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Sample records for a2a receptor complex

  1. Adenosine A2A receptor ligand recognition and signaling is blocked by A2B receptors.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Sonja; Navarro, Gemma; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel; Seibt, Benjamin F; Ammon, York-Christoph; de Filippo, Elisabetta; Danish, Azeem; Lacher, Svenja K; Červinková, Barbora; Rafehi, Muhammad; Fuxe, Kjell; Schiedel, Anke C; Franco, Rafael; Müller, Christa E

    2018-03-02

    The adenosine receptor (AR) subtypes A 2A and A 2B are rhodopsin-like G s protein-coupled receptors whose expression is highly regulated under pathological, e.g. hypoxic, ischemic and inflammatory conditions. Both receptors play important roles in inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases, are blocked by caffeine, and have now become major drug targets in immuno-oncology. By Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET), bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and proximity ligation assays (PLA) we demonstrated A 2A -A 2B AR heteromeric complex formation. Moreover we observed a dramatically altered pharmacology of the A 2A AR when co-expressed with the A 2B AR (A 2B ≥ A 2A ) in recombinant as well as in native cells. In the presence of A 2B ARs, A 2A -selective ligands lost high affinity binding to A 2A ARs and displayed strongly reduced potency in cAMP accumulation and dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays. These results have major implications for the use of A 2A AR ligands as drugs as they will fail to modulate the receptor in an A 2A -A 2B heteromer context. Accordingly, A 2A -A 2B AR heteromers represent novel pharmacological targets.

  2. A2A receptor ligands: past, present and future trends.

    PubMed

    Clementina, Manera; Giuseppe, Saccomanni

    2010-01-01

    The adenosine A(2A) receptor is a member of the G protein-coupled receptor family and mediates multiple physiological effects of adenosine, both at the central nervous system and at peripheral tissues. Increasing evidence relates the A(2A) receptor with several pathological conditions such as neurodegenerative disorders, inflammation, pharmacological stress, and wound healing renewing the interest in A(2A) receptor agonists and antagonists as promising leads for drugs. However some of them initially tested in clinical trials presented several side effects, short half-life, lower solubility, and in some cases a lack of effects, perhaps attributable to receptor desensitization or to low receptor density in the targeted tissue. For these reasons it is evident that additional rational chemical modifications of the existing A(2A) receptor ligands to improve their affinity/selectivity and bioavailability as well as further studies to get new template for A(2A)AR ligands are necessary. The purpose of this review is to analyze and summarize the past and the present aspects related to the medicinal chemistry of A(2A) receptor ligands. Moreover their current and possible therapeutic applications have been also highlighted.

  3. An update on adenosine A2A receptors as drug target in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Vallano, Antoni; Fernandez-Duenas, Victor; Pedros, Consuelo; Arnau, Josep Maria; Ciruela, Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Adenosine receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that mediate the physiological functions of adenosine. In the central nervous system adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A)Rs) are highly enriched in striatopallidal neurons where they form functional oligomeric complexes with other GPCRs such us the dopamine D(2) receptor (D(2)R). Furthermore, it is assumed that the formation of balanced A(2A)R/D(2)R receptor oligomers are essential for correct striatal function as the allosteric receptor-receptor interactions established within the oligomer are needed for properly sensing adenosine and dopamine. Interestingly, A(2A)R activation reduces the affinity of striatal D(2)R for dopamine and the blockade of A(2A)R with specific antagonists facilitates function of the D(2)R. Thus, it may be postulated that A(2A)R antagonists are pro-dopaminergic agents. Therefore, A(2A)R antagonists will potentially reduce the effects associated with dopamine depletion in Parkinson's disease (PD). Accordingly, this class of compounds have recently attracted considerable attention as potential therapeutic agents for PD pharmacotherapy as they have shown potential effectiveness in counteracting motor dysfunctions and also displayed neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects in animal models of PD. Overall, we provide here an update of the current state of the art of these A(2A)R-based approaches that are under clinical study as agents devoted to alleviate PD symptoms.

  4. The importance of the adenosine A(2A) receptor-dopamine D(2) receptor interaction in drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Filip, M; Zaniewska, M; Frankowska, M; Wydra, K; Fuxe, K

    2012-01-01

    Drug addiction is a serious brain disorder with somatic, psychological, psychiatric, socio-economic and legal implications in the developed world. Illegal (e.g., psychostimulants, opioids, cannabinoids) and legal (alcohol, nicotine) drugs of abuse create a complex behavioral pattern composed of drug intake, withdrawal, seeking and relapse. One of the hallmarks of drugs that are abused by humans is that they have different mechanisms of action to increase dopamine (DA) neurotransmission within the mesolimbic circuitry of the brain and indirectly activate DA receptors. Among the DA receptors, D(2) receptors are linked to drug abuse and addiction because their function has been proven to be correlated with drug reinforcement and relapses. The recognition that D(2) receptors exist not only as homomers but also can form heteromers, such as with the adenosine (A)(2A) receptor, that are pharmacologically and functionally distinct from their constituent receptors, has significantly expanded the range of potential drug targets and provided new avenues for drug design in the search for novel drug addiction therapies. The aim of this review is to bring current focus on A(2A) receptors, their physiology and pharmacology in the central nervous system, and to discuss the therapeutic relevance of these receptors to drug addiction. We concentrate on the contribution of A(2A) receptors to the effects of different classes of drugs of abuse examined in preclinical behavioral experiments carried out with pharmacological and genetic tools. The consequences of chronic drug treatment on A(2A) receptor-assigned functions in preclinical studies are also presented. Finally, the neurochemical mechanism of the interaction between A(2A) receptors and drugs of abuse in the context of the heteromeric A(2A)-D(2) receptor complex is discussed. Taken together, a significant amount of experimental analyses provide evidence that targeting A(2A) receptors may offer innovative translational strategies

  5. Adenosine A2A receptor antagonists are potential antidepressants: evidence based on pharmacology and A2A receptor knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Yacoubi, Malika El; Ledent, Catherine; Parmentier, Marc; Bertorelli, Rosalia; Ongini, Ennio; Costentin, Jean; Vaugeois, Jean-Marie

    2001-01-01

    Adenosine, an ubiquitous neuromodulator, and its analogues have been shown to produce ‘depressant' effects in animal models believed to be relevant to depressive disorders, while adenosine receptor antagonists have been found to reverse adenosine-mediated ‘depressant' effect. We have designed studies to assess whether adenosine A2A receptor antagonists, or genetic inactivation of the receptor would be effective in established screening procedures, such as tail suspension and forced swim tests, which are predictive of clinical antidepressant activity. Adenosine A2A receptor knockout mice were found to be less sensitive to ‘depressant' challenges than their wildtype littermates. Consistently, the adenosine A2A receptor blockers SCH 58261 (1 – 10 mg kg−1, i.p.) and KW 6002 (0.1 – 10 mg kg−1, p.o.) reduced the total immobility time in the tail suspension test. The efficacy of adenosine A2A receptor antagonists in reducing immobility time in the tail suspension test was confirmed and extended in two groups of mice. Specifically, SCH 58261 (1 – 10 mg kg−1) and ZM 241385 (15 – 60 mg kg−1) were effective in mice previously screened for having high immobility time, while SCH 58261 at 10 mg kg−1 reduced immobility of mice that were selectively bred for their spontaneous ‘helplessness' in this assay. Additional experiments were carried out using the forced swim test. SCH 58261 at 10 mg kg−1 reduced the immobility time by 61%, while KW 6002 decreased the total immobility time at the doses of 1 and 10 mg kg−1 by 75 and 79%, respectively. Administration of the dopamine D2 receptor antagonist haloperidol (50 – 200 μg kg−1 i.p.) prevented the antidepressant-like effects elicited by SCH 58261 (10 mg kg−1 i.p.) in forced swim test whereas it left unaltered its stimulant motor effects. In conclusion, these data support the hypothesis that A2A receptor antagonists prolong escape

  6. Interactions between Calmodulin, Adenosine A2A, and Dopamine D2 Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Gemma; Aymerich, Marisol S.; Marcellino, Daniel; Cortés, Antoni; Casadó, Vicent; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I.; Agnati, Luigi; Woods, Amina S.; Fuxe, Kjell; Lluís, Carmen; Lanciego, Jose Luis; Ferré, Sergi; Franco, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    The Ca2+-binding protein calmodulin (CaM) has been shown to bind directly to cytoplasmic domains of some G protein-coupled receptors, including the dopamine D2 receptor. CaM binds to the N-terminal portion of the long third intracellular loop of the D2 receptor, within an Arg-rich epitope that is also involved in the binding to Gi/o proteins and to the adenosine A2A receptor, with the formation of A2A-D2 receptor heteromers. In the present work, by using proteomics and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) techniques, we provide evidence for the binding of CaM to the A2A receptor. By using BRET and sequential resonance energy transfer techniques, evidence was obtained for CaM-A2A-D2 receptor oligomerization. BRET competition experiments indicated that, in the A2A-D2 receptor heteromer, CaM binds preferentially to a proximal C terminus epitope of the A2A receptor. Furthermore, Ca2+ was found to induce conformational changes in the CaM-A2A-D2 receptor oligomer and to selectively modulate A2A and D2 receptor-mediated MAPK signaling in the A2A-D2 receptor heteromer. These results may have implications for basal ganglia disorders, since A2A-D2 receptor heteromers are being considered as a target for anti-parkinsonian agents. PMID:19632986

  7. Adenosine A(2A) receptor dynamics studied with the novel fluorescent agonist Alexa488-APEC.

    PubMed

    Brand, Frank; Klutz, Athena M; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Fredholm, Bertil B; Schulte, Gunnar

    2008-08-20

    G protein-coupled receptors, such as the adenosine A(2A) receptor, are dynamic proteins, which undergo agonist-dependent redistribution from the cell surface to intracellular membranous compartments, such as endosomes. In order to study the kinetics of adenosine A(2A) receptor redistribution in living cells, we synthesized a novel fluorescent agonist, Alexa488-APEC. Alexa488-APEC binds to adenosine A(2A) (K(i)=149+/-27 nM) as well as A(3) receptors (K(i)=240+/-160 nM) but not to adenosine A(1) receptors. Further, we characterized the dose-dependent increase in Alexa488-APEC-induced cAMP production as well as cAMP response element binding (CREB) protein phosphorylation, verifying the ligand's functionality at adenosine A(2A) but not A(2B) receptors. In live-cell imaging studies, Alexa488-APEC-induced adenosine A(2A) receptor internalization, which was blocked by the competitive reversible antagonist ZM 241385 and hyperosmolaric sucrose. Further, internalized adenosine A(2A) receptors co-localized with clathrin and Rab5, indicating that agonist stimulation promotes adenosine A(2A) receptor uptake through a clathrin-dependent mechanism to Rab5-positive endosomes. The basic characterization of Alexa488-APEC described here showed that it provides a useful tool for tracing adenosine A(2A) receptors in vitro.

  8. Adenosine A2a receptors and O2 sensing in development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Reduced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, via activation of adenylate kinase and the resulting exponential rise in the cellular AMP/ATP ratio, appears to be a critical factor underlying O2 sensing in many chemoreceptive tissues in mammals. The elevated AMP/ATP ratio, in turn, activates key enzymes that are involved in physiologic adjustments that tend to balance ATP supply and demand. An example is the conversion of AMP to adenosine via 5′-nucleotidase and the resulting activation of adenosine A2A receptors, which are involved in acute oxygen sensing by both carotid bodies and the brain. In fetal sheep, A2A receptors associated with carotid bodies trigger hypoxic cardiovascular chemoreflexes, while central A2A receptors mediate hypoxic inhibition of breathing and rapid eye movements. A2A receptors are also involved in hypoxic regulation of fetal endocrine systems, metabolism, and vascular tone. In developing lambs, A2A receptors play virtually no role in O2 sensing by the carotid bodies, but brain A2A receptors remain critically involved in the roll-off ventilatory response to hypoxia. In adult mammals, A2A receptors have been implicated in O2 sensing by carotid glomus cells, while central A2A receptors likely blunt hypoxic hyperventilation. In conclusion, A2A receptors are crucially involved in the transduction mechanisms of O2 sensing in fetal carotid bodies and brains. Postnatally, central A2A receptors remain key mediators of hypoxic respiratory depression, but they are less critical for O2 sensing in carotid chemoreceptors, particularly in developing lambs. PMID:21677265

  9. Ligand-dependent oligomerization of dopamine D(2) and adenosine A(2A) receptors in living neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Vidi, Pierre-Alexandre; Chemel, Benjamin R; Hu, Chang-Deng; Watts, Val J

    2008-09-01

    Adenosine A(2A) and dopamine D(2) receptors (A(2A) and D(2)) associate in homo- and heteromeric complexes in the striatum, providing a structural basis for their mutual antagonism. At the cellular level, the portion of receptors engaging in homo- and heteromers, as well as the effect of persistent receptor activation or antagonism on the cell oligomer repertoire, are largely unknown. We have used bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) to visualize A(2A) and D(2) oligomerization in the Cath.a differentiated neuronal cell model. Receptor fusions to BiFC fluorescent protein fragments retained their function when expressed alone or in A(2A)/A(2A), D(2)/D(2), and A(2A)/D(2) BiFC pairs. Robust fluorescence complementation reflecting A(2A)/D(2) heteromers was detected at the cell membrane as well as in endosomes. In contrast, weaker BiFC signals, largely confined to intracellular domains, were detected with A(2A)/dopamine D(1) BiFC pairs. Multicolor BiFC was used to simultaneously visualize A(2A) and D(2) homo- and heteromers in living cells and to examine drug-induced changes in receptor oligomers. Prolonged D(2) stimulation with quinpirole lead to the internalization of D(2)/D(2) and A(2A)/D(2) oligomers and resulted in decreased A(2A)/D(2) relative to A(2A)/A(2A) oligomer formation. Opposing effects were observed in cells treated with D(2) antagonists or with the A(2A) agonist 5'-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine (MECA). Subsequent radioreceptor binding analysis indicated that the drug-induced changes in oligomer formation were not readily explained by alterations in receptor density. These observations support the hypothesis that long-term drug exposure differentially alters A(2A)/D(2) receptor oligomerization and provide the first demonstration for the use of BiFC to monitor drug-modulated GPCR oligomerization.

  10. Adenosine A2A Receptors Modulate Acute Injury and Neuroinflammation in Brain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Pedata, Felicita; Pugliese, Anna Maria; Coppi, Elisabetta; Dettori, Ilaria; Maraula, Giovanna; Cellai, Lucrezia; Melani, Alessia

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular concentration of adenosine in the brain increases dramatically during ischemia. Adenosine A2A receptor is expressed in neurons and glial cells and in inflammatory cells (lymphocytes and granulocytes). Recently, adenosine A2A receptor emerged as a potential therapeutic attractive target in ischemia. Ischemia is a multifactorial pathology characterized by different events evolving in the time. After ischemia the early massive increase of extracellular glutamate is followed by activation of resident immune cells, that is, microglia, and production or activation of inflammation mediators. Proinflammatory cytokines, which upregulate cell adhesion molecules, exert an important role in promoting recruitment of leukocytes that in turn promote expansion of the inflammatory response in ischemic tissue. Protracted neuroinflammation is now recognized as the predominant mechanism of secondary brain injury progression. A2A receptors present on central cells and on blood cells account for important effects depending on the time-related evolution of the pathological condition. Evidence suggests that A2A receptor antagonists provide early protection via centrally mediated control of excessive excitotoxicity, while A2A receptor agonists provide protracted protection by controlling massive blood cell infiltration in the hours and days after ischemia. Focus on inflammatory responses provides for adenosine A2A receptor agonists a wide therapeutic time-window of hours and even days after stroke. PMID:25165414

  11. Membrane omega-3 fatty acids modulate the oligomerisation kinetics of adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guixà-González, Ramon; Javanainen, Matti; Gómez-Soler, Maricel; Cordobilla, Begoña; Domingo, Joan Carles; Sanz, Ferran; Pastor, Manuel; Ciruela, Francisco; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Selent, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Membrane levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an essential omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (ω-3 PUFA), are decreased in common neuropsychiatric disorders. DHA modulates key cell membrane properties like fluidity, thereby affecting the behaviour of transmembrane proteins like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These receptors, which have special relevance for major neuropsychiatric disorders have recently been shown to form dimers or higher order oligomers, and evidence suggests that DHA levels affect GPCR function by modulating oligomerisation. In this study, we assessed the effect of membrane DHA content on the formation of a class of protein complexes with particular relevance for brain disease: adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptor oligomers. Using extensive multiscale computer modelling, we find a marked propensity of DHA for interaction with both A2A and D2 receptors, which leads to an increased rate of receptor oligomerisation. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) experiments performed on living cells suggest that this DHA effect on the oligomerisation of A2A and D2 receptors is purely kinetic. This work reveals for the first time that membrane ω-3 PUFAs play a key role in GPCR oligomerisation kinetics, which may have important implications for neuropsychiatric conditions like schizophrenia or Parkinson’s disease.

  12. Reduced response to the formalin test and lowered spinal NMDA glutamate receptor binding in adenosine A2A receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Hussey, Martin J; Clarke, Geoffrey D; Ledent, Catherine; Hourani, Susanna M O; Kitchen, Ian

    2007-06-01

    Adenosine is a neuromodulator with complex effects on pain pathways. Mice lacking the adenosine A2A receptor are hypoalgesic, and have altered analgesic responses to receptor-selective opioid agonists. These and other findings suggest a role for the adenosine A2A receptor in sensitizing afferent fibres projecting to the spinal cord. To test this hypothesis formalin (20 microl, 5%) was injected into the paw and nociceptive responses were measured in wildtype and adenosine A2A receptor knockout mice. There was a significant reduction in nociception associated with sensory nerve activation in the knockout mice as measured by time spent biting/licking the formalin-injected paw and number of flinches seen during the first phase, but only the number of flinches was reduced during the second inflammatory phase. In addition, the selective adenosine A2A antagonist SCH58261 (3 and 10 mg/kg) also antagonised both phases of the formalin test. We also labelled NMDA glutamate and NK1 receptors in spinal cord sections as an indirect measure of nociceptive transmission from peripheral sites to the spinal cord. [3H]-Substance P binding to NK1 receptors was unaltered but there was a substantial reduction in binding of [3H]-MK801 to NMDA glutamate receptors in all regions of the spinal cord from knockout mice. The decrease in NMDA glutamate receptor binding may reflect reduced peripheral sensory input to the spinal cord during development and could relate to the hypoalgesia in this genotype. These results support a key role for the adenosine A2A receptor in peripheral nociceptive pathways.

  13. Adenosine A(2A) receptors are necessary and sufficient to trigger memory impairment in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Pagnussat, N; Almeida, A S; Marques, D M; Nunes, F; Chenet, G C; Botton, P H S; Mioranzza, S; Loss, C M; Cunha, R A; Porciúncula, L O

    2015-08-01

    Caffeine (a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist) prevents memory deficits in aging and Alzheimer's disease, an effect mimicked by adenosine A2 A receptor, but not A1 receptor, antagonists. Hence, we investigated the effects of adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists on memory performance and scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice. We determined whether A2 A receptors are necessary for the emergence of memory impairments induced by scopolamine and whether A2 A receptor activation triggers memory deficits in naïve mice, using three tests to assess short-term memory, namely the object recognition task, inhibitory avoidance and modified Y-maze. Scopolamine (1.0 mg·kg(-1) , i.p.) impaired short-term memory performance in all three tests and this scopolamine-induced amnesia was prevented by the A2 A receptor antagonist (SCH 58261, 0.1-1.0 mg·kg(-1) , i.p.) and by the A1 receptor antagonist (DPCPX, 0.2-5.0 mg·kg(-1) , i.p.), except in the modified Y-maze where only SCH58261 was effective. Both antagonists were devoid of effects on memory or locomotion in naïve rats. Notably, the activation of A2 A receptors with CGS 21680 (0.1-0.5 mg·kg(-1) , i.p.) before the training session was sufficient to trigger memory impairment in the three tests in naïve mice, and this effect was prevented by SCH 58261 (1.0 mg·kg(-1) , i.p.). Furthermore, i.c.v. administration of CGS 21680 (50 nmol) also impaired recognition memory in the object recognition task. These results show that A2 A receptors are necessary and sufficient to trigger memory impairment and further suggest that A1 receptors might also be selectively engaged to control the cholinergic-driven memory impairment. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  14. Adenosine A2A receptors are necessary and sufficient to trigger memory impairment in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Pagnussat, N; Almeida, A S; Marques, D M; Nunes, F; Chenet, G C; Botton, P H S; Mioranzza, S; Loss, C M; Cunha, R A; Porciúncula, L O

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Caffeine (a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist) prevents memory deficits in aging and Alzheimer’s disease, an effect mimicked by adenosine A2A receptor, but not A1 receptor, antagonists. Hence, we investigated the effects of adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists on memory performance and scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice. Experimental Approach We determined whether A2A receptors are necessary for the emergence of memory impairments induced by scopolamine and whether A2A receptor activation triggers memory deficits in naïve mice, using three tests to assess short-term memory, namely the object recognition task, inhibitory avoidance and modified Y-maze. Key Results Scopolamine (1.0 mg·kg−1, i.p.) impaired short-term memory performance in all three tests and this scopolamine-induced amnesia was prevented by the A2A receptor antagonist (SCH 58261, 0.1–1.0 mg·kg−1, i.p.) and by the A1 receptor antagonist (DPCPX, 0.2–5.0 mg·kg−1, i.p.), except in the modified Y-maze where only SCH58261 was effective. Both antagonists were devoid of effects on memory or locomotion in naïve rats. Notably, the activation of A2A receptors with CGS 21680 (0.1–0.5 mg·kg−1, i.p.) before the training session was sufficient to trigger memory impairment in the three tests in naïve mice, and this effect was prevented by SCH 58261 (1.0 mg·kg−1, i.p.). Furthermore, i.c.v. administration of CGS 21680 (50 nmol) also impaired recognition memory in the object recognition task. Conclusions and Implications These results show that A2A receptors are necessary and sufficient to trigger memory impairment and further suggest that A1 receptors might also be selectively engaged to control the cholinergic-driven memory impairment. PMID:25939452

  15. Singular Location and Signaling Profile of Adenosine A2A-Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor Heteromers in the Dorsal Striatum.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Estefanía; Chiarlone, Anna; Medrano, Mireia; Puigdellívol, Mar; Bibic, Lucka; Howell, Lesley A; Resel, Eva; Puente, Nagore; Casarejos, María J; Perucho, Juan; Botta, Joaquín; Suelves, Nuria; Ciruela, Francisco; Ginés, Silvia; Galve-Roperh, Ismael; Casadó, Vicent; Grandes, Pedro; Lutz, Beat; Monory, Krisztina; Canela, Enric I; Lluís, Carmen; McCormick, Peter J; Guzmán, Manuel

    2018-04-01

    The dorsal striatum is a key node for many neurobiological processes such as motor activity, cognitive functions, and affective processes. The proper functioning of striatal neurons relies critically on metabotropic receptors. Specifically, the main adenosine and endocannabinoid receptors present in the striatum, ie, adenosine A 2A receptor (A 2A R) and cannabinoid CB 1 receptor (CB 1 R), are of pivotal importance in the control of neuronal excitability. Facilitatory and inhibitory functional interactions between striatal A 2A R and CB 1 R have been reported, and evidence supports that this cross-talk may rely, at least in part, on the formation of A 2A R-CB 1 R heteromeric complexes. However, the specific location and properties of these heteromers have remained largely unknown. Here, by using techniques that allowed a precise visualization of the heteromers in situ in combination with sophisticated genetically modified animal models, together with biochemical and pharmacological approaches, we provide a high-resolution expression map and a detailed functional characterization of A 2A R-CB 1 R heteromers in the dorsal striatum. Specifically, our data unveil that the A 2A R-CB 1 R heteromer (i) is essentially absent from corticostriatal projections and striatonigral neurons, and, instead, is largely present in striatopallidal neurons, (ii) displays a striking G protein-coupled signaling profile, where co-stimulation of both receptors leads to strongly reduced downstream signaling, and (iii) undergoes an unprecedented dysfunction in Huntington's disease, an archetypal disease that affects striatal neurons. Altogether, our findings may open a new conceptual framework to understand the role of coordinated adenosine-endocannabinoid signaling in the indirect striatal pathway, which may be relevant in motor function and neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Adenosine receptor A2A deficiency in leukocytes increases arterial neointima formation in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Zhang, Weiyu; Tang, Rong; Zhu, Chuhong; Bucher, Christoph; Blazar, Bruce R; Geng, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Chunxiang; Linden, Joel; Wu, Chaodong; Huo, Yuqing

    2010-05-01

    To use the mice deficient in both adenosine receptor A(2A)(A(2A)R(-/-)) and apolipoprotein E (apoE(-/-)) to investigate the role of A(2A)R in mediating the interactions of leukocytes with injured arterial walls and the formation of arterial neointima induced by a guide wire. In apoE(-/-) mice, A(2A)R deficiency increased the size of the arterial neointima in injured carotid arteries by 83%. Arterial neointima formation was also enhanced in chimeric mice that underwent bone marrow transplantation (these mice lacked A(2A)R in their bone marrow-derived cells). Epifluorescence intravital microscopy showed that neutrophil rolling and adherence to the injured arterial area were enhanced by 80% and 110% in A(2A)R(-/-)/apoE(-/-) mice, respectively. This phenomenon occurred even though the protein levels of homing molecules on A(2A)R-deficient neutrophils were unchanged from those of wild-type neutrophils. A(2A)R-deficient neutrophils exhibited an increase in the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) clustering, and the affinity of b(2) integrins. The inhibition of p38 phosphorylation abrogated the increased PSGL-1 clustering and beta(2) integrin affinity, thus reversing the increased homing ability of A(2A)R-deficient leukocytes. A(2A)R plays a complex role in inflammation and tissue injury. The deficiency of A(2A)R enhances the homing ability of leukocytes and increases the formation of the arterial neointima after injury. A(2A)R antagonists are being tested for the treatment of neurodegenerative and other chronic diseases. An evaluation of the effect of A(2A)R antagonists on arterial restenosis after arterial angioplasty should be conducted.

  17. A2A adenosine receptor upregulation correlates with disease activity in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Bortoluzzi, Alessandra; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Govoni, Marcello; Padovan, Melissa; Ravani, Annalisa; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2016-08-26

    Adenosine is a purine nucleoside implicated in the regulation of the innate and adaptive immune systems, acting through its interaction with four cell surface receptors: A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. There is intense interest in understanding how adenosine functions in health and during disease, but surprisingly little is known about the actual role of adenosine-mediated mechanisms in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). With this background, the aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that dysregulation of A1, A2A, A2B, and A3 adenosine receptors (ARs) in lymphocytes of patients with SLE may be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease and to examine the correlations between the status of the ARs and the clinical parameters of SLE. ARs were analyzed by performing saturation-binding assays, as well as messenger RNA and Western blot analysis, with lymphocytes of patients with SLE in comparison with healthy subjects. We tested the effect of A2AAR agonists in the nuclear factor kB (NF-kB) pathway and on the release of interferon (IFN)-α; tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α; and interleukin (IL)-2, IL-6, IL-1β, and IL-10. In lymphocytes obtained from 80 patients with SLE, A2AARs were upregulated compared with those of 80 age-matched healthy control subjects, while A1, A2B, and A3 ARs were unchanged. A2AAR density was inversely correlated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index 2000 score disease activity through time evaluated according to disease course patterns, serositis, hypocomplementemia, and anti-double-stranded DNA positivity. A2AAR activation inhibited the NF-kB activation pathway and diminished inflammatory cytokines (IFN-α, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-6, IL-1β), but it potentiated the release of anti-inflammatory IL-10. These data suggest the involvement of A2AARs in the complex pathogenetic network of SLE, acting as a modulator of the inflammatory process. It could represent a compensatory pathway to better counteract disease activity. A2AAR

  18. The adenosine a2a receptor inhibits matrix-induced inflammation in a novel fashion.

    PubMed

    Scheibner, Kara A; Boodoo, Sada; Collins, Samuel; Black, Katharine E; Chan-Li, Yee; Zarek, Paul; Powell, Jonathan D; Horton, Maureen R

    2009-03-01

    Endogenous mediators within the inflammatory milieu play a critical role in directing the scope, duration, and resolution of inflammation. High-molecular-weight extracellular matrix hyaluronan (HA) helps to maintain homeostasis. During inflammation, hyaluronan is broken down into fragments that induce chemokines and cytokines, thereby augmenting the inflammatory response. Tissue-derived adenosine, released during inflammation, inhibits inflammation via the anti-inflammatory A2 adenosine receptor (A2aR). We demonstrate that adenosine modulates HA-induced gene expression via the A2aR. A2aR stimulation inhibits HA fragment-induced pro-fibrotic genes TNF-alpha, keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2, and MIP-1alpha while simultaneously synergizing with hyaluronan fragments to up-regulate the TH1 cytokine IL-12. Interestingly, A2aR stimulation mediates these affects via the novel cAMP-activated guanine nucleotide exchange factor EPAC. In addition, A2aR-null mice are more susceptible to bleomycin-induced lung injury, consistent with a role for endogenous adenosine in inhibiting the inflammation that may lead to fibrosis. Indeed, the bleomycin treated A2aR-null mice demonstrate increased lung inflammation, HA accumulation, and histologic damage. Overall, our data elucidate the opposing roles of tissue-derived HA fragments and adenosine in regulating noninfectious lung inflammation and support the pursuit of A2aR agonists as a means of pharmacologically inhibiting inflammation that may lead to fibrosis.

  19. Reduced adenosine A2a receptor-mediated efferent arteriolar vasodilation contributes to diabetes-induced glomerular hyperfiltration.

    PubMed

    Persson, Patrik; Hansell, Peter; Palm, Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with increased risk for development of kidney disease, and an increased glomerular filtration rate is an early indication of altered kidney function. Here we determine whether reduced adenosine A2a receptor-mediated vasodilation of the efferent arteriole contributes to the increased glomerular filtration rate in diabetes. The glomerular filtration rate, renal blood flow, and proximal tubular stop flow pressure were investigated in control and streptozotocin-diabetic rats during baseline and after administration of the adenosine A2a receptor antagonist ZM241385 or the adenosine A2a receptor agonist CGS21680. The diabetes-induced glomerular hyperfiltration was reduced by 24% following A2a receptor stimulation but was unaffected by A2a receptor inhibition. Contrarily, glomerular filtration rate in controls increased by 22% after A2a receptor inhibition and was unaffected by A2a stimulation. The increased glomerular filtration rate after A2a receptor inhibition in controls and decreased glomerular filtration rate after A2a receptor activation in diabetics were caused by increased and decreased stop flow pressure, respectively. None of the interventions affected renal blood flow. Thus, the normal adenosine A2a receptor-mediated tonic vasodilation of efferent arterioles is abolished in the diabetic kidney. This causes increased efferent arteriolar resistance resulting in increased filtration fraction and hyperfiltration.

  20. Adenosine A2A receptor hyperexpression in patients with severe SIRS after cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Kerbaul, François; Bénard, Frédéric; Giorgi, Roch; Youlet, By; Carrega, Louis; Zouher, Ibrahim; Mercier, Laurence; Gérolami, Victoria; Bénas, Vincent; Blayac, Dorothée; Gariboldi, Vlad; Collart, Frédéric; Guieu, Régis

    2008-08-01

    Adenosine (ADO) is an endogenous nucleoside, which has been involved in blood pressure failure during severe systemic inflammatory response syndrome (severe SIRS) after cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Adenosine acts via its receptor subtypes, namely A1, A2A, A2B, or A3. Because A2A receptors are implicated in vascular tone, their expression might contribute to severe SIRS. We compared adenosine plasma levels (APLs) and A2A ADO receptor expression (ie, B, K, and mRNA amount) in patients with or without postoperative SIRS. : This was a prospective comparative observational study. Forty-four patients who underwent cardiac surgery involving CPB. Ten healthy subjects served as controls. Among the patients, 11 presented operative vasoplegia and postoperative SIRS (named complicated patients) and 33 were without vasoplegia or SIRS (named uncomplicated patients). Adenosine plasma levels, K, B, and mRNA amount (mean +/- SD) were measured on peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Adenosine plasma levels, B, and K were significantly higher in complicated patients than in uncomplicated patients (APLs: 2.7 +/- 1.0 vs 1.0 +/- 0.5 micromol l, P < 0.05; B: 210 +/- 43 vs 65 +/- 26 fmol/mg, P < 0.05; K: 35 +/- 10 vs 2 +/- 1 nM, P < 0.05). In uncomplicated patients, APLs remain higher than in controls (1 +/- 0.5 vs 0.6 +/- 0.25 micromol/L; P < 0.05). Mean arterial pressure was inversely correlated to APLs (R = -0.58; P < 0.001) and B (R = -0.64; P < 0.001) leading to an increased requirement of vasoactive drugs during the postoperative period in vasoplegic patients. High expression of A2A ADO receptor and high APLs may be a predictive factor of postoperative severe SIRS after CPB.

  1. Therapeutic Opportunities for Caffeine and A2A Receptor Antagonists in Retinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Boia, Raquel; Ambrósio, António Francisco; Santiago, Ana Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine, the major component of coffee, is the most consumed psychostimulant in the world. Caffeine is an adenosine analog and acts as a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist. The majority of the effects of caffeine are mainly mediated by the blockade of adenosine receptors, and the proved neuroprotective effects of caffeine in brain disorders have been mimicked by the blockade of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR). A growing body of evidence demonstrates that microglia-mediated neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of brain and retinal diseases. Moreover, the control of microglia reactivity by blocking A2AR has been proposed to be the mechanism underlying the observed protective effects of caffeine. Hence, it is conceivable that caffeine and A2AR antagonists offer therapeutic value for the treatment of retinal diseases, mainly those involving microglia-mediated neuroinflammation. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. A2A adenosine receptor ligand binding and signalling is allosterically modulated by adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Gracia, Eduard; Pérez-Capote, Kamil; Moreno, Estefanía; Barkešová, Jana; Mallol, Josefa; Lluís, Carme; Franco, Rafael; Cortés, Antoni; Casadó, Vicent; Canela, Enric I

    2011-05-01

    A2ARs (adenosine A2A receptors) are highly enriched in the striatum, which is the main motor control CNS (central nervous system) area. BRET (bioluminescence resonance energy transfer) assays showed that A2AR homomers may act as cell-surface ADA (adenosine deaminase; EC 3.5.4.4)-binding proteins. ADA binding affected the quaternary structure of A2ARs present on the cell surface. ADA binding to adenosine A2ARs increased both agonist and antagonist affinity on ligand binding to striatal membranes where these proteins are co-expressed. ADA also increased receptor-mediated ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2) phosphorylation. Collectively, the results of the present study show that ADA, apart from regulating the concentration of extracellular adenosine, may behave as an allosteric modulator that markedly enhances ligand affinity and receptor function. This powerful regulation may have implications for the physiology and pharmacology of neuronal A2ARs.

  3. Adenosine A2A Receptors in the Amygdala Control Synaptic Plasticity and Contextual Fear Memory

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Ana Patrícia; Machado, Nuno J; Gonçalves, Nélio; Kaster, Manuella P; Simões, Ana T; Nunes, Ana; Pereira de Almeida, Luís; Goosens, Ki Ann; Rial, Daniel; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2016-01-01

    The consumption of caffeine modulates working and reference memory through the antagonism of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) controlling synaptic plasticity processes in hippocampal excitatory synapses. Fear memory essentially involves plastic changes in amygdala circuits. However, it is unknown if A2ARs in the amygdala regulate synaptic plasticity and fear memory. We report that A2ARs in the amygdala are enriched in synapses and located to glutamatergic synapses, where they selectively control synaptic plasticity rather than synaptic transmission at a major afferent pathway to the amygdala. Notably, the downregulation of A2ARs selectively in the basolateral complex of the amygdala, using a lentivirus with a silencing shRNA (small hairpin RNA targeting A2AR (shA2AR)), impaired fear acquisition as well as Pavlovian fear retrieval. This is probably associated with the upregulation and gain of function of A2ARs in the amygdala after fear acquisition. The importance of A2ARs to control fear memory was further confirmed by the ability of SCH58261 (0.1 mg/kg; A2AR antagonist), caffeine (5 mg/kg), but not DPCPX (0.5 mg/kg; A1R antagonist), treatment for 7 days before fear conditioning onwards, to attenuate the retrieval of context fear after 24–48 h and after 7–8 days. These results demonstrate that amygdala A2ARs control fear memory and the underlying process of synaptic plasticity in this brain region. This provides a neurophysiological basis for the association between A2AR polymorphisms and phobia or panic attacks in humans and prompts a therapeutic interest in A2ARs to manage fear-related pathologies. PMID:27312408

  4. Adenosine A2A Receptor Antagonists and Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This Review summarizes and updates the work on adenosine A2A receptor antagonists for Parkinson’s disease from 2006 to the present. There have been numerous publications, patent applications, and press releases within this time frame that highlight new medicinal chemistry approaches to this attractive and promising target to treat Parkinson’s disease. The Review is broken down by scaffold type and will discuss the efforts to optimize particular scaffolds for activity, pharmacokinetics, and other drug discovery parameters. The majority of approaches focus on preparing selective A2A antagonists, but a few approaches to dual A2A/A1 antagonists will also be highlighted. The in vivo profiles of compounds will be highlighted and discussed to compare activities across different chemical series. A clinical report and update will be given on compounds that have entered clinical trials. PMID:22860156

  5. NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via a GABAergic mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S.

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is a powerful central neuromodulator acting via opposing A1 (inhibitor) and A2a (activator) receptors. However, in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), both adenosine receptor subtypes attenuate cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) sympathoinhibition of renal, adrenal, and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and attenuate reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Adenosine A1 receptors inhibit glutamatergic transmission in the CCR pathway, whereas adenosine A2a receptors most likely facilitate release of an unknown inhibitory neurotransmitter, which, in turn, inhibits the CCR. We hypothesized that adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the CCR via facilitation of GABA release in the NTS. In urethane-chloralose-anesthetized rats (n = 51), we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of the 5-HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (1–8 μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors [microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 (20 pmol/50 nl)] preceded by blockade of GABAA or GABAB receptors in the NTS [bicuculline (10 pmol/100 nl) or SCH-50911 (1 nmol/100 nl)]. Blockade of GABAA receptors virtually abolished adenosine A2a receptor-mediated inhibition of the CCR. GABAB receptors had much weaker but significant effects. These effects were similar for the different sympathetic outputs. We conclude that stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibits CCR-evoked hemodynamic and regional sympathetic reflex responses via a GABA-ergic mechanism. PMID:25910812

  6. Sympathetic activity relates to adenosine A(2A) receptor gene variation in blood-injury phobia.

    PubMed

    Hohoff, C; Domschke, K; Schwarte, K; Spellmeyer, G; Vögele, C; Hetzel, G; Deckert, J; Gerlach, A L

    2009-06-01

    Variation in the candidate genes adenosine A(2A) receptor (A(2A)R), catechol-O-methyl-transferase (COMT), and norepinephrine transporter (NET) has been suggested to influence vulnerability to panic disorder. We therefore investigated patients with another anxiety disorder with an even higher heritability, the blood-injury phobia, for association of these variants and used sympathetic measures during venipuncture, which serve as a naturalistic trigger of anxiety and autonomic hyperarousal, as an intermediate phenotype of anxiety. Patients homozygous for the A(2A)R 1976T allele as compared to patients carrying at least one 1976C allele exhibited a significantly increased respiratory rate with a trend towards elevated measures of systolic and diastolic blood pressure and respiratory minute volume. None of the sympathetic measures were influenced by the COMT or NET polymorphisms.This study provides preliminary data suggesting an influence of the A(2A)R 1976C/T polymorphism on sympathetic psychophysiological indicators of anxiety-related arousal in blood-injury phobia and thereby further supports a role of the A(2A)R gene in the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders.

  7. Key Modulatory Role of Presynaptic Adenosine A2A Receptors in Cortical Neurotransmission to the Striatal Direct Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz, César; Luján, Rafael; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Simoes, Ana Patrícia; Lerner, Talia N.; Borycz, Janusz; Kachroo, Anil; Canas, Paula M.; Orru, Marco; Schwarzschild, Michael A.; Rosin, Diane L.; Kreitzer, Anatol C.; Cunha, Rodrigo A.; Watanabe, Masahiko; Ferré, Sergi

    2009-01-01

    Basal ganglia processing results from a balanced activation of direct and indirect striatal efferent pathways, which are controlled by dopamine D1 and D2 receptors, respectively. Adenosine A2A receptors are considered novel antiparkinsonian targets, based on their selective postsynaptic localization in the indirect pathway, where they modulate D2 receptor function. The present study provides evidence for the existence of an additional, functionally significant, segregation of A2A receptors at the presynaptic level. Using integrated anatomical, electrophysiological, and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that presynaptic A2A receptors are preferentially localized in cortical glutamatergic terminals that contact striatal neurons of the direct pathway, where they exert a selective modulation of corticostriatal neurotransmission. Presynaptic striatal A2A receptors could provide a new target for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:19936569

  8. Key modulatory role of presynaptic adenosine A2A receptors in cortical neurotransmission to the striatal direct pathway.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, César; Luján, Rafael; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Simoes, Ana Patrícia; Lerner, Talia N; Borycz, Janusz; Kachroo, Anil; Canas, Paula M; Orru, Marco; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Rosin, Diane L; Kreitzer, Anatol C; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Watanabe, Masahiko; Ferré, Sergi

    2009-11-18

    Basal ganglia processing results from a balanced activation of direct and indirect striatal efferent pathways, which are controlled by dopamine D1 and D2 receptors, respectively. Adenosine A2A receptors are considered novel antiparkinsonian targets, based on their selective postsynaptic localization in the indirect pathway, where they modulate D2 receptor function. The present study provides evidence for the existence of an additional, functionally significant, segregation of A2A receptors at the presynaptic level. Using integrated anatomical, electrophysiological, and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that presynaptic A2A receptors are preferentially localized in cortical glutamatergic terminals that contact striatal neurons of the direct pathway, where they exert a selective modulation of corticostriatal neurotransmission. Presynaptic striatal A2A receptors could provide a new target for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  9. The plant hormone zeatin riboside inhibits T lymphocyte activity via adenosine A2A receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Lappas, Courtney M

    2015-01-01

    Cytokinins are plant hormones that play an integral role in multiple aspects of plant growth and development. The biological functions of cytokinins in mammalian systems are, however, largely uncharacterized. The naturally occurring cytokinin zeatin riboside has recently been demonstrated to activate the mammalian adenosine A(2A) receptor, which is broadly expressed by various cell types including immune system cells, with the activation of the A(2A)R playing a role in the regulation of cells involved in both innate and adaptive immunity. We show for the first time that zeatin riboside modulates mammalian immune system activity via an A(2A)R-dependent mechanism. Specifically, zeatin riboside treatment induces the production of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) by T lymphocytes and inhibits the production by CD3(+)CD4(+) T cells of interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-2, tumor-necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-4 and IL-13, and the production by CD3(+)CD8(+) T cells of IFN-γ, IL-2 and TNF-α. Additionally, the upregulation of CD25, CD69 and CD40L by activated T lymphocytes is modulated by zeatin riboside. Zeatin riboside treatment also potently inhibits thioglycollate-induced peritoneal leukocytosis. The immunomodulatory activities of zeatin riboside are blocked by co-treatment with the selective A(2A)R antagonist ZM241385. These data suggest that zeatin riboside possesses therapeutic potential as a mammalian immunomodulatory agent.

  10. Pharmacological evidence for different populations of postsynaptic adenosine A2A receptors in the rat striatum

    PubMed Central

    Orrú, Marco; Quiroz, César; Guitart, Xavier; Ferré, Sergi

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) are highly concentrated in the striatum. Two pharmacological different functional populations of A2ARs have been recently described based on their different affinities for the A2AR antagonist SCH-442416. This compound has high affinity for A2ARs not forming heteromers or forming heteromers with adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs) while showing very low affinity for A2ARs forming heteromers with dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs). It has been widely described that striatal A1R-A2AR heteromers are preferentially localized presynaptically in the glutamatergic terminals that contact GABAergic dynorphinergic neurons, and that A2AR-D2R heteromers are localized postsynaptically in GABAergic enkephalinergic neurons. In the present study we provide evidence suggesting that SCH-442416 also targets postsynaptic A2AR not forming heteromers with D2R, which are involved in the motor depressant effects induced by D2R antagonists. SCH-442416 counteracted motor depression in rats induced by the D2R antagonist raclopride at a dose that did not produce motor activation or that blocked motor depression induced by an A2AR agonist. Furthermore, we re-evaluated the recently suggested key role of cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1Rs) in the effects of A2AR antagonists acting at postsynaptic A2ARs. By recording locomotor activity and monitoring striatal glutamate release induced by cortical electrical stimulation in rats after administration of A2AR and CB1R antagonists, we did not find evidence for any significant role of endocannabinoids in the post- or presynaptic effects of A2AR antagonists. The present results further suggest the existence of at least two functionally and pharmacologically different populations of striatal postsynaptic A2ARs. PMID:21752341

  11. Role of Microglia Adenosine A2A Receptors in Retinal and Brain Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Ana R.; Baptista, Filipa I.; Santos, Paulo F.; Cristóvão, Gonçalo; Ambrósio, António F.; Cunha, Rodrigo A.; Gomes, Catarina A.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroinflammation mediated by microglial cells in the brain has been commonly associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Whether this microglia-mediated neuroinflammation is cause or consequence of neurodegeneration is still a matter of controversy. However, it is unequivocal that chronic neuroinflammation plays a role in disease progression and halting that process represents a potential therapeutic strategy. The neuromodulator adenosine emerges as a promising targeting candidate based on its ability to regulate microglial proliferation, chemotaxis, and reactivity through the activation of its G protein coupled A2A receptor (A2AR). This is in striking agreement with the ability of A2AR blockade to control several brain diseases. Retinal degenerative diseases have been also associated with microglia-mediated neuroinflammation, but the role of A2AR has been scarcely explored. This review aims to compare inflammatory features of Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases with glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, discussing the therapeutic potential of A2AR in these degenerative conditions. PMID:25132733

  12. Adenosine A2A Receptor Deletion Blocks the Beneficial Effects of Lactobacillus reuteri in Regulatory T-Deficient Scurfy Mice

    PubMed Central

    He, Baokun; Hoang, Thomas K.; Tran, Dat Q.; Rhoads, Jon Marc; Liu, Yuying

    2017-01-01

    The lack of a functional Foxp3 transcription factor and regulatory T (Treg) cells causes lethal, CD4+ T cell-driven autoimmune diseases in scurfy (SF) mice and humans. Recent studies have shown that adenosine A2A receptor activation limits inflammation and tissue damage, thereby playing an anti-inflammatory role. However, the role of the adenosine A2A receptor in the development of disease in SF mice remains unclear. Using a genetic approach, we found that adenosine A2A receptor deletion in SF mice (SF⋅A2A-/-) does not affect early life events, the development of a lymphoproliferative disorder, or hyper-production of pro-inflammatory cytokines seen in the Treg-deficiency state. As shown previously, Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 treatment prolonged survival and reduced multiorgan inflammation in SF mice. In marked contrast, A2A receptor deletion completely blocked these beneficial effects of L. reuteri in SF mice. Altogether, these results suggest that although absence of the adenosine A2A receptor does not affect the development of disease in SF mice, it plays a critical role in the immunomodulation by L. reuteri in Treg-deficiency disease. The adenosine A2A receptor and its activation may have a role in treating other Treg dysfunction-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:29270168

  13. Ligand-dependent cholesterol interactions with the human A2A adenosine receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Young; Patel, Rohan; Lyman, Edward

    2013-01-01

    We present nearly ten microseconds of all-atom simulation data of a G-protein coupled receptor, the human A2A adenosine receptor, bound to four different ligands. Our focus is on binding of cholesterol to the “cholesterol consensus motif,” a cluster of five amino acids on the second and fourth transmembrane helices, which interact with two cholesterols in the intracellular leaflet of the bilayer. We find evidence for a ligand-specific interaction between the CCM and cholesterol, mediated by the rotameric dynamics and configuration of Trp129. Binding of the synthetic agonist UK432097 disrupts hydrogen bonding between Trp129 and Ser47, which activates the rotameric dynamics of Trp129 and disrupts the interaction with one of the two cholesterols. We also investigate the effect of four thermostabilizing mutations, three of which are located on helix two. The conformational stability of helix two has been proposed to be sensitive to interaction with cholesterol in the CCM, suggesting a mechanism for the thermostabilization. However, our data are instead suggestive of a force-field dependent “straightening” of helix two, and therefore offer no basis for rationalizing the effect of the quadruple mutant. PMID:23454349

  14. Ligand-Dependent Activation and Deactivation of the Human Adenosine A2A Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianing; Jonsson, Amanda L.; Beuming, Thijs; Shelley, John C.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are membrane proteins with critical functions in cellular signal transduction, representing a primary class of drug targets. Acting by direct binding, many drugs modulate GPCR activity and influence the signaling pathways associated with numerous diseases. However, complete details of ligand-dependent GPCR activation/deactivation are difficult to obtain from experiments. Therefore, it remains unclear how ligands modulate a GPCR’s activity. To elucidate the ligand-dependent activation/deactivation mechanism of the human adenosine A2A receptor (AA2AR), a member of the class A GPCRs, we performed large-scale unbiased molecular dynamics and metadynamics simulations of the receptor embedded in a membrane. At the atomic level, we have observed distinct structural states that resemble the active and inactive states. In particular we noted key structural elements changing in a highly concerted fashion during the conformational transitions, including six conformational states of a tryptophan (Trp2466.48). Our findings agree with a previously proposed view, that during activation, this tryptophan residue undergoes a rotameric transition that may be coupled to a series of coherent conformational changes, resulting in the opening of the G protein-binding site. Further, metadynamics simulations provide quantitative evidence for this mechanism, suggesting how ligand binding shifts the equilibrium between the active and inactive states. Our analysis also proposes that a few specific residues are associated with agonism/antagonism, affinity and selectivity, and suggests that the ligand-binding pocket can be thought of as having three distinct regions, providing dynamic features for structure-based design. Additional simulations with AA2AR bound to a novel ligand are consistent with our proposed mechanism. Generally, our study provides insights into the ligand-dependent AA2AR activation/deactivation in addition to what has been found in crystal

  15. Allosteric mechanisms within the adenosine A2A-dopamine D2 receptor heterotetramer

    PubMed Central

    Ferré, Sergi; Bonaventura, Jordi; Tomasi, Dardo; Navarro, Gemma; Moreno, Estefanía; Cortés, Antonio; Lluís, Carme; Casadó, Vicent; Volkow, Nora D.

    2017-01-01

    The structure constituted by a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) homodimer and a G protein provides a main functional unit and oligomeric entities can be viewed as multiples of dimers. For GPCR heteromers, experimental evidence supports a tetrameric structure, comprised of two different homodimers, each able to signal with its preferred G protein. GPCR homomers and heteromers can act as the conduit of allosteric interactions between orthosteric ligands. The well-known agonist/agonist allosteric interaction in the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR)-dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) heteromer, by which A2AR agonists decrease the affinity of D2R agonists, gave the first rationale for the use of A2AR antagonists in Parkinson’s disease. We review new pharmacological findings that can be explained in the frame of a tetrameric structure of the A2AR-D2R heteromer: first, ligand-independent allosteric modulations by the D2R that result in changes of the binding properties of A2AR ligands; second, differential modulation of the intrinsic efficacy of D2R ligands for G protein-dependent and independent signaling; third, the canonical antagonistic Gs-Gi interaction within the frame of the heteromer; and fourth, the ability of A2AR antagonists, including caffeine, to also exert the same allosteric modulations of D2R ligands than A2AR agonists, while A2AR agonists and antagonists counteract each other’s effects. These findings can have important clinical implications when evaluating the use of A2AR antagonists. They also call for the need of monitoring caffeine intake when evaluating the effect of D2R ligands, when used as therapeutic agents in neuropsychiatric disorders or as probes in imaging studies. PMID:26051403

  16. A role for a specific cholesterol interaction in stabilizing the Apo configuration of the human A(2A) adenosine receptor.

    PubMed

    Lyman, Edward; Higgs, Chris; Kim, Byungchan; Lupyan, Dmitry; Shelley, John C; Farid, Ramy; Voth, Gregory A

    2009-12-09

    The function of G-protein-coupled receptors is tightly modulated by the lipid environment. Long-timescale molecular dynamics simulations (totaling approximately 3 mus) of the A(2A) receptor in cholesterol-free bilayers, with and without the antagonist ZM241385 bound, demonstrate the instability of helix II in the apo receptor in cholesterol-poor membrane regions. We directly observe that the effect of cholesterol binding is to stabilize helix II against a buckling-type deformation, perhaps rationalizing the observation that the A(2A) receptor couples to G protein only in the presence of cholesterol (Zezula and Freissmuth, 2008). The results suggest a mechanism by which the A(2A) receptor may function as a coincidence detector, activating only in the presence of both cholesterol and agonist. We also observed a previously hypothesized conformation of the tryptophan "rotameric switch" on helix VI in which a phenylalanine on helix V positions the tryptophan out of the ligand binding pocket.

  17. GDNF control of the glutamatergic cortico-striatal pathway requires tonic activation of adenosine A2A Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Catarina A.R.V.; Simões, Patrícia F.; Canas, Paula M.; Quiroz, César; Sebastião, Ana M.; Ferré, Sergi; Cunha, Rodrigo A.; Ribeiro, Joaquim A.

    2009-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) affords neuroprotection in Parkinson’s disease in accordance with its ability to bolster nigrostriatal innervation. We previously found that GDNF facilitates dopamine release in a manner dependent on adenosine A2A receptor activation. Since motor dysfunction also involves modifications of striatal glutamatergic innervation, we now tested if GDNF and its receptor system, Ret (rearranged during transfection) and GFRα1 (GDNF family receptor alpha 1) controlled the cortico-striatal glutamatergic pathway in an A2A receptor-dependent manner. GDNF (10 ng/ml) enhanced (by ≈13%) glutamate release from rat striatal nerve endings, an effect potentiated (up to ≈ 30%) by the A2A receptor agonist CGS 21680 (10 nM) and prevented by the A2A receptor antagonist, SCH 58261 (50 nM). Triple immunocytochemical studies revealed that Ret and GFRα1 were located in 50% of rat striatal glutamatergic terminals (immunopositive for vesicular glutamate transporters-1/2), where they were found to be co-located with A2A receptors. Activation of the glutamatergic system upon in vivo electrical stimulation of the rat cortico-striatal input induced striatal Ret phosphoprylation that was prevented by pre-treatment with the A2A receptor antagonist, MSX-3 (3 mg/kg). The results provide the first functional and morphological evidence that GDNF controls cortico-striatal glutamatergic pathways in a manner largely dependent on the co-activation of adenosine A2A receptors. PMID:19141075

  18. Macrophage A2A Adenosinergic Receptor Modulates Oxygen-Induced Augmentation of Murine Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    D’Alessio, Franco R.; Eto, Yoshiki; Chau, Eric; Avalos, Claudia; Waickman, Adam T.; Garibaldi, Brian T.; Mock, Jason R.; Files, Daniel C.; Sidhaye, Venkataramana; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.; Powell, Jonathan; Horton, Maureen; King, Landon S.

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) causes significant morbidity and mortality. Exacerbating factors increasing the risk of ARDS remain unknown. Supplemental oxygen is often necessary in both mild and severe lung disease. The potential effects of supplemental oxygen may include augmentation of lung inflammation by inhibiting anti-inflammatory pathways in alveolar macrophages. We sought to determine oxygen-derived effects on the anti-inflammatory A2A adenosinergic (ADORA2A) receptor in macrophages, and the role of the ADORA2A receptor in lung injury. Wild-type (WT) and ADORA2A−/− mice received intratracheal lipopolysaccharide (IT LPS), followed 12 hours later by continuous exposure to 21% oxygen (control mice) or 60% oxygen for 1 to 3 days. We measured the phenotypic endpoints of lung injury and the alveolar macrophage inflammatory state. We tested an ADORA2A-specific agonist, CGS-21680 hydrochloride, in LPS plus oxygen-exposed WT and ADORA2A−/− mice. We determined the specific effects of myeloid ADORA2A, using chimera experiments. Compared with WT mice, ADORA2A−/− mice exposed to IT LPS and 60% oxygen demonstrated significantly more histologic lung injury, alveolar neutrophils, and protein. Macrophages from ADORA2A−/− mice exposed to LPS plus oxygen expressed higher concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines and cosignaling molecules. CGS-21680 prevented the oxygen-induced augmentation of lung injury after LPS only in WT mice. Chimera experiments demonstrated that the transfer of WT but not ADORA2A−/− bone marrow cells into irradiated ADORA2A−/− mice reduced lung injury after LPS plus oxygen, demonstrating myeloid ADORA2A protection. ADORA2A is protective against lung injury after LPS and oxygen. Oxygen after LPS increases macrophage activation to augment lung injury by inhibiting the ADORA2A pathway. PMID:23349051

  19. Allosteric interactions between agonists and antagonists within the adenosine A2A receptor-dopamine D2 receptor heterotetramer.

    PubMed

    Bonaventura, Jordi; Navarro, Gemma; Casadó-Anguera, Verònica; Azdad, Karima; Rea, William; Moreno, Estefanía; Brugarolas, Marc; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I; Lluís, Carme; Cortés, Antoni; Volkow, Nora D; Schiffmann, Serge N; Ferré, Sergi; Casadó, Vicent

    2015-07-07

    Adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR)-dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) heteromers are key modulators of striatal neuronal function. It has been suggested that the psychostimulant effects of caffeine depend on its ability to block an allosteric modulation within the A2AR-D2R heteromer, by which adenosine decreases the affinity and intrinsic efficacy of dopamine at the D2R. We describe novel unsuspected allosteric mechanisms within the heteromer by which not only A2AR agonists, but also A2AR antagonists, decrease the affinity and intrinsic efficacy of D2R agonists and the affinity of D2R antagonists. Strikingly, these allosteric modulations disappear on agonist and antagonist coadministration. This can be explained by a model that considers A2AR-D2R heteromers as heterotetramers, constituted by A2AR and D2R homodimers, as demonstrated by experiments with bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and bimolecular fluorescence and bioluminescence complementation. As predicted by the model, high concentrations of A2AR antagonists behaved as A2AR agonists and decreased D2R function in the brain.

  20. Allosteric interactions between agonists and antagonists within the adenosine A2A receptor-dopamine D2 receptor heterotetramer

    PubMed Central

    Bonaventura, Jordi; Navarro, Gemma; Casadó-Anguera, Verònica; Azdad, Karima; Rea, William; Moreno, Estefanía; Brugarolas, Marc; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I.; Lluís, Carme; Cortés, Antoni; Volkow, Nora D.; Schiffmann, Serge N.; Ferré, Sergi; Casadó, Vicent

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR)-dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) heteromers are key modulators of striatal neuronal function. It has been suggested that the psychostimulant effects of caffeine depend on its ability to block an allosteric modulation within the A2AR-D2R heteromer, by which adenosine decreases the affinity and intrinsic efficacy of dopamine at the D2R. We describe novel unsuspected allosteric mechanisms within the heteromer by which not only A2AR agonists, but also A2AR antagonists, decrease the affinity and intrinsic efficacy of D2R agonists and the affinity of D2R antagonists. Strikingly, these allosteric modulations disappear on agonist and antagonist coadministration. This can be explained by a model that considers A2AR-D2R heteromers as heterotetramers, constituted by A2AR and D2R homodimers, as demonstrated by experiments with bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and bimolecular fluorescence and bioluminescence complementation. As predicted by the model, high concentrations of A2AR antagonists behaved as A2AR agonists and decreased D2R function in the brain. PMID:26100888

  1. Striatal Pre- and Postsynaptic Profile of Adenosine A2A Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz, César; Beaumont, Vahri; Goldberg, Steven R.; Lluís, Carme; Cortés, Antoni; Franco, Rafael; Casadó, Vicent; Canela, Enric I.; Ferré, Sergi

    2011-01-01

    Striatal adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) are highly expressed in medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the indirect efferent pathway, where they heteromerize with dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs). A2ARs are also localized presynaptically in cortico-striatal glutamatergic terminals contacting MSNs of the direct efferent pathway, where they heteromerize with adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs). It has been hypothesized that postsynaptic A2AR antagonists should be useful in Parkinson's disease, while presynaptic A2AR antagonists could be beneficial in dyskinetic disorders, such as Huntington's disease, obsessive-compulsive disorders and drug addiction. The aim or this work was to determine whether selective A2AR antagonists may be subdivided according to a preferential pre- versus postsynaptic mechanism of action. The potency at blocking the motor output and striatal glutamate release induced by cortical electrical stimulation and the potency at inducing locomotor activation were used as in vivo measures of pre- and postsynaptic activities, respectively. SCH-442416 and KW-6002 showed a significant preferential pre- and postsynaptic profile, respectively, while the other tested compounds (MSX-2, SCH-420814, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261) showed no clear preference. Radioligand-binding experiments were performed in cells expressing A2AR-D2R and A1R-A2AR heteromers to determine possible differences in the affinity of these compounds for different A2AR heteromers. Heteromerization played a key role in the presynaptic profile of SCH-442416, since it bound with much less affinity to A2AR when co-expressed with D2R than with A1R. KW-6002 showed the best relative affinity for A2AR co-expressed with D2R than co-expressed with A1R, which can at least partially explain the postsynaptic profile of this compound. Also, the in vitro pharmacological profile of MSX-2, SCH-420814, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261 was is in accordance with their mixed pre- and postsynaptic profile. On the basis of their preferential

  2. Past, present and future of A2A adenosine receptor antagonists in the therapy of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Armentero, Marie Therese; Pinna, Annalisa; Ferré, Sergi; Lanciego, José Luis; Müller, Christa E.; Franco, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Several selective antagonists for adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) are currently under evaluation in clinical trials (phases I to III) to treat Parkinson’s disease, and they will probably soon reach the market. The usefulness of these antagonists has been deduced from studies demonstrating functional interactions between dopamine D2 and adenosine A2A receptors in the basal ganglia. At present it is believed that A2AR antagonists can be used in combination with the dopamine precursor L-DOPA to minimize the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s patients. However, a considerable body of data indicates that in addition to ameliorating motor symptoms, adenosine A2AR antagonists may also prevent neurodegeneration. Despite these promising indications, one further issue must be considered in order to develop fully optimized anti-parkinsonian drug therapy, namely the existence of receptor (hetero)dimers/oligomers of G protein-coupled receptors, a topic currently the focus of intense debate within the scientific community. Dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs) expressed in the striatum are known to form heteromers with A2A adenosine receptors. Thus, the development of heteromer-specific A2A receptor antagonists represents a promising strategy for the identification of more selective and safer drugs. PMID:21810444

  3. A 2A adenosine receptor regulates glia proliferation and pain after peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Bura, S Andreea; Nadal, Xavier; Ledent, Catherine; Maldonado, Rafael; Valverde, Olga

    2008-11-15

    Peripheral nerve injury produces a persistent neuropathic pain state characterized by spontaneous pain, allodynia and hyperalgesia. In this study, we evaluated the possible involvement of A 2ARs in the development of neuropathic pain and the expression of microglia and astrocytes in the spinal cord after sciatic nerve injury. For this purpose, partial ligation of the sciatic nerve was performed in A 2A knockout mice and wild-type littermates. The development of mechanical and thermal allodynia, as well as thermal hyperalgesia was evaluated by using the von Frey filament model, the cold-plate test and the plantar test, respectively. In wild-type animals, sciatic nerve injury led to a neuropathic pain syndrome that was revealed in these three nociceptive behavioural tests. However, a significant decrease of the mechanical allodynia and a suppression of thermal hyperalgesia and allodynia were observed in A 2AR deficient mice. The expression of microglia and astrocytes was enhanced in wild-type mice exposed to sciatic nerve injury and this response was attenuated in knockout animals. Taken together, our results demonstrate the involvement of A 2ARs in the control of neuropathic pain and propose this receptor as an interesting target for the development of new drugs for the management of this clinical syndrome.

  4. Adenosine A2A Receptor Signaling in the Immunopathogenesis of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Rajasundaram, Skanda

    2018-01-01

    Our increasing appreciation of adenosine as an endogenous signaling molecule that terminates inflammation has generated excitement regarding the potential to target adenosine receptors (ARs) in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS), a disease of chronic neuroinflammation. Of the four G protein-coupled ARs, A2ARs are the principal mediator of adenosine’s anti-inflammatory effects and accordingly, there is a growing body of evidence surrounding the role of A2ARs in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the dominant animal model of MS. Such evidence points to a complex, often paradoxical role for A2ARs in the immunopathogenesis of EAE, where they have the ability to both exacerbate and alleviate disease severity. This review seeks to interpret these paradoxical findings and evaluate the therapeutic promise of A2ARs. In essence, the complexities of A2AR signaling arise from two properties. Firstly, A2AR signaling downregulates the inflammatory potential of TH lymphocytes whilst simultaneously facilitating the recruitment of these cells into the CNS. Secondly, A2AR expression by myeloid cells – infiltrating macrophages and CNS-resident microglia – has the capacity to promote both tissue injury and repair in chronic neuroinflammation. Consequently, the therapeutic potential of targeting A2ARs is greatly undermined by the risk of collateral tissue damage in the periphery and/or CNS. PMID:29559972

  5. Exploring an interaction of adenosine A2A receptor variability with coffee and tea intake in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Tan, E K; Lu, Z Y; Fook-Chong, S M C; Tan, E; Shen, H; Chua, E; Yih, Y; Teo, Y Y; Zhao, Y

    2006-09-05

    Caffeine is an adenosine receptor A1 and A2A receptor antagonist and a putative functional genetic variant of the A2A receptor (2592C > Tins) mediates caffeine-induced anxiety. Here we investigated the potential interaction of this A2A genetic variant with the quantity of coffee and tea intake and their relationship with the risk of PD. A total of 441 subjects consisting of 222 PD and 219 race, gender and age matched controls were included. A multivariate analysis of the variables including the 2592C > Tins A2A genotypes, age of onset, gender, and the quantity of tea and coffee intake, interaction of the A2A genotypes with coffee intake, interaction of A2A genotypes with tea intake demonstrated the quantity of coffee intake to be significantly associated with PD (P < 0.0005, OR = 0.922, 95% CI: 0.881, 0.964). However, there was no significant interaction of the A2A genotypes with the quantity of coffee and tea intake in modulating the risk of PD. The dose dependent protective effect of coffee intake in PD was independent of the 2592C > Tins A2A genotype suggesting that the pharmacogenetic action of caffeine in PD may be mediated differently from other caffeine-induced neurologic syndromes.

  6. LASSBio-897 Reduces Lung Injury Induced by Silica Particles in Mice: Potential Interaction with the A2A Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Vinicius F.; Ferreira, Tatiana P. T.; de Arantes, Ana C. S.; Noël, François; Tesch, Roberta; Sant’Anna, Carlos M. R.; Barreiro, Eliezer J. L.; Fraga, Carlos A. M.; Rodrigues e Silva, Patrícia M.; Martins, Marco A.

    2017-01-01

    Silicosis is a lethal fibro-granulomatous pulmonary disease highly prevalent in developing countries, for which no proper therapy is available. Among a small series of N-acylhydrazones, the safrole-derived compound LASSBio-897 (3-thienylidene-3, 4-methylenedioxybenzoylhydrazide) raised interest due to its ability to bind to the adenosine A2A receptor. Here, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic potential of LASSBio-897, exploring translation to a mouse model of silicosis and the A2A receptor as a site of action. Pulmonary mechanics, inflammatory, and fibrotic changes were assessed 28 days after intranasal instillation of silica particles in Swiss–Webster mice. Glosensor cAMP HEK293G cells, CHO cells stably expressing human adenosine receptors and ligand binding assay were used to evaluate the pharmacological properties of LASSBio-897 in vitro. Molecular docking studies of LASSBio-897 were performed using the genetic algorithm software GOLD 5.2. We found that the interventional treatment with the A2A receptor agonist CGS 21680 reversed silica particle-induced airway hyper-reactivity as revealed by increased responses of airway resistance and lung elastance following aerosolized methacholine. LASSBio-897 (2 and 5 mg/kg, oral) similarly reversed pivotal lung pathological features of silicosis in this model, reducing levels of airway resistance and lung elastance, granuloma formation and collagen deposition. In competition assays, LASSBio-897 decreased the binding of the selective A2A receptor agonist [3H]-CGS21680 (IC50 = 9.3 μM). LASSBio-897 (50 μM) induced modest cAMP production in HEK293G cells, but it clearly synergized the cAMP production by adenosine in a mechanism sensitive to the A2A antagonist SCH 58261. This synergism was also seen in CHO cells expressing the A2A, but not those expressing A2B, A1 or A3 receptors. Based on the evidence that LASSBio-897 binds to A2A receptor, molecular docking studies were performed using the A2A receptor

  7. Functional histamine H3 and adenosine A2A receptor heteromers in recombinant cells and rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Márquez-Gómez, Ricardo; Robins, Meridith T; Gutiérrez-Rodelo, Citlaly; Arias, Juan-Manuel; Olivares-Reyes, Jesús-Alberto; van Rijn, Richard M; Arias-Montaño, José-Antonio

    2018-03-01

    In the striatum, histamine H 3 receptors (H 3 Rs) are co-expressed with adenosine A 2A receptors (A 2A Rs) in the cortico-striatal glutamatergic afferents and the GABAergic medium-sized spiny neurons that originate the indirect pathway of the basal ganglia. This location allows H 3 Rs and A 2A Rs to regulate the striatal GABAergic and glutamatergic transmission. However, whether these receptors can physically interact has not yet been assessed. To test this hypothesis, a heteromer-selective in vitro assay was used to detect functional complementation between a chimeric A 2A R 302 -Gα qi4 and wild-type H 3 Rs in transfected HEK-293T cells. H 3 R activation with the agonist RAMH resulted in Ca 2+ mobilization (pEC 50 7.31 ± 0.23; maximal stimulation, Emax 449 ± 25% of basal) indicative of receptor heterodimerization. Functional H 3 R-A 2A R heteromers were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and observations of differential cAMP signaling when both receptors were co-expressed in the same cells. In membranes from rat striatal synaptosomes, H 3 R activation decreased A 2A R affinity for the agonist CGS-21680 (pKi values 8.10 ± 0.04 and 7.70 ± 0.04). Moreover, H 3 Rs and A 2A Rs co-immunoprecipitated in protein extracts from striatal synaptosomes. These results support the existence of a H 3 R-A 2A R heteromer with possible physiological implications for the modulation of the intra-striatal transmission. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Multi-Inhibitory Effects of A2A Adenosine Receptor Signaling on Neutrophil Adhesion Under Flow.

    PubMed

    Yago, Tadayuki; Tsukamoto, Hiroki; Liu, Zhenghui; Wang, Ying; Thompson, Linda F; McEver, Rodger P

    2015-10-15

    A2A adenosine receptor (A2AAR) signaling negatively regulates inflammatory responses in many disease models, but the detailed mechanisms remain unclear. We used the selective A2AAR agonist, ATL313, to examine how A2AAR signaling affects human and murine neutrophil adhesion under flow. Treating neutrophils with ATL313 inhibited selectin-induced, β2 integrin-dependent slow rolling and chemokine-induced, β2 integrin-dependent arrest on ICAM-1. ATL313 inhibited selectin-induced β2 integrin extension, which supports slow rolling, and chemokine-induced hybrid domain "swing-out," which supports arrest. Furthermore, ATL313 inhibited integrin outside-in signaling as revealed by reduced neutrophil superoxide production and spreading on immobilized anti-β2 integrin Ab. ATL313 suppressed selectin-triggered activation of Src family kinases (SFKs) and p38 MAPK, chemokine-triggered activation of Ras-related protein 1, and β2 integrin-triggered activation of SFKs and Vav cytoskeletal regulatory proteins. ATL313 activated protein kinase A and its substrate C-terminal Src kinase, an inhibitor of SFKs. Treating neutrophils with a protein kinase A inhibitor blocked the actions of ATL313. In vivo, ATL313-treated neutrophils rolled faster and arrested much less frequently in postcapillary venules of the murine cremaster muscle after TNF-α challenge. Furthermore, ATL313 markedly suppressed neutrophil migration into the peritoneum challenged with thioglycollate. ATL313 did not affect A2AAR-deficient neutrophils, confirming its specificity. Our findings provide new insights into the anti-inflammatory mechanisms of A2AAR signaling and the potential utility of A2AAR agonists in inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. Molecular Evidence of Adenosine Deaminase Linking Adenosine A2A Receptor and CD26 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Estefanía; Canet, Júlia; Gracia, Eduard; Lluís, Carme; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I.; Cortés, Antoni; Casadó, Vicent

    2018-01-01

    Adenosine is an endogenous purine nucleoside that acts in all living systems as a homeostatic network regulator through many pathways, which are adenosine receptor (AR)-dependent and -independent. From a metabolic point of view, adenosine deaminase (ADA) is an essential protein in the regulation of the total intracellular and extracellular adenosine in a tissue. In addition to its cytosolic localization, ADA is also expressed as an ecto-enzyme on the surface of different cells. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (CD26) and some ARs act as binding proteins for extracellular ADA in humans. Since CD26 and ARs interact with ADA at opposite sites, we have investigated if ADA can function as a cell-to-cell communication molecule by bridging the anchoring molecules CD26 and A2AR present on the surfaces of the interacting cells. By combining site-directed mutagenesis of ADA amino acids involved in binding to A2AR and a modification of the bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) technique that allows detection of interactions between two proteins expressed in different cell populations with low steric hindrance (NanoBRET), we show direct evidence of the specific formation of trimeric complexes CD26-ADA-A2AR involving two cells. By dynamic mass redistribution assays and ligand binding experiments, we also demonstrate that A2AR-NanoLuc fusion proteins are functional. The existence of this ternary complex is in good agreement with the hypothesis that ADA could bridge T-cells (expressing CD26) and dendritic cells (expressing A2AR). This is a new metabolic function for ecto-ADA that, being a single chain protein, it has been considered as an example of moonlighting protein, because it performs more than one functional role (as a catalyst, a costimulator, an allosteric modulator and a cell-to-cell connector) without partitioning these functions in different subunits. PMID:29497379

  10. Nucleus Accumbens Adenosine A2A Receptors Regulate Exertion of Effort by Acting on the Ventral Striatopallidal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mingote, Susana; Font, Laura; Farrar, Andrew M.; Vontell, Regina; Worden, Lila T.; Stopper, Colin M.; Port, Russell G.; Sink, Kelly S.; Bunce, Jamie G.; Chrobak, James J.; Salamone, John D.

