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Sample records for a2b receptor subtype

  1. Role of adenosine A2B receptors in inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Feoktistov, Igor; Biaggioni, Italo

    2013-01-01

    Recent progress in our understanding of the unique role of A2B receptors in the regulation of inflammation, immunity and tissue repair was considerably facilitated with the introduction of new pharmacological and genetic tools. However, it also led to seemingly conflicting conclusions on the role of A2B adenosine receptors in inflammation with some publications indicating pro-inflammatory effects and others suggesting the opposite. This chapter reviews the functions of A2B receptors in various cell types related to inflammation and integrated effects of A2B receptor modulation in several animal models of inflammation. It is argued that translation of current findings into novel therapies would require a better understanding of A2B receptors functions in diverse types of inflammatory responses in various tissues and at different points of their progression. PMID:21586358

  2. Recent developments in A2B adenosine receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Kalla, Rao V; Zablocki, Jeff; Tabrizi, Mojgan Aghazadeh; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    A selective, high-affinity A(2B) adenosine receptor (AR) antagonist will be useful as a pharmacological tool to help determine the role of the A(2B)AR in inflammatory diseases and angiogenic diseases. Based on early A(2B)AR-selective ligands with nonoptimal pharmaceutical properties, such as 15 (MRS 1754: K(i)(hA(2B)) = 2 nM; K(i)(hA(1)) = 403 nM; K(i)(hA(2A)) = 503 NM, and K(i)(hA(3)) = 570 nM), several groups have discovered second-generation A(2B)AR ligands that are suitable for development. Scientists at CV Therapeutics have discovered the selective, high-affinity A(2B)AR antagonist 22, a 8-(4-pyrazolyl)-xanthine derivative, (CVT-6883, K(i)(hA(2B)) = 22 nM; K(i)(hA(1)) = 1,940 nM; K(i)(hA(2A)) = 3,280; and K(i)(hA(3)) = 1,070 nM). Compound 22 has demonstrated favorable pharmacokinetic (PK) properties (T(1/2) = 4 h and F > 35% rat), and it is a functional antagonist at the A(2B)AR(K (B) = 6 nM). In a mouse model of asthma, compound 22 demonstrated a dose-dependent efficacy supporting the role of the A(2B)AR in asthma. In two Phase I clinical trails, 22 (CVT-6883) was found to be safe, well tolerated, and suitable for once-daily dosing. Baraldi et al. have independently discovered a selective, high-affinity A(2B)AR antagonist, 30 (MRE2029F20), 8-(5-pyrazolyl)-xanthine (K(i)(hA(2B)) = 5.5 nM; K(i)(hA(1)) = 200 nM; K(i)(hA(2A), A(3)) > 1,000, that has been selected for development in conjunction with King Pharmaceuticals. Compound 30 has been demonstrated to be a functional antagonist of the A(2B)AR, and it has been radiolabeled for use in pharmacological studies. A third compound, 58 (LAS-38096), is a 2-aminopyrimidine derivative (discovered by the Almirall group) that has high A(2B)AR affinity and selectivity (K(i)(hA(2B)) = 17 nM; K(i)(hA(1)) > 1,000 nM; K(i)(hA(2A)) > 2,500; and K(i)(hA(3)) > 1,000 nM), and 58 has been moved into preclinical safety testing. A fourth selective, high-affinity A(2B)AR antagonist, 54 (OSIP339391 K(i))(hA(2B)) = 0.5 nM; K(i))(hA(1

  3. Recent improvements in the development of A2B adenosine receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Tabrizi, Mojgan Aghazadeh; Fruttarolo, Francesca; Romagnoli, Romeo; Preti, Delia

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine is known to exert most of its physiological functions by acting as local modulator at four receptor subtypes named A1, A2A, A2B and A3 (ARs). Principally as a result of the difficulty in identifying potent and selective agonists, the A2B AR is the least extensively characterised of the adenosine receptors family. Despite these limitations, growing understanding of the physiological meaning of this target indicates promising therapeutic perspectives for specific ligands. As A2B AR signalling seems to be associated with pre/postconditioning cardioprotective and anti-inflammatory mechanisms, selective agonists may represent a new therapeutic group for patients suffering from coronary artery disease. Herein we present an overview of the recent advancements in identifying potent and selective A2B AR agonists reported in scientific and patent literature. These compounds can be classified into adenosine-like and nonadenosine ligands. Nucleoside-based agonists are the result of modifying adenosine by substitution at the N6-, C2-positions of the purine heterocycle and/or at the 5′-position of the ribose moiety or combinations of these substitutions. Compounds 1-deoxy-1-{6-[N′-(furan-2-carbonyl)-hydrazino]-9H-purin-9-yl}-N-ethyl-β-D-ribofuranuronamide (19, hA1Ki = 1050 nM, hA2AKi = 1550 nM, hA2B EC50 = 82 nM, hA3Ki > 5 μM) and its 2-chloro analogue 23 (hA1Ki = 3500 nM, hA2AKi = 4950 nM, hA2B EC50 = 210 nM, hA3Ki > 5 μM) were confirmed to be potent and selective full agonists in a cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) functional assay in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing hA2B AR. Nonribose ligands are represented by conveniently substituted dicarbonitrilepyridines, among which 2-[6-amino-3,5-dicyano-4-[4-(cyclopropylmethoxy)phenyl]pyridin-2-ylsulfanyl]acetamide (BAY-60–6583, hA1, hA2A, hA3 EC50 > 10 μM; hA2B EC50 = 3 nM) is currently under preclinical-phase investigation for treating coronary

  4. Recent improvements in the development of A2B adenosine receptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Tabrizi, Mojgan Aghazadeh; Fruttarolo, Francesca; Romagnoli, Romeo; Preti, Delia

    2008-01-01

    Adenosine is known to exert most of its physiological functions by acting as local modulator at four receptor subtypes named A1, A2A, A2B and A3 (ARs). Principally as a result of the difficulty in identifying potent and selective agonists, the A2B AR is the least extensively characterised of the adenosine receptors family. Despite these limitations, growing understanding of the physiological meaning of this target indicates promising therapeutic perspectives for specific ligands. As A2B AR signalling seems to be associated with pre/postconditioning cardioprotective and anti-inflammatory mechanisms, selective agonists may represent a new therapeutic group for patients suffering from coronary artery disease. Herein we present an overview of the recent advancements in identifying potent and selective A2B AR agonists reported in scientific and patent literature. These compounds can be classified into adenosine-like and nonadenosine ligands. Nucleoside-based agonists are the result of modifying adenosine by substitution at the N6-, C2-positions of the purine heterocycle and/or at the 5′-position of the ribose moiety or combinations of these substitutions. Compounds 1-deoxy-1-{6-[N′-(furan-2-carbonyl)-hydrazino]-9H-purin-9-yl}-N-ethyl-β-D-ribofuranuronamide (19, hA1Ki = 1050 nM, hA2AKi = 1550 nM, hA2B EC50 = 82 nM, hA3Ki > 5 μM) and its 2-chloro analogue 23 (hA1Ki = 3500 nM, hA2AKi = 4950 nM, hA2B EC50 = 210 nM, hA3Ki > 5 μM) were confirmed to be potent and selective full agonists in a cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) functional assay in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing hA2B AR. Nonribose ligands are represented by conveniently substituted dicarbonitrilepyridines, among which 2-[6-amino-3,5-dicyano-4-[4-(cyclopropylmethoxy)phenyl]pyridin-2-ylsulfanyl]acetamide (BAY-60–6583, hA1, hA2A, hA3 EC50 > 10 μM; hA2B EC50 = 3 nM) is currently under preclinical-phase investigation for treating coronary

  5. 3D-pharmacophore models for selective A2A and A2B adenosine receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jing; Wang, Songqing; Gao, Shaofen; Dai, Xuedong; Gao, Qingzhi

    2007-01-01

    Three-dimensional pharmacophore models were generated for A2A and A2B adenosine receptors (ARs) based on highly selective A2A and A2B antagonists using the Catalyst program. The best pharmacophore model for selective A2A antagonists (Hypo-A2A) was obtained through a careful validation process. Four features contained in Hypo-A2A (one ring aromatic feature (R), one positively ionizable feature (P), one hydrogen bond acceptor lipid feature (L), and one hydrophobic feature (H)) seem to be essential for antagonists in terms of binding activity and A2A AR selectivity. The best pharmacophore model for selective A2B antagonists (Hypo-A2B) was elaborated by modifying the Catalyst common features (HipHop) hypotheses generated from the selective A2B antagonists training set. Hypo-A2B also consists of four features: one ring aromatic feature (R), one hydrophobic aliphatic feature (Z), and two hydrogen bond acceptor lipid features (L). All features play an important role in A2B AR binding affinity and are essential for A2B selectivity. Both A2A and A2B pharmacophore models have been validated toward a wide set of test molecules containing structurally diverse selective antagonists of all AR subtypes. They are capable of identifying correspondingly high potent antagonists and differentiating antagonists between subtypes. The results of our study will act as a valuable tool for retrieving structurally diverse compounds with desired biological activities and designing novel selective adenosine receptor ligands. PMID:17330954

  6. A2B adenosine receptor activity is reduced in neutrophils from patients with systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bazzichi, Laura; Trincavelli, Letizia; Rossi, Alessandra; De Feo, Francesca; Lucacchini, Antonio; Bombardieri, Stefano; Martini, Claudia

    2005-01-01

    We conducted the present study to investigate protein expression and functioning of A2A and A2B adenosine receptors (ARs) in neutrophils of patients affected by systemic sclerosis (SSc). The presence of A2A and A2B ARs was assessed by immunoblotting using specific antibodies. Equilibrium A2A and A2B ARs binding parameters were evaluated by radioligand binding assay. Functional studies were conducted to investigate coupling of the A2B AR to the adenylyl cyclase pathway. This is the first report of the use of Western blot analysis to confirm the presence of A2A and A2B ARs in human neutrophils. No significant changes in A2A AR binding parameters or expression levels were detected between SSc patients and healthy control individuals. A significant decrease (65%) in the maximum density of A2B AR binding sites occurred in SSc neutrophils, whereas no changes in the affinity constant values were found. Moreover, a decrease in A2B AR mediated adenylyl cyclase activity was observed in patients with SSc. Our findings demonstrate the occurrence of selective alterations in A2B AR density and signalling in SSc. PMID:15743465

  7. Expression of adenosine A2b receptor in rat type II and III taste cells.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Kentaro; Dohi, Yukari; Yamanaka, Yuri; Miyata, Ai; Tsukamoto, Katsunobu; Yabu, Miharu; Ohishi, Akihiro; Nagasawa, Kazuki

    2014-05-01

    We previously demonstrated that equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 was expressed in taste cells, suggesting the existence of an adenosine signaling system, but whether or not the expression of an adenosine receptor occurs in rat taste buds remains unknown. Therefore, we examined the expression profiles of adenosine receptors and evaluated their functionality in rat circumvallate papillae. Among adenosine receptors, the mRNA for an adenosine A2b receptor (A2bR) was expressed by the rat circumvallate papillae, and its expression level was significantly greater in the circumvallate papillae than in the non-taste lingual epithelium. A2bR-immunoreactivity was detected primarily in type II taste cells, and partial, but significant expression was also observed in type III ones, but there was no immunoreactivity in type I ones. The cAMP generation in isolated epithelium containing taste buds treated with 500 μM adenosine or 10 μM BAY60-6583 was significantly increased compared to in the controls. These findings suggest that adenosine plays a role in signaling transmission via A2bR between taste cells in rats. PMID:24327108

  8. The A2B adenosine receptor modulates pulmonary hypertension associated with interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Zhong, Hongyan; Acero, Luis; Weng, Tingting; Melicoff, Ernestina; West, James D; Hemnes, Anna; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger K; Blackwell, Timothy S; Xia, Yang; Johnston, Richard A; Zeng, Dewan; Belardinelli, Luiz; Blackburn, Michael R

    2012-06-01

    Development of pulmonary hypertension is a common and deadly complication of interstitial lung disease. Little is known regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to pulmonary hypertension in patients with interstitial lung disease, and effective treatment options are lacking. The purpose of this study was to examine the adenosine 2B receptor (A(2B)R) as a regulator of vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary fibrosis. To accomplish this, cellular and molecular changes in vascular remodeling were monitored in mice exposed to bleomycin in conjunction with genetic removal of the A(2B)R or treatment with the A(2B)R antagonist GS-6201. Results demonstrated that GS-6201 treatment or genetic removal of the A(2B)R attenuated vascular remodeling and hypertension in our model. Furthermore, direct A(2B)R activation on vascular cells promoted interleukin-6 and endothelin-1 release. These studies identify a novel mechanism of disease progression to pulmonary hypertension and support the development of A(2B)R antagonists for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension secondary to interstitial lung disease. PMID:22415303

  9. Adenosine A(1), A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) receptors in hematopoiesis. 1. Expression of receptor mRNA in four mouse hematopoietic precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Streitová, D; Sefc, L; Savvulidi, F; Pospísil, M; Holá, J; Hofer, M

    2010-01-01

    Four mouse bone marrow or thymus cell populations, namely granulopoietic/monocytopoietic, erythropoietic, B-lymphopoietic, and T-lymphopoietic precursor cells have been assayed by RT-PCR technique for the presence and relative amounts of adenosine A(1), A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) receptor mRNA. It has been found that (i) all four populations studied express all four adenosine receptor subtypes, (ii) the A(1), receptor is the least expressed in all populations studied, (iii) the A(3) receptor is markedly expressed in the populations of granulopoietic/monocytopoietic and erythropoietic cells, (iv) the A(2a) receptor is markedly expressed in the populations of B-lymphopoietic and T-lymphopoietic cells, and v) the A(2b) receptor does not predominate in any of the precursor cells studied. Our data offer a new possibility for the assessment of the readiness of these cells to respond, by receptor-mediated mechanisms, to adenosine or its analogs present in the tissues as a result of endogenous processes and/or following their administration. PMID:19249907

  10. Adenosine A2B Receptor: From Cell Biology to Human Diseases.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying; Huang, Pingbo

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine is a ubiquitous signaling molecule that modulates a wide array of biological processes. Recently, significant advances have been made in our understanding of A2B adenosine receptor (A2BAR). In this review, we first summarize some of the general characteristics of A2BAR, and then we describe the multiple binding partners of the receptor, such as newly identified α-actinin-1 and p105, and discuss how these associated proteins could modulate A2BAR's functions, including certain seemingly paradoxical functions of the receptor. Growing evidence indicates a critical role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes, in addition to its importance in the regulation of vascular diseases, and lung disease. Here, we also discuss the role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes and the potential of the receptor as a target for treating these three diseases. PMID:27606311

  11. Adenosine A2B Receptor: From Cell Biology to Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ying; Huang, Pingbo

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine is a ubiquitous signaling molecule that modulates a wide array of biological processes. Recently, significant advances have been made in our understanding of A2B adenosine receptor (A2BAR). In this review, we first summarize some of the general characteristics of A2BAR, and then we describe the multiple binding partners of the receptor, such as newly identified α-actinin-1 and p105, and discuss how these associated proteins could modulate A2BAR's functions, including certain seemingly paradoxical functions of the receptor. Growing evidence indicates a critical role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes, in addition to its importance in the regulation of vascular diseases, and lung disease. Here, we also discuss the role of A2BAR in cancer, renal disease, and diabetes and the potential of the receptor as a target for treating these three diseases. PMID:27606311

  12. A2B Adenosine Receptor Agonist Improves Erectile Function in Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jiaming; Wang, Bohan; Du, Chuanjun; Xu, Gang; Zhang, Zhewei; Li, Yi; Zhang, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is an important risk factor for erectile dysfunction (ED). Recent studies have indicated that A2B adenosine receptor (ADORA2B) signaling is essential for penile erection. Thus, we hypothesize that diabetic ED may be attributed to impaired A2B adenosine signaling. To test this hypothesis, we generated diabetic rats by injecting streptozocin as animal model. After 12 weeks, immunohistochemistry staining was used to localize the expression of ADORA2B. Western Blot and quantitative PCR were employed to determine ADORA2B expression level. Intracavernosal pressure (ICP) measurement was used to evaluate erectile function. Diabetic rats received a single intravenous injection of BAY 60-6583, an ADORA2B agonist, or vehicle solution, at 60 min before the ICP measurement. The results showed that ADORA2B expressed in the nerve bundle, smooth muscle, and endothelium in penile tissue of control mice. Western Blot and quantitative PCR results indicated that the expression levels of ADORA2B protein and mRNA were significantly reduced in penile tissues of diabetic rats. Functional studies showed that the erectile response induced by electrical stimulation was remarkably decreased in diabetic rats, compared with age-matched control rats. However, at 60 min after BAY 60-6583 treatment, the erectile function was improved in diabetic rats, suggesting that enhancement of ADORA2B signaling may improve erectile function in diabetic ED. This preclinical study has revealed a previously unrecognized therapeutic possibility of BAY 60-6583 as an effective and mechanism-based drug to treat diabetic ED. In conclusion, we propose that impaired A2B adenosine signaling is one of the pathological mechanisms of diabetic ED. PMID:26447087

  13. The A2B adenosine receptor protects against inflammation and excessive vascular adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dan; Zhang, Ying; Nguyen, Hao G.; Koupenova, Milka; Chauhan, Anil K.; Makitalo, Maria; Jones, Matthew R.; Hilaire, Cynthia St.; Seldin, David C.; Toselli, Paul; Lamperti, Edward; Schreiber, Barbara M.; Gavras, Haralambos; Wagner, Denisa D.; Ravid, Katya

    2006-01-01

    Adenosine has been described as playing a role in the control of inflammation, but it has not been certain which of its receptors mediate this effect. Here, we generated an A2B adenosine receptor–knockout/reporter gene–knock-in (A2BAR-knockout/reporter gene–knock-in) mouse model and showed receptor gene expression in the vasculature and macrophages, the ablation of which causes low-grade inflammation compared with age-, sex-, and strain-matched control mice. Augmentation of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, and a consequent downregulation of IκB-α are the underlying mechanisms for an observed upregulation of adhesion molecules in the vasculature of these A2BAR-null mice. Intriguingly, leukocyte adhesion to the vasculature is significantly increased in the A2BAR-knockout mice. Exposure to an endotoxin results in augmented proinflammatory cytokine levels in A2BAR-null mice compared with control mice. Bone marrow transplantations indicated that bone marrow (and to a lesser extent vascular) A2BARs regulate these processes. Hence, we identify the A2BAR as a new critical regulator of inflammation and vascular adhesion primarily via signals from hematopoietic cells to the vasculature, focusing attention on the receptor as a therapeutic target. PMID:16823489

  14. The Quintiles Prize Lecture 2004. The identification of the adenosine A2B receptor as a novel therapeutic target in asthma.

    PubMed

    Holgate, Stephen T

    2005-08-01

    Adenosine is a powerful bronchoconstrictor of asthmatic, but not normal, airways. In vitro studies on isolated human mast cells and basophils revealed that adenosine and selective analogues augmented inflammatory mediator release from mast cells by stimulating A(2) receptors. Pharmacological blockade of mast cell mediator release in vivo also attenuated adenosine-induced bronchoconstriction, as did theophylline, by adenosine A(2) receptor antagonism. Further in vitro studies revealed that the asthmatic response to adenosine is likely to be mediated via the A(2B) subtype which is selectively antagonised by enprofylline. Studies in animal models, especially mice, have shown a close synergistic interaction between adenosine, Th2 and airway remodelling responses. The recent description of A(2B) receptors on human airway smooth muscle cells that mediate cytokine and chemokine release and induce differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts strengthens the view that adenosine maybe more than an inflammatory mediator in asthma but also participates in airway wall remodelling in this disease. These data have provided a firm basis for developing adenosine A(2B) receptor antagonists as a new therapeutic approach to this disease. PMID:15980878

  15. The Quintiles Prize Lecture 2004: The identification of the adenosine A2B receptor as a novel therapeutic target in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Holgate, Stephen T

    2005-01-01

    Adenosine is a powerful bronchoconstrictor of asthmatic, but not normal, airways. In vitro studies on isolated human mast cells and basophils revealed that adenosine and selective analogues augmented inflammatory mediator release from mast cells by stimulating A2 receptors. Pharmacological blockade of mast cell mediator release in vivo also attenuated adenosine-induced bronchoconstriction, as did theophylline, by adenosine A2 receptor antagonism. Further in vitro studies revealed that the asthmatic response to adenosine is likely to be mediated via the A2B subtype which is selectively antagonised by enprofylline. Studies in animal models, especially mice, have shown a close synergistic interaction between adenosine, Th2 and airway remodelling responses. The recent description of A2B receptors on human airway smooth muscle cells that mediate cytokine and chemokine release and induce differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts strengthens the view that adenosine maybe more than an inflammatory mediator in asthma but also participates in airway wall remodelling in this disease. These data have provided a firm basis for developing adenosine A2B receptor antagonists as a new therapeutic approach to this disease. PMID:15980878

  16. The A2B adenosine receptor modulates pulmonary hypertension associated with interstitial lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Zhong, Hongyan; Acero, Luis; Weng, Tingting; Melicoff, Ernestina; West, James D.; Hemnes, Anna; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Xia, Yang; Johnston, Richard A.; Zeng, Dewan; Belardinelli, Luiz; Blackburn, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Development of pulmonary hypertension is a common and deadly complication of interstitial lung disease. Little is known regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to pulmonary hypertension in patients with interstitial lung disease, and effective treatment options are lacking. The purpose of this study was to examine the adenosine 2B receptor (A2BR) as a regulator of vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary fibrosis. To accomplish this, cellular and molecular changes in vascular remodeling were monitored in mice exposed to bleomycin in conjunction with genetic removal of the A2BR or treatment with the A2BR antagonist GS-6201. Results demonstrated that GS-6201 treatment or genetic removal of the A2BR attenuated vascular remodeling and hypertension in our model. Furthermore, direct A2BR activation on vascular cells promoted interleukin-6 and endothelin-1 release. These studies identify a novel mechanism of disease progression to pulmonary hypertension and support the development of A2BR antagonists for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension secondary to interstitial lung disease.—Karmouty-Quintana, H., Zhong, H., Acero, L., Weng, T., Melicoff, E., West, J. D., Hemnes, A., Grenz, A., Eltzschig, H. K., Blackwell, T. S., Xia, Y., Johnston, R. A., Zeng, D., Belardinelli, L., Blackburn, M. R. The A2B adenosine receptor modulates pulmonary hypertension associated with interstitial lung disease. PMID:22415303

  17. Adenosine A2B receptor modulates intestinal barrier function under hypoxic and ischemia/reperfusion conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Qiu, Yuan; Wang, Wensheng; Xiao, Weidong; Liang, Hongyin; Zhang, Chaojun; Yang, Hanwenbo; Teitelbaum, Daniel H; Sun, Li-Hua; Yang, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Background: Intestinal barrier function failure from ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) and acute hypoxia has been implicated as a critical determinant in the predisposition to intestinal inflammation and a number of inflammatory disorders. Here, we identified the role of Adenosine A2B receptor (A2BAR) in the regulation of intestinal barrier function under I/R and acute hypoxic conditions. Methods: C57BL/6J mice were used, and were randomized into three groups: Sham, I/R, IR+PSB1115 (a specific A2BAR antagonist) groups. After surgery, the small bowel was harvested for immunohistochemical staining, RNA and protein content, and intestinal permeability analyses. Using an epithelial cell culture model, we investigated the influence of hypoxia on the epithelial function, and the role of A2BAR in the expressions of tight junction and epithelial permeability. The expressions of Claudin-1, occludin and ZO-1 were detected by RT-PCR and Western-Blot. Epithelial barrier function was assessed with transepithelial resistance (TER). Results and conclusions: The A2BAR antagonist, PSB1115, significantly increased tight junction protein expression after intestinal I/R or acute hypoxia conditions. PSB1115 also attenuated the disrupted distribution of TJ proteins. Furthermore, inhibition of A2BAR attenuated the decrease in TER induced by I/R or acute hypoxic conditions, and maintained intestinal barrier function. Antagonism of A2BAR activity improves intestinal epithelial structure and barrier function in a mouse model of intestinal I/R and a cell model of acute hypoxia. These findings support a potentially destructive role for A2BAR under intestinal I/R and acute hypoxic conditions. PMID:24966910

  18. Signaling through the A2B Adenosine Receptor Dampens Endotoxin-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Schingnitz, Ulrich; Hartman, Katherine; MacManus, Christopher F.; Eckle, Tobias; Zug, Stephanie; Colgan, Sean P.; Eltzschig, Holger K.

    2010-01-01

    Sepsis and septic acute lung injury are among the leading causes for morbidity and mortality of critical illness. Extracellular adenosine is a signaling molecule implicated in the cellular adaptation to hypoxia, ischemia or inflammation. Therefore, we pursued the role of the A2B adenosine receptor (A2BAR) as potential therapeutic target in endotoxin-induced acute lung injury. We gained initial insight from in vitro studies of cultured endothelia or epithelia exposed to inflammatory mediators showing time-dependent induction of the A2BAR (up to 12.9±3.4-fold, p<0.05). Similarly, murine studies of endotoxin-induced lung injury identified an almost 4.6-fold induction of A2BAR transcript and corresponding protein induction with LPS-exposure. Studies utilizing A2BAR promoter constructs and RNA-protection assays indicated that A2BAR induction involved mRNA stability. Functional studies of LPS-induced lung injury revealed that pharmacological inhibition or genetic deletion of the A2BAR was associated with dramatic increases in lung inflammation and histologic tissue injury. Studies of A2BAR-bone marrow chimeric mice suggested pulmonary A2BAR signaling in lung protection. Finally, studies with a specific A2BAR agonist (BAY 60-6583) demonstrated attenuation of lung inflammation and pulmonary edema in wild-type but not in gene-targeted mice for the A2BAR. These studies suggest the A2BAR as potential therapeutic target in the treatment of endotoxin-induced forms of acute lung injury. PMID:20348420

  19. Adenosine A(1), A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) receptors in hematopoiesis. 2. Expression of receptor mRNA in resting and lipopolysaccharide-activated mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Streitová, D; Hofer, M; Holá, J; Vacek, A; Pospísil, M

    2010-01-01

    Expression of mRNA for adenosine receptor subtypes A(1), A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) in normal and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated murine RAW 264.7 macrophages has been investigated using the method of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results have shown a very low, unquantifiable expression of adenosine A(1) receptor mRNA in both normal and LPS-activated macrophages. The other three adenosine receptor mRNAs have been found to be expressed at various but always quantifiable levels. Activation of the macrophages by LPS induced upregulation of the expression of adenosine receptor A(2a) and A(2b) mRNA, whereas the expression of adenosine receptor A(3) mRNA was downregulated. Unstimulated macrophages exhibited a high expression of the A(2b) adenosine receptor mRNA. The findings are discussed from the point of view of the antiinflammatory and hematopoiesis-stimulating roles of the adenosine receptor signaling. PMID:19249906

  20. IFN-γ Prevents Adenosine Receptor (A2bR) Upregulation To Sustain the Macrophage Activation Response.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Heather B; Ward, Amanda; Hamidzadeh, Kajal; Ravid, Katya; Mosser, David M

    2015-10-15

    The priming of macrophages with IFN-γ prior to TLR stimulation results in enhanced and prolonged inflammatory cytokine production. In this study, we demonstrate that, following TLR stimulation, macrophages upregulate the adenosine 2b receptor (A2bR) to enhance their sensitivity to immunosuppressive extracellular adenosine. This upregulation of A2bR leads to the induction of macrophages with an immunoregulatory phenotype and the downregulation of inflammation. IFN-γ priming of macrophages selectively prevents the induction of the A2bR in macrophages to mitigate sensitivity to adenosine and to prevent this regulatory transition. IFN-γ-mediated A2bR blockade leads to a prolonged production of TNF-α and IL-12 in response to TLR ligation. The pharmacologic inhibition or the genetic deletion of the A2bR results in a hyperinflammatory response to TLR ligation, similar to IFN-γ treatment of macrophages. Conversely, the overexpression of A2bR on macrophages blunts the IFN-γ effects and promotes the development of immunoregulatory macrophages. Thus, we propose a novel mechanism whereby IFN-γ contributes to host defense by desensitizing macrophages to the immunoregulatory effects of adenosine. This mechanism overcomes the transient nature of TLR activation, and prolongs the antimicrobial state of the classically activated macrophage. This study may offer promising new targets to improve the clinical outcome of inflammatory diseases in which macrophage activation is dysregulated. PMID:26355158

  1. Progress in the discovery of selective, high affinity A(2B) adenosine receptor antagonists as clinical candidates.

    PubMed

    Kalla, Rao V; Zablocki, Jeff

    2009-03-01

    The selective, high affinity A(2B) adenosine receptor (AdoR) antagonists that were synthesized by several research groups should aid in determining the role of the A(2B) AdoR in inflammatory diseases like asthma or rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and angiogenic diseases like diabetic retinopathy or cancer. CV Therapeutics scientists discovered the selective, high affinity A(2B) AdoR antagonist 10, a 8-(4-pyrazolyl)-xanthine derivative [CVT-6883, K(i)(hA(2B)) = 22 nM; K(i)(hA(1)) = 1,940 nM; K(i)(hA(2A)) = 3,280; and K(i)(hA(3)) = 1,070 nM] that has favorable pharmacokinetic (PK) properties (t (1/2) = 4 h and F > 35% rat). Compound 10 demonstrated functional antagonism at the A(2B) AdoR (K(B) = 6 nM) and efficacy in a mouse model of asthma. In two phase 1 clinical trials, CVT-6883 was found to be safe, well tolerated, and suitable for once daily dosing. A second compound 20, 8-(5-pyrazolyl)-xanthine, has been nominated for development from Baraldi's group in conjunction with King Pharmaceuticals that has favorable A(2B) AdoR affinity and selectivity [K(i)(hA(2B)) = 5.5 nM; K(i)(hA(1)) > 1,000 nM; K(i)(hA(2A)) > 1,000; and K(i)(hA(3)) > 1,000 nM], and it has been demonstrated to be a functional antagonist. A third compound 32, a 2-aminopyrimidine, from the Almirall group has high A(2B) AdoR affinity and selectivity [K(i)(hA(2B)) = 17 nM; K(i)(hA(1)) > 1,000 nM; K(i)(hA(2A)) > 2,500; and K(i)(hA(3)) > 1,000 nM], and 32 has been moved into preclinical safety testing. Since three highly selective, high affinity A(2B) AdoR antagonists have been nominated for development with 10 (CVT-6883) being the furthest along in the development process, the role of the A(2B) AdoR in various disease states will soon be established. PMID:18568423

  2. The adenosine A2B receptor is involved in anion secretion in human pancreatic duct Capan-1 epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, M; Inagaki, A; Novak, I; Matsuda, H

    2016-07-01

    Adenosine modulates a wide variety of biological processes via adenosine receptors. In the exocrine pancreas, adenosine regulates transepithelial anion secretion in duct cells and is considered to play a role in acini-to-duct signaling. To identify the functional adenosine receptors and Cl(-) channels important for anion secretion, we herein performed experiments on Capan-1, a human pancreatic duct cell line, using open-circuit Ussing chamber and gramicidin-perforated patch-clamp techniques. The luminal addition of adenosine increased the negative transepithelial potential difference (V te) in Capan-1 monolayers with a half-maximal effective concentration value of approximately 10 μM, which corresponded to the value obtained on whole-cell Cl(-) currents in Capan-1 single cells. The effects of adenosine on V te, an equivalent short-circuit current (I sc), and whole-cell Cl(-) currents were inhibited by CFTRinh-172, a cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel inhibitor. The adenosine A2B receptor agonist, BAY 60-6583, increased I sc and whole-cell Cl(-) currents through CFTR Cl(-) channels, whereas the A2A receptor agonist, CGS 21680, had negligible effects. The A2B receptor antagonist, PSB 603, inhibited the response of I sc to adenosine. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the A2A and A2B receptors colocalized with Ezrin in the luminal membranes of Capan-1 monolayers and in rat pancreatic ducts. Adenosine elicited the whole-cell Cl(-) currents in guinea pig duct cells. These results demonstrate that luminal adenosine regulates anion secretion by activating CFTR Cl(-) channels via adenosine A2B receptors on the luminal membranes of Capan-1 cells. The present study endorses that purinergic signaling is important in the regulation of pancreatic secretion. PMID:26965147

  3. Identification of angiotensin II receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, A.T.; Herblin, W.F.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L.; )

    1989-11-30

    We have demonstrated the existence of two distinct subtypes of the angiotensin II receptor in the rat adrenal gland using radioligand binding and tissue section autoradiography. The identification of the subtypes was made possible by the discovery of two structurally dissimilar, nonpeptide compounds, DuP 753 and EXP655, that show reciprocal selectivity for the two subtypes. In the rat adrenal cortex, DuP 753 inhibited 80% of the total AII binding with an IC50 value on the sensitive sites of 2 x 10(-8) M, while EXP655 displaced only 20%. In the rat adrenal medulla, EXP655 gave 90% inhibition of AII binding with an IC50 value of 3.0 x 10(-8) M, while DuP 753 was essentially inactive. The combination of the two compounds completely inhibited AII binding in both tissues.

  4. A2B adenosine receptor dampens hypoxia-induced vascular leak

    PubMed Central

    Eckle, Tobias; Faigle, Marion; Grenz, Almut; Laucher, Stefanie; Thompson, Linda F.

    2008-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine has been implicated in adaptation to hypoxia and previous studies demonstrated a central role in vascular responses. Here, we examined the contribution of individual adenosine receptors (ARs: A1AR/A2AAR/A2BAR/A3AR) to vascular leak induced by hypoxia. Initial profiling studies revealed that siRNA-mediated repression of the A2BAR selectively increased endothelial leak in response to hypoxia in vitro. In parallel, vascular permeability was significantly increased in vascular organs of A2BAR−/−-mice subjected to ambient hypoxia (8% oxygen, 4 hours; eg, lung: 2.1 ± 0.12-fold increase). By contrast, hypoxia-induced vascular leak was not accentuated in A1AR−/−-, A2AAR−/−-, or A3AR−/−-deficient mice, suggesting a degree of specificity for the A2BAR. Further studies in wild type mice revealed that the selective A2BAR antagonist PSB1115 resulted in profound increases in hypoxia-associated vascular leakage while A2BAR agonist (BAY60-6583 [2-[6-amino-3,5-dicyano-4-[4-(cyclopropylmethoxy)-. phenyl]pyridin-2-ylsulfanyl]acetamide]) treatment was associated with almost complete reversal of hypoxia-induced vascular leakage (eg, lung: 2.0 ± 0.21-fold reduction). Studies in bone marrow chimeric A2BAR mice suggested a predominant role of vascular A2BARs in this response, while hypoxia-associated increases in tissue neutrophils were, at least in part, mediated by A2BAR expressing hematopoietic cells. Taken together, these studies provide pharmacologic and genetic evidence for vascular A2BAR signaling as central control point of hypoxia-associated vascular leak. PMID:18056839

  5. Deletion of the distal COOH-terminus of the A2B adenosine receptor switches internalization to an arrestin- and clathrin-independent pathway and inhibits recycling

    PubMed Central

    Mundell, SJ; Matharu, A-L; Nisar, S; Palmer, TM; Benovic, JL; Kelly, E

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: We have investigated the effect of deletions of a postsynaptic density, disc large and zo-1 protein (PDZ) motif at the end of the COOH-terminus of the rat A2B adenosine receptor on intracellular trafficking following long-term exposure to the agonist 5′-(N-ethylcarboxamido)-adenosine. Experimental approach: The trafficking of the wild type A2B adenosine receptor and deletion mutants expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells was studied using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in combination with immunofluorescence microscopy. Key results: The wild type A2B adenosine receptor and deletion mutants were all extensively internalized following prolonged treatment with NECA. The intracellular compartment through which the Gln325-stop receptor mutant, which lacks the Type II PDZ motif found in the wild type receptor initially trafficked was not the same as the wild type receptor. Expression of dominant negative mutants of arrestin-2, dynamin or Eps-15 inhibited internalization of wild type and Leu330-stop receptors, whereas only dominant negative mutant dynamin inhibited agonist-induced internalization of Gln325-stop, Ser326-stop and Phe328-stop receptors. Following internalization, the wild type A2B adenosine receptor recycled rapidly to the cell surface, whereas the Gln325-stop receptor did not recycle. Conclusions and implications: Deletion of the COOH-terminus of the A2B adenosine receptor beyond Leu330 switches internalization from an arrestin- and clathrin-dependent pathway to one that is dynamin dependent but arrestin and clathrin independent. The presence of a Type II PDZ motif appears to be essential for arrestin- and clathrin-dependent internalization, as well as recycling of the A2B adenosine receptor following prolonged agonist addition. PMID:20128803

  6. Potential Role of A2B Adenosine Receptors on Proliferation/Migration of Fetal Endothelium Derived from Preeclamptic Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Acurio, Jesenia; Troncoso, Felipe; Salomon, Carlos; Aguayo, Claudio; Sobrevia, Luis

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the functionality of A2B adenosine receptor (A2BAR) and the nitric oxide (NO) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling pathway in the endothelial cell proliferation/migration during preeclampsia, we used human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) isolated from normal pregnancies (n = 15) or pregnancies with preeclampsia (n = 15). Experiments were performed in presence or absence of the nonselective adenosine receptor agonist NECA, the A2BAR selective antagonist MRS-1754, and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NAME. Results indicated that cells from preeclampsia exhibited a significant higher protein level of A2BAR and logEC50 for NECA-mediated proliferation than normotensive pregnancies. The stimulatory effect of NECA (10 μM, 24 h) on cell proliferation was prevented by MRS-1754 (5 nM) coincubation only in cells from normotensive pregnancies. Nevertheless, L-NAME (100 μM, 24 h) reduced the NECA-induced cell proliferation/migration in HUVEC from normal pregnancy; however in preeclampsia only NECA-induced cell proliferation was reduced by L-NAME. Moreover, NECA increased protein nitration and abundance of VEGF in cells from normal pregnancy and effect prevented by MRS-1754 coincubation. Nevertheless, in preeclampsia NECA did not affect the protein level of VEGF. In conclusion HUVECs from preeclampsia exhibit elevated protein level of A2BAR and impairment of A2BAR-mediated NO/VEGF signaling pathway. PMID:24877077

  7. P2 receptor subtypes in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed Central

    Kunapuli, S P; Daniel, J L

    1998-01-01

    Extracellular nucleotides have been implicated in a number of physiological functions. Nucleotides act on cell-surface receptors known as P2 receptors, of which several subtypes have been cloned. Both ATP and ADP are stored in platelets and are released upon platelet activation. Furthermore, nucleotides are also released from damaged or broken cells. Thus during vascular injury nucleotides play an important role in haemostasis through activation of platelets, modulation of vascular tone, recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes to the site of injury, and facilitation of adhesion of leucocytes to the endothelium. Nucleotides also moderate these functions by generating nitric oxide and prostaglandin I2 through activation of endothelial cells, and by activating different receptor subtypes on vascular smooth muscle cells. In the heart, P2 receptors regulate contractility through modulation of L-type Ca2+ channels, although the molecular mechanisms involved are still under investigation. Classical pharmacological studies have identified several P2 receptor subtypes in the cardiovascular system. Molecular pharmacological studies have clarified the nature of some of these receptors, but have complicated the picture with others. In platelets, the classical P2T receptor has now been resolved into three P2 receptor subtypes: the P2Y1, P2X1 and P2TAC receptors (the last of these, which is coupled to the inhibition of adenylate cyclase, is yet to be cloned). In peripheral blood leucocytes, endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes, the effects of classical P2X, P2Y and P2U receptors have been found to be mediated by more than one P2 receptor subtype. However, the exact functions of these multiple receptor subtypes remain to be understood, as P2-receptor-selective agonists and antagonists are still under development. PMID:9841859

  8. A novel mechanism of control of NFκB activation and inflammation involving A2B adenosine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ying; Duan, Yuanyuan; Eisenstein, Anna S.; Hu, Wenbao; Quintana, Adrien; Lam, Wai Kwan; Wang, Yan; Wu, Zhenguo; Ravid, Katya; Huang, Pingbo

    2012-01-01

    Summary The nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) pathway controls a variety of processes, including inflammation, and thus, the regulation of NFκB has been a continued focus of study. Here, we report a newly identified regulation of this pathway, involving direct binding of the transcription factor NFκB1 (the p105 subunit of NFκB) to the C-terminus of the A2B adenosine receptor (A2BAR), independent of ligand activation. Intriguingly, binding of A2BAR to specific sites on p105 prevents polyubiquitylation and degradation of p105 protein. Ectopic expression of the A2BAR increases p105 levels and inhibits NFκB activation, whereas p105 protein levels are reduced in cells from A2BAR-knockout mice. In accordance with the known regulation of expression of anti- and pro-inflammatory cytokines by p105, A2BAR-null mice generate less interleukin (IL)-10, and more IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α). Taken together, our results show that the A2BAR inhibits NFκB activation by physically interacting with p105, thereby blocking its polyubiquitylation and degradation. Our findings unveil a surprising function for the A2BAR, and provide a novel mechanistic insight into the control of the NFκB pathway and inflammation. PMID:22767505

  9. GABAA receptor subtypes: the "one glass of wine" receptors.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Richard W; Hanchar, Harry J; Meera, Pratap; Wallner, Martin

    2007-05-01

    This review discusses evidence for and apparent controversy about, gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor (GABAAR) subtypes that mediate alcohol effects experienced during social drinking. GABAARs that contain the beta3 and delta subunits were shown to be enhanced by alcohol concentrations that mirror the concentration dependence of alcohol responses in humans. A mutation (alpha6R100Q) previously found in alcohol nontolerant rats in the cerebellar GABAAR alpha6 subunit is sufficient for increased alcohol-induced ataxia in rats homozygous for this mutation (alpha6-100QQ) and further increases alcohol sensitivity of tonic GABA currents (mediated by alpha6betadelta receptors) in cerebellar granule cells of alpha6-100QQ rats and in recombinant alpha6R100Qbeta3delta receptors. This provided the first direct evidence that these types of receptors mediate behavioral effects of ethanol. Furthermore, the behavioral alcohol antagonist Ro15-4513 specifically reverses ethanol enhancement on alpha4/6beta3delta receptors. Unexpectedly, native and recombinant alpha4/6beta3delta receptors bind the behavioral alcohol antagonist Ro15-4513 with high affinity and this binding is competitive with EtOH, suggesting a specific and mutually exclusive (competitive) ethanol/Ro15-4513 site, which explains the puzzling activity of Ro15-4513 as a behavioral alcohol antagonist. Our conclusion from these findings is that alcohol/Ro15-4513-sensitive GABAAR subtypes are important alcohol targets and that alcohol at relevant concentrations is more specific than previously thought. In this review, we discuss technical difficulties in expressing recombinant delta subunit-containing receptors in oocytes and mammalian cells that may have contributed to negative results and confusion. Not only because we have reproduced detailed positive results numerous times, and we and many others have built extensively on basic findings, but also because we explain and combine many previously puzzling

  10. Increased adenosine contributes to penile fibrosis, a dangerous feature of priapism, via A2B adenosine receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jiaming; Jiang, Xianzhen; Dai, Yingbo; Zhang, Yujin; Tang, Yuxin; Sun, Hong; Mi, Tiejuan; Phatarpekar, Prasad V.; Kellems, Rodney E.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Xia, Yang

    2010-01-01

    offer a potential target for prevention and treatment of penile fibrosis, a dangerous complication seen in priapism.—Wen, J., Jiang, X., Dai, Y., Zhang, Y., Tang, Y., Sun, H., Mi, T., Phatarpekar, P. V., Kellems, R. E., Blackburn, M. R., Xia, Y. Increased adenosine contributes to penile fibrosis, a dangerous feature of priapism, via A2B adenosine receptor signaling. PMID:19858092

  11. Heterogeneity of muscarinic receptor subtypes in cerebral blood vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Villalon, A.L.; Krause, D.N.; Ehlert, F.J.; Duckles, S.P. )

    1991-07-01

    The identity and distribution of muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes and associated signal transduction mechanisms was characterized for the cerebral circulation using correlated functional and biochemical investigations. Subtypes were distinguished by the relative affinities of a panel of muscarinic antagonists, pirenzepine, AF-DX 116 (11-2-((2-(diethylaminomethyl)- 1-piperidinyl)acetyl)-5,11-dihydro-6H- pyrido(2,3-b)(1,4)benzodiazepine-6-one), hexahydrosiladifenidol, methoctramine, 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methobromide, dicyclomine, para-fluoro-hexahydrosiladifenidol and atropine. Muscarinic receptors characterized by inhibition of (3H)quinuclidinylbenzilate binding in membranes of bovine pial arteries were of the M2 subtype. In contrast pharmacological analysis of (3H)-quinuclidinylbenzilate binding in bovine intracerebral microvessels suggests the presence of an M4 subtype. Receptors mediating endothelium-dependent vasodilation in rabbit pial arteries were of the M3 subtype, whereas muscarinic receptors stimulating endothelium-independent phosphoinositide hydrolysis in bovine pial arteries were of the M1 subtype. These findings suggest that characteristics of muscarinic receptors in cerebral blood vessels vary depending on the type of vessel, cellular location and function mediated.

  12. A2B Adenosine Receptor Blockade Enhances Macrophage-Mediated Bacterial Phagocytosis and Improves Polymicrobial Sepsis Survival in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Belikoff, Bryan G.; Hatfield, Stephen; Georgiev, Peter; Ohta, Akio; Lukashev, Dmitriy; Buras, Jon A.; Remick, Daniel G.; Sitkovsky, Michail

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial treatment strategies must improve to reduce the high mortality rates in septic patients. In noninfectious models of acute inflammation, activation of A2B adenosine receptors (A2BR) in extracellular adenosine-rich microenvironments causes immunosuppression. We examined A2BR in antibacterial responses in the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model of sepsis. Antagonism of A2BR significantly increased survival, enhanced bacterial phagocytosis, and decreased IL-6 and MIP-2 (a CXC chemokine) levels after CLP in outbred (ICR/CD-1) mice. During the CLP-induced septic response in A2BR knockout mice, hemodynamic parameters were improved compared with wild-type mice in addition to better survival and decreased plasma IL-6 levels. A2BR deficiency resulted in a dramatic 4-log reduction in peritoneal bacteria. The mechanism of these improvements was due to enhanced macrophage phagocytic activity without augmenting neutrophil phagocytosis of bacteria. Following ex vivo LPS stimulation, septic macrophages from A2BR knockout mice had increased IL-6 and TNF-α secretion compared with wild-type mice. A therapeutic intervention with A2BR blockade was studied by using a plasma biomarker to direct therapy to those mice predicted to die. Pharmacological blockade of A2BR even 32 h after the onset of sepsis increased survival by 65% in those mice predicted to die. Thus, even the late treatment with an A2BR antagonist significantly improved survival of mice (ICR/CD-1) that were otherwise determined to die according to plasma IL-6 levels. Our findings of enhanced bacterial clearance and host survival suggest that antagonism of A2BRs offers a therapeutic target to improve macrophage function in a late treatment protocol that improves sepsis survival. PMID:21242513

  13. Diversity of native nicotinic receptor subtypes in mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Zoli, Michele; Pistillo, Francesco; Gotti, Cecilia

    2015-09-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are a heterogeneous family of pentameric ligand-gated cation channels that are expressed throughout the brain and involved in a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological processes. The nAChR subtypes share a common basic structure, but their biophysical and pharmacological properties depend on their subunit composition, which is therefore central to understanding their function in the nervous system and discovering new subtype selective drugs. The development of new technologies and the generation of mice carrying deletions or the expression of gain-of-function nAChR subunits, or GFP-tagged receptor genes has allowed the in vivo identification of complex subtypes and to study the role of individual subtypes in specific cells and complex neurobiological systems but much less is known about which native nAChR subtypes are involved in specific physiological functions and pathophysiological conditions in human brain. We briefly review some recent findings concerning the structure and function of native nAChRs, focussing on the subtypes identified in the rodent habenulo-interpeduncular pathway, a pathway involved in nicotine reinforcement and withdrawal. We also discuss recent findings concerning the expression of native subtypes in primate brain. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor: From Molecular Biology to Cognition'. PMID:25460185

  14. Expression of Receptors for Tetanus Toxin and Monoclonal Antibody A2B5 by Pancreatic Islet Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenbarth, G. S.; Shimizu, K.; Bowring, M. A.; Wells, S.

    1982-08-01

    Studies of the reaction of antibody A2B5 and tetanus toxin with pancreatic islet cells, islet cell tumors, and other human amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation (APUD) tumors are described. By indirect immunofluorescence, antibody A2B5 and tetanus toxin were shown to specifically bind to the plasma membrane of human, rat, chicken, and mouse islet cells. The binding of antibody A2B5 to the cell surface of living islet cells has allowed isolation of these cells from a suspension of pancreatic cells by using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter. In studies designed to determine whether tetanus toxin and antibody A2B5 bound to the same surface antigen, A2B5 and tetanus toxin did not compete for binding to normal islet cells, a human islet cell tumor, or a rat islet cell tumor. In addition to binding to islet cell tumors, antibody A2B5 reacts with frozen sections, isolated cells, and cell lines of neural, neural crest, and APUD origin.

  15. Up regulation of A2B adenosine receptor on monocytes are crucially required for immune pathogenicity in Indian patients exposed to Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Vijayamahantesh; Amit, Ajay; Kumar, Santosh; Dikhit, Manas R; Jha, Pravin K; Singh, Ashish K; Sinha, Kislay K; Pandey, Krishna; Das, V N R; Das, Pradeep; Bimal, Sanjiva

    2016-03-01

    Adenosine, an endogenous purine nucleoside is one such extracellular signalling molecule whose role in regulation of anti-inflammatory cytokines and immune pathogenicity in visceral leishmaniasis is not fully understood. Here, we investigated the relationship between Leishmania donovani infection and expression of A2B receptor on monocytes in VL patients in their pre and post treatment stage. We also investigated the molecular mechanisms influencing the interaction between immunopathogenicity and infection by exposing Leishmania donovani pulsed macrophages to Adenosine. A direct correlation of up-regulated A2B expression on monocytes with increased parasite load was also observed. Our results also suggested that A2B receptor activation is critically required for the stimulatory effect of adenosine on IL-10 production and suppression of nitric oxide release. The stimulatory effect of adenosine on Leishmania donovani induced IL-10 production required ERK1/2 activation and is p-38 MAPK independent. PMID:26748211

  16. Cardiac and neuroprotection regulated by α1-adrenergic receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Dianne M.; Doze, Van A.

    2013-01-01

    Sympathetic nervous system regulation by the α1-adrenergic receptor (AR) subtypes (α1A, α1B, α1D) is complex, whereby chronic activity can be either detrimental or protective for both heart and brain function. This review will summarize the evidence that this dual regulation can be mediated through the different α1-AR subtypes in the context of cardiac hypertrophy, heart failure, apoptosis, ischemic preconditioning, neurogenesis, locomotion, neurodegeneration, cognition, neuroplasticity, depression, anxiety, epilepsy, and mental illness. PMID:21338248

  17. Activation of A2b adenosine receptor regulates ovarian cancer cell growth: involvement of Bax/Bcl-2 and caspase-3.

    PubMed

    Hajiahmadi, Sima; Panjehpour, Mojtaba; Aghaei, Mahmoud; Shabani, Mahdi

    2015-08-01

    A2b adenosine receptor (A2bAR) acts as a potent regulator of cell growth in various cell lines. The present study was designed to understand the controlling mechanism of A2bAR agonist (NECA)-induced apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells. Real-time PCR and western blotting assays were used to evaluate the gene and protein expression profiles of A2bAR, respectively. MTT assay was used to study the cell proliferation effect of A2bAR agonist (NECA). Detection of apoptosis was conducted using annexin V-FITC/PI staining, caspase-3 activation assay, and the expression of Bax and Bcl-2 proteins analysis. The mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨM) was analyzed by employing JC-1 prob. The mRNA and protein expression levels of A2bAR in ovarian cancer cells were detected. NECA significantly reduced cell viability in a dose-dependent manner in OVCAR-3 and Caov-4 cell lines. The growth inhibition effect of NECA was related to the induction of cell apoptosis, which was manifested by annexin V-FITC staining, activation of caspase-3, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potentials (ΔΨm). In addition, downregulation of the regulatory protein Bcl-2 and upregulation of Bax protein by NECA were also observed. These findings demonstrated that NECA induces apoptosis via the mitochondrial signaling pathway. Thus, A2bAR agonists may be a potential agent for induction of apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells. PMID:25877700

  18. Dual A1/A2B Receptor Blockade Improves Cardiac and Renal Outcomes in a Rat Model of Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction.

    PubMed

    Tofovic, Stevan P; Salah, Eman M; Smits, Glenn J; Whalley, Eric T; Ticho, Barry; Deykin, Aaron; Jackson, Edwin K

    2016-02-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is prevalent and often accompanied by metabolic syndrome. Current treatment options are limited. Here, we test the hypothesis that combined A1/A2B adenosine receptor blockade is beneficial in obese ZSF1 rats, an animal model of HFpEF with metabolic syndrome. The combined A1/A2B receptor antagonist 3-[4-(2,6-dioxo-1,3-dipropyl-7H-purin-8-yl)-1-bicyclo[2.2.2]octanyl]propanoic acid (BG9928) was administered orally (10 mg/kg/day) to obese ZSF1 rats (n = 10) for 24 weeks (from 20 to 44 weeks of age). Untreated ZSF1 rats (n = 9) served as controls. After 24 weeks of administration, BG9928 significantly lowered plasma triglycerides (in mg/dl: control group, 4351 ± 550; BG9928 group, 2900 ± 551) without adversely affecting plasma cholesterol or activating renin release. BG9928 significantly decreased 24-hour urinary glucose excretion (in mg/kg/day: control group, 823 ± 179; BG9928 group, 196 ± 80) and improved oral glucose tolerance, polydipsia, and polyuria. BG9928 significantly augmented left ventricular diastolic function in association with a reduction in cardiac vasculitis and cardiac necrosis. BG9928 significantly reduced 24-hour urinary protein excretion (in mg/kg/day: control group, 1702 ± 263; BG9928 group, 1076 ± 238), and this was associated with a reduction in focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, tubular atrophy, tubular dilation, and deposition of proteinaceous material in the tubules. These findings show that, in a model of HFpEF with metabolic syndrome, A1/A2B receptor inhibition improves hyperlipidemia, exerts antidiabetic actions, reduces HFpEF, improves cardiac histopathology, and affords renal protection. We conclude that chronic administration of combined A1/A2B receptor antagonists could be beneficial in patients with HFpEF, in particular those with comorbidities such as obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemias. PMID:26585572

  19. Multiple estrogen receptor subtypes influence ingestive behavior in female rodents.

    PubMed

    Santollo, Jessica; Daniels, Derek

    2015-12-01

    Postmenopausal women are at an increased risk of obesity and cardiovascular-related diseases. This is attributable, at least in part, to loss of the ovarian hormone estradiol, which inhibits food and fluid intake in humans and laboratory animal models. Although the hypophagic and anti-dipsogenic effects of estradiol have been well documented for decades, the precise mechanisms underlying these effects are not fully understood. An obvious step toward addressing this open question is identifying which estrogen receptor subtypes are involved and what intracellular processes are involved. This question, however, is complicated not only by the variety of estrogen receptor subtypes that exist, but also because many subtypes have multiple locations of action (i.e. in the nucleus or in the plasma membrane). This review will highlight our current understanding of the roles that specific estrogen receptor subtypes play in mediating estradiol's anorexigenic and anti-dipsogenic effects along with highlighting the many open questions that remain. This review will also describe recent work being performed by our laboratory aimed at answering these open questions. PMID:26037634

  20. The adrenergic receptor subtypes present in frog (Rana esculenta) skin.

    PubMed

    Bellantuono, Vito; Cassano, Giuseppe; Lippe, Claudio

    2008-08-01

    Frog skin transports ions and water under hormonal control. In spite of the fundamental role played by adrenergic stimulation in maintaining the water balance of the organism, the receptor subtype(s) present in the skin have not been identified yet. We measured the increase in short-circuit current (ISC, an estimate of ion transport) induced by cirazoline, clonidine, xamoterol, formoterol, or BRL 37344, in order to verify the presence of alpha1, alpha2, beta1, beta2, or beta3 receptor subtypes, respectively. Only after treatment with formoterol, BRL 37344 and, to a lesser extent, cirazoline was measured a significant increase in ISC (57%, 33.2%, and 4.7%, respectively). The formoterol and BRL 37344 concentrations producing half-maximal effect (EC50) were 1.12 and 70.1 nM, respectively. Moreover, the formoterol effect was inhibited by treatment with ICI 118551 (antagonist of beta2 receptors) while SR 59230A (antagonist of beta3 receptors) had no effect; opposite findings were obtained when the BRL 37344 stimulation was investigated. Finally, by measuring the transepithelial fluxes of 22Na+ and 36Cl-, we demonstrated that Na+ absorption is increased by activation of beta2 and beta3 and is cAMP-sensitive, whereas the Cl- secretion is only increased by activation of beta2 receptors and is cAMP- and calmodulin-sensitive. PMID:18544474

  1. Selective blockade of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 is neuroprotective.

    PubMed

    Bruno, V; Ksiazek, I; Battaglia, G; Lukic, S; Leonhardt, T; Sauer, D; Gasparini, F; Kuhn, R; Nicoletti, F; Flor, P J

    2000-09-01

    We have used potent and selective non-competitive antagonists of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) -- 2-methyl-6-phenylethynylpyridine (MPEP), [6-methyl-2-(phenylazo)-3-pyridinol] (SIB-1757) and [(E)-2-methyl-6-(2-phenylethenyl)pyridine] (SIB-1893) - to examine whether endogenous activation of this particular metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype contributes to neuronal degeneration. In cortical cultures challenged with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), all three mGlu5 receptor antagonists were neuroprotective. The effect of MPEP was highly specific because the close analogue, 3-methyl-6-phenylethynylpyridine (iso-MPEP), which did not antagonize heterologously expressed mGlu5 receptors, was devoid of activity on NMDA toxicity. Neuroprotection by mGlu5 receptor antagonists was also observed in cortical cultures challenged with a toxic concentration of beta-amyloid peptide. We have also examined the effect of mGlu5 receptor antagonists in in vivo models of excitotoxic degeneration. MPEP and SIB-1893 were neuroprotective against neuronal damage induced by intrastriatal injection of NMDA or quinolinic acid. These results indicate that mGlu5 receptors represent a suitable target for novel neuroprotective agents of potential application in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:10974306

  2. 5-Hydroxytryptamine Receptor Subtypes and their Modulators with Therapeutic Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Pithadia, Anand B.; Jain, Sunita M.

    2009-01-01

    5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) has become one of the most investigated and complex biogenic amines. The main receptors and their subtypes, e.g., 5-HTI (5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HTID, 5-HTIE and 5-HT1F), 5-HT2 (5-HT2A, 5-HT2B and 5-HT2C), 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT5 (5-HT5A, 5-HT5B), 5-HT6 and 5-HT7 have been identified. Specific drugs which are capable of either selectively stimulating or inhibiting these receptor subtypes are being designed. This has generated therapeutic potentials of 5-HT receptor modulators in a variety of disease conditions. Conditions where 5-HT receptor modulators have established their use with distinct efficacy and advantages include migraine, anxiety, psychosis, obesity and cancer therapy-induced vomiting by cytotoxic drugs and radiation. Discovery of 5-HT, its biosynthesis, metabolism, physiological role and the potential of 5-HT receptor modulators in various nervous, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal tract disorders, bone growth and micturition have been discussed in this article. Keywords 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors; Modulators; Biogenic amines PMID:22505971

  3. Excess adenosine in murine penile erectile tissues contributes to priapism via A2B adenosine receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Tiejuan; Abbasi, Shahrzad; Zhang, Hong; Uray, Karen; Chunn, Janci L.; Xia, Ling Wei; Molina, Jose G.; Weisbrodt, Norman W.; Kellems, Rodney E.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Xia, Yang

    2008-01-01

    Priapism, abnormally prolonged penile erection in the absence of sexual excitation, is associated with ischemia-mediated erectile tissue damage and subsequent erectile dysfunction. It is common among males with sickle cell disease (SCD), and SCD transgenic mice are an accepted model of the disorder. Current strategies to manage priapism suffer from a poor fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the disorder. Here we report that mice lacking adenosine deaminase (ADA), an enzyme necessary for the breakdown of adenosine, displayed unexpected priapic activity. ADA enzyme therapy successfully corrected the priapic activity both in vivo and in vitro, suggesting that it was dependent on elevated adenosine levels. Further genetic and pharmacologic evidence demonstrated that A2B adenosine receptor–mediated (A2BR-mediated) cAMP and cGMP induction was required for elevated adenosine–induced prolonged penile erection. Finally, priapic activity in SCD transgenic mice was also caused by elevated adenosine levels and A2BR activation. Thus, we have shown that excessive adenosine accumulation in the penis contributes to priapism through increased A2BR signaling in both Ada–/– and SCD transgenic mice. These findings provide insight regarding the molecular basis of priapism and suggest that strategies to either reduce adenosine or block A2BR activation may prove beneficial in the treatment of this disorder. PMID:18340377

  4. Angiotensin II receptor subtypes in rat renal preglomerular vessels.

    PubMed

    De León, H; Garcia, R

    1992-01-01

    A simple technique to isolate rat renal preglomerular vessels is described. Kidneys were pressed against a 0.3 mm stainless steel grid. The whole vascular tree, including the interlobar, arcuate, and interlobular arteries, as well as the afferent arterioles, remained on the grid surface from where they were recovered. Extensive washing yielded a highly pure preparation of renal microvessels. Radioligand binding experiments were performed to characterize 125I-[Sar1,Ile8]-ANG II binding sites in preglomerular microvessel membranes. Equilibrium saturation binding experiments revealed the presence of one group of high affinity receptors (Kd = 1.22 +/- 0.171 nM; Bmax = 209 +/- 14 fmol/mg protein). Competitive inhibition experiments with two highly specific nonpeptide ANG II antagonists, losartan (DuP 753), which is specific for the AT1 receptor subtype, and PD123319, which is specific for the AT2 subtype, demonstrated that the large majority of, if not all, ANG II receptors in rat renal preglomerular vessels correspond to the AT1 subtype. PMID:1299411

  5. Localization of the adenosine A1 receptor subtype gene (ADORA1) to chromosome 1q32.1

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend-Nicholson, A.; Schofield, P.R.; Baker, E.

    1995-03-20

    Adenosine, acting through its receptors, exerts effects on almost all organ systems, influencing a diversity of physiological responses, including the inhibition of neurotransmitter release, the modulation of cardiac rhythmicity and contractility, and the potentiation of IgE-dependent mediator release. Adenosine receptors belong to the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily, a class of cell-surface receptors that, when activated, couple to a heterotrimeric G protein complex to effect signal transduction. Molecular cloning and subsequent pharmacological and biochemical analyses have led to the identification of four different subtypes of adenosine receptor. The A3 receptor has been localized to chromosome 3 in the mouse by interspecific backcross analysis, suggesting a human chromosomal localization of 1p13 from known mouse-human linkage homologies. We have previously mapped the A2b adenosine receptor subtype to chromosome 17p11.2-p12 using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and PCR-based screening of somatic cell hybrid DNAs. A previous report has concluded that the Al and A2a receptor subtypes are localized on chromosome 22q11.2-q13.1 and 11q11-q13, respectively, but conflicts with that of MacCollin et al., who have mapped the A2a gene to chromosome 22. In this report, we show that the human A1 adenosine receptor subtype does not map to chromosome 22q11.2-q13.1, but is instead localized on chromosome 1q32. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  6. The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Uses its C-Terminus to Regulate the A2B Adenosine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Watson, Michael J; Lee, Shernita L; Marklew, Abigail J; Gilmore, Rodney C; Gentzsch, Martina; Sassano, Maria F; Gray, Michael A; Tarran, Robert

    2016-01-01

    CFTR is an apical membrane anion channel that regulates fluid homeostasis in many organs including the airways, colon, pancreas and sweat glands. In cystic fibrosis, CFTR dysfunction causes significant morbidity/mortality. Whilst CFTR's function as an ion channel has been well described, its ability to regulate other proteins is less understood. We have previously shown that plasma membrane CFTR increases the surface density of the adenosine 2B receptor (A2BR), but not of the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR), leading to an enhanced, adenosine-induced cAMP response in the presence of CFTR. In this study, we have found that the C-terminal PDZ-domain of both A2BR and CFTR were crucial for this interaction, and that replacing the C-terminus of A2BR with that of β2AR removed this CFTR-dependency. This observation extended to intact epithelia and disruption of the actin cytoskeleton prevented A2BR-induced but not β2AR-induced airway surface liquid (ASL) secretion. We also found that CFTR expression altered the organization of the actin cytoskeleton and PDZ-binding proteins in both HEK293T cells and in well-differentiated human bronchial epithelia. Furthermore, removal of CFTR's PDZ binding motif (ΔTRL) prevented actin rearrangement, suggesting that CFTR insertion in the plasma membrane results in local reorganization of actin, PDZ binding proteins and certain GPCRs. PMID:27278076

  7. The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Uses its C-Terminus to Regulate the A2B Adenosine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Michael J.; Lee, Shernita L.; Marklew, Abigail J.; Gilmore, Rodney C.; Gentzsch, Martina; Sassano, Maria F.; Gray, Michael A.; Tarran, Robert

    2016-01-01

    CFTR is an apical membrane anion channel that regulates fluid homeostasis in many organs including the airways, colon, pancreas and sweat glands. In cystic fibrosis, CFTR dysfunction causes significant morbidity/mortality. Whilst CFTR’s function as an ion channel has been well described, its ability to regulate other proteins is less understood. We have previously shown that plasma membrane CFTR increases the surface density of the adenosine 2B receptor (A2BR), but not of the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR), leading to an enhanced, adenosine-induced cAMP response in the presence of CFTR. In this study, we have found that the C-terminal PDZ-domain of both A2BR and CFTR were crucial for this interaction, and that replacing the C-terminus of A2BR with that of β2AR removed this CFTR-dependency. This observation extended to intact epithelia and disruption of the actin cytoskeleton prevented A2BR-induced but not β2AR-induced airway surface liquid (ASL) secretion. We also found that CFTR expression altered the organization of the actin cytoskeleton and PDZ-binding proteins in both HEK293T cells and in well-differentiated human bronchial epithelia. Furthermore, removal of CFTR’s PDZ binding motif (ΔTRL) prevented actin rearrangement, suggesting that CFTR insertion in the plasma membrane results in local reorganization of actin, PDZ binding proteins and certain GPCRs. PMID:27278076

  8. Remifentanil-induced preconditioning has cross-talk with A1 and A2B adenosine receptors in ischemic-reperfused rat heart

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong-Cheol; Jung, Jiyoon; Park, Sang-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a cross-talk between opioid receptors (OPRs) and adenosine receptors (ADRs) in remifentanil preconditioning (R-Pre) and, if so, to investigate the types of ADRs involved in the cross-talk. Isolated rat hearts received 30 min of regional ischemia followed by 2 hr of reperfusion. OPR and ADR antagonists were perfused from 10 min before R-Pre until the end of R-Pre. The heart rate, left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP), velocity of contraction (+dP/dtmax), and coronary flow (CF) were recorded. The area at risk and area of necrosis were measured. After reperfusion, the LVDP, +dP/dtmax, and CF showed a significant increase in the R-Pre group compared with the control group (no intervention before or after regional ischemia). These increases in the R-Pre group were blocked by naloxone, a nonspecific ADR antagonist, an A1 ADR antagonist, and an A2B ADR antagonist. The infarct size was reduced significantly in the R-Pre group compared with the control group. The infarct-reducing effect in the R-Pre group was blocked by naloxone, the nonspecific ADR antagonist, the A1 ADR antagonist, and the A2B ADR antagonist. The results of this study demonstrate that there is cross-talk between ADRs and OPRs in R-Pre and that A1 ADR and A2B ADR appear to be involved in the cross-talk. PMID:26773185

  9. Remifentanil-induced preconditioning has cross-talk with A1 and A2B adenosine receptors in ischemic-reperfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Cheol; Jung, Jiyoon; Park, Sang-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a cross-talk between opioid receptors (OPRs) and adenosine receptors (ADRs) in remifentanil preconditioning (R-Pre) and, if so, to investigate the types of ADRs involved in the cross-talk. Isolated rat hearts received 30 min of regional ischemia followed by 2 hr of reperfusion. OPR and ADR antagonists were perfused from 10 min before R-Pre until the end of R-Pre. The heart rate, left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP),velocity of contraction (+dP/dtmax), and coronary flow (CF) were recorded. The area at risk and area of necrosis were measured. After reperfusion, the LVDP, +dP/dtmax,and CF showed a significant increase in the R-Pre group compared with the control group (no intervention before or after regional ischemia). These increases in the R-Pre group were blocked by naloxone, a nonspecific ADR antagonist, an A1 ADR antagonist, and an A2B ADR antagonist. The infarct size was reduced significantly in the R-Pre group compared with the control group. The infarct-reducing effect in the R-Pre group was blocked by naloxone, the nonspecific ADR antagonist, the A1 ADR antagonist, and the A2B ADR antagonist. The results of this study demonstrate that there is cross-talk between ADRs and OPRs in R-Pre and that A1 ADR and A2B ADR appear to be involved in the cross-talk. PMID:26773185

  10. Excess adenosine A2B receptor signaling contributes to priapism through HIF-1α mediated reduction of PDE5 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Chen; Wen, Jiaming; Zhang, Yujin; Dai, Yingbo; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Weiru; Qi, Lin; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Kellems, Rodney E.; Xia, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Priapism is featured with prolonged and painful penile erection and is prevalent among males with sickle cell disease (SCD). The disorder is a dangerous urological and hematological emergency since it is associated with ischemic tissue damage and erectile disability. Here we report that phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) gene expression and PDE activity is significantly reduced in penile tissues of two independent priapic models: SCD mice and adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient mice. Moreover, using ADA enzyme therapy to reduce adenosine or a specific antagonist to block A2B adenosine receptor (ADORA2B) signaling, we successfully attenuated priapism in both ADA−/− and SCD mice by restoring penile PDE5 gene expression to normal levels. This finding led us to further discover that excess adenosine signaling via ADORA2B activation directly reduces PDE5 gene expression in a hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α)-dependent manner. Overall, we reveal that excess adenosine-mediated ADORA2B signaling underlies reduced penile PDE activity by decreasing PDE5 gene expression in a HIF-1α-dependent manner and provide new insight for the pathogenesis of priapism and novel therapies for the disease.—Ning, C., Wen, J., Zhang, Y., Dai, Y., Wang, W., Zhang, W., Qi, L., Grenz, A., Eltzschig, H. K., Blackburn, M. R., Kellems, R. E., Xia, Y. Excess adenosine A2B receptor signaling contributes to priapism through HIF-1α mediated reduction of PDE5 gene expression. PMID:24614760

  11. A2B adenosine receptor signaling attenuates acute lung injury by enhancing alveolar fluid clearance in mice.

    PubMed

    Eckle, Tobias; Grenz, Almut; Laucher, Stefanie; Eltzschig, Holger K

    2008-10-01

    Although acute lung injury contributes significantly to critical illness, resolution often occurs spontaneously via activation of incompletely understood pathways. We recently found that mechanical ventilation of mice increases the level of pulmonary adenosine, and that mice deficient for extracellular adenosine generation show increased pulmonary edema and inflammation after ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Here, we profiled the response to VILI in mice with genetic deletions of each of the 4 adenosine receptors (ARs) and found that deletion of the A2BAR gene was specifically associated with reduced survival time and increased pulmonary albumin leakage after injury. In WT mice, treatment with an A2BAR-selective antagonist resulted in enhanced pulmonary inflammation, edema, and attenuated gas exchange, while an A2BAR agonist attenuated VILI. In bone marrow-chimeric A2BAR mice, although the pulmonary inflammatory response involved A2BAR signaling from bone marrow-derived cells, A2BARs located on the lung tissue attenuated VILI-induced albumin leakage and pulmonary edema. Furthermore, measurement of alveolar fluid clearance (AFC) demonstrated that A2BAR signaling enhanced amiloride-sensitive fluid transport and elevation of pulmonary cAMP levels following VILI, suggesting that A2BAR agonist treatment protects by drying out the lungs. Similar enhancement of pulmonary cAMP and AFC were also observed after beta-adrenergic stimulation, a pathway known to promote AFC. Taken together, these studies reveal a role for A2BAR signaling in attenuating VILI and implicate this receptor as a potential therapeutic target during acute lung injury. PMID:18787641

  12. Adenosine augments interleukin-10 production by microglial cells through an A2B adenosine receptor-mediated process

    PubMed Central

    Koscsó, Balázs; Csóka, Balázs; Selmeczy, Zsolt; Himer, Leonóra; Pacher, Pál; Virág, László; Haskó, György

    2011-01-01

    Microglia are activated by pathogen-associated molecular patterns and produce pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-12, and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Adenosine is an endogenous purine nucleoside and is a ligand of four G protein-coupled adenosine receptors (ARs), which are the A1AR, A2AAR, A2BAR and A3AR. ARs have been shown to suppress TNF-α production by microglia, but their role in regulating IL-10 production has not been studied. Here, we demonstrate that adenosine augments IL-10 production by activated murine microglia while suppressing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Since the order of potency of selective AR agonists in inducing IL-10 production was 5′-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) > N6-(3-iodobenzyl)-adenosine-5′-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA) > 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA) ≥ 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5′-N-ethyl-carboxamidoadenosine (CGS21680), and the A2BAR antagonist MRS-1754 prevented the effect of NECA, we conclude that the stimulatory effect of adenosine on IL-10 production is mediated by the A2BAR. Mechanistically, adenosine augmented IL-10 mRNA accumulation by a transcriptional process. Using mutant IL-10 promoter constructs we showed that a CREB-binding region in the promoter mediated the augmenting effect of adenosine on IL-10 transcription. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that adenosine induced CREB phosphorylation at the IL-10 promoter. Silencing CREB using lentivirally delivered shRNA blocked the enhancing effect of adenosine on IL-10 production confirming a role for CREB in mediating the stimulatory effect of adenosine on IL-10 production. In addition, adenosine augmented IL-10 production by stimulating p38 MAPK. Collectively, our results establish that A2BARs augment IL-10 production by activated murine microglia. PMID:22116830

  13. Highly selective agonists for substance P receptor subtypes.

    PubMed Central

    Wormser, U; Laufer, R; Hart, Y; Chorev, M; Gilon, C; Selinger, Z

    1986-01-01

    The existence of a third tachykinin receptor (SP-N) in the mammalian nervous system was demonstrated by development of highly selective agonists. Systematic N-methylation of individual peptide bonds in the C-terminal hexapeptide of substance P gave rise to agonists which specifically act on different receptor subtypes. The most selective analog of this series, succinyl-[Asp6,Me-Phe8]SP6-11, elicits half-maximal contraction of the guinea pig ileum through the neuronal SP-N receptor at a concentration of 0.5 nM. At least 60,000-fold higher concentrations of this peptide are required to stimulate the other two tachykinin receptors (SP-P and SP-E). The action of selective SP-N agonists in the guinea pig ileum is antagonized by opioid peptides, suggesting a functional counteraction between opiate and SP-N receptors. These results indicate that the tachykinin receptors are distinct entities which may mediate different physiological functions. PMID:2431898

  14. Defining Breast Cancer Intrinsic Subtypes by Quantitative Receptor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cheang, Maggie C.U.; Martin, Miguel; Nielsen, Torsten O.; Prat, Aleix; Voduc, David; Rodriguez-Lescure, Alvaro; Ruiz, Amparo; Chia, Stephen; Shepherd, Lois; Ruiz-Borrego, Manuel; Calvo, Lourdes; Alba, Emilio; Carrasco, Eva; Caballero, Rosalia; Tu, Dongsheng; Pritchard, Kathleen I.; Levine, Mark N.; Bramwell, Vivien H.; Parker, Joel; Bernard, Philip S.; Ellis, Matthew J.; Perou, Charles M.; Di Leo, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To determine intrinsic breast cancer subtypes represented within categories defined by quantitative hormone receptor (HR) and HER2 expression. Methods. We merged 1,557 cases from three randomized phase III trials into a single data set. These breast tumors were centrally reviewed in each trial for quantitative ER, PR, and HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) stain and by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), with intrinsic subtyping by research-based PAM50 RT-qPCR assay. Results. Among 283 HER2-negative tumors with <1% HR expression by IHC, 207 (73%) were basal-like; other subtypes, particularly HER2-enriched (48, 17%), were present. Among the 1,298 HER2-negative tumors, borderline HR (1%–9% staining) was uncommon (n = 39), and these tumors were heterogeneous: 17 (44%) luminal A/B, 12 (31%) HER2-enriched, and only 7 (18%) basal-like. Including them in the definition of triple-negative breast cancer significantly diminished enrichment for basal-like cancer (p < .05). Among 106 HER2-positive tumors with <1% HR expression by IHC, the HER2-enriched subtype was the most frequent (87, 82%), whereas among 127 HER2-positive tumors with strong HR (>10%) expression, only 69 (54%) were HER2-enriched and 55 (43%) were luminal (39 luminal B, 16 luminal A). Quantitative HR expression by RT-qPCR gave similar results. Regardless of methodology, basal-like cases seldom expressed ER/ESR1 or PR/PGR and were associated with the lowest expression level of HER2/ERBB2 relative to other subtypes. Conclusion. Significant discordance remains between clinical assay-defined subsets and intrinsic subtype. For identifying basal-like breast cancer, the optimal HR IHC cut point was <1%, matching the American Society of Clinical Oncology and College of American Pathologists guidelines. Tumors with borderline HR staining are molecularly diverse and may require additional assays to clarify underlying biology. PMID:25908555

  15. MicroRNA signatures predict dysregulated vitamin D receptor and calcium pathways status in limb girdle muscle dystrophies (LGMD) 2A/2B.

    PubMed

    Aguennouz, M; Lo Giudice, C; Licata, N; Rodolico, C; Musumeci, O; Fanin, M; Migliorato, A; Ragusa, M; Macaione, V; Di Giorgio, R M; Angelini, C; Toscano, A

    2016-08-01

    miRNA expression profile and predicted pathways involved in selected limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD)2A/2B patients were investigated. A total of 187 miRNAs were dysregulated in all patients, with six miRNAs showing opposite regulation in LGMD2A versus LGMD2B patients. Silico analysis evidence: (1) a cluster of the dysregulated miRNAs resulted primarily involved in inflammation and calcium metabolism, and (2) two genes predicted as controlled by calcium-assigned miRNAs (Vitamin D Receptor gene and Guanine Nucleotide Binding protein beta polypeptide 1gene) showed an evident upregulation in LGMD2B patients, in accordance with miRNA levels. Our data support alterations in calcium pathway status in LGMD 2A/B, suggesting myofibre calcium imbalance as a potential therapeutic target. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27558075

  16. Genotypic Prediction of Co-receptor Tropism of HIV-1 Subtypes A and C.

    PubMed

    Riemenschneider, Mona; Cashin, Kieran Y; Budeus, Bettina; Sierra, Saleta; Shirvani-Dastgerdi, Elham; Bayanolhagh, Saeed; Kaiser, Rolf; Gorry, Paul R; Heider, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1) infections with CCR5-antagonists requires the co-receptor usage prediction of viral strains. Currently available tools are mostly designed based on subtype B strains and thus are in general not applicable to non-B subtypes. However, HIV-1 infections caused by subtype B only account for approximately 11% of infections worldwide. We evaluated the performance of several sequence-based algorithms for co-receptor usage prediction employed on subtype A V3 sequences including circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) and subtype C strains. We further analysed sequence profiles of gp120 regions of subtype A, B and C to explore functional relationships to entry phenotypes. Our analyses clearly demonstrate that state-of-the-art algorithms are not useful for predicting co-receptor tropism of subtype A and its CRFs. Sequence profile analysis of gp120 revealed molecular variability in subtype A viruses. Especially, the V2 loop region could be associated with co-receptor tropism, which might indicate a unique pattern that determines co-receptor tropism in subtype A strains compared to subtype B and C strains. Thus, our study demonstrates that there is a need for the development of novel algorithms facilitating tropism prediction of HIV-1 subtype A to improve effective antiretroviral treatment in patients. PMID:27126912

  17. Genotypic Prediction of Co-receptor Tropism of HIV-1 Subtypes A and C

    PubMed Central

    Riemenschneider, Mona; Cashin, Kieran Y.; Budeus, Bettina; Sierra, Saleta; Shirvani-Dastgerdi, Elham; Bayanolhagh, Saeed; Kaiser, Rolf; Gorry, Paul R.; Heider, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1) infections with CCR5-antagonists requires the co-receptor usage prediction of viral strains. Currently available tools are mostly designed based on subtype B strains and thus are in general not applicable to non-B subtypes. However, HIV-1 infections caused by subtype B only account for approximately 11% of infections worldwide. We evaluated the performance of several sequence-based algorithms for co-receptor usage prediction employed on subtype A V3 sequences including circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) and subtype C strains. We further analysed sequence profiles of gp120 regions of subtype A, B and C to explore functional relationships to entry phenotypes. Our analyses clearly demonstrate that state-of-the-art algorithms are not useful for predicting co-receptor tropism of subtype A and its CRFs. Sequence profile analysis of gp120 revealed molecular variability in subtype A viruses. Especially, the V2 loop region could be associated with co-receptor tropism, which might indicate a unique pattern that determines co-receptor tropism in subtype A strains compared to subtype B and C strains. Thus, our study demonstrates that there is a need for the development of novel algorithms facilitating tropism prediction of HIV-1 subtype A to improve effective antiretroviral treatment in patients. PMID:27126912

  18. Localization of nigrostriatal dopamine receptor subtypes and adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Filloux, F.; Dawson, T.M.; Wamsley, J.K.

