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Sample records for a3 facilitates lysosomal

  1. Cellular Cholesterol Accumulation Facilitates Ubiquitination and Lysosomal Degradation of Cell Surface-Resident ABCA1.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Tadahaya; Hayashi, Hisamitsu; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    By excreting cellular cholesterol to apolipoprotein A-I, ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) mediates the biogenesis of high-density lipoprotein in hepatocytes and prevents foam cell formation from macrophages. We recently showed that cell surface-resident ABCA1 (csABCA1) undergoes ubiquitination and later lysosomal degradation through the endosomal sorting complex required for transport system. Herein, we investigated the relevance of this degradation pathway to the turnover of csABCA1 in hypercholesterolemia. Immunoprecipitation and cell surface-biotinylation studies with HepG2 cells and mouse peritoneal macrophages showed that the ubiquitination level and degradation of csABCA1 were facilitated by treatment with a liver X receptor (LXR) agonist and acetylated low-density lipoprotein. The effects of an LXR agonist and acetylated low-density lipoprotein on the degradation of csABCA1 were repressed completely by treatment with bafilomycin, an inhibitor of lysosomal degradation, and by depletion of tumor susceptibility gene 101, a major component of endosomal sorting complex required for transport-I. RNAi analysis indicated that LXRβ inhibited the accelerated lysosomal degradation of csABCA1 by the LXR agonist, regardless of its transcriptional activity. Cell surface coimmunoprecipitation with COS1 cells expressing extracellularly hemagglutinin-tagged ABCA1 showed that LXRβ interacted with csABCA1 and inhibited the ubiquitination of csABCA1. Immunoprecipitates with anti-ABCA1 antibodies from the liver plasma membranes showed less LXRβ and a higher ubiquitination level of ABCA1 in high-fat diet-fed mice than in normal chow-fed mice. Under conditions of high cellular cholesterol content, csABCA1 became susceptible to ubiquitination by dissociation of LXRβ from csABCA1, which facilitated the lysosomal degradation of csABCA1 through the endosomal sorting complex required for transport system. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Mucolipin 1 positively regulates TLR7 responses in dendritic cells by facilitating RNA transportation to lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobing; Saitoh, Shin-Ichiroh; Shibata, Takuma; Tanimura, Natsuko; Fukui, Ryutaro; Miyake, Kensuke

    2015-02-01

    Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and TLR9 sense microbial single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) and ssDNA in endolysosomes. Nucleic acid (NA)-sensing in endolysosomes is thought to be important for avoiding TLR7/9 responses to self-derived NAs. Aberrant self-derived NA transportation to endolysosomes predisposes to autoimmune diseases. To restrict NA-sensing in endolysosomes, TLR7/9 trafficking is tightly controlled by a multiple transmembrane protein Unc93B1. In contrast to TLR7/9 trafficking, little is known about a mechanism underlying NA transportation. We here show that Mucolipin 1 (Mcoln1), a member of the transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channel gene family, has an important role in ssRNA trafficking into lysosomes. Mcoln1(-/-) dendritic cells (DCs) showed impaired TLR7 responses to ssRNA. A mucolipin agonist specifically enhanced TLR7 responses to ssRNAs. The channel activity of Mcoln1 is activated by a phospholipid phosphatidylinositol (3,5) bisphosphate (PtdIns(3,5)P2), which is generated by a class III lipid kinase PIKfyve. A PIKfyve inhibitor completely inhibited TLR7 responses to ssRNA in DCs. Confocal analyses showed that ssRNA transportation to lysosomes in DCs was impaired by PIKfyve inhibitor as well as by the lack of Mcoln1. Transportation of TLR9 ligands was also impaired by the PIKfyve inhibitor. These results demonstrate that the PtdIns(3,5)P2-Mcoln1 axis has an important role in ssRNA transportation into lysosomes in DCs. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Deficiency of Neuronal p38α MAPK Attenuates Amyloid Pathology in Alzheimer Disease Mouse and Cell Models through Facilitating Lysosomal Degradation of BACE1.

    PubMed

    Schnöder, Laura; Hao, Wenlin; Qin, Yiren; Liu, Shirong; Tomic, Inge; Liu, Xu; Fassbender, Klaus; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-29

    Amyloid β (Aβ) damages neurons and triggers microglial inflammatory activation in the Alzheimer disease (AD) brain. BACE1 is the primary enzyme in Aβ generation. Neuroinflammation potentially up-regulates BACE1 expression and increases Aβ production. In Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein-transgenic mice and SH-SY5Y cell models, we specifically knocked out or knocked down gene expression of mapk14, which encodes p38α MAPK, a kinase sensitive to inflammatory and oxidative stimuli. Using immunological and biochemical methods, we observed that reduction of p38α MAPK expression facilitated the lysosomal degradation of BACE1, decreased BACE1 protein and activity, and subsequently attenuated Aβ generation in the AD mouse brain. Inhibition of p38α MAPK also enhanced autophagy. Blocking autophagy by treating cells with 3-methyladenine or overexpressing dominant-negative ATG5 abolished the deficiency of the p38α MAPK-induced BACE1 protein reduction in cultured cells. Thus, our study demonstrates that p38α MAPK plays a critical role in the regulation of BACE1 degradation and Aβ generation in AD pathogenesis. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Synergy of 2-deoxy-D-glucose combined with berberine in inducing the lysosome/autophagy and transglutaminase activation-facilitated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Halicka, H Dorota; Garcia, Jorge; Li, Jiangwei; Zhao, Hong; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2017-02-01

    Utilizing a variety of flow cytometric methods evidence was obtained indicating that a combination of the glucose analog 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-dG) and the plant alkaloid berberine (BRB) produces synergistic effect in the induction of apoptosis in human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells. The synergistic effect is seen at concentrations of the drugs at which each of them alone shows no cytotoxicity at all. The data suggest that the combination of these drugs, which are known in terms of their overall toxicity, side effects and pharmacokinetics may be considered for further studies as chemopreventive and cancer treatment modalities. Of interest are results indicating that rapamycin, which similarly to BRB, suppresses mTOR signaling, when combined with 2-dG shows no synergistic properties. Metformin, on other hand, requires much higher concentration to show the synergy with 2-dG. Also of interest are the findings pertaining to the methodology of the present study. Specifically, dynamic assessment of cellular viability was performed by using the DRAQ7 cell exclusion fluorochrome present in cultures from 0 to 72 h. Concurrent measurement of lysosomal proton pump using acridine orange as the probe shows activation of lysosomes in the cells treated with 2-dG or BRB alone as well as with the drugs combined. Apoptosis was assessed by measuring DNA fragmentation, cell cycle, activation of caspase-3 and tissue transglutaminase (Tgase). A novel cytometric method was developed based on analysis of lysosomal (acidic vesicles) proton pump in live cells followed by cell lysis with detergent and fluorochrome labeling of proteins and DNA to analyze Tgase activation concurrently with cell cycle, in same population of cells. The data show that the cell subpopulation undergoing apoptosis has increased side (right-angle) light scatter likely due to the presence of the crosslinked (solid state) proteins, the consequence Tgase activation.

  5. Lipids, lysosomes, and autophagy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lipids are essential components of a cell providing energy substrates for cellular processes, signaling intermediates, and building blocks for biological membranes. Lipids are constantly recycled and redistributed within a cell. Lysosomes play an important role in this recycling process that involves the recruitment of lipids to lysosomes via autophagy or endocytosis for their degradation by lysosomal hydrolases. The catabolites produced are redistributed to various cellular compartments to support basic cellular function. Several studies demonstrated a bidirectional relationship between lipids and lysosomes that regulate autophagy. While lysosomal degradation pathways regulate cellular lipid metabolism, lipids also regulate lysosome function and autophagy. In this review, we focus on this bidirectional relationship in the context of dietary lipids and provide an overview of recent evidence of how lipid-overload lipotoxicity, as observed in obesity and metabolic syndrome, impairs lysosomal function and autophagy that may eventually lead to cellular dysfunction or cell death. PMID:27330054

  6. Hepoxilin A(3) facilitates neutrophilic breach of lipoxygenase-expressing airway epithelial barriers.

    PubMed

    Tamang, David L; Pirzai, Waheed; Priebe, Gregory P; Traficante, David C; Pier, Gerald B; Falck, John R; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D; McCormick, Beth A; Gronert, Karsten; Hurley, Bryan P

    2012-11-15

    A feature shared by many inflammatory lung diseases is excessive neutrophilic infiltration. Neutrophil homing to airspaces involve multiple factors produced by several distinct cell types. Hepoxilin A(3) is a neutrophil chemoattractant produced by pathogen-infected epithelial cells that is hypothesized to facilitate neutrophil breach of mucosal barriers. Using a Transwell model of lung epithelial barriers infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we explored the role of hepoxilin A(3) in neutrophil transepithelial migration. Pharmacological inhibitors of the enzymatic pathways necessary to generate hepoxilin A(3), including phospholipase A(2) and 12-lipoxygenase, potently interfere with P. aeruginosa-induced neutrophil transepithelial migration. Both transformed and primary human lung epithelial cells infected with P. aeruginosa generate hepoxilin A(3) precursor arachidonic acid. All four known lipoxygenase enzymes capable of synthesizing hepoxilin A(3) are expressed in lung epithelial cell lines, primary small airway epithelial cells, and human bronchial epithelial cells. Lung epithelial cells produce increased hepoxilin A(3) and lipid-derived neutrophil chemotactic activity in response to P. aeruginosa infection. Lipid-derived chemotactic activity is soluble epoxide hydrolase sensitive, consistent with hepoxilin A(3) serving a chemotactic role. Stable inhibitory structural analogs of hepoxilin A(3) are capable of impeding P. aeruginosa-induced neutrophil transepithelial migration. Finally, intranasal infection of mice with P. aeruginosa promotes enhanced cellular infiltrate into the airspace, as well as increased concentration of the 12-lipoxygenase metabolites hepoxilin A(3) and 12-hydroxyeicosa-5Z,8Z,10E,14Z-tetraenoic acid. Data generated from multiple models in this study provide further evidence that hepoxilin A(3) is produced in response to lung pathogenic bacteria and functions to drive neutrophils across epithelial barriers.

  7. STUDIES ON LYSOSOMES

    PubMed Central

    Weissmann, Gerald; Keiser, Harold; Bernheimer, Alan W.

    1963-01-01

    Streptolysins O and S from hemolytic streptococci have been added to granular fractions of tissue homogenates in 0.25 M sucrose prepared from rabbit liver, heart, spleen and lymph nodes. At concentrations ranging from 0.65 µg/ml to 2.0 mg/ml of streptolysin S, and from 10 µg/ml to 1.0 mg/ml of streptolysin O, two lysosomal enzymes (beta glucuronidase and acid phosphatase) and, to a lesser degree, one mitochondrial enzyme (malic dehydrogenase) were released into the supernatants of the reaction mixture. Although the hemolytic action of each lysin paralleled the effect on lysosomes, at equivalent levels of hemolytic activity, SLS was approximately 10 times more active on lysosomes than SLO. SLO was inhibited by cholesterol, cortisol, and specific antibody in vitro; pretreatment of animals with cortisone decreased the susceptibility of their isolated lysosomes to SLO. These agents failed to prevent SLS action on lysosomes. SLO had a pH optimum of 6.5 against lysosomes while SLS was maximally active at 7.5. No other streptococcal extracellular products were as active on lysosomes as the streptolysins, although activated streptococcal proteinase precursor released some hydrolases from the granules. Similarities between the actions of SLO and SLS on red cells and lysosomes suggested that the membranes bounding lysosomes and erythrocytes have common properties. PMID:14074385

  8. Uncovering the role of Snapin in regulating autophagy-lysosomal function.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qian; Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2011-04-01

    The autophagy-lysosomal system is the major degradation pathway essential for the maintenance and survival of neurons. This process requires efficient late endocytic transport from distal processes to the soma, in which lysosomes are predominantly localized. However, it is not clear how late endocytic transport has an impact upon neuronal autophagy-lysosomal function. We recently revealed that Snapin acts as a dynein motor adaptor and coordinates retrograde transport and late endosomal-lysosomal trafficking, thus maintaining efficient autophagy-lysosomal function in neurons. Snapin(-/-) neurons display impaired retrograde transport and clustering of late endosomes along neuronal processes, aberrant accumulation of immature lysosomes, and impaired clearance of autolysosomes. Snapin deficiency leads to reduced neuron viability, neurodegeneration, and developmental defects in the central nervous system. Reintroducing the snapin transgene rescues these phenotypes by enhancing the delivery of endosomal cargos to lysosomes and by facilitating autophagy-lysosomal function. Our study suggests that Snapin is a candidate molecular target for autophagy-lysosomal regulation.

  9. TFEB regulates lysosomal proteostasis.

    PubMed

    Song, Wensi; Wang, Fan; Savini, Marzia; Ake, Ashley; di Ronza, Alberto; Sardiello, Marco; Segatori, Laura

    2013-05-15

    Loss-of-function diseases are often caused by destabilizing mutations that lead to protein misfolding and degradation. Modulating the innate protein homeostasis (proteostasis) capacity may lead to rescue of native folding of the mutated variants, thereby ameliorating the disease phenotype. In lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs), a number of highly prevalent alleles have missense mutations that do not impair the enzyme's catalytic activity but destabilize its native structure, resulting in the degradation of the misfolded protein. Enhancing the cellular folding capacity enables rescuing the native, biologically functional structure of these unstable mutated enzymes. However, proteostasis modulators specific for the lysosomal system are currently unknown. Here, we investigate the role of the transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis and function, in modulating lysosomal proteostasis in LSDs. We show that TFEB activation results in enhanced folding, trafficking and lysosomal activity of a severely destabilized glucocerebrosidase (GC) variant associated with the development of Gaucher disease (GD), the most common LSD. TFEB specifically induces the expression of GC and of key genes involved in folding and lysosomal trafficking, thereby enhancing both the pool of mutated enzyme and its processing through the secretory pathway. TFEB activation also rescues the activity of a β-hexosaminidase mutant associated with the development of another LSD, Tay-Sachs disease, thus suggesting general applicability of TFEB-mediated proteostasis modulation to rescue destabilizing mutations in LSDs. In summary, our findings identify TFEB as a specific regulator of lysosomal proteostasis and suggest that TFEB may be used as a therapeutic target to rescue enzyme homeostasis in LSDs.

  10. Lysosomes and Brain Health.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Jaiprakash; di Ronza, Alberto; Lotfi, Parisa; Sardiello, Marco

    2018-04-16

    One of the fundamental properties of the cell is the capability to digest and remodel its own components according to metabolic and developmental needs. This is accomplished via the autophagy-lysosome system, a pathway of critical importance in the brain, where it contributes to neuronal plasticity and must protect nonreplaceable neurons from the potentially harmful accumulation of cellular waste. The study of lysosomal biogenesis and function in the context of common and rare neurodegenerative diseases has revealed that a dysfunctional autophagy-lysosome system is the shared nexus where multiple, interconnected pathogenic events take place. The characterization of pathways and mechanisms regulating the lysosomal system and autophagic clearance offers unprecedented opportunities for the development of polyvalent therapeutic strategies based on the enhancement of the autophagy-lysosome pathway to maintain cellular homeostasis and achieve neuroprotection. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Neuroscience Volume 41 is July 8, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  11. Lysosomal Lipid Storage Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Heike; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2011-01-01

    Lysosomal lipid storage diseases, or lipidoses, are inherited metabolic disorders in which typically lipids accumulate in cells and tissues. Complex lipids, such as glycosphingolipids, are constitutively degraded within the endolysosomal system by soluble hydrolytic enzymes with the help of lipid binding proteins in a sequential manner. Because of a functionally impaired hydrolase or auxiliary protein, their lipid substrates cannot be degraded, accumulate in the lysosome, and slowly spread to other intracellular membranes. In Niemann-Pick type C disease, cholesterol transport is impaired and unesterified cholesterol accumulates in the late endosome. In most lysosomal lipid storage diseases, the accumulation of one or few lipids leads to the coprecipitation of other hydrophobic substances in the endolysosomal system, such as lipids and proteins, causing a “traffic jam.” This can impair lysosomal function, such as delivery of nutrients through the endolysosomal system, leading to a state of cellular starvation. Therapeutic approaches are currently restricted to mild forms of diseases with significant residual catabolic activities and without brain involvement. PMID:21502308

  12. Lysosomal lipid storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Heike; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2011-06-01

    Lysosomal lipid storage diseases, or lipidoses, are inherited metabolic disorders in which typically lipids accumulate in cells and tissues. Complex lipids, such as glycosphingolipids, are constitutively degraded within the endolysosomal system by soluble hydrolytic enzymes with the help of lipid binding proteins in a sequential manner. Because of a functionally impaired hydrolase or auxiliary protein, their lipid substrates cannot be degraded, accumulate in the lysosome, and slowly spread to other intracellular membranes. In Niemann-Pick type C disease, cholesterol transport is impaired and unesterified cholesterol accumulates in the late endosome. In most lysosomal lipid storage diseases, the accumulation of one or few lipids leads to the coprecipitation of other hydrophobic substances in the endolysosomal system, such as lipids and proteins, causing a "traffic jam." This can impair lysosomal function, such as delivery of nutrients through the endolysosomal system, leading to a state of cellular starvation. Therapeutic approaches are currently restricted to mild forms of diseases with significant residual catabolic activities and without brain involvement.

  13. Lysosomal storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Carlos R.; Gahl, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are cytoplasmic organelles that contain a variety of different hydrolases. A genetic deficiency in the enzymatic activity of one of these hydrolases will lead to the accumulation of the material meant for lysosomal degradation. Examples include glycogen in the case of Pompe disease, glycosaminoglycans in the case of the mucopolysaccharidoses, glycoproteins in the cases of the oligosaccharidoses, and sphingolipids in the cases of Niemann-Pick disease types A and B, Gaucher disease, Tay-Sachs disease, Krabbe disease, and metachromatic leukodystrophy. Sometimes, the lysosomal storage can be caused not by the enzymatic deficiency of one of the hydrolases, but by the deficiency of an activator protein, as occurs in the AB variant of GM2 gangliosidosis. Still other times, the accumulated lysosomal material results from failed egress of a small molecule as a consequence of a deficient transporter, as in cystinosis or Salla disease. In the last couple of decades, enzyme replacement therapy has become available for a number of lysosomal storage diseases. Examples include imiglucerase, taliglucerase and velaglucerase for Gaucher disease, laronidase for Hurler disease, idursulfase for Hunter disease, elosulfase for Morquio disease, galsulfase for Maroteaux-Lamy disease, alglucosidase alfa for Pompe disease, and agalsidase alfa and beta for Fabry disease. In addition, substrate reduction therapy has been approved for certain disorders, such as eliglustat for Gaucher disease. The advent of treatment options for some of these disorders has led to newborn screening pilot studies, and ultimately to the addition of Pompe disease and Hurler disease to the Recommended Uniform Screening Panel (RUSP) in 2015 and 2016, respectively. PMID:29152458

  14. Lysosomal storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Carlos R; Gahl, William A

    2017-05-25

    Lysosomes are cytoplasmic organelles that contain a variety of different hydrolases. A genetic deficiency in the enzymatic activity of one of these hydrolases will lead to the accumulation of the material meant for lysosomal degradation. Examples include glycogen in the case of Pompe disease, glycosaminoglycans in the case of the mucopolysaccharidoses, glycoproteins in the cases of the oligosaccharidoses, and sphingolipids in the cases of Niemann-Pick disease types A and B, Gaucher disease, Tay-Sachs disease, Krabbe disease, and metachromatic leukodystrophy. Sometimes, the lysosomal storage can be caused not by the enzymatic deficiency of one of the hydrolases, but by the deficiency of an activator protein, as occurs in the AB variant of GM2 gangliosidosis. Still other times, the accumulated lysosomal material results from failed egress of a small molecule as a consequence of a deficient transporter, as in cystinosis or Salla disease. In the last couple of decades, enzyme replacement therapy has become available for a number of lysosomal storage diseases. Examples include imiglucerase, taliglucerase and velaglucerase for Gaucher disease, laronidase for Hurler disease, idursulfase for Hunter disease, elosulfase for Morquio disease, galsulfase for Maroteaux-Lamy disease, alglucosidase alfa for Pompe disease, and agalsidase alfa and beta for Fabry disease. In addition, substrate reduction therapy has been approved for certain disorders, such as eliglustat for Gaucher disease. The advent of treatment options for some of these disorders has led to newborn screening pilot studies, and ultimately to the addition of Pompe disease and Hurler disease to the Recommended Uniform Screening Panel (RUSP) in 2015 and 2016, respectively.

  15. Developing team leadership to facilitate guideline utilization: planning and evaluating a 3-month intervention strategy.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Wendy; Davies, Barbara; Tourangeau, Ann; Lefebre, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Research describes leadership as important to guideline use. Yet interventions to develop current and future leaders for this purpose are not well understood. To describe the planning and evaluation of a leadership intervention to facilitate nurses' use of guideline recommendations for diabetic foot ulcers in home health care. Planning the intervention involved a synthesis of theory and research (qualitative interviews and chart audits). One workshop and three follow-up teleconferences were delivered at two sites to nurse managers and clinical leaders (n=15) responsible for 180 staff nurses. Evaluation involved workshop surveys and interviews. Highest rated intervention components (four-point scale) were: identification of target indicators (mean 3.7), and development of a team leadership action plan (mean 3.5). Pre-workshop barriers assessment rated lowest (mean 2.9). Three months later participants indicated their leadership performance had changed as a result of the intervention, being more engaged with staff and clear about implementation goals. Creating a team leadership action plan to operationalize leadership behaviours can help in delivery of evidence-informed care. Access to clinical data and understanding team leadership knowledge and skills prior to formal training will assist nursing management in tailoring intervention strategies to identify needs and gaps. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Lysosomes: regulators of autophagy in the retinal pigmented epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Debasish; Valapala, Mallika; Shang, Peng; Hose, Stacey; Grebe, Rhonda; Lutty, Gerard A.; Zigler, J. Samuel; Kaarniranta, Kai; Handa, James T.

    2015-01-01

    The retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) is critically important to retinal homeostasis, in part due to its very active processes of phagocytosis and autophagy. Both of these processes depend upon the normal functioning of lysosomes, organelles which must fuse with (auto)phagosomes to deliver the hydrolases that effect degradation of cargo. It has become clear that signaling through mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), is very important in the regulation of lysosomal function. This signaling pathway is becoming a target for therapeutic intervention in diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), where lysosomal function is defective. In addition, our laboratory has been studying animal models in which the gene (Cryba1) for βA3/A1-crystallin is deficient. These animals exhibit impaired lysosomal clearance in the RPE and pathological signs that are similar to some of those seen in AMD patients. The data demonstrate that βA3/A1-crystallin localizes to lysosomes in the RPE and that it is a binding partner of V-ATPase, the proton pump that acidifies the lysosomal lumen. This suggests that βA3/A1-crystallin may also be a potential target for therapeutic intervention in AMD. In this review, we focus on effector molecules that impact the lysosomal-autophagic pathway in RPE cells. PMID:26321509

  17. LYSOSOMES IN LYMPHOID TISSUE

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, William E.; Finkenstaedt, John T.; de Duve, Christian

    1967-01-01

    Methods have been developed for the quantitative assay of cytochrome oxidase, esterase, and 11 acid hydrolases in rat-spleen homogenates. These methods seem to be applicable also to other lymphoid tissues. Preliminary studies, extended to nine of the acid hydrolases, indicate that these enzymes occur in partly latent and sedimentable form and that they can be unmasked and rendered soluble by some of the treatments that liberate the enzymes from rat-liver lysosomes. The spleen particles appear to be very sensitive to mechanical injury, a property which necessitates special precautions in homogenizing the tissue. Agglutination of spleen particles takes place to a larger extent in 0.25 M sucrose than in 0.15 M KCl. PMID:10976225

  18. The enlarged lysosomes in beigej cells result from decreased lysosome fission and not increased lysosome fusion

    PubMed Central

    Durchfort, Nina; Verhoef, Shane; Vaughn, Michael B; Shrestha, Rishna; Adam, Dieter; Kaplan, Jerry; Ward, Diane McVey

    2011-01-01

    Chediak-Higashi Syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder that affects vesicle morphology. The Chs1/Lyst protein is a member of the BEACH family of proteins. The absence of Chs1/Lyst gives rise to enlarged lysosomes. Lysosome size is regulated by a balance between vesicle fusion and fission and can be reversibly altered by acidifying the cytoplasm using Acetate Ringer’s or by incubating with the drug vacuolin-1. We took advantage of these procedures to determine rates of lysosome fusion and fission in the presence or absence of Chs1/Lyst. Here we show by microscopy, flow cytometry and in vitro fusion that the absence of the Chs1/Lyst protein does not increase the rate of lysosome fusion. Rather, our data indicate that loss of this protein decreases the rate of lysosome fission. We further show that overexpression of the Chs1/Lyst protein gives rise to a faster rate of lysosome fission. These results indicate that Chs1/Lyst regulates lysosome size by affecting fission. PMID:21985295

  19. Neuropathic Lysosomal Storage Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pastores, Gregory M.; Maegawa, Gustavo H.B.

    2014-01-01

    The lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a clinically heterogeneous group of inborn errors of metabolism, associated with the accumulation of incompletely degraded macromolecules within several cellular sites. Affected individuals present with a broad range of clinical problems, including hepatosplenomegaly and skeletal dysplasia. Onset of symptoms may range from birth to adulthood. The majority are associated with neurological features, including developmental delay, behavioral/psychiatric disturbances, seizures, acroparesthesia, motor weakness, cerebrovascular ischemic events and extra-pyramidal signs. It should be noted that later-onset forms are often misdiagnosed as symptoms, which might include psychiatric manifestations, are slowly progressive and may precede other neurologic or systemic features. Inheritance is primarily autosomal recessive. For all subtypes, diagnosis can be confirmed using a combination of biochemical and/or molecular assays. In a few LSDs, treatment with either hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, enzyme replacement or substrate reduction therapy is available. Genetic counseling is important, so patients and their families can be informed of reproductive risks, disease prognosis and therapeutic options. Investigations of disease mechanisms are providing insights into potential therapeutic approaches. Symptomatic care, which remains the mainstay for most subtypes, can lead to significant improvement in quality of life. PMID:24176423

  20. STUDIES ON LYSOSOMES

    PubMed Central

    Weissmann, Gerald; Thomas, Lewis

    1962-01-01

    Granular fractions sedimenting between 800 g and 15,000 g have been prepared in 0.25 M sucrose from the livers of normal young rabbits and from the livers of rabbits injected with A. aerogenes endotoxin. As early as 5 minutes after endotoxin, there was an augmented release of two enzymes, beta glucuronidase and cathepsin, into the supernatant of fractions which had been incubated or incubated and irradiated with a mercury vapor lamp at 37°C. These effects were maximum at 30 minutes after endotoxin and were associated with a depletion of the total activities of the two enzymes within the granules. Concurrently there was a rise in the activity of the two enzymes in fractions of the homogenate which were unsedimentable at 15,000 g. Fractions prepared from animals made tolerant to endotoxin no longer responded to incubation and irradiation by an augmented release of these two hydrolases, nor did fractions prepared from animals pretreated with glucocorticoids. Pretreatment with DOCA did not prevent release of enzymes after endotoxin. The results have been interpreted to indicate that one consequence of the injection of endotoxin is an effect upon the stability of lysosomes, with subsequent release of acid hydrolases into the cell sap or surrounding tissue. Glucocorticoids may exert their pharmacologic effects through the protection of these subcellular particles against a variety of injurious agents. PMID:13999781

  1. High lumenal chloride in the lysosome is critical for lysosome function.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Kasturi; Leung, KaHo; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2017-07-25

    Lysosomes are organelles responsible for the breakdown and recycling of cellular machinery. Dysfunctional lysosomes give rise to lysosomal storage disorders as well as common neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we use a DNA-based, fluorescent chloride reporter to measure lysosomal chloride in Caenorhabditis elegans as well as murine and human cell culture models of lysosomal diseases. We find that the lysosome is highly enriched in chloride, and that chloride reduction correlates directly with a loss in the degradative function of the lysosome. In nematodes and mammalian cell culture models of diverse lysosomal disorders, where previously only lysosomal pH dysregulation has been described, massive reduction of lumenal chloride is observed that is ~10 3 fold greater than the accompanying pH change. Reducing chloride within the lysosome impacts Ca 2+ release from the lysosome and impedes the activity of specific lysosomal enzymes indicating a broader role for chloride in lysosomal function.

  2. Lysosomal acid lipase and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Du, Hong; Grabowski, Gregory A

    2004-10-01

    Atherosclerosis remains the leading cause of death in the developed countries. In addition to lipid-lowering drugs - statins, dietary control, and exercise, new approaches are needed for the treatment and prevention of atherosclerosis. This review will focus on the role(s) of lysosomal acid lipase and its use as an enzyme therapy to reduce atherosclerotic lesions in a mouse model and to examine the molecular basis supporting this novel strategy and its mechanism of effect. Administration of human lysosomal acid lipase via tail vein into mice with atherosclerosis eliminates early aortic and coronary ostial lesions and reduces lesional size in advanced disease. The reduction of advanced lesional area is related to decreases in foamy macrophages, collagen positive areas, and necrotic areas. Compared with sham-treated mice, the human lysosomal acid lipase-treated mice also have reduced levels of plasma cholesteryl esters, and reduced levels of hepatic cholesterol and triglycerides. These studies indicate that administrated lysosomal acid lipase affects the atherogenesis by at least two mechanisms: (1) direct targeting of lesional macrophages with resultant decreases in cholesteryl esters and triglyceride in the lysosomes of macrophages in the lesions; (2) systemic effects that mediate the liver to reduce the hepatic cholesteryl ester and triglyceride release, possibly leading to reduced production of VLDL and LDL.

  3. Reporter Assay for Endo/Lysosomal Escape of Toxin-Based Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Gilabert-Oriol, Roger; Thakur, Mayank; von Mallinckrodt, Benedicta; Bhargava, Cheenu; Wiesner, Burkhard; Eichhorst, Jenny; Melzig, Matthias F.; Fuchs, Hendrik; Weng, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Protein-based therapeutics with cytosolic targets are capable of exhibiting their therapeutic effect once they have escaped from the endosomes or lysosomes. In this study, the reporters—horseradish peroxidase (HRP), Alexa Fluor 488 (Alexa) and ricin A-chain (RTA)—were investigated for their capacity to monitor the endo/lysosomal escape of the ribosome-inactivating protein, saporin. The conjugates—saporin-HRP, Alexasaporin and saporin-KQ-RTA—were constructed, and the endo/lysosomal escape of these conjugates alone (lack of endo/lysosomal release) or in combination with certain structurally-specific triterpenoidal saponins (efficient endo/lysosomal escape) was characterized. HRP failed in reporting the endo/lysosomal escape of saporin. Contrastingly, Alexa Fluor 488 successfully allowed the report of the process at a toxin concentration of 1000 nM. In addition, single endo/lysosome analysis facilitated the determination of the amount of Alexasaporin released from each vesicle. RTA was also successful in reporting the endo/lysosomal escape of the enzymatically inactive mutant, saporin-KQ, but in this case, the sensitivity of the method reached a toxin concentration of 10 nM. In conclusion, the simultaneous usage of Alexa Fluor 488 and RTA as reporters may provide the possibility of monitoring the endo/lysosomal escape of protein-based therapeutics in the concentration range of 10–1000 nM. PMID:24859158

  4. Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation of Ankle Plantar Flexors Spasticity: A 3-Month Study with Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhihao; Sun, Yao; Wang, Ninghua; Gao, Fan; Wei, Kunlin; Wang, Qining

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to investigate the effect of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF)-based rehabilitation for ankle plantar flexors spasticity by using a Robotic Ankle–foot Rehabilitation System (RARS). A modified robot-assisted system was proposed, and seven poststroke patients with hemiplegic spastic ankles participated in a 3-month robotic PNF training. Their impaired sides were used as the experimental group, while their unimpaired sides as the control group. A robotic intervention for the experimental group started from a 2-min passive stretching to warming-up or relaxing the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles and also ended with the same one. Then a PNF training session including 30 trials was activated between them. The rehabilitation trainings were carried out three times a week as an addition to their regular rehabilitation exercise. Passive range of motion, resistance torque, and stiffness were measured in both ankles before and after the interventions. The changes in Achilles tendon length, walking speed, and lower limb function were also evaluated by the same physician or physiotherapist for each participant. Biomechanical measurements before interventions showed significant difference between the experimental group and the control group due to ankle spasticity. For the control group, there was no significant difference in the 3 months with no robotic intervention. But for the experimental group, passive dorsiflexion range of motion increased (p < 0.01), resistance torque under different dorsiflexion angle levels (0°, 10°, and 20°) decreased (p < 0.05, p < 0.001, and p < 0.001, respectively), and quasi-static stiffness under different dorsiflexion angle levels (0°, 10°, and 20°) also decreased (p < 0.01, p < 0.001, and p < 0.001, respectively). Achilles’s tendon length shortened (p < 0.01), while its thickness showed no significant change (p > 0.05). The robotic rehabilitation also improved the

  5. Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation of Ankle Plantar Flexors Spasticity: A 3-Month Study with Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhihao; Sun, Yao; Wang, Ninghua; Gao, Fan; Wei, Kunlin; Wang, Qining

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to investigate the effect of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF)-based rehabilitation for ankle plantar flexors spasticity by using a Robotic Ankle-foot Rehabilitation System (RARS). A modified robot-assisted system was proposed, and seven poststroke patients with hemiplegic spastic ankles participated in a 3-month robotic PNF training. Their impaired sides were used as the experimental group, while their unimpaired sides as the control group. A robotic intervention for the experimental group started from a 2-min passive stretching to warming-up or relaxing the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles and also ended with the same one. Then a PNF training session including 30 trials was activated between them. The rehabilitation trainings were carried out three times a week as an addition to their regular rehabilitation exercise. Passive range of motion, resistance torque, and stiffness were measured in both ankles before and after the interventions. The changes in Achilles tendon length, walking speed, and lower limb function were also evaluated by the same physician or physiotherapist for each participant. Biomechanical measurements before interventions showed significant difference between the experimental group and the control group due to ankle spasticity. For the control group, there was no significant difference in the 3 months with no robotic intervention. But for the experimental group, passive dorsiflexion range of motion increased ( p  < 0.01), resistance torque under different dorsiflexion angle levels (0°, 10°, and 20°) decreased ( p  < 0.05, p  < 0.001, and p  < 0.001, respectively), and quasi-static stiffness under different dorsiflexion angle levels (0°, 10°, and 20°) also decreased ( p  < 0.01, p  < 0.001, and p  < 0.001, respectively). Achilles's tendon length shortened ( p  < 0.01), while its thickness showed no significant change ( p  > 0.05). The robotic rehabilitation also

  6. Lysosomal exocytosis and lipid storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Samie, Mohammad Ali; Xu, Haoxing

    2014-06-01

    Lysosomes are acidic compartments in mammalian cells that are primarily responsible for the breakdown of endocytic and autophagic substrates such as membranes, proteins, and lipids into their basic building blocks. Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of metabolic disorders caused by genetic mutations in lysosomal hydrolases required for catabolic degradation, mutations in lysosomal membrane proteins important for catabolite export or membrane trafficking, or mutations in nonlysosomal proteins indirectly affecting these lysosomal functions. A hallmark feature of LSDs is the primary and secondary excessive accumulation of undigested lipids in the lysosome, which causes lysosomal dysfunction and cell death, and subsequently pathological symptoms in various tissues and organs. There are more than 60 types of LSDs, but an effective therapeutic strategy is still lacking for most of them. Several recent in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that induction of lysosomal exocytosis could effectively reduce the accumulation of the storage materials. Meanwhile, the molecular machinery and regulatory mechanisms for lysosomal exocytosis are beginning to be revealed. In this paper, we first discuss these recent developments with the focus on the functional interactions between lipid storage and lysosomal exocytosis. We then discuss whether lysosomal exocytosis can be manipulated to correct lysosomal and cellular dysfunction caused by excessive lipid storage, providing a potentially general therapeutic approach for LSDs. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Cystine transport in purified rat liver lysosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Jonas, A J

    1986-01-01

    Amino acid efflux from highly purified rat liver lysosomes exposed to the methyl ester derivatives of leucine, methionine, tyrosine and cystine was examined. The lysosomal efflux of leucine, methionine and tyrosine was unaffected by the presence of MgATP, whereas cystine efflux was stimulated by MgATP. Exposure of lysosomes to 2 mM-MgATP resulted in lysosomal acidification and a 0.5 pH unit increase in the lysosomal pH gradient through the action of a proton-pumping ATPase. Cystine efflux was also stimulated when the lysosomal proton gradient was increased through changes in buffer pH. Decreasing the lysosomal proton gradient with ionophores resulted in diminished cystine efflux. Bivalent cations had no effect on the lysosomal efflux of leucine, methionine and tyrosine. However, cystine efflux was stimulated by the presence of bivalent cations even when the lysosomal proton gradient was minimized. Cation-stimulated cystine efflux was inhibited by the presence of the calcium ionophore A23187, which altered the lysosomal membrane potential. Cystine efflux from lysosomes appears to be uniquely dependent on pH gradients and cation concentrations. PMID:3098236

  8. Mechanisms and functions of lysosome positioning

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Jing; Guardia, Carlos M.; Keren-Kaplan, Tal

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lysosomes have been classically considered terminal degradative organelles, but in recent years they have been found to participate in many other cellular processes, including killing of intracellular pathogens, antigen presentation, plasma membrane repair, cell adhesion and migration, tumor invasion and metastasis, apoptotic cell death, metabolic signaling and gene regulation. In addition, lysosome dysfunction has been shown to underlie not only rare lysosome storage disorders but also more common diseases, such as cancer and neurodegeneration. The involvement of lysosomes in most of these processes is now known to depend on the ability of lysosomes to move throughout the cytoplasm. Here, we review recent findings on the mechanisms that mediate the motility and positioning of lysosomes, and the importance of lysosome dynamics for cell physiology and pathology. PMID:27799357

  9. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based approach for investigating late endosome–lysosome retrograde fusion events

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, A.M.; Goldman, S.D.B.; Krise, J.P.

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, lysosomes have been considered to be a terminal endocytic compartment. Recent studies suggest that lysosomes are quite dynamic, being able to fuse with other late endocytic compartments as well as with the plasma membrane. Here we describe a quantitative fluorescence energy transfer (FRET)-based method for assessing rates of retrograde fusion between terminal lysosomes and late endosomes in living cells. Late endosomes were specifically labeled with 800-nm latex beads that were conjugated with streptavidin and Alexa Fluor 555 (FRET donor). Terminal lysosomes were specifically labeled with 10,000-MW dextran polymers conjugated with biotin and Alexa Fluor 647 (FRET acceptor). Following late endosome–lysosome fusion, the strong binding affinity between streptavidin and biotin brought the donor and acceptor fluorophore molecules into close proximity, thereby facilitating the appearance of a FRET emission signal. Because apparent size restrictions in the endocytic pathway do not permit endocytosed latex beads from reaching terminal lysosomes in an anterograde fashion, the appearance of the FRET signal is consistent with retrograde transport of lysosomal cargo back to late endosomes. We assessed the efficiency of this transport step in fibroblasts affected by different lysosome storage disorders—Niemann–Pick type C, mucolipidosis type IV, and Sandhoff’s disease, all of which have a similar lysosomal lipid accumulation phenotype. We report here, for the first time, that these disorders can be distinguished by their rate of transfer of lysosome cargos to late endosomes, and we discuss the implications of these findings for developing new therapeutic strategies. PMID:19109922

  10. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based approach for investigating late endosome-lysosome retrograde fusion events.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, A M; Goldman, S D B; Krise, J P

    2009-03-01

    Traditionally, lysosomes have been considered to be a terminal endocytic compartment. Recent studies suggest that lysosomes are quite dynamic, being able to fuse with other late endocytic compartments as well as with the plasma membrane. Here we describe a quantitative fluorescence energy transfer (FRET)-based method for assessing rates of retrograde fusion between terminal lysosomes and late endosomes in living cells. Late endosomes were specifically labeled with 800-nm latex beads that were conjugated with streptavidin and Alexa Fluor 555 (FRET donor). Terminal lysosomes were specifically labeled with 10,000-MW dextran polymers conjugated with biotin and Alexa Fluor 647 (FRET acceptor). Following late endosome-lysosome fusion, the strong binding affinity between streptavidin and biotin brought the donor and acceptor fluorophore molecules into close proximity, thereby facilitating the appearance of a FRET emission signal. Because apparent size restrictions in the endocytic pathway do not permit endocytosed latex beads from reaching terminal lysosomes in an anterograde fashion, the appearance of the FRET signal is consistent with retrograde transport of lysosomal cargo back to late endosomes. We assessed the efficiency of this transport step in fibroblasts affected by different lysosome storage disorders-Niemann-Pick type C, mucolipidosis type IV, and Sandhoff's disease, all of which have a similar lysosomal lipid accumulation phenotype. We report here, for the first time, that these disorders can be distinguished by their rate of transfer of lysosome cargos to late endosomes, and we discuss the implications of these findings for developing new therapeutic strategies.

  11. Multi-Drug Resistance Transporter 2 Regulates Mucosal Inflammation by Facilitating the Synthesis of Hepoxilin A3

    PubMed Central

    Pazos, Michael; Siccardi, Dario; Mumy, Karen L.; Bien, Jeffrey D.; Louie, Steve; Shi, Hai Ning; Gronert, Karsten; Mrsny, Randall J.; McCormick, Beth A.

    2008-01-01

    Neutrophil transmigration across mucosal surfaces contributes to dysfunction of epithelial barrier properties, a characteristic underlying many mucosal inflammatory diseases. Thus, insight into the directional movement of neutrophils across epithelial barriers will provide important information relating to the mechanisms of such inflammatory disorders. The eicosanoid hepoxilin A3, an endogenous product of 12-lipoxygenase activity, is secreted from the apical surface of the epithelial barrier and establishes a chemotatic gradient to guide neutrophils from the submucosa, across epithelia to the luminal site of an inflammatory stimulus - the final step in neutrophil recruitment. Currently, little is known regarding how hepoxilin A3 is secreted from the intestinal epithelium during an inflammatory insult. In this study we reveal that hepoxilin A3 is a substrate for the apical efflux ABC transporter, multi-drug resistance protein 2 (MRP2). Moreover, using multiple in vitro and in vivo models we show that induction of intestinal inflammation profoundly up-regulates apical expression of MRP2, and that interfering with hepoxilin A3 synthesis and/or inhibition of MRP2 function results in a marked reduction in inflammation and severity of disease. Lastly, examination of inflamed intestinal epithelia in human biopsies revealed up-regulation of MRP2. Thus, blocking hepoxilin A3 synthesis and/or inhibiting MRP2 may lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of epithelial-associated inflammatory conditions. PMID:19017997

  12. Characterization of Drosophila Saposin-related mutants as a model for lysosomal sphingolipid storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Heike; Paradis, Marie; Gosejacob, Dominic; Papan, Cyrus; Shevchenko, Andrej; Psathaki, Olympia Ekaterina; Thielisch, Melanie; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sphingolipidoses are inherited diseases belonging to the class of lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs), which are characterized by the accumulation of indigestible material in the lysosome caused by specific defects in the lysosomal degradation machinery. While some LSDs can be efficiently treated by enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), this is not possible if the nervous system is affected due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier. Sphingolipidoses in particular often present as severe, untreatable forms of LSDs with massive sphingolipid and membrane accumulation in lysosomes, neurodegeneration and very short life expectancy. The digestion of intralumenal membranes within lysosomes is facilitated by lysosomal sphingolipid activator proteins (saposins), which are cleaved from a prosaposin precursor. Prosaposin mutations cause some of the severest forms of sphingolipidoses, and are associated with perinatal lethality in mice, hampering studies on disease progression. We identify the Drosophila prosaposin orthologue Saposin-related (Sap-r) as a key regulator of lysosomal lipid homeostasis in the fly. Its mutation leads to a typical spingolipidosis phenotype with an enlarged endolysosomal compartment and sphingolipid accumulation as shown by mass spectrometry and thin layer chromatography. Sap-r mutants show reduced viability with ∼50% survival to adulthood, allowing us to study progressive neurodegeneration and analyze their lipid profile in young and aged flies. Additionally, we observe a defect in sterol homeostasis with local sterol depletion at the plasma membrane. Furthermore, we find that autophagy is increased, resulting in the accumulation of mitochondria in lysosomes, concomitant with increased oxidative stress. Together, we establish Drosophila Sap-r mutants as a lysosomal storage disease model suitable for studying the age-dependent progression of lysosomal dysfunction associated with lipid accumulation and the resulting pathological signaling

  13. High lumenal chloride in the lysosome is critical for lysosome function

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Kasturi; Leung, KaHo; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2017-01-01

    Lysosomes are organelles responsible for the breakdown and recycling of cellular machinery. Dysfunctional lysosomes give rise to lysosomal storage disorders as well as common neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we use a DNA-based, fluorescent chloride reporter to measure lysosomal chloride in Caenorhabditis elegans as well as murine and human cell culture models of lysosomal diseases. We find that the lysosome is highly enriched in chloride, and that chloride reduction correlates directly with a loss in the degradative function of the lysosome. In nematodes and mammalian cell culture models of diverse lysosomal disorders, where previously only lysosomal pH dysregulation has been described, massive reduction of lumenal chloride is observed that is ~103 fold greater than the accompanying pH change. Reducing chloride within the lysosome impacts Ca2+ release from the lysosome and impedes the activity of specific lysosomal enzymes indicating a broader role for chloride in lysosomal function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.28862.001 PMID:28742019

  14. BACE is degraded via the lysosomal pathway.

    PubMed

    Koh, Young Ho; von Arnim, Christine A F; Hyman, Bradley T; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2005-09-16

    Amyloid plaques are formed by aggregates of amyloid-beta-peptide, a 37-43-amino acid fragment (primarily Abeta(40) and Abeta(42)) generated by proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by beta- and gamma-secretases. A type I transmembrane aspartyl protease, BACE (beta-site APP cleaving enzyme), has been identified to be the beta-secretase. BACE is targeted through the secretory pathway to the plasma membrane where it can be internalized to endosomes. The carboxyl terminus of BACE contains a di-leucine-based signal for sorting of transmembrane proteins to endosomes and lysosomes. In this study, we set out to determine whether BACE is degraded by the lysosomal pathway and whether the di-leucine motif is necessary for targeting BACE to the lysosomes. Here we show that lysosomal inhibitors, chloroquine and NH(4)Cl, lead to accumulation of endogenous and ectopically expressed BACE in a variety of cell types, including primary neurons. Furthermore, the inhibition of lysosomal hydrolases results in the redistribution and accumulation of BACE in the late endosomal/lysosomal compartments (lysosome-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP2)-positive). In contrast, the BACE-LL/AA mutant, in which Leu(499) and Leu(500) in the COOH-terminal sequence (DDISLLK) were replaced by alanines, only partially co-localized with LAMP2-positive compartments following inhibition of lysosomal hydrolases. Collectively, our data indicate that BACE is transported to the late endosomal/lysosomal compartments where it is degraded via the lysosomal pathway and that the di-leucine motif plays a role in sorting BACE to lysosomes.

  15. A ratiometric fluorescence probe for lysosomal polarity.

    PubMed

    Li, Miao; Fan, Jiangli; Li, Haidong; Du, Jianjun; Long, Saran; Peng, Xiaojun

    2018-05-01

    Lysosomal polarity affects the interaction activities between enzymes and substrates at the cellular level. Abnormal lysosomal polarity closely linked with disorders and diseases is worthy of attention. The first fluorescence probe, which can image polarity ratiometrically and detect lysosomal polarity quantitatively, is reported herein. The probe termed NOH can emit dual-peaks both in solvents (λ em  = 474, 552 nm) and in micro-environment. NOH exhibits the Boltzmann function response of the fluorescence intensity ratio to the polarity in a wide range and localizes at lysosomes specifically (R r  = 0.97). In the method of ratiometric fluorescence imaging with NOH, the variation of lysosomal polarity (Δf) can be directly discerned by the color changes. In virtue of ratiometric fluorescence imaging and the Boltzmann function relationship between the fluorescence intensity ratio and the polarity, lysosomal polarity in MCF-7 cells was calculated to be 0.224 and the polarity in the condition of lysosomal storage disorders (or cell death) could also be obtained. This probe will be a promising tool for studying lysosome-related physiological or pathological processes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A Molecular Mechanism to Regulate Lysosome Motility for Lysosome Positioning and Tubulation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinran; Rydzewski, Nicholas; Hider, Ahmad; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yang, Junsheng; Wang, Wuyang; Gao, Qiong; Cheng, Xiping; Xu, Haoxing

    2016-01-01

    To mediate the degradation of bio-macromolecules, lysosomes must traffic towards cargo-carrying vesicles for subsequent membrane fusion or fission. Mutations of the lysosomal Ca2+ channel TRPML1 cause lysosome storage disease (LSD) characterized by disordered lysosomal membrane trafficking in cells. Here we show that TRPML1 activity is required to promote Ca2+-dependent centripetal movement of lysosomes towards the perinuclear region, where autophagosomes accumulate, upon autophagy induction. ALG-2, an EF-hand-containing protein, serves as a lysosomal Ca2+ sensor that associates physically with the minus-end directed dynactin-dynein motor, while PI(3,5)P2, a lysosome-localized phosphoinositide, acts upstream of TRPML1. Furthermore, the PI(3,5)P2-TRPML1-ALG-2-dynein signaling is necessary for lysosome tubulation and reformation. In contrast, the TRPML1 pathway is not required for the perinuclear accumulation of lysosomes observed in many LSDs, which is instead likely caused by secondary cholesterol accumulation that constitutively activates Rab7-RILP-dependent retrograde transport. Collectively, Ca2+ release from lysosomes provides an on-demand mechanism regulating lysosome motility, positioning, and tubulation. PMID:26950892

  17. Lysosome enlargement during inhibition of the lipid kinase PIKfyve proceeds through lysosome coalescence.

    PubMed

    Choy, Christopher H; Saffi, Golam; Gray, Matthew A; Wallace, Callen; Dayam, Roya M; Ou, Zhen-Yi A; Lenk, Guy; Puertollano, Rosa; Watkins, Simon C; Botelho, Roberto J

    2018-04-16

    Lysosomes receive and degrade cargo from endocytosis, phagocytosis and autophagy. They also play an important role in sensing and instructing cells on their metabolic state. The lipid kinase PIKfyve generates phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate to modulate lysosome function. PIKfyve inhibition leads to impaired degradative capacity, ion dysregulation, abated autophagic flux, and a massive enlargement of lysosomes. Collectively, this leads to various physiological defects including embryonic lethality, neurodegeneration and overt inflammation. While being the most dramatic phenotype, the reasons for lysosome enlargement remain unclear. Here, we examined whether biosynthesis and/or fusion-fission dynamics contribute to swelling. First, we show that PIKfyve inhibition activates TFEB, TFE3 and MITF enhancing lysosome gene expression. However, this did not augment lysosomal protein levels during acute PIKfyve inhibition and deletion of TFEB and/or related proteins did not impair lysosome swelling. Instead, PIKfyve inhibition led to fewer but enlarged lysosomes, suggesting that an imbalance favouring lysosome fusion over fission causes lysosome enlargement. Indeed, conditions that abated fusion curtailed lysosome swelling in PIKfyve-inhibited cells. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Podocytes Degrade Endocytosed Albumin Primarily in Lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Carson, John M.; Okamura, Kayo; Wakashin, Hidefumi; McFann, Kim; Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Kopp, Jeffrey B.; Blaine, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Albuminuria is a strong, independent predictor of chronic kidney disease progression. We hypothesize that podocyte processing of albumin via the lysosome may be an important determinant of podocyte injury and loss. A human urine derived podocyte-like epithelial cell (HUPEC) line was used for in vitro experiments. Albumin uptake was quantified by Western blot after loading HUPECs with fluorescein-labeled (FITC) albumin. Co-localization of albumin with lysosomes was determined by confocal microscopy. Albumin degradation was measured by quantifying FITC-albumin abundance in HUPEC lysates by Western blot. Degradation experiments were repeated using HUPECs treated with chloroquine, a lysosome inhibitor, or MG-132, a proteasome inhibitor. Lysosome activity was measured by fluorescence recovery after photo bleaching (FRAP). Cytokine production was measured by ELISA. Cell death was determined by trypan blue staining. In vivo, staining with lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) was performed on tissue from a Denys-Drash trangenic mouse model of nephrotic syndrome. HUPECs endocytosed albumin, which co-localized with lysosomes. Choloroquine, but not MG-132, inhibited albumin degradation, indicating that degradation occurs in lysosomes. Cathepsin B activity, measured by FRAP, significantly decreased in HUPECs exposed to albumin (12.5% of activity in controls) and chloroquine (12.8%), and declined further with exposure to albumin plus chloroquine (8.2%, p<0.05). Cytokine production and cell death were significantly increased in HUPECs exposed to albumin and chloroquine alone, and these effects were potentiated by exposure to albumin plus chloroquine. Compared to wild-type mice, glomerular staining of LAMP-1 was significantly increased in Denys-Drash mice and appeared to be most prominent in podocytes. These data suggest lysosomes are involved in the processing of endocytosed albumin in podocytes, and lysosomal dysfunction may contribute to podocyte injury and

  19. Recent advances in gene therapy for lysosomal storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Rastall, David Pw; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a group of genetic diseases that result in metabolic derangements of the lysosome. Most LSDs are due to the genetic absence of a single catabolic enzyme, causing accumulation of the enzyme's substrate within the lysosome. Over time, tissue-specific substrate accumulations result in a spectrum of symptoms and disabilities that vary by LSD. LSDs are promising targets for gene therapy because delivery of a single gene into a small percentage of the appropriate target cells may be sufficient to impact the clinical course of the disease. Recently, there have been several significant advancements in the potential for gene therapy of these disorders, including the first human trials. Future clinical trials will build upon these initial attempts, with an improved understanding of immune system responses to gene therapy, the obstacle that the blood-brain barrier poses for neuropathic LSDs, as well other biological barriers that, when overcome, may facilitate gene therapy for LSDs. In this manuscript, we will highlight the recent innovations in gene therapy for LSDs and discuss the clinical limitations that remain to be overcome, with the goal of fostering an understanding and further development of this important field.

  20. Nanoparticles restore lysosomal acidification defects: Implications for Parkinson and other lysosomal-related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bourdenx, Mathieu; Daniel, Jonathan; Genin, Emilie; Soria, Federico N.; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Bezard, Erwan; Dehay, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lysosomal impairment causes lysosomal storage disorders (LSD) and is involved in pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, notably Parkinson disease (PD). Strategies enhancing or restoring lysosomal-mediated degradation thus appear as tantalizing disease-modifying therapeutics. Here we demonstrate that poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) acidic nanoparticles (aNP) restore impaired lysosomal function in a series of toxin and genetic cellular models of PD, i.e. ATP13A2-mutant or depleted cells or glucocerebrosidase (GBA)-mutant cells, as well as in a genetic model of lysosomal-related myopathy. We show that PLGA-aNP are transported to the lysosome within 24 h, lower lysosomal pH and rescue chloroquine (CQ)-induced toxicity. Re-acidification of defective lysosomes following PLGA-aNP treatment restores lysosomal function in different pathological contexts. Finally, our results show that PLGA-aNP may be detected after intracerebral injection in neurons and attenuate PD-related neurodegeneration in vivo by mechanisms involving a rescue of compromised lysosomes. PMID:26761717

  1. Environmental prognostics: an integrated model supporting lysosomal stress responses as predictive biomarkers of animal health status.

    PubMed

    Moore, Michael N; Icarus Allen, J; McVeigh, Allan

    2006-04-01

    The potential prognostic use of lysosomal reactions to environmental pollutants is explored in relation to predicting animal health in marine mussels, based on diagnostic biomarker data. Cellular lysosomes are already known to accumulate many metals and organic xenobiotics and the lysosomal accumulation of the carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC) is demonstrated here in the hepatopancreatic digestive cells and ovarian oocytes of the blue mussel. Lysosomal membrane integrity or stability appears to be a generic indicator of cellular well-being in eukaryotes; and in bivalve molluscs it is correlated with total oxygen and nitrogen radical scavenging capacity (TOSC), protein synthesis, scope for growth and larval viability; and inversely correlated with DNA damage (micronuclei), as well as lysosomal swelling (volume density), lipidosis and lipofuscinosis, which are all characteristic of failed or incomplete autophagy. Integration of multiple biomarker data is achieved using multivariate statistics and then mapped onto "health status space" by using lysosomal membrane stability as a measure of cellular well-being. This is viewed as a crucial step towards the derivation of explanatory frameworks for prediction of pollutant impact on animal health; and has facilitated the development of a conceptual mechanistic model linking lysosomal damage and autophagic dysfunction with injury to cells, tissues and the whole animal. This model has also complemented the creation and use of a cell-based bioenergetic computational model of molluscan hepatopancreatic cells that simulates lysosomal and cellular reactions to pollutants. More speculatively, the use of coupled empirical measurements of biomarker reactions and modelling is proposed as a practical approach to the development of an operational toolbox for predicting the health of the environment.

  2. Giant Cellular Vacuoles Induced by Rare Earth Oxide Nanoparticles are Abnormally Enlarged Endo/Lysosomes and Promote mTOR-Dependent TFEB Nucleus Translocation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jun; Shi, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Ji-Qian; Zhang, Yun-Jiao; Zhang, Li; Liu, Yun; Jin, Pei-Pei; Wei, Peng-Fei; Shi, Rong-Hua; Zhou, Wei; Wen, Long-Ping

    2016-11-01

    Many nanomaterials are reported to disrupt lysosomal function and homeostasis, but how cells sense and then respond to nanomaterial-elicited lysosome stress is poorly understood. Nucleus translocation of transcription factor EB (TFEB) plays critical roles in lysosome biogenesis following lysosome stress induced by starvation. The authors previously reported massive cellular vacuolization, along with autophagy induction, in cells treated with rare earth oxide (REO) nanoparticles. Here, the authors identify these giant cellular vacuoles as abnormally enlarged and alkalinized endo/lysosomes whose formation is dependent on macropinocytosis. This vacuolization causes deactivation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a TFEB-interacting kinase that resides on the lysosome membrane. Subsequently, TFEB is dephosphorylated at serine 142 and translocated into cell nucleus. This nucleus translocation of TFEB is observed only in vacuolated cells and it is critical for maintaining lysosome homeostasis after REO nanoparticle treatment, as knock-down of TFEB gene significantly compromises lysosome function and enhances cell death in nanoparticle-treated cells. Our results reveal that cellular vacuolization, which is commonly observed in cells treated with REOs and other nanomaterials, represents a condition of profound lysosome stress, and cells sense and respond to this stress by facilitating mTOR-dependent TFEB nucleus translocation in an effort to restore lysosome homeostasis. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: lysosomal acid lipase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... breaks down lipids such as cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. The lipids produced through these processes, cholesterol and ... activity results in the accumulation of cholesteryl esters, triglycerides, and other lipids within lysosomes, causing fat buildup ...

  4. Lysosome-targeting agents in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    Despite considerable efforts from multiple laboratories worldwide, highly specific inhibitors of autophagy for clinical use are not yet available. Lysosomal inhibitors are being employed instead, in spite of multiple limitations that are summarized herein. PMID:29348815

  5. Molecular pathologies of and enzyme replacement therapies for lysosomal diseases.

    PubMed

    Sakuraba, Hitoshi; Sawada, Makoto; Matsuzawa, Fumiko; Aikawa, Sei-ichi; Chiba, Yasunori; Jigami, Yoshifumi; Itoh, Kohji

    2006-08-01

    Lysosomal diseases comprise a group of inherited disorders resulting from defects of lysosomal enzymes and their cofactors, and in many of them the nervous system is affected. Recently, enzyme replacement therapy with recombinant lysosomal enzymes has been clinically available for several lysosomal diseases. Such enzyme replacement therapies can improve non-neurological disorders but is not effective for neurological ones. In this review, we discuss the molecular pathologies of lysosomal diseases from the protein structural aspect, current enzyme replacement therapies, and attempts to develop enzyme replacement therapies effective for lysosomal diseases associated with neurological disorders, i.e., production of enzymes, brain-specific delivery and incorporation of lysosomal enzymes into cells.

  6. Lysosomal Storage Disorders in the Newborn

    PubMed Central

    Staretz-Chacham, Orna; Lang, Tess C.; LaMarca, Mary E.; Krasnewich, Donna; Sidransky, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders are rare inborn errors of metabolism, with a combined incidence of 1 in 1500 to 7000 live births. These relatively rare disorders are seldom considered when evaluating a sick newborn. A significant number of the >50 different lysosomal storage disorders, however, do manifest in the neonatal period and should be part of the differential diagnosis of several perinatal phenotypes. We review the earliest clinical features, diagnostic tests, and treatment options for lysosomal storage disorders that can present in the newborn. Although many of the lysosomal storage disorders are characterized by a range in phenotypes, the focus of this review is on the specific symptoms and clinical findings that present in the perinatal period, including neurologic, respiratory, endocrine, and cardiovascular manifestations, dysmorphic features, hepatosplenomegaly, skin or ocular involvement, and hydrops fetalis/congenital ascites. A greater awareness of these features may help to reduce misdiagnosis and promote the early detection of lysosomal storage disorders. Implementing therapy at the earliest stage possible is crucial for several of the lysosomal storage disorders; hence, an early appreciation of these disorders by physicians who treat newborns is essential. PMID:19336380

  7. [Application of lysosomal detection in marine pollution monitoring: research progress].

    PubMed

    Weng, You-Zhu; Fang, Yong-Qiang; Zhang, Yu-Sheng

    2013-11-01

    Lysosome is an important organelle existing in eukaryotic cells. With the development of the study on the structure and function of lysosome in recent years, lysosome is considered as a target of toxic substances on subcellular level, and has been widely applied abroad in marine pollution monitoring. This paper summarized the biological characteristics of lysosomal marker enzyme, lysosome-autophagy system, and lysosomal membrane, and introduced the principles and methods of applying lysosomal detection in marine pollution monitoring. Bivalve shellfish digestive gland and fish liver are the most sensitive organs for lysosomal detection. By adopting the lysosomal detection techniques such as lysosomal membrane stability (LMS) test, neutral red retention time (NRRT) assay, morphological measurement (MM) of lysosome, immunohistochemical (Ih) assay of lysosomal marker enzyme, and electron microscopy (EM), the status of marine pollution can be evaluated. It was suggested that the lysosome could be used as a biomarker for monitoring marine environmental pollution. The advantages and disadvantages of lysosomal detection and some problems worthy of attention were analyzed, and the application prospects of lysosomal detection were discussed.

  8. DRAM1 Regulates Autophagy Flux through Lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun-Chao; Qin, Zheng-Hong

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported that the mitochondria inhibitor 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP), induces the expression of DNA damage-regulated autophagy modulator1 (DRAM1) and activation of autophagy in rat striatum. Although the role of DRAM1 in autophagy has been previously characterized, the detailed mechanism by which DRAM1 regulates autophagy activity has not been fully understood. The present study investigated the role of DRAM1 in regulating autophagy flux. In A549 cells expressing wilt-type TP53, 3-NP increased the protein levels of DRAM1 and LC3-II, whereas decreased the levels of SQSTM1 (sequestosome 1). The increase in LC3-II and decrease in SQSTM1 were blocked by the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyl-adenine. Lack of TP53 or knock-down of TP53 in cells impaired the induction of DRAM1. Knock-down of DRAM1 with siRNA significantly reduced 3-NP-induced upregulation of LC3-II and downregulation of SQSTM1, indicating DRAM1 contributes to autophagy activation. Knock-down of DRAM1 robustly decreased rate of disappearance of induced autophagosomes, increased RFP-LC3 fluorescence dots and decreased the decline of LC3-II after withdraw of rapamycin, indicating DRAM1 promotes autophagy flux. DRAM1 siRNA inhibited lysosomal V-ATPase and acidification of lysosomes. As a result, DRAM1 siRNA reduced activation of lysosomal cathepsin D. Similar to DRAM1 siRNA, lysosomal inhibitors E64d and chloroquine also inhibited clearance of autophagosomes and activation of lysosomal cathapsin D after 3-NP treatment. These data suggest that DRAM1 plays important roles in autophagy activation induced by mitochondria dysfunction. DRAM1 affects autophagy through argument of lysosomal acidification, fusion of lysosomes with autophagosomes and clearance of autophagosomes. PMID:23696801

  9. Lysosomal fusion and SNARE function are impaired by cholesterol accumulation in lysosomal storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Fraldi, Alessandro; Annunziata, Fabio; Lombardi, Alessia; Kaiser, Hermann-Josef; Medina, Diego Luis; Spampanato, Carmine; Fedele, Anthony Olind; Polishchuk, Roman; Sorrentino, Nicolina Cristina; Simons, Kai; Ballabio, Andrea

    2010-11-03

    The function of lysosomes relies on the ability of the lysosomal membrane to fuse with several target membranes in the cell. It is known that in lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs), lysosomal accumulation of several types of substrates is associated with lysosomal dysfunction and impairment of endocytic membrane traffic. By analysing cells from two severe neurodegenerative LSDs, we observed that cholesterol abnormally accumulates in the endolysosomal membrane of LSD cells, thereby reducing the ability of lysosomes to efficiently fuse with endocytic and autophagic vesicles. Furthermore, we discovered that soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein (SNAP) receptors (SNAREs), which are key components of the cellular membrane fusion machinery are aberrantly sequestered in cholesterol-enriched regions of LSD endolysosomal membranes. This abnormal spatial organization locks SNAREs in complexes and impairs their sorting and recycling. Importantly, reducing membrane cholesterol levels in LSD cells restores normal SNARE function and efficient lysosomal fusion. Our results support a model by which cholesterol abnormalities determine lysosomal dysfunction and endocytic traffic jam in LSDs by impairing the membrane fusion machinery, thus suggesting new therapeutic targets for the treatment of these disorders.

  10. Sensitive detection of lysosomal membrane permeabilization by lysosomal galectin puncta assay

    PubMed Central

    Aits, Sonja; Kricker, Jennifer; Liu, Bin; Ellegaard, Anne-Marie; Hämälistö, Saara; Tvingsholm, Siri; Corcelle-Termeau, Elisabeth; Høgh, Søren; Farkas, Thomas; Holm Jonassen, Anna; Gromova, Irina; Mortensen, Monika; Jäättelä, Marja

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) contributes to tissue involution, degenerative diseases, and cancer therapy. Its investigation has, however, been hindered by the lack of sensitive methods. Here, we characterize and validate the detection of galectin puncta at leaky lysosomes as a highly sensitive and easily manageable assay for LMP. LGALS1/galectin-1 and LGALS3/galectin-3 are best suited for this purpose due to their widespread expression, rapid translocation to leaky lysosomes and availability of high-affinity antibodies. Galectin staining marks individual leaky lysosomes early during lysosomal cell death and is useful when defining whether LMP is a primary or secondary cause of cell death. This sensitive method also reveals that cells can survive limited LMP and confirms a rapid formation of autophagic structures at the site of galectin puncta. Importantly, galectin staining detects individual leaky lysosomes also in paraffin-embedded tissues allowing us to demonstrate LMP in tumor xenografts in mice treated with cationic amphiphilic drugs and to identify a subpopulation of lysosomes that initiates LMP in involuting mouse mammary gland. The use of ectopic fluorescent galectins renders the galectin puncta assay suitable for automated screening and visualization of LMP in live cells and animals. Thus, the lysosomal galectin puncta assay opens up new possibilities to study LMP in cell death and its role in other cellular processes such as autophagy, senescence, aging, and inflammation. PMID:26114578

  11. Sensitive detection of lysosomal membrane permeabilization by lysosomal galectin puncta assay.

    PubMed

    Aits, Sonja; Kricker, Jennifer; Liu, Bin; Ellegaard, Anne-Marie; Hämälistö, Saara; Tvingsholm, Siri; Corcelle-Termeau, Elisabeth; Høgh, Søren; Farkas, Thomas; Holm Jonassen, Anna; Gromova, Irina; Mortensen, Monika; Jäättelä, Marja

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) contributes to tissue involution, degenerative diseases, and cancer therapy. Its investigation has, however, been hindered by the lack of sensitive methods. Here, we characterize and validate the detection of galectin puncta at leaky lysosomes as a highly sensitive and easily manageable assay for LMP. LGALS1/galectin-1 and LGALS3/galectin-3 are best suited for this purpose due to their widespread expression, rapid translocation to leaky lysosomes and availability of high-affinity antibodies. Galectin staining marks individual leaky lysosomes early during lysosomal cell death and is useful when defining whether LMP is a primary or secondary cause of cell death. This sensitive method also reveals that cells can survive limited LMP and confirms a rapid formation of autophagic structures at the site of galectin puncta. Importantly, galectin staining detects individual leaky lysosomes also in paraffin-embedded tissues allowing us to demonstrate LMP in tumor xenografts in mice treated with cationic amphiphilic drugs and to identify a subpopulation of lysosomes that initiates LMP in involuting mouse mammary gland. The use of ectopic fluorescent galectins renders the galectin puncta assay suitable for automated screening and visualization of LMP in live cells and animals. Thus, the lysosomal galectin puncta assay opens up new possibilities to study LMP in cell death and its role in other cellular processes such as autophagy, senescence, aging, and inflammation.

  12. Lysosome Enlargement Enhanced Photochemotherapy Using a Multifunctional Nanogel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiqi; Tung, Ching-Hsuan

    2018-02-07

    Large lysosomes are susceptible toward rupture because of an increased membrane tension. Here we report a strategy to first enlarge and weaken the lysosome and then destroy it to boost the efficiency of photochemotherapy using a hyaluronan nanogel, carrying chloroquine as a lysosomal expander, rhodamine B as a photosensitive lysosomal destroyer, and cisplatin as a chemotherapeutic. This all-in-one nanogel provides a facile approach and new insight into improve the photochemotherapy, by making use of lysosome's size, as a risk factor in lysosomal destabilization.

  13. Intracellular sphingosine releases calcium from lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Höglinger, Doris; Haberkant, Per; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Riezman, Howard; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M; Galione, Antony; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-11-27

    To elucidate new functions of sphingosine (Sph), we demonstrate that the spontaneous elevation of intracellular Sph levels via caged Sph leads to a significant and transient calcium release from acidic stores that is independent of sphingosine 1-phosphate, extracellular and ER calcium levels. This photo-induced Sph-driven calcium release requires the two-pore channel 1 (TPC1) residing on endosomes and lysosomes. Further, uncaging of Sph leads to the translocation of the autophagy-relevant transcription factor EB (TFEB) to the nucleus specifically after lysosomal calcium release. We confirm that Sph accumulates in late endosomes and lysosomes of cells derived from Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) patients and demonstrate a greatly reduced calcium release upon Sph uncaging. We conclude that sphingosine is a positive regulator of calcium release from acidic stores and that understanding the interplay between Sph homeostasis, calcium signaling and autophagy will be crucial in developing new therapies for lipid storage disorders such as NPC.

  14. Cytolysin-dependent evasion of lysosomal killing.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, Anders; Bentley, Colette Cywes; Shakhnovic, Elizabeth A; Wessels, Michael R

    2005-04-05

    Local host defenses limit proliferation and systemic spread of pathogenic bacteria from sites of mucosal colonization. For pathogens such as streptococci that fail to grow intracellularly, internalization and killing by epithelial cells contribute to the control of bacterial growth and dissemination. Here, we show that group A Streptococcus (GAS), the agent of streptococcal sore throat and invasive soft tissue infections, evades internalization and intracellular killing by pharyngeal epithelial cells. Production of the cholesterol-binding cytotoxin streptolysin O (SLO) prevented internalization of GAS into lysosomes. In striking contrast, GAS rendered defective in production of SLO were internalized directly or rapidly transported into lysosomes, where they were killed by a pH-dependent mechanism. Because SLO is the prototype of cholesterol-dependent cytolysins produced by many Gram-positive bacteria, cytolysin-mediated evasion of lysosomal killing may be a general mechanism to protect such pathogens from clearance by host epithelial cells.

  15. Select microtubule inhibitors increase lysosome acidity and promote lysosomal disruption in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Dannie; Gebbia, Marinella; Prabha, Swayam; Gronda, Marcela; MacLean, Neil; Wang, Xiaoming; Hurren, Rose; Sukhai, Mahadeo A; Cho, Eunice E; Manolson, Morris F; Datti, Alessandro; Wrana, Jeffrey; Minden, Mark D; Al-Awar, Rima; Aman, Ahmed; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; Schimmer, Aaron D

    2015-07-01

    To identify new biological vulnerabilities in acute myeloid leukemia, we screened a library of natural products for compounds cytotoxic to TEX leukemia cells. This screen identified the novel small molecule Deoxysappanone B 7,4' dimethyl ether (Deox B 7,4), which possessed nanomolar anti-leukemic activity. To determine the anti-leukemic mechanism of action of Deox B 7,4, we conducted a genome-wide screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and identified enrichment of genes related to mitotic cell cycle as well as vacuolar acidification, therefore pointing to microtubules and vacuolar (V)-ATPase as potential drug targets. Further investigations into the mechanisms of action of Deox B 7,4 and a related analogue revealed that these compounds were reversible microtubule inhibitors that bound near the colchicine site. In addition, Deox B 7,4 and its analogue increased lysosomal V-ATPase activity and lysosome acidity. The effects on microtubules and lysosomes were functionally important for the anti-leukemic effects of these drugs. The lysosomal effects were characteristic of select microtubule inhibitors as only the Deox compounds and nocodazole, but not colchicine, vinca alkaloids or paclitaxel, altered lysosome acidity and induced lysosomal disruption. Thus, our data highlight a new mechanism of action of select microtubule inhibitors on lysosomal function.

  16. Incorporation of lysosomal sequestration in the mechanistic model for prediction of tissue distribution of basic drugs.

    PubMed

    Assmus, Frauke; Houston, J Brian; Galetin, Aleksandra

    2017-11-15

    cell types. Despite this extensive lysosomal sequestration in the individual cells types, the maximal change in the overall predicted tissue Kpu was <3-fold for lysosome-rich tissues investigated here. Accounting for the variability in cellular physiological model input parameters, in particular lysosomal pH and fraction of the cellular volume occupied by the lysosomes, only partially explained discrepancies between observed and predicted Kpu data in the lung. Improved understanding of the system properties, e.g., cell/organelle composition is required to support further development of mechanistic equations for the prediction of drug tissue distribution. Application of this revised mechanistic model is recommended for prediction of Kpu in lysosome-rich tissue to facilitate the advancement of physiologically-based prediction of volume of distribution and drug exposure in the tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Glycosphingolipid lysosomal storage diseases: therapy and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jeyakumar, M; Butters, T D; Dwek, R A; Platt, F M

    2002-10-01

    Paediatric neurodegenerative diseases are frequently caused by inborn errors in glycosphingolipid (GSL) catabolism and are collectively termed the glycosphingolipidoses. GSL catabolism occurs in the lysosome and a defect in an enzyme involved in GSL degradation leads to the lysosomal storage of its substrate(s). GSLs are abundantly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) and the disorders frequently have a progressive neurodegenerative course. Our understanding of pathogenesis in these diseases is incomplete and currently few options exist for therapy. In this review we discuss how mouse models of these disorders are providing insights into pathogenesis and also leading to progress in evaluating experimental therapies.

  18. Endothelial Rab7 GTPase mediates tumor growth and metastasis in lysosomal acid lipase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ting; Ding, Xinchun; Yan, Cong; Du, Hong

    2017-11-24

    Tumors depend on their microenvironment for sustained growth, invasion, and metastasis. In this environment, endothelial cells (ECs) are an important stromal cell type interacting with malignant cells to facilitate tumor angiogenesis and cancer cell extravasation. Of note, lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) deficiency facilitates melanoma growth and metastasis. ECs from LAL-deficient ( lal -/- ) mice possess enhanced proliferation, migration, and permeability of inflammatory cells by activating the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Here we report that lal -/- ECs facilitated in vivo tumor angiogenesis, growth, and metastasis, largely by stimulating tumor cell proliferation, migration, adhesion, and transendothelial migration via increased expression of IL-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1). This prompted us to look for lysosomal proteins that are involved in lal -/- EC dysfunctions. We found that lal -/- ECs displayed increased expression of Rab7, a late endosome/lysosome-associated small GTPase. Moreover, Rab7 and mTOR were co-increased and co-localized to lysosomes and physically interacted in lal -/- ECs. Rab7 inhibition reversed lal -/- EC dysfunctions, including decreasing their enhanced migration and permeability of tumor-stimulatory myeloid cells, and suppressed EC-mediated stimulation of in vitro tumor cell transmigration, proliferation, and migration and in vivo tumor growth and metastasis. Finally, Rab7 inhibition reduced overproduction of reactive oxygen species and increased IL-6 and MCP-1 secretion in lal -/- ECs. Our results indicate that metabolic reprogramming resulting from LAL deficiency enhances the ability of ECs to stimulate tumor cell proliferation and metastasis through stimulation of lysosome-anchored Rab7 activity. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. The physiological determinants of drug-induced lysosomal stress resistance

    PubMed Central

    Woldemichael, Tehetina; Rosania, Gus R.

