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Sample records for a2b receptor based

  1. Classifier ensemble based on feature selection and diversity measures for predicting the affinity of A(2B) adenosine receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Bonet, Isis; Franco-Montero, Pedro; Rivero, Virginia; Teijeira, Marta; Borges, Fernanda; Uriarte, Eugenio; Morales Helguera, Aliuska

    2013-12-23

    A(2B) adenosine receptor antagonists may be beneficial in treating diseases like asthma, diabetes, diabetic retinopathy, and certain cancers. This has stimulated research for the development of potent ligands for this subtype, based on quantitative structure-affinity relationships. In this work, a new ensemble machine learning algorithm is proposed for classification and prediction of the ligand-binding affinity of A(2B) adenosine receptor antagonists. This algorithm is based on the training of different classifier models with multiple training sets (composed of the same compounds but represented by diverse features). The k-nearest neighbor, decision trees, neural networks, and support vector machines were used as single classifiers. To select the base classifiers for combining into the ensemble, several diversity measures were employed. The final multiclassifier prediction results were computed from the output obtained by using a combination of selected base classifiers output, by utilizing different mathematical functions including the following: majority vote, maximum and average probability. In this work, 10-fold cross- and external validation were used. The strategy led to the following results: i) the single classifiers, together with previous features selections, resulted in good overall accuracy, ii) a comparison between single classifiers, and their combinations in the multiclassifier model, showed that using our ensemble gave a better performance than the single classifier model, and iii) our multiclassifier model performed better than the most widely used multiclassifier models in the literature. The results and statistical analysis demonstrated the supremacy of our multiclassifier approach for predicting the affinity of A(2B) adenosine receptor antagonists, and it can be used to develop other QSAR models.

  2. Adenosine A2B and A3 receptor location at the mouse neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Neus; Priego, Mercedes; Hurtado, Erica; Obis, Teresa; Santafe, Manel M; Tomàs, Marta; Lanuza, Maria Angel; Tomàs, Josep

    2014-07-01

    To date, four subtypes of adenosine receptors have been cloned (A(1)R, A(2A)R, A(2B)R, and A(3)R). In a previous study we used confocal immunocytochemistry to identify A(1)R and A(2A)R receptors at mouse neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). The data shows that these receptors are localized differently in the three cells (muscle, nerve and glia) that configure the NMJs. A(1)R localizes in the terminal teloglial Schwann cell and nerve terminal, whereas A(2A)R localizes in the postsynaptic muscle and in the axon and nerve terminal. Here, we use Western blotting to investigate the presence of A(2B)R and A(3)R receptors in striated muscle and immunohistochemistry to localize them in the three cells of the adult neuromuscular synapse. The data show that A(2B)R and A(3)R receptors are present in the nerve terminal and muscle cells at the NMJs. Neither A(2B)R nor A(3)R receptors are localized in the Schwann cells. Thus, the four subtypes of adenosine receptors are present in the motor endings. The presence of these receptors in the neuromuscular synapse allows the receptors to be involved in the modulation of transmitter release. © 2014 Anatomical Society.

  3. A2B Adenosine Receptor Agonist Improves Erectile Function in Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jiaming; Wang, Bohan; Du, Chuanjun; Xu, Gang; Zhang, Zhewei; Li, Yi; Zhang, Nan

    2015-10-01

    Diabetes is an important risk factor for erectile dysfunction (ED). Recent studies have indicated that A2B adenosine receptor (ADORA2B) signaling is essential for penile erection. Thus, we hypothesize that diabetic ED may be attributed to impaired A2B adenosine signaling. To test this hypothesis, we generated diabetic rats by injecting streptozocin as animal model. After 12 weeks, immunohistochemistry staining was used to localize the expression of ADORA2B. Western Blot and quantitative PCR were employed to determine ADORA2B expression level. Intracavernosal pressure (ICP) measurement was used to evaluate erectile function. Diabetic rats received a single intravenous injection of BAY 60-6583, an ADORA2B agonist, or vehicle solution, at 60 min before the ICP measurement. The results showed that ADORA2B expressed in the nerve bundle, smooth muscle, and endothelium in penile tissue of control mice. Western Blot and quantitative PCR results indicated that the expression levels of ADORA2B protein and mRNA were significantly reduced in penile tissues of diabetic rats. Functional studies showed that the erectile response induced by electrical stimulation was remarkably decreased in diabetic rats, compared with age-matched control rats. However, at 60 min after BAY 60-6583 treatment, the erectile function was improved in diabetic rats, suggesting that enhancement of ADORA2B signaling may improve erectile function in diabetic ED. This preclinical study has revealed a previously unrecognized therapeutic possibility of BAY 60-6583 as an effective and mechanism-based drug to treat diabetic ED. In conclusion, we propose that impaired A2B adenosine signaling is one of the pathological mechanisms of diabetic ED.

  4. Adenosine A2B receptor: from cell biology to human diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ying; Huang, Pingbo

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular adenosine is a ubiquitous signaling molecule that modulates a wide array of biological processes. Recently, significant advances have been made in our understanding of A2B adenosine receptor (A2BAR). In this review, we first summarize some of the general characteristics of A2BAR, and then we describe the multiple binding partners of the receptor, such as newly identified α-actinin-1 and p105, and discuss how these associated proteins could modulate A2BAR’s functions, including certain seemingly paradoxical functions of the receptor. Growing evidence indicates a critical role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes, in addition to its importance in the regulation of vascular diseases and lung disease. Here, we also discuss the role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes and the potential of the receptor as a target for treating these three diseases.

  5. Elevated Adenosine Induces Placental DNA Hypomethylation Independent of A2B Receptor Signaling in Preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Aji; Wu, Hongyu; Iriyama, Takayuki; Zhang, Yujin; Sun, Kaiqi; Song, Anren; Liu, Hong; Peng, Zhangzhe; Tang, Lili; Lee, Minjung; Huang, Yun; Ni, Xin; Kellems, Rodney E; Xia, Yang

    2017-07-01

    Preeclampsia is a prevalent pregnancy hypertensive disease with both maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Emerging evidence indicates that global placental DNA hypomethylation is observed in patients with preeclampsia and is linked to altered gene expression and disease development. However, the molecular basis underlying placental epigenetic changes in preeclampsia remains unclear. Using 2 independent experimental models of preeclampsia, adenosine deaminase-deficient mice and a pathogenic autoantibody-induced mouse model of preeclampsia, we demonstrate that elevated placental adenosine not only induces hallmark features of preeclampsia but also causes placental DNA hypomethylation. The use of genetic approaches to express an adenosine deaminase minigene specifically in placentas, or adenosine deaminase enzyme replacement therapy, restored placental adenosine to normal levels, attenuated preeclampsia features, and abolished placental DNA hypomethylation in adenosine deaminase-deficient mice. Genetic deletion of CD73 (an ectonucleotidase that converts AMP to adenosine) prevented the elevation of placental adenosine in the autoantibody-induced preeclampsia mouse model and ameliorated preeclampsia features and placental DNA hypomethylation. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that elevated placental adenosine-mediated DNA hypomethylation predominantly occurs in spongiotrophoblasts and labyrinthine trophoblasts and that this effect is independent of A2B adenosine receptor activation in both preeclampsia models. Extending our mouse findings to humans, we used cultured human trophoblasts to demonstrate that adenosine functions intracellularly and induces DNA hypomethylation without A2B adenosine receptor activation. Altogether, both mouse and human studies reveal novel mechanisms underlying placental DNA hypomethylation and potential therapeutic approaches for preeclampsia. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Adenosine A2B Receptor Deficiency Promotes Host Defenses against Gram-Negative Bacterial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Barletta, Kathryn E.; Cagnina, R. Elaine; Burdick, Marie D.; Linden, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Activation of the adenosine A2B receptor (A2BR) promotes antiinflammatory effects in diverse biological settings, but the role of this receptor in antimicrobial host defense in the lung has not been established. Gram-negative bacillary pneumonia is a common and serious illness associated with high morbidity and mortality, the treatment of which is complicated by increasing rates of antibiotic resistance. Objectives: To test the hypothesis that absence of adenosine A2B receptor signaling promotes host defense against bacterial pneumonia. Methods: We used a model of Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia in wild-type mice and mice with targeted deletion of the A2BR. Host responses were compared in vivo and leukocyte responses to the bacteria were examined in vitro. Measurements and Main Results: A2BR–/– mice demonstrated enhanced bacterial clearance from the lung and improved survival after infection with K. pneumoniae compared with wild-type controls, an effect that was mediated by bone marrow–derived cells. Leukocyte recruitment to the lungs and expression of inflammatory cytokines did not differ between A2BR–/– and wild-type mice, but A2BR–/– neutrophils exhibited sixfold greater bactericidal activity and enhanced production of neutrophil extracellular traps compared with wild-type neutrophils when incubated with K. pneumoniae. Consistent with this finding, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from A2BR–/– mice with Klebsiella pneumonia contained more extracellular DNA compared with wild-type mice with pneumonia. Conclusions: These data suggest that the absence of A2BR signaling enhances antimicrobial activity in gram-negative bacterial pneumonia. PMID:22997203

  7. Adenosine A2B receptor modulates intestinal barrier function under hypoxic and ischemia/reperfusion conditions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Qiu, Yuan; Wang, Wensheng; Xiao, Weidong; Liang, Hongyin; Zhang, Chaojun; Yang, Hanwenbo; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Sun, Li-Hua; Yang, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal barrier function failure from ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and acute hypoxia has been implicated as a critical determinant in the predisposition to intestinal inflammation and a number of inflammatory disorders. Here, we identified the role of Adenosine A2B receptor (A2BAR) in the regulation of intestinal barrier function under I/R and acute hypoxic conditions. C57BL/6J mice were used, and were randomized into three groups: Sham, I/R, IR+PSB1115 (a specific A2BAR antagonist) groups. After surgery, the small bowel was harvested for immunohistochemical staining, RNA and protein content, and intestinal permeability analyses. Using an epithelial cell culture model, we investigated the influence of hypoxia on the epithelial function, and the role of A2BAR in the expressions of tight junction and epithelial permeability. The expressions of Claudin-1, occludin and ZO-1 were detected by RT-PCR and Western-Blot. Epithelial barrier function was assessed with transepithelial resistance (TER). The A2BAR antagonist, PSB1115, significantly increased tight junction protein expression after intestinal I/R or acute hypoxia conditions. PSB1115 also attenuated the disrupted distribution of TJ proteins. Furthermore, inhibition of A2BAR attenuated the decrease in TER induced by I/R or acute hypoxic conditions, and maintained intestinal barrier function. Antagonism of A2BAR activity improves intestinal epithelial structure and barrier function in a mouse model of intestinal I/R and a cell model of acute hypoxia. These findings support a potentially destructive role for A2BAR under intestinal I/R and acute hypoxic conditions.

  8. Adenosine enhances sweet taste through A2B receptors in the taste bud

    PubMed Central

    Dando, Robin; Dvoryanchikov, Gennady; Pereira, Elizabeth; Chaudhari, Nirupa; Roper, Stephen D.

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian taste buds use ATP as a neurotransmitter. Taste Receptor (Type II) cells secrete ATP via gap junction hemichannels into the narrow extracellular spaces within a taste bud. This ATP excites primary sensory afferent fibers and also stimulates neighboring taste bud cells. Here we show that extracellular ATP is enzymatically degraded to adenosine within mouse vallate taste buds and that this nucleoside acts as an autocrine neuromodulator to selectively enhance sweet taste. In Receptor cells in a lingual slice preparation, Ca2+ mobilization evoked by focally applied artificial sweeteners was significantly enhanced by adenosine (50 µM). Adenosine had no effect on bitter or umami taste responses, and the nucleoside did not affect Presynaptic (Type III) taste cells. We also used biosensor cells to measure transmitter release from isolated taste buds. Adenosine (5 µM) enhanced ATP release evoked by sweet but not bitter taste stimuli. Using single-cell RT-PCR on isolated vallate taste cells, we show that many Receptor cells express adenosine receptors, Adora2b, while Presynaptic (Type III) and Glial-like (Type I) cells seldom do. Furthermore, Adora2b receptors are significantly associated with expression of the sweet taste receptor subunit, Tas1r2. Adenosine is generated during taste stimulation mainly by the action of the ecto-5′-nucleotidase, NT5E, and to a lesser extent, prostatic acid phosphatase (ACPP). Both these ecto-nucleotidases are expressed by Presynaptic cells, as shown by single-cell RT-PCR, enzyme histochemistry and immunofluorescence. Our findings suggest that ATP released during taste reception is degraded to adenosine to exert positive modulation particularly on sweet taste. PMID:22219293

  9. Adenosine enhances sweet taste through A2B receptors in the taste bud.

    PubMed

    Dando, Robin; Dvoryanchikov, Gennady; Pereira, Elizabeth; Chaudhari, Nirupa; Roper, Stephen D

    2012-01-04

    Mammalian taste buds use ATP as a neurotransmitter. Taste Receptor (type II) cells secrete ATP via gap junction hemichannels into the narrow extracellular spaces within a taste bud. This ATP excites primary sensory afferent fibers and also stimulates neighboring taste bud cells. Here we show that extracellular ATP is enzymatically degraded to adenosine within mouse vallate taste buds and that this nucleoside acts as an autocrine neuromodulator to selectively enhance sweet taste. In Receptor cells in a lingual slice preparation, Ca(2+) mobilization evoked by focally applied artificial sweeteners was significantly enhanced by adenosine (50 μM). Adenosine had no effect on bitter or umami taste responses, and the nucleoside did not affect Presynaptic (type III) taste cells. We also used biosensor cells to measure transmitter release from isolated taste buds. Adenosine (5 μM) enhanced ATP release evoked by sweet but not bitter taste stimuli. Using single-cell reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR on isolated vallate taste cells, we show that many Receptor cells express the adenosine receptor, Adora2b, while Presynaptic (type III) and Glial-like (type I) cells seldom do. Furthermore, Adora2b receptors are significantly associated with expression of the sweet taste receptor subunit, Tas1r2. Adenosine is generated during taste stimulation mainly by the action of the ecto-5'-nucleotidase, NT5E, and to a lesser extent, prostatic acid phosphatase. Both these ecto-nucleotidases are expressed by Presynaptic cells, as shown by single-cell RT-PCR, enzyme histochemistry, and immunofluorescence. Our findings suggest that ATP released during taste reception is degraded to adenosine to exert positive modulation particularly on sweet taste.

  10. Impact and benefit of A(2B)-adenosine receptor agonists for the respiratory tract: mucociliary clearance, ciliary beat frequency, trachea muscle tonus and cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Walaschewski, Robin; Begrow, Frank; Verspohl, Eugen J

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine is known to induce a bronchospasm in asthma- and COPD patients. The role of A(2B) receptors was investigated with respect to several parameters of the respiratory tract: tonus of smooth muscle, ciliary beat frequency as measured by high-speed video camera connected to a microscope (both in rats) and mucociliary clearance (MCC; transport of a fluorescent dye using a microdialysis procedure) in mice.  NECA (5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine) (a non-selective adenosine receptor agonist) was able to acutely induce a contraction, which was reversed to a relaxation after repeated dosing. This relaxation was completely abolished by PSB-1115, an A(2B) receptor antagonist. IL-13 (cytokine) was not involved mediating acute contractility effects. MCC was increased by BAY 60-6583 (A(2B) receptor agonist) and NECA (counteracted by the A(2B) receptor antagonist PSB-1115). Activation of A(2B) adenosine receptors by BAY 60-6583 induced an increase of the ciliary beat frequency, which could be reduced by administration of PSB-1115. Several cytokines were increased by NECA although only some are relevant because they are not blocked by A(2B) receptor antagonism. The A(2B) receptors are involved in airway relaxation, MCC improvement and ciliary beat frequency. A(2B) receptor agonists may be of therapeutic value and should be developed. © 2012 The Authors. JPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  11. Adenosine A(2B) receptor antagonist PSB603 suppresses tumor growth and metastasis by inhibiting induction of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Wakako; Tanaka, Satomi; Tsukimoto, Mitsutoshi; Kojima, Shuji

    2014-04-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a role in suppression of immune response, including anti-tumor immunity. We have recently reported that treatment of naïve CD4 T cells with adenosine A(2B) receptor antagonist PSB603 under Treg-skewing conditions inhibits expression of Foxp3, a marker of differentiation to Treg, without blocking IL-2 production or CD25 expression, which are activation markers, in CD4 T cells. We hypothesized that PSB603 suppresses cancer growth and metastasis by inhibiting induction of Treg, thereby facilitating anti-tumor immunity. In this study, we first examined the effect of PSB603 on tumor growth in B16 melanoma-bearing C57BL/6 mice. Administration of PSB603 significantly suppressed the increase of tumor volume as well as the increase of Treg population in these mice. The populations of CD4 and CD8 T cells were higher and splenic lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity towards B16 melanoma was significantly increased in PSB603-treated mice. We confirmed that PSB603 did not reduce the viability of B16 melanoma cells in vitro. Moreover, we also examined the effect of PSB603 on tumor metastasis in pulmonary metastasis model mice intravenously injected with B16 melanoma cells. The metastasis was also suppressed in PSB603-treated mice, in which the population of Treg was significantly lower. Overall, our results suggest that A(2B) receptor antagonist PSB603 enhances anti-tumor immunity by inhibiting differentiation to Treg, resulting in a delay of tumor growth and a suppression of metastasis.

  12. The A2b adenosine receptor antagonist PSB-603 promotes oxidative phosphorylation and ROS production in colorectal cancer cells via adenosine receptor-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mølck, Christina; Ryall, James; Failla, Laura M; Coates, Janine L; Pascussi, Jean-Marc; Heath, Joan K; Stewart, Gregory; Hollande, Frédéric

    2016-12-01

    Adenosine is a multifaceted regulator of tumor progression. It modulates immune cell activity as well as acting directly on tumor cells. The A 2b adenosine receptor (A 2b -AR) is thought to be an important mediator of these effects. In this study we sought to analyze the contribution of the A 2b -AR to the behavior of colorectal cancer cells. The A 2b -AR antagonist PSB-603 changed cellular redox state without affecting cellular viability. Quantification of cellular bioenergetics demonstrated that PSB-603 increased basal oxygen consumption rates, indicative of enhanced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Unexpectedly, pharmacological and genetic approaches to antagonize AR-related signalling of PSB-603 did not abolish the response, suggesting that it was AR-independent. PSB-603 also induced acute increases in reactive oxygen species, and PSB-603 synergized with chemotherapy treatment to increase colorectal cancer cell death, consistent with the known link between cellular metabolism and chemotherapy response. PSB-603 alters cellular metabolism in colorectal cancer cells and increases their sensitivity to chemotherapy. Although requiring more mechanistic insight into its A 2b -AR-independent activity, our results show that PSB-603 may have clinical value as an anti-colorectal cancer therapeutic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Deletion of the distal COOH-terminus of the A2B adenosine receptor switches internalization to an arrestin- and clathrin-independent pathway and inhibits recycling.

    PubMed

    Mundell, S J; Matharu, A-L; Nisar, S; Palmer, T M; Benovic, J L; Kelly, E

    2010-02-01

    We have investigated the effect of deletions of a postsynaptic density, disc large and zo-1 protein (PDZ) motif at the end of the COOH-terminus of the rat A(2B) adenosine receptor on intracellular trafficking following long-term exposure to the agonist 5'-(N-ethylcarboxamido)-adenosine. The trafficking of the wild type A(2B) adenosine receptor and deletion mutants expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells was studied using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in combination with immunofluorescence microscopy. The wild type A(2B) adenosine receptor and deletion mutants were all extensively internalized following prolonged treatment with NECA. The intracellular compartment through which the Gln(325)-stop receptor mutant, which lacks the Type II PDZ motif found in the wild type receptor initially trafficked was not the same as the wild type receptor. Expression of dominant negative mutants of arrestin-2, dynamin or Eps-15 inhibited internalization of wild type and Leu(330)-stop receptors, whereas only dominant negative mutant dynamin inhibited agonist-induced internalization of Gln(325)-stop, Ser(326)-stop and Phe(328)-stop receptors. Following internalization, the wild type A(2B) adenosine receptor recycled rapidly to the cell surface, whereas the Gln(325)-stop receptor did not recycle. Deletion of the COOH-terminus of the A(2B) adenosine receptor beyond Leu(330) switches internalization from an arrestin- and clathrin-dependent pathway to one that is dynamin dependent but arrestin and clathrin independent. The presence of a Type II PDZ motif appears to be essential for arrestin- and clathrin-dependent internalization, as well as recycling of the A(2B) adenosine receptor following prolonged agonist addition.

  14. Epithelial-specific A2B adenosine receptor signaling protects the colonic epithelial barrier during acute colitis

    PubMed Central

    Aherne, CM; Saeedi, B; Collins, CB; Masterson, JC; McNamee, EN; Perrenoud, L; Rapp, CR; Curtis, VF; Bayless, A; Fletcher, A; Glover, LE; Evans, CM; Jedlicka, P; Furuta, GT; de Zoeten, EF; Colgan, SP; Eltzschig, HK

    2015-01-01

    Central to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) pathogenesis is loss of mucosal barrier function. Emerging evidence implicates extracellular adenosine signaling in attenuating mucosal inflammation. We hypothesized that adenosine-mediated protection from intestinal barrier dysfunction involves tissue-specific signaling through the A2B adenosine receptor (Adora2b) at the intestinal mucosal surface. To address this hypothesis, we combined pharmacologic studies and studies in mice with global or tissue-specific deletion of the Adora2b receptor. Adora2b−/− mice experienced a significantly heightened severity of colitis, associated with a more acute onset of disease and loss of intestinal epithelial barrier function. Comparison of mice with Adora2b deletion on vascular endothelial cells (Adora2bfl/flVeCadCre+) or intestinal epithelia (Adora2bfl/flVillinCre+) revealed a selective role for epithelial Adora2b signaling in attenuating colonic inflammation. In vitro studies with Adora2b knockdown in intestinal epithelial cultures or pharmacologic studies highlighted Adora2b-driven phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) as a specific barrier repair response. Similarly, in vivo studies in genetic mouse models or treatment studies with an Adora2b agonist (BAY 60-6583) recapitulate these findings. Taken together, our results suggest that intestinal epithelial Adora2b signaling provides protection during intestinal inflammation via enhancing mucosal barrier responses. PMID:25850656

  15. Colonic motor dysfunctions in a mouse model of high-fat diet-induced obesity: an involvement of A2B adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Antonioli, Luca; Pellegrini, Carolina; Fornai, Matteo; Tirotta, Erika; Gentile, Daniela; Benvenuti, Laura; Giron, Maria Cecilia; Caputi, Valentina; Marsilio, Ilaria; Orso, Genny; Bernardini, Nunzia; Segnani, Cristina; Ippolito, Chiara; Csóka, Balázs; Németh, Zoltán H; Haskó, György; Scarpignato, Carmelo; Blandizzi, Corrado; Colucci, Rocchina

    2017-12-01

    Adenosine A 2B receptors (A 2B R) regulate several enteric functions. However, their implication in the pathophysiology of intestinal dysmotility associated with high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity has not been elucidated. We investigated the expression of A 2B R in mouse colon and their role in the mechanisms underlying the development of enteric dysmotility associated with obesity. Wild-type C57BL/6J mice were fed with HFD (60% kcal from fat) or normocaloric diet (NCD; 18% kcal from fat) for 8 weeks. Colonic A 2B R localization was examined by immunofluorescence. The role of A 2B R in the control of colonic motility was examined in functional experiments on longitudinal muscle preparations (LMPs). In NCD mice, A 2B R were predominantly located in myenteric neurons; in HFD animals, their expression increased throughout the neuromuscular layer. Functionally, the A 2B R antagonist MRS1754 enhanced electrically induced NK 1 -mediated tachykininergic contractions in LMPs from HFD mice, while it was less effective in tissues from NCD mice. The A 2B receptor agonist BAY 60-6583 decreased colonic tachykininergic contractions in LMPs, with higher efficacy in preparations from obese mice. Both A 2B R ligands did not affect contractions elicited by exogenous substance P. Obesity is related with a condition of colonic inflammation, leading to an increase of A 2B R expression. A 2B R, modulating the activity of excitatory tachykininergic nerves, participate to the enteric dysmotility associated with obesity.

  16. The hybrid molecule, VCP746, is a potent adenosine A2B receptor agonist that stimulates anti-fibrotic signalling.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Elizabeth A; Chuo, Chung Hui; Baltos, Jo-Anne; Ford, Leigh; Scammells, Peter J; Wang, Bing H; Christopoulos, Arthur; White, Paul J; May, Lauren T

    2016-10-01

    We have recently described the rationally-designed adenosine receptor agonist, 4-(5-amino-4-benzoyl-3-(3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)thiophen-2-yl)-N-(6-(9-((2R,3R,4S,5R)-3,4-dihydroxy-5-(hydroxylmethyl)tetrahydro-furan-2-yl)-9H-purin-6-ylamino)hexyl)benzamide (VCP746), a hybrid molecule consisting of an adenosine moiety linked to an adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) allosteric modulator moiety. At the A1AR, VCP746 mediated cardioprotection in the absence of haemodynamic side effects such as bradycardia. The current study has now identified VCP746 as an important pharmacological tool for the adenosine A2B receptor (A2BAR). The binding and function of VCP746 at the A2BAR was rigorously characterised in a heterologous expression system, in addition to examination of its anti-fibrotic signalling in cardiac- and renal-derived cells. In FlpInCHO cells stably expressing the human A2BAR, VCP746 was a high affinity, high potency A2BAR agonist that stimulated Gs- and Gq-mediated signal transduction, with an apparent lack of system bias relative to prototypical A2BAR agonists. The distinct agonist profile may result from an atypical binding mode of VCP746 at the A2BAR, which was consistent with a bivalent mechanism of receptor interaction. In isolated neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts (NCF), VCP746 stimulated potent inhibition of both TGF-β1- and angiotensin II-mediated collagen synthesis. Similar attenuation of TGF-β1-mediated collagen synthesis was observed in renal mesangial cells (RMC). The anti-fibrotic signalling mediated by VCP746 in NCF and RMC was selectively reversed in the presence of an A2BAR antagonist. Thus, we believe, VCP746 represents an important tool to further investigate the role of the A2BAR in cardiac (patho)physiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Purinergic A2b Receptor Activation by Extracellular Cues Affects Positioning of the Centrosome and Nucleus and Causes Reduced Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Ou, Young; Chan, Gordon; Zuo, Jeremy; Rattner, Jerome B; van der Hoorn, Frans A

    2016-07-15

    The tight, relative positioning of the nucleus and centrosome in mammalian cells is important for the regulation of cell migration. Under pathophysiological conditions, the purinergic A2b receptor can regulate cell motility, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Expression of A2b, normally low, is increased in tissues experiencing adverse physiological conditions, including hypoxia and inflammation. ATP is released from such cells. We investigated whether extracellular cues can regulate centrosome-nucleus positioning and cell migration. We discovered that hypoxia as well as extracellular ATP cause a reversible increase in the distance between the centrosome and nucleus and reduced cell motility. We uncovered the underlying pathway: both treatments act through the A2b receptor and specifically activate the Epac1/RapGef3 pathway. We show that cells lacking A2b do not respond in this manner to hypoxia or ATP but transfection of A2b restores this response, that Epac1 is critically involved, and that Rap1B is important for the relative positioning of the centrosome and nucleus. Our results represent, to our knowledge, the first report demonstrating that pathophysiological conditions can impact the distance between the centrosome and nucleus. Furthermore, we identify the A2b receptor as a central player in this process. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Purinergic A2b Receptor Activation by Extracellular Cues Affects Positioning of the Centrosome and Nucleus and Causes Reduced Cell Migration*

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Young; Chan, Gordon; Zuo, Jeremy; Rattner, Jerome B.; van der Hoorn, Frans A.

    2016-01-01

    The tight, relative positioning of the nucleus and centrosome in mammalian cells is important for the regulation of cell migration. Under pathophysiological conditions, the purinergic A2b receptor can regulate cell motility, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Expression of A2b, normally low, is increased in tissues experiencing adverse physiological conditions, including hypoxia and inflammation. ATP is released from such cells. We investigated whether extracellular cues can regulate centrosome-nucleus positioning and cell migration. We discovered that hypoxia as well as extracellular ATP cause a reversible increase in the distance between the centrosome and nucleus and reduced cell motility. We uncovered the underlying pathway: both treatments act through the A2b receptor and specifically activate the Epac1/RapGef3 pathway. We show that cells lacking A2b do not respond in this manner to hypoxia or ATP but transfection of A2b restores this response, that Epac1 is critically involved, and that Rap1B is important for the relative positioning of the centrosome and nucleus. Our results represent, to our knowledge, the first report demonstrating that pathophysiological conditions can impact the distance between the centrosome and nucleus. Furthermore, we identify the A2b receptor as a central player in this process. PMID:27226580

  19. Expression of Receptors for Tetanus Toxin and Monoclonal Antibody A2B5 by Pancreatic Islet Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenbarth, G. S.; Shimizu, K.; Bowring, M. A.; Wells, S.

    1982-08-01

    Studies of the reaction of antibody A2B5 and tetanus toxin with pancreatic islet cells, islet cell tumors, and other human amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation (APUD) tumors are described. By indirect immunofluorescence, antibody A2B5 and tetanus toxin were shown to specifically bind to the plasma membrane of human, rat, chicken, and mouse islet cells. The binding of antibody A2B5 to the cell surface of living islet cells has allowed isolation of these cells from a suspension of pancreatic cells by using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter. In studies designed to determine whether tetanus toxin and antibody A2B5 bound to the same surface antigen, A2B5 and tetanus toxin did not compete for binding to normal islet cells, a human islet cell tumor, or a rat islet cell tumor. In addition to binding to islet cell tumors, antibody A2B5 reacts with frozen sections, isolated cells, and cell lines of neural, neural crest, and APUD origin.

  20. Coupling to protein kinases A and C of adenosine A2B receptors involved in the facilitation of noradrenaline release in the prostatic portion of rat vas deferens.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Glória; Quintas, Clara; Talaia, Carlos; Gonçalves, Jorge

    2004-08-01

    In the prostatic portion of rat vas deferens, the non-selective adenosine receptor agonist NECA (0.1-30 microM), but not the A(2A) agonist CGS 21680 (0.001-10 microM), caused a facilitation of electrically evoked noradrenaline release (up to 43 +/- 4%), when inhibitory adenosine A(1) receptors were blocked. NECA-elicited facilitation of noradrenaline release was prevented by the A(2B) receptor-antagonist MRS 1754, enhanced by preventing cyclic-AMP degradation with rolipram, abolished by the protein kinase A inhibitors H-89, KT 5720 and cyclic-AMPS-Rp and attenuated by the protein kinase C inhibitors Ro 32-0432 and calphostin C. The adenosine uptake inhibitor NBTI also elicited a facilitation of noradrenaline release; an effect that was abolished by adenosine deaminase and attenuated by MRS 1754, by inhibitors of the extracellular nucleotide metabolism and by blockade of alpha(1)-adrenoceptors and P2X receptors with prazosin and NF023, respectively. It was concluded that adenosine A(2B) receptors are involved in a facilitation of noradrenaline release in the prostatic portion of rat vas deferens that can be activated by adenosine formed by extracellular catabolism of nucleotides. The receptors seem to be coupled to the adenylyl cyclase-protein kinase A pathway but activation of the protein kinase C by protein kinase A, may also contribute to the adenosine A(2B) receptor-mediated facilitation of noradrenaline release.

  1. Excess adenosine in murine penile erectile tissues contributes to priapism via A2B adenosine receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Tiejuan; Abbasi, Shahrzad; Zhang, Hong; Uray, Karen; Chunn, Janci L.; Xia, Ling Wei; Molina, Jose G.; Weisbrodt, Norman W.; Kellems, Rodney E.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Xia, Yang

    2008-01-01

    Priapism, abnormally prolonged penile erection in the absence of sexual excitation, is associated with ischemia-mediated erectile tissue damage and subsequent erectile dysfunction. It is common among males with sickle cell disease (SCD), and SCD transgenic mice are an accepted model of the disorder. Current strategies to manage priapism suffer from a poor fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the disorder. Here we report that mice lacking adenosine deaminase (ADA), an enzyme necessary for the breakdown of adenosine, displayed unexpected priapic activity. ADA enzyme therapy successfully corrected the priapic activity both in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that it was dependent on elevated adenosine levels. Further genetic and pharmacologic evidence demonstrated that A2B adenosine receptor–mediated (A2BR-mediated) cAMP and cGMP induction was required for elevated adenosine–induced prolonged penile erection. Finally, priapic activity in SCD transgenic mice was also caused by elevated adenosine levels and A2BR activation. Thus, we have shown that excessive adenosine accumulation in the penis contributes to priapism through increased A2BR signaling in both Ada–/– and SCD transgenic mice. These findings provide insight regarding the molecular basis of priapism and suggest that strategies to either reduce adenosine or block A2BR activation may prove beneficial in the treatment of this disorder. PMID:18340377

  2. Beneficial Role of Erythrocyte Adenosine A2B Receptor-Mediated AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Activation in High-Altitude Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Zhang, Yujin; Wu, Hongyu; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Yegutkin, Gennady G; Song, Anren; Sun, Kaiqi; Li, Jessica; Cheng, Ning-Yuan; Huang, Aji; Edward Wen, Yuan; Weng, Ting Ting; Luo, Fayong; Nemkov, Travis; Sun, Hong; Kellems, Rodney E; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Hansen, Kirk C; Zhao, Bihong; Subudhi, Andrew W; Jameson-Van Houten, Sonja; Julian, Colleen G; Lovering, Andrew T; Eltzschig, Holger K; Blackburn, Michael R; Roach, Robert C; Xia, Yang

    2016-08-02

    High altitude is a challenging condition caused by insufficient oxygen supply. Inability to adjust to hypoxia may lead to pulmonary edema, stroke, cardiovascular dysfunction, and even death. Thus, understanding the molecular basis of adaptation to high altitude may reveal novel therapeutics to counteract the detrimental consequences of hypoxia. Using high-throughput, unbiased metabolomic profiling, we report that the metabolic pathway responsible for production of erythrocyte 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate (2,3-BPG), a negative allosteric regulator of hemoglobin-O2 binding affinity, was significantly induced in 21 healthy humans within 2 hours of arrival at 5260 m and further increased after 16 days at 5260 m. This finding led us to discover that plasma adenosine concentrations and soluble CD73 activity rapidly increased at high altitude and were associated with elevated erythrocyte 2,3-BPG levels and O2 releasing capacity. Mouse genetic studies demonstrated that elevated CD73 contributed to hypoxia-induced adenosine accumulation and that elevated adenosine-mediated erythrocyte A2B adenosine receptor activation was beneficial by inducing 2,3-BPG production and triggering O2 release to prevent multiple tissue hypoxia, inflammation, and pulmonary vascular leakage. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that erythrocyte AMP-activated protein kinase was activated in humans at high altitude and that AMP-activated protein kinase is a key protein functioning downstream of the A2B adenosine receptor, phosphorylating and activating BPG mutase and thus inducing 2,3-BPG production and O2 release from erythrocytes. Significantly, preclinical studies demonstrated that activation of AMP-activated protein kinase enhanced BPG mutase activation, 2,3-BPG production, and O2 release capacity in CD73-deficient mice, in erythrocyte-specific A2B adenosine receptor knockouts, and in wild-type mice and in turn reduced tissue hypoxia and inflammation. Together, human and mouse studies reveal novel

  3. Characterisation of endogenous A2A and A2B receptor-mediated cyclic AMP responses in HEK 293 cells using the GloSensor™ biosensor: Evidence for an allosteric mechanism of action for the A2B-selective antagonist PSB 603.

    PubMed

    Goulding, Joelle; May, Lauren T; Hill, Stephen J

    2018-01-01

    Endogenous adenosine A 2B receptors (A 2B AR) mediate cAMP accumulation in HEK 293 cells. Here we have used a biosensor to investigate the mechanism of action of the A 2B AR antagonist PSB 603 in HEK 293 cells. The A 2A agonist CGS 21680 elicited a small response in these cells (circa 20% of that obtained with NECA), suggesting that they also contain a small population of A 2A receptors. The responses to NECA and adenosine were antagonised by PSB 603, but not by the selective A 2A AR antagonist SCH 58261. In contrast, CGS 21680 responses were not antagonised by high concentrations of PSB 603, but were sensitive to inhibition by SCH 58261. Analysis of the effect of increasing concentrations of PSB 603 on the response to NECA indicated a non-competitive mode of action yielding a marked reduction in the NECA E MAX with no significant effect on EC 50 values. Kinetics analysis of the effect of PSB 603 on the A 2B AR-mediated NECA responses confirmed a saturable effect that was consistent with an allosteric mode of antagonism. The possibility that PSB 603 acts as a negative allosteric modulator of A 2B AR suggests new approaches to the development of therapeutic agents to treat conditions where adenosine levels are high. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Neutrophil-derived 5′-Adenosine Monophosphate Promotes Endothelial Barrier Function via CD73-mediated Conversion to Adenosine and Endothelial A2B Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lennon, Paul F.; Taylor, Cormac T.; Stahl, Gregory L.; Colgan, Sean P.

    1998-01-01

    During episodes of inflammation, polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) transendothelial migration has the potential to disturb vascular barrier function and give rise to intravascular fluid extravasation and edema. However, little is known regarding innate mechanisms that dampen fluid loss during PMN-endothelial interactions. Using an in vitro endothelial paracellular permeability model, we observed a PMN-mediated decrease in endothelial paracellular permeability. A similar decrease was elicited by cell-free supernatants from activated PMN (FMLP 10−6 M), suggesting the presence of a PMN-derived soluble mediator(s). Biophysical and biochemical analysis of PMN supernatants revealed a role for PMN-derived 5′-adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and its metabolite, adenosine, in modulation of endothelial paracellular permeability. Supernatants from activated PMN contained micromolar concentrations of bioactive 5′-AMP and adenosine. Furthermore, exposure of endothelial monolayers to authentic 5′-AMP and adenosine increased endothelial barrier function more than twofold in both human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human microvascular endothelial cells. 5′-AMP bioactivity required endothelial CD73-mediated conversion of 5′-AMP to adenosine via its 5′-ectonucleotidase activity. Decreased endothelial paracellular permeability occurred through adenosine A2B receptor activation and was accompanied by a parallel increase in intracellular cAMP. We conclude that activated PMN release soluble mediators, such as 5′-AMP and adenosine, that promote endothelial barrier function. During inflammation, this pathway may limit potentially deleterious increases in endothelial paracellular permeability and could serve as a basic mechanism of endothelial resealing during PMN transendothelial migration. PMID:9782120

  5. The A2B Adenosine Receptor Modulates the Epithelial– Mesenchymal Transition through the Balance of cAMP/PKA and MAPK/ERK Pathway Activation in Human Epithelial Lung Cells

    PubMed Central

    Giacomelli, Chiara; Daniele, Simona; Romei, Chiara; Tavanti, Laura; Neri, Tommaso; Piano, Ilaria; Celi, Alessandro; Martini, Claudia; Trincavelli, Maria L.

    2018-01-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a complex process in which cell phenotype switches from the epithelial to mesenchymal one. The deregulations of this process have been related with the occurrence of different diseases such as lung cancer and fibrosis. In the last decade, several efforts have been devoted in understanding the mechanisms that trigger and sustain this transition process. Adenosine is a purinergic signaling molecule that has been involved in the onset and progression of chronic lung diseases and cancer through the A2B adenosine receptor subtype activation, too. However, the relationship between A2BAR and EMT has not been investigated, yet. Herein, the A2BAR characterization was carried out in human epithelial lung cells. Moreover, the effects of receptor activation on EMT were investigated in the absence and presence of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β1), which has been known to promote the transition. The A2BAR activation alone decreased and increased the expression of epithelial markers (E-cadherin) and the mesenchymal one (Vimentin, N-cadherin), respectively, nevertheless a complete EMT was not observed. Surprisingly, the receptor activation counteracted the EMT induced by TGF-β1. Several intracellular pathways regulate the EMT: high levels of cAMP and ERK1/2 phosphorylation has been demonstrated to counteract and promote the transition, respectively. The A2BAR stimulation was able to modulated these two pathways, cAMP/PKA and MAPK/ERK, shifting the fine balance toward activation or inhibition of EMT. In fact, using a selective PKA inhibitor, which blocks the cAMP pathway, the A2BAR-mediated EMT promotion were exacerbated, and conversely the selective inhibition of MAPK/ERK counteracted the receptor-induced transition. These results highlighted the A2BAR as one of the receptors involved in the modulation of EMT process. Nevertheless, its activation is not enough to trigger a complete transition, its ability to affect different

  6. 2′,3′-cAMP, 3′-AMP, and 2′-AMP inhibit human aortic and coronary vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation via A2B receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jin; Gillespie, Delbert G.

    2011-01-01

    Rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from renal microvessels metabolize 2′,3′-cAMP to 2′-AMP and 3′-AMP, and these AMPs are converted to adenosine that inhibits microvascular VSMC proliferation via A2B receptors. The goal of this study was to test whether this mechanism also exists in VSMCs from conduit arteries and whether it is similarly expressed in human vs. rat VSMCs. Incubation of rat and human aortic VSMCs with 2′,3′-cAMP concentration-dependently increased levels of 2′-AMP and 3′-AMP in the medium, with a similar absolute increase in 2′-AMP vs. 3′-AMP. In contrast, in human coronary VSMCs, 2′,3′-cAMP increased 2′-AMP levels yet had little effect on 3′-AMP levels. In all cell types, 2′,3′-cAMP increased levels of adenosine, but not 5′-AMP, and 2′,3′-AMP inhibited cell proliferation. Antagonism of A2B receptors (MRS-1754), but not A1 (1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine), A2A (SCH-58261), or A3 (VUF-5574) receptors, attenuated the antiproliferative effects of 2′,3′-cAMP. In all cell types, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, and 5′-AMP increased adenosine levels, and inhibition of ecto-5′-nucleotidase blocked this effect of 5′-AMP but not that of 2′-AMP nor 3′-AMP. Also, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, and 5′-AMP, like 2′,3′-cAMP, exerted antiproliferative effects that were abolished by antagonism of A2B receptors with MRS-1754. In conclusion, VSMCs from conduit arteries metabolize 2′,3′-cAMP to AMPs, which are metabolized to adenosine. In rat and human aortic VSMCs, both 2′-AMP and 3′-AMP are involved in this process, whereas, in human coronary VSMCs, 2′,3′-cAMP is mainly converted to 2′-AMP. Because adenosine inhibits VSMC proliferation via A2B receptors, local vascular production of 2′,3′-cAMP may protect conduit arteries from atherosclerosis. PMID:21622827

  7. Conferring Virulence: Structure and Function of the chimeric A2B5 Typhoid Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jeongmin; Gao, Xiang; Galán, Jorge E.

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella Typhi differs from most other salmonellae in that it causes a life-threatening systemic infection known as typhoid fever1. The molecular bases for its unique clinical presentation are unknown2. Here we found that in an animal model, the systemic administration of typhoid toxin, a unique virulence factor of S. Typhi, reproduces many of the acute symptoms of typhoid fever. We identified specific carbohydrate moieties on specific surface glycoproteins that serve as receptors for typhoid toxin, which explains its broad cell target specificity. We present the atomic structure of typhoid toxin, which shows an unprecedented A2B5 organization with two covalently-linked A subunits non-covalently-associated to a pentameric B subunit. The structure provides insight into the toxin’s receptor-binding specificity and delivery mechanisms and reveals how the activities of two powerful toxins have been coopted into a single, unique toxin that can induce many of the symptoms characteristic of typhoid fever. These findings may lead to the development of potentially life-saving therapeutics against typhoid fever. PMID:23842500

  8. Collaborative study for the establishment of the 2(nd) International Standard for Bleomycin Complex A2/B2.

    PubMed

    Jorajuria, S; Raphalen, C; Dujardin, V; Daas, A

    2015-01-01

    Organization (WHO) International Standard (IS) for bleomycin complex A2/B2. Eight laboratories from different countries participated. Potencies of the candidate material were estimated by microbiological assays with sensitive micro-organisms. To ensure continuity between consecutive batches, the 1(st) IS for bleomycin complex A2/B2 was used as a reference. Based on the results of the study, the 2(nd) IS for bleomycin complex A2/B2 was adopted at the meeting of the WHO Expert Committee for Biological Standardization (ECBS) in 2014 with an assigned potency of 12 500 International Units (IU) per vial. The 2(nd) IS for bleomycin complex A2/B2 is available from the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & HealthCare (EDQM).

  9. A2B corroles: Fluorescence signaling systems for sensing fluoride ions.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Omprakash; Varshney, Atul; Kumar, Anil; Ratnesh, Ratneshwar Kumar; Mehata, Mohan Singh

    2018-05-19

    Four free base corroles, 1-4, A 2 B, (where A = nitrophenyl, and B = pentafluorophenyl, 2, 6-difluoro, 3, 4, 5-trifluoro and 4-carboxymethylphenyl group) have been synthesized, characterized and demonstrated as excellent chemosensor for the detection of fluoride ions selectively in toluene solution. The reported corroles shows highest quantum yield in free base form of porphyrinoid systems so far. All these corrole, 1-4, have the excellent ability to sense fluoride ion. Cumulative effect of static and dynamic factors is responsible for the quenching of fluorescence which indicates the detection of fluoride ion in solution. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. 5′-AMP impacts lymphocyte recirculation through activation of A2B receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bouma, Hjalmar R.; Mandl, Judith N.; Strijkstra, Arjen M.; Boerema, Ate S.; Kok, Jan-Willem; van Dam, Annie; IJzerman, Ad; Kroese, Frans G. M.; Henning, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Natural hibernation consists of torpid phases with metabolic suppression alternating with euthermic periods. Induction of torpor holds substantial promise in various medical conditions, including trauma, major surgery, and transplantation. Torpor in mice can be induced pharmacologically by 5′-AMP. Previously, we showed that during natural torpor, the reduction in body temperature results in lymphopenia via a reduction in plasma S1P. Here, we show that during torpor induced by 5′-AMP, there is a similar reduction in the number of circulating lymphocytes that is a result of their retention in secondary lymphoid organs. This lymphopenia could be mimicked by engagement of A2BRs by a selective A2BR agonist (LUF6210) in the absence of changes in temperature and prevented by A2BR antagonists during 5′-AMP-induced torpor. In addition, forced cooling of mice led to peripheral blood lymphopenia, independent of A2BR signaling. The induction of torpor using 5′-AMP impacted the migration of lymphocytes within and between secondary lymphoid organs. During torpor, the homing into LNs was impaired, and two-photon intravital microscopy revealed that cell motility was decreased significantly and rapidly upon 5′-AMP administration. Furthermore, the S1P plasma concentration was reduced by 5′-AMP but not by LUF6210. S1P plasma levels restored upon arousal. Likely, the reduced migration in LNs combined with the reduced S1P plasma level substantially reduces lymphocyte egress after injection of 5′-AMP. In conclusion, 5′-AMP induces a state of pharmacological torpor in mice, during which, lymphopenia is governed primarily by body temperature-independent suppression of lymphocyte egress from LNs. PMID:23682128

  11. A2B Adenosine Receptor–Mediated Induction of IL-6 Promotes CKD

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yingbo; Zhang, Weiru; Wen, Jiaming; Zhang, Yujin; Kellems, Rodney E.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic elevation of adenosine, which occurs in the setting of repeated or prolonged tissue injury, can exacerbate cellular dysfunction, suggesting that it may contribute to the pathogenesis of CKD. Here, mice with chronically elevated levels of adenosine, resulting from a deficiency in adenosine deaminase (ADA), developed renal dysfunction and fibrosis. Both the administration of polyethylene glycol–modified ADA to reduce adenosine levels and the inhibition of the A2B adenosine receptor (A2BR) attenuated renal fibrosis and dysfunction. Furthermore, activation of A2BR promoted renal fibrosis in both mice infused with angiotensin II (Ang II) and mice subjected to unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). These three mouse models shared a similar profile of profibrotic gene expression in kidney tissue, suggesting that they share similar signaling pathways that lead to renal fibrosis. Finally, both genetic and pharmacologic approaches showed that the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 mediates adenosine-induced renal fibrosis downstream of A2BR. Taken together, these data suggest that A2BR-mediated induction of IL-6 contributes to renal fibrogenesis and shows potential therapeutic targets for CKD. PMID:21511827

  12. Phylogeography of Y-chromosome haplogroup O3a2b2-N6 reveals patrilineal traces of Austronesian populations on the eastern coastal regions of Asia

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Yik-Ying; Huang, Yun-Zhi; Wang, Ling-Xiang; Yu, Ge; Saw, Woei-Yuh; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Lu, Yan; Zhang, Chao; Xu, Shu-Hua; Jin, Li; Li, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Austronesian diffusion is considered one of the greatest dispersals in human history; it led to the peopling of an extremely vast region, ranging from Madagascar in the Indian Ocean to Easter Island in Remote Oceania. The Y-chromosome haplogroup O3a2b*-P164(xM134), a predominant paternal lineage of Austronesian populations, is found at high frequencies in Polynesian populations. However, the internal phylogeny of this haplogroup remains poorly investigated. In this study, we analyzed -seventeen Y-chromosome sequences of haplogroup O3a2b*-P164(xM134) and generated a revised phylogenetic tree of this lineage based on 310 non-private Y-chromosome polymorphisms. We discovered that all available O3a2b*-P164(xM134) samples belong to the newly defined haplogroup O3a2b2-N6 and samples from Austronesian populations belong to the sublineage O3a2b2a2-F706. Additionally, we genotyped a series of Y-chromosome polymorphisms in a large collection of samples from China. We confirmed that the sublineage O3a2b2a2b-B451 is unique to Austronesian populations. We found that O3a2b2-N6 samples are widely distributed on the eastern coastal regions of Asia, from Korea to Vietnam. Furthermore, we propose- that the O3a2b2a2b-B451 lineage represents a genetic connection between ancestors of Austronesian populations and ancient populations in North China, where foxtail millet was domesticated about 11,000 years ago. The large number of newly defined Y-chromosome polymorphisms and the revised phylogenetic tree of O3a2b2-N6 will be helpful to explore the origin of proto-Austronesians and the early diffusion process of Austronesian populations. PMID:28380021

  13. Purification and characterization of Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pestis LcrV-cholera toxin A(2)/B chimeras.

    PubMed

    Tinker, Juliette K; Davis, Chadwick T; Arlian, Britni M

    2010-11-01

    Yersinia pestis is a virulent human pathogen and potential biological weapon. Despite a long history of research on this organism, there is no licensed vaccine to protect against pneumonic forms of Y. pestis disease. In the present study, plasmids were constructed to express cholera toxin A(2)/B chimeric molecules containing the LcrV protective antigen from Yersinia enterocolitica and Y. pestis. These chimeras were expressed and purified to high yields from the supernatant of transformed Escherichia coli. Western and GM(1) ELISA assays were used to characterize the composition, receptor-binding and relative stability of the LcrV-CTA(2)/B chimera in comparison to cholera toxin. In addition, we investigated the ability of the Y. pestis LcrV-CTA(2)/B chimera to bind to and internalize into cultured epithelial cells and macrophages by confocal microscopy. These studies indicate that the uptake and trafficking of the LcrV antigen from the chimera is comparable to the trafficking of native toxin. Together these findings report that stable, receptor-binding, non-toxic LcrV-cholera toxin A(2)/B chimeras can be expressed at high levels in E. coli and purified from the supernatant. In addition, the internalization of antigen in vitro reported here supports the development of these molecules as novel mucosal vaccine candidates. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Purification and characterization of Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pestis LcrV–cholera toxin A2/B chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Chadwick T.; Arlian, Britni M.

    2010-01-01

    Yersinia pestis is a virulent human pathogen and potential biological weapon. Despite a long history of research on this organism, there is no licensed vaccine to protect against pneumonic forms of Y. pestis disease. In the present study, plasmids were constructed to express cholera toxin A2/B chimeric molecules containing the LcrV protective antigen from Y. enterocolitica and Y. pestis. These chimeras were expressed and purified to high yields from the supernatant of transformed E. coli. Western and GM1 ELISA assays were used to characterize the composition, receptor-binding and relative stability of the LcrV-CTA2/B chimera in comparison to cholera toxin. In addition, we investigated the ability of the Y. pestis LcrV-CTA2/B chimera to bind to and internalize into cultured epithelial cells and macrophages by confocal microscopy. These studies indicate that the uptake and trafficking of the LcrV antigen from the chimera is comparable to the trafficking of native toxin. Together these findings report that stable, receptor-binding, non-toxic LcrV-cholera toxin A2/B chimeras can be expressed at high levels in E. coli and purified from the supernatant. In addition, the internalization of antigen in vitro reported here supports the development of these molecules as novel mucosal vaccine candidates. PMID:20438844

  15. A PCV2 vaccine based on genotype 2b is more effective than a 2a-based vaccine to protect against PCV2b or combined PCV2a/2b viremia in pigs with concurrent PCV2, PRRSV and PPV infection.

    PubMed

    Opriessnig, Tanja; O'Neill, Kevin; Gerber, Priscilla F; de Castro, Alessandra M M G; Gimenéz-Lirola, Luis G; Beach, Nathan M; Zhou, Lei; Meng, Xiang-Jin; Wang, Chong; Halbur, Patrick G

    2013-01-07

    The predominant genotype of porcine circovirus (PCV) in the pig population today is PCV2b yet PCV2a-based commercial vaccines are considered effective in protecting against porcine circovirus associated disease. The objective of this study was to compare the ability of PCV2a- and PCV2b-based vaccines to control PCV2b viremia in a challenge model that mimics the U.S. field situation. Sixty-three pigs were randomly assigned to one of eight groups. Sixteen pigs were vaccinated with an experimental live-attenuated chimeric PCV1-2a vaccine based on genotype 2a and another 16 pigs with a chimeric PCV1-2b vaccine based on genotype 2b. Challenge was done 28 days post vaccination (dpv) using PCV2b (or a combination of PCV2a and PCV2b), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), and porcine parvovirus (PPV) to mimic what commonly occurs in the field. The experiment was terminated 21 days post challenge (dpc) or 49dpv. Pigs vaccinated with the chimeric PCV1-2b vaccine had significantly higher levels of PCV1-2b viremia and shedding of the PCV1-2b vaccine virus in feces and nasal secretions but also a more robust humoral immune response as evidenced by significantly higher ELISA S/P ratios compared to the PCV1-2a vaccination. Regardless of challenge, the PCV1-2b vaccination significantly reduced the prevalence and amount of PCV2 viremia compared to the PCV1-2a vaccination. Interestingly, in the non-vaccinated pigs concurrent PCV2a infection resulted in clinical disease and increased macroscopic lung lesions compared to pigs challenged with PCV2b alone, further supporting the idea that concurrent PCV2a/PCV2b infection is necessary for optimal PCV2 replication. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Immunodiagnosis of tumors in vivo using radiolabeled monoclonal antibody A2B5

    SciTech Connect

    Reintgen, D.S.; Shimizu, K.; Coleman, E.

    1983-07-01

    Recently a murine monoclonal antibody (A2B5) has been described that reacts with a membrane associated GQ ganglioside common to peptide secreting normal cells and tumors. In vitro binding data demonstrated the presence of this ganglioside on neurons, adrenal medulla, and pancreatic islets, along with neuroendocrine tumors such as insulinomas, pheochromocytomas, melanomas and neuroblastomas. Negative binding has previously been shown for tissue sections from liver, kidney, colon, lung, stomach, and tumors not derived from the neural crest. Because of the specificity at A2B5 in vitro, this monoclonal antibody was labeled with /sup 131/I for in vivo tumor localization studies. Daily radionuclearmore » scans were obtained in 5 KX rats bearing the radiation induced rat insulinoma with disappearance of the label from the blood pool and concentration in the tumor so that by the fourth day, the only activity present by scan was in the insulinoma. In addition A2B5 also localized to five different human melanoma cells lines grown in nude mice with high tumor/blood levels compared to normal tissues, while no localization is seen in nudes carrying osteosarcomas, colon, bladder, and renal cell carcinomas. In addition antibody A2B5 did not concentrate in any normal tissue though the antigen is present on several. The finding that A2B5 reacts across species lines (mouse, rat, man) lends itself to obvious diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities.« less

  17. Textbook Evaluation: An Analysis of Listening Comprehension Parts in Top Notch 2A & 2B

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soori, Afshin; Haghani, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Textbooks are the instruments that assist both teachers and learners in process of second language learning. With respect to the importance of textbooks in a language course, evaluation of course books is a significant issue for most researchers. The present study investigated and analyzed Listening Comprehension parts in Top Notch 2A & 2B 2nd…

  18. Receptor-based 3D QSAR analysis of estrogen receptor ligands - merging the accuracy of receptor-based alignments with the computational efficiency of ligand-based methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sippl, Wolfgang

    2000-08-01

    One of the major challenges in computational approaches to drug design is the accurate prediction of binding affinity of biomolecules. In the present study several prediction methods for a published set of estrogen receptor ligands are investigated and compared. The binding modes of 30 ligands were determined using the docking program AutoDock and were compared with available X-ray structures of estrogen receptor-ligand complexes. On the basis of the docking results an interaction energy-based model, which uses the information of the whole ligand-receptor complex, was generated. Several parameters were modified in order to analyze their influence onto the correlation between binding affinities and calculated ligand-receptor interaction energies. The highest correlation coefficient ( r 2 = 0.617, q 2 LOO = 0.570) was obtained considering protein flexibility during the interaction energy evaluation. The second prediction method uses a combination of receptor-based and 3D quantitative structure-activity relationships (3D QSAR) methods. The ligand alignment obtained from the docking simulations was taken as basis for a comparative field analysis applying the GRID/GOLPE program. Using the interaction field derived with a water probe and applying the smart region definition (SRD) variable selection, a significant and robust model was obtained ( r 2 = 0.991, q 2 LOO = 0.921). The predictive ability of the established model was further evaluated by using a test set of six additional compounds. The comparison with the generated interaction energy-based model and with a traditional CoMFA model obtained using a ligand-based alignment ( r 2 = 0.951, q 2 LOO = 0.796) indicates that the combination of receptor-based and 3D QSAR methods is able to improve the quality of the underlying model.

  19. Ligand- and receptor-based docking with LiBELa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos Muniz, Heloisa; Nascimento, Alessandro S.

    2015-08-01

    Methodologies on molecular docking are constantly improving. The problem consists on finding an optimal interplay between the computational cost and a satisfactory physical description of ligand-receptor interaction. In pursuit of an advance in current methods we developed a mixed docking approach combining ligand- and receptor-based strategies in a docking engine, where tridimensional descriptors for shape and charge distribution of a reference ligand guide the initial placement of the docking molecule and an interaction energy-based global minimization follows. This hybrid docking was evaluated with soft-core and force field potentials taking into account ligand pose and scoring. Our approach was found to be competitive to a purely receptor-based dock resulting in improved logAUC values when evaluated with DUD and DUD-E. Furthermore, the smoothed potential as evaluated here, was not advantageous when ligand binding poses were compared to experimentally determined conformations. In conclusion we show that a combination of ligand- and receptor-based strategy docking with a force field energy model results in good reproduction of binding poses and enrichment of active molecules against decoys. This strategy is implemented in our tool, LiBELa, available to the scientific community.

  20. Isolation and characteristics of CD133‑/A2B5+ and CD133‑/A2B5‑ cells from the SHG139s cell line.

    PubMed

    Han, Yong; Wang, Hangzhou; Huang, Yulun; Cheng, Zhe; Sun, Ting; Chen, Guilin; Xie, Xueshun; Zhou, Youxin; Du, Ziwei

    2015-12-01

    In glioma tissues, there are small cell populations with the capability of sustaining tumor formation. These cells are referred to as glioma stem cells (GSCs). However, the presence of subpopulations of GSCs, and the differences between each subpopulation remain to be fully elucidated. In the present study, CD133‑/A2B5‑ and CD133‑/A2B5+ cells from the SHG139 GSC cell line (SHG139s) were isolated using magnetic‑activated cell sorting. Following xenografting into nude mice, the two isolated subpopulations generated tumors. The characteristics of the two subpopulations were investigated extensively, and it was found that the two exhibited cancer stem cell characteristics. These cells expressed stem cell markers, exhibited a neurosphere‑like appearance, and were found to exhibit self‑renewal and multipotency capabilities. Subsequently, the self‑renewal and proliferation abilities of the two subpopulations were compared. It was found that the A2B5‑ cells had a higher proliferative index and a higher self‑renewal ability, compared with the A2B5+ cells. In addition, the A2B5‑ cells exhibited increased angiogenic ability. However, the invasion ability of the A2B5+ cells was higher than that of the A2B5‑ cells. Taken together, the results of the present study suggested that there are different cell subpopulations in GSCs, and each subpopulation has its own properties.

  1. An evolution based biosensor receptor DNA sequence generation algorithm.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eungyeong; Lee, Malrey; Gatton, Thomas M; Lee, Jaewan; Zang, Yupeng

    2010-01-01

    A biosensor is composed of a bioreceptor, an associated recognition molecule, and a signal transducer that can selectively detect target substances for analysis. DNA based biosensors utilize receptor molecules that allow hybridization with the target analyte. However, most DNA biosensor research uses oligonucleotides as the target analytes and does not address the potential problems of real samples. The identification of recognition molecules suitable for real target analyte samples is an important step towards further development of DNA biosensors. This study examines the characteristics of DNA used as bioreceptors and proposes a hybrid evolution-based DNA sequence generating algorithm, based on DNA computing, to identify suitable DNA bioreceptor recognition molecules for stable hybridization with real target substances. The Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP) approach is applied in the proposed algorithm to evaluate the safety and fitness of the generated DNA sequences. This approach improves efficiency and stability for enhanced and variable-length DNA sequence generation and allows extension to generation of variable-length DNA sequences with diverse receptor recognition requirements.

  2. Novel cell-based odorant sensor elements based on insect odorant receptors.

    PubMed

    Mitsuno, Hidefumi; Sakurai, Takeshi; Namiki, Shigehiro; Mitsuhashi, Hiroyuki; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2015-03-15

    Development of cell-based odorant sensor elements combined not only high degree of sensitivity and selectivity but also long-term stability is crucial for their practical applications. Here we report the development of a novel cell-based odorant sensor element that sensitively and selectively detects odorants and displays increased fluorescent intensities over a long period of time. Our odorant sensor elements, based on Sf21 cell lines expressing insect odorant receptors, are sensitive to the level of several tens of parts per billion in solution, can selectively distinguish between different types of odorants based on the odorant selectivity intrinsic to the expressed receptors, and have response times of approximately 13s. Specifically, with the use of Sf21 cells and insect odorant receptors, we demonstrated that the established cell lines stably expressing insect odorant receptors are able to detect odorants with consistent responsiveness for at least 2 months, thus exceeding the short life-span normally associated with cell-based sensors. We also demonstrated the development of a compact odorant sensor chip by integrating the established insect cell lines into a microfluidic chip. The methodology we established in this study, in conjunction with the large repertoire of insect odorant receptors, will aid in the development of practical cell-based odorant sensors for various applications, including food administration and health management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. High-pressure behavior of A 2 B 2 O 7 pyrochlore (A=Eu, Dy; B=Ti, Zr)

    SciTech Connect

    Rittman, Dylan R.; Turner, Katlyn M.; Park, Sulgiye

    2017-01-24

    In situ high-pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were used to determine the influence of composition on the high-pressure behavior of A 2B 2O 7 pyrochlore (A = Eu, Dy; B = Ti, Zr) up to ~50 GPa. Based on X-ray diffraction results, all compositions transformed to the high-pressure cotunnite structure. The B-site cation species had a larger effect on the transition pressure than the A-site cation species, with the onset of the phase transformation occurring at ~41 GPa for B = Ti and ~16 GPa B = Zr. But, the A-site cation affected the kinetics of the phase transformation,more » with the transformation for compositions with the smaller ionic radii, i.e., A = Dy, proceeding faster than those with a larger ionic radii, i.e., A = Eu. Our results were consistent with previous work in which the radius-ratio of the A- and B-site cations determined the energetics of disordering, and compositions with more similarly sized A- and B-site cations had a lower defect formation energy. Raman spectra revealed differences in the degree of short-range order of the different compositions. Due to the large phase fraction of cotunnite at high pressure for B = Zr compositions, Raman modes for cotunnite could be observed, with more modes recorded for A = Eu than A = Dy. These additional modes are attributed to increased short-to-medium range ordering in the initially pyrochlore structured Eu 2Zr 2O 7 as compared with the initially defect-fluorite structured Dy 2Zr 2O 7.« less

  4. High-pressure behavior of A 2 B 2 O 7 pyrochlore (A=Eu, Dy; B=Ti, Zr)

    SciTech Connect

    Rittman, Dylan R.; Turner, Katlyn M.; Park, Sulgiye

    2017-01-28

    In situ high-pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were used to determine the influence of composition on the high-pressure behavior of A 2B 2O 7 pyrochlore (A=Eu, Dy; B=Ti, Zr) up to ~50GPa. Based on X-ray diffraction results, all compositions transformed to the high-pressure cotunnite structure. The B-site cation species had a larger effect on the transition pressure than the A-site cation species, with the onset of the phase transformation occurring at ~41 GPa for B=Ti and ~16 GPa B=Zr. However, the A-site cation affected the kinetics of the phase transformation, with the transformation for compositions with the smaller ionicmore » radii, i.e., A=Dy, proceeding faster than those with a larger ionic radii, i.e., A=Eu. These results were consistent with previous work in which the radius-ratio of the A- and B-site cations determined the energetics of disordering, and compositions with more similarly sized A- and B-site cations had a lower defect formation energy. Raman spectra revealed differences in the degree of short-range order of the different compositions. Due to the large phase fraction of cotunnite at high pressure for B=Zr compositions, Raman modes for cotunnite could be observed, with more modes recorded for A=Eu than A=Dy. These additional modes are attributed to increased short-to-medium range ordering in the initially pyrochlore structured Eu 2Zr 2O 7 as compared with the initially defect-fluorite structured Dy 2Zr 2O 7.« less

  5. Phenyl boron-based compounds as anion receptors for non-aqueous battery electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Hung Sui; Yang, Xiao-Qing; McBreen, James; Sun, Xuehui

    2002-01-01

    Novel fluorinated boronate-based compounds which act as anion receptors in non-aqueous battery electrolytes are provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the fluorinated boronate-based compounds of the invention enhance ionic conductivity and cation transference number of non-aqueous electrolytes. The fluorinated boronate-based anion receptors include different fluorinated alkyl and aryl groups.

  6. Structure-based receptor MIMICS targeted against bacterial superantigen toxins

    DOEpatents

    Gupta, Goutam [Santa Fe, NM; Hong-Geller, Elizabeth [Los Alamos, NM; Shiflett, Patrick R [Los Alamos, NM; Lehnert, Nancy M [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-08-18

    The invention provides therapeutic compositions useful in the treatment of bacterial superantigen mediated conditions, such as Toxic Shock Syndrome. The compositions comprise genetically engineered bifunctional polypeptides containing a specific T-cell receptor binding domain and a specific MHC class II receptor binding domain, each targeting non-overlapping epitopes on a superantigen molecule against which they are designed. The anti-superantigen "receptor mimetics" or "chimeras" are rationally designed to recreate the modality of superantigen binding directly to both the TCR and the MHC-II receptor, and are capable of acting as decoys for superantigen binding, effectively out-competing the host T-cell and MHC-II receptors, the natural host receptors.

  7. Dimer-based model for heptaspanning membrane receptors.

    PubMed

    Franco, Rafael; Casadó, Vicent; Mallol, Josefa; Ferré, Sergi; Fuxe, Kjell; Cortés, Antonio; Ciruela, Francisco; Lluis, Carmen; Canela, Enric I

    2005-07-01

    The existence of intramembrane receptor-receptor interactions for heptaspanning membrane receptors is now fully accepted, but a model considering dimers as the basic unit that binds to two ligand molecules is lacking. Here, we propose a two-state-dimer model in which the ligand-induced conformational changes from one component of the dimer are communicated to the other. Our model predicts cooperativity in binding, which is relevant because the other current models fail to address this phenomenon satisfactorily. Our two-state-dimer model also predicts the variety of responses elicited by full or partial agonists, neutral antagonists and inverse agonists. This model can aid our understanding of the operation of heptaspanning receptors and receptor channels, and, potentially, be important for improving the treatment of cardiovascular, neurological and neuropsychyatric diseases.

  8. Global Profiling of hnRNP A2/B1-RNA Binding on Chromatin Highlights LncRNA Interactions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Eric D; Balas, Maggie M; Griffin, April M; Roberts, Justin T; Johnson, Aaron M

    2018-06-23

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) often carry out their functions through associations with adaptor proteins. We recently identified heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A2/B1 as an adaptor of the human HOTAIR lncRNA. hnRNP A2 and B1 are splice isoforms of the same gene. The spliced version of HOTAIR preferentially associates with the B1 isoform, which we hypothesize contributes to RNA-RNA matching between HOTAIR and transcripts of target genes in breast cancer. Here we used enhanced cross-linking immunoprecipitation (eCLIP) to map the direct interactions between A2/B1 and RNA in breast cancer cells. Despite differing by only twelve amino acids, the A2 and B1 splice isoforms associate preferentially with distinct populations of RNA in vivo. Through cellular fractionation experiments we characterize the pattern of RNA association in chromatin, nucleoplasm, and cytoplasm. We find that a majority of interactions occur on chromatin, even those that do not contribute to co-transcriptional splicing. A2/B1 binding site locations on multiple RNAs hint at a contribution to the regulation and function of lncRNAs. Surprisingly, the strongest A2/B1 binding site occurs in a retained intron of HOTAIR, which interrupts an RNA-RNA interaction hotspot. In vitro eCLIP experiments highlight additional exonic B1 binding sites in HOTAIR which also surround the RNA-RNA interaction hotspot. Interestingly, a version of HOTAIR with the intron retained is still capable of making RNA-RNA interactions in vitro through the hotspot region. Our data further characterize the multiple functions of a repurposed splicing factor with isoform-biased interactions, and highlight that the majority of these functions occur on chromatin-associated RNA.

  9. Characterization of a symbol rate timing recovery technique for a 2B1Q digital receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboulnasr, T.; Hage, M.; Sayar, B.; Aly, S.

    1994-02-01

    This paper presents a study of several implementations of the Mueller and Muller symbol rate timing recovery algorithm for ISDN transmission over digital subscriber loops (DSL). Implementations of this algorithm using various estimates of a specified timing function are investigated. It will be shown that despite the fact that all of the estimates considered are derived based on one set of conditions, their performance varies widely in a real system. The intrinsic properties of these estimates are first analyzed, then their performance on real subscriber loops is studied through extensive simulations of a practical digital receiver. The effect of various system parameters such as channel distortion and additive noise are included. Possible sources of convergence problems are also identified and corrective action proposed.

  10. Structure-based discovery and binding site analysis of histamine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Róbert; Keserű, György M

    2016-12-01

    The application of structure-based drug discovery in histamine receptor projects was previously hampered by the lack of experimental structures. The publication of the first X-ray structure of the histamine H1 receptor has been followed by several successful virtual screens and binding site analysis studies of H1-antihistamines. This structure together with several other recently solved aminergic G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) enabled the development of more realistic homology models for H2, H3 and H4 receptors. Areas covered: In this paper, the authors review the development of histamine receptor models and their application in drug discovery. Expert opinion: In the authors' opinion, the application of atomistic histamine receptor models has played a significant role in understanding key ligand-receptor interactions as well as in the discovery of novel chemical starting points. The recently solved H1 receptor structure is a major milestone in structure-based drug discovery; however, our analysis also demonstrates that for building H3 and H4 receptor homology models, other GPCRs may be more suitable as templates. For these receptors, the authors envisage that the development of higher quality homology models will significantly contribute to the discovery and optimization of novel H3 and H4 ligands.

  11. Deprescribing benzodiazepine receptor agonists: Evidence-based clinical practice guideline.

    PubMed

    Pottie, Kevin; Thompson, Wade; Davies, Simon; Grenier, Jean; Sadowski, Cheryl A; Welch, Vivian; Holbrook, Anne; Boyd, Cynthia; Swenson, Robert; Ma, Andy; Farrell, Barbara

    2018-05-01

    To develop an evidence-based guideline to help clinicians make decisions about when and how to safely taper and stop benzodiazepine receptor agonists (BZRAs); to focus on the highest level of evidence available and seek input from primary care professionals in the guideline development, review, and endorsement processes. The overall team comprised 8 clinicians (1 family physician, 2 psychiatrists, 1 clinical psychologist, 1 clinical pharmacologist, 2 clinical pharmacists, and 1 geriatrician) and a methodologist; members disclosed conflicts of interest. For guideline development, a systematic process was used, including the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) approach. Evidence was generated by conducting a systematic review of BZRA deprescribing trials for insomnia, as well as performing a review of reviews of the harms of continued BZRA use and narrative syntheses of patient preferences and resource implications. This evidence and GRADE quality of evidence ratings were used to generate recommendations. The team refined guideline content and recommendations through consensus and synthesized clinical considerations to address front-line clinician questions. The draft guideline was reviewed by clinicians and stakeholders. We recommend that deprescribing (tapering slowly) of BZRAs be offered to elderly adults (≥ 65 years) who take BZRAs, regardless of duration of use, and suggest that deprescribing (tapering slowly) be offered to adults aged 18 to 64 who have used BZRAs for more than 4 weeks. These recommendations apply to patients who use BZRAs to treat insomnia on its own (primary insomnia) or comorbid insomnia where potential underlying comorbidities are effectively managed. This guideline does not apply to those with other sleep disorders or untreated anxiety, depression, or other physical or mental health conditions that might be causing or aggravating insomnia. Benzodiazepine receptor agonists are associated with harms

  12. Ligand-biased ensemble receptor docking (LigBEnD): a hybrid ligand/receptor structure-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Polo C.-H.; Abagyan, Ruben; Totrov, Maxim

    2018-01-01

    Ligand docking to flexible protein molecules can be efficiently carried out through ensemble docking to multiple protein conformations, either from experimental X-ray structures or from in silico simulations. The success of ensemble docking often requires the careful selection of complementary protein conformations, through docking and scoring of known co-crystallized ligands. False positives, in which a ligand in a wrong pose achieves a better docking score than that of native pose, arise as additional protein conformations are added. In the current study, we developed a new ligand-biased ensemble receptor docking method and composite scoring function which combine the use of ligand-based atomic property field (APF) method with receptor structure-based docking. This method helps us to correctly dock 30 out of 36 ligands presented by the D3R docking challenge. For the six mis-docked ligands, the cognate receptor structures prove to be too different from the 40 available experimental Pocketome conformations used for docking and could be identified only by receptor sampling beyond experimentally explored conformational subspace.

  13. Utilization of the Tango beta-arrestin recruitment technology for cell-based EDG receptor assay development and interrogation.