    1988-04-01

    Quantitative autoradiography using (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390, (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride and (/sup 3/H)-forskolin was used to assess the effects of single and combined neurotoxin lesions of the nigrostriatal pathway in the rat brain on dopamine (DA) receptor subtypes and adenylate cyclase (AC), respectively. Ibotenic acid (IA) lesions of the caudate-putamen (CPu) resulted in near total loss of both (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 and of (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding in the ipsilateral CPu and substantia nigra reticulata (SNR). (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding in the CPu was only partially removed by this same lesion, and nigral (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding was virtually unchanged. 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and IA lesions of the substantia nigra compacta (SNC) did not affect (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 or (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding, but largely removed (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding in the SNC. A 6-OHDA lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway followed by an ipsilateral IA injection of the CPu failed to further reduce (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding in the CPu. These results demonstrate that postsynaptic DA receptors in the CPu are of both the D1 and D2 variety; however, a portion of D2 receptors in the CPu may be presynaptic on afferent nerve terminals to this structure. D1 receptors in the SNR are presynaptic on striatonigral terminals, whereas the D2 receptors of the SNC are autoreceptors on nigral DA neurons. The existence of presynaptic D2 receptors on nigrostriatal DA-ergic terminals could not be confirmed by this study. Co-localization of D1 receptors and AC occurs in both the CPu and SNR.

  19. Identification of two H3-histamine receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    West, R.E. Jr.; Zweig, A.; Shih, N.Y.; Siegel, M.I.; Egan, R.W.; Clark, M.A. )

    1990-11-01

    The H3-histamine receptor provides feedback inhibition of histamine synthesis and release as well as inhibition of other neurotransmitter release. We have characterized this receptor by radioligand binding studies with the H3 agonist N alpha-(3H)methylhistamine ((3H)NAMHA). The results of (3H)NAMHA saturation binding and NAMHA inhibition of (3H)NAMHA binding were consistent with an apparently single class of receptors (KD = 0.37 nM, Bmax = 73 fmol/mg of protein) and competition assays with other agonists and the antagonists impromidine and dimaprit disclosed only a single class of sites. In contrast, inhibition of (3H)NAMHA binding by the specific high affinity H3 antagonist thioperamide revealed two classes of sites (KiA = 5 nM, BmaxA = 30 fmol/mg of protein; KiB = 68 nM, BmaxB = 48 fmol/mg of protein). Burimamide, another antagonist that, like thioperamide, contains a thiourea group, likewise discriminated between two classes of sites. In addition to differences between some antagonist potencies for the two receptors, there is a differential guanine nucleotide sensitivity of the two. The affinity of the H3A receptor for (3H) NAMHA was reduced less than 2-fold, whereas (3H)NAMHA binding to the H3B receptor was undetectable in the presence of guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate). The distinction between H3A and H3B receptor subtypes, the former a high affinity and the latter a low affinity thioperamide site, draws support from published in vitro data.

  20. Adrenergic receptor subtypes in the cerebral circulation of newborn piglets

    SciTech Connect

    Wagerle, L.C.; Delivoria-Papadopoulos, M.

    1987-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the ..cap alpha..-adrenergic receptor subtype mediating cerebral vasoconstriction during sympathetic nerve stimulation in the newborn piglet. The effect of ..cap alpha../sub 1/- and ..cap alpha../sub 2/-antagonists prazosin and yohimbine on the cerebrovascular response to unilateral electrical stimulation (15 Hz, 15 V) of the superior cervical sympathetic trunk was studied in 25 newborn piglets. Regional cerebral blood flow was measured with tracer microspheres. Sympathetic stimulation decreased blood flow to the ipsilateral cerebrum hippocampus, choroid plexus, and masseter muscle. ..cap alpha../sub 1/-Adrenergic receptor blockade with prazosin inhibited the sympathetic vasoconstriction in the cerebrum, hippocampus, and masseter muscle and abolished it in the choroid plexus. ..cap alpha../sub s/-Adrenergic receptor blockade with yohimbine had no effect. Following the higher dose of yohimbine, however, blood flow to all brain regions was increased by approximately two-fold, possibly due to enhanced cerebral metabolism. These data demonstrate that vascular ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptors mediate vasoconstriction to neuroadrenergic stimulation in cerebral resistance vessels in the newborn piglet.

  1. Molecular and cellular analysis of human histamine receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Roland; Strasser, Andrea; Schneider, Erich H.; Neumann, Detlef; Dove, Stefan; Buschauer, Armin

    2013-01-01

    The human histamine receptors hH1R and hH2R constitute important drug targets, and hH3R and hH4R have substantial potential in this area. Considering the species-specificity of pharmacology of HxR orthologs, it is important to analyze hHxRs. Here,we summarize current knowledge of hHxRs endogenously expressed in human cells and hHxRs recombinantly expressed in mammalian and insect cells. We present the advantages and disadvantages of the various systems. We also discuss problems associated with the use of hHxR antibodies, an issue of general relevance for G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). There is much greater overlap in activity of ‘selective’ ligands for other hHxRs than the cognate receptor subtype than generally appreciated. Studies with native and recombinant systems support the concept of ligand-specific receptor conformations, encompassing agonists and antagonists. It is emerging that for characterization of hHxR ligands, one cannot rely on a single test system and a single parameter. Rather, multiple systems and parameters have to be studied. Although such studies are time-consuming and expensive, ultimately, they will increase drug safety and efficacy. PMID:23254267

  2. FROM MOLECULAR PHYLOGENY TOWARDS DIFFERENTIATING PHARMACOLOGY FOR NMDA RECEPTOR SUBTYPES

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Randall J.; Curtice, Kigen J.; Twede, Vernon D.; Watkins, Maren; Gruszczyński, Paweł; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Horvath, Martin P.; Olivera, Baldomero M.

    2014-01-01

    In order to decode the roles that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors play in excitatory neurotransmission, synaptic plasticity, and neuropathologies, there is need for ligands that differ in their subtype selectivity. The conantokin family of Conus peptides is the only group of peptidic natural products known to target NMDA receptors. Using a search that was guided by phylogeny, we identified new conantokins from the marine snail Conus bocki that complement the current repertoire of NMDA receptor pharmacology. Channel currents measured in Xenopus oocytes demonstrate conantokins conBk-A, conBk-B, and conBk-C have highest potencies for NR2D containing receptors, in contrast to previously characterized conantokins that preferentially block NR2B containing NMDA receptors. Conantokins are rich in γ-carboxyglutamate, typically 17–34 residues, and adopt helical structure in a calcium-dependent manner. As judged by CD spectroscopy, conBk-C adopts significant helical structure in a calcium ion-dependent manner, while calcium, on its own, appears insufficient to stabilize helical conformations of conBk-A or conBk-B. Molecular dynamics simulations help explain the differences in calcium-stabilized structures. Two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy shows that the 9-residue conBk-B is relatively unstructured but forms a helix in the presence of TFE and calcium ions that is similar to other conantokin structures. These newly discovered conantokins hold promise that further exploration of small peptidic antagonists will lead to a set of pharmacological tools that can be used to characterize the role of NMDA receptors in nervous system function and disease. PMID:24508768

  3. Actinin-1 binds to the C-terminus of A2B adenosine receptor (A2BAR) and enhances A2BAR cell-surface expression.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying; Hu, Wenbao; Yu, Xiaojie; Liu, Zhengzhao; Tarran, Robert; Ravid, Katya; Huang, Pingbo

    2016-07-15

    A2BAR (A2B adenosine receptor) has been implicated in several physiological conditions, such as allergic or inflammatory disorders, vasodilation, cell growth and epithelial electrolyte secretion. For mediating the protein-protein interactions of A2BAR, the receptor's C-terminus is recognized to be crucial. In the present study, we unexpectedly found that two point mutations in the A2BAR C-terminus (F297A and R298A) drastically impaired the expression of A2BAR protein by accelerating its degradation. Thus we tested the hypothesis that these two point mutations disrupt A2BAR's interaction with a protein essential for A2BAR stability. Our results show that both mutations disrupted the interaction of A2BAR with actinin-1, an actin-associated protein. Furthermore, actinin-1 binding stabilized the global and cell-surface expression of A2BAR. By contrast, actinin-4, another non-muscle actinin isoform, did not bind to A2BAR. Thus our findings reveal a previously unidentified regulatory mechanism of A2BAR abundance. PMID:27208173

  4. Propofol Restores Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Receptor Subtype-1 Sensitivity via Activation of Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin Receptor Subtype-1 in Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyu; Wickley, Peter J.; Sinha, Sayantani; Bratz, Ian N.; Damron, Derek S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Crosstalk between peripheral nociceptors belonging to the transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor subtype-1 (TRPV1) and ankyrin subtype-1 (TRPA1) family has recently been demonstrated. Moreover, the intravenous anesthetic propofol has been shown to directly activate TRPA1 receptors, and indirectly restore sensitivity of TRPV1 receptors in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons. Our objective was to determine the extent to which TRPA1 activation is involved in mediating the propofol-induced restoration of TRPV1 sensitivity. Methods Mouse DRG neurons were isolated by enzymatic dissociation and grown for 24 h. F-11 cells were transfected with complementary DNA for both TRPV1 and TRPA1 or TRPV1 only. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration was measured in individual cells via fluorescence microscopy. Following TRPV1 de-sensitization with capsaicin (100 nM), cells were treated with propofol (1, 5 and 10 μM) alone, propofol in the presence of the TRPA1 antagonist, HC-030031 (0.5 μM) or the TRPA1 agonist, Allyl isothiocyanate (AITC, 100 μM) and capsaicin was then reapplied. Results In DRG neurons that contain both TRPV1 and TRPA1, propofol and AITC restored TRPV1 sensitivity. However, in DRG neurons containing only TRPV1 receptors, exposure to propofol or AITC following de-sensitization did not restore capsaicin-induced TRPV1 sensitivity. Similarly, in F-11 cells transfected with both TRPV1 and TRPA1, propofol and AITC restored TRPV1 sensitivity. However, in F-11 cells transfected with TRPV1 only, neither propofol nor AITC were capable of restoring TRPV1 sensitivity. Conclusions These data demonstrate that propofol restores TRPV1 sensitivity in primary DRG neurons and in cultured F-11 cells transfected with both the TRPV1 and TRPA1 receptors via a TRPA1-dependent process. Propofol’s effects on sensory neurons may be clinically important and contribute to peripheral sensitization to nociceptive stimuli in traumatized tissue. PMID:21364461

  5. A2B adenosine receptor contributes to penile erection via PI3K/AKT signaling cascade-mediated eNOS activation

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jiaming; Grenz, Almut; Zhang, Yujin; Dai, Yingbo; Kellems, Rodney E.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Xia, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Normal penile erection is under the control of multiple factors and signaling pathways. Although adenosine signaling is implicated in normal and abnormal penile erection, the exact role and the underlying mechanism for adenosine signaling in penile physiology remain elusive. Here we report that shear stress leads to increased adenosine release from endothelial cells. Subsequently, we determined that ecto-5′-nucleotidase (CD73) is a key enzyme required for the production of elevated adenosine from ATP released by shear-stressed endothelial cells. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that shear stress-mediated elevated adenosine functions through the adenosine A2B receptor (A2BR) to activate the PI3K/AKT signaling cascade and subsequent increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation. These in vitro studies led us to discover further that adenosine was induced during sustained penile erection and contributes to PI3K/AKT activation and subsequent eNOS phosphorylation via A2BR signaling in intact animal. Finally, we demonstrate that lowering adenosine in wild-type mice or genetic deletion of A2BR in mutant mice significantly attenuated PI3K/AKT activation, eNOS phosphorylation, and subsequent impaired penile erection featured with the reduction of ratio of maximal intracavernosal pressure to systemic arterial pressure from 0.49 ± 0.03 to 0.41 ± 0.05 and 0.38 ± 0.04, respectively (both P<0.05). Overall, using biochemical, cellular, genetic, and physiological approaches, our findings reveal that adenosine is a novel molecule signaling via A2BR activation, contributing to penile erection via PI3K/AKT-dependent eNOS activation. These studies suggest that this signaling pathway may be a novel therapeutic target for erectile disorders.—Wen, J., Grenz, A., Zhang, Y., Dai, Y., Kellems, R. E., Blackburn, M. R., Eltzschig, H. K., Xia, Y. A2B adenosine receptor contributes to penile erection via PI3K/AKT signaling cascade-mediated eNOS activation. PMID

  6. Selective labeling and localization of the M4 (m4) muscarinic receptor subtype.

    PubMed

    Ferrari-Dileo, G; Waelbroeck, M; Mash, D C; Flynn, D D

    1994-12-01

    We report here a novel strategy for the selective labeling and localization of the M4 (m4) muscarinic receptor subtype, based on the distinct kinetics of the muscarinic antagonists dexetimide and N-methylscopolamine (NMS) and on the selectivity profile of guanylpirenzepine and AF-DX 116 for the m1-m5 muscarinic receptor subtypes expressed in CHO-K1 cells. Incubation with 10 nM dexetimide, a nonselective antagonist, resulted in > 90% occupancy of each of the m1-m5 receptor subtypes. The relatively rapid rates of dexetimide dissociation from the m1, m2, and m4 receptor subtypes (t1/2 values of < 12.5 min) and the slower rates of dexetimide dissociation from the m3 and m5 receptor subtypes (t1/2 values of 65 and 75 min, respectively) favored the labeling of the m1, m2, and m4 receptor subtypes with short incubations with [3H]NMS. Inclusion of 200 nM guanylpirenzepine and 250 nM AF-DX 116 prevented the binding of [3H]NMS to the majority of the m1 and m2 receptor subtypes, respectively, resulting in primary labeling of the m4 receptor subtype. Brief dissociation of the radioligand in the presence of 1 microM atropine improved the ratio of m4 to m2 labeling by selectively removing [3H]NMS from the m2 subtype. Under these conditions, the ratio of [3H]NMS binding to the m4 versus m1, m2, m3, and m5 receptor subtypes was 4:1. In vitro autoradiography combined with these m4-selective labeling conditions demonstrated that the M4 (m4) receptor subtype was localized to the primary visual area (V1, area 17, occipital cortex) and the basal ganglia, a distribution distinct from that demonstrated for the M1 (m1), M2 (m2), and M3 (m3) receptor subtypes. These results demonstrate that a combination of the distinct kinetics of dexetimide and NMS and the receptor subtype selectivity of guanylpirenzepine and AF-DX 116 provides a valuable labeling strategy to examine the distribution and localization of the M4 (m4) muscarinic receptor subtype in brain, peripheral tissues, and cell lines

  7. 2-Substituted adenosine derivatives: affinity and efficacy at four subtypes of human adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhan-Guo; Mamedova, Liaman K; Chen, Peiran; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2004-11-15

    The affinity and efficacy at four subtypes (A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3)) of human adenosine receptors (ARs) of a wide range of 2-substituted adenosine derivatives were evaluated using radioligand binding assays and a cyclic AMP functional assay in intact CHO cells stably expressing these receptors. Similar to previous studies of the N(6)-position, several 2-substituents were found to be critical structural determinants for the A(3)AR activation. The following adenosine 2-ethers were moderately potent partial agonists (K(i), nM): benzyl (117), 3-chlorobenzyl (72), 2-(3-chlorophenyl)ethyl (41), and 2-(2-naphthyl)ethyl (130). The following adenosine 2-ethers were A(3)AR antagonists: 2,2-diphenylethyl, 2-(2-norbornan)ethyl, R- and S-2-phenylbutyl, and 2-(2-chlorophenyl)ethyl. 2-(S-2-Phenylbutyloxy)adenosine as an A(3)AR antagonist right-shifted the concentration-response curve for the inhibition by NECA of cyclic AMP accumulation with a K(B) value of 212 nM, which is similar to its binding affinity (K(i) = 175 nM). These 2-substituted adenosine derivatives were generally less potent at the A(1)AR in comparison to the A(3)AR, but fully efficacious, with binding K(i) values over 100 nM. The 2-phenylethyl moiety resulted in higher A(3)AR affinity (K(i) in nM) when linked to the 2-position of adenosine through an ether group (54), than when linked through an amine (310) or thioether (1960). 2-[2-(l-Naphthyl)ethyloxy]adenosine (K(i) = 3.8 nM) was found to be the most potent and selective (>50-fold) A(2A) agonist in this series. Mixed A(2A)/A(3)AR agonists have been identified. Interestingly, although most of these compounds were extremely weak at the A(2B)AR, 2-[2-(2-naphthyl)ethyloxy]adenosine (EC(50) = 1.4 microM) and 2-[2-(2-thienyl)-ethyloxy]adenosine (EC(50) = 1.8 microM) were found to be relatively potent A(2B) agonists, although less potent than NECA (EC(50) = 140 nM). PMID:15476669

  8. A2B adenosine receptors mediate relaxation of the pig intravesical ureter: adenosine modulation of non adrenergic non cholinergic excitatory neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Medardo; Barahona, María Victoria; Bustamante, Salvador; García-Sacristán, Albino; Orensanz, Luis M

    1999-01-01

    or NO, through activation of A2B-receptors located in the smooth muscle. This relaxation may modulate the ureteral NANC excitatory neurotransmission through a postsynaptic mechanism. PMID:10193777

  9. Cherry-picked ligands at histamine receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Sadek, Bassem; Stark, Holger

    2016-07-01

    Histamine, a biogenic amine, is considered as a principle mediator of multiple physiological effects through binding to its H1, H2, H3, and H4 receptors (H1-H4Rs). Currently, the HRs have gained attention as important targets for the treatment of several diseases and disorders ranging from allergy to Alzheimer's disease and immune deficiency. Accordingly, medicinal chemistry studies exploring histamine-like molecules and their physicochemical properties by binding and interacting with the four HRs has led to the development of a diversity of agonists and antagonists that display selectivity for each HR subtype. An overview on H1-R4Rs and developed ligands representing some key steps in development is provided here combined with a short description of structure-activity relationships for each class. Main chemical diversities, pharmacophores, and pharmacological profiles of most innovative H1-H4R agonists and antagonists are highlighted. Therefore, this overview should support the rational choice for the optimal ligand selection based on affinity, selectivity and efficacy data in biochemical and pharmacological studies. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'. PMID:26581501

  10. Receptor Activity-modifying Proteins 2 and 3 Generate Adrenomedullin Receptor Subtypes with Distinct Molecular Properties.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Harriet A; Chakravarthy, Madhuri; Abhayawardana, Rekhati S; Gingell, Joseph J; Garelja, Michael; Pardamwar, Meenakshi; McElhinney, James M W R; Lathbridge, Alex; Constantine, Arran; Harris, Paul W R; Yuen, Tsz-Ying; Brimble, Margaret A; Barwell, James; Poyner, David R; Woolley, Michael J; Conner, Alex C; Pioszak, Augen A; Reynolds, Christopher A; Hay, Debbie L

    2016-05-27

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a peptide hormone with numerous effects in the vascular systems. AM signals through the AM1 and AM2 receptors formed by the obligate heterodimerization of a G protein-coupled receptor, the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), and receptor activity-modifying proteins 2 and 3 (RAMP2 and RAMP3), respectively. These different CLR-RAMP interactions yield discrete receptor pharmacology and physiological effects. The effective design of therapeutics that target the individual AM receptors is dependent on understanding the molecular details of the effects of RAMPs on CLR. To understand the role of RAMP2 and -3 on the activation and conformation of the CLR subunit of AM receptors, we mutated 68 individual amino acids in the juxtamembrane region of CLR, a key region for activation of AM receptors, and determined the effects on cAMP signaling. Sixteen CLR mutations had differential effects between the AM1 and AM2 receptors. Accompanying this, independent molecular modeling of the full-length AM-bound AM1 and AM2 receptors predicted differences in the binding pocket and differences in the electrostatic potential of the two AM receptors. Druggability analysis indicated unique features that could be used to develop selective small molecule ligands for each receptor. The interaction of RAMP2 or RAMP3 with CLR induces conformational variation in the juxtamembrane region, yielding distinct binding pockets, probably via an allosteric mechanism. These subtype-specific differences have implications for the design of therapeutics aimed at specific AM receptors and for understanding the mechanisms by which accessory proteins affect G protein-coupled receptor function. PMID:27013657

  11. Receptor Activity-modifying Proteins 2 and 3 Generate Adrenomedullin Receptor Subtypes with Distinct Molecular Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Harriet A.; Chakravarthy, Madhuri; Abhayawardana, Rekhati S.; Gingell, Joseph J.; Garelja, Michael; Pardamwar, Meenakshi; McElhinney, James M. W. R.; Lathbridge, Alex; Constantine, Arran; Harris, Paul W. R.; Yuen, Tsz-Ying; Brimble, Margaret A.; Barwell, James; Poyner, David R.; Woolley, Michael J.; Conner, Alex C.; Pioszak, Augen A.; Reynolds, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a peptide hormone with numerous effects in the vascular systems. AM signals through the AM1 and AM2 receptors formed by the obligate heterodimerization of a G protein-coupled receptor, the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), and receptor activity-modifying proteins 2 and 3 (RAMP2 and RAMP3), respectively. These different CLR-RAMP interactions yield discrete receptor pharmacology and physiological effects. The effective design of therapeutics that target the individual AM receptors is dependent on understanding the molecular details of the effects of RAMPs on CLR. To understand the role of RAMP2 and -3 on the activation and conformation of the CLR subunit of AM receptors, we mutated 68 individual amino acids in the juxtamembrane region of CLR, a key region for activation of AM receptors, and determined the effects on cAMP signaling. Sixteen CLR mutations had differential effects between the AM1 and AM2 receptors. Accompanying this, independent molecular modeling of the full-length AM-bound AM1 and AM2 receptors predicted differences in the binding pocket and differences in the electrostatic potential of the two AM receptors. Druggability analysis indicated unique features that could be used to develop selective small molecule ligands for each receptor. The interaction of RAMP2 or RAMP3 with CLR induces conformational variation in the juxtamembrane region, yielding distinct binding pockets, probably via an allosteric mechanism. These subtype-specific differences have implications for the design of therapeutics aimed at specific AM receptors and for understanding the mechanisms by which accessory proteins affect G protein-coupled receptor function. PMID:27013657

  12. Elevated Ecto-5’-nucleotidase-Mediated Increased Renal Adenosine Signaling Via A2B Adenosine Receptor Contributes to Chronic Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiru; Zhang, Yujin; Wang, Wei; Dai, Yingbo; Ning, Chen; Luo, Renna; Sun, Kaiqi; Glover, Louise; Grenz, Almut; Sun, Hong; Tao, Lijian; Zhang, Wenzheng; Colgan, Sean P.; Blackburn, Michael R.; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Kellems, Rodney E.; Xia, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Hypertension is the most prevalent life-threatening disease worldwide and is frequently associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the molecular basis underlying hypertensive CKD is not fully understood. Objective We sought to identify specific factors and signaling pathways that contribute to hypertensive CKD and thereby exacerbate disease progression. Methods and Results Using high-throughput quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction profiling, we discovered that the expression level of 5′-ectonucleotidase (CD73), a key enzyme that produces extracellular adenosine, was significantly increased in the kidneys of angiotensin II–infused mice, an animal model of hypertensive nephropathy. Genetic and pharmacological studies in mice revealed that elevated CD73-mediated excess renal adenosine preferentially induced A2B adenosine receptor (ADORA2B) production and that enhanced kidney ADORA2B signaling contributes to angiotensin II–induced hypertension. Similarly, in humans, we found that CD73 and ADORA2B levels were significantly elevated in the kidneys of CKD patients compared with normal individuals and were further elevated in hypertensive CKD patients. These findings led us to further discover that elevated renal CD73 contributes to excess adenosine signaling via ADORA2B activation that directly stimulates endothelin-1 production in a hypoxia-inducible factor-α–dependent manner and underlies the pathogenesis of the disease. Finally, we revealed that hypoxia-inducible factor-α is an important factor responsible for angiotensin II–induced CD73 and ADORA2B expression at the transcriptional level. Conclusions Overall, our studies reveal that angiotensin II–induced renal CD73 promotes the production of renal adenosine that is a prominent driver of hypertensive CKD by enhanced ADORA2B signaling–mediated endothelin-1 induction in a hypoxia-inducible factor-α–dependent manner. The inhibition of excess adenosine

  13. Blockade of Cocaine or σ Receptor Agonist Self Administration by Subtype-Selective σ Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Katz, Jonathan L; Hiranita, Takato; Kopajtic, Theresa A; Rice, Kenner C; Mesangeau, Christophe; Narayanan, Sanju; Abdelazeem, Ahmed H; McCurdy, Christopher R

    2016-07-01

    The identification of sigma receptor (σR) subtypes has been based on radioligand binding and, despite progress with σ1R cellular function, less is known about σR subtype functions in vivo. Recent findings that cocaine self administration experience will trigger σR agonist self administration was used in this study to assess the in vivo receptor subtype specificity of the agonists (+)-pentazocine, PRE-084 [2-(4-morpholinethyl) 1-phenylcyclohexanecarboxylate hydrochloride], and 1,3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG) and several novel putative σR antagonists. Radioligand binding studies determined in vitro σR selectivity of the novel compounds, which were subsequently studied for self administration and antagonism of cocaine, (+)-pentazocine, PRE-084, or DTG self administration. Across the dose ranges studied, none of the novel compounds were self administered, nor did they alter cocaine self administration. All compounds blocked DTG self administration, with a subset also blocking (+)-pentazocine and PRE-084 self administration. The most selective of the compounds in binding σ1Rs blocked cocaine self administration when combined with a dopamine transport inhibitor, either methylphenidate or nomifensine. These drug combinations did not decrease rates of responding maintained by food reinforcement. In contrast, the most selective of the compounds in binding σ2Rs had no effect on cocaine self administration in combination with either dopamine transport inhibitor. Thus, these results identify subtype-specific in vivo antagonists, and the utility of σR agonist substitution for cocaine self administration as an assay capable of distinguishing σR subtype selectivity in vivo. These results further suggest that effectiveness of dual σR antagonism and dopamine transport inhibition in blocking cocaine self administration is specific for σ1Rs and further support this dual targeting approach to development of cocaine antagonists. PMID:27189970

  14. Blockade of Cocaine or σ Receptor Agonist Self Administration by Subtype-Selective σ Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Hiranita, Takato; Kopajtic, Theresa A.; Rice, Kenner C.; Mesangeau, Christophe; Narayanan, Sanju; Abdelazeem, Ahmed H.; McCurdy, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    The identification of sigma receptor (σR) subtypes has been based on radioligand binding and, despite progress with σ1R cellular function, less is known about σR subtype functions in vivo. Recent findings that cocaine self administration experience will trigger σR agonist self administration was used in this study to assess the in vivo receptor subtype specificity of the agonists (+)-pentazocine, PRE-084 [2-(4-morpholinethyl) 1-phenylcyclohexanecarboxylate hydrochloride], and 1,3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG) and several novel putative σR antagonists. Radioligand binding studies determined in vitro σR selectivity of the novel compounds, which were subsequently studied for self administration and antagonism of cocaine, (+)-pentazocine, PRE-084, or DTG self administration. Across the dose ranges studied, none of the novel compounds were self administered, nor did they alter cocaine self administration. All compounds blocked DTG self administration, with a subset also blocking (+)-pentazocine and PRE-084 self administration. The most selective of the compounds in binding σ1Rs blocked cocaine self administration when combined with a dopamine transport inhibitor, either methylphenidate or nomifensine. These drug combinations did not decrease rates of responding maintained by food reinforcement. In contrast, the most selective of the compounds in binding σ2Rs had no effect on cocaine self administration in combination with either dopamine transport inhibitor. Thus, these results identify subtype-specific in vivo antagonists, and the utility of σR agonist substitution for cocaine self administration as an assay capable of distinguishing σR subtype selectivity in vivo. These results further suggest that effectiveness of dual σR antagonism and dopamine transport inhibition in blocking cocaine self administration is specific for σ1Rs and further support this dual targeting approach to development of cocaine antagonists. PMID:27189970

  15. 2-Substituted adenosine derivatives: affinity and efficacy at four subtypes of human adenosine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhan-Guo; Mamedova, Liaman K.; Chen, Peiran; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    The affinity and efficacy at four subtypes (A1, A2A, A2B and A3) of human adenosine receptors (ARs) of a wide range of 2-substituted adenosine derivatives were evaluated using radioligand binding assays and a cyclic AMP functional assay in intact CHO cells stably expressing these receptors. Similar to previous studies of the N6-position, several 2-substituents were found to be critical structural determinants for the A3AR activation. The following adenosine 2-ethers were moderately potent partial agonists (Ki, nM): benzyl (117), 3-chlorobenzyl (72), 2-(3-chlorophenyl)ethyl (41), and 2-(2-naphthyl)ethyl (130). The following adenosine 2-ethers were A3AR antagonists: 2,2-diphenylethyl, 2-(2-norbornan)ethyl, R- and S-2-phenylbutyl, and 2-(2-chlorophenyl)ethyl. 2-(S-2-Phenylbutyloxy)a-denosine as an A3AR antagonist right-shifted the concentration–response curve for the inhibition by NECA of cyclic AMP accumulation with a KB value of 212 nM, which is similar to its binding affinity (Ki = 175 nM). These 2-substituted adenosine derivatives were generally less potent at the A1AR in comparison to the A3AR, but fully efficacious, with binding Ki values over 100 nM. The 2-phenylethyl moiety resulted in higher A3AR affinity (Ki in nM) when linked to the 2-position of adenosine through an ether group (54), than when linked through an amine (310) or thioether (1960). 2-[2-(l-Naphthyl)ethyloxy]adenosine (Ki = 3.8 nM) was found to be the most potent and selective (>50-fold) A2A agonist in this series. Mixed A2A/A3AR agonists have been identified. Interestingly, although most of these compounds were extremely weak at the A2BAR, 2-[2-(2-naphthyl)ethyloxy]adenosine (EC50 = 1.4 µM) and 2-[2-(2-thienyl)-ethyloxy]adenosine (EC50 = 1.8 (M) were found to be relatively potent A2B agonists, although less potent than NECA (EC50 = 140 nM). PMID:15476669

  16. Different subtypes of opioid receptors have different affinities for G-proteins.

    PubMed

    Polastron, J; Jauzac, P

    1994-05-01

    In this work, we have characterized the opioid receptor expressed by the human neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-BE and compared its hydrodynamic behaviour with those of well known opioid receptors: mu-opioid receptor of rabbit cerebellum and delta-opioid receptor of the hybrid cell line NG 108-15. Human neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-BE expresses a substantial amount of opioid receptors (200-300 fmoles/mg of protein). Pharmacological characterization suggests an heterogenous population of receptors and the presence of two delta subtypes which are, at least partially, negatively coupled with adenylate cyclase via a Gi protein. These receptors exist under two different molecular forms and, in this respect, strikingly contrast with the archetypic delta receptors of NG 108-15 hybrid cell line which show only a high molecular weight form and appear more tightly coupled with the G protein. Hydrodynamic behaviour of SK-N-BE opioid receptors is reminiscent of the profile observed with the rabbit cerebellum mu-opioid receptor. This observation is consistent with the presence of two delta-opioid receptors subtypes, one of which exhibiting properties close to those of mu opioid receptors. Taken overall, our results suggest that different types and subtypes of opioid receptors, even if they are coupled to the same inhibitory G protein, are more or less tightly coupled with their transduction proteins and that closely related opioid receptors can form allosterically interacting complexes. PMID:7920183

  17. Retinoic acid receptor subtype-specific transcriptotypes in the early zebrafish embryo.

    PubMed

    Samarut, Eric; Gaudin, Cyril; Hughes, Sandrine; Gillet, Benjamin; de Bernard, Simon; Jouve, Pierre-Emmanuel; Buffat, Laurent; Allot, Alexis; Lecompte, Odile; Berekelya, Liubov; Rochette-Egly, Cécile; Laudet, Vincent

    2014-02-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) controls many aspects of embryonic development by binding to specific receptors (retinoic acid receptors [RARs]) that regulate complex transcriptional networks. Three different RAR subtypes are present in vertebrates and play both common and specific roles in transducing RA signaling. Specific activities of each receptor subtype can be correlated with its exclusive expression pattern, whereas shared activities between different subtypes are generally assimilated to functional redundancy. However, the question remains whether some subtype-specific activity still exists in regions or organs coexpressing multiple RAR subtypes. We tackled this issue at the transcriptional level using early zebrafish embryo as a model. Using morpholino knockdown, we specifically invalidated the zebrafish endogenous RAR subtypes in an in vivo context. After building up a list of RA-responsive genes in the zebrafish gastrula through a whole-transcriptome analysis, we compared this panel of genes with those that still respond to RA in embryos lacking one or another RAR subtype. Our work reveals that RAR subtypes do not have fully redundant functions at the transcriptional level but can transduce RA signal in a subtype-specific fashion. As a result, we define RAR subtype-specific transcriptotypes that correspond to repertoires of genes activated by different RAR subtypes. Finally, we found genes of the RA pathway (cyp26a1, raraa) the regulation of which by RA is highly robust and can even resist the knockdown of all RARs. This suggests that RA-responsive genes are differentially sensitive to alterations in the RA pathway and, in particular, cyp26a1 and raraa are under a high pressure to maintain signaling integrity. PMID:24422634

  18. GABAA Receptor Subtypes: the ‘One Glass of Wine’ Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Richard W.; Hanchar, Harry J.; Meera, Pratap; Wallner, Martin

    2010-01-01

    This review discusses evidence for and apparent controversy about, GABAA receptor subtypes that mediate alcohol effects experienced during social drinking. GABAA receptors that contain the β3 and δ subunits were shown to be enhanced by alcohol concentrations that mirror the concentration-dependence of alcohol responses in humans. A mutation (α6R100Q) previously found in alcohol non-tolerant (ANT) rats in the cerebellar GABAA receptor α6 subunit is sufficient for increased alcohol-induced ataxia in rats homozygous for this mutation (α6-100QQ) and further increases alcohol-sensitivity of tonic GABA currents (mediated by α6βδ receptors) in cerebellar granule cells of α6-100QQ rats and in recombinant α6R100Qβ3δ receptors. This provided the first direct evidence that these types of receptors mediate behavioral effects of ethanol. Furthermore the behavioral alcohol antagonist Ro15-4513 specifically reverses ethanol enhancement on α4/6β3δ receptors. Unexpectedly, native and recombinant α4/6β3δ receptors bind the behavioral alcohol antagonist Ro15-4513 with high affinity and this binding is competitive with EtOH, suggesting a specific and mutually exclusive (competitive) ethanol/Ro15-4513 site which explains the puzzling activity of Ro15-4513 as a behavioral alcohol antagonist. Our conclusion from these findings is that alcohol/Ro15-4513-sensitive GABAA receptor subtypes are important alcohol targets and that alcohol at relevant concentrations is more specific than previously thought. In this review we discuss technical difficulties in expressing recombinant δ subunit-containing receptors in oocytes and mammalian cells, that may have contributed to negative results and confusion. Not only because we have reproduced detailed positive results numerous times, and we and many others have built extensively on basic findings, but also because we explain and combine many previously puzzling results into a coherent and highly plausible paradigm on how alcohol

  19. Distinct sequence elements control the specificity of G protein activation by muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes.

    PubMed Central

    Lechleiter, J; Hellmiss, R; Duerson, K; Ennulat, D; David, N; Clapham, D; Peralta, E

    1990-01-01

    Relatively little is understood concerning the mechanisms by which subtypes of receptors, G proteins and effector enzymes interact to transduce specific signals. Through expression of normal, hybrid and deletion mutant receptors in Xenopus oocytes, we determined the G protein coupling characteristics of the functionally distinct m2 and m3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) subtypes and identified the critical receptor sequences responsible for G protein specificity. Activation of a pertussis toxin insensitive G protein pathway, leading to a rapid and transient release of intracellular Ca2+ characteristic of the m3 receptor, could be specified by the transfer of as few as nine amino acids from the m3 to the m2 receptor. In a reciprocal manner, transfer of no more than 21 residues from the m2 to the m3 receptor was sufficient to specify activation of a pertussis toxin sensitive G protein coupled to a slow and oscillatory Ca2+ release pathway typical of the m2 subtype. Notably, these critical residues occur within the same region of the third cytoplasmic domain of functionally distinct mAChR subtypes. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2124972

  20. Phosphoinositide system-linked serotonin receptor subtypes and their pharmacological properties and clinical correlates.

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, S C; Davis, J M; Pandey, G N

    1995-01-01

    Serotonergic neurotransmission represents a complex mechanism involving pre- and post-synaptic events and distinct 5-HT receptor subtypes. Serotonin (5-HT) receptors have been classified into several categories, and they are termed as 5-HT1, 5-HT2, 5-HT3, 5-HT4, 5-HT5, 5-HT6 and 5-HT7 type receptors. 5-HT1 receptors have been further subdivided into 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT1D, 5-HT1E and 5-HT1F. 5-HT2 receptors have been divided into 5-HT2A, 5-HT2B and 5-HT2C receptors. All 5-HT2 receptor subtypes are linked to the multifunctional phosphoinositide (PI) signalling system. 5-HT3 receptors are considered ion-gated receptors and are also linked to the PI signalling system by an unknown mechanism. The 5-HT2A receptor subtype is the most widely studied of the 5-HT receptors in psychiatric disorders (for example, suicide, depression and schizophrenia) as well as in relation to the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs. The roles of 5-HT2C and 5-HT3 receptors in psychiatric disorders are less clear. These 5-HT receptors also play an important role in alcoholism. It has been shown that 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C and 5-HT3 antagonists cause attenuation of alcohol intake in animals and humans. However, the exact mechanisms are unknown. The recent cloning of the cDNAs for 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C and 5-HT3 receptors provides the opportunity to explore the molecular mechanisms responsible for the alterations in these receptors during illness as well as pharmacotherapy. This review article will focus on the current research into the pharmacological properties, molecular biology, and clinical correlates of 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C and 5-HT3 receptors. PMID:7786883

  1. Differential subcellular distribution of rat brain dopamine receptors and subtype-specific redistribution induced by cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Voulalas, Pamela J.; Schetz, John; Undieh, Ashiwel S.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the subcellular distribution of dopamine D1, D2 and D5 receptor subtypes in rat frontal cortex, and examined whether psychostimulant-induced elevation of synaptic dopamine could alter the receptor distribution. Differential detergent solubilization and density gradient centrifugation were used to separate various subcellular fractions, followed by semi-quantitative determination of the relative abundance of specific receptor proteins in each fraction. D1 receptors were predominantly localized to detergent-resistant membranes, and a portion of these receptors also floated on sucrose gradients. These properties are characteristic of proteins found in lipid rafts and caveolae. D2 receptors exhibited variable distribution between cytoplasmic, detergent-soluble and detergent-resistant membrane fractions, yet were not present in buoyant membranes. Most D5 receptor immunoreactivity was distributed into the cytoplasmic fraction, failing to sediment at forces up to 300,000g, while the remainder was localized to detergent-soluble membranes in cortex. D5 receptors were undetectable in detergent-resistant fractions or raft-like subdomains. Following daily cocaine administration for seven days, a significant portion of D1 receptors translocated from detergent-resistant membranes to detergent-soluble membranes and the cytoplasmic fraction. The distributions of D5 and D2 receptor subtypes were not significantly altered by cocaine treatment. These data imply that D5 receptors are predominantly cytoplasmic, D2 receptors are diffusely distributed within the cell, whereas D1 receptors are mostly localized to lipid rafts within the rat frontal cortex. Dopamine receptor subtype localization is susceptible to modulation by pharmacological manipulations that elevate synaptic dopamine, however the functional implications of such drug-induced receptor warrant further investigation. PMID:21236347

  2. Binding and functional properties of hexocyclium and sila-hexocyclium derivatives to muscarinic receptor subtypes.

    PubMed Central

    Waelbroeck, M.; Camus, J.; Tastenoy, M.; Feifel, R.; Mutschler, E.; Tacke, R.; Strohmann, C.; Rafeiner, K.; Rodrigues de Miranda, J. F.; Lambrecht, G.

    1994-01-01

    1. We have compared the binding properties of several hexocyclium and sila-hexocyclium derivatives to muscarinic M1 receptors (in rat brain, human neuroblastoma (NB-OK 1) cells and calf superior cervical ganglia), rat heart M2 receptors, rat pancreas M3 receptors and M4 receptors in rat striatum, with their functional antimuscarinic properties in rabbit vas deferens (M1/M4-like), guinea-pig atria (M2), and guinea-pig ileum (M3) muscarinic receptors. 2. Sila-substitution (C/Si exchange) of hexocyclium (-->sila-hexocyclium) and demethyl-hexocyclium (-->demethyl-sila-hexocyclium) did not significantly affect their affinities for muscarinic receptors. By contrast, sila-substitution of o-methoxy-hexocyclium increased its affinity 2 to 3 fold for all the muscarinic receptor subtypes studied. 3. The p-fluoro- and p-chloro-derivatives of sila-hexocyclium had lower affinities than the parent compound at the four receptor subtypes, in binding and pharmacological studies. 4. In binding studies, o-methoxy-sila-hexocyclium (M1 = M4 > or = M3 > or = M2) had a much lower affinity than sila-hexocyclium for the four receptor subtypes, and discriminated the receptor subtypes more poorly than sila-hexocyclium (M1 = M3 > M4 > M2). This is in marked contrast with the very clear selectivity of o-methoxy-sila-hexocyclium for the prejunctional M1/M4-like heteroreceptors in rabbit vas deferens. 5. The tertiary amines demethyl-hexocyclium, demethyl-sila-hexocyclium and demethyl-o-methoxy-sila-hexocyclium had 10 to 30 fold lower affinities than the corresponding quaternary ammonium derivatives. PMID:8075869

  3. Cockroach GABAB receptor subtypes: molecular characterization, pharmacological properties and tissue distribution.

    PubMed

    Blankenburg, S; Balfanz, S; Hayashi, Y; Shigenobu, S; Miura, T; Baumann, O; Baumann, A; Blenau, W

    2015-01-01

    γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the predominant inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS). Its effects are mediated by either ionotropic GABAA receptors or metabotropic GABAB receptors. GABAB receptors regulate, via Gi/o G-proteins, ion channels, and adenylyl cyclases. In humans, GABAB receptor subtypes are involved in the etiology of neurologic and psychiatric disorders. In arthropods, however, these members of the G-protein-coupled receptor family are only inadequately characterized. Interestingly, physiological data have revealed important functions of GABAB receptors in the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana. We have cloned cDNAs coding for putative GABAB receptor subtypes 1 and 2 of P. americana (PeaGB1 and PeaGB2). When both receptor proteins are co-expressed in mammalian cells, activation of the receptor heteromer with GABA leads to a dose-dependent decrease in cAMP production. The pharmacological profile differs from that of mammalian and Drosophila GABAB receptors. Western blot analyses with polyclonal antibodies have revealed the expression of PeaGB1 and PeaGB2 in the CNS of the American cockroach. In addition to the widespread distribution in the brain, PeaGB1 is expressed in salivary glands and male accessory glands. Notably, PeaGB1-like immunoreactivity has been detected in the GABAergic salivary neuron 2, suggesting that GABAB receptors act as autoreceptors in this neuron. PMID:25242738

  4. Metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 antagonism in learning and memory

    PubMed Central

    Simonyi, Agnes; Schachtman, Todd R.; Christoffersen, Gert R. J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The role of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5 receptor) in learning and memory and other behaviors are reviewed by examining the influence of selective antagonists and genetic knockout on performance. This receptor is involved in spatial learning, contextual fear conditioning, inhibitory avoidance, fear potentiated startle, and conditioned taste aversion. However, mGlu5 receptor antagonists have proven to be ineffective in other learning tasks, such as the delayed-match-to-position test and a three-hole spatial learning task. Locomotion is often decreased by mGlu5 receptor antagonists; and other behaviors such as social interaction and consummatory responses can also be affected. In mGlu5 receptor knockout mice, performance in contextual fear conditioning and spatial water maze tasks is impaired. Although the available evidence is suggestive of an important contribution of mGlu5 receptors to cognitive functions, further studies are needed, particularly those with in vivo evaluation of the role of mGlu5 receptors in selective brain regions in different stages of memory formation. PMID:20363219

  5. Repeated stressful experiences differently affect brain dopamine receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Puglisi-Allegra, S.; Cabib, S. , Roma ); Kempf, E.; Schleef, C. )

    1991-01-01

    The binding of tritiated spiperone (D2 antagonist) and tritiated SCH 23390 (D1 antagonist), in vivo, was investigated in the caudatus putamen (CP) and nucleus accumbens septi (NAS) of mice submitted to ten daily restraint stress sessions. Mice sacrificed 24 hr after the last stressful experience presented a 64% decrease of D2 receptor density (Bmax) but no changes in D1 receptor density in the NAS. In the CP a much smaller (11%) reduction of D2 receptor density was accompanied by a 10% increase of D1 receptors. These results show that the two types of dopamine (DA) receptors adapt in different or even opposite ways to environmental pressure, leading to imbalance between them.

  6. Distribution and effects of the muscarinic receptor subtypes in the primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Groleau, Marianne; Kang, Jun Il; Huppé-Gourgues, Frédéric; Vaucher, Elvire

    2015-01-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors modulate the activity and plasticity of the visual cortex. Muscarinic receptors are divided into five subtypes that are not homogeneously distributed throughout the cortical layers and cells types. This distribution results in complex action of the muscarinic receptors in the integration of visual stimuli. Selective activation of the different subtypes can either strengthen or weaken cortical connectivity (e.g., thalamocortical vs. corticocortical), i.e., it can influence the processing of certain stimuli over others. Moreover, muscarinic receptors differentially modulate some functional properties of neurons during experience-dependent activity and cognitive processes and they contribute to the fine-tuning of visual processing. These functions are involved in the mechanisms of attention, maturation and learning in the visual cortex. This minireview describes the anatomo-functional aspects of muscarinic modulation of the primary visual cortex’s (V1) microcircuitry. PMID:26150786

  7. Identification of Receptor Ligands and Receptor Subtypes Using Antagonists in a Capillary Electrophoresis Single-Cell Biosensor Separation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, Harvey A.; Orwar, Owe; Scheller, Richard H.; Zare, Richard N.

    1995-08-01

    A capillary electrophoresis system with single-cell biosensors as a detector has been used to separate and identify ligands in complex biological samples. The power of this procedure was significantly increased by introducing antagonists that inhibited the cellular response from selected ligand-receptor interactions. The single-cell biosensor was based on the ligand-receptor binding and G-protein-mediated signal transduction pathways in PC12 and NG108-15 cell lines. Receptor activation was measured as increases in cytosolic free calcium ion concentration by using fluorescence microscopy with the intracellular calcium ion indicator fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester. Specifically, a mixture of bradykinin (BK) and acetylcholine (ACh) was fractionated and the components were identified by inhibiting the cellular response with icatibant (HOE 140), a selective antagonist to the BK B_2 receptor subtype (B_2BK), and atropine, an antagonist to muscarinic ACh receptor subtypes. Structurally related forms of BK were also identified based on inhibiting B_2BK receptors. Applications of this technique include identification of endogenous BK in a lysate of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (Hep G2) and screening for bioactivity of BK degradation products in human blood plasma. The data demonstrate that the use of antagonists with a single-cell biosensor separation system aids identification of separated components and receptor subtypes.

  8. Alpha-1-Adrenergic Receptor Subtypes in Non-Failing and Failing Human Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Brian C.; Swigart, Philip M; DeMarco, Teresa; Hoopes, Charles; Simpson, Paul C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Alpha-1-adrenergic receptors (α1-ARs) play adaptive roles in the heart and protect against the development of heart failure (HF). The three α1-AR subtypes,α1A, α1B, and α1D, have distinct physiological roles in mouse heart, but very little is known about α1-subtypes in human heart. Here we test the hypothesis that the α1A and α1B subtypes are present in human myocardium, similar to the mouse, and are not down-regulated in heart failure. Methods and Results Hearts from transplant recipients and unused donors were failing (n = 12; mean EF 24%) or non-failing (n = 9; mean EF 59%), and similar in age (~44 years) and sex (~70% male). We measured the α1-AR subtypes in multiple regions of both ventricles by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR and radioligand binding. All three α1-AR subtype mRNAs were present, and α1A mRNA was most abundant (~65% of total α1-AR mRNA). However, only α1A and α1B binding were present, and the α1B was most abundant (60% of total). In failing hearts, α1A and α1B binding were not down-regulated, in contrast with β1-ARs. Conclusions Our data show for the first time that the α1A and α1B subtypes are both present in human myocardium, but α1D binding is not, and that the α1-subtypes are not down-regulated in HF. Since α1-subtypes in the human heart are similar to mouse, where adaptive and protective effects of α1-subtypes are most convincing, it might become feasible to treat HF with a drug targeting the α1A and/or α1B. PMID:19919991

  9. A Molecular and Chemical Perspective in Defining Melatonin Receptor Subtype Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Chan, King Hang; Wong, Yung Hou

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin is primarily synthesized and secreted by the pineal gland during darkness in a normal diurnal cycle. In addition to its intrinsic antioxidant property, the neurohormone has renowned regulatory roles in the control of circadian rhythm and exerts its physiological actions primarily by interacting with the G protein-coupled MT1 and MT2 transmembrane receptors. The two melatonin receptor subtypes display identical ligand binding characteristics and mediate a myriad of signaling pathways, including adenylyl cyclase inhibition, phospholipase C stimulation and the regulation of other effector molecules. Both MT1 and MT2 receptors are widely expressed in the central nervous system as well as many peripheral tissues, but each receptor subtype can be linked to specific functional responses at the target tissue. Given the broad therapeutic implications of melatonin receptors in chronobiology, immunomodulation, endocrine regulation, reproductive functions and cancer development, drug discovery and development programs have been directed at identifying chemical molecules that bind to the two melatonin receptor subtypes. However, all of the melatoninergics in the market act on both subtypes of melatonin receptors without significant selectivity. To facilitate the design and development of novel therapeutic agents, it is necessary to understand the intrinsic differences between MT1 and MT2 that determine ligand binding, functional efficacy, and signaling specificity. This review summarizes our current knowledge in differentiating MT1 and MT2 receptors and their signaling capacities. The use of homology modeling in the mapping of the ligand-binding pocket will be described. Identification of conserved and distinct residues will be tremendously useful in the design of highly selective ligands. PMID:24018885

  10. Oestrogen and progesterone receptor expression in subtypes of canine mammary tumours in intact and ovariectomised dogs.

    PubMed

    Mainenti, M; Rasotto, R; Carnier, P; Zappulli, V

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate as a potential prognostic indicator the relationship between histological subtype of canine mammary tumours (CMTs) and oestrogen-α (ORα) and progesterone (PR) receptor expression. Using immunohistochemistry, receptor expression in neoplastic epithelial cells was assessed in 12 different subtypes in 113 CMTs (34 benign, 79 malignant) and 101 surrounding normal tissues. Sixty-eight and 45 CMTs were from intact and ovariectomised bitches, respectively. Histological subtype strongly influenced ORα/PR expression: simple and complex adenomas as well as simple tubular carcinomas exhibited the greatest expression, whereas immunohistochemical labelling for these receptors was weakest in carcinoma and malignant myoepitheliomas, as well as in solid/anaplastic carcinomas and comedocarcinomas. Receptor expression was generally higher in benign relative to malignant neoplasms, and in the latter it was significantly lower in ovariectomised vs. intact bitches. Lymphatic invasion, mitotic index, nodule diameter, and tumour grade were significantly associated with ORα/PR expression. Although not found to be an independent prognostic indicator, tumours from dogs with <10% cells with ORα/PR expression had a poorer prognosis. Lymphatic invasion, the state of the margins of excision, and mitotic index were found to be independent prognostic indicators. Overall, the results suggest that differences in histological subtype and whether or not a bitch has been ovariectomised should be considered when evaluating the significance of ORα and PR expression in CMTs. PMID:24980810

  11. Spaceflight regulates ryanodine receptor subtype 1 in portal vein myocytes in the opposite way of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dabertrand, Fabrice; Porte, Yves; Macrez, Nathalie; Morel, Jean-Luc

    2012-02-01

    Gravity has a structural role for living systems. Tissue development, architecture, and organization are modified when the gravity vector is changed. In particular, microgravity induces a redistribution of blood volume and thus pressure in the astronaut body, abolishing an upright blood pressure gradient, inducing orthostatic hypotension. The present study was designed to investigate whether isolated vascular smooth muscle cells are directly sensitive to altered gravitational forces and, second, whether sustained blood pressure changes act on the same molecular target. Exposure to microgravity during 8 days in the International Space Station induced the decrease of ryanodine receptor subtype 1 expression in primary cultured myocytes from rat hepatic portal vein. Identical results were found in portal vein from mice exposed to microgravity during an 8-day shuttle spaceflight. To evaluate the functional consequences of this physiological adaptation, we have compared evoked calcium signals obtained in myocytes from hindlimb unloaded rats, in which the shift of blood pressure mimics the one produced by the microgravity, with those obtained in myocytes from rats injected with antisense oligonucleotide directed against ryanodine receptor subtype 1. In both conditions, calcium signals implicating calcium-induced calcium release were significantly decreased. In contrast, in spontaneous hypertensive rat, an increase in ryanodine receptor subtype 1 expression was observed as well as the calcium-induced calcium release mechanism. Taken together, our results shown that myocytes were directly sensitive to gravity level and that they adapt their calcium signaling pathways to pressure by the regulation of the ryanodine receptor subtype 1 expression. PMID:22096120

  12. A comprehensive method for the quantitative determination of dopamine receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    McGonigle, P.; Huff, R.M.; Molinoff, P.B.

    1984-01-01

    We have demonstrated that three subtypes of dopamine receptors can be characterized using several radioligand binding techniques. Indirect binding assays in which several competing ligands were used to inhibit the binding of the nonselective radioligand spiroperidol resulted in shallow displacement curves with Hill coefficients less than 1. Nonlinear regression analysis of these curves also indicated that there were two subtypes of the D-2 receptor present in a ratio of approximately 3 to 1. Direct binding assays with (3H)alpha-flupenthixol showed that this radioligand nonselectively labeled D-2A, D-2B, and D-1 receptors. Inhibition of the binding of (3H)alpha-flupenthixol by spiroperidol revealed that spiroperidol had a much higher affinity for D-2A and D-2B receptors than for D-1 receptors. Masking D-2 receptors with nanomolar concentrations of spiroperidol permitted characterization of D-1 receptors with the radioligand (3H)alpha-flupenthixol. Indirect binding assays of D-1 receptors with numerous competing ligands resulted in steep displacement curves with Hill coefficients of 1. This is consistent with the existence of a single, homogeneous population of D-1 receptors.

  13. The triplet puzzle theory indicates extensive formation of heteromers between opioid and chemokine receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Tarakanov, Alexander O; Fuxe, Kjell

    2015-11-01

    Biochemical studies had previously demonstrated examples of heteromerization between opioid and chemokine receptors. Based on the triplet puzzle theory, it has been discovered that opioid receptors are structurally more closely related to chemokine receptors than to other class A G-protein-coupled receptors. Their similarity is established in terms of the number of triplet homologies Asn-Leu-Ala, Thr-Leu-Pro, and Tyr-Ala-Phe in the amino acid code of extensive numbers of members of these two receptor groups. Such widespread similarities probably mean that many opioid and chemokine receptor subtypes utilize some of these mutual triplets to form heteromers. The findings underline that heteromerization among these two receptor groups can represent a major general mechanism for significant interactions between opioid peptides and chemokines in pain and neuroinflammation within the neural-glial networks of the CNS including immune cells. PMID:26133164

  14. The N-terminal domain of GluR6-subtype glutamate receptor ion channels

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Janesh; Schuck, Peter; Jin, Rongsheng; Mayer, Mark L.

    2009-09-25

    The amino-terminal domain (ATD) of glutamate receptor ion channels, which controls their selective assembly into AMPA, kainate and NMDA receptor subtypes, is also the site of action of NMDA receptor allosteric modulators. Here we report the crystal structure of the ATD from the kainate receptor GluR6. The ATD forms dimers in solution at micromolar protein concentrations and crystallizes as a dimer. Unexpectedly, each subunit adopts an intermediate extent of domain closure compared to the apo and ligand-bound complexes of LIVBP and G protein-coupled glutamate receptors (mGluRs), and the dimer assembly has a markedly different conformation from that found in mGluRs. This conformation is stabilized by contacts between large hydrophobic patches in the R2 domain that are absent in NMDA receptors, suggesting that the ATDs of individual glutamate receptor ion channels have evolved into functionally distinct families.

  15. Thiochrome enhances acetylcholine affinity at muscarinic M4 receptors: receptor subtype selectivity via cooperativity rather than affinity.

    PubMed

    Lazareno, S; Dolezal, V; Popham, A; Birdsall, N J M

    2004-01-01

    Thiochrome (2,7-dimethyl-5H-thiachromine-8-ethanol), an oxidation product and metabolite of thiamine, has little effect on the equilibrium binding of l-[3H]N-methyl scopolamine ([3H]NMS) to the five human muscarinic receptor subtypes (M1-M5) at concentrations up to 0.3 mM. In contrast, it inhibits [3H]NMS dissociation from M1 to M4 receptors at submillimolar concentrations and from M5 receptors at 1 mM. These results suggest that thiochrome binds allosterically to muscarinic receptors and has approximately neutral cooperativity with [3H]NMS at M1 to M4 and possibly M5 receptors. Thiochrome increases the affinity of acetylcholine (ACh) 3- to 5-fold for inhibiting [3H]NMS binding to M4 receptors but has no effect on ACh affinity at M1 to M3 or M5 receptors. Thiochrome (0.1 mM) also increases the direct binding of [3H]ACh to M4 receptors but decreases it slightly at M2 receptors. In agreement with the binding data, thiochrome does not affect the potency of ACh for stimulating the binding of guanosine 5'-O-(3-[35S]thiotriphosphate) ([35S]GTPgammaS) to membranes containing M1 to M3 receptors, but it increases ACh potency 3.5-fold at M4 receptors. It also selectively reduces the release of [3H]ACh from potassium-stimulated slices of rat striatum, which contain autoinhibitory presynaptic M4 receptors, but not from hippocampal slices, which contain presynaptic M2 receptors. We conclude that thiochrome is a selective M4 muscarinic receptor enhancer of ACh affinity and has neutral cooperativity with ACh at M1 to M3 receptors; it therefore demonstrates a powerful new form of selectivity, "absolute subtype selectivity", which is derived from cooperativity rather than from affinity. PMID:14722259

  16. Muscarinic and dopaminergic receptor subtypes on striatal cholinergic interneurons

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, V.L.; Dawson, T.M.; Wamsley, J.K. )

    1990-12-01

    Unilateral stereotaxic injection of small amounts of the cholinotoxin, AF64A, caused minimal nonselective tissue damage and resulted in a significant loss of the presynaptic cholinergic markers (3H)hemicholinium-3 (45% reduction) and choline acetyltransferase (27% reduction). No significant change from control was observed in tyrosine hydroxylase or tryptophan hydroxylase activity; presynaptic neuronal markers for dopamine- and serotonin-containing neurons, respectively. The AF64A lesion resulted in a significant reduction of dopamine D2 receptors as evidenced by a decrease in (3H)sulpiride binding (42% reduction) and decrease of muscarinic non-M1 receptors as shown by a reduction in (3H)QNB binding in the presence of 100 nM pirenzepine (36% reduction). Saturation studies revealed that the change in (3H)sulpiride and (3H)QNB binding was due to a change in Bmax not Kd. Intrastriatal injection of AF64A failed to alter dopamine D1 or muscarinic M1 receptors labeled with (3H)SCH23390 and (3H)pirenzepine, respectively. In addition, no change in (3H)forskolin-labeled adenylate cyclase was observed. These results demonstrate that a subpopulation of muscarinic receptors (non-M1) are presynaptic on cholinergic interneurons (hence, autoreceptors), and a subpopulation of dopamine D2 receptors are postsynaptic on cholinergic interneurons. Furthermore, dopamine D1, muscarinic M1 and (3H)forskolin-labeled adenylate cyclase are not localized to striatal cholinergic interneurons.

  17. The role of serotonin receptor subtypes in treating depression: a review of animal studies

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Gregory V.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are effective in treating depression. Given the existence of different families and subtypes of 5-HT receptors, multiple 5-HT receptors may be involved in the antidepressant-like behavioral effects of SSRIs. Objective Behavioral pharmacology studies investigating the role of 5-HT receptor subtypes in producing or blocking the effects of SSRIs were reviewed. Results Few animal behavior tests were available to support the original development of SSRIs. Since their development, a number of behavioral tests and models of depression have been developed that are sensitive to the effects of SSRIs, as well as to other types of antidepressant treatments. The rationale for the development and use of these tests is reviewed. Behavioral effects similar to those of SSRIs (antidepressant-like) have been produced by agonists at 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2C, 5-HT4, and 5-HT6 receptors. Also, antagonists at 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C, 5-HT3, 5- HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors have been reported to produce antidepressant-like responses. Although it seems paradoxical that both agonists and antagonists at particular 5-HT receptors can produce antidepressant-like effects, they probably involve diverse neurochemical mechanisms. The behavioral effects of SSRIs and other antidepressants may also be augmented when 5-HT receptor agonists or antagonists are given in combination. Conclusions The involvement of 5-HT receptors in the antidepressant-like effects of SSRIs is complex and involves the orchestration of stimulation and blockade at different 5-HT receptor subtypes. Individual 5-HT receptors provide opportunities for the development of a newer generation of antidepressants that may be more beneficial and effective than SSRIs. PMID:21107537

  18. Racial Variations in Prostate Cancer Molecular Subtypes and Androgen Receptor Signaling Reflect Anatomic Tumor Location

    PubMed Central

    Faisal, Farzana A.; Sundi, Debasish; Tosoian, Jeffrey J.; Choeurng, Voleak; Alshalalfa, Mohammed; Ross, Ashley E.; Klein, Eric; Den, Robert; Dicker, Adam; Erho, Nicholas; Davicioni, Elai; Lotan, Tamara L.; Schaeffer, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) subtypes based on ETS gene expression have been described. Recent studies suggest there are racial differences in tumor location, with PCa located anteriorly more often among African-American (AA) compared to Caucasian-American (CA) men. In this retrospective analysis of a multi-institutional cohort treated by radical prostatectomy (179 CA, 121 AA), we evaluated associations among molecular subtype, race, anatomic tumor location, and androgen receptor (AR) signaling. Subtype (m-ERG+, m-ETS+, m-SPINK1+, or triple-negative) was determined using distribution-based outlier analysis. AR signaling was investigated using gene expression profiling of canonical AR targets. m-ERG+ was more common in CA than AA men (47% vs 22%, p < 0.001). AA men were more likely to be m-SPINK1+ (13% vs 7%; p = 0.069) and triple-negative (50% vs 37%; p = 0.043). Racial differences in molecular subtypes did not persist when tumors were analyzed by location, suggesting a biologically important relationship between tumor location and subtype. Accordingly, anterior tumor location was associated with higher Decipher scores and lower global AR signaling. Patient summary This study demonstrates associations among patient race, prostate cancer molecular subtypes, and tumor location. Location-specific differences in androgen regulation may further underlie these relationships. PMID:26443432

  19. Localization of D1 and D2 dopamine receptors in brain with subtype-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Levey, A I; Hersch, S M; Rye, D B; Sunahara, R K; Niznik, H B; Kitt, C A; Price, D L; Maggio, R; Brann, M R; Ciliax, B J

    1993-10-01

    Five or more dopamine receptor genes are expressed in brain. However, the pharmacological similarities of the encoded D1-D5 receptors have hindered studies of the localization and functions of the subtypes. To better understand the roles of the individual receptors, antibodies were raised against recombinant D1 and D2 proteins and were shown to bind to the receptor subtypes specifically in Western blot and immunoprecipitation studies. Each antibody reacted selectively with the respective receptor protein expressed both in cells transfected with the cDNAs and in brain. By immunocytochemistry, D1 and D2 had similar regional distributions in rat, monkey, and human brain, with the most intense staining in striatum, olfactory bulb, and substantia nigra. Within each region, however, the precise distributions of each subtype were distinct and often complementary. D1 and D2 were differentially enriched in striatal patch and matrix compartments, in selective layers of the olfactory bulb, and in either substantia nigra pars compacta or reticulata. Electron microscopy demonstrated that D1 and D2 also had highly selective subcellular distributions. In the rat neostriatum, the majority of D1 and D2 immunoreactivity was localized in postsynaptic sites in subsets of spiny dendrites and spine heads in rat neostriatum. Presynaptic D1 and D2 receptors were also observed, indicating both subtypes may regulate neurotransmitter release. D1 was also present in axon terminals in the substantia nigra. These results provide a morphological substrate for understanding the pre- and postsynaptic functions of the genetically defined D1 and D2 receptors in discrete neuronal circuits in mammalian brain. PMID:8415621

  20. Affinity profiles of hexahydro-sila-difenidol analogues at muscarinic receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Lambrecht, G; Feifel, R; Wagner-Röder, M; Strohmann, C; Zilch, H; Tacke, R; Waelbroeck, M; Christophe, J; Boddeke, H; Mutschler, E

    1989-09-01

    In an attempt to assess the structural requirements of hexahydro-sila-difenidol for potency and selectivity, a series of analogues modified in the amino group and the phenyl ring were investigated for their affinity to muscarinic M1-(rabbit vas deferens), M2- (guinea-pig atria) and M3- (guinea-pig ileum) receptors. All compounds were competitive antagonists in the three tissues. Their affinities to the three muscarinic receptor subtypes differed by more than two orders of magnitude and the observed receptor selectivities were not associated with high affinity. The pyrrolidino and hexamethyleneimino analogues, compounds substituted in the phenyl ring with a methoxy group or a chlorine atom as well as p-fluoro-hexahydro-difenidol displayed the same affinity profile as the parent compound, hexahydro-sila-difenidol: M1 approximately M3 greater than M2. A different selectivity pattern was observed for p-fluoro-hexahydro-sila-difenidol: M3 greater than M1 greater than M2. This compound exhibited its highest affinity for M3-receptors in guinea-pig ileum (pA2 = 7.84), intermediate affinity for M1-receptors in rabbit vas deferens (pA2 = 6.68) and lowest affinity for the M2-receptors in guinea-pig atria (pA2 = 6.01). This receptor selectivity profile of p-fluoro-hexahydro-sila-difenidol was confirmed in ganglia (M1), atria (M2) and ileum (M3) of the rat. Furthermore, dose ratios obtained with either pirenzepine (M1) or hexahydrosila-difenidol (M2 and M3) and the p-fluoro analogue used in combination suggested that the antagonism was additive, implying mutual competition with a single population of muscarinic receptor subtypes. These results indicate that p-fluoro-hexahydro-sila-difenidol represents a valuable tool for characterization of muscarinic receptor subtypes. PMID:2583233

  1. Ligand binding properties of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes (m1-m5) expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, G Z; Kameyama, K; Rinken, A; Haga, T

    1995-07-01

    Five subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (m1-m5) have been expressed in insect cells (Spodoptera frugiperda, Sf9) using the baculovirus system. Up to 6 nmol of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors were produced by 1 liter culture; 0.3 to 0.6 (human m1), 3 to 6 (human m2), 2 to 4 (rat m3), 1 to 2 (rat m4) and 0.5 to 1 (human m5) nmol. Pirenzepine, AF-DX116 and hexahidrosiladifenidol showed the highest affinity for the m1, m2 and m3 subtype, respectively, indicating that these receptors expressed in Sf9 cells retain the same substrate specificity as those in mammalian tissues or cultured cells. Among 32 kinds of muscarinic ligands examined in the present studies, prifinium was found to have the highest affinity for the m4 subtype, and pilocarpine, oxotremorine, McN-A343 and promethazine the highest affinity for the m5 subtype, although the differences in the affinities among the five subtypes were less than 10-fold. Alcuronium increased the binding of [3H]N-methylscopalamine to the m2 subtype, but not the m1, m4 and m5 subtypes and only slightly to the m3 subtype. Similar but smaller effects of fangchinoline and tetrandrine were found for [3H]N-methylscopalamine binding to only the m3 subtype. These effects may also be useful for the discrimination of individual subtypes. PMID:7616422

  2. Regulation of subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors in rat brain following treatment with 6-hydroxydopamine

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.W.; Wolfe, B.B.; Molinoff, P.B.

    1989-07-01

    The technique of quantitative autoradiography has been used to localize changes in the densities of subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors in rat brain following treatment with 6-hydroxydopamine. Previously reported increases in the density of beta 1-adrenergic receptors in the cerebral cortex were confirmed. The anatomical resolution of autoradiography made it possible to detect changes in the density of beta 2-adrenergic receptors in the cortex and in a number of other brain regions. The density of beta 1-adrenergic receptors increased from 30 to 50% depending on the region of the cortex being examined. The increase in the somatomotor cortex was greater than that in the frontal or occipital cortex. The increase in the density of beta 2-adrenergic receptors in the cortex was not as widespread as that of beta 1-adrenergic receptors and occurred primarily in frontal cortex, where the density of receptors increased by 40%. The densities of both beta 1- and beta 2-adrenergic receptors increased in a number of forebrain, thalamic, and midbrain structures. Selective changes in the density of beta 1-adrenergic receptors were observed in the superficial gray layer of the superior colliculus and in the amygdala. The density of beta 2-adrenergic receptors increased in the caudate-putamen, the substantia nigra, and the lateral and central nuclei of the thalamus, whereas the density of beta 1-adrenergic receptors did not change in these regions. The densities of both subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors increased in the hippocampus, the cerebellum, the lateral posterior nucleus of the thalamus, and the dorsal lateral geniculate.

  3. Subtype-selective positive cooperative interactions between brucine analogs and acetylcholine at muscarinic receptors: functional studies.

    PubMed

    Birdsall, N J; Farries, T; Gharagozloo, P; Kobayashi, S; Lazareno, S; Sugimoto, M

    1999-04-01

    In radioligand binding studies, it has been reported that brucine, N-chloromethyl brucine, and brucine N-oxide increased the affinity of acetylcholine for M1, M3, and M4 muscarinic receptors, respectively, in a manner consistent with the predictions of the ternary complex allosteric model. We now demonstrate an equivalent ability of these three allosteric agents to modulate the actions of acetylcholine in functional studies in membranes and in whole cells. The enhancing actions of brucine and brucine N-oxide on acetylcholine (ACh) potency at M1 and M4 receptors respectively have been confirmed in guanosine-5'-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate, GTPase, cAMP, and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization assays of function. In general, neither the basal nor the maximally stimulated response to ACh is affected. The subtype-selective allosteric effects of N-chloromethyl brucine on M2 and M3 receptors were shown to be qualitatively and quantitatively the same in guanosine-5'-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate functional assays, in terms of both its affinity and cooperativity with ACh, as those found in binding assays. Neutral cooperativity of N-chloromethyl brucine with ACh on M4 receptor function was also observed, thereby demonstrating its "absolute subtype selectivity": a lack of action at any concentration at M4 receptors and an action at M2 and M3 receptors. The enhancing action of N-chloromethyl brucine on neurogenically released ACh binding at M3 receptors was also detected in whole tissue as an increased contraction of the isolated guinea pig ileum to submaximal electrical stimulation. In conclusion, these functional studies confirm that brucine analogs are allosteric enhancers of ACh affinity at certain muscarinic receptor subtypes. PMID:10101037

  4. Desformylflustrabromine: A Novel Positive Allosteric Modulator for beta2 Subunit Containing Nicotinic Receptor Sub-Types.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Anshul A

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are ligand-gated transmembrane ion channels that are present at the neuromuscular junction and in different locations in the nervous system. The different subtypes of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors that are found in the brain are thought to be involved in many neurological processes such as pain, cognitive function and depression, as well as in the pathophysiology of numerous neurological diseases and conditions. While the neurotransmitter acetylcholine is an endogenous agonist for all nicotinic receptors subtypes, many drugs that act as agonists and antagonists have also been identified or developed for these receptors. In addition, a novel class of compounds described as allosteric modulators have also been identified or developed for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Allosteric modulators are ligands that bind to nicotinic receptors at sites other than the orthosteric site where acetylcholine binds. One such allosteric modulator is desformylflustrabromine. Five chemical analogs along with desformylflustrabromine act as positive allosteric modulator for nAChRs that contain the beta2 subunit in their pentameric structure. Here the discovery and development, medicinal chemistry and pharmacological actions of desformylflustrabromine have been discussed. Desformylflustrabromine and its chemical analogs have the potential to develop into clinically used drugs for neurological diseases and conditions where nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are involved. PMID:26818864

  5. Subtype-specific control of P2X receptor channel signaling by ATP and Mg2+

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mufeng; Silberberg, Shai D.; Swartz, Kenton J.

    2013-01-01

    The identity and forms of activating ligands for ion channels are fundamental to their physiological roles in rapid electrical signaling. P2X receptor channels are ATP-activated cation channels that serve important roles in sensory signaling and inflammation, yet the active forms of the nucleotide are unknown. In physiological solutions, ATP is ionized and primarily found in complex with Mg2+. Here we investigated the active forms of ATP and found that the action of MgATP2− and ATP4− differs between subtypes of P2X receptors. The slowly desensitizing P2X2 receptor can be activated by free ATP, but MgATP2− promotes opening with very low efficacy. In contrast, both free ATP and MgATP2− robustly open the rapidly desensitizing P2X3 subtype. A further distinction between these two subtypes is the ability of Mg2+ to regulate P2X3 through a distinct allosteric mechanism. Importantly, heteromeric P2X2/3 channels present in sensory neurons exhibit a hybrid phenotype, characterized by robust activation by MgATP2− and weak regulation by Mg2+. These results reveal the existence of two classes of homomeric P2X receptors with differential sensitivity to MgATP2− and regulation by Mg2+, and demonstrate that both restraining mechanisms can be disengaged in heteromeric channels to form fast and sensitive ATP signaling pathways in sensory neurons. PMID:23959888

  6. Structural basis for receptor subtype-specific regulation revealed by a chimeric beta 3/beta 2-adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Liggett, S B; Freedman, N J; Schwinn, D A; Lefkowitz, R J

    1993-01-01

    The physiological significance of multiple G-protein-coupled receptor subtypes, such as the beta-adrenergic receptors (beta ARs), remains obscure, since in many cases several subtypes activate the same effector and utilize the same physiological agonists. We inspected the deduced amino acid sequences of the beta AR subtypes for variations in the determinants for agonist regulation as a potential basis for subtype differentiation. Whereas the beta 2AR has a C terminus containing 11 serine and threonine residues representing potential sites for beta AR kinase phosphorylation, which mediates rapid agonist-promoted desensitization, only 3 serines are present in the comparable region of the beta 3AR, and they are in a nonfavorable context. The beta 3AR also lacks sequence homology in regions which are important for agonist-mediated sequestration and down-regulation of the beta 2AR, although such determinants are less well defined. We therefore tested the idea that the agonist-induced regulatory properties of the two receptors might differ by expressing both subtypes in CHW cells and exposing them to the agonist isoproterenol. The beta 3AR did not display short-term agonist-promoted functional desensitization or sequestration, or long-term down-regulation. To assign a structural basis for these subtype-specific differences in agonist regulation, we constructed a chimeric beta 3/beta 2AR which comprised the beta 3AR up to proline-365 of the cytoplasmic tail and the C terminus of the beta 2AR. When cells expressing this chimeric beta 3/beta 2AR were exposed to isoproterenol, functional desensitization was observed. Whole-cell phosphorylation studies showed that the beta 2AR displayed agonist-dependent phosphorylation, but no such phosphorylation could be demonstrated with the beta 3AR, even when beta AR kinase was overexpressed. In contrast, the chimeric beta 3/beta 2AR did display agonist-dependent phosphorylation, consistent with its functional desensitization. In

  7. Electrophysiology-Based Assays to Detect Subtype-Selective Modulation of Human Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kirsch, Glenn E.; Fedorov, Nikolai B.; Kuryshev, Yuri A.; Liu, Zhiqi; Orr, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-31) gave the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) the responsibility for regulating tobacco products. Nicotine is the primary addictive component of tobacco and its effects can be modulated by additional ingredients in manufactured products. Nicotine acts by mimicking the neurotransmitter acetylcholine on neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), which function as ion channels in cholinergic modulation of neurotransmission. Subtypes within the family of neuronal nAChRs are defined by their α- and β-subunit composition. The subtype-selective profiles of tobacco constituents are largely unknown, but could be essential for understanding the physiological effects of tobacco products. In this report, we report the development and validation of electrophysiology-based high-throughput screens (e-HTS) for human nicotinic subtypes, α3β4, α3β4α5, α4β2, and α7 stably expressed in Chinese Hamster Ovary cells. Assessment of agonist sensitivity and acute desensitization gave results comparable to those obtained by conventional manual patch clamp electrophysiology assays. The potency of reference antagonists for inhibition of the receptor channels and selectivity of positive allosteric modulators also were very similar between e-HTS and conventional manual patch voltage clamp data. Further validation was obtained in pilot screening of a library of FDA-approved drugs that identified α7 subtype-selective positive allosteric modulation by novel compounds. These assays provide new tools for profiling of nicotinic receptor selectivity. PMID:27505073

  8. Electrophysiology-Based Assays to Detect Subtype-Selective Modulation of Human Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Glenn E; Fedorov, Nikolai B; Kuryshev, Yuri A; Liu, Zhiqi; Armstrong, Lucas C; Orr, Michael S

    2016-08-01

    The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-31) gave the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) the responsibility for regulating tobacco products. Nicotine is the primary addictive component of tobacco and its effects can be modulated by additional ingredients in manufactured products. Nicotine acts by mimicking the neurotransmitter acetylcholine on neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), which function as ion channels in cholinergic modulation of neurotransmission. Subtypes within the family of neuronal nAChRs are defined by their α- and β-subunit composition. The subtype-selective profiles of tobacco constituents are largely unknown, but could be essential for understanding the physiological effects of tobacco products. In this report, we report the development and validation of electrophysiology-based high-throughput screens (e-HTS) for human nicotinic subtypes, α3β4, α3β4α5, α4β2, and α7 stably expressed in Chinese Hamster Ovary cells. Assessment of agonist sensitivity and acute desensitization gave results comparable to those obtained by conventional manual patch clamp electrophysiology assays. The potency of reference antagonists for inhibition of the receptor channels and selectivity of positive allosteric modulators also were very similar between e-HTS and conventional manual patch voltage clamp data. Further validation was obtained in pilot screening of a library of FDA-approved drugs that identified α7 subtype-selective positive allosteric modulation by novel compounds. These assays provide new tools for profiling of nicotinic receptor selectivity. PMID:27505073

  9. Pressure-selective modulation of NMDA receptor subtypes may reflect 3D structural differences.

    PubMed

    Mor, Amir; Kuttner, Yosef Y; Levy, Shiri; Mor, Merav; Hollmann, Michael; Grossman, Yoram

    2012-01-01

    Professional deep-water divers exposed to high pressure (HP) above 1.1 MPa suffer from High Pressure Neurological Syndrome (HPNS), which is associated with CNS hyperexcitability. We have previously reported that HP augments N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) synaptic responses, increases neuronal excitability, and potentially causes irreversible neuronal damage. We now report that HP (10.1 MPa) differentially affects eight specific NMDAR subtypes. GluN1(1a or 1b) was co-expressed with one of the four GluN2(A-D) subunits in Xenopus laevis oocytes. HP increased ionic currents (measured by two electrode voltage clamps) of one subtype, reduced the current in four others, and did not affect the current in the remaining three. 3D theoretical modeling was aimed at revealing specific receptor domains involved with HP selectivity. In light of the information on the CNS spatial distribution of the different NMDAR subtypes, we conclude that the NMDAR's diverse responses to HP may lead to selective HP effects on different brain regions. These discoveries call for further and more specific investigation of deleterious HP effects and suggest the need for a re-evaluation of deep-diving safety guidelines. PMID:22973194

  10. α6β2*-subtype nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are more sensitive than α4β2*-subtype receptors to regulation by chronic nicotine administration

    PubMed Central

    Marks, MJ; Grady, SR; Salminen, O; Paley, MA; Wageman, CR; McIntosh, JM; Whiteaker, P

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) of the α6β2* subtype (where * indicates the possible presence of additional subunits) are prominently expressed on dopaminergic neurons. Because of this, their role in tobacco use and nicotine dependence has received much attention. Previous studies have demonstrated that α6β2*-nAChR are downregulated following chronic nicotine exposure (unlike other subtypes that have been investigated – most prominently α4β2* nAChR). This study examines, for the first time, effects across a comprehensive chronic nicotine dose range. Chronic nicotine dose-responses and quantitative ligand-binding autoradiography were used to define nicotine sensitivity of changes in α4β2*-nAChR and α6β2*-nAChR expression. α6β2*-nAChR downregulation by chronic nicotine exposure in dopaminergic and optic-tract nuclei was ≈three-fold more sensitive than upregulation of α4β2*-nAChR. In contrast, nAChR-mediated [3H]-dopamine release from dopamine-terminal region synaptosomal preparations changed only in response to chronic treatment with high nicotine doses, while dopaminergic parameters (transporter expression and activity, dopamine receptor expression) were largely unchanged. Functional measures in olfactory tubercle preparations were made for the first time; both nAChR expression levels and nAChR-mediated functional measures changed differently between striatum and olfactory tubercles. These results show that functional changes measured using synaptosomal [3H]-DA release are primarily due to changes in nAChR, rather than in dopaminergic, function. PMID:24661093

  11. Identification of opioid receptor subtypes in antinociceptive actions of supraspinally-administered mitragynine in mice.