    2009-01-01

    Goal-directed actions are sensitive to work-related response costs, and dopamine in nucleus accumbens is thought to modulate the exertion of effort in motivated behavior. Dopamine-rich striatal areas such as nucleus accumbens also contain high numbers of adenosine A2A receptors, and, for that reason, the behavioral and neurochemical effects of the adenosine A2A receptor agonist CGS 21680 [2-p-(2-carboxyethyl) phenethylamino-5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine] were investigated. Stimulation of accumbens adenosine A2A receptors disrupted performance of an instrumental task with high work demands (i.e., an interval lever-pressing schedule with a ratio requirement attached) but had little effect on a task with a lower work requirement. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that accumbens neurons that project to the ventral pallidum showed adenosine A2A receptors immunoreactivity. Moreover, activation of accumbens A2A receptors by local injections of CGS 21680 increased extracellular GABA levels in the ventral pallidum. Combined contralateral injections of CGS 21680 into the accumbens and the GABAA agonist muscimol into ventral pallidum (i.e., “disconnection” methods) also impaired response output, indicating that these structures are part of a common neural circuitry regulating the exertion of effort. Thus, accumbens adenosine A2A receptors appear to regulate behavioral activation and effort-related processes by modulating the activity of the ventral striatopallidal pathway. Research on the effort-related functions of these forebrain systems may lead to a greater understanding of pathological features of motivation, such as psychomotor slowing, anergia, and fatigue in depression. PMID:18768698

  11. Adenosine A(2A) receptor up-regulates retinal wave frequency via starburst amacrine cells in the developing rat retina.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pin-Chien; Hsiao, Yu-Tien; Kao, Shao-Yen; Chen, Ching-Feng; Chen, Yu-Chieh; Chiang, Chung-Wei; Lee, Chien-Fei; Lu, Juu-Chin; Chern, Yijuang; Wang, Chih-Tien

    2014-01-01

    Developing retinas display retinal waves, the patterned spontaneous activity essential for circuit refinement. During the first postnatal week in rodents, retinal waves are mediated by synaptic transmission between starburst amacrine cells (SACs) and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The neuromodulator adenosine is essential for the generation of retinal waves. However, the cellular basis underlying adenosine's regulation of retinal waves remains elusive. Here, we investigated whether and how the adenosine A(2A) receptor (A(2A)R) regulates retinal waves and whether A(2A)R regulation of retinal waves acts via presynaptic SACs. We showed that A(2A)R was expressed in the inner plexiform layer and ganglion cell layer of the developing rat retina. Knockdown of A(2A)R decreased the frequency of spontaneous Ca²⁺ transients, suggesting that endogenous A(2A)R may up-regulate wave frequency. To investigate whether A(2A)R acts via presynaptic SACs, we targeted gene expression to SACs by the metabotropic glutamate receptor type II promoter. Ca²⁺ transient frequency was increased by expressing wild-type A(2A)R (A2AR-WT) in SACs, suggesting that A(2A)R may up-regulate retinal waves via presynaptic SACs. Subsequent patch-clamp recordings on RGCs revealed that presynaptic A(2A)R-WT increased the frequency of wave-associated postsynaptic currents (PSCs) or depolarizations compared to the control, without changing the RGC's excitability, membrane potentials, or PSC charge. These findings suggest that presynaptic A(2A)R may not affect the membrane properties of postsynaptic RGCs. In contrast, by expressing the C-terminal truncated A(2A)R mutant (A(2A)R-ΔC) in SACs, the wave frequency was reduced compared to the A(2A)R-WT, but was similar to the control, suggesting that the full-length A(2A)R in SACs is required for A(2A)R up-regulation of retinal waves. A(2A)R up-regulates the frequency of retinal waves via presynaptic SACs, requiring its full-length protein structure. Thus, by

  12. Changes in spinal delta and kappa opioid systems in mice deficient in the A2A receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Alexis; Ledent, Catherine; Kelly, Mary; Hourani, Susanna M O; Kitchen, Ian

    2002-11-01

    A large body of evidence indicates important interactions between the adenosine and opioid systems in regulating pain at both the spinal and supraspinal level. Mice lacking the A(2A) receptor gene have been developed successfully, and these animals were shown to be hypoalgesic. To investigate whether there are any compensatory alterations in opioid systems in mutant animals, we have performed quantitative autoradiographic mapping of mu, delta, kappa, and opioid receptor-like (ORL1) opioid receptors in the brains and spinal cords of wild-type and homozygous A(2A) receptor knock-out mice. In addition, mu-, delta-, and kappa-mediated antinociception using the tail immersion test was tested in wild-type and homozygous A(2A) receptor knock-out mice. A significant reduction in [3H]deltorphin-I binding to delta receptors and a significant increase in [3H]CI-977 binding to kappa receptors was detected in the spinal cords but not in the brains of the knock-out mice. Mu and ORL1 receptor expression were not altered significantly. Moreover, a significant reduction in delta-mediated antinociception and a significant increase in kappa-mediated antinociception were detected in mutant mice, whereas mu-mediated antinociception was unaffected. Comparison of basal nociceptive latencies showed a significant hypoalgesia in knock-out mice when tested at 55 degrees C but not at 52 degrees C. The results suggest a functional interaction between the spinal delta and kappa opioid and the peripheral adenosine system in the control of pain pathways.

  13. A Role for a Specific Cholesterol Interaction in Stabilizing the Apo Configuration of the Human A2A Adenosine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lyman, Edward; Higgs, Chris; Kim, Byungchan; Lupyan, Dmitry; Shelley, John C.; Farid, Ramy; Voth, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The function of G-protein coupled receptors is tightly modulated by the lipid environment. Long timescale molecular dynamics simulations (totaling ~3 microsec) of the A2A receptor in cholesterol-free bilayers, with and without the antagonist ZM241385 bound, demonstrate an instability of helix II in the apo receptor in cholesterol-poor membrane regions. We directly observe that the effect of cholesterol binding is to stabilize helix II against a buckling type deformation, perhaps rationalizing the observation that the A2A receptor couples to G-protein only in the presence of cholesterol (Zezula and Freissmuth, 2008). The results suggest a mechanism by which the A2A receptor may function as a coincidence detector, activating only in the presence of both cholesterol and agonist. We also observed a previously hypothesized conformation of the tryptophan “rotameric switch” on helix VI in which a phenylalanine on helix V positions the tryptophan out of the ligand binding pocket. PMID:20004169

  14. Reinforcing and neurochemical effects of cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonists, but not cocaine, are altered by an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Justinová, Zuzana; Ferré, Sergi; Redhi, Godfrey H.; Mascia, Paola; Stroik, Jessica; Quarta, Davide; Yasar, Sevil; Müller, Christa E.; Franco, Rafael; Goldberg, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    Several recent studies suggest functional and molecular interactions between striatal adenosine A2A and cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Here we demonstrate that A2A receptors selectively modulate reinforcing effects of cannabinoids. We studied effects of A2A receptor blockade on the reinforcing effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and the endogenous CB1 receptor ligand anandamide under a fixed-ratio (FR) schedule of intravenous drug injection in squirrel monkeys. A low dose of the selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonist MSX-3 (1 mg/kg) caused downward shifts of THC and anandamide dose-response curves. In contrast, a higher dose of MSX-3 (3 mg/kg) shifted THC and anandamide dose-response curves to the left. MSX-3 did not modify cocaine or food-pellet self-administration. Also, MSX-3 neither promoted reinstatement of extinguished drug-seeking behavior nor altered reinstatement of drug-seeking behavior by non-contingent priming injections of THC. Finally, using in-vivo microdialysis in freely-moving rats, a behaviorally active dose of MSX-3 significantly counteracted THC-induced, but not cocaine-induced, increases in extracellular dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens shell. The significant and selective results obtained with the lower dose of MSX-3 suggest that adenosine A2A antagonists acting preferentially at presynaptic A2A receptors might selectively reduce reinforcing effects of cannabinoids that lead to their abuse. However, the appearance of potentiating rather than suppressing effects on cannabinoid reinforcement at the higher dose of MSX-3 would likely preclude the use of such a compound as a medication for cannabis abuse. Adenosine A2A antagonists with more selectivity for presynaptic versus postsynaptic receptors could be potential medications for treatment of cannabis abuse. PMID:21054689

  15. The neuronal Ca(2+) -binding protein 2 (NECAB2) interacts with the adenosine A(2A) receptor and modulates the cell surface expression and function of the receptor.

    PubMed

    Canela, Laia; Luján, Rafael; Lluís, Carme; Burgueño, Javier; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I; Franco, Rafael; Ciruela, Francisco

    2007-09-01

    Heptaspanning membrane also known as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) do interact with a variety of intracellular proteins whose function is regulate receptor traffic and/or signaling. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, NECAB2, a neuronal calcium binding protein, was identified as a binding partner for the adenosine A(2A) receptor (A(2A)R) interacting with its C-terminal domain. Co-localization, co-immunoprecipitation and pull-down experiments showed a close and specific interaction between A(2A)R and NECAB2 in both transfected HEK-293 cells and also in rat striatum. Immunoelectron microscopy detection of NECAB2 and A(2A)R in the rat striatopallidal structures indicated that both proteins are co-distributed in the same glutamatergic nerve terminals. The interaction of NECAB2 with A(2A)R modulated the cell surface expression, the ligand-dependent internalization and the receptor-mediated activation of the MAPK pathway. Overall, these results show that A(2A)R interacts with NECAB2 in striatal neurones co-expressing the two proteins and that the interaction is relevant for A(2A)R function.

  16. Adenosine A2A receptor deletion affects social behaviors and anxiety in mice: Involvement of anterior cingulate cortex and amygdala.

    PubMed

    López-Cruz, Laura; Carbó-Gas, Maria; Pardo, Marta; Bayarri, Pilar; Valverde, Olga; Ledent, Catherine; Salamone, John D; Correa, Mercè

    2017-03-15

    Blockade of adenosine A 2A receptors can potentiate motivation to work for natural reinforcers such as food. Conspecific interaction is a potent natural reinforcer in social animals that can be manifested as preference for social exploration versus other sources of novel stimulation. Deficiencies in this type of motivated behavior (social withdrawal) have been seen in several pathologies such as autism and depression. However, the role of A 2A receptors in motivation for social interaction has not been widely explored. Social interaction paradigms evaluate the natural preference of animals for exploring other conspecifics, and the ability to differentiate between familiar versus novel ones. Anxiety is one of the factors that can induce avoidance of social interaction. In the present study, adenosine A 2A knockout (A 2A KO) and wild-type (WT) mice were assessed for social and anxiety-related behaviors. c-Fos immunoreactivity was evaluated as a measure of neuronal activation in brain areas involved in different aspects of motivation and emotional processes. Although A 2A KO mice showed an anxious profile, they displayed higher levels of sociability and were less sensitive to social novelty. WT mice displayed a typical pattern of social recognition 24h later, but not A 2A KO mice, which explored equally both conspecifics. There were no differences between strains in aggressiveness, perseverance or social odor preferences. c-Fos immunoreactivity in A 2A KO mice was higher in anterior cingulate and amygdala compared to WT mice. Thus, A 2A receptors appear to be potential targets for the improvement of pathologies related to social function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. CHOLESTEROL 27-HYDROXYLASE BUT NOT APOLIPOPROTEIN apoE CONTRIBUTES TO A2A ADENOSINE RECEPTOR STIMULATED REVERSE CHOLESTEROL TRANSPORT

    PubMed Central

    Bingham, Taiese Crystal; Parathath, Saj; Tian, Heather; Reiss, Allison; Chan, Edwin; Fisher, Edward A.; Cronstein, Bruce N.

    2011-01-01

    Movement of free cholesterol between the cellular compartment and acceptor is governed by cholesterol gradients that are determined by several enzymes and reverse cholesterol transport proteins. We have previously demonstrated that adenosine A2A receptors inhibit foam cell formation and stimulate production of cholesterol 27-hydroxylase (CYP27A1), an enzyme involved in the conversion of cholesterol to oxysterols. We therefore asked whether the effect of adenosine A2A receptors on foam cell formation in vitro are mediated by CYP27A1 or apoE, a carrier for cholesterol in the serum. We found that specific lentiviral siRNA infection markedly reduced apoE or 27-hydroxylase mRNA in THP-1 cells. Despite diminished apoE expression (p< 0.0002, IFNγ CGS vs. IFNγ alone, n= 4) CGS-21680, an adenosine A2A receptor agonist, inhibits foam cell formation. In contrast, CGS-21680 had no effect on reducing foam cell formation in CYP27A1 KD cells (4±2% p<0.5113 inhibition vs. IFNγ alone n= 4). Previously we reported the A2A agonist CGS-21680 increases apoAI-mediated cholesterol efflux nearly 2-fold in wildtype macrophages. Adenosine receptor activation had no effect on cholesterol efflux in CYP27A1 KD cells but reduced efflux in apoE KD cells. These results demonstrate that adenosine A2A receptor occupancy diminishes foam cell formation by increasing expression and function of CYP27A1. PMID:21258856

  18. Cholesterol 27-hydroxylase but not apolipoprotein apoE contributes to A2A adenosine receptor stimulated reverse cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Bingham, Taiese Crystal; Parathath, Saj; Tian, Heather; Reiss, Allison; Chan, Edwin; Fisher, Edward A; Cronstein, Bruce N

    2012-02-01

    Movement of free cholesterol between the cellular compartment and acceptor is governed by cholesterol gradients that are determined by several enzymes and reverse cholesterol transport proteins. We have previously demonstrated that adenosine A(2A) receptors inhibit foam cell formation and stimulate production of cholesterol 27-hydroxylase (CYP27A1), an enzyme involved in the conversion of cholesterol to oxysterols. We therefore asked whether the effect of adenosine A(2A) receptors on foam cell formation in vitro is mediated by CYP27A1 or apoE, a carrier for cholesterol in the serum. We found that specific lentiviral siRNA infection markedly reduced apoE or 27-hydroxylase mRNA in THP-1 cells. Despite diminished apoE expression (p < 0.0002, interferon-gamma (IFNγ) CGS vs. IFNγ alone, n=4), CGS-21680, an adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist, inhibits foam cell formation. In contrast, CGS-21680 had no effect on reducing foam cell formation in CYP27A1 KD cells (4 ± 2%; p<0.5113, inhibition vs. IFNγ alone, n=4). Previously, we reported the A(2A) agonist CGS-21680 increases apoAI-mediated cholesterol efflux nearly twofold in wild-type macrophages. Adenosine receptor activation had no effect on cholesterol efflux in CYP27A1 KD cells but reduced efflux in apoE KD cells. These results demonstrate that adenosine A(2A) receptor occupancy diminishes foam cell formation by increasing expression and function of CYP27A1.

  19. Integrating Pharmacophore into Membrane Molecular Dynamics Simulations to Improve Homology Modeling of G Protein-coupled Receptors with Ligand Selectivity: A2A Adenosine Receptor as an Example.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lingxiao; Guan, Mengxin; Jin, Hongwei; Liu, Zhenming; Zhang, Liangren

    2015-12-01

    Homology modeling has been applied to fill in the gap in experimental G protein-coupled receptors structure determination. However, achievement of G protein-coupled receptors homology models with ligand selectivity remains challenging due to structural diversity of G protein-coupled receptors. In this work, we propose a novel strategy by integrating pharmacophore and membrane molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to improve homology modeling of G protein-coupled receptors with ligand selectivity. To validate this integrated strategy, the A2A adenosine receptor (A2A AR), whose structures in both active and inactive states have been established, has been chosen as an example. We performed blind predictions of the active-state A2A AR structure based on the inactive-state structure and compared the performance of different refinement strategies. The blind prediction model combined with the integrated strategy identified ligand-receptor interactions and conformational changes of key structural elements related to the activation of A2 A AR, including (i) the movements of intracellular ends of TM3 and TM5/TM6; (ii) the opening of ionic lock; (iii) the movements of binding site residues. The integrated strategy of pharmacophore with molecular dynamics simulations can aid in the optimization in the identification of side chain conformations in receptor models. This strategy can be further investigated in homology modeling and expand its applicability to other G protein-coupled receptor modeling, which should aid in the discovery of more effective and selective G protein-coupled receptor ligands. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Antidepressant activity of the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, istradefylline (KW-6002) on learned helplessness in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Koji; Kobayashi, Minoru; Shiozaki, Shizuo; Ohta, Teruko; Mori, Akihisa; Jenner, Peter; Kanda, Tomoyuki

    2014-07-01

    Istradefylline, an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, improves motor function in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD) and in patients with PD. In addition, some A2A antagonists exert antidepressant-like activity in rodent models of depression, such as the forced swim and the tail suspension tests. We have investigated the effect of istradefylline on depression-like behaviors using the rat learned helplessness (LH) model. Acute, as well as chronic, oral administration of istradefylline significantly improved the inescapable shock (IES)-induced escape deficit with a degree of efficacy comparable to chronic treatment with the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine and the selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine. Both the A1/A2A receptor nonspecific antagonist theophylline and the moderately selective antagonist CGS15943, but not the A1 selective antagonist DPCPX, ameliorated the IES-induced escape deficit. The enhancement of escape response by istradefylline was reversed by a local injection of the A2A specific agonist CGS21680 either into the nucleus accumbens, the caudate-putamen, or the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, but not by the A1 specific agonist R-PIA into the nucleus accumbens. Moreover, neither the 5-HT2A/2C receptor antagonist methysergide or the adrenergic α 2 antagonist yohimbine, nor the β-adrenergic antagonist propranolol, affected the improvement of escape response induced by istradefylline. Istradefylline exerts antidepressant-like effects via modulation of A2A receptor activity which is independent of monoaminergic transmission in the brain. Istradefylline may represent a novel treatment option for depression in PD as well as for the motor symptoms.

  1. The protective effect of adenosine A2A receptor antagonism in cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Pedata, F; Gianfriddo, M; Turchi, D; Melani, A

    2005-03-01

    We reviewed our most recent work on the protective effect of adenosine A(2A)antagonism in cerebral ischemia. Focal ischemia was produced in rats by introducing a nylon monofilament pre-coated with silicone through the external carotid artery to occlude the right MCA at its origin. A(2A) antagonism was found protective in the model of permanent focal ischemia induced by the monofilament technique. This methodology provides the possibility of evaluating the protection against the outflow of excitatory amino acids and against an acute motor disturbance, i.e.contralateral turning to the ischemic side in the first hours after ischemia in awake rats. Hours later, a definite neurological deficit and necrotic neuronal damage can be evaluated. Our results suggest that A(2A) antagonism may be protective from the earliest up to several hours after the ischemic event.

  2. Adenosine A2A receptor inhibition restores the normal transport of endothelial glutamate transporters in the brain.

    PubMed

    Bai, Wei; Li, Ping; Ning, Ya-Lei; Peng, Yan; Xiong, Ren-Ping; Yang, Nan; Chen, Xing; Zhou, Yuan-Guo

    2018-04-15

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) on cerebral vascular endothelial cells play an important role in maintaining glutamate homeostasis in the brain. The dysfunction of endothelial EAATs is an important reason for the dramatically elevated brain glutamate levels after brain injury, such as traumatic brain injury (TBI). The adenosine A 2A receptor (A 2A R) plays an important role in regulating the brain glutamate level after brain injury; however, researchers have not clearly determined whether this role was related to its ability to regulate endothelial EAATs. Activation of A 2A R in vitro not only decreased the PKA- and glutamate level-dependent strengthening of the interaction between NKA-α1 and the FXYD1 subunit and the subsequent decrease in the activity of Na + /K + -ATPases (NKAs) but also enhanced its interaction with EAATs and ultimately aggravated the reverse transport function of endothelial EAATs under oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) conditions. Conversely, inhibition of A 2A R restored the normal transport of EAAT. Moreover, A 2A R inhibition increased NKA activity and decreased its interaction with EAATs in isolated brain capillaries after TBI, further confirming its role in endothelial EAATs in vivo. Based on our results, A 2A R played an important role in regulating endothelial EAAT function, and strategies that restore the normal transport of endothelial EAATs through the inhibition of A 2A R might serve as an effective treatment for brain injury. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Adenosine is required for sustained inflammasome activation via the A2A receptor and the HIF-1α pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Xinshou; Ghani, Ayaz; Malik, Ahsan; Wilder, Tuere; Colegio, Oscar Rene; Flavell, Richard Anthony; Cronstein, Bruce Neil; Mehal, Wajahat Zafar

    2013-12-01

    Inflammasome pathways are important in chronic diseases; however, it is not known how the signalling is sustained after initiation. Inflammasome activation is dependent on stimuli such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and ATP that provide two distinct signals resulting in rapid production of interleukin (IL)-1β, with the lack of response to repeat stimulation. Here we report that adenosine is a key regulator of inflammasome activity, increasing the duration of the inflammatory response via the A2A receptor. Adenosine does not replace signals provided by stimuli such as LPS or ATP but sustains inflammasome activity via a cAMP/PKA/CREB/HIF-1α pathway. In the setting of the lack of IL-1β responses after previous exposure to LPS, adenosine can supersede this tolerogenic state and drive IL-1β production. These data reveal that inflammasome activity is sustained, after initial activation, by A2A receptor-mediated signalling.

  4. Crystal structure of the adenosine A2A receptor bound to an antagonist reveals a potential allosteric pocket

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bingfa; Bachhawat, Priti; Chu, Matthew Ling-Hon; Wood, Martyn; Ceska, Tom; Sands, Zara A.; Mercier, Joel; Lebon, Florence; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Kobilka, Brian K.

    2017-01-01

    The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) has long been implicated in cardiovascular disorders. As more selective A2AR ligands are being identified, its roles in other disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease, are starting to emerge, and A2AR antagonists are important drug candidates for nondopaminergic anti-Parkinson treatment. Here we report the crystal structure of A2A receptor bound to compound 1 (Cmpd-1), a novel A2AR/N-methyl d-aspartate receptor subtype 2B (NR2B) dual antagonist and potential anti-Parkinson candidate compound, at 3.5 Å resolution. The A2A receptor with a cytochrome b562-RIL (BRIL) fusion (A2AR–BRIL) in the intracellular loop 3 (ICL3) was crystallized in detergent micelles using vapor-phase diffusion. Whereas A2AR–BRIL bound to the antagonist ZM241385 has previously been crystallized in lipidic cubic phase (LCP), structural differences in the Cmpd-1–bound A2AR–BRIL prevented formation of the lattice observed with the ZM241385–bound receptor. The crystals grew with a type II crystal lattice in contrast to the typical type I packing seen from membrane protein structures crystallized in LCP. Cmpd-1 binds in a position that overlaps with the native ligand adenosine, but its methoxyphenyl group extends to an exosite not previously observed in other A2AR structures. Structural analysis revealed that Cmpd-1 binding results in the unique conformations of two tyrosine residues, Tyr91.35 and Tyr2717.36, which are critical for the formation of the exosite. The structure reveals insights into antagonist binding that are not observed in other A2AR structures, highlighting flexibility in the binding pocket that may facilitate the development of A2AR-selective compounds for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. PMID:28167788

  5. Crystal structure of the adenosine A 2A receptor bound to an antagonist reveals a potential allosteric pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Bingfa; Bachhawat, Priti; Chu, Matthew Ling-Hon

    2017-02-06

    The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) has long been implicated in cardiovascular disorders. As more selective A2AR ligands are being identified, its roles in other disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease, are starting to emerge, and A2AR antagonists are important drug candidates for nondopaminergic anti-Parkinson treatment. Here we report the crystal structure of A2A receptor bound to compound 1 (Cmpd-1), a novel A2AR/N-methyl D-aspartate receptor subtype 2B (NR2B) dual antagonist and potential anti-Parkinson candidate compound, at 3.5 Å resolution. The A2A receptor with a cytochrome b562-RIL (BRIL) fusion (A2AR–BRIL) in the intracellular loop 3 (ICL3) was crystallized in detergent micelles using vapor-phasemore » diffusion. Whereas A2AR–BRIL bound to the antagonist ZM241385 has previously been crystallized in lipidic cubic phase (LCP), structural differences in the Cmpd-1–bound A2AR–BRIL prevented formation of the lattice observed with the ZM241385–bound receptor. The crystals grew with a type II crystal lattice in contrast to the typical type I packing seen from membrane protein structures crystallized in LCP. Cmpd-1 binds in a position that overlaps with the native ligand adenosine, but its methoxyphenyl group extends to an exosite not previously observed in other A2AR structures. Structural analysis revealed that Cmpd-1 binding results in the unique conformations of two tyrosine residues, Tyr91.35 and Tyr2717.36, which are critical for the formation of the exosite. The structure reveals insights into antagonist binding that are not observed in other A2AR structures, highlighting flexibility in the binding pocket that may facilitate the development of A2AR-selective compounds for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease.« less

  6. The Corticostriatal Adenosine A2A Receptor Controls Maintenance and Retrieval of Spatial Working Memory.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhihui; Chen, Xingjun; Wang, Tao; Gao, Ying; Li, Fei; Chen, Long; Xue, Jin; He, Yan; Li, Yan; Guo, Wei; Zheng, Wu; Zhang, Liping; Ye, Fenfen; Ren, Xiangpeng; Feng, Yue; Chan, Piu; Chen, Jiang-Fan

    2018-03-15

    Working memory (WM) taps into multiple executive processes including encoding, maintenance, and retrieval of information, but the molecular and circuit modulation of these WM processes remains undefined due to the lack of methods to control G protein-coupled receptor signaling with temporal resolution of seconds. By coupling optogenetic control of the adenosine A 2A receptor (A 2A R) signaling, the Cre-loxP-mediated focal A 2A R knockdown with a delayed non-match-to-place (DNMTP) task, we investigated the effect of optogenetic activation and focal knockdown of A 2A Rs in the dorsomedial striatum (n = 8 to 14 per group) and medial prefrontal cortex (n = 16 to 22 per group) on distinct executive processes of spatial WM. We also evaluated the therapeutic effect of the A 2A R antagonist KW6002 on delayed match-to-sample/place tasks in 6 normal and 6 MPTP-treated cynomolgus monkeys. Optogenetic activation of striatopallidal A 2A Rs in the dorsomedial striatum selectively at the delay and choice (not sample) phases impaired DNMTP performance. Optogenetic activation of A 2A Rs in the medial prefrontal cortex selectively at the delay (not sample or choice) phase improved DNMTP performance. The corticostriatal A 2A R control of spatial WM was specific for a novel but not well-trained DNMTP task. Focal dorsomedial striatum A 2A R knockdown or KW6002 improved DNMTP performance in mice. Last, KW6002 improved spatial WM in delayed match-to-sample and delayed match-to-place tasks of normal and dopamine-depleted cynomolgus monkeys. The A 2A Rs in striatopallidal and medial prefrontal cortex neurons exert distinctive control of WM maintenance and retrieval to achieve cognitive stability and flexibility. The procognitive effect of KW6002 in nonhuman primates provides the preclinical data to translate A 2A R antagonists for improving cognitive impairments in Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Structure-Activity Relationships of the Sustained Effects of Adenosine A2A Receptor Agonists Driven by Slow Dissociation Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Hothersall, J. Daniel; Guo, Dong; Sarda, Sunil; Sheppard, Robert J.; Chen, Hongming; Keur, Wesley; Waring, Michael J.; IJzerman, Adriaan P.; Hill, Stephen J.; Dale, Ian L.

    2017-01-01

    The duration of action of adenosine A2A receptor (A2A) agonists is critical for their clinical efficacy, and we sought to better understand how this can be optimized. The in vitro temporal response profiles of a panel of A2A agonists were studied using cAMP assays in recombinantly (CHO) and endogenously (SH-SY5Y) expressing cells. Some agonists (e.g., 3cd; UK-432,097) but not others (e.g., 3ac; CGS-21680) demonstrated sustained wash-resistant agonism, where residual receptor activation continued after washout. The ability of an antagonist to reverse pre-established agonist responses was used as a surrogate read-out for agonist dissociation kinetics, and together with radioligand binding studies suggested a role for slow off-rate in driving sustained effects. One compound, 3ch, showed particularly marked sustained effects, with a reversal t1/2 > 6 hours and close to maximal effects that remained for at least 5 hours after washing. Based on the structure-activity relationship of these compounds, we suggest that lipophilic N6 and bulky C2 substituents can promote stable and long-lived binding events leading to sustained agonist responses, although a high compound logD is not necessary. This provides new insight into the binding interactions of these ligands and we anticipate that this information could facilitate the rational design of novel long-acting A2A agonists with improved clinical efficacy. PMID:27803241

  8. Acetylcholine Receptor: Complex of Homologous Subunits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raftery, Michael A.; Hunkapiller, Michael W.; Strader, Catherine D.; Hood, Leroy E.

    1980-06-01

    The acetylcholine receptor from the electric ray Torpedo californica is composed of five subunits; two are identical and the other three are structurally related to them. Microsequence analysis of the four polypeptides demonstrates amino acid homology among the subunits. Further sequence analysis of both membrane-bound and Triton-solubilized, chromatographically purified receptor gave the stoichiometry of the four subunits (40,000:50,000:60,000:65,000 daltons) as 2:1:1:1, indicating that this protein is a pentameric complex with a molecular weight of 255,000 daltons. Genealogical analysis suggests that divergence from a common ancestral gene occurred early in the evolution of the receptor. This shared ancestry argues that each of the four subunits plays a functional role in the receptor's physiological action.

  9. Acetate supplementation modulates brain adenosine metabolizing enzymes and adenosine A2A receptor levels in rats subjected to neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acetate supplementation reduces neuroglia activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in rat models of neuroinflammation and Lyme neuroborreliosis. Because single-dose glyceryl triacetate (GTA) treatment increases brain phosphocreatine and reduces brain AMP levels, we postulate that GTA modulates adenosine metabolizing enzymes and receptors, which may be a possible mechanism to reduce neuroinflammation. Methods To test this hypothesis, we quantified the ability of GTA to alter brain levels of ecto-5’-nucleotidase (CD73), adenosine kinase (AK), and adenosine A2A receptor using western blot analysis and CD73 activity by measuring the rate of AMP hydrolysis. Neuroinflammation was induced by continuous bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion in the fourth ventricle of the brain for 14 and 28 days. Three treatment strategies were employed, one and two where rats received prophylactic GTA through oral gavage with LPS infusion for 14 or 28 days. In the third treatment regimen, an interventional strategy was used where rats were subjected to 28 days of neuroinflammation, and GTA treatment was started on day 14 following the start of the LPS infusion. Results We found that rats subjected to neuroinflammation for 28 days had a 28% reduction in CD73 levels and a 43% increase in AK levels that was reversed with prophylactic acetate supplementation. CD73 activity in these rats was increased by 46% with the 28-day GTA treatment compared to the water-treated rats. Rats subjected to neuroinflammation for 14 days showed a 50% increase in levels of the adenosine A2A receptor, which was prevented with prophylactic acetate supplementation. Interventional GTA therapy, beginning on day 14 following the induction of neuroinflammation, resulted in a 67% increase in CD73 levels and a 155% increase in adenosine A2A receptor levels. Conclusion These results support the hypothesis that acetate supplementation can modulate brain CD73, AK and adenosine A2A receptor

  10. Selecting an optimal number of binding site waters to improve virtual screening enrichments against the adenosine A2A receptor.

    PubMed

    Lenselink, Eelke B; Beuming, Thijs; Sherman, Woody; van Vlijmen, Herman W T; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2014-06-23

    A major challenge in structure-based virtual screening (VS) involves the treatment of explicit water molecules during docking in order to improve the enrichment of active compounds over decoys. Here we have investigated this in the context of the adenosine A2A receptor, where water molecules have previously been shown to be important for achieving high enrichment rates with docking, and where the positions of some binding site waters are known from a high-resolution crystal structure. The effect of these waters (both their presence and orientations) on VS enrichment was assessed using a carefully curated set of 299 high affinity A2A antagonists and 17,337 decoys. We show that including certain crystal waters greatly improves VS enrichment and that optimization of water hydrogen positions is needed in order to achieve the best results. We also show that waters derived from a molecular dynamics simulation - without any knowledge of crystallographic waters - can improve enrichments to a similar degree as the crystallographic waters, which makes this strategy applicable to structures without experimental knowledge of water positions. Finally, we used decision trees to select an ensemble of structures with different water molecule positions and orientations that outperforms any single structure with water molecules. The approach presented here is validated against independent test sets of A2A receptor antagonists and decoys from the literature. In general, this water optimization strategy could be applied to any target with waters-mediated protein-ligand interactions.

  11. Adenosine A(2A) receptor modulation of hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapse plasticity during associative learning in behaving mice.

    PubMed

    Fontinha, Bruno M; Delgado-García, José M; Madroñal, Noelia; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Sebastião, Ana M; Gruart, Agnès

    2009-06-01

    Previous in vitro studies have characterized the electrophysiological and molecular signaling pathways of adenosine tonic modulation on long-lasting synaptic plasticity events, particularly for hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). However, it remains to be elucidated whether the long-term changes produced by endogenous adenosine in the efficiency of synapses are related to those required for learning and memory formation. Our goal was to understand how endogenous activation of adenosine excitatory A(2A) receptors modulates the associative learning evolution in conscious behaving mice. We have studied here the effects of the application of a highly selective A(2A) receptor antagonist, SCH58261, upon a well-known associative learning paradigm-classical eyeblink conditioning. We used a trace paradigm, with a tone as the conditioned stimulus (CS) and an electric shock presented to the supraorbital nerve as the unconditioned stimulus (US). A single electrical pulse was presented to the Schaffer collateral-commissural pathway to evoke field EPSPs (fEPSPs) in the pyramidal CA1 area during the CS-US interval. In vehicle-injected animals, there was a progressive increase in the percentage of conditioning responses (CRs) and in the slope of fEPSPs through conditioning sessions, an effect that was completely prevented (and lost) in SCH58261 (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) -injected animals. Moreover, experimentally evoked LTP was impaired in SCH58261-injected mice. In conclusion, the endogenous activation of adenosine A(2A) receptors plays a pivotal effect on the associative learning process and its relevant hippocampal circuits, including activity-dependent changes at the CA3-CA1 synapse.

  12. Neuroprotection by caffeine in the MPTP model of parkinson's disease and its dependence on adenosine A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Xu, K; Di Luca, D G; Orrú, M; Xu, Y; Chen, J-F; Schwarzschild, M A

    2016-05-13

    Considerable epidemiological and laboratory data have suggested that caffeine, a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist, may protect against the underlying neurodegeneration of parkinson's disease (PD). Although both caffeine and more specific antagonists of the A2A subtype of adenosine receptor (A2AR) have been found to confer protection in animal models of PD, the dependence of caffeine's neuroprotective effects on the A2AR is not known. To definitively determine its A2AR dependence, the effect of caffeine on 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6 tetra-hydropyridine (MPTP) neurotoxicity was compared in wild-type (WT) and A2AR gene global knockout (A2A KO) mice, as well as in central nervous system (CNS) cell type-specific (conditional) A2AR knockout (cKO) mice that lack the receptor either in postnatal forebrain neurons or in astrocytes. In WT and in heterozygous A2AR KO mice caffeine pretreatment (25mg/kgip) significantly attenuated MPTP-induced depletion of striatal dopamine. By contrast in homozygous A2AR global KO mice caffeine had no effect on MPTP toxicity. In forebrain neuron A2AR cKO mice, caffeine lost its locomotor stimulant effect, whereas its neuroprotective effect was mostly preserved. In astrocytic A2AR cKO mice, both caffeine's locomotor stimulant and protective properties were undiminished. Taken together, these results indicate that neuroprotection by caffeine in the MPTP model of PD relies on the A2AR, although the specific cellular localization of these receptors remains to be determined. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. All rights reserved.

  13. Blockade of adenosine A2A receptors reverses short-term social memory impairments in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Prediger, Rui D S; Fernandes, Daniel; Takahashi, Reinaldo N

    2005-04-30

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) exhibit impairment across several cognitive domains such as attention, short-term memory and spatial reference memory. These cognitive deficits have been variously attributed to disrupted dopaminergic, cholinergic and adenosinergic neurotransmitter function. However, social memory in SHR has not been investigated. In the present study, we therefore evaluated whether SHR exhibit altered short-term social memory abilities compared to normotensive Wistar rats (WIS) through two experimental paradigms (social recognition and habituation-dishabituation tests). We also compared the performance of SHR and WIS rats in the object recognition test. SHR exhibited significantly impaired performance in both models of social memory, but not in the object recognition test, demonstrating a selective deficit in the ability to recognize a juvenile rat after a short period of time. The administration of acute doses of the non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine (3.0 or 10.0 mg/kg, i.p.) and the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist 4-(2-[7-amino-2-[2-furyl][1,2,4]triazolo-[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-yl-amino]ethyl) phenol (ZM241385, 0.5 or 1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) but not the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX, 1.0 or 3.0 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed this social memory impairment in SHR, but these treatments did not alter the hypertension state. These results demonstrate an impairment of short-term social memory in SHR and the involvement of the adenosine A2A receptors in this alteration.

  14. Dipyridamole attenuates ischemia reperfusion induced acute kidney injury through adenosinergic A1 and A2A receptor agonism in rats.

    PubMed

    Puri, Nikkita; Mohey, Vinita; Singh, Manjinder; Kaur, Tajpreet; Pathak, Devendra; Buttar, Harpal Singh; Singh, Amrit Pal

    2016-04-01

    Dipyridamole (DYP) is an anti-platelet agent with marked vasodilator, anti-oxidant, and anti-inflammatory activity. The present study investigated the role of adenosine receptors in DYP-mediated protection against ischemia reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) in rats. The rats were subjected to bilateral renal ischemia for 40 min followed by reperfusion for 24 h. The renal damage induced by ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) was assessed by measuring creatinine clearance, blood urea nitrogen, uric acid, plasma potassium, fractional excretion of sodium, and microproteinuria in rats. The oxidative stress in renal tissues was assessed by quantification of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, superoxide anion generation, and reduced glutathione level. The hematoxylin-eosin staining was carried out to observe histopathological changes in renal tissues. DYP (10 and 30 mg/kg, intraperitoneal, i.p.) was administered 30 min before subjecting the rats to renal IRI. In separate groups, caffeine (50 mg/kg, i.p.), an adenosinergic A1 and A2A receptor antagonist was administered with and without DYP treatment before subjecting the rats to renal IRI. The ischemia reperfusion-induced AKI was demonstrated by significant changes in serum as well as urinary parameters, enhanced oxidative stress, and histopathological changes in renal tissues. The administration of DYP demonstrated protection against AKI. The prior treatment with caffeine abolished DYP-mediated reno-protection suggesting role of A1 and A2A adenosine receptors in DYP-mediated reno-protection in rats. It is concluded that adenosine receptors find their definite involvement in DYP-mediated anti-oxidative and reno-protective effect against ischemia reperfusion-induced AKI.

  15. Impact of purification conditions and history on A 2A adenosine receptor activity: The role of CHAPS and lipids

    SciTech Connect

    Naranjo, Andrea N.; McNeely, Patrick M.; Katsaras, John

    2016-05-27

    The adenosine A 2A receptor (A 2AR) is a much-studied class A G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). For biophysical studies, A 2AR is commonly purified in a detergent mixture of dodecylmaltoside (DDM), 3-(3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammoniopropane sulfonate (CHAPS), and cholesteryl hemisuccinate (CHS). Here we studied the effects of CHAPS on the ligand binding activity and stability of wild type, full-length human A 2AR. We also tested the cholesterol requirement for maintaining the active conformation of the receptor when solubilized in detergent micelles. To this end, the receptor was purified using DDM, DDM/CHAPS, or the short hydrocarbon chain lipid 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC, di-6:0PC). After solubilizationmore » in DDM, DDM/CHAPS, or DHPC micelles, although A 2AR was found to retain its native-like fold, its binding ability was significantly compromised compared to DDM or DDM/CHAPS with CHS. It therefore appears that although cholesterol is not needed for A 2AR to retain a native-like, α-helical conformation, it may be a critical component for high affinity ligand binding. Further, this result suggests that the conformational differences between the active and inactive protein may be so subtle that commonly used spectroscopic methods are unable to differentiate between the two forms, highlighting the need for activity measurements. Furthermore, the studies presented in this paper also underline the importance of the protein’s purification history; i.e., detergents that interact with the protein during purification affect the ligand binding properties of the receptor in an irreversible manner.« less

  16. Adenosine A(2A) receptor gene (ADORA2A) variants may increase autistic symptoms and anxiety in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Christine M; Agelopoulos, Konstantin; Huy, Ellen; Rothermundt, Matthias; Krakowitzky, Petra; Meyer, Jobst; Deckert, Jürgen; von Gontard, Alexander; Hohoff, Christa

    2010-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are heterogeneous disorders presenting with increased rates of anxiety. The adenosine A(2A) receptor gene (ADORA2A) is associated with panic disorder and is located on chromosome 22q11.23. Its gene product, the adenosine A(2A) receptor, is strongly expressed in the caudate nucleus, which also is involved in ASD. As autistic symptoms are increased in individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, and large 22q11.2 deletions and duplications have been observed in ASD individuals, in this study, 98 individuals with ASD and 234 control individuals were genotyped for eight single-nucleotide polymorphisms in ADORA2A. Nominal association with the disorder was observed for rs2236624-CC, and phenotypic variability in ASD symptoms was influenced by rs3761422, rs5751876 and rs35320474. In addition, association of ADORA2A variants with anxiety was replicated for individuals with ASD. Findings point toward a possible mediating role of ADORA2A variants on phenotypic expression in ASD that need to be replicated in a larger sample.

  17. Resetting microbiota by Lactobacillus reuteri inhibits T reg deficiency–induced autoimmunity via adenosine A2A receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Thomas K.; Tian, Xiangjun; Luo, Meng; Zhou, Jain; Tatevian, Nina; Molina, Jose G.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Gomez, Thomas H.

    2017-01-01

    Regulatory T (T reg) cell deficiency causes lethal, CD4+ T cell–driven autoimmune diseases. Stem cell transplantation is used to treat these diseases, but this procedure is limited by the availability of a suitable donor. The intestinal microbiota drives host immune homeostasis by regulating the differentiation and expansion of T reg, Th1, and Th2 cells. It is currently unclear if T reg cell deficiency–mediated autoimmune disorders can be treated by targeting the enteric microbiota. Here, we demonstrate that Foxp3+ T reg cell deficiency results in gut microbial dysbiosis and autoimmunity over the lifespan of scurfy (SF) mouse. Remodeling microbiota with Lactobacillus reuteri prolonged survival and reduced multiorgan inflammation in SF mice. L. reuteri changed the metabolomic profile disrupted by T reg cell deficiency, and a major effect was to restore levels of the purine metabolite inosine. Feeding inosine itself prolonged life and inhibited multiorgan inflammation by reducing Th1/Th2 cells and their associated cytokines. Mechanistically, the inhibition of inosine on the differentiation of Th1 and Th2 cells in vitro depended on adenosine A2A receptors, which were also required for the efficacy of inosine and of L. reuteri in vivo. These results reveal that the microbiota–inosine–A2A receptor axis might represent a potential avenue for combatting autoimmune diseases mediated by T reg cell dysfunction. PMID:27994068

  18. Up-regulation of striatal adenosine A2A receptors with iron deficiency in rats. Effects on locomotion and cortico-striatal neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz, César; Pearson, Virginia; Gulyani, Seema; Allen, Richard; Earley, Christopher; Ferré, Sergi

    2010-01-01

    Brain iron deficiency leads to altered dopaminergic function in experimental animals, which can provide a mechanistic explanation for iron deficiency-related human sensory-motor disorders, such as Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS). However, mechanisms linking both conditions have not been determined. Considering the strong modulation exerted by adenosine on dopamine signaling, one connection could involve changes in adenosine receptor expression or function. In the striatum, presynaptic A2A receptors are localized in glutamatergic terminals contacting GABAergic dynorphinergic neurons and their function can be analyzed by the ability of A2A receptor antagonists to block the motor output induced by cortical electrical stimulation. Postsynaptic A2A receptors are localized in the dendritic field of GABAergic enkephalinergic neurons and their function can be analyzed by studying the ability of A2A receptor antagonists to produce locomotor activity and to counteract striatal ERK1/2 phosphorylation induced by cortical electrical stimulation. Increased density of striatal A2A receptors was found in rats fed during three weeks with an iron-deficient diet during the post-weaning period. In iron-deficient rats, the selective A2A receptor antagonist MSX-3, at doses of 1 and 3 mg/kg, was more effective at blocking motor output induced by cortical electrical stimulation (presynaptic A2A receptor-mediated effect) and at enhancing locomotor activation and blocking striatal ERK phosphorylation induced by cortical electrical stimulation (postsynaptic A2A receptor-mediated effects). These results indicate that brain iron deficiency induces a functional up-regulation of both striatal pre- and postsynaptic A2A receptor, which could be involved in sensory-motor disorders associated with iron deficiency such as RLS. PMID:20385128

  19. Up-regulation of striatal adenosine A(2A) receptors with iron deficiency in rats: effects on locomotion and cortico-striatal neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, César; Pearson, Virginia; Gulyani, Seema; Allen, Richard; Earley, Christopher; Ferré, Sergi

    2010-07-01

    Brain iron deficiency leads to altered dopaminergic function in experimental animals, which can provide a mechanistic explanation for iron deficiency-related human sensory-motor disorders, such as Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS). However, mechanisms linking both conditions have not been determined. Considering the strong modulation exerted by adenosine on dopamine signaling, one connection could involve changes in adenosine receptor expression or function. In the striatum, presynaptic A(2A) receptors are localized in glutamatergic terminals contacting GABAergic dynorphinergic neurons and their function can be analyzed by the ability of A(2A) receptor antagonists to block the motor output induced by cortical electrical stimulation. Postsynaptic A(2A) receptors are localized in the dendritic field of GABAergic enkephalinergic neurons and their function can be analyzed by studying the ability of A(2A) receptor antagonists to produce locomotor activity and to counteract striatal ERK1/2 phosphorylation induced by cortical electrical stimulation. Increased density of striatal A(2A) receptors was found in rats fed during 3 weeks with an iron-deficient diet during the post-weaning period. In iron-deficient rats, the selective A(2A) receptor antagonist MSX-3, at doses of 1 and 3 mg/kg, was more effective at blocking motor output induced by cortical electrical stimulation (presynaptic A(2A) receptor-mediated effect) and at enhancing locomotor activation and blocking striatal ERK phosphorylation induced by cortical electrical stimulation (postsynaptic A(2A) receptor-mediated effects). These results indicate that brain iron deficiency induces a functional up-regulation of both striatal pre- and postsynaptic A(2A) receptor, which could be involved in sensory-motor disorders associated with iron deficiency such as RLS. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Adenosine through the A2A adenosine receptor increases IL-1β in the brain contributing to anxiety.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Gabriel S; Darmody, Patrick T; Walsh, John P; Moon, Morgan L; Kwakwa, Kristin A; Bray, Julie K; McCusker, Robert H; Freund, Gregory G

    2014-10-01

    Anxiety is one of the most commonly reported psychiatric conditions, but its pathogenesis is poorly understood. Ailments associated with activation of the innate immune system, however, are increasingly linked to anxiety disorders. In adult male mice, we found that adenosine doubled caspase-1 activity in brain by a pathway reliant on ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, protein kinase A (PKA) and the A2A adenosine receptor (AR). In addition, adenosine-dependent activation of caspase-1 increased interleukin (IL)-1β in the brain by 2-fold. Peripheral administration of adenosine in wild-type (WT) mice led to a 2.3-fold increase in caspase-1 activity in the amygdala and to a 33% and 42% reduction in spontaneous locomotor activity and food intake, respectively, that were not observed in caspase-1 knockout (KO), IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1) KO and A2A AR KO mice or in mice administered a caspase-1 inhibitor centrally. Finally, adenosine administration increased anxiety-like behaviors in WT mice by 28% in the open field test and by 55% in the elevated zero-maze. Caspase-1 KO mice, IL-1R1 KO mice, A2A AR KO mice and WT mice treated with the KATP channel blocker, glyburide, were resistant to adenosine-induced anxiety-like behaviors. Thus, our results indicate that adenosine can act as an anxiogenic by activating caspase-1 and increasing IL-1β in the brain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Novel Alexa Fluor-488 labeled antagonist of the A(2A) adenosine receptor: Application to a fluorescence polarization-based receptor binding assay.

    PubMed

    Kecskés, Miklós; Kumar, T Santhosh; Yoo, Lena; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2010-08-15

    Fluorescence polarization (FP) assay has many advantages over the traditional radioreceptor binding studies. We developed an A(2A) adenosine receptor (AR) FP assay using a newly synthesized fluorescent antagonist of the A(2A)AR (MRS5346), a pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-amine derivative conjugated to the fluorescent dye Alexa Fluor-488. MRS5346 displayed a K(i) value of 111+/-16nM in radioligand binding using [(3)H]CGS21680 and membranes prepared from HEK293 cells stably expressing the human A(2A)AR. In a cyclic AMP functional assay, MRS5346 was shown to be an A(2A)AR antagonist. MRS5346 did not show any effect on A(1) and A(3) ARs in binding or the A(2B)AR in a cyclic AMP assay at 10microM. Its suitability as a fluorescent tracer was indicated in an initial observation of an FP signal following A(2A)AR binding. The FP signal was optimal with 20nM MRS5346 and 150microg protein/mL HEK293 membranes. The association and dissociation kinetic parameters were readily determined using this FP assay. The K(d) value of MRS5346 calculated from kinetic parameters was 16.5+/-4.7nM. In FP competition binding experiments using MRS5346 as a tracer, K(i) values of known AR agonists and antagonists consistently agreed with K(i) values from radioligand binding. Thus, this FP assay, which eliminates using radioisotopes, appears to be appropriate for both routine receptor binding and high-throughput screening with respect to speed of analysis, displaceable signal and precision. The approach used in the present study could be generally applicable to other GPCRs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Direct or indirect stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors enhances bone regeneration as well as bone morphogenetic protein-2

    PubMed Central

    Mediero, Aránzazu; Wilder, Tuere; Perez-Aso, Miguel; Cronstein, Bruce N.

    2015-01-01

    Promoting bone regeneration and repair of bone defects is a need that has not been well met to date. We have previously found that adenosine, acting via A2A receptors (A2AR) promotes wound healing and inhibits inflammatory osteolysis and hypothesized that A2AR might be a novel target to promote bone regeneration. Therefore, we determined whether direct A2AR stimulation or increasing endogenous adenosine concentrations via purine transport blockade with dipyridamole regulates bone formation. We determined whether coverage of a 3 mm trephine defect in a mouse skull with a collagen scaffold soaked in saline, bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2; 200 ng), 1 μM CGS21680 (A2AR agonist, EC50 = 160 nM), or 1 μM dipyridamole (EC50 = 32 nM) promoted bone regeneration. Microcomputed tomography examination demonstrated that CGS21680 and dipyridamole markedly enhanced bone regeneration as well as BMP-2 8 wk after surgery (60 ± 2%, 79 ± 2%, and 75 ± 1% bone regeneration, respectively, vs. 32 ± 2% in control, P < 0.001). Blockade by a selective A2AR antagonist (ZM241385, 1 μM) or deletion of A2AR abrogated the effect of CGS21680 and dipyridamole on bone regeneration. Both CGS21680 and dipyridamole treatment increased alkaline phosphatase-positive osteoblasts and diminished tartrate resistance acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts in the defects. In vivo imaging with a fluorescent dye for new bone formation revealed a strong fluorescent signal in treated animals that was equivalent to BMP-2. In conclusion, stimulation of A2AR by specific agonists or by increasing endogenous adenosine levels stimulates new bone formation as well as BMP-2 and represents a novel approach to stimulating bone regeneration.—Mediero, A., Wilder, T., Perez-Aso, M., Cronstein, B. N. Direct or indirect stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors enhances bone regeneration as well as bone morphogenetic protein-2. PMID:25573752

  3. Dopamine receptor heteromeric complexes and their emerging functions.

    PubMed

    George, Susan R; Kern, Andras; Smith, Roy G; Franco, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine neurotransmission is traditionally accepted as occurring through the five dopamine receptors that transduce its signal. Recent evidence has demonstrated that the range of physiologically relevant dopamine signaling complexes is greatly expanded by the ability of dopamine receptors to interact with other dopamine receptors and with receptors of other endogenous signaling ligands. These novel heteromeric complexes have functional properties distinct from the component receptors or are able to modulate the canonical signaling and function of the cognate receptors. These dopamine receptor heteromers provide new insight into physiological mechanisms and pathophysiological processes involving dopamine. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Modulation of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors in C6 glioma cells during hypoxia: involvement of endogenous adenosine.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Carlos A; León, David; Ruiz, María Angeles; Albasanz, José Luis; Martín, Mairena

    2008-06-01

    During hypoxia, extracellular adenosine levels are increased to prevent cell damage, playing a neuroprotective role mainly through adenosine A(1) receptors. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effect of hypoxia in both adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors endogenously expressed in C6 glioma cells. Two hours of hypoxia (5% O(2)) caused a significant decrease in adenosine A(1) receptors. The same effect was observed at 6 h and 24 h of hypoxia. However, adenosine A(2A) receptors were significantly increased at the same times. These effects were not due to hypoxia-induced alterations in cells number or viability. Changes in receptor density were not associated with variations in the rate of gene expression. Furthermore, hypoxia did not alter HIF-1alpha expression in C6 cells. However, HIF-3alpha, CREB and CREM were decreased. Adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptor density in normoxic C6 cells treated with adenosine for 2, 6 and 24 h was similar to that observed in cells after oxygen deprivation. When C6 cells were subjected to hypoxia in the presence of adenosine deaminase, the density of receptors was not significantly modulated. Moreover, DPCPX, an A(1) receptor antagonist, blocked the effects of hypoxia on these receptors, while ZM241385, an A(2A) receptor antagonist, was unable to prevent these changes. These results suggest that moderate hypoxia modulates adenosine receptors and cAMP response elements in glial cells, through a mechanism in which endogenous adenosine and tonic A(1) receptor activation is involved.

  5. Caffeine acts through neuronal adenosine A2A receptors to prevent mood and memory dysfunction triggered by chronic stress

    PubMed Central

    Kaster, Manuella P.; Machado, Nuno J.; Silva, Henrique B.; Nunes, Ana; Ardais, Ana Paula; Santana, Magda; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E.; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S.; Porciúncula, Lisiane O.; Chen, Jiang Fan; Tomé, Ângelo R.; Agostinho, Paula; Canas, Paula M.; Cunha, Rodrigo A.

    2015-01-01

    The consumption of caffeine (an adenosine receptor antagonist) correlates inversely with depression and memory deterioration, and adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) antagonists emerge as candidate therapeutic targets because they control aberrant synaptic plasticity and afford neuroprotection. Therefore we tested the ability of A2AR to control the behavioral, electrophysiological, and neurochemical modifications caused by chronic unpredictable stress (CUS), which alters hippocampal circuits, dampens mood and memory performance, and enhances susceptibility to depression. CUS for 3 wk in adult mice induced anxiogenic and helpless-like behavior and decreased memory performance. These behavioral changes were accompanied by synaptic alterations, typified by a decrease in synaptic plasticity and a reduced density of synaptic proteins (synaptosomal-associated protein 25, syntaxin, and vesicular glutamate transporter type 1), together with an increased density of A2AR in glutamatergic terminals in the hippocampus. Except for anxiety, for which results were mixed, CUS-induced behavioral and synaptic alterations were prevented by (i) caffeine (1 g/L in the drinking water, starting 3 wk before and continued throughout CUS); (ii) the selective A2AR antagonist KW6002 (3 mg/kg, p.o.); (iii) global A2AR deletion; and (iv) selective A2AR deletion in forebrain neurons. Notably, A2AR blockade was not only prophylactic but also therapeutically efficacious, because a 3-wk treatment with the A2AR antagonist SCH58261 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed the mood and synaptic dysfunction caused by CUS. These results herald a key role for synaptic A2AR in the control of chronic stress-induced modifications and suggest A2AR as candidate targets to alleviate the consequences of chronic stress on brain function. PMID:26056314

  6. The adenosine metabolite inosine is a functional agonist of the adenosine A2A receptor with a unique signaling bias

    PubMed Central

    Welihinda, Ajith A.; Kaur, Manmeet; Greene, Kelly; Zhai, Yongjiao; Amento, Edward P.

    2016-01-01

    Inosine is an endogenous purine nucleoside that is produced by catabolism of adenosine. Adenosine has a short half-life (approximately 10 s) and is rapidly deaminated to inosine, a stable metabolite with a half-life of approximately 15 h. Resembling adenosine, inosine acting through adenosine receptors (ARs) exerts a wide range of anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects in vivo. The immunomodulatory effects of inosine in vivo, at least in part, are mediated via the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR), an observation that cannot be explained fully by in vitro pharmacological characterization of inosine at the A2AR. It is unclear whether the in vivo effects of inosine are due to inosine or a metabolite of inosine engaging the A2AR. Here, utilizing a combination of label-free, cell-based, and membrane-based functional assays in conjunction with an equilibrium agonist-binding assay we provide evidence for inosine engagement at the A2AR and subsequent activation of downstream signaling events. Inosine-mediated A2AR activation leads to cAMP production with an EC50 of 300.7 μM and to extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 and -2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation with an EC50 of 89.38 μM. Our data demonstrate that inosine produces ERKl/2-biased signaling whereas adenosine produces cAMP-biased signaling at the A2AR, highlighting pharmacological differences between these two agonists. Given the in vivo stability of inosine, our data suggest an additional, previously unrecognized, mechanism that utilizes inosine to functionally amplify and prolong A2AR activation in vivo. PMID:26903141

  7. The adenosine metabolite inosine is a functional agonist of the adenosine A2A receptor with a unique signaling bias.

    PubMed

    Welihinda, Ajith A; Kaur, Manmeet; Greene, Kelly; Zhai, Yongjiao; Amento, Edward P

    2016-06-01

    Inosine is an endogenous purine nucleoside that is produced by catabolism of adenosine. Adenosine has a short half-life (approximately 10s) and is rapidly deaminated to inosine, a stable metabolite with a half-life of approximately 15h. Resembling adenosine, inosine acting through adenosine receptors (ARs) exerts a wide range of anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects in vivo. The immunomodulatory effects of inosine in vivo, at least in part, are mediated via the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR), an observation that cannot be explained fully by in vitro pharmacological characterization of inosine at the A2AR. It is unclear whether the in vivo effects of inosine are due to inosine or a metabolite of inosine engaging the A2AR. Here, utilizing a combination of label-free, cell-based, and membrane-based functional assays in conjunction with an equilibrium agonist-binding assay we provide evidence for inosine engagement at the A2AR and subsequent activation of downstream signaling events. Inosine-mediated A2AR activation leads to cAMP production with an EC50 of 300.7μM and to extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 and -2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation with an EC50 of 89.38μM. Our data demonstrate that inosine produces ERK1/2-biased signaling whereas adenosine produces cAMP-biased signaling at the A2AR, highlighting pharmacological differences between these two agonists. Given the in vivo stability of inosine, our data suggest an additional, previously unrecognized, mechanism that utilizes inosine to functionally amplify and prolong A2AR activation in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Activation of the adenosine A2A receptor attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and is associated with increased intracellular calcium levels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yumei; Zou, Haifeng; Zhao, Ping; Sun, Bo; Wang, Jinghua; Kong, Qingfei; Mu, Lili; Zhao, Sihan; Wang, Guangyou; Wang, Dandan; Zhang, Yao; Zhao, Jiaying; Yin, Pengqi; Liu, Lei; Zhao, Xiuli; Li, Hulun

    2016-08-25

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a common autoimmune disease that inevitably causes inflammatory nerve demyelination. However, an effective approach to prevent its course is still lacking and urgently needed. Recently, the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) has emerged as a novel inflammation regulator. Manipulation of A2AR activity may suppress the MS process and protect against nerve damage. To test this hypothesis, we treated murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model for MS, with the selective A2AR agonist, CGS21680 (CGS). We evaluated the effects of CGS on the pathological features of EAE progression, including CNS cellular infiltration, inflammatory cytokine expression, lymphocyte proliferation, and cell surface markers. Treatment with CGS significantly suppressed specific lymphocyte proliferation, reduced infiltration of CD4(+) T lymphocytes, and attenuated the expression of inflammatory cytokines, which in turn inhibited the EAE progression. For the first time, we demonstrate that CGS can increase the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in murine lymphocytes, which may be the mechanism underlying the suppressive effects of CGS-induced A2AR activation on EAE progression. Our findings strongly suggest that A2AR is a potential therapeutic target for MS and provide insight into the mechanism of action of A2AR agonists, which may offer a therapeutic option for this disease. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Striatal adenosine A2A receptor neurons control active-period sleep via parvalbumin neurons in external globus pallidus

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Wei-Min; Yang, Su-Rong; Cherasse, Yoan; Lazarus, Michael; Schiffmann, Serge N; d'Exaerde, Alban de Kerchove

    2017-01-01

    Dysfunction of the striatum is frequently associated with sleep disturbances. However, its role in sleep-wake regulation has been paid little attention even though the striatum densely expresses adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs), which are essential for adenosine-induced sleep. Here we showed that chemogenetic activation of A2AR neurons in specific subregions of the striatum induced a remarkable increase in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Anatomical mapping and immunoelectron microscopy revealed that striatal A2AR neurons innervated the external globus pallidus (GPe) in a topographically organized manner and preferentially formed inhibitory synapses with GPe parvalbumin (PV) neurons. Moreover, lesions of GPe PV neurons abolished the sleep-promoting effect of striatal A2AR neurons. In addition, chemogenetic inhibition of striatal A2AR neurons led to a significant decrease of NREM sleep at active period, but not inactive period of mice. These findings reveal a prominent contribution of striatal A2AR neuron/GPe PV neuron circuit in sleep control. PMID:29022877

  10. Mechanistic insights into allosteric regulation of the A 2A adenosine G protein-coupled receptor by physiological cations

    DOE PAGES

    Ye, Libin; Neale, Chris Andrew; Sljoka, Adnan; ...

    2018-04-10

    Cations play key roles in regulating G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), although their mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, 19F NMR is used to delineate the effects of cations on functional states of the adenosine A 2A GPCR. While Na + reinforces an inactive ensemble and a partial-agonist stabilized state, Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ shift the equilibrium toward active states. Positive allosteric effects of divalent cations are more pronounced with agonist and a G-protein-derived peptide. In cell membranes, divalent cations enhance both the affinity and fraction of the high affinity agonist-bound state. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest high concentrations of divalent cations bridgemore » specific extracellular acidic residues, bringing TM5 and TM6 together at the extracellular surface and allosterically driving open the G-protein-binding cleft as shown by rigidity-transmission allostery theory. Lastly, an understanding of cation allostery should enable the design of allosteric agents and enhance our understanding of GPCR regulation in the cellular milieu.« less

  11. Persistent reduction of cocaine seeking by pharmacological manipulation of adenosine A1 and A 2A receptors during extinction training in rats.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Casey E; Hobson, Benjamin D; Levis, Sophia C; Bachtell, Ryan K

    2014-08-01

    Adenosine receptor stimulation and blockade have been shown to modulate a variety of cocaine-related behaviors. These studies identify the direct effects of adenosine receptor stimulation on cocaine seeking during extinction training and the persistent effects on subsequent reinstatement to cocaine seeking. Rats self-administered cocaine on a fixed ratio one schedule in daily sessions over 3 weeks. Following a 1-week withdrawal, the direct effects of adenosine receptor modulation were tested by administering the adenosine A1 receptor agonist, N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 0.03 and 0.1 mg/kg), the adenosine A2A agonist, CGS 21680 (0.03 and 0.1 mg/kg), the presynaptic adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, SCH 442416 (0.3, 1, and 3 mg/kg), or vehicle prior to each of six daily extinction sessions. The persistent effects of adenosine receptor modulation during extinction training were subsequently tested on reinstatement to cocaine seeking induced by cues, cocaine, and the dopamine D2 receptor agonist, quinpirole. All doses of CPA and CGS 21680 impaired initial extinction responding; however, only CPA treatment during extinction produced persistent impairment in subsequent cocaine- and quinpirole-induced seeking. Dissociating CPA treatment from extinction did not alter extinction responding or subsequent reinstatement. Administration of SCH 442416 had no direct effects on extinction responding but produced dose-dependent persistent impairment of cocaine- and quinpirole-induced seeking. These findings demonstrate that adenosine A1 or A2A receptor stimulation directly impair extinction responding. Interestingly, adenosine A1 receptor stimulation or presynaptic adenosine A2A receptor blockade during extinction produces lasting changes in relapse susceptibility.

  12. Cannabidiol provides long-lasting protection against the deleterious effects of inflammation in a viral model of multiple sclerosis: a role for A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Mecha, M; Feliú, A; Iñigo, P M; Mestre, L; Carrillo-Salinas, F J; Guaza, C

    2013-11-01

    Inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS) is a complex process that involves a multitude of molecules and effectors, and it requires the transmigration of blood leukocytes across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the activation of resident immune cells. Cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychotropic cannabinoid constituent of Cannabis sativa, has potent anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties. Yet, how this compound modifies the deleterious effects of inflammation in TMEV-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) remains unknown. Using this viral model of multiple sclerosis (MS), we demonstrate that CBD decreases the transmigration of blood leukocytes by downregulating the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), chemokines (CCL2 and CCL5) and the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β, as well as by attenuating the activation of microglia. Moreover, CBD administration at the time of viral infection exerts long-lasting effects, ameliorating motor deficits in the chronic phase of the disease in conjunction with reduced microglial activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Adenosine A2A receptors participate in some of the anti-inflammatory effects of CBD, as the A2A antagonist ZM241385 partially blocks the protective effects of CBD in the initial stages of inflammation. Together, our findings highlight the anti-inflammatory effects of CBD in this viral model of MS and demonstrate the significant therapeutic potential of this compound for the treatment of pathologies with an inflammatory component. © 2013.

  13. Beneficial effects of a novel agonist of the adenosine A2A receptor on monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats

    PubMed Central

    Alencar, Allan K N; Pereira, Sharlene L; Montagnoli, Tadeu L; Maia, Rodolfo C; Kümmerle, Arthur E; Landgraf, Sharon S; Caruso-Neves, Celso; Ferraz, Emanuelle B; Tesch, Roberta; Nascimento, José H M; de Sant'Anna, Carlos M R; Fraga, Carlos A M; Barreiro, Eliezer J; Sudo, Roberto T; Zapata-Sudo, Gisele

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by enhanced pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy and increased right ventricular systolic pressure. Here, we investigated the effects of a N-acylhydrazone derivative, 3,4-dimethoxyphenyl-N-methyl-benzoylhydrazide (LASSBio-1359), on monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats. Experimental Approach PAH was induced in male Wistar rats by a single i.p. injection of MCT (60 mg·kg−1) and 2 weeks later, oral LASSBio-1359 (50 mg·kg−1) or vehicle was given once daily for 14 days. Echocardiography was used to measure cardiac function and pulmonary artery dimensions, with histological assay of vascular collagen. Studies of binding to human recombinant adenosine receptors (A1, A2A, A3) and of docking with A2A receptors were also performed. Key Results MCT administration induced changes in vascular and ventricular structure and function, characteristic of PAH. These changes were reversed by treatment with LASSBio-1359. MCT also induced endothelial dysfunction in pulmonary artery, as measured by diminished relaxation of pre-contracted arterial rings, and this dysfunction was reversed by LASSBio-1359. In pulmonary artery rings from normal Wistar rats, LASSBio-1359 induced relaxation, which was decreased by the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, ZM 241385. In adenosine receptor binding studies, LASSBio-1359 showed most affinity for the A2A receptor and in the docking analyses, binding modes of LASSBio-1359 and the A2A receptor agonist, CGS21680, were very similar. Conclusion and Implications In rats with MCT-induced PAH, structural and functional changes in heart and pulmonary artery were reversed by treatment with oral LASSBio-1359, most probably through the activation of adenosine A2A receptors. PMID:23530610

  14. Adenosine A2A Receptor Up-Regulates Retinal Wave Frequency via Starburst Amacrine Cells in the Developing Rat Retina

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pin-Chien; Hsiao, Yu-Tien; Kao, Shao-Yen; Chen, Ching-Feng; Chen, Yu-Chieh; Chiang, Chung-Wei; Lee, Chien-fei; Lu, Juu-Chin; Chern, Yijuang; Wang, Chih-Tien

    2014-01-01

    Background Developing retinas display retinal waves, the patterned spontaneous activity essential for circuit refinement. During the first postnatal week in rodents, retinal waves are mediated by synaptic transmission between starburst amacrine cells (SACs) and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The neuromodulator adenosine is essential for the generation of retinal waves. However, the cellular basis underlying adenosine's regulation of retinal waves remains elusive. Here, we investigated whether and how the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) regulates retinal waves and whether A2AR regulation of retinal waves acts via presynaptic SACs. Methodology/Principal Findings We showed that A2AR was expressed in the inner plexiform layer and ganglion cell layer of the developing rat retina. Knockdown of A2AR decreased the frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ transients, suggesting that endogenous A2AR may up-regulate wave frequency. To investigate whether A2AR acts via presynaptic SACs, we targeted gene expression to SACs by the metabotropic glutamate receptor type II promoter. Ca2+ transient frequency was increased by expressing wild-type A2AR (A2AR-WT) in SACs, suggesting that A2AR may up-regulate retinal waves via presynaptic SACs. Subsequent patch-clamp recordings on RGCs revealed that presynaptic A2AR-WT increased the frequency of wave-associated postsynaptic currents (PSCs) or depolarizations compared to the control, without changing the RGC's excitability, membrane potentials, or PSC charge. These findings suggest that presynaptic A2AR may not affect the membrane properties of postsynaptic RGCs. In contrast, by expressing the C-terminal truncated A2AR mutant (A2AR-ΔC) in SACs, the wave frequency was reduced compared to the A2AR-WT, but was similar to the control, suggesting that the full-length A2AR in SACs is required for A2AR up-regulation of retinal waves. Conclusions/Significance A2AR up-regulates the frequency of retinal waves via presynaptic SACs, requiring its full

  15. Insulin-Increased L-Arginine Transport Requires A2A Adenosine Receptors Activation in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Gutiérrez, Enrique; Westermeier, Francisco; Salomón, Carlos; González, Marcelo; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea; Sobrevia, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine causes vasodilation of human placenta vasculature by increasing the transport of arginine via cationic amino acid transporters 1 (hCAT-1). This process involves the activation of A2A adenosine receptors (A2AAR) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Insulin increases hCAT-1 activity and expression in HUVECs, and A2AAR stimulation increases insulin sensitivity in subjects with insulin resistance. However, whether A2AAR plays a role in insulin-mediated increase in L-arginine transport in HUVECs is unknown. To determine this, we first assayed the kinetics of saturable L-arginine transport (1 minute, 37°C) in the absence or presence of nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBTI, 10 µmol/L, adenosine transport inhibitor) and/or adenosine receptors agonist/antagonists. We also determined hCAT-1 protein and mRNA expression levels (Western blots and quantitative PCR), and SLC7A1 (for hCAT-1) reporter promoter activity. Insulin and NBTI increased the extracellular adenosine concentration, the maximal velocity for L-arginine transport without altering the apparent K m for L-arginine transport, hCAT-1 protein and mRNA expression levels, and SLC7A1 transcriptional activity. An A2AAR antagonist ZM-241385 blocked these effects. ZM241385 inhibited SLC7A1 reporter transcriptional activity to the same extent in cells transfected with pGL3-hCAT-1−1606 or pGL3-hCAT-1−650 constructs in the presence of NBTI + insulin. However, SLC7A1 reporter activity was increased by NBTI only in cells transfected with pGL3-hCAT-1−1606, and the ZM-241385 sensitive fraction of the NBTI response was similar in the absence or in the presence of insulin. Thus, insulin modulation of hCAT-1 expression and activity requires functional A2AAR in HUVECs, a mechanism that may be applicable to diseases associated with fetal insulin resistance, such as gestational diabetes. PMID:22844517

  16. Absence of the Adenosine A2A Receptor Confers Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension and Increased Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, M.H.; Gong, Y.S.; Su, M.S.; Dai, Z.Y.; Dai, S.S.; Bao, S.Z.; Li, N.; Zheng, R.Y.; He, J.C.; Chen, J.F.; Wang, X.T.

