The impact of adenosine and A(2B) receptors on glucose homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Rüsing, D; Müller, C E; Verspohl, E J

    2006-12-01

    Adenosine and adenosine receptor antagonists are involved in glucose homoeostasis. The participating receptors are not known, mainly due to a lack of specific agonists and antagonists, but are reasonable targets for anti-diabetic therapy. The stable, albeit nonselective, adenosine analogue NECA (5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine) (10 microM) reduced glucose-stimulated insulin release from INS-1 cells. This was mimicked by A(1)-(CHA), A(2A)-(CGS-21680) and A(3)-receptor agonists (Cl-IB-MECA). Two newly synthesized A(2B)-receptor antagonists, PSB-53 and PSB-1115, counteracted the inhibitory effect of NECA. These in-vitro effects were mirrored by in-vivo data with respect to CHA, CGS and Cl-IB-MECA. Distinct concentrations of either PSB-53 or PSB-1115 reversed the decrease in plasma insulin induced by NECA. This was not mimicked by a corresponding change in blood glucose. The effect of PSB-1115 was also obvious in diabetic GotoKakizaki rats: plasma insulin was increased whereas blood glucose was unchanged. During most experiments the effects on blood glucose were not impressive probably because of the physiologically necessary homoeostasis. The adenosine levels were not different in normal Wistar rats and in diabetic GotoKakzaki rats. Altogether the A(2B)-receptor antagonists showed an anti-diabetic potential mainly by increasing plasma insulin levels under conditions when the adenosine tonus was elevated in-vivo and increased insulin release in-vitro.

  7. Signal transduction activated by cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Laviada, Inés; Ruiz-Llorente, Lidia

    2005-07-01

    Since the discovery that cannabinoids exert biological actions through binding to specific receptors, signal mechanisms triggered by these receptors have been focus of extensive study. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signalling events produced by cannabinoids from membrane receptors to downstream regulators. Two types of cannabinoid receptors have been identified to date: CB(1) and CB(2) both belonging to the heptahelichoidal receptor family but with different tissue distribution and signalling mechanisms. Coupling to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding protein and thus inhibition of adenylyl cyclase has been observed in both receptors but other signal transduction pathways that are regulated or not by these G proteins are differently activated upon ligand-receptor binding including ion channels, sphingomyelin hydrolysis, ceramide generation, phospholipases activation and downstream targets as MAP kinase cascade, PI3K, FAK or NOS regulation. Cannabinoids may also act independently of CB(1)or CB(2) receptors. The existence of new unidentified putative cannabinoid receptors has been claimed by many investigators. Endocannabinoids activate vanilloid TRPV1 receptors that may mediate some of the cannabinoid effects. Other actions of cannabinoids can occur through non-receptor-mediated mechanisms.

  8. Structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Largent, B.L.; Wikstroem, H.G.; Gundlach, A.L.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-12-01

    The structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity have been evaluated by examining a wide range of compounds related to opioids, neuroleptics, and phenylpiperidine dopaminergic structures for affinity at sigma receptor-binding sites labeled with (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP. Among opioid compounds, requirements for sigma receptor affinity differ strikingly from the determinants of affinity for conventional opiate receptors. Sigma sites display reverse stereoselectivity to classical opiate receptors. Multi-ringed opiate-related compounds such as morphine and naloxone have negligible affinity for sigma sites, with the highest sigma receptor affinity apparent for benzomorphans which lack the C ring of opioids. Highest affinity among opioids and other compounds occurs with more lipophilic N-substituents. This feature is particularly striking among the 3-PPP derivatives as well as the opioids. The butyrophenone haloperidol is the most potent drug at sigma receptors we have detected. Among the series of butyrophenones, receptor affinity is primarily associated with the 4-phenylpiperidine moiety. Conformational calculations for various compounds indicate a fairly wide range of tolerance for distances between the aromatic ring and the amine nitrogen, which may account for the potency at sigma receptors of structures of considerable diversity. Among the wide range of structures that bind to sigma receptor-binding sites, the common pharmacophore associated with high receptor affinity is a phenylpiperidine with a lipophilic N-substituent.

