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Sample records for a2b antagonist mediate

  1. Adenosine A(2A) agonist and A(2B) antagonist mediate an inhibition of inflammation-induced contractile disturbance of a rat gastrointestinal preparation.

    PubMed

    Michael, Sebastian; Warstat, Claudia; Michel, Fabien; Yan, Luo; Müller, Christa E; Nieber, Karen

    2010-03-01

    Adenosine can show anti-inflammatory as well as pro-inflammatory activities. The contribution of the specific adenosine receptor subtypes in various cells, tissues and organs is complex. In this study, we examined the effect of the adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist CGS 21680 and the A(2B)R antagonist PSB-1115 on acute inflammation induced experimentally by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) on rat ileum/jejunum preparations. Pre-incubation of the ileum/jejunum segments with TNBS for 30 min resulted in a concentration-dependent inhibition of acetylcholine (ACh)-induced contractions. Pharmacological activation of the A(2A)R with CGS 21680 (0.1-10 microM) pre-incubated simultaneously with TNBS (10 mM) prevented concentration-dependently the TNBS-induced inhibition of the ACh contractions. Stimulation of A(2B)R with the selective agonist BAY 60-6583 (10 microM) did neither result in an increase nor in a further decrease of ACh-induced contractions compared to the TNBS-induced inhibition. The simultaneous pre-incubation of the ileum/jejunum segments with TNBS (10 mM) and the selective A(2B)R antagonist PSB-1115 (100 microM) inhibited the contraction-decreasing effect of TNBS. The effects of the A(2A)R agonist and the A(2B)R antagonist were in the same range as the effect induced by 1 microM methotrexate. The combination of the A(2A)R agonist CGS 21680 and the A(2B)R antagonist PSB-1115 at subthreshold concentrations of both agents found a significant amelioration of the TNBS-diminished contractility. Our results demonstrate that the activation of A(2A) receptors or the blockade of the A(2B) receptors can prevent the inflammation-induced disturbance of the ACh-induced contraction in TNBS pre-treated small intestinal preparations. The combination of both may be useful for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  2. Adenosine receptor A2b on hematopoietic cells mediates LPS-induced migration of PMNs into the lung interstitium.

    PubMed

    Konrad, Franziska M; Witte, Esther; Vollmer, Irene; Stark, Stefanie; Reutershan, Jörg

    2012-09-01

    Uncontrolled transmigration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) into the different compartments of the lungs (intravascular, interstitial, alveolar) is a critical event in the early stage of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Adenosine receptor A(2b) is highly expressed in the inflamed lungs and has been suggested to mediate cell trafficking. In a murine model of LPS-induced lung inflammation, we investigated the role of A(2b) on migration of PMNs into the different compartments of the lung. In A(2b)(-/-) mice, LPS-induced accumulation of PMNs was significantly higher in the interstitium, but not in the alveolar space. In addition, pulmonary clearance of PMNs was delayed in A(2b)(-/-) mice. Using chimeric mice, we identified A(2b) on hematopoietic cells as crucial for PMN migration. A(2b) did not affect the release of relevant chemokines into the alveolar space. LPS-induced microvascular permeability was under the control of A(2b) on both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. Activation of A(2b) on endothelial cells also reduced formation of LPS-induced stress fibers, highlighting its role for endothelial integrity. A specific A(2b) agonist (BAY 60-6583) was effective in decreasing PMN migration into the lung interstitium and microvascular permeability. In addition, in vitro transmigration of human PMNs through a layer of human endothelial or epithelial cells was A(2b) dependent. Activation of A(2b) on human PMNs reduced oxidative burst activity. Together, our results demonstrate anti-inflammatory effects of A(2b) on two major characteristics of acute lung injury, with a distinct role of hematopoietic A(2b) for cell trafficking and endothelial A(2b) for microvascular permeability.

  3. Blockade of A2b Adenosine Receptor Reduces Tumor Growth and Immune Suppression Mediated by Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in a Mouse Model of Melanoma12

    PubMed Central

    Iannone, Raffaella; Miele, Lucio; Maiolino, Piera; Pinto, Aldo; Morello, Silvana

    2013-01-01

    The A2b receptor (A2bR) belongs to the adenosine receptor family. Emerging evidence suggest that A2bR is implicated in tumor progression in some murine tumor models, but the therapeutic potential of targeting A2bR in melanoma has not been examined. This study first shows that melanoma-bearing mice treated with Bay 60-6583, a selective A2bR agonist, had increased melanoma growth. This effect was associated with higher levels of immune regulatory mediators interleukin-10 (IL-10) and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and accumulation of tumor-associated CD11b positive Gr1 positive cells (CD11b+Gr1+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Depletion of CD11b+Gr1+ cells completely reversed the protumor activity of Bay 60-6583. Conversely, pharmacological blockade of A2bR with PSB1115 reversed immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment, leading to a significant melanoma growth delay. PSB1115 treatment reduced both levels of IL-10 and MCP-1 and CD11b+Gr1+ cell number in melanoma lesions. These effects were associated with higher frequency of tumor-infiltrating CD8 positive (CD8+) T cells and natural killer T (NKT) cells and increased levels of T helper 1 (Th1)-like cytokines. Adoptive transfer of CD11b+Gr1+ cells abrogated the antitumor activity of PSB1115. These data suggest that the antitumor activity of PSB1115 relies on its ability to lower accumulation of tumor-infiltrating MDSCs and restore an efficient antitumor T cell response. The antitumor effect of PSB1115 was not observed in melanoma-bearing nude mice. Furthermore, PSB1115 enhanced the antitumor efficacy of dacarbazine. These data indicate that A2bR antagonists such as PSB1115 should be investigated as adjuvants in the treatment of melanoma. PMID:24403862

  4. Ligand-, structure- and pharmacophore-based molecular fingerprints: a case study on adenosine A1, A2A, A2B, and A3 receptor antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirci, Francesco; Goracci, Laura; Rodríguez, David; van Muijlwijk-Koezen, Jacqueline; Gutiérrez-de-Terán, Hugo; Mannhold, Raimund

    2012-11-01

    FLAP fingerprints are applied in the ligand-, structure- and pharmacophore-based mode in a case study on antagonists of all four adenosine receptor (AR) subtypes. Structurally diverse antagonist collections with respect to the different ARs were constructed by including binding data to human species only. FLAP models well discriminate "active" (=highly potent) from "inactive" (=weakly potent) AR antagonists, as indicated by enrichment curves, numbers of false positives, and AUC values. For all FLAP modes, model predictivity slightly decreases as follows: A2BR > A2AR > A3R > A1R antagonists. General performance of FLAP modes in this study is: ligand- > structure- > pharmacophore- based mode. We also compared the FLAP performance with other common ligand- and structure-based fingerprints. Concerning the ligand-based mode, FLAP model performance is superior to ECFP4 and ROCS for all AR subtypes. Although focusing on the early first part of the A2A, A2B and A3 enrichment curves, ECFP4 and ROCS still retain a satisfactory retrieval of actives. FLAP is also superior when comparing the structure-based mode with PLANTS and GOLD. In this study we applied for the first time the novel FLAPPharm tool for pharmacophore generation. Pharmacophore hypotheses, generated with this tool, convincingly match with formerly published data. Finally, we could demonstrate the capability of FLAP models to uncover selectivity aspects although single AR subtype models were not trained for this purpose.

  5. Neutrophil-derived 5′-Adenosine Monophosphate Promotes Endothelial Barrier Function via CD73-mediated Conversion to Adenosine and Endothelial A2B Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lennon, Paul F.; Taylor, Cormac T.; Stahl, Gregory L.; Colgan, Sean P.

    1998-01-01

    During episodes of inflammation, polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) transendothelial migration has the potential to disturb vascular barrier function and give rise to intravascular fluid extravasation and edema. However, little is known regarding innate mechanisms that dampen fluid loss during PMN-endothelial interactions. Using an in vitro endothelial paracellular permeability model, we observed a PMN-mediated decrease in endothelial paracellular permeability. A similar decrease was elicited by cell-free supernatants from activated PMN (FMLP 10−6 M), suggesting the presence of a PMN-derived soluble mediator(s). Biophysical and biochemical analysis of PMN supernatants revealed a role for PMN-derived 5′-adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and its metabolite, adenosine, in modulation of endothelial paracellular permeability. Supernatants from activated PMN contained micromolar concentrations of bioactive 5′-AMP and adenosine. Furthermore, exposure of endothelial monolayers to authentic 5′-AMP and adenosine increased endothelial barrier function more than twofold in both human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human microvascular endothelial cells. 5′-AMP bioactivity required endothelial CD73-mediated conversion of 5′-AMP to adenosine via its 5′-ectonucleotidase activity. Decreased endothelial paracellular permeability occurred through adenosine A2B receptor activation and was accompanied by a parallel increase in intracellular cAMP. We conclude that activated PMN release soluble mediators, such as 5′-AMP and adenosine, that promote endothelial barrier function. During inflammation, this pathway may limit potentially deleterious increases in endothelial paracellular permeability and could serve as a basic mechanism of endothelial resealing during PMN transendothelial migration. PMID:9782120

  6. A2B adenosine receptor contributes to penile erection via PI3K/AKT signaling cascade-mediated eNOS activation

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jiaming; Grenz, Almut; Zhang, Yujin; Dai, Yingbo; Kellems, Rodney E.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Xia, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Normal penile erection is under the control of multiple factors and signaling pathways. Although adenosine signaling is implicated in normal and abnormal penile erection, the exact role and the underlying mechanism for adenosine signaling in penile physiology remain elusive. Here we report that shear stress leads to increased adenosine release from endothelial cells. Subsequently, we determined that ecto-5′-nucleotidase (CD73) is a key enzyme required for the production of elevated adenosine from ATP released by shear-stressed endothelial cells. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that shear stress-mediated elevated adenosine functions through the adenosine A2B receptor (A2BR) to activate the PI3K/AKT signaling cascade and subsequent increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation. These in vitro studies led us to discover further that adenosine was induced during sustained penile erection and contributes to PI3K/AKT activation and subsequent eNOS phosphorylation via A2BR signaling in intact animal. Finally, we demonstrate that lowering adenosine in wild-type mice or genetic deletion of A2BR in mutant mice significantly attenuated PI3K/AKT activation, eNOS phosphorylation, and subsequent impaired penile erection featured with the reduction of ratio of maximal intracavernosal pressure to systemic arterial pressure from 0.49 ± 0.03 to 0.41 ± 0.05 and 0.38 ± 0.04, respectively (both P<0.05). Overall, using biochemical, cellular, genetic, and physiological approaches, our findings reveal that adenosine is a novel molecule signaling via A2BR activation, contributing to penile erection via PI3K/AKT-dependent eNOS activation. These studies suggest that this signaling pathway may be a novel therapeutic target for erectile disorders.—Wen, J., Grenz, A., Zhang, Y., Dai, Y., Kellems, R. E., Blackburn, M. R., Eltzschig, H. K., Xia, Y. A2B adenosine receptor contributes to penile erection via PI3K/AKT signaling cascade-mediated eNOS activation. PMID

  7. Inhibition of Inflammation and Bone Erosion by RNA Interference-Mediated Silencing of Heterogeneous Nuclear RNP A2/B1 in Two Experimental Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Herman, Sonja; Fischer, Anita; Presumey, Jessy; Hoffmann, Markus; Koenders, Marije I; Escriou, Virginie; Apparailly, Florence; Steiner, Guenter

    2015-09-01

    The nuclear protein heterogeneous nuclear RNP A2/B1 (hnRNP A2/B1) is involved in posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. It is constitutively expressed in lymphoid organs and highly up-regulated in the synovial tissue of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), who may also generate autoantibodies to this protein. This study was undertaken to investigate the potential involvement of hnRNP A2/B1 in the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis, by silencing hnRNP A2/B1 expression in 2 animal models of RA. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) and the K/BxN serum-transfer model were used as animal models of RA. Efficient silencing of hnRNP A2/B1 was achieved using a liposome-based carrier system for delivery of small interfering RNAs. Expression of hnRNP A2/B1 was analyzed by flow cytometry, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry. The number of osteoclasts was determined by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Cytokine levels and anticollagen antibody levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Efficient silencing of hnRNP A2/B1 was achieved in all lymphoid organs. In both experimental models, the incidence and severity of arthritis were largely reduced and bone erosion was not detectable as compared to the control groups. Down-modulation of hnRNP A2/B1 significantly interfered with the production of proinflammatory cytokines from monocyte/macrophages, but not from T cells. Consistent with these findings, production of T cell cytokines was not impaired when cells were restimulated in vitro with type II collagen. Furthermore, levels of anticollagen antibodies were not affected by hnRNP A2/B1 silencing. Our findings suggest that hnRNP A2/B1 has an important role in regulation of the innate immune system, especially at the level of monocyte/macrophage activation. Therefore, down-modulation of hnRNP A2/B1 seems to affect primarily the effector phase of autoimmune arthritis. © 2015

  8. Inosine attenuates spontaneous activity in the rat neurogenic bladder through an A2B pathway

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Claire; Cristofaro, Vivian; Sack, Bryan S.; Lukianov, Stefan N.; Schäfer, Mattias; Chung, Yeun Goo; Sullivan, Maryrose P.; Adam, Rosalyn M.

    2017-01-01

    Neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) is among the most challenging complications of spinal cord injury (SCI). A recent report by us demonstrated an improvement in NDO in SCI rats following chronic systemic treatment with the purine nucleoside inosine. The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanism of action of inosine underlying improvement of NDO. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent complete spinal cord transection at T8. Inosine (1 mM) delivered intravesically to SCI rats during conscious cystometry significantly decreased the frequency of spontaneous non-voiding contractions. In isolated tissue assays, inosine (1 mM) significantly decreased the amplitude of spontaneous activity (SA) in SCI bladder muscle strips. This effect was prevented by a pan-adenosine receptor antagonist CGS15943, but not by A1 or A3 receptor antagonists. The A2A antagonist ZM241385 and A2B antagonist PSB603 prevented the effect of inosine. The effect of inosine was mimicked by the adenosine receptor agonist NECA and the A2B receptor agonist BAY60-6583. The inhibition of SA by inosine was not observed in the presence of the BK antagonist, iberiotoxin, but persisted in the presence of KATP and SK antagonists. These findings demonstrate that inosine acts via an A2B receptor-mediated pathway that impinges on specific potassium channel effectors. PMID:28294142

  9. Microbial Herd Protection Mediated by Antagonistic Interaction in Polymicrobial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Megan J. Q.; Liang, Xiaoye; Smart, Matt; Tang, Le; Moore, Richard; Ingalls, Brian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In host and natural environments, microbes often exist in complex multispecies communities. The molecular mechanisms through which such communities develop and persist, despite significant antagonistic interactions between species, are not well understood. The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a lethal weapon commonly employed by Gram-negative bacteria to inhibit neighboring species through the delivery of toxic effectors. It is well established that intraspecies protection is conferred by immunity proteins that neutralize effector toxicities. In contrast, the mechanisms for interspecies protection are not clear. Here we use two T6SS-active antagonistic bacterial species, Aeromonas hydrophila and Vibrio cholerae, to demonstrate that interspecies protection is dependent on effectors. A. hydrophila and V. cholerae do not share conserved immunity genes but could coexist equally in a mixture. However, mutants lacking the T6SS or effectors were effectively eliminated by the competing wild-type strain. Time-lapse microscopic analyses showed that mutually lethal interactions drive the segregation of mixed species into distinct single-species clusters by eliminating interspersed single cells. Cluster formation provides herd protection by abolishing lethal interactions inside each cluster and restricting the interactions to the boundary. Using an agent-based modeling approach, we simulated the antagonistic interactions of two hypothetical species. The resulting simulations recapitulated our experimental observations. These results provide mechanistic insights regarding the general role of microbial weapons in determining the structures of complex multispecies communities. IMPORTANCE Investigating the warfare of microbes allows us to better understand the ecological relationships in complex microbial communities such as the human microbiota. Here we use the T6SS, a deadly bacterial weapon, as a model to demonstrate the importance of lethal interactions in

  10. Bradykinin as a pain mediator: receptors are localized to sensory neurons, and antagonists have analgesic actions

    SciTech Connect

    Steranka, L.R.; Manning, D.C.; DeHaas, C.J.

    1988-05-01

    Autoradiographic studies localize (/sup 3/H)bradykinin receptor binding sites to the substantia gelatinosa, dorsal root, and a subset of small cells in both the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia of the guinea pig. (/sup 3/H)Bradykinin labeling is also observed over myocardinal/coronary visceral afferent fibers. The localization of (/sup 3/H)bradykinin receptors to nociceptive pathways supports a role for bradykinin in pain mediation. Several bradkykinin antagonists block bradykinin-induced acute vascular pain in the rat. The bradykinin antagonists also relieve bradykinin- and urate-induced hyperalgesia in the rat paw. These results indicate that bradykinin is a physiologic mediator of pain and that bradykinin antagonists havemore » analgesic activity in both acute and chronic pain models.« less

  11. Maternal exposure to folic acid antagonists and placenta-mediated adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shi Wu; Zhou, Jia; Yang, Qiuying; Fraser, William; Olatunbosun, Olufemi; Walker, Mark

    2008-12-02

    In previous studies, maternal exposure to folic acid antagonists was associated with increased risks of neural tube defects, cardiovascular defects, oral clefts and urinary tract defects. The objective of the current study was to assess the possible effects of using folic acid antagonists in pregnancy on placenta-mediated adverse outcomes of pregnancy. We used data from an administrative database to retrospectively compare the occurrence of placenta-mediated adverse pregnancy outcomes between pregnant women exposed to folic acid antagonists and women without exposure to these agents. We included in the analysis a total of 14 982 women who had been exposed to folic acid antagonists and 59 825 women who had not been exposed. Sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim was the most frequently prescribed dihydrofolate reductase inhibitor (a total of 12 546 exposures during the preconception period and all 3 trimesters), and phenobarbital was the most frequently prescribed among the other folic acid antagonists (a total of 1565 exposures). The risks of preeclampsia (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.39-1.66), severe preeclampsia (OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.38-2.28), placental abruption (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.12-1.57), fetal growth restriction defined as less than the 10th percentile (OR 1.07, 95% CI 1.01-1.13), fetal growth restriction defined as less than the 3rd percentile (OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.11-1.34) and fetal death (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.07-1.70) were greater among mothers with exposure to folic acid antagonists. In general, the risks associated with exposure to other folic acid antagonists were higher than those associated with exposure to dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors. Supplementary analyses involving tight matching with propensity score, restriction of the analysis to women with exposure during the first and second trimesters and restriction of the analysis to specific categories of folic acid antagonists yielded similar results. Maternal exposure to folic acid

  12. SSTR-Mediated Imaging in Breast Cancer: Is There a Role for Radiolabeled Somatostatin Receptor Antagonists?

    PubMed

    Dalm, Simone U; Haeck, Joost; Doeswijk, Gabriela N; de Blois, Erik; de Jong, Marion; van Deurzen, Carolien H M

    2017-10-01

    Recent studies have shown enhanced tumor targeting by novel somatostatin receptor (SSTR) antagonists compared with clinically widely used agonists. However, these results have been obtained mostly in neuroendocrine tumors, and only limited data are available for cancer types with lower SSTR expression, including breast cancer (BC). To date, two studies have reported higher binding of the antagonist than the agonist in BC, but in both studies only a limited number of cases were evaluated. In this preclinical study, we further investigated whether the application of an SSTR antagonist can improve SSTR-mediated BC imaging in a large panel of BC specimens. We also generated an in vivo BC mouse model and performed SPECT/MRI and biodistribution studies. Methods: Binding of 111 In-DOTA-Tyr 3 -octreotate (SSTR agonist) and 111 In-DOTA-JR11 (SSTR antagonist) to 40 human BC specimens was compared using in vitro autoradiography. SSTR2 immunostaining was performed to confirm SSTR2 expression of the tumor cells. Furthermore, binding of the radiolabeled SSTR agonist and antagonist was analyzed in tissue material from 6 patient-derived xenografts. One patient-derived xenograft, the estrogen receptor-positive model T126, was chosen to generate in vivo mouse models containing orthotopic breast tumors for in vivo SPECT/MRI and biodistribution studies after injection with 177 Lu-DOTA-Tyr 3 -octreotate or 177 Lu-DOTA-JR11. Results: 111 In-DOTA-JR11 binding to human BC tissue was significantly higher than 111 In-DOTA-Tyr 3 -octreotate binding ( P < 0.001). The median ratio of antagonist binding versus agonist binding was 3.39 (interquartile range, 2-5). SSTR2 immunostaining confirmed SSTR2 expression on the tumor cells. SPECT/MRI of the mouse model found better tumor visualization with the antagonist. This result was in line with the significantly higher tumor uptake of the radiolabeled antagonist than of the agonist as measured in biodistribution studies 285 min after radiotracer

  13. Angiopoietin-1 mediates the proangiogenic activity of the bone morphogenic protein antagonist Drm.

    PubMed

    Mitola, Stefania; Moroni, Emanuela; Ravelli, Cosetta; Andres, German; Belleri, Mirella; Presta, Marco

    2008-08-15

    Recent observations have shown that Drm, a member the Dan family of bone morphogenic protein (BMP) antagonists, induces endothelial cell (EC) sprouting in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo by interacting with signaling EC receptors in a BMP-independent manner. Here, recombinant Drm (rDrm) up-regulates angiopoientin-1 (Ang-1) expression in EC without affecting Ang-2 and Tie-2 receptor expression. Ang-1 up-regulation is mediated by the activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB. Specific inhibition of Ang-1 activity by anti-Ang-1 antibodies, soluble Tie-2 receptor, or Ang-1 siRNA transfection significantly reduced the rDrm-mediated sprouting of EC in three-dimensional fibrin and type I collagen gels. In addition, Ang-1 antagonists inhibited the angiogenic activity exerted by rDrm in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane. Taken together, the data indicate that the proangiogenic activity of Drm is mediated by the activation of an Ang-1-dependent autocrine loop of stimulation in EC.

  14. Characterization of the A2B adenosine receptor from mouse, rabbit, and dog.

    PubMed

    Auchampach, John A; Kreckler, Laura M; Wan, Tina C; Maas, Jason E; van der Hoeven, Dharini; Gizewski, Elizabeth; Narayanan, Jayashree; Maas, Garren E

    2009-04-01

    We have cloned and pharmacologically characterized the A(2B) adenosine receptor (AR) from the dog, rabbit, and mouse. The full coding regions of the dog and mouse A(2B)AR were obtained by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, and the rabbit A(2B)AR cDNA was obtained by screening a rabbit brain cDNA library. It is noteworthy that an additional clone was isolated by library screening that was identical in sequence to the full-length rabbit A(2B)AR, with the exception of a 27-base pair deletion in the region encoding amino acids 103 to 111 (A(2B)AR(103-111)). This 9 amino acid deletion is located in the second intracellular loop at the only known splice junction of the A(2B)AR and seems to result from the use of an additional 5' donor site found in the rabbit and dog but not in the human, rat, or mouse sequences. [(3)H]3-Isobutyl-8-pyrrolidinoxanthine and 8-[4-[((4-cyano-[2,6-(3)H]-phenyl)carbamoylmethyl)oxy]phenyl]-1,3-di(n-propyl)xanthine ([(3)H]MRS 1754) bound with high affinity to membranes prepared from human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells expressing mouse, rabbit, and dog A(2B)ARs. Competition binding studies performed with a panel of agonist (adenosine and 2-amino-3,5-dicyano-4-phenylpyridine analogs) and antagonist ligands identified similar potency orders for the A(2B)AR orthologs, although most xanthine antagonists displayed lower binding affinity for the dog A(2B)AR compared with A(2B)ARs from rabbit and mouse. No specific binding could be detected with membranes prepared from HEK 293 cells expressing the rabbit A(2B)AR(103-111) variant. Furthermore, the variant failed to stimulate adenylyl cyclase or calcium mobilization. We conclude that significant differences in antagonist pharmacology of the A(2B)AR exist between species and that some species express nonfunctional variants of the A(2B)AR due to "leaky" splicing.

  15. GluN2B subunit-containing NMDA receptor antagonists prevent Aβ-mediated synaptic plasticity disruption in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Neng-Wei; Klyubin, Igor; Anwyl, Roger; Rowan, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Currently, treatment with the relatively low-affinity NMDA receptor antagonist memantine provides limited benefit in Alzheimer's disease (AD). One probable dose-limiting factor in the use of memantine is the inhibition of NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity mechanisms believed to underlie certain forms of memory. Moreover, amyloid-β protein (Aβ) oligomers that are implicated in causing the cognitive deficits of AD potently inhibit this form of plasticity. Here we examined if subtype-preferring NMDA receptor antagonists could preferentially protect against the inhibition of NMDA receptor-dependent plasticity of excitatory synaptic transmission by Aβ in the hippocampus in vivo. Using doses that did not affect control plasticity, antagonists selective for NMDA receptors containing GluN2B but not other GluN2 subunits prevented Aβ1–42 -mediated inhibition of plasticity. Evidence that the proinflammatory cytokine TNFα mediates this deleterious action of Aß was provided by the ability of TNFα antagonists to prevent Aβ1–42 inhibition of plasticity and the abrogation of a similar disruptive effect of TNFα using a GluN2B-selective antagonist. Moreover, at nearby synapses that were resistant to the inhibitory effect of TNFα, Aβ1–42 did not significantly affect plasticity. These findings suggest that preferentially targeting GluN2B subunit-containing NMDARs may provide an effective means of preventing cognitive deficits in early Alzheimer's disease. PMID:19918059

  16. Root Bending Is Antagonistically Affected by Hypoxia and ERF-Mediated Transcription via Auxin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Eysholdt-Derzsó, Emese; Sauter, Margret

    2017-09-01

    When plants encounter soil water logging or flooding, roots are the first organs to be confronted with reduced gas diffusion resulting in limited oxygen supply. Since roots do not generate photosynthetic oxygen, they are rapidly faced with oxygen shortage rendering roots particularly prone to damage. While metabolic adaptations to low oxygen conditions, which ensure basic energy supply, have been well characterized, adaptation of root growth and development have received less attention. In this study, we show that hypoxic conditions cause the primary root to grow sidewise in a low oxygen environment, possibly to escape soil patches with reduced oxygen availability. This growth behavior is reversible in that gravitropic growth resumes when seedlings are returned to normoxic conditions. Hypoxic root bending is inhibited by the group VII ethylene response factor (ERFVII) RAP2.12, as rap2.12-1 seedlings show exaggerated primary root bending. Furthermore, overexpression of the ERFVII member HRE2 inhibits root bending, suggesting that primary root growth direction at hypoxic conditions is antagonistically regulated by hypoxia and hypoxia-activated ERFVIIs. Root bending is preceded by the establishment of an auxin gradient across the root tip as quantified with DII-VENUS and is synergistically enhanced by hypoxia and the auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid. The protein abundance of the auxin efflux carrier PIN2 is reduced at hypoxic conditions, a response that is suppressed by RAP2.12 overexpression, suggesting antagonistic control of auxin flux by hypoxia and ERFVII. Taken together, we show that hypoxia triggers an escape response of the primary root that is controlled by ERFVII activity and mediated by auxin signaling in the root tip. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Novel ABCG2 Antagonists Reverse Topotecan-Mediated Chemotherapeutic Resistance in Ovarian Carcinoma Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Jerec W; Lovato, Debbie M; Severns, Virginia; Sklar, Larry A; Larson, Richard S

    2016-12-01

    Chemotherapeutic resistance remains a challenge in the treatment of ovarian carcinoma, especially in recurrent disease. Despite the fact that most patients with newly diagnosed tumors attain complete remission following cytoreductive surgery and chemotherapy, ovarian carcinoma has a recurrence rate that exceeds 75%. The ATP-binding cassette family G member 2 (ABCG2) efflux protein has been described as one mechanism that confers multiple-drug resistance to solid tumors and contributes to topotecan resistance in ovarian carcinoma. In fact, one clinical trial demonstrated ABCG2 expression in all patients with primary or recurrent ovarian carcinoma. On the basis of our previous work, we hypothesized that three compounds (CID44640177, CID1434724, and CID46245505), which represent a new piperazine-substituted pyrazolo[1,5]pyrimidine substructure class of ABCG2-specific antagonists, would restore chemosensitivity to drug-resistant ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo To address the treatment difficulties associated with chemotherapeutic resistance in ovarian cancer, we combined each compound (CID44640177, CID1434724, and CID46245505) with topotecan and administered the mixture to chemoresistant Igrov1/T8 ovarian cancer cells in vitro and Igrov1/T8 xenografts in CB-17 SCID mice. We found that only nanomolar concentrations of each ABCG2 inhibitor in combination with topotecan were required to restore chemosensitivity to Igrov1/T8 cells in vitro In vivo, substantial tumor reduction was achieved with each compound in 4 days, with CID1434724 causing the largest reduction in excess of 60%. No signs of secondary toxic effects were observed with the ABCG2 antagonists. These novel compounds should be viewed as promising drug candidates to reverse ABCG2-mediated chemoresistance. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(12); 2853-62. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Glutamate receptor antagonists inhibit calpain-mediated cytoskeletal proteolysis in focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Minger, S L; Geddes, J W; Holtz, M L; Craddock, S D; Whiteheart, S W; Siman, R G; Pettigrew, L C

    1998-11-09

    Excitatory amino acids may promote microtubular proteolysis observed in ischemic neuronal degeneration by calcium-mediated activation of calpain, a neutral protease. We tested this hypothesis in an animal model of focal cerebral ischemia without reperfusion. Spontaneously hypertensive rats were treated with 2, 3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo-(F)quinoxaline (NBQX), a competitive antagonist of the neuronal receptor for alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), or cis-4-[phosphono-methyl]-2-piperidine carboxylic acid (CGS 19755), a competitive antagonist of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. After treatment, all animals were subjected to permanent occlusion of the middle cerebral artery for 6 or 24 h. Infarct volumes measured in animals pretreated with CGS 19755 after 24 h of ischemia were significantly smaller than those quantified in ischemic controls. Rats pretreated with NBQX showed partial amelioration of cytoskeletal injury with preserved immunolabeling of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP 2) at 6 and 24 h and reduced accumulation of calpain-cleaved spectrin byproducts only at 6 h. Prevention of cytoskeletal damage was more effective after pretreatment with CGS 19755, as shown by retention of MAP 2 immunolabeling and significant restriction of calpain activity at both 6 and 24 h. Preserved immunolabeling of tau protein was observed at 6 and 24 h only in animals pretreated with CGS 19755. Western analysis performed on ischemic cortex taken from controls or rats pretreated with either NBQX or CGS 19755 suggested that loss of tau protein immunoreactivity was caused by dephosphorylation, rather than proteolysis. These results demonstrate a crucial link between excitotoxic neurotransmission, microtubular proteolysis, and neuronal degeneration in focal cerebral ischemia. Copyright 1998 Elsevier Science B.V.

  19. Locus Coeruleus and Tuberomammillary Nuclei Ablations Attenuate Hypocretin/Orexin Antagonist-Mediated REM Sleep.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Michael D; Nguyen, Alexander T; Warrier, Deepti R; Palmerston, Jeremiah B; Thomas, Alexia M; Morairty, Stephen R; Neylan, Thomas C; Kilduff, Thomas S

    2016-01-01

    Hypocretin 1 and 2 (Hcrts; also known as orexin A and B), excitatory neuropeptides synthesized in cells located in the tuberal hypothalamus, play a central role in the control of arousal. Hcrt inputs to the locus coeruleus norepinephrine (LC NE) system and the posterior hypothalamic histaminergic tuberomammillary nuclei (TMN HA) are important efferent pathways for Hcrt-induced wakefulness. The LC expresses Hcrt receptor 1 (HcrtR1), whereas HcrtR2 is found in the TMN. Although the dual Hcrt/orexin receptor antagonist almorexant (ALM) decreases wakefulness and increases NREM and REM sleep time, the neural circuitry that mediates these effects is currently unknown. To test the hypothesis that ALM induces sleep by selectively disfacilitating subcortical wake-promoting populations, we ablated LC NE neurons (LCx) or TMN HA neurons (TMNx) in rats using cell-type-specific saporin conjugates and evaluated sleep/wake following treatment with ALM and the GABAA receptor modulator zolpidem (ZOL). Both LCx and TMNx attenuated the promotion of REM sleep by ALM without affecting ALM-mediated increases in NREM sleep. Thus, eliminating either HcrtR1 signaling in the LC or HcrtR2 signaling in the TMN yields similar effects on ALM-induced REM sleep without affecting NREM sleep time. In contrast, neither lesion altered ZOL efficacy on any measure of sleep-wake regulation. These results contrast with those of a previous study in which ablation of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons attenuated ALM-induced increases in NREM sleep time without affecting REM sleep, indicating that Hcrt neurotransmission influences distinct aspects of NREM and REM sleep at different locations in the sleep-wake regulatory network.

  20. OPIOID ANTAGONISTS BLOCK THE ACQUISITION OF ETHANOL-MEDIATED CONDITIONED TACTILE PREFERENCE IN INFANT RATS

    PubMed Central

    Nizhnikov, Michael Eduard; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Truxell, Eric; Spear, Norman E.

    2009-01-01

    It has been difficult to find conditioned preference for tactile cues paired with ethanol intoxication in rats. Toward understanding the ontogeny of ethanol reinforcement, we aimed at establishing a simple and reliable procedure for: (i) assessing primary appetitive conditioning to ethanol in infant rats and (ii) discerning the role the opioid system plays in ethanol-mediated conditioning at this age. Experiment 1 determined the parameters (i.e., dose, interval of conditioning) for assessing ethanol-mediated conditioning. Pups were then trained with differential Pavlovian conditioning (Experiments 2 and 3) in which ethanol intoxication (1.0 – 2.0 g/kg, intragastrically or intraperitoneally delivered) was paired with a tactile stimulus (sandpaper) while an alternative texture signaled the absence of ethanol’s effects. Unpaired control conditions were also employed. Tactile preferences were assessed after two conditioning sessions. Paired rats spent significantly more time on sandpaper than unpaired controls, an effect that was greater following intragastric administration of 1.0 than 2.0 g/kg ethanol. This effect was replicated in Experiments 4a and 4c and found to be inhibited by pretreatment with general (naloxone) or specific (D-Pen-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 [CTOP] and naltrindole) opioid antagonists. Blood ethanol levels at conditioning were not altered by naloxone (Exp. 4b). The study outlines a procedure that reveals appetitive conditioning to ethanol by infant rats. The results are discussed in terms of a potential ethanol-induced activation of the endogenous opioid system during the onset of the intoxication process. PMID:19671461

  1. Tachykinin NK₁ receptor antagonist co-administration attenuates opioid withdrawal-mediated spinal microglia and astrocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Tumati, Suneeta; Largent-Milnes, Tally M; Keresztes, Attila I; Yamamoto, Takashi; Vanderah, Todd W; Roeske, William R; Hruby, Victor J; Varga, Eva V

    2012-06-05

    Prolonged morphine treatment increases pain sensitivity in many patients. Enhanced spinal Substance P release is one of the adaptive changes associated with sustained opioid exposure. In addition to pain transmitting second order neurons, spinal microglia and astrocytes also express functionally active Tachykinin NK₁ (Substance P) receptors. In the present work we investigated the role of glial Tachykinin NK₁ receptors in morphine withdrawal-mediated spinal microglia and astrocyte activation. Our data indicate that intrathecal co-administration (6 days, twice daily) of a selective Tachykinin NK₁ receptor antagonist (N-acetyl-L-tryptophan 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)benzylester (L-732,138; 20 μg/injection)) attenuates spinal microglia and astrocyte marker and pro-inflammatory mediator immunoreactivity as well as hyperalgesia in withdrawn rats. Furthermore, covalent linkage of the opioid agonist with a Tachykinin NK₁ antagonist pharmacophore yielded a bivalent compound that did not augment spinal microglia or astrocyte marker or pro-inflammatory mediator immunoreactivity and did not cause paradoxical pain sensitization upon drug withdrawal. Thus, bivalent opioid/Tachykinin NK₁ receptor antagonists may provide a novel paradigm for long-term pain management.

  2. Stimulation of adenosine A2b receptors blocks apoptosis in the non-infarcted myocardium even when administered after the onset of infarction.

    PubMed

    Simonis, Gregor; Wiedemann, Stephan; Joachim, Dirk; Weinbrenner, Christof; Marquetant, Rainer; Strasser, Ruth H

    2009-08-01

    Chronic adenosine A2b receptor stimulation has been shown to prevent ventricular remodelling after myocardial infarction (MI). We hypothesized that this effect is due to the inhibition of cardiac myocyte apoptosis in the myocardium remote from the infarction. Rats were subjected to MI by LAD ligation in situ. Some animals were pre-treated with the stable adenosine analogue 2-chloro-adenosine (CADO). After 24 h, pro- and anti-apoptotic signals (protein kinase C isoforms, p38, g proteins, Bcl-2/Bax ratio, Akt, Bad), and marker of apoptosis execution (caspase-3, TUNEL) were quantified in the remote myocardium. CADO prevented the occurrence of apoptosis in the remote myocardium of an infarcted heart. This effect occured not only when CADO was started before the onset of ischemia but also when it started 3 h after the infarction. The anti-apoptotic effect of CADO was blocked by simultaneous administration of the selective adenosine A2b receptor antagonist MRS1754 (1 mg/kg). The anti-apoptotic effect of CADO seems to be mediated by g(alphaq) and by the activation of survival kinases (Bad) and by inhibition of the pro-apoptotic PKC-delta/p38-MAPK-pathway. Chronic adenosine A2b receptor stimulation blocks cardiac myocyte apoptosis in the remote myocardium even when started after the onset of infarction. This may explain the anti-remodelling-effect of the A2b receptor stimulation after infarction.

  3. PAR1 antagonists inhibit thrombin-induced platelet activation whilst leaving the PAR4-mediated response intact.

    PubMed

    Judge, Heather M; Jennings, Lisa K; Moliterno, David J; Hord, Edward; Ecob, Rosemary; Tricoci, Pierluigi; Rorick, Tyrus; Kotha, Jayaprakash; Storey, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    Thrombin-induced platelet activation is initiated by PAR1 and PAR4 receptors. Vorapaxar, a PAR1 antagonist, has been assessed in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and stable atherosclerotic disease in addition to standard-of-care treatment. In clinical trials, vorapaxar has been observed to reduce the frequency of ischaemic events in some subgroups though in others has increased the frequency of bleeding events. Among patients undergoing CABG surgery, which is associated with excess thrombin generation, bleeding was not increased. The aim of these studies was to investigate the effects of selective PAR1 antagonism on thrombin-induced platelet activation in patients receiving vorapaxar or placebo in the TRACER trial and to explore the roles of PAR1 and PAR4 in thrombin-induced platelet activation in healthy volunteers. ACS patients receiving vorapaxar or placebo in the TRACER trial were studied at baseline and 4 hours, 1 and 4 months during drug administration. Thrombin-induced calcium mobilisation in platelet-rich plasma was assessed by flow cytometry. In vitro studies were performed in healthy volunteers using the PAR1 antagonist SCH79797 or PAR4 receptor desensitisation. Vorapaxar treatment significantly inhibited thrombin-induced calcium mobilisation, leaving a residual, delayed response. These findings were consistent with calcium mobilisation mediated via the PAR4 receptor and were reproduced in vitro using SCH79797. PAR4 receptor desensitization, in combination with SCH79797, completely inhibited thrombin-induced calcium mobilisation confirming that the residual calcium mobilisation was mediated via PAR4. In conclusion vorapaxar selectively antagonises the PAR1-mediated component of thrombin-induced platelet activation, leaving the PAR4-mediated response intact, which may explain why vorapaxar is well tolerated in patients undergoing CABG surgery since higher thrombin levels in this setting may override the effects of PAR1 antagonism through PAR4

  4. Dual effect of the novel peptide antagonist K-14585 on proteinase-activated receptor-2-mediated signalling.

    PubMed

    Goh, Fui Goon; Ng, Pei Yuen; Nilsson, Mary; Kanke, Toru; Plevin, Robin

    2009-12-01

    Here we have examined the effects of the novel peptide antagonist N-[1-(2,6-dichlorophenyl)methyl]-3-(1-pyrrolidinylmethyl)-1H-indol-5-yl]aminocarbonyl]-glycinyl-L-lysinyl-L-phenylalanyl-N-benzhydrylamide (K-14585) on proteinase-activated receptor (PAR)(2)-mediated intracellular signalling events. Using NCTC2544 cells expressing PAR(2), we assessed the effects of K-14585 on PAR(2)-mediated [(3)H] inositol phosphate accumulation, MAP kinase activation, p65 NFkappaB phosphorylation and DNA binding and IL-8 production. Pretreatment with K-14585 (5 microM) inhibited [(3)H] inositol phosphate levels stimulated by PAR(2)-activating peptide Ser-Leu-Ile-Gly-Lys-Val (SLIGKV-OH) in PAR(2)-expressing NCTC2544 cells. K-14585 pretreatment did not influence PAR(2)-mediated extracellular regulated kinase activation but inhibited p38 MAP kinase phosphorylation. At a higher concentration (30 microM), K-14585 alone stimulated p38 MAP kinase activation. These effects were replicated in EAhy926 cells, endogenously expressing PAR(2), but not in parental or PAR(4)-expressing NCTC2544 cells, suggesting these effects were PAR(2)-dependent. SLIGKV-mediated stimulation of p38 MAP kinase phosphorylation was substantially reduced by the G(q/11) inhibitor YM-254890, without affecting K-14585-mediated phosphorylation. Pretreatment with K-14585 inhibited PAR(2)-mediated p65 NFkappaB phosphorylation and NFkappaB-DNA binding. K-14585 (30 microM) alone stimulated comparable NFkappaB reporter activity to SLIGKV-OH. K-14585 inhibited SLIGKV-stimulated IL-8 production, but given alone increased IL-8. While SLIGKV-induced IL-8 formation was reduced by both SB203580 and YM-254890, the response to K-14585 was sensitive to SB203580 but not YM-254890. These data reveal that K-14585 has a duality of action functioning both as an antagonist and agonist due to either partial agonist actions or possible agonist-directed signalling. The data also suggest two modes of p38 MAP kinase activation emanating from PAR

  5. Regulation of Retinoid-Mediated Signaling Involved in Skin Homeostasis by RAR and RXR Agonists/Antagonists in Mouse Skin

    PubMed Central

    Gericke, Janine; Ittensohn, Jan; Mihály, Johanna; Álvarez, Susana; Álvarez, Rosana; Töröcsik, Dániel; de Lera, Ángel R.; Rühl, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous retinoids like all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) play important roles in skin homeostasis and skin-based immune responses. Moreover, retinoid signaling was found to be dysregulated in various skin diseases. The present study used topical application of selective agonists and antagonists for retinoic acid receptors (RARs) α and γ and retinoid-X receptors (RXRs) for two weeks on mouse skin in order to determine the role of retinoid receptor subtypes in the gene regulation in skin. We observed pronounced epidermal hyperproliferation upon application of ATRA and synthetic agonists for RARγ and RXR. ATRA and the RARγ agonist further increased retinoid target gene expression (Rbp1, Crabp2, Krt4, Cyp26a1, Cyp26b1) and the chemokines Ccl17 and Ccl22. In contrast, a RARα agonist strongly decreased the expression of ATRA-synthesis enzymes, of retinoid target genes, markers of skin homeostasis, and various cytokines in the skin, thereby markedly resembling the expression profile induced by RXR and RAR antagonists. Our results indicate that RARα and RARγ subtypes possess different roles in the skin and may be of relevance for the auto-regulation of endogenous retinoid signaling in skin. We suggest that dysregulated retinoid signaling in the skin mediated by RXR, RARα and/or RARγ may promote skin-based inflammation and dysregulation of skin barrier properties. PMID:23638129

  6. Root Bending Is Antagonistically Affected by Hypoxia and ERF-Mediated Transcription via Auxin Signaling1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Eysholdt-Derzsó, Emese

    2017-01-01

    When plants encounter soil water logging or flooding, roots are the first organs to be confronted with reduced gas diffusion resulting in limited oxygen supply. Since roots do not generate photosynthetic oxygen, they are rapidly faced with oxygen shortage rendering roots particularly prone to damage. While metabolic adaptations to low oxygen conditions, which ensure basic energy supply, have been well characterized, adaptation of root growth and development have received less attention. In this study, we show that hypoxic conditions cause the primary root to grow sidewise in a low oxygen environment, possibly to escape soil patches with reduced oxygen availability. This growth behavior is reversible in that gravitropic growth resumes when seedlings are returned to normoxic conditions. Hypoxic root bending is inhibited by the group VII ethylene response factor (ERFVII) RAP2.12, as rap2.12-1 seedlings show exaggerated primary root bending. Furthermore, overexpression of the ERFVII member HRE2 inhibits root bending, suggesting that primary root growth direction at hypoxic conditions is antagonistically regulated by hypoxia and hypoxia-activated ERFVIIs. Root bending is preceded by the establishment of an auxin gradient across the root tip as quantified with DII-VENUS and is synergistically enhanced by hypoxia and the auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid. The protein abundance of the auxin efflux carrier PIN2 is reduced at hypoxic conditions, a response that is suppressed by RAP2.12 overexpression, suggesting antagonistic control of auxin flux by hypoxia and ERFVII. Taken together, we show that hypoxia triggers an escape response of the primary root that is controlled by ERFVII activity and mediated by auxin signaling in the root tip. PMID:28698356

  7. Acute dilation to alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonists uncovers dual constriction and dilation mediated by arterial alpha(2)-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Crassous, P A; Flavahan, S; Flavahan, N A

    2009-11-01

    In mouse tail arteries, selective alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonism with rauwolscine caused powerful dilation during constriction to the alpha(1)-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine. This study therefore assessed phenylephrine's selectivity at vascular alpha-adrenoceptors and the mechanism(s) underlying dilation to rauwolscine. Mouse isolated tail arteries were assessed using a pressure myograph. The alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist UK14,304 caused low-maximum constriction that was inhibited by rauwolscine (3 x 10(-8) M) but not by the selective alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin (10(-7) M). Concentration-effect curves to phenylephrine, cirazoline or noradrenaline were unaffected by rauwolscine but were inhibited by prazosin, which was more effective at high compared with low levels of constriction. In the presence of prazosin, rauwolscine inhibited the curves and was more effective at low compared with high levels of constriction. Although rauwolscine alone did not affect concentration-effect curves to phenylephrine, noradrenaline or cirazoline, it caused marked transient dilation when administered during constriction to these agonists. Dilation was mimicked by another alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist (RX821002, 3 x 10(-8) M), was dependent on agonist selectivity, and did not occur during adrenoceptor-independent constriction (U46619). During constriction to UK14,304 plus U46619, rauwolscine or rapid removal of UK14,304 caused transient dilation that virtually abolished the combined constriction. Endothelial denudation reduced these dilator responses. Inhibition of alpha(2)-adrenoceptors caused transient dilation that was substantially greater than the contribution of alpha(2)-adrenoceptors to the constriction. This reflects a slowly reversing alpha(2)-adrenoceptor-mediated endothelium-dependent dilation and provides a rapid, sensitive test of alpha(2)-adrenoceptor activity. This approach also clearly emphasizes the poor selectivity of phenylephrine at vascular

  8. 2-Alkynyl-8-aryladenines possessing an amide moiety: their synthesis and structure-activity relationships of effects on hepatic glucose production induced via agonism of the A(2B) adenosine receptor.

    PubMed

    Harada, H; Asano, O; Kawata, T; Inoue, T; Horizoe, T; Yasuda, N; Nagata, K; Murakami, M; Nagaoka, J; Kobayashi, S; Tanaka, I; Abe, S

    2001-10-01

    A series of 2-alkynyl-8-aryladenine derivatives bearing an amide moiety at the 9-position of adenine was synthesized. These analogues were evaluated for inhibitory activity on N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA)-induced glucose production in primary cultured rat hepatocytes. The m-primary benzamide derivative 15f was the most potent compound (IC(50)=0.017 microM), being 15-fold more active than the corresponding 9-methyl derivative (1). Compound 15f showed 72- and 5.2-fold selectivity for human A(2B) receptor versus human A(1) and A(2A) receptors, respectively. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies of the synthesized compounds indicated that a three-carbon linker, fixed in the form of a benzene ring, between the adenine core and the amide moiety is important for both A(2B) antagonistic activity and selectivity. The IC(50) values in rat hepatocyte glucose assay correlated well with the IC(50) values in cAMP assay using Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with human A(2B) receptors (r(2)=0.94). The A(1) and A(2A) affinities showed no correlation with the potency to inhibit NECA-induced glucose production. These results strongly support our previous conclusion that adenosine agonist-induced hepatic glucose production in rat hepatocytes is mediated through the A(2B) receptor.

  9. Glutamine antagonist-mediated immune suppression decreases pathology but delays virus clearance in mice during nonfatal alphavirus encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Victoria K; Glowinski, Rebecca; Braxton, Alicia M; Potter, Michelle C; Slusher, Barbara S; Griffin, Diane E

    2017-08-01

    Infection of weanling C57BL/6 mice with the TE strain of Sindbis virus (SINV) causes nonfatal encephalomyelitis associated with hippocampal-based memory impairment that is partially prevented by treatment with 6-diazo-5-oxo-l-norleucine (DON), a glutamine antagonist (Potter et al., J Neurovirol 21:159, 2015). To determine the mechanism(s) of protection, lymph node and central nervous system (CNS) tissues from SINV-infected mice treated daily for 1 week with low (0.3mg/kg) or high (0.6mg/kg) dose DON were examined. DON treatment suppressed lymphocyte proliferation in cervical lymph nodes resulting in reduced CNS immune cell infiltration, inflammation, and cell death compared to untreated SINV-infected mice. Production of SINV-specific antibody and interferon-gamma were also impaired by DON treatment with a delay in virus clearance. Cessation of treatment allowed activation of the antiviral immune response and viral clearance, but revived CNS pathology, demonstrating the ability of the immune response to mediate both CNS damage and virus clearance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pharmacological significance of the interplay between angiotensin receptors: MAS receptors as putative final mediators of the effects elicited by angiotensin AT1 receptors antagonists.

    PubMed

    Pernomian, Larissa; Pernomian, Laena; Gomes, Mayara S; da Silva, Carlos H T P

    2015-12-15

    The interplay between angiotensin AT1 receptors and MAS receptors relies on several inward regulatory mechanisms from renin-angiotensin system (RAS) including the functional crosstalk between angiotensin II and angiotensin-(1-7), the competitive AT1 antagonism exhibited by angiotensin-(1-7), the antagonist feature assigned to AT1/MAS heterodimerization on AT1 signaling and the AT1-mediated downregulation of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Recently, such interplay has acquired an important significance to RAS Pharmacology since a few studies have supporting strong evidences that MAS receptors mediate the effects elicited by AT1 antagonists. The present Perspective provides an overview of the regulatory mechanisms involving AT1 and MAS receptors, their significance to RAS Pharmacology and the future directions on the interplay between angiotensin receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The A2B adenosine receptor modulates pulmonary hypertension associated with interstitial lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Zhong, Hongyan; Acero, Luis; Weng, Tingting; Melicoff, Ernestina; West, James D.; Hemnes, Anna; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Xia, Yang; Johnston, Richard A.; Zeng, Dewan; Belardinelli, Luiz; Blackburn, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Development of pulmonary hypertension is a common and deadly complication of interstitial lung disease. Little is known regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to pulmonary hypertension in patients with interstitial lung disease, and effective treatment options are lacking. The purpose of this study was to examine the adenosine 2B receptor (A2BR) as a regulator of vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary fibrosis. To accomplish this, cellular and molecular changes in vascular remodeling were monitored in mice exposed to bleomycin in conjunction with genetic removal of the A2BR or treatment with the A2BR antagonist GS-6201. Results demonstrated that GS-6201 treatment or genetic removal of the A2BR attenuated vascular remodeling and hypertension in our model. Furthermore, direct A2BR activation on vascular cells promoted interleukin-6 and endothelin-1 release. These studies identify a novel mechanism of disease progression to pulmonary hypertension and support the development of A2BR antagonists for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension secondary to interstitial lung disease.—Karmouty-Quintana, H., Zhong, H., Acero, L., Weng, T., Melicoff, E., West, J. D., Hemnes, A., Grenz, A., Eltzschig, H. K., Blackwell, T. S., Xia, Y., Johnston, R. A., Zeng, D., Belardinelli, L., Blackburn, M. R. The A2B adenosine receptor modulates pulmonary hypertension associated with interstitial lung disease. PMID:22415303

  12. Cataleptic effects of γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) and baclofen in mice: mediation by GABAB receptors, but differential enhancement by N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    France, Charles P.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analog that is used to treat narcolepsy but that is also abused. GHB has many actions in common with the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen, but their underlying GABAB receptor mechanisms may be different. Objective The aim of this study is to further investigate a possible differential role of glutamate in GABAB receptor-mediated effects of GHB and baclofen. Materials and methods The experiments examined the effects of non-competitive antagonists at the N-methyl-d-asparate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptors on GHB-induced catalepsy and compared these effects with those on baclofen-induced catalepsy. Results In C57BL/6J mice, ketamine, phencyclidine (PCP), and dizocilpine (MK-801) all enhanced GHB-induced catalepsy. They did so with a potency order (i.e., MK-801 > PCP > ketamine) consistent with their relative potencies as NMDA antagonists but not as inhibitors of dopamine or organic cation transporters. Ketamine, PCP, and MK-801 enhanced catalepsy along inverted U-shaped dose–response curves likely because higher doses affected motor coordination, which limited their catalepsy-enhancing effects. Doses that were maximally effective to enhance GHB-induced catalepsy did not affect the cataleptic effects of baclofen. Conclusions The finding that NMDA receptor antagonists enhance the cataleptic effects of GHB but not those of baclofen is further evidence that the GABAB receptor mechanisms mediating the effects of GHB and GABAB agonists are not identical. Differential interactions of glutamate with the GABAB receptor mechanisms mediating the effects of GHB and baclofen may explain why GHB is effective for treating narcolepsy and is abused, whereas baclofen is not. PMID:18446324

  13. A prostaglandin E (PGE) receptor EP4 antagonist protects natural killer cells from PGE2-mediated immunosuppression and inhibits breast cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xinrong; Holt, Dawn; Kundu, Namita; Reader, Jocelyn; Goloubeva, Olga; Take, Yukinori; Fulton, Amy M.

    2013-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 is frequently upregulated in epithelial tumors and contributes to poor outcomes in multiple malignancies. The COX-2 product prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) promotes tumor growth and metastasis by acting on a family of four G protein-coupled receptors (EP1–4). Using a novel small molecule EP4 antagonist (RQ-15986) and a syngeneic murine model of metastatic breast cancer, we determined the effect of EP4 blockade on innate immunity and tumor biology. Natural killer (NK)-cell functions are markedly depressed in mice bearing murine mammary tumor 66.1 or 410.4 cells owing to the actions of PGE2 on NK cell EP4 receptors. The EP4 agonist PGE1-OH inhibits NK functions in vitro, and this negative regulation is blocked by RQ-15986. Likewise, the treatment of tumor-bearing mice with RQ-15986 completely protected NK cells from the immunosuppressive effects of the tumor microenvironment in vivo. RQ-15986 also has direct effects on EP4 expressed by tumor cells, inhibiting the PGE2-mediated activation of adenylate cyclase and blocking PGE2-induced tumor cell migration. The pretreatment of tumor cells with a non-cytotoxic concentration of RQ-15986 inhibited lung colonization, a beneficial effect that was lost in mice depleted of NK cells. The oral administration of RQ-15986 inhibited the growth of tumor cells implanted into mammary glands and their spontaneous metastatic colonization to the lungs, resulting in improved survival. Our findings reveal that EP4 antagonism prevents tumor-mediated NK-cell immunosuppression and demonstrates the anti-metastatic activity of a novel EP4 antagonist. These observations support the investigation of EP4 antagonists in clinical trials. PMID:23482441

  14. The SnRK2-APC/CTE regulatory module mediates the antagonistic action of gibberellic acid and abscisic acid pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qibing; Wu, Fuqing; Sheng, Peike; Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Xiuping; Wang, Jiulin; Cheng, Zhijun; Wang, Jie; Wang, Haiyang; Wan, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellic acid (GA) antagonistically regulate many developmental processes and responses to biotic or abiotic stresses in higher plants. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this antagonism is still poorly understood. Here, we show that loss-of-function mutation in rice Tiller Enhancer (TE), an activator of the APC/CTE complex, causes hypersensitivity and hyposensitivity to ABA and GA, respectively. We find that TE physically interacts with ABA receptor OsPYL/RCARs and promotes their degradation by the proteasome. Genetic analysis also shows OsPYL/RCARs act downstream of TE in mediating ABA responses. Conversely, ABA inhibits APC/CTE activity by phosphorylating TE through activating the SNF1-related protein kinases (SnRK2s), which may interrupt the interaction between TE and OsPYL/RCARs and subsequently stabilize OsPYL/RCARs. In contrast, GA can reduce the level of SnRK2s and may promote APC/CTE-mediated degradation of OsPYL/RCARs. Thus, we propose that the SnRK2-APC/CTE regulatory module represents a regulatory hub underlying the antagonistic action of GA and ABA in plants. PMID:26272249

  15. The SnRK2-APC/C(TE) regulatory module mediates the antagonistic action of gibberellic acid and abscisic acid pathways.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qibing; Wu, Fuqing; Sheng, Peike; Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Xiuping; Wang, Jiulin; Cheng, Zhijun; Wang, Jie; Wang, Haiyang; Wan, Jianmin

    2015-08-14

    Abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellic acid (GA) antagonistically regulate many developmental processes and responses to biotic or abiotic stresses in higher plants. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this antagonism is still poorly understood. Here, we show that loss-of-function mutation in rice Tiller Enhancer (TE), an activator of the APC/C(TE) complex, causes hypersensitivity and hyposensitivity to ABA and GA, respectively. We find that TE physically interacts with ABA receptor OsPYL/RCARs and promotes their degradation by the proteasome. Genetic analysis also shows OsPYL/RCARs act downstream of TE in mediating ABA responses. Conversely, ABA inhibits APC/C(TE) activity by phosphorylating TE through activating the SNF1-related protein kinases (SnRK2s), which may interrupt the interaction between TE and OsPYL/RCARs and subsequently stabilize OsPYL/RCARs. In contrast, GA can reduce the level of SnRK2s and may promote APC/C(TE)-mediated degradation of OsPYL/RCARs. Thus, we propose that the SnRK2-APC/C(TE) regulatory module represents a regulatory hub underlying the antagonistic action of GA and ABA in plants.

  16. Buprenorphine-Mediated Transition from Opioid Agonist to Antagonist Treatment: State of the Art and New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mannelli, Paolo; Peindl, Kathleen S.; Lee, Tong; Bhatia, Kamal S.; Wu, Li-Tzy

    2012-01-01

    Constant refinement of opioid dependence (OD) therapies is a condition to promote treatment access and delivery. Among other applications, the partial opioid agonist buprenorphine has been studied to improve evidence-based interventions for the transfer of patients from opioid agonist to antagonist medications. This paper summarizes PubMed-searched clinical investigations and conference papers on the transition from methadone maintenance to buprenorphine and from buprenorphine to naltrexone, discussing challenges and advances. The majority of the 26 studies we examined were uncontrolled investigations. Many small clinical trials have demonstrated the feasibility of in- or outpatient transfer to buprenorphine from low to moderate methadone doses (up to 60–70 mg). Results on the conversion from higher methadone doses, on the other hand, indicate significant withdrawal discomfort, and need for ancillary medications and inpatient treatment. Tapering high methadone doses before the transfer to buprenorphine is not without discomfort and the risk of relapse. The transition buprenorphine-naltrexone has been explored in several pilot studies, and a number of treatment methods to reduce withdrawal intensity warrant further investigation, including the co-administration of buprenorphine and naltrexone. Outpatient transfer protocols using buprenorphine, and direct comparisons with other modalities of transitioning from opioid agonist to antagonist medications are limited. Given its potential salience, the information gathered should be used in larger clinical trials on short and long-term outcomes of opioid agonist-antagonist transition treatments. Future studies should also test new pharmacological mechanisms to help reduce physical dependence, and identify individualized approaches, including the use of pharmacogenetics and long-acting opioid agonist and antagonist formulations. PMID:22280332

  17. Elevated Adenosine Induces Placental DNA Hypomethylation Independent of A2B Receptor Signaling in Preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Aji; Wu, Hongyu; Iriyama, Takayuki; Zhang, Yujin; Sun, Kaiqi; Song, Anren; Liu, Hong; Peng, Zhangzhe; Tang, Lili; Lee, Minjung; Huang, Yun; Ni, Xin; Kellems, Rodney E; Xia, Yang

    2017-07-01

    Preeclampsia is a prevalent pregnancy hypertensive disease with both maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Emerging evidence indicates that global placental DNA hypomethylation is observed in patients with preeclampsia and is linked to altered gene expression and disease development. However, the molecular basis underlying placental epigenetic changes in preeclampsia remains unclear. Using 2 independent experimental models of preeclampsia, adenosine deaminase-deficient mice and a pathogenic autoantibody-induced mouse model of preeclampsia, we demonstrate that elevated placental adenosine not only induces hallmark features of preeclampsia but also causes placental DNA hypomethylation. The use of genetic approaches to express an adenosine deaminase minigene specifically in placentas, or adenosine deaminase enzyme replacement therapy, restored placental adenosine to normal levels, attenuated preeclampsia features, and abolished placental DNA hypomethylation in adenosine deaminase-deficient mice. Genetic deletion of CD73 (an ectonucleotidase that converts AMP to adenosine) prevented the elevation of placental adenosine in the autoantibody-induced preeclampsia mouse model and ameliorated preeclampsia features and placental DNA hypomethylation. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that elevated placental adenosine-mediated DNA hypomethylation predominantly occurs in spongiotrophoblasts and labyrinthine trophoblasts and that this effect is independent of A2B adenosine receptor activation in both preeclampsia models. Extending our mouse findings to humans, we used cultured human trophoblasts to demonstrate that adenosine functions intracellularly and induces DNA hypomethylation without A2B adenosine receptor activation. Altogether, both mouse and human studies reveal novel mechanisms underlying placental DNA hypomethylation and potential therapeutic approaches for preeclampsia. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Effect of endothelin-A receptor antagonist on mu, delta and kappa opioid receptor-mediated antinociception in mice.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Shaifali; Zhang, Zhong; Patterson, Nicole; Gulati, Anil

    2010-06-10

    We have previously shown the involvement of central endothelin (ET) mechanisms in morphine analgesia and tolerance. Here we investigated the interaction of centrally administered endothelin ET(A) receptor antagonist, BMS182874, with DAMGO (micro opioid receptor agonist), SNC80 (delta opioid receptor agonist), U50,488H (kappa opioid receptor agonist), and oxycodone (micro and kappa opioid receptor agonist) towards antinociception, tolerance to antinociception and body temperature. Antinociception was determined using tail-flick latency method. BMS182874 (50microg, i.c.v.) treatment alone did not produce analgesia or change in body temperature. However, BMS182874 significantly enhanced antinociception response of DAMGO (66.75%), SNC80 (62.40%), U50,488H (55.38%), and oxycodone (61.72%). Chronic treatment with DAMGO, SNC80, U50,488H or oxycodone, induced tolerance to antinociception. Treatment with BMS182874 restored antinociceptive effect in mice that were tolerant to DAMGO, SNC80, U50,488H as well as oxycodone. Antinociceptive response of DAMGO, SNC80, U50,488H, and oxycodone in tolerant mice treated with BMS182874 was significantly higher (44.55%, 37.48%, 43.02%, and 56.08%, respectively) compared to tolerant mice treated with vehicle. Body temperature decreased with DAMGO, SNC80, U50,488H, and oxycodone; tolerance did not develop to hypothermic effect and BMS182874 did not affect DAMGO, SNC80, U50,488H, or oxycodone induced changes in body temperature. Opioid-antagonist naloxone, completely blocked antinociceptive effect of DAMGO, SNC80, U50,488H or oxycodone and potentiation of antinociception by BMS182874. It is concluded that BMS182874 potentiated antinociception and restored antinociceptive effect in mice tolerant to micro, delta and kappa selective, as well as a non-selective opioid receptor agonist. Therefore, endothelin ET(A) receptor antagonists could be useful in the restoration of antinociceptive effect during tolerance to opiates.

  19. In vitro Study of the Antagonistic Effect of Low-dose Liquiritigenin on Gemcitabine-induced Capillary Leak Syndrome in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma via Inhibiting ROS- Mediated Signalling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Xia, Qing; Luo, Rui-Jie; Lin, Zi-Qi; Xue, Ping

    2015-01-01

    To investigate in-vitro antagonistic effect of low-dose liquiritigenin on gemcitabine-induced capillary leak syndrome (CLS) in pancreatic adenocarcinoma via inhibiting reactive oxygen species (ROS)- mediated signalling pathways. Human pancreatic adenocarcinoma Panc-1 cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were pre-treated using low-dose liquiritigenin for 24 h, then added into gemcitabine and incubated for 48 h. Cell viability, apoptosis rate and ROS levels of Panc-1 cells and HUVECs were respectively detected through methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazoliumbromide (MTT) and flow cytometry. For HUVECs, transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and transcellular and paracellular leak were measured using transwell assays, then poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) and metal matrix proteinase-9 (MMP9) activity were assayed via kits, mRNA expressions of p53 and Rac-1 were determined through quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR); The expressions of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and PARP-1 were measured via western blotting. Low-dose liquiritigenin exerted no effect on gemcitabine-induced changes of cell viability, apoptosis rate and ROS levels in Panc-1 cells, but for HUVECs, liquiritigenin (3 μM) could remarkably elevate gemcitabine- induced decrease of cell viability, transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), pro-MMP9 level and expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 (p<0.01). Meanwhile, it could also significantly decrease gemcitabine-induced increase of transcellular and paracellular leak, ROS level, PARP-1 activity, Act-MMP9 level, mRNA expressions of p53 and Rac-1, expression of PARP-1 and apoptosis rate (p<0.01). Low-dose liquiritigenin exerts an antagonistic effect on gemcitabine-induced leak across HUVECs via inhibiting ROS-mediated signalling pathways, but without affecting gemcitabine-induced Panc-1 cell apoptosis. Therefore, low-dose liquiritigenin might be beneficial to

  20. Short Communication: Inhibition of DC-SIGN-Mediated HIV-1 Infection by Complementary Actions of Dendritic Cell Receptor Antagonists and Env-Targeting Virus Inactivators.

    PubMed

    Pustylnikov, Sergey; Dave, Rajnish S; Khan, Zafar K; Porkolab, Vanessa; Rashad, Adel A; Hutchinson, Matthew; Fieschi, Frank; Chaiken, Irwin; Jain, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    The DC-SIGN receptor on human dendritic cells interacts with HIV gp120 to promote both infection of antigen-presenting cells and transinfection of T cells. We hypothesized that in DC-SIGN-expressing cells, both DC-SIGN ligands such as dextrans and gp120 antagonists such as peptide triazoles would inhibit HIV infection with potential complementary antagonist effects. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the effects of dextran (D66), isomaltooligosaccharides (D06), and several peptide triazoles (HNG156, K13, and UM15) on HIV infection of B-THP-1/DC-SIGN cells. In surface plasmon resonance competition assays, D66 (IC50 = 35.4 μM) and D06 (IC50 = 3.4 mM) prevented binding of soluble DC-SIGN to immobilized mannosylated bovine serum albumin (BSA). An efficacious dose-dependent inhibition of DC-SIGN-mediated HIV infection in both pretreatment and posttreatment settings was observed, as indicated by inhibitory potentials (EC50) [D66 (8 μM), D06 (48 mM), HNG156 (40 μM), UM15 (100 nM), and K13 (25 nM)]. Importantly, both dextrans and peptide triazoles significantly decreased HIV gag RNA levels [D66 (7-fold), D06 (13-fold), HNG156 (7-fold), K-13 (3-fold), and UM15 (6-fold)]. Interestingly, D06 at the highest effective concentration showed a 14-fold decrease of infection, while its combination with 50 μM HNG156 showed a 26-fold decrease. Hence, these compounds can combine to inactivate the viruses and suppress DC-SIGN-mediated virus-cell interaction that as shown earlier leads to dendritic cell HIV infection and transinfection dependent on the DC-SIGN receptor.

  1. Novel bis-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine (bis-TMP) and bis-mecamylamine antagonists at neuronal nicotinic receptors mediating nicotine-evoked dopamine release

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenfa; Pivavarchyk, Marharyta; Subramanian, K. Leela; Deaciuc, A. Gabriela; Dwoskin, Linda P.; Crooks, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    By linking two or three mecamylamine or 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine (TMP) molecules together via a linear lipophilic bis-methylene linker or a specially designed conformationally restricted tris-linker, a series of bis- and tris-tertiary amine analogs has been synthesized and evaluated as potent antagonists at nAChRs mediating nicotine-evoked [3H]dopamine release from rat striatal slices. Compounds 7e, 14b and 16 demonstrated high potency in decreasing nicotine-evoked [3H]dopamine release (IC50=2.2, 46, and 107 nM, respectively. The preliminary structure-activity data obtained with these new analogs suggest the importance of the length of the methylene linker in the bis-analog series. Such bis-tertiary amino analogs may provide a new strategy for the design of drugable ligands that have high inhibitory potency against nAChRs mediating nicotine-evoked dopamine release in striatum, which have been suggested to be target receptors of interest in the development of potential smoking cessation therapies. PMID:20079634

  2. Nonsteroidal Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonist Finerenone Protects Against Acute Kidney Injury-Mediated Chronic Kidney Disease: Role of Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Lattenist, Lionel; Lechner, Sebastian M; Messaoudi, Smail; Le Mercier, Alan; El Moghrabi, Soumaya; Prince, Sonia; Bobadilla, Norma A; Kolkhof, Peter; Jaisser, Frédéric; Barrera-Chimal, Jonatan

    2017-05-01

    Acute kidney injury induced by ischemia/reperfusion (IR) is a frequent complication in hospitalized patients. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism has shown to be helpful against renal IR consequences; however, the potential benefit of novel nonsteroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists such as finerenone has to be further explored. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of finerenone to prevent the acute and chronic consequences of ischemic acute kidney injury. For the acute study (24 hours), 18 rats were divided into sham, bilateral renal ischemia of 25 minutes, and rats that received 3 doses of finerenone at 48, 24, and 1 hour before the ischemia. For the chronic study (4 months), 23 rats were divided into sham, rats that underwent 45 minutes of bilateral ischemia, and rats treated with finerenone at days 2 and 1 and 1 hour before IR. We found that after 24 hours of reperfusion, the untreated IR rats presented kidney dysfunction and tubular injury. Kidney injury molecule-1 and neutrophil gelatinase associated to lipolacin mRNA levels were increased. In contrast, the rats treated with finerenone displayed normal kidney function and significantly lesser tubular injury and kidney injury molecule-1 and neutrophil gelatinase associated to lipolacin levels. After 4 months, the IR rats developed chronic kidney disease, evidenced by kidney dysfunction, increased proteinuria and renal vascular resistance, tubular dilation, extensive tubule-interstitial fibrosis, and an increase in kidney transforming growth factor-β and collagen-I mRNA. The transition from acute kidney injury to chronic kidney disease was fully prevented by finerenone. Altogether, our data show that in the rat, finerenone is able to prevent acute kidney injury induced by IR and the chronic and progressive deterioration of kidney function and structure. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Afferent Pathway-Mediated Effect of α1 Adrenergic Antagonist, Tamsulosin, on the Neurogenic Bladder After Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Han, Jin-Hee; Kim, Sung-Eun; Ko, Il-Gyu; Kim, Jayoung; Kim, Khae Hawn

    2017-09-01

    The functions of the lower urinary tract (LUT), such as voiding and storing urine, are dependent on complex central neural networks located in the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral ganglia. Thus, the functions of the LUT are susceptible to various neurologic disorders including spinal cord injury (SCI). SCI at the cervical or thoracic levels disrupts voluntary control of voiding and the normal reflex pathways coordinating bladder and sphincter functions. In this context, it is noteworthy that α1-adrenoceptor blockers have been reported to relieve voiding symptoms and storage symptoms in elderly men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Tamsulosin, an α1-adrenoceptor blocker, is also considered the most effective regimen for patients with LUT symptoms such as BPH and overactive bladder (OAB). In the present study, the effects of tamsulosin on the expression of c-Fos, nerve growth factor (NGF), and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase (NADPH-d) in the afferent micturition areas, including the pontine micturition center (PMC), the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray matter (vlPAG), and the spinal cord (L5), of rats with an SCI were investigated. SCI was found to remarkably upregulate the expression of c-Fos, NGF, and NADPH-d in the afferent pathway of micturition, the dorsal horn of L5, the vlPAG, and the PMC, resulting in the symptoms of OAB. In contrast, tamsulosin treatment significantly suppressed these neural activities and the production of nitric oxide in the afferent pathways of micturition, and consequently, attenuated the symptoms of OAB. Based on these results, tamsulosin, an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist, could be used to attenuate bladder dysfunction following SCI. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the exact mechanism and effects of tamsulosin on the afferent pathways of micturition.

  4. Selective A2A receptor antagonist prevents microglia-mediated neuroinflammation and protects retinal ganglion cells from high intraocular pressure-induced transient ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Maria H; Boia, Raquel; Elvas, Filipe; Martins, Tiago; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Ambrósio, António Francisco; Santiago, Ana Raquel

    2016-03-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of vision loss and blindness worldwide, characterized by chronic and progressive neuronal loss. Reactive microglial cells have been recognized as a neuropathologic feature, contributing to local inflammation and retinal neurodegeneration. In a recent in vitro work (organotypic cultures), we demonstrated that blockade of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) prevents the neuroinflammatory response and affords protection to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) against exposure to elevated hydrostatic pressure (EHP), to mimic elevated intraocular pressure (IOP), the main risk factor for glaucoma development. Herein, we investigated whether a selective A2AR antagonist (SCH 58261) could modulate retinal microglia reactivity and their inflammatory response. Furthermore, we took advantage of the high IOP-induced transient ischemia (ischemia-reperfusion, I-R) animal model to evaluate the protective role of A2AR blockade in the control of retinal neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Primary microglial cell cultures were challenged either with lipopolysaccharide or with EHP, in the presence or absence of A2AR antagonist SCH 58261 (50 nM). In addition, I-R injury was induced in adult Wistar rats after intravitreal administration of SCH 58261 (100 nM, 5 μL). Our results showed that SCH 58261 attenuated microglia reactivity and the increased expression and release of proinflammatory cytokines. Moreover, intravitreal administration of SCH 58261 prevented I-R-induced cell death and RGC loss, by controlling microglial-mediated neuroinflammatory response. These results prompt the proposal that A2AR blockade may have great potential in the management of retinal neurodegenerative diseases characterized by microglia reactivity and RGC death, such as glaucoma and ischemic diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Adenosine receptor antagonists effect on plasma-enhanced killing.

    PubMed

    Bauzá, Gustavo; Moitra, Rituparna; Remick, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that naive plasma has inherent capabilities to enhance bacterial opsonization and phagocyte killing, but not all plasma is equally effective. This raised the question of whether plasma constituents other than opsonins may play a role. Adenosine receptor antagonists have been shown to modulate cytokine response and survival in mice after a bacterial challenge. We investigated whether selective adenosine receptor blockade would influence the ability of naive plasma to effectively control bacterial growth. Colonic bacteria- and thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages and neutrophils were obtained from naive mice. Stock murine plasma from naive was purchased and categorized as having high plasma-enhanced bacterial killing capacity using our previously described methods. Bacteria and plasma were incubated to allow for opsonization and then added to macrophages previously exposed to selected adenosine receptor antagonists: ZM 241385: A2A, MRS1754: A2B, DPCPX: A1, and MRS1220: A3. The final mixture was plated on blood agar plates in aerobic and anaerobic conditions and bacterial colony-forming units quantified after 24 h. This study demonstrated that exogenous adenosine was able to significantly decrease phagocyte killing of cecal bacteria. Blocking adenosine receptors with selective antagonists altered the bacterial killing capacity of plasma. Selectively blocking the A1, A2A, or A2B receptors proved most beneficial at reversing the effect of adenosine. Consistent with previous work, only macrophage killing of bacteria could be modulated by adenosine receptor blockade because neutrophils were unaffected. These data demonstrate that adenosine decreases macrophage killing of enteric bacteria and that this effect is mediated through the adenosine receptors.

  6. LHRH antagonists.

    PubMed

    Haviv, F; Bush, E N; Knittle, J; Greer, J

    1998-01-01

    After almost two decades, the research on LHRH antagonists has produced a number of decapeptides that are currently in clinical studies. The structures of these antagonists, unlike the agonists, differ substantially from that of LHRH. Five of the ten amino acids are unnatural and of D configuration. The structural combination of a hydrophobic N-terminus (residues 1, 2, and 3) and a basic/hydrophilic C-terminus (residues 6 and 8) was thought to be responsible for some HR reactions encountered with the second generation of LHRH antagonists. This side effect was greatly reduced by substituting the appropriate combination of amino acids at positions 5, 6, and 8. The next hurdle in the drug development of LHRH antagonists was solubility and aggregation. In the case of A-75998, water solubility was improved by 12- to 25-fold via substitution of NMeTyr at position 5. However, based on DLS analysis, the aqueous solutions still contained some large aggregates that were not visible to the naked eye. This formation of aggregates was eliminated on formulating A-75998 in Encapsin. In men, a single s.c. dose of 2 mg of A-75998 suppressed T to the castrate levels for over 30 hr. Other LHRH antagonists including ganirelix and cetrorelix are also in phase I/II clinical studies. Clinical studies with cetrorelix in prostate cancer; in vitro fertilization, and benign prostate hypotrophy have been reported.