    2011-01-01

    Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by sustained elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance resulting from endothelial and smooth muscle cell dysfunction and collagen deposition in pulmonary vascular walls. In this study, we investigated the role of the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) in the development of PAH by determining the effect of genetic inactivation of A2ARs on pulmonary vascular remodeling in mice. Methods and Results We characterized hemodynamic, histological and ultrastructural changes in pulmonary vascular remodeling in A2AR knockout (KO) mice compared with their wild-type (WT) littermates after exposure to normoxia and hypoxic conditions. After exposure to normoxia, compared to WT mice, A2AR KO mice displayed: (1) increased right ventricular systolic pressures and an elevated ratio of the right ventricle over left ventricle plus septum (Fulton index), (2) increased wall area and thickness as well as enhanced smooth muscle actin immunoreactivity in pulmonary resistance vessels, (3) increased proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive cells in pulmonary resistance vessels and (4) increased smooth muscle cells hypertrophy and collagen deposition in the adventitia of pulmonary arteriole walls as revealed by electron microscope. By contrast, histological analysis revealed no features of hypertensive nephropathy in A2AR KO mice and there was no significant difference in systemic blood pressure, and left ventricular masses among the 3 genotypes. Furthermore, following chronic exposure to hypoxia, A2AR KO mice exhibited exacerbated elevation in right ventricular systolic pressure, hypertrophy of pulmonary resistance vessels and increased cell proliferation in pulmonary resistance vessels, compared to WT littermates. Thus, genetic inactivation of A2ARs selectively produced PAH and associated increased smooth muscle proliferation and collagen deposition. Conclusions Extracellular adenosine acting at A2ARs represents an important

  17. Genetic Deletion of the Adenosine A2A Receptor Confers Postnatal Development of Relative Myopia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiangtian; Huang, Qinzhu; An, Jianhong; Lu, Runxia; Qin, Xiaoyi; Jiang, Liqin; Li, Yuan; Wang, Jianhua; Chen, Jiangfan; Qu, Jia

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To critically evaluate whether the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) plays a role in postnatal refractive development in mice. Methods. Custom-built biometric systems specifically designed for mice were used to assess the development of relative myopia by examining refraction and biometrics in A2AR knockout (KO) mice and wild-type (WT) littermates between postnatal days (P)28 and P56. Ocular dimensions were measured by customized optical coherence tomography (OCT), refractive state by eccentric infrared photorefraction (EIR), and corneal radius of curvature by modified keratometry. Scleral collagen diameter and density were examined by electron microscopy on P35. The effect of A2AR activation on collagen mRNA expression and on soluble collagen production was examined in cultured human scleral fibroblasts by real-time RT-PCR and a collagen assay kit. Results. Compared with WT littermates, the A2AR KO mice displayed relative myopia (average difference, 5.1 D between P28 and P35) and associated increases in VC depth and axial length from P28 to P56. Furthermore, the myopic shift in A2AR KO mice was associated with ultrastructural changes in the sclera: Electron microscopy revealed denser collagen fibrils with reduced diameter in A2AR KO compared with WT. Last, A2AR activation induced expression of mRNAs for collagens I, III, and V and increased production of soluble collagen in cultured human scleral fibroblasts. Conclusions. Genetic deletion of the A2AR promotes development of relative myopia with increased axial length and altered scleral collagen fiber structure during postnatal development in mice. Thus, the A2AR may be important in normal refractive development. PMID:20484596

  18. Anti-inflammatory effects of inosine in allergic lung inflammation in mice: evidence for the participation of adenosine A2A and A 3 receptors.

    PubMed

    da Rocha Lapa, Fernanda; de Oliveira, Ana Paula Ligeiro; Accetturi, Beatriz Golega; de Oliveira Martins, Isabelli; Domingos, Helory Vanni; de Almeida Cabrini, Daniela; de Lima, Wothan Tavares; Santos, Adair Roberto Soares

    2013-09-01

    Inosine, a naturally occurring purine formed from the breakdown of adenosine, is associated with immunoregulatory effects. Evidence shows that inosine modulates lung inflammation and regulates cytokine generation. However, its role in controlling allergen-induced lung inflammation has yet to be identified. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of inosine and adenosine receptors in a murine model of lung allergy induced by ovalbumin (OVA). Intraperitoneal administration of inosine (0.001-10 mg/kg, 30 min before OVA challenge) significantly reduced the number of leukocytes, macrophages, lymphocytes and eosinophils recovered in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of sensitized mice compared with controls. Interestingly, our results showed that pre-treatment with the selective A2A receptor antagonist (ZM241385), but not with the selective A2B receptor antagonist (alloxazine), reduced the inhibitory effects of inosine against macrophage count, suggesting that A2A receptors mediate monocyte recruitment into the lungs. In addition, the pre-treatment of mice with selective A3 antagonist (MRS3777) also prevented inosine effects against macrophages, lymphocytes and eosinophils. Histological analysis confirmed the effects of inosine and A2A adenosine receptors on cell recruitment and demonstrated that the treatment with ZM241385 and alloxazine reverted inosine effects against mast cell migration into the lungs. Accordingly, the treatment with inosine reduced lung elastance, an effect related to A2 receptors. Moreover, inosine reduced the levels of Th2-cytokines, interleukin-4 and interleukin-5, an effect that was not reversed by A2A or A2B selective antagonists. Our data show that inosine acting on A2A or A3 adenosine receptors can regulate OVA-induced allergic lung inflammation and also implicate inosine as an endogenous modulator of inflammatory processes observed in the lungs of asthmatic patients.

  19. METABOTROPIC GLUTAMATE TYPE 5, DOPAMINE D2 AND ADENOSINE A2A RECEPTORS FORM HIGHER-ORDER OLIGOMERS IN LIVING CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Cabello, Nuria; Gandía, Jorge; Bertarelli, Daniela C. G.; Watanabe, Masahiko; Lluís, Carme; Franco, Rafael; Ferré, Sergi; Luján, Rafael; Ciruela, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are known to form homo- and heteromers at the plasma membrane, but the stoichiometry of these receptor oligomers are relatively unknown. Here, by using bimolecular fluorescence complementation, we visualized for the first time the occurrence of heterodimers of metabotropic glutamate mGlu5 receptors (mGlu5R) and dopamine D2 receptors (D2R) in living cells. Furthermore, the combination of bimolecular fluorescence complementation and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer techniques, as well as the sequential resonance energy transfer (SRET) technique, allowed us to detect the occurrence receptor oligomers containing more than two protomers, mGlu5R, D2R and adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR). Interestingly, by using high-resolution immunoelectron microscopy we could confirm that the three receptors co-distribute within the extrasynaptic plasma membrane of the same dendritic spines of asymmetrical, putative glutamatergic, striatal synapses. Also, co-immunoprecipitation experiments in native tissue demonstrated the existence of an association of mGlu5R, D2R and A2AR in rat striatum homogenates. Overall, these results provide new insights into the molecular composition of G protein-coupled receptor oligomers in general and the mGlu5R/D2R/A2AR oligomer in particular, a receptor oligomer that might constitute an important target for the treatment of some neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:19344374

  20. Behavioural and biochemical responses to morphine associated with its motivational properties are altered in adenosine A2A receptor knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Castañé, A; Wells, L; Soria, G; Hourani, S; Ledent, C; Kitchen, I; Opacka-Juffry, J; Maldonado, R; Valverde, O

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: The purinergic system through the A2A adenosine receptor regulates addiction induced by different drugs of abuse. The aim of the present study was to investigate the specific role of A2A adenosine receptors (A2ARs) in the behavioural and neurochemical responses to morphine associated with its motivational properties. Experimental approach: Mice lacking A2ARs (A2A knockout (KO) mice) and wild-type littermates were used to evaluate behavioural responses induced by morphine. Antinociception was assessed using the tail-immersion and the hot-plate tests. Place-conditioning paradigms were used to evaluate the rewarding effects of morphine and the dysphoric responses of morphine withdrawal. Microdialysis studies were carried out to evaluate changes in the extracellular levels of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens of A2A KO mice after morphine administration. Key results: The acute administration of morphine induced a similar enhancement of locomotor activity and antinociceptive responses in both genotypes. However, the rewarding effects induced by morphine were completely blocked in A2A KO mice. Also, naloxone did not induce place aversion in animals lacking the A2ARs. Conclusions and implications: Our findings demonstrate that the rewarding and aversive effects associated with morphine abstinence were abolished in A2A KO mice, supporting a differential role of the A2A adenosine receptor in the somatic and motivational effects of morphine addiction. This study provides evidence for the role of A2ARs as general modulators of the motivational properties of drugs of abuse. Pharmacological manipulation of these receptors may represent a new target in the management of drug addiction. PMID:18660831

  1. Differential effects of presynaptic versus postsynaptic adenosine A2A receptor blockade on Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) self-administration in squirrel monkeys.

    PubMed

    Justinová, Zuzana; Redhi, Godfrey H; Goldberg, Steven R; Ferré, Sergi

    2014-05-07

    Different doses of an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist MSX-3 [3,7-dihydro-8-[(1E)-2-(3-ethoxyphenyl)ethenyl]-7 methyl-3-[3-(phosphooxy)propyl-1-(2 propynil)-1H-purine-2,6-dione] were found previously to either decrease or increase self-administration of cannabinoids delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) or anandamide in squirrel monkeys. It was hypothesized that the decrease observed with a relatively low dose of MSX-3 was related to blockade of striatal presynaptic A2A receptors that modulate glutamatergic neurotransmission, whereas the increase observed with a higher dose was related to blockade of postsynaptic A2A receptors localized in striatopallidal neurons. This hypothesis was confirmed in the present study by testing the effects of the preferential presynaptic and postsynaptic A2A receptor antagonists SCH-442416 [2-(2-furanyl)-7-[3-(4-methoxyphenyl)propyl]-7H-pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-amine] and KW-6002 [(E)-1, 3-diethyl-8-(3,4-dimethoxystyryl)-7-methyl-3,7-dihydro-1H-purine-2,6-dione], respectively, in squirrel monkeys trained to intravenously self-administer THC. SCH-442416 produced a significant shift to the right of the THC self-administration dose-response curves, consistent with antagonism of the reinforcing effects of THC. Conversely, KW-6002 produced a significant shift to the left, consistent with potentiation of the reinforcing effects of THC. These results show that selectively blocking presynaptic A2A receptors could provide a new pharmacological approach to the treatment of marijuana dependence and underscore corticostriatal glutamatergic neurotransmission as a possible main mechanism involved in the rewarding effects of THC.

  2. Potentiation of cytokine induction of group IIA phospholipase A(2) in rat mesangial cells by ATP and adenosine via the A2A adenosine receptor.

    PubMed

    Scholz-Pedretti, K; Pfeilschifter, J; Kaszkin, M

    2001-01-01

    1. In rat mesangial cells extracellular nucleotides were found to increase arachidonic acid release by a cytosolic phospholipase A(2) through the P2Y(2) purinergic receptor. 2. In this study we investigated the effects of ATP and UTP on interleukin-1ss (IL-1ss)-induced mRNA expression and activity of group IIA phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2)-IIA) in rat mesangial cells. 3. Treatment of cells for 24 h with extracellular ATP potentiated IL-1ss-stimulated sPLA(2)-IIA induction, whereas UTP had no effect. 4. We obtained the following evidence that the P2Y(2) receptor is not involved in the potentiation of sPLA(2)-IIA induction: (i) ATP-gamma-S had no enhancing effect; (ii) suramin, a P(2) receptor antagonist, did not inhibit ATP-mediated potentiation; (iii) inhibition of degradation of extracellular nucleotides by the 5'-ectonucleotidase inhibitor AOPCP did not enhance sPLA(2)-IIA induction and (iv) adenosine deaminase treatment completely abolished the ATP-mediated potentiation of sPLA(2)-IIA induction. 5. In contrast, treatment of mesangial cells with adenosine or the A2A receptor agonist CGS 21680 mimicked the effects of ATP in enhancing IL-1ss-stimulated sPLA(2)-IIA induction, whereas the specific A2A receptor antagonist ZM 241385 completely abolished the potentiating effect of ATP or adenosine. 6. The protein kinase A inhibitor Rp-8-Br-cyclic AMPS dose-dependently inhibited the enhancing effect of ATP or adenosine indicating the participation of an adenosine receptor-mediated cyclic AMP-dependent signalling pathway. 7. These data indicate that ATP mediates proinflammatory long-term effects in rat mesangial cells via its degradation product adenosine through the A2A receptor resulting in potentiation of sPLA(2)-IIA induction.

  3. Interactions among the components of the interleukin-10 receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Krause, Christopher D; Mei, Erwen; Mirochnitchenko, Olga; Lavnikova, Natasha; Xie, Junxia; Jia, Yiwei; Hochstrasser, Robin M; Pestka, Sidney

    2006-02-10

    We used fluorescence resonance energy transfer previously to show that the interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) receptor complex is a preformed entity mediated by constitutive interactions between the IFN-gammaR2 and IFN-gammaR1 chains, and that this preassembled entity changes its structure after the treatment of cells with IFN-gamma. We applied this technique to determine the structure of the interleukin-10 (IL-10) receptor complex and whether it undergoes a similar conformational change after treatment of cells with IL-10. We report that, like the IFN-gamma receptor complex, the IL-10 receptor complex is preassembled: constitutive but weaker interactions occur between the IL-10R1 and IL-10R2 chains, and between two IL-10R2 chains. The IL-10 receptor complex undergoes no major conformational changes when cells are treated with cellular or Epstein-Barr viral IL-10. Receptor complex preassembly may be an inherent feature of Class 2 cytokine receptor complexes.

  4. Studying Nuclear Receptor Complexes in the Cellular Environment.

    PubMed

    Schaufele, Fred

    2016-01-01

    The ligand-regulated structure and biochemistry of nuclear receptor complexes are commonly determined by in vitro studies of isolated receptors, cofactors, and their fragments. However, in the living cell, the complexes that form are governed not just by the relative affinities of isolated cofactors for the receptor but also by the cell-specific sequestration or concentration of subsets of competing or cooperating cofactors, receptors, and other effectors into distinct subcellular domains and/or their temporary diversion into other cellular activities. Most methods developed to understand nuclear receptor function in the cellular environment involve the direct tagging of the nuclear receptor or its cofactors with fluorescent proteins (FPs) and the tracking of those FP-tagged factors by fluorescence microscopy. One of those approaches, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy, quantifies the transfer of energy from a higher energy "donor" FP to a lower energy "acceptor" FP attached to a single protein or to interacting proteins. The amount of FRET is influenced by the ligand-induced changes in the proximities and orientations of the FPs within the tagged nuclear receptor complexes, which is an indicator of the structure of the complexes, and by the kinetics of the interaction between FP-tagged factors. Here, we provide a guide for parsing information about the structure and biochemistry of nuclear receptor complexes from FRET measurements in living cells.

  5. Evaluation of antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like activity of purinedione-derivatives with affinity for adenosine A2A receptors in mice.

    PubMed

    Dziubina, Anna; Szmyd, Karina; Zygmunt, Małgorzata; Sapa, Jacek; Dudek, Magdalena; Filipek, Barbara; Drabczyńska, Anna; Załuski, Michał; Pytka, Karolina; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2016-12-01

    It has recently been suggested that the adenosine A 2A receptor plays a role in several animal models of depression. Additionally, A 2A antagonists have reversed behavioral deficits and exhibited a profile similar to classical antidepressants. In the present study, imidazo- and pyrimido[2,1-f]purinedione derivatives (KD 66, KD 167, KD 206) with affinity to A 2A receptors but poor A 1 affinity were evaluated for their antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like activity. The activity of these derivatives was tested using a tail suspension and forced swim test, two widely-used behavioral paradigms for the evaluation of antidepressant-like activity. In turn, the anxiolytic activity was evaluated using the four-plate test. The results showed the antidepressant-like activity of pyrimido- and imidazopurinedione derivatives (i.e. KD 66, KD 167 and KD 206) in acute and chronic behavioral tests in mice. KD 66 revealed an anxiolytic-like effect, while KD 167 increased anxiety behaviors. KD 206 had no effect on anxiety. Furthermore, none of the tested compounds increased locomotor activity. Available data support the proposition that the examined compounds with adenosine A 2A receptor affinity may be an interesting target for the development of antidepressant and/or anxiolytic agents. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  6. Decreases in yeast expression yields of the human adenosine A2a receptor are a result of translational or post-translational events.

    PubMed

    Niebauer, Ronald T; Wedekind, Alison; Robinson, Anne Skaja

    2004-09-01

    The human adenosine receptor (A2a), a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), was C-terminally tagged with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to gain an understanding of the expression limitations of this medically relevant class of membrane proteins. The A2a-GFP protein was able to bind adenosine analogs indicating that the GFP tag did not alter the ligand binding activity of the receptor. A screen based on whole cell fluorescence was developed and a library of clones with various gene copy numbers was screened via flow cytometry to isolate clones with the highest protein expression levels. All clones studied exhibited a decrease in the net A2a-GFP protein production rate over time as determined by whole cell fluorescence, Western blotting, confocal microscopy, and ligand binding. Quantitative PCR showed that A2a-GFP mRNA levels remained relatively high even as the protein production rate decreased. A cycloheximide chase experiment showed that the mature protein was stable over time and was not significantly degraded. Taken together, these results suggest that heterologous expression of GPCRs is limited by a translational or post-translational bottleneck that is unique from expression limitations seen for soluble proteins.

  7. Comparison of the Human A2A Adenosine Receptor Recognition by Adenosine and Inosine: New Insight from Supervised Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Deganutti, Giuseppe; Welihinda, Ajith; Moro, Stefano

    2017-08-22

    Adenosine deaminase converts adenosine into inosine. In contrast to adenosine, relatively little attention has been paid to the physiological roles of inosine. Nevertheless, recent studies have demonstrated that inosine has neuroprotective, cardioprotective, immunomodulatory, and antidepressive effects. Inosine was recently shown to be a less potent agonist than adenosine at the A 2A adenosine receptor. To better depict the differences in the mechanisms of receptor recognition between adenosine and inosine, we carried out supervised molecular dynamics (SuMD) simulations, and the results are analyzed herein. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Role and Function of A2A and A3 Adenosine Receptors in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis, Psoriatic Arthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ravani, Annalisa; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Bortoluzzi, Alessandra; Padovan, Melissa; Pasquini, Silvia; Gessi, Stefania; Merighi, Stefania; Borea, Pier Andrea; Govoni, Marcello; Varani, Katia

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases that affect joints, causing debilitating pain and disability. Adenosine receptors (ARs) play a key role in the mechanism of inflammation, and the activation of A2A and A3AR subtypes is often associated with a reduction of the inflammatory status. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of ARs in patients suffering from early-RA (ERA), RA, AS and PsA. Messenger RNA (mRNA) analysis and saturation binding experiments indicated an upregulation of A2A and A3ARs in lymphocytes obtained from patients when compared with healthy subjects. A2A and A3AR agonists inhibited nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) activation and reduced inflammatory cytokines release, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6. Moreover, A2A and A3AR activation mediated a reduction of metalloproteinases (MMP)-1 and MMP-3. The effect of the agonists was abrogated by selective antagonists demonstrating the direct involvement of these receptor subtypes. Taken together, these data confirmed the involvement of ARs in chronic autoimmune rheumatic diseases highlighting the possibility to exploit A2A and A3ARs as therapeutic targets, with the aim to limit the inflammatory responses usually associated with RA, AS and PsA. PMID:28338619

  9. Role and Function of A2A and A₃ Adenosine Receptors in Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis, Psoriatic Arthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ravani, Annalisa; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Bortoluzzi, Alessandra; Padovan, Melissa; Pasquini, Silvia; Gessi, Stefania; Merighi, Stefania; Borea, Pier Andrea; Govoni, Marcello; Varani, Katia

    2017-03-24

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases that affect joints, causing debilitating pain and disability. Adenosine receptors (ARs) play a key role in the mechanism of inflammation, and the activation of A 2A and A₃AR subtypes is often associated with a reduction of the inflammatory status. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of ARs in patients suffering from early-RA (ERA), RA, AS and PsA. Messenger RNA (mRNA) analysis and saturation binding experiments indicated an upregulation of A 2A and A₃ARs in lymphocytes obtained from patients when compared with healthy subjects. A 2A and A₃AR agonists inhibited nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) activation and reduced inflammatory cytokines release, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6. Moreover, A 2A and A₃AR activation mediated a reduction of metalloproteinases (MMP)-1 and MMP-3. The effect of the agonists was abrogated by selective antagonists demonstrating the direct involvement of these receptor subtypes. Taken together, these data confirmed the involvement of ARs in chronic autoimmune rheumatic diseases highlighting the possibility to exploit A 2A and A₃ARs as therapeutic targets, with the aim to limit the inflammatory responses usually associated with RA, AS and PsA.

  10. Adenosine A2A receptors are required for glutamate mGluR5- and dopamine D1 receptor-evoked ERK1/2 phosphorylation in rat hippocampus: involvement of NMDA receptor.

    PubMed

    Krania, Paraskevi; Dimou, Eleni; Bantouna, Maria; Kouvaros, Stylianos; Tsiamaki, Eirini; Papatheodoropoulos, Costas; Sarantis, Konstantinos; Angelatou, Fevronia

    2018-05-01

    Interaction between mGluR5 and NMDA receptors (NMDAR) is vital for synaptic plasticity and cognition. We recently demonstrated that stimulation of mGluR5 enhances NMDAR responses in hippocampus by phosphorylating NR2B(Tyr1472) subunit, and this reaction was enabled by adenosine A 2A receptors (A 2A R) (J Neurochem, 135, 2015, 714). In this study, by using in vitro phosphorylation and western blot analysis in hippocampal slices of male Wistar rats, we show that mGluR5 stimulation or mGluR5/NMDARs co-stimulation synergistically activate ERK1/2 signaling leading to c-Fos expression. Interestingly, both reactions are under the permissive control of endogenous adenosine acting through A 2A Rs. Moreover, mGluR5-mediated ERK1/2 phosphorylation depends on NMDAR, which however exhibits a metabotropic way of function, since no ion influx through its ion channel is required. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that mGluR5 and mGluR5/NMDAR-evoked ERK1/2 activation correlates well with the mGluR5/NMDAR-evoked NR2B(Tyr1472) phosphorylation, since both phenomena coincide temporally, are Src dependent, and are both enabled by A 2A Rs. This indicates a functional involvement of NR2B(Tyr1472) phosphorylation in the ERK1/2 activation. Our biochemical results are supported by electrophysiological data showing that in CA1 region of hippocampus, the theta burst stimulation (TBS)-induced long-term potentiation coincides temporally with an increase in ERK1/2 activation and both phenomena are dependent on the tripartite A 2A , mGlu5, and NMDARs. Furthermore, we show that the dopamine D1 receptors evoked ERK1/2 activation as well as the NR2B(Tyr1472) phosphorylation are also regulated by endogenous adenosine and A 2A Rs. In conclusion, our results highlight the A 2A Rs as a crucial regulator not only for NMDAR responses, but also for regulating ERK1/2 signaling and its downstream pathways, leading to gene expression, synaptic plasticity, and memory consolidation. © 2017 International

  11. H(N), N, C(α), C(β) and C' assignments of the intrinsically disordered C-terminus of human adenosine A2A receptor.

    PubMed

    Tossavainen, Helena; Hellman, Maarit; Piirainen, Henni; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka; Permi, Perttu

    2015-10-01

    The C-terminus of the human adenosine A2A receptor differs from the other human adenosine receptors by its exceptional length and lack of a canonical cysteine residue. We have previously structurally characterized this C-terminal domain and its interaction with calmodulin. It was shown to be structurally disordered and flexible, and to bind calmodulin with high affinity in a calcium-dependent manner. Interaction with calmodulin takes place at the N-terminal end of the A2A C-terminal domain without major conformational changes in the latter. NMR was one of the biophysical methods used in the study. Here we present the H(N), N, C(α), C(β) and C' chemical shift assignments of the free form of the C-terminus residues 293-412, used in the NMR spectroscopic characterization of the domain.

  12. GABAB Receptor Complex as a Potential Target for Tumor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Su, Li; Zhang, Qian; He, Cong; Zhang, Zhongling; Yi, Ping; Liu, Jianfeng

    2012-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the vertebrate central nervous system. Metabotropic GABAB receptors are heterodimeric G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) consisting of GABAB1 and GABAB2 subunits. The intracellular C-terminal domains of GABAB receptors are involved in heterodimerization, oligomerization, and association with other proteins, which results in a large receptor complex. Multiple splice variants of the GABAB1 subunit have been identified in which GABAB1a and GABAB1b are the most abundant isoforms in the nervous system. Isoforms GABAB1c through GABAB1n are minor isoforms and are detectable only at mRNA levels. Some of the minor isoforms have been detected in peripheral tissues and encode putative soluble proteins with C-terminal truncations. Interestingly, increased expression of GABAB receptors has been detected in several human cancer cells and tissues. Moreover, GABAB receptor agonist baclofen inhibited tumor growth in rat models. GABAB receptor activation not only induces suppressing the proliferation and migration of various human tumor cells but also results in inactivation of CREB (cAMP-responsive element binding protein) and ERK in tumor cells. Their structural complexity makes it possible to disrupt the functions of GABAB receptors in various ways, raising GABAB receptor diversity as a potential therapeutic target in some human cancers. PMID:22266766

  13. A genetic variation in the adenosine A2A receptor gene (ADORA2A) contributes to individual sensitivity to caffeine effects on sleep.

    PubMed

    Rétey, J V; Adam, M; Khatami, R; Luhmann, U F O; Jung, H H; Berger, W; Landolt, H-P

    2007-05-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used stimulant in Western countries. Some people voluntarily reduce caffeine consumption because it impairs the quality of their sleep. Studies in mice revealed that the disruption of sleep after caffeine is mediated by blockade of adenosine A2A receptors. Here we show in humans that (1) habitual caffeine consumption is associated with reduced sleep quality in self-rated caffeine-sensitive individuals, but not in caffeine-insensitive individuals; (2) the distribution of distinct c.1083T>C genotypes of the adenosine A2A receptor gene (ADORA2A) differs between caffeine-sensitive and -insensitive adults; and (3) the ADORA2A c.1083T>C genotype determines how closely the caffeine-induced changes in brain electrical activity during sleep resemble the alterations observed in patients with insomnia. These data demonstrate a role of adenosine A2A receptors for sleep in humans, and suggest that a common variation in ADORA2A contributes to subjective and objective responses to caffeine on sleep.

  14. Deletion of striatal adenosine A2A receptor spares latent inhibition and prepulse inhibition but impairs active avoidance learning

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Philipp; Wei, Catherine J.; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Boison, Detlev; Yee, Benjamin K.

    2013-01-01

    Following early clinical leads, the adenosine A2AR receptor (A2AR) has continued to attract attention as a potential novel target for treating schizophrenia; especially against the negative and cognitive symptoms of the disease because of A2AR’s unique modulatory action over glutamatergic in addition to dopaminergic signaling. Through the antagonistic interaction with the dopamine D2 receptor, and by regulating glutamate release and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor function, striatal A2AR is ideally positioned to fine-tune the dopamine-glutamate balance whose disturbance is implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. However, the precise function of striatal A2ARsin the regulation of schizophrenia-relevant behavior is poorly understood. Here, we tested the impact of conditional striatum-specific A2AR knockout (st-A2AR-KO) on latent inhibition (LI) and prepulse inhibition (PPI) – behavior that is tightly regulated by striatal dopamine and glutamate. These are two common cross-species translational tests for the assessment of selective attention and sensorimotor gating deficits reported in schizophrenia patients; and enhanced performance in these tests is associated with antipsychotic drug action. We found that neither LI nor PPI was significantly affected in st-A2AR-KO mice; although a deficit in active avoidance learning was identified in these animals. The latter phenotype, however, was not replicated in another form of aversive conditioning – conditioned taste aversion. Hence, the present study shows that neither learned inattention (as measured by LI) nor sensory gating (as indexed by PPI) requires the integrity of striatal A2ARs– a finding that may undermine the hypothesized importance of A2AR in the genesis and/or treatment of schizophrenia. PMID:23276608

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of the adenosine A2a receptor in POPC and POPE lipid bilayers: effects of membrane on protein behavior.

    PubMed

    Ng, Hui Wen; Laughton, Charles A; Doughty, Stephen W

    2014-02-24

    Analysis of 300 ns (ns) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of an adenosine A2a receptor (A2a AR) model, conducted in triplicate, in 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (POPE) bilayers reveals significantly different protein dynamical behavior. Principal component analysis (PCA) shows that the dissimilarities stem from interhelical rather than intrahelical motions. The difference in the hydrophobic thicknesses of these simulated lipid bilayers is potentially a significant reason for the observed difference in results. The distinct lipid headgroups might also lead to different molecular interactions and hence different protein loop motions. Overall, the A2a AR shows higher mobility and flexibility in POPC as compared to POPE.

  16. Chronic oral administration of MPEP, an antagonist of mGlu5 receptor, during gestation and lactation alters mGlu5 and A2A receptors in maternal and neonatal brain.

    PubMed

    López-Zapata, Antonio; León-Navarro, David Agustín; Crespo, María; Albasanz, José Luis; Martín, Mairena

    2017-03-06

    Antidepressant and anxiolytic drugs are widely consumed even by pregnant and lactating women. The metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu 5 ) antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP) exerts antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like actions. Given that treatment for anxiety and depression use to be prolonged in time, it is conceivable a possible modulation of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlu receptors) after prolonged MPEP exposure, which could also modify adenosine A 2A receptors (A 2A R) since functional cross-talk between them has been reported. Here we report that MPEP crosses placental barrier and reaches neonatal brain through maternal milk using LC-MS/MS methods. Therefore, we analyzed mGlu receptors, mainly mGlu 5 , and A 2A R in both maternal and fetal brain after chronic maternal consumption of MPEP during gestation and/or lactation using radioligand binding, Western-blotting, real-time PCR and phospholipase C (PLC) activity assays. In maternal brain, chronic MPEP consumption caused a significant loss of mGlu, including mGlu 5 , and A 2A R receptors level in plasma membrane. PLC activity assays showed that mGlu 5 signaling pathway was desensitized. No variations on mRNA level coding A 2A R, A 1 R and mGlu 5 were found after MPEP treatments. In female neonatal brain, maternal consumption of MPEP caused a significant increase in mGlu, including mGlu 5 , and A 2A R receptors level. Neither mGlu receptors nor A 2A R were modified in male neonatal brain after maternal MPEP intake. Finally, neither molecular nor behavioral changes (anxiety- and depression-like behavior) were observed in 3-month-old female offspring. In summary, mGlu 5 and A 2A R are altered in both maternal and female neonatal brain after chronic maternal consumption of MPEP during gestation and/or lactation. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nucleus accumbens and effort-related functions: behavioral and neural markers of the interactions between adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Farrar, A M; Segovia, K N; Randall, P A; Nunes, E J; Collins, L E; Stopper, C M; Port, R G; Hockemeyer, J; Müller, C E; Correa, M; Salamone, J D

    2010-04-14

    Nucleus accumbens dopamine (DA) is a critical component of the brain circuitry regulating work output in reinforcement-seeking behavior and effort-related choice behavior. Moreover, there is evidence of an interaction between DA D(2) and adenosine A(2A) receptor function. Systemic administration of adenosine A(2A) antagonists reverses the effects of D(2) antagonists on tasks that assess effort related choice. The present experiments were conducted to determine if nucleus accumbens is a brain locus at which adenosine A(2A) and DA D(2) antagonists interact to regulate effort-related choice behavior. A concurrent fixed ratio 5 (FR5)/chow feeding procedure was used; with this procedure, rats can choose between completing an FR5 lever-pressing requirement for a preferred food (i.e., high carbohydrate operant pellets) or approaching and consuming a freely available food (i.e., standard rodent chow). Rats trained with this procedure spend most of their time pressing the lever for the preferred food, and eat very little of the concurrently available chow. Intracranial injections of the selective DA D(2) receptor antagonist eticlopride (1.0, 2.0, 4.0 microg) into nucleus accumbens core, but not a dorsal control site, suppressed FR5 lever-pressing and increased consumption of freely available chow. Either systemic or intra-accumbens injections of the adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist MSX-3 reversed these effects of eticlopride on effort-related choice. Intra-accumbens injections of eticlopride also increased local expression of c-Fos immunoreactivity, and this effect was attenuated by co-administration of MSX-3. Adenosine and DA systems interact to regulate instrumental behavior and effort-related processes, and nucleus accumbens is an important locus for this interaction. These findings may have implications for the treatment of psychiatric symptoms such as psychomotor slowing, anergia and fatigue. Copyright 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Imidazo[2,1-i]purin-5-ones and related tricyclic water-soluble purine derivatives: potent A(2A)- and A(3)-adenosine receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christa E; Thorand, Mark; Qurishi, Ramatullah; Diekmann, Martina; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Padgett, William L; Daly, John W

    2002-08-01

    A series of tricyclic imidazo[2,1-i]purinones and ring-enlarged analogues derived from xanthine derivatives have been prepared as adenosine receptor (AR) antagonists. In comparison with xanthines, the tricyclic compounds exhibit increased water solubility due to a basic nitrogen atom, which can be protonated under physiological conditions. Substituents were introduced that confer high affinity for A(2A) or A(3) ARs, respectively. A new capillary electrophoresis method was developed for the determination of the enantiomeric purity of selected chiral products using native and modified beta-cyclodextrins as chiral discriminators. The compounds were investigated in radioligand binding assays at rat brain A(1) and A(2A) ARs. Selected compounds were additionally investigated in radioligand binding assays at human recombinant A(3) ARs and in functional studies (adenylate cyclase assays) at A(1) ARs of rat fat cell membranes, A(2A) ARs of rat PC 12 cell membranes, and mouse A(2B) ARs of NIH 3T3 cell membranes. Structure-activity relationships were similar to those of corresponding xanthine derivatives. The 2-styrylimidazopurinones were less potent at A(2A) ARs as compared to 8-styrylxanthine derivatives. The most potent compound at A(2A) ARs was (S)-1,4-dimethyl-8-ethyl-2-styryl-imidazo[2,1-i]purinone (S-25) exhibiting a K(i) value of 424 nM at rat A(2A) ARs. The compound was highly selective for A(2A) receptors vs A(1) and A(3) ARs. Selectivity vs A(2B) ARs, however, was low. Among the 1-unsubstituted 2-phenyl-imidazo[2,1-i]purin-5-one derivatives, very potent and highly selective antagonists for human A(3) ARs were identified. The most potent A(3) antagonist of the present series was (R)-4-methyl-8-ethyl-2-phenyl-imidazo[2,1-i]purin-5-one (R-24) exhibiting a K(i) value of 2.3 nM and high selectivity for A(3) receptors vs all other AR subtypes.

  19. Quaternary structure of a G-protein-coupled receptor heterotetramer in complex with Gi and Gs.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Gemma; Cordomí, Arnau; Zelman-Femiak, Monika; Brugarolas, Marc; Moreno, Estefania; Aguinaga, David; Perez-Benito, Laura; Cortés, Antoni; Casadó, Vicent; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I; Lluís, Carme; Pardo, Leonardo; García-Sáez, Ana J; McCormick, Peter J; Franco, Rafael

    2016-04-05

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), in the form of monomers or homodimers that bind heterotrimeric G proteins, are fundamental in the transfer of extracellular stimuli to intracellular signaling pathways. Different GPCRs may also interact to form heteromers that are novel signaling units. Despite the exponential growth in the number of solved GPCR crystal structures, the structural properties of heteromers remain unknown. We used single-particle tracking experiments in cells expressing functional adenosine A1-A2A receptors fused to fluorescent proteins to show the loss of Brownian movement of the A1 receptor in the presence of the A2A receptor, and a preponderance of cell surface 2:2 receptor heteromers (dimer of dimers). Using computer modeling, aided by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assays to monitor receptor homomerization and heteromerization and G-protein coupling, we predict the interacting interfaces and propose a quaternary structure of the GPCR tetramer in complex with two G proteins. The combination of results points to a molecular architecture formed by a rhombus-shaped heterotetramer, which is bound to two different interacting heterotrimeric G proteins (Gi and Gs). These novel results constitute an important advance in understanding the molecular intricacies involved in GPCR function.

  20. Spatiotemporal brain dynamics of emotional face processing modulations induced by the serotonin 1A/2A receptor agonist psilocybin.

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, Fosco; Schmidt, André; Pokorny, Thomas; Kometer, Michael; Seifritz, Erich; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2014-12-01

    Emotional face processing is critically modulated by the serotonergic system. For instance, emotional face processing is impaired by acute psilocybin administration, a serotonin (5-HT) 1A and 2A receptor agonist. However, the spatiotemporal brain mechanisms underlying these modulations are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the spatiotemporal brain dynamics underlying psilocybin-induced modulations during emotional face processing. Electrical neuroimaging analyses were applied to visual evoked potentials in response to emotional faces, following psilocybin and placebo administration. Our results indicate a first time period of strength (i.e., Global Field Power) modulation over the 168-189 ms poststimulus interval, induced by psilocybin. A second time period of strength modulation was identified over the 211-242 ms poststimulus interval. Source estimations over these 2 time periods further revealed decreased activity in response to both neutral and fearful faces within limbic areas, including amygdala and parahippocampal gyrus, and the right temporal cortex over the 168-189 ms interval, and reduced activity in response to happy faces within limbic and right temporo-occipital brain areas over the 211-242 ms interval. Our results indicate a selective and temporally dissociable effect of psilocybin on the neuronal correlates of emotional face processing, consistent with a modulation of the top-down control. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. In search of novel ligands using a structure-based approach: a case study on the adenosine A2A receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenselink, Eelke B.; Beuming, Thijs; van Veen, Corine; Massink, Arnault; Sherman, Woody; van Vlijmen, Herman W. T.; IJzerman, Adriaan P.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we present a case study to explore the challenges associated with finding novel molecules for a receptor that has been studied in depth and has a wealth of chemical information available. Specifically, we apply a previously described protocol that incorporates explicit water molecules in the ligand binding site to prospectively screen over 2.5 million drug-like and lead-like compounds from the commercially available eMolecules database in search of novel binders to the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AAR). A total of seventy-one compounds were selected for purchase and biochemical assaying based on high ligand efficiency and high novelty (Tanimoto coefficient ≤0.25 to any A2AAR tested compound). These molecules were then tested for their affinity to the adenosine A2A receptor in a radioligand binding assay. We identified two hits that fulfilled the criterion of 50 % radioligand displacement at a concentration of 10 μM. Next we selected an additional eight novel molecules that were predicted to make a bidentate interaction with Asn2536.55, a key interacting residue in the binding pocket of the A2AAR. None of these eight molecules were found to be active. Based on these results we discuss the advantages of structure-based methods and the challenges associated with finding chemically novel molecules for well-explored targets.

  2. Caffeine Reverts Memory But Not Mood Impairment in a Depression-Prone Mouse Strain with Up-Regulated Adenosine A2A Receptor in Hippocampal Glutamate Synapses.

    PubMed

    Machado, Nuno J; Simões, Ana Patrícia; Silva, Henrique B; Ardais, Ana Paula; Kaster, Manuella P; Garção, Pedro; Rodrigues, Diana I; Pochmann, Daniela; Santos, Ana Isabel; Araújo, Inês M; Porciúncula, Lisiane O; Tomé, Ângelo R; Köfalvi, Attila; Vaugeois, Jean-Marie; Agostinho, Paula; El Yacoubi, Malika; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Gomes, Catarina A

    2017-03-01

    Caffeine prophylactically prevents mood and memory impairments through adenosine A 2A receptor (A 2A R) antagonism. A 2A R antagonists also therapeutically revert mood and memory impairments, but it is not known if caffeine is also therapeutically or only prophylactically effective. Since depression is accompanied by mood and memory alterations, we now explored if chronic (4 weeks) caffeine consumption (0.3 g/L) reverts mood and memory impairment in helpless mice (HM, 12 weeks old), a bred-based model of depression. HM displayed higher immobility in the tail suspension and forced swimming tests, greater anxiety in the elevated plus maze, and poorer memory performance (modified Y-maze and object recognition). HM also had reduced density of synaptic (synaptophysin, SNAP-25), namely, glutamatergic (vGluT1; -22 ± 7 %) and GABAergic (vGAT; -23 ± 8 %) markers in the hippocampus. HM displayed higher A 2A R density (72 ± 6 %) in hippocampal synapses, an enhanced facilitation of hippocampal glutamate release by the A 2A R agonist, CGS21680 (30 nM), and a larger LTP amplitude (54 ± 8 % vs. 21 ± 5 % in controls) that was restored to control levels (30 ± 10 %) by the A 2A R antagonist, SCH58261 (50 nM). Notably, caffeine intake reverted memory deficits and reverted the loss of hippocampal synaptic markers but did not affect helpless or anxiety behavior. These results reinforce the validity of HM as an animal model of depression by showing that they also display reference memory deficits. Furthermore, caffeine intake selectively reverted memory but not mood deficits displayed by HM, which are associated with an increased density and functional impact of hippocampal A 2A R controlling synaptic glutamatergic function.

  3. The effect of caffeine to increase reaction time in the rat during a test of attention is mediated through antagonism of adenosine A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Guy A; Grzelak, Michael E; Pond, Annamarie J; Cohen-Williams, Mary E; Hodgson, Robert A; Varty, Geoffrey B

    2007-12-11

    Caffeine produces effects on cognitive function particularly relating to aspects of attention such as reaction time. Considering the plasma exposure levels following regular caffeine intake, and the affinity of caffeine for known protein targets, these effects are likely mediated by either the adenosine A(1) or A(2A) receptor. In the present studies, two rat strains [Long-Evans (LE) and CD] were trained to asymptote performance in a test of selective attention, the 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT). Next, the effects of caffeine were compared to the selective A(2A) antagonists, SCH 412348 and KW-6002 (Istradefylline), and the A(1) antagonist, DPCPX. Further studies compared the psychostimulant effects of each drug. Finally, we tested the A(2A) agonist, CGS-21680, on 5-CSRTT performance and given the antipsychotic potential of this drug class, studied the interaction between CGS-21680 and amphetamine in this task. Caffeine (3-10mg/kg IP) increased reaction time in both LE and CD rats, with no effect on accuracy, an effect replicated by SCH 412348 (0.1-1mg/kg PO) and KW-6002 (1-3mg/kg PO), but not DPCPX (3-30 mg/kg PO). At least with SCH 412348, these effects were at doses that were not overtly psychostimulant. In contrast, CGS-21680 (0.03-0. 3mg/kg IP) slowed reaction speed and increased omissions. Interestingly, at a comparatively low dose of 0.03 mg/kg, CGS-21680 attenuated the increased premature responding produced by amphetamine (1mg/kg IP). The present results suggest that the attention-enhancing effects of caffeine are mediated through A(2A) receptor blockade, and selective A(2A) receptor antagonists may have potential as therapies for attention-related disorders. Furthermore, the improvement in response control in amphetamine-treated rats following CGS-21680 pretreatment supports the view that A(2A) agonists have potential as novel antipsychotics.

  4. Baicalin attenuates chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension via adenosine A2A receptor-induced SDF-1/CXCR4/PI3K/AKT signaling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaoying; Wu, Peiliang; Huang, Feifei; Xu, Min; Chen, Mayun; Huang, Kate; Li, Guo-Ping; Xu, Manhuan; Yao, Dan; Wang, Liangxing

    2017-08-03

    Baicalin, an important flavonoid in Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi extracts, exerts a variety of pharmacological effects. In this study, we explored the effects of baicalin on chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and investigated the mechanism underlying these effects. Moreover, we examined whether the inflammatory response was mediated by the A 2A receptor (A 2A R) and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)/C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4)-induced phosphatidyl inositol-3-kinase (PI3K) signaling in vivo. We established a hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (HPH) mouse model by subjecting wild-type (WT) and A 2A R knockout (A 2A R -/- ) animals to chronic hypoxia, and we examined the effects of a 4-week treatment with baicalin or the A 2A R agonist CGS21680 in these animals. Invasive hemodynamic parameters, the right ventricular hypertrophy index, pulmonary congestion, the pulmonary arterial remodeling index, blood gas parameters, A 2A R expression, and the expression of SDF-1/CXCR4/PI3K/protein kinase B (PKB; AKT) signaling components were measured. Compared with WT mice, A 2A R -/- mice exhibited increased right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), right ventricle-to-left ventricle plus septum [RV/(LV + S)] ratio, RV weight-to-body weight (RV/BW) ratio, and lung wet weight-to-body weight (Lung/BW) ratio in the absence of an altered mean carotid arterial pressure (mCAP). These changes were accompanied by increases in pulmonary artery wall area and thickness and reductions in arterial oxygen pressure (P a O 2 ) and hydrogen ion concentration (pH). In the HPH model, A 2A R -/- mice displayed increased CXCR4, SDF-1, phospho-PI3K, and phospho-AKT expression compared with WT mice. Treating WT and A 2A R -/- HPH mice with baicalin or CGS21680 attenuated the hypoxia-induced increases in RVSP, RV/(LV + S) and Lung/BW, as well as pulmonary arterial remodeling. Additionally, baicalin or CGS21680 alone could reverse the hypoxia

  5. Caffeine reverses age-related deficits in olfactory discrimination and social recognition memory in rats. Involvement of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Prediger, Rui D S; Batista, Luciano C; Takahashi, Reinaldo N

    2005-06-01

    Caffeine, a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist, has been suggested as a potential drug to counteract age-related cognitive decline since critical changes in adenosinergic neurotransmission occur with aging. In the present study, olfactory discrimination and short-term social memory of 3, 6, 12 and 18 month-old rats were assessed with the olfactory discrimination and social recognition tasks, respectively. The actions of caffeine (3.0, 10.0 and 30.0 mg/kg, i.p.), the A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX (1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg, i.p.) and the A2A receptor antagonist ZM241385 (0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) in relation to age-related effects on olfactory functions were also studied. The 12 and 18 month-old rats exhibited significantly impaired performance in both models, demonstrating deficits in their odor discrimination and in their ability to recognize a juvenile rat after a short period of time. Acute treatment with caffeine or ZM241385, but not with DPCPX, reversed these age-related olfactory deficits. The present results suggest the participation of adenosine receptors in the control of olfactory functions and confirm the potential of caffeine for the treatment of aged-related cognitive decline.

  6. Inosine reduces pain-related behavior in mice: involvement of adenosine A1 and A2A receptor subtypes and protein kinase C pathways.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Francisney P; Figueredo, Sonia M; Marcon, Rodrigo; Martins, Daniel F; Macedo, Sérgio J; Lima, Denise A N; Almeida, Rúbia C; Ostroski, Rosana M; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; Santos, Adair Roberto Soares

    2010-08-01

    Inosine, an endogenous purine, is the first metabolite of adenosine in a reaction catalyzed by adenosine deaminase. This study aimed to investigate the antinociceptive effects of inosine against several models of pain in mice and rats. In mice, inosine given by systemic or central routes inhibited acetic acid-induced nociception. Furthermore, inosine also decreased the late phase of formalin-induced licking and the nociception induced by glutamate. Inosine produced inhibition (for up to 4 h) of mechanical allodynia induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) injected into the mouse's paw. Given chronically for 21 days, inosine reversed the mechanical allodynia caused by CFA. Moreover, inosine also reduced the thermal (cold stimuli) and mechanical allodynia caused by partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL) for 4 h; when inosine was chronically administered, it decreased the mechanical allodynia induced by PSNL for 22 days. Antinociception caused by inosine in the acetic acid test was attenuated by treatment of mice with 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX; a selective adenosine A(1) receptor antagonist), 8-phenyltheophylline (8-PT; a nonselective adenosine A(1) receptor antagonist), and 4-{2- [7-amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo-[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-yl- amino]ethyl}phenol (ZM241385; a selective adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist). In rats, inosine inhibited the mechanical and heat hyperalgesia induced by bradykinin and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, without affecting similar responses caused by prostaglandin E(2) or forskolin. These results indicate that inosine induces antinociceptive, antiallodynic, and antihyperalgesic effects in rodents. The precise mechanisms through which inosine produces antinociception are currently under investigation, but involvement of adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors and blockade of the protein kinase C pathway seem to largely account for inosine's antinociceptive effect.

  7. Structural biology of glutamate receptor ion channel complexes.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Mark L

    2016-12-01

    Chemical transmission at excitatory synapses in the brain is mediated by a diverse family of glutamate receptor ion channels (iGluRs), tetrameric membrane protein assemblies of molecular weight 400-600kDa. Until recently, structural information for intact iGluRs was limited to biochemically tractable homomeric receptors trapped in different conformational states. These provided key insights into the mechanisms of iGluR activation and desensitization. Structures of heteromeric AMPA and NMDA receptors, the major iGluR families in the brain, together with long awaited cryo-EM structures of an AMPA receptor TARP complex, expand this picture and reveal surprising conformational diversity, raising many fundamental and controversial questions. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. The antidepressant-like effect of inosine in the FST is associated with both adenosine A1 and A 2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Kaster, Manuella P; Budni, Josiane; Gazal, Marta; Cunha, Mauricio P; Santos, Adair R S; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2013-09-01

    Inosine is an endogenous purine nucleoside, which is formed during the breakdown of adenosine. The adenosinergic system was already described as capable of modulating mood in preclinical models; we now explored the effects of inosine in two predictive models of depression: the forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST). Mice treated with inosine displayed higher anti-immobility in the FST (5 and 50 mg/kg, intraperitoneal route (i.p.)) and in the TST (1 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.) when compared to vehicle-treated groups. These antidepressant-like effects started 30 min and lasted for 2 h after intraperitoneal administration of inosine and were not accompanied by any changes in the ambulatory activity in the open-field test. Both adenosine A1 and A2A receptor antagonists prevented the antidepressant-like effect of inosine in the FST. In addition, the administration of an adenosine deaminase inhibitor (1 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.) also caused an antidepressant-like effect in the FST. These results indicate that inosine possesses an antidepressant-like effect in the FST and TST probably through the activation of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors, further reinforcing the potential of targeting the purinergic system to the management of mood disorders.

  9. Effects of a Proprietary Standardized Orthosiphon stamineus Ethanolic Leaf Extract on Enhancing Memory in Sprague Dawley Rats Possibly via Blockade of Adenosine A2A Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Yogendra; Choudhary, Vandana Kotak; Bommu, Praveen; Wong, Hoi Jin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore a propriety standardized ethanolic extract from leaves of Orthosiphon stamineus Benth in improving impairments in short-term social memory in vivo, possibly via blockade of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). The ethanolic extract of O. stamineus leaves showed significant in vitro binding activity of A2AR with 74% inhibition at 150 μg/ml and significant A2AR antagonist activity with 98% inhibition at 300 μg/mL. A significant adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) antagonist activity with 100% inhibition was observed at 300 μg/mL. Its effect on learning and memory was assessed via social recognition task using Sprague Dawley rats whereby the ethanolic extract of O. stamineus showed significant (p < 0.001) change in recognition index (RI) at 300 mg/kg and 600 mg/kg p.o and 120 mg/kg i.p., respectively, compared to the vehicle control. In comparison, the ethanolic extract of Polygonum minus aerial parts showed small change in inflexion; however, it remained insignificant in RI at 200 mg/kg p.o. Our findings suggest that the ethanolic extract of O. stamineus leaves improves memory by reversing age-related deficits in short-term social memory and the possible involvement of adenosine A1 and adenosine A2A as a target bioactivity site in the restoration of memory. PMID:26649059

  10. Major dorsoventral differences in the modulation of the local CA1 hippocampal network by NMDA, mGlu5, adenosine A2A and cannabinoid CB1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Kouvaros, S; Papatheodoropoulos, C

    2016-03-11

    Recent research points to diversification in the local neuronal circuitry between dorsal (DH) and ventral (VH) hippocampus that may be involved in the large-scale functional segregation along the long axis of the hippocampus. Here, using CA1 field recordings from rat hippocampal slices, we show that activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) reduced excitatory transmission more in VH than in DH, with an adenosine A1 receptor-independent mechanism, and reduced inhibition and enhanced postsynaptic excitability only in DH. Strikingly, co-activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor-5 (mGluR5) with NMDAR, by CHPG and NMDA respectively, strongly potentiated the effects of NMDAR in DH but had not any potentiating effect in VH. Furthermore, the synergistic actions in DH were occluded by blockade of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) by their antagonist ZM 241385 demonstrating a tonic action of these receptors in DH. Exogenous activation of A2ARs by 4-[2-[[6-amino-9-(N-ethyl-β-D-ribofuranuronamidosyl)-9H-purin-2-yl]amino]ethyl]benzenepropanoic acid hydrochloride (CGS 21680) did not change the effects of mGluR5-NMDAR co-activation in either hippocampal pole. Importantly, blockade of cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1Rs) by their antagonist 1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-4-morpholinyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM 281) restricted the synergistic actions of mGluR5-NMDARs on excitatory synaptic transmission and postsynaptic excitability and abolished their effect on inhibition. Furthermore, AM 281 increased the excitatory transmission only in DH indicating that CB1Rs were tonically active in DH but not VH. Removing the magnesium ions from the perfusion medium neither stimulated the interaction between mGluR5 and NMDAR in VH nor augmented the synergy of the two receptors in DH. These findings show that the NMDAR-dependent modulation of fundamental parameters of the local neuronal network, by mGluR5, A2AR and CB1R, markedly differs between DH and VH. We

  11. Andrographolide protects liver cells from H2O2 induced cell death by upregulation of Nrf-2/HO-1 mediated via adenosine A2a receptor signalling.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Smriti P K; Khole, Swati; Jagadish, Nidhi; Ghosh, Debjani; Gadgil, Vijay; Sinkar, Vilas; Ghaskadbi, Saroj S

    2016-11-01

    Andrographolide, principle constituent of Andrographis paniculata Nees is used in traditional medicine in Southeast Asia and is known to exhibit various biological activities. Its antioxidant activity is due to its ability to activate one of the antioxidant enzymes, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) which is regulated transcriptionally through Nrf-2. However, molecular mechanism underlying activation of Nrf-2/HO-1 has not yet been clearly understood. Protective effect of andrographolide against H2O2 induced cell death, reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation was observed in HepG2 cells. Ability of andrographolide to modulate G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) mediated signalling was determined using in silico docking and gene expression was analyzed by qRT-PCR, confocal microscopy and western blot analysis. We clearly show that andrographolide via adenosine A2A receptor signalling leads to activation of p38 MAP kinase, resulting in upregulation of Nrf-2, its translocation to nucleus and activation of HO-1. Additionally, it activates adenylate cyclase resulting in cAMP formation which in turn activates protein kinase A leading to inhibition of GSK-3β by phosphorylation. Inactivated GSK-3β leads to retention of Nrf-2 in the nucleus leading to sustained expression of HO-1 by binding to its antioxidant response element (ARE). Thus, andrographolide probably by binding to adenosine A2a receptor activates Nrf-2 transcription and also inhibits its exclusion from the nucleus by inactivating GSK-3β, together resulting in activation of HO-1. We speculate that andrographolide can be used as a therapeutic drug to combat oxidative stress implicated in pathogenesis of various diseases such as diabetes, osteoporosis, neurodegenerative diseases etc. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Ex vivo lung perfusion with adenosine A2A receptor agonist allows prolonged cold preservation of lungs donated after cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Cynthia E; Pope, Nicolas H; Charles, Eric J; Huerter, Mary E; Sharma, Ashish K; Salmon, Morgan D; Carter, Benjamin T; Stoler, Mark H; Lau, Christine L; Laubach, Victor E; Kron, Irving L

    2016-02-01

    Ex vivo lung perfusion has been successful in the assessment of marginal donor lungs, including donation after cardiac death (DCD) donor lungs. Ex vivo lung perfusion also represents a unique platform for targeted drug delivery. We sought to determine whether ischemia-reperfusion injury would be decreased after transplantation of DCD donor lungs subjected to prolonged cold preservation and treated with an adenosine A2A receptor agonist during ex vivo lung perfusion. Porcine DCD donor lungs were preserved at 4°C for 12 hours and underwent ex vivo lung perfusion for 4 hours. Left lungs were then transplanted and reperfused for 4 hours. Three groups (n = 4/group) were randomized according to treatment with the adenosine A2A receptor agonist ATL-1223 or the dimethyl sulfoxide vehicle: Infusion of dimethyl sulfoxide during ex vivo lung perfusion and reperfusion (DMSO), infusion of ATL-1223 during ex vivo lung perfusion and dimethyl sulfoxide during reperfusion (ATL-E), and infusion of ATL-1223 during ex vivo lung perfusion and reperfusion (ATL-E/R). Final Pao2/Fio2 ratios (arterial oxygen partial pressure/fraction of inspired oxygen) were determined from samples obtained from the left superior and inferior pulmonary veins. Final Pao2/Fio2 ratios in the ATL-E/R group (430.1 ± 26.4 mm Hg) were similar to final Pao2/Fio2 ratios in the ATL-E group (413.6 ± 18.8 mm Hg), but both treated groups had significantly higher final Pao2/Fio2 ratios compared with the dimethyl sulfoxide group (84.8 ± 17.7 mm Hg). Low oxygenation gradients during ex vivo lung perfusion did not preclude superior oxygenation capacity during reperfusion. After prolonged cold preservation, treatment of DCD donor lungs with an adenosine A2A receptor agonist during ex vivo lung perfusion enabled Pao2/Fio2 ratios greater than 400 mm Hg after transplantation in a preclinical porcine model. Pulmonary function during ex vivo lung perfusion was not predictive of outcomes after transplantation. Copyright

  13. Lidocaine relaxation in isolated rat aortic rings is enhanced by endothelial removal: possible role of Kv, KATP channels and A2a receptor crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Arsyad, Aryadi; Dobson, Geoffrey P

    2016-12-03

    Lidocaine is an approved local anesthetic and Class 1B antiarrhythmic with a number of ancillary properties. Our aim was to investigate lidocaine's vasoreactivity properties in intact versus denuded rat thoracic aortic rings, and the effect of inhibitors of nitric oxide (NO), prostenoids, voltage-dependent K v and K ATP channels, membrane Na + /K + pump, and A 2a and A 2b receptors. Aortic rings were harvested from adult male Sprague Dawley rats and equilibrated in an organ bath containing oxygenated, modified Krebs-Henseleit solution, pH 7.4, 37 °C. The rings were pre-contracted sub-maximally with 0.3 μM norepinephrine (NE), and the effect of increasing lidocaine concentrations was examined. Rings were tested for viability after each experiment with maximally dilating 100 μM papaverine. The drugs 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), glibenclamide, 5-hydroxydecanoate, ouabain, 8-(3-chlorostyryl) caffeine and PSB-0788 were examined. All drugs tested had no significant effect on basal tension. Lidocaine relaxation in intact rings was biphasic between 1 and 10 μM (Phase 1) and 10 and 1000 μM (Phase 2). Mechanical removal of the endothelium resulted in further relaxation, and at lower concentrations ring sensitivity (% relaxation per μM lidocaine) significantly increased 3.5 times compared to intact rings. The relaxing factor(s) responsible for enhancing ring relaxation did not appear to be NO- or prostacyclin-dependent, as L-NAME and indomethacin had little or no effect on intact ring relaxation. In denuded rings, lidocaine relaxation was completely abolished by K v channel inhibition and significantly reduced by antagonists of the MitoK ATP channel, and to a lesser extent the SarcK ATP channel. Curiously, A 2a subtype receptor antagonism significantly inhibited lidocaine relaxation above 100 μM, but not the A 2b receptor. We show that lidocaine relaxation in rat thoracic aorta was biphasic and significantly enhanced by endothelial removal, which did not appear to be

  14. Adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonism reverses the effects of dopamine receptor antagonism on instrumental output and effort-related choice in the rat: implications for studies of psychomotor slowing.

    PubMed

    Farrar, Andrew M; Pereira, Mariana; Velasco, Francisco; Hockemeyer, Jörg; Müller, Christa E; Salamone, John D

    2007-04-01

    Organisms frequently make effort-related decisions based upon assessments of motivational value and response costs. Energy-related dysfunctions such as psychomotor slowing and apathy are critically involved in some clinical syndromes. Dopamine (DA), particularly in the nucleus accumbens, regulates effort-related processes. Dopamine antagonism and accumbens dopamine depletions cause rats performing on choice tasks to reallocate their behavior away from food-reinforced tasks that have high response requirements. There is evidence of a functional interaction between DA and adenosine A(2A) receptors in the neostriatum and nucleus accumbens. The present experiments were conducted to determine if adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonism could reverse the effects of dopamine receptor antagonism on instrumental behavior and effort-related choice. The adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist MSX-3 was investigated for its ability to reverse the effects of the dopamine receptor antagonist haloperidol (0.1 mg/kg) on fixed ratio 5 instrumental lever-pressing and on response allocation using a concurrent lever-pressing/chow-feeding choice task. Haloperidol significantly suppressed fixed ratio 5 responding, and with rats responding on the concurrent choice task, it altered choice behavior, significantly reducing lever-pressing for food and increasing chow intake. Injections of MSX-3 (0.5-2.0 mg/kg) produced a dose-related attenuation of the effects of 0.1 mg/kg haloperidol on both tasks. The high dose of MSX-3, when administered in the absence of haloperidol, did not significantly affect responding on either task. Adenosine and dopamine systems interact to regulate instrumental behavior and effort-related processes, which may have implications for the treatment of psychiatric symptoms such as psychomotor slowing or anergia.

  15. Unprecedented Therapeutic Potential with a Combination of A2A/NR2B Receptor Antagonists as Observed in the 6-OHDA Lesioned Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Anne; Downey, Patrick; Nicolas, Jean-Marie; Scheller, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease, the long-term use of dopamine replacing agents is associated with the development of motor complications; therefore, there is a need for non-dopaminergic drugs. This study evaluated the potential therapeutic impact of six different NR2B and A2A receptor antagonists given either alone or in combination in unilateral 6-OHDA-lesioned rats without (monotherapy) or with (add-on therapy) the co-administration of L-Dopa: Sch-58261+ Merck 22; Sch-58261+Co-101244; Preladenant + Merck 22; Preladenant + Radiprodil; Tozadenant + Radiprodil; Istradefylline + Co-101244. Animals given monotherapy were assessed on distance traveled and rearing, whereas those given add-on therapy were assessed on contralateral rotations. Three-way mixed ANOVA were conducted to assess the main effect of each drug separately and to determine whether any interaction between two drugs was additive or synergistic. Additional post hoc analyses were conducted to compare the effect of the combination with the effect of the drugs alone. Motor activity improved significantly and was sustained for longer when the drugs were given in combination than when administered separately at the same dose. Similarly, when tested as add-on treatment to L-Dopa, the combinations resulted in higher levels of contralateral rotation in comparison to the single drugs. Of special interest, the activity observed with some combinations could not be described by a simplistic additive effect and involved more subtle synergistic pharmacological interactions. The combined administration of A2A/NR2B-receptor antagonists improved motor behaviour in 6-OHDA rats. Given the proven translatability of this model such a combination may be expected to be effective in improving motor symptoms in patients. PMID:25513815

  16. Rubimetide, humanin, and MMK1 exert anxiolytic-like activities via the formyl peptide receptor 2 in mice followed by the successive activation of DP1, A2A, and GABAA receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hui; Sonada, Soushi; Yoshikawa, Akihiro; Ohinata, Kousaku; Yoshikawa, Masaaki

    2016-09-01

    Rubimetide (Met-Arg-Trp), which had been isolated as an antihypertensive peptide from an enzymatic digest of spinach ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), showed anxiolytic-like activity prostaglandin (PG) D2-dependent manner in the elevated plus-maze test after administration at a dose of 0.1mg/kg (ip.) or 1mg/kg (p.o.) in male mice of ddY strain. In this study, we found that rubimetide has weak affinities for the FPR1 and FPR2, subtypes of formyl peptide receptor (FPR). The anxiolytic-like activity of rubimetide (0.1mg/kg, ip.) was blocked by WRW4, an antagonist of FPR2, but not by Boc-FLFLF, an antagonist of FPR1, suggesting that the anxiolytic-like activity was mediated by the FPR2. Humanin, an endogenous agonist peptide of the FPR2, exerted an anxiolytic-like activity after intracerebroventricular (icv) administration, which was also blocked by WRW4. MMK1, a synthetic agonist peptide of the FPR2, also exerted anxiolytic-like activity. Thus, FPR2 proved to mediate anxiolytic-like effect as the first example of central effect exerted by FPR agonists. As well as the anxiolytic-like activity of rubimetide, that of MMK1 was blocked by BW A868C, an antagonist of the DP1-receptor. Furthermore, anxiolytic-like activity of rubimetide was blocked by SCH58251 and bicuculline, antagonists for adenosine A2A and GABAA receptors, respectively. From these results, it is concluded that the anxiolytic-like activities of rubimetide and typical agonist peptides of the FPR2 were mediated successively by the PGD2-DP1 receptor, adenosine-A2A receptor, and GABA-GABAA receptor systems downstream of the FPR2. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Crystal structure of NL63 respiratory coronavirus receptor-binding domain complexed with its human receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kailang; Li, Weikai; Peng, Guiqing

    2010-03-04

    NL63 coronavirus (NL63-CoV), a prevalent human respiratory virus, is the only group I coronavirus known to use angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as its receptor. Incidentally, ACE2 is also used by group II SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). We investigated how different groups of coronaviruses recognize the same receptor, whereas homologous group I coronaviruses recognize different receptors. We determined the crystal structure of NL63-CoV spike protein receptor-binding domain (RBD) complexed with human ACE2. NL63-CoV RBD has a novel {beta}-sandwich core structure consisting of 2 layers of {beta}-sheets, presenting 3 discontinuous receptor-binding motifs (RBMs) to bind ACE2. NL63-CoV and SARS-CoV have no structural homologymore » in RBD cores or RBMs; yet the 2 viruses recognize common ACE2 regions, largely because of a 'virus-binding hotspot' on ACE2. Among group I coronaviruses, RBD cores are conserved but RBMs are variable, explaining how these viruses recognize different receptors. These results provide a structural basis for understanding viral evolution and virus-receptor interactions.« less

  18. Protective effect of caffeine and a selective A2A receptor antagonist on impairment of memory and oxidative stress of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Leite, Marlon Régis; Wilhelm, Ethel A; Jesse, Cristiano R; Brandão, Ricardo; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne

    2011-04-01

    In this study, the effects of caffeine (CAF) and SCH58261, a selective A(2A) receptor antagonist, on memory impairment and oxidative stress generated by aging in rats were investigated. Young and aged rats were treated daily per 10 days with CAF (30 mg/kg p.o.) or SCH58261 (0.5mg/kg, p.o.) or vehicle (1 ml/kg p.o.). Rats were trained and tested in a novel object recognition task. After the behavioral test, ascorbic acid and oxygen and nitrogen reactive species levels as well as Na(+)K(+) ATPase activity were determined in rat brain. The results demonstrated that the age-related memory deficit was reversed by treatment with CAF or SCH58261. Treatment with CAF or SCH58261 significantly normalized oxygen and nitrogen reactive species levels increased in brains of aged rats. Na(+)K(+) ATPase activity inhibited in brains of aged rats was also normalized by CAF or SCH58261 treatment. A decrease in basal ascorbic acid levels in brains of aged rats was not changed by CAF or SCH58261. These results demonstrated that CAF and SCH58261, modulators of adenosinergic receptors, were able to reverse age-associated memory impairment and to partially reduce oxidative stress. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Deletion of Adenosine A2A Receptors from Astrocytes Disrupts Glutamate Homeostasis Leading to Psychomotor and Cognitive Impairment: Relevance to Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Matos, Marco; Shen, Hai-Ying; Augusto, Elisabete; Wang, Yumei; Wei, Catherine J.; Wang, Yu Tian; Agostinho, Paula; Boison, Detlev; Cunha, Rodrigo A.; Chen, Jiang-Fan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) modulate dopamine and glutamate signaling and thereby may influence some of the psychomotor and cognitive processes associated with schizophrenia. Because astroglial A2AR regulate the availability of glutamate, we hypothesized that they might play an unprecedented role in some of the processes leading to the development of schizophrenia, which we investigated using a mouse line with a selective deletion of A2AR in astrocytes (Gfa2-A2AR knockout [KO] mice]. METHODS We examined Gfa2-A2AR KO mice for behaviors thought to recapitulate some features of schizophrenia, namely enhanced MK-801 psychomotor response (positive symptoms) and decreased working memory (cognitive symptoms). In addition, we probed for neurochemical alterations in the glutamatergic circuitry, evaluating glutamate uptake and release and the levels of key proteins defining glutamatergic signaling (glutamate transporter-I [GLT-I], N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors [NMDA-R] and α-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors [AMPA-R]) to provide a mechanistic understanding of the phenotype encountered. RESULTS We show that Gfa2-A2AR KO mice exhibited enhanced MK-801 psychomotor response and decreased working memory; this was accompanied by a disruption of glutamate homeostasis characterized by aberrant GLT-I activity, increased presynaptic glutamate release, NMDA-R 2B subunit upregulation, and increased internalization of AMPA-R. Accordingly, selective GLT-I inhibition or blockade of GluR1/2 endocytosis prevented the psychomotor and cognitive phenotypes in Gfa2-A2AR KO mice, namely in the nucleus accumbens. CONCLUSIONS These results show that the dysfunction of astrocytic A2AR, by controlling GLT-I activity, triggers an astrocyte-to-neuron wave of communication resulting in disrupted glutamate homeostasis, thought to underlie several endophenotypes relevant to schizophrenia. PMID:25869810

  20. Deletion of adenosine A2A receptors from astrocytes disrupts glutamate homeostasis leading to psychomotor and cognitive impairment: relevance to schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Matos, Marco; Shen, Hai-Ying; Augusto, Elisabete; Wang, Yumei; Wei, Catherine J; Wang, Yu Tian; Agostinho, Paula; Boison, Detlev; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Chen, Jiang-Fan

    2015-12-01

    Adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) modulate dopamine and glutamate signaling and thereby may influence some of the psychomotor and cognitive processes associated with schizophrenia. Because astroglial A2AR regulate the availability of glutamate, we hypothesized that they might play an unprecedented role in some of the processes leading to the development of schizophrenia, which we investigated using a mouse line with a selective deletion of A2AR in astrocytes (Gfa2-A2AR knockout [KO] mice]. We examined Gfa2-A2AR KO mice for behaviors thought to recapitulate some features of schizophrenia, namely enhanced MK-801 psychomotor response (positive symptoms) and decreased working memory (cognitive symptoms). In addition, we probed for neurochemical alterations in the glutamatergic circuitry, evaluating glutamate uptake and release and the levels of key proteins defining glutamatergic signaling (glutamate transporter-I [GLT-I], N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors [NMDA-R] and α-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors [AMPA-R]) to provide a mechanistic understanding of the phenotype encountered. We show that Gfa2-A2AR KO mice exhibited enhanced MK-801 psychomotor response and decreased working memory; this was accompanied by a disruption of glutamate homeostasis characterized by aberrant GLT-I activity, increased presynaptic glutamate release, NMDA-R 2B subunit upregulation, and increased internalization of AMPA-R. Accordingly, selective GLT-I inhibition or blockade of GluR1/2 endocytosis prevented the psychomotor and cognitive phenotypes in Gfa2-A2AR KO mice, namely in the nucleus accumbens. These results show that the dysfunction of astrocytic A2AR, by controlling GLT-I activity, triggers an astrocyte-to-neuron wave of communication resulting in disrupted glutamate homeostasis, thought to underlie several endophenotypes relevant to schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Allosteric Pathways in the PPARγ-RXRα nuclear receptor complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Clarisse G.; Silveira, Rodrigo L.; Rivalta, Ivan; Batista, Victor S.; Skaf, Munir S.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the nature of allostery in DNA-nuclear receptor (NR) complexes is of fundamental importance for drug development since NRs regulate the transcription of a myriad of genes in humans and other metazoans. Here, we investigate allostery in the peroxisome proliferator-activated/retinoid X receptor heterodimer. This important NR complex is a target for antidiabetic drugs since it binds to DNA and functions as a transcription factor essential for insulin sensitization and lipid metabolism. We find evidence of interdependent motions of Ω-loops and PPARγ-DNA binding domain with contacts susceptible to conformational changes and mutations, critical for regulating transcriptional functions in response to sequence-dependent DNA dynamics. Statistical network analysis of the correlated motions, observed in molecular dynamics simulations, shows preferential allosteric pathways with convergence centers comprised of polar amino acid residues. These findings are particularly relevant for the design of allosteric modulators of ligand-dependent transcription factors.

  2. Excitatory effect of the A2A adenosine receptor agonist CGS-21680 on spontaneous and K+-evoked acetylcholine release at the mouse neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Palma, A G; Muchnik, S; Losavio, A S

    2011-01-13

    The mechanism of action of the A2A adenosine receptor agonist 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl) phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine hydrochloride (CGS-21680) in the facilitation of spontaneous (isotonic and hypertonic condition) and K+-evoked acetylcholine (ACh) release was investigated in the mouse diaphragm muscles. At isotonic condition, the CGS-21680-induced excitatory effect on miniature end-plate potential (MEPP) frequency was not modified in the presence of CdCl2 and in a medium free of Ca2+ (0Ca2+-EGTA), but it was abolished after buffering the rise of intracellular Ca2+ with 1,2-bis-(2-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetra(acetoxy-methyl) (BAPTA-AM) and when the Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin was used to deplete intracellular Ca2+ stores. CGS-21680 did not have a direct effect on the Ca2+-independent neurotransmitter-releasing machinery, since the modulatory effect on the hypertonic response was also occluded by BAPTA-AM and thapsigargin. CGS-21680 facilitation on K+-evoked ACh release was not altered by the P/Q-type voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC) blocker ω-Agatoxin IVA, but it was completely prevented by both, the L-type VDCC blocker nitrendipine (which is known to immobilize their gating charges), or thapsigargin, suggesting that the effects of CGS-21680 on L-type VDCC and thapsigargin-sensitive internal stores are associated. We found that the VDCC pore blocker Cd2+ (2 mM Ca2+ or 0Ca2+-EGTA) failed to affect the CGS-21680 effect in high K+ whereas nitrendipine in 0Ca2+-EGTA+Cd2+ occluded its action. The blockade of Ca2+ release from endoplasmic reticulum with ryanodine antagonized the facilitating effect of CGS-21680 in control and high K+ concentration. It is concluded that, at the mouse neuromuscular junction, activation of A2A receptors facilitates spontaneous and K+-evoked ACh release by an external Ca2+-independent mechanism but that involves mobilization of Ca2+ from internal stores: during spontaneous ACh release

  3. Ephrin receptor (Eph) -A1, -A2, -A4 and -A7 expression in mobile tongue squamous cell carcinoma: associations with clinicopathological parameters and patients survival.