    PubMed

    Wetter, Justin A; Revankar, Chetana; Hanson, Bonnie J

    2009-10-01

    Cellular assay development for the endothelial differentiation gene (EDG) family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and related lysophospholipid (LP) receptors is complicated by endogenous receptor expression and divergent receptor signaling. Endogenously expressed LP receptors exist in most tissue culture cell lines. These LP receptors, along with other endogenously expressed GPCRs, contribute to off-target signaling that can complicate interpretation of second-messenger-based cellular assay results. These receptors also activate a diverse and divergent set of cellular signaling pathways, necessitating the use of a variety of assay formats with mismatched procedures and functional readouts. This complicates examination and comparison of these receptors across the entire family. The Tango technology uses the conserved beta-arrestin-dependent receptor deactivation process to allow interrogation of the EDG and related receptors with a single functional assay. This method also isolates the target receptor signal, allowing the use of tissue culture cell lines regardless of their endogenous receptor expression. The authors describe the use of this technique to build cell-based receptor-specific assays for all 8 members of the EDG receptor family as well as the related LPA receptors GPR23, GPR92, and GPR87. In addition, they demonstrate the value of this technology for identification and investigation of functionally selective receptor compounds as demonstrated by the immunosuppressive compound FtY720-P and its action at the EDG(1) and EDG(3) receptors.

  14. Discovery of spiropiperidine-based potent and selective Orexin-2 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Tatsuhiko; Tomata, Yoshihide; Kunitomo, Jun; Hirozane, Mariko; Marui, Shogo

    2011-11-01

    To generate novel human Orexin-2 Receptor (OX2R) antagonists, a spiropiperidine based scaffold was designed and a SAR study was carried out. Compound 4f possessed the highest OX2R antagonistic activity with an IC(50) value of 3nM with 450-fold selectivity against Orexin-1 Receptor (OX1R). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Similarity- and Substructure-Based Development of β2-Adrenergic Receptor Ligands Based on Unusual Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) and a well-explored target. Here, we report the discovery of 13 ligands, ten of which are novel, of this particular GPCR. They have been identified by similarity- and substructure-based searches using multiple ligands, which were described in an earlier study, as starting points. Of note, two of the molecules used as queries here distinguish themselves from other β2AR antagonists by their unique scaffold. The molecules described in this work allow us to explore the ligand space around the previously reported molecules in greater detail, leading to insights into their structure–activity relationship. We also report experimental binding and selectivity data and putative binding modes for the novel molecules. PMID:28523097

  16. Density functional theory and conductivity studies of boron-based anion receptors

    DOE PAGES

    Leung, Kevin; Chaudhari, Mangesh I.; Rempe, Susan B.; ...

    2015-07-10

    Anion receptors that bind strongly to fluoride anions in organic solvents can help dissolve the lithium fluoride discharge products of primary carbon monofluoride (CFx) batteries, thereby preventing the clogging of cathode surfaces and improving ion conductivity. The receptors are also potentially beneficial to rechargeable lithium ion and lithium air batteries. We apply Density Functional Theory (DFT) to show that an oxalate-based pentafluorophenyl-boron anion receptor binds as strongly, or more strongly, to fluoride anions than many phenyl-boron anion receptors proposed in the literature. Experimental data shows marked improvement in electrolyte conductivity when this oxalate anion receptor is present. The receptor ismore » sufficiently electrophilic that organic solvent molecules compete with F – for boron-site binding, and specific solvent effects must be considered when predicting its F – affinity. To further illustrate the last point, we also perform computational studies on a geometrically constrained boron ester that exhibits much stronger gas-phase affinity for both F – and organic solvent molecules. After accounting for specific solvent effects, however, its net F – affinity is about the same as the simple oxalate-based anion receptor. Lastly, we propose that LiF dissolution in cyclic carbonate organic solvents, in the absence of anion receptors, is due mostly to the formation of ionic aggregates, not isolated F – ions.« less

  17. FRET-based sensors for the human M1-, M3-, and M5-acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Nicole; Bätz, Julia; Zabel, Ulrike; Lohse, Martin J; Hoffmann, Carsten

    2011-02-01

    Based on the recently developed approach to generate fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based sensors to measure GPCR activation, we generated sensor constructs for the human M(1)-, M(3)-, and M(5)-acetylcholine receptor. The receptors were labeled with cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) at their C-terminus, and with fluorescein arsenical hairpin binder (FlAsH) via tetra-cysteine tags inserted in the third intracellular loop. We then measured FRET between the donor CFP and the acceptor FlAsH in living cells and real time. Agonists like acetylcholine, carbachol, or muscarine activate each receptor construct with half-maximal activation times between 60 and 70ms. Removal of the agonist caused the reversal of the signal. Compared with all other agonists, oxotremorine M differed in two major aspects: it caused significantly slower signals at M(1)- and M(5)-acetylcholine receptors and the amplitude of these signals was larger at the M(1)-acetylcholine receptor. Concentration-response curves for the agonists reveal that all agonists tested, with the mentioned exception of oxotremorine M, caused similar maximal FRET-changes as acetylcholine for the M(1)-, M(3)- and M(5)-acetylcholine receptor constructs. Taken together our data support the notion that orthosteric agonists behave similar at different muscarinic receptor subtypes but that kinetic differences can be observed for receptor activation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Implementation of a Fluorescence-Based Screening Assay Identifies Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists Clobenpropit and Iodophenpropit as Subunit-Selective N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Kasper B.; Mullasseril, Praseeda; Dawit, Sara; Kurtkaya, Natalie L.; Yuan, Hongjie; Vance, Katie M.; Orr, Anna G.; Kvist, Trine; Ogden, Kevin K.; Le, Phuong; Vellano, Kimberly M.; Lewis, Iestyn; Kurtkaya, Serdar; Du, Yuhong; Qui, Min; Murphy, T. J.; Snyder, James P.; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2010-01-01

    N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate a slow, Ca2+-permeable component of excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system and play a pivotal role in synaptic plasticity, neuronal development, and several neurological diseases. We describe a fluorescence-based assay that measures NMDA receptor-mediated changes in intracellular calcium in a BHK-21 cell line stably expressing NMDA receptor NR2D with NR1 under the control of a tetracycline-inducible promoter (Tet-On). The assay selectively identifies allosteric modulators by using supramaximal concentrations of glutamate and glycine to minimize detection of competitive antagonists. The assay is validated by successfully identifying known noncompetitive, but not competitive NMDA receptor antagonists among 1800 screened compounds from two small focused libraries, including the commercially available library of pharmacologically active compounds. Hits from the primary screen are validated through a secondary screen that used two-electrode voltage-clamp recordings on recombinant NMDA receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. This strategy identified several novel modulators of NMDA receptor function, including the histamine H3 receptor antagonists clobenpropit and iodophenpropit, as well as the vanilloid receptor transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1) antagonist capsazepine. These compounds are noncompetitive antagonists and the histamine H3 receptor ligand showed submicromolar potency at NR1/NR2B NMDA receptors, which raises the possibility that compounds can be developed that act with high potency on both glutamate and histamine receptor systems simultaneously. Furthermore, it is possible that some actions attributed to histamine H3 receptor inhibition in vivo may also involve NMDA receptor antagonism. PMID:20197375

  19. AMP is an adenosine A1 receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Rittiner, Joseph E; Korboukh, Ilia; Hull-Ryde, Emily A; Jin, Jian; Janzen, William P; Frye, Stephen V; Zylka, Mark J

    2012-02-17

    Numerous receptors for ATP, ADP, and adenosine exist; however, it is currently unknown whether a receptor for the related nucleotide adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) exists. Using a novel cell-based assay to visualize adenosine receptor activation in real time, we found that AMP and a non-hydrolyzable AMP analog (deoxyadenosine 5'-monophosphonate, ACP) directly activated the adenosine A(1) receptor (A(1)R). In contrast, AMP only activated the adenosine A(2B) receptor (A(2B)R) after hydrolysis to adenosine by ecto-5'-nucleotidase (NT5E, CD73) or prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP, ACPP). Adenosine and AMP were equipotent human A(1)R agonists in our real-time assay and in a cAMP accumulation assay. ACP also depressed cAMP levels in mouse cortical neurons through activation of endogenous A(1)R. Non-selective purinergic receptor antagonists (pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid and suramin) did not block adenosine- or AMP-evoked activation. Moreover, mutation of His-251 in the human A(1)R ligand binding pocket reduced AMP potency without affecting adenosine potency. In contrast, mutation of a different binding pocket residue (His-278) eliminated responses to AMP and to adenosine. Taken together, our study indicates that the physiologically relevant nucleotide AMP is a full agonist of A(1)R. In addition, our study suggests that some of the physiological effects of AMP may be direct, and not indirect through ectonucleotidases that hydrolyze this nucleotide to adenosine.

  20. Structure-Based Virtual Screening for Dopamine D2 Receptor Ligands as Potential Antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Silva, Andrea G; Loza, María I; Kolb, Peter; Castro, Marián; Poso, Antti

    2016-04-05

    Structure-based virtual screening using a D2 receptor homology model was performed to identify dopamine D2 receptor ligands as potential antipsychotics. From screening a library of 6.5 million compounds, 21 were selected and were subjected to experimental validation. From these 21 compounds tested, ten D2 ligands were identified (47.6% success rate, among them D2 receptor antagonists, as expected) that have additional affinity for other receptors tested, in particular 5-HT2A receptors. The affinity (Ki values) of the compounds ranged from 58 nm to about 24 μM. Similarity and fragment analysis indicated a significant degree of structural novelty among the identified compounds. We found one D2 receptor antagonist that did not have a protonatable nitrogen atom, which is a key structural element of the classical D2 pharmacophore model necessary for interaction with the conserved Asp(3.32) residue. This compound exhibited greater than 20-fold binding selectivity for the D2 receptor over the D3 receptor. We provide additional evidence that the amide hydrogen atom of this compound forms a hydrogen bond with Asp(3.32), as determined by tests of its derivatives that cannot maintain this interaction. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of indole-based sigma receptor ligands

    PubMed Central

    Mésangeau, Christophe; Amata, Emanuele; Alsharif, Walid; Seminerio, Michael J.; Robson, Matthew J.; Matsumoto, Rae R.; Poupaert, Jacques H.; McCurdy, Christopher R.

    2011-01-01

    A series of novel indole-based analogues were prepared and their affinities for sigma receptors were determined using in vitro radioligand binding assays. The results of this study identified several compounds with nanomolar sigma-2 affinity and significant selectivity over sigma-1 receptors. In particular, 2-(4-(3-(4-fluorophenyl)indol-1-yl)butyl)-6,7-dimethoxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (9f) was found to display high affinity at sigma-2 receptors with good selectivity (σ-1/σ-2 = 395). The pharmacological binding profile for this compound was established with other relevant nonsigma sites. PMID:21899931

  2. Uncovering Molecular Bases Underlying Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptor Inhibitor Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Alsamarah, Abdelaziz; LaCuran, Alecander E.; Oelschlaeger, Peter; Hao, Jijun; Luo, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal alteration of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling is implicated in many types of diseases including cancer and heterotopic ossifications. Hence, small molecules targeting BMP type I receptors (BMPRI) to interrupt BMP signaling are believed to be an effective approach to treat these diseases. However, lack of understanding of the molecular determinants responsible for the binding selectivity of current BMP inhibitors has been a big hindrance to the development of BMP inhibitors for clinical use. To address this issue, we carried out in silico experiments to test whether computational methods can reproduce and explain the high selectivity of a small molecule BMP inhibitor DMH1 on BMPRI kinase ALK2 vs. the closely related TGF-β type I receptor kinase ALK5 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2 (VEGFR2) tyrosine kinase. We found that, while the rigid docking method used here gave nearly identical binding affinity scores among the three kinases; free energy perturbation coupled with Hamiltonian replica-exchange molecular dynamics (FEP/H-REMD) simulations reproduced the absolute binding free energies in excellent agreement with experimental data. Furthermore, the binding poses identified by FEP/H-REMD led to a quantitative analysis of physical/chemical determinants governing DMH1 selectivity. The current work illustrates that small changes in the binding site residue type (e.g. pre-hinge region in ALK2 vs. ALK5) or side chain orientation (e.g. Tyr219 in caALK2 vs. wtALK2), as well as a subtle structural modification on the ligand (e.g. DMH1 vs. LDN193189) will cause distinct binding profiles and selectivity among BMP inhibitors. Therefore, the current computational approach represents a new way of investigating BMP inhibitors. Our results provide critical information for designing exclusively selective BMP inhibitors for the development of effective pharmacotherapy for diseases caused by aberrant BMP signaling. PMID:26133550

  3. A combined ligand-based and target-based drug design approach for G-protein coupled receptors: application to salvinorin A, a selective kappa opioid receptor agonist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Nidhi; Chevé, Gwénaël; Ferguson, David M.; McCurdy, Christopher R.

    2006-08-01

    Combined ligand-based and target-based drug design approaches provide a synergistic advantage over either method individually. Therefore, we set out to develop a powerful virtual screening model to identify novel molecular scaffolds as potential leads for the human KOP (hKOP) receptor employing a combined approach. Utilizing a set of recently reported derivatives of salvinorin A, a structurally unique KOP receptor agonist, a pharmacophore model was developed that consisted of two hydrogen bond acceptor and three hydrophobic features. The model was cross-validated by randomizing the data using the CatScramble technique. Further validation was carried out using a test set that performed well in classifying active and inactive molecules correctly. Simultaneously, a bovine rhodopsin based "agonist-bound" hKOP receptor model was also generated. The model provided more accurate information about the putative binding site of salvinorin A based ligands. Several protein structure-checking programs were used to validate the model. In addition, this model was in agreement with the mutation experiments carried out on KOP receptor. The predictive ability of the model was evaluated by docking a set of known KOP receptor agonists into the active site of this model. The docked scores correlated reasonably well with experimental p K i values. It is hypothesized that the integration of these two independently generated models would enable a swift and reliable identification of new lead compounds that could reduce time and cost of hit finding within the drug discovery and development process, particularly in the case of GPCRs.

  4. Rational design of orally-active, pyrrolidine-based progesterone receptor partial agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Scott K.; Washburn, David G.; Frazee, James S.

    2010-09-03

    Using the X-ray crystal structure of an amide-based progesterone receptor (PR) partial agonist bound to the PR ligand binding domain, a novel PR partial agonist class containing a pyrrolidine ring was designed. Members of this class of N-alkylpyrrolidines demonstrate potent and highly selective partial agonism of the progesterone receptor, and one of these analogs was shown to be efficacious upon oral dosing in the OVX rat model of estrogen opposition.

  5. Tris(2-aminoethyl)amine based tripodal urea receptors for oxalate: encapsulation of staggered vs. planar conformers.

    PubMed

    Bose, Purnandhu; Dutta, Ranjan; Ghosh, Pradyut

    2013-07-28

    Simple tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (TREN) based tripodal urea receptors are investigated for the encapsulation of divalent oxalate (C2O4(2-)) in a semi-aqueous medium. A single crystal X-ray diffraction study shows that the receptor with 3-cyanophenyl functionality captures a staggered conformer whereas the 3-fluorophenyl functionalized receptor encapsulates a less stable planar conformer.

  6. Targeted Segment Transfer from Rye Chromosome 2R to Wheat Chromosomes 2A, 2B, and 7B.

    PubMed

    Ren, Tianheng; Li, Zhi; Yan, Benju; Tan, Feiquan; Tang, Zongxiang; Fu, Shulan; Yang, Manyu; Ren, Zhenglong

    2017-01-01

    Increased chromosome instability was induced by a rye (Secale cereale L.) monosomic 2R chromosome into wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Centromere breakage and telomere dysfunction result in high rates of chromosome aberrations, including breakages, fissions, fusions, deletions, and translocations. Plants with target traits were sequentially selected to produce a breeding population, from which 3 translocation lines with target traits have been selected. In these lines, wheat chromosomes 2A, 2B, and 7B recombined with segments of the rye chromosome arm 2RL. This was detected by FISH analysis using repeat sequences pSc119.2, pAs1 and genomic DNA of rye together as probes. The translocation chromosomes in these lines were named as 2ASMR, 2BSMR, and 7BSMR. The small segments that were transferred into wheat consisted of pSc119.2 repeats and other chromatin regions that conferred resistance to stripe rust and expressed target traits. These translocation lines were highly resistant to stripe rust, and expressed several typical traits that were associated with chromosome arm 2RL, which are better than those of its wheat parent, disomic addition, and substitution lines that show agronomic characteristics. The integration of molecular methods and conventional techniques to improve wheat breeding schemes are discussed. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Structure-based drug design for G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Congreve, Miles; Dias, João M; Marshall, Fiona H

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the structural biology of G protein-coupled receptors has undergone a transformation over the past 5 years. New protein-ligand complexes are described almost monthly in high profile journals. Appreciation of how small molecules and natural ligands bind to their receptors has the potential to impact enormously how medicinal chemists approach this major class of receptor targets. An outline of the key topics in this field and some recent examples of structure- and fragment-based drug design are described. A table is presented with example views of each G protein-coupled receptor for which there is a published X-ray structure, including interactions with small molecule antagonists, partial and full agonists. The possible implications of these new data for drug design are discussed. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Receptor-based screening assays for the detection of antibiotics residues - A review.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Saeed; Ning, Jianan; Cheng, Guyue; Ahmad, Ijaz; Li, Jun; Mingyue, Liu; Qu, Wei; Iqbal, Mujahid; Shabbir, M A B; Yuan, Zonghui

    2017-05-01

    Consumer and regulatory agencies have a high concern to antibiotic residues in food producing animals, so appropriate screening assays of fast, sensitive, low cost, and easy sample preparation for the identification of these residues are essential for the food-safety insurance. Great efforts in the development of a high-throughput antibiotic screening assay have been made in recent years. Concerning the screening of antibiotic residue, this review elaborate an overview on the availability, advancement and applicability of antibiotic receptor based screening assays for the safety assessment of antibiotics usage (i.e. radio receptor assay, enzyme labeling assays, colloidal gold receptor assay, enzyme colorimetry assay and biosensor assay). This manuscript also tries to shed a light on the selection, preparation and future perspective of receptor protein for antibiotic residue detection. These assays have been introduced for the screening of numerous food samples. Receptor based screening technology for antibiotic detection has high accuracy. It has been concluded that at the same time, it can detect a class of drugs for certain receptor, and realize the multi-residue detection. These assays offer fast, easy and precise detection of antibiotics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Receptor-based differences in human aortic smooth muscle cell membrane stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, H.; Kamm, R. D.; So, P. T.; Lee, R. T.

    2001-01-01

    Cells respond to mechanical stimuli with diverse molecular responses. The nature of the sensory mechanism involved in mechanotransduction is not known, but integrins may play an important role. The integrins are linked to both the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix, suggesting that probing cells via integrins should yield different mechanical properties than probing cells via non-cytoskeleton-associated receptors. To test the hypothesis that the mechanical properties of a cell are dependent on the receptor on which the stress is applied, human aortic smooth muscle cells were plated, and magnetic beads, targeted either to the integrins via fibronectin or to the transferrin receptor by use of an IgG antibody, were attached to the cell surface. The resistance of the cell to deformation ("stiffness") was estimated by oscillating the magnetic beads at 1 Hz by use of single-pole magnetic tweezers at 2 different magnitudes. The ratio of bead displacements at different magnitudes was used to explore the mechanical properties of the cells. Cells stressed via the integrins required approximately 10-fold more force to obtain the same bead displacements as the cells stressed via the transferrin receptors. Cells stressed via integrins showed stiffening behavior as the force was increased, whereas this stiffening was significantly less for cells stressed via the transferrin receptor (P<0.001). Mechanical characteristics of vascular smooth muscle cells depend on the receptor by which the stress is applied, with integrin-based linkages demonstrating cell-stiffening behavior.

  10. Ligand-based receptor tyrosine kinase partial agonists: New paradigm for cancer drug discovery?

    PubMed

    Riese, David J

    2011-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are validated targets for oncology drug discovery and several RTK antagonists have been approved for the treatment of human malignancies. Nonetheless, the discovery and development of RTK antagonists has lagged behind the discovery and development of agents that target G-protein coupled receptors. In part, this is because it has been difficult to discover analogs of naturally-occurring RTK agonists that function as antagonists. AREAS COVERED: Here we describe ligands of ErbB receptors that function as partial agonists for these receptors, thereby enabling these ligands to antagonize the activity of full agonists for these receptors. We provide insights into the mechanisms by which these ligands function as antagonists. We discuss how information concerning these mechanisms can be translated into screens for novel small molecule- and antibody-based antagonists of ErbB receptors and how such antagonists hold great potential as targeted cancer chemotherapeutics. EXPERT OPINION: While there have been a number of important key findings into this field, the identification of the structural basis of ligand functional specificity is still of the greatest importance. While it is true that, with some notable exceptions, peptide hormones and growth factors have not proven to be good platforms for oncology drug discovery; addressing the fundamental issues of antagonistic partial agonists for receptor tyrosine kinases has the potential to steer oncology drug discovery in new directions. Mechanism based approaches are now emerging to enable the discovery of RTK partial agonists that may antagonize both agonist-dependent and -independent RTK signaling and may hold tremendous promise as targeted cancer chemotherapeutics.

  11. Generating "fragment-based virtual library" using pocket similarity search of ligand-receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Khashan, Raed S

    2015-01-01

    As the number of available ligand-receptor complexes is increasing, researchers are becoming more dedicated to mine these complexes to aid in the drug design and development process. We present free software which is developed as a tool for performing similarity search across ligand-receptor complexes for identifying binding pockets which are similar to that of a target receptor. The search is based on 3D-geometric and chemical similarity of the atoms forming the binding pocket. For each match identified, the ligand's fragment(s) corresponding to that binding pocket are extracted, thus forming a virtual library of fragments (FragVLib) that is useful for structure-based drug design. The program provides a very useful tool to explore available databases.

  12. Transcriptional regulation of heat shock proteins and ascorbate peroxidase by CtHsfA2b from African bermudagrass conferring heat tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiuyun; Huang, Wanlu; Yang, Zhimin; Liu, Jun; Huang, Bingru

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress transcription factor A2s (HsfA2s) are key regulators in plant response to high temperature. Our objectives were to isolate an HsfA2 gene (CtHsfA2b) from a warm-season grass species, African bermudagrass (Cynodon transvaalensis Burtt-Davy), and to determine the physiological functions and transcriptional regulation of HsfA2 for improving heat tolerance. Gene expression analysis revealed that CtHsfA2b was heat-inducible and exhibited rapid response to increasing temperature. Ectopic expression of CtHsfA2b improved heat tolerance in Arabidopsis and restored heat-sensitive defects of Arabidopsis hsfa2 mutant, which was demonstrated by higher survival rate and photosynthetic parameters, and lower electrolyte leakage in transgenic plants compared to the WT or hsfa2 mutant. CtHsfA2b transgenic plants showed elevated transcriptional regulation of several downstream genes, including those encoding ascorbate peroxidase (AtApx2) and heat shock proteins [AtHsp18.1-CI, AtHsp22.0-ER, AtHsp25.3-P and AtHsp26.5-P(r), AtHsp70b and AtHsp101-3]. CtHsfA2b was found to bind to the heat shock element (HSE) on the promoter of AtApx2 and enhanced transcriptional activity of AtApx2. These results suggested that CtHsfA2b could play positive roles in heat protection by up-regulating antioxidant defense and chaperoning mechanisms. CtHsfA2b has the potential to be used as a candidate gene to genetically modify cool-season species for improving heat tolerance. PMID:27320381

  13. Customizing G Protein-coupled receptor models for structure-based virtual screening.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Chris; Rognan, Didier

    2009-01-01

    This review will focus on the construction, refinement, and validation of G Protein-coupled receptor models for the purpose of structure-based virtual screening. Practical tips and tricks derived from concrete modeling and virtual screening exercises to overcome the problems and pitfalls associated with the different steps of the receptor modeling workflow will be presented. These examples will not only include rhodopsin-like (class A), but also secretine-like (class B), and glutamate-like (class C) receptors. In addition, the review will present a careful comparative analysis of current crystal structures and their implication on homology modeling. The following themes will be discussed: i) the use of experimental anchors in guiding the modeling procedure; ii) amino acid sequence alignments; iii) ligand binding mode accommodation and binding cavity expansion; iv) proline-induced kinks in transmembrane helices; v) binding mode prediction and virtual screening by receptor-ligand interaction fingerprint scoring; vi) extracellular loop modeling; vii) virtual filtering schemes. Finally, an overview of several successful structure-based screening shows that receptor models, despite structural inaccuracies, can be efficiently used to find novel ligands.

  14. Dopamine D1 Receptors in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex Regulate Effort-Based Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweimer, Judith; Hauber, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) has been implicated in encoding whether or not an action is worth performing in view of the expected benefit and the cost of performing the action. Dopamine input to the ACC may be critical for this form of effort-based decision making; however, the role of distinct ACC dopamine receptors is yet unknown.…

  15. Receptor-specific modulation of risk-based decision making by nucleus accumbens dopamine.

    PubMed

    Stopper, Colin M; Khayambashi, Shahin; Floresco, Stan B

    2013-04-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAc) serves as an integral node within cortico-limbic circuitry that regulates various forms of cost-benefit decision making. The dopamine (DA) system has also been implicated in enabling organisms to overcome a variety of costs to obtain more valuable rewards. However, it remains unclear how DA activity within the NAc may regulate decision making involving reward uncertainty. This study investigated the contribution of different DA receptor subtypes in the NAc to risk-based decision making, assessed with a probabilistic discounting task. In well-trained rats, D1 receptor blockade with SCH 23,390 decreased preference for larger, uncertain rewards, which was associated with enhanced negative-feedback sensitivity (ie, an increased tendency to select a smaller/certain option after an unrewarded risky choice). Treatment with a D1 agonist (SKF 81,297) optimized decision making, increasing choice of the risky option when reward probability was high, and decreasing preference under low probability conditions. In stark contrast, neither blockade of NAc D2 receptors with eticlopride, nor stimulation of these receptors with quinpirole or bromocriptine influenced risky choice. In comparison, infusion of the D3-preferring agonist PD 128,907 decreased reward sensitivity and risky choice. Collectively, these results show that mesoaccumbens DA refines risk-reward decision biases via dissociable mechanisms recruiting D1 and D3, but not D2 receptors. D1 receptor activity mitigates the effect of reward omissions on subsequent choices to promote selection of reward options that may have greater long-term utility, whereas excessive D3 receptor activity blunts the impact that larger/uncertain rewards have in promoting riskier choices.

  16. Cell-Based Odorant Sensor Array for Odor Discrimination Based on Insect Odorant Receptors.

    PubMed

    Termtanasombat, Maneerat; Mitsuno, Hidefumi; Misawa, Nobuo; Yamahira, Shinya; Sakurai, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Nagamune, Teruyuki; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2016-07-01

    The olfactory system of living organisms can accurately discriminate numerous odors by recognizing the pattern of activation of several odorant receptors (ORs). Thus, development of an odorant sensor array based on multiple ORs presents the possibility of mimicking biological odor discrimination mechanisms. Recently, we developed novel odorant sensor elements with high sensitivity and selectivity based on insect OR-expressing Sf21 cells that respond to target odorants by displaying increased fluorescence intensity. Here we introduce the development of an odorant sensor array composed of several Sf21 cell lines expressing different ORs. In this study, an array pattern of four cell lines expressing Or13a, Or56a, BmOR1, and BmOR3 was successfully created using a patterned polydimethylsiloxane film template and cell-immobilizing reagents, termed biocompatible anchor for membrane (BAM). We demonstrated that BAM could create a clear pattern of Sf21 sensor cells without impacting their odorant-sensing performance. Our sensor array showed odorant-specific response patterns toward both odorant mixtures and single odorant stimuli, allowing us to visualize the presence of 1-octen-3-ol, geosmin, bombykol, and bombykal as an increased fluorescence intensity in the region of Or13a, Or56a, BmOR1, and BmOR3 cell lines, respectively. Therefore, we successfully developed a new methodology for creating a cell-based odorant sensor array that enables us to discriminate multiple target odorants. Our method might be expanded into the development of an odorant sensor capable of detecting a large range of environmental odorants that might become a promising tool used in various applications including the study of insect semiochemicals and food contamination.

  17. Exploring the Role of Receptor Flexibility in Structure-Based Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Feixas, Ferran; Lindert, Steffen; Sinko, William; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The proper understanding of biomolecular recognition mechanisms that take place in a drug target is of paramount importance to improve the efficiency of drug discovery and development. The intrinsic dynamic character of proteins has a strong influence on biomolecular recognition mechanisms and models such as conformational selection have been widely used to account for this dynamic association process. However, conformational changes occurring in the receptor prior and upon association with other molecules are diverse and not obvious to predict when only a few structures of the receptor are available. In view of the prominent role of protein flexibility in ligand binding and its implications for drug discovery, it is of great interest to identify receptor conformations that play a major role in biomolecular recognition before starting rational drug design efforts. In this review, we discuss a number of recent advances in computer-aided drug discovery techniques that have been proposed to incorporate receptor flexibility into structure-based drug design. The allowance for receptor flexibility provided by computational techniques such as molecular dynamics simulations or enhanced sampling techniques helps to improve the accuracy of methods used to estimate binding affinities and, thus, such methods can contribute to the discovery of novel drug leads. PMID:24332165

  18. On the use of nonfluorescent dye labeled ligands in FRET-based receptor binding studies.

    PubMed

    Tahtaoui, Chouaib; Guillier, Fabrice; Klotz, Philippe; Galzi, Jean-Luc; Hibert, Marcel; Ilien, Brigitte

    2005-12-01

    The efficiency of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is dependent upon donor-acceptor proximity and spectral overlap, whether the acceptor partner is fluorescent or not. We report here on the design, synthesis, and characterization of two novel pirenzepine derivatives that were coupled to patent blue VF and pinacyanol dyes. These nonfluorescent compounds, when added to cells stably expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-fused muscarinic M1 receptors, promote EGFP fluorescence extinction in a time-, concentration-, and atropine-dependent manner. They display nanomolar affinity for the muscarinic receptor, determined using either FRET or classical radioligand binding conditions. We provide evidence that these compounds behave as potent acceptors of energy from excited EGFP with quenching efficiencies comparable to those of analogous fluorescent bodipy or rhodamine red pirenzepine derivatives. The advantages they offer over fluorescent ligands are illustrated and discussed in terms of reliability, sensitivity, and wider applicability of FRET-based receptor binding assays.

  19. Structure-Based Rational Design of a Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4) Decoy Receptor with High Binding Affinity for a Target Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Chul; Hong, Seungpyo; Park, Keunwan; Jeon, Young Ho; Kim, Dongsup; Cheong, Hae-Kap; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2012-01-01

    Repeat proteins are increasingly attracting much attention as alternative scaffolds to immunoglobulin antibodies due to their unique structural features. Nonetheless, engineering interaction interface and understanding molecular basis for affinity maturation of repeat proteins still remain a challenge. Here, we present a structure-based rational design of a repeat protein with high binding affinity for a target protein. As a model repeat protein, a Toll-like receptor4 (TLR4) decoy receptor composed of leucine-rich repeat (LRR) modules was used, and its interaction interface was rationally engineered to increase the binding affinity for myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD2). Based on the complex crystal structure of the decoy receptor with MD2, we first designed single amino acid substitutions in the decoy receptor, and obtained three variants showing a binding affinity (KD) one-order of magnitude higher than the wild-type decoy receptor. The interacting modes and contributions of individual residues were elucidated by analyzing the crystal structures of the single variants. To further increase the binding affinity, single positive mutations were combined, and two double mutants were shown to have about 3000- and 565-fold higher binding affinities than the wild-type decoy receptor. Molecular dynamics simulations and energetic analysis indicate that an additive effect by two mutations occurring at nearby modules was the major contributor to the remarkable increase in the binding affinities. PMID:22363519

  20. Structure-based discovery of selective serotonin 5-HT(1B) receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, David; Brea, José; Loza, María Isabel; Carlsson, Jens

    2014-08-05

    The development of safe and effective drugs relies on the discovery of selective ligands. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) G protein-coupled receptors are therapeutic targets for CNS disorders but are also associated with adverse drug effects. The determination of crystal structures for the 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptors provided an opportunity to identify subtype selective ligands using structure-based methods. From docking screens of 1.3 million compounds, 22 molecules were predicted to be selective for the 5-HT1B receptor over the 5-HT2B subtype, a requirement for safe serotonergic drugs. Nine compounds were experimentally verified as 5-HT1B-selective ligands, with up to 300-fold higher affinities for this subtype. Three of the ligands were agonists of the G protein pathway. Analysis of state-of-the-art homology models of the two 5-HT receptors revealed that the crystal structures were critical for predicting selective ligands. Our results demonstrate that structure-based screening can guide the discovery of ligands with specific selectivity profiles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Nanoparticle-Based Receptors Mimic Protein-Ligand Recognition.

    PubMed

    Riccardi, Laura; Gabrielli, Luca; Sun, Xiaohuan; De Biasi, Federico; Rastrelli, Federico; Mancin, Fabrizio; De Vivo, Marco

    2017-07-13

    The self-assembly of a monolayer of ligands on the surface of noble-metal nanoparticles dictates the fundamental nanoparticle's behavior and its functionality. In this combined computational-experimental study, we analyze the structure, organization, and dynamics of functionalized coating thiols in monolayer-protected gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). We explain how functionalized coating thiols self-organize through a delicate and somehow counterintuitive balance of interactions within the monolayer itself and with the solvent. We further describe how the nature and plasticity of these interactions modulate nanoparticle-based chemosensing. Importantly, we found that self-organization of coating thiols can induce the formation of binding pockets in AuNPs. These transient cavities can accommodate small molecules, mimicking protein-ligand recognition, which could explain the selectivity and sensitivity observed for different organic analytes in NMR chemosensing experiments. Thus, our findings advocate for the rational design of tailored coating groups to form specific recognition binding sites on monolayer-protected AuNPs.

  2. RNA Aptamer-Based Functional Ligands of the Neurotrophin Receptor, TrkB

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yang Zhong; Hernandez, Frank J.; Gu, Bin; Stockdale, Katie R.; Nanapaneni, Kishore; Scheetz, Todd E.; Behlke, Mark A.; Peek, Andrew S.; Bair, Thomas; Giangrande, Paloma H.

    2012-01-01

    Many cell surface signaling receptors, such as the neurotrophin receptor, TrkB, have emerged as potential therapeutic targets for diverse diseases. Reduced activation of TrkB in particular is thought to contribute to neurodegenerative diseases. Unfortunately, development of therapeutic reagents that selectively activate particular cell surface receptors such as TrkB has proven challenging. Like many cell surface signaling receptors, TrkB is internalized upon activation; in this proof-of-concept study, we exploited this fact to isolate a pool of nuclease-stabilized RNA aptamers enriched for TrkB agonists. One of the selected aptamers, C4-3, was characterized with recombinant protein-binding assays, cell-based signaling and functional assays, and, in vivo in a seizure model in mice. C4-3 binds the extracellular domain of TrkB with high affinity (KD ∼2 nM) and exhibits potent TrkB partial agonistic activity and neuroprotective effects in cultured cortical neurons. In mice, C4-3 activates TrkB upon infusion into the hippocampus; systemic administration of C4-3 potentiates kainic acid-induced seizure development. We conclude that C4-3 is a potentially useful therapeutic agent for neurodegenerative diseases in which reduced TrkB activation has been implicated. We anticipate that the cell-based aptamer selection approach used here will be broadly applicable to the identification of aptamer-based agonists for a variety of cell-surface signaling receptors. PMID:22752556

  3. CoMSIA and Docking Study of Rhenium Based Estrogen Receptor Ligand Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Wolohan, Peter; Reichert, David E.

    2007-01-01

    OPLS all atom force field parameters were developed in order to model a diverse set of novel rhenium based estrogen receptor ligands whose relative binding affinities (RBA) to the estrogen receptor alpha isoform (ERα) with respect to 17β-Estradiol were available. The binding properties of these novel rhenium based organometallic complexes were studied with a combination of Comparative Molecular Similarity Indices Analysis (CoMSIA) and docking. A total of 29 estrogen receptor ligands consisting of 11 rhenium complexes and 18 organic ligands were docked inside the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of ERα utilizing the program Gold. The top ranked pose was used to construct CoMSIA models from a training set of 22 of the estrogen receptor ligands which were selected at random. In addition scoring functions from the docking runs and the polar volume (PV) were also studied to investigate their ability to predict RBA ERα. A partial least-squares analysis consisting of the CoMSIA steric, electrostatic and hydrophobic indices together with the polar volume proved sufficiently predictive having a correlation coefficient, r2, of 0.94 and a cross-validated correlation coefficient, q2, utilizing the leave one out method of 0.68. Analysis of the scoring functions from Gold showed particularly poor correlation to RBA ERα which did not improve when the rhenium complexes were extracted to leave the organic ligands. The combined CoMSIA and polar volume model ranked correctly the ligands in order of increasing RBA ERα, illustrating the utility of this method as a prescreening tool in the development of novel rhenium based estrogen receptor ligands. PMID:17280694

  4. An automated system for the analysis of G protein-coupled receptor transmembrane binding pockets: alignment, receptor-based pharmacophores, and their application.

    PubMed

    Kratochwil, Nicole A; Malherbe, Pari; Lindemann, Lothar; Ebeling, Martin; Hoener, Marius C; Mühlemann, Andreas; Porter, Richard H P; Stahl, Martin; Gerber, Paul R

    2005-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) share a common architecture consisting of seven transmembrane (TM) domains. Various lines of evidence suggest that this fold provides a generic binding pocket within the TM region for hosting agonists, antagonists, and allosteric modulators. Here, a comprehensive and automated method allowing fast analysis and comparison of these putative binding pockets across the entire GPCR family is presented. The method relies on a robust alignment algorithm based on conservation indices, focusing on pharmacophore-like relationships between amino acids. Analysis of conservation patterns across the GPCR family and alignment to the rhodopsin X-ray structure allows the extraction of the amino acids lining the TM binding pocket in a so-called ligand binding pocket vector (LPV). In a second step, LPVs are translated to simple 3D receptor pharmacophore models, where each amino acid is represented by a single spherical pharmacophore feature and all atomic detail is omitted. Applications of the method include the assessment of selectivity issues, support of mutagenesis studies, and the derivation of rules for focused screening to identify chemical starting points in early drug discovery projects. Because of the coarseness of this 3D receptor pharmacophore model, however, meaningful scoring and ranking procedures of large sets of molecules are not justified. The LPV analysis of the trace amine-associated receptor family and its experimental validation is discussed as an example. The value of the 3D receptor model is demonstrated for a class C GPCR family, the metabotropic glutamate receptors.

  5. Insulin receptor-related receptor as an extracellular pH sensor involved in the regulation of acid-base balance.

    PubMed

    Petrenko, Alexander G; Zozulya, Sergey A; Deyev, Igor E; Eladari, Dominique

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies of insulin receptor-related receptor (IRR) revealed its unusual property to activate upon extracellular application of mildly alkaline media, pH>7.9. The activation of IRR with hydroxyl anion has typical features of ligand-receptor interaction; it is specific, dose-dependent, involves the IRR extracellular domain and is accompanied by a major conformational change. IRR is a member of the insulin receptor minifamily and has been long viewed as an orphan receptor tyrosine kinase since no peptide or protein agonist of IRR was found. In the evolution, IRR is highly conserved since its divergence from the insulin and insulin-like growth factor receptors in amphibia. The latter two cannot be activated by alkali. Another major difference between them is that unlike ubiquitously expressed insulin and insulin-like growth factor receptors, IRR is found in specific sets of cells of only some tissues, most of them being exposed to extracorporeal liquids of extreme pH. In particular, largest concentrations of IRR are in beta-intercalated cells of the kidneys. The primary physiological function of these cells is to excrete excessive alkali as bicarbonate into urine. When IRR is removed genetically, animals loose the property to excrete bicarbonate upon experimentally induced alkalosis. In this review, we will discuss the available in vitro and in vivo data that support the hypothesis of IRR role as a physiological alkali sensor that regulates acid-base balance. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Emerging recognition and activation mechanisms of receptor tyrosine kinases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Transplantation of A2 and A2B kidneys from deceased donors into B waiting list candidates increases their transplantation rate.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Christopher F; Nelson, Paul W; Shield, Charles F; Ross, Gilbert; Warady, Bradley; Murillo, Daniel; Winklhofer, Franz T

    2004-01-01

    Transplant centers in the Midwest Transplant Network began transplanting kidneys from A2 or A2B donors into blood group B and O patients in 1986. Since 1991, an OPTN/UNOS variance has permitted us to allocate these kidneys preferentially into B and O waiting list patients. With more than 10 years of experience we have noted the following: 1. Thirty-one percent more blood group B patients were transplanted by allocating them A2 or A2B kidneys from our deceased donors. 2. Ten-year graft survival for B recipients of an A2 or A2B kidney (72%) was equivalent to that for B recipients of a B kidney (69%). 3. Type B recipients of simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplants (n=4) also did well with A2 or A2B organs. 4. Non-A recipients were transplanted only when their anti-A IgG titer history was consistently low (< or =4). 5. Most (90%) blood group B patients had a low anti-A IgG titer history; whereas, only one-third of blood group O patients had a low titer history. 6. Neither ethnicity nor HLA class I sensitization level influenced the anti-A IgG titer history. 7. In an OPO with mostly (87%) white donors, nearly 20% of blood group A donors were A2. 8. Waiting time until transplantation was lower for B patients who received an A2 or A2B kidney than for those who received a B or O kidney. 9. Our OPO blood group B waiting list was reduced from 25 low PRA (<40%) B candidates in 1994 to 4 in July, 2004. 10. Blood group A candidates received 6.4% fewer transplants with our A2/A2B--> B allocation algorithm. 11. Minority patients were transplanted at the same rate when using the A2/A2B--> B allocation algorithm as when using the standard UNOS algorithm for allocating B and O kidneys--> B patients.

  7. Novel Yeast-based Strategy Unveils Antagonist Binding Regions on the Nuclear Xenobiotic Receptor PXR*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Redinbo, Matthew R.; Venkatesh, Madhukumar; Ekins, Sean; Chaudhry, Anik; Bloch, Nicolin; Negassa, Abdissa; Mukherjee, Paromita; Kalpana, Ganjam; Mani, Sridhar

    2013-01-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a master regulator of xenobiotic metabolism, and its activity is critical toward understanding the pathophysiology of several diseases, including inflammation, cancer, and steatosis. Previous studies have demonstrated that ketoconazole binds to ligand-activated PXR and antagonizes receptor control of gene expression. Structure-function as well as computational docking analysis suggested a putative binding region containing critical charge clamp residues Gln-272, and Phe-264 on the AF-2 surface of PXR. To define the antagonist binding surface(s) of PXR, we developed a novel assay to identify key amino acid residues on PXR based on a yeast two-hybrid screen that examined mutant forms of PXR. This screen identified multiple “gain-of-function” mutants that were “resistant” to the PXR antagonist effects of ketoconazole. We then compared our screen results identifying key PXR residues to those predicted by computational methods. Of 15 potential or putative binding residues based on docking, we identified three residues in the yeast screen that were then systematically verified to functionally interact with ketoconazole using mammalian assays. Among the residues confirmed by our study was Ser-208, which is on the opposite side of the protein from the AF-2 region critical for receptor regulation. The identification of new locations for antagonist binding on the surface or buried in PXR indicates novel aspects to the mechanism of receptor antagonism. These results significantly expand our understanding of antagonist binding sites on the surface of PXR and suggest new avenues to regulate this receptor for clinical applications. PMID:23525103

  8. Receptor-based 3D-QSAR in Drug Design: Methods and Applications in Kinase Studies.

    PubMed

    Fang, Cheng; Xiao, Zhiyan

    2016-01-01

    Receptor-based 3D-QSAR strategy represents a superior integration of structure-based drug design (SBDD) and three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) analysis. It combines the accurate prediction of ligand poses by the SBDD approach with the good predictability and interpretability of statistical models derived from the 3D-QSAR approach. Extensive efforts have been devoted to the development of receptor-based 3D-QSAR methods and two alternative approaches have been exploited. One associates with computing the binding interactions between a receptor and a ligand to generate structure-based descriptors for QSAR analyses. The other concerns the application of various docking protocols to generate optimal ligand poses so as to provide reliable molecular alignments for the conventional 3D-QSAR operations. This review highlights new concepts and methodologies recently developed in the field of receptorbased 3D-QSAR, and in particular, covers its application in kinase studies.

  9. Model for capping of membrane receptors based on boundary surface effects

    PubMed Central

    Gershon, N. D.

    1978-01-01

    Crosslinking of membrane surface receptors may lead to their segregation into patches and then into a single large aggregate at one pole of the cell. This process is called capping. Here, a novel explanation of such a process is presented in which the membrane is viewed as a supersaturated solution of receptors in the lipid bilayer and the adjacent two aqueous layers. Without a crosslinking agent, a patch of receptors that is less than a certain size cannot stay in equilibrium with the solution and thus should dissolve. Patches greater than a certain size are stable and can, in principle, grow by the precipitation of the remaining dissolved receptors from the supersaturated solution. The task of the crosslinking molecules is to form such stable patches. These considerations are based on a qualitative thermodynamic calculation that takes into account the existence of a boundary tension in a patch (in analogy to the surface tension of a droplet). Thermodynamically, these systems should cap spontaneously after the patches have reached a certain size. But, in practice, such a process can be very slow. A suspension of patches may stay practically stable. The ways in which a cell may abolish this metastable equilibrium and thus achieve capping are considered and possible effects of capping inhibitors are discussed. PMID:274724

  10. A Hexahomotrioxacalix[3]arene-Based Ditopic Receptor for Alkylammonium Ions Controlled by Ag + Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Xue-Kai; Ikejiri, Yusuke; Wu, Chong

    A receptor cone-1 based on a hexahomotrioxacalix[3]arene bearing three pyridyl groups was successfully synthesized, which has a C 3-symmetric conformation and is capable of binding alkylammonium and metal ions simultaneously in a cooperative fashion. It can bind alkylammonium ions through the π-cavity formed by three aryl rings. This behaviour is consistent with the cone-in/cone-out conformational rearrangement needed to reorganize the cavity for endo-complexation. As a C 3-symmetrical pyridyl-substituted calixarene, receptor cone-1 can also bind an Ag + ion, and the nitrogen atoms are turned towards the inside of the cavity and interact with Ag +. After complexation of tris(2-pyridylamide) derivativemore » receptor cone-1 with Ag +, the original C 3-symmetry was retained and higher complexation selectivity for n-BuNH 3 + versus t-BuNH 3 + was observed. Thus, it is believed that this receptor will have a role to play in the sensing, detection, and recognition of Ag + and n-BuNH 3 + ions.« less

  11. A Hexahomotrioxacalix[3]arene-Based Ditopic Receptor for Alkylammonium Ions Controlled by Ag + Ions

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Xue-Kai; Ikejiri, Yusuke; Wu, Chong; ...

    2018-02-21

    A receptor cone-1 based on a hexahomotrioxacalix[3]arene bearing three pyridyl groups was successfully synthesized, which has a C 3-symmetric conformation and is capable of binding alkylammonium and metal ions simultaneously in a cooperative fashion. It can bind alkylammonium ions through the π-cavity formed by three aryl rings. This behaviour is consistent with the cone-in/cone-out conformational rearrangement needed to reorganize the cavity for endo-complexation. As a C 3-symmetrical pyridyl-substituted calixarene, receptor cone-1 can also bind an Ag + ion, and the nitrogen atoms are turned towards the inside of the cavity and interact with Ag +. After complexation of tris(2-pyridylamide) derivativemore » receptor cone-1 with Ag +, the original C 3-symmetry was retained and higher complexation selectivity for n-BuNH 3 + versus t-BuNH 3 + was observed. Thus, it is believed that this receptor will have a role to play in the sensing, detection, and recognition of Ag + and n-BuNH 3 + ions.« less

  12. Artificial sensory hairs based on the flow sensitive receptor hairs of crickets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, M.; van Baar, J. J.; Wiegerink, R. J.; Lammerink, T. S. J.; de Boer, J. H.; Krijnen, G. J. M.

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents the modelling, design, fabrication and characterization of flow sensors based on the wind-receptor hairs of crickets. Cricket sensory hairs are highly sensitive to drag-forces exerted on the hair shaft. Artificial sensory hairs have been realized in SU-8 on suspended SixNy membranes. The movement of the membranes is detected capacitively. Capacitance versus voltage, frequency dependence and directional sensitivity measurements have been successfully carried out on fabricated sensor arrays, showing the viability of the concept.

  13. Raloxifene increases prefrontal activity during emotional inhibition in schizophrenia based on estrogen receptor genotype.

    PubMed

    Kindler, Jochen; Weickert, Cynthia Shannon; Schofield, Peter R; Lenroot, Rhoshel; Weickert, Thomas W

    2016-12-01

    People with schizophrenia show decreased prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity during emotional response inhibition, a cognitive process sensitive to hormonal influences. Raloxifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, binds estrogen receptor alpha (ESR-α), improves memory, attention and normalizes cortical and hippocampal activity during learning and emotional face recognition in schizophrenia. Here, we tested the extent to which raloxifene restores neuronal activity during emotional response inhibition in schizophrenia. Since genetic variation in estrogen receptor alpha (ESR-1) determines cortical ESR-α production and correlates with cognition, we also predicted that genetic ESR-1 variation would differentially relate to increased cortical activity by raloxifene administration. Thirty people with schizophrenia participated in a thirteen-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over adjunctive treatment trial of raloxifene administered at 120mg/day. Effects of raloxifene on brain activation were assessed based on ESR-1 genotype using functional magnetic resonance imaging during emotional word inhibition. Raloxifene increased PFC activity during inhibition of response to negative words and the raloxifene related increased PFC activity was greater in patients homozygous for ESR-1 rs9340799 AA relative to G carriers. Comparison to 23 healthy controls demonstrated that PFC activity of people with schizophrenia receiving raloxifene was more similar to controls than to their own brain activity during placebo. Estrogen receptor modulation by raloxifene restores PFC activity during emotional response inhibition in schizophrenia and ESR-1 genotype predicts degree of increased neural activity in response to raloxifene. While these preliminary results require replication, they suggest the potential for personalized pharmacotherapy using ESR-1 and estrogen receptor targeting compounds in schizophrenia. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B

  14. [Integration of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics based on the in vivo analysis of drug-receptor binding].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shizuo

    2015-01-01

      As I was deeply interested in the effects of drugs on the human body, I chose pharmacology as the subject of special study when I became a 4th year student at Shizuoka College of Pharmacy. I studied abroad as a postdoctoral fellow for two years, from 1978, under the tutelage of Professor Henry I. Yamamura (pharmacology) in the College of Medicine at the University of Arizona, USA. He taught me a variety of valuable skills such as the radioreceptor binding assay, which represented the most advanced technology developed in the US at that time. After returning home, I engaged in clarifying receptor abnormalities in pathological conditions, as well as in drug action mechanisms, by making the best use of this radioreceptor binding assay. In 1989, following the founding of the University of Shizuoka, I was invited by Professor Ryohei Kimura to join the Department of Pharmacokinetics. This switch in discipline provided a good opportunity for me to broaden my perspectives in pharmaceutical sciences. I worked on evaluating drug-receptor binding in vivo as a combined index for pharmacokinetics and pharmacological effect manifestation, with the aim of bridging pharmacology and pharmacokinetics. In fact, by focusing on data from in vivo receptor binding, it became possible to clearly rationalize the important consideration of drug dose-concentration-action relationships, and to study quantitative and kinetic analyses of relationships among pharmacokinetics, receptor binding and pharmacological effects. Based on this concept, I was able to demonstrate the utility of dynamic analyses of drug-receptor binding in drug discovery, drug fostering, and the proper use of pharmacokinetics with regard to many drugs.

  15. Active radar guides missile to its target: receptor-based targeted treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma by nanoparticulate systems.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing-Jun; Liao, Jia-Zhi; Lin, Ju-Sheng; He, Xing-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) usually present at advanced stages and do not benefit from surgical resection, so drug therapy should deserve a prominent place in unresectable HCC treatment. But chemotherapy agents, such as doxorubicin, cisplatin, and paclitaxel, frequently encounter important problems such as low specificity and non-selective biodistribution. Recently, the development of nanotechnology led to significant breakthroughs to overcome these problems. Decorating the surfaces of nanoparticulate-based drug carriers with homing devices has demonstrated its potential in concentrating chemotherapy agents specifically to HCC cells. In this paper, we reviewed the current status of active targeting strategies for nanoparticulate systems based on various receptors such as asialoglycoprotein receptor, transferrin receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, folate receptor, integrin, and CD44, which are abundantly expressed on the surfaces of hepatocytes or liver cancer cells. Furthermore, we pointed out their merits and defects and provided theoretical references for further research.

  16. Facile screening of potential xenoestrogens by an estrogen receptor-based reusable optical biosensor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lanhua; Zhou, Xiaohong; Lu, Yun; Shan, Didi; Xu, Bi; He, Miao; Shi, Hanchang; Qian, Yi

    2017-11-15

    The apparent increase in hormone-induced cancers and disorders of the reproductive tract has led to a growing demand for new technologies capable of screening xenoestrogens. We reported an estrogen receptor (ER)-based reusable fiber biosensor for facile screening estrogenic compounds in environment. The bioassay is based on the competition of xenoestrogens with 17β-estradiol (E 2 ) for binding to the recombinant receptor of human estrogen receptor α (hERα) protein, leaving E 2 free to bind to fluorophore-labeled anti-E 2 monoclonal antibody. Unbound anti-E 2 antibody then binds to the immobilized E 2 -protein conjugate on the fiber surface, and is detected by fluorescence emission induced by evanescent field. As expected, the stronger estrogenic activity of xenoestrogen would result in the weaker fluorescent signal. Three estrogen-agonist compounds, diethylstilbestrol (DES), 4-n-nonylphenol (NP) and 4-n-octylphenol (OP), were chosen as a paradigm for validation of this assay. The rank order of estrogenic potency determined by this biosensor was DES>OP>NP, which were consistent with the published results in numerous studies. Moreover, the E 2 -protein conjugate modified optical fiber was robust enough for over 300 sensing cycles with the signal recoveries ranging from 90% to 100%. In conclusion, the biosensor is reusable, reliable, portable and amenable to on-line operation, providing a facile, efficient and economical alternative to screen potential xenoestrogens in environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Dimensionality of Motion and Binding Valency Govern Receptor-Ligand Kinetics As Revealed by Agent-Based Modeling.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Teresa; Figge, Marc Thilo

    2017-01-01

    Mathematical modeling and computer simulations have become an integral part of modern biological research. The strength of theoretical approaches is in the simplification of complex biological systems. We here consider the general problem of receptor-ligand binding in the context of antibody-antigen binding. On the one hand, we establish a quantitative mapping between macroscopic binding rates of a deterministic differential equation model and their microscopic equivalents as obtained from simulating the spatiotemporal binding kinetics by stochastic agent-based models. On the other hand, we investigate the impact of various properties of B cell-derived receptors-such as their dimensionality of motion, morphology, and binding valency-on the receptor-ligand binding kinetics. To this end, we implemented an algorithm that simulates antigen binding by B cell-derived receptors with a Y-shaped morphology that can move in different dimensionalities, i.e., either as membrane-anchored receptors or as soluble receptors. The mapping of the macroscopic and microscopic binding rates allowed us to quantitatively compare different agent-based model variants for the different types of B cell-derived receptors. Our results indicate that the dimensionality of motion governs the binding kinetics and that this predominant impact is quantitatively compensated by the bivalency of these receptors.

  18. Mass Spectrometry-Based GPCR Proteomics: Comprehensive Characterization of the Human Cannabinoid 1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zvonok, Nikolai; Xu, Wei; Williams, John; Janero, David R.; Krishnan, Srinivasan C.; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2013-01-01

    The human cannabinoid 1 receptor (hCB1), a ubiquitous G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), transmits cannabinergic signals that participate in diverse (patho)physiological processes. Pharmacotherapeutic hCB1 targeting is considered a tractable approach for treating such prevalent diseases as obesity, mood disorders, and drug addiction. The hydrophobic nature of the transmembrane helices of hCB1 presents a formidable difficulty to its direct structural analysis. Comprehensive experimental characterization of functional hCB1 by mass spectrometry (MS) is essential to the targeting of affinity probes that can be used to define directly hCB1 binding domains using a ligand-assisted experimental approach. Such information would greatly facilitate the rational design of hCB1-selective agonists/antagonists with therapeutic potential. We report the first high-coverage MS analysis of the primary sequence of the functional hCB1 receptor, one of the few such comprehensive MS-based analyses of any GPCR. Recombinant C-terminal hexa-histidine-tagged hCB1 (His6-hCB1) was expressed in cultured insect (Spodoptera frugiperda) cells, solubilized by a procedure devised to enhance receptor purity following metal-affinity chromatography, desalted by buffer exchange, and digested in solution with (chymo)-trypsin. “Bottom-up” nanoLC-MS/MS of the (chymo)tryptic digests afforded a degree of overall hCB1 coverage (>94%) thus far reported for only two other GPCRs. This MS-compatible procedure devised for His6-hCB1 sample preparation, incorporating in-solution (chymo)trypsin digestion in the presence of a low concentration of CYMAL-5 detergent, may be applicable to the MS-based proteomic characterization of other GPCRs. This work should help enable future ligand-assisted structural characterization of hCB1 binding motifs at the amino-acid level using rationally designed and targeted covalent cannabinergic probes. PMID:20131867

  19. A recombinant estrogen receptor fragment-based homogeneous fluorescent assay for rapid detection of estrogens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Xie, Jiangbi; Zhu, Xiaocui; Li, Jinqiu; Zhao, Dongqin; Zhao, Meiping

    2014-05-15

    In this work, we demonstrate a novel estrogenic receptor fragment-based homogeneous fluorescent assay which enables rapid and sensitive detection of 17β-estradiol (E2) and other highly potent estrogens. A modified human estrogenic receptor fragment (N-His × 6-hER270-595-C-Strep tag II) has been constructed that contains amino acids 270-595 of wild-type human estrogenic receptor α (hER270-595) and two specific tags (6 × His and Strep tag II) fused to the N and C terminus, respectively. The designed receptor protein fragment could be easily produced by prokaryotic expression with high yield and high purity. The obtained protein exhibits high binding affinity to E2 and the two tags greatly facilitate the application of the recombinant protein. Taking advantage of the unique spectroscopic properties of coumestrol (CS), a fluorescent phytoestrogen, a CS/hER270-595-based fluorescent assay has been developed which can sensitively respond to E2 within 1.0 min with a linear working range from 0.1 to 20 ng/mL and a limit of detection of 0.1 ng/mL. The assay was successfully applied for rapid detection of E2 in the culture medium of rat hippocampal neurons. The method also holds great potential for high-throughput monitoring the variation of estrogen levels in complex biological fluids, which is crucial for investigation of the molecular basis of various estrogen-involved processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Absolute binding free energies between T4 lysozyme and 141 small molecules: calculations based on multiple rigid receptor configurations

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Bing; Nguyen, Trung Hai; Minh, David D. L.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of estimating protein-ligand binding free energies using multiple rigid receptor configurations. Based on T4 lysozyme snapshots extracted from six alchemical binding free energy calculations with a flexible receptor, binding free energies were estimated for a total of 141 ligands. For 24 ligands, the calculations reproduced flexible-receptor estimates with a correlation coefficient of 0.90 and a root mean square error of 1.59 kcal/mol. The accuracy of calculations based on Poisson-Boltzmann/Surface Area implicit solvent was comparable to previously reported free energy calculations. PMID:28430432

  1. FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS OF A NOVEL POSITIVE ALLOSTERIC MODULATOR OF AMPA RECEPTORS DERIVED FROM A STRUCTURE-BASED DRUG DESIGN STRATEGY

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Jonathan E.; Benveniste, Morris; Maclean, John K. F.; Partin, Kathryn M.; Jamieson, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulators of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors facilitate synaptic plasticity and can improve various forms of learning and memory. These modulators show promise as therapeutic agents for the treatment of neurological disorders such as schizophrenia, ADHD, and mental depression. Three classes of positive modulator, the benzamides, the thiadiazides, and the biarylsulfonamides differentially occupy a solvent accessible binding pocket at the interface between the two subunits that form the AMPA receptor ligand-binding pocket. Here, we describe the electrophysiological properties of a new chemotype derived from a structure-based drug design strategy (SBDD), which makes similar receptor interactions compared to previously reported classes of modulator. This pyrazole amide derivative, JAMI1001A, with a promising developability profile, efficaciously modulates AMPA receptor deactivation and desensitization of both flip and flop receptor isoforms. PMID:22735771

  2. SPR-based fragment screening with neurotensin receptor 1 generates novel small molecule ligands

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Sylwia; Casagrande, Fabio; Hug, Melanie N.; Wang, Lisha; Heine, Philipp; Kummer, Lutz; Plückthun, Andreas; Hennig, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The neurotensin receptor 1 represents an important drug target involved in various diseases of the central nervous system. So far, the full exploitation of potential therapeutic activities has been compromised by the lack of compounds with favorable physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties which efficiently penetrate the blood-brain barrier. Recent progress in the generation of stabilized variants of solubilized neurotensin receptor 1 and its subsequent purification and successful structure determination presents a solid starting point to apply the approach of fragment-based screening to extend the chemical space of known neurotensin receptor 1 ligands. In this report, surface plasmon resonance was used as primary method to screen 6369 compounds. Thereby 44 hits were identified and confirmed in competition as well as dose-response experiments. Furthermore, 4 out of 8 selected hits were validated using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as orthogonal biophysical method. Computational analysis of the compound structures, taking the known crystal structure of the endogenous peptide agonist into consideration, gave insight into the potential fragment-binding location and interactions and inspires chemistry efforts for further exploration of the fragments. PMID:28510609

  3. Sensors Based on Bio and Biomimetic Receptors in Medical Diagnostic, Environment, and Food Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kozitsina, Alisa N; Svalova, Tatiana S; Malysheva, Natalia N; Okhokhonin, Andrei V; Vidrevich, Marina B; Brainina, Khiena Z

    2018-04-01

    Analytical chemistry is now developing mainly in two areas: automation and the creation of complexes that allow, on the one hand, for simultaneously analyzing a large number of samples without the participation of an operator, and on the other, the development of portable miniature devices for personalized medicine and the monitoring of a human habitat. The sensor devices, the great majority of which are biosensors and chemical sensors, perform the role of the latter. That last line is considered in the proposed review. Attention is paid to transducers, receptors, techniques of immobilization of the receptor layer on the transducer surface, processes of signal generation and detection, and methods for increasing sensitivity and accuracy. The features of sensors based on synthetic receptors and additional components (aptamers, molecular imprinted polymers, biomimetics) are discussed. Examples of bio- and chemical sensors' application are given. Miniaturization paths, new power supply means, and wearable and printed sensors are described. Progress in this area opens a revolutionary era in the development of methods of on-site and in-situ monitoring, that is, paving the way from the "test-tube to the smartphone".

  4. Pixel-based absorption correction for dual-tracer fluorescence imaging of receptor binding potential

    PubMed Central

    Kanick, Stephen C.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Gunn, Jason; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Ratiometric approaches to quantifying molecular concentrations have been used for decades in microscopy, but have rarely been exploited in vivo until recently. One dual-tracer approach can utilize an untargeted reference tracer to account for non-specific uptake of a receptor-targeted tracer, and ultimately estimate receptor binding potential quantitatively. However, interpretation of the relative dynamic distribution kinetics is confounded by differences in local tissue absorption at the wavelengths used for each tracer. This study simulated the influence of absorption on fluorescence emission intensity and depth sensitivity at typical near-infrared fluorophore wavelength bands near 700 and 800 nm in mouse skin in order to correct for these tissue optical differences in signal detection. Changes in blood volume [1-3%] and hemoglobin oxygen saturation [0-100%] were demonstrated to introduce substantial distortions to receptor binding estimates (error > 30%), whereas sampled depth was relatively insensitive to wavelength (error < 6%). In response, a pixel-by-pixel normalization of tracer inputs immediately post-injection was found to account for spatial heterogeneities in local absorption properties. Application of the pixel-based normalization method to an in vivo imaging study demonstrated significant improvement, as compared with a reference tissue normalization approach. PMID:25360349

  5. A live zebrafish-based screening system for human nuclear receptor ligand and cofactor discovery.

    PubMed

    Tiefenbach, Jens; Moll, Pamela R; Nelson, Meryl R; Hu, Chun; Baev, Lilia; Kislinger, Thomas; Krause, Henry M

    2010-03-22

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) belong to a superfamily of transcription factors that regulate numerous homeostatic, metabolic and reproductive processes. Taken together with their modulation by small lipophilic molecules, they also represent an important and successful class of drug targets. Although many NRs have been targeted successfully, the majority have not, and one third are still orphans. Here we report the development of an in vivo GFP-based reporter system suitable for monitoring NR activities in all cells and tissues using live zebrafish (Danio rerio). The human NR fusion proteins used also contain a new affinity tag cassette allowing the purification of receptors with bound molecules from responsive tissues. We show that these constructs 1) respond as expected to endogenous zebrafish hormones and cofactors, 2) facilitate efficient receptor and cofactor purification, 3) respond robustly to NR hormones and drugs and 4) yield readily quantifiable signals. Transgenic lines representing the majority of human NRs have been established and are available for the investigation of tissue- and isoform-specific ligands and cofactors.

  6. Discovery of an Oxybenzylglycine Based Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Alpha Selective

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Kennedy, L; Shi, Y

    2010-01-01

    An 1,3-oxybenzylglycine based compound 2 (BMS-687453) was discovered to be a potent and selective peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) {alpha} agonist, with an EC{sub 50} of 10 nM for human PPAR{alpha} and {approx}410-fold selectivity vs human PPAR{gamma} in PPAR-GAL4 transactivation assays. Similar potencies and selectivity were also observed in the full length receptor co-transfection assays. Compound 2 has negligible cross-reactivity against a panel of human nuclear hormone receptors including PPAR{delta}. Compound 2 demonstrated an excellent pharmacological and safety profile in preclinical studies and thus was chosen as a development candidate for the treatment of atherosclerosis and dyslipidemia. The X-ray cocrystalmore » structures of the early lead compound 12 and compound 2 in complex with PPAR{alpha} ligand binding domain (LBD) were determined. The role of the crystal structure of compound 12 with PPAR{alpha} in the development of the SAR that ultimately resulted in the discovery of compound 2 is discussed.« less

  7. A receptor-based model for dopamine-induced fMRI signal

    PubMed Central

    Mandeville, Joseph. B.; Sander, Christin Y. M.; Jenkins, Bruce G.; Hooker, Jacob M.; Catana, Ciprian; Vanduffel, Wim; Alpert, Nathaniel M.; Rosen, Bruce R.; Normandin, Marc D.

    2013-01-01

    This report describes a multi-receptor physiological model of the fMRI temporal response and signal magnitude evoked by drugs that elevate synaptic dopamine in basal ganglia. The model is formulated as a summation of dopamine’s effects at D1-like and D2-like receptor families, which produce functional excitation and inhibition, respectively, as measured by molecular indicators like adenylate cyclase or neuroimaging techniques like fMRI. Functional effects within the model are described in terms of relative changes in receptor occupancies scaled by receptor densities and neuro-vascular coupling constants. Using literature parameters, the model reconciles many discrepant observations and interpretations of pre-clinical data. Additionally, we present data showing that amphetamine stimulation produces fMRI inhibition at low doses and a biphasic response at higher doses in the basal ganglia of non-human primates (NHP), in agreement with model predictions based upon the respective levels of evoked dopamine. Because information about dopamine release is required to inform the fMRI model, we simultaneously acquired PET 11C-raclopride data in several studies to evaluate the relationship between raclopride displacement and assumptions about dopamine release. At high levels of dopamine release, results suggest that refinements of the model will be required to consistently describe the PET and fMRI data. Overall, the remarkable success of the model in describing a wide range of preclinical fMRI data indicate that this approach will be useful for guiding the design and analysis of basic science and clinical investigations and for interpreting the functional consequences of dopaminergic stimulation in normal subjects and in populations with dopaminergic neuroadaptations. PMID:23466936

  8. Discovery of Novel Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-2 Inhibitors by Structure-based Virtual Screening.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zheng; Yu, Tian; Sun, Rong; Wang, Shan; Chen, Xiao-Qian; Cheng, Li-Jia; Liu, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) is a trans-membrane receptor like protein, and aberrant signaling of HER2 is implicated in many human cancers, such as ovarian cancer, gastric cancer, and prostate cancer, most notably breast cancer. Moreover, it has been in the spotlight in the recent years as a promising new target for therapy of breast cancer. Since virtual screening has become an integral part of the drug discovery process, it is of great significant to identify novel HER2 inhibitors by structure-based virtual screening. In this study, we carried out a series of elegant bioinformatics approaches, such as virtual screening and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to identify HER2 inhibitors from Food and Drug Administration-approved small molecule drug as potential "new use" drugs. Molecular docking identified top 10 potential drugs which showed spectrum affinity to HER2. Moreover, MD simulations suggested that ZINC08214629 (Nonoxynol-9) and ZINC03830276 (Benzonatate) might exert potential inhibitory effects against HER2-targeted anti-breast cancer therapeutics. Together, our findings may provide successful application of virtual screening studies in the lead discovery process, and suggest that our discovered small molecules could be effective HER2 inhibitor candidates for further study. A series of elegant bioinformatics approaches, including virtual screening and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were took advantage to identify human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) inhibitors. Molecular docking recognized top 10 candidate compounds, which showed spectrum affinity to HER2. Further, MD simulations suggested that ZINC08214629 (Nonoxynol-9) and ZINC03830276 (Benzonatate) in candidate compounds were identified as potential "new use" drugs against HER2-targeted anti-breast cancer therapeutics. Abbreviations used: HER2: Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2, FDA: Food and Drug Administration, PDB: Protein Database Bank, RMSDs: Root mean

  9. Extrasynaptic Glutamate Receptor Activation as Cellular Bases for Dynamic Range Compression in Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Oikonomou, Katerina D.; Short, Shaina M.; Rich, Matthew T.; Antic, Srdjan D.

    2012-01-01

    Repetitive synaptic stimulation overcomes the ability of astrocytic processes to clear glutamate from the extracellular space, allowing some dendritic segments to become submerged in a pool of glutamate, for a brief period of time. This dynamic arrangement activates extrasynaptic NMDA receptors located on dendritic shafts. We used voltage-sensitive and calcium-sensitive dyes to probe dendritic function in this glutamate-rich location. An excess of glutamate in the extrasynaptic space was achieved either by repetitive synaptic stimulation or by glutamate iontophoresis onto the dendrites of pyramidal neurons. Two successive activations of synaptic inputs produced a typical NMDA spike, whereas five successive synaptic inputs produced characteristic plateau potentials, reminiscent of cortical UP states. While NMDA spikes were coupled with brief calcium transients highly restricted to the glutamate input site, the dendritic plateau potentials were accompanied by calcium influx along the entire dendritic branch. Once initiated, the glutamate-mediated dendritic plateau potentials could not be interrupted by negative voltage pulses. Activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors in cellular compartments void of spines is sufficient to initiate and support plateau potentials. The only requirement for sustained depolarizing events is a surplus of free glutamate near a group of extrasynaptic receptors. Highly non-linear dendritic spikes (plateau potentials) are summed in a highly sublinear fashion at the soma, revealing the cellular bases of signal compression in cortical circuits. Extrasynaptic NMDA receptors provide pyramidal neurons with a function analogous to a dynamic range compression in audio engineering. They limit or reduce the volume of “loud sounds” (i.e., strong glutamatergic inputs) and amplify “quiet sounds” (i.e., glutamatergic inputs that barely cross the dendritic threshold for local spike initiation). Our data also explain why consecutive cortical UP

  10. High-throughput receptor-based assay for the detection of spirolides by chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Laura P; Vilariño, Natalia; Molgó, Jordi; Aráoz, Rómulo; Botana, Luis M

    2013-12-01

    The spirolides are marine toxins that belong to a new class of macrocyclic imines produced by dinoflagellates. In this study a previously described solid-phase receptor-based assay for the detection of spirolides was optimized for high-throughput screening and prevalidated. This method is based on the competition between 13-desmethyl spirolide C and biotin-α-bungarotoxin immobilized on a streptavidin-coated surface, for binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. In this inhibition assay the amount of nAChR bound to the well surface is quantified using a specific antibody, followed by a second anti-mouse IgG antibody labeled with horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The assay protocol was optimized for 384-well microplates, which allowed a reduction of the amount of reagents per sample and an increase of the number of samples per plate versus previously published receptor-based assays. The sensitivity of the assay for 13-desmethyl spirolide C ranged from 5 to 150 ng mL(-1). The performance of the assay in scallop extracts was adequate, with an estimated detection limit for 13-desmethyl spirolide C of 50 μg kg(-1) of shellfish meat. The recovery rate of 13-desmethyl spirolide C for spiked samples with this assay was 80% and the inter-assay coefficient of variation was 8%. This 384-well microplate, chemiluminescence method can be used as a high-throughput screening assay to detect 13-desmethyl spirolide C in shellfish meat in order to reduce the number of samples to be processed through bioassays or analytical methods. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Design of novel neurokinin 1 receptor antagonists based on conformationally constrained aromatic amino acids and discovery of a potent chimeric opioid agonist-neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Ballet, Steven; Feytens, Debby; Buysse, Koen; Chung, Nga N; Lemieux, Carole; Tumati, Suneeta; Keresztes, Attila; Van Duppen, Joost; Lai, Josephine; Varga, Eva; Porreca, Frank; Schiller, Peter W; Vanden Broeck, Jozef; Tourwé, Dirk

    2011-04-14

    A screening of conformationally constrained aromatic amino acids as base cores for the preparation of new NK1 receptor antagonists resulted in the discovery of three new NK1 receptor antagonists, 19 [Ac-Aba-Gly-NH-3',5'-(CF(3))(2)-Bn], 20 [Ac-Aba-Gly-NMe-3',5'-(CF(3))(2)-Bn], and 23 [Ac-Tic-NMe-3',5'-(CF(3))(2)-Bn], which were able to counteract the agonist effect of substance P, the endogenous ligand of NK1R. The most active NK1 antagonist of the series, 20 [Ac-Aba-Gly-NMe-3',5'-(CF(3))(2)-Bn], was then used in the design of a novel, potent chimeric opioid agonist-NK1 receptor antagonist, 35 [Dmt-D-Arg-Aba-Gly-NMe-3',5'-(CF(3))(2)-Bn], which combines the N terminus of the established Dmt(1)-DALDA agonist opioid pharmacophore (H-Dmt-D-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH(2)) and 20, the NK1R ligand. The opioid component of the chimeric compound 35, that is, Dmt-D-Arg-Aba-Gly-NH(2) (36), also proved to be an extremely potent and balanced μ and δ opioid receptor agonist with subnanomolar binding and in vitro functional activity.