  7. Indoleamine antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Clineschmidt, B.V.; Lotti, V.J.

    1974-01-01

    Four indoleamine antagonists were evaluated for relative potencies as inhibitors of tryptamine-induced forepaw clonus and 5-hydroxytryptophan-evoked head twitches. Methergoline was approximately three times more potent against the forepaw clonus than the head twitch response, whereas methysergide exhibited nearly equal activity in both tests. Cyproheptadine and cinanserin showed a profile opposite to methergoline and a greater degree of selectivity, being 25 to 40 times more potent as inhibitors of the 5-hydroxytryptophan- than of the tryptamine-induced response. These findings clearly demonstrate that the rank order of potency of indoleamine antagonists varies greatly depending upon the test procedure employed. PMID:4547673

  8. An A2B Adenosine Receptor Agonist Promotes Th17 Autoimmune Responses in Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis (EAU) via Dendritic Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingjiazi; Liang, Dongchun; Zuo, Aijun; Shao, Hui; Kaplan, Henry J; Sun, Deming

    2015-01-01

    We have recently reported that, although adenosine receptor (AR) agonists have a suppressive effect on Th1 autoreactive T cells, their effect on Th17 autoreactive T cells and γδ T cells is stimulatory and this effect is mainly mediated via A2A adenosine receptors (A2ARs). In this study, we further demonstrate that treatment of C57BL/6 (B6) mice with a selective A2B adenosine receptor (A2BR) agonist greatly enhanced the development of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU), whereas treatment with an A2BR antagonist significantly ameliorated severity of EAU. The A2BR agonist-treated mice showed augmented Th17, but not Th1, responses. Mechanistic studies showed that the A2BR agonist-induced enhancement of the Th17 response was significantly lower when TCR-δ-/- mice received the same treatment and that transfer of γδ T cells into TCR-δ-/- mice partially restored this effect. We also showed that dendritic cells (DCs) from A2BR agonist-treated mice showed a significantly increased ability to activate γδ T cells and Th17 autoreactive T cells. Thus, our previous studies have shown that, in EAU, activated γδ T cells possess greatly increased ability to enhance Th17 autoimmune responses. In the present study, we showed that exposure of DCs to A2BR agonist facilitated γδ T cell activation, leading to augmented Th17 responses and progressive EAU development. Our results further support our previous finding that AR agonists have distinct effects on Th1 and Th17 autoimmune responses.

  9. An A2B Adenosine Receptor Agonist Promotes Th17 Autoimmune Responses in Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis (EAU) via Dendritic Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingjiazi; Liang, Dongchun; Zuo, Aijun; Shao, Hui; Kaplan, Henry J.; Sun, Deming

    2015-01-01

    We have recently reported that, although adenosine receptor (AR) agonists have a suppressive effect on Th1 autoreactive T cells, their effect on Th17 autoreactive T cells and γδ T cells is stimulatory and this effect is mainly mediated via A2A adenosine receptors (A2ARs). In this study, we further demonstrate that treatment of C57BL/6 (B6) mice with a selective A2B adenosine receptor (A2BR) agonist greatly enhanced the development of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU), whereas treatment with an A2BR antagonist significantly ameliorated severity of EAU. The A2BR agonist-treated mice showed augmented Th17, but not Th1, responses. Mechanistic studies showed that the A2BR agonist-induced enhancement of the Th17 response was significantly lower when TCR-δ-/- mice received the same treatment and that transfer of γδ T cells into TCR-δ-/- mice partially restored this effect. We also showed that dendritic cells (DCs) from A2BR agonist-treated mice showed a significantly increased ability to activate γδ T cells and Th17 autoreactive T cells. Thus, our previous studies have shown that, in EAU, activated γδ T cells possess greatly increased ability to enhance Th17 autoimmune responses. In the present study, we showed that exposure of DCs to A2BR agonist facilitated γδ T cell activation, leading to augmented Th17 responses and progressive EAU development. Our results further support our previous finding that AR agonists have distinct effects on Th1 and Th17 autoimmune responses. PMID:26147733

  10. In silico design of small peptides antagonist against leptin receptor for the treatment of obesity and its associated immune-mediated diseases.

    PubMed

    Munikumar, Manne; Krishna, Vagolu Siva; Reddy, Varikasuvu Seshadri; Rajeswari, Bolla; Sriram, Dharmarajan; Rao, Mendu Vishnuvardhana

    2018-04-04

    Excess adiposity in obese inhibits negatively impacts immune function and host defence. Obesity is characterized by a state of low-grade, chronic inflammation in addition to disturbed levels of circulating nutrients and metabolic hormones. The impact of metabolic abnormalities on obesity-related co-morbidities has undergone intense scrutiny over the past decades. Thus, treatment of obesity and its associated immune-mediated diseases is challenging due to impaired function of leptin system. These disorders are managed through antibiotics and by cytokines replacement. However, the effectiveness of cytokines coupled to the complexity of the cytokine network leads to severe side-effects, which can still occur after careful preclinical evaluation. In addition, synthetic immunotherapeutics carry a degree of risk, time-consuming and expensive. Hence, the complexity of existing therapy and adverse effects emphasizes the need for an alternative approach for the management of immune dysfunction associated with obesity. Computer-aided small molecule antibody technology has been successful in the design of novel biologicals for the diagnosis of diseases and therapeutic interventions. In this study, the crystal structure of leptin receptor (LEPR) complex with monoclonal antibody (9F8 Fab) was explored to predict Ag-Ab interactions using bioinformatics tools. The LEPR of complementarity-determining region (CDR) loops were mutated with published positive control residues of Ser, Thr, Tyr, Trp, and Phe to design a set of 678 peptides which were evaluated through Ag-peptide docking, binding free-energies, and interaction energies. Thus, hypothesized novel peptides can be explored as clinically applicable antagonists for the treatment of obesity and associated immune-mediated diseases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The tumor antagonistic steroidal alkaloid Solanidine prompts the intrinsic suicidal signal mediated DFF-40 nuclear import and nucleosomal disruption.

    PubMed

    Malojirao, Vikas H; Vigneshwaran, V; Thirusangu, Prabhu; Mahmood, Riaz; Prabhakar, B T

    2018-04-15

    Aim Deformity in the cellular homeostatic event associated with cell survival and apoptosis are committing factors for carcinogenesis. Interventions of these events by pharmacologically active agent gain predominance in cancer treatment. In current investigation Solanidine, a steroidal alkaloid was evaluated on tumorigenesis by targeting death signal using multiple tumor cells and model systems. Anti-proliferative effect was evaluated using cytotoxic studies. Prolonged cytotoxic effect of Solanidine was examined by colony formation assay. Exhibition of apoptotic hallmark induced by Solanidine was examined using FACS analysis, Annexin-V staining, Acridine orange staining, TUNEL assay. Altered gene expression was evaluated using Immunoblot, Immunofluorescence and Immunohistochemistry technique. In-vitro results were revalidated in EAC solid tumor and CAM xenograft model. Solanidine exerts its potential effect in a target specific manner. The cytotoxic/anticlonogenic activity was due to induction of typical cellular apoptotic hallmarks and cell cycle blockage at S-G2/M phase. The molecular events underlying this effect is through activation of intrinsic pathway via Bax, Bad and Cytochrome c activation by neutralizing Bcl-2 expression, along with downregulated PI3K/Akt survival signal. As a consequence, downstream pro apoptogenic gene, active Caspase-3 was over expressed by Solanidine to cleave its substrate PARP and promotes nuclear import of DFF-40. Anti-carcinogenic aptitude was further confirmed by murine solid tumors and in-vivo CAM xenograft studies. Solanidine emerged as active molecule against tomorigenesis by activating nuclear import of DFF-40 mediated nucleosomal disruption and cell demise. It can be developed as a potential apoptogenic small molecule for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Serotonin-1A receptor stimulation mediates effects of a metabotropic glutamate 2/3 receptor antagonist, 2S-2-amino-2-(1S,2S-2-carboxycycloprop-1-yl)-3-(xanth-9-yl)propanoic acid (LY341495), and an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, ketamine, in the novelty-suppressed feeding test.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Kenichi; Iijima, Michihiko; Chaki, Shigeyuki

    2014-06-01

    α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptor stimulation has been proposed to be a common neural mechanism of metabotropic glutamate 2/3 (mGlu2/3) receptor antagonists and an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, ketamine, exerting antidepressant effects in animal models. AMPA receptor stimulation has also been shown to mediate an increase in the extracellular level of serotonin (5-HT) in the medial prefrontal cortex by an mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist in rats. However, involvement of the serotonergic system in the actions of mGlu2/3 receptor antagonists and ketamine is not well understood. We investigated involvement of the serotonergic system in the effects of an mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, 2S-2-amino-2-(1S,2S-2-carboxycycloprop-1-yl)-3-(xanth-9-yl)propanoic acid (LY341495), and ketamine in a novelty-suppressed feeding (NSF) test in mice. The intraperitoneal administration of LY341495 or ketamine at 30 min prior to the test significantly shortened latency to feed, which was attenuated by an AMPA receptor antagonist, 2,3-dioxo-6-nitro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydr-obenzo[f]quinoxaline-7-sulfonamide (NBQX). The effects of LY341495 and ketamine were no longer observed in mice pretreated with a tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor, para-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA). Moreover, the effects of LY341495 and ketamine were blocked by a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, N-{2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl}-N-(2-pyridynyl) cyclohexane-carboxamide (WAY100635), but not by a 5-HT2A/2C receptor antagonist, ritanserin. Likewise, an AMPA receptor potentiator, 2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxin-7-yl-(1-piperidyl)methanone (CX546), shortened latency to feed in the NSF test, which was prevented by depletion of 5-HT and blockade of 5-HT1A receptor. These results suggest that AMPA receptor-dependent 5-HT release and subsequent 5-HT1A receptor stimulation may be involved in the actions of an mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist and ketamine in the NSF test.

  13. Adenosine A2A receptor ligand recognition and signaling is blocked by A2B receptors.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Sonja; Navarro, Gemma; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel; Seibt, Benjamin F; Ammon, York-Christoph; de Filippo, Elisabetta; Danish, Azeem; Lacher, Svenja K; Červinková, Barbora; Rafehi, Muhammad; Fuxe, Kjell; Schiedel, Anke C; Franco, Rafael; Müller, Christa E

    2018-03-02

    The adenosine receptor (AR) subtypes A 2A and A 2B are rhodopsin-like G s protein-coupled receptors whose expression is highly regulated under pathological, e.g. hypoxic, ischemic and inflammatory conditions. Both receptors play important roles in inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases, are blocked by caffeine, and have now become major drug targets in immuno-oncology. By Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET), bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and proximity ligation assays (PLA) we demonstrated A 2A -A 2B AR heteromeric complex formation. Moreover we observed a dramatically altered pharmacology of the A 2A AR when co-expressed with the A 2B AR (A 2B ≥ A 2A ) in recombinant as well as in native cells. In the presence of A 2B ARs, A 2A -selective ligands lost high affinity binding to A 2A ARs and displayed strongly reduced potency in cAMP accumulation and dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays. These results have major implications for the use of A 2A AR ligands as drugs as they will fail to modulate the receptor in an A 2A -A 2B heteromer context. Accordingly, A 2A -A 2B AR heteromers represent novel pharmacological targets.

  14. Gait and behavior in an IL1β-mediated model of rat knee arthritis and effects of an IL1 antagonist.

    PubMed

    Allen, Kyle D; Adams, Samuel B; Mata, Brian A; Shamji, Mohammed F; Gouze, Elvire; Jing, Liufang; Nettles, Dana L; Latt, L Daniel; Setton, Lori A

    2011-05-01

    Interleukin-1 beta (IL1β) is a proinflammatory cytokine that mediates arthritic pathologies. Our objectives were to evaluate pain and limb dysfunction resulting from IL1β over-expression in the rat knee and to investigate the ability of local IL1 receptor antagonist (IL1Ra) delivery to reverse-associated pathology. IL1β over-expression was induced in the right knees of 30 Wistar rats via intra-articular injection of rat fibroblasts retrovirally infected with human IL1β cDNA. A subset of animals received a 30 µl intra-articular injection of saline or human IL1Ra on day 1 after cell delivery (0.65 µg/µl hIL1Ra, n = 7 per group). Joint swelling, gait, and sensitivity were investigated over 1 week. On day 8, animals were sacrificed and joints were collected for histological evaluation. Joint inflammation and elevated levels of endogenous IL1β were observed in knees receiving IL1β-infected fibroblasts. Asymmetric gaits favoring the affected limb and heightened mechanical sensitivity (allodynia) reflected a unilateral pathology. Histopathology revealed cartilage loss on the femoral groove and condyle of affected joints. Intra-articular IL1Ra injection failed to restore gait and sensitivity to preoperative levels and did not reduce cartilage degeneration observed in histopathology. Joint swelling and degeneration subsequent to IL1β over-expression is associated limb hypersensitivity and gait compensation. Intra-articular IL1Ra delivery did not result in marked improvement for this model; this may be driven by rapid clearance of administered IL1Ra from the joint space. These results motivate work to further investigate the behavioral consequences of monoarticular arthritis and sustained release drug delivery strategies for the joint space. Copyright © 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  15. N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists for stroke and head trauma.

    PubMed

    Wood, P L; Hawkinson, J E

    1997-04-01

    impetus in the investigation of alternative approaches to modulating the NMDA receptor complex. In the case of glycine site antagonists, these compounds have been shown in preclinical studies to be devoid of PCP-like actions and the neuronal vacuolisation associated with the competitive and non-competitive NMDA antagonists. This has induced the development of a number of chemical series with at least three compounds currently in Phase I and II clinical trials. These include ACEA 1021, GV150526A and ZD9379. Clinical efficacies and therapeutic indices of these compounds should be defined in 1998 and 1999. An alternative approach using a partial agonist of the glycine site (1-aminocyclopropane-carboxylic acid, ACPC) has been halted in Phase I. Another approach which has led to the development of NMDA receptor antagonists, selective for the NMDA receptor subunits 1A/2B (NR1A/2B subtype), was the discovery in early studies of the neuroprotective actions of ifenprodil. Structural analogues include eliprodil, CP-101,606 and lubeluzole. In the cases of eliprodil and lubeluzole, these compounds have demonstrated neuroprotection in preclinical models, but they possess the extremely dangerous side-effect of increasing cardiac repolarisation time (i.e., increased QTc interval). The therapeutic index for these compounds is low. This has led to the termination of eliprodil's development and has limited the current dosing strategy with lubeluzole. It has not been disclosed if CP-101,606 possesses this dose-limiting side-effect. In summary, strategies for drug design and development based on our knowledge of the NMDA receptor complex have led to the development of a new generation of compounds for the treatment of stroke and traumatic brain injury, which remain to be evaluated in the clinic. The success of this approach will be defined in the next two to three years.

  16. Regulation of ERRα Gene Expression by Estrogen Receptor Agonists and Antagonists in SKBR3 Breast Cancer Cells: Differential Molecular Mechanisms Mediated by G Protein-Coupled Receptor GPR30/GPER-1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yin; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Teng, Christina T.

    2010-01-01

    In selected tissues and cell lines, 17β-estradiol (E2) regulates the expression of estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα), a member of the orphan nuclear receptor family. This effect is thought to be mediated by the estrogen receptor α (ERα). However in the ERα- and ERβ-negative SKBR3 breast cancer cell line, physiological levels of E2 also stimulate ERRα expression. Here, we explored the molecular mechanism that mediates estrogen action in ER-negative breast cancer cells. We observed that E2, the ERα agonist, as well as the ERα antagonists ICI 182,780 and tamoxifen (TAM), a selective ER modulator, stimulate the transcriptional activity of the ERRα gene and increase the production of ERRα protein in SKBR3 cells. Moreover, the ERRα downstream target genes expression and cellular proliferation are also increased. We show further that the G protein-coupled receptor GPR30/GPER-1 (GPER-1) mediates these effects. The GPER-1 specific ligand G-1 mimics the actions of E2, ICI 182,780, and TAM on ERRα expression, and changing the levels of GPER-1 mRNA by overexpression or small interfering RNA knockdown affected the expression of ERRα accordingly. Utilizing inhibitors, we delineate a different downstream pathway for ER agonist and ER antagonist-triggered signaling through GPER-1. We also find differential histone acetylation and transcription factor recruitment at distinct nucleosomes of the ERRα promoter, depending on whether the cells are activated with E2 or with ER antagonists. These findings provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of GPER-1/ERRα-mediated signaling and may be relevant to what happens in breast cancer cells escaping inhibitory control by TAM. PMID:20211987

  17. Power Generation Unit of Nano-Satellites STUDSAT 2A/2B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velayudhan, Sneha; Bhavana, K. H.; Ravi Kumar, H. M.; Ranjith, H. G.; Ghosh, Sujay

    2014-08-01

    STUDSAT 2A/2B [8] are the twin nano-satellites. Electrical power system is one of the most important subsystems of STUDSAT 2A/2B which provides conditioned power to all the subsystem. Power generating unit is one of the most important units in Electrical Power system. The power generation unit of STUDSAT-2A/2B consists of 3 solar panels out of which 2 are deployable and 1 is body mounted and a maximum Power point Tracker(MPPT).The total orbital period of STUDSAT-2A/2B is 98min.The sunlit period is about 63.8min.The power can be generated by the solar panels only during this period. Since the power generated by the solar panel is affected by the solar irradiation, temperature etc. It's difficult to generate the maximum power at all the point in an orbit, hence maximum power point trackers are used. These maximum power point trackers track the maximum power point on the solar panel using perturb and observe algorithm and hence maximum power is generated at all the points in an orbit.This paper presents the power profile for both body mounted and deployable solar panels. It gives a brief description of how the power generated by the solar cells is conditioned and the power protection unit with simulation results and testing results for the solar panel used in STUDSAT-2A/2B.

  18. Links Between Insulin Resistance, Adenosine A2B Receptors, and Inflammatory Markers in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Figler, Robert A.; Wang, Guoquan; Srinivasan, Susseela; Jung, Dae Young; Zhang, Zhiyou; Pankow, James S.; Ravid, Katya; Fredholm, Bertil; Hedrick, Catherine C.; Rich, Stephen S.; Kim, Jason K.; LaNoue, Kathryn F.; Linden, Joel

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the mechanisms by which blockade of adenosine A2B receptors (A2BRs) reduces insulin resistance. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We investigated the effects of deleting or blocking the A2BR on insulin sensitivity using glucose tolerance tests (GTTs) and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps in mouse models of type 2 diabetes. The effects of diabetes on A2BR transcription and signaling were measured in human and mouse macrophages and mouse endothelial cells. In addition, tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in ∼42 kb encompassing the A2BR gene, ADORA2B, were evaluated for associations with markers of diabetes and inflammation. RESULTS Treatment of mice with the nonselective adenosine receptor agonist 5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadensoine (NECA) increased fasting blood glucose and slowed glucose disposal during GTTs. These responses were inhibited by A2BR deletion or blockade and minimally affected by deletion of A1Rs or A2ARs. During hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp of diabetic KKAY mice, A2BR antagonism increased glucose infusion rate, reduced hepatic glucose production, and increased glucose uptake into skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue. Diabetes caused a four- to sixfold increase in A2BR mRNA in endothelial cells and macrophages and resulted in enhanced interleukin (IL)-6 production in response to NECA due to activation of protein kinases A and C. Five consecutive tag SNPs in ADORA2B were highly correlated with IL-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP). Diabetes had a highly significant independent effect on variation in inflammatory markers. The strength of associations between several ADORA2B SNPs and inflammatory markers was increased when accounting for diabetes status. CONCLUSIONS Diabetes affects the production of adenosine and the expression of A2BRs that stimulate IL-6 and CRP production, insulin resistance, and the association between ADORA2B SNPs and inflammatory markers. We hypothesize that increased A2BR signaling in diabetes

  19. Immunosuppression by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists is mediated through inhibition of Kv1.3 and KCa3.1 channels in T cells.

    PubMed

    Kahlfuß, Sascha; Simma, Narasimhulu; Mankiewicz, Judith; Bose, Tanima; Lowinus, Theresa; Klein-Hessling, Stefan; Sprengel, Rolf; Schraven, Burkhart; Heine, Martin; Bommhardt, Ursula

    2014-03-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are ligand-gated ion channels that play an important role in neuronal development, plasticity, and excitotoxicity. NMDAR antagonists are neuroprotective in animal models of neuronal diseases, and the NMDAR open-channel blocker memantine is used to treat Alzheimer's disease. In view of the clinical application of these pharmaceuticals and the reported expression of NMDARs in immune cells, we analyzed the drug's effects on T-cell function. NMDAR antagonists inhibited antigen-specific T-cell proliferation and cytotoxicity of T cells and the migration of the cells toward chemokines. These activities correlated with a reduction in T-cell receptor (TCR)-induced Ca(2+) mobilization and nuclear localization of NFATc1, and they attenuated the activation of Erk1/2 and Akt. In the presence of antagonists, Th1 effector cells produced less interleukin-2 (IL-2) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ), whereas Th2 cells produced more IL-10 and IL-13. However, in NMDAR knockout mice, the presumptive expression of functional NMDARs in wild-type T cells was inconclusive. Instead, inhibition of NMDAR antagonists on the conductivity of Kv1.3 and KCa3.1 potassium channels was found. Hence, NMDAR antagonists are potent immunosuppressants with therapeutic potential in the treatment of immune diseases, but their effects on T cells have to be considered in that Kv1.3 and KCa3.1 channels are their major effectors.

  20. Excess adenosine in murine penile erectile tissues contributes to priapism via A2B adenosine receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Tiejuan; Abbasi, Shahrzad; Zhang, Hong; Uray, Karen; Chunn, Janci L.; Xia, Ling Wei; Molina, Jose G.; Weisbrodt, Norman W.; Kellems, Rodney E.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Xia, Yang

    2008-01-01

    Priapism, abnormally prolonged penile erection in the absence of sexual excitation, is associated with ischemia-mediated erectile tissue damage and subsequent erectile dysfunction. It is common among males with sickle cell disease (SCD), and SCD transgenic mice are an accepted model of the disorder. Current strategies to manage priapism suffer from a poor fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the disorder. Here we report that mice lacking adenosine deaminase (ADA), an enzyme necessary for the breakdown of adenosine, displayed unexpected priapic activity. ADA enzyme therapy successfully corrected the priapic activity both in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that it was dependent on elevated adenosine levels. Further genetic and pharmacologic evidence demonstrated that A2B adenosine receptor–mediated (A2BR-mediated) cAMP and cGMP induction was required for elevated adenosine–induced prolonged penile erection. Finally, priapic activity in SCD transgenic mice was also caused by elevated adenosine levels and A2BR activation. Thus, we have shown that excessive adenosine accumulation in the penis contributes to priapism through increased A2BR signaling in both Ada–/– and SCD transgenic mice. These findings provide insight regarding the molecular basis of priapism and suggest that strategies to either reduce adenosine or block A2BR activation may prove beneficial in the treatment of this disorder. PMID:18340377

  1. Probes for narcotic receptor mediated phenomena. 44. Synthesis of an N-substituted 4-hydroxy-5-(3-hydroxyphenyl)morphan with high affinity and selective μ-antagonist activity

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Malliga R.; Lee, Yong Sok; Deschamps, Jeffrey R.; Dersch, Christina M.; Rothman, Richard B.; Jacobson, Arthur E.; Rice, Kenner C.

    2012-01-01

    A simple three-step synthesis of 5-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-2-methyl-2-azabicyclo[3.3.1]nonan-4-ol (3a) was achieved using an osmium tetroxide mediated oxidation of the known intermediate 6. A pyrrolidine-ring variant of 3a (3-(7-(hydroxymethyl)-6-methyl-6-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octan-1-yl)phenol (5)) was isolated when other routes were used. The epimeric hydroxy analogue 4a was synthesized by simple inversion of the stereochemistry at C-4. Both N-methyl (3a and 4a) and N-phenethyl (3b and 4b) derivatives were synthesized. The compounds were examined for their opioid receptor affinity and the N-phenethyl analogue 3b was found to have relatively weak affinity for the μ-opioid receptor (Ki = 74 nM). However, the N-phenethyl analogue of the C-4 epimer, 4b, had about 15 fold higher affinity than 3b and was selective for the μ-opioid receptor (Ki = 4.6 nM). Compound 4b was a moderately potent μ-opioid antagonist (Ke = 12 nM), as determined by [35S]GTP-γ-S assays. Compounds 3b and 4b were energy minimized at the level of B3LYP/6-31G*, and then overlaid onto the 5-phenylmorphan, the (1R,5R,9S)-(−)-enantiomer of 2b (Fig. 1) with the α or β-OH group at the C-9 position. The spatial orientation of the hydroxyl moiety in 3b, 4b, 2a, and 2b is proposed to be the structural requirement for high μ-opioid receptor binding affinity and their agonist or antagonist activity. The modest change in spatial position of the hydroxyl moiety, and not the N-substituent, induced the change from potent agonist to an antagonist of moderate potency. PMID:22341895

  2. 5-HT2CR antagonist/5-HT2CR inverse agonist recovered the increased isolation-induced aggressive behavior of BALB/c mice mediated by ADAR1 (p110) expression and Htr2c RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weizhi; Xu, Hong; Xue, Ying; An, Dong; Li, Huairui; Chen, Wei; Yu, Deqin; Sun, Yiping; Ma, Jianmei; Tang, Yiyuan; Xiao, Zhaoyang; Yin, Shengming

    2018-03-01

    Social isolation enhances the aggressive behavior of animals, but the detailed mechanism remains unclear. Epigenetic studies have suggested that Htr2c RNA editing is closely related to aggressive behavior. This study aims to obtain a fundamental understanding of how social isolation impacts adenosine deaminase acting on RNA 1 (ADAR1, RNA editing enzyme) and Htr2c RNA editing, leading to aggressive behavior, and explore the effective solutions for the recovery of this behavior. We evaluated 21-day-old BALB/c mice with and without isolation for aggressive behavior using a resident-intruder test. Immune-reactivity and protein expression of ADAR1 (p110) were measured using immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Htr2c RNA editing was evaluated using pyrosequencing. In addition, the 5-HT 2C R antagonist SB243213/5-HT 2C R inverse agonist SB206553 was used to treat the isolated mice, and the performance of both treatments on the behavior, ADAR1 (p110) expression, and Htr2c RNA editing in isolated mice was examined. Both the protein expression and immune-reactivity of ADAR1 (p110) in the amygdala decreased, but the percentage of Htr2c RNA editing at A and B sites of amygdala only showed a moderate increase in isolated BALB/c mice with enhanced aggressive behavior compared to the age-matched group-housed BALB/c mice. Additionally, treatment with the 5-HT 2C R antagonist SB243213/5-HT 2C R inverse agonist SB206553 recovered the enhanced aggressive behavior of isolated mice and returned the protein expression and immune-reactivity of ADAR1 (p110) back to the normal level. Moreover, compared to the age-matched isolated mice treated with physiological saline, isolated mice treated with 5-HT 2C R inverse agonist SB206553 showed a lower percentage of Htr2c RNA editing at both A and B sites, and the same result occurred in isolated mice treated with 5-HT 2C R antagonist SB243213 at B site of Htr2c RNA editing. The 5-HT 2C R antagonist SB243213/5-HT 2C R inverse agonist SB

  3. Epithelial-specific A2B adenosine receptor signaling protects the colonic epithelial barrier during acute colitis

    PubMed Central

    Aherne, CM; Saeedi, B; Collins, CB; Masterson, JC; McNamee, EN; Perrenoud, L; Rapp, CR; Curtis, VF; Bayless, A; Fletcher, A; Glover, LE; Evans, CM; Jedlicka, P; Furuta, GT; de Zoeten, EF; Colgan, SP; Eltzschig, HK

    2015-01-01

    Central to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) pathogenesis is loss of mucosal barrier function. Emerging evidence implicates extracellular adenosine signaling in attenuating mucosal inflammation. We hypothesized that adenosine-mediated protection from intestinal barrier dysfunction involves tissue-specific signaling through the A2B adenosine receptor (Adora2b) at the intestinal mucosal surface. To address this hypothesis, we combined pharmacologic studies and studies in mice with global or tissue-specific deletion of the Adora2b receptor. Adora2b−/− mice experienced a significantly heightened severity of colitis, associated with a more acute onset of disease and loss of intestinal epithelial barrier function. Comparison of mice with Adora2b deletion on vascular endothelial cells (Adora2bfl/flVeCadCre+) or intestinal epithelia (Adora2bfl/flVillinCre+) revealed a selective role for epithelial Adora2b signaling in attenuating colonic inflammation. In vitro studies with Adora2b knockdown in intestinal epithelial cultures or pharmacologic studies highlighted Adora2b-driven phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) as a specific barrier repair response. Similarly, in vivo studies in genetic mouse models or treatment studies with an Adora2b agonist (BAY 60-6583) recapitulate these findings. Taken together, our results suggest that intestinal epithelial Adora2b signaling provides protection during intestinal inflammation via enhancing mucosal barrier responses. PMID:25850656

  4. H1 but not H2 histamine antagonist receptors mediate anxiety-related behaviors and emotional memory deficit in mice subjected to elevated plus-maze testing

    PubMed Central

    Serafim, K.R.; Kishi, M.S.; Canto-de-Souza, A.; Mattioli, R.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the role of H1 and H2 receptors in anxiety and the retrieval of emotional memory using a Trial 1/Trial 2 (T1/T2) protocol in an elevated plus-maze (EPM). Tests were performed on 2 consecutive days, designated T1 and T2. Before T1, the mice received intraperitoneal injections of saline (SAL), 20 mg/kg zolantidine (ZOL, an H2 receptor antagonist), or 8.0 or 16 mg/kg chlorpheniramine (CPA, an H1 receptor antagonist). After 40 min, they were subjected to the EPM test. In T2 (24 h later), each group was subdivided into two additional groups, and the animals from each group were re-injected with SAL or one of the drugs. In T1, the Student t-test showed no difference between the SAL and ZOL or 8 mg/kg CPA groups with respect to the percentages of open arm entries (%OAE) and open arm time (%OAT). However, administration of CPA at the highest dose of 16 mg/kg decreased %OAE and %OAT, but not locomotor activity, indicating anxiogenic-like behavior. Emotional memory, as revealed by a reduction in open arm exploration between the two trials, was observed in all experimental groups, indicating that ZOL and 8 mg/kg CPA did not affect emotional memory, whereas CPA at the highest dose affected acquisition and consolidation, but not retrieval of memory. Taken together, these results suggest that H1 receptor, but not H2, is implicated in anxiety-like behavior and in emotional memory acquisition and consolidation deficits in mice subjected to EPM testing. PMID:23598647

  5. H₁ but not H₂ histamine antagonist receptors mediate anxiety-related behaviors and emotional memory deficit in mice subjected to elevated plus-maze testing.

    PubMed

    Serafim, K R; Kishi, M S; Canto-de-Souza, A; Mattioli, R

    2013-05-01

    This study investigated the role of H₁ and H₂ receptors in anxiety and the retrieval of emotional memory using a Trial 1/Trial 2 (T1/T2) protocol in an elevated plus-maze (EPM). Tests were performed on 2 consecutive days, designated T1 and T2. Before T1, the mice received intraperitoneal injections of saline (SAL), 20 mg/kg zolantidine (ZOL, an H2 receptor antagonist), or 8.0 or 16 mg/kg chlorpheniramine (CPA, an H1 receptor antagonist). After 40 min, they were subjected to the EPM test. In T2 (24 h later), each group was subdivided into two additional groups, and the animals from each group were re-injected with SAL or one of the drugs. In T1, the Student t-test showed no difference between the SAL and ZOL or 8 mg/kg CPA groups with respect to the percentages of open arm entries (%OAE) and open arm time (%OAT). However, administration of CPA at the highest dose of 16 mg/kg decreased %OAE and %OAT, but not locomotor activity, indicating anxiogenic-like behavior. Emotional memory, as revealed by a reduction in open arm exploration between the two trials, was observed in all experimental groups, indicating that ZOL and 8 mg/kg CPA did not affect emotional memory, whereas CPA at the highest dose affected acquisition and consolidation, but not retrieval of memory. Taken together, these results suggest that H₁ receptor, but not H₂, is implicated in anxiety-like behavior and in emotional memory acquisition and consolidation deficits in mice subjected to EPM testing.

  6. Adenosine A2B receptor: from cell biology to human diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ying; Huang, Pingbo

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular adenosine is a ubiquitous signaling molecule that modulates a wide array of biological processes. Recently, significant advances have been made in our understanding of A2B adenosine receptor (A2BAR). In this review, we first summarize some of the general characteristics of A2BAR, and then we describe the multiple binding partners of the receptor, such as newly identified α-actinin-1 and p105, and discuss how these associated proteins could modulate A2BAR’s functions, including certain seemingly paradoxical functions of the receptor. Growing evidence indicates a critical role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes, in addition to its importance in the regulation of vascular diseases and lung disease. Here, we also discuss the role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes and the potential of the receptor as a target for treating these three diseases.

  7. Leishmania amazonensis-Induced cAMP Triggered by Adenosine A2B Receptor Is Important to Inhibit Dendritic Cell Activation and Evade Immune Response in Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Amanda Braga; Souza-Testasicca, Míriam Conceição; Mineo, Tiago Wilson Patriarca; Afonso, Luís Carlos Crocco

    2017-01-01

    Differently from others Leishmania species, infection by the protozoan parasite L. amazonensis is associated with a lack of antigen-specific T-cell responses. Dendritic cells (DC) are essential for the innate immune response and for directing the differentiation of T-helper lymphocytes. Previously, we showed that L. amazonensis infection impairs DC activation through the activation of adenosine A2B receptor, and here, we evaluated the intracellular events triggered by this receptor in infected cells. To this aim, bone marrow-derived DC from C57BL/6J mice were infected with metacyclic promastigotes of L. amazonensis. Our results show, for the first time, that L. amazonensis increases the production of cAMP and the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) in infected DC by a mechanism dependent on the A2B receptor. Furthermore, L. amazonensis impairs CD40 expression and IL-12 production by DC, and the inhibition of adenylate cyclase, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and ERK1/2 prevent these effects. The increase of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and the inhibition of DC activation by L. amazonensis are independent of protein kinase A (PKA). In addition, C57BL/6J mice were inoculated in the ears with metacyclic promastigotes, in the presence of PSB1115, an A2B receptor antagonist. PSB1115 treatment increases the percentage of CD40+ DC on ears and draining lymph nodes. Furthermore, this treatment reduces lesion size and tissue parasitism. Lymph node cells from treated mice produce higher levels of IFN-γ than control mice, without altering the production of IL-10. In conclusion, we suggest a new pathway used by the parasite (A2B receptor → cAMP → PI3K → ERK1/2) to suppress DC activation, which may contribute to the decrease of IFN-γ production following by the deficiency in immune response characteristic of L. amazonensis infection. PMID:28791011

  8. Leishmania amazonensis-Induced cAMP Triggered by Adenosine A2B Receptor Is Important to Inhibit Dendritic Cell Activation and Evade Immune Response in Infected Mice.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Amanda Braga; Souza-Testasicca, Míriam Conceição; Mineo, Tiago Wilson Patriarca; Afonso, Luís Carlos Crocco

    2017-01-01

    Differently from others Leishmania species, infection by the protozoan parasite L. amazonensis is associated with a lack of antigen-specific T-cell responses. Dendritic cells (DC) are essential for the innate immune response and for directing the differentiation of T-helper lymphocytes. Previously, we showed that L. amazonensis infection impairs DC activation through the activation of adenosine A 2B receptor, and here, we evaluated the intracellular events triggered by this receptor in infected cells. To this aim, bone marrow-derived DC from C57BL/6J mice were infected with metacyclic promastigotes of L. amazonensis . Our results show, for the first time, that L. amazonensis increases the production of cAMP and the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) in infected DC by a mechanism dependent on the A 2B receptor. Furthermore, L. amazonensis impairs CD40 expression and IL-12 production by DC, and the inhibition of adenylate cyclase, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and ERK1/2 prevent these effects. The increase of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and the inhibition of DC activation by L. amazonensis are independent of protein kinase A (PKA). In addition, C57BL/6J mice were inoculated in the ears with metacyclic promastigotes, in the presence of PSB1115, an A 2B receptor antagonist. PSB1115 treatment increases the percentage of CD40 + DC on ears and draining lymph nodes. Furthermore, this treatment reduces lesion size and tissue parasitism. Lymph node cells from treated mice produce higher levels of IFN-γ than control mice, without altering the production of IL-10. In conclusion, we suggest a new pathway used by the parasite (A 2B receptor → cAMP → PI3K → ERK1/2) to suppress DC activation, which may contribute to the decrease of IFN-γ production following by the deficiency in immune response characteristic of L. amazonensis infection.

  9. Use of antagonists and morpholinos in loss-of-function analyses: estrogen receptor ESR2a mediates the effects of 17alpha-ethinylestradiol on primordial germ cell distribution in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jingying; Sun, Shaoyang; Guo, Meng; Song, Houyan

    2014-05-15

    Various chemicals released into the aquatic environment adversely affect the reproductive system of fish, particularly by changing gonad structure and function. 17alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2) is a potent environmental estrogen that disrupts sexual differentiation and normal reproduction in fish. Previous studies have shown that exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) disrupts the migration of primordial germ cells (PGCs) in zebrafish. To investigate the effects of EE2 exposure on PGC migration, zebrafish embryos were injected with gfp-nanos mRNA to label PGCs and subsequently exposed to different concentrations of EE2. Typical estrogen receptor antagonist treatment and morpholino knockdown experiments were used to identify functional estrogen receptors that mediate the effects of EE2. The migration of PGCs was disrupted after exposure to high concentrations of EE2 (1 mirog/L). Loss-of-function analyses were performed for estrogen receptor ESR1, ESR2a, and ESR2b, and only loss of ESR2a resulted in a decreased number of ectopic PGCs following exposure to 1 mirog/L EE2. EE2 exposure disrupts PGC migration and distribution, and this effect is mediated through the estrogen receptor ESR2a.

  10. PXR antagonists and implication in drug metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Sridhar; Dou, Wei; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    Adopted orphan nuclear receptor (NR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), plays a central role in the regulation of xeno- and endobiotic metabolism. Since the discovery of the functional role of PXR in 1998, there is evolving evidence for the role of PXR agonists in abrogating metabolic pathophysiology (e.g., cholestasis, hypercholesterolemia, and inflammation). However, more recently, it is clear that PXR is also an important mediator of adverse xeno- (e.g., enhances acetaminophen toxicity) and endobiotic (e.g., hepatic steatosis) metabolic phenotypes. Moreover, in cancer therapeutics, PXR activation can induce drug resistance, and there is growing evidence for tissue-specific enhancement of the malignant phenotype. Thus, in these instances, there may be a role for PXR antagonists. However, as opposed to the discovery efforts for PXR agonists, there are only a few antagonists described. The mode of action of these antagonists (e.g., sulforaphane) remains less clear. Our laboratory efforts have focused on this question. Since the original discovery of azoles analogs as PXR antagonists, we have preliminarily defined an important PXR antagonist pharmacophore and developed less-toxic PXR antagonists. In this review, we describe our published and unpublished findings on recent structure-function studies involving the azole chemical scaffold. Further work in the future is needed to fully define potent, more-selective PXR antagonists that may be useful in clinical application. PMID:23330542

  11. The Anti-inflammatory Effect of the CXCR4 Antagonist-N15P Peptide and Its Modulation on Inflammation-Associated Mediators in LPS-Induced PBMC.

    PubMed

    Mo, Xue-mei; Sun, Han-xiao

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation was the important pathological process of many disease developments, but current therapeutic means for inflammatory diseases are not satisfactory. Chemokines and their receptors represent valuable targets for anti-inflammatory drug discovery. The N15P polypeptide (sequence: LGASWHRPDKCCLGY) is independently developed by our research group, it is a new CXCR4 antagonist drug derived from viral macrophage inflammatory protein-II (vMIP-II). This study aims to clarify the anti-inflammatory potency of N15P polypeptide on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in vitro. In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effects of N15P polypeptide by the LPS-induced peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) model and measured the level of inflammatory factors (tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-6, IL-8, nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), MyD88, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and Akt). The messenger RNA (mRNA) expressions of inflammatory factors were analyzed by real-time PCR (RT-PCR) microarray analysis, and the production of inflammatory factors was measured further by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot. The results showed that the expression of inflammatory factors (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, NF-κB, COX-2, TLR4, MyD88, PI3K, and Akt) was downregulated by N15P peptide, suggesting that N15P peptide has a strong inhibitory effect on the inflammatory responses induced by LPS.

  12. A2B adenosine receptor induces protective antihelminth type 2 immune responses.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nirav; Wu, Wenhui; Mishra, Pankaj K; Chen, Fei; Millman, Ariel; Csóka, Balázs; Koscsó, Balázs; Eltzschig, Holger K; Haskó, György; Gause, William C

    2014-03-12

    The type 2 immune response evoked by intestinal nematode parasites contributes to worm expulsion and tolerance to associated tissue damage. We investigated whether this host response is affected by blocking signaling by the putative endogenous danger signal adenosine, which can be released during inflammation and host cell damage. Specific blockade of the A2B adenosine receptor (A2BAR) inhibited worm elimination and the development of innate and adaptive components of the type 2 primary and memory response. Infected mice lacking A2BAR exhibited decreased M2 macrophage and eosinophil recruitment and reduced IL-4 and IL-13 cytokine production. Additionally, shortly after infection, upregulation of the alarmin IL-33, which drives type 2 immunity, and activation of innate lymphoid type 2 (ILC2) cells was inhibited, while exogenous IL-33 restored ILC2 cell activation and type 2 cytokine expression. Thus, adenosine acts as a danger-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) that initiates helminth-induced type 2 immune responses through A2BAR. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. C-027 Inhibits IgE-mediated passive sensitization bronchoconstriction and acts as a histamine and serotonin antagonist in human airways

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Philip R.; Zhang, Jie; Damera, Gautam; Hoshi, Toshinori; Zopf, David A.; Panettieri, Reynold A.

    2014-01-01

    Atopic asthma is poorly controlled by current therapies. Newer therapies and novel antihistamines are, therefore, required to treat patients whose atopic asthma is not controlled. For the first time, C-027 is shown to antagonize histamine, IgE-mediated and serotonin-induced contraction in human airways and vessels. Human precision-cut lung slices (PCLS, 250 µm thick), containing an airway or blood vessel, were pretreated with either C-027 (2 hours) or with vehicle alone and were contracted with histamine or serotonin. Known antihistamine was used as a comparator in antihistamine studies. Also, human airways were contracted via IgE passive sensitization in the presence or absence of C-027 or fexofenadine. Affinity of C-027 toward human G-protein coupled receptors was also determined, as well as the drug's biodistribution in murine model. C-027 was shown to have the highest affinity toward human histamine and serotonin receptors. Subsequently, C-027 was shown to antagonize histamine- and serotonin-induced airway and vascular smooth muscle contraction, respectively, and histamine-released bronchocontraction mediated by IgE passive sensitization in human small airways. C-027 also inhibited histamine-mediated single-cell calcium ion release. Low levels of C-027 were found in murine brain tissue. Collectively, these data suggest that C-027 markedly inhibits IgE-induced bronchoconstriction and antagonizes histamine and serotonin-contraction with little biodistribution in the brain. The compound may offer a future therapy for allergen-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in patients with asthma. PMID:22195688

  14. Expression of Receptors for Tetanus Toxin and Monoclonal Antibody A2B5 by Pancreatic Islet Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenbarth, G. S.; Shimizu, K.; Bowring, M. A.; Wells, S.

    1982-08-01

    Studies of the reaction of antibody A2B5 and tetanus toxin with pancreatic islet cells, islet cell tumors, and other human amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation (APUD) tumors are described. By indirect immunofluorescence, antibody A2B5 and tetanus toxin were shown to specifically bind to the plasma membrane of human, rat, chicken, and mouse islet cells. The binding of antibody A2B5 to the cell surface of living islet cells has allowed isolation of these cells from a suspension of pancreatic cells by using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter. In studies designed to determine whether tetanus toxin and antibody A2B5 bound to the same surface antigen, A2B5 and tetanus toxin did not compete for binding to normal islet cells, a human islet cell tumor, or a rat islet cell tumor. In addition to binding to islet cell tumors, antibody A2B5 reacts with frozen sections, isolated cells, and cell lines of neural, neural crest, and APUD origin.

  15. Metabolism of a 5HT6 antagonist, 2-methyl-1-(phenylsulfonyl)-4-(piperazin-1-yl)-1H-benzo[d]imidazole (SAM-760): impact of sulfonamide metabolism on diminution of a ketoconazole mediated clinical drug-drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Sawant-Basak, Aarti; Obach, R Scott; Doran, Angela C; Lockwood, Peter; Schildknegt, Klaas; Gao, Hongying; Mancuso, Jessica; Tse, Susanna; Comery, Tom

    2018-04-25

    SAM-760, (2-methyl-1-(phenylsulfonyl)-4-(piperazin-1-yl)-1H-benzo[d]imidazole), a 5HT 6 antagonist, was investigated in humans for the treatment of Alzheimer's dementia. In liver microsomes and recombinant CYP450 isozymes, SAM-760 was predominantly metabolized by CYP3A (~85%). Based on these observations and an expectation of 5-fold magnitude of interaction with moderate to strong CYP3A inhibitors, a clinical DDI study was performed. In presence of ketoconazole, mean C max and AUC 0-inf of SAM-760 showed only a modest increase by 30% and 38%, respectively. In vitro investigation of this unexpectedly low interaction was undertaken using [ 14 C]SAM-760. Radiometric profiling in human hepatocytes, confirmed all oxidative metabolites observed previously with unlabeled SAM-760; however the pre-dominant radiometric peak was an unexpected polar metabolite which was insensitive to pan-CYP inhibitor, 1-aminobenzotriazole. In human hepatocytes, radiometric integration attributed 43% of total metabolism of SAM-760 to this non-CYP pathway. Using an authentic standard, this predominant metabolite was confirmed as benzenesulfinic acid. Additional investigation revealed that the benzenesulfinic acid metabolite may be a novel, non-enzymatic, thiol mediated reductive cleavage of aryl sulfonamide group of SAM-760. We also determined the relative contribution of P450 to metabolism of SAM-760 in human hepatocytes, by following the rate of formation of oxidative metabolites in presence and absence of P450 isoform specific inhibitors. P450 mediated oxidative metabolism of SAM-760 was still primarily attributed to CYP3A (33%), with minor contributions from CYP isoforms 2C19 and 2D6. Thus, disposition of [ 14 C]SAM-760 in human hepatocytes via novel sulfonamide metabolism and CYP3A verified the lower than expected clinical DDI when SAM-760 was co-administered with ketoconazole. The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  16. Quantification of the Contribution of GLP-1 to Mediating Insulinotropic Effects of DPP-4 Inhibition With Vildagliptin in Healthy Subjects and Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Using Exendin [9-39] as a GLP-1 Receptor Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Nauck, Michael A; Kind, Joachim; Köthe, Lars D; Holst, Jens J; Deacon, Carolyn F; Broschag, Matthias; He, Yan Ling; Kjems, Lise; Foley, James

    2016-08-01

    We quantified the contribution of GLP-1 as a mediator of the therapeutic effects of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibition (vildagliptin) by using the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin [9-39] in patients with type 2 diabetes and in healthy subjects. Thirty-two patients with type 2 diabetes and 29 age- and weight-matched healthy control subjects were treated in randomized order with 100 mg once daily vildagliptin or placebo for 10 days. Meal tests were performed (days 9 and 10) without and with a high-dose intravenous infusion of exendin [9-39]. The main end point was the ratio of the areas under the curve (AUCs) of integrated insulin secretion rates (total AUCISR) and glucose (total AUCglucose) over 4 h after the meal. Vildagliptin treatment more than doubled responses of intact GLP-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and lowered glucose responses without changing AUCISR/AUCglucose in healthy subjects. Vildagliptin significantly increased this ratio by 10.5% in patients with type 2 diabetes, and exendin [9-39] reduced it (both P < 0.0001). The percentage reduction in the AUCISR/AUCglucose ratio achieved with exendin [9-39] was significantly smaller after vildagliptin treatment than after placebo treatment (P = 0.026) and was equivalent to 47 ± 5% of the increments due to vildagliptin. Thus, other mediators appear to contribute significantly to the therapeutic effects of DPP-4 inhibition. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  17. 5′-AMP impacts lymphocyte recirculation through activation of A2B receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bouma, Hjalmar R.; Mandl, Judith N.; Strijkstra, Arjen M.; Boerema, Ate S.; Kok, Jan-Willem; van Dam, Annie; IJzerman, Ad; Kroese, Frans G. M.; Henning, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Natural hibernation consists of torpid phases with metabolic suppression alternating with euthermic periods. Induction of torpor holds substantial promise in various medical conditions, including trauma, major surgery, and transplantation. Torpor in mice can be induced pharmacologically by 5′-AMP. Previously, we showed that during natural torpor, the reduction in body temperature results in lymphopenia via a reduction in plasma S1P. Here, we show that during torpor induced by 5′-AMP, there is a similar reduction in the number of circulating lymphocytes that is a result of their retention in secondary lymphoid organs. This lymphopenia could be mimicked by engagement of A2BRs by a selective A2BR agonist (LUF6210) in the absence of changes in temperature and prevented by A2BR antagonists during 5′-AMP-induced torpor. In addition, forced cooling of mice led to peripheral blood lymphopenia, independent of A2BR signaling. The induction of torpor using 5′-AMP impacted the migration of lymphocytes within and between secondary lymphoid organs. During torpor, the homing into LNs was impaired, and two-photon intravital microscopy revealed that cell motility was decreased significantly and rapidly upon 5′-AMP administration. Furthermore, the S1P plasma concentration was reduced by 5′-AMP but not by LUF6210. S1P plasma levels restored upon arousal. Likely, the reduced migration in LNs combined with the reduced S1P plasma level substantially reduces lymphocyte egress after injection of 5′-AMP. In conclusion, 5′-AMP induces a state of pharmacological torpor in mice, during which, lymphopenia is governed primarily by body temperature-independent suppression of lymphocyte egress from LNs. PMID:23682128

  18. Caffeine Reduces 11β-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase Type 2 Expression in Human Trophoblast Cells through the Adenosine A2B Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sharmin, Saina; Guan, Haiyan; Williams, Andrew Scott; Yang, Kaiping

    2012-01-01

    Maternal caffeine consumption is associated with reduced fetal growth, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are unknown. Since there is evidence that decreased placental 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2) is linked to fetal growth restriction, we hypothesized that caffeine may inhibit fetal growth partly through down regulating placental 11β-HSD2. As a first step in examining this hypothesis, we studied the effects of caffeine on placental 11β-HSD2 activity and expression using our established primary human trophoblast cells as an in vitro model system. Given that maternal serum concentrations of paraxanthine (the primary metabolite of caffeine) were greater in women who gave birth to small-for-gestational age infants than to appropriately grown infants, we also studied the effects of paraxanthine. Our main findings were: (1) both caffeine and paraxanthine decreased placental 11β-HSD2 activity, protein and mRNA in a concentration-dependent manner; (2) this inhibitory effect was mediated by the adenosine A2B receptor, since siRNA-mediated knockdown of this receptor prevented caffeine- and paraxanthine-induced inhibition of placental 11β-HSD2; and (3) forskolin (an activator of adenyl cyclase and a known stimulator of 11β-HSD2) abrogated the inhibitory effects of both caffeine and paraxanthine, which provides evidence for a functional link between exposure to caffeine and paraxanthine, decreased intracellular levels of cAMP and reduced placental 11β-HSD2. Taken together, these findings reveal that placental 11β-HSD2 is a novel molecular target through which caffeine may adversely affect fetal growth. They also uncover a previously unappreciated role for the adenosine A2B receptor signaling in regulating placental 11β-HSD2, and consequently fetal development. PMID:22701600

  19. 19 CFR 351.214 - New shipper reviews under section 751(a)(2)(B) of the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false New shipper reviews under section 751(a)(2)(B) of the Act. 351.214 Section 351.214 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...) In an antidumping proceeding involving imports from a nonmarket economy country, a certification that...

  20. A new alcohol antagonist: Phaclofen

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, A.M.; Harris, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    The ability of the GABA{sub B} receptor antagonist, phaclofen to alter behavioral effects of ethanol was evaluated by loss of righting reflex (sleep time), motor incoordination (bar holding), spontaneous locomotion (open field activity) and hypothermia. Pretreatment with phaclofen significantly decreased the effects of ethanol on motor incoordination, locomotor activity and hypothermia. However, phaclofen had no effect on either pentobarbital- or diazepam-induced motor incoordination. Phaclofen slightly increased the ED{sub 50} for loss of the righting reflex but did not alter either the duration of reflex loss produced by ethanol or blood ethanol levels at awakening. Our results suggest phaclofen is rapidlymore » inactivated resulting in difficulty in observing antagonism of long duration ethanol effects. These findings suggest that the GABA{sub B} system may play a role in mediating several important actions of ethanol.« less

  1. Opioid Antagonist Impedes Exposure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merluzzi, Thomas V.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Thirty spider-phobic adults underwent exposure to 17 phobic-related, graded performance tests. Fifteen subjects were assigned to naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, and 15 were assigned to placebo. Naltrexone had a significant effect on exposure, with naltrexone subjects taking significantly longer to complete first 10 steps of exposure and with…

  2. Xanthines as Adenosine Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    The natural plant alkaloids caffeine and theophylline were the first adenosine receptor (AR) antagonists described in the literature. They exhibit micromolar affinities and are non-selective. A large number of derivatives and analogs have subsequently been synthesized and evaluated as AR antagonists. Very potent antagonists have thus been developed with selectivity for each of the four AR subtypes. PMID:20859796

  3. Indications for Opioid Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Coppes, O J Michael; Sang, Christine N

    2017-06-01

    As opioids have become more common in clinical practice for the treatment of both acute and chronic pain, so too has the need for a deeper understanding of the clinical applications of opioid antagonists. The purpose of this review is to present both the longstanding and potential new indications for the use of drugs that block the effects of opioid receptors. There is a growing body of data demonstrating the modulation of pain by opioid antagonists. Additional clinical studies that show their direct antinociceptive effects and/or enhancement of the analgesic potency of opioid agonists are warranted. We briefly discuss the well-established role that these agents play in the reversal of life-threatening opioid toxicity and explore both existing and expanding clinical applications, including their apparent paradox that they may themselves be associated with analgesia.

  4. Purification and characterization of Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pestis LcrV-cholera toxin A(2)/B chimeras.

    PubMed

    Tinker, Juliette K; Davis, Chadwick T; Arlian, Britni M

    2010-11-01

    Yersinia pestis is a virulent human pathogen and potential biological weapon. Despite a long history of research on this organism, there is no licensed vaccine to protect against pneumonic forms of Y. pestis disease. In the present study, plasmids were constructed to express cholera toxin A(2)/B chimeric molecules containing the LcrV protective antigen from Yersinia enterocolitica and Y. pestis. These chimeras were expressed and purified to high yields from the supernatant of transformed Escherichia coli. Western and GM(1) ELISA assays were used to characterize the composition, receptor-binding and relative stability of the LcrV-CTA(2)/B chimera in comparison to cholera toxin. In addition, we investigated the ability of the Y. pestis LcrV-CTA(2)/B chimera to bind to and internalize into cultured epithelial cells and macrophages by confocal microscopy. These studies indicate that the uptake and trafficking of the LcrV antigen from the chimera is comparable to the trafficking of native toxin. Together these findings report that stable, receptor-binding, non-toxic LcrV-cholera toxin A(2)/B chimeras can be expressed at high levels in E. coli and purified from the supernatant. In addition, the internalization of antigen in vitro reported here supports the development of these molecules as novel mucosal vaccine candidates. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Purification and characterization of Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pestis LcrV–cholera toxin A2/B chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Chadwick T.; Arlian, Britni M.

    2010-01-01

    Yersinia pestis is a virulent human pathogen and potential biological weapon. Despite a long history of research on this organism, there is no licensed vaccine to protect against pneumonic forms of Y. pestis disease. In the present study, plasmids were constructed to express cholera toxin A2/B chimeric molecules containing the LcrV protective antigen from Y. enterocolitica and Y. pestis. These chimeras were expressed and purified to high yields from the supernatant of transformed E. coli. Western and GM1 ELISA assays were used to characterize the composition, receptor-binding and relative stability of the LcrV-CTA2/B chimera in comparison to cholera toxin. In addition, we investigated the ability of the Y. pestis LcrV-CTA2/B chimera to bind to and internalize into cultured epithelial cells and macrophages by confocal microscopy. These studies indicate that the uptake and trafficking of the LcrV antigen from the chimera is comparable to the trafficking of native toxin. Together these findings report that stable, receptor-binding, non-toxic LcrV-cholera toxin A2/B chimeras can be expressed at high levels in E. coli and purified from the supernatant. In addition, the internalization of antigen in vitro reported here supports the development of these molecules as novel mucosal vaccine candidates. PMID:20438844

  6. Adenosine signaling inhibits CIITA-mediated MHC class II transactivation in lung fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, Mingming; Xia, Jun; Wu, Xiaoyan; Kong, Hui; Wang, Hong; Xie, Weiping; Xu, Yong

    2013-08-01

    Efficient antigen presentation by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules represents a critical process in adaptive immunity. Class II transactivator (CIITA) is considered the master regulator of MHC class II (MHC II) transcription. Previously, we have shown that CIITA expression is upregulated in smooth muscle cells deficient in A2b adenosine receptor. Here, we report that treatment with the adenosine receptor agonist adenosine-5'N-ethylcarboxamide (NECA) attenuated MHC II transcription in lung fibro-blast cells as a result of CIITA repression. Further analysis revealed that NECA preferentially abrogated CIITA transcription through promoters III and IV. Blockade with a selective A2b receptor antagonist MRS-1754 restored CIITA-dependent MHC II transactivation. Forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator, achieved the same effect as NECA. A2b signaling repressed CIITA transcription by altering histone modifications and recruitment of key factors on the CIITA promoters in a STAT1-dependent manner. MRS-1754 blocked the antagonism of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) in CIITA induction by interferon gamma (IFN-γ), alluding to a potential dialogue between TGF-β and adenosine signaling pathways. Finally, A2b signaling attenuated STAT1 phosphorylation and stimulated TGF-β synthesis. In conclusion, we have identified an adenosine-A2b receptor-adenylyl cyclase axis that influences CIITA-mediated MHC II transactivation in lung fibroblast cells and as such have provided invaluable insights into the development of novel immune-modulatory strategies. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Phylogeography of Y-chromosome haplogroup O3a2b2-N6 reveals patrilineal traces of Austronesian populations on the eastern coastal regions of Asia

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Yik-Ying; Huang, Yun-Zhi; Wang, Ling-Xiang; Yu, Ge; Saw, Woei-Yuh; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Lu, Yan; Zhang, Chao; Xu, Shu-Hua; Jin, Li; Li, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Austronesian diffusion is considered one of the greatest dispersals in human history; it led to the peopling of an extremely vast region, ranging from Madagascar in the Indian Ocean to Easter Island in Remote Oceania. The Y-chromosome haplogroup O3a2b*-P164(xM134), a predominant paternal lineage of Austronesian populations, is found at high frequencies in Polynesian populations. However, the internal phylogeny of this haplogroup remains poorly investigated. In this study, we analyzed -seventeen Y-chromosome sequences of haplogroup O3a2b*-P164(xM134) and generated a revised phylogenetic tree of this lineage based on 310 non-private Y-chromosome polymorphisms. We discovered that all available O3a2b*-P164(xM134) samples belong to the newly defined haplogroup O3a2b2-N6 and samples from Austronesian populations belong to the sublineage O3a2b2a2-F706. Additionally, we genotyped a series of Y-chromosome polymorphisms in a large collection of samples from China. We confirmed that the sublineage O3a2b2a2b-B451 is unique to Austronesian populations. We found that O3a2b2-N6 samples are widely distributed on the eastern coastal regions of Asia, from Korea to Vietnam. Furthermore, we propose- that the O3a2b2a2b-B451 lineage represents a genetic connection between ancestors of Austronesian populations and ancient populations in North China, where foxtail millet was domesticated about 11,000 years ago. The large number of newly defined Y-chromosome polymorphisms and the revised phylogenetic tree of O3a2b2-N6 will be helpful to explore the origin of proto-Austronesians and the early diffusion process of Austronesian populations. PMID:28380021

  8. Phylogeography of Y-chromosome haplogroup O3a2b2-N6 reveals patrilineal traces of Austronesian populations on the eastern coastal regions of Asia.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lan-Hai; Yan, Shi; Teo, Yik-Ying; Huang, Yun-Zhi; Wang, Ling-Xiang; Yu, Ge; Saw, Woei-Yuh; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Lu, Yan; Zhang, Chao; Xu, Shu-Hua; Jin, Li; Li, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Austronesian diffusion is considered one of the greatest dispersals in human history; it led to the peopling of an extremely vast region, ranging from Madagascar in the Indian Ocean to Easter Island in Remote Oceania. The Y-chromosome haplogroup O3a2b*-P164(xM134), a predominant paternal lineage of Austronesian populations, is found at high frequencies in Polynesian populations. However, the internal phylogeny of this haplogroup remains poorly investigated. In this study, we analyzed -seventeen Y-chromosome sequences of haplogroup O3a2b*-P164(xM134) and generated a revised phylogenetic tree of this lineage based on 310 non-private Y-chromosome polymorphisms. We discovered that all available O3a2b*-P164(xM134) samples belong to the newly defined haplogroup O3a2b2-N6 and samples from Austronesian populations belong to the sublineage O3a2b2a2-F706. Additionally, we genotyped a series of Y-chromosome polymorphisms in a large collection of samples from China. We confirmed that the sublineage O3a2b2a2b-B451 is unique to Austronesian populations. We found that O3a2b2-N6 samples are widely distributed on the eastern coastal regions of Asia, from Korea to Vietnam. Furthermore, we propose- that the O3a2b2a2b-B451 lineage represents a genetic connection between ancestors of Austronesian populations and ancient populations in North China, where foxtail millet was domesticated about 11,000 years ago. The large number of newly defined Y-chromosome polymorphisms and the revised phylogenetic tree of O3a2b2-N6 will be helpful to explore the origin of proto-Austronesians and the early diffusion process of Austronesian populations.

  9. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells contribute to A2B adenosine receptor-induced VEGF production and angiogenesis in a mouse melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Claudia; Miele, Lucio; Porta, Amalia; Pinto, Aldo; Morello, Silvana

    2015-09-29

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an angiogenic factor critically involved in tumor progression. Adenosine A2B receptor plays a pivotal role in promoting tumor growth. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in the pro-angiogenic effects of A2B and to determine whether A2B blockade could enhance the effectiveness of anti-VEGF treatment. Mice treated with Bay60-6583, a selective A2B receptor agonist, showed enhanced tumor VEGF-A expression and vessel density. This effect was associated with accelerated tumor growth, which could be reversed with anti-VEGF treatment. Bay60-6583 increased the accumulation of tumor CD11b+Gr1+ cells. Depletion of MDSCs in mice significantly reduced A2B-induced VEGF production. However, A2B receptor stimulation did not directly regulate VEGF expression in isolated tumor myeloid cells. Mechanistically, Bay60-6583-treated melanoma tissues showed increased STAT3 activation. Inhibition of STAT3 significantly decreased the pro-tumor activity of Bay60-6583 and reduced tumor VEGF expression. Pharmacological blockade of A2B receptor with PSB1115 significantly reduced tumor growth by inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and increasing T cells numbers within the tumor microenvironment. These effects are, at least in part, dependent on impaired tumor accumulation of Gr1+ cells upon A2B receptor blockade. PSB1115 increased the effectiveness of anti-VEGF treatment.

  10. The effect of H₁ and H₂ receptor antagonists on melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Anbar, Tag S; Westerhof, Wiete; Badawy, Nafisa A; Abdel-Rahman, Amal T; Abd El-Raheem, Talal A; Sayed, Saadea R; Ali, Azza H; Salem, Hossam

    2012-01-01

    Histamine was found to stimulate melanogenesis in cultured human melanocytes specifically mediated by histamine H 2 receptors via protein kinase A activation. Based on this finding, the effect of topically applied H 2 antagonist on UVB-irradiated Guinea pigs' skin was examined and found to be suppressive on the post-irradiation melanogenesis. In this study, we tried to explore the role of topically applied H 1 and H 2 receptor antagonists, in inhibition of UVB-induced melanization. The effect of topically applied H 1 and H 2 receptor antagonists in inhibition of melanization was done clinically and histochemically using Fontana Masson and DOPA reactions compared with placebo. The post-irradiation pigmentation was found to be brownish/black instead of the original light brown color. This color change occurred below the shaved orange-red fur suggesting a switch of melanogenesis from pheomelanin to eumelanin. The induced pigmentation was suppressed by topically applied H 2 antagonist while both H 1 antagonist and vehicle had no effect. The microscopic examination showed that the keratinocytes in the H 2 antagonist-treated areas contained few melanosomes while the nearby dendrites are full of them. H 2 antagonists' inhibition of UVB-induced pigmentation is not only due to suppression of melanization but also due to a specific action on melanosomes' transfer.

  11. Small Molecule CXCR3 Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Stephen P; Cox, Rhona J

    2016-04-14

    Chemokines and their receptors are known to play important roles in disease. More than 40 chemokine ligands and 20 chemokine receptors have been identified, but, to date, only two small molecule chemokine receptor antagonists have been approved by the FDA. The chemokine receptor CXCR3 was identified in 1996, and nearly 20 years later, new areas of CXCR3 disease biology continue to emerge. Several classes of small molecule CXCR3 antagonists have been developed, and two have shown efficacy in preclinical models of inflammatory disease. However, only one CXCR3 antagonist has been evaluated in clinical trials, and there remain many opportunities to further investigate known classes of CXCR3 antagonists and to identify new chemotypes. This Perspective reviews the known CXCR3 antagonists and considers future opportunities for the development of small molecules for clinical evaluation.

  12. Targeted Segment Transfer from Rye Chromosome 2R to Wheat Chromosomes 2A, 2B, and 7B.

    PubMed

    Ren, Tianheng; Li, Zhi; Yan, Benju; Tan, Feiquan; Tang, Zongxiang; Fu, Shulan; Yang, Manyu; Ren, Zhenglong

    2017-01-01

    Increased chromosome instability was induced by a rye (Secale cereale L.) monosomic 2R chromosome into wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Centromere breakage and telomere dysfunction result in high rates of chromosome aberrations, including breakages, fissions, fusions, deletions, and translocations. Plants with target traits were sequentially selected to produce a breeding population, from which 3 translocation lines with target traits have been selected. In these lines, wheat chromosomes 2A, 2B, and 7B recombined with segments of the rye chromosome arm 2RL. This was detected by FISH analysis using repeat sequences pSc119.2, pAs1 and genomic DNA of rye together as probes. The translocation chromosomes in these lines were named as 2ASMR, 2BSMR, and 7BSMR. The small segments that were transferred into wheat consisted of pSc119.2 repeats and other chromatin regions that conferred resistance to stripe rust and expressed target traits. These translocation lines were highly resistant to stripe rust, and expressed several typical traits that were associated with chromosome arm 2RL, which are better than those of its wheat parent, disomic addition, and substitution lines that show agronomic characteristics. The integration of molecular methods and conventional techniques to improve wheat breeding schemes are discussed. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. High-pressure behavior of A2B2O7 pyrochlore (A=Eu, Dy; B=Ti, Zr)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittman, Dylan R.; Turner, Katlyn M.; Park, Sulgiye; Fuentes, Antonio F.; Yan, Jinyuan; Ewing, Rodney C.; Mao, Wendy L.

    2017-01-01

    In situ high-pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were used to determine the influence of composition on the high-pressure behavior of A2B2O7 pyrochlore (A = Eu, Dy; B = Ti, Zr) up to ˜50 GPa. Based on X-ray diffraction results, all compositions transformed to the high-pressure cotunnite structure. The B-site cation species had a larger effect on the transition pressure than the A-site cation species, with the onset of the phase transformation occurring at ˜41 GPa for B = Ti and ˜16 GPa B = Zr. However, the A-site cation affected the kinetics of the phase transformation, with the transformation for compositions with the smaller ionic radii, i.e., A = Dy, proceeding faster than those with a larger ionic radii, i.e., A = Eu. These results were consistent with previous work in which the radius-ratio of the A- and B-site cations determined the energetics of disordering, and compositions with more similarly sized A- and B-site cations had a lower defect formation energy. Raman spectra revealed differences in the degree of short-range order of the different compositions. Due to the large phase fraction of cotunnite at high pressure for B = Zr compositions, Raman modes for cotunnite could be observed, with more modes recorded for A = Eu than A = Dy. These additional modes are attributed to increased short-to-medium range ordering in the initially pyrochlore structured Eu2Zr2O7 as compared with the initially defect-fluorite structured Dy2Zr2O7.

  14. High-pressure behavior of A 2 B 2 O 7 pyrochlore (A=Eu, Dy; B=Ti, Zr)

    SciTech Connect

    Rittman, Dylan R.; Turner, Katlyn M.; Park, Sulgiye

    2017-01-28

    In situ high-pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were used to determine the influence of composition on the high-pressure behavior of A 2B 2O 7 pyrochlore (A=Eu, Dy; B=Ti, Zr) up to ~50GPa. Based on X-ray diffraction results, all compositions transformed to the high-pressure cotunnite structure. The B-site cation species had a larger effect on the transition pressure than the A-site cation species, with the onset of the phase transformation occurring at ~41 GPa for B=Ti and ~16 GPa B=Zr. However, the A-site cation affected the kinetics of the phase transformation, with the transformation for compositions with the smaller ionicmore » radii, i.e., A=Dy, proceeding faster than those with a larger ionic radii, i.e., A=Eu. These results were consistent with previous work in which the radius-ratio of the A- and B-site cations determined the energetics of disordering, and compositions with more similarly sized A- and B-site cations had a lower defect formation energy. Raman spectra revealed differences in the degree of short-range order of the different compositions. Due to the large phase fraction of cotunnite at high pressure for B=Zr compositions, Raman modes for cotunnite could be observed, with more modes recorded for A=Eu than A=Dy. These additional modes are attributed to increased short-to-medium range ordering in the initially pyrochlore structured Eu 2Zr 2O 7 as compared with the initially defect-fluorite structured Dy 2Zr 2O 7.« less

  15. High-pressure behavior of A 2 B 2 O 7 pyrochlore (A=Eu, Dy; B=Ti, Zr)

    DOE PAGES

    Rittman, Dylan R.; Turner, Katlyn M.; Park, Sulgiye; ...

    2017-01-24

    In situ high-pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were used to determine the influence of composition on the high-pressure behavior of A 2B 2O 7 pyrochlore (A = Eu, Dy; B = Ti, Zr) up to ~50 GPa. Based on X-ray diffraction results, all compositions transformed to the high-pressure cotunnite structure. The B-site cation species had a larger effect on the transition pressure than the A-site cation species, with the onset of the phase transformation occurring at ~41 GPa for B = Ti and ~16 GPa B = Zr. But, the A-site cation affected the kinetics of the phase transformation,more » with the transformation for compositions with the smaller ionic radii, i.e., A = Dy, proceeding faster than those with a larger ionic radii, i.e., A = Eu. Our results were consistent with previous work in which the radius-ratio of the A- and B-site cations determined the energetics of disordering, and compositions with more similarly sized A- and B-site cations had a lower defect formation energy. Raman spectra revealed differences in the degree of short-range order of the different compositions. Due to the large phase fraction of cotunnite at high pressure for B = Zr compositions, Raman modes for cotunnite could be observed, with more modes recorded for A = Eu than A = Dy. These additional modes are attributed to increased short-to-medium range ordering in the initially pyrochlore structured Eu 2Zr 2O 7 as compared with the initially defect-fluorite structured Dy 2Zr 2O 7.« less

  16. The aminopyridine-3,5-dicarbonitrile core for the design of new non-nucleoside-like agonists of the human adenosine A2B receptor.

    PubMed

    Betti, Marco; Catarzi, Daniela; Varano, Flavia; Falsini, Matteo; Varani, Katia; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Dal Ben, Diego; Lambertucci, Catia; Colotta, Vittoria

    2018-04-25

    A new series of amino-3,5-dicyanopyridines (3-28) as analogues of the adenosine hA 2B receptor agonist BAY60-6583 (compound 1) was synthesized. All the compounds that interact with the hA 2B adenosine receptor display EC 50 values in the range 9-350 nM behaving as partial agonists, with the only exception being the 2-{[4-(4-acetamidophenyl)-6-amino-3,5-dicyanopyridin-2-yl]thio}acetamide (8) which shows a full agonist profile. Moreover, the 2-[(1H-imidazol-2-yl)methylthio)]-6-amino-4-(4-cyclopropylmethoxy-phenyl)pyridine-3,5-dicarbonitrile (15) turns out to be 3-fold more active than 1 although less selective. This result can be considered a real breakthrough due to the currently limited number of non-adenosine hA 2B AR agonists reported in literature. To simulate the binding mode of nucleoside and non-nucleoside agonists at the hA 2B AR, molecular docking studies were performed at homology models of this AR subtype developed by using two crystal structures of agonist-bound A 2A AR as templates. These investigations allowed us to represent a hypothetical binding mode of hA 2B receptor agonists belonging to the amino-3,5-dicyanopyridine series and to rationalize the observed SAR. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Draft genome sequence of Bacillus velezensis 2A-2B strain: a rhizospheric inhabitant of Sporobolus airoides (Torr.) Torr., with antifungal activity against root rot causing phytopathogens.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Raudales, Inés; De La Cruz-Rodríguez, Yumiko; Alvarado-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Vega-Arreguín, Julio; Fraire-Mayorga, Ahuitz; Alvarado-Rodríguez, Miguel; Balderas-Hernández, Victor; Fraire-Velázquez, Saúl

    2017-01-01

    A Bacillus velezensis strain from the rhizosphere of Sporobolus airoides (Torr.) Torr . , a grass in central-north México, was isolated during a biocontrol of phytopathogens scrutiny study. The 2A-2B strain exhibited at least 60% of growth inhibition of virulent isolates of phytopathogens causing root rot. These phytopathogens include Phytophthora capsici , Fusarium solani , Fusarium oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani . Furthermore, the 2A-2B strain is an indolacetic acid producer, and a plant inducer of PR1, which is an induced systemic resistance related gene in chili pepper plantlets. Whole genome sequencing was performed to generate a draft genome assembly of 3.953 MB with 46.36% of GC content, and a N50 of 294,737. The genome contains 3713 protein coding genes and 89 RNA genes. Moreover, comparative genome analysis revealed that the 2A-2B strain had the greatest identity (98.4%) with Bacillus velezensis.

  18. Deletion of the distal COOH-terminus of the A2B adenosine receptor switches internalization to an arrestin- and clathrin-independent pathway and inhibits recycling

    PubMed Central

    Mundell, SJ; Matharu, A-L; Nisar, S; Palmer, TM; Benovic, JL; Kelly, E

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: We have investigated the effect of deletions of a postsynaptic density, disc large and zo-1 protein (PDZ) motif at the end of the COOH-terminus of the rat A2B adenosine receptor on intracellular trafficking following long-term exposure to the agonist 5′-(N-ethylcarboxamido)-adenosine. Experimental approach: The trafficking of the wild type A2B adenosine receptor and deletion mutants expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells was studied using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in combination with immunofluorescence microscopy. Key results: The wild type A2B adenosine receptor and deletion mutants were all extensively internalized following prolonged treatment with NECA. The intracellular compartment through which the Gln325-stop receptor mutant, which lacks the Type II PDZ motif found in the wild type receptor initially trafficked was not the same as the wild type receptor. Expression of dominant negative mutants of arrestin-2, dynamin or Eps-15 inhibited internalization of wild type and Leu330-stop receptors, whereas only dominant negative mutant dynamin inhibited agonist-induced internalization of Gln325-stop, Ser326-stop and Phe328-stop receptors. Following internalization, the wild type A2B adenosine receptor recycled rapidly to the cell surface, whereas the Gln325-stop receptor did not recycle. Conclusions and implications: Deletion of the COOH-terminus of the A2B adenosine receptor beyond Leu330 switches internalization from an arrestin- and clathrin-dependent pathway to one that is dynamin dependent but arrestin and clathrin independent. The presence of a Type II PDZ motif appears to be essential for arrestin- and clathrin-dependent internalization, as well as recycling of the A2B adenosine receptor following prolonged agonist addition. PMID:20128803

  19. Sexual conflict and antagonistic coevolution across water strider populations.

    PubMed

    Perry, Jennifer C; Rowe, Locke

    2012-02-01

    Microevolutionary studies have demonstrated sexually antagonistic selection on sexual traits, and existing evidence supports a macroevolutionary pattern of sexually antagonistic coevolution. Two current questions are how antagonistic selection within-populations scales to divergence among populations, and to what extent intraspecific divergence matches species-level patterns. To address these questions, we conducted an intraspecific comparative study of sexual armaments and mating behaviors in a water strider (Gerris incognitus) in which male genitals grasp resistant females and female abdominal structures help ward off males. The degree of exaggeration of these armaments coevolves across species. We found a similar strong pattern of antagonistic coevolution among populations, suggesting that sexual conflict drives population differentiation in morphology. Furthermore, relative exaggeration in armaments was closely related to mating outcomes in a common environment. Interestingly, the effect of armaments on mating was mediated by population sexual size dimorphism. When females had a large size advantage, mating activity was low and independent of armaments, but when males had a relative size advantage, mating activity depended on which sex had relatively exaggerated armaments. Thus, a strong signal of sexually antagonistic coevolution is apparent even among populations. These results open opportunities to understand links between sexual arms races, ecological variation, and reproductive isolation. © 2011 The Author(s). Evolution© 2011 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  20. Whole-Genome Sequence of Clostridium botulinum A2B3 87, a Highly Virulent Strain Involved in a Fatal Case of Foodborne Botulism in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Giordani, Francesco; Fillo, Silvia; Anselmo, Anna; Palozzi, Anna Maria; Fortunato, Antonella; Gentile, Bernardina; Pittiglio, Valentina; Spagnolo, Ferdinando; Anniballi, Fabrizio; Fiore, Alfonsina; Auricchio, Bruna; De Medici, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the genome sequence of a rare bivalent strain of Clostridium botulinum, A2B3 87. The strain was isolated from a foodborne botulism case that occurred in Italy in 1995. The case was characterized by rapid evolution of the illness and failure of conventional treatments. PMID:25814616

  1. β-Asarone Inhibits Invasion and EMT in Human Glioma U251 Cells by Suppressing Splicing Factor HnRNP A2/B1.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Wu, Mingxia; Wang, Chengqiang; Yu, Zanyang; Wang, Hongmei; Qi, Hongyi; Xu, Xiaoyu

    2018-03-16

    β-asarone, the main component in the volatile oil of Acori tatarinowii Rhizoma, has been found to possess antitumor activity. However, its effect and mechanisms against tumor invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) are still unclear. In this study, no or less cytotoxicity was caused by β-asarone within 0-120 μM in human glioma U251 cells for 48 h. β-asarone (30 and 60 μM) inhibited the migration of U251 cells in the wound healing assay, suppressed the invasion of U251 cells in the Boyden chamber invasion assay, and inhibited the adhesion of U251 cells onto the Matrigel. Moreover, β-asarone suppressed EMT with the up-regulation of E-cadherin and the down-regulation of vimentin. HnRNP A2/B1, a well-characterized oncogenic protein, was shown at a high basal level in U251 cells and β-asarone reduced hnRNP A2/B1 expression in a concentration and time-dependent way. Importantly, hnRNP A2/B1 overexpression significantly counteracted the inhibition of β-asarone on the migration, invasion, and adhesion of U251 cells and reversed the modulation of EMT markers by β-asarone. Additionally, β-asarone decreased the MMP-9 and p-STAT3 in U251 cells, which was also reversed by hnRNP A2/B1 overexpression. Together, our results suggest that hnRNP A2/B1 may be a potential molecular target underlying the inhibitory effect of β-asarone on invasion and EMT in glioma cells.