    PubMed

    Thongpradichote, S; Matsumoto, K; Tohda, M; Takayama, H; Aimi, N; Sakai, S; Watanabe, H

    1998-01-01

    Mitragynine (MG), a major alkaloidal constituent extracted from the plant Mitragyna speciosa Korth, is known to exert an opioid-like activity. Our previous study showed the involvement of opioid systems in the antinociceptive activity of MG in the tail-pinch and hot-plate tests in mice. In the present study, to clarify the opioid receptor subtypes involved in the antinociceptive action of MG, we investigated the effects of selective antagonists for mu-, delta- and kappa- opioid receptors on antinociception caused by the intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of MG in the tail-pinch and hot-plate tests in mice. The coadministration of a selective mu-opioid antagonist, cyprodime (1-10 microg, i.c.v.) and the pretreatment with a selective mu1-opioid antagonist naloxonazine (1-3 microg, i.c.v.) significantly antagonized the antinociceptive activities of MG (10 microg, i.c.v.) and morphine (MOR, 3 microg, i.c.v.) in the tail-pinch and hot-plate tests. Naltrindole (1-5 ng, i.c.v.), a selective delta-opioid antagonist, also blocked the effects of MG (10 microg, i.c.v.) without affecting MOR (3 microg, i.c.v.) antinociception. Nor-binaltorphimine, a selective kappa-opioid antagonist, significantly attenuated MG (10 microg, i.c.v.) antinociception in the tail-pinch test but not in the hot-plate test at the dose (1 microg, i.c.v.) that antagonized the antinociceptive effects of the selective kappa-opioid agonist U50,488H in both tests, while it had no effect on MOR antinociception in either tests. These results suggest that antinociception caused by i.c.v. MG is dominantly mediated by mu- and delta-opioid receptor subtypes, and that the selectivity of MG for the supraspinal opioid receptor subtypes differs from that of MOR in mice. PMID:9585164

  12. [Pathophysiological significance of the natriuretic peptide system: receptor subtype as another key factor].

    PubMed

    Naruse, M; Yoshimoto, T; Tanabe, A; Naruse, K

    1998-09-01

    The natriuretic peptide (NP) system is one of the most important systems regulating blood pressure and body-fluid homeostasis. The biological activities of the system are determined by the NPs and the receptors, which are comprised of three subtypes: NP-AR and NP-BR related to biological activities and NP-CR related to the clearance of NP. We focused our studies on the receptor subtypes. In hypertensive rats (SHR-SP/Izm, DOCA/salt), NP-AR was upregulated and NP-CR was downregulated. The ACE inhibitor derapril, but not the Ca2+ blocker manidipine, normalized the upregulated NP-AR, but the effect was completely abolished by the bradykinin beta 2-receptor antagonist, suggesting that bradykinin regulates the vascular NP-AR. The AT1 antagonist TCV-116, but not manidipine, reversed the downregulated NP-CR. Ang II decreased NP-CR in cultured aortic smooth muscle cells. These results suggest that upregulation of NP-AR and downregulation of NP-CR with the increased plasma NPs counteract hypertension by enhancing the action of NP. A beta-blocker (carvedilol) potentiated the hypotensive action of NPs by increasing plasma NPs and enhancing the vascular response to NPs via downregulation of the vascular and lung NP-CR. The newly found mode of actions could be related to its anti-heart failure effect. In genetically hyperglycemic Wistar fatty rats, vascular NP-BR and NP-AR were upregulated. Since plasma ANP and vascular CNP were significantly increased, the local CNP/NP-BR system as well as the systemic ANP/NP-AR system may play an important role in counteracting vascular remodeling in diabetes mellitus. All these observations provide in vivo evidence for the pathophysiological significance of the receptor subtype of the NPs. PMID:9793068

  13. Importance of Breast Cancer Subtype in the Development of Androgen Receptor Directed Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Elgene; Ni, Min; Cao, Shiliang; Hazra, Aditi; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Brown, Myles

    2014-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) has re-emerged as a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer. This stems from recent progress made in preclinical models, that have recognized important differences in the effect of AR expression on patient outcomes among different breast cancer subtypes. In parallel, the clinical development of new generations of AR directed therapies for prostate cancer has begun to mature. The availability of these new agents has translated into new trials to treat breast cancer. It is critical that studies of the effect of AR expression and signaling in breast cancer be context and subtype specific in order to successfully target AR signalling as a therapeutic strategy for breast cancer. We will review developments in preclinical studies, and recent clinical trials targeting AR in breast cancer. PMID:24860642

  14. Common genetic variation in adiponectin, leptin, and leptin receptor and association with breast cancer subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Nyante, Sarah J.; Gammon, Marilie D.; Kaufman, Jay S.; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Lin, Dan Yu; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Hu, Yijuan; He, Qianchuan; Luo, Jingchun; Millikan, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Adipocytokines are produced by visceral fat, and levels may be associated with breast cancer risk. We investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in adipocytokine genes adiponectin (ADIPOQ), leptin (LEP), and the leptin receptor (LEPR) were associated with basal-like or luminal A breast cancer subtypes. 104 candidate and tag SNPs were genotyped in 1776 of 2022 controls and 1972 (200 basal-like, 679 luminal A) of 2311 cases from the Carolina Breast Cancer Study (CBCS), a population-based case–control study of whites and African Americans. Breast cancer molecular subtypes were determined by immunohistochemistry. Genotype odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. Haplotype ORs and 95% CIs were estimated using Hapstat. Interactions with waist-hip ratio were evaluated using a multiplicative interaction term. Ancestry was estimated from 144 ancestry informative markers (AIMs), and included in models to control for population stratification. Candidate SNPs LEPR K109R (rs1137100) and LEPR Q223R (rs1137101) were positively associated with luminal A breast cancer, whereas ADIPOQ +45 T/G (rs2241766), ADIPOQ +276 G/T (rs1501299), and LEPR K656N (rs8129183) were not associated with either subtype. Few patterns were observed among tag SNPs, with the exception of 3 LEPR SNPs (rs17412175, rs9436746, and rs9436748) that were in moderate LD and inversely associated with basal-like breast cancer. However, no SNP associations were statistically significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons. Haplotypes in LEP and LEPR were associated with both basal-like and luminal A subtypes. There was no evidence of interaction with waist-hip ratio. Data suggest associations between LEPR candidate SNPs and luminal A breast cancer in the CBCS and LEPR intron 2 tag SNPs and basal-like breast cancer. Replication in additional studies where breast cancer subtypes have been defined is necessary to confirm these

  15. Common genetic variation in adiponectin, leptin, and leptin receptor and association with breast cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Nyante, Sarah J; Gammon, Marilie D; Kaufman, Jay S; Bensen, Jeannette T; Lin, Dan Yu; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Hu, Yijuan; He, Qianchuan; Luo, Jingchun; Millikan, Robert C

    2011-09-01

    Adipocytokines are produced by visceral fat, and levels may be associated with breast cancer risk. We investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in adipocytokine genes adiponectin (ADIPOQ), leptin (LEP), and the leptin receptor (LEPR) were associated with basal-like or luminal A breast cancer subtypes. 104 candidate and tag SNPs were genotyped in 1776 of 2022 controls and 1972 (200 basal-like, 679 luminal A) of 2311 cases from the Carolina Breast Cancer Study (CBCS), a population-based case-control study of whites and African Americans. Breast cancer molecular subtypes were determined by immunohistochemistry. Genotype odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. Haplotype ORs and 95% CIs were estimated using Hapstat. Interactions with waist-hip ratio were evaluated using a multiplicative interaction term. Ancestry was estimated from 144 ancestry informative markers (AIMs), and included in models to control for population stratification. Candidate SNPs LEPR K109R (rs1137100) and LEPR Q223R (rs1137101) were positively associated with luminal A breast cancer, whereas ADIPOQ +45 T/G (rs2241766), ADIPOQ +276 G/T (rs1501299), and LEPR K656N (rs8129183) were not associated with either subtype. Few patterns were observed among tag SNPs, with the exception of 3 LEPR SNPs (rs17412175, rs9436746, and rs9436748) that were in moderate LD and inversely associated with basal-like breast cancer. However, no SNP associations were statistically significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons. Haplotypes in LEP and LEPR were associated with both basal-like and luminal A subtypes. There was no evidence of interaction with waist-hip ratio. Data suggest associations between LEPR candidate SNPs and luminal A breast cancer in the CBCS and LEPR intron 2 tag SNPs and basal-like breast cancer. Replication in additional studies where breast cancer subtypes have been defined is necessary to confirm these

  16. Expression of muscarinic receptor subtypes in tree shrew ocular tissues and their regulation during the development of myopia

    PubMed Central

    Jobling, A.I.; Truong, H.T.; Cottriall, C.L.; Gentle, A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Muscarinic receptors are known to regulate several important physiologic processes in the eye. Antagonists to these receptors such as atropine and pirenzepine are effective at stopping the excessive ocular growth that results in myopia. However, their site of action is unknown. This study details ocular muscarinic subtype expression within a well documented model of eye growth and investigates their expression during early stages of myopia induction. Methods Total RNA was isolated from tree shrew corneal, iris/ciliary body, retinal, choroidal, and scleral tissue samples and was reverse transcribed. Using tree shrew-specific primers to the five muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes (CHRM1-CHRM5), products were amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and their identity confirmed using automated sequencing. The expression of the receptor proteins (M1-M5) were also explored in the retina, choroid, and sclera using immunohistochemistry. Myopia was induced in the tree shrew for one or five days using monocular deprivation of pattern vision, and the expression of the receptor subtypes was assessed in the retina, choroid, and sclera using real-time PCR. Results All five muscarinic receptor subtypes were expressed in the iris/ciliary body, retina, choroid, and sclera while gene products corresponding to CHRM1, CHRM3, CHRM4, and CHRM5 were present in the corneal samples. The gene expression data were confirmed by immunohistochemistry with the M1-M5 proteins detected in the retina, choroid, and sclera. After one or five days of myopia development, muscarinic receptor gene expression remained unaltered in the retinal, choroidal, and scleral tissue samples. Conclusions This study provides a comprehensive profile of muscarinic receptor gene and protein expression in tree shrew ocular tissues with all receptor subtypes found in tissues implicated in the control of eye growth. Despite the efficacy of muscarinic antagonists at inhibiting myopia development, the

  17. Alterations of muscarinic receptor subtypes in pathways relating to memory: Effects of lesions and transplants

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, V.L.

    1989-01-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors have been classified pharmacologically into two distinct populations designated muscarinic type-one (M-1) and mscarinic type-two (M-2). The semiquantitative technique of receptor autoradiography was used to examine the anatomical and cellular distribution, and densities of M-1 and M-2 receptors in the rate brain. Muscarinic receptors were labeled with the classical antagonist ({sup 3}H)quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB). Differentiation of the muscarinic subtypes was accomplished by competition studies of ({sup 3}H)QNB against the relatively selective M-1 antagonist pirenzepine (PZ), and the relatively selective M-2 antagonist, AFDX-116. In addition, M-1 and M-2 receptors were directly labeled with ({sup 3}H)PZ and ({sup 3}H)AFDX-116, respectively. Cholinergic pathways from the large cholinergic neurons in the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (NBM) to the cortex and from the medial septum (MS) to the hippocampus were examined by lesioning with the selective cholinergic neurotoxin, AF64A. Bilateral cerebral cortical infarction was performed in order to analyze potential changes in muscarinic receptor populations in subcortical structures that are sensitive to cortical infarction. Finally, the response of muscarinic receptors to fetal septodiagonal band transplants in the deafferentated hippocampus was examined.

  18. The SOL-2/Neto auxiliary protein modulates the function of AMPA-subtype ionotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Mellem, Jerry E; Jensen, Michael; Brockie, Penelope J; Walker, Craig S; Hoerndli, Frédéric J; Hauth, Linda; Madsen, David M; Maricq, Andres V

    2012-09-01

    The neurotransmitter glutamate mediates excitatory synaptic transmission by gating ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs). AMPA receptors (AMPARs), a subtype of iGluR, are strongly implicated in synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. We previously discovered two classes of AMPAR auxiliary proteins in C. elegans that modify receptor kinetics and thus change synaptic transmission. Here, we have identified another auxiliary protein, SOL-2, a CUB-domain protein that associates with both the related auxiliary subunit SOL-1 and with the GLR-1 AMPAR. In sol-2 mutants, behaviors dependent on glutamatergic transmission are disrupted, GLR-1-mediated currents are diminished, and GLR-1 desensitization and pharmacology are modified. Remarkably, a secreted variant of SOL-1 delivered in trans can rescue sol-1 mutants, and this rescue depends on in cis expression of SOL-2. Finally, we demonstrate that SOL-1 and SOL-2 have an ongoing role in the adult nervous system to control AMPAR-mediated currents. PMID:22958824

  19. Quantitative method of analyzing the interaction of slightly selective radioligands with multiple receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    McGonigle, P.; Neve, K.A.; Molinoff, P.B.

    1986-10-01

    Subclasses of receptors exist for most neurotransmitters. Frequently, two subtypes of receptors coexist in the same tissue and, in some cases, they mediate the same physiological response. In tissues with two classes of binding sites for a given hormone, an estimate of the proportion of each class of binding sites is obtained by inhibiting the binding of a single concentration of a radioligand with a selective unlabeled ligand. Accurate estimates of the density of each class of receptors will only be obtained, however, if the radioligand is entirely nonselective. Selectivity of just 2- to 3-fold can markedly influence the results of subtype analysis. The conclusion that a radioligand is nonselective is usually based on the results of a saturation binding curve. If Scatchard analysis results in a linear plot, the radioligand is nonselective. Scatchard analysis cannot distinguish between a radioligand that is nonselective and one that is slightly selective. The use of a slightly selective radioligand can lead to errors of 50% or more, depending on the concentration of the radioligand relative to the Kd values of the two classes of sites. A new method has been developed that can be used to quantitate 2- to 3-fold differences in the affinity of two distinct classes of binding sites for a radioligand. This approach requires that a series of inhibition experiments with a selective unlabeled ligand be performed in the presence of increasing concentrations of the radioligand. Analysis of the resulting inhibition curves, utilizing the mathematical modeling program MLAB on the PROPHET system, yields accurate estimates of the density of each class of receptor as well as the affinity of each receptor for the labeled and unlabeled ligands. This approach was used to determine whether /sup 125/I-iodopindolol shows selectivity for beta 1- or beta 2-adrenergic receptors.

  20. Quantitative Single-Cell Analysis of Signaling Pathways Activated Immediately Downstream of Histamine Receptor Subtypes.

    PubMed

    van Unen, Jakobus; Rashidfarrokhi, Ali; Hoogendoorn, Eelco; Postma, Marten; Gadella, Theodorus W J; Goedhart, Joachim

    2016-09-01

    Genetically encoded biosensors based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) can visualize responses of individual cells in real time. Here, we evaluated whether FRET-based biosensors provide sufficient contrast and specificity to measure activity of G-protein-coupled receptors. The four histamine receptor subtypes (H1R, H2R, H3R, and H4R) respond to the ligand histamine by activating three canonical heterotrimeric G-protein-mediated signaling pathways with a reported high degree of specificity. Using FRET-based biosensors, we demonstrate that H1R activates Gαq. We also observed that H1R activates Gαi, albeit at a 10-fold lower potency. In addition to increasing cAMP levels, most likely via Gαs, we found that the H2R induces Gαq-mediated calcium release. The H3R and H4R activated Gαi with high specificity and a high potency. We demonstrate that a number of FRET sensors provide sufficient contrast to: 1) analyze the specificity of the histamine receptor subtypes for different heterotrimeric G-protein families with single-cell resolution, 2) probe for antagonist specificity, and 3) allow the measurement of single-cell concentration-response curves. PMID:27358232

  1. Muscarinic receptor subtype determines vulnerability to oxidative stress in COS-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Joseph, J A; Fisher, D R; Strain, J

    2002-01-15

    Research has suggested that there may be increased brain-region selective vulnerability to oxidative stress in aging and that Vulnerability to oxidative stress may be important in determining regional differences in neuronal aging. We assessed whether one factor determining vulnerability to oxidative stress might involve qualitative/quantitative differences in receptor subtypes in various neuronal populations. COS-7 cells were transfected with one of five muscarinic receptor subtypes (M1-M5 AChR) to DA (1 mM for 4 h) and intracellular Ca2+ levels were examined via fluorescent imaging analysis prior to and following 750 microM oxotremorine (oxo). Results indicated that the ability of the cells to clear excess Ca2+ (i.e., Ca2+ Recovery) following oxo stimulation varied as a function of transfected mAChR subtype, with DA-treated M1, M2, or M4 cells showing greater decrements in Recovery than those transfected with M3 or M5 AChR. A similar pattern of results in M1- or M3-transfected DA-exposed cells was seen with respect to Viability. Viability of the untransfected cells was unaffected by DA. Pretreatment with Trolox (a Vitamin E analog) or PBN (a nitrone trapping agent) did not alter the DA effects on cell Recovery in the M1-transfected cells, but were effective in preventing the decrements in Viability. The calcium channel antagonists (L and N, respectively), Nifedipine and Conotoxin prevented both the DA-induced deficits in Recovery and Viability. Results are discussed in terms of receptor involvement in the regional differences in Vulnerability to oxidative stress with age, and that loss of neuronal function may not inevitably lead to cell death. PMID:11796204

  2. Pharmacological characterization of a selective agonist for Bombesin Receptor Subtype - 3

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Nothacker, Hans-Peter; Wang, Zhiwei; Bohn, Laura M; Civelli, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Bombesin receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) is an orphan G protein-coupled receptor in the bombesin receptor family that still awaits identification of its natural ligand. BRS-3 deficient mice develop a mild late-onset obesity with metabolic defects, implicating BRS-3 plays a role in feeding and metabolism. We describe here the pharmacological characterization of a synthetic compound, 16a, which serves as a potent agonist for BRS-3. This compound is selective for BRS-3 as it does not activate neuromedin B or gastrin-releasing peptide receptors, two most closely related bombesin receptors, as well as a series of other GPCRs. We assessed the receptor trafficking of BRS-3 and found that compound 16a promoted β-arrestin translocation to the cell membrane. Neither central nor peripheral administration of compound 16a affects locomotor activity in mice. Therefore compound 16a is a potential tool to study the function of the BRS-3 system in vitro and possibly in vivo. PMID:19580790

  3. Guanylpirenzepine distinguishes between neuronal ml and m4 muscarinic receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Monferini, E.; Cereda, E.; Ladinsky, H.; Donetti, A.; Giraldo, E. )

    1990-01-01

    Guanylpirenzepine, a polar, non-quaternary analog of pirenzepine, exhibited a novel binding behavior in rat brain regions: in competition binding experiments against (3H)pirenzepine labeling the M1 receptor in membranes from cerebral cortex, hippocampus and striatum, the compound, differently from pirenzepine, displayed heterogeneous binding curves. Computer assisted analysis of these curves, evidenced the existence of two populations of binding sites: a large proportion (84-89%) of high affinity receptors (KH = 64-92 nM) and a remainder with very low affinity (KL = 19-28 microM). Like pirenzepine, guanylpirenzepine showed low affinity for the glandular M3 and the cardiac M2 receptors when (3H)N-methylscopolamine was used to label the receptors in membranes from these two tissues; affinity values for guanylpirenzepine were 1336 and 5790 nM respectively, vs 323 and 683 nM for pirenzepine. We conclude that guanylpirenzepine is able to discriminate between m1 and m4 receptor subtypes and may represent a new tool for deeper studies on muscarinic receptors classification.

  4. Pharmacological identification of cholinergic receptor subtypes on Drosophila melanogaster larval heart.

    PubMed

    Malloy, Cole A; Ritter, Kyle; Robinson, Jonathan; English, Connor; Cooper, Robin L

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster heart is a popular model in which to study cardiac physiology and development. Progress has been made in understanding the role of endogenous compounds in regulating cardiac function in this model. It is well characterized that common neurotransmitters act on many peripheral and non-neuronal tissues as they flow through the hemolymph of insects. Many of these neuromodulators, including acetylcholine (ACh), have been shown to act directly on the D. melanogaster larval heart. ACh is a primary neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS) of vertebrates and at the neuromuscular junctions on skeletal and cardiac tissue. In insects, ACh is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter of sensory neurons and is also prominent in the CNS. A full understanding regarding the regulation of the Drosophila cardiac physiology by the cholinergic system remains poorly understood. Here we use semi-intact D. melanogaster larvae to study the pharmacological profile of cholinergic receptor subtypes, nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), in modulating heart rate (HR). Cholinergic receptor agonists, nicotine and muscarine both increase HR, while nAChR agonist clothianidin exhibits no significant effect when exposed to an open preparation at concentrations as low as 100 nM. In addition, both nAChR and mAChR antagonists increase HR as well but also display capabilities of blocking agonist actions. These results provide evidence that both of these receptor subtypes display functional significance in regulating the larval heart's pacemaker activity. PMID:26438517

  5. Structure-Based Evolution of Subtype-Selective Neurotensin Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Schaab, Carolin; Kling, Ralf Christian; Einsiedel, Jürgen; Hübner, Harald; Clark, Tim; Seebach, Dieter; Gmeiner, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Subtype-selective agonists of the neurotensin receptor NTS2 represent a promising option for the treatment of neuropathic pain, as NTS2 is involved in the mediation of μ-opioid-independent anti-nociceptive effects. Based on the crystal structure of the subtype NTS1 and previous structure–activity relationships (SARs) indicating a potential role for the sub-pocket around Tyr11 of NT(8–13) in subtype-specific ligand recognition, we have developed new NTS2-selective ligands. Starting from NT(8–13), we replaced the tyrosine unit by β2-amino acids (type 1), by heterocyclic tyrosine bioisosteres (type 2) and peptoid analogues (type 3). We were able to evolve an asymmetric synthesis of a 5-substituted azaindolylalanine and its application as a bioisostere of tyrosine capable of enhancing NTS2 selectivity. The S-configured test compound 2 a, [(S)-3-(pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyridine-5-yl)-propionyl11]NT(8–13), exhibits substantial NTS2 affinity (4.8 nm) and has a nearly 30-fold NTS2 selectivity over NTS1. The (R)-epimer 2 b showed lower NTS2 affinity but more than 600-fold selectivity over NTS1. PMID:25478316

  6. Alpha1-adrenoreceptor in human hippocampus: binding and receptor subtype mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Szot, Patricia; White, Sylvia S; Greenup, J Lynne; Leverenz, James B; Peskind, Elaine R; Raskind, Murray A

    2005-10-01

    Alpha1-adrenoreceptors (AR), of which three subtypes exist (alpha1A-, alpha1B- and alpha1D-AR) are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate the actions of norepinephrine and epinephrine both peripherally and centrally. In the CNS, alpha1-ARs are found in the hippocampus where animal studies have shown the ability of alpha1-AR agents to modulate long-term potentiation and memory; however, the precise distribution of alpha1-AR expression and its subtypes in the human brain is unknown making functional comparisons difficult. In the human hippocampus, 3H-prazosin (alpha1-AR antagonist) labels only the dentate gyrus (molecular, granule and polymorphic layers) and the stratum lucidum of the CA3 homogeneously. Human alpha1A-AR mRNA in the hippocampus is observed only in the dentate gyrus granule cell layer, while alpha1D-AR mRNA expression is observed only in the pyramidal cell layers of CA1, CA2 and CA3, regions where 3H-prazosin did not bind. alpha1B-AR mRNA is not expressed at detectable levels in the human hippocampus. These results confirm a difference in hippocampal alpha1-AR localization between rat and humans and further describe a difference in the localization of the alpha1A- and alpha1D-AR mRNA subtype between rats and humans. PMID:16039007

  7. Expression of the Somatostatin Receptor Subtype 4 in Intact and Inflamed Pulmonary Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Varecza, Zoltán; Elekes, Krisztián; László, Terézia; Perkecz, Anikó; Pintér, Erika; Sándor, Zoltán; Szolcsányi, János; Keszthelyi, Dániel; Szabó, Árpád; Sándor, Katalin; Molnár, Tamás F.; Szántó, Zalán; Pongrácz, Judit E.; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2009-01-01

    Somatostatin released from capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves of the lung during endotoxin-induced murine pneumonitis inhibits inflammation and hyperresponsiveness, presumably via somatostatin receptor subtype 4 (sst4). The goal of the present study was to identify sst4 receptors in mouse and human lungs and to reveal its inflammation-induced alterations with real-time quantitative PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. In non-inflamed mouse and human lungs, mRNA expression and immunolocalization of sst4 are very similar. They are present on bronchial epithelial, vascular endothelial, and smooth-muscle cells. The sst4 receptor protein in the mouse lung significantly increases 24 hr after intranasal endotoxin administration as well as in response to 3 months of whole-body cigarette smoke exposure, owing to the infiltrating sst4-positivite mononuclear cells and neutrophils. In the chronically inflamed human lung, the large number of activated macrophages markedly elevate sst4 mRNA levels, although there is no change in acute purulent pneumonia, in which granulocytes accumulate. Despite mouse granulocytes, human neutrophils do not show sst4 immunopositivity. We provide the first evidence for the expression, localization, and inflammation-induced alterations of sst4 receptors in murine and human lungs. Inasmuch as tissue distribution of this receptor is highly similar, extrapolation of murine experimental results to human conditions might be possible. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:1127–1137, 2009) PMID:19687471

  8. Quantitative autoradiographic analysis of muscarinic receptor subtypes and their role in representational memory

    SciTech Connect

    Messer, W.S.

    1986-01-01

    Autoradiographic techniques were used to examine the distribution of muscarinic receptors in rat brain slices. Agonist and selective antagonist binding were examined by measuring the ability for unlabeled ligands to inhibit (/sup 3/H)-1-QNB labeling of muscarinic receptors. The distribution of high affinity pirenzepine binding sites (M/sub 1/ subtype) was distinct from the distribution of high affinity carbamylcholine sites, which corresponded to the M/sub 2/ subtype. In a separate assay, the binding profile for pirenzepine was shown to differ from the profile for scopolamine, a classical muscarinic antagonist. Muscarinic antagonists, when injected into the Hippocampus, impaired performance of a representational memory task. Pirenzepine, the M/sub 1/ selective antagonist, produced representational memory deficits. Scopolamine, a less selective muscarinic antagonist, caused increases in running times in some animals which prevented a definitive interpretation of the nature of the impairment. Pirenzepine displayed a higher affinity for the hippocampus and was more effective in producing a selective impairment of representational memory than scopolamine. The data indicated that cholinergic activity in the hippocampus was necessary for representation memory function.

  9. ROLES OF OPIOID RECEPTOR SUBTYPES IN MEDIATING ALCOHOL SEEKING INDUCED BY DISCRETE CUES AND CONTEXT

    PubMed Central

    Marinelli, Peter W.; Funk, Douglas; Harding, Stephen; Li, Zhaoxia; Juzytsch, Walter; Lê, A.D.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of selective blockade of the delta (DOP) or mu opioid (MOP) receptors on alcohol seeking induced by discrete cues and context. In Experiment 1, rats were trained to self-administer alcohol in an environment with distinct sensory properties. After extinction in a different context with separate sensory properties, rats were tested for context-induced renewal in the original context following treatment with the DOP receptor antagonist naltrindole (0 – 15-mg/kg, IP) or the MOP receptor antagonist CTOP (0 – 3-µg/kg ICV). In a separate set of experiments, reinstatement was tested with the presentation of a discrete light+tone cue previously associated with alcohol delivery, following extinction without the cue. In Experiment 2, the effects of naltrindole (0 – 5-mg/kg, IP) or CTOP (0 – 3-µg/kg µg ICV) were assessed. For context-induced renewal, 7.5-mg/kg naltrindole reduced responding without affecting locomotor activity. Both doses of CTOP attenuated responding in the first 15 min of the renewal test session; however, total responses did not differ at the end of the session. For discrete cue-induced reinstatement, 1 and 5-mg/kg naltrindole attenuated responding, but CTOP had no effect. We conclude that while DOP receptors mediate alcohol seeking induced by discrete cues and context, MOP receptors may play a modest role only in context-induced renewal. These findings point to a differential involvement of opioid receptor subtypes in the effects of different kinds of conditioned stimuli on alcohol seeking, and support a more prominent role for DOP receptors. PMID:19686472

  10. Roles of opioid receptor subtypes in mediating alcohol-seeking induced by discrete cues and context.

    PubMed

    Marinelli, Peter W; Funk, Douglas; Harding, Stephen; Li, Zhaoxia; Juzytsch, Walter; Lê, A D

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of selective blockade of the delta (DOP) or mu (MOP) opioid receptors on alcohol-seeking induced by discrete cues and context. In Experiment 1, rats were trained to self-administer alcohol in an environment with distinct sensory properties. After extinction in a different context with separate sensory properties, rats were tested for context-induced renewal in the original context following treatment with the DOP receptor antagonist naltrindole (0-15 mg/kg, i.p.) or the MOP receptor antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH(2) (CTOP) (0-3 microg/4 microL, i.c.v.). In Experiment 2, reinstatement was tested with the presentation of a discrete light + tone cue previously associated with alcohol delivery, following extinction without the cue. The effects of naltrindole (0-5 mg/kg, i.p.) or CTOP (0-3 microg/4 microL, i.c.v.) were assessed. For context-induced renewal, 7.5 mg/kg naltrindole reduced responding without affecting locomotor activity. Both doses of CTOP attenuated responding in the first 15 min of the renewal test session; however, total responses did not differ at the end of the session. For discrete-cue-induced reinstatement, 1 and 5 mg/kg naltrindole attenuated responding but CTOP had no effect. We conclude that whereas DOP receptors mediate alcohol-seeking induced by discrete cues and context, MOP receptors may play a modest role only in context-induced renewal. These findings point to a differential involvement of opioid receptor subtypes in the effects of different kinds of conditioned stimuli on alcohol-seeking and support a more prominent role for DOP receptors. PMID:19686472

  11. Regulation and ontogeny of subtypes of muscarinic receptors and muscarinic receptor-mediated

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.

    1989-01-01

    The densities of total and M1 muscarinic receptors were measured using the muscarinic receptor antagonists {sup 3}H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and {sup 3}H-pirenzepine, respectively. Thus, the difference between the density of {sup 3}H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and {sup 3}H-pirenzepine binding sites represents the density of M2 sites. In addition, there is no observable change in either acetylcholine-stimulated phosphoinositide breakdown (suggested to be an M1 receptor-mediated response) or in carbachol-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation (suggested to be an M2 receptor-mediated response) in slices of cortex+dorsal hippocampus following chronic atropine administration. In other experiments, it has been shown that the M1 and M2 receptors in rat cortex have different ontogenetic profiles. The M2 receptor is present at adult levels at birth, while the M1 receptor develops slowly from low levels at postnatal week 1 to adult levels at postnatal week 3. The expression of acetylcholine-stimulated phosphoinositide breakdown parallels the development of M1 receptors, while the development of carbachol-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation occurs abruptly between weeks 2 and 3 postnatally.

  12. Molecular mechanism of ligand recognition by NR3 subtype glutamate receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Yongneng; Harrison, Chris B.; Freddolino, Peter L.; Schulten, Klaus; Mayer, Mark L.

    2008-10-27

    NR3 subtype glutamate receptors have a unique developmental expression profile, but are the least well-characterized members of the NMDA receptor gene family, which have key roles in synaptic plasticity and brain development. Using ligand binding assays, crystallographic analysis, and all atom MD simulations, we investigate mechanisms underlying the binding by NR3A and NR3B of glycine and D-serine, which are candidate neurotransmitters for NMDA receptors containing NR3 subunits. The ligand binding domains of both NR3 subunits adopt a similar extent of domain closure as found in the corresponding NR1 complexes, but have a unique loop 1 structure distinct from that in all other glutamate receptor ion channels. Within their ligand binding pockets, NR3A and NR3B have strikingly different hydrogen bonding networks and solvent structures from those found in NR1, and fail to undergo a conformational rearrangement observed in NR1 upon binding the partial agonist ACPC. MD simulations revealed numerous interdomain contacts, which stabilize the agonist-bound closed-cleft conformation, and a novel twisting motion for the loop 1 helix that is unique in NR3 subunits.

  13. Stereoselective inhibition of muscarinic receptor subtypes by the enantiomers of hexahydro-difenidol and acetylenic analogues.

    PubMed Central

    Feifel, R.; Wagner-Röder, M.; Strohmann, C.; Tacke, R.; Waelbroeck, M.; Christophe, J.; Mutschler, E.; Lambrecht, G.

    1990-01-01

    1. The affinities of the (R)- and (S)-enantiomers of hexahydro-difenidol (1) and its acetylenic analogues hexbutinol (2), hexbutinol methiodide (3) and p-fluoro-hexbutinol (4) (stereochemical purity greater than 99.8%) for muscarinic receptors in rabbit vas deferens (M1), guinea-pig atria (M2) and guinea-pig ileum (M3) were measured by dose-ratio experiments. 2. The (R)-enantiomers consistently showed higher affinities than the (S)-isomers. The stereoselectivity ratios [(R)/(S)] were greatest with the enantiomers of 1 (vas deferens: 550; ileum: 191; atria: 17) and least with those of the p-Fluoro-analogue 4 (vas deferens: 34; ileum: 8.5; atria: 1.7). 3. The enantiomeric potency ratios for compounds 1-4 were highest in rabbit vas deferens, intermediate in guinea-pig ileum and much less in guinea-pig atria. Thus, these ratios may serve as a predictor of muscarinic receptor subtype identity. 4. (S)-p-Fluoro-hexbutinol [(S)-4] showed a novel receptor selectivity profile with preference for M3 receptors: M3 greater than M2 greater than or equal to M1. 5. These results do not conform to Pfeiffer's rule that activity differences between enantiomers are greater with more potent compounds. PMID:2331578

  14. Development of GABAA Receptor Subtype-Selective Imidazobenzodiazepines as Novel Asthma Treatments.

    PubMed

    Forkuo, Gloria S; Guthrie, Margaret L; Yuan, Nina Y; Nieman, Amanda N; Kodali, Revathi; Jahan, Rajwana; Stephen, Michael R; Yocum, Gene T; Treven, Marco; Poe, Michael M; Li, Guanguan; Yu, Olivia B; Hartzler, Benjamin D; Zahn, Nicolas M; Ernst, Margot; Emala, Charles W; Stafford, Douglas C; Cook, James M; Arnold, Leggy A

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that subtype-selective GABAA receptor modulators are able to relax precontracted human airway smooth muscle ex vivo and reduce airway hyper-responsiveness in mice upon aerosol administration. Our goal in this study was to investigate systemic administration of subtype-selective GABAA receptor modulators to alleviate bronchoconstriction in a mouse model of asthma. Expression of GABAA receptor subunits was identified in mouse lungs, and the effects of α4-subunit-selective GABAAR modulators, XHE-III-74EE and its metabolite XHE-III-74A, were investigated in a murine model of asthma (ovalbumin sensitized and challenged BALB/c mice). We observed that chronic treatment with XHE-III-74EE significantly reduced airway hyper-responsiveness. In addition, acute treatment with XHE-III-74A but not XHE-III-74EE decreased airway eosinophilia. Immune suppressive activity was also shown in activated human T-cells with a reduction in IL-2 expression and intracellular calcium concentrations [Ca(2+)]i in the presence of GABA or XHE-III-74A, whereas XHE-III-74EE showed only partial reduction of [Ca(2+)]i and no inhibition of IL-2 secretion. However, both compounds significantly relaxed precontracted tracheal rings ex vivo. Overall, we conclude that the systemic delivery of a α4-subunit-selective GABAAR modulator shows good potential for a novel asthma therapy; however, the pharmacokinetic properties of this class of drug candidates have to be improved to enable better beneficial systemic pharmacodynamic effects. PMID:27120014

  15. Endothelin receptor subtypes and their functional relevance in human small coronary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Pierre, Lisa N; Davenport, Anthony P

    1998-01-01

    The potent constrictor peptide endothelin (ET) has been implicated in various cardiovascular disorders including myocardial infarction and atherosclerosis. We have investigated the nature of ET receptor subtypes present on human small coronary arteries.Small coronary arteries were mounted in a wire-myograph for in vitro pharmacology. To investigate the ET receptor subtypes present in different segments of the coronary vascular tree, arteries were grouped according to internal diameter. Responses in arteries with small internal diameters (mean 316.7±7.9 μm; Group B) were compared to those in larger arteries (mean 586.2±23.1 μm; Group A).ET-1 consistently and potently contracted arteries from Group A and B, with EC50 values of 1.7 (0.9–3.2) nM (n=15) and 2.3 (1.4–4.2) nM (n=14), respectively. No correlation was observed between ET-1 potency and internal diameter. The response to ET-1 was potently antagonized by the selective ETA receptor antagonist PD156707 in both Group A and Group B, yielding pA2 values of 8.60±0.12 (n=4–6) and 8.38±0.17 (n=4–6), respectively. Slopes from Schild regression were not significantly different from unity.In contrast to ET-1, individual responses to ET-3 were variable. While all arteries from Group A responded to ET-3 (EC50∼69 (23–210) nM) (n=12), no response was obtained in 5 of the 14 tested in Group B. Of those responding, many failed to reach a maximum at concentrations up to 1 μM. ET-1 was more potent than ET-3 in all arteries tested. A biphasic ET-3 response was observed in 8 arteries suggesting that a small ETB population was also present in some patients. The selective ETB receptor agonist sarafotoxin S6c had little or no effect up to 10 nM (n=4–6).Responses to ET-1 and ET-3 were unaffected by removal of the endothelium in arteries from both groups suggesting a lack of functional, relaxant ETB receptors on endothelial cells (n=5).Using autoradiography, specific high density binding of the non

  16. Multiple receptor subtypes mediate the effects of serotonin on rat subfornical organ neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scrogin, K. E.; Johnson, A. K.; Schmid, H. A.

    1998-01-01

    The subfornical organ (SFO) receives significant serotonergic innervation. However, few reports have examined the functional effects of serotonin on SFO neurons. This study characterized the effects of serotonin on spontaneously firing SFO neurons in the rat brain slice. Of 31 neurons tested, 80% responded to serotonin (1-100 microM) with either an increase (n = 15) or decrease (n = 10) in spontaneous activity. Responses to serotonin were dose dependent and persisted after synaptic blockade. Excitatory responses could also be mimicked by the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)2A/2C receptor agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI; 1-10 microM) and could be blocked by the 5-HT2A/2C-receptor antagonist LY-53,857 (10 microM). LY-53,857 unmasked inhibitory responses to serotonin in 56% of serotonin-excited cells tested. Serotonin-inhibited cells were also inhibited by the 5-HT1A-receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT; 1-10 microM; n = 7). The data indicate that SFO neurons are responsive to serotonin via postsynaptic activation of multiple receptor subtypes. The results suggest that excitatory responses to serotonin are mediated by 5-HT2A or 5-HT2C receptors and that inhibitory responses may be mediated by 5-HT1A receptors. In addition, similar percentages of serotonin-excited and -inhibited cells were also sensitive to ANG II. As such the functional relationship between serotonin and ANG II in the SFO remains unclear.

  17. DNA Methylation Patterns Can Estimate Nonequivalent Outcomes of Breast Cancer with the Same Receptor Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min; Zhang, Shaojun; Wen, Yanhua; Wang, Yihan; Wei, Yanjun; Liu, Hongbo; Zhang, Dongwei; Su, Jianzhong; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer has various molecular subtypes and displays high heterogeneity. Aberrant DNA methylation is involved in tumor origin, development and progression. Moreover, distinct DNA methylation patterns are associated with specific breast cancer subtypes. We explored DNA methylation patterns in association with gene expression to assess their impact on the prognosis of breast cancer based on Infinium 450K arrays (training set) from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). The DNA methylation patterns of 12 featured genes that had a high correlation with gene expression were identified through univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards models and used to define the methylation risk score (MRS). An improved ability to distinguish the power of the DNA methylation pattern from the 12 featured genes (p = 0.00103) was observed compared with the average methylation levels (p = 0.956) or gene expression (p = 0.909). Furthermore, MRS provided a good prognostic value for breast cancers even when the patients had the same receptor status. We found that ER-, PR- or Her2- samples with high-MRS had the worst 5-year survival rate and overall survival time. An independent test set including 28 patients with death as an outcome was used to test the validity of the MRS of the 12 featured genes; this analysis obtained a prognostic value equivalent to the training set. The predict power was validated through two independent datasets from the GEO database. The DNA methylation pattern is a powerful predictor of breast cancer survival, and can predict outcomes of the same breast cancer molecular subtypes. PMID:26550991

  18. Lynx1 and Aβ1-42 bind competitively to multiple nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Morten S; Arvaniti, Maria; Jensen, Majbrit M; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Dolgikh, Dmitry A; Pinborg, Lars H; Härtig, Wolfgang; Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2016-10-01

    Lynx1 regulates synaptic plasticity in the brain by regulating nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). It is not known to which extent Lynx1 can bind to endogenous nAChR subunits in the brain or how this interaction is affected by Alzheimer's disease pathology. We apply affinity purification to demonstrate that a water-soluble variant of human Lynx1 (Ws-Lynx1) isolates α3, α4, α5, α6, α7, β2, and β4 nAChR subunits from human and rat cortical extracts, and rat midbrain and olfactory bulb extracts, suggesting that Lynx1 forms complexes with multiple nAChR subtypes in the human and rodent brain. Incubation with Ws-Lynx1 decreases nicotine-mediated extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in PC12 cells and striatal neurons, indicating that binding of Ws-Lynx1 is sufficient to inhibit signaling downstream of nAChRs. The effect of nicotine in PC12 cells is independent of α7 or α4β2 nAChRs, suggesting that Lynx1 can affect the function of native non-α7, non-α4β2 nAChR subtypes. We further show that Lynx1 and oligomeric β-amyloid1-42 compete for binding to several nAChR subunits, that Ws-Lynx1 prevents β-amyloid1-42-induced cytotoxicity in cortical neurons, and that cortical Lynx1 levels are decreased in a transgenic mouse model with concomitant β-amyloid and tau pathology. Our data suggest that Lynx1 binds to multiple nAChR subtypes in the brain and that this interaction might have functional and pathophysiological implications in relation to Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27460145

  19. Recent Progress in Understanding Subtype Specific Regulation of NMDA Receptors by G Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs)

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kai; Jackson, Michael F.; MacDonald, John F.

    2014-01-01

    G Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of receptors whose ligands constitute nearly a third of prescription drugs in the market. They are widely involved in diverse physiological functions including learning and memory. NMDA receptors (NMDARs), which belong to the ionotropic glutamate receptor family, are likewise ubiquitously expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) and play a pivotal role in learning and memory. Despite its critical contribution to physiological and pathophysiological processes, few pharmacological interventions aimed directly at regulating NMDAR function have been developed to date. However, it is well established that NMDAR function is precisely regulated by cellular signalling cascades recruited downstream of G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) stimulation. Accordingly, the downstream regulation of NMDARs likely represents an important determinant of outcome following treatment with neuropsychiatric agents that target selected GPCRs. Importantly, the functional consequence of such regulation on NMDAR function varies, based not only on the identity of the GPCR, but also on the cell type in which relevant receptors are expressed. Indeed, the mechanisms responsible for regulating NMDARs by GPCRs involve numerous intracellular signalling molecules and regulatory proteins that vary from one cell type to another. In the present article, we highlight recent findings from studies that have uncovered novel mechanisms by which selected GPCRs regulate NMDAR function and consequently NMDAR-dependent plasticity. PMID:24562329

  20. β-Adrenergic receptor subtype signaling in heart: From bench to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Anthony Yiu Ho; Xiao, Rui-ping

    2012-01-01

    β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) stimulation by the sympathetic nervous system or circulating catecholamines is broadly involved in peripheral blood circulation, metabolic regulation, muscle contraction, and central neural activities. In the heart, acute βAR stimulation serves as the most powerful means to regulate cardiac output in response to a fight-or-flight situation, whereas chronic βAR stimulation plays an important role in physiological and pathological cardiac remodeling. There are three βAR subtypes, β1AR, β2AR and β3AR, in cardiac myocytes. Over the past two decades, we systematically investigated the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the different even opposite functional roles of β1AR and β2AR subtypes in regulating cardiac structure and function, with keen interest in the development of novel therapies based on our discoveries. We have made three major discoveries, including (1) dual coupling of β2AR to Gs and Gi proteins in cardiomyocytes, (2) cardioprotection by β2AR signaling in improving cardiac function and myocyte viability, and (3) PKA-independent, CaMKII-mediated β1AR apoptotic and maladaptive remodeling signaling in the heart. Based on these discoveries and salutary effects of β1AR blockade on patients with heart failure, we envision that activation of β2AR in combination with clinically used β1AR blockade should provide a safer and more effective therapy for the treatment of heart failure. PMID:22286918

  1. Identification of vagal sensory receptors in the rat lung: are there subtypes of slowly adapting receptors?

    PubMed Central

    Bergren, D R; Peterson, D F

    1993-01-01

    1. We studied the characteristics of pulmonary sensory receptors whose afferent fibres are in the left vagus nerve of opened-chest rats. The activity of these receptors was recorded during mechanical ventilation approximating eupnoea, as well as during deflation, stepwise inflations and constant-pressure inflations of the lungs. Data were also collected from closed-chest rats and analysed separately. 2. Ninety-four per cent of receptors were located in the ipsilateral lung or airways with the remainder in the contralateral lung. 3. Not only were slowly adapting receptors (SARs) the most abundant pulmonary receptors but 21% of them were either exclusively or predominantly active during the deflationary phase of the ventilatory cycle. Deflationary units were found in opened- and closed-chest rats. The average conduction velocity for all fibres innervating SARs averaged 29.7 m s-1. 4. We found rapidly adapting receptors (RARs) to be extremely rare in the rat. Their activity was sparse and irregular. The conduction velocities of fibres innervating RARs averaged 12.3 m s-1. 5. Far more abundant than RARs in the remaining population of pulmonary fibres were C fibres. They were observed to have an average conduction velocity of 2.1 m s-1, base-level activity which was irregular and a high pressure threshold of activation and were stimulated by intravenous capsaicin injection. 6. Notable differences exist between pulmonary receptors in rats and those reported in other species. The variations include the abundant existence of intrapulmonary SARs with exclusively deflationary modulation and the rarity of RARs. We also encountered C fibres which have not previously been described systematically in the rat. PMID:8229824

  2. Effect of estrogen receptor-subtype-specific ligands on fertility in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Dumasia, Kushaan; Kumar, Anita; Kadam, Leena; Balasinor, N H

    2015-06-01

    Maintenance of normal male fertility relies on the process of spermatogenesis which is under complex endocrine control by mechanisms involving gonadotropin and steroid hormones. Although testosterone is the primary sex steroid in males, estrogen is locally produced in the testis and plays a very crucial role in male fertility. This is evident from presence of both the estrogen receptors alpha (ERα) and beta (ERβ) in the testis and their absence, as in the case of knockout mice models, leads to sterility. The present study was undertaken to understand individual roles of the two ERs in spermatogenesis and their direct contribution towards the maintenance of male fertility using receptor-subtype-specific ligands. Administration of ERα and β agonists to adult male rats for 60 days results in a significant decrease in fertility, mainly due to an increase in pre- and post-implantation loss and a concomitant decrease in litter size and sperm counts. Our results indicate that ERα is mainly involved in negative feedback regulation of gonadotropin hormones, whereas both ERs are involved in regulation of prolactin and testosterone production. Histological examinations of the testis reveal that ERβ could be involved in the process of spermiation since many failed spermatids were observed in stages IX-XI following ERβ agonist treatment. Our results indicate that overactivation of estrogen signaling through either of its receptors can have detrimental effects on the fertility parameters and that the two ERs have both overlapping and distinct roles in maintenance of male fertility. PMID:25869617

  3. Antagonism of Neuronal Prostaglandin E2 Receptor Subtype 1 Mitigates Amyloid β Neurotoxicity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianwu; Rose, Shannon; Montine, Kathleen; Keene, C. Dirk; Montine, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate that regional brain eicosanoid signaling is important in initiation and progression of neurodegenerative conditions that have a neuroinflammatory pathologic component, such as AD. We hypothesized that PGE2 receptor subtype 1 (EP1) signaling (linked to intracellular Ca2+ release) regulates Aβ peptide neurotoxicity and tested this in two complementary in vitro models: a human neuroblastoma cell line (MC65) producing Aβ1-40 through conditional expression of the APP C-terminal portion, and murine primary cortical neuron cultures exposed to Aβ1-42. In MC65 cells, EP1 receptor antagonist SC-51089 reduced Aβ neurotoxicity ~50% without altering high molecular weight Aβ immunoreactive species formation. Inositol-3-phosphate receptor antagonist 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl borate offered similar protection. SC-51089 largely protected the neuron cultures from synthetic Aβ1-42 neurotoxicity. Nimodipine, a Ca2+ channel blocker, was completely neuroprotective in both models. Based on these data, we conclude that suppressing neuronal EP1 signaling may represent a promising therapeutic approach to ameliorate Aβ peptide neurotoxicity. PMID:22718277

  4. Structure-based approach for the study of thyroid hormone receptor binding affinity and subtype selectivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang-Fang; Yang, Wei; Shi, Yong-Hui; Cheng, Xiang-Rong; Le, Guo-Wei

    2016-10-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) possesses the ability to lower cholesterol and improve cardiac performance, which have prompted the efforts to design analogs that can utilize the cholesterol-lowering property without adversely affecting heart function. In order to gain insights into the interaction mechanism for agonists at the active site of thyroid hormone receptor β (TRβ), quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models have been developed on TRβ agonists, significant statistical coefficients were obtained (CoMFA, R(2)cv, .732), (CoMSIA, R(2)cv, .853), indicating the internal consistency of the models, the obtained models were further validated using the test set, the acquired R(2)pred values .7054 and .7129 were in good agreement with the experimental results. The key amino acids affecting ligand binding were identified by molecular docking, and the detailed binding modes of the compounds with different activities were also determined. Furthermore, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were conducted to assess the reliability of the derived models and the docking results. Moreover, TH exerts significant physiological effects through modulation of the two human thyroid hormone receptor subtypes. Because TRβ and TRα locate in different target cells, selective TR ligands would target specific tissues regulated by one receptor without affecting the other. Thus, the 3D information was analyzed to reveal the most relevant structural features involved in selectivity. The findings serve as the basis for further investigation into selective TRβ/TRα agonists. PMID:26510472

  5. Regulation of specific target genes and biological responses by estrogen receptor subtype agonists

    PubMed Central

    Leitman, Dale C.; Paruthiyil, Sreenivasan; Vivar, Omar I.; Saunier, Elise F.; Herber, Candice B.; Cohen, Isaac; Tagliaferri, Mary; Speed, Terence P.

    2010-01-01

    Estrogenic effects are mediated through two estrogen receptor (ER) subtypes, ERα and ERβ. Estrogens are the most commonly prescribed drugs to treat menopausal conditions, but by non-selectively triggering both ERα and ERβ pathways in different tissues they can cause serious adverse effects. The different sizes of the binding pockets and sequences of their activation function domains indicate that ERα and ERβ should have different specificities for ligands and biological responses that can be exploited for designing safer and more selective estrogens. ERα and ERβ regulate different genes by binding to different regulatory elements and recruiting different transcription and chromatin remodeling factors that are expressed in a cell-specific manner. ERα- and ERβ-selective agonists have been identified that demonstrate that the two ERs produce distinct biological effects. ERα and ERβ agonists are promising new approach for treating specific conditions associated with menopause. PMID:20951642

  6. Subtype selective NMDA receptor antagonists induce recovery of synapses lost following exposure to HIV-1 Tat

    PubMed Central

    Shin, AH; Kim, HJ; Thayer, SA

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Neurocognitive disorders afflict approximately 20% of HIV-infected patients. HIV-1-infected cells in the brain shed viral proteins such as transactivator of transcription (Tat). Tat elicits cell death and synapse loss via processes initiated by NMDA receptor activation but mediated by separate downstream signalling pathways. Subunit selective NMDA receptor antagonists may differentially modulate survival relative to synaptic changes. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Tat-evoked cell death was quantified by measuring propidium iodide uptake into rat hippocampal neurons in culture. The effects of Tat on synaptic changes were measured using an imaging-based assay that quantified clusters of the scaffolding protein postsynaptic density 95 fused to green fluorescent protein. KEY RESULTS Dizocilpine, a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, inhibited Tat-induced synapse loss, subsequent synapse recovery and Tat-induced cell death with comparable potencies. Memantine (10 µM) and ifenprodil (10 µM), which preferentially inhibit GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors, protected from Tat-induced cell death with no effect on synapse loss. Surprisingly, memantine and ifenprodil induced synapse recovery in the presence of Tat. In contrast, the GluN2A-prefering antagonist TCN201 prevented synapse loss and recovery with no effect on cell death. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Synapse loss is a protective mechanism that enables the cell to cope with excess excitatory input. Thus, memantine and ifenprodil are promising neuroprotective drugs because they spare synaptic changes and promote survival. These GluN2B-preferring drugs induced recovery from Tat-evoked synapse loss, suggesting that synaptic pharmacology changed during the neurotoxic process. NMDA receptor subtypes differentially participate in the adaptation and death induced by excitotoxic insult. PMID:22142193

  7. Metabotropic glutamate receptor subtypes modulating neurotransmission at parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses in rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Neale, S A; Garthwaite, J; Batchelor, A M

    2001-07-01

    The actions of reportedly group-selective metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor agonists and antagonists on neurotransmission at parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses in the rat cerebellum have been characterised using sharp microelectrode recording and an in vitro slice preparation. Application of the group I agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) or the group III selective agonist L(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (L-AP4) depressed synaptic transmission in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner (EC(50)=18 and 5 microM, respectively). The depression produced by DHPG was unrelated to the depolarisation observed in some Purkinje cells. The group II agonist (2S,2'R,3'R)-2-(2',3'-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine (DCG IV, 1 microM) had no effect. The effects of DHPG were inhibited by the group I-selective antagonist 7-hydroxyiminocyclopropan[b]chromen-1a-carboxylic acid ethyl ester (CPCCOEt), but not by the group II/III antagonist alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG). The effect of L-AP4 was inhibited by MPPG, but not by the group I/II antagonist (S)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG). By themselves, the antagonists did not affect the EPSPs, suggesting that neither receptor is activated during low frequency neurotransmission. It is concluded that, in addition to the excitatory role for group I receptors described previously, both group I and III (but not group II) mGlu receptors operate at this synapse to inhibit synaptic transmission. The specific receptor subtypes involved are likely to be mGlu1 and mGlu4. PMID:11445184

  8. Differentiation of muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes in human cortex and pons - Implications for anti-motion sickness therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, Bruce G.; Peroutka, Stephen J.

    1988-01-01

    Radioligand binding studies were used to analyze muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes in human cortex and pons. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors were labeled by H-3-quinuclidinyl benzilate (H-3-QNB). Scopolamine was equipotent in both brain regions and did not discriminate subtypes of H-3-QNB binding. By contrast, the M1 selective antagonist pirenzepine was approximately 33-fold more potent in human cortex than pons. Carbachol, a putative M2 selective agonist, was more than 100-fold more potent in human pons than cortex. These results demonstrate that the human pons contains a relatively large proportion of carbachol-sensitive muscarinic cholinergic receptors. Drugs targeted to this subpopulation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors may prove to be effective anti-motion sickness agents with less side effects than scopolamine.

  9. The Alpha-1D Is the Predominant Alpha-1-Adrenergic Receptor Subtype in Human Epicardial Coronary Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Brian C.; Swigart, Philip M.; Laden, Marie-Eve; DeMarco, Teresa; Hoopes, Charles; Simpson, Paul C.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The goal was to identify alpha-1-adrenergic receptor (α1-AR) subtypes in human coronary arteries. Background The α1-ARs regulate human coronary blood flow. α1-ARs exist as three molecular subtypes, α1A, α1B, and α1D, and the α1D subtype mediates coronary vasoconstriction in the mouse. However, the α1A is thought to be the only subtype in human coronary arteries. Methods We obtained human epicardial coronary arteries and left ventricular (LV) myocardium from 19 transplant recipients and 6 unused donors (age 19–70 years; 68% male; 32% with coronary artery disease). We cultured coronary rings and human coronary smooth muscle cells. We assayed α1- and β-AR subtype mRNAs by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR; and subtype proteins, by radioligand binding and ERK activation. Results The α1D subtype was 85% of total coronary α1-AR mRNA and 75% of total α1-AR protein, and α1D stimulation activated ERK. In contrast, the α1D was low in LV myocardium. Total coronary α1-AR levels were one-third of β-ARs, which were 99% the β2 subtype. Conclusions The α1D subtype is predominant and functional in human epicardial coronary arteries, whereas the α1A and α1B are present at very low levels. This distribution is similar to the mouse, where myocardial α1A and α1B-ARs mediate beneficial functional responses, and coronary α1Ds mediate vasoconstriction. Thus, α1D-selective antagonists might mediate coronary vasodilation, without the negative cardiac effects of non-selective α1-AR antagonists in current use. Furthermore, it could be possible to selectively activate beneficial myocardial α1A and/or α1B-AR signaling without causing coronary vasoconstriction. PMID:19761933

  10. Pharmacological evidence for a novel cysteinyl-leukotriene receptor subtype in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Walch, Laurence; Norel, Xavier; Bäck, Magnus; Gascard, Jean-Pierre; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Brink, Charles

    2002-01-01

    To characterize the cysteinyl-leukotriene receptors (CysLT receptors) in isolated human pulmonary arteries, ring preparations were contracted with leukotriene C4 (LTC4) and leukotriene D4 (LTD4) in either the absence or presence of the selective CysLT1 receptor antagonists, ICI 198615, MK 571 or the dual CysLT1/CysLT2 receptor antagonist, BAY u9773. Since the contractions induced by the cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cysLTs) in intact preparations failed to attain a plateau response over the concentration range studied, the endothelium was removed and the tissue treated continuously with indomethacin (Rubbed+INDO). In these latter preparations, the pEC50 for LTC4 and LTD4 were not significantly different (7.61±0.07, n=20 and 7.96±0.09, n=22, respectively). However, the LTC4 and LTD4 contractions were markedly potentiated when compared with data from intact tissues. Leukotriene E4 (LTE4) did not contract human isolated pulmonary arterial preparations. In addition, treatment of preparations with LTE4 (1 μM; 30 min) did not modify either the LTC4 or LTD4 contractions. Treatment of preparations with the S-conjugated glutathione (S-hexyl-GSH; 100 μM, 30 min), an inhibitor of the metabolism of LTC4 to LTD4, did not modify LTC4 contractions. The pEC50 values for LTC4 were significantly reduced by treatment of the preparations with either ICI 198615, MK 571 or BAY u9773 and the pKB values were: 7.20, 7.02 and 6.26, respectively. In contrast, these antagonists did not modify the LTD4 pEC50 values. These findings suggest the presence of two CysLT receptors on human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle. A CysLT1 receptor with a low affinity for CysLT1 antagonists and a novel CysLT receptor subtype, both responsible for vasoconstriction. Activation of this latter receptor by LTC4 and LTD4 induced a contractile response which was resistant to the selective CysLT1 antagonists (ICI 198615 and MK 571) as well as the non-selective (CysLT1/CysLT2) antagonist, BAY u9773. PMID

  11. Receptor-Binding Profiles of H7 Subtype Influenza Viruses in Different Host Species

    PubMed Central

    Gambaryan, Alexandra S.; Matrosovich, Tatyana Y.; Philipp, Jennifer; Munster, Vincent J.; Fouchier, Ron A. M.; Cattoli, Giovanni; Capua, Ilaria; Krauss, Scott L.; Webster, Robert G.; Banks, Jill; Bovin, Nicolai V.; Klenk, Hans-Dieter

    2012-01-01

    Influenza viruses of gallinaceous poultry and wild aquatic birds usually have distinguishable receptor-binding properties. Here we used a panel of synthetic sialylglycopolymers and solid-phase receptor-binding assays to characterize receptor-binding profiles of about 70 H7 influenza viruses isolated from aquatic birds, land-based poultry, and horses in Eurasia and America. Unlike typical duck influenza viruses with non-H7 hemagglutinin (HA), all avian H7 influenza viruses, irrespective of the host species, displayed a poultry-virus-like binding specificity, i.e., preferential binding to sulfated oligosaccharides Neu5Acα2-3Galβ1-4(6-O-HSO3)GlcNAc and Neu5Acα2-3Galβ1-4(Fucα1-3)(6-O-HSO3)GlcNAc. This phenotype correlated with the unique amino acid sequence of the amino acid 185 to 189 loop of H7 HA and seemed to be dependent on ionic interactions between the sulfate group of the receptor and Lys193 and on the lack of sterical clashes between the fucose residue and Gln222. Many North American and Eurasian H7 influenza viruses displayed weak but detectable binding to the human-type receptor moiety Neu5Acα2-6Galβ1-4GlcNAc, highlighting the potential of H7 influenza viruses for avian-to-human transmission. Equine H7 influenza viruses differed from other viruses by preferential binding to the N-glycolyl form of sialic acid. Our data suggest that the receptor-binding site of contemporary H7 influenza viruses in aquatic and terrestrial birds was formed after the introduction of their common precursor from ducks to a new host, presumably, gallinaceous poultry. The uniformity of the receptor-binding profile of H7 influenza viruses in various wild and domestic birds indicates that there is no strong receptor-mediated host range restriction in birds on viruses with this HA subtype. This notion agrees with repeated interspecies transmission of H7 influenza viruses from aquatic birds to poultry. PMID:22345462

  12. Classification of M/sub 1/ and M/sub 2/ receptor subtypes in vivo by autoradiography using (/sup 125/I) (R,R) 4IQNB: Implications for imaging receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, R.E.; Moody, T.; Kzeszotarski, W.J.; Schneidau, T.S.; Jagoda, E.M.; Reba, R.C.

    1985-05-01

    (/sup 125/I) (R,R) 3-Quinuclidinyl 4-Iodobenzilate (4IQNB) is a high affinity radiotracer for the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor which exhibits differential kinetics of dissociation from the receptor subtypes, M/sub 1/ and M/sub 2/. The authors have determined the relative percentages of M/sub 1/ to M/sub 2/-receptor subtype in six structures of rat brain by equilibrium competition using the selective antagonist, QNX, and by analysis of the off-rate profiles for 4IQNB. The results are comparable and provide: (% M/sub 1/) caudate nucleus - 100%, hippocampus - 92%, cortex - 82%, thalamus - 6%, superior + inferior colliculi - 41%, and pons - 23%. To determine the relative proportions of M/sub 1/ to M/sub 2/ receptors in vivo we examined the distribution of 4IQNB at 2 h and 24 h by autoradiography. At 2 h, both M/sub 1/ and M/sub 2/ receptors will be labeled but at 24 h only the M/sub 1/ receptor will retain radiotracer. At 2 h, all structures of the brain are variably labeled with the cortex, hippocampus, caudate nucleus, olfactory nuclei, nucleus accumbens, pontine nuclei, and anteroventral thalamic nucleus (AV) most heavily labeled. At 24 h, both the pontine and AV, as well as the less heavily labeled hypothalamus, superior colliculus and mesencephalic nuclei, are devoid of radiotracer thus indicating predominantly M/sub 2/ receptor. Quantitation is necessary to determine possible washout of activity from the M/sub 2/ receptors in cortex. Similar time studies in man should provide distinctions between the M/sub 1/ and M/sub 2/ receptor rich structures and the preferential loss of a subtype of receptor due to disease.

  13. Aging and long-term caloric restriction regulate neuropeptide Y receptor subtype densities in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Veyrat-Durebex, Christelle; Quirion, Rémi; Ferland, Guylaine; Dumont, Yvan; Gaudreau, Pierrette

    2013-06-01

    The effects of aging and long-term caloric restriction (LTCR), on the regulation of neuropeptide Y (NPY) Y1, Y2 and Y5 receptors subtypes, was studied in 20-month-old male rats fed ad libitum (AL) or submitted to a 40% caloric restriction for 12 months. [(125)I]GR231118, a Y1 antagonist was used as Y1 receptor radioligand. [(125)I][Leu(31), Pro(34)]PYY, a high affinity agonist of Y1 and Y5 subtypes was used in the absence or presence of 100 nM BIBO3304 (a highly selective Y1 receptor antagonist) to assess the apparent levels of [(125)I][Leu(31), Pro(34)]PYY/BIBO3304 insensitive sites (Y5-like) from [(125)I][Leu(31), Pro(34)]PYY/BIBO3304 sensitive sites (Y1). [(125)I]PYY(3-36) was used to label the Y2 receptor. In the brain of 3-month-old AL rats, the distribution and densities of Y1, Y2 and Y5 receptors were in agreement with previous reports. In the brain of 20AL rats, a decrease of NPY receptor subtype densities in regions having important physiological functions such as the cingulate cortex, hippocampus and dentate gyrus, thalamus and hypothalamus was observed. In contrast, LTCR had multiple effects. It induced specific decreases of Y1-receptor densities in the dentate gyrus, thalamic and hypothalamic nuclei and lateral hypothalamic area and Y2-receptor densities in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of hypothalamus. Moreover, it prevented the age-induced increase in Y1-receptor densities in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus and decrease in the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus, and increased Y2-receptor densities in the CA2 subfield of the hippocampus. These results indicate that LTCR not only counteracts some of the deleterious effects of aging on NPY receptor subtype densities but exerts specific effects of its own. The overall impact of the regulation of NPY receptor subtypes in the brain of old calorie-restricted rats may protect the neural circuits involved in pain, emotions, feeding and memory functions. PMID:23410741

  14. Cloning and expression of a human kidney cDNA for an /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor subtype

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, J.W.; Kobilka, T.S.; Yang-Feng, T.L.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J.; Kobilka, B.K.

    1988-09-01

    An /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor subtype has been cloned from a human kidney cDNA library using the gene for the human platelet /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor as a probe. The deduced amino acid sequence resembles the human platelet /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor and is consistent with the structure of other members of he family of guanine nucleotide-binding protein-coupled receptors. The cDNA was expressed in a mammalian cell line (COS-7), and the /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic ligand (/sup 3/H)rauwolscine was bound. Competition curve analysis with a variety of adrenergic ligands suggests that this cDNA clone represents the /alpha//sub 2/B-adrenergic receptor. The gene for this receptor is on human chromosome 4, whereas the gene for the human platelet /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor (/alpha//sub 2/A) lies on chromosome 10. This ability to express the receptor in mammalian cells, free of other adrenergic receptor subtypes, should help in developing more selective /alpha/-adrenergic ligands.

  15. Interaction of psychoactive tryptamines with biogenic amine transporters and serotonin receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Blough, Bruce E.; Landavazo, Antonio; Decker, Ann M.; Partilla, John S.; Baumann, Michael H.; Rothman, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Synthetic hallucinogenic tryptamines, especially those originally described by Alexander Shulgin, continue to be abused in the United States. The range of subjective experiences produced by different tryptamines suggests that multiple neurochemical mechanisms are involved in their actions, in addition to the established role of agonist activity at serotonin-2A (5-HT2A) receptors. Objectives This study evaluated the interaction of a series of synthetic tryptamines with biogenic amine neurotransmitter transporters and with serotonin (5-HT) receptor subtypes implicated in psychedelic effects. Methods Neurotransmitter transporter activity was determined in rat brain synaptosomes. Receptor activity was determined using calcium mobilization and DiscoveRx PathHunter® assays in HEK293, Gα16-CHO, and CHOk1 cells transfected with human receptors. Results Twenty-one tryptamines were analyzed in transporter uptake and release assays, and 5-HT2A, serotonin 1A (5-HT1A), and 5-HT2A β-arrestin functional assays. Eight of the compounds were found to have 5-HT-releasing activity. Thirteen compounds were found to be 5-HT uptake inhibitors or were inactive. All tryptamines were 5-HT2A agonists with a range of potencies and efficacies, but only a few compounds were 5-HT1A agonists. Most tryptamines recruited β-arrestin through 5-HT2A activation. Conclusions All psychoactive tryptamines are 5-HT2A agonists, but 5-HT transporter (SERT) activity may contribute significantly to the pharmacology of certain compounds. The in vitro transporter data confirm structure-activity trends for releasers and uptake inhibitors whereby releasers tend to be structurally smaller compounds. Interestingly, two tertiary amines were found to be selective substrates at SERT, which dispels the notion that 5-HT-releasing activity is limited only to primary or secondary amines. PMID:24800892

  16. Cloning and expression of prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype 1 (ep 1 ) in Bostrichthys sinensis.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xiao Jian; Hong, Wan Shu; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Yu Ting; Chen, Shi Xi

    2014-08-01

    Our previous studies suggested that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a putative sex pheromone in Chinese black sleeper Bostrichthys sinensis, a fish species that inhabits intertidal zones and mates and spawns inside a muddy burrow. We found immunoreactivities of PGE2 receptor subtypes (Ep1-3) expressed in the olfactory sac, but only Ep1 presented higher density of immunoreactivity in mature fish than that in immature fish in both sexes. To gain a better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanism for the detection of PGE2 in the olfactory system, we cloned an ep 1 cDNA from the adult olfactory sac. The open-reading frame of the ep 1 consisted of 1,134-bp nucleotides that encoded a 378-amino acid-long protein with a seven-transmembrane domain, typical for the G protein-coupled receptors superfamily. Expression of ep 1 mRNA was observed in all tissues examined, with higher levels obtained in the olfactory sacs and testes. The expression of ep 1 mRNA in the olfactory sacs and gonads was significantly higher in both sexes of mature fish than in those of immature ones. Taken together, our results suggested that Ep1, which is highly expressed in the olfactory sacs and gonads of mature fish, is important for the control of reproduction and may be involved in PGE2-initiated spawning behavior in B. sinensis. PMID:24566823

  17. Systemic and renal effects of an ETA receptor subtype-specific antagonist in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Schmetterer, Leopold; Dallinger, Susanne; Bobr, Barbara; Selenko, Nicole; Eichler, Hans-Georg; Wolzt, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Endothelins (ETs) might play a pathophysiological role in a variety of vascular diseases. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of BQ-123, a specific ETA receptor antagonist on systemic and renal haemodynamics in healthy subjects. This was done at baseline and during infusion of exogenous ET-1.The study was performed in a balanced, randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind 4 way cross-over design in 10 healthy male subjects. Subjects received co-infusions of ET-1 (2.5 ng kg−1 min−1 for 120 min) or placebo and BQ-123 (15 μg min−1 for 60 min and subsequently 60 μg min−1 for 60 min) or placebo. Renal plasma flow (RPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were assessed by the para-aminohippurate (PAH) and the inulin plasma clearance method, respectively.BQ-123 alone had no renal or systemic haemodynamic effect. ET-1 significantly reduced RPF (−24%, P<0.001) and GFR (−12%, P=0.034). These effects were abolished by co-infusion of either dose of BQ-123 (RPF: P=0.0012; GFR: P=0.020).BQ-123 reversed the renal haemodynamic effects induced by exogenous ET-1 in vivo. This indicates that vasoconstriction in the kidney provoked by ET-1 is predominantly mediated by the ETA receptor subtype. PMID:9692778

  18. Binding properties of nine 4-diphenyl-acetoxy-N-methyl-piperidine (4-DAMP) analogues to M1, M2, M3 and putative M4 muscarinic receptor subtypes.

    PubMed Central

    Waelbroeck, M.; Camus, J.; Tastenoy, M.; Christophe, J.

    1992-01-01

    1. We compared the binding properties of 4-diphenyl-acetoxy-N-methyl-piperidine methiodide (4-DAMP) and nine analogues of this compound on muscarinic receptors of human neuroblastoma NB-OK1 cells (M1 subtype), rat heart (M2 subtype), rat pancreas (M3 subtype) and to the putative M4 subtype in striatum. 2. The requirements for high affinity binding were somewhat different for the four receptor subtypes. In general, the requirements of M3 receptors were more stringent than for M1, M2 or putative M4 receptors. 3. The abilities of the compounds to discriminate muscarinic receptor subtypes were not correlated with their affinities at any subtype. 4. The temperature-dependence of binding of 4-DAMP analogues to M2 receptors varied with the drug structure. In particular, the increased affinity of the alpha-methyl derivative of 4-DAMP could be ascribed to van der Waals interactions. 5. The affinities of most 4-DAMP analogues for M2 and M3 receptors were similar to their pharmacological potencies on atrial and ileum preparations, respectively. 6. At concentrations above 1 microM, all 4-DAMP analogues as well as atropine, reduced the [3H]-N-methyl scopolamine ([3H]-NMS) dissociation rate from cardiac muscarinic receptors, with no obvious structure-activity relationship. PMID:1596694

  19. N-Methyl scan of somatostatin octapeptide agonists produces interesting effects on receptor subtype specificity.

    PubMed

    Rajeswaran, W G; Hocart, S J; Murphy, W A; Taylor, J E; Coy, D H

    2001-04-26

    The search for synthetic analogues of somatostatin which exhibit selective affinities for the five receptor subtypes is of considerable basic and therapeutic interest and has generated a large number of potent agonist analogues with a wide spectrum of binding profiles. In the past, conformational restriction of side chain groups and the peptide backbone has yielded the most interesting results. Under the latter category and as part of the present study, we were interested in the potential effects of N-methylation of peptide bond NH groups on binding affinity since this approach had not been systematically examined with these peptides. This was aided by new chemistries for introducing an N-Me group during regular solid-phase peptide synthesis using Boc protection. A number of interesting effects were noted on relative binding affinities of the two series of agonist sequences chosen, DPhe(5)(or Tyr(5))-c[Cys(6)-Phe(7)-DTrp(8)-Lys(9)-Thr(10)-Cys(11)]Thr(12)-NH(2) (SRIF numbering), at the five known human somatostatin receptors transfected into and stably expressed by CHO cells. N-Methylation of residues 7 (Phe), 10 (Thr), 11 (Cys), and 12 (Thr) largely destroyed affinities for all five receptors. N-Methylation of DTrp in the DPhe series gave an analogue with extraordinarily high affinity for the type 5 receptor for which it was also quite selective. N-Methylation of Lys in both series resulted in retention of type 2 affinity despite this residue constituting the "active center" of somatostatin peptides. N-Methylation of either the N-terminal Tyr residue or of Cys(6) in the Tyr series resulted in analogues with extraordinarily high affinity for the type 3 receptor, also with a degree of specificity. N-Methylation of the peptide bond constrains the conformational space of the amino acid and eliminates the possibility of donor hydrogen bond formation from the amide linkage. The beta-bend conformation of the agonists around DTrp-Lys is stabilized by a transannular

  20. M3-subtype muscarinic receptor that controls intracellular calcium release and inositol phosphate accumulation in gastric parietal cells.

    PubMed

    Leonard, A; Cuq, P; Magous, R; Bali, J P

    1991-07-25

    The muscarinic receptor subtype which triggers acid secretion was investigated in isolated rabbit gastric parietal cells. Cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), measured with the fluorescent indicator FURA-2, increased rapidly after full agonist (carbachol) stimulation (6-8 sec), then returned to an intermediate sustained value. Other M2-agonists, oxotremorine and arecoline, produced a partial [Ca2+]i increase, whereas M1-agonists, pilocarpine and [4-m-chlorophenylcarbamoyloxyl]-2-butynyl-trimethylammonium, were without any significant effect. [Ca2+]i rise was inhibited by selective muscarinic antagonists: atropine greater than 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methyl-piperidine methbromide greater than quinuclidinylbenzilate (QNB) greater than pirenzepine greater than 11-[[2-[(diethylamino)methyl]-1-piperidinyl]acetyl]-5,11-dihydro-6H- pyrido[2,3-b][1,4]benzodiazepine-6-one, this sequence being characteristic of the involvement of an M3-subtype. This inhibition was shown to be stereoselective; dexetimide and (-)QNB were more potent than levetimide and (+)QNB. The IC50 values for inhibition of [Ca2+]i increase by muscarinic antagonists were in good agreement with those obtained for inhibition of phospholipase C activation. In conclusion, the muscarinic receptor that controls acid secretion appears to be of the M3-subtype and the biochemical events coupled to the activation of this receptor system are also controlled through the same subtype. PMID:1651079

  1. Angiotensin II receptor subtypes are coupled with distinct signal-transduction mechanisms in neurons and astrocytes from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Sumners, C.; Wei Tang; Zelezna, B.; Raizada, M.K. )

    1991-09-01

    Both neurons and astrocytes contain specific receptors for angiotensin II (AII). The authors used selective ligands for the AT{sub 1} and AT{sub 2} types of AII receptors to investigate the expression of functional receptor subtypes in astrocyte cultures and neuron cultures from 1-day-old (neonatal) rat brain. In astrocyte cultures, competition of {sup 125}I-labeled AII ({sup 125}I-AII) specific binding with AT{sub 1} (DuP753) or AT{sub 2} {l brace}PD123177, CGP42112A, (Phe(p-NH{sub 2}){sup 6})AII{r brace} selective receptor ligands revealed a potency series of AII > DuP753 > > > CGP42112A > (Phe(p-NH{sub 2}){sup 6})AII > PD123177. These results suggest a predominance of the AT{sub 1} receptor subtype in neonatal astrocytes. {sup 125}I-AII specific binding to neonate neuronal cultures was reduced 73-84% by 1 {mu} MPD123177, and the residual {sup 125}I-AII specific binding was eliminated by DuP753. The results suggest that astrocyte cultures from neonatal rat brains contain predominantly AT{sub 1} receptors that are coupled to a stimulation of inositophospholipid hydrolysis. In contrast, neuron cultures from neonatal rat brain contain mostly AT{sub 2} receptors that are coupled to a reduction in basal cGMP levels, but a smaller population of AT{sub 1} receptors is also present in these neurons.

  2. Identification of muscarinic receptor subtypes involved in catecholamine secretion in adrenal medullary chromaffin cells by genetic deletion

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Keita; Matsuoka, Hidetada; Miyata, Hironori; Matsui, Minoru; Inoue, Masumi

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Activation of muscarinic receptors results in catecholamine secretion in adrenal chromaffin cells in many mammals, and muscarinic receptors partly mediate synaptic transmission from the splanchnic nerve, at least in guinea pigs. To elucidate the physiological functions of muscarinic receptors in chromaffin cells, it is necessary to identify the muscarinic receptor subtypes involved in excitation. Experimental Approach To identify muscarinic receptors, pharmacological tools and strains of mice where one or several muscarinic receptor subtypes were genetically deleted were used. Cellular responses to muscarinic stimulation in isolated chromaffin cells were studied with the patch clamp technique and amperometry. Key Results Muscarinic M1, M4 and M5 receptors were immunologically detected in mouse chromaffin cells, and these receptors disappeared after the appropriate gene deletion. Mouse cells secreted catecholamines in response to muscarinic agonists, angiotensin II and a decrease in external pH. Genetic deletion of M1, but not M3, M4 or M5, receptors in mice abolished secretion in response to muscarine, but not to other stimuli. The muscarine-induced secretion was suppressed by MT7, a snake peptide toxin specific for M1 receptors. Similarly, muscarine failed to induce an inward current in the presence of MT7 in mouse and rat chromaffin cells. The binding affinity of VU0255035 for the inhibition of muscarine-induced currents agreed with that for the M1 receptor. Conclusions and Implications Based upon the effects of genetic deletion of muscarinic receptors and MT7, it is concluded that the M1 receptor alone is responsible for muscarine-induced catecholamine secretion. PMID:25393049

  3. Two cholecystokinin receptor subtypes are identified in goldfish, being the CCKAR involved in the regulation of intestinal motility.