    2017-01-01

    Many weakly basic, lipophilic drugs accumulate in lysosomes and exert complex, pleiotropic effects on organelle structure and function. Thus, modeling how perturbations of lysosomal physiology affect the maintenance of lysosomal ion homeostasis is necessary to elucidate the key factors which determine the toxicological effects of lysosomotropic agents, in a cell-type dependent manner. Accordingly, a physiologically-based mathematical modeling and simulation approach was used to explore the dynamic, multi-parameter phenomenon of lysosomal stress. With this approach, parameters that are either directly involved in lysosomal ion transportation or lysosomal morphology were transiently altered to investigate their downstream effects on lysosomal physiology reflected by the changes they induce in lysosomal pH, chloride, and membrane potential. In addition, combinations of parameters were simultaneously altered to assess which parameter was most critical for recovery of normal lysosomal physiology. Lastly, to explore the relationship between organelle morphology and induced stress, we investigated the effects of parameters controlling organelle geometry on the restoration of normal lysosomal physiology following a transient perturbation. Collectively, our results indicate a key, interdependent role of V-ATPase number and membrane proton permeability in lysosomal stress tolerance. This suggests that the cell-type dependent regulation of V-ATPase subunit expression and turnover, together with the proton permeability properties of the lysosomal membrane, is critical to understand the differential sensitivity or resistance of different cell types to the toxic effects of lysosomotropic drugs. PMID:29117253

  20. Reactivation of Lysosomal Ca2+ Efflux Rescues Abnormal Lysosomal Storage in FIG4-Deficient Cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jianlong; Hu, Bo; Arpag, Sezgi; Yan, Qing; Hamilton, Audra; Zeng, Yuan-Shan; Vanoye, Carlos G; Li, Jun

    2015-04-29

    Loss of function of FIG4 leads to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Type 4J, Yunis-Varon syndrome, or an epilepsy syndrome. FIG4 is a phosphatase with its catalytic specificity toward 5'-phosphate of phosphatidylinositol-3,5-diphosphate (PI3,5P2). However, the loss of FIG4 decreases PI3,5P2 levels likely due to FIG4's dominant effect in scaffolding a PI3,5P2 synthetic protein complex. At the cellular level, all these diseases share similar pathology with abnormal lysosomal storage and neuronal degeneration. Mice with no FIG4 expression (Fig4(-/-)) recapitulate the pathology in humans with FIG4 deficiency. Using a flow cytometry technique that rapidly quantifies lysosome sizes, we detected an impaired lysosomal fission, but normal fusion, in Fig4(-/-) cells. The fission defect was associated with a robust increase of intralysosomal Ca(2+) in Fig4(-/-) cells, including FIG4-deficient neurons. This finding was consistent with a suppressed Ca(2+) efflux of lysosomes because the endogenous ligand of lysosomal Ca(2+) channel TRPML1 is PI3,5P2 that is deficient in Fig4(-/-) cells. We reactivated the TRPML1 channels by application of TRPML1 synthetic ligand, ML-SA1. This treatment reduced the intralysosomal Ca(2+) level and rescued abnormal lysosomal storage in Fig4(-/-) culture cells and ex vivo DRGs. Furthermore, we found that the suppressed Ca(2+) efflux in Fig4(-/-) culture cells and Fig4(-/-) mouse brains profoundly downregulated the expression/activity of dynamin-1, a GTPase known to scissor organelle membranes during fission. This downregulation made dynamin-1 unavailable for lysosomal fission. Together, our study revealed a novel mechanism explaining abnormal lysosomal storage in FIG4 deficiency. Synthetic ligands of the TRPML1 may become a potential therapy against diseases with FIG4 deficiency. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/356801-12$15.00/0.

  1. Critical Functions of the Lysosome in Cancer Biology.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Shawn M; Vander Heiden, Matthew G

    2017-01-06

    Lysosomes (or lytic bodies) were so named because they contain high levels of hydrolytic enzymes. Lysosome function and dysfunction have been found to play important roles in human disease, including cancer; however, the ways in which lysosomes contribute to tumorigenesis and cancer progression are still being uncovered. Beyond serving as a cellular recycling center, recent evidence suggests that the lysosome is involved in energy homeostasis, generating building blocks for cell growth, mitogenic signaling, priming tissues for angiogenesis and metastasis formation, and activating transcriptional programs. This review examines emerging knowledge of how lysosomal processes contribute to the hallmarks of cancer and highlights vulnerabilities that might be exploited for cancer therapy.

  2. Mechanisms of Dendritic Cell Lysosomal Killing of Cryptococcus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hole, Camaron R.; Bui, Hoang; Wormley, Floyd L.; Wozniak, Karen L.

    2012-10-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic pulmonary fungal pathogen that disseminates to the CNS causing fatal meningitis in immunocompromised patients. Dendritic cells (DCs) phagocytose C. neoformans following inhalation. Following uptake, cryptococci translocate to the DC lysosomal compartment and are killed by oxidative and non-oxidative mechanisms. DC lysosomal extracts kill cryptococci in vitro; however, the means of antifungal activity remain unknown. Our studies determined non-oxidative antifungal activity by DC lysosomal extract. We examined DC lysosomal killing of cryptococcal strains, anti-fungal activity of purified lysosomal enzymes, and mechanisms of killing against C. neoformans. Results confirmed DC lysosome fungicidal activity against all cryptococcal serotypes. Purified lysosomal enzymes, specifically cathepsin B, inhibited cryptococcal growth. Interestingly, cathepsin B combined with its enzymatic inhibitors led to enhanced cryptococcal killing. Electron microscopy revealed structural changes and ruptured cryptococcal cell walls following treatment. Finally, additional studies demonstrated that osmotic lysis was responsible for cryptococcal death.

  3. Autophagy, lipophagy and lysosomal lipid storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Ward, Carl; Martinez-Lopez, Nuria; Otten, Elsje G; Carroll, Bernadette; Maetzel, Dorothea; Singh, Rajat; Sarkar, Sovan; Korolchuk, Viktor I

    2016-04-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process with an essential function in the maintenance of cellular and tissue homeostasis. It is primarily recognised for its role in the degradation of dysfunctional proteins and unwanted organelles, however in recent years the range of autophagy substrates has also been extended to lipids. Degradation of lipids via autophagy is termed lipophagy. The ability of autophagy to contribute to the maintenance of lipo-homeostasis becomes particularly relevant in the context of genetic lysosomal storage disorders where perturbations of autophagic flux have been suggested to contribute to the disease aetiology. Here we review recent discoveries of the molecular mechanisms mediating lipid turnover by the autophagy pathways. We further focus on the relevance of autophagy, and specifically lipophagy, to the disease mechanisms. Moreover, autophagy is also discussed as a potential therapeutic target in several key lysosomal storage disorders. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A voltage-dependent K+ channel in the lysosome is required for refilling lysosomal Ca2+ stores

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Lawas, Maria; Yu, Lu; Cheng, Xiping; Gu, Mingxue; Sahoo, Nirakar; Li, Xinran; Li, Ping; Ireland, Stephen; Meredith, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    The resting membrane potential (Δψ) of the cell is negative on the cytosolic side and determined primarily by the plasma membrane’s selective permeability to K+. We show that lysosomal Δψ is set by lysosomal membrane permeabilities to Na+ and H+, but not K+, and is positive on the cytosolic side. An increase in juxta-lysosomal Ca2+ rapidly reversed lysosomal Δψ by activating a large voltage-dependent and K+-selective conductance (LysoKVCa). LysoKVCa is encoded molecularly by SLO1 proteins known for forming plasma membrane BK channels. Opening of single LysoKVCa channels is sufficient to cause the rapid, striking changes in lysosomal Δψ. Lysosomal Ca2+ stores may be refilled from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ via ER–lysosome membrane contact sites. We propose that LysoKVCa serves as the perilysosomal Ca2+ effector to prime lysosomes for the refilling process. Consistently, genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of LysoKVCa, or abolition of its Ca2+ sensitivity, blocks refilling and maintenance of lysosomal Ca2+ stores, resulting in lysosomal cholesterol accumulation and a lysosome storage phenotype. PMID:28468834

  5. Intracellular sphingosine releases calcium from lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Höglinger, Doris; Haberkant, Per; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Riezman, Howard; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M; Galione, Antony; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate new functions of sphingosine (Sph), we demonstrate that the spontaneous elevation of intracellular Sph levels via caged Sph leads to a significant and transient calcium release from acidic stores that is independent of sphingosine 1-phosphate, extracellular and ER calcium levels. This photo-induced Sph-driven calcium release requires the two-pore channel 1 (TPC1) residing on endosomes and lysosomes. Further, uncaging of Sph leads to the translocation of the autophagy-relevant transcription factor EB (TFEB) to the nucleus specifically after lysosomal calcium release. We confirm that Sph accumulates in late endosomes and lysosomes of cells derived from Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) patients and demonstrate a greatly reduced calcium release upon Sph uncaging. We conclude that sphingosine is a positive regulator of calcium release from acidic stores and that understanding the interplay between Sph homeostasis, calcium signaling and autophagy will be crucial in developing new therapies for lipid storage disorders such as NPC. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10616.001 PMID:26613410

  6. The Role of Microscopy in Understanding Atherosclerotic Lysosomal Lipid Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray Jerome, W.; Yancey, Patricia G.

    2003-02-01

    Microscopy has played a critical role in first identifying and then defining the role of lysosomes in formation of atherosclerotic foam cells. We review the evidence implicating lysosomal lipid accumulation as a factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis with reference to the role of microscopy. In addition, we explore mechanisms by which lysosomal lipid engorgement occurs. Low density lipoproteins which have become modified are the major source of lipid for foam cell formation. These altered lipoproteins are taken into the cell via receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivered to lysosomes. Under normal conditions, lipids from these lipoproteins are metabolized and do not accumulate in lysosomes. In the atherosclerotic foam cell, this normal metabolism is inhibited so that cholesterol and cholesteryl esters accumulate in lysosomes. Studies of cultured cells incubated with modified lipoproteins suggests this abnormal metabolism occurs in two steps. Initially, hydrolysis of lipoprotein cholesteryl esters occurs normally, but the resultant free cholesterol cannot exit the lysosome. Further lysosomal cholesterol accumulation inhibits hydrolysis, producing a mixture of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters within swollen lysosomes. Various lipoprotein modifications can produce this lysosomal engorgement in vitro and it remains to be seen which modifications are most important in vivo.

  7. Regulation of lysosomal ion homeostasis by channels and transporters.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jian; Zhu, Michael X

    2016-08-01

    Lysosomes are the major organelles that carry out degradation functions. They integrate and digest materials compartmentalized by endocytosis, phagocytosis or autophagy. In addition to more than 60 hydrolases residing in the lysosomes, there are also ion channels and transporters that mediate the flux or transport of H(+), Ca(2+), Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-) across the lysosomal membranes. Defects in ionic exchange can lead to abnormal lysosome morphology, defective vesicle trafficking, impaired autophagy, and diseases such as neurodegeneration and lysosomal storage disorders. The latter are characterized by incomplete lysosomal digestion and accumulation of toxic materials inside enlarged intracellular vacuoles. In addition to degradation, recent studies have revealed the roles of lysosomes in metabolic pathways through kinases such as mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) and transcriptional regulation through calcium signaling molecules such as transcription factor EB (TFEB) and calcineurin. Owing to the development of new approaches including genetically encoded fluorescence probes and whole endolysosomal patch clamp recording techniques, studies on lysosomal ion channels have made remarkable progress in recent years. In this review, we will focus on the current knowledge of lysosome-resident ion channels and transporters, discuss their roles in maintaining lysosomal function, and evaluate how their dysfunction can result in disease.

  8. Loss of the chloride channel ClC-7 leads to lysosomal storage disease and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Dagmar; Planells-Cases, Rosa; Fuhrmann, Jens C; Scheel, Olaf; Zeitz, Oliver; Ruether, Klaus; Schmitt, Anja; Poët, Mallorie; Steinfeld, Robert; Schweizer, Michaela; Kornak, Uwe; Jentsch, Thomas J

    2005-01-01

    ClC-7 is a chloride channel of late endosomes and lysosomes. In osteoclasts, it may cooperate with H+-ATPases in acidifying the resorption lacuna. In mice and man, loss of ClC-7 or the H+-ATPase a3 subunit causes osteopetrosis, a disease characterized by defective bone resorption. We show that ClC-7 knockout mice additionally display neurodegeneration and severe lysosomal storage disease despite unchanged lysosomal pH in cultured neurons. Rescuing their bone phenotype by transgenic expression of ClC-7 in osteoclasts moderately increased their lifespan and revealed a further progression of the central nervous system pathology. Histological analysis demonstrated an accumulation of electron-dense material in neurons, autofluorescent structures, microglial activation and astrogliosis. Like in human neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, there was a strong accumulation of subunit c of the mitochondrial ATP synthase and increased amounts of lysosomal enzymes. Such alterations were minor or absent in ClC-3 knockout mice, despite a massive neurodegeneration. Osteopetrotic oc/oc mice, lacking a functional H+-ATPase a3 subunit, showed no comparable retinal or neuronal degeneration. There are important medical implications as defects in the H+-ATPase and ClC-7 can underlie human osteopetrosis. PMID:15706348

  9. Characterization of lysosomes and lysosomal enzymes from Chediak-Higashi-syndrome cultured fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, A L; Stein, R; Sundsmo, M; Yeh, R Y

    1986-01-01

    Chediak-Higashi-syndrome cultured skin fibroblasts were used to study the possible involvement of lysosomal enzymes and lysosomal dysfunction in this disorder. Our evidence indicated that Chediak-Higashi fibroblasts displayed a significant decrease in the specific activity of the acidic alpha-D-mannosidase (pH 4.2) compared with normal controls. Additional studies revealed a small, but significant, decrease in the rate of degradation of 125I-labelled beta-D-glucosidase that had been endocytosed into Chediak-Higashi cells. PMID:3099770

  10. Reactivation of Lysosomal Ca2+ Efflux Rescues Abnormal Lysosomal Storage in FIG4-Deficient Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jianlong; Hu, Bo; Arpag, Sezgi; Yan, Qing; Hamilton, Audra; Zeng, Yuan-Shan; Vanoye, Carlos G.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function of FIG4 leads to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease Type 4J, Yunis-Varon syndrome, or an epilepsy syndrome. FIG4 is a phosphatase with its catalytic specificity toward 5′-phosphate of phosphatidylinositol-3,5-diphosphate (PI3,5P2). However, the loss of FIG4 decreases PI3,5P2 levels likely due to FIG4's dominant effect in scaffolding a PI3,5P2 synthetic protein complex. At the cellular level, all these diseases share similar pathology with abnormal lysosomal storage and neuronal degeneration. Mice with no FIG4 expression (Fig4−/−) recapitulate the pathology in humans with FIG4 deficiency. Using a flow cytometry technique that rapidly quantifies lysosome sizes, we detected an impaired lysosomal fission, but normal fusion, in Fig4−/− cells. The fission defect was associated with a robust increase of intralysosomal Ca2+ in Fig4−/− cells, including FIG4-deficient neurons. This finding was consistent with a suppressed Ca2+ efflux of lysosomes because the endogenous ligand of lysosomal Ca2+ channel TRPML1 is PI3,5P2 that is deficient in Fig4−/− cells. We reactivated the TRPML1 channels by application of TRPML1 synthetic ligand, ML-SA1. This treatment reduced the intralysosomal Ca2+ level and rescued abnormal lysosomal storage in Fig4−/− culture cells and ex vivo DRGs. Furthermore, we found that the suppressed Ca2+ efflux in Fig4−/− culture cells and Fig4−/− mouse brains profoundly downregulated the expression/activity of dynamin-1, a GTPase known to scissor organelle membranes during fission. This downregulation made dynamin-1 unavailable for lysosomal fission. Together, our study revealed a novel mechanism explaining abnormal lysosomal storage in FIG4 deficiency. Synthetic ligands of the TRPML1 may become a potential therapy against diseases with FIG4 deficiency. PMID:25926456

  11. The late endosome/lysosome-anchored p18-mTORC1 pathway controls terminal maturation of lysosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yusuke; Nada, Shigeyuki; Mori, Shunsuke

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p18 is a membrane adaptor that anchors mTORC1 to late endosomes/lysosomes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the role of the p18-mTORC1 pathway in lysosome biogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The loss of p18 causes accumulation of intact late endosomes by arresting lysosome maturation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of mTORC1 activity with rapamycin phenocopies the defects of p18 loss. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The p18-mTORC1 pathway plays crucial roles in the terminal maturation of lysosomes. -- Abstract: The late endosome/lysosome membrane adaptor p18 (or LAMTOR1) serves as an anchor for the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and is required for its activation on lysosomes. The loss ofmore » p18 causes severe defects in cell growth as well as endosome dynamics, including membrane protein transport and lysosome biogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects on lysosome biogenesis remain unknown. Here, we show that the p18-mTORC1 pathway is crucial for terminal maturation of lysosomes. The loss of p18 causes aberrant intracellular distribution and abnormal sizes of late endosomes/lysosomes and an accumulation of late endosome specific components, including Rab7, RagC, and LAMP1; this suggests that intact late endosomes accumulate in the absence of p18. These defects are phenocopied by inhibiting mTORC1 activity with rapamycin. Loss of p18 also suppresses the integration of late endosomes and lysosomes, resulting in the defective degradation of tracer proteins. These results suggest that the p18-mTORC1 pathway plays crucial roles in the late stages of lysosomal maturation, potentially in late endosome-lysosome fusion, which is required for processing of various macromolecules.« less

  12. Endo-lysosomal dysfunction: a converging mechanism in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Telpoukhovskaia, Maria A; Bahr, Ben A; Chen, Xu; Gan, Li

    2018-02-01

    Endo-lysosomal pathways are essential in maintaining protein homeostasis in the cell. Numerous genes in the endo-lysosomal pathways have been found to associate with neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Mutations of these genes lead to dysfunction in multiple steps of the endo-lysosomal network: autophagy, endocytic trafficking and lysosomal degradation, resulting in accumulation of pathogenic proteins. Although the exact pathogenic mechanism varies for different disease-associated genes, dysfunction of the endo-lysosomal pathways represents a converging mechanism shared by these diseases. Therefore, strategies that correct or compensate for endo-lysosomal dysfunction may be promising therapeutic approaches to treat neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Cancer-associated lysosomal changes: friends or foes?

    PubMed

    Kallunki, T; Olsen, O D; Jäättelä, M

    2013-04-18

    Rapidly dividing and invasive cancer cells are strongly dependent on effective lysosomal function. Accordingly, transformation and cancer progression are characterized by dramatic changes in lysosomal volume, composition and cellular distribution. Depending on one's point of view, the cancer-associated changes in the lysosomal compartment can be regarded as friends or foes. Most of them are clearly transforming as they promote invasive growth, angiogenesis and drug resistance. The same changes can, however, strongly sensitize cells to lysosomal membrane permeabilization and thereby to lysosome-targeting anti-cancer drugs. In this review we compile our current knowledge on cancer-associated changes in lysosomal composition and discuss the consequences of these alterations to cancer progression and the possibilities they can bring to cancer therapy.

  14. Using the Technology Acceptance Model to explore community dwelling older adults' perceptions of a 3D interior design application to facilitate pre-discharge home adaptations.

    PubMed

    Money, Arthur G; Atwal, Anita; Young, Katherine L; Day, Yasmin; Wilson, Lesley; Money, Kevin G

    2015-08-26

    In the UK occupational therapy pre-discharge home visits are routinely carried out as a means of facilitating safe transfer from the hospital to home. Whilst they are an integral part of practice, there is little evidence to demonstrate they have a positive outcome on the discharge process. Current issues for patients are around the speed of home visits and the lack of shared decision making in the process, resulting in less than 50 % of the specialist equipment installed actually being used by patients on follow-up. To improve practice there is an urgent need to examine other ways of conducting home visits to facilitate safe discharge. We believe that Computerised 3D Interior Design Applications (CIDAs) could be a means to support more efficient, effective and collaborative practice. A previous study explored practitioners perceptions of using CIDAs; however it is important to ascertain older adult's views about the usability of technology and to compare findings. This study explores the perceptions of community dwelling older adults with regards to adopting and using CIDAs as an assistive tool for the home adaptations process. Ten community dwelling older adults participated in individual interactive task-focused usability sessions with a customised CIDA, utilising the think-aloud protocol and individual semi-structured interviews. Template analysis was used to carry out both deductive and inductive analysis of the think-aloud and interview data. Initially, a deductive stance was adopted, using the three pre-determined high-level themes of the technology acceptance model (TAM): Perceived Usefulness (PU), Perceived Ease of Use (PEOU), Actual Use (AU). Inductive template analysis was then carried out on the data within these themes, from which a number of sub-thmes emerged. Regarding PU, participants believed CIDAs served as a useful visual tool and saw clear potential to facilitate shared understanding and partnership in care delivery. For PEOU, participants were

  15. Cysteine cathepsins are essential in lysosomal degradation of α-synuclein.

    PubMed

    McGlinchey, Ryan P; Lee, Jennifer C

    2015-07-28

    A cellular feature of Parkinson's disease is cytosolic accumulation and amyloid formation of α-synuclein (α-syn), implicating a misregulation or impairment of protein degradation pathways involving the proteasome and lysosome. Within lysosomes, cathepsin D (CtsD), an aspartyl protease, is suggested to be the main protease for α-syn clearance; however, the protease alone only generates amyloidogenic C terminal-truncated species (e.g., 1-94, 5-94), implying that other proteases and/or environmental factors are needed to facilitate degradation and to avoid α-syn aggregation in vivo. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, to our knowledge, we report the first peptide cleavage map of the lysosomal degradation process of α-syn. Studies of purified mouse brain and liver lysosomal extracts and individual human cathepsins demonstrate a direct involvement of cysteine cathepsin B (CtsB) and L (CtsL). Both CtsB and CtsL cleave α-syn within its amyloid region and circumvent fibril formation. For CtsD, only in the presence of anionic phospholipids can this protease cleave throughout the α-syn sequence, suggesting that phospholipids are crucial for its activity. Taken together, an interplay exists between α-syn conformation and cathepsin activity with CtsL as the most efficient under the conditions examined. Notably, we discovered that CtsL efficiently degrades α-syn amyloid fibrils, which by definition are resistant to broad spectrum proteases. This work implicates CtsB and CtsL as essential in α-syn lysosomal degradation, establishing groundwork to explore mechanisms to enhance their cellular activity and levels as a potential strategy for clearance of α-syn.

  16. Identification and Characterization of Pharmacological Chaperones to Correct Enzyme Deficiencies in Lysosomal Storage Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Richie; Powe, Allan C.; Boyd, Robert; Lee, Gary; Flanagan, John J.; Benjamin, Elfrida R.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Many human diseases result from mutations in specific genes. Once translated, the resulting aberrant proteins may be functionally competent and produced at near-normal levels. However, because of the mutations, the proteins are recognized by the quality control system of the endoplasmic reticulum and are not processed or trafficked correctly, ultimately leading to cellular dysfunction and disease. Pharmacological chaperones (PCs) are small molecules designed to mitigate this problem by selectively binding and stabilizing their target protein, thus reducing premature degradation, facilitating intracellular trafficking, and increasing cellular activity. Partial or complete restoration of normal function by PCs has been shown for numerous types of mutant proteins, including secreted proteins, transcription factors, ion channels, G protein-coupled receptors, and, importantly, lysosomal enzymes. Collectively, lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) result from genetic mutations in the genes that encode specific lysosomal enzymes, leading to a deficiency in essential enzymatic activity and cellular accumulation of the respective substrate. To date, over 50 different LSDs have been identified, several of which are treated clinically with enzyme replacement therapy or substrate reduction therapy, although insufficiently in some cases. Importantly, a wide range of in vitro assays are now available to measure mutant lysosomal enzyme interaction with and stabilization by PCs, as well as subsequent increases in cellular enzyme levels and function. The application of these assays to the identification and characterization of candidate PCs for mutant lysosomal enzymes will be discussed in this review. In addition, considerations for the successful in vivo use and development of PCs to treat LSDs will be discussed. PMID:21612550

  17. Clinical neurogenetics: neuropathic lysosomal storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Pastores, Gregory M; Maegawa, Gustavo H B

    2013-11-01

    The lysosomal storage disorders are a clinically heterogeneous group of inborn errors of metabolism, associated with the accumulation of incompletely degraded macromolecules within several cellular sites. Affected individuals present with a broad range of clinical problems, including hepatosplenomegaly and skeletal dysplasia. Onset of symptoms may range from birth to adulthood. Most are associated with neurologic features. Later-onset forms are often misdiagnosed as symptoms, which might include psychiatric manifestations, are slowly progressive, and may precede other neurologic or systemic features. Symptomatic care, which remains the mainstay for most subtypes, can lead to significant improvement in quality of life. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Imaging and imagination: understanding the endo-lysosomal system

    PubMed Central

    van Meel, Eline

    2008-01-01

    Lysosomes are specialized compartments for the degradation of endocytosed and intracellular material and essential regulators of cellular homeostasis. The importance of lysosomes is illustrated by the rapidly growing number of human disorders related to a defect in lysosomal functioning. Here, we review current insights in the mechanisms of lysosome biogenesis and protein sorting within the endo-lysosomal system. We present increasing evidence for the existence of parallel pathways for the delivery of newly synthesized lysosomal proteins directly from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the endo-lysosomal system. These pathways are either dependent or independent of mannose 6-phosphate receptors and likely involve multiple exits for lysosomal proteins from the TGN. In addition, we discuss the different endosomal intermediates and subdomains that are involved in sorting of endocytosed cargo. Throughout our review, we highlight some examples in the literature showing how imaging, especially electron microscopy, has made major contributions to our understanding of the endo-lysosomal system today. PMID:18274773

  19. Lysosome acidification by photoactivated nanoparticles restores autophagy under lipotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Trudeau, Kyle M.; Colby, Aaron H.; Zeng, Jialiu; Las, Guy; Feng, Jiazuo H.; Shirihai, Orian S.

    2016-01-01

    In pancreatic β-cells, liver hepatocytes, and cardiomyocytes, chronic exposure to high levels of fatty acids (lipotoxicity) inhibits autophagic flux and concomitantly decreases lysosomal acidity. Whether impaired lysosomal acidification is causally inhibiting autophagic flux and cellular functions could not, up to the present, be determined because of the lack of an approach to modify lysosomal acidity. To address this question, lysosome-localizing nanoparticles are described that, upon UV photoactivation, enable controlled acidification of impaired lysosomes. The photoactivatable, acidifying nanoparticles (paNPs) demonstrate lysosomal uptake in INS1 and mouse β-cells. Photoactivation of paNPs in fatty acid–treated INS1 cells enhances lysosomal acidity and function while decreasing p62 and LC3-II levels, indicating rescue of autophagic flux upon acute lysosomal acidification. Furthermore, paNPs improve glucose-stimulated insulin secretion that is reduced under lipotoxicity in INS1 cells and mouse islets. These results establish a causative role for impaired lysosomal acidification in the deregulation of autophagy and β-cell function under lipotoxicity. PMID:27377248

  20. Lysosomal disruption preferentially targets acute myeloid leukemia cells and progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Sukhai, Mahadeo A.; Prabha, Swayam; Hurren, Rose; Rutledge, Angela C.; Lee, Anna Y.; Sriskanthadevan, Shrivani; Sun, Hong; Wang, Xiaoming; Skrtic, Marko; Seneviratne, Ayesh; Cusimano, Maria; Jhas, Bozhena; Gronda, Marcela; MacLean, Neil; Cho, Eunice E.; Spagnuolo, Paul A.; Sharmeen, Sumaiya; Gebbia, Marinella; Urbanus, Malene; Eppert, Kolja; Dissanayake, Dilan; Jonet, Alexia; Dassonville-Klimpt, Alexandra; Li, Xiaoming; Datti, Alessandro; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Wrana, Jeff; Rogers, Ian; Sonnet, Pascal; Ellis, William Y.; Corey, Seth J.; Eaves, Connie; Minden, Mark D.; Wang, Jean C.Y.; Dick, John E.; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; Schimmer, Aaron D.

    2012-01-01

    Despite efforts to understand and treat acute myeloid leukemia (AML), there remains a need for more comprehensive therapies to prevent AML-associated relapses. To identify new therapeutic strategies for AML, we screened a library of on- and off-patent drugs and identified the antimalarial agent mefloquine as a compound that selectively kills AML cells and AML stem cells in a panel of leukemia cell lines and in mice. Using a yeast genome-wide functional screen for mefloquine sensitizers, we identified genes associated with the yeast vacuole, the homolog of the mammalian lysosome. Consistent with this, we determined that mefloquine disrupts lysosomes, directly permeabilizes the lysosome membrane, and releases cathepsins into the cytosol. Knockdown of the lysosomal membrane proteins LAMP1 and LAMP2 resulted in decreased cell viability, as did treatment of AML cells with known lysosome disrupters. Highlighting a potential therapeutic rationale for this strategy, leukemic cells had significantly larger lysosomes compared with normal cells, and leukemia-initiating cells overexpressed lysosomal biogenesis genes. These results demonstrate that lysosomal disruption preferentially targets AML cells and AML progenitor cells, providing a rationale for testing lysosomal disruption as a novel therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:23202731

  1. High-throughput screening for human lysosomal beta-N-Acetyl hexosaminidase inhibitors acting as pharmacological chaperones.

    PubMed

    Tropak, Michael B; Blanchard, Jan E; Withers, Stephen G; Brown, Eric D; Mahuran, Don

    2007-02-01

    The adult forms of Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases result when the activity of beta-hexosaminidase A (Hex) falls below approximately 10% of normal due to decreased transport of the destabilized mutant enzyme to the lysosome. Carbohydrate-based competitive inhibitors of Hex act as pharmacological chaperones (PC) in patient cells, facilitating exit of the enzyme from the endoplasmic reticulum, thereby increasing the mutant Hex protein and activity levels in the lysosome 3- to 6-fold. To identify drug-like PC candidates, we developed a fluorescence-based real-time enzyme assay and screened the Maybridge library of 50,000 compounds for inhibitors of purified Hex. Three structurally distinct micromolar competitive inhibitors, a bisnaphthalimide, nitro-indan-1-one, and pyrrolo[3,4-d]pyridazin-1-one were identified that specifically increased lysosomal Hex protein and activity levels in patient fibroblasts. These results validate screening for inhibitory compounds as an approach to identifying PCs.

  2. Cellular Uptake and Delivery of Myeloperoxidase to Lysosomes Promote Lipofuscin Degradation and Lysosomal Stress in Retinal Cells.

    PubMed

    Yogalingam, Gouri; Lee, Amanda R; Mackenzie, Donald S; Maures, Travis J; Rafalko, Agnes; Prill, Heather; Berguig, Geoffrey Y; Hague, Chuck; Christianson, Terri; Bell, Sean M; LeBowitz, Jonathan H

    2017-03-10

    Neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) catalyzes the H 2 O 2 -dependent oxidation of chloride anion to generate hypochlorous acid, a potent antimicrobial agent. Besides its well defined role in innate immunity, aberrant degranulation of neutrophils in several inflammatory diseases leads to redistribution of MPO to the extracellular space, where it can mediate tissue damage by promoting the oxidation of several additional substrates. Here, we demonstrate that mannose 6-phosphate receptor-mediated cellular uptake and delivery of MPO to lysosomes of retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells acts to clear this harmful enzyme from the extracellular space, with lysosomal-delivered MPO exhibiting a half-life of 10 h. Lysosomal-targeted MPO exerts both cell-protective and cytotoxic functions. From a therapeutic standpoint, MPO catalyzes the in vitro degradation of N -retinylidene- N -retinylethanolamine, a toxic form of retinal lipofuscin that accumulates in RPE lysosomes and drives the pathogenesis of Stargardt macular degeneration. Furthermore, chronic cellular uptake and accumulation of MPO in lysosomes coincides with N -retinylidene- N -retinylethanolamine elimination in a cell-based model of macular degeneration. However, lysosomal-delivered MPO also disrupts lysosomal acidification in RPE cells, which coincides with nuclear translocation of the lysosomal stress-sensing transcription factor EB and, eventually, cell death. Based on these findings we predict that under periods of acute exposure, cellular uptake and lysosomal degradation of MPO mediates elimination of this harmful enzyme, whereas chronic exposure results in progressive accumulation of MPO in lysosomes. Lysosomal-accumulated MPO can be both cell-protective, by promoting the degradation of toxic retinal lipofuscin deposits, and cytotoxic, by triggering lysosomal stress and cell death. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Dysfunction of autophagy and endosomal-lysosomal pathways: Roles in pathogenesis of Down syndrome and Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Colacurcio, Daniel J; Pensalfini, Anna; Jiang, Ying; Nixon, Ralph A

    2018-01-01

    Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) have an increased risk of early-onset Alzheimer's Disease (AD), largely owing to a triplication of the APP gene, located on chromosome 21. In DS and AD, defects in endocytosis and lysosomal function appear at the earliest stages of disease development and progress to widespread failure of intraneuronal waste clearance, neuritic dystrophy and neuronal cell death. The same genetic factors that cause or increase AD risk are also direct causes of endosomal-lysosomal dysfunction, underscoring the essential partnership between this dysfunction and APP metabolites in AD pathogenesis. The appearance of APP-dependent endosome anomalies in DS beginning in infancy and evolving into the full range of AD-related endosomal-lysosomal deficits provides a unique opportunity to characterize the earliest pathobiology of AD preceding the classical neuropathological hallmarks. Facilitating this characterization is the authentic recapitulation of this endosomal pathobiology in peripheral cells from people with DS and in trisomy mouse models. Here, we review current research on endocytic-lysosomal dysfunction in DS and AD, the emerging importance of APP/βCTF in initiating this dysfunction, and the potential roles of additional trisomy 21 genes in accelerating endosomal-lysosomal impairment in DS. Collectively, these studies underscore the growing value of investigating DS to probe the biological origins of AD as well as to understand and ameliorate the developmental disability of DS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Expanding Newborn Screening for Lysosomal Disorders: Opportunities and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waggoner, Darrel J.; Tan, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Newborn screening (NBS), since its implementation in the 1960s, has traditionally been successful in reducing mortality and disability in children with a range of different conditions. Lysosomal storage disorders (LSD) are a heterogeneous group of inherited metabolic diseases that result from lysosomal dysfunction. Based on available treatment and…

  5. Fasting-induced hormonal regulation of lysosomal function

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liqun; Wang, Ke; Long, Aijun; Jia, Liangjie; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Deng, Haiteng; Li, Yu; Han, Jinbo; Wang, Yiguo

    2017-01-01

    Lysosomes are centers for nutrient sensing and recycling that allow mammals to adapt to starvation. Regulation of lysosome dynamics by internal nutrient signaling is well described, but the mechanisms by which external cues modulate lysosomal function are unclear. Here, we describe an essential role of the fasting-induced hormone fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) in lysosome homeostasis in mice. Fgf21 deficiency impairs hepatic lysosomal function by blocking transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosome biogenesis and autophagy. FGF21 induces mobilization of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum, which activates the transcriptional repressor downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), and thereby inhibits expression of Mid1 (encoding the E3 ligase Midline-1). Protein phosphatase PP2A, a substrate of MID1, accumulates and dephosphorylates TFEB, thereby upregulating genes involved in lysosome biogenesis, autophagy and lipid metabolism. Thus, an FGF21-TFEB signaling axis links lysosome homeostasis with extracellular hormonal signaling to orchestrate lipid metabolism during fasting. PMID:28374748

  6. Lysosomal and tissue-level biomarkers in mussels cross-transplanted among four estuaries with different pollution levels.

    PubMed

    Lekube, Xabier; Izagirre, Urtzi; Soto, Manu; Marigómez, Ionan

    2014-02-15

    A 3-4 wk cross-transplantation experiment was carried out in order to investigate the sensitivity, rapidity, durability and reversibility of lysosomal and tissue-level biomarkers in the digestive gland of mussels. Four localities in the Basque coast with different levels of chemical pollution and environmental stress were selected. Lysosomal membrane stability (LP) and lysosomal structural changes (VvL; S/VL; NvL) and changes in cell-type composition in digestive gland epithelium (VvBAS) were investigated to determine short (2d) and mid-term (3-4 wk) responses after cross-transplantation. Mussels from Txatxarramendi presented VvBAS<0.1 μm(3)/μm(3) (unstressed) whilst VvBAS>0.12 μm(3)/μm(3) was recorded in mussels from Plentzia (moderate stress) and VvBAS>0.2 μm(3)/μm(3) in Arriluze and Muskiz (high stress). Accordingly, LP<10 min (high stress) was recorded in mussels from Muskiz and Arriluze and LP~15 min (low-to-moderate stress) in those from Plentzia and Txatxarramendi. According to the VvL, S/VL and NvL data, a certain lysosomal enlargement was envisaged in mussels from Arriluze in comparison with those from Txatxarramendi and Plentzia. Mussels from Muskiz exhibited a peculiar endo-lysosomal system made of abundant tiny lysosomes (low VvL and high S/VL and NvL values). Lysosomal and tissue-level biomarkers were responsive after 2d cross-transplantation between the reference and the polluted localities, which indicated that these biomarkers were quickly induced and, to a large extent, reversible. Moreover, the tissue-level biomarker values were maintained during the entire period (3-4 wk) of cross-transplantation, which evidenced the durability of the responsiveness. In contrast, comparisons in the mid-term were unfeasible for lysosomal biomarkers as these exhibited a seasonal winter attenuation resulting from low food availability and low temperatures. In conclusion, lysosomal enlargement and membrane stability and changes in cell-type composition were

  7. Emerging drugs for lysosomal storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Beck, Michael

    2010-09-01

    Because orphan drug regulations encouraged development of drugs for rare disorders by granting marketing exclusivity for many years and other commercial benefits, treatment has become achievable for a few lysosomal storage disorders also. The presently available therapies, however, are not able to address all aspects of these multisystemic disorders and do not cure the patient. Therefore, there is a need for producing new drugs that are based on known pathophysiological mechanisms, such as enzyme replacement or inhibition of substrate synthesis, or which use new approaches to prevent the build-up of storage material. New compounds that are being designed by different pharmaceutical companies can be divided in two groups, enzyme targeted and substrate targeted drugs. Enzyme targeted drugs include substances that modify the enzyme to make it more accessible to organs such as the bone or the brain, enhance enzyme activity (chaperones) or activate enzyme synthesis by small molecules that induce read-through of premature stop codons of genes that bear a nonsense mutation. To the group of substrate targeted drugs belong substances that inhibit the synthesis or modify the structure of the substrate (substrate deprivation or substrate optimization, respectively). For this review, a literature research has been undertaken that covers the years 1968 - 2010. The reader of this paper will get an overview of drugs for lysosomal storage disorders that are on the market or are under development. This will help in the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie these rare metabolic diseases. In addition, the reader should realize that the increasing number of these very expensive drugs may lead to significant consequences for the health economic system. In the last years, the interest of scientists and pharmaceutical companies in lysosomal storage disorders has increased dramatically, leading to the production of a rising number of different drugs. These drugs

  8. Haptoglobin Genotype-dependent Differences in Macrophage Lysosomal Oxidative Injury*

    PubMed Central

    Asleh, Rabea; Ward, John; Levy, Nina S.; Safuri, Shady; Aronson, Doron; Levy, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    The major function of the Haptoglobin (Hp) protein is to control trafficking of extracorpuscular hemoglobin (Hb) thru the macrophage CD163 receptor with degradation of the Hb in the lysosome. There is a common copy number polymorphism in the Hp gene (Hp 2 allele) that has been associated with a severalfold increased incidence of atherothrombosis in multiple longitudinal studies. Increased plaque oxidation and apoptotic markers have been observed in Hp 2-2 atherosclerotic plaques, but the mechanism responsible for this finding has not been determined. We proposed that the increased oxidative injury in Hp 2-2 plaques is due to an impaired processing of Hp 2-2-Hb complexes within macrophage lysosomes, thereby resulting in redox active iron accumulation, lysosomal membrane oxidative injury, and macrophage apoptosis. We sought to test this hypothesis in vitro using purified Hp-Hb complex and cells genetically manipulated to express CD163. CD163-mediated endocytosis and lysosomal degradation of Hp-Hb were decreased for Hp 2-2-Hb complexes. Confocal microscopy using lysotropic pH indicator dyes demonstrated that uptake of Hp 2-2-Hb complexes disrupted the lysosomal pH gradient. Cellular fractionation studies of lysosomes isolated from macrophages incubated with Hp 2-2-Hb complexes demonstrated increased lysosomal membrane oxidation and a loss of lysosomal membrane integrity leading to lysosomal enzyme leakage into the cytoplasm. Additionally, markers of apoptosis, DNA fragmentation, and active caspase 3 were increased in macrophages that had endocytosed Hp 2-2-Hb complexes. These data provide novel mechanistic insights into how the Hp genotype regulates lysosomal oxidative stress within macrophages after receptor-mediated endocytosis of Hb. PMID:24778180

  9. Surface-targeted lysosomal membrane glycoprotein-1 (Lamp-1) enhances lysosome exocytosis and cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Kima, P E; Burleigh, B; Andrews, N W

    2000-12-01

    To gain entry into non-phagocytic cells, Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes recruit lysosomes to the host cell surface. Lysosome fusion at the site of parasite entry leads to the formation of a parasitophorous vacuole with lysosomal properties. Here, we show that increased expression of the lysosomal membrane glycoprotein Lamp-1 at the cell surface renders CHO cells more susceptible to trypomastigote invasion in a microtubule-dependent fashion. Mutation of critical residues in the lysosome-targeting motif of Lamp-1 abolished the enhancement of T. cruzi invasion. This suggests that interactions dependent on Lamp-1 cytoplasmic tail motifs, and not the surface-exposed luminal domain, modulate T. cruzi entry. Measurements of Ca2+-triggered exocytosis of lysosomes in these cell lines revealed an enhancement of beta-hexosaminidase release in cells expressing wild-type Lamp-1 on the plasma membrane; this effect was not observed in cell lines transfected with Lamp-1 cytoplasmic tail mutants. These results also implicate Ca2+-regulated lysosome exocytosis in cell invasion by T. cruzi and indicate a role for the Lamp-1 cytosolic domain in promoting more efficient fusion of lysosomes with the plasma membrane.

  10. Gene therapy for lysosomal storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Yiannis A; Enriquez, Annette; Benjamin, Compton

    2003-08-01

    Gene therapy has become the next frontier in the treatment and potential cure of many disorders that are refractive to current therapies. The lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) collectively constitute one of the largest groups of inherited metabolic disorders. Propelled by the exciting success of enzyme replacement therapies applied to LSDs without neuropathology, the development of effective gene therapy protocols for the LSDs is underway. For the LSDs with neuropathology, in particular, it has become clear that gene therapy is at present one of only a few therapeutic options with the potential for success. Studies summarised in this review indicate that gene therapy using a variety of vectors both in vivo and ex vivo have shown great promise for the treatment of these diseases. However, several problems require serious attention before it will be feasible to embark on human gene therapy trials.

  11. Rab-interacting lysosomal protein (RILP): the Rab7 effector required for transport to lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Cantalupo, Giuseppina; Alifano, Pietro; Roberti, Vera; Bruni, Carmelo B.; Bucci, Cecilia

    2001-01-01

    Rab7 is a small GTPase that controls transport to endocytic degradative compartments. Here we report the identification of a novel 45 kDa protein that specifically binds Rab7GTP at its C-terminus. This protein contains a domain comprising two coiled-coil regions typical of myosin-like proteins and is found mainly in the cytosol. We named it RILP (Rab-interacting lysosomal protein) since it can be recruited efficiently on late endosomal and lysosomal membranes by Rab7GTP. RILP-C33 (a truncated form of the protein lacking the N-terminal half) strongly inhibits epidermal growth factor and low-density lipoprotein degradation, and causes dispersion of lysosomes similarly to Rab7 dominant-negative mutants. More importantly, expression of RILP reverses/prevents the effects of Rab7 dominant-negative mutants. All these data are consistent with a model in which RILP represents a downstream effector for Rab7 and both proteins act together in the regulation of late endocytic traffic. PMID:11179213

  12. Soluble adenylyl cyclase is essential for proper lysosomal acidification

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Nawreen; Ramos-Espiritu, Lavoisier; Milner, Teresa A.; Levin, Lonny R.

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes, the degradative organelles of the endocytic and autophagic pathways, function at an acidic pH. Lysosomes are acidified by the proton-pumping vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase), but the molecular processes that set the organelle’s pH are not completely understood. In particular, pH-sensitive signaling enzymes that can regulate lysosomal acidification in steady-state physiological conditions have yet to be identified. Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a widely expressed source of cAMP that serves as a physiological pH sensor in cells. For example, in proton-secreting epithelial cells, sAC is responsible for pH-dependent translocation of V-ATPase to the luminal surface. Here we show genetically and pharmacologically that sAC is also essential for lysosomal acidification. In the absence of sAC, V-ATPase does not properly localize to lysosomes, lysosomes fail to fully acidify, lysosomal degradative capacity is diminished, and autophagolysosomes accumulate. PMID:27670898

  13. Mediated calcium transport by isolated human fibroblast lysosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lemons, R.M.; Thoene, J.G.

    1991-08-05

    Lysosomes purified by Percoll gradient from normal human fibroblasts (GM0010A) show uptake of Ca2+ in a mediated manner. The uptake is linear over the first 1.5 min and approaches a steady state by 10 min. Uptake is saturable, displaying a Vmax of about 10 pmol/min/unit hexosaminidase at 20 mM Ca2+ (7 nmol/min/mg protein), and a Km of 5.7 mM. Ca2+ uptake increases with increasing extralysosomal pH from 5.0 to 8.5. The Q10 is 1.6, and Ea 8.7 kcal/mol. Uptake of 0.1 mM Ca2+ was inhibited to the extent indicated by 1.0 mM of the following: Cd2+, 100%; Hg2+, 100%; Zn2+,more » 89%; Mg2+, 77%; Ba2+, 60%; Sr2+, 37%; Fe2+, 20%; Cu2+, 0%. Mono- and trivalent cations had no effect. ATP (1.0 mM) inhibited uptake by 80%, and chloroquine (0.1 mM) inhibited by 60%, as did 1.0 mM L-cystine. Cysteamine, N-ethylmaleimide, and the anions Cl-, SO(2-)4, and acetate had no effect. The calcium ionophore A23187 augmented uptake by 10-fold at 10 microM. Surprisingly, Pb2+ greatly augmented lysosomal Ca2+ uptake in a concentration-dependent manner. Pb2+, however, adversely affected lysosomal latency. Lysosomal calcium uptake was not affected by inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate, and calcium-induced calcium release from lysosomes was not observed. A role for lysosomes in cellular calcium homeostasis has not been previously suggested. This work shows that Ca2+ can be transported into and out of lysosomes and could assist in lysosomal proteolysis. The extent of further lysosomal participation in cellular calcium regulation is unclear.« less

  14. Two Pore Channel 2 (TPC2) Inhibits Autophagosomal-Lysosomal Fusion by Alkalinizing Lysosomal pH*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yingying; Hao, Bai-Xia; Graeff, Richard; Wong, Connie W. M.; Wu, Wu-Tian; Yue, Jianbo

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved lysosomal degradation pathway, yet the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP), one of the most potent Ca2+ mobilizing messengers, elicits Ca2+ release from lysosomes via the two pore channel 2 (TPC2) in many cell types. Here we found that overexpression of TPC2 in HeLa or mouse embryonic stem cells inhibited autophagosomal-lysosomal fusion, thereby resulting in the accumulation of autophagosomes. Treatment of TPC2 expressing cells with a cell permeant-NAADP agonist, NAADP-AM, further induced autophagosome accumulation. On the other hand, TPC2 knockdown or treatment of cells with Ned-19, a NAADP antagonist, markedly decreased the accumulation of autophagosomes. TPC2-induced accumulation of autophagosomes was also markedly blocked by ATG5 knockdown. Interestingly, inhibiting mTOR activity failed to increase TPC2-induced autophagosome accumulation. Instead, we found that overexpression of TPC2 alkalinized lysosomal pH, and lysosomal re-acidification abolished TPC2-induced autophagosome accumulation. In addition, TPC2 overexpression had no effect on general endosomal-lysosomal degradation but prevented the recruitment of Rab-7 to autophagosomes. Taken together, our data demonstrate that TPC2/NAADP/Ca2+ signaling alkalinizes lysosomal pH to specifically inhibit the later stage of basal autophagy progression. PMID:23836916

  15. Gene therapy for the lysosomal storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Salazar, Mario A; Novelli, Enrico; Barranger, John A

    2002-08-01

    The lysosomal storage disorders (LSD) are monogenic inborn errors of metabolism with heterogeneous pathophysiology and clinical manifestations. In recent decades, these disorders have been models for the development of molecular and cellular therapies for inherited metabolic diseases. Studies in preclinical in vitro systems and animal models have established proof-of-concept for the development of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) as therapeutic options for several LSDs. BMT is limited by poor donor availability and high morbidity and mortality, and although ERT is a good treatment, it is not a life-long cure. Its high cost remains an impediment for developing countries. While substrate synthesis inhibition therapy is an important idea, its clinical use is far from certain. The neuropathology present in many LSDs has responded poorly to BMT or ERT, which makes gene therapy an attractive therapeutic alternative. Oncoretroviral vectors, and more recently adeno-associated and lentiviral vectors have been tested with some success. This review summarizes the main gene therapy strategies which have been employed or are under development for both non-neurological and neuronopathic LSDs. Some of the in vitro and in vivo preclinical studies presented herein have provided the rationale for gene therapy clinical trials for Gaucher disease Type 1.

  16. Pompe disease: Shared and unshared features of lysosomal storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jeong-A; Kakhlon, Or; Li, Lishu; Myerowitz, Rachel; Raben, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Pompe disease, an inherited deficiency of lysosomal acid α-glucosidase (GAA), is a severe metabolic myopathy with a wide range of clinical manifestations. It is the first recognized lysosomal storage disorder and the first neuromuscular disorder for which a therapy (enzyme replacement) has been approved. As GAA is the only enzyme that hydrolyses glycogen to glucose in the acidic environment of the lysosome, its deficiency leads to glycogen accumulation within and concomitant enlargement of this organelle. Since the introduction of the therapy, the overall understanding of the disease has progressed significantly, but the pathophysiology of muscle damage is still not fully understood. The emerging complex picture of the pathological cascade involves disturbance of calcium homeostasis, mitochondrial abnormalities, dysfunctional autophagy, accumulation of toxic undegradable materials, and accelerated production of lipofuscin deposits that are unrelated to aging. The relationship of Pompe disease to other lysosomal storage disorders and potential therapeutic interventions for Pompe disease are discussed.

  17. Lysosomal storage disorders: A review of the musculoskeletal features.

    PubMed

    James, Rebecca A; Singh-Grewal, Davinder; Lee, Senq-J; McGill, Jim; Adib, Navid

    2016-03-01

    The lysosomal storage disorders are a collection of progressive, multisystem disorders that frequently present in childhood. Their timely diagnosis is paramount as they are becoming increasingly treatable. Musculoskeletal manifestations often occur early in the disease course, hence are useful as diagnostics clues. Non-inflammatory joint stiffness or pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, trigger fingers, unexplained pain crises and short stature should all prompt consideration of a lysosomal storage disorder. Recurrent ENT infections, hepatosplenomegaly, recurrent hernias and visual/hearing impairment - especially when clustered together - are important extra-skeletal features. As diagnostic and therapeutic options continue to evolve, children with lysosomal storage disorders and their families are facing more sophisticated options for screening and treatment. The aim of this article is to highlight the paediatric presentations of lysosomal storage disorders, with an emphasis on the musculoskeletal features. © 2016 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  18. Action of polystyrene nanoparticles of different sizes on lysosomal function and integrity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Data from environmental exposure to nanoparticles (NPs) suggest that chronic exposure may increase the incidence of lung, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Impairment of cell function by intracellular accumulation of NPs is also suspected. Many types of NPs have been detected in the endosomal-lysosomal system and, upon repeated exposure, alterations of the endosomal-lysosomal system may occur. To identify such effects we compared the effect of carboxyl polystyrene particles (CPS) of different sizes (20-500 nm) on lysosomes of the endothelial cell line EAhy926 after short (24h) and long (72h-96h) exposure times. Lysosomal localization of CPS, as well as lysosomal pH, lysosomal membrane integrity, morphology of the endosomal-lysosomal system and activities of the lysosomal enzymes,cathepsin B and sulfatases, upon exposure to CPS were recorded. Results CPS in sizes ≤100 nm showed high co-localization with lysosomes already after 4h, larger CPS after 24h. None of the particles at non-cytotoxic concentrations caused marked changes in lysosomal pH or destroyed lysosomal membrane integrity. At 24h of exposure, 20 nm CPS induced significant dilatation of the endosomal-lysosomal system and reduced activity of lysosomal sulfatases. After 72h, these alterations were less pronounced. Conclusions Despite accumulation in lysosomes CPS induced only small changes in lysosomes. Upon longer contact, these changes are even less pronounced. The presented panel of assays may serve to identify effects on lysosomes also for other NPs. PMID:22789069

  19. CNS-directed gene therapy for lysosomal storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Sands, Mark S; Haskins, Mark E

    2008-04-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of inherited metabolic disorders usually caused by deficient activity of a single lysosomal enzyme. As most lysosomal enzymes are ubiquitously expressed, a deficiency in a single enzyme can affect multiple organ systems, including the central nervous system (CNS). At least 75% of all LSDs have a significant CNS component. Approaches such as bone marrow transplantation (BMT) or enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) can effectively treat the systemic disease associated with LSDs in some patients. However, CNS disease remains a major challenge. Gene therapy represents a promising approach for the treatment of CNS disease as it has the potential to provide a permanent source of the deficient enzyme. Direct intracranial injection of viral gene transfer vectors has resulted in reduced lysosomal storage and functional improvement in certain small (rodent) and large (canine and feline) animal models of LSDs. The addition of protein transduction domains (PTDs) to the recombinant enzymes increased the distribution of enzyme and the extent of correction. Therapeutic levels of lysosomal enzymes can also be delivered to distant sites in the brain by anterograde and retrograde axonal transport. Finally, combining disparate approaches such as BMT and CNS-directed gene therapy can increase treatment efficacy in LSDs with severe CNS disease that are refractory to more conventional approaches. The development of gene transfer vectors that mediate persistent expression in vivo, the addition of PTDs, a better understanding of lysosomal enzyme trafficking and combining different therapies provide hope that the CNS component of LSDs can be effectively treated.

  20. The crucial impact of lysosomes in aging and longevity

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Hughes, Adam L.; Madeo, Frank; Ruckenstuhl, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are the main catabolic organelles of a cell and play a pivotal role in a plethora of cellular processes, including responses to nutrient availability and composition, stress resistance, programmed cell death, plasma membrane repair, development, and cell differentiation. In line with this pleiotropic importance for cellular and organismal life and death, lysosomal dysfunction is associated with many age-related pathologies like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease, as well as with a decline in lifespan. Conversely, targeting lysosomal functional capacity is emerging as a means to promote longevity. Here, we analyze the current knowledge on the prominent influence of lysosomes on aging-related processes, such as their executory and regulatory roles during general and selective macroautophagy, or their storage capacity for amino acids and ions. In addition, we review and discuss the roles of lysosomes as active players in the mechanisms underlying known lifespan-extending interventions like, for example, spermidine or rapamycin administration. In conclusion, this review aims at critically examining the nature and pliability of the different layers, in which lysosomes are involved as a control hub for aging and longevity. PMID:27125853

  1. Purification and immunological quantification of rat liver lysosomal glycosidases.

    PubMed Central

    de Groen, P C; LeSage, G D; Tietz, P S; LaRusso, N F

    1989-01-01

    Although lysosomal enzyme activities are known to vary in response to numerous physiological and pharmacological stimuli, the relationship between lysosomal enzyme activity and enzyme concentration has not been systematically studied. Therefore we developed radioimmunoassays for two lysosomal glycosidases in order to determine lysosomal enzyme concentration. beta-Galactosidase and beta-glucuronidase were purified from rat liver 2780-fold and 1280-fold respectively, by using differential centrifugation, affinity chromatography, ion-exchange chromatography and molecular-sieve chromatography. Polyclonal antibodies to these enzymes were raised in rabbits, and two radioimmunoassays were established. Antibody specificity was shown by: (i) selective immunoprecipitation of enzyme activity; (ii) identical bands of purified enzyme on SDS/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and immunoelectrophoresis; (iii) single immunoreactive peaks in molecular-sieve chromatography experiments. Sensitivities of the assays were such that 15 ng of beta-galactosidase and 45 ng of beta-glucuronidase decreased the ratio of bound to free radiolabel by 50%; minimal detectable amounts of immunoreactive enzymes were 2 ng and 10 ng respectively. The assays were initially used to assess the effects of physiological perturbations (i.e. fasting and age) on enzyme concentrations in rat liver; these experiments showed that changes in enzyme concentrations do not always correlate with changes in enzyme activities. This represents the first report of radioimmunoassays for lysosomal glycosidases. The results suggest that these radioimmunoassays provide useful technology for the study of regulatory control mechanisms of the concentrations of lysosomal glycosidases in mammalian tissues. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. PMID:2513804

  2. Lysosomal enzymes and their receptors in invertebrates: an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nadimpalli Siva; Bhamidimarri, Poorna M

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal biogenesis is an important process in eukaryotic cells to maintain cellular homeostasis. The key components that are involved in the biogenesis such as the lysosomal enzymes, their modifications and the mannose 6-phosphate receptors have been well studied and their evolutionary conservation across mammalian and non-mammalian vertebrates is clearly established. Invertebrate lysosomal biogenesis pathway on the other hand is not well studied. Although, details on mannose 6-phosphate receptors and enzymes involved in lysosomal enzyme modifications were reported earlier, a clear cut pathway has not been established. Recent research on the invertebrate species involving biogenesis of lysosomal enzymes suggests a possible conserved pathway in invertebrates. This review presents certain observations based on these processes that include biochemical, immunological and functional studies. Major conclusions include conservation of MPR-dependent pathway in higher invertebrates and recent evidence suggests that MPR-independent pathway might have been more prominent among lower invertebrates. The possible components of MPR-independent pathway that may play a role in lysosomal enzyme targeting are also discussed here.

  3. Interorganellar Regulation of Lysosome Positioning by the Golgi Apparatus through Rab34 Interaction with Rab-interacting Lysosomal Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tuanlao; Hong, Wanjin

    2002-01-01

    We present evidence to suggest the existence of a regulatory pathway for the Golgi apparatus to modulate the spatial positioning of otherwise distantly located lysosomes. Rab34, a new member of the Rab GTPase family, is associated primarily with the Golgi apparatus. Expression of wild-type or GTP-restricted but not GDP-restricted versions of Rab34 causes spatial redistribution of lysosomes from the periphery to the peri-Golgi region. The regulation of lysosomal positioning by Rab34 depends on its association with the membrane mediated by prenylation and its direct interaction with Rab-interacting lysosomal protein (RILP). This biological activity, mediated by Rab34-RILP interaction, is dependent on Lys82 in the switch I region. Our results have uncovered a novel mechanism for the Golgi apparatus to regulate the spatial distribution of another organelle. PMID:12475955

  4. Enzymatic reduction of disulfide bonds in lysosomes: Characterization of a Gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunachalam, Balasubramanian; Phan, Uyen T.; Geuze, Hans J.; Cresswell, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Proteins internalized into the endocytic pathway are usually degraded. Efficient proteolysis requires denaturation, induced by acidic conditions within lysosomes, and reduction of inter- and intrachain disulfide bonds. Cytosolic reduction is mediated enzymatically by thioredoxin, but the mechanism of lysosomal reduction is unknown. We describe here a lysosomal thiol reductase optimally active at low pH and capable of catalyzing disulfide bond reduction both in vivo and in vitro. The active site, determined by mutagenesis, consists of a pair of cysteine residues separated by two amino acids, similar to other enzymes of the thioredoxin family. The enzyme is a soluble glycoprotein that is synthesized as a precursor. After delivery into the endosomal/lysosomal system by the mannose 6-phosphate receptor, N- and C-terminal prosequences are removed. The enzyme is expressed constitutively in antigen-presenting cells and induced by IFN-γ in other cell types, suggesting a potentially important role in antigen processing.

  5. Clinical Features of Lysosomal Acid Lipase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Burton, Barbara K; Deegan, Patrick B; Enns, Gregory M; Guardamagna, Ornella; Horslen, Simon; Hovingh, Gerard K; Lobritto, Steve J; Malinova, Vera; McLin, Valerie A; Raiman, Julian; Di Rocco, Maja; Santra, Saikat; Sharma, Reena; Sykut-Cegielska, Jolanta; Whitley, Chester B; Eckert, Stephen; Valayannopoulos, Vassili; Quinn, Anthony G

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize key clinical manifestations of lysosomal acid lipase deficiency (LAL D) in children and adults. Investigators reviewed medical records of LAL D patients ages ≥5 years, extracted historical data, and obtained prospective laboratory and imaging data on living patients to develop a longitudinal dataset. A total of 49 patients were enrolled; 48 had confirmed LAL D. Mean age at first disease-related abnormality was 9.0 years (range 0-42); mean age at diagnosis was 15.2 years (range 1-46). Twenty-nine (60%) were male patients, and 27 (56%) were <20 years of age at the time of consent/assent. Serum transaminases were elevated in most patients with 458 of 499 (92%) of alanine aminotransferase values and 265 of 448 (59%) of aspartate aminotransferase values above the upper limit of normal. Most patients had elevated low-density lipoprotein (64% patients) and total cholesterol (63%) at baseline despite most being on lipid-lowering therapies, and 44% had high-density lipoprotein levels below the lower limit of normal. More than half of the patients with liver biopsies (n = 31, mean age 13 years) had documented evidence of steatosis (87%) and/or fibrosis (52%). Imaging assessments revealed that the median liver volume was ∼1.15 multiples of normal (MN) and median spleen volume was ∼2.2 MN. Six (13%) patients had undergone a liver transplant (ages 9-43.5 years). This study provides the largest longitudinal case review of patients with LAL D and confirms that LAL D is predominantly a pediatric disease causing early and progressive hepatic dysfunction associated with dyslipidemia that often leads to liver failure and transplantation.

  6. Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency: Expanding differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Valayannopoulos, Vassili; Mengel, Eugen; Brassier, Anais; Grabowski, Gregory

    The differential diagnoses for metabolic liver diseases may be challenging in clinical settings, which represents a critical issue for disorders such as lysosomal acid lipase deficiency (LAL-D). LAL-D is caused by deficient activity of the LAL enzyme, resulting in the accumulation of cholesteryl esters and triglycerides throughout the body, predominately in the liver, spleen, gastrointestinal tract, and blood vessel walls. LAL-D is a progressive, multi-organ disease with early mortality and significant morbidity characterized by a combination of hepatic dysfunction and dyslipidemia. Evidence suggests LAL-D may be substantially underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed, which is critical given that disease progression can be unpredictable, with liver failure and/or accelerated atherosclerosis potentially contributing to early mortality. However, given the development of a simple diagnostic test and recently approved treatment, LAL-D should be incorporated into the differential diagnosis in relevant clinical settings. LAL-D can be diagnosed using an LAL enzyme-based biochemical test, thereby allowing for active monitoring of patients to detect potential disease complications and consider treatment options including diet, lipid-lowering medication, and treatment with sebelipase alfa, a recombinant enzyme replacement therapy shown to provide clinical benefit and improve disease-relevant markers in clinical trials. To illustrate the complexity of diagnosing LAL-D, this manuscript will describe the path to diagnosing LAL-D in a series of patient cases in which LAL-D was diagnosed as well as in patients where other diseases, such as Gaucher disease and Niemann-Pick disease, were initially suspected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Impairment of chaperone-mediated autophagy leads to selective lysosomal degradation defects in the lysosomal storage disease cystinosis

    PubMed Central

    Napolitano, Gennaro; Johnson, Jennifer L; He, Jing; Rocca, Celine J; Monfregola, Jlenia; Pestonjamasp, Kersi; Cherqui, Stephanie; Catz, Sergio D

    2015-01-01

    Metabolite accumulation in lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) results in impaired cell function and multi-systemic disease. Although substrate reduction and lysosomal overload-decreasing therapies can ameliorate disease progression, the significance of lysosomal overload-independent mechanisms in the development of cellular dysfunction is unknown for most LSDs. Here, we identify a mechanism of impaired chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) in cystinosis, a LSD caused by defects in the cystine transporter cystinosin (CTNS) and characterized by cystine lysosomal accumulation. We show that, different from other LSDs, autophagosome number is increased, but macroautophagic flux is not impaired in cystinosis while mTOR activity is not affected. Conversely, the expression and localization of the CMA receptor LAMP2A are abnormal in CTNS-deficient cells and degradation of the CMA substrate GAPDH is defective in Ctns−/− mice. Importantly, cysteamine treatment, despite decreasing lysosomal overload, did not correct defective CMA in Ctns−/− mice or LAMP2A mislocalization in cystinotic cells, which was rescued by CTNS expression instead, suggesting that cystinosin is important for CMA activity. In conclusion, CMA impairment contributes to cell malfunction in cystinosis, highlighting the need for treatments complementary to current therapies that are based on decreasing lysosomal overload. PMID:25586965

  8. Disulfide Reduction in the Endocytic Pathway: Immunological Functions of Gamma-Interferon-Inducible Lysosomal Thiol Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Cresswell, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) is constitutively expressed in most antigen presenting cells and is interferon γ inducible in other cell types via signal transducer and activator of transcription 1. Normally, N- and C-terminal propeptides are cleaved in the early endosome, and the mature protein resides in late endosomes and lysosomes. Correspondingly, GILT has maximal reductase activity at an acidic pH. Monocyte differentiation via Toll-like receptor 4 triggers secretion of a disulfide-linked dimer of the enzymatically active precursor, which may contribute to inflammation. GILT facilitates major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-restricted processing through reduction of protein disulfide bonds in the endocytic pathway and is hypothesized to expose buried epitopes for MHC class II binding. GILT can also facilitate the transfer of disulfide-containing antigens into the cytosol, enhancing their cross-presentation by MHC class I. A variety of antigens are strongly influenced by GILT-mediated reduction, including hen egg lysozyme, melanocyte differentiation antigens, and viral envelope glycoproteins. In addition, GILT is conserved among lower eukaryotes and likely has additional functions. For example, GILT expression increases the stability of superoxide dismutase 2 and decreases reactive oxygen species, which correlates with decreased cellular proliferation. It is also a critical host factor for infection with Listeria monocytogenes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 657–668. PMID:21506690

  9. LAAT-1 is the lysosomal lysine/arginine transporter that maintains amino acid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Du, Hongwei; Rutkowski, Rachael; Gartner, Anton; Wang, Xiaochen

    2012-07-20

    Defective catabolite export from lysosomes results in lysosomal storage diseases in humans. Mutations in the cystine transporter gene CTNS cause cystinosis, but other lysosomal amino acid transporters are poorly characterized at the molecular level. Here, we identified the Caenorhabditis elegans lysosomal lysine/arginine transporter LAAT-1. Loss of laat-1 caused accumulation of lysine and arginine in enlarged, degradation-defective lysosomes. In mutants of ctns-1 (C. elegans homolog of CTNS), LAAT-1 was required to reduce lysosomal cystine levels and suppress lysosome enlargement by cysteamine, a drug that alleviates cystinosis by converting cystine to a lysine analog. LAAT-1 also maintained availability of cytosolic lysine/arginine during embryogenesis. Thus, LAAT-1 is the lysosomal lysine/arginine transporter, which suggests a molecular explanation for how cysteamine alleviates a lysosomal storage disease.

  10. LAAT-1 is the Lysosomal Lysine/Arginine Transporter that Maintains Amino Acid Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bin; Du, Hongwei; Rutkowski, Rachael; Gartner, Anton; Wang, Xiaochen

    2012-01-01

    Defective catabolite export from lysosomes results in lysosomal storage diseases in humans. Mutations in the cystine transporter gene CTNS cause cystinosis, but other lysosomal amino acid transporters are poorly characterized at the molecular level. Here we identified the C. elegans lysosomal lysine/arginine transporter, LAAT-1. Loss of laat-1 caused accumulation of lysine and arginine in enlarged, degradation-defective lysosomes. In mutants of ctns-1 (C. elegans homolog of CTNS), LAAT-1 was required to reduce lysosomal cystine levels and suppress lysosome enlargement by cysteamine, a drug that alleviates cystinosis by converting cystine to a lysine analog. LAAT-1 also maintained availability of cytosolic lysine/arginine during embryogenesis. We showed that LAAT-1 is the lysosomal lysine/arginine transporter and suggested a molecular explanation for how cysteamine alleviates a lysosomal storage disease. PMID:22822152

  11. Coronary Artery Disease-Associated LIPA Coding Variant rs1051338 Reduces Lysosomal Acid Lipase Levels and Activity in Lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Morris, Gavin E; Braund, Peter S; Moore, Jasbir S; Samani, Nilesh J; Codd, Veryan; Webb, Tom R

    2017-06-01

    Genome-wide association studies have linked variants at chromosome 10q23 with increased coronary artery disease risk. The disease-associated variants fall in LIPA , which encodes lysosomal acid lipase (LAL), the enzyme responsible for lysosomal cholesteryl ester hydrolysis. Loss-of-function mutations in LIPA result in accelerated atherosclerosis. Surprisingly, the coronary artery disease variants are associated with increased LIPA expression in some cell types. In this study, we address this apparent contradiction. We investigated a coding variant rs1051338, which is in high linkage disequilibrium ( r 2 =0.89) with the genome-wide association study lead-associated variant rs2246833 and causes a nonsynonymous threonine to proline change within the signal peptide of LAL. Transfection of allele-specific expression constructs showed that the risk allele results in reduced lysosomal LAL protein ( P =0.004) and activity ( P =0.005). Investigation of LAL localization and turnover showed the risk LAL protein is degraded more quickly. This mechanism was confirmed in disease-relevant macrophages from individuals homozygous for either the nonrisk or risk allele. There was no difference in LAL protein or activity in whole macrophage extracts; however, we found reduced LAL protein ( P =0.02) and activity ( P =0.026) with the risk genotype in lysosomal extracts, suggesting that the risk genotype affects lysosomal LAL activity. Inhibition of the proteasome resulted in equal amounts of lysosomal LAL protein in risk and nonrisk macrophages. Our findings show that the coronary artery disease-associated coding variant rs1051338 causes reduced lysosomal LAL protein and activity because of increased LAL degradation, providing a plausible causal mechanism of increased coronary artery disease risk. © 2017 The Authors.

  12. Coronary Artery Disease–Associated LIPA Coding Variant rs1051338 Reduces Lysosomal Acid Lipase Levels and Activity in Lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Gavin E.; Braund, Peter S.; Moore, Jasbir S.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Codd, Veryan

    2017-01-01

    Objective— Genome-wide association studies have linked variants at chromosome 10q23 with increased coronary artery disease risk. The disease-associated variants fall in LIPA, which encodes lysosomal acid lipase (LAL), the enzyme responsible for lysosomal cholesteryl ester hydrolysis. Loss-of-function mutations in LIPA result in accelerated atherosclerosis. Surprisingly, the coronary artery disease variants are associated with increased LIPA expression in some cell types. In this study, we address this apparent contradiction. Approach and Results— We investigated a coding variant rs1051338, which is in high linkage disequilibrium (r2=0.89) with the genome-wide association study lead–associated variant rs2246833 and causes a nonsynonymous threonine to proline change within the signal peptide of LAL. Transfection of allele-specific expression constructs showed that the risk allele results in reduced lysosomal LAL protein (P=0.004) and activity (P=0.005). Investigation of LAL localization and turnover showed the risk LAL protein is degraded more quickly. This mechanism was confirmed in disease-relevant macrophages from individuals homozygous for either the nonrisk or risk allele. There was no difference in LAL protein or activity in whole macrophage extracts; however, we found reduced LAL protein (P=0.02) and activity (P=0.026) with the risk genotype in lysosomal extracts, suggesting that the risk genotype affects lysosomal LAL activity. Inhibition of the proteasome resulted in equal amounts of lysosomal LAL protein in risk and nonrisk macrophages. Conclusions— Our findings show that the coronary artery disease–associated coding variant rs1051338 causes reduced lysosomal LAL protein and activity because of increased LAL degradation, providing a plausible causal mechanism of increased coronary artery disease risk. PMID:28279971

  13. Lysosomal acid lipase A and the hypercholesterolaemic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Fouchier, Sigrid W; Defesche, Joep C

    2013-08-01

    Mutations in lysosomal acid lipase A (LIPA) result in two phenotypes depending on the extent of lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) deficiency: the severe, early-onset Wolman disease or the less severe cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD). In CESD, the severity of the symptoms, hepatomegaly and hypercholesterolaemia, can be highly variable, presenting in childhood or adulthood. Therefore, it is likely that many patients are undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Nevertheless, LAL deficiency has been recognized for more than 25 years, but adequate therapeutic strategies are limited. CESD has an estimated prevalence of one in 90,000 to 170,000 individuals in the general population, confirming the likelihood that this disease is currently underdiagnosed. A number of studies have shown that in LIPA deficient patients the hypercholesterolaemic phenotype can be attenuated using statin therapy, and favourable effects on reduction of lipid accumulation in lysosomes have been reported. Targeting lysosomal exocytosis with LAL replacement therapy was shown to be successful in animal models and recently a phase I/II study demonstrated its safety and its potential metabolic efficacy on transaminase levels. The hypercholesterolaemic phenotype in CESD can be difficult to distinguish from other known hypercholesterolaemic disorders. In the majority of CESD cases with hypercholesterolaemia favourable responses on statin treatment are observed, but the effect on reduction of lipid accumulation in lysosomes needs to be further evaluated. Combining statins with LAL replacement therapy may provide a promising approach for optimal treatment of LIPA deficiencies in the future.

  14. LAMP proteins are required for fusion of lysosomes with phagosomes

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Kassidy K; Eskelinen, Eeva-Liisa; Scott, Cameron C; Malevanets, Anatoly; Saftig, Paul; Grinstein, Sergio

    2007-01-01

    Lysosome-associated membrane proteins 1 and 2 (LAMP-1 and LAMP-2) are delivered to phagosomes during the maturation process. We used cells from LAMP-deficient mice to analyze the role of these proteins in phagosome maturation. Macrophages from LAMP-1- or LAMP-2-deficient mice displayed normal fusion of lysosomes with phagosomes. Because ablation of both the lamp-1 and lamp-2 genes yields an embryonic-lethal phenotype, we were unable to study macrophages from double knockouts. Instead, we reconstituted phagocytosis in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) by transfection of FcγIIA receptors. Phagosomes formed by FcγIIA-transfected MEFs obtained from LAMP-1- or LAMP-2- deficient mice acquired lysosomal markers. Remarkably, although FcγIIA-transfected MEFs from double-deficient mice ingested particles normally, phagosomal maturation was arrested. LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 double-deficient phagosomes acquired Rab5 and accumulated phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate, but failed to recruit Rab7 and did not fuse with lysosomes. We attribute the deficiency to impaired organellar motility along microtubules. Time-lapse cinematography revealed that late endosomes/lysosomes as well as phagosomes lacking LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 had reduced ability to move toward the microtubule-organizing center, likely precluding their interaction with each other. PMID:17245426

  15. Lysosomal Multienzyme Complex: Pros and Cons of Working Together

    PubMed Central

    Bonten, Erik J.; Annunziata, Ida; d’Azzo, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitous distribution of lysosomes and their heterogeneous protein composition reflects the versatility of these organelles in maintaining cell homeostasis and their importance in tissue differentiation and remodeling. In lysosomes, the degradation of complex, macromolecular substrates requires the synergistic action of multiple hydrolases that usually work in a stepwise fashion. This catalytic machinery explains the existence of lysosomal enzyme complexes that can be dynamically assembled and disassembled to efficiently and quickly adapt to the pool of substrates to be processed or degraded, adding extra tiers to the regulation of the individual protein components. An example of such a complex is the one composed of three hydrolases that are ubiquitously but differentially expressed: the serine carboxypeptidase, Protective Protein/Cathepsin A (PPCA), the sialidase, Neuraminidase-1 (NEU1), and the glycosidase β-Galactosidase (β-GAL). Next to this ‘core’ complex, the existence of sub-complexes, that may contain additional components, and function at the cell surface or extracellularly, suggests as yet unexplored functions of these enzymes. Here we review how studies of basic biological processes in the mouse models of three lysosomal storage disorders, galactosialidosis, sialidosis, and GM1-gangliosidosis, revealed new and unexpected roles for the three respective affected enzymes, Ppca, Neu1 and β-Gal, that go beyond their canonical degradative activities. These findings have broadened our perspective on their functions and may pave the way for the development of new therapies for these lysosomal storage disorders. PMID:24337808

  16. Neuronal lysosomal enzyme replacement using fragment C of tetanus toxin.

    PubMed

    Dobrenis, K; Joseph, A; Rattazzi, M C

    1992-03-15

    Development of a strategy for efficient delivery of exogenous enzyme to neuronal lysosomes is essential to achieve enzyme replacement in neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases. We tested whether effective lysosomal targeting of the human enzyme beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase A (Hex A; beta-N-acetyl-D-hexosaminide N-acetylhexosaminohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.52) can be obtained by coupling it via disulfide linkage to the atoxic fragment C of tetanus toxin (TTC) that is bound avidly by neuronal membrane. TTC-Hex A conjugation resulted in neuronal surface binding and enhanced endocytosis of enzyme as observed in immunofluorescence studies with rat brain cultures. In immunoelectrophoretic quantitative uptake studies, rat neuronal cell cultures contained 16- and 40-fold greater amounts of enzyme after incubation with TTC-Hex A than with nonderivatized Hex A. In cerebral cortex cell cultures from a feline model of human GM2 gangliosidosis (Tay-Sachs and Sandhoff diseases), binding and uptake patterns of the enzymes were similar to those in the rat brain cell cultures. After exposure to extracellular concentrations of enzyme attainable in vivo, lysosomal storage of immunodetectable GM2 ganglioside was virtually eliminated in neurons exposed to TTC-Hex A, whereas a minimal effect was observed with Hex A. These findings demonstrate the usefulness of TTC adducts for effective neuronal lysosomal enzyme replacement.