  2. Design and synthesis of peripherally restricted transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonists.

    PubMed

    Tamayo, Nuria; Liao, Hongyu; Stec, Markian M; Wang, Xianghong; Chakrabarti, Partha; Retz, Dan; Doherty, Elizabeth M; Surapaneni, Sekhar; Tamir, Rami; Bannon, Anthony W; Gavva, Narender R; Norman, Mark H

    2008-05-08

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel antagonists may have clinical utility for the treatment of chronic nociceptive and neuropathic pain. We recently advanced a TRPV1 antagonist, 3 (AMG 517), into clinical trials as a new therapy for the treatment of pain. However, in addition to the desired analgesic effects, this TRPV1 antagonist significantly increased body core temperature following oral administration in rodents. Here, we report one of our approaches to eliminate or minimize the on-target hyperthermic effect observed with this and other TRPV1 antagonists. Through modifications of our clinical candidate, 3 a series of potent and peripherally restricted TRPV1 antagonists have been prepared. These analogues demonstrated on-target coverage in vivo but caused increases in body core temperature, suggesting that peripheral restriction was not sufficient to separate antagonism mediated antihyperalgesia from hyperthermia. Furthermore, these studies demonstrate that the site of action for TRPV1 blockade elicited hyperthermia is outside the blood-brain barrier.

  3. Progesterone receptor isoforms, agonists and antagonists differentially reprogram estrogen signaling.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Hari; Greene, Marianne E; Zarnke, Allison L; Laine, Muriel; Al Abosy, Rose; Chang, Ya-Fang; Dembo, Anna G; Schoenfelt, Kelly; Vadhi, Raga; Qiu, Xintao; Rao, Prakash; Santhamma, Bindu; Nair, Hareesh B; Nickisch, Klaus J; Long, Henry W; Becker, Lev; Brown, Myles; Greene, Geoffrey L

    2018-01-12

    Major roadblocks to developing effective progesterone receptor (PR)-targeted therapies in breast cancer include the lack of highly-specific PR modulators, a poor understanding of the pro- or anti-tumorigenic networks for PR isoforms and ligands, and an incomplete understanding of the cross talk between PR and estrogen receptor (ER) signaling. Through genomic analyses of xenografts treated with various clinically-relevant ER and PR-targeting drugs, we describe how the activation or inhibition of PR differentially reprograms estrogen signaling, resulting in the segregation of transcriptomes into separate PR agonist and antagonist-mediated groups. These findings address an ongoing controversy regarding the clinical utility of PR agonists and antagonists, alone or in combination with tamoxifen, for breast cancer management. Additionally, the two PR isoforms PRA and PRB, bind distinct but overlapping genomic sites and interact with different sets of co-regulators to differentially modulate estrogen signaling to be either pro- or anti-tumorigenic. Of the two isoforms, PRA inhibited gene expression and ER chromatin binding significantly more than PRB. Differential gene expression was observed in PRA and PRB-rich patient tumors and PRA-rich gene signatures had poorer survival outcomes. In support of antiprogestin responsiveness of PRA-rich tumors, gene signatures associated with PR antagonists, but not PR agonists, predicted better survival outcomes. The better patient survival associated with PR antagonists versus PR agonists treatments was further reflected in the higher in vivo anti-tumor activity of therapies that combine tamoxifen with PR antagonists and modulators. This study suggests that distinguishing common effects observed due to concomitant interaction of another receptor with its ligand (agonist or antagonist), from unique isoform and ligand-specific effects will inform the development of biomarkers for patient selection and translation of PR

  4. Progesterone receptor isoforms, agonists and antagonists differentially reprogram estrogen signaling

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Hari; Greene, Marianne E.; Zarnke, Allison L.; Laine, Muriel; Al Abosy, Rose; Chang, Ya-Fang; Dembo, Anna G.; Schoenfelt, Kelly; Vadhi, Raga; Qiu, Xintao; Rao, Prakash; Santhamma, Bindu; Nair, Hareesh B.; Nickisch, Klaus J.; Long, Henry W.; Becker, Lev; Brown, Myles; Greene, Geoffrey L.

    2018-01-01

    Major roadblocks to developing effective progesterone receptor (PR)-targeted therapies in breast cancer include the lack of highly-specific PR modulators, a poor understanding of the pro- or anti-tumorigenic networks for PR isoforms and ligands, and an incomplete understanding of the cross talk between PR and estrogen receptor (ER) signaling. Through genomic analyses of xenografts treated with various clinically-relevant ER and PR-targeting drugs, we describe how the activation or inhibition of PR differentially reprograms estrogen signaling, resulting in the segregation of transcriptomes into separate PR agonist and antagonist-mediated groups. These findings address an ongoing controversy regarding the clinical utility of PR agonists and antagonists, alone or in combination with tamoxifen, for breast cancer management. Additionally, the two PR isoforms PRA and PRB, bind distinct but overlapping genomic sites and interact with different sets of co-regulators to differentially modulate estrogen signaling to be either pro- or anti-tumorigenic. Of the two isoforms, PRA inhibited gene expression and ER chromatin binding significantly more than PRB. Differential gene expression was observed in PRA and PRB-rich patient tumors and PRA-rich gene signatures had poorer survival outcomes. In support of antiprogestin responsiveness of PRA-rich tumors, gene signatures associated with PR antagonists, but not PR agonists, predicted better survival outcomes. The better patient survival associated with PR antagonists versus PR agonists treatments was further reflected in the higher in vivo anti-tumor activity of therapies that combine tamoxifen with PR antagonists and modulators. This study suggests that distinguishing common effects observed due to concomitant interaction of another receptor with its ligand (agonist or antagonist), from unique isoform and ligand-specific effects will inform the development of biomarkers for patient selection and translation of PR

  5. Histamine H4 receptor antagonists are superior to traditional antihistamines in the attenuation of experimental pruritus.

    PubMed

    Dunford, Paul J; Williams, Kacy N; Desai, Pragnya J; Karlsson, Lars; McQueen, Daniel; Thurmond, Robin L

    2007-01-01

    Histamine is a potent mediator of itch in humans, yet histamine H(1) receptor antagonists have been shown to be of limited use in the treatment of certain chronic pruritic diseases. The histamine H(4) receptor is a recently described histamine receptor, expressed on hematopoietic cells, linked to the pathology of allergy and asthma. The contribution of the novel histamine H(4) receptor to histaminergic and allergic pruritus was investigated. Histamine and a selective histamine H(4) receptor agonist caused scratching responses in mice, which were almost completely attenuated in histamine H(4) receptor knockout mice or by pretreatment with the selective histamine H(4) receptor antagonist, JNJ 7777120. Pruritus induced by allergic mechanisms was also potently inhibited with histamine H(4) receptor antagonist treatment or in histamine H(4) receptor knockout mice. In all cases, the inhibitory effect of histamine H(4) receptor antagonist was greater than those observed with histamine H(1) receptor antagonists. The histamine H(4) receptor-mediated pruritus was shown to be independent of mast cells or other hematopoietic cells and may result from actions on peripheral neurons. These results demonstrate that the histamine H(4) receptor is involved in pruritic responses in mice to a greater extent than the histamine H(1) receptor. Histamine H(4) receptor antagonists may have therapeutic utility for treating chronic pruritic diseases in humans where histamine H(1) receptor antagonists are not effective.

  6. Attenuation in rats of impairments of memory by scopolamine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist, by mecamylamine, a nicotinic receptor antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Newman, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Scopolamine, a muscarinic antagonist, impairs learning and memory for many tasks, supporting an important role for the cholinergic system in these cognitive functions. The findings are most often interpreted to indicate that a decrease in postsynaptic muscarinic receptor activation mediates the memory impairments. However, scopolamine also results in increased release of acetylcholine in the brain as a result of blocking presynaptic muscarinic receptors. Objectives The present experiments assess whether scopolamine-induced increases in acetylcholine release may impair memory by overstimulating postsynaptic cholinergic nicotinic receptors, i.e., by reaching the high end of a nicotinic receptor activation inverted-U dose-response function. Results Rats tested in a spontaneous alternation task showed dose-dependent working memory deficits with systemic injections of mecamylamine and scopolamine. When an amnestic dose of scopolamine (0.15 mg/kg) was co-administered with a subamnestic dose of mecamylamine (0.25 mg/kg), this dose of mecamylamine significantly attenuated the scopolamine-induced memory impairments. We next assessed the levels of acetylcholine release in the hippocampus in the presence of scopolamine and mecamylamine. Mecamylamine injections resulted in decreased release of acetylcholine, while scopolamine administration caused a large increase in acetylcholine release. Conclusions These findings indicate that a nicotinic antagonist can attenuate impairments in memory produced by a muscarinic antagonist. The nicotinic antagonist may block excessive activation of nicotinic receptors postsynaptically or attenuate increases in acetylcholine release presynaptically. Either effect of a nicotinic antagonist—to decrease scopolamine-induced increases in acetylcholine output or to decrease post-synaptic acetylcholine receptor activation—may mediate the negative effects on memory of muscarinic antagonists. PMID:26660295

  7. Antiallergic effects of H1-receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Baroody, F M; Naclerio, R M

    2000-01-01

    The primary mechanism of antihistamine action in the treatment of allergic diseases is believed to be competitive antagonism of histamine binding to cellular receptors (specifically, the H1-receptors), which are present on nerve endings, smooth muscles, and glandular cells. This notion is supported by the fact that structurally unrelated drugs antagonize the H1-receptor and provide clinical benefit. However, H1-receptor antagonism may not be their sole mechanism of action in treating allergic rhinitis. On the basis of in vitro and animal experiments, drugs classified as H1-receptor antagonists have long been recognized to have additional pharmacological properties. Most first-generation H1-antihistamines have anticholinergic, sedative, local anaesthetic, and anti-5-HT effects, which might favourably affect the symptoms of the allergic response but also contribute to side-effects. These additional properties are not uniformly distributed among drugs classified as H1-receptor antagonists. Azatadine, for example, inhibits in vitro IgE-mediated histamine and leukotriene (LT) release from mast cells and basophils. In human challenge models, terfenadine, azatadine, and loratadine reduce IgE-mediated histamine release. Cetirizine reduces eosinophilic infiltration at the site of antigen challenge in the skin, but not the nose. In a nasal antigen challenge model, cetirizine pretreatment did not affect the levels of histamine and prostaglandin D2 recovered in postchallenge lavages, whereas the levels of albumin, N-tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester (TAME) esterase activity, and LTs were reduced. Terfenadine, cetirizine, and loratadine blocked allergen-induced hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. In view of the complexity of the pathophysiology of allergy, a number of H1 antagonists with additional properties are currently under development for allergic diseases. Mizolastine, a new H1-receptor antagonist, has been shown to have additional actions that should help reduce the

  8. MicroRNA-128b suppresses tumor growth and promotes apoptosis by targeting A2bR in gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ping; Guo, Xueyan; Zong, Wei

    2015-11-27

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play crucial roles in the development and progression of human cancers, including gastric cancer (GC). The discovery of miRNAs may provide a new and powerful tool for studying the mechanism, diagnosis, and treatment of GC. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role and mechanism of miR-128b in the development and progression of GC. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to measure the expression level of miR-128b in GC tissues and cell lines. We found that miR-128b was significantly down-regulated in GC tissues and cell lines. In addition, over-expression of miR-128b inhibited GC cell proliferation, migration andmore » invasion of GC cells in vitro. Gain-of-function in vitro experiments further showed that the miR-128b mimic significantly promoted GC cell apoptosis. Subsequent dual-luciferase reporter assay identified one of the proto-oncogene A2bR as direct target of miR-128b. Therefore, our results indicate that miR-128b is a proto-oncogene miRNA that can suppresses GC proliferation and migration through down-regulation of the oncogene gene A2bR. Taken together, our results indicate that miR-128b could serve as a potential diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic option for human GC in the near future. - Highlights: • The expression of MiR-128b is significantly down-regulated in GC tissues and cell lines. • Ectopic expression of miR-128b directly affects cell proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro. • Overexpression of miR-128b increases apoptosis in GC cells. • A2bR is a candidate target gene of miR-128b. • MiR-128b represses cell proliferation, migration and invasion and promotes apoptosis by targeting A2bR in GC.« less

  9. hnRNP A2/B1 interacts with influenza A viral protein NS1 and inhibits virus replication potentially through suppressing NS1 RNA/protein levels and NS1 mRNA nuclear export

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yimeng; Zhou, Jianhong; Du, Yuchun, E-mail: ydu@uark.edu

    2014-01-20

    The NS1 protein of influenza viruses is a major virulence factor and exerts its function through interacting with viral/cellular RNAs and proteins. In this study, we identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 (hnRNP A2/B1) as an interacting partner of NS1 proteins by a proteomic method. Knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) resulted in higher levels of NS vRNA, NS1 mRNA, and NS1 protein in the virus-infected cells. In addition, we demonstrated that hnRNP A2/B1 proteins are associated with NS1 and NS2 mRNAs and that knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 promotes transport of NS1 mRNA from the nucleus to themore » cytoplasm in the infected cells. Lastly, we showed that knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 leads to enhanced virus replication. Our results suggest that hnRNP A2/B1 plays an inhibitory role in the replication of influenza A virus in host cells potentially through suppressing NS1 RNA/protein levels and NS1 mRNA nucleocytoplasmic translocation. - Highlights: • Cellular protein hnRNP A2/B1 interacts with influenza viral protein NS1. • hnRNP A2/B1 suppresses the levels of NS1 protein, vRNA and mRNA in infected cells. • hnRNP A2/B1 protein is associated with NS1 and NS2 mRNAs. • hnRNP A2/B1 inhibits the nuclear export of NS1 mRNAs. • hnRNP A2/B1 inhibits influenza virus replication.« less

  10. Smac mimetics as IAP antagonists.

    PubMed

    Fulda, Simone

    2015-03-01

    As the Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) proteins are expressed at high levels in human cancers, they represent promising targets for therapeutic intervention. Small-molecule inhibitors of IAP proteins mimicking the endogenous IAP antagonist Smac, called Smac mimetics, neutralize IAP proteins and thereby promote the induction of cell death. Smac mimetics have been shown in preclinical models of human cancer to directly trigger cancer cell death or to sensitize for cancer cell death induced by a variety of cytotoxic stimuli. Smac mimetics are currently undergoing clinical evaluation in phase I/II trials, demonstrating that therapeutic targeting of IAP proteins has reached the clinical stage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Crystal structure of human glycine receptor-α3 bound to antagonist strychnine.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Chen, Hao; Michelsen, Klaus; Schneider, Stephen; Shaffer, Paul L

    2015-10-08

    Neurotransmitter-gated ion channels of the Cys-loop receptor family are essential mediators of fast neurotransmission throughout the nervous system and are implicated in many neurological disorders. Available X-ray structures of prokaryotic and eukaryotic Cys-loop receptors provide tremendous insights into the binding of agonists, the subsequent opening of the ion channel, and the mechanism of channel activation. Yet the mechanism of inactivation by antagonists remains unknown. Here we present a 3.0 Å X-ray structure of the human glycine receptor-α3 homopentamer in complex with a high affinity, high-specificity antagonist, strychnine. Our structure allows us to explore in detail the molecular recognition of antagonists. Comparisons with previous structures reveal a mechanism for antagonist-induced inactivation of Cys-loop receptors, involving an expansion of the orthosteric binding site in the extracellular domain that is coupled to closure of the ion pore in the transmembrane domain.

  12. Antiviral activity of formyl peptide receptor 2 antagonists against influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Courtin, Noémie; Fotso, Aurélien Fotso; Fautrad, Pierre; Mas, Floriane; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Riteau, Béatrice

    2017-07-01

    Influenza viruses are one of the most important respiratory pathogens worldwide, causing both epidemic and pandemic infections. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of FPR2 antagonists PBP10 and BOC2 on influenza virus replication. We determined that these molecules exhibit antiviral effects against influenza A (H1N1, H3N2, H6N2) and B viruses. FPR2 antagonists used in combination with oseltamivir showed additive antiviral effects. Mechanistically, the antiviral effect of PBP10 and BOC2 is mediated through early inhibition of virus-induced ERK activation. Finally, our preclinical studies showed that FPR2 antagonists protected mice from lethal infections induced by influenza, both in a prophylactic and therapeutic manner. Thus, FPR2 antagonists might be explored for novel treatments against influenza. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. DFT Predictions of Electronic, Transport, and Bulk Properties of Cubic Antifluorite A2B Compounds (A = Li, Na, B = O,S,Se)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malozovsky, Yuriy; Franklin, Lashounda; Bagayoko, Diola

    We present results from ab-initio,self-consistent calculations of electronic, transport, and bulk properties of cubic antifluorite (anti-CaF2) compounds A2B (A = Li, Na, B = O, S, Se). Our computations employed the local density approximation (LDA) potential of Ceperley and Alder and the linear combination of atomic orbital (LCAO) formalism. The implementation of the LCAO formalism followed the Bagayoko, Zhao, and Williams method, as enhanced by Ekuma and Franklin (BZW-EF). Consequently, our calculations search for and attained the ground states of the systems under study, as required by DFT; our results therefore possess the full, physical content of DFT. We discuss band structures, band gaps, and related properties of these materials, including calculated, total and partial densities of states (DOS and PDOS), effective masses of charge carriers, equilibrium lattice constants, and the bulk moduli of cubic antifluorite compounds A2B (A = Li, Na, B = O, S, Se). Our results are predictions in some cases, due to the lack of experimental data. Work funded in part by the US Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) (Award No.DE-NA0002630), the National Science Foundation (NSF) (Award No, 1503226), LaSPACE, and LONI-SUBR.

  14. VHL genetic alteration in CCRCC does not determine de-regulation of HIF, CAIX, hnRNP A2/B1 and osteopontin.

    PubMed

    Nyhan, Michelle J; El Mashad, Shereen M; O'Donovan, Tracey R; Ahmad, Sarfraz; Collins, Chris; Sweeney, Paul; Rogers, Eamonn; O'Sullivan, Gerald C; McKenna, Sharon L

    2011-06-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumour suppressor gene inactivation is associated with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) development. The VHL protein (pVHL) has been proposed to regulate the expression of several proteins including Hypoxia Inducible Factor-α (HIF-α), carbonic anhydrase (CA)IX, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP)A2/B1 and osteopontin. pVHL has been characterized in vitro, however, clinical studies are limited. We evaluated the impact of VHL genetic alterations on the expression of several pVHL protein targets in paired normal and tumor tissue. The VHL gene was sequenced in 23 CCRCC patients and VHL transcript levels were evaluated by Real-Time RT-PCR. Expression of pVHL's protein targets were determined by Western blotting in 17 paired patient samples. VHL genetic alterations were identified in 43.5% (10/23) of CCRCCs. HIF-1α, HIF-2α and CAIX were up-regulated in 88.2% (15/17), 100% (17/17) and 88.2% (15/17) of tumors respectively and their expression is independent of VHL status. hnRNP A2/B1 and osteopontin expression was variable in CCRCCs and had no association with VHL genetic status. As expression of these proposed pVHL targets can be achieved independently of VHL mutation (and possibly by hypoxia alone), this data suggests that other pVHL targets may be more crucial in renal carcinogenesis.

  15. Adenosine-evoked hyperpolarization of retinal ganglion cells is mediated by G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K+ and small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel activation.

    PubMed

    Clark, Benjamin D; Kurth-Nelson, Zeb L; Newman, Eric A

    2009-09-09

    Adenosine is a neuromodulator that activates presynaptic receptors to regulate synaptic transmission and postsynaptic receptors to hyperpolarize neurons. Here, we report that adenosine-induced hyperpolarization of retinal ganglion cells is produced by the activation of A(1) receptors, which initiates a signaling cascade that activates G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K(+) (GIRK) channels and small conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (SK) channels. Rat retinal ganglion cells were stimulated by focal ejection of the adenosine receptor agonist 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) while cell activity was monitored with whole-cell patch recordings and Ca(2+) imaging. Focal ejections of NECA evoked outward currents in all cells tested and reduced light- and depolarization-induced spiking. The NECA-evoked current was abolished by the A(1) antagonist 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX) but was unaffected by A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) antagonists, indicating that the response was mediated entirely by A(1) receptors. The GIRK channel blocker rTertiapin-Q diminished the NECA-evoked inhibitory current by 56 +/- 12%, whereas the SK channel blocker apamin decreased the NECA-induced current by 42 +/- 7%. The SK component of the NECA-evoked current coincided with an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) and was blocked by IP(3) receptor antagonists and depletion of internal Ca(2+) stores, suggesting that A(1) receptor activation leads to an increase in IP(3), which then elevates intracellular Ca(2+) and activates SK channels. This A(1)-mediated, prolonged SK channel activation has not been described previously. The coactivation of GIRK and SK channels represents a novel mechanism of adenosine-mediated neuromodulation that could contribute to the regulation of retinal ganglion cell activity.

  16. Action of serotonin antagonists on cytoplasmic calcium levels in early embryos of sea urchin Lytechinus pictus.

    PubMed

    Shmukler, Y B; Buznikov, G A; Whitaker, M J

    1999-03-01

    Possible interaction of the serotonergic system with intracellular calcium mechanisms was investigated using techniques of ratio imaging measurement of intracellular Ca2+ and confocal microscopy in cleaving embryos of sea urchin Lytechinus pictus. Some serotonin antagonists specifically increase free intracellular Ca2+ and evoke transient regression of the first cleavage furrow, suggesting possible linkage of serotonergic and calcium mechanisms in the regulation of cellular events during cleavage divisions. These effects were more pronounced in the experiments with hydrophilic 5-HT-antagonists, quarternary ammonium salts that do not penetrate the cell membrane. Thus, it appears that 5-HT-receptors which mediate these effects are localised on the cell membrane, whereas previously studied receptors mediating the cytostatic action of lipophilic 5-HT-antagonists are localised intracellularly.

  17. Differential regulation of human cardiac β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors by chronic β-adrenoceptor antagonist treatment

    PubMed Central

    Motomura, S.; Deighton, N. M.; Zerkowski, H.-R.; Khamssi, M.; Brodde, O.-E.

    1990-01-01

    In patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting chronic β1-adrenoceptor antagonist treatment increased right atrial β1-adrenoceptor number, did not affect β2-adrenoceptor number and decreased muscarinic M2-receptor number. Concomitantly, the M2-receptor-mediated negative inotropic effect of carbachol was reduced, while the β1-adrenoceptor-mediated positive inotropic effect of noradrenaline was not altered. The β2-adrenoceptor mediated positive inotropic effect of procaterol, however, was markedly enhanced. We conclude that chronic β1-adrenoceptor antagonist treatment increases β1-adrenoceptor number, sensitizes β2-adrenoceptor function and desensitizes M2-receptor function in the human heart. PMID:1980074

  18. Vavilosides A1/A2-B1/B2, new furostane glycosides from the bulbs of Allium vavilovii with cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Zolfaghari, Behzad; Sadeghi, Masoud; Troiano, Raffaele; Lanzotti, Virginia

    2013-04-01

    A phytochemical analysis of the bulbs of Allium vavilovii M. Pop. & Vved. was attained for the first time extensively, affording to the isolation of four new furostanol saponins, named vavilosides A1/A2-B1/B2 (1a/b-2a/2b), as two couple of isomers in equilibrium, together with ascalonicoside A1/A2 (3a/3b) and 22-O-methyl ascalonicoside A1/A2 (4a/4b), previously isolated from shallot, Allium ascalonicum. High concentrations of kaempferol, kaempferide, and kaempferol 4(I)-glucoside were also isolated. The chemical structures of the new compounds, established through a combination of extensive nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry and chemical analyses, were identified as (25R)-furost-5(6)-en-1β,3β,22α,26-tetraol 1-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-β-D-galactopyranosyl 26-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside (vaviloside A1), (25R)-furost-5(6)-en-1β,3β,22β,26-tetraol 1-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-β-D-galactopyranosyl 26-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside (vaviloside A2), (25R)-furost-5(6)-en-1β,3β,22α,26-tetraol 1-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-β-D-xylopyranosyl 26-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside (vaviloside B1), (25R)-furost-5(6)-en-1β,3β,22β,26-tetraol 1-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-β-d-xylopyranosyl 26-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside (vaviloside B2). The isolated saponins showed cytotoxic activity on J-774, murine monocyte/macrophage, and WEHI-164, murine fibrosarcoma, cell lines with the following rank: vaviloside B1/B2>ascalonicoside A1/A2>vaviloside A1/A2. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of monoisomeric 1,8,15,22-substituted (A3B and A2B2) phthalocyanines and phthalocyanine-fullerene dyads.

    PubMed

    Ranta, Jenni; Kumpulainen, Tatu; Lemmetyinen, Helge; Efimov, Alexander

    2010-08-06

    Synthesis and characterization of three phthalocyanine-fullerene (Pc-C(60)) dyads, corresponding monoisomeric phthalocyanines (Pc), and building blocks, phthalonitriles, are described. Six novel bisaryl phthalonitriles were prepared by the Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction from trifluoromethanesulfonic acid 2,3-dicyanophenyl ester and various oxaborolanes. Two phthalonitriles were selected for the synthesis of A(3)B- and A(2)B(2)-type phthalocyanines. Phthalonitrile 4 has a bulky 3,5-di-tert-butylphenyl substituent at the alpha-phthalo position, which forces only one regioisomer to form and greatly increases the solubility of phthalocyanine. Phthalonitrile 8 has a 3-phenylpropanol side chain at the alpha-position making further modifications of the side group possible. Synthesized monoisomeric A(3)B- and A(2)B(2)-type phthalocyanines are modified by attachment of malonic residues. Finally, fullerene is covalently linked to phthalocyanine with one or two malonic bridges to produce Pc-C(60) dyads. Due to the monoisomeric structure and increased solubility of phthalocyanines, the quality of NMR spectra of the compounds is enhanced significantly, making detailed NMR analysis of the structures possible. The synthesized dyads have different orientations of phthalocyanine and fullerene, which strongly influence the electron transfer (ET) from phthalocyanine to fullerene moiety. Fluorescence quenchings of the dyads were measured in both polar and nonpolar solvents, and in all cases, the quenching was more efficient in the polar environment. As expected, most efficient fluorescence quenching was observed for dyad 20b, with two linkers and phthalocyanine and fullerene in face-to-face orientation.

  20. Discovery of non-peptide small molecular CXCR4 antagonists as anti-HIV agents: Recent advances and future opportunities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng; Kang, Dongwei; Huang, Boshi; Liu, Na; Zhao, Fabao; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-05-23

    CXCR4 plays vital roles in HIV-1 life cycle for it's essential in mediating the interaction of host and virus and completing the entry process in the lifecycle of HIV-1 infection. Compared with some traditional targets, CXCR4 provides a novel and less mutated drug target in the battle against AIDS. Its antagonists have no cross resistance with other antagonists. Great achievements have been made recent years and a number of small molecular CXCR4 antagonists with diversity scaffolds have been discovered. In this review, recent advances in the discovery of CXCR4 antagonists with special attentions on their evolution and structure-activity relationships of representative CXCR4 antagonists are described. Moreover, some classical medicinal chemistry strategies and novel methodologies are also introduced. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. [Extracorporeal life support in calcium antagonist intoxication].

    PubMed

    Groot, M W; Grewal, S; Meeder, H J; van Thiel, R J; den Uil, C A

    2017-01-01

    Intoxication with calcium antagonists is associated with poor outcome. Even mild calcium antagonist overdose may be fatal. A 51-year-old woman and a 51-year-old man came to the Accident and Emergency Department in severe shock after they had taken a calcium antagonist overdose. After extensive medicinal therapy had failed, they both needed extracorporeal life support (ECLS) as a bridge to recovery. In severe calcium antagonist overdose, the combination of vasoplegia and cardiac failure leads to refractory shock. ECLS temporarily supports the circulation and maintains organ perfusion. In this way ECLS functions as a bridge to recovery and may possibly save lives. Timely consultation with and referral to an ECLS centre is recommended in patients with calcium antagonist overdose.

  2. Modulation of bitter taste perception by a small molecule hTAS2R antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Slack, Jay P.; Brockhoff, Anne; Batram, Claudia; Menzel, Susann; Sonnabend, Caroline; Born, Stephan; Galindo, Maria Mercedes; Kohl, Susann; Thalmann, Sophie; Ostopovici-Halip, Liliana; Simons, Christopher T.; Ungureanu, Ioana; Duineveld, Kees; Bologa, Cristian G.; Behrens, Maik; Furrer, Stefan; Oprea, Tudor I.; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Summary Human bitter taste is mediated by the hTAS2R family of G protein-coupled receptors [1-4]. The discovery of the hTAS2Rs enables the potential to develop specific bitter receptor antagonists that could be beneficial as chemical probes to examine the role of bitter receptor function in gustatory and non-gustatory tissues. In addition, they could have widespread utility in food and beverages fortified with vitamins, antioxidants and other nutraceuticals since many of these have unwanted bitter aftertastes. We employed a high-throughput screening approach to discover a novel bitter receptor antagonist (GIV3727) that inhibits activation of hTAS2R31 by saccharin and acesulfame K, two common artificial sweeteners. Pharmacological analyses revealed that GIV3727 likely acts as an orthosteric, insurmountable antagonist of hTAS2R31. Surprisingly, we also found that this compound could inhibit five additional hTAS2Rs, including the closely related receptor hTAS2R43. Molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis studies suggest that two residues in helix seven are important for antagonist activity in hTAS2R43/31. In human sensory trials, GIV3727 significantly reduced the bitterness associated with the two sulphonamide sweeteners, indicating that TAS2R antagonists are active in vivo. Our results demonstrate that small molecule bitter receptor antagonists can effectively reduce the bitter taste qualities of foods, beverages, and pharmaceuticals. PMID:20537538

  3. Anti-idiotypic antibody: A new strategy for the development of a growth hormone receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Lan, Hainan; Zheng, Xin; Khan, Muhammad Akram; Li, Steven

    2015-11-01

    In general, traditional growth hormone receptor antagonist can be divided into two major classes: growth hormone (GH) analogues and anti-growth hormone receptor (GHR) antibodies. Herein, we tried to explore a new class of growth hormone receptor (GHR) antagonist that may have potential advantages over the traditional antagonists. For this, we developed a monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody growth hormone, termed CG-86. A series of experiments were conducted to characterize and evaluate this antibody, and the results from a competitive receptor-binding assay, Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISA) and epitope mapping demonstrate that CG-86 behaved as a typical Ab2β. Next, we examined its antagonistic activity using in vitro cell models, and the results showed that CG-86 could effectively inhibit growth hormone receptor-mediated signalling and effectively inhibit growth hormone-induced Ba/F3-GHR638 proliferation. In summary, these studies show that an anti-idiotypic antibody (CG-86) has promise as a novel growth hormone receptor antagonist. Furthermore, the current findings also suggest that anti-idiotypic antibody may represent a novel strategy to produce a new class of growth hormone receptor antagonist, and this strategy may be applied with other cytokines or growth factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Role of substance P on histamine H(3) antagonist-induced scratching behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Hossen, Maria Alejandra; Inoue, Toshio; Shinmei, Yoshifumi; Fujii, Yoko; Watanabe, Takeshi; Kamei, Chiaki

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the involvement of chemical mediators, other than histamine, in the scratching behavior induced by H(3) antagonists. Scratching behavior was induced by the histamine H(3) antagonists iodophenpropit and clobenpropit (10 nmol/site) when they were injected intradermally into the rostral part of the back of mast-cell-deficient (WBB6F1 W/W(v)) and wild-type (WBB6F1 +/+) mice. Subsequently, the effect of spantide, a tachykinin NK(1) antagonist, was measured for 60 min. The effects of the H(3) antagonists on in vitro histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells were also investigated. When spantide was injected intradermally at a dose of 0.5 nmol/site, it significantly inhibited the response. Furthermore, iodophenpropit and clobenpropit (10(-6)-10(-8) M) did not induce histamine release in isolated rat peritoneal mast cells. Our results indicate that substance P is involved in the skin responses elicited by the histamine H(3) antagonists. Moreover, the fact that these histamine H(3) antagonists did not induce significant increases in the histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells suggests that the histamine H(3) receptor may not be present in the peripheral cells considered in this study.

  5. Opioid antagonists for alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Rösner, Susanne; Hackl-Herrwerth, Andrea; Leucht, Stefan; Vecchi, Simona; Srisurapanont, Manit; Soyka, Michael

    2010-12-08

    Alcohol dependence belongs to the globally leading health risk factors. Therapeutic success of psychosocial programs for relapse prevention is moderate and could be increased by an adjuvant treatment with the opioid antagonists naltrexone and nalmefene. To determine the effectiveness and tolerability of opioid antagonists in the treatment of alcohol dependence. We searched the Cochrane Drugs and Alcohol Group (CDAG) Specialized Register, PubMed, EMBASE and CINAHL in January 2010 and inquired manufacturers and researchers for unpublished trials. All double-blind randomised controlled trials (RCTs) which compare the effects of naltrexone or nalmefene with placebo or active control on drinking-related outcomes. Two authors independently extracted outcome data. Trial quality was assessed by one author and cross-checked by a second author. Based on a total of 50 RCTs with 7793 patients, naltrexone reduced the risk of heavy drinking to 83% of the risk in the placebo group RR 0.83 (95% CI 0.76 to 0.90) and decreased drinking days by about 4%, MD -3.89 (95% CI -5.75 to -2.04). Significant effects were also demonstrated for the secondary outcomes of the review including heavy drinking days, MD - 3.25 (95% CI -5.51 to -0.99), consumed amount of alcohol, MD - 10.83 (95% CI -19.69 to -1.97) and gamma-glutamyltransferase, MD - 10.37 (95% CI -18.99 to -1.75), while effects on return to any drinking, RR 0.96 (95 CI 0.92 to 1.00) missed statistical significance. Side effects of naltrexone were mainly gastrointestinal problems (e.g. nausea: RD 0.10; 95% CI 0.07 to 0.13) and sedative effects (e.g. daytime sleepiness: RD 0.09; 95% CI 0.05 to 0.14). Based on a limited study sample, effects of injectable naltrexone and nalmefene missed statistical significance. Effects of industry-sponsored studies, RR 0.90 (95% CI 0.78 to 1.05) did not significantly differ from those of non-profit funded trials, RR 0.84 (95% CI 0.77 to 0.91) and the linear regression test did not indicate publication

  6. Enhanced adenylate cyclase activity of turkey erythrocytes following treatment with beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Peters, J R; Nambi, P; Sibley, D R; Lefkowitz, R J

    1984-12-15

    The turkey erythrocyte contains a beta 1-adrenergic receptor-linked adenylate cyclase system. We have examined the effects of pretreatment with receptor antagonists on adenylate cyclase activity and the individual components in the pathway of enzyme activation in this system. Isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity is increased by 30% (P less than 0.01) over control in membranes derived from cells preincubated with the antagonist propranolol. The effect is stereospecific and dose-related with a EC50 of 100 nM for the (-) isomer. The time course of effect is rapid being complete by 90 min. Non-receptor mediated stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity by manganese ion, forskolin and NaF is similarly enhanced following propranolol pretreatment. Sensitization of adenylate cyclase activity also occurs following pretreatment with a number of antagonists but is not seen after preincubation with pindolol or practolol. Quantitation of beta-adrenergic receptor (R) density using [125I]cyanopindolol indicates no difference between membranes derived from control and antagonist pretreated cells. Coupling of R with the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein (N) as assessed by high affinity agonist binding is unchanged following pretreatment. The efficacy of 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate Gpp(NH)p in producing a shift of agonist binding curves associated with destabilization of high affinity H-R-N complexes, is also the same (EC50 = 0.2 microM) in membranes from control and antagonist treated cells. The isoproterenol stimulated rate of release of [3H]GDP from membranes preloaded with [3H]GTP as an index of formation of an active form of the N protein is similarly unaffected by antagonist preincubation. We conclude that the mechanism of the observed sensitization of turkey erythrocyte adenylate cyclase by beta-adrenergic antagonists is receptor mediated and likely involves facilitation of N interaction with the catalytic subunit of the enzyme.

  7. Sigma ligands, but not N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists, reduce levodopa-induced dyskinesias.

    PubMed

    Paquette, Melanie A; Brudney, Elizabeth G; Putterman, Daniel B; Meshul, Charles K; Johnson, Steven W; Berger, Stephen Paul

    2008-01-08

    Levodopa (L-DOPA) is the 'gold standard' to treat Parkinson's disease. Unfortunately, dyskinesias detract from its efficacy. Current dyskinesia treatments, including amantadine and dextromethorphan, are thought to work via N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonism, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The NMDA antagonists MK-801 and HA-966 failed to suppress expression of dyskinesias in the 6-hydroxydopamine rat. Dyskinesias, however, were suppressed by the NMDA and sigma (sigma)-1 receptor ligand dextromethorphan and by the sigma-1 antagonist BMY-14802. Antidyskinetic effects of dextromethorphan may be mediated via mechanisms other than NMDA, including the sigma-1 receptor and other binding sites common to dextromethorphan and BMY-14802.

  8. Therapeutic Opportunities for Caffeine and A2A Receptor Antagonists in Retinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Boia, Raquel; Ambrósio, António Francisco; Santiago, Ana Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine, the major component of coffee, is the most consumed psychostimulant in the world. Caffeine is an adenosine analog and acts as a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist. The majority of the effects of caffeine are mainly mediated by the blockade of adenosine receptors, and the proved neuroprotective effects of caffeine in brain disorders have been mimicked by the blockade of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR). A growing body of evidence demonstrates that microglia-mediated neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of brain and retinal diseases. Moreover, the control of microglia reactivity by blocking A2AR has been proposed to be the mechanism underlying the observed protective effects of caffeine. Hence, it is conceivable that caffeine and A2AR antagonists offer therapeutic value for the treatment of retinal diseases, mainly those involving microglia-mediated neuroinflammation. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Successful ABO-Incompatible Renal Transplantation:  Blood Group A1B Donor Into A2B Recipient With Anti-A1 Isoagglutinins.

    PubMed

    Fadeyi, Emmanuel A; Stratta, Robert J; Farney, Alan C; Pomper, Gregory J

    2016-08-01

    Transplantation of the blood group A2B in a recipient was successfully performed in the setting of receiving a deceased donor kidney from an "incompatible" A1B donor. The donor and recipient were both typed for ABO blood group, including ABO genotyping. The donor and recipient were tested for ABO, non-ABO, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. The donor and recipient were typed for HLA antigens, including T- and B-flow cytometry crossmatch tests. The recipient's RBCs were negative with A1 lectin, and immunoglobulin G anti-A1 was demonstrated in the recipient's plasma. The donor-recipient pair was a four-antigen HLA mismatch, but final T- and B-flow cytometry crossmatch tests were compatible. The transplant procedure was uneventful; the patient experienced immediate graft function with no episodes of rejection or readmissions more than 2 years later. It may be safe to transplant across the A1/A2 blood group AB mismatch barrier in the setting of low titer anti-A1 isoagglutinins without the need for pretransplant desensitization even if the antibody produced reacts with anti-human globulin. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. The Evolution of Sexually Antagonistic Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Jennifer C.; Rowe, Locke

    2015-01-01

    Sexual conflict occurs whenever there is sexually antagonistic selection on shared traits. When shared traits result from interactions (e.g., mating rate) and have a different genetic basis in each sex (i.e., interlocus conflict), then sex-specific traits that shift the value of these interaction traits toward the sex-specific optimum will be favored. Male traits can be favored that increase the fitness of their male bearers, but decrease the fitness of interacting females. Likewise, female traits that reduce the costs of interacting with harmful males may simultaneously impose costs on males. If the evolution of these antagonistic traits changes the nature of selection acting on the opposite sex, interesting coevolutionary dynamics will result. Here we examine three current issues in the study of sexually antagonistic interactions: the female side of sexual conflict, the ecological context of sexual conflict, and the strength of evidence for sexually antagonistic coevolution. PMID:26032715

  11. Antagonist muscle coactivation during isokinetic knee extension.

    PubMed

    Aagaard, P; Simonsen, E B; Andersen, J L; Magnusson, S P; Bojsen-Møller, F; Dyhre-Poulsen, P

    2000-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to quantify the amount of antagonist coactivation and the resultant moment of force generated by the hamstring muscles during maximal quadriceps contraction in slow isokinetic knee extension. The net joint moment at the knee joint and electromyographic (EMG) signals of the vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, rectus femoris muscles (quadriceps) and the biceps femoris caput longum and semitendinosus muscles (hamstrings) were obtained in 16 male subjects during maximal isokinetic knee joint extension (KinCom, ROM 90-10 degrees, 30 degrees x s(-1)). Two types of extension were performed: [1] maximal concentric quadriceps contractions and [2] maximal eccentric hamstring contractions Hamstring antagonist EMG in [1] were converted into antagonist moment based on the EMG-moment relationships determined in [2] and vice versa. Since antagonist muscle coactivation was present in both [1] and [2] a set of related equations was constructed to yield the moment/EMG relationships for the hamstring and quadriceps muscles, respectively. The equations were solved separately for every 0.05 degrees knee joint angle in the 90-10 degrees range of excursion (0 degrees = full extension) ensuring that the specificity of muscle length and internal muscle lever arms were incorporated into the moment/EMG relationships established. Substantial hamstring coactivation was observed during quadriceps agonist contraction. This resulted in a constant level of antagonist hamstring moment of about 30 Nm throughout the range of motion. In the range of 30-10 degrees from full knee extension this antagonist hamstring moment corresponded to 30-75% of the measured knee extensor moment. The level of antagonist coactivation was 3-fold higher for the lateral (Bfcl) compared to medial (ST) hamstring muscles The amount of EMG crosstalk between agonist-antagonist muscle pairs was negligible (Rxy2<0.02-0.06). The present data show that substantial antagonist coactivation of the

  12. Antagonist wear by polished zirconia crowns.

    PubMed

    Hartkamp, Oliver; Lohbauer, Ulrich; Reich, Sven

    The aim of this in vivo study was to measure antagonist wear caused by polished monolithic posterior zirconia crowns over a 24-month period using the intraoral digital impression (IDI) technique. Thirteen zirconia crowns were placed in nine patients. The crowns and adjacent teeth were captured using an intraoral scanner (Lava C.O.S.). The corresponding antagonist teeth and the respective neighboring teeth were also scanned. Scanning was performed immediately after the restoration (baseline) as well as 12 and 24 months after crown placement. Geomagic Qualify software was used to superimpose the follow-up data sets onto the corresponding baseline data set, identify wear sites, and measure maximum vertical height loss in each individual wear site. Overall antagonist wear was then determined as the mean of wear rates measured in all of the individual antagonist units. In addition, wear rates in enamel and ceramic antagonists were analyzed as part of the scope of this study. The maximum mean wear with standard deviation (SD) in the overall sample with a total of nine patients, 13 antagonist units, and 98 evaluable wear sites was 86 ± 23 µm at 12 months, and 103 ± 39 µm at 24 months. The maximum mean wear in the enamel antagonist subgroup was 87 ± 41 µm at 12 months, and 115 ± 71 µm at 24 months; and in the ceramic antagonist subgroup 107 ± 22 µm at 12 months, and 120 ± 27 µm at 24 months. The wear rates determined in this study are comparable to those of existing studies. The IDI technique of wear analysis can be carried out in a practical manner and produces useful results.

  13. Nuclear waste disposal—pyrochlore (A2B2O7): Nuclear waste form for the immobilization of plutonium and "minor" actinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, Rodney C.; Weber, William J.; Lian, Jie

    2004-06-01

    During the past half-century, the nuclear fuel cycle has generated approximately 1400 metric tons of plutonium and substantial quantities of the "minor" actinides, such as Np, Am, and Cm. The successful disposition of these actinides has an important impact on the strategy for developing advanced nuclear fuel cycles, weapons proliferation, and the geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. During the last decade, there has been substantial interest in the use of the isometric pyrochlore structure-type, A2B2O7, for the immobilization of actinides. Most of the interest has focused on titanate-pyrochlore because of its chemical durability; however, these compositions experience a radiation-induced transition from the crystalline-to-aperiodic state due to radiation damage from the alpha-decay of actinides. Depending on the actinide concentration, the titanate pyrochlore will become amorphous in less than 1000 years of storage. Recently, systematic ion beam irradiations of a variety of pyrochlore compositions has revealed that many zirconate pyrochlores do not become amorphous, but remain crystalline as a defect fluorite structure-type due to disordering of the A- and B-site cations. The zirconate pyrochlores will remain crystalline even to very high doses, greater than 100 displacements per atom. Systematic experimental studies of actinide-doped and ion beam-irradiated pyrochlore, analyses of natural U- and Th-bearing pyrochlore, and simulations of the energetics of the disordering process now provide a rather detailed understanding of the structural and chemical controls on the response of pyrochlore to radiation. These results provide a solid basis for predicting the behavior and durability of pyrochlore used to immobilize plutonium.

  14. The effect of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists on the alpha-adrenoceptor blockade produced by phenoxybenzamine.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, A; Sharma, P L

    1977-05-01

    The effect of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists on the irreversible alpha-adrenoceptor blockade produced by phenoxybenzamine was studied in dogs. The pressor effects of adrenaline were revived after the inhibition by the alpha-receptor block by (+/-) propranolol, (-) INPEA, (+/-) MJ 1999 and (+/-) butoxamine. The enantiomers (+) propranolol and (+) INPEA were ineffective in this regard. (+/-) Practolol also did not revive the pressor effect of the amines. The alpha-receptor mediated effect of the amines, in the nictitating membrana-receptor blockade. It is concluded that (1) blockade of the peripheral (beta-2) receptors is essential for the revival of the pressor effects, (2) local anesthetic effect of the beta-antagonists is not involved. Further work using a series of doses of agonists and antagonists of alpha-and beta-receptors is indicated to clarify the nature of this drug-interaction.

  15. Immunopharmacological role of the leukotriene receptor antagonists and inhibitors of leukotrienes generating enzymes in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mirshafiey, Abbas; Jadidi-Niaragh, Farhad

    2010-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease that involves central nervous system, and is generally associated with demyelination and axonal lesion. The effective factors for initiation of the inflammatory responses have not been known precisely so far. Leukotrienes (LTs) are inflammatory mediators with increased levels in the cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients and in experimental models of multiple sclerosis. Inhibition of LT receptors with specific antagonists can decrease inflammatory responses. In this review article we try to clarify the role of LT receptor antagonists and also inhibitors of enzymes which are involved in LTs generating pathway for treating multiple sclerosis as new targets for MS therapy. Moreover, we suggest that blockage of LT receptors by potent specific antagonists and/or agonists can be as a novel useful method in treatment of MS.

  16. Sexually Antagonistic “Zygotic Drive” of the Sex Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Rice, William R.; Gavrilets, Sergey; Friberg, Urban

    2008-01-01

    Genomic conflict is perplexing because it causes the fitness of a species to decline rather than improve. Many diverse forms of genomic conflict have been identified, but this extant tally may be incomplete. Here, we show that the unusual characteristics of the sex chromosomes can, in principle, lead to a previously unappreciated form of sexual genomic conflict. The phenomenon occurs because there is selection in the heterogametic sex for sex-linked mutations that harm the sex of offspring that does not carry them, whenever there is competition among siblings. This harmful phenotype can be expressed as an antagonistic green-beard effect that is mediated by epigenetic parental effects, parental investment, and/or interactions among siblings. We call this form of genomic conflict sexually antagonistic “zygotic drive”, because it is functionally equivalent to meiotic drive, except that it operates during the zygotic and postzygotic stages of the life cycle rather than the meiotic and gametic stages. A combination of mathematical modeling and a survey of empirical studies is used to show that sexually antagonistic zygotic drive is feasible, likely to be widespread in nature, and that it can promote a genetic “arms race” between the homo- and heteromorphic sex chromosomes. This new category of genomic conflict has the potential to strongly influence other fundamental evolutionary processes, such as speciation and the degeneration of the Y and W sex chromosomes. It also fosters a new genetic hypothesis for the evolution of enigmatic fitness-reducing traits like the high frequency of spontaneous abortion, sterility, and homosexuality observed in humans. PMID:19096519

  17. Novel CRTH2 antagonists: a review of patents from 2006 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Ulven, Trond; Kostenis, Evi

    2010-11-01

    The receptor CRTH2 (also known as DP₂) is an important mediator of the inflammatory effects of prostaglandin D₂ and has attracted much attention as a therapeutic target for the treatment of conditions such as asthma, COPD, allergic rhinitis and atopic dermatitis. The validation of CRTH2 as a therapeutic target and the early antagonists are summarized, CRTH2 antagonists published in the patent literature from 2006 to 2009 are comprehensively covered and a general update on the recent progress in the development of CRTH2 antagonists for the treatment of inflammatory diseases is provided. Insight into the validation of CRTH2 as a therapeutic target, a comprehensive overview of the development of new CRTH2 ligands between 2006 and 2009, and a general overview of the state of the art. Many diverse potent CRTH2 antagonists are now available, and several are in or on the way into the clinic. It is still early to draw final conclusions, but preliminary results give reason for optimism, and the prospect that we will see new CRTH2 antagonists reaching the market for the treatment of asthma, rhinitis, atopic dermatitis and/or COPD seems good.

  18. In vitro digestion of purified β-casein variants A(1), A(2), B, and I: effects on antioxidant and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory capacity.

    PubMed

    Petrat-Melin, B; Andersen, P; Rasmussen, J T; Poulsen, N A; Larsen, L B; Young, J F

    2015-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of bovine milk proteins affect the protein profile of the milk and, hence, certain technological properties, such as casein (CN) number and cheese yield. However, reports show that such polymorphisms may also affect the health-related properties of milk. Therefore, to gain insight into their digestion pattern and bioactive potential, β-CN was purified from bovine milk originating from cows homozygous for the variants A(1), A(2), B, and I by a combination of cold storage, ultracentrifugation, and acid precipitation. The purity of the isolated β-CN was determined by HPLC, variants were verified by mass spectrometry, and molar extinction coefficients at λ=280nm were determined. β-Casein from each of the variants was subjected to in vitro digestion using pepsin and pancreatic enzymes. Antioxidant and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory capacities of the hydrolysates were assessed at 3 stages of digestion and related to that of the undigested samples. Neither molar extinction coefficients nor overall digestibility varied significantly between these 4 variants; however, clear differences in digestion pattern were indicated by gel electrophoresis. In particular, after 60min of pepsin followed by 5min of pancreatic enzyme digestion, one ≈4kDa peptide with the N-terminal sequence (106)H-K-E-M-P-F-P-K- was absent from β-CN variant B. This is likely a result of the (122)Ser to (122)Arg substitution in variant B introducing a novel trypsin cleavage site, leading to the changed digestion pattern. All investigated β-CN variants exhibited a significant increase in antioxidant capacity upon digestion, as measured by the Trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity assay. After 60min of pepsin + 120min of pancreatic enzyme digestion, the accumulated increase in antioxidant capacity was ≈1.7-fold for the 4 β-CN variants. The ACE inhibitory capacity was also significantly increased by digestion, with the B variant reaching the highest inhibitory

  19. Design of a superior cytokine antagonist for topical ophthalmic use

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jinzhao; Townson, Sharon A.; Kovalchin, Joseph T.; Masci, Allyson; Kiner, Olga; Shu, Yanqun; King, Bracken M.; Schirmer, Emily; Golden, Kathryn; Thomas, Christoph; Garcia, K. Christopher; Zarbis-Papastoitsis, Gregory; Furfine, Eric S.; Barnes, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    IL-1 is a key inflammatory and immune mediator in many diseases, including dry-eye disease, and its inhibition is clinically efficacious in rheumatoid arthritis and cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes. To treat ocular surface disease with a topical biotherapeutic, the uniqueness of the site necessitates consideration of the agent’s size, target location, binding kinetics, and thermal stability. Here we chimerized two IL-1 receptor ligands, IL-1β and IL-1Ra, to create an optimized receptor antagonist, EBI-005, for topical ocular administration. EBI-005 binds its target, IL-1R1, 85-fold more tightly than IL-1Ra, and this increase translates to an ∼100-fold increase in potency in vivo. EBI-005 preserves the affinity bias of IL-1Ra for IL-1R1 over the decoy receptor (IL-1R2), and, surprisingly, is also more thermally stable than either parental molecule. This rationally designed antagonist represents a unique approach to therapeutic design that can potentially be exploited for other β-trefoil family proteins in the IL-1 and FGF families. PMID:23431173

  20. Design of a superior cytokine antagonist for topical ophthalmic use.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jinzhao; Townson, Sharon A; Kovalchin, Joseph T; Masci, Allyson; Kiner, Olga; Shu, Yanqun; King, Bracken M; Schirmer, Emily; Golden, Kathryn; Thomas, Christoph; Garcia, K Christopher; Zarbis-Papastoitsis, Gregory; Furfine, Eric S; Barnes, Thomas M

    2013-03-05

    IL-1 is a key inflammatory and immune mediator in many diseases, including dry-eye disease, and its inhibition is clinically efficacious in rheumatoid arthritis and cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes. To treat ocular surface disease with a topical biotherapeutic, the uniqueness of the site necessitates consideration of the agent's size, target location, binding kinetics, and thermal stability. Here we chimerized two IL-1 receptor ligands, IL-1β and IL-1Ra, to create an optimized receptor antagonist, EBI-005, for topical ocular administration. EBI-005 binds its target, IL-1R1, 85-fold more tightly than IL-1Ra, and this increase translates to an ∼100-fold increase in potency in vivo. EBI-005 preserves the affinity bias of IL-1Ra for IL-1R1 over the decoy receptor (IL-1R2), and, surprisingly, is also more thermally stable than either parental molecule. This rationally designed antagonist represents a unique approach to therapeutic design that can potentially be exploited for other β-trefoil family proteins in the IL-1 and FGF families.

  1. Coronary dilation with nitrocompounds and calcium antagonists.

    PubMed

    Jost, S; Rafflenbeul, W; Lichtlen, P R

    1990-01-01

    The vasodilatory effects of nitrocompounds and calcium antagonists on epicardial coronary arteries represent substantial antianginal mechanisms in the presence of coronary vasospasm or eccentric coronary stenoses. With high doses of nitrocompounds, angiographically normal coronary segments can be dilated by an average of approx. 30%, some coronary stenoses even by up to 100%, usually without severe reduction of blood pressure. With calcium antagonists, a similar extent of dilation of normal coronary arteries and eccentric stenoses can be obtained. Our own group demonstrated an average dilation of normal coronary arteries of about 20% after intravenous administration of dihydropyridine calcium antagonists; however, the average systolic blood pressure dropped below 100 mmHg after these compounds. Hence, although in isolated human coronary arteries high concentrations of calcium antagonists were shown to induce a considerably greater vasodilation than nitrocompounds, the early drop in blood pressure prohibits a higher dosage of calcium antagonists in vivo. In the presence of coronary artery disease, particularly when associated with coronary vasospasm, a combination of the two groups of compounds might be recommendable, since an addition of the effects of coronary vasomotor tone is likely. Furthermore, the antianginal effects of a reduction of preload and afterload are complementary.

  2. Emerging therapies for atopic dermatitis: TRPV1 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Bonchak, Jonathan G; Swerlick, Robert A

    2018-03-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels are important mediators of somatosensory signaling throughout the body. Our understanding of the contribution of TRPs to a multitude of cutaneous physiologic processes has grown substantially in the past decade. TRP cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1), one of the better-understood members of this large family of ion channels, affects multiple pathways involved in pruritus. Further, TRPV1 appears to play a role in maintaining skin barrier function. Together, these properties make TRPV1 a ripe target for new therapies in atopic dermatitis. Neurokinin antagonists may affect similar pathways and have been studied to this effect. Early trials data suggest that these therapies are safe, but assessment of their efficacy in atopic dermatitis is pending as we await publication of phase II and III clinical trials data. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Discovery of novel N-aryl piperazine CXCR4 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huanyu; Prosser, Anthony R; Liotta, Dennis C; Wilson, Lawrence J

    2015-11-01

    A novel series of CXCR4 antagonists with substituted piperazines as benzimidazole replacements is described. These compounds showed micromolar to nanomolar potency in CXCR4-mediated functional and HIV assays, namely inhibition of X4 HIV-1(IIIB) virus in MAGI-CCR5/CXCR4 cells and inhibition of SDF-1 induced calcium release in Chem-1 cells. Preliminary SAR investigations led to the identification of a series of N-aryl piperazines as the most potent compounds. Results show SAR that indicates type and position of the aromatic ring, as well as type of linker and stereochemistry are significant for activity. Profiling of several lead compounds showed that one (49b) reduced susceptibility towards CYP450 and hERG, and the best overall profile when considering both SDF-1 and HIV potencies (6-20 nM). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists-A New Sprinkle of Salt and Youth.

    PubMed

    Stojadinovic, Olivera; Lindley, Linsey E; Jozic, Ivan; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2016-10-01

    Skin atrophy and impaired cutaneous wound healing are the recognized side effects of topical glucocorticoid (GC) therapy. Although GCs have high affinity for the glucocorticoid receptor, they also bind and activate the mineralocorticoid receptor. In light of this, one can speculate that some of the GC-mediated side effects can be remedied by blocking activation of the mineralocorticoid receptor. Indeed, according to Nguyen et al., local inhibition of the mineralocorticoid receptor via antagonists (spironolactone, canrenoate, and eplerenone) rescues GC-induced delayed epithelialization and accelerates wound closure in diabetic animals by targeting epithelial sodium channels and stimulating keratinocyte proliferation. These findings suggest that the use of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists coupled with GC therapy may be beneficial in overcoming at least some of the GC-mediated side effects. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. No evidence for priming response in Galleria mellonella larvae exposed to toxin protein PirA2B2 from Photorhabdus luminescens TT01: An association with the inhibition of the host cellular immunity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gongqing; Yi, Yunhong; Sun, Jianyu; Li, Mei; Qiu, Lihong

    2015-11-17

    There is accumulating evidence that many invertebrates including insects can acquire enhanced immune protection against subsequently pathogens infection through immune priming. However, whether the toxin protein from pathogenic bacteria can induce such priming response remains unclear. Here we cloned, expressed and purified the toxin Photorhabdus insect-related proteins A2B2 (PirA2B2) from Photorhabdus luminescens TT01. We primed Galleria mellonella with sublethal dose of PirA2B2 and then challenged the larvae with viable P. luminescens TT01 at 48 h after priming. We found no evidence for immune priming in G. mellonella larvae exposed to PirA2B2. Priming the larvae with PirA2B2 did not improve their resistance in a subsequent challenge with P. luminescens TT01. Whereas a robust priming response was observed when the larvae exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) extracted from P. luminescens TT01. Because the larvae primed with LPS showed significant higher resistance against P. luminescens TT01 infection than those of the PBS and BSA controls. Furthermore, we investigated the changes of the cellular immune parameters, such as hemocyte counts, phagocytic activity and encapsulation ability of the hemocytes, after priming. We found that the toxin PirA2B2 significantly decreased the cellular immunity of the larvae, whereas the LPS significantly increased them. These results indicated that the degree of priming response in G. mellonella correlated positively to the levels of cellular immune parameters, and the underlying mechanism in regulating the immune priming of invertebrates was not homologous to that of the immunological memory of vertebrates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Small molecule antagonists of integrin receptors.

    PubMed

    Perdih, A; Dolenc, M Sollner

    2010-01-01

    The complex and widespread family of integrin receptors is involved in numerous physiological processes, such as tissue remodeling, angiogenesis, development of the immune response and homeostasis. In addition, their key role has been elucidated in important pathological disorders such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, autoimmune and inflammatory diseases and in the pathogenesis of infectious diseases, making them highly important targets for modern drug design campaigns. In this review we seek to present a concise overview of the small molecule antagonists of this diverse and highly complex receptor family. Integrin antagonists are classified according to the targeted integrin receptor and are discussed in four sections. First we present the fibrinogen alpha(IIb)beta3 and the vitronectin alpha (V)beta(3) receptor antagonists. The remaining selective integrin antagonists are examined in the third section. The final section is dedicated to molecules with dual or multiple integrin activity. In addition, the use of antibodies and peptidomimetic approaches to modulate the integrin receptors are discussed, as well providing the reader with an overall appreciation of the field.

  7. Azines as histamine H4 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lazewska, Dorota; Kiec-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2012-01-01

    Since 2000, when the histamine H4 receptor (H4R) was cloned, it has constituted an interesting target for drug development. Pharmacological studies suggest the potential utility of histamine H4R antagonists/inverse agonists in the treatment of inflammatory diseases, e.g. allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis, colitis, or pruritus. The first H4R ligands were non-selective compounds, but intensive chemical and pharmacological work has led to the discovery of highly potent and selective H4R antagonists (e.g. JNJ7777120, CZC-13788, PF-2988403, A-940894, A-987306). The first compound (UR-63325) has finally entered into clinical studies for the treatment of allergic respiratory diseases (completing the phase I ascending dose trial) and has been found to be safe and well tolerated. The number of scientific publications and patent applications in the H4 field is increasing annually. Among the diverse chemical structures of the H4R antagonists described a 2-aminopyrimidine scaffold is repeatedly found. This review looked at recent advances in the search for H4R antagonists as reflected in patent applications/patents and peer-reviewed publications over the last two years. The work concerns azines (mono-, di-, triazines) and their fused analogues. The chemistry and pharmacology has been described.

  8. Effects of intra-accumbens focal administrations of glutamate antagonists on object recognition memory in mice.

    PubMed

    Sargolini, Francesca; Roullet, Pascal; Oliverio, Alberto; Mele, Andrea

    2003-01-22

    Generally recognition memory is distinguished into spatial and object memories that have been suggested to relay at a cortical level on different neural substrates. Recent studies point to a possible involvement of the nucleus accumbens (Nac) in spatial memory, demonstrating that blockade of glutamate antagonists within this structure impairs acquisition and consolidation of spatial information, while not many data are available on the potential role of this structure in object recognition. Thus in this study we wanted to investigate the effects of intra-accumbens focal administrations of NMDA antagonist, AP-5 (0.05, 0.1, 0.15 or 0.2 microg per side), and AMPA antagonist, DNQX (0.0005 or 0.001 microg per side), in object recognition memory. The spontaneous preference displayed by mice for novel objects was taken as an index for measuring object recognition. Pre-training focal administrations of both antagonists impaired the ability of mice to selectively explore the novel object in test session. However, the AMPA antagonist induced also a decrease in exploration and locomotion. In order to assess whether glutamate receptors located within the Nac were also involved in subsequent steps of object information processing, we performed additional experiments injecting AP-5 and DNQX immediately after training and testing the animals 24-h later. In this case, AP-5 but not the AMPA antagonist impaired exploration of the novel object. These results demonstrate that the Nac is involved in object recognition, and confirm that the different glutamate receptors mediate different component of information processing within the accumbens.

  9. Development of NMDAR Antagonists with Reduced Neurotoxic Side Effects: a Study on GK11

    PubMed Central

    Teigell, Marisa; Prieto-Cappellini, Monica; Vignon, Jacques; Privat, Alain; Perez-Polo, Regino; Nesic, Olivera; Hirbec, Helene

    2013-01-01

    The NMDAR glutamate receptor subtype mediates various vital physiological neuronal functions. However, its excessive activation contributes to neuronal damage in a large variety of acute and chronic neurological disorders. NMDAR antagonists thus represent promising therapeutic tools that can counteract NMDARs’ overactivation. Channel blockers are of special interest since they are use-dependent, thus being more potent at continuously activated NMDARs, as may be the case in pathological conditions. Nevertheless, it has been established that NMDAR antagonists, such as MK801, also have unacceptable neurotoxic effects. Presently only Memantine is considered a safe NMDAR antagonist and is used clinically. It has recently been speculated that antagonists that preferentially target extrasynaptic NMDARs would be less toxic. We previously demonstrated that the phencyclidine derivative GK11 preferentially inhibits extrasynaptic NMDARs. We thus anticipated that this compound would be safer than other known NMDAR antagonists. In this study we used whole-genome profiling of the rat cingulate cortex, a brain area that is particularly sensitive to NMDAR antagonists, to compare the potential adverse effects of GK11 and MK801. Our results showed that in contrast to GK11, the transcriptional profile of MK801 is characterized by a significant upregulation of inflammatory and stress-response genes, consistent with its high neurotoxicity. In addition, behavioural and immunohistochemical analyses confirmed marked inflammatory reactions (including astrogliosis and microglial activation) in MK801-treated, but not GK11-treated rats. Interestingly, we also showed that GK11 elicited less inflammation and neuronal damage, even when compared to Memantine, which like GK11, preferentially inhibits extrasynaptic NMDAR. As a whole, our study suggests that GK11 may be a more attractive therapeutic alternative in the treatment of CNS disorders characterized by the overactivation of glutamate

  10. Evidence for allosteric interactions of antagonist binding to the smoothened receptor.

    PubMed

    Rominger, Cynthia M; Bee, Wei-Lin Tiger; Copeland, Robert A; Davenport, Elizabeth A; Gilmartin, Aidan; Gontarek, Richard; Hornberger, Keith R; Kallal, Lorena A; Lai, Zhihong; Lawrie, Kenneth; Lu, Quinn; McMillan, Lynette; Truong, Maggie; Tummino, Peter J; Turunen, Brandon; Will, Matthew; Zuercher, William J; Rominger, David H

    2009-06-01

    The Smoothened receptor (Smo) mediates hedgehog (Hh) signaling critical for development, cell growth, and migration, as well as stem cell maintenance. Aberrant Hh signaling pathway activation has been implicated in a variety of cancers, and small-molecule antagonists of Smo have entered human clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. Here, we report the biochemical characterization of allosteric interactions of agonists and antagonists for Smo. Binding of two radioligands, [(3)H]3-chloro-N-[trans-4-(methylamino)cyclohexyl]-N-{[3-(4-pyridinyl)-phenyl]methyl}-1-benzothiophene-2-carboxamide (SAG-1.3) (agonist) and [(3)H]cyclopamine (antagonist), was characterized using human Smo expressed in human embryonic kidney 293F membranes. We observed full displacement of [(3)H]cyclopamine by all Smo agonist and antagonist ligands examined. N-[(1E)-(3,5-Dimethyl-1-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)methylidene]-4-(phenylmethyl)-1-piperazinamine (SANT-1), an antagonist, did not fully inhibit the binding of [(3)H]SAG-1.3. In a functional cell-based beta-lactamase reporter gene assay, SANT-1 and N-[3-(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)-4-chlorophenyl]-3,4,5-tris(ethyloxy)-benzamide (SANT-2) fully inhibited 3-chloro-4,7-difluoro-N-[trans-4-(methylamino)cyclohexyl]-N-{[3-(4-pyridinyl)phenyl]methyl}-1-benzothiophene-2-carboxamide (SAG-1.5)-induced Hh pathway activation. Detailed "Schild-type" radioligand binding analysis with [(3)H]SAG-1.3 revealed that two structurally distinct Smoothened receptor antagonists, SANT-1 and SANT-2, bound in a manner consistent with that of allosteric modulation. Our mechanism of action characterization of radioligand binding to Smo combined with functional data provides a better understanding of small-molecule interactions with Smo and their influence on the Hh pathway.

  11. Antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal in humans.

    PubMed

    Gorelick, David A; Goodwin, Robert S; Schwilke, Eugene; Schwope, David M; Darwin, William D; Kelly, Deanna L; McMahon, Robert P; Liu, Fang; Ortemann-Renon, Catherine; Bonnet, Denis; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2011-10-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonists have potential therapeutic benefits, but antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal has not been reported in humans. Ten male daily cannabis smokers received 8 days of increasingly frequent 20-mg oral Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) dosages (40-120 mg/d) around-the-clock to standardize cannabis dependence while residing on a closed research unit. On the ninth day, double-blind placebo or 20- (suggested therapeutic dose) or 40-mg oral rimonabant, a CB1-cannabinoid receptor antagonist, was administered. Cannabis withdrawal signs and symptoms were assessed before and for 23.5 hours after rimonabant. Rimonabant, THC, and 11-hydroxy-THC plasma concentrations were quantified by mass spectrometry. The first 6 subjects received 20-mg rimonabant (1 placebo); the remaining 4 subjects received 40-mg rimonabant (1 placebo). Fourteen subjects enrolled; 10 completed before premature termination because of withdrawal of rimonabant from clinical development. Three of 5 subjects in the 20-mg group, 1 of 3 in the 40-mg group, and none of 2 in the placebo group met the prespecified withdrawal criterion of 150% increase or higher in at least 3 visual analog scales for cannabis withdrawal symptoms within 3 hours of rimonabant dosing. There were no significant associations between visual analog scale, heart rate, or blood pressure changes and peak rimonabant plasma concentration, area-under-the-rimonabant-concentration-by-time curve (0-8 hours), or peak rimonabant/THC or rimonabant/(THC + 11-hydroxy-THC) plasma concentration ratios. In summary, prespecified criteria for antagonist-elicited cannabis withdrawal were not observed at the 20- or 40-mg rimonabant doses. These data do not preclude antagonist-elicited withdrawal at higher rimonabant doses.

  12. Progress in corticotropin-releasing factor-1 antagonist development

    PubMed Central

    Zorrilla, Eric P.; Koob, George F.

    2010-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor antagonists have been sought since the stress-secreted peptide was isolated in 1981. Although evidence suggests the limited efficacy of CRF1 antagonists as antidepressants, CRF1 antagonists might be novel pharmacotherapies for anxiety and addiction. Progress in understanding the two-domain model of ligand–receptor interactions for CRF family receptors might yield chemically novel CRF1 receptor antagonists, including peptide CRF1 antagonists, antagonists with signal transduction selectivity and nonpeptide CRF1 antagonists that act via the extracellular (rather than transmembrane) domains. Novel ligands that conform to prevalent pharmacophore and exhibit drug-like pharmacokinetic properties have been identified. The therapeutic utility of CRF1 antagonists should soon be clearer: several small molecules are currently in Phase II/III clinical trials for depression, anxiety and irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:20206287

  13. Endosperm and Nucellus Develop Antagonistically in Arabidopsis Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenjia; Coen, Olivier; Pechoux, Christine; Magnani, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    In angiosperms, seed architecture is shaped by the coordinated development of three genetically different components: embryo, endosperm, and maternal tissues. The relative contribution of these tissues to seed mass and nutrient storage varies considerably among species. The development of embryo, endosperm, or nucellus maternal tissue as primary storage compartments defines three main typologies of seed architecture. It is still debated whether the ancestral angiosperm seed accumulated nutrients in the endosperm or the nucellus. During evolution, plants shifted repeatedly between these two storage strategies through molecular mechanisms that are largely unknown. Here, we characterize the regulatory pathway underlying nucellus and endosperm tissue partitioning in Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that Polycomb-group proteins repress nucellus degeneration before fertilization. A signal initiated in the endosperm by the AGAMOUS-LIKE62 MADS box transcription factor relieves this Polycomb-mediated repression and therefore allows nucellus degeneration. Further downstream in the pathway, the TRANSPARENT TESTA16 (TT16) and GORDITA MADS box transcription factors promote nucellus degeneration. Moreover, we demonstrate that TT16 mediates the crosstalk between nucellus and seed coat maternal tissues. Finally, we characterize the nucellus cell death program and its feedback role in timing endosperm development. Altogether, our data reveal the antagonistic development of nucellus and endosperm, in coordination with seed coat differentiation. PMID:27233529

  14. Effect of a Hypocretin/Orexin Antagonist on Neurocognitive Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    a novel hypocretiniorexin antagonist, almorexant (ALM), to a standard hypnotic , zolpidem (ZOL), and placebo (PBO) on neurocognitive performance at...Placebo-Controlled, Randomized, Parallel- Group Study Comparing the Effect of a Novel HypocretiniOrexin Antagonist (Almorexant) Versus a Standard Hypnotic ...Group Study Comparing the Effect of a Novel HypocretiniOrexin Antagonist (Almorexant) Versus a Standard Hypnotic (Zolpidem) and Placebo on

  15. Global regulation by CsrA and its RNA antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Tony; Babitzke, Paul

    2018-01-01

    The sequence-specific RNA binding protein CsrA is employed by diverse bacteria in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. Its binding interactions with RNA have been documented at atomic resolution and shown to alter RNA secondary structure, RNA stability, translation and/or Rho-mediated transcription termination through a growing number of molecular mechanisms. In Gammaproteobacteria, small regulatory RNAs that contain multiple CsrA binding sites compete with mRNA for binding to CsrA, thereby sequestering and antagonizing this protein. Both the synthesis and turnover of these sRNAs are regulated, allowing CsrA activity to be rapidly and efficiently adjusted in response to nutritional conditions and stresses. Feedback loops between the Csr regulatory components improve the dynamics of signal response by the Csr system. The Csr system of E. coli is intimately interconnected with other global regulatory systems, permitting it to contribute to regulation by those systems. In some species, a protein antagonist of CsrA functions as part of a checkpoint for flagellum biosynthesis. In other species, a protein antagonist participates in a mechanism in which a type III secretion system is used for sensing interactions with host cells. Recent transcriptomics studies reveal vast effects of CsrA on gene expression through direct binding to hundreds of mRNAs, and indirectly through its effects on the expression of dozens of transcription factors. CsrA binding to basepairing sRNAs and novel mRNA segments, such as the 3′ UTR and deep within coding regions, predict its participation in yet to be discovered regulatory mechanisms. PMID:29573256

  16. NAN-190, a possible specific antagonist for methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Ginawi, O T; Al-Majed, A A; Al-Suwailem, A K

    2005-03-01

    Effect of NAN-190, a selective 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist, on methamphetamine-induced locomotor activity, anorexia, analgesia, and hyperthermia was investigated in male mice. Methamphetamine (1.5 mg/kg, i.p) produced a significant increase in locomotor activity, which was significantly antagonized by NAN-190 at a dose of 4 mg/kg, i.p. NAN-190 did not alter the antinociceptive activity of mice when it was administered alone. Methamphetamine (2 mg/kg, i.p) produced a significant decrease in food intake of mice, which were deprived of food during the previous 24h. This anorectic activity of methamphetamine was significantly antagonized by NAN-190 at a dose of 2 mg/kg, i.p. NAN-190 did not alter the food intake of mice when it was administered alone. Methamphetamine (2 mg/kg, i.p) also produced a significant increase in body temperature of mice, which was significantly antagonized by NAN-190 at a dose of 0.5 mg/kg, i.p. NAN-190 did not alter the body temperature of mice when it was administered alone. In the writhing test, methamphetamine (1 mg/kg, i.p) produced a significant antinociceptive effect in mice. This was significantly antagonized by NAN-190 at a dose of 1 mg/kg, i.p. NAN-190 did not alter the antinociceptive activity of mice when it was administered alone. The results of the present study indicate a possible role for serotonergic mechanisms, in addition to the catecholaminergic systems, in the above-studied activities of methamphetamine in mice. This role is possibly mediated through direct stimulation of the 5-HT(1A) receptor subtype. All of the above-studied activities of methamphetamine were antagonized by NAN-190, which may indicate that NAN-190 is a possible antagonist for methamphetamine.

  17. N-Benzylpiperidine Derivatives as α7 Nicotinic Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Criado, Manuel; Mulet, José; Sala, Francisco; Sala, Salvador; Colmena, Inés; Gandía, Luis; Bautista-Aguilera, Oscar M; Samadi, Abdelouahid; Chioua, Mourad; Marco-Contelles, José

    2016-08-17

    A series of multitarget directed propargylamines, as well as other differently susbstituted piperidines have been screened as potential modulators of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Most of them showed antagonist actions on α7 nAChRs. Especially, compounds 13, 26, and 38 displayed submicromolar IC50 values on homomeric α7 nAChRs, whereas they were less effective on heteromeric α3β4 and α4β2 nAChRs (up to 20-fold higher IC50 values in the case of 13). Antagonism was concentration dependent and noncompetitive, suggesting that these compounds behave as negative allosteric modulators of nAChRs. Upon the study of a series of less complex derivatives, the N-benzylpiperidine motif, common to these compounds, was found to be the main pharmacophoric group. Thus, 2-(1-benzylpiperidin-4-yl)-ethylamine (48) showed an inhibitory potency comparable to the one of the previous compounds and also a clear preference for α7 nAChRs. In a neuroblastoma cell line, representative compounds 13 and 48 also inhibited, in a concentration-dependent manner, cytosolic Ca(2+) signals mediated by nAChRs. Finally, compounds 38 and 13 inhibited 5-HT3A serotonin receptors whereas they had no effect on α1 glycine receptors. Given the multifactorial nature of many pathologies in which nAChRs are involved, these piperidine antagonists could have a therapeutic potential in cases where cholinergic activity has to be negatively modulated.