    PubMed

    Tinoco, A B; Valenciano, A I; Gómez-Boronat, M; Blanco, A M; Nisembaum, L G; De Pedro, N; Delgado, M J

    2015-09-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) plays a key role in the digestive physiology of vertebrates. However, very little is known about the role of CCK on intestinal functions in fish. The present study identifies two CCK receptor subtypes in a stomachless teleost, the goldfish (Carassius auratus), and investigates by using an in vitro system their involvement mediating the effects of the sulfated octapeptide of CCK (CCK-8S) on the motility of isolated proximal intestine. Partial-length mRNAs encoding two CCK receptor isoforms (CCKAR and CCKBR.I) were sequenced and the structural analysis showed that both receptors belong to the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily. Both goldfish CCK receptor sequences were more closely related to zebrafish sequences, sharing the lowest similarities with cavefish and tilapia. The highest expression of goldfish CCKAR was observed along the whole intestine whereas the CCKBR gen was predominantly expressed in the hypothalamus, vagal lobe and posterior intestine. Application of CCK-8S to the organ bath evoked a concentration-dependent contractile response in intestine strips. The contractions were not blocked by either tetrodotoxin or atropine, suggesting that CCK-8S acts on the gut smooth muscle directly. Preincubations of intestine strips with devazepide and L365,260 (CCKAR and CCKBR receptor selective antagonists) showed that the CCK-8S-induced contraction could be partially mediated by the CCKAR receptor subtype, which is also the most abundant CCK receptor found in gastrointestinal tissues. In conclusion, two CCK receptors with a differential distribution pattern has been identified in goldfish, and the CCKAR subtype is mainly involved in the regulation of intestinal motility by the CCK-8S. PMID:26051613

  4. Characterization of the PGE2 receptor subtype in bovine chondrocytes in culture.

    PubMed Central

    de Brum-Fernandes, A. J.; Morisset, S.; Bkaily, G.; Patry, C.

    1996-01-01

    1. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is an autacoid that decreases proteoglycan synthesis, increases metalloprotease production by cultured chondrocytes, and can modulate some of the actions of interleukin-1 on cartilage. The objective of the present study was to characterize the subtype of prostaglandin E2 receptor present in bovine chondrocytes in culture. 2. Primary cultures of articular chondrocytes were prepared from slices of bovine carpal cartilage by sequential digestion with type III hyaluronidase, trypsin, type II collagenase, followed by overnight incubation in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) with type II collagenase, washing, and seeding at a density of 2 x 10(5) cells cm-2 in DMEM with 10% foetal bovine serum. 3. PGE2 and carbaprostacyclin induced dose-dependent increases in intracellular cyclic AMP in bovine chondrocytes in culture. The potencies of these compounds were different, and maximal doses of PGE2 and carbaprostacyclin had an additive effect. PGD2 induced a small increase in intracellular cyclic AMP only at a high concentration (10(-5) M). 4. PGE2 was more potent that the EP2 agonist 11-deoxy-PGE1 at inducing increases in intracellular cyclic AMP. The EP2 agonist butaprost, however, induced only a small increase at a concentration of 10(-5)M. 17-Phenyl-PGE2 (EP1 agonist), sulprostone and MB 28767 (15S-hydroxy-9-oxo-16-phenoxy-omega-tetranorprost-13E-enoic acid) (EP3 agonists) did not induce an increase in intracellular cyclic AMP at concentrations up to 10(-5)M. 5. The EP4 antagonist AH 23848B ([1 alpha(Z),2 beta, 5 alpha]-(+/-) -7-[5-[[(1,1'-biphenyl)-4-yl]methoxyl-2-(4-morpholinyl) -3-oxocyclopentyl]-5-heptenoic acid) antagonized PGE2 but not carbaprostacyclin effects on intracellular cyclic AMP. The Schild plot slope was different from 1 but this could be due to an interaction of PGE2 with IP receptors in high doses. The exact nature of the antagonism by compound AH 23848B could not be definitely established in these experimental

  5. The role of ultrasonographic findings to predict molecular subtype, histologic grade, and hormone receptor status of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Çelebi, Filiz; Pilancı, Kezban Nur; Ordu, Çetin; Ağacayak, Filiz; Alço, Gül; İlgün, Serkan; Sarsenov, Dauren; Erdoğan, Zeynep; Özmen, Vahit

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The correlation between imaging findings and pathologic characteristics of tumors may provide information for diagnosis and treatment of cancer. The aim of this study is to determine whether ultrasound features of breast cancer are associated with molecular subtype, histologic grade, and hormone receptor status, as well as assess the predictive value of these features. METHODS A total of 201 consecutive invasive breast cancer patients were reviewed from the database according to the Breast Imaging and Reporting Data System (BI-RADS). Tumor margins were classified as circumscribed and noncircumscribed. Noncircumscribed group was divided into indistinct, spiculated, angular, and microlobulated. The posterior acoustic features were divided into four categories: shadowing, enhancement, no change, and mixed pattern. RESULTS Tumors with posterior shadowing were more likely to be of nontriple negative subtype (odds ratio [OR], 7.42; 95% CI, 2.10–24.99; P = 0.002), low histologic grade (grade 1 or 2 vs. grade 3: OR, 2.42; 95% CI, 1.34–4.35; P = 0.003) and having at least one positive receptor (OR, 3.36; 95% CI, 1.55–7.26; P = 0.002). Tumors with circumscribed margins were more often triple-negative subtype (OR, 6.72; 95% CI, 2.56–17.65; P < 0.001), high grade (grade 3 vs. grade 1 or 2: OR, 5.42; 95% CI, 2.66–11.00; P < 0.001) and hormone receptor negative (OR, 4.87; 95% CI, 2.37–9.99; P < 0.001). CONCLUSION Sonographic features are strongly associated with molecular subtype, histologic grade, and hormone receptor status of the tumor. These findings may separate triple-negative breast cancer from other molecular subtypes. PMID:26359880

  6. Attribution to Heterogeneous Risk Factors for Breast Cancer Subtypes Based on Hormone Receptor and Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Receptor Expression in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Boyoung; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Sung, Ho Kyung; Ahn, Choonghyun; Hwang, Yunji; Jang, Jieun; Lee, Juyeon; Kim, Heewon; Shin, Hai-Rim; Park, Sohee; Han, Wonshik; Noh, Dong-Young; Yoo, Keun-Young; Kang, Daehee; Park, Sue K

    2016-04-01

    We conducted a heterogeneous risk assessment of breast cancer based on the hormone receptor (HR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) calculating the risks and population-based attributable fractions (PAFs) for modifiable and nonmodifiable factors.Using matched case-control study design from the Seoul Breast Cancer Study and the national prevalence of exposure, the risks and PAFs for modifiable and nonmodifiable factors were estimated for total breast cancers and subtypes.The attribution to modifiable factors was different for each subtype (luminal A, PAF = 61.4% [95% confidence interval, CI = 54.3%-69.8%]; luminal B, 21.4% [95% CI = 18.6-24.9%]; HER2-overexpression, 59.4% [95% CI = 47.8%-74.3%], and triple negative tumors [TNs], 27.1% [95% CI = 22.9%-32.4%)], and the attribution to the modifiable factors for the luminal A and HER2-overexpression subtypes was higher than that of the luminal B and TN subtypes (P heterogeneity ≤ 0.001). The contribution of modifiable reproductive factors to luminal A type in premenopausal women was higher than that of the other subtypes (18.2% for luminal A; 3.1%, 8.1%, and -3.1% for luminal B, HER2-overexpression, and TN subtypes, respectively; P heterogeneity ≤ 0.001). Physical activity had the highest impact preventing 32.6% of luminal A, 14.5% of luminal B, 38.0% of HER2-overexpression, and 26.9% of TN subtypes (P heterogeneity = 0.014). Total reproductive factors were also heterogeneously attributed to each breast cancer subtype (luminal A, 65.4%; luminal B, 24.1%; HER2-overexpression, 57.9%, and TN subtypes, -3.1%; P heterogeneity ≤ 0.001).Each pathological subtype of breast cancer by HRs and HER2 status may be associated with heterogeneous risk factors and their attributable risk, suggesting a different etiology. The luminal B and TN subtypes seemed to be less preventable despite intervention for alleged risk factors, even though physical activity had a high preventable

  7. Galanin subtype 1 and subtype 2 receptors mediate opposite anxiety-like effects in the rat dorsal raphe nucleus.

    PubMed

    Morais, J S; Souza, M M; Campanha, T M N; Muller, C J T; Bittencourt, A S; Bortoli, V C; Schenberg, L C; Beijamini, V

    2016-11-01

    About 40% of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) neurons co-express serotonin (5-HT) and galanin. Serotonergic pathways from the DRN to the amygdala facilitate learned anxiety, while those from the DRN to the dorsal periaqueductal grey matter (DPAG) impair innate anxiety. Previously, we showed that galanin infusion in the DRN of rats induces anxiolytic effect by impairing inhibitory avoidance without changing escape behaviour in the elevated T-maze (ETM). Here, we evaluated: (1) which galanin receptors would be involved in the anxiolytic effect of galanin in the DRN of rats tested in the ETM; (2) the effects of galanin intra-DRN on panic-like behaviours evoked by electrical stimulation of the DPAG. The activation of DRN GAL1 receptors by M617 (1.0 and 3.0nmol) facilitated inhibitory avoidance, whereas the activation of GAL2 receptors by AR-M1896 (3.0nmol) impaired the inhibitory avoidance in the ETM, suggesting an anxiogenic and an anxiolytic-like effect respectively. Both agonists did not change escape behaviour in the ETM or locomotor activity in the open field. The anxiolytic effect of AR-M1896 was attenuated by the prior administration of WAY100635 (0.18nmol), a 5-HT1A antagonist. Galanin (0.3nmol) administered in the DRN increased discreetly flight behaviours induced by electrical stimulation of the DPAG, suggesting a panicolytic effect. Together, our results showed that galanin mediates opposite anxiety responses in the DRN by activation of GAL1 and GAL2 receptors. The anxiolytic effect induced by activation of Gal2 receptors may depend on serotonergic tone. Finally, the role of galanin in panic related behaviours remains uncertain. PMID:27498247

  8. Prostaglandin E2 Receptor Subtype 2 Regulation of Scavenger Receptor CD36 Modulates Microglial Aβ42 Phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianwu; Melief, Erica; Postupna, Nadia; Montine, Kathleen S.; Keene, C. Dirk; Montine, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies underline the potential relevance of microglial innate immune activation in Alzheimer disease. Primary mouse microglia that lack prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype 2 (EP2) show decreased innate immune-mediated neurotoxicity and increased amyloid β (Aβ) peptide phagocytosis, features that were replicated in vivo. Here, we tested the hypothesis that scavenger receptor CD36 is an effector of EP2-regulated Aβ phagocytosis. CD36 expression was 143-fold greater in mouse primary microglia than in primary astrocytes. Three different means of suppressing EP2 signaling increased and an agonist of EP2 decreased CD36 expression in primary wild-type microglia. Activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 3, TLR4, and TLR7, but not TLR2 or TLR9, reduced primary microglial CD36 transcription and cell surface CD36 protein and reduced Aβ42 phagocytosis as well. At each step, the effects of innate immune activation on CD36 were reversed by at least 50% by an EP2 antagonist, and this partial rescue of microglia Aβ42 phagocytosis was largely mediated by CD36 activity. Finally, we showed in hippocampus of wild-type mice that innate immune activation suppressed CD36 expression by an EP2-dependent mechanism. Taken together with results of others that found brain clearance of Aβ peptides and behavioral improvements mediated by CD36 in mice, regulation of CD36-mediated Aβ phagocytosis by suppression of EP2 signaling may provide a new approach to suppressing some aspects of Alzheimer disease pathogenesis. PMID:25452117

  9. Eicosanoid receptor subtype-mediated opposing regulation of TLR-stimulated expression of astrocyte glial-derived neurotrophic factor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianwu; Cudaback, Eiron; Breyer, Richard M.; Montine, Kathleen S.; Keene, C. Dirk; Montine, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    A major therapeutic target for Parkinson's disease (PD) is providing increased glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to dopaminergic neurons. We tested the hypothesis that innate immune activation increases astrocyte GDNF production and that this is regulated by specific eicosanoid receptors. Innate immune-activated primary murine astrocytes were assayed for GDNF expression and secretion. Controls were agent vehicle exposure and wild-type mice. Rank order for up to 10-fold selectively increased GDNF expression was activators of TLR3 > TLR2 or TLR4 > TLR9. TLR3 activator-stimulated GDNF expression was selectively JNK-dependent, followed cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, was coincident with membranous PGE2 synthase, and was not significantly altered by a nonspecific COX- or a COX-2-selective inhibitor. Specific eicosanoid receptors had opposing effects on TLR3 activator-induced GDNF expression: ∼60% enhancement by blocking or ablating of PGE2 receptor subtype 1 (EP1), ∼30% enhancement by activating PGF2α receptor or thromboxane receptor, or ∼15% enhancement by activating EP4. These results demonstrate functionally antagonistic eicosanoid receptor subtype regulation of innate immunity-induced astrocyte GDNF expression and suggest that selective inhibition of EP1 signaling might be a means to augment astrocyte GDNF secretion in the context of innate immune activation in diseased regions of brain in PD.—Li, X., Cudaback, E., Breyer, R. M., Montine, K. S., Keene, C. D., Montine, T. J. Eicosanoid receptor subtype-mediated opposing regulation of Toll-like receptor-stimulated expression of astrocyte glial-derived neurotrophic factor. PMID:22499581

  10. An evolutionary comparison of leucine-rich repeat containing G protein-coupled receptors reveals a novel LGR subtype.

    PubMed

    Van Hiel, Matthias B; Vandersmissen, Hans Peter; Van Loy, Tom; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2012-03-01

    Leucine-rich repeat containing G protein-coupled receptors or LGRs are receptors with important functions in development and reproduction. Belonging to this evolutionarily conserved group of receptors are the well-studied glycoprotein hormone receptors and relaxin receptors in mammals, as well as the bursicon receptor, which triggers cuticle hardening and tanning in freshly enclosed insects. In this study, the numerous LGR sequences in different animal phyla are analyzed and compared. Based on these data a phylogenetic tree was generated. This information sheds new light on structural and evolutionary aspects regarding this receptor group. Apart from vertebrates and insects, LGRs are also present in early chordates (Urochordata, Cephalochordata and Hyperoartia) and other arthropods (Arachnida and Branchiopoda) as well as in Mollusca, Echinodermata, Hemichordata, Nematoda, and even in ancient animal life forms, such as Cnidaria and Placozoa. Three distinct types of LGR exist, distinguishable by their number of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), their type-specific hinge region and the presence or absence of an LDLa motif. Type C LGRs containing only one LDLa (C1 subtype) appear to be present in nearly all animal phyla. We here describe a second subtype, C2, containing multiple LDLa motifs, which was discovered in echinoderms, mollusks and in one insect species (Pediculus humanis corporis). In addition, eight putative LGRs can be predicted from the genome data of the placozoan species Trichoplax adhaerens. They may represent an ancient form of the LGRs, however, more genomic data will be required to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:22100731

  11. γ-Aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptor subtype inverse agonists as therapeutic agents in cognition.

    PubMed

    Gabriella, Guerrini; Giovanna, Ciciani

    2010-01-01

    The gabaergic system has been identified as a relevant regulator of cognitive and emotional processing. In fact, the discovery that negative allosteric regulators (or inverse agonists) at GABA(A) (γ-aminobutyric acid) α5 subtype receptors improve learning and memory tasks, has further validated this concept. The localization of these extrasynaptic subtype receptors, mainly in the hippocampus, has suggested that they play a key role in the three stages of memory: acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval. The "α5 inverse agonist" binds to an allosteric site at GABA(A) receptor, provoking a reduction of chlorine current, but to elicit this effect, the necessary condition is the binding of agonist neurotransmitter (γ-amino butyric acid) at its orthosteric site. In this case, the GABA(A) receptor is not a "constitutively active receptor" and, however, the presence of spontaneous opening channels for native GABA(A) receptors is rare. Here, we present various classes of nonselective and α5 selective GABA(A) receptor ligands, and the in vitro and in vivo tests to elucidate their affinity and activity. The study of the GABA(A) α5 inverse agonists is one of the important tools, although not the only one, for the development of clinical strategies for treatment of Alzheimer disease and mild cognitive impairment. PMID:21050918

  12. Early cerebral activities of the environmental estrogen bisphenol A appear to act via the somatostatin receptor subtype sst(2).

    PubMed Central

    Facciolo, Rosa Maria; Alò, Raffaella; Madeo, Maria; Canonaco, Marcello; Dessì-Fulgheri, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    Recently, considerable interest has been aroused by the specific actions of bisphenol A (BPA). The present investigation represents a first study dealing with the interaction of BPA with the biologically more active somatostatin receptor subtype (sst(2)) in the rat limbic circuit. After treating pregnant female Sprague-Dawley rats with two doses (400 microg/kg/day; 40 microg/kg/day) of BPA, the binding activity of the above receptor subtype was evaluated in some limbic regions of the offspring. The higher dose proved to be the more effective one, as demonstrated by the elevated affinity of sst(2) with its specific radioligand, [(125)I]-Tyr(0)somatostatin-14. The most dramatic effects of BPA on sst(2) levels occurred at the low-affinity states of such a subtype in some telencephalic limbic areas of postnatal rats (10 days of age; postnatal day [PND] 10). These included lower (p < 0.05) sst(2) levels in the gyrus dentate of the hippocampus and basomedial nucleus of the amygdala; significantly higher (p < 0.01) levels were observed only for the high-affinity states of the periventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. A similar trend was maintained in PND 23 rats with the exception of much lower levels of the high-affinity sst(2) receptor subtype in the amygdala nucleus and ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus. However, greater changes produced by this environmental estrogen were reported when the binding activity of sst(2) was checked in the presence of the two more important selective agonists (zolpidem and Ro 15-4513) specific for the alpha-containing Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptor complex. In this case, an even greater potentiating effect (p < 0.001) was mainly obtained for the low-affinity sst(2) receptor subtype in PND 10 animals, with the exception of the high-affinity type in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus and gyrus dentate. These results support the contention that an sst(2) subtype alpha-containing GABA type A receptor system might

  13. Analgesia and unwanted benzodiazepine effects in point-mutated mice expressing only one benzodiazepine-sensitive GABAA receptor subtype

    PubMed Central

    Ralvenius, William T.; Benke, Dietmar; Acuña, Mario A.; Rudolph, Uwe; Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Agonists at the benzodiazepine-binding site of GABAA receptors (BDZs) enhance synaptic inhibition through four subtypes (α1, α2, α3 and α5) of GABAA receptors (GABAAR). When applied to the spinal cord, they alleviate pathological pain; however, insufficient efficacy after systemic administration and undesired effects preclude their use in routine pain therapy. Previous work suggested that subtype-selective drugs might allow separating desired antihyperalgesia from unwanted effects, but the lack of selective agents has hitherto prevented systematic analyses. Here we use four lines of triple GABAAR point-mutated mice, which express only one benzodiazepine-sensitive GABAAR subtype at a time, to show that targeting only α2GABAARs achieves strong antihyperalgesia and reduced side effects (that is, no sedation, motor impairment and tolerance development). Additional pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analyses in these mice explain why clinically relevant antihyperalgesia cannot be achieved with nonselective BDZs. These findings should foster the development of innovative subtype-selective BDZs for novel indications such as chronic pain. PMID:25865415

  14. Characterization of the PGE receptor subtype mediating inhibition of superoxide production in human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Talpain, E; Armstrong, R A; Coleman, R A; Vardey, C J

    1995-01-01

    1. The aims of this study were to characterize the EP receptor subtype mediating the inhibition of superoxide anion generation by formyl methionyl leucine phenylalanine (FMLP)-stimulated human neutrophils, and to test the hypothesis that adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) is the second messenger mediating the inhibition of the neutrophil by prostaglandin (PG)E2. 2. PGE2 (0.001-10 microM) inhibited FMLP (100 nM)-induced O2-generation from human peripheral blood neutrophils in a concentration-dependent manner, with an EC50 of 0.15 +/- 0.03 microM, and a maximum effect ranging from 36-84% (mean inhibition of 68.7 +/- 2.5%, n = 32). 3. The EP2-receptor agonists, misoprostol, 11-deoxy PGE1, AH13205 and butaprost, all at 10 microM, inhibited O2- generation, causing 95.5 +/- 2.9%, 56.8 +/- 5.2%, 37.1 +/- 6.6% and 18.9 +/- 4.4% inhibition respectively, the latter two being much less effective than PGE2. Similarly, the EP1-receptor agonist, 17-phenyl PGE2 (10 microM), and the EP3/EP1-receptor agonist, sulprostone (10 microM), also inhibited O2- generation, causing 32.2 +/- 7.0% and 15.3 +/- 3.4% inhibition respectively. 4. The non-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitor, isobutyl methylxanthine (IBMX, 0.25 mM) inhibited the FMLP response by 54.5 +/- 5.0%. In addition, IBMX shifted concentration-effect curves for PGE2, misoprostol, 11-deoxy PGE1, butaprost, and AH 13205 to the left, to give EC50s of 0.04 +/- 0.03 (n = 13), 0.07 +/- 0.03 (n = 4), 0.08 +/- 0.03 (n = 4), 0.33 +/- 0.13 (n = 4) and 0.41 +/- 0.2 microM (n = 3) respectively, allowing equieffective concentration-ratios (EECs, PGE2 = 1) of 11.5, 5.3, 50.7 and 12.7 to be calculated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7606349

  15. Somatostatin receptor subtype 2 sensitizes human pancreatic cancer cells to death ligand-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Guillermet, Julie; Saint-Laurent, Nathalie; Rochaix, Philippe; Cuvillier, Olivier; Levade, Thierry; Schally, Andrew V; Pradayrol, Lucien; Buscail, Louis; Susini, Christiane; Bousquet, Corinne

    2003-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (sst2) gene expression is lost in 90% of human pancreatic adenocarcinomas. We previously demonstrated that stable sst2 transfection of human pancreatic BxPC-3 cells, which do not endogenously express sst2, inhibits cell proliferation, tumorigenicity, and metastasis. These sst2 effects occur as a consequence of an autocrine sst2-dependent loop, whereby sst2 induces expression of its own ligand, somatostatin. Here we investigated whether sst2 induces apoptosis in sst2-transfected BxPC-3 cells. Expression of sst2 induced a 4.4- +/- 0.05-fold stimulation of apoptosis in BxPC-3 through the activation of tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1. sst2 also sensitized these cells to apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), enhancing it 4.1- +/- 1.5-fold. Apoptosis in BxPC-3 cells mediated by TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and CD95L was likewise increased 2.3- +/- 0.5-fold and 7.4- +/- 2.5-fold, respectively. sst2-dependent activation and cell sensitization to death ligand-induced apoptosis involved activation of the executioner caspases, key factors in both death ligand- or mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. sst2 affected both pathways: first, by up-regulating expression of TRAIL and TNFalpha receptors, DR4 and TNFRI, respectively, and sensitizing the cells to death ligand-induced initiator capase-8 activation, and, second, by down-regulating expression of the antiapoptotic mitochondrial Bcl-2 protein. These results are of interest for the clinical management of chemoresistant pancreatic adenocarcinoma by using a combined gene therapy based on the cotransfer of genes for both the sst2 and a nontoxic death ligand. PMID:12490654

  16. Differential Roles of GABAA Receptor Subtypes in Benzodiazepine-Induced Enhancement of Brain-Stimulation Reward

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Lauren M; Engin, Elif; Tantillo, Gabriella; Lau, Hew Mun; Muschamp, John W; Carlezon, William A; Rudolph, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    Benzodiazepines such as diazepam are widely prescribed as anxiolytics and sleep aids. Continued use of benzodiazepines, however, can lead to addiction in vulnerable individuals. Here, we investigate the neural mechanisms of the behavioral effects of benzodiazepines using the intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) test, a procedure with which the reward-enhancing effects of these drugs can be measured. Benzodiazepines bind nonselectively to several different GABAA receptor subtypes. To elucidate the α subunit(s) responsible for the reward-enhancing effects of benzodiazepines, we examined mice carrying a histidine-to-arginine point mutation in the α1, α2, or α3 subunit, which renders the targeted subunit nonresponsive to diazepam, other benzodiazepines and zolpidem. In wild-type and α1-point-mutated mice, diazepam caused a dose-dependent reduction in ICSS thresholds (reflecting a reward-enhancing effect) that is comparable to the reduction observed following cocaine administration. This effect was abolished in α2- and α3-point-mutant mice, suggesting that these subunits are necessary for the reward-enhancing action of diazepam. α2 Subunits appear to be particularly important, since diazepam increased ICSS thresholds (reflecting an aversive-like effect) in α2-point-mutant animals. Zolpidem, an α1-preferring benzodiazepine-site agonist, had no reward-enhancing effects in any genotype. Our findings implicate α2 and α3 subunit containing GABAA receptors as key mediators of the reward-related effects of benzodiazepines. This finding has important implications for the development of new medications that retain the therapeutic effects of benzodiazepines but lack abuse liability. PMID:22763624

  17. Nerve Demyelination Increases Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 5 Expression in Peripheral Painful Mononeuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Miau-Hwa; Hsieh, Yu-Lin; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang; Tseng, To-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Wallerian degeneration or nerve demyelination, arising from spinal nerve compression, is thought to bring on chronic neuropathic pain. The widely distributed metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) is involved in modulating nociceptive transmission. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential effects of mGluR5 on peripheral hypersensitivities after chronic constriction injury (CCI). Sprague-Dawley rats were operated on with four loose ligatures around the sciatic nerve to induce thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Primary afferents in dermis after CCI exhibited progressive decreases, defined as partial cutaneous denervation; importantly, mGluR5 expressions in primary afferents were statistically increased. CCI-induced neuropathic pain behaviors through the intraplantar injections of 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP), a selective mGluR5 antagonist, were dose-dependently attenuated. Furthermore, the most increased mGluR5 expressions in primary afferents surrounded by reactive Schwann cells were observed at the distal CCI stumps of sciatic nerves. In conclusion, these results suggest that nerve demyelination results in the increases of mGluR5 expression in injured primary afferents after CCI; and further suggest that mGluR5 represents a main therapeutic target in developing pharmacological strategies to prevent peripheral hypersensitivities. PMID:25739080

  18. Characterization of the two distinct subtypes of metabotropic glutamate receptors from honeybee, Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Funada, Masahiro; Yasuo, Shinobu; Yoshimura, Takashi; Ebihara, Shizufumi; Sasagawa, Hiromi; Kitagawa, Yasuo; Kadowaki, Tatsuhiko

    2004-04-15

    L-Glutamate is a major neurotransmitter at the excitatory synapses in the vertebrate brain. It is also the excitatory neurotransmitter at neuromuscular junctions in insects, however its functions in their brains remain to be established. We identified and characterized two different subtypes (AmGluRA and AmGluRB) of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) from an eusocial insect, honeybee. Both AmGluRA and AmGluRB form homodimers independently on disulfide bonds, and bind [3H]glutamate with K(D) values of 156.7 and 80.7 nM, respectively. AmGluRB is specifically expressed in the brain, while AmGluRA is expressed in the brain and other body parts, suggesting that AmGluRA is also present at the neuromuscular junctions. Both mGluRs are expressed in the mushroom bodies and the brain regions of honeybees, where motor neurons are clustered. Their expression in the brain apparently overlaps, suggesting that they may interact with each other to modulate the glutamatergic neurotransmission. PMID:15050695

  19. Activation of the human transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 by essential oils.

    PubMed

    Ohkawara, Susumu; Tanaka-Kagawa, Toshiko; Furukawa, Yoko; Nishimura, Tetsuji; Jinno, Hideto

    2010-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel activated by capsaicin. TRPV1 is expressed not only on human sensory neurons but also on human epidermal and hair follicle keratinocytes. Therefore, TRPV1 could have the potential to be a therapeutic target for skin disorders. To search for novel TRPV1 agonists, we screened 31 essential oils by using human TRPV1-expressing HEK293 cells. TRPV1 was activated by 4 essential oils: rose, thyme geraniol, palmarosa, and tolu balsam. The dose-response curves for TRPV1 activation by the essential oils revealed a rank order potency [the half-maximal effective concentration (EC(50))] of rose>palmarosa>thyme geraniol>tolu balsam, and rank order efficiency (% activity in response to 1 microM capsaicin) of tolu balsam>rose>palmarosa>thyme geraniol. Moreover, the dose-response curves for TRPV1 activation by citronellol (main constituent of rose oil) and geraniol (main constituent of thyme geraniol and palmarosa oils) were consistent with the potency and efficiency of each essential oil. In contrast, benzyl cinnamate and benzyl benzoate (main constituent of tolu balsam oil) and geranyl acetate (main constituent of thyme geraniol oil) did not show TRPV1 activity. In this first-of-its-kind study, we successfully investigated the role of some essential oils in promoting human TRPV1 activation, and also identified two monoterpenes, citronellol and geraniol, as new human TRPV1 agonists. PMID:20686244

  20. Expression of estrogen receptor subtypes in rat pituitary gland during pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Vaillant, Colette; Chesnel, Franck; Schausi, Diane; Tiffoche, Christophe; Thieulant, Marie-Lise

    2002-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether the expression levels of mRNA of the three estrogen receptor (ER) subtypes, ERalpha, ERbeta, and truncated ER product-1 (TERP-1) found in the rat pituitary gland were modified during gestation, lactation, and postlactation periods. By using relative quantitative RT-PCR, we found that ERalpha mRNA significantly peaked in midpregnancy. However, the ERalpha protein level remained constant. ERbeta gene expression did not change throughout pregnancy, suggesting that it was not related to estradiol levels during this reproductive period. In contrast, both TERP-1 mRNA and protein levels dramatically increased throughout the second half of gestation, being faintly detectable in early pregnancy. TERP-1 expression was rapidly reversed by lactation, whereas neither pituitary ERalpha nor ERbeta relative levels were significantly altered. In addition, pup removal for 24-96 h on d 9 postpartum significantly reduced the expression of both ERalpha and ERbeta mRNA compared with that in lactating animals, but the expression of TERP-1 mRNA was no longer detected. Collectively, our data indicate that 1) TERP-1, ERalpha, and ERbeta expression levels are differentially regulated in the pituitary; 2) TERP-1 is variably expressed depending on the hormonal environment related to the estrous cycle, pregnancy, and lactation; and 3) TERP-1/ERalpha ratios dramatically change depending on reproductive periods, suggesting a critical role for TERP-1 in reproductive events. PMID:12399419

  1. Regulation of body temperature and brown adipose tissue thermogenesis by bombesin receptor subtype-3

    PubMed Central

    Lateef, Dalya M.; Abreu-Vieira, Gustavo; Xiao, Cuiying

    2014-01-01

    Bombesin receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) regulates energy homeostasis, with Brs3 knockout (Brs3−/y) mice being hypometabolic, hypothermic, and hyperphagic and developing obesity. We now report that the reduced body temperature is more readily detected if body temperature is analyzed as a function of physical activity level and light/dark phase. Physical activity level correlated best with body temperature 4 min later. The Brs3−/y metabolic phenotype is not due to intrinsically impaired brown adipose tissue function or in the communication of sympathetic signals from the brain to brown adipose tissue, since Brs3−/y mice have intact thermogenic responses to stress, acute cold exposure, and β3-adrenergic activation, and Brs3−/y mice prefer a cooler environment. Treatment with the BRS-3 agonist MK-5046 increased brown adipose tissue temperature and body temperature in wild-type but not Brs3−/y mice. Intrahypothalamic infusion of MK-5046 increased body temperature. These data indicate that the BRS-3 regulation of body temperature is via a central mechanism, upstream of sympathetic efferents. The reduced body temperature in Brs3−/y mice is due to altered regulation of energy homeostasis affecting higher center regulation of body temperature, rather than an intrinsic defect in brown adipose tissue. PMID:24452453

  2. The analgesic effect of clonixine is not mediated by 5-HT3 subtype receptors.

    PubMed

    Paeile, C; Bustamante, S E; Sierralta, F; Bustamante, D; Miranda, H F

    1995-10-01

    1. The analgesic effect of clonixinate of L-lysine (Clx) in the nociceptive C-fiber reflex in rat and in the writhing test in mice is reported. 2. Clx was administered by three routes, i.v., i.t. and i.c.v., inducing a dose-dependent antinociception. 3. The antinociceptive effect of Clx was 40-45% with respect to the control integration values in the nociceptive C-fiber reflex method. 4. The writhing test yielded ED50 values (mg/kg) of 12.0 +/- 1.3 (i.p.), 1.8 +/- 0.2 (i.t.) and 0.9 +/- 0.1 (i.c.v.) for Clx administration. 5. Ondansetron was not able to antagonize the antinociception response of Clx in the algesiometric tests used. 6. Chlorophenilbiguanide did not produce any significative change in the analgesic effect of Clx in the nociceptive C-fiber reflex method. 7. It is suggested that the mechanism of action of the central analgesia of Clx is not mediated by 5-HT3 subtype receptors. PMID:7590133

  3. EP3, Prostaglandin E2 Receptor Subtype 3, Associated with Neuronal Apoptosis Following Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ni, Haidan; Shen, Jiabing; Song, Yan; Cao, Maohong; Liu, Xiaorong; Huang, Jie; Zhang, Weidong; Xie, Lili; Ning, Xiaojin; Ke, Kaifu

    2016-08-01

    EP3 is prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype 3 and mediates the activation of several signaling pathways, changing in cAMP levels, calcium mobilization, and activation of phospholipase C. Previous studies demonstrated a direct role for EP3 in various neurodegenerative disorders, such as stroke and Alzheimer disease. However, the distribution and function of EP3 in ICH diseases remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that EP3 may be involved in neuronal apoptosis in the processes of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). From the results of Western blot and immunohistochemistry, we obtained a significant up-regulation of EP3 in neurons adjacent to the hematoma following ICH. Up-regulation of EP3 was found to be accompanied by the increased expression of active caspase-3 and pro-apoptotic Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and decreased expression of anti-apoptotic protein B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) in vivo and vitro studies. Furthermore, the expression of these three proteins reduced active caspase-3 and Bax expression, while increased Bcl-2 were changed after knocking down EP3 by RNA interference in PC12 cells, further confirmed that EP3 might exert its pro-apoptotic function on neuronal apoptosis. Thus, EP3 may play a role in promoting the neuronal apoptosis following ICH. PMID:26718710

  4. Desensitizing and non-desensitizing subtypes of alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in cockroach neurons.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Vincent L; Saar, Raimund

    2004-10-01

    Two alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive nicotinic receptor subtypes in cockroach neurons are identified as desensitizing (nAChD), selectively inhibitable with 100 nM imidacloprid, and non-desensitizing (nAChN), selectively inhibitable with 100 pM methyllycaconitine. Although the desensitization rate of nAChD receptors is highly variable, pharmacology is largely independent of desensitization rate. Because desensitized states tightly bind agonists, nAChD receptors are potently inhibited by neonicotinoids and specifically measured in radiolabeled imidacloprid binding assays. However, they are not usually detected in binding assays with radiolabeled alpha-bungarotoxin, which has a Kd for the resting state of 21 nM, but binds poorly to desensitized states often present in binding assays. In contrast, nAChN receptors are specifically measured in binding assays with radiolabeled alpha-bungarotoxin, which binds them with a Kd of 1.3 nM. nAChN receptors are activated by neonicotinoids at micromolar concentrations, and allosterically by spinosyn A, with an EC50 of 27 nM. Spinosyn A weakly antagonizes nAChD receptors -23% at 10 microM. The roles of the two nAChR subtypes in insecticide poisoning are discussed. PMID:15518655

  5. Dynamic Regulation of Quaternary Organization of the M1 Muscarinic Receptor by Subtype-selective Antagonist Drugs.

    PubMed

    Pediani, John D; Ward, Richard J; Godin, Antoine G; Marsango, Sara; Milligan, Graeme

    2016-06-17

    Although rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors can exist as both monomers and non-covalently associated dimers/oligomers, the steady-state proportion of each form and whether this is regulated by receptor ligands are unknown. Herein we address these topics for the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, a key molecular target for novel cognition enhancers, by using spatial intensity distribution analysis. This method can measure fluorescent particle concentration and assess oligomerization states of proteins within defined regions of living cells. Imaging and analysis of the basolateral surface of cells expressing some 50 molecules·μm(-2) human muscarinic M1 receptor identified a ∼75:25 mixture of receptor monomers and dimers/oligomers. Both sustained and shorter term treatment with the selective M1 antagonist pirenzepine resulted in a large shift in the distribution of receptor species to favor the dimeric/oligomeric state. Although sustained treatment with pirenzepine also resulted in marked up-regulation of the receptor, simple mass action effects were not the basis for ligand-induced stabilization of receptor dimers/oligomers. The related antagonist telenzepine also produced stabilization and enrichment of the M1 receptor dimer population, but the receptor subtype non-selective antagonists atropine and N-methylscopolamine did not. In contrast, neither pirenzepine nor telenzepine altered the quaternary organization of the related M3 muscarinic receptor. These data provide unique insights into the selective capacity of receptor ligands to promote and/or stabilize receptor dimers/oligomers and demonstrate that the dynamics of ligand regulation of the quaternary organization of G protein-coupled receptors is markedly more complex than previously appreciated. This may have major implications for receptor function and behavior. PMID:27080256

  6. Dynamic Regulation of Quaternary Organization of the M1 Muscarinic Receptor by Subtype-selective Antagonist Drugs*

    PubMed Central

    Pediani, John D.; Ward, Richard J.; Godin, Antoine G.; Marsango, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Although rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors can exist as both monomers and non-covalently associated dimers/oligomers, the steady-state proportion of each form and whether this is regulated by receptor ligands are unknown. Herein we address these topics for the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, a key molecular target for novel cognition enhancers, by using spatial intensity distribution analysis. This method can measure fluorescent particle concentration and assess oligomerization states of proteins within defined regions of living cells. Imaging and analysis of the basolateral surface of cells expressing some 50 molecules·μm−2 human muscarinic M1 receptor identified a ∼75:25 mixture of receptor monomers and dimers/oligomers. Both sustained and shorter term treatment with the selective M1 antagonist pirenzepine resulted in a large shift in the distribution of receptor species to favor the dimeric/oligomeric state. Although sustained treatment with pirenzepine also resulted in marked up-regulation of the receptor, simple mass action effects were not the basis for ligand-induced stabilization of receptor dimers/oligomers. The related antagonist telenzepine also produced stabilization and enrichment of the M1 receptor dimer population, but the receptor subtype non-selective antagonists atropine and N-methylscopolamine did not. In contrast, neither pirenzepine nor telenzepine altered the quaternary organization of the related M3 muscarinic receptor. These data provide unique insights into the selective capacity of receptor ligands to promote and/or stabilize receptor dimers/oligomers and demonstrate that the dynamics of ligand regulation of the quaternary organization of G protein-coupled receptors is markedly more complex than previously appreciated. This may have major implications for receptor function and behavior. PMID:27080256

  7. Heterogeneous Inhibition in Macroscopic Current Responses of Four Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtypes by Cholesterol Enrichment.

    PubMed

    Báez-Pagán, Carlos A; Del Hoyo-Rivera, Natalie; Quesada, Orestes; Otero-Cruz, José David; Lasalde-Dominicci, José A

    2016-08-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), located in the cell membranes of neurons and muscle cells, mediates the transmission of nerve impulses across cholinergic synapses. In addition, the nAChR is also found in the electric organs of electric rays (e.g., the genus Torpedo). Cholesterol, which is a key lipid for maintaining the correct functionality of membrane proteins, has been found to alter the nAChR function. We were thus interested to probe the changes in the functionality of different nAChRs expressed in a model membrane with modified cholesterol to phospholipid ratios (C/P). In this study, we examined the effect of increasing the C/P ratio in Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing the neuronal α7, α4β2, muscle-type, and Torpedo californica nAChRs in their macroscopic current responses. Using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique, it was found that the neuronal α7 and Torpedo nAChRs are significantly more sensitive to small increases in C/P than the muscle-type nAChR. The peak current versus C/P profiles during enrichment display different behaviors; α7 and Torpedo nAChRs display a hyperbolic decay with two clear components, whereas muscle-type and α4β2 nAChRs display simple monophasic decays with different slopes. This study clearly illustrates that a physiologically relevant increase in membrane cholesterol concentration produces a remarkable reduction in the macroscopic current responses of the neuronal α7 and Torpedo nAChRs functionality, whereas the muscle nAChR appears to be the most resistant to cholesterol inhibition among all four nAChR subtypes. Overall, the present study demonstrates differential profiles for cholesterol inhibition among the different types of nAChR to physiological cholesterol increments in the plasmatic membrane. This is the first study to report a cross-correlation analysis of cholesterol sensitivity among different nAChR subtypes in a model membrane. PMID:27116687

  8. Receptor mimicry by antibody F045-092 facilitates universal binding to the H3 subtype of influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Peter S.; Ohshima, Nobuko; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Yu, Wenli; Iba, Yoshitaka; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu; Wilson, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza viruses present a significant health challenge each year, as in the H3N2 epidemic of 2012-2013. Here, we describe an antibody, F045-092, that possesses broadly neutralizing activity against the entire H3 subtype and accommodates the natural variation and additional glycosylation in all strains tested from 1963 to 2011. Crystal structures of F045-092 in complex with HAs from 1975 and 2011 H3N2 viruses reveal the structural basis for its neutralization breadth through insertion of its 23-residue HCDR3 into the receptor-binding site that involves striking receptor mimicry. F045-092 extends its recognition to divergent subtypes, including H1, H2, and H13, using the enhanced avidity of its IgG to overcome lower affinity Fab binding, as observed with other receptor-binding site antibodies. This unprecedented level of antibody cross-reactivity against the H3 subtype can potentially inform on development of a pan-H3 vaccine or small molecule therapeutics. PMID:24717798

  9. Receptor mimicry by antibody F045–092 facilitates universal binding to the H3 subtype of influenza virus

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Peter S.; Ohshima, Nobuko; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Yu, Wenli; Iba, Yoshitaka; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-04-10

    Influenza viruses present a significant health challenge each year, as in the H3N2 epidemic of 2012–2013. Here we describe an antibody, F045–092, that possesses broadly neutralizing activity against the entire H3 subtype and accommodates the natural variation and additional glycosylation in all strains tested from 1963 to 2011. Crystal structures of F045–092 in complex with HAs from 1975 and 2011 H3N2 viruses reveal the structural basis for its neutralization breadth through insertion of its 23-residue HCDR3 into the receptor-binding site that involves striking receptor mimicry. F045–092 extends its recognition to divergent subtypes, including H1, H2 and H13, using the enhanced avidity of its IgG to overcome lower-affinity Fab binding, as observed with other antibodies that target the receptor-binding site. This unprecedented level of antibody cross-reactivity against the H3 subtype can potentially inform on development of a pan-H3 vaccine or small-molecule therapeutics.

  10. The α3β4* nicotinic ACh receptor subtype mediates physical dependence to morphine: mouse and human studies

    PubMed Central

    Muldoon, P P; Jackson, K J; Perez, E; Harenza, J L; Molas, S; Rais, B; Anwar, H; Zaveri, N T; Maldonado, R; Maskos, U; McIntosh, J M; Dierssen, M; Miles, M F; Chen, X; De Biasi, M; Damaj, M I

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Recent data have indicated that α3β4* neuronal nicotinic (n) ACh receptors may play a role in morphine dependence. Here we investigated if nACh receptors modulate morphine physical withdrawal. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACHES To assess the role of α3β4* nACh receptors in morphine withdrawal, we used a genetic correlation approach using publically available datasets within the GeneNetwork web resource, genetic knockout and pharmacological tools. Male and female European-American (n = 2772) and African-American (n = 1309) subjects from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment dataset were assessed for possible associations of polymorphisms in the 15q25 gene cluster and opioid dependence. KEY RESULTS BXD recombinant mouse lines demonstrated an increased expression of α3, β4 and α5 nACh receptor mRNA in the forebrain and midbrain, which significantly correlated with increased defecation in mice undergoing morphine withdrawal. Mice overexpressing the gene cluster CHRNA5/A3/B4 exhibited increased somatic signs of withdrawal. Furthermore, α5 and β4 nACh receptor knockout mice expressed decreased somatic withdrawal signs compared with their wild-type counterparts. Moreover, selective α3β4* nACh receptor antagonists, α-conotoxin AuIB and AT-1001, attenuated somatic signs of morphine withdrawal in a dose-related manner. In addition, two human datasets revealed a protective role for variants in the CHRNA3 gene, which codes for the α3 nACh receptor subunit, in opioid dependence and withdrawal. In contrast, we found that the α4β2* nACh receptor subtype is not involved in morphine somatic withdrawal signs. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Overall, our findings suggest an important role for the α3β4* nACh receptor subtype in morphine physical dependence. PMID:24750073

  11. International Union of Pharmacology. LXX. Subtypes of γ-Aminobutyric AcidA Receptors: Classification on the Basis of Subunit Composition, Pharmacology, and Function. Update

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Richard W.; Sieghart, Werner

    2010-01-01

    In this review we attempt to summarize experimental evidence on the existence of defined native GABAA receptor subtypes and to produce a list of receptors that actually seem to exist according to current knowledge. This will serve to update the most recent classification of GABAA receptors (Pharmacol Rev 50:291–313, 1998) approved by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Pharmacology. GABAA receptors are chloride channels that mediate the major form of fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. They are members of the Cys-loop pentameric ligand-gated ion channel (LGIC) superfamily and share structural and functional homology with other members of that family. GABAA receptors are assembled from a family of 19 homologous subunit gene products and form numerous, mostly hetero-oligomeric, pentamers. Such receptor subtypes with properties that depend on subunit composition vary in topography and ontogeny, in cellular and subcellular localization, in their role in brain circuits and behaviors, in their mechanisms of regulation, and in their pharmacology. We propose several criteria, which can be applied to all the members of the LGIC superfamily, for including a receptor subtype on a list of native hetero-oligomeric subtypes. With these criteria, we develop a working GABAA receptor list, which currently includes 26 members, but will undoubtedly be modified and grow as information expands. The list is divided into three categories of native receptor subtypes: “identified,” “existence with high probability,” and “tentative.” PMID:18790874

  12. Receptor-Defined Subtypes of Breast Cancer in Indigenous Populations in Africa: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Amanda; McCormack, Valerie; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the most common female cancer in Africa. Receptor-defined subtypes are a major determinant of treatment options and disease outcomes but there is considerable uncertainty regarding the frequency of poor prognosis estrogen receptor (ER) negative subtypes in Africa. We systematically reviewed publications reporting on the frequency of breast cancer receptor-defined subtypes in indigenous populations in Africa. Methods and Findings Medline, Embase, and Global Health were searched for studies published between 1st January 1980 and 15th April 2014. Reported proportions of ER positive (ER+), progesterone receptor positive (PR+), and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 positive (HER2+) disease were extracted and 95% CI calculated. Random effects meta-analyses were used to pool estimates. Fifty-four studies from North Africa (n = 12,284 women with breast cancer) and 26 from sub-Saharan Africa (n = 4,737) were eligible. There was marked between-study heterogeneity in the ER+ estimates in both regions (I2>90%), with the majority reporting proportions between 0.40 and 0.80 in North Africa and between 0.20 and 0.70 in sub-Saharan Africa. Similarly, large between-study heterogeneity was observed for PR+ and HER2+ estimates (I2>80%, in all instances). Meta-regression analyses showed that the proportion of ER+ disease was 10% (4%–17%) lower for studies based on archived tumor blocks rather than prospectively collected specimens, and 9% (2%–17%) lower for those with ≥40% versus those with <40% grade 3 tumors. For prospectively collected samples, the pooled proportions for ER+ and triple negative tumors were 0.59 (0.56–0.62) and 0.21 (0.17–0.25), respectively, regardless of region. Limitations of the study include the lack of standardized procedures across the various studies; the low methodological quality of many studies in terms of the representativeness of their case series and the quality of the procedures for collection

  13. Exploring amino acids derivatives as potent, selective, and direct agonists of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor subtype-1.

    PubMed

    Evindar, Ghotas; Deng, Hongfeng; Bernier, Sylvie G; Doyle, Elisabeth; Lorusso, Jeanine; Morgan, Barry A; Westlin, William F

    2013-01-15

    In the quest to discover a potent and selective class of direct agonists to the sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor, we explored the carboxylate functional group as a replacement to previously reported lead phosphates. This has led to the discovery of potent and selective direct agonists with moderate to substantial in vivo lymphopenia. The previously reported selectivity enhancing moiety (SEM) and selectivity enhancing orientation (SEO) in the phenylamide and phenylimidazole scaffolds were crucial to obtaining selectivity for S1P receptor subtype 1 over 3. PMID:23245510

  14. Multiple Molecular Subtypes of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Critically Rely on Androgen Receptor and Respond to Enzalutamide In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Valerie N.; D’Amato, Nicholas C.; Gordon, Michael A.; Lind, Hanne T.; Spoelstra, Nicole S.; Babbs, Beatrice L.; Heinz, Richard E.; Elias, Anthony; Jedlicka, Paul; Jacobsen, Britta M.; Richer, Jennifer K.

    2015-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has the lowest 5-year survival rate of invasive breast carcinomas, and currently there are no approved targeted therapies for this aggressive form of the disease. The androgen receptor (AR) is expressed in up to one third of TNBC and we find that all AR+ TNBC primary tumors tested display nuclear localization of AR, indicative of transcriptionally active receptors. While AR is most abundant in the “luminal AR (LAR)” molecular subtype of TNBC, here, for the first time, we use both the new-generation anti-androgen enzalutamide and AR knockdown to demonstrate that the other non-LAR molecular subtypes of TNBC are critically dependent on AR protein. Indeed, AR inhibition significantly reduces baseline proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, migration, and invasion and increases apoptosis in four TNBC lines (SUM159PT, HCC1806, BT549, and MDA-MB-231), representing three non-LAR TNBC molecular subtypes (mesenchymal-like, mesenchymal stem–like, and basal-like 2). In vivo, enzalutamide significantly decreases viability of SUM159PT and HCC1806 xenografts. Furthermore, mechanistic analysis reveals that AR activation upregulates secretion of the EGFR ligand amphiregulin (AREG), an effect abrogated by enzalutamide in vitro and in vivo. Exogenous AREG partially rescues the effects of AR knockdown on proliferation, migration, and invasion, demonstrating that upregulation of AREG is one mechanism by which AR influences tumorigenicity. Together, our findings indicate that non-LAR subtypes of TNBC are AR dependent and, moreover, that enzalutamide is a promising targeted therapy for multiple molecular subtypes of AR+ TNBC. PMID:25713333

  15. The role of dopamine receptor subtypes in the discriminative stimulus effects of amphetamine and cocaine in rats.

    PubMed

    Filip, M; Przegaliński, E

    1997-01-01

    The role of dopamine (DA) receptor subtypes in the discriminative stimuli of the psychostimulant drugs of abuse amphetamine and cocaine was evaluated by the ability of DA D1, D2 and D3 receptor subtype ligands to either substitute for or antagonize these effects. Separate groups of rats were trained to discriminate between amphetamine (0.5 mg/kg) and saline, and between cocaine (5 mg/kg) and saline. Both the training drugs evoked cross-substitution. In further substitution experiments, (+)-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-7,8-dihydroxy-1-phenyl-1H -3-benzazepine (SKF 38393; 5-20 mg/kg), a selective D1 agonist, moderately substituted for cocaine, but not for amphetamine. The D2 agonist bromocriptine (2.5-20 mg/kg) mimicked both training drugs' cues. Pramipexole, a D3-preferring agonist, in a dose of 0.5 mg/kg induced over 80% substitution for cocaine, and a weaker one (ca. 62%) for amphetamine. Combination tests with DA antagonists showed that the D1 antagonist (+)-3-methyl-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H -3-benzazepine (SCH 23390; 0.01-2 mg/kg), and the D2 blocker raclopride (0.13-1 mg/kg) significantly (78-100%) attenuated the effects of psychostimulants, while the D3-preferring antagonist cis-(+)-5-methoxy-1-methyl-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (UH 232; 5-20 mg/kg) did not affect them. The present results indicate a critical role of D2 receptor subtypes in the discriminative stimuli of amphetamine and cocaine in rats, as well as a less pronounced involvement of D1 and D3 subtypes in the effects under study. PMID:9431548

  16. The role of the A(2A) adenosine receptor subtype in functional hyperaemia in the hindlimb of anaesthetized cats.

    PubMed Central

    Poucher, S M

    1996-01-01

    1. The present study was designed to investigate the contribution of the A(2A) adenosine receptor subtype in the functional hyperaemia response during muscle contraction. 2. In cats anaesthetized with sodium pentobarbitone and breathing spontaneously following tracheotomy, the left sciatic and femoral nerves were electrically stimulated at 3 Hz for 20 min to induce muscle contraction, and hindlimb blood flow was measured with a flow probe. The contribution of the A(2A) adenosine receptor subtype was assessed using ZM 241385, a potent and selective A(2A) adenosine receptor antagonist. 3. In a control group, the muscle isometric tension measured in the extensor digitorum longus-tibialis anterior muscle group was 6.64 +/- 0.66 kg (100 g muscle mass)(-1) and hindlimb vascular conductance was 0.22 +/- 0.03 ml mmHg(-1)(kg body mass)(-1) at 20 min of contraction. Administration of vehicle did not affect these parameters upon a second contraction period: 6.31 +/- 0.61 kg (100 g muscle mass)(-1) and 0.23 +/- 0.03 ml mmHg(-1) (kg body mass)(-1), respectively. Total hindlimb conductance during contraction was unaffected (5.5 +/- 3.7% decrease). 4. ZM 241385 (1.0 mg kg(-1)) did not alter the amount of force produced by the muscle at 20 min of contraction. Hindlimb conductance response was reduced by 27.1 +/- 4.8% following the A(2A) selective adenosine receptor antagonist, similar to that observed with the non-selective antagonist 8-phenyltheophylline. 5. These results show that adenosine acting at the A(2A) subtype receptor can contribute up to 30% of the functional hyperaemia response in the hindlimb of anaesthetized cats. PMID:9019545

  17. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes which selectively couple to phospholipase C: Pharmacological and biochemical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, M.A.; Fraser, C.M. )

    1990-12-14

    The pharmacological and biochemical properties of rat m1 and m3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) stably transfected into Chinese hamster ovary-K1 (CHO) cells were characterized with ligand binding, affinity labeling and biochemical assays. Both mAChR subtypes display saturable, high affinity binding of (3H)-quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) and a rank order of antagonist potency of QNB greater than atropine greater than pirenzepine greater than AF-DX 116. Carbachol displacement of (3H)-QNB binding to the m3 mAChR revealed an approximate 17-fold higher affinity than observed with the m1 mAChR. (3H)-propylbenzilylcholine mustard (PrBCM) labeling of mAChR revealed that m1 and m3 mAChR migrated on SDS-polyacrylamide gels with apparent molecular masses of 80,000 and 94,000 daltons, respectively, consistent with the known differences in their molecular sizes. Both m1 and m3 mAChR elicited dose-dependent increases in the hydrolysis of phosphoinositides; however, the maximal increase in total inositol phosphates elicited with the m1 mAChR was approximately 2-fold greater than that observed in cells expressing similar densities of m3 mAChR. Agonist activation of the m1 mAChR also elicited increases in basal and forskolin-stimulated cAMP, whereas the m3 mAChR had no effect on intracellular cAMP levels. These data suggest that although m1 and m3 mAChR display a considerable degree of structural homology, they exhibit distinct pharmacological and biochemical properties.

  18. Negative Allosteric Modulators of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Subtype 5 in Addiction: a Therapeutic Window

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background: Abundant evidence at the anatomical, electrophysiological, and molecular levels implicates metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) in addiction. Consistently, the effects of a wide range of doses of different mGluR5 negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) have been tested in various animal models of addiction. Here, these studies were subjected to a systematic review to find out if mGluR5 NAMs have a therapeutic potential that can be translated to the clinic. Methods: Literature on consumption/self-administration and reinstatement of drug seeking as outcomes of interest published up to April 2015 was retrieved via PubMed. The review focused on the effects of systemic (i.p., i.v., s.c.) administration of the mGluR5 NAMs 3-((2-Methyl-4-thiazolyl)ethynyl)pyridine (MTEP) and 2-Methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP) on paradigms with cocaine, ethanol, nicotine, and food in rats. Results: MTEP and MPEP were found to reduce self-administration of cocaine, ethanol, and nicotine at doses ≥1mg/kg and 2.5mg/kg, respectively. Dose-response relationship resembled a sigmoidal curve, with low doses not reaching statistical significance and high doses reliably inhibiting self-administration of drugs of abuse. Importantly, self-administration of cocaine, ethanol, and nicotine, but not food, was reduced by MTEP and MPEP in the dose range of 1 to 2mg/kg and 2.5 to 3.2mg/kg, respectively. This dose range corresponds to approximately 50% to 80% mGluR5 occupancy. Interestingly, the limited data found in mice and monkeys showed a similar therapeutic window. Conclusion: Altogether, this review suggests a therapeutic window for mGluR5 NAMs that can be translated to the treatment of substance-related and addictive disorders. PMID:26802568

  19. Role of the A2B receptor–adenosine deaminase complex in colonic dysmotility associated with bowel inflammation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Antonioli, L; Fornai, M; Awwad, O; Giustarini, G; Pellegrini, C; Tuccori, M; Caputi, V; Qesari, M; Castagliuolo, I; Brun, P; Giron, M C; Scarpignato, C; Blandizzi, C; Colucci, R

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Adenosine A2B receptors regulate several physiological enteric functions. However, their role in the pathophysiology of intestinal dysmotility associated with inflammation has not been elucidated. Hence, we investigated the expression of A2B receptors in rat colon and their role in the control of cholinergic motility in the presence of bowel inflammation. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Colitis was induced by 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (DNBS). Colonic A2B receptor expression and localization were examined by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. The interaction between A2B receptors and adenosine deaminase was assayed by immunoprecipitation. The role of A2B receptors in the control of colonic motility was examined in functional experiments on longitudinal muscle preparations (LMPs). KEY RESULTS A2B receptor mRNA was present in colon from both normal and DNBS-treated rats but levels were increased in the latter. A2B receptors were predominantly located in the neuromuscular layer, but, in the presence of colitis, were increased mainly in longitudinal muscle. Functionally, the A2B receptor antagonist MRS 1754 enhanced both electrically-evoked and carbachol-induced cholinergic contractions in normal LMPs, but was less effective in inflamed tissues. The A2B receptor agonist NECA decreased colonic cholinergic motility, with increased efficacy in inflamed LMP. Immunoprecipitation and functional tests revealed a link between A2B receptors and adenosine deaminase, which colocalize in the neuromuscular compartment. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Under normal conditions, endogenous adenosine modulates colonic motility via A2B receptors located in the neuromuscular compartment. In the presence of colitis, this inhibitory control is impaired due to a link between A2B receptors and adenosine deaminase, which catabolizes adenosine, thus preventing A2B receptor activation. PMID:24286264

  20. Versatility or Promiscuity: The Estrogen Receptors, Control of Ligand Selectivity and an Update on Subtype Selective Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Hui Wen; Perkins, Roger; Tong, Weida; Hong, Huixiao

    2014-01-01

    The estrogen receptors (ERs) are a group of versatile receptors. They regulate an enormity of processes starting in early life and continuing through sexual reproduction, development, and end of life. This review provides a background and structural perspective for the ERs as part of the nuclear receptor superfamily and discusses the ER versatility and promiscuity. The wide repertoire of ER actions is mediated mostly through ligand-activated transcription factors and many DNA response elements in most tissues and organs. Their versatility, however, comes with the drawback of promiscuous interactions with structurally diverse exogenous chemicals with potential for a wide range of adverse health outcomes. Even when interacting with endogenous hormones, ER actions can have adverse effects in disease progression. Finally, how nature controls ER specificity and how the subtle differences in receptor subtypes are exploited in pharmaceutical design to achieve binding specificity and subtype selectivity for desired biological response are discussed. The intent of this review is to complement the large body of literature with emphasis on most recent developments in selective ER ligands. PMID:25162709

  1. Immunohistochemical Localization of AT1a, AT1b, and AT2 Angiotensin II Receptor Subtypes in the Rat Adrenal, Pituitary, and Brain with a Perspective Commentary

    PubMed Central

    Premer, Courtney; Lamondin, Courtney; Mitzey, Ann; Speth, Robert C.; Brownfield, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Angiotensin II increases blood pressure and stimulates thirst and sodium appetite in the brain. It also stimulates secretion of aldosterone from the adrenal zona glomerulosa and epinephrine from the adrenal medulla. The rat has 3 subtypes of angiotensin II receptors: AT1a, AT1b, and AT2. mRNAs for all three subtypes occur in the adrenal and brain. To immunohistochemically differentiate these receptor subtypes, rabbits were immunized with C-terminal fragments of these subtypes to generate receptor subtype-specific antibodies. Immunofluorescence revealed AT1a and AT2 receptors in adrenal zona glomerulosa and medulla. AT1b immunofluorescence was present in the zona glomerulosa, but not the medulla. Ultrastructural immunogold labeling for the AT1a receptor in glomerulosa and medullary cells localized it to plasma membrane, endocytic vesicles, multivesicular bodies, and the nucleus. AT1b and AT2, but not AT1a, immunofluorescence was observed in the anterior pituitary. Stellate cells were AT1b positive while ovoid cells were AT2 positive. In the brain, neurons were AT1a, AT1b, and AT2 positive, but glia was only AT1b positive. Highest levels of AT1a, AT1b, and AT2 receptor immunofluorescence were in the subfornical organ, median eminence, area postrema, paraventricular nucleus, and solitary tract nucleus. These studies complement those employing different techniques to characterize Ang II receptors. PMID:23573410

  2. Modulation of agonist binding to human dopamine receptor subtypes by L-prolyl-L-leucyl-glycinamide and a peptidomimetic analog.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vaneeta; Mann, Amandeep; Costain, Willard; Pontoriero, Giuseppe; Castellano, Jessica M; Skoblenick, Kevin; Gupta, Suresh K; Pristupa, Zdenek; Niznik, Hyman B; Johnson, Rodney L; Nair, Venugopalan D; Mishra, Ram K

    2005-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the role of the hypothalamic tripeptide L-prolyl-L-leucyl-glycinamide (PLG) and its conformationally constrained analog 3(R)-[(2(S)-pyrrolidinylcarbonyl)amino]-2-oxo-1-pyrrolidineacetamide (PAOPA) in modulating agonist binding to human dopamine (DA) receptor subtypes using human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells stably transfected with respective cDNAs. Both PLG and PAOPA enhanced agonist [3H]N-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) and [3H]quinpirole binding in a dose-dependent manner to the DA D2L,D2S, and D4 receptors. However, agonist binding to the D1 and D3 receptors and antagonist binding to the D2L receptors by PLG were not significantly affected. Scatchard analysis of [3H]NPA binding to membranes in the presence of PLG revealed a significant increase in affinity of the agonist binding sites for the D2L, D2S, and D4 receptors. Analysis of agonist/antagonist competition curves revealed that PLG and PAOPA increased the population and affinity of the high-affinity form of the D2L receptor and attenuated guanosine 5'-(beta,gamma-imido)-triphosphate-induced inhibition of high-affinity agonist binding sites for the DA D2L receptor. Furthermore, direct NPA binding with D2L cell membranes pretreated with suramin, a compound that can uncouple receptor/G protein complexes, and incubated with and without DA showed that both PLG and PAOPA had only increased agonist binding in membranes pretreated with both suramin and DA, suggesting that PLG requires the D2L receptor/G protein complex to increase agonist binding. These results suggest that PLG possibly modulates DA D2S, D2L, and D4 receptors in an allosteric manner and that the coupling of D2 receptors to the G protein is essential for this modulation to occur. PMID:16126839

  3. Nicotinic Receptor Subtypes Mediating Relaxation of the Normal Human Clasp and Sling Fibers of the Upper Gastric Sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Ruggieri, Michael R.; Braverman, Alan S.; Vegesna, Anil K.; Miller, Larry S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Proper function of the gastroesophageal high pressure zone is essential for the integrity of the antireflux barrier. Mechanisms include tonic contractions as well as the decreased tone during transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations. Methods We characterized the pharmacology of nicotinic receptors mediating relaxations of the human upper gastric sphincter (clasp and sling fibers) using currently available subtype selective nicotinic antagonists in tissue from organ transplant donors. Donors with either a history of gastroesophageal reflux disease or histologic evidence of Barrett’s esophagus were excluded. Clasp and sling muscle fiber strips were used for one of three paradigms. For paradigm 1, each strip was exposed to carbachol, washed, exposed to nicotinic antagonists then re-exposed to carbachol. In paradigm 2, strips were exposed to a near maximally effective bethanechol concentration then nicotine was added. Strips then were washed, exposed to nicotinic antagonists then re-exposed to bethanechol followed by nicotine. In paradigm 3, strips were exposed to bethanechol then choline or cytisine. Key Results 100 µM methyllycaconitine has no inhibitory effects on relaxations, eliminating homomeric α7 subtypes. Subtypes composed of α4β2 subunits are also eliminated because choline acts as an agonist and dihydro-beta-erythroidine is ineffective. Conclusions & Inferences Because mecamylamine blocks the relaxations and both choline and cytisine act as agonists in both clasp and sling fibers, the nicotinic receptor subtypes responsible for these relaxations could be composed of α3β4β2, α2β4 or α4β4 subunits. PMID:24827539

  4. Involvement of multiple µ-opioid receptor subtypes on the presynaptic or postsynaptic inhibition of spinal pain transmission.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Hirokazu; Takagi, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Chizuko; Yonezawa, Akihiko; Sato, Takumi; Sakurada, Tsukasa; Sakurada, Shinobu

    2014-01-01

    The involvement of the μ-opioid receptor subtypes on the presynaptic or postsynaptic inhibition of spinal pain transmission was characterized in ddY mice using endomorphins. Intrathecal treatment with capsaicin, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) or substance P elicited characteristic nociceptive behaviors that consisted primarily of vigorous biting and/or licking with some scratching. Intrathecal co-administration of endogenous μ-opioid peptide endomorphin-1 or endomorphin-2 resulted in a potent antinociceptive effect against the nociceptive behaviors induced by capsaicin, NMDA or substance P, which was eliminated by i.t. co-administration of the μ-opioid receptor antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTOP). The antinociceptive effect of endomorphin-1 was significantly suppressed by i.t.-co-administration of the μ2-opioid receptor antagonist Tyr-D-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH2 (D-Pro2-endomorphin-1) but not the μ1-opioid receptor antagonist Tyr-D-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH2 (D-Pro2-endomorphin-2) on capsaicin- or NMDA-elicited nociceptive behaviors. In contrast, the antinociceptive effect of endomorphin-2 was significantly suppressed by i.t.-co-administration of D-Pro2-endomorphin-2 but not D-Pro2-endomorphin-1 on capsaicin-, NMDA- or substance P-elicited nociceptive behaviors. Interestingly, regarding substance P-elicited nociceptive behaviors, the antinociceptive effect of endomorphin-1 was significantly suppressed by i.t.-co-administration of another μ2-opioid receptor antagonist, Tyr-D-Pro-Trp-Gly-NH2 (D-Pro2-Tyr-W-MIF-1), but not D-Pro2-endomorphin-1 or D-Pro2-endomorphin-2. The present results suggest that the multiple μ-opioid receptor subtypes are involved in the presynaptic or postsynaptic inhibition of spinal pain transmission. PMID:24512946

  5. Stereoselective recognition of the enantiomers of phenglutarimide and of six related compounds by four muscarinic receptor subtypes.

    PubMed Central

    Waelbroeck, M.; Lazareno, S.; Pfaff, O.; Friebe, T.; Tastenoy, M.; Mutschler, E.; Lambrecht, G.

    1996-01-01

    1. We have compared the binding properties of the enantiomers of phenglutarimide (1) and of six related compounds to M1 receptors in NB-OK-1 cells, M2 receptors in rat heart, M3 receptors in rat pancreas and the M4 receptors of rat striatum, with their functional (antimuscarinic) properties in rabbit vas deferens (M1/M4-like), guinea-pig atria (M2) and guinea-pig ileum (M3) receptors. The binding properties of the enantiomers of three of the compounds were also measured on cloned human m1-m4 receptors expressed by CHO cells, using [3H]-N-methylscopolamine ([3H]-NMS) as radioligand. 2. The high affinity enantiomers behaved as competitive antagonists in binding and pharmacological studies. (S)-phenglutarimide (pKi-M1 = 9.0/9.3) and (R)-thienglutarimide (pKi-M1 = 8.6/9.2) recognized selectively the native M1 > M4 > M3 > M2 receptors in tissues as well as the respective cloned receptors. 3. The pA2 values at the inhibitory heteroreceptors in the rabbit vas deferens, and at the guinea-pig atria and ileum for the seven more potent enantiomers were compatible with the previous classification of these receptors as M1/M4-like, M2 and M3, respectively. 4. Replacement of the phenyl by a thienyl ring or of the diethylamino by a piperidino group in the phenglutarimide molecule did not affect markedly the potencies of the high affinity enantiomer. In contrast, replacement of the phenyl by a cyclohexyl ring decreased 20 fold the active enantiomers potency. Methylation of the piperidine-2,6-dione nitrogen also reduced markedly the eutomers' affinities, more on the M1 than on the other subtypes. 5. The selectivity profiles (recognition of four receptor subtypes) of six of the seven less active enantiomers were different from the corresponding more active enantiomers selectivity profiles, suggesting that the preparations used in this study were pure. However, we cannot not exclude the hypothesis that the batch of (S)-thienglutarimide used in this study was contaminated by less than

  6. Cloning, mRNA expression and transcriptional regulation of five retinoid X receptor subtypes in yellow catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco by insulin.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ya-Xiong; Luo, Zhi; Wu, Kun; Zhang, Li-Han; Xu, Yi-Huan; Chen, Qi-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Retinoid X receptors (RXRs) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily and mediate development, reproduction, homeostasis and cell differentiation processes in vertebrates. In this study, full-length cDNA sequences of five rxr subtypes from yellow catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco were cloned. Their mRNA expression patterns in different tissues and transcriptional regulation by insulin were determined. Five P. fulvidraco rxr (Pf-rxr) subtypes differed in the length of cDNA sequence and the open reading frame, but shared the similar domain structures as in typical nuclear receptors. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the five Pf-rxr subtypes were paralogous genes, and that Pf-rxrβa and Pf-rxrβb had arisen during a teleost-specific genome duplication event. Five subtypes of Pf-rxr were detected in all the tested tissues. Overlapping and distinct expression patterns were found for different Pf-rxr subtypes, suggesting functional redundancy and divergence of these duplicates. Intraperitoneal insulin injection and incubation reduced the mRNA expression of Pf-rxrgb, but not other subtypes, in the liver and hepatocytes of P. fulvidraco, respectively, suggesting that Pf-rxrgb is the dominant rxr subtype involved in the insulin signaling pathway in P. fulvidraco. PMID:26519760

  7. Subtypes of the 5-HT receptor mediating the behavioural responses to 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine in the rat.

    PubMed

    Tricklebank, M D; Forler, C; Middlemiss, D N; Fozard, J R

    1985-10-29

    The 5-HT receptor subtypes involved in the mediation of reciprocal forepaw treading and the flat body posture induced by the central 5-HT receptor agonist, 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeODMT), were examined in intact rats and in rats depleted of monoamines with reserpine. Forepaw treading in non-reserpinised rats was antagonised by the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, ketanserin, only at doses in excess of those required for occupation of a large proportion of 5-HT2 receptors in brain, and at which there was significant inhibition of stereotyped sniffing induced by the dopamine receptor agonist, apomorphine. Since forepaw treading induced by 5-MeODMT was also blocked in intact rats by haloperidol, blockade of the behaviour by ketanserin may more accurately reflect antagonism at dopamine receptors than at 5-HT2 receptors. In reserpinised rats, i.e. with minimised contributions from other monoamine systems, neither forepaw treading nor the flat body posture were significantly altered by ketanserin, haloperidol or the beta 1- and beta 2-selective adrenoceptor antagonists, betaxolol and ICI 118.551, making a key role for 5-HT2 receptors, dopamine receptors and beta-adrenoceptors unlikely. In contrast, forepaw treading in both reserpinised and non-reserpinised rats was antagonised stereoselectively by pindolol and by spiperone, which interact with 5-HT1 and 5-HT1A recognition sites. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that forepaw treading induced by 5-MeODMT arises by activation of the putative 5-HT1A receptor. Antagonism of the flat body posture by pindolol could be demonstrated only in non-reserpinised rats and the mechanism of induction of this behaviour remains to be established. PMID:2935408

  8. Study of the modulatory activity of BZ (omega) receptor ligands on defensive behaviors in mice: evaluation of the importance of intrinsic efficacy and receptor subtype selectivity.

    PubMed

    Griebel, G; Perrault, G; Sanger, D J

    1999-01-01

    1. This study examined the hypothesis that the anxiolytic effects of benzodiazepine (BZ (omega)) receptor ligands may be associated with actions at a defined receptor subtype and/or their level of intrinsic activity using the mouse defense test battery. 2. This test has been designed to assess defensive reactions of Swiss mice confronted with a natural threat (a rat) and situations associated with this threat. Primary measures taken before, during and after rat confrontation were escape attempts, flight, risk assessment and defensive threat and attack. 3. The drugs used were the non-selective BZ (omega) receptor full agonist diazepam, the non-selective BZ (omega) receptor partial agonist bretazenil and the beta-carboline abecarnil which acts as a full agonist on GABAA receptors containing the alpha 1- and the alpha 3-subunits and as a partial agonist at receptors containing the alpha 2- and the alpha 5-subunits. The drugs were given alone and diazepam was co-administered with either bretazenil or abecarnil. 4. When administered alone, diazepam attenuated several defensive responses including risk assessment activities, defensive threat/attack reactions upon forced contact with the rat and escape attempts following the removal of the rat from the apparatus. Unlike diazepam, bretazenil was devoid of significant activity on defense and abecarnil displayed depressant activity. 5. Bretazenil blocked all behavioral effects of diazepam on defense behaviors. The co-administration of diazepam and abecarnil produced a behavioral profile similar to that observed when diazepam was administered alone, indicating that abecarnil did not influence the effects of diazepam on defense. By contrast, diazepam completely antagonized the sedative effects of abecarnil. 6. These findings indicate that only BZ (omega) ligands with high intrinsic efficacy at all BZ (omega) receptor subtypes display clear and specific effects on defensive behaviors in mice, and suggest that GABAA receptors

  9. Hyperspectral multiplex single-particle tracking of different receptor subtypes labeled with quantum dots in live neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrecque, Simon; Sylvestre, Jean-Philippe; Marcet, Stephane; Mangiarini, Francesca; Bourgoin, Brice; Verhaegen, Marc; Blais-Ouellette, Sébastien; De Koninck, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The efficacy of existing therapies and the discovery of innovative treatments for central nervous system (CNS) diseases have been limited by the lack of appropriate methods to investigate complex molecular processes at the synaptic level. To improve our capability to investigate complex mechanisms of synaptic signaling and remodeling, we designed a fluorescence hyperspectral imaging platform to simultaneously track different subtypes of individual neurotransmitter receptors trafficking in and out of synapses. This imaging platform allows simultaneous image acquisition of at least five fluorescent markers in living neurons with a high-spatial resolution. We used quantum dots emitting at different wavelengths and functionalized to specifically bind to single receptors on the membrane of living neurons. The hyperspectral imaging platform enabled the simultaneous optical tracking of five different synaptic proteins, including subtypes of glutamate receptors (mGluR and AMPAR) and postsynaptic signaling proteins. It also permitted the quantification of their mobility after treatments with various pharmacological agents. This technique provides an efficient method to monitor several synaptic proteins at the same time, which could accelerate the screening of effective compounds for treatment of CNS disorders.

  10. Subtype-selective nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists can improve cognitive flexibility in an attentional set shifting task.

    PubMed

    Wood, Christopher; Kohli, Shivali; Malcolm, Emma; Allison, Claire; Shoaib, Mohammed

    2016-06-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are considered to be viable targets to enhance cognition in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. Activation of nAChRs with selective nicotinic receptor agonists may provide effective means to pharmacologically treat cognitive deficits observed in schizophrenia. Cognitive flexibility is one aspect of cognition, which can be assessed in a rodent model of the attentional set-shifting task (ASST). The aim of the present study was two-fold, firstly, to evaluate the efficacy of a series of subtype selective nAChR agonists, such as those that target α7 and α4β2 nAChR subtypes in non-compromised rodents. Secondly, nicotine as a prototypic agonist was evaluated for its effects to restore attentional deficits produced by sub-chronic ketamine exposure in the ASST. Male hooded Lister rats underwent habituation, consisting of a simple odour and medium discrimination with subsequent assessment 24 h later. In experimentally naïve rats, α7 subtype selective agonists, compound-A and SSR180711 along with PNU-120596, an α7 positive allosteric modulator (PAM), were compared against the β2* selective agonist, 5IA-85380. All compounds except for PNU-120596 were observed to significantly improve extra-dimensional (ED) shift performance, nicotine, 5IA-85380 and SSR180711 further enhanced the final reversal (REV3) stage of the task. In another experiment, sub-chronic ketamine treatment produced robust deficits during the ED and the REV3 stages of the discriminations; rodents required significantly more trials to reach criterion during these discriminations. These deficits were attenuated in rodents treated acutely with nicotine (0.1 mg/kg SC) 10 min prior to the ED shift. These results highlight the potential utility of targeting nAChRs to enhance cognitive flexibility, particularly the α7 and β2* receptor subtypes. The improvement with nicotine was much greater in rodents that were impaired following the sub-chronic ketamine

  11. mRNA expression profile of serotonin receptor subtypes and distribution of serotonergic terminations in marmoset brain

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Rammohan; Watakabe, Akiya; Yamamori, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    To better understand serotonin function in the primate brain, we examined the mRNA expression patterns of all the 13 members of the serotonin receptor (5HTR) family, by in situ hybridization (ISH) and the distribution of serotonergic terminations by serotonin transporter (SERT) protein immunohistochemical analysis. Ten of the 13 5HTRs showed significant mRNA expressions in the marmoset brain. Our study shows several new features of the organization of serotonergic systems in the marmoset brain. (1) The thalamus expressed only a limited number of receptor subtypes compared with the cortex, hippocampus, and other subcortical regions. (2) In the cortex, there are layer-selective and area-selective mRNA expressions of 5HTRs. (3) Highly localized mRNA expressions of 5HT1F and 5HT3A were observed. (4) There was a conspicuous overlap of the mRNA expressions of receptor subtypes known to have somatodendritic localization of receptor proteins with dense serotonergic terminations in the visual cortex, the central lateral (CL) nucleus of the thalamus, the presubiculum, and the medial mammillary nucleus of the hypothalamus. This suggests a high correlation between serotonin availability and receptor expression at these locations. (5) The 5HTRs show differences in mRNA expression pattern between the marmoset and mouse cortices whereas the patterns of both the species were much similar in the hippocampus. We discuss the possible roles of 5HTRs in the marmoset brain revealed by the analysis of their overall mRNA expression patterns. PMID:24904298

  12. Delineation of gastric cancer subtypes by co-regulated expression of receptor tyrosine kinases and chemosensitivity genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Chun; Ma, Rong; Wu, Jian-Zhong; Xiao, Xia; Wu, Wei; Li, Gang; Chen, Bo; Sharma, Ashok; Bai, Shan; Dun, Bo-Ying; She, Jin-Xiong; Tang, Jin-Hai

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy plays a key role in improving disease-free survival and overall survival of gastric cancer (GC); however, response rates are variable and a non-negligible proportion of patients undergo toxic and costly chemotherapeutic regimens without a survival benefit. Several studies have shown the existence of GC subtypes which may predict survival and respond differently to chemotherapy. It is also known that the expression level of chemotherapy-related and target therapy-related genes correlates with response to specific antitumor drugs. Nevertheless, these genes have not been considered jointly to define GC subtypes. In this study, we evaluated seven genes known to influence chemotherapeutic response (ERCC1, BRCA1, RRM1, TUBB3, STMN1, TYMS and TOP2A) and five receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) (EGFR, ERBB2, PDGFRB, VEGFR1 and VEGFR2). We demonstrate significant heterogeneity of gene expression among GC patients and identified four GC subtypes using the expression profiles of eight genes in two co-regulation groups: chemosensitivity (BRCA1, STMN1, TYMS and TOP2A) and RTKs (EGFR, PDGFRB, VEGFR1 and VEGFR2). The results are of immediate translational value regarding GC diagnostics and therapeutics, as many of these genes are curently widely used in relevant clinical testing. PMID:26396673

  13. Delineation of gastric cancer subtypes by co-regulated expression of receptor tyrosine kinases and chemosensitivity genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu-Chun; Ma, Rong; Wu, Jian-Zhong; Xiao, Xia; Wu, Wei; Li, Gang; Chen, Bo; Sharma, Ashok; Bai, Shan; Dun, Bo-Ying; She, Jin-Xiong; Tang, Jin-Hai

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy plays a key role in improving disease-free survival and overall survival of gastric cancer (GC); however, response rates are variable and a non-negligible proportion of patients undergo toxic and costly chemotherapeutic regimens without a survival benefit. Several studies have shown the existence of GC subtypes which may predict survival and respond differently to chemotherapy. It is also known that the expression level of chemotherapy-related and target therapy-related genes correlates with response to specific antitumor drugs. Nevertheless, these genes have not been considered jointly to define GC subtypes. In this study, we evaluated seven genes known to influence chemotherapeutic response (ERCC1, BRCA1, RRM1, TUBB3, STMN1, TYMS and TOP2A) and five receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) (EGFR, ERBB2, PDGFRB, VEGFR1 and VEGFR2). We demonstrate significant heterogeneity of gene expression among GC patients and identified four GC subtypes using the expression profiles of eight genes in two co-regulation groups: chemosensitivity (BRCA1, STMN1, TYMS and TOP2A) and RTKs (EGFR, PDGFRB, VEGFR1 and VEGFR2). The results are of immediate translational value regarding GC diagnostics and therapeutics, as many of these genes are curently widely used in relevant clinical testing. PMID:26396673

  14. A melanoma subtype with intrinsic resistance to BRAF inhibition identified by receptor tyrosine kinases gene-driven classification

    PubMed Central

    Dugo, Matteo; Nicolini, Gabriella; Tragni, Gabrina; Bersani, Ilaria; Tomassetti, Antonella; Colonna, Valentina; Del Vecchio, Michele; De Braud, Filippo; Canevari, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) contributes to several aspects of oncogenesis including drug resistance. In melanoma, distinct RTKs have been involved in BRAF inhibitors (BRAFi) resistance, yet the utility of RTKs expression pattern to identify intrinsically resistant tumors has not been assessed. Transcriptional profiling of RTKs and integration with a previous classification, reveals three robust subtypes in two independent datasets of melanoma cell lines and one cohort of melanoma samples. This classification was validated by Western blot in a panel of patient-derived melanoma cell lines. One of the subtypes identified here for the first time displayed the highest and lowest expression of EGFR and ERBB3, respectively, and included BRAF-mutant tumors all intrinsically resistant to BRAFi PLX4720, as assessed by analysis of the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia pharmacogenomic study and by in vitro growth inhibition assays. High levels of EGFR were detected, even before therapy, in tumor cells of one of three melanoma patients unresponsive to BRAFi. Use of different pharmacological inhibitors highlighted the relevance of PI3K/mTOR signaling for growth of this PLX4720-resistant subtype. Our results identify a specific molecular profile of melanomas intrinsically resistant to BRAFi and suggest the PI3K/mTOR pathway as a potential therapeutic target for these tumors. PMID:25742786

  15. Bridging the Gap From Screening Assays to Estrogenic Effects in Fish: Potential Roles of Multiple Estrogen Receptor Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to delineate the ligand interactions that drive biomarker induction in fish exposed to estrogenic pollutants and provide a case study on the capacity of human (h) estrogen receptor (ER)-based in vitro screening assays to predict estrogenic effects in aquatic species. Adult male Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) were exposed to solutions of singular steroidal estrogens or to the estrogenic extract of an anaerobic swine waste lagoon. All exposure concentrations were calibrated to be equipotent based on the yeast estrogen screen (YES), which reports activation of hERα. These exposures elicited significantly different magnitudes of hepatic vitellogenin and choriogenin gene induction in the male medaka. Effects of the same YES-calibrated solutions in the T47D-KBluc assay, which reports activation of hERα and hERβ, generally recapitulated observations in medaka. Using competitive ligand binding assays, it was found that the magnitude of vitellogenin/choriogenin induction by different estrogenic ligands correlated positively with preferential binding affinity for medaka ERβ subtypes, which are highly expressed in male medaka liver prior to estrogen exposure. Results support emerging evidence that ERβ subtypes are critically involved in the teleost estrogenic response, with the ERα:ERβ ratio being of particular importance. Accordingly, incorporation of multiple ER subtypes into estrogen screening protocols may increase predictive value for the risk assessment of aquatic systems, including complex estrogenic mixtures. PMID:24422420

  16. The effects of estrogen on the α2-adrenergic receptor subtypes in rat uterine function in late pregnancy in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hajagos-Tóth, Judit; Bóta, Judit; Ducza, Eszter; Csányi, Adrienn; Tiszai, Zita; Borsodi, Anna; Samavati, Reza; Benyhe, Sándor; Gáspár, Róbert

    2016-01-01

    Aim To assess the effect of 17β-estradiol pretreatment on the function and expression of α2- adrenergic receptors (ARs) subtypes in late pregnancy in rats. Methods Sprague-Dawley SPD rats (n = 37) were treated with 17β-estradiol for 4 days starting from the 18th day of pregnancy. The myometrial expression of the α2-AR subtypes was determined by real time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. In vitro contractions were stimulated with (-)-noradrenaline, and its effect was modified with the selective antagonists BRL 44408 (α2A), ARC 239 (α2B/C), and spiroxatrine (α2A). The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation was also measured. The activated G-protein level was investigated by guanosine 5′-O-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTPγS) binding assay. Results 17β-estradiol pretreatment decreased the contractile effect of (-)-noradrenaline via the α2-ARs, and abolished the contractile effect via the α2B-ARs. All the α2-AR subtypes’ mRNA was significantly decreased. 17β-estradiol pretreatment significantly increased the myometrial cAMP level in the presence of BRL 44408 (P = 0.001), ARC 239 (P = 0.007), and spiroxatrine (P = 0.045), but did not modify it in the presence of spiroxatrine + BRL 44408 combination (P = 0.073). It also inhibited the G-protein-activating effect of (-)-noradrenaline by 25% in the presence of BRL 44408 + spiroxatrine combination. Conclusions The expression of the α2-AR subtypes is sensitive to 17β-estradiol, which decreases the contractile response of (-)-noradrenaline via the α2B-AR subtype, and might cause changes in G-protein signaling pathway. Estrogen dysregulation may be responsible for preterm labor or uterine inertia via the α2-ARs. PMID:27106352

  17. BETA-ADRENERGIC RECEPTOR SUBTYPES THAT MEDIATE RACTOPAMINE STIMULATION OF LIPOLYSIS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The RR stereoisomer of ractopamine exhibits the highest beta-AR affinity and signaling response of the four ractopamine stereoisomers. The RR isomer exhibits selective activation of the porcine beta-2 AR. Our objective was to determine the beta-AR subtypes that mediate the lipolytic response to ra...