  12. Design of novel neurokinin 1 receptor antagonists based on conformationally constrained aromatic amino acids and discovery of a potent chimeric opioid agonist-neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Ballet, Steven; Feytens, Debby; Buysse, Koen; Chung, Nga N.; Lemieux, Carole; Tumati, Suneeta; Keresztes, Attila; Van Duppen, Joost; Lai, Josephine; Varga, Eva; Porreca, Frank; Schiller, Peter W.; Broeck, Jozef Vanden; Tourwé, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    A screening of conformationally constrained aromatic amino acids as base cores for the preparation of new NK1 receptor antagonists resulted in the discovery of three new NK1 receptor antagonists, 19 [Ac-Aba-Gly-NH-3′,5′-(CF3)2-Bn], 20 [Ac-Aba-Gly-NMe-3′,5′-(CF3)2-Bn] and 23 [Ac-Tic-NMe-3′,5′-(CF3)2-Bn], which were able to counteract the agonist effect of substance P, the endogenous ligand of NK1R. The most active NK1 antagonist of the series, 20 [Ac-Aba-Gly-NMe-3′,5′-(CF3)2-Bn], was then used in the design of a novel, potent chimeric opioid agonist-NK1 receptor antagonist, 35 [Dmt-D-Arg-Aba-Gly-NMe-3′,5′-(CF3)2-Bn], which combines the N-terminus of the established Dmt1-DALDA agonist opioid pharmacophore (H-Dmt-D-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2) and 20, the NK1R ligand. The opioid component of the chimeric compound 35, i.e. Dmt-D-Arg-Aba-Gly-NH2 36, also proved to be an extremely potent and balanced μ- and δ opioid receptor agonist with subnanomolar binding and in vitro functional activity. PMID:21413804

  13. MicroRNA-128b suppresses tumor growth and promotes apoptosis by targeting A2bR in gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ping; Guo, Xueyan; Zong, Wei

    2015-11-27

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play crucial roles in the development and progression of human cancers, including gastric cancer (GC). The discovery of miRNAs may provide a new and powerful tool for studying the mechanism, diagnosis, and treatment of GC. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role and mechanism of miR-128b in the development and progression of GC. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to measure the expression level of miR-128b in GC tissues and cell lines. We found that miR-128b was significantly down-regulated in GC tissues and cell lines. In addition, over-expression of miR-128b inhibited GC cell proliferation, migration andmore » invasion of GC cells in vitro. Gain-of-function in vitro experiments further showed that the miR-128b mimic significantly promoted GC cell apoptosis. Subsequent dual-luciferase reporter assay identified one of the proto-oncogene A2bR as direct target of miR-128b. Therefore, our results indicate that miR-128b is a proto-oncogene miRNA that can suppresses GC proliferation and migration through down-regulation of the oncogene gene A2bR. Taken together, our results indicate that miR-128b could serve as a potential diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic option for human GC in the near future. - Highlights: • The expression of MiR-128b is significantly down-regulated in GC tissues and cell lines. • Ectopic expression of miR-128b directly affects cell proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro. • Overexpression of miR-128b increases apoptosis in GC cells. • A2bR is a candidate target gene of miR-128b. • MiR-128b represses cell proliferation, migration and invasion and promotes apoptosis by targeting A2bR in GC.« less

  14. An electrochemical lipopolysaccharide sensor based on an immobilized Toll-Like Receptor-4.

    PubMed

    Mayall, R M; Renaud-Young, M; Chan, N W C; Birss, V I

    2017-01-15

    Infections affect millions of people each year and yet methods to ascertain their cause can take more than 24h to be effective. This delay between the presentation with symptoms and the ability to make an informed decision about treatment can have adverse consequences, including death in severe cases. Additionally, pathogen identification is a concern for public safety amid the growing threat of bioterrorism. Developing a detection system based on the immune system offers the advantage of broad specificity, while still remaining pertinent to human health. In this work, human Toll-Like Receptor-4 (TLR-4), a protein responsible for detecting lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram-negative bacteria, was immobilized on both a large area and micro gold electrode via the tethering interaction of a modified Self-Assembled Monolayer (mSAM). In response to varying concentrations of its target, the protein-electrode combination showed a logarithmically proportional increased resistance to charge transfer from a solution-based redox probe, due to the formation of TLR-4 protein dimers. It also demonstrated excellent sensitivity to trace levels of Gram-negative bacteria, while remaining insensitive to both Gram-positive and viral challenges. Further characterization of our mSAM revealed that maintaining the appropriate receptor orientation on the electrode surface, mimicking TLR-4's role in a cellular context, was essential in producing a responsive sensor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Production of G protein-coupled receptors in an insect-based cell-free system.

    PubMed

    Sonnabend, Andrei; Spahn, Viola; Stech, Marlitt; Zemella, Anne; Stein, Christoph; Kubick, Stefan

    2017-10-01

    The biochemical analysis of human cell membrane proteins remains a challenging task due to the difficulties in producing sufficient quantities of functional protein. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent a main class of membrane proteins and drug targets, which are responsible for a huge number of signaling processes regulating various physiological functions in living cells. To circumvent the current bottlenecks in GPCR studies, we propose the synthesis of GPCRs in eukaryotic cell-free systems based on extracts generated from insect (Sf21) cells. Insect cell lysates harbor the fully active translational and translocational machinery allowing posttranslational modifications, such as glycosylation and phosphorylation of de novo synthesized proteins. Here, we demonstrate the production of several GPCRs in a eukaryotic cell-free system, performed within a short time and in a cost-effective manner. We were able to synthesize a variety of GPCRs ranging from 40 to 133 kDa in an insect-based cell-free system. Moreover, we have chosen the μ opioid receptor (MOR) as a model protein to analyze the ligand binding affinities of cell-free synthesized MOR in comparison to MOR expressed in a human cell line by "one-point" radioligand binding experiments. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 2328-2338. © 2017 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. hnRNP A2/B1 interacts with influenza A viral protein NS1 and inhibits virus replication potentially through suppressing NS1 RNA/protein levels and NS1 mRNA nuclear export

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yimeng; Zhou, Jianhong; Du, Yuchun, E-mail: ydu@uark.edu

    The NS1 protein of influenza viruses is a major virulence factor and exerts its function through interacting with viral/cellular RNAs and proteins. In this study, we identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 (hnRNP A2/B1) as an interacting partner of NS1 proteins by a proteomic method. Knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) resulted in higher levels of NS vRNA, NS1 mRNA, and NS1 protein in the virus-infected cells. In addition, we demonstrated that hnRNP A2/B1 proteins are associated with NS1 and NS2 mRNAs and that knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 promotes transport of NS1 mRNA from the nucleus to themore » cytoplasm in the infected cells. Lastly, we showed that knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 leads to enhanced virus replication. Our results suggest that hnRNP A2/B1 plays an inhibitory role in the replication of influenza A virus in host cells potentially through suppressing NS1 RNA/protein levels and NS1 mRNA nucleocytoplasmic translocation. - Highlights: • Cellular protein hnRNP A2/B1 interacts with influenza viral protein NS1. • hnRNP A2/B1 suppresses the levels of NS1 protein, vRNA and mRNA in infected cells. • hnRNP A2/B1 protein is associated with NS1 and NS2 mRNAs. • hnRNP A2/B1 inhibits the nuclear export of NS1 mRNAs. • hnRNP A2/B1 inhibits influenza virus replication.« less

  17. Adenosine receptors and caffeine in retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiang-Fan; Zhang, Shuya; Zhou, Rong; Lin, Zhenlang; Cai, Xiaohong; Lin, Jing; Huo, Yuqing; Liu, Xiaoling

    2017-06-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a major cause of childhood blindness in the world and is caused by oxygen-induced damage to the developing retinal vasculature, resulting in hyperoxia-induced vaso-obliteration and subsequent delayed retinal vascularization and hypoxia-induced pathological neovascularization driven by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling pathway in retina. Current anti-VEGF therapy has shown some effective in a clinical trial, but is associated with the unintended effects on delayed eye growth and retinal vasculature development of preterm infants. Notably, cellular responses to hypoxia are characterized by robust increases in extracellular adenosine production and the markedly induced adenosine receptors, which provide a novel target for preferential control of pathological angiogenesis without affecting normal vascular development. Here, we review the experimental evidence in support of adenosine receptor-based therapeutic strategy for ROP, including the aberrant adenosine signaling in oxygen-induced retinopathy and the role of three adenosine receptor subtypes (A 1 R, A 2A R, A 2B R) in development and treatment of ROP using oxygen-induced retinopathy models. The clinical and initial animal evidence that implicate the therapeutic effect of caffeine (a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist) in treatment of ROP are highlighted. Lastly, we discussed the translational potential as well therapeutic advantage of adenosine receptor- and caffeine-based therapy for ROR and possibly other proliferative retinopathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Partial least squares based gene expression analysis in estrogen receptor positive and negative breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Ma, W; Zhang, T-F; Lu, P; Lu, S H

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is categorized into two broad groups: estrogen receptor positive (ER+) and ER negative (ER-) groups. Previous study proposed that under trastuzumab-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy, tumor initiating cell (TIC) featured ER- tumors response better than ER+ tumors. Exploration of the molecular difference of these two groups may help developing new therapeutic strategies, especially for ER- patients. With gene expression profile from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database, we performed partial least squares (PLS) based analysis, which is more sensitive than common variance/regression analysis. We acquired 512 differentially expressed genes. Four pathways were found to be enriched with differentially expressed genes, involving immune system, metabolism and genetic information processing process. Network analysis identified five hub genes with degrees higher than 10, including APP, ESR1, SMAD3, HDAC2, and PRKAA1. Our findings provide new understanding for the molecular difference between TIC featured ER- and ER+ breast tumors with the hope offer supports for therapeutic studies.

  19. Selection of specific interactors from phage display library based on sea lamprey variable lymphocyte receptor sequences.

    PubMed

    Wezner-Ptasinska, Magdalena; Otlewski, Jacek

    2015-12-01

    Variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) are non-immunoglobulin components of adaptive immunity in jawless vertebrates. These proteins composed of leucine-rich repeat modules offer some advantages over antibodies in target binding and therefore are attractive candidates for biotechnological applications. In this paper we report the design and characterization of a phage display library based on a previously proposed dVLR scaffold containing six LRR modules [Wezner-Ptasinska et al., 2011]. Our library was designed based on a consensus approach in which the randomization scheme reflects the frequencies of amino acids naturally occurring in respective positions responsible for antigen recognition. We demonstrate general applicability of the scaffold by selecting dVLRs specific for lysozyme and S100A7 protein with KD values in the micromolar range. The dVLR library could be used as a convenient alternative to antibodies for effective isolation of high affinity binders.

  20. Rearrangement and allelic imbalance on chromosome 5 leads to homozygous deletions in the CDKN2A/2B tumor suppressor gene region in rat endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Adamovic, Tatjana; Hamta, Ahmad; Roshani, Leyla; Lü, Xuchun; Röhme, Dan; Helou, Khalil; Klinga-Levan, Karin; Levan, Göran

    2008-07-01

    The inbred BDII rat is a valuable experimental model for the genetic analysis of hormone-dependent endometrial adenocarcinoma (EAC). One common aberration detected previously by comparative genomic hybridization in rat EAC is loss affecting mostly the middle part of rat chromosome 5 (RNO5). First, we applied an RNO5-specific painting probe and four region-specific gene probes onto tumor cell metaphases from 21 EACs, and found that rearrangements involving RNO5 were common. The copy numbers of loci situated on RNO5 were found to be reduced, particularly for the CDKN2A/2B locus. Second, polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed with 22 genes and markers and homozygous deletions of the CDKN2A exon 1beta and CDKN2B genes were detected in 13 EACs (62%) and of CDKN2A exon 1alpha in 12 EACs (57%) Third, the occurrence of allelic imbalance in RNO5 was analyzed using 39 microsatellite markers covering the entire chromosome and frequent loss of heterozygosity was detected. Even more intriguing was the repeated finding of allele switching in a narrow region of 7 Mb across the CDKN2A/2B locus. We conclude that genetic events affecting the middle part of RNO5 (including bands 5q31 approximately q33 and the CDKN2A locus) contribute to the development of EAC in rat, with the CDKN2A locus having a primary role.

  1. DFT Predictions of Electronic, Transport, and Bulk Properties of Cubic Antifluorite A2B Compounds (A = Li, Na, B = O,S,Se)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malozovsky, Yuriy; Franklin, Lashounda; Bagayoko, Diola

    We present results from ab-initio,self-consistent calculations of electronic, transport, and bulk properties of cubic antifluorite (anti-CaF2) compounds A2B (A = Li, Na, B = O, S, Se). Our computations employed the local density approximation (LDA) potential of Ceperley and Alder and the linear combination of atomic orbital (LCAO) formalism. The implementation of the LCAO formalism followed the Bagayoko, Zhao, and Williams method, as enhanced by Ekuma and Franklin (BZW-EF). Consequently, our calculations search for and attained the ground states of the systems under study, as required by DFT; our results therefore possess the full, physical content of DFT. We discuss band structures, band gaps, and related properties of these materials, including calculated, total and partial densities of states (DOS and PDOS), effective masses of charge carriers, equilibrium lattice constants, and the bulk moduli of cubic antifluorite compounds A2B (A = Li, Na, B = O, S, Se). Our results are predictions in some cases, due to the lack of experimental data. Work funded in part by the US Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) (Award No.DE-NA0002630), the National Science Foundation (NSF) (Award No, 1503226), LaSPACE, and LONI-SUBR.

  2. Adnectin-Based Design of Chimeric Antigen Receptor for T Cell Engineering.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaolu; Cinay, Gunce E; Zhao, Yifan; Guo, Yunfei; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Wang, Pin

    2017-11-01

    Although chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cell therapy has achieved encouraging clinical trial results for treating hematological cancers, further optimization can likely expand this therapeutic success to more patients and other cancer types. Most CAR constructs used in clinical trials incorporate single chain variable fragment (scFv) as the extracellular antigen recognition domain. The immunogenicity of nonhuman scFv could cause host rejection against CAR T cells and compromise their persistence and efficacy. The limited availability of scFvs and slow discovery of new monoclonal antibodies also limit the development of novel CAR constructs. Adnectin, a class of affinity molecules derived from the tenth type III domain of human fibronectin, can be an alternative to scFv as an antigen-binding moiety in the design of CAR molecules. We constructed adnectin-based CARs targeting epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) and found that compared to scFv-based CAR, T cells engineered with adnectin-based CARs exhibited equivalent cell-killing activity against target H292 lung cancer cells in vitro and had comparable antitumor efficacy in xenograft tumor-bearing mice in vivo. In addition, with optimal affinity tuning, adnectin-based CAR showed higher selectivity on target cells with high EGFR expression than on those with low expression. This new design of adnectin CARs can potentially facilitate the development of T cell immunotherapy for cancer and other diseases. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Prediction of CNS occupancy of dopamine D2 receptor based on systemic exposure and in vitro experiments.

    PubMed

    Kanamitsu, Kayoko; Arakawa, Ryosuke; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Suhara, Tetsuya; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki

    2016-12-01

    The effect of drugs in the central nervous system (CNS) is closely related to occupancy of their target receptor. In this study, we integrated plasma concentrations, in vitro/in vivo data for receptor or protein binding, and in silico data, using a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model, to examine the predictability of receptor occupancy in humans. The occupancy of the dopamine D2 receptor and the plasma concentrations of the antipsychotic drugs quetiapine and perospirone in humans were collected from the literature or produced experimentally. Association and dissociation rate constants and unbound fractions in the serum and brain were determined in vitro/in vivo using human D2 receptor-expressing membrane fractions, human serum and mouse brain. The permeability of drugs across the blood-brain barrier was estimated based on their physicochemical properties. The effect of a metabolite of perospirone, ID-15036, was also considered. The time profiles of D2 receptor occupancy following oral dose of quetiapine and perospirone predicted were similar to the observed values. This approach could assist in the design of clinical studies for drug development and the prediction of the impact of drug-drug interactions on CNS function in clinical settings. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Novel cell-based assay for detection of thyroid receptor beta-interacting environmental contaminants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stavreva, Diana A.; Varticovski, Lyuba; Levkova, Ludmila; George, Anuja A.; Davis, Luke; Pegoraro, Gianluca; Blazer, Vicki S.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Hager, Gordon L.

    2016-01-01

    Even though the presence of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) with thyroid hormone (TH)-like activities in the environment is a major health concern, the methods for their efficient detection and monitoring are still limited. Here we describe a novel cell assay, based on the translocation of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)—tagged chimeric molecule of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and the thyroid receptor beta (TRβ) from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in the presence of TR ligands. Unlike the constitutively nuclear TRβ, this GFP-GR-TRβ chimera is cytoplasmic in the absence of hormone while translocating to the nucleus in a time- and concentration-dependent manner upon stimulation with triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroid hormone analogue, TRIAC, while the reverse triiodothyronine (3,3′,5′-triiodothyronine, or rT3) was inactive. Moreover, GFP-GR-TRβ chimera does not show any cross-reactivity with the GR-activating hormones, thus providing a clean system for the screening of TR beta-interacting EDCs. Using this assay, we demonstrated that Bisphenol A (BPA) and 3,3′,5,5′-Tetrabromobisphenol (TBBPA) induced GFP-GR-TRβ translocation at micro molar concentrations. We screened over 100 concentrated water samples from different geographic locations in the United States and detected a low, but reproducible contamination in 53% of the samples. This system provides a novel high-throughput approach for screening for endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) interacting with TR beta.

  5. Novel cell-based assay for detection of thyroid receptor beta-interacting environmental contaminants

    PubMed Central

    Stavreva, Diana A.; Varticovski, Lyuba; Levkova, Ludmila; George, Anuja A.; Davis, Luke; Pegoraro, Gianluca; Blazer, Vicki; Iwanowicz, Luke; Hager, Gordon L.

    2016-01-01

    Even though the presence of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) with thyroid hormone (TH)-like activities in the environment is a major health concern, the methods for their efficient detection and monitoring are still limited. Here we describe a novel cell assay, based on the translocation of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) - tagged chimeric molecule of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and the thyroid receptor beta (TRβ) from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in the presence of TR ligands. Unlike the constitutively nuclear TRβ, this GFP-GR-TRβ chimera is cytoplasmic in the absence of hormone while translocating to the nucleus in a time- and concentration-dependent manner upon stimulation with triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroid hormone analogue, TRIAC, while the reverse triiodothyronine (3,3′,5′-triiodothyronine, or rT3) was inactive. Moreover, GFP-GR-TRβ chimera does not show any cross-reactivity with the GR-activating hormones, thus providing a clean system for the screening of TR beta -interacting EDCs. Using this assay, we demonstrated that Bisphenol A (BPA) and 3,3′,5,5′-Tetrabromobisphenol (TBBPA) induced GFP-GR-TRβ translocation at micro molar concentrations. We screened over 100 concentrated water samples from different geographic locations in the United States and detected a low, but reproducible contamination in 53 % of the samples. This system provides a novel high-throughput approach for screening for endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) interacting with TR beta. PMID:27528272

  6. Alpha7 nicotinic receptors as novel therapeutic targets for inflammation-based diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bencherif, Merouane; Lippiello, Patrick M.; Lucas, Rudolf; Marrero, Mario B.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years the etiopathology of a number of debilitating diseases such as type 2 diabetes, arthritis, atherosclerosis, psoriasis, asthma, cystic fibrosis, sepsis, and ulcerative colitis has increasingly been linked to runaway cytokine-mediated inflammation. Cytokine-based therapeutic agents play a major role in the treatment of these diseases. However, the temporospatial changes in various cytokines are still poorly understood and attempts to date have focused on the inhibition of specific cytokines such as TNF-α. As an alternative approach, a number of preclinical studies have confirmed the therapeutic potential of targeting alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated anti-inflammatory effects through modulation of proinflammatory cytokines. This “cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway” modulates the immune system through cholinergic mechanisms that act on alpha7 receptors expressed on macrophages and immune cells. If the preclinical findings translate into human efficacy this approach could potentially provide new therapies for treating a broad array of intractable diseases and conditions with inflammatory components. PMID:20953658

  7. Diaminomaleonitrile-based azo receptors: Synthesis, DFT studies and their antibacterial activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanmohammadi, Hamid; Arab, Vajihe; Rezaeian, Khatereh; Talei, Gholam Reza; Pass, Maryam; Shabani, Nafiseh

    2017-02-01

    New unsymmetric diaminomaleonitrile-based azo receptors (H3Ln, n = 1-3) have been synthesized via condensation reaction of 5-(4-X-phenyl)-azo-salicyladehyde (X = NO2, OMe and CH3) with 2-amino-3-(5-bromo-2-hydroxybenzylamino)maleonitrile. The solvatochromic behaviors of the molecules were probed by studying their UV-Vis spectra in five pure organic solvents of different polarities. The p-NO2 substituted receptor shows a dramatic color change from yellow to blue upon the addition of fluoride ion in CH3CN. This capability was studied by systematic TD-DFT calculations. These compounds were assayed for their in vitro antibacterial activities against Gram-positive (S. aureus, S. epidermidis and L. monocytogenes) and Gram-negative (E. coli, P. aeruginosa and K. pneumonia.) bacteria by disc diffusion method. The results indicated that the compounds show good inhibition against Gram positive bacteria namely L. monocytogenes as compared to standard drugs.

  8. Novel cell-based assay for detection of thyroid receptor beta-interacting environmental contaminants.

    PubMed

    Stavreva, Diana A; Varticovski, Lyuba; Levkova, Ludmila; George, Anuja A; Davis, Luke; Pegoraro, Gianluca; Blazer, Vicki; Iwanowicz, Luke; Hager, Gordon L

    2016-08-10

    Even though the presence of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) with thyroid hormone (TH)-like activities in the environment is a major health concern, the methods for their efficient detection and monitoring are still limited. Here we describe a novel cell assay, based on the translocation of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged chimeric molecule of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and the thyroid receptor beta (TRβ) from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in the presence of TR ligands. Unlike the constitutively nuclear TRβ, this GFP-GR-TRβ chimera is cytoplasmic in the absence of hormone while translocating to the nucleus in a time- and concentration-dependent manner upon stimulation with triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroid hormone analogue, TRIAC, while the reverse triiodothyronine (3,3',5'-triiodothyronine, or rT3) was inactive. Moreover, GFP-GR-TRβ chimera does not show any cross-reactivity with the GR-activating hormones, thus providing a clean system for the screening of TR beta-interacting EDCs. Using this assay, we demonstrated that Bisphenol A (BPA) and 3,3',5,5'-Tetrabromobisphenol (TBBPA) induced GFP-GR-TRβ translocation at micro molar concentrations. We screened over 100 concentrated water samples from different geographic locations in the United States and detected a low, but reproducible contamination in 53% of the samples. This system provides a novel high-throughput approach for screening for endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) interacting with TR beta. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Peptide-MHC-based nanomedicines for autoimmunity function as T-cell receptor microclustering devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singha, Santiswarup; Shao, Kun; Yang, Yang; Clemente-Casares, Xavier; Solé, Patricia; Clemente, Antonio; Blanco, Jesús; Dai, Qin; Song, Fayi; Liu, Shang Wan; Yamanouchi, Jun; Umeshappa, Channakeshava Sokke; Nanjundappa, Roopa Hebbandi; Detampel, Pascal; Amrein, Matthias; Fandos, César; Tanguay, Robert; Newbigging, Susan; Serra, Pau; Khadra, Anmar; Chan, Warren C. W.; Santamaria, Pere

    2017-07-01

    We have shown that nanoparticles (NPs) can be used as ligand-multimerization platforms to activate specific cellular receptors in vivo. Nanoparticles coated with autoimmune disease-relevant peptide-major histocompatibility complexes (pMHC) blunted autoimmune responses by triggering the differentiation and expansion of antigen-specific regulatory T cells in vivo. Here, we define the engineering principles impacting biological activity, detail a synthesis process yielding safe and stable compounds, and visualize how these nanomedicines interact with cognate T cells. We find that the triggering properties of pMHC-NPs are a function of pMHC intermolecular distance and involve the sustained assembly of large antigen receptor microclusters on murine and human cognate T cells. These compounds show no off-target toxicity in zebrafish embryos, do not cause haematological, biochemical or histological abnormalities, and are rapidly captured by phagocytes or processed by the hepatobiliary system. This work lays the groundwork for the design of ligand-based NP formulations to re-program in vivo cellular responses using nanotechnology.

  10. Modern approaches to the design of memory and cognitive function stimulants based on AMPA receptor ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, V. V.; Proshin, A. N.; Kinzirsky, A. S.; Bachurin, Sergey O.

    2009-05-01

    Data on the structure and properties of compounds acting on AMPA receptors, the key subtype of ionotropic glutamate receptors of the mammalian central nervous system, are analyzed. Data on the role of these receptors in provision of memory and cognitive function formation and impairment processes are presented. The attention is focused on the modern views on the mechanisms of AMPA receptor desensitization and deactivation and action of substances affecting these processes. The structures of key positive modulators of AMPA receptors are given. The problems of application of these substances as therapeutic means for preventing and treating neurodegenerative and psychoneurological diseases are discussed. Bibliography — 121 references.

  11. Ligand and structure-based methodologies for the prediction of the activity of G protein-coupled receptor ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanzi, Stefano; Tikhonova, Irina G.; Harden, T. Kendall; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2009-11-01

    Accurate in silico models for the quantitative prediction of the activity of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligands would greatly facilitate the process of drug discovery and development. Several methodologies have been developed based on the properties of the ligands, the direct study of the receptor-ligand interactions, or a combination of both approaches. Ligand-based three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships (3D-QSAR) techniques, not requiring knowledge of the receptor structure, have been historically the first to be applied to the prediction of the activity of GPCR ligands. They are generally endowed with robustness and good ranking ability; however they are highly dependent on training sets. Structure-based techniques generally do not provide the level of accuracy necessary to yield meaningful rankings when applied to GPCR homology models. However, they are essentially independent from training sets and have a sufficient level of accuracy to allow an effective discrimination between binders and nonbinders, thus qualifying as viable lead discovery tools. The combination of ligand and structure-based methodologies in the form of receptor-based 3D-QSAR and ligand and structure-based consensus models results in robust and accurate quantitative predictions. The contribution of the structure-based component to these combined approaches is expected to become more substantial and effective in the future, as more sophisticated scoring functions are developed and more detailed structural information on GPCRs is gathered.

  12. A globotetraosylceramide (Gb₄) receptor-based ELISA for quantitative detection of Shiga toxin 2e.

    PubMed

    Togashi, Katsuhiro; Sasaki, Shiho; Sato, Wataru

    2015-08-01

    Currently, no simple assays are available for routine quantitative detection of Escherichia coli-produced Shiga toxin 2e (Stx2e) that causes porcine edema disease. Here, we present a novel quantitative detection method for Stx2e based on the measurement of Stx2e binding to the specific globotetraosylceramide (Gb4) receptor by ELISA (Gb4-ELISA). No cross-reactivity was found with the other Shiga toxins Stx1 and Stx2, indicating high specificity. When the recombinant Stx2e B subunit (Stx2eB) was used, the absorbance measured by Gb4-ELISA increased linearly with Stx2eB concentration in the range of 20-2,500 ng/ml. The Gb4-ELISA method can be easily performed, suggesting that it would be a useful diagnostic tool for porcine edema disease.

  13. Mechanism-Based Tumor-Targeting Drug Delivery System. Validation of Efficient Vitamin Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis and Drug Release

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Wong, S.; Zhao, X.

    An efficient mechanism-based tumor-targeting drug delivery system, based on tumor-specific vitamin-receptor mediated endocytosis, has been developed. The tumor-targeting drug delivery system is a conjugate of a tumor-targeting molecule (biotin: vitamin H or vitamin B-7), a mechanism-based self-immolative linker and a second-generation taxoid (SB-T-1214) as the cytotoxic agent. This conjugate (1) is designed to be (i) specific to the vitamin receptors overexpressed on tumor cell surface and (ii) internalized efficiently through receptor-mediated endocytosis, followed by smooth drug release via glutathione-triggered self-immolation of the linker. In order to monitor and validate the sequence of events hypothesized, i.e., receptor-mediated endocytosis of the conjugate,more » drug release, and drug-binding to the target protein (microtubules), three fluorescent/fluorogenic molecular probes (2, 3, and 4) were designed and synthesized. The actual occurrence of these processes was unambiguously confirmed by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) and flow cytometry using L1210FR leukemia cells, overexpressing biotin receptors. The molecular probe 4, bearing the taxoid linked to fluorescein, was also used to examine the cell specificity (i.e., efficacy of receptor-based cell targeting) for three cell lines, L1210FR (biotin receptors overexpressed), L1210 (biotin receptors not overexpressed), and WI38 (normal human lung fibroblast, biotin receptor negative). As anticipated, the molecular probe 4 exhibited high specificity only to L1210FR. To confirm the direct correlation between the cell-specific drug delivery and anticancer activity of the probe 4, its cytotoxicity against these three cell lines was also examined. The results clearly showed a good correlation between the two methods. In the same manner, excellent cell-specific cytotoxicity of the conjugate 1 (without fluorescein attachment to the taxoid) against the same three cell lines was confirmed. This

  14. Selective CB2 receptor agonists. Part 2: Structure-activity relationship studies and optimization of proline-based compounds.

    PubMed

    Riether, Doris; Zindell, Renee; Wu, Lifen; Betageri, Raj; Jenkins, James E; Khor, Someina; Berry, Angela K; Hickey, Eugene R; Ermann, Monika; Albrecht, Claudia; Ceci, Angelo; Gemkow, Mark J; Nagaraja, Nelamangala V; Romig, Helmut; Sauer, Achim; Thomson, David S

    2015-02-01

    Through a ligand-based pharmacophore model (S)-proline based compounds were identified as potent cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) agonists with high selectivity over the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1). Structure-activity relationship investigations for this compound class lead to oxo-proline compounds 21 and 22 which combine an impressive CB1 selectivity profile with good pharmacokinetic properties. In a streptozotocin induced diabetic neuropathy model, 22 demonstrated a dose-dependent reversal of mechanical hyperalgesia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Correlation of A2bAR and KLF4/KLF15 with Obesity-Dyslipidemia Induced Inflammation in Uygur Population

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cuizhe; Ha, Xiaodan; Li, Wei; Xu, Peng; Gu, Yajuan; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Yan; Xie, Jianxin; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the researchers collected visceral adipose tissue from the Uygur population, which were divided into two groups: the normal control group (NC, n = 50, 18.0 kg/m2 ≤ BMI ≤ 23.9 kg/m2) and the obese group (OB, n = 45, BMI ≥ 28 kg/m2), and then use real-time PCR to detect the mRNA expression level of key genes involved in inflammation signaling pathway. The findings suggest that, in obese status, the lower expression level of A2bAR, KLF4, and KLF15 of visceral adipose tissue may correlate with obese-dyslipidemia induced inflammation in Uygur population. PMID:27199507

  16. Synthesis and characterization of monoisomeric 1,8,15,22-substituted (A3B and A2B2) phthalocyanines and phthalocyanine-fullerene dyads.

    PubMed

    Ranta, Jenni; Kumpulainen, Tatu; Lemmetyinen, Helge; Efimov, Alexander

    2010-08-06

    Synthesis and characterization of three phthalocyanine-fullerene (Pc-C(60)) dyads, corresponding monoisomeric phthalocyanines (Pc), and building blocks, phthalonitriles, are described. Six novel bisaryl phthalonitriles were prepared by the Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction from trifluoromethanesulfonic acid 2,3-dicyanophenyl ester and various oxaborolanes. Two phthalonitriles were selected for the synthesis of A(3)B- and A(2)B(2)-type phthalocyanines. Phthalonitrile 4 has a bulky 3,5-di-tert-butylphenyl substituent at the alpha-phthalo position, which forces only one regioisomer to form and greatly increases the solubility of phthalocyanine. Phthalonitrile 8 has a 3-phenylpropanol side chain at the alpha-position making further modifications of the side group possible. Synthesized monoisomeric A(3)B- and A(2)B(2)-type phthalocyanines are modified by attachment of malonic residues. Finally, fullerene is covalently linked to phthalocyanine with one or two malonic bridges to produce Pc-C(60) dyads. Due to the monoisomeric structure and increased solubility of phthalocyanines, the quality of NMR spectra of the compounds is enhanced significantly, making detailed NMR analysis of the structures possible. The synthesized dyads have different orientations of phthalocyanine and fullerene, which strongly influence the electron transfer (ET) from phthalocyanine to fullerene moiety. Fluorescence quenchings of the dyads were measured in both polar and nonpolar solvents, and in all cases, the quenching was more efficient in the polar environment. As expected, most efficient fluorescence quenching was observed for dyad 20b, with two linkers and phthalocyanine and fullerene in face-to-face orientation.

  17. Identification of bicyclic hexafluoroisopropyl alcohol sulfonamides as retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor gamma (RORγ/RORc) inverse agonists. Employing structure-based drug design to improve pregnane X receptor (PXR) selectivity.

    PubMed

    Gong, Hua; Weinstein, David S; Lu, Zhonghui; Duan, James J-W; Stachura, Sylwia; Haque, Lauren; Karmakar, Ananta; Hemagiri, Hemalatha; Raut, Dhanya Kumar; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Khan, Javed; Camac, Dan; Sack, John S; Pudzianowski, Andrew; Wu, Dauh-Rurng; Yarde, Melissa; Shen, Ding-Ren; Borowski, Virna; Xie, Jenny H; Sun, Huadong; D'Arienzo, Celia; Dabros, Marta; Galella, Michael A; Wang, Faye; Weigelt, Carolyn A; Zhao, Qihong; Foster, William; Somerville, John E; Salter-Cid, Luisa M; Barrish, Joel C; Carter, Percy H; Dhar, T G Murali

    2018-01-15

    We disclose the optimization of a high throughput screening hit to yield benzothiazine and tetrahydroquinoline sulfonamides as potent RORγt inverse agonists. However, a majority of these compounds showed potent activity against pregnane X receptor (PXR) and modest activity against liver X receptor α (LXRα). Structure-based drug design (SBDD) led to the identification of benzothiazine and tetrahydroquinoline sulfonamide analogs which completely dialed out LXRα activity and were less potent at PXR. Pharmacodynamic (PD) data for compound 35 in an IL-23 induced IL-17 mouse model is discussed along with the implications of a high Y max in the PXR assay for long term preclinical pharmacokinetic (PK) studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Development and application of hybrid structure based method for efficient screening of ligands binding to G-protein coupled receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortagere, Sandhya; Welsh, William J.

    2006-12-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise a large superfamily of proteins that are targets for nearly 50% of drugs in clinical use today. In the past, the use of structure-based drug design strategies to develop better drug candidates has been severely hampered due to the absence of the receptor's three-dimensional structure. However, with recent advances in molecular modeling techniques and better computing power, atomic level details of these receptors can be derived from computationally derived molecular models. Using information from these models coupled with experimental evidence, it has become feasible to build receptor pharmacophores. In this study, we demonstrate the use of the Hybrid Structure Based (HSB) method that can be used effectively to screen and identify prospective ligands that bind to GPCRs. Essentially; this multi-step method combines ligand-based methods for building enriched libraries of small molecules and structure-based methods for screening molecules against the GPCR target. The HSB method was validated to identify retinal and its analogues from a random dataset of ˜300,000 molecules. The results from this study showed that the 9 top-ranking molecules are indeed analogues of retinal. The method was also tested to identify analogues of dopamine binding to the dopamine D2 receptor. Six of the ten top-ranking molecules are known analogues of dopamine including a prodrug, while the other thirty-four molecules are currently being tested for their activity against all dopamine receptors. The results from both these test cases have proved that the HSB method provides a realistic solution to bridge the gap between the ever-increasing demand for new drugs to treat psychiatric disorders and the lack of efficient screening methods for GPCRs.

  19. VH mutant rabbits lacking the VH1a2 gene develop a2+ B cells in the appendix by gene conversion-like alteration of a rearranged VH4 gene.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, D; Mage, R G; Schiaffella, E

    1998-02-01

    We investigated the molecular basis for the appearance of V(H)a2 allotype-bearing B cells in mutant Alicia rabbits. The mutation arose in an a2 rabbit; mutants exhibit altered expression of V(H) genes because of a small deletion encompassing V(H)1a2, the 3'-most gene in the V(H) locus. The V(H)1 gene is the major source of V(H)a allotype because this gene is preferentially rearranged in normal rabbits. In young homozygous ali/ali animals, the levels of a2 molecules found in the serum increase with age. In adult ali/ali rabbits, 20 to 50% of serum Igs and B cells bear a2 allotypic determinants. Previous studies suggested that positive selection results in expansion of a2 allotype-bearing B cells in the appendix of young mutant ali/ali rabbits. We separated appendix cells from a 6-wk-old Alicia rabbit by FACS based on the expression of surface IgM and a2 allotype. The VDJ portion of the expressed Ig mRNA was amplified from the IgM+ a2+ and IgM+ a2- populations by reverse transcriptase-PCR. The cDNAs from both populations were cloned and sequenced. Analysis of these sequences suggested that, in a2+ B cells, the first D proximal functional gene in Alicia rabbits, V(H)4a2, rearranged and was altered further by a gene conversion-like mechanism. Upstream V(H) genes were identified as potential gene sequence donors; V(H)9 was found to be the most frequently used gene donor. Among the a2- B cells, y33 was the most frequently rearranged gene.

  20. Chemical function based pharmacophore generation of endothelin-A selective receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Funk, Oliver F; Kettmann, Viktor; Drimal, Jan; Langer, Thierry

    2004-05-20

    Both quantitative and qualitative chemical function based pharmacophore models of endothelin-A (ET(A)) selective receptor antagonists were generated by using the two algorithms HypoGen and HipHop, respectively, which are implemented in the Catalyst molecular modeling software. The input for HypoGen is a training set of 18 ET(A) antagonists exhibiting IC(50) values ranging between 0.19 nM and 67 microM. The best output hypothesis consists of five features: two hydrophobic (HY), one ring aromatic (RA), one hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA), and one negative ionizable (NI) function. The highest scoring Hip Hop model consists of six features: three hydrophobic (HY), one ring aromatic (RA), one hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA), and one negative ionizable (NI). It is the result of an input of three highly active, selective, and structurally diverse ET(A) antagonists. The predictive power of the quantitative model could be approved by using a test set of 30 compounds, whose activity values spread over 6 orders of magnitude. The two pharmacophores were tested according to their ability to extract known endothelin antagonists from the 3D molecular structure database of Derwent's World Drug Index. Thereby the main part of selective ET(A) antagonistic entries was detected by the two hypotheses. Furthermore, the pharmacophores were used to screen the Maybridge database. Six compounds were chosen from the output hit lists for in vitro testing of their ability to displace endothelin-1 from its receptor. Two of these are new potential lead compounds because they are structurally novel and exhibit satisfactory activity in the binding assay.

  1. The selectivity of water-based pyrophosphate recognition is tuned by metal substitution in dimetallic receptors.

    PubMed

    Svane, Simon; Kjeldsen, Frank; McKee, Vickie; McKenzie, Christine J

    2015-07-14

    The three dimetallic compounds [Ga2(bpbp)(OH)2(H2O)2](ClO4)3, [In2(bpbp)(CH3CO2)2](ClO4)3 and [Zn2(bpbp)(HCO2)2](ClO4) (bpbp(-) = 2,6-bis((N,N'-bis(2-picolyl)amino)methyl)-4-tertbutylphenolate) were evaluated as stable solid state precursors for reactive solution state receptors to use for the recognition of the biologically important anion pyrophosphate in water at neutral pH. Indicator displacement assays using in situ generated complex-pyrocatechol violet adducts, {M2(bpbp)(HxPV)}(n+) M = Ga(3+), In(3+), Zn(2+), were tested for selectivity in their reactions with a series of common anions: pyrophosphate, phosphate, ATP, arsenate, nitrate, perchlorate, chloride, sulfate, formate, carbonate and acetate. The receptor employing Ga(3+) showed a slow but visually detectable response (blue to yellow) in the presence of one equivalent of pyrophosphate but no response to any other anion, even when they were present in much higher concentrations. The systems based on In(3+) or Zn(2+) show less selectivity in accord with visibly discernible responses to several of the anions. These results demonstrate a facile method for increasing anion selectivity without modification of an organic dinucleating ligand scaffold. The comfortable supramolecular recognition of pyrophosphate by the dimetallic complexes is demonstrated by the single crystal X-ray structure of [Ga2(bpbp)(HP2O7)](ClO4)2 in which the pyrophosphate is coordinated to the two gallium ions via four of its oxygen atoms.

  2. HPLC-based activity profiling for GABAA receptor modulators from the traditional Chinese herbal drug Kushen (Sophora flavescens root)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    An EtOAc extract from the roots of Sophora flavescens (Kushen) potentiated γ -aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced chloride influx in Xenopus oocytes transiently expressing GABAA receptors with subunit composition, α1β2γ2S. HPLC-based activity profiling of the extract led to the identification of 8-lavandulyl flavonoids, kushenol I, sophoraflavanone G, (–)-kurarinone, and kuraridine as GABAA receptor modulators. In addition, a series of inactive structurally related flavonoids were characterized. Among these, kushenol Y (4) was identified as a new natural product. The 8-lavandulyl flavonoids are first representatives of a novel scaffold for the target. PMID:21207144

  3. Angiotensin II receptor blocker-based therapy in Japanese elderly, high-risk, hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hisao; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei; Matsui, Kunihiko; Jinnouchi, Tomio; Jinnouchi, Hideaki; Arakawa, Kikuo

    2012-10-01

    It is unknown whether high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker therapy or angiotensin II receptor blocker + calcium channel blocker combination therapy is better in elderly hypertensive patients with high cardiovascular risk. The objective of the study was to compare the efficacy of these treatments in elderly, high-risk Japanese hypertensive patients. The OlmeSartan and Calcium Antagonists Randomized (OSCAR) study was a multicenter, prospective, randomized, open-label, blinded-end point study of 1164 hypertensive patients aged 65 to 84 years with type 2 diabetes or cardiovascular disease. Patients with uncontrolled hypertension during treatment with olmesartan 20 mg/d were randomly assigned to receive 40 mg/d olmesartan (high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker) or a calcium channel blocker + 20 mg/d olmesartan (angiotensin II receptor blocker + calcium channel blocker). The primary end point was a composite of cardiovascular events and noncardiovascular death. During a 3-year follow-up, blood pressure was significantly lower in the angiotensin II receptor blocker + calcium channel blocker group than in the high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker group. Mean blood pressure at 36 months was 135.0/74.3 mm Hg in the high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker group and 132.6/72.6 mm Hg in the angiotensin II receptor blocker + calcium channel blocker group. More primary end points occurred in the high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker group than in the angiotensin II receptor blocker + calcium channel blocker group (58 vs 48 events, hazard ratio [HR], 1.31, 95% confidence interval, 0.89-1.92; P=.17). In patients with cardiovascular disease at baseline, more primary events occurred in the high-dose angiotensin II receptor blocker group (HR, 1.63, P=.03); in contrast, fewer events were observed in the subgroup without cardiovascular disease (HR, 0.52, P=.14). This treatment-by-subgroup interaction was significant (P=.02). The angiotensin II receptor blocker and

  4. A python-based docking program utilizing a receptor bound ligand shape: PythDock.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Cho, Seung Joo; Hah, Jung-Mi

    2011-09-01

    PythDock is a heuristic docking program that uses Python programming language with a simple scoring function and a population based search engine. The scoring function considers electrostatic and dispersion/repulsion terms. The search engine utilizes a particle swarm optimization algorithm. A grid potential map is generated using the shape information of a bound ligand within the active site. Therefore, the searching area is more relevant to the ligand binding. To evaluate the docking performance of PythDock, two well-known docking programs (AutoDock and DOCK) were also used with the same data. The accuracy of docked results were measured by the difference of the ligand structure between x-ray structure, and docked pose, i.e., average root mean squared deviation values of the bound ligand were compared for fourteen protein-ligand complexes. Since the number of ligands' rotational flexibility is an important factor affecting the accuracy of a docking, the data set was chosen to have various degrees of flexibility. Although PythDock has a scoring function simpler than those of other programs (AutoDock and DOCK), our results showed that PythDock predicted more accurate poses than both AutoDock4.2 and DOCK6.2. This indicates that PythDock could be a useful tool to study ligand-receptor interactions and could also be beneficial in structure based drug design.

  5. Increasing cell–device adherence using cultured insect cells for receptor-based biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuno, Hidefumi; Sakurai, Takeshi; Okamoto, Yuki; Tixier-Mita, Agnès; Toshiyoshi, Hiroshi; Mita, Yoshio; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2018-01-01

    Field-effect transistor (FET)-based biosensors have a wide range of applications, and a bio-FET odorant sensor, based on insect (Sf21) cells expressing insect odorant receptors (ORs) with sensitivity and selectivity, has emerged. To fully realize the practical application of bio-FET odorant sensors, knowledge of the cell–device interface for efficient signal transfer, and a reliable and low-cost measurement system using the commercial complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) foundry process, will be indispensable. However, the interfaces between Sf21 cells and sensor devices are largely unknown, and electrode materials used in the commercial CMOS foundry process are generally limited to aluminium, which is reportedly toxic to cells. In this study, we investigated Sf21 cell–device interfaces by developing cross-sectional specimens. Calcium imaging of Sf21 cells expressing insect ORs was used to verify the functions of Sf21 cells as odorant sensor elements on the electrode materials. We found that the cell–device interface was approximately 10 nm wide on average, suggesting that the adhesion mechanism of Sf21 cells may differ from that of other cells. These results will help to construct accurate signal detection from expressed insect ORs using FETs. PMID:29657822

  6. Increasing cell-device adherence using cultured insect cells for receptor-based biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terutsuki, Daigo; Mitsuno, Hidefumi; Sakurai, Takeshi; Okamoto, Yuki; Tixier-Mita, Agnès; Toshiyoshi, Hiroshi; Mita, Yoshio; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2018-03-01

    Field-effect transistor (FET)-based biosensors have a wide range of applications, and a bio-FET odorant sensor, based on insect (Sf21) cells expressing insect odorant receptors (ORs) with sensitivity and selectivity, has emerged. To fully realize the practical application of bio-FET odorant sensors, knowledge of the cell-device interface for efficient signal transfer, and a reliable and low-cost measurement system using the commercial complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) foundry process, will be indispensable. However, the interfaces between Sf21 cells and sensor devices are largely unknown, and electrode materials used in the commercial CMOS foundry process are generally limited to aluminium, which is reportedly toxic to cells. In this study, we investigated Sf21 cell-device interfaces by developing cross-sectional specimens. Calcium imaging of Sf21 cells expressing insect ORs was used to verify the functions of Sf21 cells as odorant sensor elements on the electrode materials. We found that the cell-device interface was approximately 10 nm wide on average, suggesting that the adhesion mechanism of Sf21 cells may differ from that of other cells. These results will help to construct accurate signal detection from expressed insect ORs using FETs.

  7. Multiple templates-based homology modeling enhances structure quality of AT1 receptor: validation by molecular dynamics and antagonist docking.

    PubMed

    Sokkar, Pandian; Mohandass, Shylajanaciyar; Ramachandran, Murugesan

    2011-07-01

    We present a comparative account on 3D-structures of human type-1 receptor (AT1) for angiotensin II (AngII), modeled using three different methodologies. AngII activates a wide spectrum of signaling responses via the AT1 receptor that mediates physiological control of blood pressure and diverse pathological actions in cardiovascular, renal, and other cell types. Availability of 3D-model of AT1 receptor would significantly enhance the development of new drugs for cardiovascular diseases. However, templates of AT1 receptor with low sequence similarity increase the complexity in straightforward homology modeling, and hence there is a need to evaluate different modeling methodologies in order to use the models for sensitive applications such as rational drug design. Three models were generated for AT1 receptor by, (1) homology modeling with bovine rhodopsin as template, (2) homology modeling with multiple templates and (3) threading using I-TASSER web server. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation (15 ns) of models in explicit membrane-water system, Ramachandran plot analysis and molecular docking with antagonists led to the conclusion that multiple template-based homology modeling outweighs other methodologies for AT1 modeling.

  8. Comparative Analysis of the Flax Immune Receptors L6 and L7 Suggests an Equilibrium-Based Switch Activation Model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chunhong; Newell, Kim; Lawrence, Gregory J.; Ellis, Jeffrey G.; Anderson, Peter A.; Dodds, Peter N.

    2016-01-01

    NOD-like receptors (NLRs) are central components of the plant immune system. L6 is a Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain-containing NLR from flax (Linum usitatissimum) conferring immunity to the flax rust fungus. Comparison of L6 to the weaker allele L7 identified two polymorphic regions in the TIR and the nucleotide binding (NB) domains that regulate both effector ligand-dependent and -independent cell death signaling as well as nucleotide binding to the receptor. This suggests that a negative functional interaction between the TIR and NB domains holds L7 in an inactive/ADP-bound state more tightly than L6, hence decreasing its capacity to adopt the active/ATP-bound state and explaining its weaker activity in planta. L6 and L7 variants with a more stable ADP-bound state failed to bind to AvrL567 in yeast two-hybrid assays, while binding was detected to the signaling active variants. This contrasts with current models predicting that effectors bind to inactive receptors to trigger activation. Based on the correlation between nucleotide binding, effector interaction, and immune signaling properties of L6/L7 variants, we propose that NLRs exist in an equilibrium between ON and OFF states and that effector binding to the ON state stabilizes this conformation, thereby shifting the equilibrium toward the active form of the receptor to trigger defense signaling. PMID:26744216

  9. Elucidating determinants of aerosol composition through particle-type-based receptor modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, M. L.; Jeong, C.-H.; Slowik, J. G.; Chang, R. Y.-W.; Corbin, J. C.; Lu, G.; Mihele, C.; Rehbein, P. J. G.; Sills, D. M. L.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Brook, J. R.; Evans, G. J.

    2011-03-01

    An aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) was deployed at a semi-rural site in Southern Ontario to characterize the size and chemical composition of individual particles. Particle-type-based receptor modelling of these data was used to investigate the determinants of aerosol chemical composition in this region. Individual particles were classified into particle-types and positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to their temporal trends to separate and cross-apportion particle-types to factors. The extent of chemical processing for each factor was assessed by evaluating the internal and external mixing state of the characteristic particle-types. The nine factors identified helped to elucidate the coupled interactions of these determinants. Nitrate-laden dust was found to be the dominant type of locally emitted particles measured by ATOFMS. Several factors associated with aerosol transported to the site from intermediate local-to-regional distances were identified: the Organic factor was associated with a combustion source to the north-west; the ECOC Day factor was characterized by nearby local-to-regional carbonaceous emissions transported from the south-west during the daytime; and the Fireworks factor consisted of pyrotechnic particles from the Detroit region following holiday fireworks displays. Regional aerosol from farther emissions sources were reflected through three factors: two biomass burning factors and a highly chemically processed long range transport factor. The biomass burning factors were separated by PMF due to differences in chemical processing which were caused in part by the passage of two thunderstorm gust fronts with different air mass histories. The remaining two factors, ECOC Night and Nitrate Background, represented the night-time partitioning of nitrate to pre-existing particles of different origins. The distinct meteorological conditions observed during this month-long study in the summer of 2007 provided a unique range

  10. Elucidating determinants of aerosol composition through particle-type-based receptor modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, M. L.; Jeong, C.-H.; Slowik, J. G.; Chang, R. Y.-W.; Corbin, J. C.; Lu, G.; Mihele, C.; Rehbein, P. J. G.; Sills, D. M. L.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Brook, J. R.; Evans, G. J.

    2011-08-01

    An aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) was deployed at a semi-rural site in southern Ontario to characterize the size and chemical composition of individual particles. Particle-type-based receptor modelling of these data was used to investigate the determinants of aerosol chemical composition in this region. Individual particles were classified into particle-types and positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to their temporal trends to separate and cross-apportion particle-types to factors. The extent of chemical processing for each factor was assessed by evaluating the internal and external mixing state of the characteristic particle-types. The nine factors identified helped to elucidate the coupled interactions of these determinants. Nitrate-laden dust was found to be the dominant type of locally emitted particles measured by ATOFMS. Several factors associated with aerosol transported to the site from intermediate local-to-regional distances were identified: the Organic factor was associated with a combustion source to the north-west; the ECOC Day factor was characterized by nearby local-to-regional carbonaceous emissions transported from the south-west during the daytime; and the Fireworks factor consisted of pyrotechnic particles from the Detroit region following holiday fireworks displays. Regional aerosol from farther emissions sources was reflected through three factors: two Biomass Burning factors and a highly chemically processed Long Range Transport factor. The Biomass Burning factors were separated by PMF due to differences in chemical processing which were in part elucidated by the passage of two thunderstorm gust fronts with different air mass histories. The remaining two factors, ECOC Night and Nitrate Background, represented the night-time partitioning of nitrate to pre-existing particles of different origins. The distinct meteorological conditions observed during this month-long study in the summer of 2007 provided a unique

  11. Successful ABO-Incompatible Renal Transplantation:  Blood Group A1B Donor Into A2B Recipient With Anti-A1 Isoagglutinins.

    PubMed

    Fadeyi, Emmanuel A; Stratta, Robert J; Farney, Alan C; Pomper, Gregory J

    2016-08-01

    Transplantation of the blood group A2B in a recipient was successfully performed in the setting of receiving a deceased donor kidney from an "incompatible" A1B donor. The donor and recipient were both typed for ABO blood group, including ABO genotyping. The donor and recipient were tested for ABO, non-ABO, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. The donor and recipient were typed for HLA antigens, including T- and B-flow cytometry crossmatch tests. The recipient's RBCs were negative with A1 lectin, and immunoglobulin G anti-A1 was demonstrated in the recipient's plasma. The donor-recipient pair was a four-antigen HLA mismatch, but final T- and B-flow cytometry crossmatch tests were compatible. The transplant procedure was uneventful; the patient experienced immediate graft function with no episodes of rejection or readmissions more than 2 years later. It may be safe to transplant across the A1/A2 blood group AB mismatch barrier in the setting of low titer anti-A1 isoagglutinins without the need for pretransplant desensitization even if the antibody produced reacts with anti-human globulin. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. The insect ecdysone receptor is a good potential target for RNAi-based pest control.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rong; Xu, Xinping; Liang, Yongkang; Tian, Honggang; Pan, Zhanqing; Jin, Shouheng; Wang, Na; Zhang, Wenqing

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has great potential for use in insect pest control. However, some significant challenges must be overcome before RNAi-based pest control can become a reality. One challenge is the proper selection of a good target gene for RNAi. Here, we report that the insect ecdysone receptor (EcR) is a good potential target for RNAi-based pest control in the brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens, a serious insect pest of rice plants. We demonstrated that the use of a 360 bp fragment (NlEcR-c) that is common between NlEcR-A and NlEcR-B for feeding RNAi experiments significantly decreased the relative mRNA expression levels of NlEcR compared with those in the dsGFP control. Feeding RNAi also resulted in a significant reduction in the number of offspring per pair of N. lugens. Consequently, a transgenic rice line expressing NlEcR dsRNA was constructed by Agrobacterium- mediated transformation. The results of qRT-PCR showed that the total copy number of the target gene in all transgenic rice lines was 2. Northern blot analysis showed that the small RNA of the hairpin dsNlEcR-c was successfully expressed in the transgenic rice lines. After newly hatched nymphs of N. lugens fed on the transgenic rice lines, effective RNAi was observed. The NlEcR expression levels in all lines examined were decreased significantly compared with the control. In all lines, the survival rate of the nymphs was nearly 90%, and the average number of offspring per pair in the treated groups was significantly less than that observed in the control, with a decrease of 44.18-66.27%. These findings support an RNAi-based pest control strategy and are also important for the management of rice insect pests.

  13. Exploring G protein-coupled receptor signaling networks using SILAC-based phosphoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Grace R.; Bethard, Jennifer R.; Berkaw, Mary N.; Nagel, Alexis K.; Luttrell, Louis M.; Ball, Lauren E.

    2015-01-01

    The type 1 parathyroid hormone receptor (PTH1R) is a key regulator of calcium homeostasis and bone turnover. Here, we employed SILAC-based quantitative mass spectrometry combined with bioinformatic pathways analysis to examine global changes in protein phosphorylation following short-term stimulation of endogenously expressed PTH1R in osteoblastic cells in vitro. Following 5 min exposure to the conventional agonist, PTH(1-34), we detected significant changes in the phosphorylation of 224 distinct proteins. Kinase substrate motif enrichment demonstrated that consensus motifs for PKA and CAMK2 were the most heavily upregulated within the phosphoproteome, while consensus motifs for mitogen-activated protein kinases were strongly downregulated. Signaling pathways analysis identified ERK1/2 and AKT as important nodal kinases in the downstream network and revealed strong regulation of small GTPases involved in cytoskeletal rearrangement, cell motility, and focal adhesion complex signaling. Our data illustrate the utility of quantitative mass spectrometry in measuring dynamic changes in protein phosphorylation following GPCR activation. PMID:26160508

  14. Synthesis, Pharmacological Evaluation, and Docking Studies of Novel Pyridazinone-Based Cannabinoid Receptor Type 2 Ligands.

    PubMed

    Ragusa, Giulio; Bencivenni, Serena; Morales, Paula; Callaway, Tyra; Hurst, Dow P; Asproni, Battistina; Merighi, Stefania; Loriga, Giovanni; Pinna, Gerard A; Reggio, Patricia H; Gessi, Stefania; Murineddu, Gabriele

    2018-03-25

    In recent years, cannabinoid type 2 receptors (CB 2 R) have emerged as promising therapeutic targets in a wide variety of diseases. Selective ligands of CB 2 R are devoid of the psychoactive effects typically observed for CB 1 R ligands. Based on our recent studies on a class of pyridazinone 4-carboxamides, further structural modifications of the pyridazinone core were made to better investigate the structure-activity relationships for this promising scaffold with the aim to develop potent CB 2 R ligands. In binding assays, two of the new synthesized compounds [6-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-2-(4-fluorobenzyl)-cis-N-(4-methylcyclohexyl)-3-oxo-2,3-dihydropyridazine-4-carboxamide (2) and 6-(4-chloro-3-methylphenyl)-cis-N-(4-methylcyclohexyl)-3-oxo-2-pentyl-2,3-dihydropyridazine-4-carboxamide (22)] showed high CB 2 R affinity, with K i values of 2.1 and 1.6 nm, respectively. In addition, functional assays of these compounds and other new active related derivatives revealed their pharmacological profiles as CB 2 R inverse agonists. Compound 22 displayed the highest CB 2 R selectivity and potency, presenting a favorable in silico pharmacokinetic profile. Furthermore, a molecular modeling study revealed how 22 produces inverse agonism through blocking the movement of the toggle-switch residue, W6.48. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Technical aspects of gel-based proteomics designed for elucidating an aryl hydrocarbon receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Wada, Yoshinao; Nakano, Norihiko

    2004-01-01

    The identification of proteins by mass spectrometry has revolutionalized the basic method of identifying proteins constituting an intracellular unit or network for certain biological functions. The gel-based strategy following immunoprecipitation was applied to elucidating proteins associated with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Two hundred femtomoles of AhR was recovered from approximately 2 x 10(7) HepG2 cells by immunoprecipitation and was sufficient for identification by peptide mass fingerprinting. Possible candidates for the AhR-associated proteins were also identified. Improvements of the current strategy to increase the overall sensitivity tenfold are required to clarify the AhR complex in full detail. For example, a combination of trypsin and Achromobacter protease I for in-gel digestion allows the number of missed cleavage sites to be set at zero for database searching, thereby reducing random matches and facilitating identification. There is also room for improvement in each step of sample preparation prior to mass spectrometry.

  16. Discovery of Novel GPVI Receptor Antagonists by Structure-Based Repurposing

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Lewis; Vasudevan, Sridhar R.; Jones, Chris I.; Gibbins, Jonathan M.; Churchill, Grant C.; Campbell, R. Duncan; Coxon, Carmen H.

    2014-01-01

    Inappropriate platelet aggregation creates a cardiovascular risk that is largely managed with thienopyridines and aspirin. Although effective, these drugs carry risks of increased bleeding and drug ‘resistance’, underpinning a drive for new antiplatelet agents. To discover such drugs, one strategy is to identify a suitable druggable target and then find small molecules that modulate it. A good and unexploited target is the platelet collagen receptor, GPVI, which promotes thrombus formation. To identify inhibitors of GPVI that are safe and bioavailable, we docked a FDA-approved drug library into the GPVI collagen-binding site in silico. We now report that losartan and cinanserin inhibit GPVI-mediated platelet activation in a selective, competitive and dose-dependent manner. This mechanism of action likely underpins the cardioprotective effects of losartan that could not be ascribed to its antihypertensive effects. We have, therefore, identified small molecule inhibitors of GPVI-mediated platelet activation, and also demonstrated the utility of structure-based repurposing. PMID:24971515

  17. Selective and regulated trapping of nicotinic receptor weak base ligands and relevance to smoking cessation

    PubMed Central

    Govind, Anitha P; Vallejo, Yolanda F; Stolz, Jacob R; Yan, Jing-Zhi; Swanson, Geoffrey T; Green, William N

    2017-01-01

    To better understand smoking cessation, we examined the actions of varenicline (Chantix) during long-term nicotine exposure. Varenicline reduced nicotine upregulation of α4β2-type nicotinic receptors (α4β2Rs) in live cells and neurons, but not for membrane preparations. Effects on upregulation depended on intracellular pH homeostasis and were not observed if acidic pH in intracellular compartments was neutralized. Varenicline was trapped as a weak base in acidic compartments and slowly released, blocking 125I-epibatidine binding and desensitizing α4β2Rs. Epibatidine itself was trapped; 125I-epibatidine slow release from acidic vesicles was directly measured and required the presence of α4β2Rs. Nicotine exposure increased epibatidine trapping by increasing the numbers of acidic vesicles containing α4β2Rs. We conclude that varenicline as a smoking cessation agent differs from nicotine through trapping in α4β2R-containing acidic vesicles that is selective and nicotine-regulated. Our results provide a new paradigm for how smoking cessation occurs and suggest how more effective smoking cessation reagents can be designed. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.25651.001 PMID:28718768

  18. Duplex Bioelectronic Tongue for Sensing Umami and Sweet Tastes Based on Human Taste Receptor Nanovesicles.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sae Ryun; An, Ji Hyun; Song, Hyun Seok; Park, Jin Wook; Lee, Sang Hun; Kim, Jae Hyun; Jang, Jyongsik; Park, Tai Hyun

    2016-08-23

    For several decades, significant efforts have been made in developing artificial taste sensors to recognize the five basic tastes. So far, the well-established taste sensor is an E-tongue, which is constructed with polymer and lipid membranes. However, the previous artificial taste sensors have limitations in various food, beverage, and cosmetic industries because of their failure to mimic human taste reception. There are many interactions between tastants. Therefore, detecting the interactions in a multiplexing system is required. Herein, we developed a duplex bioelectronic tongue (DBT) based on graphene field-effect transistors that were functionalized with heterodimeric human umami taste and sweet taste receptor nanovesicles. Two types of nanovesicles, which have human T1R1/T1R3 for the umami taste and human T1R2/T1R3 for the sweet taste on their membranes, immobilized on micropatterned graphene surfaces were used for the simultaneous detection of the umami and sweet tastants. The DBT platform led to highly sensitive and selective recognition of target tastants at low concentrations (ca. 100 nM). Moreover, our DBT was able to detect the enhancing effect of taste enhancers as in a human taste sensory system. This technique can be a useful tool for the detection of tastes instead of sensory evaluation and development of new artificial tastants in the food and beverage industry.

  19. Automatic superposition of drug molecules based on their common receptor site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yuichi; Inoue, Atsushi; Yamada, Miho; Tomioka, Nobuo; Itai, Akiko

    1992-10-01

    We have prevously developed a new rational method for superposing molecules in terms of submolecular physical and chemical properties, but not in terms of atom positions or chemical structures as has been done in the conventional methods. The program was originally developed for interactive use on a three-dimensional graphic display, providing goodness-of-fit indices on molecular shape, hydrogen bonds, electrostatic interactions and others. Here, we report a new unbiased searching method for the best superposition of molecules, covering all the superposing modes and conformational freedom, as an additional function of the program. The function is based on a novel least-squares method which superposes the expected positions and orientations of hydrogen bonding partners in the receptor that are deduced from both molecules. The method not only gives reliability and reproducibility to the result of the superposition, but also allows us to save labor and time. It is demonstrated that this method is very efficient for finding the correct superposing mode in such systems where hydrogen bonds play important roles.

  20. Ethylene Detection Based on Organic Field-Effect Transistors With Porogen and Palladium Particle Receptor Enhancements.

    PubMed

    Besar, Kalpana; Dailey, Jennifer; Katz, Howard E

    2017-01-18

    Ethylene sensing is a highly challenging problem for the horticulture industry because of the limited physiochemical reactivity of ethylene. Ethylene plays a very important role in the fruit life cycle and has a significant role in determining the shelf life of fruits. Limited ethylene monitoring capability results in huge losses to the horticulture industry as fruits may spoil before they reach the consumer, or they may not ripen properly. Herein we present a poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT)-based organic field effect transistor as a sensing platform for ethylene with sensitivity of 25 ppm V/V. To achieve this response, we used N-(tert-Butoxy-carbonyloxy)-phthalimide and palladium particles as additives to the P3HT film. N-(tert-Butoxy-carbonyloxy)-phthalimide is used to increase the porosity of the P3HT, thereby increasing the overall sensor surface area, whereas the palladium (<1 μm diameter) particles are used as receptors for ethylene molecules in order to further enhance the sensitivity of the sensor platform. Both modifications give statistically significant sensitivity increases over pure P3HT. The sensor response is reversible and is also highly selective for ethylene compared to common solvent vapors.

  1. A novel human-based receptor antagonist of sustained action reveals body weight control by endogenous GLP-1.

    PubMed

    Patterson, James T; Ottaway, Nickki; Gelfanov, Vasily M; Smiley, David L; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Pfluger, Paul T; Tschöp, Matthias H; Dimarchi, Richard D

    2011-02-18

    Ex-4 (9-39)a is a well characterized GLP-1 receptor antagonist that suffers from two notable limitations, its nonhuman amino acid sequence and its relatively short in vivo duration of action. Comparable N-terminal shortening of human GLP-1 lessens agonism but does not provide a high potency antagonist. Through a series of GLP-1/Ex-4 hybrid peptides, the minimal structural changes required to generate a pure GLP-1-based antagonist were identified as Glu16, Val19, and Arg20, yielding an antagonist of approximately 3-fold greater in vitro potency compared with Ex-4 (9-39)a. The structural basis of antagonism appears to result from stabilization of the α helix combined with enhanced electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions with the extracellular domain of the receptor. Site-specific acylation of the human-based antagonist yielded a peptide of increased potency as a GLP-1 receptor antagonist and 10-fold greater selectivity relative to the GIP receptor. The acylated antagonist demonstrated sufficient duration of action to maintain inhibitory activity when administered as a daily subcutaneous injection. The sustained pharmacokinetics and enhanced human sequence combine to form an antagonist optimized for clinical study. Daily administration of this antagonist by subcutaneous injection to diet-induced obese mice for 1 week caused a significant increase in food intake, body weight, and glucose intolerance, demonstrating endogenous GLP-1 as a relevant hormone in mammalian energy balance in the obese state.

  2. Neural networks distinguish between taste qualities based on receptor cell population responses.

    PubMed

    Varkevisser, B; Peterson, D; Ogura, T; Kinnamon, S C

    2001-06-01

    Response features of taste receptor cell action potentials were examined using an artificial neural network to determine whether they contain information about taste quality. Using the loose patch technique to record from hamster taste buds in vivo we recorded population responses of single fungiform papillae to NaCl (100 mM), sucrose (200 mM) and the synthetic sweetener NC-00274-01 (NC-01) (200 microM). Features of each response describing both burst and inter-burst characteristics were then presented to an artificial neural network for pairwise classification of taste stimuli. Responses to NaCl could be distinguished from those to both NC-01 and sucrose with accuracies of up to 86%. In contrast, pairwise comparisons between sucrose and NC-01 were not successful, scoring at chance (50%). Also, comparisons between two different concentrations of NaCl, 0.01 and 0.005 M, scored at chance. Pairwise comparisons using only those features that relate to the inter-burst behavior of the response (i.e. bursting rate) did not hinder the performance of the neural network as both sweeteners versus NaCl received scores of 75--85%. Comparisons using features corresponding to each individual burst scored poorly, receiving scores only slightly above chance. We then compared the sweeteners with varying concentrations of NaCl (0.1, 0.01, 0.005 and 0.001 M) using only those features corresponding to bursting rate within a 1 s time window. The neural network was capable of distinguishing between NaCl and NC-01 at all concentrations tested; while comparisons between NaCl and sucrose received high scores at all concentrations except 0.001 M. These results show that two different taste qualities can be distinguished from each other based solely on the bursting rates of action potentials in single taste buds and that this distinction is independent of stimulation intensity down to 0.001 M NaCl. These data suggest that action potentials in taste receptor cells may play a role in taste

  3. Development of a Sigma-2 Receptor affinity filter through a Monte Carlo based QSAR analysis.

    PubMed

    Rescifina, Antonio; Floresta, Giuseppe; Marrazzo, Agostino; Parenti, Carmela; Prezzavento, Orazio; Nastasi, Giovanni; Dichiara, Maria; Amata, Emanuele

    2017-08-30

    For the first time in sigma-2 (σ 2 ) receptor field, a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model has been built using pK i values of the whole set of known selective σ 2 receptor ligands (548 compounds), taken from the Sigma-2 Receptor Selective Ligands Database (S2RSLDB) (http://www.researchdsf.unict.it/S2RSLDB/), through the Monte Carlo technique and employing the software CORAL. The model has been developed by using a large and structurally diverse set of compounds, allowing for a prediction of different populations of chemical compounds endpoint (σ 2 receptor pK i ). The statistical quality reached, suggested that model for pK i determination is robust and possesses a satisfactory predictive potential. The statistical quality is high for both visible and invisible sets. The screening of the FDA approved drugs, external to our dataset, suggested that sixteen compounds might be repositioned as σ 2 receptor ligands (predicted pK i ≥8). A literature check showed that six of these compounds have already been tested for affinity at σ 2 receptor and, of these, two (Flunarizine and Terbinafine) have shown an experimental σ 2 receptor pK i >7. This suggests that this QSAR model may be used as focusing screening filter in order to prospectively find or repurpose new drugs with high affinity for the σ 2 receptor, and overall allowing for an enhanced hit rate respect to a random screening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Structure-based Virtual Screening and Identification of a Novel Androgen Receptor Antagonist*

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chin-Hee; Yang, Su Hui; Park, Eunsook; Cho, Suk Hee; Gong, Eun-Yeung; Khadka, Daulat Bikram; Cho, Won-Jea; Lee, Keesook

    2012-01-01

    Hormonal therapies, mainly combinations of anti-androgens and androgen deprivation, have been the mainstay treatment for advanced prostate cancer because the androgen-androgen receptor (AR) system plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of prostate cancers. However, the emergence of androgen resistance, largely due to inefficient anti-hormone action, limits the therapeutic usefulness of these therapies. Here, we report that 6-(3,4-dihydro-1H-isoquinolin-2-yl)-N-(6-methylpyridin-2-yl)nicotinamide (DIMN) acts as a novel anti-androgenic compound that may be effective in the treatment of both androgen-dependent and androgen-independent prostate cancers. Through AR structure-based virtual screening using the FlexX docking model, fifty-four compounds were selected and further screened for AR antagonism via cell-based tests. One compound, DIMN, showed an antagonistic effect specific to AR with comparable potency to that of the classical AR antagonists, hydroxyflutamide and bicalutamide. Consistent with their anti-androgenic activity, DIMN inhibited the growth of androgen-dependent LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Interestingly, the compound also suppressed the growth of androgen-independent C4–2 and CWR22rv prostate cancer cells, which express a functional AR, but did not suppress the growth of the AR-negative prostate cancer cells PPC-1, DU145, and R3327-AT3.1. Taken together, the results suggest that the synthetic compound DIMN is a novel anti-androgen and strong candidate for useful therapeutic agent against early stage to advanced prostate cancer. PMID:22798067

  5. CD3ζ-based chimeric antigen receptors mediate T cell activation via cis- and trans-signalling mechanisms: implications for optimization of receptor structure for adoptive cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bridgeman, J S; Ladell, K; Sheard, V E; Miners, K; Hawkins, R E; Price, D A; Gilham, D E

    2014-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) can mediate redirected lysis of tumour cells in a major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-independent manner, thereby enabling autologous adoptive T cell therapy for a variety of malignant neoplasms. Currently, most CARs incorporate the T cell receptor (TCR) CD3ζ signalling chain; however, the precise mechanisms responsible for CAR-mediated T cell activation are unclear. In this study, we used a series of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-mutant and transmembrane-modified receptors to demonstrate that CARs activate T cells both directly via the antigen-ligated signalling chain and indirectly via associated chains within the TCR complex. These observations allowed us to generate new receptors capable of eliciting polyfunctional responses in primary human T cells. This work increases our understanding of CAR function and identifies new avenues for the optimization of CAR-based therapeutic interventions. PMID:24116999

  6. Abnormal levels of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2B1 (hnRNPA2B1) in tumour tissue and blood samples from patients diagnosed with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Paul; Pollard, Damian; Larkin, AnneMarie; Henry, Michael; Meleady, Paula; Gately, Kathy; O'Byrne, Kenneth; Barr, Martin P; Lynch, Vincent; Ballot, Jo; Crown, John; Moriarty, Michael; O'Brien, Emmet; Morgan, Ross; Clynes, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Lung cancer is the second most common type of cancer in the world and is the most common cause of cancer-related death in both men and women. Research into causes, prevention and treatment of lung cancer is ongoing and much progress has been made recently in these areas, however survival rates have not significantly improved. Therefore, it is essential to develop biomarkers for early diagnosis of lung cancer, prediction of metastasis and evaluation of treatment efficiency, as well as using these molecules to provide some understanding about tumour biology and translate highly promising findings in basic science research to clinical application. In this investigation, two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were initially used to analyse conditioned media from a panel of lung cancer and normal bronchial epithelial cell lines. Significant proteins were identified with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2B1 (hnRNPA2B1), pyruvate kinase M2 isoform (PKM2), Hsc-70 interacting protein and lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) selected for analysis in serum from healthy individuals and lung cancer patients. hnRNPA2B1, PKM2 and LDHA were found to be statistically significant in all comparisons. Tissue analysis and knockdown of hnRNPA2B1 using siRNA subsequently demonstrated both the overexpression and potential role for this molecule in lung tumorigenesis. The data presented highlights a number of in vitro derived candidate biomarkers subsequently verified in patient samples and also provides some insight into their roles in the complex intracellular mechanisms associated with tumour progression.