  18. Global Regulation by CsrA and Its RNA Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Tony; Babitzke, Paul

    2018-03-01

    The sequence-specific RNA binding protein CsrA is employed by diverse bacteria in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. Its binding interactions with RNA have been documented at atomic resolution and shown to alter RNA secondary structure, RNA stability, translation, and/or Rho-mediated transcription termination through a growing number of molecular mechanisms. In Gammaproteobacteria , small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) that contain multiple CsrA binding sites compete with mRNA for binding to CsrA, thereby sequestering and antagonizing this protein. Both the synthesis and turnover of these sRNAs are regulated, allowing CsrA activity to be rapidly and efficiently adjusted in response to nutritional conditions and stresses. Feedback loops between the Csr regulatory components improve the dynamics of signal response by the Csr system. The Csr system of Escherichia coli is intimately interconnected with other global regulatory systems, permitting it to contribute to regulation by those systems. In some species, a protein antagonist of CsrA functions as part of a checkpoint for flagellum biosynthesis. In other species, a protein antagonist participates in a mechanism in which a type III secretion system is used for sensing interactions with host cells. Recent transcriptomics studies reveal vast effects of CsrA on gene expression through direct binding to hundreds of mRNAs, and indirectly through its effects on the expression of dozens of transcription factors. CsrA binding to base-pairing sRNAs and novel mRNA segments, such as the 3' untranslated region and deep within coding regions, predict its participation in yet-to-be-discovered regulatory mechanisms.

  19. Development of Kappa Opioid Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, F. Ivy; Carlezon, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Kappa opioid receptors (KORs) belong to the G-protein coupled class of receptors (GPCRs). They are activated by the endogenous opioid peptide dynorphin (DYN) and expressed at particularly high levels within brain areas implicated in modulation of motivation, emotion, and cognitive function. Chronic activation of KORs in animal models has maladaptive effects including increases in behaviors that reflect depression, the propensity to engage in drug-seeking behavior, and drug craving. The fact that KOR activation has such a profound influence on behaviors often triggered by stress has led to interest in selective KOR antagonists as potential therapeutic agents. This perspective provides a description of preclinical research conducted in the development of several different classes of selective KOR antagonists, a summary of the clinical studies conducted thus far, and recommendations for the type of work needed in the future to determine if these agents would be useful as pharmacotherapies for neuropsychiatric illness. PMID:23360448

  20. Mass-Screening of Curarimimetic Neurotoxin Antagonists.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-15

    identification of useful antagonists of curarimimetic neurotoxins, a group of snake venom proteins which bind to and inactivate the nicotinic acetylcholine...described in the original proposal. Briefly, the native toxin was prepared from B. multicinctus venom (Miami Serpentarium, Miami, FL) by chromatography on...Bungarotoxin. J. Biol. Chem. 255, 11156-11162. Wjber, M. and Changeux, J.-P. (1974) Binding of Naja np&rIcollis [ HI-alpha-Toxin to Membrane

  1. TNF alpha antagonist therapy and safety monitoring.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thao; Bachelez, Hervé; Berthelot, Jean-Marie; Blacher, Jacques; Bouhnik, Yoram; Claudepierre, Pascal; Constantin, Arnaud; Fautrel, Bruno; Gaudin, Philippe; Goëb, Vincent; Gossec, Laure; Goupille, Philippe; Guillaume-Czitrom, Séverine; Hachulla, Eric; Huet, Isabelle; Jullien, Denis; Launay, Odile; Lemann, Marc; Maillefert, Jean-Francis; Marolleau, Jean-Pierre; Martinez, Valérie; Masson, Charles; Morel, Jacques; Mouthon, Luc; Pol, Stanislas; Puéchal, Xavier; Richette, Pascal; Saraux, Alain; Schaeverbeke, Thierry; Soubrier, Martin; Sudre, Anne; Tran, Tu-Anh; Viguier, Manuelle; Vittecoq, Olivier; Wendling, Daniel; Mariette, Xavier; Sibilia, Jean

    2011-05-01

    To develop and/or update fact sheets about TNFα antagonists treatments, in order to assist physicians in the management of patients with inflammatory joint disease. 1. selection by a committee of rheumatology experts of the main topics of interest for which fact sheets were desirable; 2. identification and review of publications relevant to each topic; 3. development and/or update of fact sheets based on three levels of evidence: evidence-based medicine, official recommendations, and expert opinion. The experts were rheumatologists and invited specialists in other fields, and they had extensive experience with the management of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid. They were members of the CRI (Club Rhumatismes et Inflammation), a section of the Société Francaise de Rhumatologie. Each fact sheet was revised by several experts and the overall process was coordinated by three experts. Several topics of major interest were selected: contraindications of TNFα antagonists treatments, the management of adverse effects and concomitant diseases that may develop during these therapies, and the management of everyday situations such as pregnancy, surgery, and immunizations. After a review of the literature and discussions among experts, a consensus was developed about the content of the fact sheets presented here. These fact sheets focus on several points: 1. in RA and SpA, initiation and monitoring of TNFα antagonists treatments, management of patients with specific past histories, and specific clinical situations such as pregnancy; 2. diseases other than RA, such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis; 3. models of letters for informing the rheumatologist and general practitioner; 4. and patient information. These TNFα antagonists treatments fact sheets built on evidence-based medicine and expert opinion will serve as a practical tool for assisting physicians who manage patients on these therapies. They will be available continuously at www.cri-net.com and

  2. Interactions of Freshwater Cyanobacteria with Bacterial Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Sara; Grabherr, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyanobacterial and algal mass development, or blooms, have severe effects on freshwater and marine systems around the world. Many of these phototrophs produce a variety of potent toxins, contribute to oxygen depletion, and affect water quality in several ways. Coexisting antagonists, such as cyanolytic bacteria, hold the potential to suppress, or even terminate, such blooms, yet the nature of this interaction is not well studied. We isolated 31 cyanolytic bacteria affiliated with the genera Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, Acinetobacter, and Delftia from three eutrophic freshwater lakes in Sweden and selected four phylogenetically diverse bacterial strains with strong-to-moderate lytic activity. To characterize their functional responses to the presence of cyanobacteria, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) experiments on coculture incubations, with an initial predator-prey ratio of 1:1. Genes involved in central cellular pathways, stress-related heat or cold shock proteins, and antitoxin genes were highly expressed in both heterotrophs and cyanobacteria. Heterotrophs in coculture expressed genes involved in cell motility, signal transduction, and putative lytic activity. l,d-Transpeptidase was the only significantly upregulated lytic gene in Stenotrophomonas rhizophila EK20. Heterotrophs also shifted their central metabolism from the tricarboxylic acid cycle to the glyoxylate shunt. Concurrently, cyanobacteria clearly show contrasting antagonistic interactions with the four tested heterotrophic strains, which is also reflected in the physical attachment to their cells. In conclusion, antagonistic interactions with cyanobacteria were initiated within 24 h, and expression profiles suggest varied responses for the different cyanobacteria and studied cyanolytes. IMPORTANCE Here, we present how gene expression profiles can be used to reveal interactions between bloom-forming freshwater cyanobacteria and antagonistic heterotrophic bacteria. Species

  3. Medicinal Chemistry of Competitive Kainate Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA) receptors belong to the group of ionotropic glutamate receptors and are expressed throughout in the central nervous system (CNS). The KA receptors have been shown to be involved in neurophysiological functions such as mossy fiber long-term potentiation (LTP) and synaptic plasticity and are thus potential therapeutic targets in CNS diseases such as schizophrenia, major depression, neuropathic pain and epilepsy. Extensive effort has been made to develop subtype-selective KA receptor antagonists in order to elucidate the physiological function of each of the five subunits known (GluK1−5). However, to date only selective antagonists for the GluK1 subunit have been discovered, which underlines the strong need for continued research in this area. The present review describes the structure−activity relationship and pharmacological profile for 10 chemically distinct classes of KA receptor antagonists comprising, in all, 45 compounds. To the medicinal chemist this information will serve as reference guidance as well as an inspiration for future effort in this field. PMID:22778857

  4. Novel selective β1-adrenoceptor antagonists for concomitant cardiovascular and respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Jillian G.; Gardiner, Sheila M.; Woolard, Jeanette; Fromont, Christophe; Jadhav, Gopal P.; Mistry, Shailesh N.; Thompson, Kevin S. J.; Kellam, Barrie; Hill, Stephen J.; Fischer, Peter M.

    2017-01-01

    β-Blockers reduce mortality and improve symptoms in people with heart disease; however, current clinically available β-blockers have poor selectivity for the cardiac β1-adrenoceptor (AR) over the lung β2-AR. Unwanted β2-blockade risks causing life-threatening bronchospasm and reduced efficacy of β2-agonist emergency rescue therapy. Thus, current life-prolonging β-blockers are contraindicated in patients with both heart disease and asthma. Here, we describe NDD-713 and -825, novel highly β1-selective neutral antagonists with good pharmaceutical properties that can potentially overcome this limitation. Radioligand binding studies and functional assays that use human receptors expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells demonstrate that NDD-713 and -825 have nanomolar β1-AR affinity >500-fold β1-AR vs. β2-AR selectivity and no agonism. Studies in conscious rats demonstrate that these antagonists are orally bioavailable and cause pronounced β1-mediated reduction of heart rate while showing no effect on β2-mediated hindquarters vasodilatation. These compounds also have good disposition properties and show no adverse toxicologic effects. They potentially offer a truly cardioselective β-blocker therapy for the large number of patients with heart and respiratory or peripheral vascular comorbidities.—Baker, J. G., Gardiner, S. M., Woolard, J., Fromont, C., Jadhav, G. P., Mistry, S. N., Thompson, K. S. J., Kellam, B., Hill, S. J., Fischer, P. M. Novel selective β1-adrenoceptor antagonists for concomitant cardiovascular and respiratory disease. PMID:28400472

  5. Suppression of HPV-16 late L1 5′-splice site SD3632 by binding of hnRNP D proteins and hnRNP A2/B1 to upstream AUAGUA RNA motifs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoze; Johansson, Cecilia; Glahder, Jacob; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Schwartz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) 5′-splice site SD3632 is used exclusively to produce late L1 mRNAs. We identified a 34-nt splicing inhibitory element located immediately upstream of HPV-16 late 5′-splice site SD3632. Two AUAGUA motifs located in these 34 nt inhibited SD3632. Two nucleotide substitutions in each of the HPV-16 specific AUAGUA motifs alleviated splicing inhibition and induced late L1 mRNA production from episomal forms of the HPV-16 genome in primary human keratinocytes. The AUAGUA motifs bind specifically not only to the heterogeneous nuclear RNP (hnRNP) D family of RNA-binding proteins including hnRNP D/AUF, hnRNP DL and hnRNP AB but also to hnRNP A2/B1. Knock-down of these proteins induced HPV-16 late L1 mRNA expression, and overexpression of hnRNP A2/B1, hnRNP AB, hnRNP DL and the two hnRNP D isoforms hnRNP D37 and hnRNP D40 further suppressed L1 mRNA expression. This inhibition may allow HPV-16 to hide from the immune system and establish long-term persistent infections with enhanced risk at progressing to cancer. There is an inverse correlation between expression of hnRNP D proteins and hnRNP A2/B1 and HPV-16 L1 production in the cervical epithelium, as well as in cervical cancer, supporting the conclusion that hnRNP D proteins and A2/B1 inhibit HPV-16 L1 mRNA production. PMID:24013563

  6. Effects of intraventricular histamine and H2 receptor antagonists on intraocular pressure.

    PubMed

    Trzeciakowski, J P; Frye, G D

    1987-01-01

    Severe ocular hypertension has been reported in a chronic glaucoma patient following use of histamine H2 receptor antagonists for treatment of peptic ulcer. Subsequent studies, however, have failed to demonstrate a significant action of topical or intravenously administered H2 blockers on intraocular pressure (IOP) in humans. In this study, cimetidine and ranitidine were administered into the cerebral ventricles of unanesthetized New Zealand White rabbits. Both drugs caused prolonged increases in IOP at a dose of 1 umol. Maximal elevations of IOP occurred approximately 20 min after drug injections and averaged 5-8 mmHg above pre-drug values. In contrast, histamine (0.3 and 1.0 umol) produced biphasic effects on IOP when given by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection. These data suggest that central mechanisms may mediate the actions of some histamine receptor agonists and antagonists on IOP.

  7. 4,5-Dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-[4-(4-isopropoxy-benzyl)-phenyl]-amine (RO1138452) is a selective, pseudo-irreversible orthosteric antagonist at the prostacyclin (IP)-receptor expressed by human airway epithelial cells: IP-receptor-mediated inhibition of CXCL9 and CXCL10 release.

    PubMed

    Ayer, Linda M; Wilson, Sylvia M; Traves, Suzanne L; Proud, David; Giembycz, Mark A

    2008-02-01

    The extent to which the prostacyclin (IP) receptor regulates the release of two proinflammatory chemokines from human airway epithelial cells was investigated using the novel and competitive IP-receptor antagonist 4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)-[4-(4-isopropoxy-benzyl)-phenyl]-amine (RO1138452). In BEAS-2B human airway epithelial cells, taprostene, a selective IP-receptor agonist, suppressed interferon-gamma-induced CXCL9 and CXCL10 release in a concentration-dependent manner. These effects were mimicked by 8-bromo-cAMP, and they were abolished in cells infected with an adenovirus vector encoding a highly selective inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). RO1138452 blocked the inhibitory effect of taprostene on chemokine output in a manner inconsistent with surmountable competitive antagonism. Comparable results were obtained using primary cultures of human airway epithelial cells. The basis of the antagonism imposed by RO1138452 was studied further using BEAS-2B cells stably transfected with a cAMP-response element (CRE) luciferase reporter. On this output, RO1138452 also behaved insurmountably. Mechanistically, this could not be attributed to covalent receptor inactivation, allosterism, or a state of hemiequilibrium. Other studies established that the degree by which RO1138452 antagonized taprostene-induced CRE-dependent transcription was not reversed over a 20-h "washout" period. This pharmacological profile is consistent with the behavior of a pseudo-irreversible antagonist where dissociation from its cognate receptor is so slow that re-equilibration is not achieved at the time the response is measured. Collectively, these data provide compelling evidence that human airway epithelial cells express inhibitory IP-receptors linked to the activation of PKA. Moreover, contrary to existing literature, RO1138452 behaved pseudoirreversibly, emphasizing the need, in drug discovery, to screen potential new medicines in the target tissue(s) of interest.

  8. Bradykinin-mediated angioedema.

    PubMed

    Obtułowicz, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Angioedema and urticaria often constitute a challenge in daily clinical practice. They may either co- -occur or present as independent conditions. They are characterized by a complex pathomechanism, and their symptoms may be triggered by diverse factors. These differences are crucial for developing a successful treatment regimen. Both conditions may have an allergic origin (immunoglobulin [Ig] E and non-IgE-related), usually induced by histamine, or a nonallergic one, such as bradykinin-mediated angioedema in patients with C1 inhibitor (C1-INH) deficiency or angioedema induced by certain drugs (eg, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors). Currently, we distinguish 5 types of nonallergic angioedema: hereditary angioedema (HAE) due to C1-INH deficiency, acquired angioedema (AAE), and angioedema induced by the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, all of which are mediated by bradykinin, as well as pseudoallergic angioedema and idiopathic angioedema. Bradykinin-mediated angioedema (eg, laryngeal angioedema) may be life-threatening because of resistance to corticosteroids and antihistamine drugs. C1-INH concentrates are the drugs of choice in the treatment of HAE and AAE. In recent years, some new drugs have been introduced in the treatment of bradykinin-mediated angioedema, such as bradykinin B2-receptor antagonist, icatibant, and kallikrein inhibitor, ecallantide, which allow to improve treatment outcomes.

  9. First and second generation H₁ histamine receptor antagonists produce different sleep-inducing profiles in rats.

    PubMed

    Unno, Katsuya; Ozaki, Tomoya; Mohammad, Shahid; Tsuno, Saki; Ikeda-Sagara, Masami; Honda, Kazuki; Ikeda, Masayuki

    2012-05-15

    First generation H₁ histamine receptor antagonists, such as d-chlorpheniramine (d-CPA) and diphenhydramine, produce drowsiness in humans. They are currently used as over-the-counter sleep aids. However, the mechanisms underlying drowsiness induced by these H₁ histamine receptor antagonists remain obscure because they produce heterogeneous receptor-independent actions. Ketotifen is a second generation H₁ histamine receptor antagonist which is more permeable to the brain than newer H₁ histamine receptor antagonists. Therefore, to access sleep-inducing profiles by H₁ histamine receptor blocking actions, the present study compared the dose-dependent effects of diphenhydramine and ketotifen (1-40 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection at dark onset time) on daily sleep-wake patterns in rats. Ketotifen dose-dependently decreased rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep and increased non-REM sleep by amplifying slow-wave electroencephalogram powers. Diphenhydramine at 4 mg/kg transiently increased non-REM sleep and reduced REM sleep similar to the effects of ketotifen. The larger injections of diphenhydramine (10-40 mg/kg), however, reduced non-REM sleep, abolished slow-wave enhancements and facilitated wakefulness. The bi-directional action of diphenhydramine on sleep is similar to our former results using d-CPA. Taken together, the arousal effects caused by over-dose administrations of the first generation H₁ histamine receptor antagonists may be mediated by H₁ histamine receptor-independent actions. To further examine the tolerance of ketotifen-induced sleep, 3 mg/kg ketotifen was injected daily for 5 days 3 h before light onset time. These experiments consistently enhanced non-REM-sleep at the end of the active phase of rats, suggesting that ketotifen may function as a desirable sleep aid although the coincidental REM sleep reduction requires attention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Predicting response to opiate antagonists and placebo in the treatment of pathological gambling.

    PubMed

    Grant, Jon E; Kim, Suck Won; Hollander, Eric; Potenza, Marc N

    2008-11-01

    Although opiate antagonists have shown promise in the treatment of pathological gambling (PG), individual responses vary. No studies have systematically examined predictors of medication treatment outcome in PG. Understanding clinical variables related to treatment outcome should help generate treatment algorithms for PG. We sought to identify clinical variables associated with treatment outcome in PG subjects receiving opiate antagonists. Two hundred eighty-four subjects [137 (48.2%) women] with DSM-IV PG were treated in one of two double-blind placebo-controlled trials (16 weeks of nalmefene or 18 weeks of naltrexone). Gambling severity was assessed with the Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale Modified for Pathological Gambling (PG-YBOCS) with positive response defined as > or =35% reduction in PG-YBOCS score for at least 1 month by study endpoint. Depression, anxiety, and psychosocial functioning were included in stepwise logistic regression analyses designed to identify clinical factors independently associated with treatment response. The clinical variable most strongly associated with a positive response to an opiate antagonist was a positive family history of alcoholism (p = 0.006). Among individuals receiving higher doses of opiate antagonists (i.e., nalmefene 50 or 100 mg/day or naltrexone 100 or 150 mg/day), intensity of gambling urges (PG-YBOCS urge subscale) was associated with a positive response on a trend level (p = 0.036). Among individuals receiving placebo, younger age was associated, on a trend level, with positive treatment outcome (p = 0.012). A family history of alcoholism appears to predict response to an opiate antagonist in PG. Future research is needed to identify specific factors (e.g., genetic) mediating favorable responses.

  11. Predicting Response to Opiate Antagonists and Placebo in the Treatment of Pathological Gambling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suck Won; Hollander, Eric; Potenza, Marc N.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Although opiate antagonists have shown promise in the treatment of pathological gambling (PG), individual responses vary. No studies have systematically examined predictors of medication treatment outcome in PG. Understanding clinical variables related to treatment outcome should help generate treatment algorithms for PG. Objectives We sought to identify clinical variables associated with treatment outcome in PG subjects receiving opiate antagonists. Methods 284 subjects (137 [48.2%] women) with DSM-IV PG were treated in one of two double-blind placebo-controlled trials (16 weeks of nalmefene or 18 weeks of naltrexone). Gambling severity was assessed with the Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale Modified for Pathological Gambling [PG-YBOCS] with positive response defined as ≥ 35% reduction in PG-YBOCS score for at least one month by study endpoint. Depression, anxiety, and psychosocial functioning were included in stepwise logistic regression analyses designed to identify clinical factors independently associated with treatment response. Results The clinical variable most strongly associated with a positive response to an opiate antagonist was a positive family history of alcoholism (p=.006). Among individuals receiving higher doses of opiate antagonists (i.e., nalmefene 50mg/d or 100mg/d or naltrexone 100mg/d or 150mg/d), intensity of gambling urges (PG-YBOCS urge subscale) was associated with a positive response on a trend level (p=.036). Among individuals receiving placebo, younger age was associated, on a trend level, with positive treatment outcome (p=.012). Conclusions A family history of alcoholism appears to predict response to an opiate antagonist in PG. Future research is needed to identify specific factors (e.g., genetic) mediating favorable responses. PMID:18581096

  12. Effects of GABA agonists and antagonists on temperature-sensitive neurones in the rat hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Yakimova, K; Sann, H; Schmid, H A; Pierau, F K

    1996-07-01

    1. Extracellular recordings were obtained from 94 warm-sensitive, 6 cold-sensitive and 117 temperature-insensitive neurones in slices of the hypothalamic medial preoptic area of rats, to determine the effect of the GABAA agonist muscimol, the GABAA antagonist bicuculline, the GABAB agonist baclofen and the GABAB antagonist phaclofen on tonic activity and temperature sensitivity. 2. Muscimol and baclofen dose-dependently inhibited the tonic activity of 69% (36/52) and 97% (36/37) of the hypothalamic neurones, respectively, regardless of their type of thermosensitivity. In contrast, the GABAA antagonist bicuculline increased the tonic activity of the majority of neurones (58/83), while the GABAB antagonist phaclofen increased neuronal activity only in the high dose of 100 microM. 3. The temperature sensitivity of hypothalamic neurones was only changed by ligands of GABAB receptors, and this effect was restricted to warm-sensitive neurones. The temperature coefficient (TC) was significantly increased by the GABAB agonist baclofen (delta TC = 0.69 +/- 0.11 imp s-1 degree C-1, P < 0.01, n = 18). In contrast, the GABAB antagonist phaclofen (10 microM) decreased the temperature sensitivity (delta TC = -0.67 +/- 0.09 imp s-1 degree C-1, P < 0.01, n = 10) in doses which did not affect tonic activity. 4. The increase in temperature sensitivity due to the GABAB agonist baclofen was significantly enhanced by co-perfusion of the GABAA antagonist bicuculline, indicating an interaction of GABAA and GABAB receptor-mediated mechanisms with regard to neuronal thermosensitivity. 5. The results suggest that neurones in the medical preoptic area are subject to GABA-mediated tonic inhibition resulting in modulation of tonic activity and temperature sensitivity of warm-sensitive neurones possibly involved in the control of body temperature. The data support the hypothesis that the hypo- or hyperthermic action of an endogenous substance is related to its effect on the thermosensitivity

  13. Pressor responses to central injection of H2 antagonists not caused by GABA blockade.

    PubMed

    Trzeciakowski, J P; Frye, G D

    1986-05-27

    In awake rats, ranitidine was more effective than cimetidine in elevating blood pressure following intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection, yet neither drug affected the hypotensive response to subsequent injections of muscimol (8.8 nmol i.c.v.). Bicuculline (0.01 nmol) microinjected into the inferior colliculus of rats caused clonic seizures whereas cimetidine (100 nmol) had no effect. The antihistamines did not prevent GABAB receptor-mediated inhibition of twitch responses in transmurally stimulated guinea-pig ileum. Ranitidine potentiated rather than inhibited GABAA receptor-mediated contractions of ileum longitudinal muscle. Cimetidine had no effect on these responses except at high concentrations (3 X 10(-4) M) which caused a slight dextral shift in the contractile response curve for GABA that may be attributed to antimuscarinic actions of cimetidine. Taken together, these data do not support the concept that the centrally mediated pressor effects of H2 antagonists are caused by GABA receptor blockade.

  14. Reduction of periodontal pathogens adhesion by antagonistic strains.

    PubMed

    Van Hoogmoed, C G; Geertsema-Doornbusch, G I; Teughels, W; Quirynen, M; Busscher, H J; Van der Mei, H C

    2008-02-01

    Periodontitis results from a shift in the subgingival microflora into a more pathogenic direction with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans considered as periodontopathogens. In many cases, treatment procures only a temporary shift towards a less pathogenic microflora. An alternative treatment could be the deliberate colonization of pockets with antagonistic microorganisms to control the adhesion of periodontopathogens. The aim of this study was to identify bacterial strains that reduce adhesion of periodontopathogens to surfaces. Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus crista, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus mitis, Actinomyces naeslundii, and Haemophilus parainfluenzae were evaluated as potential antagonists against P. gingivalis ATCC 33277, P. intermedia ATCC 49046, and A. actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 43718 as periodontopathogens. Adhesion of periodontopathogens to the bottom plate of a parallel plate flow chamber was studied in the absence (control) and the presence of pre-adhering antagonistic strains up to a surface coverage of 5%. The largest reduction caused by antagonistic strains was observed for P. gingivalis. All antagonistic strains except S. crista ATCC 49999 inhibited the adhesion of P. gingivalis by at least 1.6 cells per adhering antagonist, with the largest significant reduction observed for A. naeslundii ATCC 51655 (3.8 cells per adhering antagonist). Adhering antagonists had a minimal effect on the adhesion of A. actinomycetemcomitans ATCC 43718. Intermediate but significant reductions were perceived for P. intermedia, most notably caused by S. mitis BMS. The adhesion of P. gingivalis was inhibited best by antagonistic strains, while S. mitis BMS appeared to be the most successful antagonist.

  15. PPARα/γ antagonists reverse the ameliorative effects of osthole on hepatic lipid metabolism and inflammatory response in steatohepatitic rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xi; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Ruijun; Zhu, Zengyan; Xie, Meilin

    2018-04-01

    Our previous studies have indicated that osthole may ameliorate the hepatic lipid metabolism and inflammatory response in nonalcoholic steatohepatitic rats, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. This study aimed to determine whether the effects of osthole were mediated by the activation of hepatic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α/γ (PPARα/γ). A rat model with steatohepatitis was induced by orally feeding high-fat and high-sucrose emulsion for 6 weeks. These experimental rats were then treated with osthole (20 mg/kg), PPARα antagonist MK886 (1 mg/kg) plus osthole (20 mg/kg), PPARγ antagonist GW9662 (1 mg/kg) plus osthole (20 mg/kg) and MK886 (1 mg/kg) plus GW9662 (1 mg/kg) plus osthole (20 mg/kg) for 4 weeks. The results showed that after osthole treatment, the hepatic triglycerides, free fatty acids, tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8 and liver index decreased by 52.3, 31.0, 32.4, 28.9, 36.3, 29.3 and 29.9%, respectively, and the score of steatohepatitis also decreased by 70.0%, indicating that osthole improved the hepatic steatosis and inflammation. However, these effects of osthole were reduced or abrogated after simultaneous addition of the specific PPARα antagonist MK886 or/and the PPARγ antagonist GW9662, especially in the co-PPARα/γ antagonists-treated group. Importantly, the osthole-induced hepatic expressions of PPARα/γ proteins were decreased, and the osthole-regulated hepatic expressions of lipogenic and inflammatory gene proteins were also reversed by PPARα/γ antagonist treatment. These findings demonstrated that the ameliorative effect of osthole on nonalcoholic steatohepatitis was mediated by PPARα/γ activation, and osthole might be a natural dual PPARα/γ activator.

  16. Inhibition of Ebola and Marburg Virus Entry by G Protein-Coupled Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Han; Lear-Rooney, Calli M; Johansen, Lisa; Varhegyi, Elizabeth; Chen, Zheng W; Olinger, Gene G; Rong, Lijun

    2015-10-01

    Filoviruses, consisting of Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV), are among the most lethal infectious threats to mankind. Infections by these viruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fevers in humans and nonhuman primates with high mortality rates. Since there is currently no vaccine or antiviral therapy approved for humans, there is an urgent need to develop prophylactic and therapeutic options for use during filoviral outbreaks and bioterrorist attacks. One of the ideal targets against filoviral infection and diseases is at the entry step, which is mediated by the filoviral glycoprotein (GP). In this report, we screened a chemical library of small molecules and identified numerous inhibitors, which are known G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) antagonists targeting different GPCRs, including histamine receptors, 5-HT (serotonin) receptors, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, and adrenergic receptor. These inhibitors can effectively block replication of both infectious EBOV and MARV, indicating a broad antiviral activity of the GPCR antagonists. The time-of-addition experiment and microscopic studies suggest that GPCR antagonists block filoviral entry at a step following the initial attachment but prior to viral/cell membrane fusion. These results strongly suggest that GPCRs play a critical role in filoviral entry and GPCR antagonists can be developed as an effective anti-EBOV/MARV therapy. Infection of Ebola virus and Marburg virus can cause severe illness in humans with a high mortality rate, and currently there is no FDA-approved vaccine or therapeutic treatment available. The 2013-2015 epidemic in West Africa underscores a lack of our understanding in the infection and pathogenesis of these viruses and the urgency of drug discovery and development. In this study, we have identified numerous inhibitors that are known G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) antagonists targeting different GPCRs. These inhibitors can effectively block replication of both infectious

  17. Inhibition of Ebola and Marburg Virus Entry by G Protein-Coupled Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Han; Lear-Rooney, Calli M.; Johansen, Lisa; Varhegyi, Elizabeth; Chen, Zheng W.; Olinger, Gene G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Filoviruses, consisting of Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV), are among the most lethal infectious threats to mankind. Infections by these viruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fevers in humans and nonhuman primates with high mortality rates. Since there is currently no vaccine or antiviral therapy approved for humans, there is an urgent need to develop prophylactic and therapeutic options for use during filoviral outbreaks and bioterrorist attacks. One of the ideal targets against filoviral infection and diseases is at the entry step, which is mediated by the filoviral glycoprotein (GP). In this report, we screened a chemical library of small molecules and identified numerous inhibitors, which are known G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) antagonists targeting different GPCRs, including histamine receptors, 5-HT (serotonin) receptors, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, and adrenergic receptor. These inhibitors can effectively block replication of both infectious EBOV and MARV, indicating a broad antiviral activity of the GPCR antagonists. The time-of-addition experiment and microscopic studies suggest that GPCR antagonists block filoviral entry at a step following the initial attachment but prior to viral/cell membrane fusion. These results strongly suggest that GPCRs play a critical role in filoviral entry and GPCR antagonists can be developed as an effective anti-EBOV/MARV therapy. IMPORTANCE Infection of Ebola virus and Marburg virus can cause severe illness in humans with a high mortality rate, and currently there is no FDA-approved vaccine or therapeutic treatment available. The 2013-2015 epidemic in West Africa underscores a lack of our understanding in the infection and pathogenesis of these viruses and the urgency of drug discovery and development. In this study, we have identified numerous inhibitors that are known G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) antagonists targeting different GPCRs. These inhibitors can effectively block replication of

  18. Muscarinic Receptor Antagonists: Effects on Pulmonary Function

    PubMed Central

    Buels, Kalmia S.

    2014-01-01

    In healthy lungs, muscarinic receptors control smooth muscle tone, mucus secretion, vasodilation, and inflammation. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma, cholinergic mechanisms contribute to increased bronchoconstriction and mucus secretion that limit airflow. This chapter reviews neuronal and nonneuronal sources of acetylcholine in the lung and the expression and role of M1, M2, and M3 muscarinic receptor subtypes in lung physiology. It also discusses the evidence for and against the role of parasympathetic nerves in asthma, and the current use and therapeutic potential of muscarinic receptor antagonists in COPD and asthma. PMID:22222705

  19. Internal image anti-idiotypic antibody: A new strategy for the development a new category of prolactin receptor (PRLR) antagonist.

    PubMed

    Lan, Hainan; Hong, Pan; Li, Ruonan; L, Suo; Anshan, Shan; Li, Steven; Zheng, Xin

    2017-07-01

    Over the past decades, a number of prolactin receptor (PRLR) antagonists have been developed, which can be divided into two categories, PRLR analogue and anti-PRLR antibody. However, until now, there have been no commercially available PRLR antagonists. Here, we described a new approach for the preparation of PRLR antagonist, namely internal image anti-idiotypic antibody strategy. The hybridoma technique was used to generate anti-idiotypic antibodies to PRL. Competitive ELISA, competitive receptor-binding analysis and immunofluorescence assay (IFA) were then used to screen and characterize anti-idiotypic antibodies to PRL. One internal image anti-idiotypic antibody, termed MG7, was obtained. A series of experiments demonstrated that MG7 behaved as a typical internal image anti-idiotypic antibody (Ab2β). MG7 exhibited effective antagonistic activity, which not only inhibited PRL binding to PRLR in a dose-dependent manner but also inhibited PRLR-mediated intracellular signalling. Furthermore, MG7 also blocked Nb2 cell proliferation induced by PRL. The current study suggests that MG7 has the potential application in the PRL/PRLR-related studies in future. In addition, this work also suggests that the internal image anti-idiotypic antibody may represent a novel strategy for the development of PRLR antagonist. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Diphenyl purine derivatives as peripherally selective cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Fulp, Alan; Bortoff, Katherine; Zhang, Yanan; Seltzman, Herbert; Mathews, James; Snyder, Rodney; Fennell, Tim; Maitra, Rangan

    2012-11-26

    Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) antagonists are potentially useful for the treatment of several diseases. However, clinical development of several CB1 antagonists was halted due to central nervous system (CNS)-related side effects including depression and suicidal ideation in some users. Recently, studies have indicated that selective regulation of CB1 receptors in the periphery is a viable strategy for treating several important disorders. Past efforts to develop peripherally selective antagonists of CB1 have largely targeted rimonabant, an inverse agonist of CB1. Reported here are our efforts toward developing a peripherally selective CB1 antagonist based on the otenabant scaffold. Even though otenabant penetrates the CNS, it is unique among CB1 antagonists that have been clinically tested because it has properties that are normally associated with peripherally selective compounds. Our efforts have resulted in an orally absorbed compound that is a potent and selective CB1 antagonist with limited penetration into the CNS.

  1. Diphenyl Purine Derivatives as Peripherally Selective Cannabinoid Receptor 1 Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Fulp, Alan; Bortoff, Katherine; Zhang, Yanan; Seltzman, Herbert; Mathews, James; Snyder, Rodney; Fennell, Tim; Maitra, Rangan

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) antagonists are potentially useful for the treatment of several diseases. However, clinical development of several CB1 antagonists was halted due to central nervous system (CNS)-related side effects including depression and suicidal ideation in some users. Recently, studies have indicated that selective regulation of CB1 receptors in the periphery is a viable strategy for treating several important disorders. Past efforts to develop peripherally selective antagonists of CB1 have largely targeted rimonabant, an inverse agonist of CB1. Reported here are our efforts toward developing a peripherally selective CB1 antagonist based on the otenabant scaffold. Even though otenabant penetrates the CNS, it is unique among CB1 antagonists that have been clinically tested because it has properties that are normally associated with peripherally selective compounds. Our efforts have resulted in an orally absorbed compound that is a potent and selective CB1 antagonist with limited penetration into the CNS. PMID:23098108

  2. Rational discovery of novel nuclear hormone receptor antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schapira, Matthieu; Raaka, Bruce M.; Samuels, Herbert H.; Abagyan, Ruben

    2000-02-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NRs) are potential targets for therapeutic approaches to many clinical conditions, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological diseases. The crystal structure of the ligand binding domain of agonist-bound NRs enables the design of compounds with agonist activity. However, with the exception of the human estrogen receptor-, the lack of antagonist-bound "inactive" receptor structures hinders the rational design of receptor antagonists. In this study, we present a strategy for designing such antagonists. We constructed a model of the inactive conformation of human retinoic acid receptor- by using information derived from antagonist-bound estrogen receptor-α and applied a computer-based virtual screening algorithm to identify retinoic acid receptor antagonists. Thus, the currently available crystal structures of NRs may be used for the rational design of antagonists, which could lead to the development of novel drugs for a variety of diseases.

  3. Novel dominant negative Smad antagonists to TGFbeta signaling.

    PubMed

    Ho, Joanne; Chen, Hui; Lebrun, Jean-Jacques

    2007-07-01

    We previously identified a critical serine/threonine residue within the linker domain of Smad2/3, phosphorylated by the kinase GRK2 which plays a critical role in regulating Smad signaling. To define the mechanism by which GRK2-mediated phosphorylation modifies Smad2/3 behavior at the molecular level, we generated mutant Smads where the GRK2 phosphorylation site was replaced with an aspartic acid (D) to mimic the properties of a phospho-residue or an alanine (A) as a control. Interestingly, overexpression of either the D or A mutant inhibits TGFbeta signaling, but through two distinct mechanisms. The D mutant is properly localized and released from the plasma membrane upon ligand stimulation, but fails to interact with the type I receptor kinase. The A mutant properly interacts with and is phosphorylated by the type I receptor, translocates to the nucleus and homodimerizes with wild-type R-Smads, but it fails to form a heterocomplex with Smad4. As a result, both mutants act as antagonists of endogenous TGFbeta signaling through divergent mechanisms. The D mutant acts by blocking endogenous R-Smads phosphorylation and the A mutant acts by preventing endogenous R-Smad/Smad4 heterocomplexes. Thus, mutation of the GRK2 phosphorylation site within the Smad generates dominant negative Smads that efficiently inhibit TGFbeta responses.

  4. Investigational opioid antagonists for treating opioid-induced bowel dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Mozaffari, Shilan; Nikfar, Shekoufeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2018-03-01

    Opioids have been highlighted for their role in pain relief among cancer and non-cancer patients. Novel agents have been investigated to reduce opioid-induced constipation (OIC) as the main adverse effect that may lead to treatment discontinuation. Development of peripherally acting mu-opioid receptor antagonists (PAMORA) has resulted in a novel approach to preserve the efficacy of pain control along with less OIC. Areas covered: Clinical evidence for investigational PAMORAs was reviewed and clinical trials on investigational agents to reduce OIC were included. TD-1211 is currently being evaluated in Phase II clinical trial. Oxycodone-naltrexone and ADL-5945 went through Phase III clinical trials, but have been discontinued. Expert opinion: There is a substantial need to develop agents with specific pharmacokinetic properties to meet the needs of patients with underlying diseases. Holding the efficacy of a medicine with the highest selectivity on targeted receptors and the least adverse effects is the main approach in upcoming investigations to improve patients' quality of life (QoL). Novel agents to reduce opioid-induced bowel dysfunction (OIBD) that do not reverse peripherally mediated pain analgesia are of great interest. Direct comparison of available agents in this field is lacking in the literature.

  5. Histamine and histamine receptor antagonists in cancer biology.

    PubMed

    Blaya, Bruno; Nicolau-Galmés, Francesca; Jangi, Shawkat M; Ortega-Martínez, Idoia; Alonso-Tejerina, Erika; Burgos-Bretones, Juan; Pérez-Yarza, Gorka; Asumendi, Aintzane; Boyano, María D

    2010-07-01

    Histamine has been demonstrated to be involved in cell proliferation, embryonic development, and tumour growth. These various biological effects are mediated through the activation of specific histamine receptors (H1, H2, H3, and H4) that differ in their tissue expression patterns and functions. Although many in vitro and in vivo studies of the modulatory roles of histamine in tumour development and metastasis have been reported, the effect of histamine in the progression of some types of tumours remains controversial; however, recent findings on the role of histamine in the immune system have shed new light on this question. This review focuses on the recent advances in understanding the roles of histamine and its receptors in tumour biology. We report our recent observations of the anti-tumoural effect of H1 histamine antagonists on experimental and human melanomas. We have found that in spite of exogenous histamine stimulated human melanoma cell proliferation, clonogenic ability and migration activity in a dose-dependent manner, the melanoma tumour growth was not modulated by in vivo histamine treatment. On the contrary, terfenadine-treatment in vitro induced melanoma cell death by apoptosis and in vivo terfenadine treatment significantly inhibited tumour growth in murine models. These observations increase our understanding of cancer biology and may inspire novel anticancer therapeutic strategies.

  6. Pharmacology of the inhibitory glycine receptor: agonist and antagonist actions of amino acids and piperidine carboxylic acid compounds.

    PubMed

    Schmieden, V; Betz, H

    1995-11-01

    To define structure-activity relations for ligands binding to the inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR), the agonistic and antagonistic properties of alpha- and beta-amino acids were analyzed at the recombinant human alpha 1 GlyR expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The agonistic activity of alpha-amino acids exhibited a marked stereoselectivity and was highly susceptible to substitutions at the C alpha-atom. In contrast, alpha-amino acid antagonism was not enantiomer dependent and was influenced little by C alpha-atom substitutions. The beta-amino acids taurine, beta-aminobutyric acid (beta-ABA), and beta-aminoisobutyric acid (beta-AIBA) are partial agonists at the GlyR. Low concentrations of these compounds competitively inhibited glycine responses, whereas higher concentrations elicited a significant membrane current. Nipecotic acid, which contains a trans-beta-amino acid configuration, behaved as purely competitive GlyR antagonist. Our data are consistent with the existence of a common binding site for all amino acid agonists and antagonists, at which the functional consequences of binding depend on the particular conformation a given ligand adopts within the binding pocket. In the case of beta-amino acids, the trans conformation appears to mediate antagonistic receptor binding, and the cis conformation appears to mediate agonistic receptor binding. This led us to propose that the partial agonist activity of a given beta-amino acid is determined by the relative mole fractions of the respective cis/trans conformers.

  7. Sexually Antagonistic Selection in Human Male Homosexuality

    PubMed Central

    Camperio Ciani, Andrea; Cermelli, Paolo; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate the existence of genetic factors influencing male homosexuality and bisexuality. In spite of its relatively low frequency, the stable permanence in all human populations of this apparently detrimental trait constitutes a puzzling ‘Darwinian paradox’. Furthermore, several studies have pointed out relevant asymmetries in the distribution of both male homosexuality and of female fecundity in the parental lines of homosexual vs. heterosexual males. A number of hypotheses have attempted to give an evolutionary explanation for the long-standing persistence of this trait, and for its asymmetric distribution in family lines; however a satisfactory understanding of the population genetics of male homosexuality is lacking at present. We perform a systematic mathematical analysis of the propagation and equilibrium of the putative genetic factors for male homosexuality in the population, based on the selection equation for one or two diallelic loci and Bayesian statistics for pedigree investigation. We show that only the two-locus genetic model with at least one locus on the X chromosome, and in which gene expression is sexually antagonistic (increasing female fitness but decreasing male fitness), accounts for all known empirical data. Our results help clarify the basic evolutionary dynamics of male homosexuality, establishing this as a clearly ascertained sexually antagonistic human trait. PMID:18560521

  8. Sexually antagonistic selection in human male homosexuality.

    PubMed

    Camperio Ciani, Andrea; Cermelli, Paolo; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2008-06-18

    Several lines of evidence indicate the existence of genetic factors influencing male homosexuality and bisexuality. In spite of its relatively low frequency, the stable permanence in all human populations of this apparently detrimental trait constitutes a puzzling 'Darwinian paradox'. Furthermore, several studies have pointed out relevant asymmetries in the distribution of both male homosexuality and of female fecundity in the parental lines of homosexual vs. heterosexual males. A number of hypotheses have attempted to give an evolutionary explanation for the long-standing persistence of this trait, and for its asymmetric distribution in family lines; however a satisfactory understanding of the population genetics of male homosexuality is lacking at present. We perform a systematic mathematical analysis of the propagation and equilibrium of the putative genetic factors for male homosexuality in the population, based on the selection equation for one or two diallelic loci and Bayesian statistics for pedigree investigation. We show that only the two-locus genetic model with at least one locus on the X chromosome, and in which gene expression is sexually antagonistic (increasing female fitness but decreasing male fitness), accounts for all known empirical data. Our results help clarify the basic evolutionary dynamics of male homosexuality, establishing this as a clearly ascertained sexually antagonistic human trait.

  9. Activins and activin antagonists in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Deli, Alev; Kreidl, Emanuel; Santifaller, Stefan; Trotter, Barbara; Seir, Katja; Berger, Walter; Schulte-Hermann, Rolf; Rodgarkia-Dara, Chantal; Grusch, Michael

    2008-01-01

    In many parts of the world hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is among the leading causes of cancer-related mortality but the underlying molecular pathology is still insufficiently understood. There is increasing evidence that activins, which are members of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) superfamily of growth and differentiation factors, could play important roles in liver carcinogenesis. Activins are disulphide-linked homo- or heterodimers formed from four different β subunits termed βA, βB, βC, and βE, respectively. Activin A, the dimer of two βA subunits, is critically involved in the regulation of cell growth, apoptosis, and tissue architecture in the liver, while the hepatic function of other activins is largely unexplored so far. Negative regulators of activin signals include antagonists in the extracellular space like the binding proteins follistatin and FLRG, and at the cell membrane antagonistic co-receptors like Cripto or BAMBI. Additionally, in the intracellular space inhibitory Smads can modulate and control activin activity. Accumulating data suggest that deregulation of activin signals contributes to pathologic conditions such as chronic inflammation, fibrosis and development of cancer. The current article reviews the alterations in components of the activin signaling pathway that have been observed in HCC and discusses their potential significance for liver tumorigenesis. PMID:18350601

  10. Hypocretin antagonists in insomnia treatment and beyond.

    PubMed

    Ruoff, Chad; Cao, Michelle; Guilleminault, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Hypocretin neuropeptides have been shown to regulate transitions between wakefulness and sleep through stabilization of sleep promoting GABAergic and wake promoting cholinergic/monoaminergic neural pathways. Hypocretin also influences other physiologic processes such as metabolism, appetite, learning and memory, reward and addiction, and ventilatory drive. The discovery of hypocretin and its effect upon the sleep-wake cycle has led to the development of a new class of pharmacologic agents that antagonize the physiologic effects of hypocretin (i.e. hypocretin antagonists). Further investigation of these agents may lead to novel therapies for insomnia without the side-effect profile of currently available hypnotics (e.g. impaired cognition, confusional arousals, and motor balance difficulties). However, antagonizing a system that regulates the sleep-wake cycle while also influencing non-sleep physiologic processes may create an entirely different but equally concerning side-effect profile such as transient loss of muscle tone (i.e. cataplexy) and a dampened respiratory drive. In this review, we will discuss the discovery of hypocretin and its receptors, hypocretin and the sleep-wake cycle, hypocretin antagonists in the treatment of insomnia, and other implicated functions of the hypocretin system.

  11. BQ-869, a novel NMDA receptor antagonist, protects against excitotoxicity and attenuates cerebral ischemic injury in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Guo; Wu, Fei; Wang, Er-Song

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is one of the three diseases that cause human death in current world, and it is the common, frequently occurring disease in the middle-old ages. NMDA receptors mediate glutamate-induced cell death when intensely or chronically activated, which is an important cause of neuronal cell death after acute injuries. Here, we demonstrated that BQ-869, a potent NMDA receptor antagonist, blocked NMDA receptor in concentration-dependent and dose-dependent manner, attenuated NMDA-induced Ca2+ influx, inhabited NMDAR-mEPSC in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, improved athletic ability of rats with MACO, decreased infarction size in focal cerebral ischemia rats and reduced stroke mortality. Taken together, our data demonstrate the neuroprotective effect of BQ-869 might be through inhibiting NMDA-mediated excitotoxicity. These findings indicate that BQ-869 is the most potent antagonist of NMDA receptors, and provide new insights with potential therapeutic applications for the treatment of stroke. PMID:25973006

  12. The CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 impairs reconsolidation of pavlovian fear memory in the rat basolateral amygdala.

    PubMed

    Ratano, Patrizia; Everitt, Barry J; Milton, Amy L

    2014-10-01

    We have investigated the requirement for signaling at CB1 receptors in the reconsolidation of a previously consolidated auditory fear memory, by infusing the CB1 receptor antagonist AM251, or the FAAH inhibitor URB597, directly into the basolateral amygdala (BLA) in conjunction with memory reactivation. AM251 disrupted memory restabilization, but only when administered after reactivation. URB597 produced a small, transient enhancement of memory restabilization when administered after reactivation. The amnestic effect of AM251 was rescued by coadministration of the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline at reactivation, indicating that the disruption of reconsolidation was mediated by altered GABAergic transmission in the BLA. These data show that the endocannabinoid system in the BLA is an important modulator of fear memory reconsolidation and that its effects on memory are mediated by an interaction with the GABAergic system. Thus, targeting the endocannabinoid system may have therapeutic potential to reduce the impact of maladaptive memories in neuropsychiatric disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder.

  13. 20-Aminosteroids as a novel class of selective and complete androgen receptor antagonists and inhibitors of prostate cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Fousteris, Manolis A; Schubert, Undine; Roell, Daniela; Roediger, Julia; Bailis, Nikolaos; Nikolaropoulos, Sotiris S; Baniahmad, Aria; Giannis, Athanassios

    2010-10-01

    Here, the synthesis and the evaluation of novel 20-aminosteroids on androgen receptor (AR) activity is reported. Compounds 11 and 18 of the series inhibit both the wild type and the T877A mutant AR-mediated transactivation indicating AR antagonistic function. Interestingly, minor structural changes such as stereoisomers of the amino lactame moiety exhibit preferences for antagonism among wild type and mutant AR. Other tested nuclear receptors are only weakly or not affected. In line with this, the prostate cancer cell growth of androgen-dependent but not of cancer cells lacking expression of the AR is inhibited. Further, the expression of the prostate specific antigen used as a diagnostic marker is also repressed. Finally steroid 18 enhances cellular senescence that might explain in part the growth inhibition mediated by this derivative. Steroids 11 and 18 are the first steroids that act as complete AR antagonists and exhibit AR specificity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. BQ-869, a novel NMDA receptor antagonist, protects against excitotoxicity and attenuates cerebral ischemic injury in stroke.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guo; Wu, Fei; Wang, Er-Song

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is one of the three diseases that cause human death in current world, and it is the common, frequently occurring disease in the middle-old ages. NMDA receptors mediate glutamate-induced cell death when intensely or chronically activated, which is an important cause of neuronal cell death after acute injuries. Here, we demonstrated that BQ-869, a potent NMDA receptor antagonist, blocked NMDA receptor in concentration-dependent and dose-dependent manner, attenuated NMDA-induced Ca(2+) influx, inhabited NMDAR-mEPSC in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, improved athletic ability of rats with MACO, decreased infarction size in focal cerebral ischemia rats and reduced stroke mortality. Taken together, our data demonstrate the neuroprotective effect of BQ-869 might be through inhibiting NMDA-mediated excitotoxicity. These findings indicate that BQ-869 is the most potent antagonist of NMDA receptors, and provide new insights with potential therapeutic applications for the treatment of stroke.

  15. Downstream Regulatory Element Antagonist Modulator (DREAM), a target for anti-thrombotic agents.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jaehyung

    2017-03-01

    Circulating platelets participate in the process of numerous diseases including thrombosis, inflammation, and cancer. Thus, it is of great importance to understand the underlying mechanisms mediating platelet activation under disease conditions. Emerging evidence indicates that despite the lack of a nucleus, platelets possess molecules that are involved in gene transcription in nucleated cells. This review will summarize downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a transcriptional repressor, and highlight recent findings suggesting its novel non-transcriptional role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Inhibition of Morphine Tolerance and Dependence by the NMDA Receptor Antagonist MK-801

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Keith A.; Akil, Huda

    1991-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of the glutamate receptor is an important mediator of several forms of neural and behavioral plasticity. The present studies examined whether NMDA receptors might be involved in the development of opiate tolerance and dependence, two examples of behavioral plasticity. The noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 attenuated the development of tolerance to the analgesic effect of morphine without affecting acute morphine analgesia. In addition, MK-801 attenuated the development of morphine dependence as assessed by naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. These results suggest that NMDA receptors may be important in the development of opiate tolerance and dependence.

  17. 2′,3′-cAMP, 3′-AMP, and 2′-AMP inhibit human aortic and coronary vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation via A2B receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jin; Gillespie, Delbert G.

    2011-01-01

    Rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from renal microvessels metabolize 2′,3′-cAMP to 2′-AMP and 3′-AMP, and these AMPs are converted to adenosine that inhibits microvascular VSMC proliferation via A2B receptors. The goal of this study was to test whether this mechanism also exists in VSMCs from conduit arteries and whether it is similarly expressed in human vs. rat VSMCs. Incubation of rat and human aortic VSMCs with 2′,3′-cAMP concentration-dependently increased levels of 2′-AMP and 3′-AMP in the medium, with a similar absolute increase in 2′-AMP vs. 3′-AMP. In contrast, in human coronary VSMCs, 2′,3′-cAMP increased 2′-AMP levels yet had little effect on 3′-AMP levels. In all cell types, 2′,3′-cAMP increased levels of adenosine, but not 5′-AMP, and 2′,3′-AMP inhibited cell proliferation. Antagonism of A2B receptors (MRS-1754), but not A1 (1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine), A2A (SCH-58261), or A3 (VUF-5574) receptors, attenuated the antiproliferative effects of 2′,3′-cAMP. In all cell types, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, and 5′-AMP increased adenosine levels, and inhibition of ecto-5′-nucleotidase blocked this effect of 5′-AMP but not that of 2′-AMP nor 3′-AMP. Also, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, and 5′-AMP, like 2′,3′-cAMP, exerted antiproliferative effects that were abolished by antagonism of A2B receptors with MRS-1754. In conclusion, VSMCs from conduit arteries metabolize 2′,3′-cAMP to AMPs, which are metabolized to adenosine. In rat and human aortic VSMCs, both 2′-AMP and 3′-AMP are involved in this process, whereas, in human coronary VSMCs, 2′,3′-cAMP is mainly converted to 2′-AMP. Because adenosine inhibits VSMC proliferation via A2B receptors, local vascular production of 2′,3′-cAMP may protect conduit arteries from atherosclerosis. PMID:21622827

  18. Microbiome-Derived Tryptophan Metabolites and Their Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Dependent Agonist and Antagonist Activities

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Un-Ho; Lee, Syng-Ook; Sridharan, Gautham; Lee, Kyongbum; Davidson, Laurie A.; Jayaraman, Arul; Chapkin, Robert S.; Alaniz, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The tryptophan metabolites indole, indole-3-acetate, and tryptamine were identified in mouse cecal extracts and fecal pellets by mass spectrometry. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) agonist and antagonist activities of these microbiota-derived compounds were investigated in CaCo-2 intestinal cells as a model for understanding their interactions with colonic tissue, which is highly aryl hydrocarbon (Ah)–responsive. Activation of Ah-responsive genes demonstrated that tryptamine and indole 3-acetate were AHR agonists, whereas indole was an AHR antagonist that inhibited TCDD (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin)–induced CYP1A1 expression. In contrast, the tryptophan metabolites exhibited minimal anti-inflammatory activities, whereas TCDD decreased phorbol ester-induced CXCR4 [chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4] gene expression, and this response was AHR dependent. These results demonstrate that the tryptophan metabolites indole, tryptamine, and indole-3-acetate modulate AHR-mediated responses in CaCo-2 cells, and concentrations of indole that exhibit AHR antagonist activity (100–250 μM) are detected in the intestinal microbiome. PMID:24563545

  19. Evidence against the unitary hypothesis of agonist and antagonist action at presynaptic adrenoceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Kalsner, S.

    1982-01-01

    1 The concept that presynaptic receptors regulate noradrenergic transmitter release via a system of inhibitory receptors mediating negative feedback relies on a supposed association between increases in stimulation-induced efflux of [3H]-noradrenaline by antagonists and blockade by them of the inhibitory effects of exogenous noradrenaline. 2 It was shown in guinea-pig ureter, that yohimbine (3 X 10(-7)M), a presumed selective presynaptic antagonist, increased transmitter efflux substantially at 1 Hz and 5 Hz with 100 pulses, purportedly representing antagonism of the inhibitory effect of locally released noradrenaline but did not reduce the inhibitory effect of exogenous noradrenaline (1.8 X 10(-6)M or 1.8 X 10(-7)M) except in one case. 3 Additionally, the inhibitory effect of oxymetazoline (1.0 X 10(-7)M or 1.0 X 10(-8)M) on stimulation-induced efflux was in no way antagonized by yohimbine (3 X 10(-7)M). 4 It is concluded that the increased efflux of [3H]-noradrenaline produced by antagonists and the decreased efflux produced by exogenous agonists may represent actions at different loci and that the hypothesis of presynaptic feedback regulatory sites is still not substantiated. PMID:6128040

  20. Discovery of Highly Potent Dual Orexin Receptor Antagonists via a Scaffold-Hopping Approach.

    PubMed

    Heidmann, Bibia; Gatfield, John; Roch, Catherine; Treiber, Alexander; Tortoioli, Simone; Brotschi, Christine; Williams, Jodi T; Bolli, Martin H; Abele, Stefan; Sifferlen, Thierry; Jenck, François; Boss, Christoph

    2016-10-06

    Starting from suvorexant (trade name Belsomra), we successfully identified interesting templates leading to potent dual orexin receptor antagonists (DORAs) via a scaffold-hopping approach. Structure-activity relationship optimization allowed us not only to improve the antagonistic potency on both orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptors (Ox1 and Ox2, respectively), but also to increase metabolic stability in human liver microsomes (HLM), decrease time-dependent inhibition of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4, and decrease P-glycoprotein (Pgp)-mediated efflux. Compound 80 c [{(1S,6R)-3-(6,7-difluoroquinoxalin-2-yl)-3,8-diazabicyclo[4.2.0]octan-8-yl}(4-methyl-[1,1'-biphenyl]-2-yl)methanone] is a potent and selective DORA that inhibits the stimulating effects of orexin peptides OXA and OXB at both Ox1 and Ox2. In calcium-release assays, 80 c was found to exhibit an insurmountable antagonistic profile at both Ox1 and Ox2, while displaying a sleep-promoting effect in rat and dog models, similar to that of the benchmark compound suvorexant. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Mutually-antagonistic interactions in baseball networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saavedra, Serguei; Powers, Scott; McCotter, Trent; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.

    2010-03-01

    We formulate the head-to-head matchups between Major League Baseball pitchers and batters from 1954 to 2008 as a bipartite network of mutually-antagonistic interactions. We consider both the full network and single-season networks, which exhibit structural changes over time. We find interesting structure in the networks and examine their sensitivity to baseball’s rule changes. We then study a biased random walk on the matchup networks as a simple and transparent way to (1) compare the performance of players who competed under different conditions and (2) include information about which particular players a given player has faced. We find that a player’s position in the network does not correlate with his placement in the random walker ranking. However, network position does have a substantial effect on the robustness of ranking placement to changes in head-to-head matchups.

  2. Antagonistic and Bargaining Games in Optimal Marketing Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipovetsky, S.

    2007-01-01

    Game theory approaches to find optimal marketing decisions are considered. Antagonistic games with and without complete information, and non-antagonistic games techniques are applied to paired comparison, ranking, or rating data for a firm and its competitors in the market. Mix strategy, equilibrium in bi-matrix games, bargaining models with…

  3. Third Generation Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists; Why We Need a Fourth

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Sanchez, Elise

    2015-01-01

    The first mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist, spironolactone, was developed almost 60 years ago to treat primary aldosteronism and pathological edema. Its use waned in part due to its lack of selectivity. Subsequently knowledge of the scope of MR function was expanded along with clinical evidence of the therapeutic importance of MR antagonists to prevent the ravages of inappropriate MR activation. Forty-two years elapsed between the first and MR-selective second generation of MR antagonists. Fifteen years later, despite serious shortcomings of the existing antagonists, a third generation antagonist has yet to be marketed. Progress has been slowed by the lack of appreciation of the large variety of cell types that express the MR and its diverse cell-type-specific actions, as well as its uniquely complex interactions actions at the molecular level. New MR antagonists should preferentially target the inflammatory and fibrotic effects of MR and perhaps its excitatory effects on sympathetic nervous system, but not the renal tubular epithelium or neurons of the cortex and hippocampus. This review briefly describes efforts to develop a third generation MR antagonist and why fourth generation antagonists and selective agonists based on structural determinants of tissue and ligand-specific MR activation should be contemplated. PMID:26466326

  4. Identification and determination of selected histamine antagonists by densitometric method.

    PubMed

    Czerwińska, Krystyna; Wyszomirska, Elzbieta; Mazurek, Aleksander P

    2013-01-01

    The conditions for identification were determined for four histamine antagonists: clemastine fumarate, loratadine, cetirizine dihydrochloride and desloratadine by TLC (thin-layer chromatography) method. The selected chromatographic conditions were used to develop a densitometric method for the content determination of the histamine antagonists in medicinal products and substances. The statistical data showed adequate accuracy and precision of the developed methods.

  5. Interaction between Antagonist of Cannabinoid Receptor and Antagonist of Adrenergic Receptor on Anxiety in Male Rat.

    PubMed

    Komaki, Alireza; Abdollahzadeh, Fatemeh; Sarihi, Abdolrahman; Shahidi, Siamak; Salehi, Iraj

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety is among the most common and treatable mental disorders. Adrenergic and cannabinoid systems have an important role in the neurobiology of anxiety. The elevated plus-maze (EPM) has broadly been used to investigate anxiolytic and anxiogenic compounds. The present study investigated the effects of intraperitoneal (IP) injection of cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist (AM251) in the presence of alpha-1 adrenergic antagonist (Prazosin) on rat behavior in the EPM. In this study, the data were obtained from male Wistar rat, which weighing 200- 250 g. Animal behavior in EPM were videotaped and saved in computer for 10 min after IP injection of saline, AM251 (0.3 mg/kg), Prazosin (0.3 mg/kg) and AM251 + Prazosin, subsequently scored for conventional indices of anxiety. During the test period, the number of open and closed arms entries, the percentage of entries into the open arms of the EPM, and the spent time in open and closed arms were recorded. Diazepam was considered as a positive control drug with anxiolytic effect (0.3, 0.6, 1.2 mg/kg). Diazepam increased the number of open arm entries and the percentage of spent time on the open arms. IP injection of AM251 before EPM trial decreased open arms exploration and open arm entry. Whereas, Prazosin increased open arms exploration and open arm entry. This study showed that both substances in simultaneous injection have conflicting effects on the responses of each of these two compounds in a single injection. Injection of CB1 receptor antagonist may have an anxiogenic profile in rat, whereas adrenergic antagonist has an anxiolytic effect. Further investigations are essential for better understanding of anxiolytic and anxiogenic properties and neurobiological mechanisms of action and probable interactions of the two systems.

  6. MiR-218-5p inhibits the stem cell properties and invasive ability of the A2B5⁺CD133⁻ subgroup of human glioma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhiwu; Han, Yong; Li, Yanyan; Li, Xuetao; Sun, Ting; Chen, Guilin; Huang, Yulun; Zhou, Youxin; Du, Ziwei

    2016-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) act as oncogenes or tumor-suppressor genes, and regulate the proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, differentiation, angiogenesis and behavior of glioma stem cells, which are important in glioma development and recurrence. The present study was performed to investigate the impact of miR-218-5p on stem cell properties and invasive ability of the A2B5+CD133- human glioma stem cell subgroup. qRT-PCR was used to detect miR-218-5p expression in non-cancerous brain and human glioma tissues, human glioma cell lines and human glioma stem cell lines. Lentivirus vectors encoding miR-218-5p and anti-miR-218-5p were constructed and stably transfected into A2B5+CD133- SHG-139s cells. Neurosphere formation Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) and Transwell assays, immunofluorescence and qRT-PCR analyses were used to explore the role of miR-218-5p in SHG-139s cells. qRT-PCR analysis showed that miR-218-5p expression was lower in human glioma tissues and cells than in non-cancerous brain tissues and normal human astrocyte cells, and lower in A2B5+CD133- (SHG-139s) cells than in CD133+ (SU2 and U87s) cells. The CCK-8 assay demonstrated that the growth curve was significantly inhibited in the miR-218-5p-SHG-139s cells compared to the miR-control, blank and anti-miR‑218-5p groups. The neurosphere formation assay indicated that upregulation of miR‑218-5p expression inhibited SHG-139s neurosphere formation. Immunofluorescence staining and qRT-PCR showed that miR-218-5p reduced stem cell marker (A2B5, nestin, PLAGL2, ALDH1 and Sox2) expression compared with the controls; however, immunofluorescence staining analysis showed that upregulation of miR-218-5p expression led to no difference in CD133 expression. miR‑218-5p reduced SHG-139s cell invasiveness in the Transwell assay and reduced MMP9 expression as detected in qRT-PCR and immunofluorescence analyses. All differences were statistically significant. miR-218-5p expression was lower in human glioma tissues, cells and the A2

  7. Characterization of protoberberine analogs employed as novel human P2X{sub 7} receptor antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ga Eun; Lee, Won-Gil; Lee, Song-Yi

    2011-04-15

    The P2X{sub 7} receptor (P2X{sub 7}R), a member of the ATP-gated ion channel family, is regarded as a promising target for therapy of immune-related diseases including rheumatoid arthritis and chronic pain. A group of novel protoberberine analogs (compounds 3-5), discovered by screening of chemical libraries, was here investigated with respect to their function as P2X{sub 7}R antagonists. Compounds 3-5 non-competitively inhibited BzATP-induced ethidium ion influx into hP2X{sub 7}-expressing HEK293 cells, with IC{sub 50} values of 100-300 nM. This antagonistic action on the channel further confirmed that both BzATP-induced inward currents and Ca{sup 2+} influx were strongly inhibited by compounds 3-5more » in patch-clamp and Ca{sup 2+} influx assays. The antagonists also effectively suppressed downstream signaling of P2X{sub 7} receptors including IL-1{beta} release and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 proteins in hP2X{sub 7}-expressing HEK293 cells or in differentiated human monocytes (THP-1 cells). Moreover, IL-2 secretion from CD3/CD28-stimulated Jurkat T cell was also dramatically inhibited by the antagonist. These results imply that novel protoberberine analogs may modulate P2X{sub 7} receptor-mediated immune responses by allosteric inhibition of the receptor. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted« less

  8. 2-n-Butyl-9-methyl-8-[1,2,3]triazol-2-yl-9H-purin-6-ylamine and analogues as A2A adenosine receptor antagonists. Design, synthesis, and pharmacological characterization.

    PubMed

    Minetti, Patrizia; Tinti, Maria Ornella; Carminati, Paolo; Castorina, Massimo; Di Cesare, Maria Assunta; Di Serio, Stefano; Gallo, Grazia; Ghirardi, Orlando; Giorgi, Fabrizio; Giorgi, Luca; Piersanti, Giovanni; Bartoccini, Francesca; Tarzia, Giorgio

    2005-11-03

    Two types of adenosine receptor ligands were designed, i.e., 9H-purine and 1H-imidazo[4,5-c]pyridines, to obtain selective A(2A) antagonists, and we report here their synthesis and binding affinities for the four adenosine receptor subtypes A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3). The design was carried out on the basis of the molecular modeling of a number of potent adenosine receptor antagonists described in the literature. Three compounds (25b-d) showed an interesting affinity and selectivity for the A(2A) subtype. One of them, i.e., ST1535 (2-n-butyl-9-methyl-8-[1,2,3]triazol-2-yl-9H-purin-6-ylamine, 25b) (K(i) A(2A) = 6.6 nM, K(i) A(1)/A(2A) = 12; K(i) A(2B)/A(2A) = 58; K(i) A(3)/A(2A) > 160), was selected for in vivo study and shown to induce a dose-related increase in locomotor activity, suggestive of an A(2A) antagonist type of activity.

  9. Functionalized Congeners of Tyrosine-Based P2X7 Receptor Antagonists: Probing Multiple Sites for Linking and Dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wangzhong; Ravi, R. Gnana; Kertesy, Sylvia B.; Dubyak, George R.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2017-01-01

    Chemically funtionalized analogues of antagonists of the P2X7 receptor, an ATP-gated cation channel, were synthesized as tools for biophysical studies of the receptor. These functionalized congeners were intended for use in chemical conjugation with retention of biological potency. The antagonists were L-tyrosine derivatives, related to [N-benzyloxycarbonyl-O-(4-arylsulfonyl)-L-tyrosyl]benzoylpiperazine (such as MRS2409, 2). The analogues were demonstrated to be antagonists in an assay of human P2X7 receptor function, consisting of inhibition of ATP-induced K+ efflux in HEK293 cells expressing the recombinant receptor. The analogues were of the general structure R1-Tyr(OR2)-piperazinyl-R3, in which three positions (R1–R3) were systematically varied in structure through introduction of chemically reactive groups. Each of the three positions was designed to incorporate a 3- or 4-nitrophenyl group. The nitro groups were reduced using NaBH4–copper(II) acetylacetonate to amines, which were either converted to the isothiocyanate groups, as potential affinity labels for the receptor, or acylated, as models for conjugation. An alternate route to Nα-3-aminobenzyloxycarbonyl functionalization was devised. The various positions of functionalization were compared for effects on biological potency, and the R2 and R3 positions were found to be most amenable to derivatization with retention of high potency. Four dimeric permutations of the antagonists were synthesized by coupling each of the isothiocyanate derivatives to either the precursor amine or to other amine congeners. Only dimers linked at the R2-position were potent antagonists. In concentration–response studies, two derivatives, a 3-nitrobenzyloxycarbonyl derivative 18 and a 4-nitrotoluenesulfonate 26b, displayed IC50 values of roughly 100 nM as antagonists of P2X7 receptor-mediated K+ flux. PMID:12236792

  10. Prostanoid receptor antagonists: development strategies and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Jones, RL; Giembycz, MA; Woodward, DF

    2009-01-01

    Identification of the primary products of cyclo-oxygenase (COX)/prostaglandin synthase(s), which occurred between 1958 and 1976, was followed by a classification system for prostanoid receptors (DP, EP1, EP2 …) based mainly on the pharmacological actions of natural and synthetic agonists and a few antagonists. The design of potent selective antagonists was rapid for certain prostanoid receptors (EP1, TP), slow for others (FP, IP) and has yet to be achieved in certain cases (EP2). While some antagonists are structurally related to the natural agonist, most recent compounds are ‘non-prostanoid’ (often acyl-sulphonamides) and have emerged from high-throughput screening of compound libraries, made possible by the development of (functional) assays involving single recombinant prostanoid receptors. Selective antagonists have been crucial to defining the roles of PGD2 (acting on DP1 and DP2 receptors) and PGE2 (on EP1 and EP4 receptors) in various inflammatory conditions; there are clear opportunities for therapeutic intervention. The vast endeavour on TP (thromboxane) antagonists is considered in relation to their limited pharmaceutical success in the cardiovascular area. Correspondingly, the clinical utility of IP (prostacyclin) antagonists is assessed in relation to the cloud hanging over the long-term safety of selective COX-2 inhibitors. Aspirin apart, COX inhibitors broadly suppress all prostanoid pathways, while high selectivity has been a major goal in receptor antagonist development; more targeted therapy may require an intermediate position with defined antagonist selectivity profiles. This review is intended to provide overviews of each antagonist class (including prostamide antagonists), covering major development strategies and current and potential clinical usage. PMID:19624532

  11. In vitro pharmacological characterization of vorapaxar, a novel platelet thrombin receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Hawes, Brian E; Zhai, Ying; Hesk, David; Wirth, Mark; Wei, Huijun; Chintala, Madhu; Seiffert, Dietmar

    2015-09-05

    Vorapaxar is a novel protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) antagonist recently approved for the reduction of thrombotic cardiovascular events in patients with a history of myocardial infarction or with peripheral arterial disease. The present study provides a comprehensive in vitro pharmacological characterization of vorapaxar interaction with the PAR1 receptor on human platelets. Similar studies were performed with a metabolite of vorapaxar (M20). Vorapaxar and M20 were competitive PAR1 antagonists that demonstrated concentration-dependent, saturable, specific, and slowly reversible binding to the receptor present on intact human platelets. The affinities of vorapaxar and M20 for the PAR1 receptor were in the low nanomolar range, as determined by saturation-, kinetic- and competitive binding studies. The calculated Kd and Ki values for vorapaxar increased in the presence of plasma, indicating a decrease in the free fraction available for binding to the PAR1 receptor on human platelets. Vorapaxar was also evaluated in functional assays using thrombin or a PAR1 agonist peptide (SFLLRN). Vorapaxar and M20 completely blocked thrombin-stimulated PAR1/β-arrestin association in recombinant cells and abolished thrombin-stimulated calcium influx in washed human platelets and vascular smooth muscle cells. Moreover, vorapaxar and M20 inhibited PAR1 agonist peptide-mediated platelet aggregation in human platelet rich plasma with a steep concentration response relationship. Vorapaxar exhibited high selectivity for inhibition of PAR1 over other platelet GPCRs. In conclusion, vorapaxar is a potent PAR1 antagonist exhibiting saturable, reversible, selective binding with slow off-rate kinetics and effectively inhibits thrombin's PAR1-mediated actions on human platelets. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The effect of topical application of the platelet-activating factor-antagonist, Ro 24-0238, in psoriasis vulgaris--a clinical and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Elbers, M E; Gerritsen, M J; van de Kerkhof, P C

    1994-11-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is considered to be one of the most potent lipid mediators in allergic and inflammatory reactions. Suggestions that PAF is produced by cutaneous cells, and cells infiltrating the skin from the blood, have been reported. PAF has been identified in allergic cutaneous reactions and also in psoriatic lesions. The biological activity of PAF is thought to be mediated by cell membrane receptors. Studies revealed that PAF-antagonists can be active in animal models of cutaneous inflammation. In humans PAF-antagonists showed minimal therapeutic improvement in studies of antigen-induced cutaneous responses in atopic subjects. No data are available on the effects of PAF-antagonists in psoriasis. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a potent PAF-antagonist (Ro 24-0238, 10% solution in diethylene glycol monoethyl ether) in 10 patients with chronic plaque psoriasis, a placebo-controlled double-blind study. Clinical response was evaluated and markers of inflammation, differentiation and proliferation were studied immunohistochemically on punch biopsies taken from actively treated and placebo-treated lesions, before and after treatment. This study demonstrated that a 10% solution of the PAF-antagonist Ro 24-0238 was not effective at the clinical or cell biological level after a 4-week treatment period. The most likely explanation for these negative observations is that PAF is not a significant factor in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  13. The indirect NMDAR antagonist acamprosate induces postischemic neurologic recovery associated with sustained neuroprotection and neuroregeneration.

    PubMed

    Doeppner, Thorsten R; Pehlke, Jens R; Kaltwasser, Britta; Schlechter, Jana; Kilic, Ertugrul; Bähr, Mathias; Hermann, Dirk M

    2015-12-01

    Cerebral ischemia stimulates N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) resulting in increased calcium concentration and excitotoxicity. Yet, deactivation of NMDAR failed in clinical studies due to poor preclinical study designs or toxicity of NMDAR antagonists. Acamprosate is an indirect NMDAR antagonist used for patients with chronic alcohol dependence. We herein analyzed the therapeutic potential of acamprosate on brain injury, neurologic recovery and their underlying mechanisms. Mice were exposed to cerebral ischemia, treated with intraperitoneal injections of acamprosate or saline (controls), and allowed to survive until 3 months. Acamprosate yielded sustained neuroprotection and increased neurologic recovery when given no later than 12 hours after stroke. The latter was associated with increased postischemic angioneurogenesis, albeit acamprosate did not stimulate angioneurogenesis itself. Rather, increased angioneurogenesis was due to inhibition of calpain-mediated pro-injurious signaling cascades. As such, acamprosate-mediated reduction of calpain activity resulted in decreased degradation of p35, increased abundance of the pro-survival factor STAT6, and reduced N-terminal-Jun-kinase activation. Inhibition of calpain was associated with enhanced stability of the blood-brain barrier, reduction of oxidative stress and cerebral leukocyte infiltration. Taken into account its excellent tolerability, its sustained effects on neurologic recovery, brain tissue survival, and neural remodeling, acamprosate is an intriguing candidate for adjuvant future stroke treatment.

  14. The indirect NMDAR antagonist acamprosate induces postischemic neurologic recovery associated with sustained neuroprotection and neuroregeneration

    PubMed Central

    Doeppner, Thorsten R; Pehlke, Jens R; Kaltwasser, Britta; Schlechter, Jana; Kilic, Ertugrul; Bähr, Mathias; Hermann, Dirk M

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia stimulates N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) resulting in increased calcium concentration and excitotoxicity. Yet, deactivation of NMDAR failed in clinical studies due to poor preclinical study designs or toxicity of NMDAR antagonists. Acamprosate is an indirect NMDAR antagonist used for patients with chronic alcohol dependence. We herein analyzed the therapeutic potential of acamprosate on brain injury, neurologic recovery and their underlying mechanisms. Mice were exposed to cerebral ischemia, treated with intraperitoneal injections of acamprosate or saline (controls), and allowed to survive until 3 months. Acamprosate yielded sustained neuroprotection and increased neurologic recovery when given no later than 12 hours after stroke. The latter was associated with increased postischemic angioneurogenesis, albeit acamprosate did not stimulate angioneurogenesis itself. Rather, increased angioneurogenesis was due to inhibition of calpain-mediated pro-injurious signaling cascades. As such, acamprosate-mediated reduction of calpain activity resulted in decreased degradation of p35, increased abundance of the pro-survival factor STAT6, and reduced N-terminal-Jun-kinase activation. Inhibition of calpain was associated with enhanced stability of the blood–brain barrier, reduction of oxidative stress and cerebral leukocyte infiltration. Taken into account its excellent tolerability, its sustained effects on neurologic recovery, brain tissue survival, and neural remodeling, acamprosate is an intriguing candidate for adjuvant future stroke treatment. PMID:26219600

  15. Involvement of serotonergic system in the effect of a metabotropic glutamate 5 receptor antagonist in the novelty-suppressed feeding test.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Kenichi; Chaki, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    The blockade of metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu5) receptor has been reported to exert antidepressant effects in several animal models. We previously reported that both ketamine and an mGlu5 receptor antagonist exerted an effect in a novelty-suppressed feeding (NSF) test, and that the effect of ketamine may be mediated through an α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptor-dependent increase in serotonergic transmission. However, the involvement of the serotonergic system in the effect of mGlu5 receptor antagonists in the NSF test is not well understood. Therefore, we examined the roles of the serotonergic system in the effect of an mGlu5 receptor antagonist, 6-methyl-2-(phenylethynyl)pyridine hydrochloride (MPEP), in the NSF test in mice. The administration of MPEP significantly shortened the latency to feed, which was not attenuated by the AMPA receptor antagonist, 2,3-dioxo-6-nitro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrobenzo[f]quinoxaline-7-sulfonamide (NBQX). The effect of MPEP was abolished by the tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor, para-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA). Moreover, the effect of MPEP was blocked by a serotonin (5-HT)2A/2C receptor antagonist, ritanserin, but not by a 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, N-{2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl}-N-(2-pyridynyl) cyclohexane-carboxamide (WAY100635). These results suggest that the effect of an mGlu5 receptor antagonist may be mediated by the serotonergic system, including the stimulation of the 5-HT2A/2C receptor, in an AMPA receptor-independent manner in the NSF test. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Pharmacological Society. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Using caffeine and other adenosine receptor antagonists and agonists as therapeutic tools against neurodegenerative diseases: a review.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Oliver, Marla; Díaz-Ríos, Manuel

    2014-04-17

    Caffeine is the most consumed pychostimulant in the world, and it is known to affect basic and fundamental human processes such as sleep, arousal, cognition and learning and memory. It works as a nonselective blocker of adenosine receptors (A1, A2a, A2b and A3) and has been related to the regulation of heart rate, the contraction/relaxation of cardiac and smooth muscles, and the neural signaling in the central nervous system (CNS). Since the late 1990s, studies using adenosine receptor antagonists, such as Caffeine, to block the A1 and A2a adenosine receptor subtypes have shown to reduce the physical, cellular and molecular damages caused by a spinal cord injury (SCI) or a stroke (cerebral infarction) and by other neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Interestingly, other studies using adenosine receptor agonists have also shown to provide a neuroprotective effect on various models of neurodegenerative diseases through the reduction of excitatory neurotransmitter release, apoptosis and inflammatory responses, among others. The seemingly paradoxical use of both adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists as neuroprotective agents has been attributed to differences in dosage levels, drug delivery method, extracellular concentration of excitatory neurotransmitters and stage of disease progression. We discuss and compare recent findings using both antagonists and agonists of adenosine receptors in animal models and patients that have suffered spinal cord injuries, brain strokes, and Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Additionally, we propose alternative interpretations on the seemingly paradoxical use of these drugs as potential pharmacological tools to treat these various types of neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Icatibant, a new bradykinin-receptor antagonist, in hereditary angioedema.