    PubMed

    Theocharis, Stamatios; Klijanienko, Jerzy; Giaginis, Constantinos; Alexandrou, Paraskevi; Patsouris, Efstratios; Sastre-Garau, Xavier

    2014-04-01

    Ephrin receptors (Ephs) are frequently overexpressed in a wide variety of human malignant tumors, being associated with tumor growth, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of Eph-A1, -A2, -A4 and -A7 protein expression in mobile tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Eph-A1, -A2, -A4 and -A7 protein expression was assessed immunohistochemically on 37 mobile tongue SCC tissue samples and was analyzed in relation with clinicopathological characteristics, overall and disease-free patients' survival. All the examined mobile tongue SCC cases were found positive for Eph-A1, -A2, -A4 and -A7. Significant associations were noted between high Eph-A1, -A4 and -A7 expression and absence of lymph node metastases (p = 0.0263, p = 0.0461 and p = 0.0461, respectively). High Eph-A1, -A2 and -A7 expression was significantly more frequently observed in patients presenting absence of vascular invasion (p = 0.0444), dense stromal inflammatory reaction (p = 0.0063) and female gender (p = 0.0327), respectively. Mobile tongue SCC patients with high Eph-A7 expression presented longer overall and disease-free survival compared to those with low Eph-A7 expression (log-rank test, p = 0.0093 and p = 0.0164, respectively). In multivariate analysis, Eph-A7 expression was identified as independent prognostic factor of overall survival (Cox-regression analysis, p = 0.0426). The present study supported evidence that Ephs may participate in the malignant transformation of mobile tongue SCC, reinforcing their utility as clinical markers for patients' management and prognosis, as also as targets for potential therapeutic intervention in tongue chemoprevention.

  4. Nucleotide-dependent assembly of the peroxisomal receptor export complex

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Immanuel; Saffian, Delia; Girzalsky, Wolfgang; Erdmann, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Pex1p and Pex6p are two AAA-ATPases required for biogenesis of peroxisomes. Both proteins form a hetero-hexameric complex in an ATP-dependent manner, which has a dual localization in the cytosol and at the peroxisomal membrane. At the peroxisomal membrane, the complex is responsible for the release of the import receptor Pex5p at the end of the matrix protein import cycle. In this study, we analyzed the recruitment of the AAA-complex to its anchor protein Pex15p at the peroxisomal membrane. We show that the AAA-complex is properly assembled even under ADP-conditions and is able to bind efficiently to Pex15p in vivo. We reconstituted binding of the Pex1/6p-complex to Pex15p in vitro and show that Pex6p mediates binding to the cytosolic part of Pex15p via a direct interaction. Analysis of the isolated complex revealed a stoichiometry of Pex1p/Pex6p/Pex15p of 3:3:3, indicating that each Pex6p molecule of the AAA-complex binds Pex15p. Binding of the AAA-complex to Pex15p in particular and to the import machinery in general is stabilized when ATP is bound to the second AAA-domain of Pex6p and its hydrolysis is prevented. The data indicate that receptor release in peroxisomal protein import is associated with a nucleotide-depending Pex1/6p-cycle of Pex15p-binding and release. PMID:26842748

  5. A2A Adenosine Receptors Are Differentially Modulated by Pharmacological Treatments in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients and Their Stimulation Ameliorates Adjuvant-Induced Arthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Padovan, Melissa; Targa, Martina; Corciulo, Carmen; Giacuzzo, Sarah; Merighi, Stefania; Gessi, Stefania; Govoni, Marcello; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2013-01-01

    A2A adenosine receptors (ARs) play a key role in the inhibition of the inflammatory process. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the modulation of A2AARs in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients after different pharmacological treatments and to investigate the effect of A2AAR stimulation in a rat model of arthritis. We investigated A2AAR density and functionality in RA progression by using a longitudinal study in RA patients before and after methotrexate (MTX), anti-TNFα agents or rituximab treatments. A2AARs were analyzed by saturation binding assays in lymphocytes from RA patients throughout the 24-month study timeframe. In an adjuvant-induced arthritis model in rats we showed the efficacy of the A2AAR agonist, CGS 21680 in comparison with standard therapies by means of paw volume assessment, radiographic and ultrasonographic imaging. Arthritic-associated pain was investigated in mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia tests. IL-10 release following A2AAR stimulation in lymphocytes from RA patients and in serum from arthritic rats was measured. In lymphocytes obtained from RA patients, the A2AAR up-regulation was gradually reduced in function of the treatment time and the stimulation of these receptors mediated a significant increase of IL-10 production. In the same cells, CGS 21680 did not affected cell viability and did not produced cytotoxic effects. The A2AAR agonist CGS 21680 was highly effective, as suggested by the marked reduction of clinical signs, in rat adjuvant-induced arthritis and associated pain. This study highlighted that A2AAR agonists represent a physiological-like therapeutic alternative for RA treatment as suggested by the anti-inflammatory role of A2AARs in lymphocytes from RA patients. The effectiveness of A2AAR stimulation in a rat model of arthritis supported the role of A2AAR agonists as potential pharmacological treatment for RA. PMID:23326596

  6. Dual blockade of the A1 and A2A adenosine receptor prevents amyloid beta toxicity in neuroblastoma cells exposed to aluminum chloride.

    PubMed

    Giunta, Salvatore; Andriolo, Violetta; Castorina, Alessandro

    2014-09-01

    In a previous work we have shown that exposure to aluminum (Al) chloride (AlCl3) enhanced the neurotoxicity of the amyloid beta(25-35) fragment (Abeta(25-35)) in neuroblastoma cells and affected the expression of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related genes. Caffein, a compound endowed with beneficial effects against AD, exerts neuroprotection primarily through its antagonist activity on A2A adenosine receptors (A2AR), although it also inhibits A1Rs with similar potency. Still, studies on the specific involvement of these receptors in neuroprotection in a model of combined neurotoxicity (Abeta(25-35)+AlCl3) are missing. To address this issue, cultured SH-SY5Y cells exposed to Abeta(25-35)+AlCl3 were assessed for cell viability, morphology, intracellular ROS activity and expression of apoptosis-, stress- and AD-related proteins. To define the role of A1R and A2ARs, pretreatment with caffein, specific receptor antagonists (DPCPX or SCH58261) or siRNA-mediated gene knockdown were delivered. Results indicate that AlCl3 treatment exacerbated Abeta(25-35) toxicity, increased ROS production, lipid peroxidation, β-secretase-1 (BACE1) and amyloid precursor protein (APP). Interestingly, SCH58261 successfully prevented toxicity associated to Abeta(25-35) only, whereas pretreatment with both DPCPX and SCH58261 was required to fully avert Abeta(25-35)+AlCl3-induced damage, suggesting that A1Rs might also be critically involved in protection during combined toxicity. The effects of caffein were mimicked by both N-acetyl cysteine, an antioxidant, and desferrioxamine, likely acting through distinct mechanisms. Altogether, our data establish a novel protective function associated with A1R inhibition in the setting of combined Abeta(25-35)+AlCl3 neurotoxicity, and expand our current knowledge on the potential beneficial role of caffein to prevent AD progression in subjects environmentally exposed to aluminum. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Adenosine A2A Receptors Mediate Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Electroacupuncture on Synovitis in Mice with Collagen-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qi-hui; Xie, Wen-xia; Li, Xiao-pei; Huang, Ka-te; Du, Zhong-heng; Cong, Wen-jie; Zhou, Long-hua; Ye, Tian-shen; Chen, Jiang-Fan

    2015-01-01

    To study the role of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) in mediating the anti-inflammatory effect of electroacupuncture (EA) on synovitis in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), C57BL/6 mice were divided into five treatment groups: Sham-control, CIA-control, CIA-EA, CIA-SCH58261 (A2AR antagonist), and CIA-EA-SCH58261. All mice except those in the Sham-control group were immunized with collagen II for arthritis induction. EA treatment was administered using the stomach 36 and spleen 6 points, and stimulated with a continuous rectangular wave for 30 min daily. EA treatment and SCH58261 were administered daily from days 35 to 49 (n = 10). After treatment, X-ray radiography of joint bone morphology was established at day 60 and mouse blood was collected for ELISA determination of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) levels. Mice were sacrificed and processed for histological examination of pathological changes of joint tissue, including hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemistry of A2AR expression. EA treatment resulted in significantly reduced pathological scores, TNF-α concentrations, and bone damage X-ray scores. Importantly, the anti-inflammatory and tissue-protective effect of EA treatment was reversed by coadministration of SCH58261. Thus, EA treatment exerts an anti-inflammatory effect resulting in significant protection of cartilage by activation of A2AR in the synovial tissue of CIA. PMID:25784951

  8. Structure-Activity Relationships of Truncated C2- or C8-Substituted Adenosine Derivatives as Dual Acting A2A and A3 Adenosine Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xiyan; Majik, Mahesh S.; Kim, Kyunglim; Pyee, Yuna; Lee, Yoonji; Alexander, Varughese; Chung, Hwa-Jin; Lee, Hyuk Woo; Chandra, Girish; Lee, Jin Hee; Park, Seul-gi; Choi, Won Jun; Kim, Hea Ok; Phan, Khai; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Choi, Sun; Lee, Sang Kook; Jeong, Lak Shin

    2011-01-01

    Truncated N6-substituted-4′-oxo- and 4′-thioadenosine derivatives with C2 or C8 substitution were studied as dual acting A2A and A3 adenosine receptor (AR) ligands. The lithiation-mediated stannyl transfer and palladium-catalyzed cross coupling reactions were utilized for functionalization of the C2 position of 6-chloropurine nucleosides. An unsubstituted 6-amino group and a hydrophobic C2 substituent were required for high affinity at the hA2AAR, but hydrophobic C8 substitution abolished binding at the hA2AAR. However, most of synthesized compounds displayed medium to high binding affinity at the hA3AR, regardless of C2 or C8 substitution, and low efficacy in a functional cAMP assay. Several compounds tended to be full hA2AAR agonists. C2 substitution probed geometrically through hA2AAR-docking, was important for binding in order of hexynyl > hexenyl > hexanyl. Compound 4g was the most potent ligand acting dually as hA2AAR agonist and hA3AR antagonist, which might be useful for treatment of asthma or other inflammatory diseases. PMID:22142423

  9. Ligand-, structure- and pharmacophore-based molecular fingerprints: a case study on adenosine A1, A2A, A2B, and A3 receptor antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirci, Francesco; Goracci, Laura; Rodríguez, David; van Muijlwijk-Koezen, Jacqueline; Gutiérrez-de-Terán, Hugo; Mannhold, Raimund

    2012-11-01

    FLAP fingerprints are applied in the ligand-, structure- and pharmacophore-based mode in a case study on antagonists of all four adenosine receptor (AR) subtypes. Structurally diverse antagonist collections with respect to the different ARs were constructed by including binding data to human species only. FLAP models well discriminate "active" (=highly potent) from "inactive" (=weakly potent) AR antagonists, as indicated by enrichment curves, numbers of false positives, and AUC values. For all FLAP modes, model predictivity slightly decreases as follows: A2BR > A2AR > A3R > A1R antagonists. General performance of FLAP modes in this study is: ligand- > structure- > pharmacophore- based mode. We also compared the FLAP performance with other common ligand- and structure-based fingerprints. Concerning the ligand-based mode, FLAP model performance is superior to ECFP4 and ROCS for all AR subtypes. Although focusing on the early first part of the A2A, A2B and A3 enrichment curves, ECFP4 and ROCS still retain a satisfactory retrieval of actives. FLAP is also superior when comparing the structure-based mode with PLANTS and GOLD. In this study we applied for the first time the novel FLAPPharm tool for pharmacophore generation. Pharmacophore hypotheses, generated with this tool, convincingly match with formerly published data. Finally, we could demonstrate the capability of FLAP models to uncover selectivity aspects although single AR subtype models were not trained for this purpose.

  10. Adenosine transporter ENT1 regulates the acquisition of goal-directed behavior and ethanol drinking through A2A receptor in the dorsomedial striatum.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hyung Wook; Hinton, David J; Kang, Na Young; Kim, Taehyun; Lee, Moonnoh R; Oliveros, Alfredo; Adams, Chelsea; Ruby, Christina L; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2013-03-06

    Adenosine signaling has been implicated in the pathophysiology of many psychiatric disorders including alcoholism. Striatal adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) play an essential role in both ethanol drinking and the shift from goal-directed action to habitual behavior. However, direct evidence for a role of striatal A2AR signaling in ethanol drinking and habit development has not been established. In the present study, we found that decreased A2AR-mediated CREB activity in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) enhanced initial behavioral acquisition of goal-directed behaviors and the vulnerability to progress to excessive ethanol drinking during operant conditioning in mice lacking ethanol-sensitive adenosine transporter ENT1 (ENT1(-/-)). Using mice expressing β-galactosidase (lacZ) under the control of seven repeated CRE sites in both genotypes (CRE-lacZ/ENT1(+/+) mice and CRE-lacZ/ENT1(-/-) mice) and the dominant-negative form of CREB, we found that reduced CREB activity in the DMS was causally associated with decreased A2AR signaling and increased goal-directed ethanol drinking. Finally, we have demonstrated that the A2AR antagonist ZM241385 dampened protein kinase A activity-mediated signaling in the DMS and promoted excessive ethanol drinking in ENT1(+/+) mice, but not in ENT1(-/-) mice. Our results indicate that A2AR-mediated CREB signaling in the DMS is a key determinant in enhancing the development of goal-directed ethanol drinking in mice.

  11. A(2a) adenosine receptor mediates PKA-dependent glutamate release from synaptic-like vesicles and Ca(2+) efflux from an IP(3)- and ryanodine-insensitive intracellular calcium store in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Takeshi; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism underlying transmitter release from astrocytes is not fully understood. The present study examined A(2a) adenosine receptor-mediated glutamate release and intracellular Ca(2+) rise in cultured rat hippocampal astrocytes. Intracellular amino acids were measured with HPLC. Glutamate release from astrocytes and intracellular Ca(2+) mobilizations were monitored in the NADH imaging, FM1-43 imaging, and fura-2 imaging. The siRNA to silence the A(2a) adenosine receptor-targeted gene was constructed and transfected into cells. Glutamate was condensed in 'synaptic-like vesicle' fractions. In the NADH imaging, CGS21680, an agonist of A2a adenosine receptors, increased NADH fluorescent signals, that reflects glutamate release, and the effect was inhibited by DMPX, an inhibitor of A(2a) adenosine receptors, H-89, a PKA inhibitor, vesicular transport inhibitors, or botulinum toxin-A, an exocytosis inhibitor. In the FM1-43 imaging to see vesicular recycling, CGS21680 decreased FM1-43 fluorescent signals, that was also prevented by DMPX, H-89, vesicular transport inhibitors, or botulinum toxin-A. CGS21680 increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations both in Ca(2+)-containing and -free extracellular solution. The Ca(2+) rise was inhibited by DMPX, H-89, or the vesicular transport inhibitor brefeldin A, but it was not affected by inhibitors for phospholipase C, IP(3) receptor, and ryanodine receptor. CGS21680-induced glutamate release and intracellular Ca(2+) rise were prevented by knocking-down A(2a) adenosine receptor. The results of the present study show that A(2a) adenosine receptor/PKA promotes glutamate release from synaptic-like vesicles and stimulates Ca(2+) efflux from an IP(3)- and ryanodine-insensitive intracellular calcium store. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Kinetic Complexity of the Global Response to Glucocorticoid Receptor Action

    PubMed Central

    John, Sam; Johnson, Thomas A.; Sung, Myong-Hee; Biddie, Simon C.; Trump, Saskia; Koch-Paiz, Christine A.; Davis, Sean R.; Walker, Robert; Meltzer, Paul S.; Hager, Gordon L.

    2009-01-01

    We have characterized the kinetic response of gene targets throughout the murine genome to transcriptional modulation by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). In contrast to a model in which multiple genes are either repressed or activated during the GR response, the vast majority of responsive genes are subject to complex regulation profiles, frequently with alternate activation and repression phases. We also observe that GR binding at response elements does not always correlate with the target gene response profile. Thus, the cellular response to GR stimulation involves a highly orchestrated series of regulatory actions and not simply a binary response to hormone. PMID:19131569

  13. An histidine covalent receptor/butenolide complex mediates strigolactone perception

    PubMed Central

    Badet-Denisot, Marie-Ange; Pillot, Jean-Paul; Cornu, David; Le Caer, Jean-Pierre; Burger, Marco; Pelissier, Frank; Retailleau, Pascal; Turnbull, Colin; Bonhomme, Sandrine; Chory, Joanne; Rameau, Catherine; Boyer, François-Didier

    2016-01-01

    Strigolactone plant hormones control plant architecture and are key players in both symbiotic and parasitic interactions. They contain an ABC tricyclic lactone connected to a butenolide group, the D-ring. The DWARF14 (D14) strigolactone receptor belongs to the superfamily of α/β-hydrolases and is known to hydrolyze the bond between the ABC lactone and the D-ring. Here we characterize the binding and catalytic functions of RAMOSUS3 (RMS3), the pea (Pisum sativum) ortholog of rice (Oryza sativa) D14 strigolactone receptor. Using novel profluorescent probes with strigolactone-like bioactivity, we show that RMS3 acts as a single-turnover enzyme that explains its apparent low enzymatic rate. We further demonstrate the formation of a covalent RMS3/D-ring complex, essential for bioactivity, in which the D-ring is attached to Histidine 247 of the catalytic triad. These results reveal an undescribed mechanism of plant hormone reception where the receptor performs an irreversible enzymatic reaction to generate its own ligand. PMID:27479744

  14. 3D model of amphioxus steroid receptor complexed with estradiol

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Michael E., E-mail: mbaker@ucsd.edu; Chang, David J.

    2009-08-28

    The origins of signaling by vertebrate steroids are not fully understood. An important advance was the report that an estrogen-binding steroid receptor [SR] is present in amphioxus, a basal chordate with a similar body plan as vertebrates. To investigate the evolution of estrogen-binding to steroid receptors, we constructed a 3D model of amphioxus SR complexed with estradiol. This 3D model indicates that although the SR is activated by estradiol, some interactions between estradiol and human ER{alpha} are not conserved in the SR, which can explain the low affinity of estradiol for the SR. These differences between the SR and ER{alpha}more » in the steroid-binding domain are sufficient to suggest that another steroid is the physiological regulator of the SR. The 3D model predicts that mutation of Glu-346 to Gln will increase the affinity of testosterone for amphioxus SR and elucidate the evolution of steroid-binding to nuclear receptors.« less

  15. 2-n-Butyl-9-methyl-8-[1,2,3]triazol-2-yl-9H-purin-6-ylamine and analogues as A2A adenosine receptor antagonists. Design, synthesis, and pharmacological characterization.

    PubMed

    Minetti, Patrizia; Tinti, Maria Ornella; Carminati, Paolo; Castorina, Massimo; Di Cesare, Maria Assunta; Di Serio, Stefano; Gallo, Grazia; Ghirardi, Orlando; Giorgi, Fabrizio; Giorgi, Luca; Piersanti, Giovanni; Bartoccini, Francesca; Tarzia, Giorgio

    2005-11-03

    Two types of adenosine receptor ligands were designed, i.e., 9H-purine and 1H-imidazo[4,5-c]pyridines, to obtain selective A(2A) antagonists, and we report here their synthesis and binding affinities for the four adenosine receptor subtypes A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3). The design was carried out on the basis of the molecular modeling of a number of potent adenosine receptor antagonists described in the literature. Three compounds (25b-d) showed an interesting affinity and selectivity for the A(2A) subtype. One of them, i.e., ST1535 (2-n-butyl-9-methyl-8-[1,2,3]triazol-2-yl-9H-purin-6-ylamine, 25b) (K(i) A(2A) = 6.6 nM, K(i) A(1)/A(2A) = 12; K(i) A(2B)/A(2A) = 58; K(i) A(3)/A(2A) > 160), was selected for in vivo study and shown to induce a dose-related increase in locomotor activity, suggestive of an A(2A) antagonist type of activity.

  16. Inosine, an Endogenous Purine Nucleoside, Suppresses Immune Responses and Protects Mice from Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis: a Role for A2A Adenosine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, Stella Célio; Dos Santos Coelho, Igor; Lieberknecht, Vicente; Cunha, Mauricio Peña; Calixto, João B; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; Santos, Adair Roberto Soares; Dutra, Rafael Cypriano

    2017-07-01

    were blocked by inosine treatment. Additionally, inosine consistently inhibited IL-17 levels in peripheral lymphoid tissue, as well as IL-4 levels and A2AR up-regulation in the spinal cord, likely, through an ERK1-independent pathway. EAE: experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis; MS: multiple sclerosis; A2AR: adenosine A2A receptor; IL-17: interleukin-17; IL-4: interleukin-4.

  17. Optogenetic activation of intracellular adenosine A2A receptor signaling in the hippocampus is sufficient to trigger CREB phosphorylation and impair memory.

    PubMed

    Li, P; Rial, D; Canas, P M; Yoo, J-H; Li, W; Zhou, X; Wang, Y; van Westen, G J P; Payen, M-P; Augusto, E; Gonçalves, N; Tomé, A R; Li, Z; Wu, Z; Hou, X; Zhou, Y; IJzerman, A P; PIJzerman, Ad; Boyden, E S; Cunha, R A; Qu, J; Chen, J-F

    2015-11-01

    Human and animal studies have converged to suggest that caffeine consumption prevents memory deficits in aging and Alzheimer's disease through the antagonism of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs). To test if A2AR activation in the hippocampus is actually sufficient to impair memory function and to begin elucidating the intracellular pathways operated by A2AR, we have developed a chimeric rhodopsin-A2AR protein (optoA2AR), which retains the extracellular and transmembrane domains of rhodopsin (conferring light responsiveness and eliminating adenosine-binding pockets) fused to the intracellular loop of A2AR to confer specific A2AR signaling. The specificity of the optoA2AR signaling was confirmed by light-induced selective enhancement of cAMP and phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-MAPK) (but not cGMP) levels in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells, which was abolished by a point mutation at the C terminal of A2AR. Supporting its physiological relevance, optoA2AR activation and the A2AR agonist CGS21680 produced similar activation of cAMP and p-MAPK signaling in HEK293 cells, of p-MAPK in the nucleus accumbens and of c-Fos/phosphorylated-CREB (p-CREB) in the hippocampus, and similarly enhanced long-term potentiation in the hippocampus. Remarkably, optoA2AR activation triggered a preferential p-CREB signaling in the hippocampus and impaired spatial memory performance, while optoA2AR activation in the nucleus accumbens triggered MAPK signaling and modulated locomotor activity. This shows that the recruitment of intracellular A2AR signaling in the hippocampus is sufficient to trigger memory dysfunction. Furthermore, the demonstration that the biased A2AR signaling and functions depend on intracellular A2AR loops prompts the possibility of targeting the intracellular A2AR-interacting partners to selectively control different neuropsychiatric behaviors.

  18. Assessment of exonic single nucleotide polymorphisms in the adenosine A2A receptor gene to high myopia susceptibility in Chinese subjects

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Xue, Anquan; Chen, Wei; Ding, Yang; Yan, Dongsheng; Peng, Jiqing; Zeng, Changqing; Qu, Jia

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) modulates collagen synthesis and extracellular matrix production in ocular tissues that contribute to eye growth and the development of myopia. We aimed to determine if single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in A2AR exons associates with high myopia found in Chinese subjects. Methods DNA samples were prepared from venous lymphocytes of 175 Chinese subjects with high myopia of less than –8.00 diopters (D) correction and 101 ethnically similar controls with between –1.00 D and +1.00 D correction. The coding region sequences of A2AR were amplified by PCR and analyzed by Sanger sequencing. The detected variations were confirmed by reverse sequencing. Allelic frequencies of all detected common SNPs were assessed for Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium. Results Five variations in A2AR exons, 5675 A>G, 5765 C>T, 13325 G>A, 13448 C>T, and 14000 T>A, were detected in controls at a low frequency (<1%). However, one SNP, 13772 T>C (rs5751876), showed its polymorphism in 53.3% of the total study population. The rs5751876 is a synonymous substitution located in a tyrosine codon of exon 2. Despite no significant difference in genotype distribution between cases and controls, the frequency of heterozygotes with the rs5751876 genotype was significantly lower in subjects with high myopia. Conclusions The reduced frequency of the heterozygote rs5751876 genotype in subjects suggests a possible association of A2AR with high myopia in a Chinese population. PMID:22740769

  19. Adenosine Transporter ENT1 Regulates the Acquisition of Goal-Directed Behavior and Ethanol Drinking Through A2A Receptor in the Dorsomedial Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Hyung Wook; Hinton, David J.; Kang, Na Young; Kim, Taehyun; Lee, Moonnoh R.; Oliveros, Alfredo; Adams, Chelsea; Ruby, Christina L.; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine signaling has been implicated in the pathophysiology of many psychiatric disorders including alcoholism. Striatal adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) play an essential role in both ethanol drinking and the shift from goal-directed action to habitual behavior. However, direct evidence for a role of striatal A2AR signaling in ethanol drinking and habit development has not been established. Here, we identified that decreased A2AR-mediated CREB activity in the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) enhanced initial behavioral acquisition of goal-directed behaviors and the vulnerability to progress to excessive ethanol drinking during operant conditioning in mice lacking ethanol-sensitive adenosine transporter ENT1 (ENT1−/−). Utilizing mice expressing β-galactosidase (lacZ) under the control of seven-repeated CRE sites in both genotypes (CRE-lacZ/ENT1+/+ mice and CRE-lacZ/ENT1−/− mice) as well as dnCREB (dominant negative form of CREB), we found that reduced CREB activity in the DMS is causally associated with decreased A2AR signaling and increased goal-directed ethanol drinking. Finally, we demonstrated that A2AR antagonist (ZM241385) dampened PKA-activity mediated signaling in the DMS and promoted excessive ethanol drinking in ENT1+/+ mice, but not in ENT1−/− mice. Taken together, our studies indicate that A2AR-mediated CREB signaling in the DMS is a key determinant to enhance the development of goal-directed ethanol drinking in mice. PMID:23467349

  20. Cocaine-Induced Changes of Synaptic Transmission in the Striatum are Modulated by Adenosine A2A Receptors and Involve the Tyrosine Phosphatase STEP

    PubMed Central

    Chiodi, Valentina; Mallozzi, Cinzia; Ferrante, Antonella; Chen, Jiang F; Lombroso, Paul J; Di Stasi, Anna Maria Michela; Popoli, Patrizia; Domenici, Maria Rosaria

    2014-01-01

    The striatum is a brain area implicated in the pharmacological action of drugs of abuse. Adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) are highly expressed in the striatum and mediate, at least in part, cocaine-induced psychomotor effects in vivo. Here we studied the synaptic mechanisms implicated in the pharmacological action of cocaine in the striatum and investigated the influence of A2ARs. We found that synaptic transmission was depressed in corticostriatal slices after perfusion with cocaine (10 μM). This effect was reduced by the A2AR antagonist ZM241385 and almost abolished in striatal A2AR-knockout mice (mice lacking A2ARs in striatal neurons, stA2ARKO). The effect of cocaine on synaptic transmission was also prevented by the protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) inhibitor sodium orthovanadate (Na3VO4). In synaptosomes prepared from striatal slices, we found that the activity of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) was upregulated by cocaine, prevented by ZM241385, and absent in synaptosomes from stA2ARKO. The role played by STEP in cocaine modulation of synaptic transmission was investigated in whole-cell voltage clamp recordings from medium spiny neurons of the striatum. We found that TAT-STEP, a peptide that renders STEP enzymatically inactive, prevented cocaine-induced reduction in AMPA- and NMDA-mediated excitatory post-synaptic currents, whereas the control peptide, TAT-myc, had no effect. These results demonstrate that striatal A2ARs modulate cocaine-induced synaptic depression in the striatum and highlight the potential role of PTPs and specifically STEP in the effects of cocaine. PMID:23989619

  1. Selective A2A receptor antagonist prevents microglia-mediated neuroinflammation and protects retinal ganglion cells from high intraocular pressure-induced transient ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Maria H; Boia, Raquel; Elvas, Filipe; Martins, Tiago; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Ambrósio, António Francisco; Santiago, Ana Raquel

    2016-03-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of vision loss and blindness worldwide, characterized by chronic and progressive neuronal loss. Reactive microglial cells have been recognized as a neuropathologic feature, contributing to local inflammation and retinal neurodegeneration. In a recent in vitro work (organotypic cultures), we demonstrated that blockade of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) prevents the neuroinflammatory response and affords protection to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) against exposure to elevated hydrostatic pressure (EHP), to mimic elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), the main risk factor for glaucoma development. Herein, we investigated whether a selective A2AR antagonist (SCH 58261) could modulate retinal microglia reactivity and their inflammatory response. Furthermore, we took advantage of the high IOP-induced transient ischemia (ischemia-reperfusion, I-R) animal model to evaluate the protective role of A2AR blockade in the control of retinal neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Primary microglial cell cultures were challenged either with lipopolysaccharide or with EHP, in the presence or absence of A2AR antagonist SCH 58261 (50 nM). In addition, I-R injury was induced in adult Wistar rats after intravitreal administration of SCH 58261 (100 nM, 5 μL). Our results showed that SCH 58261 attenuated microglia reactivity and the increased expression and release of proinflammatory cytokines. Moreover, intravitreal administration of SCH 58261 prevented I-R-induced cell death and RGC loss, by controlling microglial-mediated neuroinflammatory response. These results prompt the proposal that A2AR blockade may have great potential in the management of retinal neurodegenerative diseases characterized by microglia reactivity and RGC death, such as glaucoma and ischemic diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Core skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor calcium release complex.

    PubMed

    Dulhunty, Angela F; Wei-LaPierre, Lan; Casarotto, Marco G; Beard, Nicole A

    2017-01-01

    The core skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RyR1) calcium release complex extends through three compartments of the muscle fibre, linking the extracellular environment through the cytoplasmic junctional gap to the lumen of the internal sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium store. The protein complex is essential for skeletal excitation-contraction (EC)-coupling and skeletal muscle function. Its importance is highlighted by perinatal death if any one of the EC-coupling components are missing and by myopathies associated with mutation of any of the proteins. The proteins essential for EC-coupling include the DHPR α 1S subunit in the transverse tubule membrane, the DHPR β 1a subunit in the cytosol and the RyR1 ion channel in the SR membrane. The other core proteins are triadin and junctin and calsequestrin, associated mainly with SR. These SR proteins are not essential for survival but exert structural and functional influences that modify the gain of EC-coupling and maintain normal muscle function. This review summarises our current knowledge of the individual protein/protein interactions within the core complex and their overall contribution to EC-coupling. We highlight significant areas that provide a continuing challenge for the field. Additional important components of the Ca 2+ release complex, such as FKBP12, calmodulin, S100A1 and Stac3 are identified and reviewed elsewhere. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. Culture as a mediator of gene-environment interaction: Cultural consonance, childhood adversity, a 2A serotonin receptor polymorphism, and depression in urban Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dressler, William W; Balieiro, Mauro C; Ferreira de Araújo, Luiza; Silva, Wilson A; Ernesto Dos Santos, José

    2016-07-01

    Research on gene-environment interaction was facilitated by breakthroughs in molecular biology in the late 20th century, especially in the study of mental health. There is a reliable interaction between candidate genes for depression and childhood adversity in relation to mental health outcomes. The aim of this paper is to explore the role of culture in this process in an urban community in Brazil. The specific cultural factor examined is cultural consonance, or the degree to which individuals are able to successfully incorporate salient cultural models into their own beliefs and behaviors. It was hypothesized that cultural consonance in family life would mediate the interaction of genotype and childhood adversity. In a study of 402 adult Brazilians from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds, conducted from 2011 to 2014, the interaction of reported childhood adversity and a polymorphism in the 2A serotonin receptor was associated with higher depressive symptoms. Further analysis showed that the gene-environment interaction was mediated by cultural consonance in family life, and that these effects were more pronounced in lower social class neighborhoods. The findings reinforce the role of the serotonergic system in the regulation of stress response and learning and memory, and how these processes in turn interact with environmental events and circumstances. Furthermore, these results suggest that gene-environment interaction models should incorporate a wider range of environmental experience and more complex pathways to better understand how genes and the environment combine to influence mental health outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Astrocytic Lrp4 (Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 4) Contributes to Ischemia-Induced Brain Injury by Regulating ATP Release and Adenosine-A2AR (Adenosine A2A Receptor) Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xin-Chun; Hu, Jin-Xia; Li, Lei; Li, Qiang; Tang, Fu-Lei; Lin, Sen; Sun, Dong; Sun, Xiang-Dong; Cui, Gui-Yun; Mei, Lin; Xiong, Wen-Cheng

    2018-01-01

    Lrp4 (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4) is predominantly expressed in astrocytes, where it regulates glutamatergic neurotransmission by suppressing ATP release. Here, we investigated Lrp4's function in ischemia/stroke-induced brain injury response, which includes glutamate-induced neuronal death and reactive astrogliosis. The brain-specific Lrp4 conditional knockout mice (Lrp4 GFAP-Cre ), astrocytic-specific Lrp4 conditional knockout mice (Lrp4 GFAP-creER ), and their control mice (Lrp4 f/f ) were subjected to photothrombotic ischemia and the transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. After ischemia/stroke, mice or their brain samples were subjected to behavior tests, brain histology, immunofluorescence staining, Western blot, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. In addition, primary astrocytes and neurons were cocultured with or without oxygen and glucose deprivation and in the presence or absence of the antagonist for adenosine-A 2A R (adenosine A2A receptor) or ATP-P2X7R (P2X purinoceptor 7) signaling. Gliotransmitters, such as glutamate, d-serine, ATP, and adenosine, in the condition medium of cultured astrocytes were also measured. Lrp4, largely expressed in astrocytes, was increased in response to ischemia/stroke. Both Lrp4 GFAP-Cre and Lrp4 GFAP-creER mice showed less brain injury, including reduced neuronal death, and impaired reactive astrogliosis. Mechanistically, Lrp4 conditional knockout in astrocytes increased ATP release and the production of ATP derivative, adenosine, which were further elevated by oxygen and glucose deprivation. Pharmacological inhibition of ATP-P 2 X 7 R or adenosine-A 2A R signaling diminished Lrp4 GFAP-creER 's protective effect. The astrocytic Lrp4 plays an important role in ischemic brain injury response. Lrp4 deficiency in astrocytes seems to be protective in response to ischemic brain injury, likely because of the increased ATP release and adenosine-A 2A R signaling. © 2017 American Heart

  5. Scribble1/AP2 complex coordinates NMDA receptor endocytic recycling.

    PubMed

    Piguel, Nicolas H; Fievre, Sabine; Blanc, Jean-Michel; Carta, Mario; Moreau, Maïté M; Moutin, Enora; Pinheiro, Vera L; Medina, Chantal; Ezan, Jerome; Lasvaux, Léa; Loll, François; Durand, Christelle M; Chang, Kai; Petralia, Ronald S; Wenthold, Robert J; Stephenson, F Anne; Vuillard, Laurent; Darbon, Hervé; Perroy, Julie; Mulle, Christophe; Montcouquiol, Mireille; Racca, Claudia; Sans, Nathalie

    2014-10-23

    The appropriate trafficking of glutamate receptors to synapses is crucial for basic synaptic function and synaptic plasticity. It is now accepted that NMDA receptors (NMDARs) internalize and are recycled at the plasma membrane but also exchange between synaptic and extrasynaptic pools; these NMDAR properties are also key to governing synaptic plasticity. Scribble1 is a large PDZ protein required for synaptogenesis and synaptic plasticity. Herein, we show that the level of Scribble1 is regulated in an activity-dependent manner and that Scribble1 controls the number of NMDARs at the plasma membrane. Notably, Scribble1 prevents GluN2A subunits from undergoing lysosomal trafficking and degradation by increasing their recycling to the plasma membrane following NMDAR activation. Finally, we show that a specific YxxR motif on Scribble1 controls these mechanisms through a direct interaction with AP2. Altogether, our findings define a molecular mechanism to control the levels of synaptic NMDARs via Scribble1 complex signaling. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of adenosine and a selective A2A adenosine receptor agonist on hemodynamic and thallium-201 and technetium-99m-sestaMIBI biodistribution and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Mekkaoui, Choukri; Jadbabaie, Farid; Dione, Donald P; Meoli, David F; Purushothaman, Kailasnath; Belardinelli, Luiz; Sinusas, Albert J

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare a selective A(2A) adenosine receptor agonist (regadenoson) with adenosine in clinically relevant canine models with regard to effects on hemodynamics and thallium-201 ((201)Tl) and technetium-99m ((99m)Tc)-sestaMIBI biodistribution and kinetics. The clinical application of vasodilator stress for perfusion imaging requires consideration of the effects of these vasodilating agents on systemic hemodynamics, coronary flow, and radiotracer uptake and clearance kinetics. Sequential imaging and arterial blood sampling was performed on control, anesthetized closed-chest canines (n = 7) to evaluate radiotracer biodistribution and kinetics after either a bolus administration of regadenoson (2.5 microg/kg) or 4.5-min infusion of adenosine (280 microg/kg). The effects of regadenoson on coronary flow and myocardial radiotracer uptake were then evaluated in an open-chest canine model of a critical stenosis (n = 7). Results from ex vivo single-photon emission computed tomography were compared with tissue well-counting. The use of regadenoson compared favorably with adenosine in regard to the duration and magnitude of the hemodynamic effects and the effect on (201)Tl and (99m)Tc-sestaMIBI biodistribution and kinetics. The arterial blood clearance half-time was significantly faster for (99m)Tc-sestaMIBI (regadenoson: 1.4 +/- 0.03 min; adenosine: 1.5 +/- 0.08 min) than for (201)Tl (regadenoson: 2.5 +/- 0.16 min, p < 0.01; adenosine: 2.7 +/- 0.04 min, p < 0.01) for both vasodilator stressors. The relative microsphere flow deficit (0.34 +/- 0.02%) during regadenoson stress was significantly greater than the relative perfusion defect with (99m)Tc-sestaMIBI (0.69 +/- 0.03%, p < 0.001) or (201)Tl (0.53 +/- 0.02%, p < 0.001), although (201)Tl tracked the flow deficit within the ischemic region better than (99m)Tc-sestaMIBI. The perfusion defect score was larger with (201)Tl (22 +/- 2.8% left ventricular) than with (99m)Tc-sestaMIBI (17 +/- 1

  7. Antigen-B Cell Receptor Complexes Associate with Intracellular major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class II Molecules*

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Margarida; Tucker, Heidi; Drake, Lisa; Nichol, Kathleen; Drake, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen processing and MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation by antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells and B cells allows the activation of naïve CD4+ T cells and cognate interactions between B cells and effector CD4+ T cells, respectively. B cells are unique among class II-restricted antigen-presenting cells in that they have a clonally restricted antigen-specific receptor, the B cell receptor (BCR), which allows the cell to recognize and respond to trace amounts of foreign antigen present in a sea of self-antigens. Moreover, engagement of peptide-class II complexes formed via BCR-mediated processing of cognate antigen has been shown to result in a unique pattern of B cell activation. Using a combined biochemical and imaging/FRET approach, we establish that internalized antigen-BCR complexes associate with intracellular class II molecules. We demonstrate that the M1-paired MHC class II conformer, shown previously to be critical for CD4 T cell activation, is incorporated selectively into these complexes and loaded selectively with peptide derived from BCR-internalized cognate antigen. These results demonstrate that, in B cells, internalized antigen-BCR complexes associate with intracellular MHC class II molecules, potentially defining a site of class II peptide acquisition, and reveal a selective role for the M1-paired class II conformer in the presentation of cognate antigen. These findings provide key insights into the molecular mechanisms used by B cells to control the source of peptides charged onto class II molecules, allowing the immune system to mount an antibody response focused on BCR-reactive cognate antigen. PMID:26400081

  8. Cocaine Disrupts Histamine H3 Receptor Modulation of Dopamine D1 Receptor Signaling: σ1-D1-H3 Receptor Complexes as Key Targets for Reducing Cocaine's Effects

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Estefanía; Moreno-Delgado, David; Navarro, Gemma; Hoffmann, Hanne M.; Fuentes, Silvia; Rosell-Vilar, Santi; Gasperini, Paola; Rodríguez-Ruiz, Mar; Medrano, Mireia; Mallol, Josefa; Cortés, Antoni; Casadó, Vicent; Lluís, Carme; Ferré, Sergi; Ortiz, Jordi; Canela, Enric

    2014-01-01

    The general effects of cocaine are not well understood at the molecular level. What is known is that the dopamine D1 receptor plays an important role. Here we show that a key mechanism may be cocaine's blockade of the histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of D1 receptor function. This blockade requires the σ1 receptor and occurs upon cocaine binding to σ1-D1-H3 receptor complexes. The cocaine-mediated disruption leaves an uninhibited D1 receptor that activates Gs, freely recruits β-arrestin, increases p-ERK 1/2 levels, and induces cell death when over activated. Using in vitro assays with transfected cells and in ex vivo experiments using both rats acutely treated or self-administered with cocaine along with mice depleted of σ1 receptor, we show that blockade of σ1 receptor by an antagonist restores the protective H3 receptor-mediated brake on D1 receptor signaling and prevents the cell death from elevated D1 receptor signaling. These findings suggest that a combination therapy of σ1R antagonists with H3 receptor agonists could serve to reduce some effects of cocaine. PMID:24599455

  9. Bitopic fluorescent antagonists of the A2A adenosine receptor based on pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-amine functionalized congeners.

    PubMed

    Duroux, Romain; Ciancetta, Antonella; Mannes, Philip; Yu, Jinha; Boyapati, Shireesha; Gizewski, Elizabeth; Yous, Said; Ciruela, Francisco; Auchampach, John A; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2017-08-01

    A pyrazolo[4,3- e ][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5- c ]pyrimidin-5-amine antagonist of the A 2A adenosine receptor (AR) was functionalized as amine congeners, fluorescent conjugates and a sulfonate, and the A 2A AR binding modes were predicted computationally. The optimal n -butyl spacer was incorporated into the following A 2A AR-selective ( K i , nM) conjugates: BODIPY630/650 derivative 11 (MRS7396, 24.6) and AlexaFluor488 derivative 12 (MRS7416, 30.3). Flow cytometry of 12 in hA 2A AR-expressing HEK-293 cells displayed saturable binding (low nonspecific) and inhibition by known A 2A AR antagonists. Water-soluble sulfonate 13 was a highly potent ( K i = 6.2 nM) and selective A 2A AR antagonist based on binding and functional assays. Docking and molecular dynamics simulations predicted the regions of interaction of the distal portions of these chain-extended ligands with the A 2A AR. The BODIPY630/650 fluorophore of 11 was buried in a hydrophobic interhelical (TM1/TM7) region, while AlexaFluor488 of 12 associated with the hydrophilic extracellular loops. In conclusion, we have identified novel high affinity antagonist probes for A 2A AR drug discovery and characterization.

  10. Humanin Inhibits Neuronal Cell Death by Interacting with a Cytokine Receptor Complex or Complexes Involving CNTF Receptor α/WSX-1/gp130

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Yuichi; Kurita, Megumi; Aiso, Sadakazu; Nishimoto, Ikuo

    2009-01-01

    Humanin (HN) inhibits neuronal death induced by various Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related insults via an unknown receptor on cell membranes. Our earlier study indicated that the activation of STAT3 was essential for HN-induced neuroprotection, suggesting that the HN receptor may belong to the cytokine receptor family. In this study, a series of loss-of-function tests indicated that gp130, the common subunit of receptors belonging to the IL-6 receptor family, was essential for HN-induced neuroprotection. Overexpression of ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor α (CNTFR) and/or the IL-27 receptor subunit, WSX-1, but not that of any other tested gp130-related receptor subunit, up-regulated HN binding to neuronal cells, whereas siRNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous CNTFR and/or WSX-1 reduced it. These results suggest that both CNTFR and WSX-1 may be also involved in HN binding to cells. Consistent with these results, loss-of-functions of CNTFR or WSX-1 in neuronal cells nullified their responsiveness to HN-mediated protection. In vitro–reconstituted binding assays showed that HN, but not the other control peptide, induced the hetero-oligomerization of CNTFR, WSX-1, and gp130. Together, these results indicate that HN protects neurons by binding to a complex or complexes involving CNTFR/WSX-1/gp130. PMID:19386761

  11. Epigenetic regulation of olfactory receptor gene expression by the Myb-MuvB/dREAM complex.

    PubMed

    Sim, Choon Kiat; Perry, Sarah; Tharadra, Sana Khalid; Lipsick, Joseph S; Ray, Anandasankar

    2012-11-15

    In both mammals and insects, an olfactory neuron will usually select a single olfactory receptor and repress remaining members of large receptor families. Here we show that a conserved multiprotein complex, Myb-MuvB (MMB)/dREAM, plays an important role in mediating neuron-specific expression of the carbon dioxide (CO(2)) receptor genes (Gr63a/Gr21a) in Drosophila. Activity of Myb in the complex is required for expression of Gr63a/Gr21a and acts in opposition to the histone methyltransferase Su(var)3-9. Consistent with this, we observed repressive dimethylated H3K9 modifications at the receptor gene loci, suggesting a mechanism for silencing receptor gene expression. Conversely, other complex members, Mip120 (Myb-interacting protein 120) and E2F2, are required for repression of Gr63a in inappropriate neurons. Misexpression in mutants is accompanied by an increase in the H3K4me3 mark of active chromatin at the receptor gene locus. Nuclei of CO(2) receptor-expressing neurons contain reduced levels of the repressive subunit Mip120 compared with surrounding neurons and increased levels of Myb, suggesting that activity of the complex can be regulated in a cell-specific manner. Our evidence suggests a model in which olfactory receptors are regulated epigenetically and the MMB/dREAM complex plays a critical role in specifying, maintaining, and modulating the receptor-to-neuron map.

  12. Unsaturated free fatty acids increase benzodiazepine receptor agonist binding depending on the subunit composition of the GABAA receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Witt, M R; Westh-Hansen, S E; Rasmussen, P B; Hastrup, S; Nielsen, M

    1996-11-01

    It has been shown previously that unsaturated free fatty acids (FFAs) strongly enhance the binding of agonist benzodiazepine receptor ligands and GABAA receptor ligands in the CNS in vitro. To investigate the selectivity of this effect, recombinant human GABAA/benzodiazepine receptor complexes formed by different subunit compositions (alpha x beta y gamma 2, x = 1, 2, 3, and 5; y = 1, 2, and 3) were expressed using the baculovirus-transfected Sf9 insect cell system. At 10(-4) M, unsaturated FFAs, particularly arachidonic (20:4) and docosahexaenoic (22:6) acids, strongly stimulated (> 200% of control values) the binding of [3H]flunitrazepam ([3H]FNM) to the alpha 3 beta 2 gamma 2 receptor combination in whole cell preparations. No effect or small increases in levels of unsaturated FFAs on [3H]FNM binding to alpha 1 beta x gamma 2 and alpha 2 beta x gamma 2 receptor combinations were observed, and weak effects (130% of control values) were detected using the alpha 5 beta 2 gamma 2 receptor combination. The saturated FFAs, stearic and palmitic acids, were without effect on [3H]FNM binding to any combination of receptor complexes. The hydroxylated unsaturated FFAs, ricinoleic and ricinelaidic acids, were shown to decrease the binding of [3H]FNM only if an alpha 1 beta 2 gamma 2 receptor combination was used. Given the heterogeneity of the GABAA/ benzodiazepine receptor subunit distribution in the CNS, the effects of FFAs on the benzodiazepine receptor can be assumed to vary at both cellular and regional levels.

  13. Fractalkine (CX3CL1) enhances hippocampal N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) function via d-serine and adenosine receptor type A2 (A2AR) activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background N-Methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) play fundamental roles in basic brain functions such as excitatory neurotransmission and learning and memory processes. Their function is largely regulated by factors released by glial cells, including the coagonist d-serine. We investigated whether the activation of microglial CX3CR1 induces the release of factors that modulate NMDAR functions. Methods We recorded the NMDAR component of the field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (NMDA-fEPSPs) elicited in the CA1 stratum radiatum of mouse hippocampal slices by Shaffer collateral stimulation and evaluated d-serine content in the extracellular medium of glial primary cultures by mass spectrometry analysis. Results We demonstrated that CX3CL1 increases NMDA-fEPSPs by a mechanism involving the activity of the adenosine receptor type A2 (A2AR) and the release of the NMDAR coagonist d-serine. Specifically (1) the selective A2AR blocker 7-(2-phenylethyl)-5-amino-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo-[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine (SCH58261) and the genetic ablation of A2AR prevent CX3CL1 action while the A2AR agonist 5-(6-amino-2-(phenethylthio)-9H-purin-9-yl)-N-ethyl-3,4-dihydroxytetrahydrofuran-2-carboxamide (VT7) mimics CX3CL1 effect, and (2) the selective blocking of the NMDAR glycine (and d-serine) site by 5,7-dicholorokynurenic acid (DCKA), the enzymatic degradation of d-serine by d-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) and the saturation of the coagonist site by d-serine, all block the CX3CL1 effect. In addition, mass spectrometry analysis demonstrates that stimulation of microglia and astrocytes with CX3CL1 or VT7 increases d-serine release in the extracellular medium. Conclusions CX3CL1 transiently potentiates NMDAR function though mechanisms involving A2AR activity and the release of d-serine. PMID:23981568

  14. Sex Difference in Coronary Endothelial Dysfunction in Apolipoprotein-E Knockout Mouse: Role of NO and A2A Adenosine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xueping; Teng, B.; Mustafa, S Jamal

    2015-01-01

    Objective Sex plays an important role in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases. This study aims to investigate how sex impacts on the coronary flow regulation during atherosclerosis. Methods ApoE KO mouse fed with western diet were used for atherosclerosis model. Coronary RH and flow response were measured using Langendorff-perfused isolated hearts. Results Coronary RH and A23187-induced NO-dependent flow increases were significantly reduced in female (by ~28% and 48%, respectively), but not in male atherosclerotic mice. However, SNP-induced coronary vasodilation remains intact in both sexes of ApoE KO mice. L-NAME (NOS inhibitor) reduced baseline flow and RH to a lesser extent in ApoE KO (by ~19% and 31%) vs. WT (~30% and 59%, respectively), and abolished the sex difference in RH. In contrast, SCH58261 (a selective A2A AR antagonist) reduced the baseline flow and RH to a greater extent in atherosclerotic mice, but did not affect the sex difference. Immunofluorescent staining of coronary arteries showed a similar A2A AR up-regulation in both sexes of ApoE KO mice. Conclusions Our results suggest that during atherosclerosis, female mice are more susceptible to NO-dependent endothelial dysfunction and the up-regulation of A2A AR may serve as a compensatory mechanism to counteract the compromised endothelial function. PMID:26201383

  15. Ethylene Regulates Levels of Ethylene Receptor/CTR1 Signaling Complexes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DOE PAGES

    Shakeel, Samina N.; Gao, Zhiyong; Amir, Madiha; ...

    2015-03-26

    The plant hormone ethylene is perceived by a five-member family of receptors in Arabidopsis thaliana. The receptors function in conjunction with the Raf-like kinase CTR1 to negatively regulate ethylene signal transduction. CTR1 interacts with multiple members of the receptor family based on co-purification analysis, interacting more strongly with receptors containing a receiver domain. Levels of membrane-associated CTR1 vary in response to ethylene, doing so in a post-transcriptional manner that correlates with ethylene-mediated changes in levels of the ethylene receptors ERS1, ERS2, EIN4, and ETR2. Interactions between CTR1 and the receptor ETR1 protect ETR1 from ethylene-induced turnover. Kinetic and dose-response analysesmore » support a model in which two opposing factors control levels of the ethylene receptor/CTR1 complexes. Ethylene stimulates the production of new complexes largely through transcriptional induction of the receptors. However, ethylene also induces turnover of receptors, such that levels of ethylene receptor/CTR1 complexes decrease at higher ethylene concentrations. Lastly, we discuss implications of this model for ethylene signaling.« less

  16. BDNF prevents NMDA-induced toxicity in models of Huntington's disease: the effects are genotype specific and adenosine A2A receptor is involved.

    PubMed

    Martire, Alberto; Pepponi, Rita; Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Ferrante, Antonella; Chiodi, Valentina; Popoli, Patrizia

    2013-04-01

    NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity is thought to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease (HD). The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is also highly involved in HD and whose effects are modulated by adenosine A2 ARs, influences the activity and expression of striatal NMDA receptors. In electrophysiology experiments, we investigated the role of BDNF toward NMDA-induced effects in HD models, and the possible involvement of A2ARs. In corticostriatal slices from wild-type mice and age-matched symptomatic R6/2 mice (a model of HD), NMDA application (75 μM) induced a transient or a permanent (i.e., toxic) reduction of field potential amplitude, respectively. BDNF (10 ng/mL) potentiated NMDA effects in wild-type, while it protected from NMDA toxicity in R6/2 mice. Both effects of BDNF were prevented by A2 AR blockade. The protective effect of BDNF against NMDA-induced toxicity was reproduced in a cellular model of HD. These findings may have very important implications for the neuroprotective potential of BDNF and A2 AR ligands in HD. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  17. Thermodynamics of Complexation between Thiourea-based Receptor and Acetate in Water/Acetonitrile Mixture.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takaya; Shibuya, Yuuta; Sato, Takaya; Nishizawa, Seiichi; Sato, Itaru; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2016-01-01

    A thiourea-based receptor has been extensively studied for selective anion recognition for reasons of its strong hydrogen bond donor ability. In the present study, the thermodynamics of complexation between a thiourea-based receptor and acetate was examined in a water/acetonitrile mixture. The receptor used in this study was N,N'-bis(p-nitrophenyl)thiourea (BNPTU). UV/vis spectroscopic titration and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) experiments clearly revealed endothermic and entropy-driven complexation of BNPTU with acetate in water/acetonitrile mixtures. Since the endothermic peaks found in water/acetonitrile mixtures were about three times greater than those in acetonitrile, it appears that preferential hydration of both receptor and acetate was responsible for the endothermic and entropy-driven complexation reaction. The thermodynamic properties found in this study have the potential to contribute to the design of a thiourea-based anion receptor.

  18. Transcriptional profiling of striatal neurons in response to single or concurrent activation of dopamine D2, adenosine A(2A) and metabotropic glutamate type 5 receptors: focus on beta-synuclein expression.

    PubMed

    Canela, Laia; Selga, Elisabet; García-Martínez, Juan Manuel; Amaral, Olavo B; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Alberch, Jordi; Canela, Enric I; Franco, Rafael; Noé, Véronique; Lluís, Carme; Ciudad, Carlos J; Ciruela, Francisco

    2012-10-25

    G protein-coupled receptor oligomerization is a concept which is changing the understanding of classical pharmacology. Both, oligomerization and functional interaction between adenosine A(2A,) dopamine D(2) and metabotropic glutamate type 5 receptors have been demonstrated in the striatum. However, the transcriptional consequences of receptors co-activation are still unexplored. We aim here to determine the changes in gene expression of striatal primary cultured neurons upon isolated or simultaneous receptor activation. Interestingly, we found that 95 genes of the total analyzed (15,866 transcripts and variants) changed their expression in response to simultaneous stimulation of all three receptors. Among these genes, we focused on the β-synuclein (β-Syn) gene (SCNB). Quantitative PCR verified the magnitude and direction of change in expression of SCNB. Since β-Syn belongs to the homologous synuclein family and may be considered a natural regulator of α-synuclein (α-Syn), it has been proposed that β-Syn might act protectively against α-Syn neuropathology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Haplotype resolution of leukocyte receptor complex in cattle through targeted enrichment and SMRT sequencing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The highly repetitive nature of cattle leukocyte receptor complex (LRC) has made it difficult to assemble and fully characterize this region with short reads used by second-generation sequencing. Previously, we reported the first two cattle killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) haplotypes; one ...

  20. Selectivity and Specificity of Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor Ligands: “Off-Targets” or Complex Pharmacology?

    PubMed Central

    Pyne, Nigel J.; Pyne, Susan

    2011-01-01

    A recent perspective published in Frontiers of Pharmacology by Salomone and Waeber (2011) discussed the selectivity and specificity of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor ligands. This perspective surveyed the use of various S1P receptor ligands and attempted to reconcile a number of inconsistencies in the predicted biological outcomes: these were interpreted as “off-target” effects. Therefore the perspective cautioned against the use of these S1P receptor ligands. Here we highlight the complex pharmacology of S1P receptors, which along with “inside-out” signaling might provide an alternative explanation for “off-target” effects. PMID:21687518

  1. Selectivity and specificity of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor ligands: "off-targets" or complex pharmacology?

    PubMed

    Pyne, Nigel J; Pyne, Susan

    2011-01-01

    A recent perspective published in Frontiers of Pharmacology by Salomone and Waeber (2011) discussed the selectivity and specificity of sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) receptor ligands. This perspective surveyed the use of various S1P receptor ligands and attempted to reconcile a number of inconsistencies in the predicted biological outcomes: these were interpreted as "off-target" effects. Therefore the perspective cautioned against the use of these S1P receptor ligands. Here we highlight the complex pharmacology of S1P receptors, which along with "inside-out" signaling might provide an alternative explanation for "off-target" effects.

  2. Ecto-5′-Nucleotidase (CD73)-Mediated Formation of Adenosine Is Critical for the Striatal Adenosine A2A Receptor Functions

    PubMed Central

    Augusto, Elisabete; Matos, Marco; Sévigny, Jean; El-Tayeb, Ali; Bynoe, Margaret S.; Müller, Christa E.

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine is a neuromodulator acting through inhibitory A1 receptors (A1Rs) and facilitatory A2ARs, which have similar affinities for adenosine. It has been shown that the activity of intracellular adenosine kinase preferentially controls the activation of A1Rs, but the source of the adenosine activating A2ARs is unknown. We now show that ecto-5′-nucleotidase (CD73), the major enzyme able to convert extracellular AMP into adenosine, colocalizes with A2ARs in the basal ganglia. In addition to astrocytes, striatal CD73 is prominently localized to postsynaptic sites. Notably, CD73 coimmunoprecipitated with A2ARs and proximity ligation assays confirmed the close proximity of CD73 and A2ARs in the striatum. Accordingly, the cAMP formation in synaptosomes as well as the hypolocomotion induced by a novel A2AR prodrug that requires CD73 metabolization to activate A2ARs were observed in wild-type mice, but not in CD73 knock-out (KO) mice or A2AR KO mice. Moreover, CD73 KO mice displayed increased working memory performance and a blunted amphetamine-induced sensitization, mimicking the phenotype of global or forebrain-A2AR KO mice, as well as upon pharmacological A2AR blockade. These results show that CD73-mediated formation of extracellular adenosine is responsible for the activation of striatal A2AR function. This study points to CD73 as a new target that can fine-tune A2AR activity, and a novel therapeutic target to manipulate A2AR-mediated control of striatal function and neurodegeneration. PMID:23843511

  3. Involvement of CD73, equilibrative nucleoside transporters and inosine in rhythm and conduction disturbances mediated by adenosine A1 and A2A receptors in the developing heart.

    PubMed

    Robin, Elodie; Sabourin, Jessica; Marcillac, Fabrice; Raddatz, Eric

    2013-10-01

    We previously established that exogenous adenosine (ADO) induces transient arrhythmias in the developing heart via the adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) and downstream activation of NADPH oxidase/ERK and PLC/PKC pathways. Here, we investigated the mechanisms by which accumulation of endogenous ADO and its derived compound inosine (INO) in the interstitial compartment induce rhythm and conduction troubles. The validated model of the spontaneously beating heart obtained from 4-day-old chick embryos was used. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that enzymes involved in ADO and INO metabolism (CD39, CD73 and eADA) as well as equilibrative (ENT1, -3, -4) and concentrative (CNT3) nucleoside transporters were differentially expressed in atria, ventricle and outflow tract. Inactivation of ENTs by dipyridamole, 1) increased myocardial ADO level, 2) provoked atrial arrhythmias and atrio-ventricular blocks (AVB) in 70% of the hearts, 3) prolonged P wave and QT interval without altering contractility, and 4) increased ERK2 phosphorylation. Blockade of CD73-mediated phosphohydrolysis of AMP to ADO, MEK/ERK pathway inhibition or A1AR inhibition prevented these arrhythmias. Exposure to exogenous INO also caused atrial ectopy associated with AVB and ERK2 phosphorylation which were prevented by A1AR or A2AAR antagonists exclusively or by MEK/ERK inhibitor. Inhibition of ADA-mediated conversion of ADO to INO increased myocardial ADO and decreased INO as expected, but slightly augmented heart rate variability without provoking AVB. Thus, during cardiogenesis, disturbances of nucleosides metabolism and transport, can lead to interstitial accumulation of ADO and INO and provoke arrhythmias in an autocrine/paracrine manner through A1AR and A2AAR stimulation and ERK2 activation. © 2013.

  4. Crystal structure of the complex of human epidermal growth factor and receptor extracellular domains.

    PubMed

    Ogiso, Hideo; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Nureki, Osamu; Fukai, Shuya; Yamanaka, Mari; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Saito, Kazuki; Sakamoto, Ayako; Inoue, Mio; Shirouzu, Mikako; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2002-09-20

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) regulates cell proliferation and differentiation by binding to the EGF receptor (EGFR) extracellular region, comprising domains I-IV, with the resultant dimerization of the receptor tyrosine kinase. In this study, the crystal structure of a 2:2 complex of human EGF and the EGFR extracellular region has been determined at 3.3 A resolution. EGFR domains I-III are arranged in a C shape, and EGF is docked between domains I and III. The 1:1 EGF*EGFR complex dimerizes through a direct receptor*receptor interaction, in which a protruding beta-hairpin arm of each domain II holds the body of the other. The unique "receptor-mediated dimerization" was verified by EGFR mutagenesis.

  5. The neurobiology of dopamine receptors: evolution from the dual concept to heterodimer complexes.

    PubMed

    Missale, Cristina; Fiorentini, Chiara; Collo, Ginetta; Spano, PierFranco

    2010-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been classically thought to work as monomeric entities. The current view of their organization, however, assumes that they are part of highly organized molecular complexes, where different receptors and interacting proteins are clustered. These heteromers have peculiar pharmacological, signaling, and trafficking properties. GPCR heteromerization, raising different combinatorial possibilities, thus underlies an unexpected level of diversity within this receptor family. In this paper, we summarize recent data, reported by different research groups, suggesting that the dopamine (DA) D1 receptor forms heteromers with receptors of the same family and with structurally and functionally divergent receptors. DA D1 and D3 receptors and glutamate NMDA receptors regulate rewarding mechanisms and motivated behavior, modulate emotional and cognitive processes and regulate locomotor activity by extensive cross-talk mechanisms. Co-localization of D1 and D3 receptors and D1 and NMDA receptors in specific neuronal populations in the striatum and nucleus accumbens, moreover, suggested that their cross-talk may involve direct interactions. By using different experimental approaches various groups have, in fact, demonstrated the existence of D1-NMDA and D1-D3 heteromers, in both transfected cell systems and in the straitum, with peculiar pharmacological, signaling, and functional properties. The putative role of the D1-D3 and D1-NMDA heteromers in the physiological regulation of striatal function and in the development of motor dysfunctions will be discussed.

  6. Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields Increased the Anti-Inflammatory Effect of A2A and A3 Adenosine Receptors in Human T/C-28a2 Chondrocytes and hFOB 1.19 Osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Targa, Martina; Corciulo, Carmen; Gessi, Stefania; Merighi, Stefania; Setti, Stefania; Cadossi, Ruggero; Goldring, Mary B.; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine receptors (ARs) have an important role in the regulation of inflammation and their activation is involved in the inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine release. The effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) on inflammation have been reported and we have demonstrated that PEMFs increased A2A and A3AR density and functionality in different cell lines. Chondrocytes and osteoblasts are two key cell types in the skeletal system that play important role in cartilage and bone metabolism representing an interesting target to study the effect of PEMFs. The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate if PEMF exposure potentiated the anti-inflammatory effect of A2A and/or A3ARs in T/C-28a2 chondrocytes and hFOB 1.19 osteoblasts. Immunofluorescence, mRNA analysis and saturation binding assays revealed that PEMF exposure up-regulated A2A and A3AR expression. A2A and A3ARs were able to modulate cAMP production and cell proliferation. The activation of A2A and A3ARs resulted in the decrease of some of the most relevant pro-inflammatory cytokine release such as interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8, following the treatment with IL-1β as an inflammatory stimuli. In human chondrocyte and osteoblast cell lines, the inhibitory effect of A2A and A3AR stimulation on the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), an important lipid inflammatory mediator, was observed. In addition, in T/C-28a2 cells, the activation of A2A or A3ARs elicited an inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion. In hFOB 1.19 osteoblasts, PEMF exposure determined an increase of osteoprotegerin (OPG) production. The effect of the A2A or A3AR agonists in the examined cells was enhanced in the presence of PEMFs and completely blocked by using well-known selective antagonists. These results demonstrated that PEMF exposure significantly increase the anti-inflammatory effect of A2A or A3ARs suggesting their potential therapeutic use in the therapy of inflammatory bone and joint disorders

  7. H-Bonded anion-anion complex trapped in a squaramido-based receptor.

    PubMed

    Prohens, Rafel; Portell, Anna; Font-Bardia, Mercè; Bauzá, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio

    2018-02-15

    Herein we report the experimental observation (X-ray characterization) of an anion-anion complex (anion = hydrogen fumarate) stabilized by H-bonds that is trapped in a secondary squaramide receptor. High level ab initio calculations indicate that the anion-anion complex is thermodynamically unstable but kinetically stable with respect to the isolated anions.

  8. 2’,3’-cAMP, 3’-AMP, 2’-AMP and Adenosine Inhibit TNF-α and CXCL10 Production From Activated Primary Murine Microglia via A2A Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Elizabeth A.; Exo, Jennifer L.; Verrier, Jonathan D.; Jackson, Travis C.; Gillespie, Delbert G.; Janesko-Feldman, Keri; Kochanek, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Some cells, tissues and organs release 2’,3’-cAMP (a positional isomer of 3’,5’-cAMP) and convert extracellular 2’,3’-cAMP to 2’-AMP plus 3’-AMP and convert these AMPs to adenosine (called the extracellular 2’,3’-cAMP-adenosine pathway). Recent studies show that microglia have an extracellular 2’,3’-cAMP-adenosine pathway. The goal of the present study was to investigate whether the extracellular 2’,3’-cAMP-adenosine pathway could have functional consequences on the production of cytokines/chemokines by activated microglia. Methods Experiments were conducted in cultures of primary murine microglia. In the first experiment, the effect of 2’,3’-cAMP, 3’-AMP, 2’-AMP and adenosine on LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production was determined. In the next experiment, the first protocol was replicated but with the addition of 1,3-dipropyl-8-p-sulfophenylxanthine (DPSPX) (0.1 µM; antagonist of adenosine receptors). The last experiment compared the ability of 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA) (10 µM; selective A1 agonist), 5’-N-ethylcarboxamide adenosine (NECA) (10 µM; agonist for all adenosine receptor subtypes) and CGS21680 (10 µM; selective A2A agonist) to inhibit LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production. Results 1) 2’,3’-cAMP, 3’-AMP, 2’-AMP and adenosine similarly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production; 2) DPSPX nearly eliminated the inhibitory effects of 2’,3’-cAMP, 3’-AMP, 2’-AMP and adenosine on LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production; 3) CCPA did not affect LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10; 4) NECA and CGS21680 similarly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production. Conclusions 2’,3’-cAMP and its metabolites (3’-AMP, 2’-AMP and adenosine) inhibit LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production via A2A-receptor activation. Adenosine and its precursors, via A2A receptors, likely suppress TNF-α and CXCL10 production by activated microglia in brain diseases. PMID:25451117

  9. 2',3'-cAMP, 3'-AMP, 2'-AMP and adenosine inhibit TNF-α and CXCL10 production from activated primary murine microglia via A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Newell, Elizabeth A; Exo, Jennifer L; Verrier, Jonathan D; Jackson, Travis C; Gillespie, Delbert G; Janesko-Feldman, Keri; Kochanek, Patrick M; Jackson, Edwin K

    2015-01-12

    Some cells, tissues and organs release 2',3'-cAMP (a positional isomer of 3',5'-cAMP) and convert extracellular 2',3'-cAMP to 2'-AMP plus 3'-AMP and convert these AMPs to adenosine (called the extracellular 2',3'-cAMP-adenosine pathway). Recent studies show that microglia have an extracellular 2',3'-cAMP-adenosine pathway. The goal of the present study was to investigate whether the extracellular 2',3'-cAMP-adenosine pathway could have functional consequences on the production of cytokines/chemokines by activated microglia. Experiments were conducted in cultures of primary murine microglia. In the first experiment, the effect of 2',3'-cAMP, 3'-AMP, 2'-AMP and adenosine on LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production was determined. In the next experiment, the first protocol was replicated but with the addition of 1,3-dipropyl-8-p-sulfophenylxanthine (DPSPX) (0.1 μM; antagonist of adenosine receptors). The last experiment compared the ability of 2-chloro-N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA) (10 μM; selective A1 agonist), 5'-N-ethylcarboxamide adenosine (NECA) (10 μM; agonist for all adenosine receptor subtypes) and CGS21680 (10 μM; selective A2A agonist) to inhibit LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production. (1) 2',3'-cAMP, 3'-AMP, 2'-AMP and adenosine similarly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production; (2) DPSPX nearly eliminated the inhibitory effects of 2',3'-cAMP, 3'-AMP, 2'-AMP and adenosine on LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production; (3) CCPA did not affect LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10; (4) NECA and CGS21680 similarly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production. 2',3'-cAMP and its metabolites (3'-AMP, 2'-AMP and adenosine) inhibit LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production via A2A-receptor activation. Adenosine and its precursors, via A2A receptors, likely suppress TNF-α and CXCL10 production by activated microglia in brain diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Preemptive Caffeine Administration Blocks the Increase in Postoperative Pain Caused by Previous Sleep Loss in the Rat: A Potential Role for Preoptic Adenosine A2A Receptors in Sleep-Pain Interactions.

    PubMed

    Hambrecht-Wiedbusch, Viviane S; Gabel, Maya; Liu, Linda J; Imperial, John P; Colmenero, Angelo V; Vanini, Giancarlo

    2017-09-01

    Sleep and pain are reciprocally related, but the precise mechanisms underlying this relationship are poorly understood. This study used a rat model of surgical pain to examine the effect of previous sleep loss on postoperative pain and tested the hypothesis that preoptic adenosinergic mechanisms regulate sleep-pain interactions. Relative to ad libitum sleep, 6 hours of total sleep deprivation prior to a surgical incision significantly enhanced postoperative mechanical hypersensitivity in the affected paw and prolonged the time to recovery from surgery. There were no sex-specific differences in these measures. There were also no changes in adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone levels after sleep deprivation, suggesting that this effect was not mediated by the stress associated with the sleep perturbation. Systemic administration of the nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine at the onset of sleep deprivation prevented the sleep deprivation-induced increase in postoperative hypersensitivity. Microinjection of the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist ZM 241385 into the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) blocked the increase in surgical pain levels and duration caused by prior sleep deprivation and eliminated the thermal hyperalgesia induced by sleep deprivation in a group of nonoperated (i.e., without surgical incision) rats. These data show that even a brief sleep disturbance prior to surgery worsens postoperative pain and are consistent with our hypothesis that adenosine A2A receptors in the MnPO contribute to regulate these sleep-pain interactions. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Novel TPR-containing subunit of TOM complex functions as cytosolic receptor for Entamoeba mitosomal transport.

    PubMed

    Makiuchi, Takashi; Mi-ichi, Fumika; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Under anaerobic environments, the mitochondria have undergone remarkable reduction and transformation into highly reduced structures, referred as mitochondrion-related organelles (MROs), which include mitosomes and hydrogenosomes. In agreement with the concept of reductive evolution, mitosomes of Entamoeba histolytica lack most of the components of the TOM (translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane) complex, which is required for the targeting and membrane translocation of preproteins into the canonical aerobic mitochondria. Here we showed, in E. histolytica mitosomes, the presence of a 600-kDa TOM complex composed of Tom40, a conserved pore-forming subunit, and Tom60, a novel lineage-specific receptor protein. Tom60, containing multiple tetratricopeptide repeats, is localized to the mitosomal outer membrane and the cytosol, and serves as a receptor of both mitosomal matrix and membrane preproteins. Our data indicate that Entamoeba has invented a novel lineage-specific shuttle receptor of the TOM complex as a consequence of adaptation to an anaerobic environment.

  12. Monitoring ligand-dependent assembly of receptor ternary complexes in live cells by BRETFect.

    PubMed

    Cotnoir-White, David; El Ezzy, Mohamed; Boulay, Pierre-Luc; Rozendaal, Marieke; Bouvier, Michel; Gagnon, Etienne; Mader, Sylvie

    2018-03-13

    There is currently an unmet need for versatile techniques to monitor the assembly and dynamics of ternary complexes in live cells. Here we describe bioluminescence resonance energy transfer with fluorescence enhancement by combined transfer (BRETFect), a high-throughput technique that enables robust spectrometric detection of ternary protein complexes based on increased energy transfer from a luciferase to a fluorescent acceptor in the presence of a fluorescent intermediate. Its unique donor-intermediate-acceptor relay system is designed so that the acceptor can receive energy either directly from the donor or indirectly via the intermediate in a combined transfer, taking advantage of the entire luciferase emission spectrum. BRETFect was used to study the ligand-dependent cofactor interaction properties of the estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ, which form homo- or heterodimers whose distinctive regulatory properties are difficult to dissect using traditional methods. BRETFect uncovered the relative capacities of hetero- vs. homodimers to recruit receptor-specific cofactors and regulatory proteins, and to interact with common cofactors in the presence of receptor-specific ligands. BRETFect was also used to follow the assembly of ternary complexes between the V2R vasopressin receptor and two different intracellular effectors, illustrating its use for dissection of ternary protein-protein interactions engaged by G protein-coupled receptors. Our results indicate that BRETFect represents a powerful and versatile technique to monitor the dynamics of ternary interactions within multimeric complexes in live cells.

  13. The extended human leukocyte receptor complex: diverse ways of modulating immune responses.

    PubMed

    Barrow, Alexander David; Trowsdale, John

    2008-08-01

    The leukocyte receptor complex (LRC) and its extended region comprise a large set of genes encoding immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) receptors, interspersed with other loci. Although the external Ig-like domains of these molecules are related, they have evolved to bind a wide array of different ligands. Comparison of the organization and functions of the different receptors encoded in the LRC provides insight into their roles in immune recognition, their evolution, and their relevance to disease. In addition, these molecules provide classic examples of inhibitory receptors paired, side by side, with activating receptors that couple with adapter proteins, such as DAP12. Some of these activating receptors can be considered as bifunctional sensors that can perceive changes in the state of their ligands that favors an inhibitory rather than activating response, whereas other receptors have evolved different means, acting as transporters or even molecular chaperones to achieve immune repression. We briefly summarize the complement of receptors encoded in this region of chromosome 19 and discuss the many diverse and versatile mechanisms they have evolved to restrain immune responses.