  7. Nuclear waste disposal—pyrochlore (A2B2O7): Nuclear waste form for the immobilization of plutonium and "minor" actinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, Rodney C.; Weber, William J.; Lian, Jie

    2004-06-01

    During the past half-century, the nuclear fuel cycle has generated approximately 1400 metric tons of plutonium and substantial quantities of the "minor" actinides, such as Np, Am, and Cm. The successful disposition of these actinides has an important impact on the strategy for developing advanced nuclear fuel cycles, weapons proliferation, and the geologic disposal of high-level radioactive waste. During the last decade, there has been substantial interest in the use of the isometric pyrochlore structure-type, A2B2O7, for the immobilization of actinides. Most of the interest has focused on titanate-pyrochlore because of its chemical durability; however, these compositions experience a radiation-induced transition from the crystalline-to-aperiodic state due to radiation damage from the alpha-decay of actinides. Depending on the actinide concentration, the titanate pyrochlore will become amorphous in less than 1000 years of storage. Recently, systematic ion beam irradiations of a variety of pyrochlore compositions has revealed that many zirconate pyrochlores do not become amorphous, but remain crystalline as a defect fluorite structure-type due to disordering of the A- and B-site cations. The zirconate pyrochlores will remain crystalline even to very high doses, greater than 100 displacements per atom. Systematic experimental studies of actinide-doped and ion beam-irradiated pyrochlore, analyses of natural U- and Th-bearing pyrochlore, and simulations of the energetics of the disordering process now provide a rather detailed understanding of the structural and chemical controls on the response of pyrochlore to radiation. These results provide a solid basis for predicting the behavior and durability of pyrochlore used to immobilize plutonium.

  8. Insight into pattern of codon biasness and nucleotide base usage in serotonin receptor gene family from different mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Dass, J Febin Prabhu; Sudandiradoss, C

    2012-07-15

    5-HT (5-Hydroxy-tryptamine) or serotonin receptors are found both in central and peripheral nervous system as well as in non-neuronal tissues. In the animal and human nervous system, serotonin produces various functional effects through a variety of membrane bound receptors. In this study, we focus on 5-HT receptor family from different mammals and examined the factors that account for codon and nucleotide usage variation. A total of 110 homologous coding sequences from 11 different mammalian species were analyzed using relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU), correspondence analysis (COA) and hierarchical cluster analysis together with nucleotide base usage frequency of chemically similar amino acid codons. The mean effective number of codon (ENc) value of 37.06 for 5-HT(6) shows very high codon bias within the family and may be due to high selective translational efficiency. The COA and Spearman's rank correlation reveals that the nucleotide compositional mutation bias as the major factors influencing the codon usage in serotonin receptor genes. The hierarchical cluster analysis suggests that gene function is another dominant factor that affects the codon usage bias, while species is a minor factor. Nucleotide base usage was reported using Goldman, Engelman, Stietz (GES) scale reveals the presence of high uracil (>45%) content at functionally important hydrophobic regions. Our in silico approach will certainly help for further investigations on critical inference on evolution, structure, function and gene expression aspects of 5-HT receptors family which are potential antipsychotic drug targets. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A Hexahomotrioxacalix[3]arene-Based Ditopic Receptor for Alkylammonium Ions Controlled by Ag⁺ Ions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xue-Kai; Ikejiri, Yusuke; Wu, Chong; Rahman, Shofiur; Georghiou, Paris E; Zeng, Xi; Elsegood, Mark R J; Redshaw, Carl; Teat, Simon J; Yamato, Takehiko

    2018-02-21

    A receptor cone-1 based on a hexahomotrioxacalix[3]arene bearing three pyridyl groups was successfully synthesized, which has a C₃-symmetric conformation and is capable of binding alkylammonium and metal ions simultaneously in a cooperative fashion. It can bind alkylammonium ions through the -cavity formed by three aryl rings. This behaviour is consistent with the cone-in/cone-out conformational rearrangement needed to reorganize the cavity for endo-complexation. As a C₃-symmetrical pyridyl-substituted calixarene, receptor cone-1 can also bind an Ag⁺ ion, and the nitrogen atoms are turned towards the inside of the cavity and interact with Ag⁺. After complexation of tris(2-pyridylamide) derivative receptor cone-1 with Ag⁺, the original C₃-symmetry was retained and higher complexation selectivity for n-BuNH₃⁺ versus t-BuNH₃⁺ was observed. Thus, it is believed that this receptor will have a role to play in the sensing, detection, and recognition of Ag⁺ and n-BuNH₃ + ions.

  10. Solid-phase receptor-based assay for the detection of cyclic imines by chemiluminescence, fluorescence, or colorimetry.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Laura P; Vilariño, Natalia; Molgó, Jordi; Aráoz, Rómulo; Antelo, Alvaro; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Botana, Luis M

    2011-08-01

    The spirolides and gymnodimines are marine phycotoxins included in the group of cyclic imines. The toxicity of these compounds to humans is still unknown, although their toxicity by intraperitoneal injection in rodents is very high. A receptor-based method was developed using the competition of the 13-desmethyl spirolide C with biotin-labeled α-bungarotoxin for binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and the immobilization of the α-bungarotoxin-receptor complex on streptavidin-coated surfaces. The quantification of the immobilized receptor can be achieved using a specific antibody. Finally, after the addition of a secondary antibody labeled with horseradish peroxidase, three alternative substrates of this enzyme generate a chemiluminescent, fluorescent, or colorimetric signal. The assay performs well in shellfish extracts and the detection range is 5-150 nM of 13-desmethyl spirolide C in shellfish extracts, which is at least 5 times more sensitive than the existing fluorescence polarization assay. This assay can also detect gymnodimine, although with 10 times lower sensitivity than the spirolide. The detection of cyclic imines with microplate assays would be useful for screening purposes in order to reduce the number of samples to be processed by bioassays or analytical methods.

  11. Mapping of the Localization of Type 1 Angiotensin Receptor in Membrane Microdomains Using Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer-based Sensors*

    PubMed Central

    Balla, András; Tóth, Dániel J.; Soltész-Katona, Eszter; Szakadáti, Gyöngyi; Erdélyi, László Sándor; Várnai, Péter; Hunyady, László

    2012-01-01

    Initiation and termination of signaling of the type I angiotensin receptor (AT1-R) can lead to dynamic changes in its localization in plasma membrane microdomains. Several markers were recently developed to investigate membrane microdomains. Here, we used several YFP-labeled fusion constructs (i.e. raft or non-raft plasma membrane markers) to analyze the agonist-induced changes in compartmentalization of AT1-R, including internalization or lateral movement between plasma membrane compartments in response to stimulation using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer measurements. Our data demonstrate that angiotensin II (AngII) stimulus changes the microdomain localization of wild type or mutated (DRY → AAY or TSTS → AAAA) AT1-Rs co-expressed with the fluorescent probes in HEK293 cells. The comparison of the trafficking of AT1-R upon AngII stimulus with those of [Sar1,Ile8]AngII or [Sar1,Ile4,Ile8]AngII stimulus revealed different types of changes, depending on the nature of the ligand. The observed changes in receptor compartmentalization of the AT1-R are strikingly different from those of 5HT-2C and EGF receptors, which demonstrate the usefulness of the bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based measurements in the investigation of receptor trafficking in the plasma membrane in living cell experiments. PMID:22291018

  12. Efficient Receptor Mediated siRNA Delivery in Vitro by Folic Acid Targeted Pentablock Copolymer-Based Micelleplexes.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Roman; Liu, Kegang; Wang, Xueya; Hunziker, Patrick

    2017-08-14

    Novel, biocompatible polyplexes, based on the combination of cationic pentablock copolymers with folic acid functionalized copolymers, were designed and developed for target-specific siRNA delivery. The resulting micelleplexes spontaneously formed polymeric micelles with a hydrophobic core surrounded directly by a cationic poly-2-(4-aminobutyl)-oxazole (PABOXA) and subsequently shielded by hydrophilic poly-2-methyl-oxazole (PMOXA) layer. The described micelleplexes form highly stable particles even in complete serum after 24 h compared with the highly cationic polymer PEI, which show aggregate formation in serum containing buffer solution. Targeted siRNA delivery and gene knockdown could be shown using green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressing HeLa cells, resulting in ∼31% and ∼8% suppression of the expression of GFP for targeted and nontargeted micelleplexes, respectively. Comparison studies of folic-receptor positive HeLa cells with normal folic-receptor-negative HEK293 cells revealed involvement of receptor mediated cellular uptake of fluorescently labeled siRNA. The new designed nanocarrier showed no cytotoxicity, having a potential application. The presented concept of shielding a nucleic-acid complexing cationic chains with a stealth layer and combining it with receptor ligand overcomes typical problems with undesired protein and cell interactions in delivery of nucleic acids using polymeric systems, opening new doors for application if RNA inhibition in the organism.

  13. Evaluation of estrogen receptor alpha activation by glyphosate-based herbicide constituents.

    PubMed

    Mesnage, Robin; Phedonos, Alexia; Biserni, Martina; Arno, Matthew; Balu, Sucharitha; Corton, J Christopher; Ugarte, Ricardo; Antoniou, Michael N

    2017-10-01

    The safety, including the endocrine disruptive capability, of glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs) is a matter of intense debate. We evaluated the estrogenic potential of glyphosate, commercial GBHs and polyethoxylated tallowamine adjuvants present as co-formulants in GBHs. Glyphosate (≥10,000 μg/L or 59 μM) promoted proliferation of estrogen-dependent MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Glyphosate also increased the expression of an estrogen response element-luciferase reporter gene (ERE-luc) in T47D-KBluc cells, which was blocked by the estrogen antagonist ICI 182,780. Commercial GBH formulations or their adjuvants alone did not exhibit estrogenic effects in either assay. Transcriptomics analysis of MCF-7 cells treated with glyphosate revealed changes in gene expression reflective of hormone-induced cell proliferation but did not overlap with an ERα gene expression biomarker. Calculation of glyphosate binding energy to ERα predicts a weak and unstable interaction (-4.10 kcal mol -1 ) compared to estradiol (-25.79 kcal mol -1 ), which suggests that activation of this receptor by glyphosate is via a ligand-independent mechanism. Induction of ERE-luc expression by the PKA signalling activator IBMX shows that ERE-luc is responsive to ligand-independent activation, suggesting a possible mechanism of glyphosate-mediated activation. Our study reveals that glyphosate, but not other components present in GBHs, can activate ERα in vitro, albeit at relatively high concentrations. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. A mechanism for acetylcholine receptor gating based on structure, coupling, phi, and flip.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shaweta; Chakraborty, Srirupa; Vij, Ridhima; Auerbach, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are allosteric proteins that generate membrane currents by isomerizing ("gating") between resting and active conformations under the influence of neurotransmitters. Here, to explore the mechanisms that link the transmitter-binding sites (TBSs) with the distant gate, we use mutant cycle analyses to measure coupling between residue pairs, phi value analyses to sequence domain rearrangements, and current simulations to reproduce a microsecond shut component ("flip") apparent in single-channel recordings. Significant interactions between amino acids separated by >15 Å are rare; an exception is between the αM2-M3 linkers and the TBSs that are ∼30 Å apart. Linker residues also make significant, local interactions within and between subunits. Phi value analyses indicate that without agonists, the linker is the first region in the protein to reach the gating transition state. Together, the phi pattern and flip component suggest that a complete, resting↔active allosteric transition involves passage through four brief intermediate states, with brief shut events arising from sojourns in all or a subset. We derive energy landscapes for gating with and without agonists, and propose a structure-based model in which resting→active starts with spontaneous rearrangements of the M2-M3 linkers and TBSs. These conformational changes stabilize a twisted extracellular domain to promote transmembrane helix tilting, gate dilation, and the formation of a "bubble" that collapses to initiate ion conduction. The energy landscapes suggest that twisting is the most energetically unfavorable step in the resting→active conformational change and that the rate-limiting step in the reverse process is bubble formation. © 2017 Gupta et al.

  15. A mechanism for acetylcholine receptor gating based on structure, coupling, phi, and flip

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shaweta; Chakraborty, Srirupa; Vij, Ridhima

    2017-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are allosteric proteins that generate membrane currents by isomerizing (“gating”) between resting and active conformations under the influence of neurotransmitters. Here, to explore the mechanisms that link the transmitter-binding sites (TBSs) with the distant gate, we use mutant cycle analyses to measure coupling between residue pairs, phi value analyses to sequence domain rearrangements, and current simulations to reproduce a microsecond shut component (“flip”) apparent in single-channel recordings. Significant interactions between amino acids separated by >15 Å are rare; an exception is between the αM2–M3 linkers and the TBSs that are ∼30 Å apart. Linker residues also make significant, local interactions within and between subunits. Phi value analyses indicate that without agonists, the linker is the first region in the protein to reach the gating transition state. Together, the phi pattern and flip component suggest that a complete, resting↔active allosteric transition involves passage through four brief intermediate states, with brief shut events arising from sojourns in all or a subset. We derive energy landscapes for gating with and without agonists, and propose a structure-based model in which resting→active starts with spontaneous rearrangements of the M2–M3 linkers and TBSs. These conformational changes stabilize a twisted extracellular domain to promote transmembrane helix tilting, gate dilation, and the formation of a “bubble” that collapses to initiate ion conduction. The energy landscapes suggest that twisting is the most energetically unfavorable step in the resting→active conformational change and that the rate-limiting step in the reverse process is bubble formation. PMID:27932572

  16. Altered mental status in older adults with histamine2-receptor antagonists: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Tawadrous, Davy; Dixon, Stephanie; Shariff, Salimah Z; Fleet, Jamie; Gandhi, Sonja; Jain, Arsh K; Weir, Matthew A; Gomes, Tara; Garg, Amit X

    2014-10-01

    Standard doses of histamine2-receptor antagonists (H2RAs) may induce altered mental status in older adults, especially in those with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Population-based cohort study of older adults who started a new H2RA between 2002 and 2011 was conducted. Ninety percent received the current standard H2RA dose in routine care. There was no significant difference in 27 baseline patient characteristics. The primary outcome was hospitalization with an urgent head computed tomography (CT) scan (proxy for altered mental status), and the secondary outcome was all-cause mortality also within 30days of a new H2RA prescription. Standard vs. low H2RA dose was associated with a higher risk of hospitalization with an urgent head CT scan (0.98% vs. 0.74%, absolute risk difference 0.24% [95% CI 0.11% to 0.36%], relative risk 1.33 [95% CI 1.12 to 1.58]). This risk was not modified by the presence of CKD (interaction P value=0.71). Standard vs. low H2RA dose was associated with a higher risk of mortality (1.07% vs.0.74%; absolute risk difference 0.34% [95% CI 0.20% to 0.46%], relative risk 1.46 [95% CI 1.23 to 1.73]). Compared to a lower dose, initiation of the current standard dose of H2RA in older adults is associated with a small absolute increase in the 30-day risk of altered mental status (using neuroimaging as a proxy), even in the absence of CKD. This risk may be avoided by initiating older adults on low doses of H2RAs for gastroesophogeal reflux disease, and increasing dosing as necessary for symptom control. Copyright © 2014 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. New consensus multivariate models based on PLS and ANN studies of sigma-1 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Aline A; Lipinski, Célio F; Pereira, Estevão B; Honorio, Kathia M; Oliveira, Patrícia R; Weber, Karen C; Romero, Roseli A F; de Sousa, Alexsandro G; da Silva, Albérico B F

    2017-10-02

    The treatment of neuropathic pain is very complex and there are few drugs approved for this purpose. Among the studied compounds in the literature, sigma-1 receptor antagonists have shown to be promising. In order to develop QSAR studies applied to the compounds of 1-arylpyrazole derivatives, multivariate analyses have been performed in this work using partial least square (PLS) and artificial neural network (ANN) methods. A PLS model has been obtained and validated with 45 compounds in the training set and 13 compounds in the test set (r 2 training = 0.761, q 2 = 0.656, r 2 test = 0.746, MSE test = 0.132 and MAE test = 0.258). Additionally, multi-layer perceptron ANNs (MLP-ANNs) were employed in order to propose non-linear models trained by gradient descent with momentum backpropagation function. Based on MSE test values, the best MLP-ANN models were combined in a MLP-ANN consensus model (MLP-ANN-CM; r 2 test = 0.824, MSE test = 0.088 and MAE test = 0.197). In the end, a general consensus model (GCM) has been obtained using PLS and MLP-ANN-CM models (r 2 test = 0.811, MSE test = 0.100 and MAE test = 0.218). Besides, the selected descriptors (GGI6, Mor23m, SRW06, H7m, MLOGP, and μ) revealed important features that should be considered when one is planning new compounds of the 1-arylpyrazole class. The multivariate models proposed in this work are definitely a powerful tool for the rational drug design of new compounds for neuropathic pain treatment. Graphical abstract Main scaffold of the 1-arylpyrazole derivatives and the selected descriptors.

  18. Vitamin D receptor polymorphisms and survival in patients with cutaneous melanoma: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Orlow, Irene; Reiner, Anne S; Thomas, Nancy E; Roy, Pampa; Kanetsky, Peter A; Luo, Li; Paine, Susan; Armstrong, Bruce K; Kricker, Anne; Marrett, Loraine D; Rosso, Stefano; Zanetti, Roberto; Gruber, Stephen B; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gallagher, Richard P; Dwyer, Terence; Busam, Klaus; Begg, Colin B; Berwick, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Factors known to affect melanoma survival include age at presentation, sex and tumor characteristics. Polymorphisms also appear to modulate survival following diagnosis. Result from other studies suggest that vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphisms (SNPs) impact survival in patients with glioma, renal cell carcinoma, lung, breast, prostate and other cancers; however, a comprehensive study of VDR polymorphisms and melanoma-specific survival is lacking. We aimed to investigate whether VDR genetic variation influences survival in patients with cutaneous melanoma. The analysis involved 3566 incident single and multiple primary melanoma cases enrolled in the international population-based Genes, Environment, and Melanoma Study. Melanoma-specific survival outcomes were calculated for each of 38 VDR SNPs using a competing risk analysis after adjustment for covariates. There were 254 (7.1%) deaths due to melanoma during the median 7.6 years follow-up period. VDR SNPs rs7299460, rs3782905, rs2239182, rs12370156, rs2238140, rs7305032, rs1544410 (BsmI) and rs731236 (TaqI) each had a statistically significant (trend P values < 0.05) association with melanoma-specific survival in multivariate analysis. One functional SNP (rs2239182) remained significant after adjustment for multiple testing using the Monte Carlo method. None of the SNPs associated with survival were significantly associated with Breslow thickness, ulceration or mitosis. These results suggest that the VDR gene may influence survival from melanoma, although the mechanism by which VDR exerts its effect does not seem driven by tumor aggressiveness. Further investigations are needed to confirm our results and to understand the relationship between VDR and survival in the combined context of tumor and host characteristics. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Vitamin D receptor polymorphisms and survival in patients with cutaneous melanoma: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Orlow, Irene; Reiner, Anne S.; Thomas, Nancy E.; Roy, Pampa; Kanetsky, Peter A.; Luo, Li; Paine, Susan; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Kricker, Anne; Marrett, Loraine D.; Rosso, Stefano; Zanetti, Roberto; Gruber, Stephen B.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gallagher, Richard P.; Dwyer, Terence; Busam, Klaus; Begg, Colin B.; Berwick, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Factors known to affect melanoma survival include age at presentation, sex and tumor characteristics. Polymorphisms also appear to modulate survival following diagnosis. Result from other studies suggest that vitamin D receptor (VDR) polymorphisms (SNPs) impact survival in patients with glioma, renal cell carcinoma, lung, breast, prostate and other cancers; however, a comprehensive study of VDR polymorphisms and melanoma-specific survival is lacking. We aimed to investigate whether VDR genetic variation influences survival in patients with cutaneous melanoma. The analysis involved 3566 incident single and multiple primary melanoma cases enrolled in the international population-based Genes, Environment, and Melanoma Study. Melanoma-specific survival outcomes were calculated for each of 38 VDR SNPs using a competing risk analysis after adjustment for covariates. There were 254 (7.1%) deaths due to melanoma during the median 7.6 years follow-up period. VDR SNPs rs7299460, rs3782905, rs2239182, rs12370156, rs2238140, rs7305032, rs1544410 (BsmI) and rs731236 (TaqI) each had a statistically significant (trend P values < 0.05) association with melanoma-specific survival in multivariate analysis. One functional SNP (rs2239182) remained significant after adjustment for multiple testing using the Monte Carlo method. None of the SNPs associated with survival were significantly associated with Breslow thickness, ulceration or mitosis. These results suggest that the VDR gene may influence survival from melanoma, although the mechanism by which VDR exerts its effect does not seem driven by tumor aggressiveness. Further investigations are needed to confirm our results and to understand the relationship between VDR and survival in the combined context of tumor and host characteristics. PMID:26521212

  20. Comprehensive Logic Based Analyses of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signal Transduction Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Padwal, Mahesh Kumar; Sarma, Uddipan; Saha, Bhaskar

    2014-01-01

    Among the 13 TLRs in the vertebrate systems, only TLR4 utilizes both Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) and Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor (TIR)-domain-containing adapter interferon-β-inducing Factor (TRIF) adaptors to transduce signals triggering host-protective immune responses. Earlier studies on the pathway combined various experimental data in the form of one comprehensive map of TLR signaling. But in the absence of adequate kinetic parameters quantitative mathematical models that reveal emerging systems level properties and dynamic inter-regulation among the kinases/phosphatases of the TLR4 network are not yet available. So, here we used reaction stoichiometry-based and parameter independent logical modeling formalism to build the TLR4 signaling network model that captured the feedback regulations, interdependencies between signaling kinases and phosphatases and the outcome of simulated infections. The analyses of the TLR4 signaling network revealed 360 feedback loops, 157 negative and 203 positive; of which, 334 loops had the phosphatase PP1 as an essential component. The network elements' interdependency (positive or negative dependencies) in perturbation conditions such as the phosphatase knockout conditions revealed interdependencies between the dual-specific phosphatases MKP-1 and MKP-3 and the kinases in MAPK modules and the role of PP2A in the auto-regulation of Calmodulin kinase-II. Our simulations under the specific kinase or phosphatase gene-deficiency or inhibition conditions corroborated with several previously reported experimental data. The simulations to mimic Yersinia pestis and E. coli infections identified the key perturbation in the network and potential drug targets. Thus, our analyses of TLR4 signaling highlights the role of phosphatases as key regulatory factors in determining the global interdependencies among the network elements; uncovers novel signaling connections; identifies potential drug targets for infections. PMID:24699232

  1. Cardio-oncology Related to Heart Failure: Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Target-Based Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kenigsberg, Benjamin; Jain, Varun; Barac, Ana

    2017-04-01

    Cancer therapy targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene B (ErbB)/human EGFR receptor (HER) family of tyrosine kinases has been successfully used in treatment of several malignancies. The ErbB pathways play a role in the maintenance of cardiac homeostasis. This article summarizes current knowledge about EGFR/ErbB/HER receptor-targeted cancer therapeutics focusing on their cardiotoxicity profiles, molecular mechanisms, and implications in clinical cardio-oncology. The article discusses challenges in predicting, monitoring, and treating cardiac dysfunction and heart failure associated with ErbB-targeted cancer therapeutics and highlights opportunities for researchers and clinical investigators. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Insulin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, C.R.; Harrison, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the procedure in insulin receptors. Part B: Clinical assessment, biological responses, and comparison to the IGF-1 receptor. Topics covered include: Insulin and IGF-1 receptors, Clinical assessment of receptor functions, and Biological responses.

  3. In vitro digestion of purified β-casein variants A(1), A(2), B, and I: effects on antioxidant and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory capacity.

    PubMed

    Petrat-Melin, B; Andersen, P; Rasmussen, J T; Poulsen, N A; Larsen, L B; Young, J F

    2015-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of bovine milk proteins affect the protein profile of the milk and, hence, certain technological properties, such as casein (CN) number and cheese yield. However, reports show that such polymorphisms may also affect the health-related properties of milk. Therefore, to gain insight into their digestion pattern and bioactive potential, β-CN was purified from bovine milk originating from cows homozygous for the variants A(1), A(2), B, and I by a combination of cold storage, ultracentrifugation, and acid precipitation. The purity of the isolated β-CN was determined by HPLC, variants were verified by mass spectrometry, and molar extinction coefficients at λ=280nm were determined. β-Casein from each of the variants was subjected to in vitro digestion using pepsin and pancreatic enzymes. Antioxidant and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory capacities of the hydrolysates were assessed at 3 stages of digestion and related to that of the undigested samples. Neither molar extinction coefficients nor overall digestibility varied significantly between these 4 variants; however, clear differences in digestion pattern were indicated by gel electrophoresis. In particular, after 60min of pepsin followed by 5min of pancreatic enzyme digestion, one ≈4kDa peptide with the N-terminal sequence (106)H-K-E-M-P-F-P-K- was absent from β-CN variant B. This is likely a result of the (122)Ser to (122)Arg substitution in variant B introducing a novel trypsin cleavage site, leading to the changed digestion pattern. All investigated β-CN variants exhibited a significant increase in antioxidant capacity upon digestion, as measured by the Trolox-equivalent antioxidant capacity assay. After 60min of pepsin + 120min of pancreatic enzyme digestion, the accumulated increase in antioxidant capacity was ≈1.7-fold for the 4 β-CN variants. The ACE inhibitory capacity was also significantly increased by digestion, with the B variant reaching the highest inhibitory

  4. 17O solid-state NMR spectroscopy of A2B2O7 oxides: quantitative isotopic enrichment and spectral acquisition?

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Arantxa; Moran, Robert F; Sneddon, Scott; Dawson, Daniel M; McKay, David; Bignami, Giulia P M; Blanc, Frédéric; Whittle, Karl R; Ashbrook, Sharon E

    2018-02-13

    The potential of 17 O NMR spectroscopy for the investigation of A 2 B 2 O 7 ceramic oxides important in the encapsulation of radioactive waste is demonstrated, with post-synthetic enrichment by exchange with 17 O 2 gas. For Y 2 Sn 2 O 7 , Y 2 Ti 2 O 7 and La 2 Sn 2 O 7 pyrochlores, enrichment of the two distinct O species is clearly non quantitative at lower temperatures (∼700 °C and below) and at shorter times, despite these being used in prior work, with preferential enrichment of OA 2 B 2 favoured over that of OA 4 . At higher temperatures, the 17 O NMR spectra suggest that quantitative enrichment has been achieved, but the integrated signal intensities do not reflect the crystallographic 1 : 6 (O1 : O2) ratio until corrected for differences in T 1 relaxation rates and, more importantly, the contribution of the satellite transitions. 17 O NMR spectra of Y 2 Zr 2 O 7 and Y 2 Hf 2 O 7 defect fluorites showed little difference with any variation in enrichment temperature or time, although an increase in the absolute level of enrichment (up to ∼7.5%) was observed at higher temperature. DFT calculations show that the six distinct resonances observed cannot be assigned unambiguously, as each has contributions from more than one of the five possible next nearest neighbour environments. For La 2 Ti 2 O 7 , which adopts a layered perovskite-like structure, little difference in the spectral intensities is observed with enrichment time or temperature, although the highest absolute levels of enrichment (∼13%) were obtained at higher temperature. This work demonstrates that 17 O NMR has the potential to be a powerful probe of local structure and disorder in oxides, but that considerable care must be taken both in choosing the conditions for 17 O enrichment and the experimental acquisition parameters if the necessary quantitative measurements are to be obtained for more complex systems.

  5. Immobilization free electrochemical biosensor for folate receptor in cancer cells based on terminal protection.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jiancong; Wang, Qingxiang; Yang, Weiqiang; Zhao, Mengmeng; Zhang, Ying; Guo, Longhua; Qiu, Bin; Lin, Zhenyu; Yang, Huang-Hao

    2016-12-15

    The determination of folate receptor (FR) that over expressed in vast quantity of cancerous cells frequently is significant for the clinical diagnosis and treatment of cancers. Many DNA-based electrochemical biosensors have been developed for FR detection with high selectivity and sensitivity, but most of them need complicated immobilization of DNA on the electrode surface firstly, which is tedious and therefore results in the poor reproducibility. In this study, a simple, sensitive, and selective electrochemical FR biosensor in cancer cells has been proposed, which combines the advantages of the convenient immobilization-free homogeneous indium tin oxide (ITO)-based electrochemical detection strategy and the high selectivity of the terminal protection of small molecule linked DNA. The small molecule of folic acid (FA) and an electroactive molecule of ferrocence (Fc) were tethered to 3'- and 5'-end of an arbitrary single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), respectively, forming the FA-ssDNA-Fc complex. In the absence of the target FR, the FA-ssDNA-Fc was degraded by exonuclease I (Exo I) from 3'-end and produced a free Fc, diffusing freely to the ITO electrode surface and resulting in strong electrochemical signal. When the target FR was present, the FA-ssDNA-Fc was bound to FR through specific interaction with FA anchored at the 3'-end, effectively protecting the ssDNA strand from hydrolysis by Exo I. The FR-FA-ssDNA-Fc could not diffuse easily to the negatively charged ITO electrode surface due to the electrostatic repulsion between the DNA strand and the negatively charged ITO electrode, so electrochemical signal reduced. The decreased electrochemical signal has a linear relationship with the logarithm of FR concentration in range of 10fM to 10nM with a detection limit of 3.8fM (S/N=3). The proposed biosensor has been applied to detect FR in HeLa cancer cells, and the decreased electrochemical signal has a linear relationship with the logarithm of cell concentration ranging

  6. AMP Is an Adenosine A1 Receptor Agonist*

    PubMed Central

    Rittiner, Joseph E.; Korboukh, Ilia; Hull-Ryde, Emily A.; Jin, Jian; Janzen, William P.; Frye, Stephen V.; Zylka, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous receptors for ATP, ADP, and adenosine exist; however, it is currently unknown whether a receptor for the related nucleotide adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP) exists. Using a novel cell-based assay to visualize adenosine receptor activation in real time, we found that AMP and a non-hydrolyzable AMP analog (deoxyadenosine 5′-monophosphonate, ACP) directly activated the adenosine A1 receptor (A1R). In contrast, AMP only activated the adenosine A2B receptor (A2BR) after hydrolysis to adenosine by ecto-5′-nucleotidase (NT5E, CD73) or prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP, ACPP). Adenosine and AMP were equipotent human A1R agonists in our real-time assay and in a cAMP accumulation assay. ACP also depressed cAMP levels in mouse cortical neurons through activation of endogenous A1R. Non-selective purinergic receptor antagonists (pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulfonic acid and suramin) did not block adenosine- or AMP-evoked activation. Moreover, mutation of His-251 in the human A1R ligand binding pocket reduced AMP potency without affecting adenosine potency. In contrast, mutation of a different binding pocket residue (His-278) eliminated responses to AMP and to adenosine. Taken together, our study indicates that the physiologically relevant nucleotide AMP is a full agonist of A1R. In addition, our study suggests that some of the physiological effects of AMP may be direct, and not indirect through ectonucleotidases that hydrolyze this nucleotide to adenosine. PMID:22215671

  7. Prospects for Creation of Cardioprotective Drugs Based on Cannabinoid Receptor Agonists.

    PubMed

    Maslov, Leonid N; Khaliulin, Igor; Zhang, Yi; Krylatov, Andrey V; Naryzhnaya, Natalia V; Mechoulam, Raphael; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Downey, James M

    2016-05-01

    Cannabinoids can mimic the infarct-reducing effect of early ischemic preconditioning, delayed ischemic preconditioning, and ischemic postconditioning against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion. They do this primarily through both CB1 and CB2 receptors. Cannabinoids are also involved in remote preconditioning of the heart. The cannabinoid receptor ligands also exhibit an antiapoptotic effect during ischemia/reperfusion of the heart. The acute cardioprotective effect of cannabinoids is mediated by activation of protein kinase C, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and p38 kinase. The delayed cardioprotective effect of cannabinoid anandamide is mediated via stimulation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase-Akt signaling pathway and enhancement of heat shock protein 72 expression. The delayed cardioprotective effect of another cannabinoid, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, is associated with augmentation of nitric oxide (NO) synthase expression, but data on the involvement of NO synthase in the acute cardioprotective effect of cannabinoids are contradictory. The adenosine triphosphate-sensitive K(+)channel is involved in the synthetic cannabinoid HU-210-induced cardiac resistance to ischemia/reperfusion injury. Cannabinoids inhibit Na(+)/Ca(2+)exchange via peripheral cannabinoid receptor (CB2) activation that may also be related to the antiapoptotic and cardioprotective effects of cannabinoids. The cannabinoid receptor agonists should be considered as prospective group of compounds for creation of drugs that are able to protect the heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury in the clinical setting. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Antagonists for the orphan G-protein-coupled receptor GPR55 based on a coumarin scaffold.

    PubMed

    Rempel, Viktor; Volz, Nicole; Gläser, Franziska; Nieger, Martin; Bräse, Stefan; Müller, Christa E

    2013-06-13

    The orphan G-protein-coupled receptor GPR55, which is activated by 1-lysophosphatidylinositol and interacts with cannabinoid (CB) receptor ligands, has been proposed as a new potential drug target for the treatment of diabetes, Parkinson's disease, neuropathic pain, and cancer. We applied β-arrestin assays to identify 3-substituted coumarins as a novel class of antagonists and performed an extensive structure-activity relationship study for GPR55. Selectivity versus the related receptors CB1, CB2, and GPR18 was assessed. Among the 7-unsubstituted coumarins selective, competitive GPR55 antagonists were identified, such as 3-(2-hydroxybenzyl)-5-isopropyl-8-methyl-2H-chromen-2-one (12, PSB-SB-489, IC50 = 1.77 μM, pA2 = 0.547 μM). Derivatives with long alkyl chains in position 7 were potent, possibly allosteric GPR55 antagonists which showed ancillary CB receptor affinity. 7-(1,1-Dimethyloctyl)-5-hydroxy-3-(2-hydroxybenzyl)-2H-chromen-2-one (69, PSB-SB-487, IC50 = 0.113 μM, KB = 0.561 μM) and 7-(1,1-dimethylheptyl)-5-hydroxy-3-(2-hydroxybenzyl)-2H-chromen-2-one (67, PSB-SB-1203, IC50 = 0.261 μM) were the most potent GPR55 antagonists of the present series.

  9. Design of Cyclic Peptide Based Glucose Receptors and Their Application in Glucose Sensing.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Fuyuan; He, Xingxing; Fang, Guozhen; Liu, Jifeng; Wang, Shuo

    2017-10-03

    Glucose assay is of great scientific significance in clinical diagnostics and bioprocess monitoring, and to design a new glucose receptor is necessary for the development of more sensitive, selective, and robust glucose detection techniques. Herein, a series of cyclic peptide (CP) glucose receptors were designed to mimic the binding sites of glucose binding protein (GBP), and CPs' sequence contained amino acid sites Asp, Asn, His, Asp, and Arg, which constituted the first layer interactions of GBP. The properties of these CPs used as a glucose receptor or substitute for the GBP were studied by using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) technique. It was found that CPs can form a self-assembled monolayer at the Au quartz electrode surface, and the monolayer's properties were characterized by using cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The CPs' binding affinity to saccharide (i.e., galactose, fructose, lactose, sucrose, and maltose) was investigated, and the CPs' sensitivity and selectivity toward glucose were found to be dependent upon the configuration,i.e., the amino acids sequence of the CPs. The cyclic unit with a cyclo[-CNDNHCRDNDC-] sequence gave the highest selectivity and sensitivity for glucose sensing. This work suggests that a synthetic peptide bearing a particular functional sequence could be applied for developing a new generation of glucose receptors and would find huge application in biological, life science, and clinical diagnostics fields.

  10. Structure-Based Understanding of Binding Affinity and Mode of Estrogen Receptor α Agonists and Antagonists

    EPA Science Inventory

    The flexible hydrophobic ligand binding pocket (LBP) of estrogen receptor α (ERα) allows the binding of a wide variety of endocrine disruptors. Upon ligand binding, the LBP reshapes around the contours of the ligand and stabilizes the complex by complementary hydrophobic interact...

  11. Odorant receptor-based discovery of natural repellents of human lice.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Julien; Xu, Pingxi; Yoon, Kyong S; Clark, John M; Leal, Walter S

    2015-11-01

    The body louse, Pediculus humanus humanus, is an obligate blood-feeding ectoparasite and an important insect vector that mediates the transmission of diseases to humans. The analysis of the body louse genome revealed a drastic reduction of the chemosensory gene repertoires when compared to other insects, suggesting specific olfactory adaptations to host specialization and permanent parasitic lifestyle. Here, we present for the first time functional evidence for the role of odorant receptors (ORs) in this insect, with the objective to gain insight into the chemical ecology of this vector. We identified seven putative full-length ORs, in addition to the odorant receptor co-receptor (Orco), and expressed four of them in the Xenopus laevis oocytes system. When screened with a panel of ecologically-relevant odorants, PhumOR2 responded to a narrow set of compounds. At the behavior level, both head and body lice were repelled by the physiologically-active chemicals. This study presents the first evidence of the OR pathway being functional in lice and identifies PhumOR2 as a sensitive receptor of natural repellents that could be used to develop novel efficient molecules to control these insects. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Structure-based Understanding of Binding Affinity and Mode of Estrogen Receptor α Agonists and Antagonists.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The flexible hydrophobic ligand binding pocket (LBP) of estrogen receptor α (ERα) allows the binding of a wide variety of endocrine disruptors. Upon ligand binding, the LBP reshapes around the contours of the ligand and stabilizes the complex by complementary hydrophobic interact...

  13. Scaffold-based novel SHP2 allosteric inhibitors design using Receptor-Ligand pharmacophore model, virtual screening and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jin, Wen-Yan; Ma, Ying; Li, Wei-Ya; Li, Hong-Lian; Wang, Run-Ling

    2018-04-01

    SHP2 is a potential target for the development of novel therapies for SHP2-dependent cancers. In our research, with the aid of the 'Receptor-Ligand Pharmacophore' technique, a 3D-QSAR method was carried out to explore structure activity relationship of SHP2 allosteric inhibitors. Structure-based drug design was employed to optimize SHP099, an efficacious, potent, and selective SHP2 allosteric inhibitor. A novel class of selective SHP2 allosteric inhibitors was discovered by using the powerful 'SBP', 'ADMET' and 'CDOCKER' techniques. By means of molecular dynamics simulations, it was observed that these novel inhibitors not only had the same function as SHP099 did in inhibiting SHP2, but also had more favorable conformation for binding to the receptor. Thus, this report may provide a new method in discovering novel and selective SHP2 allosteric inhibitors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Docking-based Screening of Ficus religiosa Phytochemicals as Inhibitors of Human Histamine H2 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Amit; Yadav, Birendra Singh; Singh, Swati; Maurya, Pramod Kumar; Mishra, Alok; Srivastva, Shweta; Varadwaj, Pritish Kumar; Singh, Nand Kumar; Mani, Ashutosh

    2017-10-01

    Ficus religiosa L. is generally known as Peepal and belongs to family Moraceae . The tree is a source of many compounds having high medicinal value. In gastrointestinal tract, histamine H2 receptors have key role in histamine-stimulated gastric acid secretion. Their over stimulation causes its excessive production which is responsible for gastric ulcer. This study aims to screen the range of phytochemicals present in F. religiosa for binding with human histamine H2 and identify therapeutics for a gastric ulcer from the plant. In this work, a 3D-structure of human histamine H2 receptor was modeled by using homology modeling and the predicted model was validated using PROCHECK. Docking studies were also performed to assess binding affinities between modeled receptor and 34 compounds. Molecular dynamics simulations were done to identify most stable receptor-ligand complexes. Absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and screening was done to evaluate pharmacokinetic properties of compounds. The results suggest that seven ligands, namely, germacrene, bergaptol, lanosterol, Ergost-5-en-3beta-ol, α-amyrin acetate, bergapten, and γ-cadinene showed better binding affinities. Among seven phytochemicals, lanosterol and α-amyrin acetate were found to have greater stability during simulation studies. These two compounds may be a suitable therapeutic agent against histamine H2 receptor. This study was performed to screen antiulcer compounds from F. religiosa . Molecular modeling, molecular docking and MD simulation studies were performed with selected phytochemicals from F. religiosa . The analysis suggests that Lanosterol and α-amyrin may be a suitable therapeutic agent against histamine H2 receptor. This study facilitates initiation of the herbal drug discovery process for the antiulcer activity. Abbreviations used: ADMET: Absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity, DOPE: Discrete Optimized Potential Energy, OPLS: Optimized potential for liquid

  15. Resorcarene-based receptor: versatile behavior in its interaction with heavy and soft metal cations.

    PubMed

    Danil de Namor, Angela F; Chaaban, Jinane K; Piro, Oscar E; Castellano, Eduardo E

    2006-02-09

    Standard solution Gibbs energies, DeltasG degrees, of the resorcarene-based receptor 5,11,17,23-ethylthiomethylated calix[4]resorcarene, (characterized by 1H NMR and X-ray diffraction studies) in its monomeric state (established through partition experiments) in various solvents are for the first time reported in the area of resorcarene chemistry. Transfer Gibbs energies of from hexane (reference solvent) to other medium are calculated. Agreement between DeltatG degrees (referred to the pure solvents) and standard partition Gibbs energies, DeltapG degrees (solvent mutually saturated) is found. Cation-ligand interactions were investigated through 1H NMR (CD3CN and CD3OD) and conductometric titrations in acetonitrile and methanol. 1H NMR data revealed the sites of interaction of with the metal cation. The composition of the metal-ion complexes (Ag+ and Pb2+ in acetonitrile and Ag+ and Cu2+ in methanol) was established through conductometric titrations. Thus, complexes of 1:1 stoichiometry were formed between and Ag+ and Pb2+ in acetonitrile and Cu2+ in methanol. However, in moving from acetonitrile to methanol, the composition of the silver complex was altered. Thus, two metal cations are hosted by a unit of the ligand. As far as Cu2+ and in acetonitrile is concerned, conductance data suggest that metalates are formed in which up to four units of Cu2+ are taken up per unit of resorcarene. The contrasting behavior of with Cu2+ in acetonitrile relative to methanol is discussed. As far as mercury (II) is concerned, the unusual jump in conductance observed in the titration of Hg2+ with in acetonitrile and methanol after the formation of a multicharged complex (undefined composition) is attributed to the presence of highly charged smaller units (higher mobility) resulting from the departure of pendant arms from the resorcarene backbone. Isolation of these species followed by X-ray diffraction studies corroborated this statement. The thermodynamic characterization of metal

  16. Structure-based identification and characterisation of structurally novel human P2X7 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Caseley, Emily A; Muench, Stephen P; Fishwick, Colin W; Jiang, Lin-Hua

    2016-09-15

    The P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) plays an important role in diverse conditions associated with tissue damage and inflammation, meaning that the human P2X7R (hP2X7R) is an attractive therapeutic target. The crystal structures of the zebrafish P2X4R in the closed and ATP-bound open states provide an unprecedented opportunity for structure-guided identification of new ligands. The present study performed virtual screening of ∼100,000 structurally diverse compounds against the ATP-binding pocket in the hP2X7R. This identified three compounds (C23, C40 and C60) out of 73 top-ranked compounds by testing against hP2X7R-mediated Ca(2+) responses. These compounds were further characterised using Ca(2+) imaging, patch-clamp current recording, YO-PRO-1 uptake and propidium iodide cell death assays. All three compounds inhibited BzATP-induced Ca(2+) responses concentration-dependently with IC50s of 5.1±0.3μM, 4.8±0.8μM and 3.2±0.2μM, respectively. C23 and C40 inhibited BzATP-induced currents in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner, with IC50s of 0.35±0.3μM and 1.2±0.1μM, respectively, but surprisingly C60 did not affect BzATP-induced currents up to 100μM. They suppressed BzATP-induced YO-PRO-1 uptake with IC50s of 1.8±0.9μM, 1.0±0.1μM and 0.8±0.2μM, respectively. Furthermore, these three compounds strongly protected against ATP-induced cell death. Among them, C40 and C60 exhibited strong specificity towards the hP2X7R over the hP2X4R and rP2X3R. In conclusion, our study reports the identification of three novel hP2X7R antagonists with micromolar potency for the first time using a structure-based approach, including the first P2X7R antagonist with preferential inhibition of large pore formation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Encapsulation of [F4(H2O)10](4-) in a dimeric assembly of an unidirectional arene based hexapodal amide receptor.

    PubMed

    Arunachalam, M; Ghosh, Pradyut

    2011-06-14

    An unidirectional orientation of all six arms of an arene based hexapodal amide receptor shows dimeric capsular assembly templated by a [F(4)(H(2)O)(10)](4-) cluster. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  18. Anticonvulsants Based on the α-Substituted Amide Group Pharmacophore Bind to and Inhibit Function of Neuronal Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    PubMed

    Krivoshein, Arcadius V

    2016-03-16

    Although the antiepileptic properties of α-substituted lactams, acetamides, and cyclic imides have been known for over 60 years, the mechanism by which they act remains unclear. I report here that these compounds bind to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and inhibit its function. Using transient kinetic measurements with functionally active, nondesensitized receptors, I have discovered that (i) α-substituted lactams and cyclic imides are noncompetitive inhibitors of heteromeric subtypes (such as α4β2 and α3β4) of neuronal nAChRs and (ii) the binding affinity of these compounds toward the nAChR correlates with their potency in preventing maximal electroshock (MES)-induced convulsions in mice. Based on the hypothesis that α-substituted amide group is the essential pharmacophore of these drugs, I found and tested a simple compound, 2-phenylbutyramide. This compound indeed inhibits nAChR and shows good anticonvulsant activity in mice. Molecular docking simulations suggest that α-substituted lactams, acetamides, and cyclic imides bind to the same sites on the extracellular domain of the receptor. These new findings indicate that inhibition of brain nAChRs may play an important role in the action of these antiepileptic drugs, a role that has not been previously recognized.

  19. Homogeneous time-resolved G protein-coupled receptor-ligand binding assay based on fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Antoine, Thomas; Ott, David; Ebell, Katharina; Hansen, Kerrin; Henry, Luc; Becker, Frank; Hannus, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate many important physiological functions and are considered as one of the most successful therapeutic target classes for a wide spectrum of diseases. Drug discovery projects generally benefit from a broad range of experimental approaches for screening compound libraries and for the characterization of binding modes of drug candidates. Owing to the difficulties in solubilizing and purifying GPCRs, assay formats have been so far mainly limited to cell-based functional assays and radioligand binding assays. In this study, we used fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS) to analyze the interaction of detergent-solubilized receptors to various types of GPCR ligands: endogenous peptides, small molecules, and a large surrogate antagonist represented by a blocking monoclonal antibody. Our work demonstrates the suitability of the homogeneous and time-resolved FCCS assay format for a robust, high-throughput determination of receptor-ligand binding affinities and kinetic rate constants for various therapeutically relevant GPCRs. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. New Strategy for Prostate Cancer Prevention Based on Selenium Suppression of Androgen Receptor Signaling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    regulates androgen receptor, and finasteride , a 5α-reductase inhibitor, has a synerigistic effect in inhibiting the growth of prostate cancer cells...impact of the selenium and finasteride combination on androgen signaling; 2) Identifying the pro-apoptotic target genes of FOXO1 that are induced by...selenium; 3) studying the potential AR antagonistic effect of finasteride . The last was not proposed in the original application. But we strongly

  1. Fluorescence-based optimization of human bitter taste receptor expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Sugawara, Taishi; Ito, Keisuke; Shiroishi, Mitsunori

    2009-05-15

    Human TAS2 receptors (hTAS2Rs) perceive bitter tastants, but few studies have explored the structure-function relationships of these receptors. In this paper, we report our trials on the large-scale preparations of hTAS2Rs for structural analysis. Twenty-five hTAS2Rs were expressed using a GFP-fusion yeast system in which the constructs and the culture conditions (e.g., the signal sequence, incubation time and temperature after induction) were optimized by measuring GFP fluorescence. After optimization, five hTAS2Rs (hTAS2R7, hTAS2R8, hTAS2R16, hTAS2R41, and hTAS2R48) were expressed at levels greater than 1 mg protein/L of culture, which is a preferable level for purification and crystallization. Among these fivemore » bitter taste receptors, hTAS2R41 exhibited the highest detergent solubilization efficiency of 87.1% in n-dodecyl-{beta}-D-maltopyranoside (DDM)/cholesteryl hemisuccinate (CHS). Fluorescence size-exclusion chromatography showed that hTAS2R41 exhibited monodispersity in DDM/CHS without aggregates, suggesting that hTAS2R41 is a good target for future crystallization trials.« less

  2. Development of an evidence-based approach to external quality assurance for breast cancer hormone receptor immunohistochemistry: comparison of reference values.

    PubMed

    Makretsov, Nikita; Gilks, C Blake; Alaghehbandan, Reza; Garratt, John; Quenneville, Louise; Mercer, Joel; Palavdzic, Dragana; Torlakovic, Emina E

    2011-07-01

    External quality assurance and proficiency testing programs for breast cancer predictive biomarkers are based largely on traditional ad hoc design; at present there is no universal consensus on definition of a standard reference value for samples used in external quality assurance programs. To explore reference values for estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor immunohistochemistry in order to develop an evidence-based analytic platform for external quality assurance. There were 31 participating laboratories, 4 of which were previously designated as "expert" laboratories. Each participant tested a tissue microarray slide with 44 breast carcinomas for estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor and submitted it to the Canadian Immunohistochemistry Quality Control Program for analysis. Nuclear staining in 1% or more of the tumor cells was a positive score. Five methods for determining reference values were compared. All reference values showed 100% agreement for estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor scores, when indeterminate results were excluded. Individual laboratory performance (agreement rates, test sensitivity, test specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and κ value) was very similar for all reference values. Identification of suboptimal performance by all methods was identical for 30 of 31 laboratories. Estrogen receptor assessment of 1 laboratory was discordant: agreement was less than 90% for 3 of 5 reference values and greater than 90% with the use of 2 other reference values. Various reference values provide equivalent laboratory rating. In addition to descriptive feedback, our approach allows calculation of technical test sensitivity and specificity, positive and negative predictive values, agreement rates, and κ values to guide corrective actions.

  3. Interaction of magnetite-based receptors in the beak with the visual system underlying 'fixed direction' responses in birds

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background European robins, Erithacus rubecula, show two types of directional responses to the magnetic field: (1) compass orientation that is based on radical pair processes and lateralized in favor of the right eye and (2) so-called 'fixed direction' responses that originate in the magnetite-based receptors in the upper beak. Both responses are light-dependent. Lateralization of the 'fixed direction' responses would suggest an interaction between the two magnetoreception systems. Results Robins were tested with either the right or the left eye covered or with both eyes uncovered for their orientation under different light conditions. With 502 nm turquoise light, the birds showed normal compass orientation, whereas they displayed an easterly 'fixed direction' response under a combination of 502 nm turquoise with 590 nm yellow light. Monocularly right-eyed birds with their left eye covered were oriented just as they were binocularly as controls: under turquoise in their northerly migratory direction, under turquoise-and-yellow towards east. The response of monocularly left-eyed birds differed: under turquoise light, they were disoriented, reflecting a lateralization of the magnetic compass system in favor of the right eye, whereas they continued to head eastward under turquoise-and-yellow light. Conclusion 'Fixed direction' responses are not lateralized. Hence the interactions between the magnetite-receptors in the beak and the visual system do not seem to involve the magnetoreception system based on radical pair processes, but rather other, non-lateralized components of the visual system. PMID:20707905

  4. Antigen Receptor Galaxy: A User-Friendly, Web-Based Tool for Analysis and Visualization of T and B Cell Receptor Repertoire Data

    PubMed Central

    IJspeert, Hanna; van Schouwenburg, Pauline A.; van Zessen, David; Pico-Knijnenburg, Ingrid

    2017-01-01

    Antigen Receptor Galaxy (ARGalaxy) is a Web-based tool for analyses and visualization of TCR and BCR sequencing data of 13 species. ARGalaxy consists of four parts: the demultiplex tool, the international ImMunoGeneTics information system (IMGT) concatenate tool, the immune repertoire pipeline, and the somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR) pipeline. Together they allow the analysis of all different aspects of the immune repertoire. All pipelines can be run independently or combined, depending on the available data and the question of interest. The demultiplex tool allows data trimming and demultiplexing, whereas with the concatenate tool multiple IMGT/HighV-QUEST output files can be merged into a single file. The immune repertoire pipeline is an extended version of our previously published ImmunoGlobulin Galaxy (IGGalaxy) virtual machine that was developed to visualize V(D)J gene usage. It allows analysis of both BCR and TCR rearrangements, visualizes CDR3 characteristics (length and amino acid usage) and junction characteristics, and calculates the diversity of the immune repertoire. Finally, ARGalaxy includes the newly developed SHM and CSR pipeline to analyze SHM and/or CSR in BCR rearrangements. It analyzes the frequency and patterns of SHM, Ag selection (including BASELINe), clonality (Change-O), and CSR. The functionality of the ARGalaxy tool is illustrated in several clinical examples of patients with primary immunodeficiencies. In conclusion, ARGalaxy is a novel tool for the analysis of the complete immune repertoire, which is applicable to many patient groups with disturbances in the immune repertoire such as autoimmune diseases, allergy, and leukemia, but it can also be used to address basic research questions in repertoire formation and selection. PMID:28416602

  5. Influence of autoantibodies against AT1 receptor and AGTR1 polymorphisms on candesartan-based antihypertensive regimen: results from the study of optimal treatment in hypertensive patients with anti-AT1-receptor autoantibodies trial.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanxiang; Liao, Yuhua; Yuan, Yong; Feng, Li; Ma, Shihui; Wei, Feng; Wang, Min; Zhu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    The autoantibodies against angiotensin AT1 receptors (AT1-AAs) in patients with essential hypertension exhibited an agonistic action like angiotensin II and maintained high blood pressure (BP). Angiotensin II receptor gene (AGTR1) polymorphisms were associated with BP response to RAS inhibition in the hypertensive population. Furthermore, the BP response to AT1 receptor blockers varied significantly among individuals with hypertension. We hypothesized that the polymorphisms of the AGTR1 and AT1-AAs might affect antihypertensive response to AT1 receptor blockers based in patients with primary hypertension. Patients who received a candesartan-based regimen came from the SOT-AT1 study (Study of Optimal Treatment in Hypertensive Patients with Anti-AT1-Receptor Autoantibodies). The established enzyme-labeled immunosorbent assay was used to detect AT1-AAs in the sera of the patients. Genotype 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms in AGTR1 gene was used by DNA sequencing. The correlations among AT1-AAs, AGTR1 gene polymorphisms or haplotypes, and the antihypertensive effect candesartan-based were analyzed using SPSS. The percentage of systolic BP reduction that was candesartan-based was greater in AT1-AA positive groups than in AT1-AA negative ones (21 ± 8 vs. 18 ± 9; P = .001). Meanwhile, systolic BP reduction that was candesartan-based was more significant in the group of rs5186 AC genotypes than AA homozygotes after adjusting for other confounding factors (37.55 ± 13.7 vs. 32.47 ± 17.27 mm Hg; adjusted P = .028). Furthermore, haplotypes (GCC) and (AAC) had impacts on the antihypertensive effect of candesartan therapy. The AT1-AAs, AGTR1 gene polymorphisms and haplotypes solely or jointly have influences on candesartan-based antihypertensive response in patients with primary hypertension. Copyright © 2014 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Discovery of potent, selective, orally active benzoxazepine-based Orexin-2 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Tatsuhiko; Kunitomo, Jun; Tomata, Yoshihide; Nishiyama, Keiji; Nakashima, Masato; Hirozane, Mariko; Yoshikubo, Shin-Ichi; Hirai, Keisuke; Marui, Shogo

    2011-11-01

    During our efforts to identify a series of potent, selective, orally active human Orexin-2 Receptor (OX2R) antagonists, we elucidated structure-activity relationship (SAR) on the 7-position of a benzoxazepine scaffold by utilizing Hammett σ(p) and Hansch-Fujita π value as aromatic substituent constants. The attempts led to the discovery of compound 1m, possessing good in vitro potency with over 100-fold selectivity against OX1R, good metabolic stability in human and rat liver microsome, good oral bioavailability in rats, and in vivo antagonistic activity in rats by oral administration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of non-peptide PAR1 thrombin receptor antagonists based on small bifunctional templates: arginine and phenylalanine side chain groups are keys for receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Androutsou, Maria-Eleni; Saifeddine, Mahmoud; Hollenberg, Morley D; Matsoukas, John; Agelis, George

    2010-04-01

    In the present study, we report the synthesis and biological evaluation of a series of new non-peptide PAR(1) mimetic receptor antagonists, based on conformational analysis of the S(42)FLLR(46) tethered ligand (TL) sequence of PAR(1). These compounds incorporate the key pharmacophore groups in the TL sequence, guanidyl, amino and phenyl, which are essential for triggering receptor activity. Compounds 5 and 15 (50-100 microM) inhibited both TFLLR-amide (10 microM) and thrombin-mediated (0.5 and 1 U/ml; 5 and 10 microM) calcium signaling in a cultured human HEK cell assay.

  8. The mathematics of a successful deconvolution: a quantitative assessment of mixture-based combinatorial libraries screened against two formylpeptide receptors.

    PubMed

    Santos, Radleigh G; Appel, Jon R; Giulianotti, Marc A; Edwards, Bruce S; Sklar, Larry A; Houghten, Richard A; Pinilla, Clemencia

    2013-05-30

    In the past 20 years, synthetic combinatorial methods have fundamentally advanced the ability to synthesize and screen large numbers of compounds for drug discovery and basic research. Mixture-based libraries and positional scanning deconvolution combine two approaches for the rapid identification of specific scaffolds and active ligands. Here we present a quantitative assessment of the screening of 32 positional scanning libraries in the identification of highly specific and selective ligands for two formylpeptide receptors. We also compare and contrast two mixture-based library approaches using a mathematical model to facilitate the selection of active scaffolds and libraries to be pursued for further evaluation. The flexibility demonstrated in the differently formatted mixture-based libraries allows for their screening in a wide range of assays.

  9. The Mathematics of a Successful Deconvolution: A Quantitative Assessment of Mixture-Based Combinatorial Libraries Screened Against Two Formylpeptide Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Radleigh G.; Appel, Jon R.; Giulianotti, Marc A.; Edwards, Bruce S.; Sklar, Larry A.; Houghten, Richard A.; Pinilla, Clemencia

    2014-01-01

    In the past 20 years, synthetic combinatorial methods have fundamentally advanced the ability to synthesize and screen large numbers of compounds for drug discovery and basic research. Mixture-based libraries and positional scanning deconvolution combine two approaches for the rapid identification of specific scaffolds and active ligands. Here we present a quantitative assessment of the screening of 32 positional scanning libraries in the identification of highly specific and selective ligands for two formylpeptide receptors. We also compare and contrast two mixture-based library approaches using a mathematical model to facilitate the selection of active scaffolds and libraries to be pursued for further evaluation. The flexibility demonstrated in the differently formatted mixture-based libraries allows for their screening in a wide range of assays. PMID:23722730

  10. Potent, nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) based on 8H-[1,4]oxazino[2,3-f]quinolin-8-ones.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Robert I; Thompson, Anthony W; Chen, Jyun-Hung; Caferro, Thomas R; Cummings, Marquis L; Deckhut, Charlotte P; Adams, Mark E; Tegley, Christopher M; Edwards, James P; López, Francisco J; Kallel, E Adam; Karanewsky, Donald S; Schrader, William T; Marschke, Keith B; Zhi, Lin

    2007-10-01

    A series of androgen receptor modulators based on 8H-[1,4]oxazino[2,3-f]quinolin-8-ones was synthesized and evaluated in an androgen receptor transcriptional activation assay. The most potent analogues from the series exhibited single-digit nanomolar potency in vitro. Compound 18h demonstrated full efficacy in the maintenance of muscle weight, at 10 mg/kg, with reduced activity in prostate weight in an in vivo model of androgen action.

  11. Characterization and Modulation of the Bitterness of Polymethoxyflavones Using Sensory and Receptor-Based Methods.

    PubMed

    Batenburg, A Max; de Joode, Teun; Gouka, Robin J

    2016-03-30

    An obstacle in the application of many "health ingredients" is their alleged off-flavor. We used a combination of chemical, sensory, and biological analyses to identify the bitter components in citrus peel-derived polymethoxyflavone preparations, claimed to be functional in the lowering of cholesterol. Nobiletin (56-81%) and tangeretin (10-33%) were found to be the main bitter components. Using in vitro receptor assays, hTAS2R14 was shown to be the main bitter receptor involved in their perception, with EC50 values of 14 and 63 μM, respectively. Our analysis provided several routes for off-flavor reduction. Purification is an option because a purified, single PMF species proved to be considerably less bitter upon application in emulsified foods, due to limited solubility in the aqueous phase. A second route, also demonstrated in vivo, is C5-specific demethoxylation, in line with the finding that 5-desmethylnobiletin does not activate hTAS2R14. A third route could be the use of TAS2R14 antagonists. As a proof of principle, several antagonists, with IC50 values ranging from 10 to 50 μM, were identified.

  12. Identification of novel indole based heterocycles as selective estrogen receptor modulator.

    PubMed

    Singla, Ramit; Prakash, Kunal; Bihari Gupta, Kunj; Upadhyay, Shishir; Dhiman, Monisha; Jaitak, Vikas

    2018-04-24

    In the present study, we have designed and synthesized indole derivatives by coalescing the indole nucleus with chromene carbonitrile and dihydropyridine nucleus. Two compounds 5c and 6d were selected from series I and II after sequential combinatorial library generation, docking, absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) filtering, anti-proliferative activity, cytotoxicity, and ER-α competitor assay kit by utilizing estrogen receptor-α (ER-α) dominant T47D BC cells line and PBMCs (Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells). Cell imaging experiment suggested that both the compounds successfully cross cellular biomembrane and accumulate in nuclear, cytoplasmic and plasma membrane region. Semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting experiments further supported that both compounds reduced the expression of mRNA and receptor protein of ER-α, thereby preventing downstream transactivation and signaling pathway in T47D cells line. Current findings imply that 5c and 6d represent novel ER-α antagonists and may be used in the development of chemotherapy for the management of BC. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. GPCR-ModSim: A comprehensive web based solution for modeling G-protein coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Esguerra, Mauricio; Siretskiy, Alexey; Bello, Xabier; Sallander, Jessica; Gutiérrez-de-Terán, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    GPCR-ModSim (http://open.gpcr-modsim.org) is a centralized and easy to use service dedicated to the structural modeling of G-protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs). 3D molecular models can be generated from amino acid sequence by homology-modeling techniques, considering different receptor conformations. GPCR-ModSim includes a membrane insertion and molecular dynamics (MD) equilibration protocol, which can be used to refine the generated model or any GPCR structure uploaded to the server, including if desired non-protein elements such as orthosteric or allosteric ligands, structural waters or ions. We herein revise the main characteristics of GPCR-ModSim and present new functionalities. The templates used for homology modeling have been updated considering the latest structural data, with separate profile structural alignments built for inactive, partially-active and active groups of templates. We have also added the possibility to perform multiple-template homology modeling in a unique and flexible way. Finally, our new MD protocol considers a series of distance restraints derived from a recently identified conserved network of helical contacts, allowing for a smoother refinement of the generated models which is particularly advised when there is low homology to the available templates. GPCR- ModSim has been tested on the GPCR Dock 2013 competition with satisfactory results. PMID:27166369

  14. Thermodynamic study of dihydrogen phosphate dimerisation and complexation with novel urea- and thiourea-based receptors.

    PubMed

    Bregović, Nikola; Cindro, Nikola; Frkanec, Leo; Užarević, Krunoslav; Tomišić, Vladislav

    2014-11-24

    Complexation of dihydrogen phosphate by novel thiourea and urea receptors in acetonitrile and dimethyl sulfoxide was studied in detail by an integrated approach by using several methods (isothermal titration calorimetry, ESI-MS, and (1)H NMR and UV spectroscopy). Thermodynamic investigations into H2PO4(-) dimerisation, which is a process that has been frequently recognised, but rarely quantitatively described, were carried out as well. The corresponding equilibrium was taken into account in the anion-binding studies, which enabled reliable determination of the complexation thermodynamic quantities. In both solvents the thiourea derivatives exhibited considerably higher binding affinities with respect to those containing the urea moiety. In acetonitrile, 1:1 and 2:1 (anion/receptor) complexes formed, whereas in dimethyl sulfoxide only the significantly less stable complexes of 1:1 stoichiometry were detected. The solvent effects on the thermodynamic parameters of dihydrogen phosphate dimerisation and complexation reactions are discussed. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Enrichment assessment of multiple virtual screening strategies for Toll-like receptor 8 agonists based on a maximal unbiased benchmarking data set.

    PubMed

    Pei, Fen; Jin, Hongwei; Zhou, Xin; Xia, Jie; Sun, Lidan; Liu, Zhenming; Zhang, Liangren

    2015-11-01

    Toll-like receptor 8 agonists, which activate adaptive immune responses by inducing robust production of T-helper 1-polarizing cytokines, are promising candidates for vaccine adjuvants. As the binding site of toll-like receptor 8 is large and highly flexible, virtual screening by individual method has inevitable limitations; thus, a comprehensive comparison of different methods may provide insights into seeking effective strategy for the discovery of novel toll-like receptor 8 agonists. In this study, the performance of knowledge-based pharmacophore, shape-based 3D screening, and combined strategies was assessed against a maximum unbiased benchmarking data set containing 13 actives and 1302 decoys specialized for toll-like receptor 8 agonists. Prior structure-activity relationship knowledge was involved in knowledge-based pharmacophore generation, and a set of antagonists was innovatively used to verify the selectivity of the selected knowledge-based pharmacophore. The benchmarking data set was generated from our recently developed 'mubd-decoymaker' protocol. The enrichment assessment demonstrated a considerable performance through our selected three-layer virtual screening strategy: knowledge-based pharmacophore (Phar1) screening, shape-based 3D similarity search (Q4_combo), and then a Gold docking screening. This virtual screening strategy could be further employed to perform large-scale database screening and to discover novel toll-like receptor 8 agonists. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Integrating sampling techniques and inverse virtual screening: toward the discovery of artificial peptide-based receptors for ligands.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Germán M; Salomón, Luis A; Montero-Cabrera, Luis A; de la Vega, José M García; Mascini, Marcello

    2016-05-01

    A novel heuristic using an iterative select-and-purge strategy is proposed. It combines statistical techniques for sampling and classification by rigid molecular docking through an inverse virtual screening scheme. This approach aims to the de novo discovery of short peptides that may act as docking receptors for small target molecules when there are no data available about known association complexes between them. The algorithm performs an unbiased stochastic exploration of the sample space, acting as a binary classifier when analyzing the entire peptides population. It uses a novel and effective criterion for weighting the likelihood of a given peptide to form an association complex with a particular ligand molecule based on amino acid sequences. The exploratory analysis relies on chemical information of peptides composition, sequence patterns, and association free energies (docking scores) in order to converge to those peptides forming the association complexes with higher affinities. Statistical estimations support these results providing an association probability by improving predictions accuracy even in cases where only a fraction of all possible combinations are sampled. False positives/false negatives ratio was also improved with this method. A simple rigid-body docking approach together with the proper information about amino acid sequences was used. The methodology was applied in a retrospective docking study to all 8000 possible tripeptide combinations using the 20 natural amino acids, screened against a training set of 77 different ligands with diverse functional groups. Afterward, all tripeptides were screened against a test set of 82 ligands, also containing different functional groups. Results show that our integrated methodology is capable of finding a representative group of the top-scoring tripeptides. The associated probability of identifying the best receptor or a group of the top-ranked receptors is more than double and about 10 times higher

  17. Oxytocin and Vasopressin Receptor Gene Variation as a Proximate Base for Inter- and Intraspecific Behavioral Differences in Bonobos and Chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Staes, Nicky; Stevens, Jeroen M. G.; Helsen, Philippe; Hillyer, Mia; Korody, Marisa; Eens, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Recent literature has revealed the importance of variation in neuropeptide receptor gene sequences in the regulation of behavioral phenotypic variation. Here we focus on polymorphisms in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) and vasopressin receptor gene 1a (Avpr1a) in chimpanzees and bonobos. In humans, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the third intron of OXTR (rs53576 SNP (A/G)) is linked with social behavior, with the risk allele (A) carriers showing reduced levels of empathy and prosociality. Bonobos and chimpanzees differ in these same traits, therefore we hypothesized that these differences might be reflected in variation at the rs53576 position. We sequenced a 320 bp region surrounding rs53576 but found no indications of this SNP in the genus Pan. However, we identified previously unreported SNP variation in the chimpanzee OXTR sequence that differs from both humans and bonobos. Humans and bonobos have previously been shown to have a more similar 5′ promoter region of Avpr1a when compared to chimpanzees, who are polymorphic for the deletion of ∼360 bp in this region (+/− DupB) which includes a microsatellite (RS3). RS3 has been linked with variation in levels of social bonding, potentially explaining part of the interspecies behavioral differences found in bonobos, chimpanzees and humans. To date, results for bonobos have been based on small sample sizes. Our results confirmed that there is no DupB deletion in bonobos with a sample size comprising approximately 90% of the captive founder population, whereas in chimpanzees the deletion of DupB had the highest frequency. Because of the higher frequency of DupB alleles in our bonobo population, we suggest that the presence of this microsatellite may partly reflect documented differences in levels of sociability found in bonobos and chimpanzees. PMID:25405348

  18. Prospects for Creation of Cardioprotective and Antiarrhythmic Drugs Based on Opioid Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Maslov, Leonid N; Oeltgen, Peter R.; Naryzhnaya, Natalia V.; Pei, Jian‐Ming; Brown, Stephen A.; Lishmanov, Yury B.; Downey, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract It has now been demonstrated that the μ, δ1, δ2, and κ1 opioid receptor (OR) agonists represent the most promising group of opioids for the creation of drugs enhancing cardiac tolerance to the detrimental effects of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Opioids are able to prevent necrosis and apoptosis of cardiomyocytes during I/R and improve cardiac contractility in the reperfusion period. The OR agonists exert an infarct‐reducing effect with prophylactic administration and prevent reperfusion‐induced cardiomyocyte death when ischemic injury of heart has already occurred; that is, opioids can mimic preconditioning and postconditioning phenomena. Furthermore, opioids are also effective in preventing ischemia‐induced arrhythmias. PMID:27197922

  19. Fast, metadynamics-based method for prediction of the stereochemistry-dependent relative free energies of ligand-receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Plazinska, Anita; Plazinski, Wojciech; Jozwiak, Krzysztof

    2014-04-30

    The computational approach applicable for the molecular dynamics (MD)-based techniques is proposed to predict the ligand-protein binding affinities dependent on the ligand stereochemistry. All possible stereoconfigurations are expressed in terms of one set of force-field parameters [stereoconfiguration-independent potential (SIP)], which allows for calculating all relative free energies by only single simulation. SIP can be used for studying diverse, stereoconfiguration-dependent phenomena by means of various computational techniques of enhanced sampling. The method has been successfully tested on the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) binding the four fenoterol stereoisomers by both metadynamics simulations and replica-exchange MD. Both the methods gave very similar results, fully confirming the presence of stereoselective effects in the fenoterol-β2-AR interactions. However, the metadynamics-based approach offered much better efficiency of sampling which allows for significant reduction of the unphysical region in SIP. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Genome-based identification and analysis of ionotropic receptors in Spodoptera litura.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jia-Ying; Xu, Zhi-Wen; Zhang, Xin-Min; Liu, Nai-Yong

    2018-05-22

    The ability to sense and recognize various classes of compounds is of particular importance for survival and reproduction of insects. Ionotropic receptor (IR), a sub-family of the ionotropic glutamate receptor family, has been identified as one of crucial chemoreceptor super-families, which mediates the sensing of odors and/or tastants, and serves as non-chemosensory functions. Yet, little is known about IR characteristics, evolution, and functions in Lepidoptera. Here, we identify the IR gene repertoire from a destructive polyphagous pest, Spodoptera litura. The exhaustive analyses with genome and transcriptome data lead to the identification of 45 IR genes, comprising 17 antennal IRs (A-IRs), 8 Lepidoptera-specific IRs (LS-IRs), and 20 divergent IRs (D-IRs). Phylogenetic analysis reveals that S. litura A-IRs generally retain a strict single copy within each orthologous group, and two lineage expansions are observed in the D-IR sub-family including IR100d-h and 100i-o, likely attributed to gene duplications. Results of gene structure analysis classify the SlitIRs into four types: I (intronless), II (1-3 introns), III (5-9 introns), and IV (10-18 introns). Extensive expression profiles demonstrate that the majority of SlitIRs (28/43) are enriched in adult antennae, and some are detected in gustatory-associated tissues like proboscises and legs as well as non-chemosensory organs like abdomens and reproductive tissues of both sexes. These results indicate that SlitIRs have diverse functional roles in olfaction, taste, and reproduction. Together, our study has complemented the information on chemoreceptor genes in S. litura, and meanwhile allows for target experiments to identify potential IR candidates for the control of this pest.

  1. Genome-based identification and analysis of ionotropic receptors in Spodoptera litura

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jia-Ying; Xu, Zhi-Wen; Zhang, Xin-Min; Liu, Nai-Yong

    2018-06-01

    The ability to sense and recognize various classes of compounds is of particular importance for survival and reproduction of insects. Ionotropic receptor (IR), a sub-family of the ionotropic glutamate receptor family, has been identified as one of crucial chemoreceptor super-families, which mediates the sensing of odors and/or tastants, and serves as non-chemosensory functions. Yet, little is known about IR characteristics, evolution, and functions in Lepidoptera. Here, we identify the IR gene repertoire from a destructive polyphagous pest, Spodoptera litura. The exhaustive analyses with genome and transcriptome data lead to the identification of 45 IR genes, comprising 17 antennal IRs (A-IRs), 8 Lepidoptera-specific IRs (LS-IRs), and 20 divergent IRs (D-IRs). Phylogenetic analysis reveals that S. litura A-IRs generally retain a strict single copy within each orthologous group, and two lineage expansions are observed in the D-IR sub-family including IR100d-h and 100i-o, likely attributed to gene duplications. Results of gene structure analysis classify the SlitIRs into four types: I (intronless), II (1-3 introns), III (5-9 introns), and IV (10-18 introns). Extensive expression profiles demonstrate that the majority of SlitIRs (28/43) are enriched in adult antennae, and some are detected in gustatory-associated tissues like proboscises and legs as well as non-chemosensory organs like abdomens and reproductive tissues of both sexes. These results indicate that SlitIRs have diverse functional roles in olfaction, taste, and reproduction. Together, our study has complemented the information on chemoreceptor genes in S. litura, and meanwhile allows for target experiments to identify potential IR candidates for the control of this pest.

  2. Receptor model-based source apportionment of particulate pollution in Hyderabad, India.

    PubMed

    Guttikunda, Sarath K; Kopakka, Ramani V; Dasari, Prasad; Gertler, Alan W

    2013-07-01

    Air quality in Hyderabad, India, often exceeds the national ambient air quality standards, especially for particulate matter (PM), which, in 2010, averaged 82.2 ± 24.6, 96.2 ± 12.1, and 64.3 ± 21.2 μg/m(3) of PM10, at commercial, industrial, and residential monitoring stations, respectively, exceeding the national ambient standard of 60 μg/m(3). In 2005, following an ordinance passed by the Supreme Court of India, a source apportionment study was conducted to quantify source contributions to PM pollution in Hyderabad, using the chemical mass balance (version 8.2) receptor model for 180 ambient samples collected at three stations for PM10 and PM2.5 size fractions for three seasons. The receptor modeling results indicated that the PM10 pollution is dominated by the direct vehicular exhaust and road dust (more than 60%). PM2.5 with higher propensity to enter the human respiratory tracks, has mixed sources of vehicle exhaust, industrial coal combustion, garbage burning, and secondary PM. In order to improve the air quality in the city, these findings demonstrate the need to control emissions from all known sources and particularly focus on the low-hanging fruits like road dust and waste burning, while the technological and institutional advancements in the transport and industrial sectors are bound to enhance efficiencies. Andhra Pradesh Pollution Control Board utilized these results to prepare an air pollution control action plan for the city.