  17. Negative Regulation of the Novel norpAP24 Suppressor, diehard4, in the Endo-lysosomal Trafficking Underlies Photoreceptor Cell Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jongwoo; Song, Myungchul; Hong, Sujeong

    2013-01-01

    Rhodopsin has been used as a prototype system to investigate G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) internalization and endocytic sorting mechanisms. Failure of rhodopsin recycling upon light activation results in various degenerative retinal diseases. Accumulation of internalized rhodopsin in late endosomes and the impairment of its lysosomal degradation are associated with unregulated cell death that occurs in dystrophies. However, the molecular basis of rhodopsin accumulation remains elusive. We found that the novel norpAP24 suppressor, diehard4, is responsible for the inability of endo-lysosomal rhodopsin trafficking and retinal degeneration in Drosophila models of retinal dystrophies. We found that diehard4 encodes Osiris 21. Loss of its function suppresses retinal degeneration in norpAP24, rdgC306, and trp1, but not in rdgB2, suggesting a common cause of photoreceptor death. In addition, the loss of Osiris 21 function shifts the membrane balance between late endosomes and lysosomes as evidenced by smaller late endosomes and the proliferation of lysosomal compartments, thus facilitating the degradation of endocytosed rhodopsin. Our results demonstrate the existence of negative regulation in vesicular traffic between endosomes and lysosomes. We anticipate that the identification of additional components and an in-depth description of this specific molecular machinery will aid in therapeutic interventions of various retinal dystrophies and GPCR-related human diseases. PMID:23754968

  18. Diverting intracellular trafficking of Salmonella to the lysosome through activation of the late endocytic Rab7 by intracellular delivery of muramyl dipeptide.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Konark; Parashuraman, Seetharaman; Krishnamurthy, Ganga; Majumdar, Jolly; Yadav, Ashok; Kumar, Ravi; Basu, Sandip K; Mukhopadhyay, Amitabha

    2002-09-15

    Previously, we showed that live Salmonella-containing phagosomes (LSP) recruit early acting Rab5 and promote fusion with early endosomes, thus avoiding transport to the lysosomes. Therefore, live Salmonella survive in a specialized compartment. Here we show that scavenger-receptor-mediated intracellular delivery of muramyl dipeptide (MDP) to macrophages leads to efficient killing of Salmonella both in vitro and in vivo. To understand the intracellular trafficking modulation of Salmonella by delivery of MDP, we investigated the levels of endocytic Rab proteins, which are the major regulators of vesicular transport. Western blot analysis reveals reduced Rab5 and enhanced Rab7 content in the maleylated bovine serum albumin-MDP (MBSA-MDP)-treated cells. The reduced content of Rab5 in the treated cells and on phagosomes inhibits the fusion of Salmonella-containing phagosomes with early endosomes, and the enhanced Rab7 content in these cells facilitated targeting of LSP to lysosomes, which contain cathepsin D and vacuolar ATPase, for killing. In vitro reconstitution of lysosomal transport demonstrated that a reduced content of Rab5 and an enhanced level of Rab7 in MBSA-MDP-treated cells is primarily responsible for targeting Salmonella to lysosomes. Intracellular delivery of MDP thus offers a general strategy against macrophage-associated infections caused by intracellular pathogens that survive in the host cell by resisting transport to lysosomes.

  19. GFP-like proteins stably accumulate in lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Mizushima, Noboru; Yoshimori, Tamotsu; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, its GFP variants (Aequorea GFPs), and more recently the novel GFP-like proteins from Anthozoa have greatly advanced our technologies for fluorescently labeling cells, organelles, and proteins. It has been shown, however, that some GFP-like proteins have a tendency to oligomerize and aggregate. Transfection of GFP-like proteins into cultured mammalian cells results in bright punctate structures, which are thought to be cytosolic protein aggregates. In this study, we demonstrate that these structures are not cytosolic aggregates but lysosomes that have accumulated the GFP-like proteins. Our biochemical and immunocytochemical experiments have revealed that certain GFP-like proteins expressed in the cytosol enter lysosomes possibly by an autophagy-related mechanism, but retain their fluorescence because of resistance not only to acidity but also to lysosomal proteases.

  20. Salinomycin kills cancer stem cells by sequestering iron in lysosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, Trang Thi; Hamaï, Ahmed; Hienzsch, Antje; Cañeque, Tatiana; Müller, Sebastian; Wicinski, Julien; Cabaud, Olivier; Leroy, Christine; David, Amandine; Acevedo, Verónica; Ryo, Akihide; Ginestier, Christophe; Birnbaum, Daniel; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Codogno, Patrice; Mehrpour, Maryam; Rodriguez, Raphaël

    2017-10-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a subset of cells within tumours that exhibit self-renewal properties and the capacity to seed tumours. CSCs are typically refractory to conventional treatments and have been associated to metastasis and relapse. Salinomycin operates as a selective agent against CSCs through mechanisms that remain elusive. Here, we provide evidence that a synthetic derivative of salinomycin, which we named ironomycin (AM5), exhibits a more potent and selective activity against breast CSCs in vitro and in vivo, by accumulating and sequestering iron in lysosomes. In response to the ensuing cytoplasmic depletion of iron, cells triggered the degradation of ferritin in lysosomes, leading to further iron loading in this organelle. Iron-mediated production of reactive oxygen species promoted lysosomal membrane permeabilization, activating a cell death pathway consistent with ferroptosis. These findings reveal the prevalence of iron homeostasis in breast CSCs, pointing towards iron and iron-mediated processes as potential targets against these cells.

  1. alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase deficiency, a new lysosomal storage disorder.

    PubMed

    van Diggelen, O P; Schindler, D; Willemsen, R; Boer, M; Kleijer, W J; Huijmans, J G; Blom, W; Galjaard, H

    1988-01-01

    A new lysosomal storage disease with autosomal recessive inheritance is described in two male siblings of 5 1/2 and 4 years of age. Clinical manifestations started after 9 months of age with neurological symptoms, followed by progressive psychomotor deterioration. Urinary oligosaccharide excretion was abnormal and showed a characteristic pattern on chromatography. Enzyme assays showed a profound deficiency of lysosomal alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase in cultured fibroblasts, leukocytes and plasma from the patients and reduced activity in material from the parents. The deficiency was demonstrated both with an artificial substrate and a natural one, the blood group A trisaccharide. Excessive intra-lysosomal storage of alpha-N-acetylgalactosamine-containing material was demonstrated in cultured fibroblasts from the patients, using the lectin from Helix pomatia which is specific for terminal alpha-N-acetylgalactosamine residues.

  2. The plasma activities of lysosomal enzymes in infants with necrotizing enterocolitis: new promising class of biomarkers?

    PubMed

    Benkoe, Thomas M; Mechtler, Thomas P; Pones, Mario; Prusa, Andrea-Romana; Klebermass-Schrehof, Katrin; Rebhandl, Winfried; Kasper, David C

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia plays a major role in the pathogenesis of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). The diagnosis of intestinal ischemia would be highly desirable, as it is impossible to achieve with the current diagnostic regimes. Preliminary data from an animal NEC model indicate a possible correlation between the plasma activity of the lysosomal enzyme beta-glucosidase and intestinal ischemia. In this case-control study the plasma activities of six different lysosomal enzymes were detected by high-performance liquid-chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry in 15 infants with NEC and compared to 18 controls. The plasma activities of β-glucosidase (ABG), α-glucosidase (GAA), and galactocerebrosidase (GALC) were significantly higher in the NEC group compared with controls (ABG, p=0.009; GAA, p<0.001; GALC, p<0.001). GAA and GALC showed the highest diagnostic value with areas under the curve of 0.91 and 0.87. We identified GAA and GALC as new promising biomarkers for gut wall integrity in infants with NEC, and report first results on the plasma activity of ABG. The present study supports the hypothesis that the plasma activity of ABG might serve as a marker of intestinal ischemia in NEC. The identification of intestinal ischemia could facilitate early discrimination of infants at risk for NEC from infants with benign gastrointestinal disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Real-Time Visualization of Lysosome Destruction Using a Photosensitive Toluidine Blue Nanogel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiqi; Tung, Ching-Hsuan

    2018-02-09

    Breaking the lysosome helps its sequestered payloads access their molecular targets in cells and thus enhances the intracellular drug delivery. Current strategies for lysosomal escape involve direct physical interactions with the lipid membrane. These interactions pose a systemic toxicity and uncontrolled membrane rupture risk. Here, we report a light-detonated lysosome disruption using a hyaluronan (HA) nanogel packed with toludine blue (TB). The HA/TB nanogel is concentrated within the lysosomes. The applied light assists TB in generating reactive oxygen species and destroying the lysosome in situ, both in cells and isolated lysosomes. Real time fluorescent tracking reveals that quenched TB fluorescence recovers along with lysosome explosion, relocates to the nucleus, and is presented as a fluorescent sparkling in cells. This HA/TB, composed of all clinically approved materials, represents a biocompatible and facile strategy to "bomb" lysosomes in a spatiotemporally controlled fashion. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Dyslipidaemia: Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency-a cautious leap forward.

    PubMed

    Hollak, Carla E M; Hovingh, G Kees

    2015-12-01

    Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency can lead to liver failure and early death. A recently published placebo-controlled trial shows that enzyme-replacement therapy improves plasma levels of lipids and aminotransferases, and reduces liver fat content. However, the effect on clinical end points and an appropriate indication for treatment remain to be established.

  5. Structure of human saposin A at lysosomal pH

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Chris H.; Read, Randy J.; Deane, Janet E., E-mail: jed55@cam.ac.uk

    2015-06-27

    A 1.8 Å resolution structure of the sphingolipid activator protein saposin A has been determined at pH 4.8, the physiologically relevant lysosomal pH for hydrolase enzyme activation and lipid-transfer activity. The saposins are essential cofactors for the normal lysosomal degradation of complex glycosphingolipids by acid hydrolase enzymes; defects in either saposin or hydrolase function lead to severe metabolic diseases. Saposin A (SapA) activates the enzyme β-galactocerebrosidase (GALC), which catalyzes the breakdown of β-d-galactocerebroside, the principal lipid component of myelin. SapA is known to bind lipids and detergents in a pH-dependent manner; this is accompanied by a striking transition from amore » ‘closed’ to an ‘open’ conformation. However, previous structures were determined at non-lysosomal pH. This work describes a 1.8 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure determined at the physiologically relevant lysosomal pH 4.8. In the absence of lipid or detergent at pH 4.8, SapA is observeed to adopt a conformation closely resembling the previously determined ‘closed’ conformation, showing that pH alone is not sufficient for the transition to the ‘open’ conformation. Structural alignments reveal small conformational changes, highlighting regions of flexibility.« less

  6. Selective Lysosomal Transporter Degradation by Organelle Membrane Fusion.

    PubMed

    McNally, Erin Kate; Karim, Mahmoud Abdul; Brett, Christopher Leonard

    2017-01-23

    Lysosomes rely on their resident transporter proteins to return products of catabolism to the cell for reuse and for cellular signaling, metal storage, and maintaining the lumenal environment. Despite their importance, little is known about the lifetime of these transporters or how they are regulated. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model, we discovered a new pathway intrinsic to homotypic lysosome membrane fusion that is responsible for their degradation. Transporter proteins are selectively sorted by the docking machinery into an area between apposing lysosome membranes, which is internalized and degraded by lumenal hydrolases upon organelle fusion. These proteins have diverse lifetimes that are regulated in response to protein misfolding, changing substrate levels, or TOR activation. Analogous to endocytosis for controlling surface protein levels, the "intralumenal fragment pathway" is critical for lysosome membrane remodeling required for organelle function in the context of cellular protein quality control, ion homeostasis, and metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Lysosomal Cholesterol Accumulation Sensitizes To Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity by Impairing Mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Baulies, Anna; Ribas, Vicent; Núñez, Susana; Torres, Sandra; Alarcón-Vila, Cristina; Martínez, Laura; Suda, Jo; Ybanez, Maria D.; Kaplowitz, Neil; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, Jose C.

    2015-01-01

    The role of lysosomes in acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the impact of genetic and drug-induced lysosomal cholesterol (LC) accumulation in APAP hepatotoxicity. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase)−/− mice exhibit LC accumulation and higher mortality after APAP overdose compared to ASMase+/+ littermates. ASMase−/− hepatocytes display lower threshold for APAP-induced cell death and defective fusion of mitochondria-containing autophagosomes with lysosomes, which decreased mitochondrial quality control. LC accumulation in ASMase+/+ hepatocytes caused by U18666A reproduces the susceptibility of ASMase−/− hepatocytes to APAP and the impairment in the formation of mitochondria-containing autolysosomes. LC extraction by 25-hydroxycholesterol increased APAP-mediated mitophagy and protected ASMase−/− mice and hepatocytes against APAP hepatotoxicity, effects that were reversed by chloroquine to disrupt autophagy. The regulation of LC by U18666A or 25-hydroxycholesterol did not affect total cellular sphingomyelin content or its lysosomal distribution. Of relevance, amitriptyline-induced ASMase inhibition in human hepatocytes caused LC accumulation, impaired mitophagy and increased susceptibility to APAP. Similar results were observed upon glucocerebrosidase inhibition by conduritol β-epoxide, a cellular model of Gaucher disease. These findings indicate that LC accumulation determines susceptibility to APAP hepatotoxicity by modulating mitophagy, and imply that genetic or drug-mediated ASMase disruption sensitizes to APAP-induced liver injury. PMID:26657973

  8. Mechanisms of amine accumulation in, and egress from, lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Stephen D B; Funk, Ryan S; Rajewski, Roger A; Krise, Jeffrey P

    2009-11-01

    The human body is continuously exposed to small organic molecules containing one or more basic nitrogen atoms. Many of these are endogenous (i.e., neurotransmitters, polyamines and biogenic amines), while others are exogenously supplied in the form of drugs, foods and pollutants. It is well-known that many amines have a strong propensity to specifically and substantially accumulate in highly acidic intracellular compartments, such as lysosomes, through a mechanism referred to as ion trapping. It is also known that cells have acquired the unique ability to sense and respond to amine accumulation in lysosomes in an effort to prevent potential negative consequences associated with hyperaccumulation. We describe here methods that are used to evaluate the dynamics of amine accumulation in, and egress from, lysosomes. Moreover, we highlight specific proteins that are thought to play important roles in these pathways. A theoretical model describing lysosomal amine dynamics is described and shown to adequately fit experimental kinetic data. The implications of this research in understanding and treating disease are discussed.

  9. Mechanisms of amine accumulation in, and egress from, lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Stephen DB; Funk, Ryan S; Rajewski, Roger A; Krise, Jeffrey P

    2011-01-01

    The human body is continuously exposed to small organic molecules containing one or more basic nitrogen atoms. Many of these are endogenous (i.e., neurotransmitters, polyamines and biogenic amines), while others are exogenously supplied in the form of drugs, foods and pollutants. It is well-known that many amines have a strong propensity to specifically and substantially accumulate in highly acidic intracellular compartments, such as lysosomes, through a mechanism referred to as ion trapping. It is also known that cells have acquired the unique ability to sense and respond to amine accumulation in lysosomes in an effort to prevent potential negative consequences associated with hyperaccumulation. We describe here methods that are used to evaluate the dynamics of amine accumulation in, and egress from, lysosomes. Moreover, we highlight specific proteins that are thought to play important roles in these pathways. A theoretical model describing lysosomal amine dynamics is described and shown to adequately fit experimental kinetic data. The implications of this research in understanding and treating disease are discussed. PMID:21083094

  10. RAB26 coordinates lysosome traffic and mitochondrial localization.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ramon U; Mills, Jason C

    2014-03-01

    As they mature, professional secretory cells like pancreatic acinar and gastric chief cells induce the transcription factor MIST1 (also known as BHLHA15) to substantially scale up production of large secretory granules in a process that involves expansion of apical cytoplasm and redistribution of lysosomes and mitochondria. How a scaling factor like MIST1 rearranges cellular architecture simply by regulating expression levels of its transcriptional targets is unknown. RAB26 is a MIST1 target whose role in MIST1-mediated secretory cell maturation is also unknown. Here, we confirm that RAB26 expression, unlike most Rabs which are ubiquitously expressed, is tissue specific and largely confined to MIST1-expressing secretory tissues. Surprisingly, functional studies showed that RAB26 predominantly associated with LAMP1/cathepsin D lysosomes and not directly with secretory granules. Moreover, increasing RAB26 expression - by inducing differentiation of zymogen-secreting cells or by direct transfection - caused lysosomes to coalesce in a central, perinuclear region. Lysosome clustering in turn caused redistribution of mitochondria into distinct subcellular neighborhoods. The data elucidate a novel function for RAB26 and suggest a mechanism for how cells could increase transcription of key effectors to reorganize subcellular compartments during differentiation.

  11. Lysosomal β-glucuronidase regulates Lyme and rheumatoid arthritis severity

    PubMed Central

    Bramwell, Kenneth K.C.; Ma, Ying; Weis, John H.; Chen, Xinjian; Zachary, James F.; Teuscher, Cory; Weis, Janis J.

    2013-01-01

    Lyme disease, caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most prevalent arthropod-borne illness in the United States and remains a clinical and social challenge. The spectrum of disease severity among infected patients suggests that host genetics contribute to pathogenic outcomes, particularly in patients who develop arthritis. Using a forward genetics approach, we identified the lysosomal enzyme β-glucuronidase (GUSB), a member of a large family of coregulated lysosomal enzymes, as a key regulator of Lyme-associated arthritis severity. Severely arthritic C3H mice possessed a naturally occurring hypomorphic allele, Gusbh. C57BL/6 mice congenic for the C3H Gusb allele were prone to increased Lyme-associated arthritis severity. Radiation chimera experiments revealed that resident joint cells drive arthritis susceptibility. C3H mice expressing WT Gusb as a transgene were protected from severe Lyme arthritis. Importantly, the Gusbh allele also exacerbated disease in a serum transfer model of rheumatoid arthritis. A known GUSB function is the prevention of lysosomal accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Development of Lyme and rheumatoid arthritis in Gusbh-expressing mice was associated with heightened accumulation of GAGs in joint tissue. We propose that GUSB modulates arthritis pathogenesis by preventing accumulation of proinflammatory GAGs within inflamed joint tissue, a trait that may be shared by other lysosomal exoglycosidases. PMID:24334460

  12. Neuronopathic Lysosomal Storage Diseases: Clinical and Pathologic Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prada, Carlos E.; Grabowski, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The lysosomal--autophagocytic system diseases (LASDs) affect multiple body systems including the central nervous system (CNS). The progressive CNS pathology has its onset at different ages, leading to neurodegeneration and early death. Methods: Literature review provided insight into the current clinical neurological findings,…

  13. Vibrio effector protein, VopQ, forms a lysosomal gated channel that disrupts host ion homeostasis and autophagic flux

    PubMed Central

    Sreelatha, Anju; Bennett, Terry L.; Zheng, Hui; Jiang, Qiu-Xing; Orth, Kim; Starai, Vincent J.

    2013-01-01

    Defects in normal autophagic pathways are implicated in numerous human diseases—such as neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and cardiomyopathy—highlighting the importance of autophagy and its proper regulation. Herein we show that Vibrio parahaemolyticus uses the type III effector VopQ (Vibrio outer protein Q) to alter autophagic flux by manipulating the partitioning of small molecules and ions in the lysosome. This effector binds to the conserved Vo domain of the vacuolar-type H+-ATPase and causes deacidification of the lysosomes within minutes of entering the host cell. VopQ forms a gated channel ∼18 Å in diameter that facilitates outward flux of ions across lipid bilayers. The electrostatic interactions of this type 3 secretion system effector with target membranes dictate its preference for host vacuolar-type H+-ATPase–containing membranes, indicating that its pore-forming activity is specific and not promiscuous. As seen with other effectors, VopQ is exploiting a eukaryotic mechanism, in this case manipulating lysosomal homeostasis and autophagic flux through transmembrane permeation. PMID:23798441

  14. The first echinoderm gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) identified from sea cucumber (Stichopus monotuberculatus).

    PubMed

    Ren, Chunhua; Chen, Ting; Jiang, Xiao; Luo, Xing; Wang, Yanhong; Hu, Chaoqun

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) has been described as a key enzyme that facilitating the processing and presentation of major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted antigen in mammals. In this study, the first echinoderm GILT named StmGILT was identified from sea cucumber (Stichopus monotuberculatus). The StmGILT cDNA is 1529 bp in length, containing a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 87 bp, a 3'-UTR of 674 bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 768 bp that encoding a protein of 255 amino acids with a deduced molecular weight of 27.82 kDa and a predicted isoelectric point of 4.73. The putative StmGILT protein possesses all the main characteristics of known GILT proteins, including a signature sequence, a reductase active site CXXC, twelve conserved cysteines, and two potential N-linked glycosylation sites. For the gene structure, StmGILT contains four exons separated by three introns. In the promoter region of StmGILT gene, an NF-κB binding site and an IFN-γ activation site were found. The thiol reductase activity of recombinant StmGILT protein was also demonstrated in this study. In addition, the highest level of mRNA expression was noticed in coelomocytes of S. monotuberculatus. In in vitro experiments performed in coelomocytes, the expression of StmGILT mRNA was significantly up-regulated by lipopolysaccharides (LPS), inactivated bacteria or polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid [poly (I:C)] challenge, suggested that the sea cucumber GILT might play critical roles in the innate immune defending against bacterial and viral infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A lysosome-locating and acidic pH-activatable fluorescent probe for visualizing endogenous H2O2 in lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Zhou, Shunqing; Ren, Jing; Wu, Chuanliu; Zhao, Yibing

    2017-11-20

    There is increasing evidence indicating that lysosomal H 2 O 2 is closely related to autophagy and apoptotic pathways under both physiological and pathological conditions. Therefore, fluorescent probes that can be exploited to visualize H 2 O 2 in lysosomes are potential tools for exploring diverse roles of H 2 O 2 in cells. However, functional exploration of lysosomal H 2 O 2 is limited by the lack of fluorescent probes capable of compatibly sensing H 2 O 2 under weak acidic conditions (pH = 4.5) of lysosomes. Lower spatial resolution of the fluorescent visualization of lysosomal H 2 O 2 might be caused by the interference of signals from cytosolic and mitochondrial H 2 O 2 , as well as the non-specific distribution of the probes in cells. In this work, we developed a lysosome-locating and acidic-pH-activatable fluorescent probe for the detection and visualization of H 2 O 2 in lysosomes, which consists of a H 2 O 2 -responsive boronate unit, a lysosome-locating morpholine group, and a pH-activatable benzorhodol fluorophore. The response of the fluorescent probe to H 2 O 2 is significantly more pronounced under acidic pH conditions than that under neutral pH conditions. Notably, the present probe enables the fluorescence sensing of endogenous lysosomal H 2 O 2 in living cells without external stimulations, with signal interference from the cytoplasm and other intracellular organelles being negligible.

  16. Autophagic dysfunction in a lysosomal storage disorder due to impaired proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Elrick, Matthew J; Lieberman, Andrew P

    2013-02-01

    Alterations in macroautophagy (hereafter referred to as "autophagy") are a common feature of lysosomal storage disorders, and have been hypothesized to play a major role in the pathogenesis of these diseases. We have recently reported multiple defects in autophagy contributing to the lysosomal storage disorder Niemann-Pick type C (NPC). These include increased formation of autophagosomes, slowed turnover of autophagosomes secondary to impaired lysosomal proteolysis, and delivery of stored lipids to the lysosome via autophagy. The study summarized here describes novel methods for the interrogation of individual stages of the autophagic pathway, and suggests mechanisms by which lipid storage may result in broader lysosomal dysfunction.

  17. Oxidative stress causes a decline in lysosomal integrity during hypothermic incubation of rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Peter G; Niu, Xianwa; Rigby, Paul; Steer, James H; Jeffrey, Gary P

    2008-01-01

    Oxidative stress during cold preservation has been identified as a significant cause of cell injury but the process by which injury occurs is poorly understood. We examined loss of lysosomal integrity as a possible cause of cell injury during extended cold storage of isolated rat hepatocytes. After 21 h of hypothermia, there was a marked decline in lysosomal integrity, which was correlated with an increase in lipid peroxidation. When lipid peroxidation was prevented with the antioxidant Trolox (a vitamin E analog) or the iron chelator desferrioxamine, lysosomal integrity was preserved. In contrast, increasing lysosomal iron with ferric chloride caused an increase in lipid peroxidation and decreased lysosomal integrity. Loss of lysosomal integrity during cold preservation in this experimental model was consistent with iron-initiated oxidative stress. The progressive loss of lysosomal integrity during hypothermic incubation has the potential to affect liver function after transplantation.

  18. Resolution of lysosomes in living cells with a ratiometric molecular pH-meter.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhu; Wu, Shuqi; Han, Jiahuai; Yang, Liu; Han, Shoufa

    2013-09-30

    Intracellular acidic vesicles, constituted mostly by lysosomes, mediated a variety of biological events ranging from endocytosis, apoptosis, to cancer metastasis, etc. A chimeric molecular pH-meter (Lyso-DR), comprised of a dansyl fluorophore and proton activatable rhodamine-lactam, was prepared for ratiometric reporting of intralysosomal acidity. Exclusively confined in lysosomes, Lyso-DR exhibited pH dependent dual fluorescence emission bands which enable resolution of individual lysosomes in terms of acidity and quantitation of the overall intracellular lysosomal acidity, e.g. the lysosomal pH of HeLa cells is around pH 5.0 whereas that of L929 cells is around pH 6.2. Lyso-DR effectively differentiated the lysosomal pH changes of cells undergoing apoptosis vs necrosis, suggesting its utility in investigations on lysosome involved biomedical processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Upregulation of the Rab27a-Dependent Trafficking and Secretory Mechanisms Improves Lysosomal Transport, Alleviates Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, and Reduces Lysosome Overload in Cystinosis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jennifer L.; Napolitano, Gennaro; Monfregola, Jlenia; Rocca, Celine J.; Cherqui, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Cystinosis is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by the accumulation of the amino acid cystine due to genetic defects in the CTNS gene, which encodes cystinosin, the lysosomal cystine transporter. Although many cellular dysfunctions have been described in cystinosis, the mechanisms leading to these defects are not well understood. Here, we show that increased lysosomal overload induced by accumulated cystine leads to cellular abnormalities, including vesicular transport defects and increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and that correction of lysosomal transport improves cellular function in cystinosis. We found that Rab27a was expressed in proximal tubular cells (PTCs) and partially colocalized with the lysosomal marker LAMP-1. The expression of Rab27a but not other small GTPases, including Rab3 and Rab7, was downregulated in kidneys from Ctns−/− mice and in human PTCs from cystinotic patients. Using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we found that lysosomal transport is impaired in Ctns−/− cells. Ctns−/− cells showed significant ER expansion and a marked increase in the unfolded protein response-induced chaperones Grp78 and Grp94. Upregulation of the Rab27a-dependent vesicular trafficking mechanisms rescued the defective lysosomal transport phenotype and reduced ER stress in cystinotic cells. Importantly, reconstitution of lysosomal transport mediated by Rab27a led to decreased lysosomal overload, manifested as reduced cystine cellular content. Our data suggest that upregulation of the Rab27a-dependent lysosomal trafficking and secretory pathways contributes to the correction of some of the cellular defects induced by lysosomal overload in cystinosis, including ER stress. PMID:23716592

  20. Genomic Expression Analyses Reveal Lysosomal, Innate Immunity Proteins, as Disease Correlates in Murine Models of a Lysosomal Storage Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Md. Suhail; Getz, Michelle; Safeukui, Innocent; Yi, Sue; Tamez, Pamela; Shin, Jenny; Velázquez, Peter; Haldar, Kasturi

    2012-01-01

    Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC) disease is a rare, genetic, lysosomal disorder with progressive neurodegeneration. Poor understanding of the pathophysiology and a lack of blood-based diagnostic markers are major hurdles in the treatment and management of NPC and several additional, neurological lysosomal disorders. To identify disease severity correlates, we undertook whole genome expression profiling of sentinel organs, brain, liver, and spleen of Balb/c Npc1−/− mice relative to Npc1+/− at an asymptomatic stage, as well as early- and late-symptomatic stages. Unexpectedly, we found prominent up regulation of innate immunity genes with age-dependent change in their expression, in all three organs. We shortlisted a set of 12 secretory genes whose expression steadily increased with age in both brain and liver, as potential plasma correlates of neurological and/or liver disease. Ten were innate immune genes with eight ascribed to lysosomes. Several are known to be elevated in diseased organs of murine models of other lysosomal diseases including Gaucher’s disease, Sandhoff disease and MPSIIIB. We validated the top candidate lysozyme, in the plasma of Npc1−/− as well as Balb/c Npc1nmf164 mice (bearing a point mutation closer to human disease mutants) and show its reduction in response to an emerging therapeutic. We further established elevation of innate immunity in Npc1−/− mice through multiple functional assays including inhibition of bacterial infection as well as cellular analysis and immunohistochemistry. These data revealed neutrophil elevation in the Npc1 −/− spleen and liver (where large foci were detected proximal to damaged tissue). Together our results yield a set of lysosomal, secretory innate immunity genes that have potential to be developed as pan or specific plasma markers for neurological diseases associated with lysosomal storage and where diagnosis is a major problem. Further, the accumulation of neutrophils in diseased organs (hitherto

  1. Targeting Androgen Receptor by Lysosomal Degradation in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    TC71 cells were cultured in RPMI1640 medium supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum. Calcium phosphate copredpitation was used for transfection of 293...Cation--independent the lysosome In EWS·FII-1 turnover man nose 6- phosphate receptor transformation. However, little is known about the biochemical...biotinylation technique, BioiD, we identified cation independent mannose 6 phosphate receptor ( CIMPR) as a protein located in the vicinity of EWS Fli 1

  2. Astrocyte dysfunction triggers neurodegeneration in a lysosomal storage disorder.

    PubMed

    Di Malta, Chiara; Fryer, John D; Settembre, Carmine; Ballabio, Andrea

    2012-08-28

    The role of astrocytes in neurodegenerative processes is increasingly appreciated. Here we investigated the contribution of astrocytes to neurodegeneration in multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD), a severe lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the sulfatase modifying factor 1 (SUMF1) gene. Using Cre/Lox mouse models, we found that astrocyte-specific deletion of Sumf1 in vivo induced severe lysosomal storage and autophagy dysfunction with consequential cytoplasmic accumulation of autophagic substrates. Lysosomal storage in astrocytes was sufficient to induce degeneration of cortical neurons in vivo. Furthermore, in an ex vivo coculture assay, we observed that Sumf1(-/-) astrocytes failed to support the survival and function of wild-type cortical neurons, suggesting a non-cell autonomous mechanism for neurodegeneration. Compared with the astrocyte-specific deletion of Sumf1, the concomitant removal of Sumf1 in both neurons and glia in vivo induced a widespread neuronal loss and robust neuroinflammation. Finally, behavioral analysis of mice with astrocyte-specific deletion of Sumf1 compared with mice with Sumf1 deletion in both astrocytes and neurons allowed us to link a subset of neurological manifestations of MSD to astrocyte dysfunction. This study indicates that astrocytes are integral components of the neuropathology in MSD and that modulation of astrocyte function may impact disease course.

  3. Discriminating lysosomal membrane protein types using dynamic neural network.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Vijay; Gupta, Dwijendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a dynamic artificial neural network methodology, which classifies the proteins into their classes from their sequences alone: the lysosomal membrane protein classes and the various other membranes protein classes. In this paper, neural networks-based lysosomal-associated membrane protein type prediction system is proposed. Different protein sequence representations are fused to extract the features of a protein sequence, which includes seven feature sets; amino acid (AA) composition, sequence length, hydrophobic group, electronic group, sum of hydrophobicity, R-group, and dipeptide composition. To reduce the dimensionality of the large feature vector, we applied the principal component analysis. The probabilistic neural network, generalized regression neural network, and Elman regression neural network (RNN) are used as classifiers and compared with layer recurrent network (LRN), a dynamic network. The dynamic networks have memory, i.e. its output depends not only on the input but the previous outputs also. Thus, the accuracy of LRN classifier among all other artificial neural networks comes out to be the highest. The overall accuracy of jackknife cross-validation is 93.2% for the data-set. These predicted results suggest that the method can be effectively applied to discriminate lysosomal associated membrane proteins from other membrane proteins (Type-I, Outer membrane proteins, GPI-Anchored) and Globular proteins, and it also indicates that the protein sequence representation can better reflect the core feature of membrane proteins than the classical AA composition.

  4. Design and fabrication of fluorescence resonance energy transfer-mediated fluorescent polymer nanoparticles for ratiometric sensing of lysosomal pH.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Tang, Ying; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Peisheng; Li, Ya; Jiang, Jianhui

    2016-12-15

    The design of effective tools capable of sensing lysosome pH is highly desirable for better understanding its biological functions in cellular behaviors and various diseases. Herein, a lysosome-targetable ratiometric fluorescent polymer nanoparticle pH sensor (RFPNS) was synthesized via incorporation of miniemulsion polymerization and surface modification technique. In this system, the donor: 4-ethoxy-9-allyl-1,8-naphthalimide (EANI) and the acceptor: fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) were covalently linked to the polymer nanoparticle to construct pH-responsive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) system. The FITC moieties on the surface of RFPNS underwent structural and spectral transformation as the presence of pH changes, resulting in ratiometric fluorescent sensing of pH. The as-prepared RFPNS displayed favorable water dispersibility, good pH-induced spectral reversibility and so on. Following the living cell uptake, the as-prepared RFPNS with good cell-membrane permeability can mainly stain in the lysosomes; and it can facilitate visualization of the intracellular lysosomal pH changes. This nanosensor platform offers a novel method for future development of ratiometric fluorescent probes for targeting other analytes, like ions, metabolites,and other biomolecules in biosamples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Managing Cardiovascular Risk in Lysosomal Acid Lipase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Maciejko, James J

    2017-06-01

    Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency (LAL-D) is a rare, life-threatening, autosomal recessive, lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations in the LIPA gene, which encodes for lysosomal acid lipase (LAL). This enzyme is necessary for the hydrolysis of cholesteryl ester and triglyceride in lysosomes. Deficient LAL activity causes accumulation of these lipids in lysosomes and a marked decrease in the cytoplasmic free cholesterol concentration, leading to dysfunctional cholesterol homeostasis. The accumulation of neutral lipid occurs predominantly in liver, spleen, and macrophages throughout the body, and the aberrant cholesterol homeostasis causes a marked dyslipidemia. LAL-D is characterized by accelerated atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) and hepatic microvesicular or mixed steatosis, leading to inflammation, fibrosis, cirrhosis and liver failure. LAL-D presents as a clinical continuum with two phenotypes: the infantile-onset phenotype, formally referred to as Wolman disease, and the later-onset phenotype, formerly referred to as cholesteryl ester storage disease. Infants with LAL-D present within the first few weeks of life with vomiting, diarrhea, hepatosplenomegaly, failure to thrive and rapid progression to liver failure and death by 6-12 months of age. Children and young adults with LAL-D generally present with marked dyslipidemia, hepatic enzyme elevation, hepatomegaly and mixed steatosis by liver biopsy. The average age of the initial signs and symptoms of the later-onset phenotype is about 5 years old. The typical dyslipidemia is a significantly elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentration and a low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration, placing these individuals at heightened risk for premature ASCVD. Diagnosis of the later-onset phenotype of LAL-D requires a heightened awareness of the disease because the dyslipidemia and hepatic transaminase elevation combination are common and overlap with other

  6. Estrogen modulation of avian osteoclast lysosomal gene expression.

    PubMed

    Oursler, M J; Pederson, L; Pyfferoen, J; Osdoby, P; Fitzpatrick, L; Spelsberg, T C

    1993-03-01

    We have previously demonstrated that avian osteoclasts contain high levels of 17 beta-estradiol (17 beta E2) receptors and respond to 17 beta E2 treatment with a dose-dependent decrease in in vitro resorption of [3H] proline-labeled bone particles. To more accurately assess the influence of 17 beta E2 on osteoclastic activity, the specificity of estrogen modulation of resorption levels was determined using a quantitative pit resorption assay. Treatment with 17 beta E2 significantly decreased the number of osteoclast resorption pits formed compared with that after either vehicle or 17 alpha E2 treatment. Cotreatment with 17 beta E2 and hydroxytamoxifen (a complete 17 beta E2 antagonist in birds) abrogated the influence of 17 beta E2 on resorption activity. To elucidate the mechanism by which 17 beta E2 inhibits osteoclast activity, the effects of 17 beta E2 on the steady state mRNA levels of two avian osteoclast lysosomal proteins, lysozyme and a lysosomal membrane protein (LEP-100), were examined. Using highly purified avian osteoclasts, 17 beta E2 was shown to decrease lysosomal protein mRNA levels in a dose-dependent manner within 8 h of treatment in a process that required de novo protein synthesis. This response was specific for 17 beta E2, since the inactive stereoisomer 17 alpha E2 had no effect. Furthermore, coincubation of 17 beta E2 with hydroxytamoxifen eliminated the 17 beta E2 influence. After removal of 10(-8) M 17 beta E2, lysosomal gene mRNA levels returned to near-normal levels within 24 h. This is consistent with the previously reported ability of avian osteoclast-mediated resorption activity to recover from 17 beta E2 treatment. Lysozyme protein levels similarly decreased after 17 beta E2 treatment. These data suggest that avian osteoclasts are target cells for 17 beta E2 in vitro, that osteoclast activity in vivo is likely to be modulated by circulating levels of 17 beta E2, and that the 17 beta E2 inhibition of osteoclast resorption activity may

  7. The position of lysosomes within the cell determines their luminal pH

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Danielle E.; Ostrowski, Philip; Jaumouillé, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    We examined the luminal pH of individual lysosomes using quantitative ratiometric fluorescence microscopy and report an unappreciated heterogeneity: peripheral lysosomes are less acidic than juxtanuclear ones despite their comparable buffering capacity. An increased passive (leak) permeability to protons, together with reduced vacuolar H+–adenosine triphosphatase (V-ATPase) activity, accounts for the reduced acidifying ability of peripheral lysosomes. The altered composition of peripheral lysosomes is due, at least in part, to more limited access to material exported by the biosynthetic pathway. The balance between Rab7 and Arl8b determines the subcellular localization of lysosomes; more peripheral lysosomes have reduced Rab7 density. This in turn results in decreased recruitment of Rab-interacting lysosomal protein (RILP), an effector that regulates the recruitment and stability of the V1G1 component of the lysosomal V-ATPase. Deliberate margination of lysosomes is associated with reduced acidification and impaired proteolytic activity. The heterogeneity in lysosomal pH may be an indication of a broader functional versatility. PMID:26975849

  8. Amlexanox provides a potential therapy for nonsense mutations in the lysosomal storage disorder Aspartylglucosaminuria.

    PubMed

    Banning, Antje; Schiff, Manuel; Tikkanen, Ritva

    2018-03-01

    Aspartylglucosaminuria (AGU) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the gene for aspartylglucosaminidase (AGA). This enzyme participates in glycoprotein degradation in lysosomes. AGU results in progressive mental retardation, and no curative therapy is currently available. We have here characterized the consequences of AGA gene mutations in a compound heterozygous patient who exhibits a missense mutation producing a Ser72Pro substitution in one allele, and a nonsense mutation Trp168X in the other. Ser72 is not a catalytic residue, but is required for the stabilization of the active site conformation. Thus, Ser72Pro exchange impairs the autocatalytic activation of the AGA precursor, and results in a considerable reduction of the enzyme activity and in altered AGA precursor processing. Betaine, which can partially rescue the AGA activity in AGU patients carrying certain missense mutations, turned out to be ineffective in the case of Ser72Pro substitution. The Trp168X nonsense allele results in complete lack of AGA polypeptide due to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) of the mRNA. Amlexanox, which inhibits NMD and causes a translational read-through, facilitated the synthesis of a full-length, functional AGA protein from the nonsense allele. This could be demonstrated as presence of the AGA polypeptide and increased enzyme activity upon Amlexanox treatment. Furthermore, in the Ser72Pro/Trp168X expressing cells, Amlexanox induced a synergistic increase in AGA activity and polypeptide processing due to enhanced processing of the Ser72Pro polypeptide. Our data show for the first time that Amlexanox might provide a valid therapy for AGU. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Direct mobilisation of lysosomal Ca2+ triggers complex Ca2+ signals.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Bethan S; Eden, Emily R; Schapira, Anthony H; Futter, Clare E; Patel, Sandip

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence implicates acidic organelles of the endolysosomal system as mobilisable stores of Ca(2+) but their relationship to the better-characterised endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) store remains unclear. Here we show that rapid osmotic permeabilisation of lysosomes evokes prolonged, spatiotemporally complex Ca(2+) signals in primary cultured human fibroblasts. These Ca(2+) signals comprised an initial response that correlated with lysosomal disruption and secondary long-lasting spatially heterogeneous Ca(2+) oscillations that required ER-localised inositol trisphosphate receptors. Electron microscopy identified extensive membrane contact sites between lysosomes and the ER. Mobilisation of lysosomal Ca(2+) stores is thus sufficient to evoke ER-dependent Ca(2+) release probably through lysosome-ER membrane contact sites, and akin to the proposed mechanism of action of the Ca(2+) mobilising messenger nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP). Our data identify functional and physical association of discrete Ca(2+) stores important for the genesis of Ca(2+) signal complexity.

  10. A novel transgenic mouse model of lysosomal storage disorder.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Miranda, Sonia; Ji, Rui; Jurczyk, Agata; Aryee, Ken-Edwin; Mo, Shunyan; Fletcher, Terry; Shaffer, Scott A; Greiner, Dale L; Bortell, Rita; Gregg, Ronald G; Cheng, Alan; Hennings, Leah J; Rittenhouse, Ann R

    2016-11-01

    Knockout technology has proven useful for delineating functional roles of specific genes. Here we describe and provide an explanation for striking pathology that occurs in a subset of genetically engineered mice expressing a rat Ca V β2a transgene under control of the cardiac α-myosin heavy chain promoter. Lesions were limited to mice homozygous for transgene and independent of native Cacnb2 genomic copy number. Gross findings included an atrophied pancreas; decreased adipose tissue; thickened, orange intestines; and enlarged liver, spleen, and abdominal lymph nodes. Immune cell infiltration and cell engulfment by macrophages were associated with loss of pancreatic acinar cells. Foamy macrophages diffusely infiltrated the small intestine's lamina propria, while similar macrophage aggregates packed liver and splenic red pulp sinusoids. Periodic acid-Schiff-positive, diastase-resistant, iron-negative, Oil Red O-positive, and autofluorescent cytoplasm was indicative of a lipid storage disorder. Electron microscopic analysis revealed liver sinusoids distended by clusters of macrophages containing intracellular myelin "swirls" and hepatocytes with enlarged lysosomes. Additionally, build up of cholesterol, cholesterol esters, and triglycerides, along with changes in liver metabolic enzyme levels, were consistent with a lipid processing defect. Because of this complex pathology, we examined the transgene insertion site. Multiple transgene copies inserted into chromosome 19; at this same site, an approximate 180,000 base pair deletion occurred, ablating cholesterol 25-hydroxylase and partially deleting lysosomal acid lipase and CD95 Loss of gene function can account for the altered lipid processing, along with hypertrophy of the immune system, which define this phenotype, and serendipitously provides a novel mouse model of lysosomal storage disorder. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Lysosomal stability in Oreochromis mossambicus (Peters) on exposure to surfactants.

    PubMed

    Bindu, P C; Philip, Babu; Chandran, R Vinu

    2005-01-01

    The three commonly used surfactants viz. anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cationic cetyl tri methyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and non-ionic triton X-100 were toxic even at sub lethal levels (1 ppm for 30 days) to 0. mossambicus. Lysosomal stability index (LSI) was lowest in triton-exposed animals in vitro. In vivo, CTAB was the most toxic. SDS, the anionic surfactant was the least toxic. The possible role of surfactant structure, critical micellar concentration (CMC) and metabolism in influencing the toxicity is discussed and mechanism of action via membrane lipid peroxidation is suggested.

  12. Leaving the lysosome behind: novel developments in autophagy inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Solitro, Abigail R; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P

    2016-01-01

    The search for a single silver bullet for the treatment of cancer has now been overshadowed by the identification of multiple therapeutic targets unique to each malignancy and even to each patient. In recent years, autophagy has emerged as one such therapeutic target. In response to both therapeutic and oncogenic stress, cancer cells upregulate and demonstrate an increased dependence upon this intracellular recycling process. Particularly in malignancies that currently lack targeted therapeutic options, autophagy inhibitors are the next hopeful prospects for the treatment of this disease. In this review, we discuss the rapid evolution of autophagy inhibitors from early lysosomotropic agents to next-generation lysosome-targeted drugs and beyond. PMID:26689099

  13. Cryptococcus neoformans-induced macrophage lysosome damage crucially contributes to fungal virulence.

    PubMed

    Davis, Michael J; Eastman, Alison J; Qiu, Yafeng; Gregorka, Brian; Kozel, Thomas R; Osterholzer, John J; Curtis, Jeffrey L; Swanson, Joel A; Olszewski, Michal A

    2015-03-01

    Upon ingestion by macrophages, Cryptococcus neoformans can survive and replicate intracellularly unless the macrophages become classically activated. The mechanism enabling intracellular replication is not fully understood; neither are the mechanisms that allow classical activation to counteract replication. C. neoformans-induced lysosome damage was observed in infected murine bone marrow-derived macrophages, increased with time, and required yeast viability. To demonstrate lysosome damage in the infected host, we developed a novel flow cytometric method for measuring lysosome damage. Increased lysosome damage was found in C. neoformans-containing lung cells compared with C. neoformans-free cells. Among C. neoformans-containing myeloid cells, recently recruited cells displayed lower damage than resident cells, consistent with the protective role of recruited macrophages. The magnitude of lysosome damage correlated with increased C. neoformans replication. Experimental induction of lysosome damage increased C. neoformans replication. Activation of macrophages with IFN-γ abolished macrophage lysosome damage and enabled increased killing of C. neoformans. We conclude that induction of lysosome damage is an important C. neoformans survival strategy and that classical activation of host macrophages counters replication by preventing damage. Thus, therapeutic strategies that decrease lysosomal damage, or increase resistance to such damage, could be valuable in treating cryptococcal infections. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  14. Defective lysosomal enzyme secretion in kidneys of Chediak-Higashi (beige) mice

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    The beige mouse is an animal model for the human Chediak-Higashi syndrome, a disease characterized by giant lysosomes in most cell types. In mice, treatment with androgenic hormones causes a 20-50-fold elevation in at least one kidney lysosomal enzyme, beta-glucuronidase. Beige mice treated with androgen had significantly higher kidney beta- glucuronidase, beta-galactosidase, and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (hexosaminidase) levels than normal mice. Other androgen-inducible enzymes and enzyme markers for the cytosol, mitochondria, and peroxisomes were not increased in kidney of beige mice. No significant lysosomal enzyme elevation was observed in five other organs of beige mice with or without androgen treatment, nor in kidneys of beige females not treated with androgen. Histochemical staining for glucuronidase together with subcellular fractionation showed that the higher glucuronidase content of beige mouse kidney is caused by a striking accumulation of giant glucuronidase-containing lysosomes in tubule cells near the corticomedullary boundary. In normal mice lysosomal enzymes are coordinately released into the lumen of the kidney tubules and appreciable amounts of lysosomal enzymes are present in the urine. Levels of urinary lysosomal enzymes are much lower in beige mice than in normal mice. It appears that lysosomes may accumulate in beige mice because of defective exocytosis resulting either from decreased intracellular motility of lysosomes or from their improper fusion with the plasma membrane. A similar defect could account for characteristics of the Chediak-Higashi syndrome. PMID:408

  15. Lysosomal responses in the digestive gland of the freshwater mussel, Dreissena polymorpha, experimentally exposed to cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Giamberini, Laure; Cajaraville, Miren P.

    2005-06-01

    In order to examine the possible use of lysosomal response as a biomarker of freshwater quality, structural changes of lysosomes were measured by image analysis in the digestive gland of the zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha, exposed in laboratory conditions to cadmium. Mussels were exposed to the metal (10 and 200 {mu}g/L) for 3 weeks and randomly collected after 7 and 21 days. At each treatment day, digestive tissues were excised and {beta}-glucuronidase activity was revealed in cryotome sections. Four stereological parameters were calculated: lysosomal volume density, lysosomal surface density, lysosomal surface to volume ratio, and lysosomal numerical density. The changesmore » observed in this study reflected a general activation of the lysosomal system, including an increase in both the number and the size of lysosomes in the digestive gland cells of mussels exposed to cadmium. The digestive lysosomal response in zebra mussels was related to exposure time and to metal concentration, demonstrating the potential of this biomarker in freshwater biomonitoring.« less

  16. Actin Filaments and Myosin I Alpha Cooperate with Microtubules for the Movement of LysosomesV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Cordonnier, Marie-Neige; Dauzonne, Daniel; Louvard, Daniel; Coudrier, Evelyne

    2001-01-01

    An earlier report suggested that actin and myosin I alpha (MMIα), a myosin associated with endosomes and lysosomes, were involved in the delivery of internalized molecules to lysosomes. To determine whether actin and MMIα were involved in the movement of lysosomes, we analyzed by time-lapse video microscopy the dynamic of lysosomes in living mouse hepatoma cells (BWTG3 cells), producing green fluorescent protein actin or a nonfunctional domain of MMIα. In GFP-actin cells, lysosomes displayed a combination of rapid long-range directional movements dependent on microtubules, short random movements, and pauses, sometimes on actin filaments. We showed that the inhibition of the dynamics of actin filaments by cytochalasin D increased pauses of lysosomes on actin structures, while depolymerization of actin filaments using latrunculin A increased the mobility of lysosomes but impaired the directionality of their long-range movements. The production of a nonfunctional domain of MMIα impaired the intracellular distribution of lysosomes and the directionality of their long-range movements. Altogether, our observations indicate for the first time that both actin filaments and MMIα contribute to the movement of lysosomes in cooperation with microtubules and their associated molecular motors. PMID:11739797

  17. Vacuolin-1 potently and reversibly inhibits autophagosome-lysosome fusion by activating RAB5A

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yingying; Dong, Shichen; Hao, Baixia; Li, Chang; Zhu, Kaiyuan; Guo, Wenjing; Wang, Qian; Cheung, King-Ho; Wong, Connie WM; Wu, Wu-Tian; Markus, Huss; Yue, Jianbo

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic lysosomal degradation process essential for cellular homeostasis and cell survival. Dysfunctional autophagy has been associated with a wide range of human diseases, e.g., cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. A large number of small molecules that modulate autophagy have been widely used to dissect this process and some of them, e.g., chloroquine (CQ), might be ultimately applied to treat a variety of autophagy-associated human diseases. Here we found that vacuolin-1 potently and reversibly inhibited the fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes in mammalian cells, thereby inducing the accumulation of autophagosomes. Interestingly, vacuolin-1 was less toxic but at least 10-fold more potent in inhibiting autophagy compared with CQ. Vacuolin-1 treatment also blocked the fusion between endosomes and lysosomes, resulting in a defect in general endosomal-lysosomal degradation. Treatment of cells with vacuolin-1 alkalinized lysosomal pH and decreased lysosomal Ca2+ content. Besides marginally inhibiting vacuolar ATPase activity, vacuolin-1 treatment markedly activated RAB5A GTPase activity. Expression of a dominant negative mutant of RAB5A or RAB5A knockdown significantly inhibited vacuolin-1-induced autophagosome-lysosome fusion blockage, whereas expression of a constitutive active form of RAB5A suppressed autophagosome-lysosome fusion. These data suggest that vacuolin-1 activates RAB5A to block autophagosome-lysosome fusion. Vacuolin-1 and its analogs present a novel class of drug that can potently and reversibly modulate autophagy. PMID:25483964

  18. [Therapy of lysosomal storage diseases: update and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Lara-Aguilar, Ricardo Alejandro; Juárez-Vázquez, Clara Ibet; Medina-Lozano, Claudina

    2011-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) are caused by monogenic mutations in genes coding for multiple aberrant proteins involved in the catabolism of complex lipids, glycosaminoglycans, oligosaccharides, or nucleic acids. The pathophysiology of the LSD is due to abnormal accumulation of non-hydrolyzed substrate in the lysosomes, affecting the architecture and function of cells, tissues and organs. Due to their genic and allelic heterogeneity the LSD present a wide clinical spectrum in severity of symptoms, evolution and age of onset. The therapeutic strategy has two goals: 1) Palliative management of symptoms (splenectomy, surgery to improve or restore joints or bones, drugs for CNS symptoms, etc.), and 2) The correction of activity of the mutant protein, the former has two approaches: A) Replacing deficient protein (bone marrow transplantation, hematopoietic stem cells or umbilical cord blood cells; replacement with recombinant enzyme and gene therapy) and B) Activate or enhanced the functionality of the mutant enzyme with therapeutic small molecules. Neither of the known treatments is able to address all aspects of these multisystemic disorders, nor cure the patients. Currently, the combination of corrective therapy (CT) with paliative therapy (PT) is the most promising strategy to solve most of the multisystem manifestations. The multidisciplinary medical care is fundamental for diagnosis, treatment and control of disease. Nanotechnology opens a promising new era in the treatment of LSD. Finally, the LSD that has CT must be included in newborn screening programs in order to implement timely treatment and prevent irreversible damage.

  19. Lysosomal Acid Lipase Hydrolyzes Retinyl Ester and Affects Retinoid Turnover.

    PubMed

    Grumet, Lukas; Eichmann, Thomas O; Taschler, Ulrike; Zierler, Kathrin A; Leopold, Christina; Moustafa, Tarek; Radovic, Branislav; Romauch, Matthias; Yan, Cong; Du, Hong; Haemmerle, Guenter; Zechner, Rudolf; Fickert, Peter; Kratky, Dagmar; Zimmermann, Robert; Lass, Achim

    2016-08-19

    Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) is essential for the clearance of endocytosed cholesteryl ester and triglyceride-rich chylomicron remnants. Humans and mice with defective or absent LAL activity accumulate large amounts of cholesteryl esters and triglycerides in multiple tissues. Although chylomicrons also contain retinyl esters (REs), a role of LAL in the clearance of endocytosed REs has not been reported. In this study, we found that murine LAL exhibits RE hydrolase activity. Pharmacological inhibition of LAL in the human hepatocyte cell line HepG2, incubated with chylomicrons, led to increased accumulation of REs in endosomal/lysosomal fractions. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition or genetic ablation of LAL in murine liver largely reduced in vitro acid RE hydrolase activity. Interestingly, LAL-deficient mice exhibited increased RE content in the duodenum and jejunum but decreased RE content in the liver. Furthermore, LAL-deficient mice challenged with RE gavage exhibited largely reduced post-prandial circulating RE content, indicating that LAL is required for efficient nutritional vitamin A availability. In summary, our results indicate that LAL is the major acid RE hydrolase and required for functional retinoid homeostasis. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Gene therapy for the neurological manifestations in lysosomal storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Seng H

    2014-09-01

    Over the past several years, considerable progress has been made in the development of gene therapy as a therapeutic strategy for a variety of inherited metabolic diseases, including neuropathic lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs). The premise of gene therapy for this group of diseases is borne of findings that genetic modification of a subset of cells can provide a more global benefit by virtue of the ability of the secreted lysosomal enzymes to effect cross-correction of adjacent and distal cells. Preclinical studies in small and large animal models of these disorders support the application of either a direct in vivo approach using recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors or an ex vivo strategy using lentiviral vector-modified hematopoietic stem cells to correct the neurological component of these diseases. Early clinical studies utilizing both approaches have begun or are in late-stage planning for a small number of neuropathic LSDs. Although initial indications from these studies are encouraging, it is evident that second-generation vectors that exhibit a greater safety profile and transduction activity may be required before this optimism can be fully realized. Here, I review recent progress and the remaining challenges to treat the neurological aspects of various LSDs using this therapeutic paradigm. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. New therapeutic prospects for the glycosphingolipid lysosomal storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Platt, F M; Butters, T D

    1998-08-15

    The glycosphingolipid (GSL) lysosomal storage diseases result from mutations in the genes that encode the enzymes required for glycosphingolipid catabolism within lysosomes. They are relatively rare diseases, but are frequently severe in terms of their pathology. Many involve progressive neurodegeneration, and in the most severe forms result in death in early infancy. The therapeutic options for treating these diseases are limited, and for the majority of these disorders there are currently no therapies available. To date, most research has focused on correcting the genetic lesion by gene therapy or by augmenting the enzyme activity deficient in these patients by introducing fully functional enzyme. This can be achieved by bone marrow transplantation or intravenous infusion of purified or recombinant enzyme (enzyme replacement). Gene therapy and enzyme replacement therapy are disease specific, and pharmacological approaches for the treatment of these disorders have not been fully explored. In this commentary, the problems associated with disease therapy are discussed, and a pharmacological agent (N-butyldeoxynojirimycin) is presented for the potential generic treatment of this family of disorders. Successful prevention of glycosphingolipid storage in a mouse model of Tay-Sachs disease suggests that this strategy merits clinical evaluation.

  2. Gene therapy for the neurological manifestations in lysosomal storage disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Seng H.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past several years, considerable progress has been made in the development of gene therapy as a therapeutic strategy for a variety of inherited metabolic diseases, including neuropathic lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs). The premise of gene therapy for this group of diseases is borne of findings that genetic modification of a subset of cells can provide a more global benefit by virtue of the ability of the secreted lysosomal enzymes to effect cross-correction of adjacent and distal cells. Preclinical studies in small and large animal models of these disorders support the application of either a direct in vivo approach using recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors or an ex vivo strategy using lentiviral vector-modified hematopoietic stem cells to correct the neurological component of these diseases. Early clinical studies utilizing both approaches have begun or are in late-stage planning for a small number of neuropathic LSDs. Although initial indications from these studies are encouraging, it is evident that second-generation vectors that exhibit a greater safety profile and transduction activity may be required before this optimism can be fully realized. Here, I review recent progress and the remaining challenges to treat the neurological aspects of various LSDs using this therapeutic paradigm. PMID:24683200

  3. Hydrogen peroxide induces lysosomal protease alterations in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daniel C; Mason, Ceceile W; Goodman, Carl B; Holder, Maurice S; Kirksey, Otis W; Womble, Tracy A; Severs, Walter B; Palm, Donald E

    2007-09-01

    Alterations in lysosomal proteases have been implicated in many neurodegenerative diseases. The current study demonstrates a concentration-dependent decrease in PC12 cell viability and transient changes in cystatin C (CYSC), cathepsin B (CATB), cathepsin D (CATD) and caspase-3 following exposure to H2O2. Furthermore, activation of CATD occurred following exposure to H2O2 and cysteine protease suppression, while inhibition of CATD with pepstatin A significantly improved cell viability. Additionally, significant PARP cleavage, suggestive of caspase-3-like activity, was observed following H2O2 exposure, while inhibition of caspase-3 significantly increased cell viability compared to H2O2 administration alone. Collectively, our data suggest that H2O2 induced cell death is regulated at least in part by caspase-3 and CATD. Furthermore, cysteine protease suppression increases CATD expression and activity. These studies provide insight for alternate pathways and potential therapeutic targets of cell death associated with oxidative stress and lysosomal protease alterations.

  4. Lysosomal Acid Phosphatase Deficiency: Liver Specific Variant in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Lalley, Peter A.; Shows, Thomas B.

    1977-01-01

    The number and classes of genes responsible for the final expression of lysosomal acid phosphatase were investigated in the mouse (Mus musculus ). In mouse tissues, lysosomal acid phosphatase activity was separated by gel electrophoresis into two major zones of activity. The cathodal zone of activity in liver of the SM/J inbred strain was almost completely absent, while the anodal zone was increased in activity. Other tissues from SM/J were not affected, nor were livers and other tissues in 27 inbred mouse strains. Genetic studies indicated that this deficiency variant segregated as an autosomal codominant gene which has been designated Apl to symbolize the acid phosphatase liver phenotype. The Apl gene was not linked to markers on chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 8, or X. Electrophoretic, heat denaturation, neuraminidase treatment, tartrate inhibition studies and tissue mixing experiments suggested that the Apl gene was not a structural gene for acid phosphatase, but a separate gene that functions in liver and is responsible for controlling or modifying an acid phosphatase structural gene product. PMID:17248764

  5. Toxoplasma depends on lysosomal consumption of autophagosomes for persistent infection.

    PubMed

    Di Cristina, Manlio; Dou, Zhicheng; Lunghi, Matteo; Kannan, Geetha; Huynh, My-Hang; McGovern, Olivia L; Schultz, Tracey L; Schultz, Aric J; Miller, Alyssa J; Hayes, Beth M; van der Linden, Wouter; Emiliani, Carla; Bogyo, Matthew; Besteiro, Sébastien; Coppens, Isabelle; Carruthers, Vern B

    2017-06-19

    Globally, nearly 2 billion people are infected with the intracellular protozoan Toxoplasma gondii 1 . This persistent infection can cause severe disease in immunocompromised people and is epidemiologically linked to major mental illnesses 2 and cognitive impairment 3 . There are currently no options for curing this infection. The lack of effective therapeutics is due partly to a poor understanding of the essential pathways that maintain long-term infection. Although it is known that Toxoplasma replicates slowly within intracellular cysts demarcated with a cyst wall, precisely how it sustains itself and remodels organelles in this niche is unknown. Here, we identify a key role for proteolysis within the parasite lysosomal organelle (the vacuolar compartment or VAC) in turnover of autophagosomes and persistence during neural infection. We found that disrupting a VAC-localized cysteine protease compromised VAC digestive function and markedly reduced chronic infection. Death of parasites lacking the VAC protease was preceded by accumulation of undigested autophagosomes in the parasite cytoplasm. These findings suggest an unanticipated function for parasite lysosomal degradation in chronic infection, and identify an intrinsic role for autophagy in the T. gondii parasite and its close relatives. This work also identifies a key element of Toxoplasma persistence and suggests that VAC proteolysis is a prospective target for pharmacological development.

  6. Toxoplasma depends on lysosomal consumption of autophagosomes for persistent infection

    PubMed Central

    Di Cristina, Manlio; Dou, Zhicheng; Lunghi, Matteo; Kannan, Geetha; Huynh, My-Hang; McGovern, Olivia L.; Schultz, Tracey L.; Schultz, Aric J.; Miller, Alyssa J.; Hayes, Beth M.; van der Linden, Wouter; Emiliani, Carla; Bogyo, Matthew; Besteiro, Sébastien; Coppens, Isabelle; Carruthers, Vern B.

    2017-01-01

    Globally, nearly 2 billion people are infected with the intracellular protozoan Toxoplasma gondii1. This persistent infection can cause severe disease in immunocompromised people and is epidemiologically linked to major mental illnesses2 and cognitive impairment3. There are currently no options for curing this infection. The lack of effective therapeutics is due partly to a poor understanding of essential pathways that maintain this long-term infection. Although it is known that Toxoplasma replicates slowly within intracellular cysts demarcated with a cyst wall, precisely how it sustains itself and remodels organelles in this niche is unknown. Here we identify a key role for proteolysis within the parasite lysosomal organelle (the vacuolar compartment or VAC) in turnover of autophagosomes and persistence during neural infection. We found that disrupting a VAC-localized cysteine protease compromised VAC digestive function and markedly reduced chronic infection. Death of parasites lacking the VAC protease was preceded by accumulation of undigested autophagosomes in the parasite cytoplasm. These findings suggest an unanticipated function for parasite lysosomal degradation in chronic infection and identify an intrinsic role for autophagy in the T. gondii parasite and its close relatives. This work also identifies a key element of Toxoplasma persistence and suggests that VAC proteolysis is a prospective target for pharmacologic development. PMID:28628099

  7. Energetic funnel facilitates facilitated diffusion

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Transcription factors (TFs) are able to associate to their binding sites on DNA faster than the physical limit posed by diffusion. Such high association rates can be achieved by alternating between three-dimensional diffusion and one-dimensional sliding along the DNA chain, a mechanism-dubbed facilitated diffusion. By studying a collection of TF binding sites of Escherichia coli from the RegulonDB database and of Bacillus subtilis from DBTBS, we reveal a funnel in the binding energy landscape around the target sequences. We show that such a funnel is linked to the presence of gradients of AT in the base composition of the DNA region around the binding sites. An extensive computational study of the stochastic sliding process along the energetic landscapes obtained from the database shows that the funnel can significantly enhance the probability of TFs to find their target sequences when sliding in their proximity. We demonstrate that this enhancement leads to a speed-up of the association process. PMID:29216364

  8. Energetic funnel facilitates facilitated diffusion.

    PubMed

    Cencini, Massimo; Pigolotti, Simone

    2018-01-25

    Transcription factors (TFs) are able to associate to their binding sites on DNA faster than the physical limit posed by diffusion. Such high association rates can be achieved by alternating between three-dimensional diffusion and one-dimensional sliding along the DNA chain, a mechanism-dubbed facilitated diffusion. By studying a collection of TF binding sites of Escherichia coli from the RegulonDB database and of Bacillus subtilis from DBTBS, we reveal a funnel in the binding energy landscape around the target sequences. We show that such a funnel is linked to the presence of gradients of AT in the base composition of the DNA region around the binding sites. An extensive computational study of the stochastic sliding process along the energetic landscapes obtained from the database shows that the funnel can significantly enhance the probability of TFs to find their target sequences when sliding in their proximity. We demonstrate that this enhancement leads to a speed-up of the association process. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. [Influence of delta-sleep inducing peptide on the state of lysosomal membranes and intensity of lysosomal proteolysis in different rat tissues during physiological aging of the organism].

    PubMed

    Kutilin, D S; Bondarenko, T I; Mikhaleva, I I

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that subcutaneous injection of exogenous delta-sleep inducing peptide (DSIP) to rats aged 2-24 months in a dose of 100 μg/kg animal body weight by courses of 5 consecutive days per month has a stabilizing effect on the state of lysosomal membranes in rat tissues (brain, heart muscle and liver) at different ontogenetic stages, and this effect is accompanied by increasing intensity of lysosomal proteolysis in these tissues.

  10. Lysosomal Acid Lipase Deficiency: Report of Five Cases across the Age Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Curiati, Marco Antonio; Kyosen, Sandra Obikawa; Pereira, Vanessa Gonçalves; Patrício, Francy Reis da Silva; Martins, Ana Maria

    2018-01-01

    Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) deficiency is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the LIPA gene that leads to premature organ damage and mortality. We present retrospective data from medical records of 5 Brazilian patients, showing the broad clinical spectrum of the disease.

  11. Lysosomal Rerouting of Hsp70 Trafficking as a Potential Immune Activating Tool for Targeting Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Juhász, Kata; Thuenauer, Roland; Spachinger, Andrea; Duda, Ernő; Horváth, Ibolya; Vígh, László; Sonnleitner, Alois; Balogi, Zsolt

    2013-01-01

    Tumor specific cell surface localization and release of the stress inducible heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) stimulate the immune system against cancer cells. A key immune stimulatory function of tumor-derived Hsp70 has been exemplified with the murine melanoma cell model, B16 overexpressing exogenous Hsp70. Despite the therapeutic potential mechanism of Hsp70 transport to the surface and release remained poorly understood. We investigated principles of Hsp70 trafficking in B16 melanoma cells with low and high level of Hsp70. In cells with low level of Hsp70 apparent trafficking of Hsp70 was mediated by endosomes. Excess Hsp70 triggered a series of changes such as a switch of Hsp70 trafficking from endosomes to lysosomes and a concomitant accumulation of Hsp70 in lysosomes. Moreover, lysosomal rerouting resulted in an elevated concentration of surface Hsp70 and enabled active release of Hsp70. In fact, hyperthermia, a clinically applicable approach triggered immediate active lysosomal release of soluble Hsp70 from cells with excess Hsp70. Furthermore, excess Hsp70 enabled targeting of internalized surface Hsp70 to lysosomes, allowing in turn heat-induced secretion of surface Hsp70. Altogether, we show that excess Hsp70 expressed in B16 melanoma cells diverts Hsp70 trafficking from endosomes to lysosomes, thereby supporting its surface localization and lysosomal release. Controlled excess-induced lysosomal rerouting and secretion of Hsp70 is proposed as a promising tool to stimulate anti-tumor immunity targeting melanoma. PMID:22920897

  12. The FTLD risk factor TMEM106B and MAP6 control dendritic trafficking of lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Schwenk, Benjamin M; Lang, Christina M; Hogl, Sebastian; Tahirovic, Sabina; Orozco, Denise; Rentzsch, Kristin; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Capell, Anja; Haass, Christian; Edbauer, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    TMEM106B is a major risk factor for frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43 pathology. TMEM106B localizes to lysosomes, but its function remains unclear. We show that TMEM106B knockdown in primary neurons affects lysosomal trafficking and blunts dendritic arborization. We identify microtubule-associated protein 6 (MAP6) as novel interacting protein for TMEM106B. MAP6 over-expression inhibits dendritic branching similar to TMEM106B knockdown. MAP6 knockdown fully rescues the dendritic phenotype of TMEM106B knockdown, supporting a functional interaction between TMEM106B and MAP6. Live imaging reveals that TMEM106B knockdown and MAP6 overexpression strongly increase retrograde transport of lysosomes in dendrites. Downregulation of MAP6 in TMEM106B knockdown neurons restores the balance of anterograde and retrograde lysosomal transport and thereby prevents loss of dendrites. To strengthen the link, we enhanced anterograde lysosomal transport by expressing dominant-negative Rab7-interacting lysosomal protein (RILP), which also rescues the dendrite loss in TMEM106B knockdown neurons. Thus, TMEM106B/MAP6 interaction is crucial for controlling dendritic trafficking of lysosomes, presumably by acting as a molecular brake for retrograde transport. Lysosomal misrouting may promote neurodegeneration in patients with TMEM106B risk variants. PMID:24357581

  13. Disorders of lysosomal acidification - the emerging role of v-ATPase in aging and neurodegenerative disease

    PubMed Central

    Colacurcio, Daniel J.; Nixon, Ralph A.

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy and endocytosis deliver unneeded cellular materials to lysosomes for degradation. Beyond processing cellular waste, lysosomes release metabolites and ions that serve signaling and nutrient sensing roles, linking the functions of the lysosome to various pathways for intracellular metabolism and nutrient homeostasis. Each of these lysosomal behaviors is influenced by the intraluminal pH of the lysosome, which is maintained in the low acidic range by a proton pump, the vacuolar ATPase (v-ATPase). New reports implicate altered v-ATPase activity and lysosomal pH dysregulation in cellular aging, longevity, and adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases, including forms of Parkinson Disease and Alzheimer Disease. Genetic defects of subunits composing the v-ATPase or v-ATPase-related proteins occur in an increasingly recognized group of familial neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we review the expanding roles of the v-ATPase complex as a platform regulating lysosomal proteolysis and cellular homeostasis. We discuss the unique vulnerability of neurons to persistent low level lysosomal dysfunction and review recent clinical and experimental studies that link dysfunction of the v-ATPase complex to neurodegenerative diseases across the age spectrum. PMID:27197071

  14. Lysosomal cathepsin B participates in the podosome-mediated extracellular matrix degradation and invasion via secreted lysosomes in v-Src fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Tu, Chun; Ortega-Cava, Cesar F; Chen, Gengsheng; Fernandes, Norvin D; Cavallo-Medved, Dora; Sloane, Bonnie F; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2008-11-15

    Podosomes mediate cell migration and invasion by coordinating the reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and focal matrix degradation. MMP and serine proteases have been found to function at podosomes. The lysosomal cysteine cathepsins, a third major class of matrix-degrading enzymes involved in tumor invasion and tissue remodeling, have yet to be linked to podosomes with the exception of cathepsin K in osteoclasts. Using inhibitors and shRNA-mediated depletion, we show that cathepsin B participates in podosomes-mediated focal matrix degradation and invasion in v-Src-transformed fibroblasts. We observed that lysosomal marker LAMP-1 localized at the center of podosome rosettes protruding into extracellular matrix using confocal microscopy. Time-lapse live-cell imaging revealed that lysosomal vesicles moved to and fused with podosomes. Disruption of lysosomal pH gradient with Bafilomycin A1, chloroquine, or ammonium chloride greatly enhanced the formation of podosomes and increased the matrix degradation. Live-cell imaging showed that actin structures, induced shortly after Bafilomycin A1 treatment, were closely associated with lysosomes. Overall, our results suggest that cathepsin B, delivered by lysosomal vesicles, is involved in the matrix degradtion of podosomes.

  15. Camalexin-induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells involves alterations of expression and activity of lysosomal protease cathepsin D.

    PubMed

    Smith, Basil; Randle, Diandra; Mezencev, Roman; Thomas, LeeShawn; Hinton, Cimona; Odero-Marah, Valerie

    2014-04-02

    Camalexin, the phytoalexin produced in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, possesses antiproliferative and cancer chemopreventive effects. We have demonstrated that the cytostatic/cytotoxic effects of camalexin on several prostate cancer (PCa) cells are due to oxidative stress. Lysosomes are vulnerable organelles to Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS)-induced injuries, with the potential to initiate and or facilitate apoptosis subsequent to release of proteases such as cathepsin D (CD) into the cytosol. We therefore hypothesized that camalexin reduces cell viability in PCa cells via alterations in expression and activity of CD. Cell viability was evaluated by MTS cell proliferation assay in LNCaP and ARCaP Epithelial (E) cells, and their respective aggressive sublines C4-2 and ARCaP Mesenchymal (M) cells, whereby the more aggressive PCa cells (C4-2 and ARCaPM) displayed greater sensitivity to camalexin treatments than the lesser aggressive cells (LNCaP and ARCaPE). Immunocytochemical analysis revealed CD relocalization from the lysosome to the cytosol subsequent to camalexin treatments, which was associated with increased protein expression of mature CD; p53, a transcriptional activator of CD; BAX, a downstream effector of CD, and cleaved PARP, a hallmark for apoptosis. Therefore, camalexin reduces cell viability via CD and may present as a novel therapeutic agent for treatment of metastatic prostate cancer cells.

  16. Camalexin-Induced Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells Involves Alterations of Expression and Activity of Lysosomal Protease Cathepsin D

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Basil; Randle, Diandra; Mezencev, Roman; Thomas, LeeShawn; Hinton, Cimona; Marah, Valerie

    2015-01-01

    Camalexin, the phytoalexin produced in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, possesses antiproliferative and cancer chemopreventive effects. We have demonstrated that the cytostatic/cytotoxic effects of camalexin on several prostate cancer (PCa) cells are due to oxidative stress. Lysosomes are vulnerable organelles to Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS)-induced injuries, with the potential to initiate and or facilitate apoptosis subsequent to release of proteases such as cathepsin D (CD) into the cytosol. We therefore hypothesized that camalexin reduces cell viability in PCa cells via alterations in expression and activity of CD. Cell viability was evaluated by MTS cell proliferation assay in LNCaP and ARCaP Epithelial (E) cells, and their respective aggressive sublines C4-2 and ARCaP Mesenchymal (M) cells, whereby the more aggressive PCa cells (C4-2 and ARCaPM) displayed greater sensitivity to camalexin treatments than the lesser aggressive cells (LNCaP and ARCaPE). Immunocytochemical analysis revealed CD relocalization from the lysosome to the cytosol subsequent to camalexin treatments, which was associated with increased protein expression of mature CD; p53, a transcriptional activator of CD; BAX, a downstream effector of CD, and cleaved PARP, a hallmark for apoptosis. Therefore, camalexin reduces cell viability via CD and may present as a novel therapeutic agent for treatment of metastatic prostate cancer cells. PMID:24699144

  17. Immunoelectron microscopic analysis of lysosomal deposits in alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase deficiency with angiokeratoma corporis diffusum.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Akira; Tsuyama, Shinichiro; Murata, Fusayoshi; Kodama, Kazuo; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Kanzaki, Tamotsu

    2002-05-01

    Alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (alpha-NAGA) deficiency with angiokeratoma corporis diffusum (AKCD) is one of the lysosomal storage diseases. GalNAc(alpha))1-O-Ser/Thr (Tn) is theoretically deposited in lysosomes, but substances with attached galactose and neuraminic (sialic) acid (T and sialosyl Tn, respectively) are excreted in patients' urine. In this study, in two Japanese cases we analyzed the material accumulated in lysosomes using immunoelectron microscopy with mouse antibodies to Tn, sialosyl Tn and T (Thomsen-Friedenreich) antigens in order to find out what substance(s) is really deposited in lysosomes. We found that only GalNAc(alpha)1-O-Ser/Thr (Tn) was actually accumulated in vacuolated lysosomes of vascular endothelial cells, eccrine sweat gland cells, fibroblasts and pericytes. Galactosylation and sialylation of Tn appears to occur in cells other than those in the skin. The results suggest that this disease is caused by a single enzyme deficiency.