  14. Actions of insecticides on the insect GABA receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bermudez, I.; Hawkins, C.A.; Taylor, A.M.

    1991-01-01

    The actions of insecticides on the insect gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor were investigated using (35S)t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (( 35S)TBPS) binding and voltage-clamp techniques. Specific binding of (35S)TBPS to a membrane homogenate derived from the brain of Locusta migratoria locusts is characterised by a Kd value of 79.3 {plus minus} 2.9 nM and a Bmax value of 1770 {plus minus} 40 fmol/mg protein. (35S)TBPS binding is inhibited by mM concentrations of barbiturates and benzodiazepines. In contrast dieldrin, ivermectin, lindane, picrotoxin and TBPS are inhibitors of (35S)TBPS binding at the nanomolar range. Bicuculline, baclofen and pyrethroid insecticides have no effect on (35S)TBPS binding. Thesemore » results are similar to those obtained in electrophysiological studies of the current elicited by GABA in both Locusta and Periplaneta americana central neurones. Noise analysis of the effects of lindane, TBPS, dieldrin and picrotoxin on the cockroach GABA responses reveals that these compounds decrease the variance of the GABA-induced current but have no effect on its mean open time. All these compounds, with the exception of dieldrin, significantly decrease the conductance of GABA-evoked single current.« less

  15. Chemical vapor detection using a reconstituted insect olfactory receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Sato, Koji; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2014-10-27

    The sensing of vapor odorants is highly demanded in the field of life and medical sciences. Although olfactory receptors (ORs) have potentials to recognize volatile organic compounds, the interaction of ORs, chemical vapors, and peptide components in olfactory mucus has yet to be analyzed to develop OR-based sensors. A bioinspired electrophysiology technique is shown to record the response of reconstituted insect ORs to chemical vapors. To mimic the interface between ORs and olfactory mucus, OR expressing spheroids were loaded into a hydrogel microchamber array. A negative extracellular field potential shift of spheroids was successfully observed by the stimulation of their vapor cognate ligand. Importantly, the ligand repertoire of the OR of malaria vector mosquito examined by this method differed from that of in vivo studies. Our method is useful to develop protein-based gas sensing techniques and to examine the binding of ORs and chemical vapors. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Binding of canonical Wnt ligands to their receptor complexes occurs in ordered plasma membrane environments.

    PubMed

    Sezgin, Erdinc; Azbazdar, Yagmur; Ng, Xue W; Teh, Cathleen; Simons, Kai; Weidinger, Gilbert; Wohland, Thorsten; Eggeling, Christian; Ozhan, Gunes

    2017-08-01

    While the cytosolic events of Wnt/β-catenin signaling (canonical Wnt signaling) pathway have been widely studied, only little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in Wnt binding to its receptors at the plasma membrane. Here, we reveal the influence of the immediate plasma membrane environment on the canonical Wnt-receptor interaction. While the receptors are distributed both in ordered and disordered environments, Wnt binding to its receptors selectively occurs in more ordered membrane environments which appear to cointernalize with the Wnt-receptor complex. Moreover, Wnt/β-catenin signaling is significantly reduced when the membrane order is disturbed by specific inhibitors of certain lipids that prefer to localize at the ordered environments. Similarly, a reduction in Wnt signaling activity is observed in Niemann-Pick Type C disease cells where trafficking of ordered membrane lipid components to the plasma membrane is genetically impaired. We thus conclude that ordered plasma membrane environments are essential for binding of canonical Wnts to their receptor complexes and downstream signaling activity. © 2017 The Authors. The FEBS Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  17. Receptor kinase complex transmits RALF peptide signal to inhibit root growth in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Du, Changqing; Li, Xiushan; Chen, Jia; Chen, Weijun; Li, Bin; Li, Chiyu; Wang, Long; Li, Jianglin; Zhao, Xiaoying; Lin, Jianzhong; Liu, Xuanming; Luan, Sheng; Yu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    A number of hormones work together to control plant cell growth. Rapid Alkalinization Factor 1 (RALF1), a plant-derived small regulatory peptide, inhibits cell elongation through suppression of rhizosphere acidification in plants. Although a receptor-like kinase, FERONIA (FER), has been shown to act as a receptor for RALF1, the signaling mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we identified a receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase (RPM1-induced protein kinase, RIPK), a plasma membrane-associated member of the RLCK-VII subfamily, that is recruited to the receptor complex through interacting with FER in response to RALF1. RALF1 triggers the phosphorylation of both FER and RIPK in a mutually dependent manner. Genetic analysis of the fer-4 and ripk mutants reveals RIPK, as well as FER, to be required for RALF1 response in roots. The RALF1–FER–RIPK interactions may thus represent a mechanism for peptide signaling in plants. PMID:27930296

  18. SERBP1 Is a Component of the Liver Receptor Homologue-1 Transcriptional Complex.

    PubMed

    Mari, Yelenis; West, Graham M; Scharager-Tapia, Catherina; Pascal, Bruce D; Garcia-Ordonez, Ruben D; Griffin, Patrick R

    2015-11-06

    Liver receptor homologue-1 (LRH1) is an orphan nuclear receptor that has been shown to play a role in the transcriptional regulation of pathways involved in cancer. Elucidating the components of the LRH1 transcriptional complex to better understand endogenous regulation of the receptor as well as its role in cancer remains a high priority. A sub-cellular enrichment strategy coupled with proteomic approaches was employed to identify putative LRH1 co-regulators. Nuclear fractionation protocol was essential for detection of LRH1 peptides by mass spectrometry (MS), with most peptides being observed in the insoluble fraction (receptor bound to DNA). SERBP1 and ILF3 were identified as LRH1 interacting partners by both Western blot and MS/MS analysis. Receptor knockdown by siRNA showed an increase in SERBP1 expression, while ILF3 expression was unchanged. In contrast, receptor overexpression decreased only SERBP1 mRNA levels. Consistent with these data, in a promoter:reporter assay, binding of LRH1 to the promoter region of SERBP1 resulted in a decrease in the expression level of the reporter gene, subsequently inhibiting transcription. Given the receptor's role in cancer progression, the study here elucidates additional transcriptional machinery involved in LRH1 signaling and potentially provides new targets for therapeutics development.

  19. Identification of the PGRMC1 protein complex as the putative sigma-2 receptor binding site

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jinbin; Zeng, Chenbo; Chu, Wenhua; Pan, Fenghui; Rothfuss, Justin M.; Zhang, Fanjie; Tu, Zhude; Zhou, Dong; Zeng, Dexing; Vangveravong, Suwanna; Johnston, Fabian; Spitzer, Dirk; Chang, Katherine C.; Hotchkiss, Richard S.; Hawkins, William G.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Mach, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    The sigma-2 receptor, whose gene remains to be cloned, has been validated as a biomarker for tumor cell proliferation. Here we report the use of a novel photoaffinity probe, WC-21, to identify the sigma-2 receptor binding site. WC-21, a sigma-2 ligand containing both a photoactive moiety azide and a fluorescein isothiocyanate group, irreversibly labels sigma-2 receptors in rat liver; the membrane-bound protein was then identified as PGRMC1 (progesterone receptor membrane component-1). Immunocytochemistry reveals that both PGRMC1 and SW120, a fluorescent sigma-2 receptor ligand, colocalizes with molecular markers of the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria in HeLa cells. Overexpression and knockdown of the PGRMC1 protein results in an increase and a decrease in binding of a sigma-2 selective radioligand, respectively. The identification of the putative sigma-2 receptor binding site as PGRMC1 should stimulate the development of unique imaging agents and cancer therapeutics that target the sigma-2 receptor/PGRMC1 complex. PMID:21730960

  20. Hydrogen Exchange Mass Spectrometry of Functional Membrane-bound Chemotaxis Receptor Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Koshy, Seena S.; Eyles, Stephen J.; Weis, Robert M.; Thompson, Lynmarie K.

    2014-01-01

    The transmembrane signaling mechanism of bacterial chemotaxis receptors is thought to involve changes in receptor conformation and dynamics. The receptors function in ternary complexes with two other proteins, CheA and CheW, that form extended membrane-bound arrays. Previous studies have shown that attractant binding induces a small (~2 Å) piston displacement of one helix of the periplasmic and transmembrane domains towards the cytoplasm, but it is not clear how this signal propagates through the cytoplasmic domain to control the kinase activity of the CheA bound at the membrane-distal tip, nearly 200 Å away. The cytoplasmic domain has been shown to be highly dynamic, which raises the question of how a small piston motion could propagate through a dynamic domain to control CheA kinase activity. To address this, we have developed a method for measuring dynamics of the receptor cytoplasmic fragment (CF) in functional complexes with CheA and CheW. Hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) measurements of global exchange of CF demonstrate that CF exhibits significantly slower exchange in functional complexes than in solution. Since the exchange rates in functional complexes are comparable to that of other proteins of similar structure, the CF appears to be a well-structured protein within these complexes, which is compatible with its role in propagating a signal that appears to be a tiny conformational change in the periplasmic and transmembrane domains of the receptor. We also demonstrate the feasibility of this protocol for local exchange measurements, by incorporating a pepsin digest step to produce peptides with 87% sequence coverage and only 20% back exchange. This method extends HDX-MS to membrane-bound functional complexes without detergents that may perturb the stability or structure of the system. PMID:24274333

  1. Structure and antagonism of the receptor complex mediated by human TSLP in allergy and asthma.

    PubMed

    Verstraete, Kenneth; Peelman, Frank; Braun, Harald; Lopez, Juan; Van Rompaey, Dries; Dansercoer, Ann; Vandenberghe, Isabel; Pauwels, Kris; Tavernier, Jan; Lambrecht, Bart N; Hammad, Hamida; De Winter, Hans; Beyaert, Rudi; Lippens, Guy; Savvides, Savvas N

    2017-04-03

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is pivotal to the pathophysiology of widespread allergic diseases mediated by type 2 helper T cell (Th2) responses, including asthma and atopic dermatitis. The emergence of human TSLP as a clinical target against asthma calls for maximally harnessing its therapeutic potential via structural and mechanistic considerations. Here we employ an integrative experimental approach focusing on productive and antagonized TSLP complexes and free cytokine. We reveal how cognate receptor TSLPR allosterically activates TSLP to potentiate the recruitment of the shared interleukin 7 receptor α-chain (IL-7Rα) by leveraging the flexibility, conformational heterogeneity and electrostatics of the cytokine. We further show that the monoclonal antibody Tezepelumab partly exploits these principles to neutralize TSLP activity. Finally, we introduce a fusion protein comprising a tandem of the TSLPR and IL-7Rα extracellular domains, which harnesses the mechanistic intricacies of the TSLP-driven receptor complex to manifest high antagonistic potency.

  2. Structure and antagonism of the receptor complex mediated by human TSLP in allergy and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Verstraete, Kenneth; Peelman, Frank; Braun, Harald; Lopez, Juan; Van Rompaey, Dries; Dansercoer, Ann; Vandenberghe, Isabel; Pauwels, Kris; Tavernier, Jan; Lambrecht, Bart N.; Hammad, Hamida; De Winter, Hans; Beyaert, Rudi; Lippens, Guy; Savvides, Savvas N.

    2017-01-01

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is pivotal to the pathophysiology of widespread allergic diseases mediated by type 2 helper T cell (Th2) responses, including asthma and atopic dermatitis. The emergence of human TSLP as a clinical target against asthma calls for maximally harnessing its therapeutic potential via structural and mechanistic considerations. Here we employ an integrative experimental approach focusing on productive and antagonized TSLP complexes and free cytokine. We reveal how cognate receptor TSLPR allosterically activates TSLP to potentiate the recruitment of the shared interleukin 7 receptor α-chain (IL-7Rα) by leveraging the flexibility, conformational heterogeneity and electrostatics of the cytokine. We further show that the monoclonal antibody Tezepelumab partly exploits these principles to neutralize TSLP activity. Finally, we introduce a fusion protein comprising a tandem of the TSLPR and IL-7Rα extracellular domains, which harnesses the mechanistic intricacies of the TSLP-driven receptor complex to manifest high antagonistic potency. PMID:28368013

  3. The NMDA receptor complex: a multifunctional machine at the glutamatergic synapse.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xuelai; Jin, Wu Yang; Wang, Yu Tian

    2014-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are part of a large multiprotein complex at the glutamatergic synapse. The assembly of NMDARs with synaptic proteins offers a means to regulate NMDAR channel properties and receptor trafficking, and couples NMDAR activation to distinct intracellular signaling pathways, thus contributing to the versatility of NMDAR functions. Receptor-protein interactions at the synapse provide a dynamic and powerful mechanism for regulating synaptic efficacy, but can also contribute to NMDAR overactivation-induced excitotoxicity and cellular damage under pathological conditions. An emerging concept is that by understanding the mechanisms and functions of disease-specific protein-protein interactions in the NMDAR complex, we may be able to develop novel therapies based on protein-NMDAR interactions for the treatment of brain diseases in which NMDAR dysfunction is at the root of their pathogenesis.

  4. Comparison of the cattle leukocyte receptor complex with related livestock species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The natural killer (NK) cell receptor gene complexes are highly variable between species, and their repetitive nature makes genomic assembly and characterization problematic. As a result, most reference genome assemblies are heavily fragmented and/or misassembled over these regions. However, new lon...

  5. Effect of NMDA, a Specific Agonist to NMDA Receptor Complex, on Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Motin, V G; Yasnetsov, V V

    2015-10-01

    Removal of Mg2+ ions from perfusion medium provoked epileptiform activity in CA1 field of surviving rat hippocampal slices manifested in generation of extra population spikes. MK-801 (100 μM), a specific non-competitive antagonist to NMDA-receptor complex, prevented this effect. NMDA (20 μM), the specific agonist to this complex, produced no significant effect on the orthodromic population spikes, but when applied at concentrations of 30 or 40 μM, it inhibited them partially (by 21-28%) or almost completely (by 98-99%), correspondingly. Thus, depending on concentration, NMDA can inhibit the synaptic transmission in Schaffer collaterals-hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons axis without triggering the epileptiform activity. D-AP5 (50 μM), a competitive antagonist to NMDA-receptor complex, completely prevented the inhibitory effect of NMDA (40 μM). While MK-801 (100 μM) almost completely prevented the inhibitory effect of NMDA, it did not eliminate it when applied after the agonist. Thus, MK-801 can prevent the inhibitory action of NMDA on synaptic transmission in Schaffer collaterals-hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons axis via blocking the channel of NMDA-receptor complex, while NMDA exerts its effect only via activation of NMDA receptors.

  6. The role of leukocytes bearing Natural Killer Complex receptors and Killer Immunoglobulin-like Receptors in the immunology of malaria.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Diana S; D'Ombrain, Marthe C; Schofield, Louis

    2007-08-01

    The biology of Natural Killer (NK) cells and other NK Receptor (NKR)(+) leukocytes has largely been elucidated in viral or cancer systems, and involvement in other diseases or infectious states is less clearly defined. Recently, however, clear evidence has emerged for a role in malaria. NK cells and NKR(+) leukocytes significantly control susceptibility and resistance to both malaria infection and severe disease syndromes in murine models, in dependence upon receptors encoded within the Natural Killer Complex (NKC). Plasmodium falciparum can rapidly activate human NKR(+) gammadelta T cells and NK cells in vitro, and these responses are controlled partly by NKR loci encoded within the human syntenic NKC and Killer Immunoglobulin-like Receptor (KIR) genomic regions. Neither erythrocytes nor malaria parasites express HLA or MHC Class I-like homologues, or obvious stress-type ligands, suggesting the possibility of novel NKR recognition mechanisms. Parasite-derived ligands such as P. falciparum Erythrocyte Membrane Protein-1 (PfEMP-1) and glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) regulate some of these diverse responses. Population-based immunogenetic analyses should allow the identification of NKC and KIR loci controlling innate and adaptive immune responses to malaria and associated with altered risk of infection and disease.

  7. Membrane signalling complexes: implications for development of functionally selective ligands modulating heptahelical receptor signalling.

    PubMed

    Piñeyro, Graciela

    2009-02-01

    Technological development has considerably changed the way in which we evaluate drug efficacy and has led to a conceptual revolution in pharmacological theory. In particular, molecular resolution assays have revealed that heptahelical receptors may adopt multiple active conformations with unique signalling properties. It is therefore becoming widely accepted that ligand ability to stabilize receptor conformations with distinct signalling profiles may allow to direct the stimulus generated by an activated receptor towards a specific signalling pathway. This capacity to induce only a subset of the ensemble of responses regulated by a given receptor has been termed "functional selectivity" (or "stimulus trafficking"), and provides the bases for a highly specific regulation of receptor signalling. Concomitant with these observations, heptahelical receptors have been shown to associate with G proteins and effectors to form multimeric arrays. These complexes are constitutively formed during protein synthesis and are targeted to the cell surface as integral signalling units. Herein we summarize evidence supporting the existence of such constitutive signalling arrays and analyze the possibility that they may constitute viable targets for developing ligands with "functional selectivity".

  8. SERBP1 is a component of the Liver Receptor Homolog-1 transcriptional complex

    PubMed Central

    Mari, Yelenis; West, Graham M.; Scharager-Tapia, Catherina; Pascal, Bruce D.; Garcia-Ordonez, Ruben; Griffin, Patrick R.

    2016-01-01

    Liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH1) is an orphan nuclear receptor that has been shown to play a role in the transcriptional regulation of pathways involved in cancer. Elucidating the components of the LRH1 transcriptional complex to better understand endogenous regulation of the receptor as well as its role in cancer remains a high priority. A sub-cellular enrichment strategy coupled with proteomic approaches was employed to identify putative LRH1 coregulators. Nuclear fractionation protocol was essential for detection of LRH1 peptides by mass spectrometry (MS), with most peptides being observed in the insoluble fraction (receptor bound to DNA). SERBP1 and ILF3 were identified as LRH1 interacting partners by both western blot and MS/MS analysis. Receptor knockdown by siRNA showed an increased in SERBP1 expression while ILF3 expression was unchanged. In contrast, receptor overexpression decreased only SERBP1 mRNA levels. Consistent with these data, in a promoter:reporter assay, binding of LRH1 to the promoter region of SERBP1 resulted in a decrease in the expression level of the reporter gene, and subsequently, inhibiting transcription. Given the receptor’s role in cancer progression, the study here elucidates additional transcriptional machinery involved in LRH1 signaling and potentially provides new targets for therapeutics development. PMID:26398198

  9. [Progress in the ligands and their complex structures of farnesoid X receptor].

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Hu; Fu, Jing; Zheng, Ming-Yue; Liu, Gui-Xia; Tang, Yun

    2012-06-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily. It is highly related to the formation of metabolic syndrome and the glucose homeostasis, and therefore represents an important drug target against metabolic diseases and diabetes. In recent years, great progress has been made in the agonists, antagonists, and crystal structures of FXR. The diverse FXR ligands and their structure-activity relationship are reviewed in this article. The advances in the crystal structures of FXR in complex with different ligands are also introduced.

  10. Receptors of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor family in man. Multiple functions of the large family members via interaction with complex ligands.

    PubMed

    Gliemann, J

    1998-01-01

    The LDL receptor family members are endocytic receptors composed of repeated protein modules, including clusters of ligand binding LDL receptor class A (LA) repeats. The large (approximately 600 kDa) members LRP and megalin bind numerous structurally unrelated and often complex ligands at different combinations of sites. LRP is expressed in a wide but restricted set of cell types including hepatocytes, macrophages, smooth muscle cells, and neurons of the CNS. Megalin is expressed in various epithelia including proximal kidney tubules, intestine, and ependymal cells. The two receptors share a multitude of ligands, and their function in vivo is therefore to a large extent determined by their expression pattern. For example, both receptors can endocytose lipoproteins, but this function appears mainly relevant for LRP. In addition, LRP helps regulating urokinase receptor expression on the cell surface via ligand-mediated internalization followed by return of the naked urokinase receptor to the cell surface. Both receptors also have specialist functions. LRP is specific for binding of alpha2-macroglobulin-proteinase complexes and provides clearance of the complexes and of peptides, e.g. cytokines, associated with the complex. Megalin has important functions in vitamin B12 homeostasis since it specifically mediates uptake of the vitamin B12-transcobalamin complex and helps building a storage pool for the vitamin in the kidneys. Moreover, megalin binds cubilin, the recently identified receptor for B12-intrinsic factor complex, thus providing a mechanism for uptake of dietary vitamin B12. Finally, megalin specifically mediates uptake of apolipoprotein J/clusterin, a binding protein for the Abeta peptide implicated in Alzheimer's disease. The binding of multiple complex ligands that belong to distinct physiological systems provides a challenge in future studies aiming at elucidating the role of LRP and megalin in disease mechanisms.

  11. Asymmetrical Macromolecular Complex Formation of Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor 2 (LPA2) Mediates Gradient Sensing in Fibroblasts*

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Aixia; Moon, Changsuk; Zhang, Weiqiang; Sinha, Chandrima; Yarlagadda, Sunitha; Arora, Kavisha; Wang, Xusheng; Yue, Junming; Parthasarathi, Kaushik; Heil-Chapdelaine, Rick; Tigyi, Gabor; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.

    2014-01-01

    Chemotactic migration of fibroblasts toward growth factors relies on their capacity to sense minute extracellular gradients and respond to spatially confined receptor-mediated signals. Currently, mechanisms underlying the gradient sensing of fibroblasts remain poorly understood. Using single-particle tracking methodology, we determined that a lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) gradient induces a spatiotemporally restricted decrease in the mobility of LPA receptor 2 (LPA2) on chemotactic fibroblasts. The onset of decreased LPA2 mobility correlates to the spatial recruitment and coupling to LPA2-interacting proteins that anchor the complex to the cytoskeleton. These localized PDZ motif-mediated macromolecular complexes of LPA2 trigger a Ca2+ puff gradient that governs gradient sensing and directional migration in response to LPA. Disruption of the PDZ motif-mediated assembly of the macromolecular complex of LPA2 disorganizes the gradient of Ca2+ puffs, disrupts gradient sensing, and reduces the directional migration of fibroblasts toward LPA. Our findings illustrate that the asymmetric macromolecular complex formation of chemoattractant receptors mediates gradient sensing and provides a new mechanistic basis for models to describe gradient sensing of fibroblasts. PMID:25542932

  12. Transmitter receptors reveal segregation of the arcopallium/amygdala complex in pigeons (Columba livia).

    PubMed

    Herold, Christina; Paulitschek, Christina; Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Güntürkün, Onur; Zilles, Karl

    2018-02-15

    At the beginning of the 20th century it was suggested that a complex group of nuclei in the avian posterior ventral telencephalon is comparable to the mammalian amygdala. Subsequent findings, however, revealed that most of these structures share premotor characteristics, while some indeed constitute the avian amygdala. These developments resulted in 2004 in a change of nomenclature of these nuclei, which from then on were named arcopallial or amygdala nuclei and referred to as the arcopallium/amygdala complex. The structural basis for the similarities between avian and mammalian arcopallial and amygdala subregions is poorly understood. Therefore, we analyzed binding site densities for glutamatergic AMPA, NMDA and kainate, GABAergic GABA A , muscarinic M 1 , M 2 and nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh; α 4 β 2 subtype), noradrenergic α 1 and α 2 , serotonergic 5-HT 1A and dopaminergic D 1/5 receptors using quantitative in vitro receptor autoradiography combined with a detailed analysis of the cyto- and myelo-architecture. Our approach supports a segregation of the pigeon's arcopallium/amygdala complex into the following subregions: the arcopallium anterius (AA), the arcopallium ventrale (AV), the arcopallium dorsale (AD), the arcopallium intermedium (AI), the arcopallium mediale (AM), the arcopallium posterius (AP), the nucleus posterioris amygdalopallii pars basalis (PoAb) and pars compacta (PoAc), the nucleus taeniae amgygdalae (TnA) and the area subpallialis amygdalae (SpA). Some of these subregions showed further subnuclei and each region of the arcopallium/amygdala complex are characterized by a distinct multi-receptor density expression. Here we provide a new detailed map of the pigeon's arcopallium/amygdala complex and compare the receptor architecture of the subregions to their possible mammalian counterparts. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Structure of the CCR5 Chemokine Receptor-HIV Entry Inhibitor Maraviroc Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Qiuxiang; Zhu, Ya; Li, Jian

    2013-10-21

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor acts as a co-receptor for HIV-1 viral entry. Here we report the 2.7 angstrom–resolution crystal structure of human CCR5 bound to the marketed HIV drug maraviroc. The structure reveals a ligand-binding site that is distinct from the proposed major recognition sites for chemokines and the viral glycoprotein gp120, providing insights into the mechanism of allosteric inhibition of chemokine signaling and viral entry. A comparison between CCR5 and CXCR4 crystal structures, along with models of co-receptor–gp120-V3 complexes, suggests that different charge distributions and steric hindrances caused by residue substitutions may be major determinants of HIV-1 co-receptor selectivity.more » These high-resolution insights into CCR5 can enable structure-based drug discovery for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.« less

  14. Human orexin/hypocretin receptors form constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes with each other and with human CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Jäntti, Maria H., E-mail: maria.jantti@helsinki.fi; Mandrika, Ilona, E-mail: ilona@biomed.lu.lv; Kukkonen, Jyrki P., E-mail: jyrki.kukkonen@helsinki.fi

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • OX{sub 1} and OX{sub 2} orexin and CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptor dimerization was investigated. • Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer method was used. • All receptors readily formed constitutive homo- and heteromeric complexes. - Abstract: Human OX{sub 1} orexin receptors have been shown to homodimerize and they have also been suggested to heterodimerize with CB{sub 1} cannabinoid receptors. The latter has been suggested to be important for orexin receptor responses and trafficking. In this study, we wanted to assess the ability of the other combinations of receptors to also form similar complexes. Vectors for expression of human OX{sub 1},more » OX{sub 2} and CB{sub 1} receptors, C-terminally fused with either Renilla luciferase or GFP{sup 2} green fluorescent protein variant, were generated. The constructs were transiently expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, and constitutive dimerization between the receptors was assessed by bioluminescence energy transfer (BRET). Orexin receptor subtypes readily formed homo- and hetero(di)mers, as suggested by significant BRET signals. CB{sub 1} receptors formed homodimers, and they also heterodimerized with both orexin receptors. Interestingly, BRET efficiency was higher for homodimers than for almost all heterodimers. This is likely to be due to the geometry of the interaction; the putatively symmetric dimers may place the C-termini in a more suitable orientation in homomers. Fusion of luciferase to an orexin receptor and GFP{sup 2} to CB{sub 1} produced more effective BRET than the opposite fusions, also suggesting differences in geometry. Similar was seen for the OX{sub 1}–OX{sub 2} interaction. In conclusion, orexin receptors have a significant propensity to make homo- and heterodi-/oligomeric complexes. However, it is unclear whether this affects their signaling. As orexin receptors efficiently signal via endocannabinoid production to CB{sub 1} receptors, dimerization could be an

  15. M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor facilitates the endocytosis of mu opioid receptor mediated by morphine independently of the formation of heteromeric complexes.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Gimenez, Juan F; Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Milligan, Graeme

    2017-07-01

    Morphine inefficiency to induce the internalization of mu opioid (MOP) receptors observed in numerous experimental models constitutes a paradigm of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) functional selectivity. We recently described that activation of G αq/11 proteins through 5-HT 2A serotonin receptors co-expressed in the same cells facilitates MOP receptor endocytosis promoted by morphine. In order to explore whether a different G αq/11 coupled GPCR would emulate this effect, a double stable Flp-In T-REx HEK293 cell line permanently expressing MOP-YFP receptors along with FLAG-M3-Cerulean receptors expressed in an inducible manner was generated. Fluorescence microscopy examination of these cells revealed a co-distribution of both receptors mainly compartmentalized in plasma membrane. Concurrent stimulation with carbachol and morphine promoted MOP receptor internalization, desensitization and down-regulation and this facilitation was not dependent on PKC activation. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that FLAG-M3-Cerulean/MOP-YFP receptors interact forming heteromeric complexes in a time depending manner, i.e. the strongest interaction was detected after 96h of FLAG-M3-Cerulean induced expression. Under these experimental conditions, treatment of cells with carbachol plus morphine resulted in the internalization of both receptors within separated endocytic vesicles as visualized by confocal microscopy. This trafficking segregation observed for FLAG-M3-Cerulean and MOP-YFP receptors upon agonist stimulation suggests that this protein-protein interaction presents temporal and dynamic properties. Moreover, MOP-YFP receptor internalization facilitated by FLAG-M3-Cerulean receptors is independent of the constitution of heteromeric complexes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Time-dependence of biological activity induced by covalent insulin-receptor complexes in rat adipocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Schüttler, A; Diaconescu, C; Saunders, D J; Brandenburg, D

    1985-01-01

    Lipogenesis in isolated adipocyte preparations is stimulated when photosensitive insulin derivatives are attached covalently to specific receptors. This response was compared quantitatively with that to reversibly associated insulin, and it was shown that both covalent and reversible insulin-receptor complexes behave very similarly. The extent of stimulation of lipogenesis was studied as a function of time. Cells were incubated in buffer for various times before addition to vials containing 0 (basal) or 10 ng of monocomponent insulin/ml (maximal) and [U-3H]glucose. After 60 min, the toluene-soluble [3H]lipids were measured. The maximal stimulation induced by reversibly bound insulin was virtually constant over a period of 4 h. In contrast, adipocytes to which N alpha B2-(2-nitro-4-azidophenylacetyl)-des-PheB1-insulin had been covalently attached at the start of the experiment showed a loss of stimulation with time when incubated at 37 degrees C. This loss was decreased in the presence of lysosomotropic agents such as chloroquine at concentrations (approx. 200 microM) that had very little or no effect on the basal and maximal lipogenesis rates. A simple method was used to transform the measured rate of loss of stimulation into a rate of loss of effective units. A half-time of 80 min was calculated for the effective covalent insulin-receptor units in adipocytes at 37 degrees C at pH 7.4. This is very close to values reported by others for the internalization of covalent complexes in these cells, suggesting that this may be the causative event for the deactivation of the insulin-receptor unit. The inhibitory effect of chloroquine on the deactivation may indicate that the insulin-receptor complex can function even after internalization. PMID:3910030

  17. Modulating LPS signal transduction at the LPS receptor complex with synthetic Lipid A analogues.

    PubMed

    White, Aileen F B; Demchenko, Alexei V

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis, defined as a clinical syndrome brought about by an amplified and dysregulated inflammatory response to infections, is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Despite persistent attempts to develop treatment strategies to manage sepsis in the clinical setting, the basic elements of treatment have not changed since the 1960s. As such, the development of effective therapies for reducing inflammatory reactions and end-organ dysfunction in critically ill patients with sepsis remains a global priority. Advances in understanding of the immune response to sepsis provide the opportunity to develop more effective pharmaceuticals. This article details current information on the modulation of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) receptor complex with synthetic Lipid A mimetics. As the initial and most critical event in sepsis pathophysiology, the LPS receptor provides an attractive target for antisepsis agents. One of the well-studied approaches to sepsis therapy involves the use of derivatives of Lipid A, the membrane-anchor portion of an LPS, which is largely responsible for its endotoxic activity. This article describes the structural and conformational requirements influencing the ability of Lipid A analogues to compete with LPS for binding to the LPS receptor complex and to inhibit the induction of the signal transduction pathway by impairing LPS-initiated receptor dimerization. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. MODULATING LPS SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION AT THE LPS RECEPTOR COMPLEX WITH SYNTHETIC LIPID A ANALOGUES

    PubMed Central

    White, Aileen F. B.; Demchenko, Alexei V.

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis, defined as a clinical syndrome brought about by an amplified and dysregulated inflammatory response to infections, is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Despite persistent attempts to develop treatment strategies to manage sepsis in the clinical setting, the basic elements of treatment have not changed since the 1960s. As such, the development of effective therapies for reducing inflammatory reactions and end-organ dysfunction in critically ill patients with sepsis remains a global priority. Advances in understanding of the immune response to sepsis provide the opportunity to develop more effective pharmaceuticals. This article details current information on the modulation of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) receptor complex with synthetic Lipid A mimetics. As the initial and most critical event in sepsis pathophysiology, the LPS receptor provides an attractive target for antisepsis agents. One of the well-studied approaches to sepsis therapy involves the use of derivatives of Lipid A, the membrane-anchor portion of an LPS, which is largely responsible for its endotoxic activity. This article describes the structural and conformational requirements influencing the ability of Lipid A analogues to compete with LPS for binding to the LPS receptor complex and to inhibit the induction of the signal transduction pathway by impairing LPS-initiated receptor dimerization. PMID:25480508

  19. Dopamine receptors: homomeric and heteromeric complexes in L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Solís, Oscar; Moratalla, Rosario

    2018-02-07

    The current standard treatment for Parkinson disease focuses on restoring striatal dopamine levels using L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA). However, disease progression and chronic treatment are associated with motor side effects such as L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID). Dopamine receptor function is strongly associated with the mechanisms underlying LID. In fact, increased D1R signaling is associated with this motor side effect. Compelling evidence demonstrates that dopamine receptors in the striatum can form heteromeric complexes, and heteromerization can lead to changes in the functional and pharmacological properties of receptors compared to their monomeric subtypes. Currently, the most promising strategy for therapeutic intervention in dyskinesia originates from investigations of the D1R-D3R heteromers. Interestingly, there is a correlation between the expression of D1R-D3R heteromers and the development of LID. Moreover, D3R stimulation can potentiate the D1R signaling pathway. The aim of this review is to summarize current knowledge of the distinct roles of heteromeric dopaminergic receptor complexes in LID.

  20. Caffeine Inhibits the Activation of Hepatic Stellate Cells Induced by Acetaldehyde via Adenosine A2A Receptor Mediated by the cAMP/PKA/SRC/ERK1/2/P38 MAPK Signal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wanzhi; Wang, Qi; Zhao, Han; Yang, Feng; Lv, Xiongwen; Li, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation is an essential event during alcoholic liver fibrosis. Evidence suggests that adenosine aggravates liver fibrosis via the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR). Caffeine, which is being widely consumed during daily life, inhibits the action of adenosine. In this study, we attempted to validate the hypothesis that caffeine influences acetaldehyde-induced HSC activation by acting on A2AR. Acetaldehyde at 50, 100, 200, and 400 μM significantly increased HSC-T6 cells proliferation, and cell proliferation reached a maximum at 48 h after exposure to 200 μM acetaldehyde. Caffeine and the A2AR antagonist ZM241385 decreased the cell viability and inhibited the expression of procollagen type I and type III in acetaldehyde-induced HSC-T6 cells. In addition, the inhibitory effect of caffeine on the expression of procollagen type I was regulated by A2AR-mediated signal pathway involving cAMP, PKA, SRC, and ERK1/2. Interestingly, caffeine’s inhibitory effect on the expression of procollagen type III may depend upon the A2AR-mediated P38 MAPK-dependent pathway. Conclusions: Caffeine significantly inhibited acetaldehyde-induced HSC-T6 cells activation by distinct A2AR mediated signal pathway via inhibition of cAMP-PKA-SRC-ERK1/2 for procollagen type I and via P38 MAPK for procollagen type III. PMID:24682220

  1. Splice variants of the relaxin and INSL3 receptors reveal unanticipated molecular complexity.

    PubMed

    Muda, Marco; He, Chaomei; Martini, Paolo G V; Ferraro, Tania; Layfield, Sharon; Taylor, Deanne; Chevrier, Colette; Schweickhardt, Rene; Kelton, Christie; Ryan, Peter L; Bathgate, Ross A D

    2005-08-01

    LGR7 and LGR8 are G protein-coupled receptors that belong to the leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor (LGR) family, including the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), LH and FSH receptors. LGR7 and LGR8 stimulate cAMP production upon binding of the cognate ligands, relaxin and insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3), respectively. We cloned several novel splice variants of both LGR7 and LGR8 and analysed the function of four variants. LGR7.1 is a truncated receptor, including only the N-terminal region of the receptor and two leucine rich repeats. In contrast, LGR7.2, LGR7.10 and LGR 8.1 all contain an intact seven transmembrane domain and most of the extracellular region, lacking only one or two exons in the ectodomain. Our analysis demonstrates that although LGR7.10 and LGR8.1 are expressed at the cell surface, LGR7.2 is predominantly retained within cells and LGR7.1 is partially secreted. mRNA expression analysis revealed that several variants are co-expressed in various tissues. None of these variants were able to stimulate cAMP production following relaxin or INSL3 treatment. Unexpectedly, we did not detect any direct specific relaxin or INSL3 binding on any of the splice variants. The large number of receptor splice variants identified suggests an unforeseen complexity in the physiology of this novel hormone-receptor system.

  2. Structure of the nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor in complex with a peptide mimetic

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Aaron A.; Liu, Wei; Chun, Eugene

    2012-07-11

    Members of the opioid receptor family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are found throughout the peripheral and central nervous system, where they have key roles in nociception and analgesia. Unlike the 'classical' opioid receptors, {delta}, {kappa} and {mu} ({delta}-OR, {kappa}-OR and {mu}-OR), which were delineated by pharmacological criteria in the 1970s and 1980s, the nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) peptide receptor (NOP, also known as ORL-1) was discovered relatively recently by molecular cloning and characterization of an orphan GPCR. Although it shares high sequence similarity with classical opioid GPCR subtypes ({approx}60%), NOP has a markedly distinct pharmacology, featuring activation by the endogenous peptidemore » N/OFQ, and unique selectivity for exogenous ligands. Here we report the crystal structure of human NOP, solved in complex with the peptide mimetic antagonist compound-24 (C-24) (ref. 4), revealing atomic details of ligand-receptor recognition and selectivity. Compound-24 mimics the first four amino-terminal residues of the NOP-selective peptide antagonist UFP-101, a close derivative of N/OFQ, and provides important clues to the binding of these peptides. The X-ray structure also shows substantial conformational differences in the pocket regions between NOP and the classical opioid receptors {kappa} (ref. 5) and {mu} (ref. 6), and these are probably due to a small number of residues that vary between these receptors. The NOP-compound-24 structure explains the divergent selectivity profile of NOP and provides a new structural template for the design of NOP ligands.« less

  3. Stargazin regulates AMPA receptor trafficking through adaptor protein complexes during long-term depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Shinji; Kakegawa, Wataru; Budisantoso, Timotheus; Nomura, Toshihiro; Kohda, Kazuhisa; Yuzaki, Michisuke

    2013-11-01

    Long-term depression (LTD) underlies learning and memory in various brain regions. Although postsynaptic AMPA receptor trafficking mediates LTD, its underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unclear. Here we show that stargazin, a transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory protein, forms a ternary complex with adaptor proteins AP-2 and AP-3A in hippocampal neurons, depending on its phosphorylation state. Inhibiting the stargazin-AP-2 interaction disrupts NMDA-induced AMPA receptor endocytosis, and inhibiting that of stargazin-AP-3A abrogates the late endosomal/lysosomal trafficking of AMPA receptors, thereby upregulating receptor recycling to the cell surface. Similarly, stargazin’s interaction with AP-2 or AP-3A is necessary for low-frequency stimulus-evoked LTD in CA1 hippocampal neurons. Thus, stargazin has a crucial role in NMDA-dependent LTD by regulating two trafficking pathways of AMPA receptors—transport from the cell surface to early endosomes and from early endosomes to late endosomes/lysosomes—through its sequential binding to AP-2 and AP-3A.

  4. Antidepressants and seizure-interactions at the GABA-receptor chloride-ionophore complex

    SciTech Connect

    Malatynska, E.; Knapp, R.J.; Ikeda, M.

    1988-01-01

    Convulsive seizures are a potential side effect of antidepressant drug treatment and can be produced by all classes of antidepressants. It is also know that some convulsant and anticonvulsant drug actions are mediated by the GABA-receptor chloride-ionophore complex. Drugs acting at this complex appear to induce convulsions by inhibiting chloride conductance through the associated chloride channel. Using the method of GABA-stimulated /sup 36/Cl-uptake by rat cerebral cortical vesicles, we show that some antidepressant drugs can inhibit the GABA-receptor chloride uptake, and that the degree of chloride channel inhibition by these drugs correlates with the frequency of convulsive seizures induced bymore » them.« less

  5. Insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) forms a ribonucleoprotein complex associated with polysomes.

    PubMed

    Ozoe, Atsufumi; Sone, Meri; Fukushima, Toshiaki; Kataoka, Naoyuki; Arai, Toshiya; Chida, Kazuhiro; Asano, Tomoichiro; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro

    2013-08-02

    Insulin receptor substrates (IRSs) are known to play important roles in mediating intracellular insulin-like growth factors (IGFs)/insulin signaling. In this study, we identified components of messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) as IRS-1-associated proteins. IRS-1 complex formation analysis revealed that IRS-1 is incorporated into the complexes of molecular mass more than 1000 kDa, which were disrupted by treatment with RNase. Furthermore, oligo(dT) beads precipitated IRS-1 from cell lysates, showing that the IRS-1 complexes contained messenger RNA. Taken together with the data that IRS-1 was fractionated into the polysome-containing high-density fractions, we concluded that IRS-1 forms the novel complexes with mRNPs. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Extracellular complexes of the hematopoietic human and mouse CSF-1 receptor are driven by common assembly principles.

    PubMed

    Elegheert, Jonathan; Desfosses, Ambroise; Shkumatov, Alexander V; Wu, Xiongwu; Bracke, Nathalie; Verstraete, Kenneth; Van Craenenbroeck, Kathleen; Brooks, Bernard R; Svergun, Dmitri I; Vergauwen, Bjorn; Gutsche, Irina; Savvides, Savvas N

    2011-12-07

    The hematopoietic colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R or FMS) is essential for the cellular repertoire of the mammalian immune system. Here, we report a structural and mechanistic consensus for the assembly of human and mouse CSF-1:CSF-1R complexes. The EM structure of the complete extracellular assembly of the human CSF-1:CSF-1R complex reveals how receptor dimerization by CSF-1 invokes a ternary complex featuring extensive homotypic receptor contacts and striking structural plasticity at the extremities of the complex. Studies by small-angle X-ray scattering of unliganded hCSF-1R point to large domain rearrangements upon CSF-1 binding, and provide structural evidence for the relevance of receptor predimerization at the cell surface. Comparative structural and binding studies aiming to dissect the assembly principles of human and mouse CSF-1R complexes, including a quantification of the CSF-1/CSF-1R species cross-reactivity, show that bivalent cytokine binding to receptor coupled to ensuing receptor-receptor interactions are common denominators in extracellular complex formation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of receptor modification and temperature on dynamics of sensory complexes in Escherichia coli chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Extracellular stimuli in chemotaxis of Escherichia coli and other bacteria are processed by large clusters of sensory complexes. The stable core of these clusters is formed by transmembrane receptors, a kinase CheA, and an adaptor CheW, whereas adaptation enzymes CheR and CheB dynamically associate with the clusters via interactions with receptors and/or CheA. Several biochemical studies have indicated the dependence of the sensory complex stability on the adaptive modification state of receptors and/or on temperature, which may potentially allow environment-dependent tuning of its signalling properties. However, the extent of such regulation in vivo and its significance for chemotaxis remained unclear. Results Here we used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) to confirm in vivo that the exchange of CheA and CheW shows a modest dependency on the level of receptor modification/activity. An even more dramatic effect was observed for the exchange kinetics of CheR and CheB, indicating that their association with clusters may depend on the ability to bind substrate sites on receptors and on the regulatory phosphorylation of CheB. In contrast, environmental temperature did not have a discernible effect on stability of the cluster core. Strain-specific loss of E. coli chemotaxis at high temperature could instead be explained by a heat-induced reduction in the chemotaxis protein levels. Nevertheless, high basal levels of chemotaxis and flagellar proteins in common wild type strains MG1655 and W3110 enabled these strains to maintain their chemotactic ability up to 42°C. Conclusions Our results confirmed that clusters formed by less modified receptors are more dynamic, which can explain the previously observed adjustment of the chemotaxis response sensitivity according to the level of background stimulation. We further propose that the dependency of CheR exchange on the availability of unmethylated sites on receptors is important to improve the

  8. The adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, istradefylline enhances anti-parkinsonian activity induced by combined treatment with low doses of L-DOPA and dopamine agonists in MPTP-treated common marmosets.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Shin-ichi; Soshiroda, Kazuhiro; Okita, Eri; Kawai-Uchida, Mika; Mori, Akihisa; Jenner, Peter; Kanda, Tomoyuki

    2015-11-05

    The adenosine A2A receptor antagonist, istradefylline improves motor function in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) optimally treated with a combination of L-DOPA and a dopamine agonist without increasing the risk of troublesome dyskinesia. However, the effects of istradefylline on motor function when administered in combination with low dose of L-DOPA and dopamine agonists as occurs in early PD are unknown. We investigated whether istradefylline enhances the combined anti-parkinsonian effects of a suboptimal dose of L-DOPA and a threshold dose of either the non-ergot dopamine agonist, ropinirole or the ergot dopamine agonist, pergolide in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated common marmoset. Threshold doses of ropinirole (0.025-0.075 mg/kg p.o.) and pergolide (0.01 mg/kg p.o.) produced a weak anti-parkinsonian effect. Co-administration of a suboptimal dose of L-DOPA (2.5mg/kg p.o.) with threshold doses of the dopamine agonists enhanced their anti-parkinsonian effect that led to increased 'ON' time without dyskinesia appearing. Administering istradefylline (10mg/kg p.o.) with the threshold doses of dopamine agonists and the suboptimal dose of L-DOPA in a triple combination caused a further enhancement of the anti-parkinsonian response but dyskinesia was still absent. In early PD, dopamine agonists are often used as first-line monotherapy, but efficacy is usually lost within a few years, at which time L-DOPA is added but with the risk of dyskinesia appearance. These results show that istradefylline is effective in improving motor function in combination with low dose dopaminergic drug treatment without provoking dyskinesia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Ancient divergence of a complex family of immune-type receptor genes

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, John P.; Haire, Robert N.; Mueller, M. Gail; Litman, Ronda T.; Eason, Donna D.; Tinnemore, Deborah; Amemiya, Chris T.; Ota, Tatsuya

    2013-01-01

    Multigene families of activating/inhibitory receptors belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) regulate immunological and other cell–cell interactions. A new family of such genes, termed modular domain immune-type receptors (MDIRs), has been identified in the clearnose skate (Raja eglanteria), a phylogenetically ancient vertebrate. At least five different major forms of predicted MDIR proteins are comprised of four different subfamilies of IgSF ectodomains of the intermediate (I)- or C2-set. The predicted number of individual IgSF ectodomains in MDIRs varies from one to six. MDIR1 contains a positively charged transmembrane residue and MDIR2 and MDIR3 each possesses at least one immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif in their cytoplasmic regions. MDIR4 and MDIR5 lack characteristic activating/inhibitory signalling motifs. MDIRs are encoded in a particularly large and complex multigene family. MDIR domains exhibit distant sequence similarity to mammalian CMRF-35-like molecules, polymeric immunoglobulin receptors, triggering receptors expressed on myeloid cells (TREMs), TREM-like transcripts, NKp44 and FcR homologs, as well as to sequences identified in several different vertebrate genomes. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that MDIRs are representative members of an extended family of IgSF genes that diverged before or very early in evolution of the vertebrates and subsequently came to occupy multiple, fully independent distributions in the present day. PMID:16738934

  10. Topographic Studies of Torpedo Acetylcholine Receptor Subunits as a Transmembrane Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strader, Catherine D.; Raftery, Michael A.

    1980-10-01

    The exposure of the four subunits of the acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo californica on both the extracellular and cytoplasmic faces of the postsynaptic membranes of the electroplaque cells has been investigated. Sealed membrane vesicles containing no protein components other than the receptor were isolated and were shown to have 95% of their synaptic surfaces facing the medium. The susceptibility of the four receptor subunits in these preparations to hydrolysis by trypsin both from the external and from the internal medium was used to investigate the exposure of the subunits on the synaptic and cytoplasmic surfaces of the membrane. It was shown by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis of the tryptic products that all four subunits are exposed on the extracellular surface to a similar degree. All four subunits are also exposed on the internal surface of the membrane, but the apparent degree of exposure varies with the subunit size, the larger subunits being more exposed. The results are discussed in terms of a possible topographic model of the receptor as a transmembrane protein complex.

  11. ACR-12 ionotropic acetylcholine receptor complexes regulate inhibitory motor neuron activity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Petrash, Hilary A; Philbrook, Alison; Haburcak, Marian; Barbagallo, Belinda; Francis, Michael M

    2013-03-27

    Heterogeneity in the composition of neurotransmitter receptors is thought to provide functional diversity that may be important in patterning neural activity and shaping behavior (Dani and Bertrand, 2007; Sassoè-Pognetto, 2011). However, this idea has remained difficult to evaluate directly because of the complexity of neuronal connectivity patterns and uncertainty about the molecular composition of specific receptor types in vivo. Here we dissect how molecular diversity across receptor types contributes to the coordinated activity of excitatory and inhibitory motor neurons in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that excitatory and inhibitory motor neurons express distinct populations of ionotropic acetylcholine receptors (iAChRs) requiring the ACR-12 subunit. The activity level of excitatory motor neurons is influenced through activation of nonsynaptic iAChRs (Jospin et al., 2009; Barbagallo et al., 2010). In contrast, synaptic coupling of excitatory and inhibitory motor neurons is achieved through a second population of iAChRs specifically localized at postsynaptic sites on inhibitory motor neurons. Loss of ACR-12 iAChRs from inhibitory motor neurons leads to reduced synaptic drive, decreased inhibitory neuromuscular signaling, and variability in the sinusoidal motor pattern. Our results provide new insights into mechanisms that establish appropriately balanced excitation and inhibition in the generation of a rhythmic motor behavior and reveal functionally diverse roles for iAChR-mediated signaling in this process.

  12. Structural basis for receptor recognition of vitamin-B(12)-intrinsic factor complexes.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Christian Brix Folsted; Madsen, Mette; Storm, Tina; Moestrup, Søren K; Andersen, Gregers R

    2010-03-18

    Cobalamin (Cbl, vitamin B(12)) is a bacterial organic compound and an essential coenzyme in mammals, which take it up from the diet. This occurs by the combined action of the gastric intrinsic factor (IF) and the ileal endocytic cubam receptor formed by the 460-kilodalton (kDa) protein cubilin and the 45-kDa transmembrane protein amnionless. Loss of function of any of these proteins ultimately leads to Cbl deficiency in man. Here we present the crystal structure of the complex between IF-Cbl and the cubilin IF-Cbl-binding-region (CUB(5-8)) determined at 3.3 A resolution. The structure provides insight into how several CUB (for 'complement C1r/C1s, Uegf, Bmp1') domains collectively function as modular ligand-binding regions, and how two distant CUB domains embrace the Cbl molecule by binding the two IF domains in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. This dual-point model provides a probable explanation of how Cbl indirectly induces ligand-receptor coupling. Finally, the comparison of Ca(2+)-binding CUB domains and the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-type A modules suggests that the electrostatic pairing of a basic ligand arginine/lysine residue with Ca(2+)-coordinating acidic aspartates/glutamates is a common theme of Ca(2+)-dependent ligand-receptor interactions.

  13. Transforming Growth Factor-β Receptors and Smads: Regulatory Complexity and Functional Versatility.

    PubMed

    Budi, Erine H; Duan, Dana; Derynck, Rik

    2017-09-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β family proteins control cell physiology, proliferation, and growth, and direct cell differentiation, thus playing key roles in normal development and disease. The mechanisms of how TGF-β family ligands interact with heteromeric complexes of cell surface receptors to then activate Smad signaling that directs changes in gene expression are often seen as established. Even though TGF-β-induced Smad signaling may be seen as a linear signaling pathway with predictable outcomes, this pathway provides cells with a versatile means to induce different cellular responses. Fundamental questions remain as to how, at the molecular level, TGF-β and TGF-β family proteins activate the receptor complexes and induce a context-dependent diversity of cell responses. Among the areas of progress, we summarize new insights into how cells control TGF-β responsiveness by controlling the TGF-β receptors, and into the key roles and versatility of Smads in directing cell differentiation and cell fate selection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Complex between α-bungarotoxin and an α7 nicotinic receptor ligand-binding domain chimaera

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Sun; Li, Shu-Xing; Bren, Nina

    2013-09-01

    To identify high-affinity interactions between long-chain α-neurotoxins and nicotinic receptors, we determined the crystal structure of the complex between α-btx (α-bungarotoxin) and a pentameric ligand-binding domain constructed from the human α7 AChR (acetylcholine receptor) and AChBP (acetylcholine-binding protein). The complex buries ~2000 Å 2 (1 Å=0.1 nm) of surface area, within which Arg 36 and Phe 32 from finger II of α-btx form a π-cation stack that aligns edge-to-face with the conserved Tyr 184 from loop-C of α7, while Asp 30 of α-btx forms a hydrogen bond with the hydroxy group of Tyr 184. These inter-residue interactions diverge from thosemore » in a 4.2 Å structure of α-ctx (α-cobratoxin) bound to AChBP, but are similar to those in a 1.94 Å structure of α-btx bound to the monomeric α1 extracellular domain, although compared with the monomer-bound complex, the α-btx backbone exhibits a large shift relative to the protein surface. Mutational analyses show that replacing Tyr 184 with a threonine residue abolishes high-affinity α-btx binding, whereas replacing with a phenylalanine residue maintains high affinity. Comparison of the α-btx complex with that coupled to the agonist epibatidine reveals structural rearrangements within the binding pocket and throughout each subunit. The overall findings highlight structural principles by which α-neurotoxins interact with nicotinic receptors.« less

  15. Class I major histocompatibility complex anchor substitutions alter the conformation of T cell receptor contacts.

    PubMed

    Sharma, A K; Kuhns, J J; Yan, S; Friedline, R H; Long, B; Tisch, R; Collins, E J

    2001-06-15

    An immunogenic peptide (GP2) derived from HER-2/neu binds to HLA-A2.1 very poorly. Some altered-peptide ligands (APL) of GP2 have increased binding affinity and generate improved cytotoxic T lymphocyte recognition of GP2-presenting tumor cells, but most do not. Increases in binding affinity of single-substitution APL are not additive in double-substitution APL. A common first assumption about peptide binding to class I major histocompatibility complex is that each residue binds independently. In addition, immunologists interested in immunotherapy frequently assume that anchor substitutions do not affect T cell receptor contact residues. However, the crystal structures of two GP2 APL show that the central residues change position depending on the identity of the anchor residue(s). Thus, it is clear that subtle changes in the identity of anchor residues may have significant effects on the positions of the T cell receptor contact residues.

  16. Evidence for multivalent structure of T-cell antigen receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Exley, M; Wileman, T; Mueller, B; Terhorst, C

    1995-08-01

    The T-cell antigen receptor (alpha beta or gamma delta TCR) is known to associate with four polypeptides (CD3 gamma, delta, epsilon and zeta) to form the TCR-CD3 complex. Although the six chains are well characterized, the molecular mass of the TCR-CD3 complex and stoichiometry of the components are currently uncertain. We analysed the TCR of a T-T hybridoma which expresses two distinct heterodimers. When the hybridoma was incubated with a mAb (MR9.2) specific for the V alpha 10V beta 5.1 heterodimer, both of the heterodimers were lost from the cell surface, as measured with mAb MR9.2 and MR9.7 (V alpha 1V beta 1-specific). The ability to co-modulate V alpha 1V beta 1 and V alpha 10V beta 5.1 suggested that TCR complexes could contain two alpha beta-heterodimers. Density gradient sedimentation analysis provided further evidence for higher order TCR. The sedimentation patterns of the TCR were compared to that of the B-cell antigen receptor and the well-characterized VSV membrane G-protein as well as to soluble marker proteins. Maximal cell surface murine and human TCR sedimentation coefficients were substantially greater than the 9-10S predicted for a 210 kDa monovalent alpha beta gamma delta epsilon 2 zeta 2 structure. The TCR sedimented in mild non-ionic detergents as large 18 +/- 3S complexes co-migrating with a 443 kDa marker protein. In contrast, the IgM B-cell antigen receptor had a maximal sedimentation coefficient of 10 +/- 3S, consistent with a predicted size of approximately 300 kDa. Taken together, the results suggested that T-cell antigen receptors can contain more than one alpha beta-heterodimer which could be incorporated into a minimal divalent 10-chain TCR-CD3 complex (e.g. alpha beta gamma epsilon epsilon delta zeta zeta alpha beta).

  17. Heteroreceptor Complexes Formed by Dopamine D1, Histamine H3, and N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Glutamate Receptors as Targets to Prevent Neuronal Death in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ruiz, Mar; Moreno, Estefanía; Moreno-Delgado, David; Navarro, Gemma; Mallol, Josefa; Cortés, Antonio; Lluís, Carme; Canela, Enric I; Casadó, Vicent; McCormick, Peter J; Franco, Rafael

    2017-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder causing progressive memory loss and cognitive dysfunction. Anti-AD strategies targeting cell receptors consider them as isolated units. However, many cell surface receptors cooperate and physically contact each other forming complexes having different biochemical properties than individual receptors. We here report the discovery of dopamine D 1 , histamine H 3 , and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor heteromers in heterologous systems and in rodent brain cortex. Heteromers were detected by co-immunoprecipitation and in situ proximity ligation assays (PLA) in the rat cortex where H 3 receptor agonists, via negative cross-talk, and H 3 receptor antagonists, via cross-antagonism, decreased D 1 receptor agonist signaling determined by ERK1/2 or Akt phosphorylation, and counteracted D 1 receptor-mediated excitotoxic cell death. Both D 1 and H 3 receptor antagonists also counteracted NMDA toxicity suggesting a complex interaction between NMDA receptors and D 1 -H 3 receptor heteromer function. Likely due to heteromerization, H 3 receptors act as allosteric regulator for D 1 and NMDA receptors. By bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET), we demonstrated that D 1 or H 3 receptors form heteromers with NR1A/NR2B NMDA receptor subunits. D 1 -H 3 -NMDA receptor complexes were confirmed by BRET combined with fluorescence complementation. The endogenous expression of complexes in mouse cortex was determined by PLA and similar expression was observed in wild-type and APP/PS1 mice. Consistent with allosteric receptor-receptor interactions within the complex, H 3 receptor antagonists reduced NMDA or D 1 receptor-mediated excitotoxic cell death in cortical organotypic cultures. Moreover, H 3 receptor antagonists reverted the toxicity induced by ß 1-42 -amyloid peptide. Thus, histamine H 3 receptors in D 1 -H 3 -NMDA heteroreceptor complexes arise as promising targets to prevent neurodegeneration.

  18. Preassembly and ligand-induced restructuring of the chains of the IFN-gamma receptor complex: the roles of Jak kinases, Stat1 and the receptor chains.

    PubMed

    Krause, Christopher D; Lavnikova, Natasha; Xie, Junxia; Mei, Erwen; Mirochnitchenko, Olga V; Jia, Yiwei; Hochstrasser, Robin M; Pestka, Sidney

    2006-01-01

    We previously demonstrated using noninvasive technologies that the interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) receptor complex is preassembled (1). In this report we determined how the receptor complex is preassembled and how the ligand-mediated conformational changes occur. The interaction of Stat1 with IFN-gammaR1 results in a conformational change localized to IFN-gammaR1. Jak1 but not Jak2 is required for the two chains of the IFN-gamma receptor complex (IFN-gammaR1 and IFN-gammaR2) to interact; however, the presence of both Jak1 and Jak2 is required to see any ligand-dependant conformational change. Two IFN-gammaR2 chains interact through species-specific determinants in their extracellular domains. Finally, these determinants also participate in the interaction of IFN-gammaR2 with IFN-gammaR1. These results agree with a detailed model of the IFN-gamma receptor that requires the receptor chains to be pre-associated constitutively for the receptor to be active.

  19. Unfolding of the RAP-D3 helical bundle facilitates dissociation of RAP-receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Kristine; Fisher, Carl; Blacklow, Stephen C

    2008-02-12

    The receptor-associated protein (RAP) functions as an escort protein for receptors of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) family by preventing premature intracellular binding of ligands and assisting with delivery of mature receptors to the cell surface. The modulation of affinity by pH is believed to play an important role in the escort function of RAP, because RAP binds tightly to proteins of the LDLR family at near-neutral pH early in the secretory pathway where its high affinity precludes premature binding of ligands but then dissociates from bound receptors at the lower pH of the Golgi compartment. The third domain of RAP (RAP-D3), which forms a three-helix bundle, is sufficient to reconstitute the escort activity. Here, we test the hypothesis that low-pH induced unfolding of the RAP-D3 helical bundle facilitates dissociation of RAP-receptor complexes. First, variants of RAP-D3 resistant to low pH-induced unfolding were constructed by replacing interior histidine residues with phenylalanines. In contrast to native RAP-D3, which exhibits an unfolding pKa of 6.3 and a Tm of 42 degrees C, the most hyperstable variant of RAP-D3, in which four histidine residues are replaced with phenylalanine, has an unfolding pKa of 4.8, and a Tm of 58 degrees C. The phenylalanine substitutions in RAP-D3 confer increased stability to pH-induced dissociation of complexes formed between RAP-D3 and a two-repeat fragment of the LDLR (LA3-4). When introduced into full-length RAP, the four mutations that confer hyperstability on RAP-D3 interfere with transport of endogenous LRP-1 to the cell surface in a dominant negative fashion under conditions where expression of normal RAP has no effect on LRP-1 transport. Our studies support a model in which low pH-dependent unfolding of RAP-D3 facilitates dissociation of RAP from the LA repeats of LDLR family proteins in the mildly acidic pH of the Golgi.

  20. Complexation of Eu3+ with a macrocyclic lactam receptor: Experimental and theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makrlík, Emanuel; Záliš, Stanislav; Sedláková, Zdeňka; Vaňura, Petr

    2013-04-01

    From extraction experiments and γ-activity measurements, the extraction constant corresponding to the equilibrium Eu3+(aq) + 3A-(aq) + 1 (nb) ⇔1·Eu3+(nb) + 3A-(nb) taking place in the two-phase water-nitrobenzene system (A=CFSO3-; 1 = macrocyclic lactam receptor - see Scheme 1; aq = aqueous phase, nb = nitrobenzene phase) was evaluated as log Kex (1·Eu3+, 3A-) = -4.1 ± 0.1. Further, the stability constant of the 1·Eu3+ cationic complex in nitrobenzene saturated with water was calculated for a temperature of 25 °C: log βnb (1·Eu3+) = 9.0 ± 0.1. Finally, by using DFT calculations, the most probable structure of the cationic complex species 1·Eu3+ was derived. In the resulting 1·Eu3+ complex, the "central" cation Eu3+ is bound by five bond interactions to two ethereal oxygen atoms and two carbonyl oxygens, as well as to one carbon atom of the corresponding benzene ring of the parent macrocyclic lactam receptor 1 via cation-π interaction.

  1. Structures of Receptor Complexes of a North American H7N2 Influenza Hemagglutinin with a Loop Deletion in the Receptor Binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Hua; Chen, Li-Mei; Carney, Paul J.

    2012-02-21

    Human infections with subtype H7 avian influenza viruses have been reported as early as 1979. In 1996, a genetically stable 24-nucleotide deletion emerged in North American H7 influenza virus hemagglutinins, resulting in an eight amino acid deletion in the receptor-binding site. The continuous circulation of these viruses in live bird markets, as well as its documented ability to infect humans, raises the question of how these viruses achieve structural stability and functionality. Here we report a detailed molecular analysis of the receptor binding site of the North American lineage subtype H7N2 virus A/New York/107/2003 (NY107), including complexes with an avianmore » receptor analog (3'-sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine, 3'SLN) and two human receptor analogs (6'-sialyl-N-acetyllactosamine, 6'SLN; sialyllacto-N-tetraose b, LSTb). Structural results suggest a novel mechanism by which residues Arg220 and Arg229 (H3 numbering) are used to compensate for the deletion of the 220-loop and form interactions with the receptor analogs. Glycan microarray results reveal that NY107 maintains an avian-type ({alpha}2-3) receptor binding profile, with only moderate binding to human-type ({alpha}2-6) receptor. Thus despite its dramatically altered receptor binding site, this HA maintains functionality and confirms a need for continued influenza virus surveillance of avian and other animal reservoirs to define their zoonotic potential.« less

  2. Actin-Sorting Nexin 27 (SNX27)-Retromer Complex Mediates Rapid Parathyroid Hormone Receptor Recycling*

    PubMed Central

    McGarvey, Jennifer C.; Xiao, Kunhong; Bowman, Shanna L.; Mamonova, Tatyana; Zhang, Qiangmin; Bisello, Alessandro; Sneddon, W. Bruce; Ardura, Juan A.; Jean-Alphonse, Frederic; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Puthenveedu, Manojkumar A.; Friedman, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    The G protein-coupled parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR) regulates mineral-ion homeostasis and bone remodeling. Upon parathyroid hormone (PTH) stimulation, the PTHR internalizes into early endosomes and subsequently traffics to the retromer complex, a sorting platform on early endosomes that promotes recycling of surface receptors. The C terminus of the PTHR contains a type I PDZ ligand that binds PDZ domain-containing proteins. Mass spectrometry identified sorting nexin 27 (SNX27) in isolated endosomes as a PTHR binding partner. PTH treatment enriched endosomal PTHR. SNX27 contains a PDZ domain and serves as a cargo selector for the retromer complex. VPS26, VPS29, and VPS35 retromer subunits were isolated with PTHR in endosomes from cells stimulated with PTH. Molecular dynamics and protein binding studies establish that PTHR and SNX27 interactions depend on the PDZ recognition motif in PTHR and the PDZ domain of SNX27. Depletion of either SNX27 or VPS35 or actin depolymerization decreased the rate of PTHR recycling following agonist stimulation. Mutating the PDZ ligand of PTHR abolished the interaction with SNX27 but did not affect the overall rate of recycling, suggesting that PTHR may directly engage the retromer complex. Coimmunoprecipitation and overlay experiments show that both intact and mutated PTHR bind retromer through the VPS26 protomer and sequentially assemble a ternary complex with PTHR and SNX27. SNX27-independent recycling may involve N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor, which binds both PDZ intact and mutant PTHRs. We conclude that PTHR recycles rapidly through at least two pathways, one involving the ASRT complex of actin, SNX27, and retromer and another possibly involving N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor. PMID:27008860

  3. Unbiased Identification of T-Cell Receptors Targeting Immunodominant Peptide–MHC Complexes for T-Cell Receptor Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Felix K.M.; Ellinger, Christian; Kieback, Elisa; Wilde, Susanne; Lietz, Maria; Schendel, Dolores J.; Uckert, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) immunotherapy uses T cells engineered with new TCRs to enable detection and killing of cancer cells. Efficacy of TCR immunotherapy depends on targeting antigenic peptides that are efficiently presented by the best-suited major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules of cancer cells. However, efficient strategies are lacking to easily identify TCRs recognizing immunodominant peptide-MHC (pMHC) combinations utilizing any of the six possible MHC class I alleles of a cancer cell. We generated an MHC cell library and developed a platform approach to detect, isolate, and re-express TCRs specific for immunodominant pMHCs. The platform approach was applied to identify a human papillomavirus (HPV16) oncogene E5-specific TCR, recognizing a novel, naturally processed pMHC (HLA-B*15:01) and a cytomegalovirus-specific TCR targeting an immunodominant pMHC (HLA-B*07:02). The platform provides a useful tool to isolate in an unbiased manner TCRs specific for novel and immunodominant pMHC targets for use in TCR immunotherapy. PMID:28950731

  4. A multi-protein receptor-ligand complex underlies combinatorial dendrite guidance choices in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Wei; Shen, Ao; Dong, Xintong; Tugizova, Madina; Xiang, Yang K; Shen, Kang

    2016-01-01

    Ligand receptor interactions instruct axon guidance during development. How dendrites are guided to specific targets is less understood. The C. elegans PVD sensory neuron innervates muscle-skin interface with its elaborate dendritic branches. Here, we found that LECT-2, the ortholog of leukocyte cell-derived chemotaxin-2 (LECT2), is secreted from the muscles and required for muscle innervation by PVD. Mosaic analyses showed that LECT-2 acted locally to guide the growth of terminal branches. Ectopic expression of LECT-2 from seam cells is sufficient to redirect the PVD dendrites onto seam cells. LECT-2 functions in a multi-protein receptor-ligand complex that also contains two transmembrane ligands on the skin, SAX-7/L1CAM and MNR-1, and the neuronal transmembrane receptor DMA-1. LECT-2 greatly enhances the binding between SAX-7, MNR-1 and DMA-1. The activation of DMA-1 strictly requires all three ligands, which establishes a combinatorial code to precisely target and pattern dendritic arbors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18345.001 PMID:27705746

  5. Structure of the human histamine H1 receptor complex with doxepin

    PubMed Central

    Shimamura, Tatsuro; Shiroishi, Mitsunori; Weyand, Simone; Tsujimoto, Hirokazu; Winter, Graeme; Katritch, Vsevolod; Abagyan, Ruben; Cherezov, Vadim; Liu, Wei; Han, Gye Won; Kobayashi, Takuya; Stevens, Raymond C.; Iwata, So

    2011-01-01

    Summary The biogenic amine histamine is an important pharmacological mediator involved in pathophysiological processes such as allergies and inflammations. Histamine-H1 receptor (H1R) antagonists are very effective drugs alleviating the symptoms of allergic reactions. Here we show the crystal structure of H1R complex with doxepin, a first-generation H1R-antagonist. Doxepin sits deep in the ligand binding pocket and directly interacts with the highly conserved Trp4286.48, a key residue in GPCR activation. This well-conserved pocket with mostly hydrophobic nature contributes to low selectivity of the first-generation compounds. The pocket is associated with an anion-binding region occupied by a phosphate ion. Docking of various second-generation H1R-antagonists reveals that the unique carboxyl-group present in this class of compounds interacts with Lys1915.39 and/or Lys179ECL2, both of which form part of the anion-binding region. This region is not conserved in other aminergic receptors defining how minor differences in receptor lead to pronounced selectivity differences with small molecules. PMID:21697825

  6. Crystal structure of the β 2 adrenergic receptor-Gs protein complex

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Søren G.F.; DeVree, Brian T; Zou, Yaozhong

    2011-12-07

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are responsible for the majority of cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters as well as the senses of sight, olfaction and taste. The paradigm of GPCR signalling is the activation of a heterotrimeric GTP binding protein (G protein) by an agonist-occupied receptor. The β 2 adrenergic receptor (β 2AR) activation of Gs, the stimulatory G protein for adenylyl cyclase, has long been a model system for GPCR signalling. Here we present the crystal structure of the active state ternary complex composed of agonist-occupied monomeric β 2AR and nucleotide-free Gs heterotrimer. The principal interactions between the βmore » 2AR and Gs involve the amino- and carboxy-terminal α-helices of Gs, with conformational changes propagating to the nucleotide-binding pocket. The largest conformational changes in the β 2AR include a 14Å outward movement at the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane segment 6 (TM6) and an α-helical extension of the cytoplasmic end of TM5. The most surprising observation is a major displacement of the α-helical domain of Gαs relative to the Ras-like GTPase domain. This crystal structure represents the first high-resolution view of transmembrane signalling by a GPCR.« less

  7. Med1 subunit of the mediator complex in nuclear receptor-regulated energy metabolism, liver regeneration, and hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yuzhi; Viswakarma, Navin; Reddy, Janardan K

    2014-01-01

    Several nuclear receptors regulate diverse metabolic functions that impact on critical biological processes, such as development, differentiation, cellular regeneration, and neoplastic conversion. In the liver, some members of the nuclear receptor family, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), farnesoid X receptor (FXR), liver X receptor (LXR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), and others, regulate energy homeostasis, the formation and excretion of bile acids, and detoxification of xenobiotics. Excess energy burning resulting from increases in fatty acid oxidation systems in liver generates reactive oxygen species, and the resulting oxidative damage influences liver regeneration and liver tumor development. These nuclear receptors are important sensors of exogenous activators as well as receptor-specific endogenous ligands. In this regard, gene knockout mouse models revealed that some lipid-metabolizing enzymes generate PPARα-activating ligands, while others such as ACOX1 (fatty acyl-CoA oxidase1) inactivate these endogenous PPARα activators. In the absence of ACOX1, the unmetabolized ACOX1 substrates cause sustained activation of PPARα, and the resulting increase in energy burning leads to hepatocarcinogenesis. Ligand-activated nuclear receptors recruit the multisubunit Mediator complex for RNA polymerase II-dependent gene transcription. Evidence indicates that the Med1 subunit of the Mediator is essential for PPARα, PPARγ, CAR, and GR signaling in liver. Med1 null hepatocytes fail to respond to PPARα activators in that these cells do not show induction of peroxisome proliferation and increases in fatty acid oxidation enzymes. Med1-deficient hepatocytes show no increase in cell proliferation and do not give rise to liver tumors. Identification of nuclear receptor-specific coactivators and Mediator subunits should further our understanding of the complexities of metabolic

  8. Restored mutant receptor:Corticoid binding in chaperone complexes by trimethylamine N-oxide

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Aaron L.; Elam, W. Austin; Johnson, Betty H.; Khan, Shagufta H.; Kumar, Raj; Thompson, E. Brad

    2017-01-01

    Without a glucocorticoid (GC) ligand, the transcription factor glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is largely cytoplasmic, with its GC-binding domain held in high affinity conformation by a cluster of chaperones. Binding a GC causes serial dis- and re-associations with chaperones, translocation of the GR to the nucleus, where it binds to DNA sites and associates with coregulatory proteins and basic transcription complexes. Herein, we describe the effects of a potent protective osmolyte, trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), on a conditions-dependent “activation-labile” mutant GR (GRact/l), which under GR-activating conditions cannot bind GCs in cells or in cell cytosols. In both cells and cytosols, TMAO restores binding to GRact/l by stabilizing it in complex with chaperones. Cells bathed in much lower concentrations of TMAO than those required in vitro show restoration of GC binding, presumably due to intracellular molecular crowding effects. PMID:28301576

  9. The complex G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) interactome unveils new physiopathological targets

    PubMed Central

    Penela, Petronila; Murga, Cristina; Ribas, Catalina; Lafarga, Vanesa; Mayor, Federico

    2010-01-01

    GRK2 is a ubiquitous member of the G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK) family that appears to play a central, integrative role in signal transduction cascades. GRKs participate together with arrestins in the regulation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), a family of hundreds of membrane proteins of key physiological and pharmacological importance, by triggering receptor desensitization from G proteins and GPCR internalization, and also by helping assemble macromolecular signalosomes in the receptor environment acting as agonist-regulated adaptor scaffolds, thus contributing to signal propagation. In addition, emerging evidence indicates that GRK2 can phosphorylate a growing number of non-GPCR substrates and associate with a variety of proteins related to signal transduction, thus suggesting that this kinase could also have diverse ‘effector’ functions. We discuss herein the increasing complexity of such GRK2 ‘interactome’, with emphasis on the recently reported roles of this kinase in cell migration and cell cycle progression and on the functional impact of the altered GRK2 levels observed in several relevant cardiovascular, inflammatory or tumour pathologies. Deciphering how the different networks of potential GRK2 functional interactions are orchestrated in a stimulus, cell type or context-specific way is critical to unveil the contribution of GRK2 to basic cellular processes, to understand how alterations in GRK2 levels or functionality may participate in the onset or development of several cardiovascular, tumour or inflammatory diseases, and to assess the feasibility of new therapeutic strategies based on the modulation of the activity, levels or specific interactions of GRK2. PMID:20590581

  10. Conformational Plasticity in the Transsynaptic Neurexin-Cerebellin-Glutamate Receptor Adhesion Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Shouqiang; Seven, Alpay B.; Wang, Jing

    2016-12-01

    Synaptic specificity is a defining property of neural networks. In the cerebellum, synapses between parallel fiber neurons and Purkinje cells are specified by the simultaneous interactions of secreted protein cerebellin with pre-synaptic neurexin and post-synaptic delta-type glutamate receptors (GluD). Here, we determined the crystal structures of the trimeric C1q-like domain of rat cerebellin-1, and the first complete ectodomain of a GluD, rat GluD2. Cerebellin binds to the LNS6 domain of α- and β-neurexin-1 through a high-affinity interaction that involves its highly flexible N-terminal domain. In contrast, we show that the interaction of cerebellin with isolated GluD2 ectodomain is low affinity,more » which is not simply an outcome of lost avidity when compared with binding with a tetrameric full-length receptor. Rather, high-affinity capture of cerebellin by post-synaptic terminals is likely controlled by long-distance regulation within this transsynaptic complex. Altogether, our results suggest unusual conformational flexibility within all components of the complex.« less

  11. Structure and Dynamics of the Liver Receptor Homolog 1-PGC1α Complex.

    PubMed

    Mays, Suzanne G; Okafor, C Denise; Tuntland, Micheal L; Whitby, Richard J; Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Stec, Józef; Griffin, Patrick R; Ortlund, Eric A

    2017-07-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated gamma coactivator 1- α (PGC1 α ) regulates energy metabolism by directly interacting with transcription factors to modulate gene expression. Among the PGC1 α binding partners is liver receptor homolog 1 (LRH-1; NR5A2), an orphan nuclear hormone receptor that controls lipid and glucose homeostasis. Although PGC1 α is known to bind and activate LRH-1, mechanisms through which PGC1 α changes LRH-1 conformation to drive transcription are unknown. Here, we used biochemical and structural methods to interrogate the LRH-1-PGC1 α complex. Purified, full-length LRH-1, as well as isolated ligand binding domain, bound to PGC1 α with higher affinity than to the coactivator, nuclear receptor coactivator-2 (Tif2), in coregulator peptide recruitment assays. We present the first crystal structure of the LRH-1-PGC1 α complex, which depicts several hydrophobic contacts and a strong charge clamp at the interface between these partners. In molecular dynamics simulations, PGC1 α induced correlated atomic motion throughout the entire LRH-1 activation function surface, which was dependent on charge-clamp formation. In contrast, Tif2 induced weaker signaling at the activation function surface than PGC1 α but promoted allosteric signaling from the helix 6/ β -sheet region of LRH-1 to the activation function surface. These studies are the first to probe mechanisms underlying the LRH-1-PGC1 α interaction and may illuminate strategies for selective therapeutic targeting of PGC1 α -dependent LRH-1 signaling pathways. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  12. Structure and Dynamics of the Liver Receptor Homolog 1–PGC1 α Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Mays, Suzanne G.; Okafor, C. Denise; Tuntland, Micheal L.