  3. Development of Novel Melanocortin Receptor Agonists Based on the Cyclic Peptide Framework of Sunflower Trypsin Inhibitor-1.

    PubMed

    Durek, Thomas; Cromm, Philipp M; White, Andrew M; Schroeder, Christina I; Kaas, Quentin; Weidmann, Joachim; Ahmad Fuaad, Abdullah; Cheneval, Olivier; Harvey, Peta J; Daly, Norelle L; Zhou, Yang; Dellsén, Anita; Österlund, Torben; Larsson, Niklas; Knerr, Laurent; Bauer, Udo; Kessler, Horst; Cai, Minying; Hruby, Victor J; Plowright, Alleyn T; Craik, David J

    2018-04-26

    Ultrastable cyclic peptide frameworks offer great potential for drug design due to their improved bioavailability compared to their linear analogues. Using the sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1 (SFTI-1) peptide scaffold in combination with systematic N-methylation of the grafted pharmacophore led to the identification of novel subtype selective melanocortin receptor (MCR) agonists. Multiple bicyclic peptides were synthesized and tested toward their activity at MC1R and MC3-5R. Double N-methylated compound 18 showed a p K i of 8.73 ± 0.08 ( K i = 1.92 ± 0.34 nM) and a pEC 50 of 9.13 ± 0.04 (EC 50 = 0.75 ± 0.08 nM) at the human MC1R and was over 100 times more selective for MC1R. Nuclear magnetic resonance structural analysis of 18 emphasized the role of peptide bond N-methylation in shaping the conformation of the grafted pharmacophore. More broadly, this study highlights the potential of cyclic peptide scaffolds for epitope grafting in combination with N-methylation to introduce receptor subtype selectivity in the context of peptide-based drug discovery.

  4. The Androgen Receptor and Its Use in Biological Assays: Looking Toward Effect-Based Testing and Its Applications

    PubMed Central

    Cadwallader, Amy B.; Lim, Carol S.; Rollins, Douglas E.; Botrè, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Steroid abuse is a growing problem among amateur and professional athletes. Because of an inundation of newly and illegally synthesized steroids with minor structural modifications and other designer steroid receptor modulators, there is a need to develop new methods of detection which do not require prior knowledge of the abused steroid structure. The number of designer steroids currently being abused is unknown because detection methods in general are only identifying substances with a known structure. The detection of doping is moving away from merely checking for exposure to prohibited substance toward detecting an effect of prohibited substances, as biological assays can do. Cell-based biological assays are the next generation of assays which should be utilized by antidoping laboratories; they can detect androgenic anabolic steroid and other human androgen receptor (hAR) ligand presence without knowledge of their structure and assess the relative biological activity of these compounds. This review summarizes the hAR and its action and discusses its relevance to sports doping and its use in biological assays. PMID:22080898

  5. Delta Opioid Receptor (DOR) Ligands and Pharmacology: Development of Indolo- and Quinolinomorphinan Derivatives Based on the Message-Address Concept.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Akiyoshi; Nagase, Hiroshi

    2016-10-28

    The pharmacology of the delta opioid receptor (DOR) has lagged, mainly due to the lack of an agonist with high potency and selectivity in vivo. The DOR is now receiving increasing attention, and there has been progress in the synthesis of better novel ligands. The discovery of a selective receptor DOR antagonist, naltrindole (NTI), stimulated the design and synthesis of (±)TAN-67, which was designed based on the message-address concept and the accessory site theory. Intensive studies using (±)TAN-67 determined the DOR-mediated various pharmacological effects, such as antinociceptive effects for painful diabetic neuropathy and cardiovascular protective effects. We improved the agonist activity of TAN-67 to afford SN-28, which was modified to KNT-127, a novel compound that improved the blood-brain barrier permeability. In addition, KNT-127 showed higher selectivity for the DOR and had potent agonist activity following systemic administration. Interestingly, KNT-127 produced no convulsive effects, unlike prototype DOR agonists. The KNT-127 type derivatives with a quinolinomorphinan structure are expected to be promising candidates for the development of therapeutic DOR agonists.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation study of PTP1B with allosteric inhibitor and its application in receptor based pharmacophore modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharatham, Kavitha; Bharatham, Nagakumar; Kwon, Yong Jung; Lee, Keun Woo

    2008-12-01

    Allosteric inhibition of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), has paved a new path to design specific inhibitors for PTP1B, which is an important drug target for the treatment of type II diabetes and obesity. The PTP1B1-282-allosteric inhibitor complex crystal structure lacks α7 (287-298) and moreover there is no available 3D structure of PTP1B1-298 in open form. As the interaction between α7 and α6-α3 helices plays a crucial role in allosteric inhibition, α7 was modeled to the PTP1B1-282 in open form complexed with an allosteric inhibitor (compound-2) and a 5 ns MD simulation was performed to investigate the relative orientation of the α7-α6-α3 helices. The simulation conformational space was statistically sampled by clustering analyses. This approach was helpful to reveal certain clues on PTP1B allosteric inhibition. The simulation was also utilized in the generation of receptor based pharmacophore models to include the conformational flexibility of the protein-inhibitor complex. Three cluster representative structures of the highly populated clusters were selected for pharmacophore model generation. The three pharmacophore models were subsequently utilized for screening databases to retrieve molecules containing the features that complement the allosteric site. The retrieved hits were filtered based on certain drug-like properties and molecular docking simulations were performed in two different conformations of protein. Thus, performing MD simulation with α7 to investigate the changes at the allosteric site, then developing receptor based pharmacophore models and finally docking the retrieved hits into two distinct conformations will be a reliable methodology in identifying PTP1B allosteric inhibitors.

  7. A novel BRET-based binding assay for interaction studies of relaxin family peptide receptor 3 with its ligands.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Hui; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Hu, Meng-Jun; Wei, Dian; Liu, Ya-Li; Xu, Zeng-Guang; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2017-05-01

    Relaxin family peptide receptor 3 (RXFP3) is an A-class G protein-coupled receptor that is implicated in the regulation of food intake and stress response upon activation by its cognate agonist relaxin-3. To study its interaction with various ligands, we developed a novel bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-based binding assay using the brightest NanoLuc as an energy donor and a newly developed cyan-excitable orange fluorescent protein (CyOFP) as an energy acceptor. An engineered CyOFP without intrinsic cysteine residues but with an introduced cysteine at the C-terminus was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and chemically conjugated to the A-chain N-terminus of an easily labeled chimeric R3/I5 peptide via an intermolecular disulfide linkage. After the CyOFP-conjugated R3/I5 bound to a shortened human RXFP3 (removal of 33 N-terminal residues) fused with the NanoLuc reporter at the N-terminus, high BRET signals were detected. Saturation binding and real-time binding assays demonstrated that this BRET pair retained high binding affinity with fast association/dissociation. Using this BRET pair, binding potencies of various ligands with RXFP3 were conveniently measured through competition binding assays. Thus, the novel BRET-based binding assay facilitates interaction studies of RXFP3 with various ligands. The engineered CyOFP without intrinsic cysteine residues may also be applied to other BRET-based binding assays in future studies.

  8. B Cell Receptor Signaling-Based Index as a Biomarker for the Loss of Peripheral Immune Tolerance in Autoreactive B Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lyubchenko, Taras; Zerbe, Gary O.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the loss of peripherally induced B cell immune tolerance in Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and establishes a novel signaling-based measure of activation in a subset of autoreactive B cells - the Induced tolerance status index (ITSI). Naturally occurring naïve autoreactive B cells can escape the “classical” tolerogenic mechanisms of clonal deletion and receptor editing, but remain peripherally tolerized through B cell receptor (BCR) signaling inhibition (postdevelopmental “receptor tuning” or anergy). ITSI is a statistical index that numerically determines the level of homology between activation patterns of BCR signaling intermediaries in B cells that are either tolerized or activated by auto antigen exposure, and thus quantifies the level of peripheral immune tolerance. The index is based on the logistic regression analysis of phosphorylation levels in a panel of BCR signaling proteins. Our results demonstrate a new approach to identifying autoreactive B cells based on their BCR signaling features. PMID:25057856

  9. Suppression of HPV-16 late L1 5′-splice site SD3632 by binding of hnRNP D proteins and hnRNP A2/B1 to upstream AUAGUA RNA motifs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoze; Johansson, Cecilia; Glahder, Jacob; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Schwartz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) 5′-splice site SD3632 is used exclusively to produce late L1 mRNAs. We identified a 34-nt splicing inhibitory element located immediately upstream of HPV-16 late 5′-splice site SD3632. Two AUAGUA motifs located in these 34 nt inhibited SD3632. Two nucleotide substitutions in each of the HPV-16 specific AUAGUA motifs alleviated splicing inhibition and induced late L1 mRNA production from episomal forms of the HPV-16 genome in primary human keratinocytes. The AUAGUA motifs bind specifically not only to the heterogeneous nuclear RNP (hnRNP) D family of RNA-binding proteins including hnRNP D/AUF, hnRNP DL and hnRNP AB but also to hnRNP A2/B1. Knock-down of these proteins induced HPV-16 late L1 mRNA expression, and overexpression of hnRNP A2/B1, hnRNP AB, hnRNP DL and the two hnRNP D isoforms hnRNP D37 and hnRNP D40 further suppressed L1 mRNA expression. This inhibition may allow HPV-16 to hide from the immune system and establish long-term persistent infections with enhanced risk at progressing to cancer. There is an inverse correlation between expression of hnRNP D proteins and hnRNP A2/B1 and HPV-16 L1 production in the cervical epithelium, as well as in cervical cancer, supporting the conclusion that hnRNP D proteins and A2/B1 inhibit HPV-16 L1 mRNA production. PMID:24013563

  10. Docking based design of diastereoisomeric MTCA as GPIIb/IIIa receptor inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaozhen; Wang, Yuji; Wu, Jianhui; Gui, Lin; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Zheng, Meiqing; Wang, Yaonan; Zhao, Shurui; Li, Ze; Zhao, Ming; Peng, Shiqi

    2017-12-01

    In GPIIb/IIIa mediated arterial thrombosis platelet activation plays a central role. To discover platelet activation inhibitor the pharmacophores of GPIIb/IIIa receptor inhibitors and anti-thrombotic agents were analyzed. This led to the design of (1R,3S)- and (1S,3S)-1-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-β-carboline-3-carboxylic acids as GPIIb/IIIa inhibitors. Comparing to (1S,3S)-isomer (1R,3S)-isomer had lower cdocker interaction energy. AFM image showed that the minimal effective concentration of (1S,3S)-isomer and (1R,3S)-isomer inhibiting platelet activation were 10 -5  M and 10 -6  M, respectively. In vivo 1 μmol/kg of oral (1S,3S)-isomer effectively inhibited the rats to form arterial thrombus and down regulated GPIIb/IIIa expression, but the activities were significantly lower than those of 1 μmol/kg of oral (1R,3S)-isomer. Both (1S,3S)-isomer and (1R,3S)-isomer can be safely used for structural modifications, but (1R,3S)-isomer should be superior to (1S,3S)-isomer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Treating Diabetes Mellitus: Pharmacophore Based Designing of Potential Drugs from Gymnema sylvestre against Insulin Receptor Protein.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammad Uzzal; Khan, Md Arif; Rakib-Uz-Zaman, S M; Ali, Mohammad Tuhin; Islam, Md Saidul; Keya, Chaman Ara; Salimullah, Md

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most prevalent metabolic disorders which can affect the quality of life severely. Injectable insulin is currently being used to treat DM which is mainly associated with patient inconvenience. Small molecules that can act as insulin receptor (IR) agonist would be better alternatives to insulin injection. Herein, ten bioactive small compounds derived from Gymnema sylvestre (G. sylvestre) were chosen to determine their IR binding affinity and ADMET properties using a combined approach of molecular docking study and computational pharmacokinetic elucidation. Designing structural analogues were also performed for the compounds associated with toxicity and less IR affinity. Among the ten parent compounds, six were found to have significant pharmacokinetic properties with considerable binding affinity towards IR while four compounds were associated with toxicity and less IR affinity. Among the forty structural analogues, four compounds demonstrated considerably increased binding affinity towards IR and less toxicity compared with parent compounds. Finally, molecular interaction analysis revealed that six parent compounds and four analogues interact with the active site amino acids of IR. So this study would be a way to identify new therapeutics and alternatives to insulin for diabetic patients.

  12. Mechanism-Based Mathematical Model for Gating of Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jian; Wollmuth, Lonnie P; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2015-08-27

    We present a mathematical model for ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluR's) that is built on mechanistic understanding and yields a number of thermodynamic and kinetic properties of channel gating. iGluR's are ligand-gated ion channels responsible for the vast majority of fast excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. The effects of agonist-induced closure of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) are transmitted to the transmembrane channel (TMC) via interdomain linkers. Our model demonstrates that, relative to full agonists, partial agonists may reduce either the degree of LBD closure or the curvature of the LBD free energy basin, leading to less stabilization of the channel open state and hence lower channel open probability. A rigorous relation is derived between the channel closed-to-open free energy difference and the tension within the linker. Finally, by treating LBD closure and TMC opening as diffusive motions, we obtain gating trajectories that resemble stochastic current traces from single-channel recordings and calculate the rate constants for transitions between the channel open and closed states. Our model can be implemented by molecular dynamics simulations to realistically depict iGluR gating and may guide functional experiments in gaining deeper insight into this essential family of channel proteins.

  13. Chitosan-based DNA delivery vector targeted to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor.

    PubMed

    Boonthum, Chatwalee; Namdee, Katawut; Boonrungsiman, Suwimon; Chatdarong, Kaywalee; Saengkrit, Nattika; Sajomsang, Warayuth; Ponglowhapan, Suppawiwat; Yata, Teerapong

    2017-02-10

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the application of modified chitosan as a potential vector for gene delivery to gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR)-expressing cells. Such design of gene carrier could be useful in particular for gene therapy for cancers related to the reproductive system, gene disorders of sexual development, and contraception and fertility control. In this study, a decapeptide GnRH was successfully conjugated to chitosan (CS) as confirmed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H NMR) and Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). The synthesized GnRH-conjugated chitosan (GnRH-CS) was able to condense DNA to form positively charged nanoparticles and specifically deliver plasmid DNA to targeted cells in both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures systems. Importantly, GnRH-CS exhibited higher transfection activity compared to unmodified CS. In conclusion, GnRH-conjugated chitosan can be a promising carrier for targeted DNA delivery to GnRHR-expressing cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Treating Diabetes Mellitus: Pharmacophore Based Designing of Potential Drugs from Gymnema sylvestre against Insulin Receptor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mohammad Uzzal; Khan, Md. Arif; Rakib-Uz-Zaman, S. M.; Ali, Mohammad Tuhin; Islam, Md. Saidul; Keya, Chaman Ara; Salimullah, Md.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the most prevalent metabolic disorders which can affect the quality of life severely. Injectable insulin is currently being used to treat DM which is mainly associated with patient inconvenience. Small molecules that can act as insulin receptor (IR) agonist would be better alternatives to insulin injection. Herein, ten bioactive small compounds derived from Gymnema sylvestre (G. sylvestre) were chosen to determine their IR binding affinity and ADMET properties using a combined approach of molecular docking study and computational pharmacokinetic elucidation. Designing structural analogues were also performed for the compounds associated with toxicity and less IR affinity. Among the ten parent compounds, six were found to have significant pharmacokinetic properties with considerable binding affinity towards IR while four compounds were associated with toxicity and less IR affinity. Among the forty structural analogues, four compounds demonstrated considerably increased binding affinity towards IR and less toxicity compared with parent compounds. Finally, molecular interaction analysis revealed that six parent compounds and four analogues interact with the active site amino acids of IR. So this study would be a way to identify new therapeutics and alternatives to insulin for diabetic patients. PMID:27034931

  15. A radiogallium-DOTA-based bivalent peptidic ligand targeting a chemokine receptor, CXCR4, for tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Sano, Kohei; Masuda, Ryo; Hisada, Hayato; Oishi, Shinya; Shimokawa, Kenta; Ono, Masahiro; Fujii, Nobutaka; Saji, Hideo; Mukai, Takahiro

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a novel radiogallium (Ga)-DOTA-based bivalent peptidic ligand targeting a chemokine receptor, CXCR4, for tumor imaging. A CXCR4 imaging probe with two CXCR4 antagonists (Ac-TZ14011) on Ga-DOTA core, Ga-DOTA-TZ2, was synthesized, and the affinity and binding to CXCR4 was evaluated in CXCR4 expressing cells in vitro. The affinity of Ga-DOTA-TZ2 for CXCR4 was 20-fold greater than the corresponding monovalent probe, Ga-DOTA-TZ1. (67)Ga-DOTA-TZ2 showed the significantly higher accumulation in CXCR4-expressing tumor cells compared with (67)Ga-DOTA-TZ1, suggesting the bivalent effect enhances its binding to CXCR4. The incorporation of two CXCR4 antagonists to Ga-DOTA could be effective in detecting CXCR4-expressing tumors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The significance of transferrin receptors in oncology: the development of functional nano-based drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Tortorella, Stephanie; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2014-01-01

    Anticancer therapeutic research aims to improve clinical management of the disease through the development of strategies that involve currently-relevant treatment options and targeted delivery. Tumour-specific and -targeted delivery of compounds to the site of malignancy allows for enhanced cellular uptake, increased therapeutic benefit with high intratumoural drug concentrations, and decreased systemic exposure. Due to the upregulation of transferrin receptor expression in a wide variety of cancers, its function and its highly efficient recycling pathway, strategies involving the selective targeting of the receptor are well documented. Direct conjugation and immunotoxin studies using the transferrin peptide or anti-transferrin receptor antibodies as the targeting moiety have established the capacity to enhance cellular uptake, cross the blood brain barrier, limit systemic toxicity and reverse multi-drug resistance. Limitations in direct conjugation, including the difficulty in linking an adequate amount of therapeutic compound to the ligand or antibody have identified the requirement to develop novel delivery methods. The application of nanoparticulate theory in the development of functional drug delivery systems has proven to be most promising, with the ability to selectively modify size-dependent properties and surface chemistry. The transferrin modification on a range of nanoparticle formulations enhances selective cellular uptake through transferrin-mediated processes, and increases therapeutic benefit through the ability to encapsulate high concentrations of relevant drug to the tumour site. Although ineffective in crossing the blood brain barrier in its free form, chemotherapeutic compounds including doxorubicin, may be loaded into transferrin-conjugated nanocarriers and impart cytotoxic effects in glioma cells in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, transferrin-targeted nanoparticles may be used in selective diagnostic applications with enhanced selectivity and

  17. A Fluorescent Live Imaging Screening Assay Based on Translocation Criteria Identifies Novel Cytoplasmic Proteins Implicated in G Protein-coupled Receptor Signaling Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Lecat, Sandra; Matthes, Hans W.D.; Pepperkok, Rainer; Simpson, Jeremy C.; Galzi, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Several cytoplasmic proteins that are involved in G protein-coupled receptor signaling cascades are known to translocate to the plasma membrane upon receptor activation, such as beta-arrestin2. Based on this example and in order to identify new cytoplasmic proteins implicated in the ON-and-OFF cycle of G protein-coupled receptor, a live-imaging screen of fluorescently labeled cytoplasmic proteins was performed using translocation criteria. The screening of 193 fluorescently tagged human proteins identified eight proteins that responded to activation of the tachykinin NK2 receptor by a change in their intracellular localization. Previously we have presented the functional characterization of one of these proteins, REDD1, that translocates to the plasma membrane. Here we report the results of the entire screening. The process of cell activation was recorded on videos at different time points and all the videos can be visualized on a dedicated website. The proteins BAIAP3 and BIN1, partially translocated to the plasma membrane upon activation of NK2 receptors. Proteins ARHGAP12 and PKM2 translocated toward membrane blebs. Three proteins that associate with the cytoskeleton were of particular interest : PLEKHH2 rearranged from individual dots located near the cell-substrate adhesion surface into lines of dots. The speriolin-like protein, SPATC1L, redistributed to cell-cell junctions. The Chloride intracellular Channel protein, CLIC2, translocated from actin-enriched plasma membrane bundles to cell-cell junctions upon activation of NK2 receptors. CLIC2, and one of its close paralogs, CLIC4, were further shown to respond with the same translocation pattern to muscarinic M3 and lysophosphatidic LPA receptors. This screen allowed us to identify potential actors in signaling pathways downstream of G protein-coupled receptors and could be scaled-up for high-content screening. PMID:25759509

  18. A Fluorescent Live Imaging Screening Assay Based on Translocation Criteria Identifies Novel Cytoplasmic Proteins Implicated in G Protein-coupled Receptor Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Lecat, Sandra; Matthes, Hans W D; Pepperkok, Rainer; Simpson, Jeremy C; Galzi, Jean-Luc

    2015-05-01

    Several cytoplasmic proteins that are involved in G protein-coupled receptor signaling cascades are known to translocate to the plasma membrane upon receptor activation, such as beta-arrestin2. Based on this example and in order to identify new cytoplasmic proteins implicated in the ON-and-OFF cycle of G protein-coupled receptor, a live-imaging screen of fluorescently labeled cytoplasmic proteins was performed using translocation criteria. The screening of 193 fluorescently tagged human proteins identified eight proteins that responded to activation of the tachykinin NK2 receptor by a change in their intracellular localization. Previously we have presented the functional characterization of one of these proteins, REDD1, that translocates to the plasma membrane. Here we report the results of the entire screening. The process of cell activation was recorded on videos at different time points and all the videos can be visualized on a dedicated website. The proteins BAIAP3 and BIN1, partially translocated to the plasma membrane upon activation of NK2 receptors. Proteins ARHGAP12 and PKM2 translocated toward membrane blebs. Three proteins that associate with the cytoskeleton were of particular interest : PLEKHH2 rearranged from individual dots located near the cell-substrate adhesion surface into lines of dots. The speriolin-like protein, SPATC1L, redistributed to cell-cell junctions. The Chloride intracellular Channel protein, CLIC2, translocated from actin-enriched plasma membrane bundles to cell-cell junctions upon activation of NK2 receptors. CLIC2, and one of its close paralogs, CLIC4, were further shown to respond with the same translocation pattern to muscarinic M3 and lysophosphatidic LPA receptors. This screen allowed us to identify potential actors in signaling pathways downstream of G protein-coupled receptors and could be scaled-up for high-content screening. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Receptor-receptor interactions within receptor mosaics. Impact on neuropsychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Fuxe, K; Marcellino, D; Rivera, A; Diaz-Cabiale, Z; Filip, M; Gago, B; Roberts, D C S; Langel, U; Genedani, S; Ferraro, L; de la Calle, A; Narvaez, J; Tanganelli, S; Woods, A; Agnati, L F

    2008-08-01

    Future therapies for diseases associated with altered dopaminergic signaling, including Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia and drug addiction or drug dependence may substantially build on the existence of intramembrane receptor-receptor interactions within dopamine receptor containing receptor mosaics (RM; dimeric or high-order receptor oligomers) where it is believed that the dopamine D(2) receptor may operate as the 'hub receptor' within these complexes. The constitutive adenosine A(2A)/dopamine D(2) RM, located in the dorsal striato-pallidal GABA neurons, are of particular interest in view of the demonstrated antagonistic A(2A)/D(2) interaction within these heteromers; an interaction that led to the suggestion and later demonstration that A(2A) antagonists could be used as novel anti-Parkinsonian drugs. Based on the likely existence of A(2A)/D(2)/mGluR5 RM located both extrasynaptically on striato-pallidal GABA neurons and on cortico-striatal glutamate terminals, multiple receptor-receptor interactions within this RM involving synergism between A(2A)/mGluR5 to counteract D(2) signaling, has led to the proposal of using combined mGluR5 and A(2A) antagonists as a future anti-Parkinsonian treatment. Based on the same RM in the ventral striato-pallidal GABA pathways, novel strategies for the treatment of schizophrenia, building on the idea that A(2A) agonists and/or mGluR5 agonists will help reduce the increased dopaminergic signaling associated with this disease, have been suggested. Such treatment may ensure the proper glutamatergic drive from the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus to the prefrontal cortex, one which is believed to be reduced in schizophrenia due to a dominance of D(2)-like signaling in the ventral striatum. Recently, A(2A) receptors also have been shown to counteract the locomotor and sensitizing actions of cocaine and increases in A(2A) receptors have also been observed in the nucleus accumbens after extended cocaine self-administration, probably

  20. Disruptions in effort-based decision-making and consummatory behavior following antagonism of the dopamine D2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Robles, Cindee F; Johnson, Alexander W

    2017-03-01

    Dopamine is known to influence motivational processes, however the precise role of this neurotransmitter remains a contentious issue. In the current study we sought to further characterize dopamine signaling in reward-based decision-making and consummatory behavior in mice, via lateral ventricle infusion of the dopamine D2 receptor antagonist eticlopride. In Experiment 1, we examined effort-based decision-making, in which mice had a choice between one lever, where a single response led to the delivery of a low value reward (2% sucrose); and a second lever, which led to a higher value reward (20% sucrose) that gradually required more effort to obtain. As the response schedule for the high value reward became more strict, low dose (4μg in 0.5μl) central infusions of eticlopride biased preference away from the high value reward, and toward the lever that led to the low value reward. Similarly, a higher dose of eticlopride (8μg in 0.5μl) also disrupted choice responding for the high value reward, however it did so by increasing omissions. In Experiment 2, we assessed the effects of eticlopride on consumption of 20% sucrose. The antagonist led to a dose-dependent reduction in intake, and through an analysis of licking microstructure, it was revealed that this in part reflected a reduction in the motivation to engage in consummatory behavior, rather than alterations in the evaluation of the reward. These results suggest that disruptions in D2 receptor signaling reduce the willingness to engage in effortful operant responding and consumption of a desirable outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Pharmacophore-based virtual screening, biological evaluation and binding mode analysis of a novel protease-activated receptor 2 antagonist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Nam-Chul; Seo, Seoung-Hwan; Kim, Dohee; Shin, Ji-Sun; Ju, Jeongmin; Seong, Jihye; Seo, Seon Hee; Lee, Iiyoun; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Kim, Yun Kyung; No, Kyoung Tai; Pae, Ae Nim

    2016-08-01

    Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is a G protein-coupled receptor, mediating inflammation and pain signaling in neurons, thus it is considered to be a potential therapeutic target for inflammatory diseases. In this study, we performed a ligand-based virtual screening of 1.6 million compounds by employing a common-feature pharmacophore model and two-dimensional similarity search to identify a new PAR2 antagonist. The common-feature pharmacophore model was established based on the biological screening results of our in-house library. The initial virtual screening yielded a total number of 47 hits, and additional biological activity tests including PAR2 antagonism and anti-inflammatory effects resulted in a promising candidate, compound 43, which demonstrated an IC50 value of 8.22 µM against PAR2. In next step, a PAR2 homology model was constructed using the crystal structure of the PAR1 as a template to explore the binding mode of the identified ligands. A molecular docking method was optimized by comparing the binding modes of a known PAR2 agonist GB110 and antagonist GB83, and applied to predict the binding mode of our hit compound 43. In-depth docking analyses revealed that the hydrophobic interaction with Phe2435.39 is crucial for PAR2 ligands to exert antagonistic activity. MD simulation results supported the predicted docking poses that PAR2 antagonist blocked a conformational rearrangement of Na+ allosteric site in contrast to PAR2 agonist that showed Na+ relocation upon GPCR activation. In conclusion, we identified new a PAR2 antagonist together with its binding mode, which provides useful insights for the design and development of PAR2 ligands.

  2. Dopaminergic receptor-ligand binding assays based on molecularly imprinted polymers on quartz crystal microbalance sensors.

    PubMed

    Naklua, Wanpen; Suedee, Roongnapa; Lieberzeit, Peter A

    2016-07-15

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) have been successfully applied as selective materials for assessing the binding activity of agonist and antagonist of dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) by using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). In this study, D1R derived from rat hypothalamus was used as a template and thus self-organized on stamps. Those were pressed into an oligomer film consisting of acrylic acid: N-vinylpyrrolidone: N,N'-(1,2-dihydroxyethylene) bis-acrylamide in a ratio of 2:3:12 spin coated onto a dual electrode QCM. Such we obtained one D1R-MIP-QCM electrode, whereas the other electrode carried the non-imprinted control polymer (NIP) that had remained untreated. Successful imprinting of D1R was confirmed by AFM. The polymer can re-incorporate D1R leading to frequency responses of 100-1200Hz in a concentration range of 5.9-47.2µM. In a further step such frequency changes proved inherently useful for examining the binding properties of test ligands to D1R. The resulting mass-sensitive measurements revealed Kd of dopamine∙HCl, haloperidol, and (+)-SCH23390 at 0.874, 25.6, and 0.004nM, respectively. These results correlate well with the values determined in radio ligand binding assays. Our experiments revealed that D1R-MIP sensors are useful for estimating the strength of ligand binding to the active single site. Therefore, we have developed a biomimetic surface imprinting strategy for QCM studies of D1R-ligand binding and presented a new method to ligand binding assay for D1R. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Active antitumor immunity elicited by vaccine based on recombinant form of epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bing; Wei, Yuquan; Tian, Ling; Zhao, Xia; Lu, You; Wu, Yang; Yao, Bing; Liu, Jiyan; Niu, Ting; Wen, Yanjun; He, Qiuming; Su, Jingmei; Huang, Meijuan; Lou, Yanyan; Luo, Yan; Kan, Bing

    2005-01-01

    Active immunotherapy targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) should be another attractive approach to the treatment of EGFR-positive tumors. To test this concept, the authors evaluated the potential immune responses and antitumor activities elicited by dendritic cells pulsed with recombinant ectodomain of mouse EGFR (DC-edMER). Spleen cells isolated from DC-edMER-vaccinated mice showed a high quantity of EGFR-specific antibody-producing cells. EGFR-reactive antibody in sera isolated from vaccinated mice was identified and shown to be effective against tumors in vitro and in vivo by adoptive transfer. DC-edMER vaccine also elicited cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses that could mediate antitumor effects in vitro and adoptive transfer in vivo. In addition, EGFR-specific cytokines responses were elicited by DC-edMER vaccine. Immunization with DC-edMER resulted in tumor regression and prolonged survival in mice challenged with Lewis lung carcinomas and mammary cancer models. Depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes could completely abrogate the antitumor activity and EGFR-specific antibody responses, whereas the depletion of CD8+ T lymphocytes showed partial abrogation of the antitumor activity but antibody was still detected. Furthermore, tumor-induced angiogenesis was suppressed in DC-edMER-vaccinated mice or mice treated with antibody adoptive transfer. Taken together, these findings suggest the antitumor immunity could be induced by DC-edMER, which may involve both humoral and cellular immunity, and may provide insight into the treatment of EGFR-positive tumors through the induction of active immunity against EGFR.

  4. Structure-based prediction of subtype selectivity of histamine H3 receptor selective antagonists in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Kyung; Fristrup, Peter; Abrol, Ravinder; Goddard, William A

    2011-12-27

    Histamine receptors (HRs) are excellent drug targets for the treatment of diseases, such as schizophrenia, psychosis, depression, migraine, allergies, asthma, ulcers, and hypertension. Among them, the human H(3) histamine receptor (hH(3)HR) antagonists have been proposed for specific therapeutic applications, including treatment of Alzheimer's disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), epilepsy, and obesity. However, many of these drug candidates cause undesired side effects through the cross-reactivity with other histamine receptor subtypes. In order to develop improved selectivity and activity for such treatments, it would be useful to have the three-dimensional structures for all four HRs. We report here the predicted structures of four HR subtypes (H(1), H(2), H(3), and H(4)) using the GEnSeMBLE (GPCR ensemble of structures in membrane bilayer environment) Monte Carlo protocol, sampling ∼35 million combinations of helix packings to predict the 10 most stable packings for each of the four subtypes. Then we used these 10 best protein structures with the DarwinDock Monte Carlo protocol to sample ∼50 000 × 10(20) poses to predict the optimum ligand-protein structures for various agonists and antagonists. We find that E206(5.46) contributes most in binding H(3) selective agonists (5, 6, 7) in agreement with experimental mutation studies. We also find that conserved E5.46/S5.43 in both of hH(3)HR and hH(4)HR are involved in H(3)/ H(4) subtype selectivity. In addition, we find that M378(6.55) in hH(3)HR provides additional hydrophobic interactions different from hH(4)HR (the corresponding amino acid of T323(6.55) in hH(4)HR) to provide additional subtype bias. From these studies, we developed a pharmacophore model based on our predictions for known hH(3)HR selective antagonists in clinical study [ABT-239 1, GSK-189,254 2, PF-3654746 3, and BF2.649 (tiprolisant) 4] that suggests critical selectivity directing elements are: the basic proton

  5. Encompassing receptor flexibility in virtual screening using ensemble docking-based hybrid QSAR: discovery of novel phytochemicals for BACE1 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandipan; Ramachandran, Balaji; Basu, Soumalee

    2014-10-01

    Mimicking receptor flexibility during receptor-ligand binding is a challenging task in computational drug design since it is associated with a large increase in the conformational search space. In the present study, we have devised an in silico design strategy incorporating receptor flexibility in virtual screening to identify potential lead compounds as inhibitors for flexible proteins. We have considered BACE1 (β-secretase), a key target protease from a therapeutic perspective for Alzheimer's disease, as the highly flexible receptor. The protein undergoes significant conformational transitions from open to closed form upon ligand binding, which makes it a difficult target for inhibitor design. We have designed a hybrid structure-activity model containing both ligand based descriptors and energetic descriptors obtained from molecular docking based on a dataset of structurally diverse BACE1 inhibitors. An ensemble of receptor conformations have been used in the docking study, further improving the prediction ability of the model. The designed model that shows significant prediction ability judged by several statistical parameters has been used to screen an in house developed 3-D structural library of 731 phytochemicals. 24 highly potent, novel BACE1 inhibitors with predicted activity (Ki) ≤ 50 nM have been identified. Detailed analysis reveals pharmacophoric features of these novel inhibitors required to inhibit BACE1.

  6. A DFT and semiempirical model-based study of opioid receptor affinity and selectivity in a group of molecules with a morphine structural core.

    PubMed

    Bruna-Larenas, Tamara; Gómez-Jeria, Juan S

    2012-01-01

    We report the results of a search for model-based relationships between mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptor binding affinity and molecular structure for a group of molecules having in common a morphine structural core. The wave functions and local reactivity indices were obtained at the ZINDO/1 and B3LYP/6-31G(∗∗) levels of theory for comparison. New developments in the expression for the drug-receptor interaction energy expression allowed several local atomic reactivity indices to be included, such as local electronic chemical potential, local hardness, and local electrophilicity. These indices, together with a new proposal for the ordering of the independent variables, were incorporated in the statistical study. We found and discussed several statistically significant relationships for mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptor binding affinity at both levels of theory. Some of the new local reactivity indices incorporated in the theory appear in several equations for the first time in the history of model-based equations. Interaction pharmacophores were generated for mu, delta, and kappa receptors. We discuss possible differences regulating binding and selectivity in opioid receptor subtypes. This study, contrarily to the statistically backed ones, is able to provide a microscopic insight of the mechanisms involved in the binding process.

  7. Multimodality Imaging of Gene Transfer with a Receptor-Based Reporter Gene

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ron; Parry, Jesse J.; Akers, Walter J.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.; El Naqa, Issam M.; Achilefu, Samuel; Edwards, W. Barry; Rogers, Buck E.

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy trials have traditionally used tumor and tissue biopsies for assessing the efficacy of gene transfer. Non-invasive imaging techniques offer a distinct advantage over tissue biopsies in that the magnitude and duration of gene transfer can be monitored repeatedly. Human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) has been used for the nuclear imaging of gene transfer. To extend this concept, we have developed a somatostatin receptor–enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion construct (SSTR2-EGFP) for nuclear and fluorescent multimodality imaging. Methods An adenovirus containing SSTR2-EGFP (AdSSTR2-EGFP) was constructed and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. SCC-9 human squamous cell carcinoma cells were infected with AdEGFP, AdSSTR2, or AdSSTR2-EGFP for in vitro evaluation by saturation binding, internalization, and fluorescence spectroscopy assays. In vivo biodistribution and nano-SPECT imaging studies were conducted with mice bearing SCC-9 tumor xenografts directly injected with AdSSTR2-EGFP or AdSSTR2 to determine the tumor localization of 111In-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA)-Tyr3-octreotate. Fluorescence imaging was conducted in vivo with mice receiving intratumoral injections of AdSSTR2, AdSSTR2-EGFP, or AdEGFP as well as ex vivo with tissues extracted from mice. Results The similarity between AdSSTR2-EGFP and wild-type AdSSTR2 was demonstrated in vitro by the saturation binding and internalization assays, and the fluorescence emission spectra of cells infected with AdSSTR2-EGFP was almost identical to the spectra of cells infected with wild-type AdEGFP. Biodistribution studies demonstrated that the tumor uptake of 111In-DTPA-Tyr3-octreotate was not significantly different (P > 0.05) when tumors (n = 5) were injected with AdSSTR2 or AdSSTR2-EGFP but was significantly greater than the uptake in control tumors. Fluorescence was observed in tumors injected with AdSSTR2-EGFP and AdEGFP in vivo and ex vivo but not in tumors injected with AdSSTR2

  8. Quantitative Receptor-Based Imaging of Tumor Proliferation with the Sigma-2 Ligand [18F]ISO-1

    PubMed Central

    Shoghi, Kooresh I.; Xu, Jinbin; Su, Yi; He, June; Rowland, Douglas; Yan, Ying; Garbow, Joel R.; Tu, Zhude; Jones, Lynne A.; Higashikubo, Ryuji; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Lubet, Ronald A.; Mach, Robert H.; You, Ming

    2013-01-01

    The sigma-2 receptor is expressed in higher density in proliferating (P) tumor cells versus quiescent (Q) tumor cells, thus providing an attractive target for imaging the proliferative status (i.e., P:Q ratio) of solid tumors. Here we evaluate the utility of the sigma-2 receptor ligand 2-(2-[18F]fluoroethoxy)-N-(4-(3,4-dihydro-6,7-dimethoxyisoquinolin-2(1H)-yl)butyl)-5-methyl-benzamide, [18F]ISO-1, in two different rodent models of breast cancer. In the first study, small animal Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging studies were conducted with [18F]ISO-1 and 18FDG in xenografts of mouse mammary tumor 66 and tracer uptake was correlated with the in vivo P:Q ratio determined by flow cytometric measures of BrdU-labeled tumor cells. The second model utilized a chemically-induced (N-methyl-N-nitrosourea [MNU]) model of rat mammary carcinoma to correlate measures of [18F]ISO-1 and FDG uptake with MR-based volumetric measures of tumor growth. In addition, [18F]ISO-1 and FDG were used to assess the response of MNU-induced tumors to bexarotene and Vorozole therapy. In the mouse mammary 66 tumors, a strong linear correlation was observed between the [18F]ISO-1 tumor: background ratio and the proliferative status (P:Q ratio) of the tumor (R = 0.87). Similarly, measures of [18F]ISO-1 uptake in MNU-induced tumors significantly correlated (R = 0.68, P<0.003) with changes in tumor volume between consecutive MR imaging sessions. Our data suggest that PET studies of [18F]ISO-1 provide a measure of both the proliferative status and tumor growth rate, which would be valuable in designing an appropriate treatment strategy. PMID:24073202

  9. Functional analysis of Torpedo californica nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in multiple activation states by SSM-based electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Niessen, K V; Muschik, S; Langguth, F; Rappenglück, S; Seeger, T; Thiermann, H; Worek, F

    2016-04-15

    Organophosphorus compounds (OPC), i.e. nerve agents or pesticides, are highly toxic due to their strong inhibition potency against acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Inhibited AChE results in accumulation of acetylcholine in the synaptic cleft and thus the desensitisation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in the postsynaptic membrane is provoked. Direct targeting of nAChR to reduce receptor desensitisation might be an alternative therapeutic approach. For drug discovery, functional properties of potent therapeutic candidates need to be investigated in addition to affinity properties. Solid supported membrane (SSM)-based electrophysiology is useful for functional characterisation of ligand-gated ion channels like nAChRs, as charge translocations via capacitive coupling of the supporting membrane can be measured. By varying the agonist (carbamoylcholine) concentration, different functional states of the nAChR were initiated. Using plasma membrane preparations obtained from Torpedo californica electric organ, functional properties of selected nAChR ligands and non-oxime bispyridinium compounds were investigated. Depending on overall-size, the bispyridinium compounds enhanced or inhibited cholinergic signals induced by 100 μM carbamoylcholine. Applying excessive concentrations of the agonist carbamoylcholine provoked desensitisation of the nAChRs, whereas addition of bispyridinium compounds bearing short alkyl linkers exhibited functional recovery of previously desensitised nAChRs. The results suggest that these non-oxime bispyridinium compounds possibly interacted with nAChR subtypes in a manner of a positive allosteric modulator (PAM). The described newly developed functional assay is a valuable tool for the assessment of functional properties of potential compounds such as nAChR modulating ligands, which might be a promising approach in the therapeutically treatment of OPC-poisonings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of estrogen receptor alpha activation by glyphosate-based herbicide constituents

    EPA Science Inventory

    The safety, including the endocrine disruptive capability, of glyphosate-based herbicides (GBHs) is a matter of intense debate. We evaluated the estrogenic potential of glyphosate, commercial GBHs and polyethoxylated tallowamine adjuvants present as co-formulants in GBHs. Glyph...

  11. AMP and adenosine are both ligands for adenosine 2B receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Holien, Jessica K; Seibt, Benjamin; Roberts, Veena; Salvaris, Evelyn; Parker, Michael W; Cowan, Peter J; Dwyer, Karen M

    2018-01-15

    Adenosine is considered the canonical ligand for the adenosine 2B receptor (A 2B R). A 2B R is upregulated following kidney ischemia augmenting post ischemic blood flow and limiting tubular injury. In this context the beneficial effect of A 2B R signaling has been attributed to an increase in the pericellular concentration of adenosine. However, following renal ischemia both kidney adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and adenosine levels are substantially increased. Using computational modeling and calcium mobilization assays, we investigated whether AMP could also be a ligand for A 2B R. The computational modeling suggested that AMP interacts with more favorable energy to A 2B R compared with adenosine. Furthermore, AMPαS, a non-hydrolyzable form of AMP, increased calcium uptake by Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the human A 2B R, indicating preferential signaling via the G q pathway. Therefore, a putative AMP-A 2B R interaction is supported by the computational modeling data and the biological results suggest this interaction involves preferential G q activation. These data provide further insights into the role of purinergic signaling in the pathophysiology of renal IRI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. High-expression β(1) adrenergic receptor/cell membrane chromatography method based on a target receptor to screen active ingredients from traditional Chinese medicines.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yuan; Xue, Hui; Wang, Xin; Yang, Qian; Song, Yanhong; Li, Xiaoni

    2014-02-01

    β-Adrenergic receptors are important targets for drug discovery. We have developed a new β1 -adrenergic receptor cell membrane chromatography (β1 AR-CMC) with offline ultra-performance LC (UPLC) and MS method for screening active ingredients from traditional Chinese medicines. In this study, Chinese hamster ovary-S cells with high β1 AR expression levels were established and used to prepare a cell membrane stationary phase in a β1 AR-CMC model. The retention fractions were separated and identified by the UPLC-MS system. The screening results found that isoimperatorin from Rhizoma et Radix Notopterygii was the targeted component that could act on β1 AR in similar manner of metoprolol as a control drug. In addition, the biological effects of active component were also investigated in order to search for a new type of β1 AR antagonist. It will be a useful method for drug discovery as a leading compound resource. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Synthesis and anion binding studies of tris(3-aminopropyl)amine-based tripodal urea and thiourea receptors: Proton transfer-induced selectivity for hydrogen sulfate over sulfate.

    PubMed

    Khansari, Maryam Emami; Johnson, Corey R; Basaran, Ismet; Nafis, Aemal; Wang, Jing; Leszczynski, Jerzy; Hossain, Md Alamgir

    2015-01-01

    Tris(3-aminopropyl)amine-based tripodal urea and thiourea receptors, tris([(4-cyanophenyl)amino]propyl)urea ( L1 ) and tris([(4-cyanophenyl)amino]propyl)thiourea ( L2 ), have been synthesized and their anion binding properties have been investigated for halides and oxoanions. As investigated by 1 H NMR titrations, each receptor binds an anion with a 1:1 stoichiometry via hydrogen-bonding interactions (NH⋯anion), showing the binding trend in the order of F - > H 2 PO 4 - > HCO 3 - > HSO 4 - > CH 3 COO - > SO 4 2- > Cl - > Br - > I in DMSO- d 6 . The interactions of the receptors were further studied by 2D NOESY, showing the loss of NOESY contacts of two NH resonances for the complexes of F - , H 2 PO 4 - , HCO 3 - , HSO 4 - or CH 3 COO - due to the strong NH⋯anion interactions. The observed higher binding affinity for HSO 4 - than SO 4 2- is attributed to the proton transfer from HSO 4 - to the central nitrogen of L1 or L2 which was also supported by the DFT calculations, leading to the secondary acid-base interactions. The thiourea receptor L2 has a general trend to show a higher affinity for an anion as compared to the urea receptor L1 for the corresponding anion in DMSO- d 6 . In addition, the compound L2 has been exploited for its extraction properties for fluoride in water using a liquid-liquid extraction technique, and the results indicate that the receptor effectively extracts fluoride from water showing ca. 99% efficiency (based on L2 ).

  14. Synthesis and anion binding studies of tris(3-aminopropyl)amine-based tripodal urea and thiourea receptors: Proton transfer-induced selectivity for hydrogen sulfate over sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Khansari, Maryam Emami; Johnson, Corey R.; Basaran, Ismet; Nafis, Aemal; Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Tris(3-aminopropyl)amine-based tripodal urea and thiourea receptors, tris([(4-cyanophenyl)amino]propyl)urea (L1) and tris([(4-cyanophenyl)amino]propyl)thiourea (L2), have been synthesized and their anion binding properties have been investigated for halides and oxoanions. As investigated by 1H NMR titrations, each receptor binds an anion with a 1:1 stoichiometry via hydrogen-bonding interactions (NH⋯anion), showing the binding trend in the order of F− > H2PO4− > HCO3− > HSO4− > CH3COO− > SO42− > Cl− > Br− > I in DMSO-d6. The interactions of the receptors were further studied by 2D NOESY, showing the loss of NOESY contacts of two NH resonances for the complexes of F−, H2PO4−, HCO3−, HSO4− or CH3COO− due to the strong NH⋯anion interactions. The observed higher binding affinity for HSO4− than SO42− is attributed to the proton transfer from HSO4− to the central nitrogen of L1 or L2 which was also supported by the DFT calculations, leading to the secondary acid-base interactions. The thiourea receptor L2 has a general trend to show a higher affinity for an anion as compared to the urea receptor L1 for the corresponding anion in DMSO-d6. In addition, the compound L2 has been exploited for its extraction properties for fluoride in water using a liquid-liquid extraction technique, and the results indicate that the receptor effectively extracts fluoride from water showing ca. 99% efficiency (based on L2). PMID:28184300

  15. A Regional Assessment of Marine Vessel PM2.5 Impacts in the U.S. Pacific Northwest Using a Receptor Based Source Apportionment Method

    EPA Science Inventory

    This work reports the results of a regional receptor-based source apportionment analysis using the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) model on chemically speciated PM2.5 data from 36 urban and rural monitoring sites within the U.S. Pacific Northwest. The approach taken is to mo...

  16. The Role of Adenosine Receptors in Psychostimulant Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Ballesteros-Yáñez, Inmaculada; Castillo, Carlos A.; Merighi, Stefania; Gessi, Stefania

    2018-01-01

    Adenosine receptors (AR) are a family of G-protein coupled receptors, comprised of four members, named A1, A2A, A2B, and A3 receptors, found widely distributed in almost all human body tissues and organs. To date, they are known to participate in a large variety of physiopathological responses, which include vasodilation, pain, and inflammation. In particular, in the central nervous system (CNS), adenosine acts as a neuromodulator, exerting different functions depending on the type of AR and consequent cellular signaling involved. In terms of molecular pathways and second messengers involved, A1 and A3 receptors inhibit adenylyl cyclase (AC), through Gi/o proteins, while A2A and A2B receptors stimulate it through Gs proteins. In the CNS, A1 receptors are widely distributed in the cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum, A2A receptors are localized mainly in the striatum and olfactory bulb, while A2B and A3 receptors are found at low levels of expression. In addition, AR are able to form heteromers, both among themselves (e.g., A1/A2A), as well as with other subtypes (e.g., A2A/D2), opening a whole range of possibilities in the field of the pharmacology of AR. Nowadays, we know that adenosine, by acting on adenosine A1 and A2A receptors, is known to antagonistically modulate dopaminergic neurotransmission and therefore reward systems, being A1 receptors colocalized in heteromeric complexes with D1 receptors, and A2A receptors with D2 receptors. This review documents the present state of knowledge of the contribution of AR, particularly A1 and A2A, to psychostimulants-mediated effects, including locomotor activity, discrimination, seeking and reward, and discuss their therapeutic relevance to psychostimulant addiction. Studies presented in this review reinforce the potential of A1 agonists as an effective strategy to counteract psychostimulant-induced effects. Furthermore, different experimental data support the hypothesis that A2A/D2 heterodimers are partly responsible

  17. The identification of high-affinity G protein-coupled receptor ligands from large combinatorial libraries using multicolor quantum dot-labeled cell-based screening

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Junjie; Lee, Timothy; Qi, Xin

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are involved in virtually every biological process, constitute the largest family of transmembrane receptors. Many top-selling and newly approved drugs target GPCRs. In this review, we aim to recapitulate efforts and progress in combinatorial library-assisted GPCR ligand discovery, particularly focusing on one-bead-one-compound library synthesis and quantum dot-labeled cell-based assays, which both effectively enhance the rapid identification of GPCR ligands with higher affinity and specificity. PMID:24941874

  18. Structure-Based Approach To Identify 5-[4-Hydroxyphenyl]pyrrole-2-carbonitrile Derivatives as Potent and Tissue Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators.

    PubMed

    Unwalla, Ray; Mousseau, James J; Fadeyi, Olugbeminiyi O; Choi, Chulho; Parris, Kevin; Hu, Baihua; Kenney, Thomas; Chippari, Susan; McNally, Christopher; Vishwanathan, Karthick; Kilbourne, Edward; Thompson, Catherine; Nagpal, Sunil; Wrobel, Jay; Yudt, Matthew; Morris, Carl A; Powell, Dennis; Gilbert, Adam M; Chekler, Eugene L Piatnitski

    2017-07-27

    In an effort to find new and safer treatments for osteoporosis and frailty, we describe a novel series of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). Using a structure-based approach, we identified compound 7, a potent AR (ARE EC 50 = 0.34 nM) and selective (N/C interaction EC 50 = 1206 nM) modulator. In vivo data, an AR LBD X-ray structure of 7, and further insights from modeling studies of ligand receptor interactions are also presented.

  19. Differentiation of δ, μ, and κ opioid receptor agonists based on pharmacophore development and computed physicochemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filizola, Marta; Villar, Hugo O.; Loew, Gilda H.

    2001-04-01

    Compounds that bind with significant affinity to the opioid receptor types, δ, μ, and κ, with different combinations of activation and inhibition at these three receptors could be promising behaviorally selective agents. Working on this hypothesis, the chemical moieties common to three different sets of opioid receptor agonists with significant affinity for each of the three receptor types δ, μ, or κ were identified. Using a distance analysis approach, common geometric arrangements of these chemical moieties were found for selected δ, μ, or κ opioid agonists. The chemical and geometric commonalities among agonists at each opioid receptor type were then compared with a non-specific opioid recognition pharmacophore recently developed. The comparison provided identification of the additional requirements for activation of δ, μ, and κ opioid receptors. The distance analysis approach was able to clearly discriminate κ-agonists, while global molecular properties for all compounds were calculated to identify additional requirements for activation of δ and μ receptors. Comparisons of the combined geometric and physicochemical properties calculated for each of the three sets of agonists allowed the determination of unique requirements for activation of each of the three opioid receptors. These results can be used to improve the activation selectivity of known opioid agonists and as a guide for the identification of novel selective opioid ligands with potential therapeutic usefulness.

  20. Non-gel Based Proteomics to Study Steroid Receptor Agonists in the Fathead Minnow

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicoproteomics is an emerging field that is greatly enabled by non-gel based methods using LC MS/MS for biomarker discovery and characterization for endocrine disrupting chemicals. Using iTRAQ (isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantitation), we quantified a diverse r...

  1. Carolinas SETAC: Validation of a Glucocorticoid Receptor Effects-Based Environmental Sample Screening Tool

    EPA Science Inventory

    Glucocorticoid activity has been detected, using in vitro effects-based monitoring tools (e.g. transcriptional activation bioassays), in waste and surface waters domestically and around the world. A review of the existing literature confirms that many different glucocorticoid rec...

  2. Medium-Throughput Screen of Microbially Produced Serotonin via a G-Protein-Coupled Receptor-Based Sensor.

    PubMed

    Ehrenworth, Amy M; Claiborne, Tauris; Peralta-Yahya, Pamela

    2017-10-17

    Chemical biosensors, for which chemical detection triggers a fluorescent signal, have the potential to accelerate the screening of noncolorimetric chemicals produced by microbes, enabling the high-throughput engineering of enzymes and metabolic pathways. Here, we engineer a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-based sensor to detect serotonin produced by a producer microbe in the producer microbe's supernatant. Detecting a chemical in the producer microbe's supernatant is nontrivial because of the number of other metabolites and proteins present that could interfere with sensor performance. We validate the two-cell screening system for medium-throughput applications, opening the door to the rapid engineering of microbes for the increased production of serotonin. We focus on serotonin detection as serotonin levels limit the microbial production of hydroxystrictosidine, a modified alkaloid that could accelerate the semisynthesis of camptothecin-derived anticancer pharmaceuticals. This work shows the ease of generating GPCR-based chemical sensors and their ability to detect specific chemicals in complex aqueous solutions, such as microbial spent medium. In addition, this work sets the stage for the rapid engineering of serotonin-producing microbes.

  3. The constitutive androstane receptor is a novel therapeutic target facilitating cyclophosphamide-based treatment of hematopoietic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Duan; Li, Linhao; Yang, Hui; Ferguson, Stephen S.; Baer, Maria R.; Gartenhaus, Ronald B.

    2013-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CPA) is one of the most widely used chemotherapeutic prodrugs that undergoes hepatic bioactivation mediated predominantly by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2B6. Given that the CYP2B6 gene is primarily regulated by the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3), we hypothesize that selective activation of CAR can enhance systemic exposure of the pharmacologically active 4-hydroxycyclophosamide (4-OH-CPA), with improved efficacy of CPA-based chemotherapy. In this study, we have developed a unique human primary hepatocyte (HPH)–leukemia cell coculture model; the chemotherapeutic effects of CPA on leukemia cells can be directly investigated in vitro in a cellular environment where hepatic metabolism was well maintained. Our results demonstrated that activation of CAR preferentially induces the expression of CYP2B6 over CYP3A4 in HPHs, although endogenous expression of these enzymes in leukemia cells remains negligible. Importantly, coadministration of CPA with a human CAR activator led to significantly enhanced cytotoxicity in leukemia cells by inducing the apoptosis pathways, without concomitant increase in the off-target hepatotoxicity. Associated with the enhanced antitumor activity, a time and concentration-dependent increase in 4-OH-CPA formation was observed in the coculture system. Together, our findings offer proof of concept that CAR as a novel molecular target can facilitate CPA-based chemotherapy by selectively promoting its bioactivation. PMID:23160467

  4. Hormone receptor status of contralateral breast cancers: analysis of data from the US SEER population-based registries.

    PubMed

    Mezencev, Roman; Švajdler, Marián

    2017-05-01

    Women diagnosed with breast cancer display higher propensity to develop second primary cancer in the contralateral breast (CBC). Identification of patients with increased risk of CBC and understanding relationships between hormone receptor (HR) statuses of the first and second breast cancers is desirable for endocrine-based prevention strategies. Using 1992-2012 data from 13 SEER registries, the risk of developing CBC was determined as ratio of observed and expected second breast cancers (SIR). Association between HR statuses was examined by exploratory data analysis and multivariable logistic regression. Women with ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancers have increased risk of developing CBC with SIR values 2.09 (CI 95 = 1.97-2.21) and 2.40 (CI 95 = 2.18-2.63), respectively. ER statuses of the CBC are moderately positively associated. In metachronous CBC, most cases with ER-positive first cancers had ER-positive second breast cancers (81.6 %; CI 95 = 80.2-82.9 %); however, considerable proportion of cases with ER-negative first cancers had ER-positive second cancers (48.8 %; CI 95 = 46.2-51.4 %). Some women with ER-negative breast cancers may benefit from endocrine-based prevention of ER-positive CBC.

  5. Structure-Activity Relationships of Bifunctional Cyclic Disulfide Peptides Based on Overlapping Pharmacophores at Opioid and Cholecystokinin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Agnes, Richard S.; Ying, Jinfa; Kövér, Katalin E.; Lee, Yeon Sun; Davis, Peg; Ma, Shou-wu; Badghisi, Hamid; Porreca, Frank; Lai, Josephine; Hruby, Victor J.

    2008-01-01

    Prolonged opioid exposure increases the expression of cholecystokinin (CCK) and its receptors in the central nervous system, where CCK may attenuate the antinociceptive effects of opioids. The complex interactions between opioid and CCK may play a role in the development of opioid tolerance. We designed and synthesized cyclic disulfide peptides and determined their agonist properties at opioid receptors and antagonist properties at CCK receptors. Compound 1 (Tyr-c[D-Cys-Gly-Trp-Cys]-Asp-Phe-NH2) showed potent binding and agonist activities at δ and µ opioid receptors while displaying some binding to CCK receptors. The NMR structure of the lead compound displayed similar conformational features of opioid and CCK ligands. PMID:18502541

  6. Structure-based drug design targeting the cell membrane receptor GPBAR1: exploiting the bile acid scaffold towards selective agonism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Leva, Francesco Saverio; Festa, Carmen; Renga, Barbara; Sepe, Valentina; Novellino, Ettore; Fiorucci, Stefano; Zampella, Angela; Limongelli, Vittorio

    2015-11-01

    Bile acids can regulate nutrient metabolism through the activation of the cell membrane receptor GPBAR1 and the nuclear receptor FXR. Developing an exogenous control over these receptors represents an attractive strategy for the treatment of enterohepatic and metabolic disorders. A number of dual GPBAR1/FXR agonists are known, however their therapeutic use is limited by multiple unwanted effects due to activation of the diverse downstream signals controlled by the two receptors. On the other hand, designing selective GPBAR1 and FXR agonists is challenging since the two proteins share similar structural requisites for ligand binding. Here, taking advantage of our knowledge of the two targets, we have identified through a rational drug design study a series of amine lithocholic acid derivatives as selective GPBAR1 agonists. The presence of the 3α-NH2 group on the steroidal scaffold is responsible for the selectivity over FXR unveiling unprecedented structural insights into bile acid receptors activity modulation.

  7. Selective ligand activity at Nur/retinoid X receptor complexes revealed by dimer-specific bioluminescence resonance energy transfer-based sensors

    PubMed Central

    Giner, Xavier C; Cotnoir-White, David; Mader, Sylvie; Lévesque, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Retinoid X receptors (RXR) play a role as master regulators due to their capacity to form heterodimers with other nuclear receptors. Accordingly, retinoid signaling is involved in multiple biological processes, including development, cell differentiation, metabolism and cell death. However, the role and functions of RXR in different heterodimer complexes remain unsolved, mainly because most RXR drugs (called rexinoids) are not selective to specific heterodimer complexes. This also strongly limits the use of rexinoids for specific therapeutic approaches. In order to better characterize rexinoids at specific nuclear receptor complexes, we have developed and optimized luciferase protein complementation-based Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET) assays, which can directly measure recruitment of a co-activator motif fused to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) by specific nuclear receptor dimers. To validate the assays, we compared rexinoid modulation of co-activator recruitment by RXR homodimer, and heterodimers Nur77/RXR and Nurr1/RXR. Results reveal that some rexinoids display selective co-activator recruitment activities with homo- or hetero-dimer complexes. In particular, SR11237 (BMS649) has increased potency for recruitment of co-activator motif and transcriptional activity with the Nur77/RXR heterodimer compared to other complexes. This technology should prove useful to identify new compounds with specificity for individual dimeric species formed by nuclear receptors. PMID:26148973

  8. Exploring details about structure requirements based on novel CGRP receptor antagonists urethanamide, aspartate, succinate and pyridine derivatives by in silico methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; He, Haoran; Wang, Jinghui; Han, Chunxiao; Feng, Jiaqi; Zhang, Shuwei; Yang, Ling

    2014-09-01

    The migraine never fails to afflict individuals in the world that knows no lack of such cases. CGRP (calcitonin gene-related peptide) is found closely related to migraine and olcegepant (BIBN4096) is effective in alleviating the pain. In our work, the combination of ligand- and receptor-based three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) studies along with molecular docking was applied to provide us insights about how urethanamide, pyridine and aspartate and succinate derivatives (novel CGRP receptor antagonists) play a part in inhibiting the activity of CGRP receptor. The optimal CoMSIA model shows the Q2 of 0.505, R2ncv of 0.992 and its accurate predictive ability was confirmed by checking out an independent test set which gave R2pred value of 0.885. Besides, the 3D contour maps help us identify how different groups affect the antagonist activity while connecting to some key positions. In addition, the docking analysis shows the binding site emerging as the distorted “V” shape and including two binding pockets: one of them is hydrophobic, fixing the structural part 3 of compound 80, the other anchors the part 1 of compound 80. The docking analysis also shows the interaction mechanism between compound 80 and CGRP receptor, similar to the interaction between olcegepant and CGRP receptor. The findings derived from this work reveal the mechanism of related antagonists and facilitate the future rational design of novel antagonists with higher potency.

  9. HPLC-Based Activity Profiling: Discovery of Piperine as a Positive GABAA Receptor Modulator Targeting a Benzodiazepine-Independent Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Zaugg, Janine; Baburin, Igor; Strommer, Barbara; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Hering, Steffen; Hamburger, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    A plant extract library was screened for GABAA receptor activity making use of a two-microelectrode voltage clamp assay on Xenopus laevis oocytes. An ethyl acetate extract of black pepper fruits [Piper nigrum L. (Piperaceae) 100 μg/mL] potentiated GABA-induced chloride currents through GABAA receptors (composed of α1, β2, and γ2S subunits) by 169.1 ± 2.4%. With the aid of an HPLC-based activity profiling approach, piperine (5) was identified as the main active compound, together with 12 structurally related less active or inactive piperamides (1–4, 6–13). Identification was achieved by on-line high-resolution mass spectrometry and off-line microprobe 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, using only milligram amounts of extract. Compound 5 induced a maximum potentiation of the chloride currents by 301.9 ± 26.5% with an EC50 of 52.4 ± 9.4 μM. A comparison of the modulatory activity of 5 and other naturally occurring piperamides enabled insights into structural features critical for GABAA receptor modulation. The stimulation of chloride currents through GABAA receptors by compound 5 was not antagonized by flumazenil (10 μM). These data show that piperine (5) represents a new scaffold of positive allosteric GABAA receptor modulators targeting a benzodiazepine-independent binding site. PMID:20085307

  10. Gender-dependent associations of CDKN2A/2B, KCNJ11, POLI, SLC30A8, and TCF7L2 variants with type 2 diabetes in (North African) Tunisian Arabs.

    PubMed

    Turki, Amira; Al-Zaben, Ghadeer S; Khirallah, Moncef; Marmouch, Hela; Mahjoub, Touhami; Almawi, Wassim Y

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the impact of gender on T2DM association with confirmed susceptibility loci. CDKN2A/2B rs10811661, KCNJ11 rs5219, and TCF7L2 rs7903146 were associated with T2DM in females, while POLI rs488846 was associated with T2DM among males; the association of SLC30A8 rs13266634 and TCF7L2 rs4506565, rs12243326, and rs12255372 with T2DM was gender-independent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. New Strategy for Prostate Cancer Prevention Based on Selenium Suppression of Androgen Receptor Signaling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    finasteride decreases the formation of DHT, while MSA depresses the abundance of AR protein. To study the effect of finasteride/MSA on FOXO1...chemoprevention based on selenium suppression of androgen signaling”. 4. AACR Centennial Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, April 15-18, poster presentation...AR mRNA level was depressed by 0%, 20%, or 60%, respec- tively; AR transactivation was inhibited by 35%, 10%, or 60%, respectively; whereas the PSA

  12. Nanobiophotonics for molecular imaging of cancer: Au- and Ag-based Epidermal Growth Factor receptor (EGFR) specific nanoprobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Leanne J.; Hewitt, Kevin C.

    2012-03-01

    Our aim is to create and validate a novel SERS-based nanoprobe for optical imaging of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Gold and silver nanoparticles (Au/AgNPs) of various sizes were synthesized and coupled to epidermal growth factor (EGF) via a short ligand, α-lipoic acid (206 g/mol), which binds strongly to both Au and Ag nanoparticles via its disulfide end group. We used carbodiimide chemistry to couple EGF to α-lipoic acid. These nanoprobes were tested for binding affinity using Enzyme Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (ELISA) and, in-vitro, using EGFRoverexpressing A431 cells. The nanoprobes show excellent EGFR-specific binding. Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry demonstrate the carbodiimide based linking of the carboxylic acid end-group of α-lipoic acid to one or more of the three (terminal, or 2 lysine) amine groups on EGF. ELISA confirms that the linked EGF is active by itself, and following conjugation with gold or silver nanoparticles. Compared with bare nanoparticles, UV-Vis spectroscopy of Ag-based nanoprobes exhibit significant plasmon red-shift, while there was no discernable shift for Au-based ones. Dark field microscopy shows abundant uptake by EGFR overexpressing A431 cells, and serves to further confirm the excellent binding affinity. Nanoprobe internalization and consequent aggregation is thought to be the basis of enhanced light scattering in the dark field images, supporting the notion that these nanoprobes should provide excellent SERS signals at all nanoprobe sizes. In summary, novel EGFR-specific nanoprobes have been synthesized and validated by standard assay and in cell culture for use as SERS optical imaging probes.

  13. Lung injury pathways: Adenosine receptor 2B signaling limits development of ischemic bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Densmore, John C; Schaid, Terry R; Jeziorczak, Paul M; Medhora, Meetha; Audi, Said; Nayak, Shraddha; Auchampach, John; Dwinell, Melinda R; Geurts, Aron M; Jacobs, Elizabeth R

    2017-02-01

    Purpose/Aim of the Study: Adenosine signaling was studied in bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) resulting from unilateral lung ischemia. Ischemia was achieved by either left main pulmonary artery or complete hilar ligation. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, Dahl salt sensitive (SS) rats and SS mutant rat strains containing a mutation in the A 2B adenosine receptor gene (Adora2b) were studied. Adenosine concentrations were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) by HPLC. A 2A (A 2A AR) and A 2B adenosine receptor (A 2B AR) mRNA and protein were quantified. Twenty-four hours after unilateral PA ligation, BAL adenosine concentrations from ischemic lungs were increased relative to contralateral lungs in SD rats. A 2B AR mRNA and protein concentrations were increased after PA ligation while miR27a, a negatively regulating microRNA, was decreased in ischemic lungs. A 2A AR mRNA and protein concentrations remained unchanged following ischemia. A 2B AR protein was increased in PA ligated lungs of SS rats after 7 days, and 4 h after complete hilar ligation in SD rats. SS-Adora2b mutants showed a greater extent of BOOP relative to SS rats, and greater inflammatory changes. Increased A 2B AR and adenosine following unilateral lung ischemia as well as more BOOP in A 2B AR mutant rats implicate a protective role for A 2B AR signaling in countering ischemic lung injury.

  14. Computational identification of post-translational modification-based nuclear import regulations by characterizing nuclear localization signal-import receptor interaction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jhih-Rong; Liu, Zhonghao; Hu, Jianjun

    2014-10-01

    The binding affinity between a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and its import receptor is closely related to corresponding nuclear import activity. PTM-based modulation of the NLS binding affinity to the import receptor is one of the most understood mechanisms to regulate nuclear import of proteins. However, identification of such regulation mechanisms is challenging due to the difficulty of assessing the impact of PTM on corresponding nuclear import activities. In this study we proposed NIpredict, an effective algorithm to predict nuclear import activity given its NLS, in which molecular interaction energy components (MIECs) were used to characterize the NLS-import receptor interaction, and the support vector regression machine (SVR) was used to learn the relationship between the characterized NLS-import receptor interaction and the corresponding nuclear import activity. Our experiments showed that nuclear import activity change due to NLS change could be accurately predicted by the NIpredict algorithm. Based on NIpredict, we developed a systematic framework to identify potential PTM-based nuclear import regulations for human and yeast nuclear proteins. Application of this approach has identified the potential nuclear import regulation mechanisms by phosphorylation of two nuclear proteins including SF1 and ORC6. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The changing world of G protein-coupled receptors: from monomers to dimers and receptor mosaics with allosteric receptor-receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Fuxe, Kjell; Marcellino, Daniel; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel Oscar; Frankowska, Malgorzata; Ferraro, Luca; Guidolin, Diego; Ciruela, Francisco; Agnati, Luigi F

    2010-10-01

    Based on indications of direct physical interactions between neuropeptide and monoamine receptors in the early 1980s, the term receptor-receptor interactions was introduced and later on the term receptor heteromerization in the early 1990s. Allosteric mechanisms allow an integrative activity to emerge either intramolecularly in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) monomers or intermolecularly via receptor-receptor interactions in GPCR homodimers, heterodimers, and receptor mosaics. Stable heteromers of Class A receptors may be formed that involve strong high energy arginine-phosphate electrostatic interactions. These receptor-receptor interactions markedly increase the repertoire of GPCR recognition, signaling and trafficking in which the minimal signaling unit in the GPCR homomers appears to be one receptor and one G protein. GPCR homomers and GPCR assemblies are not isolated but also directly interact with other proteins to form horizontal molecular networks at the plasma membrane.

  16. * CRISPR-Based Epigenome Editing of Cytokine Receptors for the Promotion of Cell Survival and Tissue Deposition in Inflammatory Environments.

    PubMed

    Farhang, Niloofar; Brunger, Jonathan M; Stover, Joshua D; Thakore, Pratiksha I; Lawrence, Brandon; Guilak, Farshid; Gersbach, Charles A; Setton, Lori A; Bowles, Robby D

    2017-08-01

    Musculoskeletal diseases have been associated with inflammatory cytokine action, particularly action by TNF-α and IL-1β. These inflammatory cytokines promote apoptosis and senescence of cells in diseased tissue and extracellular matrix breakdown. Stem cell-based therapies are being considered for the treatment of musculoskeletal diseases, but the presence of these inflammatory cytokines will have similar deleterious action on therapeutic cells delivered to these environments. Methods that prevent inflammatory-induced apoptosis and proinflammatory signaling, in cell and pathway-specific manners are needed. In this study we demonstrate the use of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-based epigenome editing to alter cell response to inflammatory environments by repressing inflammatory cytokine cell receptors, specifically TNFR1 and IL1R1. We targeted CRISPR/Cas9-based repressors to TNFR1 and IL1R1 gene regulatory elements in human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs) and investigated the functional outcomes of repression of these genes. Efficient signaling regulation was demonstrated in engineered hADSCs, as activity of the downstream transcription factor NF-κB was significantly reduced or maintained at baseline levels in the presence of TNF-α or IL-1β. Pellet culture of undifferentiated hADSCs demonstrated improved survival in engineered hADSCs treated with TNF-α or IL-1β, while having little effect on their immunomodulatory properties. Furthermore, engineered hADSCs demonstrated improved chondrogenic differentiation capacity in the presence of TNF-α or IL-1β, as shown by superior production of glycosaminglycans in this inflammatory environment. Overall this work demonstrates a novel method for modulating cell response to inflammatory signaling that has applications in engineering cells delivered to inflammatory environments, and as a direct gene therapy to protect endogenous cells exposed to chronic inflammation, as observed in

  17. Network-based approach to identify prognostic biomarkers for estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer treatment with tamoxifen.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Guo, Cheng-Xian; Zhou, Hong-Hao

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to identify effective gene networks and prognostic biomarkers associated with estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer using human mRNA studies. Weighted gene coexpression network analysis was performed with a complex ER+ breast cancer transcriptome to investigate the function of networks and key genes in the prognosis of breast cancer. We found a significant correlation of an expression module with distant metastasis-free survival (HR = 2.25; 95% CI .21.03-4.88 in discovery set; HR = 1.78; 95% CI = 1.07-2.93 in validation set). This module contained genes enriched in the biological process of the M phase. From this module, we further identified and validated 5 hub genes (CDK1, DLGAP5, MELK, NUSAP1, and RRM2), the expression levels of which were strongly associated with poor survival. Highly expressed MELK indicated poor survival in luminal A and luminal B breast cancer molecular subtypes. This gene was also found to be associated with tamoxifen resistance. Results indicated that a network-based approach may facilitate the discovery of biomarkers for the prognosis of ER+ breast cancer and may also be used as a basis for establishing personalized therapies. Nevertheless, before the application of this approach in clinical settings, in vivo and in vitro experiments and multi-center randomized controlled clinical trials are still needed.

  18. Droplet Digital PCR Based Androgen Receptor Variant 7 (AR-V7) Detection from Prostate Cancer Patient Blood Biopsies.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yafeng; Luk, Alison; Young, Francis P; Lynch, David; Chua, Wei; Balakrishnar, Bavanthi; de Souza, Paul; Becker, Therese M

    2016-08-04

    Androgen receptor splice variant V7 (AR-V7) was recently identified as a valuable predictive biomarker in metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Here, we report a new, sensitive and accurate screen for AR-V7 mRNA expression directly from circulating tumor cells (CTCs): We combined EpCAM-based immunomagnetic CTC isolation using the IsoFlux microfluidic platform with droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) to analyze total AR and AR-V7 expression from prostate cancer patients CTCs. We demonstrate that AR-V7 is reliably detectable in enriched CTC samples with as little as five CTCs, even considering tumor heterogeneity, and confirm detection of AR-V7 in CTC samples from advanced prostate cancer (PCa) patients with AR-V7 detection limited to castrate resistant disease status in our sample set. Sensitive molecular analyses of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) or circulating tumor nucleic acids present exciting strategies to detect biomarkers, such as AR-V7 from non-invasive blood samples, so-called blood biopsies.