  18. Pyrazolo-triazolo-pyrimidines as adenosine receptor antagonists: Effect of the N-5 bond type on the affinity and selectivity at the four adenosine receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Bolcato, Chiara; Cusan, Claudia; Pastorin, Giorgia; Cacciari, Barbara; Klotz, Karl Norbert; Morizzo, Erika

    2007-01-01

    In the last few years, many efforts have been made to search for potent and selective human A3 adenosine antagonists. In particular, one of the most promising human A3 adenosine receptor antagonists is represented by the pyrazolo-triazolo-pyrimidine family. This class of compounds has been strongly investigated from the point of view of structure-activity relationships. In particular, it has been observed that fundamental requisites for having both potency and selectivity at the human A3 adenosine receptors are the presence of a small substituent at the N8 position and an unsubstitued phenyl carbamoyl moiety at the N5 position. In this study, we report the role of the N5-bond type on the affinity and selectivity at the four adenosine receptor subtypes. The observed structure-activity relationships of this class of antagonists are also exhaustively rationalized using the recently published ligand-based homology modeling approach. PMID:18368532

  19. Muscarinic receptor subtypes differentially control synaptic input and excitability of cerebellum-projecting medial vestibular nucleus neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yun; Chen, Shao-Rui; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2016-04-01

    Neurons in the vestibular nuclei have a vital function in balance maintenance, gaze stabilization, and posture. Although muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are expressed and involved in regulating vestibular function, it remains unclear how individual mAChR subtypes regulate vestibular neuronal activity. In this study, we determined which specific subtypes of mAChRs control synaptic input and excitability of medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons that project to the cerebellum. Cerebellum-projecting MVN neurons were labeled by a fluorescent retrograde tracer and then identified in rat brainstem slices. Quantitative PCR analysis suggested that M2 and M3 were the possible major mAChR subtypes expressed in the MVN. The mAChR agonist oxotremorine-M significantly reduced the amplitude of glutamatergic excitatory post-synaptic currents evoked by stimulation of vestibular primary afferents, and this effect was abolished by the M2-preferring antagonist AF-DX 116. However, oxotremorine-M had no effect on GABA-mediated spontaneous inhibitory post-synaptic currents of labeled MVN neurons. Furthermore, oxotremorine-M significantly increased the firing activity of labeled MVN neurons, and this effect was blocked by the M3-preferring antagonist J104129 in most neurons tested. In addition, AF-DX 116 reduced the onset latency and prolonged the excitatory effect of oxotremorine-M on the firing activity of labeled MVN neurons. Our findings suggest that M3 is the predominant post-synaptic mAChR involved in muscarinic excitation of cerebellum-projecting MVN neurons. Pre-synaptic M2 mAChR regulates excitatory glutamatergic input from vestibular primary afferents, which in turn influences the excitability of cerebellum-projecting MVN neurons. This new information has important therapeutic implications for treating vestibular disorders with mAChR subtype-selective agents. Medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons projecting to the cerebellum are involved in balance control. We

  20. Food intake, tumor growth, and weight loss in EP2 receptor subtype knockout mice bearing PGE2-producing tumors

    PubMed Central

    Iresjö, Britt-Marie; Wang, Wenhua; Nilsberth, Camilla; Andersson, Marianne; Lönnroth, Christina; Smedh, Ulrika

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that prostaglandin (PG) E2 is involved in anorexia/cachexia development in MCG 101 tumor-bearing mice. In the present study, we investigate the role of PGE receptor subtype EP2 in the development of anorexia after MCG 101 implantation in wild-type (EP2+/+) or EP2-receptor knockout (EP2−/−) mice. Our results showed that host absence of EP2 receptors attenuated tumor growth and development of anorexia in tumor-bearing EP2 knockout mice compared to tumor-bearing wild-type animals. Microarray profiling of the hypothalamus revealed a relative twofold change in expression of around 35 genes including mRNA transcripts coding for Phospholipase A2 and Prostaglandin D2 synthase (Ptgds) in EP2 receptor knockout mice compared to wild-type mice. Prostaglandin D2 synthase levels were increased significantly in EP2 receptor knockouts, suggesting that improved food intake may depend on altered balance of prostaglandin production in hypothalamus since PGE2 and PGD2 display opposing effects in feeding control. PMID:26197930

  1. Distinguishing luminal breast cancer subtypes by Ki67, progesterone receptor or TP53 status provides prognostic information.

    PubMed

    Feeley, Linda P; Mulligan, Anna M; Pinnaduwage, Dushanthi; Bull, Shelley B; Andrulis, Irene L

    2014-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the prognostic significance of subgrouping estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast tumors into low- and high-risk luminal categories using Ki67 index, TP53, or progesterone receptor (PR) status. The study group comprised 540 patients with lymph node negative, invasive breast carcinoma. Luminal A subtype was defined as being ER positive, HER2 negative, and Ki67 low (<14% cells positive) and luminal B subtype as being ER positive, HER2 negative, and Ki67 high (≥ 14% cells positive). Luminal tumors were also subgrouped into risk categories based on the PR and TP53 status. Survival analysis was performed. Patients with luminal B tumors (n=173) had significantly worse disease-free survival compared to those with luminal A tumors (n=186) (log rank P-value=0.0164; univariate Cox regression relative risk 2.00; 95% CI, 1.12-3.58; P=0.0187). Luminal subtype remained an independent prognostic indicator on multivariate analysis including traditional prognostic factors (relative risk 2.12; 95% CI, 1.16-3.88; P=0.0151). Using TP53 status or PR negativity rather than Ki67 to classify ER-positive luminal tumors gave similar outcome results to those obtained using the proliferation index. However, it was a combination of the three markers, which proved the most powerful prognostically. Ki67 index, TP53 status, or PR negativity can be used to segregate ER-positive, HER2-negative tumors into prognostically meaningful subgroups with significantly different clinical outcomes. These biomarkers particularly in combination may potentially be used clinically to guide patient management. PMID:24051696

  2. A Novel Subtype of Astrocytes Expressing TRPV4 (Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4) Regulates Neuronal Excitability via Release of Gliotransmitters*

    PubMed Central

    Shibasaki, Koji; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro; Tamalu, Fuminobu; Tominaga, Makoto; Ishizaki, Yasuki

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes play active roles in the regulation of synaptic transmission. Neuronal excitation can evoke Ca2+ transients in astrocytes, and these Ca2+ transients can modulate neuronal excitability. Although only a subset of astrocytes appears to communicate with neurons, the types of astrocytes that can regulate neuronal excitability are poorly characterized. We found that ∼30% of astrocytes in the brain express transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), indicating that astrocytic subtypes can be classified on the basis of their expression patterns. When TRPV4+ astrocytes are activated by ligands such as arachidonic acid, the activation propagates to neighboring astrocytes through gap junctions and by ATP release from the TRPV4+ astrocytes. After activation, both TRPV4+ and TRPV4− astrocytes release glutamate, which acts as an excitatory gliotransmitter to increase synaptic transmission through type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR). Our results indicate that TRPV4+ astrocytes constitute a novel subtype of the population and are solely responsible for initiating excitatory gliotransmitter release to enhance synaptic transmission. We propose that TRPV4+ astrocytes form a core of excitatory glial assembly in the brain and function to efficiently increase neuronal excitation in response to endogenous TRPV4 ligands. PMID:24737318

  3. Loss of EP2 receptor subtype in colonic cells compromise epithelial barrier integrity by altering claudin-4.

    PubMed

    Lejeune, Manigandan; Moreau, France; Chadee, Kris

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a bioactive lipid mediator that exerts its biological function through interaction with four different subtypes of E-Prostanoid receptor namely EP1, EP2, EP3 and EP4. It has been known that EP2 receptor is differentially over-expressed in the epithelia of inflamed human colonic mucosa. However, the significance of the differential expression in altering epithelial barrier function is not known. In this study, we used Caco-2 cells expressing EP2 receptor, either high (EP2S) or low (EP2A), as a model epithelia and determined the barrier function of these cell monolayers by measuring the trans epithelial resistance (TER). Basal TER of EP2A (but not EP2S) monolayer was significantly lower suggesting a loss of colonic epithelial barrier integrity. In comparison, the TER of wild type Caco-2 was decreased in response to an EP2 receptor specific antagonist (AH-6809) indicating an important role for EP2 receptor in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function. The decrease TER in EP2A monolayer corresponded with a significant loss of the tight junction (TJ) protein claudin-4 without affecting other major TJ proteins. Similarly, EP2 receptor antagonism/siRNA based silencing significantly decreased claudin-4 expression in EP2S cells. Surprisingly, alteration in claudin-4 was not transcriptionally regulated in EP2A cells but rather undergoes increased proteosomal degradation. Moreover, among the TER compromising cytokines examined (IL-8, IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ) only IFN-γ was significantly up regulated in EP2A cells. However, IFN-γ did not significantly decreased claudin-4 expression in Caco-2 cells indicating no role for IFN-γ in degrading claudin-4. We conclude that differential down-regulation of EP2 receptor play a major role in compromising colonic epithelial barrier function by selectively increasing proteosomal degradation of claudin-4. PMID:25396731

  4. Subtype selectivity of the novel nonpeptide neuropeptide Y Y1 receptor antagonist BIBO 3304 and its effect on feeding in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Wieland, H A; Engel, W; Eberlein, W; Rudolf, K; Doods, H N

    1998-01-01

    The novel Y1-selective argininamide derivative BIBO 3304 ((R)-N-[[4-(aminocarbonylaminomethyl)phenyl]methyl]-N2-(diphenylacetyl)-argininamide trifluoroacetate) has been synthesized and was examined for its subtype selectivity, its in vitro antagonistic properties and its food intake inhibitory properties.BIBO 3304 displayed subnanomolar affinity for both the human and the rat Y1 receptor (IC50 values 0.38±0.06 nM and 0.72±0.42 nM, respectively). The inactive enantiomer of BIBO 3304 (BIBO 3457) had low affinity for both the human and rat Y1 receptor subtype (IC50>1000 nM). BIBO 3304 showed low affinity for the human Y2 receptor, human and rat Y4 receptor as well as for the human and rat Y5 receptor (IC50 values >1000 nM).30 μg BIBO 3304 administered into the paraventricular nucleus inhibited the feeding response induced by 1 μg NPY as well as the hyperphagia induced by a 24 h fast implying a role for Y1 receptors in NPY mediated feeding. The inactive enantiomer had no effect.BIBO 3304 inhibits neither the galanin nor the noradrenaline induced orexigenic response, but it blocked feeding behaviour elicited by both [Leu31, Pro34]NPY and NPY (3–36) suggesting an interplay between different NPY receptor subtypes in feeding behavior.The present study reveals that BIBO 3304 is a subtype selective nonpeptide antagonist with subnanomolar affinity for the Y1 receptor subtype that significantly inhibits food intake induced by application of NPY or by fasting. PMID:9806339

  5. Co-Expression of Two Subtypes of Melatonin Receptor on Rat M1-Type Intrinsically Photosensitive Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Wen-Long; Chen, Wei-Yi; Yang, Xiong-Li; Zhong, Yong-Mei; Weng, Shi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) are involved in circadian and other non-image forming visual responses. An open question is whether the activity of these neurons may also be under the regulation mediated by the neurohormone melatonin. In the present work, by double-staining immunohistochemical technique, we studied the expression of MT1 and MT2, two known subtypes of mammalian melatonin receptors, in rat ipRGCs. A single subset of retinal ganglion cells labeled by the specific antibody against melanopsin exhibited the morphology typical of M1-type ipRGCs. Immunoreactivity for both MT1 and MT2 receptors was clearly seen in the cytoplasm of all labeled ipRGCs, indicating that these two receptors were co-expressed in each of these neurons. Furthermore, labeling for both the receptors were found in neonatal M1 cells as early as the day of birth. It is therefore highly plausible that retinal melatonin may directly modulate the activity of ipRGCs, thus regulating non-image forming visual functions. PMID:25714375

  6. ( sup 3 H)DUP 753, a highly potent and specific radioligand for the angiotensin II-1 receptor subtype

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, A.T.; McCall, D.E.; Aldrich, P.E.; Timmermans, P.B. )

    1990-11-15

    ({sup 3}H)Dup 753, a nonpeptide angiotensin II (AII) receptor antagonist radioligand, was used to characterize a subtype of AII receptors in rat adrenal cortical microsomes. By Scatchard analysis, a single class of DuP 753 binding sites was found with an affinity of 6.4 nM and a Bmax of 1.3 pmol/mg protein. These sites were saturable and readily reversible. Angiotensin (I, II, III) expressed the same affinities and order of potency for these binding sites as those labeled by ({sup 3}H)AII for the AII-1 sites. The affinities expressed by nonpeptide AII antagonists were commensurate with their inhibitory potencies on AII-1 receptors. PD123177, an AII-2 specific ligand, and other non-AII peptides showed no inhibitory action. These data together with the differential tissue distribution strongly support our conclusion that ({sup 3}H)DuP 753 is a potent and highly specific radioligand for the AII-1 receptors.

  7. Heterogeneity of the M1 muscarinic receptor subtype between peripheral lung and cerebral cortex demonstrated by the selective antagonist AF-DX 116

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, J.W.; Halonen, M.; Seaver, N.A.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1987-07-27

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the majority of muscarinic receptors in rabbit peripheral lung homogenates bind pirenzepine with high affinity (putative M1 subtype). In experiments of AF-DX 116 inhibiting (TH)(-)quinuclidinyl benzilate or (TH)pirenzepine, the authors found similar inhibitory constants for AF-DX 116 binding in rat heart and rabbit peripheral lung that were 4-fold smaller (i.e. of higher affinity) than the inhibitory constant for rat cerebral cortex. This results demonstrates heterogeneity of the M1 muscarinic receptor subtype between peripheral lung and cerebral cortex. 20 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  8. Serotonin receptor subtype mediation of the interoceptive discriminative stimuli induced by 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine.

    PubMed

    Spencer, D G; Glaser, T; Traber, J

    1987-01-01

    Male Wistar rats were trained to discriminate the interoceptive effects of 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-OMe-DMT; 1.25 mg/kg, IP) from saline in a two-lever operant chamber. Following discrimination learning, the following drugs (with ED50 dose in mg/kg IP) dose-dependently generalized: lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD, 0.04), 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT, 0.11), 6-methoxy-4-(dipropyl-amino)-1,3,4,5-tetrahydrobenz(c,d)indole hydrochloride (BAY R 1531, 0.15), 5-OMe-DMT itself (0.63), ipsapirone (TVX Q 7821, 2.7), and buspirone (3.8). The potencies of these drugs in generalization tests were best correlated with their binding affinities for the 5-HT1A serotonin receptor subtype (as measured by displacement of 3H-ipsapirone in the hippocampus). Drugs not, or only partially generalizing included quipazine, bufotenin, m-trifluoromethylphenylpiperazine (TFMPP), 5-methoxy-3(1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-4-yl)-1H-indole succinate (RU 24969), citalopram, clomipramine, 1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-3-nitro-4(2-trifluoromethylphenyl)-pyridine-5- carboxylate (BAY K 8644), the buspirone metabolite 1-pyrimidinyl-piperazine (1-PP), methysergide, metergoline, and metitepine. Of the last three compounds with antagonistic activity at 5-HT receptors, as well as ketanserin, pizotifen, and ritanserin, only metitepine and pindolol could fully block the 5-OMe-DMT stimulus. Pizotifen blocked the generalization of quipazine fully, that of 5-OMe-DMT only partially, and that of ipsapirone not at all. These data indicate that the 5-HT1A receptor subtype is strongly involved in the transduction of the interoceptive discriminative stimuli induced by 5-OMe-DMT, with 5-HT2 agonism also playing a possible role. PMID:3122248

  9. The GPCR, class C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6A) receptor: from cloning to physiological function

    PubMed Central

    Clemmensen, C; Smajilovic, S; Wellendorph, P; Bräuner-Osborne, H

    2014-01-01

    GPRC6A (GPCR, class C, group 6, subtype A) is a class C GPCR that has been cloned from human, mouse and rat. Several groups have shown that the receptor is activated by a range of basic and small aliphatic L-α-amino acids of which L-arginine, L-lysine and L-ornithine are the most potent compounds with EC50 values in the mid-micromolar range. In addition, several groups have shown that the receptor is either directly activated or positively modulated by divalent cations such as Ca2+ albeit in concentrations above 5 mM, which is above the physiological concentration in most tissues. More recently, the peptide osteocalcin and the steroid testosterone have also been suggested to be endogenous GPRC6A agonists. The receptor is widely expressed in all three species which, along with the omnipresence of the amino acids and divalent cation ligands, suggest that the receptor could be involved in a broad range of physiological functions. So far, this has mainly been addressed by analyses of genetically modified mice where the GPRC6A receptor has been ablated. Although there has been some discrepancies among results reported from different groups, there is increasing evidence that the receptor is involved in regulation of inflammation, metabolism and endocrine functions. GPRC6A could thus be an interesting target for new drugs in these therapeutic areas. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of GPCRs. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-5 PMID:24032653

  10. Structure-activity relationships of new analogues of arecaidine propargyl ester at muscarinic M1 and M2 receptor subtypes.

    PubMed Central

    Moser, U.; Lambrecht, G.; Wagner, M.; Wess, J.; Mutschler, E.

    1989-01-01

    1. The potency of arecaidine propargyl ester (APE) and of several analogues containing a modified ester side chain has been assessed at M1 and M2 muscarinic receptor subtypes. APE was shown to act as a potent agonist at ganglionic M1 receptors in the pithed rat, at M2 receptors in guinea-pig isolated atria (-log EC50 = 8.22) and ileum (-log EC50 = 7.77). 2. The arecaidine 2-butynyl and 2-pentynyl esters were approximately equipotent with APE at M1 and M2 receptors, whereas the 2-hexynyl derivative was found to be less potent than APE in atria (-log EC50 = 6.80) and ileum (-log EC50 = 6.70) by about one order of magnitude. The 2-heptynyl and 3-phenyl propargyl esters exhibited no agonist actions in atria and ileum. 3. Shifting the triple bond from the 2 to the 3 position and introducing a bulky group at position 1 of the ester side chain of APE and analogues resulted in competitive antagonists (pA2 ranging from 4.9 to 7.3). 4. APE and its 2-butynyl analogue showed some agonistic selectivity for cardiac M2 receptors (potency ratio, ileum/atria = 2.8 and 4.6 respectively). All antagonists in this series of compounds were not selective in terms of affinity since their pA2 values at cardiac and ileal M2 receptors were similar (potency ratios, ileum/atria = 0.4 to 1.2). PMID:2924082

  11. A Novel Selective Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtype 1 Antagonist Reduces Seizures without Impairing Hippocampus-Dependent LearningS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Sheffler, Douglas J.; Williams, Richard; Bridges, Thomas M.; Xiang, Zixiu; Kane, Alexander S.; Byun, Nellie E.; Jadhav, Satyawan; Mock, Mathew M.; Zheng, Fang; Lewis, L. Michelle; Jones, Carrie K.; Niswender, Colleen M.; Weaver, Charles D.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Conn, P. Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that selective antagonists of specific subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) may provide a novel approach for the treatment of certain central nervous system (CNS) disorders, including epileptic disorders, Parkinson's disease, and dystonia. Unfortunately, previously reported antagonists are not highly selective for specific mAChR subtypes, making it difficult to definitively establish the functional roles and therapeutic potential for individual subtypes of this receptor subfamily. The M1 mAChR is of particular interest as a potential target for treatment of CNS disorders. We now report the discovery of a novel selective antagonist of M1 mAChRs, termed VU0255035 [N-(3-oxo-3-(4-(pyridine-4-yl)piperazin-1-yl)propyl)-benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole-4 sulfonamide]. Equilibrium radioligand binding and functional studies demonstrate a greater than 75-fold selectivity of VU0255035 for M1 mAChRs relative to M2-M5. Molecular pharmacology and mutagenesis studies indicate that VU0255035 is a competitive orthosteric antagonist of M1 mAChRs, a surprising finding given the high level of M1 mAChR selectivity relative to other orthosteric antagonists. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings demonstrate that VU0255035 inhibits potentiation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor currents by the muscarinic agonist carbachol in hippocampal pyramidal cells. VU0255035 has excellent brain penetration in vivo and is efficacious in reducing pilocarpine-induced seizures in mice. We were surprised to find that doses of VU0255035 that reduce pilocarpine-induced seizures do not induce deficits in contextual freezing, a measure of hippocampus-dependent learning that is disrupted by nonselective mAChR antagonists. Taken together, these data suggest that selective antagonists of M1 mAChRs do not induce the severe cognitive deficits seen with nonselective mAChR antagonists and could provide a novel approach for the treatment certain of CNS disorders. PMID:19407080

  12. Role of astrocytic leptin receptor subtypes on leptin permeation across hCMEC/D3 human brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hsuchou, Hung; Kastin, Abba J; Tu, Hong; Joan Abbott, N; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Pan, Weihong

    2010-12-01

    Astrocytic leptin receptors (ObR) can be up-regulated in conditions such as adult-onset obesity. To determine whether the levels and subtypes of astrocytic ObR modulate leptin transport, we co-cultured hCMEC/D3 human brain endothelial cells and C6 astrocytoma cells in the Transwell system, and tested leptin permeation from apical to basolateral chambers. In comparison with hCMEC alone, co-culture of C6 cells reduced the permeability of paracellular markers and leptin. Unexpectedly, ObRb over-expression in C6 cells increased leptin permeation whereas ObRa over-expression showed no effect when compared with the control group of pcDNA-transfected C6 cells. By contrast, the paracellular permeability to the sodium fluorescein control was unchanged by over-expression of ObR subtypes. Leptin remained intact after crossing the monolayer as shown by HPLC and acid precipitation, and this was not affected by C6 cell co-culture or the over-expression of different ObR subtypes. Thus, increased expression of ObRb (and to a lesser extent ObRe) in C6 cells specifically increased the permeation of leptin across the hCMEC monolayer. Consistent with the evidence that the most apparent regulatory changes of ObR during obesity and inflammation occur in astrocytes, the results indicate that astrocytes actively regulate leptin transport across the blood-brain barrier, a mechanism independent of reduction of paracellular permeability. PMID:20977476

  13. Distribution of dopamine D1-D4 receptor subtypes in human dorsal vagal complex.

    PubMed

    Hyde, T M; Knable, M B; Murray, A M

    1996-11-01

    The distribution of D1/D5, D2/D3, D2/D3/D4, and individually, putative D2-D4 receptors across the dorsal vagal complex of the human medulla was assessed with quantitative receptor autoradiography. D1/D5 receptors were found in very low levels. D2 receptors were concentrated in the intermediate and medial subnuclei of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), and in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMN), while D3 receptors were more homogeneous across the entire NTS, area postrema (AP), and DMN. In contrast, D4 receptors were found almost exclusively in the intermediate and medial subnuclei of the NTS, and in the DMN. These findings suggest that the "D2 family" of receptors is an important component of brain stem mechanisms regulating visceral function, including gastrointestinal systems, such as emesis, along with cardiovascular and pulmonary systems. Compounds with individual selectivity for D2, D3, or D4 receptors may be useful in the manipulation of neural networks regulating these visceral systems. PMID:8923662

  14. Differential effects of subtype-specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists on early and late hippocampal LTP.

    PubMed

    Kroker, Katja S; Rast, Georg; Rosenbrock, Holger

    2011-12-01

    Brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are involved in several neuropsychiatric disorders, e.g. Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, Tourette's syndrome, schizophrenia, depression, autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and anxiety. Currently, approaches selectively targeting the activation of specific nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are in clinical development for treatment of memory impairment of Alzheimer's disease patients. These are α4β2 and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists which are believed to enhance cholinergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission, respectively. In order to gain a better insight into the mechanistic role of these two nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in learning and memory, we investigated the effects of the α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist TC-1827 and the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist SSR180711 on hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), a widely accepted cellular experimental model of memory formation. Generally, LTP is distinguished in an early and a late form, the former being protein-synthesis independent and the latter being protein-synthesis dependent. TC-1827 was found to increase early LTP in a bell-shaped dose dependent manner, but did not affect late LTP. In contrast, the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist SSR180711 showed enhancing effects on both early and late LTP in a bell-shaped manner. Furthermore, SSR180711 not only increased early LTP, but also transformed it into late LTP, which was not observed with the α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist. Therefore, based on these findings α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (partial) agonists appear to exhibit stronger efficacy on memory improvement than α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists. PMID:21968142

  15. Cloning, molecular characterization, and chromosomal assignment of a gene encoding a second D1 dopamine receptor subtype: differential expression pattern in rat brain compared with the D1A receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Tiberi, M; Jarvie, K R; Silvia, C; Falardeau, P; Gingrich, J A; Godinot, N; Bertrand, L; Yang-Feng, T L; Fremeau, R T; Caron, M G

    1991-01-01

    Multiple D1 dopaminergic receptor subtypes have been postulated on the basis of pharmacological, biochemical, and genetic studies. We describe the isolation and characterization of a rat gene encoding a dopamine receptor that is structurally and functionally similar to the D1 dopamine receptor. The coding region, which is intronless, encodes a protein of 475 amino acids (Mr 52,834) with structural features that are consistent with receptors coupled to guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins. The expressed protein binds dopaminergic ligands and mediates stimulation of adenylyl cyclase with pharmacological properties similar to those of the D1 dopamine receptor. The gene encoding the human homologue of this receptor subtype is located to the short arm of chromosome 4 (4p16.3), the same region as the Huntington disease gene. In striking contrast to the previously cloned D1 receptor, little or no mRNA for the receptor described here was observed in striatum, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, and frontal cortex. High levels of mRNA for this receptor were found in distinct layers of the hippocampus, the mammillary nuclei, and the anterior pretectal nuclei, brain regions that have been shown to exhibit little or no D1 dopamine receptor binding. On the basis of its properties we propose that this dopamine receptor subtype be called D1B. Images PMID:1831904

  16. Cloning, molecular characterization, and chromosomal assignment of a gene encoding a second D sub 1 dopamine receptor subtype: Differential expression pattern in rat brain compared with the D sup 1A receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Tiberi, M.; Jarvie, K.R.; Silvia, C.; Falardeau, P.; Gingrich, J.A.; Godinot, N.; Bertrand, L.; Fremeau, R.T. Jr.; Caron, M.G. ); Yang-Feng, T.L. )

    1991-09-01

    Multiple D{sub 1} dopaminergic receptor subtypes have been postulated on the basis of pharmacological, biochemical, and genetic studies. The authors describe the isolation and characterization of a rat gene encoding a dopamine receptor that is structurally and functionally similar to the D{sub 1} dopamine receptor. The coding region, which is intronless, encodes a protein of 475 amino acids (M{sub r} 52,834) with structural features that are consistent with receptors coupled to guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins. The expressed protein binds dopaminergic ligands and mediates stimulation of adenylyl cyclase with pharmacological properties similar to those of the D{sub 1} dopamine receptor. The gene encoding the human homologue of this receptor subtype is located to the short arm of chromosome 4 (4p16.3), the same region as the Huntington disease gene. In striking contrast to the previously cloned D{sub 1} receptor, little or no mRNA for the receptor described here was observed in striatum, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, and frontal cortex. High levels of mRNA for this receptor were found in distinct layers of the hippocampus, the mammillary nuclei, and the anterior pretectal nuclei, brain regions that have been shown to exhibit little or no D{sub 1} dopamine receptor binding. On the basis of its properties the authors propose that this dopamine receptor subtype be called D{sub 1B}.

  17. Determinants involved in subtype-specific functions of rat trace amine-associated receptors 1 and 4

    PubMed Central

    Stäubert, C; Bohnekamp, J; Schöneberg, T

    2013-01-01

    Aims The trace amine-associated receptor (Taar) family displays high species- and subtype-specific pharmacology. Several trace amines such as β-phenylethylamine (β-PEA), p-tyramine and tryptamine are agonists at TA1 but poorly activate rat and mouse Taar4. Principal Results Using rat TA1 and Taar4 chimera, we identified determinants in transmembrane helices 3 and 6, which, when replaced by the corresponding portion of rat TA1, can rescue cell surface expression of rat Taar4. When expressed at the cell surface, rat Taar4 pharmacology was very similar to that of TA1 and coupled to the Gαs-protein/AC pathway. Our data suggest that binding pockets of Taar for surrogate agonists overlap between paralogs. Conclusions This implicates that the repertoire of Taar ensures functional redundancy, tissue- and cell-specific expression and/or different downstream signalling rather than different agonist specificity. PMID:23072560

  18. The Association of Low-To-Moderate Alcohol Consumption with Breast Cancer Subtypes Defined by Hormone Receptor Status

    PubMed Central

    Strumylaite, Loreta; Sharp, Stephen J.; Kregzdyte, Rima; Poskiene, Lina; Bogusevicius, Algirdas; Pranys, Darius

    2015-01-01

    Background Alcohol is a well-established risk factor for breast cancer, but pathways involved in alcohol-related breast carcinogenesis are not clearly defined. We examined the association between low-to-moderate alcohol intake and breast cancer subtypes by tumor hormone receptor status. Materials and Methods A hospital-based case-control study was performed in 585 cases and 1,170 controls. Information on alcohol intake and other risk factors was collected via a questionnaire. Logistic regression was used for analyses. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results The odds ratio of breast cancer was 1.75 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.21–2.53) in women who consumed ≤5 drinks/week, and 3.13 (95% CI: 1.81–5.43) in women who consumed >5 drinks/week, both compared with non-drinkers for ≥10 years, after adjustment for age and other confounders. The association of alcohol intake with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer was stronger than with estrogen receptor-negative: the odds ratio per 1 category increase was 2.05 (95% CI: 1.49–2.82) and 1.29 (95% CI: 0.85–1.94) (P-heterogeneity = 0.07). There was no evidence of an interaction between alcohol intake and menopausal status (P = 0.19) in overall group; however, it was significant in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer (P = 0.04). Conclusions Low-to-moderate alcohol intake is associated with the risk of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer with the strongest association in postmenopausal women. Since alcohol intake is a modifiable risk factor of breast cancer, every woman should be informed and advised to control alcohol use. PMID:26674340

  19. miR-155 functions downstream of angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 and calcineurin to regulate cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Zhou, Yong; Cao, Zheng; Tong, Xin Zhu; Xie, Hua Qiang; Luo, Tao; Hua, Xian Ping; Wang, Han Qin

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by maladaptive tissue remodeling that may lead to heart failure or sudden death. MicroRNAs (miRs) are negative regulators of angiotensin II and the angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 (AGTR1), which are two components involved in cardiac hypertrophy. In the present study, the interaction between angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 (AGTR1) signaling and miR-155 was investigated. Rat H9C2 (2–1) cardiomyocytes were transfected with miR-155 analogues or inhibitors, then stimulated with angiotensin II to induce cardiac hypertrophy. miR-155 expression was revealed to be altered following transfection with chemically-modified miR-155 analogues and inhibitors in rat cardiomyocytes. In cell cardiac hypertrophy models, the cell surface area, AGTR1, atrial natriuretic peptide and myosin heavy chain-β mRNA expression levels were revealed to be lower in cells stimulated with miR-155 analogue-transfected cells treated with angiotensin II compared with cells stimulated with angiotensin alone (P<0.05), as determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), quantitative PCR and western blot analyses. Furthermore, calcineurin mRNA and protein, intracellular free calcium and nuclear factor of activated T-cells-4 proteins were downregulated in miR-155 analogue-transfected cells treated with angiotensin II, as compared with cells stimulated with angiotensin II alone (P<0.05). In conclusion, the current study indicates that miR-155 may improve cardiac hypertrophy by downregulating AGTR1 and suppressing the calcium signaling pathways activated by AGTR1. PMID:27588076

  20. Two Affinity Sites of the Cannabinoid Subtype 2 Receptor Identified by a Novel Homogeneous Binding Assay.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pinilla, Eva; Rabal, Obdulia; Reyes-Resina, Irene; Zamarbide, Marta; Navarro, Gemma; Sánchez-Arias, Juan A; de Miguel, Irene; Lanciego, José L; Oyarzabal, Julen; Franco, Rafael

    2016-09-01

    Endocannabinoids act on G protein-coupled receptors that are considered potential targets for a variety of diseases. There are two different cannabinoid receptor types: ligands for cannabinoid type 2 receptors (CB2Rs) show more promise than those for cannabinoid type 1 receptors (CB1Rs) because they lack psychotropic actions. However, the complex pharmacology of these receptors, coupled with the lipophilic nature of ligands, is delaying the translational success of medications targeting the endocannabinoid system. We here report the discovery and synthesis of a fluorophore-conjugated CB2R-selective compound, CM-157 (3-[[4-[2-tert-butyl-1-(tetrahydropyran-4-ylmethyl)benzimidazol-5-yl]sulfonyl-2-pyridyl]oxy]propan-1-amine), which was useful for pharmacological characterization of CB2R by using a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay. This methodology does not require radiolabeled compounds and may be undertaken in homogeneous conditions and in living cells (i.e., without the need to isolate receptor-containing membranes). The affinity of the labeled compound was similar to that of the unlabeled molecule. Time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer assays disclosed a previously unreported second affinity site and showed conformational changes in CB2R forming receptor heteromers with G protein-coupled receptor GPR55, a receptor for l-α-lysophosphatidylinositol. The populations displaying subnanomolar and nanomolar affinities were undisclosed in competitive assays using a well known cannabinoid receptor ligand, AM630 (1-[2-(morpholin-4-yl)ethyl]-2-methyl-3-(4-methoxybenzoyl)-6-iodoindole), and TH-chrysenediol, not previously tested on binding to cannabinoid receptors. Variations in binding parameters upon formation of dimers with GPR55 may reflect decreases in binding sites or alterations of the quaternary structure of the macromolecular G protein-coupled receptor complexes. In summary, the homogeneous binding assay described here may

  1. Diet-Induced Regulation of Bitter Taste Receptor Subtypes in the Mouse Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Vegezzi, Gaia; Anselmi, Laura; Huynh, Jennifer; Barocelli, Elisabetta; Rozengurt, Enrique; Raybould, Helen; Sternini, Catia

    2014-01-01

    Bitter taste receptors and signaling molecules, which detect bitter taste in the mouth, are expressed in the gut mucosa. In this study, we tested whether two distinct bitter taste receptors, the bitter taste receptor 138 (T2R138), selectively activated by isothiocyanates, and the broadly tuned bitter taste receptor 108 (T2R108) are regulated by luminal content. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that T2R138 transcript is more abundant in the colon than the small intestine and lowest in the stomach, whereas T2R108 mRNA is more abundant in the stomach compared to the intestine. Both transcripts in the stomach were markedly reduced by fasting and restored to normal levels after 4 hours re-feeding. A cholesterol-lowering diet, mimicking a diet naturally low in cholesterol and rich in bitter substances, increased T2R138 transcript, but not T2R108, in duodenum and jejunum, and not in ileum and colon. Long-term ingestion of high-fat diet increased T2R138 RNA, but not T2R108, in the colon. Similarly, α-gustducin, a bitter taste receptor signaling molecule, was reduced by fasting in the stomach and increased by lowering cholesterol in the small intestine and by high-fat diet in the colon. These data show that both short and long term changes in the luminal contents alter expression of bitter taste receptors and associated signaling molecules in the mucosa, supporting the proposed role of bitter taste receptors in luminal chemosensing in the gastrointestinal tract. Bitter taste receptors might serve as regulatory and defensive mechanism to control gut function and food intake and protect the body from the luminal environment. PMID:25238152

  2. Serotonin homeostasis and serotonin receptors as actors of cortical construction: special attention to the 5-HT3A and 5-HT6 receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Vitalis, Tania; Ansorge, Mark S.; Dayer, Alexandre G.

    2013-01-01

    Cortical circuits control higher-order cognitive processes and their function is highly dependent on their structure that emerges during development. The construction of cortical circuits involves the coordinated interplay between different types of cellular processes such as proliferation, migration, and differentiation of neural and glial cell subtypes. Among the multiple factors that regulate the assembly of cortical circuits, 5-HT is an important developmental signal that impacts on a broad diversity of cellular processes. 5-HT is detected at the onset of embryonic telencephalic formation and a variety of serotonergic receptors are dynamically expressed in the embryonic developing cortex in a region and cell-type specific manner. Among these receptors, the ionotropic 5-HT3A receptor and the metabotropic 5-HT6 receptor have recently been identified as novel serotonergic targets regulating different aspects of cortical construction including neuronal migration and dendritic differentiation. In this review, we focus on the developmental impact of serotonergic systems on the construction of cortical circuits and discuss their potential role in programming risk for human psychiatric disorders. PMID:23801939

  3. alpha. -Adrenergic vasoconstriction and receptor subtypes in large coronary arteries of calves

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.A.; Vatner, D.E.; Knight, D.R.; Graham, R.M.; Homcy, C.J.; Vatner, S.F. New England Regional Primate Research Center, Southborough, MA )

    1988-12-01

    The authors investigated {alpha}-adrenoceptor subtype distribution in large coronary arteries from both functional and biochemical perspectives. The effects of intracoronary administration of the selective {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine, of the selective {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenoceptor agonist B-HT 920 and of the mixed {alpha}{sub 1+2}-adrenoceptor agonist norepinephrine were examined on measurements of left circumflex coronary artery diameter in conscious calves. After {beta}-adrenergic blockade, equivalent reductions in large coronary artery diameter were observed with phenylephrine, B-HT, and norepinephrine. Phenylephrine-induced constrictions were abolished by prazosin, an {alpha}{sub 1}-selective antagonist, but unaffected by rauwolscine, an {alpha}{sub 2}-selective antagonist. Conversely, the B-HT-induced constriction was abolished by rauwolscine but unaffected by prazosin. Coronary constriction with norepinephrine was attenuated with either prazosin or rauwolscine and abolished by the two antagonists combined. Ligand-binding studies in which ({sup 3}H)prazosin and ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine and sarcolemmal membranes were used revealed an {alpha}{sub 1}-adrenoceptor density of 15 {plus minus} 3.1 fmol/mg protein with a dissociation constant (K{sub D}) of 0.7 {plus minus} 0.2 nM and an {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenoceptor density of 68 {plus minus} 5.1 fmol/mg protein, with a K{sub D} of 7.4 {plus minus} 1.2 nM. Thus large coronary arteries of the calf contain both {alpha}{sub 1}- and {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenoceptor subtypes, each of which elicits constriction of the large coronary artery in the conscious animal.

  4. Enhanced latent inhibition in dopamine receptor-deficient mice is sex-specific for the D1 but not D2 receptor subtype: implications for antipsychotic drug action.

    PubMed

    Bay-Richter, Cecilie; O'Tuathaigh, Colm M P; O'Sullivan, Gerard; Heery, David M; Waddington, John L; Moran, Paula M

    2009-04-01

    Latent inhibition (LI) is reduced learning to a stimulus that has previously been experienced without consequence. It is an important model of abnormal allocation of salience to irrelevant information in patients with schizophrenia. In rodents LI is abolished by psychotomimetic drugs and in experimental conditions where LI is low in controls, its expression is enhanced by antipsychotic drugs with activity at dopamine (DA) receptors. It is however unclear what the independent contributions of DA receptor subtypes are to these effects. This study therefore examined LI in congenic DA D1 and D2 receptor knockout (D1 KO and D2 KO) mice. Conditioned suppression of drinking was used as the measure of learning in the LI procedure. Both male and female DA D2 KO mice showed clear enhancement of LI reproducing antipsychotic drug effects in the model. Unexpectedly, enhancement was also seen in D1 KO female mice but not in D1 KO male mice. This sex-specific pattern was not replicated in locomotor or motor coordination tasks nor in the effect of DA KOs on baseline learning in control groups indicating some specificity of the effect to LI. These data suggest that the dopaminergic mechanism underlying LI potentiation and possibly antipsychotic action may differ between the sexes, being mediated by D2 receptors in males but by both D1 and D2 receptors in females. These data suggest that the DA D1 receptor may prove an important target for understanding sex differences in the mechanisms of action of antipsychotic drugs and in the aetiology of aberrant salience allocation in schizophrenia. PMID:19012810

  5. Identification of four areas each enriched in a unique muscarinic receptor subtype

    SciTech Connect

    Hoss, W.; Ellerbrock, B.R.; Goldman, P.S.; Collins, D.A.; Messer, W.S. Jr. )

    1990-01-01

    The affinities of muscarinic agonists and antagonists were determined by autoradiography and image analysis in selected areas of the rat brain. IC{sub 50} values and Hill coefficients for the inhibition of the binding of 0.2 nM ({sup 3}H)-QNB to dentate gyrus, superior colliculus, rhomboid thalamus and substantia nigra were measured in coronal sections. Pirenzepine displayed a high affinity for receptors in the dentate gyrus and AF-DX 116, the superior colliculus. Both pirenzepine and AF-DX 116 had high affinities for the substantia nigra and low affinities for the rhomboid thalamus. Gallamine displayed a 50-fold preference for superior colliculus over dentate gyrus receptors. Amitriptyline was less selective, showing a modest preference for substantia nigra receptors and 4-DAMP was essentially nonselective. Carbachol was the most selective agonist with a 4000-fold preference for superior colliculus over dentate gyrus receptors. Other agonists except RS 86 were also selective for superior colliculus receptors in the order carbachol >> arecoline > bethanechol > McN A343 = oxotremorine = pilocarpine.

  6. X-ray structure, symmetry and mechanism of an AMPA-subtype glutamate receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolevsky, Alexander I.; Rosconi, Michael P.; Gouaux, Eric

    2010-02-02

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors mediate most excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system and function by opening a transmembrane ion channel upon binding of glutamate. Despite their crucial role in neurobiology, the architecture and atomic structure of an intact ionotropic glutamate receptor are unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of the {alpha}-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA)-sensitive, homotetrameric, rat GluA2 receptor at 3.6 {angstrom} resolution in complex with a competitive antagonist. The receptor harbours an overall axis of two-fold symmetry with the extracellular domains organized as pairs of local dimers and with the ion channel domain exhibiting four-fold symmetry. A symmetry mismatch between the extracellular and ion channel domains is mediated by two pairs of conformationally distinct subunits, A/C and B/D. Therefore, the stereochemical manner in which the A/C subunits are coupled to the ion channel gate is different from the B/D subunits. Guided by the GluA2 structure and site-directed cysteine mutagenesis, we suggest that GluN1 and GluN2A NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors have a similar architecture, with subunits arranged in a 1-2-1-2 pattern. We exploit the GluA2 structure to develop mechanisms of ion channel activation, desensitization and inhibition by non-competitive antagonists and pore blockers.

  7. Human alpha 2-adrenergic receptor subtype distribution: widespread and subtype-selective expression of alpha 2C10, alpha 2C4, and alpha 2C2 mRNA in multiple tissues.

    PubMed

    Eason, M G; Liggett, S B

    1993-07-01

    At present, molecular cloning and pharmacological studies have delineated three human alpha 2-adrenergic receptor (alpha 2AR) subtypes, alpha 2C10, alpha 2C4, and alpha 2C2. Assignment of the alpha 2AR subtypes to specific functions has been limited by an unclear definition of tissue alpha 2AR expression outside of the central nervous system. It has been suggested that alpha 2C4 expression is confined to the brain, that alpha 2C2 expression is only in the liver and kidney, and that there is nearly ubiquitous expression of alpha 2C10. However, this is based on studies of a limited number of rat tissues or on studies using non-species-specific approaches. Therefore, to define alpha 2C10, alpha 2C4, and alpha 2C2 tissue expression, we used reverse transcription of total RNA isolated from 20 human tissues, followed by amplification of alpha 2AR cDNA using the polymerase chain reaction. This technique provided two advantages: high sensitivity and, with the use of subtype-specific oligonucleotide primers and probes, differentiation between the alpha 2AR subtypes. The tissues studied were aorta, vena cava, heart (epicardium and endocardium), lung, skeletal muscle, liver, pancreas (head and tail), fat (perinephric and subcutaneous), kidney (cortex and medulla), prostate, stomach, ileum, jejunum, colon, adrenal gland, and spleen. We found that the majority of these tissues expressed alpha 2C10, with the exceptions being the head of the pancreas, subcutaneous fat, colon, and spleen. In marked distinction to other studies, however, we found a prolific expression of the alpha 2C4 and alpha 2C2 subtypes. Expression of alpha 2C4 was found in all tissues with the exception of liver, fat, stomach, and colon, and a virtually ubiquitous expression of alpha 2C2 was found, with the exception of epicardium. Of all tissues studied, only colon and subcutaneous fat expressed a single alpha 2AR subtype, which was alpha 2C2. Thus, the alpha 2AR subtypes do not have a confined expression but

  8. Axospinous synaptic subtype-specific differences in structure, size, ionotropic receptor expression, and connectivity in apical dendritic regions of rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Daniel A.; Geinisman, Yuri

    2008-01-01

    The morphology of axospinous synapses and their parent spines varies widely. Additionally, many of these synapses are contacted by multiple synapse boutons (MSBs) and show substantial variability in receptor expression. The two major axospinous synaptic subtypes are perforated and nonperforated, but there are several subcategories within these two classes. The present study used serial section electron microscopy to determine whether perforated and nonperforated synaptic subtypes differed with regard to their distribution, size, receptor expression, and connectivity to MSBs in three apical dendritic regions of rat hippocampal area CA1: the proximal and distal thirds of stratum radiatum, and stratum lacunosum-moleculare. All synaptic subtypes were present throughout the apical dendritic regions, but there were several subclass-specific differences. First, segmented, completely partitioned synapses changed in number, proportion, and AMPA receptor expression with distance from the soma beyond that found within other perforated synaptic subtypes. Second, atypically large nonperforated synapses showed NMDA receptor immunoreactivity identical to perforated synapses, levels of AMPA receptor expression intermediate to nonperforated and perforated synapses, and perforated synapse-like changes in structure with distance from the soma. Finally, MSB connectivity was highest in proximal stratum radiatum, but only for those MSBs comprised of nonperforated synapses. The immunogold data suggest that most MSBs would not generate simultaneous depolarizations in multiple neurons or spines, however, because the vast majority of MSBs are comprised of two synapses with abnormally low levels of receptor expression, or involve one synapse with a high level of receptor expression and another with only a low level. PMID:19006199

  9. The oxytocin/vasopressin receptor family has at least five members in the gnathostome lineage, inclucing two distinct V2 subtypes.

    PubMed

    Ocampo Daza, Daniel; Lewicka, Michalina; Larhammar, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The vertebrate oxytocin and vasopressin receptors form a family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that mediate a large variety of functions, including social behavior and the regulation of blood pressure, water balance and reproduction. In mammals four family members have been identified, three of which respond to vasopressin (VP) named V1A, V1B and V2, and one of which is activated by oxytocin (OT), called the OT receptor. Four receptors have been identified in chicken as well, but these have received different names. Until recently only V1-type receptors have been described in several species of teleost fishes. We have identified family members in several gnathostome genomes and performed phylogenetic analyses to classify OT/VP-receptors across species and determine orthology relationships. Our phylogenetic tree identifies five distinct ancestral gnathostome receptor subtypes in the OT/VP receptor family: V1A, V1B, V2A, V2B and OT receptors. The existence of distinct V2A and V2B receptors has not been previously recognized. We have found these two subtypes in all examined teleost genomes as well as in available frog and lizard genomes and conclude that the V2A-type is orthologous to mammalian V2 receptors whereas the V2B-type is orthologous to avian V2 receptors. Some teleost fishes have acquired additional and more recent gene duplicates with up to eight receptor family members. Thus, this analysis reveals an unprecedented complexity in the gnathostome repertoire of OT/VP receptors, opening interesting research avenues regarding functions such as regulation of water balance, reproduction and behavior, particularly in reptiles, amphibians, teleost fishes and cartilaginous fishes. PMID:22057000

  10. Estrogen Receptors Alpha (ERα) and Beta (ERβ): Subtype-Selective Ligands and Clinical Potential

    PubMed Central

    Paterni, Ilaria; Granchi, Carlotta; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Minutolo, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptors alpha (ERα) and beta (ERβ) are nuclear transcription factors that are involved in the regulation of many complex physiological processes in humans. Modulation of these receptors by prospective therapeutic agents is currently being considered for prevention and treatment of a wide variety of pathological conditions, such as, cancer, metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, neurodegeneration, inflammation, and osteoporosis. This review provides an overview and update of compounds that have been recently reported as modulators of ERs, with a particular focus on their potential clinical applications. PMID:24971815

  11. Anatomical characterization of bombesin receptor subtype-3 mRNA expression in the rodent central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Parks, Gregory S; Wang, Zhiwei; Wang, Lien; Lew, Michelle; Civelli, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    Bombesin receptor subtype-3 (BRS-3) is an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis. Mice deficient in BRS-3 develop late-onset mild obesity with metabolic defects, while synthetic agonists activating BRS-3 show antiobesity profiles by inhibiting food intake and increasing metabolic rate in rodent models. The molecular mechanisms and the neural circuits responsible for these effects, however, remain elusive and demand better characterization. We report here a comprehensive mapping of BRS-3 mRNA in the rat and mouse brain through in situ hybridization. Furthermore, to investigate the neurochemical characteristics of the BRS-3-expressing neurons, double in situ hybridization was performed to determine whether BRS-3 colocalizes with other neurotransmitters or neuropeptides. Many, but not all, of the BRS-3-expressing neurons were found to be glutamatergic, while few were found to be cholinergic or GABAergic. BRS-3-containing neurons do not express some of the well-characterized neuropeptides, such as neuropeptide Y (NPY), proopiomelanocortin (POMC), orexin/hypocretin, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), and kisspeptin. Interestingly, BRS-3 mRNA was found to partially colocalize with corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), suggesting novel interactions of BRS-3 with stress- and growth-related endocrine systems. Our study provides important information for evaluating BRS-3 as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity. PMID:22911445

  12. Lack of the Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 7 Selectively Modulates Theta Rhythm and Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holscher, Christian; Schmid, Susanne; Pilz, Peter K. D.; Sansig, Gilles; van der Putten, Herman; Plappert, Claudia F.

    2005-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are known to play a role in synaptic plasticity and learning. We have previously shown that mGluR7 deletion in mice produces a selective working memory (WM) impairment, while other types of memory such as reference memory remain unaffected. Since WM has been associated with Theta activity (6-12 Hz) in…

  13. Data on alteration of hormone and growth factor receptor profiles over progressive passages of breast cancer cell lines representing different clinical subtypes.

    PubMed

    Nair, Madhumathy G; Desai, Krisha; Prabhu, Jyothi S; Hari, P S; Remacle, Jose; Sridhar, T S

    2016-09-01

    Human breast cancers are a highly heterogeneous group of tumours consisting of several molecular subtypes with a variable profile of hormone, growth factor receptors and cytokeratins [1]. Here, the data shows immunofluorescence profiling of four different cell lines belonging to distinct clinical subtypes of breast cancer. Post revival, the cell lines were passaged in culture and immunophenotyping was done for ER, HER-2, AR and EGFR. Data for the markers from early passage (5th) through passages as late as 25 for the different cell lines is presented. PMID:27508248

  14. Improvements in the methodology for analyzing receptor subtypes and neuronal populations affected by anticholinesterase exposure. Annual summary report, 15 November 1983-14 November 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Wamsley, J.K.

    1984-11-14

    Conditions were defined that provide a means of selectively labeling subtypes of muscarinic receptors. The so-called M1 receptor population can be labeled with tritiated pirenzepine, while the receptor population labeled with tritiated quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) but not labeled with pirenzepine represents M2 receptor population. High- and low-affinity states of the receptors were also defined on the basis of agonist displacement of antagonist binding. Both the M1 and M2 receptor populations undergo axonal transport and the affinity states of these receptors are altered by neurochemical and neurosurgical lesions. Radioactive standards were developed that provide a means of quantitating the femtomoles of receptor bound with each ligand in microscopic regions of the brain. The technology was also devised to directly localize nicotinic cholinergic receptors using tritiated nicotine. It is now possible to localize several peptide receptors associated with cholinergic function including receptors for thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and somatostatin. The receptor autoradiographic technique was also carried beyond the receptor level of localization by using compounds to label adenylate cyclase and the GTP binding protein. This methodology should provide an elegant means of determining how anticholinesterase exposure has affected these many parameters of cholinergic nerve function.

  15. Thyroid hormone regulation of gene expression in primary cerebrocortical cells: role of thyroid hormone receptor subtypes and interactions with retinoic acid and glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Gil-Ibáñez, Pilar; Bernal, Juan; Morte, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    The effects of thyroid hormone on brain development and function are largely mediated by the binding of 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3) to its nuclear receptors (TR) to regulate positively or negatively gene expression. We have analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction the effect of T3 on primary cultured cells from the embryonic mouse cerebral cortex, on the expression of Hr, Klf9, Shh, Dio3, Aldh1a1, and Aldh1a3. In particular we focused on T3 receptor specificity, and on the crosstalk between T3, retinoic acid and dexamethasone. To check for receptor subtype specificity we used cerebrocortical cells derived from wild type mice and from mice deficient in thyroid hormone receptor subtypes. Receptor subtype specificity was found for Dio3 and Aldh1a1, which were induced by T3 only in cells expressing the T3 receptor alpha 1 subtype. Interactions of T3 with retinoic acid signaling through the control of retinoic acid metabolism are likely to be important during development. T3 had opposing influences on retinoic acid synthesizing enzymes, increasing the expression of Aldh1a1, and decreasing Aldh1a3, while increasing the retinoic acid degrading enzyme Cyp26b1. Dexamethasone increased Klf9 and Aldh1a1 expression. The effects of T3 and dexamethasone on Aldh1a1 were highly synergistic, with mRNA increments of up to 20 fold. The results provide new data on thyroid hormone regulation of gene expression and underscore the importance of thyroid hormone interactions with retinoic acid and glucocorticoids during neural development. PMID:24618783

  16. Thyroid Hormone Regulation of Gene Expression in Primary Cerebrocortical Cells: Role of Thyroid Hormone Receptor Subtypes and Interactions with Retinoic Acid and Glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Ibáñez, Pilar; Bernal, Juan; Morte, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    The effects of thyroid hormone on brain development and function are largely mediated by the binding of 3,5,3′-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3) to its nuclear receptors (TR) to regulate positively or negatively gene expression. We have analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction the effect of T3 on primary cultured cells from the embryonic mouse cerebral cortex, on the expression of Hr, Klf9, Shh, Dio3, Aldh1a1, and Aldh1a3. In particular we focused on T3 receptor specificity, and on the crosstalk between T3, retinoic acid and dexamethasone. To check for receptor subtype specificity we used cerebrocortical cells derived from wild type mice and from mice deficient in thyroid hormone receptor subtypes. Receptor subtype specificity was found for Dio3 and Aldh1a1, which were induced by T3 only in cells expressing the T3 receptor alpha 1 subtype. Interactions of T3 with retinoic acid signaling through the control of retinoic acid metabolism are likely to be important during development. T3 had opposing influences on retinoic acid synthesizing enzymes, increasing the expression of Aldh1a1, and decreasing Aldh1a3, while increasing the retinoic acid degrading enzyme Cyp26b1. Dexamethasone increased Klf9 and Aldh1a1 expression. The effects of T3 and dexamethasone on Aldh1a1 were highly synergistic, with mRNA increments of up to 20 fold. The results provide new data on thyroid hormone regulation of gene expression and underscore the importance of thyroid hormone interactions with retinoic acid and glucocorticoids during neural development. PMID:24618783

  17. Muscarinic receptor subtypes controlling the cationic current in guinea-pig ileal smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zholos, Alexander V; Bolton, Thomas B

    1997-01-01

    The effects of muscarinic antagonists on cationic current evoked by activating muscarinic receptors with the stable agonist carbachol were studied by use of patch-clamp recording techniques in guinea-pig single ileal smooth muscle cells. Ascending concentrations of carbachol (3–300 μM) activated the cationic conductance in a concentration-dependent manner with conductance at a maximally effective carbachol concentration (Gmax) of 27.4±1.4 nS and a mean −log EC50 of 5.12±0.03 (mean±s.e.mean) (n=114). Muscarinic antagonists with higher affinity for the M2 receptor, methoctramine, himbacine and tripitramine, produced a parallel shift of the carbachol concentration-effect curve to the right in a concentration-dependent manner with pA2 values of 8.1, 8.0 and 9.1, respectively. All M3 selective muscarinic antagonists tested, 4-DAMP, p-F-HHSiD and zamifenacin, reduced the maximal response in a concentration-dependent and non-competitive manner. This effect could be observed even at concentrations which did not produce any increase in the EC50 for carbachol. At higher concentrations M3 antagonists shifted the agonist curve to the right, increasing the EC50, and depressed the maximum conductance response. Atropine, a non-selective antagonist, produced both reduction in Gmax (M3 effect) and significant increase in the EC50 (M2 effect) in the same concentration range. The depression of the conductance by 4-DAMP, zamifenacin and atropine could not be explained by channel block as cationic current evoked by adding GTPγS to the pipette (without application of carbachol) was unaffected. The results support the hypothesis that carbachol activates M2 muscarinic receptors so initiating the opening of cationic channels which cause depolarization; this effect is potentiated by an unknown mechanism when carbachol activates M3 receptors. As an increasing fraction of M3 receptors are blocked by an antagonist, the effects on cationic current of an increasing proportion of

  18. Replication characteristics of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) European subtype 1 (Lelystad) and subtype 3 (Lena) strains in nasal mucosa and cells of the monocytic lineage: indications for the use of new receptors of PRRSV (Lena)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that subtype 3 strains of European type porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) are more virulent/pathogenic than subtype 1 strains. This points to differences in the pathogenesis. In the present study, a new polarized nasal mucosa explant system was used to study the invasion of the low virulent subtype 1 PRRSV strain Lelystad (LV) and the highly virulent subtype 3 PRRSV strain Lena at the portal of entry. Different cell types of the monocytic lineage (alveolar macrophages (PAM), cultured blood monocytes and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDC)) were enclosed to examine replication kinetics of both strains in their putative target cells. At 0, 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours post inoculation (hpi), virus production was analyzed and the infected cells were quantified and identified. Lena replicated much more efficiently than LV in the nasal mucosa explants and to a lesser extent in PAM. Differences in replication were not found in monocytes and moDC. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that for LV, almost all viral antigen positive cells were CD163+Sialoadhesin (Sn)+, which were mainly located in the lamina propria of the respiratory mucosa. In Lena-infected nasal mucosa, CD163+Sn+, CD163+Sn- and to a lesser extent CD163-Sn- monocytic subtypes were involved in infection. CD163+Sn- cells were mostly located within or in the proximity of the epithelium. Our results show that, whereas LV replicates in a restricted subpopulation of CD163+Sn+ monocytic cells in the upper respiratory tract, Lena hijacks a broader range of subpopulations to spread within the mucosa. Replication in CD163+Sn- cells suggests that an alternative entry receptor may contribute to the wider tropism of Lena. PMID:24007551

  19. ML-18 is a non-peptide bombesin receptor subtype-3 antagonist which inhibits lung cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Moody, Terry W; Mantey, Samuel A; Moreno, Paola; Nakamura, Taichi; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Jensen, Robert T

    2015-02-01

    Bombesin receptor subtype (BRS)-3 is a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) for the bombesin (BB)-family of peptides. BRS-3 is an orphan GPCR and little is known of its physiological role due to the lack of specific agonists and antagonists. PD168368 is a nonpeptide antagonist for the neuromedin B (NMB) receptor (R) whereas PD176252 is a nonpeptide antagonist for the gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) R and NMBR but not BRS-3. Here nonpeptide analogs of PD176252 e.g. the S-enantiomer ML-18, and the R-enantiomer, EMY-98, were investigated as BRS-3 antagonists using lung cancer cells. ML-18 and EMY-98 inhibited specific (125)I-BA1 (DTyr-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-βAla-His-Phe-Nle-NH2)BB(6-14) binding to NCI-H1299 lung cancer cells stably transfected with BRS-3 with IC50 values of 4.8 and >100μM, respectively. In contrast, ML-18 bound with lower affinity to the GRPR and NMBR with IC50 values of 16 and >100μM, respectively. ML-18 (16μM), but not its enantiomer EMY-98, inhibited the ability of 10nM BA1 to elevate cytosolic Ca(2+) in a reversible manner using lung cancer cells loaded with FURA2-AM. ML-18 (16μM), but not EMY-98, inhibited the ability of 100nM BA1 to cause tyrosine phosphorylation of the EGFR and ERK in lung cancer cells. ML-18 but not EMY-98 inhibited the proliferation of lung cancer cells. The results indicate that ML-18 is a nonpeptide BRS-3 antagonist that should serve as a template to improve potency and selectivity. PMID:25554218

  20. Rapid antidepressant actions of scopolamine: Role of medial prefrontal cortex and M1-subtype muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Navarria, Andrea; Wohleb, Eric S; Voleti, Bhavya; Ota, Kristie T; Dutheil, Sophie; Lepack, Ashley E; Dwyer, Jason M; Fuchikami, Manabu; Becker, Astrid; Drago, Filippo; Duman, Ronald S

    2015-10-01

    Clinical studies demonstrate that scopolamine, a non-selective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAchR) antagonist, produces rapid therapeutic effects in depressed patients, and preclinical studies report that the actions of scopolamine require glutamate receptor activation and the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). The present study extends these findings to determine the role of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and specific muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M-AchR) subtypes in the actions of scopolamine. The administration of scopolamine increases the activity marker Fos in the mPFC, including the infralimbic (IL) and prelimbic (PrL) subregions. Microinfusions of scopolamine into either the IL or the PrL produced significant antidepressant responses in the forced swim test, and neuronal silencing of IL or PrL blocked the antidepressant effects of systemic scopolamine. The results also demonstrate that the systemic administration of a selective M1-AChR antagonist, VU0255035, produced an antidepressant response and stimulated mTORC1 signaling in the PFC, similar to the actions of scopolamine. Finally, we used a chronic unpredictable stress model as a more rigorous test of rapid antidepressant actions and found that a single dose of scopolamine or VU0255035 blocked the anhedonic response caused by CUS, an effect that requires the chronic administration of typical antidepressants. Taken together, these findings indicate that mPFC is a critical mediator of the behavioral actions of scopolamine and identify the M1-AChR as a therapeutic target for the development of novel and selective rapid-acting antidepressants. PMID:26102021

  1. Receptor subtypes and signal transduction mechanisms contributing to the estrogenic attenuation of cannabinoid-induced changes in energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Washburn, Neal; Borgquist, Amanda; Wang, Kate; Jeffery, Garrett S; Kelly, Martin J; Wagner, Edward J

    2013-01-01

    We examined the receptor subtypes and signal transduction mechanisms contributing to the estrogenic modulation of cannabinoid-induced changes in energy balance. Food intake and, in some cases, O2 consumption, CO2 production and the respiratory exchange ratio were evaluated in ovariectomized female guinea pigs treated s.c. with the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 or its cremephor/ethanol/0.9% saline vehicle, and either with estradiol benzoate (EB), the estrogen receptor (ER) α agonist PPT, the ERβ agonist DPN, the Gq-coupled membrane ER agonist STX, the GPR30 agonist G-1 or their respective vehicles. Patch-clamp recordings were performed in hypothalamic slices. EB, STX, PPT and G-1 decreased daily food intake. Of these, EB, STX and PPT blocked the WIN 55,212-2-induced increase in food intake within 1-4 h. The estrogenic diminution of cannabinoid-induced hyperphagia correlated with a rapid (within 15 min) attenuation of cannabinoid-mediated decreases in glutamatergic synaptic input onto arcuate neurons, which was completely blocked by inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) and attenuated by inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA). STX, but not PPT, mimicked this rapid estrogenic effect. However, PPT abolished the cannabinoid-induced inhibition of glutamatergic neurotransmission in cells from animals treated 24 h prior. The estrogenic antagonism of this presynaptic inhibition was observed in anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin neurons. These data reveal that estrogens negatively modulate cannabinoid-induced changes in energy balance via Gq-coupled membrane ER- and ERα-mediated mechanisms involving activation of PKC and PKA. As such, they further our understanding of the pathways through which estrogens act to temper cannabinoid sensitivity in regulating energy homeostasis in females. PMID:22538462

  2. Oxidative stress induces itch via activation of transient receptor potential subtype ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) in mice

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Tong; JI, Ru-Rong

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of oxidative stress in itch-indicative scratching behavior in mice, and furthermore, to define the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying oxidative stress-mediated itch. Methods Scratching behavior was induced by intradermal injection of oxidants, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP) into the nape of the neck in mice and observed for 30 min. Results Intradermal H2O2 (0.03-1%) or tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP, 1-30 μmol) elicited robust scratching behavior, displaying an inverted-U-shaped dose-related curve. Naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist, but not morphine, largely suppressed the oxidants-induced scratching. Chlorpheniramine, a histamine H1 receptor antagonist, blocked histamine but not oxidants-induced scratching, indicating the involvement of histamine-independent mechanism in oxidants-evoked itch. Further, resiniferatoxin (RTX) treatment abolished oxidants-induced scratching, suggesting an essential role of C-fibers. Notably, blockade of transient receptor potential subtype ankyryn 1 (TRPA1) by selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031, or genetic deletion of Trpa1 but not Trpv1 resulted in a profound reduction in H2O2-evoked scratching. Finally, systemic administration of the antioxidants N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) or trolox (a water-soluble vitamin E analogue) attenuated scratching induced by the oxidants. Conclusion Oxidative stress by different oxidants can induce profound scratching behavior, which is largely histamine and TRPV1-independent but TRPA1-dependent. Antioxidants and TRPA1 antagonists may be used to treat human itch conditions associated with oxidative stress. PMID:22466125

  3. Inhibition of protein kinase C decreases sensitivity of GABA receptor subtype to fipronil insecticide in insect neurosecretory cells.

    PubMed

    Murillo, Laurence; Hamon, Alain; Es-Salah-Lamoureux, Zeineb; Itier, Valérie; Quinchard, Sophie; Lapied, Bruno

    2011-12-01

    Phosphorylation by serine/threonine kinases has been described as a new mechanism for regulating the effects of insecticides on insect neuronal receptors and channels. Although insect GABA receptors are commercially important targets for insecticides (e.g. fipronil), their modulation by kinases is poorly understood and the influence of phosphorylation on insecticide sensitivity is unknown. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we investigated the modulatory effect of PKC and CaMKinase II on GABA receptor subtypes (GABAR1 and GABAR2) in DUM neurons isolated from the terminal abdominal ganglion (TAG) of Periplaneta americana. Chloride currents through GABAR2 were selectively abolished by PMA and PDBu (the PKC activators) and potentiated by Gö6983, an inhibitor of PKC. Furthermore, using KN-62, a specific CaMKinase II inhibitor, we demonstrated that CaMKinase II activation was also involved in the regulation of GABAR2 function. In addition, using CdCl(2) (the calcium channel blocker) and LOE-908, a blocker of TRPγ, we revealed that calcium influx through TRPγ played an important role in kinase activations. Comparative studies performed with CACA, a selective agonist of GABAR1 in DUM neurons confirmed the involvement of these kinases in the specific regulation of GABAR2. Furthermore, our study reported that GABAR1 was less sensitive than GABAR2 to fipronil. This was demonstrated by the biphasic concentration-response curve and the current-voltage relationship established with both GABA and CACA. Finally, we demonstrated that GABAR2 was 10-fold less sensitive to fipronil following inhibition of PKC, whereas inhibition of CaMKinase II did not alter the effect of fipronil. PMID:21684305

  4. Comparative pharmacology of bombesin receptor subtype-3, nonpeptide agonist MK-5046, a universal peptide agonist, and peptide antagonist Bantag-1 for human bombesin receptors.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Paola; Mantey, Samuel A; Nuche-Berenguer, Bernardo; Reitman, Marc L; González, Nieves; Coy, David H; Jensen, Robert T

    2013-10-01

    Bombesin-receptor-subtype-3 (BRS-3) is an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor of the bombesin (Bn) family whose natural ligand is unknown and which does not bind any natural Bn-peptide with high affinity. It is present in the central nervous system, peripheral tissues, and tumors; however, its role in normal physiology/pathophysiology is largely unknown because of the lack of selective ligands. Recently, MK-5046 [(2S)-1,1,1-trifluoro-2-[4-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)phenyl]-3-(4-{[1-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]methyl}-1H-imidazol-2-yl)propan-2-ol] and Bantag-1 [Boc-Phe-His-4-amino-5-cyclohexyl-2,4,5-trideoxypentonyl-Leu-(3-dimethylamino) benzylamide N-methylammonium trifluoroacetate], a nonpeptide agonist and a peptide antagonist, respectively, for BRS-3 have been described, but there have been limited studies on their pharmacology. We studied MK-5046 and Bantag-1 interactions with human Bn-receptors-human bombesin receptor subtype-3 (hBRS-3), gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRP-R), and neuromedin B receptor (NMB-R)-and compared them with the nonselective, peptide-agonist [d-Tyr6,βAla11,Phe13,Nle14]Bn-(6-14) (peptide #1). Receptor activation was detected by activation of phospholipase C (PLC), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin, and Akt. In hBRS-3 cells, the relative affinities were Bantag-1 (1.3 nM) > peptide #1 (2 nM) > MK-5046 (37-160 nM) > GRP, NMB (>10 μM), and the binding-dose-inhibition curves were broad (>4 logs), with Hill coefficients differing significantly from unity. Curve-fitting demonstrated high-affinity (MK-5046, Ki = 0.08 nM) and low-affinity (MK-5046, Ki = 11-29 nM) binding sites. For PLC activation in hBRS-3 cells, the relative potencies were MK-5046 (0.02 nM) > peptide #1 (6 nM) > GRP, NMB, Bantag-1 (>10 μM), and MK-5046 had a biphasic dose response, whereas peptide #1 was monophasic. Bantag-1 was a specific hBRS-3-antagonist. In hBRS-3 cells, MK-5046 was a full agonist for activation of MAPK, FAK, Akt

  5. Conformational Constraint of the Glycerol Moiety of Lysophosphatidylserine Affords Compounds with Receptor Subtype Selectivity.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sejin; Inoue, Asuka; Nakamura, Sho; Kishi, Takayuki; Uwamizu, Akiharu; Sayama, Misa; Ikubo, Masaya; Otani, Yuko; Kano, Kuniyuki; Makide, Kumiko; Aoki, Junken; Ohwada, Tomohiko

    2016-04-28

    Lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS) is an endogenous lipid mediator that specifically activates membrane proteins of the P2Y and its related families of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), GPR34 (LPS1), P2Y10 (LPS2), and GPR174 (LPS3). Here, in order to increase potency and receptor selectivity, we designed and synthesized LysoPS analogues containing the conformational constraints of the glycerol moiety. These reduced structural flexibility by fixation of the glycerol framework of LysoPS using a 2-hydroxymethyl-3-hydroxytetrahydropyran skeleton, and related structures identified compounds which exhibited high potency and selectivity for activation of GPR34 or P2Y10. Morphing of the structural shape of the 2-hydroxymethyl-3-hydroxytetrahydropyran skeleton into a planar benzene ring enhanced the P2Y10 activation potentcy rather than the GPR34 activation. PMID:27077565

  6. The Role of NMDA Receptor Subtypes in Short-Term Plasticity in the Rat Entorhinal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Sophie E. L.; Yang, Jian; Jones, Roland S. G.

    2008-01-01

    We have previously shown that spontaneous release of glutamate in the entorhinal cortex (EC) is tonically facilitated via activation of presynaptic NMDA receptors (NMDAr) containing the NR2B subunit. Here we show that the same receptors mediate short-term plasticity manifested by frequency-dependent facilitation of evoked glutamate release at these synapses. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made from layer V pyramidal neurones in rat EC slices. Evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents showed strong facilitation at relatively low frequencies (3 Hz) of activation. Facilitation was abolished by an NR2B-selective blocker (Ro 25-6981), but unaffected by NR2A-selective antagonists (Zn2+, NVP-AAM077). In contrast, postsynaptic NMDAr-mediated responses could be reduced by subunit-selective concentrations of all three antagonists. The data suggest that NMDAr involved in presynaptic plasticity in layer V are exclusively NR1/NR2B diheteromers, whilst postsynaptically they are probably a mixture of NR1/NR2A, NR1/NR2B diheteromers and NR1/NR2A/NR2B triheteromeric receptors. PMID:18989370

  7. Allosteric interactions of staurosporine and other indolocarbazoles with N-[methyl-(3)H]scopolamine and acetylcholine at muscarinic receptor subtypes: identification of a second allosteric site.

    PubMed

    Lazareno, S; Popham, A; Birdsall, N J

    2000-07-01

    We have studied the interactions of five indolocarbazoles with N-[methyl-(3)H]scopolamine (NMS) and unlabeled acetylcholine at M(1)-M(4) muscarinic receptors, using equilibrium and nonequilibrium radioligand binding studies. The results are consistent with an allosteric model in which the primary and allosteric ligands bind simultaneously to the receptor and modify each other's affinities. The compounds were generally most active at M(1) receptors. [(3)H]NMS binding was enhanced by staurosporine, KT5720, and KT5823 at M(1) and M(2) receptors, and by K-252a at M(1) receptors. Gö 7874 reduced [(3)H]NMS affinity by up to threefold for all subtypes. A range of cooperative effects with acetylcholine was seen, and, at the M(1) receptor, KT5720 had a log affinity of 6.4 and enhanced acetylcholine affinity by 40%. The compounds inhibited the dissociation of [(3)H]NMS to different extents across the receptor subtypes, with the largest effects at M(1) receptors. In equilibrium binding studies the inhibitory potency of gallamine at M(1) receptors was not affected by KT5720, indicating that these agents bind to two distinct allosteric sites and have neutral cooperativity with each other. In contrast, gallamine and staurosporine had a negatively cooperative or competitive interaction at M(1) receptors. Similarly, the potency and relative effectiveness of KT5720 for inhibiting [(3)H]NMS dissociation from M(1) receptors were not affected by gallamine or brucine, but were affected in a complex manner by staurosporine. These results demonstrate that there are at least two distinct allosteric sites on the M(1) receptor, both of which can support positive cooperativity with acetylcholine. PMID:10860942

  8. Rat hippocampal muscarinic autoreceptors are similar to the M2 (cardiac) subtype: comparison with hippocampal M1, atrial M2 and ileal M3 receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, M. H.