  9. Molecular mechanisms of prolactin and its receptor.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Charles L

    2012-08-01

    Prolactin and the prolactin receptors are members of a family of hormone/receptor pairs which include GH, erythropoietin, and other ligand/receptor pairs. The mechanisms of these ligand/receptor pairs have broad similarities, including general structures, ligand/receptor stoichiometries, and activation of several common signaling pathways. But significant variations in the structural and mechanistic details are present among these hormones and their type 1 receptors. The prolactin receptor is particularly interesting because it can be activated by three sequence-diverse human hormones: prolactin, GH, and placental lactogen. This system offers a unique opportunity to compare the detailed molecular mechanisms of these related hormone/receptor pairs. This review critically evaluates selected literature that informs these mechanisms, compares the mechanisms of the three lactogenic hormones, compares the mechanism with those of other class 1 ligand/receptor pairs, and identifies information that will be required to resolve mechanistic ambiguities. The literature describes distinct mechanistic differences between the three lactogenic hormones and their interaction with the prolactin receptor and describes more significant differences between the mechanisms by which other related ligands interact with and activate their receptors.

  10. Glucocorticoid receptor transformation and DNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    Tienrungroj, W.

    1986-01-01

    The overall goal is to probe the mechanism whereby glucocorticoid receptors are transformed from a non-DNA-binding form to their active DNA-binding form. The author has examined the effect of an endogenous inhibitor purified from rat liver cytosol on receptor binding to DNA. The inhibitor binds to transformed receptors in whole cytosol and prevent their binding to DNA. He also examined the role of sulfhydryl groups in determining the DNA binding activity of the transformed receptor and in determining the transformation process. Treatment of rat liver cytosol containing temperature-transformed, (/sup 3/H)dexamethasone-bound receptors at 0/sup 0/C with the sulfhydryl modifying reagent methyl methanethiosulfonate inhibits the DNA-binding activity of the receptor, and DNA-binding activity is restored after addition of dithiothreitol. In addition, he has examined the relationship between receptor phosphorylation and DNA binding. Untransformed receptor complexes purified from cytosol prepared from mouse L cells grown in medium containing (/sup 32/P)orthophosphate contain two components, a 100 k-Da and a 90-kDa subunit, both of which are phosphoproteins. On transformation, the receptor dissociates from the 90-kDa protein. Transformation of the complex under cell free conditions does not result in a dephosphorylation of the 100-kDa steroid-binding protein. Transformed receptor that has been bound to DNA and purified by monoclonal antibody is still in a phosphorylated form. These results suggest that dephosphorylation is not required for receptor binding to DNA.

  11. The evolution of vertebrate opioid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Craig W.

    2011-01-01

    The proteins that mediate the analgesic and other effects of opioid drugs and endogenous opioid peptides are known as opioid receptors. Opioid receptors consist of a family of four closely-related proteins belonging to the large superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors. The three types of opioid receptors shown unequivocally to mediate analgesia in animal models are the mu (MOR), delta (DOR), and kappa (KOR) opioid receptor proteins. The role of the fourth member of the opioid receptor family, the nociceptin or orphanin FQ receptor (ORL), is not as clear as hyperalgesia, analgesia, and no effect was reported after administration of ORL agonists. There are now cDNA sequences for all four types of opioid receptors that are expressed in the brain of six species from three different classes of vertebrates. This review presents a comparative analysis of vertebrate opioid receptors using bioinformatics and data from recent human genome studies. Results indicate that opioid receptors arose by gene duplication, that there is a vector of opioid receptor divergence, and that MOR shows evidence of rapid evolution. PMID:19273128

  12. NMDA receptor contributions to visual contrast coding

    PubMed Central

    Manookin, Michael B.; Weick, Michael; Stafford, Benjamin K.; Demb, Jonathan B.

    2010-01-01

    Summary In the retina, it is not well understood how visual processing depends on AMPA- and NMDA-type glutamate receptors. Here, we investigated how these receptors contribute to contrast coding in identified guinea pig ganglion cell types, in vitro. NMDA-mediated responses were negligible in ON α cells but substantial in OFF α and δ cells. OFF δ cell NMDA receptors were composed of GluN2B subunits. Using a novel deconvolution method, we determined the individual contributions of AMPA, NMDA and inhibitory currents to light responses of each cell type. OFF α and δ cells used NMDA receptors for encoding either the full contrast range (α), including near-threshold responses, or only a high range (δ). However, contrast sensitivity depended substantially on NMDA receptors only in OFF α cells. NMDA receptors contribute to visual contrast coding in a cell-type specific manner. Certain cell types generate excitatory responses using primarily AMPA receptors or disinhibition. PMID:20670835