  19. A Label-Free Continuous Fluorescence-Based Assay for Monitoring Ornithine Decarboxylase Activity with a Synthetic Putrescine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Nilam, Mohamed; Gribbon, Philip; Reinshagen, Jeanette; Cordts, Kathrin; Schwedhelm, Edzard; Nau, Werner M; Hennig, Andreas

    2017-08-01

    Polyamines play an important role in cell growth, differentiation, and cancer development, and the biosynthetic pathway of polyamines is established as a drug target for the treatment of parasitic diseases, neoplasia, and cancer chemoprevention. The key enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis is ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). We report herein an analytical method for the continuous fluorescence monitoring of ODC activity based on the supramolecular receptor cucurbit[6]uril (CB6) and the fluorescent dye trans-4-[4-(dimethylamino)styryl]-1-methylpyridinium iodide (DSMI). CB6 has a significantly higher binding constant to the ODC product putrescine (>10 7 M -1 ) than to the substrate L-ornithine (340 M -1 ). This enables real-time monitoring of the enzymatic reaction through a continuous fluorescence change caused by dye displacement from the macrocycle by the formed product, which allowed a straightforward determination of enzyme kinetic parameters ( k cat = 0.12 s -1 and K M = 24 µM) and inhibition constants of the two ODC inhibitors α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). The potential for high-throughput screening (HTS) was demonstrated by excellent Z' factors (>0.9) in a microplate reader format, and the sensitivity of the assay is comparable to or better than most established complementary methods, which invariably have the disadvantage of not being compatible with direct implementation and upscaling to HTS format in the drug discovery process.

  20. A simple fluorescence-based assay for quantification of the Toll-Like Receptor agonist E6020 in vaccine formulations.

    PubMed

    Pollet, Jeroen; Versteeg, Leroy; Rezende, Wanderson; Strych, Ulrich; Gusovsky, Fabian; Hotez, Peter J; Bottazzi, Maria Elena

    2017-03-07

    Despite the generally accepted immunostimulatory effect of Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) agonists and their value as vaccine adjuvants, there remains a demand for fast and easy quantification assays for these TLR4 agonists in order to accelerate and improve vaccine formulation studies. A new medium-throughput method was developed for the quantification of the TLR4 agonist, E6020, independent of the formulation composition. The assay uses a fluorescent hydrazide (DCCH) to label the synthetic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) analog E6020 through its diketone groups. This novel, low-cost, and fluorescence based assay may obviate the need for traditional approaches that primarily rely on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) or mass spectrometry. The experiments were performed in a wide diversity of vaccine formulations containing E6020 to assess method robustness and accuracy. The assay was also expanded to evaluate the loading efficiency of E6020 in poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) micro-particles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Effect of Vegan Protein-Based Diets on Metabolic Parameters, Expressions of Adiponectin and Its Receptors in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie-Hua; Song, Jia; Chen, Yan; Ding, Qiang; Peng, Anfang; Mao, Limei

    2016-01-01

    Vegan protein-based diet has attracted increasing interest in the prevention of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Meanwhile, adiponectin has become a highly potential molecular target in the prevention of MetS. Our study will identify a potential vegan protein diet for the prevention of MetS using rat models. Thirty-six Wistar rats were randomly assigned into three groups and given diets containing one of the following proteins for 12 weeks: casein (CAS, control diet), soy protein (SOY), and gluten-soy mixed protein (GSM). Changes in metabolic parameters as well as the expressions of adiponectin and its receptors were identified. Compared to CAS diet, both SOY and GSM diets led to decreases in blood total cholesterol and triglycerides, but only GSM diet led to an increase in HDL-cholesterol; no marked difference was observed in blood glucose in all three groups; HOMA-IR was found lower only in SOY group. Among groups, the order of serum adiponectin level was found as GSM > SOY > CAS. Similar order pattern was also observed in expression of adiponectin in adipose tissue and AdipoR1 mRNA in skeletal muscle. Our results suggested for the first time that, besides SOY diet, GSM diet could also be a possible substitute of animal protein to prevent MetS. PMID:27763537

  2. HPLC-Based Activity Profiling for GABAA Receptor Modulators in Searsia pyroides Using a Larval Zebrafish Locomotor Assay.

    PubMed

    Moradi-Afrapoli, Fahimeh; van der Merwe, Hannes; De Mieri, Maria; Wilhelm, Anke; Stadler, Marco; Zietsman, Pieter C; Hering, Steffen; Swart, Kenneth; Hamburger, Matthias

    2017-10-01

    A dichloromethane extract from leaves of Searsia pyroides potentiated gamma aminobutyric acid-induced chloride currents by 171.8 ± 54% when tested at 100 µg/mL in Xenopus oocytes transiently expressing gamma aminobutyric acid type A receptors composed of α 1 β 2 γ 2 s subunits. In zebrafish larvae, the extract significantly lowered pentylenetetrazol-provoked locomotion when tested at 4 µg/mL. Active compounds of the extract were tracked with the aid of HPLC-based activity profiling utilizing a previously validated zebrafish larval locomotor activity assay. From two active HPLC fractions, compounds 1  -  3 were isolated. Structurally related compounds 4  -  6 were purified from a later eluting inactive HPLC fraction. With the aid of 1 H and 13 C NMR and high-resolution mass spectrometry, compounds 1  -  6 were identified as analogues of anacardic acid. Compounds 1  -  3 led to a concentration-dependent decrease of pentylenetetrazol-provoked locomotion in the zebrafish larvae model, while 4  -  6 were inactive. Compounds 1  -  3 enhanced gamma aminobutyric acid-induced chloride currents in Xenopus oocytes in a concentration-dependent manner, while 4  -  6 only showed marginal enhancements of gamma aminobutyric acid-induced chloride currents. Compounds 2, 3 , and 5 have not been reported previously. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. The Effect of Vegan Protein-Based Diets on Metabolic Parameters, Expressions of Adiponectin and Its Receptors in Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie-Hua; Song, Jia; Chen, Yan; Ding, Qiang; Peng, Anfang; Mao, Limei

    2016-10-18

    Vegan protein-based diet has attracted increasing interest in the prevention of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Meanwhile, adiponectin has become a highly potential molecular target in the prevention of MetS. Our study will identify a potential vegan protein diet for the prevention of MetS using rat models. Thirty-six Wistar rats were randomly assigned into three groups and given diets containing one of the following proteins for 12 weeks: casein (CAS, control diet), soy protein (SOY), and gluten-soy mixed protein (GSM). Changes in metabolic parameters as well as the expressions of adiponectin and its receptors were identified. Compared to CAS diet, both SOY and GSM diets led to decreases in blood total cholesterol and triglycerides, but only GSM diet led to an increase in HDL-cholesterol; no marked difference was observed in blood glucose in all three groups; HOMA-IR was found lower only in SOY group. Among groups, the order of serum adiponectin level was found as GSM > SOY > CAS. Similar order pattern was also observed in expression of adiponectin in adipose tissue and AdipoR1 mRNA in skeletal muscle. Our results suggested for the first time that, besides SOY diet, GSM diet could also be a possible substitute of animal protein to prevent MetS.

  4. Risk factors for breast cancer by oestrogen receptor status: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, J. A.; Rohan, T. E.; Cant, E. L.; Horsfall, D. J.; Tilley, W. D.

    1989-01-01

    Data from a population-based case-control study conducted in Adelaide, South Australia, and involving 451 case-control pairs, were analysed to determine whether the associations of menstrual, reproductive, dietary and other factors with risk of breast cancer differed by oestrogen receptor (ER) status. Data on ER status were available for 380 cases. The proportion of tumours which were ER+ increased with age, and there was a higher proportion of ER+ tumours in post-menopausal than in premenopausal women. Both oral contraceptive use (P = 0.055) and cigarette smoking (P = 0.047) were associated with increased (unadjusted) risk of ER- cancer, while having little association with risk of ER+ cancer. Most dietary factors had little association with risk of either cancer type, the main exception being the reduction in risk of ER- breast cancer with increasing beta-carotene intake (P for trend = 0.017). In general, however, links with the factors examined were not strong enough to suggest different causal pathways for ER- and ER+ breast cancer. PMID:2757918

  5. A randomized controlled non-inferiority study comparing the antiemetic effect between intravenous granisetron and oral azasetron based on estimated 5-HT3 receptor occupancy.

    PubMed

    Endo, Junki; Iihara, Hirotoshi; Yamada, Maya; Yanase, Koumei; Kamiya, Fumihiko; Ito, Fumitaka; Funaguchi, Norihiko; Ohno, Yasushi; Minatoguchi, Shinya; Itoh, Yoshinori

    2012-09-01

    The acute antiemetic effect was compared between oral azasetron and intravenous granisetron based on the 5-hydroxytryptamine(3) (5-HT(3)) receptor occupancy theory. Receptor occupancy was estimated from reported data on plasma concentrations and affinity constants to 5-HT(3) receptor. A randomized non-inferiority study comparing acute antiemetic effects between oral azasetron and intravenous granisetron was performed in 105 patients receiving the first course of carboplatin-based chemotherapy for lung cancer. Azasetron exhibited the highest 5-HT(3) receptor occupancy among various first-generation 5-HT(3) antagonists. The complete response to oral azasetron was shown to be non-inferior to that of intravenous granisetron, in which the risk difference was 0.0004 (95% confidence interval: -0.0519-0.0527). The lower limit of the confidence intervals did not exceed the negative non-inferiority margin (-0.1). The complete response during the overall period was not different (68% versus 67%). Oral azasetron was found to be non-inferior to intravenous granisetron in the acute antiemetic effect against moderately emetogenic chemotherapy.

  6. HPLC-Based Activity Profiling for GABAA Receptor Modulators in Extracts: Validation of an Approach Utilizing a Larval Zebrafish Locomotor Assay.

    PubMed

    Moradi-Afrapoli, Fahimeh; Ebrahimi, Samad Nejad; Smiesko, Martin; Hamburger, Matthias

    2017-05-26

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA A ) receptors are major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the central nervous system and a target for numerous clinically important drugs used to treat anxiety, insomnia, and epilepsy. A series of allosteric GABA A receptor agonists was identified previously with the aid of HPLC-based activity profiling, whereby activity was tracked with an electrophysiological assay in Xenopus laevis oocytes. To accelerate the discovery process, an approach has been established for HPLC-based profiling using a larval zebrafish (Danio rerio) seizure model induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), a pro-convulsant GABA A receptor antagonist. The assay was validated with the aid of representative GABAergic plant compounds and extracts. Various parameters that are relevant for the quality of results obtained, including PTZ concentration, the number of larvae, the incubation time, and the data analysis protocol, were optimized. The assay was then translated into an HPLC profiling protocol, and active compounds were tracked in extracts of Valeriana officinalis and Magnolia officinalis. For selected compounds the effects in the zebrafish larvae model were compared with data from in silico blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability predictions, to validate the use for discovery of BBB-permeable natural products.

  7. wFReDoW: A Cloud-Based Web Environment to Handle Molecular Docking Simulations of a Fully Flexible Receptor Model

    PubMed Central

    De Paris, Renata; Frantz, Fábio A.; Norberto de Souza, Osmar; Ruiz, Duncan D. A.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular docking simulations of fully flexible protein receptor (FFR) models are coming of age. In our studies, an FFR model is represented by a series of different conformations derived from a molecular dynamic simulation trajectory of the receptor. For each conformation in the FFR model, a docking simulation is executed and analyzed. An important challenge is to perform virtual screening of millions of ligands using an FFR model in a sequential mode since it can become computationally very demanding. In this paper, we propose a cloud-based web environment, called web Flexible Receptor Docking Workflow (wFReDoW), which reduces the CPU time in the molecular docking simulations of FFR models to small molecules. It is based on the new workflow data pattern called self-adaptive multiple instances (P-SaMIs) and on a middleware built on Amazon EC2 instances. P-SaMI reduces the number of molecular docking simulations while the middleware speeds up the docking experiments using a High Performance Computing (HPC) environment on the cloud. The experimental results show a reduction in the total elapsed time of docking experiments and the quality of the new reduced receptor models produced by discarding the nonpromising conformations from an FFR model ruled by the P-SaMI data pattern. PMID:23691504

  8. Significance of estrogen receptor 1 (ESR-1) gene imbalances in colon and hepatocellular carcinomas based on tissue microarrays analysis.

    PubMed

    Tsiambas, Evangelos; Georgiannos, Stavros N; Salemis, Nikolaos; Alexopoulou, Despoina; Lambropoulou, Sofia; Dimo, Blerta; Ioannidis, Ioannis; Kravvaritis, Christos; Karameris, Andreas; Patsouris, Efstratios; Dourakis, Spyridon

    2011-12-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha-encoded by ESR1 gene-overexpression correlates with prognosis and response to specific chemotherapy in breast adenocarcinoma cases. Mechanisms of ESR-1 deregulation in carcinomas remain under investigation. To analyze ESR1 in carcinomas of different histogenesis. Using tissue microarray technology, 172 primary carcinomas including breast ductal adenocarcinomas (n=60), hepatocellular carcinomas (n=52), and colon adenocarcinomas (n=60) were cored and re-embedded in three paraffin blocks. Initial diagnosis was based on liquid based cytology (LiquiPrep/ThinPrep). Immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization were performed. Quantitative evaluation of ER-a protein levels was assessed by applying digital image analysis. ER-a overexpression was observed in 41/60 (68.3%), 23/52 (44.2%) and 4/60 (6.6%) cases, respectively. ESR1 gene multiple copies were confirmed in 13/60 (21.6%) breast adenocarcinomas, but high amplification only in 8/13 (62.8%). Allelic absence was identified in 3/52 (5.7%) hepatocellular carcinomas, whereas colon adenocarcinomas demonstrated gene gains in 5/60 (8.3%) cases referred to chr 6 aneuploidy and not to amplification. ER-a overall expression was associated strongly to ESR1 gene copies only in breast carcinoma (P=0.036). ESR-1 gene overexpression happens frequently in breast cancer, but only a subset of them are high amplified cases correlated to increased response rates in hormonal therapy (tamoxifen). Absence of this mechanism in hepatocellular and colon carcinomas maybe is a negative factor for applying this therapy. This is a pattern of histo-genetic depended targeted therapeutic strategy.

  9. Circulating ghrelin, leptin, and soluble leptin receptor concentrations and cardiometabolic risk factors in a community-based sample.

    PubMed

    Ingelsson, Erik; Larson, Martin G; Yin, Xiaoyan; Wang, Thomas J; Meigs, James B; Lipinska, Izabella; Benjamin, Emelia J; Keaney, John F; Vasan, Ramachandran S

    2008-08-01

    The conjoint effects and relative importance of ghrelin, leptin, and soluble leptin receptor (sOB-R), adipokines involved in appetite control and energy expenditure in mediating cardiometabolic risk, is unknown. The objective of the study was to study the cross-sectional relations of these adipokines to cardiometabolic risk factors in a community-based sample. We measured circulating ghrelin, leptin, and sOB-R in 362 participants (mean age 45 yr; 54% women) of the Framingham Third Generation Cohort. Body mass index, waist circumference (WC), blood pressure, lipid measures, fasting glucose, smoking, and metabolic syndrome (MetS) were measured. Ghrelin and leptin concentrations were significantly higher in women (P < 0.0001). In multivariable models, ghrelin was inversely associated with age and systolic blood pressure, and leptin was positively related to body mass index and WC. sOB-R was positively associated with age, total cholesterol, and fasting glucose and inversely with WC and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Ghrelin and sOB-R concentrations were significantly lower with number of MetS components (P for trend = 0.022 and < 0.0001, respectively), whereas leptin concentrations were higher (P for trend = 0.0001). Relating all adipokines to MetS conjointly, higher ghrelin and leptin concentrations were associated with decreased and increased odds of MetS (odds ratio 0.55, P < 0.0001; odds ratio 4.44, P = 0.0002, per 1 sd increase of respective log adipokine). In our community-based sample, we observed a sexual dimorphism in circulating ghrelin and leptin concentrations. Ghrelin, leptin, and sOB-R were associated with number of MetS components cross-sectionally, consistent with the hypothesis that these adipokines may have a central role in cardiometabolic risk.

  10. Comparative effectiveness of angiotensin-receptor blockers for preventing macrovascular disease in patients with diabetes: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Tony; Camacho, Ximena; Yao, Zhan; Gomes, Tara; Juurlink, David N.; Mamdani, Muhammad M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Telmisartan, unlike other angiotensin-receptor blockers, is a partial agonist of peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor-γ, a property that has been associated with improvements in surrogate markers of cardiovascular health in small trials involving patients with diabetes. However, whether this property translates into a reduced risk of cardiovascular events and death in these patients is unknown. We sought to explore the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke and heart failure in patients with diabetes who were taking telmisartan relative to the risk of these events occurring in patients taking other angiotensin-receptor blockers. Methods: We conducted a population-based, retrospective cohort study of Ontario residents with diabetes aged 66 years and older who started treatment with candesartan, irbesartan, losartan, telmisartan or valsartan between Apr. 1, 2001, and Mar. 31, 2011. Our primary outcome was a composite of admission to hospital for acute myocardial infarction, stroke or heart failure. We examined each outcome individually in secondary analyses, in addition to all-cause mortality. Results: We identified 54 186 patients with diabetes who started taking an angiotensin-receptor blocker during the study period. After multivariable adjustment, patients who took either telmisartan (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.85, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.74–0.97) or valsartan (adjusted HR 0.86, 95% CI 0.77–0.95) had a lower risk of the composite outcome compared with patients who took irbesartan. In contrast, no significant difference in risk was seen between other angiotensin-receptor blockers and irbesartan. In secondary analyses, we found a reduced risk of admission to hospital for heart failure with telmisartan compared with irbesartan (adjusted HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.66–0.96), but no significant differences in risk were seen between angiotensin-receptor blockers in our other secondary analyses. Interpretation: Compared with other angiotensin-receptor

  11. Structural basis for ligand recognition at the benzodiazepine binding site of GABAA alpha 3 receptor, and pharmacophore-based virtual screening approach.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, R S K; Ghoshal, Nanda

    2008-10-01

    Given the heterogeneity of GABA(A) receptor, the pharmacological significance of identifying subtype selective modulators is increasingly being recognized. Thus, drugs selective for GABA(A) alpha(3) receptors are expected to display fewer side effects than the drugs presently in clinical use. Hence we carried out 3D QSAR (three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship) studies on a series of novel GABA(A) alpha(3) subtype selective modulators to gain more insight into subtype affinity. To identify the 3D functional attributes required for subtype selectivity, a chemical feature-based pharmacophore, primarily based on selective ligands representing diverse structural classes was generated. The obtained pseudo receptor model of the benzodiazepine binding site revealed a binding mode akin to "Message-Address" concept. Scaffold hopping was carried out across multi-conformational May Bridge database for the identification of novel chemotypes. Further a focused data reduction approach was employed to choose a subset of enriched compounds based on "Drug likeness" and "Similarity-based" methods. These results taken together could provide impetus for rational design and optimization of more selective and high affinity leads with a potential to have decreased adverse effects.

  12. Bio-nanocapsule-based scaffold improves the sensitivity and ligand-binding capacity of mammalian receptors on the sensor chip.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Masumi; Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Niimi, Tomoaki; Maturana, Andrés D; Kuroda, Shun'ichi

    2016-06-01

    Mammalian receptors are recognized as target molecules for drug discovery, and chemical libraries have been screened for both potential antagonists and agonists mainly by ligand-binding assays using immobilized receptors. A bio-nanocapsule (BNC) of approximately 30 nm that displays a tandem form of the protein A-derived immunoglobulin G (IgG) Fc-binding Z domains (denoted as ZZ-BNC) has been developed for both clustering and oriented immobilization of IgGs on the solid phase of immunosensors. In this study, human IgG1 Fc-fused vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor was immobilized through ZZ-BNC on the sensor chip of quartz crystal microbalance (ZZ-BNC-coating). When compared with direct adsorption and protein A-coating, the sensor chip showed higher sensitivity (∽46- and ∽165-fold, respectively) and larger ligand-binding capacity (∽4- and ∽18-fold, respectively). Furthermore, the number of VEGF molecules bound to its receptor increased from 0.20 (direct adsorption) to 2.06 by ZZ-BNC-coating, strongly suggesting that ZZ-BNC reduced the steric hindrance near ligand recognition sites through oriented immobilization. Similarly, the sensitivity and ligand-binding capacity of leptin and prolactin receptors were both enhanced at a level comparable to that observed for the VEGF receptor. Thus, the combination of ZZ-BNC and Fc-fused receptors could significantly improve the function of ligand-binding assays. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Design and Application of Synthetic Receptors for Recognition of Methylated Lysine and Supramolecular Affinity Labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gober, Isaiah Nathaniel

    possible ways for detecting PTMs and may find use in the development of new assays for enzymes that lack robust methods for measuring their activity. The third section explores the development of new small molecule receptors capable of selectively binding hydrophilic guests in water, such as the lower methylation states of lysine. We identified a receptor, A2I, that has improved binding affinity and selectivity for dimethyllysine (Kme2). The receptor was discovered and synthesized by using dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) to redesign a small molecule receptor (A2B ) that preferentially binds trimethyllysine (Kme3). Incorporating a biphenyl monomer with ortho-di-substituted carboxylates into the receptor lead to the formation of a salt bridge interaction with Kme2. These favorable electrostatic and hydrogen bonding interactions produced a receptor with 32-fold tighter binding to Kme2, which is the highest affinity synthetic receptor for Kme2 in the context of a peptide that has been reported. This work provides insight into effective strategies for binding hydrophilic, cationic guests in water and is an encouraging result toward a synthetic receptor that selectively binds Kme2 over other methylation states of lysine. In the final section, a small molecule receptor for Kme3 (A 2B) was redesigned using DCC to incorporate either aromatic or acidic amino acids into the receptor. We proposed that the incorporation of amino acids could introduce additional non-covalent interactions (such as cation-pi, electrostatic, and hydrogen bonding) with a guest bound inside the pocket of the receptor. However, selective non-covalent interactions between the amino acid side chain on the modified receptor and the bound methylated lysine guest could not be achieved. This is most likely due to the conformational flexibility of the amino acid-functionalized receptors. Furthermore, attaching amino acids to the receptor seemed to increase non-specific electrostatic interactions, resulting in

  14. Label-Free, LC-MS-Based Assays to Quantitate Small-Molecule Antagonist Binding to the Mammalian BLT1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xun; Stout, Steven; Mueller, Uwe; Boykow, George; Visconti, Richard; Siliphaivanh, Phieng; Spencer, Kerrie; Presland, Jeremy; Kavana, Michael; Basso, Andrea D; McLaren, David G; Myers, Robert W

    2017-08-01

    We have developed and validated label-free, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based equilibrium direct and competition binding assays to quantitate small-molecule antagonist binding to recombinant human and mouse BLT1 receptors expressed in HEK 293 cell membranes. Procedurally, these binding assays involve (1) equilibration of the BLT1 receptor and probe ligand, with or without a competitor; (2) vacuum filtration through cationic glass fiber filters to separate receptor-bound from free probe ligand; and (3) LC-MS analysis in selected reaction monitoring mode for bound probe ligand quantitation. Two novel, optimized probe ligands, compounds 1 and 2, were identified by screening 20 unlabeled BLT1 antagonists for direct binding. Saturation direct binding studies confirmed the high affinity, and dissociation studies established the rapid binding kinetics of probe ligands 1 and 2. Competition binding assays were established using both probe ligands, and the affinities of structurally diverse BLT1 antagonists were measured. Both binding assay formats can be executed with high specificity and sensitivity and moderate throughput (96-well plate format) using these approaches. This highly versatile, label-free method for studying ligand binding to membrane-associated receptors should find broad application as an alternative to traditional methods using labeled ligands.

  15. An Efficient Metadynamics-Based Protocol To Model the Binding Affinity and the Transition State Ensemble of G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Ligands.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Noureldin; Ibrahim, Passainte; Saladino, Giorgio; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Clark, Timothy

    2017-05-22

    A generally applicable metadynamics scheme for predicting the free energy profile of ligand binding to G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is described. A common and effective collective variable (CV) has been defined using the ideally placed and highly conserved Trp6.48 as a reference point for ligand-GPCR distance measurement and the common orientation of GPCRs in the cell membrane. Using this single CV together with well-tempered multiple-walker metadynamics with a funnel-like boundary allows an efficient exploration of the entire ligand binding path from the extracellular medium to the orthosteric binding site, including vestibule and intermediate sites. The protocol can be used with X-ray structures or high-quality homology models (based on a high-quality template and after thorough refinement) for the receptor and is universally applicable to agonists, antagonists, and partial and reverse agonists. The root-mean-square error (RMSE) in predicted binding free energies for 12 diverse ligands in five receptors (a total of 23 data points) is surprisingly small (less than 1 kcal mol -1 ). The RMSEs for simulations that use receptor X-ray structures and homology models are very similar.

  16. Secreted calmodulin-like skin protein inhibits neuronal death in cell-based Alzheimer's disease models via the heterotrimeric Humanin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Y; Nawa, M; Kurita, M; Tokizawa, M; Iwamatsu, A; Matsuoka, M

    2013-01-01

    Humanin is a secreted bioactive peptide that is protective in a variety of death models, including cell-based neuronal death models related to Alzheimer's disease (AD). To mediate the protective effect in AD-related death models, Humanin signals via a cell-surface receptor that is generally composed of three subunits: ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor α, WSX-1 and gp130 (heterotrimeric Humanin receptor; htHNR). However, the protective effect of Humanin via the htHNR is weak (EC50=1–10 μℳ); therefore, it is possible that another physiological agonist for this receptor exists in vivo. In the current study, calmodulin-like skin protein (CLSP), a calmodulin relative with an undefined function, was shown to be secreted and inhibit neuronal death via the htHNR with an EC50 of 10–100 pℳ. CLSP was highly expressed in the skin, and the concentration in circulating normal human blood was ∼5 nℳ. When administered intraperitoneally in mice, recombinant CLSP was transported across the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-barrier and its concentration in the CSF reaches 1/100 of its serum concentration at 1 h after injection. These findings suggest that CLSP is a physiological htHNR agonist. PMID:23519124

  17. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) inhibitors: development and validation of predictive 3-D QSAR models through extensive ligand- and structure-based approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragno, Rino; Ballante, Flavio; Pirolli, Adele; Wickersham, Richard B.; Patsilinakos, Alexandros; Hesse, Stéphanie; Perspicace, Enrico; Kirsch, Gilbert

    2015-08-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2, (VEGFR-2), is a key element in angiogenesis, the process by which new blood vessels are formed, and is thus an important pharmaceutical target. Here, 3-D quantitative structure-activity relationship (3-D QSAR) were used to build a quantitative screening and pharmacophore model of the VEGFR-2 receptors for design of inhibitors with improved activities. Most of available experimental data information has been used as training set to derive optimized and fully cross-validated eight mono-probe and a multi-probe quantitative models. Notable is the use of 262 molecules, aligned following both structure-based and ligand-based protocols, as external test set confirming the 3-D QSAR models' predictive capability and their usefulness in design new VEGFR-2 inhibitors. From a survey on literature, this is the first generation of a wide-ranging computational medicinal chemistry application on VEGFR2 inhibitors.

  18. A simple and highly selective 2,2-diferrocenylpropane-based multi-channel ion pair receptor for Pb(2+) and HSO4(-).

    PubMed

    Wan, Qian; Zhuo, Ji-Bin; Wang, Xiao-Xue; Lin, Cai-Xia; Yuan, Yao-Feng

    2015-03-28

    A structurally simple, 2,2-diferrocenylpropane-based ion pair receptor 1 was synthesized and characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, HRMS, elemental analyses, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The ion pair receptor 1 showed excellent selectivity and sensitivity towards Pb(2+) with multi-channel responses: a fluorescence enhancement (more than 42-fold), a notable color change from yellow to red, redox anodic shift (ΔE1/2 = 151 mV), while HSO4(-) promoted fluorescence enhancement when Pb(2+) or Zn(2+) was bonded to the cation binding-site. (1)H NMR titration and density functional theory were performed to reveal the sensing mechanism based on photo-induced electron transfer (PET).

  19. Synthesis, molecular properties estimations, and dual dopamine D2 and D3 receptor activities of Benzthiazole-based ligands.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schübler, Moritz; Sadek, Bassem; Kottke, Tim; Weizel, Lilia; Stark, Holger

    2017-09-01

    Neurleptic drugs, e.g. aripiprazole, targeting the dopamine D2s and D3 receptors (D2sR and D3R) in the central nervous system are widely used in the treatment of several psychotic and neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, a new series of benz[d]thiazole-based ligands (1-18) was synthesized by applying the bioisosteric approach derived from the selective D3Rs ligand BP-897 and its structurally related benz[d]imidazole derivatives. Herein, introduction of the benz[d]thiazole moiety was well tolerated by D2sR and D3R binding sites leading to antagonist affinities in the low nanomolar concentration range at both receptor subtypes. Further exploration of different substitution patterns at the benz[d]thiazole heterocycle and the basic 4-phenylpiperazine resulted in the discovery of high dually acting D2sR and D3R ligands. Moreover, the methoxy substitution at 2-position of 4-phenylpiperazine resulted in significantly (22-fold) increased D2sR binding affinity as compared to the parent ligand BP-897, and improved physicochemical and drug-likeness properties of ligands 1-9. However, the latter structural modifications failed to improve the drug-able properties in ligands having un-substituted 4-phenylpiperazine analogues (10-18). Accordingly, compound 7 showed in addition to high dual affinity at the D2sR and D3R (Ki (hD2SR) = 2.8 ± 0.8 nM; Ki (hD3R) = 3.0 ± 1.6 nM), promising clogS, clogP, LE (hD2sR, hD3R), LipE (hD2sR, hD3R), and drug-likeness score values of -4.7, 4.2, (0.4, 0.4), (4.4, 4.3), and 0.7, respectively. Also, the deaminated analogue 8 (Ki (hD2SR) = 3.2 ± 0.4 nM; Ki (hD3R) = 8.5 ± 2.2 nM) revealed clogS, clogP, LE (hD2sR, hD3R), LipE (hD2sR, hD3R) and drug-likeness score values of -4.7, 4.2, (0.4, 0.4), (3.9, 3.5), and 0.4, respectively. The results observed for the newly developed benz[d]thiazole-based ligands 1-18 provide clues for the diversity in structure activity relationships (SARs) at the D2sR and D3R subtypes.

  20. Development of a label-free gold nanoparticle-based colorimetric aptasensor for detection of human estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Ahirwar, Rajesh; Nahar, Pradip

    2016-01-01

    The increasing demand for easily available and low-cost diagnostics has fuelled the development of aptasensors as platforms for rapid, sensitive, and point-of-care testing of target analytes. Recently, gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-based aptasensors have attracted wide recognition owing to their color transition properties which allow real-time rapid sensing of targets. In this study, we utilized the color transition property of aptamer-functionalized AuNPs to detect and quantify estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), a key biomarker protein in breast cancer. We found that the coating of AuNPs with unmodified ERα-RNA aptamer (GGGGUCAAGGUGACCCC) makes them resistant to salt-induced aggregation. However, addition of ERα to the aptamer-protected AuNPs results in their spontaneous aggregation as evident from a color transition from wine red to deep blue. On the basis of this, we developed an ERα aptasensor, with limits of detection and quantification of 0.64 and 2.16 ng/mL, respectively; the aptasensor can efficiently detect and quantify ERα in a working range of 10 ng/mL-5μg/mL protein. Validation of the aptasensor on cellular extracts of ERα-positive MCF-7 and ERα-deficient MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells showed a target-selective response in ERα-positive samples but not in cellular extracts of ERα-deficient breast cancer cells. Further, the small size and simple fabrication chemistry of aptamers provide an additional benefit to make the ERα aptasensor a potentially useful and cost-effective tool in point-of-care analyses of ERα.

  1. Angiopoietin-2, its soluble receptor Tie-2 and subclinical cardiovascular disease in a population-based sample.

    PubMed

    Lorbeer, Roberto; Baumeister, Sebastian E; Dörr, Marcus; Felix, Stephan B; Nauck, Matthias; Grotevendt, Anne; Markus, Marcello R P; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Völzke, Henry; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Wallaschofski, Henri; Lieb, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    Higher circulating Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) levels predict cardiovascular events and mortality in clinical samples and in the general population. To better understand the underlying mechanisms, we investigated the association of circulating Ang-2 and sTie-2 (the soluble form of the Ang-2 receptor) levels with various measures of subclinical cardiovascular disease. Cross-sectional data of 3204 participants (1654 women) aged 25-88 years from the population-based Study of Health in Pomerania were analysed. LV mass (LVM) and fractional shortening were determined echocardiographically as indices of cardiac structure and function, respectively. Intima media thickness (IMT) of the common carotid artery, the number of carotid plaques and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) were used to characterise large and medium-sized arterial structure and function. Multivariable-adjusted linear and negative binomial regression models revealed an inverse association of circulating Ang-2 levels (independent variable) with fractional shortening (ß=-0.51 per 1 SD increment; 95% CI -0.86 to -0.16, p=0.005) and a positive association with number of carotid plaques (rate ratio=1.04 95% CI 1.01 to 1.07, p=0.019). No associations of Ang-2 or sTie-2 with LVM, IMT and FMD were found. Circulating Ang-2 levels were associated with select subclinical cardiovascular disease traits, consistent with the notion that the Ang-2-pathway plays a role in mediating cardiovascular morbidity. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. New approach based on immunochemical techniques for monitoring of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) in human urine.

    PubMed

    Salvador, J-Pablo; Vila-Roca, Ester; Monfort, Núria; Ventura, Rosa; Marco, M-Pilar

    2018-04-22

    Antiestrogenic compounds such as tamoxifen, toremifen and chlomifen are used illegally by athletes to minimize physical impacts such as gynecomastia resulting from the secondary effects of anabolic androgenic steroids, used to increase athletic efficiency unlawfully. The use of these compounds is banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and controls are made through analytical methodologies such as HPLC-MS/MS, which do not fulfil the sample throughput requirements. Moreover, compounds such as tamoxifen are also used to treat hormone receptor-positive breast cancer (ER + ).Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of tamoxifen may also be clinically useful for guiding treatment decisions. An accurate determination of these drugs requires a solid phase extraction of patient serum followed by HPLC-MS/MS. In the context of an unmet need of high-throughput screening (HTS) and quantitative methods for antiestrogenic substances we have approached the development of antibodies and an immunochemical assay for the determination of these antiestrogenic compounds. The strategy applied has taken into consideration that these drugs are metabolized and excreted in urine as the corresponding 4-hydroxylated compounds. A microplate-based ELISA procedure has been developed for the analysis of these metabolites in urine with a LOD of 0.15, 0.16 and 0.63 μg/L for 4OH-tamoxifen, 4OH-toremifen and 4OH-clomifen, respectively, much lower than the MRPL established by WADA (20 μg/L). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Improved Killing of Ovarian Cancer Stem Cells by Combining a Novel Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Based Immunotherapy and Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Klapdor, Rüdiger; Wang, Shuo; Hacker, Ulrich; Büning, Hildegard; Morgan, Michael; Dörk, Thilo; Hillemanns, Peter; Schambach, Axel

    2017-10-01

    Ovarian cancer represents the most lethal gynecological cancer. Although cytoreductive chemotherapy and surgery lead to complete macroscopic tumor removal, most of the patients in advanced stages suffer from recurrent disease and subsequently die. This may be explained by the activity of cancer stem cells (CSC), which are a subpopulation of cells with an elevated chemoresistance and an increased capacity for self-renewal and metastatic spread. Specifically targeting these cells by adoptive immunotherapy represents a promising strategy to reduce the risk for recurrent disease. This study selected the widely accepted CSC marker CD133 as a target for a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-based immunotherapeutic approach to treat ovarian cancer. A lentiviral vector was generated encoding a third-generation anti-CD133-CAR, and clinically used NK92 cells were transduced. These engineered natural killer (NK) cells showed specific killing against CD133-positive ovarian cancer cell lines and primary ovarian cancer cells cultured from sequential ascites harvests. Additionally, specific activation of these engineered NK cells was demonstrated via interferon-gamma secretion assays. To improve clinical efficacy of ovarian cancer treatment, the effect of the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin was evaluated together with CAR-transduced NK cell treatment. It was demonstrated that NK cells remain cytotoxic and active under cisplatin treatment and, importantly, that sequential treatment with cisplatin followed by CAR-NK cells led to the strongest killing effect. The specific eradication of ovarian CSCs by anti-CD133-CAR expressing NK92 cells represents a promising strategy and, when confirmed in vivo, shall be the basis of future clinical studies with the aim to prevent recurrent disease.

  4. Use of nuclear receptor luciferase-based bioassays to detect endocrine active chemicals in a biosolids-biochar amended soil.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Carolyn G; Joshi, Geetika; Bair, Daniel A; Oriol, Charlotte; He, Guochun; Parikh, Sanjai J; Denison, Michael S; Scow, Kate M

    2017-08-01

    Biosolids are a potentially valuable source of carbon and nutrients for agricultural soils; however, potential unintended impacts on human health and the environment must be considered. Virtually all biosolids contain trace amounts endocrine-disrupting chemicals derived from human use of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs). One potential way to reduce the bioavailability of PPCPs is to co-apply biosolids with biochar to soil, because biochar's chemical (e.g., aromaticity) and physical properties (e.g., surface area) give it a high affinity to bind many organic chemicals in the environment. We developed a soil-specific extraction method and utilized a luciferase-based bioassay (CALUX) to detect endocrine active chemicals in a biosolids-biochar co-amendment soil greenhouse study. Both biochar (walnut shell, 900 °C) and biosolids had positive impacts on carrot and lettuce biomass accumulation over our study period. However, the walnut shell biochar stimulated aryl hydrocarbon receptor activity, suggesting the presence of potential endocrine active chemicals in the biochar. Since the biochar rate tested (100 t ha -1 ) is above the average agronomic rate (10-20 t ha -1 ), endocrine effects would not be expected in most environmental applications. The effect of high temperature biochars on endocrine system pathways must be explored further, using both quantitative analytical tools to identify potential endocrine active chemicals and highly sensitive bioanalytical assays such as CALUX to measure the resulting biological activity of such compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Water exposure assessment of aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists in Three Gorges Reservoir, China using SPMD-based virtual organisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingxian; Bernhöft, Silke; Pfister, Gerd; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2014-10-15

    SPMD-based virtual organisms (VOs) were deployed at five to eight sites in the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR), China for five periods in 2008, 2009 and 2011. The water exposure of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists was assessed by the VOs. The chosen bioassay response for the extracts of the VOs, the induction of 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) was assayed using a rat hepatoma cell line (H4IIE). The results show that the extracts from the VOs could induce AhR activity significantly, whereas the chemically derived 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) equivalent (TEQcal) accounted for <11% of the observed AhR responses (TEQbio). Unidentified AhR-active compounds represented a greater proportion of the TCDD equivalent in VOs from TGR. High TEQbio value in diluted extract and low TEQbio in concentrated extract of the same sample was observed suggesting potential non-additive effects in the mixture. The levels of AhR agonists in VOs from upstream TGR were in general higher than those from downstream reservoir, indicating urbanization effect on AhR agonist pollution. The temporal variation showed that levels of AhR agonists in 2009 and 2011 were higher than those in 2008, and the potential non-additive effects in the area close to the dam were also obviously higher in 2009 and 2011 than in 2008, indicating big changes in the composition of pollutants in the area after water level reached a maximum of 175 m. Although the aqueous concentration of AhR agonists of 0.8-4.8 pg TCDDL(-1) in TGR was not alarming, the tendency of accumulating high concentration of AhR agonists in VO lipid and existence of possible synergism or antagonism in the water may exhibit a potential hazard to local biota being exposed to AhR agonists. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Clustering Heart Rate Dynamics Is Associated with β-Adrenergic Receptor Polymorphisms: Analysis by Information-Based Similarity Index

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Albert C.; Tsai, Shih-Jen; Hong, Chen-Jee; Wang, Cynthia; Chen, Tai-Jui; Liou, Ying-Jay; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic polymorphisms in the gene encoding the β-adrenergic receptors (β-AR) have a pivotal role in the functions of the autonomic nervous system. Using heart rate variability (HRV) as an indicator of autonomic function, we present a bottom-up genotype–phenotype analysis to investigate the association between β-AR gene polymorphisms and heart rate dynamics. Methods A total of 221 healthy Han Chinese adults (59 males and 162 females, aged 33.6±10.8 years, range 19 to 63 years) were recruited and genotyped for three common β-AR polymorphisms: β1-AR Ser49Gly, β2-AR Arg16Gly and β2-AR Gln27Glu. Each subject underwent two hours of electrocardiogram monitoring at rest. We applied an information-based similarity (IBS) index to measure the pairwise dissimilarity of heart rate dynamics among study subjects. Results With the aid of agglomerative hierarchical cluster analysis, we categorized subjects into major clusters, which were found to have significantly different distributions of β2-AR Arg16Gly genotype. Furthermore, the non-randomness index, a nonlinear HRV measure derived from the IBS method, was significantly lower in Arg16 homozygotes than in Gly16 carriers. The non-randomness index was negatively correlated with parasympathetic-related HRV variables and positively correlated with those HRV indices reflecting a sympathovagal shift toward sympathetic activity. Conclusions We demonstrate a bottom-up categorization approach combining the IBS method and hierarchical cluster analysis to detect subgroups of subjects with HRV phenotypes associated with β-AR polymorphisms. Our results provide evidence that β2-AR polymorphisms are significantly associated with the acceleration/deceleration pattern of heart rate oscillation, reflecting the underlying mode of autonomic nervous system control. PMID:21573230

  7. Advantages and Limitations of Androgen Receptor-Based Methods for Detecting Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Abuse as Performance Enhancing Drugs.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Kathy; Yazdi, Tahmineh; Masharani, Umesh; Tyrrell, Blake; Butch, Anthony; Schaufele, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone (T) and related androgens are performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) abused by some athletes to gain competitive advantage. To monitor unauthorized androgen abuse, doping control programs use mass spectrometry (MS) to detect androgens, synthetic anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) and their metabolites in an athlete's urine. AASs of unknown composition will not be detected by these procedures. Since AASs achieve their anabolic effects by activating the Androgen Receptor (AR), cell-based bioassays that measure the effect of a urine sample on AR activity are under investigation as complementary, pan-androgen detection methods. We evaluated an AR BioAssay as a monitor for androgen activity in urine pre-treated with glucuronidase, which releases T from the inactive T-glucuronide that predominates in urine. AR BioAssay activity levels were expressed as 'T-equivalent' concentrations by comparison to a T dose response curve. The T-equivalent concentrations of androgens in the urine of hypogonadal participants supplemented with T (in whom all androgenic activity should arise from T) were quantitatively identical to the T measurements conducted by MS at the UCLA Olympic Analytical Laboratory (0.96 ± 0.22). All 17 AASs studied were active in the AR BioAssay; other steroids were inactive. 12 metabolites of 10 commonly abused AASs, which are used for MS monitoring of AAS doping because of their prolonged presence in urine, had reduced or no AR BioAssay activity. Thus, the AR BioAssay can accurately and inexpensively monitor T, but its ability to monitor urinary AASs will be limited to a period immediately following doping in which the active AASs remain intact.

  8. Variation in the oxytocin receptor gene moderates the protective effects of a family-based prevention program on telomere length.

    PubMed

    Smearman, Erica L; Yu, Tianyi; Brody, Gene H

    2016-02-01

    Parent-child relationships with high conflict and low warmth and support are associated with later adverse behavioral and physiological child outcomes. These outcomes include shorter telomere lengths, the repetitive sequences at the ends of chromosomes that have been utilized as a biomarker for chronic stress. Our research group furthered this by exploring telomere length outcomes following a family-based prevention program and identified reduced telomere shortening 5 years post intervention among those originally exposed to nonsupportive parenting and randomized to the intervention condition. However, not all individuals respond equally, and a growing literature suggests genetic sensitivity to one's environment, with variations in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) potentially influencing this sensitivity. We utilized data from African American youths (mean age 17) randomized to intervention (n = 100) or control condition (n = 91) with baseline assessments of genetic status and nonsupportive parenting, and 5-year follow-up assessments of telomere length. We found a significant three-way interaction between nonsupportive parenting, intervention condition, and OXTR rs53576 genotype. OXTR GG individuals, who are suggested to be more sensitive to their social environment, exhibited significantly more variability, evidencing the shortest telomeres when exposed to nonsupportive parenting and randomized to the control condition, and similar telomere lengths to non at-risk groups when randomized to the intervention. In contrast, those with the A allele showed no statistical difference in telomere lengths across parental and intervention conditions. Subsequent analyses suggest that these findings may be mediated through chronic anger, whereby GG individuals exposed to nonsupportive parenting and randomized to the control condition had a greater increase in chronic anger by study follow-up, compared to those in the intervention, and this change associated with greater

  9. In Vitro Biologic Activities of the Antimicrobials Triclocarban, Its Analogs, and Triclosan in Bioassay Screens: Receptor-Based Bioassay Screens

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Ki Chang; Zhao, Bin; Chen, Jiangang; Cherednichenko, Gennady; Sanmarti, Enio; Denison, Michael S.; Lasley, Bill; Pessah, Isaac N.; Kültz, Dietmar; Chang, Daniel P.Y.; Gee, Shirley J.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2008-01-01

    Background Concerns have been raised about the biological and toxicologic effects of the antimicrobials triclocarban (TCC) and triclosan (TCS) in personal care products. Few studies have evaluated their biological activities in mammalian cells to assess their potential for adverse effects. Objectives In this study, we assessed the activity of TCC, its analogs, and TCS in in vitro nuclear-receptor–responsive and calcium signaling bioassays. Materials and methods We determined the biological activities of the compounds in in vitro, cell-based, and nuclear-receptor–responsive bioassays for receptors for aryl hydrocarbon (AhR), estrogen (ER), androgen (AR), and ryanodine (RyR1). Results Some carbanilide compounds, including TCC (1–10 μM), enhanced estradiol (E2)-dependent or testosterone-dependent activation of ER- and AR-responsive gene expression up to 2.5-fold but exhibited little or no agonistic activity alone. Some carbanilides and TCS exhibited weak agonistic and/or antagonistic activity in the AhR-responsive bioassay. TCS exhibited antagonistic activity in both ER- and AR-responsive bioassays. TCS (0.1–10 μM) significantly enhanced the binding of [3H]ryanodine to RyR1 and caused elevation of resting cytosolic [Ca2+] in primary skeletal myotubes, but carbanilides had no effect. Conclusions Carbanilides, including TCC, enhanced hormone-dependent induction of ER- and AR-dependent gene expression but had little agonist activity, suggesting a new mechanism of action of endocrine-disrupting compounds. TCS, structurally similar to noncoplanar ortho-substituted poly-chlorinated biphenyls, exhibited weak AhR activity but interacted with RyR1 and stimulated Ca2+ mobilization. These observations have potential implications for human and animal health. Further investigations are needed into the biological and toxicologic effects of TCC, its analogs, and TCS. PMID:18795164

  10. A fluoride-sensing receptor based on 2,2'-bis(indolyl)methane by dual-function of colorimetry and fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Shao, Shi Jun; Guo, Yong

    2015-10-05

    A compound based on 2,2'-bis(indolyl)methane containing nitro group was studied as a new anion receptor. It could recognize selectively F(-) by an increasing fluorescence signal and a visible color change from colorless to blue. The introduction of nitro group induced the spectral dual-function related to the deprotonation of N-H protons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. In search of novel ligands using a structure-based approach: a case study on the adenosine A2A receptor.

    PubMed

    Lenselink, Eelke B; Beuming, Thijs; van Veen, Corine; Massink, Arnault; Sherman, Woody; van Vlijmen, Herman W T; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we present a case study to explore the challenges associated with finding novel molecules for a receptor that has been studied in depth and has a wealth of chemical information available. Specifically, we apply a previously described protocol that incorporates explicit water molecules in the ligand binding site to prospectively screen over 2.5 million drug-like and lead-like compounds from the commercially available eMolecules database in search of novel binders to the adenosine A 2A receptor (A 2A AR). A total of seventy-one compounds were selected for purchase and biochemical assaying based on high ligand efficiency and high novelty (Tanimoto coefficient ≤0.25 to any A 2A AR tested compound). These molecules were then tested for their affinity to the adenosine A 2A receptor in a radioligand binding assay. We identified two hits that fulfilled the criterion of ~50 % radioligand displacement at a concentration of 10 μM. Next we selected an additional eight novel molecules that were predicted to make a bidentate interaction with Asn253 6.55 , a key interacting residue in the binding pocket of the A 2A AR. None of these eight molecules were found to be active. Based on these results we discuss the advantages of structure-based methods and the challenges associated with finding chemically novel molecules for well-explored targets.

  12. Trichoplax adhaerens reveals a network of nuclear receptors sensitive to 9-cis-retinoic acid at the base of metazoan evolution

    PubMed Central

    Novotný, Jan Philipp; Chughtai, Ahmed Ali; Kostrouchová, Markéta; Kostrouchová, Veronika; Kostrouch, David; Kaššák, Filip; Kaňa, Radek; Schierwater, Bernd; Kostrouchová, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Trichoplax adhaerens, the only known species of Placozoa is likely to be closely related to an early metazoan that preceded branching of Cnidaria and Bilateria. This animal species is surprisingly well adapted to free life in the World Ocean inhabiting tidal costal zones of oceans and seas with warm to moderate temperatures and shallow waters. The genome of T. adhaerens (sp. Grell) includes four nuclear receptors, namely orthologue of RXR (NR2B), HNF4 (NR2A), COUP-TF (NR2F) and ERR (NR3B) that show a high degree of similarity with human orthologues. In the case of RXR, the sequence identity to human RXR alpha reaches 81% in the DNA binding domain and 70% in the ligand binding domain. We show that T. adhaerens RXR (TaRXR) binds 9-cis retinoic acid (9-cis-RA) with high affinity, as well as high specificity and that exposure of T. adhaerens to 9-cis-RA regulates the expression of the putative T. adhaerens orthologue of vertebrate L-malate-NADP+ oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.1.40) which in vertebrates is regulated by a heterodimer of RXR and thyroid hormone receptor. Treatment by 9-cis-RA alters the relative expression profile of T. adhaerens nuclear receptors, suggesting the existence of natural ligands. Keeping with this, algal food composition has a profound effect on T. adhaerens growth and appearance. We show that nanomolar concentrations of 9-cis-RA interfere with T. adhaerens growth response to specific algal food and causes growth arrest. Our results uncover an endocrine-like network of nuclear receptors sensitive to 9-cis-RA in T. adhaerens and support the existence of a ligand-sensitive network of nuclear receptors at the base of metazoan evolution. PMID:28975052

  13. The Use of Physiology-Based Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Modeling in the Discovery of the Dual Orexin Receptor Antagonist ACT-541468.

    PubMed

    Treiber, Alexander; de Kanter, Ruben; Roch, Catherine; Gatfield, John; Boss, Christoph; von Raumer, Markus; Schindelholz, Benno; Muehlan, Clemens; van Gerven, Joop; Jenck, Francois

    2017-09-01

    The identification of new sleep drugs poses particular challenges in drug discovery owing to disease-specific requirements such as rapid onset of action, sleep maintenance throughout major parts of the night, and absence of residual next-day effects. Robust tools to estimate drug levels in human brain are therefore key for a successful discovery program. Animal models constitute an appropriate choice for drugs without species differences in receptor pharmacology or pharmacokinetics. Translation to man becomes more challenging when interspecies differences are prominent. This report describes the discovery of the dual orexin receptor 1 and 2 (OX 1 and OX 2 ) antagonist ACT-541468 out of a class of structurally related compounds, by use of physiology-based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PBPK-PD) modeling applied early in drug discovery. Although all drug candidates exhibited similar target receptor potencies and efficacy in a rat sleep model, they exhibited large interspecies differences in key factors determining their pharmacokinetic profile. Human PK models were built on the basis of in vitro metabolism and physicochemical data and were then used to predict the time course of OX 2 receptor occupancy in brain. An active ACT-541468 dose of 25 mg was estimated on the basis of OX 2 receptor occupancy thresholds of about 65% derived from clinical data for two other orexin antagonists, almorexant and suvorexant. Modeling predictions for ACT-541468 in man were largely confirmed in a single-ascending dose trial in healthy subjects. PBPK-PD modeling applied early in drug discovery, therefore, has great potential to assist in the identification of drug molecules when specific pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic requirements need to be met. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  14. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Novel Folic Acid Receptor-Targeted, β-Cyclodextrin-Based Drug Complexes for Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Juan-Juan; Sharma, Sonali; Shumyak, Stepan P.; Wang, Zhi-Xin; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Yangde; Guo, Peixuan; Li, Chen-Zhong; Kanwar, Jagat R.; Yang, Tianxin; Mohapatra, Shyam S.; Liu, Wanqing; Duan, Wei; Wang, Jian-Cheng; Li, Qi; Zhang, Xueji; Tan, Jun; Jia, Lee; Liang, Jun; Wei, Ming Q.; Li, Xiaotian; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Drug targeting is an active area of research and nano-scaled drug delivery systems hold tremendous potential for the treatment of neoplasms. In this study, a novel cyclodextrin (CD)-based nanoparticle drug delivery system has been assembled and characterized for the therapy of folate receptor-positive [FR(+)] cancer. Water-soluble folic acid (FA)-conjugated CD carriers (FACDs) were successfully synthesized and their structures were confirmed by 1D/2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MALDI-TOF-MS), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and circular dichroism. Drug complexes of adamatane (Ada) and cytotoxic doxorubicin (Dox) with FACD were readily obtained by mixed solvent precipitation. The average size of FACD-Ada-Dox was 1.5–2.5 nm. The host-guest association constant K a was 1,639 M−1 as determined by induced circular dichroism and the hydrophilicity of the FACDs was greatly enhanced compared to unmodified CD. Cellular uptake and FR binding competitive experiments demonstrated an efficient and preferentially targeted delivery of Dox into FR-positive tumor cells and a sustained drug release profile was seen in vitro. The delivery of Dox into FR(+) cancer cells via endocytosis was observed by confocal microscopy and drug uptake of the targeted nanoparticles was 8-fold greater than that of non-targeted drug complexes. Our docking results suggest that FA, FACD and FACD-Ada-Dox could bind human hedgehog interacting protein that contains a FR domain. Mouse cardiomyocytes as well as fibroblast treated with FACD-Ada-Dox had significantly lower levels of reactive oxygen species, with increased content of glutathione and glutathione peroxidase activity, indicating a reduced potential for Dox-induced cardiotoxicity. These results indicate that the targeted drug complex possesses high drug association and sustained drug release

  15. Regulating prefrontal cortex activation: an emerging role for the 5-HT₂A serotonin receptor in the modulation of emotion-based actions?

    PubMed

    Aznar, Susana; Klein, Anders B

    2013-12-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is involved in mediating important higher-order cognitive processes such as decision making, prompting thereby our actions. At the same time, PFC activation is strongly influenced by emotional reactions through its functional interaction with the amygdala and the striatal circuitry, areas involved in emotion and reward processing. The PFC, however, is able to modulate amygdala reactivity via a feedback loop to this area. A role for serotonin in adjusting for this circuitry of cognitive regulation of emotion has long been suggested based primarily on the positive pharmacological effect of elevating serotonin levels in anxiety regulation. Recent animal and human functional magnetic resonance studies have pointed to a specific involvement of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)2A serotonin receptor in the PFC feedback regulatory projection onto the amygdala. This receptor is highly expressed in the prefrontal cortex areas, playing an important role in modulating cortical activity and neural oscillations (brain waves). This makes it an interesting potential pharmacological target for the treatment of neuropsychiatric modes characterized by lack of inhibitory control of emotion-based actions, such as addiction and other impulse-related behaviors. In this review, we give an overview of the 5-HT2A receptor distribution (neuronal, intracellular, and anatomical) along with its functional and physiological effect on PFC activation, and how that relates to more recent findings of a regulatory effect of the PFC on the emotional control of our actions.

  16. Fragment Based Optimization of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 2 (mGluR2) Positive Allosteric Modulators in the Absence of Structural Information.

    PubMed

    Szabó, György; Túrós, György I; Kolok, Sándor; Vastag, Mónika; Sánta, Zsuzsanna; Dékány, Miklós; Lévay, György I; Greiner, István; Natsumi, Minami; Tatsuya, Watanabe; Keserű, György M

    2018-03-14

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 (mGluR2) positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) have been implicated as potential pharmacotherapy for psychiatric conditions. Screening our corporate compound deck, we identified a benzotriazole fragment (4) that was rapidly optimized to a potent and metabolically stable early lead (16). The highly lipophilic character of 16, together with its limited solubility, permeability, and high protein binding, however, did not allow reaching of the proof of concept in vivo. Since further attempts on the optimization of druglike properties were unsuccessful, the original hit 4 has been revisited and was optimized following the principles of fragment based drug discovery (FBDD). Lacking structural information on the receptor-ligand complex, we implemented a group efficiency (GE) based strategy and identified a new fragment like lead (60) with more balanced profile. Significant improvement achieved on the druglike properties nominated the compound for in vivo proof of concept studies that revealed the chemotype being a promising PAM lead targeting mGluR2 receptors.

  17. A caspase 8-based suicide switch induces apoptosis in nanobody-directed chimeric receptor expressing T cells.

    PubMed

    Khaleghi, Sepideh; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Ahmadvand, Davoud; Rasaee, Mohammad J; Pognonec, Philippe

    2012-04-01

    In accordance with the two-step hypothesis of T cell activation and the observation that stimulation through the T cell receptor (TCR) alone may lead to anergy, we focused on the introduction of co-stimulatory signaling to this type of receptors to achieve optimal activation. Enhanced mRNA and cell surface receptor expression via the co-stimulatory gene fragment (OX40) was confirmed by RT-PCR and flow cytometry. Inclusion of the OX40 co-stimulatory signaling region in series with the TCR led to enhanced antigen-induced IL-2 production after stimulation by MUC1-expressing cancer cell lines as compared to the chimeric receptor without OX40. Moreover, with the aim of maintaining high efficiency, while providing a means of controlling any possible unwanted proliferation in vivo, a regulation system was used. This controls the dimerization of a membrane-bound caspase 8 protein. Toward that goal, pFKC8 and CAR constructs were co-transfected into Jurkat cells, and the level of apoptosis was measured. 24 h after addition of the dimerizer, a 91% decrease in transfected cells was observed.

  18. Empirically-based modeling and mapping to consider the co-occurrence of ecological receptors and stressors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Part of the ecological risk assessment process involves examining the potential for environmental stressors and ecological receptors to co-occur across a landscape. In this study, we introduce a Bayesian joint modeling framework for use in evaluating and mapping the co-occurrence...

  19. Synthesis and receptor binding studies of novel 4,4-disubstituted arylalkyl/arylalkylsulfonyl piperazine and piperidine-based derivatives as a new class of σ1 ligands.

    PubMed

    Sadeghzadeh, Masoud; Sheibani, Shahab; Ghandi, Mehdi; Daha, Fariba Johari; Amanlou, Massoud; Arjmand, Mohammad; Hasani Bozcheloie, Abolfazl

    2013-06-01

    This study presents the synthesis and biological evaluation of a new series of arylalkyl/arylalkylsulfonyl piperazine and piperidine-based derivatives as sigma receptor ligands. It was found that a number of halogen substituted sulfonamides display relatively high and low affinities to σ1 and σ2 receptors, respectively. The σ1 affinities and subtype selectivities of four piperidine derivatives were also found to be generally comparable to those of piperazine analogues. Compared to σ1-Rs compounds with n = 0 and 2, those with n = 1 proved to have optimal length of carbon chain by exhibiting higher affinities. Within this series, the 4-benzyl-1-(3-iodobenzylsulfonyl)piperidine sigma ligand was identified with 96-fold σ1/σ2 selectivity ratio (Kiσ1 = 0.96 ± 0.05 nM and Kiσ2 = 91.8 ± 8.1 nM). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Fibroblast growth factor receptors in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuwei; Ding, Zhongyang

    2017-05-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors are growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases, exerting their roles in embryogenesis, tissue homeostasis, and development of breast cancer. Recent genetic studies have identified some subtypes of fibroblast growth factor receptors as strong genetic loci associated with breast cancer. In this article, we review the recent epidemiological findings and experiment results of fibroblast growth factor receptors in breast cancer. First, we summarized the structure and physiological function of fibroblast growth factor receptors in humans. Then, we discussed the common genetic variations in fibroblast growth factor receptors that affect breast cancer risk. In addition, we also introduced the potential roles of each fibroblast growth factor receptors isoform in breast cancer. Finally, we explored the potential therapeutics targeting fibroblast growth factor receptors for breast cancer. Based on the biological mechanisms of fibroblast growth factor receptors leading to the pathogenesis in breast cancer, targeting fibroblast growth factor receptors may provide new opportunities for breast cancer therapeutic strategies.

  1. An Ensemble-Based Protocol for the Computational Prediction of Helix–Helix Interactions in G Protein-Coupled Receptors using Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The accurate identification of the specific points of interaction between G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) oligomers is essential for the design of receptor ligands targeting oligomeric receptor targets. A coarse-grained molecular dynamics computer simulation approach would provide a compelling means of identifying these specific protein–protein interactions and could be applied both for known oligomers of interest and as a high-throughput screen to identify novel oligomeric targets. However, to be effective, this in silico modeling must provide accurate, precise, and reproducible information. This has been achieved recently in numerous biological systems using an ensemble-based all-atom molecular dynamics approach. In this study, we describe an equivalent methodology for ensemble-based coarse-grained simulations. We report the performance of this method when applied to four different GPCRs known to oligomerize using error analysis to determine the ensemble size and individual replica simulation time required. Our measurements of distance between residues shown to be involved in oligomerization of the fifth transmembrane domain from the adenosine A2A receptor are in very good agreement with the existing biophysical data and provide information about the nature of the contact interface that cannot be determined experimentally. Calculations of distance between rhodopsin, CXCR4, and β1AR transmembrane domains reported to form contact points in homodimers correlate well with the corresponding measurements obtained from experimental structural data, providing an ability to predict contact interfaces computationally. Interestingly, error analysis enables identification of noninteracting regions. Our results confirm that GPCR interactions can be reliably predicted using this novel methodology. PMID:28383913

  2. An Ensemble-Based Protocol for the Computational Prediction of Helix-Helix Interactions in G Protein-Coupled Receptors using Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Altwaijry, Nojood A; Baron, Michael; Wright, David W; Coveney, Peter V; Townsend-Nicholson, Andrea

    2017-05-09

    The accurate identification of the specific points of interaction between G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) oligomers is essential for the design of receptor ligands targeting oligomeric receptor targets. A coarse-grained molecular dynamics computer simulation approach would provide a compelling means of identifying these specific protein-protein interactions and could be applied both for known oligomers of interest and as a high-throughput screen to identify novel oligomeric targets. However, to be effective, this in silico modeling must provide accurate, precise, and reproducible information. This has been achieved recently in numerous biological systems using an ensemble-based all-atom molecular dynamics approach. In this study, we describe an equivalent methodology for ensemble-based coarse-grained simulations. We report the performance of this method when applied to four different GPCRs known to oligomerize using error analysis to determine the ensemble size and individual replica simulation time required. Our measurements of distance between residues shown to be involved in oligomerization of the fifth transmembrane domain from the adenosine A 2A receptor are in very good agreement with the existing biophysical data and provide information about the nature of the contact interface that cannot be determined experimentally. Calculations of distance between rhodopsin, CXCR4, and β 1 AR transmembrane domains reported to form contact points in homodimers correlate well with the corresponding measurements obtained from experimental structural data, providing an ability to predict contact interfaces computationally. Interestingly, error analysis enables identification of noninteracting regions. Our results confirm that GPCR interactions can be reliably predicted using this novel methodology.

  3. Identification of putative estrogen receptor-mediated endocrine disrupting chemicals using QSAR- and structure-based virtual screening approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Liying; Sedykh, Alexander; Tripathi, Ashutosh

    2013-10-01

    Identification of endocrine disrupting chemicals is one of the important goals of environmental chemical hazard screening. We report on the development of validated in silico predictors of chemicals likely to cause estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated endocrine disruption to facilitate their prioritization for future screening. A database of relative binding affinity of a large number of ERα and/or ERβ ligands was assembled (546 for ERα and 137 for ERβ). Both single-task learning (STL) and multi-task learning (MTL) continuous quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) models were developed for predicting ligand binding affinity to ERα or ERβ. High predictive accuracy was achieved for ERα bindingmore » affinity (MTL R{sup 2} = 0.71, STL R{sup 2} = 0.73). For ERβ binding affinity, MTL models were significantly more predictive (R{sup 2} = 0.53, p < 0.05) than STL models. In addition, docking studies were performed on a set of ER agonists/antagonists (67 agonists and 39 antagonists for ERα, 48 agonists and 32 antagonists for ERβ, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using the following ER structures (in complexes with respective ligands) retrieved from the Protein Data Bank: ERα agonist (PDB ID: 1L2I), ERα antagonist (PDB ID: 3DT3), ERβ agonist (PDB ID: 2NV7), and ERβ antagonist (PDB ID: 1L2J). We found that all four ER conformations discriminated their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Finally, both QSAR models and ER structures were employed in parallel to virtually screen several large libraries of environmental chemicals to derive a ligand- and structure-based prioritized list of putative estrogenic compounds to be used for in vitro and in vivo experimental validation. - Highlights: • This is the largest curated dataset inclusive of ERα and β (the latter is unique). • New methodology that for the first time affords acceptable ERβ models. • A combination of QSAR and docking enables prediction of affinity and

  4. Selective Glucocorticoid Receptor modulators.

    PubMed

    De Bosscher, Karolien

    2010-05-31

    The ancient two-faced Roman god Janus is often used as a metaphor to describe the characteristics of the Glucocorticoid Receptor (NR3C1), which exhibits both a beneficial side, that serves to halt inflammation, and a detrimental side responsible for undesirable effects. However, recent developments suggest that the Glucocorticoid Receptor has many more faces with the potential to express a range of different functionalities, depending on factors that include the tissue type, ligand type, receptor variants, cofactor surroundings and target gene promoters. This behavior of the receptor has made the development of safer ligands, that trigger the expression program of only a desirable subset of genes, a real challenge. Thus more knowledge-based fundamental research is needed to ensure the design and development of selective Glucocorticoid Receptor modulators capable of reaching the clinic. Recent advances in the characterization of novel selective Glucocorticoid Receptor modulators, specifically in the context of anti-inflammatory strategies, will be described in this review. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evolutionary Analysis of Functional Divergence among Chemokine Receptors, Decoy Receptors, and Viral Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Daiyasu, Hiromi; Nemoto, Wataru; Toh, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Chemokine receptors (CKRs) function in the inflammatory response and in vertebrate homeostasis. Decoy and viral receptors are two types of CKR homologs with modified functions from those of the typical CKRs. The decoy receptors are able to bind ligands without signaling. On the other hand, the viral receptors show constitutive signaling without ligands. We examined the sites related to the functional difference. At first, the decoy and viral receptors were each classified into five groups, based on the molecular phylogenetic analysis. A multiple amino acid sequence alignment between each group and the CKRs was then constructed. The difference in the amino acid composition between the group and the CKRs was evaluated as the Kullback–Leibler (KL) information value at each alignment site. The KL information value is considered to reflect the difference in the functional constraints at the site. The sites with the top 5% of KL information values were selected and mapped on the structure of a CKR. The comparisons with decoy receptor groups revealed that the detected sites were biased on the intracellular side. In contrast, the sites detected from the comparisons with viral receptor groups were found on both the extracellular and intracellular sides. More sites were found in the ligand binding pocket in the analyses of the viral receptor groups, as compared to the decoy receptor groups. Some of the detected sites were located in the GPCR motifs. For example, the DRY motif of the decoy receptors was often degraded, although the motif of the viral receptors was basically conserved. The observations for the viral receptor groups suggested that the constraints in the pocket region are loose and that the sites on the intracellular side are different from those for the decoy receptors, which may be related to the constitutive signaling activity of the viral receptors. PMID:22855685

  6. Evolutionary Analysis of Functional Divergence among Chemokine Receptors, Decoy Receptors, and Viral Receptors.

    PubMed

    Daiyasu, Hiromi; Nemoto, Wataru; Toh, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Chemokine receptors (CKRs) function in the inflammatory response and in vertebrate homeostasis. Decoy and viral receptors are two types of CKR homologs with modified functions from those of the typical CKRs. The decoy receptors are able to bind ligands without signaling. On the other hand, the viral receptors show constitutive signaling without ligands. We examined the sites related to the functional difference. At first, the decoy and viral receptors were each classified into five groups, based on the molecular phylogenetic analysis. A multiple amino acid sequence alignment between each group and the CKRs was then constructed. The difference in the amino acid composition between the group and the CKRs was evaluated as the Kullback-Leibler (KL) information value at each alignment site. The KL information value is considered to reflect the difference in the functional constraints at the site. The sites with the top 5% of KL information values were selected and mapped on the structure of a CKR. The comparisons with decoy receptor groups revealed that the detected sites were biased on the intracellular side. In contrast, the sites detected from the comparisons with viral receptor groups were found on both the extracellular and intracellular sides. More sites were found in the ligand binding pocket in the analyses of the viral receptor groups, as compared to the decoy receptor groups. Some of the detected sites were located in the GPCR motifs. For example, the DRY motif of the decoy receptors was often degraded, although the motif of the viral receptors was basically conserved. The observations for the viral receptor groups suggested that the constraints in the pocket region are loose and that the sites on the intracellular side are different from those for the decoy receptors, which may be related to the constitutive signaling activity of the viral receptors.

  7. Molecular imaging of human tumor cells that naturally overexpress type 2 cannabinoid receptors using a quinolone-based near-infrared fluorescent probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhiyuan; Shao, Pin; Zhang, Shaojuan; Ling, Xiaoxi; Bai, Mingfeng

    2014-07-01

    Cannabinoid CB2 receptors (CB2R) hold promise as therapeutic targets for treating diverse diseases, such as cancers, neurodegenerative diseases, pain, inflammation, osteoporosis, psychiatric disorders, addiction, and immune disorders. However, the fundamental role of CBR in the regulation of diseases remains unclear, largely due to a lack of reliable imaging tools for the receptors. The goal of this study was to develop a CBR-targeted molecular imaging probe and evaluate the specificity of the probe using human tumor cells that naturally overexpress CBR. To synthesize the CBR-targeted probe (NIR760-Q), a conjugable CBR ligand based on the quinolone structure was first prepared, followed by bioconjugation with a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye, NIR760. In vitro fluorescence imaging and competitive binding studies showed higher uptake of NIR760-Q than free NIR760 dye in Jurkat human acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia cells. In addition, the high uptake of NIR760-Q was significantly inhibited by the blocking agent, 4-quinolone-3-carboxamide, indicating specific binding of NIR760-Q to the target receptors. These results indicate that the NIR760-Q has potential in diagnostic imaging of CBR positive cancers and elucidating the role of CBR in the regulation of disease progression.

  8. Role of genotype-based personalized antiplatelet therapy in the era of potent P2Y₁₂ receptor inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Antonino, Mark J; Jeong, Young-Hoon; Tantry, Udaya S; Bliden, Kevin P; Gurbel, Paul A

    2012-08-01

    Therapy with clopidogrel and aspirin, commonly known as dual antiplatelet therapy, is a widely adapted secondary prevention strategy among coronary artery disease patients treated with percutaneous coronary intervention. However, in addition to response variability and high on-treatment platelet reactivity and their relation to increased adverse events during clopidogrel therapy, candidate gene studies and genome-wide association studies have highlighted the significance of single nucleotide polymorphisms of genes associated with clopidogrel metabolism in coronary artery disease patients. Genotyping may have an emerging role in personalized antiplatelet therapy, particularly with the advent of new P2Y₁₂ receptor blockers that have more rapid and potent pharmacodynamic properties than clopidogrel. The current review discusses the role of genotyping in personalizing P2Y₁₂ receptor-blocker therapy.

  9. Discovery of an Acrylic Acid Based Tetrahydroisoquinoline as an Orally Bioavailable Selective Estrogen Receptor Degrader for ERα+ Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Burks, Heather E.; Abrams, Tinya; Kirby, Christina A.

    Tetrahydroisoquinoline 40 has been identified as a potent ERα antagonist and selective estrogen receptor degrader (SERD), exhibiting good oral bioavailability, antitumor efficacy, and SERD activity in vivo. We outline the discovery and chemical optimization of the THIQ scaffold leading to THIQ 40 and showcase the racemization of the scaffold, pharmacokinetic studies in preclinical species, and the in vivo efficacy of THIQ 40 in a MCF-7 human breast cancer xenograft model.

  10. Investigation of fluids as filling of a biomimetic infrared sensor based on the infrared receptors of pyrophilous insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, T.; Li, N.; Schmitz, H.; Bousack, H.

    2012-04-01

    The beetle Melanophila acuminata is highly dependent on forest fires. The burned wood serves as food for the larvae and the adults copulate on the burned areas to put their eggs in the freshly burned trees. To be able to detect forest fires from great distances the beetle developed a highly sensitive infrared receptor which works according to a photomechanical principle. The beetle has two pit organs, one on each lateral side, of which each houses around 70 dome shaped infrared receptors. These IR-receptors consist of a hard outer cuticular shell and an inner microfluidic core. When IR-radiation is absorbed, the pressure in the core increases due to the thermal expansion. This results in a deflection of a dendritic tip of a mechanosensitiv neuron which generates the signal. This biological principle was transferred into a new kind of un-cooled technical infrared receptor. To demonstrate the functional principle and the feasibility of this IR-sensor a macroscopic demonstrator sensor was build. It consisted of an inner fluid filled cavity (pressure chamber), an IR-transmissive window and a membrane. The deflection of the membrane due to the absorbed IR-energy was measured by a sensitive commercial capacitive sensor. In the experiments ethanol with added black ink, a mix of ethanol and glucose with additional absorber, air with additional absorber and water were used as fillings of the cavity and compared against each other. In order to get insights into the physics of the results of the experiments accompanying simulations using FEM methods and analytical calculations have been performed. The results showed that ethanol and air as fillings of the cavity caused the largest deflection of the membrane. Furthermore it turned out that the thermal expansion of the sensor housing material has an important influence. The comparison of the measured deflection with calculated deflections showed a good concordance.