    2017-03-31

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated gamma coactivator 1-α (PGC1α) regulates energy metabolism by directly interacting with transcription factors to modulate gene expression. Among the PGC1α binding partners is liver receptor homolog 1 (LRH-1; NR5A2), an orphan nuclear hormone receptor that controls lipid and glucose homeostasis. Although PGC1α is known to bind and activate LRH-1, mechanisms through which PGC1α changes LRH-1 conformation to drive transcription are unknown. Here, we used biochemical and structural methods to interrogate the LRH-1–PGC1α complex. Purified, full-length LRH-1, as well as isolated ligand binding domain, bound to PGC1α with higher affinity than to the coactivator, nuclear receptor coactivator-2 (Tif2), inmore » coregulator peptide recruitment assays. We present the first crystal structure of the LRH-1–PGC1α complex, which depicts several hydrophobic contacts and a strong charge clamp at the interface between these partners. In molecular dynamics simulations, PGC1α induced correlated atomic motion throughout the entire LRH-1 activation function surface, which was dependent on charge-clamp formation. In contrast, Tif2 induced weaker signaling at the activation function surface than PGC1α but promoted allosteric signaling from the helix 6/β-sheet region of LRH-1 to the activation function surface. These studies are the first to probe mechanisms underlying the LRH-1–PGC1α interaction and may illuminate strategies for selective therapeutic targeting of PGC1α-dependent LRH-1 signaling pathways.« less

  13. Pharmacological characterisation and inhibitory effects of (2R,3R,4S,5R)-2-(6-amino-2-{[(1S)-2-hydroxy-1-(phenylmethyl)ethyl]amino}-9H-purin-9-yl)-5-(2-ethyl-2H-tetrazol-5-yl)tetrahydro-3,4-furandiol, a novel ligand that demonstrates both adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist and adenosine A(3) receptor antagonist activity.

    PubMed

    Bevan, Nicola; Butchers, Peter R; Cousins, Rick; Coates, Jill; Edgar, Emma V; Morrison, Val; Sheehan, Michael J; Reeves, Julian; Wilson, David J

    2007-06-14

    The pharmacological properties of the novel ligand, (2R,3R,4S,5R)-2-(6-amino-2-{[(1S)-2-hydroxy-1-(phenylmethyl)ethyl]amino}-9H-purin-9-yl)-5-(2-ethyl-2H-tetrazol-5-yl)tetrahydro-3,4-furandiol (I), at the human adenosine receptors were investigated using Chinese hamster ovary cell lines recombinantly expressing these receptors. Functional studies were performed using a cyclic AMP-coupled reporter gene system. Binding studies were performed using membranes from these cells. The effects of ligand (I) were also determined on functional responses of human neutrophils and eosinophils. Ligand (I) had a high affinity for the adenosine A(2A) receptor (pKi 7.8+/-0.2) and was a potent agonist at this receptor (pEC(50) 9.0+/-0.2). Ligand (I) had a similar affinity for the adenosine A(3) receptor (pKi 7.8+/-0.1) but displayed no agonist activity, acting instead as a competitive antagonist (pA(2) 8.3+/-0.04). Ligand (I) had lower affinity for adenosine A(1) and A(2B) receptors (pKireceptors (pEC(50) 7.1 at both receptors). Ligand (I) was a potent inhibitor of the generation of reactive oxygen species from human neutrophils and eosinophils (pEC(50) 9.7+/-0.1 and 9.4+/-0.2 respectively). The inhibitory effect of ligand (I) on the release of reactive oxygen species from neutrophils was antagonised competitively by the adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist 9-chloro-2-(2-furanyl)-[1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-amine (CGS15943) with a pA(2) value (10.03+/-0.44) consistent with an effect on adenosine A(2A) receptors. Ligand (I) also inhibited the release of granule proteins from neutrophils and eosinophils (pEC(50) 8.7 and 8.9 respectively), albeit less potently than as an inhibitor of reactive oxygen species generation. In summary, ligand (I) is a potent and selective agonist for the adenosine A(2A) receptor and a competitive antagonist at the adenosine A(3) receptor. Ligand (I) has potent anti-inflammatory effects on human

  14. Association of Rgs7/Gβ5 complexes with Girk channels and GABAB receptors in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Serrano, Ana; Wydeven, Nicole; Young, Daniele; Watanabe, Masahiko; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Martemyanov, Kirill A; Wickman, Kevin; Luján, Rafael

    2013-12-01

    In the hippocampus, signaling through G protein-coupled receptors is modulated by Regulators of G protein signaling (Rgs) proteins, which act to stimulate the rate of GTP hydrolysis, and consequently, G protein inactivation. The R7-Rgs subfamily selectively deactivates the G(i/o)-class of Gα subunits that mediate the action of several GPCRs. Here, we used co-immunoprecipitation, electrophysiology and immunoelectron microscopy techniques to investigate the formation of macromolecular complexes and spatial relationship of Rgs7/Gβ5 complexes and its prototypical signaling partners, the GABAB receptor and Girk channel. Co-expression of recombinant GABAB receptors and Girk channels in combination with co-immunoprecipitation experiments established that the Rgs7/Gβ5 forms complexes with GABAB receptors or Girk channels. Using electrophysiological experiments, we found that GABAB -Girk current deactivation kinetics was markedly faster in cells coexpressing Rgs7/Gβ5. At the electron microscopic level, immunolabeling for Rgs7 and Gβ5 proteins was found primarily in the dendritic layers of the hippocampus and showed similar distribution patterns. Immunoreactivity was mostly localized along the extrasynaptic plasma membrane of dendritic shafts and spines of pyramidal cells and, to a lesser extent, to that of presynaptic terminals. Quantitative analysis of immunogold particles for Rgs7 and Gβ5 revealed an enrichment of the two proteins around excitatory synapses on dendritic spines, virtually identical to that of Girk2 and GABAB1 . These data support the existence of macromolecular complexes composed of GABAB receptor-G protein-Rgs7-Girk channels in which Rgs7 and Gβ5 proteins may preferentialy modulate GABAB receptor signaling through the deactivation of Girk channels on dendritic spines. In contrast, Rgs7 and Girk2 were associated but mainly segregated from GABAB1 in dendritic shafts, where Rgs7/Gβ5 signaling complexes might modulate Girk-dependent signaling via a

  15. Association of Rgs7/Gβ5 complexes with Girk channels and GABAB receptors in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Fajardo-Serrano, Ana; Wydeven, Nicole; Young, Daniele; Watanabe, Masahiko; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Martemyanov, Kirill A.; Wickman, Kevin; Luján, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In the hippocampus, signalling through G protein-coupled receptors is modulated by Regulators of G protein Signalling (Rgs) proteins, which act to stimulate the rate of GTP hydrolysis, and consequently, G protein inactivation. The R7-Rgs subfamily selectively deactivates the Gi/o-class of Gα subunits that mediate the action of several GPCRs. Here, we used co-immunoprecipitation, electrophysiology and immunoelectron microscopy techniques to investigate the formation of macromolecular complexes and spatial relationship of Rgs7/Gβ5 complexes and its prototypical signalling partners, the GABAB receptor and Girk channel. Co-expression of recombinant GABAB receptors and Girk channels in combination with co-immunoprecipitation experiments established that the Rgs7/Gβ5 forms complexes with GABAB receptors or Girk channels. Using electrophysiological experiments, we found that GABAB-Girk current deactivation kinetics was markedly faster in cells co-expressing Rgs7/Gβ5. At the electron microscopic level, immunolabelling for Rgs7 and Gβ5 proteins was found primarily in the dendritic layers of the hippocampus and showed similar distribution patterns. Immunoreactivity was mostly localized along the extrasynaptic plasma membrane of dendritic shafts and spines of pyramidal cells and, to a lesser extent, to that of presynaptic terminals. Quantitative analysis of immunogold particles for Rgs7 and Gβ5 revealed an enrichment of the two proteins around excitatory synapses on dendritic spines, virtually identical to that of Girk2 and GABAB1. These data support the existence of macromolecular complexes composed of GABAB receptor-G protein-Rgs7-Girk channels, in which Rgs7 and Gβ5 proteins may preferentially modulate GABAB receptor signalling through the deactivation of Girk channels on dendritic spines. In contrast, Rgs7 and Girk2 were associated but mainly segregated from GABAB1 in dendritic shafts, where Rgs7/Gβ5 signalling complexes might modulate Girk-dependent signalling

  16. Molecular modeling of the complex between Torpedo acetylcholine receptor and anti-MIR Fab198.

    PubMed

    Konstantakaki, Maria; Tzartos, Socrates J; Poulas, Konstantinos; Eliopoulos, Elias

    2007-05-11

    Myasthenia gravis is a neuromuscular disorder caused by an antibody-mediated autoimmune response to the muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AChR). The majority of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) produced in rats immunized with intact AChR compete with each other for binding to an area of the alpha-subunit called the main immunogenic region (MIR). The availability of a complex between the AChR and Fab198 (Fab fragment of the anti-MIR mAb198) would help understand how the antigen and antibody interact and in designing improved antibody fragments that protect against the destructive activity of myasthenic antibodies. In the present study, we modeled the Torpedo AChR/Fab198 complex, based primarily on the recent 4A resolution structure of the Torpedo AChR. In order to computationally dock the two structures, we used the ZDOCK software. The total accessible surface area change of the complex compared to those of experimentally determined antigen-antibody complexes indicates an intermediate size contact surface. CDRs H3 and L3 seem to contribute most to the binding, while L2 seems to contribute least. These data suggest mutagenesis experiments aimed at validating the model and improving the binding affinity of Fab198 for the AChR.

  17. Structural Evidence for a Germline-Encoded T Cell Receptor - Major Histocompatibility Complex Interaction 'Codon'

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, D.; Bond, C.J.; Ely, L.K.

    2009-06-02

    All complexes of T cell receptors (TCRs) bound to peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) molecules assume a stereotyped binding 'polarity', despite wide variations in TCR-pMHC docking angles. However, existing TCR-pMHC crystal structures have failed to show broadly conserved pairwise interaction motifs. Here we determined the crystal structures of two TCRs encoded by the variable {beta}-chain 8.2 (V{sub {beta}}8.2), each bound to the MHC class II molecule I-A{sup u}, and did energetic mapping of V{sub {alpha}} and V{sub {beta}} contacts with I-A{sup u}. Together with two previously solved structures of V{sub {beta}}8.2-containing TCR-MHC complexes, we found four TCR-I-A complexes with structurally superimposablemore » interactions between the V{sub {beta}} loops and the I-A {alpha}-helix. This examination of a narrow 'slice' of the TCR-MHC repertoire demonstrates what is probably one of many germline-derived TCR-MHC interaction 'codons'.« less

  18. Adenosine A2 receptor activation ameliorates mitochondrial oxidative stress upon reperfusion through the posttranslational modification of NDUFV2 subunit of complex I in the heart.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingman; Bian, Xiyun; Liu, Yuan; Hong, Lan; Teng, Tianming; Sun, Yuemin; Xu, Zhelong

    2017-05-01

    While it is well known that adenosine receptor activation protects the heart from ischemia/reperfusion injury, the precise mitochondrial mechanism responsible for the action remains unknown. This study probed the mitochondrial events associated with the cardioprotective effect of 5'-(N-ethylcarboxamido) adenosine (NECA), an adenosine A 2 receptor agonist. Isolated rat hearts were subjected to 30min ischemia followed by 10min of reperfusion, whereas H9c2 cells experienced 20min ischemia and 10min reperfusion. NECA prevented mitochondrial structural damage, decreases in respiratory control ratio (RCR), and collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). Both the adenosine A 2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 and A 2B receptor antagonist MRS1706 inhibited the action of NECA. NECA reduced mitochondrial proteins carbonylation, H 2 O 2 , and superoxide generation at reperfusion, but did not change superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. In support, the protective effects of NECA and Peg-SOD on ΔΨm upon reperfusion were additive, implying that NECA's protection is attributable to the reduced superoxide generation but not to the enhancement of the superoxide-scavenging capacity. NECA increased the mitochondrial Src tyrosine kinase activity and suppressed complex I activity at reperfusion in a Src-dependent manner. NECA also reduced mitochondrial superoxide through Src tyrosine kinase. Studies with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometer (LC-MS) identified Tyr118 of the NDUFV2 subunit of complex 1 as a likely site of the tyrosine phosphorylation. Furthermore, the complex I activity of cells transfected with the Y118F mutant was increased, suggesting that this site might be a negative regulator of complex I activity. In support, NECA failed to suppress complex I activity at reperfusion in cells transfected with the Y118F mutant of NDUFV2. In conclusion, NECA prevents mitochondrial oxidative stress by decreasing mitochondrial superoxide generation through inhibition of

  19. Complex receptor-ligand dynamics control the response of the VEGF system to protease injury

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Vascular homeostasis and response to injury are dependent on the coordinated activity of growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF). VEGF signaling is mediated by VEGF receptors 1 (VEGFR1) and 2 (VEGFR2). VEGF also binds to extracellular matrix (ECM) and neuropilin (NP), a cell surface glycoprotein that enhances VEGF binding to VEGFR2 while inhibiting VEGF-VEGFR1 interactions. Proteases such as neutrophil elastase release VEGF bound to ECM; however, this results in proteolytic processing of VEGF to a smaller species termed VEGF fragment (VEGFf). We hypothesized that the generation and presence of VEGFf would have significant effects on the binding distribution of VEGF. Results We show that VEGFf, unlike VEGF, does not bind ECM, fibronectin, or NP-1. Using computational simulations, we find that excess VEGFf can lead to increased binding of VEGF to VEGFR2 through VEGFf binding to VEGFR1 and subsequent liberation of NP-1. We show experimentally that VEGF-induced migration has a biphasic response to conversion of VEGF to VEGFf. Simulations suggest that a simple change in VEGFR1 or VEGFR2 complexes are unlikely to be responsible and that a more complex integration of signals is more likely involved. Conclusions These findings suggest that proteolytic damage at sites of tissue injury and inflammation has the potential to modulate the VEGF system through a complex process and highlight the need for quantitative analysis to reveal mechanisms of growth factor control. PMID:22014244

  20. Unliganded Thyroid Hormone Receptor Regulates Metamorphic Timing via the Recruitment of Histone Deacetylase Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Anuran metamorphosis involves a complex series of tissue transformations that change an aquatic tadpole to a terrestrial frog and resembles the postembryonic perinatal period in mammals. Thyroid hormone (TH) plays a causative role in amphibian metamorphosis and its effect is mediated by TH receptors (TRs). Molecular analyses during Xenopus development have shown that unliganded TR recruits histone deacetylase (HDAC)-containing N-CoR/SMRT complexes and causes histone deacetylation at target genes while liganded TR leads to increased histone acetylations and altered histone methylations at target genes. Transgenic studies involving mutant TR-cofactors have shown that corepressor recruitment by unliganded TR is required to ensure proper timing of the onset of metamorphosis while coactivator levels influence the rate of metamorphic progression. In addition, a number of factors that can influence cellular free TH levels appear to contribute the timing of metamorphic transformations of different organs by regulating the levels of unliganded vs. liganded TR in an organ-specific manner. Thus, the recruitment of HDAC-containing corepressor complexes by unliganded TR likely controls both the timing of the initiation of metamorphosis and the temporal regulation of organ-specific transformations. Similar mechanisms likely mediate TR function in mammals as the maturation of many organs during postembryonic development is dependent upon TH and resembles organ metamorphosis in amphibians. PMID:23962846

  1. Unliganded thyroid hormone receptor regulates metamorphic timing via the recruitment of histone deacetylase complexes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yun-Bo

    2013-01-01

    Anuran metamorphosis involves a complex series of tissue transformations that change an aquatic tadpole to a terrestrial frog and resembles the postembryonic perinatal period in mammals. Thyroid hormone (TH) plays a causative role in amphibian metamorphosis and its effect is mediated by TH receptors (TRs). Molecular analyses during Xenopus development have shown that unliganded TR recruits histone deacetylase (HDAC)-containing N-CoR/SMRT complexes and causes histone deacetylation at target genes while liganded TR leads to increased histone acetylations and altered histone methylations at target genes. Transgenic studies involving mutant TR-cofactors have shown that corepressor recruitment by unliganded TR is required to ensure proper timing of the onset of metamorphosis while coactivator levels influence the rate of metamorphic progression. In addition, a number of factors that can influence cellular free TH levels appear to contribute the timing of metamorphic transformations of different organs by regulating the levels of unliganded vs. liganded TR in an organ-specific manner. Thus, the recruitment of HDAC-containing corepressor complexes by unliganded TR likely controls both the timing of the initiation of metamorphosis and the temporal regulation of organ-specific transformations. Similar mechanisms likely mediate TR function in mammals as the maturation of many organs during postembryonic development is dependent upon TH and resembles organ metamorphosis in amphibians. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Low Resolution Structure and Dynamics of a Colicin-Receptor Complex Determined by Neutron Scattering*

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, Luke A.; Johnson, Christopher L.; Solovyova, Alexandra S.; Callow, Phil; Weiss, Kevin L.; Ridley, Helen; Le Brun, Anton P.; Kinane, Christian J.; Webster, John R. P.; Holt, Stephen A.; Lakey, Jeremy H.

    2012-01-01

    Proteins that translocate across cell membranes need to overcome a significant hydrophobic barrier. This is usually accomplished via specialized protein complexes, which provide a polar transmembrane pore. Exceptions to this include bacterial toxins, which insert into and cross the lipid bilayer itself. We are studying the mechanism by which large antibacterial proteins enter Escherichia coli via specific outer membrane proteins. Here we describe the use of neutron scattering to investigate the interaction of colicin N with its outer membrane receptor protein OmpF. The positions of lipids, colicin N, and OmpF were separately resolved within complex structures by the use of selective deuteration. Neutron reflectivity showed, in real time, that OmpF mediates the insertion of colicin N into lipid monolayers. This data were complemented by Brewster Angle Microscopy images, which showed a lateral association of OmpF in the presence of colicin N. Small angle neutron scattering experiments then defined the three-dimensional structure of the colicin N-OmpF complex. This revealed that colicin N unfolds and binds to the OmpF-lipid interface. The implications of this unfolding step for colicin translocation across membranes are discussed. PMID:22081604

  3. Force field-based conformational searches: efficiency and performance for peptide receptor complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebner, Christoph; Niebling, Stephan; Schmuck, Carsten; Schlücker, Sebastian; Engels, Bernd

    2013-09-01

    Conformational search using force field methods on complex biomolecular systems is a key factor in understanding molecular and structural properties. The reliability of such investigations strongly depends on the efficiency of the conformational search algorithm as well as the accuracy of the employed force field. In the present work we compared the performance of two different approaches: the Monte-Carlo multiple minimum/low mode sampling (MCMM/LM), in combination with the OPLS2005 (MCMM/LM//OPLS2005), and Tabu-Search combined with Basin Hopping (TS/BH), employing the original OPLS-AA implementation proposed by Jorgensen (TS/BH//OPLS-AA). We investigated their performance in locating energetically low-lying structures and the efficiency in scanning the conformational phase space of non-covalently bonded complexes. As test systems we employed complexes of the artificial peptide receptor CBS-KKF with four different tetrapeptide ligands. The reliability and the accuracy of both approaches were examined by re-optimising all low-energy structures employing density functional theory with empirical dispersion correction in combination with triple zeta basis sets. Solvent effects were mimicked by a continuum solvent model. In all the four-test systems, the TS/BH//OPLS-AA approach yielded structures that are much lower in energy after the DFT optimisation. Additionally, it provided many low-lying structures that were not identified by the MCMM/LM//OPLS2005 approach.

  4. Ruthenium complexes with phenylterpyridine derivatives target cell membrane and trigger death receptors-mediated apoptosis in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhiqin; Gao, Pan; Yu, Lianling; Ma, Bin; You, Yuanyuan; Chan, Leung; Mei, Chaoming; Chen, Tianfeng

    2017-06-01

    Elucidation of the communication between metal complexes and cell membrane may provide useful information for rational design of metal-based anticancer drugs. Herein we synthesized a novel class of ruthenium (Ru) complexes containing phtpy derivatives (phtpy = phenylterpyridine), analyzed their structure-activity relationship and revealed their action mechanisms. The result showed that, the increase in the planarity of hydrophobic Ru complexes significantly enhanced their lipophilicity and cellular uptake. Meanwhile, the introduction of nitro group effectively improved their anticancer efficacy. Further mechanism studies revealed that, complex (2c), firstly accumulated on cell membrane and interacted with death receptors to activate extrinsic apoptosis signaling pathway. The complex was then transported into cell cytoplasm through transferrin receptor-mediated endocytosis. Most of the intracellular 2c accumulated in cell plasma, decreasing the level of cellular ROS, inducing the activation of caspase-9 and thus intensifying the apoptosis. At the same time, the residual 2c can translocate into cell nucleus to interact with DNA, induce DNA damage, activate p53 pathway and enhance apoptosis. Comparing with cisplatin, 2c possesses prolonged circulation time in blood, comparable antitumor ability and importantly, much lower toxicity in vivo. Taken together, this study uncovers the role of membrane receptors in the anticancer actions of Ru complexes, and provides fundamental information for rational design of membrane receptor targeting anticancer drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Determining the Roles of Inositol Trisphosphate Receptors in Neurodegeneration: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on a Complex Topic.

    PubMed

    Takada, Silvia Honda; Ikebara, Juliane Midori; de Sousa, Erica; Cardoso, Débora Sterzeck; Resende, Rodrigo Ribeiro; Ulrich, Henning; Rückl, Martin; Rüdiger, Sten; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki

    2017-11-01

    It is well known that calcium (Ca 2+ ) is involved in the triggering of neuronal death. Ca 2+ cytosolic levels are regulated by Ca 2+ release from internal stores located in organelles, such as the endoplasmic reticulum. Indeed, Ca 2+ transit from distinct cell compartments follows complex dynamics that are mediated by specific receptors, notably inositol trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs). Ca 2+ release by IP3Rs plays essential roles in several neurological disorders; however, details of these processes are poorly understood. Moreover, recent studies have shown that subcellular location, molecular identity, and density of IP3Rs profoundly affect Ca 2+ transit in neurons. Therefore, regulation of IP3R gene products in specific cellular vicinities seems to be crucial in a wide range of cellular processes from neuroprotection to neurodegeneration. In this regard, microRNAs seem to govern not only IP3Rs translation levels but also subcellular accumulation. Combining new data from molecular cell biology with mathematical modelling, we were able to summarize the state of the art on this topic. In addition to presenting how Ca 2+ dynamics mediated by IP3R activation follow a stochastic regimen, we integrated a theoretical approach in an easy-to-apply, cell biology-coherent fashion. Following the presented premises and in contrast to previously tested hypotheses, Ca 2+ released by IP3Rs may play different roles in specific neurological diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.

  6. MLA-sensitive cholinergic receptors involved in the detection of complex moving stimuli in retina.

    PubMed

    Reed, B T; Keyser, K T; Amthor, F R

    2004-01-01

    Acetylcholine, acting through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, mediates the response properties of many ganglion cells in the rabbit retina, including those that are directionally selective (DS; Ariel & Daw, 1982a, b). For example, Grzywacz et al. (1998) showed that cholinergic input is necessary for DS responses to drifting gratings, a form of textured stimulus. However, the identities and locations of the neuronal acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes that mediate this input are not clear (Keyser et al., 2000). We investigated the role of methyllycaconitine-sensitive, alpha7-like nAChRs in mediating DS responses to textured stimuli and apparent motion. We recorded extracellularly from On-Off DS ganglion cells in rabbit retina using everted eyecup preparations. Our data provide evidence that MLA-sensitive nAChRs are involved in mediating directionally selective responses to apparent motion and to a variety of complex, textured stimuli such as drifting square-wave gratings, transparent motion, and second-order motion.

  7. GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex in long-sleep and short-sleep mice

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    LS mice are more sensitive to benzodiazepine-induced anesthesia; however, the two lines do not differ in their hypothermic response to flurazepam. SS mice are more resistant to 3-mercaptopropionic acid-induced seizures and more sensitive to the anticonvulsant effects of benzodiazepines. The various correlates of GABA and benzodiazepine actions probably are the results of different mechanisms of action and/or differential regional control. Bicuculline competition for /sup 3/H-GABA binding sites is greater in SS cerebellar tissue and /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding is greater in the mid-brain region of LS mice. GABA enhancement of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepma binding is greater in SS mice. Ethanol also enhancesmore » /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding and increases the levels of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding above those observed for GABA. Using correlational techniques on data from LS and SS mice and several inbred mouse strains, it was demonstrated that a positive relationship exists between the degree of receptor coupling within the GABA receptor complex and the degree of resistance to seizures.« less

  8. Structure of the human [kappa]-opioid receptor in complex with JDTic

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Huixian; Wacker, Daniel; Mileni, Mauro

    2013-04-25

    Opioid receptors mediate the actions of endogenous and exogenous opioids on many physiological processes, including the regulation of pain, respiratory drive, mood, and - in the case of {kappa}-opioid receptor ({kappa}-OR) - dysphoria and psychotomimesis. Here we report the crystal structure of the human {kappa}-OR in complex with the selective antagonist JDTic, arranged in parallel dimers, at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The structure reveals important features of the ligand-binding pocket that contribute to the high affinity and subtype selectivity of JDTic for the human {kappa}-OR. Modelling of other important {kappa}-OR-selective ligands, including the morphinan-derived antagonists norbinaltorphimine and 5'-guanidinonaltrindole, and the diterpenemore » agonist salvinorin A analogue RB-64, reveals both common and distinct features for binding these diverse chemotypes. Analysis of site-directed mutagenesis and ligand structure-activity relationships confirms the interactions observed in the crystal structure, thereby providing a molecular explanation for {kappa}-OR subtype selectivity, and essential insights for the design of compounds with new pharmacological properties targeting the human {kappa}-OR.« less

  9. Modulation of acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices by the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Supavilai, P.; Karobath, M.

    1985-02-04

    GABA, THIP and muscimol enhance spontaneous and inhibit electrically induced release of tritium labelled compounds from rat striatal slices which have been pre-labelled with /sup 3/H-choline. Baclofen is inactive in this model. Muscimol can inhibit electrically induced release of tritiated material by approximately 75% with half maximal effects at 2 ..mu..M. The response to muscimol can be blocked by the GABA antagonists bicuculline methobromide, picrotoxin, anisatin, R 5135 and CPTBO (cyclopentylbicyclophosphate). Drugs which act on the benzodiazepine receptor (BR) require the presence of muscimol to be effective and they modulate the effects of muscimol in a bidirectional manner. Thus BRmore » agonists enhance and inverse BR agonists attenuate the inhibitory effects of muscimol on electrically induced release. Ro15-1788, a BR antagonist, does not modulate the inhibitory effects of muscimol but antagonizes the actions of clonazepam, a BR agonist, and of DMCM, an inverse BR agonist. These results demonstrate that a GABA/benzodiazepine receptor complex can modulate acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices in vitro. 24 references, 3 figures, 5 table.« less

  10. Tim50’s presequence receptor domain is essential for signal driven transport across the TIM23 complex

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Christian; Lytovchenko, Oleksandr; Melin, Jonathan; Chacinska, Agnieszka; Guiard, Bernard; Neumann, Piotr; Ficner, Ralf; Schmidt, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    N-terminal targeting signals (presequences) direct proteins across the TOM complex in the outer mitochondrial membrane and the TIM23 complex in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Presequences provide directionality to the transport process and regulate the transport machineries during translocation. However, surprisingly little is known about how presequence receptors interact with the signals and what role these interactions play during preprotein transport. Here, we identify signal-binding sites of presequence receptors through photo-affinity labeling. Using engineered presequence probes, photo cross-linking sites on mitochondrial proteins were mapped mass spectrometrically, thereby defining a presequence-binding domain of Tim50, a core subunit of the TIM23 complex that is essential for mitochondrial protein import. Our results establish Tim50 as the primary presequence receptor at the inner membrane and show that targeting signals and Tim50 regulate the Tim23 channel in an antagonistic manner. PMID:22065641

  11. Structure of a prehandover mammalian ribosomal SRP·SRP receptor targeting complex.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kan; Jomaa, Ahmad; Lee, Jae Ho; Chandrasekar, Sowmya; Boehringer, Daniel; Shan, Shu-Ou; Ban, Nenad

    2018-04-20

    Signal recognition particle (SRP) targets proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). SRP recognizes the ribosome synthesizing a signal sequence and delivers it to the SRP receptor (SR) on the ER membrane followed by the transfer of the signal sequence to the translocon. Here, we present the cryo-electron microscopy structure of the mammalian translating ribosome in complex with SRP and SR in a conformation preceding signal sequence handover. The structure visualizes all eukaryotic-specific SRP and SR proteins and reveals their roles in stabilizing this conformation by forming a large protein assembly at the distal site of SRP RNA. We provide biochemical evidence that the guanosine triphosphate hydrolysis of SRP·SR is delayed at this stage, possibly to provide a time window for signal sequence handover to the translocon. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  12. Pyrethroid insecticides and radioligand displacement from the GABA receptor chloride ionophore complex

    SciTech Connect

    Crofton, K.M.; Reiter, L.W.; Mailman, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    Radioligand binding displacement studies were conducted to determine the effects of Type I and II pyrethroids on /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam (FLU), /sup 3/H-muscimol (MUS), and (/sup 35/S-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) binding. Competition experiments with /sup 3/H-FLU and /sup 3/H-MUS indicate a lack of competition for binding by the pyrethroids. Type I pyrethroids failed to compete for the binding of (/sup 35/S-TBPS at concentrations as high as 50 pM. Type II pyrethroids inhibited (/sup 35/S-TBPS binding to rat brain synaptosomes with Ki values ranging from 5-10 pM. The data presented suggest that the interaction of Type II pyrethroids with the GABA receptor-ionophore complex ismore » restricted to a site near the TBPS/picrotoxinin binding site.« less

  13. DAX1: Increasing Complexity in the Roles of this Novel Nuclear Receptor

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Edward R.B.

    2007-01-01

    Summary DAX1 (NR0B1) is a nuclear receptor with a characteristic C-terminal ligand binding domain, but an atypical DNA binding domain. Mutations in the DAX1 gene cause adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) establishing its biological importance. Recent studies highlight the complexities of DAX1 regulation and function. There is considerable phenotypic variability in AHC suggesting the existence of DAX1 modifier genes and environmental influences on DAX1 function. The findings of an alternatively spliced DAX1A, more common than DAX1 in all tissues except testis, of DAX1 homodimers, and of DAX1 heterodimers with a number of transcription factor partners including DAX1A and SHP point to an expanded transcription regulatory network under DAX1 control. Model organisms (mice and zebrafish) are being used to identify other DAX1 functions and modifier genes to understand the pathogenesis of AHC and the lack of genotype-phenotype correlation. PMID:17210221

  14. Rational design of an auxin antagonist of the SCF(TIR1) auxin receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Neve, Joshua; Hirose, Masakazu; Kuboki, Atsuhito; Shimada, Yukihisa; Kepinski, Stefan; Nozaki, Hiroshi

    2012-03-16

    The plant hormone auxin is a master regulator of plant growth and development. By regulating rates of cell division and elongation and triggering specific patterning events, indole 3-acetic acid (IAA) regulates almost every aspect of plant development. The perception of auxin involves the formation of a ternary complex consisting of an F-box protein of the TIR1/AFB family of auxin receptors, the auxin molecule, and a member the Aux/IAA family of co-repressor proteins. In this study, we identified a potent auxin antagonist, α-(phenylethyl-2-oxo)-IAA, as a lead compound for TIR1/AFB receptors by in silico virtual screening. This molecule was used as the basis for the development of a more potent TIR1 antagonist, auxinole (α-[2,4-dimethylphenylethyl-2-oxo]-IAA), using a structure-based drug design approach. Auxinole binds TIR1 to block the formation of the TIR1-IAA-Aux/IAA complex and so inhibits auxin-responsive gene expression. Molecular docking analysis indicates that the phenyl ring in auxinole would strongly interact with Phe82 of TIR1, a residue that is crucial for Aux/IAA recognition. Consistent with this predicted mode of action, auxinole competitively inhibits various auxin responses in planta. Additionally, auxinole blocks auxin responses of the moss Physcomitrella patens, suggesting activity over a broad range of species. Our works not only substantiates the utility of chemical tools for plant biology but also demonstrates a new class of small molecule inhibitor of protein-protein interactions common to mechanisms of perception of other plant hormones, such as jasmonate, gibberellin, and abscisic acid.

  15. Structure of Adenovirus Complexed with Its Internalization Receptor, αvβ5 Integrin

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Charles Y.; Mathias, Patricia; Nemerow, Glen R.; Stewart, Phoebe L.

    1999-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of soluble recombinant integrin αvβ5 bound to human adenovirus types 2 and 12 (Ad2 and -12) has been determined at ∼21-Å resolution by cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM). The αvβ5 integrin is known to promote Ad cell entry. Cryo-EM has shown that the integrin-binding RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) protrusion of the Ad2 penton base protein is highly mobile (P. L. Stewart, C. Y. Chiu, S. Huang, T. Muir, Y. Zhao, B. Chait, P. Mathias, and G. R. Nemerow, EMBO J. 16:1189–1198, 1997). Sequence analysis indicated that the Ad12 RGD surface loop is shorter than that of Ad2 and probably less flexible, hence more suitable for structural characterization of the Ad-integrin complex. The cryo-EM structures of the two virus-receptor complexes revealed a ring of integrin density above the penton base of each virus serotype. As expected, the integrin density in the Ad2 complex was diffuse while that in the Ad12 complex was better defined. The integrin consists of two discrete subdomains, a globular domain with an RGD-binding cleft ∼20 Å in diameter and a distal domain with extended, flexible tails. Kinetic analysis of Ad2 interactions with αvβ5 indicated ∼4.2 integrin molecules bound per penton base at close to saturation. These results suggest that the precise spatial arrangement of five RGD protrusions on the penton base promotes integrin clustering and the signaling events required for virus internalization. PMID:10400774

  16. Equilibrium and kinetic studies on complex formation and decomposition and the movement of Cu(2+)metal ions within polytopic receptors.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Carmen Ester; González-García, Jorge; Llinares, José M; Máñez, M Angeles; Jimenez, Hermas R; García-España, Enrique; Basallote, Manuel G

    2013-05-07

    Potentiometric studies carried out on the interaction of two tritopic double-scorpiand receptors in which two equivalent 5-(2-aminoethyl)-2,5,8-triaza[9]-(2,6)-pyridinophane moieties are linked with 2,9-dimethylphenanthroline (L1) and 2,6-dimethylpyridine (L2) establish the formation of mono-, bi- and trinuclear Cu(2+) complexes. The values of the stability constants and paramagnetic (1)H NMR studies permit one to infer the most likely coordination modes of the various complexes formed. Kinetic studies on complex formation and decomposition have also been carried out. Complex formation occurs with polyphasic kinetics for both receptors, although a significant difference is found between both ligands with respect to the relative values of the rate constants for the metal coordination steps and the structural reorganizations following them. Complex decomposition occurs with two separate kinetic steps, the first one being so fast that it occurs within the stopped-flow mixing time, whereas the second one is slow enough to allow kinetic studies using a conventional spectrophotometer. As a whole, the kinetic experiments also provide information about the movement of the metal ion within the receptors. The differences observed between the different receptors can be interpreted in terms of changes in the network of hydrogen bonds formed in the different species.

  17. Rosuvastatin and Atorvastatin Are Ligands of the Human Constitutive Androstane Receptor/Retinoid X Receptor α Complex.

    PubMed

    Režen, Tadeja; Hafner, Mateja; Kortagere, Sandhya; Ekins, Sean; Hodnik, Vesna; Rozman, Damjana

    2017-08-01

    Statins are well known lipid lowering agents that inhibit the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase. They also activate drug metabolism but their exact receptor-mediated action has not been proven so far. We tested whether atorvastatin and rosuvastatin are direct ligands of human constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). We measured binding activities of atorvastatin and rosuvastatin to the human constitutive androstane receptor/retinoid X receptor α ligand-binding domain (CAR/RXR α -LBD) heterodimer with surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Additionally, three-dimensional models of CAR/RXR α -LBD were constructed by ligand-based and structure-based in silico modeling. Experiments and computational modeling show that atorvastatin and rosuvastatin bind to the human CAR/RXR α -LBD heterodimer, suggesting both can modulate the activity of CAR through direct interaction with the LBD of this receptor. We confirm that atorvastatin and rosuvastatin are direct ligands of CAR. The clinical consequences of CAR activation by statins are in their potential drug-drug interactions, and changes in glucose and energy metabolism. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  18. A Microbead Supported Membrane-Based Fluorescence Imaging Assay Reveals Intermembrane Receptor-Ligand Complex Dimension with Nanometer Precision.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Kabir H; Groves, Jay T

    2016-07-05

    Receptor-ligand complexes spanning a cell-cell interface inevitably establish a preferred intermembrane spacing based on the molecular dimensions and orientation of the complexes. This couples molecular binding events to membrane mechanics and large-scale spatial organization of receptors on the cell surface. Here, we describe a straightforward, epi-fluorescence-based method to precisely determine intermembrane receptor-ligand dimension at adhesions established by receptor-ligand binding between apposed membranes in vitro. Adhesions were reconstituted between planar and silica microbead supported membranes via specific interaction between cognate receptor/ligand pairs (EphA2/EphrinA1 and E-cadherin/anti-E-cadherin antibody). Epi-fluorescence imaging of the ligand enrichment zone in the supported membrane beneath the adhering microbead, combined with a simple geometrical interpretation, proves sufficient to estimate intermembrane receptor-ligand dimension with better than 1 nm precision. An advantage of this assay is that no specialized equipment or imaging methods are required.

  19. Selected signalling proteins recruited to the T-cell receptor-CD3 complex.

    PubMed

    Ngoenkam, Jatuporn; Schamel, Wolfgang W; Pongcharoen, Sutatip

    2018-01-01

    The T-cell receptor (TCR)-CD3 complex, expressed on T cells, determines the outcome of a T-cell response. It consists of the TCR-αβ heterodimer and the non-covalently associated signalling dimers of CD3εγ, CD3εδ and CD3ζζ. TCR-αβ binds specifically to a cognate peptide antigen bound to an MHC molecule, whereas the CD3 subunits transmit the signal into the cytosol to activate signalling events. Recruitment of proteins to specialized localizations is one mechanism to regulate activation and termination of signalling. In the last 25 years a large number of signalling molecules recruited to the TCR-CD3 complex upon antigen binding to TCR-αβ have been described. Here, we review knowledge about five of those interaction partners: Lck, ZAP-70, Nck, WASP and Numb. Some of these proteins have been targeted in the development of immunomodulatory drugs aiming to treat patients with autoimmune diseases and organ transplants. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Allergenicity resulting from functional mimicry of a Toll-like receptor complex protein.

    PubMed

    Trompette, Aurelien; Divanovic, Senad; Visintin, Alberto; Blanchard, Carine; Hegde, Rashmi S; Madan, Rajat; Thorne, Peter S; Wills-Karp, Marsha; Gioannini, Theresa L; Weiss, Jerry P; Karp, Christopher L

    2009-01-29

    Aeroallergy results from maladaptive immune responses to ubiquitous, otherwise innocuous environmental proteins. Although the proteins targeted by aeroallergic responses represent a tiny fraction of the airborne proteins humans are exposed to, allergenicity is a quite public phenomenon-the same proteins typically behave as aeroallergens across the human population. Why particular proteins tend to act as allergens in susceptible hosts is a fundamental mechanistic question that remains largely unanswered. The main house-dust-mite allergen, Der p 2, has structural homology with MD-2 (also known as LY96), the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding component of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 signalling complex. Here we show that Der p 2 also has functional homology, facilitating signalling through direct interactions with the TLR4 complex, and reconstituting LPS-driven TLR4 signalling in the absence of MD-2. Mirroring this, airway sensitization and challenge with Der p 2 led to experimental allergic asthma in wild type and MD-2-deficient, but not TLR4-deficient, mice. Our results indicate that Der p 2 tends to be targeted by adaptive immune responses because of its auto-adjuvant properties. The fact that other members of the MD-2-like lipid-binding family are allergens, and that most defined major allergens are thought to be lipid-binding proteins, suggests that intrinsic adjuvant activity by such proteins and their accompanying lipid cargo may have some generality as a mechanism underlying the phenomenon of allergenicity.

  1. Exportin 6: a novel nuclear export receptor that is specific for profilin·actin complexes

    PubMed Central

    Stüven, Theis; Hartmann, Enno; Görlich, Dirk

    2003-01-01

    Active macromolecular transport between the nucleus and cytoplasm proceeds through nuclear pore complexes and is mostly mediated by transport receptors of the importin β-superfamily. Here we identify exportin 6 (Exp6) as a novel family member from higher eukaryotes and show that it mediates nuclear export of profilin·actin complexes. Exp6 appears to contact primarily actin, but the interaction is greatly enhanced by the presence of profilin. Profilin thus functions not only as the nucleotide exchange factor for actin, but can also be regarded as a cofactor of actin export and hence as a suppressor of actin polymerization in the nucleus. Even though human and Drosophila Exp6 share only ∼20% identical amino acid residues, their function in profilin·actin export is conserved. A knock-down of Drosophila Exp6 by RNA interference abolishes nuclear exclusion of actin and results in the appearance of nuclear actin paracrystals. In contrast to a previous report, we found no indications of a major and direct role for CRM1 in actin export from mammalian or insect nuclei. PMID:14592989

  2. TARM1 Is a Novel Leukocyte Receptor Complex-Encoded ITAM Receptor That Costimulates Proinflammatory Cytokine Secretion by Macrophages and Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Radjabova, Valeria; Mastroeni, Piero; Skjødt, Karsten; Zaccone, Paola; de Bono, Bernard; Goodall, Jane C; Chilvers, Edwin R; Juss, Jatinder K; Jones, Des C; Trowsdale, John; Barrow, Alexander David

    2015-10-01

    We identified a novel, evolutionarily conserved receptor encoded within the human leukocyte receptor complex and syntenic region of mouse chromosome 7, named T cell-interacting, activating receptor on myeloid cells-1 (TARM1). The transmembrane region of TARM1 contained a conserved arginine residue, consistent with association with a signaling adaptor. TARM1 associated with the ITAM adaptor FcRγ but not with DAP10 or DAP12. In healthy mice, TARM1 is constitutively expressed on the cell surface of mature and immature CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) neutrophils within the bone marrow. Following i.p. LPS treatment or systemic bacterial challenge, TARM1 expression was upregulated by neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes and TARM1(+) cells were rapidly recruited to sites of inflammation. TARM1 expression was also upregulated by bone marrow-derived macrophages and dendritic cells following stimulation with TLR agonists in vitro. Ligation of TARM1 receptor in the presence of TLR ligands, such as LPS, enhanced the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines by macrophages and primary mouse neutrophils, whereas TARM1 stimulation alone had no effect. Finally, an immobilized TARM1-Fc fusion protein suppressed CD4(+) T cell activation and proliferation in vitro. These results suggest that a putative T cell ligand can interact with TARM1 receptor, resulting in bidirectional signaling and raising the T cell activation threshold while costimulating the release of proinflammatory cytokines by macrophages and neutrophils. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. Evidence That Both Ligand Binding and Covalent Adaptation Drive a Two-State Equilibrium in the Aspartate Receptor Signaling Complex

    PubMed Central

    Bornhorst, Joshua A.; Falke, Joseph J.

    2001-01-01

    The transmembrane aspartate receptor of bacterial chemotaxis regulates an associated kinase protein in response to both attractant binding to the receptor periplasmic domain and covalent modification of four adaptation sites on the receptor cytoplasmic domain. The existence of at least 16 covalent modification states raises the question of how many stable signaling conformations exist. In the simplest case, the receptor could have just two stable conformations (“on” and “off”) yielding the two-state behavior of a toggle-switch. Alternatively, covalent modification could incrementally shift the receptor between many more than two stable conformations, thereby allowing the receptor to function as a rheostatic switch. An important distinction between these models is that the observed functional parameters of a toggle-switch receptor could strongly covary as covalent modification shifts the equilibrium between the on- and off-states, due to population-weighted averaging of the intrinsic on- and off-state parameters. By contrast, covalent modification of a rheostatic receptor would create new conformational states with completely independent parameters. To resolve the toggle-switch and rheostat models, the present study has generated all 16 homogeneous covalent modification states of the receptor adaptation sites, and has compared their effects on the attractant affinity and kinase activity of the reconstituted receptor–kinase signaling complex. This approach reveals that receptor covalent modification modulates both attractant affinity and kinase activity up to 100-fold, respectively. The regulatory effects of individual adaptation sites are not perfectly additive, indicating synergistic interactions between sites. The three adaptation sites at positions 295, 302, and 309 are more important than the site at position 491 in regulating attractant affinity and kinase activity, thereby explaining the previously observed dominance of the former three sites in in

  4. A major prolactin-binding complex on human milk fat globule membranes contains cyclophilins A and B: the complex is not the prolactin receptor.

    PubMed

    Lorenson, Mary Y; Ueda, Eric K; Chen, KuanHui E; Walker, Ameae M

    2012-03-01

    Prolactin (PRL) in milk influences maturation of gastrointestinal epithelium and development of both the hypothalamo-pituitary and immune systems of offspring. Here, we demonstrate that most PRL in human milk is part of a novel, high-affinity, multicomponent binding complex found on the milk fat globule membrane and not in whey. To examine properties of the complex, a sensitive ELISA was developed such that human PRL (hPRL) binding to the complex was measured by loss of hPRL detectability; thus, as much as 50 ng of hPRL was undetectable in the presence of 10 μl of human milk. Using the same methodology, no comparable complex formation was observed with human serum or amniotic fluid. hPRL complexation in milk was rapid, time dependent, and cooperative. Antibodies to or competitors of the hPRL receptor (placental lactogen and growth hormone) showed the hPRL receptor was not involved in the complex. However, hPRL complexation was antagonized by cyclosporine A and anti-cyclophilins. The complex was very stable, resisting dissociation in SDS, urea, and dithiothreitol. Western analysis revealed an ∼75-kDa complex that included hPRL, cyclophilins A and B, and a 16-kDa cyclophilin A. Compared with noncomplexed hPRL, complexed hPRL in whole milk showed similar activation of STAT5 but markedly delayed activation of ERK. Alteration of signaling suggests that complex formation may alter hPRL biological activity. This is the first report of a unique, multicomponent, high-capacity milk fat reservoir of hPRL; all other analyses of milk PRL have utilized defatted milk.

  5. Frontal cortex and hippocampus neurotransmitter receptor complex level parallels spatial memory performance in the radial arm maze.

    PubMed

    Shanmugasundaram, Bharanidharan; Sase, Ajinkya; Miklosi, András G; Sialana, Fernando J; Subramaniyan, Saraswathi; Aher, Yogesh D; Gröger, Marion; Höger, Harald; Bennett, Keiryn L; Lubec, Gert

    2015-08-01

    Several neurotransmitter receptors have been proposed to be involved in memory formation. However, information on receptor complexes (RCs) in the radial arm maze (RAM) is missing. It was therefore the aim of this study to determine major neurotransmitter RCs levels that are modulated by RAM training because receptors are known to work in homo-or heteromeric assemblies. Immediate early gene Arc expression was determined by immunohistochemistry to show if prefrontal cortices (PFC) and hippocampi were activated following RAM training as these regions are known to be mainly implicated in spatial memory. Twelve rats per group, trained and untrained in the twelve arm RAM were used, frontal cortices and hippocampi were taken, RCs in membrane protein were quantified by blue-native PAGE immunoblotting. RCs components were characterised by co-immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometrical analysis and by the use of the proximity ligation assay. Arc expression was significantly higher in PFC of trained as compared to untrained rats whereas it was comparable in hippocampi. Frontal cortical levels of RCs containing AMPA receptors GluA1, GluA2, NMDA receptors GluN1 and GluN2A, dopamine receptor D1, acetylcholine nicotinic receptor alpha 7 (nAChR-α7) and hippocampal levels of RCs containing D1, GluN1, GluN2B and nAChR-α7 were increased in the trained group; phosphorylated dopamine transporter levels were decreased in the trained group. D1 and GluN1 receptors were shown to be in the same complex. Taken together, distinct RCs were paralleling performance in the RAM which is relevant for interpretation of previous and design of future work on RCs in memory studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Animal models of Parkinson׳s disease: Effects of two adenosine A2A receptor antagonists ST4206 and ST3932, metabolites of 2-n-Butyl-9-methyl-8-[1,2,3]triazol-2-yl-9H-purin-6-ylamine (ST1535).

    PubMed

    Stasi, Maria Antonietta; Minetti, Patrizia; Lombardo, Katia; Riccioni, Teresa; Caprioli, Antonio; Vertechy, Mario; Di Serio, Stefano; Pace, Silvia; Borsini, Franco

    2015-08-15

    Antagonism of the adenosine A2A receptor represents a promising strategy for non-dopaminergic treatment of Parkinson׳s disease (PD). Previously, the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist ST1535 was shown to possess potential beneficial effects in animal models of PD. Two metabolites of ST1535, namely ST3932 and ST4206, were tested in vitro to assess their affinity and activity on cloned human A2A adenosine receptors, and their metabolic profile. Additionally, ST3932 and ST4206 were investigated in vivo in animal models of PD following oral/intraperitoneal administration of 10, 20 and 40mg/kg using ST1535 as a reference compound. ST3932 and ST4206 displayed high affinity and antagonist behaviour for cloned human adenosine A2A receptors. The Ki values for ST1535, ST3932 and ST4206 were 8, 8 and 12nM, respectively, and their IC50 values on cyclic AMP were 427, 450 and 990nM, respectively. ST1535, ST3932 and ST4206 antagonized (orally) haloperidol-induced catalepsy in mice, potentiated (intraperitoneally) the number of contralateral rotations induced by l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) (3mg/kg) plus benserazide (6mg/kg) in 6-Hydroxydopamine hydrobromide (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats, and increased mouse motor activity by oral route. Thus, ST3932 and ST4206, two ST1535 metabolites, show a pharmacological activity similar to ST1535, both in vitro and in vivo, and may be regarded as an interesting pharmacological alternative to ST1535. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Changes in plasma cytokines and their soluble receptors in complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Guillermo M; Peterlin, B Lee; Perreault, Marielle J; Grothusen, John R; Schwartzman, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic and often disabling pain disorder. There is evidence demonstrating that neurogenic inflammation and activation of the immune system play a significant role in the pathophysiology of CRPS. This study evaluated the plasma levels of cytokines, chemokines, and their soluble receptors in 148 subjects afflicted with CRPS and in 60 gender- and age-matched healthy controls. Significant changes in plasma cytokines, chemokines, and their soluble receptors were found in subjects with CRPS as compared with healthy controls. For most analytes, these changes resulted from a distinct subset of the CRPS subjects. When the plasma data from the CRPS subjects was subjected to cluster analysis, it revealed 2 clusters within the CRPS population. The category identified as most important for cluster separation by the clustering algorithm was TNFα. Cluster 1 consisted of 64% of CRPS subjects and demonstrated analyte values similar to the healthy control individuals. Cluster 2 consisted of 36% of the CRPS subjects and demonstrated significantly elevated levels of most analytes and in addition, it showed that the increased plasma analyte levels in this cluster were correlated with disease duration and severity. The identification of biomarkers that define disease subgroups can be of great value in the design of specific therapies and of great benefit to the design of clinical trials. It may also aid in advancing our understanding of the mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of CRPS, which may lead to novel treatments for this very severe condition. Copyright © 2012 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Fc receptor-mediated immune responses: new tools but increased complexity in HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Inchaustegui, Diego A; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2013-07-01

    The modest success of the RV144 HIV vaccine trial in Thailand and the ensuing suggestion that a Fc-receptormediated antibody activity might have played a role in the protection observed have intensified investigations on Fcrelated immune responses. HIV neutralizing antibodies have been and continue to be the focal point of research into humoral immune protection. However, recent knowledge that their protective efficacy can be augmented by Fc-FcR interactions has increased the complexity of identifying immune correlates of protection. If anything, continued studies of both humoral and cellular immune mechanisms point to the lack of a single protective anti-HIV immune response. Here we focus on humoral immunity, analyzing the role played by Fc receptor-related responses and discussing how new knowledge of their interactions requires further investigation, but may also spur novel vaccination approaches. We initially address classical Fc-receptor mediated anti-viral mechanisms including antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-dependent cell mediated viral inhibition (ADCVI), and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), as well as the effector cells that mediate these functions. Next, we summarize key aspects of FcR-Fc interactions that are important for potential control of HIV/SIV such as FcR polymorphisms and post-transcriptional modifications. Finally we discuss less commonly studied non-mechanistic anti-HIV immune functions: antibody avidity and envelopespecific B cell memory. Overall, a spectrum of immune responses, reflecting the immune system's redundancy, will likely be needed to prevent HIV infection and/or disease progression. Aside from elicitation of critical immune mechanisms, a successful vaccine will need to induce mature B cell responses and long-lasting immune memory.

  9. The GABAA receptor complex in hepatic encephalopathy. Autoradiographic evidence for the presence of elevated levels of a benzodiazepine receptor ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, A.S.; Ostrowski, N.L.; Gammal, S.H.

    1990-02-01

    Autoradiographic analysis was used to examine radioligand binding to benzodiazepine (BZ) and GABAA receptors in the brains of rabbits with hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Thin sections of whole brain from normal rabbits and rabbits with HE were mounted on slides and subdivided into two groups. One group was washed before incubation with radioligand, while the second group was not prewashed. (3H)Flunitrazepam binding to BZ receptors was decreased by 22% to 42% (p less than 0.05) in the cerebral cortex, superior and inferior colliculi, and cerebellum of unwashed sections from rabbits with HE compared to all other groups. The binding of (3H)Romore » 15-1788 to unwashed sections from rabbits with HE was reduced by a similar degree (18% to 37%, p less than 0.05) in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, superior colliculus, and cerebellar cortex. Incubation of sections with the GABA-mimetic muscimol and NaCl produced an additional decrease in (3H)flunitrazepam binding to the cortex and hippocampus (25% to 31%, p less than 0.05) in unwashed HE rabbit brain, but increased radioligand binding (27% to 71%, p less than 0.05) to several regions in control rabbits. No changes in radioligand binding to either GABAA or peripheral benzodiazepine receptors was observed between HE and control rabbit sections. These findings are consistent with previous electrophysiologic and neurochemical observations indicating no significant changes in either the function or density of GABAA or BZ receptors in this model of HE. Further, they indicate that a reversible BZ receptor ligand with agonist properties is present in the brain in HE. This substance may contribute to the enhancement of GABAergic tone observed in this syndrome.« less

  10. Complexes of gastrin with In3+, Ru3+ or Ga3+ ions are not recognised by the cholecystokinin 2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Laval, Marie; Marshall, Kathryn M; Sachinidis, John; Scott, Andrew; Eutick, Mal; Baldwin, Graham S

    2017-10-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin (Gamide) binds trivalent metal ions, including indium (In), ruthenium (Ru) and gallium (Ga), with high affinity. Complexes of gastrin with chelated isotopes of In and Ga have previously been used for the location of tumours expressing the cholecystokinin 2 receptor (CCK2R). The aim of the present study was to purify the complexes of Gamide with radioactive isotopes of In, Ru or Ga and to investigate their ability to bind to the CCK2R. The radioactive Gamide complexes were purified on Sep-Pak C18 cartridges or by anion exchange HPLC. Binding to the CCK2R was assessed with a stably transfected clone of the gastric carcinoma cell line AGS. The 106 Ru-Gamide complex could be eluted from the C18 cartridge; the 111 In-Gamide and 68 Ga-Gamide complexes bound irreversibly. All three complexes were successfully purified by anion exchange HPLC. The failure to detect binding of the 111 In-Gamide, 106 Ru-Gamide and 68 Ga-Gamide complexes to the CCK2R suggests that formation of these complexes will not be useful for the detection of tumours expressing this receptor, but may instead provide alternative ways to block the actions of Gamide as a growth factor or a stimulant of gastric acid secretion. The complexes between the hormone gastrin and radioactive 111 In, 106 Ru or 68 Ga ions were purified by anion exchange HPLC using a NaCl gradient. The failure to detect binding of the complexes to the cholecystokinin 2 receptor suggests that metal ion treatment may provide novel approaches to block the biological actions of gastrin.

  11. Multiple cytokines regulate the NK gene complex-encoded receptor repertoire of mature NK cells and T cells.

    PubMed

    Gays, Frances; Martin, Kimberley; Kenefeck, Rupert; Aust, Jonathan G; Brooks, Colin G

    2005-09-01

    Mature NK cells comprise a highly diverse population of lymphocytes that express different permutations of receptors to facilitate recognition of diseased cells and perhaps pathogens themselves. Many of these receptors, such as those belonging to the NKRP1, NKG2, and Ly49 families are encoded in the NK gene complex (NKC). It is generally thought that these NKC-encoded receptors are acquired by a poorly understood stochastic mechanism, which operates exclusively during NK cell development, and that following maturation the repertoire is fixed. However, we report a series of observations that demonstrates that the mature NK cell repertoire in mice can in fact be radically remodeled by multiple cytokines. Thus, both IL-2 and IL-15 selectively induce the de novo expression of Ly49E on the majority of mature NK cells. By contrast, IL-4 not only blocks this IL-2-induced acquisition of Ly49E, but reduces the proportion of mature NK cells that expresses pre-existing Ly49 receptors and abrogates the expression of NKG2 receptors while leaving the expression of several NKRP1 receptors unaltered. IL-21 also abrogates NKG2 expression on mature NK cells and selectively down-regulates Ly49F. IL-4 and IL-21 additionally cause dramatic and selective alterations in the NKC-encoded receptor repertoire of IL-2-activated T cells but these are quite different to the changes induced on NK cells. Collectively these findings reveal an unexpected aspect of NKC receptor expression that has important implications for our understanding of the function of these receptors and of the genetic mechanisms that control their expression.

  12. Regulation of Fas receptor/Fas-asssociated protein with death domain apoptotic complex and associated signalling systems by cannabinoid receptors in the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Álvaro-Bartolomé, M; Esteban, S; García-Gutiérrez, MS; Manzanares, J; Valverde, O; García-Sevilla, JA

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Natural and synthetic cannabinoids (CBs) induce deleterious or beneficial actions on neuronal survival. The Fas-associated protein with death domain (FADD) promotes apoptosis, and its phosphorylated form (p-FADD) mediates non-apoptotic actions. The regulation of Fas/FADD, mitochondrial apoptotic proteins and other pathways by CB receptors was investigated in the mouse brain. Experimental approach: Wild-type, CB1 and CB2 receptor knock-out (KO) mice were used to assess differences in receptor genotypes. CD1 mice were used to evaluate the effects of CB drugs on canonical apoptotic pathways and associated signalling systems. Target proteins were quantified by Western blot analysis. Key results: In brain regions of CB1 receptor KO mice, Fas/FADD was reduced, but p-Ser191 FADD and the p-FADD/FADD ratio were increased. In CB2 receptor KO mice, Fas/FADD was increased, but the p-FADD/FADD ratio was not modified. In mutant mice, cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose)-polymerase (PARP) did not indicate alterations in brain cell death. In CD1 mice, acute WIN55212-2 (CB1 receptor agonist), but not JWH133 (CB2 receptor agonist), inversely modulated brain FADD and p-FADD. Chronic WIN55212-2 induced FADD down-regulation and p-FADD up-regulation. Acute and chronic WIN55212-2 did not alter mitochondrial proteins or PARP cleavage. Acute, but not chronic, WIN55212-2 stimulated activation of anti-apoptotic (ERK, Akt) and pro-apoptotic (JNK, p38 kinase) pathways. Conclusions and implications: CB1 receptors appear to exert a modest tonic activation of Fas/FADD complexes in brain. However, chronic CB1 receptor stimulation decreased pro-apoptotic FADD and increased non-apoptotic p-FADD. The multifunctional protein FADD could participate in the mechanisms of neuroprotection induced by CBs. This article is part of a themed issue on Cannabinoids. To view the editorial for this themed issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2010.00831.x PMID:20590568

  13. Brazilin selectively disrupts proximal IL-1 receptor signaling complex formation by targeting an IKK-upstream signaling components.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Juhee; Lee, Ji Hoon; Park, Kyeong Ah; Byun, Hee Sun; Lee, Hyunji; Lee, Yoonjung; Zhang, Tiejun; Kang, Kidong; Seok, Jeong Ho; Kwon, Hyun-Jung; Han, Man-Deuk; Kang, Seong Wook; Hong, Jang Hee; Hur, Gang Min

    2014-06-15

    The ligation of interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) or tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) induces the recruitment of adaptor proteins and their concomitant ubiquitination to the proximal receptor signaling complex, respectively. Such are upstream signaling events of IKK that play essential roles in NF-κB activation. Thus, the discovery of a substance that would modulate the recruitment of key proximal signaling elements at the upstream level of IKK has been impending in this field of study. Here, we propose that brazilin, an active compound of Caesalpinia sappan L. (Leguminosae), is a potent NF-κB inhibitor that selectively disrupts the formation of the upstream IL-1R signaling complex. Analysis of upstream signaling events revealed that brazilin markedly abolished the IL-1β-induced polyubiquitination of IRAK1 and its interaction with IKK-γ counterpart. Notably, pretreatment of brazilin drastically interfered the recruitment of the receptor-proximal signaling components including IRAK1/4 and TRAF6 onto MyD88 in IL-1R-triggerd NF-κB activation. Interestingly, brazilin did not affect the TNF-induced RIP1 ubiquitination and the recruitment of RIP1 and TRAF2 to TNFR1, suggesting that brazilin is effective in selectively suppressing the proximal signaling complex formation of IL-1R, but not that of TNFR1. Moreover, our findings suggest that such a disruption of IL-1R-proximal complex formation by brazilin is not mediated by affecting the heterodimerization of IL-1R and IL-1RAcP. Taken together, the results suggest that the anti-IKK activity of brazilin is induced by targeting IKK upstream signaling components and subsequently disrupting proximal IL-1 receptor signaling complex formation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Crystal structure of PXY-TDIF complex reveals a conserved recognition mechanism among CLE peptide-receptor pairs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Heqiao; Lin, Xiaoya; Han, Zhifu; Qu, Li-Jia; Chai, Jijie

    2016-01-01

    Plants can achieve amazing lifespans because of their continuous and repetitive formation of new organs by stem cells present within meristems. The balance between proliferation and differentiation of meristem cells is largely regulated by the CLAVATA3/ENDOSPERM SURROUNDING REGION (CLE) peptide hormones. One of the well-characterized CLE peptides, CLE41/TDIF (tracheary elements differentiation inhibitory factor), functions to suppress tracheary element differentiation and promote procambial cell proliferation, playing important roles in vascular development and wood formation. The recognition mechanisms of TDIF or other CLE peptides by their respective receptors, however, remain largely elusive. Here we report the crystal structure of TDIF in complex with its receptor PXY, a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase (LRR-RK). Our structure reveals that TDIF mainly adopts an “Ω”-like conformation binding to the inner surface of the LRR domain of PXY. Interaction between TDIF and PXY is predominately mediated by the relatively conserved amino acids of TDIF. Structure-based sequence alignment showed that the TDIF-interacting motifs are also conserved among other known CLE receptors. Our data provide a structural template for understanding the recognition mechanism of CLE peptides by their receptors, offering an opportunity for the identification of receptors of other uncharacterized CLE peptides. PMID:27055373

  15. Bile salt receptor complex activates a pathogenic type III secretion system

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Peng; Rivera-Cancel, Giomar; Kinch, Lisa N.

    2016-07-05

    Bile is an important component of the human gastrointestinal tract with an essential role in food absorption and antimicrobial activities. Enteric bacterial pathogens have developed strategies to sense bile as an environmental cue to regulate virulence genes during infection. We discovered thatVibrio parahaemolyticusVtrC, along with VtrA and VtrB, are required for activating the virulence type III secretion system 2 in response to bile salts. The VtrA/VtrC complex activates VtrB in the presence of bile salts. The crystal structure of the periplasmic domains of the VtrA/VtrC heterodimer reveals a β-barrel with a hydrophobic inner chamber. A co-crystal structure of VtrA/VtrC withmore » bile salt, along with biophysical and mutational analysis, demonstrates that the hydrophobic chamber binds bile salts and activates the virulence network. As part of a family of conserved signaling receptors, VtrA/VtrC provides structural and functional insights into the evolutionarily conserved mechanism used by bacteria to sense their environment.« less

  16. Bile salt receptor complex activates a pathogenic type III secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Rivera-Cancel, Giomar; Kinch, Lisa N; Salomon, Dor; Tomchick, Diana R; Grishin, Nick V; Orth, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Bile is an important component of the human gastrointestinal tract with an essential role in food absorption and antimicrobial activities. Enteric bacterial pathogens have developed strategies to sense bile as an environmental cue to regulate virulence genes during infection. We discovered that Vibrio parahaemolyticus VtrC, along with VtrA and VtrB, are required for activating the virulence type III secretion system 2 in response to bile salts. The VtrA/VtrC complex activates VtrB in the presence of bile salts. The crystal structure of the periplasmic domains of the VtrA/VtrC heterodimer reveals a β-barrel with a hydrophobic inner chamber. A co-crystal structure of VtrA/VtrC with bile salt, along with biophysical and mutational analysis, demonstrates that the hydrophobic chamber binds bile salts and activates the virulence network. As part of a family of conserved signaling receptors, VtrA/VtrC provides structural and functional insights into the evolutionarily conserved mechanism used by bacteria to sense their environment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15718.001 PMID:27377244

  17. The human GCOM1 complex gene interacts with the NMDA receptor and internexin-alpha.

    PubMed

    Roginski, Raymond S; Lau, Chi W; Santoiemma, Phillip P; Weaver, Sara J; Du, Peicheng; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Yang, Jay

    2018-03-30

    The known functions of the human GCOM1 complex hub gene include transcription elongation and the intercalated disk of cardiac myocytes. However, in all likelihood, the gene's most interesting, and thus far least understood, roles will be found in the central nervous system. To investigate the functions of the GCOM1 gene in the CNS, we have cloned human and rat brain cDNAs encoding novel, 105 kDa GCOM1 combined (Gcom) proteins, designated Gcom15, and identified a new group of GCOM1 interacting genes, termed Gints, from yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screens. We showed that Gcom15 interacts with the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor by co-expression in heterologous cells, in which we observed bi-directional co-immunoprecipitation of human Gcom15 and murine NR1. Our Y2H screens revealed 27 novel GCOM1 interacting genes, many of which are synaptic proteins and/or play roles in neurologic diseases. Finally, we showed, using rat brain protein preparations, that the Gint internexin-alpha (INA), a known interactor of the NMDAR, co-IPs with GCOM1 proteins, suggesting a GCOM1-GRIN1-INA interaction and a novel pathway that may be relevant to neuroprotection. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Bile salt receptor complex activates a pathogenic type III secretion system

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Peng; Rivera-Cancel, Giomar; Kinch, Lisa N.; ...

    2016-07-05

    Bile is an important component of the human gastrointestinal tract with an essential role in food absorption and antimicrobial activities. Enteric bacterial pathogens have developed strategies to sense bile as an environmental cue to regulate virulence genes during infection. We discovered that Vibrio parahaemolyticus VtrC, along with VtrA and VtrB, are required for activating the virulence type III secretion system 2 in response to bile salts. The VtrA/VtrC complex activates VtrB in the presence of bile salts. The crystal structure of the periplasmic domains of the VtrA/VtrC heterodimer reveals a β-barrel with a hydrophobic inner chamber. A co-crystal structure ofmore » VtrA/VtrC with bile salt, along with biophysical and mutational analysis, demonstrates that the hydrophobic chamber binds bile salts and activates the virulence network. As part of a family of conserved signaling receptors, VtrA/VtrC provides structural and functional insights into the evolutionarily conserved mechanism used by bacteria to sense their environment.« less

  19. A novel T cell receptor single-chain signaling complex mediates antigen-specific T cell activity and tumor control.

    PubMed

    Stone, Jennifer D; Harris, Daniel T; Soto, Carolina M; Chervin, Adam S; Aggen, David H; Roy, Edward J; Kranz, David M

    2014-11-01

    Adoptive transfer of genetically modified T cells to treat cancer has shown promise in several clinical trials. Two main strategies have been applied to redirect T cells against cancer: (1) introduction of a full-length T cell receptor (TCR) specific for a tumor-associated peptide-MHC, or (2) introduction of a chimeric antigen receptor, including an antibody fragment specific for a tumor cell surface antigen, linked intracellularly to T cell signaling domains. Each strategy has advantages and disadvantages for clinical applications. Here, we present data on the in vitro and in vivo effectiveness of a single-chain signaling receptor incorporating a TCR variable fragment as the targeting element (referred to as TCR-SCS). This receptor contained a single-chain TCR (Vα-linker-Vβ) from a high-affinity TCR called m33, linked to the intracellular signaling domains of CD28 and CD3ζ. This format avoided mispairing with endogenous TCR chains and mediated specific T cell activity when expressed in either CD4 or CD8 T cells. TCR-SCS-transduced CD8-negative cells showed an intriguing sensitivity, compared to full-length TCRs, to higher densities of less stable pepMHC targets. T cells that expressed this peptide-specific receptor persisted in vivo, and exhibited polyfunctional responses. Growth of metastatic antigen-positive tumors was significantly inhibited by T cells that expressed this receptor, and tumor cells that escaped were antigen-loss variants. TCR-SCS receptors represent an alternative targeting receptor strategy that combines the advantages of single-chain expression, avoidance of TCR chain mispairing, and targeting of intracellular antigens presented in complex with MHC proteins.