    PubMed

    Cicardi, Marco; Banerji, Aleena; Bracho, Francisco; Malbrán, Alejandro; Rosenkranz, Bernd; Riedl, Marc; Bork, Konrad; Lumry, William; Aberer, Werner; Bier, Henning; Bas, Murat; Greve, Jens; Hoffmann, Thomas K; Farkas, Henriette; Reshef, Avner; Ritchie, Bruce; Yang, William; Grabbe, Jürgen; Kivity, Shmuel; Kreuz, Wolfhart; Levy, Robyn J; Luger, Thomas; Obtulowicz, Krystyna; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Bull, Christian; Sitkauskiene, Brigita; Smith, William B; Toubi, Elias; Werner, Sonja; Anné, Suresh; Björkander, Janne; Bouillet, Laurence; Cillari, Enrico; Hurewitz, David; Jacobson, Kraig W; Katelaris, Constance H; Maurer, Marcus; Merk, Hans; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Feighery, Conleth; Floccard, Bernard; Gleich, Gerald; Hébert, Jacques; Kaatz, Martin; Keith, Paul; Kirkpatrick, Charles H; Langton, David; Martin, Ludovic; Pichler, Christiane; Resnick, David; Wombolt, Duane; Fernández Romero, Diego S; Zanichelli, Andrea; Arcoleo, Francesco; Knolle, Jochen; Kravec, Irina; Dong, Liying; Zimmermann, Jens; Rosen, Kimberly; Fan, Wing-Tze

    2010-08-05

    Hereditary angioedema is characterized by recurrent attacks of angioedema of the skin, larynx, and gastrointestinal tract. Bradykinin is the key mediator of symptoms. Icatibant is a selective bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist. In two double-blind, randomized, multicenter trials, we evaluated the effect of icatibant in patients with hereditary angioedema presenting with cutaneous or abdominal attacks. In the For Angioedema Subcutaneous Treatment (FAST) 1 trial, patients received either icatibant or placebo; in FAST-2, patients received either icatibant or oral tranexamic acid, at a dose of 3 g daily for 2 days. Icatibant was given once, subcutaneously, at a dose of 30 mg. The primary end point was the median time to clinically significant relief of symptoms. A total of 56 and 74 patients underwent randomization in the FAST-1 and FAST-2 trials, respectively. The primary end point was reached in 2.5 hours with icatibant versus 4.6 hours with placebo in the FAST-1 trial (P=0.14) and in 2.0 hours with icatibant versus 12.0 hours with tranexamic acid in the FAST-2 trial (P<0.001). In the FAST-1 study, 3 recipients of icatibant and 13 recipients of placebo needed treatment with rescue medication. The median time to first improvement of symptoms, as assessed by patients and by investigators, was significantly shorter with icatibant in both trials. No icatibant-related serious adverse events were reported. In patients with hereditary angioedema having acute attacks, we found a significant benefit of icatibant as compared with tranexamic acid in one trial and a nonsignificant benefit of icatibant as compared with placebo in the other trial with regard to the primary end point. The early use of rescue medication may have obscured the benefit of icatibant in the placebo trial. (Funded by Jerini; ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT00097695 and NCT00500656.)

  18. Icatibant, a New Bradykinin-Receptor Antagonist, in Hereditary Angioedema

    PubMed Central

    Cicardi, M.; Banerji, A.; Bracho, F.; Malbrán, A.; Rosenkranz, B.; Riedl, M.; Bork, K.; Lumry, W.; Aberer, W.; Bier, H.; Bas, M.; Greve, J.; Hoffmann, T.K.; Farkas, H.; Reshef, A.; Ritchie, B.; Yang, W.; Grabbe, J.; Kivity, S.; Kreuz, W.; Levy, R.J.; Luger, T.; Obtulowicz, K.; Schmid-Grendelmeier, P.; Bull, C.; Sitkauskiene, B.; Smith, W.B.; Toubi, E.; Werner, S.; Anné, S.; Björkander, J.; Bouillet, L.; Cillari, E.; Hurewitz, D.; Jacobson, K.W.; Katelaris, C.H.; Maurer, M.; Merk, H.; Bernstein, J.A.; Feighery, C.; Floccard, B.; Gleich, G.; Hébert, J.; Kaatz, M.; Keith, P.; Kirkpatrick, C.H.; Langton, D.; Martin, L.; Pichler, C.; Resnick, D.; Wombolt, D.; Fernández Romero, D.S.; Zanichelli, A.; Arcoleo, F.; Knolle, J.; Kravec, I.; Dong, L.; Zimmermann, J.; Rosen, K.; Fan, W.-T.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hereditary angioedema is characterized by recurrent attacks of angioedema of the skin, larynx, and gastrointestinal tract. Bradykinin is the key mediator of symptoms. Icatibant is a selective bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist. METHODS In two double-blind, randomized, multicenter trials, we evaluated the effect of icatibant in patients with hereditary angioedema presenting with cutaneous or abdominal attacks. In the For Angioedema Subcutaneous Treatment (FAST) 1 trial, patients received either icatibant or placebo; in FAST-2, patients received either icatibant or oral tranexamic acid, at a dose of 3 g daily for 2 days. Icatibant was given once, subcutaneously, at a dose of 30 mg. The primary end point was the median time to clinically significant relief of symptoms. RESULTS A total of 56 and 74 patients underwent randomization in the FAST-1 and FAST-2 trials, respectively. The primary end point was reached in 2.5 hours with icatibant versus 4.6 hours with placebo in the FAST-1 trial (P = 0.14) and in 2.0 hours with icatibant versus 12.0 hours with tranexamic acid in the FAST-2 trial (P<0.001). In the FAST-1 study, 3 recipients of icatibant and 13 recipients of placebo needed treatment with rescue medication. The median time to first improvement of symptoms, as assessed by patients and by investigators, was significantly shorter with icatibant in both trials. No icatibant-related serious adverse events were reported. CONCLUSIONS In patients with hereditary angioedema having acute attacks, we found a significant benefit of icatibant as compared with tranexamic acid in one trial and a nonsignificant benefit of icatibant as compared with placebo in the other trial with regard to the primary end point. The early use of rescue medication may have obscured the benefit of icatibant in the placebo trial. (Funded by Jerini; ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT00097695 and NCT00500656.) PMID:20818888

  19. Antagonistic neural networks underlying differentiated leadership roles.

    PubMed

    Boyatzis, Richard E; Rochford, Kylie; Jack, Anthony I

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of two distinct leadership roles, the task leader and the socio-emotional leader, has been documented in the leadership literature since the 1950s. Recent research in neuroscience suggests that the division between task-oriented and socio-emotional-oriented roles derives from a fundamental feature of our neurobiology: an antagonistic relationship between two large-scale cortical networks - the task-positive network (TPN) and the default mode network (DMN). Neural activity in TPN tends to inhibit activity in the DMN, and vice versa. The TPN is important for problem solving, focusing of attention, making decisions, and control of action. The DMN plays a central role in emotional self-awareness, social cognition, and ethical decision making. It is also strongly linked to creativity and openness to new ideas. Because activation of the TPN tends to suppress activity in the DMN, an over-emphasis on task-oriented leadership may prove deleterious to social and emotional aspects of leadership. Similarly, an overemphasis on the DMN would result in difficulty focusing attention, making decisions, and solving known problems. In this paper, we will review major streams of theory and research on leadership roles in the context of recent findings from neuroscience and psychology. We conclude by suggesting that emerging research challenges the assumption that role differentiation is both natural and necessary, in particular when openness to new ideas, people, emotions, and ethical concerns are important to success.

  20. Noradrenergic antagonists mitigate amphetamine-induced recovery.

    PubMed

    Hylin, M J; Brenneman, M M; Corwin, J V

    2017-09-15

    Brain injury, including that due to stroke, leaves individuals with cognitive deficits that can disrupt daily aspect of living. As of now there are few treatments that shown limited amounts of success in improving functional outcome. The use of stimulants such as amphetamine have shown some success in improving outcome following brain injury. While the pharmacological mechanisms for amphetamine are known; the specific processes responsible for improving behavioral outcome following injury remain unknown. Understanding these mechanisms can help to refine the use of amphetamine as a potential treatment or lead to the use of other methods that share the same pharmacological properties. One proposed mechanism is amphetamine's impact upon noradrenaline (NA). In the current, study noradrenergic antagonists were administered prior to amphetamine to pharmacologically block α- and β-adrenergic receptors. The results demonstrated that the blockade of these receptors disrupted amphetamines ability to induce recovery from hemispatial neglect using an established aspiration lesion model. This suggests that amphetamine's ability to ameliorate neglect deficits may be due in part to noradrenaline. These results further support the role of noradrenaline in functional recovery. Finally, the development of polytherapies and combined therapeutics, while promising, may need to consider the possibility that drug interactions can negate the effectiveness of treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Antagonistic neural networks underlying differentiated leadership roles

    PubMed Central

    Boyatzis, Richard E.; Rochford, Kylie; Jack, Anthony I.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of two distinct leadership roles, the task leader and the socio-emotional leader, has been documented in the leadership literature since the 1950s. Recent research in neuroscience suggests that the division between task-oriented and socio-emotional-oriented roles derives from a fundamental feature of our neurobiology: an antagonistic relationship between two large-scale cortical networks – the task-positive network (TPN) and the default mode network (DMN). Neural activity in TPN tends to inhibit activity in the DMN, and vice versa. The TPN is important for problem solving, focusing of attention, making decisions, and control of action. The DMN plays a central role in emotional self-awareness, social cognition, and ethical decision making. It is also strongly linked to creativity and openness to new ideas. Because activation of the TPN tends to suppress activity in the DMN, an over-emphasis on task-oriented leadership may prove deleterious to social and emotional aspects of leadership. Similarly, an overemphasis on the DMN would result in difficulty focusing attention, making decisions, and solving known problems. In this paper, we will review major streams of theory and research on leadership roles in the context of recent findings from neuroscience and psychology. We conclude by suggesting that emerging research challenges the assumption that role differentiation is both natural and necessary, in particular when openness to new ideas, people, emotions, and ethical concerns are important to success. PMID:24624074

  2. Cannabinoid receptor antagonists: pharmacological opportunities, clinical experience, and translational prognosis.

    PubMed

    Janero, David R; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2009-03-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid (CB) (endocannabinoid) signaling system is involved in a variety of (patho)physiological processes, primarily by virtue of natural, arachidonic acid-derived lipids (endocannabinoids) that activate G protein-coupled CB1 and CB2 receptors. A hyperactive endocannabinoid system appears to contribute to the etiology of several disease states that constitute significant global threats to human health. Consequently, mounting interest surrounds the design and profiling of receptor-targeted CB antagonists as pharmacotherapeutics that attenuate endocannabinoid transmission for salutary gain. Experimental and clinical evidence supports the therapeutic potential of CB1 receptor antagonists to treat overweight/obesity, obesity-related cardiometabolic disorders, and substance abuse. Laboratory data suggest that CB2 receptor antagonists might be effective immunomodulatory and, perhaps, anti-inflammatory drugs. One CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist, rimonabant, has emerged as the first-in-class drug approved outside the United States for weight control. Select follow-on agents (taranabant, otenabant, surinabant, rosonabant, SLV-319, AVE1625, V24343) have also been studied in the clinic. However, rimonabant's market withdrawal in the European Union and suspension of rimonabant's, taranabant's, and otenabant's ongoing development programs have highlighted some adverse clinical side effects (especially nausea and psychiatric disturbances) of CB1 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists. Novel CB1 receptor ligands that are peripherally directed and/or exhibit neutral antagonism (the latter not affecting constitutive CB1 receptor signaling) may optimize the benefits of CB1 receptor antagonists while minimizing any risk. Indeed, CB1 receptor-neutral antagonists appear from preclinical data to offer efficacy comparable to or better than that of prototype CB1 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists, with less propensity to induce nausea. Continued

  3. Molecular characterization of the gerbil C5a receptor and identification of a transmembrane domain V amino acid that is crucial for small molecule antagonist interaction.

    PubMed

    Waters, Stephen M; Brodbeck, Robbin M; Steflik, Jeremy; Yu, Jianying; Baltazar, Carolyn; Peck, Amy E; Severance, Daniel; Zhang, Lu Yan; Currie, Kevin; Chenard, Bertrand L; Hutchison, Alan J; Maynard, George; Krause, James E

    2005-12-09

    Anaphylatoxin C5a is a potent inflammatory mediator associated with pathogenesis and progression of several inflammation-associated disorders. Small molecule C5a receptor (C5aR) antagonist development is hampered by species-specific receptor biology and the associated inability to use standard rat and mouse in vivo models. Gerbil is one rodent species reportedly responsive to small molecule C5aR antagonists with human C5aR affinity. We report the identification of the gerbil C5aR cDNA using a degenerate primer PCR cloning strategy. The nucleotide sequence revealed an open reading frame encoding a 347-amino acid protein. The cloned receptor (expressed in Sf9 cells) bound recombinant human C5a with nanomolar affinity. Alignment of the gerbil C5aR sequence with those from other species showed that a Trp residue in transmembrane domain V is the only transmembrane domain amino acid unique to small molecule C5aR antagonist-responsive species (i.e. gerbil, human, and non-human primate). Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate human and mouse C5aRs with a residue exchange of this Trp residue. Mutation of Trp to Leu in human C5aR completely eliminated small molecule antagonist-receptor interaction. In contrast, mutation of Leu to Trp in mouse C5aR enabled small molecule antagonist-receptor interaction. This crucial Trp residue is located deeper within transmembrane domain V than residues reportedly involved in C5a- and cyclic peptide C5a antagonist-receptor interaction, suggesting a novel interaction site(s) for small molecule antagonists. These data provide insight into the basis for small molecule antagonist species selectivity and further define sites critical for C5aR activation and function.

  4. Effect of prolonged vibration to synergistic and antagonistic muscles on the rectus femoris activation during multi-joint exercises.

    PubMed

    Ema, Ryoichi; Takayama, Hirokazu; Miyamoto, Naokazu; Akagi, Ryota

    2017-10-01

    Unique neuromuscular activation of the quadriceps femoris is observed during multi-joint leg extensions: lower activation of the biarticular rectus femoris (RF) than monoarticular vasti muscles. As one of the potential mechanisms for the lower RF activation, Ia afferent-mediated inhibitory connections between synergistic muscles and/or between agonist and antagonist muscles have been proposed. If this is the major factor, it is hypothesized that RF activation during multi-joint leg extensions increases after prolonged vibration to synergistic and/or antagonist muscles. This study tested the hypothesis. Fourteen men exerted maximal voluntary isometric knee extension and flexion and performed submaximal parallel squat before and after one of the following three interventions on different days: prolonged vibration to the vastus lateralis (VL, synergist) or biceps femoris (BF, antagonist), or quiet sitting for 30 min. Muscle activations of the quadriceps femoris and hamstrings were determined using surface electromyography. After prolonged VL or BF vibration, VL (21%) or BF (30%) activation during isometric contractions significantly decreased, which was significantly correlated with the reduction of the maximal isometric knee extension or flexion strength. The magnitude of RF activation during squat was significantly lower than those of VL and the vastus medialis. No significant increase in RF activation during squat was observed after vibrations. The findings suggest that lower biarticular RF activation compared with the monoarticular vasti muscles during multi-joint exercises does not result from the modulation by peripheral inhibitory input from Ia afferents originating from synergist and/or antagonist muscles.

  5. Effects of dopamine D1-like and D2-like antagonists on cocaine discrimination in muscarinic receptor knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Morgane; Caine, Simon Barak

    2016-01-01

    Muscarinic and dopamine brain systems interact intimately, and muscarinic receptor ligands, like dopamine ligands, can modulate the reinforcing and discriminative stimulus (SD) effects of cocaine. To enlighten the dopamine/muscarinic interactions as they pertain to the SD effects of cocaine, we evaluated whether muscarinic M1, M2 or M4 receptors are necessary for dopamine D1 and/or D2 antagonist mediated modulation of the SD effects of cocaine. Knockout mice lacking M1, M2, or M4 receptors, as well as control wild-type mice and outbred Swiss-Webster mice, were trained to discriminate 10 mg/kg cocaine from saline in a food-reinforced drug discrimination procedure. Effects of pretreatments with the dopamine D1 antagonist SCH 23390 and the dopamine D2 antagonist eticlopride were evaluated. In intact mice, both SCH 23390 and eticlopride attenuated the cocaine discriminative stimulus effect, as expected. SCH 23390 similarly attenuated the cocaine discriminative stimulus effect in M1 knockout mice, but not in mice lacking M2 or M4 receptors. The effects of eticlopride were comparable in each knockout strain. These findings demonstrate differences in the way that D1 and D2 antagonists modulate the SD effects of cocaine, D1 modulation being at least partially dependent upon activity at the inhibitory M2/M4 muscarinic subtypes, while D2 modulation appeared independent of these systems. PMID:26874213

  6. Identification of Receptor Ligands and Receptor Subtypes Using Antagonists in a Capillary Electrophoresis Single-Cell Biosensor Separation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, Harvey A.; Orwar, Owe; Scheller, Richard H.; Zare, Richard N.

    1995-08-01

    A capillary electrophoresis system with single-cell biosensors as a detector has been used to separate and identify ligands in complex biological samples. The power of this procedure was significantly increased by introducing antagonists that inhibited the cellular response from selected ligand-receptor interactions. The single-cell biosensor was based on the ligand-receptor binding and G-protein-mediated signal transduction pathways in PC12 and NG108-15 cell lines. Receptor activation was measured as increases in cytosolic free calcium ion concentration by using fluorescence microscopy with the intracellular calcium ion indicator fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester. Specifically, a mixture of bradykinin (BK) and acetylcholine (ACh) was fractionated and the components were identified by inhibiting the cellular response with icatibant (HOE 140), a selective antagonist to the BK B_2 receptor subtype (B_2BK), and atropine, an antagonist to muscarinic ACh receptor subtypes. Structurally related forms of BK were also identified based on inhibiting B_2BK receptors. Applications of this technique include identification of endogenous BK in a lysate of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (Hep G2) and screening for bioactivity of BK degradation products in human blood plasma. The data demonstrate that the use of antagonists with a single-cell biosensor separation system aids identification of separated components and receptor subtypes.

  7. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Khanfar, Mohammad A.; Affini, Anna; Lutsenko, Kiril; Nikolic, Katarina; Butini, Stefania; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®), the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures. PMID:27303254

  8. Essential oils of culinary herbs and spices display agonist and antagonist activities at human aryl hydrocarbon receptor AhR.

    PubMed

    Bartoňková, Iveta; Dvořák, Zdeněk

    2018-01-01

    Essential oils (EOs) of culinary herbs and spices are used to flavor, color and preserve foods and drinks. Dietary intake of EOs is significant, deserving an attention of toxicologists. We examined the effects of 31 EOs of culinary herbs and spices on the transcriptional activity of human aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), which is a pivotal xenobiotic sensor, having also multiple roles in human physiology. Tested EOs were sorted out into AhR-inactive ones (14 EOs) and AhR-active ones, including full agonists (cumin, jasmine, vanilla, bay leaf), partial agonists (cloves, dill, thyme, nutmeg, oregano) and antagonists (tarragon, caraway, turmeric, lovage, fennel, spearmint, star anise, anise). Major constituents (>10%) of AhR-active EOs were studied in more detail. We identified AhR partial agonists (carvacrol, ligustilide, eugenol, eugenyl acetate, thymol, ar-turmerone) and antagonists (trans-anethole, butylidine phtalide, R/S-carvones, p-cymene), which account for AhR-mediated activities of EOs of fennel, anise, star anise, caraway, spearmint, tarragon, cloves, dill, turmeric, lovage, thyme and oregano. We also show that AhR-mediated effects of some individual constituents of EOs differ from those manifested in mixtures. In conclusion, EOs of culinary herbs and spices are agonists and antagonists of human AhR, implying a potential for food-drug interactions and interference with endocrine pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Pharmacological characterization of AZD5069, a slowly reversible CXC chemokine receptor 2 antagonist.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, David J; Wiley, Katherine; Dainty, Ian; MacIntosh, Fraser; Phillips, Caroline; Gaw, Alasdair; Mårdh, Carina Kärrman

    2015-05-01

    In normal physiologic responses to injury and infection, inflammatory cells enter tissue and sites of inflammation through a chemotactic process regulated by several families of proteins, including inflammatory chemokines, a family of small inducible cytokines. In neutrophils, chemokines chemokine (CXC motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1) and CXCL8 are potent chemoattractants and activate G protein-coupled receptors CXC chemokine receptor 1 (CXCR1) and CXCR2. Several small-molecule antagonists of CXCR2 have been developed to inhibit the inflammatory responses mediated by this receptor. Here, we present the data describing the pharmacology of AZD5069 [N-(2-(2,3-difluorobenzylthio)-6-((2R,3S)-3,4-dihydroxybutan-2-yloxy)[2,4,5,6-(13)C4, 1,3-(15)N2]pyrimidin-4-yl)azetidine-1-sulfonamide,[(15)N2,(13)C4]N-(2-(2,3-difluoro-6-[3H]-benzylthio)-6-((2R,3S)-3,4-dihydroxybutan-2-yloxy)pyrimidin-4-yl)azetidine-1-sulfonamide], a novel antagonist of CXCR2. AZD5069 was shown to inhibit binding of radiolabeled CXCL8 to human CXCR2 with a pIC50 value of 9.1. Furthermore, AZD5069 inhibited neutrophil chemotaxis, with a pA2 of approximately 9.6, and adhesion molecule expression, with a pA2 of 6.9, in response to CXCL1. AZD5069 was a slowly reversible antagonist of CXCR2 with effects of time and temperature evident on the pharmacology and binding kinetics. With short incubation times, AZD5069 appeared to have an antagonist profile with insurmountable antagonism of calcium response curves. This behavior was also observed in vivo in an acute lipopolysaccharide-induced lung inflammation model. Altogether, the data presented here show that AZD5069 represents a novel, potent, and selective CXCR2 antagonist with potential as a therapeutic agent in inflammatory conditions. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  10. P2X1 Receptor Antagonists Inhibit HIV-1 Fusion by Blocking Virus-Coreceptor Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Giroud, Charline; Marin, Mariana; Hammonds, Jason; Spearman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 Env glycoprotein-mediated fusion is initiated upon sequential binding of Env to CD4 and the coreceptor CXCR4 or CCR5. Whereas these interactions are thought to be necessary and sufficient to promote HIV-1 fusion, other host factors can modulate this process. Previous studies reported potent inhibition of HIV-1 fusion by selective P2X1 receptor antagonists, including NF279, and suggested that these receptors play a role in HIV-1 entry. Here we investigated the mechanism of antiviral activity of NF279 and found that this compound does not inhibit HIV-1 fusion by preventing the activation of P2X1 channels but effectively blocks the binding of the virus to CXCR4 or CCR5. The notion of an off-target effect of NF279 on HIV-1 fusion is supported by the lack of detectable expression of P2X1 receptors in cells used in fusion experiments and by the fact that the addition of ATP or the enzymatic depletion of ATP in culture medium does not modulate viral fusion. Importantly, NF279 fails to inhibit HIV-1 fusion with cell lines and primary macrophages when added at an intermediate stage downstream of Env-CD4-coreceptor engagement. Conversely, in the presence of NF279, HIV-1 fusion is arrested downstream of CD4 binding but prior to coreceptor engagement. NF279 also antagonizes the signaling function of CCR5, CXCR4, and another chemokine receptor, as evidenced by the suppression of calcium responses elicited by specific ligands and by recombinant gp120. Collectively, our results demonstrate that NF279 is a dual HIV-1 coreceptor inhibitor that interferes with the functional engagement of CCR5 and CXCR4 by Env. IMPORTANCE Inhibition of P2X receptor activity suppresses HIV-1 fusion and replication, suggesting that P2X signaling is involved in HIV-1 entry. However, mechanistic experiments conducted in this study imply that P2X1 receptor is not expressed in target cells or involved in viral fusion. Instead, we found that inhibition of HIV-1 fusion by a specific P2X1

  11. Practical recommendations for calcium channel antagonist poisoning.

    PubMed

    Rietjens, S J; de Lange, D W; Donker, D W; Meulenbelt, J

    2016-02-01

    Calcium channel antagonists (CCAs) are widely used for different cardiovascular disorders. At therapeutic doses, CCAs have a favourable side effect profile. However, in overdose, CCAs can cause serious complications, such as severe hypotension and bradycardia. Patients in whom a moderate to severe intoxication is anticipated should be observed in a monitored setting for at least 12 hours if an immediate-release formulation is ingested, and at least 24 hours when a sustained-release formulation (or amlodipine) is involved, even if the patient is asymptomatic. Initial treatment is aimed at gastrointestinal decontamination and general supportive care, i.e., fluid resuscitation and correction of metabolic acidosis and electrolyte disturbances. In moderate to severe CCA poisoning, a combined medical strategy might be indispensable, such as administration of vasopressors, intravenous calcium and hyperinsulinaemia/euglycaemia therapy. Especially hyperinsulinaemia/euglycaemia therapy is an important first-line treatment in CCA-overdosed patients in whom a large ingestion is suspected. High-dose insulin, in combination with glucose, seems to be most effective when used early in the intoxication phase, even when the patient shows hardly any haemodynamic instability. Intravenous lipid emulsion therapy should only be considered in patients with life-threatening cardiovascular toxicity, such as refractory shock, which is unresponsive to conventional therapies. When supportive and specific pharmacological measures fail to adequately reverse refractory conditions in CCA overdose, the use of extracorporeal life support should be considered. The efficacy of these pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions generally advocated in CCA poisoning needs further in-depth mechanistic foundation, in order to improve individualised treatment of CCA-overdosed patients.

  12. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of TNF Antagonists in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Reena; Levesque, Barrett G.; Sandborn, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Although tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antagonists play a critical role in the treatment of moderate-to-severe inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), several factors can impact treatment response. The degree of systemic inflammation, serum albumin concentration, disease type, body mass index, gender, concomitant therapy with immunosuppressive agents, and especially development of antidrug antibodies (ADAs) are key determinants of TNF antagonist pharmacokinetics and clinical outcomes. Therefore, measurement of serum drug and antibody concentrations in patients with IBD who are on TNF antagonists has the potential to guide clinical decision-making, optimize treatment, improve outcomes, and reduce healthcare costs. Multiple strategies to prevent ADA formation exist, including multiple clinical algorithms that employ therapeutic drug monitoring to optimize treatment following a secondary loss of therapeutic response. An individualized approach is needed, however, to identify early predictors of ADA development and other confounders of TNF antagonist therapy. PMID:28845139

  13. Complications of TNF-α antagonists and iron homeostasis

    EPA Science Inventory

    TNF-α is a central regulator of inflammation and its blockade downregulates other proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. Subsequently, TNF-α antagonists are currently used in treatment regimens directed toward several inflammatory diseases. Despite a beneficia...

  14. Identification of M-CSF agonists and antagonists

    DOEpatents

    Pandit, Jayvardhan [Mystic, CT; Jancarik, Jarmila [Walnut Creek, CA; Kim, Sung-Hou [Moraga, CA; Koths, Kirston [El Cerrito, CA; Halenbeck, Robert [San Rafael, CA; Fear, Anna Lisa [Oakland, CA; Taylor, Eric [Oakland, CA; Yamamoto, Ralph [Martinez, CA; Bohm, Andrew [Armonk, NY

    2000-02-15

    The present invention is directed to methods for crystallizing macrophage colony stimulating factor. The present invention is also directed to methods for designing and producing M-CSF agonists and antagonists using information derived from the crystallographic structure of M-CSF. The invention is also directed to methods for screening M-CSF agonists and antagonists. In addition, the present invention is directed to an isolated, purified, soluble and functional M-CSF receptor.

  15. Prevention of Stimulant Induced Euphoria with an Opioid Receptor Antagonist

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0510 TITLE: Prevention of Stimulant Induced Euphoria with an Opioid Receptor Antagonist PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Prevention(of(Stimulant(Induced(Euphoria(with(an( Opioid (Receptor(Antagonist(( 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...naltrexone(in(medication(naïve(young(adults((age(18#30)(who(exhibit(a(euphoric( response(to(methylphenidate(administered(on(the(“ Drug (Feeling(Visit

  16. Fosinopril H(2)-receptor antagonists interaction studies by derivative spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Najma; Arayne, M Saeed; Sana, Aisha

    2007-01-01

    Fosinopril sodium, a phosphinic acid derivative is an angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, which had been employed for the treatment of hypertension and congestive heart failure; long tem use of ACE inhibitor often result in stress ulcers due to which H(2) receptor antagonists are also concurrently prescribed. The later compete with histamine for H(2) receptors and block gastric acid secretion and some cardiovascular effects of histamine. Our studies are focused on the in vitro availability of fosinopril in presence of commonly used H(2) receptor antagonists. Derivative spectroscopy has been employed for the quantitation of fosinopril and H(2) receptor antagonists followed by linear regression analysis. These studies were carried out in buffers of pH 7.4 and 9 at 37, 48 and 60( masculine)C. Stability constant and thermodynamic function had also been calculated in order to evaluate the reaction mechanism. Commonly prescribed H(2) receptor antagonists like cimetidine, ranitidine and famotidine were used in these studies. Present study clearly indicated that most of the H(2) receptor antagonists studied decreased the availability of fosinopril which conclude that availability of fosinopril can be affected by the concurrent administration of H(2) receptor antagonists.

  17. Platelet-activating factor (PAF)-antagonists of natural origin.

    PubMed

    Singh, Preeti; Singh, Ishwari Narayan; Mondal, Sambhu Charan; Singh, Lubhan; Garg, Vipin Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Presently herbal medicines are being used by about 80% of the world population for primary health care as they stood the test of time for their safety, efficacy, cultural acceptability and lesser side effects. The discovery of platelet activating factor antagonists (PAF antagonists) during these decades are going on with different framework, but the researchers led their efficiency in studying in vitro test models. Since it is assumed that PAF play a central role in etiology of many diseases in humans such as asthma, neuronal damage, migraine, cardiac diseases, inflammatory, headache etc. Present days instinctively occurring PAF antagonist exists as a specific grade of therapeutic agents for the humans against these and different diseases either laid hold of immunological or non-immunological types. Ginkgolide, cedrol and many other natural PAF antagonists such as andrographolide, α-bulnesene, cinchonine, piperine, kadsurenone, different Piper species' natural products and marine origin plants extracts or even crude drugs having PAF antagonist properties are being used currently against different inflammatory pathologies. This review is an attempt to summarize the data on PAF and action of natural PAF antagonists on it, which were evaluated by in vivo and in vitro assays. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Glutamate Receptor Antagonists as Fast-Acting Therapeutic Alternatives for the Treatment of Depression: Ketamine and Other Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Niciu, Mark J.; Henter, Ioline D.; Luckenbaugh, David A.; Zarate, Carlos A.; Charney, Dennis S.

    2014-01-01

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine has rapid and potent antidepressant effects in treatment-resistant major depressive disorder and bipolar depression. These effects are in direct contrast to the more modest effects seen after weeks of treatment with classic monoaminergic antidepressants. Numerous open-label and case studies similarly validate ketamine’s antidepressant properties. These clinical findings have been reverse-translated into preclinical models in an effort to elucidate ketamine’s antidepressant mechanism of action, and three important targets have been identified: mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2), and glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3). Current clinical and preclinical research is focused on (a) prolonging/maintaining ketamine’s antidepressant effects, (b) developing more selective NMDA receptor antagonists free of ketamine’s adverse effects, and (c) identifying predictor, mediator/moderator, and treatment response biomarkers of ketamine’s antidepressant effects. PMID:24392693

  19. Combining growth hormone-releasing hormone antagonist with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antagonist greatly augments benign prostatic hyperplasia shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Rick, Ferenc G; Szalontay, Luca; Schally, Andrew V; Block, Norman L; Nadji, Mehrdad; Szepeshazi, Karoly; Vidaurre, Irving; Zarandi, Marta; Kovacs, Magdolna; Rekasi, Zoltan

    2012-04-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia often affects aging men. Antagonists of the neuropeptide growth hormone-releasing hormone reduced prostate weight in an androgen induced benign prostatic hyperplasia model in rats. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antagonists also produce marked, protracted improvement in lower urinary tract symptoms, reduced prostate volume and an increased urinary peak flow rate in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia. We investigated the influence of a combination of antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone on animal models of benign prostatic hyperplasia. We evaluated the effects of the growth hormone-releasing hormone antagonist JMR-132, given at a dose of 40 μg daily, the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antagonist cetrorelix, given at a dose of 0.625 mg/kg, and their combination on testosterone induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in adult male Wistar rats in vivo. Prostate tissue was examined biochemically and histologically. Serum levels of growth hormone, luteinizing hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1, dihydrotestosterone and prostate specific antigen were determined. Marked shrinkage of the rat prostate (30.3%) occurred in response to the combination of growth hormone-releasing hormone and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antagonists (p<0.01). The combination strongly decreased prostatic prostate specific antigen, 6-transmembrane epithelial antigen of the prostate, interleukin-1β, nuclear factor-κβ and cyclooxygenase-2, and decreased serum prostate specific antigen. A combination of growth hormone-releasing hormone antagonist with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antagonist potentiated a reduction in prostate weight in an experimental benign prostatic hyperplasia model. Results suggest that this shrinkage in prostate volume was induced by the direct inhibitory effects of growth hormone-releasing hormone and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antagonists exerted

  20. Do TRPV1 antagonists increase the risk for skin tumourigenesis? A collaborative in vitro and in vivo assessment.

    PubMed

    Park, Miyoung; Naidoo, Anita A; Burns, Angie; Choi, Jin Kyu; Gatfield, Kelly M; Vidgeon-Hart, Martin; Bae, Il-Hong; Lee, Chang Seok; Choi, Gyeyoung; Powell, Andrew J; Park, Young-Ho; Fagg, Rajni

    2018-04-01

    A recent hypothesis suggesting that the pharmacological target TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily, member 1) may function as a tumour suppressor, which potentially impacts the development of TRPV1 antagonist therapeutics for a range of conditions. However, little is known about the long-term physiologic effects of TRPV1 blockade in the skin. In vitro and in vivo studies suggested that the potent TRPV1 competitive antagonist AMG-9810 promoted proliferation in N/TERT1 cells (telomerase-immortalised primary human keratinocytes 1) and tumour development in mouse skin that was mediated through EGFR/Akt/mTOR signalling. We attempted to reproduce the reported in vitro and in vivo findings to further explore this hypothesis to understand the underlying mechanism and the risk associated with TRPV1 antagonism in the skin. In vitro proliferation studies using multiple methods and topical application with AMG-9810 and structurally similar TRPV1 antagonists such as SB-705498 and PAC-14028 were performed. Although we confirmed expression of TRPV1 in primary human epidermal keratinocytes (HEKn) and spontaneously immortalised human keratinocytes (HaCaT), we were unable to demonstrate cell proliferation in either cell type or any clear evidence of increased expression of proteins in the EGFR/Akt/mTOR signalling pathway with these molecules. We were also unable to demonstrate skin tumour promotion or underlying molecular mechanisms involved in the EGFR/Akt/mTOR signalling pathway in a single-dose and two-stage carcinogenesis mouse study treated with TRPV1 antagonists. In conclusion, our data suggest that inhibiting the pharmacological function of TRPV1 in skin by specific antagonists has not been considered to be indicative of skin tumour development.

  1. The incentive amplifying effects of nicotine are reduced by selective and non-selective dopamine antagonists in rats

    PubMed Central

    Palmatier, Matthew I.; Kellicut, Marissa R.; Sheppard, A. Brianna; Brown, Russell W.; Robinson, Donita L.

    2015-01-01

    Nicotine is a psychomotor stimulant with ‘reinforcement enhancing’ effects – the actions of nicotine in the brain increase responding for non-nicotine rewards. We hypothesized that this latter effect of nicotine depends on increased incentive properties of anticipatory cues; consistent with this hypothesis, multiple laboratories have reported that nicotine increases sign tracking, i.e. approach to a conditioned stimulus (CS), in Pavlovian conditioned-approach tasks. Incentive motivation and sign tracking are mediated by mesolimbic dopamine (DA) transmission and nicotine facilitates mesolimbic DA release. Therefore, we hypothesized that the incentive-promoting effects of nicotine would be impaired by DA antagonists. To test this hypothesis, separate groups of rats were injected with nicotine (0.4 mg/kg base) or saline prior to Pavlovian conditioning sessions in which a CS (30 s illumination of a light or presentation of a lever) was immediately followed by a sweet reward delivered in an adjacent location. Both saline and nicotine pretreated rats exhibited similar levels of conditioned approach to the reward location (goal tracking), but nicotine pretreatment significantly increased approach to the CS (sign tracking), regardless of type (lever or light). The DAD1 antagonist SCH-23390 and the DAD2/3 antagonist eticlopride reduced conditioned approach in all rats, but specifically reduced goal tracking in the saline pretreated rats and sign tracking in the nicotine pretreated rats. The non-selective DA antagonist flupenthixol reduced sign-tracking in nicotine rats at all doses tested; however, only the highest dose of flupenthixol reduced goal tracking in both nicotine and saline groups. The reductions in conditioned approach behavior, especially those by SCH-23390, were dissociated from simple motor suppressant effects of the antagonists. These experiments are the first to investigate the effects of dopaminergic drugs on the facilitation of sign

  2. Pharmacophore-based virtual screening, biological evaluation and binding mode analysis of a novel protease-activated receptor 2 antagonist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Nam-Chul; Seo, Seoung-Hwan; Kim, Dohee; Shin, Ji-Sun; Ju, Jeongmin; Seong, Jihye; Seo, Seon Hee; Lee, Iiyoun; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Kim, Yun Kyung; No, Kyoung Tai; Pae, Ae Nim

    2016-08-01

    Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is a G protein-coupled receptor, mediating inflammation and pain signaling in neurons, thus it is considered to be a potential therapeutic target for inflammatory diseases. In this study, we performed a ligand-based virtual screening of 1.6 million compounds by employing a common-feature pharmacophore model and two-dimensional similarity search to identify a new PAR2 antagonist. The common-feature pharmacophore model was established based on the biological screening results of our in-house library. The initial virtual screening yielded a total number of 47 hits, and additional biological activity tests including PAR2 antagonism and anti-inflammatory effects resulted in a promising candidate, compound 43, which demonstrated an IC50 value of 8.22 µM against PAR2. In next step, a PAR2 homology model was constructed using the crystal structure of the PAR1 as a template to explore the binding mode of the identified ligands. A molecular docking method was optimized by comparing the binding modes of a known PAR2 agonist GB110 and antagonist GB83, and applied to predict the binding mode of our hit compound 43. In-depth docking analyses revealed that the hydrophobic interaction with Phe2435.39 is crucial for PAR2 ligands to exert antagonistic activity. MD simulation results supported the predicted docking poses that PAR2 antagonist blocked a conformational rearrangement of Na+ allosteric site in contrast to PAR2 agonist that showed Na+ relocation upon GPCR activation. In conclusion, we identified new a PAR2 antagonist together with its binding mode, which provides useful insights for the design and development of PAR2 ligands.

  3. Vitamin K antagonist use and mortality in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Voskamp, Pauline W M; Rookmaaker, Maarten B; Verhaar, Marianne C; Dekker, Friedo W; Ocak, Gurbey

    2018-01-01

    The risk-benefit ratio of vitamin K antagonists for different CHA2DS2-VASc scores in patients with end-stage renal disease treated with dialysis is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between vitamin K antagonist use and mortality for different CHA2DS2-VASc scores in a cohort of end-stage renal disease patients receiving dialysis treatment. We prospectively followed 1718 incident dialysis patients. Hazard ratios were calculated for all-cause and cause-specific (stroke, bleeding, cardiovascular and other) mortality associated with vitamin K antagonist use. Vitamin K antagonist use as compared with no vitamin K antagonist use was associated with a 1.2-fold [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.0-1.5] increased all-cause mortality risk, a 1.5-fold (95% CI 0.6-4.0) increased stroke mortality risk, a 1.3-fold (95% CI 0.4-4.2) increased bleeding mortality risk, a 1.2-fold (95% CI 0.9-1.8) increased cardiovascular mortality risk and a 1.2-fold (95% CI 0.8-1.6) increased other mortality risk after adjustment. Within patients with a CHA2DS2-VASc score ≤1, vitamin K antagonist use was associated with a 2.8-fold (95% CI 1.0-7.8) increased all-cause mortality risk as compared with no vitamin K antagonist use, while vitamin K antagonist use within patients with a CHA2DS2-VASc score ≥2 was not associated with an increased mortality risk after adjustment. Vitamin K antagonist use was not associated with a protective effect on mortality in the different CHA2DS2-VASc scores in dialysis patients. The lack of knowledge on the indication for vitamin K antagonist use could lead to confounding by indication. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  4. Bacterial antagonists of fungal pathogens also control root-knot nematodes by induced systemic resistance of tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Adam, Mohamed; Heuer, Holger; Hallmann, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    The potential of bacterial antagonists of fungal pathogens to control the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita was investigated under greenhouse conditions. Treatment of tomato seeds with several strains significantly reduced the numbers of galls and egg masses compared with the untreated control. Best performed Bacillus subtilis isolates Sb4-23, Mc5-Re2, and Mc2-Re2, which were further studied for their mode of action with regard to direct effects by bacterial metabolites or repellents, and plant mediated effects. Drenching of soil with culture supernatants significantly reduced the number of egg masses produced by M. incognita on tomato by up to 62% compared to the control without culture supernatant. Repellence of juveniles by the antagonists was shown in a linked twin-pot set-up, where a majority of juveniles penetrated roots on the side without inoculated antagonists. All tested biocontrol strains induced systemic resistance against M. incognita in tomato, as revealed in a split-root system where the bacteria and the nematodes were inoculated at spatially separated roots of the same plant. This reduced the production of egg masses by up to 51%, while inoculation of bacteria and nematodes in the same pot had only a minor additive effect on suppression of M. incognita compared to induced systemic resistance alone. Therefore, the plant mediated effect was the major reason for antagonism rather than direct mechanisms. In conclusion, the bacteria known for their antagonistic potential against fungal pathogens also suppressed M. incognita. Such "multi-purpose" bacteria might provide new options for control strategies, especially with respect to nematode-fungus disease complexes that cause synergistic yield losses.

  5. Deficits in cognition and synaptic plasticity in a mouse model of Down syndrome ameliorated by GABAB receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Kleschevnikov, A.M.; Belichenko, P.V.; Faizi, M.; Jacobs, L.F.; Htun, K.; Shamloo, M.; Mobley, W.C.

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive impairment in Down syndrome (DS) is characterized by deficient learning and memory. Mouse genetic models of DS exhibit impaired cognition in hippocampally mediated behavioral tasks and reduced synaptic plasticity of hippocampal pathways. Enhanced efficiency of GABAergic neurotransmission was implicated in those changes. We have recently shown that signaling through postsynaptic GABAB receptors is significantly increased in the dentate gyrus (DG) of Ts65Dn mice, a genetic model of DS. Here we examined a role for GABAB receptors in cognitive deficits in DS by defining the effect of selective GABAB receptor antagonists on behavior and synaptic plasticity of adult Ts65Dn mice. Treatment with the GABAB receptor antagonist CGP55845 restored memory of Ts65Dn mice in the novel place recognition, novel object recognition and contextual fear conditioning tasks, but did not affect locomotion and performance in T-maze. The treatment increased hippocampal levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), equally in 2N and Ts65Dn mice. In hippocampal slices, treatment with the GABAB receptor antagonists CGP55845 or CGP52432 enhanced long-term potentiation (LTP) in the Ts65Dn DG. The enhancement of LTP was accompanied by an increase in the NMDA receptor-mediated component of the tetanus-evoked responses. These findings are evidence for a contribution of GABAB receptors to changes in hippocampal-based cognition in the Ts65Dn mouse. The ability to rescue cognitive performance through treatment with selective GABAB receptor antagonists motivates studies to further explore the therapeutic potential of these compounds in people with DS. PMID:22764230

  6. Sulforaphane is not an effective antagonist of the human pregnane X-receptor in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Poulton, Emma Jane; Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington; Levy, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN), is an effective in vitro antagonist of ligand activation of the human pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR). PXR mediated CYP3A4 up-regulation is implicated in adverse drug-drug interactions making identification of small molecule antagonists a desirable therapeutic goal. SFN is not an antagonist to mouse or rat PXR in vitro; thus, normal rodent species are not suitable as in vivo models for human response. To evaluate whether SFN can effectively antagonize ligand activation of human PXR in vivo, a three-armed, randomized, crossover trial was conducted with 24 healthy adults. The potent PXR ligand — rifampicin (300 mg/d) was givenmore » alone for 7 days in arm 1, or in daily combination with 450 μmol SFN (Broccoli Sprout extract) in arm 2; SFN was given alone in arm 3. Midazolam as an in vivo phenotype marker of CYP3A was administered before and after each treatment arm. Rifampicin alone decreased midazolam AUC by 70%, indicative of the expected increase in CYP3A4 activity. Co-treatment with SFN did not reduce CYP3A4 induction. Treatment with SFN alone also did not affect CYP3A4 activity in the cohort as a whole, although in the subset with the highest basal CYP3A4 activity there was a statistically significant increase in midazolam AUC (i.e., decrease in CYP3A4 activity). A parallel study in humanized PXR mice yielded similar results. The parallel effects of SFN between humanized PXR mice and human subjects demonstrate the predictive value of humanized mouse models in situations where species differences in ligand-receptor interactions preclude the use of a native mouse model for studying human ligand-receptor pharmacology. -- Highlights: ► The effects of SFN on PXR mediated CYP3A4 induction in humanized PXR mice and humans were examined. ► SFN had no effect on rifampicin mediated CYP3A4 induction in humans or humanized mice. ► SFN had a modest effect on basal CYP3A4 activity among subjects with higher baseline activity.

  7. Mass spectroscopy identifies the splicing-associated proteins, PSF, hnRNP H3, hnRNP A2/B1, and TLS/FUS as interacting partners of the ZNF198 protein associated with rearrangement in myeloproliferative disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kasyapa, Chitta S.; Kunapuli, Padmaja; Cowell, John K.

    2005-09-10

    ZNF198 is fused with FGFR1 in an atypical myeloproliferative disease that results in constitutive activation of the kinase domain and mislocalization to the cytoplasm. We have used immunoprecipitation of a GFP-tagged ZNF198 combined with MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy to identify interacting proteins. P splicing factor (PSF) was identified as one of the proteins and this interaction was confirmed by Western blotting. Other proteins identified were the spliceosomal components hnRNP A2/B1, hnRNP H3, and TLS/FUS. PSF is also known to interact with PTB, another member of the hnRNP family of proteins, and we further demonstrated that PTB interacts with ZNF198. The interactionmore » between TLS/FUS and ZNF198 was confirmed using Western blot analysis. In 293 cells expressing the ZNF198/FGFR1 fusion protein, neither PSF nor PTB binds to the fusion protein, possibly because of their differential localization in the cell.« less

  8. Atomic structure and electronic properties of A2B2XY (A = Si-Pb, B = Cl-I, and XY = PN and SiS) inorganic double helices: first principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Bijoy, T K; Murugan, P; Kumar, Vijay

    2018-03-05

    We study the structural stability and electronic properties of new classes of DNA-like inorganic double helices of the type A 2 B 2 XY (A = Si-Pb, B = Cl-I, and XY = PN and SiS) by employing first principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations including van der Waals interactions. In these quaternary double helices PN or SiS forms the inner helix while the AB helix wraps around the inner helix and the two are interconnected. We find that the bromides and iodides of Ge, Sn, and Pb as well as Pb 2 Cl 2 PN form structurally stable double helices while Ge 2 I 2 SiS as well as bromides and iodides of Sn and Pb have stable double helices. The atomic structures of different double helices have been analyzed in detail to understand the stability of these systems as there is up to about 80% difference in the interatomic distances in the two helices which is remarkable. Also in these new classes of double helices there is polar covalent bonding in the inner helix due to heteroatoms. We have calculated the DDEC6 partial atomic charges and bond orders which suggest strong covalent bonding in the inner helix. The electronic structure reveals that these double helices are semiconducting and in many cases the band gap is direct. Furthermore, we have studied the effects of doping and found that hole doping is the most appropriate way to tuning their electronic properties.

  9. NMDA antagonists exert distinct effects in experimental organophosphate or carbamate poisoning in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Dekundy, Andrzej; Kaminski, Rafal M.; Zielinska, Elzbieta

    2007-03-15

    Organophosphate (OP) and carbamate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors produce seizures and lethality in mammals. Anticonvulsant and neuroprotective properties of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists encourage the investigation of their effects in AChE inhibitor-induced poisonings. In the present study, the effects of dizocilpine (MK-801, 1 mg/kg) or 3-((RS)-2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP, 10 mg/kg), alone or combined with muscarinic antagonist atropine (1.8 mg/kg), on convulsant and lethal properties of an OP pesticide dichlorvos or a carbamate drug physostigmine, were studied in mice. Both dichlorvos and physostigmine induced dose-dependent seizure activity and lethality. Atropine did not prevent the occurrence of convulsions but decreased the lethal effects ofmore » both dichlorvos and physostigmine. MK-801 or CPP blocked or attenuated, respectively, dichlorvos-induced convulsions. Contrariwise, NMDA antagonists had no effect in physostigmine-induced seizures or lethality produced by dichlorvos or physostigmine. Concurrent pretreatment with atropine and either MK-801 or CPP blocked or alleviated seizures produced by dichlorvos, but not by physostigmine. Both MK-801 and CPP co-administered with atropine enhanced its antilethal effects in both dichlorvos and physostigmine poisoning. In both saline- and AChE inhibitor-treated mice, no interaction of the investigated antidotes with brain cholinesterase was found. The data indicate that both muscarinic ACh and NMDA receptor-mediated mechanisms contribute to the acute toxicity of AChE inhibitors, and NMDA receptors seem critical to OP-induced seizures.« less

  10. Calcium antagonists and calmodulin inhibitors block cytokinin-induced bud formation in Funaria.

    PubMed

    Saunders, M J; Hepler, P K

    1983-09-01

    The plant hormone cytokinin stimulates nuclear migration followed by an asymmetric cell division in target cells of the protonema of the moss Funaria hygrometrica, leading to bud formation. The role of calcium in this developmental event was investigated by examining the effects of various calcium antagonists on the cytokinin-induced division. Calcium-free medium (buffered with EGTA), the extracellular Ca2+ antagonist La3+ (lanthanum), and the Ca2+ channel inhibitors D 600 and verapamil all block bud formation. These inhibitions are partially reversed by washing the cells or by raising the extracellular [Ca2+]. The Ca2+ ionophore A23187 partially reversed the effects of D 600 and verapamil. Bud formation is also inhibited by the intracellular Ca2+ antagonist TMB-8 (8-diethylamino)octyl 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate HCl), and this inhibition is partially reversed by washing or raising the extracellular [Ca2+]. The cross walls of both the filaments and bud initial cells formed during TMB-8 exposure exhibit a distorted morphology. High concentrations of TMB-8 block nuclear migration. The calmodulin inhibitor trifluoperazine stops cytokinin-induced budding more effectively than the related compound chlorpromazine. Low concentrations of these two compounds do not affect nuclear migration; however, the target cell does not enter mitosis. These results support the hypothesis that a rise in intracellular calcium mediates cytokinin-induced bud formation in Funaria. It is concluded that the proposed cytokinin-induced rise in intracellular calcium may be effected in part by the activation of calmodulin. The essential source of Ca2+ appears to be extracellular, because blocking Ca2+ uptake with Ca2+ transport inhibitors can block both nuclear migration and subsequent division.

  11. RS-127445: a selective, high affinity, orally bioavailable 5-HT2B receptor antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Bonhaus, Douglas W; Flippin, Lee A; Greenhouse, Robert J; Jaime, Saul; Rocha, Cindy; Dawson, Mark; Van Natta, Kristine; Chang, L K; Pulido-Rios, Tess; Webber, Andrea; Leung, Edward; Eglen, Richard M; Martin, Graeme R

    1999-01-01

    Efforts to define precisely the role of 5-HT2B receptors in normal and disease processes have been hindered by the absence of selective antagonists. To address this deficiency, we developed a series of naphthylpyrimidines as potentially useful 5-HT2B receptor antagonists. RS-127445 (2-amino-4-(4-fluoronaphth-1-yl)-6-isopropylpyrimidine) was found to have nanomolar affinity for the 5-HT2B receptor (pKi=9.5±0.1) and 1,000 fold selectivity for this receptor as compared to numerous other receptor and ion channel binding sites. In cells expressing human recombinant 5-HT2B receptors, RS-127445 potently antagonized 5-HT-evoked formation of inositol phosphates (pKB=9.5±0.1) and 5-HT-evoked increases in intracellular calcium (pIC50=10.4±0.1). RS-127445 also blocked 5-HT-evoked contraction of rat isolated stomach fundus (pA2=9.5±1.1) and (±)α-methyl-5-HT-mediated relaxation of the rat jugular vein (pA2=9.9±0.3). RS-127445 had no detectable intrinsic activity in these assays. In rats, the fraction of RS-127445 that was bioavailable via the oral or intraperitoneal routes was 14 and 60% respectively. Intraperitoneal administration of RS-127445 (5 mg kg−1) produced plasma concentrations predicted to fully saturate accessible 5-HT2B receptors for at least 4 h. In conclusion, RS-127445 is a selective, high affinity 5-HT2B receptor antagonist suitable for use in vivo. The therapeutic potential of this molecule is being further evaluated. PMID:10455251

  12. IAP Antagonists Enhance Apoptotic Response to Enzalutamide in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells via Autocrine TNF-α Signaling.

    PubMed

    Pilling, Amanda B; Hwang, Ok; Boudreault, Alain; Laurent, Alain; Hwang, Clara

    2017-06-01

    RNA expression and autocrine protein secretion. Blocking TNF-α signaling abrogates the apoptotic response demonstrating that TNF-α plays a critical role in executing cell death in response to this drug combination. These findings suggest that IAP antagonists can increase sensitivity and amplify the caspase-mediated apoptotic response to enzalutamide through TNF-α signaling mechanisms. Combination with an IAP antagonist increases enzalutamide sensitivity, lowers the apoptotic threshold and may combat drug resistance in patients with prostate cancer. Prostate 77:866-877, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Identification of anrF gene, a homology of admM of andrimid biosynthetic gene cluster related to the antagonistic activity of Enterobacter cloacae B8

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xu-Ping; Zhu, Jun-Li; Yao, Xue-Ping; He, Shi-Cheng; Huang, Hai-Ning; Chen, Wei-Liang; Hu, Yong-Hao; Li, De-Bao

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To identify the gene (s) related to the antagonistic activity of Enterobacter cloacae B8 and to elucidate its antagonistic mechanism. METHODS: Transposon-mediated mutagenesis and tagging method and cassette PCR-based chromosomal walking method were adopted to isolate the mutant strain(s) of B8 that lost the antagonistic activity and to clone DNA fragments around Tn5 insertion site. Sequence compiling and open reading frame (ORF) finding were done with DNAStar program and homologous sequence and conserved domain searches were performed with BlastN or BlastP programs at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. To verify the gene involved in the antagonistic activity, complementation of a full-length clone of the anrF gene to the mutant B8F strain was used. RESULTS: A 3 321 bp contig around the Tn5 insertion site was obtained and an ORF of 2 634 bp in length designated as anrFgene encoding for a 877 aa polyketide synthase-like protein was identified. It had a homology of 83% at the nucleotide level and 79% ID/87% SIM at the protein level, to the admM gene of Pantoea agglomerans andrimid biosynthetic gene cluster (AY192157). The Tn5 was inserted at 2 420 bp of the gene corresponding to the COG3319 (the thioesterase domain of type I polyketide synthase) coding region on B8F. The antagonistic activity against Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae was resumed with complementation of the full-length anrF gene to the mutant B8F. CONCLUSION: The anrF gene obtained is related to the antagonistic activity of B8, and the antagonistic substances produced by B8 are andrimid and/or its analogs. PMID:16273642

  14. Identification of anrF gene, a homology of admM of andrimid biosynthetic gene cluster related to the antagonistic activity of Enterobacter cloacae B8.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xu-Ping; Zhu, Jun-Li; Yao, Xue-Ping; He, Shi-Cheng; Huang, Hai-Ning; Chen, Wei-Liang; Hu, Yong-Hao; Li, De-Bao

    2005-10-21

    To identify the gene (s) related to the antagonistic activity of Enterobacter cloacae B8 and to elucidate its antagonistic mechanism. Transposon-mediated mutagenesis and tagging method and cassette PCR-based chromosomal walking method were adopted to isolate the mutant strain(s) of B8 that lost the antagonistic activity and to clone DNA fragments around Tn5 insertion site. Sequence compiling and open reading frame (ORF) finding were done with DNAStar program and homologous sequence and conserved domain searches were performed with BlastN or BlastP programs at www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. To verify the gene involved in the antagonistic activity, complementation of a full-length clone of the anrF gene to the mutant B8F strain was used. A 3 321 bp contig around the Tn5 insertion site was obtained and an ORF of 2 634 bp in length designated as anrF gene encoding for a 877 aa polyketide synthase-like protein was identified. It had a homology of 83% at the nucleotide level and 79% ID/87% SIM at the protein level, to the admM gene of Pantoea agglomerans andrimid biosynthetic gene cluster (AY192157). The Tn5 was inserted at 2 420 bp of the gene corresponding to the COG3319 (the thioesterase domain of type I polyketide synthase) coding region on B8F. The antagonistic activity against Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae was resumed with complementation of the full-length anrF gene to the mutant B8F. The anrF gene obtained is related to the antagonistic activity of B8, and the antagonistic substances produced by B8 are andrimid and/or its analogs.

  15. Effects of GABA receptor antagonists on thresholds of P23H rat retinal ganglion cells to electrical stimulation of the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Ralph J.; Rizzo, Joseph F., III

    2011-06-01

    An electronic retinal prosthesis may provide useful vision for patients suffering from retinitis pigmentosa (RP). In animal models of RP, the amount of current needed to activate retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is higher than in normal, healthy retinas. In this study, we sought to reduce the stimulation thresholds of RGCs in a degenerate rat model (P23H-line 1) by blocking GABA receptor mediated inhibition in the retina. We examined the effects of TPMPA, a GABAC receptor antagonist, and SR95531, a GABAA receptor antagonist, on the electrically evoked responses of RGCs to biphasic current pulses delivered to the subretinal surface through a 400 µm diameter electrode. Both TPMPA and SR95531 reduced the stimulation thresholds of ON-center RGCs on average by 15% and 20% respectively. Co-application of the two GABA receptor antagonists had the greatest effect, on average reducing stimulation thresholds by 32%. In addition, co-application of the two GABA receptor antagonists increased the magnitude of the electrically evoked responses on average three-fold. Neither TPMPA nor SR95531, applied alone or in combination, had consistent effects on the stimulation thresholds of OFF-center RGCs. We suggest that the effects of the GABA receptor antagonists on ON-center RGCs may be attributable to blockage of GABA receptors on the axon terminals of ON bipolar cells.

  16. A computational study to identify the key residues of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in the interactions with its antagonists.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Tayebeh; Ghayeb, Yousef

    2018-05-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) compose a family of nuclear receptors, PPARα, PPARβ, and PPARγ, which mediate the effects of lipidic ligands at the transcriptional level. Among these, the PPARγ has been known to regulate adipocyte differentiation, fatty acid storage and glucose metabolism, and is a target of antidiabetic drugs. In this work, the interactions between PPARγ and its six known antagonists were investigated using computational methods such as molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and the hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM). The binding energies evaluated by molecular docking varied between -22.59 and -35.15 kJ mol - 1 . In addition, MD simulations were performed to investigate the binding modes and PPARγ conformational changes upon binding of antagonists. Analysis of the root-mean-square fluctuations (RMSF) of backbone atoms shows that H3 of PPARγ has a higher mobility in the absence of antagonists and moderate conformational changes were observed. The interaction energies between antagonists and each PPARγ residue involved in the interactions were studied by QM/MM calculations. These calculations reveal that antagonists with different structures show different interaction energies with the same residue of PPARγ. Therefore, it can be concluded that the key residues vary depending on the structure of the ligand, which binds to PPARγ.

  17. A novel Nogo-66 receptor antagonist peptide promotes neurite regeneration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhongqing; Dai, Xiaoyong; Li, Yu; Jiang, Shuwen; Lou, Guofeng; Cao, Qiaoyu; Hu, Rendong; Huang, Yadong; Su, Zhijian; Chen, Meiwan; Luo, Huanmin; Lin, Xi; Sun, Jun; Xiao, Fei

    2016-03-01

    The Nogo-66 receptor (NgR1), a receptor for Nogo-A, contributes to the inhibition of axonal regeneration in the adult central nervous system after traumatic injuries. Thus, NgR1 has been considered a critical target in axon regeneration therapy. Here, we identified a specific NgR1 antagonist peptide (HIYTALV, named NAP2) which promotes neurite regeneration in vitro from a phage display heptapeptide library. NAP2 was co-localized with NgR1 on the surface of PC12 cells and cerebellar granule cells (CGCs) by immunofluorescence assay. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-streptavidin-biotin assay further showed that NAP2 binds to NgR1 and the dissociation constant (Kd) was 0.45 μM Functional analyses indicated that NAP2 could reduce the inhibitory effects of Nogo-66 on neurite outgrowth in differentiated PC12 cells and CGCs by blocking the Nogo-66-induced activation of Rho-associated coiled coil-containing protein kinase (ROCK), collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2) and myosin light chain (MLC). Taken together, the small molecule NgR1 antagonist peptide NAP2 (MW: 815.98Da) has a potential ability in crossing blood brain barrier and will be a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of spinal cord injury and neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The CRH1 Antagonist GSK561679 Increases Human Fear But Not Anxiety as Assessed by Startle

    PubMed Central

    Grillon, Christian; Hale, Elizabeth; Lieberman, Lynne; Davis, Andrew; Pine, Daniel S; Ernst, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Fear to predictable threat and anxiety to unpredictable threat reflect distinct processes mediated by different brain structures, the central nucleus of the amygdala and the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), respectively. This study tested the hypothesis that the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF1) antagonist GSK561679 differentially reduces anxiety but increases fear in humans. A total of 31 healthy females received each of four treatments: placebo, 50 mg GSK561679 (low-GSK), 400 mg GSK561679 (high-GSK), and 1 mg alprazolam in a crossover design. Participants were exposed to three conditions during each of the four treatments. The three conditions included one in which predictable aversive shocks were signaled by a cue, a second during which shocks were administered unpredictably, and a third condition without shock. Fear and anxiety were assessed using the acoustic startle reflex. High-GSK had no effect on startle potentiation during unpredictable threat (anxiety) but increased startle potentiation during the predictable condition (fear). Low-GSK did not affect startle potentiation across conditions. Consistent with previous findings, alprazolam reduced startle potentiation during unpredictable threat but not during predictable threat. The increased fear by high-GSK replicates animal findings and suggests a lift of the inhibitory effect of the BNST on the amygdala by the CRF1 antagonist. PMID:25430779

  19. Antagonist of GH-releasing hormone receptors alleviates experimental ocular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yong Jie; Chan, Sun On; Chong, Kelvin Kam Lung; Li, Benjamin Fuk Loi; Ng, Tsz Kin; Yip, Yolanda Wong Ying; Chen, Haoyu; Zhang, Mingzhi; Block, Norman L; Cheung, Herman S; Schally, Andrew V; Pang, Chi Pui

    2014-12-23

    Disruptions in immunity and occurrence of inflammation cause many eye diseases. The growth hormone-releasing hormone-growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 (GHRH-GH-IGF1) axis exerts regulatory effects on the immune system. Its involvement in ocular inflammation remains to be investigated. Here we studied this signaling in endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) generated by LPS. The increase in GHRH receptor (GHRH-R) protein levels was parallel to the increase in mRNA levels of pituitary-specific transcription factor-1, GHRH-R splice variant 1, GHRH, and GH following LPS insult. Elevation of GHRH-R and GH receptor was localized on the epithelium of the iris and ciliary body, and GHRH-R was confined to the infiltrating macrophages and leukocytes in aqueous humor but not to those in stroma. Treatment with GHRH-R antagonist decreased LPS-stimulated surges of GH and IGF1 in aqueous humor and alleviated inflammation by reducing the infiltration of macrophages and leukocytes and the production of TNF-α, IL-1β, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1. Our results indicate that inflammation in the iris and ciliary body involves the activation of GHRH signaling, which affects the recruitment of immune cells and the production of proinflammatory mediators that contribute to EIU pathogenesis. Moreover, the results suggest that GHRH-R antagonists are potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of acute ocular inflammation.

  20. Intra-ventral pallidal glutamate antagonists block expression of morphine-induced place preference.

    PubMed

    Dallimore, Jeanine E; Mickiewicz, Amanda L; Napier, T Celeste

    2006-10-01

    The role of ionotropic glutamate receptors within the ventral pallidum (VP) in the expression of conditioned place preference (CPP) and motor adaptations to morphine was evaluated. VP-cannulated rats were subjected to 3 days of conditioning in which saline was paired to one distinct chamber in the morning and morphine (8 mg/kg ip or its vehicle) was paired to an alternate chamber in the afternoon. This induced (a) CPP expression in drug-free rats 1 day later, which was blocked by immediate pretreatments with intra-VP injections of a glutamate antagonist cocktail (DL-2-amino-5- phosphonopentanoic acid lithium salt [AP-5] + 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione disodium salt [CNQX]), and (b) changes in motor function expressed following an acute morphine challenge 18 days later, which were absent if preceded by a 10-day treatment with the glutamate antagonists injected unilaterally once daily in alternating hemispheres. Thus, VP ionotropic glutamate receptors are critical mediators of the expression of place preference and motor adaptations subsequent to repeated morphine exposure.

  1. A Novel CXCR4 Antagonist CX549 Induces Neuroprotection in Stroke Brain

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kuo-Jen; Yu, Seong-Jin; Shia, Kak-Shan; Wu, Chien-Huang; Song, Jen-Shin; Kuan, Hsuan-Hao; Yeh, Kai-Chia; Chen, Chiung-Tong; Bae, Eunkyune; Wang, Yun

    2017-01-01

    C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) is a receptor for a pleiotropic chemokine CXCL12. Previous studies have shown that the acute administration of the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 reduced neuroinflammation in stroke brain and mobilized bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). The purpose of this study was to characterize the neuroprotective and neurotrophic effect of a novel CXCR4 antagonist CX549. We demonstrated that CX549 had a higher affinity for CXCR4 and was more potent than AMD3100 to inhibit CXCL12-mediated chemotaxis in culture. CX549 effectively reduced the activation of microglia and improved neuronal survival after injury in neuron/microglia cocultures. Early poststroke treatment with CX549 significantly improved behavioral function, reduced brain infarction, and suppressed the expression of inflammatory markers. Compared to AMD3100, CX549 has a higher affinity for CXCR4, is more efficient to mobilize HSCs for transplantation, and induces behavioral improvement. Our data support that CX549 is a potent anti-inflammatory agent, is neuroprotective against ischemic brain injury, and may have clinical implications for the treatment of stroke. PMID:27938478

  2. Synthesis and biological evaluation of quinoline salicylic acids as P-selectin antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kaila, Neelu; Janz, Kristin; DeBernardo, Silvano; Bedard, Patricia W; Camphausen, Raymond T; Tam, Steve; Tsao, Desirée H H; Keith, James C; Nickerson-Nutter, Cheryl; Shilling, Adam; Young-Sciame, Ruth; Wang, Qin

    2007-01-11

    Leukocyte recruitment of sites of inflammation and tissue injury involves leukocyte rolling along the endothelial wall, followed by firm adherence of the leukocyte, and finally transmigration of the leukocyte across cell junctions into the underlying tissue. The initial rolling step is mediated by the interaction of leukocyte glycoproteins containing active moieties such as sialyl Lewisx (sLex) with P-selectin expressed on endothelial cells. Consequently, inhibition of this interaction by means of a small molecule P-selectin antagonist is an attractive strategy for the treatment of inflammatory diseases such as arthritis. High-throughput screening of the Wyeth chemical library identified the quinoline salicylic acid class of compounds (1) as antagonists of P-selectin, with potency in in vitro and cell-based assays far superior to that of sLex. Through iterative medicinal chemistry, we identified analogues with improved P-selectin activity, decreased inhibition of dihydrooratate dehydrogenase, and acceptable CYP profiles. Lead compound 36 was efficacious in the rat AIA model of rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. Structure of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor bound to an antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Haga, Kazuko; Kruse, Andrew C.; Asada, Hidetsugu

    2012-03-15

    The parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system regulates the activity of multiple organ systems. Muscarinic receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate the response to acetylcholine released from parasympathetic nerves. Their role in the unconscious regulation of organ and central nervous system function makes them potential therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 receptor) is essential for the physiological control of cardiovascular function through activation of G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels, and is of particular interest because of its extensive pharmacological characterization with both orthosteric and allosteric ligands. Here we report the structuremore » of the antagonist-bound human M2 receptor, the first human acetylcholine receptor to be characterized structurally, to our knowledge. The antagonist 3-quinuclidinyl-benzilate binds in the middle of a long aqueous channel extending approximately two-thirds through the membrane. The orthosteric binding pocket is formed by amino acids that are identical in all five muscarinic receptor subtypes, and shares structural homology with other functionally unrelated acetylcholine binding proteins from different species. A layer of tyrosine residues forms an aromatic cap restricting dissociation of the bound ligand. A binding site for allosteric ligands has been mapped to residues at the entrance to the binding pocket near this aromatic cap. The structure of the M2 receptor provides insights into the challenges of developing subtype-selective ligands for muscarinic receptors and their propensity for allosteric regulation.« less

  4. MDM2 antagonists synergize broadly and robustly with compounds targeting fundamental oncogenic signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Dongyin; Lofgren, Julie A.; Osgood, Tao; Robertson, Rebecca; Canon, Jude; Su, Cheng; Jones, Adrie; Zhao, Xiaoning; Deshpande, Chetan; Payton, Marc; Ledell, Jebediah; Hughes, Paul E.; Oliner, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    While MDM2 inhibitors hold great promise as cancer therapeutics, drug resistance will likely limit their efficacy as single agents. To identify drug combinations that might circumvent resistance, we screened for agents that could synergize with MDM2 inhibition in the suppression of cell viability. We observed broad and robust synergy when combining MDM2 antagonists with either MEK or PI3K inhibitors. Synergy was not limited to cell lines harboring MAPK or PI3K pathway mutations, nor did it depend on which node of the PI3K axis was targeted. MDM2 inhibitors also synergized strongly with BH3 mimetics, BCR-ABL antagonists, and HDAC inhibitors. MDM2 inhibitor-mediated synergy with agents targeting these mechanisms was much more prevalent than previously appreciated, implying that clinical translation of these combinations could have far-reaching implications for public health. These findings highlight the importance of combinatorial drug targeting and provide a framework for the rational design of MDM2 inhibitor clinical trials. PMID:24810962

  5. A Novel CXCR4 Antagonist CX549 Induces Neuroprotection in Stroke Brain.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kuo-Jen; Yu, Seong-Jin; Shia, Kak-Shan; Wu, Chien-Huang; Song, Jen-Shin; Kuan, Hsuan-Hao; Yeh, Kai-Chia; Chen, Chiung-Tong; Bae, Eunkyune; Wang, Yun

    2017-04-13

    C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) is a receptor for a pleiotropic chemokine CXCL12. Previous studies have shown that the acute administration of the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 reduced neuroinflammation in stroke brain and mobilized bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). The purpose of this study was to characterize the neuroprotective and neurotrophic effect of a novel CXCR4 antagonist CX549. We demonstrated that CX549 had a higher affinity for CXCR4 and was more potent than AMD3100 to inhibit CXCL12-mediated chemotaxis in culture. CX549 effectively reduced the activation of microglia and improved neuronal survival after injury in neuron/microglia cocultures. Early poststroke treatment with CX549 significantly improved behavioral function, reduced brain infarction, and suppressed the expression of inflammatory markers. Compared to AMD3100, CX549 has a higher affinity for CXCR4, is more efficient to mobilize HSCs for transplantation, and induces behavioral improvement. Our data support that CX549 is a potent anti-inflammatory agent, is neuroprotective against ischemic brain injury, and may have clinical implications for the treatment of stroke.

  6. Effect of H2-receptor antagonists on bile acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Shindo, K; Fukumura, M

    1995-04-01

    Several reports have been presented concerning pronounced overgrowth of bacteria in gastric juices of patients treated with H2-receptor antagonists. However, there has been no report concerning influence of H2-receptor antagonists on jejunal flora. Thus, to investigate the influence and its effect on bile acid metabolism, this study was performed: 1) to examine whether patients with gastric ulcers who have been treated with H2-receptor antagonists have positive bile acid breath tests due to bacterial overgrowth in their jejuna; 2) to verify that these bacteria, isolated and identified, have deconjugation ability; and 3) to determine whether the changes in the gastric pH are related to bacterial overgrowth. The methods used were detection of deconjugation of bile acids in early phase by a bile acid breath test using 5 muCi of oral glycine-1-14C labeled glycocholate, aspiration of jejunal fluids by a double lumen tube with a rubber cover on the tip, and examination of deconjugation ability by thin layer chromatography. Expired breath samples from all 18 patients after administration of H2-receptor antagonists showed a significant increase in 14CO2 specific activity compared with those before administration of H2-receptor antagonist and the normal controls, and bacterial overgrowth was found in the jejunal fluid of the patients after administration of H2-receptor antagonist. The administration of tetracycline to the 18 patients reduced the 14CO2 specific activity significantly. The following species were identified in the jejunal fluid samples obtained from the patients: Escherichia coli, Candida albicans, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, enterococcus, Lactobacillus bifidus, Bacteroides vulgatus, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides uniformis, Eubacterium lentum, and Eubacterium parvum. All of the species identified except for Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans deconjugated bile acids. There were significant correlations between the 14CO2

  7. Intact cell binding for in vitro prediction of sedative and non-sedative histamine H1-receptor antagonists based on receptor internalization.

    PubMed

    Hishinuma, Shigeru; Sato, Yuko; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Komazaki, Hiroshi; Saito, Masaki

    2008-05-01

    We evaluated changes in the binding properties of sedative and non-sedative histamine H1-receptor antagonists induced by internalization of H1 receptors in intact human U373 MG astrocytoma cells. Internalization of H1 receptors was induced without their degradation by treatment with 0.1 mM histamine for 30 min at 37 degrees C, and then the intact cell binding assay was performed at 4 degrees C. The binding properties of [3H]mepyramine, a cell-penetrating radioligand for H1 receptors, were not changed by histamine pretreatment. Displacement curves for sedative H1-receptor antagonists (diphenhydramine, chlorpheniramine, promethazine, ketotifen, azelastine and oxatomide) against [3H]mepyramine binding were not changed by histamine pretreatment. In contrast, the displacement curves for non-sedative H1-receptor antagonists (mequitazine, bepotastine, olopatadine, epinastine, carebastine, desloratadine and fexofenadine) were changed by histamine pretreatment: two types of changes, i.e. a rightward shift in the monophasic curve or an increase in the proportion of the low affinity component of the biphasic curve, were prevented under hypertonic conditions, in which clathrin-mediated receptor internalization is known to be inhibited. Thus, internalization-mediated changes in the binding properties of H1-receptor antagonists were well correlated with their sedative and non-sedative behaviors, which might confirm their permeability through the biomembrane and possibly the blood brain barrier.

  8. Small molecule inhibitor of apoptosis proteins antagonists: a patent review.

    PubMed

    Hird, Alexander W; Aquila, Brian M; Hennessy, Edward J; Vasbinder, Melissa M; Yang, Bin

    2015-07-01

    The family of inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) plays a key role in the suppression of proapoptotic signaling; hence, a small molecule that disrupts the binding of IAPs with their functional partner should restore apoptotic response to proapoptotic stimuli in cells. The continued publication of new patent applications of IAP antagonists over the past 4 years is a testament to the continued interest surrounding the IAP family of proteins. This review summarizes the IAP antagonist patent literature from 2010 to 2014. Monovalent and bivalent Smac mimetics will be covered as well as two new developments in the field: IAP antagonists coupled to or merged with other targeted agents and new BIR2 selective IAP antagonists. In addition to the well-explored scaffolds for monovalent and bivalent Smac-mimetics, some companies have taken more drastic approaches to explore new chemical space - for example, fragment-based approaches and macrocyclic inhibitors. Furthermore, other companies have designed compounds with alternative biological profiles - tethering to known kinase binding structures, trying to target to the mitochondria or introducing selective binding to the BIR2 domain. An overview of the status for the four small molecule IAP antagonists being evaluated in active human clinical trials is also provided.