    1990-01-01

    1. Affinity constants for 15 non-selective or putatively selective muscarinic antagonists were determined at muscarinic autoreceptors and postsynaptic receptors (linked to phosphatidylinositol (PI) hydrolysis) in rat hippocampal slices, at muscarinic receptors mediating contractility in guinea-pig atria or ileal smooth muscle and at binding sites in rat cerebral cortical membranes labelled with [3H]-1-quinuclidinyl benzilate or [3H]-pirenzepine. 2. Comparison of the affinities of these antagonists at central M1 receptors (inositol-monophosphate formation in rat hippocampal slices) with their affinities at peripheral M1 receptors (inhibition by McN-A-343 of electrically stimulated twitches in rabbit vas deferens) provides support for the suggestion that these receptors may differ pharmacologically. 3. Comparison of affinity constants obtained by displacement of specifically bound [3H]-pirenzepine from rat cerebral cortical membranes with those obtained in functional tests showed poor correlations between affinities for binding sites and for functional atrial receptors or for hippocampal autoreceptors. A significant correlation was found between affinities for [3H]-pirenzepine binding and those determined at muscarinic receptors linked to PI turnover in rat hippocampus. A significant correlation was also obtained between the affinities for specific [3H]-pirenzepine binding sites in cortical membranes and the affinities at ileal receptors. 4. Comparison of the affinity values for muscarinic autoreceptors in rat hippocampus with affinity values obtained from in vitro models of muscarinic receptor subtypes showed no significant correlations between these autoreceptors and either M1 or M3 receptors. A significant correlation was found between antagonist affinities for hippocampal autoreceptors and muscarinic receptors in the heart. Therefore, muscarinic autoreceptors in rat hippocampus are pharmacologically similar to the M2 (cardiac) muscarinic receptor subtype. PMID

  9. Comparative Pharmacology of Bombesin Receptor Subtype-3, Nonpeptide Agonist MK-5046, a Universal Peptide Agonist, and Peptide Antagonist Bantag-1 for Human Bombesin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Paola; Mantey, Samuel A.; Nuche-Berenguer, Bernardo; Reitman, Marc L.; González, Nieves; Coy, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Bombesin-receptor-subtype-3 (BRS-3) is an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor of the bombesin (Bn) family whose natural ligand is unknown and which does not bind any natural Bn-peptide with high affinity. It is present in the central nervous system, peripheral tissues, and tumors; however, its role in normal physiology/pathophysiology is largely unknown because of the lack of selective ligands. Recently, MK-5046 [(2S)-1,1,1-trifluoro-2-[4-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)phenyl]-3-(4-{[1-(trifluoromethyl)cyclopropyl]methyl}-1H-imidazol-2-yl)propan-2-ol] and Bantag-1 [Boc-Phe-His-4-amino-5-cyclohexyl-2,4,5-trideoxypentonyl-Leu-(3-dimethylamino) benzylamide N-methylammonium trifluoroacetate], a nonpeptide agonist and a peptide antagonist, respectively, for BRS-3 have been described, but there have been limited studies on their pharmacology. We studied MK-5046 and Bantag-1 interactions with human Bn-receptors—human bombesin receptor subtype-3 (hBRS-3), gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRP-R), and neuromedin B receptor (NMB-R)—and compared them with the nonselective, peptide-agonist [d-Tyr6,βAla11,Phe13,Nle14]Bn-(6–14) (peptide #1). Receptor activation was detected by activation of phospholipase C (PLC), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin, and Akt. In hBRS-3 cells, the relative affinities were Bantag-1 (1.3 nM) > peptide #1 (2 nM) > MK-5046 (37–160 nM) > GRP, NMB (>10 μM), and the binding-dose-inhibition curves were broad (>4 logs), with Hill coefficients differing significantly from unity. Curve-fitting demonstrated high-affinity (MK-5046, Ki = 0.08 nM) and low-affinity (MK-5046, Ki = 11–29 nM) binding sites. For PLC activation in hBRS-3 cells, the relative potencies were MK-5046 (0.02 nM) > peptide #1 (6 nM) > GRP, NMB, Bantag-1 (>10 μM), and MK-5046 had a biphasic dose response, whereas peptide #1 was monophasic. Bantag-1 was a specific hBRS-3-antagonist. In hBRS-3 cells, MK-5046 was a full agonist for activation of MAPK

  10. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes involved in facilitation of GABAergic inhibition in mouse superficial superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Endo, Toshiaki; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Obata, Kunihiko; Isa, Tadashi

    2005-12-01

    The superficial superior colliculus (sSC) is a key station in the sensory processing related to visual salience. The sSC receives cholinergic projections from the parabigeminal nucleus, and previous studies have revealed the presence of several different nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits in the sSC. In this study, to clarify the role of the cholinergic inputs to the sSC, we examined current responses induced by ACh in GABAergic and non-GABAergic sSC neurons using in vitro slice preparations obtained from glutamate decarboxylase 67-green fluorescent protein (GFP) knock-in mice in which GFP is specifically expressed in GABAergic neurons. Brief air pressure application of acetylcholine (ACh) elicited nicotinic inward current responses in both GABAergic and non-GABAergic neurons. The inward current responses in the GABAergic neurons were highly sensitive to a selective antagonist for alpha3beta2- and alpha6beta2-containing receptors, alpha-conotoxin MII (alphaCtxMII). A subset of these neurons exhibited a faster alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive inward current component, indicating the expression of alpha7-containing nAChRs. We also found that the activation of presynaptic nAChRs induced release of GABA, which elicited a burst of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents mediated by GABA(A) receptors in non-GABAergic neurons. This ACh-induced GABA release was mediated mainly by alphaCtxMII-sensitive nAChRs and resulted from the activation of voltage-dependent calcium channels. Morphological analysis revealed that recorded GFP-positive neurons are interneurons and GFP-negative neurons include projection neurons. These findings suggest that nAChRs are involved in the regulation of GABAergic inhibition and modulate visual processing in the sSC. PMID:16107532

  11. Differential regulation of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 and nuclear factor-κB by angiotensin II receptor subtypes in type 2 diabetic kidney.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Anuradha; Goru, Santosh Kumar; Kadakol, Almesh; Malek, Vajir; Gaikwad, Anil Bhanudas

    2015-11-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) acts through Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE)/Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R) axis to promote renal failure whereas the Ang II type 2 receptor (AT2R)/Angiotensin Converting Enzyme 2 (ACE2)/Ang1-7/Mas axis constitutes the protective arm of Renin Angiotensin System (RAS). Though Ang II has been known to activate the Nuclear Factor-κB (NF-κB) signalling pathway through different receptor subtype(s) in different tissues under various diseases, the subtype orchestrating this stimulation in type 2 diabetic kidney remains elusive. ACE2, a protective monocarboxypeptidase, responsible for conversion of Ang II to Ang1-7, opposes the deleterious effects of RAS pathway but how its expression is altered with blockade of AT1R and AT2R is not yet known. Hence, the present study was conceived to understand the regulation of NF-κB and ACE2 by using specific AT1 and AT2 receptor antagonists in non-genetic model of type 2 diabetic nephropathy. Our results show that the AT1R and AT2R antagonists lead to the repression and activation of NF-κB signalling pathway, respectively which suggests the role of AT1R in NF-κB activation. The blockade of AT2R led to an increase in ACE2 expression, which may be a compensatory response to the drastically increased inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress in the diabetic kidney. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing the differential regulation of NF-κB and ACE2 by Ang II receptor subtypes and thus this study improves our understanding regarding regulation of inflammatory cascade and ACE2 by AT1R and AT2R in type 2 diabetic kidney, which may help in designing novel strategies to combat the disease in future. PMID:26271886

  12. Molecular expression of adenosine receptors in OVCAR-3, Caov-4 and SKOV-3 human ovarian cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Hajiahmadi, S.; Panjehpour, M.; Aghaei, M.; Mousavi, S.

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine receptors (A1, A2a, A2b and A3) have several physiological and pathological roles in cancer cell lines. The present study was carried out to evaluate the mRNA and protein expression profile and functional role of adenosine receptors in OVCAR-3, Caov-4 and SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cell lines. The levels of mRNA and protein expression of A1, A2a, A2b and A3 adenosine receptors in the ovarian cancer cell lines were measured by Real-time PCR and western blotting. The functional roles of adenosine receptors were investigated through measurement of cAMP levels after agonist treatment. The mRNA and protein of all adenosine receptors subtypes were expressed in the ovarian cancer cell lines. Our findings demonstrated that A2b and A3 had the most mRNA and protein expression. Moreover, cAMP assay confirmed the functional role of A2b and A3 adenosine receptors. This findings demonstrated that A2b and A3 subtypes are most important adenosine receptors in humn ovarian cancer cell lines. This information provide a strong possibility into the relationship of A2b and A3 adenosine receptor and ovarian cancer. PMID:26430456

  13. Molecular expression of adenosine receptors in OVCAR-3, Caov-4 and SKOV-3 human ovarian cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hajiahmadi, S; Panjehpour, M; Aghaei, M; Mousavi, S

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine receptors (A1, A2a, A2b and A3) have several physiological and pathological roles in cancer cell lines. The present study was carried out to evaluate the mRNA and protein expression profile and functional role of adenosine receptors in OVCAR-3, Caov-4 and SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cell lines. The levels of mRNA and protein expression of A1, A2a, A2b and A3 adenosine receptors in the ovarian cancer cell lines were measured by Real-time PCR and western blotting. The functional roles of adenosine receptors were investigated through measurement of cAMP levels after agonist treatment. The mRNA and protein of all adenosine receptors subtypes were expressed in the ovarian cancer cell lines. Our findings demonstrated that A2b and A3 had the most mRNA and protein expression. Moreover, cAMP assay confirmed the functional role of A2b and A3 adenosine receptors. This findings demonstrated that A2b and A3 subtypes are most important adenosine receptors in humn ovarian cancer cell lines. This information provide a strong possibility into the relationship of A2b and A3 adenosine receptor and ovarian cancer. PMID:26430456

  14. In vivo ketamine-induced changes in [11C]ABP688 binding to metabotropic glutamate receptors subtype 5

    PubMed Central

    DeLorenzo, Christine; DellaGioia, Nicole; Bloch, Michael; Sanacora, Gerard; Nabulsi, Nabeel; Abdallah, Chadi; Yang, Jie; Wen, Ruofeng; Mann, J. John; Krystal, John H.; Parsey, Ramin V.; Carson, Richard E.; Esterlis, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Background At subanesthetic doses, ketamine, an N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor antagonist, increases glutamate release. Here, we imaged the acute effect of ketamine on brain metabotropic glutamatergic receptors subtype 5 (mGluR5) with a high affinity PET ligand [11C]ABP688 ((E)-3-((6-methylpyridin-2-yl)ethynyl)-cyclohex-2-enone-O-11C-methyl-oxime), a negative allosteric modulator of mGluR5. Methods Ten healthy nonsmoking human volunteers (34±13 years old) received two [11C]ABP688 PET scans on the same day – before (scan 1) and during i.v. ketamine administration (0.23mg/kg over 1min, then 0.58mg/kg over 1h; scan 2). PET data were acquired for 90 min immediately following [11C]ABP688 bolus injection. Input functions were obtained through arterial blood sampling with metabolite analysis. Results A significant reduction in [11C]ABP688 volume of distribution (VT) was observed in scan 2 relative to scan 1 of 21.3 ± 21.4%, on average, in the anterior cingulate, medial prefrontal cortex, orbital prefrontal cortex, ventral striatum, parietal lobe, dorsal putamen, dorsal caudate, amygdala, and hippocampus. There was a significant increase in measurements of dissociative state after ketamine initiation (p<0.05) that resolved after completion of the scan. Discussion This study provides first evidence that ketamine administration decreases [11C]ABP688 binding in vivo in human subjects. Results suggest that [11C]ABP688 binding is sensitive to ketamine-induced effects, although the high individual variation in ketamine response requires further examination. PMID:25156701

  15. Mediation by the same muscarinic receptor subtype of phasic and tonic contractile activities in the rat isolated portal vein.

    PubMed Central

    Pfaffendorf, M.; Van Zwieten, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of several agonists on the phasic and tonic contractile responses to muscarinic receptor stimulation have been investigated in the rat portal vein in vitro. 2. Neither chemical denervation with 6-hydroxydopamine nor the presence of the alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist, prazosin, influenced the spontaneous or the stimulated myogenic activity of the portal vein. 3. Indomethacin and NG-nitro-L-arginine were used to investigate the influence of vasoactive factors in this preparation. They slightly increased the frequency and the amplitude of the spontaneous myogenic activity of the portal vein, respectively. NG-nitro-L-arginine but not indomethacin enhanced the maximal phasic response to carbachol. Both indomethacin and NG-nitro-L-arginine failed to influence the tonic response to carbachol. 4. Muscarinic agonists increased phasic activity according to the rank order of potency: acetylcholine > muscarine > methacholine > carbachol > aceclidine > bethanechol. These effects were superimposed on a sustained contracture at higher concentrations. Oxotremorine was more potent than arecoline in increasing the mechanical phasic activity, without inducing a sustained contracture. Pilocarpine and McN A343 were weak agonists, producing submaximal effects only on phasic activity. 5. The muscarinic antagonists AF-DX116, 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine (4-DAMP), P-fluorohexahydrosiladiphenidol (pFHHSiD) and pirenzepine antagonized the phasic and tonic mechanical responses to carbachol. Although the tonic contracture was slightly more sensitive to all antagonists studied, the rank order of potency: 4-DAMP > pFHHSiD > pirenzepine > AF-DX 116 was the same for both types of responses, which is indicative of a M3-receptor subtype.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8428203

  16. Association of alpha subunit of GABAA receptor subtype gene polymorphisms with epilepsy susceptibility and drug resistance in north Indian population.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Ritu; Lakhan, Ram; Kalita, J; Misra, U K; Mittal, Balraj

    2010-05-01

    GABA (gamma-amino butyric acid) receptors have always been an inviting target in the etiology and treatment of epilepsy because of its role as a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. The aim of our study was to find out the possible role of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) present in GABRA1 IVS11+15 A>G (rs2279020) and GABRG2 588C>T (rs211037) genes in seizure susceptibility and pharmaco-resistance in northern Indian patients with epilepsy. A total of 395 epilepsy patients and 199 control subjects were enrolled for present study. The genotyping was done by PCR-RFLP methods. The GABRA1 IVS11+15 A>G polymorphism conferred high risk for epilepsy susceptibility at genotype 'AG' (P=0.004, OR=1.77, 95% CI=1.20-2.63), 'GG' (P=0.01, OR=1.80, 95% CI=1.15-2.80) and G allele level (P=0.001, OR=1.50, 95% CI=1.16-1.92). Moreover this polymorphism was also associated with multiple drug resistance in patients with epilepsy for homozygous variant 'GG' genotype (P=0.031, OR=1.84, 95% CI=1.05-3.23) and G allele (P=0.020, OR=1.43, 95% CI=1.05-1.95). However GABRG2 588C>T polymorphism was not found to be associated either with epilepsy susceptibility or with drug resistance. Overall results indicate differential role of different subunits of GABA(A) receptor subtypes in epilepsy susceptibility and pharmacotherapy. PMID:20356767

  17. Association between histopathological subtype, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake and epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    QIANG, GUANGLIANG; HUANG, WEI; LIANG, CHAOYANG; XU, RUI; YAN, JUE; XU, YANYAN; WANG, YE; DA, JIPING; SHI, BIN; GUO, YONGQING; LIU, DERUO

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between histopathological subtypes, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in patients with lung adenocarcinoma (ADC). The cases of 97 patients with lung ADC who underwent 18F-FDG positron emission tomography-computed tomography prior to surgical resection were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were stratified according to the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (IASLC/ATS/ERS) classification, and graded using a histopathological scoring system. EGFR mutations were identified. Clinicopathological characteristics associated with EGFR mutation status were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analyses. EGFR mutation was identified in 45.4% of the patients and was associated with gender, smoking history, maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and histopathological score. ADC patients with a low SUVmax were more likely to exhibit EGFR mutations compared with patients with a high SUVmax (P=0.018). Patients with a lower histopathological score possessed a significantly lower SUVmax compared with patients with a higher score (P<0.001). Furthermore, the histopathological score and smoking history of the patients were identified to be independent predictors for EGFR mutations, according to multivariate logistic regression analysis. In conclusion, SUVmax and EGFR mutations were associated with lung ADC patients stratified according to the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification. Overall, SUVmax has the potential to be a useful marker in stratifying pre-operative patients with lung ADC and identifying EGFR mutations. PMID:26998075

  18. Negative Allosteric Modulators Selective for The NR2B Subtype of The NMDA Receptor Impair Cognition in Multiple Domains.

    PubMed

    Weed, Michael R; Bookbinder, Mark; Polino, Joseph; Keavy, Deborah; Cardinal, Rudolf N; Simmermacher-Mayer, Jean; Cometa, Fu-ni L; King, Dalton; Thangathirupathy, Srinivasan; Macor, John E; Bristow, Linda J

    2016-01-01

    Antidepressant activity of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists and negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) has led to increased investigation of their behavioral pharmacology. NMDA antagonists, such as ketamine, impair cognition in multiple species and in multiple cognitive domains. However, studies with NR2B subtype-selective NAMs have reported mixed results in rodents including increased impulsivity, no effect on cognition, impairment or even improvement of some cognitive tasks. To date, the effects of NR2B-selective NAMs on cognitive tests have not been reported in nonhuman primates. The current study evaluated two selective NR2B NAMs, CP101,606 and BMT-108908, along with the nonselective NMDA antagonists, ketamine and AZD6765, in the nonhuman primate Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) list-based delayed match to sample (list-DMS) task. Ketamine and the two NMDA NR2B NAMs produced selective impairments in memory in the list-DMS task. AZD6765 impaired performance in a non-specific manner. In a separate cohort, CP101,606 impaired performance of the nonhuman primate CANTAB visuo-spatial Paired Associates Learning (vsPAL) task with a selective impairment at more difficult conditions. The results of these studies clearly show that systemic administration of a selective NR2B NAM can cause transient cognitive impairment in multiple cognitive domains. PMID:26105137

  19. The neuroactive peptide N-acetylaspartylglutamate is not an agonist at the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 3 of metabotropic glutamate receptor.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Maninder; Yao, Yi; Blake, Timothy J; Hampson, David R; Johnson, Edwin C

    2009-07-01

    The peptide N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) is present in high concentrations in the mammalian central nervous system. Various mechanisms have been proposed for its action, including selective activation of the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) subtype 3, its action at the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, or the production of glutamate by its hydrolysis catalyzed by an extracellular protease. To re-examine its agonist activity at mGluR3, we coexpressed human or rat mGluR3 with G protein inward rectifying channels in Xenopus laevis oocytes. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of commercial sources of NAAG showed 0.38 to 0.48% glutamate contamination. Although both human and rat mGluR3 were highly sensitive to glutamate, with EC(50) values of 58 and 28 nM, respectively, purified NAAG (100 microM) had little activity (7.7% of full activation by glutamate). Only in the millimolar range did it show significant activity, possibly due to residual traces of glutamate remaining in the purified NAAG preparations. In contrast, the unpurified NAAG sample did produce a full agonist response with mGluR3 coexpressed with G alpha(15), with an EC(50) of 120 microM, as measured by a calcium release assay. This response can be explained by the 0.38 to 0.48% glutamate contamination. Our results suggest that NAAG may not have a direct agonist activity at the mGluR3 receptor. Thus, several in vivo and in vitro published results that did not address the issue of glutamate contamination of NAAG preparations may need to be re-evaluated. PMID:19389924

  20. Epidermal growth factor receptor expression in different subtypes of oral lichenoid disease

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Ramírez, Dionisio A.; Rodríguez-Tojo, María J.; Coca-Meneses, Juan C.; Marichalar-Mendia, Xabier

    2014-01-01

    The oral lichenoid disease (OLD) includes different chronic inflammatory processes such as oral lichen planus (OLP) and oral lichenoid lesions (OLL), both entities with controversial diagnosis and malignant potential. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EFGR) is an important oral carcinogenesis biomarker and overexpressed in several oral potentially malignant disorders. Objectives: To analyze the EGFR expression in the OLD to find differences between OLP and OLL, and to correlate it with the main clinical and pathological features. Material and Methods: Forty-four OLD cases were studied and classified according to their clinical (Group C1: only papular lesions / Group C2: papular and other lesions) and histopathological features (Group HT: OLP-typical / Group HC: OLP-compatible) based in previous published criteria. Standard immunohistochemical identification of EGFR protein was performed. Comparative and descriptive statistical analyses were performed. Results: Thirty-five cases (79.5%) showed EGFR overexpression without significant differences between clinical and histopathological groups (p<0.05). Histological groups showed significant differences in the EGFR expression pattern (p=0.016). Conlusions: All OLD samples showed high EGFR expression. The type of clinical lesion was not related with EGFR expression; however, there are differences in the EGFR expression pattern between histological groups that may be related with a different biological profile and malignant risk. Key words:Oral lichenoid disease, oral lichen planus, oral lichenoid lesion, oral carcinogenesis, EGFR. PMID:24880441

  1. Aldosterone Induces Renal Fibrosis and Inflammatory M1-Macrophage Subtype via Mineralocorticoid Receptor in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Fernández, Beatriz; Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Cortegano, Isabel; Ballesteros, Sandra; Alía, Mario; Cannata-Ortiz, Pablo; Olivares-Álvaro, Elena; Egido, Jesús; de Andrés, Belén; Gaspar, María Luisa; de las Heras, Natalia; Lahera, Vicente; Moreno, Juan Antonio

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate macrophages heterogeneity and structural, functional and inflammatory alterations in rat kidney by aldosterone + salt administration. The effects of treatment with spironolactone on above parameters were also analyzed. Male Wistar rats received aldosterone (1 mgkg-1d-1) + 1% NaCl for 3 weeks. Half of the animals were treated with spironolactone (200 mg kg-1d-1). Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were elevated (p<0.05) in aldosterone + salt–treated rats. Relative kidney weight, collagen content, fibronectin, macrophage infiltrate, CTGF, Col I, MMP2, TNF-α, CD68, Arg2, and SGK-1 were increased (p<0.05) in aldosterone + salt–treated rats, being reduced by spironolactone (p<0.05). Increased iNOS and IFN-γ mRNA gene expression (M1 macrophage markers) was observed in aldosterone + salt rats, whereas no significant differences were observed in IL-10 and gene ArgI mRNA expression or ED2 protein content (M2 macrophage markers). All the observed changes were blocked with spironolactone treatment. Macrophage depletion with liposomal clodronate reduced macrophage influx and inflammatory M1 markers (INF-γ or iNOS), whereas interstitial fibrosis was only partially reduced after this intervention, in aldosterone plus salt-treated rats. In conclusion, aldosterone + salt administration mediates inflammatory M1 macrophage phenotype and increased fibrosis throughout mineralocorticoid receptors activation. PMID:26730742

  2. Cyclopropyl-containing positive allosteric modulators of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5.

    PubMed

    Lakkaraju, Sirish K; Mbatia, Hannah; Hanscom, Marie; Zhao, Zaorui; Wu, Junfang; Stoica, Bogdan; MacKerell, Alexander D; Faden, Alan I; Xue, Fengtian

    2015-06-01

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) binding to the transmembrane (TM) domain of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) are promising therapeutic agents for psychiatric disorders and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Novel PAMs based on a trans-2-phenylcyclopropane amide scaffold have been designed and synthesized. Facilitating ligand design and allowing estimation of binding affinities to the mGluR5 TM domain was the novel computational strategy, site identification by ligand competitive saturation (SILCS). The potential protective activity of the new compounds was evaluated using nitric oxide (NO) production in BV2 microglial cell cultures treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and the toxicity of the new compounds tested using a cell viability assay. One of the new compounds, 3a, indicated promising activity with potency of 30 μM, which is 4.5-fold more potent than its lead compound 3,3'-difluorobenzaldazine (DFB), and showed no detectable toxicity with concentrations as high as 1000 μM. Thus this compound represents a new lead for possible development as treatment for TBI and related neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25937015

  3. Natural cytotoxicity receptor splice variants orchestrate the distinct functions of human natural killer cell subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Siewiera, Johan; Gouilly, Jordi; Hocine, Hocine-Rachid; Cartron, Géraldine; Levy, Claude; Al-Daccak, Reem; Jabrane-Ferrat, Nabila

    2015-01-01

    The natural cytotoxicity receptors NKp46/NCR1, NKp44/NCR2 and NKp30/NCR3 are critical for natural killer (NK) cell functions. Their genes are transcribed into several splice variants whose physiological relevance is not yet fully understood. Here we report that decidua basalis NK (dNK) cells of the pregnant uterine mucosa and peripheral blood NK (pNK) cells, two functionally distinct subsets of the physiological NK cell pool, display differential expression of NKp30/NCR3 and NKp44/NCR2 splice variants. The presence of cytokines that are enriched within the decidual microenvironment is sufficient to convert the splice variant profile of pNK cells into one similar to that of dNK cells. This switch is associated with decreased cytotoxic function and major adaptations to the secretome, hallmarks of the decidual phenotype. Thus, NKp30/NCR3 and NKp44/NCR2 splice variants delineate functionally distinct NK cell subsets. To our knowledge, this is the first conclusive evidence underlining the physiological importance of NCR splice variants. PMID:26666685

  4. Ethanol acts directly on extrasynaptic subtypes of GABAA receptors to increase tonic inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Santhakumar, Vijayalakshmi; Wallner, Martin; Otis, Thomas S.

    2007-01-01

    Based on the similarity of ethanol intoxication to the behavioral effects of drugs known to target GABAA receptors (GABARs) it has been suspected for decades that ethanol facilitates the activity of GABA. Even so, it has been surprisingly difficult to identify molecular targets of ethanol. Research conducted over the past several years suggests that a subclass of GABARs (those containing δ subunits) responds in a relevant concentration range to ethanol. Although δ subunit-containing GABARs are not ubiquitously expressed at inhibitory synapses like their γ subunit-containing, synaptic counterparts, they are found in many neurons in extrasynaptic locations. Here they give rise to a tonic form of inhibition that can potently suppress neuronal excitability. Studies have shown that both recombinant and native δ subunit-containing GABARs: 1) are modulated by behaviorally-relevant (i.e. low millimolar) concentrations of ethanol, 2) directly bind ethanol over the same concentration range, 3) show altered function upon single amino substitutions linked to changes in behavioral responsiveness to ethanol, and 4) are a site of action of Ro15-4513, a competitive antagonist of ethanol binding and a drug which prevents many of the behavioral aspects of ethanol intoxication. Despite such comprehensive evidence, however, the field is not free from controversy. This review evaluates published data for and against a central role of δ subunit-containing GABARs in ethanol actions and suggests future directions that might help settle points of controversy. PMID:17591544

  5. Discrimination of putative M1 and M2 muscarinic receptor subtypes in rat brain by N-ethoxycarbonyl-2-ethoxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline (EEDQ)

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, A.B.; Creese, I.

    1986-03-01

    The EC/sub 50/ of EEDQ for the inhibition of (/sup 3/H)(-)QNB binding in vitro was approximately 3 fold lower for homogenates of hippocampus than brainstem (containing predominantly putative M/sub 1/ and M/sub 2/ muscarinic receptor subtypes respectively). Furthermore, the time-dependent loss of (/sup 3/H)(-)QNB binding produced by 100 ..mu..M EEDQ was faster in homogenates of hippocampus than brainstem. Administration of EEDQ (20 mg/kg i.p.) irreversibly reduced the Bmax of (/sup 3/H)(-)QNB binding by 56% and 34% in hippocampus and brainstem respectively. Pirenzepine competition for the remaining (/sup 3/H)(-)QNB binding sites following in vitro and in vivo treatment with EEDQ revealed a significant increase in the proportion of (/sup 3/H)(-)QNB binding sites having low affinity for pirenzepine (M/sub 2/ receptors), indicating that the high affinity pirenzepine binding sites (M/sub 1/ receptors) were selectively and irreversibly lost. Thus, EEDQ discriminates the same putative M/sub 1/ and M/sub 2/ muscarinic receptor subtypes that are discriminated by pirenzepine. The reduction of (/sup 3/H)(-)QNB binding could be prevented both in vitro and in vivo by atropine or scopolamine. These data may indicate differences in the accessibility of these putative receptor subtypes to EEDQ or, alternatively, differences in the availability of carboxyl groups able to interact with EEDQ at the ligand recognition site of M/sub 1/ and M/sub 2/ muscarinic receptors.

  6. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor subtypes differentially recognize regioisomers of D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, M; Takeuchi, H; Riley, A M; Mills, S J; Watanabe, Y; Potter, B V

    1997-01-01

    The Ins(1,4,5)P3 regioisomers, Ins(1,4,6)P3 and Ins(1,3,6)P3, which can mimic the 1,4,5-arrangement on the inositol ring of Ins(1,4,5)P3, were examined for Ca2+ release by using four types of saponin-permeabilized cell possessing various abundances of receptor subtypes, with special reference to the relation of potency to receptor subtype. Ins(1,4,6)P3 and Ins(1,3,6)P3 were weak agonists in rat basophilic leukaemic cells (RBL cells), which possess predominantly subtype II receptors, with respective potencies of 1/200 and less than 1/500 that of Ins(1,4,5)P3 [the EC50 values were 0.2, 45 and more than 100 microM for Ins(1,4,5)P3, Ins(1,4,6)P3 and Ins(1,3,6)P3 respectively]. Similar rank order potencies were also evaluated for the displacement of [3H]Ins(1,4,5)P3 bound to RBL cell membranes by these regioisomers. However, they caused Ca2+ release from GH3 rat pituitary cells possessing predominantly subtype I receptors more potently; Ins(1,4,6)P3 and Ins(1,3,6)P3 evoked release at respective concentrations of only one-third and one-twentieth that of Ins(1,4,5)P3 (the EC50 values were 0.4, 1.2 and 8 microM for Ins(1,4,5)P3, Ins(1,4,6)P3 and Ins(1,3,6)P3 respectively). In COS-1 African green-monkey kidney cells, with the relative abundances of 37% of the subtype II and of 62% of the subtype III receptor, potencies of 1/40 and approx. 1/200 for Ins(1, 4,6)P3 and Ins(1,3,6)P3 respectively were exhibited relative to Ins(1,4,5)P3 (the EC50 values were 0.4, 15 and approx. 80 microM for Ins(1,4,5)P3, Ins(1,4,6)P3 and Ins(1,3,6)P3 respectively). In HL-60 human leukaemic cells, in spite of the dominant presence of subtype I receptors (71%), similar respective potencies to those seen with COS-1 cells were exhibited (the EC50 values were 0.3, 15 and approx. 100 microM for Ins(1,4,5)P3, Ins(1,4,6)P3 and Ins(1,3,6)P3 respectively). These results indicate that these regioisomers are the first ligands that distinguish between receptor subtypes; the present observations are of

  7. The α3β4* nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtype mediates nicotine reward and physical nicotine withdrawal signs independently of the α5 subunit in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Kia J.; Sanjakdar, Sarah S.; Muldoon, Pretal P.; McIntosh, J. Michael; Damaj, M. Imad

    2013-01-01

    The 15q25 gene cluster contains genes that code for the α5, α3, and β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) subunits, and in human genetic studies, has shown the most robust association with smoking behavior and nicotine dependence to date. The limited available animal studies implicate a role for the α5 and β4 nAChR subunits in nicotine dependence and withdrawal; however studies focusing on the behavioral role of the α3β4* nAChR receptor subtype in nicotine dependence are lacking. Because of the apparent role of the α3β4* nAChR subtype in nicotine dependence, the goal of the current study was to better evaluate the involvement of this subtype in nicotine mediated behavioral responses. Using the selective α3β4* nAChR antagonist, α-conotoxin AuIB, we assessed the role of α3β4* nAChRs in acute nicotine, nicotine reward, and physical and affective nicotine withdrawal. Because α5 has also been implicated in nicotine dependence behaviors in mice and can form functional receptors with α3β4*, we also evaluated the role of the α3β4α5* nAChR subtype in nicotine reward and somatic nicotine withdrawal signs by blocking the α3β4* nAChR subtype in α5 nAChR knockout mice with AuIB. AuIB had no significant effect on acute nicotine behaviors, but dose-dependently attenuated nicotine reward and physical withdrawal signs, with no significant effect in affective withdrawal measures. Interestingly, AuIB also attenuated nicotine reward and somatic signs in α5 nAChR knockout mice. This study shows that α3β4* nAChRs mediate nicotine reward and physical nicotine withdrawal, but not acute nicotine behaviors or affective nicotine withdrawal signs in mice. The α5 subunit is not required in the receptor assembly to mediate these effects. Our findings suggest an important role for the α3β4* nAChR subtype in nicotine reward and physical aspects of the nicotine withdrawal syndrome. PMID:23416040

  8. Affinity-Based Screening of Tetravalent Peptides Identifies Subtype-Selective Neutralizers of Shiga Toxin 2d, a Highly Virulent Subtype, by Targeting a Unique Amino Acid Involved in Its Receptor Recognition.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Takaaki; Watanabe-Takahashi, Miho; Shimizu, Eiko; Zhang, Baihao; Funamoto, Satoru; Yamasaki, Shinji; Nishikawa, Kiyotaka

    2016-09-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx), a major virulence factor of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), can be classified into two subgroups, Stx1 and Stx2, each consisting of various closely related subtypes. Stx2 subtypes Stx2a and Stx2d are highly virulent and linked with serious human disorders, such as acute encephalopathy and hemolytic-uremic syndrome. Through affinity-based screening of a tetravalent peptide library, we previously developed peptide neutralizers of Stx2a in which the structure was optimized to bind to the B-subunit pentamer. In this study, we identified Stx2d-selective neutralizers by targeting Asn16 of the B subunit, an amino acid unique to Stx2d that plays an essential role in receptor binding. We synthesized a series of tetravalent peptides on a cellulose membrane in which the core structure was exactly the same as that of peptides in the tetravalent library. A total of nine candidate motifs were selected to synthesize tetravalent forms of the peptides by screening two series of the tetravalent peptides. Five of the tetravalent peptides effectively inhibited the cytotoxicity of Stx2a and Stx2d, and notably, two of the peptides selectively inhibited Stx2d. These two tetravalent peptides bound to the Stx2d B subunit with high affinity dependent on Asn16. The mechanism of binding to the Stx2d B subunit differed from that of binding to Stx2a in that the peptides covered a relatively wide region of the receptor-binding surface. Thus, this highly optimized screening technique enables the development of subtype-selective neutralizers, which may lead to more sophisticated treatments of infections by Stx-producing EHEC. PMID:27382021

  9. The marine phycotoxin gymnodimine targets muscular and neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes with high affinity.

    PubMed

    Kharrat, Riadh; Servent, Denis; Girard, Emmanuelle; Ouanounou, Gilles; Amar, Muriel; Marrouchi, Riadh; Benoit, Evelyne; Molgó, Jordi

    2008-11-01

    Gymnodimines (GYMs) are phycotoxins exhibiting unusual structural features including a spirocyclic imine ring system and a trisubstituted tetrahydrofuran embedded within a 16-membered macrocycle. The toxic potential and the mechanism of action of GYM-A, highly purified from contaminated clams, have been assessed. GYM-A in isolated mouse phrenic hemidiaphragm preparations produced a concentration- and time-dependent block of twitch responses evoked by nerve stimulation, without affecting directly elicited muscle twitches, suggesting that it may block the muscle nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor (nAChR). This was confirmed by the blockade of miniature endplate potentials and the recording of subthreshold endplate potentials in GYM-A paralyzed frog and mouse isolated neuromuscular preparations. Patch-clamp recordings in Xenopus skeletal myocytes revealed that nicotinic currents evoked by constant iontophoretical ACh pulses were blocked by GYM-A in a reversible manner. GYM-A also blocked, in a voltage-independent manner, homomeric human alpha7 nAChR expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Competition-binding assays confirmed that GYM-A is a powerful ligand interacting with muscle-type nAChR, heteropentameric alpha3beta2, alpha4beta2, and chimeric alpha7-5HT(3) neuronal nAChRs. Our data show for the first time that GYM-A broadly targets nAChRs with high affinity explaining the basis of its neurotoxicity, and also pave the way for designing specific tests for accurate GYM-A detection in shellfish samples. PMID:18990115

  10. Efficient functional coupling of the human D3 dopamine receptor to G(o) subtype of G proteins in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Zaworski, P G; Alberts, G L; Pregenzer, J F; Im, W B; Slightom, J L; Gill, G S

    1999-11-01

    1 The D3 dopamine receptor presumably activates Gi/Go subtypes of G-proteins, like the structurally analogous D2 receptor, but its signalling targets have not been clearly established due to weak functional signals from cloned receptors as heterologously expressed in mostly non-neuronal cell lines. 2 In this study, recombinant human D3 receptors expressed in a human neuroblastoma cell line, SH-SY5Y, produced much greater signals than those expressed in a human embryonic kidney cell line, HEK293. Quinpirole, a prototypic agonist, markedly inhibited forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production and Ca2+-channel (N-type) currents in SH-SY5Y cells, and enhanced GTPgamma35S binding in isolated membranes, nearly ten times greater than that observed in HEK293 cell membranes. 3 GTPgamma35S-bound Galpha subunits from quinpirole-activated and solubilized membranes were monitored upon immobilization with various Galpha-specific antibodies. Galphao subunits (not Galphai) were highly labelled with GTPgamma35S in SH-SY5Y, but not in HEK293 cell membranes, despite their abundance in the both cell types, as shown with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blots. N-type Ca2+ channels and adenylyl cyclase V (D3-specific effector), on the other hand, exist only in SH-SY5Y cells. 4 More efficient coupling of the D3 receptor to Go subtypes in SH-SY5Y than HEK293 cells may be attributed, at least in part, to the two D3 neuronal effectors only present in SH-SY5Y cells (N-type Ca2+-channels and adenylyl cyclase V). The abundance of Go subtypes in the both cell lines seems to indicate their availability not a limiting factor. PMID:10578130

  11. Adaptive increases in expression and vasodilator activity of estrogen receptor subtypes in a blood vessel-specific pattern during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mata, Karina M; Li, Wei; Reslan, Ossama M; Siddiqui, Waleed T; Opsasnick, Lauren A; Khalil, Raouf A

    2015-11-15

    Normal pregnancy is associated with adaptive hemodynamic, hormonal, and vascular changes, and estrogen (E2) may promote vasodilation during pregnancy; however, the specific E2 receptor (ER) subtype, post-ER signaling mechanism, and vascular bed involved are unclear. We tested whether pregnancy-associated vascular adaptations involve changes in the expression/distribution/activity of distinct ER subtypes in a blood vessel-specific manner. Blood pressure (BP) and plasma E2 were measured in virgin and pregnant (day 19) rats, and the thoracic aorta, carotid artery, mesenteric artery, and renal artery were isolated for measurements of ERα, ERβ, and G protein-coupled receptor 30 [G protein-coupled ER (GPER)] expression and tissue distribution in parallel with relaxation responses to E2 (all ERs) and the specific ER agonist 4,4',4″-(4-propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)-tris-phenol (PPT; ERα), diarylpropionitrile (DPN; ERβ), and G1 (GPER). BP was slightly lower and plasma E2 was higher in pregnant versus virgin rats. Western blots revealed increased ERα and ERβ in the aorta and mesenteric artery and GPER in the aorta of pregnant versus virgin rats. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the increases in ERs were mainly in the intima and media. In phenylephrine-precontracted vessels, E2 and PPT caused relaxation that was greater in the aorta and mesenteric artery but similar in the carotid and renal artery of pregnant versus virgin rats. DPN- and G1-induced relaxation was greater in the mesenteric and renal artery than in the aorta and carotid artery, and aortic relaxation to G1 was greater in pregnant versus virgin rats. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester with or without the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin with or without the EDHF blocker tetraethylammonium or endothelium removal reduced E2, PPT, and G1-induced relaxation in the aorta of pregnant rats, suggesting an endothelium-dependent mechanism, but did not affect E2-, PPT

  12. Effects of Long-Term Treatment with Estradiol and Estrogen Receptor Subtype Agonists on Serotonergic Function in Ovariectomized Rats.

    PubMed

    Benmansour, Saloua; Adeniji, Opeyemi S; Privratsky, Anthony A; Frazer, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Acute estradiol treatment was reported to slow the clearance of serotonin via activation of estrogen receptors (ER)β and/or GPR30 and to block the ability of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) to slow serotonin clearance via activation of ERα. In this study, the behavioral consequences of longer-term treatments with estradiol or ER subtype-selective agonists and/or an SSRI were examined in the forced swim test (FST). Ovariectomized rats were administered the following for 2 weeks: estradiol, ERβ agonist (diarylpropionitrile, DPN), GPR30 agonist (G1), ERα agonist (PPT), and/or the SSRI sertraline. Similar to sertraline, longer-term treatment with estradiol, DPN or G1 induced an antidepressant-like effect. By contrast, PPT did not, even though it blocked the antidepressant-like effect of sertraline. Uterus weights, used as a peripheral measure of estrogenic activity, were increased by estradiol and PPT but not DPN or G1 treatment. A second part of this study investigated, using Western blot analyses in homogenates from hippocampus, whether these behavioral effects are accompanied by changes in the activation of specific signaling pathways and/or TrkB. Estradiol and G1 increased phosphorylation of Akt, ERK and TrkB. These effects were similar to those obtained after treatment with sertraline. Treatment with DPN increased phosphorylation of ERK and TrkB, but it did not alter that of Akt. Treatment with PPT increased phosphorylation of Akt and ERK without altering that of TrkB. In conclusion, activation of at least TrkB and possibly ERK may be involved in the antidepressant-like effect of estradiol, ERβ and GPR30 agonists whereas Akt activation may not be necessary. PMID:26159182

  13. Inter-residue coupling contributes to high-affinity subtype-selective binding of α-bungarotoxin to nicotinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sine, Steven M.; Huang, Sun; Li, Shu-Xing; daCOSTA, Corrie J. B.; Chen, Lin

    2014-01-01

    The crystal structure of a pentameric α7 ligand-binding domain chimaera with bound α-btx (α-bungarotoxin) showed that of the five conserved aromatic residues in α7, only Tyr184 in loop C of the ligand-binding site was required for high-affinity binding. To determine whether the contribution of Tyr184 depends on local residues, we generated mutations in an α7/5HT3A (5-hydroxytryptamine type 3A) receptor chimaera, individually and in pairs, and measured 125I-labelled α-btx binding. The results show that mutations of individual residues near Tyr184 do not affect α-btx affinity, but pairwise mutations decrease affinity in an energetically coupled manner. Kinetic measurements show that the affinity decreases arise through increases in the α-btx dissociation rate with little change in the association rate. Replacing loop C in α7 with loop C from the α-btx-insensitive α2 or α3 subunits abolishes high-affinity α-btx binding, but preserves acetylcholine-elicited single channel currents. However, in both the α2 and α3 construct, mutating either residue that flanks Tyr184 to its α7 counterpart restores high-affinity α-btx binding. Analogously, in α7, mutating both residues that flank Tyr184 to the α2 or α3 counterparts abolishes high-affinity α-btx binding. Thus interaction between Tyr184 and local residues contributes to high-affinity subtype-selective α-btx binding. PMID:23802200

  14. VU0477573: Partial Negative Allosteric Modulator of the Subtype 5 Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor with In Vivo Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Nickols, Hilary Highfield; Yuh, Joannes P; Gregory, Karen J; Morrison, Ryan D; Bates, Brittney S; Stauffer, Shaun R; Emmitte, Kyle A; Bubser, Michael; Peng, Weimin; Nedelcovych, Michael T; Thompson, Analisa; Lv, Xiaohui; Xiang, Zixiu; Daniels, J Scott; Niswender, Colleen M; Lindsley, Craig W; Jones, Carrie K; Conn, P Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) have potential applications in the treatment of fragile X syndrome, levodopa-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease, addiction, and anxiety; however, clinical and preclinical studies raise concerns that complete blockade of mGlu5 and inverse agonist activity of current mGlu5 NAMs contribute to adverse effects that limit the therapeutic use of these compounds. We report the discovery and characterization of a novel mGlu5 NAM, N,N-diethyl-5-((3-fluorophenyl)ethynyl)picolinamide (VU0477573) that binds to the same allosteric site as the prototypical mGlu5 NAM MPEP but displays weak negative cooperativity. Because of this weak cooperativity, VU0477573 acts as a "partial NAM" so that full occupancy of the MPEP site does not completely inhibit maximal effects of mGlu5 agonists on intracellular calcium mobilization, inositol phosphate (IP) accumulation, or inhibition of synaptic transmission at the hippocampal Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapse. Unlike previous mGlu5 NAMs, VU0477573 displays no inverse agonist activity assessed using measures of effects on basal [(3)H]inositol phosphate (IP) accumulation. VU0477573 acts as a full NAM when measuring effects on mGlu5-mediated extracellular signal-related kinases 1/2 phosphorylation, which may indicate functional bias. VU0477573 exhibits an excellent pharmacokinetic profile and good brain penetration in rodents and provides dose-dependent full mGlu5 occupancy in the central nervous system (CNS) with systemic administration. Interestingly, VU0477573 shows robust efficacy, comparable to the mGlu5 NAM MTEP, in models of anxiolytic activity at doses that provide full CNS occupancy of mGlu5 and demonstrate an excellent CNS occupancy-efficacy relationship. VU0477573 provides an exciting new tool to investigate the efficacy of partial NAMs in animal models. PMID:26503377

  15. Transgenic overexpression of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 attenuates isoproterenol-induced myocardial fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Zhang, Yunrong; Li, De; Zhang, Yan; Tang, Bing; Li, Gang; Yang, Yongjian; Yang, Dachun

    2016-08-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel with high permeability to Ca2+. Intracellular Ca2+ signaling is an essential regulator of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) that plays a beneficial role in myocardial fibrosis. The aim of the present study was to determine the role of TRPV1 in isoproterenol-induced myocardial fibrosis. Transgenic mice overexpressing TRPV1 were generated on a C57BL/6J genetic background. An animal model of myocardial fibrosis was created by subcutaneously injecting the mice with isoproterenol. We found that the wild-type mice exhibited a significant increase in heart/body weight ratio, left ventricle/body weight ratio, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP), the cardiac fibrotic lesion area and collagen content, as well as a marked decrease in eNOS phosphorylation and NO/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels at 2 weeks after the administration of isoproterenol (all p<0.01). However, these changes were significantly attenuated in the TRPV1 transgenic mice (p<0.05 or p<0.01). Moreover, the beneficial effects on myocardial fibrosis exerted by the overexpression of TRPV1 were attenuated by the administration of the eNOS inhibitor, Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (all p<0.05). Similar anti-fibrotic effects were observed in in vitro experiments with primary cultured cardiac fibroblasts. The findings of our study suggest that TRPV1 overexpression attenuates isoproterenol‑induced myocardial fibrosis. PMID:27314441

  16. Histamine induces the production of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in human astrocytic cultures via H1-receptor subtype.

    PubMed

    Patel, Aarti; Vasanthan, Vishnu; Fu, Wen; Fahlman, Richard P; MacTavish, David; Jhamandas, Jack H

    2016-05-01

    Accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) protein within the brain is a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). One strategy to facilitate Aβ clearance from the brain is to promote Aβ catabolism. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), a member of the family of Zn(+2)-containing endoproteases, known to be expressed and secreted by astrocytes, is capable of degrading Aβ. Histamine, a major aminergic brain neurotransmitter, stimulates the production of MMP-9 in keratinocytes through the histamine H1 receptor (H1R). In the present study, we show that histamine evokes a concentration- and calcium-dependent release of MMP-9 from human astrocytic U373 cells and primary cultures of human and rat astrocytes through the H1R subtype. Activation of H1R on astrocytes elevated intracellular levels of Ca(2+) that was accompanied by time-dependent increases in MAP kinase p44/p42 and PKC. In-cell western blots revealed dose-dependent increases in both enzymes, confirming involvement of these signal transduction pathways. We next investigated the extent of recombinant human MMP-9 (rhMMP-9) proteolytic activity on soluble oligomeric Aβ (soAβ). Mass spectrometry demonstrated time-dependent cleavage of soAβ (20 μM), but not another amyloidogenic protein amylin, upon incubation with rhMMP-9 (100 nM) at 1, 4 and 17 h. Furthermore, Western blots showed a shift in soAβ equilibrium toward lower order, less toxic monomeric species. In conclusion, both MAPK p44/p42 and PKC pathways appear to be involved in histamine-upregulated MMP-9 release via H1Rs in astrocytes. Furthermore, MMP-9 appears to cleave soAβ into less toxic monomeric species. Given the key role of histamine in MMP-9 release, this neurotransmitter may serve as a potential therapeutic target for AD. PMID:25682263

  17. Prevention by blockade of angiotensin subtype1-receptors of the development of genetic hypertension but not its heritability.

    PubMed Central

    Madeddu, P.; Anania, V.; Varoni, M. V.; Parpaglia, P. P.; Demontis, M. P.; Fattaccio, M. C.; Palomba, D.; Pollock, D.; Glorioso, N.

    1995-01-01

    1. We determined whether early inhibition of angiotensin II subtype1 (AT1) receptors by the newly synthesized nonpeptidic antagonist, A-81988, can attenuate the development of hypertension in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and if the altered blood pressure phenotype can be passed on to the subsequent generation, not exposed to the antagonist. 2. Pairs of SHR were mated while drinking tap water or A-81988 in tap water, and the progeny was maintained on the parental regimen until 14 weeks of age. At this stage, A-81988-treated rats showed lower systolic blood pressure and body weight values (136 +/- 5 versus 185 +/- 4 mmHg and 247 +/- 4 versus 283 +/- 4 g in controls, P < 0.01); while heart rate was similar. In addition, mean blood pressure was reduced (101 +/- 7 versus 170 +/- 7 mmHg in controls, P < 0.01), and the pressor responses to intravenous or intracerebroventricular angiotensin II were inhibited by 27 and 59%, respectively. Heart/body weight ratio was smaller in A-81988-treated rats (3.2 +/- 0.1 versus 3.8 +/- 0.1 in controls, P < 0.01). 3. The antihypertensive and antihypertrophic effect of A-81988 persisted in rats removed from therapy for 7 weeks (systolic blood pressure: 173 +/- 4 versus 220 +/- 4 mmHg, heart/body weight ratio: 3.4 +/- 0.1 versus 4.1 +/- 0.1 in controls at 21 weeks of age, P < 0.01 for both comparisons), whereas the cardiovascular hypertensive phenotype was fully expressed in the subsequent generation that was maintained without treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7582472

  18. The role of dopamine D2, but not D3 or D4, receptor subtypes, in quinpirole-induced inhibition of the cardioaccelerator sympathetic outflow in pithed rats

    PubMed Central

    Altamirano-Espinoza, A H; González-Hernández, A; Manrique-Maldonado, G; Marichal-Cancino, B A; Ruiz-Salinas, I; Villalón, C M

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Quinpirole (a dopamine D2-like receptor agonist) inhibits the cardioaccelerator sympathetic outflow in pithed rats by sympathoinhibitory D2-like receptors. The present study was designed to identify pharmacologically the specific D2-like receptor subtypes (i.e. D2, D3 and D4) involved in this sympathoinhibition by quinpirole. Experimental Approach One hundred fourteen male Wistar rats were pithed, artificially ventilated with room air and prepared for either preganglionic spinal (C7-T1) stimulation of the cardioaccelerator sympathetic outflow (n = 102) or i.v. bolus injections of exogenous noradrenaline (n = 12). This approach resulted in frequency-dependent and dose-dependent tachycardic responses, respectively, as previously reported by our group. Key Results I.v. continuous infusions of quinpirole (0.1–10 μg kg−1 min−1), but not of saline (0.02 mL min−1), dose-dependently inhibited the sympathetically induced tachycardic responses. Moreover, the cardiac sympathoinhibition induced by 3 μg kg−1 min−1 quinpirole (which failed to affect the tachycardic responses to i.v. noradrenaline) was: (i) unchanged after i.v. injections of the antagonists SB-277011-A (D3; 100–300 μg kg−1) or L-745,870 (D4; 30–100 μg kg−1); and (ii) markedly blocked and abolished by, respectively, 100 and 300 μg kg−1 of the D2 preferring receptor subtype antagonist L-741,626. These doses of antagonists, which did not affect per se the sympathetically induced tachycardic responses, were high enough to completely block their respective receptors. Conclusions and Implications The cardiac sympathoinhibition induced by 3 μg kg−1 min−1 quinpirole involves the dopamine D2 receptor subtype, with no evidence for the involvement of the D3 or D4 subtypes. This provides new evidence for understanding the modulation of the cardioaccelerator sympathetic outflow. PMID:24032529

  19. Binding and functional properties of antimuscarinics of the hexocyclium/sila-hexocyclium and hexahydro-diphenidol/hexahydro-sila-diphenidol type to muscarinic receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Waelbroeck, M; Tastenoy, M; Camus, J; Christophe, J; Strohmann, C; Linoh, H; Zilch, H; Tacke, R; Mutschler, E; Lambrecht, G

    1989-09-01

    1. In an attempt to assess the structural requirements for the muscarinic receptor selectivity of hexahydro-diphenidol (hexahydro-difenidol) and hexahydro-sila-diphenidol (hexahydro-sila-difenidol), a series of structurally related C/Si pairs were investigated, along with atropine, pirenzepine and methoctramine, for their binding affinities in NB-OK 1 cells as well as in rat heart and pancreas. 2. The action of these antagonists at muscarinic receptors mediating negative inotropic responses in guinea-pig atria and ileal contractions has also been assessed. 3. Antagonist binding data indicated that NB-OK 1 cells (M1 type) as well as rat heart (cardiac type) and pancreas (glandular/smooth muscle type) possess different muscarinic receptor subtypes. 4. A highly significant correlation was found between the binding affinities of the antagonists to muscarinic receptors in rat heart and pancreas, respectively, and the affinities to muscarinic receptors in guinea-pig atria and ileum. This implies that the muscarinic binding sites in rat heart and the receptors in guinea-pig atria are essentially similar, but different from those in pancreas and ileum. 5. The antimuscarinic potency of hexahydro-diphenidol and hexahydro-sila-diphenidol at the three subtypes was influenced differently by structural modifications (e.g. quaternization). Different selectivity profiles for the antagonists were obtained, which makes these compounds useful tools to investigate further muscarinic receptor heterogeneity. Indeed, the tertiary analogues hexahydro-diphenidol (HHD) and hexahydro-sila-diphenidol (HHSiD) had an M1 = glandular/smooth muscle greater than cardiac selectivity profile, whereas the quaternary analogues HHD methiodide and HHSiD methiodide were M1 preferring (M1 greater than glandular/smooth muscle, cardiac). PMID:2804545

  20. Binding and functional properties of antimuscarinics of the hexocyclium/sila-hexocyclium and hexahydro-diphenidol/hexahydro-sila-diphenidol type to muscarinic receptor subtypes.

    PubMed Central

    Waelbroeck, M.; Tastenoy, M.; Camus, J.; Christophe, J.; Strohmann, C.; Linoh, H.; Zilch, H.; Tacke, R.; Mutschler, E.; Lambrecht, G.

    1989-01-01

    1. In an attempt to assess the structural requirements for the muscarinic receptor selectivity of hexahydro-diphenidol (hexahydro-difenidol) and hexahydro-sila-diphenidol (hexahydro-sila-difenidol), a series of structurally related C/Si pairs were investigated, along with atropine, pirenzepine and methoctramine, for their binding affinities in NB-OK 1 cells as well as in rat heart and pancreas. 2. The action of these antagonists at muscarinic receptors mediating negative inotropic responses in guinea-pig atria and ileal contractions has also been assessed. 3. Antagonist binding data indicated that NB-OK 1 cells (M1 type) as well as rat heart (cardiac type) and pancreas (glandular/smooth muscle type) possess different muscarinic receptor subtypes. 4. A highly significant correlation was found between the binding affinities of the antagonists to muscarinic receptors in rat heart and pancreas, respectively, and the affinities to muscarinic receptors in guinea-pig atria and ileum. This implies that the muscarinic binding sites in rat heart and the receptors in guinea-pig atria are essentially similar, but different from those in pancreas and ileum. 5. The antimuscarinic potency of hexahydro-diphenidol and hexahydro-sila-diphenidol at the three subtypes was influenced differently by structural modifications (e.g. quaternization). Different selectivity profiles for the antagonists were obtained, which makes these compounds useful tools to investigate further muscarinic receptor heterogeneity. Indeed, the tertiary analogues hexahydro-diphenidol (HHD) and hexahydro-sila-diphenidol (HHSiD) had an M1 = glandular/smooth muscle greater than cardiac selectivity profile, whereas the quaternary analogues HHD methiodide and HHSiD methiodide were M1 preferring (M1 greater than glandular/smooth muscle, cardiac). PMID:2804545

  1. Solution conformation of a neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist {alpha}-conotoxin OmIA that discriminates {alpha}3 vs. {alpha}6 nAChR subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Seung-Wook; Kim, Do-Hyoung; Olivera, Baldomero M.; McIntosh, J. Michael; Han, Kyou-Hoon . E-mail: khhan600@kribb.re.kr

    2006-06-23

    {alpha}-Conotoxin OmIA from Conus omaria is the only {alpha}-conotoxin that shows a {approx}20-fold higher affinity to the {alpha}3{beta}2 over the {alpha}6{beta}2 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. We have determined a three-dimensional structure of {alpha}-conotoxin OmIA by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. {alpha}-Conotoxin OmIA has an '{omega}-shaped' overall topology with His{sup 5}-Asn{sup 12} forming an {alpha}-helix. Structural features of {alpha}-conotoxin OmIA responsible for its selectivity are suggested by comparing its surface characteristics with other functionally related {alpha}4/7 subfamily conotoxins. Reduced size of the hydrophilic area in {alpha}-conotoxin OmIA seems to be associated with the reduced affinity towards the {alpha}6{beta}2 nAChR subtype.

  2. Discovery and Characterization of Novel Subtype-Selective Allosteric Agonists for the Investigation of M1 Receptor Function in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Cholinergic transmission in the forebrain is mediated primarily by five subtypes of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), termed M1−M5. Of the mAChR subtypes, M1 is among the most heavily expressed in regions that are critical for learning and memory and has been viewed as the most critical mAChR subtype for memory and attention mechanisms. Unfortunately, it has been difficult to develop selective activators of M1 and other individual mAChR subtypes, which has prevented detailed studies of the functional roles of selective activation of M1. Using a functional high-throughput screening and subsequent diversity-oriented synthesis approach, we have discovered a novel series of highly selective M1 allosteric agonists. These compounds activate M1 with EC50 values in the 150−500 nM range and have unprecedented, clean ancillary pharmacology (no substantial activity at 10 μM across a large panel of targets). Targeted mutagenesis revealed a potentially novel allosteric binding site in the third extracellular loop of the M1 receptor for these allosteric agonists. Optimized compounds, such as VU0357017, provide excellent brain exposure after systemic dosing and have robust in vivo efficacy in reversing scopolamine-induced deficits in a rodent model of contextual fear conditioning. This series of selective M1 allosteric agonists provides critical research tools to allow dissection of M1-mediated effects in the CNS and potential leads for novel treatments for Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia. PMID:21961051

  3. Characterisation of the contribution of the GABA-benzodiazepine α1 receptor subtype to [11C]Ro15-4513 PET images

    PubMed Central

    Myers, James FM; Rosso, Lula; Watson, Ben J; Wilson, Sue J; Kalk, Nicola J; Clementi, Nicoletta; Brooks, David J; Nutt, David J; Turkheimer, Federico E; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R

    2012-01-01

    This positron emission tomography (PET) study aimed to further define selectivity of [11C]Ro15-4513 binding to the GABARα5 relative to the GABARα1 benzodiazepine receptor subtype. The impact of zolpidem, a GABARα1-selective agonist, on [11C]Ro15-4513, which shows selectivity for GABARα5, and the nonselective benzodiazepine ligand [11C]flumazenil binding was assessed in humans. Compartmental modelling of the kinetics of [11C]Ro15-4513 time-activity curves was used to describe distribution volume (VT) differences in regions populated by different GABA receptor subtypes. Those with low α5 were best fitted by one-tissue compartment models; and those with high α5 required a more complex model. The heterogeneity between brain regions suggested spectral analysis as a more appropriate method to quantify binding as it does not a priori specify compartments. Spectral analysis revealed that zolpidem caused a significant VT decrease (∼10%) in [11C]flumazenil, but no decrease in [11C]Ro15-4513 binding. Further analysis of [11C]Ro15-4513 kinetics revealed additional frequency components present in regions containing both α1 and α5 subtypes compared with those containing only α1. Zolpidem reduced one component (mean±s.d.: 71%±41%), presumed to reflect α1-subtype binding, but not another (13%±22%), presumed to reflect α5. The proposed method for [11C]Ro15-4513 analysis may allow more accurate selective binding assays and estimation of drug occupancy for other nonselective ligands. PMID:22214903

  4. Synthesis and in vitro autoradiographic evaluation of a novel high-affinity radioiodinated ligand for imaging brain cannabinoid subtype-1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Sean R; Varnäs, Katarina; Jia, Zhisheng; Gulyás, Balázs; Pike, Victor W; Halldin, Christer

    2009-11-01

    There is strong interest to study the involvement of brain cannabinoid subtype-1 (CB1) receptors in neuropsychiatric disorders with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and a suitable radioligand. Here we report the synthesis of a novel high-affinity radioiodinated CB1 receptor ligand ([125I]8, [125I]1-(2-iodophenyl)-4-cyano-5-(4-methoxyphenyl)-N-(piperidin-1-yl)-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxylate, [125I]SD7015). By autoradiography in vitro, [125I]8 showed selective binding to CB1 receptors on human brain postmortem cryosections and now merits labeling with iodine-123 for further evaluation as a SPECT radioligand in non-human primate. PMID:19767206

  5. Structure-Activity Relationships in a Novel Series of 7-Substituted-Aryl Quinolines and 5-Substituted-Aryl Benzothiazoles at the Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 5

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Zou, Mu-Fa; Rodriguez, Alice L.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Newman, Amy Hauck

    2010-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) has been implicated in numerous neuropsychiatric disorders including addiction. We have discovered that the rigid diaryl alkyne template, derived from the potent and selective noncompetitive mGluR5 antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP), can serve to guide the design of novel quinoline analogues and pharmacophore optimization has resulted in potent mGluR5 noncompetitive antagonists (EC50 range 60–100 nM) in the quinoline series. PMID:20382541

  6. Involvement of subtype 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors in apoptosis and caspase-7 over-expression in spinal cord of neuropathic rats

    PubMed Central

    Siniscalco, Dario; Giordano, Catia; Fuccio, Carlo; Luongo, Livio; Ferraraccio, Franca; Rossi, Francesca; de Novellis, Vito; Roth, Kevin A.; Maione, Sabatino

    2008-01-01

    The effect of the non-selective, 1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA), and selective (3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrano[2,3-b]quinolin-7-yl)-(cis-4- methoxycyclohexyl) methanone (JNJ16259685), metabotropic glutamate subtype 1 (mGlu1) receptor antagonists, on rat sciatic nerve chronic constrictive injury (CCI)- induced hyperalgesia, allodynia, spinal dorsal horn apoptosis, and gliosis was examined at 3 and 7 days post-injury. RT-PCR analysis showed increased expression of bax, apoptotic protease-activating factor-1 (apaf-1), nestin, GFAP, and caspase-7 mRNA in the dorsal horn spinal cord by 3 days post-CCI. At 7 days post-CCI, only over-expression of bcl-2, nestin and GFAP mRNA was observed. Administration of AIDA reduced thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia at 3 and 7 days post-CCI; administration of JNJ16259685 reduced thermal hyperalgesia at 3 and 7 days post-CCI, but not mechanical allodynia. AIDA decreased the mRNA levels of bax, apaf-1, GFAP and caspase-7 genes. JNJ16259685 increased the mRNA levels of bcl- 2 and GFAP gene, and decreased APAF-1 and caspases-7 genes. Inhibiting mGlu1 receptors also reduced TUNEL-positive profiles and immunohistochemical reactivity for caspase-7. We report here that despite inhibiting CCI-induced over-expression of pro-apoptotic genes in the spinal cord dorsal horn, the selective mGlu1 receptor antagonist JNJ16259685 exerted only a slight and transient allodynic effect. Moreover, JNJ16259685, but not the non-selective AIDA, increased astrogliosis which may account for its decreased analgesic efficacy. This study provides evidence that the contemporary and partial blockade of group I and likely ionotropic glutamate receptors may be a more suitable therapy than selective blockade of mGlu1 subtype receptors condition to decrease neuropathic pain symptoms. PMID:18325779

  7. Curcumin pretreatment mediates antidiabetogenesis via functional regulation of adrenergic receptor subtypes in the pancreas of multiple low-dose streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Naijil, George; Anju, T R; Jayanarayanan, S; Paulose, C S

    2015-09-01

    Lifestyle modification pivoting on nutritional management holds tremendous potential to meet the challenge of management of diabetes. The current study hypothesizes that regular uptake of curcumin lowers the incidence of diabetes by functional regulation of pancreatic adrenergic receptor subtypes. The specific objective of the study was to identify the regulatory pathways implicated in the antidiabetogenesis effect of curcumin in multiple low-dose streptozotocin (MLD-STZ)-induced diabetic Wistar rats. Administration of MLD-STZ to curcumin-pretreated rats induced a prediabetic condition. Scatchard analysis, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and confocal microscopic studies confirmed a significant increase in α2-adrenergic receptor expression in the pancreas of diabetic rats. Pretreatment with curcumin significantly decreased α2-adrenergic receptor expression. The diabetic group showed a significant decrease in the expression of β-adrenergic receptors when compared with control. Pretreatment significantly increased β-adrenergic receptor expression to near control. When compared with the diabetic rats, a significant up-regulation of CREB, phospholipase C, insulin receptor, and glucose transporter 2 were observed in the pretreated group. Curcumin pretreatment was also able to maintain near control levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate, cyclic guanosine monophosphate, and inositol triphosphate. These results indicate that a marked decline in α2-adrenergic receptor function relents sympathetic inhibition of insulin release. It also follows that escalated signaling through β-adrenergic receptors mediates neuronal stimulation of hyperglycemia-induced β-cell compensatory response. Curcumin-mediated functional regulation of adrenergic receptors and modulation of key cell signaling molecules improve pancreatic glucose sensing, insulin gene expression, and insulin secretion. PMID:26255758

  8. α-Conotoxins Identify the α3β4* Subtype as the Predominant Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Expressed in Human Adrenal Chromaffin Cells.

    PubMed

    Hone, Arik J; McIntosh, J Michael; Azam, Layla; Lindstrom, Jon; Lucero, Linda; Whiteaker, Paul; Passas, Juan; Blázquez, Jesús; Albillos, Almudena

    2015-11-01

    Ligands that selectively inhibit human α3β2 and α6β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) and not the closely related α3β4 and α6β4 subtypes are lacking. Current α-conotoxins (α-Ctxs) that discriminate among these nAChR subtypes in rat fail to discriminate among the human receptor homologs. In this study, we describe the development of α-Ctx LvIA(N9R,V10A) that is 3000-fold more potent on oocyte-expressed human α3β2 than α3β4 and 165-fold more potent on human α6/α3β2β3 than α6/α3β4 nAChRs. This analog was used in conjuction with three other α-Ctx analogs and patch-clamp electrophysiology to characterize the nAChR subtypes expressed by human adrenal chromaffin cells. LvIA(N9R,V10A) showed little effect on the acetylcholine-evoked currents in these cells at concentrations expected to inhibit nAChRs with β2 ligand-binding sites. In contrast, the β4-selective α-Ctx BuIA(T5A,P6O) inhibited >98% of the acetylcholine-evoked current, indicating that most of the heteromeric receptors contained β4 ligand-binding sites. Additional studies using the α6-selective α-Ctx PeIA(A7V,S9H,V10A,N11R,E14A) indicated that the predominant heteromeric nAChR expressed by human adrenal chromaffin cells is the α3β4* subtype (asterisk indicates the possible presence of additional subunits). This conclusion was supported by polymerase chain reaction experiments of human adrenal medulla gland and of cultured human adrenal chromaffin cells that demonstrated prominent expression of RNAs for α3, α5, α7, β2, and β4 subunits and a low abundance of RNAs for α2, α4, α6, and α10 subunits. PMID:26330550

  9. Ultradian oscillation in expression of four melatonin receptor subtype genes in the pineal gland of the grass puffer, a semilunar-synchronized spawner, under constant darkness

    PubMed Central

    Ikegami, Taro; Maruyama, Yusuke; Doi, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Atsuhiko; Ando, Hironori

    2015-01-01

    Melatonin receptor gene expression as well as melatonin synthesis and secretion activities were examined in the pineal gland of the grass puffer, which exhibits unique lunar/tidal cycle-synchronized mass spawing: spawning occurs before high tide on the day of spring tide during spawing season. Melatonin synthesizing activity was assessed by the abundance of arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase 2 (AANAT2) mRNA. The amount of aanat2 mRNA was low during light phase and initiated to increase after the light was turned off. The secretion of melatonin from primary pineal organ culture was stimulated after the light was turned off and ceased immediately after the light was turned on. The expression levels of four melatonin receptor subtype genes (mel1a1.4, mel1a1.7, mel1b, and mel1c) showed synchronous variations, and the levels tended to be high during the dark phase under light/dark conditions. These results suggest that the action of melatonin on the pineal gland is highly dependent on light and photoperiod, possibly with stronger action during night time. Under constant darkness, the expression of four melatonin receptor subtype genes showed unique ultradian oscillations with the period of 14.0–15.4 h, suggesting the presence of a circatidal oscillator in the pineal gland. The present results indicate that melatonin may serve local chronobiological functions in the pineal gland. These cyclic expressions of melatonin receptor genes in the pineal gland may be important in the control of the lunar/tidal cycle-synchronized mass spawning in the grass puffer. PMID:25688184

  10. Activation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtype 4 Is Essential for Cholinergic Stimulation of Gastric Acid Secretion: Relation to D Cell/Somatostatin

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Koji; Endoh, Takuya; Hayashi, Shusaku; Aihara, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors exist in five subtypes (M1∼M5), and they are widely expressed in various tissues to mediate diverse autonomic functions, including gastric secretion. In the present study, we demonstrated, using M1∼M5 KO mice, the importance of M4 receptors in carbachol (CCh) stimulation of acid secretion and investigated how the secretion is modulated by the activation of M4 receptors. Methods: C57BL/6J mice of wild-type (WT) and M1–M5 KO were used. Under urethane anesthesia, acid secretion was measured in the stomach equipped with an acute fistula. CCh (30 μg/kg) was given subcutaneously (s.c.) to stimulate acid secretion. Atropine or octreotide (a somatostatin analog) was given s.c. 20 min before the administration of CCh. CYN154806 (a somatostatin SST2 receptor antagonist) was given i.p. 20 min before the administration of octreotide or CCh. Results: CCh caused an increase of acid secretion in WT mice, and the effect was totally inhibited by prior administration of atropine. The effect of CCh was similarly observed in the animals lacking M1, M2 or M5 receptors but significantly decreased in M3 or M4 KO mice. CYN154806, the SST2 receptor antagonist, dose-dependently and significantly reversed the decreased acid response to CCh in M4 but not M3 KO mice. Octreotide, the somatostatin analog, inhibited the secretion of acid under CCh-stimulated conditions in WT mice. The immunohistochemical study showed the localization of M4 receptors on D cells in the stomach. Serum somatostatin levels in M4 KO mice were higher than WT mice under basal conditions, while those in WT mice were significantly decreased in response to CCh. Conclusions: These results suggest that under cholinergic stimulation the acid secretion is directly mediated by M3 receptors and indirectly modified by M4 receptors. It is assumed that the activation of M4 receptors inhibits the release of somatostatin from D cells and minimizes the acid inhibitory effect of

  11. (3H)WB4101 labels the 5-HT1A serotonin receptor subtype in rat brain. Guanine nucleotide and divalent cation sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, A.B.; Battaglia, G.; Creese, I.

    1985-12-01

    In the presence of a 30 nM prazosin mask, (/sup 3/H)-2-(2,6-dimethoxyphenoxyethyl) aminomethyl-1,4-benzodioxane ((/sup 3/H)WB4101) can selectively label 5-HT1 serotonin receptors. Serotonin exhibits high affinity (Ki = 2.5 nM) and monophasic competition for (/sup 3/H) WB4101 binding in cerebral cortex. We have found a significant correlation (r = 0.96) between the affinities of a number of serotonergic and nonserotonergic compounds at (/sup 3/H)WB4101-binding sites in the presence of 30 nM prazosin and (/sup 3/H) lysergic acid diethylamide ((/sup 3/H)LSD)-labeled 5-HT1 serotonin receptors in homogenates of rat cerebral cortex. Despite similar pharmacological profiles, distribution studies indicate that, in the presence of 5 mM MgSO4, the Bmax of (/sup 3/H)WB4101 is significantly lower than the Bmax of (/sup 3/H)LSD in various brain regions. WB4101 competition for (/sup 3/H) LSD-labeled 5-HT1 receptors fits best to a computer-derived model assuming two binding sites, with the KH for WB4101 being similar to the KD of (/sup 3/H)WB4101 binding derived from saturation experiments. This suggests that (/sup 3/H)WB4101 labels only one of the subtypes of the 5-HT1 serotonin receptors labeled by (/sup 3/H)LSD. The selective 5-HT1A serotonin receptor antagonist, spiperone, and the selective 5-HT1A agonist, 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetraline, exhibit high affinity and monophasic competition for (/sup 3/H)WB4101 but compete for multiple (/sup 3/H)LSD 5-HT1 binding sites. These data indicate that (/sup 3/H)WB4101 selectively labels the 5-HT1A serotonin receptor, whereas (/sup 3/H) LSD appears to label both the 5-HT1A and the 5-HT1B serotonin receptor subtypes. The divalent cations, Mn2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ were found to markedly increase the affinity and Bmax of (/sup 3/H)WB4101 binding in cerebral cortex. Conversely, the guanine nucleotides guanylylimidodiphosphate and GTP, but not the adenosine nucleotide ATP, markedly reduce the Bmax of (/sup 3/H)WB4101 binding.

  12. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype 4 is essential for cholinergic stimulation of duodenal bicarbonate secretion in mice - relationship to D cell/somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, K; Kita, K; Takahashi, K; Aihara, E; Hayashi, S

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the roles of muscarinic (M) acetylcholine receptor subtype in the cholinergic stimulation of duodenal HCO3(-) secretion using knockout (KO) mice. Wild-type and M1-M5 KO C57BL/6J mice were used. The duodenal mucosa was mounted on an Ussing chamber, and HCO3(-) secretion was measured at pH 7.0 using a pH-stat method in vitro. Carbachol (CCh) or other agents were added to the serosal side. CCh dose-dependently stimulated HCO3(-) secretion in wild-type mice, and this effect was completely inhibited in the presence of atropine. The HCO3(-) response to CCh in wild-type mice was also inhibited by pirenzepine (M1 antagonist), 4DAMP (M3 antagonist), and tropicamide (M4 antagonist), but not by methoctramine (M2 antagonist). CCh stimulated HCO3(-) secretion in M2 and M5 KO animals as effectively as in WT mice; however, this stimulatory effect was significantly attenuated in M1, M3, and M4 KO mice. The decrease observed in the CCh-stimulated HCO3(-) response in M4 KO mice was reversed by the co-application of CYN154806, a somatostatin receptor type 2 (SST2) antagonist. Octreotide (a somatostatin analogue) decreased the basal and CCh-stimulated secretion of HCO3(-) in wild-type mice. The co-localized expression of somatostatin and M4 receptors was confirmed immunohistologically in the duodenum. We concluded that the duodenal HCO3(-) response to CCh was directly mediated by M1/M3 receptors and indirectly modified by M4 receptors. The activation of M4 receptors was assumed to inhibit the release of somatostatin from D cells and potentiate the HCO3(-) response by removing the negative influence of somatostatin via the activation of SST2 receptors. PMID:26084221

  13. Down-regulation of muscarinic receptors and the m3 subtype in white-footed mice by dietary exposure to parathion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jett, D.A.; Hill, E.F.; Fernando, J.C.; Eldefrawi, M.E.; Eldefrawi, A.T.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of ad libitum dietary exposure (as occurs in the field) to parathion for 14 d was investigated on the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) in brains and submaxillary glands of adults of a field species, the white-footed mouse Peromyscus leucopus. Immunoprecipitation using subtype selective antibodies revealed that the relative ratios of the m1-m5 mAChR subtypes in Peromyscus brain were similar to those in rat brain. There was little variability in acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in control mice brains but large variability in 39 exposed mice, resulting from differences in food ingestion and parathion metabolism. Accordingly, data on radioligand binding to mAChRs in each mouse brain were correlated with brain AChE activity in the same mouse, and AChE inhibition served as a biomarker of exposure reflecting in situ paraoxon concentrations. Exposure to parathion for 14 d reduced maximal binding (Bmax) of [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]QNB), [3H]-N-methylscopolamine ([3H]NMS), and [3H]-4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methiodide ([3H]-4-DAMP) by up to approximately 58% without affecting receptor affinities for these ligands. Maximal reduction in Bmax of [3H]QNB and [3H]-4-DAMP binding occurred in mice with highest AChE inhibition, while equivalent maximal reduction in Bmax of [3H]NMS occurred in mice with only approximately 10% AChE inhibition, without further change at higher parathion doses. This is believed to be due to the hydrophilicity of [3H]NMS, which limits its accessibility to internalized desensitized receptors. In submaxillary glands (mAChRs are predominantly m3 subtype), there were significant dose-dependent reductions in [3H]QNB binding and m3 mRNA levels in exposed mice, revealed by Northern blot analyses. The reduction in m3 receptors is suggested to result mostly from reduced synthesis at the transcription level, rather than from translational or posttranslational events. The data suggest that down-regulation of mAChRs occurs

  14. Racial disparities in individual breast cancer outcomes by hormone-receptor subtype, area-level socio-economic status and healthcare resources

    PubMed Central

    Akinyemiju, Tomi; Moore, Justin Xavier; Ojesina, Akinyemi I.; Waterbor, John W.; Altekruse, Sean F

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the influence of area-level socio-economic status and healthcare access in addition to tumor hormone-receptor subtype on individual breast cancer stage, treatment, and mortality among Non-Hispanic (NH)-Black, NH-White, and Hispanic US adults. Analysis was based on 456,217 breast cancer patients in the SEER database from 2000 to 2010. Multilevel and multivariable-adjusted logistic and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was conducted to account for clustering by SEER registry of diagnosis. NH-Black women had greater area-level access to healthcare resources compared with women of other races. For instance, the average numbers of oncology hospitals per million population in counties with NH-Black, NH-White, and Hispanic women were 8.1, 7.7, and 5.0 respectively; average numbers of medical doctors per million in counties with NH-Black, NH-White, and Hispanic women were 100.7, 854.0, and 866.3 respectively; and average number of Ob/Gyn in counties with NH-Black, NH-White, and Hispanic women was 155.6, 127.4, and 127.3, respectively (all p values <0.001). Regardless, NH-Black women (HR 1.39, 95 % CI 1.36–1.43) and Hispanic women (HR 1.05, 95 % CI 1.03–1.08) had significantly higher breast cancer mortality compared with NH-White women even after adjusting for hormone-receptor subtype, area-level socioeconomic status, and area-level healthcare access. In addition, lower county-level socio-economic status and healthcare access measures were significantly and independently associated with stage at presentation, surgery, and radiation treatment as well as mortality after adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, and HR subtype. Although breast cancer HR subtype is a strong, important, and consistent predictor of breast cancer outcomes, we still observed significant and independent influences of area-level SES and HCA on breast cancer outcomes that deserve further study and may be critical to eliminating breast cancer outcome

  15. Racial disparities in individual breast cancer outcomes by hormone-receptor subtype, area-level socio-economic status and healthcare resources.