  20. Effects of Long-Term Alcohol Drinking on the Dopamine D2 Receptor: Gene Expression and Heteroreceptor Complexes in the Striatum in Rats.

    PubMed

    Feltmann, Kristin; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel Oscar; Rüegg, Joëlle; Pinton, Luca; de Oliveira Sergio, Thatiane; Narváez, Manuel; Jimenez-Beristain, Antonio; Ekström, Tomas J; Fuxe, Kjell; Steensland, Pia

    2018-02-01

    Reduced dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) ligand binding has repeatedly been demonstrated in the striatum of humans with alcohol use disorder (AUD). The attenuated D2R binding has been suggested to reflect a reduced D2R density, which in turn has been proposed to drive craving and relapse. However, results from rodent studies addressing the effects of alcohol drinking on D2R density have been inconsistent. A validated alcohol drinking model (intermittent access to 20% alcohol) in Wistar rats was used to study the effects of voluntary alcohol drinking (at least 12 weeks) on the D2R in the striatum compared to age-matched alcohol-naïve control rats. Reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR was used to quantify isoform-specific Drd2 gene expression levels. Using bisulfite pyrosequencing, DNA methylation levels of a regulatory region of the Drd2 gene were determined. In situ proximity ligation assay was used to measure densities of D2R receptor complexes: D2R-D2R, adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR)-D2R, and sigma1 receptor (sigma1R)-D2R. Long-term voluntary alcohol drinking significantly reduced mRNA levels of the long D2R isoform in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) but did not alter CpG methylation levels in the analyzed sequence of the Drd2 gene. Alcohol drinking also reduced the striatal density of D2R-D2R homoreceptor complexes, increased the density of A2AR-D2R heteroreceptor complexes in the NAc shell and the dorsal striatum, and decreased the density of sigma1R-D2R heteroreceptor complexes in the dorsal striatum. The present results on long-term alcohol drinking might reflect reduced D2R levels through reductions in D2R-D2R homoreceptor complexes and gene expression. Furthermore, based on antagonistic interactions between A2AR and D2R, an increased density of A2AR-D2R heteroreceptor complexes might indicate a reduced affinity and signaling of the D2R population within the complex. Hence, both reduced striatal D2R levels and reduced D2R protomer affinity within the striatal A2AR

  1. Biogenesis of the mitochondrial TOM complex: Mim1 promotes insertion and assembly of signal-anchored receptors.

    PubMed

    Becker, Thomas; Pfannschmidt, Sylvia; Guiard, Bernard; Stojanovski, Diana; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Kutik, Stephan; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Meisinger, Chris; Wiedemann, Nils

    2008-01-04

    The translocase of the outer membrane (TOM complex) is the central entry gate for nuclear-encoded mitochondrial precursor proteins. All Tom proteins are also encoded by nuclear genes and synthesized as precursors in the cytosol. The channel-forming beta-barrel protein Tom40 is targeted to mitochondria via Tom receptors and inserted into the outer membrane by the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM complex). A further outer membrane protein, Mim1, plays a less defined role in assembly of Tom40 into the TOM complex. The three receptors Tom20, Tom22, and Tom70 are anchored in the outer membrane by a single transmembrane alpha-helix, located at the N terminus in the case of Tom20 and Tom70 (signal-anchored) or in the C-terminal portion in the case of Tom22 (tail-anchored). Insertion of the precursor of Tom22 into the outer membrane requires pre-existing Tom receptors while the import pathway of the precursors of Tom20 and Tom70 is only poorly understood. We report that Mim1 is required for efficient membrane insertion and assembly of Tom20 and Tom70, but not Tom22. We show that Mim1 associates with SAM(core) components to a large SAM complex, explaining its role in late steps of the assembly pathway of Tom40. We conclude that Mim1 is not only required for biogenesis of the beta-barrel protein Tom40 but also for membrane insertion and assembly of signal-anchored Tom receptors. Thus, Mim1 plays an important role in the efficient assembly of the mitochondrial TOM complex.

  2. Structure of the Human Dopamine D3 Receptor in Complex with a D2/D3 Selective Antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Ellen Y.T.; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Qiang

    2010-11-30

    Dopamine modulates movement, cognition, and emotion through activation of dopamine G protein-coupled receptors in the brain. The crystal structure of the human dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) in complex with the small molecule D2R/D3R-specific antagonist eticlopride reveals important features of the ligand binding pocket and extracellular loops. On the intracellular side of the receptor, a locked conformation of the ionic lock and two distinctly different conformations of intracellular loop 2 are observed. Docking of R-22, a D3R-selective antagonist, reveals an extracellular extension of the eticlopride binding site that comprises a second binding pocket for the aryl amide of R-22, which differsmore » between the highly homologous D2R and D3R. This difference provides direction to the design of D3R-selective agents for treating drug abuse and other neuropsychiatric indications.« less

  3. Ligand-induced dynamics of heterotrimeric G protein-coupled receptor-like kinase complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Jones, Alan M.

    2017-02-10

    Background Arabidopsis, 7-transmembrane Regulator of G signaling protein 1 (AtRGS1) modulates canonical G protein signaling by promoting the inactive state of heterotrimeric G protein complex on the plasma membrane. It is known that plant leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR RLKs) phosphorylate AtRGS1 in vitro but little is known about the in vivo interaction, molecular dynamics, or the cellular consequences of this interaction. Methods Therefore, a subset of the known RLKs that phosphorylate AtRGS1 were selected for elucidation, namely, BAK1, BIR1, FLS2. Several microscopies for both static and dynamic protein-protein interactions were used to follow in vivo interactions between the RLKsmore » and AtRGS1 after the presentation of the Pathogen-associated Molecular Pattern, Flagellin 22 (Flg22). These microscopies included FoÈrster Resonance Energy Transfer, Bimolecular Fluoresence Complementation, and Cross Number and Brightness fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy. In addition, reactive oxygen species and calcium changes in living cells were quantitated using luminometry and R-GECO1 microscopy. Results The LRR RLKs BAK1 and BIR1, interact with AtRGS1 at the plasma membrane. The RLK ligand flg22 sets BAK1 in motion toward AtRGS1 and BIR1 away, both returning to the baseline orientations by 10 minutes. The C-terminal tail of AtRGS1 is important for the interaction with BAK1 and for the tempo of the AtRGS1/BIR1 dynamics. This window of time corresponds to the flg22-induced transient production of reactive oxygen species and calcium release which are both attenuated in the rgs1 and the bak1 null mutants. Conclusions A temporal model of these interactions is proposed. flg22 binding induces nearly instantaneous dimerization between FLS2 and BAK1. Phosphorylated BAK1 interacts with and enables AtRGS1 to move away from BIR1 and AtRGS1 becomes phosphorylated leading to its endocytosis thus leading to de-repression by permitting AtGPA1 to exchange GDP for GTP

  4. The crystal structure of DR6 in complex with the amyloid precursor protein provides insight into death receptor activation

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Kai; Olsen, Olav; Tzvetkova-Robev, Dorothea; ...

    2015-04-02

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) has garnered considerable attention due to its genetic links to Alzheimer's disease. Death receptor 6 (DR6) was recently shown to bind APP via the protein extracellular regions, stimulate axonal pruning, and inhibit synapse formation. Here, we report the crystal structure of the DR6 ectodomain in complex with the E2 domain of APP and show that it supports a model for APP-induced dimerization and activation of cell surface DR6.

  5. HRas signal transduction promotes hepatitis C virus cell entry by triggering assembly of the host tetraspanin receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Zona, Laetitia; Lupberger, Joachim; Sidahmed-Adrar, Nazha; Thumann, Christine; Harris, Helen J; Barnes, Amy; Florentin, Jonathan; Tawar, Rajiv G; Xiao, Fei; Turek, Marine; Durand, Sarah C; Duong, François H T; Heim, Markus H; Cosset, François-Loïc; Hirsch, Ivan; Samuel, Didier; Brino, Laurent; Zeisel, Mirjam B; Le Naour, François; McKeating, Jane A; Baumert, Thomas F

    2013-03-13

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) entry is dependent on coreceptor complex formation between the tetraspanin superfamily member CD81 and the tight junction protein claudin-1 (CLDN1) on the host cell membrane. The receptor tyrosine kinase EGFR acts as a cofactor for HCV entry by promoting CD81-CLDN1 complex formation via unknown mechanisms. We identify the GTPase HRas, activated downstream of EGFR signaling, as a key host signal transducer for EGFR-mediated HCV entry. Proteomic analysis revealed that HRas associates with tetraspanin CD81, CLDN1, and the previously unrecognized HCV entry cofactors integrin β1 and Ras-related protein Rap2B in hepatocyte membranes. HRas signaling is required for lateral membrane diffusion of CD81, which enables tetraspanin receptor complex assembly. HRas was also found to be relevant for entry of other viruses, including influenza. Our data demonstrate that viruses exploit HRas signaling for cellular entry by compartmentalization of entry factors and receptor trafficking. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Terbutaline causes immobilization of single β2-adrenergic receptor-ligand complexes in the plasma membrane of living A549 cells as revealed by single-molecule microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieben, Anne; Kaminski, Tim; Kubitscheck, Ulrich; Häberlein, Hanns

    2011-02-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors are important targets for various drugs. After signal transduction, regulatory processes, such as receptor desensitization and internalization, change the lateral receptor mobility. In order to study the lateral diffusion of β2-adrenergic receptors (β2AR) complexed with fluorescently labeled noradrenaline (Alexa-NA) in plasma membranes of A549 cells, trajectories of single receptor-ligand complexes were monitored using single-particle tracking. We found that a fraction of 18% of all β2ARs are constitutively immobile. About 2/3 of the β2ARs moved with a diffusion constant of D2 = 0.03+/-0.001 μm2/s and about 17% were diffusing five-fold faster (D3 = 0.15+/-0.02 μm2/s). The mobile receptors moved within restricted domains and also showed a discontinuous diffusion behavior. Analysis of the trajectory lengths revealed two different binding durations with τ1 = 77+/-1 ms and τ2 = 388+/-11 ms. Agonistic stimulation of the β2AR-Alexa-NA complexes with 1 μM terbutaline caused immobilization of almost 50% of the receptors within 35 min. Simultaneously, the mean area covered by the mobile receptors decreased significantly. Thus, we demonstrated that agonistic stimulation followed by cell regulatory processes results in a change in β2AR mobility suggesting that different receptor dynamics characterize different receptor states.

  7. Synthesis and biological evaluation of metabolites of 2-n-butyl-9-methyl-8-[1,2,3]triazol-2-yl-9H-purin-6-ylamine (ST1535), a potent antagonist of the A2A adenosine receptor for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Piersanti, Giovanni; Bartoccini, Francesca; Lucarini, Simone; Cabri, Walter; Stasi, Maria Antonietta; Riccioni, Teresa; Borsini, Franco; Tarzia, Giorgio; Minetti, Patrizia

    2013-07-11

    The synthesis and preliminary in vitro evaluation of five metabolites of the A2A antagonist ST1535 (1) are reported. The metabolites, originating in vivo from enzymatic oxidation of the 2-butyl group of the parent compound, were synthesized from 6-chloro-2-iodo-9-methyl-9H-purine (2) by selective C-C bond formation via halogen/magnesium exchange reaction and/or palladium-catalyzed reactions. The metabolites behaved in vitro as antagonist ligands of cloned human A2A receptor with affinities (Ki 7.5-53 nM) comparable to that of compound 1 (Ki 10.7 nM), thus showing that the long duration of action of 1 could be in part due to its metabolites. General behavior after oral administration in mice was also analyzed.

  8. Retinoic acid-induced CCR9 expression requires transient TCR stimulation and cooperativity between NFATc2 and the retinoic acid receptor/retinoid X receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Ohoka, Yoshiharu; Yokota, Aya; Takeuchi, Hajime; Maeda, Naoko; Iwata, Makoto

    2011-01-15

    Retinoic acid (RA) imprints gut-homing specificity on T cells upon activation by inducing the expression of chemokine receptor CCR9 and integrin α4β7. CCR9 expression seemed to be more highly dependent on RA than was the α4β7 expression, but its molecular mechanism remained unclear. In this article, we show that NFAT isoforms NFATc1 and NFATc2 directly interact with RA receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR) but play differential roles in RA-induced CCR9 expression on murine naive CD4(+) T cells. TCR stimulation for 6-24 h was required for the acquisition of responsiveness to RA and induced activation of NFATc1 and NFATc2. However, RA failed to induce CCR9 expression as long as TCR stimulation continued. After terminating TCR stimulation or adding cyclosporin A to the culture, Ccr9 gene transcription was induced, accompanied by inactivation of NFATc1 and sustained activation of NFATc2. Reporter and DNA-affinity precipitation assays demonstrated that the binding of NFATc2 to two NFAT-binding sites and that of the RAR/RXR complex to an RA response element half-site in the 5'-flanking region of the mouse Ccr9 gene were critical for RA-induced promoter activity. NFATc2 directly bound to RARα and RXRα, and it enhanced the binding of RARα to the RA response element half-site. NFATc1 also bound to the NFAT-binding sites and directly to RARα and RXRα, but it inhibited the NFATc2-dependent promoter activity. These results suggest that the cooperativity between NFATc2 and the RAR/RXR complex is essential for CCR9 expression on T cells and that NFATc1 interferes with the action of NFATc2.

  9. Synergistic Binding of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-A and Its Receptors to Heparin Selectively Modulates Complex Affinity.

    PubMed

    Teran, Madelane; Nugent, Matthew A

    2015-06-26

    Angiogenesis is a highly regulated process orchestrated by the VEGF system. Heparin/heparan sulfate proteoglycans and neuropilin-1 (NRP-1) have been identified as co-receptors, yet the mechanisms of action have not been fully defined. In the present study, we characterized molecular interactions between receptors and co-receptors, using surface plasmon resonance and in vitro binding assays. Additionally, we demonstrate that these binding events are relevant to VEGF activity within endothelial cells. We defined interactions and structural requirements for heparin/HS interactions with VEGF receptor (VEGFR)-1, NRP-1, and VEGF165 in complex with VEGFR-2 and NRP-1. We demonstrate that these structural requirements are distinct for each interaction. We further show that VEGF165, VEGFR-2, and monomeric NRP-1 bind weakly to heparin alone yet show synergistic binding to heparin when presented together in various combinations. This synergistic binding appears to translate to alterations in VEGF signaling in endothelial cells. We found that soluble NRP-1 increases VEGF binding and activation of VEGFR-2 and ERK1/2 in endothelial cells and that these effects require sulfated HS. These data suggest that the presence of HS/heparin and NRP-1 may dictate the specific receptor type activated by VEGF and ultimately determine the biological output of the system. The ability of co-receptors to fine-tune VEGF responsiveness suggests the possibility that VEGF-mediated angiogenesis can be selectively stimulated or inhibited by targeting HS/heparin and NRP-1. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Distribution of interleukin-1 receptor complex at the synaptic membrane driven by interleukin-1β and NMDA stimulation.

    PubMed

    Gardoni, Fabrizio; Boraso, Mariaserena; Zianni, Elisa; Corsini, Emanuela; Galli, Corrado L; Cattabeni, Flaminio; Marinovich, Marina; Di Luca, Monica; Viviani, Barbara

    2011-02-11

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that contributes to neuronal injury in various degenerative diseases, and is therefore a potential therapeutic target. It exerts its biological effect by activating the interleukin-1 receptor type I (IL-1RI) and recruiting a signalling core complex consisting of the myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MyD88) and the IL-1R accessory protein (IL-1RAcP). This pathway has been clearly described in the peripheral immune system, but only scattered information is available concerning the molecular composition and distribution of its members in neuronal cells. The findings of this study show that IL-1RI and its accessory proteins MyD88 and IL-1RAcP are differently distributed in the hippocampus and in the subcellular compartments of primary hippocampal neurons. In particular, only IL-1RI is enriched at synaptic sites, where it co-localises with, and binds to the GluN2B subunit of NMDA receptors. Furthermore, treatment with NMDA increases IL-1RI interaction with NMDA receptors, as well as the surface expression and localization of IL-1RI at synaptic membranes. IL-1β also increases IL-1RI levels at synaptic sites, without affecting the total amount of the receptor in the plasma membrane. Our results reveal for the first time the existence of a dynamic and functional interaction between NMDA receptor and IL-1RI systems that could provide a molecular basis for IL-1β as a neuromodulator in physiological and pathological events relying on NMDA receptor activation.

  11. Antidepressant activity of fluoxetine in the zinc deficiency model in rats involves the NMDA receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Doboszewska, Urszula; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Sowa-Kućma, Magdalena; Młyniec, Katarzyna; Rafało, Anna; Ostachowicz, Beata; Lankosz, Marek; Nowak, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    The zinc deficiency animal model of depression has been proposed; however, it has not been validated in a detailed manner. We have recently shown that depression-like behavior induced by dietary zinc restriction is associated with up-regulation of hippocampal N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). Here we examined the effects of chronic administration of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine (FLX), on behavioral and biochemical alterations (within NMDAR signaling pathway) induced by zinc deficiency. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed a zinc adequate diet (ZnA, 50mg Zn/kg) or a zinc deficient diet (ZnD, 3mg Zn/kg) for 4 weeks. Then, FLX treatment (10mg/kg, i.p.) begun. Following 2 weeks of FLX administration the behavior of the rats was examined in the forced swim test (FST) and the spontaneous locomotor activity test. Twenty four hours later tissue was harvested. The proteins of NMDAR (GluN1, GluN2A and GluN2B) or AMPAR (GluA1) subunits, p-CREB and BDNF in the hippocampus (Western blot) and serum zinc level (TXRF) were examined. Depression-like behavior induced by ZnD in the FST was sensitive to chronic treatment with FLX. ZnD increased levels of GluN1, GluN2A, GluN2B and decreased pS485-GluA1, p-CREB and BDNF proteins. Administration of FLX counteracted the zinc restriction-induced changes in serum zinc level and hippocampal GluN1, GluN2A, GluN2B and p-CREB but not BDNF or pS845-GluA1 protein levels. This finding adds new evidence to the predictive validity of the proposed zinc deficiency model of depression. Antidepressant-like activity of FLX in the zinc deficiency model is associated with NMDAR complex. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Anion complexation with cyanobenzoyl substituted first and second generation tripodal amide receptors: crystal structure and solution studies.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Md Najbul; Gogoi, Abhijit; Das, Gopal

    2015-09-14

    Anion complexation properties of two new tripodal amide receptors have been extensively studied here. Two tripodal receptors have been synthesized from the reaction of cyanobenzoyl acid chloride with two tri-amine building blocks such as (i) tris(2-aminoethyl)amine and (ii) tris(2-(4-aminophenoxy)ethyl)amine, which resulted in the first (L1) and second (L2) generation tripodal amides respectively. A detailed comparison of their coordination behavior with anions is also described by crystallographic and solution state experiments. The crystal structure demonstrates various types of spatial orientations of tripodal arms in two receptors and concomitantly interacts with anions distinctively. Intramolecular H-bonding between amide N–H and CO prevents opening of the receptor cavity in the crystal, which leads to a locked conformation of L1 having C(3v) symmetry and makes amide hydrogen unavailable for the anion which results in side cleft anion binding. However, in L2 we conveniently shift the anion binding sites to a distant position which increases cavity size as well as rules out any intramolecular H-bonding between amide N–H and CO. The crystal structure shows a different orientation of the arms in L2; it adopts a quasi-planar arrangement with C(2v) symmetry. In the crystal structure two arms are pointed in the same direction and while extending the contact the third arm is H-bonded with the apical N-atom through a –CN group, making a pseudo capsular cavity where the anion interacts. Most importantly spatial reorientation of the receptor L2 from a C(2v) symmetry to a folded conformation with a C(3v) symmetry was observed only in the presence of an octahedral SiF6(2-) anion and forms a sandwich type complex. Receptors L1 and L2 are explored for their solution state anion binding abilities. The substantial changes in chemical shifts were observed for the amide (-NH) and aromatic hydrogen (-CH) (especially for F(-)), indicating the role of these hydrogens in

  13. Analytical use of multi-protein Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer to demonstrate membrane-facilitated interactions within cytokine receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Krause, Christopher D; Izotova, Lara S; Pestka, Sidney

    2013-10-01

    Experiments measuring Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between cytokine receptor chains and their associated proteins led to hypotheses describing their organization in intact cells. These interactions occur within a larger protein complex or within a given nano-environment. To illustrate this complexity empirically, we developed a protocol to analyze FRET among more than two fluorescent proteins (multi-FRET). In multi-FRET, we model FRET among more than two fluorophores as the sum of all possible pairwise interactions within the complex. We validated our assumption by demonstrating that FRET among pairs within a fluorescent triplet resembled FRET between each pair measured in the absence of the third fluorophore. FRET between two receptor chains increases with increasing FRET between the ligand-binding chain (e.g., IFN-γR1, IL-10R1 and IFN-λR1) and an acylated fluorescent protein that preferentially resides within subsections of the plasma membrane. The interaction of IL-10R2 with IFN-λR1 or IL-10R1 results in decreased FRET between IL-10R2 and the acylated fluorescent protein. Finally, we analyzed FRET among four fluorescent proteins to demonstrate that as FRET between IFN-γR1 and IFN-γR2 or between IFN-αR1 and IFN-αR2c increases, FRET among other pairs of proteins changes within each complex. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Analytical use of multi-protein fluorescence resonance energy transfer to demonstrate membrane-facilitated interactions within cytokine receptor complexes

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Christopher D.; Izotova, Lara S.; Pestka, Sidney

    2013-01-01

    Experiments measuring Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between cytokine receptor chains and their associated proteins led to hypotheses describing their organization in intact cells. These interactions occur within a larger protein complex or within a given nano-environment. To illustrate this complexity empirically, we developed a protocol to analyze FRET among more than two fluorescent proteins (multi-FRET). In multi-FRET, we model FRET among more than two fluorophores as the sum of all possible pairwise interactions within the complex. We validated our assumption by demonstrating that FRET among pairs within a fluorescent triplet resembled FRET between each pair measured in the absence of the third fluorophore. FRET between two receptor chains increases with increasing FRET between the ligand-binding chain (e.g., IFN-γR1, IL-10R1 and IFN-λR1) and an acylated fluorescent protein that preferentially resides within subsections of the plasma membrane. The interaction of IL-10R2 with IFN-λR1 or IL-10R1 results in decreased FRET between IL-10R2 and the acylated fluorescent protein. Finally, we analyzed FRET among four fluorescent proteins to demonstrate that as FRET between IFN-γR1 and IFN-γR2 or between IFN-αR1 and IFN-αR2c increases, FRET among other pairs of proteins changes within each complex. PMID:23769803

  15. Structure of the full human RXR/VDR nuclear receptor heterodimer complex with its DR3 target DNA

    PubMed Central

    Orlov, Igor; Rochel, Natacha; Moras, Dino; Klaholz, Bruno P

    2012-01-01

    Transcription regulation by steroid hormones and other metabolites is mediated by nuclear receptors (NRs) such as the vitamin D and retinoid X receptors (VDR and RXR). Here, we present the cryo electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of the heterodimeric complex of the liganded human RXR and VDR bound to a consensus DNA response element forming a direct repeat (DR3). The cryo-EM map of the 100-kDa complex allows positioning the individual crystal structures of ligand- and DNA-binding domains (LBDs and DBDs). The LBDs are arranged perpendicular to the DNA and are located asymmetrically at the DNA 5′-end of the response element. The structure reveals that the VDR N-terminal A/B domain is located close to the DNA. The hinges of both VDR and RXR are fully visible and hold the complex in an open conformation in which co-regulators can bind. The asymmetric topology of the complex provides the structural basis for RXR being an adaptive partner within NR heterodimers, while the specific helical structure of VDR's hinge connects the 3′-bound DBD with the 5′-bound LBD and thereby serves as a conserved linker of defined length sensitive to mutational deletion. PMID:22179700

  16. LIGAND-INDEPENDENT INTERACTION OF THE TYPE I INTERFERON RECEPTOR COMPLEX IS NECESSARY TO OBSERVE ITS BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Christopher D.; Digioia, Gina; Izotova, Lara S.; Xie, Junxia; Kim, Youngsun; Schwartz, Barbara J.; Mirochnitchenko, Olga V.; Pestka, Sidney

    2013-01-01

    Ectopic coexpression of the two chains of the Type I and Type III interferon (IFN) receptor complexes (IFN-αR1 and IFN-αR2c, or IFN-λR1 and IL-10R2) yielded sensitivity to IFN-alpha or IFN-lambda in only some cells. We found that IFN-αR1 and IFN-αR2c exhibit FRET only when expressed at equivalent and low levels. Expanded clonal cell lines expressing both IFN-αR1 and IFN-αR2c were sensitive to IFN-alpha only when IFN-αR1 and IFN-αR2c exhibited FRET in the absence of human IFN-alpha. Coexpression of RACK-1 or Jak1 enhanced the affinity of the interaction between IFN-αR1 and IFN-αR2c. Both IFN-αR1 and IFN-αR2c exhibited FRET with Jak1 and Tyk2. Together with data showing that disruption of the preassociation between the IFN-gamma receptor chains inhibited its biological activity, we propose that biologically active IFN receptors require ligand-independent juxtaposition of IFN receptor chains assisted by their associated cytosolic proteins. PMID:23830819

  17. Ligand-independent interaction of the type I interferon receptor complex is necessary to observe its biological activity.

    PubMed

    Krause, Christopher D; Digioia, Gina; Izotova, Lara S; Xie, Junxia; Kim, Youngsun; Schwartz, Barbara J; Mirochnitchenko, Olga V; Pestka, Sidney

    2013-10-01

    Ectopic coexpression of the two chains of the Type I and Type III interferon (IFN) receptor complexes (IFN-αR1 and IFN-αR2c, or IFN-λR1 and IL-10R2) yielded sensitivity to IFN-alpha or IFN-lambda in only some cells. We found that IFN-αR1 and IFN-αR2c exhibit FRET only when expressed at equivalent and low levels. Expanded clonal cell lines expressing both IFN-αR1 and IFN-αR2c were sensitive to IFN-alpha only when IFN-αR1 and IFN-αR2c exhibited FRET in the absence of human IFN-alpha. Coexpression of RACK-1 or Jak1 enhanced the affinity of the interaction between IFN-αR1 and IFN-αR2c. Both IFN-αR1 and IFN-αR2c exhibited FRET with Jak1 and Tyk2. Together with data showing that disruption of the preassociation between the IFN-gamma receptor chains inhibited its biological activity, we propose that biologically active IFN receptors require ligand-independent juxtaposition of IFN receptor chains assisted by their associated cytosolic proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Robo and Ror function in a common receptor complex to regulate Wnt-mediated neurite outgrowth in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaming; Ding, Mei

    2018-03-06

    Growing axons are exposed to various guidance cues en route to their targets, but the mechanisms that govern the response of growth cones to combinations of signals remain largely elusive. Here, we found that the sole Robo receptor, SAX-3, in Caenorhabditis elegans functions as a coreceptor for Wnt/CWN-2 molecules. SAX-3 binds to Wnt/CWN-2 and facilitates the membrane recruitment of CWN-2. SAX-3 forms a complex with the Ror/CAM-1 receptor and its downstream effector Dsh/DSH-1, promoting signal transduction from Wnt to Dsh. sax-3 functions in Wnt-responsive cells and the SAX-3 receptor is restricted to the side of the cell from which the neurite is extended. DSH-1 has a similar asymmetric distribution, which is disrupted by sax-3 mutation. Taking these results together, we propose that Robo receptor can function as a Wnt coreceptor to regulate Wnt-mediated biological processes in vivo. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  19. The complex role of NOTCH receptors and their ligands in the development of hepatoblastoma, cholangiocarcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gil-García, Borja; Baladrón, Victoriano

    2016-02-01

    The NOTCH signalling pathway is one of the key molecular pathways of embryonic development and adult tissues homeostasis in mammals. Mammals have four NOTCH receptors and various ligands that modulate their activity. Many cell disorders, whose genesis involves the NOTCH signalling pathway, have been discovered, including cancer. The mechanisms by which these receptors and their ligands affect liver cell transformation are not yet well understood, and they seem to behave as both oncogenes and tumour-suppressor proteins. In this review, we discuss the published data regarding the role of these proteins in the development of hepatoblastoma, cholangiocarcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma malignancies. The alteration of the NOTCH signalling pathway may be one of the main drivers of hepatic neoplastic growth. However, this signalling pathway might also modulate the development of specific liver tumour features. The complexity of the function of NOTCH receptors and their ligands may be due to their interactions with many other cell signalling pathways. Furthermore, the different levels of expression and activation of these receptors could be a reason for their distinct and sometimes contradictory effects. © 2015 Société Française des Microscopies and Société de Biologie Cellulaire de France. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Pneumococcal polysaccharides complexed with C3d bind to human B lymphocytes via complement receptor type 2.

    PubMed Central

    Griffioen, A W; Rijkers, G T; Janssens-Korpela, P; Zegers, B J

    1991-01-01

    The immunoregulatory function of the complement system has been the focus of many investigations. In particular, fragments of complement factor C3 have been shown to play a role in B-lymphocyte activation and proliferation, lymphokine production, and the generation of in vitro antibody production. Purified pneumococcal polysaccharides (PS) can induce direct activation of C3 via the alternative pathway. Using sera of C1q-deficient patients and healthy subjects, we demonstrated that C3d, a split product of C3 that is generated after degradation of iC3b, can be bound to PS antigens. The binding of C3d to PS can occur in the absence of specific antibodies. Subsequently, we showed that PS complexed with C3d can be recognized by complement receptor type 2 that is expressed on B cells. Treatment of B cells with a monoclonal antibody recognizing the C3d-binding site of complement receptor type 2 reduces the binding of PS-C3d to the cells. In addition, we showed that PS4 complexed with C3d exerted an increased immunogenicity compared with free PS4. Our results show that the complement system plays a role in the activation of PS-specific B cells, carrying membrane receptors for C3d. Consequently, the complement system plays a regulatory role in the antibody response to T-cell-independent type 2 antigens such as PS. PMID:1826897

  1. Structure of an HIV gp120 envelope glycoprotein in complex with the CD4 receptor and a neutralizing human antibody.

    PubMed

    Kwong, P D; Wyatt, R; Robinson, J; Sweet, R W; Sodroski, J; Hendrickson, W A

    1998-06-18

    The entry of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) into cells requires the sequential interaction of the viral exterior envelope glycoprotein, gp120, with the CD4 glycoprotein and a chemokine receptor on the cell surface. These interactions initiate a fusion of the viral and cellular membranes. Although gp120 can elicit virus-neutralizing antibodies, HIV eludes the immune system. We have solved the X-ray crystal structure at 2.5 A resolution of an HIV-1 gp120 core complexed with a two-domain fragment of human CD4 and an antigen-binding fragment of a neutralizing antibody that blocks chemokine-receptor binding. The structure reveals a cavity-laden CD4-gp120 interface, a conserved binding site for the chemokine receptor, evidence for a conformational change upon CD4 binding, the nature of a CD4-induced antibody epitope, and specific mechanisms for immune evasion. Our results provide a framework for understanding the complex biology of HIV entry into cells and should guide efforts to intervene.

  2. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor complex in the hippocampus of elderly, normal individuals and those with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ułas, J; Brunner, L C; Geddes, J W; Choe, W; Cotman, C W

    1992-07-01

    The various ligand binding sites of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor complex in the hippocampal formation and parahippocampal gyrus of Alzheimer's disease patients and age-matched normal individuals were examined using quantitative autoradiography. The hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus of the normal elderly brain exhibited virtually identical distributions of L-[3H]glutamate, [3H]5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H- dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-iminemaleate ([3H]MK-801), [3H][(+/-)2-carboxypiperazine-4-yl]propyl-1-phosphonic acid ([3H]CPP) and strychnine-insensitive [3H]glycine binding sites (r greater than 0.87) suggesting that binding occurred to different domains of the same receptor macromolecule. The binding of [3H]MK-801 to channel-associated phencyclidine sites appeared to be most severely impaired in Alzheimer's disease, especially at the anterior hippocampal level. When the data were averaged and the means for Alzheimer's disease and control group compared, a 34% decrease (P less than 0.01) in [3H]MK-801 binding was identified in the CA1 stratum pyramidale and a smaller decrease was found in the dentate gyrus molecular layer, parahippocampal gyrus and subiculum. The CA1 region exhibited a similar 35% reduction (P less than 0.05) in L-[3H]glutamate binding to N-methyl-D-aspartate-sensitive sites. This decrease most probably reflected a decline in receptor density. Binding of [3H]CPP to antagonist-preferring sites and [3H]glycine to glycine modulatory sites did not change significantly. However, a marked intersubject variability in N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor binding was observed in control and Alzheimer's disease groups. This variability was not related to age, sex or post mortem delay. Some Alzheimer's disease patients showed markedly reduced receptor binding levels, while others showed no changes or even increased binding. The loss of N-methyl-D-aspartate-sensitive sites did not correlate with a loss of neurons in the CA1 region (r = 0.286). Similarly, no

  3. Frizzled7: A Promising Achilles’ Heel for Targeting the Wnt Receptor Complex to Treat Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Phesse, Toby; Flanagan, Dustin; Vincan, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Frizzled7 is arguably the most studied member of the Frizzled family, which are the cognate Wnt receptors. Frizzled7 is highly conserved through evolution, from Hydra through to humans, and is expressed in diverse organisms, tissues and human disease contexts. Frizzled receptors can homo- or hetero-polymerise and associate with several co-receptors to transmit Wnt signalling. Notably, Frizzled7 can transmit signalling via multiple Wnt transduction pathways and bind to several different Wnt ligands, Frizzled receptors and co-receptors. These promiscuous binding and functional properties are thought to underlie the pivotal role Frizzled7 plays in embryonic developmental and stem cell function. Recent studies have identified that Frizzled7 is upregulated in diverse human cancers, and promotes proliferation, progression and invasion, and orchestrates cellular transitions that underscore cancer metastasis. Importantly, Frizzled7 is able to regulate Wnt signalling activity even in cancer cells which have mutations to down-stream signal transducers. In this review we discuss the various aspects of Frizzled7 signalling and function, and the implications these have for therapeutic targeting of Frizzled7 in cancer. PMID:27196929

  4. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors control acetylcholine and noradrenaline release in the rodent habenulo-interpeduncular complex

    PubMed Central

    Beiranvand, F; Zlabinger, C; Orr-Urtreger, A; Ristl, R; Huck, S; Scholze, P

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nACh receptors) play a central role in the habenulo-interpeduncular system. We studied nicotine-induced release of NA and ACh in the habenula and interpeduncular nucleus (IPN). Experimental approach The habenula and IPN were loaded with [3H]-choline or [3H]-NA and placed in superfusion chambers. [3H]-ACh release was also stimulated using nicotinic agonists, electrical pulses and elevated [KCl]o in hippocampal and cortical slices from rats, wild-type mice and mice lacking α5, α7, β2, or β4 nACh receptor subunits. Finally, we analysed nACh receptor subtypes in the IPN using immunoprecipitation. Key results Nicotine induced release of [3H]-ACh in the IPN of rats and mice. This release was calcium-dependent but not blocked by tetrodotoxin (TTX); moreover, [3H]-ACh release was abolished in β4-knockout mice but was unaffected in β2- and α5-knockout mice. In contrast, nicotine-induced release of [3H]-NA in the IPN and habenula was blocked by TTX and reduced in both β2-knockout and β4-knockout mice, and dose–response curves were right-shifted in α5-knockout mice. Although electrical stimuli triggered the release of both transmitters, [3H]-ACh release required more pulses delivered at a higher frequency. Conclusions and implications Our results confirm previous findings that β4-containing nACh receptors are critical for [3H]-ACh release in the mouse IPN. Experiments using α5-knockout mice also revealed that unlike in the hippocampus, nicotine-induced [3H]-NA release in the habenulo-interpeduncular system is altered in this knockout model. As α5-containing nACh receptors play a key role in nicotine intake, our results add NA to the list of transmitters involved in this mechanism. PMID:25041479

  5. Engineering of Substrate Selectivity for Tissue Factor·Factor VIIa Complex Signaling through Protease-activated Receptor 2*

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Katrine S.; Østergaard, Henrik; Olsen, Ole H.; Bjelke, Jais R.; Ruf, Wolfram; Petersen, Lars C.

    2010-01-01

    The complex of factor VIIa (FVIIa) with tissue factor (TF) triggers coagulation by recognizing its macromolecular substrate factors IX (FIX) and X (FX) predominantly through extended exosite interactions. In addition, TF mediates unique cell-signaling properties in cancer, angiogenesis, and inflammation that involve proteolytic cleavage of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2). PAR2 is cleaved by FVIIa in the binary TF·FVIIa complex and by FXa in the ternary TF·FVIIa·FXa complex, but physiological roles of these signaling complexes are incompletely understood. In a screen of FVIIa protease domain mutants, three variants (Q40A, Q143N, and T151S) activated macromolecular coagulation substrates and supported signaling of the ternary TF·FVIIa-Xa complex normally but were severely impaired in binary TF·FVIIa·PAR2 signaling. The residues identified were located in the model-predicted S2′ pocket of FVIIa, and complementary PAR2 P2′ Leu-38 replacements demonstrated that the P2′ side chain was indeed crucial for PAR2 cleavage by TF·FVIIa. In addition, PAR2 was activated more efficiently by FVIIa T99Y, consistent with further contributions from the S2 subsite. The P2 residue preference of FVIIa and FXa predicted additional PAR2 mutants that were efficiently activated by TF·FVIIa but resistant to cleavage by the alternative PAR2 activator FXa. Thus, contrary to the paradigm of exosite-assisted cleavage of PAR1 by thrombin, the cofactor-associated protease FVIIa recognizes PAR2 predominantly by catalytic cleft interactions. Furthermore, the delineated molecular details of this substrate interaction enabled protein engineering of protease-selective PAR2 receptors that will aid further studies to dissect the roles of TF signaling complexes in vivo. PMID:20388709

  6. Yokukansan enhances pentobarbital-induced sleep in socially isolated mice: possible involvement of GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Egashira, Nobuaki; Nogami, Ai; Iwasaki, Katsunori; Ishibashi, Ayumi; Uchida, Naoki; Takasaki, Kotaro; Mishima, Kenichi; Nishimura, Ryoji; Oishi, Ryozo; Fujiwara, Michihiro

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of the Kampo medicine Yokukansan (YKS) on pentobarbital-induced sleep in group-housed and socially isolated mice. Socially isolated mice showed shorter sleeping time than the group-housed mice. YKS (300 mg/kg, p.o.) prolonged the pentobarbital-induced sleeping time in socially isolated mice without affecting pentobarbital sleep in group-housed mice. The prolongation of sleeping time by YKS was reversed by bicuculline (3 mg/kg, i.p.) and flumazenil (3 mg/kg, i.p.), but not WAY100635. These findings suggest that the GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor complex, but not 5-HT(1A) receptors, is involved in the reversal effect of YKS on the decrease of pentobarbital sleep by social isolation.

  7. Euphorbia hirta reverses chronic stress-induced anxiety and mediates its action through the GABA(A) receptor benzodiazepine receptor-Cl(-) channel complex.

    PubMed

    Anuradha, H; Srikumar, B N; Shankaranarayana Rao, B S; Lakshmana, M

    2008-01-01

    Chronic stress is known to result in impairment of learning and memory and precipitate several affective disorders including depression and anxiety. Drugs of natural origin are known to possess several effects on the central nervous system and are emerging as promising alternative therapies. In this context, the hydroalcoholic extract of Euphorbia hirta (Eh) was evaluated for anxiolytic property in chronically stressed rats subjected to elevated plus maze (EPM) and open field test (OFT). Eh treatment (200 mg/kg, p.o.; seven days) showed marked anti-anxiety activity in chronic immobilization stress. In contrast, the forced swim stress-induced anxiety was only partially decreased by Eh. Co-treatment of rats with flumazenil (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.), bicuculline (1 mg/kg, i.p.) or picrotoxin (1 mg/kg, i.p.) resulted in a significant reduction of anxiolytic effect of Eh indicating that its actions are mediated through GABA(A) receptor-benzodiazepine receptor-Cl(-) channel complex. Thus, our studies indicate that Eh is a potential anxiolytic drug, which might be beneficial in the treatment of stress-induced anxiety disorders.

  8. Complex pharmacology of novel allosteric free fatty acid 3 receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Brian D; Christiansen, Elisabeth; Murdoch, Hannah; Jenkins, Laura; Hansen, Anders Højgaard; Madsen, Ole; Ulven, Trond; Milligan, Graeme

    2014-08-01

    Analysis of the roles of the short chain fatty acid receptor, free fatty acid 3 receptor (FFA3), has been severely limited by the low potency of its endogenous ligands, the crossover of function of these on the closely related free fatty acid 2 receptor, and a dearth of FFA3-selective synthetic ligands. From a series of hexahydroquinolone-3-carboxamides, we demonstrate that 4-(furan-2-yl)-2-methyl-5-oxo-N-(o-tolyl)-1,4,5,6,7,8-hexahydroquinoline-3-carboxamide is a selective and moderately potent positive allosteric modular (PAM)-agonist of the FFA3 receptor. Modest chemical variations within this series resulted in compounds completely lacking activity, acting as FFA3 PAMs, or appearing to act as FFA3-negative allosteric modulators. However, the pharmacology of this series was further complicated in that certain analogs displaying overall antagonism of FFA3 function actually appeared to generate their effects via a combined positive allosteric binding cooperativity and negative allosteric effect on orthosteric ligand maximal signaling response. These studies show that various PAM-agonist and allosteric modulators of FFA3 can be identified and characterized. However, within the current chemical series, considerable care must be taken to define the pharmacological characteristics of specific compounds before useful predictions of their activity and their use in defining specific roles of FFA3 in either in vitro and in vivo settings can be made. Copyright © 2014 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  9. Effects of gamma irradiation on the DNA-protein complex between the estrogen response element and the estrogen receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štísová, Viktorie; Goffinont, Stephane; Spotheim-Maurizot, Melanie; Davídková, Marie

    2010-08-01

    Signaling by estrogens, risk factors in breast cancer, is mediated through their binding to the estrogen receptor protein (ER), followed by the formation of a complex between ER and a DNA sequence, called estrogen response element (ERE). Anti-estrogens act as competitive inhibitors by blocking the signal transduction. We have studied in vitro the radiosensitivity of the complex between ERα, a subtype of this receptor, and a DNA fragment bearing ERE, as well as the influence of an estrogen (estradiol) or an anti-estrogen (tamoxifen) on this radiosensitivity. We observe that the complex is destabilized upon irradiation with γ rays in aerated aqueous solution. The analysis of the decrease of binding abilities of the two partners shows that destabilization is mainly due to the damage to the protein. The destabilization is reduced when irradiating in presence of tamoxifen and is increased in presence of estradiol. These effects are due to opposite influences of the ligands on the loss of binding ability of ER. The mechanism that can account for our results is: binding of estradiol or tamoxifen induces distinct structural changes of the ER ligand-binding domain that can trigger (by allostery) distinct structural changes of the ER DNA-binding domains and thus, can differently affect ER-ERE interaction.

  10. Defining the Conformation of the Estrogen Receptor Complex That Controls Estrogen-Induced Apoptosis in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Obiorah, Ifeyinwa; Sengupta, Surojeet; Curpan, Ramona

    2014-01-01

    Development of acquired antihormone resistance exposes a vulnerability in breast cancer: estrogen-induced apoptosis. Triphenylethylenes (TPEs), which are structurally similar to 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4OHT), were used for mechanistic studies of estrogen-induced apoptosis. These TPEs all stimulate growth in MCF-7 cells, but unlike the planar estrogens they block estrogen-induced apoptosis in the long-term estrogen-deprived MCF7:5C cells. To define the conformation of the TPE:estrogen receptor (ER) complex, we employed a previously validated assay using the induction of transforming growth factor α (TGFα) mRNA in situ in MDA-MB 231 cells stably transfected with wild-type ER (MC2) or D351G ER mutant (JM6). The assays discriminate ligand fit in the ER based on the extremes of published crystallography of planar estrogens or TPE antiestrogens. We classified the conformation of planar estrogens or angular TPE complexes as “estrogen-like” or “antiestrogen-like” complexes, respectively. The TPE:ER complexes did not readily recruit the coactivator steroid receptor coactivator-3 (SRC3) or ER to the PS2 promoter in MCF-7 and MCF7:5C cells, and molecular modeling showed that they prefer to bind to the ER in an antagonistic fashion, i.e., helix 12 not sealing the ligand binding domain (LBD) effectively, and therefore reduce critical SRC3 binding. The fully activated ER complex with helix 12 sealing the LBD is suggested to be the appropriate trigger to initiate rapid estrogen-induced apoptosis. PMID:24608856

  11. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors control acetylcholine and noradrenaline release in the rodent habenulo-interpeduncular complex.

    PubMed

    Beiranvand, F; Zlabinger, C; Orr-Urtreger, A; Ristl, R; Huck, S; Scholze, P

    2014-12-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nACh receptors) play a central role in the habenulo-interpeduncular system. We studied nicotine-induced release of NA and ACh in the habenula and interpeduncular nucleus (IPN). The habenula and IPN were loaded with [(3) H]-choline or [(3) H]-NA and placed in superfusion chambers. [(3) H]-ACh release was also stimulated using nicotinic agonists, electrical pulses and elevated [KCl]o in hippocampal and cortical slices from rats, wild-type mice and mice lacking α5, α7, β2, or β4 nACh receptor subunits. Finally, we analysed nACh receptor subtypes in the IPN using immunoprecipitation. Nicotine induced release of [(3) H]-ACh in the IPN of rats and mice. This release was calcium-dependent but not blocked by tetrodotoxin (TTX); moreover, [(3) H]-ACh release was abolished in β4-knockout mice but was unaffected in β2- and α5-knockout mice. In contrast, nicotine-induced release of [(3) H]-NA in the IPN and habenula was blocked by TTX and reduced in both β2-knockout and β4-knockout mice, and dose-response curves were right-shifted in α5-knockout mice. Although electrical stimuli triggered the release of both transmitters, [(3) H]-ACh release required more pulses delivered at a higher frequency. Our results confirm previous findings that β4-containing nACh receptors are critical for [(3) H]-ACh release in the mouse IPN. Experiments using α5-knockout mice also revealed that unlike in the hippocampus, nicotine-induced [(3) H]-NA release in the habenulo-interpeduncular system is altered in this knockout model. As α5-containing nACh receptors play a key role in nicotine intake, our results add NA to the list of transmitters involved in this mechanism. © 2014 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The British Pharmacological Society.

  12. The antigenic complex in HIT binds to B cells via complement and complement receptor 2 (CD21)

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Sanjay; Lee, Grace M.; Hester, C. Garren; Poncz, Mortimer; McKenzie, Steven E.; Sachais, Bruce S.; Rauova, Lubica; Kelsoe, Garnett; Cines, Douglas B.; Frank, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia is a prothrombotic disorder caused by antibodies to platelet factor 4 (PF4)/heparin complexes. The mechanism that incites such prevalent anti-PF4/heparin antibody production in more than 50% of patients exposed to heparin in some clinical settings is poorly understood. To investigate early events associated with antigen exposure, we first examined the interaction of PF4/heparin complexes with cells circulating in whole blood. In healthy donors, PF4/heparin complexes bind preferentially to B cells (>90% of B cells bind to PF4/heparin in vitro) relative to neutrophils, monocytes, or T cells. Binding of PF4 to B cells is heparin dependent, and PF4/heparin complexes are found on circulating B cells from some, but not all, patients receiving heparin. Given the high proportion of B cells that bind PF4/heparin, we investigated complement as a mechanism for noncognate antigen recognition. Complement is activated by PF4/heparin complexes, co-localizes with antigen on B cells from healthy donors, and is present on antigen-positive B cells in patients receiving heparin. Binding of PF4/heparin complexes to B cells is mediated through the interaction between complement and complement receptor 2 (CR2 [CD21]). To the best of our knowledge, these are the first studies to demonstrate complement activation by PF4/heparin complexes, opsonization of PF4/heparin to B cells via CD21, and the presence of complement activation fragments on circulating B cells in some patients receiving heparin. Given the critical contribution of complement to humoral immunity, our observations provide new mechanistic insights into the immunogenicity of PF4/heparin complexes. PMID:27412887

  13. Structure and stability of complexes of agmatine with some functional receptor residues of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remko, Milan; Broer, Ria; Remková, Anna; Van Duijnen, Piet Th.

    2017-04-01

    The paper reports the results of a theoretical study of the conformational behavior and basicity of biogenic amine agmatine. The complexes modelling of agmatine - protein interaction are also under scrutiny of our investigation using the Becke3LYP and B97D levels of the density functional theory. The relative stabilities (Gibbs energies) of individual complexes are by both DFT methods described equally. Hydration has a dramatic effect on the hydrogen bonded complexes studied. The pairing acidic carboxylate group with different agmatine species resulted in charged hydrogen bond complexes containing negatively charged acetate species acting as proton acceptors.

  14. Mechanisms for Antagonistic Regulation of AMPA and NMDA-D1 Receptor Complexes at Postsynaptic Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, Johann; Scheler, Gabriele

    2004-01-01

    From the analysis of these pathways we conclude that postsynaptic processes that regulate synaptic transmission undergo significant cross-talk with respect to glutamatergic and neuromodulatory (dopamine) signals. The main hypothesis is that of a compensatory regulation, a competitive switch between the induction of increased AMPA conductance by CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation and reduced expression of PP2A, and increased D1 receptor sensitivity and expression by increased PKA, PP2A and decreased PP-1/calcineurin expression. Both types of plasticity are induced by NMDA receptor activation and increased internal calcium, they require different internal conditions to become expressed. Specifically we propose that AMPA regulation and D1 regulation are inversely coupled;The net result may be a bifurcation of synaptic state into predominantly AMPA or NMDA-D1 synapses. This could have functional consequences: stable connections for AMPA and conditional gating for NMDA-D1 synapses.

  15. A complex epistatic network limits the mutational reversibility in the influenza hemagglutinin receptor-binding site.

    PubMed

    Wu, Nicholas C; Thompson, Andrew J; Xie, Jia; Lin, Chih-Wei; Nycholat, Corwin M; Zhu, Xueyong; Lerner, Richard A; Paulson, James C; Wilson, Ian A

    2018-03-28

    The hemagglutinin (HA) receptor-binding site (RBS) in human influenza A viruses is critical for attachment to host cells, which imposes a functional constraint on its natural evolution. On the other hand, being part of the major antigenic sites, the HA RBS of human H3N2 viruses needs to constantly mutate to evade the immune system. From large-scale mutagenesis experiments, we here show that several of the natural RBS substitutions become integrated into an extensive epistatic network that prevents substitution reversion. X-ray structural analysis reveals the mechanistic consequences as well as changes in the mode of receptor binding. Further studies are necessary to elucidate whether such entrenchment limits future options for immune escape or adversely affect long-term viral fitness.

  16. The DEG/ENaC Protein MEC-10 Regulates The Transduction Channel Complex in C. elegans Touch Receptor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Árnadóttir, Jóhanna; O'Hagan, Robert; Chen, Yushu; Goodman, Miriam B.; Chalfie, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Gentle touch sensation in Caenorhabditis elegans is mediated by the MEC-4/MEC-10 channel complex, which is expressed exclusively in six touch receptor neurons (TRNs). The complex contains two pore-forming subunits, MEC-4 and MEC-10, as well as the accessory subunits MEC-2, MEC-6 and UNC-24. MEC-4 is essential for channel function, but beyond its role as a pore-forming subunit, the functional contribution of MEC-10 to the channel complex and to touch sensation is unclear. We addressed this question using behavioral assays, in vivo electrophysiological recordings from TRNs, and heterologous expression of mutant MEC-10 isoforms. Animals with a deletion in mec-10 showed only a partial loss of touch sensitivity and a modest decrease in the size of the mechanoreceptor current (MRC). In contrast, five previously identified mec-10 alleles acted as recessive gain-of-function alleles that resulted in complete touch insensitivity. Each of these alleles produced a substantial decrease in MRC size and a shift in the reversal potential in vivo. The latter finding indicates that these mec-10 mutations alter the ionic selectivity of the transduction channel in vivo. All mec-10 mutant animals had properly localized channel complexes, indicating that the loss of MRCs was not due to a dramatic mislocalization of transduction channels. Finally, electrophysiological examination of heterologously expressed complexes suggests that mutant MEC-10 proteins may affect channel current via MEC-2. PMID:21880930

  17. Adeno-associated virus-2 and its primary cellular receptor-Cryo-EM structure of a heparin complex

    SciTech Connect

    O'Donnell, Jason; Taylor, Kenneth A.; Chapman, Michael S.

    2009-03-15

    Adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV-2) is a leading candidate vector for gene therapy. Cell entry starts with attachment to a primary receptor, Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycan (HSPG) before binding to a co-receptor. Here, cryo-electron microscopy provides direct visualization of the virus-HSPG interactions. Single particle analysis was performed on AAV-2 complexed with a 17 kDa heparin fragment at 8.3 A resolution. Heparin density covers the shoulder of spikes surrounding viral 3-fold symmetry axes. Previously implicated, positively charged residues R{sub 448/585}, R{sub 451/588} and R{sub 350/487} from another subunit cluster at the center of the heparin footprint. The footprint is much more extensivemore » than apparent through mutagenesis, including R{sub 347/484}, K{sub 395/532} and K{sub 390/527} that are more conserved, but whose roles have been controversial. It also includes much of a region proposed as a co-receptor site, because prior studies had not revealed heparin interactions. Heparin density bridges over the viral 3-fold axes, indicating multi-valent attachment to symmetry-related binding sites.« less

  18. Structure of the receptor-binding domain of human thrombopoietin determined by complexation with a neutralizing antibody fragment

    PubMed Central

    Feese, Michael D.; Tamada, Taro; Kato, Yoichi; Maeda, Yoshitake; Hirose, Masako; Matsukura, Yasuko; Shigematsu, Hideki; Muto, Takanori; Matsumoto, Atsushi; Watarai, Hiroshi; Ogami, Kinya; Tahara, Tomoyuki; Kato, Takashi; Miyazaki, Hiroshi; Kuroki, Ryota

    2004-01-01

    The cytokine thrombopoietin (TPO), the ligand for the hematopoietic receptor c-Mpl, acts as a primary regulator of megakaryocytopoiesis and platelet production. We have determined the crystal structure of the receptor-binding domain of human TPO (hTPO163) to a 2.5-Å resolution by complexation with a neutralizing Fab fragment. The backbone structure of hTPO163 has an antiparallel four-helix bundle fold. The neutralizing Fab mainly recognizes the C–D crossover loop containing the species invariant residue Q111. Titration calorimetric experiments show that hTPO163 interacts with soluble c-Mpl containing the extracellular cytokine receptor homology domains with 1:2 stoichiometry with the binding constants of 3.3 × 109 M–1 and 1.1 × 106 M–1. The presence of the neutralizing Fab did not inhibit binding of hTPO163 to soluble c-Mpl fragments, but the lower-affinity binding disappeared. Together with prior genetic data, these define the structure–function relationships in TPO and the activation scheme of c-Mpl. PMID:14769915

  19. Treating diabetes and obesity with an FGF21-mimetic antibody activating the βKlotho/FGFR1c receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Foltz, Ian N; Hu, Sylvia; King, Chadwick; Wu, Xinle; Yang, Chaofeng; Wang, Wei; Weiszmann, Jennifer; Stevens, Jennitte; Chen, Jiyun Sunny; Nuanmanee, Noi; Gupte, Jamila; Komorowski, Renee; Sekirov, Laura; Hager, Todd; Arora, Taruna; Ge, Hongfei; Baribault, Helene; Wang, Fen; Sheng, Jackie; Karow, Margaret; Wang, Minghan; Luo, Yongde; McKeehan, Wallace; Wang, Zhulun; Véniant, Murielle M; Li, Yang

    2012-11-28

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a distinctive member of the FGF family with potent beneficial effects on lipid, body weight, and glucose metabolism and has attracted considerable interest as a potential therapeutic for treating diabetes and obesity. As an alternative to native FGF21, we have developed a monoclonal antibody, mimAb1, that binds to βKlotho with high affinity and specifically activates signaling from the βKlotho/FGFR1c (FGF receptor 1c) receptor complex. In obese cynomolgus monkeys, injection of mimAb1 led to FGF21-like metabolic effects, including decreases in body weight, plasma insulin, triglycerides, and glucose during tolerance testing. Mice with adipose-selective FGFR1 knockout were refractory to FGF21-induced improvements in glucose metabolism and body weight. These results in obese monkeys (with mimAb1) and in FGFR1 knockout mice (with FGF21) demonstrated the essential role of FGFR1c in FGF21 function and suggest fat as a critical target tissue for the cytokine and antibody. Because mimAb1 depends on βKlotho to activate FGFR1c, it is not expected to induce side effects caused by activating FGFR1c alone. The unexpected finding of an antibody that can activate FGF21-like signaling through cell surface receptors provided preclinical validation for an innovative therapeutic approach to diabetes and obesity.

  20. Complement C5a Receptor is the Key Initiator of Neutrophil Adhesion Igniting Immune Complex-induced Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Miyabe, Yoshishige; Miyabe, Chie; Murooka, Thomas T; Kim, Edward Y; Newton, Gail A; Kim, Nancy D; Haribabu, Bodduluri; Luscinskas, Francis W; Mempel, Thorsten R; Luster, Andrew D

    2017-01-01

    The deposition of immune complexes (IC) in tissues induces a "type III hypersensitivity" that results in tissue damage and underlies the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases. The neutrophil is the first immune cell recruited into sites of IC deposition and plays a critical role in shaping the overall tissue response. However, the mechanism by which IC initiate and propagate neutrophil infiltration into tissue is not known. Here, using intravital multiphoton joint imaging of IC-induced arthritis in live mice, we found that the complement C5a receptor (C5aR) was the key initiator of neutrophil adhesion on joint endothelium. C5a presented on joint endothelium induced β2 integrin-dependent neutrophil arrest, facilitating neutrophil spreading and transition to crawling, and subsequent leukotriene B 4 receptor (BLT1)-mediated extravasation of the first neutrophils. The chemokine receptor CCR1 promoted neutrophil crawling on the joint endothelium while CXCR2 amplified late neutrophil recruitment and survival once in the joint. Thus, imaging arthritis has defined a new paradigm for type III hypersensitivity where C5a directly initiates neutrophil adhesion on the joint endothelium igniting inflammation.

  1. Protein receptor-independent plasma membrane remodeling by HAMLET: A tumoricidal protein-lipid complex

    DOE PAGES

    Nadeem, Aftab; Sanborn, Jeremy; Gettel, Douglas L.; ...

    2015-11-12

    A central tenet of signal transduction in eukaryotic cells is that extra-cellular ligands activate specific cell surface receptors, which orchestrate downstream responses. This ‘’protein-centric” view is increasingly challenged by evidence for the involvement of specialized membrane domains in signal transduction. Here, we propose that membrane perturbation may serve as an alternative mechanism to activate a conserved cell-death program in cancer cells. This view emerges from the extraordinary manner in which HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills a wide range of tumor cells in vitro and demonstrates therapeutic efficacy and selectivity in cancer models and clinical studies. Wemore » identify a ‘’receptor independent” transformation of vesicular motifs in model membranes, which is paralleled by gross remodeling of tumor cell membranes. Furthermore, we find that HAMLET accumulates within these de novo membrane conformations and define membrane blebs as cellular compartments for direct interactions of HAMLET with essential target proteins such as the Ras family of GTPases. In conclusion, we demonstrate lower sensitivity of healthy cell membranes to HAMLET challenge. These features suggest that HAMLET-induced curvature-dependent membrane conformations serve as surrogate receptors for initiating signal transduction cascades, ultimately leading to cell death.« less

  2. EGFR and the complexity of receptor crosstalk in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Guerrero, E; Jo, S R; Chong, B H; Khachigian, L M

    2013-01-01

    Signaling pathways play a critical role in the maintenance of cellular structure and function. These pathways can act together with synergistic or antagonistic outcome. Cooperative and integrative cellular communication networks, otherwise known as crosstalk can amplify signaling cascades. Here, we focus on receptor crosstalk in the context of cardiovascular pathologies, mainly involving the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a critical mediator of multiple receptor pathways in normal physiological and pathophysiological processes. Considerable experimental evidence suggests that the uncontrolled expression of EGFR contributes to tumorigenesis through inhibition of apoptosis, angiogenesis, anchorage-independent growth and tumor-associated inflammation. Abnormal activation of the intrinsic tyrosine kinase of EGFR through mutation or overexpression is observed in various human cancer types. On the other hand, the role of EGFR in vascular biology is not well understood. In cardiovascular pathologies, such as atherosclerosis and restenosis, vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) migrate and proliferate, contributing to neointima formation, whilst apoptosis may cause plaque instability. EGFR can be transactivated by numerous pathologic stimuli that regulate SMC behaviour. This review describes our current understanding of the role of EGFR in SMC biology and pathology.

  3. Dopamine D1 and adenosine A1 receptors form functionally interacting heteromeric complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ginés, Silvia; Hillion, Joëlle; Torvinen, Maria; Le Crom, Stèphane; Casadó, Vicent; Canela, Enric I.; Rondin, Sofia; Lew, Jow Y.; Watson, Stanley; Zoli, Michele; Agnati, Luigi Francesco; Vernier, Philippe; Lluis, Carmen; Ferré, Sergi; Fuxe, Kjell; Franco, Rafael

    2000-01-01

    The possible molecular basis for the previously described antagonistic interactions between adenosine A1 receptors (A1R) and dopamine D1 receptors (D1R) in the brain have been studied in mouse fibroblast Ltk− cells cotransfected with human A1R and D1R cDNAs or with human A1R and dopamine D2 receptor (long-form) (D2R) cDNAs and in cortical neurons in culture. A1R and D1R, but not A1R and D2R, were found to coimmunoprecipitate in cotransfected fibroblasts. This selective A1R/D1R heteromerization disappeared after pretreatment with the D1R agonist, but not after combined pretreatment with D1R and A1R agonists. A high degree of A1R and D1R colocalization, demonstrated in double immunofluorescence experiments with confocal laser microscopy, was found in both cotransfected fibroblast cells and cortical neurons in culture. On the other hand, a low degree of A1R and D2R colocalization was observed in cotransfected fibroblasts. Pretreatment with the A1R agonist caused coclustering (coaggregation) of A1R and D1R, which was blocked by combined pretreatment with the D1R and A1R agonists in both fibroblast cells and in cortical neurons in culture. Combined pretreatment with D1R and A1R agonists, but not with either one alone, substantially reduced the D1R agonist-induced accumulation of cAMP. The A1R/D1R heteromerization may be one molecular basis for the demonstrated antagonistic modulation of A1R of D1R receptor signaling in the brain. The persistence of A1R/D1R heteromerization seems to be essential for the blockade of A1R agonist-induced A1R/D1R coclustering and for the desensitization of the D1R agonist-induced cAMP accumulation seen on combined pretreatment with D1R and A1R agonists, which indicates a potential role of A1R/D1R heteromers also in desensitization mechanisms and receptor trafficking. PMID:10890919

  4. Simulations of transferred NOE in a ternary peptide-receptor-lipid complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaplicki, J.; Milon, A.

    1998-02-01

    Analyses of neuropeptides interacting with their receptors in presence of lipid membranes require the use of spin systems including several molecules (peptide, membrane, receptor) in at least three states (free, membrane-bound and receptor-bound ligand). Moreover, the exchange rates can be arbitrary. We have developed a program, based on the generalized relaxation matrix method, capable of treating all direct and indirect spin interactions. The program allows a simulation of homonuclear NOE and ROE experiments in case of arbitrary exchange rates, for systems with internal mobility and groups of equivalent spins. We present here some simulations for a system of three states, such as the free, membrane-bound and receptor-bound ligand, aiming at defining more precisely the limits of the transferred NOE experiments for the determination of the receptor-bound conformation of a neuropeptide. Dans le cas d'étude des interactions entre les neuropeptides et leurs récepteurs membranaires on travaille avec un système de plusieurs spins, dans au moins trois états (libre, intermédiaire et lié), qui peuvent appartenir à des molécules différentes (ligand, membrane et récepteur). De plus, les constantes d'échange parmi ces états sont arbitraires. Nous avons développé un logiciel, basé sur la méthode des matrices de relaxation, qui décrit tous les effets d'interactions (directes et indirectes) entre les spins. Ce logiciel permet de simuler les expériences homonucléaires NOE et ROE dans les cas d'échange arbitraire, pour les systèmes possédant une mobilité interne et des groupes de spins équivalents. Nous présentons le résultat de simulations obtenues dans un système à trois états du type peptide libre, peptide lié au lipide, peptide lié au récepteur, dont le but est de préciser les limites d'utilisation des NOEs transférés en vue de déterminer la conformation de neuropeptides liés à leur récepteur.

  5. TMED10 Protein Interferes with Transforming Growth Factor (TGF)-β Signaling by Disrupting TGF-β Receptor Complex Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Naoko; Tsuchiya, Yuki; Kako, Kenro; Umezaki, Kenryu; Sano, Keigo; Ikeno, Souichi; Otsuka, Eri; Shigeta, Masashi; Nakagawa, Ai; Sakata, Nobuo; Itoh, Fumiko; Nakano, Yota; Iemura, Shun-ichiro; van Dinther, Maarten; Natsume, Tohru; ten Dijke, Peter; Itoh, Susumu

    2017-01-01

    The intensity and duration of TGF-β signaling determine the cellular biological response. How this is negatively regulated is not well understood. Here, we identified a novel negative regulator of TGF-β signaling, transmembrane p24-trafficking protein 10 (TMED10). TMED10 disrupts the complex formation between TGF-β type I (also termed ALK5) and type II receptors (TβRII). Misexpression studies revealed that TMED10 attenuated TGF-β-mediated signaling. A 20-amino acid-long region from Thr91 to Glu110 within the extracellular region of TMED10 was found to be crucial for TMED10 interaction with both ALK5 and TβRII. Synthetic peptides corresponding to this region inhibit both TGF-β-induced Smad2 phosphorylation and Smad-dependent transcriptional reporter activity. In a xenograft cancer model, where previously TGF-β was shown to elicit tumor-promoting effects, gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies for TMED10 revealed a decrease and increase in the tumor size, respectively. Thus, we determined herein that TMED10 expression levels are the key determinant for efficiency of TGF-β receptor complex formation and signaling. PMID:28115518

  6. Transient complexes. A structural model for the activation of adenylate cyclase by hormone receptors (guanine nucleotides/irradiation inactivation)

    PubMed Central

    Martin, B. Richard; Stein, Janet M.; Kennedy, Edwina L.; Doberska, Christine A.; Metcalfe, James C.

    1979-01-01

    1. The irradiation-inactivation procedure was used to study changes in the state of association of the protein components of adenylate cyclase in intact rat liver plasma membranes by measurement of alterations in the target size determined from the catalytic activity of the enzyme. 2. A decrease in target size at 30°C in response to p[NH]ppG (guanosine 5′-[βγ-imido]triphosphate) or GTP was demonstrated, which we take to reflect the dissociation of a regulatory subunit. The effect of GTP is potentiated by glucagon. This effect is not observed at 0°C. 3. An increase in target size was observed in response to glucagon in the absence of guanine nucleotides, which we take to reflect the association of glucagon receptor with adenylate cyclase. 4. We propose a model for the activation of adenylate cyclase by glucagon in which the binding of the hormone to its receptor causes an initial association of the receptor with the catalytic unit of the enzyme and a regulatory subunit to form a ternary complex. The subsequent activation of the adenylate cyclase results from the dissociation of the ternary complex to leave a free catalytic unit in the activated state. This dissociation requires the binding of a guanine nucleotide to the regulatory subunit. 5. The effects of variation of temperature on the activation of adenylate cyclase by glucagon and guanine nucleotides were examined and are discussed in relation to the irradiation-activation data. 6. The effectiveness of hormones, guanine nucleotides and combinations of hormone and guanine nucleotides as activators of adenylate cyclase in both rat liver and rat fat-cell plasma membranes was studied and the results are discussed in relation to the model proposed, which is also considered in relation to the observations published by other workers. PMID:230831

  7. The evolutionary origin of auditory receptors in Tettigonioidea: the complex tibial organ of Schizodactylidae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauß, Johannes; Lakes-Harlan, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    Audition in insects is of polyphyletic origin. Tympanal ears derived from proprioceptive or vibratory receptor organs, but many questions of the evolution of insect auditory systems are still open. Despite the rather typical bauplan of the insect body, e.g., with a fixed number of segments, tympanal ears evolved at very different places, but only ensiferans have ears at the foreleg tibia, located in the tibial organ. The homology and monophyly of ensiferan ears is controversial, and no precursor organ was unambiguously identified for auditory receptors. The latter can only be identified by comparative study of recent atympanate taxa. These atympanate taxa are poorly investigated. In this paper, we report the neuroanatomy of the tibial organ of Comicus calcaris (Irish 1986), an atympanate Schizodactylid (splay-footed cricket). This representative of a Gondwana relict group has a tripartite sensory organ, homologous to tettigoniid ears. A comparison with morphology-based cladistic phylogeny indicates that the tripartite neuronal organization present in the majority of Tettigonioidea presumably preceded evolution of a hearing sense in the Tettigonioidea. Furthermore, the absence of a tripartite organ in Grylloidea argues against a monophyletic origin and homology of the cricket and katydid ears. The tracheal attachment of sensory neurons typical for ears of Tettigonioidea is present in C. calcaris and may have facilitated cooption for auditory function. The functional auditory organ was presumably formed in evolution by successive non-neural modifications of trachea and tympana. This first investigation of the neuroanatomy of Schizodactylidae suggests a non-auditory chordotonal organ as the precursor for auditory receptors of related tympanate taxa and adds evidence for the phylogenetic position of the group.

  8. Complex Human Glucocorticoid Receptor dim Mutations Define Glucocorticoid Induced Apoptotic Resistance in Bone Cells

    PubMed Central

    Scoltock, Alyson B.; Hamel, Brant L.; Yudt, Matthew R.; Cidlowski, John A.

    2012-01-01

    A mutation in the D-loop of the second zinc finger of the DNA-binding domain of the human glucocorticoid receptor (hGR), A458T (GRdim), has been suggested to be essential for dimerization and DNA binding of the GR, and genetically altered GRdim mice survive, whereas murine GR knockout mice die. Interestingly, thymocytes isolated from the GRdim mice were reported to be resistant to glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis. To further evaluate the dim mutations in glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis, we stably expressed either the hGRdim (A458T) or the hGRdim4 (A458T, R460D, D462C, and N454D) mutant receptors in human osteosarcoma (U-2 OS) cells that are devoid of hGR and unresponsive to glucocorticoids. We analyzed these cell lines by comparison with a stable expression hGRα U-2 OS cell line, which undergoes apoptosis after glucocorticoid treatment. Transient reporter gene assays with glucocorticoid response element-driven vectors revealed that the hGRdim mutation had diminished steroid responsiveness and cells carrying the hGRdim4 mutation were unresponsive to steroid, whereas glucocorticoid-induced nuclear factor κB repression was unaffected by either mutation. Interestingly, both the hGRdim and hGRdim4 receptors readily formed dimers as measured by immunoprecipitation. Examination of GR-mediated apoptosis showed that hGRdim cells were only partially resistant to apoptosis, whereas hGRdim4 cells were completely resistant to glucocorticoid-induced cell death despite remaining sensitive to other apoptotic stimuli. Global gene expression analysis revealed that hGRdim4 cells widely regulated gene expression but differentially regulated apoptotic mRNA when compared with cells expressing wild-type hGRα. These studies challenge conclusions drawn from previous studies of GR dim mutants. PMID:22174376

  9. Molecular modeling of the human vasopressin V2 receptor/agonist complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaplewski, Cezary; Kaźmierkiewicz, Rajmund; Ciarkowski, Jerzy

    1998-05-01

    The V2 vasopressin renal receptor (V2R), which controls antidiuresis in mammals, is a member of the large family of heptahelical transmembrane (7TM) G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Using the automated GPCR modeling facility available via Internet (http://expasy.hcuge.ch/swissmod/SWISS-MODEL.html) for construction of the 7TM domain in accord with the bovine rhodopsin (RD) footprint, and the SYBYL software for addition of the intra- and extracellular domains, the human V2R was modeled. The structure was further refined and its conformational variability tested by the use of a version of the Constrained Simulated Annealing (CSA) protocol developed in this laboratory. An inspection of the resulting structure reveals that the V2R (likewise any GPCR modeled this way) is much thicker and accordingly forms a more spacious TM cavity than most of the hitherto modeled GPCR constructs do, typically based on the structure of bacteriorhodopsin (BRD). Moreover, in this model the 7TM helices are arranged differently than they are in any BRD-based model. Thus, the topology and geometry of the TM cavity, potentially capable of receiving ligands, is in this model quite different than it is in the earlier models. In the subsequent step, two ligands, the native [arginine8]vasopressin (AVP) and the selective agonist [d-arginine8]vasopressin (DAVP) were inserted, each in two topologically non-equivalent ways, into the TM cavity and the resulting structures were equilibrated and their conformational variabilities tested using CSA as above. The best docking was selected and justified upon consideration of ligand-receptor interactions and structure-activity data. Finally, the amino acid residues were indicated, mainly in TM helices 3-7, as potentially important in both AVP and DAVP docking. Among those Cys112, Val115-Lys116, Gln119, Met123 in helix 3; Glu174 in helix 4; Val206, Ala210, Val213-Phe214 in helix 5; Trp284, Phe287-Phe288, Gln291 in helix 6; and Phe307, Leu310, Ala314 and

  10. Forced Homo- and Heterodimerization of All gp130-Type Receptor Complexes Leads to Constitutive Ligand-independent Signaling and Cytokine-independent Growth

    PubMed Central

    Suthaus, Jan; Tillmann, Anna; Lorenzen, Inken; Bulanova, Elena; Rose-John, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Naturally ligand independent constitutively active gp130 variants were described to be responsible for inflammatory hepatocellular adenomas. Recently, we genetically engineered a ligand-independent constitutively active gp130 variant based on homodimerization of Jun leucine zippers. Because also heterodimeric complexes within the gp130 family may have tumorigenic potential, we seek to generate ligand-independent constitutively active heterodimers for all known gp130-receptor complexes based on IL-15/IL-15Rα-sushi fusion proteins. Ligand-independent heterodimerization of gp130 with WSX-1, LIFR, and OSMR and of OSMR with GPL led to constitutive, ligand-independent STAT1 and/or STAT3 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Moreover, these receptor combinations induced transcription of the STAT3 target genes c-myc and Pim-1 and factor-independent growth of stably transduced Ba/F3-gp130 cells. Here, we establish the IL-15/IL-15Rα-sushi system as a new system to mimic constitutive and ligand-independent activation of homo- and heterodimeric receptor complexes, which might be applicable to other heterodimeric receptor families. A mutated IL-15 protein, which was still able to bind the IL-15Rα-sushi domain, but not to β- and γ-receptor chains, in combination with the 2A peptide technology may be used to translate our in vitro data into the in vivo situation to assess the tumorigenic potential of gp130-heterodimeric receptor complexes. PMID:20554759

  11. N-Ethylmaleimide Dissociates α7 ACh Receptor from a Complex with NSF and Promotes Its Delivery to the Presynaptic Membrane.