  18. Lysosome activation clears aggregates and enhances quiescent neural stem cell activation during aging.

    PubMed

    Leeman, Dena S; Hebestreit, Katja; Ruetz, Tyson; Webb, Ashley E; McKay, Andrew; Pollina, Elizabeth A; Dulken, Ben W; Zhao, Xiaoai; Yeo, Robin W; Ho, Theodore T; Mahmoudi, Salah; Devarajan, Keerthana; Passegué, Emmanuelle; Rando, Thomas A; Frydman, Judith; Brunet, Anne

    2018-03-16

    In the adult brain, the neural stem cell (NSC) pool comprises quiescent and activated populations with distinct roles. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that quiescent and activated NSCs exhibited differences in their protein homeostasis network. Whereas activated NSCs had active proteasomes, quiescent NSCs contained large lysosomes. Quiescent NSCs from young mice accumulated protein aggregates, and many of these aggregates were stored in large lysosomes. Perturbation of lysosomal activity in quiescent NSCs affected protein-aggregate accumulation and the ability of quiescent NSCs to activate. During aging, quiescent NSCs displayed defects in their lysosomes, increased accumulation of protein aggregates, and reduced ability to activate. Enhancement of the lysosome pathway in old quiescent NSCs cleared protein aggregates and ameliorated the ability of quiescent NSCs to activate, allowing them to regain a more youthful state. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  19. The lysosome as a command-and-control center for cellular metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chun-Yan; Zoncu, Roberto

    2016-09-12

    Lysosomes are membrane-bound organelles found in every eukaryotic cell. They are widely known as terminal catabolic stations that rid cells of waste products and scavenge metabolic building blocks that sustain essential biosynthetic reactions during starvation. In recent years, this classical view has been dramatically expanded by the discovery of new roles of the lysosome in nutrient sensing, transcriptional regulation, and metabolic homeostasis. These discoveries have elevated the lysosome to a decision-making center involved in the control of cellular growth and survival. Here we review these recently discovered properties of the lysosome, with a focus on how lysosomal signaling pathways respond to external and internal cues and how they ultimately enable metabolic homeostasis and cellular adaptation. © 2016 Lim and Zoncu.

  20. Alterations in membrane trafficking and pathophysiological implications in lysosomal storage disorders.

    PubMed

    Kuech, Eva-Maria; Brogden, Graham; Naim, Hassan Y

    2016-11-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders are a heterogeneous group of more than 50 distinct inborn metabolic diseases affecting about 1 in 5000 to 7000 live births. The diseases often result from mutations followed by functional deficiencies of enzymes or transporters within the acidic environment of the lysosome, which mediate the degradation of a wide subset of substrates, including glycosphingolipids, glycosaminoglycans, cholesterol, glycogen, oligosaccharides, peptides and glycoproteins, or the export of the respective degradation products from the lysosomes. The progressive accumulation of uncleaved substrates occurs in multiple organs and finally causes a broad spectrum of different pathologies including visceral, neurological, skeletal and hematologic manifestations. Besides deficient lysosomal enzymes and transporters other defects may lead to lysosomal storage disorders, including activator defects, membrane defects or defects in modifier proteins. In this review we concentrate on four different lysosomal storage disorders: Niemann-Pick type C, Fabry disease, Gaucher disease and Pompe disease. While the last three are caused by defective lysosomal hydrolases, Niemann-Pick type C is caused by the inability to export LDL-derived cholesterol out of the lysosome. We want to emphasise potential implications of membrane trafficking defects on the pathology of these diseases, as many mutations interfere with correct lysosomal protein trafficking and alter cellular lipid homeostasis. Current therapeutic strategies are summarised, including substrate reduction therapy as well as pharmacological chaperone therapy which directly aim to improve folding and lysosomal transport of misfolded mutant proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  1. Infant case of lysosomal acid lipase deficiency: Wolman's disease.

    PubMed

    Sadhukhan, Meghmala; Saha, Amit; Vara, Roshni; Bhaduri, Bim

    2014-05-15

    Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder which causes two distinct clinical phenotypes: Wolman's disease and cholesterol ester storage disease. LAL hydrolyses LDL-derived triglycerides and cholesterol esters to glycerol or cholesterol and free fatty acids. Its deficiency leads to accumulation of intracellular triglycerides and/or cholesterol esters. In early onset LAL deficiency, clinical manifestations start in the first few weeks of life with persistent vomiting, failure to thrive, hepatosplenomegaly, liver dysfunction and hepatic failure. Adrenal calcification is a striking feature but is present in only about 50% of cases. We report a case of an infant presenting with vomiting, diarrhoea, hepatosplenomegaly and poor weight gain that was subsequently diagnosed as Wolman's disease. He was entered into a clinical trial for LAL replacement therapy. This case reinforces that early onset LAL deficiency should be considered in a baby presenting with failure to thrive, gastrointestinal symptoms and hepatosplenomegaly. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  2. Lysosomal Acid Lipase Deficiency: Could Dyslipidemia Drive the Diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Guardamagna, Ornella; Guaraldi, Federica

    2017-01-01

    LAL-deficiency (LAL-D) is a rare and systemic condition, secondary to LIPA gene mutations, responsible for lysosomal accumulation of cholesteryl esters and triglycerides, whose manifestations are very heterogeneous in terms of the age of onset, severity and the type of clinical and radiological manifestations. Dyslipidemia, hepatomegaly and hepatosteatosis with increased levels of transaminases are the most common features. The increased risk of premature atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disorders, secondary to a generalized alteration of lipid profile and lipoprotein dysfunction associated with LAL-D, has been increasingly pointed out. Therefore, medical awareness towards LAL-deficiency should be increased, since this condition has to be considered in the differential diagnosis of pediatric conditions manifested with dyslipidemia and hepatic accumulation of intracellular products. On the other hand, early patient identification and management remain challenging. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Mexican consensus on lysosomal acid lipase deficiency diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Frias, R; García-Ortiz, J E; Valencia-Mayoral, P F; Castro-Narro, G E; Medina-Bravo, P G; Santillán-Hernández, Y; Flores-Calderón, J; Mehta, R; Arellano-Valdés, C A; Carbajal-Rodríguez, L; Navarrete-Martínez, J I; Urbán-Reyes, M L; Valadez-Reyes, M T; Zárate-Mondragón, F; Consuelo-Sánchez, A

    Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency (LAL-D) causes progressive cholesteryl ester and triglyceride accumulation in the lysosomes of hepatocytes and monocyte-macrophage system cells, resulting in a systemic disease with various manifestations that may go unnoticed. It is indispensable to recognize the deficiency, which can present in patients at any age, so that specific treatment can be given. The aim of the present review was to offer a guide for physicians in understanding the fundamental diagnostic aspects of LAL-D, to successfully aid in its identification. The review was designed by a group of Mexican experts and is presented as an orienting algorithm for the pediatrician, internist, gastroenterologist, endocrinologist, geneticist, pathologist, radiologist, and other specialists that could come across this disease in their patients. An up-to-date review of the literature in relation to the clinical manifestations of LAL-D and its diagnosis was performed. The statements were formulated based on said review and were then voted upon. The structured quantitative method employed for reaching consensus was the nominal group technique. A practical algorithm of the diagnostic process in LAL-D patients was proposed, based on clinical and laboratory data indicative of the disease and in accordance with the consensus established for each recommendation. The algorithm provides a sequence of clinical actions from different studies for optimizing the diagnostic process of patients suspected of having LAL-D. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  4. Synergistic Anticancer Action of Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization and Glycolysis Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kosic, Milica; Arsikin-Csordas, Katarina; Paunovic, Verica; Firestone, Raymond A; Ristic, Biljana; Mircic, Aleksandar; Petricevic, Sasa; Bosnjak, Mihajlo; Zogovic, Nevena; Mandic, Milos; Bumbasirevic, Vladimir; Trajkovic, Vladimir; Harhaji-Trajkovic, Ljubica

    2016-10-28

    We investigated the in vitro and in vivo anticancer effect of combining lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP)-inducing agent N-dodecylimidazole (NDI) with glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2DG). NDI-triggered LMP and 2DG-mediated glycolysis block synergized in inducing rapid ATP depletion, mitochondrial damage, and reactive oxygen species production, eventually leading to necrotic death of U251 glioma cells but not primary astrocytes. NDI/2DG-induced death of glioma cells was partly prevented by lysosomal cathepsin inhibitor E64 and antioxidant α-tocopherol, suggesting the involvement of LMP and oxidative stress in the observed cytotoxicity. LMP-inducing agent chloroquine also displayed a synergistic anticancer effect with 2DG, whereas glucose deprivation or glycolytic inhibitors iodoacetate and sodium fluoride synergistically cooperated with NDI, thus further indicating that the anticancer effect of NDI/2DG combination was indeed due to LMP and glycolysis block. The two agents synergistically induced ATP depletion, mitochondrial depolarization, oxidative stress, and necrotic death also in B16 mouse melanoma cells. Moreover, the combined oral administration of NDI and 2DG reduced in vivo melanoma growth in C57BL/6 mice by inducing necrotic death of tumor cells, without causing liver, spleen, or kidney toxicity. Based on these results, we propose that NDI-triggered LMP causes initial mitochondrial damage that is further increased by 2DG due to the lack of glycolytic ATP required to maintain mitochondrial health. This leads to a positive feedback cycle of mitochondrial dysfunction, ATP loss, and reactive oxygen species production, culminating in necrotic cell death. Therefore, the combination of LMP-inducing agents and glycolysis inhibitors seems worthy of further exploration as an anticancer strategy. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Radiological and clinical characterization of the lysosomal storage disorders: non-lipid disorders.

    PubMed

    Parker, E I; Xing, M; Moreno-De-Luca, A; Harmouche, E; Terk, M R

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a large group of genetic metabolic disorders that result in the accumulation of abnormal material, such as mucopolysaccharides, glycoproteins, amino acids and lipids, within cells. Since many LSDs manifest during infancy or early childhood, with potentially devastating consequences if left untreated, timely identification is imperative to prevent irreversible damage and early death. In this review, the key imaging features of the non-lipid or extralipid LSDs are examined and correlated with salient clinical manifestations and genetic information. Disorders are stratified based on the type of excess material causing tissue or organ dysfunction, with descriptions of the mucopolysaccharidoses, mucolipidoses, alpha-mannosidosis, glycogen storage disorder II and cystinosis. In addition, similarities and differences in radiological findings between each of these LSDs are highlighted to facilitate further recognition. Given the rare and extensive nature of the LSDs, mastery of their multiple clinical and radiological traits may seem challenging. However, an understanding of the distinguishing imaging characteristics of LSDs and their clinical correlates may allow radiologists to play a key role in the early diagnosis of these progressive and potentially fatal disorders.

  6. Combined effects of thermal stress and Cd on lysosomal biomarkers and transcription of genes encoding lysosomal enzymes and HSP70 in mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Izagirre, Urtzi; Errasti, Aitzpea; Bilbao, Eider; Múgica, María; Marigómez, Ionan

    2014-04-01

    In estuaries and coastal areas, intertidal organisms may be subject to thermal stress resulting from global warming, together with pollution. In the present study, the combined effects of thermal stress and exposure to Cd were investigated in the endo-lysosomal system of digestive cells in mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis. Mussels were maintained for 24h at 18°C and 26°C seawater temperature in absence and presence of 50 μg Cd/L seawater. Cadmium accumulation in digestive gland tissue, lysosomal structural changes and membrane stability were determined. Semi-quantitative PCR was applied to reveal the changes elicited by the different experimental conditions in hexosaminidase (hex), β-glucuronidase (gusb), cathepsin L (ctsl) and heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) gene transcription levels. Thermal stress provoked lysosomal enlargement whilst Cd-exposure led to fusion of lysosomes. Both thermal stress and Cd-exposure caused lysosomal membrane destabilisation. hex, gusb and ctsl genes but not hsp70 gene were transcriptionally up-regulated as a result of thermal stress. In contrast, all the studied genes were transcriptionally down-regulated in response to Cd-exposure. Cd bioaccumulation was comparable at 18°C and 26°C seawater temperatures but interactions between thermal stress and Cd-exposure were remarkable both in lysosomal biomarkers and in gene transcription. hex, gusb and ctsl genes, reacted to elevated temperature in absence of Cd but not in Cd-exposed mussels. Therefore, thermal stress resulting from global warming might influence the use and interpretation of lysosomal biomarkers in marine pollution monitoring programmes and, vice versa, the presence of pollutants may condition the capacity of mussels to respond against thermal stress in a climate change scenario. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Reversal of advanced disease in lysosomal acid lipase deficient mice: a model for lysosomal acid lipase deficiency disease.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying; Xu, You-Hai; Du, Hong; Quinn, Brian; Liou, Benjamin; Stanton, Lori; Inskeep, Venette; Ran, Huimin; Jakubowitz, Phillip; Grilliot, Nicholas; Grabowski, Gregory A

    2014-07-01

    Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) is an essential enzyme that hydrolyzes triglycerides (TG) and cholesteryl esters (CE) in lysosomes. Mutations of the LIPA gene lead to Wolman disease (WD) and cholesterol ester storage disease (CESD). The disease hallmarks include hepatosplenomegaly and extensive storage of CE and/or TG. The effects of intravenous investigational enzyme therapy (ET) on survival and efficacy were evaluated in Lipa knock out, lal-/- mice with advanced disease using recombinant human LAL (rhLAL). Comparative ET was conducted with lower doses (weekly, 0.8 and 3.2mg/kg) beginning at 16 weeks (study 1), and with higher dose (10mg/kg) in early (8-weeks), middle (16-weeks) and late (24-weeks) disease stages (study 2). In study 1, rhLAL extended the life span of lal-/- mice in a dose dependent manner by 52 (0.8 mg/kg) or 94 (3.2mg/kg) days. This was accompanied by partial correction of cholesterol and TG levels in spleen and liver. In study 2, the high dose resulted in a significant improvement in organ size (liver, spleen and small intestine) and tissue histology as well as significant decreases in cholesterol and TG in all three groups. In the treated livers and spleens the cholesterol and TG levels were reduced to below treatment initiation levels indicating a reversal of disease manifestations, even in advanced disease. ET diminished liver fibrosis and macrophage proliferation. These results show that LAL deficiency can be improved biochemically and histopathologically by various dosages of ET, even in advanced disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. SNAPIN is critical for lysosomal acidification and autophagosome maturation in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Bo; Huang, Qi-Quan; Birkett, Robert; Doyle, Renee; Dorfleutner, Andrea; Stehlik, Christian; He, Congcong; Pope, Richard M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We previously observed that SNAPIN, which is an adaptor protein in the SNARE core complex, was highly expressed in rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissue macrophages, but its role in macrophages and autoimmunity is unknown. To identify SNAPIN's role in these cells, we employed siRNA to silence the expression of SNAPIN in primary human macrophages. Silencing SNAPIN resulted in swollen lysosomes with impaired CTSD (cathepsin D) activation, although total CTSD was not reduced. Neither endosome cargo delivery nor lysosomal fusion with endosomes or autophagosomes was inhibited following the forced silencing of SNAPIN. The acidification of lysosomes and accumulation of autolysosomes in SNAPIN-silenced cells was inhibited, resulting in incomplete lysosomal hydrolysis and impaired macroautophagy/autophagy flux. Mechanistic studies employing ratiometric color fluorescence on living cells demonstrated that the reduction of SNAPIN resulted in a modest reduction of H+ pump activity; however, the more critical mechanism was a lysosomal proton leak. Overall, our results demonstrate that SNAPIN is critical in the maintenance of healthy lysosomes and autophagy through its role in lysosome acidification and autophagosome maturation in macrophages largely through preventing proton leak. These observations suggest an important role for SNAPIN and autophagy in the homeostasis of macrophages, particularly long-lived tissue resident macrophages. PMID:27929705

  9. Subversion of a lysosomal pathway regulating neutrophil apoptosis by a major bacterial toxin, pyocyanin.

    PubMed

    Prince, Lynne R; Bianchi, Stephen M; Vaughan, Kathryn M; Bewley, Martin A; Marriott, Helen M; Walmsley, Sarah R; Taylor, Graham W; Buttle, David J; Sabroe, Ian; Dockrell, David H; Whyte, Moira K B

    2008-03-01

    Neutrophils undergo rapid constitutive apoptosis that is accelerated following bacterial ingestion as part of effective immunity, but is also accelerated by bacterial exotoxins as a mechanism of immune evasion. The paradigm of pathogen-driven neutrophil apoptosis is exemplified by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxic metabolite, pyocyanin. We previously showed pyocyanin dramatically accelerates neutrophil apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo, impairs host defenses, and favors bacterial persistence. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of pyocyanin-induced neutrophil apoptosis. Pyocyanin induced early lysosomal dysfunction, shown by altered lysosomal pH, within 15 min of exposure. Lysosomal disruption was followed by mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, caspase activation, and destabilization of Mcl-1. Pharmacological inhibitors of a lysosomal protease, cathepsin D (CTSD), abrogated pyocyanin-induced apoptosis, and translocation of CTSD to the cytosol followed pyocyanin treatment and lysosomal disruption. A stable analog of cAMP (dibutyryl cAMP) impeded the translocation of CTSD and prevented the destabilization of Mcl-1 by pyocyanin. Thus, pyocyanin activated a coordinated series of events dependent upon lysosomal dysfunction and protease release, the first description of a bacterial toxin using a lysosomal cell death pathway. This may be a pathological pathway of cell death to which neutrophils are particularly susceptible, and could be therapeutically targeted to limit neutrophil death and preserve host responses.

  10. Structural changes in lysosomes from cultured human fibroblasts in Duchenne's muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    1981-01-01

    We have previously reported a decreased activity of the lysosomal enzyme dipeptidyl aminopeptidase-I (DAP-I) in cultured fibroblasts from patients with Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD). Here we report that electron microscope examination of these cells reveals the presence of abundant lamellar bodies, a morphologic abnormalities commonly associated with impaired lysosomal function. Morphometric analysis of these cytoplasmic figures in dystrophic cells shows a sevenfold increase relative to normal controls (P less than 0.01). Analysis of lysosomal density profiles by density gradient centrifugation reveals similar patterns in normal and DMD cells. Treatment of lysosomes wit the nonionic detergent Triton X-100 causes an activation of DAP-I. This activation, attributable to structure-linked latency, is markedly diminished in DMD cells which show an optimal activation of only 180% compared to 255% for control fibroblasts (P less than 0.01). These data suggest an alteration in the properties of the lysosomal membrane in DMD fibroblasts. This suggestion is also supported by studies on the release of DAP-I from lysosomes by osmotic shock which show it to be a membrane-associated enzyme with membrane-binding characteristics intermediate between those of tightly bound beta-glucosidase and those of unbound N-acetylgalactosaminidase. The latency characteristics of these other lysosomal enzymes are not altered in the DMD cells, indicating that the effect is specific for DAP-I. PMID:6782112

  11. The small GTPase Arl8b regulates assembly of the mammalian HOPS complex on lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Khatter, Divya; Raina, Vivek B.; Dwivedi, Devashish; Sindhwani, Aastha; Bahl, Surbhi; Sharma, Mahak

    2015-01-01

    The homotypic fusion and protein sorting (HOPS) complex is a multi-subunit complex conserved from yeast to mammals that regulates late endosome and lysosome fusion. However, little is known about how the HOPS complex is recruited to lysosomes in mammalian cells. Here, we report that the small GTPase Arl8b, but not Rab7 (also known as RAB7A), is essential for membrane localization of the human (h)Vps41 subunit of the HOPS complex. Assembly of the core HOPS subunits to Arl8b- and hVps41-positive lysosomes is guided by their subunit–subunit interactions. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated depletion of hVps41 resulted in the impaired degradation of EGFR that was rescued upon expression of wild-type but not an Arl8b-binding-defective mutant of hVps41, suggesting that Arl8b-dependent lysosomal localization of hVps41 is required for its endocytic function. Furthermore, we have also identified that the Arl8b effector SKIP (also known as PLEKHM2) interacts with and recruits HOPS subunits to Arl8b and kinesin-positive peripheral lysosomes. Accordingly, RNAi-mediated depletion of SKIP impaired lysosomal trafficking and degradation of EGFR. These findings reveal that Arl8b regulates the association of the human HOPS complex with lysosomal membranes, which is crucial for the function of this tethering complex in endocytic degradation. PMID:25908847

  12. Amino-Si-rhodamines: A new class of two-photon fluorescent dyes with intrinsic targeting ability for lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongxing; Liu, Jing; Wang, Linfang; Sun, Minjia; Yan, Xiaohan; Wang, Juanjuan; Guo, Jian-Ping; Guo, Wei

    2018-03-01

    Noninvasive and specific visualization of lysosomes by fluorescence technology is critical for studying lysosomal trafficking in health and disease and for evaluating new cancer therapeutics that target tumor cell lysosomes. To date, there are two basic types of lysosomal probes whose lysosomal localization correlates with lysosomal acidity and endocytosis pathway, respectively. However, the former may suffer from pH-sensitive lysosomal localization and alkalization-induced lysosomal enzyme inactivation, and the latter need long incubation time to penetrate cell membrane due to the energy-dependency of endocytosis process. In this work, a new class of two-photon fluorescent dyes, termed amino-Si-rhodamines (ASiRs), were developed, which possess the intrinsic lysosome-targeted ability that is independent of lysosomal acidity and endocytosis pathway. As a result, ASiRs show not only the stable lysosomal localization against lysosomal pH changes and negligible interference to lysosomal function, but also excellent cell-membrane-permeability due to the energy-independent passive diffusion pathway. These merits, coupled with their excellent two-photon photophysical properties, long-term retention ability in lysosomes, and negligible cytotoxicity, make ASiRs very suitable for real-time and long-term tracking of lysosomes in living cells or tissues without interference to normal cellular processes. Moreover, the easy functionalization via amino linker further allows the construction of various fluorescent probes for biological targets of interest based on ASiR skeleton, as indicated by the cancer-targeted fluorescent probe ASiR6 as well as a fluorescent peroxynitrite probe ASiR-P. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Synthetic High-Density Lipoprotein-Like Nanocarrier Improved Cellular Transport of Lysosomal Cholesterol in Human Sterol Carrier Protein-Deficient Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Nam, Da-Eun; Kim, Ok-Kyung; Park, Yoo Kyoung; Lee, Jeongmin

    2016-01-01

    Sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2), which is not found in tissues of people with Zellweger syndrome, facilitates the movement of cholesterol within cells, resulting in abnormal accumulation of cholesterol in SCP-2-deficient cells. This study investigated whether synthetic high-density lipoprotein-like nanocarrier (sHDL-NC) improves the cellular transport of lysosomal cholesterol to plasma membrane in SCP-2-deficient fibroblasts. Human SCP-2-deficient fibroblasts were incubated with [(3)H-cholesterol]LDL as a source of cholesterol and sHDL-NC. The cells were fractionated by centrifugation permit tracking of [(3)H]-cholesterol from lysosome into plasma membrane. Furthermore, cellular content of cholesteryl ester as a storage form and mRNA expression of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor were measured to support the cholesterol transport to plasma membrane. Incubation with sHDL-NC for 8 h significantly increased uptake of [(3)H]-cholesterol to lysosome by 53% and further enhanced the transport of [(3)H]-cholesterol to plasma membrane by 32%. Treatment with sHDL-NC significantly reduced cellular content of cholesteryl ester and increased mRNA expression of LDL receptor (LDL-R). In conclusion, sHDL-NC enables increased transport of lysosomal cholesterol to plasma membrane. In addition, these data were indirectly supported by decreased cellular content of cholesteryl ester and increased gene expression of LDL-R. Therefore, sHDL-NC may be a useful vehicle for transporting cholesterol, which may help to prevent accumulation of cholesterol in SCP-2-deficient fibroblasts.

  14. A Two-Photon Fluorescent Probe for Lysosomal Thiols in Live Cells and Tissues.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jiangli; Han, Zhichao; Kang, Yao; Peng, Xiaojun

    2016-01-22

    Lysosome-specific fluorescent probes are exclusive to elucidate the functions of lysosomal thiols. Moreover, two-photon microscopy offers advantages of less phototoxicity, better three dimensional spatial localization, deeper penetration depth and lower self-absorption. However, such fluorescent probes for thiols are still rare. In this work, an efficient two-photon fluorophore 1,8-naphthalimide-based probe conjugating a 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonyl chloride and morpholine was designed and synthesized, which exhibited high selectivity and sensitivity towards lysosomal thiols by turn-on fluorescence method quantitatively and was successfully applied to the imaging of thiols in live cells and tissues by two-photon microscopy.

  15. A Two-Photon Fluorescent Probe for Lysosomal Thiols in Live Cells and Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jiangli; Han, Zhichao; Kang, Yao; Peng, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Lysosome-specific fluorescent probes are exclusive to elucidate the functions of lysosomal thiols. Moreover, two-photon microscopy offers advantages of less phototoxicity, better three dimensional spatial localization, deeper penetration depth and lower self-absorption. However, such fluorescent probes for thiols are still rare. In this work, an efficient two-photon fluorophore 1,8-naphthalimide-based probe conjugating a 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonyl chloride and morpholine was designed and synthesized, which exhibited high selectivity and sensitivity towards lysosomal thiols by turn-on fluorescence method quantitatively and was successfully applied to the imaging of thiols in live cells and tissues by two-photon microscopy.

  16. Lysosomal glycosphingolipid catabolism by acid ceramidase: formation of glycosphingoid bases during deficiency of glycosidases.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, Maria J; Marques, André R A; Appelman, Monique D; Verhoek, Marri; Strijland, Anneke; Mirzaian, Mina; Scheij, Saskia; Ouairy, Cécile M; Lahav, Daniel; Wisse, Patrick; Overkleeft, Herman S; Boot, Rolf G; Aerts, Johannes M

    2016-03-01

    Glycosphingoid bases are elevated in inherited lysosomal storage disorders with deficient activity of glycosphingolipid catabolizing glycosidases. We investigated the molecular basis of the formation of glucosylsphingosine and globotriaosylsphingosine during deficiency of glucocerebrosidase (Gaucher disease) and α-galactosidase A (Fabry disease). Independent genetic and pharmacological evidence is presented pointing to an active role of acid ceramidase in both processes through deacylation of lysosomal glycosphingolipids. The potential pathophysiological relevance of elevated glycosphingoid bases generated through this alternative metabolism in patients suffering from lysosomal glycosidase defects is discussed. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  17. Specific Substrate for the Assay of Lysosomal Acid Lipase.

    PubMed

    Masi, Sophia; Chennamaneni, Naveen; Turecek, Frantisek; Scott, C Ronald; Gelb, Michael H

    2018-04-01

    Deficiency of lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) causes Wolman disease and cholesterol ester storage disease. With the recent introduction of enzyme replacement therapy to manage LAL deficiency comes the need for a reliable assay of LAL enzymatic activity that can be applied to dried blood spots (DBS). We prepared and tested a library of analogs of palmitoyl 4-methylumbelifferyl esters to find a highly active and specific substrate for LAL in DBS. The LAL assay was optimized leading to both LC-MS/MS and fluorometric assay of LAL. We tested the new assay on DBS from healthy and LAL-deficient patients. The ester formed between palmitic acid and 4-propyl-8-methyl-7-hydroxycoumarin (P-PMHC) was found to be >98% selective for LAL in DBS based on the sensitivity of its activity to the LAL-specific inactivator Lalistat-2 and the fact that the activity was close to zero using DBS from patients previously shown to be LAL-deficient. Use of P-PMHC and heavy isotope-labeled internal standard with optimized assay conditions led to an approximately 2-fold increase in the specific activity of LAL compared with the previously reported LAL assay. Patients deficient in LAL were readily distinguished from normal persons with the new LAL assay using UPLC-MS/MS or fluorometric assay platforms. The new assay can measure LAL in DBS with a single measurement compared with the previous method involving 2 assays done in parallel. © 2017 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  18. Sebelipase alfa: enzymatic replacement treatment for lysosomal acid lipase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Paton, D M

    2016-05-01

    Sebelipase alfa was approved for use in 2015 for patients suffering from lysosomal acid lipase deficiency in either of its two forms. The more severe, early-onset form, Wolman disease, occurs in young infants in whom it is normally fatal within the first year of life. Sebelipase alfa has allowed a small number of such infants to achieve a relatively normal growth rate and to survive for 2 or more years. In older children and adults, the enzyme has corrected their dyslipidemia and produced significant improvement in markers of hepatic function. Important unanswered questions remain, such as to what extent treatment with sebelipase alfa alters the long-term cardiovascular and hepatic consequences of this rare recessive genetic disorder. Further research is also required to determine the true frequency of the disorder in different populations and ethnic groups. The high cost of treatment with sebelipase alfa also poses a very significant obstacle for many health plans. Copyright 2016 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  19. Less Is More: Substrate Reduction Therapy for Lysosomal Storage Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Maria Francisca; Santos, Juliana Inês; Alves, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of rare, life-threatening genetic disorders, usually caused by a dysfunction in one of the many enzymes responsible for intralysosomal digestion. Even though no cure is available for any LSD, a few treatment strategies do exist. Traditionally, efforts have been mainly targeting the functional loss of the enzyme, by injection of a recombinant formulation, in a process called enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), with no impact on neuropathology. This ineffectiveness, together with its high cost and lifelong dependence is amongst the main reasons why additional therapeutic approaches are being (and have to be) investigated: chaperone therapy; gene enhancement; gene therapy; and, alternatively, substrate reduction therapy (SRT), whose aim is to prevent storage not by correcting the original enzymatic defect but, instead, by decreasing the levels of biosynthesis of the accumulating substrate(s). Here we review the concept of substrate reduction, highlighting the major breakthroughs in the field and discussing the future of SRT, not only as a monotherapy but also, especially, as complementary approach for LSDs. PMID:27384562

  20. Pulmonary and generalized lysosomal storage induced by amphiphilic drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Hruban, Z

    1984-01-01

    Administration of amphiphilic drugs to experimental animals causes formation of myelinoid bodies in many cell types, accumulation of foamy macrophages in pulmonary alveoli and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. These changes are the result of an interaction between the drugs and phospholipids which leads to an alteration in physicochemical properties of the phospholipids. Impairment of the digestion of altered pulmonary secretions in phagosomes of macrophages results in accumulation of foam cells in pulmonary alveoli. Impairment of the metabolism of altered phospholipids removed by autophagy induces an accumulation of myelinoid bodies. The administration of amphiphilic compounds thus causes pulmonary intra-alveolar histiocytosis which is a part of a drug-induced lysosomal storage or generalized lipidosis. The accumulation of drug-lipid complexes in myelinoid bodies and in pulmonary foam cells may lead to alteration of cellular functioning and to clinical disease. Currently over 50 amphiphilic drugs are known. Unique pharmacological properties necessitate clinical use of some of these drugs. The occurrence and severity of potential clinical side effects depend on the nature of each drug, dosage and duration of treatment, simultaneous administration of other drugs and foods, individual metabolic pattern of the patient and other factors. Further studies on factors preventing and potentiating adverse effects of amphiphilic drugs are indicated. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. PMID:6376111

  1. Lysosomal trafficking of TGFBIp via caveolae-mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung-Il; Maeng, Yong-Sun; Kim, Tae-Im; Lee, Yangsin; Kim, Yong-Sun; Kim, Eung Kweon

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta-induced protein (TGFBIp) is ubiquitously expressed in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of various tissues and cell lines. Progressive accumulation of mutant TGFBIp is directly involved in the pathogenesis of TGFBI-linked corneal dystrophy. Recent studies reported that mutant TGFBIp accumulates in cells; however, the trafficking of TGFBIp is poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated TGFBIp trafficking to determine the route of its internalization and secretion and to elucidate its roles in the pathogenesis of granular corneal dystrophy type 2 (GCD2). Our data indicate that newly synthesized TGFBIp was secreted via the endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi-dependent secretory pathway, and this secretion was delayed in the corneal fibroblasts of patients with GCD2. We also found that TGFBIp was internalized by caveolae-mediated endocytosis, and the internalized TGFBIp accumulated after treatment with bafilomycin A1, an inhibitor of lysosomal degradation. In addition, the proteasome inhibitor MG132 inhibits the endocytosis of TGFBIp. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed that TGFBIp interacted with integrin αVβ3. Moreover, treatment with arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) tripeptide suppressed the internalization of TGFBIp. These insights on TGFBIp trafficking could lead to the identification of novel targets and the development of new therapies for TGFBI-linked corneal dystrophy.

  2. Non-neuronopathic lysosomal storage disorders: Disease spectrum and treatments.

    PubMed

    Pastores, Gregory M; Hughes, Derralynn A

    2015-03-01

    Distinctive facial features, hepatosplenomegaly or cardiomyopathy with or without associated skeletal dysplasia are clinical manifestations that may be suggestive of an underlying lysosomal storage disorder (LSD), However, these features may not be evident in certain subtypes associated primarily with central nervous system involvement. Age at onset can be broad, ranging from infancy to adulthood. Diagnosis may be delayed, as manifestations may be slow to evolve (taking months to years), particularly in those with later (adult-)onset, and in isolated cases (i.e., those without a prior family history). Diagnosis of individual subtypes can be confirmed using a combination of biochemical and molecular assays. In a few LSDs, treatment with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, enzyme replacement or substrate reduction therapy is available. Symptomatic and palliative measure may enhance quality of life for both treatable and currently untreatable cases. Genetic counseling is important, so patients and their families can be informed of reproductive risks, disease prognosis and therapeutic options. Investigations of underlying disease mechanisms are enhancing knowledge about rare diseases, but also other more common medical conditions, on account of potential convergent disease pathways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Lysosomal acid lipase regulates fatty acid channeling in brown adipose tissue to maintain thermogenesis.

    PubMed

    Duta-Mare, Madalina; Sachdev, Vinay; Leopold, Christina; Kolb, Dagmar; Vujic, Nemanja; Korbelius, Melanie; Hofer, Dina C; Xia, Wenmin; Huber, Katharina; Auer, Martina; Gottschalk, Benjamin; Magnes, Christoph; Graier, Wolfgang F; Prokesch, Andreas; Radovic, Branislav; Bogner-Strauss, Juliane G; Kratky, Dagmar

    2018-04-01

    Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) is the only known enzyme, which hydrolyzes cholesteryl esters and triacylglycerols in lysosomes of multiple cells and tissues. Here, we explored the role of LAL in brown adipose tissue (BAT). LAL-deficient (Lal-/-) mice exhibit markedly reduced UCP1 expression in BAT, modified BAT morphology with accumulation of lysosomes, and mitochondrial dysfunction, consequently leading to regular hypothermic events in mice kept at room temperature. Cold exposure resulted in reduced lipid uptake into BAT, thereby aggravating dyslipidemia and causing life threatening hypothermia in Lal-/- mice. Linking LAL as a potential regulator of lipoprotein lipase activity, we found Angptl4 mRNA expression upregulated in BAT. Our data demonstrate that LAL is critical for shuttling fatty acids derived from circulating lipoproteins to BAT during cold exposure. We conclude that inhibited lysosomal lipid hydrolysis in BAT leads to impaired thermogenesis in Lal-/- mice. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Lysosomal acid lipase: at the crossroads of normal and atherogenic cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dubland, Joshua A; Francis, Gordon A

    2015-01-01

    Unregulated cellular uptake of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins in the arterial intima leads to the formation of foam cells in atherosclerosis. Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) plays a crucial role in both lipoprotein lipid catabolism and excess lipid accumulation as it is the primary enzyme that hydrolyzes cholesteryl esters derived from both low density lipoprotein (LDL) and modified forms of LDL. Evidence suggests that as atherosclerosis progresses, accumulation of excess free cholesterol in lysosomes leads to impairment of LAL activity, resulting in accumulation of cholesteryl esters in the lysosome as well as the cytosol in foam cells. Impaired metabolism and release of cholesterol from lysosomes can lead to downstream defects in ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 regulation, needed to offload excess cholesterol from plaque foam cells. This review focuses on the role LAL plays in normal cholesterol metabolism and how the associated changes in its enzymatic activity may ultimately contribute to atherosclerosis progression.

  5. A TRP Channel Senses Lysosome Neutralization by Pathogens to Trigger Their Expulsion

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yuxuan; Li, Guojie; Zhang, Xiaoli; Xu, Haoxing; Abraham, Soman N.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Vertebrate cells have evolved elaborate cell-autonomous defense programs to monitor subcellular compartments for infection and to evoke counter-responses. These programs are activated by pathogen-associated pattern molecules and by various strategies intracellular pathogens employ to alter cellular microenvironments. Here, we show that when uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) infect bladder epithelial cells (BECs), they are targeted by autophagy but avoid degradation because of their capacity to neutralize lysosomal pH. This change is detected by mucolipin TRP channel 3 (TRPML3), a transient receptor potential cation channel localized to lysosomes. TRPML3 activation then spontaneously initiates lysosome exocytosis, resulting in expulsion of exosome-encased bacteria. These studies reveal a cellular default system for lysosome homeostasis that has been co-opted by the autonomous defense program to clear recalcitrant pathogens. PMID:26027738

  6. Lipid Involvement in Neurodegenerative Diseases of the Motor System: Insights from Lysosomal Storage Diseases.

    PubMed

    Dodge, James C

    2017-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a heterogeneous group of rare inherited metabolic diseases that are frequently triggered by the accumulation of lipids inside organelles of the endosomal-autophagic-lysosomal system (EALS). There is now a growing realization that disrupted lysosomal homeostasis (i.e., lysosomal cacostasis) also contributes to more common neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson disease (PD). Lipid deposition within the EALS may also participate in the pathogenesis of some additional neurodegenerative diseases of the motor system. Here, I will highlight the lipid abnormalities and clinical manifestations that are common to LSDs and several diseases of the motor system, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), atypical forms of spinal muscular atrophy, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), multiple system atrophy (MSA), PD and spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA). Elucidating the underlying basis of intracellular lipid mislocalization as well as its consequences in each of these disorders will likely provide innovative targets for therapeutic research.

  7. A NIR phosphorescent osmium(ii) complex as a lysosome tracking reagent and photodynamic therapeutic agent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pingyu; Wang, Yi; Qiu, Kangqiang; Zhao, Zhiqian; Hu, Rentao; He, Chuanxin; Zhang, Qianling; Chao, Hui

    2017-11-14

    A novel near infrared (NIR) phosphorescent osmium complex (Os1) was developed for lysosome tracking and photodynamic therapy. Owing to its NIR photophysical properties, cellular imaging ability and phototoxicity, it has advantages over its ruthenium analogue (Ru1).

  8. Autophagy Regulates Cholesterol Efflux from Macrophage Foam Cells via Lysosomal Acid Lipase

    PubMed Central

    Ouimet, Mireille; Franklin, Vivian; Mak, Esther; Liao, Xianghai; Tabas, Ira; Marcel, Yves L.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The lipid droplet (LD) is the major site of cholesterol storage in macrophage foam cells and is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of atherosclerosis. Cholesterol, stored as cholesteryl esters (CEs), is liberated from this organelle and delivered to cholesterol acceptors. The current paradigm attributes all cytoplasmic CE hydrolysis to the action of neutral CE hydrolases. Here, we demonstrate an important role for lysosomes in LD CE hydrolysis in cholesterol-loaded macrophages, in addition to that mediated by neutral hydrolases. Furthermore, we demonstrate that LDs are delivered to lysosomes via autophagy, where lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) acts to hydrolyze LD CE to generate free cholesterol mainly for ABCA1-dependent efflux; this process is specifically induced upon macrophage cholesterol loading. We conclude that, in macrophage foam cells, lysosomal hydrolysis contributes to the mobilization of LD-associated cholesterol for reverse cholesterol transport. PMID:21641547

  9. Facilitating Facilitators: Enhancing PBL through a Structured Facilitator Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinitri, Francine D.; Wilhelm, Sheila M.; Crabtree, Brian L.

    2015-01-01

    With increasing adoption of the problem-based learning (PBL) model, creative approaches to enhancing facilitator training and optimizing resources to maintain effective learning in small groups is essential. We describe a theoretical framework for the development of a PBL facilitator training program that uses the constructivist approach as the…

  10. Lysosomal exocytosis in response to subtle membrane damage following nanosecond pulse exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalzell, Danielle R.; Roth, Caleb C.; Bernhard, Joshua A.; Payne, Jason A.; Wilmink, Gerald J.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2011-03-01

    The cellular response to subtle membrane damage following exposure to nanosecond electric pulses (nsEP) is not well understood. Recent work has shown that when cells are exposed to nsEP, ion permeable nanopores (< 2nm) are created in the plasma membrane in contrast to larger diameter pores (> 2nm) created by longer micro and millisecond duration pulses. Macroscopic damage to a plasma membrane by a micropipette has been shown to cause internal vesicles (lysosomes) to undergo exocytosis to repair membrane damage, a calcium mediated process called lysosomal exocytosis. Formation of large pores in the plasma membrane by electrical pulses has been shown to elicit lysosomal exocytosis in a variety of cell types. Our research objective is to determine whether lysosomal exocytosis will occur in response to nanopores formed by exposure to nsEP. In this paper we used propidium iodide (PI) and Calcium Green-1 AM ester (CaGr) to differentiate between large and small pores formed in CHO-K1 cells following exposure to either 1 or 20, 600-ns duration electrical pulses at 16.2 kV/cm. This information was compared to changes in membrane organization observed by increases in FM1-43 fluorescence, both in the presence and absence of calcium ions in the outside buffer. In addition, we monitored the real time migration of lysosomes within the cell using Cellular Lights assay to tag LAMP-1, a lysosomal membrane protein. Both 1 and 20 pulses elicited a large influx of extracellular calcium, while little PI uptake was observed following a single pulse exposure. Statistically significant increases in FM1-43 fluorescence were seen in samples containing calcium suggesting that calcium-triggered membrane repair may be occurring. Lastly, density of lysosomes within cells, specifically around the nucleus, appeared to change rapidly upon nsEP stimulation suggesting lysosomal migration.

  11. Mutant Huntingtin Is Secreted via a Late Endosomal/Lysosomal Unconventional Secretory Pathway.

    PubMed

    Trajkovic, Katarina; Jeong, Hyunkyung; Krainc, Dimitri

    2017-09-13

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG triplet in the gene encoding for huntingtin (Htt). The resulting mutant protein (mHtt) with extended polyglutamine (polyQ) sequence at the N terminus leads to neuronal degeneration both in a cell-autonomous and a non-cell-autonomous manner. Recent studies identified mHtt in the extracellular environment and suggested that its spreading contributes to toxicity, but the mechanism of mHtt release from the cell of origin remains unknown. In this study, we performed a comprehensive, unbiased analysis of secretory pathways and identified an unconventional lysosomal pathway as an important mechanism for mHtt secretion in mouse neuroblastoma and striatal cell lines, as well as in primary neurons. mHtt secretion was dependent on synaptotagmin 7, a regulator of lysosomal secretion, and inhibited by chemical ablation of late endosomes/lysosomes, suggesting a lysosomal secretory pattern. mHtt was targeted preferentially to the late endosomes/lysosomes compared with wild-type Htt. Importantly, we found that late endosomal/lysosomal targeting and secretion of mHtt could be inhibited efficiently by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and neutral sphingomyelinase chemical inhibitors, Ly294002 and GW4869, respectively. Together, our data suggest a lysosomal mechanism of mHtt secretion and offer potential strategies for pharmacological modulation of its neuronal secretion. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This is the first study examining the mechanism of mutant huntingtin (mHTT) secretion in an unbiased manner. We found that the protein is secreted via a late endosomal/lysosomal unconventional secretory pathway. Moreover, mHtt secretion can be reduced significantly by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and neutral sphingomyelinase inhibitors. Understanding and manipulating the secretion of mHtt is important because of its potentially harmful propagation in the brain. Copyright © 2017 the

  12. Lysosomal responses to heat-shock of seasonal temperature extremes in Cd-exposed mussels.

    PubMed

    Múgica, M; Izagirre, U; Marigómez, I

    2015-07-01

    The present study was aimed at determining the effect of temperature extremes on lysosomal biomarkers in mussels exposed to a model toxic pollutant (Cd) at different seasons. For this purpose, temperature was elevated 10°C (from 12°C to 22°C in winter and from 18°C to 28°C in summer) for a period of 6h (heat-shock) in control and Cd-exposed mussels, and then returned back to initial one. Lysosomal membrane stability and lysosomal structural changes in digestive gland were investigated. In winter, heat-shock reduced the labilisation period (LP) of the lysosomal membrane, especially in Cd-exposed mussels, and provoked transient lysosomal enlargement. LP values recovered after the heat-shock cessation but lysosomal enlargement prevailed in both experimental groups. In summer, heat-shock induced remarkable reduction in LP and lysosomal enlargement (more markedly in Cd-exposed mussels), which recovered within 3 days. Besides, whilst heat-shock effects on LP were practically identical for Cd-exposed mussels in winter and summer, the effects were longer-lasting in summer than in winter for control mussels. Thus, lysosomal responsiveness after heat-shock was higher in summer than in winter but recovery was faster as well, and therefore the consequences of the heat shock seem to be more decisive in winter. In contrast, inter-season differences were attenuated in the presence of Cd. Consequently, mussels seem to be better prepared in summer than in winter to stand short periods of abrupt temperature change; this is, however, compromised when mussels are exposed to pollutants such as Cd. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The Phytoestrogen Genistein Modulates Lysosomal Metabolism and Transcription Factor EB (TFEB) Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Moskot, Marta; Montefusco, Sandro; Jakóbkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Mozolewski, Paweł; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Di Bernardo, Diego; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Medina, Diego L.; Ballabio, Andrea; Gabig-Cimińska, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Genistein (5,7-dihydroxy-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one) has been previously proposed as a potential drug for use in substrate reduction therapy for mucopolysaccharidoses, a group of inherited metabolic diseases caused by mutations leading to inefficient degradation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in lysosomes. It was demonstrated that this isoflavone can cross the blood-brain barrier, making it an especially desirable potential drug for the treatment of neurological symptoms present in most lysosomal storage diseases. So far, no comprehensive genomic analyses have been performed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the effect elicited by genistein. Therefore, the aim of this work was to identify the genistein-modulated gene network regulating GAG biosynthesis and degradation, taking into consideration the entire lysosomal metabolism. Our analyses identified over 60 genes with known roles in lysosomal biogenesis and/or function whose expression was enhanced by genistein. Moreover, 19 genes whose products are involved in both GAG synthesis and degradation pathways were found to be remarkably differentially regulated by genistein treatment. We found a regulatory network linking genistein-mediated control of transcription factor EB (TFEB) gene expression, TFEB nuclear translocation, and activation of TFEB-dependent lysosome biogenesis to lysosomal metabolism. Our data indicate that the molecular mechanism of genistein action involves not only impairment of GAG synthesis but more importantly lysosomal enhancement via TFEB. These findings contribute to explaining the beneficial effects of genistein in lysosomal storage diseases as well as envisage new therapeutic approaches to treat these devastating diseases. PMID:24770416

  14. Lysosomal acid lipase and lipid metabolism: new mechanisms, new questions, and new therapies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanrui

    2018-03-15

    Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL), encoded by the LIPA gene, is an essential lysosomal enzyme that hydrolyzes cholesteryl ester and triglyceride delivered to the lysosome. This review highlights the novel pathophysiological role of LAL, the functional genomic discoveries of LIPA as a risk locus for coronary heart diseases (CHD), and the clinical advance in therapies for LAL deficiency. The essential role of LAL in lipid metabolism has been confirmed in human and mice with LAL deficiency. In humans, loss-of-function mutations of LIPA cause rare lysosomal disorders, Wolman disease, and cholesteryl ester storage disease, in which LAL enzyme replacement therapy has shown significant benefits in a phase 3 clinical trial. Recent studies have revealed the role of LAL-mediated lysosomal lipolysis in regulating macrophage M2 polarization, lipid mediator production, VLDL secretion, lysosomal function and autophagy, extracellular degradation of aggregated-LDL, and adipose tissue lipolysis. Genome-wide association studies and functional genomic studies have identified LIPA as a risk locus for CHD, but the causal variants and mechanisms remain to be determined. Despite years of research, our understanding of LAL is incomplete. Future studies will continue to focus on the key pathophysiological functions of LAL in health and diseases including CHD.

  15. Impulse control disorder, lysosomal malfunction and ATP13A2 insufficiency in Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Ping; Li, Jianfeng; Lu, Yanhua; Wang, Lihui; Chen, Gang

    2017-02-01

    Lysosomal transport of cargos in neurons is essential for neuronal proteostasis, transmission and functional motors and behaviours. Lysosomal malfunction including storage disorders is involved in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Given the unclear molecular mechanisms of diverse defects in PD phenotypes, especially behavioural deficits, this mini review explores the cellular contexts of PD impulse control disorders and the molecular aspects of lysosomal cross-membrane transports. Focuses are paid to trace metal involvements in α-synuclein assembly in Lewy bodies, the functions and molecular interactions of ATP13A2 as ATPase transporters in lysosomal membranes for cross-membrane trafficking and lysosomal homeostasis, and our current understandings of the neural circuits in ICD. Erroneously polarized distributions of cargos such as metals and lipids on each side of lysosomal membranes triggered by gene mutations and deregulated expression of ATP13A2 may thus instigate sensing protein structural changes such as aggregations, organelle degeneration, and specific neuronal ageing and death in Parkinsonism. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. Dysregulation of autophagy as a common mechanism in lysosomal storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Seranova, Elena; Connolly, Kyle J; Zatyka, Malgorzata; Rosenstock, Tatiana R; Barrett, Timothy; Tuxworth, Richard I; Sarkar, Sovan

    2017-12-12

    The lysosome plays a pivotal role between catabolic and anabolic processes as the nexus for signalling pathways responsive to a variety of factors, such as growth, nutrient availability, energetic status and cellular stressors. Lysosomes are also the terminal degradative organelles for autophagy through which macromolecules and damaged cellular components and organelles are degraded. Autophagy acts as a cellular homeostatic pathway that is essential for organismal physiology. Decline in autophagy during ageing or in many diseases, including late-onset forms of neurodegeneration is considered a major contributing factor to the pathology. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that impairment in autophagy is also a central mechanism underlying several lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs). LSDs are a class of rare, inherited disorders whose histopathological hallmark is the accumulation of undegraded materials in the lysosomes due to abnormal lysosomal function. Inefficient degradative capability of the lysosomes has negative impact on the flux through the autophagic pathway, and therefore dysregulated autophagy in LSDs is emerging as a relevant disease mechanism. Pathology in the LSDs is generally early-onset, severe and life-limiting but current therapies are limited or absent; recognizing common autophagy defects in the LSDs raises new possibilities for therapy. In this review, we describe the mechanisms by which LSDs occur, focusing on perturbations in the autophagy pathway and present the latest data supporting the development of novel therapeutic approaches related to the modulation of autophagy. © 2017 The Author(s).

  17. Glycoprotein lysosomal storage disorders: alpha- and beta-mannosidosis, fucosidosis and alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Michalski, J C; Klein, A

    1999-10-08

    Glycoproteinoses belong to the lysosomal storage disorders group. The common feature of these diseases is the deficiency of a lysosomal protein that is part of glycan catabolism. Most of the lysosomal enzymes involved in the hydrolysis of glycoprotein carbohydrate chains are exo-glycosidases, which stepwise remove terminal monosaccharides. Thus, the deficiency of a single enzyme causes the blockage of the entire pathway and induces a storage of incompletely degraded substances inside the lysosome. Different mutations may be observed in a single disease and in all cases account for the nonexpression of lysosomal glycosidase activity. Different clinical phenotypes generally characterize a specific disorder, which rather must be described as a continuum in severity, suggesting that other biochemical or environmental factors influence the course of the disease. This review provides details on clinical features, genotype-phenotype correlations, enzymology and biochemical storage of four human glycoprotein lysosomal storage disorders, respectively alpha- and beta-mannosidosis, fucosidosis and alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase deficiency. Moreover, several animal disorders of glycoprotein metabolism have been found and constitute valuable models for the understanding of their human counterparts.

  18. Distinct Protein Sorting and Localization to Premelanosomes, Melanosomes, and Lysosomes in Pigmented Melanocytic Cells✪

    PubMed Central

    Raposo, Graça; Tenza, Danielle; Murphy, Diane M.; Berson, Joanne F.; Marks, Michael S.

    2001-01-01

    Melanosomes and premelanosomes are lysosome-related organelles with a unique structure and cohort of resident proteins. We have positioned these organelles relative to endosomes and lysosomes in pigmented melanoma cells and melanocytes. Melanosome resident proteins Pmel17 and TRP1 localized to separate vesicular structures that were distinct from those enriched in lysosomal proteins. In immunogold-labeled ultrathin cryosections, Pmel17 was most enriched along the intralumenal striations of premelanosomes. Increased pigmentation was accompanied by a decrease in Pmel17 and by an increase in TRP1 in the limiting membrane. Both proteins were largely excluded from lysosomal compartments enriched in LAMP1 and cathepsin D. By kinetic analysis of fluid phase uptake and immunogold labeling, premelanosomal proteins segregated from endocytic markers within an unusual endosomal compartment. This compartment contained Pmel17, was accessed by BSA–gold after 15 min, was acidic, and displayed a cytoplasmic planar coat that contained clathrin. Our results indicate that premelanosomes and melanosomes represent a distinct lineage of organelles, separable from conventional endosomes and lysosomes within pigmented cells. Furthermore, they implicate an unusual clathrin-coated endosomal compartment as a site from which proteins destined for premelanosomes and lysosomes are sorted. PMID:11266471

  19. Lysosome and Calcium Dysregulation in Alzheimer’s Disease – Partners in Crime

    PubMed Central

    McBrayer, MaryKate; Nixon, Ralph A.

    2014-01-01

    Early onset familial Alzheimer’s disease (FAD) is caused by mutations of Presenilin 1, Presenilin 2, and amyloid precursor protein. Beyond the effects of PS1 mutations on proteolytic functions of the gamma-secretase complex, mutant or deficient PS1 disrupts lysosomal function and calcium homeostasis, both of which are considered strong pathogenic factors in FAD. Loss of PS1 function compromises assembly and proton-pumping activity of the vacuolar-ATPase on lysosomes, leading to defective lysosomal acidification and marked impairment of autophagy. Additional dysregulation of cellular calcium by mutant PS1 in FAD has been ascribed to altered ion channels in the endoplasmic reticulum; however, rich stores of calcium in lysosomes are also abnormally released in PS1-deficient cells secondary to the lysosomal acidification defect. The resultant rise in cytosolic calcium activates calcium-dependent enzymes, contributing substantially to calpain over-activation that is a final common pathway leading to neurofibrillary degeneration in all forms of AD. Here we discuss the close inter-relationships among deficits of lysosomal function, autophagy, and calcium homeostasis as a pathogenic process in PS1-related FAD and their relevance to sporadic AD. PMID:24256243

  20. Genome-wide analyses in neuronal cells reveal that upstream transcription factors regulate lysosomal gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Tomoyuki; Tosaki, Asako; Kurosawa, Masaru; Shimogori, Tomomi; Hattori, Nobutaka; Nukina, Nobuyuki

    2016-03-01

    The upstream transcription factors (USFs) USF1 and USF2 are ubiquitously expressed transcription factors that are characterized by a conserved basic helix-loop-helix/leucine zipper DNA-binding domain. They form homo- or heterodimers, and recognize E-box motifs to modulate gene expression. They are known to regulate diverse cellular functions, including the cell cycle, immune responses and glucose/lipid metabolism, but their roles in neuronal cells remain to be clarified. Here, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation of USF1 from mouse brain cortex. Subsequent promoter array analysis (ChIP-chip) indicated that USF1 exclusively bound to the CACGTG E-box motifs in the proximal promoter regions. Importantly, functional annotation of the USF1-binding targets revealed an enrichment of genes related to lysosomal functions. Gene expression array analysis using a neuronal cell line subsequently revealed that knockdown of USFs de-regulated lysosomal gene expression. Altered expression was validated by quantitative RT-PCR, supporting the conclusion that USFs regulate lysosomal gene expression. Furthermore, USF knockdown slightly increased LysoTracker Red staining, implying a role for USFs in modulating lysosomal homeostasis. Together, our comprehensive genome-scale analyses identified lysosomal genes as targets of USFs in neuronal cells, suggesting a potential additional pathway of lysosomal regulation. The data for the gene expression array and ChIP-chip have been submitted to the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) under accession numbers GSE76615 and GSE76616, respectively. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  1. FLCN Maintains the Leucine Level in Lysosome to Stimulate mTORC1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi; Ji, Xin; Qiao, Xianfeng; Jin, Yaping; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The intracellular amino acid pool within lysosome is a signal that stimulates the nutrient-sensing mTORC1 signalling pathway. The signal transduction cascade has garnered much attention, but little is known about the sequestration of the signalling molecules within the lysosome. Using human HEK293 cells as a model, we found that suppression of the BHD syndrome gene FLCN reduced the leucine level in lysosome, which correlated with decreased mTORC1 activity. Both consequences could be reversed by supplementation with high levels of leucine, but not other tested amino acids. Conversely, overexpressed FLCN could sequester lysosomal leucine and stimulate mTORC1 in an amino acid limitation environment. These results identify a novel function of FLCN: it controls mTORC1 by modulating the leucine signal in lysosome. Furthermore, we provided evidence that FLCN exerted this role by inhibiting the accumulation of the amino acid transporter PAT1 on the lysosome surface, thereby maintaining the signal level within the organelle. PMID:27280402

  2. The Rab7 effector PLEKHM1 binds Arl8b to promote cargo traffic to lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Marwaha, Rituraj; Arya, Subhash B.; Jagga, Divya; Kaur, Harmeet

    2017-01-01

    Endocytic, autophagic, and phagocytic vesicles move on microtubule tracks to fuse with lysosomes. Small GTPases, such as Rab7 and Arl8b, recruit their downstream effectors to mediate this transport and fusion. However, the potential cross talk between these two GTPases is unclear. Here, we show that the Rab7 effector PLEKHM1 simultaneously binds Rab7 and Arl8b, bringing about clustering and fusion of late endosomes and lysosomes. We show that the N-terminal RUN domain of PLEKHM1 is necessary and sufficient for interaction with Arl8b and its subsequent localization to lysosomes. Notably, we also demonstrate that Arl8b mediates recruitment of HOPS complex to PLEKHM1-positive vesicle contact sites. Consequently, Arl8b binding to PLEKHM1 is required for its function in delivery and, therefore, degradation of endocytic and autophagic cargo in lysosomes. Finally, we also show that PLEKHM1 competes with SKIP for Arl8b binding, which dictates lysosome positioning. These findings suggest that Arl8b, along with its effectors, orchestrates lysosomal transport and fusion. PMID:28325809

  3. Regulation of membrane trafficking by signalling on endosomal and lysosomal membranes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinran; Garrity, Abigail G; Xu, Haoxing

    2013-01-01

    Endosomal and lysosomal membrane trafficking requires the coordination of multiple signalling events to control cargo sorting and processing, and endosome maturation. The initiation and termination of signalling events in endosomes and lysosomes is not well understood, but several key regulators have been identified, which include small GTPases, phosphoinositides, and Ca2+. Small GTPases act as master regulators and molecular switches in a GTP-dependent manner, initiating signalling cascades to regulate the direction and specificity of endosomal trafficking. Phosphoinositides are membrane-bound lipids that indicate vesicular identities for recruiting specific cytoplasmic proteins to endosomal membranes, thus allowing specificity of membrane fusion, fission, and cargo sorting to occur within and between specific vesicle compartments. In addition, phosphoinositides regulate the function of membrane proteins such as ion channels and transporters in a compartment-specific manner to mediate transport and signalling. Finally, Ca2+, a locally acting second messenger released from intracellular ion channels, may provide precise spatiotemporal regulation of endosomal signalling and trafficking events. Small GTPase signalling can regulate phosphoinositide conversion during endosome maturation, and electrophysiological studies on isolated endosomes have shown that endosomal and lysosomal Ca2+ channels are directly modulated by endosomal lipids. Thus trafficking and maturation of endosomes and lysosomes can be precisely regulated by dynamic changes in GTPases and membrane lipids, as well as Ca2+ signalling. Importantly, impaired phosphoinositide and Ca2+ signalling can cause endosomal and lysosomal trafficking defects at the cellular level, and a spectrum of lysosome storage diseases. PMID:23878375

  4. Lysosomal routing of Fc gamma RI from early endosomes requires recruitment of tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Norman, J C; Harrison, P T; Davis, W; Floto, R A; Allen, J M

    1998-01-01

    The high-affinity receptor for immunoglobulin G (Fc gamma RI) plays a central role in the clearance of immune complexes by mediating their internalization and delivery to lysosomes. In monocytic U937 cells, receptor internalization is independent of tyrosine kinase activity. However, the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, genistein, prevents further progress of the receptor to lysosomes and traps it in a sub-plasma membrane early endosome. Similarly, Fc gamma RI expressed in COS cells is able to internalize immune complexes but is unable to translocate to lysosomes. This suggests that Fc gamma RI, whose cytoplasmic tail is devoid of known signalling motifs, must recruit tyrosine kinases via its gamma-chain to achieve lysosomal delivery. We show that a chimera of the extracellular domain of Fc gamma RI and the cytoplasmic tail of the gamma-chain is both internalized and efficiently trafficked to lysosomes. Our study suggests that a key function of the gamma-chain is recruitment of tyrosine kinases to initiate the intracellular signalling pathways required to target Fc gamma RI following immune complex aggregation to lysosomes and not to initiate endocytosis per se. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9708186

  5. TFEB activation promotes the recruitment of lysosomal glycohydrolases β-hexosaminidase and β-galactosidase to the plasma membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Magini, Alessandro; Department of Medical and Biological Sciences; Polchi, Alice

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •TFEB activation promotes the increase of Hex and Gal activities. •The increase of Hex and Gal activities is related to transcriptional regulation. •TFEB promotes the recruitment of mature Hex and Gal on cell surface. -- Abstract: Lysosomes are membrane-enclosed organelles containing acid hydrolases. They mediate a variety of physiological processes, such as cellular clearance, lipid homeostasis, energy metabolism and pathogen defence. Lysosomes can secrete their content through a process called lysosome exocytosis in which lysosomes fuse with the plasma membrane realising their content into the extracellular milieu. Lysosomal exocytosis is not only responsible for the secretion of lysosomal enzymes,more » but it also has a crucial role in the plasma membrane repair. Recently, it has been demonstrated that lysosome response to the physiologic signals is regulated by the transcription factor EB (TFEB). In particular, lysosomal secretion is transcriptionally regulated by TFEB which induces both the docking and fusion of lysosomes with the plasma membrane. In this work we demonstrated that TFEB nuclear translocation is accompanied by an increase of mature glycohydrolases β-hexosaminidase and β-galactosidase on cell surface. This evidence contributes to elucidate an unknown TFEB biological function leading the lysosomal glycohydrolases on plasma membrane.« less

  6. Lysosomal acid lipase in mesenchymal stem cell stimulation of tumor growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ting; Yan, Cong; Du, Hong

    2016-09-20

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an important participant in the tumor microenvironment, in which they promote tumor growth and progression. Here we report for the first time that depletion of lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) in MSCs impairs their abilities to stimulate tumor growth and metastasis both in allogeneic and syngeneic mouse models. Reduced cell viability was observed in LAL-deficient (lal-/-) MSCs, which was a result of both increased apoptosis and decreased proliferation due to cell cycle arrest. The synthesis and secretion of cytokines and chemokines that are known to mediate MSCs' tumor-stimulating and immunosuppressive effects, i.e., IL-6, MCP-1 and IL-10, were down-regulated in lal-/- MSCs. When tumor cells were treated with the conditioned medium from lal-/- MSCs, decreased proliferation was observed, accompanied by reduced activation of oncogenic intracellular signaling molecules in tumor cells. Co-injection of lal-/- MSCs and B16 melanoma cells into wild type mice not only induced CD8+ cytotoxic T cells, but also decreased accumulation of tumor-promoting Ly6G+CD11b+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), which may synergistically contribute to the impairment of tumor progression. Furthermore, lal-/- MSCs showed impaired differentiation towards tumor-associated fibroblasts. In addition, MDSCs facilitated MSC proliferation, which was mediated by MDSC-secreted cytokines and chemokines. Our results indicate that LAL plays a critical role in regulating MSCs' ability to stimulate tumor growth and metastasis, which provides a mechanistic basis for targeting LAL in MSCs to reduce the risk of cancer metastasis.

  7. The Novel Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis Gene MFSD8 Encodes a Putative Lysosomal Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Siintola, Eija ; Topcu, Meral ; Aula, Nina ; Lohi, Hannes ; Minassian, Berge A. ; Paterson, Andrew D. ; Liu, Xiao-Qing ; Wilson, Callum ; Lahtinen, Ulla ; Anttonen, Anna-Kaisa ; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina 

    2007-01-01

    The late-infantile–onset forms are the most genetically heterogeneous group among the autosomal recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorders, the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs). The Turkish variant was initially considered to be a distinct genetic entity, with clinical presentation similar to that of other forms of late-infantile–onset NCL (LINCL), including age at onset from 2 to 7 years, epileptic seizures, psychomotor deterioration, myoclonus, loss of vision, and premature death. However, Turkish variant LINCL was recently found to be genetically heterogeneous, because mutations in two genes, CLN6 and CLN8, were identified to underlie the disease phenotype in a subset of patients. After a genomewide scan with single-nucleotide–polymorphism markers and homozygosity mapping in nine Turkish families and one Indian family, not linked to any of the known NCL loci, we mapped a novel variant LINCL locus to chromosome 4q28.1-q28.2 in five families. We identified six different mutations in the MFSD8 gene (previously denoted “MGC33302”), which encodes a novel polytopic 518–amino acid membrane protein that belongs to the major facilitator superfamily of transporter proteins. MFSD8 is expressed ubiquitously, with several alternatively spliced variants. Like the majority of the previously identified NCL proteins, MFSD8 localizes mainly to the lysosomal compartment. However, the function of MFSD8 remains to be elucidated. Analysis of the genome-scan data suggests the existence of at least three more genes in the remaining five families, further corroborating the great genetic heterogeneity of LINCLs. PMID:17564970

  8. Sebelipase Alfa: A Review in Lysosomal Acid Lipase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Frampton, James E

    2016-12-01

    Sebelipase alfa (Kanuma ® , Kanuma™), the first commercially available recombinant human lysosomal acid lipase (LAL), is approved in various countries worldwide, including those of the EU, the USA and Japan, as a long-term enzyme replacement therapy for patients diagnosed with LAL deficiency (LAL-D), an ultra-rare, autosomal recessive, progressive metabolic liver disease. In an ongoing study in nine infants presenting with early-onset LAL-D (Wolman disease), open-label treatment with sebelipase alfa significantly improved 1-year survival compared with historical controls. A substantial mortality benefit was maintained at 2 years of age, as was a reduction in disease-related activity. In an ongoing study of 66 children and adults with late-onset LAL-D (cholesteryl ester storage disease), 20 weeks' double-blind treatment with sebelipase alfa significantly reduced multiple disease-related hepatic and lipid abnormalities compared with placebo. Sustained improvements in markers of liver damage and dyslipidaemia were seen after 76 weeks' open-label treatment in an extension of this trial and, similarly, after 2 years' open-label treatment in an extension of another study in nine adults with late-onset LAL-D. Sebelipase alfa therapy has thus far been generally well tolerated, with signs and symptoms consistent with anaphylaxis being the most serious adverse reactions experienced by patients receiving the drug in clinical trials. Due to the rarity of the disease, these studies have enrolled a limited number of patients. Nonetheless, the available data indicate that sebelipase alfa is an effective disease-specific therapy for individuals with LAL-D who have historically been managed using supportive therapies (e.g. cholesterol reduction, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and liver transplantation).

  9. STRUCTURAL BASIS OF STEROL BINDING BY NPC2, A LYSOSOMAL PROTEIN DEFICIENT IN NIEMANN-PICK TYPE C2 DISEASE*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Sujuan; Benoff, Brian; Liou, Heng-Ling; Lobel, Peter; Stock, Ann M.

    2013-01-01

    NPC2 is a small lysosomal glycoprotein that binds cholesterol with submicromolar affinity. Deficiency in NPC2 is the cause of Niemann Pick type C2 disease, a fatal neurovisceral disorder characterized by accumulation of cholesterol in lysosomes. Here we report the crystal structure of bovine NPC2 bound to cholesterol-3-O-sulfate, an analog that binds with greater apparent affinity than cholesterol. Structures of both apo- and sterol-bound NPC2 were observed within the same crystal lattice, with an asymmetric unit containing one molecule of apoNPC2 and two molecules of sterol-bound NPC2. As predicted from a previously determined structure of apoNPC2, the sterol binds in a deep hydrophobic pocket sandwiched between the two β sheets of NPC2, with only the sulfate substituent of the ligand exposed to solvent. In the two available structures of apoNPC2, the incipient ligand-binding pocket, which ranges from a loosely packed hydrophobic core to a small tunnel, is too small to accommodate cholesterol. In the presence of sterol, the pocket expands, facilitated by a slight separation of the β strands and substantial reorientation of some side chains, resulting in a perfect molding of the pocket around the hydrocarbon portion of cholesterol. A notable feature is the repositioning of two aromatic residues at the tunnel entrance that are essential for NPC2 function. The NPC2 structures provide evidence of a malleable binding site, consistent with the previously documented broad range of sterol ligand specificity. PMID:17573352

  10. Gene therapy for lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) in large animal models.

    PubMed

    Haskins, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are inherited metabolic disorders caused by deficient activity of a single lysosomal enzyme or other defects resulting in deficient catabolism of large substrates in lysosomes. There are more than 40 forms of inherited LSDs known to occur in humans, with an aggregate incidence estimated at 1 in 7,000 live births. Clinical signs result from the inability of lysosomes to degrade large substrates; because most lysosomal enzymes are ubiquitously expressed, a deficiency in a single enzyme can affect multiple organ systems. Thus LSDs are associated with high morbidity and mortality and represent a significant burden on patients, their families, the health care system, and society. Because lysosomal enzymes are trafficked by a mannose 6-phosphate receptor mechanism, normal enzyme provided to deficient cells can be localized to the lysosome to reduce and prevent storage. However, many LSDs remain untreatable, and gene therapy holds the promise for effective therapy. Other therapies for some LSDs do exist, or are under evaluation, including heterologous bone marrow or cord blood transplantation (BMT), enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), and substrate reduction therapy (SRT), but these treatments are associated with significant concerns, including high morbidity and mortality (BMT), limited positive outcomes (BMT), incomplete response to therapy (BMT, ERT, and SRT), life-long therapy (ERT, SRT), and cost (BMT, ERT, SRT). Gene therapy represents a potential alternative, albeit with its own attendant concerns, including levels and persistence of expression and insertional mutagenesis resulting in neoplasia. Naturally occurring animal homologues of LSDs have been described in all common domestic animals (and in some that are less common) and these animal models play a critical role in evaluating the efficacy and safety of therapy.

  11. Ethambutol-induced toxicity is mediated by zinc and lysosomal membrane permeabilization in cultured retinal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hyewon; Yoon, Young Hee; Hwang, Jung Jin

    2009-03-01

    Ethambutol, an efficacious antituberculosis agent, can cause irreversible visual loss in a small but significant fraction of patients. However, the mechanism of ocular toxicity remains to be established. We previously reported that ethambutol caused severe vacuole formation in cultured retinal cells, and that the addition of zinc along with ethambutol aggravated vacuole formation whereas addition of the cell-permeable zinc chelator, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine (TPEN), reduced vacuole formation. To investigate the origin of vacuoles and to obtain an understanding of drug toxicity, we used cultured primary retinal cells from newborn Sprague-Dawley rats and imaged ethambutol-treated cells stained with FluoZin-3, zinc-specific fluorescentmore » dye, under a confocal microscope. Almost all ethambutol-induced vacuoles contained high levels of labile zinc. Double staining with LysoTracker or MitoTracker revealed that almost all zinc-containing vacuoles were lysosomes and not mitochondria. Intracellular zinc chelation with TPEN markedly blocked both vacuole formation and zinc accumulation in the vacuole. Immunocytochemistry with antibodies to lysosomal-associated membrane protein-2 (LAMP-2) and cathepsin D, an acid lysosomal hydrolase, disclosed lysosomal activation after exposure to ethambutol. Immunoblotting after 12 h exposure to ethambutol showed that cathepsin D was released into the cytosol. In addition, cathepsin inhibitors attenuated retinal cell toxicity induced by ethambutol. This is consistent with characteristics of lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP). TPEN also inhibited both lysosomal activation and LMP. Thus, accumulation of zinc in lysosomes, and eventual LMP, may be a key mechanism of ethambutol-induced retinal cell death.« less

  12. Dictyostelium LvsB Mutants Model the Lysosomal Defects Associated with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Edward; Wang, Ning; Wu, Wei-l; Weatherford, Alisha; De Lozanne, Arturo; Cardelli, James

    2002-01-01

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in a gene encoding a protein named LYST in humans (“lysosomal trafficking regulator”) or Beige in mice. A prominent feature of this disease is the accumulation of enlarged lysosome-related granules in a variety of cells. The genome of Dictyostelium discoideum contains six genes encoding proteins that are related to LYST/Beige in amino acid sequence, and disruption of one of these genes, lvsA (large volume sphere), results in profound defects in cytokinesis. To better understand the function of this family of proteins in membrane trafficking, we have analyzed mutants disrupted in lvsA, lvsB, lvsC, lvsD, lvsE, and lvsF. Of all these, only lvsA and lvsB mutants displayed interesting phenotypes in our assays. lvsA-null cells exhibited defects in phagocytosis and contained abnormal looking contractile vacuole membranes. Loss of LvsB, the Dictyostelium protein most similar to LYST/Beige, resulted in the formation of enlarged vesicles that by multiple criteria appeared to be acidic lysosomes. The rates of endocytosis, phagocytosis, and fluid phase exocytosis were normal in lvsB-null cells. Also, the rates of processing and the efficiency of targeting of lysosomal α-mannosidase were normal, although lvsB mutants inefficiently retained α-mannosidase, as well as two other lysosomal cysteine proteinases. Finally, results of pulse-chase experiments indicated that an increase in fusion rates accounted for the enlarged lysosomes in lvsB-null cells, suggesting that LvsB acts as a negative regulator of fusion. Our results support the notion that LvsB/LYST/Beige function in a similar manner to regulate lysosome biogenesis. PMID:11854420

  13. Expression of the lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) in astrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Stine S; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte; Christensen, Karina G; Kristensen, Bjarne

    2013-01-01

    Targeting of lysosomes is a novel therapeutic anti-cancer strategy for killing the otherwise apoptosis-resistant cancer cells. Such strategies are urgently needed for treatment of brain tumors, especially the glioblastoma, which is the most frequent and most malignant type. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of lysosomes in astrocytic brain tumors focussing also on the therapy resistant tumor stem cells. Expression of the lysosomal marker LAMP-1 (lysosomal-associated membrane protein-1) was investigated by immunohistochemistry in 112 formalin fixed paraffin embedded astrocytomas and compared with tumor grade and overall patient survival. Moreover, double immunofluorescence stainings were performed with LAMP-1 and the astrocytic marker GFAP and the putative stem cell marker CD133 on ten glioblastomas. Most tumors expressed the LAMP-1 protein in the cytoplasm of the tumor cells, while the blood vessels were positive in all tumors. The percentage of LAMP-1 positive tumor cells and staining intensities increased with tumor grade but variations in tumors of the same grade were also found. No association was found between LAMP-1 expression and patient overall survival in the individual tumor grades. LAMP-1/GFAP showed pronounced co-expression and LAMP-1/CD133 was co-expressed as well suggesting that tumor cells including the proposed tumor stem cells contain lysosomes. The results suggest that high amounts of lysosomes are present in glioblastomas and in the proposed tumor stem cells. Targeting of lysosomes may be a promising novel therapeutic strategy against this highly malignant neoplasm. PMID:23826410

  14. Lysosomal Trafficking, Antigen Presentation, and Microbial Killing Are Controlled by the Arf-like GTPase Arl8b

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Salil; Sharma, Mahak; Ung, Cindy; Tuli, Amit; Barral, Duarte C.; Hava, David L.; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Hacohen, Nir; Brenner, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Antigen presentation and microbial killing are critical arms of host defense that depend upon cargo trafficking into lysosomes. Yet, the molecular regulators of traffic into lysosomes are only partly understood. Here, using a lysosome-dependent immunological screen of a trafficking shRNA library, we identified the Arf-like GTPase Arl8b as a critical regulator of cargo delivery to lysosomes. Homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting (HOPS) complex members were identified as effectors of Arl8b and were dependent on Arl8b for recruitment to lysosomes, suggesting that Arl8b-HOPS plays a general role in directing traffic to lysosomes. Moreover, the formation of CD1 antigen-presenting complexes in lysosomes, their delivery to the plasma membrane, and phagosome-lysosome fusion were all markedly impaired in Arl8b silenced cells resulting in corresponding defects in T cell activation and microbial killing. Together, these results define Arl8b as a key regulator of lysosomal cellular and immunological functions. PMID:21802320

  15. Defects in ER–endosome contacts impact lysosome function in hereditary spastic paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Timothy; Connell, James W.; Winner, Beate

    2017-01-01

    Contacts between endosomes and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) promote endosomal tubule fission, but the mechanisms involved and consequences of tubule fission failure are incompletely understood. We found that interaction between the microtubule-severing enzyme spastin and the ESCRT protein IST1 at ER–endosome contacts drives endosomal tubule fission. Failure of fission caused defective sorting of mannose 6-phosphate receptor, with consequently disrupted lysosomal enzyme trafficking and abnormal lysosomal morphology, including in mouse primary neurons and human stem cell–derived neurons. Consistent with a role for ER-mediated endosomal tubule fission in lysosome function, similar lysosomal abnormalities were seen in cellular models lacking the WASH complex component strumpellin or the ER morphogen REEP1. Mutations in spastin, strumpellin, or REEP1 cause hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), a disease characterized by axonal degeneration. Our results implicate failure of the ER–endosome contact process in axonopathy and suggest that coupling of ER-mediated endosomal tubule fission to lysosome function links different classes of HSP proteins, previously considered functionally distinct, into a unifying pathway for axonal degeneration. PMID:28389476

  16. Not nanocarbon but dispersant induced abnormality in lysosome in macrophages in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yudasaka, Masako; Zhang, Minfang; Matsumura, Sachiko; Yuge, Ryota; Ichihashi, Toshinari; Irie, Hiroshi; Shiba, Kiyotaka; Iijima, Sumio

    2015-05-15

    The properties of nanocarbons change from hydrophobic to hydrophilic as a result of coating them with dispersants, typically phospholipid polyethylene glycols, for biological studies. It has been shown that the dispersants remain attached to the nanocarbons when they are injected in mice and influence the nanocarbons' biodistribution in vivo. We show in this report that the effects of dispersants also appear at the subcellular level in vivo. Carbon nanohorns (CNHs), a type of nanocarbon, were dispersed with ceramide polyethylene glycol (CPEG) and intravenously injected in mice. Histological observations and electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray analysis revealed that, in liver and spleen, the lysosome membranes were damaged, and the nanohorns formed a complex with hemosiderin in the lysosomes of the macrophages. It is inferred that the lysosomal membrane was damaged by sphigosine generated as a result of CPEG decomposition, which changed the intra lysosomal conditions, inducing the formation of the CPEG-CNH and hemosiderin complex. For comparison, when glucose was used instead of CPEG, neither the nanohorn–hemosiderin complex nor lysosomal membrane damage was found. Our results suggest that surface functionalization can control the behavior of nancarbons in cells in vivo and thereby improve their suitability for medical applications.