    PubMed

    Akinyemiju, Tomi; Moore, Justin Xavier; Ojesina, Akinyemi I; Waterbor, John W; Altekruse, Sean F

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study is to determine the influence of area-level socio-economic status and healthcare access in addition to tumor hormone-receptor subtype on individual breast cancer stage, treatment, and mortality among Non-Hispanic (NH)-Black, NH-White, and Hispanic US adults. Analysis was based on 456,217 breast cancer patients in the SEER database from 2000 to 2010. Multilevel and multivariable-adjusted logistic and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was conducted to account for clustering by SEER registry of diagnosis. NH-Black women had greater area-level access to healthcare resources compared with women of other races. For instance, the average numbers of oncology hospitals per million population in counties with NH-Black, NH-White, and Hispanic women were 8.1, 7.7, and 5.0 respectively; average numbers of medical doctors per million in counties with NH-Black, NH-White, and Hispanic women were 100.7, 854.0, and 866.3 respectively; and average number of Ob/Gyn in counties with NH-Black, NH-White, and Hispanic women was 155.6, 127.4, and 127.3, respectively (all p values <0.001). Regardless, NH-Black women (HR 1.39, 95 % CI 1.36-1.43) and Hispanic women (HR 1.05, 95 % CI 1.03-1.08) had significantly higher breast cancer mortality compared with NH-White women even after adjusting for hormone-receptor subtype, area-level socio-economic status, and area-level healthcare access. In addition, lower county-level socio-economic status and healthcare access measures were significantly and independently associated with stage at presentation, surgery, and radiation treatment as well as mortality after adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, and HR subtype. Although breast cancer HR subtype is a strong, important, and consistent predictor of breast cancer outcomes, we still observed significant and independent influences of area-level SES and HCA on breast cancer outcomes that deserve further study and may be critical to eliminating breast cancer outcome

  16. Influence of moonlight on mRNA expression patterns of melatonin receptor subtypes in the pineal organ of a tropical fish.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong-Ju; Park, Ji-Gweon; Takeuchi, Yuki; Hur, Sung-Pyo; Lee, Young-Don; Kim, Se-Jae; Takemura, Akihiro

    2014-04-01

    The goldlined spinefoot, Siganus guttatus, is a lunar-synchronized spawner, which repeatedly releases gametes around the first quarter moon during the reproductive season. A previous study reported that manipulating moonlight brightness at night disrupted synchronized spawning, suggesting involvement of this natural light source in lunar synchronization. The present study examined whether the mRNA expression pattern of melatonin receptor subtypes MT1 and Mel1c in the pineal organ of the goldlined spinefoot is related to moonlight. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that the abundance of MT1 and Mel1c mRNA at midnight increased during the new moon phase and decreased during the full moon phase. Exposing fish to moonlight intensity during the full moon period resulted in a decrease in Mel1c mRNA abundance within 1h. Fluctuations in the melatonin receptor genes according to changes in the moon phase agreed with those of melatonin levels in the blood. These results indicate that periodic changes in cues from the moon influence melatonin receptor mRNA expression levels. The melatonin-melatonin receptor system may play a role in predicting the moon phase through changes in night brightness. PMID:24269345

  17. The anti-inflammatory selective melanocortin receptor subtype 4 agonist, RO27-3225, fails to prevent acoustic trauma-induced tinnitus in rats.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yiwen; McPherson, Kate; Reid, Peter; Smith, Paul F

    2015-08-15

    In preliminary studies we have observed a massive microglial activation in the cochlear nucleus following acoustic trauma-induced tinnitus in rats, which suggests that inflammatory responses within the central auditory system may be involved in the development and maintenance of tinnitus. Recently, the anti-inflammatory properties of melanocortins (MCs), have gained increasing interest in pharmacology due to their promising therapeutic potential in the treatment of inflammatory-mediated diseases. Among the five subtypes of the MC receptor, MC3 and MC4 receptors are the predominant brain receptors and are thought to play an important role in brain inflammation and neuroprotection. Importantly, MC4 receptors have been found in the mouse and rat central auditory systems. In this study we investigated whether the MC4 receptor agonist, RO27-3225, injected s.c at a dose of 90 or 180µg/kg, 30min before acoustic trauma and then every 12h for 10 days, could prevent the development of acoustic trauma-induced tinnitus in rats, using a conditioned behavioural suppression model. Although evidence of tinnitus developed in the exposed-vehicle group compared to the sham-vehicle group (P≤0.03), in response to a 32kHz tone, there were no significant drug effects from treatment with RO27-3225, indicating that it did not confer any protection against the development of tinnitus in this animal model. This result suggests that the anti-inflammatory effects of MC4 receptor agonists may not be sufficient to prevent tinnitus. PMID:25977231

  18. A1-, A2A- and A3-subtype adenosine receptors modulate intraocular pressure in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Marcel Y; Stone, Richard A; Civan, Mortimer M

    2001-01-01

    Despite the potential importance of the mouse in studying the pharmacology of aqueous dynamics, measurement of intraocular pressure (IOP) in its very small eye has been problematic. Utilizing a novel servo-null electrophysiologic approach recently applied to the mouse, we have identified a diversity of adenosine-receptor mechanisms in modulating IOP in this species. We report the first evidence that A3 receptors increase IOP in any species, and verify in the mouse reports with larger mammals that A1 receptors lower and A2A receptors increase IOP. PMID:11564641

  19. A divergent role for estrogen receptor-beta in node-positive and node-negative breast cancer classified according to molecular subtypes: an observational prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Novelli, Flavia; Milella, Michele; Melucci, Elisa; Di Benedetto, Anna; Sperduti, Isabella; Perrone-Donnorso, Raffaele; Perracchio, Letizia; Venturo, Irene; Nisticò, Cecilia; Fabi, Alessandra; Buglioni, Simonetta; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Mottolese, Marcella

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Estrogen receptor-alpha (ER-α) and progesterone receptor (PgR) are consolidated predictors of response to hormonal therapy (HT). In contrast, little information regarding the role of estrogen receptor-beta (ER-β) in various breast cancer risk groups treated with different therapeutic regimens is available. In particular, there are no data concerning ER-β distribution within the novel molecular breast cancer subtypes luminal A (LA) and luminal B (LB), HER2 (HS), and triple-negative (TN). Methods We conducted an observational prospective study using immunohistochemistry to evaluate ER-β expression in 936 breast carcinomas. Associations with conventional biopathological factors and with molecular subtypes were analyzed by multiple correspondence analysis (MCA), while univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis and classification and regression tree analysis were applied to determine the impact of ER-β on disease-free survival in the 728 patients with complete follow-up data. Results ER-β evenly distributes (55.5%) across the four molecular breast cancer subtypes, confirming the lack of correlation between ER-β and classical prognosticators. However, the relationships among the biopathological factors, analyzed by MCA, showed that ER-β positivity is located in the quadrant containing more aggressive phenotypes such as HER2 and TN or ER-α/PgR/Bcl2- tumors. Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox regression analysis identified ER-β as a significant discriminating factor for disease-free survival both in the node-negative LA (P = 0.02) subgroup, where it is predictive of response to HT, and in the node-positive LB (P = 0.04) group, where, in association with PgR negativity, it conveys a higher risk of relapse. Conclusion Our data indicated that, in contrast to node-negative patients, in node-positive breast cancer patients, ER-β positivity appears to be a biomarker related to a more aggressive clinical course. In this context, further investigations

  20. The effect of hypophysectomy and growth hormone replacement on sst1 and sst2 somatostatin receptor subtype messenger ribonucleic acids in the arcuate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Guo, F; Beaudet, A; Tannenbaum, G S

    1996-09-01

    Although considerable evidence indicates that somatostatin (SRIF) exerts direct actions on GH-releasing hormone-containing arcuate neurons within the hypothalamus to modulate hypophyseal GH secretion, the underlying mechanism(s) remains to be elucidated. We recently demonstrated high levels of expression of the messenger RNAs (mRNAs) coding for two prototypic receptors of the recently cloned SRIF receptor (sst) family, sst1 and sst2, in the arcuate nucleus of the rat hypothalamus. However, information on the biological roles of these receptor subtypes and the factors regulating their expression is lacking. In the present study, we hypothesized that perturbations in GH would influence sst mRNA levels in cells of the arcuate nucleus in vivo. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of hypophysectomy (HPX) and HPX with GH replacement, on sst1 and sst2 mRNA levels in the brains of adult male rats by in situ hybridization using 35S-labeled antisense riboprobes. The number of labeled cells and the density of silver grains per cell were quantified using a computer-assisted image analysis system. Two weeks after HPX, there was a 50-60% reduction in both the number and labeling density of sst1 and sst2 mRNA-expressing cells in the arcuate nucleus compared to those in sham-operated control rats. Administration of recombinant human GH (200 micrograms/day for 7 days by continuous sc infusion using osmotic minipumps) to HPX rats augmented both the cell number (P < 0.05) and labeling density (P < 0.01) of sst1 mRNA in the arcuate nucleus, but did not significantly alter sst2 mRNA levels compared to those in HPX rats infused with H2O. There were no significant changes in sst1 and sst2 mRNA levels in extra-arcuate areas, including the cerebral cortex and medial habenula, or in suprachiasmatic, medial preoptic, and magnocellular preoptic nuclei after either HPX or GH replacement. These results indicate that the expression of both sst1 and sst2 SRIF receptor subtypes in

  1. Structure and Receptor Binding Preferences of Recombinant Hemagglutinins from Avian and Human H6 and H10 Influenza A Virus Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hua; Carney, Paul J.; Chang, Jessie C.; Villanueva, Julie M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT During 2013, three new avian influenza A virus subtypes, A(H7N9), A(H6N1), and A(H10N8), resulted in human infections. While the A(H7N9) virus resulted in a significant epidemic in China across 19 provinces and municipalities, both A(H6N1) and A(H10N8) viruses resulted in only a few human infections. This study focuses on the major surface glycoprotein hemagglutinins from both of these novel human viruses. The detailed structural and glycan microarray analyses presented here highlight the idea that both A(H6N1) and A(H10N8) virus hemagglutinins retain a strong avian receptor binding preference and thus currently pose a low risk for sustained human infections. IMPORTANCE Human infections with zoonotic influenza virus subtypes continue to be a great public health concern. We report detailed structural analysis and glycan microarray data for recombinant hemagglutinins from A(H6N1) and A(H10N8) viruses, isolated from human infections in 2013, and compare them with hemagglutinins of avian origin. This is the first structural report of an H6 hemagglutinin, and our results should further the understanding of these viruses and provide useful information to aid in the continuous surveillance of these zoonotic influenza viruses. PMID:25673707

  2. Orally Active Metabotropic Glutamate Subtype 2 Receptor Positive Allosteric Modulators: Structure-Activity Relationships and Assessment in a Rat Model of Nicotine Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Sidique, Shyama; Dhanya, Raveendra-Panickar; Sheffler, Douglas J.; Nickols, Hilary Highfield; Yang, Li; Dahl, Russell; Mangravita-Novo, Arianna; Smith, Layton H.; D’Souza, Manoranjan S.; Semenova, Svetlana; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Markou, Athina; Cosford, Nicholas D. P.

    2012-01-01

    Compounds that modulate metabotropic glutamate subtype 2 (mGlu2) receptors have the potential to treat several disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) including drug dependence. Herein we describe the synthesis and structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies around a series of mGlu2 receptor positive allosteric modulators (PAMs). The effects of N-substitution (R1) and substitutions on the aryl ring (R2) were identified as key areas for SAR exploration (Figure 3). Investigation of the effects of varying substituents in both the isoindolinone (2) and benzisothiazolone (3) series led to compounds with improved in vitro potency and/or efficacy. In addition, several analogues exhibited promising pharmacokinetic (PK) properties. Furthermore, compound 2 was shown to dose-dependently decrease nicotine self-administration in rats following oral administration. Our data, showing for the first time efficacy of an mGlu2 receptor PAM in this in vivo model, suggest potential utility for the treatment of nicotine dependence in humans. PMID:23009245

  3. The potency and efficacy of anticholinergics to inhibit haloperidol-induced catalepsy in rats correlates with their rank order of affinities for the muscarinic receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Erosa-Rivero, Helena B; Bata-García, José L; Alvarez-Cervera, Fernando J; Heredia-López, Francisco J; Góngora-Alfaro, José L

    2014-06-01

    Extrapyramidal syndromes (EPS) caused by antipsychotic therapy are currently treated with anticholinergics that lack selectivity for the five muscarinic receptor subtypes. Since these receptors are heterogeneously expressed among the different classes of striatal neurons and their afferents, it can be expected that their simultaneous blockade will cause distinct, sometimes opposed, effects within the striatal circuitry. In order to test the hypothesis that the differential blockade of the muscarinic receptor subtypes would influence their potency and efficacy to prevent EPS, here we tested four anticholinergics with varying order of affinities for the muscarinic receptor subtypes, and compared their dose-response curves to inhibit haloperidol-induced catalepsy in male rats. Drugs were applied into the lateral ventricle 15 min before haloperidol (2 mg/kg, s.c.). Catalepsy was measured in the bar test at 15 min intervals during 5 h. The preferential M1/M4 antagonist pirenzepine (3, 10, 30, 100, and 300 nmol) caused a dose-dependent inhibition of catalepsy intensity: ED50 = 5.6 nmol [95% CI, 3.9-8.1], and latency: ED50 = 5.6 nmol [95% CI, 3.7-8.6]. Pirenzepine had the steepest dose-response curve, producing maximal inhibition (84 ± 5%) at the dose of 10 nmol, while its effect tended to reverse at higher doses (62 ± 11%). The purported M1/M3 antagonist 4-DAMP (30, 100, and 300 nmol) also caused a dose-dependent inhibition of catalepsy intensity: ED50 = 29.5 nmol [95% CI, 7.0 to 123.0], and latency: ED50 = 28.5 nmol [95% CI, 2.2 to 362.0]. However, the curve for 4-DAMP had a less pronounced slope, reaching its maximal effect (63 ± 14%) at the dose of 300 nmol. The M2/M4 antagonist AF-DX 116 (10, 30, and 300 nmol) only caused a partial inhibition of catalepsy (30 ± 11%) at the dose of 30 nmol, but this changed to a non-significant increment (15 ± 10%) at the dose of 100 nmol. The alleged M4 antagonist tropicamide (30, 100, 300, and

  4. A comparative study of the effects of the intravenous self-administration or subcutaneous minipump infusion of nicotine on the expression of brain neuronal nicotinic receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Milena; Mugnaini, Manolo; Tessari, Michela; Zoli, Michele; Gaimarri, Annalisa; Manfredi, Irene; Pistillo, Francesco; Clementi, Francesco; Gotti, Cecilia

    2010-08-01

    Long-term nicotine exposure changes neuronal acetylcholine nicotinic receptor (nAChR) subtype expression in the brains of smokers and experimental animals. The aim of this study was to investigate nicotine-induced changes in nAChR expression in two models commonly used to describe the effects of nicotine in animals: operant (two-lever presses) intravenous self-administration (SA) and passive subcutaneous nicotine administration via an osmotic minipump (MP). In the MP group, alpha4beta2 nAChRs were up-regulated in all brain regions, alpha6beta2* nAChRs were down-regulated in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and caudate-putamen, and alpha7 nAChRs were up-regulated in the caudal cerebral cortex (CCx); the up-regulation of alpha4beta2alpha5 nAChRs in the CCx was also suggested. In the SA group, alpha4beta2 up-regulation was lower and limited to the CCx and NAc; there were no detectable changes in alpha6beta2* or alpha7 nACRs. In the CCx of the MP rats, there was a close correlation between the increase in alpha4beta2 binding and alpha4 and beta2 subunit levels measured by means of Western blotting, demonstrating that the up-regulation was due to an increase in alpha4beta2 proteins. Western blotting also showed that the increase in the beta2 subunit exceeded that of the alpha4 subunit, suggesting that a change in alpha4beta2 stoichiometry may occur in vivo as has been shown in vitro. These results show that nicotine has an area-specific effect on receptor subtypes, regardless of its administration route, but the effect is quantitatively greater in the case of MP administration. PMID:20439469

  5. (11) C-labeled and (18) F-labeled PET ligands for subtype-specific imaging of histamine receptors in the brain.

    PubMed

    Funke, Uta; Vugts, Danielle J; Janssen, Bieneke; Spaans, Arnold; Kruijer, Perry S; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Perk, Lars R; Windhorst, Albert D

    2013-01-01

    The signaling molecule histamine plays a key role in the mediation of immune reactions, in gastric secretion, and in the sensory system. In addition, it has an important function as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, acting in pituitary hormone secretion, wakefulness, motor and cognitive functions, as well as in itch and nociception. This has raised interest in the role of the histaminergic system for the treatment and diagnosis of various pathologies such as allergy, sleeping and eating disorders, neurodegeneration, neuroinflammation, mood disorders, and pruritus. In the past 20 years, several ligands targeting the four different histamine receptor subtypes have been explored as potential radiotracers for positron emission tomography (PET). This contribution provides an overview of the developments of subtype-selective carbon-11-labeled and fluorine-18-labeled compounds for imaging in the brain. Using specific radioligands, the H1 R expression in human brain could be examined in diseases such as schizophrenia, depression, and anorexia nervosa. In addition, the sedative effects of antihistamines could be investigated in terms of H1 R occupancy. The H3 R is of special interest because of its regulatory role in the release of various other neurotransmitters, and initial H3 R PET imaging studies in humans have been reported. The H4 R is the youngest member of the histamine receptor family and is involved in neuroinflammation and various sensory pathways. To date, two H4 R-specific (11) C-labeled ligands have been synthesized, and the imaging of the H4 R in vivo is in the early stage. PMID:24285318

  6. Role of Dopamine Receptors Subtypes, D1-Like and D2-Like, within the Nucleus Accumbens Subregions, Core and Shell, on Memory Consolidation in the One-Trial Inhibitory Avoidance Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manago, Francesca; Castellano, Claudio; Oliverio, Alberto; Mele, Andrea; De Leonibus, Elvira

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence demonstrated that dopamine within the nucleus accumbens mediates consolidation of both associative and nonassociative memories. However, the specific contribution of the nucleus accumbens subregions, core and shell, and of D1 and D2 receptors subtypes has not been yet clarified. The aim of this study was, therefore, to directly…

  7. Survival Improvement in Korean Breast Cancer Patients Due to Increases in Early-Stage Cancers and Hormone Receptor Positive/HER2 Negative Subtypes: A Nationwide Registry-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    You, Jee Man; Kim, Yun Gyoung; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Nam, Seok Jin; Lee, Jong Won; Lim, Woosung; Lee, Mi-Ri; Noh, Dong-Young

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate whether the observed changes over time in the survival rates vary according to the intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer diagnosed. Methods Data from 46,320 breast cancer patients in the Korean Breast Cancer Registry who underwent surgery between 1999 and 2006 were reviewed. Among them, results from 25,887 patients with available data about the status of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) were analyzed. Patients were classified into two cohorts according to the year in which they underwent surgery: 1999-2002 and 2003-2006. Results The patients treated in the latter time period showed significantly better overall survival (OS) compared with those in the former period when adjusted for follow-up duration. The proportion of hormone receptor+/HER2-subtype and stage I breast cancer were significantly higher in the latter period (47.4% vs. 54.6%, p<0.001; 31.0% vs. 39.6%, p<0.001, respectively). Improvement in OS between the former and latter periods was seen in all subtypes of breast cancer, including triple-negative cancers (all p-values <0.001 in univariate and multivariate analyses). Conclusion Improvement in survival in Korean breast cancer patients over the study years is being observed in all subtypes of breast cancer, implying that increases in both early-stage detection and the proportion of less aggressive cancers contribute to this improvement. PMID:25834605

  8. Dopamine-Induced Stress Signaling in COS-7 Cells Transfected With Selectively Vulnerable Muscarinic Receptor Subtypes is Partially Mediated Via the i3 Loop and Antagonized By Blueberry Extract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Muscarinic receptors (MAChRs) are intimately involved in various aspects of both neuronal and vascular functioning, and there is selective oxidative stress sensitivity (OSS) among MAChR subtypes, with M1, M2, and M4 showing > OSS as evidenced by the inability of the cell to extrude or sequester Ca2+...

  9. Subtype-selective regulation of IP3 receptors by thimerosal via cysteine residues within the IP3-binding core and suppressor domain

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Samir A.; Rossi, Ana M.; Riley, Andrew M.; Potter, Barry V. L.; Taylor, Colin W.

    2013-01-01

    IP3R (IP3 [inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate] receptors) and ryanodine receptors are the most widely expressed intracellular Ca2+ channels and both are regulated by thiol reagents. In DT40 cells stably expressing single subtypes of mammalian IP3R, low concentrations of thimerosal (also known as thiomersal), which oxidizes thiols to form a thiomercurylethyl complex, increased the sensitivity of IP3-evoked Ca2+ release via IP3R1 and IP3R2, but inhibited IP3R3. Activation of IP3R is initiated by IP3 binding to the IBC (IP3-binding core; residues 224–604) and proceeds via re-arrangement of an interface between the IBC and SD (suppressor domain; residues 1–223). Thimerosal (100 μM) stimulated IP3 binding to the isolated NT (N-terminal; residues 1–604) of IP3R1 and IP3R2, but not to that of IP3R3. Binding of a competitive antagonist (heparin) or partial agonist (dimeric-IP3) to NT1 was unaffected by thiomersal, suggesting that the effect of thimerosal is specifically related to IP3R activation. IP3 binding to NT1 in which all cysteine residues were replaced by alanine was insensitive to thimerosal, so too were NT1 in which cysteine residues were replaced in either the SD or IBC. This demonstrates that thimerosal interacts directly with cysteine in both the SD and IBC. Chimaeric proteins in which the SD of the IP3R was replaced by the structurally related A domain of a ryanodine receptor were functional, but thimerosal inhibited both IP3 binding to the chimaeric NT and IP3-evoked Ca2+ release from the chimaeric IP3R. This is the first systematic analysis of the effects of a thiol reagent on each IP3R subtype. We conclude that thimerosal selectively sensitizes IP3R1 and IP3R2 to IP3 by modifying cysteine residues within both the SD and IBC and thereby stabilizing an active conformation of the receptor. PMID:23282150

  10. Activation of Distinct P2Y Receptor Subtypes Stimulates Insulin Secretion in MIN6 Mouse Pancreatic β Cells

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Ramachandran; de Azua, Inigo Ruiz; Wess, Jürgen; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular nucleotides and their receptor antagonists have therapeutic potential in disorders such as inflammation, brain disorders, and cardiovascular diseases. Pancreatic β cells express several purinergic receptors, and reported nucleotide effects on insulin secretion are contradictory. We studied the effect of P2Y receptors on insulin secretion and cell death in MIN6, mouse pancreatic β cells. Expression of P2Y1 and P2Y6 receptors was revealed by total mRNA analysis using RT-PCR. MIN6 cells were stimulated in the presence of 16.7 mM glucose with or without P2Y1 and P2Y6 agonists, 2-MeSADP and Up3U, respectively. Both the agonists increased insulin secretion with EC50 values of 44.6±7.0 nM and 30.7±12.7 nM respectively. The insulin secretion by P2Y1 and P2Y6 agonists was blocked by their selective antagonists MRS2179 and MRS2578, respectively. Binding of the selective P2Y1 receptor antagonist radioligand [125I]MRS2500 in MIN6 cell membranes was saturable (KD 4.74±0.47 nM), and known P2Y1 ligands competed with high affinities. Inflammation and glucose toxicity leads to pancreatic β cell death in diabetes. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that Up3U but not 2-MeSADP protected MIN6 cells against TNF-α induced apoptosis. Overall, the results demonstrate that selective stimulation of P2Y1 and P2Y6 receptors increases insulin secretion that accompanies intracellular calcium release, suggesting potential application of P2Y receptor ligands in the treatment of diabetes. PMID:20067775

  11. Anti-inflammatory effects of PGE2 in the lung: role of the EP4 receptor subtype

    PubMed Central

    Birrell, Mark A; Maher, Sarah A; Dekkak, Bilel; Jones, Victoria; Wong, Sissie; Brook, Peter; Belvisi, Maria G

    2015-01-01

    Background Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are chronic inflammatory diseases of the airway. Current treatment options (long acting β-adrenoceptor agonists and glucocorticosteroids) are not optimal as they are only effective in certain patient groups and safety concerns exist regarding both compound classes. Therefore, novel bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory strategies are being pursued. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is an arachidonic acid-derived eicosanoid produced by the lung which acts on four different G-protein coupled receptors (EP1–4) to cause an array of beneficial and deleterious effects. The aim of this study was to identify the EP receptor mediating the anti-inflammatory actions of PGE2 in the lung using a range of cell-based assays and in vivo models. Methods and results It was demonstrated in three distinct model systems (innate stimulus, lipopolysaccharide (LPS); allergic response, ovalbumin (OVA); inhaled pollutant, cigarette smoke) that mice missing functional EP4 (Ptger4−/−) receptors had higher levels of airway inflammation, suggesting that endogenous PGE2 was suppressing inflammation via EP4 receptor activation. Cell-based assay systems (murine and human monocytes/alveolar macrophages) demonstrated that PGE2 inhibited cytokine release from LPS-stimulated cells and that this was mimicked by an EP4 (but not EP1–3) receptor agonist and inhibited by an EP4 receptor antagonist. The anti-inflammatory effect occurred at the transcriptional level and was via the adenylyl cyclase/cAMP/ cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) axis. Conclusion This study demonstrates that EP4 receptor activation is responsible for the anti-inflammatory activity of PGE2 in a range of disease relevant models and, as such, could represent a novel therapeutic target for chronic airway inflammatory conditions. PMID:25939749

  12. Specific targeting of the GABA-A receptor α5 subtype by a selective inverse agonist restores cognitive deficits in Down syndrome mice

    PubMed Central

    Braudeau, J; Delatour, B; Duchon, A; Pereira, P Lopes; Dauphinot, L; de Chaumont, F; Olivo-Marin, J-C; Dodd, RH; Hérault, Y; Potier, M-C

    2011-01-01

    An imbalance between inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission has been proposed to contribute to altered brain function in individuals with Down syndrome (DS). Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and accordingly treatment with GABA-A antagonists can efficiently restore cognitive functions of Ts65Dn mice, a genetic model for DS. However, GABA-A antagonists are also convulsant which preclude their use for therapeutic intervention in DS individuals. Here, we have evaluated safer strategies to release GABAergic inhibition using a GABA-A-benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist selective for the α5-subtype (α5IA). We demonstrate that α5IA restores learning and memory functions of Ts65Dn mice in the novel-object recognition and in the Morris water maze tasks. Furthermore, we show that following behavioural stimulation, α5IA enhances learning-evoked immediate early gene products in specific brain regions involved in cognition. Importantly, acute and chronic treatments with α5IA do not induce any convulsant or anxiogenic effects that are associated with GABA-A antagonists or non-selective inverse agonists of the GABA-A-benzodiazepine receptors. Finally, chronic treatment with α5IA did not induce histological alterations in the brain, liver and kidney of mice. Our results suggest that non-convulsant α5-selective GABA-A inverse agonists could improve learning and memory deficits in DS individuals. PMID:21693554

  13. Syntheses of 2-amino and 2-halothiazole derivatives as high-affinity metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 ligands and potential radioligands for in vivo imaging.

    PubMed

    Siméon, Fabrice G; Wendahl, Matthew T; Pike, Victor W

    2011-02-10

    The structure of the potent selective mGlu(5) ligand, SP203 (1, 3-fluoro-5-[[2-(fluoromethyl)thiazol-4-yl]ethynyl]benzonitrile), was modified by replacing the 2-fluoromethyl substituent with an amino or halo substituent and by variation of substituents in the distal aromatic ring to provide a series of new high-affinity mGlu(5) ligands. In this series, among the most potent ligands obtained, the 2-chloro-thiazoles 7a and 7b and the 2-fluorothiazole 10b showed subnanomolar mGlu(5) affinity. 10b also displayed >10000-fold selectivity over all other metabotropic receptor subtypes plus a wide range of other receptors and binding sites. The 2-fluorothiazoles 10a and 10b were labeled using [(18)F]fluoride ion (t(1/2) = 109.7 min) in moderately high radiochemical yield to provide potential radioligands that may resist troublesome radiodefluorination during the imaging of brain mGlu(5) with position emission tomography. The iodo compound 9b has nanomolar affinity for mGlu(5) and may also serve as a lead to a potential (123)I-labeled ligand for imaging brain mGlu(5) with single photon emission computed tomography. PMID:21207959

  14. A case of lithium intoxication induced by an antihypertensive angiotensin 1 subtype-specific angiotensin II receptor blocker in an elderly patient with bipolar disorder and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yuichi; Nishida, Shohei; Takekoshi, Akira; Murakami, Muneharu; Yamada, Megumi; Kimura, Akio; Suzuki, Akio; Inuzuka, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Lithium carbonate is considered to be a first-line treatment for bipolar disorder; however, this drug has a narrow therapeutic window, and lithium intoxication is commonly induced by various drugs interaction and situations. We herein report a case of lithium intoxication induced by the administration of an antihypertensive agent targeting the angiotensin 1 (AT1) subtype of the angiotensin II receptor in a 65-year-old woman with a 40-year history of bipolar disorder type 1, and 1-year history of essential hypertension. Her bipolar disorder had been well-controlled with 600 mg/day of lithium carbonate for more than 10 years. She was later diagnosed with hypertension and the AT1 receptor blocker, azilsartan was thereafter administrated on a daily basis. After 3 weeks of azilsartan administration, she presented with progressive action tremor and showed a gradual deterioration of her physical state. Four months after the start of azilsartan administration, she presented with alternating episodes of diarrhea and constipation. Two weeks before admission to our hospital, she presented with mild consciousness disturbances, myoclonus, truncal ataxia, and appetite loss. She was diagnosed to have lithium intoxication based on an elevated serum lithium concentration of 3.28 mEq/l.It is therefore important to evaluate the serum lithium concentration after the administration of antihypertensive agents, and consider lithium-antihypertensive agent interactions when selecting antihypertensive agents in elderly patients receiving long-term lithium carbonate treatment. PMID:27535187

  15. (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET and gene expression profile in patients with neuroendocrine carcinomas: strong correlation between PET tracer uptake and gene expression of somatostatin receptor subtype 2.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Ingrid H; Langer, Seppo W; Federspiel, Birgitte H; Oxbøl, Jytte; Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Mortensen, Jann; Oturai, Peter; Knigge, Ulrich; Kjær, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor expression on both protein and gene expression level was compared with in vivo (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in patients with neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC). Twenty-one patients with verified NEC who underwent a (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT between November 2012 and May 2014, were retrospectively included. By real-time polymerase chain reaction, we quantitatively determined the gene expression of several genes and compared with (68)Ga-DOTATOC PET uptake. By immunohistochemistry we qualitatively studied the expression of assorted proteins in NEC. The median age at diagnosis was 68 years (range 41-84) years. All patients had WHO performance status 0-1. Median Ki67 index was 50% (range 20-100%). Gene expression of somatostatin receptor subtype (SSTR) 2 and Ki67 were both positively correlated to the (68)Ga-DOTATOC uptake (r=0.89; p<0.0001 and r=0.5; p=0.021, respectively). Furthermore, SSTR2 and SSTR5 gene expression were strongly and positively correlated (r=0.57; p=0.006). This study as the first verifies a positive and close correlation of (68)Ga-DOTATOC uptake and gene expression of SSTR2 in NEC. SSTR2 gene expression has a stronger correlation to (68)Ga-DOTATOC uptake than SSTR5. In addition, the results indicate that the gene expression levels of SSTR2 and SSTR5 at large follow one another. PMID:27069766

  16. 68Ga-DOTATOC PET and gene expression profile in patients with neuroendocrine carcinomas: strong correlation between PET tracer uptake and gene expression of somatostatin receptor subtype 2

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Ingrid H; Langer, Seppo W; Federspiel, Birgitte H; Oxbøl, Jytte; Loft, Annika; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Mortensen, Jann; Oturai, Peter; Knigge, Ulrich; Kjær, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor expression on both protein and gene expression level was compared with in vivo 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in patients with neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC). Twenty-one patients with verified NEC who underwent a 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT between November 2012 and May 2014, were retrospectively included. By real-time polymerase chain reaction, we quantitatively determined the gene expression of several genes and compared with 68Ga-DOTATOC PET uptake. By immunohistochemistry we qualitatively studied the expression of assorted proteins in NEC. The median age at diagnosis was 68 years (range 41-84) years. All patients had WHO performance status 0-1. Median Ki67 index was 50% (range 20-100%). Gene expression of somatostatin receptor subtype (SSTR) 2 and Ki67 were both positively correlated to the 68Ga-DOTATOC uptake (r=0.89; p<0.0001 and r=0.5; p=0.021, respectively). Furthermore, SSTR2 and SSTR5 gene expression were strongly and positively correlated (r=0.57; p=0.006). This study as the first verifies a positive and close correlation of 68Ga-DOTATOC uptake and gene expression of SSTR2 in NEC. SSTR2 gene expression has a stronger correlation to 68Ga-DOTATOC uptake than SSTR5. In addition, the results indicate that the gene expression levels of SSTR2 and SSTR5 at large follow one another. PMID:27069766

  17. Design of 4-Oxo-1-aryl-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamides as Selective Negative Allosteric Modulators of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 2.

    PubMed

    Felts, Andrew S; Rodriguez, Alice L; Smith, Katrina A; Engers, Julie L; Morrison, Ryan D; Byers, Frank W; Blobaum, Anna L; Locuson, Charles W; Chang, Sichen; Venable, Daryl F; Niswender, Colleen M; Daniels, J Scott; Conn, P Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W; Emmitte, Kyle A

    2015-11-25

    Both orthosteric and allosteric antagonists of the group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGlus) have been used to establish a link between mGlu2/3 inhibition and a variety of CNS diseases and disorders. Though these tools typically have good selectivity for mGlu2/3 versus the remaining six members of the mGlu family, compounds that are selective for only one of the individual group II mGlus have proved elusive. Herein we report on the discovery of a potent and highly selective mGlu2 negative allosteric modulator 58 (VU6001192) from a series of 4-oxo-1-aryl-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamides. The concept for the design of this series centered on morphing a quinoline series recently disclosed in the patent literature into a chemotype previously used for the preparation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype 1 positive allosteric modulators. Compound 58 exhibits a favorable profile and will be a useful tool for understanding the biological implications of selective inhibition of mGlu2 in the CNS. PMID:26524606

  18. Syntheses of 2-Amino and 2-Halothiazole Derivatives as High-Affinity Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 5 Ligands and Potential Radioligands for In Vivo Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Siméon, Fabrice G; Wendahl, Matthew T.; Pike, Victor W.

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the potent selective mGlu5 ligand, SP203 (1, 3-fluoro-5-[[2-(fluoromethyl)thiazol-4-yl]ethynyl]benzonitrile), was modified by replacing the 2-fluoromethyl substituent with an amino or halo substituent and by variation of substituents in the distal aromatic ring to provide a series of new high-affinity mGlu5 ligands. In this series, among the most potent ligands obtained, the 2-chloro-thiazoles 7a and 7b and the 2-fluorothiazole 10b showed sub-nanomolar mGlu5 affinity. 10b also displayed >10,000-fold selectivity over all other metabotropic receptor subtypes plus a wide range of other receptors and binding sites. The 2-fluorothiazoles 10a and 10b were labeled using [18F]fluoride ion (t1/2 = 109.7 min) in moderately high radiochemical yield to provide potential radioligands that may resist troublesome radiodefluorination during the imaging of brain mGlu5 with position emission tomography. The iodo compound 9b has nanomolar affinity for mGlu5 and may also serve as a lead to a potential 123I-labeled ligand for imaging brain mGlu5 with single photon emission computed tomography. PMID:21207959

  19. Receptor specificity of subtype H1 influenza A viruses isolated from swine and humans in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The evolution of receptor specificity of classical swine influenza viruses leading to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus was analyzed in glycan microarrays. Classical influenza viruses from the alpha, beta, and gamma antigenic clusters isolated between 1945 and 2009 revealed a binding profile very simila...

  20. Functional and structural interaction of (-)-lobeline with human α4β2 and α4β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Arias, Hugo R; Feuerbach, Dominik; Ortells, Marcelo

    2015-07-01

    To determine the pharmacologic activity of (-)-lobeline between human (h)α4β2 and hα4β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs), functional and structural experiments were performed. The Ca(2+) influx results established that (-)-lobeline neither actives nor enhances the function of the studied AChR subtypes, but competitively inhibits hα4β4 AChRs with potency ∼10-fold higher than that for hα4β2 AChRs. This difference is due to a higher binding affinity for the [(3)H]cytisine sites at hα4β4 compared to hα4β2 AChRs, which, in turn, can be explained by our molecular dynamics (MD) results: (1) higher stability of (-)-lobeline and its hydrogen bonds within the α4β4 pocket compared to the α4β2 pocket, (2) (-)-lobeline promotes Loop C to cap the binding site at the α4β4 pocket, but forces Loop C to get apart from the α4β2 pocket, precluding the gating process elicited by agonists, and (3) the orientation of (-)-lobeline within the α4β4, but not the α4β2, subpocket, promoted by the t- (or t+) rotameric state of α4-Tyr98, remains unchanged during the whole MD simulation. This study gives a detailed view of the molecular and dynamics events evoked by (-)-lobeline supporting the differential binding affinity and subsequent inhibitory potency between hα4β2 and hα4β4 AChRs, and supports the possibility that the latter subtype is also involved in its activity. PMID:25794424

  1. Effects of zotepine, chlorpromazine and haloperidol on D-1, D-2, D-3 and D-4 subtypes of dopamine receptors in rat striatal and bovine caudate nucleus membranes.

    PubMed

    Arima, T; Makihata, J; Makimura, T; Nomura, Y; Segawa, T

    1986-01-01

    Inhibitory effects of zotepine (Zot) on D-1, D-2, D-3 and D-4 subtypes of dopamine (DA) receptors were investigated in crude synaptic membranes of rat striatum and bovine caudate nucleus and compared to those of chlorpromazine (CPZ) and haloperidol (HAL). From the IC(50)-values of Zot, CPZ and HAL, the K-values of each drug are estimated as follows: 34.4, 152 and 244 nM (D-1, (3)H-labeled cis-flupenthixol binding (1.0 nM) to rat membranes); 37.4, 7.1 and 2.4 nM (D-2, [(3)H]spiperone (Spi) binding (0.5 nM) to rat membranes in the presence of 0.1 ?M ketanserin); 73.1, 15.2 and 22.4 nM (D-3, (3)H-labeled N-propylapomorphine (NPA) binding (0.29 nM) to bovine membranes in the presence of 0.1 ?M Spi); 9.5, 65.3 and 3.1 nM (D-4, [(3)H]NPA binding (0.29 nM) bovine membranes in the presence of 25 nM DA), respectively. Zot binds with higher affinity to D-4 but lower affinity to D-3 than to other subtypes. It is also presumed that Zot binds to D-1 with high affinity and D-2 and D-3 with low affinity compared to CPZ and HAL. PMID:20493089

  2. The stereotypy-inducing and OCD-like effects of chronic ‘binge’ cocaine are modulated by distinct subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Metaxas, A; Keyworth, HL; Yoo, JH; Chen, Y; Kitchen, I; Bailey, A

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE High rates of cigarette smoking occur in cocaine-dependent individuals, reflecting an involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in cocaine-elicited behaviour. This study was designed to assess the contribution of different nAChR subtypes to the behavioural and neurochemical effects of chronic cocaine treatment. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Cocaine (15 mg·kg−1, i.p.) was administered to male C57BL/6J mice in a chronic ‘binge’ paradigm, with and without the coadministration of the α7 preferring nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA; 5 mg·kg−1, i.p.) or the β2* nAChR antagonist dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE; 2 mg·kg−1, i.p.). Quantitative autoradiography was used to examine the effect of cocaine exposure on α7 and α4β2* nAChRs, and on the high-affinity choline transporter. KEY RESULTS MLA+cocaine administration induced an intense self-grooming behaviour, indicating a likely role for α7 nAChRs in modulating this anxiogenic, compulsive-like effect of cocaine. In the major island of Calleja, a key area of action for neuroleptics, MLA+cocaine reduced choline transporter binding compared with cocaine (with or without DHβE) administration. DHβE treatment prevented the induction of stereotypy sensitisation to cocaine but prolonged locomotor sensitisation, implicating heteromeric β2* nAChRs in the neuroadaptations mediating cocaine-induced behavioural sensitisation. ‘Binge’ cocaine treatment region-specifically increased α4β2* nAChR binding in the midbrain dopaminergic regions: ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra pars compacta. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS We have shown a differential, subtype-selective, contribution of nAChRs to the behavioural and neurochemical sequelae of chronic cocaine administration. These data support the clinical utility of targeting specific nAChR subtypes for the alleviation of cocaine-abuse symptomatology. PMID:22568685

  3. Functional characterization of estrogen receptor subtypes, ER{alpha} and ER{beta}, mediating vitellogenin production in the liver of rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Leanos-Castaneda, Olga Kraak, Glen van der

    2007-10-15

    The estrogen-dependent process of vitellogenesis is a key function on oviparous fish reproduction and it has been widely used as an indicator of xenoestrogen exposure. The two estrogen receptor (ER) subtypes, ER{alpha} and ER{beta}, are often co-expressed in the liver of fish. The relative contribution of each ER subtype to modulate vitellogenin production by hepatocytes was studied using selected compounds known to preferentially interact with specific ER subtypes: propyl-pyrazole-triol (PPT) an ER{alpha} selective agonist, methyl-piperidino-pyrazole (MPP) an ER{alpha} selective antagonist, and diarylpropionitrile (DPN) an ER{beta} selective agonist. First, the relative binding affinity of the test compounds to estradiol for rainbow trout hepatic nuclear ER was determined using a competitive ligand binding assay. All the test ligands achieved complete displacement of specific [{sup 3}H]-estradiol binding from the nuclear ER extract. This indicates that the test ligands have the potential to modify the ER function in the rainbow trout liver. Secondly, the ability of the test compounds to induce or inhibit vitellogenin production by primary cultures of rainbow trout hepatocytes was studied. Estradiol and DPN were the only compounds that induced a dose-dependent increase on vitellogenin synthesis. The lack of vitellogenin induction by PPT indicates that ER{alpha} could not have a role on this reproductive process whereas the ability of DPN to induce vitellogenin production supports the participation of ER{beta}. In addition, this hypothesis is reinforced by the results obtained from MPP plus estradiol. On one hand, the absence of suppressive activity of MPP in the estradiol-induced vitellogenin production does not support the participation of ER{alpha}. On the other hand, once blocked ER{alpha} with MPP, the only manifestation of agonist activity of estradiol would be achieved via ER{beta}. In conclusion, the present results indicate that vitellogenin production is

  4. The G Protein-coupled Receptor Family C Group 6 Subtype A (GPRC6A) Receptor Is Involved in Amino Acid-induced Glucagon-like Peptide-1 Secretion from GLUTag Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Oya, Manami; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Pais, Ramona; Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona; Tsuboi, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Although amino acids are dietary nutrients that evoke the secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) from intestinal L cells, the precise molecular mechanism(s) by which amino acids regulate GLP-1 secretion from intestinal L cells remains unknown. Here, we show that the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), family C group 6 subtype A (GPRC6A), is involved in amino acid-induced GLP-1 secretion from the intestinal L cell line GLUTag. Application of l-ornithine caused an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in GLUTag cells. Application of a GPRC6A receptor antagonist, a phospholipase C inhibitor, or an IP3 receptor antagonist significantly suppressed the l-ornithine-induced [Ca2+]i increase. We found that the increase in [Ca2+]i stimulated by l-ornithine correlated with GLP-1 secretion and that l-ornithine stimulation increased exocytosis in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, depletion of endogenous GPRC6A by a specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) inhibited the l-ornithine-induced [Ca2+]i increase and GLP-1 secretion. Taken together, these findings suggest that the GPRC6A receptor functions as an amino acid sensor in GLUTag cells that promotes GLP-1 secretion. PMID:23269670

  5. Abdominal surgery inhibits circulating acyl ghrelin and ghrelin-O-acyltransferase levels in rats: role of the somatostatin receptor subtype 2

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel-Stengel, Miriam; Wang, Lixin; Shaikh, Almaas; Lambrecht, Nils W. G.; Rivier, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Clinical studies are evaluating the efficacy of synthetic ghrelin agonists in postoperative ileus management. However, the control of ghrelin secretion under conditions of postoperative gastric ileus is largely unknown. Peripheral somatostatin inhibits ghrelin secretion in animals and humans. We investigated the time course of ghrelin changes postsurgery in fasted rats and whether somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (sst2) signaling is involved. Abdominal surgery (laparotomy and 1-min cecal palpation) induced a rapid and long-lasting decrease in plasma acyl ghrelin levels as shown by the 64, 67, and 59% reduction at 0.5, 2, and 5 h postsurgery, respectively, compared with sham (anesthesia alone for 10 min, P < 0.05). Levels were partly recovered at 7 h and fully restored at 24 h. The percentage of acyl ghrelin reduction was significantly higher than that of desacyl ghrelin at 2 h postsurgery and not at any other time point. This was associated with a 48 and 23% decrease in gastric and plasma ghrelin-O-acyltransferase protein concentrations, respectively (P < 0.001). Ghrelin-positive cells in the oxyntic mucosa expressed sst2a receptor and the sst2 agonist S-346-011 inhibited fasting acyl ghrelin levels by 64 and 77% at 0.5 and 2 h, respectively. The sst2 antagonist S-406-028 prevented the abdominal surgery-induced decreased circulating acyl ghrelin but not the delayed gastric emptying assessed 0.5 h postinjection. These data show that activation of sst2 receptor located on gastric X/A-like cells plays a key role in the rapid inhibition of circulating acyl ghrelin induced by abdominal surgery while not being primarily involved in the early phase of postoperative gastric ileus. PMID:21636529

  6. Cloning of ligand-specific cell lines via gene transfer: identification of a D2 dopamine receptor subtype.

    PubMed Central

    Todd, R D; Khurana, T S; Sajovic, P; Stone, K R; O'Malley, K L

    1989-01-01

    Using rat genomic DNA, we have established a transfected mouse fibroblast cell line that expresses a spiperone binding site with the pharmacological characteristics of a D2 dopamine receptor. The expressed D2 receptors are the product of a gene that is distinct from that reported by Bunzow et al. [Bunzow, J. R., Van Tol, H. H. M., Granoly, D. K., Albert, P., Salon, J., Christie, M., Machida, C. A., Neve, K. A. & Civelli, O. (1988) Nature (London) 336, 783-787]. Flow cytometry with the Ca2+-sensitive dye indo-1 demonstrated that activation of the expressed D2 sites resulted in increases in intracellular calcium that were dependent on the influx of external Ca2+. These general cloning procedures should be applicable to the production of cell lines expressing a variety of genes for which only functional assays are available. Images PMID:2532359

  7. Development of ligands at γ-aminobutyrric acid type A (GABAA) receptor subtype as new agents for pain relief.

    PubMed

    Guerrini, Gabriella; Ciciani, Giovanna; Bruni, Fabrizio; Selleri, Silvia; Martini, Claudia; Daniele, Simona; Ghelardini, Carla; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Costanzo, Annarella

    2011-12-15

    The identification of compounds with selective anxiolytic-like effects, exerted through the benzodiazepine site on γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptors, and that show pronounced antihyperalgesia in several pain models, has oriented research towards the development of new agents for the relief of pain. Starting from our previously reported ligands at the benzodiazepine site on GABA(A) receptors showing selective anxiolytic-like effects, we have designed new compounds with the aim of identifying those devoid of the typical side effects of the classical benzodiazepines. Our preliminary results indicate that compounds 4, 10(±) and 11 have a very promising antihyperalgesic profile in different animal pain models (peripheral mono-neuropathy, STZ-induced hyperalgesia). In particular 11 exhibits high potency since it exerted its protective effect starting from the dose of 3mg/kg po, after single injection. PMID:22094278

  8. Autocrine interferon-γ may affect malignant behavior and sensitivity to tamoxifen of MCF-7 via estrogen receptor β subtype.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiu Long; Wang, Yue; Yao, Zhi; Duan, Hongjie; Li, Zhijun; Liu, Wenxing; Zhang, Hongjian; Deng, Wei Min

    2015-12-01

    Mitogenic actions of estrogens are mediated by two distinct estrogen receptors (ERs), which are critical in the progression and therapeutic response of breast cancer. ER expression is a dynamic phenomenon that is regulated by numerous factors, including cytokines, in the tumor microenvironment. Recently, studies have shown that autocrine production of IL-4 promotes cancer cell growth and there is negative correlation between tumor IL-4 and hormone receptor levels, suggesting that there is crosstalk between cytokine receptors and ER. Thus, we evaluated for interaction between the two ERs and the cytokines IL-4 and IFN-γ, and if this interaction modulates malignant behavior. We identified that ERβ exerts protective activity in the progression of breast cancer cell line MCF-7, which co-expresses ERα and ERβ. IFN-γ and IL-4 have the opposite effects on malignant biological behavior. Furthermore, we found positive correlation between IFN-γ and ERβ expression in MCF-7. We also determined that autocrine IFN-γ in MCF-7 increases mRNA expression of ERβ resulting in enhanced sensitivity to tamoxifen (TAM). These results indicate that ERβ and autocrine IFN-γ represent two putative targets for breast cancer therapy. PMID:26397740

  9. Inhibitory Effect of the Somatostatin Receptor Subtype-4 Agonist NNC 26-9100 on the Micturition Reflex in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Masashi; Yoshimura, Naoki; Inoue, Seiya; Hinata, Nobuyuki; Chancellor, Michael B.; Takenaka, Atsushi

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of activation of sst4 on the micturition reflex in rats. Methods Continuous cystometrograms (0.04 ml/min infusion rate) were performed in female Sprague-Dawley rats (242-265 g) under urethane anesthesia. After stable micturition cycles were established, a selective sst4 receptor agonist, NNC 26-9100, was administered intravenously in normal rats or rats pretreated with capsaicin 4 days before the experiments. Micturition parameters were recorded and compared before and after drug administration. Results Intravenous administration of NNC 26-9100 (10 to 300 μg/kg) significantly increased intercontraction interval in dose dependent fashion. Intravenous administration of NNC 26-9100 (10 to 300 μg/kg) also significantly increased pressure threshold in dose dependent fashion. There were no significant changes in baseline pressure, maximum voiding pressure or post-void residual volume. However, NNC 26-9100-induced increases in intercontraction intervals and pressure threshold were not seen in rats with C-fiber desensitization induced by capsaicin pretreatment. Conclusion These results indicate that in urethane-anesthetized rats activation of sst4 receptor can inhibit the micturition reflex via suppression of capsaicin sensitive C-fiber afferent pathways. Thus sst4 receptor could be a potential target for the treatment of C-fiber afferent mediated bladder dysfunctions. PMID:22951005

  10. Prostaglandin E Receptor Subtype 4 Signaling in the Heart: Role in Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury and Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yin; Tang, Eva Hoi Ching; Ma, Haichun

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is an endogenous lipid mediator, produced from the metabolism of arachidonic acids, upon the sequential actions of phospholipase A2, cyclooxygenases, and prostaglandin E synthases. The various biological functions governed by PGE2 are mediated through its four distinct prostaglandin E receptors (EPs), designated as EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4, among which the EP4 receptor is the one most widely distributed in the heart. The availability of global or cardiac-specific EP4 knockout mice and the development of selective EP4 agonists/antagonists have provided substantial evidence to support the role of EP4 receptor in the heart. However, like any good drama, activation of PGE2-EP4 signaling exerts both protective and detrimental effects in the ischemic heart disease. Thus, the primary object of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current progress of the PGE2-EP4 signaling in ischemic heart diseases, including cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. A better understanding of PGE2-EP4 signaling should promote the development of more effective therapeutic approaches to treat the ischemic heart diseases without triggering unwanted side effects. PMID:27190998

  11. Discrimination by benextramine between the NPY-Y1 receptor subtypes present in rabbit isolated vas deferens and saphenous vein.

    PubMed Central

    Palea, S.; Corsi, M.; Rimland, J. M.; Trist, D. G.

    1995-01-01

    1. In order to characterize the neuropeptide Y (NPY) Y1 receptors known to be present in rabbit isolated vas deferens and saphenous vein, the pharmacological activity of the selective NPY Y1 receptor agonists, [Leu31,Pro34] NPY and various other peptide agonists, together with the putative NPY antagonist, benextramine, were compared in the two tissues. 2. In rabbit isolated saphenous vein, cumulative dose-response curves to various NPY agonists were obtained. All the peptides tested caused contractions which developed quite slowly. The rank order of potency obtained was: PYY > NPY > [Leu31,Pro34] NPY = NPY2-36 > hPP >> NPY13-36 = NPY18-36. Incubation with benextramine (BXT) at 100 microM for 30 min irreversibly abolished the contractile response to [Leu31,Pro34] NPY but was ineffective against NPY18-36-induced contractions. 3. Cumulative dose-response curves to [Leu31,Pro34] NPY were performed in the same preparation before and after incubation with 100 microM BXT for 20 min in order to inactivate NPY Y1 receptors. The pKA (-logKA) estimation for [Leu31,Pro34] NPY was 7.60 +/- 0.30 using the operational model and 7.20 +/- 0.33 using the null method; the difference between the two methods was not statistically significant (P = 0.36). 4. Prostatic segments of rabbit vas deferens were electrically stimulated with single pulses. Immediately after stabilization of the contractile response, a cumulative dose-response curve to various NPY agonists was obtained in each tissue.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7647980

  12. Attenuated Stress Response to Acute Restraint and Forced Swimming Stress in Arginine Vasopressin 1b Receptor Subtype (Avpr1b) Receptor Knockout Mice and Wild-Type Mice Treated with a Novel Avpr1b Receptor Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Roper, J A; Craighead, M; O’Carroll, A-M; Lolait, S J

    2010-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) synthesised in the parvocellular region of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and released into the pituitary portal vessels acts on the 1b receptor subtype (Avpr1b) present in anterior pituitary corticotrophs to modulate the release of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH). Corticotrophin-releasing hormone is considered the major drive behind ACTH release; however, its action is augmented synergistically by AVP. To determine the extent of vasopressinergic influence in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response to restraint and forced swimming stress, we compared the stress hormone levels [plasma ACTH in both stressors and corticosterone (CORT) in restraint stress only] following acute stress in mutant Avpr1b knockout (KO) mice compared to their wild-type controls following the administration of a novel Avpr1b antagonist. Restraint and forced swimming stress-induced increases in plasma ACTH were significantly diminished in mice lacking a functional Avpr1b and in wild-type mice that had been pre-treated with Avpr1b antagonist. A corresponding decrease in plasma CORT levels was also observed in acute restraint-stressed knockout male mice, and in Avpr1b-antagonist-treated male wild-type mice. By contrast, plasma CORT levels were not reduced in acutely restraint-stressed female knockout animals, or in female wild-type animals pre-treated with Avpr1b antagonist. These results demonstrate that pharmacological antagonism or inactivation of Avpr1b causes a reduction in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis response, particularly ACTH, to acute restraint and forced swimming stress, and show that Avpr1b knockout mice constitute a model by which to study the contribution of Avpr1b to the HPA axis response to acute stressors. PMID:20846299

  13. Involvement of Descending Serotonergic and Noradrenergic Systems and their Spinal Receptor Subtypes in the Antinociceptive Effect of Dipyrone.

    PubMed

    Gencer, A; Gunduz, O; Ulugol, A

    2015-12-01

    The antinociceptive effect of dipyrone is partly due to its action upon pain-related central nervous system structures. Despite intensive research, the precise mechanisms mediating its analgesic effects remain unclear. Here, we aimed to determine whether neurotoxic destruction of descending inhibitory pathways affect dipyrone-induced antinociception and whether various spinal serotonergic and adrenergic receptors are involved in this antinociception. The nociceptive response was assessed by the tail-flick test. Mice injected with dipyrone (150, 300, 600 mg/kg, i.p.) elicited dose-related antinociception. The neurotoxins 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (50 μg/mouse) and 6-hydroxydopamine (20 μg/mouse) are applied intrathecally to deplete serotonin and noradrenaline in the spinal cord. 3 days after neurotoxin injections, a significant reduction in the antinociceptive effect of dipyrone was observed. Intrathecal administration of monoaminergic antagonists (10 μg/mouse), the 5-HT2a antagonist ketanserin, the 5-HT3 antagonist ondansetron, the 5-HT7 antagonist SB-258719, α1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin, α2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine, and the β-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol also attenuated dipyrone antinociception. We propose that descending serotonergic and noradrenergic pathways play pivotal role in dipyrone-induced antinociception and spinal 5-HT2a, 5-HT3, and 5-HT7-serotonergic and α1, α2, and β-adrenergic receptors mediate this effect. PMID:25647230

  14. Depression-like behavior in rat: Involvement of galanin receptor subtype 1 in the ventral periaqueductal gray.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Li, Hui; Barde, Swapnali; Zhang, Ming-Dong; Sun, Jing; Wang, Tong; Zhang, Pan; Luo, Hanjiang; Wang, Yongjun; Yang, Yutao; Wang, Chuanyue; Svenningsson, Per; Theodorsson, Elvar; Hökfelt, Tomas G M; Xu, Zhi-Qing David

    2016-08-01

    The neuropeptide galanin coexists in rat brain with serotonin in the dorsal raphe nucleus and with noradrenaline in the locus coeruleus (LC), and it has been suggested to be involved in depression. We studied rats exposed to chronic mild stress (CMS), a rodent model of depression. As expected, these rats showed several endophenotypes relevant to depression-like behavior compared with controls. All these endophenotypes were normalized after administration of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. The transcripts for galanin and two of its receptors, galanin receptor 1 (GALR1) and GALR2, were analyzed with quantitative real-time PCR using laser capture microdissection in the following brain regions: the hippocampal formation, LC, and ventral periaqueductal gray (vPAG). Only Galr1 mRNA levels were significantly increased, and only in the latter region. After knocking down Galr1 in the vPAG with an siRNA technique, all parameters of the depressive behavioral phenotype were similar to controls. Thus, the depression-like behavior in rats exposed to CMS is likely related to an elevated expression of Galr1 in the vPAG, suggesting that a GALR1 antagonist could have antidepressant effects. PMID:27457954

  15. Specific LPA receptor subtype mediation of LPA-induced hypertrophy of cardiac myocytes and involvement of Akt and NFkappaB signal pathways.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinghai; Chen, Yuefeng; Zhu, Weiquan; Han, Yu; Han, Bianmei; Xu, Ruixia; Deng, Linzi; Cai, Yan; Cong, Xiangfeng; Yang, Yuejing; Hu, Shengshou; Chen, Xi

    2008-04-15

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid with diverse functions mediated via G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In view of the elevated levels of LPA in acute myocardial infarction (MI) patients we have conducted studies aimed at identifying specific LPA receptor subtypes and signaling events that may mediate its actions in hypertrophic remodeling. Experiments were carried out in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCMs) exposed to LPA and in a rat MI model. In NRCMs, LPA-induced hypertrophic growth was completely abrogated by DGPP, an LPA1/LPA3 antagonist. The LPA3 agonist OMPT, but not the LPA2 agonist dodecylphosphate, promoted hypertrophy as examined by 3[H]-Leucine incorporation, ANF-luciferase expression and cell area. In in vivo experiments, LPA1, LPA2 and LPA3 mRNA levels as well as LPA1 and LPA3 protein levels increased together with left ventricular remodeling (LVRM) after MI. In addition, LPA stimulated the phosphorylation of Akt and p65 protein and activated NF-kappaB-luciferase expression. Inhibitors of PI3K (wortmannin), mTOR (rapamycin), and NF-kappaB (PDTC or SN50) effectively prevented LPA-induced 3[H]-Leucine incorporation and ANF-luciferase expression. Furthermore, ERK inhibitors (U0126 and PD98059) suppressed LPA-stimulated activation of NF-kappaB and p65 phosphorylation whereas wortmannin showed no effect on NF-kappaB activation. Our findings indicate that LPA3 and/or LPA1 mediate LPA-induced hypertrophy of NRCMs and that LPA1 and LPA3 may be involved in LVRM of MI rats. Moreover, Akt and NF-kappaB signaling pathways independently implicate in LPA-stimulated myocardial hypertrophic growth. PMID:17891781

  16. Galanin stimulates cortisol secretion from human adrenocortical cells through the activation of galanin receptor subtype 1 coupled to the adenylate cyclase-dependent signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Belloni, Anna S; Malendowicz, Ludwik K; Rucinski, Marcin; Guidolin, Diego; Nussdorfer, Gastone G

    2007-12-01

    Previous studies showed that galanin receptors are expressed in the rat adrenal, and galanin modulates glucocorticoid secretion in this species. Hence, we investigated the expression of the various galanin receptor subtypes (GAL-R1, GAL-R2 and GAL-R3) in the human adrenocortical cells, and the possible involvement of galanin in the control of cortisol secretion. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction detected the expression of GAL-R1 (but not GAL-R2 and GAL-R3) in the inner zones of the human adrenal cortex. The galanin concentration dependently enhanced basal, but not ACTH-stimulated secretion of cortisol from dispersed inner adrenocortical cells (maximal effective concentration, 10(-8) M). The cortisol response to 10(-8) M galanin was abrogated by GAL-R1 immunoneutralization, and unaffected by GAL-R2 or GAL-R3 immunoneutralization. Galanin (10(-8) M) and ACTH (10(-9) M) enhanced cyclic-AMP production from dispersed cells, and the response was suppressed by the adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ-22536 (10(-4) M). Galanin did not affect inositol triphosphate release, which, in contrast, was raised by angiotensin-II (10(-8) M). SQ-22536 and the protein kinase (PK)A inhibitor H-89 (10(-5) M) abolished the cortisol response to 10(-8) M galanin, while the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 and the PKC inhibitor calphostin-C were ineffective. Preincubation with pertussis toxin (Ptx) (0.5 microg/ml) partially inhibited the cortisol response to galanin. We conclude that galanin stimulates cortisol secretion from human inner adrenocortical cells, acting through GAL-R1 coupled to the adenylate cyclase/PKA-dependent signaling cascade via a Ptx-sensitive Galpha protein. PMID:17982695

  17. Blocking Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 7 (mGlu7) via the Venus Flytrap Domain (VFTD) Inhibits Amygdala Plasticity, Stress, and Anxiety-related Behavior♦

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Christine E.; Peterlik, Daniel; Neuhäuser, Christoph; Bouhelal, Rochdi; Kaupmann, Klemens; Laue, Grit; Uschold-Schmidt, Nicole; Feuerbach, Dominik; Zimmermann, Kaspar; Ofner, Silvio; Cryan, John F.; van der Putten, Herman; Fendt, Markus; Vranesic, Ivo; Glatthar, Ralf; Flor, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 7 (mGlu7) is an important presynaptic regulator of neurotransmission in the mammalian CNS. mGlu7 function has been linked to autism, drug abuse, anxiety, and depression. Despite this, it has been difficult to develop specific blockers of native mGlu7 signaling in relevant brain areas such as amygdala and limbic cortex. Here, we present the mGlu7-selective antagonist 7-hydroxy-3-(4-iodophenoxy)-4H-chromen-4-one (XAP044), which inhibits lateral amygdala long term potentiation (LTP) in brain slices from wild type mice with a half-maximal blockade at 88 nm. There was no effect of XAP044 on LTP of mGlu7-deficient mice, indicating that this pharmacological effect is mGlu7-dependent. Unexpectedly and in contrast to all previous mGlu7-selective drugs, XAP044 does not act via the seven-transmembrane region but rather via a binding pocket localized in mGlu7's extracellular Venus flytrap domain, a region generally known for orthosteric agonist binding. This was shown by chimeric receptor studies in recombinant cell line assays. XAP044 demonstrates good brain exposure and wide spectrum anti-stress and antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like efficacy in rodent behavioral paradigms. XAP044 reduces freezing during acquisition of Pavlovian fear and reduces innate anxiety, which is consistent with the phenotypes of mGlu7-deficient mice, the results of mGlu7 siRNA knockdown studies, and the inhibition of amygdala LTP by XAP044. Thus, we present an mGlu7 antagonist with a novel molecular mode of pharmacological action, providing significant application potential in psychiatry. Modeling the selective interaction between XAP044 and mGlu7's Venus flytrap domain, whose three-dimensional structure is already known, will facilitate future drug development supported by computer-assisted drug design. PMID:24596089

  18. Cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2R) agonist, GW405833 reduces agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations in mouse pancreatic acinar cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zebing; Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Jingke; Zhao, Mengqin; Sun, Nana; Sun, Fangfang; Shen, Jianxin; Zhang, Haiying; Xia, Kunkun; Chen, Dejie; Gao, Ming; Hammer, Ronald P.; Liu, Qingrong; Xi, Zhengxiong; Fan, Xuegong; Wu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence demonstrates that the blockade of intracellular Ca2+ signals may protect pancreatic acinar cells against Ca2+ overload, intracellular protease activation, and necrosis. The activation of cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2R) prevents acinar cell pathogenesis in animal models of acute pancreatitis. However, whether CB2Rs modulate intracellular Ca2+ signals in pancreatic acinar cells is largely unknown. We evaluated the roles of CB2R agonist, GW405833 (GW) in agonist-induced Ca2+ oscillations in pancreatic acinar cells using multiple experimental approaches with acute dissociated pancreatic acinar cells prepared from wild type, CB1R-knockout (KO), and CB2R-KO mice. Immunohistochemical labeling revealed that CB2R protein was expressed in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Electrophysiological experiments showed that activation of CB2Rs by GW reduced acetylcholine (ACh)-, but not cholecystokinin (CCK)-induced Ca2+ oscillations in a concentration-dependent manner; this inhibition was prevented by a selective CB2R antagonist, AM630, or was absent in CB2R-KO but not CB1R-KO mice. In addition, GW eliminated L-arginine-induced enhancement of Ca2+ oscillations, pancreatic amylase, and pulmonary myeloperoxidase. Collectively, we provide novel evidence that activation of CB2Rs eliminates ACh-induced Ca2+ oscillations and L-arginine-induced enhancement of Ca2+ signaling in mouse pancreatic acinar cells, which suggests a potential cellular mechanism of CB2R-mediated protection in acute pancreatitis. PMID:27432473

  19. Role of thyroid hormone receptor subtypes α and β on gene expression in the cerebral cortex and striatum of postnatal mice.

    PubMed

    Gil-Ibañez, Pilar; Morte, Beatriz; Bernal, Juan

    2013-05-01

    The effects of thyroid hormones (THs) on brain development and function are largely mediated by the control of gene expression. This is achieved by the binding of the genomically active T3 to transcriptionally active nuclear TH receptors (TRs). T3 and the TRs can either induce or repress transcription. In hypothyroidism, the reduction of T3 lowers the expression of a set of genes, the positively regulated genes, and increases the expression of negatively regulated genes. Two mechanisms may account for the effect of hypothyroidism on genes regulated directly by T3: first, the loss of T3 signaling and TR transactivation, and second, an intrinsic activity of the unliganded TRs directly responsible for repression of positive genes and enhancement of negative genes. To analyze the contribution of the TR subtypes α and β, we have measured by RT-PCR the expression of a set of positive and negative genes in the cerebral cortex and the striatum of TR-knockout male and female mice. The results indicate that TRα1 exerts a predominant but not exclusive role in the regulation of positive and negative genes. However, a fraction of the genes analyzed are not or only mildly affected by the total absence of TRs. Furthermore, hypothyroidism has a mild effect on these genes in the absence of TRα1, in agreement with a role of unliganded TRα1 in the effects of hypothyroidism. PMID:23493375

  20. Cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2R) agonist, GW405833 reduces agonist-induced Ca(2+) oscillations in mouse pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zebing; Wang, Haiyan; Wang, Jingke; Zhao, Mengqin; Sun, Nana; Sun, Fangfang; Shen, Jianxin; Zhang, Haiying; Xia, Kunkun; Chen, Dejie; Gao, Ming; Hammer, Ronald P; Liu, Qingrong; Xi, Zhengxiong; Fan, Xuegong; Wu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence demonstrates that the blockade of intracellular Ca(2+) signals may protect pancreatic acinar cells against Ca(2+) overload, intracellular protease activation, and necrosis. The activation of cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2R) prevents acinar cell pathogenesis in animal models of acute pancreatitis. However, whether CB2Rs modulate intracellular Ca(2+) signals in pancreatic acinar cells is largely unknown. We evaluated the roles of CB2R agonist, GW405833 (GW) in agonist-induced Ca(2+) oscillations in pancreatic acinar cells using multiple experimental approaches with acute dissociated pancreatic acinar cells prepared from wild type, CB1R-knockout (KO), and CB2R-KO mice. Immunohistochemical labeling revealed that CB2R protein was expressed in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Electrophysiological experiments showed that activation of CB2Rs by GW reduced acetylcholine (ACh)-, but not cholecystokinin (CCK)-induced Ca(2+) oscillations in a concentration-dependent manner; this inhibition was prevented by a selective CB2R antagonist, AM630, or was absent in CB2R-KO but not CB1R-KO mice. In addition, GW eliminated L-arginine-induced enhancement of Ca(2+) oscillations, pancreatic amylase, and pulmonary myeloperoxidase. Collectively, we provide novel evidence that activation of CB2Rs eliminates ACh-induced Ca(2+) oscillations and L-arginine-induced enhancement of Ca(2+) signaling in mouse pancreatic acinar cells, which suggests a potential cellular mechanism of CB2R-mediated protection in acute pancreatitis. PMID:27432473

  1. Stimulatory effects of opioid neuropeptides on locomotory activity and conformational changes in invertebrate and human immunocytes: evidence for a subtype of delta receptor.

    PubMed

    Stefano, G B; Cadet, P; Scharrer, B

    1989-08-01

    The presence of opioid neuropeptides was shown to stimulate conformational changes and locomotory activity in immunocytes of two representatives of invertebrates as well as in human leukocytes. Cells were examined by use of phase-contrast and Nomarski optics coupled with a Zeiss Axiophot microscope, and of the Zeiss Videoplan/Vidas Image Analysis system. Immunocompetent blood cells, activated by exogenous opioids or stressful stimuli presumed to engage endogenous opioids, showed flattening, elongation, and formation of pseudopodia. In the mollusc Mytilus edulis, ameboid movements resulted in the formation of cell clusters, an activity not observed in untreated controls, or in immunocytes simultaneously exposed to opioid and naloxone. Tests with nine immunoreactive substances revealed immunocyte stimulation by delta, mu-, kappa-, and epsilon(?)-selective ligands. One of these, [D-Ala2,D-Met5]enkephalinamide (DAMA), active at a concentration of 10 pM, proved to be considerably more effective than the rest. The high pharmacological potency of DAMA, observed in both human and invertebrate immunocytes, sets this opioid apart from the closely related [D-Ala2,D-Leu5]enkephalin, a discrepancy not occurring in the mammalian nervous system. This suggests a specific function for [Met]enkephalin in immunoregulation, mediated perhaps by a special subtype of delta receptor. PMID:2548205

  2. Down-regulation of pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 by somatostatin receptor subtype 5: a novel mechanism for inhibition of cellular proliferation and insulin secretion by somatostatin

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guisheng; Sinnett-Smith, Jim; Liu, Shi-He; Yu, Juehua; Wu, James; Sanchez, Robbi; Pandol, Stephen J.; Abrol, Ravinder; Nemunaitis, John; Rozengurt, Enrique; Brunicardi, F. Charles

    2014-01-01

    Somatostatin (SST) is a regulatory peptide and acts as an endogenous inhibitory regulator of the secretory and proliferative responses of target cells. SST’s actions are mediated by a family of seven transmembrane domain G protein-coupled receptors that comprise five distinct subtypes (SSTR1-5). SSTR5 is one of the major SSTRs in the islets of Langerhans. Homeodomain-containing transcription factor pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX-1) is essential for pancreatic development, β cell differentiation, maintenance of normal β cell functions in adults and tumorigenesis. Recent studies show that SSTR5 acts as a negative regulator for PDX-1 expression and that SSTR5 mediates somatostatin’s inhibitory effect on cell proliferation and insulin expression/excretion through down-regulating PDX-1 expression. SSTR5 exerts its inhibitory effect on PDX-1 expression at both the transcriptional level by down-regulating PDX-1 mRNA and the post-translational level by enhancing PDX-1 ubiquitination. Identification of PDX-1 as a transcriptional target for SSTR5 may help in guiding the choice of therapeutic cancer treatments. PMID:25009500

  3. ANG II receptor subtype 1a gene knockdown in the subfornical organ prevents increased drinking behavior in bile duct-ligated rats

    PubMed Central

    Walch, Joseph D.; Nedungadi, T. Prashant

    2014-01-01

    Bile duct ligation (BDL) causes congestive liver failure that initiates hemodynamic changes, resulting in dilutional hyponatremia due to increased water intake and vasopressin release. This project tested the hypothesis that angiotensin signaling at the subfornical organ (SFO) augments drinking behavior in BDL rats. A genetically modified adeno-associated virus containing short hairpin RNA (shRNA) for ANG II receptor subtype 1a (AT1aR) gene was microinjected into the SFO of rats to knock down expression. Two weeks later, BDL or sham surgery was performed. Rats were housed in metabolic chambers for measurement of fluid and food intake and urine output. The rats were euthanized 28 days after BDL surgery for analysis. A group of rats was perfused for immunohistochemistry, and a second group was used for laser-capture microdissection for analysis of SFO AT1aR gene expression. BDL rats showed increased water intake that was attenuated in rats that received SFO microinjection of AT1aR shRNA. Among BDL rats treated with scrambled (control) and AT1aR shRNA, we observed an increased number of vasopressin-positive cells in the supraoptic nucleus that colocalized with ΔFosB staining, suggesting increased vasopressin release in both groups. These results indicate that angiotensin signaling through the SFO contributes to increased water intake, but not dilutional hyponatremia, during congestive liver failure. PMID:25009217

  4. Acute alertness-promoting effects of a novel histamine subtype-3 receptor inverse agonist in healthy sleep-deprived male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Iannone, R; Palcza, J; Renger, J J; Calder, N; Cerchio, K; Gottesdiener, K; Hargreaves, R; Dijk, D J; Boyle, J; Murphy, M G

    2010-12-01

    The alertness-promoting effect of MK-0249 (10 or 50 mg), a histamine subtype-3 receptor (HRH3) inverse agonist (IA), was evaluated in the stimulant reference sleep deprivation model (SRSDM) using a double-blind, double-dummy, placebo- and modafinil- (200 mg) controlled, four-period crossover design in 24 healthy young men. The two primary hypotheses were related to sleep latency (first appearance of one epoch of stage 2, 3, or 4 or REM sleep, as detected using polysomnography (PSG)) at 8:00 AM on day 2. Statistically significant increases in sleep latency were observed in association with the use of modafinil 200 mg (9.07 min; P < 0.0001), MK-0249 50 mg (5.17 min; P = 0.008), and MK-0249 10 mg (5.45 min; P = 0.005) at the maintenance of wakefulness test (MWT) at 8:00 AM. Sleep latency was higher when averaged over all MWT time points (P < 0.0001 for modafinil and for both doses of MK-0249). The alertness-promoting effect with the use of MK-0249 in the SRSDM suggests that HRH3 IAs may be effective in disorders involving excessive somnolence. PMID:20981000

  5. Internalization of RGD peptide conjugates of near-infrared fluorescent probes in different cell lines occurs via different integrin receptor subtypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloch, S.; Xu, B.; Ye, Y.; Liang, K.; Achilefu, S.

    2006-02-01

    Expression of integrin α vβ 3 is upregulated in a number of cancers including colon, pancreas, lung and breast. Previous studies demonstrated that near infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes designed to target α vβ 3 accumulated both in vitro and in vivo in α vβ 3-positive tumor cells. To evaluate the selectivity of some NIR-labeled RGD peptides for α vβ 3, the molecular probes were incubated in different cells, including the α vβ 3-positive U87 and A549 cells, and α vβ 3-negative HT29 cells. Whereas the RGD compounds tested internalized in the A549 cells, their uptake by the HT29 cell line, which is positive for α vβ 5 and α vβ 6, was low. The uptake of these probes in U87 depended on the structural features of the compounds. Further studies with functional blocking antibodies showed that the internalization in the α vβ 3-positive cells may be mediated by different integrin receptor subtypes. The preliminary results suggest that the internalization of linear RGD peptides is mediated by the α vβ 3 heterodimer but rearrangement of the peptide sequence could alter the selectivity of the molecular probes for different integrin subunits in the dimeric α and β proteins. Thus, a careful choice of RGD peptides can be used to monitor the functional status of different integrins in cells and tissues.

  6. The receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP){beta}/{zeta} is expressed in different subtypes of human breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Garcia-Suarez, Olivia; Menendez-Rodriguez, Primitiva; Mortimer, J.; Chang, Y.; Astudillo, A.; Deuel, T.F.

    2007-10-12

    Increasing evidence suggests mutations in human breast cancer cells that induce inappropriate expression of the 18-kDa cytokine pleiotrophin (PTN, Ptn) initiate progression of breast cancers to a more malignant phenotype. Pleiotrophin signals through inactivating its receptor, the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP){beta}/{zeta}, leading to increased tyrosine phosphorylation of different substrate proteins of RPTP{beta}/{zeta}, including {beta}-catenin, {beta}-adducin, Fyn, GIT1/Cat-1, and P190RhoGAP. PTN signaling thus has wide impact on different important cellular systems. Recently, PTN was found to activate anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) through the PTN/RPTP{beta}/{zeta} signaling pathway; this discovery potentially is very important, since constitutive ALK activity of nucleophosmin (NPM)-ALK fusion protein is causative of anaplastic large cell lymphomas, and, activated ALK is found in other malignant cancers. Recently ALK was identified in each of 63 human breast cancers from 22 subjects. We now demonstrate that RPTP{beta}/{zeta} is expressed in each of these same 63 human breast cancers that previously were found to express ALK and in 10 additional samples of human breast cancer. RPTP{beta}/{zeta} furthermore was localized not only in its normal association with the cell membrane but also scattered in cytoplasm and in nuclei in different breast cancer cells and, in the case of infiltrating ductal carcinomas, the distribution of RPTP{beta}/{zeta} changes as the breast cancer become more malignant. The data suggest that the PTN/RPTP{beta}/{zeta} signaling pathway may be constitutively activated and potentially function to constitutively activate ALK in human breast cancer.

  7. Facilitation of fear extinction by novelty depends on dopamine acting on D1-subtype dopamine receptors in hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Jefferson; Alves, Niége; Borges, Sidnei; Roehrs, Rafael; de Carvalho Myskiw, Jociane; Furini, Cristiane Regina Guerino; Izquierdo, Ivan; Mello-Carpes, Pâmela B.

    2015-01-01

    Extinction is the learned inhibition of retrieval. Recently it was shown that a brief exposure to a novel environment enhances the extinction of contextual fear in rats, an effect explainable by a synaptic tagging-and-capture process. Here we examine whether this also happens with the extinction of another fear-motivated task, inhibitory avoidance (IA), and whether it depends on dopamine acting on D1 or D5 receptors. Rats were trained first in IA and then in extinction of this task. The retention of extinction was measured 24 h later. A 5-min exposure to a novel environment 30 min before extinction training enhanced its retention. Right after exposure to the novelty, animals were given bilateral intrahippocampal infusions of vehicle (VEH), of the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin, of the D1/D5 dopaminergic antagonist SCH23390, of the PKA inhibitor Rp-cAMP or of the PKC inhibitor Gö6976, and of the PKA stimulator Sp-cAMP or of the PKC stimulator PMA. The novelty increased hippocampal dopamine levels and facilitated the extinction, which was inhibited by intrahippocampal protein synthesis inhibitor anisomysin, D1/D5 dopaminerdic antagonist SCH23390, or PKA inhibitor Rp-cAMP and unaffected by PKC inhibitor Gö6976; additionally, the hippocampal infusion of PKA stimulator Sp-cAMP reverts the effect of D1/D5 dopaminergic antagonist SCH 23390, but the infusion of PKC stimulator PMA does not. The results attest to the generality of the novelty effect on fear extinction, suggest that it relies on synaptic tagging and capture, and show that it depends on hippocampal dopamine D1 but not D5 receptors. PMID:25775606

  8. Internalization and desensitization of adenosine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Klaasse, Elisabeth C.; de Grip, Willem J.; Beukers, Margot W.

    2007-01-01

    Until now, more than 800 distinct G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been identified in the human genome. The four subtypes of the adenosine receptor (A1, A2A, A2B and A3 receptor) belong to this large family of GPCRs that represent the most widely targeted pharmacological protein class. Since adenosine receptors are widespread throughout the body and involved in a variety of physiological processes and diseases, there is great interest in understanding how the different subtypes are regulated, as a basis for designing therapeutic drugs that either avoid or make use of this regulation. The major GPCR regulatory pathway involves phosphorylation of activated receptors by G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), a process that is followed by binding of arrestin proteins. This prevents receptors from activating downstream heterotrimeric G protein pathways, but at the same time allows activation of arrestin-dependent signalling pathways. Upon agonist treatment, adenosine receptor subtypes are differently regulated. For instance, the A1Rs are not (readily) phosphorylated and internalize slowly, showing a typical half-life of several hours, whereas the A2AR and A2BR undergo much faster downregulation, usually shorter than 1 h. The A3R is subject to even faster downregulation, often a matter of minutes. The fast desensitization of the A3R after agonist exposure may be therapeutically equivalent to antagonist occupancy of the receptor. This review describes the process of desensitization and internalization of the different adenosine subtypes in cell systems, tissues and in vivo studies. In addition, molecular mechanisms involved in adenosine receptor desensitization are discussed. PMID:18368531

  9. Difference and Influence of Inactive and Active States of Cannabinoid Receptor Subtype CB2: From Conformation to Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianping; Feng, Zhiwei; Ma, Shifan; Zhang, Yu; Tong, Qin; Alqarni, Mohammed Hamed; Gou, Xiaojun; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2016-06-27

    Cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), is a promising target for the treatment of neuropathic pain, osteoporosis, immune system, cancer, and drug abuse. The lack of an experimental three-dimensional CB2 structure has hindered not only the development of studies of conformational differences between the inactive and active CB2 but also the rational discovery of novel functional compounds targeting CB2. In this work, we constructed models of both inactive and active CB2 by homology modeling. Then we conducted two comparative 100 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on the two systems-the active CB2 bound with both the agonist and G protein and the inactive CB2 bound with inverse agonist-to analyze the conformational difference of CB2 proteins and the key residues involved in molecular recognition. Our results showed that the inactive CB2 and the inverse agonist remained stable during the MD simulation. However, during the MD simulations, we observed dynamical details about the breakdown of the "ionic lock" between R131(3.50) and D240(6.30) as well as the outward/inward movements of transmembrane domains of the active CB2 that bind with G proteins and agonist (TM5, TM6, and TM7). All of these results are congruent with the experimental data and recent reports. Moreover, our results indicate that W258(6.48) in TM6 and residues in TM4 (V164(4.56)-L169(4.61)) contribute greatly to the binding of the agonist on the basis of the binding energy decomposition, while residues S180-F183 in extracellular loop 2 (ECL2) may be of importance in recognition of the inverse agonist. Furthermore, pharmacophore modeling and virtual screening were carried out for the inactive and active CB2 models in parallel. Among all 10 hits, two compounds exhibited novel scaffolds and can be used as novel chemical probes for future studies of CB2. Importantly, our studies show that the hits obtained from the inactive CB2 model mainly act as inverse agonist(s) or neutral

  10. Evaluation of the Biological Activity of Opuntia ficus indica as a Tissue- and Estrogen Receptor Subtype-Selective Modulator.