  11. Cerebral morphology and dopamine D2/D3receptor distribution in humans: A combined [18F]fallypride and voxel-based morphometry study

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Neil D.; Zald, David H.; Ding, Zhaohua; Riccardi, Patrizia; Ansari, M. Sib; Baldwin, Ronald M.; Cowan, Ronald L.; Li, Rui; Kessler, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between cerebral morphology and the expression of dopamine receptors has not been extensively studied in humans. Elucidation of such relationships may have important methodological implications for clinical studies of dopamine receptor ligand binding differences between control and patient groups. The association between cerebral morphology and dopamine receptor distribution was examined in 45 healthy subjects who completed T1-weighted structural MRI and PET scanning with the D2/D3 ligand [18F]fallypride. Optimized voxel-based morphometry was used to create grey matter volume and density images. Grey matter volume and density images were correlated with binding potential (BPND) images on a voxel-by-voxel basis using the Biological Parametric Mapping toolbox. Associations between cerebral morphology and BPND were also examined for selected regions-of-interest (ROIs) after spatial normalization. Voxel-wise analyses indicated that grey matter volume and density positively correlated with BPND throughout the midbrain, including the substantia nigra. Positive correlations were observed in medial cortical areas, including anterior cingulate and medial prefrontal cortex, and circumscribed regions of the temporal, frontal, and parietal lobes. ROI analyses revealed significant positive correlations between BPND and cerebral morphology in the caudate, thalamus, and amygdala. Few negative correlations between morphology and BPND were observed. Overall, grey matter density appeared more strongly correlated with BPND than grey matter volume. Cerebral morphology, particularly grey matter density, correlates with [18F]fallypride BPND in a regionally specific manner. Clinical studies comparing dopamine receptor availability between clinical and control groups may benefit by accounting for potential differences in cerebral morphology that exist even after spatial normalization. PMID:19457373

  12. Cerebral morphology and dopamine D2/D3 receptor distribution in humans: a combined [18F]fallypride and voxel-based morphometry study.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Neil D; Zald, David H; Ding, Zhaohua; Riccardi, Patrizia; Ansari, M Sib; Baldwin, Ronald M; Cowan, Ronald L; Li, Rui; Kessler, Robert M

    2009-05-15

    The relationship between cerebral morphology and the expression of dopamine receptors has not been extensively studied in humans. Elucidation of such relationships may have important methodological implications for clinical studies of dopamine receptor ligand binding differences between control and patient groups. The association between cerebral morphology and dopamine receptor distribution was examined in 45 healthy subjects who completed T1-weighted structural MRI and PET scanning with the D(2)/D(3) ligand [(18)F]fallypride. Optimized voxel-based morphometry was used to create grey matter volume and density images. Grey matter volume and density images were correlated with binding potential (BP(ND)) images on a voxel-by-voxel basis using the Biological Parametric Mapping toolbox. Associations between cerebral morphology and BP(ND) were also examined for selected regions-of-interest (ROIs) after spatial normalization. Voxel-wise analyses indicated that grey matter volume and density positively correlated with BP(ND) throughout the midbrain, including the substantia nigra. Positive correlations were observed in medial cortical areas, including anterior cingulate and medial prefrontal cortex, and circumscribed regions of the temporal, frontal, and parietal lobes. ROI analyses revealed significant positive correlations between BP(ND) and cerebral morphology in the caudate, thalamus, and amygdala. Few negative correlations between morphology and BP(ND) were observed. Overall, grey matter density appeared more strongly correlated with BP(ND) than grey matter volume. Cerebral morphology, particularly grey matter density, correlates with [(18)F]fallypride BP(ND) in a regionally specific manner. Clinical studies comparing dopamine receptor availability between clinical and control groups may benefit by accounting for potential differences in cerebral morphology that exist even after spatial normalization.

  13. Development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a beta-1 adrenergic receptor-based assay for monitoring the drug atenolol.

    PubMed

    Sapir, A; Shalev, A Hariton; Skalka, N; Bronshtein, A; Altstein, M

    2013-03-01

    Two approaches for monitoring atenolol (ATL) were applied: an immunochemical assay and a competitive-binding assay, based on the interaction between ATL and its target receptor, β1 adrenergic receptor (β1AR). Polyclonal antibodies (Abs) for ATL were generated, and a highly specific microplate immunochemical assay, that is, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), for its detection was developed. The ATL ELISA exhibited I50 and limit of detection (I20) values of 0.15 ± 0.048 and 0.032 ± 0.016 ng/ml, respectively, and the Abs did not cross-react with any of the tested beta-blocker drugs. Furthermore, a human β1AR (h-β1AR) was stably expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda cells (Sf9). The receptor was employed to develop a competitive-binding assay that monitored binding of ATL in the presence of isoproteranol by quantification of secondary messenger, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), levels in the transfected cells. The assay showed that the recombinant h-β1AR was functional, could bind the agonistic ligand isoproterenol as well as the antagonist ATL, as indicated by a dose-dependent elevation of cAMP in the presence of isoproteranol, and decrease after ATL addition. The highly efficient and sensitive ELISA and the receptor assay represent two methods suitable for efficient and cost-effective large-scale, high-throughput monitoring of ATL in environmental, agricultural, and biological samples. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  14. Stereochemical study of mouse muscone receptor MOR215-1 and vibrational theory based on statistical physics formalism.

    PubMed

    Ben Khemis, Ismahene; Mechi, Nesrine; Ben Lamine, Abdelmottaleb

    2018-02-10

    In the biosensor system, olfactory receptor sites could be activated by odorant molecules and then the biological interactions are converted into electrical signals by a signal transduction cascade that leads the toopening of ion channels, generating a current that leads into the cilia and depolarizes the membrane. The aim of this paper is to present a new investigation that allows determining the olfactory band using a monolayer adsorption with identical sites modeling which may also describe the static and the dynamic sensitivities through the expression of the olfactory response. Moreover, knowing the size of receptor site in olfactory sensory neurons provides valuable information about the relationship between molecular structure and biological activity. The determination of microreceptors and mesoreceptors is mostly carried out via physical adsorption and the radius is calculated using the Kelvin equation. The mean values of radius obtained from the maximum of the receptor size distributions peaks are 4 nm for ℓ-muscone and 6 nm for d-muscone. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Albumin-based nanoparticles as methylprednisolone carriers for targeted delivery towards the neonatal Fc receptor in glomerular podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lin; Chen, Mingyu; Mao, Huijuan; Wang, Ningning; Zhang, Bo; Zhao, Xiufen; Qian, Jun; Xing, Changying

    2017-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are commonly used in the treatment of nephrotic syndrome. However, high doses and long periods of GC therapy can result in severe side effects. The present study aimed to selectively deliver albumin-methylprednisolone (MP) nanoparticles towards glomerular podocytes, which highly express the specific neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) of albumin. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was labeled with a fluorescent dye and linked with modified MP via an amide bond. The outcome nanoparticle named BSA633-MP showed a uniform size with a diameter of approximately 10 nm and contained 12 drug molecules on average. The nanoconjugates were found to be stable at pH 7.4 and acid-sensitive at pH 4.0, with approximately 72% release of the MP drug after 48 h of incubation. The nanoparticle demonstrated a 36-fold uptake in receptor-specific cellular delivery in the FcRn-expressing human podocytes compared to the uptake in the non-FcRn-expressing control cells. Co-localization further confirmed that uptake of the nanoconjugates involved receptor-mediated endocytosis followed by lysosome associated transportation. In vitro cellular experiments indicated that the BSA633-MP ameliorated puromycin aminonucleoside-induced podocyte apoptosis. Moreover, in vivo fluorescence molecular imaging showed that BSA633-MP was mainly accumulated in the liver and kidney after intravenous dosing for 24 h. Collectively, this study may provide an approach for the effective and safe therapy of nephrotic syndrome. PMID:28259932

  16. Dopamine depletion shifts behavior from activity based reinforcers to more sedentary ones and adenosine receptor antagonism reverses that shift: Relation to ventral striatum DARPP32 phosphorylation patterns.

    PubMed

    López-Cruz, Laura; San Miguel, Noemí; Carratalá-Ros, Carla; Monferrer, Lidón; Salamone, John D; Correa, Mercè

    2018-02-02

    The mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system plays a critical role in behavioral activation and effort-based decision-making. DA depletion produces anergia (shifts to low effort options) in animals tested on effort-based decision-making tasks. Caffeine, the most consumed stimulant in the world, acts as an adenosine A 1 /A 2A receptor antagonist, and in striatal areas DA D 1 and D 2 receptors are co-localized with adenosine A 1 and A 2A receptors respectively. In the present work, we evaluated the effect of caffeine on anergia induced by the VMAT-2 inhibitor tetrabenazine (TBZ), which depletes DA. Anergia was evaluated in a three-chamber T-maze task in which animals can chose between running on a wheel (RW) vs. sedentary activities such as consuming sucrose or sniffing a neutral odor. TBZ-caffeine interactions in ventral striatum were evaluated using DARPP-32 phosphorylation patterns as an intracellular marker of DA-adenosine receptor interaction. In the T-maze, control mice spent more time running and much less consuming sucrose or sniffing. TBZ (4.0 mg/kg) reduced ventral striatal DA tissue levels as measured by HPLC, and also shifted preferences in the T-maze, reducing selection of the reinforcer that involved vigorous activity (RW), but increasing consumption of a reinforcer that required little effort (sucrose), at doses that had no effect on independent measures of appetite or locomotion in a RW. Caffeine at doses that had no effect on their own reversed the effects of TBZ on T-maze performance, and also suppressed TBZ-induced pDARPP-32(Thr34) expression as measured by western blot, suggesting a role for D 2 -A 2A interactions. These results support the idea that DA depletion produces anergia, but does not affect the primary motivational effects of sucrose. Caffeine, possibly by acting on A 2A receptors in ventral striatum, reversed the DA depletion effects. It is possible that caffeine, like selective adenosine A2A antagonists, could have some therapeutic benefit

  17. Brain penetrant liver X receptor (LXR) modulators based on a 2,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrazole core.

    PubMed

    Tice, Colin M; Noto, Paul B; Fan, Kristi Yi; Zhao, Wei; Lotesta, Stephen D; Dong, Chengguo; Marcus, Andrew P; Zheng, Ya-Jun; Chen, Guozhou; Wu, Zhongren; Van Orden, Rebecca; Zhou, Jing; Bukhtiyarov, Yuri; Zhao, Yi; Lipinski, Kerri; Howard, Lamont; Guo, Joan; Kandpal, Geeta; Meng, Shi; Hardy, Andrew; Krosky, Paula; Gregg, Richard E; Leftheris, Katerina; McKeever, Brian M; Singh, Suresh B; Lala, Deepak; McGeehan, Gerard M; Zhuang, Linghang; Claremon, David A

    2016-10-15

    Liver X receptor (LXR) agonists have been reported to lower brain amyloid beta (Aβ) and thus to have potential for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Structure and property based design led to the discovery of a series of orally bioavailable, brain penetrant LXR agonists. Oral administration of compound 18 to rats resulted in significant upregulation of the expression of the LXR target gene ABCA1 in brain tissue, but no significant effect on Aβ levels was detected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Inhibition of Smooth Muscle Proliferation by Urea-Based Alkanoic Acids via Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α–Dependent Repression of Cyclin D1

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Valerie Y.; Morisseau, Christophe; Falck, John R.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Kroetz, Deanna L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective Proliferation of smooth muscle cells is implicated in cardiovascular complications. Previously, a urea-based soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor was shown to attenuate smooth muscle cell proliferation. We examined the possibility that urea-based alkanoic acids activate the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) and the role of PPARα in smooth muscle cell proliferation. Methods and Results Alkanoic acids transactivated PPARα, induced binding of PPARα to its response element, and significantly induced the expression of PPARα-responsive genes, showing their function as PPARα agonists. Furthermore, the alkanoic acids attenuated platelet-derived growth factor–induced smooth muscle cell proliferation via repression of cyclin D1 expression. Using small interfering RNA to decrease endogenous PPARα expression, it was determined that PPARα was partially involved in the cyclin D1 repression. The antiproliferative effects of alkanoic acids may also be attributed to their inhibitory effects on soluble epoxide hydrolase, because epoxyeicosatrienoic acids alone inhibited smooth muscle cell proliferation. Conclusions These results show that attenuation of smooth muscle cell proliferation by urea-based alkanoic acids is mediated, in part, by the activation of PPARα. These acids may be useful for designing therapeutics to treat diseases characterized by excessive smooth muscle cell proliferation. PMID:16917105

  19. GPCR-SSFE 2.0-a fragment-based molecular modeling web tool for Class A G-protein coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Worth, Catherine L; Kreuchwig, Franziska; Tiemann, Johanna K S; Kreuchwig, Annika; Ritschel, Michele; Kleinau, Gunnar; Hildebrand, Peter W; Krause, Gerd

    2017-07-03

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are key players in signal transduction and therefore a large proportion of pharmaceutical drugs target these receptors. Structural data of GPCRs are sparse yet important for elucidating the molecular basis of GPCR-related diseases and for performing structure-based drug design. To ameliorate this problem, GPCR-SSFE 2.0 (http://www.ssfa-7tmr.de/ssfe2/), an intuitive web server dedicated to providing three-dimensional Class A GPCR homology models has been developed. The updated web server includes 27 inactive template structures and incorporates various new functionalities. Uniquely, it uses a fingerprint correlation scoring strategy for identifying the optimal templates, which we demonstrate captures structural features that sequence similarity alone is unable to do. Template selection is carried out separately for each helix, allowing both single-template models and fragment-based models to be built. Additionally, GPCR-SSFE 2.0 stores a comprehensive set of pre-calculated and downloadable homology models and also incorporates interactive loop modeling using the tool SL2, allowing knowledge-based input by the user to guide the selection process. For visual analysis, the NGL viewer is embedded into the result pages. Finally, blind-testing using two recently published structures shows that GPCR-SSFE 2.0 performs comparably or better than other state-of-the art GPCR modeling web servers. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Atom and receptor based 3D QSAR models for generating new conformations from pyrazolopyrimidine as IL-2 inducible tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ul-Haq, Zaheer; Effendi, Juweria Shahrukh; Ashraf, Sajda; Bkhaitan, Majdi M

    2017-06-01

    In the current study, quantitative three-dimensional structure-activity-relationship (3D-QSAR) method was performed to design a model for new chemical entities by utilizing pyrazolopyrimidines. Their inhibiting activity on receptor IL-2 Itk correlates descriptors based on topology and hydrophobicity. The best model developed by ligand-based (atom-based) approach has correlation-coefficient of r 2 : 0.987 and cross-validated squared correlation-coefficient of q 2 : 0.541 with an external prediction capability of r 2 : 0.944. Whereas the best selected model developed by structured-based (receptor-based) approach has correlation-coefficient of r 2 : 0.987, cross-validated squared correlation-coefficient of q 2 : 0.637 with an external predictive ability of r 2 : 0.941. The statistical parameters prove that structure-based gave a better model to design new chemical scaffolds. The results achieved indicated that hydrophobicity at R 1 location play a vital role in the inhibitory activity and introduction of appropriately bulky and strongly hydrophobic-groups at position 3 of the terminal phenyl-group which is highly significant to enhance the activity. Six new pyrazolopyrimidine derivatives were designed. Docking simulation study was carried out and their inhibitory activity was predicted by the best structure based model with predictive activity of ranging from 8.43 to 8.85 log unit. The interacting residues PHE435, ASP500, LYS391, GLU436, MET438, CYS442, ILE369, VAL377 of PDB 4HCT were studied with respect to type of bonding with the new compounds. This study was aimed to search out more potent inhibitors of IL-2 Itk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Nanobody-based chimeric receptor gene integration in Jurkat cells mediated by PhiC31 integrase

    SciTech Connect

    Iri-Sofla, Farnoush Jafari; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh, E-mail: rahbarif@modares.ac.ir; Ahmadvand, Davoud

    2011-11-01

    The crucial role of T lymphocytes in anti-tumor immunity has led to the development of novel strategies that can target and activate T cells against tumor cells. Recombinant DNA technology has been used to generate non-MHC-restricted chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). Here, we constructed a panel of recombinant CAR that harbors the anti-MUC1 nanobody and the signaling and co-signaling moieties (CD3{zeta}/CD28) with different spacer regions derived from human IgG3 with one or two repeats of the hinge sequence or the hinge region of Fc{gamma}RII. The PhiC31 integrase system was employed to investigate if the recombination efficiency could be recruited for highmore » and stable expression of T cell chimeric receptor genes. The effect of nuclear localization signal (NLS) and two different promoters (CMV and CAG) on efficacy of PhiC31 integrase in human T cell lines was evaluated. The presence of integrase in combination with NLS, mediated up to 7.6 and 8.5 fold increases in CAR expression in ZCHN-attB and ZCHHN-attB cassette integrated T cells, respectively. Our results showed that highly efficient and stable transduction of the Jurkat cell line by PhiC31 integrase is a feasible modality for generating anti-cancer chimeric T cells for use in cancer immunotherapy.« less

  2. Nanobody-based chimeric receptor gene integration in Jurkat cells mediated by φC31 integrase.

    PubMed

    Iri-Sofla, Farnoush Jafari; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Ahmadvand, Davoud; Rasaee, Mohammad J

    2011-11-01

    The crucial role of T lymphocytes in anti-tumor immunity has led to the development of novel strategies that can target and activate T cells against tumor cells. Recombinant DNA technology has been used to generate non-MHC-restricted chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). Here, we constructed a panel of recombinant CAR that harbors the anti-MUC1 nanobody and the signaling and co-signaling moieties (CD3ζ/CD28) with different spacer regions derived from human IgG3 with one or two repeats of the hinge sequence or the hinge region of FcγRII. The PhiC31 integrase system was employed to investigate if the recombination efficiency could be recruited for high and stable expression of T cell chimeric receptor genes. The effect of nuclear localization signal (NLS) and two different promoters (CMV and CAG) on efficacy of PhiC31 integrase in human T cell lines was evaluated. The presence of integrase in combination with NLS, mediated up to 7.6 and 8.5 fold increases in CAR expression in ZCHN-attB and ZCHHN-attB cassette integrated T cells, respectively. Our results showed that highly efficient and stable transduction of the Jurkat cell line by PhiC31 integrase is a feasible modality for generating anti-cancer chimeric T cells for use in cancer immunotherapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Functionalized Dendrimer-Based Delivery of Angiotensin Type 1 Receptor siRNA for Preserving Cardiac Function Following Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Gu, Catherine; Cabigas, E. Bernadette; Pendergrass, Karl D.; Brown, Milton E.; Luo, Ying; Davis, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death throughout the world and much pathology is associated with upregulation of inflammatory genes. Gene silencing using RNA interference is a powerful tool in regulating gene expression, but its application in CVDs has been prevented by the lack of efficient delivery systems. We report here the development of tadpole dendrimeric materials for siRNA delivery in a rat ischemia-reperfusion (IR) model. Angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 receptor (AT1R), the major receptor that mediates most adverse effects of Ang II, was chosen to be the silencing targeting. Among the three tadpole dendrimers synthesized, the oligo-arginine conjugated dendrimer loaded with siRNA demonstrated effective down-regulation in AT1R expression in cardiomyocytes in vitro. When the dendrimeric material was applied in vivo, the siRNA delivery prevented the increase in AT1R levels and significantly improved cardiac function recovery compared to saline injection or empty dendrimer treated groups after IR injury. These experiments demonstrate a potential treatment for dysfunction caused by IR injury and may represent an alternative to AT1R blockade. PMID:23433774

  4. Biosensor-based approach identifies four distinct calmodulin-binding domains in the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Tran, Quang-Kim; Vermeer, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER) has been demonstrated to participate in many cellular functions, but its regulatory inputs are not clearly understood. Here we describe a new approach that identifies GPER as a calmodulin-binding protein, locates interaction sites, and characterizes their binding properties. GPER coimmunoprecipitates with calmodulin in primary vascular smooth muscle cells under resting conditions, which is enhanced upon acute treatment with either specific ligands or a Ca(2+)-elevating agent. To confirm direct interaction and locate the calmodulin-binding domain(s), we designed a series of FRET biosensors that consist of enhanced cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins flanking each of GPER's submembrane domains (SMDs). Responses of these biosensors showed that all four submembrane domains directly bind calmodulin. Modifications of biosensor linker identified domains that display the strongest calmodulin-binding affinities and largest biosensor dynamics, including a.a. 83-93, 150-175, 242-259, 330-351, corresponding respectively to SMDs 1, 2, 3, and the juxta-membranous section of SMD4. These biosensors bind calmodulin in a strictly Ca(2+)-dependent fashion and with disparate affinities in the order SMD2>SMD4>SMD3>SMD1, apparent K d values being 0.44 ± 0.03, 1.40 ± 0.16, 8.01 ± 0.29, and 136.62 ± 6.56 µM, respectively. Interestingly, simultaneous determinations of biosensor responses and suitable Ca(2+) indicators identified separate Ca(2+) sensitivities for their interactions with calmodulin. SMD1-CaM complexes display a biphasic Ca(2+) response, representing two distinct species (SMD1 sp1 and SMD1 sp2) with drastically different Ca(2+) sensitivities. The Ca(2+) sensitivities of CaM-SMDs interactions follow the order SMD1sp1>SMD4>SMD2>SMD1sp2>SMD3, EC50(Ca(2+)) values being 0.13 ± 0.02, 0.75 ± 0.05, 2.38 ± 0.13, 3.71 ± 0.13, and 5.15 ± 0.25 µM, respectively. These data indicate that calmodulin may regulate GPER

  5. Synthetic Polymer Affinity Ligand for Bacillus thuringiensis ( Bt) Cry1Ab/Ac Protein: The Use of Biomimicry Based on the Bt Protein-Insect Receptor Binding Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingming; Huang, Rong; Weisman, Adam; Yu, Xiaoyang; Lee, Shih-Hui; Chen, Yalu; Huang, Chao; Hu, Senhua; Chen, Xiuhua; Tan, Wenfeng; Liu, Fan; Chen, Hao; Shea, Kenneth J

    2018-05-24

    We report a novel strategy for creating abiotic Bacillus thuringiensis ( Bt) protein affinity ligands by biomimicry of the recognition process that takes place between Bt Cry1Ab/Ac proteins and insect receptor cadherin-like Bt-R 1 proteins. Guided by this strategy, a library of synthetic polymer nanoparticles (NPs) was prepared and screened for binding to three epitopes 280 FRGSAQGIEGS 290 , 368 RRPFNIGINNQQ 379 and 436 FRSGFSNSSVSIIR 449 located in loop α8, loop 2 and loop 3 of domain II of Bt Cry1Ab/Ac proteins. A negatively charged and hydrophilic nanoparticle (NP12) was found to have high affinity to one of the epitopes, 368 RRPFNIGINNQQ 379 . This same NP also had specific binding ability to both Bt Cry1Ab and Bt Cry1Ac, proteins that share the same epitope, but very low affinity to Bt Cry2A, Bt Cry1C and Bt Cry1F closely related proteins that lack epitope homology. To locate possible NP- Bt Cry1Ab/Ac interaction sites, NP12 was used as a competitive inhibitor to block the binding of 865 NITIHITDTNNK 876 , a specific recognition site in insect receptor Bt-R 1 , to 368 RRPFNIGINNQQ 379 . The inhibition by NP12 reached as high as 84%, indicating that NP12 binds to Bt Cry1Ab/Ac proteins mainly via 368 RRPFNIGINNQQ 379 . This epitope region was then utilized as a "target" or "bait" for the separation and concentration of Bt Cry1Ac protein from the extract of transgenic Bt cotton leaves by NP12. This strategy, based on the antigen-receptor recognition mechanism, can be extended to other biotoxins and pathogen proteins when designing biomimic alternatives to natural protein affinity ligands.

  6. Prediction of binding affinity and efficacy of thyroid hormone receptor ligands using QSAR and structure based modeling methods

    PubMed Central

    Politi, Regina; Rusyn, Ivan; Tropsha, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The thyroid hormone receptor (THR) is an important member of the nuclear receptor family that can be activated by endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC). Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models have been developed to facilitate the prioritization of THR-mediated EDC for the experimental validation. The largest database of binding affinities available at the time of the study for ligand binding domain (LBD) of THRβ was assembled to generate both continuous and classification QSAR models with an external accuracy of R2=0.55 and CCR=0.76, respectively. In addition, for the first time a QSAR model was developed to predict binding affinities of antagonists inhibiting the interaction of coactivators with the AF-2 domain of THRβ (R2=0.70). Furthermore, molecular docking studies were performed for a set of THRβ ligands (57 agonists and 15 antagonists of LBD, 210 antagonists of the AF-2 domain, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using several THRβ structures retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. We found that two agonist-bound THRβ conformations could effectively discriminate their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Moreover, one of the agonist conformations could discriminate agonists from antagonists. Finally, we have conducted virtual screening of a chemical library compiled by the EPA as part of the Tox21 program to identify potential THRβ-mediated EDCs using both QSAR models and docking. We concluded that the library is unlikely to have any EDC that would bind to the THRβ. Models developed in this study can be employed either to identify environmental chemicals interacting with the THR or, conversely, to eliminate the THR-mediated mechanism of action for chemicals of concern. PMID:25058446

  7. Signal Transduction by a Fungal NOD-Like Receptor Based on Propagation of a Prion Amyloid Fold

    PubMed Central

    Daskalov, Asen; Habenstein, Birgit; Martinez, Denis; Debets, Alfons J. M.; Sabaté, Raimon; Loquet, Antoine; Saupe, Sven J.

    2015-01-01

    In the fungus Podospora anserina, the [Het-s] prion induces programmed cell death by activating the HET-S pore-forming protein. The HET-s β-solenoid prion fold serves as a template for converting the HET-S prion-forming domain into the same fold. This conversion, in turn, activates the HET-S pore-forming domain. The gene immediately adjacent to het-S encodes NWD2, a Nod-like receptor (NLR) with an N-terminal motif similar to the elementary repeat unit of the β-solenoid fold. NLRs are immune receptors controlling cell death and host defense processes in animals, plants and fungi. We have proposed that, analogously to [Het-s], NWD2 can activate the HET-S pore-forming protein by converting its prion-forming region into the β-solenoid fold. Here, we analyze the ability of NWD2 to induce formation of the β-solenoid prion fold. We show that artificial NWD2 variants induce formation of the [Het-s] prion, specifically in presence of their cognate ligands. The N-terminal motif is responsible for this prion induction, and mutations predicted to affect the β-solenoid fold abolish templating activity. In vitro, the N-terminal motif assembles into infectious prion amyloids that display a structure resembling the β-solenoid fold. In vivo, the assembled form of the NWD2 N-terminal region activates the HET-S pore-forming protein. This study documenting the role of the β-solenoid fold in fungal NLR function further highlights the general importance of amyloid and prion-like signaling in immunity-related cell fate pathways. PMID:25671553

  8. A Single Base Pair Mutation Encoding a Premature Stop Codon in the MIS type II receptor is Responsible for Canine Persistent Müllerian Duct Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiufeng; Wan, Shengqin; Pujar, Shashikant; Haskins, Mark E.; Schlafer, Donald H.; Lee, Mary M.; Meyers-Wallen, Vicki N.

    2008-01-01

    Müllerian Inhibiting Substance (MIS), a secreted glycoprotein in the Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-beta) family of growth factors, mediates regression of the Müllerian ducts during embryonic sex differentiation in males. In Persistent Müllerian Duct Syndrome (PMDS), rather than undergoing involution, the Müllerian ducts persist in males, giving rise to the uterus, Fallopian tubes, and upper vagina. Genetic defects in MIS or its receptor (MISRII) have been identified in patients with PMDS. The phenotype in the canine model of PMDS derived from the miniature schnauzer breed is strikingly similar to that of human patients. In this model, PMDS is inherited as a sex-limited autosomal recessive trait. Previous studies indicated that a defect in the MIS receptor or its downstream signaling pathway was likely to be causative of the canine syndrome. In this study the canine PMDS phenotype and clinical sequelae are described in detail. Affected and unaffected members of this pedigree are genotyped, identifying a single base pair substitution in MISRII that introduces a stop codon in exon 3. The homozygous mutation terminates translation at 80 amino acids, eliminating much of the extracellular domain and the entire transmembrane and intracellular signaling domains. Findings in this model may enable insights to be garnered from correlation of detailed clinical descriptions with molecular defects, which are not otherwise possible in the human syndrome. PMID:18723470

  9. 3D pharmacophore-based virtual screening, docking and density functional theory approach towards the discovery of novel human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Dhrubajyoti; Baruah, Vishwa Jyoti; Chaliha, Amrita Kashyap; Kakoti, Bibhuti Bhushan; Sarma, Diganta; Buragohain, Alak Kumar

    2016-12-21

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is one of the four members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family and is expressed to facilitate cellular proliferation across various tissue types. Therapies targeting HER2, which is a transmembrane glycoprotein with tyrosine kinase activity, offer promising prospects especially in breast and gastric/gastroesophageal cancer patients. Persistence of both primary and acquired resistance to various routine drugs/antibodies is a disappointing outcome in the treatment of many HER2 positive cancer patients and is a challenge that requires formulation of new and improved strategies to overcome the same. Identification of novel HER2 inhibitors with improved therapeutics index was performed with a highly correlating (r=0.975) ligand-based pharmacophore model (Hypo1) in this study. Hypo1 was generated from a training set of 22 compounds with HER2 inhibitory activity and this well-validated hypothesis was subsequently used as a 3D query to screen compounds in a total of four databases of which two were natural product databases. Further, these compounds were analyzed for compliance with Veber's drug-likeness rule and optimum ADMET parameters. The selected compounds were then subjected to molecular docking and Density Functional Theory (DFT) analysis to discern their molecular interactions at the active site of HER2. The findings thus presented would be an important starting point towards the development of novel HER2 inhibitors using well-validated computational techniques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Family-based association study of 5-HT(2A) receptor T102C polymorphism and suicidal behavior in Ashkenazi inpatient adolescents.

    PubMed

    Zalsman, Gil; Frisch, Amos; Baruch-Movshovits, Ruth; Sher, Leo; Michaelovsky, Elena; King, Robert A; Fischel, Tsvi; Hermesh, Haggai; Goldberg, Pablo; Gorlyn, Marianne; Misgav, Sagit; Apter, Alan; Tyano, Sam; Weizman, Abraham

    2005-01-01

    Suicidal behavior runs in families and is partially genetically determined. Since greater serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor binding has been reported in postmortem brain and platelets of suicide victims, the 5-HT(2A) receptor gene polymorphism T102C became one of the candidate sites in the study of suicide and impulsive-aggressive traits. However, studies that examined the association of this polymorphism with suicidality have contradictory results. This study used a family-based method and one homogenous ethnic group to overcome ethnic stratification in order to test this association. Thirty families of inpatient adolescents from Jewish Ashkenazi origin, with a recent suicide attempt, were genotyped. All subjects were interviewed for clinical diagnosis, depressive and impulsive-aggressive traits and demographic data. Allele frequencies were assessed using the Haplotype Relative Risk method for trios. No difference was found in allelic distribution between transmitted and non-transmitted alleles. There was no significant association of genotype with any of the clinical traits These preliminary results suggest that the 5-HT(2A) T102C polymorphism is unlikely to be associated with suicidal behavior and related traits in adolescent suicide attempters.

  11. Dietary fiber intake and risk of breast cancer defined by estrogen and progesterone receptor status: the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Narita, Saki; Inoue, Manami; Saito, Eiko; Abe, Sarah K; Sawada, Norie; Ishihara, Junko; Iwasaki, Motoki; Yamaji, Taiki; Shimazu, Taichi; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Shibuya, Kenji; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2017-06-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested a protective effect of dietary fiber intake on breast cancer risk while the results have been inconsistent. Our study aimed to investigate the association between dietary fiber intake and breast cancer risk and to explore whether this association is modified by reproductive factors and hormone receptor status of the tumor. A total of 44,444 women aged 45 to 74 years from the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study were included in analyses. Dietary intake assessment was performed using a validated 138-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for breast cancer incidence were calculated by multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models. During 624,423 person-years of follow-up period, 681 breast cancer cases were identified. After adjusting for major confounders for breast cancer risk, inverse trends were observed but statistically non-significant. Extremely high intake of fiber was associated with decreased risk of breast cancer but this should be interpreted with caution due to limited statistical power. In stratified analyses by menopausal and hormone receptor status, null associations were observed except for ER-PR- status. Our findings suggest that extreme high fiber intake may be associated with decreased risk of breast cancer but the level of dietary fiber intake among Japanese population might not be sufficient to examine the association between dietary fiber intake and breast cancer risk.

  12. Differential distribution of adenosine receptors in rat cochlea.

    PubMed

    Vlajkovic, Srdjan M; Abi, Shukri; Wang, Carol J H; Housley, Gary D; Thorne, Peter R

    2007-06-01

    Adenosine is a constitutive cell metabolite that can be released from cells via specific bi-directional transporters and is an end-point for nucleotide hydrolysis. In the extracellular space, adenosine becomes a signalling molecule for P1 (adenosine) receptors that modulate physiological responses in a wide range of mammalian tissues. Whereas adenosine signalling has been implicated in the regulation of cochlear blood flow and in cochlear protection from oxidative damage, the potential roles for adenosine signalling in the modulation of sound transduction and auditory neurotransmission have not been established. We have characterised the expression and distribution of adenosine receptors in the rat cochlea. mRNA transcripts for all four subtypes of adenosine receptors (A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3)) were detected in dissected cochlear tissue by using reverse transcription/polymerase chain reaction analysis. The protein distribution for the A(1), A(2A) and A(3) receptor subtypes was identified by immunoperoxidase histochemistry and confocal immunofluorescence labelling. These receptors were differentially expressed in the organ of Corti, spiral ganglion neurones, lateral wall tissues and cochlear blood vessels. The distribution of adenosine receptors in sensory and neural tissues and in the vasculature coincided with other elements of purinergic signalling (P2X and P2Y receptors, ectonucleotidases), consistent with the integrative regulation of many physiological processes in the cochlea by extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides. Our study provides a framework for further investigation of adenosine signalling in the inner ear, including putative roles in oxidative stress responses.

  13. Discovery of novel Tetrahydrobenzo[b]thiophene and pyrrole based scaffolds as potent and selective CB2 receptor ligands: The structural elements controlling binding affinity, selectivity and functionality.

    PubMed

    Osman, Noha A; Ligresti, Alessia; Klein, Christian D; Allarà, Marco; Rabbito, Alessandro; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Abouzid, Khaled A; Abadi, Ashraf H

    2016-10-21

    CB2-based therapeutics show strong potential in the treatment of diverse diseases such as inflammation, multiple sclerosis, pain, immune-related disorders, osteoporosis and cancer, without eliciting the typical neurobehavioral side effects of CB1 ligands. For this reason, research activities are currently directed towards the development of CB2 selective ligands. Herein, the synthesis of novel heterocyclic-based CB2 selective compounds is reported. A set of 2,5-dialkyl-1-phenyl-1H-pyrrole-3-carboxamides, 5-subtituted-2-(acylamino)/(2-sulphonylamino)-thiophene-3-carboxylates and 2-(acylamino)/(2-sulphonylamino)-tetrahydrobenzo[b]thiophene-3-carboxylates were synthesized. Biological results revealed compounds with remarkably high CB2 binding affinity and CB2/CB1 subtype selectivity. Compound 19a and 19b from the pyrrole series exhibited the highest CB2 receptor affinity (Ki = 7.59 and 6.15 nM, respectively), as well as the highest CB2/CB1 subtype selectivity (∼70 and ∼200-fold, respectively). In addition, compound 6b from the tetrahydrobenzo[b]thiophene series presented the most potent and selective CB2 ligand in this series (Ki = 2.15 nM and CB2 subtype selectivity of almost 500-fold over CB1). Compound 6b showed a full agonism, while compounds 19a and 19b acted as inverse agonists when tested in an adenylate cyclase assay. The present findings thus pave the way to the design and optimization of heterocyclic-based scaffolds with lipophilic carboxamide and/or retroamide substituent that can be exploited as potential CB2 receptor activity modulators. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Prediction of binding affinity and efficacy of thyroid hormone receptor ligands using QSAR and structure-based modeling methods

    SciTech Connect

    Politi, Regina; Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599; Rusyn, Ivan, E-mail: iir@unc.edu

    2014-10-01

    The thyroid hormone receptor (THR) is an important member of the nuclear receptor family that can be activated by endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC). Quantitative Structure–Activity Relationship (QSAR) models have been developed to facilitate the prioritization of THR-mediated EDC for the experimental validation. The largest database of binding affinities available at the time of the study for ligand binding domain (LBD) of THRβ was assembled to generate both continuous and classification QSAR models with an external accuracy of R{sup 2} = 0.55 and CCR = 0.76, respectively. In addition, for the first time a QSAR model was developed to predict bindingmore » affinities of antagonists inhibiting the interaction of coactivators with the AF-2 domain of THRβ (R{sup 2} = 0.70). Furthermore, molecular docking studies were performed for a set of THRβ ligands (57 agonists and 15 antagonists of LBD, 210 antagonists of the AF-2 domain, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using several THRβ structures retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. We found that two agonist-bound THRβ conformations could effectively discriminate their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Moreover, one of the agonist conformations could discriminate agonists from antagonists. Finally, we have conducted virtual screening of a chemical library compiled by the EPA as part of the Tox21 program to identify potential THRβ-mediated EDCs using both QSAR models and docking. We concluded that the library is unlikely to have any EDC that would bind to the THRβ. Models developed in this study can be employed either to identify environmental chemicals interacting with the THR or, conversely, to eliminate the THR-mediated mechanism of action for chemicals of concern. - Highlights: • This is the largest curated dataset for ligand binding domain (LBD) of the THRβ. • We report the first QSAR model for antagonists of AF-2 domain of THRβ. • A combination of QSAR and docking enables

  15. Characterization of VOC sources in an urban area based on PTR-MS measurements and receptor modelling.

    PubMed

    Stojić, A; Stojić, S Stanišić; Šoštarić, A; Ilić, L; Mijić, Z; Rajšić, S

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the concentrations of volatile organic compounds were measured by the use of proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, together with NO x , NO, NO2, SO2, CO and PM10 and meteorological parameters in an urban area of Belgrade during winter 2014. The multivariate receptor model US EPA Unmix was applied to the obtained dataset resolving six source profiles, which can be attributed to traffic-related emissions, gasoline evaporation/oil refineries, petrochemical industry/biogenic emissions, aged plumes, solid-fuel burning and local laboratories. Besides the vehicle exhaust, accounting for 27.6 % of the total mixing ratios, industrial emissions, which are present in three out of six resolved profiles, exert a significant impact on air quality in the urban area. The major contribution of regional and long-range transport was determined for source profiles associated with petrochemical industry/biogenic emissions (40 %) and gasoline evaporation/oil refineries (29 %) using trajectory sector analysis. The concentration-weighted trajectory model was applied with the aim of resolving the spatial distribution of potential distant sources, and the results indicated that emission sources from neighbouring countries, as well as from Slovakia, Greece, Poland and Scandinavian countries, significantly contribute to the observed concentrations.

  16. P2X7 receptor expression levels determine lethal effects of a purine based danger signal in T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Aswad, Fred; Dennert, Gunther

    2006-09-01

    Contact of T lymphocytes with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) or ATP causes cell death that requires expression of purinergic receptor P2X(7) (P2X(7)R). T cell subsets differ in their responses to NAD and ATP, which awaits a mechanistic explanation. Here, we show that sensitivity to ATP correlates with P2X(7)R expression levels in CD4 cells, CD8 cells and CD4(+)CD25(+) cells from both C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice. But P2X(7)R ligands do not only induce cell death but also shedding of CD62L. It is shown here that in CD62L(high) T cells, CD62L shedding correlates with low expression of P2X(7)Rs and lower cell death, whereas in CD62L(low) cells P2X(7)R expression and death are higher. The possibility is therefore investigated that P2X(7)Rs induce T cell activation. Experiments show that spontaneous T cell proliferation is somewhat higher in cells expressing P2X(7)Rs, but this effect we suggest is caused by P2X(7)R expression on accessory cells.

  17. High affinity receptor labeling based on basic leucine zipper domain peptides conjugated with pH-sensitive fluorescent dye: Visualization of AMPA-type glutamate receptor endocytosis in living neurons.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ayako; Asanuma, Daisuke; Kamiya, Mako; Urano, Yasuteru; Okabe, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Techniques to visualize receptor trafficking in living neurons are important, but currently available methods are limited in their labeling efficiency, specificity and reliability. Here we report a method for receptor labeling with a basic leucine zipper domain peptide (ZIP) and a binding cassette specific to ZIP. Receptors are tagged with a ZIP-binding cassette at their extracellular domain. Tagged receptors expressed in cultured cells were labeled with exogenously applied fluorescently labeled ZIP with low background and high affinity. To test if ZIP labeling is useful in monitoring endocytosis and intracellular trafficking, we next conjugated ZIP with a pH-sensitive dye RhP-M (ZIP-RhP-M). ZIP binding to its binding cassette was pH-resistant and RhP-M fluorescence dramatically increased in acidic environment. Thus AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) labeled by ZIP-RhP-M can report receptor endocytosis and subsequent intracellular trafficking. Application of ZIP-RhP-M to cultured hippocampal neurons expressing AMPARs tagged with a ZIP-binding cassette resulted in appearance of fluorescent puncta in PSD-95-positive large spines, suggesting local endocytosis and acidification of AMPARs in individual mature spines. This spine pool of AMPARs in acidic environment was distinct from the early endosomes labeled by transferrin uptake. These results suggest that receptor labeling by ZIP-RhP-M is a useful technique for monitoring endocytosis and intracellular trafficking. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Synaptopathy--from Biology to Therapy'. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Spatial and temporal dynamics of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts, integrins, and actin cytoskeleton as probed with fluorescence-based imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Syed, Aleem

    Systematic spatial and temporal fluctuations are a fundamental part of any biological process. For example, lateral diffusion of membrane proteins is one of the key mechanisms in their cellular function. Lateral diffusion governs how membrane proteins interact with intracellular, transmembrane, and extracellular components to achieve their function. Herein, fluorescence-based techniques are used to elucidate the dynamics of receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) and integrin membrane proteins. RAGE is a transmembrane protein that is being used as a biomarker for various diseases. RAGE dependent signaling in numerous pathological conditions is well studied. However, RAGE lateral diffusion in the cell membranemore » is poorly understood. For this purpose, effect of cholesterol, cytoskeleton dynamics, and presence of ligand on RAGE lateral diffusion is investigated.« less

  19. [18F]FE@SNAP—A new PET tracer for the melanin concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHR1): Microfluidic and vessel-based approaches

    PubMed Central

    Philippe, Cécile; Ungersboeck, Johanna; Schirmer, Eva; Zdravkovic, Milica; Nics, Lukas; Zeilinger, Markus; Shanab, Karem; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Karanikas, Georgios; Spreitzer, Helmut; Viernstein, Helmut; Mitterhauser, Markus; Wadsak, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the expression of the melanin concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCHR1) are involved in a variety of pathologies, especially obesity and anxiety disorders. To monitor these pathologies in-vivo positron emission tomography (PET) is a suitable method. After the successful radiosynthesis of [11C]SNAP-7941—the first PET-Tracer for the MCHR1, we aimed to synthesize its [18F]fluoroethylated analogue: [18F]FE@SNAP. Therefore, microfluidic and vessel-based approaches were tested. [18F]fluoroethylation was conducted via various [18F]fluoroalkylated synthons and direct [18F]fluorination. Only the direct [18F]fluorination of a tosylated precursor using a flow-through microreactor was successful, affording [18F]FE@SNAP in 44.3 ± 2.6%. PMID:22921745

  20. Structure- and reactivity-based development of covalent inhibitors of the activating and gatekeeper mutant forms of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR).

    PubMed

    Ward, Richard A; Anderton, Mark J; Ashton, Susan; Bethel, Paul A; Box, Matthew; Butterworth, Sam; Colclough, Nicola; Chorley, Christopher G; Chuaqui, Claudio; Cross, Darren A E; Dakin, Les A; Debreczeni, Judit É; Eberlein, Cath; Finlay, M Raymond V; Hill, George B; Grist, Matthew; Klinowska, Teresa C M; Lane, Clare; Martin, Scott; Orme, Jonathon P; Smith, Peter; Wang, Fengjiang; Waring, Michael J

    2013-09-12

    A novel series of small-molecule inhibitors has been developed to target the double mutant form of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase, which is resistant to treatment with gefitinib and erlotinib. Our reported compounds also show selectivity over wild-type EGFR. Guided by molecular modeling, this series was evolved to target a cysteine residue in the ATP binding site via covalent bond formation and demonstrates high levels of activity in cellular models of the double mutant form of EGFR. In addition, these compounds show significant activity against the activating mutations, which gefitinib and erlotinib target and inhibition of which gives rise to their observed clinical efficacy. A glutathione (GSH)-based assay was used to measure thiol reactivity toward the electrophilic functionality of the inhibitor series, enabling both the identification of a suitable reactivity window for their potency and the development of a reactivity quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) to support design.

  1. Immunization of knock-out α/β interferon receptor mice against high lethal dose of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus with a cell culture based vaccine.

    PubMed

    Canakoglu, Nurettin; Berber, Engin; Tonbak, Sukru; Ertek, Mustafa; Sozdutmaz, Ibrahim; Aktas, Munir; Kalkan, Ahmet; Ozdarendeli, Aykut

    2015-03-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is an acute tick-borne zoonotic disease. The disease has been reported in many countries of Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and in Eurasia. During the past decade, new foci of CCHF have emerged in the Balkan Peninsula, southwest Russia, the Middle East, western China, India, Africa, and Turkey. CCHF virus produces severe hemorrhagic manifestations in humans with fatality rates up to 30%. Vaccine development efforts have been significantly hampered by a lack of animal models and therefore, no protective vaccine has been achieved. Lately, IFN α/β receptor deficient (IFNAR-/-) mice have been established as a novel small animal model of CCHF virus infection. In the present study, we found that IFNAR-/- mice highly susceptible to CCHF virus Turkey-Kelkit06 strain. Immunization with the cell culture based vaccine elicited a significant level of protection against high dose challenge (1,000 PPFU) with a homologous CCHF virus in IFNAR-/- mice.

  2. Use of histamine H2 receptor antagonists and outcomes in patients with heart failure: a nationwide population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Adelborg, Kasper; Sundbøll, Jens; Schmidt, Morten; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Weiss, Noel S; Pedersen, Lars; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2018-01-01

    Histamine H 2 receptor activation promotes cardiac fibrosis and apoptosis in mice. However, the potential effectiveness of histamine H 2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) in humans with heart failure is largely unknown. We examined the association between H2RA initiation and all-cause mortality among patients with heart failure. Using Danish medical registries, we conducted a nationwide population-based active-comparator cohort study of new users of H2RAs and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) after first-time hospitalization for heart failure during the period 1995-2014. Hazard ratios (HRs) for all-cause mortality and hospitalization due to worsening of heart failure, adjusting for age, sex, and time between heart failure diagnosis and initiation of PPI or H2RA therapy, index year, comorbidity, cardiac surgery, comedications, and socioeconomic status were computed based on Cox regression analysis. Our analysis included 42,902 PPI initiators (median age 78 years, 46% female) and 3,296 H2RA initiators (median age 76 years, 48% female). Mortality risk was lower among H2RA initiators than PPI initiators after 1 year (26% vs 31%) and 5 years (60% vs 66%). In multivariable analyses, the 1-year HR was 0.80 (95% CI, 0.74-0.86) and the 5-year HR was 0.85 (95% CI, 0.80-0.89). These findings were consistent after propensity score matching and for ischemic and nonischemic heart failure, as for sex and age groups. The rate of hospitalization due to worsening of heart failure was lower among H2RA initiators than PPI initiators. In patients with heart failure, H2RA initiation was associated with 15%-20% lower mortality than PPI initiation.

  3. Cannabinoid CB1 /CB2 receptor agonists attenuate hyperactivity and body weight loss in a rat model of activity-based anorexia.

    PubMed

    Scherma, Maria; Satta, Valentina; Collu, Roberto; Boi, Maria Francesca; Usai, Paolo; Fratta, Walter; Fadda, Paola

    2017-08-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious psychiatric condition characterized by excessive body weight loss and disturbed perceptions of body shape and size, often associated with excessive physical activity. There is currently no effective drug-related therapy of this disease and this leads to high relapse rate. Clinical data suggest that a promising therapy to treat and reduce reoccurrence of AN may be based on the use of drugs that target the endocannabinoid (EC) system, which appears dysregulated in AN patients. The activity-based anorexia (ABA) rodent model mimics the severe body weight loss and increased physical activity, as well as the neuroendocrine disturbances (i.e. hypoleptinaemia and hypercortisolaemia) in AN. This study investigated whether cannabinoid agonists can effectively modify anorexic-like behaviours and neuroendocrine changes in rats subjected to a repeated ABA regime that mimics the human condition in which patients repeatedly undergo a recovery and illness cycle. Our data show that subchronic treatment with both the natural CB 1 /CB 2 receptor agonist Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol and the synthetic CB 1 /CB 2 receptor agonist CP-55,940 significantly reduced body weight loss and running wheel activity in ABA rats. These behavioural effects were accompanied by an increase in leptin signalling and a decrease in plasma levels of corticosterone. Taken together, our results further demonstrate the involvement of the EC system in AN pathophysiology and that strategies which modulate EC signalling are useful to treat this disorder, specifically in patients where physical hyperactivity plays a central role in its progression and maintenance. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  4. A capture method based on the VC1 domain reveals new binding properties of the human receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE).

    PubMed

    Degani, Genny; Altomare, Alessandra A; Colzani, Mara; Martino, Caterina; Mazzolari, Angelica; Fritz, Guenter; Vistoli, Giulio; Popolo, Laura; Aldini, Giancarlo

    2017-04-01

    The Advanced Glycation and Lipoxidation End products (AGEs and ALEs) are a heterogeneous class of compounds derived from the non-enzymatic glycation or protein adduction by lipoxidation break-down products. The receptor for AGEs (RAGE) is involved in the progression of chronic diseases based on persistent inflammatory state and oxidative stress. RAGE is a pattern recognition receptor (PRR) and the inhibition of the interaction with its ligands or of the ligand accumulation have a potential therapeutic effect. The N-terminal domain of RAGE, the V domain, is the major site of AGEs binding and is stabilized by the adjacent C1 domain. In this study, we set up an affinity assay relying on the extremely specific biological interaction AGEs ligands have for the VC1 domain. A glycosylated form of VC1, produced in the yeast Pichia pastoris, was attached to magnetic beads and used as insoluble affinity matrix (VC1-resin). The VC1 interaction assay was employed to isolate specific VC1 binding partners from in vitro generated AGE-albumins and modifications were identified/localized by mass spectrometry analysis. Interestingly, this method also led to the isolation of ALEs produced by malondialdehyde treatment of albumins. Computational studies provided a rational-based interpretation of the contacts established by specific modified residues and amino acids of the V domain. The validation of VC1-resin in capturing AGE-albumins from complex biological mixtures such as plasma and milk, may lead to the identification of new RAGE ligands potentially involved in pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic responses, independently of their structures or physical properties, and without the use of any covalent derivatization process. In addition, the method can be applied to the identification of antagonists of RAGE-ligand interaction. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A2BR adenosine receptor modulates sweet taste in circumvallate taste buds.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Shinji; Baquero, Arian; Yang, Dan; Shultz, Nicole; Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Ravid, Katya; Kinnamon, Sue C; Finger, Thomas E

    2012-01-01

    In response to taste stimulation, taste buds release ATP, which activates ionotropic ATP receptors (P2X2/P2X3) on taste nerves as well as metabotropic (P2Y) purinergic receptors on taste bud cells. The action of the extracellular ATP is terminated by ectonucleotidases, ultimately generating adenosine, which itself can activate one or more G-protein coupled adenosine receptors: A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. Here we investigated the expression of adenosine receptors in mouse taste buds at both the nucleotide and protein expression levels. Of the adenosine receptors, only A2B receptor (A2BR) is expressed specifically in taste epithelia. Further, A2BR is expressed abundantly only in a subset of taste bud cells of posterior (circumvallate, foliate), but not anterior (fungiform, palate) taste fields in mice. Analysis of double-labeled tissue indicates that A2BR occurs on Type II taste bud cells that also express Gα14, which is present only in sweet-sensitive taste cells of the foliate and circumvallate papillae. Glossopharyngeal nerve recordings from A2BR knockout mice show significantly reduced responses to both sucrose and synthetic sweeteners, but normal responses to tastants representing other qualities. Thus, our study identified a novel regulator of sweet taste, the A2BR, which functions to potentiate sweet responses in posterior lingual taste fields.

  6. A2BR Adenosine Receptor Modulates Sweet Taste in Circumvallate Taste Buds

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dan; Shultz, Nicole; Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Ravid, Katya; Kinnamon, Sue C.; Finger, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    In response to taste stimulation, taste buds release ATP, which activates ionotropic ATP receptors (P2X2/P2X3) on taste nerves as well as metabotropic (P2Y) purinergic receptors on taste bud cells. The action of the extracellular ATP is terminated by ectonucleotidases, ultimately generating adenosine, which itself can activate one or more G-protein coupled adenosine receptors: A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. Here we investigated the expression of adenosine receptors in mouse taste buds at both the nucleotide and protein expression levels. Of the adenosine receptors, only A2B receptor (A2BR) is expressed specifically in taste epithelia. Further, A2BR is expressed abundantly only in a subset of taste bud cells of posterior (circumvallate, foliate), but not anterior (fungiform, palate) taste fields in mice. Analysis of double-labeled tissue indicates that A2BR occurs on Type II taste bud cells that also express Gα14, which is present only in sweet-sensitive taste cells of the foliate and circumvallate papillae. Glossopharyngeal nerve recordings from A2BR knockout mice show significantly reduced responses to both sucrose and synthetic sweeteners, but normal responses to tastants representing other qualities. Thus, our study identified a novel regulator of sweet taste, the A2BR, which functions to potentiate sweet responses in posterior lingual taste fields. PMID:22253866

  7. Role of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors in Action-Based Predictive Coding Deficits in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kort, Naomi S; Ford, Judith M; Roach, Brian J; Gunduz-Bruce, Handan; Krystal, John H; Jaeger, Judith; Reinhart, Robert M G; Mathalon, Daniel H

    2017-03-15

    Recent theoretical models of schizophrenia posit that dysfunction of the neural mechanisms subserving predictive coding contributes to symptoms and cognitive deficits, and this dysfunction is further posited to result from N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor (NMDAR) hypofunction. Previously, by examining auditory cortical responses to self-generated speech sounds, we demonstrated that predictive coding during vocalization is disrupted in schizophrenia. To test the hypothesized contribution of NMDAR hypofunction to this disruption, we examined the effects of the NMDAR antagonist, ketamine, on predictive coding during vocalization in healthy volunteers and compared them with the effects of schizophrenia. In two separate studies, the N1 component of the event-related potential elicited by speech sounds during vocalization (talk) and passive playback (listen) were compared to assess the degree of N1 suppression during vocalization, a putative measure of auditory predictive coding. In the crossover study, 31 healthy volunteers completed two randomly ordered test days, a saline day and a ketamine day. Event-related potentials during the talk/listen task were obtained before infusion and during infusion on both days, and N1 amplitudes were compared across days. In the case-control study, N1 amplitudes from 34 schizophrenia patients and 33 healthy control volunteers were compared. N1 suppression to self-produced vocalizations was significantly and similarly diminished by ketamine (Cohen's d = 1.14) and schizophrenia (Cohen's d = .85). Disruption of NMDARs causes dysfunction in predictive coding during vocalization in a manner similar to the dysfunction observed in schizophrenia patients, consistent with the theorized contribution of NMDAR hypofunction to predictive coding deficits in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Editor's Highlight: Structure-Based Investigation on the Binding and Activation of Typical Pesticides With Thyroid Receptor.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Dandan; Han, Jian; Yao, Tingting; Wang, Qiangwei; Zhou, Bingsheng; Mohamed, Abou Donia; Zhu, Guonian

    2017-12-01

    A broad range of pesticides have been reported to interfere with the normal function of the thyroid endocrine system. However, the precise mechanism(s) of action has not yet been thoroughly elucidated. In this study, 21 pesticides were assessed for their binding interactions and the potential to disrupt thyroid homeostasis. In the GH3 luciferase reporter gene assays, 5 of the pesticides tested had agonistic effects in the order of procymidone > imidacloprid > mancozeb > fluroxypyr > atrazine. 11 pesticides inhibited luciferase activity of T3 to varying degrees, demonstrating their antagonistic activity. And there are 4 pesticides showed mixed effects when treated with different concentrations. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor technique was used to directly measure the binding interactions of these pesticides to the human thyroid hormone receptor (hTR). 13 pesticides were observed to bind directly with TR, with a KD ranging from 4.80E-08 M to 9.44E-07 M. The association and disassociation of the hTR/pesticide complex revealed 2 distinctive binding modes between the agonists and antagonists. At the same time, a different binding mode was displayed by the pesticides showed mix agonist and antagonist activity. In addition, the molecular docking simulation analyses indicated that the interaction energy calculated by CDOCKER for the agonists and antagonists correlated well with the KD values measured by the surface plasmon resonance assay. These results help to explain the differences of the TR activities of these tested pesticides. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified natural killer cell-based immunotherapy and immunological synapse formation in cancer and HIV.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongfang; Tian, Shuo; Zhang, Kai; Xiong, Wei; Lubaki, Ndongala Michel; Chen, Zhiying; Han, Weidong

    2017-12-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and natural killer (NK) cells contribute to the body's immune defenses. Current chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cell immunotherapy shows strong promise for treating various cancers and infectious diseases. Although CAR-modified NK cell immunotherapy is rapidly gaining attention, its clinical applications are mainly focused on preclinical investigations using the NK92 cell line. Despite recent advances in CAR-modified T cell immunotherapy, cost and severe toxicity have hindered its widespread use. To alleviate these disadvantages of CAR-modified T cell immunotherapy, additional cytotoxic cell-mediated immunotherapies are urgently needed. The unique biology of NK cells allows them to serve as a safe, effective, alternative immunotherapeutic strategy to CAR-modified T cells in the clinic. While the fundamental mechanisms underlying the cytotoxicity and side effects of CAR-modified T and NK cell immunotherapies remain poorly understood, the formation of the immunological synapse (IS) between CAR-modified T or NK cells and their susceptible target cells is known to be essential. The role of the IS in CAR T and NK cell immunotherapies will allow scientists to harness the power of CAR-modified T and NK cells to treat cancer and infectious diseases. In this review, we highlight the potential applications of CAR-modified NK cells to treat cancer and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and discuss the challenges and possible future directions of CAR-modified NK cell immunotherapy, as well as the importance of understanding the molecular mechanisms of CAR-modified T cell- or NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity and side effects, with a focus on the CAR-modified NK cell IS.

  10. Studies on molecular properties prediction and histamine H3 receptor affinities of novel ligands with uracil-based motifs.

    PubMed

    Lipani, Luca; Odadzic, Dalibor; Weizel, Lilia; Schwed, Johannes-Stephan; Sadek, Bassem; Stark, Holger

    2014-10-30

    The histamine H3 receptor (H3R) plays a role in cognitive and memory processes and is involved in different neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and narcolepsy. Therefore, several hH3R antagonists/inverse agonists entered clinical phases for a broad spectrum of mainly centrally occurring diseases. However, many other promising candidates failed due to their pharmacokinetic profile, mostly because of their strong lipophilicity accompanied with low solubility. Analysis of previous potential H3R selective antagonists/inverse agonists, e.g. pitolisant, revealed promising results concerning physicochemical properties and drug-likeness. Herein, a series of new hH3R ligands 8-20 consisting of piperidin-1-yl or piperidin-1-yl-propoxyphenyl coupled to different uracil, thymine, and 5,6-dimethyluracil related moieties, were synthesized, evaluated on their binding properties at the hH3R and the estimation of different physicochemical and drug-likeness properties. Due to the coupling to various positions at pyrimidine-2,4-(1H,3H)-dione, affinity at hH3Rs and drug-likeness parameters have been improved. For instance, compound 9 showed in addition to high affinity at the hH3R (pKi (hH3R) = 8.14) clog S, clog P, LE, LipE, and drug-likeness score values of -4.36, 3.47, 0.34, 4.63, and 1.54, respectively. Also, the methyl substituted analog 17 (pKi (hH3R) = 8.15) revealed LE, LipE and drug-likeness score values of -3.29, 2.47, 0.49, 5.52, and 1.76, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Therapeutically targeting glypican-2 via single-domain antibody-based chimeric antigen receptors and immunotoxins in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Fu, Haiying; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2017-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer that is fatal in almost half of patients despite intense multimodality treatment. This cancer is derived from neuroendocrine tissue located in the sympathetic nervous system. Glypican-2 (GPC2) is a cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan that is important for neuronal cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth. In this study, we find that GPC2 protein is highly expressed in about half of neuroblastoma cases and that high GPC2 expression correlates with poor overall survival compared with patients with low GPC2 expression. We demonstrate that silencing of GPC2 by CRISPR-Cas9 or siRNA results in the inhibition of neuroblastoma tumor cell growth. GPC2 silencing inactivates Wnt/β-catenin signaling and reduces the expression of the target gene N-Myc, an oncogenic driver of neuroblastoma tumorigenesis. We have isolated human single-domain antibodies specific for GPC2 by phage display technology and found that the single-domain antibodies can inhibit active β-catenin signaling by disrupting the interaction of GPC2 and Wnt3a. To explore GPC2 as a potential target in neuroblastoma, we have developed two forms of antibody therapeutics, immunotoxins and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells. Immunotoxin treatment was demonstrated to inhibit neuroblastoma growth in mice. CAR T cells targeting GPC2 eliminated tumors in a disseminated neuroblastoma mouse model where tumor metastasis had spread to multiple clinically relevant sites, including spine, skull, legs, and pelvis. This study suggests GPC2 as a promising therapeutic target in neuroblastoma. PMID:28739923

  12. Therapeutically targeting glypican-2 via single-domain antibody-based chimeric antigen receptors and immunotoxins in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Fu, Haiying; Hewitt, Stephen M; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Ho, Mitchell

    2017-08-08

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer that is fatal in almost half of patients despite intense multimodality treatment. This cancer is derived from neuroendocrine tissue located in the sympathetic nervous system. Glypican-2 (GPC2) is a cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan that is important for neuronal cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth. In this study, we find that GPC2 protein is highly expressed in about half of neuroblastoma cases and that high GPC2 expression correlates with poor overall survival compared with patients with low GPC2 expression. We demonstrate that silencing of GPC2 by CRISPR-Cas9 or siRNA results in the inhibition of neuroblastoma tumor cell growth. GPC2 silencing inactivates Wnt/β-catenin signaling and reduces the expression of the target gene N-Myc, an oncogenic driver of neuroblastoma tumorigenesis. We have isolated human single-domain antibodies specific for GPC2 by phage display technology and found that the single-domain antibodies can inhibit active β-catenin signaling by disrupting the interaction of GPC2 and Wnt3a. To explore GPC2 as a potential target in neuroblastoma, we have developed two forms of antibody therapeutics, immunotoxins and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells. Immunotoxin treatment was demonstrated to inhibit neuroblastoma growth in mice. CAR T cells targeting GPC2 eliminated tumors in a disseminated neuroblastoma mouse model where tumor metastasis had spread to multiple clinically relevant sites, including spine, skull, legs, and pelvis. This study suggests GPC2 as a promising therapeutic target in neuroblastoma.

  13. Proton pump inhibitor and histamine-2 receptor antagonist use and risk of liver cancer in two population-based studies.

    PubMed

    Tran, K T; McMenamin, Ú C; Hicks, B; Murchie, P; Thrift, A P; Coleman, H G; Iversen, L; Johnston, B T; Lee, A J; Cardwell, C R

    2018-05-09

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and histamine-2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) are commonly used. PPIs have been shown to promote liver cancer in rats; however, only one study has examined the association in humans. To investigate PPIs and H2RAs and risk of primary liver cancer in two large independent study populations. We conducted a nested case-control study within the Primary Care Clinical Informatics Unit (PCCIU) database in which up to five controls were matched to cases with primary liver cancer, recorded by General Practitioners. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for associations with prescribed PPIs and H2RAs were calculated using conditional logistic regression. We also conducted a prospective cohort study within the UK Biobank using self-reported medication use and cancer-registry recorded primary liver cancer. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs were calculated using Cox regression. In the PCCIU case-control analysis, 434 liver cancer cases were matched to 2103 controls. In the UK Biobank cohort, 182 of 475 768 participants developed liver cancer. In both, ever use of PPIs was associated with increased liver cancer risk (adjusted OR 1.80, 95% CI 1.34, 2.41 and adjusted HR 1.99, 95% CI 1.34, 2.94 respectively). There was little evidence of association with H2RA use (adjusted OR 1.21, 95% CI 0.84, 1.76 and adjusted HR 1.70, 95% CI 0.82, 3.53 respectively). We found some evidence that PPI use was associated with liver cancer. Whether this association is causal or reflects residual confounding or reverse causation requires additional research. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Characterization of 4-Nitrophenylpropyl-N-alkylamine Interactions with Sigma Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Uyen B.; Hajipour, Abdol R.; Ramachandran, Subramaniam; Ruoho, Arnold E.

    2011-01-01

    Sigma receptors are small membrane proteins implicated in a number of pathophysiological conditions including drug addiction, psychosis and cancer; thus, small molecule inhibitors of sigma receptors have been proposed as potential pharmacotherapeutics for these diseases. We previously discovered that endogenous monochain N-alkyl sphingolipids including D-erythro-sphingosine, sphinganine, and N,N-dimethyl sphingosine bind to the sigma-1 receptor at physiologically relevant concentrations [Ramachandran et al. 2009 Eur J Pharmacol. 609(1–3):19–26]. Here, we investigated several N-alkylamines of varying chain lengths as sigma receptor ligands. Although the KI values for N-alkylamines were found to be in the micromolar range, when N-3-phenylpropyl and N-3-(4-nitrophenyl)propyl derivatives of butyl- (1a and 1b), heptyl- (2a and 2b), dodecyl- (3a and 3b), and octadecyl-amine (4a and 4b) were evaluated as sigma receptor ligands we found that these compounds exhibited nanomolar affinities with both sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptors. A screen of the high affinity ligands 2a, 2b, 3a and 3b against a variety of other receptors/transporters confirmed these four compounds to be highly selective mixed sigma-1 and sigma-2 ligands. Additionally, in HEK293 cells reconstituted with Kv1.4 potassium channel and the sigma-1 receptor, these derivatives were able to inhibit the outward current from the channel – consistent with sigma receptor modulation. Finally, cytotoxicity assays showed that 2a, 2b, 3a and 3b were highly potent against a number of cancer cell lines, demonstrating their potential utility as mixed sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptor anti-cancer agents. PMID:21790129

  15. On the role of subtype selective adenosine receptor agonists during proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human primary bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Costa, M Adelina; Barbosa, A; Neto, E; Sá-e-Sousa, A; Freitas, R; Neves, J M; Magalhães-Cardoso, T; Ferreirinha, F; Correia-de-Sá, P

    2011-05-01

    Purines are important modulators of bone cell biology. ATP is metabolized into adenosine by human primary osteoblast cells (HPOC); due to very low activity of adenosine deaminase, the nucleoside is the end product of the ecto-nucleotidase cascade. We, therefore, investigated the expression and function of adenosine receptor subtypes (A(1) , A(2A) , A(2B) , and A(3) ) during proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of HPOC. Adenosine A(1) (CPA), A(2A) (CGS21680C), A(2B) (NECA), and A(3) (2-Cl-IB-MECA) receptor agonists concentration-dependently increased HPOC proliferation. Agonist-induced HPOC proliferation was prevented by their selective antagonists, DPCPX, SCH442416, PSB603, and MRS1191. CPA and NECA facilitated osteogenic differentiation measured by increases in alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. This contrasts with the effect of CGS21680C which delayed HPOC differentiation; 2-Cl-IB-MECA was devoid of effect. Blockade of the A(2B) receptor with PSB603 prevented osteogenic differentiation by NECA. In the presence of the A(1) antagonist, DPCPX, CPA reduced ALP activity at 21 and 28 days in culture. At the same time points, blockade of A(2A) receptors with SCH442416 transformed the inhibitory effect of CGS21680C into facilitation. Inhibition of adenosine uptake with dipyridamole caused a net increase in osteogenic differentiation. The presence of all subtypes of adenosine receptors on HPOC was confirmed by immunocytochemistry. Data show that adenosine is an important regulator of osteogenic cell differentiation through the activation of subtype-specific receptors. The most abundant A(2B) receptor seems to have a consistent role in cell differentiation, which may be balanced through the relative strengths of A(1) or A(2A) receptors determining whether osteoblasts are driven into proliferation or differentiation. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. The Use of Benzodiazepine Receptor Agonists and Risk of Respiratory Failure in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Nationwide Population-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Su-Jung; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Chao, Tze-Fan; Liu, Chia-Jen; Wang, Kang-Ling; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chou, Pesus; Wang, Fu-Der

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Insomnia is prevalent in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and benzodiazepine receptor agonists (BZRAs) are the most commonly used drugs despite their adverse effects on respiratory function. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of BZRAs was associated with an increased risk of respiratory failure (RF) in COPD patients. Design: Matched case-control study. Setting: National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) in Taiwan. Participants: The case group consisted of 2,434 COPD patients with RF, and the control group consisted of 2,434 COPD patients without RF, matched for age, sex, and date of enrollment. Measurements and Results: Exposure to BZRAs during the 180-day period preceding the index date was analyzed and compared in the case and control groups. Conditional logistic regression was performed, and the use of BZRAs was associated with an increased risk of RF (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.56, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.14–2.13). In subgroup analysis, we found that the benzodiazepine (BZD) users had a higher risk of RF (aOR 1.58, 95% CI 1.14–2.20), whereas the risk in non-benzodiazepine (non-BZD) users was insignificant (aOR 0.85, 95% CI 0.51–1.44). A greater than 2-fold increase in risk was found in those who received two or more kinds of BZRAs and those using a combination of BZD and non-BZD medications. Conclusions: The use of benzodiazepine receptor agonists was a significant risk factor for respiratory failure in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Compared to benzodiazepine, the prescription of non-benzodiazepine may be safer for the management of insomnia in COPD patients. Citation: Chen SJ, Yeh CM, Chao TF, Liu CJ, Wang KL, Chen TJ, Chou P, Wang FD. The use of benzodiazepine receptor agonists and risk of respiratory failure in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a nationwide population-based case-control study. SLEEP 2015;38(7):1045–1050

  17. Retrovirus-Based Virus-Like Particle Immunogenicity and Its Modulation by Toll-Like Receptor Activation.

    PubMed

    Pitoiset, Fabien; Vazquez, Thomas; Levacher, Beatrice; Nehar-Belaid, Djamel; Dérian, Nicolas; Vigneron, James; Klatzmann, David; Bellier, Bertrand

    2017-11-01

    Retrovirus-derived virus-like particles (VLPs) are particularly interesting vaccine platforms, as they trigger efficient humoral and cellular immune responses and can be used to display heterologous antigens. In this study, we characterized the intrinsic immunogenicity of VLPs and investigated their possible adjuvantization by incorporation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands. We designed a noncoding single-stranded RNA (ncRNA) that could be encapsidated by VLPs and induce TLR7/8 signaling. We found that VLPs efficiently induce in vitro dendritic cell activation, which can be improved by ncRNA encapsidation ( ncRNA VLPs). Transcriptome studies of dendritic cells harvested from the spleens of immunized mice identified antigen presentation and immune activation as the main gene expression signatures induced by VLPs, while TLR signaling and Th1 signatures characterize ncRNA VLPs. In vivo and compared with standard VLPs, ncRNA VLPs promoted Th1 responses and improved CD8 + T cell proliferation in a MyD88-dependent manner. In an HIV vaccine mouse model, HIV-pseudotyped ncRNA VLPs elicited stronger antigen-specific cellular and humoral responses than VLPs. Altogether, our findings provide molecular evidence for a strong vaccine potential of retrovirus-derived VLPs that can be further improved by harnessing TLR-mediated immune activation. IMPORTANCE We previously reported that DNA vaccines encoding antigens displayed in/on retroviral VLPs are more efficient than standard DNA vaccines at inducing cellular and humoral immune responses. We aimed to decipher the mechanisms and investigated the VLPs' immunogenicity independently of DNA vaccination. We show that VLPs have the ability to activate antigen-presenting cells directly, thus confirming their intrinsic immunostimulatory properties and their potential to be used as an antigenic platform. Notably, this immunogenicity can be further improved and/or oriented by the incorporation into VLPs of ncRNA, which provides further

  18. Supraphysiologic control over HIV-1 replication mediated by CD8 T cells expressing a re-engineered CD4-based chimeric antigen receptor

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Max W.; Ellebrecht, Christoph T.; Glover, Joshua A.; Secreto, Anthony J.; Kulikovskaya, Irina; Yi, Yanjie; Wang, Jianbin; Dufendach, Keith A.; Holmes, Michael C.; Collman, Ronald G.

    2017-01-01

    HIV is adept at avoiding naturally generated T cell responses; therefore, there is a need to develop HIV-specific T cells with greater potency for use in HIV cure strategies. Starting with a CD4-based chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) that was previously used without toxicity in clinical trials, we optimized the vector backbone, promoter, HIV targeting moiety, and transmembrane and signaling domains to determine which components augmented the ability of T cells to control HIV replication. This re-engineered CAR was at least 50-fold more potent in vitro at controlling HIV replication than the original CD4 CAR, or a TCR-based approach, and substantially better than broadly neutralizing antibody-based CARs. A humanized mouse model of HIV infection demonstrated that T cells expressing optimized CARs were superior at expanding in response to antigen, protecting CD4 T cells from infection, and reducing viral loads compared to T cells expressing the original, clinical trial CAR. Moreover, in a humanized mouse model of HIV treatment, CD4 CAR T cells containing the 4-1BB costimulatory domain controlled HIV spread after ART removal better than analogous CAR T cells containing the CD28 costimulatory domain. Together, these data indicate that potent HIV-specific T cells can be generated using improved CAR design and that CAR T cells could be important components of an HIV cure strategy. PMID:29023549

  19. GalaxyGPCRloop: Template-Based and Ab Initio Structure Sampling of the Extracellular Loops of G-Protein-Coupled Receptors.

    PubMed

    Won, Jonghun; Lee, Gyu Rie; Park, Hahnbeom; Seok, Chaok

    2018-06-07

    The second extracellular loops (ECL2s) of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are often involved in GPCR functions, and their structures have important implications in drug discovery. However, structure prediction of ECL2 is difficult because of its long length and the structural diversity among different GPCRs. In this study, a new ECL2 conformational sampling method involving both template-based and ab initio sampling was developed. Inspired by the observation of similar ECL2 structures of closely related GPCRs, a template-based sampling method employing loop structure templates selected from the structure database was developed. A new metric for evaluating similarity of the target loop to templates was introduced for template selection. An ab initio loop sampling method was also developed to treat cases without highly similar templates. The ab initio method is based on the previously developed fragment assembly and loop closure method. A new sampling component that takes advantage of secondary structure prediction was added. In addition, a conserved disulfide bridge restraining ECL2 conformation was predicted and analytically incorporated into sampling, reducing the effective dimension of the conformational search space. The sampling method was combined with an existing energy function for comparison with previously reported loop structure prediction methods, and the benchmark test demonstrated outstanding performance.

  20. The LDL receptor.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Joseph L; Brown, Michael S

    2009-04-01

    In this article, the history of the LDL receptor is recounted by its codiscoverers. Their early work on the LDL receptor explained a genetic cause of heart attacks and led to new ways of thinking about cholesterol metabolism. The LDL receptor discovery also introduced three general concepts to cell biology: receptor-mediated endocytosis, receptor recycling, and feedback regulation of receptors. The latter concept provides the mechanism by which statins selectively lower plasma LDL, reducing heart attacks and prolonging life.