  17. Roles of the Drosophila LRRK2 homolog in Rab7-dependent lysosomal positioning

    PubMed Central

    Dodson, Mark W.; Zhang, Ting; Jiang, Changan; Chen, Shengdi; Guo, Ming

    2012-01-01

    LRRK2 (PARK8) is the most common genetic determinant of Parkinson's disease (PD), with dominant mutations in LRRK2 causing inherited PD and sequence variation at the LRRK2 locus associated with increased risk for sporadic PD. Although LRRK2 has been implicated in diverse cellular processes encompassing almost all cellular compartments, the precise functions of LRRK2 remain unclear. Here, we show that the Drosophila homolog of LRRK2 (Lrrk) localizes to the membranes of late endosomes and lysosomes, physically interacts with the crucial mediator of late endosomal transport Rab7 and negatively regulates rab7-dependent perinuclear localization of lysosomes. We also show that a mutant form of lrrk analogous to the pathogenic LRRK2G2019S allele behaves oppositely to wild-type lrrk in that it promotes rather than inhibits rab7-dependent perinuclear lysosome clustering, with these effects of mutant lrrk on lysosome position requiring both microtubules and dynein. These data suggest that LRRK2 normally functions in Rab7-dependent lysosomal positioning, and that this function is disrupted by the most common PD-causing LRRK2 mutation, linking endolysosomal dysfunction to the pathogenesis of LRRK2-mediated PD. PMID:22171073

  18. Trafficking defects in WASH-knockout fibroblasts originate from collapsed endosomal and lysosomal networks

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Timothy S.; Gorman, Jacquelyn A.; Artal-Martinez de Narvajas, Amaia; Koenig, Alexander O.; Billadeau, Daniel D.

    2012-01-01

    The Arp2/3-activator Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein and Scar homologue (WASH) is suggested to regulate actin-dependent membrane scission during endosomal sorting, but its cellular roles have not been fully elucidated. To investigate WASH function, we generated tamoxifen-inducible WASH-knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (WASHout MEFs). Of interest, although EEA1+ endosomes were enlarged, collapsed, and devoid of filamentous-actin and Arp2/3 in WASHout MEFs, we did not observe elongated membrane tubules emanating from these disorganized endomembranes. However, collapsed WASHout endosomes harbored segregated subdomains, containing either retromer cargo recognition complex–associated proteins or EEA1. In addition, we observed global collapse of LAMP1+ lysosomes, with some lysosomal membrane domains associated with endosomes. Both epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and transferrin receptor (TfnR) exhibited changes in steady-state cellular localization. EGFR was directed to the lysosomal compartment and exhibited reduced basal levels in WASHout MEFs. However, although TfnR was accumulated with collapsed endosomes, it recycled normally. Moreover, EGF stimulation led to efficient EGFR degradation within enlarged lysosomal structures. These results are consistent with the idea that discrete receptors differentially traffic via WASH-dependent and WASH-independent mechanisms and demonstrate that WASH-mediated F-actin is requisite for the integrity of both endosomal and lysosomal networks in mammalian cells. PMID:22718907

  19. Two phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases control lysosomal delivery of the Gaucher disease enzyme, β-glucocerebrosidase

    PubMed Central

    Jović, Marko; Kean, Michelle J.; Szentpetery, Zsofia; Polevoy, Gordon; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Brill, Julie A.; Balla, Tamas

    2012-01-01

    Gaucher disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a defect in the degradation of glucosylceramide catalyzed by the lysosomal enzyme β-glucocerebrosidase (GBA). GBA reaches lysosomes via association with its receptor, lysosomal integral membrane protein type 2 (LIMP-2). We found that distinct phosphatidylinositol 4-kinases (PI4Ks) play important roles at multiple steps in the trafficking pathway of the LIMP-2/GBA complex. Acute depletion of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate in the Golgi caused accumulation of LIMP-2 in this compartment, and PI4KIIIβ was found to be responsible for controlling the exit of LIMP-2 from the Golgi. In contrast, depletion of PI4KIIα blocked trafficking at a post-Golgi compartment, leading to accumulation of LIMP-2 in enlarged endosomal vesicles. PI4KIIα depletion also caused secretion of missorted GBA into the medium, which was attenuated by limiting LIMP-2/GBA exit from the Golgi by PI4KIIIβ inhibitors. These studies identified PI4KIIIβ and PI4KIIα as important regulators of lysosomal delivery of GBA, revealing a new element of control to sphingolipid homeostasis by phosphoinositides. PMID:22337770

  20. A lysosomal switch triggers proteostasis renewal in the immortal C. elegans germ lineage.

    PubMed

    Bohnert, K Adam; Kenyon, Cynthia

    2017-11-30

    Although individuals age and die with time, an animal species can continue indefinitely, because of its immortal germ-cell lineage. How the germline avoids transmitting damage from one generation to the next remains a fundamental question in biology. Here we identify a lysosomal switch that enhances germline proteostasis before fertilization. We find that Caenorhabditis elegans oocytes whose maturation is arrested by the absence of sperm exhibit hallmarks of proteostasis collapse, including protein aggregation. Remarkably, sperm-secreted hormones re-establish oocyte proteostasis once fertilization becomes imminent. Key to this restoration is activation of the vacuolar H + -ATPase (V-ATPase), a proton pump that acidifies lysosomes. Sperm stimulate V-ATPase activity in oocytes by signalling the degradation of GLD-1, a translational repressor that blocks V-ATPase synthesis. Activated lysosomes, in turn, promote a metabolic shift that mobilizes protein aggregates for degradation, and reset proteostasis by enveloping and clearing the aggregates. Lysosome acidification also occurs during Xenopus oocyte maturation; thus, a lysosomal switch that enhances oocyte proteostasis in anticipation of fertilization may be conserved in other species.

  1. Alterations in lysosomal and proteasomal markers in Parkinson's disease: relationship to alpha-synuclein inclusions.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yaping; Dodiya, Hemraj; Aebischer, Patrick; Olanow, C Warren; Kordower, Jeffrey H

    2009-09-01

    We explored the relationship between ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) and lysosomal markers and the formation of alpha-synuclein (alpha-syn) inclusions in nigral neurons in Parkinson disease (PD). Lysosome Associated Membrane Protein 1(LAMP1), Cathepsin D (CatD), and Heat Shock Protein73 (HSP73) immunoreactivity were significantly decreased within PD nigral neurons when compared to age-matched controls. This decrease was significantly greater in nigral neurons that contained alpha-syn inclusions. Immunoreactivity for 20S proteasome was similarly reduced in PD nigral neurons, but only in cells that contained inclusions. In aged control brains, there is staining for alpha-syn protein, but it is non-aggregated and there is no difference in LAMP1, CatD, HSP73 or 20S proteasome immunoreactivity between alpha-syn positive or negative neuromelanin-laden nigral neurons. Targeting over-expression of mutant human alpha-syn in the rat substantia nigra using viral vectors revealed that lysosomal and proteasomal markers were significantly decreased in the neurons that displayed alpha-syn-ir inclusions. These findings suggest that alpha-syn aggregation is a key feature associated with decline of proteasome and lysosome and support the hypothesis that cell degeneration in PD involves proteosomal and lysosomal dysfunction, impaired protein clearance, and protein accumulation and aggregation leading to cell death.

  2. Lysosomes in the Pathogenesis of the Renal Necrosis of Choline-Deficient Rats

    PubMed Central

    Monserrat, A. J.; Hamilton, F.; Ghoshal, A. K.; Porta, E. A.; Hartroft, W. S.

    1972-01-01

    Previously published data from our laboratories led us to postulate that alterations in lysosomes may play a cardinal pathogenic role in the fatal renal necrosis of choline-deficient weanling rats. To explore this hypothesis further a series of five different experiments were carried out. In the first two experiments the effect of a “stabilizer” of the lysosomes, hydrocortisone, was studied; conversely, in the third and fourth experiments, the effect of a “labilizer,” vitamin A, was studied. Finally, in the fifth experiment, the renal levels of a lysosomal enzyme, acid phosphatase, were evaluated biochemically. Results of the first two experiments revealed a protective effect of hydrocortisone while those of the third and fourth an aggravating effect of vitamin A. Results of the fifth experiment indicated lysosomal changes in the prenecrotic and early necrotic stages. These results along with those from our previous studies, support the concept that lysosomal alterations play an important pathogenic role in renal changes of choline-deficient weanling rats. ImagesFig 3Fig 4Fig 1Fig 2 PMID:5080696

  3. Loss of PIKfyve in platelets causes a lysosomal disease leading to inflammation and thrombosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Min, Sang H; Suzuki, Aae; Stalker, Timothy J; Zhao, Liang; Wang, Yuhuan; McKennan, Chris; Riese, Matthew J; Guzman, Jessica F; Zhang, Suhong; Lian, Lurong; Joshi, Rohan; Meng, Ronghua; Seeholzer, Steven H; Choi, John K; Koretzky, Gary; Marks, Michael S; Abrams, Charles S

    2014-09-02

    PIKfyve is essential for the synthesis of phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(3,5)P2] and for the regulation of endolysosomal membrane dynamics in mammals. PtdIns(3,5)P2 deficiency causes neurodegeneration in mice and humans, but the role of PtdIns(3,5)P2 in non-neural tissues is poorly understood. Here we show that platelet-specific ablation of PIKfyve in mice leads to accelerated arterial thrombosis, and, unexpectedly, also to inappropriate inflammatory responses characterized by macrophage accumulation in multiple tissues. These multiorgan defects are attenuated by platelet depletion in vivo, confirming that they reflect a platelet-specific process. PIKfyve ablation in platelets induces defective maturation and excessive storage of lysosomal enzymes that are released upon platelet activation. Impairing lysosome secretion from PIKfyve-null platelets in vivo markedly attenuates the multiorgan defects, suggesting that platelet lysosome secretion contributes to pathogenesis. Our findings identify PIKfyve as an essential regulator for platelet lysosome homeostasis, and demonstrate the contributions of platelet lysosomes to inflammation, arterial thrombosis and macrophage biology.

  4. Color reduction of melanin by lysosomal and peroxisomal enzymes isolated from mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong Jun; Sekhon, Simranjeet Singh; Yoon, Jihee; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2016-02-01

    Lysosomes and peroxisomes are organelles with many functions in all eukaryotic cells. Lysosomes contain hydrolytic enzymes (lysozyme) that degrade molecules, whereas peroxisomes contain enzymes such as catalase that convert hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to water and oxygen and neutralize toxicity. In contrast, melanin is known as a helpful element to protect the skin against harmful ultraviolet rays. However, a high quantity of melanin leads to hyperpigmentation or skin cancer in human. New materials have already been discovered to inhibit tyrosinase in melanogenesis; however, melanin reduction does not suggest their preparation. In this study, we report that the color intensity because of melanin decreased by the cellular activation of lysosomes and peroxisomes. An increase in the superficial intensity of lysosome and peroxisome activities of HeLa cells was observed. In addition, a decrease in the amount of melanin has also been observed in mammalian cells without using any other chemical, showing that the process can work in vivo for treating melanin. Therefore, the results of this study indicate that the amount of melanin decreases by the lysosome and peroxisome activity after entering the cells, and functional organelles are effective in color reduction. This mechanism can be used in vivo for treating melanin.

  5. Lysosomal Degradation Is Required for Sustained Phagocytosis of Bacteria by Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ching-On; Gregory, Steven; Hu, Hongxiang; Chao, Yufang; Sepúlveda, Victoria E; He, Yuchun; Li-Kroeger, David; Goldman, William E; Bellen, Hugo J; Venkatachalam, Kartik

    2017-06-14

    Clearance of bacteria by macrophages involves internalization of the microorganisms into phagosomes, which are then delivered to endolysosomes for enzymatic degradation. These spatiotemporally segregated processes are not known to be functionally coupled. Here, we show that lysosomal degradation of bacteria sustains phagocytic uptake. In Drosophila and mammalian macrophages, lysosomal dysfunction due to loss of the endolysosomal Cl - transporter ClC-b/CLCN7 delayed degradation of internalized bacteria. Unexpectedly, defective lysosomal degradation of bacteria also attenuated further phagocytosis, resulting in elevated bacterial load. Exogenous application of bacterial peptidoglycans restored phagocytic uptake in the lysosomal degradation-defective mutants via a pathway requiring cytosolic pattern recognition receptors and NF-κB. Mammalian macrophages that are unable to degrade internalized bacteria also exhibit compromised NF-κB activation. Our findings reveal a role for phagolysosomal degradation in activating an evolutionarily conserved signaling cascade, which ensures that continuous uptake of bacteria is preceded by lysosomal degradation of microbes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Reduced lysosomal clearance of autophagosomes promotes survival and colonization of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Hu, Wei; Cho, Chi H; Chan, Francis Kl; Yu, Jun; Ross Fitzgerald, J; Cheung, Cynthia Ky; Xiao, Zhan G; Shen, Jing; Li, Long F; Li, Ming X; Wu, Justin Cy; Ling, Thomas Kw; Chan, Jason Yk; Ko, Ho; Tse, Gary; Ng, Siew C; Yu, Sidney; Wang, Maggie Ht; Gin, Tony; Ashktorab, Hassan; Smoot, Duane T; Wong, Sunny H; Chan, Matthew Tv; Wu, William Kk

    2018-04-01

    Evasion of autophagy is key for intracellular survival of bacteria in host cells, but its involvement in persistent infection by Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium identified to invade gastric epithelial cells, remains obscure. The aim of this study was to functionally characterize the role of autophagy in H. pylori infection. Autophagy was assayed in H. pylori-infected human gastric epithelium and the functional role of autophagy was determined via genetic or pharmacological ablation of autophagy in mouse and cell line models of H. pylori infection. Here, we showed that H. pylori inhibited lysosomal function and thereby promoted the accumulation of autophagosomes in gastric epithelial cells. Importantly, inhibiting autophagosome formation by pharmacological inhibitors or genetic ablation of BECN1 or ATG5 reduced H. pylori intracellular survival, whereas inhibition of lysosomal functions exerted an opposite effect. Further experiments demonstrated that H. pylori inhibited lysosomal acidification and the retrograde trafficking of mannose-6-phosphate receptors, both of which are known to positively regulate lysosomal function. We conclude that H. pylori subverts autophagy into a pro-survival mechanism through inhibition of lysosomal clearance of autophagosomes. Disruption of autophagosome formation offers a novel strategy to reduce H. pylori colonization in human stomachs. Copyright © 2018 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2018 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. γ-Interferon-inducible Lysosomal Thiol Reductase (GILT) Maintains Phagosomal Proteolysis in Alternatively Activated Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Balce, Dale R.; Allan, Euan R. O.; McKenna, Neil; Yates, Robin M.

    2014-01-01

    Although it is known that lysosomal cysteine cathepsins require a reducing environment for optimal activity, it is not firmly established how these enzymes are maintained in their reduced-active state in the acidic and occasionally oxidative environment within phagosomes and lysosomes. γ-Interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) has been the only enzyme described in the endosomes, lysosomes, and phagosomes with the potential to catalyze the reduction of cysteine cathepsins. Our goal in the current study was to assess the effect of GILT on major phagosomal functions with an emphasis on proteolytic efficiency in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages. Assessment of phagosomal disulfide reduction upon internalization of IgG-opsonized experimental particles confirmed a major role for GILT in phagosomal disulfide reduction in both resting and interferon-γ-activated macrophages. Furthermore we observed a decrease in early phagosomal proteolytic efficiency in GILT-deficient macrophages, specifically in the absence of an NADPH oxidase-mediated respiratory burst. This deficiency was more prominent in IL-4-activated macrophages that inherently possess lower levels of NADPH oxidase activity. Finally, we provide evidence that GILT is required for optimal activity of the lysosomal cysteine protease, cathepsin S. In summary, our results suggest a role for GILT in maintaining cysteine cathepsin proteolytic efficiency in phagosomes, particularly in the absence of high NADPH oxidase activity, which is characteristic of alternatively activated macrophages. PMID:25253686

  8. Lysosomal cross-correction by hematopoietic stem cell-derived macrophages via tunneling nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Naphade, Swati; Sharma, Jay; Chevronnay, Héloïse P. Gaide; Shook, Michael A.; Yeagy, Brian A.; Rocca, Celine J.; Ur, Sarah N.; Lau, Athena J.; Courtoy, Pierre J.; Cherqui, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Despite controversies on the potential of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to promote tissue repair, we previously showed that HSC transplantation could correct cystinosis, a multi-systemic lysosomal storage disease, caused by a defective lysosomal membrane cystine transporter, cystinosin (CTNS). Addressing the cellular mechanisms, we here report vesicular cross-correction after HSC differentiation into macrophages. Upon co-culture with cystinotic fibroblasts, macrophages produced tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) allowing transfer of cystinosin-bearing lysosomes into Ctns-deficient cells, which exploited the same route to retrogradely transfer cystine-loaded lysosomes to macrophages, providing a bidirectional correction mechanism. TNT formation was enhanced by contact with diseased cells. In vivo, HSCs grafted to cystinotic kidneys also generated nanotubular extensions resembling invadopodia that crossed the dense basement membranes and delivered cystinosin into diseased proximal tubular cells. This is the first report of correction of a genetic lysosomal defect by bidirectional vesicular exchange via TNTs and suggests broader potential for HSC transplantation for other disorders due to defective vesicular proteins. PMID:25186209

  9. Activity-Dependent Exocytosis of Lysosomes Regulates the Structural Plasticity of Dendritic Spines.

    PubMed

    Padamsey, Zahid; McGuinness, Lindsay; Bardo, Scott J; Reinhart, Marcia; Tong, Rudi; Hedegaard, Anne; Hart, Michael L; Emptage, Nigel J

    2017-01-04

    Lysosomes have traditionally been viewed as degradative organelles, although a growing body of evidence suggests that they can function as Ca 2+ stores. Here we examined the function of these stores in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. We found that back-propagating action potentials (bpAPs) could elicit Ca 2+ release from lysosomes in the dendrites. This Ca 2+ release triggered the fusion of lysosomes with the plasma membrane, resulting in the release of Cathepsin B. Cathepsin B increased the activity of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), an enzyme involved in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodelling and synaptic plasticity. Inhibition of either lysosomal Ca 2+ signaling or Cathepsin B release prevented the maintenance of dendritic spine growth induced by Hebbian activity. This impairment could be rescued by exogenous application of active MMP-9. Our findings suggest that activity-dependent exocytosis of Cathepsin B from lysosomes regulates the long-term structural plasticity of dendritic spines by triggering MMP-9 activation and ECM remodelling. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Molecular characterization of aspartylglucosaminidase, a lysosomal hydrolase upregulated during strobilation in the moon jellyfish, Aurelia aurita.

    PubMed

    Tsujita, Natsumi; Kuwahara, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Hiroki; Yanaka, Noriyuki; Arakawa, Kenji; Kuniyoshi, Hisato

    2017-05-01

    The life cycle of the moon jellyfish, Aurelia aurita, alternates between a benthic asexual polyp stage and a planktonic sexual medusa (jellyfish) stage. Transition from polyp to medusa is called strobilation. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of strobilation, we screened for genes that are upregulated during strobilation using the differential display method and we identified aspartylglucosaminidase (AGA), which encodes a lysosomal hydrolase. Similar to AGAs from other species, Aurelia AGA possessed an N-terminal signal peptide and potential N-glycosylation sites. The genomic region of Aurelia AGA was approximately 9.8 kb in length and contained 12 exons and 11 introns. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that AGA expression increased during strobilation, and was then decreased in medusae. To inhibit AGA function, we administered the lysosomal acidification inhibitors, chloroquine or bafilomycin A1, to animals during strobilation. Both inhibitors disturbed medusa morphogenesis at the oral end, suggesting involvement of lysosomal hydrolases in strobilation.

  11. Prevention of lysosomal storage in Tay-Sachs mice treated with N-butyldeoxynojirimycin.

    PubMed

    Platt, F M; Neises, G R; Reinkensmeier, G; Townsend, M J; Perry, V H; Proia, R L; Winchester, B; Dwek, R A; Butters, T D

    1997-04-18

    The glycosphingolipid (GSL) lysosomal storage diseases result from the inheritance of defects in the genes encoding the enzymes required for catabolism of GSLs within lysosomes. A strategy for the treatment of these diseases, based on an inhibitor of GSL biosynthesis N-butyldeoxynojirimycin, was evaluated in a mouse model of Tay-Sachs disease. When Tay-Sachs mice were treated with N-butyldeoxynojirimycin, the accumulation of GM2 in the brain was prevented, with the number of storage neurons and the quantity of ganglioside stored per cell markedly reduced. Thus, limiting the biosynthesis of the substrate (GM2) for the defective enzyme (beta-hexosaminidase A) prevents GSL accumulation and the neuropathology associated with its lysosomal storage.

  12. The Ubiquitin–Proteasome System and the Autophagic–Lysosomal System in Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ihara, Yasuo; Morishima-Kawashima, Maho; Nixon, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    As neurons age, their survival depends on eliminating a growing burden of damaged, potentially toxic proteins and organelles—a capability that declines owing to aging and disease factors. Here, we review the two proteolytic systems principally responsible for protein quality control in neurons and their important contributions to Alzheimer disease pathogenesis. In the first section, the discovery of paired helical filament ubiquitination is described as a backdrop for discussing the importance of the ubiquitin–proteasome system in Alzheimer disease. In the second section, we review the prominent involvement of the lysosomal system beginning with pathological endosomal–lysosomal activation and signaling at the very earliest stages of Alzheimer disease followed by the progressive failure of autophagy. These abnormalities, which result in part from Alzheimer-related genes acting directly on these lysosomal pathways, contribute to the development of each of the Alzheimer neuropathological hallmarks and represent a promising therapeutic target. PMID:22908190

  13. Rab7: role of its protein interaction cascades in endo-lysosomal traffic.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuanlao; Ming, Zhang; Xiaochun, Wu; Hong, Wanjin

    2011-03-01

    Protein-protein interaction cascades are crucial for cellular signaling pathways and cell morphogenesis. Membrane traffic along the secretory and endocytic pathways is similarly governed by regulated protein-protein interactions of diverse machineries, which are inter-regulated, assembled and disassembled sequentially to drive membrane budding, vesicle transport, membrane fission and fusion. Rab7, the key regulator in endo-lysosomal trafficking investigated extensively in the past decades, is emerging to govern early-to-late endosomal maturation, microtubule minus-end as well as plus-end directed endosomal migration and positioning, and endosome-lysosome transport through different protein-protein interaction cascades. We summarize here the key protein interaction cascades of Rab7 by focusing on endo-lysosomal trafficking regulated by its interaction with HOPs, RILP, ORP1L, FYCO1 and Mon1/Sand1-CCZ1 complex. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The ubiquitin-proteasome system and the autophagic-lysosomal system in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Yasuo; Morishima-Kawashima, Maho; Nixon, Ralph

    2012-08-01

    As neurons age, their survival depends on eliminating a growing burden of damaged, potentially toxic proteins and organelles-a capability that declines owing to aging and disease factors. Here, we review the two proteolytic systems principally responsible for protein quality control in neurons and their important contributions to Alzheimer disease pathogenesis. In the first section, the discovery of paired helical filament ubiquitination is described as a backdrop for discussing the importance of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in Alzheimer disease. In the second section, we review the prominent involvement of the lysosomal system beginning with pathological endosomal-lysosomal activation and signaling at the very earliest stages of Alzheimer disease followed by the progressive failure of autophagy. These abnormalities, which result in part from Alzheimer-related genes acting directly on these lysosomal pathways, contribute to the development of each of the Alzheimer neuropathological hallmarks and represent a promising therapeutic target.

  15. The inactivation of the sortilin gene leads to a partial disruption of prosaposin trafficking to the lysosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Jibin; Racicott, Jesse; Morales, Carlos R., E-mail: carlos.morales@mcgill.ca

    2009-11-01

    Lysosomes are intracellular organelles which contain enzymes and activator proteins involved in the digestion and recycling of a variety of cellular and extracellular substances. We have identified a novel sorting receptor, sortilin, which is involved in the lysosomal trafficking of the sphingolipid activator proteins, prosaposin and GM{sub 2}AP, and the soluble hydrolases cathepsin D, cathepsin H, and acid sphingomyelinase. Sortilin belongs to a growing family of receptors with homology to the yeast Vps10 protein, which acts as a lysosomal sorting receptor for carboxypeptidase Y. In this study we examined the effects of the sortilin gene inactivation in mice. The inactivationmore » of this gene did not yield any noticeable lysosomal pathology. To determine the existence of an alternative receptor complementing the sorting function of sortilin, we quantified the concentration of prosaposin in the lysosomes of the nonciliated epithelial cells lining the efferent ducts. These cells were chosen because they express sortilin and have a large number of lysosomes containing prosaposin. In addition, the nonciliated cells are known to endocytose luminal prosaposin that is synthesized and secreted by Sertoli cells into the seminiferous luminal fluids. Consequently, the nonciliated cells are capable of targeting both exogenous and endogenous prosaposin to the lysosomes. Using electron microscope immunogold labeling and quantitative analysis, our results demonstrate that inactivation of the sortilin gene produces a significant decrease of prosaposin in the lysosomes. When luminal prosaposin was excluded from the efferent ducts, the level of prosaposin in lysosomes was even lower in the mutant mice. Nonetheless, a significant amount of prosaposin continues to reach the lysosomal compartment. These results strongly suggest the existence of an alternative receptor that complements the function of sortilin and explains the lack of lysosomal storage disorders in the sortilin

  16. LYSOSOMAL AND ULTRASTRUCTURAL CHANGES IN HUMAN "TOXIC" NEUTROPHILS DURING BACTERIAL INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Charles E.; Katayama, Isao; Cotran, Ramzi S.; Finland, Maxwell

    1969-01-01

    "Toxic" neutrophils from humans with severe bacterial infections, identified by the presence of Döhle bodies, "toxic" granules, and vacuoles were shown to differ from normal neutrophils both in ultrastructure and in lysosome activity. Döhle bodies were identified as lamellar aggregates of rough endoplasmic reticulum. Toxic granules corresponded to the azurophilic granules usually identified by Romanowsky stains only in neutrophil precursors. By electron microscopy such granules were large, electron-dense, and peroxidase positive; they could usually be distinguished from the smaller, less dense, "specific" granules also present in control neutrophils, but in the latter they became visible by light microscopy only after prolonged staining or following fixation with glutaraldehyde. These observations suggest that toxic granules represent an abnormal staining reaction of the large dense granules in the toxic cells, and not phagocytized material, newly formed abnormal granules or autophagic bodies. Alkaline phosphatase activity was significantly greater in toxic neutrophils than in normal ones; 80% of the activity of both was located in the lysosome fraction. Beta glucuronidase was normal. Total acid phosphatase was normal, but the percentage located in the nonlysosome fraction of toxic neutrophils was increased, suggesting that lysosomes were "labilized." Formation of neutral red vacuoles in supravitally stained preparations, an index of lysosome activity, occurred more rapidly in toxic neutrophils. This reaction paralleled degranulation and the formation of clear vacuoles in unstained wet mounts and could be blocked by colchicine, a lysosome stabilizer, or enhanced by procedures which activate lysosomes. "Autophagic" vacuoles were observed by electron microscopy in some toxic neutrophils. These observations are discussed in relation to the concept that the "toxic" neutrophils in severe bacterial infection reflect cellular immaturity and/or stimulation or

  17. A novel fluorescent probe reveals starvation controls the commitment of amyloid precursor protein to the lysosome.

    PubMed

    Hein, Leanne K; Apaja, Pirjo M; Hattersley, Kathryn; Grose, Randall H; Xie, Jianling; Proud, Christopher G; Sargeant, Timothy J

    2017-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most important cause of dementia but there is no therapy that has been demonstrated to stop or slow disease progression. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) is the source of amyloid-β (Aβ), which aggregates in Alzheimer's disease to form toxic oligomeric species. The endo-lysosomal system can clear APP and Aβ from the cell if these molecular species are trafficked through to the lysosome. Currently, there are no easy methods available for the analysis of lysosomal APP trafficking. We therefore generated a fusion protein (tandem-fluorescent, or tf-APP) that allows detection of changes in APP trafficking using accessible techniques such as flow cytometry. This permits rapid analysis or screening of genes and compounds that alter APP processing in the cell. Using our novel molecular probe, we determined that starvation induces trafficking of APP and APP-carboxy-terminal fragments (APP-CTFs) to the degradative endo-lysosomal network. In line with this finding, suppression of mTOR signalling using AZD8055 also strongly induced trafficking of APP to the endo-lysosomal system. Remarkably, activation of mTOR signalling via RHEB over-expression inhibited the starvation-induced autophagy but did not affect trafficking of tf-APP. These results show tf-APP can be used to determine how APP is trafficked through the lysosomal system of the cell. This molecular probe is therefore useful for determining the molecular mechanism behind the commitment of APP to the degradative pathway or for screening compounds that can induce this effect. This is important as clearance of APP and APP-CTF provides an important potential therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Lysosomal storage and impaired autophagy lead to inflammasome activation in Gaucher macrophages.

    PubMed

    Aflaki, Elma; Moaven, Nima; Borger, Daniel K; Lopez, Grisel; Westbroek, Wendy; Chae, Jae Jin; Marugan, Juan; Patnaik, Samarjit; Maniwang, Emerson; Gonzalez, Ashley N; Sidransky, Ellen

    2016-02-01

    Gaucher disease, the inherited deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase, is characterized by the presence of glucosylcer-amide macrophages, the accumulation of glucosylceramide in lysosomes and the secretion of inflammatory cytokines. However, the connection between this lysosomal storage and inflammation is not clear. Studying macrophages derived from peripheral monocytes from patients with type 1 Gaucher disease with genotype N370S/N370S, we confirmed an increased secretion of interleukins IL-1β and IL-6. In addition, we found that activation of the inflammasome, a multiprotein complex that activates caspase-1, led to the maturation of IL-1β in Gaucher macrophages. We show that inflammasome activation in these cells is the result of impaired autophagy. Treatment with the small-molecule glucocerebrosidase chaperone NCGC758 reversed these defects, inducing autophagy and reducing IL-1β secretion, confirming the role of the deficiency of lysosomal glucocerebrosidase in these processes. We found that in Gaucher macrophages elevated levels of the autophagic adaptor p62 prevented the delivery of inflammasomes to autophagosomes. This increase in p62 led to activation of p65-NF-kB in the nucleus, promoting the expression of inflammatory cytokines and the secretion of IL-1β. This newly elucidated mechanism ties lysosomal dysfunction to inflammasome activation, and may contribute to the massive organomegaly, bone involvement and increased susceptibility to certain malignancies seen in Gaucher disease. Moreover, this link between lysosomal storage, impaired autophagy, and inflammation may have implications relevant to both Parkinson disease and the aging process. Defects in these basic cellular processes may also provide new therapeutic targets. Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Toll-like Receptor 2 Signalling and the Lysosomal Machinery in Barrett's Esophagus.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, Romy E; Siersema, Peter D; Vleggaar, Frank P; Ten Kate, Fiebo J; Posthuma, George; Souza, Rhonda F; de Haan, Judith; van Baal, Jantine W P M

    2016-09-01

    Inflammation plays an important role in the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma and its metaplastic precursor lesion, Barrett's esophagus. Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 signalling and lysosomal function have been linked to inflammation-associated carcinogenesis. We examined the expression of TLR2 in the esophagus and the effect of long-term TLR2 activation on morphological changes and expression of factors involved in lysosomal function in a Barrett's esophagus epithelium cell line. TLR2 expression in normal squamous esophagus, reflux esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma biopsies was assessed with Q-RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Barrett's esophagus epithelium cells (BAR-T) were incubated with acid and bile salts in the presence or absence of the TLR2 agonist Pam3CSK4 for a period up to 4 weeks. Morphological changes were assessed with electron microscopy, while Q-RT-PCR was used to determine the expression of lysosomal enzymes (Cathepsin B and C) and factors involved in endocytosis (LAMP-1 and M6PR) and autophagy (LC3 and Rab7). TLR2 was expressed in normal squamous esophagus, reflux esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus but was most prominent in esophageal adenocarcinoma. Long-term TLR2 activation in acid and bile salts exposed BAR-T cells resulted in more and larger lysosomes, more mitochondria and increased expression of LAMP-1, M6PR, Cathepsin B and C when compared to BAR-T cells incubated with acid and bile salts but no TLR2 agonist. Factors associated with autophagy (LC3 and Rab7) expression remained largely unchanged. Activation of TLR2 in acid and bile salts exposed Barrett epithelium cells resulted in an increased number of mitochondria and lysosomes and increased expression of lysosomal enzymes and factors involved in endocytosis.

  20. Gene therapy approaches for lysosomal storage disorders, a good model for the treatment of mendelian diseases.

    PubMed

    Tomanin, Rosella; Zanetti, Alessandra; Zaccariotto, Eva; D'Avanzo, Francesca; Bellettato, Cinzia M; Scarpa, Maurizio

    2012-07-01

    This review describes the different gene therapy technologies applied to approach lysosomal storage disorders, monogenic conditions, with known genetic and biochemical defects, for many of which animal models are available. Both viral and nonviral procedures are described, underlying the specific needs that the treatment of genetic disorders requires. Lysosomal storage disorders represent a good model of study of gene therapeutic procedures that are, or could be, relevant to the treatment of several other mendelian diseases. © 2012 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica © 2012 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  1. Altered lysosome distribution is an early neuropathological event in neurological forms of Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Zigdon, Hila; Meshcheriakova, Anna; Farfel-Becker, Tamar; Volpert, Giora; Sabanay, Helena; Futerman, Anthony H

    2017-03-01

    In the lysosomal storage disorder Gaucher disease (GD), glucosylceramide (GlcCer) accumulates due to the defective activity of glucocerebrosidase. A subset of GD patients develops neuropathology. We now show mislocalization of Limp2-positive puncta and a large reduction in the number of Lamp1-positive puncta, which are associated with impaired tubulin. These changes occur at an early stage in animal models of GD, prior to development of overt symptoms and considerably earlier than neuronal loss. Altered lysosomal localization and cytoskeleton disruption precede the neuroinflammatory pathways, axonal dystrophy and neuronal loss previously characterized in neuronal forms of GD. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  2. Cloning, phylogenetic analysis and 3D modeling of a putative lysosomal acid lipase from the camel, Camelus dromedarius.

    PubMed

    Ataya, Farid Shokry

    2012-08-30

    Acid lipase belongs to a family of enzymes that is mainly present in lysosomes of different organs and the stomach. It is characterized by its capacity to withstand acidic conditions while maintaining high lipolytic activity. We cloned for the first time the full coding sequence of camel's lysosomal acid lipase, cLIPA using RT-PCR technique (Genbank accession numbers JF803951 and AEG75815, for the nucleotide and aminoacid sequences respectively). The cDNA sequencing revealed an open reading frame of 1,197 nucleotides that encodes a protein of 399 aminoacids which was similar to that from other related mammalian species. Bioinformatic analysis was used to determine the aminoacid sequence, 3D structure and phylogeny of cLIPA. Bioinformatics analysis suggested the molecular weight of the translated protein to be 45.57 kDa, which could be decreased to 43.16 kDa after the removal of a signal peptide comprising the first 21 aminoacids. The deduced cLIPA sequences exhibited high identity with Equus caballus (86%), Numascus leucogenys (85%), Homo sapiens (84%), Sus scrofa (84%), Bos taurus (82%) and Ovis aries (81%). cLIPA shows high aminoacid sequence identity with human and dog-gastric lipases (58%, and 59% respectively) which makes it relevant to build a 3D structure model for cLIPA. The omparison confirms the presence of the catalytic triad and the oxyanion hole in cLIPA. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that camel cLIPA is grouped with monkey, human, pig, cow and goat. The level of expression of cLIPA in five camel tissues was examined using Real Time-PCR. The highest level of cLIPA transcript was found in the camel testis (162%), followed by spleen (129%), liver (100%), kidney (20.5%) and lung (17.4%).

  3. Lysosomal elastase and cathepsin G in beige mice. Neutrophils of beige (Chediak-Higashi) mice selectively lack lysosomal elastase and cathepsin G

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    A profound decrease in activities of the two lysosomal serine proteinases, elastase, and cathepsin G, was found in neutrophils of four independent beige mutants. Elastase and cathepsin G activities were assayed with the specific synthetic substrates MeO-Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro- Val-MCA and Suc-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-pNA, respectively. The defect is intrinsic to cells of beige mice, since transplantation of bone marrow from normal to mutant mice restored normal proteinase activity, and normal mice transplanted with beige marrow produced neutrophils with a deficiency of proteinase activity. The loss of elastase and cathepsin G activity was confirmed by separation of [3H]diisopropylfluorophosphate- labeled proteins on denaturing gels, which also revealed that other serine proteinases are at normal levels in beige neutrophil extracts. The deficiency of lysosomal proteinase activity appears specific, in that four other common neutrophil lysosomal enzymes, plus the spectrum of major neutrophil proteins are not affected by the beige mutation. The deficiency of proteinase activity is likely not the primary genetic alteration of the beige mutation, since more than one proteinase is affected, and heterozygous F1 mice have normal rather than intermediate levels of both proteinases. The lowered proteinase activity may contribute to the high susceptibility of beige mice and Chediak-Higashi patients to infection. PMID:3512758

  4. ZnT2 is a critical mediator of lysosomal-mediated cell death during early mammary gland involution

    PubMed Central

    Hennigar, Stephen R.; Seo, Young Ah; Sharma, Supriya; Soybel, David I.; Kelleher, Shannon L.

    2015-01-01

    Mammary gland involution is the most dramatic example of physiological cell death. It occurs through an initial phase of lysosomal-mediated cell death (LCD) followed by mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis. Zinc (Zn) activates both LCD and apoptosis in vitro. The Zn transporter ZnT2 imports Zn into vesicles and mitochondria and ZnT2-overexpression activates cell death in mammary epithelial cells (MECs). We tested the hypothesis that ZnT2-mediated Zn transport is critical for mammary gland involution in mice. Following weaning, ZnT2 abundance increased in lysosomes and mitochondria, which paralleled Zn accumulation in each of these organelles. Adenoviral expression of ZnT2 in lactating mouse mammary glands in vivo increased Zn in lysosomes and mitochondria and activated LCD and apoptosis, promoting a profound reduction in MECs and alveoli. Injection of TNFα, a potent activator of early involution, into the mammary gland fat pads of lactating mice increased ZnT2 and Zn in lysosomes and activated premature involution. Exposure of cultured MECs to TNFα redistributed ZnT2 to lysosomes and increased lysosomal Zn, which activated lysosomal swelling, cathepsin B release, and LCD. Our data implicate ZnT2 as a critical mediator of cell death during involution and importantly, that as an initial involution signal, TNFα redistributes ZnT2 to lysosomes to activate LCD. PMID:25620235

  5. Long-Term Lysosomes Tracking with a Water-Soluble Two-Photon Phosphorescent Iridium(III) Complex.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Kangqiang; Huang, Huaiyi; Liu, Bingyang; Liu, Yukang; Huang, Ziyi; Chen, Yu; Ji, Liangnian; Chao, Hui

    2016-05-25

    Lysosomes are the stomachs of the cells that degrade endocytosis and intracellular biomacromolecules and participate in various other cellular processes, such as apoptosis and cell migration. The ability of long-term tracking of lysosomes is very important to understand the details of lysosomal functions and to evaluate drug and gene delivery systems. For studying lysosomes, we designed and synthesized a water-soluble triscyclometalated iridium(III) complex (Ir-lyso) attaching morpholine moieties. The phosphorescent intensity of Ir-lyso is responsive to pH and decreases with an increase in the pH but not quenching in high pH. With excellent two-photon properties, Ir-lyso was used to light up the lysosomes in living cells and 3D tumor spheroids. Moreover, Ir-lyso could label lysosomes more than 4 days, so we developed this complex to act as a long-term probe for tracking lysosomes during cell migration and apoptosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paradigm of metal complexes as the two-photon phosphorescent probe for long-term lysosomes tracking.

  6. A New Ratiometric Lysosomal Copper(II) Fluorescent Probe To Map a Dynamic Metallome in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Giuffrida, Maria Laura; Trusso Sfrazzetto, Giuseppe; Satriano, Cristina; Zimbone, Stefania; Tomaselli, Gaetano A; Copani, Agata; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2018-03-05

    We synthesized a new ratiometric fluorescent Cu 2+ probe, bearing a morpholine moiety for selective binding to lysosomes and two picolylamine arms for the specific chelation of divalent copper ions. The probe capability to detect lysosomal Cu 2+ was demonstrated in human differentiated neuroblastoma cells by confocal microscopy.

  7. Distinct Mechanisms of Ferritin Delivery to Lysosomes in Iron-Depleted and Iron-Replete Cells ▿

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Takeshi; Komatsu, Masaaki; Yamaguchi-Iwai, Yuko; Ishikawa, Fuyuki; Mizushima, Noboru; Iwai, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Ferritin is a cytosolic protein that stores excess iron, thereby protecting cells from iron toxicity. Ferritin-stored iron is believed to be utilized when cells become iron deficient; however, the mechanisms underlying the extraction of iron from ferritin have yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that ferritin is degraded in the lysosome under iron-depleted conditions and that the acidic environment of the lysosome is crucial for iron extraction from ferritin and utilization by cells. Ferritin was targeted for degradation in the lysosome even under iron-replete conditions in primary cells; however, the mechanisms underlying lysosomal targeting of ferritin were distinct under depleted and replete conditions. In iron-depleted cells, ferritin was targeted to the lysosome via a mechanism that involved autophagy. In contrast, lysosomal targeting of ferritin in iron-replete cells did not involve autophagy. The autophagy-independent pathway of ferritin delivery to lysosomes was deficient in several cancer-derived cells, and cancer-derived cell lines are more resistant to iron toxicity than primary cells. Collectively, these results suggest that ferritin trafficking may be differentially regulated by cell type and that loss of ferritin delivery to the lysosome under iron-replete conditions may be related to oncogenic cellular transformation. PMID:21444722

  8. Therapeutic effects of remediating autophagy failure in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease by enhancing lysosomal proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dun-Sheng; Stavrides, Philip; Mohan, Panaiyur S; Kaushik, Susmita; Kumar, Asok; Ohno, Masuo; Schmidt, Stephen D; Wesson, Daniel W; Bandyopadhyay, Urmi; Jiang, Ying; Pawlik, Monika; Peterhoff, Corrinne M; Yang, Austin J; Wilson, Donald A; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Westaway, David; Mathews, Paul M; Levy, Efrat; Cuervo, Ana M; Nixon, Ralph A

    2011-07-01

    The extensive autophagic-lysosomal pathology in Alzheimer disease (AD) brain has revealed a major defect: in the proteolytic clearance of autophagy substrates. Autophagy failure contributes on several levels to AD pathogenesis and has become an important therapeutic target for AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. We recently observed broad therapeutic effects of stimulating autophagic-lysosomal proteolysis in the TgCRND8 mouse model of AD that exhibits defective proteolytic clearance of autophagic substrates, robust intralysosomal amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) accumulation, extracellular β-amyloid deposition and cognitive deficits. By genetically deleting the lysosomal cysteine protease inhibitor, cystatin B (CstB), to selectively restore depressed cathepsin activities, we substantially cleared Aβ, ubiquitinated proteins and other autophagic substrates from autolysosomes/lysosomes and rescued autophagic-lysosomal pathology, as well as reduced total Aβ40/42 levels and extracellular amyloid deposition, highlighting the underappreciated importance of the lysosomal system for Aβ clearance. Most importantly, lysosomal remediation prevented the marked learning and memory deficits in TgCRND8 mice. Our findings underscore the pathogenic significance of autophagic-lysosomal dysfunction in AD and demonstrate the value of reversing this dysfunction as an innovative therapeautic strategy for AD.

  9. Disorders of lysosomal acidification-The emerging role of v-ATPase in aging and neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Colacurcio, Daniel J; Nixon, Ralph A

    2016-12-01

    Autophagy and endocytosis deliver unneeded cellular materials to lysosomes for degradation. Beyond processing cellular waste, lysosomes release metabolites and ions that serve signaling and nutrient sensing roles, linking the functions of the lysosome to various pathways for intracellular metabolism and nutrient homeostasis. Each of these lysosomal behaviors is influenced by the intraluminal pH of the lysosome, which is maintained in the low acidic range by a proton pump, the vacuolar ATPase (v-ATPase). New reports implicate altered v-ATPase activity and lysosomal pH dysregulation in cellular aging, longevity, and adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases, including forms of Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease. Genetic defects of subunits composing the v-ATPase or v-ATPase-related proteins occur in an increasingly recognized group of familial neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we review the expanding roles of the v-ATPase complex as a platform regulating lysosomal hydrolysis and cellular homeostasis. We discuss the unique vulnerability of neurons to persistent low level lysosomal dysfunction and review recent clinical and experimental studies that link dysfunction of the v-ATPase complex to neurodegenerative diseases across the age spectrum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Cocaine induces a mixed lysosomal lipidosis in cultured fibroblasts, by inactivation of acid sphingomyelinase and inhibition of phospholipase A1.

    PubMed

    Nassogne, Marie-Cécile; Lizarraga, Chantal; N'Kuli, Francisca; Van Bambeke, Françoise; Van Binst, Roger; Wallemacq, Pierre; Tulkens, Paul M; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule; Levade, Thierry; Courtoy, Pierre J

    2004-01-15

    This paper reports that cocaine may induce a lysosomal storage disorder. Indeed, culture of Rat-1 fibroblasts with 250-500 microM cocaine induced after 2-3 days a major accumulation in lysosomes of electron-dense lamellar structures. By subcellular fractionation, this was reflected by a selective decrease of the buoyant density of several lysosomal enzymes, indicating lysosomal lipid overload. Biochemical analysis confirmed an increased cellular content of major phospholipids and sphingomyelin, but not of cholesterol. Cocaine, a membrane-permeant weak base, is concentrated by acidotropic sequestration, because its accumulation was abrogated by the proton ionophore, monensin and the vacuolar ATPase inhibitor, bafilomycin A1. At its estimated lysosomal concentration, cocaine almost completely inhibited phospholipase A1 activity on liposomes. Cell incubation with cocaine, but not with its inactive metabolite, benzoylecgonine, rapidly inactivated acid sphingomyelinase, as reflected by a 10-fold decrease in Vmax with identical Km. Acid sphingomyelinase inactivation was fully prevented by the thiol proteinases inhibitors, leupeptin and E64, indicating that cocaine induces selective sphingomyelinase proteolysis. Upon cocaine removal, acid sphingomyelinase activity was rapidly restored, pointing to its fast turnover. In contrast, the cellular content of several other lysosomal hydrolases was increased up to 2-fold. Together, these data show that acidotropic accumulation of cocaine in lysosomes rapidly inhibits acid phospholipase A1 and inactivates acid sphingomyelinase, which can explain induction of a mixed lysosomal lipidosis.

  11. Transcription factor EB: from master coordinator of lysosomal pathways to candidate therapeutic target in degenerative storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Sardiello, Marco

    2016-05-01

    The lysosome is the main catabolic hub of the cell. Owing to its role in fundamental processes such as autophagy, plasma membrane repair, mTOR signaling, and maintenance of cellular homeostasis, the lysosome has a profound influence on cellular metabolism and human health. Indeed, inefficient or impaired lysosomal function has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of degenerative diseases affecting various organs and tissues, most notably the brain, liver, and muscle. The discovery of the coordinated lysosomal expression and regulation (CLEAR) genetic program and its master controller, transcription factor EB (TFEB), has provided an unprecedented tool to study and manipulate lysosomal function. Most lysosome-based processes-including macromolecule degradation, autophagy, lysosomal exocytosis, and proteostasis-are under the transcriptional control of TFEB. Interestingly, impaired TFEB signaling has been suggested to be a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of several degenerative storage diseases. Preclinical studies based on TFEB exogenous expression to reinstate TFEB activity or promote CLEAR network-based lysosomal enhancement have highlighted TFEB as a candidate therapeutic target for the treatment of various degenerative storage diseases. © 2016 The Authors. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of New York Academy of Sciences.

  12. Relationship between medium pH and that of the lysosomal matrix as studied by two independent methods.

    PubMed

    Reijngoud, D J; Oud, P S; Kás, J; Tager, J M

    1976-10-05

    1. The method of estimating the intralysosomal pH by measuring the distribution of [14C]methylamine in lysosomes isolated from the livers of Triton WR 1339-treated rats has been critically examined. 2. In lysed lysosomes, methylamine is bound to the membrane fragments, but this binding can be completely suppressed by increasing the concentration of monovalent cations in the medium. 3. In intact lysosomes, the binding of [14C]methylamine is only partly inhibited by monovalent cations at 25 degrees C. 4. THe accumulation of [14C]methylamine in intact lysosomes is progressively inhibited as the concentration of methylamine is increased. A similar inhibition of [14C]methylamine accumulation is obtained with NH4Cl. 5. Similar values for the intralysosomal pH were obtained from measurements of the distribution of methylamine, dimethylamine and trimethylamine, which are accumulated in the lysosomes, and of 5,5-dimethyloxazolidinedione-2,4, which is excluded. 6. The breakdown of endocytosed 123I-labelled bovine serum albumin by intact isolated lysosomes is much less sensitive to the pH of the medium than the breakdown of added protein by lysed lysosomes. 7. The intralysosomal pH has been estimated by comparing the rate of breakdown of endocytosed 125I-labelled albumin in intact lysosomes as a function of medium pH with that of added 125I-labelled albumin by lysed lysosomes at different pH values. The values obtained agree well with those calculated from the distribution of [14C]methylamine. 8. Methylamine and NH4Cl inhibit the breakdown of 125I-labelled albumin in intact lysosomes, particularly at high medium pH, but have no effect on the breakdown by lysed lysosomes. 9. It is concluded that a pH difference across the lysosomal membrane (more acidic inside than outside) is maintained by the presence of indiffusible negatively charged groups within the lysosomes, and by the permeation across the lysosomal membrane of protons together with permeant anions (or of OH- in

  13. Chemical screen to reduce sterol accumulation in Niemann-Pick C disease cells identifies novel lysosomal acid lipase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Anton I; Rujoi, Madalina; Huang, Amy Y; Du, Hong; Grabowski, Gregory A; Maxfield, Frederick R

    2009-12-01

    Niemann-Pick C disease (NPC) is a lysosomal storage disorder causing abnormal accumulation of unesterified free cholesterol in lysosomal storage organelles. High content phenotypic microscopy chemical screens in both human and hamster NPC-deficient cells have identified several compounds that partially revert the NPC phenotype. Cell biological and biochemical studies show that several of these molecules inhibit lysosomal acid lipase, the enzyme that hydrolyzes LDL-derived triacylglycerol and cholesteryl esters. The effects of reduced lysosomal acid lipase activity in lowering cholesterol accumulation in NPC mutant cells were verified by RNAi-mediated knockdown of lysosomal acid lipase in NPC1-deficient human fibroblasts. This work demonstrates the utility of phenotypic cellular screens as a means to identify molecular targets for altering a complex process such as intracellular cholesterol trafficking and metabolism.

  14. Engineering of GlcNAc-1-Phosphotransferase for Production of Highly Phosphorylated Lysosomal Enzymes for Enzyme Replacement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin; Lee, Wang-Sik; Doray, Balraj; Kornfeld, Stuart

    2017-06-16

    Several lysosomal enzymes currently used for enzyme replacement therapy in patients with lysosomal storage diseases contain very low levels of mannose 6-phosphate, limiting their uptake via mannose 6-phosphate receptors on the surface of the deficient cells. These enzymes are produced at high levels by mammalian cells and depend on endogenous GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase α/β precursor to phosphorylate the mannose residues on their glycan chains. We show that co-expression of an engineered truncated GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase α/β precursor and the lysosomal enzyme of interest in the producing cells resulted in markedly increased phosphorylation and cellular uptake of the secreted lysosomal enzyme. This method also results in the production of highly phosphorylated acid β-glucocerebrosidase, a lysosomal enzyme that normally has just trace amounts of this modification.

  15. Ambroxol improves lysosomal biochemistry in glucocerebrosidase mutation-linked Parkinson disease cells.

    PubMed

    McNeill, Alisdair; Magalhaes, Joana; Shen, Chengguo; Chau, Kai-Yin; Hughes, Derralyn; Mehta, Atul; Foltynie, Tom; Cooper, J Mark; Abramov, Andrey Y; Gegg, Matthew; Schapira, Anthony H V

    2014-05-01

    Gaucher disease is caused by mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene, which encodes the lysosomal hydrolase glucosylceramidase. Patients with Gaucher disease and heterozygous glucocerebrosidase mutation carriers are at increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease. Indeed, glucocerebrosidase mutations are the most frequent risk factor for Parkinson's disease in the general population. Therefore there is an urgent need to understand the mechanisms by which glucocerebrosidase mutations predispose to neurodegeneration to facilitate development of novel treatments. To study this we generated fibroblast lines from skin biopsies of five patients with Gaucher disease and six heterozygous glucocerebrosidase mutation carriers with and without Parkinson's disease. Glucosylceramidase protein and enzyme activity levels were assayed. Oxidative stress was assayed by single cell imaging of dihydroethidium. Glucosylceramidase enzyme activity was significantly reduced in fibroblasts from patients with Gaucher disease (median 5% of controls, P = 0.0001) and heterozygous mutation carriers with (median 59% of controls, P = 0.001) and without (56% of controls, P = 0.001) Parkinson's disease compared with controls. Glucosylceramidase protein levels, assessed by western blot, were significantly reduced in fibroblasts from Gaucher disease (median glucosylceramidase levels 42% of control, P < 0.001) and heterozygous mutation carriers with (median 59% of control, P < 0.001) and without (median 68% of control, P < 0.001) Parkinson's disease. Single cell imaging of dihydroethidium demonstrated increased production of cytosolic reactive oxygen species in fibroblasts from patients with Gaucher disease (dihydroethidium oxidation rate increased by a median of 62% compared to controls, P < 0.001) and heterozygous mutation carriers with (dihydroethidium oxidation rate increased by a median of 68% compared with controls, P < 0.001) and without (dihydroethidium oxidation rate increased by a

  16. Lysosomal activation is a compensatory response against protein accumulation and associated synaptopathogenesis--an approach for slowing Alzheimer disease?

    PubMed

    Bendiske, Jennifer; Bahr, Ben A

    2003-05-01

    Previous reports suggest that age-related lysosomal disturbances contribute to Alzheimer-type accumulations of protein species, blockage of axonal/dendritic transport, and synaptic decline. Here, we tested the hypothesis that lysosomal enzymes are upregulated as a compensatory response to pathogenic protein accumulation. In the hippocampal slice model, tau deposits and amyloidogenic fragments induced by the lysosomal inhibitor chloroquine were accompanied by disrupted microtubule integrity and by corresponding declines in postsynaptic glutamate receptors and the presynaptic marker synaptophysin. In the same slices, cathepsins B, D, and L, beta-glucuronidase, and elastase were upregulated by 70% to 135%. To address whether this selective activation of the lysosomal system represents compensatory signaling, N-Cbz-L-phenylalanyl-L-alanyl-diazomethylketone (PADK) was used to enhance the lysosome response, generating 4- to 8-fold increases in lysosomal enzymes. PADK-mediated lysosomal modulation was stable for weeks while synaptic components remained normal. When PADK and chloroquine were co-infused, chloroquine no longer increased cellular tau levels. To assess pre-existing pathology, chloroquine was applied for 6 days after which its removal resulted in continued degeneration. In contrast, enhancing lysosomal activation by replacing chloroquine after 6 days with PADK led to clearance of accumulated protein species and restored microtubule integrity. Transport processes lost during chloroquine exposure were consequently re-established, resulting in marked recovery of synaptic components. These data indicate that compensatory activation of lysosomes follows protein accumulation events, and that lysosomal modulation represents a novel approach for treating Alzheimer disease and other protein deposition diseases.

  17. Intracellular distribution of psychotropic drugs in the grey and white matter of the brain: the role of lysosomal trapping

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Władysława A; Wójcikowski, Jacek; Pałucha, Agnieszka

    2001-01-01

    Since the brain is not a homogenous organ (i.e. the phospholipid pattern and density of lysosomes may vary in its different regions), in the present study we examined the uptake of psychotropic drugs by vertically cut slices of whole brain, grey (cerebral cortex) and white (corpus callosum, internal capsule) matter of the brain and by neuronal and astroglial cell cultures.Moreover, we assessed the contribution of lysosomal trapping to total drug uptake (total uptake=lysosomal trapping+phospholipid binding) by tissue slices or cells conducting experiments in the presence and absence of ‘lysosomal inhibitors', i.e., the lysosomotropic compound ammonium chloride (20 mM) or the Na+/H+-ionophore monensin (10 μM), which elevated the internal pH of lysosomes. The initial concentration of psychotropic drug in the incubation medium was 5 μM.Both total uptake and lysosomal trapping of the antidepressants investigated (imipramine, amitriptyline, fluoxetine, sertraline) and neuroleptics (promazine, perazine, thioridazine) were higher in the grey matter and neurones than in the white matter and astrocytes, respectively. Lysosomal trapping of the psychotropics occurred mainly in neurones where thioridazine sertraline and perazine showed the highest degree of lysosomotropism.Distribution interactions between antidepressants and neuroleptics took place in neurones via mutual inhibition of lysosomal trapping of drugs.A differential number of neuronal and glial cells in the brain may mask the lysosomal trapping and the distribution interactions of less potent lysosomotropic drugs in vertically cut brain slices.A reduction (via a distribution interaction) in the concentration of psychotropics in lysosomes (depot), which leads to an increase in their level in membranes and tissue fluids, may intensify the pharmacological action of the combined drugs. PMID:11606321

  18. Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency--an under-recognized cause of dyslipidaemia and liver dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Reiner, Željko; Guardamagna, Ornella; Nair, Devaki; Soran, Handrean; Hovingh, Kees; Bertolini, Stefano; Jones, Simon; Ćorić, Marijana; Calandra, Sebastiano; Hamilton, John; Eagleton, Terence; Ros, Emilio

    2014-07-01

    Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency (LAL-D) is a rare autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease caused by deleterious mutations in the LIPA gene. The age at onset and rate of progression vary greatly and this may relate to the nature of the underlying mutations. Patients presenting in infancy have the most rapidly progressive disease, developing signs and symptoms in the first weeks of life and rarely surviving beyond 6 months of age. Children and adults typically present with some combination of dyslipidaemia, hepatomegaly, elevated transaminases, and microvesicular hepatosteatosis on biopsy. Liver damage with progression to fibrosis, cirrhosis and liver failure occurs in a large proportion of patients. Elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels are common features, and cardiovascular disease may manifest as early as childhood. Given that these clinical manifestations are shared with other cardiovascular, liver and metabolic diseases, it is not surprising that LAL-D is under-recognized in clinical practice. This article provides practical guidance to lipidologists, endocrinologists, cardiologists and hepatologists on how to recognize individuals with this life-limiting disease. A diagnostic algorithm is proposed with a view to achieving definitive diagnosis using a recently developed blood test for lysosomal acid lipase. Finally, current management options are reviewed in light of the ongoing development of enzyme replacement therapy with sebelipase alfa (Synageva BioPharma Corp., Lexington, MA, USA), a recombinant human lysosomal acid lipase enzyme. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. The lysosomal enzymes acid phosphatase and cathepsin D in rats intoxicated with Senna occidentalis seeds.

    PubMed

    Calore, E E; Calore, N M; Weg, R; Cavaliere, M J; Ruckert da Rosa, A; De Souza Dias, S

    1999-04-01

    Chronic administration of Senna occidentalis seeds induces an experimental toxic myopathy characterized by skeletal muscle fibers atrophy, decrease in histochemical activity of cytochrome oxidase, and increase of the acid phosphatase activity in muscle fibres at the light microscopic level. The mechanisms that lead to the increase of this lysosomal enzyme activity are not known and could be related to other biochemical disturbs than the mitochondrial function impairment. The main aim of the present study is to localize the acid phosphatase activity using a cytochemical method at transmission electron microscopy level and to quantify cathepsin D in muscle of rats chronically intoxicated with Senna occidentalis seeds by immunoblotting. Acid phosphatase was observed in lysosomes and over profiles of some organelles apparently not involved by lysosomal membrane. In addition immunoblotting demonstrated a decrease in the content of the precursor and of the mature form of cathepsin D in samples of muscles and liver of intoxicated animals. We concluded that there is a selective increase in acid phosphatase activity in muscle--and maybe in other tissues--of animals intoxicated with Senna occidentalis, that can be related to the skeletal muscle atrophy and the intense decrease in weight gain of these animals. Further studies should be performed to establish the mechanisms of selectivity in increase of lysosomal enzymes in different situations and pathological states.

  20. Enzymatically active lysosomal proteases are associated with amyloid deposits in Alzheimer brain.

    PubMed Central

    Cataldo, A M; Nixon, R A

    1990-01-01

    The formation of beta-amyloid in the brains of individuals with Alzheimer disease requires the proteolytic cleavage of a membrane-associated precursor protein. The proteases that may be involved in this process have not yet been identified. Cathepsins are normally intracellular proteolytic enzymes associated with lysosomes; however, when sections from Alzheimer brains were stained by antisera to cathepsin D and cathepsin B, high levels of immunoreactivity were also detected in senile plaques. Extracellular sites of cathepsin immunoreactivity were not seen in control brains from age-matched individuals without neurologic disease or from patients with Huntington disease or Parkinson disease. In situ enzyme histochemistry of cathepsin D and cathepsin B on sections of neocortex using synthetic peptides and protein substrates showed that senile plaques contained the highest levels of enzymatically active cathepsin. At the ultrastructural level, cathepsin immunoreactivity in senile plaques was localized principally to lysosomal dense bodies and lipofuscin granules, which were extracellular. Similar structures were abundant in degenerating neurons of Alzheimer neocortex, and cathepsin-laden neuronal perikarya in various stages of disintegration could be seen within some senile plaques. The high levels of enzymatically competent lysosomal proteases abnormally localized in senile plaques represent evidence for candidate enzymes that may mediate the proteolytic formation of amyloid. We propose that amyloid precursor protein within senile plaques is processed by lysosomal proteases principally derived from degenerating neurons. Escape of cathepsins from the stringently regulated intracellular milieu provides a basis for an abnormal sequence of proteolytic cleavages of accumulating amyloid precursor protein. Images PMID:1692625

  1. Possible Existence of Lysosome-Like Organella within Mitochondria and Its Role in Mitochondrial Quality Control

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Futamura, Manabu; Miyamoto, Takafumi; Yoshida, Masaki; Ono, Masaya; Ichinose, Shizuko; Arakawa, Hirofumi

    2011-01-01

    The accumulation of unhealthy mitochondria results in mitochondrial dysfunction, which has been implicated in aging, cancer, and a variety of degenerative diseases. However, the mechanism by which mitochondrial quality is regulated remains unclear. Here, we show that Mieap, a novel p53-inducible protein, induces intramitochondrial lysosome-like organella that plays a critical role in mitochondrial quality control. Mieap expression is directly regulated by p53 and is frequently lost in human cancer as result of DNA methylation. Mieap dramatically induces the accumulation of lysosomal proteins within mitochondria and mitochondrial acidic condition without destroying the mitochondrial structure (designated MALM, for Mieap-induced accumulation of lysosome-like organelles within mitochondria) in response to mitochondrial damage. MALM was not related to canonical autophagy. MALM is involved in the degradation of oxidized mitochondrial proteins, leading to increased ATP synthesis and decreased reactive oxygen species generation. These results suggest that Mieap induces intramitochondrial lysosome-like organella that plays a critical role in mitochondrial quality control by eliminating oxidized mitochondrial proteins. Cancer cells might accumulate unhealthy mitochondria due to p53 mutations and/or Mieap methylation, representing a potential cause of the Warburg effect. PMID:21264221

  2. [C-terminal lysosome targeting domain of CD63 modifies cellular localization of rabies virus glycoprotein].

    PubMed

    Starodubova, E S; Kuzmenko, Y V; Latanova, A A; Preobrazhenskaya, O V; Karpov, V L

    2017-01-01

    The glycoprotein of rabies virus is the central antigen elicited the immune response to infection; therefore, the majority of developing anti-rabies vaccines are based on this protein. In order to increase the efficacy of DNA immunogen encoding rabies virus glycoprotein, the construction of chimeric protein with the CD63 domain has been proposed. The CD63 is a transmembrane protein localized on the cell surface and in lysosomes. The lysosome targeting motif GYEVM is located at its C-terminus. We used the domain that bears this motif (c-CD63) to generate chimeric glycoprotein in order to relocalize it into lysosomes. Here, it was shown that, in cells transfected with plasmid that encodes glycoprotein with c-CD63 motif at the C-terminus, the chimeric protein was predominantly observed in lysosomes and at the cell membrane where the unmodified glycoprotein is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and at the cell surface. We suppose that current modification of the glycoprotein may improve the immunogenicity of anti-rabies DNA vaccines due to more efficient antibody production.

  3. The Endo-Lysosomal System of Brain Endothelial Cells Is Influenced by Astrocytes In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Toth, Andrea E; Siupka, Piotr; P Augustine, Thomas J; Venø, Susanne T; Thomsen, Louiza B; Moos, Torben; Lohi, Hannes T; Madsen, Peder; Lykke-Hartmann, Karin; Nielsen, Morten S

    2018-03-20

    Receptor- and adsorptive-mediated transport through brain endothelial cells (BEC) of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) involves a complex array of subcellular vesicular structures, the endo-lysosomal system. It consists of several types of vesicles, such as early, recycling, and late endosomes, retromer-positive structures, and lysosomes. Since this system is important for receptor-mediated transcytosis of drugs across brain capillaries, our aim was to characterise the endo-lysosomal system in BEC with emphasis on their interactions with astrocytes. We used primary porcine BEC in monoculture and in co-culture with primary rat astrocytes. The presence of astrocytes changed the intraendothelial vesicular network and significantly impacted vesicular number, morphology, and distribution. Additionally, gene set enrichment analysis revealed that 60 genes associated with vesicular trafficking showed altered expression in co-cultured BEC. Cytosolic proteins involved in subcellular trafficking were investigated to mark transport routes, such as RAB25 for transcytosis. Strikingly, the adaptor protein called AP1-μ1B, important for basolateral sorting in epithelial cells, was not expressed in BEC. Altogether, our data pin-point unique features of BEC trafficking network, essentially mapping the endo-lysosomal system of in vitro BBB models. Consequently, our findings constitute a valuable basis for planning the optimal route across the BBB when advancing drug delivery to the brain.

  4. Role of AP1 and Gadkin in the traffic of secretory endo-lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Laulagnier, Karine; Schieber, Nicole L.; Maritzen, Tanja; Haucke, Volker; Parton, Robert G.; Gruenberg, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Whereas lysosome-related organelles (LRO) of specialized cells display both exocytic and endocytic features, lysosomes in nonspecialized cells can also acquire the property to fuse with the plasma membrane upon an acute rise in cytosolic calcium. Here, we characterize this unconventional secretory pathway in fibroblast-like cells, by monitoring the appearance of Lamp1 on the plasma membrane and the release of lysosomal enzymes into the medium. After sequential ablation of endocytic compartments in living cells, we find that donor membranes primarily derive from a late compartment, but that an early compartment is also involved. Strikingly, this endo-secretory process is not affected by treatments that inhibit endosome dynamics (microtubule depolymerization, cholesterol accumulation, overexpression of Rab7 or its effector Rab-interacting lysosomal protein [RILP], overexpression of Rab5 mutants), but depends on Rab27a, a GTPase involved in LRO secretion, and is controlled by F-actin. Moreover, we find that this unconventional endo-secretory pathway requires the adaptor protein complexes AP1, Gadkin (which recruits AP1 by binding to the γ1 subunit), and AP2, but not AP3. We conclude that a specific fraction of the AP2-derived endocytic pathway is dedicated to secretory purposes under the control of AP1 and Gadkin. PMID:21525240

  5. The endosome–lysosome pathway and information generation in the immune system☆

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Colin

    2012-01-01

    For a long time the lysosomal pathway was thought to be exclusively one for catabolism and recycling of material taken up by endocytosis from the external milieu or from the cytosol by autophagy. At least in the immune system it is clear now that endo/lysosomal proteolysis generates crucially important information, in particular peptides that bind class II MHC molecules to create ligands for survey by the diverse antigen receptors of the T lymphocyte system. This process of antigen processing and presentation is used to display not only foreign but also self peptides and therefore is important for ‘self’ tolerance as well as immunity to pathogens. Some cells, macrophages and particularly dendritic cells can load peptides on class I MHC molecules in the endosome system through the important, though still not fully characterised, pathway of cross-presentation. Here I try to provide a brief review of how this area developed focussing to some extent our own contributions to understanding the class II MHC pathway. I also mention briefly recent work of others showing that proteolysis along this pathway turns out to regulate immune signalling events in the innate immune system such as the activation of some members of the Toll-like receptor family. Finally, our recent work on the endo/lysosome targeted protease inhibitor cystatin F, suggests that auto-regulation of protease activity in some immune cells occurs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteolysis 50 years after the discovery of lysosome. PMID:21782984

  6. Gallium and Functionalized-Porphyrins Combine to Form Potential Lysosome-Specific Multimodal Bioprobes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jie; Harriss, Bethany I; Chan, Chi-Fai; Jiang, Lijun; Tsoi, Tik-Hung; Long, Nicholas J; Wong, Wing-Tak; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Wong, Ka-Leung

    2016-07-18

    A water-soluble bimetallic normal ("cold") and radiochemical ("hot") gallium-porphyrin-ruthenium-bipyridine complex (GaporRu-1) has been synthesized by microwave methodology in short reaction times with good (>85%) yields. (68)GaporRu-1 is demonstrated to be a potential multimodal and functional bioprobe for positron emission tomography (PET), lysosome specific optical imaging, and photodynamic therapy.

  7. Multivalent immune complexes divert FcRn to lysosomes by exclusion from recycling sorting tubules.

    PubMed

    Weflen, Andrew W; Baier, Nina; Tang, Qing-Juan; Van den Hof, Malon; Blumberg, Richard S; Lencer, Wayne I; Massol, Ramiro H

    2013-08-01

    The neonatal receptor for immunoglobulin G (IgG; FcRn) prevents IgG degradation by efficiently sorting IgG into recycling endosomes and away from lysosomes. When bound to IgG-opsonized antigen complexes, however, FcRn traffics cargo into lysosomes, where antigen processing can occur. Here we address the mechanism of sorting when FcRn is bound to multivalent IgG-opsonized antigens. We find that only the unbound receptor or FcRn bound to monomeric IgG is sorted into recycling tubules emerging from early endosomes. Cross-linked FcRn is never visualized in tubules containing the unbound receptor. Similar results are found for transferrin receptor, suggesting a general mechanism of action. Deletion or replacement of the FcRn cytoplasmic tail does not prevent diversion of trafficking to lysosomes upon cross-linking. Thus physical properties of the lumenal ligand-receptor complex appear to act as key determinants for sorting between the recycling and lysosomal pathways by regulating FcRn entry into recycling tubules.

  8. A saposin deficiency model in Drosophila: Lysosomal storage, progressive neurodegeneration and sensory physiological decline.

    PubMed

    Hindle, Samantha J; Hebbar, Sarita; Schwudke, Dominik; Elliott, Christopher J H; Sweeney, Sean T

    2017-02-01

    Saposin deficiency is a childhood neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder (LSD) that can cause premature death within three months of life. Saposins are activator proteins that promote the function of lysosomal hydrolases that mediate the degradation of sphingolipids. There are four saposin proteins in humans, which are encoded by the prosaposin gene. Mutations causing an absence or impaired function of individual saposins or the whole prosaposin gene lead to distinct LSDs due to the storage of different classes of sphingolipids. The pathological events leading to neuronal dysfunction induced by lysosomal storage of sphingolipids are as yet poorly defined. We have generated and characterised a Drosophila model of saposin deficiency that shows striking similarities to the human diseases. Drosophila saposin-related (dSap-r) mutants show a reduced longevity, progressive neurodegeneration, lysosomal storage, dramatic swelling of neuronal soma, perturbations in sphingolipid catabolism, and sensory physiological deterioration. Our data suggests a genetic interaction with a calcium exchanger (Calx) pointing to a possible calcium homeostasis deficit in dSap-r mutants. Together these findings support the use of dSap-r mutants in advancing our understanding of the cellular pathology implicated in saposin deficiency and related LSDs. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Role of AP1 and Gadkin in the traffic of secretory endo-lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Laulagnier, Karine; Schieber, Nicole L; Maritzen, Tanja; Haucke, Volker; Parton, Robert G; Gruenberg, Jean

    2011-06-15

    Whereas lysosome-related organelles (LRO) of specialized cells display both exocytic and endocytic features, lysosomes in nonspecialized cells can also acquire the property to fuse with the plasma membrane upon an acute rise in cytosolic calcium. Here, we characterize this unconventional secretory pathway in fibroblast-like cells, by monitoring the appearance of Lamp1 on the plasma membrane and the release of lysosomal enzymes into the medium. After sequential ablation of endocytic compartments in living cells, we find that donor membranes primarily derive from a late compartment, but that an early compartment is also involved. Strikingly, this endo-secretory process is not affected by treatments that inhibit endosome dynamics (microtubule depolymerization, cholesterol accumulation, overexpression of Rab7 or its effector Rab-interacting lysosomal protein [RILP], overexpression of Rab5 mutants), but depends on Rab27a, a GTPase involved in LRO secretion, and is controlled by F-actin. Moreover, we find that this unconventional endo-secretory pathway requires the adaptor protein complexes AP1, Gadkin (which recruits AP1 by binding to the γ1 subunit), and AP2, but not AP3. We conclude that a specific fraction of the AP2-derived endocytic pathway is dedicated to secretory purposes under the control of AP1 and Gadkin.

  10. Lysosomal alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase deficiency, the enzymatic defect in angiokeratoma corporis diffusum with glycopeptiduria.