  13. Targeting Nuclear Receptors with Marine Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunyan; Li, Qianrong; Li, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are important pharmaceutical targets because they are key regulators of many metabolic and inflammatory diseases, including diabetes, dyslipidemia, cirrhosis, and fibrosis. As ligands play a pivotal role in modulating nuclear receptor activity, the discovery of novel ligands for nuclear receptors represents an interesting and promising therapeutic approach. The search for novel NR agonists and antagonists with enhanced selectivities prompted the exploration of the extraordinary chemical diversity associated with natural products. Recent studies involving nuclear receptors have disclosed a number of natural products as nuclear receptor ligands, serving to re-emphasize the translational possibilities of natural products in drug discovery. In this review, the natural ligands of nuclear receptors will be described with an emphasis on their mechanisms of action and their therapeutic potentials, as well as on strategies to determine potential marine natural products as nuclear receptor modulators. PMID:24473166

  14. Structure, function, and regulation of adrenergic receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Strosberg, A. D.

    1993-01-01

    Adrenergic receptors for adrenaline and noradrenaline belong to the large multigenic family of receptors coupled to GTP-binding proteins. Three pharmacologic types have been identified: alpha 1-, alpha 2-, and beta-adrenergic receptors. Each of these has three subtypes, characterized by both structural and functional differences. The alpha 2 and beta receptors are coupled negatively and positively, respectively, to adenylyl cyclase via Gi or Gs regulatory proteins, and the alpha 1 receptors modulate phospholipase C via the Go protein. Subtype expression is regulated at the level of the gene, the mRNA, and the protein through various transcriptional and postsynthetic mechanisms. Adrenergic receptors constitute, after rhodopsin, one of the best studied models for the other receptors coupled to G proteins that are likely to display similar structural and functional properties. PMID:8401205

  15. Olfactory receptor neuron profiling using sandalwood odorants.

    PubMed

    Bieri, Stephan; Monastyrskaia, Katherine; Schilling, Boris

    2004-07-01

    The mammalian olfactory system can discriminate between volatile molecules with subtle differences in their molecular structures. Efforts in synthetic chemistry have delivered a myriad of smelling compounds of different qualities as well as many molecules with very similar olfactive properties. One important class of molecules in the fragrance industry are sandalwood odorants. Sandalwood oil and four synthetic sandalwood molecules were selected to study the activation profile of endogenous olfactory receptors when exposed to compounds from the same odorant family. Dissociated rat olfactory receptor neurons were exposed to the sandalwood molecules and the receptor activation studied by monitoring fluxes in the internal calcium concentration. Olfactory receptor neurons were identified that were specifically stimulated by sandalwood compounds. These neurons expressed olfactory receptors that can discriminate between sandalwood odorants with slight differences in their molecular structures. This is the first study in which an important class of perfume compounds was analyzed for its ability to activate endogenous olfactory receptors in olfactory receptor neurons.

  16. Targeting nuclear receptors with marine natural products.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunyan; Li, Qianrong; Li, Yong

    2014-01-27

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are important pharmaceutical targets because they are key regulators of many metabolic and inflammatory diseases, including diabetes, dyslipidemia, cirrhosis, and fibrosis. As ligands play a pivotal role in modulating nuclear receptor activity, the discovery of novel ligands for nuclear receptors represents an interesting and promising therapeutic approach. The search for novel NR agonists and antagonists with enhanced selectivities prompted the exploration of the extraordinary chemical diversity associated with natural products. Recent studies involving nuclear receptors have disclosed a number of natural products as nuclear receptor ligands, serving to re-emphasize the translational possibilities of natural products in drug discovery. In this review, the natural ligands of nuclear receptors will be described with an emphasis on their mechanisms of action and their therapeutic potentials, as well as on strategies to determine potential marine natural products as nuclear receptor modulators.

  17. Solubilization and reconstitution of renal vasopressin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Aiyar, N.; Nambi, P.; Stassen, F.; Crooke, S.T.