  1. Nuclear receptors in bile acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiangang; Chiang, John Y. L.

    2013-01-01

    Bile acids are signaling molecules that activate nuclear receptors, such as farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and vitamin D receptor, and play a critical role in the regulation of lipid, glucose, energy, and drug metabolism. These xenobiotic/endobiotic-sensing nuclear receptors regulate phase I oxidation, phase II conjugation, and phase III transport in bile acid and drug metabolism in the digestive system. Integration of bile acid metabolism with drug metabolism controls absorption, transport, and metabolism of nutrients and drugs to maintain metabolic homeostasis and also protects against liver injury, inflammation, and related metabolic diseases, such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile-acid–based drugs targeting nuclear receptors are in clinical trials for treating cholestatic liver diseases and fatty liver disease. PMID:23330546

  2. Determination of HIV-1 co-receptor usage.

    PubMed

    Cavarelli, Mariangela; Scarlatti, Gabriella

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) infects target cells through interaction with the CD4 molecule and chemokine receptors, mainly the β-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) and the α-chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4). Viral isolates can be phenotypically classified based on the co-receptor they utilize to infect target cells. In this chapter, methods to determine the co-receptor usage of HIV-1 variants are described.

  3. Plasma epidermal growth factor receptor mutation testing with a chip-based digital PCR system in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Norimitsu; Kenmotsu, Hirotsugu; Serizawa, Masakuni; Umehara, Rina; Ono, Akira; Hisamatsu, Yasushi; Wakuda, Kazushige; Omori, Shota; Nakashima, Kazuhisa; Taira, Tetsuhiko; Naito, Tateaki; Murakami, Haruyasu; Koh, Yasuhiro; Mori, Keita; Endo, Masahiro; Nakajima, Takashi; Yamada, Masanobu; Kusuhara, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Toshiaki

    2017-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation testing is a companion diagnostic to determine eligibility for treatment with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Recently, plasma-based EGFR testing by digital polymerase chain reaction (dPCR), which enables accurate quantification of target DNA, has shown promise as a minimally invasive diagnostic. Here, we aimed to evaluate the accuracy of a plasma-based EGFR mutation test developed using chip-based dPCR-based detection of 3 EGFR mutations (exon 19 deletions, L858R in exon 21, and T790M in exon 20). Forty-nine patients with NSCLC harboring EGFR-activating mutations were enrolled, and circulating free DNAs (cfDNAs) were extracted from the plasma of 21 and 28 patients before treatment and after progression following EGFR-TKI treatment, respectively. Using reference genomic DNA containing each mutation, the detection limit of each assay was determined to be 0.1%. The sensitivity and specificity of detecting exon 19 deletions and L858R mutations, calculated by comparing the mutation status in the corresponding tumors, were 70.6% and 93.3%, and 66.7% and 100%, respectively, showing similar results compared with previous studies. T790M was detected in 43% of 28 cfDNAs after progression with EGFR-TKI treatment, but in no cfDNAs before the start of the treatment. This chip-based dPCR assay can facilitate detection of EGFR mutations in cfDNA as a minimally invasive method in clinical settings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Cancer Therapeutic Based on T Cell Receptors Designed to Regiospecifically Release Interleukin-12 | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Surgery Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize a potential cancer therapeutic based on T cells genetically engineered to express the human interleukin 12 (IL-12) cytokine only in the tumor environment.

  5. A ditopic fluorescence sensor for saccharides and mercury based on a boronic-acid receptor and desulfurisation reaction.

    PubMed

    Xing, Zhitao; Wang, Hui-Chen; Cheng, Yixiang; James, Tony D; Zhu, Chengjian

    2011-11-04

    Two boron-contained fluorescent sensors, 1 and 2, based on coumarin have been prepared. The fluorescence response of the two systems was investigated with addition of saccharide and mercury ions. Sensor 2 behaves as a bifunctional fluorescent switch with chemical inputs of D-fructose and mercury ions. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Comparison of Relative Binding Affinities for Trout and Human Estrogen Receptor Based upon Different Competitive Binding Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of a predictive model based upon a single aquatic species inevitably raises the question of whether this information is valid for other species. To partially address this question, relative binding affinities (RBA) for six alkylphenols (para-substituted, n- and b...

  7. A new approach for investigating protein flexibility based on Constraint Logic Programming. The first application in the case of the estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Dal Palú, Alessandro; Spyrakis, Francesca; Cozzini, Pietro

    2012-03-01

    We describe the potential of a novel method, based on Constraint Logic Programming (CLP), developed for an exhaustive sampling of protein conformational space. The CLP framework proposed here has been tested and applied to the estrogen receptor, whose activity and function is strictly related to its intrinsic, and well known, dynamics. We have investigated in particular the flexibility of H12, focusing on the pathways followed by the helix when moving from one stable crystallographic conformation to the others. Millions of geometrically feasible conformations were generated, selected and the traces connecting the different forms were determined by using a shortest path algorithm. The preliminary analyses showed a marked agreement between the crystallographic agonist-like, antagonist-like and hypothetical apo forms, and the corresponding conformations identified by the CLP framework. These promising results, together with the short computational time required to perform the analyses, make this constraint-based approach a valuable tool for the study of protein folding prediction. The CLP framework enables one to consider various structural and energetic scenarious, without changing the core algorithm. To show the feasibility of the method, we intentionally choose a pure geometric setting, neglecting the energetic evaluation of the poses, in order to be independent from a specific force field and to provide the possibility of comparing different behaviours associated with various energy models. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Structure-based Design, Synthesis, Biochemical and Pharmacological Characterization of Novel Salvinorin A Analogues as Active State Probes of the κ-Opioid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Feng; Bikbulatov, Ruslan V.; Mocanu, Viorel; Dicheva, Nedyalka; Parker, Carol E.; Wetsel, William C.; Mosier, Philip D.; Westkaemper, Richard B.; Allen, John A.; Zjawiony, Jordan K.; Roth, Bryan L.

    2009-01-01

    Salvinorin A, the most potent naturally occurring hallucinogen, has gained increasing attention since the κ-opioid receptor (KOR) was identified as its principal molecular target by us (Roth et al, PNAS, 2002). Here we report the design, synthesis and biochemical characterization of novel, irreversible, salvinorin A-derived ligands suitable as active state probes of the KOR. Based on prior substituted cysteine accessibility and molecular modeling studies, C3157.38 was chosen as a potential anchoring point for covalent labeling of salvinorin A-derived ligands. Automated docking of a series of potential covalently-bound ligands suggested that either a haloacetate moiety or other similar electrophilic groups could irreversibly bind with C3157.38. 22-thiocyanatosalvinorin A (RB-64) and 22-chlorosalvinorin A (RB-48) were both found to be extraordinarily potent and selective KOR agonists in vitro and in vivo. As predicted based on molecular modeling studies, RB-64 induced wash-resistant inhibition of binding with a strict requirement for a free cysteine in or near the binding pocket. Mass spectrometry (MS) studies utilizing synthetic KOR peptides and RB-64 supported the hypothesis that the anchoring residue was C3157.38 and suggested one biochemical mechanism for covalent binding. These studies provide direct evidence for the presence of a free cysteine in the agonist-bound state of KOR and provide novel insights into the mechanism by which salvinorin A binds to and activates KOR. PMID:19555087

  9. T-RMSD: a fine-grained, structure-based classification method and its application to the functional characterization of TNF receptors.

    PubMed

    Magis, Cedrik; Stricher, François; van der Sloot, Almer M; Serrano, Luis; Notredame, Cedric

    2010-07-16

    This study addresses the relation between structural and functional similarity in proteins. We introduce a novel method named tree based on root mean square deviation (T-RMSD), which uses distance RMSD (dRMSD) variations to build fine-grained structure-based classifications of proteins. The main improvement of the T-RMSD over similar methods, such as Dali, is its capacity to produce the equivalent of a bootstrap value for each cluster node. We validated our approach on two domain families studied extensively for their role in many biological and pathological pathways: the small GTPase RAS superfamily and the cysteine-rich domains (CRDs) associated with the tumor necrosis factor receptors (TNFRs) family. Our analysis showed that T-RMSD is able to automatically recover and refine existing classifications. In the case of the small GTPase ARF subfamily, T-RMSD can distinguish GTP- from GDP-bound states, while in the case of CRDs it can identify two new subgroups associated with well defined functional features (ligand binding and formation of ligand pre-assembly complex). We show how hidden Markov models (HMMs) can be built on these new groups and propose a methodology to use these models simultaneously in order to do fine-grained functional genomic annotation without known 3D structures. T-RMSD, an open source freeware incorporated in the T-Coffee package, is available online. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Conformational, vibrational and DFT studies of a newly synthesized arylpiperazine-based drug and evaluation of its reactivity towards the human GABA receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onawole, A. T.; Al-Ahmadi, A. F.; Mary, Y. S.; Panicker, C. Y.; Ullah, N.; Armaković, S.; Armaković, S. J.; Van Alsenoy, C.; Al-Saadi, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    This study reports a computational assessment of important biochemical properties and vibrational assignments for the synthesized 1-(4-(3-methoxy-4-nitrophenyl)piperazin-1-yl)ethanone (MNPE). MNPE is related to the commonly used arylpiperazine-based drugs that exhibit a wide range of pharmacological activities. The characterization of MNPE is based on the readily sighted 1363 cm-1 infrared band (associated with piperazine ring stretching), 1308 cm-1 Raman line (associated with the phenyl ring breathing), 1242 cm-1 Raman line and 1092 cm-1 infrared band (both associated with Csbnd N stretching) as key modes in its vibrational spectra. First principle calculations revealed that MNPE could exist in sixteen different plausible conformations, which were used as basis to understand the possible molecular docking mechanism of the molecule as an agonist in the human GABAA receptor. The best binding scenarios showed the presence of intramolecular hydrogen bonding in MNPE and was comparable with the most stable configuration. It was further evaluated for its reactivity properties by utilizing the concepts of Average Local Ionization Energies (ALIE) and Fukui functions. The autoxidation and hydrolysis degradation likelihood of MNPE estimated from the computed bond dissociation energies and radial distribution functions predicted that MNPE is to be readily biodegradable in aqueous solutions.

  11. Multifunctional carboxymethyl cellulose-based magnetic nanovector as a theragnostic system for folate receptor targeted chemotherapy, imaging, and hyperthermia against cancer.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Balasubramanian; Aswathy, Ravindran Girija; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Suzuki, Masashi; Fukuda, Takahiro; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Sakthikumar, Dasappan Nair

    2013-03-12

    A multifunctional biocompatible nanovector based on magnetic nanoparticle and carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) was developed. The nanoparticles have been characterized using TEM, SEM, DLS, FT-IR spectra, VSM, and TGA studies. We found that the synthesized carboxymethyl cellulose magnetic nanoparticles (CMC MNPs) were spherical in shape with an average size of 150 nm having low aggregation and superparamagnetic properties. We found that the folate-tagged CMC MNPs were delivered to cancer cells by a folate-receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanism. 5-FU was encapsulated as a model drug for delivering cytotoxicity, and we could demonstrate the sustained release of 5-FU. It was also observed that the FITC-labeled CMC MNPs could effectively enter cells, and the fate of nanoparticles was tracked with Lysotracker. The CMC MNPs could induce significant cell death when an alternating magnetic field was applied. These results indicate that the multifunctional CMC MNPs possess a high drug loading efficiency and high biocompatibility and with low cell cytotoxicity and can be considered to be promising candidates for CMC-based targeted drug delivery, cellular imaging, and magnetic hyperthermia (MHT).

  12. Considerations for potency equivalent calculations in the Ah receptor-based CALUX bioassay: normalization of superinduction results for improved sample potency estimation.

    PubMed

    Baston, David S; Denison, Michael S

    2011-02-15

    The chemically activated luciferase expression (CALUX) system is a mechanistically based recombinant luciferase reporter gene cell bioassay used in combination with chemical extraction and clean-up methods for the detection and relative quantitation of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and related dioxin-like halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons in a wide variety of sample matrices. While sample extracts containing complex mixtures of chemicals can produce a variety of distinct concentration-dependent luciferase induction responses in CALUX cells, these effects are produced through a common mechanism of action (i.e. the Ah receptor (AhR)) allowing normalization of results and sample potency determination. Here we describe the diversity in CALUX response to PCDD/Fs from sediment and soil extracts and not only report the occurrence of superinduction of the CALUX bioassay, but we describe a mechanistically based approach for normalization of superinduction data that results in a more accurate estimation of the relative potency of such sample extracts. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Considerations for potency equivalent calculations in the Ah receptor-based CALUX bioassay: Normalization of superinduction results for improved sample potency estimation

    PubMed Central

    Baston, David S.; Denison, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    The chemically activated luciferase expression (CALUX) system is a mechanistically based recombinant luciferase reporter gene cell bioassay used in combination with chemical extraction and clean-up methods for the detection and relative quantitation of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and related dioxin-like halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons in a wide variety of sample matrices. While sample extracts containing complex mixtures of chemicals can produce a variety of distinct concentration-dependent luciferase induction responses in CALUX cells, these effects are produced through a common mechanism of action (i.e. the Ah receptor (AhR)) allowing normalization of results and sample potency determination. Here we describe the diversity in CALUX response to PCDD/Fs from sediment and soil extracts and not only report the occurrence of superinduction of the CALUX bioassay, but we describe a mechanistically based approach for normalization of superinduction data that results in a more accurate estimation of the relative potency of such sample extracts. PMID:21238730

  14. Ratiometric fluorescent receptors for both Zn2+ and H2PO4(-) ions based on a pyrenyl-linked triazole-modified homooxacalix[3]arene: a potential molecular traffic signal with an R-S latch logic circuit.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xin-long; Zeng, Xi; Redshaw, Carl; Yamato, Takehiko

    2011-07-15

    A ratiometric fluorescent receptor with a C(3) symmetric structure based on a pyrene-linked triazole-modified homooxacalix[3]arene (L) was synthesized and characterized. This system exhibited an interesting ratiometric detection signal output for targeting cations and anions through switching the excimer emission of pyrene from the "on-off" to the "off-on" type in neutral solution. (1)H NMR titration results suggested that the Zn(2+) center of receptor L·Zn(2+) provided an excellent pathway of organizing anion binding groups for optimal host-guest interactions. It is thus believed that this receptor has potential application in sensing, detection, and recognition of both Zn(2+) and H(2)PO(4)(-) ions with different optical signals. In addition, the fluorescence emission changes by the inputs of Zn(2+) and H(2)PO(4)(-) ions can be viewed as a combinational R-S latch logic circuit at the molecular level.

  15. Glucose-Based Peritoneal Dialysis Fluids Downregulate Toll-Like Receptors and Trigger Hyporesponsiveness to Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns in Human Peritoneal Mesothelial Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun; Yang, Xiao; Zhang, Yun-Fang; Wang, Ya-Ning; Liu, Mei; Dong, Xiu-Qing; Fan, Jin-Jin; Yu, Xue-Qing

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of glucose-based peritoneal dialysis (PD) fluids and icodextrin-based PD fluids on the expression of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)/TLR4 and subsequent ligand-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and NF-κB signaling and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) mRNA expression in human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMCs). A human peritoneal mesothelial cell line (HMrSV5) was stimulated with glucose-based and icodextrin-based peritoneal dialysis fluids. Cell viability was assessed using MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide]. TLR2/TLR4 expression was determined by real-time PCR, Western blotting, and an immunofluorescence assay. In addition, cells were pretreated with different PD solutions and then incubated with Pam3CSK4 or lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and the degrees of MAPK and NF-κB activation were reflected by detecting the phosphorylation levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38, and p65, using a Western blot method. TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA expression was measured by real-time PCR. Glucose-based peritoneal dialysis fluids suppressed the expression of TLR2 and TLR4 proteins in HPMCs. Challenge of cells with either Pam3CSK4 or LPS resulted in impaired TNF-α and IL-1β production. Moreover, reduced TLR2 and TLR4 levels in glucose-based peritoneal dialysis solution-treated mesothelial cells were accompanied by reduced p42/44 (ERK1/2), JNK, p38 MAPK, and NF-κB p65 phosphorylation upon TLR ligand engagement. No significant changes in MAPK and NF-κB signaling and TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA expression were observed in icodextrin-based PD solution-treated mesothelial cells. Glucose-based PD solution, but not icodextrin-based PD solution, downregulates expression of TLR2/TLR4 by human peritoneal mesothelial cells and triggers hyporesponsiveness to pathogen-associated molecular patterns. PMID

  16. Open challenges in structure-based virtual screening: Receptor modeling, target flexibility consideration and active site water molecules description.

    PubMed

    Spyrakis, Francesca; Cavasotto, Claudio N

    2015-10-01

    Structure-based virtual screening is currently an established tool in drug lead discovery projects. Although in the last years the field saw an impressive progress in terms of algorithm development, computational performance, and retrospective and prospective applications in ligand identification, there are still long-standing challenges where further improvement is needed. In this review, we consider the conceptual frame, state-of-the-art and recent developments of three critical "structural" issues in structure-based drug lead discovery: the use of homology modeling to accurately model the binding site when no experimental structures are available, the necessity of accounting for the dynamics of intrinsically flexible systems as proteins, and the importance of considering active site water molecules in lead identification and optimization campaigns. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Signaling Pathways of Purinergic Receptors and Their Interactions with Cholinergic and Adrenergic Pathways in the Lacrimal Gland

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Robin R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Purinergic receptors play a key role in the function of the lacrimal gland (LG) as P1 purinergic receptors A1, A2A, and A2B, P2X1–7 receptors, and many of the P2Y receptors are expressed. Methods: This review examines the current knowledge of purinergic receptors in the LG as well as the signaling pathways activated by these receptors. Results: These receptors are expressed on the acinar, ductal, and myoepithelial cells. Considerable crosstalk exists between the pathways activated by P2X7 receptors with those activated by M3 muscarinic or α1D adrenergic receptors. The mechanism of the crosstalk between P2X7 and M3 muscarinic receptors differs from that of the crosstalk between P2X7 and α1D adrenergic receptors. Conclusions: Understanding purinergic receptors and how they modulate protein secretion could play a key role in normal and pathological responses of the LG. PMID:27463365

  18. An Immunotherapeutic Approach to the Treatment and Prevention of Breast Cancer, Based on Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Variant, Type III

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-05-01

    H. (1996). Pulmonary metastases neutralization and tumor rejection by in vivo administration of B glucan and bispecific antibody. Int. J. Cancer 65...AD GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-96-1-6016 Title: An Immunotherapeutic Approach to the Treatment and Prevention of Breast Cancer , Based on Epidermal Growth...Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE May 1999 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE An Immunotherapeutic Approach to the Treatment and Prevention of Breast Cancer

  19. α1-Adrenergic receptor antagonists and gynecomastia. A case series from the Italian spontaneous reporting system and VigiBase(™).

    PubMed

    Viola, Ermelinda; Opri, Sibilla; Moretti, Ugo; Leone, Roberto; Casini, Maria Luisa; Ruggieri, Sara; Minore, Claudia; Conforti, Anita

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the cases of gynecomastia associated with α1A-adrenergic receptor antagonists (α1-ARAs) in the Italian spontaneous reporting system database (Rete Nazionale di Farmacovigilanza or RNF) and in the World Health Organization ICSRs database (VigiBase(™)), focusing on tamsulosin use. We analyzed the spontaneous reports of gynecomastia related to the use of α1-ARAs and collected from the RNF and from VigiBase(™) up to December 2012. Cases of gynecomastia have been defined as reports associated with gynecomastia according with Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA). Reporting odds ratio (ROR) and Information Component (IC) were calculated as measures of disproportionality in RNF and VigiBase(™), respectively. Up to December 2012, about 186,000 reports were recorded in the RNF. Among these, 902 reports of adverse drug reaction (ADR) have been associated with the use of at least one α1-ARAs. Of these, in 15 cases, gynecomastia was a listed ADR: in 10, the suspected drug was tamsulosin (in eight, it was the sole suspect); in two, doxazosin and alfuzosin, respectively; and in one, terazosin. ROR for tamsulosin was 5.3 (95% CI 1.8, 15.7). In VigiBase(™), 84 reports of gynecomastia indicated tamsulosin as suspected drug. Tamsulosin-associated gynecomastia showed the highest IC value within this class of drugs (IC 95% 2.43). In this study, we highlight a possible association between gynecomastia and tamsulosin use. To our knowledge, this association has not been described before and could represent a potential signal.

  20. Cannabinoid Receptor 2 Participates in Amyloid-β Processing in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease but Plays a Minor Role in the Therapeutic Properties of a Cannabis-Based Medicine.

    PubMed

    Aso, Ester; Andrés-Benito, Pol; Carmona, Margarita; Maldonado, Rafael; Ferrer, Isidre

    2016-01-01

    The endogenous cannabinoid system represents a promising therapeutic target to modify neurodegenerative pathways linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the specific contribution of CB2 receptor to the progression of AD-like pathology and its role in the positive effect of a cannabis-based medicine (1:1 combination of Δ9-tetrahidrocannabinol and cannabidiol) previously demonstrated to be beneficial in the AβPP/PS1 transgenic model of the disease. A new mouse strain was generated by crossing AβPP/PS1 transgenic mice with CB2 knockout mice. Results show that lack of CB2 exacerbates cortical Aβ deposition and increases the levels of soluble Aβ40. However, CB2 receptor deficiency does not affect the viability of AβPP/PS1 mice, does not accelerate their memory impairment, does not modify tau hyperphosphorylation in dystrophic neurites associated to Aβ plaques, and does not attenuate the positive cognitive effect induced by the cannabis-based medicine in these animals. These findings suggest a minor role for the CB2 receptor in the therapeutic effect of the cannabis-based medicine in AβPP/PS1 mice, but also constitute evidence of a link between CB2 receptor and Aβ processing.

  1. Bispecific light T-cell engagers for gene-based immunotherapy of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-positive malignancies.

    PubMed

    Mølgaard, Kasper; Harwood, Seandean L; Compte, Marta; Merino, Nekane; Bonet, Jaume; Alvarez-Cienfuegos, Ana; Mikkelsen, Kasper; Nuñez-Prado, Natalia; Alvarez-Mendez, Ana; Sanz, Laura; Blanco, Francisco J; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2018-06-04

    The recruitment of T-cells by bispecific antibodies secreted from adoptively transferred, gene-modified autologous cells has shown satisfactory results in preclinical cancer models. Even so, the approach's translation into the clinic will require incremental improvements to its efficacy and reduction of its toxicity. Here, we characterized a tandem T-cell recruiting bispecific antibody intended to benefit gene-based immunotherapy approaches, which we call the light T-cell engager (LiTE), consisting of an EGFR-specific single-domain V HH antibody fused to a CD3-specific scFv. We generated two LiTEs with the anti-EGFR V HH and the anti-CD3 scFv arranged in both possible orders. Both constructs were well expressed in mammalian cells as highly homogenous monomers in solution with molecular weights of 43 and 41 kDa, respectively. In situ secreted LiTEs bound the cognate antigens of both parental antibodies and triggered the specific cytolysis of EGFR-expressing cancer cells without inducing T-cell activation and cytotoxicity spontaneously or against EGFR-negative cells. Light T-cell engagers are, therefore, suitable for future applications in gene-based immunotherapy approaches.

  2. Molecular determinants of ligand binding modes in the histamine H(4) receptor: linking ligand-based three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) models to in silico guided receptor mutagenesis studies.

    PubMed

    Istyastono, Enade P; Nijmeijer, Saskia; Lim, Herman D; van de Stolpe, Andrea; Roumen, Luc; Kooistra, Albert J; Vischer, Henry F; de Esch, Iwan J P; Leurs, Rob; de Graaf, Chris

    2011-12-08

    The histamine H(4) receptor (H(4)R) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that plays an important role in inflammation. Similar to the homologous histamine H(3) receptor (H(3)R), two acidic residues in the H(4)R binding pocket, D(3.32) and E(5.46), act as essential hydrogen bond acceptors of positively ionizable hydrogen bond donors in H(4)R ligands. Given the symmetric distribution of these complementary pharmacophore features in H(4)R and its ligands, different alternative ligand binding mode hypotheses have been proposed. The current study focuses on the elucidation of the molecular determinants of H(4)R-ligand binding modes by combining (3D) quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR), protein homology modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, and site-directed mutagenesis studies. We have designed and synthesized a series of clobenpropit (N-(4-chlorobenzyl)-S-[3-(4(5)-imidazolyl)propyl]isothiourea) derivatives to investigate H(4)R-ligand interactions and ligand binding orientations. Interestingly, our studies indicate that clobenpropit (2) itself can bind to H(4)R in two distinct binding modes, while the addition of a cyclohexyl group to the clobenpropit isothiourea moiety allows VUF5228 (5) to adopt only one specific binding mode in the H(4)R binding pocket. Our ligand-steered, experimentally supported protein modeling method gives new insights into ligand recognition by H(4)R and can be used as a general approach to elucidate the structure of protein-ligand complexes.

  3. Circulating Angiopoietin-2 and Its Soluble Receptor Tie-2 Concentrations Are Related to Renal Function in Two Population-Based Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Hennings, Anna; Hannemann, Anke; Rettig, Rainer; Dörr, Marcus; Nauck, Matthias; Völzke, Henry; Lerch, Markus M.; Lieb, Wolfgang; Friedrich, Nele

    2016-01-01

    Background An intact angiopoietin/Tie-2 ligand receptor system is indispensable for life. High circulating angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) concentrations are strongly associated with kidney disease involving the progressive loss of glomerular filtration. The aim of our study was to investigate the associations between renal function and serum Ang-2 or serum Tie-2 concentrations in the general population. Methods Data of 3081 and 4088 subjects from two population-based studies, the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP-1) and SHIP-Trend, were used. Renal function was assessed by serum creatinine, cystatin C concentration, creatinine-based estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR(crea)], cystatin C-based eGFR [eGFR(cys)] and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (uACR). Analyses of variance and linear regression models were calculated. Results In both cohorts, strong positive associations between serum cystatin C concentrations and serum Ang-2 or Tie-2 concentrations as well as inverse associations between eGFR(cys) and serum Ang-2 or Tie-2 concentrations were found. These relations were also present in a subpopulation without hypertension or diabetes mellitus type 2. Furthermore, we detected weak U-shaped associations between serum creatinine concentrations or eGFR(crea) and serum Ang-2 concentrations. With respect to uACR a strong positive association with serum Ang-2 concentrations was revealed. Conclusion Serum Ang-2 concentrations are strongly associated with sensitive parameters of renal impairment like serum cystatin C, uACR and eGFR(cys). These findings persisted even after exclusion of subjects with hypertension or diabetes mellitus type 2, conditions that predispose to chronic renal disease and are associated with increased Ang-2 concentrations. Interestingly, we did not detect the same strong relations between serum creatinine and eGFR(crea) with serum Ang-2 concentration. Additionally, significant association of serum Tie-2 concentrations with cystatin C and e

  4. Circulating Angiopoietin-2 and Its Soluble Receptor Tie-2 Concentrations Are Related to Renal Function in Two Population-Based Cohorts.

    PubMed

    Hennings, Anna; Hannemann, Anke; Rettig, Rainer; Dörr, Marcus; Nauck, Matthias; Völzke, Henry; Lerch, Markus M; Lieb, Wolfgang; Friedrich, Nele

    2016-01-01

    An intact angiopoietin/Tie-2 ligand receptor system is indispensable for life. High circulating angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) concentrations are strongly associated with kidney disease involving the progressive loss of glomerular filtration. The aim of our study was to investigate the associations between renal function and serum Ang-2 or serum Tie-2 concentrations in the general population. Data of 3081 and 4088 subjects from two population-based studies, the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP-1) and SHIP-Trend, were used. Renal function was assessed by serum creatinine, cystatin C concentration, creatinine-based estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR(crea)], cystatin C-based eGFR [eGFR(cys)] and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (uACR). Analyses of variance and linear regression models were calculated. In both cohorts, strong positive associations between serum cystatin C concentrations and serum Ang-2 or Tie-2 concentrations as well as inverse associations between eGFR(cys) and serum Ang-2 or Tie-2 concentrations were found. These relations were also present in a subpopulation without hypertension or diabetes mellitus type 2. Furthermore, we detected weak U-shaped associations between serum creatinine concentrations or eGFR(crea) and serum Ang-2 concentrations. With respect to uACR a strong positive association with serum Ang-2 concentrations was revealed. Serum Ang-2 concentrations are strongly associated with sensitive parameters of renal impairment like serum cystatin C, uACR and eGFR(cys). These findings persisted even after exclusion of subjects with hypertension or diabetes mellitus type 2, conditions that predispose to chronic renal disease and are associated with increased Ang-2 concentrations. Interestingly, we did not detect the same strong relations between serum creatinine and eGFR(crea) with serum Ang-2 concentration. Additionally, significant association of serum Tie-2 concentrations with cystatin C and eGFR(cys) were detected.

  5. LAPTM4B gene copy number gain is associated with inferior response to anthracycline-based chemotherapy in hormone receptor negative breast carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Rusz, Orsolya; Papp, Orsolya; Vízkeleti, Laura; Molnár, Béla Ákos; Bende, Kristóf Csaba; Lotz, Gábor; Ács, Balázs; Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Székely, Tamás; Báthori, Ágnes; Szundi, Csilla; Kulka, Janina; Szállási, Zoltán; Tőkés, Anna-Mária

    2018-05-16

    To determine the associations between lysosomal-associated transmembrane protein 4b (LAPTM4B) gene copy number and response to different chemotherapy regimens in hormone receptor negative (HR-) primary breast carcinomas. Two cohorts were analyzed: (1) 69 core biopsies from HR-breast carcinomas treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (anthracycline based in 72.5% of patients and non-anthracycline based in 27.5% of patients). (2) Tissue microarray (TMA) of 74 HR-breast carcinomas treated with adjuvant therapy (77.0% of the patients received anthracycline, 17.6% of the patients non-anthracycline-based therapy, and in 5.4% of the cases, no treatment data are available). Interphase FISH technique was applied on pretreatment core biopsies (cohort I) and on TMAs (cohort II) using custom-made dual-labelled FISH probes (LAPTM4B/CEN8q FISH probe Abnova Corp.). In the neoadjuvant cohort in the anthracycline-treated group, we observed a significant difference (p = 0.029) of average LAPTM4B copy number between the non-responder and pathological complete responder groups (4.1 ± 1.1 vs. 2.6 ± 0.1). In the adjuvant setting, the anthracycline-treated group of metastatic breast carcinomas was characterized by higher LAPTM4B copy number comparing to the non-metastatic ones (p = 0.046). In contrast, in the non-anthracycline-treated group of patients, we did not find any LAPTM4B gene copy number differences between responder vs. non-responder groups or between metastatic vs. non-metastatic groups. Our results confirm the possible role of the LAPTM4B gene in anthracycline resistance in HR- breast cancer. Analyzing LAPTM4B copy number pattern may support future treatment decision.

  6. Simulating the multicellular homeostasis with a cell-based discrete receptor dynamics model: The non-mutational origin of cancer and aging.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yuting; Chen, Yu

    2016-09-07

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the multicellular homeostasis in epithelial tissues over very large timescales. Inspired by the receptor dynamics of IBCell model proposed by Rejniak et al. an on-grid agent-based model for multicellular system is constructed. Instead of observing the multicellular architectural morphologies, the diversity of homeostatic states is quantitatively analyzed through a substantial number of simulations by measuring three new order parameters, the phenotypic population structure, the average proliferation age and the relaxation time to stable homeostasis. Nearby the interfaces of distinct homeostatic phases in 3D phase diagrams of the three order parameters, intermediate quasi-stable phases of slow dynamics that features quasi-stability with a large spectrum of relaxation timescales are found. A further exploration on the static and dynamic correlations among the three order parameters reveals that the quasi-stable phases evolve towards two terminations, tumorigenesis and degeneration, which are respectively accompanied by rejuvenation and aging. With the exclusion of the environmental impact and the mutational strategies, the results imply that cancer and aging may share the non-mutational origin in the intrinsic slow dynamics of the multicellular systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Label-free sensitive luminescence biosensor for immunoglobulin G based on Ag6Au6 ethisterone cluster-estrogen receptor α aggregation and graphene.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nannan; Guo, Wenjing; Lin, Zhixiang; Wei, Qiaohua; Chen, Guonan

    2018-08-01

    A specific and label-free "on-off-on" luminescence biosensor based on a novel heterometallic cluster [Ag 6 Au 6 (ethisterone) 12 ]-estrogen receptor α (Ag 6 Au 6 Eth-ERα) aggregation utilizing graphene oxide (GO) as a quencher to lead a small background signal was firstly constructed to detect immunoglobulin G (IgG) with a simple process and high selectivity. The efficient photoluminescent (PL) Ag 6 Au 6 Eth-ERα aggregation is strongly quenched by GO. In the presence of IgG, the PL of this system will be restored, and perceivable by human eyes under UV lamp excitation (365 nm). The quenching mechanism of GO on Ag 6 Au 6 Eth-ERα and enhancement mechanism of IgG on Ag 6 Au 6 Eth-ERα-GO were investigated in detail. Under the optimum conditions, the biosensor for high sensitive IgG detection expressed a wider linear range of 0.0078-10 ng/mL and a lower detection limit of 0.65 pg/mL with good stability and repeatability, which provided a new approach for label-free IgG detection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The Gly972Arg polymorphism in insulin receptor substrate-1 is associated with decreased birth weight in a population-based sample of Brazilian newborns.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Rosângela M N; de Castro, Vagner; Sales, Teresa; Passini, Renato; Marba, Sergio T M; Saad, Sara T O; Saad, Mario J A

    2002-03-01

    We studied the association between the Gly972Arg polymorphism in insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) and birth weight in a population-based sample of Brazilian newborns. We studied 194 newborn children with adequate gestational age to identify the association between the Gly972Arg polymorphism and birth weight using PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The data showed that the birth weight was lower in the newborns with the Gly972Arg polymorphism in IRS-1 compared with control subjects (3,141 +/- 31.8 vs. 3,373 +/- 80.3 g, P < 0.008). The results also showed that the frequency of this polymorphism was increased in newborns with a birth weight <3,000 g (P=0.041). These results suggest that the genotype Gly972Arg may influence birth weight, reinforcing the hypothesis that genetically determined insulin resistance and/or reduced insulin secretion can result in impaired insulin-mediated growth in the fetus.

  9. Discovery of Selective and Noncovalent Diaminopyrimidine-Based Inhibitors of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Containing the T790M Resistance Mutation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Activating mutations within the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase domain, commonly L858R or deletions within exon 19, increase EGFR-driven cell proliferation and survival and are correlated with impressive responses to the EGFR inhibitors erlotinib and gefitinib in nonsmall cell lung cancer patients. Approximately 60% of acquired resistance to these agents is driven by a single secondary mutation within the EGFR kinase domain, specifically substitution of the gatekeeper residue threonine-790 with methionine (T790M). Due to dose-limiting toxicities associated with inhibition of wild-type EGFR (wtEGFR), we sought inhibitors of T790M-containing EGFR mutants with selectivity over wtEGFR. We describe the evolution of HTS hits derived from Jak2/Tyk2 inhibitors into selective EGFR inhibitors. X-ray crystal structures revealed two distinct binding modes and enabled the design of a selective series of novel diaminopyrimidine-based inhibitors with good potency against T790M-containing mutants of EGFR, high selectivity over wtEGFR, broad kinase selectivity, and desirable physicochemical properties. PMID:25383627

  10. Development of a 3D Tissue Culture-Based High-Content Screening Platform That Uses Phenotypic Profiling to Discriminate Selective Inhibitors of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases.

    PubMed

    Booij, Tijmen H; Klop, Maarten J D; Yan, Kuan; Szántai-Kis, Csaba; Szokol, Balint; Orfi, Laszlo; van de Water, Bob; Keri, Gyorgy; Price, Leo S

    2016-10-01

    3D tissue cultures provide a more physiologically relevant context for the screening of compounds, compared with 2D cell cultures. Cells cultured in 3D hydrogels also show complex phenotypes, increasing the scope for phenotypic profiling. Here we describe a high-content screening platform that uses invasive human prostate cancer cells cultured in 3D in standard 384-well assay plates to study the activity of potential therapeutic small molecules and antibody biologics. Image analysis tools were developed to process 3D image data to measure over 800 phenotypic parameters. Multiparametric analysis was used to evaluate the effect of compounds on tissue morphology. We applied this screening platform to measure the activity and selectivity of inhibitors of the c-Met and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinases in 3D cultured prostate carcinoma cells. c-Met and EGFR activity was quantified based on the phenotypic profiles induced by their respective ligands, hepatocyte growth factor and EGF. The screening method was applied to a novel collection of 80 putative inhibitors of c-Met and EGFR. Compounds were identified that induced phenotypic profiles indicative of selective inhibition of c-Met, EGFR, or bispecific inhibition of both targets. In conclusion, we describe a fully scalable high-content screening platform that uses phenotypic profiling to discriminate selective and nonselective (off-target) inhibitors in a physiologically relevant 3D cell culture setting. © 2016 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  11. Design of novel multifunctional targeting nano-carrier drug delivery system based on CD44 receptor and tumor microenvironment pH condition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Daquan; Lian, Shengnan; Sun, Jingfang; Liu, Zongliang; Zhao, Feng; Jiang, Yongtao; Gao, Mingming; Sun, Kaoxiang; Liu, Wanhui; Fu, Fenghua

    2016-01-01

    In this study, to develop a multifunctional targeting nano-carrier drug delivery system for cancer therapy, the novel pH-sensitive ketal based oligosaccharides of hyaluronan (oHA) conjugates were synthesized by chemical conjugation of hydrophobic menthone 1,2-glycerol ketal (MGK) to the backbone of oHA with the histidine as the linker of proton sponge effect. The multifunctional oHA conjugates, oHA-histidine-MGK (oHM) carried the pH-sensitive MGK as hydrophobic moieties and oHA as the target of CD44 receptor. The oHM could self-assemble to nano-sized spherical shape with the average diameters of 128.6 nm at pH 7.4 PBS conditions. The oHM nanoparticles (oHMN) could release encapsulated curcumin (Cur) with 82.6% at pH 5.0 compared with 49.3% at pH 7.4. The results of cytotoxicity assay indicated that encapsulated Cur in oHMN (Cur-oHMN) were stable and have less toxicity compared to Cur suspension. The anti-tumor efficacy in vivo suggested that Cur-oHMN suppressed tumor growth most efficiently. These results present the promising potential of oHMN as a stable and effective nano-sized pH-sensitive drug delivery system for cancer treatment.

  12. Yellow Fever Virus, but Not Zika Virus or Dengue Virus, Inhibits T-Cell Receptor-Mediated T-Cell Function by an RNA-Based Mechanism.

    PubMed

    McLinden, James H; Bhattarai, Nirjal; Stapleton, Jack T; Chang, Qing; Kaufman, Thomas M; Cassel, Suzanne L; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S; Haim, Hillel; Houtman, Jon C; Xiang, Jinhua

    2017-11-27

    The Flavivirus genus within the Flaviviridae family is comprised of many important human pathogens including yellow fever virus (YFV), dengue virus (DENV), and Zika virus (ZKV), all of which are global public health concerns. Although the related flaviviruses hepatitis C virus and human pegivirus (formerly named GBV-C) interfere with T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling by novel RNA and protein-based mechanisms, the effect of other flaviviruses on TCR signaling is unknown. Here, we studied the effect of YFV, DENV, and ZKV on TCR signaling. Both YFV and ZKV replicated in human T cells in vitro; however, only YFV inhibited TCR signaling. This effect was mediated at least in part by the YFV envelope (env) protein coding RNA. Deletion mutagenesis studies demonstrated that expression of a short, YFV env RNA motif (vsRNA) was required and sufficient to inhibit TCR signaling. Expression of this vsRNA and YFV infection of T cells reduced the expression of a Src-kinase regulatory phosphatase (PTPRE), while ZKV infection did not. YFV infection in mice resulted in impaired TCR signaling and PTPRE expression, with associated reduction in murine response to experimental ovalbumin vaccination. Together, these data suggest that viruses within the flavivirus genus inhibit TCR signaling in a species-dependent manner. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Immunization of Knock-Out α/β Interferon Receptor Mice against High Lethal Dose of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus with a Cell Culture Based Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Canakoglu, Nurettin; Berber, Engin; Tonbak, Sukru; Ertek, Mustafa; Sozdutmaz, Ibrahim; Aktas, Munir; Kalkan, Ahmet; Ozdarendeli, Aykut

    2015-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is an acute tick-borne zoonotic disease. The disease has been reported in many countries of Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and in Eurasia. During the past decade, new foci of CCHF have emerged in the Balkan Peninsula, southwest Russia, the Middle East, western China, India, Africa, and Turkey. CCHF virus produces severe hemorrhagic manifestations in humans with fatality rates up to 30%. Vaccine development efforts have been significantly hampered by a lack of animal models and therefore, no protective vaccine has been achieved. Lately, IFN α/β receptor deficient (IFNAR−/−) mice have been established as a novel small animal model of CCHF virus infection. In the present study, we found that IFNAR−/− mice highly susceptible to CCHF virus Turkey-Kelkit06 strain. Immunization with the cell culture based vaccine elicited a significant level of protection against high dose challenge (1,000 PPFU) with a homologous CCHF virus in IFNAR−/− mice. PMID:25760444

  14. Discovery of Selective and Noncovalent Diaminopyrimidine-Based Inhibitors of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Containing the T790M Resistance Mutation

    DOE PAGES

    Hanan, Emily J.; Eigenbrot, Charles; Bryan, Marian C.; ...

    2014-11-10

    Activating mutations within the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase domain, commonly L858R or deletions within exon 19, increase EGFR-driven cell proliferation and survival and are correlated with impressive responses to the EGFR inhibitors erlotinib and gefitinib in nonsmall cell lung cancer patients. Approximately 60% of acquired resistance to these agents is driven by a single secondary mutation within the EGFR kinase domain, specifically substitution of the gatekeeper residue threonine-790 with methionine (T790M). Due to dose-limiting toxicities associated with inhibition of wild-type EGFR (wtEGFR), we sought inhibitors of T790M-containing EGFR mutants with selectivity over wtEGFR. Here in this paper, wemore » describe the evolution of HTS hits derived from Jak2/Tyk2 inhibitors into selective EGFR inhibitors. X-ray crystal structures revealed two distinct binding modes and enabled the design of a selective series of novel diaminopyrimidine-based inhibitors with good potency against T790M-containing mutants of EGFR, high selectivity over wtEGFR, broad kinase selectivity, and desirable physicochemical properties.« less

  15. Structure-based pharmacophore design and virtual screening for novel potential inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor as an approach to breast cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mahernia, Shabnam; Hassanzadeh, Malihe; Sharifi, Niusha; Mehravi, Bita; Paytam, Fariba; Adib, Mehdi; Amanlou, Massoud

    2018-02-01

    Cancer cells are described with features of uncontrolled growth, invasion and metastasis. The epidermal growth factor receptor subfamily of tyrosine kinases (EGFR-TK) plays a crucial regulatory role in the control of cellular proliferation and progression of various cancers. Therefore, its inhibition might lead to the discovery of a new generation of anticancer drugs. In the present study, structure-based pharmacophore modeling, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations were applied to identify potential hits, which exhibited good inhibition on the proliferation of MCF-7 breast cancer cell line and favorable binding interactions on EGFR-TK. Selected compounds were examined for their anticancer activity against the Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 (MCF-7) breast cancer cell line which overexpresses EGFR using the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) tetrazolium reduction assay. Compounds 1 and 2, with an isoindoline-1-one core, induced significant inhibition of breast cancer cells proliferation with IC[Formula: see text] values 327 and 370 nM, respectively.

  16. C,N-bipyrazole receptor grafted onto a porous silica surface as a novel adsorbent based polymer hybrid.

    PubMed

    Radi, Smaail; Attayibat, Ahmed; El-Massaoudi, Mohamed; Bacquet, Maryse; Jodeh, Shehdeh; Warad, Ismail; Al-Showiman, Salim S; Mabkhot, Yahia N

    2015-10-01

    A simple heterogeneous synthesis of pure adsorbent based polymer hybrid made by condensing a functionalized C,N-bipyrazole with a 3-glycidoxypropyl-trimethoxysilane silylant agent, previously anchored on a silica surface was developed. The formed material (SG2P) was characterized through elemental analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy, (13)C NMR of solid state, scanning electron microscope (SEM), and was studied and evaluated by determination of the surface area using the BET equation, the adsorption and desorption capability using the isotherm of nitrogen and B.J.H. pore sizes. The new material exhibits good thermal stability determined by thermogravimetry curves and good chemical stability was examined in various acidic and buffer solutions (pH 1-7). The binding and adsorption abilities of SG2P were investigated for Hg(2+), Cd(2+), Pb(2+), Zn(2+), K(+), Na(+) and Li(+) cations and compared to the results of classical liquid-liquid extraction with the unbound C,N-bipyrazole compound. The grafting at the surface of silica does not affect complexing properties of the ligand and the SG2P exhibits a high selectivity toward Hg(2+) ion with no complexation being observed towards zinc and alkali metals. The extracted and the complexing cation percentages were determined by atomic absorption measurements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A biology-driven receptor model for daily pollen allergy risk in Korea based on Weibull probability density function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyu Rang; Kim, Mijin; Choe, Ho-Seong; Han, Mae Ja; Lee, Hye-Rim; Oh, Jae-Won; Kim, Baek-Jo

    2017-02-01

    Pollen is an important cause of respiratory allergic reactions. As individual sanitation has improved, allergy risk has increased, and this trend is expected to continue due to climate change. Atmospheric pollen concentration is highly influenced by weather conditions. Regression analysis and modeling of the relationships between airborne pollen concentrations and weather conditions were performed to analyze and forecast pollen conditions. Traditionally, daily pollen concentration has been estimated using regression models that describe the relationships between observed pollen concentrations and weather conditions. These models were able to forecast daily concentrations at the sites of observation, but lacked broader spatial applicability beyond those sites. To overcome this limitation, an integrated modeling scheme was developed that is designed to represent the underlying processes of pollen production and distribution. A maximum potential for airborne pollen is first determined using the Weibull probability density function. Then, daily pollen concentration is estimated using multiple regression models. Daily risk grade levels are determined based on the risk criteria used in Korea. The mean percentages of agreement between the observed and estimated levels were 81.4-88.2 % and 92.5-98.5 % for oak and Japanese hop pollens, respectively. The new models estimated daily pollen risk more accurately than the original statistical models because of the newly integrated biological response curves. Although they overestimated seasonal mean concentration, they did not simulate all of the peak concentrations. This issue would be resolved by adding more variables that affect the prevalence and internal maturity of pollens.

  18. A biology-driven receptor model for daily pollen allergy risk in Korea based on Weibull probability density function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyu Rang; Kim, Mijin; Choe, Ho-Seong; Han, Mae Ja; Lee, Hye-Rim; Oh, Jae-Won; Kim, Baek-Jo

    2017-02-01

    Pollen is an important cause of respiratory allergic reactions. As individual sanitation has improved, allergy risk has increased, and this trend is expected to continue due to climate change. Atmospheric pollen concentration is highly influenced by weather conditions. Regression analysis and modeling of the relationships between airborne pollen concentrations and weather conditions were performed to analyze and forecast pollen conditions. Traditionally, daily pollen concentration has been estimated using regression models that describe the relationships between observed pollen concentrations and weather conditions. These models were able to forecast daily concentrations at the sites of observation, but lacked broader spatial applicability beyond those sites. To overcome this limitation, an integrated modeling scheme was developed that is designed to represent the underlying processes of pollen production and distribution. A maximum potential for airborne pollen is first determined using the Weibull probability density function. Then, daily pollen concentration is estimated using multiple regression models. Daily risk grade levels are determined based on the risk criteria used in Korea. The mean percentages of agreement between the observed and estimated levels were 81.4-88.2 % and 92.5-98.5 % for oak and Japanese hop pollens, respectively. The new models estimated daily pollen risk more accurately than the original statistical models because of the newly integrated biological response curves. Although they overestimated seasonal mean concentration, they did not simulate all of the peak concentrations. This issue would be resolved by adding more variables that affect the prevalence and internal maturity of pollens.

  19. Synthesis and biological evaluation of bivalent cannabinoid receptor ligands based on hCB₂R selective benzimidazoles reveal unexpected intrinsic properties.

    PubMed

    Nimczick, Martin; Pemp, Daniela; Darras, Fouad H; Chen, Xinyu; Heilmann, Jörg; Decker, Michael

    2014-08-01

    The design of bivalent ligands targeting G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) often leads to the development of new, highly selective and potent compounds. To date, no bivalent ligands for the human cannabinoid receptor type 2 (hCB₂R) of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) are described. Therefore, two sets of homobivalent ligands containing as parent structure the hCB2R selective agonist 13a and coupled at different attachment positions were synthesized. Changes of the parent structure at these positions have a crucial effect on the potency and efficacy of the ligands. However, we discovered that bivalency has an influence on the effect at both cannabinoid receptors. Moreover, we found out that the spacer length and the attachment position altered the efficacy of the bivalent ligands at the receptors by turning agonists into antagonists and inverse agonists. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of targeted deletion of A1 adenosine receptors on postischemic cardiac function and expression of adenosine receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Morrison, R Ray; Teng, Bunyen; Oldenburg, Peter J; Katwa, Laxmansa C; Schnermann, Jurgen B; Mustafa, S Jamal

    2006-10-01

    To examine ischemic tolerance in the absence of A(1) adenosine receptors (A(1)ARs), isolated wild-type (WT) and A(1)AR knockout (A(1)KO) murine hearts underwent global ischemia-reperfusion, and injury was measured in terms of functional recovery and efflux of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Hearts were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR both at baseline and at intervals during ischemia-reperfusion to determine whether compensatory expression of other adenosine receptor subtypes occurs with either A(1)AR deletion and/or ischemia-reperfusion. A(1)KO hearts had higher baseline coronary flow (CF) and left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) than WT hearts, whereas heart rate was unchanged by A(1)AR deletion. After 20 min of ischemia, CF was attenuated in A(1)KO compared with WT hearts, and this reduction persisted throughout reperfusion. Final recovery of LVDP was decreased in A(1)KO hearts (54.4 +/- 5.1 vs. WT 81.1 +/- 3.4% preischemic baseline) and correlated with higher diastolic pressure during reperfusion. Postischemic efflux of LDH was greater in A(1)KO compared with WT hearts. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated the absence of A(1)AR transcript in A(1)KO hearts, and the message for A(2A), A(2B), and A(3) adenosine receptors was similar in uninstrumented A(1)KO and WT hearts. Ischemia-reperfusion increased A(2B) mRNA expression 2.5-fold in both WT and A(1)KO hearts without changing A(1) or A(3) expression. In WT hearts, ischemia transiently doubled A(2A) mRNA, which returned to preischemic level upon reperfusion, a pattern not observed in A(1)KO hearts. Together, these data affirm the cardioprotective role of A(1)ARs and suggest that induced expression of other adenosine receptor subtypes may participate in the response to ischemia-reperfusion in isolated murine hearts.

  1. Potential clinical applications of rhGM-CSF in acute myeloid leukemia based on its biologic activity and receptor interaction.

    PubMed

    Lanza, F; Rigolin, G M; Castagnari, B; Moretti, S; Castoldi, G

    1997-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a multilineage hemopoietic growth factor that stimulates proliferation, differentiation, and survival of progenitor cells, enhances the functional activities of mature myeloid effector cells, and plays a key role in host defense and the inflammatory process. Although the clinical use of rhGM-CSF in patients affected by lymphoid malignancies is widely accepted, its utility and safety in the management of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) is still controversial. The three main schedules adopted for clinical application of GM-CSF in AML are as follows: A) post-chemotherapy, in order to shorten the duration of neutropenia and/or monocytopenia; B) prechemotherapy to recruit blast cells into active cell cycle phases, and to increase their sensitivity to cell cycle-dependent cytotoxic drugs; C) as a mobilizing agent to induce the release of progenitor cells from bone marrow into circulation (peripheral blood progenitor cell transplantation-PBPC). The objective of this paper is to analyze the potential clinical applications of rhGM-CSF in AML. The material examined in the present review includes several personal papers in this field and articles and abstracts published in journals covered by the Science Citation Index. Based on current knowledge, it may be argued that rhGM-CSF should be used only in a subset of AML patients at high risk of infection mortality, including elderly subjects, and/or in those AML patients who relapse or are resistant to induction treatment. However, the risk of stimulating the leukemic clone following GM-CSF therapy should be kept in mind when using this growth factor in the clinical setting, even though the great majority of the reported papers on this subject have shown that GM-CSF therapy does not affect relapse rates, frequency of remissions or patient life expectancy. It is likely that new data from controlled clinical trials will clarify the

  2. A model-based analysis of the clinical and economic impact of personalising P2Y12-receptor inhibition with platelet function testing in acute coronary syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Straub, Niels; Beivers, Andreas; Lenk, Ekaterina; Aradi, Daniel; Sibbing, Dirk

    2014-02-01

    Although some observational studies reported that the measured level of P2Y12-inhibition is predictive for thrombotic events, the clinical and economic benefit of incorporating PFT to personalize P2Y12-receptor directed antiplatelet treatment is unknown. Here, we assessed the clinical impact and cost-effectiveness of selecting P2Y12-inhibitors based on platelet function testing (PFT) in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients undergoing PCI. A decision model was developed to analyse the health economic effects of different strategies. PFT-guided treatment was compared with the three options of general clopidogrel, prasugrel or ticagrelor treatment. In the PFT arm, low responders to clopidogrel received prasugrel, while normal responders carried on with clopidogrel. The associated endpoints in the model were cardiovascular death, stent thrombosis and major bleeding. With a simulated cohort of 10,000 patients treated for one year, there were 93 less events in the PFT arm compared to general clopidogrel. In prasugrel and ticagrelor arms, 110 and 86 events were prevented compared to clopidogrel treatment, respectively. The total expected costs (including event costs, drug costs and PFT costs) for generic clopidogrel therapy were US$ 1,059/patient. In the PFT arm, total costs were US$ 1,494, while in the prasugrel and ticagrelor branches they were US$ 3,102 and US$ 3,771, respectively. The incremental-cost-effectiveness-ratio (ICER) was US$ 46,770 for PFT-guided therapy, US$ 185,783 for prasugrel and US$ 315,360 for ticagrelor. In this model-based analysis, a PFT-guided therapy may have fewer adverse outcomes than general treatment with clopidogrel and may be more cost-effective than prasugrel or ticagrelor treatment in ACS patients undergoing PCI.

  3. A novel cell-based assay for inhibitory anti-muscarinic type 3 receptor antibodies in primary Sjögren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bastian, Isabell; Gordon, Tom P; Jackson, Michael W

    2015-12-01

    Inhibitory autoantibodies acting at the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor type 3 (M3R) are postulated to mediate autonomic dysfunction, including decreased salivary and lacrimal gland output and extra-glandular manifestations, in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome. However, the contention that anti-M3R antibodies are pathogenic in patients remains untested, due to a lack of assays both sophisticated enough to detect inhibitory anti-M3R antibodies yet suitable for screening large patient cohorts. In the current study, we have established a cell-based bioassay of M3R activity, based on dual transfection of the M3R and a luciferase reporter gene. The bioassay is capable of capturing real-time agonist-mediated signalling of the M3R, which is inhibited specifically by patient IgG that have previously been demonstrated to have anti-M3R activity. The assay can be run in multi-well culture plates, and analysed using simple luminescence readers. As such, the new bioassay incorporating M3R-mediated luciferase transduction is the first assay adaptable to common diagnostic platforms that is capable of determining the presence in patient serum of functionally active anti-M3R autoantibodies. The new bioassay should prove useful for large cohort screening studies aiming to correlate the presence in patients of inhibitory anti-M3R antibodies with symptoms of both glandular and extra-glandular autonomic dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Multiple receptor-ligand based pharmacophore modeling and molecular docking to screen the selective inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase-9 from natural products.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qi; Wang, Yijun; Hou, Jiaying; Yao, Qizheng; Zhang, Ji

    2017-07-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is an attractive target for cancer therapy. In this study, the pharmacophore model of MMP-9 inhibitors is built based on the experimental binding structures of multiple receptor-ligand complexes. It is found that the pharmacophore model consists of six chemical features, including two hydrogen bond acceptors, one hydrogen bond donor, one ring aromatic regions, and two hydrophobic (HY) features. Among them, the two HY features are especially important because they can enter the S1' pocket of MMP-9 which determines the selectivity of MMP-9 inhibitors. The reliability of pharmacophore model is validated based on the two different decoy sets and relevant experimental data. The virtual screening, combining pharmacophore model with molecular docking, is performed to identify the selective MMP-9 inhibitors from a database of natural products. The four novel MMP-9 inhibitors of natural products, NP-000686, NP-001752, NP-014331, and NP-015905, are found; one of them, NP-000686, is used to perform the experiment of in vitro bioassay inhibiting MMP-9, and the IC 50 value was estimated to be only 13.4 µM, showing the strongly inhibitory activity of NP-000686 against MMP-9, which suggests that our screening results should be reliable. The binding modes of screened inhibitors with MMP-9 active sites were discussed. In addition, the ADMET properties and physicochemical properties of screened four compounds were assessed. The found MMP-9 inhibitors of natural products could serve as the lead compounds for designing the new MMP-9 inhibitors by carrying out structural modifications in the future.

  5. Comparison of Estrogen Receptor Assay Results from Pathology Reports with Results from Central Laboratory Testing: Implications for Population-Based Studies of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Collins, LC; Marotti, J; Baer, HJ; Deitz, AC; Colditz, GA; Tamimi, RM

    2014-01-01

    Population-based studies of women with breast cancer commonly utilize information culled from pathology reports rather than central pathology review. The reliability of this information, particularly with regard to tumor biomarker results, is of concern. To address this, we evaluated the concordance between estrogen receptor (ER) results as determined from the original pathology reports and ER results obtained on the same specimens following testing in a single laboratory. Tissue microarrays (TMAs) were constructed from paraffin blocks of 3,167 breast cancers that developed in women enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Study. ER immunostains were performed on all TMA sections in single run. Results of ER immunostains performed on the TMA sections were compared with ER assay results abstracted from pathology reports. Among 1,851 cases of invasive breast cancer in which both ER results from pathology reports and central ER test results were available, the reported ER status and the ER status as determined from immunostains on TMAs were in agreement in 1,651 cases (87.3 %; kappa value 0.64, p<0.0001). When the comparison was restricted to ER assays originally performed by immunohistochemistry, the agreement rate increased to 92.3% (kappa value 0.78, p<0.0001). These results provide a framework for the accuracy of ER results abstracted from clinical records. Further, they suggest that utilizing ER assay results from pathology reports is a reasonable, albeit imperfect, alternative to central laboratory ER testing for large, population-based studies of patients with breast cancer. PMID:18230800

  6. Progress toward heterologous expression of active G-protein-coupled receptors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Linking cellular stress response with translocation and trafficking

    PubMed Central

    O'Malley, Michelle A; Mancini, J Dominic; Young, Carissa L; McCusker, Emily C; Raden, David; Robinson, Anne S

    2009-01-01

    High-level expression of mammalian G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is a necessary step toward biophysical characterization and high-resolution structure determination. Even though many heterologous expression systems have been used to express mammalian GPCRs at high levels, many receptors are improperly trafficked or are inactive in these systems. En route to engineering a robust microbial host for GPCR expression, we have investigated the expression of 12 GPCRs in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where all receptors are expressed at the mg/L scale. However, only the human adenosine A2a (hA2aR) receptor is active for ligand-binding and located primarily at the plasma membrane, whereas other tested GPCRs are mainly retained within the cell. Selective receptors associate with BiP, an ER-resident chaperone, and activated the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway, which suggests that a pool of receptors may be folded incorrectly. Leader sequence cleavage of the expressed receptors was complete for the hA2aR, as expected, and partially cleaved for hA2bR, hCCR5R, and hD2LR. Ligand-binding assays conducted on the adenosine family (hA1R, hA2aR, hA2bR, and hA3R) of receptors show that hA2aR and hA2bR, the only adenosine receptors that demonstrate leader sequence processing, display activity. Taken together, these studies point to translocation as a critical limiting step in the production of active mammalian GPCRs in S. cerevisiae. PMID:19760666

  7. 5-Functionalized indazoles as glucocorticoid receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Bai, Mei; Carr, Grant; Deorazio, Russell J; Friedrich, Thomas D; Dobritsa, Svetlana; Fitzpatrick, Kevin; Guzzo, Peter R; Kitchen, Douglas B; Lynch, Michael A; Peace, Denise; Sajad, Mohammed; Usyatinsky, Alexander; Wolf, Mark A

    2010-05-15

    An indazole based series of glucocorticoid receptor agonists is reported. The SAR exploration of this scaffold yielded compounds with nanomolar affinity for the glucocorticoid receptor with indications of selectivity for the preferred transrepression mechanism; in vivo efficacy was observed in the mouse LPS induced TNFalpha model for compound 28. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Significance of the imidazoline receptors in toxicology.

    PubMed

    Lowry, J A; Brown, J T

    2014-06-01

    leading to research that has focused on the effect of I-2 receptors and depression and the suggestion of a possible antidepressant action of the imidazolines. I-2 receptor ligands may have substantial antinociceptive activity and work synergistically with opioids in acute pain. Imidazoline-3 (I-3) receptors are located on the pancreatic β-cells and modulate glucose homeostasis. IMIDAZOLINE LIGANDS: Four endogenous compounds have been found to bind and include clonidine-displacing substance, agmatine, harmane, and imidazole acetic acid. Significant interest in developing new agents with higher selectivity and affinity for I-1 receptors has resulted. Toxicology. Alpha-2 adrenoceptor and imidazoline receptor agonists such as clonidine and tetrahydrozoline are common ingestions reported to poison control centers. The most common toxic effects of clonidine are similar to those of the over-the-counter imidazolines and include CNS depression, bradycardia, hypotension, respiratory depression, miosis, hypothermia, and hypertension (early and transient). Based on their structure and subsequent studies, imidazoline receptors seem to be the primary binding site for these chemicals. Case reports typically illustrate rapid onset of action with serious side effects following ingestion of relatively small amounts. These agents have been reportedly used in drug-assisted sexual assaults. Much of the toxicity associated with drugs such as clonidine, guanfacine, and tetrahydrozoline are due to their binding to imidazoline receptors. Knowledge of the imidazoline receptors may lead to new therapeutic agents and inform management of patients with imidazoline overdose.

  9. CCR2 and CCR5 receptor-binding properties of herpesvirus-8 vMIP-II based on sequence analysis and its solution structure.

    PubMed

    Shao, W; Fernandez, E; Sachpatzidis, A; Wilken, J; Thompson, D A; Schweitzer, B I; Lolis, E

    2001-05-01

    Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) is the infectious agent responsible for Kaposi's sarcoma and encodes a protein, macrophage inflammatory protein-II (vMIP-II), which shows sequence similarity to the human CC chemokines. vMIP-II has broad receptor specificity that crosses chemokine receptor subfamilies, and inhibits HIV-1 viral entry mediated by numerous chemokine receptors. In this study, the solution structure of chemically synthesized vMIP-II was determined by nuclear magnetic resonance. The protein is a monomer and possesses the chemokine fold consisting of a flexible N-terminus, three antiparallel beta strands, and a C-terminal alpha helix. Except for the N-terminal residues (residues 1-13) and the last two C-terminal residues (residues 73-74), the structure of vMIP-II is well-defined, exhibiting average rmsd of 0.35 and 0.90 A for the backbone heavy atoms and all heavy atoms of residues 14-72, respectively. Taking into account the sequence differences between the various CC chemokines and comparing their three-dimensional structures allows us to implicate residues that influence the quaternary structure and receptor binding and activation of these proteins in solution. The analysis of the sequence and three-dimensional structure of vMIP-II indicates the presence of epitopes involved in binding two receptors CCR2 and CCR5. We propose that vMIP-II was initially specific for CCR5 and acquired receptor-binding properties to CCR2 and other chemokine receptors.

  10. New approaches for the reliable in vitro assessment of binding affinity based on high-resolution real-time data acquisition of radioligand-receptor binding kinetics.

    PubMed

    Zeilinger, Markus; Pichler, Florian; Nics, Lukas; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Spreitzer, Helmut; Hacker, Marcus; Mitterhauser, Markus

    2017-12-01

    Resolving the kinetic mechanisms of biomolecular interactions have become increasingly important in early-phase drug development. Since traditional in vitro methods belong to dose-dependent assessments, binding kinetics is usually overlooked. The present study aimed at the establishment of two novel experimental approaches for the assessment of binding affinity of both, radiolabelled and non-labelled compounds targeting the A 3 R, based on high-resolution real-time data acquisition of radioligand-receptor binding kinetics. A novel time-resolved competition assay was developed and applied to determine the K i of eight different A 3 R antagonists, using CHO-K1 cells stably expressing the hA 3 R. In addition, a new kinetic real-time cell-binding approach was established to quantify the rate constants k on and k off , as well as the dedicated K d of the A 3 R agonist [ 125 I]-AB-MECA. Furthermore, lipophilicity measurements were conducted to control influences due to physicochemical properties of the used compounds. Two novel real-time cell-binding approaches were successfully developed and established. Both experimental procedures were found to visualize the kinetic binding characteristics with high spatial and temporal resolution, resulting in reliable affinity values, which are in good agreement with values previously reported with traditional methods. Taking into account the lipophilicity of the A 3 R antagonists, no influences on the experimental performance and the resulting affinity were investigated. Both kinetic binding approaches comprise tracer administration and subsequent binding to living cells, expressing the dedicated target protein. Therefore, the experiments resemble better the true in vivo physiological conditions and provide important markers of cellular feedback and biological response.

  11. Influence of toll-like receptor 4 gene variants and plasma fatty acid profile on systemic inflammation: A population-based cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Norde, Marina Maintinguer; Oki, Erica; Carioca, Antonio A F; Castro, Inar A; Souza, José M P; Marchioni, Dirce M L; Fisberg, Regina M; Rogero, Marcelo M

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) gene single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and plasma fatty acid (FA) profile in modulating risk for systemic inflammation. In all, 262 adult (19-59 y) participants of the Health Survey of São Paulo met the inclusion criteria. Anthropometric parameters, blood pressure, plasma inflammatory biomarker concentration, and fatty acid profile were measured and four SNPs of the TLR4 gene (rs4986790, rs4986791, rs11536889, and rs5030728) were genotyped. Multivariate cluster analysis was performed to stratify individuals based on levels of 11 plasma inflammatory biomarkers into two groups: inflammatory (INF) and noninflammatory (NINF). No association was found between any of the SNPs studied and systemic inflammation. The INF cluster had higher palmitic acid levels (P = 0.039) and estimated stearoyl coenzyme A desaturase activity (P = 0.045) and lower polyunsaturated fatty acid (P = 0.011), ω-6 fatty acid (P = 0.018), arachidonic acid (P = 0.002) levels, and estimated δ-5 desaturase activity (P = 0.025) compared with the NINF cluster. Statistically significant interaction between rs11536889 and arachidonic acid/eicosapentaenoic acid (AA/EPA) ratio (P = 0.034) was found to increase the odds of belonging to the INF cluster when individuals had the variant allele C and were at the higher percentile of AA/EPA plasma ratio. Plasma fatty acid profile modulated the odds of belonging to the INF cluster depending on genotypes of TRL4 gene polymorphisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of a cell-based qualitative assay for detection of neutralizing anti-human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (hIL-1Ra) antibodies in rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jin; Li, Jingjing; Yang, Minmin; Wu, Mingyuan; Tu, Ping; Yu, Yan; Han, Wei

    2015-01-01

    To determine the incidence of the positive neutralizing anti-human interleukin receptor antagonist (anti-IL-1Ra), a novel assay based on the proliferation of human melanoma A375.S2 cells was developed and validated. In the presence of a growth-limiting concentration of IL-1β, A375.S2 cells were able to regain proliferation following the addition of IL-1Ra in a concentration-dependent manner. This dose-response effect enabled the validation of a standard curve for calculation of the concentration of IL-1Ra or, inversely, the concentration of neutralizing anti-IL-1Ra antibodies in cell culture medium or sera. The assay used CCK-8 as an indicator of proliferation. The dose-response relationship between rhIL-1Ra (dose range of 5-75 ng/ml rhIL-1Ra) and A375.S2 cell proliferation was sigmoidal and fitted a four-parameter logistic model. The percent coefficients of variation (%CVs) of quality control samples were 12.5 and 11.9% for intra-assay repeatability and 14.5 and 19.5% for inter-assay repeatability, while the total accuracy was in the range of 97.2-103.6%. For the neutralization assay, the optimal sample dilution factor was found to be 40-fold and the reasonable standard for positive and negative decision was calculated to be 59.4% neutralization rate. The %CVs of quality control samples were 12.7 and 24.0% for intra-assay repeatability and 11.6 and 30.0% for inter-assay repeatability. Analysis using the assay showed that rats could produce neutralizing anti-IL-1Ra antibodies after repeated intramuscular injection with rhIL-1Ra, and this response was not significantly dependent on the dose injected.

  13. High-throughput multiplexed T-cell-receptor excision circle quantitative PCR assay with internal controls for detection of severe combined immunodeficiency in population-based newborn screening.

    PubMed

    Gerstel-Thompson, Jacalyn L; Wilkey, Jonathan F; Baptiste, Jennifer C; Navas, Jennifer S; Pai, Sung-Yun; Pass, Kenneth A; Eaton, Roger B; Comeau, Anne Marie

    2010-09-01

    Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) targeting a specific marker of functional T cells, the T-cell-receptor excision circle (TREC), detects the absence of functional T cells and has a demonstrated clinical validity for detecting severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) in infants. There is need for a qPCR TREC assay with an internal control to monitor DNA quality and the relative cellular content of the particular dried blood spot punch sampled in each reaction. The utility of the qPCR TREC assay would also be far improved if more tests could be performed on the same newborn screening sample. We approached the multiplexing of qPCR for TREC by attenuating the reaction for the reference gene, with focus on maintaining tight quality assurance for reproducible slopes and for prevention of sample-to-sample cross contamination. Statewide newborn screening for SCID using the multiplexed assay was implemented, and quality-assurance data were recorded. The multiplex qPCR TREC assay showed nearly 100% amplification efficiency for each of the TREC and reference sequences, clinical validity for multiple forms of SCID, and an analytic limit of detection consistent with prevention of contamination. The eluate and residual ghost from a 3.2-mm dried blood spot could be used as source material for multiplexed immunoassays and multiplexed DNA tests (Multiplex Plus), with no disruption to the multiplex TREC qPCR. Population-based SCID newborn screening programs should consider multiplexing for quality assurance purposes. Potential benefits of using Multiplex Plus include the ability to perform multianalyte profiling.

  14. Association between the arginine vasopressin 1a receptor (AVPR1a) gene and autism in a family-based study: mediation by socialization skills.

    PubMed

    Yirmiya, N; Rosenberg, C; Levi, S; Salomon, S; Shulman, C; Nemanov, L; Dina, C; Ebstein, R P

    2006-05-01

    We examined three microsatellites in the arginine vasopressin 1a receptor gene (AVPR1a), two in the promoter region (RS1 and RS3) and an intronic microsatellite (AVR), for association with autism as well as scores on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale (VABS), the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R) and the Autism Diagnostic Observation Scale-Generic (ADOS-G), measures that are widely used to diagnose autism spectrum disorders. We tested for association between the AVPR1a microsatellites and autism in 116 families (128 probands diagnosed with the ADI-R and ADOS-G using a family-based association test (UNPHASED)). Testing each individual microsatellite showed significant transmission disequilibrium in these families with the AVR intronic microsatellite (UNPHASED: LRS=11.46, global P-value=0.009, df=3). Haplotype analysis of three microsatellites also showed significant association (LRS=144.94, df=103, global P=0.004). Additionally, significant association is observed between these three microsatellite haplotypes and the VABS scores (P=0.009), with the ADI-R (P=0.009) and the ADOS-G (P=0.0000765) diagnoses of autistic disorder versus pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) that were available for 47 of these probands. This is the third consecutive report of an association between the AVPR1a gene and autism spectrum disorders and in the current study a third microsatellite is shown to be associated with autism spectrum disorders as well as haplotypes consisting of all three markers. Importantly, the association appears to be mainly mediated by the role of the AVPR1a gene in shaping socialization skills, similar to its role in lower vertebrates.Molecular Psychiatry (2006) 11, 488-494. doi:10.1038/sj.mp.4001812; published online 7 March 2006.

  15. Anti-hepatitis B virus (HBV) response of imiquimod based toll like receptor 7 ligand in hbv-positive human hepatocelluar carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Das, Dipanwita; Sengupta, Isha; Sarkar, Neelakshi; Pal, Ananya; Saha, Debraj; Bandopadhyay, Manikankana; Das, Chandrima; Narayan, Jimmy; Singh, Shivaram Prasad; Chakrabarti, Sekhar; Chakravarty, Runu

    2017-01-14

    Toll like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in innate immunity and various studies suggest that TLRs play a crucial role in pathogenesis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The present study aims in looking into the status of crucial host and viral gene expression on inciting TLR7. The transcription of TLR7 pathway signaling molecules and HBV DNA viral load were quantified by Real Time-PCR after stimulation of TLR7 with its imiquimod based ligand, R837. Cell cycle analysis was performed using flow-cytometry. Expression of TLR7 and chief cell cycle regulator governing G1/S transition, p53 was also seen in liver biopsysss samples of CHB patients. HBV induced alteration in histone modifications in HepG2 cells and its restoration on TLR7 activation was determined using western blot. The TLR7 expression remains downregulated in HepG2.2.15 cells and in liver biopsy samples from CHB patients. Interestingly HBV DNA viral load showed an inverse relationship with the TLR7 expression in the biopsy samples. We also evaluated the anti-viral activity of R837, an agonist of TLR7. It was observed that there was a suppression of HBV replication and viral protein production upon TLR7 stimulation. R837 triggers the anti-viral action probably through the Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) pathway. We also observed a downregulation of histone H3K9Me3 repression mark upon R837 treatment in HBV replicating HepG2.2.15 cells, mimicking that of un-infected HepG2 cells. Additionally, the G1/S cell cycle arrest introduced by HBV in HepG2.2.15 cells was released upon ligand treatment. The study thus holds a close insight into the changes in hepatocyte micro-environment on TLR7 stimulation in HBV infection.

  16. [Impact of anti-diabetic therapy based on glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists on the cardiovascular risk of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Camafort-Babkowski, Miguel

    2013-08-17

    Anti-diabetic drugs have, in addition to their well-known glucose lowering-effect, different effects in the rest of cardiovascular factors that are associated with diabetes mellitus. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have recently been incorporated to the therapeutic arsenal of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The objective of this review is to summarize the available evidence on the effect of the GLP-1 receptor agonists on different cardiovascular risk factors, mediated by the effect of GLP-1 receptor agonists on the control of hyperglycaemia and the GLP-1 receptor agonists effect on other cardiovascular risk factors (weight control, blood pressure control, lipid profile and all other cardiovascular risk biomarkers). In addition, we present the emerging evidence with regards to the impact that GLP-1 receptor agonists therapy could have in the reduction of cardiovascular events and the currently ongoing studies addressing this issue. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.