    PubMed Central

    Kanzaki, T; Wang, A M; Desnick, R J

    1991-01-01

    Recently a novel case of angiokeratoma corporis diffusum with glycoaminoaciduria was described in a 46-yr-old Japanese woman. Known causes of the cutaneous manifestation were eliminated by enzyme analyses, and further characterization of the accumulated urinary O-linked sialopeptides revealed identity to those excreted by patients with an infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy due to lysosomal alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase deficiency. Investigation of the alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity and protein in the proband revealed less than 2% of normal activity and the absence of detectable immunoreactive enzyme protein, findings comparable to those in the patients with infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy and alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase deficiency. In addition, the proband's unaffected offspring had half-normal levels of alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity, consistent with this enzymatic deficiency being the primary metabolic defect in this autosomal recessive trait. Ultrastructural examination of skin and blood cells from the adult proband revealed the presence of prominent lysosomal inclusions containing diffuse amorphous and filamentous material. In contrast, these morphologic findings were not observed in the nonneural tissues from patients with infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy and alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase deficiency. These studies document the occurrence of two forms of alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase deficiency and sialopeptiduria, a severe infantile-onset form of neuroaxonal dystrophy without angiokeratoma or visceral lysosomal inclusions and an adult-onset form characterized by angiokeratoma, extensive lysosomal accumulation of sialoglycopeptides and the absence of detectable neurologic involvement. Images PMID:1907616

  11. The GARP Complex Is Involved in Intracellular Cholesterol Transport via Targeting NPC2 to Lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jian; Zhang, Ying-Yu; Luo, Jie; Wang, Ju-Qiong; Zhou, Yu-Xia; Miao, Hong-Hua; Shi, Xiong-Jie; Qu, Yu-Xiu; Xu, Jie; Li, Bo-Liang; Song, Bao-Liang

    2017-06-27

    Proper intracellular cholesterol trafficking is critical for cellular function. Two lysosome-resident proteins, NPC1 and NPC2, mediate the egress of low-density lipoprotein-derived cholesterol from lysosomes. However, other proteins involved in this process remain largely unknown. Through amphotericin B-based selection, we isolated two cholesterol transport-defective cell lines. Subsequent whole-transcriptome-sequencing analysis revealed two cell lines bearing the same mutation in the vacuolar protein sorting 53 (Vps53) gene. Depletion of VPS53 or other subunits of the Golgi-associated retrograde protein (GARP) complex impaired NPC2 sorting to lysosomes and caused cholesterol accumulation. GARP deficiency blocked the retrieval of the cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR) to the trans-Golgi network. Further, Vps54 mutant mice displayed reduced cellular NPC2 protein levels and increased cholesterol accumulation, underscoring the physiological role of the GARP complex in cholesterol transport. We conclude that the GARP complex contributes to intracellular cholesterol transport by targeting NPC2 to lysosomes in a CI-MPR-dependent manner. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Production and characterization of a human lysosomal recombinant iduronate-2-sulfatase produced in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Natalia; Rodríguez-Lopez, Alexander; Díaz, Sergio; Losada, Juan C; Díaz-Rincón, Dennis J; Cardona, Carolina; Espejo-Mojica, Ángela J; Ramírez, Aura M; Ruiz, Fredy; Landázuri, Patricia; Poutou-Piñales, Raúl A; Cordoba-Ruiz, Henry A; Alméciga-D Íaz, Carlos J; Barrera-Avellaneda, Luis A

    2018-04-06

    Hunter syndrome (Mucopolysaccharidosis II, MPS II) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disease produced by the deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS). Currently, MPS II patients are mainly treated with enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) using recombinant enzymes produced in mammalian cells. As an alternative, several studies have shown the production of active and therapeutic forms of lysosomal proteins in microorganisms. In this paper, we report the production and characterization of a recombinant IDS produced in the yeast Pichia pastoris (prIDS). We evaluated the effect of culture conditions and gene sequence optimization on prIDS production. The results showed that the highest production of prIDS was obtained at oxygen-limited conditions using a codon-optimized IDS cDNA. The purified enzyme showed a final activity of 12.45 nmol mg -1 h -1 and an apparent molecular mass of about 90 kDa. The highest stability was achieved at pH 6.0 and prIDS also showed a high stability in human serum. Noteworthy, the enzyme was taken up by culture cells in a dose-dependent manner through mannose receptors, which allowed the delivered of the enzyme to the lysosome. In summary, these results show the potential of Pichia pastoris as host to produce an IDS intended for a MPS II ERT. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetic perspective on the role of the autophagy-lysosome pathway in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Gan-Or, Ziv; Dion, Patrick A; Rouleau, Guy A

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD), once considered as a prototype of a sporadic disease, is now known to be considerably affected by various genetic factors, which interact with environmental factors and the normal process of aging, leading to PD. Large studies determined that the hereditary component of PD is at least 27%, and in some populations, single genetic factors are responsible for more than 33% of PD patients. Interestingly, many of these genetic factors, such as LRRK2, GBA, SMPD1, SNCA, PARK2, PINK1, PARK7, SCARB2, and others, are involved in the autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP). Some of these genes encode lysosomal enzymes, whereas others correspond to proteins that are involved in transport to the lysosome, mitophagy, or other autophagic-related functions. Is it possible that all these factors converge into a single pathway that causes PD? In this review, we will discuss these genetic findings and the role of the ALP in the pathogenesis of PD and will try to answer this question. We will suggest a novel hypothesis for the pathogenic mechanism of PD that involves the lysosome and the different autophagy pathways. PMID:26207393

  14. Melanoma cell lysosome secretory burst neutralizes the CTL-mediated cytotoxicity at the lytic synapse

    PubMed Central

    Khazen, Roxana; Müller, Sabina; Gaudenzio, Nicolas; Espinosa, Eric; Puissegur, Marie-Pierre; Valitutti, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Human melanoma cells express various tumour antigens that are recognized by CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and elicit tumour-specific responses in vivo. However, natural and therapeutically enhanced CTL responses in melanoma patients are of limited efficacy. The mechanisms underlying CTL effector phase failure when facing melanomas are still largely elusive. Here we show that, on conjugation with CTL, human melanoma cells undergo an active late endosome/lysosome trafficking, which is intensified at the lytic synapse and is paralleled by cathepsin-mediated perforin degradation and deficient granzyme B penetration. Abortion of SNAP-23-dependent lysosomal trafficking, pH perturbation or impairment of lysosomal proteolytic activity restores susceptibility to CTL attack. Inside the arsenal of melanoma cell strategies to escape immune surveillance, we identify a self-defence mechanism based on exacerbated lysosome secretion and perforin degradation at the lytic synapse. Interfering with this synaptic self-defence mechanism might be useful in potentiating CTL-mediated therapies in melanoma patients. PMID:26940455

  15. Dietary protein deficiency reduces lysosomal and nonlysosomal ATP-dependent proteolysis in muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawa, N. E. Jr; Kettelhut, I. C.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    When rats are fed a protein deficient (PD) diet for 7 days, rates of proteolysis in skeletal muscle decrease by 40-50% (N. E. Tawa, Jr., and A. L. Goldberg. Am. J. Physiol. 263 (Endocrinol. Metab. 26): E317-325, 1992). To identify the underlying biochemical adaptations, we measured different proteolytic processes in incubated muscles. The capacity for intralysosomal proteolysis, as shown by sensitivity to methylamine or lysosomal protease inhibitors, fell 55-75% in muscles from PD rats. Furthermore, extracts of muscles of PD rats showed 30-70% lower activity of many lysosomal proteases, including cathepsins B, H, and C, and carboxypeptidases A and C, as well as other lysosomal hydrolases. The fall in cathepsin B and proteolysis was evident by 3 days on the PD diet, and both returned to control levels 3 days after refeeding of the normal diet. In muscles maintained under optimal conditions, 80-90% of protein breakdown occurs by nonlysosomal pathways. In muscles of PD rats, this ATP-dependent process was also 40-60% slower. Even though overall proteolysis decreased in muscles of PD rats, their capacity for Ca(2+)-dependent proteolysis increased (by 66%), as did the activity of the calpains (+150-250%). Thus the lysosomal and the ATP-dependent processes decrease coordinately and contribute to the fall in muscle proteolysis in PD animals.

  16. Antibody-mediated enzyme replacement therapy targeting both lysosomal and cytoplasmic glycogen in Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Yi, Haiqing; Sun, Tao; Armstrong, Dustin; Borneman, Scott; Yang, Chunyu; Austin, Stephanie; Kishnani, Priya S; Sun, Baodong

    2017-05-01

    Pompe disease is characterized by accumulation of both lysosomal and cytoplasmic glycogen primarily in skeletal and cardiac muscles. Mannose-6-phosphate receptor-mediated enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid α-glucosidase (rhGAA) targets the enzyme to lysosomes and thus is unable to digest cytoplasmic glycogen. Studies have shown that anti-DNA antibody 3E10 penetrates living cells and delivers "cargo" proteins to the cytosol or nucleus via equilibrative nucleoside transporter ENT2. We speculate that 3E10-mediated ERT with GAA will target both lysosomal and cytoplasmic glycogen in Pompe disease. A fusion protein (FabGAA) containing a humanized Fab fragment derived from the murine 3E10 antibody and the 110 kDa human GAA precursor was constructed and produced in CHO cells. Immunostaining with an anti-Fab antibody revealed that the Fab signals did not co-localize with the lysosomal marker LAMP2 in cultured L6 myoblasts or Pompe patient fibroblasts after incubation with FabGAA. Western blot with an anti-GAA antibody showed presence of the 150 kDa full-length FabGAA in the cell lysates, in addition to the 95- and 76 kDa processed forms of GAA that were also seen in the rhGAA-treated cells. Blocking of mannose-6-phosphate receptor with mannose-6-phosphate markedly reduced the 95- and the 76 kDa forms but not the 150 kDa form. In GAA-KO mice, FabGAA achieved similar treatment efficacy as rhGAA at an equal molar dose in reducing tissue glycogen contents. Our data suggest that FabGAA retains the ability of rhGAA to treat lysosomal glycogen accumulation and has the beneficial potential over rhGAA to reduce cytoplasmic glycogen storage in Pompe disease. FabGAA can be delivered to both the cytoplasm and lysosomes in cultured cells. FabGAA equally reduced lysosomal glycogen accumulation as rhGAA in GAA-KO mice. FabGAA has the beneficial potential over rhGAA to clear cytoplasmic glycogen. This study suggests a novel antibody-enzyme fusion protein therapy

  17. Regulation of fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14) expression levels via ligand-independent lysosomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Gurunathan, Sujatha; Winkles, Jeffrey A; Ghosh, Sankar; Hayden, Matthew S

    2014-05-09

    Fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14) is a highly inducible cytokine receptor that engages multiple intracellular signaling pathways, including nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Fn14 expression is regulated by several cytokines and growth factors, and Fn14 is transiently up-regulated after injury. In contrast, in states of chronic inflammatory disease and in some solid tumors, Fn14 is persistently up-regulated. However, the post-translational regulation of Fn14 expression has not been directly investigated. Thus, we examined Fn14 proteostasis in the presence and absence of the Fn14 ligand TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK). Similar to other TNF receptor superfamily members, we found that TWEAK induces Fn14 internalization and degradation. Surprisingly, we also observed rapid, TWEAK-independent, constitutive Fn14 internalization and turnover. Fn14 levels are maintained in cell culture by ongoing synthesis and trafficking of the receptor, leading to subsequent down-regulation by lysosomal degradation. Unexpectedly, the extracellular domain of Fn14 is necessary and sufficient for constitutive turnover. Based on these findings, we propose a model in which constitutive down-regulation of Fn14 facilitates dynamic regulation of Fn14 protein levels and prevents spontaneous or inappropriate receptor signaling.

  18. Uptake and Trafficking of Mildly Oxidized LDL and Acetylated LDL in THP-1 Cells Does Not Explain the Differences in Lysosomal Metabolism of These Two Lipoproteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yancey, Patricia G.; Miles, Stacia; Schwegel, Jennifer; Gray Jerome, W.

    2002-04-01

    Foam cells in the atherosclerotic lesion have substantial cholesterol stores within large, swollen lysosomes. This feature is mimicked by incubating THP-1 macrophages with mildly oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL). Incubation of THP-1 cells with acetylated LDL produces cytoplasmic cholesteryl ester accumulation rather than lysosomal storage. The differences could be due to differences in uptake and delivery of lipoprotein to lysosomes or to lysosomal and post-lysosomal processing events. We compared uptake and lysosomal trafficking of acetylated and oxidized LDL using colloidal gold-labeled lipoproteins. Labeling did not alter cellular cholesterol accumulation. We found that uptake and delivery to lysosomes are not different for acetylated and oxidized LDL. In fact, both oxidized and acetylated LDL can be delivered to the same lysosomes. Sequential incubation with oxidized LDL followed by acetylated LDL showed that the lipid-engorged lysosomes are long-lived structures, continuously accepting newly ingested lipoprotein. Comparison of acetylated and oxidized LDL in mouse peritoneal macrophages, a cell which does not accumulate substantial lysosomal lipid, also revealed no differences in uptake. This indicates that in THP-1 cells, the differences in metabolism of oxidized and acetylated LDL are due to cell-specific lysosomal or post-lysosomal events not present in B6C3F1 mouse macrophages.

  19. UVA causes dual inactivation of cathepsin B and L underlying lysosomal dysfunction in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lamore, Sarah D; Wondrak, Georg T

    2013-06-05

    Cutaneous exposure to chronic solar UVA-radiation is a causative factor in photocarcinogenesis and photoaging. Recently, we have identified the thiol-dependent cysteine-protease cathepsin B as a novel UVA-target undergoing photo-oxidative inactivation upstream of autophagic-lysosomal dysfunction in fibroblasts. In this study, we examined UVA effects on a wider range of cathepsins and explored the occurrence of UVA-induced cathepsin inactivation in other cultured skin cell types. In dermal fibroblasts, chronic exposure to non-cytotoxic doses of UVA caused pronounced inactivation of the lysosomal cysteine-proteases cathepsin B and L, effects not observed in primary keratinocytes and occurring only to a minor extent in primary melanocytes. In order to determine if UVA-induced lysosomal impairment requires single or dual inactivation of cathepsin B and/or L, we used a genetic approach (siRNA) to selectively downregulate enzymatic activity of these target cathepsins. Monitoring an established set of protein markers (including LAMP1, LC3-II, and p62) and cell ultrastructural changes detected by electron microscopy, we observed that only dual genetic antagonism (targeting both CTSB and CTSL expression) could mimic UVA-induced autophagic-lysosomal alterations, whereas single knockdown (targeting CTSB or CTSL only) did not display 'UVA-mimetic' effects failing to reproduce the UVA-induced phenotype. Taken together, our data demonstrate that chronic UVA inhibits both cathepsin B and L enzymatic activity and that dual inactivation of both enzymes is a causative factor underlying UVA-induced impairment of lysosomal function in dermal fibroblasts. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. UVA Causes Dual Inactivation of Cathepsin B and L Underlying Lysosomal Dysfunction in Human Dermal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Lamore, Sarah D.; Wondrak, Georg T.

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous exposure to chronic solar UVA-radiation is a causative factor in photocarcinogenesis and photoaging. Recently, we have identified the thiol-dependent cysteine-protease cathepsin B as a novel UVA-target undergoing photo-oxidative inactivation upstream of autophagic-lysosomal dysfunction in fibroblasts. In this study, we examined UVA effects on a wider range of cathepsins and explored the occurrence of UVA-induced cathepsin inactivation in other cultured skin cell types. In dermal fibroblasts, chronic exposure to non-cytotoxic doses of UVA caused pronounced inactivation of the lysosomal cysteine-proteases cathepsin B and L, effects not observed in primary keratinocytes and occurring only to a minor extent in primary melanocytes. In order to determine if UVA-induced lysosomal impairment requires single or dual inactivation of cathepsin B and/or L, we used a genetic approach (siRNA) to selectively downregulate enzymatic activity of these target cathepsins. Monitoring an established set of protein markers (including LAMP1, LC3-II, and p62) and cell ultrastructural changes detected by electron microscopy, we observed that only dual genetic antagonism (targeting both CTSB and CTSL expression) could mimic UVA-induced autophagic-lysosomal alterations, whereas single knockdown (targeting CTSB or CTSL only) did not display ‘UVA-mimetic’ effects failing to reproduce the UVA-induced phenotype. Taken together, our data demonstrate that chronic UVA inhibits both cathepsin B and L enzymatic activity and that dual inactivation of both enzymes is a causative factor underlying UVA-induced impairment of lysosomal function in dermal fibroblasts. PMID:23603447

  1. The GATOR2 Component Wdr24 Regulates TORC1 Activity and Lysosome Function.

    PubMed

    Cai, Weili; Wei, Youheng; Jarnik, Michal; Reich, John; Lilly, Mary A

    2016-05-01

    TORC1 is a master regulator of metabolism in eukaryotes that responds to multiple upstream signaling pathways. The GATOR complex is a newly defined upstream regulator of TORC1 that contains two sub-complexes, GATOR1, which inhibits TORC1 activity in response to amino acid starvation and GATOR2, which opposes the activity of GATOR1. While the GATOR1 complex has been implicated in a wide array of human pathologies including cancer and hereditary forms of epilepsy, the in vivo relevance of the GATOR2 complex remains poorly understood in metazoans. Here we define the in vivo role of the GATOR2 component Wdr24 in Drosophila. Using a combination of genetic, biochemical, and cell biological techniques we demonstrate that Wdr24 has both TORC1 dependent and independent functions in the regulation of cellular metabolism. Through the characterization of a null allele, we show that Wdr24 is a critical effector of the GATOR2 complex that promotes the robust activation of TORC1 and cellular growth in a broad array of Drosophila tissues. Additionally, epistasis analysis between wdr24 and genes that encode components of the GATOR1 complex revealed that Wdr24 has a second critical function, the TORC1 independent regulation of lysosome dynamics and autophagic flux. Notably, we find that two additional members of the GATOR2 complex, Mio and Seh1, also have a TORC1 independent role in the regulation of lysosome function. These findings represent a surprising and previously unrecognized function of GATOR2 complex components in the regulation of lysosomes. Consistent with our findings in Drosophila, through the characterization of a wdr24-/- knockout HeLa cell line we determined that Wdr24 promotes lysosome acidification and autophagic flux in mammalian cells. Taken together our data support the model that Wdr24 is a key effector of the GATOR2 complex, required for both TORC1 activation and the TORC1 independent regulation of lysosomes.

  2. Autophagic-lysosomal dysregulation downstream of cathepsin B inactivation in human skin fibroblasts exposed to UVA

    PubMed Central

    Lamore, Sarah D.; Wondrak, Georg T.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, using 2D-DIGE proteomics we have identified cathepsin B as a novel target of UVA in human Hs27 skin fibroblasts. In response to chronic exposure to noncytotoxic doses of UVA (9.9 J/cm2, twice a week, 3 weeks), photooxidative impairment of cathepsin B enzymatic activity occurred with accumulation of autofluorescent aggregates colocalizing with lysosomes, an effect mimicked by pharmacological antagonism of cathepsin B using the selective inhibitor CA074Me. Here, we have further explored the mechanistic involvement of cathepsin B inactivation in UVA-induced autophagic-lysosomal alterations using autophagy-directed PCR expression array analysis as a discovery tool. Consistent with lysosomal expansion, UVA upregulated cellular protein levels of the lysosomal marker glycoprotein Lamp-1, and increased levels of the lipidated autophagosomal membrane constituent LC3-II were detected. UVA did not alter expression of beclin 1 (BECN1), an essential factor for initiation of autophagy, but upregulation of p62 (sequestosome 1, SQSTM1), a selective autophagy substrate, and α-synuclein (SNCA), an autophagic protein substrate and aggresome component, was observed at the mRNA and protein level. Moreover, UVA downregulated transglutaminase-2 (TGM2), an essential enzyme involved in autophagolysosome maturation. Strikingly, UVA effects on Lamp-1, LC3-II, beclin 1, p62, α-synuclein, and transglutaminase-2 were mimicked by CA074Me treatment. Taken together, our data suggest that UVA-induced autophagic-lysosomal alterations occur as a consequence of impaired autophagic flux downstream of cathepsin B inactivation, a novel molecular mechanism potentially involved in UVA-induced skin photodamage. PMID:21773629

  3. The GATOR2 Component Wdr24 Regulates TORC1 Activity and Lysosome Function

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Weili; Wei, Youheng; Jarnik, Michal; Reich, John; Lilly, Mary A.

    2016-01-01

    TORC1 is a master regulator of metabolism in eukaryotes that responds to multiple upstream signaling pathways. The GATOR complex is a newly defined upstream regulator of TORC1 that contains two sub-complexes, GATOR1, which inhibits TORC1 activity in response to amino acid starvation and GATOR2, which opposes the activity of GATOR1. While the GATOR1 complex has been implicated in a wide array of human pathologies including cancer and hereditary forms of epilepsy, the in vivo relevance of the GATOR2 complex remains poorly understood in metazoans. Here we define the in vivo role of the GATOR2 component Wdr24 in Drosophila. Using a combination of genetic, biochemical, and cell biological techniques we demonstrate that Wdr24 has both TORC1 dependent and independent functions in the regulation of cellular metabolism. Through the characterization of a null allele, we show that Wdr24 is a critical effector of the GATOR2 complex that promotes the robust activation of TORC1 and cellular growth in a broad array of Drosophila tissues. Additionally, epistasis analysis between wdr24 and genes that encode components of the GATOR1 complex revealed that Wdr24 has a second critical function, the TORC1 independent regulation of lysosome dynamics and autophagic flux. Notably, we find that two additional members of the GATOR2 complex, Mio and Seh1, also have a TORC1 independent role in the regulation of lysosome function. These findings represent a surprising and previously unrecognized function of GATOR2 complex components in the regulation of lysosomes. Consistent with our findings in Drosophila, through the characterization of a wdr24-/- knockout HeLa cell line we determined that Wdr24 promotes lysosome acidification and autophagic flux in mammalian cells. Taken together our data support the model that Wdr24 is a key effector of the GATOR2 complex, required for both TORC1 activation and the TORC1 independent regulation of lysosomes. PMID:27166823

  4. A Comparative Study on the Alterations of Endocytic Pathways in Multiple Lysosomal Storage Disorders.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, Jeff; Manthe, Rachel L; Solomon, Melani; Garnacho, Carmen; Muro, Silvia

    2016-02-01

    Many cellular activities and pharmaceutical interventions involve endocytosis and delivery to lysosomes for processing. Hence, lysosomal processing defects can cause cell and tissue damage, as in lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) characterized by lysosomal accumulation of undegraded materials. This storage causes endocytic and trafficking alterations, which exacerbate disease and hinder treatment. However, there have been no systematic studies comparing different endocytic routes in LSDs. Here, we used genetic and pharmacological models of four LSDs (type A Niemann-Pick, type C Niemann-Pick, Fabry, and Gaucher diseases) and evaluated the pinocytic and receptor-mediated activity of the clathrin-, caveolae-, and macropinocytic routes. Bulk pinocytosis was diminished in all diseases, suggesting a generic endocytic alteration linked to lysosomal storage. Fluid-phase (dextran) and ligand (transferrin) uptake via the clathrin route were lower for all LSDs. Fluid-phase and ligand (cholera toxin B) uptake via the caveolar route were both affected but less acutely in Fabry or Gaucher diseases. Epidermal growth factor-induced macropinocytosis was altered in Niemann-Pick cells but not other LSDs. Intracellular trafficking of ligands was also distorted in LSD versus wild-type cells. The extent of these endocytic alterations paralleled the level of cholesterol storage in disease cell lines. Confirming this, pharmacological induction of cholesterol storage in wild-type cells disrupted endocytosis, and model therapeutics restored uptake in proportion to their efficacy in attenuating storage. This suggests a proportional and reversible relationship between endocytosis and lipid (cholesterol) storage. By analogy, the accumulation of biological material in other diseases, or foreign material from drugs or their carriers, may cause similar deficits, warranting further investigation.

  5. Malignant transformation alters intracellular trafficking of lysosomal cathepsin D in human breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Y; Sameni, M; Sloane, B F

    1998-01-01

    Increased expression and alteration of intracellular trafficking of lysosomal cathepsins have been reported in malignant tumors, or in cells transformed by the transfection with the ras oncogene. In the present study, immortal MCF-10A human breast epithelial cells were transformed with the mutated ras oncogene. Both cell lines were investigated for changes in the intracellular localization of lysosomal cathepsin D and lamp-1 (lysosome-associated membrane protein) employing specific antibodies and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. The results revealed that staining for cathepsin D along with for lamp-1 was mostly localized in the perinuclear region of MCF-10A cells. In contrast, the staining for these proteins was found to be widely distributed throughout the cytoplasm and at the cell periphery in MCF-10AneoT cells. The organization of microtubules, but not actin, appeared to differ between MCF-10A cells and their oncogenic ras transfectants. When the microtubules were depolymerized by treatment of MCF-10A cells with nocodazole, vesicles containing the lysosomal cathepsin D were dispersed in the cytoplasm and translocation of these vesicles to the cell periphery was observed. The intracellular localization of cathepsin D in the nocodazole-treated MCF-10A cells seemed to be similar to that observed in the oncogenic ras transfectants of these cells. When taxol, which inhibits microtubule depolymerization, was added to the culture medium of neoT cells, a polymerized microtubule network was observed, and the reclustering of cathepsin D and lamp-1 occurred in an unidirectional manner towards the perinuclear region. These findings support a model in which cytoskeletal microtubule organization is closely related to the trafficking of lysosomes/endosomes, and in which oncogenic ras interferes with such organization in human breast epithelial cells.

  6. Transcriptional Profiling of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Exposed to In Vitro Lysosomal Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wenwei; de Sessions, Paola Florez; Teoh, Garrett Hor Keong; Mohamed, Ahmad Naim Nazri; Zhu, Yuan O.; Koh, Vanessa Hui Qi; Ang, Michelle Lay Teng; Dedon, Peter C.; Hibberd, Martin Lloyd

    2016-01-01

    Increasing experimental evidence supports the idea that Mycobacterium tuberculosis has evolved strategies to survive within lysosomes of activated macrophages. To further our knowledge of M. tuberculosis response to the hostile lysosomal environment, we profiled the global transcriptional activity of M. tuberculosis when exposed to the lysosomal soluble fraction (SF) prepared from activated macrophages. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis was performed using various incubation conditions, ranging from noninhibitory to cidal based on the mycobacterial replication or killing profile. Under inhibitory conditions that led to the absence of apparent mycobacterial replication, M. tuberculosis expressed a unique transcriptome with modulation of genes involved in general stress response, metabolic reprogramming, respiration, oxidative stress, dormancy response, and virulence. The transcription pattern also indicates characteristic cell wall remodeling with the possible outcomes of increased infectivity, intrinsic resistance to antibiotics, and subversion of the host immune system. Among the lysosome-specific responses, we identified the glgE-mediated 1,4 α-glucan synthesis pathway and a defined group of VapBC toxin/anti-toxin systems, both of which represent toxicity mechanisms that potentially can be exploited for killing intracellular mycobacteria. A meta-analysis including previously reported transcriptomic studies in macrophage infection and in vitro stress models was conducted to identify overlapping and nonoverlapping pathways. Finally, the Tap efflux pump-encoding gene Rv1258c was selected for validation. An M. tuberculosis ΔRv1258c mutant was constructed and displayed increased susceptibility to killing by lysosomal SF and the antimicrobial peptide LL-37, as well as attenuated survival in primary murine macrophages and human macrophage cell line THP-1. PMID:27324481

  7. Glucose Modulation Induces Lysosome Formation and Increases Lysosomotropic Drug Sequestration via the P-Glycoprotein Drug Transporter*

    PubMed Central

    Seebacher, Nicole A.; Lane, Darius J. R.; Jansson, Patric J.; Richardson, Des R.

    2016-01-01

    Pgp is functional on the plasma membrane and lysosomal membrane. Lysosomal-Pgp can pump substrates into the organelle, thereby trapping certain chemotherapeutics (e.g. doxorubicin; DOX). This mechanism serves as a “safe house” to protect cells against cytotoxic drugs. Interestingly, in contrast to DOX, lysosomal sequestration of the novel anti-tumor agent and P-glycoprotein (Pgp) substrate, di-2-pyridylketone-4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Dp44mT), induces lysosomal membrane permeabilization. This mechanism of lysosomal-Pgp utilization enhances cytotoxicity to multidrug-resistant cells. Consequently, Dp44mT has greater anti-tumor activity in drug-resistant relative to non-Pgp-expressing tumors. Interestingly, stressors in the tumor microenvironment trigger endocytosis for cell signaling to assist cell survival. Hence, this investigation examined how glucose variation-induced stress regulated early endosome and lysosome formation via endocytosis of the plasma membrane. Furthermore, the impact of glucose variation-induced stress on resistance to DOX was compared with Dp44mT and its structurally related analogue, di-2-pyridylketone 4-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (DpC). These studies showed that glucose variation-induced stress-stimulated formation of early endosomes and lysosomes. In fact, through the process of fluid-phase endocytosis, Pgp was redistributed from the plasma membrane to the lysosomal membrane via early endosome formation. This lysosomal-Pgp actively transported the Pgp substrate, DOX, into the lysosome where it became trapped as a result of protonation at pH 5. Due to increased lysosomal DOX trapping, Pgp-expressing cells became more resistant to DOX. In contrast, cytotoxicity of Dp44mT and DpC was potentiated due to more lysosomes containing functional Pgp under glucose-induced stress. These thiosemicarbazones increased lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cell death. This mechanism has critical implications for drug-targeting in

  8. Glucose Modulation Induces Lysosome Formation and Increases Lysosomotropic Drug Sequestration via the P-Glycoprotein Drug Transporter.

    PubMed

    Seebacher, Nicole A; Lane, Darius J R; Jansson, Patric J; Richardson, Des R

    2016-02-19

    Pgp is functional on the plasma membrane and lysosomal membrane. Lysosomal-Pgp can pump substrates into the organelle, thereby trapping certain chemotherapeutics (e.g. doxorubicin; DOX). This mechanism serves as a "safe house" to protect cells against cytotoxic drugs. Interestingly, in contrast to DOX, lysosomal sequestration of the novel anti-tumor agent and P-glycoprotein (Pgp) substrate, di-2-pyridylketone-4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Dp44mT), induces lysosomal membrane permeabilization. This mechanism of lysosomal-Pgp utilization enhances cytotoxicity to multidrug-resistant cells. Consequently, Dp44mT has greater anti-tumor activity in drug-resistant relative to non-Pgp-expressing tumors. Interestingly, stressors in the tumor microenvironment trigger endocytosis for cell signaling to assist cell survival. Hence, this investigation examined how glucose variation-induced stress regulated early endosome and lysosome formation via endocytosis of the plasma membrane. Furthermore, the impact of glucose variation-induced stress on resistance to DOX was compared with Dp44mT and its structurally related analogue, di-2-pyridylketone 4-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (DpC). These studies showed that glucose variation-induced stress-stimulated formation of early endosomes and lysosomes. In fact, through the process of fluid-phase endocytosis, Pgp was redistributed from the plasma membrane to the lysosomal membrane via early endosome formation. This lysosomal-Pgp actively transported the Pgp substrate, DOX, into the lysosome where it became trapped as a result of protonation at pH 5. Due to increased lysosomal DOX trapping, Pgp-expressing cells became more resistant to DOX. In contrast, cytotoxicity of Dp44mT and DpC was potentiated due to more lysosomes containing functional Pgp under glucose-induced stress. These thiosemicarbazones increased lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cell death. This mechanism has critical implications for drug-targeting in

  9. Facilitating Organizational Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    The first of the three papers in this symposium, "Conflicts that Arise in Small Group Facilitation: A Descriptive Study of Accounts, Actions, Outcomes, and Assessments" (Judith A. Kolb, William J. Rothwell), contains self-report verbatim accounts contributed by facilitators and the results of a literature review on small group conflict.…

  10. Phosphorylation of human aquaporin 2 (AQP2) allosterically controls its interaction with the lysosomal trafficking protein LIP5.

    PubMed

    Roche, Jennifer Virginia; Survery, Sabeen; Kreida, Stefan; Nesverova, Veronika; Ampah-Korsah, Henry; Gourdon, Maria; Deen, Peter M T; Törnroth-Horsefield, Susanna

    2017-09-01

    The interaction between the renal water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2) and the lysosomal trafficking regulator-interacting protein LIP5 targets AQP2 to multivesicular bodies and facilitates lysosomal degradation. This interaction is part of a process that controls AQP2 apical membrane abundance in a vasopressin-dependent manner, allowing for urine volume adjustment. Vasopressin regulates phosphorylation at four sites within the AQP2 C terminus (Ser 256 , Ser 261 , Ser 264 , and Thr 269 ), of which Ser 256 is crucial and sufficient for AQP2 translocation from storage vesicles to the apical membrane. However, whether AQP2 phosphorylation modulates AQP2-LIP5 complex affinity is unknown. Here we used far-Western blot analysis and microscale thermophoresis to show that the AQP2 binds LIP5 in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. We constructed five phospho-mimicking mutants (S256E, S261E, S264E, T269E, and S256E/T269E) and a C-terminal truncation mutant (ΔP242) that lacked all phosphorylation sites but retained a previously suggested LIP5-binding site. CD spectroscopy indicated that wild-type AQP2 and the phospho-mimicking mutants had similar overall structure but displayed differences in melting temperatures possibly arising from C-terminal conformational changes. Non-phosphorylated AQP2 bound LIP5 with the highest affinity, whereas AQP2-ΔP242 had 20-fold lower affinity as determined by microscale thermophoresis. AQP2-S256E, S261E, T269E, and S256E/T269E all had reduced affinity. This effect was most prominent for AQP2-S256E, which fits well with its role in apical membrane targeting. AQP2-S264E had affinity similar to non-phosphorylated AQP2, possibly indicating a role in exosome excretion. Our data suggest that AQP2 phosphorylation allosterically controls its interaction with LIP5, illustrating how altered affinities to interacting proteins form the basis for regulation of AQP2 trafficking by post-translational modifications. © 2017 by The American Society for

  11. First-Generation Antipsychotic Haloperidol Alters the Functionality of the Late Endosomal/Lysosomal Compartment in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Canfrán-Duque, Alberto; Barrio, Luis C.; Lerma, Milagros; de la Peña, Gema; Serna, Jorge; Pastor, Oscar; Lasunción, Miguel A.; Busto, Rebeca

    2016-01-01

    First- and second-generation antipsychotics (FGAs and SGAs, respectively), have the ability to inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis and also to interrupt the intracellular cholesterol trafficking, interfering with low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-derived cholesterol egress from late endosomes/lysosomes. In the present work, we examined the effects of FGA haloperidol on the functionality of late endosomes/lysosomes in vitro. In HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells incubated in the presence of 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanineperchlorate (DiI)-LDL, treatment with haloperidol caused the enlargement of organelles positive for late endosome markers lysosome-associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP-2) and LBPA (lysobisphosphatidic acid), which also showed increased content of both free-cholesterol and DiI derived from LDL. This indicates the accumulation of LDL-lipids in the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment caused by haloperidol. In contrast, LDL traffic through early endosomes and the Golgi apparatus appeared to be unaffected by the antipsychotic as the distribution of both early endosome antigen 1 (EEA1) and coatomer subunit β (β-COP) were not perturbed. Notably, treatment with haloperidol significantly increased the lysosomal pH and decreased the activities of lysosomal protease and β-d-galactosidase in a dose-dependent manner. We conclude that the alkalinization of the lysosomes’ internal milieu induced by haloperidol affects lysosomal functionality. PMID:26999125

  12. BORC Functions Upstream of Kinesins 1 and 3 to Coordinate Regional Movement of Lysosomes Along Different Microtubule Tracks

    PubMed Central

    Guardia, Carlos M.; Farías, Ginny G.; Jia, Rui; Pu, Jing; Bonifacino, Juan S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The multiple functions of lysosomes are critically dependent on their ability to undergo bidirectional movement along microtubules between the center and the periphery of the cell. Centrifugal and centripetal movement of lysosomes is mediated by kinesin and dynein motors, respectively. We recently described a multisubunit complex named BORC that recruits the small GTPase Arl8 to lysosomes to promote their kinesin-dependent movement toward the cell periphery. Here we show that BORC and Arl8 function upstream of two structurally distinct kinesin types: kinesin-1 (KIF5B) and kinesin-3 (KIF1Bβ and KIF1A). Remarkably, KIF5B preferentially moves lysosomes on perinuclear tracks enriched in acetylated α-tubulin, whereas KIF1Bβ and KIF1A drive lysosome movement on more rectilinear, peripheral tracks enriched in tyrosinated α-tubulin. These findings establish BORC as a master regulator of lysosome positioning through coupling to different kinesins and microtubule tracks. Common regulation by BORC enables coordinate control of lysosome movement in different regions of the cell. PMID:27851960

  13. Lysosomal Proteolysis and Autophagy Require Presenilin 1 and Are Disrupted by Alzheimer-Related PS1 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju-Hyun; Yu, W. Haung; Kumar, Asok; Lee, Sooyeon; Mohan, Panaiyur S.; Peterhoff, Corrinne M.; Wolfe, Devin M.; Martinez-Vicente, Marta; Massey, Ashish C.; Sovak, Guy; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Westaway, David; Sisodia, Sangram S.; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Nixon, Ralph A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Macroautophagy is a lysosomal degradative pathway essential for neuron survival. Here we show that macroautophagy requires the Alzheimer's disease (AD) - related protein, presenilin-1 (PS1). In PS1-null blastocysts, neurons from mice hypomorphic for PS1 or conditionally depleted of PS1, substrate proteolysis and autophagosome clearance during macroautophagy are prevented due to a selective impairment of autolysosome acidification and cathepsin activation. These deficits are caused by failed PS1-dependent targeting of the v-ATPase subunit to lysosomes. N-glycosylation of the V0a1 subunit, essential for its efficient ER-to-lysosome delivery, requires the selective binding of PS1 holoprotein to the unglycosylated subunit and the Sec61alpha/oligosaccharyltransferase complex. PS1 mutations causing early-onset AD produce a similar lysosomal/autophagy phenotype in fibroblasts from AD patients. PS1 is therefore essential for v-ATPase targeting to lysosomes, lysosome acidification, and proteolysis during autophagy. Defective lysosomal proteolysis represents a basis for pathogenic protein accumulations and neuronal cell death in AD and suggests novel therapeutic targets. PMID:20541250

  14. The role of intermediate vesicles in the adsorptive endocytosis and transport of ligand to lysosomes by human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Recent work from several laboratories has suggested the participation of intermediate structures in the delivery of adsorbed ligands from the plasma membrane to lysosomes. This report presents subcellular fractionation studies bearing on the role of these structures in adsorptive pinocytosis of epidermal growth factor (EGF), beta- hexosaminidase, and low density lipoprotein (LDL) by human fibroblasts. Using a two-step Percoll density gradient fractionation, we identified newly internalized (5 min) EGF in two intermediate density structures that are essentially negative for plasma membrane marker, and more bouyant than secondary lysosomes. Continued incubation for 20 min resulted in transfer to (or conversion to) vesicles sedimenting with secondary lysosomes. Internalized beta-hexosaminidase and LDL behaved similarly, appearing first in structures of intermediate density, and later appearing in association with secondary lysosomes. Two drugs, NH4Cl and monensin, were found to inhibit ligand transfer to the secondary lysosome peak, although they did not inhibit entry of bound ligands into intermediate density structures. Upon removal of both inhibitors, internalized ligands were quickly transferred to the secondary lysosome peak. This "transfer process" was faster for EGF, than for the other two ligands studied. We interpret these data to indicate that the endocytosis of these three ligands, and their delivery to lysosomes in fibroblasts, proceeds through a common pathway, involving intermediate nonlysosomal structures. PMID:6220018

  15. Glyco-engineering strategies for the development of therapeutic enzymes with improved efficacy for the treatment of lysosomal storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Oh, Doo-Byoung

    2015-08-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of inherent diseases characterized by massive accumulation of undigested compounds in lysosomes, which is caused by genetic defects resulting in the deficiency of a lysosomal hydrolase. Currently, enzyme replacement therapy has been successfully used for treatment of 7 LSDs with 10 approved therapeutic enzymes whereas new approaches such as pharmacological chaperones and gene therapy still await evaluation in clinical trials. While therapeutic enzymes for Gaucher disease have N-glycans with terminal mannose residues for targeting to macrophages, the others require N-glycans containing mannose-6-phosphates that are recognized by mannose-6-phosphate receptors on the plasma membrane for cellular uptake and targeting to lysosomes. Due to the fact that efficient lysosomal delivery of therapeutic enzymes is essential for the clearance of accumulated compounds, the suitable glycan structure and its high content are key factors for efficient therapeutic efficacy. Therefore, glycan remodeling strategies to improve lysosomal targeting and tissue distribution have been highlighted. This review describes the glycan structures that are important for lysosomal targeting and provides information on recent glyco-engineering technologies for the development of therapeutic enzymes with improved efficacy.

  16. Glyco-engineering strategies for the development of therapeutic enzymes with improved efficacy for the treatment of lysosomal storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Doo-Byoung

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of inherent diseases characterized by massive accumulation of undigested compounds in lysosomes, which is caused by genetic defects resulting in the deficiency of a lysosomal hydrolase. Currently, enzyme replacement therapy has been successfully used for treatment of 7 LSDs with 10 approved therapeutic enzymes whereas new approaches such as pharmacological chaperones and gene therapy still await evaluation in clinical trials. While therapeutic enzymes for Gaucher disease have N-glycans with terminal mannose residues for targeting to macrophages, the others require N-glycans containing mannose-6-phosphates that are recognized by mannose-6-phosphate receptors on the plasma membrane for cellular uptake and targeting to lysosomes. Due to the fact that efficient lysosomal delivery of therapeutic enzymes is essential for the clearance of accumulated compounds, the suitable glycan structure and its high content are key factors for efficient therapeutic efficacy. Therefore, glycan remodeling strategies to improve lysosomal targeting and tissue distribution have been highlighted. This review describes the glycan structures that are important for lysosomal targeting and provides information on recent glyco-engineering technologies for the development of therapeutic enzymes with improved efficacy. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(8): 438-444] PMID:25999178

  17. The phosphorus content of lysosomes in hepatocytes and Kupffer cells. A study using electron-spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Köpf-Maier, P

    1990-01-01

    In the present study, the distribution of phosphorus was analyzed within lysosomes of hepatocytes, Kupffer cells and mast cells in untreated liver tissue of mice by the use of electron-spectroscopic imaging, a new electron-microscopical method which combines microanalysis with ultrastructural representation and allows to image the spatial distribution of light elements such as O, N or P in cells and tissues. The obtained analytical data unfolded marked differences regarding the phosphorus content of lysosomes within hepatocytes. Whereas peribiliary bodies always included phosphorus highly condensed in a coarse-granular distribution, the lysosomes apart from biliary capillaries contained different amounts of phosphorus, varying from high concentration to moderate and negligible amounts appearing as dust-like powder in the lysosomal interior. In contrast, the lysosomes of Kupffer cells always comprised phosphorus in high density and similar concentration as it is found in cytoplasmic ribosomes. These results confirm a pronounced and unexpected heterogeneity regarding the elemental composition of lysosomes in hepatocytes and Kupffer cells. It may be assumed that this heterogeneity is not accidental but based on differences in the functional state of lysosomes and the activity of their hydrolytic enzymes.

  18. Autophagy Inhibits the Accumulation of Advanced Glycation End Products by Promoting Lysosomal Biogenesis and Function in the Kidney Proximal Tubules.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Atsushi; Takabatake, Yoshitsugu; Kimura, Tomonori; Maejima, Ikuko; Namba, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Matsuda, Jun; Minami, Satoshi; Kaimori, Jun-Ya; Matsui, Isao; Matsusaka, Taiji; Niimura, Fumio; Yoshimori, Tamotsu; Isaka, Yoshitaka

    2017-05-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are involved in the progression of diabetic nephropathy. AGEs filtered by glomeruli or delivered from the circulation are endocytosed and degraded in the lysosomes of kidney proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTECs). Autophagy is a highly conserved degradation system that regulates intracellular homeostasis by engulfing cytoplasmic components. We have recently demonstrated that autophagic degradation of damaged lysosomes is indispensable for cellular homeostasis in some settings. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that autophagy could contribute to the degradation of AGEs in the diabetic kidney by modulating lysosomal biogenesis. Both a high-glucose and exogenous AGE overload gradually blunted autophagic flux in the cultured PTECs. AGE overload upregulated lysosomal biogenesis and function in vitro, which was inhibited in autophagy-deficient PTECs because of the impaired nuclear translocation of transcription factor EB. Consistently, streptozotocin-treated, PTEC-specific, autophagy-deficient mice failed to upregulate lysosomal biogenesis and exhibited the accumulation of AGEs in the glomeruli and renal vasculature as well as in the PTECs, along with worsened inflammation and fibrosis. These results indicate that autophagy contributes to the degradation of AGEs by the upregulation of lysosomal biogenesis and function in diabetic nephropathy. Strategies aimed at promoting lysosomal function hold promise for treating diabetic nephropathy. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  19. EGF receptor lysosomal degradation is delayed in the cells stimulated with EGF-Quantum dot bioconjugate but earlier key events of endocytic degradative pathway are similar to that of native EGF.

    PubMed

    Salova, Anna V; Belyaeva, Tatiana N; Leontieva, Ekaterina A; Kornilova, Elena S

    2017-07-04

    Quantum dots (QDs) complexed to ligands recognizing surface receptors undergoing internalization are an attractive tool for live cell imaging of ligand-receptor complexes behavior and for specific tracking of the cells of interest. However, conjugation of quasi-multivalent large QD-particle to monovalent small growth factors like EGF that bound their tyrosine-kinase receptors may affect key endocytic events tightly bound to signaling. Here, by means of confocal microscopy we have addressed the key endocytic events of lysosomal degradative pathway stimulated by native EGF or EGF-QD bioconjugate. We have demonstrated that the decrease in endosome number, increase in mean endosome integrated density and the pattern of EEA1 co-localization with EGF-EGFR complexes at early stages of endocytosis were similar for the both native and QD-conjugated ligands. In both cases enlarged hollow endosomes appeared after wortmannin treatment. This indicates that early endosomal fusions and their maturation proceed similar for both ligands. EGF-QD and native EGF similarly accumulated in juxtanuclear region, and live cell imaging of endosome motion revealed the behavior described elsewhere for microtubule-facilitated motility. Finally, EGF-QD and the receptor were found in lysosomes. However, degradation of receptor part of QD-EGF-EGFR-complex was delayed compared to native EGF, but not inhibited, while QDs fluorescence was detected in lysosomes even after 24 hours. Importantly, in HeLa and A549 cells the both ligands behaved similarly. We conclude that during endocytosis EGF-QD behaves as a neutral marker for degradative pathway up to lysosomal stage and can also be used as a long-term cell marker.

  20. Lysosomal function is involved in 17β-estradiol-induced estrogen receptor α degradation and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Totta, Pierangela; Pesiri, Valeria; Marino, Maria; Acconcia, Filippo

    2014-01-01

    The homeostatic control of the cellular proteome steady-state is dependent either on the 26S proteasome activity or on the lysosome function. The sex hormone 17β-estradiol (E2) controls a plethora of biological functions by binding to the estrogen receptor α (ERα), which is both a nuclear ligand-activated transcription factor and also an extrinsic plasma membrane receptor. Regulation of E2-induced physiological functions (e.g., cell proliferation) requires the synergistic activation of both transcription of estrogen responsive element (ERE)-containing genes and rapid extra-nuclear phosphorylation of many different signalling kinases (e.g., ERK/MAPK; PI3K/AKT). Although E2 controls ERα intracellular content and activity via the 26S proteasome-mediated degradation, biochemical and microscopy-based evidence suggests a possible cross-talk among lysosomes and ERα activities. Here, we studied the putative localization of endogenous ERα to lysosomes and the role played by lysosomal function in ERα signalling. By using confocal microscopy and biochemical assays, we report that ERα localizes to lysosomes and to endosomes in an E2-dependent manner. Moreover, the inhibition of lysosomal function obtained by chloroquine demonstrates that, in addition to 26S proteasome-mediated receptor elimination, lysosome-based degradation also contributes to the E2-dependent ERα breakdown. Remarkably, the lysosome function is further involved in those ERα activities required for E2-dependent cell proliferation while it is dispensable for ERα-mediated ERE-containing gene transcription. Our discoveries reveal a novel lysosome-dependent degradation pathway for ERα and show a novel biological mechanism by which E2 regulates ERα cellular content and, as a consequence, cellular functions.

  1. Lysosomal proteolysis inhibition selectively disrupts axonal transport of degradative organelles and causes an Alzheimer’s-like axonal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sooyeon; Sato, Yutaka; Nixon, Ralph A.

    2012-01-01

    In the hallmark neuritic dystrophy of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), autophagic vacuoles containing incompletely digested proteins selectively accumulate in focal axonal swellings, reflecting defects in both axonal transport and autophagy. Here, we investigated the possibility that impaired lysosomal proteolysis could be a basis for both defects leading to neuritic dystrophy. In living primary mouse cortical neurons expressing fluorescence-tagged markers, LC3-positive autophagosomes forming in axons rapidly acquired the endo-lysosomal markers, Rab7 and LAMP1, and underwent exclusive retrograde movement. Proteolytic clearance of these transported autophagic vacuoles was initiated upon fusion with bi-directionally moving lysosomes that increase in number at more proximal axon levels and in the perikaryon. Disrupting lysosomal proteolysis by either inhibiting cathepsins directly or by suppressing lysosomal acidification slowed the axonal transport of autolysosomes, late endosomes and lysosomes and caused their selective accumulation within dystrophic axonal swellings. Mitochondria and other organelles lacking cathepsins moved normally under these conditions, indicating that the general functioning of the axonal transport system was preserved. Dystrophic swellings induced by lysosomal proteolysis inhibition resembled in composition those in several mouse models of AD and also acquired other AD-like features, including immunopositivity for ubiquitin, APP, and neurofilament protein hyperphosphorylation. Restoration of lysosomal proteolysis reversed the affected movements of proteolytic Rab7 vesicles, which in turn, largely cleared autophagic substrates and reversed the axonal dystrophy. These studies identify the AD-associated defects in neuronal lysosomal proteolysis as a possible basis for the selective transport abnormalities and highly characteristic pattern of neuritic dystrophy associated with AD. PMID:21613495

  2. Pim-1L Protects Cell Surface-Resident ABCA1 From Lysosomal Degradation in Hepatocytes and Thereby Regulates Plasma High-Density Lipoprotein Level.

    PubMed

    Katsube, Akira; Hayashi, Hisamitsu; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki

    2016-12-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) exerts an atheroprotective action through the biogenesis of high-density lipoprotein in hepatocytes and prevents the formation of foam cells from macrophages. Controlling ABCA1 is a rational approach to improving atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Although much is known about the regulatory mechanism of ABCA1 synthesis, the molecular mechanism underpinning its degradation remains to be clearly described. ABCA1 possesses potential sites of phosphorylation by serine/threonine-protein kinase Pim-1 (Pim-1). Pim-1 depletion decreased the expression of cell surface-resident ABCA1 (csABCA1) and apolipoprotein A-I-mediated [ 3 H]cholesterol efflux in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2, but not in peritoneal macrophages from mice. In vitro kinase assay, immunoprecipitation, and immunocytochemistry suggested phosphorylation of csABCA1 by the long form of Pim-1 (Pim-1L). Cell surface biotinylation indicated that Pim-1L inhibited lysosomal degradation of csABCA1 involving the liver X receptor β, which interacts with csABCA1 and thereby protects it from ubiquitination and subsequent lysosomal degradation. Cell surface coimmunoprecipitation with COS-1 cells expressing extracellularly hemagglutinin-tagged ABCA1 showed that Pim-1L-mediated phosphorylation of csABCA1 facilitated the interaction between csABCA1 and liver X receptor β and thereby stabilized the csABCA1-Pim-1L complex. Mice deficient in Pim-1 kinase activity showed lower expression of ABCA1 in liver plasma membranes and lower plasma high-density lipoprotein levels than control mice. Pim-1L protects hepatic csABCA1 from lysosomal degradation by facilitating the physical interaction between csABCA1 and liver X receptor β and subsequent stabilization of the csABCA1-Pim-1L complex and thereby regulates the circulating level of high-density lipoprotein. Our findings may aid the development of high-density lipoprotein-targeted therapy. © 2016 American Heart Association

  3. Dissociation of intracellular lysosomal rupture from the cell death caused by silica

    PubMed Central

    Kane, AB; Stanton, RP; Raymond, EG; Dobson, ME; Knafelc, ME; Farber, JL

    1980-01-01

    The relationship between intracellular lysosomal rupture and cell death caused by silica was studied in P388d(1) macrophages. After 3 h of exposure to 150 μg silica in medium containing 1.8 mM Ca(2+), 60 percent of the cells were unable to exclude trypan blue. In the absence of extracellular Ca(2+), however, all of the cells remained viable. Phagocytosis of silica particles occurred to the same extent in the presence or absence of Ca(2+). The percentage of P388D(1) cells killed by silica depended on the dose and the concentration of Ca(2+) in the medium. Intracellular lyosomal rupture after exposure to silica was measured by acridine orange fluorescence or histochemical assay of horseradish peroxidase. With either assay, 60 percent of the cells exposed to 150 μg silica for 3 h in the presence of Ca(2+) showed intracellular lysosomal rupture, was not associated with measureable degradation of total DNA, RNA, protein, or phospholipids or accelerated turnover of exogenous horseradish peroxidase. Pretreatment with promethazine (20 μg/ml) protected 80 percent of P388D(1) macrophages against silica toxicity although lysosomal rupture occurred in 60-70 percent of the cells. Intracellular lysosomal rupture was prevented in 80 percent of the cells by pretreatment with indomethacin (5 x 10(-5)M), yet 40-50 percent of the cells died after 3 h of exposure to 150 μg silica in 1.8 mM extracellular Ca(2+). The calcium ionophore A23187 also caused intracellular lysosomal rupture in 90-98 percent of the cells treated for 1 h in either the presence or absence of extracellular Ca(2+). With the addition of 1.8 mM Ca(2+), 80 percent of the cells was killed after 3 h, whereas all of the cells remained viable in the absence of Ca(2+). These experiments suggest that intracellular lysosomal rupture is not causally related to the cell death cause by silica or A23187. Cell death is dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) and may be mediated by an influx of these ions across the plasma membrane

  4. Effects of pH and Iminosugar Pharmacological Chaperones on Lysosomal Glycosidase Structure and Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, Raquel L.; D’aquino, J. Alejandro; Ringe, Dagmar

    2009-06-05

    Human lysosomal enzymes acid-{beta}-glucosidase (GCase) and acid-{alpha}-galactosidase ({alpha}-Gal A) hydrolyze the sphingolipids glucosyl- and globotriaosylceramide, respectively, and mutations in these enzymes lead to the lipid metabolism disorders Gaucher and Fabry disease, respectively. We have investigated the structure and stability of GCase and {alpha}-Gal A in a neutral-pH environment reflective of the endoplasmic reticulum and an acidic-pH environment reflective of the lysosome. These details are important for the development of pharmacological chaperone therapy for Gaucher and Fabry disease, in which small molecules bind mutant enzymes in the ER to enable the mutant enzyme to meet quality control requirements for lysosomal trafficking.more » We report crystal structures of apo GCase at pH 4.5, at pH 5.5, and in complex with the pharmacological chaperone isofagomine (IFG) at pH 7.5. We also present thermostability analysis of GCase at pH 7.4 and 5.2 using differential scanning calorimetry. We compare our results with analogous experiments using {alpha}-Gal A and the chaperone 1-deoxygalactonijirimycin (DGJ), including the first structure of {alpha}-Gal A with DGJ. Both GCase and {alpha}-Gal A are more stable at lysosomal pH with and without their respective iminosugars bound, and notably, the stability of the GCase-IFG complex is pH sensitive. We show that the conformations of the active site loops in GCase are sensitive to ligand binding but not pH, whereas analogous galactose- or DGJ-dependent conformational changes in {alpha}-Gal A are not seen. Thermodynamic parameters obtained from {alpha}-Gal A unfolding indicate two-state, van't Hoff unfolding in the absence of the iminosugar at neutral and lysosomal pH, and non-two-state unfolding in the presence of DGJ. Taken together, these results provide insight into how GCase and {alpha}-Gal A are thermodynamically stabilized by iminosugars and suggest strategies for the development of new pharmacological

  5. Training Internal Facilitators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, R. Glenn; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Corning enhanced teamwork by training employees to facilitate team training. The employees learned to deal with change management, interpersonal communication, feedback, group development, team and individual expectations, and conflict management. (SK)

  6. Investigation of novel chemical inhibitors of human lysosomal acid lipase: virtual screening and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Azam, Syed Sikander; Abbasi, Sumra Wajid; Tahir, Shifa

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, identification of new potent small inhibitors of human lysosomal acid lipase using structure-based methods has been reported. Virtual Screening (VS), compounds from literature and molecular docking studies were employed to find the suitable inhibitors against lysosomal acid lipase (LAL). Specifically for this study a homology model of LipA enzyme was generated based on the structure of dog gastric lipase. As a result of structurebased virtual screening 28 inhibitors were identified from ZINC database. Rest of the inhibitors were selected from literature. Among the studied 65 inhibitors, compound having zinc ID ZINC15707335 exhibiting minimum binding affinity and hydrogen bond and hydrophobic interactions with specific amino acid residues was selected as lead compound.

  7. A Novel Homozygous LIPA Mutation in a Korean Child with Lysosomal Acid Lipase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Yeon; Kim, Ju Whi; Lee, Kyung Jae; Park, Eunhyang; Kang, Gyeong Hoon; Choi, Young Hun; Kim, Woo Sun; Ko, Jung Min; Moon, Jin Soo; Ko, Jae Sung

    2017-12-01

    Patients with lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) deficiency and glycogen storage disease (GSD) demonstrated hepatomegaly and dyslipidemia. In our case, a 6-year-old boy presented with hepatosplenomegaly. At 3 years of age, GSD had been diagnosed by liver biopsy at another hospital. He showed elevated serum liver enzymes and dyslipidemia. Liver biopsy revealed diffuse microvesicular fatty changes in hepatocytes, septal fibrosis and foamy macrophages. Ultrastructural examination demonstrated numerous lysosomes that contained lipid material and intracytoplasmic cholesterol clefts. A dried blood spot test revealed markedly decreased activity of LAL. LIPA gene sequencing identified the presence of a novel homozygous mutation (p.Thr177Ile). The patient's elevated liver enzymes and dyslipidemia improved with enzyme replacement therapy. This is the first report of a Korean child with LAL deficiency, and our findings suggest that this condition should be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with hepatosplenomegaly and dyslipidemia.

  8. Alz-50/Gallyas-positive lysosome-like intraneuronal granules in Alzheimer's disease and control brains.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, K; Akiyama, H; Arai, T; Kondo, H; Haga, C; Iritani, S; Tsuchiya, K

    1998-12-18

    The Gallyas-Braak silver impregnation method revealed neurons containing well-defined intraneuronal granules in both Alzheimer's disease and normal control brains. The granules were immunostained prominently with the Alz-50 antibody and, to a lesser degree, with the tau-2 antibody, but not with other anti-tau antibodies examined. The areas of distribution of granule-containing neurons detected by the Gallyas-Braak method appeared to overlap with the reported main sites of subcortical distribution of neurofibrillary tangles. They, however, were not observed in the cerebral cortex, including the hippocampal region. The Alz-50 immunoreactive granules showed ultrastructural features similar to those of lysosomes or lipofuscin. These findings suggest that denatured tau might be degraded in lysosomes.

  9. Effect of immunological inhibition of lysosome function on radiation survival of rat sarcoma cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Paris, J.E.; Wang, L.

    1974-01-01

    An antibody capable of inhibiting lysosomal hydrolytic activity was prepared and its effects on the gamma -radiation survival curves of cultured CCL 47 rat-sarcomal cells were studied over a dose range 0 to 800 rads. In 22 experiments, an average D/sub o/ of 160 rads was determined. The average extrapolation number was 1.7. In 17 experiments in the presence of antilysosomal globulins, an average of D/sub o/ of 200 rads and an extrapolation number of 1.4 were found. It is postulated that these enhanced survival rates were due to the immunologcal suppression of the lysosomal hydrolytic activity. Participation of endogenousmore » acid hydrolases in cell autolysis would be impaired by their insolubilization in situ by the antilysosomal antibodies. A delay in the autolytic events would provide a certain advantage to partially injured cells that retained repair capabilities. (UK)« less

  10. Amino acids and mTORC1: from lysosomes to disease

    PubMed Central

    Efeyan, Alejo; Zoncu, Roberto; Sabatini, David M.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase controls growth and metabolism, and its deregulation underlies the pathogenesis of many diseases, including cancer, neurodegeneration, and diabetes. mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) integrates signals arising from nutrients, energy, and growth factors, but how exactly these signals are propagated await to be fully understood. Recent findings have placed the lysosome, a key mediator of cellular catabolism, at the core of mTORC1 regulation by amino acids. A multiprotein complex that includes the Rag GTPases, Ragulator, and the v-ATPase forms an amino acid-sensing machinery on the lysosomal surface that affects the decision between cell growth and catabolism at multiple levels. The involvement of a catabolic organelle in growth signaling may have important implications for our understanding of mTORC1-related pathologies. PMID:22749019

  11. Biomarkers in the diagnosis of lysosomal storage disorders: proteins, lipids, and inhibodies.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Johannes M F G; Kallemeijn, Wouter W; Wegdam, Wouter; Joao Ferraz, Maria; van Breemen, Marielle J; Dekker, Nick; Kramer, Gertjan; Poorthuis, Ben J; Groener, Johanna E M; Cox-Brinkman, Josanne; Rombach, Saskia M; Hollak, Carla E M; Linthorst, Gabor E; Witte, Martin D; Gold, Henrik; van der Marel, Gijs A; Overkleeft, Herman S; Boot, Rolf G

    2011-06-01

    A biomarker is an analyte indicating the presence of a biological process linked to the clinical manifestations and outcome of a particular disease. In the case of lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs), primary and secondary accumulating metabolites or proteins specifically secreted by storage cells are good candidates for biomarkers. Clinical applications of biomarkers are found in improved diagnosis, monitoring disease progression, and assessing therapeutic correction. These are illustrated by reviewing the discovery and use of biomarkers for Gaucher disease and Fabry disease. In addition, recently developed chemical tools allowing specific visualization of enzymatically active lysosomal glucocerebrosidase are described. Such probes, coined inhibodies, offer entirely new possibilities for more sophisticated molecular diagnosis, enzyme replacement therapy monitoring, and fundamental research.

  12. Approaches for detecting lysosomal alkalinization and impaired degradation in fresh and cultured RPE cells: evidence for a role in retinal degenerations.

    PubMed

    Guha, Sonia; Coffey, Erin E; Lu, Wennan; Lim, Jason C; Beckel, Jonathan M; Laties, Alan M; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen; Mitchell, Claire H

    2014-09-01

    Lysosomes contribute to a multitude of cellular processes, and the pH of the lysosomal lumen plays a central mechanistic role in many of these functions. In addition to controlling the rate of enzymatic degradation for material delivered through autophagic or phagocytotic pathways, lysosomal pH regulates events such as lysosomal fusion with autophagosomes and the release of lysosomal calcium into the cytoplasm. Disruption of either the steady state lysosomal pH or of the regulated manipulations to lysosomal pH may be pathological. For example, chloroquine elevates the lysosomal pH of retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells and triggers a retinopathy characterized by the accumulation of lipofuscin-like material in both humans and animals. Compensatory responses to restore lysosomal pH are observed; new data illustrate that chronic chloroquine treatment increases mRNA expression of the lysosomal/autophagy master transcription factor TcFEB and of the vesicular proton pump vHATPase in the RPE/choroid of mice. An elevated lysosomal pH with upregulation of TcFEB and vHATPase resembles the pathology in fibroblasts of patients with mutant presenilin 1 (PS1), suggesting a common link between age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and Alzheimer's disease. While the absolute rise in pH is often small in these disorders, elevations of only a few tenths of a pH unit can have a major impact on both lysosomal function and the accumulation of waste over decades. Accurate measurement of lysosomal pH can be complex, and imprecise measurements have clouded the field. Protocols to optimize pH measurement from fresh and cultured cells are discussed, and indirect measurements to confirm changes in lysosomal pH and degradative capacity are addressed. The ability of reacidifying treatments to restore degradative function confirms the central role of lysosomal pH in these disorders and identifies potential approaches to treat diseases of lysosomal accumulation like AMD and Alzheimer

  13. Effect of glutamate on lysosomal membrane permeabilization in primary cultured cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Yan, Min; Zhu, Wenbo; Zheng, Xiaoke; Li, Yuan; Tang, Lipeng; Lu, Bingzheng; Chen, Wenli; Qiu, Pengxin; Leng, Tiandong; Lin, Suizhen; Yan, Guangmei; Yin, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Glutamate is the principal neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity is the predominant cause of cerebral damage. Recent studies have shown that lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) is involved in ischemia‑associated neuronal death in non‑human primates. This study was designed to investigate the effect of glutamate on lysosomal stability in primary cultured cortical neurons. Glutamate treatment for 30 min induced the permeabilization of lysosomal membranes as assessed by acridine orange redistribution and immunofluorescence of cathepsin B in the cytoplasm. Inhibition of glutamate excitotoxicity by the NMDA receptor antagonist MK‑801 and the calcium chelator ethylene glycol‑bis (2‑aminoethylether)‑N, N, N', N'‑tetraacetic acid, rescued lysosomes from permeabilization. The role of calpain and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in inducing LMP was also investigated. Ca2+ overload following glutamate treatment induced the activation of calpain and the production of ROS, which are two major contributors to neuronal death. It has been reported that lysosomal‑associated membrane protein 2 (LAMP2) and heat shock protein (HSP)70 are two calpain substrates that promote LMP in cancer cells; however, it was found that calpains were activated by glutamate, but only LAMP2 was subsequently degraded. Furthermore, LMP was not alleviated by treatment with the calpain inhibitors calpeptin and SJA6017, which blocked the cleavage of the calpain substrate α‑fodrin. It was demonstrated that LMP was significantly alleviated by treatment with the antioxidant N‑Acetyl‑L‑cysteine, indicating that LMP involvement in early glutamate excitotoxicity may be mediated partly by ROS rather than calpain activation. Overall, these data shed light on the role of ROS-mediated LMP in early glutamate excitotoxicity.

  14. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte granules are secretory lysosomes, containing both perforin and granzymes

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) contain granules that are exocytosed during specific interaction with target cells (TC). In this process, the granule contents, including the lethal protein perforin, as well as granzymes, a family of serine esterases, are delivered to the TC. Information regarding the routing of these proteins towards the granule and their exact localization within the granule is of primary importance to resolve the mechanism of granule-mediated TC killing. In this study, the subcellular localization of perforin, granzymes, and known endosomal and lysosomal marker proteins was determined in human and murine CTL, by immunogold labeling of ultrathin cryosections followed by electron microscopy. Perforin and granzymes can be detected in rough endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi complex, trans-Golgi reticulum, and in all cytotoxic granules. Within the granules, they have a similar distribution and are localized not only in the so-called dense core but also over the region containing small internal vesicles. This finding implies that perforin and granzymes can be released in membrane- enveloped and/or -associated form into the intercellular cleft formed upon CTL-TC interaction. On the basis of the present evidence, additional release of these molecules in soluble form cannot be excluded. The lysosomal membrane glycoproteins lamp-1, lamp-2, and CD63, are abundantly present on the granule-delimiting outer membrane, which becomes incorporated into the CTL plasma membrane during lethal hit delivery. In contrast, the cation-dependent mannose 6-phosphate receptor, known to be present in endosomes and absent from lysosomes, is found only in a minority of the granules. Together with our previous findings that the granules are acidic and connected to the endocytic pathway, these observations define CTL granules as secretory lysosomes. PMID:2022921

  15. The granzyme B-Serpinb9 axis controls the fate of lymphocytes after lysosomal stress

    PubMed Central

    Bird, C H; Christensen, M E; Mangan, M S J; Prakash, M D; Sedelies, K A; Smyth, M J; Harper, I; Waterhouse, N J; Bird, P I

    2014-01-01

    Cytotoxic lymphocytes (CLs) contain lysosome-related organelles (LROs) that perform the normal degradative functions of the lysosome, in addition to storage and release of powerful cytotoxins employed to kill virally infected or abnormal cells. Among these cytotoxins is granzyme B (GrB), a protease that has also been implicated in activation (restimulation)-induced cell death of natural killer (NK) and T cells, but the underlying mechanism and its regulation are unclear. Here we show that restimulation of previously activated human or mouse lymphocytes induces lysosomal membrane permeabilisation (LMP), followed by GrB release from LROs into the CL cytosol. The model lysosomal stressors sphingosine and Leu-Leu-methyl-ester, and CLs from gene-targeted mice were used to show that LMP releases GrB in both a time- and concentration-dependent manner, and that the liberated GrB is responsible for cell death. The endogenous GrB inhibitor Serpinb9 (Sb9) protects CLs against LMP-induced death but is decreasingly effective as the extent of LMP increases. We also used these model stressors to show that GrB is the major effector of LMP-mediated death in T cells, but that in NK cells additional effectors are released, making GrB redundant. We found that limited LMP and GrB release occurs constitutively in proliferating lymphocytes and in NK cells engaged with targets in vitro. In Ectromelia virus-infected lymph nodes, working NK cells lacking Sb9 are more susceptible to GrB-mediated death. Taken together, these data show that a basal level of LMP occurs in proliferating and activated lymphocytes, and is increased on restimulation. LMP releases GrB from LROs into the lymphocyte cytoplasm and its ensuing interaction with Sb9 dictates whether or not the cell survives. The GrB-Sb9 nexus may therefore represent an additional mechanism of limiting lymphocyte lifespan and populations. PMID:24488096

  16. Cholesteryl hemiesters alter lysosome structure and function and induce proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Neuza; Estronca, Luís M B B; Silva, João; Encarnação, Marisa R; Mateus, Rita; Silva, Diogo; Santarino, Inês B; Saraiva, Margarida; Soares, Maria I L; Pinho E Melo, Teresa M V D; Jacinto, António; Vaz, Winchil L C; Vieira, Otília V

    2017-02-01

    Cholesteryl hemiesters are oxidation products of polyunsaturated fatty acid esters of cholesterol. Their oxo-ester precursors have been identified as important components of the "core aldehydes" of human atheromata and in oxidized lipoproteins (Ox-LDL). We had previously shown, for the first time, that a single compound of this family, cholesteryl hemisuccinate (ChS), is sufficient to cause irreversible lysosomal lipid accumulation (lipidosis), and is toxic to macrophages. These features, coupled to others such as inflammation, are typically seen in atherosclerosis. To obtain insights into the mechanism of cholesteryl hemiester-induced pathological changes in lysosome function and induction of inflammation in vitro and assess their impact in vivo. We have examined the effects of ChS on macrophages (murine cell lines and primary cultures) in detail. Specifically, lysosomal morphology, pH, and proteolytic capacity were examined. Exposure of macrophages to sub-toxic ChS concentrations caused enlargement of the lysosomes, changes in their luminal pH, and accumulation of cargo in them. In primary mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM), ChS-exposure increased the secretion of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6. In zebrafish larvae (wild-type AB and PU.1:EGFP), fed with a ChS-enriched diet, we observed lipid accumulation, myeloid cell-infiltration in their vasculature and decrease in larval survival. Under the same conditions the effects of ChS were more profound than the effects of free cholesterol (FC). Our data strongly suggest that cholesteryl hemiesters are pro-atherogenic lipids able to mimic features of Ox-LDL both in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A cyanobenzo[a]phenoxazine-based near infrared lysosome-tracker for in cellulo imaging.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ru; Liu, Wu; Xu, Yu-Jie; Lu, Jian-Mei; Ge, Jian-Feng; Ihara, Masataka

    2013-11-25

    A cyanobenzo[a]phenoxazine-based pH probe with pKa = 5.0 exhibits OFF-ON emission at 625-850 nm upon excitation at 600 nm in aqueous buffers. The in cellulo imaging experiments with HeLa cells indicate that the probe can serve as a lysosome-specific probe under red light excitation (633 nm) with near infrared emission (650-790 nm).

  18. Virus replication, cytopathology, and lysosomal enzyme response of mitotic and interphase Hep-2 cells infected with poliovirus.

    PubMed

    Bienz, K; Egger, D; Wolff, D A

    1973-04-01

    Mitotic Hep-2 cells, selected by the PEL (colloidal silica) density gradient method and held in mitosis with Colcemid, are readily infected by poliovirus type I (Mahoney). They produce and release the same amount of virus as interphase, random-growing cells. In contrast to interphase cells, mitotic cells show no detectable virus-induced cytopathic effect at the light microscopy level and only slight alterations, consisting of small clusters of vacuoles, at the electron microscopy level. Mitotic cells contain the same total amount of lysosomal enzymes per cell as interphase cells, but they display no redistribution of lysosomal enzymes during the virus infection as interphase cells do. This supports the view that lysosomal enzyme redistribution is associated with the cytopathic effect in poliovirus infection but shows that virus synthesis and release is not dependent on either the cytopathic effect or lysosomal enzyme release. The possible reasons for the lack of cytopathic effect in mitotic cells are discussed.

  19. A genome-wide RNAi screen for microtubule bundle formation and lysosome motility regulation in Drosophila S2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, Amber L.; Luan, Chi-Hao; Dusel, Brendon E.; Dunne, Sara Fernandez; Winding, Michael; Dixit, Vishrut J.; Robins, Chloe; Saluk, Jennifer L.; Logan, David J.; Carpenter, Anne E.; Sharma, Manu; Dean, Deborah; Cohen, Andrew R.; Gelfand, Vladimir I.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Long-distance intracellular transport of organelles, mRNA, and proteins (“cargo”) occurs along the microtubule cytoskeleton by the action of kinesin and dynein motor proteins; the vast network of factors involved in regulating intracellular cargo transport are still unknown. We capitalize on the Drosophila melanogaster S2 model cell system to monitor lysosome transport along microtubule bundles, which require enzymatically active kinesin-1 motor protein for their formation. We use an automated tracking program and a naïve Bayesian classifier for the multivariate motility data to analyze 15,683 gene phenotypes, and find 98 proteins involved in regulating lysosome motility along microtubules and 48 involved in the formation of microtubule filled processes in S2 cells. We identify innate immunity genes, ion channels and signaling proteins having a role in lysosome motility regulation, and find an unexpected relationship between the dynein motor, Rab7a and lysosome motility regulation. PMID:26774481

  20. Neutral red retention by lysosomes from earthworm (Lumbricus rubellus) coelomocytes: A simple biomarker of exposure to soil copper

    SciTech Connect

    Weeks, J.M.; Svendsen, C.

    1996-10-01

    A simple subcellular histochemical staining technique employing the lysosomal probe neutral red has been developed for use with the epiendogeic earthworm Lumbricus rubellus Hoffmeister. Coelomocytes extracted from the coelomic cavity of earthworms into an isotonic earthworm Ringer solution were allowed to adhere to a microscope slide for 30 s before the application of a neutral red dye. This red dye was rapidly accumulated within the lysosomes. Observation of the loss of this dye from these lysosomes into the surrounding cytosol has enabled the quantification of the degree of lysosomal damage caused to earthworms with exposure to an increasing range ofmore » soil copper concentrations, in both laboratory and mesocosm studies. This simple in vitro biomarker has potential for the rapid assessment of the toxic effects to earthworms from soils contaminated with heavy metals and metalloids.« less

  1. Investigation of endosome and lysosome biology by ultra pH-sensitive nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chensu; Zhao, Tian; Li, Yang; Huang, Gang; White, Michael A; Gao, Jinming

    2017-04-01

    Endosomes and lysosomes play a critical role in various aspects of cell physiology such as nutrient sensing, receptor recycling, protein/lipid catabolism, and cell death. In drug delivery, endosomal release of therapeutic payloads from nanocarriers is also important in achieving efficient delivery of drugs to reach their intracellular targets. Recently, we invented a library of ultra pH-sensitive (UPS) nanoprobes with exquisite fluorescence response to subtle pH changes. The UPS nanoprobes also displayed strong pH-specific buffer effect over small molecular bases with broad pH responses (e.g., chloroquine and NH 4 Cl). Tunable pH transitions from 7.4 to 4.0 of UPS nanoprobes cover the entire physiological pH of endocytic organelles (e.g., early and late endosomes) and lysosomes. These unique physico-chemical properties of UPS nanoprobes allowed a 'detection and perturbation' strategy for the investigation of luminal pH in cell signaling and metabolism, which introduces a nanotechnology-enabled paradigm for the biological studies of endosomes and lysosomes. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. SRT1720 induces lysosomal-dependent cell death of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lahusen, Tyler J; Deng, Chu-Xia

    2015-01-01

    SRT1720 is an activator of SIRT1, a NAD(+)-dependent protein and histone deacetylase that plays an important role in numerous biologic processes. Several studies have illustrated that SRT1720 treatment could improve metabolic conditions in mouse models and in a study in cancer SRT1720 caused increased apoptosis of myeloma cells. However, the effect of SRT1720 on cancer may be complex, as some recent studies have demonstrated that SRT1720 may not directly activate SIRT1 and another study showed that SRT1720 treatment could promote lung metastasis. To further investigate the role of SRT1720 in breast cancer, we treated SIRT1 knockdown and control breast cancer cell lines with SRT1720 both in vitro and in vivo. We showed that SRT1720 more effectively decreased the viability of basal-type MDA-MB-231 and BT20 cells as compared with luminal-type MCF-7 breast cancer cells or nontumorigenic MCF-10A cells. We demonstrated that SRT1720 induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization and necrosis, which could be blocked by lysosomal inhibitors. In contrast, SRT1720-induced cell death occurred in vitro irrespective of SIRT1 status, whereas in nude mice, SRT1720 exhibited a more profound effect in inhibiting the growth of allograft tumors of SIRT1 proficient cells as compared with tumors of SIRT1-deficient cells. Thus, SRT1720 causes lysosomal-dependent necrosis and may be used as a therapeutic agent for breast cancer treatment. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency: wolman disease and cholesteryl ester storage disease.