    PubMed

    Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2016-08-01

    N-Ethylmaleimide (NEM)-sensitive factor (NSF) associates with soluble NSF attachment protein (SNAP), that binds to SNAP receptors (SNAREs) including syntaxin, SNAP25, and synaptobrevin. The complex of NSF/SNAP/SNAREs plays a critical role in the regulation of vesicular traffic. The present study investigated NEM-regulated α7 ACh receptor translocation. NSF associated with β-SNAP and the SNAREs syntaxin 1 and synaptobrevin 2 in the rat hippocampus. NSF also associated with the α7 ACh receptor subunit, the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunits GluA1 and GluA2, and the γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptor γ2 subunit. NEM, an inhibitor of NSF, significantly dissociated the α7 ACh receptor subunit from a complex with NSF and increased cell surface localization of the receptor subunit, but such effect was not obtained with the GluA1, GluA2 or γ2 subunits. NEM, alternatively, dissociated synaptobrevin 2 from an assembly of NSF/β-SNAP/syntaxin 1/synaptobrevin 2. NEM significantly increased the rate of nicotine-triggered AMPA receptor-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents, without affecting the amplitude, in rat hippocampal slices. The results of the present study indicate that NEM releases the α7 ACh receptor subunit and synaptobrevin 2 from an assembly of α7 ACh receptor subunit/NSF/β-SNAP/syntaxin 1/synaptobrevin 2, thereby promoting delivery of the α7 ACh receptor subunit to presynaptic membrane.

  12. Synthesis and amino acids complexation of tripodal hexasubstituted benzene chiral receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choksakulporn, Saowanaporn; Punkvang, Auradee; Sritana-anant, Yongsak

    2015-02-01

    The parent 1,3,5-triacetyl-2,4,6-trihydroxybenzene was prepared in up to 91% yield using a one-pot, one step reaction catalyzed by aluminum chloride. Its alkylations with 1,5-dibromopentane generated a symmetric tripodal hexasubstituted benzene precursor in the alternated conformer predicted by a theoretical calculation. Subsequent substitutions and reductions provided the corresponding tris-amine in 59% yield. Aminations of the tripodal precursor with (R)-(+)-1-phenylethylamine obtained a chiral tris-amine ligand in 44% yield. 1H NMR titrations of this ligand with each of three L-amino acid derivatives as guest molecules confirmed the presence of their complexes, in which the complex with alanine derivative displayed the strongest interactions with the ligand. Job plots suggested that all complexes composed of 1:2 ratios of the ligand and these guests. Theoretical calculations additionally revealed the structures and the associated binding parameters of the complexes.

  13. Evolutionary history of the T cell receptor complex as revealed by small-spotted catshark (Scyliorhinus canicula).

    PubMed

    Pettinello, Rita; Redmond, Anthony K; Secombes, Christopher J; Macqueen, Daniel J; Dooley, Helen

    2017-09-01

    In every jawed vertebrate species studied so far, the T cell receptor (TCR) complex is composed of two different TCR chains (α/β or γ/δ) and a number of CD3 subunits responsible for transmitting signals into the T cell. In this study, we characterised all of the TCR and CD3 genes of small-spotted catshark (Scyliorhinus canicula) and analysed their expression in a broad range of tissues. While the TCR complex is highly conserved across jawed vertebrates, we identified a number of differences in catshark, most notably the presence of two copies of both TCRβ and CD3γδ, and the absence of a functionally-important proline rich region from CD3ε. We also demonstrate that TCRβ has duplicated independently multiple times in jawed vertebrate evolution, bringing additional diversity to the TCR complex. This study reveals new insights about the evolutionary history of the TCR complex and raises new avenues for future exploration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Crystal structure of a complete ternary complex of T-cell receptor, peptide-MHC, and CD4

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Yiyuan; Wang, Xin Xiang; Mariuzza, Roy A

    2012-07-11

    Adaptive immunity depends on specific recognition by a T-cell receptor (TCR) of an antigenic peptide bound to a major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) molecule on an antigen-presenting cell (APC). In addition, T-cell activation generally requires binding of this same pMHC to a CD4 or CD8 coreceptor. Here, we report the structure of a complete TCR-pMHC-CD4 ternary complex involving a human autoimmune TCR, a myelin-derived self-peptide bound to HLA-DR4, and CD4. The complex resembles a pointed arch in which TCR and CD4 are each tilted ~65° relative to the T-cell membrane. By precluding direct contacts between TCR and CD4, the structure explainsmore » how TCR and CD4 on the T cell can simultaneously, yet independently, engage the same pMHC on the APC. The structure, in conjunction with previous mutagenesis data, places TCR-associated CD3εγ and CD3εδ subunits, which transmit activation signals to the T cell, inside the TCR-pMHC-CD4 arch, facing CD4. By establishing anchor points for TCR and CD4 on the T-cell membrane, the complex provides a basis for understanding how the CD4 coreceptor focuses TCR on MHC to guide TCR docking on pMHC during thymic T-cell selection.« less

  15. The adenosine A(2A) antagonistic properties of selected C8-substituted xanthines.

    PubMed

    Van der Walt, Mietha M; Terre'Blanche, Gisella; Petzer, Anél; Lourens, Anna C U; Petzer, Jacobus P

    2013-08-01

    The adenosine A2A receptor is considered to be an important target for the development of new therapies for Parkinson's disease. Several antagonists of the A2A receptor have entered clinical trials for this purpose and many research groups have initiated programs to develop A2A receptor antagonists. Most A2A receptor antagonists belong to two different chemical classes, the xanthine derivatives and the amino-substituted heterocyclic compounds. In an attempt to discover high affinity A2A receptor antagonists and to further explore the structure-activity relationships (SARs) of A2A antagonism by the xanthine class of compounds, this study examines the A2A antagonistic properties of series of (E)-8-styrylxanthines, 8-(phenoxymethyl)xanthines and 8-(3-phenylpropyl)xanthines. The results document that among these series, the (E)-8-styrylxanthines have the highest binding affinities with the most potent homologue, (E)-1,3-diethyl-7-methyl-8-[(3-trifluoromethyl)styryl]xanthine, exhibiting a Ki value of 11.9 nM. This compound was also effective in reversing haloperidol-induced catalepsy in rats, providing evidence that it is in fact an A2A receptor antagonist. The importance of substitution at C8 with the styryl moiety was demonstrated by the finding that none of the 8-(phenoxymethyl)xanthines and 8-(3-phenylpropyl)xanthines exhibited high binding affinities for the A2A receptor. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ligand-binding domain of an α7-nicotinic receptor chimera and its complex with agonist.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Xing; Huang, Sun; Bren, Nina; Noridomi, Kaori; Dellisanti, Cosma D; Sine, Steven M; Chen, Lin

    2011-09-11

    The α(7) acetylcholine receptor (AChR) mediates pre- and postsynaptic neurotransmission in the central nervous system and is a potential therapeutic target in neurodegenerative, neuropsychiatric and inflammatory disorders. We determined the crystal structure of the extracellular domain of a receptor chimera constructed from the human α(7) AChR and Lymnaea stagnalis acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP), which shares 64% sequence identity and 71% similarity with native α(7). We also determined the structure with bound epibatidine, a potent AChR agonist. Comparison of the structures revealed molecular rearrangements and interactions that mediate agonist recognition and early steps in signal transduction in α(7) AChRs. The structures further revealed a ring of negative charge within the central vestibule, poised to contribute to cation selectivity. Structure-guided mutational studies disclosed distinctive contributions to agonist recognition and signal transduction in α(7) AChRs. The structures provide a realistic template for structure-aided drug design and for defining structure-function relationships of α(7) AChRs. © 2011 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Learning induces the translin/trax RNase complex to express activin receptors for persistent memory.

    PubMed

    Park, Alan Jung; Havekes, Robbert; Fu, Xiuping; Hansen, Rolf; Tudor, Jennifer C; Peixoto, Lucia; Li, Zhi; Wu, Yen-Ching; Poplawski, Shane G; Baraban, Jay M; Abel, Ted

    2017-09-20

    Long-lasting forms of synaptic plasticity and memory require de novo protein synthesis. Yet, how learning triggers this process to form memory is unclear. Translin/trax is a candidate to drive this learning-induced memory mechanism by suppressing microRNA-mediated translational silencing at activated synapses. We find that mice lacking translin/trax display defects in synaptic tagging, which requires protein synthesis at activated synapses, and long-term memory. Hippocampal samples harvested from these mice following learning show increases in several disease-related microRNAs targeting the activin A receptor type 1C (ACVR1C), a component of the transforming growth factor-β receptor superfamily. Furthermore, the absence of translin/trax abolishes synaptic upregulation of ACVR1C protein after learning. Finally, synaptic tagging and long-term memory deficits in mice lacking translin/trax are mimicked by ACVR1C inhibition. Thus, we define a new memory mechanism by which learning reverses microRNA-mediated silencing of the novel plasticity protein ACVR1C via translin/trax.

  18. Molecular Architecture of the Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I-Binding Site of Ly49 Natural Killer Cell Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Deng,L.; Cho, S.; Malchiodi, E.

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a vital role in the detection and destruction of virally infected and tumor cells during innate immune responses. The highly polymorphic Ly49 family of NK receptors regulates NK cell function by sensing major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules on target cells. Despite the determination of two Ly49-MHC-I complex structures, the molecular features of Ly49 receptors that confer specificity for particular MHC-I alleles have not been identified. To understand the functional architecture of Ly49-binding sites, we determined the crystal structures of Ly49C and Ly49G and completed refinement of the Ly49C-H-2Kb complex. This information, combined withmore » mutational analysis of Ly49A, permitted a structure-based classification of Ly49s that we used to dissect the binding site into three distinct regions, each having different roles in MHC recognition. One region, located at the center of the binding site, has a similar structure across the Ly49 family and mediates conserved interactions with MHC-I that contribute most to binding. However, the preference of individual Ly49s for particular MHC-I molecules is governed by two regions that flank the central region and are structurally more variable. One of the flanking regions divides Ly49s into those that recognize both H-2D and H-2K versus only H-2D ligands, whereas the other discriminates among H-2D or H-2K alleles. The modular design of Ly49-binding sites provides a framework for predicting the MHC-binding specificity of Ly49s that have not been characterized experimentally.« less

  19. X-ray and neutron small-angle scattering analysis of the complex formed by the Met receptor and the Listeria monocytogenes invasion protein InlB.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Hartmut H; Petoukhov, Maxim V; Härtlein, Michael; Moulin, Martine; Gherardi, Ermanno; Timmins, Peter; Heinz, Dirk W; Svergun, Dmitri I

    2008-03-21

    The Listeria monocytogenes surface protein InlB binds to the extracellular domain of the human receptor tyrosine kinase Met, the product of the c-met proto-oncogene. InlB binding activates the Met receptor, leading to uptake of Listeria into normally nonphagocytic host cells. The N-terminal half of InlB (InlB(321)) is sufficient for Met binding and activation. The complex between this Met-binding domain of InlB and various constructs of the Met ectodomain was characterized by size exclusion chromatography and dynamic light scattering, and structural models were built using small-angle X-ray scattering and small-angle neutron scattering. Although most receptor tyrosine kinase ligands induce receptor dimerization, InlB(321) consistently binds the Met ectodomain with a 1:1 stoichiometry. A construct comprising the Sema and PSI domains of Met, although sufficient to bind the physiological Met ligand hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor, does not form a complex with InlB(321) in solution, highlighting the importance of Met Ig domains for InlB binding. Small-angle X-ray scattering and small-angle neutron scattering measurements of ligand and receptor, both free and in complex, reveal an elongated shape for the receptor. The four Ig domains form a bent, rather than a fully extended, conformation, and InlB(321) binds to Sema and the first Ig domain of Met, in agreement with the recent crystal structure of a smaller Met fragment in complex with InlB(321). These results call into question whether receptor dimerization is the basic underlying event in InlB(321)-mediated Met activation and demonstrate differences in the mechanisms by which the physiological ligand hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor and InlB(321) bind and activate the Met receptor.

  20. A PTK7/Ror2 Co-Receptor Complex Affects Xenopus Neural Crest Migration

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Hanna; Rollwitz, Erik; Borchers, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Neural crest cells are a highly migratory pluripotent cell population that generates a wide array of different cell types and failure in their migration can result in severe birth defects and malformation syndromes. Neural crest migration is controlled by various means including chemotaxis, repellent guidance cues and cell-cell interaction. Non-canonical Wnt PCP (planar cell polarity) signaling has previously been shown to control cell-contact mediated neural crest cell guidance. PTK7 (protein tyrosine kinase 7) is a transmembrane pseudokinase and a known regulator of Wnt/PCP signaling, which is expressed in Xenopus neural crest cells and required for their migration. PTK7 functions as a Wnt co-receptor; however, it remains unclear by which means PTK7 affects neural crest migration. Expressing fluorescently labeled proteins in Xenopus neural crest cells we find that PTK7 co-localizes with the Ror2 Wnt-receptor. Further, co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that PTK7 interacts with Ror2. The PTK7/Ror2 interaction is likely relevant for neural crest migration, because Ror2 expression can rescue the PTK7 loss of function migration defect. Live cell imaging of explanted neural crest cells shows that PTK7 loss of function affects the formation of cell protrusions as well as cell motility. Co-expression of Ror2 can rescue these defects. In vivo analysis demonstrates that a kinase dead Ror2 mutant cannot rescue PTK7 loss of function. Thus, our data suggest that Ror2 can substitute for PTK7 and that the signaling function of its kinase domain is required for this effect. PMID:26680417

  1. Identification of Complete Repertoire of Apis florea Odorant Receptors Reveals Complex Orthologous Relationships with Apis mellifera

    PubMed Central

    Karpe, Snehal D.; Jain, Rikesh; Brockmann, Axel; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We developed a computational pipeline for homology based identification of the complete repertoire of olfactory receptor (OR) genes in the Asian honey bee species, Apis florea. Apis florea is phylogenetically the most basal honey bee species and also the most distant sister species to the Western honey bee Apis mellifera, for which all OR genes had been identified before. Using our pipeline, we identified 180 OR genes in A. florea, which is very similar to the number of ORs identified in A. mellifera (177 ORs). Many characteristics of the ORs including gene structure, synteny of tandemly repeated ORs and basic phylogenetic clustering are highly conserved. The composite phylogenetic tree of A. florea and A. mellifera ORs could be divided into 21 clades which are in harmony with the existing Hymenopteran tree. However, we found a few nonorthologous OR relationships between both species as well as independent pseudogenization of ORs suggesting separate evolutionary changes. Particularly, a subgroup of the OR gene clade XI, which had been hypothesized to code cuticular hydrocarbon receptors showed a high number of species-specific ORs. RNAseq analysis detected a total number of 145 OR transcripts in male and 162 in female antennae. Most of the OR genes were highly expressed on the female antennae. However, we detected five distinct male-biased OR genes, out of which three genes (AfOr11, AfOr18, AfOr170P) were shown to be male-biased in A. mellifera, too, thus corroborating a behavioral function in sex-pheromone communication. PMID:27540087

  2. Lipopolysaccharides and trophic factors regulate the LPS receptor complex in nodose and trigeminal neurons.

    PubMed

    Kunda, P E; Cavicchia, J C; Acosta, C G

    2014-11-07

    Binding of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) to toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) triggers an innate immunoresponse associated with pain and inflammation. The expression, and to a greater extent the regulation of TLR4 and its auxiliary proteins (myeloid differentiation protein 1 (MD1), myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD2) and cluster of differentiation 14 (CD14)), are both poorly understood in trigeminal and nodose neurons. We used a combination of Western blotting, semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), pharmacological manipulation and immunohistochemistry. The expression pattern and regulation by LPS and trophic factors of TLR4/MD2/CD14 and radioprotective protein of 105kDa (RP105)/MD1 were determined in neonatal trigeminal and nodose mice neurons. We found that all these proteins were expressed in both trigeminal and nodose neurons. The trophic factors Artemin and nerve growth factor (NGF) up-regulated MD2 and RP105 mRNA levels in trigeminal neurons. In nodose neurons the trophic factors brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) up-regulated MD1 and RP105 mRNA levels. Also we observed that in both neuronal types LPS acutely (within 20 min) down-regulated CD14 and MD2 mRNAs. In addition, LPS increased significantly the proportion of trigeminal and nodose neurons expressing nociceptin/orphanin FQ in culture probably acting via TLR4/MD2. Although the exact mechanisms underlying the regulation by trophic factors and LPS require further elucidation, the findings of this study indicate that LPS acts through its archetypical receptor in trigeminal and nodose neurons. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Complex Biology of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor and Its Role in the Pituitary Gland.

    PubMed

    Formosa, Robert; Vassallo, Josanne

    2017-08-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor best known for its ability to mediate the effects of environmental toxins such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD or dioxin), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), benzene, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) through the initiation of transcription of a number of metabolically active enzymes. Therefore, the AHR has been studied mostly in the context of xenobiotic signaling. However, several studies have shown that the AHR is constitutively active and plays an important role in general cell physiology, independently of its activity as a xenobiotic receptor and in the absence of exogenous ligands. Within the pituitary, activation of the AHR by environmental toxins has been implicated in disruption of gonadal development and fertility. Studies carried out predominantly in mouse models have revealed the detrimental influence of several environmental toxins on specific cell lineages of the pituitary tissue mediated by activation of AHR and its downstream effectors. Activation of AHR during fetal development adversely affected pituitary development while adult models exposed to AHR ligands demonstrated varying degrees of pituitary dysfunction. Such dysfunction may arise as a result of direct effects on pituitary cells or indirect effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. This review offers in-depth analysis of all aspects of AHR biology, with a particular focus on its role and activity within the adenohypophysis and specifically in pituitary tumorigenesis. A novel mechanism by which the AHR may play a direct role in pituitary cell proliferation and tumor formation is postulated. This review therefore attempts to cover all aspects of the AHR's role in the pituitary tissue, from fetal development to adult physiology and the pathophysiology underlying endocrine disruption and pituitary tumorigenesis.

  4. Predicted Structures of Agonist and Antagonist Bound Complexes of Adenosine A3 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Kyung; Riley, Lindsay; Abrol, Ravinder; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Goddard, William A.

    2011-01-01

    We used the GEnSeMBLE Monte Carlo method to predict ensemble of the 20 best packings (helix rotations and tilts) based on the neutral total energy (E) from a vast number (10 trillion) of potential packings for each of the 4 subtypes of the adenosine G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are involved in many cytoprotective functions. We then used the DarwinDock Monte Carlo methods to predict the binding pose for the human A3 adenosine receptor (hAA3R) for subtype selective agonists and antagonists. We find that all four A3 agonists stabilize the 15th lowest conformation of apo-hAA3R while also binding strongly to the 1st and 3rd. In contrast the four A3 antagonists stabilize the 2nd or 3rd lowest conformation. These results show that different ligands can stabilize different GPCR conformations, which will likely affect function, complicating the design of functionally unique ligands. Interestingly all agonists lead to a trans χ1 angle for W6.48 that experiments on other GPCRs associate with G-protein activation while all 20 apo-AA3R conformations have a W6.48 gauche+ χ1 angle associated experimentally with inactive GPCRs for other systems. Thus docking calculations have identified critical ligand-GPCR structures involved with activation. We find that the predicted binding site for selective agonist Cl-IB-MECA to the predicted structure of hAA3R shows favorable interactions to three subtype variable residues, I2536.58, V169EL2, and Q167EL2, while the predicted structure for hAA2AR shows weakened to the corresponding amino acids: T2566.58, E169EL2, and L167EL2, explaining the observed subtype selectivity. PMID:21488099

  5. Crystallization of a 2:2 complex of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF) with the ligand-binding region of the GCSF receptor

    PubMed Central

    Honjo, Eijiro; Tamada, Taro; Maeda, Yoshitake; Koshiba, Takumi; Matsukura, Yasuko; Okamoto, Tomoyuki; Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Tokunaga, Masao; Kuroki, Ryota

    2005-01-01

    The granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF) receptor receives signals for regulating the maturation, proliferation and differentiation of the precursor cells of neutrophilic granulocytes. The signalling complex composed of two GCSFs (GCSF, 19 kDa) and two GCSF receptors (GCSFR, 34 kDa) consisting of an Ig-like domain and a cytokine-receptor homologous (CRH) domain was crystallized. A crystal of the complex was grown in 1.0 M sodium formate and 0.1 M sodium acetate pH 4.6 and belongs to space group P41212 (or its enantiomorph P43212), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 110.1, c = 331.8 Å. Unfortunately, this crystal form did not diffract beyond 5 Å resolution. Since the heterogeneity of GCSF receptor appeared to prevent the growth of good-quality crystals, the GCSF receptor was fractionated by anion-exchange chromatography. Crystals of the GCSF–fractionated GCSF receptor complex were grown as a new crystal form in 0.2 M ammonium phosphate. This new crystal form diffracted to beyond 3.0 Å resolution and belonged to space group P3121 (or its enantiomorph P3221), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 134.8, c = 105.7 Å. PMID:16511159

  6. Differential nuclear localization of the IFNGR-1 and IFNGR-2 subunits of the IFN-gamma receptor complex following activation by IFN-gamma.

    PubMed

    Larkin, J; Johnson, H M; Subramaniam, P S

    2000-06-01

    We have recently identified a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) in the C-terminus of murine type II interferon (IFN), IFN-gamma, that is responsible for the internalization and nuclear translocation of extracellularly added IFN-gamma. Because the uptake of IFN-gamma is a receptor-mediated endocytotic process, we examined in this study the fate of both the receptor subunits (IFNGR-1 and IFNGR-2) of the heterodimeric IFN-gamma receptor complex. Human IFN-gamma (HuIFN-gamma) was also found to contain a polybasic NLS in a conserved C-terminal region capable of directing its nuclear translocation. Like the ligand, the IFNGR-1 subunit of the receptor complex on WISH cells was found to be translocated to the nucleus on treatment with HuIFN-gamma. Using a combination of immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence techniques, we found the nuclear accumulation of IFNGR-1 to be ligand dependent, and it was evident within 10-20 min after ligand stimulation. IFNGR-1 was found to colocalize, in a time-dependent and dose-dependent fashion, with the nuclear translocation of the transcription factor Stat1alpha, which is activated by this ligand-receptor system. In addition, Stat1alpha was found to be complexed with IFNGR-1 over the time period of its nuclear translocation. In marked contrast, IFNGR-2 was not transported to the nucleus. The surface immunofluorescence pattern of IFNGR-2 suggested that, following ligand stimulation, the majority of IFNGR-2 remains at the cell surface, whereas IFNGR-1 is endocytosed and targeted to the cell nucleus. These findings suggest that IFNGR-1 plays an active intracellular role in signal transduction events subsequent to the binding of ligand to the dimeric receptor complex. Furthermore, these studies provide the first example of the selective endocytosis and nuclear translocation of a subunit of a multimeric receptor complex.

  7. Crystal Structure of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin G (SEG) in Complex with a Mouse T-cell Receptor Beta Chain

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, M.M.; Robinson, H.; Cho, S.

    2011-01-14

    Superantigens (SAgs) are bacterial or viral toxins that bind MHC class II (MHC-II) molecules and T-cell receptor (TCR) in a nonconventional manner, inducing T-cell activation that leads to inflammatory cytokine production, which may result in acute toxic shock. In addition, the emerging threat of purpura fulminans and community-associated meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus emphasizes the importance of a better characterization of SAg binding to their natural ligands that may allow the development of reagents to neutralize their action. The three-dimensional structure of the complex between a mouse TCR {beta} chain (mV{beta}8.2) and staphylococcal enterotoxin G (SEG) at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution revealed amore » binding site that does not conserve the 'hot spots' present in mV{beta}8.2-SEC2, mV{beta}8.2-SEC3, mV{beta}8.2-SEB, and mV{beta}8.2-SPEA complexes. Analysis of the mV{beta}8.2-SEG interface allowed us to explain the higher affinity of this complex compared with the others, which may account for the early activation of T-cells bearing mV{beta}8.2 by SEG. This mode of interaction between SEG and mV{beta}8.2 could be an adaptive advantage to bestow on the pathogen a faster rate of colonization of the host.« less

  8. Neuropilin-1 forms complexes with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 during megakaryocytic differentiation of UT-7/TPO cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsaka, Akimichi, E-mail: ohsaka@juntendo.ac.jp; Hirota-Komatsu, Satoko; Shibata, Miki

    2009-12-25

    We investigated whether the gene expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors (VEGFR and neuropilin-1 [NRP-1]) could be specifically regulated during the megakaryocytic differentiation of human thrombopoietin (TPO)-dependent UT-7/TPO cells. Undifferentiated UT-7/TPO cells expressed a functional VEGFR-2, leading to VEGF binding and VEGF{sub 165}-induced tyrosine phosphorylation, cell proliferation, and apoptosis inhibition. The megakaryocytic differentiation of UT-7/TPO cells on treatment with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) was accompanied by a marked up-regulation of NRP-1 mRNA and protein expression and by an increase in VEGF-binding activity, which was mainly mediated by VEGFR-2. VEGF{sub 165} promoted the formation of complexes containingmore » NRP-1 and VEGFR-2 in undifferentiated UT-7/TPO cells in a dose-dependent manner. Unlike human umbilical vein endothelial cells, PMA-differentiated UT-7/TPO cells exhibited complex formation between NRP-1 and VEGFR-2 even in the absence of VEGF{sub 165}. These findings suggest that NRP-1-VEGFR-2-complex formation may contribute to effective cellular functions mediated by VEGF{sub 165} in megakaryocytic cells.« less

  9. Hard wiring of T cell receptor specificity for the major histocompatibility complex is underpinned by TCR adaptability

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, Scott R.; Chen, Zhenjun; Archbold, Julia K.

    2010-07-07

    {alpha}{beta} T cell receptors (TCRs) are genetically restricted to corecognize peptide antigens bound to self-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) molecules; however, the basis for this MHC specificity remains unclear. Despite the current dogma, evaluation of the TCR-pMHC-I structural database shows that the nongermline-encoded complementarity-determining region (CDR)-3 loops often contact the MHC-I, and the germline-encoded CDR1 and -2 loops frequently participate in peptide-mediated interactions. Nevertheless, different TCRs adopt a roughly conserved docking mode over the pMHC-I, in which three MHC-I residues (65, 69, and 155) are invariably contacted by the TCR in one way or another. Nonetheless, the impact of mutations atmore » these three positions, either individually or together, was not uniformly detrimental to TCR recognition of pHLA-B*0801 or pHLA-B*3508. Moreover, when TCR-pMHC-I recognition was impaired, this could be partially restored by expression of the CD8 coreceptor. The structure of a TCR-pMHC-I complex in which these three (65, 69, and 155) MHC-I positions were all mutated resulted in shifting of the TCR footprint relative to the cognate complex and formation of compensatory interactions. Collectively, our findings reveal the inherent adaptability of the TCR in maintaining peptide recognition while accommodating changes to the central docking site on the pMHC-I.« less

  10. T cell receptor recognition of a 'super-bulged' major histocompatibility complex class I-bound peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Tynan, Fleur E; Burrows, Scott R; Buckle, Ashley M

    2010-07-20

    Unusually long major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted epitopes are important in immunity, but their 'bulged' conformation represents a potential obstacle to {alpha}{beta} T cell receptor (TCR)-MHC class I docking. To elucidate how such recognition is achieved while still preserving MHC restriction, we have determined here the structure of a TCR in complex with HLA-B*3508 presenting a peptide 13 amino acids in length. This complex was atypical of TCR-peptide-MHC class I interactions, being dominated at the interface by peptide-mediated interactions. The TCR assumed two distinct orientations, swiveling on top of the centrally bulged, rigid peptide such that only limited contactsmore » were made with MHC class I. Although the TCR-peptide recognition resembled an antibody-antigen interaction, the TCR-MHC class I contacts defined a minimal 'generic footprint' of MHC-restriction. Thus our findings simultaneously demonstrate the considerable adaptability of the TCR and the 'shape' of MHC restriction.« less

  11. Attractant Regulation of the Aspartate Receptor–Kinase Complex: Limited Cooperative Interactions between Receptors and Effects of the Receptor Modification State†

    PubMed Central

    Bornhorst, Joshua A.; Falke, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    The manner by which the bacterial chemotaxis system responds to a wide range of attractant concentrations remains incompletely understood. In principle, positive cooperativity between chemotaxis receptors could explain the ability of bacteria to respond to extremely low attractant concentrations. By utilizing an in vitro receptor-coupled kinase assay, the attractant-dependent response curve has been measured for the Salmonella typhimurium aspartate chemoreceptor. The attractant chosen, α-methyl aspartate, was originally used to quantitate high receptor sensitivity at low attractant concentrations by Segall, Block, and Berg [(1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 83, 8987–8991]. The attractant response curve exhibits limited positive cooperativity, yielding a Hill coefficient of 1.7–2.4, and this Hill coefficient is relatively independent of both the receptor modification state and the mole ratio of CheA to receptor. These results disfavor models in which there are strong cooperative interactions between large numbers of receptor dimers in an extensive receptor array. Instead, the results are consistent with cooperative interactions between a small number of coupled receptor dimers. Because the in vitro receptor-coupled kinase assay utilizes higher than native receptor densities arising from overexpression, the observed positive cooperativity may overestimate that present in native receptor populations. Such positive cooperativity between dimers is fully compatible with the negative cooperativity previously observed between the two symmetric ligand binding sites within a single dimer. The attractant affinity of the aspartate receptor is found to depend on the modification state of its covalent adaptation sites. Increasing the the level of modification decreases the apparent attractant affinity at least 10-fold in the in vitro receptor-coupled kinase assay. This observation helps explain the ability of the chemotaxis pathway to respond to a broad range of

  12. Wnt-5a/Frizzled9 Receptor Signaling through the Gαo-Gβγ Complex Regulates Dendritic Spine Formation.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Valerie T; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Henríquez, Juan Pablo; Lorenzo, Alfredo; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2016-09-02

    Wnt ligands play crucial roles in the development and regulation of synapse structure and function. Specifically, Wnt-5a acts as a secreted growth factor that regulates dendritic spine formation in rodent hippocampal neurons, resulting in postsynaptic development that promotes the clustering of the PSD-95 (postsynaptic density protein 95). Here, we focused on the early events occurring after the interaction between Wnt-5a and its Frizzled receptor at the neuronal cell surface. Additionally, we studied the role of heterotrimeric G proteins in Wnt-5a-dependent synaptic development. We report that FZD9 (Frizzled9), a Wnt receptor related to Williams syndrome, is localized in the postsynaptic region, where it interacts with Wnt-5a. Functionally, FZD9 is required for the Wnt-5a-mediated increase in dendritic spine density. FZD9 forms a precoupled complex with Gαo under basal conditions that dissociates after Wnt-5a stimulation. Accordingly, we found that G protein inhibition abrogates the Wnt-5a-dependent pathway in hippocampal neurons. In particular, the activation of Gαo appears to be a key factor controlling the Wnt-5a-induced dendritic spine density. In addition, we found that Gβγ is required for the Wnt-5a-mediated increase in cytosolic calcium levels and spinogenesis. Our findings reveal that FZD9 and heterotrimeric G proteins regulate Wnt-5a signaling and dendritic spines in cultured hippocampal neurons. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Wnt-5a/Frizzled9 Receptor Signaling through the Gαo-Gβγ Complex Regulates Dendritic Spine Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Valerie T.; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Henríquez, Juan Pablo; Lorenzo, Alfredo; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2016-01-01

    Wnt ligands play crucial roles in the development and regulation of synapse structure and function. Specifically, Wnt-5a acts as a secreted growth factor that regulates dendritic spine formation in rodent hippocampal neurons, resulting in postsynaptic development that promotes the clustering of the PSD-95 (postsynaptic density protein 95). Here, we focused on the early events occurring after the interaction between Wnt-5a and its Frizzled receptor at the neuronal cell surface. Additionally, we studied the role of heterotrimeric G proteins in Wnt-5a-dependent synaptic development. We report that FZD9 (Frizzled9), a Wnt receptor related to Williams syndrome, is localized in the postsynaptic region, where it interacts with Wnt-5a. Functionally, FZD9 is required for the Wnt-5a-mediated increase in dendritic spine density. FZD9 forms a precoupled complex with Gαo under basal conditions that dissociates after Wnt-5a stimulation. Accordingly, we found that G protein inhibition abrogates the Wnt-5a-dependent pathway in hippocampal neurons. In particular, the activation of Gαo appears to be a key factor controlling the Wnt-5a-induced dendritic spine density. In addition, we found that Gβγ is required for the Wnt-5a-mediated increase in cytosolic calcium levels and spinogenesis. Our findings reveal that FZD9 and heterotrimeric G proteins regulate Wnt-5a signaling and dendritic spines in cultured hippocampal neurons. PMID:27402827

  14. T cell differentiation stages identified by molecular and immunologic analysis of the T cell receptor complex in childhood lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mirro, J; Kitchingman, G; Behm, F G; Murphy, S B; Goorha, R M

    1987-03-01

    T cell differentiation was investigated by determining the relationship of T cell receptor (Ti) gene rearrangement and transcription to the expression of surface and cytoplasmic T3 antigen using blast cells from five children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia of thymic origin. Patterns of monoclonal antibody (MoAb) reactivity indicated that these cases were representative of the three recognized stages (I, II, III) of human thymocyte development. The T3 antigen, which becomes linked to the Ti to form a functional T cell receptor complex on mature thymocytes, was expressed on the cell surface in two cases (stage III). However, in the remaining three cases that were surface T3 negative (stages I and II), large amounts of T3 were identified in the cytoplasm by immunoperoxidase staining and flow cytometry. Leukemic blasts from all five patients showed rearranged genes encoding the beta-chain portion of the Ti heterodimer. RNA transcripts of Ti beta-chain genes were also evident in lymphoblasts from all five cases, but transcripts coding for the alpha-chain portion of Ti were found only in cases that expressed T3 on the cell surface. Thus the absence of surface T3 (and presumably Ti) coincides with the absence of Ti alpha-chain RNA, suggesting that transcription of alpha-chain genes is a critical regulatory event in the surface expression of the Ti-T3 complex. Leukemic T cells that rearrange and express Ti beta-chain genes but lack Ti alpha-chain messenger RNA (mRNA) may represent a stage of differentiation analogous to pre-B cells, where heavy-chain immunoglobulin (Ig) genes are rearranged and expressed but light-chain Ig genes are not expressed.

  15. Electron Microscopy Analysis of a Disaccharide Analog complex Reveals Receptor Interactions of Adeno-Associated Virus

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qing; Spilman, Michael; Meyer, Nancy L.; Lerch, Thomas F.; Stagg, Scott M.; Chapman, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanistic studies of macromolecular complexes often feature x-ray structures of complexes with bound ligands. The attachment of Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV) to cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) is an example that has not proven amenable to crystallography, because the binding of GAG analogs disrupts lattice contacts. The interactions of AAV with GAGs are of interest in mediating the cell specificity of AAV-based gene therapy vectors. Previous electron microscopy led to differing conclusions on the exact binding site and the existence of large ligand-induced conformational changes in the virus. Conformational changes are expected during cell entry, but it has remained unclear whether the electron microscopy provided evidence of their induction by GAG-binding. Taking advantage of automated data collection, careful processing and new methods of structure refinement, the structure of AAV-DJ complexed with sucrose octasulfate is determined by electron microscopy difference map analysis to 4.8 Å resolution. At this higher resolution, individual sulfate groups are discernible, providing a stereochemical validation of map interpretation, and highlighting interactions with two surface arginines that have been implicated in genetic studies. Conformational changes induced by the SOS are modest and limited to the loop most directly interacting with the ligand. While the resolution attainable will depend on sample order and other factors, there are an increasing number of macromolecular complexes that can be studied by cryo-electron microscopy at resolutions beyond 5 Å, for which the approaches used here could be used to characterize the binding of inhibitors and other small molecule effectors when crystallography is not tractable. PMID:24036405

  16. Identification of an abscisic acid transporter by functional screening using the receptor complex as a sensor

    PubMed Central

    Kanno, Yuri; Hanada, Atsushi; Chiba, Yasutaka; Ichikawa, Takanari; Nakazawa, Miki; Matsui, Minami; Koshiba, Tomokazu; Kamiya, Yuji; Seo, Mitsunori

    2012-01-01

    Movement of the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) within plants has been documented; however, the molecular mechanisms that regulate ABA transport are not fully understood. By using a modified yeast two-hybrid system, we screened Arabidopsis cDNAs capable of inducing interactions between the ABA receptor PYR/PYL/RCAR and PP2C protein phosphatase under low ABA concentrations. By using this approach, we identified four members of the NRT1/PTR family as candidates for ABA importers. Transport assays in yeast and insect cells demonstrated that at least one of the candidates ABA-IMPORTING TRANSPORTER (AIT) 1, which had been characterized as the low-affinity nitrate transporter NRT1.2, mediates cellular ABA uptake. Compared with WT, the ait1/nrt1.2 mutants were less sensitive to exogenously applied ABA during seed germination and/or postgermination growth, whereas overexpression of AIT1/NRT1.2 resulted in ABA hypersensitivity in the same conditions. Interestingly, the inflorescence stems of ait1/nrt1.2 had a lower surface temperature than those of the WT because of excess water loss from open stomata. We detected promoter activities of AIT1/NRT1.2 around vascular tissues in inflorescence stems, leaves, and roots. These data suggest that the function of AIT1/NRT1.2 as an ABA importer at the site of ABA biosynthesis is important for the regulation of stomatal aperture in inflorescence stems. PMID:22645333

  17. Transcriptional Regulation of Flotillins by the Extracellularly Regulated Kinases and Retinoid X Receptor Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Banning, Antje; Ockenga, Wymke; Finger, Fabian; Siebrasse, Philipp; Tikkanen, Ritva

    2012-01-01

    Flotillin-1 and flotillin-2 are important regulators of signal transduction pathways such as growth factor signaling. Flotillin expression is increased under pathological conditions such as neurodegenerative disorders and cancer. Despite their importance for signal transduction, very little is known about the transcriptional regulation of flotillins. Here, we analyzed the expression of flotillins at transcriptional level and identified flotillins as downstream targets of the mitogen activated kinases ERK1/2. The promoter activity of flotillins was increased upon growth factor stimulation in a MAPK dependent manner. Overexpression of serum response factor or early growth response gene 1 resulted in increased flotillin mRNA and protein expression. Furthermore, both promoter activity and expression of endogenous flotillins were increased upon treatment with retinoic acid or by overexpression of the retinoid X receptor and its binding partners RARα and PPARγ. Our data indicate that the expression of flotillins, which can be detected in all cultured cells, is fine-tuned in response to various external stimuli. This regulation may be critical for the outcome of signaling cascades in which flotillins are known to be involved. PMID:23029064

  18. A DOCK8-WIP-WASp complex links T cell receptors to the actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Erin; Tohme, Mira; Hedayat, Mona; Leick, Marion; Kumari, Sudha; Ramesh, Narayanaswamy; Massaad, Michel J; Ullas, Sumana; Azcutia, Veronica; Goodnow, Christopher C; Randall, Katrina L; Qiao, Qi; Wu, Hao; Al-Herz, Waleed; Cox, Dianne; Hartwig, John; Irvine, Darrell J; Luscinskas, Francis W; Geha, Raif S

    2016-10-03

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is associated with mutations in the WAS protein (WASp), which plays a critical role in the initiation of T cell receptor-driven (TCR-driven) actin polymerization. The clinical phenotype of WAS includes susceptibility to infection, allergy, autoimmunity, and malignancy and overlaps with the symptoms of dedicator of cytokinesis 8 (DOCK8) deficiency, suggesting that the 2 syndromes share common pathogenic mechanisms. Here, we demonstrated that the WASp-interacting protein (WIP) bridges DOCK8 to WASp and actin in T cells. We determined that the guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity of DOCK8 is essential for the integrity of the subcortical actin cytoskeleton as well as for TCR-driven WASp activation, F-actin assembly, immune synapse formation, actin foci formation, mechanotransduction, T cell transendothelial migration, and homing to lymph nodes, all of which also depend on WASp. These results indicate that DOCK8 and WASp are in the same signaling pathway that links TCRs to the actin cytoskeleton in TCR-driven actin assembly. Further, they provide an explanation for similarities in the clinical phenotypes of WAS and DOCK8 deficiency.

  19. Aberrant distribution of junctional complex components in retinoic acid receptor alpha-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sanny S W; Choi, Cindy; Wang, Xiangyuan; Hallock, Loretta; Wolgemuth, Debra J

    2009-01-01

    Retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARα)-deficient mice are sterile, with abnormalities in the progression of spermatogenesis and spermiogenesis. In the present study, we investigated whether defective retinoid signaling involved at least in part, disrupted cell-cell interactions. Hypertonic fixation approaches revealed defects in the integrity of the Sertoli-cell barrier in the tubules of RARα-deficient testes. Dye transfer experiments further revealed that coupling between cells from the basal to adluminal compartments was aberrant. There were also differences in the expression of several known retinoic acid (RA)-responsive genes encoding structural components of tight junctions and gap junctions. Immunostaining demonstrated a delay in the incorporation of zonula occludens (ZO-1), a peripheral component protein of tight junctions, into the Sertoli cell tight junctions. Markedly reduced expression of connexin-40 in mutant pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids was found by in situ hybridization. An ectopic distribution of vimentin and disrupted cyclic expression of vimentin, which is usually tightly regulated during spermiogenesis, was found in RARα-deficient testes at all ages examined. Thus, the specific defects in spermiogenesis in RARα-deficient testes may correlate with a disrupted cyclic expression of RA-responsive structural components, including vimentin, a down-regulation of connexin-40 in spermatogenic cells, and delayed assembly of ZO-1 into Sertoli cell tight junctions. Interestingly, bioinformatic analysis revealed that many genes that are components of tight junctions and gap junctions contained potential retinoic acid response element binding sites. PMID:19937743

  20. Aberrant distribution of junctional complex components in retinoic acid receptor alpha-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sanny S W; Choi, Cindy; Wang, Xiangyuan; Hallock, Loretta; Wolgemuth, Debra J

    2010-06-01

    Retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARalpha)-deficient mice are sterile, with abnormalities in the progression of spermatogenesis and spermiogenesis. In this study, we investigated whether defective retinoid signaling involved at least in part, disrupted cell-cell interactions. Hypertonic fixation approaches revealed defects in the integrity of the Sertoli-cell barrier in the tubules of RARalpha-deficient testes. Dye transfer experiments further revealed that coupling between cells from the basal to adluminal compartments was aberrant. There were also differences in the expression of several known retinoic acid (RA)-responsive genes encoding structural components of tight junctions and gap junctions. Immunostaining demonstrated a delay in the incorporation of zonula occludens (ZO-1), a peripheral component protein of tight junctions, into the Sertoli cell tight junctions. Markedly reduced expression of connexin-40 in mutant pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids was found by in situ hybridization. An ectopic distribution of vimentin and disrupted cyclic expression of vimentin, which is usually tightly regulated during spermiogenesis, was found in RARalpha-deficient testes at all ages examined. Thus, the specific defects in spermiogenesis in RARalpha-deficient testes may correlate with a disrupted cyclic expression of RA-responsive structural components, including vimentin, a downregulation of connexin-40 in spermatogenic cells, and delayed assembly of ZO-1 into Sertoli cell tight junctions. Interestingly, bioinformatic analysis revealed that many genes that are components of tight junctions and gap junctions contained potential retinoic acid response element binding sites. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. [Effect of damage integrity rat brain synaptic membranes on the functional activity GABA(A)-receptor/Cl(-)-ionophore complex in the CNC].

    PubMed

    Rebrov, I G; Kalinina, M V

    2013-01-01

    Functional activity of the CGABA(A)-receptor/Cl(-) ionophore complex was investigated the muscimol-stimulated entry of the radioactive isotope 36Cl(-) in synaptoneurosomes in changing the structure and permeability of neuronal membranes. Integrity of the membranes was damaged by removal of Ca(+2) and Mg(+2) from the incubation medium and by the method of freezing-thawing synaptoneurosomes. In both cases, an increase in basal 36Cl(-) entry into synaptoneurosomes, indicating increased nonspecific permeability of neuronal membranes, and decreased activity the CABA(A)-receptor/Cl(-) ionophore complex. The conclusion about the relationship of processes damage neuronal membranes and reducing the inhibitory processes in the epileptic focus.

  2. Quantitative Analysis of STD-NMR Spectra of Reversibly Forming Ligand-Receptor Complexes.

    PubMed

    Krishna, N Rama; Jayalakshmi, V

    2008-01-01

    We describe our work on the quantitative analysis of STD-NMR spectra of reversibly forming ligand-receptorcomplexes. This analysis is based on the theory of complete relaxation and conformational exchange matrixanalysis of saturation transfer (CORCEMA-ST) effects. As part of this work, we have developed two separateversions of the CORCEMA-ST program. The first version predicts the expected STD intensities for a givenmodel of a ligand-protein complex, and compares them quantitatively with the experimental data.This version is very useful for rapidly determining if a model for a given ligand-proteincomplex is compatible with the STD-NMR data obtained in solution. It is also useful in determining theoptimal experimental conditions for undertaking the STD-NMR measurements on a given complex by computersimulations. In the second version of the CORCEMA-ST program, we have implemented a torsion anglerefinement feature for the bound ligand within the protein binding pocket. In this approach, the globalminimum for the bound ligand conformation is obtained by a hybrid structure refinement protocol involvingCORCEMA-ST calculation of intensities and simulated annealing refinement of torsion angles of the boundligand using STD-NMR intensities as experimental constraints to minimize a pseudo-energy function.This procedure is useful in refining and improving the initial models based on crystallography, computerdocking, or other procedures to generate models for the bound ligand within the protein binding pocket compatiblewith solution STD-NMR data. In this chapter we describe the properties of the STD-NMR spectra, includingthe dependence of the intensities on various parameters. We also describe the results of the CORCEMA-STanalyses of experimental STD-NMR data on some ligand-protein complexes to illustrate the quantitativeanalysis of the data using this method. This CORCEMA-ST program is likely to be useful in structure-baseddrug design efforts.

  3. Complex regulation of human androgen receptor expression by Wnt signaling in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, X; Chen, M-W; Terry, S; Vacherot, F; Bemis, DL; Capodice, J; Kitajewski, J; de la Taille, A; Benson, MC; Guo, Y; Buttyan, R

    2009-01-01

    β-Catenin, a component of the Wnt signaling pathway, is a coactivator of human androgen receptor (hAR) transcriptional activity. Here, we show that Wnt signaling also influences androgen-mediated signaling through its ability to regulate hAR mRNA and protein in prostate cancer (PCa) cells. Three functional LEF-1/TCF binding sites lie within the promoter of the hAR gene as shown by CHIP assays that captured β-catenin-bound chromatin from Wnt-activated LNCaP cells. Chimeric reporter vectors that use the hAR gene promoter to drive luciferase expression confirmed that these LEF-1/TCF binding elements are able to confer robust upregulation of luciferase expression when stimulated by Wnt-1 or by transfection with β-catenin and that dominant-negative TCF or mutations within the dominant TCF-binding element abrogated the response. Semi-quantitative and real time RT-PCR assays confirmed that Wnt activation upregulates hAR mRNA in PCa cells. In contrast, hAR protein expression was strongly suppressed by Wnt activation. The reduction of hAR protein is consistent with evidence that Wnt signaling increased phosphorylation of Akt and its downstream target, MDM2 that promotes degradation of hAR protein through a proteasomal pathway. These data indicate that the hAR gene is a direct target of LEF-1/TCF transcriptional regulation in PCa cells but also show that the expression of the hAR protein is suppressed by a degradation pathway regulated by cross-talk of Wnt to Akt that is likely mediated by Wnt-directed degradation of the B regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase, PP2A. PMID:16474850

  4. Topography of toxin-acetylcholine receptor complexes by using photoactivatable toxin derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Chatrenet, B; Trémeau, O; Bontems, F; Goeldner, M P; Hirth, C G; Ménez, A

    1990-01-01

    We have defined the molecular environment of a snake neurotoxin interacting with the high- and low-affinity binding sites of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR). This was done by photocoupling reactions using three toxin derivatives with photoactivatable moieties on Lys-15, Lys-47, and Lys-51. Competition data showed that Lys-47 belongs to the toxin-AcChoR interacting domain whereas the other two residues are excluded from it. We first tentatively determined the threshold of covalent coupling, indicative of the proximity between the photoactivatable probes and subunits, by quantifying the coupling occurring between the same derivatives and a model compound (i.e., a toxin-specific monoclonal antibody). We then (i) quantified the coupling yields occurring when both binding sites of AcChoR were occupied by the toxin derivatives, (ii) discriminately quantified the coupling yields at the high-affinity binding site, and (iii) deduced the coupling yields at the low-affinity binding site. In the high-affinity site, the probes on Lys-15 and Lys-47 predominantly reacted with the high-affinity site of the AcChoR alpha subunit whereas the probe on Lys-51 reacted with the delta subunit. In the low-affinity site, the probe on Lys-47 predominantly reacted with the low-affinity site of the alpha chain and the beta chain whereas those on Lys-15 and Lys-51 reacted with the gamma and delta chains, respectively. A three-dimensional model showing a unique organization of AcChoR bound to two toxin molecules is presented. Images PMID:2333287

  5. Receptor component protein (RCP): a member of a multi-protein complex required for G-protein-coupled signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Prado, M A; Evans-Bain, B; Dickerson, I M

    2002-08-01

    The calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor component protein (RCP) is a 148-amino-acid intracellular protein that is required for G-protein-coupled signal transduction at receptors for the neuropeptide CGRP. RCP works in conjunction with two other proteins to constitute a functional CGRP receptor: calcitonin-receptor-like receptor (CRLR) and receptor-activity-modifying protein 1 (RAMP1). CRLR has the stereotypical seven-transmembrane topology of a G-protein-coupled receptor; it requires RAMP1 for trafficking to the cell surface and for ligand specificity, and requires RCP for coupling to the cellular signal transduction pathway. We have made cell lines that expressed an antisense construct of RCP and determined that CGRP-mediated signal transduction was reduced, while CGRP binding was unaffected. Furthermore, signalling at two other endogenous G-protein-coupled receptors was unaffected, suggesting that RCP was specific for a limited subset of receptors.

  6. Crystal Structure of Botulinum Neurotoxin Type a in Complex With the Cell Surface Co-Receptor GT1b-Insight Into the Toxin-Neuron Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Stenmark, P.; Dupuy, J.; Inamura, A.

    2009-05-26

    Botulinum neurotoxins have a very high affinity and specificity for their target cells requiring two different co-receptors located on the neuronal cell surface. Different toxin serotypes have different protein receptors; yet, most share a common ganglioside co-receptor, GT1b. We determined the crystal structure of the botulinum neurotoxin serotype A binding domain (residues 873-1297) alone and in complex with a GT1b analog at 1.7 A and 1.6 A, respectively. The ganglioside GT1b forms several key hydrogen bonds to conserved residues and binds in a shallow groove lined by Tryptophan 1266. GT1b binding does not induce any large structural changes in themore » toxin; therefore, it is unlikely that allosteric effects play a major role in the dual receptor recognition. Together with the previously published structures of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B in complex with its protein co-receptor, we can now generate a detailed model of botulinum neurotoxin's interaction with the neuronal cell surface. The two branches of the GT1b polysaccharide, together with the protein receptor site, impose strict geometric constraints on the mode of interaction with the membrane surface and strongly support a model where one end of the 100 A long translocation domain helix bundle swing into contact with the membrane, initiating the membrane anchoring event.« less

  7. IL-7 Induces an Epitope Masking of γc Protein in IL-7 Receptor Signaling Complex

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Tae Sik; Jo, Yuna; Lee, Byunghyuk; Kim, Geona; Hwang, Hyunju; Ko, Eunhee; Kang, Seung Wan; Oh, Sae-Ock; Baek, Sun-Yong; Yoon, Sik; Lee, Jung Sub

    2017-01-01

    IL-7 signaling via IL-7Rα and common γ-chain (γc) is necessary for the development and homeostasis of T cells. Although the delicate mechanism in which IL-7Rα downregulation allows the homeostasis of T cell with limited IL-7 has been well known, the exact mechanism behind the interaction between IL-7Rα and γc in the absence or presence of IL-7 remains unclear. Additionally, we are still uncertain as to how only IL-7Rα is separately downregulated by the binding of IL-7 from the IL-7Rα/γc complex. We demonstrate here that 4G3, TUGm2, and 3E12 epitope masking of γc protein are induced in the presence of IL-7, indicating that the epitope alteration is induced by IL-7 binding to the preassembled receptor core. Moreover, the epitope masking of γc protein is inversely correlated with the expression of IL-7Rα upon IL-7 binding, implying that the structural alteration of γc might be involved in the regulation of IL-7Rα expression. The conformational change in γc upon IL-7 binding may contribute not only to forming the functional IL-7 signaling complex but also to optimally regulating the expression of IL-7Rα. PMID:28127156

  8. There goes the neighborhood: Assembly of transcriptional complexes during the regulation of metabolism and inflammation by the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Greulich, Franziska; Hemmer, M Charlotte; Rollins, David A; Rogatsky, Inez; Uhlenhaut, N Henriette

    2016-10-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs), as ligands for the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), represent one of the most effective and frequently used classes of drugs for anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive therapy. In addition, its role in physiological and pathophysiological processes makes the GR an important research target. The past decades have yielded a wealth of insight into the physiological and pharmacological effects of GCs. Today's era of next generation sequencing techniques is now beginning to elucidate the molecular and genomic circuits underlying GR's cell type-specific actions. This review focuses on the concepts and insights gained from recent studies in two of the most important tissues for GC action: the liver (mediating GR's metabolic effects) and macrophages (as the main target of anti-inflammatory GC therapy). We summarize results obtained from transgenic mouse models, molecular and genome-wide studies to illustrate GR's complex interactions with DNA, chromatin, co-regulators and other transcription factors. Characterizing the cell type-specific transcriptional complexes assembled around GR will pave the road for the development of new anti-inflammatory and metabolic therapies in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The structure of the death receptor 4–TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (DR4–TRAIL) complex

    PubMed Central

    Ramamurthy, Vidhyashankar; Yamniuk, Aaron P.; Lawrence, Eric J.; Yong, Wei; Schneeweis, Lumelle A.; Cheng, Lin; Murdock, Melissa; Corbett, Martin J.; Doyle, Michael L.; Sheriff, Steven

    2015-01-01

    The structure of death receptor 4 (DR4) in complex with TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) has been determined at 3 Å resolution and compared with those of previously determined DR5–TRAIL complexes. Consistent with the high sequence similarity between DR4 and DR5, the overall arrangement of the DR4–TRAIL complex does not differ substantially from that of the DR5–TRAIL complex. However, subtle differences are apparent. In addition, solution interaction studies were carried out that show differences in the thermodynamics of binding DR4 or DR5 with TRAIL. PMID:26457518

  10. Clobazam and Its Active Metabolite N-desmethylclobazam Display Significantly Greater Affinities for α2- versus α1-GABAA–Receptor Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Henrik Sindal; Nichol, Kathryn; Lee, Deborah; Ebert, Bjarke

    2014-01-01

    Clobazam (CLB), a 1,5-benzodiazepine (BZD), was FDA-approved in October 2011 for the adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) in patients 2 years and older. BZDs exert various CNS effects through allosteric modulation of GABAA receptors. The structurally distinct, 1,4-BZD clonazepam (CLN) is also approved to treat LGS. The precise mechanisms of action and clinical efficacy of both are unknown. Data show that the GABAA α1-subunit–selective compound zolpidem [ZOL] exhibits hypnotic/sedative effects. Conversely, data from knock-in mice carrying BZD binding site mutations suggest that the α2 subunit mediates anticonvulsant effects, without sedative actions. Hence, the specific pattern of interactions across the GABAA receptor complexes of BZDs might be reflected in their clinical efficacies and adverse effect profiles. In this study, GABAA-receptor binding affinities of CLB, N-desmethylclobazam (N-CLB, the major metabolite of CLB), CLN, and ZOL were characterized with native receptors from rat-brain homogenates and on cloned receptors from HEK293 cells transfected with combinations of α (α1, α2, α3, or α5), β2, and γ2 subtypes. Our results demonstrate that CLB and N-CLB have significantly greater binding affinities for α2- vs. α1-receptor complexes, a difference not observed for CLN, for which no distinction between α2 and α1 receptors was observed. Our experiments with ZOL confirmed the high preference for α1 receptors. These results provide potential clues to a new understanding of the pharmacologic modes of action of CLB and N-CLB. PMID:24533090

  11. Crystal Structure of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 in Complex with the Extracellular Domain of the Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Christina Rye; Garibay, Patrick; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Hastrup, Sven; Peters, Günther H.; Rudolph, Rainer; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen

    2010-01-01

    GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1) is an incretin released from intestinal L-cells in response to food intake. Activation of the GLP-1 receptor potentiates the synthesis and release of insulin from pancreatic β-cells in a glucose-dependent manner. The GLP-1 receptor belongs to class B of the G-protein-coupled receptors, a subfamily characterized by a large N-terminal extracellular ligand binding domain. Exendin-4 and GLP-1 are 50% identical, and exendin-4 is a full agonist with similar affinity and potency for the GLP-1 receptor. We recently solved the crystal structure of the GLP-1 receptor extracellular domain in complex with the competitive antagonist exendin-4(9–39). Interestingly, the isolated extracellular domain binds exendin-4 with much higher affinity than the endogenous agonist GLP-1. Here, we have solved the crystal structure of the extracellular domain in complex with GLP-1 to 2.1 Åresolution. The structure shows that important hydrophobic ligand-receptor interactions are conserved in agonist- and antagonist-bound forms of the extracellular domain, but certain residues in the ligand-binding site adopt a GLP-1-specific conformation. GLP-1 is a kinked but continuous α-helix from Thr13 to Val33 when bound to the extracellular domain. We supplemented the crystal structure with site-directed mutagenesis to link the structural information of the isolated extracellular domain with the binding properties of the full-length receptor. The data support the existence of differences in the binding modes of GLP-1 and exendin-4 on the full-length GLP-1 receptor. PMID:19861722

  12. Crystal structure of glucagon-like peptide-1 in complex with the extracellular domain of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Christina Rye; Garibay, Patrick; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Hastrup, Sven; Peters, Günther H; Rudolph, Rainer; Reedtz-Runge, Steffen

    2010-01-01

    GLP-1 (glucagon-like peptide-1) is an incretin released from intestinal L-cells in response to food intake. Activation of the GLP-1 receptor potentiates the synthesis and release of insulin from pancreatic beta-cells in a glucose-dependent manner. The GLP-1 receptor belongs to class B of the G-protein-coupled receptors, a subfamily characterized by a large N-terminal extracellular ligand binding domain. Exendin-4 and GLP-1 are 50% identical, and exendin-4 is a full agonist with similar affinity and potency for the GLP-1 receptor. We recently solved the crystal structure of the GLP-1 receptor extracellular domain in complex with the competitive antagonist exendin-4(9-39). Interestingly, the isolated extracellular domain binds exendin-4 with much higher affinity than the endogenous agonist GLP-1. Here, we have solved the crystal structure of the extracellular domain in complex with GLP-1 to 2.1 Aresolution. The structure shows that important hydrophobic ligand-receptor interactions are conserved in agonist- and antagonist-bound forms of the extracellular domain, but certain residues in the ligand-binding site adopt a GLP-1-specific conformation. GLP-1 is a kinked but continuous alpha-helix from Thr(13) to Val(33) when bound to the extracellular domain. We supplemented the crystal structure with site-directed mutagenesis to link the structural information of the isolated extracellular domain with the binding properties of the full-length receptor. The data support the existence of differences in the binding modes of GLP-1 and exendin-4 on the full-length GLP-1 receptor.

  13. Water Dynamics at Protein-Protein Interfaces: Molecular Dynamics Study of Virus-Host Receptor Complexes.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Priyanka; Botlani, Mohsen; Varma, Sameer

    2014-12-26

    The dynamical properties of water at protein-water interfaces are unlike those in the bulk. Here we utilize molecular dynamics simulations to study water dynamics in interstitial regions between two proteins. We consider two natural protein-protein complexes, one in which the Nipah virus G protein binds to cellular ephrin B2 and the other in which the same G protein binds to ephrin B3. While the two complexes are structurally similar, the two ephrins share only a modest sequence identity of ∼50%. X-ray crystallography also suggests that these interfaces are fairly extensive and contain exceptionally large amounts of waters. We find that while the interstitial waters tend to occupy crystallographic sites, almost all waters exhibit residence times of less than hundred picoseconds in the interstitial region. We also find that while the differences in the sequence of the two ephrins result in quantitative differences in the dynamics of interstitial waters, the trends in the shifts with respect to bulk values are similar. Despite the high wetness of the protein-protein interfaces, the dynamics of interstitial waters are considerably slower compared to the bulk-the interstitial waters diffuse an order of magnitude slower and have 2-3 fold longer hydrogen bond lifetimes and 2-1000 fold slower dipole relaxation rates. To understand the role of interstitial waters, we examine how implicit solvent models compare against explicit solvent models in producing ephrin-induced shifts in the G conformational density. Ephrin-induced shifts in the G conformational density are critical to the allosteric activation of another viral protein that mediates fusion. We find that in comparison with the explicit solvent model, the implicit solvent model predicts a more compact G-B2 interface, presumably because of the absence of discrete waters at the G-B2 interface. Simultaneously, we find that the two models yield strikingly different induced changes in the G conformational density, even

  14. Physical mapping of the human T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) {beta}-chain gene complex

    SciTech Connect

    Yashim, Y.; So, A.K.

    1994-09-01

    The genetic variation of the TCR loci and their contribution to autoimmune diseases is poorly defined, in direct contrast to the clear examples of disease association with the Class I and II alleles of the major histocompatibility complex. We have therefore started to determine the gene organization and polymorphism of the TCR {beta} locus. Yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) were used to construct a physical map of the germline human TCR {beta}-chain gene complex. Variable gene (V{beta}) sequences for the 25 known V{beta} subfamilies were amplified by PCR and were used as probes to screen a YAC library. Five positive YACsmore » were identified. YACs designated B3, E11 and H11 of sizes 820, 400 and 600 kbp, respectively, were analyzed for their V{beta} content by pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). YAC B3 was found to contain all 25 V{beta} subfamilies, E11 for 14 and H11 for 7. B3 was also positive for the constant region genes. Restriction enzyme mapping of B3 located V{beta} and C{beta} gene regions to four Sfi I fragments of 280, 110, 90 and 125 kbp, and was in accordance with published data. The data thus showed that YAC B3 encoded a complete and unrearranged TCR {beta}-gene locus. The map was further resolved by locating restriction sites for Sal I and Bssll II on B3. Fluorescent in situ hybridization to human metaphase chromosomes localized B3 to chromosome 7q35. However, two additional signals were obtained: one attributable to V{beta} orphon cluster on chromosome 9q21; the second to the long arm of chromosome 2. PCR amplification of a chromosome 2 somatic cell hybrid using primers for all 25 V{beta} gene families revealed the signal was not attributable to a second orphon cluster. It is suggested that B3 is a chimeric YAC with an intact TCR {beta} locus flanked by chromosome 2 sequences. The determination of the TCR genomic organization will help extend studies of the role T-cells play in autoimmune diseases.« less

  15. Progesterone receptor isoforms PRA and PRB differentially contribute to breast cancer cell migration through interaction with focal adhesion kinase complexes

    PubMed Central

    Bellance, Catherine; Khan, Junaid A.; Meduri, Geri; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Lombès, Marc; Loosfelt, Hugues

    2013-01-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) and progestins affect mammary tumorigenesis; however, the relative contributions of PR isoforms A and B (PRA and PRB, respectively) in cancer cell migration remains elusive. By using a bi-inducible MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line expressing PRA and/or PRB, we analyzed the effect of conditional PR isoform expression. Surprisingly, unliganded PRB but not PRA strongly enhanced cell migration as compared with PR(–) cells. 17,21-Dimethyl-19-norpregna-4,9-dien-3,20-dione (R5020) progestin limited this effect and was counteracted by the antagonist 11β-(4-dimethyl­amino)­phenyl-17β-hydroxy-17-(1-propynyl)­estra-4,9-dien-3-one (RU486). Of importance, PRA coexpression potentiated PRB-mediated migration, whereas PRA alone was ineffective. PR isoforms differentially regulated expressions of major players of cell migration, such as urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), its inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, uPA receptor (uPAR), and β1-integrin, which affect focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling. Moreover, unliganded PRB but not PRA enhanced FAK Tyr397 phosphorylation and colocalized with activated FAK in cell protrusions. Because PRB, as well as PRA, coimmunoprecipitated with FAK, both isoforms can interact with FAK complexes, depending on their respective nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. In addition, FAK degradation was coupled to R5020-dependent turnovers of PRA and PRB. Such an effect of PRB/PRA expression on FAK signaling might thus affect adhesion/motility, underscoring the implication of PR isoforms in breast cancer invasiveness and metastatic evolution with underlying therapeutic outcomes. PMID:23485561

  16. Progesterone receptor isoforms PRA and PRB differentially contribute to breast cancer cell migration through interaction with focal adhesion kinase complexes.

    PubMed

    Bellance, Catherine; Khan, Junaid A; Meduri, Geri; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Lombès, Marc; Loosfelt, Hugues

    2013-05-01

    Progesterone receptor (PR) and progestins affect mammary tumorigenesis; however, the relative contributions of PR isoforms A and B (PRA and PRB, respectively) in cancer cell migration remains elusive. By using a bi-inducible MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line expressing PRA and/or PRB, we analyzed the effect of conditional PR isoform expression. Surprisingly, unliganded PRB but not PRA strongly enhanced cell migration as compared with PR(-) cells. 17,21-Dimethyl-19-norpregna-4,9-dien-3,20-dione (R5020) progestin limited this effect and was counteracted by the antagonist 11β-(4-dimethyl-amino)-phenyl-17β-hydroxy-17-(1-propynyl)-estra-4,9-dien-3-one (RU486). Of importance, PRA coexpression potentiated PRB-mediated migration, whereas PRA alone was ineffective. PR isoforms differentially regulated expressions of major players of cell migration, such as urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), its inhibitor plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, uPA receptor (uPAR), and β1-integrin, which affect focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling. Moreover, unliganded PRB but not PRA enhanced FAK Tyr397 phosphorylation and colocalized with activated FAK in cell protrusions. Because PRB, as well as PRA, coimmunoprecipitated with FAK, both isoforms can interact with FAK complexes, depending on their respective nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. In addition, FAK degradation was coupled to R5020-dependent turnovers of PRA and PRB. Such an effect of PRB/PRA expression on FAK signaling might thus affect adhesion/motility, underscoring the implication of PR isoforms in breast cancer invasiveness and metastatic evolution with underlying therapeutic outcomes.

  17. Defining Binding Efficiency and Specificity of Auxins for SCFTIR1/AFB-Aux/IAA Co-receptor Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Structure–activity profiles for the phytohormone auxin have been collected for over 70 years, and a number of synthetic auxins are used in agriculture. Auxin classification schemes and binding models followed from understanding auxin structures. However, all of the data came from whole plant bioassays, meaning the output was the integral of many different processes. The discovery of Transport Inhibitor-Response 1 (TIR1) and the Auxin F-Box (AFB) proteins as sites of auxin perception and the role of auxin as molecular glue in the assembly of co-receptor complexes has allowed the development of a definitive quantitative structure–activity relationship for TIR1 and AFB5. Factorial analysis of binding activities offered two uncorrelated factors associated with binding efficiency and binding selectivity. The six maximum-likelihood estimators of Efficiency are changes in the overlap matrixes, inferring that Efficiency is related to the volume of the electronic system. Using the subset of compounds that bound strongly, chemometric analyses based on quantum chemical calculations and similarity and self-similarity indices yielded three classes of Specificity that relate to differential binding. Specificity may not be defined by any one specific atom or position and is influenced by coulomb matrixes, suggesting that it is driven by electrostatic forces. These analyses give the first receptor-specific classification of auxins and indicate that AFB5 is the preferred site for a number of auxinic herbicides by allowing interactions with analogues having van der Waals surfaces larger than that of indole-3-acetic acid. The quality factors are also examined in terms of long-standing models for the mechanism of auxin binding. PMID:24313839

  18. The Cannabinoid Receptor CB1 Interacts with the WAVE1 Complex and Plays a Role in Actin Dynamics and Structural Plasticity in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Njoo, Christian; Agarwal, Nitin; Lutz, Beat; Kuner, Rohini

    2015-01-01

    The molecular composition of the cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor complex beyond the classical G-protein signaling components is not known. Using proteomics on mouse cortex in vivo, we pulled down proteins interacting with CB1 in neurons and show that the CB1 receptor assembles with multiple members of the WAVE1 complex and the RhoGTPase Rac1 and modulates their activity. Activation levels of CB1 receptor directly impacted on actin polymerization and stability via WAVE1 in growth cones of developing neurons, leading to their collapse, as well as in synaptic spines of mature neurons, leading to their retraction. In adult mice, CB1 receptor agonists attenuated activity-dependent remodeling of dendritic spines in spinal cord neurons in vivo and suppressed inflammatory pain by regulating the WAVE1 complex. This study reports novel signaling mechanisms for cannabinoidergic modulation of the nervous system and demonstrates a previously unreported role for the WAVE1 complex in therapeutic applications of cannabinoids. PMID:26496209

  19. Functional modulation of cerebral gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex with ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate: Presence of independent binding site for ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate

    SciTech Connect

    Taguchi, J.; Kuriyama, K.

    1990-05-01

    Effect of ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCE) on the function of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex was studied. Beta-CCE noncompetitively and competitively inhibited (3H)flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptor, but not (3H)muscimol binding to GABAA receptor as well as t-(3H)butylbicycloorthobenzoate (( 3H) TBOB) binding to chloride ion channel, in particulate fraction of the mouse brain. Ro15-1788 also inhibited competitively (3H) flunitrazepam binding. On the other hand, the binding of beta-(3H)CCE was inhibited noncompetitively and competitively by clonazepam and competitively by Ro15-1788. In agreement with these results, benzodiazepines-stimulated (3H)muscimol binding was antagonized by beta-CCE and Ro15-1788. Gel column chromatography for themore » solubilized fraction from cerebral particulate fraction by 0.2% sodium deoxycholate (DOC-Na) in the presence of 1 M KCl indicated that beta-(3H)CCE binding site was eluted in the same fraction (molecular weight, 250,000) as the binding sites for (3H)flunitrazepam, (3H)muscimol and (3H)TBOB. GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx into membrane vesicles prepared from the bovine cerebral cortex was stimulated and attenuated by flunitrazepam and beta-CCE, respectively. These effects of flunitrazepam and beta-CCE on the GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx were antagonized by Ro15-1788. The present results suggest that the binding site for beta-CCE, which resides on GABAA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex, may be different from that for benzodiazepine. Possible roles of beta-CCE binding site in the allosteric inhibitions on benzodiazepine binding site as well as on the functional coupling between chloride ion channel and GABAA receptor are also suggested.« less

  20. High Affinity Binding of the Receptor-associated Protein D1D2 Domains with the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein (LRP1) Involves Bivalent Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Joni M.; Young, Patricia A.; Strickland, Dudley K.

    2016-01-01

    The LDL receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) is a large endocytic receptor that binds and mediates the endocytosis of numerous structurally diverse ligands. Currently, the basis for ligand recognition by LRP1 is not well understood. LRP1 requires a molecular chaperone, termed the receptor-associated protein (RAP), to escort the newly synthesized receptor from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi. RAP is a three-domain protein that contains the following two high affinity binding sites for LRP1: one is located within domains 1 and 2, and one is located in its third domain. Studies on the interaction of the RAP third domain with LRP1 reveal critical contributions by lysine 256 and lysine 270 for this interaction. From these studies, a model for ligand recognition by this class of receptors has been proposed. Here, we employed surface plasmon resonance to investigate the binding of RAP D1D2 to LRP1. Our results reveal that the high affinity of D1D2 for LRP1 results from avidity effects mediated by the simultaneous interactions of lysine 60 in D1 and lysine 191 in D2 with sites on LRP1 to form a bivalent D1D2-LRP1 complex. When lysine 60 and 191 are both mutated to alanine, the binding of D1D2 to LRP1 is ablated. Our data also reveal that D1D2 is able to bind to a second distinct site on LRP1 to form a monovalent complex. The studies confirm the canonical model for ligand recognition by this class of receptors, which is initiated by pairs of lysine residues that dock into acidic pockets on the receptor. PMID:27402839

  1. MS-377, a selective sigma receptor ligand, indirectly blocks the action of PCP in the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor ion-channel complex in primary cultured rat neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Karasawa, Jun-ichi; Yamamoto, Hideko; Yamamoto, Toshifumi; Sagi, Naoki; Horikomi, Kazutoshi; Sora, Ichiro

    2002-02-22

    MS-377 ((R)-(+)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-[4-(2-methoxyethyl)piperazin-1-yl]methyl-2-pyrrolid