    1987-05-01

    Renal vasopressin receptors (V/sub 2/) mediating antidiuresis are coupled to adenylate cyclase. To determine the molecular properties of these vasopressin receptors, it is necessary to solubilize the receptors from the membranes. Solubilization of vasopressin receptors in the non-liganded state was shown to abolish hormone recognition. To preserve ligand binding capacity they have developed reconstitution procedures for the renal vasopressin receptors. The pig kidney membranes were solubilized using a zwitterionic detergent, egg lysolecithin and then reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles. Specific binding of (/sup 3/H) lysine vasopressin ((/sup 3/H)LVP) to these solubilized reconstituted fractions was fast, saturable and increased linearly with protein concentration. Scatchard analysis of (/sup 3/H)LVP binding indicated the presence of single class of binding sites with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 2.3 nM. In competition binding experiments, the solubilized receptors displayed the same pharmacological profile as was observed with membrane V/sub 2/ receptors.

  18. Binding of ATP to the progesterone receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Moudgil, V K; Toft, D O

    1975-01-01

    The possible interaction of progesterone--receptor complexes with nucleotides was tested by affinity chromatography. The cytosol progesterone receptor from hen oviduct was partially purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation before use. When progesterone was bound to the receptor, the resulting complex could be selectively adsorbed onto columns of ATP-Sepharose. This interaction was reversible and of an ionic nature since it could be disrupted by high-salt conditions. A competitive binding assay was used to test the specificity of receptor binding to several other nucleotides, including ADP, AMP, and cAMP. A clear specificity for binding ATP was evident from these studies. When ATP was added to receptor preparations, the nucleotide did not affect the sedimentation properties or hormone binding characteristics of the receptor. Although the function of ATP remains unknown, these studies indicate a role of this nucleotide in some aspect of hormone receptor activity. PMID:165493

  19. Receptor arrays optimized for natural odor statistics.

    PubMed

    Zwicker, David; Murugan, Arvind; Brenner, Michael P

    2016-05-17

    Natural odors typically consist of many molecules at different concentrations. It is unclear how the numerous odorant molecules and their possible mixtures are discriminated by relatively few olfactory receptors. Using an information theoretic model, we show that a receptor array is optimal for this task if it achieves two possibly conflicting goals: (i) Each receptor should respond to half of all odors and (ii) the response of different receptors should be uncorrelated when averaged over odors presented with natural statistics. We use these design principles to predict statistics of the affinities between receptors and odorant molecules for a broad class of odor statistics. We also show that optimal receptor arrays can be tuned to either resolve concentrations well or distinguish mixtures reliably. Finally, we use our results to predict properties of experimentally measured receptor arrays. Our work can thus be used to better understand natural olfaction, and it also suggests ways to improve artificial sensor arrays.

  20. Hunting Viral Receptors Using Haploid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pillay, Sirika; Carette, Jan E.

    2016-01-01

    Viruses have evolved intricate mechanisms to gain entry into the host cell. Identification of critical receptors has enabled insights into virus particle internalization, host and tissue tropism, and viral pathogenesis. In this review we discuss the most commonly employed methods for virus receptor discovery, specifically highlighting the use of forward genetic screens in human haploid cells. The ability to generate true knockout alleles at high saturation provides a sensitive means to study virus-host interactions. As an example, haploid genetic screens identified the lysosomal proteins, NPC1 and LAMP1, as intracellular receptors for Ebola virus and Lassa virus, respectively. From these studies emerges the notion that receptor usage by these viruses is highly dynamic involving a programmed switch from cell surface receptor to intracellular receptor. Broad application of genetic knockout approaches will chart functional landscapes of receptors and endocytic pathways hijacked by viruses. PMID:26958914

  1. Ligands for Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Geoffrey T.; Sakai, Ryuichi

    Marine-derived small molecules and peptides have played a central role in elaborating pharmacological specificities and neuronal functions of mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs), the primary mediators of excitatory syn-aptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS). As well, the pathological sequelae elicited by one class of compounds (the kainoids) constitute a widely-used animal model for human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). New and existing molecules could prove useful as lead compounds for the development of therapeutics for neuropathologies that have aberrant glutamatergic signaling as a central component. In this chapter we discuss natural source origins and pharmacological activities of those marine compounds that target ionotropic glutamate receptors.