    PubMed

    Tylki-Szymańska, Anna; Jurecka, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD, OMIM #278000) and Wolman disease (OMIM #278000) are autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorders caused by a deficient activity of lysosomal acid lipase (cholesteryl ester hydrolase, LAL). Human lysosomal acid lipase is essential for the metabolism of cholesteryl esters and triglycerides. In Wolman disease, LAL activity is usually absent, whereas CESD usually presents some residual LAL activity. In infants, poor weight gain, massive hepatosplenomegaly, calcified adrenal glands (present about 2/3 of the time), vomiting, diarrhea and failure to thrive are indicative of Wolman disease. The clinical picture is more variable in CESD. Hepatomegaly and/or elevation of liver transaminases are almost always present. Hepatic steatosis often leads to fibrosis and cirrhosis. Other signs often include splenomegaly, high total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, and low HDL-cholesterol. The diagnosis of LAL deficiency requires clinical experience and specialized laboratory tests. The diagnosis is based on finding deficient activity of acid lipase and/or molecular tests. Pilot screening projects using dried blood spot testing in 1) children with atypical fatty liver disease in the absence of overweight, 2) patients with dyslipidaemia and presence of hepatomegaly and/or elevated transaminases, 3) newborns/neonates with hepatomegaly and abdominal distension/failure to thrive/elevated transaminases are currently underway. Early diagnosis is particularly important for the enzyme replacement therapy. Human trials with recombinant LAL are currently ongoing, raising the prospect for specific correction of LAL deficiency in this progressive and often debilitating disorder.

  4. Lysosomal Acid Lipase Deficiency Unmasked in Two Children With Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Himes, Ryan W; Barlow, Sarah E; Bove, Kevin; Quintanilla, Norma M; Sheridan, Rachel; Kohli, Rohit

    2016-10-01

    Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency (LAL-D) is a classic lysosomal storage disorder characterized by accumulation of cholesteryl ester and triglyceride. Although it is associated with progressive liver injury, fibrosis, and end-stage liver disease in children and adolescents, LAL-D frequently presents with nonspecific signs that overlap substantially with other, more common, chronic conditions like nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), metabolic syndrome, and certain inherited dyslipidemias. We present 2 children with NAFLD who achieved clinically significant weight reduction through healthy eating and exercise, but who failed to have the anticipated improvements in aminotransferases and γ-glutamyl transferase. Liver biopsies performed for these "treatment failures" demonstrated significant microvesicular steatosis, prompting consideration of coexisting metabolic diseases. In both patients, lysosomal acid lipase activity was low and LIPA gene testing confirmed LAL-D. We propose that LAL-D should be considered in the differential diagnosis when liver indices in patients with NAFLD fail to improve in the face of appropriate body weight reduction. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. The role of sebelipase alfa in the treatment of lysosomal acid lipase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Erwin, Angelika L

    2017-07-01

    Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency (LALD) is a lysosomal storage disorder (LSD) characterized either by infantile onset with fulminant clinical course and very poor prognosis or childhood/adult-onset disease with an attenuated phenotype. The disorder is often misdiagnosed or remains undiagnosed in children and adults due to a rather unspecific clinical presentation with dyslipidemia and steatohepatitis. Until recently, no good treatment options were available for LALD. Despite supportive and symptomatic therapies, death occurred before 1 year of age in patients with infantile-onset disease and patients with childhood/adult-onset LALD suffered from significant complications, such as liver cirrhosis, requiring liver transplantation and early-onset cardiovascular disease. With the recent approval of sebelipase alfa for clinical use in infantile- as well as childhood/adult-onset LALD, a new treatment era for this disorder has begun. Sebelipase alfa is a recombinant human lysosomal acid lipase (LAL), which is administered via the intravenous route. Clinical trials have shown significant improvement of disease parameters such as liver transaminases, hepatomegaly, and dyslipidemia in childhood/adult-onset LALD patients. Treatment of infants with the severe infantile-onset form of the disease has led to improved survival beyond the age of 1 year, and also showed improvement of hepatic and gastrointestinal symptoms, as well as growth. Overall, sebelipase alfa has a favorable safety profile and promises to be a good long-term treatment option for patients with LALD, with significant reduction of disease burden and increased life expectancy.

  6. Hypochlorous acid induces apoptosis of cultured cortical neurons through activation of calpains and rupture of lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Yap, Yann Wan; Whiteman, Matthew; Bay, Boon Huat; Li, Yuhong; Sheu, Fwu-Shan; Qi, Robert Z; Tan, Chee Hong; Cheung, Nam Sang

    2006-09-01

    3-Chlorotyrosine, a bio-marker of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) in vivo, was reported to be substantially elevated in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. Thus, HOCl might be implicated in the development of AD. However, its effect and mechanism on neuronal cell death have not been investigated. Here, we report for the first time that HOCl treatment induces an apoptotic-necrotic continuum of concentration-dependent cell death in cultured cortical neurons. Neurotoxicity caused by an intermediate concentration of HOCl (250 microm) exhibited several biochemical markers of apoptosis in the absence of caspase activation. However, the involvement of calpains was demonstrated by data showing that calpain inhibitors protect cortical neurons from apoptosis and the formation of 145/150 kDa alpha-fodrin fragments. Moreover, an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration was associated with HOCl neurotoxicity and Ca2+ channel antagonists, and Ca2+ chelators prevented cleavage of alpha-fodrin and the induction of apoptosis. Finally, we found that calpain activation ruptured lysosomes. Stabilization of lysosomes by calpain inhibitors or imidazoline drugs, as well as inhibition of cathepsin protease activities, rescued cells from HOCl-induced neurotoxicity. Our results showed for the first time that HOCl induces apoptosis in cortical neurons, and that the cell death process involves calpain activation and rupture of lysosomes.

  7. Gene therapy for lysosomal storage diseases: progress, challenges and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Seregin, Sergey S; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Lysosomal Storage Diseases (LSDs) comprise a group of over fifty inherited metabolic disorders, with their hallmark feature being deficient catabolism and accumulation (storage) of macromolecules in the lysosomes due to genetic deficiency of specific lysosomal enzymes. The combined incidence of LSDs is estimated to be ~1 in 7,000 births. LSD symptoms can vary significantly, primarily due to the nature of the gene defect (null or missense mutations) as well as which cells are affected. Cumulatively, LSDs place a significant burden on patients and their families, causing much in the way of morbidity and mortality. Currently, there is no cure for any LSD. This review will describe currently available treatment options for LSD patients, and then focus upon gene therapy prospects for various LSDs. Worldwide, researchers have accumulated significant data in humans affected by LSDs, as well as several small and large animal models. As a result, various viral and non-viral gene transfer platforms have been developed and specifically optimized to treat LSDs. In this review we will describe advances suggesting that the LSDs may be some of the most amenable diseases to treat by gene therapy based approaches. However, to overcome the several remaining limitations encountered by these approaches, a deep understanding of the biology of the LSDs is required, as well as the host innate and adaptive immune responses to the act of gene transfer.

  8. Trex1 regulates lysosomal biogenesis and interferon-independent activation of antiviral genes

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Maroof; Koch, James; Rakheja, Dinesh; Pattnaik, Asit K.; Brugarolas, James; Dozmorov, Igor; Levine, Beth; Wakeland, Edward K.; Lee-kirsch, Min Ae; Yan, Nan

    2012-01-01

    Innate immune sensing of viral nucleic acids triggers type I interferon (IFN) production, which activates interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and directs a multifaceted antiviral response. ISGs can also be activated through IFN-independent pathways, although the precise mechanisms remain elusive. Here we found that the cytosolic exonuclease Trex1 regulates the activation of a subset of ISGs independently of IFN. Both Trex1−/− mouse and TREX1-mutant human cells express high levels of antiviral genes and are refractory to viral infections. The IFN-independent activation of antiviral genes in Trex1−/− cells requires STING, TBK1 and IRF3 and IRF7. We also found that Trex1-deficient cells display expanded lysosomal compartment, altered subcellular localization of the transcription factor EB (TFEB), and reduced mTORC1 activity. Together, our data identify Trex1 as a regulator of lysosomal biogenesis and IFN-independent activation of antiviral genes, and shows dysregulation of lysosomes can elicit innate immune responses. PMID:23160154

  9. Arsenite exposure in human lymphoblastoid cell lines induces autophagy and coordinated induction of lysosomal genes.

    PubMed

    Bolt, Alicia M; Douglas, Randi M; Klimecki, Walter T

    2010-11-30

    Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic is associated with diverse, complex diseases, making the identification of the mechanism underlying arsenic-induced toxicity a challenge. An increasing body of literature from epidemiological and in vitro studies has demonstrated that arsenic is an immunotoxicant, but the mechanism driving arsenic-induced immunotoxicity is not well established. We have previously demonstrated that in human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), arsenic-induced cell death is strongly associated with the induction of autophagy. In this study we utilized genome-wide gene expression analysis and functional assays to characterize arsenic-induced effects in seven LCLs that were exposed to an environmentally relevant, minimally cytotoxic, concentration of arsenite (0.75 μM) over an eight-day time course. Arsenic exposure resulted in inhibition of cellular growth and induction of autophagy (measured by expansion of acidic vesicles) over the eight-day exposure duration. Gene expression analysis revealed that arsenic exposure increased global lysosomal gene expression, which was associated with increased functional activity of the lysosome protease, cathepsin D. The arsenic-induced expansion of the lysosomal compartment in LCL represents a novel target that may offer insight into the immunotoxic effects of arsenic. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Pharmacological Chaperone Therapy: Preclinical Development, Clinical Translation, and Prospects for the Treatment of Lysosomal Storage Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Parenti, Giancarlo; Andria, Generoso; Valenzano, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a group of inborn metabolic diseases caused by mutations in genes that encode proteins involved in different lysosomal functions, in most instances acidic hydrolases. Different therapeutic approaches have been developed to treat these disorders. Pharmacological chaperone therapy (PCT) is an emerging approach based on small-molecule ligands that selectively bind and stabilize mutant enzymes, increase their cellular levels, and improve lysosomal trafficking and activity. Compared to other approaches, PCT shows advantages, particularly in terms of oral administration, broad biodistribution, and positive impact on patients' quality of life. After preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies, PCT is now being translated in the first clinical trials, either as monotherapy or in combination with enzyme replacement therapy, for some of the most prevalent LSDs. For some LSDs, the results of the first clinical trials are encouraging and warrant further development. Future research in the field of PCT will be directed toward the identification of novel chaperones, including new allosteric drugs, and the exploitation of synergies between chaperone treatment and other therapeutic approaches. PMID:25881001

  11. Substrate deprivation: a new therapeutic approach for the glycosphingolipid lysosomal storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Platt, F M; Butters, T D

    2000-02-01

    The glycosphingolipid (GSL) lysosomal storage diseases are a family of human metabolic diseases that, in their severest forms, cause death in early infancy, as a result of progressive neurodegeneration. They are caused by mutations in the genes encoding the glycohydrolases or the activator proteins that catabolise GSLs within lysosomes. In these diseases the GSL substrate of the defective enzyme accumulates in the lysosome, where it is stored and leads to cellular dysfunction and disease. The therapeutic options for treating these diseases are relatively limited; in fact, there are currently no available therapies for most of these disorders. The problem is further compounded by difficulties in delivering therapeutic agents to the central nervous system, which is where the pathology is frequently manifested. To date, research effort has mainly focused on strategies for augmenting enzyme concentrations to compensate for the underlying defect. These strategies include bone-marrow transplantation, enzyme-replacement therapy and gene therapy. Our group has been exploring the alternative strategy of substrate deprivation. This approach aims to balance the rate of GSL synthesis with the impaired rate of GSL breakdown. Studies using an asymptomatic mouse model of Tay-Sachs disease have shown that substrate deprivation prevents GSL storage. In a severe neurodegenerative mouse model of Sandhoff disease, substrate deprivation delayed the onset of symptoms and disease progression, and significantly increased life expectancy. The implications of this research for human therapy have been discussed.

  12. Quantitative Differences in the Urinary Proteome of Siblings Discordant for Type 1 Diabetes Include Lysosomal Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Suh, Moo-Jin; Tovchigrechko, Andrey; Thovarai, Vishal; Rolfe, Melanie A; Torralba, Manolito G; Wang, Junmin; Adkins, Joshua N; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M; Osborne, Whitney; Cogen, Fran R; Kaplowitz, Paul B; Metz, Thomas O; Nelson, Karen E; Madupu, Ramana; Pieper, Rembert

    2015-08-07

    Individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) often have higher than normal blood glucose levels, causing advanced glycation end product formation and inflammation and increasing the risk of vascular complications years or decades later. To examine the urinary proteome in juveniles with T1D for signatures indicative of inflammatory consequences of hyperglycemia, we profiled the proteome of 40 T1D patients with an average of 6.3 years after disease onset and normal or elevated HbA1C levels, in comparison with a cohort of 41 healthy siblings. Using shotgun proteomics, 1036 proteins were identified, on average, per experiment, and 50 proteins showed significant abundance differences using a Wilcoxon signed-rank test (FDR q-value ≤ 0.05). Thirteen lysosomal proteins were increased in abundance in the T1D versus control cohort. Fifteen proteins with functional roles in vascular permeability and adhesion were quantitatively changed, including CD166 antigen and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2. α-N-Acetyl-galactosaminidase and α-fucosidase 2, two differentially abundant lysosomal enzymes, were detected in western blots with often elevated quantities in the T1D versus control cohort. Increased release of proteins derived from lysosomes and vascular epithelium into urine may result from hyperglycemia-associated inflammation in the kidney vasculature.

  13. SPE-39 Family Proteins Interact with the HOPS Complex and Function in Lysosomal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guang-dan; Salazar, Gloria; Zlatic, Stephanie A.; Fiza, Babar; Doucette, Michele M.; Heilman, Craig J.; Levey, Allan I.

    2009-01-01

    Yeast and animal homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting (HOPS) complexes contain conserved subunits, but HOPS-mediated traffic in animals might require additional proteins. Here, we demonstrate that SPE-39 homologues, which are found only in animals, are present in RAB5-, RAB7-, and RAB11-positive endosomes where they play a conserved role in lysosomal delivery and probably function via their interaction with the core HOPS complex. Although Caenorhabditis elegans spe-39 mutants were initially identified as having abnormal vesicular biogenesis during spermatogenesis, we show that these mutants also have disrupted processing of endocytosed proteins in oocytes and coelomocytes. C. elegans SPE-39 interacts in vitro with both VPS33A and VPS33B, whereas RNA interference of VPS33B causes spe-39–like spermatogenesis defects. The human SPE-39 orthologue C14orf133 also interacts with VPS33 homologues and both coimmunoprecipitates and cosediments with other HOPS subunits. SPE-39 knockdown in cultured human cells altered the morphology of syntaxin 7-, syntaxin 8-, and syntaxin 13-positive endosomes. These effects occurred concomitantly with delayed mannose 6-phosphate receptor-mediated cathepsin D delivery and degradation of internalized epidermal growth factor receptors. Our findings establish that SPE-39 proteins are a previously unrecognized regulator of lysosomal delivery and that C. elegans spermatogenesis is an experimental system useful for identifying conserved regulators of metazoan lysosomal biogenesis. PMID:19109425

  14. Methods of analysis of the membrane trafficking pathway from recycling endosomes to lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takahide; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2014-01-01

    The transferrin receptor (TfR) is responsible for iron uptake through its trafficking between the plasma membrane and recycling endosomes, and as a result it has become a well-known marker for recycling endosomes. Although the molecular basis of the TfR recycling pathway has been thoroughly investigated, the TfR degradation mechanism has been poorly understood. Exposure of cultured cells to two drugs, the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide and the V-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin A1, recently showed that TfR is not only recycled back to the plasma membrane after endocytosis but is constitutively transported to lysosomes for degradation. The results of genome-wide screening of mouse Rab small GTPases (common regulators of membrane trafficking in all eukaryotes) have indicated that Rab12 regulates TfR trafficking to lysosomes independently of the known membrane trafficking pathways, for example, the conventional endocytic pathway and recycling pathway. This chapter summarizes the methods that the authors used to analyze the membrane trafficking pathway from recycling endosomes to lysosomes that is specifically regulated by Rab12. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Prevention of Lysosomal Storage Diseases and Derivation of Mutant Stem Cell Lines by Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Altarescu, Gheona; Beeri, Rachel; Eiges, Rachel; Epsztejn-Litman, Silvina; Eldar-Geva, Talia; Elstein, Deborah; Zimran, Ari; Margalioth, Ehud J.; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Renbaum, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) allows birth of unaffected children for couples at risk for a genetic disorder. We present the strategy and outcome of PGD for four lysosomal storage disorders (LSD): Tay-Sachs disease (TSD), Gaucher disease (GD), Fabry disease (FD), and Hunter syndrome (HS), and subsequent development of stem cell lines. For each disease, we developed a family-specific fluorescent multiplex single-cell PCR protocol that included the familial mutation and informative markers surrounding the mutation. Embryo biopsy and PGD analysis were performed on either oocytes (polar bodies one and two) or on single blastomeres from a six-cell embryo. We treated twenty families carrying mutations in these lysosomal storage disorders, including 3 couples requiring simultaneous analysis for two disorders (TSD/GD, TSD/balanced Robertsonian translocation 45XYder(21;14), and HS/oculocutaneus albinism). These analyses led to an overall pregnancy rate/embryo transfer of 38% and the birth of 20 unaffected children from 17 families. We have found that PGD for lysosomal disorders is a safe and effective method to prevent birth of affected children. In addition, by using mutant embryos for the derivation of stem cell lines, we have successfully established GD and HS hESC lines for use as valuable models in LSD research. PMID:23320174

  16. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is responsible for the lysosomal degradation of dopamine D3 receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohan; Sun, Ningning; Zheng, Mei; Kim, Kyeong-Man

    2016-08-05

    GRK2-/β-Arrestin- and PKA-/PKC-mediated desensitization, internalization, and degradation are three representative pathways for regulating G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Compared with GRK2/β-arrestin-mediated ones, functional relationship among the aforementioned three regulatory processes mediated by PKA/PKC is less clear. Dopamine D3 receptor (D3R), a major target of currently available antipsychotic drugs, is a typical GPCR that selectively undergoes PKC-mediated regulation. In the present study, we examined PKC-mediated internalization of D3R in correlation with its roles in desensitization and degradation. Our results showed that the kinase activity of PKCβII and the 229th and 257th serine residues of D3R were required for PKC-mediated desensitization, internalization, and degradation of D3R. PMA treatment ubiquitinated D3R and induced its degradation through lysosomal pathway. Blockade of clathrin-mediated internalization inhibited PKC-mediated lysosomal degradation of D3R but did not affect its desensitization. These results suggested that PKC-mediated phosphorylation of D3R involved clathrin-mediated internalization, which was important for the lysosomal degradation of D3R. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Prevention of lysosomal storage diseases and derivation of mutant stem cell lines by preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Altarescu, Gheona; Beeri, Rachel; Eiges, Rachel; Epsztejn-Litman, Silvina; Eldar-Geva, Talia; Elstein, Deborah; Zimran, Ari; Margalioth, Ehud J; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Renbaum, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) allows birth of unaffected children for couples at risk for a genetic disorder. We present the strategy and outcome of PGD for four lysosomal storage disorders (LSD): Tay-Sachs disease (TSD), Gaucher disease (GD), Fabry disease (FD), and Hunter syndrome (HS), and subsequent development of stem cell lines. For each disease, we developed a family-specific fluorescent multiplex single-cell PCR protocol that included the familial mutation and informative markers surrounding the mutation. Embryo biopsy and PGD analysis were performed on either oocytes (polar bodies one and two) or on single blastomeres from a six-cell embryo. We treated twenty families carrying mutations in these lysosomal storage disorders, including 3 couples requiring simultaneous analysis for two disorders (TSD/GD, TSD/balanced Robertsonian translocation 45XYder(21;14), and HS/oculocutaneus albinism). These analyses led to an overall pregnancy rate/embryo transfer of 38% and the birth of 20 unaffected children from 17 families. We have found that PGD for lysosomal disorders is a safe and effective method to prevent birth of affected children. In addition, by using mutant embryos for the derivation of stem cell lines, we have successfully established GD and HS hESC lines for use as valuable models in LSD research.

  18. AMPK Inhibits ULK1-Dependent Autophagosome Formation and Lysosomal Acidification via Distinct Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nwadike, Chinwendu; Williamson, Leon E; Gallagher, Laura E; Guan, Jun-Lin; Chan, Edmond Y W

    2018-05-15

    Autophagy maintains metabolism in response to starvation, but each nutrient is sensed distinctly. Amino acid deficiency suppresses mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (MTORC1), while glucose deficiency promotes AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). The MTORC1 and AMPK signaling pathways converge onto the ULK1/2 autophagy initiation complex. Here, we show that amino acid starvation promoted formation of ULK1- and sequestosome 1/p62-positive early autophagosomes. Autophagosome initiation was controlled by MTORC1 sensing glutamine, leucine, and arginine levels together. In contrast, glucose starvation promoted AMPK activity, phosphorylation of ULK1 Ser555, and LC3-II accumulation, but with dynamics consistent with a block in autophagy flux. We studied the flux pathway and found that starvation of amino acid but not of glucose activated lysosomal acidification, which occurred independently of autophagy and ULK1. In addition to lack of activation, glucose starvation inhibited the ability of amino acid starvation to activate both autophagosome formation and the lysosome. Activation of AMPK and phosphorylation of ULK1 were determined to specifically inhibit autophagosome formation. AMPK activation also was sufficient to prevent lysosome acidification. These results indicate concerted but distinct AMPK-dependent mechanisms to suppress early and late phases of autophagy. Copyright © 2018 Nwadike et al.

  19. Intercellular communication via the endo-lysosomal system: translocation of granzymes through membrane barriers.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Sarah E; D'Angelo, Michael E; Bird, Phillip I

    2012-01-01

    Cytotoxic lymphocytes (CLs) are responsible for the clearance of virally infected or neoplastic cells. CLs possess specialised lysosome-related organelles called granules which contain the granzyme family of serine proteases and perforin. Granzymes may induce apoptosis in the target cell when delivered by the pore forming protein, perforin. Here we follow the perforin-granzyme pathway from synthesis and storage in the granule, to exocytosis and finally delivery into the target cell. This review focuses on the controversial subject of perforin-mediated translocation of granzymes into the target cell cytoplasm. It remains unclear whether this occurs at the cell surface with granzymes moving through a perforin pore in the plasma membrane, or if it involves internalisation of perforin and granzymes and subsequent release from an endocytic compartment. The latter mechanism would represent an example of cross talk between the endo-lysosomal pathways of individual cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteolysis 50 years after the discovery of lysosome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Nicotinamide Inhibits the Lysosomal Cathepsin b-like Protease and Kills African Trypanosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Unciti-Broceta, Juan D.; Maceira, José; Morales, Sonia; García-Pérez, Angélica; Muñóz-Torres, Manuel E.; Garcia-Salcedo, Jose A.

    2013-01-01

    Nicotinamide, a soluble compound of the vitamin B3 group, has antimicrobial activity against several microorganisms ranging from viruses to parasite protozoans. However, the mode of action of this antimicrobial activity is unknown. Here, we investigate the trypanocidal activity of nicotinamide on Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African trypanosomiasis. Incubation of trypanosomes with nicotinamide causes deleterious defects in endocytic traffic, disruption of the lysosome, failure of cytokinesis, and, ultimately, cell death. At the same concentrations there was no effect on a cultured mammalian cell line. The effects on endocytosis and vesicle traffic were visible within 3 h and can be attributed to inhibition of lysosomal cathepsin b-like protease activity. The inhibitory effect of nicotinamide was confirmed by a direct activity assay of recombinant cathepsin b-like protein. Taken together, these data demonstrate that inhibition of the lysosomal protease cathepsin b-like blocks endocytosis, causing cell death. In addition, these results demonstrate for the first time the inhibitory effect of nicotinamide on a protease. PMID:23443665

  1. Coumarinocoumarin-Based Two-Photon Fluorescent Cysteine Biosensor for Targeting Lysosome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunyang; Zhou, Liuqing; Liu, Wei; Liu, Weisheng

    2018-05-01

    Coumarinocoumarin, one of the coumarin derivatives, is easy to synthesize and has rich modification sites. The large conjugate plane of coumarinocoumarin gives it a more excellent optical property than conventional coumarin, for example, the two-photon fluorescence property. So, the coumarinocoumarin-based probe (CCy) has been designed and synthesized, which is the first lysosomal targeting fluorescent biosensor for cysteine. This probe was prepared by a three-step procedure as a latent fluorescence probe to achieve high sensitivity and fluorescence turn-on response toward cysteine (Cys) over homocysteine (Hcy), glutathione (GSH), and other various natural amino acids under physiological conditions. Upon addition of Cys to the solution of CCy, remarkable enhancement on 520 nm of fluorescence spectra can be monitored. This probe was then successfully used for fluorescence imaging of Cys in mice organ tissues and HeLa cells, and quantitative determination has been achieved within a certain range, which proved the permeability of CCy. The concentration of Cys in animal serum was measured and the viability exceeded 80%, indicating that CCy can be a biocompatible and rapid probe for Cys in vivo. Simultaneously, its ability to detect Cys in lysosome has been validated by its lysosomal targeting.

  2. How and why intralumenal membrane fragments form during vacuolar lysosome fusion

    PubMed Central

    Mattie, Sevan; McNally, Erin K.; Karim, Mahmoud A.; Vali, Hojatollah; Brett, Christopher L.

    2017-01-01

    Lysosomal membrane fusion mediates the last step of the autophagy and endocytosis pathways and supports organelle remodeling and biogenesis. Because fusogenic proteins and lipids concentrate in a ring at the vertex between apposing organelle membranes, the encircled area of membrane can be severed and internalized within the lumen as a fragment upon lipid bilayer fusion. How or why this intralumenal fragment forms during fusion, however, is not entirely clear. To better understand this process, we studied fragment formation during homotypic vacuolar lysosome membrane fusion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using cell-free fusion assays and light microscopy, we find that GTPase activation and trans-SNARE complex zippering have opposing effects on fragment formation and verify that this affects the morphology of the fusion product and regulates transporter protein degradation. We show that fragment formwation is limited by stalk expansion, a key intermediate of the lipid bilayer fusion reaction. Using electron microscopy, we present images of hemifusion diaphragms that form as stalks expand and propose a model describing how the fusion machinery regulates fragment formation during lysosome fusion to control morphology and protein lifetimes. PMID:27881666

  3. The influence of lysosomal stability of silver nanomaterials on their toxicity to human cells.

    PubMed

    Setyawati, Magdiel Inggrid; Yuan, Xun; Xie, Jianping; Leong, David Tai

    2014-08-01

    How silver nanomaterials (Ag NMs) could induce toxicity has been debated heatedly by many researchers. We utilized Ag nanoclusters (Ag NCs) with the same size and ligand protection but different core surface speciation. Ag(+)-rich NCs (Ag(+)-R NCs) and their counterpart, the reduced Ag(0)-rich NCs (Ag(0)-R NCs) are synthesized to represent possible dichotomous stages in silver nanomaterial degradation process. Here we show Ag(0)-R NCs induce higher cellular toxicity when compared to Ag(+)-R NCs. This cellular toxicity is brought about via the modulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells as a result of the more rapid release of Ag species from Ag(0)-R NCs and subsequent oxidation into Ag(+) in the lysosomal compartment. The weaker Ag(0)-R bond greatly potentiated the release of Ag species in the acidic and enzymatic processes within the lysosomes. Since lysosomes are absent in bacteria, increasing silver nanomaterials stability may lower toxicity in mammalian cells whilst not reducing their efficacy to fight bacteria; this redesign can result in a safer silver nanomaterial. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Acid sphingomyelinase modulates the autophagic process by controlling lysosomal biogenesis in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Kil; Jin, Hee Kyung; Park, Min Hee; Kim, Bo-ra; Lee, Phil Hyu; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Carter, Janet E; He, Xingxuan; Schuchman, Edward H; Bae, Jae-sung

    2014-07-28

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), abnormal sphingolipid metabolism has been reported, although the pathogenic consequences of these changes have not been fully characterized. We show that acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is increased in fibroblasts, brain, and/or plasma from patients with AD and in AD mice, leading to defective autophagic degradation due to lysosomal depletion. Partial genetic inhibition of ASM (ASM(+/-)) in a mouse model of familial AD (FAD; amyloid precursor protein [APP]/presenilin 1 [PS1]) ameliorated the autophagocytic defect by restoring lysosomal biogenesis, resulting in improved AD clinical and pathological findings, including reduction of amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition and improvement of memory impairment. Similar effects were noted after pharmacologic restoration of ASM to the normal range in APP/PS1 mice. Autophagic dysfunction in neurons derived from FAD patient induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) was restored by partial ASM inhibition. Overall, these results reveal a novel mechanism of ASM pathogenesis in AD that leads to defective autophagy due to impaired lysosomal biogenesis and suggests that partial ASM inhibition is a potential new therapeutic intervention for the disease. © 2014 Lee et al.

  5. U1 small nuclear RNA overexpression implicates autophagic-lysosomal system associated with AD.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhi; Du, Zhanqiang; Zhai, Baohui; Yang, Zhuo; Zhang, Tao

    2018-01-29

    Recently, we reported that presenilin 1 considerably increased the expression level of U1 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) accompanied with the adverse change of amyloid precursor protein (APP) expression, β-amyloid (Aβ) production and cell apoptosis. In the present study, it was found that U1 snRNA overexpression significantly elevated the expression level of autophagy. Moreover, rapamycin further enhanced the Aβ production and cell apoptosis, whereas these processes were effectively inhibited by 3-MA. Acridine orange staining images showed that U1 snRNA overexpression not only activated autophagy pathway, but also led to the autophagic-lysosomal system dysfunction in cells. Immunofluorescence assay showed autophagic vacuoles localization with APP, which was the precursor protein of main component of toxic protein in AD. Meanwhile, the superoxide dismutase activity was remarkably decreased and MDA level was significantly increased by U1 snRNA overexpression in cells, suggesting that there was a possible pathway to elucidate how the U1 snRNA overexpression induced cell damage. We further found that U1 snRNA overexpression altered lysosomal biogenesis and autophagic-lysosomal fusion. In combination with our previous results, it suggests that the malfunction of autophagy pathway provides important insight into molecular mechanisms of augment the aggregation of Aβ and induction of cell apoptosis contributed to AD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Wolman's disease and cholesteryl ester storage disorder: the phenotypic spectrum of lysosomal acid lipase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pericleous, Marinos; Kelly, Claire; Wang, Tim; Livingstone, Callum; Ala, Aftab

    2017-09-01

    Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency is a rare, autosomal recessive condition caused by mutations in the gene encoding lysosomal acid lipase (LIPA) that result in reduced or absent activity of this essential enzyme. The severity of the resulting disease depends on the nature of the underlying mutation and magnitude of its effect on enzymatic function. Wolman's disease is a severe disorder that presents during infancy, resulting in failure to thrive, hepatomegaly, and hepatic failure, and an average life expectancy of less than 4 months. Cholesteryl ester storage disorder arises later in life and is less severe, although the two diseases share many common features, including dyslipidaemia and transaminitis. The prevalence of these diseases has been estimated at one in 40 000 to 300 000, but many cases are undiagnosed and unreported, and awareness among clinicians is low. Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency-which can be diagnosed using dry blood spot testing-is often misdiagnosed as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), hereditary dyslipidaemia, or cryptogenic cirrhosis. There are no formal guidelines for treatment of these patients, and treatment options are limited. In this Review we appraise the existing literature on Wolman's disease and cholesteryl ester storage disease, and discuss available treatments, including enzyme replacement therapy, oral lipid-lowering therapy, stem-cell transplantation, and liver transplantation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Pharmacologic manipulation of lysosomal enzyme transport across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Urayama, Akihiko; Grubb, Jeffrey H; Sly, William S; Banks, William A

    2016-03-01

    The adult blood-brain barrier, unlike the neonatal blood-brain barrier, does not transport lysosomal enzymes into brain, making enzyme replacement therapy ineffective in treating the central nervous system symptoms of lysosomal storage diseases. However, enzyme transport can be re-induced with alpha-adrenergics. Here, we examined agents that are known to alter the blood-brain barrier transport of large molecules or to induce lysosomal enzyme transport across the blood-brain barrier ((±)epinephrine, insulin, retinoic acid, and lipopolysaccharide) in 2-week-old and adult mice. In 2-week-old adolescent mice, all these pharmacologic agents increased brain and heart uptake of phosphorylated human β-glucuronidase. In 8-week-old adult mice, manipulations with (±)epinephrine, insulin, and retinoic acid were significantly effective on uptake by brain and heart. The increased uptake of phosphorylated human β-glucuronidase was inhibited by mannose 6-phosphate for the agents (±)epinephrine and retinoic acid and by L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester for the agent lipopolysaccharide in neonatal and adult mice. An in situ brain perfusion study revealed that retinoic acid directly modulated the transport of phosphorylated human β-glucuronidase across the blood-brain barrier. The present study indicates that there are multiple opportunities to at least transiently induce phosphorylated human β-glucuronidase transport at the adult blood-brain barrier. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Alpha Adrenergic Induction of Transport of Lysosomal Enzyme across the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Urayama, Akihiko; Dohgu, Shinya; Robinson, Sandra M; Sly, William S; Grubb, Jeffery H; Banks, William A

    2015-01-01

    The impermeability of the adult blood-brain barrier (BBB) to lysosomal enzymes impedes the ability to treat the central nervous system manifestations of lysosomal storage diseases. Here, we found that simultaneous stimulation of the alpha1 and alpha2 adrenoreceptor restores in adult mice the high rate of transport for the lysosomal enzyme P-GUS that is seen in neonates but lost with development. Beta adrenergics, other monoamines, and acetylcholine did not restore this transport. A high dose (500 microg/mouse) of clonidine, a strong alpha2 and weak alpha1 agonist, was able to act as monotherapy in the stimulation of P-GUS transport. Neither use of alpha1 plus alpha2 agonists nor the high dose clonidine disrupted the BBB to albumin. In situ brain perfusion and immunohistochemistry studies indicated that adrengerics act on transporters already at the luminal surface of brain endothelial cells. These results show that adrenergic stimulation, including monotherapy with clonidine, could be key for CNS enzyme replacement therapy.

  9. Lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP-1) in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Barrachina, M; Maes, T; Buesa, C; Ferrer, I

    2006-10-01

    Lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP-1) is a glycoprotein highly expressed in lysosomal membranes. The present study was initiated to test LAMP-1 mRNA and protein levels in post mortem frontal cortex (area 8) of Alzheimer's disease (AD) stages I-IIA/B and stages V-VIC of Braak and Braak, compared with age-matched controls. TaqMan PCR assays and Western blots demonstrated upregulation of LAMP-1 mRNA and protein in the cerebral cortex in ADVC. In addition, immunohistochemical studies have shown increased LAMP-1 immunoreactivity in neurones, and in glial cells surrounding senile plaques, in AD cases. Interestingly, LAMP-1 immunoreactivity has little correlation with phosphorylated tau deposition and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), as neurones with NFTs were rarely LAMP-1 immunoreactive. In contrast, LAMP-1 expression was enhanced in neurones with granulovacuolar degeneration. Finally, LAMP-1 occurred in microglia and multinucleated giant cells in one AD case in whom amyloid burden was cleared following betaA-peptide immunization. These findings support the participation of lysosomes in betaA-amyloid and, probably, in hyperphosphorylated tau turnover in AD.

  10. Filamin A stabilizes Fc gamma RI surface expression and prevents its lysosomal routing.

    PubMed

    Beekman, Jeffrey M; van der Poel, Cees E; van der Linden, Joke A; van den Berg, Debbie L C; van den Berghe, Peter V E; van de Winkel, Jan G J; Leusen, Jeanette H W

    2008-03-15

    Filamin A, or actin-binding protein 280, is a ubiquitously expressed cytosolic protein that interacts with intracellular domains of multiple receptors to control their subcellular distribution, and signaling capacity. In this study, we document interaction between FcgammaRI, a high-affinity IgG receptor, and filamin A by yeast two-hybrid techniques and coimmunoprecipitation. Both proteins colocalized at the plasma membrane in monocytes, but dissociated upon FcgammaRI triggering. The filamin-deficient cell line M2 and a filamin-reconstituted M2 subclone (A7), were used to further study FcgammaRI-filamin interactions. FcgammaRI transfection in A7 cells with filamin resulted in high plasma membrane expression levels. In filamin-deficient M2 cells and in filamin RNA-interference studies, FcgammaRI surface expression was consistently reduced. FcgammaRI localized to LAMP-1-positive vesicles in the absence of filamin as shown by confocal microscopy indicative for lysosomal localization. Mouse IgG2a capture experiments suggested a transient membrane expression of FcgammaRI before being transported to the lysosomes. These data support a pivotal role for filamin in FcgammaRI surface expression via retention of FcgammaRI from a default lysosomal pathway.

  11. LAMP-3 (Lysosome-Associated Membrane Protein 3) Promotes the Intracellular Proliferation of Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Ju; Park, Kwan-Sik; Jeon, In-Sook; Choi, Jae-Woon; Lee, Sang-Jeon; Choy, Hyun E.; Song, Ki-Duk; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Choi, Joong-Kook

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are cellular organelles containing diverse classes of catabolic enzymes that are implicated in diverse cellular processes including phagocytosis, autophagy, lipid transport, and aging. Lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMP-1 and LAMP-2) are major glycoproteins important for maintaining lysosomal integrity, pH, and catabolism. LAMP-1 and LAMP-2 are constitutively expressed in Salmonella-infected cells and are recruited to Salmonella-containing vacuoles (SCVs) as well as Salmonella-induced filaments (Sifs) that promote the survival and proliferation of the Salmonella. LAMP-3, also known as DC-LAMP/CD208, is a member of the LAMP family of proteins, but its role during Salmonella infection remains unclear. DNA microarray analysis identified LAMP-3 as one of the genes responding to LPS stimulation in THP-1 macrophage cells. Subsequent analyses reveal that LPS and Salmonella induced the expression of LAMP-3 at both the transcriptional and translational levels. Confocal Super resolution N-SIM imaging revealed that LAMP-3, like LAMP-2, shifts its localization from the cell surface to alongside Salmonella. Knockdown of LAMP-3 by specific siRNAs decreased the number of Salmonella recovered from the infected cells. Therefore, we conclude that LAMP-3 is induced by Salmonella infection and recruited to the Salmonella pathogen for intracellular proliferation. PMID:27329040

  12. syk protein tyrosine kinase regulates Fc receptor gamma-chain-mediated transport to lysosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Bonnerot, C; Briken, V; Brachet, V; Lankar, D; Cassard, S; Jabri, B; Amigorena, S

    1998-01-01

    B- and T-cell receptors, as well as most Fc receptors (FcR), are part of a large family of membrane proteins named immunoreceptors and are expressed on all cells of the immune system. Immunoreceptors' biological functions rely on two of their fundamental attributes: signal transduction and internalization. The signals required for these two functions are present in the chains associated with immunoreceptors, within conserved amino acid motifs called immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs). We have examined the role of the protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) syk, a critical effector of immunoreceptor-mediated cell signalling through ITAMs, in FcR-associated gamma-chain internalization and lysosomal targeting. A point mutation in the immunoreceptor-associated gamma-chain ITAM affecting syk activation, as well as overexpression of a syk dominant negative mutant, inhibited signal transduction without affecting receptor coated-pit localization or internalization. In contrast, blocking of gamma-chain-mediated syk activation impaired FcR transport from endosomes to lysosomes and selectively inhibited the presentation of certain T-cell epitopes. Therefore, activation of the PTK syk is dispensable for receptor internalization, but necessary for cell signalling and for gamma-chain-mediated FcR delivery to lysosomes. PMID:9707420

  13. Toxic detection in mine water based on proteomic analysis of lysosomal enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Tu; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Bang, Seung Hyuck; Hong, Ji Hye; Kwon, Soon Dong; Min, Jiho

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Lysosome is the cell-organelle which is commonly used as biomonitoring tool in environmental pollution. In this study, the lysosomal proteomic of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was analyzed for utilization in the detection of toxic substances in mine water samples. Methods This work informs the expression of lysosomal proteomic in yeast in response with toxic chemicals, such as sodium meta-arsenite and tetracycline, for screening specific biomarkers. After that, a recombinant yeast contained this biomarker were constructed for toxic detection in pure toxic chemicals and mine water samples. Results Each chemical had an optimal dose at which the fluorescent protein intensity reached the peak. In the case of water samples, the yeast showed the response with sample 1, 3, 4, and 5; whereas there is no response with sample 2, 6, and 7. Conclusions The recombinant yeast showed a high ability of toxic detection in response with several chemicals such as heavy metals and pharmaceuticals. In the case of mine water samples, the response varied depending on the sample content. PMID:25384384

  14. Starch Binding Domain-containing Protein 1 Plays a Dominant Role in Glycogen Transport to Lysosomes in Liver.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Yi, Haiqing; Yang, Chunyu; Kishnani, Priya S; Sun, Baodong

    2016-08-05

    A small portion of cellular glycogen is transported to and degraded in lysosomes by acid α-glucosidase (GAA) in mammals, but it is unclear why and how glycogen is transported to the lysosomes. Stbd1 has recently been proposed to participate in glycogen trafficking to lysosomes. However, our previous study demonstrated that knockdown of Stbd1 in GAA knock-out mice did not alter lysosomal glycogen storage in skeletal muscles. To further determine whether Stbd1 participates in glycogen transport to lysosomes, we generated GAA/Stbd1 double knock-out mice. In fasted double knock-out mice, glycogen accumulation in skeletal and cardiac muscles was not affected, but glycogen content in liver was reduced by nearly 73% at 3 months of age and by 60% at 13 months as compared with GAA knock-out mice, indicating that the transport of glycogen to lysosomes was suppressed in liver by the loss of Stbd1. Exogenous expression of human Stbd1 in double knock-out mice restored the liver lysosomal glycogen content to the level of GAA knock-out mice, as did a mutant lacking the Atg8 family interacting motif (AIM) and another mutant that contains only the N-terminal 24 hydrophobic segment and the C-terminal starch binding domain (CBM20) interlinked by an HA tag. Our results demonstrate that Stbd1 plays a dominant role in glycogen transport to lysosomes in liver and that the N-terminal transmembrane region and the C-terminal CBM20 domain are critical for this function. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Endocytic pathway rapidly delivers internalized molecules to lysosomes: an analysis of vesicle trafficking, clustering and mass transfer.

    PubMed

    Pangarkar, Chinmay; Dinh, Anh-Tuan; Mitragotri, Samir

    2012-08-20

    Lysosomes play a critical role in intracellular drug delivery. For enzyme-based therapies, they represent a potential target site whereas for nucleic acid or many protein drugs, they represent the potential degradation site. Either way, understanding the mechanisms and processes involved in routing of materials to lysosomes after cellular entry is of high interest to the field of drug delivery. Most therapeutic cargoes other than small hydrophobic molecules enter the cells through endocytosis. Endocytosed cargoes are routed to lysosomes via microtubule-based transport and are ultimately shared by various lysosomes via tethering and clustering of endocytic vesicles followed by exchange of their contents. Using a combined experimental and numerical approach, here we studied the rates of mass transfer into and among the endocytic vesicles in a model cell line, 3T3 fibroblasts. In order to understand the relationship of mass transfer with microtubular transport and vesicle clustering, we varied both properties through various pharmacological agents. At the same time, microtubular transport and vesicle clustering were modeled through diffusion-advection equations and the Smoluchowski equations, respectively. Our analysis revealed that the rate of mass transfer is optimally related to microtubular transport and clustering properties of vesicles. Further, the rate of mass transfer is highest in the innate state of the cell. Any perturbation to either microtubular transport or vesicle aggregation led to reduced mass transfer to lysosome. These results suggest that in the absence of an external intervention the endocytic pathway appears to maximize molecular delivery to lysosomes. Strategies are discussed to reduce mass transfer to lysosomes so as to extend the residence time of molecules in endosomes or late endosomes, thus potentially increasing the likelihood of their escape before disposition in the lysosomes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Autophagy Facilitates Salmonella Replication in HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong B.; Croxen, Matthew A.; Marchiando, Amanda M.; Ferreira, Rosana B. R.; Cadwell, Ken; Foster, Leonard J.; Finlay, B. Brett

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy is a process whereby a double-membrane structure (autophagosome) engulfs unnecessary cytosolic proteins, organelles, and invading pathogens and delivers them to the lysosome for degradation. We examined the fate of cytosolic Salmonella targeted by autophagy and found that autophagy-targeted Salmonella present in the cytosol of HeLa cells correlates with intracellular bacterial replication. Real-time analyses revealed that a subset of cytosolic Salmonella extensively associates with autophagy components p62 and/or LC3 and replicates quickly, whereas intravacuolar Salmonella shows no or very limited association with p62 or LC3 and replicates much more slowly. Replication of cytosolic Salmonella in HeLa cells is significantly decreased when autophagy components are depleted. Eventually, hyperreplication of cytosolic Salmonella potentiates cell detachment, facilitating the dissemination of Salmonella to neighboring cells. We propose that Salmonella benefits from autophagy for its cytosolic replication in HeLa cells. PMID:24618251

  17. Atorvastatin inhibits the apoptosis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells induced by angiotensin II via the lysosomal-mitochondrial axis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ye; Li, Yuan; Ye, Ning; Guo, Xiaofan; Li, Zhao; Sun, Guozhe; Sun, Yingxian

    2016-09-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate lysosomes-mitochondria cross-signaling in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced apoptosis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and whether atorvastatin played a protective role via lysosomal-mitochondrial axis. Apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry, Hoechst 33342 and AO/EB assay. The temporal relationship of lysosomal and mitochondrial permeabilization was established. Activity of Cathepsin D (CTSD) was suppressed by pharmacological and genetic approaches. Proteins production were measured by western blotting. Our study showed that Ang II could induce the apoptosis of HUVECs in a dose-depended and time-depended manner. Exposure to 1 μM Ang II for 24 h resulted in mitochondrial depolarization, cytochrome c release, and increased ROS production. Lysosomal permeabilization and CTSD redistribution into the cytoplasm occurred several hours prior to mitochondrial dysfunction. These effects were all suppressed by atorvastatin. Either pharmacological or genetic inhibition of CTSD preserved mitochondrial function and decreased apoptosis in HUVECs. Most importantly, we found that the protective effect of atorvastatin was significantly greater than pharmacological or genetic inhibition of CTSD. Finally, overexpression of CTSD without exposure to Ang II had no effect on mitochondrial function and apoptosis. Our data strongly suggested that Ang II induced apoptosis through the lysosomal-mitochondrial axis in HUVECs. Furthermore, atorvastatin played an important role in the regulation of lysosomes and mitochondria stability, resulting in an antagonistic role against Ang II on HUVECs.

  18. HGF-induced invasion by prostate tumor cells requires anterograde lysosome trafficking and activity of Na+-H+ exchangers

    PubMed Central

    Steffan, Joshua J.; Williams, Brittany C.; Welbourne, Tomas; Cardelli, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is found in tumor microenvironments, and interaction with its tyrosine kinase receptor Met triggers cell invasion and metastasis. It was previously shown that acidic extracellular pH stimulated peripheral lysosome trafficking, resulting in increased cathepsin B secretion and tumor cell invasion, which was dependent upon sodium-proton exchanger (NHE) activity. We now demonstrate that HGF induced the trafficking of lysosomes to the cell periphery, independent of HGF-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition. HGF-induced anterograde lysosome trafficking depended upon the PI3K pathway, microtubules and RhoA, resulting in increased cathepsin B secretion and invasion by the cells. HGF-induced NHE activity via increased net acid production, and inhibition of NHE activity with 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)-amiloride (EIPA), or a combination of the NHE1-specific drug cariporide and the NHE3-specific drug s3226 prevented HGF-induced anterograde trafficking and induced retrograde trafficking in HGF-overexpressing cells. EIPA treatment reduced cathepsin B secretion and HGF-induced invasion by the tumor cells. Lysosomes were located more peripherally in Rab7-shRNA-expressing cells and these cells were more invasive than control cells. Overexpression of the Rab7 effector protein, RILP, resulted in a juxtanuclear location of lysosomes and reduced HGF-induced invasion. Together, these results suggest that the location of lysosomes is an inherently important aspect of invasion by tumor cells. PMID:20215403

  19. Polyketide synthase (PKS) reduces fusion of Legionella pneumophila-containing vacuoles with lysosomes and contributes to bacterial competitiveness during infection.

    PubMed

    Shevchuk, Olga; Pägelow, Dennis; Rasch, Janine; Döhrmann, Simon; Günther, Gabriele; Hoppe, Julia; Ünal, Can Murat; Bronietzki, Marc; Gutierrez, Maximiliano Gabriel; Steinert, Michael

    2014-11-01

    L. pneumophila-containing vacuoles (LCVs) exclude endocytic and lysosomal markers in human macrophages and protozoa. We screened a L. pneumophila mini-Tn10 transposon library for mutants, which fail to inhibit the fusion of LCVs with lysosomes by loading of the lysosomal compartment with colloidal iron dextran, mechanical lysis of infected host cells, and magnetic isolation of LCVs that have fused with lysosomes. In silico analysis of the mutated genes, D. discoideum plaque assays and infection assays in protozoa and U937 macrophage-like cells identified well established as well as novel putative L. pneumophila virulence factors. Promising candidates were further analyzed for their co-localization with lysosomes in host cells using fluorescence microscopy. This approach corroborated that the O-methyltransferase, PilY1, TPR-containing protein and polyketide synthase (PKS) of L. pneumophila interfere with lysosomal degradation. Competitive infections in protozoa and macrophages revealed that the identified PKS contributes to the biological fitness of pneumophila strains and may explain their prevalence in the epidemiology of Legionnaires' disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Iron-Mediated Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization in Ethanol-Induced Hepatic Oxidative Damage and Apoptosis: Protective Effects of Quercetin.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanyan; Chen, Man; Xu, Yanyan; Yu, Xiao; Xiong, Ting; Du, Min; Sun, Jian; Liu, Liegang; Tang, Yuhan; Yao, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Iron, in its free ferrous states, can catalyze Fenton reaction to produce OH∙, which is recognized as a crucial role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver diseases (ALD). As a result of continuous decomposition of iron-containing compounds, lysosomes contain a pool of redox-active iron. To investigate the important role of intralysosomal iron in alcoholic liver injury and the potential protection of quercetin, male C57BL/6J mice fed by Lieber De Carli diets containing ethanol (30% of total calories) were cotreated by quercetin or deferoxamine (DFO) for 15 weeks and ethanol-incubated mice primary hepatocytes were pretreated with FeCl3, DFO, and bafilomycin A1 at their optimal concentrations and exposure times. Chronic ethanol consumption caused an evident increase in lysosomal redox-active iron accompanying sustained oxidative damage. Iron-mediated ROS could trigger lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and subsequent mitochondria apoptosis. The hepatotoxicity was attenuated by reducing lysosomal iron while being exacerbated by escalating lysosomal iron. Quercetin substantially alleviated the alcoholic liver oxidative damage and apoptosis by decreasing lysosome iron and ameliorating iron-mediated LMP, which provided a new prospective of the use of quercetin against ALD.

  1. Distinct features of multivesicular body-lysosome fusion revealed by a new cell-free content-mixing assay.

    PubMed

    Karim, Mahmoud Abdul; Samyn, Dieter Ronny; Mattie, Sevan; Brett, Christopher Leonard

    2018-02-01

    When marked for degradation, surface receptor and transporter proteins are internalized and delivered to endosomes where they are packaged into intralumenal vesicles (ILVs). Many rounds of ILV formation create multivesicular bodies (MVBs) that fuse with lysosomes exposing ILVs to hydrolases for catabolism. Despite being critical for protein degradation, the molecular underpinnings of MVB-lysosome fusion remain unclear, although machinery underlying other lysosome fusion events is implicated. But how then is specificity conferred? And how is MVB maturation and fusion coordinated for efficient protein degradation? To address these questions, we developed a cell-free MVB-lysosome fusion assay using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model. After confirming that the Rab7 ortholog Ypt7 and the multisubunit tethering complex HOPS (homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting complex) are required, we found that the Qa-SNARE Pep12 distinguishes this event from homotypic lysosome fusion. Mutations that impair MVB maturation block fusion by preventing Ypt7 activation, confirming that a Rab-cascade mechanism harmonizes MVB maturation with lysosome fusion. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Contribution of mitochondria and lysosomes to photodynamic therapy-induced death in cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieminen, Anna-Liisa; Azizuddin, Kashif; Zhang, Ping; Kenney, Malcolm E.; Pediaditakis, Peter; Lemasters, John J.; Oleinick, Nancy L.

    2008-02-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), visible light activates a photosensitizing drug added to a tissue, resulting in singlet oxygen formation and cell death. Employing confocal microscopy, we previously found that the phthalocyanine Pc 4 localized primarily to mitochondrial membranes in various cancer cell lines, resulting in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, followed by inner membrane permeabilization (mitochondrial permeability transition) with mitochondrial depolarization and swelling, which in turn led to cytochrome c release and apoptotic death. Recently, derivatives of Pc 4 with OH groups added to one of the axial ligands were synthesized. These derivatives appeared to be taken up more avidly by cells and caused more cytotoxicity than the parent compound Pc 4. Using organelle-specific fluorophores, we found that one of these derivatives, Pc 181, accumulated into lysosomes and that PDT with Pc 181 caused rapid disintegration of lysosomes. We hypothesized that chelatable iron released from lysosomes during PDT contributes to mitochondrial damage and subsequent cell death. We monitored cytosolic Fe2+ concentrations after PDT with calcein. Fe2+ binds to calcein causing quenching of calcein fluorescence. After bafilomycin, an inhibitor of the vacuolar proton-translocating ATPase, calcein fluorescence became quenched, an effect prevented by starch desferal s-DFO, an iron chelator that enters cells by endocytosis. After Pc 181-PDT, cytosolic calcein fluorescence also decreased, indicating increased chelatable Fe2+ in the cytosol, and apoptosis occurred. s-DFO decreased Pc 181-PDT-induced apoptosis as measured by a decrease of caspase-3 activation. In isolated mitochondria preparations, Fe2+ induced mitochondrial swelling, which was prevented by Ru360, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter. The data support a hypothesis of oxidative injury in which Pc 181-PDT disintegrates lysosomes and releases constituents that synergistically promote

  3. Size-dependent accumulation of particles in lysosomes modulates dendritic cell function through impaired antigen degradation

    PubMed Central

    Seydoux, Emilie; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Nita, Izabela M; Balog, Sandor; Gazdhar, Amiq; Stumbles, Philip A; Petri-Fink, Alke; Blank, Fabian; von Garnier, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nanosized particles may enable therapeutic modulation of immune responses by targeting dendritic cell (DC) networks in accessible organs such as the lung. To date, however, the effects of nanoparticles on DC function and downstream immune responses remain poorly understood. Methods Bone marrow–derived DCs (BMDCs) were exposed in vitro to 20 or 1,000 nm polystyrene (PS) particles. Particle uptake kinetics, cell surface marker expression, soluble protein antigen uptake and degradation, as well as in vitro CD4+ T-cell proliferation and cytokine production were analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, co-localization of particles within the lysosomal compartment, lysosomal permeability, and endoplasmic reticulum stress were analyzed. Results The frequency of PS particle–positive CD11c+/CD11b+ BMDCs reached an early plateau after 20 minutes and was significantly higher for 20 nm than for 1,000 nm PS particles at all time-points analyzed. PS particles did not alter cell viability or modify expression of the surface markers CD11b, CD11c, MHC class II, CD40, and CD86. Although particle exposure did not modulate antigen uptake, 20 nm PS particles decreased the capacity of BMDCs to degrade soluble antigen, without affecting their ability to induce antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell proliferation. Co-localization studies between PS particles and lysosomes using laser scanning confocal microscopy detected a significantly higher frequency of co-localized 20 nm particles as compared with their 1,000 nm counterparts. Neither size of PS particle caused lysosomal leakage, expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress gene markers, or changes in cytokines profiles. Conclusion These data indicate that although supposedly inert PS nanoparticles did not induce DC activation or alteration in CD4+ T-cell stimulating capacity, 20 nm (but not 1,000 nm) PS particles may reduce antigen degradation through interference in the lysosomal compartment. These findings emphasize the

  4. Cytoplasmic nanojunctions between lysosomes and sarcoplasmic reticulum are required for specific calcium signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fameli, Nicola; Ogunbayo, Oluseye A.

    2014-01-01

    Herein we demonstrate how nanojunctions between lysosomes and sarcoplasmic reticulum (L-SR junctions) serve to couple lysosomal activation to regenerative, ryanodine receptor-mediated cellular Ca 2+ waves. In pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) it has been proposed that nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) triggers increases in cytoplasmic Ca 2+ via L-SR junctions, in a manner that requires initial Ca 2+ release from lysosomes and subsequent Ca 2+-induced Ca 2+ release (CICR) via ryanodine receptor (RyR) subtype 3 on the SR membrane proximal to lysosomes. L-SR junction membrane separation has been estimated to be < 400 nm and thus beyond the resolution of light microscopy, which has restricted detailed investigations of the junctional coupling process. The present study utilizes standard and tomographic transmission electron microscopy to provide a thorough ultrastructural characterization of the L-SR junctions in PASMCs. We show that L-SR nanojunctions are prominent features within these cells and estimate that the junctional membrane separation and extension are about 15 nm and 300 nm, respectively. Furthermore, we develop a quantitative model of the L-SR junction using these measurements, prior kinetic and specific Ca 2+ signal information as input data. Simulations of NAADP-dependent junctional Ca 2+ transients demonstrate that the magnitude of these signals can breach the threshold for CICR via RyR3. By correlation analysis of live cell Ca 2+ signals and simulated Ca 2+ transients within L-SR junctions, we estimate that “trigger zones” comprising 60–100 junctions are required to confer a signal of similar magnitude. This is compatible with the 110 lysosomes/cell estimated from our ultrastructural observations. Most importantly, our model shows that increasing the L-SR junctional width above 50 nm lowers the magnitude of junctional [Ca 2+] such that there is a failure to breach the threshold for CICR via RyR3. L-SR junctions are

  5. Modulating lysosomal function through lysosome membrane permeabilization or autophagy suppression restores sensitivity to cisplatin in refractory non-small-cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Circu, Magdalena; Cardelli, James; Barr, Martin; O’Byrne, Kenneth; Mills, Glenn

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Most patients develop resistance to platinum within several months of treatment. We investigated whether triggering lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) or suppressing autophagy can restore cisplatin susceptibility in lung cancer with acquired chemoresistance. Cisplatin IC50 in A549Pt (parental) and A549cisR (cisplatin resistant) cells was 13 μM and 47 μM, respectively. Following cisplatin exposure, A549cisR cells failed to elicit an apoptotic response. This was manifested by diminished Annexin–V staining, caspase 3 and 9, BAX and BAK activation in resistant but not in parental cells. Chloroquine preferentially promoted LMP in A549cisR cells, revealed by leakage of FITC-dextran into the cytosol as detected by immunofluorescence microscopy. This was confirmed by increased cytosolic cathepsin D signal on Immunoblot. Cell viability of cisplatin-treated A549cisR cells was decreased when co-treated with chloroquine, corresponding to a combination index below 0.8, suggesting synergism between the two drugs. Notably, chloroquine activated the mitochondrial cell death pathway as indicated by increase in caspase 9 activity. Interestingly, inhibition of lysosomal proteases using E64 conferred cytoprotection against cisplatin and chloroquine co-treatment, suggesting that chloroquine-induced cell death occurred in a cathepsin-mediated mechanism. Likewise, blockage of caspases partially rescued A549cisR cells against the cytotoxicity of cisplatin and chloroquine combination. Cisplatin promoted a dose-dependent autophagic flux induction preferentially in A549cisR cells, as evidenced by a surge in LC3-II/α-tubulin following pre-treatment with E64 and increase in p62 degradation. Compared to untreated cells, cisplatin induced an increase in cyto-ID-loaded autophagosomes in A549cisR cells that was further amplified by chloroquine, pointing toward autophagic flux activation by cisplatin. Interestingly, this effect

  6. LAPTM4B facilitates late endosomal ceramide export to control cell death pathways.

    PubMed

    Blom, Tomas; Li, Shiqian; Dichlberger, Andrea; Bäck, Nils; Kim, Young Ah; Loizides-Mangold, Ursula; Riezman, Howard; Bittman, Robert; Ikonen, Elina

    2015-10-01

    Lysosome-associated protein transmembrane-4b (LAPTM4B) associates with poor prognosis in several cancers, but its physiological function is not well understood. Here we use novel ceramide probes to provide evidence that LAPTM4B interacts with ceramide and facilitates its removal from late endosomal organelles (LEs). This lowers LE ceramide in parallel with and independent of acid ceramidase-dependent catabolism. In LAPTM4B-silenced cells, LE sphingolipid accumulation is accompanied by lysosomal membrane destabilization. However, these cells resist ceramide-driven caspase-3 activation and apoptosis induced by chemotherapeutic agents or gene silencing. Conversely, LAPTM4B overexpression reduces LE ceramide and stabilizes lysosomes but sensitizes to drug-induced caspase-3 activation. Together, these data uncover a cellular ceramide export route from LEs and identify LAPTM4B as its regulator. By compartmentalizing ceramide, LAPTM4B controls key sphingolipid-mediated cell death mechanisms and emerges as a candidate for sphingolipid-targeting cancer therapies.

  7. Human Papillomavirus L2 facilitates viral escape from late endosomes via Sorting Nexin 17

    PubMed Central

    Marušič, Martina Bergant; Ozbun, Michelle A; Campos, Samuel K; Myers, Michael P; Banks, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    The Human Papillomavirus (HPV) L2 capsid protein plays an essential role during the early stages of viral infection, but the molecular mechanisms underlying its mode of action remain obscure. Using a proteomic approach we have identified the adaptor protein, Sorting Nexin 17 (SNX17) as a strong interacting partner of HPV L2. This interaction occurs through a highly conserved SNX17 consensus binding motif, which is present in the majority of HPV L2 proteins analysed. Using mutants of L2 defective for SNX17 interaction, or siRNA ablation of SNX17 expression we demonstrate that the interaction between L2 and SNX17 is essential for viral infection. Furthermore, loss of the L2-SNX17 interaction results in enhanced turnover of the L2 protein and decreased stability of the viral capsids, and concomitantly there is a dramatic decrease in the efficiency with which viral genomes transit to the nucleus. Indeed, using a range of endosomal and lysosomal markers we show that capsids defective in their capacity to bind SNX17 transit much more rapidly to the lysosomal compartment. These results demonstrate that the L2-SNX17 interaction is essential for viral infection and facilitates the escape of the L2-DNA complex from the late endosomal/lysosomal compartments. PMID:22151726

  8. Ubiquilin/Dsk2 promotes inclusion body formation and vacuole (lysosome)-mediated disposal of mutated huntingtin.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Kun-Han; Liang, Fengshan; Higgins, Ryan; Wang, Yanchang

    2016-07-01

    Ubiquilin proteins contain a ubiquitin-like domain (UBL) and ubiquitin-associated domain(s) that interact with the proteasome and ubiquitinated substrates, respectively. Previous work established the link between ubiquilin mutations and neurodegenerative diseases, but the function of ubiquilin proteins remains elusive. Here we used a misfolded huntingtin exon I containing a 103-polyglutamine expansion (Htt103QP) as a model substrate for the functional study of ubiquilin proteins. We found that yeast ubiquilin mutant (dsk2Δ) is sensitive to Htt103QP overexpression and has a defect in the formation of Htt103QP inclusion bodies. Our evidence further suggests that the UBL domain of Dsk2 is critical for inclusion body formation. Of interest, Dsk2 is dispensable for Htt103QP degradation when Htt103QP is induced for a short time before noticeable inclusion body formation. However, when the inclusion body forms after a long Htt103QP induction, Dsk2 is required for efficient Htt103QP clearance, as well as for autophagy-dependent delivery of Htt103QP into vacuoles (lysosomes). Therefore our data indicate that Dsk2 facilitates vacuole-mediated clearance of misfolded proteins by promoting inclusion body formation. Of importance, the defect of inclusion body formation in dsk2 mutants can be rescued by human ubiquilin 1 or 2, suggesting functional conservation of ubiquilin proteins. © 2016 Chuang et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  9. BECN1/Beclin 1 sorts cell-surface APP/amyloid β precursor protein for lysosomal degradation

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Gayathri; Zhu, Wan; Plowey, Edward D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The regulation of plasma membrane (PM)-localized transmembrane protein/receptor trafficking has critical implications for cell signaling, metabolism and survival. In this study, we investigated the role of BECN1 (Beclin 1) in the degradative trafficking of PM-associated APP (amyloid β precursor protein), whose metabolism to amyloid-β, an essential event in Alzheimer disease, is dependent on divergent PM trafficking pathways. We report a novel interaction between PM-associated APP and BECN1 that recruits macroautophagy/endosomal regulatory proteins PIK3C3 and UVRAG. We found that BECN1 promotes surface APP internalization and sorting predominantly to endosomes and endolysosomes. BECN1 also promotes the targeting of a smaller fraction of internalized APP to LC3-positive phagophores, suggesting a role for BECN1-dependent PM macroautophagy in APP degradation. Furthermore, BECN1 facilitates lysosomal degradation of surface APP and reduces the secretion of APP metabolites (soluble ectodomains, sAPP). The association between APP and BECN1 is dependent on the evolutionarily conserved domain (ECD) of BECN1 (amino acids 267–337). Deletion of a BECN1 ECD subregion (amino acids 285–299) did not impair BECN1- PIK3C3 interaction, PtdIns3K function or macroautophagy, but was sufficient to impair the APP-BECN1 interaction and BECN1's effects on surface APP internalization and degradation, resulting in increased secretion of sAPPs. Interestingly, both the BECN1-APP association and BECN1-dependent APP endocytosis and degradative trafficking were negatively regulated by active AKT. Our results further implicate phosphorylation of the BECN1 Ser295 residue in the inhibition of APP degradation by AKT. Our studies reveal a novel function for BECN1 in the sorting of a plasma membrane protein for endolysosomal and macroautophagic degradation. PMID:27715386

  10. Formation of Freirian Facilitators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Phyllis

    This paper is written for people who are already familiar with the philosophy and methodology of Paulo Freire's liberatory education and are interested in creating a formation program for adult education facilitators using his ideas. The author describes the paper as "a collection of thoughts, of things to consider," when organizing such…

  11. Facilitation of Adult Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boydell, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Taking an autobiographical approach, I tell the story of my experiences facilitating adult development, in a polytechnic and as a management consultant. I relate these to a developmental framework of Modes of Being and Learning that I created and elaborated with colleagues. I connect this picture with a number of related models, theories,…

  12. Facilitators in Ambivalence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlsson, Mikael R.; Erlandson, Peter

    2018-01-01

    This is part of a larger ethnographical study concerning how school development in a local educational context sets cultural and social life in motion. The main data "in this article" consists of semi-structural interviews with teachers (facilitators) who have the responsibility of carrying out a project about formative assessment in…

  13. Selective screening for lysosomal storage diseases with dried blood spots collected on filter paper in 4,700 high-risk colombian subjects.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Alfredo; Giugliani, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) are a very heterogeneous group of hereditary disorders. The diagnostic process usually involves complex sampling, processing, testing, and validation procedures, performed by specialized laboratories only, which causes great limitations in reaching a diagnosis for patients affected by these diseases.There are few studies about LSDs in Colombia. The diagnostic limitations often make medical practitioners disregard the possibility of these disorders while diagnosing their patients. The current study documents the results of a 7-year screening in high-risk patients, aimed to detect LSDs using dried blood spots (DBS) collected on filter paper, with a micromethodology that facilitates diagnosis even with a large number of samples.The activities of α-galactosidase A, α glucosidase, α-L-iduronidase, arylsulfatase B, β-galactosidase, β-glucosidase, total hexosaminidase, iduronate sulfatase, and chitotriosidase were analyzed in high-risk patients for lysosomal disease. The catalytic activity was evaluated with fluorometric micromethods using artificial substrates marked with 4-methylumbelliferone.The reference values for a control population were established for the enzymes listed above, and 242 patients were found to have an enzyme deficiency, guiding to the following diagnoses: Fabry disease (n = 31), Pompe disease (n = 16), Hurler Syndrome (n = 15), Maroteaux-Lamy Syndrome (n = 34), GM1 Gangliosidosis (n = 10), Morquio B (n = 1), Gaucher disease (n = 101), Sandhoff disease (n = 1), Mucolipidosis (n = 2), and Hunter Syndrome (n = 31). In conclusion, this protocol provides a comprehensive diagnostic approach which could be carried out in Colombia and made it available to medical services spread around the country, enabling the identification of a large number of patients affected by LSDs, which could potentially benefit from the therapeutic tools already available for many of these diseases.

  14. Hydrogen sulfide induced neuronal death occurs via glutamate receptor and is associated with calpain activation and lysosomal rupture in mouse primary cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Nam Sang; Peng, Zhao Feng; Chen, Minghui Jessica; Moore, Philip K; Whiteman, Matthew

    2007-09-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a cytotoxic gas recently proposed as a novel neuromodulator. Endogenous levels of H(2)S in the brain range between 50 and 160 microM and perturbed H(2)S synthesis has been reported in the brains from stroke, Alzheimer's disease and Down syndrome patients. Recently, in immature non-glutamate receptor expressing mouse cortical neurons H(2)S was shown to inhibit cell death exhibited by high concentrations of glutamate whereas H(2)S was not cytotoxic. Due to the reported role of H(2)S in facilitating LTP through NMDA receptors we examined the effects of H(2)S on glutamate receptor functioning using mature cortical neurons expressing functional glutamate receptor subtypes. Addition of 100 microM glutamate exhibited extensive cell death which was exacerbated by co-incubation with < or = 200 microM of the H(2)S donor sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS). At <200 microM NaHS induced apoptosis whereas >200 microM NaHS induced necrosis. Cell death was inhibited by pharmacological glutamate receptor antagonists MK801 and APV (NMDA receptor antagonists), and CNQX (kainate and AMPA receptor antagonist) but not kynurenate (broad spectrum glutamate receptor antagonist), GYKI52466 (more selective AMPA receptor antagonist) and CYZ (AMPA receptor potentiator). Although markers of apoptosis were observed, we did not detect caspase activation either by Western blotting or fluorescence assays and caspase inhibitors did not prevent cell death. Rather, H(2)S induced calpain activation and lysosomal membrane destabilization; processes inhibited by preferential antagonists of NMDA and kainate receptors. These data suggest that H(2)S induced neuronal death through ionotropic glutamate receptors, which recruits apoptosis to ensure cellular demise and employs calpains and lysosomal rupture. This study provides novel insights into cell death observed in neurodegenerative diseases involving glutamate receptor activation and perturbed H(2)S synthesis.

  15. Involvement of lysosomal dysfunction in silver nanoparticle-induced cellular damage in A549 human lung alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Miyayama, Takamitsu; Matsuoka, Masato

    2016-01-01

    While silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are widely used in consumer and medical products, the mechanism by which AgNPs cause pulmonary cytotoxicity is not clear. AgNP agglomerates are found in endo-lysosomal structures within the cytoplasm of treated cells. In this study, the functional role of lysosomes in AgNP-induced cellular damage was examined in A549 human lung alveolar epithelial cells. We evaluated the intracellular distribution of AgNPs, lysosomal pH, cellular viability, Ag dissolution, and metallothionein (MT) mRNA levels in AgNP-exposed A549 cells that were treated with bafilomycin A1, the lysosomal acidification inhibitor. Exposure of A549 cells to citrate-coated AgNPs (20 nm diameter) for 24 h induced cellular damage and cell death at 100 and 200 μg Ag/ml, respectively. Confocal laser microscopic examination of LysoTracker-stained cells showed that AgNPs colocalized with lysosomes and their agglomeration increased in a dose-dependent manner (50-200 μg Ag/ml). In addition, the fluorescence signals of LysoTracker were reduced following exposure to AgNPs, suggesting the elevation of lysosomal pH. Treatment of A549 cells with 200 nM bafilomycin A1 and AgNPs (50 μg Ag/ml) further reduced the fluorescence signals of LysoTracker. AgNP-induced cell death was also increased by bafilomycin A1 treatment. Finally, treatment with bafilomycin A1 suppressed the dissolution of Ag and decreased the mRNA expression levels of MT-I and MT-II following exposure to AgNPs. The perturbation of lysosomal pH by AgNP exposure may play a role in AgNP agglomeration and subsequent cellular damage in A549 cells.

  16. Repetitive stimulation of autophagy-lysosome machinery by intermittent fasting preconditions the myocardium to ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Godar, Rebecca J; Ma, Xiucui; Liu, Haiyan; Murphy, John T; Weinheimer, Carla J; Kovacs, Attila; Crosby, Seth D; Saftig, Paul; Diwan, Abhinav

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, a lysosomal degradative pathway, is potently stimulated in the myocardium by fasting and is essential for maintaining cardiac function during prolonged starvation. We tested the hypothesis that intermittent fasting protects against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury via transcriptional stimulation of the autophagy-lysosome machinery. Adult C57BL/6 mice subjected to 24-h periods of fasting, every other day, for 6 wk were protected from in-vivo ischemia-reperfusion injury on a fed day, with marked reduction in infarct size in both sexes as compared with nonfasted controls. This protection was lost in mice heterozygous null for Lamp2 (coding for lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2), which demonstrate impaired autophagy in response to fasting with accumulation of autophagosomes and SQSTM1, an autophagy substrate, in the heart. In lamp2 null mice, intermittent fasting provoked progressive left ventricular dilation, systolic dysfunction and hypertrophy; worsening cardiomyocyte autophagosome accumulation and lack of protection to ischemia-reperfusion injury, suggesting that intact autophagy-lysosome machinery is essential for myocardial homeostasis during intermittent fasting and consequent ischemic cardioprotection. Fasting and refeeding cycles resulted in transcriptional induction followed by downregulation of autophagy-lysosome genes in the myocardium. This was coupled with fasting-induced nuclear translocation of TFEB (transcription factor EB), a master regulator of autophagy-lysosome machinery; followed by rapid decline in nuclear TFEB levels with refeeding. Endogenous TFEB was essential for attenuation of hypoxia-reoxygenation-induced cell death by repetitive starvation, in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, in-vitro. Taken together, these data suggest that TFEB-mediated transcriptional priming of the autophagy-lysosome machinery mediates the beneficial effects of fasting-induced autophagy in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  17. Ceria nanoparticles stabilized by organic surface coatings activate the lysosome-autophagy system and enhance autophagic clearance.

    PubMed

    Song, Wensi; Soo Lee, Seung; Savini, Marzia; Popp, Lauren; Colvin, Vicki L; Segatori, Laura

    2014-10-28

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) are widely used in a variety of industrial applications including UV filters and catalysts. The expanding commercial scale production and use of ceria nanoparticles have inevitably increased the risk of release of nanoceria into the environment as well as the risk of human exposure. The use of nanoceria in biomedical applications is also being currently investigated because of its recently characterized antioxidative properties. In this study, we investigated the impact of ceria nanoparticles on the lysosome-autophagy system, the main catabolic pathway that is activated in mammalian cells upon internalization of exogenous material. We tested a battery of ceria nanoparticles functionalized with different types of biocompatible coatings (N-acetylglucosamine, polyethylene glycol and polyvinylpyrrolidone) expected to have minimal effect on lysosomal integrity and function. We found that ceria nanoparticles promote activation of the transcription factor EB, a master regulator of lysosomal function and autophagy, and induce upregulation of genes of the lysosome-autophagy system. We further show that the array of differently functionalized ceria nanoparticles tested in this study enhance autophagic clearance of proteolipid aggregates that accumulate as a result of inefficient function of the lysosome-autophagy system. This study provides a mechanistic understanding of the interaction of ceria nanoparticles with the lysosome-autophagy system and demonstrates that ceria nanoparticles are activators of autophagy and promote clearance of autophagic cargo. These results provide insights for the use of nanoceria in biomedical applications, including drug delivery. These findings will also inform the design of engineered nanoparticles with safe and precisely controlled impact on the environment and the design of nanotherapeutics for the treatment of diseases with defective autophagic function and accumulation of lysosomal storage material.

  18. Membrane Cholesterol Removal Changes Mechanical Properties of Cells and Induces Secretion of a Specific Pool of Lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Roma, Paula Magda S.; Alves, Ana Paula; Rocha, Carolina D.; Valverde, Thalita M.; Aguiar, Pedro Henrique N.; Almeida, Fernando P.; Guimarães, Allan J.; Guatimosim, Cristina; Silva, Aristóbolo M.; Fernandes, Maria C.; Andrews, Norma W.; Viana, Nathan B.; Mesquita, Oscar N.; Agero, Ubirajara; Andrade, Luciana O.