  9. The muscle relaxant thiocolchicoside is an antagonist of GABAA receptor function in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Carta, Mario; Murru, Luca; Botta, Paolo; Talani, Giuseppe; Sechi, GianPietro; De Riu, PierLuigi; Sanna, Enrico; Biggio, Giovanni

    2006-09-01

    Thiocolchicoside (TCC) is used clinically for its muscle relaxant, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic properties, and it has been shown to interact with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors (GABAARs) and strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in the rat central nervous system. In contrast to a proposed agonistic action at these two types of inhibitory receptors, pharmacological evidence has shown that, under certain conditions, TCC manifests convulsant activity in animals and humans. We now show that the phasic and tonic GABAAR-mediated currents recorded from Purkinje cells and granule neurons, respectively, in parasagittal cerebellar slices from adult male rats were inhibited by TCC in a concentration-dependent manner. The median inhibitory concentrations of TCC for these effects were approximately 0.15 and approximately 0.9 microM, respectively. TCC did not potentiate GABABR-mediated currents in hippocampal slices, suggesting that its muscle relaxant action is not mediated by GABABRs. Intraperitoneal injection of TCC in rats either alone or in combination with negative modulators of GABAergic transmission revealed convulsant and proconvulsant actions of this drug. Our data, consistent with clinical observations of the epileptogenic effect of this compound, suggest that TCC is a potent competitive antagonist of GABAAR function.

  10. Barley MLA immune receptors directly interfere with antagonistically acting transcription factors to initiate disease resistance signaling.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng; Yu, Deshui; Jiao, Jian; Jing, Shaojuan; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Shen, Qian-Hua

    2013-03-01

    The nucleotide binding domain and Leucine-rich repeat (NLR)-containing proteins in plants and animals mediate pathogen sensing inside host cells and mount innate immune responses against microbial pathogens. The barley (Hordeum vulgare) mildew A (MLA) locus encodes coiled-coil (CC)-type NLRs mediating disease resistance against the powdery mildew pathogen Blumeria graminis. Here, we report direct interactions between MLA and two antagonistically acting transcription factors, MYB6 and WRKY1. The N-terminal CC signaling domain of MLA interacts with MYB6 to stimulate its DNA binding activity. MYB6 functions as a positive regulator of basal and MLA-mediated immunity responses to B. graminis. MYB6 DNA binding is antagonized by direct association with WRKY1 repressor, which in turn also interacts with the MLA CC domain. The activated form of full-length MLA10 receptor is needed to release MYB6 activator from WRKY1 repression and to stimulate MYB6-dependent gene expression. This implies that, while sequestered by the WRKY1 repressor in the presence of the resting immune receptor, MYB6 acts as an immediate and positive postactivation signaling component of the active state of MLA during transcriptional reprogramming for innate immune responses.

  11. The Use of IL-1 Receptor Antagonist (Anakinra) in Idiopathic Recurrent Pericarditis: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Baskar, Shankar; Klein, Allan L.; Zeft, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent pericarditis is a complication of acute pericarditis in 20–30% of the patients and is usually idiopathic in nature. The underlying pathogenesis of this condition remains unclear, although immune-mediated mechanisms seem likely. A subgroup of these patients with refractory symptoms can be challenging to manage, and multiple immunosuppressive medications have been used without consistent benefit. Anakinra, an interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, has been used in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and autoinflammatory syndromes. Preliminary evidence suggests that anakinra could be a promising therapy for idiopathic recurrent pericarditis. In this narrative review, we summarize the current understanding of the etiopathogenesis of idiopathic recurrent pericarditis, mechanism of action of anakinra, and the preliminary evidence, supporting the use of anakinra in pericarditis. PMID:26942035

  12. Development of novel azabenzofuran TRPA1 antagonists as in vivo tools.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Katrina W; Boezio, Alessandro A; Cheung, Eugene; Lee, Josie; Olivieri, Philip; Schenkel, Laurie B; Wan, Qian; Wang, Weiya; Wells, Mary C; Youngblood, Beth; Gavva, Narender R; Lehto, Sonya G; Geuns-Meyer, Stephanie

    2014-08-01

    The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel is activated by noxious stimuli including chemical irritants and endogenous inflammatory mediators. Antagonists of this channel are currently being investigated for use as therapeutic agents for treating pain, airway disorders, and itch. A novel azabenzofuran series was developed that demonstrated in vitro inhibition of allyl isothiocyanate (AITC)-induced (45)Ca(2+) uptake with nanomolar potencies against both human and rat TRPA1. From this series, compound 10 demonstrated in vivo target coverage in an AITC-induced flinching model in rats while providing unbound plasma concentrations up to 16-fold higher than the TRPA1 rat IC50. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Early Use of the NMDA Receptor Antagonist Ketamine in Refractory and Superrefractory Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Zeiler, F. A.

    2015-01-01

    Refractory status epilepticus (RSE) and superrefractory status epilepticus (SRSE) pose a difficult clinical challenge. Multiple cerebral receptor and transporter changes occur with prolonged status epilepticus leading to pharmacoresistance patterns unfavorable for conventional antiepileptics. In particular, n-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor upregulation leads to glutamate mediated excitotoxicity. Targeting these NMDA receptors may provide a novel approach to otherwise refractory seizures. Ketamine has been utilized in RSE. Recent systematic review indicates 56.5% and 63.5% cessation in seizures in adults and pediatrics, respectively. No complications were described. We should consider earlier implementation of ketamine or other NMDA receptor antagonists, for RSE. Prospective study of early implementation of ketamine should shed light on the role of such medications in RSE. PMID:25649724

  14. Evidence that endogenous inosine and adenosine-mediated hyperglycaemia during ischaemia-reperfusion through A3 adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Cortés, D; Guinzberg, R; Villalobos-Molina, R; Piña, E

    2009-10-01

    1 The molecular mechanism underlying stress-induced hyperglycemia has not been comprehensively clarified. Recently, we demonstrated in ischaemia-reperfusion (I-R) stress-subjected liver that inosine and adenosine are mainly responsible for the hyperglycemia observed. 2 We aimed to advance in the knowledge of the role of inosine plus adenosine as mediators of hepatic-induced hyperglycemia detected after I-R in lower limbs. 3 Acute ischaemia was conducted in anesthetized rats by occluding downstream abdominal aorta and cava vein; then, reperfusion was allowed. Blood samples from hepatic or abdominal cava veins were taken throughout the experiments to measure glucose, inosine and adenosine. Antagonists to adenosine (AdoR) and adrenergic receptors (AdrR) were administered during ischaemia to analyze their effect on hepatic glucose release. 4 Ischaemia up to 60 min produced minor increase of glucose and nucleosides blood values, but 5 min of ischaemia followed by 2- (or 10-) min reperfusion increased glucose 23%, and those of inosine or adenosine by 100%. After 60 min of ischaemia and 10 min of reperfusion, glycemia rose 2-fold and blood inosine and adenosine, 3.3- and 2.7-fold, respectively. A linear positive correlation, r(2), as high as 0.839 between glucose and either nucleoside blood values was calculated. The hyperglycemia response to I-R decreased by 0, 25, 33, 45 and 100% after selective inhibition of A(2B) AdoR, A(2A) AdoR, a(1B) AdrR, A(1) AdoR, and A(3) AdoR, respectively. 5 Inosine-adenosine couple through activation of hepatic A(3) AdoR is the main signal for releasing glucose from liver glycogen and for promoting hyperglycemia following experimental injury of I-R from lower limbs.

  15. New insights into the stereochemical requirements of the bradykinin B2 receptor antagonists binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupala, Cecylia S.; Gomez-Gutierrez, Patricia; Perez, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    Bradykinin (BK) is a member of the kinin family, released in response to inflammation, trauma, burns, shock, allergy and some cardiovascular diseases, provoking vasodilatation and increased vascular permeability among other effects. Their actions are mediated through at least two G-protein coupled receptors, B1 a receptor up-regulated during inflammation episodes or tissue trauma and B2 that is constitutively expressed in a variety of cell types. The goal of the present work is to carry out a structure-activity study of BK B2 antagonism, taking into account the stereochemical features of diverse non-peptide antagonists and the way these features translate into ligand anchoring points to complementary regions of the receptor, through the analysis of the respective ligand-receptor complex. For this purpose an atomistic model of the BK B2 receptor was built by homology modeling and subsequently refined embedded in a lipid bilayer by means of a 600 ns molecular dynamics trajectory. The average structure from the last hundred nanoseconds of the molecular dynamics trajectory was energy minimized and used as model of the receptor for docking studies. For this purpose, a set of compounds with antagonistic profile, covering maximal diversity were selected from the literature. Specifically, the set of compounds include Fasitibant, FR173657, Anatibant, WIN64338, Bradyzide, CHEMBL442294, and JSM10292. Molecules were docked into the BK B2 receptor model and the corresponding complexes analyzed to understand ligand-receptor interactions. The outcome of this study is summarized in a 3D pharmacophore that explains the observed structure-activity results and provides insight into the design of novel molecules with antagonistic profile. To prove the validity of the pharmacophore hypothesized a virtual screening process was also carried out. The pharmacophore was used as query to identify new hits using diverse databases of molecules. The results of this study revealed a set of new

  16. Histamine H4 receptor antagonists: the new antihistamines?

    PubMed

    Fung-Leung, Wai-Ping; Thurmond, Robin L; Ling, Ping; Karlsson, Lars

    2004-11-01

    Antihistamines (histamine H1 receptor antagonists) are a mainstay treatment for atopic allergy, yet they are only partially effective in relieving the symptoms of the disease. They also have very limited value for the treatment of asthma, despite the well-characterized bronchoconstrictory effects of histamine. The recent discovery of a fourth histamine receptor (H4), and the realization that it is exclusively expressed on hematopoietic cell types that are most implicated in the development and symptomatology of allergy and asthma, suggests that pharmacological targeting of the H4 receptor, either alone or in combination with H1 receptor antagonists, may prove useful for treating both allergy and asthma. Here we review the known biology associated with the H4 receptor, as well the effects of a highly selective H1 receptor antagonist.

  17. Rimonabant, a potent CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist, is a Gαi/oprotein inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Porcu, Alessandra; Melis, Miriam; Turecek, Rostislav; Ullrich, Celine; Mocci, Ignazia; Bettler, Bernhard; Gessa, Gian Luigi; Castelli, M Paola

    2018-05-01

    Rimonabant is a potent and selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist widely used in animal and clinical studies. Besides its antagonistic properties, numerous studies have shown that, at micromolar concentrations rimonabant behaves as an inverse agonist at CB1 receptors. The mechanism underpinning this activity is unclear. Here we show that micromolar concentrations of rimonabant inhibited Gα i/o -type G proteins, resulting in a receptor-independent block of G protein signaling. Accordingly, rimonabant decreased basal and agonist stimulated [ 35 S]GTPγS binding to cortical membranes of CB1- and GABA B -receptor KO mice and Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell membranes stably transfected with GABA B or D2 dopamine receptors. The structural analog of rimonabant, AM251, decreased basal and baclofen-stimulated GTPγS binding to rat cortical and CHO cell membranes expressing GABA B receptors. Rimonabant prevented G protein-mediated GABA B and D2 dopamine receptor signaling to adenylyl cyclase in Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells and to G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K + channels (GIRK) in midbrain dopamine neurons of CB1 KO mice. Rimonabant suppressed GIRK gating induced by GTPγS in CHO cells transfected with GIRK, consistent with a receptor-independent action. Bioluminescent resonance energy transfer (BRET) measurements in living CHO cells showed that, in presence or absence of co-expressed GABA B receptors, rimonabant stabilized the heterotrimeric Gαi/o-protein complex and prevented conformational rearrangements induced by GABA B receptor activation. Rimonabant failed to inhibit Gαs-mediated signaling, supporting its specificity for Gα i/o -type G proteins. The inhibition of Gα i/o protein provides a new site of rimonabant action that may help to understand its pharmacological and toxicological effects occurring at high concentrations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. TRPA1 antagonists as potential analgesic drugs.

    PubMed

    Andrade, E L; Meotti, F C; Calixto, J B

    2012-02-01

    The necessity of safe and effective treatments for chronic pain has intensified the search for new analgesic drugs. In the last few years, members of a closely-related family of ion channels, called transient receptor potential (TRP) have been identified in different cell types and their functions in physiological and pathological conditions have been characterized. The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), originally called ANKTM1 (ankyrin-like with transmembrane domains protein 1), is a molecule that has been conserved in different species during evolution; TRPA1 is a cation channel that functions as a cellular sensor, detecting mechanical, chemical and thermal stimuli, being a component of neuronal, epithelial, blood and smooth muscle tissues. In mammals, TRPA1 is largely expressed in primary sensory neurons that mediate somatosensory processes and nociceptive transmission. Recent studies have described the role of TRPA1 in inflammatory and neuropathic pain. However, its participation in cold sensation has not been agreed in different studies. In this review, we focus on data that support the relevance of the activation and blockade of TRPA1 in pain transmission, as well as the mechanisms underlying its activation and modulation by exogenous and endogenous stimuli. We also discuss recent advances in the search for new analgesic medicines targeting the TRPA1 channel. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Endothelin receptor antagonists influence cardiovascular morphology in uremic rats.

    PubMed

    Nabokov, A V; Amann, K; Wessels, S; Münter, K; Wagner, J; Ritz, E

    1999-02-01

    In is generally held that renal failure results in blood pressure (BP)-independent structural changes of the myocardium and the vasculature. The contribution, if any, of endothelin (ET) to these changes has been unknown. We morphometrically studied random samples of the left ventricle myocardium and small intramyocardial arteries in subtotally (5/6) nephrectomized (SNx) male Sprague-Dawley rats treated with either the selective ETA receptor antagonist BMS182874 (30 mg/kg/day) or the nonselective ETA/ETB receptor antagonist Ro46-2005 (30 mg/kg/day) in comparison with either sham-operated rats, untreated SNx, or SNx rats treated with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor trandolapril (0.1 mg/kg/day). Eight weeks later, systolic BP was lower in trandolapril-treated SNx compared with untreated SNx animals. No decrease in BP was seen following either ET receptor antagonist at the dose used. A significantly increased volume density of the myocardial interstitium was found in untreated SNx rats as compared with sham-operated controls. Such interstitial expansion was prevented by trandolapril and either ET receptor antagonist. SNx caused a substantial increase in the wall thickness of small intramyocardial arteries. The increase was prevented by trandolapril or BMS182874 treatment. The arteriolar wall:lumen ratio was significantly lower in all treated groups when compared with untreated SNx. In contrast, only trandolapril, but not the ET receptor antagonists, attenuated thickening of the aortic media in SNx animals. The ETA-selective and ETA/ETB-nonselective receptor antagonists appear to prevent development of myocardial fibrosis and structural changes of small intramyocardial arteries in experimental chronic renal failure. This effect is independent of systemic BP.

  20. Clinical Development of Histamine H4Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Thurmond, Robin L; Venable, Jennifer; Savall, Brad; La, David; Snook, Sandra; Dunford, Paul J; Edwards, James P

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of the histamine H 4 receptor (H 4 R) provided a new avenue for the exploration of the physiological role of histamine, as well as providing a new drug target for the development of novel antihistamines. The first step in this process was the identification of selective antagonists to help unravel the pharmacology of the H 4 R relative to other histamine receptors. The discovery of the selective H 4 R antagonist JNJ 7777120 was vital for showing a role for the H 4 R in inflammation and pruritus. While this compound has been very successful as a tool for understanding the function of the receptor, it has drawbacks, including a short in vivo half-life and hypoadrenocorticism toxicity in rats and dogs, that prevented advancing it into clinical studies. Further research let to the discovery of JNJ 39758979, which, similar to JNJ 7777120, was a potent and selective H 4 R antagonist and showed anti-inflammatory and anti-pruritic activity preclinically. JNJ 39758979 advanced into human clinical studies and showed efficacy in reducing experimental pruritus and in patients with atopic dermatitis. However, development of this compound was terminated due to the occurrence of drug-induced agranulocytosis. This was overcome by developing another H 4 R antagonist with a different chemical structure, toreforant, that does not appear to have this side effect. Toreforant has been tested in clinical studies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, or psoriasis. In conclusions there have been many H 4 R antagonists reported in the literature, but only a few have been studied in humans underscoring the difficulty in finding ligands with all of the properties necessary for testing in the clinic. Nevertheless, the clinical data to date suggests that H 4 R antagonists can be beneficial in treating atopic dermatitis and pruritus.

  1. Histamine 2 Receptor Antagonists and Proton Pump Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brinkworth, Megan D; Aouthmany, Mouhammad; Sheehan, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Within the last 50 years, the pharmacologic market for gastric disease has grown exponentially. Currently, medical management with histamine 2 receptor antagonist and proton pump inhibitors are the mainstay of therapy over surgical intervention. These are generally regarded as safe medications, but there are growing numbers of cases documenting adverse effects, especially those manifesting in the skin. Here we review the pharmacology, common clinical applications, and adverse reactions of both histamine 2 receptor antagonists and proton pump inhibitors with a particular focus on the potential for allergic reactions including allergic contact dermatitis.

  2. Teratogenicity with angiotensin II receptor antagonists in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Boix, E; Zapater, P; Picó, A; Moreno, O

    2005-12-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin II (AT-II)-receptor-antagonists have been demonstrated to cause fetotoxicity when administered to women during the second and third trimester of pregnancy. Although use of ACE inhibitors during the first trimester of pregnancy seems to be safe, with no associated teratogenicity, there is not sufficient information regarding the safety of first-trimester exposure to AT-II-receptor-antagonists. We report a case of exencephaly and unilateral renal agenesia in a fetus of a diabetic woman who became pregnant while taking irbesartan.

  3. Fasitibant chloride, a kinin B2 receptor antagonist, and dexamethasone interact to inhibit carrageenan-induced inflammatory arthritis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Valenti, Claudio; Giuliani, Sandro; Cialdai, Cecilia; Tramontana, Manuela; Maggi, Carlo Alberto

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Bradykinin, through the kinin B2 receptor, is involved in inflammatory processes related to arthropathies. B2 receptor antagonists inhibited carrageenan-induced arthritis in rats in synergy with anti-inflammatory steroids. The mechanism(s) underlying this drug interaction was investigated. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Drugs inhibiting inflammatory mediators released by carrageenan were injected, alone or in combination, into the knee joint of pentobarbital anaesthetized rats 30 min before intra-articular administration of carrageenan. Their effects on the carrageenan-induced inflammatory responses (joint pain, oedema and neutrophil recruitment) and release of inflammatory mediators (prostaglandins, IL-1β, IL-6 and the chemokine GRO/CINC-1), were assessed after 6 h. KEY RESULTS The combination of fasitibant chloride (MEN16132) and dexamethasone was more effective than each drug administered alone in inhibiting knee joint inflammation and release of inflammatory mediators. Fasitibant chloride, MK571, atenolol, des-Arg9-[Leu8]-bradykinin (B2 receptor, leukotriene, catecholamine and B1 receptor antagonists, respectively) and dexketoprofen (COX inhibitor), reduced joint pain and, except for the latter, also diminished joint oedema. A combination of drugs inhibiting joint pain (fasitibant chloride, des-Arg9-[Leu8]-bradykinin, dexketoprofen, MK571 and atenolol) and oedema (fasitibant chloride, des-Arg9-[Leu8]-bradykinin, MK571 and atenolol) abolished the respective inflammatory response, producing inhibition comparable with that achieved with the combination of fasitibant chloride and dexamethasone. MK571 alone was able to block neutrophil recruitment. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Bradykinin-mediated inflammatory responses to intra-articular carrageenan were not controlled by steroids, which were not capable of preventing bradykinin effects either by direct activation of the B2 receptor, or through the indirect effects mediated by release of eicosanoids

  4. A new and specific non-NMDA receptor antagonist, FG 9065, blocks L-AP4-evoked depolarization in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Sheardown, M J

    1988-04-13

    L(+)-AP4 (2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate) depolarized slices of rat cerebral cortex, when applied following a 2 min priming application of quisqualate. This response diminishes with time and is not seen after NMDA application. A new selective non-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist, 6-cyano-7-nitro-2,3-dihydroxyquinoxaline (FG 9065), inhibits the L(+)-AP4 depolarization. It is argued that the response is mediated indirectly by postsynaptic quisqualate receptors.

  5. The opioid antagonist, β-funaltrexamine, inhibits chemokine expression in human astroglial cells

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Randall L.; Buck, Daniel J.; Saffarian, Neda; Stevens, Craig W.

    2007-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that neuroinflammatory responses in astroglia, including chemokine expression, are altered by opioids. Astroglial chemokines, such as CXCL10, are instrumental in response to many neuropathological insults. Opioid mediated disruption of astroglial CXCL10 expression may be detrimental in opioid abusers or patients receiving acute opioid therapy. We have characterized the in vitro effects of opioids on CXCL10 protein expression in human astroglial (A172) cells. The proinflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α induced CXCL10 expression in A172 cells. Using MG-132, helenalin and SN50 [inhibitors of the transcription factor, nuclear factor (NF)-κB], we determined that NF-κB activation is instrumental in TNFα induced CXCL10 expression in A172 astroglia. Morphine exposure during the 24 h TNFα stimulation period did not alter CXCL10 expression. However, fentanyl, a more potent mu opioid receptor (MOR) agonist, inhibited TNFα induced CXCL10 expression. Interestingly, neither the nonselective opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone nor β-funaltrexamine (β-FNA), a highly selective MOR antagonist, blocked fentanyl mediated inhibition of TNFα induced CXCL10 expression. Rather, β-FNA dose dependently inhibited TNFα induced CXCL10 expression with a greater potency than that observed for fentanyl. Immunoblot analysis indicated that morphine, fentanyl and β-FNA each reduced TNFα induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65. These data show that β-FNA and fentanyl inhibit TNFα induced CXCL10 expression via a MOR independent mechanism. Data also suggest that inhibition of TNFα induced CXCL10 expression by fentanyl and β-FNA is not directly related to a reduction in NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation. Further investigation is necessary in order to fully elucidate the mechanism through which these two opioid compounds inhibit CXCL10 expression. Understanding the mechanism by which chemokine expression is suppressed, particularly by the

  6. Controlling the cytokine storm in severe bacterial diarrhoea with an oral Toll-like receptor 4 antagonist.

    PubMed

    Islam, Dilara; Lombardini, Eric; Ruamsap, Nattaya; Imerbsin, Rawiwan; Khantapura, Patchariya; Teo, Ian; Neesanant, Pimmnapar; Gonwong, Siriphan; Yongvanitchit, Kosol; Swierczewski, Brett E; Mason, Carl J; Shaunak, Sunil

    2016-02-01

    Shigella dysenteriae causes the most severe of all infectious diarrhoeas and colitis. We infected rhesus macaques orally and also treated them orally with a small and non-absorbable polypropyletherimine dendrimer glucosamine that is a Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) antagonist. Antibiotics were not given for this life-threatening infection. Six days later, the clinical score for diarrhoea, mucus and blood was 54% lower, colon interleukin-8 and interleukin-6 were both 77% lower, and colon neutrophil infiltration was 75% less. Strikingly, vasculitis did not occur and tissue fibrin thrombi were reduced by 67%. There was no clinical toxicity or adverse effect of dendrimer glucosamine on systemic immunity. This is the first report in non-human primates of the therapeutic efficacy of a small and orally bioavailable TLR antagonist in severe infection. Our results show that an oral TLR4 antagonist can enable controlled resolution of the infection-related-inflammatory response and can also prevent neutrophil-mediated gut wall necrosis in severe infectious diarrhoeas. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Association between Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist (IL1RN) Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (VNTR) Polymorphism and Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Mohammad; Naderi, Mohammad; Ebrahimi, Mahboubeh; Amininia, Shadi; Bahari, Gholamreza; Taheri, Mohsen; Eskandari-Nasab, Ebrahim; Ghavami, Saeid

    2015-02-01

    Macrophages and T-lymphocytes are involved in immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Macrophage produces interleukin (IL)-1 as an inflammatory mediator. IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL1-Ra) is a natural antagonist of IL-1 receptors. In this study we aimed to examine the possible association between the variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL1RN) gene and pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in a sample of Iranian population. Our study is a case-control study and we examined the VNTR of the IL1RN gene in 265 PTB and 250 healthy subjects by PCR. Neither the overall chi-square comparison of PTB and control subjects nor the logistic regression analysis indicated any association between VNTR IL1RN polymorphism and PTB. Our data suggest that VNTR IL1RN polymorphism may not be associated with the risk of PTB in a sample of Iranian population. Larger studies with different ethnicities are needed to find out the impact of IL1RN VNTR polymorphism on risk of developing TB.

  8. Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone antagonists for assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed

    Al-Inany, Hesham G; Youssef, Mohamed A; Ayeleke, Reuben Olugbenga; Brown, Julie; Lam, Wai Sun; Broekmans, Frank J

    2016-04-29

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists can be used to prevent a luteinizing hormone (LH) surge during controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) without the hypo-oestrogenic side-effects, flare-up, or long down-regulation period associated with agonists. The antagonists directly and rapidly inhibit gonadotrophin release within several hours through competitive binding to pituitary GnRH receptors. This property allows their use at any time during the follicular phase. Several different regimens have been described including multiple-dose fixed (0.25 mg daily from day six to seven of stimulation), multiple-dose flexible (0.25 mg daily when leading follicle is 14 to 15 mm), and single-dose (single administration of 3 mg on day 7 to 8 of stimulation) protocols, with or without the addition of an oral contraceptive pill. Further, women receiving antagonists have been shown to have a lower incidence of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). Assuming comparable clinical outcomes for the antagonist and agonist protocols, these benefits would justify a change from the standard long agonist protocol to antagonist regimens. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2001, and previously updated in 2006 and 2011. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists compared with the standard long protocol of GnRH agonists for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation in assisted conception cycles. We searched the Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Trials Register (searched from inception to May 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, inception to 28 April 2015), Ovid MEDLINE (1966 to 28 April 2015), EMBASE (1980 to 28 April 2015), PsycINFO (1806 to 28 April 2015), CINAHL (to 28 April 2015) and trial registers to 28 April 2015, and handsearched bibliographies of relevant publications and reviews, and abstracts of major scientific meetings, for

  9. Antagonistic peptide technology for functional dissection of CLE peptides revisited.

    PubMed

    Czyzewicz, Nathan; Wildhagen, Mari; Cattaneo, Pietro; Stahl, Yvonne; Pinto, Karine Gustavo; Aalen, Reidunn B; Butenko, Melinka A; Simon, Rüdiger; Hardtke, Christian S; De Smet, Ive

    2015-08-01

    In the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, over 1000 putative genes encoding small, presumably secreted, signalling peptides can be recognized. However, a major obstacle in identifying the function of genes encoding small signalling peptides is the limited number of available loss-of-function mutants. To overcome this, a promising new tool, antagonistic peptide technology, was recently developed. Here, this antagonistic peptide technology was tested on selected CLE peptides and the related IDA peptide and its usefulness in the context of studies of peptide function discussed. Based on the analyses, it was concluded that the antagonistic peptide approach is not the ultimate means to overcome redundancy or lack of loss-of-function lines. However, information collected using antagonistic peptide approaches (in the broad sense) can be very useful, but these approaches do not work in all cases and require a deep insight on the interaction between the ligand and its receptor to be successful. This, as well as peptide ligand structure considerations, should be taken into account before ordering a wide range of synthetic peptide variants and/or generating transgenic plants. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  10. Antagonistic peptide technology for functional dissection of CLE peptides revisited

    PubMed Central

    Czyzewicz, Nathan; Wildhagen, Mari; Cattaneo, Pietro; Stahl, Yvonne; Pinto, Karine Gustavo; Aalen, Reidunn B.; Butenko, Melinka A.; Simon, Rüdiger; Hardtke, Christian S.; De Smet, Ive

    2015-01-01

    In the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, over 1000 putative genes encoding small, presumably secreted, signalling peptides can be recognized. However, a major obstacle in identifying the function of genes encoding small signalling peptides is the limited number of available loss-of-function mutants. To overcome this, a promising new tool, antagonistic peptide technology, was recently developed. Here, this antagonistic peptide technology was tested on selected CLE peptides and the related IDA peptide and its usefulness in the context of studies of peptide function discussed. Based on the analyses, it was concluded that the antagonistic peptide approach is not the ultimate means to overcome redundancy or lack of loss-of-function lines. However, information collected using antagonistic peptide approaches (in the broad sense) can be very useful, but these approaches do not work in all cases and require a deep insight on the interaction between the ligand and its receptor to be successful. This, as well as peptide ligand structure considerations, should be taken into account before ordering a wide range of synthetic peptide variants and/or generating transgenic plants. PMID:26136270

  11. Medium-Induced Antagonistic Behavior in Staphylococcus Aureus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benathen, Isaiah A.

    1992-01-01

    Antagonism is the production of substances by microorganisms that inhibit or prevent the growth of other bacteria. This paper demonstrates the antagonistic behavior of gram-positive coccus on the B. subtilis and Enterococcus faecalis gram-positive microorganisms, showing that the process of antagonism is sometimes dependent on the nutritional…

  12. The Effect of Antagonist Muscle Sensory Input on Force Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Onushko, Tanya; Schmit, Brian D.; Hyngstrom, Allison

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand how stretch-related sensory feedback from an antagonist muscle affects agonist muscle output at different contraction levels in healthy adults. Ten young (25.3 ± 2.4 years), healthy subjects performed constant isometric knee flexion contractions (agonist) at 6 torque levels: 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 30%, and 40% of their maximal voluntary contraction. For half of the trials, subjects received patellar tendon taps (antagonist sensory feedback) during the contraction. We compared error in targeted knee flexion torque and hamstring muscle activity, with and without patellar tendon tapping, across the 6 torque levels. At lower torque levels (5%, 10%, and 15%), subjects produced greater knee torque error following tendon tapping compared with the same torque levels without tendon tapping. In contrast, we did not find any difference in torque output at higher target levels (20%, 30%, and 40%) between trials with and without tendon tapping. We also observed a load-dependent increase in the magnitude of agonist muscle activity after tendon taps, with no associated load-dependent increase in agonist and antagonist co-activation, or reflex inhibition from the antagonist tapping. The findings suggest that at relatively low muscle activity there is a deficiency in the ability to correct motor output after sensory disturbances, and cortical centers (versus sub-cortical) are likely involved. PMID:26186590

  13. An Antagonistic Dialogue about Chaordic Systems Thinking: Part II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wafler, Toni

    2004-01-01

    This paper is a continuation of the antagonistic dialogue about the differences of chaordic systems thinking (CST) and socio-technical systems design (STS). In this second part of the conversation a concrete example is used to illustrate the added value provided by CST. Whereas STS focuses on an organization's surface by designing processes and…

  14. Retention and Outcome in a Narcotic Antagonist Treatment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capone, Thomas; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Patients in an outpatient narcotic antagonist treatment program were followed through their course of treatment. Those who remained longer were found to enter treatment with more stable employment records and less recent opiate use. They also appeared more successful at termination, with better vocational stability, less extraneous drug use, and…

  15. Indications for the use of parenteral H2-receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J C; Walker, J P

    1984-11-19

    Development of acute mucosal ulceration is a complex series of catabolic interactions. Hospitalized patients with duodenal or gastric ulcer, pathologic gastric hypersecretory states (such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome), gastric outlet obstruction, esophagitis, severe gastritis or duodenitis, sepsis, trauma (particularly head injury or burns), and some patients receiving high-dose corticosteroids are at risk of developing acute stress ulcers. Treatment should be initiated as soon as the patient is identified as being at risk, because measures designed to prevent bleeding or perforation are more effective than those designed to stop bleeding once it supervenes and the cascade of multiple organ failure commences. The presence of acid will trigger the onset of this condition; however, ulceration will not occur if the intraluminal pH can be maintained above 5 by periodic antacid treatment or by H2-receptor blockade. The dosing regimen of antacid or of H2-receptor antagonist should not be fixed, but should be sufficient to keep the gastric pH higher than 5. Antagonists administered via a nasogastric tube are the first line of defense, but 30 to 50 percent of the most ill patients will also be treated parenterally with H2-receptor antagonists. Parenteral H2-receptor blockade therapy is indicated in these patients when the risk of acute or continued ulceration of esophageal, gastric, or duodenal mucosa is high and the oral administration of medication is either not possible or the response to such therapy is unreliable. Parenteral H2-receptor antagonists are rarely administered alone.

  16. Non-NMDA receptor antagonist-induced drinking in rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Z.; Johnson, A. K.

    1998-01-01

    Glutamate has been implicated in the central control of mechanisms that maintain body fluid homeostasis. The present studies demonstrate that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of the non-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists 6, 7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX) and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3 dione (CNQX) induce drinking in rats. The dipsogenic effect of i.c.v. DNQX was antagonized by the non-NMDA receptor agonist alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA). The water intake induced by DNQX was also blocked by pretreatment with a NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801, but not by angiotensin type 1 (AT1) or acetylcholine muscarinic receptor antagonists (losartan and atropine). The results indicate that non-NMDA receptors may exert a tonic inhibitory effect within brain circuits that control dipsogenic activity and that functional integrity of NMDA receptors may be required for the non-NMDA receptor antagonists to induce water intake. Copyright 1998 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  17. Characterization of a novel non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qun-Yi; Zhang, Meng; State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai

    2010-01-15

    Selective antagonists of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) are desirable for the treatment of hypercortisolemia associated with Cushing's syndrome, psychic depression, obesity, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, and glaucoma. NC3327, a non-steroidal small molecule with potent binding affinity to GR (K{sub i} = 13.2 nM), was identified in a high-throughput screening effort. As a full GR antagonist, NC3327 greatly inhibits the dexamethasone (Dex) induction of marker genes involved in hepatic gluconeogenesis, but has a minimal effect on matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), a GR responsive pro-inflammatory gene. Interestingly, the compound recruits neither coactivators nor corepressors to the GR complex but competes with glucocorticoids formore » the interaction between GR and a coactivator peptide. Moreover, NC3327 does not trigger GR nuclear translocation, but significantly blocks Dex-induced GR transportation to the nucleus, and thus appears to be a 'competitive' GR antagonist. Therefore, the non-steroidal compound, NC3327, may represent a new class of GR antagonists as potential therapeutics for a variety of cortisol-related endocrine disorders.« less

  18. Neuroprotection by NMDA receptor antagonists in a variety of neuropathologies.

    PubMed

    Palmer, G C

    2001-09-01

    Because of adverse reactions, early efforts to introduce high affinity competitive or use-dependent NMDA receptor antagonists into patients suffering from stroke, head trauma or epilepsy met with failure. Later it was discovered that both low affinity use-dependent NMDA receptor antagonists and compounds with selective affinity for the NR2B receptor subunit met the criteria for safe administration into patients. Furthermore, these low affinity antagonists exhibit significant mechanistic differences from their higher affinity counterparts. Success of the latter is attested to the ability of the following low affinity compounds to be marketed: 1) Cough suppressant-dextromethorphan (available for decades); 2) Parkinson's disease--amantadine, memantine and budipine; 3) Dementia--memantine; and 4) Epilepsy--felbamate. Moreover, Phase III clinical trials are ongoing with remacemide for epilepsy and Huntington's disease and head trauma for HU-211. A host of compounds are or were under evaluation for the possible treatment of stroke, head trauma, hyperalgesia and various neurodegenerative disorders. Despite the fact that other drugs with associated NMDA receptor mechanisms have reached clinical status, this review focuses only on those competitive and use-dependent NMDA receptor antagonists that reached clinical trails. The ensuing discussions link the in vivo pharmacological investigations that led to the success/mistakes/ failures for eventual testing of promising compounds in the clinic.

  19. α-Aryl pyrrolidine sulfonamides as TRPA1 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vishal A; Shore, Daniel G M; Chen, Huifen; Chen, Jun; Do, Steven; Hackos, David H; Kolesnikov, Aleks; Lyssikatos, Joseph P; Tay, Suzanne; Wang, Lan; Estrada, Anthony A

    2016-01-15

    A series of α-aryl pyrrolidine sulfonamide TRPA1 antagonists were advanced from an HTS hit to compounds that were stable in liver microsomes with retention of TRPA1 potency. Metabolite identification studies and physicochemical properties were utilized as a strategy for compound design. These compounds serve as starting points for further compound optimization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Fine-Tuning Development Through Antagonistic Peptides: An Emerging Theme.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Suk; De Smet, Ive

    2016-12-01

    Peptide ligand-receptor kinase interactions have emerged as a key component of plant growth and development. Now, highly related small signaling peptides have been shown to act antagonistically on the same receptor kinase, providing new insights into how plants optimize developmental processes using competitive peptides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Screening and Selection of New Antagonists of the RING-Mediated Hdm2/Hdmx Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    biological applications. Adv Drug Deliv Rev, 2009, 61, 953-964. [36] Duchardt, F.;Fotin-Mleczek, M.;Schwarz, H.;Fischer, R.; Brock , R. A comprehensive model...2009) 953-964. [58] F. Duchardt, M. Fotin-Mleczek, H. Schwarz, R. Fischer, R. Brock , A comprehensive model for the cellular uptake of cationic cell...backbone-engineered HIV pro- tease. Science. 1992;256(5054):221–5. 71. Kohn M, Breinbauer R. The staudinger ligation—a gift to chemical biology

  2. Screening and Selection of New Antagonists of the RING-Mediated Hdm2/Hdmx Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    B1 was active against S. aureus, but not E. coli [15], and in the second study , led by Gran Fig. (5...antibiotics. Anti-HIV Activity The anti-HIV activity of cyclotides has been one of the most extensively studied so far due to its potential pharmacological...39]. Recent studies have also suggested a strong correlation between the hydrophobic character of cyclotides and their anti-HIV activities [119

  3. Screening and Selection of New Antagonists of the RING-Mediated Hdm2/Hdmx Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    Page Introduction…………………………………………………………….………..….. 4 Body………………………………………………………………………………….. 5 Key Research...papers #3, #4 and #5 (see appendix section). Key Research Accomplishments • We have accomplished the biosynthesis of a large combinatorial library...processed and cyclized has not been completely elucidated yet. However, recent studies suggest that an asparaginyl endopeptidase (AEP) is a key element

  4. Antagonistic Serotonergic and Octopaminergic Neural Circuits Mediate Food-Dependent Locomotory Behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    McCloskey, Richard J.; Peters, Emily

    2017-01-01

    Biogenic amines are conserved signaling molecules that link food cues to behavior and metabolism in a wide variety of organisms. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the biogenic amines serotonin (5-HT) and octopamine regulate a number of food-related behaviors. Using a novel method for long-term quantitative behavioral imaging, we show that 5-HT and octopamine jointly influence locomotor activity and quiescence in feeding and fasting hermaphrodites, and we define the neural circuits through which this modulation occurs. We show that 5-HT produced by the ADF neurons acts via the SER-5 receptor in muscles and neurons to suppress quiescent behavior and promote roaming in fasting worms, whereas 5-HT produced by the NSM neurons acts on the MOD-1 receptor in AIY neurons to promote low-amplitude locomotor behavior characteristic of well fed animals. Octopamine, produced by the RIC neurons, acts via SER-3 and SER-6 receptors in SIA neurons to promote roaming behaviors characteristic of fasting animals. We find that 5-HT signaling is required for animals to assume food-appropriate behavior, whereas octopamine signaling is required for animals to assume fasting-appropriate behavior. The requirement for both neurotransmitters in both the feeding and fasting states enables increased behavioral adaptability. Our results define the molecular and neural pathways through which parallel biogenic amine signaling tunes behavior appropriately to nutrient conditions. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Animals adjust behavior in response to environmental changes, such as fluctuations in food abundance, to maximize survival and reproduction. Biogenic amines, such as like serotonin, are conserved neurotransmitters that regulate behavior and metabolism in relation to energy status. Disruptions of biogenic amine signaling contribute to human neurological diseases of mood, appetite, and movement. In this study, we investigated the roles of the biogenic amines serotonin and octopamine in regulating locomotion behaviors associated with feeding and fasting in the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans. We identified neural circuits through which these signals work to govern behavior. Understanding the molecular pathways through which biogenic amines function in model organisms may improve our understanding of dysfunctions of appetite and behavior found in mammals, including humans. PMID:28698386

  5. Ultra-low dose cannabinoid antagonist AM251 enhances cannabinoid anticonvulsant effects in the pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure in mice.

    PubMed

    Gholizadeh, Shervin; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Ghasemi, Mehdi; Bahremand, Arash; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2007-11-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that cannabinoid compounds are anticonvulsant since they have inhibitory effects at micromolar doses, which are mediated by activated receptors coupling to Gi/o proteins. Surprisingly, both the analgesic and anticonvulsant effects of opioids are enhanced by ultra-low doses (nanomolar to picomolar) of the opioid antagonist naltrexone and as opioid and cannabinoid systems interact, it has been shown that ultra-low dose naltrexone also enhances cannabinoid-induced antinociception. However, regarding the seizure modulating properties of both classes of receptors this study investigated whether ultra-low dose cannabinoid antagonist AM251 influences cannabinoid anticonvulsant effects. The clonic seizure threshold (CST) was tested in separate groups of male NMRI mice following injection of vehicle, the cannabinoid selective agonist arachidonyl-2-chloroethylamide (ACEA) and ultra-low doses of the cannabinoid CB1 antagonist AM251 and a combination of ACEA and AM251 doses in a model of clonic seizure induced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ). Systemic administration of ultra-low doses of AM251 (10 fg/kg-100 ng/kg) significantly potentiated the anticonvulsant effect of ACEA at 0.5 and 1 mg/kg. Moreover, inhibition of cannabinoid induced excitatory signaling by AM251 (100 pg/kg) unmasked a strong anticonvulsant effect for very low doses of ACEA (100 ng/kg-100 microg/kg), suggesting that a presumed inhibitory component of cannabinoid receptor signaling can exert strong seizure-protective effects even at very low levels of cannabinoid receptor activation. A similar potentiation by AM251 (100 pg/kg and 1 ng/kg) of anticonvulsant effects of non-effective dose of ACEA (0.5 and 1 mg/kg) was also observed in the generalized tonic-clonic model of seizure. The present data suggest that ultra-low doses of cannabinoid receptor antagonists may provide a potent strategy to modulate seizure susceptibility, especially in conjunction with very low doses of

  6. Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone antagonists for assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed

    Al-Inany, Hesham G; Youssef, Mohamed Afm; Aboulghar, Mohamed; Broekmans, Frank; Sterrenburg, Monique; Smit, Janine; Abou-Setta, Ahmed M

    2011-05-11

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists can be used to prevent a luteinizing hormone (LH) surge during controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) without the hypo-estrogenic side-effects, flare-up, or long down-regulation period associated with agonists. The antagonists directly and rapidly inhibit gonadotropin release within several hours through competitive binding to pituitary GnRH receptors. This property allows their use at any time during the follicular phase. Several different regimes have been described including multiple-dose fixed (0.25 mg daily from day six to seven of stimulation), multiple-dose flexible (0.25 mg daily when leading follicle is 14 to 15 mm), and single-dose (single administration of 3 mg on day 7 to 8 of stimulation) protocols, with or without the addition of an oral contraceptive pill. Further, women receiving antagonists have been shown to have a lower incidence of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). Assuming comparable clinical outcomes for the antagonist and agonist protocols, these benefits would justify a change from the standard long agonist protocol to antagonist regimens. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2001, and previously updated in 2006. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists with the standard long protocol of GnRH agonists for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation in assisted conception cycle We performed electronic searches of major databases, for example Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE (from 1987 to April 2010); and handsearched bibliographies of relevant publications and reviews, and abstracts of major scientific meetings, for example the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) and American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM). A date limited search of Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL

  7. Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone antagonists for assisted reproductive technology.

    PubMed

    Gilliam, Melissa L

    2011-09-01

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists can be used to prevent a luteinizing hormone (LH) surge during controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) without the hypo-estrogenic side-effects, flare-up, or long down-regulation period associated with agonists. The antagonists directly and rapidly inhibit gonadotrophin release within several hours through competitive binding to pituitary GnRH receptors. This property allows their use at any time during the follicular phase. Several different regimes have been described including multiple-dose fixed (0.25 mg daily from day six to seven of stimulation), multiple-dose flexible (0.25 mg daily when leading follicle is 14 to 15 mm), and single-dose (single administration of 3 mg on day 7 to 8 of stimulation) protocols, with or without the addition of an oral contraceptive pill. Further, women receiving antagonists have been shown to have a lower incidence of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). Assuming comparable clinical outcomes for the antagonist and agonist protocols, these benefits would justify a change from the standard long agonist protocol to antagonist regimens. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2001, and previously updated in 2006. To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists compared with the standard long protocol of GnRH agonists for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation in assisted conception cycle. We performed electronic searches of major databases, for example Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE (from 1987 to April 2010); and handsearched bibliographies of relevant publications and reviews, and abstracts of major scientific meetings, for example the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) and American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM). : Two review authors independently screened the relevant citations for randomized controlled trials

  8. Effects of muscarinic receptor antagonists on cocaine discrimination in wild-type mice and in muscarinic receptor M1, M2, and M4 receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Lauren; Thomsen, Morgane

    2017-06-30

    Muscarinic M 1 /M 4 receptor stimulation can reduce abuse-related effects of cocaine and may represent avenues for treating cocaine addiction. Muscarinic antagonists can mimic and enhance effects of cocaine, including discriminative stimulus (S D ) effects, but the receptor subtypes mediating those effects are not known. A better understanding of the complex cocaine/muscarinic interactions is needed to evaluate and develop potential muscarinic-based medications. Here, knockout mice lacking M 1 , M 2 , or M 4 receptors (M 1 -/- , M 2 -/- , M 4 -/- ), as well as control wild-type mice and outbred Swiss-Webster mice, were trained to discriminate 10mg/kg cocaine from saline. Muscarinic receptor antagonists with no subtype selectivity (scopolamine), or preferential affinity at the M 1 , M 2 , or M 4 subtype (telenzepine, trihexyphenidyl; methoctramine, AQ-RA 741; tropicamide) were tested alone and in combination with cocaine. In intact animals, antagonists with high affinity at M 1 /M 4 receptors partially substituted for cocaine and increased the S D effect of cocaine, while M 2 -preferring antagonists did not substitute, and reduced the S D effect of cocaine. The cocaine-like effects of scopolamine were absent in M 1 -/- mice. The cocaine S D attenuating effects of methoctramine were absent in M 2 -/- mice and almost absent in M 1 -/- mice. The findings indicate that the cocaine-like S D effects of muscarinic antagonists are primarily mediated through M 1 receptors, with a minor contribution of M 4 receptors. The data also support our previous findings that stimulation of M 1 receptors and M 4 receptors can each attenuate the S D effect of cocaine, and show that this can also be achieved by blocking M 2 autoreceptors, likely via increased acetylcholine release. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Mediator Deathwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Tony

    2005-01-01

    The most discussed and analyzed form of deathwork is the dyadic "therapist" [double arrow] "client" relationship, but this far from exhausts the various types of professional work involving the dead. Mediator deathwork is where the professional gleans or constructs information about the dead, edits and polishes it, and publicly…

  10. Antagonistic interactions between plant competition and insect herbivory.

    PubMed

    Schädler, Martin; Brandl, Roland; Haase, Josephine

    2007-06-01

    Interspecific competition between plants and herbivory by specialized insects can have synergistic effects on the growth and performance of the attacked host plant. We tested the hypothesis that competition between plants may also negatively affect the performance of herbivores as well as their top-down effect on the host plant. In such a case, the combined effects of competition and herbivory may be less than expected from a simple multiplicative response. In other words, competition and herbivory may interact antagonistically. In a greenhouse experiment, Poa annua was grown in the presence or absence of a competitor (either Plantago lanceolata or Trifolium repens), as well as with or without a Poa-specialist aphid herbivore. Both competition and herbivory negatively affected Poa growth. Competition also reduced aphid density on Poa. This effect could in part be explained by changes in the biomass and the nitrogen content of Poa shoots. In treatments with competitors, reduced aphid densities alleviated the negative effect of herbivory on above- and belowground Poa biomass. Hence, we were able to demonstrate an antagonistic interaction between plant-plant interspecific competition and herbivory. However, response indices suggested that antagonistic interactions between competition and herbivory were contingent on the identity of the competitor. We found the antagonistic effect only in treatments with T. repens as the competitor. We conclude that both competitor identity and the herbivore's ability to respond with changes in its density or activity to plant competition affect the magnitude and direction (synergistic vs. antagonistic) of the interaction between competition and herbivory on plant growth.

  11. Role of the NR2A/2B subunits of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor in glutamate-induced glutamic acid decarboxylase alteration in cortical GABAergic neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Monnerie, H; Hsu, F-C; Coulter, D A; Le Roux, P D

    2010-12-29

    The vulnerability of brain neuronal cell subpopulations to neurologic insults varies greatly. Among cells that survive a pathological insult, for example ischemia or brain trauma, some may undergo morphological and/or biochemical changes that may compromise brain function. The present study is a follow-up of our previous studies that investigated the effect of glutamate-induced excitotoxicity on the GABA synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65/67)'s expression in surviving DIV 11 cortical GABAergic neurons in vitro [Monnerie and Le Roux, (2007) Exp Neurol 205:367-382, (2008) Exp Neurol 213:145-153]. An N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated decrease in GAD expression was found following glutamate exposure. Here we examined which NMDAR subtype(s) mediated the glutamate-induced change in GAD protein levels. Western blotting techniques on cortical neuron cultures showed that glutamate's effect on GAD proteins was not altered by NR2B-containing diheteromeric (NR1/NR2B) receptor blockade. By contrast, blockade of triheteromeric (NR1/NR2A/NR2B) receptors fully protected against a decrease in GAD protein levels following glutamate exposure. When receptor location on the postsynaptic membrane was examined, extrasynaptic NMDAR stimulation was observed to be sufficient to decrease GAD protein levels similar to that observed after glutamate bath application. Blocking diheteromeric receptors prevented glutamate's effect on GAD proteins after extrasynaptic NMDAR stimulation. Finally, NR2B subunit examination with site-specific antibodies demonstrated a glutamate-induced, calpain-mediated alteration in NR2B expression. These results suggest that glutamate-induced excitotoxic NMDAR stimulation in cultured GABAergic cortical neurons depends upon subunit composition and receptor location (synaptic vs. extrasynaptic) on the neuronal membrane. Biochemical alterations in surviving cortical GABAergic neurons in various disease states may contribute to the altered

  12. S961, an insulin receptor antagonist causes hyperinsulinemia, insulin-resistance and depletion of energy stores in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Vikram, Ajit; Jena, Gopabandhu, E-mail: gbjena@gmail.com

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields}Insulin receptor antagonist S961 causes hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in rats. {yields}Peroxysome-proliferator-activated-receptor-gamma agonist pioglitazone improves S961 induced hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance. {yields}Long term treatment with insulin receptor antagonist S961 results in the decreased adiposity and hepatic glycogen content. {yields}Improvement in the hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance by pioglitazone clearly demonstrates that S961 treated rats can be successfully used to screen the novel therapeutic interventions having potential to improve glucose disposal through receptor independent mechanisms. -- Abstract: Impairment in the insulin receptor signaling and insulin mediated effects are the key features of type 2 diabetes. Here we report thatmore » S961, a peptide insulin receptor antagonist induces hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia ({approx}18-fold), glucose intolerance and impairment in the insulin mediated glucose disposal in the Sprague-Dawley rats. Further, long-term S961 treatment (15 day, 10 nM/kg/day) depletes energy storage as evident from decrease in the adiposity and hepatic glycogen content. However, peroxysome-proliferator-activated-receptor-gamma (PPAR{gamma}) agonist pioglitazone significantly (P < 0.001) restored S961 induced hyperglycemia (196.73 {+-} 16.32 vs. 126.37 {+-} 27.07 mg/dl) and glucose intolerance ({approx}78%). Improvement in the hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance by pioglitazone clearly demonstrates that S961 treated rats can be successfully used to screen the novel therapeutic interventions having potential to improve glucose disposal through receptor independent mechanisms. Further, results of the present study reconfirms and provide direct evidence to the crucial role of insulin receptor signaling in the glucose homeostasis and fuel metabolism.« less

  13. The CRF1 receptor antagonist R121919 attenuates the neuroendocrine and behavioral effects of precipitated lorazepam withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Skelton, Kelly H; Gutman, David A; Thrivikraman, K V; Nemeroff, Charles B; Owens, Michael J

    2007-06-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is the primary physiologic regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and serves to globally coordinate the mammalian stress response. Hyperactivity of central nervous system CRF neurotransmission, acting primarily via the CRF(1) receptor, has been strongly implicated in the pathophysiology of depression and anxiety. Furthermore, there is evidence of enhanced CRF transcription, release, and neuronal activity after the administration of and withdrawal from several drugs of abuse, including cannabis, cocaine, ethanol, and morphine. Treatment with CRF antagonists has been demonstrated to reduce the severity of certain drug withdrawal symptoms, implicating a specific role for activation of CRF neurons in mediating the anxiogenic and stress-like reactions observed after abrupt drug discontinuation. To extend these findings, we investigated whether pretreatment with the selective CRF(1) receptor antagonist R121919 decreases the behavioral and neuroendocrine activation observed after the precipitation of benzodiazepine (BZ) withdrawal in BZ-dependent rats. Pretreatment with R121919 attenuated the subsequent HPA axis activation, behavioral measures of anxiety, and expression of the CRF gene in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, as measured by CRF heteronuclear RNA, which occurs after flumazenil-precipitation of withdrawal from the BZ, lorazepam. These results indicate that the activation of CRF neuronal systems may be a common neurobiological mechanism in withdrawal from drugs of abuse and moreover, that the CRF(1) receptor subtype plays a major role in mediating the effects of CRF on neuroendocrine and behavioral responses during BZ withdrawal. Therefore, CRF(1) receptor antagonists may be of therapeutic utility in the treatment of drug withdrawal syndromes.

  14. Imidazo[2,1-i]purin-5-ones and related tricyclic water-soluble purine derivatives: potent A(2A)- and A(3)-adenosine receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christa E; Thorand, Mark; Qurishi, Ramatullah; Diekmann, Martina; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Padgett, William L; Daly, John W

    2002-08-01

    A series of tricyclic imidazo[2,1-i]purinones and ring-enlarged analogues derived from xanthine derivatives have been prepared as adenosine receptor (AR) antagonists. In comparison with xanthines, the tricyclic compounds exhibit increased water solubility due to a basic nitrogen atom, which can be protonated under physiological conditions. Substituents were introduced that confer high affinity for A(2A) or A(3) ARs, respectively. A new capillary electrophoresis method was developed for the determination of the enantiomeric purity of selected chiral products using native and modified beta-cyclodextrins as chiral discriminators. The compounds were investigated in radioligand binding assays at rat brain A(1) and A(2A) ARs. Selected compounds were additionally investigated in radioligand binding assays at human recombinant A(3) ARs and in functional studies (adenylate cyclase assays) at A(1) ARs of rat fat cell membranes, A(2A) ARs of rat PC 12 cell membranes, and mouse A(2B) ARs of NIH 3T3 cell membranes. Structure-activity relationships were similar to those of corresponding xanthine derivatives. The 2-styrylimidazopurinones were less potent at A(2A) ARs as compared to 8-styrylxanthine derivatives. The most potent compound at A(2A) ARs was (S)-1,4-dimethyl-8-ethyl-2-styryl-imidazo[2,1-i]purinone (S-25) exhibiting a K(i) value of 424 nM at rat A(2A) ARs. The compound was highly selective for A(2A) receptors vs A(1) and A(3) ARs. Selectivity vs A(2B) ARs, however, was low. Among the 1-unsubstituted 2-phenyl-imidazo[2,1-i]purin-5-one derivatives, very potent and highly selective antagonists for human A(3) ARs were identified. The most potent A(3) antagonist of the present series was (R)-4-methyl-8-ethyl-2-phenyl-imidazo[2,1-i]purin-5-one (R-24) exhibiting a K(i) value of 2.3 nM and high selectivity for A(3) receptors vs all other AR subtypes.

  15. TRPV4 antagonist GSK2193874 does not modulate cough response to osmotic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Buday, Tomas; Kovacikova, Lea; Ruzinak, Robert; Plevkova, Jana

    2017-02-01

    Osmolarity changes of airway superficial fluid are associated with cough and are used in research. TRPV4 is calcium channel initially described as osmosensor. In the airways, it can play role in increasing cough reflex sensitivity. The aim of our study was to test whether cough to osmotic stimuli is mediated via TRPV4 channel. Cough response was measured in 12 male guinea pigs by inhalation of saline, distilled water, hypertonic solution and citric acid for 10min in whole-body plethysmograph. Data were obtained in naïve animals and after pre-treatment with selective TRPV4 antagonist GSK2193874 in doses 300μg/kg (GSK300) and 900μg/kg (GSK900). Cough response to all tested aerosols was significantly higher than to saline. Pre-treatment with GSK300 did not influence response to osmotic stimuli - only reduced cough to citric acid. GSK900 reduced cough response to hypotonic stimuli and citric acid. TRPV4 mediated activation of airway afferents does not seem to be the exclusive mechanism responsible for cough to osmotic stimuli. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Histamine and Skin Barrier: Are Histamine Antagonists Useful for the Prevention or Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis?

    PubMed

    De Benedetto, Anna; Yoshida, Takeshi; Fridy, Sade; Park, Joo-Eun S; Kuo, I-Hsin; Beck, Lisa A

    2015-04-21

    Atopic Dermatitis (AD), the most common chronic inflammatory skin disease, is characterized by an overactive immune response to a host of environmental allergens and dry, itchy skin. Over the past decade important discoveries have demonstrated that AD develops in part from genetic and/or acquired defects in the skin barrier. Histamine is an aminergic neurotransmitter involved in physiologic and pathologic processes such as pruritus, inflammation, and vascular leak. Enhanced histamine release has been observed in the skin of patients with AD and antihistamines are often prescribed for their sedating and anti-itch properties. Recent evidence suggests that histamine also inhibits the terminal differentiation of keratinocytes and impairs the skin barrier, raising the question whether histamine might play a role in AD barrier impairment. This, coupled with the notion that histamine's effects mediated through the recently identified histamine receptor H4R, may be important in allergic inflammation, has renewed interest in this mediator in allergic diseases. In this paper we summarize the current knowledge on histamine and histamine receptor antagonists in AD and skin barrier function.

  17. Novel Alexa Fluor-488 labeled antagonist of the A(2A) adenosine receptor: Application to a fluorescence polarization-based receptor binding assay.

    PubMed

    Kecskés, Miklós; Kumar, T Santhosh; Yoo, Lena; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2010-08-15

    Fluorescence polarization (FP) assay has many advantages over the traditional radioreceptor binding studies. We developed an A(2A) adenosine receptor (AR) FP assay using a newly synthesized fluorescent antagonist of the A(2A)AR (MRS5346), a pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-amine derivative conjugated to the fluorescent dye Alexa Fluor-488. MRS5346 displayed a K(i) value of 111+/-16nM in radioligand binding using [(3)H]CGS21680 and membranes prepared from HEK293 cells stably expressing the human A(2A)AR. In a cyclic AMP functional assay, MRS5346 was shown to be an A(2A)AR antagonist. MRS5346 did not show any effect on A(1) and A(3) ARs in binding or the A(2B)AR in a cyclic AMP assay at 10microM. Its suitability as a fluorescent tracer was indicated in an initial observation of an FP signal following A(2A)AR binding. The FP signal was optimal with 20nM MRS5346 and 150microg protein/mL HEK293 membranes. The association and dissociation kinetic parameters were readily determined using this FP assay. The K(d) value of MRS5346 calculated from kinetic parameters was 16.5+/-4.7nM. In FP competition binding experiments using MRS5346 as a tracer, K(i) values of known AR agonists and antagonists consistently agreed with K(i) values from radioligand binding. Thus, this FP assay, which eliminates using radioisotopes, appears to be appropriate for both routine receptor binding and high-throughput screening with respect to speed of analysis, displaceable signal and precision. The approach used in the present study could be generally applicable to other GPCRs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Analgesic effectiveness of the narcotic agonist-antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Houde, Raymond W.

    1979-01-01

    1 Two fundamentally different types of narcotic-antogonists have been found to be very effective analgesics with relatively low dependence-producing potentials. 2 These two drug classes can be distinguished as being either morphine-like or nalorphine-like on the basis of their subjective and objective effects after single doses and on chronic administration, and by the character of their abstinence syndromes on abrupt withdrawal or on precipitation by other antagonists. 3 To explain differences in side effects associated with their analgesic actions, the existence of three types of receptors has been postulated: a μ receptor which is believed to be associated with euphoria and other typical morphine-like effects and a kappa (χ) and a sigma (σ) receptor which are believed to be associated with the sedative and psychotomimetic effects, respectively, of the nalorphine-like drugs. 4 The antagonist-analgesics of the morphine-type have the characteristics of being agonists of low intrinsic activity but with high affinity for the μ receptor. Representative analgesics of this type are profadol, propiram and buprenorphine. 5 The antagonist-analgesics of the nalorphine-type are drugs which are believed to have varying degrees of affinity and intrinsic activity at all three receptors, but characteristically seem to act merely as competitive antagonists with no intrinsic activity at the μ receptor. Representative analgesics of this type are pentazocine, nalbuphine and butorphanol. 6 There are considerable differences among the individual drugs of each type in terms of their analgesic and narcotic-antagonistic potencies. However, clear differences in analgesic efficacy among any of the antagonist-analgesics remain to be proved. All give evidence of being capable of relieving pain in nondependent patients in situations in which doses of morphine (or its surrogates) usually used would be effective. 7 The major advantages of the partial agonists of the morphine-type over the

  19. The systemic immune network in recent onset type 1 diabetes: central role of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (DIATOR Trial).

    PubMed

    Kolb, Hubert; Lückemeyer, Kathrin; Heise, Tim; Herder, Christian; Schloot, Nanette C; Koenig, Wolfgang; Heinemann, Lutz; Martin, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that the systemic immune milieu in recent-onset type 1 diabetes is associated with residual beta cell function and other metabolic patient characteristics. All patients (n = 89, 40% female) of the Diabetes and Atorvastatin (DIATOR) Trial were analyzed at recruitment, i.e. prior to receiving the study medication. Inclusion criteria were insulin dependent diabetes for 2 weeks to 3 months, age range 18-39 years, and islet cell autoantibodies. Blood samples were analyzed for 14 immune mediators by standard methods. Concentrations of all mediators correlated with at least one other mediator (p<0.05, Spearman correlation) giving rise to a network. Interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL1-RA) held a central position and was associated with both pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators. Further central elements were the pro-inflammatory mediators CRP and IL-6, the soluble adhesion molecules sICAM-1 and E-selectin, and MCP-4 which held a central position in the chemokine network. The two Th1-associated mediators IFNγ and IP-10 remained outside the network but correlated with each other. All correlations were positive (r = 0.25-0.72), i.e., high levels of pro-inflammatory mediators were accompanied by increased levels of anti-inflammatory mediators. IL-1RA was the only mediator associated with fasting and liquid mixed meal stimulated C-peptide concentrations (r = 0.31 and 0.24, p = 0.003 and 0.025, after adjustment for age, sex, BMI). There were associations between the immune mediator network and BMI (IL-1RA, CRP, IL-6, MCP-4, MIP-1ß) but few or no associations with HbA1c, insulin dose, lipid parameters, age or sex. In patients with recent onset type 1 diabetes, systemic acute phase proteins, cytokines, chemokines and soluble adhesion molecules form a network. Among the few central elements IL-1RA has a dominant role. IL-1RA is associated with all other groups of mediators and is the only mediator which correlates (positively) with

  20. The Systemic Immune Network in Recent Onset Type 1 Diabetes: Central Role of Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist (DIATOR Trial)

    PubMed Central

    Kolb, Hubert; Lückemeyer, Kathrin; Heise, Tim; Herder, Christian; Schloot, Nanette C.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Heinemann, Lutz; Martin, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Background The hypothesis was tested that the systemic immune milieu in recent-onset type 1 diabetes is associated with residual beta cell function and other metabolic patient characteristics. Methods and Findings All patients (n = 89, 40% female) of the Diabetes and Atorvastatin (DIATOR) Trial were analyzed at recruitment, i.e. prior to receiving the study medication. Inclusion criteria were insulin dependent diabetes for 2 weeks to 3 months, age range 18–39 years, and islet cell autoantibodies. Blood samples were analyzed for 14 immune mediators by standard methods. Concentrations of all mediators correlated with at least one other mediator (p<0.05, Spearman correlation) giving rise to a network. Interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL1-RA) held a central position and was associated with both pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators. Further central elements were the pro-inflammatory mediators CRP and IL-6, the soluble adhesion molecules sICAM-1 and E-selectin, and MCP-4 which held a central position in the chemokine network. The two Th1-associated mediators IFNγ and IP-10 remained outside the network but correlated with each other. All correlations were positive (r = 0.25–0.72), i.e., high levels of pro-inflammatory mediators were accompanied by increased levels of anti-inflammatory mediators. IL-1RA was the only mediator associated with fasting and liquid mixed meal stimulated C-peptide concentrations (r = 0.31 and 0.24, p = 0.003 and 0.025, after adjustment for age, sex, BMI). There were associations between the immune mediator network and BMI (IL-1RA, CRP, IL-6, MCP-4, MIP-1ß) but few or no associations with HbA1c, insulin dose, lipid parameters, age or sex. Conclusions In patients with recent onset type 1 diabetes, systemic acute phase proteins, cytokines, chemokines and soluble adhesion molecules form a network. Among the few central elements IL-1RA has a dominant role. IL-1RA is associated with all other groups of mediators and is the only

  1. DOR(2)-selective but not DOR(1)-selective antagonist abolishes anxiolytic-like effects of the δ opioid receptor agonist KNT-127.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Azusa; Nagase, Hiroshi; Oka, Jun-Ichiro; Yamada, Mitsuhiko; Saitoh, Akiyoshi

    2014-04-01

    Recently, we reported that the δ opioid receptor (DOR) agonist KNT-127 produces anxiolytic-like effects in behaving rats. Here, we report on the roles of DOR subtypes ( DOR(1) and DOR(2)) play in mediating KNT-127-induced anxiolytic-like effects. Pretreatment with the DOR(2)-selective antagonist naltriben (NTB; 0.05mg/kg, s.c.) completely abolished KNT-127 (3.0mg/kg, s.c.)-induced anxiolytic-like effects in rats performing the elevated plus-maze task. By contrast, the DOR(1)-selective antagonist 7-benzylidenenaltrexone (BNTX; 0.5mg/kg, s.c.) produced no effect at a dose that completely blocked the antinociceptive effects of KNT-127. These findings were also supported by results from a light/dark test and open-field test. We clearly demonstrated that the DOR(2)-selective antagonist, but not the DOR(1)-selective antagonist, abolishes the anxiolytic-like effects of the DOR agonist KNT-127, suggesting different roles of these DOR subtypes in anxiety. We propose that DOR(2)-selective agonists would be good candidates for future development of anxiolytic drugs. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The application of solid-state NMR spectroscopy to study candesartan cilexetil (TCV-116) membrane interactions. Comparative study with the AT1R antagonist drug olmesartan.

    PubMed

    Ntountaniotis, Dimitrios; Kellici, Tahsin; Tzakos, Andreas; Kolokotroni, Pinelopi; Tselios, Theodore; Becker-Baldus, Johanna; Glaubitz, Clemens; Lin, Sonyan; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Mavromoustakos, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    ΑΤ1 receptor (AT1R) antagonists exert their antihypertensive effects by preventing the vasoconstrictive hormone AngII to bind to the AT1 receptor. It has been proposed that these biological effects are mediated through a two-step mechanism reaction. In the first step, they are incorporated in the core of the lipid bilayers and in the second step they reach the active site of the receptor through lateral diffusion. In this model, drug/membrane interactions are key elements for the drugs achieving inhibition at the AT1 receptor. In this work, the interactions of the prodrug candesartan cilexetil (TCV-116) with lipid bilayers are studied at molecular detail. Solid-state (13)C-CP/MAS, 2D (1)H-(1)H NOESY NMR spectroscopy and in silico calculations are used. TCV-116 and olmesartan, another drug which acts as an AT1R antagonist are compared for their dynamic effects in lipid bilayers using solid-state (2)H-NMR. We find a similar localization of TCV-116 compared to other AT1 antagonists in the intermediate polar region. In addition, we can identify specific local interactions. These interactions may be associated in part with the discrete pharmacological profiles observed for different antagonists. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Opioid antagonists with minimal sedation for opioid withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Gowing, Linda; Ali, Robert; White, Jason M

    2017-05-29

    Managed withdrawal is a necessary step prior to drug-free treatment or as the endpoint of long-term substitution treatment. To assess the effects of opioid antagonists plus minimal sedation for opioid withdrawal. Comparators were placebo as well as more established approaches to detoxification, such as tapered doses of methadone, adrenergic agonists, buprenorphine and symptomatic medications. We updated our searches of the following databases to December 2016: CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO and Web of Science. We also searched two trials registers and checked the reference lists of included studies for further references to relevant studies. We included randomised and quasi-randomised controlled clinical trials along with prospective controlled cohort studies comparing opioid antagonists plus minimal sedation versus other approaches or different opioid antagonist regimens for withdrawal in opioid-dependent participants. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Ten studies (6 randomised controlled trials and 4 prospective cohort studies, involving 955 participants) met the inclusion criteria for the review. We considered 7 of the 10 studies to be at high risk of bias in at least one of the domains we assessed.Nine studies compared an opioid antagonist-adrenergic agonist combination versus a treatment regimen based primarily on an alpha 2 -adrenergic agonist (clonidine or lofexidine). Other comparisons (placebo, tapered doses of methadone, buprenorphine) made by included studies were too diverse for any meaningful analysis. This review therefore focuses on the nine studies comparing an opioid antagonist (naltrexone or naloxone) plus clonidine or lofexidine versus treatment primarily based on clonidine or lofexidine.Five studies took place in an inpatient setting, two studies were in outpatients with day care, two used day care only for the first day of opioid antagonist administration, and one study described the setting as outpatient

  4. D1 dopamine receptor-mediated induction of zif268 and c-fos in the dopamine-depleted striatum: differential regulation and independence from NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Keefe, K A; Gerfen, C R

    1996-04-01

    Excitatory amino acid afferents from cerebral cortex and dopamine afferents from the substantia nigra synapse on common projection neurons in the striatum. Activation of D1 dopamine receptors increases immediate early gene expression in the striatum and conductance through the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. To examine the contribution of NMDA receptor activation to dopamine receptor-mediated responses, we determined the effects of intrastriatal administration of NMDA antagonists on immediate early gene expression in the striatum and rotational behavior induced by stimulation of the D1 receptor in rats with unilateral dopamine depletions. Systemic administration of SKF 38393 increased c-fos and zif268 mRNAs in the striatum and induced contralateral rotation. Intrastriatal infusion of the competitive NMDA receptor antagonist (+/-)-3-(2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)-propyl -1-phosphonic acid caused a dose-dependent attenuation of SKF 38393-induced rotation and partially decreased c-fos mRNA expression. However, D1-mediated increases in zif268 mRNA were not affected, except by the highest concentration of antagonist used (10 mM). Another competitive antagonist, 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid, had similar effects. Like the competitive antagonists, intrastriatal infusion of the non-competitive NMDA antagonist MK-801 partially decreased c-fos, but not zif268, mRNA in the area around the microdialysis probe. However, unlike competitive antagonists, local infusion of 1 mM MK-801 potentiated D1-mediated increases in c-fos and zif268 mRNAs in lateral striatum. These data suggest that 1) some D1 dopamine receptor-mediated effects on striatal function are independent of ongoing NMDA receptor activation, whereas other effects are at least partially mediated by NMDA receptor activity in the striatum, and 2) competitive and non-competitive antagonists of the NMDA receptor differently affect D1-mediated immediate early gene expression in the striatum.

  5. Serotonin 2C receptor antagonist improves fear discrimination and subsequent safety signal recall.

    PubMed

    Foilb, Allison R; Christianson, John P

    2016-02-04

    The capacity to discriminate between safety and danger is fundamental for survival, but is disrupted in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Acute stressors cause a release of serotonin (5-HT) in the forebrain, which is one mechanism for enhanced fear and anxiety; these effects are mediated by the 5-HT2Creceptor. Using a fear discrimination paradigm where a danger signal conditioned stimulus (CS+) co-terminates with a mild footshock and a safety signal (CS-) indicates the absence of shock, we demonstrate that danger/safety discrimination and fear inhibition develop over the course of 4 daily conditioning sessions. Systemic administration of the 5-HT2Creceptor antagonist SB 242084 (0.25 or 1.0mg/kg) prior to conditioning reduced behavioral freezing during conditioning, and improved learning and subsequent inhibition of fear by the safety signal. Discrimination was apparent in the first recall test, and discrimination during training was evident after 3days of conditioning versus 5days in the vehicle treated controls. These results suggest a novel therapeutic use for 5-HT2Creceptor antagonists to improve learning under stressful circumstances. Potential anatomical loci for 5-HT2Creceptor modulation of fear discrimination learning and cognitive performance enhancement are discussed. John P. Christianson and Allison R. Foilb, the authors, verify that animal research was carried out in accordance with the National Institute of Health Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals (NIH Publications No. 80-23) and all procedures involving animals were reviewed and approved by the Boston College Animal Care and Use Committee. All efforts were made to limit the number of animals used and their suffering. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Definition of critical periods for Hedgehog pathway antagonist-induced holoprosencephaly, cleft lip, and cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Heyne, Galen W; Melberg, Cal G; Doroodchi, Padydeh; Parins, Kia F; Kietzman, Henry W; Everson, Joshua L; Ansen-Wilson, Lydia J; Lipinski, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway mediates multiple spatiotemporally-specific aspects of brain and face development. Genetic and chemical disruptions of the pathway are known to result in an array of structural malformations, including holoprosencephaly (HPE), clefts of the lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P), and clefts of the secondary palate only (CPO). Here, we examined patterns of dysmorphology caused by acute, stage-specific Hh signaling inhibition. Timed-pregnant wildtype C57BL/6J mice were administered a single dose of the potent pathway antagonist vismodegib at discrete time points between gestational day (GD) 7.0 and 10.0, an interval approximately corresponding to the 15th to 24th days of human gestation. The resultant pattern of facial and brain dysmorphology was dependent upon stage of exposure. Insult between GD7.0 and GD8.25 resulted in HPE, with peak incidence following exposure at GD7.5. Unilateral clefts of the lip extending into the primary palate were also observed, with peak incidence following exposure at GD8.875. Insult between GD9.0 and GD10.0 resulted in CPO and forelimb abnormalities. We have previously demonstrated that Hh antagonist-induced cleft lip results from deficiency of the medial nasal process and show here that CPO is associated with reduced growth of the maxillary-derived palatal shelves. By defining the critical periods for the induction of HPE, CL/P, and CPO with fine temporal resolution, these results provide a mechanism by which Hh pathway disruption can result in "non-syndromic" orofacial clefting, or HPE with or without co-occurring clefts. This study also establishes a novel and tractable mouse model of human craniofacial malformations using a single dose of a commercially available and pathway-specific drug.

  7. Structure of CC chemokine receptor 2 with orthosteric and allosteric antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Yi; Qin, Ling; Zacarías, Natalia V. Ortiz

    2016-12-07

    CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) is one of 19 members of the chemokine receptor subfamily of human class A G-protein-coupled receptors. CCR2 is expressed on monocytes, immature dendritic cells, and T-cell subpopulations, and mediates their migration towards endogenous CC chemokine ligands such as CCL2 (ref. 1). CCR2 and its ligands are implicated in numerous inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases2 including atherosclerosis, multiple sclerosis, asthma, neuropathic pain, and diabetic nephropathy, as well as cancer3. These disease associations have motivated numerous preclinical studies and clinical trials4 (see http://www.clinicaltrials.gov) in search of therapies that target the CCR2–chemokine axis. To aid drug discovery efforts5, heremore » we solve a structure of CCR2 in a ternary complex with an orthosteric (BMS-681 (ref. 6)) and allosteric (CCR2-RA-[R]7) antagonist. BMS-681 inhibits chemokine binding by occupying the orthosteric pocket of the receptor in a previously unseen binding mode. CCR2-RA-[R] binds in a novel, highly druggable pocket that is the most intracellular allosteric site observed in class A G-protein-coupled receptors so far; this site spatially overlaps the G-protein-binding site in homologous receptors. CCR2-RA-[R] inhibits CCR2 non-competitively by blocking activation-associated conformational changes and formation of the G-protein-binding interface. The conformational signature of the conserved microswitch residues observed in double-antagonist-bound CCR2 resembles the most inactive G-protein-coupled receptor structures solved so far. Like other protein–protein interactions, receptor–chemokine complexes are considered challenging therapeutic targets for small molecules, and the present structure suggests diverse pocket epitopes that can be exploited to overcome obstacles in drug design.« less

  8. Cyclic degradation of antagonistic shape memory actuated structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofla, A. Y. N.; Elzey, D. M.; Wadley, H. N. G.

    2008-04-01

    Antagonistic shape memory actuated structures exploit opposing pairs of one-way shape memory alloy (SMA) linear actuators to create devices capable of a fully reversible response. Unlike many conventional reversible SMA devices they do not require bias force components (springs) to return them to their pre-actuated configuration. However, the repeated use of SMA antagonistic devices results in the accumulation of plastic strain in the actuators which can diminish their actuation stroke. We have investigated this phenomenon and the effect of shape memory alloy pre-strain upon it for near equi-atomic NiTi actuators. We find that the degradation eventually stabilizes during cycling. A thermomechanical treatment has been found to significantly reduce degradation in cyclic response of the actuators.