  2. Ligands for Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Geoffrey T.; Sakai, Ryuichi

    2010-01-01

    Marine-derived small molecules and peptides have played a central role in elaborating pharmacological specificities and neuronal functions of mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs), the primary mediators of excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS). As well, the pathological sequelae elicited by one class of compounds (the kainoids) constitute a widely-used animal model for human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE). New and existing molecules could prove useful as lead compounds for the development of therapeutics for neuropathologies that have aberrant glutamatergic signaling as a central component. In this chapter we discuss natural source origins and pharmacological activities of those marine compounds that target ionotropic glutamate receptors. PMID:19184587

  3. What are Nuclear Receptor Ligands?

    PubMed Central

    Sladek, Frances M.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a family of highly conserved transcription factors that regulate transcription in response to small lipophilic compounds. They play a role in every aspect of development, physiology and disease in humans. They are also ubiquitous in and unique to the animal kingdom suggesting that they may have played an important role in their evolution. In contrast to the classical endocrine receptors that originally defined the family, recent studies suggest that the first NRs might have been sensors of their environment, binding ligands that were external to the host organism. The purpose of this review is to provide a broad perspective on NR ligands and address the issue of exactly what constitutes a NR ligand from historical, biological and evolutionary perspectives. This discussion will lay the foundation for subsequent reviews in this issue as well as pose new questions for future investigation. PMID:20615454

  4. Measurement of Receptor Signaling Bias.

    PubMed

    Kenakin, Terry

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are often pleiotropically linked to numerous cellular signaling mechanisms in cells, and it is now known that many agonists differentially activate some signaling pathways at the expense of others. The mechanism for this effect is the stabilization of different active receptor states by different agonists, and it leads to varying qualities of efficacy for different agonists. Agonist bias is a powerful mechanism to amplify beneficial signals and diminish harmful signals, and thus improve the overall profile of agonist ligands. This unit describes a method to quantify agonist bias with a scale that enables medicinal chemists to amplify or reduce these effects in new molecules. The method is based on the Black/Leff operational model and yields a statistical estimate of the confidence for bias measurements. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27636109

  5. A new family of insect tyramine receptors.

    PubMed

    Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Klaerke, Dan A; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P

    2005-12-16

    The Drosophila Genome Project database contains a gene, CG7431, annotated to be an "unclassifiable biogenic amine receptor." We have cloned this gene and expressed it in Chinese hamster ovary cells. After testing various ligands for G protein-coupled receptors, we found that the receptor was specifically activated by tyramine (EC(50), 5x10(-7)M) and that it showed no cross-reactivity with beta-phenylethylamine, octopamine, dopa, dopamine, adrenaline, noradrenaline, tryptamine, serotonin, histamine, and a library of 20 Drosophila neuropeptides (all tested in concentrations up to 10(-5) or 10(-4)M). The receptor was also expressed in Xenopus oocytes, where it was, again, specifically activated by tyramine with an EC(50) of 3x10(-7)M. Northern blots showed that the receptor is already expressed in 8-hour-old embryos and that it continues to be expressed in all subsequent developmental stages. Adult flies express the receptor both in the head and body (thorax/abdomen) parts. In addition to the Drosophila tyramine receptor gene, CG7431, we found another closely related Drosophila gene, CG16766, that probably also codes for a tyramine receptor. Furthermore, we annotated similar tyramine-like receptor genes in the genomic databases from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae and the honeybee Apis mellifera. These four tyramine or tyramine-like receptors constitute a new receptor family that is phylogenetically distinct from the previously identified insect octopamine/tyramine receptors. The Drosophila tyramine receptor is, to our knowledge, the first cloned insect G protein-coupled receptor that appears to be fully specific for tyramine.

  6. Aza compounds as anion receptors

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Hung Sui; Yang, Xiao-Qing; McBreen, James

    1998-01-06

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of Li.sup.+ ion in alkali metal batteries.

  7. Aza compounds as anion receptors

    DOEpatents

    Lee, H.S.; Yang, X.Q.; McBreen, J.

    1998-01-06

    A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of Li{sup +} ion in alkali metal batteries. 3 figs.

  8. Acetylcholine Receptor: An Allosteric Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changeux, Jean-Pierre; Devillers-Thiery, Anne; Chemouilli, Phillippe

    1984-09-01

    The nicotine receptor for the neurotransmitter acetylcholine is an allosteric protein composed of four different subunits assembled in a transmembrane pentamer α 2β γ δ . The protein carries two acetylcholine sites at the level of the α subunits and contains the ion channel. The complete sequence of the four subunits is known. The membrane-bound protein undergoes conformational transitions that regulate the opening of the ion channel and are affected by various categories of pharmacologically active ligands.