    PubMed

    An, Byoung Ha; Jeong, Hyesoo; Zhou, Wenmei; Liu, Xiyuan; Kim, Soolin; Jang, Chang Young; Kim, Hyun-Sook; Sohn, Johann; Park, Hye-Jin; Sung, Na-Hye; Hong, Cheol Yi; Chang, Minsun

    2016-06-01

    Phytoestrogens are selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) with potential for use in hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to relieve peri/postmenopausal symptoms. This study was aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the SERM properties of the extract of Korean-grown Opuntia ficus-indica (KOFI). The KOFI extract induced estrogen response element (ERE)-driven transcription in breast and endometrial cancer cell lines and the expression of endogenous estrogen-responsive genes in breast cancer cells. The flavonoid content of different KOFI preparations affected ERE-luciferase activities, implying that the flavonoid composition likely mediated the estrogenic activities in cells. Oral administration of KOFI decreased the weight gain and levels of both serum glucose and triglyceride in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Finally, KOFI had an inhibitory effect on the 17β-estradiol-induced proliferation of the endometrial epithelium in OVX rats. Our data demonstrate that KOFI exhibited SERM activity with no uterotrophic side effects. Therefore, KOFI alone or in combination with other botanical supplements, vitamins, or minerals may be an effective and safe alternative active ingredient to HRTs, for the management of postmenopausal symptoms. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26989859

  11. Estradiol receptors in combination with neu or myc oncogene amplifications might define new subtypes of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bolufer, P; Molina, R; Ruiz, A; Hernandez, M; Vazquez, C; Lluch, A

    1994-09-01

    Amplifications of neu and c-myc were evaluated in 218 and 145 breast cancers (BC), respectively. Oncogene amplifications were determined for the most part by Southern blot. An association between the proportion of nodes affected and the intensity of neu amplification in estadiol receptor negative (ER-) BC was found (P = 0.028), which was confirmed by the multi-factor analysis of variance (P = 0.05). A significantly greater incidence in neu amplifications among BC with metastases was also found (P = 0.031). A strong association (P = 0.01) between the neu and myc amplification was observed. There is a strong association between myc amplification and ER- BC (P < 0.01). It is concluded that (1) the combination ER- with neu amplification might define a new group of more aggressive BC, as is suggested by their associated nodal involvement; (2) the linkage of myc amplifications with ER- BC and high grade of neu amplification might reflect a trait of tumor aggressivity. PMID:7988041

  12. Triaryl-Substituted Schiff Bases Are High-Affinity Subtype-Selective Ligands for the Estrogen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We have explored the isoelectronic replacement of the C=C double bond found at the core of many nonsteroidal estrogen ligands with a simple Schiff base (C=N). Di- and triaryl-substituted imine derivatives were conveniently prepared by the condensation of benzophenones with various anilines without the need for phenolic hydroxy protection. Most of these imines demonstrated high affinity for the estrogen receptors, which, in some cases exceeded that of estradiol. In cell-based assays, these imines profiled as ERα agonists but as ERβ antagonists, showing preferential reliance on the N-terminal activation function (AF1), which is more active in ERα. X-ray analysis revealed that the triaryl-imines distort the ligand-binding pocket in a new way: by controlling the separation of helices 3 and 11, which appears to alter the C-terminal AF2 surface that binds transcriptional coactivators. This work suggests that C=N for C=C substitution might be more widely considered as a general strategy for preparing drug analogues. PMID:24708493

  13. A Novel α2/α4 Subtype-selective Positive Allosteric Modulator of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Acting from the C-tail of an α Subunit.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyi; Kuryatov, Alexander; Jin, Zhuang; Norleans, Jack; Kamenecka, Theodore M; Kenny, Paul J; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-11-27

    Positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) are important therapeutic candidates as well as valuable research tools. We identified a novel type II PAM, (R)-7-bromo-N-(piperidin-3-yl)benzo[b]thiophene-2-carboxamide (Br-PBTC), which both increases activation and reactivates desensitized nAChRs. This compound increases acetylcholine-evoked responses of α2* and α4* nAChRs but is without effect on α3* or α6* nAChRs (* indicates the presence of other nAChR subunits). Br-BPTC acts from the C-terminal extracellular sequences of α4 subunits, which is also a PAM site for steroid hormone estrogens such as 17β-estradiol. Br-PBTC is much more potent than estrogens. Like 17β-estradiol, the non-steroid Br-PBTC only requires one α4 subunit to potentiate nAChR function, and its potentiation is stronger with more α4 subunits. This feature enables Br-BPTC to potentiate activation of (α4β2)(α6β2)β3 but not (α6β2)2β3 nAChRs. Therefore, this compound is potentially useful in vivo for determining functions of different α6* nAChR subtypes. Besides activation, Br-BPTC affects desensitization of nAChRs induced by sustained exposure to agonists. After minutes of exposure to agonists, Br-PBTC reactivated short term desensitized nAChRs that have at least two α4 subunits but not those with only one. Three α4 subunits were required for Br-BPTC to reactivate long term desensitized nAChRs. These data suggest that higher PAM occupancy promotes channel opening more efficiently and overcomes short and long term desensitization. This C-terminal extracellular domain could be a target for developing subtype or state-selective drugs for nAChRs. PMID:26432642

  14. Differences in muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes in the central nervous system of long sleep and short sleep mice. [Ethanol effects

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, M.; Ming, X.; McArdle, J.J. )

    1989-02-09

    Differences in voluntary ethanol consumption have been noted in various inbred strains of mice and pharmacogenetic approaches have been used to study the mechanisms of action of many drugs such as ethanol. Long-sleep (LS) and short-sleep (SS) mice, selectively bred for differences in ethanol induced narcosis, provide a method by which a relationship between the differential responsiveness of these geno-types and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) may be evaluated. Sleep times after injection of 3ml ethanol/kg (i.p.) verified the higher sensitivity of LS vs. SS. Mean body weights of LS (26.5g) vs. SS (22g) were also significantly (p<.01) greater. Binding assays for ({sup 3}H)(-) quinuclidinylbenzilate (({sup 3}H)(-)QNB), a specific but nonsubtype selective mAChR antagonist, ({sup 3}H)pirenzepine (({sup 3}H)PZ), a specific M1 mAChR antagonist and ({sup 3}H)11-2-((2-((diethylamino) methyl)-1-piperidinyl) acetyl)-5,11-dihydro-6H-pyrido (2,3-b) (1,4) benzodiazepine-6-one, (({sup 3}H)AF-DX 116), an M2 selective antagonist were performed to determine mAChR affinity (K{sub d}) and density (B{sub max}) in CNS regions such as the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, corpus striatum and other areas. Significantly lower (30-40%) ({sup 3}H)(-)QNB binding suggests that SS have fewer mAChR's than LS in many areas. These differences may relate to their differential ethanol sensitivity.

  15. Oral Mineralocorticoid-Receptor Antagonists: Real-Life Experience in Clinical Subtypes of Nonresolving Central Serous Chorioretinopathy With Chronic Epitheliopathy

    PubMed Central

    Daruich, Alejandra; Matet, Alexandre; Dirani, Ali; Gallice, Mathilde; Nicholson, Luke; Sivaprasad, Sobha; Behar-Cohen, Francine

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy and safety of oral mineralocorticoid-receptor antagonist (MRa) therapy in three clinical presentations of nonresolving central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) with chronic epitheliopathy. Methods Retrospective case series of consecutive patients with nonresolving CSCR treated with oral eplerenone or spironolactone. Treatment criteria were: persistent CSCR with subretinal fluid (SRF) lasting longer than 4 months; recurrent CSCR with SRF lasting longer than 2 months; persistent CSCR (SRF ≥ 4 months) with fundus autofluorescence gravitational tracks. Outcomes at 1, 3, and 6 months were: foveal SRF height, central macular thickness (CMT), subfoveal choroidal thickness (SFCT), best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), and occurrence of side effects. Results Among 54 eyes from 42 patients (mean age: 53 years), mean foveal SRF, CMT, and SFCT decreased significantly at 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment initiation. Mean BCVA improved significantly at 6 months. In the subgroup analysis, mean foveal SRF, CMT, and SFCT decreased significantly at 3 and 6 months in the persistent and recurrent groups. In persistent cases with tracks, a significant diminution of mean CMT and SFCT was achieved at 6 months. Treatment-related side effects were observed in 6 patients, prompting treatment discontinuation in one case. Conclusion Response to treatment was observed in the three subgroups. In persistent CSCR with tracks the response was delayed compared with persistent and recurrent cases, suggesting that longer treatment durations would be beneficial in patients with gravitational tracks of RPE alteration. Translational Relevance The clinical response to oral MRa is consistent with the involvement of the mineralocorticoid pathway in CSCR pathogenesis. PMID:26966638

  16. Differential actions of antiparkinson agents at multiple classes of monoaminergic receptor. II. Agonist and antagonist properties at subtypes of dopamine D(2)-like receptor and alpha(1)/alpha(2)-adrenoceptor.

    PubMed

    Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Cussac, Didier; Audinot, Valérie; Nicolas, Jean-Paul; De Ceuninck, Frédéric; Boutin, Jean-A; Millan, Mark J

    2002-11-01

    properties at multiple subtypes of D(2)-like receptor and alpha(1)/alpha(2)-AR, actions, which likely contribute to their contrasting functional profiles. PMID:12388667

  17. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor beta/delta (PPARbeta/delta) increases the expression of prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype EP4. The roles of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta.

    PubMed

    Han, ShouWei; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D; Wingerd, Byron; Roman, Jesse

    2005-09-30

    The prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype EP4 has been implicated in the growth and progression of human non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). However, the factors that control its expression have not been entirely elucidated. Our studies show that NSCLC cells express peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor beta/delta (PPARbeta/delta) protein and that treatment with a selective PPARbeta/delta agonist (GW501516) increases EP4 mRNA and protein levels. GW501516 induced NSCLC cell proliferation, and this effect was prevented by PPARbeta/delta antisense or EP4 short interfering RNA (siRNA). GW501516 increased the phosphorylation of Akt and decreased PTEN expression. The selective inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K), wortmannin, and PPARbeta/delta antisense, abrogated the effect of GW501516 on EP4 expression, whereas that of the inhibitor of Erk did not. GW501516 also increased EP4 promoter activity through effects on the region between -1555 and -992 bp in the EP4 promoter, and mutation of the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) site in this region abrogated the effect of GW501516. GW501516 increased not only the binding activity of C/EBP to the NF-IL6 site in the EP4 promoter, which was prevented by the inhibitor of PI3-K, but also increased C/EBPbeta protein in a dose- and PPARbeta/delta-dependent manner. The effect of GW501516 on EP4 protein was eliminated in the presence of C/EBPbeta siRNA. Finally, we showed that pretreatment of NSCLC with GW501516 further increased NSCLC cell proliferation in response to exogenous dimethyl-prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) that was diminished in the presence of PPARbeta/delta antisense and EP4 siRNA. Taken together, these findings suggest that activation of PPARbeta/delta induces PGE2 receptor subtype EP4 expression through PI3-K signals and increases human lung carcinoma cell proliferation in response to PGE2. The increase in transcription of the EP4 gene by PPARbeta/delta agonist was associated with increased C

  18. Synthesis and bioactivity of MSH4 oligomers prepared by an A2 + B2 strategy

    PubMed Central

    Dehigaspitiya, Dilani Chathurika; Navath, Suryakiran; Weber, Craig S.; Lynch, Ronald M.; Mash, Eugene A.

    2014-01-01

    Oligomers incorporating the tetrapeptide MSH4, the minimum active sequence of melanocyte stimulating hormone, were synthesized by an A2 + B2 strategy involving microwave-assisted copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. A2 contained an MSH4 core while B2 contained a (Pro-Gly)3 spacer. Soluble mixtures containing compounds with up to eight MSH4 units were obtained from oligomerizations at high monomer concentrations. The avidities of several oligomeric mixtures were evaluated by means of a competitive binding assay using HEK293 cells engineered to overexpress the melanocortin 4 receptor. When based on total MSH4 concentrations, avidities were only minimally enhanced compared with a monovalent control. The lack of variation in the effect of ligands on probe binding is consistent with high off rates for MSH4 in both monovalent and oligomeric constructs relative to that of the competing probe. PMID:26120211

  19. Adenosine Receptors and Membrane Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Lasley, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine receptors are a member of the large family of seven transmembrane spanning G protein coupled receptors (GPCR). The four adenosine receptor subtypes – A1, A2a, A2b, A3 – exert their effects via the activation of one or more heterotrimeric G proteins resulting in the modulation of intracellular signaling. Numerous studies over the past decade have documented the complexity of GPCR signaling at the level of protein-protein interactions as well as through signaling crosstalk. With respect to adenosine receptors the activation of one receptor subtype can have profound direct effects in one cell type, but little or no effect in other cells. There is significant evidence that the compartmentation of subcellular signaling plays a physiological role in the fidelity of GPCR signaling. This compartmentation is evident at the level of the plasma membrane in the form of membrane microdomains such as caveolae and lipid rafts. This review will summarize and critically assess our current understanding of the role of membrane microdomains in regulating adenosine receptor signaling. PMID:20888790

  20. Protective effect of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) modulator, against behavioral, biochemical and structural damage in experimental models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jayant, Shalini; Sharma, B M; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-07-01

    Alzheime's disease (AD) is an overwhelming neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by synaptic dysfunction, memory loss, neuro-inflammation and neural cell death. Very few treatments are in hand for the management of AD and they are only concentrating on peculiar aspects. Hence, an immense thrust is required to find utmost therapeutic targets to conquer this condition. This study investigates a potential role of vanillin, a selective agonist of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) in the experimental models of AD viz. intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) streptozotocin (STZ) and aluminum trichloride (AlCl3)+d-galactose induced AD in mice. The i.c.v. administration of STZ and intraperitoneally administration of AlCl3+d-galactose have significantly impaired learning-memory (Morris water maze and attentional set-shifting test), brain structure (hematoxylin, eosin and Congo red staining), enhanced brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive substance - TBARS and glutathione - GSH), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE), inflammation (MPO), and calcium levels (Ca(++)). Treatment with vanillin in different doses and donepezil have significantly ameliorated i.c.v. STZ and AlCl3+d-galactose induced reduction in executive function, impaired reversal learning, cognition, memory and brain damage. Treatment with these drugs has also reduced the brain oxidative stress (TBARS and GSH), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), and AChE, MPO, and Ca(++) levels. These results indicate that vanillin, a selective agonist of TRPV1 and donepezil, a potent acetylcholine esterase inhibitor have attenuated i.c.v. STZ and AlCl3+d-galactose induced experimental AD. Hence, pharmacological positive modulation of TRPV1 channels may be a potential research target for mitigation of AD. PMID:27084583

  1. The Role of Aldehyde Oxidase and Xanthine Oxidase in the Biotransformation of a Novel Negative Allosteric Modulator of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 5

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Ryan D.; Blobaum, Anna L.; Byers, Frank W.; Santomango, Tammy S.; Bridges, Thomas M.; Stec, Donald; Brewer, Katrina A.; Sanchez-Ponce, Raymundo; Corlew, Melany M.; Rush, Roger; Felts, Andrew S.; Manka, Jason; Bates, Brittney S.; Venable, Daryl F.; Rodriguez, Alice L.; Jones, Carrie K.; Niswender, Colleen M.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig W.; Emmitte, Kyle A.

    2012-01-01

    Negative allosteric modulation (NAM) of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) represents a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of childhood developmental disorders, such as fragile X syndrome and autism. VU0409106 emerged as a lead compound within a biaryl ether series, displaying potent and selective inhibition of mGlu5. Despite its high clearance and short half-life, VU0409106 demonstrated efficacy in rodent models of anxiety after extravascular administration. However, lack of a consistent correlation in rat between in vitro hepatic clearance and in vivo plasma clearance for the biaryl ether series prompted an investigation into the biotransformation of VU0409106 using hepatic subcellular fractions. An in vitro appraisal in rat, monkey, and human liver S9 fractions indicated that the principal pathway was NADPH-independent oxidation to metabolite M1 (+16 Da). Both raloxifene (aldehyde oxidase inhibitor) and allopurinol (xanthine oxidase inhibitor) attenuated the formation of M1, thus implicating the contribution of both molybdenum hydroxylases in the biotransformation of VU0409106. The use of 18O-labeled water in the S9 experiments confirmed the hydroxylase mechanism proposed, because 18O was incorporated into M1 (+18 Da) as well as in a secondary metabolite (M2; +36 Da), the formation of which was exclusively xanthine oxidase-mediated. This unusual dual and sequential hydroxylase metabolism was confirmed in liver S9 and hepatocytes of multiple species and correlated with in vivo data because M1 and M2 were the principal metabolites detected in rats administered VU0409106. An in vitro-in vivo correlation of predicted hepatic and plasma clearance was subsequently established for VU0409106 in rats and nonhuman primates. PMID:22711749

  2. The metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 antagonist fenobam is analgesic and has improved in vivo selectivity compared with the prototypical antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine.

    PubMed

    Montana, Michael C; Cavallone, Laura F; Stubbert, Kristi K; Stefanescu, Andrei D; Kharasch, Evan D; Gereau, Robert W

    2009-09-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) has been demonstrated to play a role in the modulation of numerous nociceptive modalities. When administered via peripheral, intrathecal, or systemic routes, mGlu5 antagonists have analgesic properties in a variety of preclinical pain models. Despite a wealth of data supporting the use of mGlu5 antagonists to treat pain, studies have been limited to preclinical animal models due to a lack of mGlu5 antagonists that are approved for use in humans. It has been demonstrated previously that fenobam [N-(3-chlorophenyl)-N'-(4,5-dihydro-1-methyl-4-oxo-1H-imidazole-2-yl)urea], an anxiolytic shown to be safe and effective in human trials, is a selective and potent noncompetitive antagonist of mGlu5 (J Pharmacol Exp Ther 315:711-721, 2005). Here, we report a series of studies aimed at testing whether fenobam, similar to the prototypical mGlu5 antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP), has analgesic properties in mice. We show that fenobam reduces formalin-induced pain behaviors and relieves established inflammation-induced thermal hypersensitivity in mice. Similar results were seen with MPEP. Administration of fenobam resulted in an increase in locomotor activity in the open-field task but did not impair performance on the accelerating Rotarod. Analysis of brain and plasma fenobam levels indicated that fenobam is rapidly concentrated in brain after intraperitoneal administration in mice but is essentially cleared from circulation within 1 h after injection. Fenobam had no analgesic effect in mGlu5 knockout mice, whereas the prototypical antagonist MPEP retained significant analgesic efficacy in mGlu5 knockouts. These results demonstrate that fenobam is analgesic in mice and has an improved in vivo selectivity for mGlu5 over MPEP. PMID:19515968

  3. Synthesis, radiolabelling and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of a novel fluorinated ABP688 derivative for the PET imaging of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5

    PubMed Central

    Sephton, Selena Milicevic; Dennler, Patrick; Leutwiler, Dominique S; Mu, Linjing; Wanger-Baumann, Cindy A; Schibli, Roger; Krämer, Stefanie D; Ametamey, Simon M

    2012-01-01

    (E)-3-(Pyridin-2-ylethynyl)cyclohex-2-enone O-(2-(3-18F-fluoropropoxy)ethyl) oxime ([18F]-PSS223) was evaluated in vitro and in vivo to establish its potential as a PET tracer for imaging metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5). [18F]-PSS223 was obtained in 20% decay corrected radiochemical yield whereas the non-radioactive PSS223 was accomplished in 70% chemical yield in a SN2 reaction of common intermediate mesylate 8 with potassium fluoride. The in vitro binding affinity of [18F]-PSS223 was measured directly in a Scatchard assay to give Kd = 3.34 ± 2.05 nM. [18F]-PSS223 was stable in PBS and rat plasma but was significantly metabolized by rat liver microsomal enzymes, but to a lesser extent by human liver microsomes. Within 60 min, 90% and 20% of [18F]-PSS223 was metabolized by rat and human microsome enzymes, respectively. In vitro autoradiography on horizontal rat brain slices showed heterogeneous distribution of [18F]-PSS223 with the highest accumulation in brain regions where mGluR5 is highly expressed (hippocampus, striatum and cortex). Autoradiography in vitro under blockade conditions with ABP688 confirmed the high specificity of [18F]-PSS223 for mGluR5. Under the same blocking conditions but using the mGluR1 antagonist, JNJ16259685, no blockade was observed demonstrating the selectivity of [18F]-PSS223 for mGluR5 over mGluR1. Despite favourable in vitro properties of [18F]-PSS223, a clear-cut visualization of mGluR5-rich brain regions in vivo in rats was not possible mainly due to a fast clearance from the brain and low metabolic stability of [18F]-PSS223. PMID:23133799

  4. Dose-dependent, Saturable Occupancy of the Metabotropic Glutamate Subtype 5 Receptor by Fenobam as Measured with [11C]ABP688 PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    KUWABARA, HIROTO; STANSFIELD, KIRSTIE; VALENTINE, HEATHER; ALEXANDER, MOHAB; KUMAR, ANIL; HILTON, JOHN; DANNALS, ROBERT F.; WONG, DEAN F.; GASPARINI, FABRIZIO

    2014-01-01

    Fenobam is a negative allosteric modulator of the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) with inverse agonist activity and is expected to contribute to the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders involving dysfunction of mGluR5 including Fragile × syndrome. This study examined whether [11C]ABP688, an antagonist PET radioligand, competes with fenobam for the same binding site in the non-human primate brain and would allow examination of occupancy-plasma concentration relationships in the evaluation of the drug for target disorders in the human brain. Four paired PET studies with [11C]ABP688 were performed in baboons at a baseline condition and after intravenous treatment with fenobam at different dose levels (0.3 - 1.33 mg/kg). Total distribution volume (VT) and binding potential (BPND) using the cerebellum as a reference region were obtained by the plasma reference graphical method. Then it was examined whether occupancy follows a dose-dependent, saturating pattern that was predicted by a modified first-order Hill equation in individual regions. Baseline regional VT and BPND values agreed with previously published data. Occupancy showed dose-dependent and saturating patterns in individual regions, reaching >90% occupancy at 1.33 mg/kg dose of fenobam in the majority of regions. To our knowledge, this is the first use of PET to characterize the mGluR5 therapeutic drug fenobam. This study demonstrates a proof of principle for determining the in vivo occupancy of fenobam in primates. The results indicate that [11C]ABP688 and PET may be useful for examination of occupancy of mGluR5 by fenobam, which should prove to be useful for designing future studies and treatment of human disease states. PMID:25098663

  5. Dose-dependent, saturable occupancy of the metabotropic glutamate subtype 5 receptor by fenobam as measured with [(11) C]ABP688 PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Mathews, William B; Kuwabara, Hiroto; Stansfield, Kirstie; Valentine, Heather; Alexander, Mohab; Kumar, Anil; Hilton, John; Dannals, Robert F; Wong, Dean F; Gasparini, Fabrizio

    2014-08-01

    Fenobam is a negative allosteric modulator of the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) with inverse agonist activity and is expected to contribute to the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders involving dysfunction of mGluR5 including Fragile X syndrome. This study examined whether [(11) C]ABP688, an antagonist PET radioligand, competes with fenobam for the same binding site in the nonhuman primate brain and would allow examination of occupancy-plasma concentration relationships in the evaluation of the drug for target disorders in the human brain. Four paired PET studies with [(11) C]ABP688 were performed in baboons at a baseline condition and after intravenous treatment with fenobam at different dose levels (0.3-1.33 mg/kg). Total distribution volume (VT ) and binding potential (BPND ) using the cerebellum as a reference region were obtained by the plasma reference graphical method. Then it was examined whether occupancy follows a dose-dependent, saturating pattern that was predicted by a modified first-order Hill equation in individual regions. Baseline regional VT and BPND values agreed with previously published data. Occupancy showed dose-dependent and saturating patterns in individual regions, reaching >90% occupancy at 1.33 mg/kg dose of fenobam in the majority of regions. To our knowledge, this is the first use of PET to characterize the mGluR5 therapeutic drug fenobam. This study demonstrates a proof of principle for determining the in vivo occupancy of fenobam in primates. The results indicate that [(11) C]ABP688 and PET may be useful for examination of occupancy of mGluR5 by fenobam, which should prove to be useful for designing future studies and treatment of human disease states. Synapse, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25098663

  6. Distinct mixtures of muscarinic receptor subtypes mediate inhibition of noradrenaline release in different mouse peripheral tissues, as studied with receptor knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Trendelenburg, Anne-Ulrike; Meyer, Angelika; Wess, Jürgen; Starke, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    The muscarinic heteroreceptors modulating noradrenaline release in atria, urinary bladder and vas deferens were previously studied in mice in which the M2 or the M4 muscarinic receptor genes had been disrupted. These experiments showed that these tissues possessed both M2 and non-M2 heteroreceptors. The analysis was now extended to mice in which either the M3, both the M2 and the M3, or both the M2 and the M4 genes had been disrupted (M3-knockout, M2/3-knockout and M2/4-knockout). Tissues were preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline and then stimulated electrically (20 pulses per 50 Hz). In wild-type atria, carbachol (0.01–100 μM) decreased the electrically evoked tritium overflow by maximally 60–78%. The maximum inhibition of carbachol was reduced to 57% in M3-knockout and to 23% in M2/4-knockout atria. Strikingly, the effect of carbachol was abolished in M2/3-knockout atria. In wild-type bladder, carbachol (0.01–100 μM) reduced the evoked tritium overflow by maximally 57–71%. This effect remained unchanged in the M3-knockout, but was abolished in the M2/4-knockout bladder. In wild-type vas deferens, carbachol (0.01–100 μM) reduced the evoked tritium overflow by maximally 34–48%. The maximum inhibition of carbachol was reduced to 40% in the M3-knockout and to 18% in the M2/4-knockout vas deferens. We conclude that the postganglionic sympathetic axons of mouse atria possess M2 and M3, those of the urinary bladder M2 and M4, and those of the vas deferens M2, M3 and M4 release-inhibiting muscarinic receptors. PMID:15965496

  7. Differentiation of sigma ligand-activated receptor subtypes that modulate NMDA-evoked [3H]-noradrenaline release in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed Central

    Monnet, F. P.; de Costa, B. R.; Bowen, W. D.

    1996-01-01

    1. It is now widely accepted that there are two classes of sigma (sigma) binding sites, denoted sigma(1) and sigma(2), and recently sigma(3) subtype has been proposed. Selective sigma(1) and sigma(2) receptor agonists are known to modulate the neuronal response to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) in vivo and in vitro. To identify the site of action of a series of recently synthesised high affinity sigma ligands, the present in vitro series of experiments was carried out on NMDA-evoked [3H]-noradrenaline ([3H]-NA) overflow from preloaded hippocampal slices of the rat. 2. The ligands (+)-cis-N-methyl-N-[2,(3,4-dichlorophenyl) ethyl]-2-(1-pyrrolidinyl) cyclohexylamine (BD-737) and (+)-pentazocine, considered as the prototypic sigma(1) agonists, potentiated the NMDA response from 10 nM to 100 nM. This potentiation faded between 100 nM and 1 microM ligand concentrations. On the other hand, 1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine (DTG), a mixed sigma(1)/sigma(2) agonist, at concentrations greater than 100 nM inhibited the NMDA-evoked [3H]-NA release. Spiperone, considered as active on putative sigma(3) receptors, was without effect on the NMDA response, or on the potentiating effect of BD-737. 3. The high affinity sigma antagonists haloperidol and 1[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-4-methylpiperazine (BD-1063), inactive by themselves on the NMDA-induced response, at concentrations above 30 nM totally prevented the potentiating effect of (+)-pentazocine (100 nM) as well as the inhibitory effect of DTG (300 nM) on NMDA-evoked [3H]-NA release. Whereas haloperidol and BD-1063, at concentrations < 1 microM, were inactive on the potentiating effect of BD-737 (100 nM). 4. 4-(4-Chlorophenyl)-alpha-4-fluorophenyl-4-hydroxy-1-piperidinebutanol (reduced haloperidol), N-[2-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)ethyl]-N-methyl-2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)ethylamine (BD-1008), inactive by themselves on the NMDA-evoked [3H]-NA release, failed to reverse the effects of (+)-pentazocine and DTG, but at concentrations of 30 nM to 1 micro

  8. Contractile effects and receptor analysis of adenosine-receptors in human detrusor muscle from stable and neuropathic bladders.

    PubMed

    Pakzad, Mahreen; Ikeda, Youko; McCarthy, Carly; Kitney, Darryl G; Jabr, Rita I; Fry, Christopher H

    2016-08-01

    To measure the relative transcription of adenosine receptor subtypes and the contractile effects of adenosine and selective receptor-subtype ligands on detrusor smooth muscle from patients with neuropathic overactive (NDO) and stable bladders and also from guinea-pigs. Contractile function was measured at 37°C in vitro from detrusor smooth muscle strips. Contractions were elicited by superfusate agonists or by electrical field stimulation. Adenosine-receptor (A1, A2A, A2B, A3) transcription was measured by RT-PCR. Adenosine attenuated nerve-mediated responses with equivalent efficacy in human and guinea-pig tissue (pIC50 3.65-3.86); the action was more effective at low (1-8 Hz) compared to high (20-40 Hz) stimulation frequencies in human NDO and guinea-pig tissue. With guinea-pig detrusor the action of adenosine was mirrored by the A1/A2-agonist N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA), partly abolished in turn by the A2B-selectve antagonist alloxazine, as well as the A1-selective agonist N6- cyclopentyladenosine (CPA). With detrusor from stable human bladders the effects of NECA and CPA were much smaller than that of adenosine. Adenosine also attenuated carbachol contractures, but mirrored by NECA (in turn blocked by alloxazine) only in guinea-pig tissue. Adenosine receptor subtype transcription was measured in human detrusor and was similar in both groups, except reduced A2A levels in overactive bladder. Suppression of the carbachol contracture in human detrusor is independent of A-receptor activation, in contrast to an A2B-dependent action with guinea-pig tissue. Adenosine also reduced nerve-mediated contractions, by an A1- dependent action suppressing ATP neurotransmitter action. PMID:27185496

  9. First-in-class thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)-based compound binds to a pharmacologically distinct TRH receptor subtype in human brain and is effective in neurodegenerative models.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Julie A; Boyle, Noreen T; Cole, Natalie; Slator, Gillian R; Colivicchi, M Alessandra; Stefanini, Chiara; Gobbo, Oliviero L; Scalabrino, Gaia A; Ryan, Sinead M; Elamin, Marwa; Walsh, Cathal; Vajda, Alice; Goggin, Margaret M; Campbell, Matthew; Mash, Deborah C; O'Mara, Shane M; Brayden, David J; Callanan, John J; Tipton, Keith F; Della Corte, Laura; Hunter, Jackie; O'Boyle, Kathy M; Williams, Carvell H; Hardiman, Orla

    2015-02-01

    JAK4D, a first-in-class thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)-based compound, is a prospective therapeutic candidate offering a multifaceted approach to treating neurodegeneration and other CNS conditions. The purpose of these studies was to determine the ability of JAK4D to bind to TRH receptors in human brain and to evaluate its neuropharmacological effects in neurodegenerative animal models. Additionally, JAK4D brain permeation was examined in mouse, and initial toxicology was assessed in vivo and in vitro. We report that JAK4D bound selectively with nanomolar affinity to native TRH receptors in human hippocampal tissue and showed for the first time that these receptors are pharmacologically distinct from TRH receptors in human pituitary, thus revealing a new TRH receptor subtype which represents a promising neurotherapeutic target in human brain. Systemic administration of JAK4D elicited statistically significant and clinically-relevant neuroprotective effects in three established neurodegenerative animal models: JAK4D reduced cognitive deficits when administered post-insult in a kainate (KA)-induced rat model of neurodegeneration; it protected against free radical release and neuronal damage evoked by intrastriatal microdialysis of KA in rat; and it reduced motor decline, weight loss, and lumbar spinal cord neuronal loss in G93A-SOD1 transgenic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis mice. Ability to cross the blood-brain barrier and a clean initial toxicology profile were also shown. In light of these findings, JAK4D is an important tool for investigating the hitherto-unidentified central TRH receptor subtype reported herein and an attractive therapeutic candidate for neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25281210

  10. Presence of sst5TMD4, a truncated splice variant of the somatostatin receptor subtype 5, is associated to features of increased aggressiveness in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gahete, Manuel D.; Serrano-Somavilla, Ana; Villa-Osaba, Alicia; Adrados, Magdalena; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Martín-Pérez, Elena; Culler, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) are rare and heterogeneous tumors, and their biological behavior is not well known. We studied the presence and potential functional roles of somatostatin receptors (sst1-5), focusing particularly on the truncated variants (sst5TMD4, sst5TMD5) and on their relationships with the angiogenic system (Ang/Tie-2 and VEGF) in human GEP-NETs. Experimental Design We evaluated 42 tumor tissue samples (26 primary/16 metastatic) from 26 patients with GEP-NETs, and 30 non-tumoral tissues (26 from adjacent non-tumor regions and 4 from normal controls) from a single center. Expression of sst1-5, sst5TMD4, sst5TMD5, Ang1-2, Tie-2 and VEGF was analyzed using real-time qPCR, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry. Expression levels were associated with tumor characteristics and clinical outcomes. Functional role of sst5TMD4 was analyzed in GEP-NET cell lines. Results sst1 exhibited the highest expression in GEP-NET, whilst sst2 was the most frequently observed sst-subtype (90.2%). Expression levels of sst1, sst2, sst3, sst5TMD4, and sst5TMD5 were significantly higher in tumor tissues compared to their adjacent non-tumoral tissue. Lymph-node metastases expressed higher levels of sst5TMD4 than in its corresponding primary tumor tissue. sst5TMD4 was also significantly higher in intestinal tumor tissues from patients with residual disease of intestinal origin compared to those with non-residual disease. Functional assays demonstrated that the presence of sst5TMD4 was associated to enhanced malignant features in GEP-NET cells. Angiogenic markers correlated positively with sst5TMD4, which was confirmed by immunohistochemical/fluorescence studies. Conclusions sst5TMD4 is overexpressed in GEP-NETs and is associated to enhanced aggressiveness, suggesting its potential value as biomarker and target in GEP-NETs. PMID:26673010

  11. A(3) adenosine receptor ligands: history and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Baraldi, P G; Cacciari, B; Romagnoli, R; Merighi, S; Varani, K; Borea, P A; Spalluto, G

    2000-03-01

    Adenosine regulates many physiological functions through specific cell membrane receptors. On the basis of pharmacological studies and molecular cloning, four different adenosine receptors have been identified and classified as A(1), A(2A), A(2B), and A(3). These adenosine receptors are members of the G-protein-coupled receptor family. While adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptor subtypes have been pharmacologically characterized through the use of selective ligands, the A(3) adenosine receptor subtype is presently under study in order to better understand its physio-pathological functions. Activation of adenosine A(3) receptors has been shown to stimulate phospholipase C and D and to inhibit adenylate cyclase. Activation of A(3) adenosine receptors also causes the release of inflammatory mediators such as histamine from mast cells. These mediators are responsible for processes such as inflammation and hypotension. It has also been suggested that the A(3) receptor plays an important role in brain ischemia, immunosuppression, and bronchospasm in several animal models. Based on these results, highly selective A(3) adenosine receptor agonists and/or antagonists have been indicated as potential drugs for the treatment of asthma and inflammation, while highly selective agonists have been shown to possess cardioprotective effects. The updated material related to this field of research has been rationalized and arranged in order to offer an overview of the topic. PMID:10723024

  12. Quantitative measurement of the levels of melanocortin receptor subtype 1, 2, 3 and 5 and pro-opio-melanocortin peptide gene expression in subsets of human peripheral blood leucocytes.

    PubMed

    Andersen, G N; Hägglund, M; Nagaeva, O; Frängsmyr, L; Petrovska, R; Mincheva-Nilsson, L; Wikberg, J E S

    2005-03-01

    Levels of the melanocortin receptor (MCR) 1, 2, 3 and 5 subtypes and pro-opio-melanocortin (POMC) protein mRNA were measured by the real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction method in CD4+ T helper (Th) cells, CD8+ T cytotoxic cells, CD19+ B cells, CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells, CD14+ monocytes and CD15+ granulocytes from healthy donors. We found high levels of all of the MC1, 2, 3 and 5R subtype mRNA in Th cells and moderate levels in NK cells, monocytes and granulocytes. POMC peptide mRNA was found in all examined leucocyte subsets, but only low levels were present in granulocytes. Our findings suggest a co-ordinating role for MCR subtypes and their naturally occurring ligands in the co-operation between innate and adaptive immunity. Moreover, our findings are compatible with earlier finding of MCR-mediated tolerance induction in Th cells. PMID:15787746

  13. Image-derived and arterial blood sampled input functions for quantitative PET imaging of the angiotensin II subtype 1 receptor in the kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Tao; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.; Li, Xin; Vranesic, Melin; Lodge, Martin A.; Gulaldi, Nedim C. M.; Szabo, Zsolt

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The radioligand {sup 11}C-KR31173 has been introduced for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the angiotensin II subtype 1 receptor in the kidney in vivo. To study the biokinetics of {sup 11}C-KR31173 with a compartmental model, the input function is needed. Collection and analysis of arterial blood samples are the established approach to obtain the input function but they are not feasible in patients with renal diseases. The goal of this study was to develop a quantitative technique that can provide an accurate image-derived input function (ID-IF) to replace the conventional invasive arterial sampling and test the method in pigs with the goal of translation into human studies. Methods: The experimental animals were injected with [{sup 11}C]KR31173 and scanned up to 90 min with dynamic PET. Arterial blood samples were collected for the artery derived input function (AD-IF) and used as a gold standard for ID-IF. Before PET, magnetic resonance angiography of the kidneys was obtained to provide the anatomical information required for derivation of the recovery coefficients in the abdominal aorta, a requirement for partial volume correction of the ID-IF. Different image reconstruction methods, filtered back projection (FBP) and ordered subset expectation maximization (OS-EM), were investigated for the best trade-off between bias and variance of the ID-IF. The effects of kidney uptakes on the quantitative accuracy of ID-IF were also studied. Biological variables such as red blood cell binding and radioligand metabolism were also taken into consideration. A single blood sample was used for calibration in the later phase of the input function. Results: In the first 2 min after injection, the OS-EM based ID-IF was found to be biased, and the bias was found to be induced by the kidney uptake. No such bias was found with the FBP based image reconstruction method. However, the OS-EM based image reconstruction was found to reduce variance in the subsequent

  14. A2B Adenosine Receptor–Mediated Induction of IL-6 Promotes CKD

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yingbo; Zhang, Weiru; Wen, Jiaming; Zhang, Yujin; Kellems, Rodney E.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic elevation of adenosine, which occurs in the setting of repeated or prolonged tissue injury, can exacerbate cellular dysfunction, suggesting that it may contribute to the pathogenesis of CKD. Here, mice with chronically elevated levels of adenosine, resulting from a deficiency in adenosine deaminase (ADA), developed renal dysfunction and fibrosis. Both the administration of polyethylene glycol–modified ADA to reduce adenosine levels and the inhibition of the A2B adenosine receptor (A2BR) attenuated renal fibrosis and dysfunction. Furthermore, activation of A2BR promoted renal fibrosis in both mice infused with angiotensin II (Ang II) and mice subjected to unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). These three mouse models shared a similar profile of profibrotic gene expression in kidney tissue, suggesting that they share similar signaling pathways that lead to renal fibrosis. Finally, both genetic and pharmacologic approaches showed that the inflammatory cytokine IL-6 mediates adenosine-induced renal fibrosis downstream of A2BR. Taken together, these data suggest that A2BR-mediated induction of IL-6 contributes to renal fibrogenesis and shows potential therapeutic targets for CKD. PMID:21511827

  15. The Clinically-tested S1P Receptor Agonists, FTY720 and BAF312, Demonstrate Subtype-Specific Bradycardia (S1P1) and Hypertension (S1P3) in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Fryer, Ryan M.; Muthukumarana, Akalushi; Harrison, Paul C.; Nodop Mazurek, Suzanne; Chen, Rong Rhonda; Harrington, Kyle E.; Dinallo, Roger M.; Horan, Joshua C.; Patnaude, Lori; Modis, Louise K.; Reinhart, Glenn A.

    2012-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phospate (S1P) and S1P receptor agonists elicit mechanism-based effects on cardiovascular function in vivo. Indeed, FTY720 (non-selective S1PX receptor agonist) produces modest hypertension in patients (2–3 mmHg in 1-yr trial) as well as acute bradycardia independent of changes in blood pressure. However, the precise receptor subtypes responsible is controversial, likely dependent upon the cardiovascular response in question (e.g. bradycardia, hypertension), and perhaps even species-dependent since functional differences in rodent, rabbit, and human have been suggested. Thus, we characterized the S1P receptor subtype specificity for each compound in vitro and, in vivo, the cardiovascular effects of FTY720 and the more selective S1P1,5 agonist, BAF312, were tested during acute i.v. infusion in anesthetized rats and after oral administration for 10 days in telemetry-instrumented conscious rats. Acute i.v. infusion of FTY720 (0.1, 0.3, 1.0 mg/kg/20 min) or BAF312 (0.5, 1.5, 5.0 mg/kg/20 min) elicited acute bradycardia in anesthetized rats demonstrating an S1P1 mediated mechanism-of-action. However, while FTY720 (0.5, 1.5, 5.0 mg/kg/d) elicited dose-dependent hypertension after multiple days of oral administration in rat at clinically relevant plasma concentrations (24-hr mean blood pressure = 8.4, 12.8, 16.2 mmHg above baseline vs. 3 mmHg in vehicle controls), BAF312 (0.3, 3.0, 30.0 mg/kg/d) had no significant effect on blood pressure at any dose tested suggesting that hypertension produced by FTY720 is mediated S1P3 receptors. In summary, in vitro selectivity results in combination with studies performed in anesthetized and conscious rats administered two clinically tested S1P agonists, FTY720 or BAF312, suggest that S1P1 receptors mediate bradycardia while hypertension is mediated by S1P3 receptor activation. PMID:23285242

  16. The clinically-tested S1P receptor agonists, FTY720 and BAF312, demonstrate subtype-specific bradycardia (S1P₁) and hypertension (S1P₃) in rat.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Ryan M; Muthukumarana, Akalushi; Harrison, Paul C; Nodop Mazurek, Suzanne; Chen, Rong Rhonda; Harrington, Kyle E; Dinallo, Roger M; Horan, Joshua C; Patnaude, Lori; Modis, Louise K; Reinhart, Glenn A

    2012-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phospate (S1P) and S1P receptor agonists elicit mechanism-based effects on cardiovascular function in vivo. Indeed, FTY720 (non-selective S1P(X) receptor agonist) produces modest hypertension in patients (2-3 mmHg in 1-yr trial) as well as acute bradycardia independent of changes in blood pressure. However, the precise receptor subtypes responsible is controversial, likely dependent upon the cardiovascular response in question (e.g. bradycardia, hypertension), and perhaps even species-dependent since functional differences in rodent, rabbit, and human have been suggested. Thus, we characterized the S1P receptor subtype specificity for each compound in vitro and, in vivo, the cardiovascular effects of FTY720 and the more selective S1P₁,₅ agonist, BAF312, were tested during acute i.v. infusion in anesthetized rats and after oral administration for 10 days in telemetry-instrumented conscious rats. Acute i.v. infusion of FTY720 (0.1, 0.3, 1.0 mg/kg/20 min) or BAF312 (0.5, 1.5, 5.0 mg/kg/20 min) elicited acute bradycardia in anesthetized rats demonstrating an S1P₁ mediated mechanism-of-action. However, while FTY720 (0.5, 1.5, 5.0 mg/kg/d) elicited dose-dependent hypertension after multiple days of oral administration in rat at clinically relevant plasma concentrations (24-hr mean blood pressure = 8.4, 12.8, 16.2 mmHg above baseline vs. 3 mmHg in vehicle controls), BAF312 (0.3, 3.0, 30.0 mg/kg/d) had no significant effect on blood pressure at any dose tested suggesting that hypertension produced by FTY720 is mediated S1P₃ receptors. In summary, in vitro selectivity results in combination with studies performed in anesthetized and conscious rats administered two clinically tested S1P agonists, FTY720 or BAF312, suggest that S1P₁ receptors mediate bradycardia while hypertension is mediated by S1P₃ receptor activation. PMID:23285242

  17. Tweaking Subtype Selectivity and Agonist Efficacy at (S)-2-Amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) Receptors in a Small Series of BnTetAMPA Analogues.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang-Yan; Larsen, Younes; Navarrete, Cristina Vara; Jensen, Anders A; Nielsen, Birgitte; Al-Musaed, Ali; Frydenvang, Karla; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm; Pickering, Darryl S; Clausen, Rasmus Prætorius

    2016-03-10

    A series of analogues of the (S)-2-Amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptor agonist BnTetAMPA (5b) were synthesized and characterized pharmacologically in radioligand binding assays at native and cloned AMPA receptors and functionally by two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology at the four homomeric AMPA receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The analogues 6 and 7 exhibit very different pharmacological profiles with binding affinity preference for the subtypes GluA1 and GluA3, respectively. X-ray crystal structures of three ligands (6, 7, and 8) in complex with the agonist binding domain (ABD) of GluA2 show that they induce full domain closure despite their low agonist efficacies. Trp767 in GluA2 ABD could be an important determinant for partial agonism of this compound series at AMPA receptors, since agonist efficacy also correlated with the location of the Trp767 side chain. PMID:26862980

  18. Reinforcing effects of compounds lacking intrinsic efficacy at α1 subunit-containing GABAA receptor subtypes in midazolam- but not cocaine-experienced rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Shinday, Nina M; Sawyer, Eileen K; Fischer, Bradford D; Platt, Donna M; Licata, Stephanie C; Atack, John R; Dawson, Gerard R; Reynolds, David S; Rowlett, James K

    2013-05-01

    Benzodiazepines are prescribed widely but their utility is limited by unwanted side effects, including abuse potential. The mechanisms underlying the abuse-related effects of benzodiazepines are not well understood, although α1 subunit-containing GABAA receptors have been proposed to have a critical role. Here, we examine the reinforcing effects of several compounds that vary with respect to intrinsic efficacy at α2, α3, and α5 subunit-containing GABAA receptors but lack efficacy at α1 subunit-containing GABAA receptors ('α1-sparing compounds'): MRK-623 (functional selectivity for α2/α3 subunit-containing receptors), TPA023B (functional selectivity for α2/α3/α5 subunit-containing receptors), and TP003 (functional selectivity for α3 subunit-containing receptors). The reinforcing effects of the α1-sparing compounds were compared with those of the non-selective benzodiazepine receptor partial agonist MRK-696, and non-selective benzodiazepine receptor full agonists, midazolam and lorazepam, in rhesus monkeys trained to self-administer midazolam or cocaine, under a progressive-ratio schedule of intravenous (i.v.) drug injection. The α1-sparing compounds were self-administered significantly above vehicle levels in monkeys maintained under a midazolam baseline, but not under a cocaine baseline over the dose ranges tested. Importantly, TP003 had significant reinforcing effects, albeit at lower levels of self-administration than non-selective benzodiazepine receptor agonists. Together, these results suggest that α1 subunit-containing GABAA receptors may have a role in the reinforcing effects of benzodiazepine-type compounds in monkeys with a history of stimulant self-administration, whereas α3 subunit-containing GABAA receptors may be important mediators of the reinforcing effects of benzodiazepine-type compounds in animals with a history of sedative-anxiolytic/benzodiazepine self-administration. PMID:23303046

  19. Effects of estradiol, estrogen receptor subtype-selective agonists and genistein on glucose metabolism in leptin resistant female Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats.

    PubMed

    Weigt, Carmen; Hertrampf, Torsten; Flenker, Ulrich; Hülsemann, Frank; Kurnaz, Pinar; Fritzemeier, Karl Heinrich; Diel, Patrick

    2015-11-01

    The leptin resistant Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats are hyperphagic and become obese, but whereas the males develop type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the females remain euglycaemic. As estrogen deficiency is known to increase the risk of developing T2DM, we evaluated the role of ER subtypes alpha and beta in the development of glucose tolerance in leptin resistant ovariectomized (OVX) ZDF rats. At least six rats per group were treated with either vehicle (OVX), 17β-estradiol (E2), ER subtype-selective agonists (Alpha and Beta), or genistein (Gen) for 17 weeks. At the end of the treatment period a glucose tolerance assay was performed and the metabolic flux of (13)C-glucose for the E2 group was investigated. OVX ZDF rats treated with E2, Alpha, Beta, and Gen tolerated the glucose significantly better than untreated controls. E2 treatment increased absorbance/flux of (13)C-glucose to metabolic relevant tissues such liver, adipose tissue, gastrocnemius, and soleus muscle. Moreover, whereas Alpha treatment markedly increased mRNA expression of GLUT4 in gastrocnemius muscle, Beta treatment resulted in the largest fiber sizes of the soleus muscle. Treatment with Gen increased both the mRNA expression of GLUT 4 and the fiber sizes in the skeletal muscle. In addition, E2 and Alpha treatment decreased food intake and body weight gain. In summary, estrogen-improved glucose absorption is mediated via different molecular mechanisms: while activation of ER alpha seems to stimulate muscular GLUT4 functionality, activation of ER beta results in a hypertrophy of muscle fibers. In addition, selective activation of ER alpha decreased food intake and body weight gain. Our data further indicate that ER subtype-selective agonists and genistein improve systemic glucose tolerance also in the absence of a functional leptin signaling pathway. PMID:26134426

  20. Distribution of the Vasotocin Subtype Four Receptor (VT4R) in the Anterior Pituitary Gland of the Chicken, Gallus gallus, and its Possible Role in the Avian Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Selvam, R; Jurkevich, A; Kang, S W; Mikhailova, M V; Cornett, L E; Kuenzel, W J

    2013-01-01

    The neurohormone arginine vasotocin (AVT) in non mammalian vertebrates is homologous to arginine vasopressin (AVP) in mammals. Its actions are mediated via G protein-coupled receptors that belong to the vasotocin/mesotocin family. Because of the known regulatory effects of nonapeptide hormones on anterior pituitary functions, receptor subtypes in that family have been proposed to be located in anterior pituitary cells. Recently, an avian vasotocin receptor subtype designated VT4R has been cloned, which shares 69% sequence homology with a human vasopressin receptor, the V1aR. In the present study, a polyclonal antibody to the VT4R was developed and validated to confirm its specificity to the VT4R. The antibody was used to test the hypothesis that the VT4R is present in the avian anterior pituitary and is specifically associated with certain cell types, where its expression is modulated by acute stress. Western blotting of membrane protein extracts from pituitary tissue, the use of HeLa cells transfected with the VT4R and peptide competition assays all confirmed the specificity of the antibody to the VT4R. Dual-labelling immunofluorescence microscopy was utilised to identify pituitary cell types that contained immunoreactive VT4R. The receptor was found to be widely distributed throughout the cephalic lobe but not in the caudal lobe of the anterior pituitary. Immunoreactive VT4R was associated with corticotrophs. Approximately 89% of immunolabelled corticotrophs were shown to contain the VT4R. The immunoreactive VT4R was not found in gonadotrophs, somatotrophs or lactotrophs. To determine a possible functional role of the VT4R and previously characterised VT2R, gene expression levels in the anterior pituitary were determined after acute immobilisation stress by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The results showed a significant increase in plasma corticosterone levels (three- to four-fold), a significant reduction of VT4R mRNA and an

  1. Potentiation of GluN2C/D NMDA receptor subtypes in the amygdala facilitates the retention of fear and extinction learning in mice.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Kevin K; Khatri, Alpa; Traynelis, Stephen F; Heldt, Scott A

    2014-02-01

    NMDA receptors are glutamate receptor ion channels that contribute to synaptic plasticity and are important for many forms of learning and memory. In the amygdala, NMDA receptors are critical for the acquisition, retention, and extinction of classically conditioned fear responses. Although the GluN2B subunit has been implicated in both the acquisition and extinction of conditioned fear, GluN2C-knockout mice show reduced conditioned fear responses. Moreover, D-cycloserine (DCS), which facilitates fear extinction, selectively enhances the activity of GluN2C-containing NMDA receptors. To further define the contribution of GluN2C receptors to fear learning, we infused the GluN2C/GluN2D-selective potentiator CIQ bilaterally into the basolateral amygdala (3, 10, or 30 μg/side) following either fear conditioning or fear extinction training. CIQ both increased the expression of conditioned fear 24 h later and enhanced the extinction of the previously conditioned fear response. These results support a critical role for GluN2C receptors in the amygdala in the consolidation of learned fear responses and suggest that increased activity of GluN2C receptors may underlie the therapeutic actions of DCS. PMID:24008353

  2. Roles of different subtypes of opioid receptors in mediating the ventrolateral orbital cortex opioid-induced inhibition of mirror-neuropathic pain in the rat.

    PubMed

    Zhao, M; Wang, J Y; Jia, H; Tang, J S

    2007-02-23

    Previous studies have demonstrated that opioid receptors in the prefrontal ventrolateral orbital cortex (VLO) are involved in anti-nociception. The aim of this current study was to examine whether opioid receptors in the VLO have effects on the hypersensitivity induced by contralateral L5 and L6 spinal nerve ligation (SNL), termed as mirror neuropathic pain (MNP) in the male rat. Morphine (1.0, 2.5, 5.0 microg) microinjected into the VLO contralateral to the SNL depressed the mechanical paw withdrawal assessed by von Frey filaments and the cold plate (4 degrees C)-induced paw lifting in a dose-dependent manner on the side without SNL. These effects were antagonized by microinjection of the non-selective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (1.0 mug) into the same VLO site. Microinjection of endomorphin-1 (5.0 microg), a highly selective mu-opioid receptor agonist, and [d-Ala(2), d-Leu(5)]-enkephalin (DADLE, 10 microg), a delta-/mu-receptor agonist, also depressed the MNP. The effects of both drugs were blocked by selective mu-receptor antagonist beta-funaltrexamine (beta-FNA, 3.75 microg), but the effect of the DADLE was not influenced by the selective delta-receptor antagonist naltrindole (5.0 microg). Microinjection of the kappa-opioid receptor agonist spiradoline mesylate salt (U-62066) (100 microg) had no effect on the MNP. These results suggest that the VLO is involved in opioid-induced inhibition of the MNP and the effect is mediated by mu- (but not delta- and kappa-) opioid receptors. PMID:17184926

  3. [Molecular Subtypes of Gastric Cancer].

    PubMed

    Hatogai, Ken; Doi, Toshihiko

    2016-03-01

    Gastric cancer has been classified based on the pathological characteristics including microscopic configuration and growth pattern. Although these classifications have been used in studies investigating prognosis and recurrence pattern, they are not considered for decisions regarding the therapeutic strategy. In the ToGA study, trastuzumab, an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody, demonstrated clinical efficacy for gastric cancer with HER2 overexpression or HER2 gene amplification. Based on these findings of the ToGA study, the definition of HER2-positive gastric cancer was established. Thereafter, several molecular targeted agents, including agents targeting other receptor tyrosine kinases, have been investigated in gastric cancer. However, to date no biomarker, except HER2, has been established. Based on the recent technological development in the field of gene analysis, a comprehensive molecular evaluation of gastric cancer was performed as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, and a new molecular classification was proposed that divided gastric cancer into the following 4 subtypes: tumors positive for Epstein-Barr virus, microsatellite instability tumors, genomically stable tumors, and tumors with chromosomal instability. Each subtype has specific molecular alterations including gene mutation and amplification, DNA methylation, and protein overexpression. Additionally, some subtypes were suggested to be correlated with the clinicopathological characteristics or as targets of some molecular targeted agents that are currently under development. The new molecular classification is expected to be a roadmap for patient stratification and clinical trials on molecular targeted therapies in gastric cancer. PMID:27067842

  4. Immunodiagnosis of tumors in vivo using radiolabeled monoclonal antibody A2B5

    SciTech Connect

    Reintgen, D.S.; Shimizu, K.; Coleman, E.; Briner, W.; Kitzmiller, J.; Eisenbarth, G.; Seigler, H.F.

    1983-07-01

    Recently a murine monoclonal antibody (A2B5) has been described that reacts with a membrane associated GQ ganglioside common to peptide secreting normal cells and tumors. In vitro binding data demonstrated the presence of this ganglioside on neurons, adrenal medulla, and pancreatic islets, along with neuroendocrine tumors such as insulinomas, pheochromocytomas, melanomas and neuroblastomas. Negative binding has previously been shown for tissue sections from liver, kidney, colon, lung, stomach, and tumors not derived from the neural crest. Because of the specificity at A2B5 in vitro, this monoclonal antibody was labeled with /sup 131/I for in vivo tumor localization studies. Daily radionuclear scans were obtained in 5 KX rats bearing the radiation induced rat insulinoma with disappearance of the label from the blood pool and concentration in the tumor so that by the fourth day, the only activity present by scan was in the insulinoma. In addition A2B5 also localized to five different human melanoma cells lines grown in nude mice with high tumor/blood levels compared to normal tissues, while no localization is seen in nudes carrying osteosarcomas, colon, bladder, and renal cell carcinomas. In addition antibody A2B5 did not concentrate in any normal tissue though the antigen is present on several. The finding that A2B5 reacts across species lines (mouse, rat, man) lends itself to obvious diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities.

  5. Morphology diagrams for A2B copolymer melts: real-space self-consistent field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rajeev; Sides, Scott; Mays, Jimmy; Li, Yige; Sumpter, Bobby G

    2012-01-01

    Morphology diagrams for A2B copolymer melts are constructed using real-space self-consistent field theory (SCFT). In particular, the effect of architectural asymmetry on the morphology diagram is studied. It is shown that asymmetry in the lengths of A arms in the A2B copolymer melts aids in the microphase separation. As a result, the disorder-order transition boundaries for the A2B copolymer melts are shown to shift downward in terms of N, and N being the Flory s chi parameter and the total number of the Kuhn segments,respectively, in comparison with the A2B copolymers containing symmetric A arms. Furthermore, perforated lamellar (PL) and a micelle-like (M) microphase segregated morphologies are found to compete with the classical morphologies namely, lamellar, cylinders, spheres and gyroid. The PL morphology is found to be stable for A2B copolymers containing asymmetric A arms and M is found to be metastable for the parameter range explored in this work.

  6. Expression of netrin-1 receptors in retina of oxygen-induced retinopathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Netrin-1 has been reported to promote retinal neovascularization in oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR). However, netrin-1 receptors, which may mediate netrin-1 action during retinal neovascularization, have not been characterized. In this study, we investigated netrin-1 receptor subtype expression and associated changes in the retinas of mice with OIR. Methods C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 75±2% oxygen for 5 days and then returned to normal air to induce retinal neovascularization. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot were used to examine the expression of netrin-1 receptor subtypes in the mouse retinas. Double staining of netrin-1 receptor subtypes and isolectin B4 was used to determine the location of the netrin-1 receptor subtypes in the retinas. Inhibition of retinal neovascularization was achieved by UNC5B shRNA plasmid intravitreal injection. Retinal neovascularization was examined by fluorescein angiography and quantification of preretinal neovascular nuclei in retinal sections. Results RT-PCR results showed that, except for UNC5A, netrin-1 receptor subtypes UNC5B, UNC5C, UNC5D, DCC, neogenin, and A2b were all expressed in the retinas of OIR mice 17 days after birth. Western blots showed that only UNC5B expression was significantly increased on that day, and immunofluorescence results showed that only UNC5B and neogenin were expressed in retinal vessels. Treatment of OIR mice with the UNC5B shRNA plasmid dramatically reduced neovascular tufts and neovascular outgrowth into the inner limiting membrane. Conclusions UNC5B may promote retinal neovascularization in OIR mice. PMID:25149138

  7. Immunodiagnosis of tumors in vivo using radiolabeled monoclonal antibody A2B5.

    PubMed

    Reintgen, D S; Shimizu, K; Coleman, E; Briner, W; Kitzmiller, J; Eisenbarth, G; Seigler, H F

    1983-07-01

    Recently a murine monoclonal antibody (A2B5) has been described that reacts with a membrane associated GQ ganglioside common to peptide secreting normal cells and tumors. In vitro binding data demonstrated the presence of this ganglioside on neurons, adrenal medulla, and pancreatic islets, along with neuroendocrine tumors such as insulinomas, pheochromocytomas, melanomas and neuroblastomas. Negative binding has previously been shown for tissue sections from liver, kidney, colon, lung, stomach, and tumors not derived from the neural crest. Because of the specificity at A2B5 in vitro, this monoclonal antibody was labeled with 131I for in vivo tumor localization studies. Daily radionuclear scans were obtained in 5 KX rats bearing the radiation induced rat insulinoma with disappearance of the label from the blood pool and concentration in the tumor so that by the fourth day, the only activity present by scan was in the insulinoma. Tissue-counting data showed tumor/blood ratios (av +/- SE, 1.29 +/- 0.25) of A2B5 activity two to ten times the average activity found in other organs (0.28 +/- 0.05). No tumor concentration of the control nonspecific monoclonal antibody P3X63 was evident (0.27 +/- 0.04). In addition A2B5 also localized to five different human melanoma cells lines grown in nude mice with high tumor/blood levels (1.04 +/- 0.27) compared to normal tissues (0.32 +/- 0.05) (P = .0005), while no localization is seen in nudes carrying osteosarcomas, colon, bladder, and renal cell carcinomas. In addition antibody A2B5 did not concentrate in any normal tissue though the antigen is present on several. The finding that A2B5 reacts across species lines (mouse, rat, man) lends itself to obvious diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities. PMID:6306349

  8. Relationship of epidermal growth factor receptor activating mutations with histologic subtyping according to International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society 2011 adenocarcinoma classification and their impact on overall survival

    PubMed Central

    Maturu, Venkata Nagarjuna; Singh, Navneet; Bal, Amanjit; Gupta, Nalini; Das, Ashim; Behera, Digambar

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is limited Indian data on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene activating mutations (AMs) prevalence and their clinicopathologic associations. The current study aimed to assess the relationship between EGFR AM and histologic subtypes and their impact on overall survival (OS) in a North Indian cohort. Patients and Methods: Retrospective analysis of nonsmall cell lung cancer patients who underwent EGFR mutation testing (n = 186) over 3 years period (2012–2014). EGFR mutations were tested using polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing. Patients were classified as EGFR AM, EGFR wild type (WT) or EGFR unknown (UKN). Histologically adenocarcinomas (ADC) were further categorized as per the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society-2011 classification. Results: Overall EGFR AM prevalence was 16.6%. The ratio of exon 19 deletions to exon 21 L858R mutations was 3.17:1. Female sex (P = 0.002), never smoking status (P = 0.002), metastatic disease (P = 0.032), and nonsolid subtype of ADC (P = 0.001) were associated with EGFR AM on univariate logistic regression analysis (LRA). On multivariate LRA, solid ADC was negatively associated with EGFR AM. Median OS was higher in patients with EGFR AM (750 days) as compared to EGFR-WT (459 days) or EGFR-UKN (291 days) for the overall population and in patients with Stage IV disease (750 days vs. 278 days for EGFR-WT, P = 0.024). On univariate Cox proportional hazard (CPH) analysis, smoking, poor performance status (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group ≥ 2), EGFR-UKN status, and solid ADC were associated with worse OS while female sex and lepidic ADC had better OS. On multivariate CPH analysis, lepidic ADC (hazard ratio [HR] =0.12) and EGFR-WT/EGFR-UKN (HR = 2.39 and HR = 3.30 respectively) were independently associated with OS in separate analyses. Conclusions: Histologic subtyping of ADC performed on small biopsies is

  9. A comparative analysis of the activity of ligands acting at P2X and P2Y receptor subtypes in models of neuropathic, acute and inflammatory pain

    PubMed Central

    Andó, RD; Méhész, B; Gyires, K; Illes, P; Sperlágh, B

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study was undertaken to compare the analgesic activity of antagonists acting at P2X1, P2X7, and P2Y12 receptors and agonists acting at P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y4, and P2Y6 receptors in neuropathic, acute, and inflammatory pain. Experimental approach: The effect of the wide spectrum P2 receptor antagonist PPADS, the selective P2X7 receptor antagonist Brilliant Blue G (BBG), the P2X1 receptor antagonist (4,4′,4″,4-[carbonylbis(imino-5,1,3-benzenetriyl-bis(carbonylimino))]tetrakis-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid, octasodium salt (NF449) and (8,8′-[carbonylbis(imino-3,1-phenylenecarbonylimino)]bis-1,3,5-naphthalene-trisulphonic acid, hexasodium salt (NF023), the P2Y12 receptor antagonist (2,2-dimethyl-propionic acid 3-(2-chloro-6-methylaminopurin-9-yl)-2-(2,2-dimethyl-propionyloxymethyl)-propylester (MRS2395), the selective P2Y1 receptor agonist ([[(1R,2R,3S,4R,5S)-4-[6-amino-2-(methylthio)-9H-purin-9-yl]-2,3-dihydroxybicyclo[3.1.0]hex-1-yl]methyl] diphosphoric acid mono ester trisodium salt (MRS2365), the P2Y2/P2Y4 agonist uridine-5′-triphosphate (UTP), and the P2Y4/P2Y6 agonist uridine-5′-diphosphate (UDP) were examined on mechanical allodynia in the Seltzer model of neuropathic pain, on acute thermal nociception, and on the inflammatory pain and oedema induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Key results: MRS2365, MRS2395 and UTP, but not the other compounds, significantly alleviated mechanical allodynia in the neuropathic pain model, with the following rank order of minimal effective dose (mED) values: MRS2365 > MRS2395 > UTP. All compounds had a dose-dependent analgesic action in acute pain except BBG, which elicited hyperalgesia at a single dose. The rank order of mED values in acute pain was the following: MRS2365 > MRS2395 > NF449 > NF023 > UDP = UTP > PPADS. MRS2365 and MRS2395 had a profound, while BBG had a mild effect on inflammatory pain, with a following rank order of mED values: MRS2395 > MRS2365 > BBG. None of the tested

  10. Identification of A2B5-positive putative oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and A2B5-positive astrocytes in adult human white matter.

    PubMed

    Scolding, N J; Rayner, P J; Compston, D A

    1999-03-01

    Spontaneous remyelination of previously demyelinated axons is found in a substantial minority of acute and chronic lesions in multiple sclerosis. In the rodent, central remyelination restores saltatory conduction and helps restore limb function, and it seems likely that endogenous myelin repair contributes to neurological recovery in multiple sclerosis. However, the identity of the remyelinating cell remains enigmatic. Fully differentiated oligodendrocytes have very limited capacity for recapitulating their developmental activities and re-engaging myelination pathways. Proliferative oligodendrocyte progenitors--often known as O-2A cells because of their ability to differentiate in vitro into either oligodendrocytes or ("type 2") astrocytes--are, in contrast, extremely efficient at myelin repair either spontaneously, or after transplantation into the de- or dysmyelinated CNS. Oligodendrocyte progenitors are present in both developing and adult rodent CNS. We have previously demonstrated that proliferative oligodendrocyte progenitors are present in cultures prepared from the adult human CNS. Here, using fresh tissue print preparations, we report that cells with processes and the A2B5-positive immunophenotype of proliferative oligodendrocyte progenitors are present in situ in adult human white matter. This technique also reveals the occurrence of A2B5-positive astrocytes, a cell also not previously identified in the normal adult human CNS. In the light of the rodent data showing the importance of oligodendrocyte progenitors in myelin repair, our findings suggesting the presence of progenitors in the adult human brain may have significant implications for spontaneous remyelination in multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating conditions. PMID:10051212

  11. Identification of antagonists to the vasotocin receptor sub-type 4 (VT4R) involved in stress by molecular modelling and verification using anterior pituitary cells

    PubMed Central

    Bingham, Daniel; Tessaro, Brian A.; Kumar, Thallapuranam K. Suresh; Kuenzel, Wayne J.

    2014-01-01

    The vasotocin receptor family is homologous to the mammalian vasopressin G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) family. The vasotocin receptor 2 (VT2R) and 4 (VT4R) have recently been shown to play important role(s) in the neuroendocrine regulation of stress in birds. A homology-based structural model of VT4R of the domestic chicken, Gallus gallus, was built using the sophisticated SYBYL-X suite. The structure of VT4R built with and without extra- and intracellular unstructured loops showed a seven-helix transmembrane domain, which is a characteristic feature of GPCRs. Several agonists and antagonists were screened by molecular docking to map their potential binding sites on the structure of VT4R. Interestingly, the presence of the N-terminal, intracellular and extracellular loops and C-terminal amino acid sequences emerging from the transmembrane domains during molecular docking appeared to influence the binding interface of the peptide agonists and peptide/non-peptide antagonists on the VT4R. The presence of unstructured loops, however, did not affect the relative binding affinity ranking of the peptide antagonists to VT4R. In general, the natural ligand, arginine vasotocin and the peptide/non-peptide antagonists were observed to be more deeply buried in the receptor. Results of in vitro inhibition experiments, using cultured anterior pituitary cells, showed excellent agreement with the binding affinity of the antagonists predicted by molecular docking. The results of this study provide valuable clues for the rational design of novel pharmaceutical compounds capable of blocking or attenuating the stress response. PMID:23672311

  12. A novel substituted aminoquinoline selectively targets voltage-sensitive sodium channel isoforms and NMDA receptor subtypes and alleviates chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Tabakoff, Boris; Ren, Wenhua; Vanderlinden, Lauren; Snell, Lawrence D; Matheson, Christopher J; Wang, Ze-Jun; Levinson, Rock; Smothers, C Thetford; Woodward, John J; Honse, Yumiko; Lovinger, David; Rush, Anthony M; Sather, William A; Gustafson, Daniel L; Hoffman, Paula L

    2016-08-01

    Recent understanding of the systems that mediate complex disease states, has generated a search for molecules that simultaneously modulate more than one component of a pathologic pathway. Chronic pain syndromes are etiologically connected to functional changes (sensitization) in both peripheral sensory neurons and in the central nervous system (CNS). These functional changes involve modifications of a significant number of components of signal generating, signal transducing and signal propagating pathways. Our analysis of disease-related changes which take place in sensory neurons during sensitization led to the design of a molecule that would simultaneously inhibit peripheral NMDA receptors and voltage sensitive sodium channels. In the current report, we detail the selectivity of N,N-(diphenyl)-4-ureido-5,7-dichloro-2-carboxy-quinoline (DCUKA) for action at NMDA receptors composed of different subunit combinations and voltage sensitive sodium channels having different α subunits. We show that DCUKA is restricted to the periphery after oral administration, and that circulating blood levels are compatible with its necessary concentrations for effects at the peripheral cognate receptors/channels that were assayed in vitro. Our results demonstrate that DCUKA, at concentrations circulating in the blood after oral administration, can modulate systems which are upregulated during peripheral sensitization, and are important for generating and conducting pain information to the CNS. Furthermore, we demonstrate that DCUKA ameliorates the hyperalgesia of chronic pain without affecting normal pain responses in neuropathic and inflammation-induced chronic pain models. PMID:27158117

  13. The association of soy food consumption with the risk of subtype of breast cancers defined by hormone receptor and HER2 status.

    PubMed

    Baglia, Michelle L; Zheng, Wei; Li, Honglan; Yang, Gong; Gao, Jing; Gao, Yu-Tang; Shu, Xiao-Ou

    2016-08-15

    Soy food intake has previously been associated with reduced breast cancer risk. Epidemiological evidence for subgroups of breast cancer, particularly by menopausal and hormone receptor status, is less consistent. To evaluate the role of hormone receptor and menopausal status on the association between soy food intake and breast cancer risk, we measured usual soy food intake in adolescence and adulthood via food frequency questionnaire in 70,578 Chinese women, aged 40-70 years, recruited to the Shanghai Women's Health Study (1996-2000). After a median follow-up of 13.2 years (range: 0.01-15.0), 1,034 incident breast cancer cases were identified. Using Cox models, we found that adult soy intake was inversely associated with breast cancer risk [hazard ratio (HR) for fifth versus first quintile soy protein intake = 0.78; 95% confidence interval (CI):0.63-0.97]. The association was predominantly seen in premenopausal women (HR = 0.46; 95% CI:0.29-0.74). Analyses further stratified by hormone receptor status showed that adult soy intake was associated with significantly decreased risk of estrogen receptor (ER)+/progesterone receptor (PR)+ breast cancer in postmenopausal women (HR = 0.72; 95% CI:0.53-0.96) and decreased risk of ER-/PR- breast cancer in premenopausal women (HR = 0.46; 95% CI:0.22-0.97). The soy association did not vary by human epidermal growth factor-2 (HER2) status. Furthermore, we found that high soy intake during adulthood and adolescence was associated with reduced premenopausal breast cancer risk (HR = 0.53; 95% CI: 0.32-0.88; comparing third vs. first tertile) while high adulthood soy intake was associated with postmenopausal breast cancer only when adolescent intake was low (HR = 0.63; 95% CI: 0.43-0.91). Our study suggests that hormonal status, menopausal status and time window of exposure are important factors influencing the soy-breast cancer association. PMID:27038352

  14. Measurements of the Urbach tail for A2B6 mixed crystals by the photothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakrzewski, J.; Malinski, M.; Strzałkowski, K.; Firszt, F.; Łęgowski, S.; Męczyńska, H.

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents the influence of the composition of several mixed A2B6 crystals on the broadening of the optical absorption coefficient spectra. This broadening is observed as the change of the piezoelectric spectra associated with the change oft he Urbach tail. This effect is interpreted as a result of the increase of the compositional disorder of the crystal lattice.

  15. Binding mode of an α-amino acid-linked quinoxaline-2,3-dione analogue at glutamate receptor subtype GluK1.

    PubMed

    Demmer, Charles S; Møller, Charlotte; Brown, Patricia M G E; Han, Liwei; Pickering, Darryl S; Nielsen, Birgitte; Bowie, Derek; Frydenvang, Karla; Kastrup, Jette S; Bunch, Lennart

    2015-06-17

    Two α-amino acid-functionalized quinoxalines, 1a (CNG-10301) and 1b (CNG-10300), of a quinoxaline moiety coupled to an amino acid moiety were designed, synthesized, and characterized pharmacologically. While 1a displayed low affinity at native AMPA, KA, and NMDA receptors, and at homomeric GluK1,3 receptors, the affinity for GluK2 was in the midmicromolar range (Ki = 136 μM), 1b displayed low to midmicromolar range binding affinity at all the iGluRs (Ki = 9-126 μM). In functional experiments (outside-out patches excised from transfected HEK293T cells), 100 μM 1a partially blocked GluK1 (33% peak response), while GluK2 was unaffected (96% peak response). Furthermore, 1a was shown not to be an agonist at GluK1 and GluK2 at 100 μM. On the other hand, 100 μM 1b fully antagonized GluK1 (8% peak response) but only partially blocked GluK2 (33% peak response). An X-ray structure at 2.3 Å resolution of 1b in the GluK1-LBD (ligand-binding domain) disclosed an unexpected binding mode compared to the predictions made during the design phase; the quinoxaline moiety remains to act as an amino acid bioisostere, but the amino acid moiety is oriented into a new area within the GluK1 receptor. The structure of the GluK1-LBD with 1b showed a large variation in domain openings of the three molecules from 25° to 49°, demonstrating that the GluK1-LBD is capable of undergoing major domain movements. PMID:25856736

  16. Critical role of 5-HT1A, 5-HT3, and 5-HT7 receptor subtypes in the initiation, generation, and propagation of the murine colonic migrating motor complex.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Eamonn J; Heredia, Dante J; Smith, Terence K

    2010-07-01

    The colonic migrating motor complex (CMMC) is necessary for fecal pellet propulsion in the murine colon. We have previously shown that 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) released from enterochromaffin cells activates 5-HT(3) receptors on the mucosal processes of myenteric Dogiel type II neurons to initiate the events underlying the CMMC. Our aims were to further investigate the roles of 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(3), and 5-HT(7) receptor subtypes in generating and propagating the CMMC using intracellular microelectrodes or tension recordings from the circular muscle (CM) in preparations with and without the mucosa. Spontaneous CMMCs were recorded from the CM in isolated murine colons but not in preparations without the mucosa. In mucosaless preparations, ondansetron (3 microM; 5-HT(3) antagonist) plus hexamethonium (100 microM) completely blocked spontaneous inhibitory junction potentials, depolarized the CM. Ondansetron blocked the preceding hyperpolarization associated with a CMMC. Spontaneous CMMCs and CMMCs evoked by spritzing 5-HT (10 and 100 microM) or nerve stimulation in preparations without the mucosa were blocked by SB 258719 or SB 269970 (1-5 microM; 5-HT(7) antagonists). Both NAN-190 and (S)-WAY100135 (1-5 microM; 5-HT(1A) antagonists) blocked spontaneous CMMCs and neurally evoked CMMCs in preparations without the mucosa. Both NAN-190 and (S)-WAY100135 caused an atropine-sensitive depolarization of the CM. The precursor of 5-HT, 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) (10 microM), and 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) (5 microM; 5-HT(1/5/7) agonist) increased the frequency of spontaneous CMMCs. 5-HTP and 5-CT also induced CMMCs in preparations with and without the mucosa, which were blocked by SB 258719. 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(3), and 5-HT(7) receptors, most likely on Dogiel Type II/AH neurons, are important in initiating, generating, and propagating the CMMC. Tonic inhibition of the CM appears to be driven by ongoing activity in descending serotonergic interneurons; by activating 5-HT(7

  17. Synthesis and Evaluation of Novel Radioligands Based on 3-[5-(Pyridin-2-yl)-2H-tetrazol-2-yl]benzonitrile for Positron Emission Tomography Imaging of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 5.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Yoko; Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Fujinaga, Masayuki; Ogawa, Masanao; Kurihara, Yusuke; Nengaki, Nobuki; Kumata, Katsushi; Yui, Joji; Hatori, Akiko; Xie, Lin; Zhang, Yiding; Kawamura, Kazunori; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2016-04-28

    We found out 3-[5-(pyridin-2-yl)-2H-tetrazol-2-yl]benzonitrile analogues as the candidate for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agents of metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5). Among these compounds, 3-methyl-5-(5-(pyridin-2-yl)-2H-tetrazol-2-yl)benzonitrile (10) exhibited high binding affinity (Ki = 9.4 nM) and moderate lipophilicity (cLogD, 2.4). Subsequently, [(11)C]10 was radiosynthesized at 25 ± 14% radiochemical yield (n = 11) via C-[(11)C]methylation of the arylstannyl precursor 15 with [(11)C]methyl iodide. In vitro autoradiography and PET assessments using [(11)C]10 showed high specific binding in the striatum and hippocampus, two brain regions enriched with mGluR5. Moreover, test-retest PET studies with [(11)C]10 indicated high reliability to quantify mGluR5 density, such as the intraclass correlation coefficient (0.90) and Pearson r (0.91) in the striatum of rat brain. We demonstrated that [(11)C]10 is a useful PET ligand for imaging and quantitative analysis of mGluR5. Furthermore, [(11)C]10 might be modified using its skeleton as a lead compound. PMID:27015128

  18. Structure–Activity Relationships Comparing N-(6-Methylpyridin-yl)-Substituted Aryl Amides to 2-Methyl-6-(substituted-arylethynyl)pyridines or 2-Methyl-4-(substituted-arylethynyl)thiazoles as Novel Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 5 Antagonists†

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Santosh S.; Zou, Mu-Fa; Cao, Jianjing; Deschamps, Jeffrey R.; Rodriguez, Alice L.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Newman, Amy Hauck

    2010-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) has been implicated in anxiety, depression, pain, mental retardation, and addiction. The potent and selective noncompetitive mGluR5 antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP, 1) has been a critically important tool used to further elucidate the role of mGluR5 in these CNS disorders. In an effort to provide novel and structurally diverse selective mGluR5 antagonists, we previously described a set of analogues with moderate activity wherein the alkyne bond was replaced with an amide group. In the present report, extended series of both amide and alkyne-based ligands were synthesized. MGluR5 binding and functional data were obtained that identified (1) several novel alkynes with comparable affinities to 1 at mGluR5 (e.g., 10 and 20–23), but (2) most structural variations to the amide template were not well tolerated, although a few potent amides were discovered (e.g., 55 and 56). Several of these novel analogues show drug-like physical properties (e.g., cLogP range) 2–5) that support their use for in vivo investigation into the role of mGluR5 in CNS disorders. PMID:19445453

  19. Subtyping Stuttering II

    PubMed Central

    Seery, Carol Hubbard; Watkins, Ruth V.; Mangelsdorf, Sarah C.; Shigeto, Aya

    2007-01-01

    This paper is the second in a series of two articles exploring subtypes of stuttering, and it addresses the question of whether and how language ability and temperament variables may be relevant to the study of subtypes within the larger population of children who stutter. Despite observations of varied profiles among young children who stutter, efforts to identify and characterize subtypes of stuttering have had limited influence on theoretical or clinical understanding of the disorder. This manuscript briefly highlights research on language and temperament in young children who stutter, and considers whether the results can provide guidance for efforts to more effectively investigate and elucidate subtypes in childhood stuttering. Issues from the literature that appear relevant to research on stuttering subtypes include: (a) the question of whether stuttering is best characterized as categorical or continuous; (b) interpretation of individual differences in skills and profiles; and (c) the fact that, during the preschool years, the interaction among domains such as language and temperament are changing very rapidly, resulting in large differences in developmental profiles within relatively brief chronological age periods. PMID:17825669

  20. Similarities in the behavior and molecular deficits in the frontal cortex between the neurotensin receptor subtype 1 knockout mice and chronic phencyclidine-treated mice: relevance to schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhimin; Boules, Mona; Williams, Katrina; Gordillo, Andres; Li, Shuhua; R