  9. In-silico guided discovery of novel CCR9 antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Cross, Jason B.; Romero, Jan; Heifetz, Alexander; Humphries, Eric; Hall, Katie; Wu, Yuchuan; Stucka, Sabrina; Zhang, Jing; Chandonnet, Haoqun; Lippa, Blaise; Ryan, M. Dominic; Baber, J. Christian

    2018-03-01

    Antagonism of CCR9 is a promising mechanism for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. There is limited experimental data on CCR9 and its ligands, complicating efforts to identify new small molecule antagonists. We present here results of a successful virtual screening and rational hit-to-lead campaign that led to the discovery and initial optimization of novel CCR9 antagonists. This work uses a novel data fusion strategy to integrate the output of multiple computational tools, such as 2D similarity search, shape similarity, pharmacophore searching, and molecular docking, as well as the identification and incorporation of privileged chemokine fragments. The application of various ranking strategies, which combined consensus and parallel selection methods to achieve a balance of enrichment and novelty, resulted in 198 virtual screening hits in total, with an overall hit rate of 18%. Several hits were developed into early leads through targeted synthesis and purchase of analogs.

  10. Endothelin-1 and endothelin receptor antagonists in cardiovascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Kirchengast, M; Münter, K

    1999-09-01

    Endothelins build a peptide family composed of three isoforms, each of them containing 21 amino acids. Endothelin-1 is the isoform mainly responsible for any cardiovascular action and therefore the sole scope of this review. Endothelin-1 is the most potent endogenous vasoconstrictor known; in addition it acts as a potent (co)mitogen. There is a substantial body of experimental evidence that endothelin-1 may contribute not only to sustained vasoconstriction, but also to remodeling within the cardiovascular system. Thus, with the help of endothelin receptor antagonists (available for a few years) the involvement of mainly ETA receptors in structural diseases such as heart failure, pulmonary hypertension, atherosclerosis, restenosis, systemic hypertension, and chronic renal failure has been shown. These data make endothelin receptor antagonists, and especially those selective for the ETA receptor, promising agents for the treatment of chronic cardiovascular diseases associated with remodeling. Currently several chemically distinct, orally available members of this novel class of therapeutic agents are under clinical investigation.

  11. Metabolism-based identification of a potent thrombin receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Clasby, Martin C; Chackalamannil, Samuel; Czarniecki, Michael; Doller, Dario; Eagen, Keith; Greenlee, William; Kao, Grace; Lin, Yan; Tsai, Hsingan; Xia, Yan; Ahn, Ho-Sam; Agans-Fantuzzi, Jacqueline; Boykow, George; Chintala, Madhu; Foster, Carolyn; Smith-Torhan, April; Alton, Kevin; Bryant, Matthew; Hsieh, Yunsheng; Lau, Janice; Palamanda, Jairam

    2007-01-11

    The metabolism of our prototypical thrombin receptor antagonist 1, Ki = 2.7 nM, was studied and three major metabolites (2, 4, and 5) were found. The structures of the metabolites were verified independently by synthesis. Compound 4 was shown to be a potent antagonist of the thrombin receptor with a Ki = 11 nM. Additionally, compound 4 showed a 3-fold improvement in potency with respect to 1 in an agonist-induced ex-vivo platelet aggregation assay in cynomolgus monkeys after oral administration; this activity was sustained with 60% inhibition observed at 24 h post-dose. Compound 4 was highly active in functional assays and showed excellent oral bioavailability in rats and monkeys. Compound 4 showed a superior rat enzyme induction profile relative to compound 1, allowing it to replace compound 1 as a development candidate.

  12. Antagonistic otolith-visual units in cat vestibular nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daunton, Nancy G.; Christensen, Carol A.

    1992-01-01

    The nature of neural coding of visual (Vis) and vestibular (Vst) information on translational motion in the region of the vestibular nuclei was investigated using extracellular single-unit recordings in alert adult cats. Responses were recorded and averaged over 60 cycles of stimulation in the vertical and horizontal planes, which included the Vst (movement of the animal in the dark), Vis (movement within lighted visual surround), and combined Vis and Vst (movement of the animal within the lighted stationary visual surround). Data are reported on responses to stimulations along the axis showing maximal sensitivity. A small number of units were identified that showed an antagonistic relationship between their Vis and Vst responses (since they were maximally excited by Vis and by Vst stimulations in the same direction). Results suggest that antagonistic units may belong to an infrequently encountered, but functionally distinct, class of neurons.

  13. Identification and characterization of a selective allosteric antagonist of human P2X4 receptor channels.

    PubMed

    Ase, Ariel R; Honson, Nicolette S; Zaghdane, Helmi; Pfeifer, Tom A; Séguéla, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    P2X4 is an ATP-gated nonselective cation channel highly permeable to calcium. There is increasing evidence that this homomeric purinoceptor, which is expressed in several neuronal and immune cell types, is involved in chronic pain and inflammation. The current paucity of unambiguous pharmacological tools available to interrogate or modulate P2X4 function led us to pursue the search for selective antagonists. In the high-throughput screen of a compound library, we identified the phenylurea BX430 (1-(2,6-dibromo-4-isopropyl-phenyl)-3-(3-pyridyl)urea, molecular weight = 413), with antagonist properties on human P2X4-mediated calcium uptake. Patch-clamp electrophysiology confirmed direct inhibition of P2X4 currents by extracellular BX430, with submicromolar potency (IC50 = 0.54 µM). BX430 is highly selective, having virtually no functional impact on all other P2X subtypes, namely, P2X1-P2X3, P2X5, and P2X7, at 10-100 times its IC50. Unexpected species differences were noticed, as BX430 is a potent antagonist of zebrafish P2X4 but has no effect on rat and mouse P2X4 orthologs. The concentration-response curve for ATP on human P2X4 in the presence of BX430 shows an insurmountable blockade, indicating a noncompetitive allosteric mechanism of action. Using a fluorescent dye uptake assay, we observed that BX430 also effectively suppresses ATP-evoked and ivermectin-potentiated membrane permeabilization induced by P2X4 pore dilation. Finally, in single-cell calcium imaging, we validated its selective inhibitory effects on native P2X4 channels at the surface of human THP-1 cells that were differentiated into macrophages. In summary, this ligand provides a novel molecular probe to assess the specific role of P2X4 in inflammatory and neuropathic conditions, where ATP signaling has been shown to be dysfunctional. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  14. Urinary responses to acute moxonidine are inhibited by natriuretic peptide receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    El-Ayoubi, Rouwayda; Menaouar, Ahmed; Gutkowska, Jolanta; Mukaddam-Daher, Suhayla

    2005-05-01

    We have previously shown that acute intravenous injections of moxonidine and clonidine increase plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), a vasodilator, diuretic and natriuretic hormone. We hypothesized that moxonidine stimulates the release of ANP, which would act on its renal receptors to cause diuresis and natriuresis, and these effects may be altered in hypertension. Moxonidine (0, 10, 50, 100 or 150 microg in 300 microl saline) and clonidine (0, 1, 5 or 10 microg in 300 microl saline) injected intravenously in conscious normally hydrated normotensive Sprague-Dawley rats (SD, approximately 200 g) and 12-14-week-old Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) dose-dependently stimulated diuresis, natriuresis, kaliuresis and cGMP excretion, with these effects being more pronounced during the first hour post-injection. The actions of 5 microg clonidine and 50 microg moxonidine were inhibited by yohimbine, an alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist, and efaroxan, an imidazoline I1-receptor antagonist. Moxonidine (100 microg) stimulated (P<0.01) diuresis in SHR (0.21+/-0.04 vs 1.16+/-0.06 ml h(-1) 100 g(-1)), SD (0.42+/-0.06 vs 1.56+/-0.19 ml h(-1) 100 g(-1)) and WKY (0.12+/-0.04 vs 1.44+/-0.21 ml h(-1) 100 g(-1)). Moxonidine-stimulated urine output was lower in SHR than in SD and WKY. Moxonidine-stimulated sodium and potassium excretions were lower in SHR than in SD, but not WKY, demonstrating an influence of strain but not of pressure. Pretreatment with the natriuretic peptide antagonist anantin (5 or 10 microg) resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of moxonidine-stimulated urinary actions. Anantin (10 microg) inhibited (P<0.01) urine output to 0.38+/-0.06, 0.12+/-0.01, and 0.16+/-0.04 ml h(-1) 100 g(-1) in SD, WKY, and SHR, respectively. Moxonidine increased (P<0.01) plasma ANP in SD (417+/-58 vs 1021+/-112 pg ml(-1)) and WKY (309+/-59 vs 1433+/-187 pg ml(-1)), and in SHR (853+/-96 vs 1879+/-229 pg ml(-1)). These results demonstrate that natriuretic

  15. Development of KGF Antagonist as a Breast Cancer Therapeutic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    of synthetic peptide quantity for this kind of assay, 3H-thymidine incorporation assay was not carried out. This assay will be performed after...established, however due to lack of synthetic peptide quantity for this kind of assay, aromatase activity assay was not carried out. This assay will be...Eleven potential synthetic peptide -antagonists were developed - Stably transfected human breast cancer cell lines were established - Primary cultured

  16. Effect of a Hypocretin/Orexin Antagonist on Neurocogniive Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    receptor antagonist with a novel mechanism of action that has shown promise as an effective hypnotic . Preclinical data demonstrate that animals treated...immunohistochemistry with Fos and phenotypic markers. Status: Data collection and analysis ongoing; see below. 3b. Assessment of hypnotic efficacy in saporin...microinjections of hypnotics into the BF and their effects on sleep-wake behavior or neurotransmitters in brain. We proposed to use in vivo

  17. Effect of a Hypocretin/Orexin Antagonist on Neurocognitive Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    cells are more strongly activated by ZOL (Task 4a). Lesions of the basal forebrain (BF), a wakefulness-promoting area, potentiated the hypnotic ...receptor antagonist with a novel mechanism of action that has shown promise as an effective hypnotic . Preclinical data demonstrate that animals...results are consistent with the hypothesis that, although both ALM and ZOL are effective hypnotic medications, rats would show less functional impairment

  18. Disubstituted piperidines as potent Orexin (hypocretin) receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Rong; Song, Xinyi; Bali, Purva; Smith, Anthony; Bayona, Claudia Ruiz; Lin, Li; Cameron, Michael D.; McDonald, Patricia H.; Kenny, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    A series of orexin receptor antagonists was synthesized based on a substituted piperidine scaffold. Through traditional medicinal chemistry structure activity relationships (SAR), installation of various groups at the 3–6-positions of the piperidine led to modest enhancement in receptor selectivity. Compounds were profiled in vivo for plasma and brain levels in order to identify candidates suitable for efficacy in a model of drug addiction. PMID:22617492

  19. Calmodulin antagonists promote TRA-8 therapy of resistant pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Kaiyu; Yong, Sun; Xu, Fei; Zhou, Tong; McDonald, Jay M; Chen, Yabing

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly malignant with limited therapy and a poor prognosis. TRAIL-activating therapy has been promising, however, clinical trials have shown resistance and limited responses of pancreatic cancers. We investigated the effects of calmodulin(CaM) antagonists, trifluoperazine(TFP) and tamoxifen(TMX), on TRA-8-induced apoptosis and tumorigenesis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells, and underlying mechanisms. TFP or TMX alone did not induce apoptosis of resistant PANC-1 cells, while they dose-dependently enhanced TRA-8-induced apoptosis. TMX treatment enhanced efficacy of TRA-8 therapy on tumorigenesis in vivo. Analysis of TRA-8-induced death-inducing-signaling-complex (DISC) identified recruitment of survival signals, CaM/Src, into DR5-associated DISC, which was inhibited by TMX/TFP. In contrast, TMX/TFP increased TRA-8-induced DISC recruitment/activation of caspase-8. Consistently, caspase-8 inhibition blocked the effects of TFP/TMX on TRA-8-induced apoptosis. Moreover, TFP/TMX induced DR5 expression. With a series of deletion/point mutants, we identified CaM antagonist-responsive region in the putative Sp1-binding domain between −295 to −300 base pairs of DR5 gene. Altogether, we have demonstrated that CaM antagonists enhance TRA-8-induced apoptosis of TRA-8-resistant pancreatic cancer cells by increasing DR5 expression and enhancing recruitment of apoptotic signal while decreasing survival signals in DR5-associated DISC. Our studies support the use of these readily available CaM antagonists combined with TRAIL-activating agents for pancreatic cancer therapy. PMID:26320171

  20. Orai and TRPC channel characterization in FcεRI-mediated calcium signaling and mediator secretion in human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Wajdner, Hannah E; Farrington, Jasmine; Barnard, Claire; Peachell, Peter T; Schnackenberg, Christine G; Marino, Joseph P; Xu, Xiaoping; Affleck, Karen; Begg, Malcolm; Seward, Elizabeth P

    2017-03-01

    Inappropriate activation of mast cells via the Fc ε RI receptor leads to the release of inflammatory mediators and symptoms of allergic disease. Calcium influx is a critical regulator of mast cell signaling and is required for exocytosis of preformed mediators and for synthesis of eicosanoids, cytokines and chemokines. Studies in rodent and human mast cells have identified Orai calcium channels as key contributors to Fc ε RI-initiated mediator release. However, until now the role of TRPC calcium channels in Fc ε RI-mediated human mast cell signaling has not been published. Here, we show evidence for the expression of Orai 1,2, and 3 and TRPC1 and 6 in primary human lung mast cells and the LAD2 human mast cell line but, we only find evidence of functional contribution of Orai and not TRPC channels to Fc ε RI-mediated calcium entry. Calcium imaging experiments, utilizing an Orai selective antagonist (Synta66) showed the contribution of Orai to Fc ε RI-mediated signaling in human mast cells. Although, the use of a TRPC3/6 selective antagonist and agonist (GSK-3503A and GSK-2934A, respectively) did not reveal evidence for TRPC6 contribution to Fc ε RI-mediated calcium signaling in human mast cells. Similarly, inactivation of STIM1-regulated TRPC1 in human mast cells (as tested by transfecting cells with STIM1-KK 684-685 EE - TRPC1 gating mutant) failed to alter Fc ε RI-mediated calcium signaling in LAD2 human mast cells. Mediator release assays confirm that Fc ε RI-mediated calcium influx through Orai is necessary for histamine and TNF α release but is differentially involved in the generation of cytokines and eicosanoids. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  1. Mixed agonist-antagonist opiates and physical dependence.

    PubMed

    Jacob, J J; Michaud, G M; Tremblay, E C

    1979-01-01

    1 General methods (chronic, subacute and acute) for assessing physical dependence potential, abstinence precipitating capacity and abstinence preventing activity are briefly presented. 2 Direct dependence experiments indicate that, in general, mixed agonist-antagonist analgesics have relatively lower physical dependence potentials than pure agonist analgesics. That of buprenorphine seems to be particularly low in various animal species. 3 When substitution techniques are used, the dependence potential of buprenorphine seems to be somewhat more developed than with direct dependence techniques. 4 Among various agonists (morphine, methadone and etorphine), antagonists (naloxone, naltrexone and diprenorphine) and mixed agonist-antagonists (pentazocine, butorphanol and buprenorphine), buprenorphine is the most potent and the longest acting drug in preventing precipitated abstinence in mice, rats and dogs. 5 The low physical dependence potential of buprenorphine may result in part from the very slow dissociation of the complex it forms with opiate receptors. This potential might be underestimated when precipitated abstinence methods are used, as naloxone would displace buprenorphine from its receptors only to a very limited extent. New means of evaluating dependence by more direct means need to be developed. 6 Overall, the properties of mixed agonists in general justify their use as analgesics with lower physical dependence potential than the pure opiates and further, those of buprenorphine seem to indicate its possible utility for the treatment of opiate addiction.

  2. Mixed agonist-antagonist opiates and physical dependence

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, J. J. C.; Michaud, G. M.; Tremblay, E. C.

    1979-01-01

    1 General methods (chronic, subacute and acute) for assessing physical dependence potential, abstinence precipitating capacity and abstinence preventing activity are briefly presented. 2 Direct dependence experiments indicate that, in general, mixed agonist-antagonist analgesics have relatively lower physical dependence potentials than pure agonist analgesics. That of buprenorphine seems to be particularly low in various animal species. 3 When substitution techniques are used, the dependence potential of buprenorphine seems to be somewhat more developed than with direct dependence techniques. 4 Among various agonists (morphine, methadone and etorphine), antagonists (naloxone, naltrexone and diprenorphine) and mixed agonist-antagonists (pentazocine, butorphanol and buprenorphine), buprenorphine is the most potent and the longest acting drug in preventing precipitated abstinence in mice, rats and dogs. 5 The low physical dependence potential of buprenorphine may result in part from the very slow dissociation of the complex it forms with opiate receptors. This potential might be underestimated when precipitated abstinence methods are used, as naloxone would displace buprenorphine from its receptors only to a very limited extent. New means of evaluating dependence by more direct means need to be developed. 6 Overall, the properties of mixed agonists in general justify their use as analgesics with lower physical dependence potential than the pure opiates and further, those of buprenorphine seem to indicate its possible utility for the treatment of opiate addiction. PMID:572694

  3. Frequent epigenetic inactivation of Wnt antagonist genes in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, H; Toyota, M; Caraway, H; Gabrielson, E; Ohmura, T; Fujikane, T; Nishikawa, N; Sogabe, Y; Nojima, M; Sonoda, T; Mori, M; Hirata, K; Imai, K; Shinomura, Y; Baylin, S B; Tokino, T

    2008-01-01

    Although mutation of APC or CTNNB1 (β-catenin) is rare in breast cancer, activation of Wnt signalling is nonetheless thought to play an important role in breast tumorigenesis, and epigenetic silencing of Wnt antagonist genes, including the secreted frizzled-related protein (SFRP) and Dickkopf (DKK) families, has been observed in various tumours. In breast cancer, frequent methylation and silencing of SFRP1 was recently documented; however, altered expression of other Wnt antagonist genes is largely unknown. In the present study, we found frequent methylation of SFRP family genes in breast cancer cell lines (SFRP1, 7 out of 11, 64%; SFRP2, 11 out of 11, 100%; SFRP5, 10 out of 11, 91%) and primary breast tumours (SFRP1, 31 out of 78, 40%; SFRP2, 60 out of 78, 77%; SFRP5, 55 out of 78, 71%). We also observed methylation of DKK1, although less frequently, in cell lines (3 out of 11, 27%) and primary tumours (15 out of 78, 19%). Breast cancer cell lines express various Wnt ligands, and overexpression of SFRPs inhibited cancer cell growth. In addition, overexpression of a β-catenin mutant and depletion of SFRP1 using small interfering RNA synergistically upregulated transcriptional activity of T-cell factor/lymphocyte enhancer factor. Our results confirm the frequent methylation and silencing of Wnt antagonist genes in breast cancer, and suggest that their loss of function contributes to activation of Wnt signalling in breast carcinogenesis. PMID:18283316

  4. [Necrotic leg ulcer revealing vasculitis induced by vitamin K antagonists].

    PubMed

    Chabli, H; Hocar, O; Akhdari, N; Amal, S; Hakkou, M; Hamdaoui, A

    2015-12-01

    Vitamin K antagonists are widely used in thromboembolic diseases. Hemorrhagic complications related to drug overdose represent their main side effect. We report a rare side effect, a severe and unexpected type of skin vasculitis - necrotic leg ulcer - induced by vitamin K antagonist. A 63-year-old female with a history of diabetes developed hyperalgesic necrotic ulcerations on the lower limbs one month after starting an acenocoumarol-based treatment for ischemic heart disease. Histological examination revealed lymphocytic vasculitis with fibrinoid necrosis. Etiological explorations searching for vasculitis were negative. In the absence of a precise etiology, drug-induced ulcer was suspected. Low molecular weight heparin was prescribed to replace acenocoumarol. The lesions slowly resolved with topical treatment. The chronological criteria and the negativity of etiological explorations allowed the diagnosis of vitamin K antagonist-induced necrotic skin ulcer. Clinicians should be aware of this rare complication induced by oral anticoagulants because of its practical therapeutic implications. This is the first case of necrotic leg ulcer induced by acenocoumarol corresponding histologically to necrotising lymphocytic vasculitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Glutamate receptor antagonists with the potential for migraine treatment.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Anna; Rustichelli, Cecilia; Baraldi, Carlo

    2017-12-01

    Preclinical, clinical, and other (e.g., genetic) evidence support the concept that migraine susceptibility may at least partially result from a glutamatergic system disorder. Therefore, the receptors of the glutamatergic system are considered relatively new targets for investigational drugs to treat migraine. Investigational and established glutamate receptor antagonists (GluRAs) have been shown to possess antinociceptive properties in preclinical models of trigeminovascular nociception and have been evaluated in clinical trials. This review focuses on preclinical and clinical studies of GluRAs for the treatment of migraine. Areas covered: A PubMed database search (from 1987 to December 2016) and a review of published studies on GluRAs in migraine were conducted. Expert opinion: All published clinical trials of investigational GluRAs have been unsuccessful in establishing benefit for acute migraine treatment. Clinical trial results contrast with the preclinical data, suggesting that glutamate (Glu) does not play a decisive role after the attack has already been triggered. These antagonists may instead be useful for migraine prophylaxis. Improving patient care requires further investigating and critically analyzing the role of Glu in migraine, designing experimental models to study more receptors and their corresponding antagonists, and identifying biomarkers to facilitate trials designed to target specific subgroups of migraine patients.

  6. Does intergenerational social mobility affect antagonistic attitudes towards ethnic minorities?

    PubMed

    Tolsma, Jochem; de Graaf, Nan Dirk; Quillian, Lincoln

    2009-06-01

    Up till now, no study satisfactorily addressed the effect of social mobility on antagonistic attitudes toward ethnic minorities. In this contribution, we investigate the effect of educational and class intergenerational mobility on ethnic stereotypes, ethnic threat, and opposition to ethnic intermarriage by using diagonal mobility models. We test several hypotheses derived from ethnic competition theory and socialization theory with data from the Social and Cultural Developments in The Netherlands surveys (SOCON, waves 1995, 2000, and 2005) and The Netherlands Kinship and Panel Study (NKPS, wave 2002). We find that the relative influence of social origin and social destination depends on the specific origin and destination combination. If one moves to a more tolerant social destination position, the influence of the social origin position is negligible. If on the other hand, one is socially mobile to a less tolerant social position, the impact of the origin on antagonistic attitudes is substantial and may even exceed the impact of the destination category. This confirms our hypothesis that adaptation to more tolerant norms is easier than adaptation to less tolerant norms. We find only meagre evidence for the hypothesis that downward mobility leads to frustration and consequently to more antagonistic attitudes.

  7. μ Opioid receptor: novel antagonists and structural modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaserer, Teresa; Lantero, Aquilino; Schmidhammer, Helmut; Spetea, Mariana; Schuster, Daniela

    2016-02-01

    The μ opioid receptor (MOR) is a prominent member of the G protein-coupled receptor family and the molecular target of morphine and other opioid drugs. Despite the long tradition of MOR-targeting drugs, still little is known about the ligand-receptor interactions and structure-function relationships underlying the distinct biological effects upon receptor activation or inhibition. With the resolved crystal structure of the β-funaltrexamine-MOR complex, we aimed at the discovery of novel agonists and antagonists using virtual screening tools, i.e. docking, pharmacophore- and shape-based modeling. We suggest important molecular interactions, which active molecules share and distinguish agonists and antagonists. These results allowed for the generation of theoretically validated in silico workflows that were employed for prospective virtual screening. Out of 18 virtual hits evaluated in in vitro pharmacological assays, three displayed antagonist activity and the most active compound significantly inhibited morphine-induced antinociception. The new identified chemotypes hold promise for further development into neurochemical tools for studying the MOR or as potential therapeutic lead candidates.

  8. Deoxycholic acid conjugates are muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Chen, Ying; Zimniak, Piotr; Cheng, Kunrong

    2002-08-01

    In the course of examining the actions of major human bile acids on cholinergic receptors, we discovered that conjugates of lithocholic acid are partial muscarinic agonists. In the present communication, we report that conjugates of deoxycholic acid (DC) act as cholinergic muscarinic receptor antagonists. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing rat M3-muscarinic receptors were used to test bile acids for inhibition of radioligand [N- (3)H-methylscopolamine ((3)H-NMS)] binding; alteration of inositol phosphate (IP) formation; mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphorylation and cell toxicity. We observed approximately 18.8, 30.3 and 37.1% inhibition of (3)H-NMS binding with DC and its glycine (DCG) and taurine (DCT) conjugates, respectively (all 100 micromol/l, p < 0.01). DCT and DCG inhibited acetylcholine-induced increases in IP formation and MAP kinase phosphorylation (p44 and p42 ERK). DCG and DCT did not alter trypan blue exclusion or lactate dehydrogenase release from CHO-M3 cells. We observed the following rank order of potency (IC(50) micromol/l) for inhibition of (3)H-NMS by muscarinic antagonists and bile acids: NMS (0.0004) > 4-DAMP (0.009) > atropine (0.012) > DCT (170) > DCG (250). None of the bile acids tested were hydrolyzed by recombinant cholinesterase. At concentrations achieved in human bile, DC derivatives are natural muscarinic antagonists. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  9. Toxicological Differences Between NMDA Receptor Antagonists and Cholinesterase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaodong; Lin, Xiaotian; Hu, Rui; Sun, Nan; Hao, Jingru; Gao, Can

    2016-08-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs), represented by donepezil, rivastigmine, and galantamine, used to be the only approved class of drugs for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. After the approval of memantine by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonists have been recognized by authorities and broadly used in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Along with complementary mechanisms of action, NMDA antagonists and ChEIs differ not only in therapeutic effects but also in adverse reactions, which is an important consideration in clinical drug use. And the number of patients using NMDA antagonists and ChEIs concomitantly has increased, making the matter more complicated. Here we used the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System for statistical analysis , in order to compare the adverse events of memantine and ChEIs. In general, the clinical evidence confirmed the safety advantages of memantine over ChEIs, reiterating the precautions of clinical drug use and the future direction of antidementia drug development. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Antagonistic coevolution between the sexes in a group of insects.

    PubMed

    Arnqvist, Göran; Rowe, Locke

    2002-02-14

    In coevolutionary 'arms races' between the sexes, the outcome of antagonistic interactions may remain at an evolutionary standstill. The advantage gained by one sex, with any evolutionary exaggeration of arms, is expected to be matched by analogous counteradaptations in the other sex. This fundamental coevolutionary process may thus be hidden from the evolutionist's eye, and no natural examples are known. We have studied the effects of male and female armament (clasping and anti-clasping morphologies) on the outcome of antagonistic mating interactions in 15 species of water strider, using a combination of experimental and phylogenetic comparative methods. Here we present, by assessing the independent effects of both species-specific level of arms escalation and small imbalances in the amounts of arms between the sexes within species, the consequences of a sexual arms race. Evolutionary change in the balance of armament between males and females, but not in the species-specific level of escalation, has resulted in evolutionary change in the outcome of sexually antagonistic interactions such as mating rate.

  11. Adenosine A2A receptor antagonists are potential antidepressants: evidence based on pharmacology and A2A receptor knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Yacoubi, Malika El; Ledent, Catherine; Parmentier, Marc; Bertorelli, Rosalia; Ongini, Ennio; Costentin, Jean; Vaugeois, Jean-Marie

    2001-01-01

    Adenosine, an ubiquitous neuromodulator, and its analogues have been shown to produce ‘depressant' effects in animal models believed to be relevant to depressive disorders, while adenosine receptor antagonists have been found to reverse adenosine-mediated ‘depressant' effect. We have designed studies to assess whether adenosine A2A receptor antagonists, or genetic inactivation of the receptor would be effective in established screening procedures, such as tail suspension and forced swim tests, which are predictive of clinical antidepressant activity. Adenosine A2A receptor knockout mice were found to be less sensitive to ‘depressant' challenges than their wildtype littermates. Consistently, the adenosine A2A receptor blockers SCH 58261 (1 – 10 mg kg−1, i.p.) and KW 6002 (0.1 – 10 mg kg−1, p.o.) reduced the total immobility time in the tail suspension test. The efficacy of adenosine A2A receptor antagonists in reducing immobility time in the tail suspension test was confirmed and extended in two groups of mice. Specifically, SCH 58261 (1 – 10 mg kg−1) and ZM 241385 (15 – 60 mg kg−1) were effective in mice previously screened for having high immobility time, while SCH 58261 at 10 mg kg−1 reduced immobility of mice that were selectively bred for their spontaneous ‘helplessness' in this assay. Additional experiments were carried out using the forced swim test. SCH 58261 at 10 mg kg−1 reduced the immobility time by 61%, while KW 6002 decreased the total immobility time at the doses of 1 and 10 mg kg−1 by 75 and 79%, respectively. Administration of the dopamine D2 receptor antagonist haloperidol (50 – 200 μg kg−1 i.p.) prevented the antidepressant-like effects elicited by SCH 58261 (10 mg kg−1 i.p.) in forced swim test whereas it left unaltered its stimulant motor effects. In conclusion, these data support the hypothesis that A2A receptor antagonists prolong escape

  12. Abiotic conditions affect floral antagonists and mutualists of Impatiens capensis (Balsaminaceae).

    PubMed

    Soper Gorden, Nicole L; Adler, Lynn S

    2013-04-01

    While the effect of abiotic factors on leaf herbivory is well known, the relative importance of abiotic conditions influencing both mutualists and antagonists is less well understood. Species interactions could enhance or reduce the direct effects of abiotic factors, depending on how mutualists and antagonists respond to abiotic conditions. We manipulated soil nutrients and shade in a factorial design and measured soil moisture in the annual Impatiens capensis. We then measured interactions with mutualists (two pollinating species) and antagonists (herbivores, florivores, nectar thieves, and flower bud gallers), as well as plant growth, floral rewards, and plant reproduction. Fertilizer increased plant growth, floral attractiveness, mutualist and antagonist interactions, and plant reproduction. Shade had no effects, and soil moisture was negatively associated with plant growth and reproduction. All effects were additive. Mutualist and antagonist floral interactions both increased on fertilized plants, but antagonists increased at a greater rate, leading to a larger ratio of antagonist to mutualist interactions on fertilized plants. Despite having more antagonists, fertilized plants still had significantly higher reproduction, suggesting higher tolerance to antagonists. Abiotic effects can have consistent effects on antagonists and mutualists, and on both floral and leaf antagonists. However, tolerance to antagonisms increased in favorable conditions. Thus, the direct positive effects of favorable abiotic conditions on plants outweighed negative indirect effects via increased antagonisms, which may lead to selection to grow in high-nutrient microsites in spite of increased herbivory.

  13. Arginine mimetic structures in biologically active antagonists and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Masic, Lucija Peterlin

    2006-01-01

    Peptidomimetics have found wide application as bioavailable, biostable, and potent mimetics of naturally occurring biologically active peptides. L-Arginine is a guanidino group-containing basic amino acid, which is positively charged at neutral pH and is involved in many important physiological and pathophysiological processes. Many enzymes display a preference for the arginine residue that is found in many natural substrates and in synthetic inhibitors of many trypsin-like serine proteases, e.g. thrombin, factor Xa, factor VIIa, trypsin, and in integrin receptor antagonists, used to treat many blood-coagulation disorders. Nitric oxide (NO), which is produced by oxidation of L-arginine in an NADPH- and O(2)-dependent process catalyzed by isoforms of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), exhibits diverse roles in both normal and pathological physiologies and has been postulated to be a contributor to the etiology of various diseases. Development of NOS inhibitors as well as analogs and mimetics of the natural substrate L-arginine, is desirable for potential therapeutic use and for a better understanding of their conformation when bound in the arginine binding site. The guanidino residue of arginine in many substrates, inhibitors, and antagonists forms strong ionic interactions with the carboxylate of an aspartic acid moiety, which provides specificity for the basic amino acid residue in the active side. However, a highly basic guanidino moiety incorporated in enzyme inhibitors or receptor antagonists is often associated with low selectivity and poor bioavailability after peroral application. Thus, significant effort is focused on the design and preparation of arginine mimetics that can confer selective inhibition for specific trypsin-like serine proteases and NOS inhibitors as well as integrin receptor antagonists and possess reduced basicity for enhanced oral bioavailability. This review will describe the survey of arginine mimetics designed to mimic the function of the

  14. Newborn Analgesia Mediated by Oxytocin during Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mazzuca, Michel; Minlebaev, Marat; Shakirzyanova, Anastasia; Tyzio, Roman; Taccola, Giuliano; Janackova, Sona; Gataullina, Svetlana; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Giniatullin, Rashid; Khazipov, Rustem

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms controlling pain in newborns during delivery are poorly understood. We explored the hypothesis that oxytocin, an essential hormone for labor and a powerful neuromodulator, exerts analgesic actions on newborns during delivery. Using a thermal tail-flick assay, we report that pain sensitivity is two-fold lower in rat pups immediately after birth than 2 days later. Oxytocin receptor antagonists strongly enhanced pain sensitivity in newborn, but not in 2-day-old rats, whereas oxytocin reduced pain at both ages suggesting an endogenous analgesia by oxytocin during delivery. Similar analgesic effects of oxytocin, measured as attenuation of pain-vocalization induced by electrical whisker pad stimulation, were also observed in decerebrated newborns. Oxytocin reduced GABA-evoked calcium responses and depolarizing GABA driving force in isolated neonatal trigeminal neurons suggesting that oxytocin effects are mediated by alterations of intracellular chloride. Unlike GABA signaling, oxytocin did not affect responses mediated by P2X3 and TRPV1 receptors. In keeping with a GABAergic mechanism, reduction of intracellular chloride by the diuretic NKCC1 chloride co-transporter antagonist bumetanide mimicked the analgesic actions of oxytocin and its effects on GABA responses in nociceptive neurons. Therefore, endogenous oxytocin exerts an analgesic action in newborn pups that involves a reduction of the depolarizing action of GABA on nociceptive neurons. Therefore, the same hormone that triggers delivery also acts as a natural pain killer revealing a novel facet of the protective actions of oxytocin in the fetus at birth. PMID:21519396

  15. Overcoming the unexpected functional inversion of a PqsR antagonist in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: an in vivo potent antivirulence agent targeting pqs quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cenbin; Maurer, Christine K; Kirsch, Benjamin; Steinbach, Anke; Hartmann, Rolf W

    2014-01-20

    The virulence regulator PqsR of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is considered as an attractive target for attenuating the bacterial pathogenicity without eliciting resistance. However, despite efforts and desires, no promising PqsR antagonist has been discovered thus far. Now, a surprising functionality change of a highly affine PqsR antagonist in P. aeruginosa is revealed, which is mediated by a bacterial signal molecule synthase and responsible for low cellular potency. Blockade of the susceptible position led to the discovery of the first antivirulence compound that is potent in vivo and targets PqsR, thus providing a proof of concept for this novel antivirulence therapy. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Histamine induces human lung fibroblast-mediated collagen gel contraction via histamine H1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Horie, Masafumi; Saito, Akira; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Mikami, Yu; Sakamoto, Makiko; Jo, Taisuke; Nakajima, Jun; Takizawa, Hajime; Nagase, Takahide; Kohyama, Tadashi

    2014-06-01

    Airway remodeling is implicated in irreversible airflow limitation of refractory asthma, which includes increased smooth muscle mass and subepithelial fibrosis. Activated fibroblasts acquire contractile phenotype to participate in tissue contraction and structural alteration of extracellular matrices. Histamine is a potent mediator of allergic inflammation, substantially involved in asthmatic pathophysiology. We hypothesized that histamine might play a role in airway remodeling, and investigated its effect on fibroblast-mediated collagen gel contraction. Fibroblast-mediated collagen gel contraction was studied. Histamine's regulation of collagen gel contraction was characterized by using specific histamine-receptor antagonists, an IP3 receptor antagonist and a PKC inhibitor. Histamine induced contraction of collagen gels embedded with human lung fibroblasts, in a time-dependent manner, and at the concentration more than 10(-6) M, both in four primary cultured adult lung fibroblasts and three fetal lung fibroblast cell lines. This effect was attenuated by H1 receptor antagonist, whereas those for H2 to H4 receptors failed to show an inhibitory effect. Furthermore, IP3 receptor-mediated Ca(2+) mobilization was implicated in histamine's action on collagen gel contraction. Our results suggest that histamine is involved in airway remodeling through its action on lung fibroblasts, and antihistamine drugs, especially H1 receptor antagonists, might be potentially beneficial for a subset of asthmatic patients.

  17. Vorapaxar: The Current Role and Future Directions of a Novel Protease-Activated Receptor Antagonist for Risk Reduction in Atherosclerotic Disease.

    PubMed

    Gryka, Rebecca J; Buckley, Leo F; Anderson, Sarah M

    2017-03-01

    Despite the current standard of care, patients with cardiovascular disease remain at a high risk for recurrent events. Inhibition of thrombin-mediated platelet activation through protease-activated receptor-1 antagonism may provide reductions in atherosclerotic disease beyond those achievable with the current standard of care. Our primary objective is to evaluate the clinical literature regarding the role of vorapaxar (Zontivity™) in the reduction of cardiovascular events in patients with a history of myocardial infarction and peripheral artery disease. In particular, we focus on the potential future directions for protease-activating receptor antagonists in the treatment of a broad range of atherosclerotic diseases. A literature search of PubMed and EBSCO was conducted to identify randomized clinical trials from August 2005 to June 2016 using the search terms: 'vorapaxar', 'SCH 530348', 'protease-activated receptor-1 antagonist', and 'Zontivity™'. Bibliographies were searched and additional resources were obtained. Vorapaxar is a first-in-class, protease-activated receptor-1 antagonist. The Thrombin Receptor Antagonist for Clinical Event Reduction (TRACER) trial did not demonstrate a significant reduction in a broad primary composite endpoint. However, the Thrombin-Receptor Antagonist in Secondary Prevention of Atherothrombotic Ischemic Events (TRA 2°P-TIMI 50) trial examined a more traditional composite endpoint and found a significant benefit with vorapaxar. Vorapaxar significantly increased bleeding compared with standard care. Ongoing trials will help define the role of vorapaxar in patients with peripheral arterial disease, patients with diabetes mellitus, and other important subgroups. The use of multivariate modeling may enable the identification of subgroups with maximal benefit and minimal harm from vorapaxar. Vorapaxar provides clinicians with a novel mechanism of action to further reduce the burden of ischemic heart disease. Identification of

  18. Small-molecule melanin-concentrating hormone-1 receptor antagonists require brain penetration for inhibition of food intake and reduction in body weight.

    PubMed

    Eric Hu, X; Wos, John A; Dowty, Martin E; Suchanek, Paula M; Ji, Wei; Chambers, James B; Benoit, Stephen C; Clegg, Deborah J; Reizes, Ofer

    2008-01-01

    The melanin-concentrating hormone-1 receptor (MCH1R) is a G-protein-coupled receptor expressed in the brain and peripheral tissues that regulates energy storage and body weight. Here, we focused on discovery of the mechanism and site of action for a small-molecule MCH1R antagonist, which yields weight loss in a mouse model of human obesity. MCH1R is expressed throughout the brain but also found in peripheral tissues known to regulate fat storage and utilization, e.g., skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Previous studies of MCH1R antagonist studies have not delineated the site that is critical for mediating the anorexigenic and weight-reducing actions. In this study, we evaluated the role of the brain and peripheral tissue receptors. We developed a novel nonbrain-permeable MCH antagonist analog with a carboxylic acid moiety to specifically test the site of action. Based on in vitro and in vivo assays, the analog is not able to cross the blood-brain barrier and does not lead to inhibition of food intake and reduced body weight. The data clearly demonstrate that MCH1R antagonists need access to the brain to reduce body weight and fat mass. The brain-permeable MCH1R antagonist leads to significant reduction in body weight and fat mass in diet-induced obese mice. The effect is dose-dependent and appears to be partially driven by a reduction in food intake. Finally, these studies show the utility of a medicinal chemistry approach to address an important biological and pharmacological question.

  19. Analytical ultracentrifugation with fluorescence detection system reveals differences in complex formation between recombinant human TNF and different biological TNF antagonists in various environments.

    PubMed

    Krayukhina, Elena; Noda, Masanori; Ishii, Kentaro; Maruno, Takahiro; Wakabayashi, Hirotsugu; Tada, Minoru; Suzuki, Takuo; Ishii-Watabe, Akiko; Kato, Masahiko; Uchiyama, Susumu

    A number of studies have attempted to elucidate the binding mechanism between tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and clinically relevant antagonists. None of these studies, however, have been conducted as close as possible to physiologic conditions, and so the relationship between the size distribution of TNF-antagonist complexes and the antagonists' biological activity or adverse effects remains elusive. Here, we characterized the binding stoichiometry and sizes of soluble TNF-antagonist complexes for adalimumab, infliximab, and etanercept that were formed in human serum and in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Fluorescence-detected sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation analyses revealed that adalimumab and infliximab formed a range of complexes with TNF, with the major complexes consisting of 3 molcules of the respective antagonist and one or 2 molcules of TNF. Considerably greater amounts of high-molecular-weight complexes were detected for infliximab in human serum. The emergence of peaks with higher sedimentation coefficients than the adalimumab monomer as a function of added human serum albumin (HSA) concentration in PBS suggested weak reversible interactions between HSA and immunoglobulins. Etanerept exclusively formed 1:1 complexes with TNF in PBS, and a small amount of complexes with higher stoichiometry was detected in human serum. Consistent with these biophysical characterizations, a reporter assay showed that adalimumab and infliximab, but not etanercept, exerted FcγRIIa- and FcγRIIIa-mediated cell signaling in the presence of TNF and that infliximab exhibited higher potency than adalimumab. This study shows that assessing distribution profiles in serum will contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of the in vivo behavior of therapeutic proteins.

  20. The assembly of very low density lipoproteins in rat hepatoma McA-RH7777 cells is inhibited by phospholipase A2 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Tran, K; Wang, Y; DeLong, C J; Cui, Z; Yao, Z

    2000-08-11

    In McA-RH7777 cells, the oleate-stimulated assembly and secretion of very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) was associated with enhanced deacylation of phospholipids, which was markedly decreased by inactivation of the cellular phospholipase A(2). Treatment of the cells with antagonists or antisense oligonucleotide of the Ca(2+)-independent phospholipase A(2) (iPLA(2)) significantly inhibited secretion of apoB100-VLDL and triglyceride. Similar inhibitory effect of the iPLA(2) antagonists was observed on apoB48-VLDL secretion, but secretion of high density lipoprotein particles (such as apoAI- and apoB48-high density lipoprotein) or proteins in general was unaffected. The iPLA(2) antagonist did not affect the synthesis of apoB100 or triglyceride, nor did it affect the activities of phospholipase D, phosphatidate phosphohydrolase, or microsomal triglyceride transfer protein. Inactivation of iPLA(2) resulted in impaired apoB100-VLDL assembly as shown by decreased apoB100-VLDL and triglyceride within the microsomal lumen, with concomitant increase in apoB100 association with the microsomal membranes. The inhibitory effect of iPLA(2) antagonists on apoB100-VLDL assembly/secretion could be abated by pretreatment of cells with oleate. Analysis of molecular species of microsomal phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine by electron spray tandem mass spectrometry revealed that the enrichment of oleoyl moieties was altered by the treatment of iPLA(2) antagonist. These results suggest that the oleate-induced VLDL assembly/secretion may depend upon the establishment of membrane glycerolipids enriched in oleoyl chain, a process mediated by the iPLA(2) activity.

  1. Analytical ultracentrifugation with fluorescence detection system reveals differences in complex formation between recombinant human TNF and different biological TNF antagonists in various environments

    PubMed Central

    Krayukhina, Elena; Noda, Masanori; Ishii, Kentaro; Maruno, Takahiro; Wakabayashi, Hirotsugu; Tada, Minoru; Suzuki, Takuo; Ishii-Watabe, Akiko; Kato, Masahiko; Uchiyama, Susumu

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A number of studies have attempted to elucidate the binding mechanism between tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and clinically relevant antagonists. None of these studies, however, have been conducted as close as possible to physiologic conditions, and so the relationship between the size distribution of TNF-antagonist complexes and the antagonists' biological activity or adverse effects remains elusive. Here, we characterized the binding stoichiometry and sizes of soluble TNF-antagonist complexes for adalimumab, infliximab, and etanercept that were formed in human serum and in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Fluorescence-detected sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation analyses revealed that adalimumab and infliximab formed a range of complexes with TNF, with the major complexes consisting of 3 molcules of the respective antagonist and one or 2 molcules of TNF. Considerably greater amounts of high-molecular-weight complexes were detected for infliximab in human serum. The emergence of peaks with higher sedimentation coefficients than the adalimumab monomer as a function of added human serum albumin (HSA) concentration in PBS suggested weak reversible interactions between HSA and immunoglobulins. Etanerept exclusively formed 1:1 complexes with TNF in PBS, and a small amount of complexes with higher stoichiometry was detected in human serum. Consistent with these biophysical characterizations, a reporter assay showed that adalimumab and infliximab, but not etanercept, exerted FcγRIIa- and FcγRIIIa-mediated cell signaling in the presence of TNF and that infliximab exhibited higher potency than adalimumab. This study shows that assessing distribution profiles in serum will contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of the in vivo behavior of therapeutic proteins. PMID:28387583

  2. The leukotriene B4 receptors BLT1 and BLT2 form an antagonistic sensitizing system in peripheral sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Sebastian; Sisignano, Marco; Kern, Katharina; Pierre, Sandra; Tunaru, Sorin; Jordan, Holger; Suo, Jing; Treutlein, Elsa-Marie; Angioni, Carlo; Ferreiros, Nerea; Leffler, Andreas; DeBruin, Natasja; Offermanns, Stefan; Geisslinger, Gerd; Scholich, Klaus

    2017-04-14

    Sensitization of the heat-activated ion channel transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) through lipids is a fundamental mechanism during inflammation-induced peripheral sensitization. Leukotriene B4 is a proinflammatory lipid mediator whose role in peripheral nociceptive sensitization is not well understood to date. Two major G-protein-coupled receptors for leukotriene B4 have been identified: the high-affinity receptor BLT1 and the low-affinity receptor BLT2. Transcriptional screening for the expression G-protein-coupled receptors in murine dorsal root ganglia showed that both receptors were among the highest expressed in dorsal root ganglia. Calcium imaging revealed a sensitization of TRPV1-mediated calcium increases in a relative narrow concentration range for leukotriene B4 (100-200 nm). Selective antagonists and neurons from knock-out mice demonstrated a BLT1-dependent sensitization of TRPV1-mediated calcium increases. Accordingly, leukotriene B4-induced thermal hyperalgesia was mediated through BLT1 and TRPV1 as shown using the respective knock-out mice. Importantly, higher leukotriene B4 concentrations (>0.5 μm) and BLT2 agonists abolished sensitization of the TRPV1-mediated calcium increases. Also, BLT2 activation inhibited protein kinase C- and protein kinase A-mediated sensitization processes through the phosphatase calcineurin. Consequently, a selective BLT2-receptor agonist increased thermal and mechanical withdrawal thresholds during zymosan-induced inflammation. In accordance with these data, immunohistochemical analysis showed that both leukotriene B4 receptors were expressed in peripheral sensory neurons. Thus, the data show that the two leukotriene B4 receptors have opposing roles in the sensitization of peripheral sensory neurons forming a self-restricting system. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Diadenosine polyphosphates as antagonists of the endogenous P2Y1 receptor in rat brain capillary endothelial cells of the B7 and B10 clones

    PubMed Central

    Vigne, Paul; Breittmayer, Jean Philippe; Frelin, Christian

    2000-01-01

    Diadenosine polyphosphates (ApnAs, n=2–7) are considered as stress mediators in the cardiovascular system. They act both via identified P2 purinoceptors and via yet to be characterized receptors. This study analyses the actions of ApnAs in clones of rat brain capillary endothelial cells that express P2Y1 receptors (B10 cells) or both P2Y1 and P2Y2 receptors (B7 cells).B10 cells responded to Ap3A with rises in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). This response was prevented by adenosine-3′-phosphate-5′-phosphate, an antagonist of P2Y1 receptors. It was largely suppressed by a treatment with apyrase VII or with creatine phosphokinase/creatine phosphate to degrade contaminating ADP.ApnAs inhibited ADP induced increases in [Ca2+]i mediated by P2Y1 receptors by shifting ADP concentration-response curves to larger concentrations. Apparent Ki values were estimated to be 6 μM for Ap4A, 10 μM for Ap5A and 47 μM for Ap6A. Ap2A and Ap3A were much less active.ApnAs were neither agonists nor antagonists of the endogenous P2Y2 receptor in B7 cells.ApnAs are neither agonists nor antagonists of the Gi-coupled, ADP receptor in B10 cells.The results suggest that most actions of ApnAs in B7 and B10 cells can be accounted for by endogenous P2Y1 receptors. Ap4A, Ap5A and Ap6A are specific antagonists of endogenous Ca2+-coupled P2Y1 receptors. PMID:10742308

  4. Chronic escitalopram treatment caused dissociative adaptation in serotonin (5-HT) 2C receptor antagonist-induced effects in REM sleep, wake and theta wave activity.

    PubMed

    Kostyalik, Diána; Kátai, Zita; Vas, Szilvia; Pap, Dorottya; Petschner, Péter; Molnár, Eszter; Gyertyán, István; Kalmár, Lajos; Tóthfalusi, László; Bagdy, Gyorgy

    2014-03-01

    Several multi-target drugs used in treating psychiatric disorders, such as antidepressants (e.g. agomelatine, trazodone, nefazodone, amitriptyline, mirtazapine, mianserin, fluoxetine) or most atypical antipsychotics, have 5-hydroxytryptamine 2C (5-HT2C) receptor-blocking property. Adaptive changes in 5-HT2C receptor-mediated functions are suggested to contribute to therapeutic effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants after weeks of treatment, at least in part. Beyond the mediation of anxiety and other functions, 5-HT2C receptors are involved in sleep regulation. Anxiety-related adaptive changes caused by antidepressants have been studied extensively, although sleep- and electroencephalography (EEG)-related functional studies are still lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic SSRI treatment on 5-HT2C receptor antagonist-induced functions in different vigilance stages and on quantitative EEG (Q-EEG) spectra. Rats were treated with a single dose of the selective 5-HT2C receptor antagonist SB-242084 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle at the beginning of passive phase following a 20-day-long SSRI (escitalopram; 10 mg/kg/day, osmotic minipump) or VEHICLE pretreatment. Fronto-parietal electroencephalogram, electromyogram and motility were recorded during the first 3 h of passive phase. We found that the chronic escitalopram pretreatment attenuated the SB-242084-caused suppression in rapid eye movement sleep (REMS). On the contrary, the 5-HT2C receptor antagonist-induced elevations in passive wake and theta (5-9 Hz) power density during active wake and REMS were not affected by the SSRI. In conclusion, attenuation in certain, but not all vigilance- and Q-EEG-related functions induced by the 5-HT2C receptor antagonist, suggests dissociation in 5-HT2C receptor adaptation.

  5. In vivo activation of the SK channel in the spinal cord reduces the NMDA receptor antagonist dose needed to produce antinociception in an inflammatory pain model.

    PubMed

    Hipólito, Lucia; Fakira, Amanda K; Cabañero, David; Blandón, Rebecca; Carlton, Susan M; Morón, Jose A; Melyan, Zara

    2015-05-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonists have been shown to reduce mechanical hypersensitivity in animal models of inflammatory pain. However, their clinical use is associated with significant dose-limiting side effects. Small-conductance Ca-activated K channels (SK) have been shown to modulate NMDAR activity in the brain. We demonstrate that in vivo activation of SK channels in the spinal cord can alleviate mechanical hypersensitivity in a rat model of inflammatory pain. Intrathecal (i.t.) administration of the SK channel activator, 6,7-dichloro-1H-indole-2,3-dione 3-oxime (NS309), attenuates complete Freund adjuvant (CFA)-induced mechanical hypersensitivity in a dose-dependent manner. Postsynaptic expression of the SK channel subunit, SK3, and apamin-sensitive SK channel-mediated currents recorded from superficial laminae are significantly reduced in the dorsal horn (DH) after CFA. Complete Freund adjuvant-induced decrease in SK-mediated currents can be reversed in vitro by bath application of NS309. In addition, immunostaining for the SK3 subunit indicates that SK3-containing channels within DH neurons can have both somatic and dendritic localization. Double immunostaining shows coexpression of SK3 and NMDAR subunit, NR1, compatible with functional interaction. Moreover, we demonstrate that i.t. coadministration of NS309 with an NMDAR antagonist reduces the dose of NMDAR antagonist, DL-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (DL-AP5), required to produce antinociceptive effects in the CFA model. This reduction could attenuate the unwanted side effects associated with NMDAR antagonists, giving this combination potential clinical implications.

  6. Transcriptional and translational regulation of calpain in the rat heart after myocardial infarction--effects of AT(1) and AT(2) receptor antagonists and ACE inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Sandmann, S; Yu, M; Unger, T

    2001-02-01

    1. Recent studies demonstrated that the cardiac calpain system is activated during ischaemic events and is involved in cardiomyocyte injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of AT(1) and AT(2) receptors in the regulation of calpain-mediated myocardial damage following myocardial infarction (MI). 2. Infarcted animals were treated either with placebo, the ACE inhibitor ramipril (1 mg kg(-1) d(-1)), the AT(1) receptor antagonist valsartan (10 mg kg(-1) d(-1)) or the AT(2) receptor antagonist PD 123319 (30 mg kg(-1) d(-1)). Treatment was started 7 days prior to surgery. On day 1, 3, 7 and 14 after MI, gene expression and protein levels of calpain I, II and calpastatin were determined in left ventricular free wall (LVFW) and interventricular septum (IS). At day 3 and 14 post MI, morphological investigations were performed. 3. Calpain I mRNA expression and protein levels were increased in IS 14 days post MI, whereas mRNA expression and protein levels of calpain II were maximally increased in LVFW 3 days post MI. Ramipril and valsartan decreased mRNA and protein up-regulation of calpain I and II, and reduced infarct size and interstitial fibrosis. PD 123319 did not affect calpain I or II up-regulation in the infarcted myocardium, but decreased interstitial fibrosis. Calpastatin expression and translation were not affected by AT receptor antagonists or ACE inhibitor. 4. Our data demonstrate a distinct, temporary-spatial up-regulation of calpain I and II following MI confer with the hypothesis of calpain I being involved in cardiac remodelling in the late and calpain II contributing to cardiac tissue damage in the early phase of MI. The up-regulation of calpain I and II is partly mediated via the AT(1) receptor and can be reduced by ACE inhibitors and AT(1) receptor antagonists.

  7. Effects of ONO-6950, a novel dual cysteinyl leukotriene 1 and 2 receptors antagonist, in a guinea pig model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Yonetomi, Yasuo; Sekioka, Tomohiko; Kadode, Michiaki; Kitamine, Tetsuya; Kamiya, Akihiro; inoue, Atsuto; Nakao, Takafumi; Nomura, Hiroaki; Murata, Masayuki; Nakao, Shintaro; Nambu, Fumio; Fujita, Manabu; Nakade, Shinji; Kawabata, Kazuhito

    2015-10-15

    We assessed in this study the anti-asthmatic effects of ONO-6950, a novel cysteinyl leukotriene 1 (CysLT1) and 2 (CysLT2) receptors dual antagonist, in normal and S-hexyl glutathione (S-hexyl GSH)-treated guinea pigs, and compared these effects to those of montelukast, a CysLT1 selective receptor antagonist. Treatment with S-hexyl GSH reduced animals LTC4 metabolism, allowing practical evaluation of CysLT2 receptor-mediated airway response. ONO-6950 antagonized intracellular calcium signaling via human and guinea pig CysLT1 and CysLT2 receptors with IC50 values of 1.7 and 25 nM, respectively (human receptors) and 6.3 and 8.2 nM, respectively (guinea pig receptors). In normal guinea pigs, both ONO-6950 (1 or 0.3 mg/kg, p.o.) and the CysLT1 receptor antagonist montelukast (0.3 or 0.1 mg/kg, p.o.) fully attenuated CysLT1-mediated bronchoconstriction and airway vascular hyperpermeability induced by LTD4. On the other hand, in S-hexyl GSH-treated guinea pigs ONO-6950 at 3 mg/kg, p.o. or more almost completely inhibited bronchoconstriction and airway vascular hyperpermeability elicited by LTC4, while montelukast showed only partial or negligible inhibition of these airway responses. In ovalbumin sensitized guinea pigs, treatment with S-hexyl GSH on top of pyrilamine and indomethacin rendered antigen-induced bronchoconstriction sensitive to both CysLT1 and CysLT2 receptor antagonists. ONO-6950 strongly inhibited this asthmatic response to the level attained by combination therapy with montelukast and BayCysLT2RA, a selective CysLT2 receptor antagonist. These results clearly demonstrate that ONO-6950 is an orally active dual CysLT1/LT2 receptor antagonist that may provide a novel therapeutic option for patients with asthma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. PPADS: an antagonist at endothelial P2Y-purinoceptors but not P2U-purinoceptors.

    PubMed

    Brown, C; Tanna, B; Boarder, M R

    1995-11-01

    1. Bovine aortic endothelial (BAE) cells contain two co-existing receptors for extracellular ATP, the P2Y and P2U-purinoceptors. Here we have determined whether the proposed P2X-purinoceptor antagonist, pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2', 4'-disulphonic acid (PPADS) could distinguish between these two receptor subtypes. 2. Cells labelled with myo-[2-3H]-inositol were stimulated with increasing concentrations of either the P2Y-agonist, 2MeSATP, or the P2U-agonist, UTP in the absence or presence of 30 microM PPADS. The accumulation of total [3H]-inositol (poly)phosphates mediated by 2MeSATP was markedly attenuated by PPADS, whereas the response to UTP was not significantly affected. 3. Stimulation of BAE cells with increasing concentrations of ATP showed a reduced response in the presence of 10 microM PPADS, but this effect of the antagonist was not significant. By contrast, inhibition of the response to ADP was profound and highly significant. 4. These observations show that PPADS is not a selective P2X-purinoceptor antagonist, but is able to distinguish between P2Y- and P2YU-purinoceptors in BAE cells, and indicate that this compound may provide a useful tool in the study of multiple subtypes of P2-purinoceptors. Furthermore the results are consistent with the hypothesis that ATP interacts with both receptor subtypes, but that the action of ADP is primarily at the P2Y-purinoceptor in these endothelial cells.

  9. PPADS: an antagonist at endothelial P2Y-purinoceptors but not P2U-purinoceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, C.; Tanna, B.; Boarder, M. R.

    1995-01-01

    1. Bovine aortic endothelial (BAE) cells contain two co-existing receptors for extracellular ATP, the P2Y and P2U-purinoceptors. Here we have determined whether the proposed P2X-purinoceptor antagonist, pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2', 4'-disulphonic acid (PPADS) could distinguish between these two receptor subtypes. 2. Cells labelled with myo-[2-3H]-inositol were stimulated with increasing concentrations of either the P2Y-agonist, 2MeSATP, or the P2U-agonist, UTP in the absence or presence of 30 microM PPADS. The accumulation of total [3H]-inositol (poly)phosphates mediated by 2MeSATP was markedly attenuated by PPADS, whereas the response to UTP was not significantly affected. 3. Stimulation of BAE cells with increasing concentrations of ATP showed a reduced response in the presence of 10 microM PPADS, but this effect of the antagonist was not significant. By contrast, inhibition of the response to ADP was profound and highly significant. 4. These observations show that PPADS is not a selective P2X-purinoceptor antagonist, but is able to distinguish between P2Y- and P2YU-purinoceptors in BAE cells, and indicate that this compound may provide a useful tool in the study of multiple subtypes of P2-purinoceptors. Furthermore the results are consistent with the hypothesis that ATP interacts with both receptor subtypes, but that the action of ADP is primarily at the P2Y-purinoceptor in these endothelial cells. PMID:8581277

  10. AHR-16303B, a novel antagonist of 5-HT2 receptors and voltage-sensitive calcium channels

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, R.J.; Appell, K.C.; Kilpatrick, B.F.

    1991-01-01

    In vivo and in vitro methods were used to characterize AHR-16303B, a novel compound with antagonistic action at 5-HT2 receptors and voltage-sensitive calcium channels. The 5-HT2 receptor-antagonistic properties of AHR-16303B were demonstrated by inhibition of (a) (3H)ketanserin binding to rat cerebral cortical membranes (IC50 = 165 nM); (b) 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-induced foot edema in rats (minimum effective dose, (MED) = 0.32 mg/kg orally, p.o.); (c) 5-HT-induced vasopressor responses in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) (ID50 = 0.18 mg/kg intravenously (i.v.), 1.8 mg/kg p.o.), (d) 5-HT-induced antidiuresis in rats (MED = 1 mg/kg p.o.), and (e) platelet aggregation induced by 5-HT + ADPmore » (IC50 = 1.5 mM). The calcium antagonist properties of AHR-16303B were demonstrated by inhibition of (a) (3H)nimodipine binding to voltage-sensitive calcium channels on rabbit skeletal muscle membranes (IC50 = 15 nM), (b) KCl-stimulated calcium flux into cultured PC12 cells (IC50 = 81 nM), and (c) CaCl2-induced contractions of rabbit thoracic aortic strips (pA2 = 8.84). AHR-16303B had little or no effect on binding of radioligands to dopamine2 (DA2) alpha 1, alpha 2, H1, 5-HT1 alpha, beta 2, muscarinic M1, or sigma opioid receptors; had no effect on 5-HT3 receptor-mediated vagal bradycardia; and had only minor negative inotropic, chronotropic, and dromotropic effects on isolated guinea pig atria. In conscious SHR, 30 mg/kg p.o. AHR-16303B completely prevented the vasopressor responses to i.v. 5-HT, and decreased blood pressure (BP) by 24% 3 h after dosing.« less

  11. Protection from fatal viral encephalomyelitis: AMPA receptor antagonists have a direct effect on the inflammatory response to infection

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Ivorlyne P.; Lee, Eun-Young; Prow, Natalie; Ngwang, Brownhilda; Griffin, Diane E.

    2008-01-01

    Neuronal cell death during fatal acute viral encephalomyelitis can result from damage caused by virus replication, glutamate excitotoxicity, and the immune response. A neurovirulent strain of the alphavirus Sindbis virus (NSV) causes fatal encephalomyelitis associated with motor neuron death in adult C57BL/6 mice that can be prevented by treatment with the prototypic noncompetitive α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) glutamate receptor antagonist GYKI 52466 [Nargi-Aizenman J, et al. (2004) Ann Neurol 55:541–549]. To determine the mechanism of protection, NSV-infected mice were treated with 7-acetyl-5-(4-aminophenyl)-8(R)-methyl-8,9-dihydro-7H-1,3-dioxolo-(4,5-h)-benzodiazepine (talampanel), a potent, orally available member of the 2,3 benzodiazepine class of noncompetitive AMPA glutamate receptor antagonists. Talampanel-treated mice were protected from NSV-induced paralysis and death. Examination of the brain during infection showed significantly less mononuclear cell infiltration and no increase in astrocyte expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein in treated mice compared with untreated mice. Lack of CNS inflammation was attributable to failure of treated mice to induce activation and proliferation of lymphocytes in secondary lymphoid tissue in response to infection. Antibody responses to NSV were also suppressed by talampanel treatment, and virus clearance was delayed. These studies reveal a previously unrecognized effect of AMPA receptor antagonists on the immune response and suggest that prevention of immune-mediated damage, in addition to inhibition of excitotoxicity, is a mechanism by which these drugs protect from death of motor neurons caused by viral infection. PMID:18296635

  12. PD 102807, a novel muscarinic M4 receptor antagonist, discriminates between striatal and cortical muscarinic receptors coupled to cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    Olianas, M C; Onali, P

    1999-01-01

    In membranes of Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the cloned human M1-M4 muscarinic receptor subtypes, PD 102807, a novel M4 selective antagonist, was found to counteract the M4 receptor-induced stimulation of [35S]-GTPgammaS binding to membrane G proteins with a pK(B) of 7.40, a value which was 63-, 33- and 10-fold higher than those displayed at M1 (pK(B) = 5.60), M2 (pK(B) = 5.88) and M3 (pK(B) = 6.39) receptor subtypes, respectively. In rat striatal membranes, PD 102807 antagonized the muscarinic inhibition of dopamine (DA) D1 receptor-stimulated adenylyl cyclase with a pK(B) value of 7.36. In contrast, in membranes of rat frontal cortex, PD 102807 displayed lower potencies in antagonizing either the muscarinic facilitation of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH)-stimulated adenylyl cyclase (pK(B) = 5.79) or inhibition of Ca2+/calmodulin (Ca2+/CaM)-stimulated enzyme activity (pK(B) = 5.95). In each response investigated, PD 102807 interacted with muscarinic receptors in a manner typical of a simple competitive antagonist. These data provide additional evidence that PD 102807 is a M4-receptor preferring antagonist and that this compound can discriminate the striatal muscarinic receptors inhibiting DA D1 receptor activity from the cortical receptors mediating the potentiation of CRH receptor signalling and the inhibition of Ca2+/CaM-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity.

  13. Potent Inhibition of Alcohol Self-Administration in Alcohol-Preferring Rats by a κ-Opioid Receptor Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Azar, Marc R.

    2014-01-01

    A substituted aryl amide derivative of 6-naltrexamine—17-cyclopropylmethyl-3,14β-dihydroxy-4,5α-epoxy-6β-[(4′-trimethylfluoro)benzamido]morphinan-hydrochloride—(compound 5), previously shown to be a potent κ-opioid receptor antagonist, was used to characterize the physicochemical properties and efficacy to decrease alcohol self-administration in alcohol-preferring rats (P-rats) and binge-like P-rats. Previous studies showed that compounds closely related to compound 5 possessed favorable properties regarding penetration of the blood-brain barrier. Pharmacokinetic studies showed that compound 5 had acceptable bioavailability. In contrast to other κ-receptor antagonists, in particular norbinaltorphimine, compound 5 showed favorable drug-like properties. Based on these findings, further studies were done. Safety studies showed that compound 5 was not hepatotoxic at doses 200-fold greater than an efficacious dose. The effects of compound 5 or naltrexone on the hepatotoxicity of thiobenzamide were investigated. In contrast to naltrexone, which exacerbated thiobenzamide-mediated hepatotoxicity, compound 5 was observed to be hepatoprotective. Based on the physicochemical properties of compound 5, the compound was examined in rat animal models of alcohol self-administration. The inhibition of ethanol self-administration by compound 5 in alcohol-dependent and alcohol-nondependent P-rats trained to self-administer a 10% (w/v) ethanol solution, using operant techniques, showed very potent efficacy (i.e., estimated ED50 values of 4–5 μg/kg). In a binge-like P-rat animal model, inhibition of alcohol self-administration by compound 5 had an estimated ED50 value of 8 μg/kg. The results suggest that compound 5 is a potent drug-like κ-opioid receptor antagonist of utility in alcohol cessation medications development. PMID:24817033

  14. A trimeric structural fusion of an antagonistic tumor necrosis factor-α mutant enhances molecular stability and enables facile modification.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Masaki; Ando, Daisuke; Kamada, Haruhiko; Taki, Shintaro; Niiyama, Mayumi; Mukai, Yohei; Tadokoro, Takashi; Maenaka, Katsumi; Nakayama, Taisuke; Kado, Yuji; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Tsunoda, Shin-Ichi

    2017-04-21

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) exerts its biological effect through two types of receptors, p55 TNF receptor (TNFR1) and p75 TNF receptor (TNFR2). An inflammatory response is known to be induced mainly by TNFR1, whereas an anti-inflammatory reaction is thought to be mediated by TNFR2 in some autoimmune diseases. We have been investigating the use of an antagonistic TNF mutant (TNFR1-selective antagonistic TNF mutant (R1antTNF)) to reveal the pharmacological effect of TNFR1-selective inhibition as a new therapeutic modality. Here, we aimed to further improve and optimize the activity and behavior of this mutant protein both in vitro and in vivo Specifically, we examined a trimeric structural fusion of R1antTNF, formed via the introduction of short peptide linkers, as a strategy to enhance bioactivity and molecular stability. By comparative analysis with R1antTNF, the trimeric fusion, referred to as single-chain R1antTNF (scR1antTNF), was found to retain in vitro molecular properties of receptor selectivity and antagonistic activity but displayed a marked increase in thermal stability. The residence time of scR1antTNF in vivo was also significantly prolonged. Furthermore, molecular modification using polyethylene glycol (PEG) was easily controlled by limiting the number of reactive sites. Taken together, our findings show that scR1antTNF displays enhanced molecular stability while maintaining biological activity compared with R1antTNF. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Effects of dopamine antagonists on drug cue-induced reinstatement of nicotine-seeking behavior in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiu; Jernigen, Courtney; Gharib, Maysa; Booth, Sheri; Caggiula, Anthony R.; Sved, Alan F.

    2010-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurotransmission has been implicated in associative learning processes related to drugs of abuse. However, it is not clear whether blockade of activation of dopamine receptors alters conditioned incentive properties of nicotine-associated cues. Using a response-reinstatement procedure, this study examined the effects of antagonists selective for the D1 and the D2 subtypes of dopamine receptors on cue-induced reinstatement of nicotine-seeking behavior. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained in 30 daily 1 h sessions to intravenously self-administer nicotine (0.03 mg/kg/infusion) on a FR5 schedule and associate a conditioned stimulus (cue) with each nicotine delivery. After extinction of responding by withholding nicotine (saline substitution) and its cue, the reinstatement tests were conducted following subcutaneous administration of a D1 antagonist SCH23390 (0, 5, 10, 30 μg/kg) or a D2 antagonist eticlopride (0, 5, 10, 30 μg/kg) in different groups of animals. Both SCH23390 and eticlopride significantly attenuated the magnitude of cue-elicited reinstatement of nicotine-seeking responding. These results indicate that activation of dopaminergic D1 and D2 receptors may play a role in mediating the conditioned motivational effects of nicotine-associated cues as measured in the response-reinstatement procedure. These findings suggest that manipulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission at the D1 and/or D2 receptors may prove to be a potential target for the development of pharmacotherapy for prevention of environmental nicotine cue-triggered smoking relapse. PMID:20168211

  16. Classification and virtual screening of androgen receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiazhong; Gramatica, Paola

    2010-05-24

    Computational tools, such as quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR), are highly useful as screening support for prioritization of substances of very high concern (SVHC). From the practical point of view, QSAR models should be effective to pick out more active rather than inactive compounds, expressed as sensitivity in classification works. This research investigates the classification of a big data set of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs)-androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, mainly aiming to improve the external sensitivity and to screen for potential AR binders. The kNN, lazy IB1, and ADTree methods and the consensus approach were used to build different models, which improve the sensitivity on external chemicals from 57.1% (literature) to 76.4%. Additionally, the models' predictive abilities were further validated on a blind collected data set (sensitivity: 85.7%). Then the proposed classifiers were used: (i) to distinguish a set of AR binders into antagonists and agonists; (ii) to screen a combined estrogen receptor binder database to find out possible chemicals that can bind to both AR and ER; and (iii) to virtually screen our in-house environmental chemical database. The in silico screening results suggest: (i) that some compounds can affect the normal endocrine system through a complex mechanism binding both to ER and AR; (ii) new EDCs, which are nonER binders, but can in silico bind to AR, are recognized; and (iii) about 20% of compounds in a big data set of environmental chemicals are predicted as new AR antagonists. The priority should be given to them to experimentally test the binding activities with AR.

  17. Correlated EMG Oscillations between Antagonists during Cocontraction in Men.

    PubMed

    Yoshitake, Yasuhide; Kanehisa, Hiroaki; Shinohara, Minoru

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the modulation of common low-frequency oscillations in pools of motor units across antagonistic muscles because of the difference in the activation level of pools of spinal motor neurons and the presence of neuromuscular fatigue during intended cocontraction. Ten healthy young men (21.8 ± 1.5 yr) performed intended steady cocontractions of elbow flexors and extensors at maximal and a submaximal (10% of maximal EMG) effort. The submaximal cocontraction was repeated after sustained maximal contraction of elbow flexors. Surface EMG was recorded from the biceps brachii and triceps brachii muscles. Correlated EMG oscillations between the antagonistic muscles were quantified by the cross-correlation function (CCF) using rectified EMG for the <3-Hz band and using rectified and unrectified EMG for the 3- to 15-Hz bands. The positive CCF peak in rectified EMG <3 Hz with little time lag (i.e., in-phase oscillations) during submaximal cocontraction was smaller compared with maximal cocontraction, but increased after the sustained contraction. In the 3- to 15-Hz band of both unrectified and rectified EMG, a negative CCF peak (i.e., out-of-phase oscillations) during submaximal cocontraction was smaller compared with maximal cocontraction but increased after the sustained contraction. Across subjects, the degree of reduction in maximal EMG amplitude after the sustained contraction was correlated with the amount of change in the CCF peak in <3 Hz but not in the 3- to 15-Hz band. The results indicate that 1) in-phase <3-Hz and out-of-phase 3-15-Hz correlated EMG oscillations between antagonistic muscles occur during intended cocontraction, and 2) the magnitude of these correlated oscillations increases with the activation level of pools of spinal motor neurons and neuromuscular fatigue.

  18. Membrane formation in liquids by adding an antagonistic salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadakane, Koichiro; Seto, Hideki

    2018-03-01

    Antagonistic salts are composed of hydrophilic and hydrophobic ions. In a binary mixture, such as water and organic solvent, these ion pairs preferentially dissolve to those phases, respectively, and there is a coupling between the charge density and the composition. The heterogeneous distribution of ions forms a large electric double layer at the interface between these solvents. This reduces the interfacial tension between water and organic solvent, and stabilizes an ordered structure, such as a membrane. These phenomena have been extensively studied from both theoretical and experimental point of view. In addition, the numerical simulations can reproduce such ordered structures.

  19. Discovery of dopamine D₄ receptor antagonists with planar chirality.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Fabrizio; Ortner, Birgit; Hübner, Harald; Löber, Stefan; Tschammer, Nuska; Gmeiner, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Employing the D4 selective phenylpiperazine 2 as a lead compound, planar chiral analogs with paracyclophane substructure were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to bind and activate dopamine receptors. The study revealed that the introduction of a [2.2]paracyclophane moiety is tolerated by dopamine receptors of the D2 family. Subtype selectivity for D4 and ligand efficacy depend on the absolute configuration of the test compounds. Whereas the achiral single-layered lead 2 and the double-layered paracyclophane (R)-3 showed partial agonist properties, the enantiomer (S)-3 behaved as a neutral antagonist. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Antagonistic interactions of phylloplane bacteria with Drechslera dictyoides (Drechslera) Shoemaker.

    PubMed

    Austin, B; Dickinson, C H; Goodfellow, M

    1977-06-01

    Strains of Listeria denitrificans (E2), Pseudomonas fluorescens (C37 and C92), and Xanthomonas campestris (D119), isolated from the phylloplane of Lolium perenne (S24), were antagonistic to Drechslera dictyoides (Drechslera) Shoemaker. From in vitro and in vivo experiments it was deduced that their mode of activity included an initial inhibition of spore germination, a retardation in the rate of germ-tube elongation, and ultimately lysis of the hyphae. The effects were expressed on the plant in terms of reduced levels of disease symptoms and sporulation.

  1. Esthetic Prosthetic Restorations: Reliability and Effects on Antagonist Dentition

    PubMed Central

    Daou, Elie E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in ceramics have greatly improved the functional and esthetic properties of restorative materials. New materials offer an esthetic and functional oral rehabilitation, however their impact on opposing teeth is not welldocumented. Peer-reviewed articles published till December 2014 were identified through Pubmed (Medline and Elsevier). Scientifically, there are several methods of measuring the wear process of natural dentition which enhances the comparison of the complicated results. This paper presents an overview of the newly used prosthetic materials and their implication on antagonist teeth or prostheses, especially emphasizing the behavior of zirconia restorations. PMID:26962376

  2. Antibiotic discovery throughout the Small World Initiative: A molecular strategy to identify biosynthetic gene clusters involved in antagonistic activity.

    PubMed

    Davis, Elizabeth; Sloan, Tyler; Aurelius, Krista; Barbour, Angela; Bodey, Elijah; Clark, Brigette; Dennis, Celeste; Drown, Rachel; Fleming, Megan; Humbert, Allison; Glasgo, Elizabeth; Kerns, Trent; Lingro, Kelly; McMillin, MacKenzie; Meyer, Aaron; Pope, Breanna; Stalevicz, April; Steffen, Brittney; Steindl, Austin; Williams, Carolyn; Wimberley, Carmen; Zenas, Robert; Butela, Kristen; Wildschutte, Hans

    2017-06-01

    The emergence of bacterial pathogens resistant to all known antibiotics is a global health crisis. Adding to this problem is that major pharmaceutical companies have shifted away from antibiotic discovery due to low profitability. As a result, the pipeline of new antibiotics is essentially dry and many bacteria now resist the effects of most commonly used drugs. To address this global health concern, citizen science through the Small World Initiative (SWI) was formed in 2012. As part of SWI, students isolate bacteria from their local environments, characterize the strains, and assay for antibiotic production. During the 2015 fall semester at Bowling Green State University, students isolated 77 soil-derived bacteria and genetically characterized strains using the 16S rRNA gene, identified strains exhibiting antagonistic activity, and performed an expanded SWI workflow using transposon mutagenesis to identify a biosynthetic gene cluster involved in toxigenic compound production. We identified one mutant with loss of antagonistic activity and through subsequent whole-genome sequencing and linker-mediated PCR identified a 24.9 kb biosynthetic gene locus likely involved in inhibitory activity in that mutant. Further assessment against human pathogens demonstrated the inhibition of Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the presence of this compound, thus supporting our molecular strategy as an effective research pipeline for SWI antibiotic discovery and genetic characterization. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptor antagonists prevent minocycline-induced neuroprotection following traumatic brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Rodriguez, Ana Belen; Siopi, Eleni; Finn, David P; Marchand-Leroux, Catherine; Garcia-Segura, Luis M; Jafarian-Tehrani, Mehrnaz; Viveros, Maria-Paz

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and its consequences represent one of the leading causes of death in young adults. This lesion mediates glial activation and the release of harmful molecules and causes brain edema, axonal injury, and functional impairment. Since glial activation plays a key role in the development of this damage, it seems that controlling it could be beneficial and could lead to neuroprotective effects. Recent studies show that minocycline suppresses microglial activation, reduces the lesion volume, and decreases TBI-induced locomotor hyperactivity up to 3 months. The endocannabinoid system (ECS) plays an important role in reparative mechanisms and inflammation under pathological situations by controlling some mechanisms that are shared with minocycline pathways. We hypothesized that the ECS could be involved in the neuroprotective effects of minocycline. To address this hypothesis, we used a murine TBI model in combination with selective CB1 and CB2 receptor antagonists (AM251 and AM630, respectively). The results provided the first evidence for the involvement of ECS in the neuroprotective action of minocycline on brain edema, neurological impairment, diffuse axonal injury, and microglial activation, since all these effects were prevented by the CB1 and CB2 receptor antagonists. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 antagonists block the noxious effects of toxic industrial isocyanates and tear gases

    PubMed Central

    Bessac, Bret F.; Sivula, Michael; von Hehn, Christian A.; Caceres, Ana I.; Escalera, Jasmine; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2009-01-01

    The release of methyl isocyanate in Bhopal, India, caused the worst industrial accident in history. Exposures to industrial isocyanates induce lacrimation, pain, airway irritation, and edema. Similar responses are elicited by chemicals used as tear gases. Despite frequent exposures, the biological targets of isocyanates and tear gases in vivo have not been identified, precluding the development of effective countermeasures. We use Ca2+ imaging and electrophysiology to show that the noxious effects of isocyanates and those of all major tear gas agents are caused by activation of Ca2+ influx and membrane currents in mustard oil-sensitive sensory neurons. These responses are mediated by transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), an ion channel serving as a detector for reactive chemicals. In mice, genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of TRPA1 dramatically reduces isocyanate- and tear gas-induced nocifensive behavior after both ocular and cutaneous exposures. We conclude that isocyanates and tear gas agents target the same neuronal receptor, TRPA1. Treatment with TRPA1 antagonists may prevent and alleviate chemical irritation of the eyes, skin, and airways and reduce the adverse health effects of exposures to a wide range of toxic noxious chemicals.—Bessac, B. F., Sivula, M., von Hehn, C. A., Caceres, A. I., Escalera, J., Jordt, S.-E. Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 antagonists block the noxious effects of toxic industrial isocyanates and tear gases. PMID:19036859

  5. Antisense and sense RNA probe hybridization to immobilized crude cellular lysates: a tool to screen growth hormone antagonists.