  9. N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor mediated toxicity in nonneuronal cell lines: characterization using fluorescent measures of cell viability and reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Anegawa, N J; Guttmann, R P; Grant, E R; Anand, R; Lindstrom, J; Lynch, D R

    2000-05-01

    Cells transfected with specific N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subtypes undergo cell death that mimics glutamate-induced excitotoxicity pharmacologically. We have further characterized the mechanisms of cell death resulting from NMDA receptor activation in such cells through development of cell counting methods based on co-transfection with green fluorescent protein. When co-transfected with NMDA receptors, GFP expression was limited to live cells as indicated by the observation that GFP was only detected in cells which were positive for markers of live cells, and was found in no cells which were trypan blue or propidium iodide positive. Using co-transfection with green fluorescent protein and cell counting of viable cells with a fluorescence activated cells sorter, we confirmed the subunit-specific profile of NMDA receptor-mediated cell death in cells transfected with NMDA receptors. Toxicity was greatest in the NR1A/2A receptor, less in the NR1A/2B receptor, and least in NR1A/2C receptors. Cell death also differed pharmacologically between subunit combinations. Cell death in cells transfected with NR 1A/2A was blocked by amino-phosphonovaleric acid at lower concentrations than in cells transfected with NR 1A/2B. In cells transfected with the NR1A/2A or NR1A/2B combinations but not NR1A/2C, cell death was also associated with production of reactive oxygen species. In addition, removal of the final 400 amino acids of the C-terminal region of NR2A decreased cell death. The use of GFP based cell counting provides a sensitive mechanism for assessing the mechanism of excitotoxicity in transfected cell models.

  10. Insulin receptor in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Petruzzelli, L.; Herrera, R.; Rosen, O.

    1986-05-01

    A specific, high affinity insulin receptor is present in both adult Drosophila and in Drosophila embryos. Wheat germ lectin-enriched extracts of detergent-solubilized membranes from embryos and adults bind insulin with a K/sub d/ of 15 nM. Binding is specific for insulin; micromolar concentrations of proinsulin, IGFI, and IGFII are required to displace bound /sup 125/I-insulin. Insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase activity appears during embryogenesis. It is evident between 6 and 12 hours of development, peaks between 12 and 18 hours and falls in the adult. During 0-6 hours of embryogenesis, and in the adult, a specific protein band (Mr = 135,000) is crosslinked to /sup 125/I-insulin. During 6-12 and 12-18 hours of embryogenesis stages in which insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase is high, an additional band (Mr = 100,000) becomes crosslinked to /sup 125/I-insulin. Isolation and DNA sequence analysis of genomic clones encoding the Drosophila insulin receptor will be presented as will the characterization of insulin receptor mRNA's during development.

  11. Modes of glutamate receptor gating

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Gabriela K

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The time course of excitatory synaptic currents, the major means of fast communication between neurons of the central nervous system, is encoded in the dynamic behaviour of post-synaptic glutamate-activated channels. First-pass attempts to explain the glutamate-elicited currents with mathematical models produced reaction mechanisms that included only the most basic functionally defined states: resting vs. liganded, closed vs. open, responsive vs. desensitized. In contrast, single-molecule observations afforded by the patch-clamp technique revealed an unanticipated kinetic multiplicity of transitions: from microseconds-lasting flickers to minutes-long modes. How these kinetically defined events impact the shape of the synaptic response, how they relate to rearrangements in receptor structure, and whether and how they are physiologically controlled represent currently active research directions. Modal gating, which refers to the slowest, least frequently observed ion-channel transitions, has been demonstrated for representatives of all ion channel families. However, reaction schemes have been largely confined to the short- and medium-range time scales. For glutamate receptors as well, modal gating has only recently come under rigorous scrutiny. This article reviews the evidence for modal gating of glutamate receptors and the still developing hypotheses about the mechanism(s) by which modal shifts occur and the ways in which they may impact the time course of synaptic transmission. PMID:22106181

  12. [Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Engen, Kristine; Agartz, Ingrid

    2016-06-01

    BACKGROUND In 2007 a clinical disease caused by autoantibodies directed against the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor was described for the first time. Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis is a subacute, autoimmune neurological disorder with psychiatric manifestations. The disease is a form of limbic encephalitis and is often paraneoplastic. The condition is also treatable. In this review article we examine the development of the disease, clinical practice, diagnostics and treatment.MATERIAL AND METHOD The article is based on references retrieved from searches in PubMed, and a discretionary selection of articles from the authors' own literature archive.RESULTS The disease most frequently affects young women. It may initially be perceived as a psych