    PubMed

    Rosengren, Linda; Simko, Hanna; Aryan, Ladan; Axelsson-Lendin, Pia; Chmielewska, Joanna; Mode, Agneta; Parrow, Vendela

    2005-04-01

    The growth-promoting effect of growth hormone (GH) is primarily mediated by insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). The liver is the main source of circulating IGF-I. The authors have used rodent primary hepatocytes for studies on pharmacological intervention of IGF-I mRNA expression. A 96-well nonradioactive IGF-1 mRNA quantification assay was developed, based on the hybridization of sense and antisense RNA probes, to replicate membranes with crude hepatocyte lysates. The sense hybridization was used as an internal standard. The antagonistic properties of a set of GH-receptor binding compounds were evaluated. Two compounds were found to down-regulate IGF-I mRNA. Effects due to metabolic inhibition or toxicity were excluded using a cell proliferation assay. To investigate potential unspecific transcriptional effects, the mRNA levels of the housekeeping genes, beta-actin and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), were determined. Two other GH-regulated genes, cytochrome P450 2C12 (CYP2C12) and a rat homologue to the human alpha1B-glycoprotein (A1BG), were quantified by RNase protection assays and found to be down-regulated, confirming the antagonistic property of 1 compound. In conclusion, a direct filter hybridization assay of hepatocyte lysates using nonradioactive sense and antisense probes can be used for quantitative mRNA measurements and could constitute a valuable tool in screening for pharmacologically active compounds.

  6. Effects of β-adrenoceptor antagonists on alcohol drinking by alcohol-dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, Nicholas W; Koob, George F

    2010-10-01

    Alcohol-dependent animals display enhanced stress responsivity, reward thresholds, and alcohol self-administration during alcohol withdrawal, and some of these aspects of alcohol dependence may be mediated by activation of brain norepinephrine (NE) systems. This study examined the effects of propranolol, a β-adrenoceptor antagonist, on operant alcohol-reinforced responding by alcohol-dependent and non-dependent rats. Adult male Wistar rats were trained to respond for alcohol in an operant conditioning paradigm on fixed-ratio-1 (FR-1) and progressive ratio (PR) reinforcement schedules. Rats were either made dependent on alcohol via chronic intermittent (14 h ON/10 h OFF) alcohol vapor inhalation or were not exposed to alcohol vapor. Rats were tested for the effects of propranolol (0-10 mg/kg) or nadolol (0-20 mg/kg) on operant alcohol-reinforced responding at the time point corresponding to 6-8 h withdrawal in dependent animals. All doses of propranolol suppressed FR-1 operant alcohol-reinforced responding in alcohol-dependent rats, but only the highest dose suppressed FR-1 responding by controls. No dose of propranolol affected water responding. Nadolol did not affect operant behavior. Propranolol suppressed PR operant alcohol-reinforced responding across groups, an effect attributable to significant suppression of alcohol responding at the highest dose. Following development of alcohol dependence, rats exhibit hypersensitivity to the suppressive effects of propranolol on operant alcohol-reinforced responding. This effect is mediated by central actions of the drug, is not attributable to motor effects, and may reflect activation of brain NE systems that contributes to withdrawal-induced negative emotional states and drives alcohol drinking in the dependent organism.

  7. Effects of the N-methyl-D-Aspartate receptor antagonist dextromethorphan on vibrotactile adaptation.

    PubMed

    Folger, Stephen E; Tannan, Vinay; Zhang, Zheng; Holden, Jameson K; Tommerdahl, Mark

    2008-09-16

    Previous reports have demonstrated that short durations of vibrotactile stimuli (less than or equal to 2 sec) effectively and consistently modify both the perceptual response in humans as well as the neurophysiological response in somatosensory cortex. The change in cortical response with adaptation has been well established by a number of studies, and other reports have extended those findings in determining that both GABA- and NMDAR-mediated neurotransmission play a significant role in the dynamic response of somatosensory cortical neurons. In this study, we evaluated the impact that dextromethorphan (DXM), an NMDAR antagonist, had on two distinct vibrotactile adaptation tasks. All subjects, both those that ingested 60 mg DXM and those that ingested placebo, were evaluated for their amplitude discriminative capacity between two simultaneously delivered vibrotactile stimuli both with and without 3 conditions of pre-exposure to adapting stimulation. The results demonstrated that the perceptual metrics of subjects who ingested 60 mg DXM were significantly altered from that of controls when the amplitude discrimination task followed one of the conditions of adapting stimulation. Without the condition of pre-exposure to an adapting stimulus (or stimuli), there was little difference between the observations obtained from the subjects that ingested DXM and controls. Peak impact on subject response occurred at 60 min post-ingestion, whereas the scores of controls who ingested placebo were not impacted. The results - that DXM blocks vibrotactile adaptation - is consistent with the suggestion that NMDAR-mediated neurotransmission plays a significant role in the perceptual adaptive response. This finding is also consistent with neurophysiological findings that report observations of the effects of NMDAR block on the SI cortical response to repetitive vibrotactile stimulation.

  8. Salt Stress and Ethylene Antagonistically Regulate Nucleocytoplasmic Partitioning of COP1 to Control Seed Germination.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanwen; Wang, Juan; Shi, Hui; Gu, Juntao; Dong, Jingao; Deng, Xing Wang; Huang, Rongfeng

    2016-04-01

    Seed germination, a critical stage initiating the life cycle of a plant, is severely affected by salt stress. However, the underlying mechanism of salt inhibition of seed germination (SSG) is unclear. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENESIS1 (COP1) counteracts SSG Genetic assays provide evidence that SSG in loss of function of the COP1 mutant was stronger than this in the wild type. A GUS-COP1 fusion was constitutively localized to the nucleus in radicle cells. Salt treatment caused COP1 to be retained in the cytosol, but the addition of ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate had the reverse effect on the translocation of COP1 to the nucleus, revealing that ethylene and salt exert opposite regulatory effects on the localization of COP1 in germinating seeds. However, loss of function of the ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3 (EIN3) mutant impaired the ethylene-mediated rescue of the salt restriction of COP1 to the nucleus. Further research showed that the interaction between COP1 and LONG HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5) had a role in SSG Correspondingly, SSG in loss of function of HY5 was suppressed. Biochemical detection showed that salt promoted the stabilization of HY5, whereas ethylene restricted its accumulation. Furthermore, salt treatment stimulated and ethylene suppressed transcription of ABA INSENSITIVE5 (ABI5), which was directly transcriptionally regulated by HY5. Together, our results reveal that salt stress and ethylene antagonistically regulate nucleocytoplasmic partitioning of COP1, thereby controlling Arabidopsis seed germination via the COP1-mediated down-regulation of HY5 and ABI5. These findings enhance our understanding of the stress response and have great potential for application in agricultural production. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  9. The selective β1-adrenoceptor antagonist nebivolol is a potential oestrogen receptor agonist with neuroprotective abilities

    PubMed Central

    Manthey, D; Gamerdinger, M; Behl, C

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Nebivolol, a selective β1-adrenoceptor antagonist mediating rapid vasodilating effects, is used clinically to treat hypertension. Recently, it was reported that nebivolol also acts as an oestrogen receptor (ER) agonist. To investigate the neuroprotective potential of oestrogens, we assessed the oestrogenic effects of nebivolol in several in vitro neuronal models. Experimental approach: Human neuroepithelioma SK-N-MC cells stably transfected with human ER α and β, and mouse N2A neuroblastoma cells expressing human APP695SWE[N2Aswe, stably transfected with the Swedish mutation form of the Alzheimer-associated amyloid precursor protein (APPswe, K670M/N671L)] were incubated with different concentrations of nebivolol and 17β-oestradiol (E2) for 24–48 h. ER activation was detected in a specific reporter assay, and ER-dependent gene expression was measured by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT PCR). Furthermore, cell survival rates were determined, and oxidative stress was induced by hydrogen peroxide and paraquat. Amyloid β protein precursor (APP) processing was investigated, and the cleavage fragments sAPPα and Aβ were quantified via α-, β- and γ-secretase activity assays. Alterations of secretase expression levels were determined by qRT PCR. Key results: Nebivolol induces oestrogen-dependent gene transcription, and protects neuronal cells against oxidative stress even at low and physiological concentrations (10−8 M). Moreover, nebivolol modulates processing of APP in mouse neuronal N2Aswe cells by increasing α-secretase activity, ultimately leading to enhanced release of soluble non-amyloidogenic sAPPα. Conclusions and implications: We showed that nebivolol acts as ER agonist in neuronal cell lines, and suggest oestrogen-like neuroprotective effects mediated by nebivolol. PMID:20128815

  10. Multiple GPCR conformations and signalling pathways: implications for antagonist affinity estimates

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Jillian G.; Hill, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Antagonist affinity measurements have traditionally been considered important in characterizing the cell-surface receptors present in a particular cell or tissue. A central assumption has been that antagonist affinity is constant for a given receptor–antagonist interaction, regardless of the agonist used to stimulate that receptor or the downstream response that is measured. As a consequence, changes in antagonist affinity values have been taken as initial evidence for the presence of novel receptor subtypes. Emerging evidence suggests, however, that receptors can possess multiple binding sites and the same receptor can show different antagonist affinity measurements under distinct experimental conditions. Here, we discuss several mechanisms by which antagonists have different affinities for the same receptor as a consequence of allosterism, coupling to different G proteins, multiple (but non-interacting) receptor sites, and signal-pathway-dependent pharmacology (where the pharmacology observed varies depending on the signalling pathway measured). PMID:17629959

  11. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Modelling of Receptor Internalization with CRTH2 Antagonists to Optimize Dose Selection.

    PubMed

    Krause, Andreas; Zisowsky, Jochen; Strasser, Daniel S; Gehin, Martine; Sidharta, Patricia N; Groenen, Peter M A; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2016-07-01

    The chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on T helper-2 cells (CRTH2) is a G-protein-coupled receptor for prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), a key mediator in inflammatory disorders. Two selective and potent CRTH2 antagonists currently in clinical development, ACT-453859 and setipiprant, were compared with respect to their (predicted) clinical efficacy. Population pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) models were developed to characterize how plasma concentrations (PK) of ACT-453859, its active metabolite ACT-463036 and setipiprant related to their effect on blocking PGD2-induced internalization of CRTH2 on eosinophils (PD). Simulations were used to identify doses and dosing regimens leading to 90 % of maximum blockade of CRTH2 internalization at trough. A combined concentration of ACT-453859 and its metabolite ACT-463036, with weights proportional to potency (based on an eosinophil shape change assay), enabled good characterization of the PD effect. The modelling and simulation results facilitated decision making by suggesting an ACT-453859 dose of 400 mg once daily (or 100 mg twice daily) for clinically relevant CRTH2 antagonism. Pharmacometric quantification demonstrated that CRTH2 internalization is a useful new biomarker to study CRTH2 antagonism. Ninety percent of maximum blockade of CRTH2 internalization at trough is suggested as a quantitative PD target in clinical studies.

  12. A randomized placebo-controlled trial of an NMDA receptor antagonist in sleep-disordered breathing.

    PubMed

    Torvaldsson, Stefan; Grote, Ludger; Peker, Yüksel; Basun, Hans; Hedner, Jan

    2005-06-01

    Hypoxemia is a powerful stimulus of glutamate release in the central nervous system (CNS) and a hallmark phenomenon in sleep disordered breathing (SDB). Glutamate effects that include neuronal damage and apoptosis following hypoxemia and apnea following microinjections in animal models are in part mediated via postjunctional N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. This was a double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled single dose cross-over study of the NMDA receptor antagonist AR-R15896AR in 15 male patients with moderate to severe SDB. Seven patients received 120 mg and eight patients received 350 mg AR-R15896AR or corresponding placebo (given by 2 h infusion) starting half an hour before estimated sleep onset. AR-R15896AR concentrations were in line with the predicting kinetic model. A standard polysomnographic montage was applied. Repeated plasma samples were obtained in nine patients for analysis of plasma glutamate. Glutamate concentration in plasma did not change overnight and was unrelated to severity of SDB. Overall AHI (apnea-hypopnea index; primary efficacy variable) or investigated oxygen saturation variables were not significantly changed after AR-R15896AR at either dosage level. Side effects were mostly confined to the higher dose level and included vivid dreams, nightmares as well as in two cases mild hallucinations. The previously postulated role of glutamate in SDB could not be confirmed after AR-R15896AR induced NMDA-receptor blockade.

  13. DREAM (downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator) contributes to synaptic depression and contextual fear memory.

    PubMed

    Wu, Long-Jun; Mellström, Britt; Wang, Hansen; Ren, Ming; Domingo, Sofia; Kim, Susan S; Li, Xiang-Yao; Chen, Tao; Naranjo, Jose R; Zhuo, Min

    2010-01-21

    The downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, binds specifically to DNA and several nucleoproteins regulating gene expression and with proteins outside the nucleus to regulate membrane excitability or calcium homeostasis. DREAM is highly expressed in the central nervous system including the hippocampus and cortex; however, the roles of DREAM in hippocampal synaptic transmission and plasticity have not been investigated. Taking advantage of transgenic mice overexpressing a Ca2+-insensitive DREAM mutant (TgDREAM), we used integrative methods including electrophysiology, biochemistry, immunostaining, and behavior tests to study the function of DREAM in synaptic transmission, long-term plasticity and fear memory in hippocampal CA1 region. We found that NMDA receptor but not AMPA receptor-mediated current was decreased in TgDREAM mice. Moreover, synaptic plasticity, such as long-term depression (LTD) but not long-term potentiation (LTP), was impaired in TgDREAM mice. Biochemical experiments found that DREAM interacts with PSD-95 and may inhibit NMDA receptor function through this interaction. Contextual fear memory was significantly impaired in TgDREAM mice. By contrast, sensory responses to noxious stimuli were not affected. Our results demonstrate that DREAM plays a novel role in postsynaptic modulation of the NMDA receptor, and contributes to synaptic plasticity and behavioral memory.

  14. Quinazoline based α1-adrenoreceptor antagonists with potent antiproliferative activity in human prostate cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Maestri, Valentina; Tarozzi, Andrea; Simoni, Elena; Cilia, Antonio; Poggesi, Elena; Naldi, Marina; Nicolini, Benedetta; Pruccoli, Letizia; Rosini, Michela; Minarini, Anna

    2017-08-18

    New α 1 -adrenoreceptor (α 1 -AR) antagonists related to prazosin and doxazosin were synthesized by replacing piperazine ring with (S)- or (R)-3-aminopiperidine. Binding studies indicated that the S configuration at the 3-C position of the piperidine ring is crucial for an optimal interaction of the compounds at all three α 1 -AR subtypes. Quinazolines 9 and 10, bearing a quinone ring on the lateral chain, exhibited also potent antiproliferative activity in LNCaP androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cell lines, higher than that of doxazosin. Compound 10 increased apoptosis, in terms of DNA fragmentation, without triggering cell necrosis. The prooxidant activity found in compound 10 may underlie its ability to inhibit cell proliferation in synergy with the effect mediated by α 1 -AR antagonism. Due to its better biological profile compared to doxazosin for LNCaP cell line, compound 10 might be a valuable lead compound for the design of new prostate antitumor agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. In vitro toxicity of the galanin receptor 3 antagonist SNAP 37889.

    PubMed

    Koller, Andreas; Rid, Raphaela; Beyreis, Marlena; Bianchini, Rodolfo; Holub, Barbara S; Lang, Andreas; Locker, Felix; Brodowicz, Bernhard; Velickovic, Ognjen; Jakab, Martin; Kerschbaum, Hubert; Önder, Kamil; Kofler, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Galanin and its receptors (GAL1, GAL2, GAL3) modulate a range of neuronal, immune and vascular activities. In vivo administration of SNAP 37889 (1-phenyl-3-[[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]imino]-1H-indol-2-one), a potent small non-peptidergic antagonist of GAL3, was reported to reduce anxiety- and depression-related behavior, ethanol consumption, and antagonizes the effect of galanin on plasma extravasation in rodent models. Accordingly, SNAP 37889 has been proposed as a potential therapeutic agent to treat anxiety and depression disorders. Therefore, we evaluated the toxicity of SNAP 37889 to different cell types. Our experiments revealed that SNAP 37889 (≥10μM) induced apoptosis in epithelial (HMCB) and microglial (BV-2) cell lines expressing endogenous GAL3, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60) expressing GAL2, and in a neuronal cell line (SH-SY5Y) lacking galanin receptor expression altogether. In conclusion, SNAP 37889 is toxic to a variety of cell types independent of GAL3 expression. We caution that the clinical use of SNAP 37889 at doses that might be used to treat anxiety- or depression- related diseases could have unexpected non-galanin receptor-mediated toxicity, especially on immune cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. DREAM (Downstream Regulatory Element Antagonist Modulator) contributes to synaptic depression and contextual fear memory

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein, binds specifically to DNA and several nucleoproteins regulating gene expression and with proteins outside the nucleus to regulate membrane excitability or calcium homeostasis. DREAM is highly expressed in the central nervous system including the hippocampus and cortex; however, the roles of DREAM in hippocampal synaptic transmission and plasticity have not been investigated. Taking advantage of transgenic mice overexpressing a Ca2+-insensitive DREAM mutant (TgDREAM), we used integrative methods including electrophysiology, biochemistry, immunostaining, and behavior tests to study the function of DREAM in synaptic transmission, long-term plasticity and fear memory in hippocampal CA1 region. We found that NMDA receptor but not AMPA receptor-mediated current was decreased in TgDREAM mice. Moreover, synaptic plasticity, such as long-term depression (LTD) but not long-term potentiation (LTP), was impaired in TgDREAM mice. Biochemical experiments found that DREAM interacts with PSD-95 and may inhibit NMDA receptor function through this interaction. Contextual fear memory was significantly impaired in TgDREAM mice. By contrast, sensory responses to noxious stimuli were not affected. Our results demonstrate that DREAM plays a novel role in postsynaptic modulation of the NMDA receptor, and contributes to synaptic plasticity and behavioral memory. PMID:20205763

  17. Coexpressed D1- and D2-Like Dopamine Receptors Antagonistically Modulate Acetylcholine Release in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Andrew T.; Maher, Kathryn N.; Wani, Khursheed A.; Betts, Katherine E.; Chase, Daniel L.

    2011-01-01

    Dopamine acts through two classes of G protein-coupled receptor (D1-like and D2-like) to modulate neuron activity in the brain. While subtypes of D1- and D2-like receptors are coexpressed in many neurons of the mammalian brain, it is unclear how signaling by these coexpressed receptors interacts to modulate the activity of the neuron in which they are expressed. D1- and D2-like dopamine receptors are also coexpressed in the cholinergic ventral-cord motor neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans. To begin to understand how coexpressed dopamine receptors interact to modulate neuron activity, we performed a genetic screen in C. elegans and isolated mutants defective in dopamine response. These mutants were also defective in behaviors mediated by endogenous dopamine signaling, including basal slowing and swimming-induced paralysis. We used transgene rescue experiments to show that defects in these dopamine-specific behaviors were caused by abnormal signaling in the cholinergic motor neurons. To investigate the interaction between the D1- and D2-like receptors specifically in these cholinergic motor neurons, we measured the sensitivity of dopamine-signaling mutants and transgenic animals to the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor aldicarb. We found that D2 signaling inhibited acetylcholine release from the cholinergic motor neurons while D1 signaling stimulated release from these same cells. Thus, coexpressed D1- and D2-like dopamine receptors act antagonistically in vivo to modulate acetylcholine release from the cholinergic motor neurons of C. elegans. PMID:21515580

  18. Shaping of inner ear sensory organs through antagonistic interactions between Notch signalling and Lmx1a

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Zoe F; Chen, Ziqi; Chrysostomou, Elena; Żak, Magdalena; Kang, Miso; Canden, Elachumee

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms of formation of the distinct sensory organs of the inner ear and the non-sensory domains that separate them are still unclear. Here, we show that several sensory patches arise by progressive segregation from a common prosensory domain in the embryonic chicken and mouse otocyst. This process is regulated by mutually antagonistic signals: Notch signalling and Lmx1a. Notch-mediated lateral induction promotes prosensory fate. Some of the early Notch-active cells, however, are normally diverted from this fate and increasing lateral induction produces misshapen or fused sensory organs in the chick. Conversely Lmx1a (or cLmx1b in the chick) allows sensory organ segregation by antagonizing lateral induction and promoting commitment to the non-sensory fate. Our findings highlight the dynamic nature of sensory patch formation and the labile character of the sensory-competent progenitors, which could have facilitated the emergence of new inner ear organs and their functional diversification in the course of evolution. PMID:29199954

  19. Disinhibition of female sexual behavior by a CRH receptor antagonist in Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Jones, Juli E; Pick, Rebecca R; Davenport, Matthew D; Keene, Alex C; Corp, Eric S; Wade, George N

    2002-09-01

    Several conditions that inhibit female sexual behavior are thought to be associated with altered corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) activity in the brain. The present experiments examined the hypothesis that endogenous CRH receptor signaling mediates the inhibition of estrous behavior by undernutrition and in other instances of sexual dysfunction. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of CRH or urocortin inhibited estrous behavior in ovariectomized steroid-primed hamsters. Conversely, ICV infusion of the CRH receptor antagonist astressin prevented the suppression of estrous behavior by food deprivation or by ICV administration of neuropeptide Y. Astressin treatment also induced sexual receptivity in nonresponders, animals that do not normally come into heat when treated with hormones, and this effect persisted in subsequent weekly tests in the absence of any further astressin treatment. Activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis was neither necessary nor sufficient to inhibit estrous behavior, indicating that this phenomenon is due to other central actions of CRH receptor agonists. This is the first direct evidence that CRH receptor signaling may be a final common pathway by which undernutrition and other conditions inhibit female sexual behavior.

  20. Effects of calmodulin antagonists on the active Ca2+ uptake by rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Vale, M G; Moreno, A J; Carvalho, A P

    1983-01-01

    The mechanism of Ca2+ transport by rat liver mitochondria was investigated with respect to the possible involvement of calmodulin in this process. We studied the action of exogenous calmodulin isolated from brain tissue on the Ca2+-transport system, as well as the effect of two types of calmodulin antagonists; the phenothiazine drugs trifluoperazine and chlorpromazine and the more specific substance compound 48/80. Our results show that Ca2+ transport by mitochondria and mitochondrial ATPase activity are insensitive to exogenous calmodulin, although they can be inhibited by the phenothiazines. Since no effect of compound 48/80 was observed, we believe that the phenothiazines act through a mechanism that does not involve calmodulin. This is in accord with our inability to locate significant quantities of calmodulin in mitochondria by radioimmunoassay analysis. Our results further show that trifluoperazine and chlorpromazine also inhibit the electron-carrier system of the respiratory chain, and this effect may mediate their inhibitory action on Ca2+ transport when it is energized by respiration instead of ATP hydrolysis. PMID:6226286

  1. Erythropoietin and its antagonist regulate hypoxic fictive breathing in newborn mice.

    PubMed

    Khemiri, Hanan; Seaborn, Tommy; Gestreau, Christian; Soliz, Jorge

    2012-08-15

    Clinical use of erythropoietin in adult and newborn patients has revealed its involvement in neuroprotection, neurogenesis, and angiogenesis. More recently, we showed in adult mouse, that brain erythropoietin interacts with the major brainstem centers associated with respiration to enhance the ventilatory response to acute and chronic conditions of physiological hypoxia (e.g., as occurring at high altitude). However, whether brain erythropoietin is involved in breathing regulation in newborns remains unknown. In this study, en bloc brainstem-spinal cord preparations were obtained from mice at postnatal day 4. After various periods (30, 60, or 90 min) of incubation with 0, 25, or 250 U of erythropoietin, preparations were superfused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid bubbled with normoxic or hypoxic gas mixtures. The electrophysiological fictive breathing produced by axons at the C4 ventral root was next recorded. Our results show that erythropoietin attenuates the hypoxia-mediated decrease of the central respiratory activity and improves post-hypoxic recovery. Additional analysis revealed that the soluble erythropoietin receptor (the endogenous erythropoietin antagonist) dramatically decreases neural hypoxic respiratory activity, confirming the specific erythropoietin effect on respiratory drive. These results imply that erythropoietin exerts main modulation and maintenance of respiratory motor output during hypoxic and post-hypoxic challenges in 4-days old mice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of a cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonist on eosinophil recruitment in experimental allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Hiroko; Morikawa, Hiroshi; Howie, Karen; Crawford, Lynn; Baatjes, Adrian J; Denburg, Elisha; Cyr, Michael M; Denburg, Judah A

    2004-01-01

    The cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) are potent lipid mediators in allergic disease, acting through a receptor (cysLT1-R) which can be targeted in rhinitis and asthma. We investigated the effects of cysLT1-R antagonism in experimental allergic rhinitis, focusing on bone marrow eosinophil progenitor responses. BALB/c mice were sensitized, then given daily intranasal ovalbumin for 2 weeks, with montelukast sodium (5 mg/kg or 2·5 mg/kg) or placebo by gavage. Bone marrow eosinophil/basophil colonies were enumerated, and colony cells were morphologically assessed as indices of eosinophil differentiation and maturation. Montelukast treatment resulted in a significant decrease of eosinophils in the nasal mucosa, and in either bone marrow interleukin (IL)-5-, but not IL-3-, or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-responsive eosinophil/basophil colony-forming units, and IL-5-stimulated eosinophil maturation. These results indicate that cysLT1-R antagonism in vivo limits both IL-5-responsive eosinophilopoiesis, acting at several stages of eosinophil differentiation and maturation. The anti-allergic effects of cysLT1-R antagonists are consistent with the concept that cysLTs and IL-5 act together in the recruitment of eosinophils and eosinophil progenitors from the marrow during upper airway allergic inflammation. PMID:15379985

  3. Uterine infusion of melatonin or melatonin receptor antagonist alters ovine feto-placental hemodynamics during midgestation.

    PubMed

    Lemley, Caleb O; Camacho, Leticia E; Vonnahme, Kimberly A

    2013-08-01

    Dietary melatonin supplementation from mid- to late gestation increases umbilical artery blood flow and causes disproportionate fetal growth. Melatonin receptors have been described throughout the cardiovascular system; however, there is a paucity of data on the function of placental melatonin receptors. The objectives of the current experiment were to determine fetal descending aorta blood flow, umbilical artery blood flow, and placental and fetal development following a 4-wk uterine infusion of melatonin (MEL), melatonin receptor 1 and 2 antagonist (luzindole; LUZ), or vehicle (CON) from Day 62 to Day 90 of gestation. After 4 wk of infusion, umbilical artery blood flow and umbilical artery blood flow relative to placentome weight were increased (P < 0.05) in MEL- versus CON- and LUZ-infused dams. Fetal descending aorta blood flow was increased (P < 0.05) in MEL- versus CON- and LUZ-infused dams, while fetal descending aorta blood flow relative to fetal weight was increased in MEL- versus CON-infused dams and decreased in LUZ- versus CON-infused dams. Following the 4-wk infusion, we observed an increase in placental efficiency (fetal-placentome weight ratio) in MEL- versus LUZ-infused dams. The increase in umbilical artery blood flow due to chronic uterine melatonin infusion is potentiated by an increased fetal cardiac output through the descending aorta. Moreover, melatonin receptor antagonism decreased fetal descending aorta blood flow relative to fetal weight. Therefore, melatonin receptor activation may partially mediate the observed increase in fetal blood flow following dietary melatonin supplementation.

  4. Molecular determinants responsible for sedative and non-sedative properties of histamine H₁-receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Uesawa, Yoshihiro; Hishinuma, Shigeru; Shoji, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    There is argument whether non-sedative properties of histamine H1-receptor antagonists (antihistamines) are determined by their active extrusions from the brain via P-glycoprotein or their restricted penetration through the blood-brain barrier. We have reported that sedative and non-sedative antihistamines can be well discriminated by measuring changes in their binding to H1 receptors upon receptor internalization in intact cells, which depends on their membrane-penetrating ability. In this study, molecular determinants responsible for sedative and non-sedative properties of antihistamines were evaluated by quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses. Multiple regression analyses were applied to construct a QSAR model, taking internalization-mediated changes in the binding of antihistamines as objective variables and their structural descriptors as explanatory variables. The multiple regression model was successfully constructed with two explanatory variables, i.e., lipophilicity of the compounds at physiological pH (logD) and mean information content on the distance degree equality (IDDE) (r(2) = 0.753). The constructed model discriminated between sedative and non-sedative antihistamines with 94% accuracy for external validation. These results suggest that logD and IDDE concerning lipophilicity and molecular shapes of compounds, respectively, predominantly determine the membrane-penetrating ability of antihistamines for their side effects on the central nervous system.

  5. Radiographic severity of knee osteoarthritis is conditional on interleukin 1 receptor antagonist gene variations

    PubMed Central

    Attur, Mukundan; Wang, Hwa-Ying; Kraus, Virginia Byers; Bukowski, Jack F; Aziz, Nazneen; Krasnokutsky, Svetlana; Samuels, Jonathan; Greenberg, Jeffrey; McDaniel, Gary; Abramson, Steven B; Kornman, Kenneth S

    2010-01-01

    Background A lack of biomarkers that identify patients at risk for severe osteoarthritis (OA) complicates development of disease-modifying OA drugs. Objective To determine whether inflammatory genetic markers could stratify patients with knee OA into high and low risk for destructive disease. Methods Genotype associations with knee OA severity were assessed in two Caucasian populations. Fifteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in six inflammatory genes were evaluated for association with radiographic severity and with synovial fluid mediators in a subset of the patients. Results Interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL1RN) SNPs (rs419598, rs315952 and rs9005) predicted Kellgren–Lawrence scores independently in each population. One IL1RN haplotype was associated with lower odds of radiographic severity (OR=0.15; 95% CI 0.065 to 0.349; p<0.0001), greater joint space width and lower synovial fluid cytokine levels. Carriage of the IL1RN haplotype influenced the age relationship with severity. Conclusion IL1RN polymorphisms reproducibly contribute to disease severity in knee OA and may be useful biomarkers for patient selection in disease-modifying OA drug trials. PMID:19934104

  6. Enhancement of a nociceptive reaction by opioid antagonists in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, J J; Ramabadran, K

    1978-01-01

    1. The opioid antagonists, naloxone, GPA 2163, levallorphan and Mr-2266 reduced the latency of the jumping reaction of mice in the hot plate test. The (+)-isomers of levallorphan and Mr-2266 which are devoid of antagonistic activity did not increase this latency. 2. In the same nociceptive reaction test, the enhancing effect of naloxone progressed in a dose-range similar to that required for the antagonism by naloxone of the depressive action of morphine. 3. The facilitatory effect of naloxone was not blocked by the previous administration of morphine or etorphine but it was prevented by pretreatment with a high dose of buprenorphine. 4. The antagonism by naloxone of morphine and of buprenorphine did not follow the same pattern. 5. The factors which are or may be involved in the efficacy of naloxone in enhancing nociceptive reactions are discussed. 6. The enhancing effect of naloxone may be due to an antagonism of endogenous ligands for the opiate receptor. If so, these ligands would be involved in reaction to but not in perception of nociceptive stimuli which need not be harmful ones. PMID:698486

  7. Human homosexuality: a paradigmatic arena for sexually antagonistic selection?

    PubMed

    Camperio Ciani, Andrea; Battaglia, Umberto; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2015-01-29

    Sexual conflict likely plays a crucial role in the origin and maintenance of homosexuality in our species. Although environmental factors are known to affect human homosexual (HS) preference, sibling concordances and population patterns related to HS indicate that genetic components are also influencing this trait in humans. We argue that multilocus, partially X-linked genetic factors undergoing sexually antagonistic selection that promote maternal female fecundity at the cost of occasional male offspring homosexuality are the best candidates capable of explaining the frequency, familial clustering, and pedigree asymmetries observed in HS male proband families. This establishes male HS as a paradigmatic example of sexual conflict in human biology. HS in females, on the other hand, is currently a more elusive phenomenon from both the empirical and theoretical standpoints because of its fluidity and marked environmental influence. Genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, the latter involving sexually antagonistic components, have been hypothesized for the propagation and maintenance of female HS in the population. However, further data are needed to truly clarify the evolutionary dynamics of this trait. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  8. Human Homosexuality: A Paradigmatic Arena for Sexually Antagonistic Selection?

    PubMed Central

    Ciani, Andrea Camperio; Battaglia, Umberto; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Sexual conflict likely plays a crucial role in the origin and maintenance of homosexuality in our species. Although environmental factors are known to affect human homosexual (HS) preference, sibling concordances and population patterns related to HS indicate that genetic components are also influencing this trait in humans. We argue that multilocus, partially X-linked genetic factors undergoing sexually antagonistic selection that promote maternal female fecundity at the cost of occasional male offspring homosexuality are the best candidates capable of explaining the frequency, familial clustering, and pedigree asymmetries observed in HS male proband families. This establishes male HS as a paradigmatic example of sexual conflict in human biology. HS in females, on the other hand, is currently a more elusive phenomenon from both the empirical and theoretical standpoints because of its fluidity and marked environmental influence. Genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, the latter involving sexually antagonistic components, have been hypothesized for the propagation and maintenance of female HS in the population. However, further data are needed to truly clarify the evolutionary dynamics of this trait. PMID:25635045

  9. Evolution of coreceptor utilization to escape CCR5 antagonist therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Gao, Xiang; Martin, John; Rosa, Bruce; Chen, Zheng; Mitreva, Makedonka; Henrich, Timothy; Kuritzkes, Daniel; Ratner, Lee

    2016-07-01

    The HIV-1 envelope interacts with coreceptors CCR5 and CXCR4 in a dynamic, multi-step process, its molecular details not clearly delineated. Use of CCR5 antagonists results in tropism shift and therapeutic failure. Here we describe a novel approach using full-length patient-derived gp160 quasispecies libraries cloned into HIV-1 molecular clones, their separation based on phenotypic tropism in vitro, and deep sequencing of the resultant variants for structure-function analyses. Analysis of functionally validated envelope sequences from patients who failed CCR5 antagonist therapy revealed determinants strongly associated with coreceptor specificity, especially at the gp120-gp41 and gp41-gp41 interaction surfaces that invite future research on the roles of subunit interaction and envelope trimer stability in coreceptor usage. This study identifies important structure-function relationships in HIV-1 envelope, and demonstrates proof of concept for a new integrated analysis method that facilitates laboratory discovery of resistant mutants to aid in development of other therapeutic agents. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Discovery of Novel Proline-Based Neuropeptide FF Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thuy; Decker, Ann M; Langston, Tiffany L; Mathews, Kelly M; Siemian, Justin N; Li, Jun-Xu; Harris, Danni L; Runyon, Scott P; Zhang, Yanan

    2017-10-18

    The neuropeptide FF (NPFF) system has been implicated in a number of physiological processes including modulating the pharmacological activity of opioid analgesics and several other classes of drugs of abuse. In this study, we report the discovery of a novel proline scaffold with antagonistic activity at the NPFF receptors through a high throughput screening campaign using a functional calcium mobilization assay. Focused structure-activity relationship studies on the initial hit 1 have resulted in several analogs with calcium mobilization potencies in the submicromolar range and modest selectivity for the NPFF1 receptor. Affinities and potencies of these compounds were confirmed in radioligand binding and functional cAMP assays. Two compounds, 16 and 33, had good solubility and blood-brain barrier permeability that fall within the range of CNS permeant candidates without the liability of being a P-glycoprotein substrate. Finally, both compounds reversed fentanyl-induced hyperalgesia in rats when administered intraperitoneally. Together, these results point to the potential of these proline analogs as promising NPFF receptor antagonists.

  11. Opioid antagonists in broadly defined behavioral addictions: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Piquet-Pessôa, Marcelo; Fontenelle, Leonardo F

    2016-01-01

    Naltrexone (NTX), a mu-opioid receptor antagonist, has been approved for the treatment of alcoholism and opioid dependence. More recently, however, NTX and a related drug, nalmefene (NMF), have also shown positive results for the treatment of gambling disorders. In this study, we reviewed the trials testing the effect of opioid antagonists (OA) in gambling disorders and in other broadly defined behavioral addictions, including selected DSM-5 disruptive, impulse-control, and conduct disorders, obsessive-compulsive and related disorders, eating disorders, and other conditions not currently recognized by official classification schemes. We found six randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of OA in gambling disorder, two RCTs of OA in trichotillomania (hair pulling disorder), two RCTs of OA in binge eating disorder, and one RCT of OA for kleptomania. We also reviewed case reports on hypersexual disorder, compulsive buying and skin picking disorders. The reviewed data supported the use of OA, namely NTX and NMF, in gambling disorder (both) and kleptomania (NTX). We did not find enough evidence to support the use of NTX or NMF in trichotillomania (hair pulling disorder), excoriation (skin-picking) disorder, compulsive buying disorder, hypersexual disorder, or binge eating disorder.

  12. Fires can benefit plants by disrupting antagonistic interactions.

    PubMed

    García, Y; Castellanos, M C; Pausas, J G

    2016-12-01

    Fire has a key role in the ecology and evolution of many ecosystems, yet its effects on plant-insect interactions are poorly understood. Because interacting species are likely to respond to fire differently, disruptions of the interactions are expected. We hypothesized that plants that regenerate after fire can benefit through the disruption of their antagonistic interactions. We expected stronger effects on interactions with specialist predators than with generalists. We studied two interactions between two Mediterranean plants (Ulex parviflorus, Asphodelus ramosus) and their specialist seed predators after large wildfires. In A. ramosus we also studied the generalist herbivores. We sampled the interactions in burned and adjacent unburned areas during 2 years by estimating seed predation, number of herbivores and fruit set. To assess the effect of the distance to unburned vegetation we sampled plots at two distance classes from the fire perimeter. Even 3 years after the fires, Ulex plants experienced lower seed damage by specialists in burned sites. The presence of herbivores on Asphodelus decreased in burned locations, and the variability in their presence was significantly related to fruit set. Generalist herbivores were unaffected. We show that plants can benefit from fire through the disruption of their antagonistic interactions with specialist seed predators for at least a few years. In environments with a long fire history, this effect might be one additional mechanism underlying the success of fire-adapted plants.

  13. Histamine H1 antagonists and clinical characteristics of febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Zolaly, Mohammed A

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether seizure susceptibility due to antihistamines is provoked in patients with febrile seizures. The current descriptive study was carried out from April 2009 to February 2011 in 250 infants and children who visited the Madinah Maternity and Children's Hospital as a result of febrile convulsions. They were divided into two groups according to administration of antihistamines at the onset of fever. Detailed clinical manifestations were compared between patients with and without administration of antihistamines. The time from fever detection to seizure onset was significantly shorter in the antihistamine group than that in the nonantihistamine group, and the duration of seizures was significantly longer in the antihistamine group than in the nonantihistamine group. No significant difference was found in time from fever detection to seizure onset or seizure duration between patients who received a first-generation antihistamine and those who received a second-generation antihistamine. Due to their central nervous system effects, H1 antagonists should not be administered to patients with febrile seizures and epilepsy. Caution should be exercised regarding the use of histamine H1 antagonists in young infants, because these drugs could potentially disturb the anticonvulsive central histaminergic system.

  14. Histamine H1 antagonists and clinical characteristics of febrile seizures

    PubMed Central

    Zolaly, Mohammed A

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine whether seizure susceptibility due to antihistamines is provoked in patients with febrile seizures. Methods The current descriptive study was carried out from April 2009 to February 2011 in 250 infants and children who visited the Madinah Maternity and Children’s Hospital as a result of febrile convulsions. They were divided into two groups according to administration of antihistamines at the onset of fever. Results Detailed clinical manifestations were compared between patients with and without administration of antihistamines. The time from fever detection to seizure onset was significantly shorter in the antihistamine group than that in the nonantihistamine group, and the duration of seizures was significantly longer in the antihistamine group than in the nonantihistamine group. No significant difference was found in time from fever detection to seizure onset or seizure duration between patients who received a first-generation antihistamine and those who received a second-generation antihistamine. Conclusion Due to their central nervous system effects, H1 antagonists should not be administered to patients with febrile seizures and epilepsy. Caution should be exercised regarding the use of histamine H1 antagonists in young infants, because these drugs could potentially disturb the anticonvulsive central histaminergic system. PMID:22505826

  15. NMDA receptor antagonists extend the sensitive period for imprinting.

    PubMed

    Parsons, C H; Rogers, L J

    2000-03-01

    Filial imprinting in the domestic chick occurs during a sensitive period of development. The exact timing of this period can vary according to the methods used to measure imprinting. Using our imprinting paradigm, we have shown that normal, dark-reared chicks lose the ability to imprint after the second day post-hatching. Further, we reported that chicks treated 10 h after hatching with a mixture of the noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine (55 mg/kg) and the alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor agonist xylazine (6 mg/kg) were able to imprint on day 8 after hatching, whereas controls treated with saline did not imprint. We now show that the effect of the ketamine-xylazine mixture can be mimicked by treating chicks with ketamine alone or with another noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801 (5 mg/kg). Treating chicks with a single dose of ketamine (55 mg/kg) or with a single dose of xylazine (6 mg/kg) failed to produce the effect on the sensitive period. However, prolonging the action of ketamine by treating chicks with two doses of ketamine (at 10 and 12 h after hatching) did allow imprinting on day 8. In contrast, prolonging the action of xylazine had no effect on the sensitive period for imprinting. Chicks treated with MK-801 were also able to imprint on day 8. Thus, we have evidence that the NMDA receptor system is involved in the mechanisms that control the sensitive period for imprinting.

  16. Optimization of Bicyclic Lactam Derivatives as NMDA Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Espadinha, Margarida; Dourado, Jorge; Lajarin-Cuesta, Rocio; Herrera-Arozamena, Clara; Gonçalves, Lidia M D; Rodríguez-Franco, María Isabel; de Los Rios, Cristobal; Santos, Maria M M

    2017-04-06

    N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are fundamental for the normal function of the central nervous system (CNS), and play an important role in memory and learning. Over-activation of these receptors leads to neuronal loss associated with major neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and epilepsy. In this study, 22 novel enantiopure bicyclic lactams were designed, synthesized, and evaluated as NMDA receptor antagonists. Most of the new compounds displayed NMDA receptor antagonism, and the most promising compound showed an IC 50 value on the same order of magnitude as that of memantine, an NMDA receptor antagonist in clinical use for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Further biological evaluation indicated that this compound is brain permeable (determined by an in vitro assay) and non-hepatotoxic. All these results indicate that (3S,7aS)-7a-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-(4-hydroxybenzyl)tetrahydropyrrolo[2,1-b]oxazol-5(6H)-one (compound 5 b) is a potential candidate for the treatment of pathologies associated with the over-activation of NMDA receptors. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Advantages of histamine H4 receptor antagonist usage with H1 receptor antagonist for the treatment of murine allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Ayuko; Seike, Masahiro; Okawa, Haruka; Kadawaki, Yayoi; Ohtsu, Hiroshi

    2012-09-01

    Histamine facilitates development of eczematous lesions in chronic allergic contact dermatitis. In addition to the well-known corticosteroid treatments, H1 receptor (H1R) antagonists also have been used. This study observed effects of histamine H4 receptor (H4R) antagonist usage with H1R antagonist in a murine chronic allergic contact dermatitis model, developed by repeated percutaneous challenge to the dorsal skin with 2,4,6-trinitro-1-chlorobenzene (TNCB). The H1R antagonist olopatadine hydrochloride and/or the H4R antagonist JNJ7777120 was then administered. Combination therapy was more effective than H1R antagonist monotherapy. Serum IgE and levels of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and IL-6 (Th2 cytokines) in eczematous lesions decreased with combined therapy. Combined therapy with H1R and H4R antagonists counteracts the disadvantages of each as monotherapeutic agents and potentially represents a new strategy for the treatment of chronic allergic contact dermatitis. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel 1-deoxy-1-[6-[((hetero)arylcarbonyl)hydrazino]- 9H-purin-9-yl]-N-ethyl-beta-D-ribofuranuronamide derivatives as useful templates for the development of A2B adenosine receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Preti, Delia; Tabrizi, Mojgan Aghazadeh; Fruttarolo, Francesca; Romagnoli, Romeo; Carrion, Maria Dora; Cara, Luisa Carlota Lopez; Moorman, Allan R; Varani, Katia; Borea, Pier Andrea

    2007-01-25

    The lack of molecules endowed with selective and potent agonistic activity toward the hA2B adenosine receptors has limited the studies on this pharmacological target and consequently the evaluation of its therapeutic potential. We report the design and the synthesis of the first potent (EC50 in the nanomolar range) and selective hA2B adenosine receptor agonists consisting of 1-deoxy-1-[6-[((hetero)arylcarbonyl)hydrazino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-N-ethyl-beta-D-ribofuranuronamide derivatives. The concurrent effect of 6-substitution of the purine nucleus with a ((hetero)arylcarbonyl)hydrazino function and a 2-chloro substitution has been investigated in such NECA derivatives.

  19. Combination of IAP antagonist and IFNγ activates novel caspase-10- and RIPK1-dependent cell death pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tanzer, Maria C; Khan, Nufail; Rickard, James A; Etemadi, Nima; Lalaoui, Najoua; Spall, Sukhdeep Kaur; Hildebrand, Joanne M; Segal, David; Miasari, Maria; Chau, Diep; Wong, WendyWei-Lynn; McKinlay, Mark; Chunduru, Srinivas K; Benetatos, Christopher A; Condon, Stephen M; Vince, James E; Herold, Marco J; Silke, John

    2017-01-01

    Peptido-mimetic inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) antagonists (Smac mimetics (SMs)) can kill tumour cells by depleting endogenous IAPs and thereby inducing tumour necrosis factor (TNF) production. We found that interferon-γ (IFNγ) synergises with SMs to kill cancer cells independently of TNF− and other cell death receptor signalling pathways. Surprisingly, CRISPR/Cas9 HT29 cells doubly deficient for caspase-8 and the necroptotic pathway mediators RIPK3 or MLKL were still sensitive to IFNγ/SM-induced killing. Triple CRISPR/Cas9-knockout HT29 cells lacking caspase-10 in addition to caspase-8 and RIPK3 or MLKL were resistant to IFNγ/SM killing. Caspase-8 and RIPK1 deficiency was, however, sufficient to protect cells from IFNγ/SM-induced cell death, implying a role for RIPK1 in the activation of caspase-10. These data show that RIPK1 and caspase-10 mediate cell death in HT29 cells when caspase-8-mediated apoptosis and necroptosis are blocked and help to clarify how SMs operate as chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:28106882

  20. Barley MLA Immune Receptors Directly Interfere with Antagonistically Acting Transcription Factors to Initiate Disease Resistance Signaling[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Cheng; Yu, Deshui; Jiao, Jian; Jing, Shaojuan; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Shen, Qian-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The nucleotide binding domain and Leucine-rich repeat (NLR)–containing proteins in plants and animals mediate pathogen sensing inside host cells and mount innate immune responses against microbial pathogens. The barley (Hordeum vulgare) mildew A (MLA) locus encodes coiled-coil (CC)–type NLRs mediating disease resistance against the powdery mildew pathogen Blumeria graminis. Here, we report direct interactions between MLA and two antagonistically acting transcription factors, MYB6 and WRKY1. The N-terminal CC signaling domain of MLA interacts with MYB6 to stimulate its DNA binding activity. MYB6 functions as a positive regulator of basal and MLA-mediated immunity responses to B. graminis. MYB6 DNA binding is antagonized by direct association with WRKY1 repressor, which in turn also interacts with the MLA CC domain. The activated form of full-length MLA10 receptor is needed to release MYB6 activator from WRKY1 repression and to stimulate MYB6-dependent gene expression. This implies that, while sequestered by the WRKY1 repressor in the presence of the resting immune receptor, MYB6 acts as an immediate and positive postactivation signaling component of the active state of MLA during transcriptional reprogramming for innate immune responses. PMID:23532068

  1. Development of a new anti-prolactin receptor (PRLR) antibody, F56, which can serve as a PRLR antagonist.

    PubMed

    Cui, Huanzhong; Ma, Yun Zhi; Wang, Yanrong; Song, Meng; Zhang, Hui

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we developed a new prolactin receptor (PRLR) antagonist using the hybridoma technique. A series of monoclonal antibodies against prolactin receptor (PRLR) was prepared, from which we characterized and selected one anti-PRLR antibody, F56. Epitome mapping showed that F56 and prolactin (PRL) share a common binding epitope on PRLR, and therefore, F56 could compete with prolactin (PRL) for binding to PRLR. Subsequent experiments indicated that F56 could effectively neutralize PRLR-mediated intracellular signalling molecules, such as signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 and kinase 2 (ERK1/2), either by endogenously expressed PRLR or in a cell model transfected with PRLR. In addition, further experiments showed that F56 could effectively inhibit PRL-induced cell proliferation. The current study suggests that F56 has potential applications in PRLR-related studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Endogenous CD317/Tetherin limits replication of HIV-1 and murine leukemia virus in rodent cells and is resistant to antagonists from primate viruses.

    PubMed

    Goffinet, Christine; Schmidt, Sarah; Kern, Christian; Oberbremer, Lena; Keppler, Oliver T

    2010-11-01

    Human CD317 (BST-2/tetherin) is an intrinsic immunity factor that blocks the release of retroviruses, filoviruses, herpesviruses, and arenaviruses. It is unclear whether CD317 expressed endogenously in rodent cells has the capacity to interfere with the replication of the retroviral rodent pathogen murine leukemia virus (MLV) or, in the context of small-animal model development, contributes to the well-established late-phase restriction of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Here, we show that small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of CD317 relieved a virion release restriction and markedly enhanced the egress of HIV-1, HIV-2, and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in rat cells, including primary macrophages. Moreover, rodent CD317 potently inhibited MLV release, and siRNA-mediated depletion of CD317 in a mouse T-cell line resulted in the accelerated spread of MLV. Several virus-encoded antagonists have recently been reported to overcome the restriction imposed by human or monkey CD317, including HIV-1 Vpu, envelope glycoproteins of HIV-2 and Ebola virus, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus K5, and SIV Nef. In contrast, both rat and mouse CD317 showed a high degree of resistance to these viral antagonists. These data suggest that CD317 is a broadly acting and conserved mediator of innate control of retroviral infection and pathogenesis that restricts the release of retroviruses and lentiviruses in rodents. The high degree of resistance of the rodent CD317 restriction factors to antagonists from primate viruses has implications for HIV-1 small-animal model development and may guide the design of novel antiviral interventions.

  3. Pharmacological profiles of the subtypes of muscarinic cholinoceptors that mediate aggregation of pigment in the melanophores of two species of catfish.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, H; Fujii, R

    1994-06-01

    Using selective antagonists, including pirenzepine, adiphenine, AF-DX 116, gallamine, and 4-DAMP, we attempted to characterize the muscarinic cholinoceptors on the melanophores of the translucent glass catfish Kryptopterus bicirrhis and the mailed catfish Corydoras paleatus. The M3 receptor-selective antagonist, 4-DAMP, potently inhibited the acetylcholine-induced aggregation of pigment in both species. It appeared, therefore, that the receptors that mediated the cholinergically evoked aggregation of melanosomes in these species were of the M3 muscarinic subtype.

  4. Endothelin-1 Elicits TRP-Mediated Pain in an Acid-Induced Oral Ulcer Model.

    PubMed

    Nodai, T; Hitomi, S; Ono, K; Masaki, C; Harano, N; Morii, A; Sago-Ito, M; Ujihara, I; Hibino, T; Terawaki, K; Omiya, Y; Hosokawa, R; Inenaga, K

    2018-03-01

    Oral ulcer is the most common oral disease and leads to pain during meals and speaking, reducing the quality of life of patients. Recent evidence using animal models suggests that oral ulcers induce cyclooxygenase-dependent spontaneous pain and cyclooxygenase-independent mechanical allodynia. Endothelin-1 is upregulated in oral mucosal inflammation, although it has not been shown to induce pain in oral ulcers. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of endothelin-1 signaling with oral ulcer-induced pain using our proprietary assay system in conscious rats. Endothelin-1 was significantly upregulated in oral ulcers experimentally induced by topical acetic acid treatment, while endothelin-1 production was suppressed by antibacterial pretreatment. Spontaneous nociceptive behavior in oral ulcer model rats was inhibited by swab applications of BQ-788 (ET B receptor antagonist), ONO-8711 (prostanoid receptor EP 1 antagonist), and HC-030031 (TRPA1 antagonist). Prostaglandin E 2 production in the ulcers was suppressed by BQ-788. Mechanical allodynia in the model was inhibited not only by BQ-788 and HC-030031 but also by BQ-123 (ET A receptor antagonist), SB-366791 (TRPV1 antagonist), and RN-1734 (TRPV4 antagonist). In naive rats, submucosal injection of endothelin-1 caused mechanical allodynia that was sensitive to HC-030031 and SB-366791 but not to RN-1734. These results suggest that endothelin-1 production following oral bacterial invasion via ulcerative regions elicits TRPA1-mediated spontaneous pain. This pain likely occurs through an indirect route that involves ET B receptor-accelerated prostanoid production. Endothelin-1 elicits directly TRPA1- and TRPV1-mediated mechanical allodynia via both ET A and ET B receptors on nociceptive fibers. The TRPV4-mediated allodynia component seems to be independent of endothelin signaling. These findings highlight the potential of endothelin signaling blockers as effective analgesic approaches for oral ulcer patients.

  5. Effect of α{sub 7} nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists and antagonists on motor function in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, Kevin D., E-mail: kevin.welch@ars.usda.gov; Pfister, James A.; Lima, Flavia G.

    2013-02-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are ligand-gated cation channels found throughout the body, and serve to mediate diverse physiological functions. Muscle-type nAChRs located in the motor endplate region of muscle fibers play an integral role in muscle contraction and thus motor function. The toxicity and teratogenicity of many plants (which results in millions of dollars in losses annually to the livestock industry) are due to various toxins that bind to nAChRs including deltaline and methyllycaconitine (MLA) from larkspur (Delphinium) species, and nicotine and anabasine from tobacco (Nicotiana) species. The primary result of the actions of these alkaloids at nAChRs is neuromuscularmore » paralysis and respiratory failure. The objective of this study was to further characterize the motor coordination deficiencies that occur upon exposure to a non-lethal dose of nAChR antagonists MLA and deltaline as well as nAChR agonists nicotine and anabasine. We evaluated the effect of nAChR agonists and antagonists on the motor function and coordination in mice using a balance beam, grip strength meter, rotarod, open field analysis and tremor monitor. These analyses demonstrated that within seconds after treatment the mice had significant loss of motor function and coordination that lasted up to 1 min, followed by a short period of quiescence. Recovery to normal muscle coordination was rapid, typically within approximately 10 min post-dosing. However, mice treated with the nAChR agonist nicotine and anabasine required a slightly longer time to recover some aspects of normal muscle function in comparison to mice treated with the nAChR antagonist MLA or deltaline. -- Highlights: ► Mice treated with nAChR agonists and antagonists have a loss in motor function. ► These deficits are temporary as near normal motor function returns within 10 min. ► There are compound-specific differences in the effects on motor function.« less

  6. Novel Bivalent 5-HT2A Receptor Antagonists Exhibit High Affinity and Potency in Vitro and Efficacy in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Soto, Claudia A; Shashack, Matthew J; Fox, Robert G; Bubar, Marcy J; Rice, Kenner C; Watson, Cheryl S; Cunningham, Kathryn A; Gilbertson, Scott R; Anastasio, Noelle C

    2018-03-21

    The 5-HT 2A receptor (5-HT 2A R) plays an important role in various neuropsychiatric disorders, including substance use disorder and schizophrenia. Homodimerization of this receptor has been suggested, but tools that allow direct assessment of the relevance of the 5-HT 2A R:5-HT 2A R homodimer in these disorders are necessary. We chemically modified the selective 5-HT 2A R antagonist M100907 to synthesize a series of homobivalent ligands connected by ethylene glycol linkers of varying lengths that may be useful tools for probing 5-HT 2A R:5-HT 2A R homodimer function. We tested these molecules for 5-HT 2A R antagonist activity in a cell line stably expressing the functional 5-HT 2A R and quantified a downstream signaling target, activation (phosphorylation) of extracellular regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK 1/2 ), in comparison to in vivo efficacy of altering spontaneous or cocaine-evoked locomotor activity in rats. All of the synthetic compounds inhibited 5-HT-mediated phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 in the cellular signaling assay; the potency of the bivalent ligands varied as a function of linker length, with the intermediate linker lengths being the most potent. The K i values for the binding of bivalent ligands to 5-HT 2A R were only slightly lower than the values for the parent (+)-M100907 compound, but significant selectivity for 5-HT 2A R over 5-HT 2B R or 5-HT 2C R binding was retained. In addition, the 11-atom-linked bivalent 5-HT 2A R antagonist (2 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) demonstrated efficacy on par with that of (+)-M100907 in inhibiting cocaine-evoked hyperactivity. As we develop further strategies for ligand-evoked receptor assembly and analyses of diverse signaling and functional roles, these novel homobivalent 5-HT 2A R antagonist ligands will serve as useful in vitro and in vivo probes of 5-HT 2A R structure and function.

  7. The dual orexin receptor antagonist almorexant induces sleep and decreases orexin-induced locomotion by blocking orexin 2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Mang, Géraldine M; Dürst, Thomas; Bürki, Hugo; Imobersteg, Stefan; Abramowski, Dorothee; Schuepbach, Edi; Hoyer, Daniel; Fendt, Markus; Gee, Christine E

    2012-12-01

    Orexin peptides activate orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptors (OX(1)R and OX(2)R), regulate locomotion and sleep-wake. The dual OX(1)R/OX(2)R antagonist almorexant reduces activity and promotes sleep in multiple species, including man. The relative contributions of the two receptors in locomotion and sleep/wake regulation were investigated in mice. Mice lacking orexin receptors were used to determine the contribution of OX(1)R and OX(2)R to orexin A-induced locomotion and to almorexant-induced sleep. N/A. C57BL/6J mice and OX(1)R(+/+), OX(1)R(-/-), OX(2)R(+/+), OX(2)R(-/-) and OX(1)R(-/-)/OX(2)R(-/-) mice. Intracerebroventricular orexin A; oral dosing of almorexant. Almorexant attenuated orexin A-induced locomotion. As in other species, almorexant dose-dependently increased rapid eye movement sleep (REM) and nonREM sleep in mice. Almorexant and orexin A were ineffective in OX(1)R(-/-)/OX(2)R(-/-) mice. Both orexin A-induced locomotion and sleep induction by almorexant were absent in OX(2)R(-/-) mice. Interestingly, almorexant did not induce cataplexy in wild-type mice under conditions where cataplexy was seen in mice lacking orexins and in OX(1)R(-/-)/OX(2)R(-/-) mice. Almorexant dissociates very slowly from OX(2)R as measured functionally and in radioligand binding. Under non equilibrium conditions in vitro, almorexant was a dual antagonist whereas at equilibrium, almorexant became OX(2)R selective. In vivo, almorexant specifically inhibits the actions of orexin A. The two known orexin receptors mediate sleep induction by almorexant and orexin A-induced locomotion. However, OX(2)R activation mediates locomotion induction by orexin A and antagonism of OX(2)R is sufficient to promote sleep in mice.

  8. Peptidomimetic antagonists of alphavbeta3 inhibit bone resorption by inhibiting osteoclast bone resorptive activity, not osteoclast adhesion to bone.

    PubMed

    Carron, C P; Meyer, D M; Engleman, V W; Rico, J G; Ruminski, P G; Ornberg, R L; Westlin, W F; Nickols, G A

    2000-06-01

    Osteoclasts are actively motile on bone surfaces and undergo alternating cycles of migration and resorption. Osteoclast interaction with the extracellular matrix plays a key role in the osteoclast resorptive process and a substantial body of evidence suggests that integrin receptors are important in osteoclast function. These integrin receptors bind to the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence found in a variety of extracellular matrix proteins and it is well established that the interaction of osteoclast alpha v beta 3 integrin with the RGD motif within bone matrix proteins is important in osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. In this study, we characterized the effects of two synthetic peptidomimetic antagonists of alpha v beta 3, SC-56631 and SC-65811, on rabbit osteoclast adhesion to purified matrix proteins and bone, and on bone resorption in vitro. SC-56631 and SC-65811 are potent inhibitors of vitronectin binding to purified alpha v beta 3. Both SC-56631 and SC-65811 inhibited osteoclast adhesion to osteopontin- and vitronectin-coated surfaces and time-lapse video microscopy showed that osteoclasts rapidly retract from osteopontin-coated surfaces when exposed to SC-56631 and SC-65811. SC-56631 and SC-65811 blocked osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in a dose-responsive manner. Further analysis showed that SC-65811 and SC-56631 reduced the number of resorption pits produced per osteoclast and the average pit size. SC-65811 was a more potent inhibitor of bone resorption and the combination of reduced pit number and size led to a 90% inhibition of bone resorption. Surprisingly, however, osteoclasts treated with SC-65811, SC-56631 or the disintegrin echistatin, at concentrations that inhibit bone resorption did not inhibit osteoclast adhesion to bone. These results suggest that alphavbeta3 antagonists inhibited bone resorption by decreasing osteoclast bone resorptive activity or efficiency but not by inhibiting osteoclast adhesion to bone per se.

  9. Pharmacological characterization of GSK1004723, a novel, long-acting antagonist at histamine H(1) and H(3) receptors.

    PubMed

    Slack, R J; Russell, L J; Hall, D A; Luttmann, M A; Ford, A J; Saunders, K A; Hodgson, S T; Connor, H E; Browning, C; Clark, K L

    2011-11-01

    Preclinical pharmacological characterization of GSK1004723, a novel, dual histamine H(1) and H(3) receptor antagonist. GSK1004723 was characterized in vitro and in vivo using methods that included radioligand binding, intracellular calcium mobilization, cAMP production, GTPγS binding, superfused human bronchus and guinea pig whole body plethysmography. In cell membranes over-expressing human recombinant H(1) and H(3) receptors, GSK1004723 displayed high affinity, competitive binding (H(1) pKi = 10.2; H(3) pKi = 10.6). In addition, GSK1004723 demonstrated slow dissociation from both receptors with a t(1/2) of 1.2 and 1.5 h for H(1) and H(3) respectively. GSK1004723 specifically antagonized H(1) receptor mediated increases in intracellular calcium and H(3) receptor mediated increases in GTPγS binding. The antagonism exerted was retained after cell washing, consistent with slow dissociation from H(1) and H(3) receptors. Duration of action was further evaluated using superfused human bronchus preparations. GSK1004723 (100 nmol·L(-1) ) reversed an established contractile response to histamine. When GSK1004723 was removed from the perfusate, only 20% recovery of the histamine response was observed over 10 h. Moreover, 21 h post-exposure to GSK1004723 there remained almost complete antagonism of responses to histamine. In vivo pharmacology was studied in conscious guinea pigs in which nasal congestion induced by intranasal histamine was measured indirectly (plethysmography). GSK1004723 (0.1 and 1 mg·mL(-1) intranasal) antagonized the histamine-induced response with a duration of up to 72 h. GSK1004723 is a potent and selective histamine H(1) and H(3) receptor antagonist with a long duration of action and represents a potential novel therapy for allergic rhinitis. © 2011 GlaxoSmithKline. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  10. Bcl-2 antagonists interact synergistically with bortezomib in DLBCL cells in association with JNK activation and induction of ER stress.

    PubMed

    Dasmahapatra, Girija; Lembersky, Dmitry; Rahmani, Mohamed; Kramer, Lora; Friedberg, Jonathan; Fisher, Richard I; Dent, Paul; Grant, Steven

    2009-05-01

    Mechanisms underlying interactions between the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib and small molecule Bcl-2 antagonists were examined in GC- and ABC-type human DLBCL (diffuse lymphocytic B-cell lymphoma) cells. Concomitant or sequential exposure to non- or minimally toxic concentrations of bortezomib or other proteasome inhibitors and either HA14-1 or gossypol resulted in a striking increase in Bax/Bak conformational change/translocation, cytochrome c release, caspase activation and synergistic induction of apoptosis in both GC- and ABC-type cells. These events were associated with a sharp increase in activation of the stress kinase JNK and evidence of ER stress induction (e.g., eIF2alpha phosphorylation, activation of caspases-2 and -4, and Grp78 upregulation). Pharmacologic or genetic (e.g., shRNA knockdown) interruption of JNK signaling attenuated HA14-1/bortezomib lethality and ER stress induction. Genetic disruption of the ER stress pathway (e.g., in cells expressing caspase-4 shRNA or DN-eIF2alpha) significantly attenuated lethality. The toxicity of this regimen was independent of ROS generation. Finally, HA14-1 significantly increased bortezomib-mediated JNK activation, ER stress induction, and lethality in bortezomib-resistant cells. Collectively these findings indicate that small molecule Bcl-2 antagonists promote bortezomib-mediated mitochondrial injury and lethality in DLBCL cells in association with enhanced JNK activation and ER stress induction. They also raise the possibility that such a strategy may be effective in different DLBCL sub-types (e.g., GC- or ABC), and in bortezomib-resistant disease.

  11. Pharmacological characterization of GSK1004723, a novel, long-acting antagonist at histamine H1 and H3 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Slack, RJ; Russell, LJ; Hall, DA; Luttmann, MA; Ford, AJ; Saunders, KA; Hodgson, ST; Connor, HE; Browning, C; Clark, KL

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Preclinical pharmacological characterization of GSK1004723, a novel, dual histamine H1 and H3 receptor antagonist. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH GSK1004723 was characterized in vitro and in vivo using methods that included radioligand binding, intracellular calcium mobilization, cAMP production, GTPγS binding, superfused human bronchus and guinea pig whole body plethysmography. KEY RESULTS In cell membranes over-expressing human recombinant H1 and H3 receptors, GSK1004723 displayed high affinity, competitive binding (H1 pKi = 10.2; H3 pKi = 10.6). In addition, GSK1004723 demonstrated slow dissociation from both receptors with a t1/2 of 1.2 and 1.5 h for H1 and H3 respectively. GSK1004723 specifically antagonized H1 receptor mediated increases in intracellular calcium and H3 receptor mediated increases in GTPγS binding. The antagonism exerted was retained after cell washing, consistent with slow dissociation from H1 and H3 receptors. Duration of action was further evaluated using superfused human bronchus preparations. GSK1004723 (100 nmol·L−1) reversed an established contractile response to histamine. When GSK1004723 was removed from the perfusate, only 20% recovery of the histamine response was observed over 10 h. Moreover, 21 h post-exposure to GSK1004723 there remained almost complete antagonism of responses to histamine. In vivo pharmacology was studied in conscious guinea pigs in which nasal congestion induced by intranasal histamine was measured indirectly (plethysmography). GSK1004723 (0.1 and 1 mg·mL−1 intranasal) antagonized the histamine-induced response with a duration of up to 72 h. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS GSK1004723 is a potent and selective histamine H1 and H3 receptor antagonist with a long duration of action and represents a potential novel therapy for allergic rhinitis. PMID:22022805

  12. Efficacy of leukotriene receptor antagonist with anti-H1 receptor antagonist plus anti-H2 receptor antagonist for treatment of refractory chronic idiopathic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Wan, Kong-Sang; Chang, Yung-Sen

    2014-12-01

    The efficacy of the combination of leukotriene receptor antagonist (LRA) and H1 antihistamine was similar to the synergistic regimen of H1 and H2 antihistamine for treatment of chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU). However, the effective rates of these two regimens were only 53.3% and 63.3%, respectively. A total of 50 with two combined therapeutic regimens treatment ineffective patients were evaluated. Patients were single blinded and randomly assigned to one of two medication groups that received the following regimens for 4 weeks: Group A (n = 30), combination of LRA, H1 antihistamine and H2 antihistamine. Group B (n = 20) continued with the previously taken two combination regimens. The treatment efficacy was measured by daily urticaria activity score (UAS) of wheal and itch. A positive therapeutic response was defined as a reduction to <25% of baseline weekly UAS, while a relapse was a return to >75% of baseline weekly UAS. At the end of 4 weeks, the UAS response to treatment of Group A was decreased from 35.2% to 21.2%, and the Group B was persisted with 33.9% as before the treatment. The combination of LRA, H2 antihistamine and H1 antihistamine is promising for the refractory CIU cases, which were refractory for two combined therapeutic regimens.

  13. Functionalized Congeners of P2Y1 Receptor Antagonists:

    SciTech Connect

    de Castro, Sonia; Maruoka, Hiroshi; Hong, Kunlun

    2010-01-01

    The P2Y{sub 1} receptor is a prothrombotic G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activated by ADP. Preference for the North (N) ring conformation of the ribose moiety of adenine nucleotide 3',5'-bisphosphate antagonists of the P2Y{sub 1} receptor was established by using a ring-constrained methanocarba (a bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane) ring as a ribose substitute. A series of covalently linkable N{sup 6}-methyl-(N)-methanocarba-2'-deoxyadenosine-3',5'-bisphosphates containing extended 2-alkynyl chains was designed, and binding affinity at the human (h) P2Y{sub 1} receptor determined. The chain of these functionalized congeners contained hydrophilic moieties, a reactive substituent, or biotin, linked via an amide. Variation of the chain length and position of anmore » intermediate amide group revealed high affinity of carboxylic congener 8 (K{sub i} 23 nM) and extended amine congener 15 (K{sub i} 132 nM), both having a 2-(1-pentynoyl) group. A biotin conjugate 18 containing an extended {epsilon}-aminocaproyl spacer chain exhibited higher affinity than a shorter biotinylated analogue. Alternatively, click coupling of terminal alkynes of homologous 2-dialkynyl nucleotide derivatives to alkyl azido groups produced triazole derivatives that bound to the P2Y{sub 1} receptor following deprotection of the bisphosphate groups. The preservation of receptor affinity of the functionalized congeners was consistent with new P2Y{sub 1} receptor modeling and ligand docking. Attempted P2Y{sub 1} antagonist conjugation to PAMAM dendrimer carriers by amide formation or palladium-catalyzed reaction between an alkyne on the dendrimer and a 2-iodopurine-derivatized nucleotide was unsuccessful. A dialkynyl intermediate containing the chain length favored in receptor binding was conjugated to an azide-derivatized dendrimer, and the conjugate inhibited ADP-promoted human platelet aggregation. This is the first example of attaching a strategically functionalized P2Y receptor antagonist to a PAMAM

  14. Paradoxical effects of the opioid antagonist naltrexone on morphine analgesia, tolerance, and reward in rats.

    PubMed

    Powell, Kelly J; Abul-Husn, Noura S; Jhamandas, Asha; Olmstead, Mary C; Beninger, Richard J; Jhamandas, Khem

    2002-02-01

    Opioid agonists such as morphine have been found to exert excitatory and inhibitory receptor-mediated effects at low and high doses, respectively. Ultra-low doses of opioid antagonists (naloxone and naltrexone), which selectively inhibit the excitatory effects, have been reported to augment systemic morphine analgesia and inhibit the development of tolerance/physical dependence. This study investigated the site of action of the paradoxical effects of naltrexone and the generality of this effect. The potential of ultra-low doses of naltrexone to influence morphine-induced analgesia was investigated in tests of nociception. Administration of intrathecal (0.05 and 0.1 ng) or systemic (10 ng/kg i.p.) naltrexone augmented the antinociception produced by an acute submaximal dose of intrathecal (5 microg) or systemic (7.5 mg/kg i.p.) morphine in the tail-flick test. Chronic intrathecal (0.005 and 0.05 ng) or systemic (10 ng/kg) naltrexone combined with morphine (15 microg i.t.; 15 mg/kg i.p.) over a 7-day period inhibited the decline in morphine antinociception and prevented the loss of morphine potency. In animals rendered tolerant to intrathecal (15 microg) or systemic (15 mg/kg) morphine, administration of naltrexone (0.05 ng i.t.; 10 and 50 ng/kg i.p.) significantly restored the antinociceptive effect and potency of morphine. Thus, in ultra-low doses, naltrexone paradoxically enhances morphine analgesia and inhibits or reverses tolerance through a spinal action. The potential of naltrexone to influence morphine-induced reward was also investigated using a place preference paradigm. Systemic administration of ultra-low doses of naltrexone (16.7, 20.0, and 25.0 ng/kg) with morphine (1.0 mg/kg) extended the duration of the morphine-induced conditioned place preference. These effects of naltrexone on morphine-induced reward may have implications for chronic treatment with agonist-antagonist combinations.

  15. Structure-based identification and characterisation of structurally novel human P2X7 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Caseley, Emily A; Muench, Stephen P; Fishwick, Colin W; Jiang, Lin-Hua

    2016-09-15

    The P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) plays an important role in diverse conditions associated with tissue damage and inflammation, meaning that the human P2X7R (hP2X7R) is an attractive therapeutic target. The crystal structures of the zebrafish P2X4R in the closed and ATP-bound open states provide an unprecedented opportunity for structure-guided identification of new ligands. The present study performed virtual screening of ∼100,000 structurally diverse compounds against the ATP-binding pocket in the hP2X7R. This identified three compounds (C23, C40 and C60) out of 73 top-ranked compounds by testing against hP2X7R-mediated Ca(2+) responses. These compounds were further characterised using Ca(2+) imaging, patch-clamp current recording, YO-PRO-1 uptake and propidium iodide cell death assays. All three compounds inhibited BzATP-induced Ca(2+) responses concentration-dependently with IC50s of 5.1±0.3μM, 4.8±0.8μM and 3.2±0.2μM, respectively. C23 and C40 inhibited BzATP-induced currents in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner, with IC50s of 0.35±0.3μM and 1.2±0.1μM, respectively, but surprisingly C60 did not affect BzATP-induced currents up to 100μM. They suppressed BzATP-induced YO-PRO-1 uptake with IC50s of 1.8±0.9μM, 1.0±0.1μM and 0.8±0.2μM, respectively. Furthermore, these three compounds strongly protected against ATP-induced cell death. Among them, C40 and C60 exhibited strong specificity towards the hP2X7R over the hP2X4R and rP2X3R. In conclusion, our study reports the identification of three novel hP2X7R antagonists with micromolar potency for the first time using a structure-based approach, including the first P2X7R antagonist with preferential inhibition of large pore formation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of SB-271046: A potent, selective and orally active 5-HT6 receptor antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Routledge, Carol; Bromidge, Steven M; Moss, Stephen F; Price, Gary W; Hirst, Warren; Newman, Helen; Riley, Graham; Gager, Tracey; Stean, Tania; Upton, Neil; Clarke, Stephen E; Brown, Anthony M; Middlemiss, Derek N

    2000-01-01

    SB-271046, potently displaced [3H]-LSD and [125I]-SB-258585 from human 5-HT6 receptors recombinantly expressed in HeLa cells in vitro (pKi 8.92 and 9.09 respectively). SB-271046 also displaced [125I]-SB-258585 from human caudate putamen and rat and pig striatum membranes (pKi 8.81, 9.02 and 8.55 respectively). SB-271046 was over 200 fold selective for the 5-HT6 receptor vs 55 other receptors, binding sites and ion channels. In functional studies on human 5-HT6 receptors SB-271046 competitively antagonized 5-HT-induced stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity with a pA2 of 8.71. SB-271046 produced an increase in seizure threshold over a wide-dose range in the rat maximal electroshock seizure threshold (MEST) test, with a minimum effective dose of ⩽0.1 mg kg−1 p.o. and maximum effect at 4 h post-dose. The level of anticonvulsant activity achieved correlated well with the blood concentrations of SB-271046 (EC50 of 0.16 μM) and brain concentrations of 0.01–0.04 μM at Cmax. These data, together with the observed anticonvulsant activity of other selective 5-HT6 receptor antagonists, SB-258510 (10 mg kg−1, 2–6 h pre-test) and Ro 04-6790 (1–30 mg kg−1, 1 h pre-test), in the rat MEST test, suggest that the anticonvulsant properties of SB-271046 are likely to be mediated by 5-HT6 receptors. Overall, these studies demonstrate that SB-271046 is a potent and selective 5-HT6 receptor antagonist and is orally active in the rat MEST test. SB-271046 represents a valuable tool for evaluating the in vivo central function of 5-HT6 receptors. PMID:10928964

  17. Effect of leukotriene receptor antagonists on vascular permeability during endotoxic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, J.A.; Li, E.J.; Spicer, K.M.

    1990-11-01

    Evidence has accumulated that sulfidopeptide leukotrienes are significant pathogenic mediators of certain hematologic and hemodynamic sequelae of endotoxic shock. In the present study, the effects of a selective LTD4/E4 receptor antagonist, LY171883 (LY), or a selective LTD4 receptor