    2013-01-01

    In a previous study we had shown that membrane cholesterol removal induced unregulated lysosomal exocytosis events leading to the depletion of lysosomes located at cell periphery. However, the mechanism by which cholesterol triggered these exocytic events had not been uncovered. In this study we investigated the importance of cholesterol in controlling mechanical properties of cells and its connection with lysosomal exocytosis. Tether extraction with optical tweezers and defocusing microscopy were used to assess cell dynamics in mouse fibroblasts. These assays showed that bending modulus and surface tension increased when cholesterol was extracted from fibroblasts plasma membrane upon incubation with MβCD, and that the membrane-cytoskeleton relaxation time increased at the beginning of MβCD treatment and decreased at the end. We also showed for the first time that the amplitude of membrane-cytoskeleton fluctuation decreased during cholesterol sequestration, showing that these cells become stiffer. These changes in membrane dynamics involved not only rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton, but also de novo actin polymerization and stress fiber formation through Rho activation. We found that these mechanical changes observed after cholesterol sequestration were involved in triggering lysosomal exocytosis. Exocytosis occurred even in the absence of the lysosomal calcium sensor synaptotagmin VII, and was associated with actin polymerization induced by MβCD. Notably, exocytosis triggered by cholesterol removal led to the secretion of a unique population of lysosomes, different from the pool mobilized by actin depolymerizing drugs such as Latrunculin-A. These data support the existence of at least two different pools of lysosomes with different exocytosis dynamics, one of which is directly mobilized for plasma membrane fusion after cholesterol removal. PMID:24376622

  19. Repetitive stimulation of autophagy-lysosome machinery by intermittent fasting preconditions the myocardium to ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Godar, Rebecca J; Ma, Xiucui; Liu, Haiyan; Murphy, John T; Weinheimer, Carla J; Kovacs, Attila; Crosby, Seth D; Saftig, Paul; Diwan, Abhinav

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, a lysosomal degradative pathway, is potently stimulated in the myocardium by fasting and is essential for maintaining cardiac function during prolonged starvation. We tested the hypothesis that intermittent fasting protects against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury via transcriptional stimulation of the autophagy-lysosome machinery. Adult C57BL/6 mice subjected to 24-h periods of fasting, every other day, for 6 wk were protected from in-vivo ischemia-reperfusion injury on a fed day, with marked reduction in infarct size in both sexes as compared with nonfasted controls. This protection was lost in mice heterozygous null for Lamp2 (coding for lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2), which demonstrate impaired autophagy in response to fasting with accumulation of autophagosomes and SQSTM1, an autophagy substrate, in the heart. In lamp2 null mice, intermittent fasting provoked progressive left ventricular dilation, systolic dysfunction and hypertrophy; worsening cardiomyocyte autophagosome accumulation and lack of protection to ischemia-reperfusion injury, suggesting that intact autophagy-lysosome machinery is essential for myocardial homeostasis during intermittent fasting and consequent ischemic cardioprotection. Fasting and refeeding cycles resulted in transcriptional induction followed by downregulation of autophagy-lysosome genes in the myocardium. This was coupled with fasting-induced nuclear translocation of TFEB (transcription factor EB), a master regulator of autophagy-lysosome machinery; followed by rapid decline in nuclear TFEB levels with refeeding. Endogenous TFEB was essential for attenuation of hypoxia-reoxygenation-induced cell death by repetitive starvation, in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, in-vitro. Taken together, these data suggest that TFEB-mediated transcriptional priming of the autophagy-lysosome machinery mediates the beneficial effects of fasting-induced autophagy in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:26103523

  20. Program Facilitates Distributed Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    KNET computer program facilitates distribution of computing between UNIX-compatible local host computer and remote host computer, which may or may not be UNIX-compatible. Capable of automatic remote log-in. User communicates interactively with remote host computer. Data output from remote host computer directed to local screen, to local file, and/or to local process. Conversely, data input from keyboard, local file, or local process directed to remote host computer. Written in ANSI standard C language.

  1. Lysosomal acid lipase regulates VLDL synthesis and insulin sensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Radović, Branislav; Vujić, Nemanja; Leopold, Christina; Schlager, Stefanie; Goeritzer, Madeleine; Patankar, Jay V; Korbelius, Melanie; Kolb, Dagmar; Reindl, Julia; Wegscheider, Martin; Tomin, Tamara; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Schittmayer, Matthias; Groschner, Lukas; Magnes, Christoph; Diwoky, Clemens; Frank, Saša; Steyrer, Ernst; Du, Hong; Graier, Wolfgang F; Madl, Tobias; Kratky, Dagmar

    2016-08-01

    Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) hydrolyses cholesteryl esters and triacylglycerols (TG) within lysosomes to mobilise NEFA and cholesterol. Since LAL-deficient (Lal (-/-) ) mice suffer from progressive loss of adipose tissue and severe accumulation of lipids in hepatic lysosomes, we hypothesised that LAL deficiency triggers alternative energy pathway(s). We studied metabolic adaptations in Lal (-/-) mice. Despite loss of adipose tissue, Lal (-/-) mice show enhanced glucose clearance during insulin and glucose tolerance tests and have increased uptake of [(3)H]2-deoxy-D-glucose into skeletal muscle compared with wild-type mice. In agreement, fasted Lal (-/-) mice exhibit reduced glucose and glycogen levels in skeletal muscle. We observed 84% decreased plasma leptin levels and significantly reduced hepatic ATP, glucose, glycogen and glutamine concentrations in fed Lal (-/-) mice. Markedly reduced hepatic acyl-CoA concentrations decrease the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) target genes. However, treatment of Lal (-/-) mice with the PPARα agonist fenofibrate further decreased plasma TG (and hepatic glucose and glycogen) concentrations in Lal (-/-) mice. Depletion of hepatic nuclear factor 4α and forkhead box protein a2 in fasted Lal (-/-) mice might be responsible for reduced expression of microsomal TG transfer protein, defective VLDL synthesis and drastically reduced plasma TG levels. Our findings indicate that neither activation nor inactivation of PPARα per se but rather the availability of hepatic acyl-CoA concentrations regulates VLDL synthesis and subsequent metabolic adaptations in Lal (-/-) mice. We conclude that decreased plasma VLDL production enhances glucose uptake into skeletal muscle to compensate for the lack of energy supply.

  2. Lysoplex: An efficient toolkit to detect DNA sequence variations in the autophagy-lysosomal pathway.

    PubMed

    Di Fruscio, Giuseppina; Schulz, Angela; De Cegli, Rossella; Savarese, Marco; Mutarelli, Margherita; Parenti, Giancarlo; Banfi, Sandro; Braulke, Thomas; Nigro, Vincenzo; Ballabio, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The autophagy-lysosomal pathway (ALP) regulates cell homeostasis and plays a crucial role in human diseases, such as lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) and common neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, the identification of DNA sequence variations in genes involved in this pathway and their association with human diseases would have a significant impact on health. To this aim, we developed Lysoplex, a targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) approach, which allowed us to obtain a uniform and accurate coding sequence coverage of a comprehensive set of 891 genes involved in lysosomal, endocytic, and autophagic pathways. Lysoplex was successfully validated on 14 different types of LSDs and then used to analyze 48 mutation-unknown patients with a clinical phenotype of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL), a genetically heterogeneous subtype of LSD. Lysoplex allowed us to identify pathogenic mutations in 67% of patients, most of whom had been unsuccessfully analyzed by several sequencing approaches. In addition, in 3 patients, we found potential disease-causing variants in novel NCL candidate genes. We then compared the variant detection power of Lysoplex with data derived from public whole exome sequencing (WES) efforts. On average, a 50% higher number of validated amino acid changes and truncating variations per gene were identified. Overall, we identified 61 truncating sequence variations and 488 missense variations with a high probability to cause loss of function in a total of 316 genes. Interestingly, some loss-of-function variations of genes involved in the ALP pathway were found in homozygosity in the normal population, suggesting that their role is not essential. Thus, Lysoplex provided a comprehensive catalog of sequence variants in ALP genes and allows the assessment of their relevance in cell biology as well as their contribution to human disease.

  3. Combination of Classifiers Identifies Fungal-Specific Activation of Lysosome Genes in Human Monocytes.

    PubMed

    Leonor Fernandes Saraiva, João P; Zubiria-Barrera, Cristina; Klassert, Tilman E; Lautenbach, Maximilian J; Blaess, Markus; Claus, Ralf A; Slevogt, Hortense; König, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Blood stream infections can be caused by several pathogens such as viruses, fungi and bacteria and can cause severe clinical complications including sepsis. Delivery of appropriate and quick treatment is mandatory. However, it requires a rapid identification of the invading pathogen. The current gold standard for pathogen identification relies on blood cultures and these methods require a long time to gain the needed diagnosis. The use of in situ experiments attempts to identify pathogen specific immune responses but these often lead to heterogeneous biomarkers due to the high variability in methods and materials used. Using gene expression profiles for machine learning is a developing approach to discriminate between types of infection, but also shows a high degree of inconsistency. To produce consistent gene signatures, capable of discriminating fungal from bacterial infection, we have employed Support Vector Machines (SVMs) based on Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP). Combining classifiers by joint optimization constraining them to the same set of discriminating features increased the consistency of our biomarker list independently of leukocyte-type or experimental setup. Our gene signature showed an enrichment of genes of the lysosome pathway which was not uncovered by the use of independent classifiers. Moreover, our results suggest that the lysosome genes are specifically induced in monocytes. Real time qPCR of the identified lysosome-related genes confirmed the distinct gene expression increase in monocytes during fungal infections. Concluding, our combined classifier approach presented increased consistency and was able to "unmask" signaling pathways of less-present immune cells in the used datasets.

  4. Inhibition of substrate synthesis as a strategy for glycolipid lysosomal storage disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Platt, F M; Jeyakumar, M; Andersson, U; Priestman, D A; Dwek, R A; Butters, T D; Cox, T M; Lachmann, R H; Hollak, C; Aerts, J M; Van Weely, S; Hrebícek, M; Moyses, C; Gow, I; Elstein, D; Zimran, A

    2001-04-01

    The glycosphingolipid (GSL) lysosomal storage diseases are caused by mutations in the genes encoding the glycohydrolases that catabolize GSLs within lysosomes. In these diseases the substrate for the defective enzyme accumulates in the lysosome and the stored GSL leads to cellular dysfunction and disease. The diseases frequently have a progressive neurodegenerative course. The therapeutic options for treating these diseases are relatively limited, and for the majority there are no effective therapies. The problem is further compounded by difficulties in delivering therapeutic agents to the brain. Most research effort to date has focused on strategies for augmenting enzyme levels to compensate for the underlying defect. These include bone marrow transplantation (BMT), enzyme replacement and gene therapy. An alternative strategy that we have been exploring is substrate deprivation. This approach aims to balance the rate of GSL synthesis with the impaired rate of GSL breakdown. The imino sugar N-butyldeoxynojirimycin (NB-DNJ) inhibits the first step in GSL biosynthesis and has been used to evaluate this approach. Studies in an asymptomatic mouse model of Tay-Sachs disease have shown that substrate deprivation prevents GSL storage in the CNS. In a severe neurodegenerative mouse model of Sandhoff disease, substrate deprivation delayed the onset of symptoms and disease progression and significantly increased life expectancy. Combining NB-DNJ and BMT was found to be synergistic in the Sandhoff mouse model. A clinical trial in type I Gaucher disease has been undertaken and has shown beneficial effects. Efficacy was demonstrated on the basis of significant decreases in liver and spleen volumes, gradual but significant improvement in haematological parameters and disease activity markers, together with diminished GSL biosynthesis and storage as determined by independent biochemical assays. Further trials in type I Gaucher disease are in progress; studies are planned in

  5. AGE-albumin enhances ABCA1 degradation by ubiquitin-proteasome and lysosomal pathways in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Iborra, Rodrigo Tallada; Machado-Lima, Adriana; Okuda, Ligia Shimabukuro; Pinto, Paula Ramos; Nakandakare, Edna Regina; Machado, Ubiratan Fabres; Correa-Giannella, Maria Lucia; Pickford, Russell; Woods, Tom; Brimble, Margaret A; Rye, Kerry-Anne; Lu, Rui; Yokoyama, Shinji; Passarelli, Marisa

    2018-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) induce cellular oxidative/endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammation. We investigated its underlying mechanisms for atherogenesis focusing on regulation of ABCA1 protein decay in macrophages. The ABCA1 decay rate was evaluated in macrophages after treatment with LXR agonist and by incubation with control (C) or AGE-albumin concomitant or not with cycloheximide, MG-132, ammonium chloride and calpain inhibitors were utilized to inhibit, respectively, proteasome, lysosome and ABCA1 proteolysis at cell surface. ABCA1 was determined by immunoblot and the protein decay rate calculated along time by the slope of the linear regression. Ubiquitination level was determined in ABCA1 immunoprecipitated from whole cell lysate or bulk cell membrane. AGE effect was also analyzed in THP-1 cells transfected with siRNA-RAGE. Carboxymethyllysine (CML) and pyrraline (PYR) were determined by LC/MS. One-way ANOVA and Student t test were utilized to compare results. CML and PYR-albumin were higher in AGE-albumin as compared to C. AGE-albumin reduced ABCA1 in J774 and THP-1 macrophages (20-30%) and induced a higher ABCA1 ubiquitination and a faster protein decay rate that was dependent on the presence of AGE during the kinetics of measurement in the presence of cycloheximide. Proteasomal inhibition restored and lysosomal inhibition partially recovered ABCA1 in cells treated with AGE-albumin. Calpain inhibition was not able to rescue ABCA1. RAGE knockdown prevented the reduction in ABCA1 elicited by AGE. AGE-albumin diminishes ABCA1 by accelerating its degradation through the proteasomal and lysosomal systems. This may increase lipid accumulation in macrophages by diminishing cholesterol efflux via RAGE signaling contributing to atherosclerosis in diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Diagnostic and clinical relevance of the autophago-lysosomal network in human gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Jennewein, Lukas; Ronellenfitsch, Michael W.; Antonietti, Patrick; Ilina, Elena I.; Jung, Jennifer; Stadel, Daniela; Flohr, Lisa-Marie; Zinke, Jenny; von Renesse, Janusz; Drott, Ulrich; Baumgarten, Peter; Braczynski, Anne K.; Penski, Cornelia; Burger, Michael C.; Theurillat, Jean-Philippe; Steinbach, Joachim P.; Plate, Karl-Heinz; Dikic, Ivan; Fulda, Simone; Brandts, Christian; Kögel, Donat; Behrends, Christian; Harter, Patrick N.; Mittelbronn, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the conserved intracellular digestion mechanism ‘autophagy’ has been considered to be involved in early tumorigenesis and its blockade proposed as an alternative treatment approach. However, there is an ongoing debate about whether blocking autophagy has positive or negative effects in tumor cells. Since there is only poor data about the clinico-pathological relevance of autophagy in gliomas in vivo, we first established a cell culture based platform for the in vivo detection of the autophago-lysosomal components. We then investigated key autophagosomal (LC3B, p62, BAG3, Beclin1) and lysosomal (CTSB, LAMP2) molecules in 350 gliomas using immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, immunoblotting and qPCR. Autophagy was induced pharmacologically or by altering oxygen and nutrient levels. Our results show that autophagy is enhanced in astrocytomas as compared to normal CNS tissue, but largely independent from the WHO grade and patient survival. A strong upregulation of LC3B, p62, LAMP2 and CTSB was detected in perinecrotic areas in glioblastomas suggesting micro-environmental changes as a driver of autophagy induction in gliomas. Furthermore, glucose restriction induced autophagy in a concentration-dependent manner while hypoxia or amino acid starvation had considerably lesser effects. Apoptosis and autophagy were separately induced in glioma cells both in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, our findings indicate that autophagy in gliomas is rather driven by micro-environmental changes than by primary glioma-intrinsic features thus challenging the concept of exploitation of the autophago-lysosomal network (ALN) as a treatment approach in gliomas. PMID:26956048

  7. The intracellular location of lysosomal enzymes in developing Dictyostelium discoideum cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lenhard, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The author has found that developing Dictyostelium cells contain two distinct acid hydrolase-containing organelles. Vesicles from cells at different stages of development were separated using Percoll density gradients. The lower density vesicles (LDVs or lysosomes) were present in nourished and starved cells. The higher density vesicles (HDVs) arose during starvation-induced differentiation. HDVs lacked two prestalk cell-specific lysosomal enzymes which were contained in LDVs. Prespore cell-specific spore coat proteins were detected in HDVs by ELISA. ({sup 35}S)sulfate labeling revealed that HDVs contained newly made glycoproteins as well as glycoproteins found in preexisting LDVs. Pulse-chase experiments using ({sup 35}S)methionine revealed that {alpha}-mannosidasemore » from pre-existing LDVs an newly made {alpha}-mannosidase had entered HDVs. These data suggest that prespore LDVs mature to become HDVs. He has obtained evidence that HDVs are identical to prespore vesicles. Prespore vesicles are specialized secretory organelles which arise during prespore cell differentiation and which secrete their contents during terminal differentiation. As prespore vesicles secreted their contents, there was a co-incidental increase in extracellular acid hydrolase activity and a decrease in HDV-associated enzyme activity. Electron micrographs revealed that prespore cells contained two acid phosphatase-staining organelles, one of which appeared to be identical to lysosomes from nourished cells and a second which had features similar to prespore vesicles. Ricin-gold affinity electron microscopy was used to label the mucopolysaccharide component of prespore vesicles and the spore coat. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed co-localization of {alpha}-mannosidase with ricin-gold in prespore vesicles and the spore coat.« less

  8. Phagosome-lysosome fusion inhibited by algal symbionts of Hydra viridis

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Certain species of Chlorella live within the digestive cells of the fresh water cnidarian Hydra viridis. When introduced into the hydra gut, these symbiotic algae are phagocytized by digestive cells but avoid host digestion and persist at relatively constant numbers within host cells. In contrast, heat-killed symbionts are rapidly degraded after phagocytosis. Live symbionts appear to persist because host lysosomes fail to fuse with phagosomes containing live symbionts. Neither acid phosphatase nor ferritin was delivered via lysosomes into phagosomes containing live symbionts, whereas these lysosomal markers were found in 50% of the vacuoles containing heat-killed symbionts 1 h after phagocytosis. Treatment of symbiotic algae before phagocytosis with polycationic polypeptides abolishes algal persistence and perturbs the ability of these algae to control the release of photosynthate in vitro. Similarly, inhibition of photosynthesis and hence of the release of photosynthetic products as a result of prolonged darkness and 3-(3,4- dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethyl urea (DCMU) treatment also abolishes persistence. Symbiotic algae are not only protected from host digestive attack but are also selectively transported within host cells, moving from the apical site of phagocytosis to a basal position of permanent residence. This process too is disrupted by polycationic polypeptides, DCMU and darkness. Both algal persistence and transport may, therefore, be a function of the release of products from living, photosynthesizing symbionts. Vinblastine treatment of host animals blocked the movement of algae within host cells but did not perturb algal persistence: algal persistence and the transport of algae may be initiated by the same signal, but they are not interdependent processes. PMID:7119017

  9. Magnetic Resonance Findings of the Corpus Callosum in Canine and Feline Lysosomal Storage Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Daisuke; Tamura, Shinji; Nakamoto, Yuya; Matsuki, Naoaki; Takahashi, Kimimasa; Fujita, Michio; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Yamato, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Several reports have described magnetic resonance (MR) findings in canine and feline lysosomal storage diseases such as gangliosidoses and neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. Although most of those studies described the signal intensities of white matter in the cerebrum, findings of the corpus callosum were not described in detail. A retrospective study was conducted on MR findings of the corpus callosum as well as the rostral commissure and the fornix in 18 cases of canine and feline lysosomal storage diseases. This included 6 Shiba Inu dogs and 2 domestic shorthair cats with GM1 gangliosidosis; 2 domestic shorthair cats, 2 familial toy poodles, and a golden retriever with GM2 gangliosidosis; and 2 border collies and 3 chihuahuas with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses, to determine whether changes of the corpus callosum is an imaging indicator of those diseases. The corpus callosum and the rostral commissure were difficult to recognize in all cases of juvenile-onset gangliosidoses (GM1 gangliosidosis in Shiba Inu dogs and domestic shorthair cats and GM2 gangliosidosis in domestic shorthair cats) and GM2 gangliosidosis in toy poodles with late juvenile-onset. In contrast, the corpus callosum and the rostral commissure were confirmed in cases of GM2 gangliosidosis in a golden retriever and canine neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses with late juvenile- to early adult-onset, but were extremely thin. Abnormal findings of the corpus callosum on midline sagittal images may be a useful imaging indicator for suspecting lysosomal storage diseases, especially hypoplasia (underdevelopment) of the corpus callosum in juvenile-onset gangliosidoses. PMID:24386203

  10. The role of ubiquitination in lysosomal trafficking of δ-opioid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Anastasia G; White, Ian J.; Marsh, Mark; von Zastrow, Mark; Hislop, James N

    2010-01-01

    Lysyl-ubiquitination of signaling receptors is widely recognized to drive their proteolytic down-regulation via the multivesicular body (MVB) / lysosome pathway. Ubiquitination can act at multiple steps in this pathway, depending on receptor type and organism examined. No previous study has identified specific trafficking step(s) controlled by ubiquitination of a mammalian seven-transmembrane receptor (7TMR). The δ-opioid receptor (DOR) undergoes ligand-induced is a mammalian 7TMR down-regulation by ESCRT-dependent endocytic trafficking to lysosomes. In contrast to a number of other signaling receptors, the DOR can down-regulate effectively when its ubiquitination is prevented. We explored the membrane trafficking basis of this behavior. First, we show that that undergoes rapid lysosomal down-regulation physiologically, but this 7TMR has a still-unexplained ability to down-regulate effectively even when its ubiquitination is blocked. define pathway underlying internalized DORs traverse the canonical MVB pathway and localize to intralumenal vesicles (ILVs). Second, we show that DOR ubiquitination stimulates, but is not essential for, receptor transfer to ILVs and proteolysis of the receptor endodomain. Third, we show that receptor uHere we show that DORs traffic via morphologically typical MVBs and, similar to other signaling receptors, ubiquitination of DORs promotes the transfer of receptors from the limiting membrane of MVBs into intralumenal vesicles (ILVs). However, biquitination plays no detectable role in the early sorting of internalized DORs out of the recycling pathway. Finally, we show that DORs undergo extensive proteolytic fragmentation in the ectodomain, even when receptor ubiquitination is prevented or ILV formation itself is blocked. Together these results are sufficient to explain why DORs down-regulate effectively in the absence of ubiquitination, and they place a discrete molecular sorting operation in the MVB pathway effectively upstream of the

  11. Determination of frequencies of alleles, associated with the pseudodeficiency of lysosomal hydrolases, in population of Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Olkhovych, N V; Gorovenko, N G

    2016-01-01

    The pseudodeficiency of lysosomal hydrolases described as a significant reduction in enzyme activi­ty in vitro in clinically healthy individuals, can lead to diagnostic errors in the process of biochemical analysis of lysosomal storage disease in case of its combination with pathology of another origin. Pseudodeficiency is mostly caused by some non-pathogenic changes in the corresponding gene. These changes lead to the in vitro lability of the enzyme molecule, whereas in vivo the enzyme retains its functional activity. To assess the prevalence of the most common lysosomal hydrolases pseudodeficiency alleles in Ukraine, we have determined the frequency of alleles c.1055A>G and c.* 96A>G in the ARSA gene, substitutions c.739C>T (R247W) and c.745C>T (R249W) in the HEXA gene, c.1726G>A (G576S) and c.2065G>A (E689K) in the GAA gene, c.937G>T (D313Y) in the GLA1 gene and c.898G>A (A300T) in the IDUA gene in a group of 117 healthy individuals from different regions of the country and 14 heterozygous carriers of pathogenic mutations in the HEXA gene (parents of children with confirmed diagnosis of Tay-Sachs disease). The total frequency of haplotypes, associated with arylsulfatase A pseudodeficiency, in healthy people in Ukraine (c.1055G/c.*96G and c.1055G/c.*96A haplotypes) was 10.3%. The frequency of c.739C>T (R247W) allele, associated with hexo­saminidase A pseudodeficiency, among Tay-Sachs carriers from Ukraine was 7.1%. The total frequency of α-glucosidase pseudodeficiency haplotypes in healthy individuals in Ukraine (c.1726A/c.2065A and c.1726G/c.2065A haplotypes) was 2.6%. No person among examined individuals with the substitution c.937G>T (D313Y) in the GLA1 gene and c.898G>A (A300T) in the IDUA gene was found. The differential diagnostics of lysosomal storage diseases requires obligatory determination of the presence of the pseudodeficiency alleles, particularly the ones with high incidence in the total population. Ignoring phenomenon of pseudodeficiency may

  12. Cholesterol and multilamellar bodies: Lysosomal dysfunction in GBA-Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    García-Sanz, Patricia; Orgaz, Lorena; Fuentes, José M; Vicario, Carlos; Moratalla, Rosario

    2018-01-01

    Lipid and cholesterol metabolism might play a role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease (PD). However, the association between cholesterol and PD is not clearly established. Cholesterol accumulation is closely related to the expression of multilamellar bodies (MLBs). Also, cholesterol controls autophagosome transport. Thus, impaired cholesterol and autophagosome trafficking might lead to robust autophagic vacuole accumulation. Our recent work provides the first evidence that the presence of the N370S GBA mutation produces an accumulation of cholesterol, which alters autophagy-lysosome function with the appearance of MLBs, rendering the cell more vulnerable and sensitive to apoptosis.

  13. Loss of Niemann-Pick C1 or C2 protein results in similar biochemical changes suggesting that these proteins function in a common lysosomal pathway.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Sayali S; Jadot, Michel; Sohar, Istvan; Sleat, David E; Stock, Ann M; Lobel, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Niemann-Pick Type C (NPC) disease is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by accumulation of unesterified cholesterol and other lipids in the endolysosomal system. NPC disease results from a defect in either of two distinct cholesterol-binding proteins: a transmembrane protein, NPC1, and a small soluble protein, NPC2. NPC1 and NPC2 are thought to function closely in the export of lysosomal cholesterol with both proteins binding cholesterol in vitro but they may have unrelated lysosomal roles. To investigate this possibility, we compared biochemical consequences of the loss of either protein. Analyses of lysosome-enriched subcellular fractions from brain and liver revealed similar decreases in buoyant densities of lysosomes from NPC1 or NPC2 deficient mice compared to controls. The subcellular distribution of both proteins was similar and paralleled a lysosomal marker. In liver, absence of either NPC1 or NPC2 resulted in similar alterations in the carbohydrate processing of the lysosomal protease, tripeptidyl peptidase I. These results highlight biochemical alterations in the lysosomal system of the NPC-mutant mice that appear secondary to lipid storage. In addition, the similarity in biochemical phenotypes resulting from either NPC1 or NPC2 deficiency supports models in which the function of these two proteins within lysosomes are linked closely.

  14. Adaptor Protein Complexes AP-1 and AP-3 Are Required by the HHV-7 Immunoevasin U21 for Rerouting of Class I MHC Molecules to the Lysosomal Compartment

    PubMed Central

    Kimpler, Lisa A.; Glosson, Nicole L.; Downs, Deanna; Gonyo, Patrick; May, Nathan A.; Hudson, Amy W.

    2014-01-01

    The human herpesvirus-7 (HHV-7) U21 gene product binds to class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules and reroutes them to a lysosomal compartment. Trafficking of integral membrane proteins to lysosomes is mediated through cytoplasmic sorting signals that recruit heterotetrameric clathrin adaptor protein (AP) complexes, which in turn mediate protein sorting in post-Golgi vesicular transport. Since U21 can mediate rerouting of class I molecules to lysosomes even when lacking its cytoplasmic tail, we hypothesize the existence of a cellular protein that contains the lysosomal sorting information required to escort class I molecules to the lysosomal compartment. If such a protein exists, we expect that it might recruit clathrin adaptor protein complexes as a means of lysosomal sorting. Here we describe experiments demonstrating that the μ adaptins from AP-1 and AP-3 are involved in U21-mediated trafficking of class I molecules to lysosomes. These experiments support the idea that a cellular protein(s) is necessary for U21-mediated lysosomal sorting of class I molecules. We also examine the impact of transient versus chronic knockdown of these adaptor protein complexes, and show that the few remaining μ subunits in the cells are eventually able to reroute class I molecules to lysosomes. PMID:24901711

  15. BODIPY-Based Two-Photon Fluorescent Probe for Real-Time Monitoring of Lysosomal Viscosity with Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling-Ling; Li, Kun; Li, Meng-Yang; Shi, Lei; Liu, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Hong; Pan, Sheng-Lin; Wang, Nan; Zhou, Qian; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2018-05-01

    The viscosity of lysosome is reported to be a key indicator of lysosomal functionality. However, the existing mechanical methods of viscosity measurement can hardly be applied at the cellular or subcellular level. Herein, a BODIPY-based two-photon fluorescent probe was presented for monitoring lysosomal viscosity with high spatial and temporal resolution. By installing two morpholine moieties to the fluorophore as target and rotational groups, the TICT effect between the two morpholine rings and the main fluorophore scaffold endowed the probe with excellent viscosity sensitivity. Moreover, Lyso-B succeeded in showing the impact of dexamethasone on lysosomal viscosity in real time.

  16. A novel approach to analyze lysosomal dysfunctions through subcellular proteomics and lipidomics: the case of NPC1 deficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tharkeshwar, Arun Kumar; Trekker, Jesse; Vermeire, Wendy; Pauwels, Jarne; Sannerud, Ragna; Priestman, David A.; Te Vruchte, Danielle; Vints, Katlijn; Baatsen, Pieter; Decuypere, Jean-Paul; Lu, Huiqi; Martin, Shaun; Vangheluwe, Peter; Swinnen, Johannes V.; Lagae, Liesbet; Impens, Francis; Platt, Frances M.; Gevaert, Kris; Annaert, Wim

    2017-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have mainly been used as cellular carriers for genes and therapeutic products, while their use in subcellular organelle isolation remains underexploited. We engineered SPIONs targeting distinct subcellular compartments. Dimercaptosuccinic acid-coated SPIONs are internalized and accumulate in late endosomes/lysosomes, while aminolipid-SPIONs reside at the plasma membrane. These features allowed us to establish standardized magnetic isolation procedures for these membrane compartments with a yield and purity permitting proteomic and lipidomic profiling. We validated our approach by comparing the biomolecular compositions of lysosomes and plasma membranes isolated from wild-type and Niemann-Pick disease type C1 (NPC1) deficient cells. While the accumulation of cholesterol and glycosphingolipids is seen as a primary hallmark of NPC1 deficiency, our lipidomics analysis revealed the buildup of several species of glycerophospholipids and other storage lipids in selectively late endosomes/lysosomes of NPC1-KO cells. While the plasma membrane proteome remained largely invariable, we observed pronounced alterations in several proteins linked to autophagy and lysosomal catabolism reflecting vesicular transport obstruction and defective lysosomal turnover resulting from NPC1 deficiency. Thus the use of SPIONs provides a major advancement in fingerprinting subcellular compartments, with an increased potential to identify disease-related alterations in their biomolecular compositions.

  17. Autophagy regulation revealed by SapM-induced block of autophagosome-lysosome fusion via binding RAB7

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Dong, E-mail: austhudong@126.com; Wu, Jing, E-mail: wujing8008@126.com; Wang, Wan

    2015-05-29

    The mechanism underlying autophagy alteration by mycobacterium tuberculosis remains unclear. Our previous study shows LpqH, a lipoprotein of mycobacterium tuberculosis, can cause autophagosomes accumulation in murine macrophages. It is well known that SapM, another virulence factor, plays an important role in blocking phagosome-endosome fusion. However, the mechanism that SapM interferes with autophagy remains poorly defined. In this study, we report that SapM suppresses the autophagy flux by blocking autophagosome fusion with lysosome. Exposure to SapM results in accumulations of autophagosomes and decreased co-localization of autophagosome with lysosome. Molecularly, Rab7, a small GTPase, is blocked by SapM through its CT domainmore » and is prevented from involvement of autophagosome-lysosome fusion. In conclusion, our study reveals that SapM takes Rab7 as a previously unknown target to govern a distinct molecular mechanism underlying autophagosome-lysosome fusion, which may bring light to a new thought about developing potential drugs or vaccines against tuberculosis. - Highlights: • A mechanism for disrupting autophagosome-lysosome fusion induced by SapM. • Rab7 is involved in SapM-inhibited autophagy. • SapM interacts with Rab7 by CT-domain. • CT-domain is indispensable to SapM-inhibited autophagy.« less

  18. Angiotensin II-induced angiotensin II type I receptor lysosomal degradation studied by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hewang; Yu, Peiying; Felder, Robin A.; Periasamy, Ammasi; Jose, Pedro A.

    2009-02-01

    Upon activation, the angiotensin (Ang) II type 1 receptor (AT1Rs) rapidly undergoes endocytosis. After a series of intracellular processes, the internalized AT1Rs recycle back to the plasma membrane or are trafficked to proteasomes or lysosomes for degradation. We recently reported that AT1Rs degrades in proteasomes upon stimulation of the D5 dopamine receptor (D5R) in human renal proximal tubule and HEK-293 cells. This is in contrast to the degradation of AT1R in lysosomes upon binding Ang II. However, the dynamic regulation of the AT1Rs in lysosomes is not well understood. Here we investigated the AT1Rs lysosomal degradation using FRET-FLIM in HEK 293 cells heterologously expressing the human AT1R tagged with EGFP as the donor fluorophore. Compared to its basal state, the lifetime of AT1Rs decreased after a 5-minute treatment with Ang II treatment and colocalized with Rab5 but not Rab7 and LAMP1. With longer Ang II treatment (30 min), the AT1Rs lifetime decreased and co-localized with Rab5, as well as Rab7 and LAMP1. The FLIM data are corroborated with morphological and biochemical co-immunoprecipitation studies. These data demonstrate that Ang II induces the internalization of AT1Rs into early sorting endosomes prior to trafficking to late endosomes and subsequent degradation in lysosomes.

  19. Invariant Natural Killer T cells are not affected by lysosomal storage in patients with Niemann-Pick disease type C

    PubMed Central

    Speak, Anneliese O; Platt, Nicholas; Salio, Mariolina; te Vruchte, Danielle Taylor; Smith, David A; Shepherd, Dawn; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal; Yanjanin, Nicole M.; Simmons, Louise; Imrie, Jackie; Wraith, James E.; Lachmann, Robin; Hartung, Ralf; Runz, Heiko; Mengel, Eugen; Beck, Michael; Hendriksz, Christian J; Porter, Forbes D; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Platt, Frances M

    2012-01-01

    Summary Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cells are a specialised subset of T cells that are restricted to the MHC class I like molecule, CD1d. The ligands for iNKT cells are lipids, with the canonical superagonist being α-galactosylceramide, a non-mammalian glycosphingolipid. Trafficking of CD1d through the lysosome is required for the development of murine iNKT cells. Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by dysfunction in either of two lysosomal proteins, NPC1 or NPC2, resulting in the storage of multiple lipids, including glycosphingolipids. In the NPC1 mouse model iNKT cells are virtually undetectable, which is likely due to the inability of CD1d to be loaded with the selecting ligand due to defective lysosomal function and/or CD1d trafficking. However, in this study we have found that in NPC1 patients iNKT cells are present in normal frequencies phenotype and functional response to stimulation. In addition, antigen-presenting cells derived from NPC1 patients are functionally competent to present several different CD1d/iNKT cell ligands. This further supports the hypothesis that there are different trafficking requirements for the development of murine and human iNKT cells and a functional lysosomal/late-endosomal compartment is not required for human iNKT cell development. PMID:22585405

  20. A novel approach to analyze lysosomal dysfunctions through subcellular proteomics and lipidomics: the case of NPC1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tharkeshwar, Arun Kumar; Trekker, Jesse; Vermeire, Wendy; Pauwels, Jarne; Sannerud, Ragna; Priestman, David A; Te Vruchte, Danielle; Vints, Katlijn; Baatsen, Pieter; Decuypere, Jean-Paul; Lu, Huiqi; Martin, Shaun; Vangheluwe, Peter; Swinnen, Johannes V; Lagae, Liesbet; Impens, Francis; Platt, Frances M; Gevaert, Kris; Annaert, Wim

    2017-01-30

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have mainly been used as cellular carriers for genes and therapeutic products, while their use in subcellular organelle isolation remains underexploited. We engineered SPIONs targeting distinct subcellular compartments. Dimercaptosuccinic acid-coated SPIONs are internalized and accumulate in late endosomes/lysosomes, while aminolipid-SPIONs reside at the plasma membrane. These features allowed us to establish standardized magnetic isolation procedures for these membrane compartments with a yield and purity permitting proteomic and lipidomic profiling. We validated our approach by comparing the biomolecular compositions of lysosomes and plasma membranes isolated from wild-type and Niemann-Pick disease type C1 (NPC1) deficient cells. While the accumulation of cholesterol and glycosphingolipids is seen as a primary hallmark of NPC1 deficiency, our lipidomics analysis revealed the buildup of several species of glycerophospholipids and other storage lipids in selectively late endosomes/lysosomes of NPC1-KO cells. While the plasma membrane proteome remained largely invariable, we observed pronounced alterations in several proteins linked to autophagy and lysosomal catabolism reflecting vesicular transport obstruction and defective lysosomal turnover resulting from NPC1 deficiency. Thus the use of SPIONs provides a major advancement in fingerprinting subcellular compartments, with an increased potential to identify disease-related alterations in their biomolecular compositions.

  1. A novel approach to analyze lysosomal dysfunctions through subcellular proteomics and lipidomics: the case of NPC1 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tharkeshwar, Arun Kumar; Trekker, Jesse; Vermeire, Wendy; Pauwels, Jarne; Sannerud, Ragna; Priestman, David A.; te Vruchte, Danielle; Vints, Katlijn; Baatsen, Pieter; Decuypere, Jean-Paul; Lu, Huiqi; Martin, Shaun; Vangheluwe, Peter; Swinnen, Johannes V.; Lagae, Liesbet; Impens, Francis; Platt, Frances M.; Gevaert, Kris; Annaert, Wim

    2017-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have mainly been used as cellular carriers for genes and therapeutic products, while their use in subcellular organelle isolation remains underexploited. We engineered SPIONs targeting distinct subcellular compartments. Dimercaptosuccinic acid-coated SPIONs are internalized and accumulate in late endosomes/lysosomes, while aminolipid-SPIONs reside at the plasma membrane. These features allowed us to establish standardized magnetic isolation procedures for these membrane compartments with a yield and purity permitting proteomic and lipidomic profiling. We validated our approach by comparing the biomolecular compositions of lysosomes and plasma membranes isolated from wild-type and Niemann-Pick disease type C1 (NPC1) deficient cells. While the accumulation of cholesterol and glycosphingolipids is seen as a primary hallmark of NPC1 deficiency, our lipidomics analysis revealed the buildup of several species of glycerophospholipids and other storage lipids in selectively late endosomes/lysosomes of NPC1-KO cells. While the plasma membrane proteome remained largely invariable, we observed pronounced alterations in several proteins linked to autophagy and lysosomal catabolism reflecting vesicular transport obstruction and defective lysosomal turnover resulting from NPC1 deficiency. Thus the use of SPIONs provides a major advancement in fingerprinting subcellular compartments, with an increased potential to identify disease-related alterations in their biomolecular compositions. PMID:28134274

  2. The lysosome system is severely impaired in a cellular model of neurodegeneration induced by HSV-1 and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kristen, Henrike; Sastre, Isabel; Muñoz-Galdeano, Teresa; Recuero, Maria; Aldudo, Jesus; Bullido, Maria J

    2018-03-29

    The causal agent(s) and molecular mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) remain unclear. Mounting evidence suggests that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection is involved in the AD pathogenesis. Oxidative stress (OS) may also be crucial in the AD development. Our group previously reported that both HSV-1 and OS trigger the appearance of AD-type neurodegeneration markers. The main aim of the present study was to identify the mechanisms involved in this triggering. Expression studies revealed the involvement of a set of OS-regulated genes in HSV-1-infected cells and in cells harboring the Swedish mutation of the amyloid beta precursor protein gene. Functional annotation of these genes revealed the lysosome system to be impaired, suggesting that the interaction of OS with both HSV-1 and amyloid beta precursor protein mutations affects lysosomal function. Functional studies revealed HSV-1 infection and OS to increase the lysosome load, reduce the activity of lysosomal hydrolases, affect cathepsin maturation, and inhibit the endocytosis-mediated degradation of the epidermal growth factor receptor. These findings suggest alterations in the lysosome system to be involved in different forms of AD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Regulation of Lysosomal Function by the DAF-16 Forkhead Transcription Factor Couples Reproduction to Aging in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Baxi, Kunal; Ghavidel, Ata; Waddell, Brandon; Harkness, Troy A; de Carvalho, Carlos E

    2017-09-01

    Aging in eukaryotes is accompanied by widespread deterioration of the somatic tissue. Yet, abolishing germ cells delays the age-dependent somatic decline in Caenorhabditis elegans In adult worms lacking germ cells, the activation of the DAF-9/DAF-12 steroid signaling pathway in the gonad recruits DAF-16 activity in the intestine to promote longevity-associated phenotypes. However, the impact of this pathway on the fitness of normally reproducing animals is less clear. Here, we explore the link between progeny production and somatic aging and identify the loss of lysosomal acidity-a critical regulator of the proteolytic output of these organelles-as a novel biomarker of aging in C. elegans The increase in lysosomal pH in older worms is not a passive consequence of aging, but instead is timed with the cessation of reproduction, and correlates with the reduction in proteostasis in early adult life. Our results further implicate the steroid signaling pathway and DAF-16 in dynamically regulating lysosomal pH in the intestine of wild-type worms in response to the reproductive cycle. In the intestine of reproducing worms, DAF-16 promotes acidic lysosomes by upregulating the expression of v-ATPase genes. These findings support a model in which protein clearance in the soma is linked to reproduction in the gonad via the active regulation of lysosomal acidification. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  4. Loss of the interferon-γ-inducible regulatory immunity-related GTPase (IRG), Irgm1, causes activation of effector IRG proteins on lysosomes, damaging lysosomal function and predicting the dramatic susceptibility of Irgm1-deficient mice to infection.

    PubMed

    Maric-Biresev, Jelena; Hunn, Julia P; Krut, Oleg; Helms, J Bernd; Martens, Sascha; Howard, Jonathan C

    2016-04-20

    The interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-inducible immunity-related GTPase (IRG), Irgm1, plays an essential role in restraining activation of the IRG pathogen resistance system. However, the loss of Irgm1 in mice also causes a dramatic but unexplained susceptibility phenotype upon infection with a variety of pathogens, including many not normally controlled by the IRG system. This phenotype is associated with lymphopenia, hemopoietic collapse, and death of the mouse. We show that the three regulatory IRG proteins (GMS sub-family), including Irgm1, each of which localizes to distinct sets of endocellular membranes, play an important role during the cellular response to IFN-γ, each protecting specific membranes from off-target activation of effector IRG proteins (GKS sub-family). In the absence of Irgm1, which is localized mainly at lysosomal and Golgi membranes, activated GKS proteins load onto lysosomes, and are associated with reduced lysosomal acidity and failure to process autophagosomes. Another GMS protein, Irgm3, is localized to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes; in the Irgm3-deficient mouse, activated GKS proteins are found at the ER. The Irgm3-deficient mouse does not show the drastic phenotype of the Irgm1 mouse. In the Irgm1/Irgm3 double knock-out mouse, activated GKS proteins associate with lipid droplets, but not with lysosomes, and the Irgm1/Irgm3(-/-) does not have the generalized immunodeficiency phenotype expected from its Irgm1 deficiency. The membrane targeting properties of the three GMS proteins to specific endocellular membranes prevent accumulation of activated GKS protein effectors on the corresponding membranes and thus enable GKS proteins to distinguish organellar cellular membranes from the membranes of pathogen vacuoles. Our data suggest that the generalized lymphomyeloid collapse that occurs in Irgm1(-/-) mice upon infection with a variety of pathogens may be due to lysosomal damage caused by off-target activation of GKS proteins on lysosomal

  5. Lysosomal Protein Lamtor1 Controls Innate Immune Responses via Nuclear Translocation of Transcription Factor EB.

    PubMed

    Hayama, Yoshitomo; Kimura, Tetsuya; Takeda, Yoshito; Nada, Shigeyuki; Koyama, Shohei; Takamatsu, Hyota; Kang, Sujin; Ito, Daisuke; Maeda, Yohei; Nishide, Masayuki; Nojima, Satoshi; Sarashina-Kida, Hana; Hosokawa, Takashi; Kinehara, Yuhei; Kato, Yasuhiro; Nakatani, Takeshi; Nakanishi, Yoshimitsu; Tsuda, Takeshi; Koba, Taro; Okada, Masato; Kumanogoh, Atsushi

    2018-04-23

    Amino acid metabolism plays important roles in innate immune cells, including macrophages. Recently, we reported that a lysosomal adaptor protein, Lamtor1, which serves as the scaffold for amino acid-activated mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), is critical for the polarization of M2 macrophages. However, little is known about how Lamtor1 affects the inflammatory responses that are triggered by the stimuli for TLRs. In this article, we show that Lamtor1 controls innate immune responses by regulating the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of transcription factor EB (TFEB), which has been known as the master regulator for lysosome and autophagosome biogenesis. Furthermore, we show that nuclear translocation of TFEB occurs in alveolar macrophages of myeloid-specific Lamtor1 conditional knockout mice and that these mice are hypersensitive to intratracheal administration of LPS and bleomycin. Our observation clarified that the amino acid-sensing pathway consisting of Lamtor1, mTORC1, and TFEB is involved in the regulation of innate immune responses. Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  6. Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency in all siblings of the same parents.

    PubMed

    Maciejko, James J; Anne, Premchand; Raza, Saleem; Lyons, Hernando J

    We present 4 normal-weight sibling children with lysosomal acid lipase deficiency (LAL-D). LAL-D was considered in the differential diagnosis based on the absence of secondary causes and primary inherited traits for their marked hyperlipidemia, together with unexplained hepatic transaminase elevation. Residual lysosomal acid lipase activity confirmed the diagnosis. DNA sequencing of LIPA indicated that the siblings were compound heterozygotes (c.894G>A and c.428+1G>A). This case describes the unusual occurrence of all offspring from the same nonconsanguineous mother and father inheriting compound heterozygosity of a recessive trait and the identification of an apparently unique LIPA mutation (c.428+1G>A). It highlights the collaborative effort between a lipidologist and gastroenterologist in developing a differential diagnosis leading to the confirmatory diagnosis of this rare, life-threatening disease. With the availability of an effective enzyme replacement therapy (sebelipase alfa), LAL-D should be entertained in the differential diagnosis of children, adolescents, and young adults with idiopathic hyperlipidemia and unexplained hepatic transaminase elevation. Copyright © 2017 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Low Serum Lysosomal Acid Lipase Activity Correlates with Advanced Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Shteyer, Eyal; Villenchik, Rivka; Mahamid, Mahmud; Nator, Nidaa; Safadi, Rifaat

    2016-02-27

    Fatty liver has become the most common liver disorder and is recognized as a major health burden in the Western world. The causes for disease progression are not fully elucidated but lysosomal impairment is suggested. Here we evaluate a possible role for lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) activity in liver disease. To study LAL levels in patients with microvesicular, idiopathic cirrhosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Medical records of patients with microvesicular steatosis, cryptogenic cirrhosis and NAFLD, diagnosed on the basis of liver biopsies, were included in the study. Measured serum LAL activity was correlated to clinical, laboratory, imaging and pathological data. No patient exhibited LAL activity compatible with genetic LAL deficiency. However, serum LAL activity inversely predicted liver disease severity. A LAL level of 0.5 was the most sensitive for detecting both histologic and noninvasive markers for disease severity, including lower white blood cell count and calcium, and elevated γ-glutamyltransferase, creatinine, glucose, glycated hemoglobin, uric acid and coagulation function. Serum LAL activity <0.5 indicates severe liver injury in patients with fatty liver and cirrhosis. Further studies should define the direct role of LAL in liver disease severity and consider the possibility of replacement therapy.

  8. Novel LIPA mutations in Mexican siblings with lysosomal acid lipase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Santillán-Hernández, Yuritzi; Almanza-Miranda, Enory; Xin, Winnie W; Goss, Kendrick; Vera-Loaiza, Aurea; Gorráez-de la Mora, María T; Piña-Aguilar, Raul E

    2015-01-21

    Lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) deficiency is an under-recognized lysosomal disease caused by deficient enzymatic activity of LAL. In this report we describe two affected female Mexican siblings with early hepatic complications. At two months of age, the first sibling presented with alternating episodes of diarrhea and constipation, and later with hepatomegaly, elevated transaminases, high levels of total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low levels of high-density lipoprotein. Portal hypertension and grade 2 esophageal varices were detected at four years of age. The second sibling presented with hepatomegaly, elevated transaminases and mildly elevated low-density lipoprotein and low high-density lipoprotein at six months of age. LAL activity was deficient in both patients. Sequencing of LIPA revealed two previously unreported heterozygous mutations in exon 4: c.253C>A and c.294C>G. These cases highlight the clinical continuum between the so-called Wolman disease and cholesteryl ester storage disease, and underscore that LAL deficiency represents a single disease with a degree of clinical heterogeneity.

  9. Gene therapy for lysosomal storage disorders: recent advances for metachromatic leukodystrophy and mucopolysaccaridosis I.

    PubMed

    Penati, Rachele; Fumagalli, Francesca; Calbi, Valeria; Bernardo, Maria Ester; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2017-07-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are rare inherited metabolic disorders characterized by a dysfunction in lysosomes, leading to waste material accumulation and severe organ damage. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) and haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) have been exploited as potential treatments for LSDs but pre-clinical and clinical studies have shown in some cases limited efficacy. Intravenous ERT is able to control the damage of visceral organs but cannot prevent nervous impairment. Depending on the disease type, HSCT has important limitations when performed for early variants, unless treatment occurs before disease onset. In the attempt to overcome these issues, gene therapy has been proposed as a valuable therapeutic option, either ex vivo, with target cells genetically modified in vitro, or in vivo, by inserting the genetic material with systemic or intra-parenchymal, in situ administration. In particular, the use of autologous haematopoietic stem cells (HSC) transduced with a viral vector containing a healthy copy of the mutated gene would allow supra-normal production of the defective enzyme and cross correction of target cells in multiple tissues, including the central nervous system. This review will provide an overview of the most recent scientific advances in HSC-based gene therapy approaches for the treatment of LSDs with particular focus on metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) and mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS-I).

  10. Abnormalities in neural progenitor cells in a dog model of lysosomal storage disease.

    PubMed

    Walton, Raquel M; Wolfe, John H

    2007-08-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders constitute a large group of genetic diseases, many of which are characterized by mental retardation and other neurologic symptoms. The mechanisms of neural dysfunction remain poorly understood. Because neural progenitor cells (NPCs) are fundamentally important to normal brain development and function, we investigated NPC properties in a canine model of mucopolysaccharidosis VII (MPS VII). MPS VII is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by defects in the catabolism of glycosaminoglycans. NPCs were isolated from the olfactory bulb, cerebellum, and striatal subventricular zone of normal and MPS VII (beta-glucuronidase-deficient) postnatal dog brains. Canine NPCs (cNPCs) from normal and MPS VII brains had similar growth curves, but cerebellar-derived cNPCs grew significantly slower than those derived from other regions. In differentiation assays, MPS VII cNPCs from the striatal subventricular zone and cerebellum generated fewer mature neuronal and/or glial cells than normal, and MPS VII olfactory bulb-derived cNPCs retained significantly more phenotypically immature cells. These differences were only present at the earliest time point after isolation; at later passages, there were no differences attributable to genotype. The data suggest that MPS VII cNPCs respond differently to developmental cues in vivo, probably because of the diseased neural microenvironment rather than intrinsic cellular deficits.

  11. Trypanosomatid parasites rescue heme from endocytosed hemoglobin through lysosomal HRG transporters.

    PubMed

    Cabello-Donayre, María; Malagarie-Cazenave, Sophie; Campos-Salinas, Jenny; Gálvez, Francisco J; Rodríguez-Martínez, Alba; Pineda-Molina, Estela; Orrego, Lina M; Martínez-García, Marta; Sánchez-Cañete, María P; Estévez, Antonio M; Pérez-Victoria, José M

    2016-09-01

    Pathogenic trypanosomatid parasites are auxotrophic for heme and they must scavenge it from their human host. Trypanosoma brucei (responsible for sleeping sickness) and Leishmania (leishmaniasis) can fulfill heme requirement by receptor-mediated endocytosis of host hemoglobin. However, the mechanism used to transfer hemoglobin-derived heme from the lysosome to the cytosol remains unknown. Here we provide strong evidence that HRG transporters mediate this essential step. In bloodstream T. brucei, TbHRG localizes to the endolysosomal compartment where endocytosed hemoglobin is known to be trafficked. TbHRG overexpression increases cytosolic heme levels whereas its downregulation is lethal for the parasites unless they express the Leishmania orthologue LmHR1. LmHR1, known to be an essential plasma membrane protein responsible for the uptake of free heme in Leishmania, is also present in its acidic compartments which colocalize with endocytosed hemoglobin. Moreover, LmHR1 levels modulated by its overexpression or the abrogation of an LmHR1 allele correlate with the mitochondrial bioavailability of heme from lysosomal hemoglobin. In addition, using heme auxotrophic yeasts we show that TbHRG and LmHR1 transport hemoglobin-derived heme from the digestive vacuole to the cytosol. Collectively, these results show that trypanosomatid parasites rescue heme from endocytosed hemoglobin through endolysosomal HRG transporters, which could constitute novel drug targets. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. [High cost drugs for rare diseases in Brazil: the case of lysosomal storage disorders].

    PubMed

    de Souza, Mônica Vinhas; Krug, Bárbara Corrêa; Picon, Paulo Dornelles; Schwartz, Ida Vanessa Doederlein

    2010-11-01

    This paper approaches in a critical way aspects of Brazilian public policies for drugs, emphasizing those classified as high cost and for rare diseases. The lysosomal storage diseases was taken as an example because of their rarity and the international trend for the development of new drugs for their treatment, all at high costs. Three lysosomal storage diseases were approached: Gaucher disease, Fabry disease and mucopolysaccharidosis type I. Gaucher disease has its treatment drug licensed in Brazil and guidelines for its use are established through a clinical protocol by the Ministry of Health. The others have their drug treatments registered in Brazil; however, no treatment guidelines for them have been developed by the government. The objective of the paper was to foster the discussion on the role of health technology assessment for high-cost drugs for rare diseases in Brazil, emphasizing the need for establishing health policies with legitimacy towards these diseases. Despite the difficulties in establishing a health policy for each rare disease, it is possible to create rational models to deal with this growing challenge.

  13. Expression of the disease on female carriers of X-linked lysosomal disorders: a brief review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Most lysosomal diseases (LD) are inherited as autosomal recessive traits, but two important conditions have X-linked inheritance: Fabry disease and Mucopolysaccharidosis II (MPS II). These two diseases show a very different pattern regarding expression on heterozygotes, which does not seem to be explained by the X-inactivation mechanism only. While MPS II heterozygotes are asymptomatic in most instances, in Fabry disease most of female carriers show some disease manifestation, which is sometimes severe. It is known that there is a major difference among X-linked diseases depending on the cell autonomy of the gene product involved and, therefore, on the occurrence of cross-correction. Since lysosomal enzymes are usually secreted and uptaken by neighbor cells, the different findings between MPS II and Fabry disease heterozygotes can also be due to different efficiency of cross-correction (higher in MPS II and lower in Fabry disease). In this paper, we review these two X-linked LD in order to discuss the mechanisms that could explain the different rates of penetrance and expressivity observed in the heterozygotes; this could be helpful to better understand the expression of X-linked traits. PMID:20509947

  14. Caffeine stimulates hepatic lipid metabolism by the autophagy-lysosomal pathway in mice.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rohit A; Farah, Benjamin L; Singh, Brijesh K; Siddique, Monowarul M; Li, Ying; Wu, Yajun; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Gooding, Jessica; Ching, Jianhong; Zhou, Jin; Martinez, Laura; Xie, Sherwin; Bay, Boon-Huat; Summers, Scott A; Newgard, Christopher B; Yen, Paul M

    2014-04-01

    Caffeine is one of the world's most consumed drugs. Recently, several studies showed that its consumption is associated with lower risk for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), an obesity-related condition that recently has become the major cause of liver disease worldwide. Although caffeine is known to stimulate hepatic fat oxidation, its mechanism of action on lipid metabolism is still not clear. Here, we show that caffeine surprisingly is a potent stimulator of hepatic autophagic flux. Using genetic, pharmacological, and metabolomic approaches, we demonstrate that caffeine reduces intrahepatic lipid content and stimulates β-oxidation in hepatic cells and liver by an autophagy-lysosomal pathway. Furthermore, caffeine-induced autophagy involved down-regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling and alteration in hepatic amino acids and sphingolipid levels. In mice fed a high-fat diet, caffeine markedly reduces hepatosteatosis and concomitantly increases autophagy and lipid uptake in lysosomes. These results provide novel insight into caffeine's lipolytic actions through autophagy in mammalian liver and its potential beneficial effects in NAFLD. © 2014 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  15. Postnatal and prenatal diagnosis of lysosomal storage diseases in the former Soviet Union.

    PubMed

    Krasnopolskaya, X D; Mirenburg, T V; Akhunov, V S; Voskoboeva, E Y

    1997-02-14

    Diagnosis and prevention of lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) in the former Soviet Union (FSU) is based on the interaction of various local counselling units with the Department of Inherited Metabolic Diseases (DIMD) at the Research Center of Medical Genetics (RAMS). Work began in 1982 using standard, as well as newly developed biochemical techniques. 25 different LSD were diagnosed in 445 patients from 404 families. 106 pregnancies in families at risk were monitored prenatally, and 25 affected fetuses were diagnosed and aborted. The clinical spectrum of diagnosed lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) was surprisingly heterogeneous. Besides classical forms of LSD numerous atypical forms were discovered. They included juvenile and adult forms of some sphingolipidoses manifesting as progressive dystonia, spinocerebellar degeneration and hebephrenic schizophrenia, as well as an atypical form of mucolipidosis III in which the clinical phenotype bore an obvious resemblance to that of mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) VI. The incidence of MPS was much higher than that of other LSD. It was evaluated as 1:15000 for two regions of the FSU. This investigation revealed some peculiarities of the ethnic distribution of MPS in populations of the FSU and supported the high prevalence of the gene for Tay-Sachs disease gene in Ashkenazi Jews.

  16. Interconversion of the specificities of human lysosomal enzymes associated with Fabry and Schindler diseases.

    PubMed

    Tomasic, Ivan B; Metcalf, Matthew C; Guce, Abigail I; Clark, Nathaniel E; Garman, Scott C

    2010-07-09

    The human lysosomal enzymes alpha-galactosidase (alpha-GAL, EC 3.2.1.22) and alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (alpha-NAGAL, EC 3.2.1.49) share 46% amino acid sequence identity and have similar folds. The active sites of the two enzymes share 11 of 13 amino acids, differing only where they interact with the 2-position of the substrates. Using a rational protein engineering approach, we interconverted the enzymatic specificity of alpha- GAL and alpha-NAGAL. The engineered alpha-GAL (which we call alpha-GAL(SA)) retains the antigenicity of alpha-GAL but has acquired the enzymatic specificity of alpha-NAGAL. Conversely, the engineered alpha-NAGAL (which we call alpha-NAGAL(EL)) retains the antigenicity of alpha-NAGAL but has acquired the enzymatic specificity of the alpha-GAL enzyme. Comparison of the crystal structures of the designed enzyme alpha-GAL(SA) to the wild-type enzymes shows that active sites of alpha-GAL(SA) and alpha-NAGAL superimpose well, indicating success of the rational design. The designed enzymes might be useful as non-immunogenic alternatives in enzyme replacement therapy for treatment of lysosomal storage disorders such as Fabry disease.

  17. Interconversion of the Specificities of Human Lysosomal Enzymes Associated with Fabry and Schindler Diseases*

    PubMed Central

    Tomasic, Ivan B.; Metcalf, Matthew C.; Guce, Abigail I.; Clark, Nathaniel E.; Garman, Scott C.

    2010-01-01

    The human lysosomal enzymes α-galactosidase (α-GAL, EC 3.2.1.22) and α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (α-NAGAL, EC 3.2.1.49) share 46% amino acid sequence identity and have similar folds. The active sites of the two enzymes share 11 of 13 amino acids, differing only where they interact with the 2-position of the substrates. Using a rational protein engineering approach, we interconverted the enzymatic specificity of α- GAL and α-NAGAL. The engineered α-GAL (which we call α-GALSA) retains the antigenicity of α-GAL but has acquired the enzymatic specificity of α-NAGAL. Conversely, the engineered α-NAGAL (which we call α-NAGALEL) retains the antigenicity of α-NAGAL but has acquired the enzymatic specificity of the α-GAL enzyme. Comparison of the crystal structures of the designed enzyme α-GALSA to the wild-type enzymes shows that active sites of α-GALSA and α-NAGAL superimpose well, indicating success of the rational design. The designed enzymes might be useful as non-immunogenic alternatives in enzyme replacement therapy for treatment of lysosomal storage disorders such as Fabry disease. PMID:20444686

  18. A new V-ATPase regulatory mechanism mediated by the Rab interacting lysosomal protein (RILP)

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, Maria; Bucci, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Progressive luminal acidification of intracellular compartments is important for their functions. Proton transport into the organelle's lumen is mediated by vacuolar ATPases (V-ATPases) large multi-subunit proton pumps organized into 2 domains, V0 and V1, working together as a rotary machine. The interaction of each subunit with specific partners plays a crucial role in controlling V-ATPase activity. Recently, we have shown that RILP, a Rab7 effector regulating late endocytic traffic and biogenesis of multivesicular bodies (MVBs), is a specific interactor of the V-ATPase subunit V1G1, a fundamental component of the peripheral stalk for correct V-ATPase assembly. RILP controls V1G1 stability and localization affecting V-ATPase assembly and function at the level of endosomes and lysosomes. The discovery of this new regulatory mechanism for V-ATPase opens new scenario to the comprehension of organelle's pH regulation and reveals a key role of RILP in controlling different aspects of endosome to lysosome transport. PMID:26843904

  19. Bilayered Clathrin Coats on Endosomal Vacuoles Are Involved in Protein Sorting toward Lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Sachse, Martin; Urbé, Sylvie; Oorschot, Viola; Strous, Ger J.; Klumperman, Judith

    2002-01-01

    In many cells endosomal vacuoles show clathrin coats of which the function is unknown. Herein, we show that this coat is predominantly present on early endosomes and has a characteristic bilayered appearance in the electron microscope. By immunoelectron miscroscopy we show that the coat contains clathrin heavy as well as light chain, but lacks the adaptor complexes AP1, AP2, and AP3, by which it differs from clathrin coats on endocytic vesicles and recycling endosomes. The coat is insensitive to short incubations with brefeldin A, but disappears in the presence of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin. No association of endosomal coated areas with tracks of tubulin or actin was found. By quantitative immunoelectron microscopy, we found that the lysosomal-targeted receptors for growth hormone (GHR) and epidermal growth factor are concentrated in the coated membrane areas, whereas the recycling transferrin receptor is not. In addition, we found that the proteasomal inhibitor MG 132 induces a redistribution of a truncated GHR (GHR-369) toward recycling vesicles, which coincided with a redistribution of endosomal vacuole-associated GHR-369 to the noncoated areas of the limiting membrane. Together, these data suggest a role for the bilayered clathrin coat on vacuolar endosomes in targeting of proteins to lysosomes. PMID:11950941

  20. Lysosomal storage disease: gene therapy on both sides of the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Aronovich, Elena L.; Hackett, Perry B.

    2014-01-01

    Most lysosomal storage disorders affect the nervous system as well as other tissues and organs of the body. Previously, the complexities of these diseases, particularly in treating neurologic abnormalities, were too great to surmount. However, based on recent developments there are realistic expectations that effective therapies are coming soon. Gene therapy offers the possibility of affordable, comprehensive treatment associated with these diseases currently not provided by standards of care. With a focus on correction of neurologic disease by systemic gene therapy of mucopolysaccharidoses types I and IIIA, we review some of the major recent advances in viral and non-viral vectors, methods of their delivery and strategies leading to correction of both the nervous and somatic tissues as well as evaluation of functional correction of neurologic manifestations in animal models. We discuss two questions: what systemic gene therapy strategies work best for correction of both somatic and neurologic abnormalities in a lysosomal storage disorder and is there evidence that targeting peripheral tissues (e.g., in the liver) has a future for ameliorating neurologic disease in patients? PMID:25410058

  1. Acetate-induced apoptosis in colorectal carcinoma cells involves lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cathepsin D release

    PubMed Central

    Marques, C; Oliveira, C S F; Alves, S; Chaves, S R; Coutinho, O P; Côrte-Real, M; Preto, A

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is one of the most common causes of cancer-related mortality. Short-chain fatty acids secreted by dietary propionibacteria from the intestine, such as acetate, induce apoptosis in CRC cells and may therefore be relevant in CRC prevention and therapy. We previously reported that acetic acid-induced apoptosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells involves partial vacuole permeabilization and release of Pep4p, the yeast cathepsin D (CatD), which has a protective role in this process. In cancer cells, lysosomes have emerged as key players in apoptosis through selective lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and release of cathepsins. However, the role of CatD in CRC survival is controversial and has not been assessed in response to acetate. We aimed to ascertain whether LMP and CatD are involved in acetate-induced apoptosis in CRC cells. We showed that acetate per se inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis. More importantly, we uncovered that acetate triggers LMP and CatD release to the cytosol. Pepstatin A (a CatD inhibitor) but not E64d (a cathepsin B and L inhibitor) increased acetate-induced apoptosis of CRC cells, suggesting that CatD has a protective role in this process. Our data indicate that acetate induces LMP and subsequent release of CatD in CRC cells undergoing apoptosis, and suggest exploiting novel strategies using acetate as a prevention/therapeutic agent in CRC, through simultaneous treatment with CatD inhibitors. PMID:23429293

  2. Acetate-induced apoptosis in colorectal carcinoma cells involves lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cathepsin D release.

    PubMed

    Marques, C; Oliveira, C S F; Alves, S; Chaves, S R; Coutinho, O P; Côrte-Real, M; Preto, A

    2013-02-21

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is one of the most common causes of cancer-related mortality. Short-chain fatty acids secreted by dietary propionibacteria from the intestine, such as acetate, induce apoptosis in CRC cells and may therefore be relevant in CRC prevention and therapy. We previously reported that acetic acid-induced apoptosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells involves partial vacuole permeabilization and release of Pep4p, the yeast cathepsin D (CatD), which has a protective role in this process. In cancer cells, lysosomes have emerged as key players in apoptosis through selective lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and release of cathepsins. However, the role of CatD in CRC survival is controversial and has not been assessed in response to acetate. We aimed to ascertain whether LMP and CatD are involved in acetate-induced apoptosis in CRC cells. We showed that acetate per se inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis. More importantly, we uncovered that acetate triggers LMP and CatD release to the cytosol. Pepstatin A (a CatD inhibitor) but not E64d (a cathepsin B and L inhibitor) increased acetate-induced apoptosis of CRC cells, suggesting that CatD has a protective role in this process. Our data indicate that acetate induces LMP and subsequent release of CatD in CRC cells undergoing apoptosis, and suggest exploiting novel strategies using acetate as a prevention/therapeutic agent in CRC, through simultaneous treatment with CatD inhibitors.

  3. Increased plasma oligomeric alpha-synuclein in patients with lysosomal storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Pchelina, S N; Nuzhnyi, E P; Emelyanov, A K; Boukina, T M; Usenko, T S; Nikolaev, M A; Salogub, G N; Yakimovskii, A F; Zakharova, E Yu

    2014-11-07

    A link between lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) and neurodegenerative disorders associated with accumulation of presynaptic protein alpha-synuclein has been shown. Particularly, Gaucher disease (GD) patients with a deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GBA) and carriers of GBA mutations are at increased risk of Parkinson's disease (PD). It remains unclear whether this link is due to increased alpha-synuclein oligomerization. Here we show that level of oligomeric alpha-synuclein form, associated with PD development, is increased in plasma of GD patients (n=41, median=22.9pg/mL, range1.57-444.58pg/mL; controls (n=40, median=6.02pg/mL, range 1.05-103.14pg/mL, p<0.0001). This difference is absent in GD patients receiving enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for more than 5 years. Moreover, the levels of alpha-synuclein oligomers in plasma are also higher in patients with other LSDs (Niemann-Pick type C, Krabbe disease, Wolman disease) compared to the median value in controls. Therefore, we suggest that mutations in the GBA gene and at least in several other LSDs genes may be associated with an increase in oligomeric alpha-synuclein in plasma. ERT applied for recovering of GBA functions in GD treatment might decrease formation of plasma oligomeric alpha-synuclein. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Defects of Vps15 in skeletal muscles lead to autophagic vacuolar myopathy and lysosomal disease

    PubMed Central

    Nemazanyy, Ivan; Blaauw, Bert; Paolini, Cecilia; Caillaud, Catherine; Protasi, Feliciano; Mueller, Amelie; Proikas-Cezanne, Tassula; Russell, Ryan C; Guan, Kun-Liang; Nishino, Ichizo; Sandri, Marco; Pende, Mario; Panasyuk, Ganna

    2013-01-01

    The complex of Vacuolar Protein Sorting 34 and 15 (Vps34 and Vps15) has Class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity and putative roles in nutrient sensing, mammalian Target Of Rapamycin (mTOR) activation by amino acids, cell growth, vesicular trafficking and autophagy. Contrary to expectations, here we show that Vps15-deficient mouse tissues are competent for LC3-positive autophagosome formation and maintain mTOR activation. However, an impaired lysosomal function in mutant cells is traced by accumulation of adaptor protein p62, LC3 and Lamp2 positive vesicles, which can be reverted to normal levels after ectopic overexpression of Vps15. Mice lacking Vps15 in skeletal muscles, develop a severe myopathy. Distinct from the autophagy deficient Atg7−/− mutants, pathognomonic morphological hallmarks of autophagic vacuolar myopathy (AVM) are observed in Vps15−/− mutants, including elevated creatine kinase plasma levels, accumulation of autophagosomes, glycogen and sarcolemmal features within the fibres. Importantly, Vps34/Vps15 overexpression in myoblasts of Danon AVM disease patients alleviates the glycogen accumulation. Thus, the activity of the Vps34/Vps15 complex is critical in disease conditions such as AVMs, and possibly a variety of other lysosomal storage diseases. PMID:23630012

  5. The fusion of autophagosome with lysosome is impaired in L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongwei; Yu, Xiao; Zhu, Shaihong; Li, Xia; Lu, Ben; Li, Zhiqiang; Yu, Can

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory pancreatic disease that carries considerable morbidity and mortality. The pathogenesis of this disease remains poorly understood. We investigated the incidence of autophagy in mice following induction of acute pancreatitis. Mice were received intraperitoneal injections of L-arginine (200 mg × 2/100 g BW), while controls were administered with saline. Pancreatic tissues were assessed by histology, electron microscopy and western blotting. Injection of L-arginine resulted in the accumulation of autophagosomes and a relative paucity of autolysosomes. Moreover, the autophagy marker p62 is significantly increased. However, the lysosomal-associated membrane protein-2 (Lamp-2), a protein that is required for the proper fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes, is decreased in acute pancreatitis. These results suggest that a crucial role for autophagy and Lamp-2 in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. Our data suggest that the autophagic flux is impaired in acute pancreatitis. The depletion of Lamp-2 may play a role in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis.

  6. SKIP controls lysosome positioning using a composite kinesin-1 heavy and light chain-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Sanger, Anneri; Yip, Yan Y.; Randall, Thomas S.; Pernigo, Stefano; Steiner, Roberto A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The molecular interplay between cargo recognition and regulation of the activity of the kinesin-1 microtubule motor is not well understood. Using the lysosome adaptor SKIP (also known as PLEKHM2) as model cargo, we show that the kinesin heavy chains (KHCs), in addition to the kinesin light chains (KLCs), can recognize tryptophan-acidic-binding determinants on the cargo when presented in the context of an extended KHC-interacting domain. Mutational separation of KHC and KLC binding shows that both interactions are important for SKIP–kinesin-1 interaction in vitro and that KHC binding is important for lysosome transport in vivo. However, in the absence of KLCs, SKIP can only bind to KHC when autoinhibition is relieved, suggesting that the KLCs gate access to the KHCs. We propose a model whereby tryptophan-acidic cargo is first recognized by KLCs, resulting in destabilization of KHC autoinhibition. This primary event then makes accessible a second SKIP-binding site on the KHC C-terminal tail that is adjacent to the autoinhibitory IAK region. Thus, cargo recognition and concurrent activation of kinesin-1 proceed in hierarchical stepwise fashion driven by a dynamic network of inter- and intra-molecular interactions. PMID:28302907

  7. Newborn screening for lysosomal storage disorders: clinical evaluation of a two-tier strategy.

    PubMed

    Meikle, Peter J; Ranieri, Enzo; Simonsen, Henrik; Rozaklis, Tina; Ramsay, Steve L; Whitfield, Phillip D; Fuller, Maria; Christensen, Ernst; Skovby, Flemming; Hopwood, John J

    2004-10-01

    To evaluate the use of protein markers using immune-quantification assays and of metabolite markers using tandem mass spectrometry for the identification, at birth, of individuals who have a lysosomal storage disorder. A retrospective analysis was conducted of Guthrie cards that were collected from newborns in Denmark during the period 1982-1997. Patients whose lysosomal storage disorder (LSD; 47 representing 12 disorders) was diagnosed in Denmark during the period 1982-1997 were selected, and their Guthrie cards were retrieved from storage. Control cards (227) were retrieved from the same period. Additional control cards (273) were collected from the South Australian Screening Centre (Australia). From 2 protein and 94 metabolite markers, 15 were selected and evaluated for their use in the identification of LSDs. Glycosphingolipid and oligosaccharide markers showed 100% sensitivity and specificity for the identification of Fabry disease, alpha-mannosidosis, mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) IVA, MPS IIIA, Tay-Sachs disease, and I-cell disease. Lower sensitivities were observed for Gaucher disease and sialidosis. No useful markers were identified for Krabbe disease, MPS II, Pompe disease, and Sandhoff disease. The protein markers LAMP-1 and saposin C were not able to differentiate individuals who had an LSD from the control population. Newborn screening for selected LSDs is possible with current technology. However, additional development is required to provide a broad coverage of disorders in a single, viable program.

  8. Relative acidic compartment volume as a lysosomal storage disorder–associated biomarker

    PubMed Central

    te Vruchte, Danielle; Speak, Anneliese O.; Wallom, Kerri L.; Al Eisa, Nada; Smith, David A.; Hendriksz, Christian J.; Simmons, Louise; Lachmann, Robin H.; Cousins, Alison; Hartung, Ralf; Mengel, Eugen; Runz, Heiko; Beck, Michael; Amraoui, Yasmina; Imrie, Jackie; Jacklin, Elizabeth; Riddick, Kate; Yanjanin, Nicole M.; Wassif, Christopher A.; Rolfs, Arndt; Rimmele, Florian; Wright, Naomi; Taylor, Clare; Ramaswami, Uma; Cox, Timothy M.; Hastings, Caroline; Jiang, Xuntian; Sidhu, Rohini; Ory, Daniel S.; Arias, Begona; Jeyakumar, Mylvaganam; Sillence, Daniel J.; Wraith, James E.; Porter, Forbes D.; Cortina-Borja, Mario; Platt, Frances M.

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs) occur at a frequency of 1 in every 5,000 live births and are a common cause of pediatric neurodegenerative disease. The relatively small number of patients with LSDs and lack of validated biomarkers are substantial challenges for clinical trial design. Here, we evaluated the use of a commercially available fluorescent probe, Lysotracker, that can be used to measure the relative acidic compartment volume of circulating B cells as a potentially universal biomarker for LSDs. We validated this metric in a mouse model of the LSD Niemann-Pick type C1 disease (NPC1) and in a prospective 5-year international study of NPC patients. Pediatric NPC subjects had elevated acidic compartment volume that correlated with age-adjusted clinical severity and was reduced in response to therapy with miglustat, a European Medicines Agency–approved drug that has been shown to reduce NPC1-associated neuropathology. Measurement of relative acidic compartment volume was also useful for monitoring therapeutic responses of an NPC2 patient after bone marrow transplantation. Furthermore, this metric identified a potential adverse event in NPC1 patients receiving i.v. cyclodextrin therapy. Our data indicate that relative acidic compartment volume may be a useful biomarker to aid diagnosis, clinical monitoring, and evaluation of therapeutic responses in patients with lysosomal disorders. PMID:24487591

  9. WO3/Pt nanoparticles promote light-induced lipid peroxidation and lysosomal instability within tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Clark, Andrea J; Petty, Howard R

    2016-02-19

    Although metal-metal oxide nanoparticles have attracted considerable interest as catalysts, they have attracted little interest in nanomedicine. This is likely due to the fact that metal oxide semiconductors generally require biologically harmful ultraviolet excitation. In contrast, this study focuses upon WO3/Pt nanoparticles, which can be excited by visible light. To optimize the nanoparticles' catalytic performance, platinization was performed at alkaline pH. These nanoparticles destroyed organic dyes, consumed dissolved oxygen and produced hydroxyl radicals. 4T1 breast cancer cells internalized WO3/Pt nanoparticles within the membrane-bound endo-lysosomal compartment as shown by electron and fluorescence microscopy. During visible light exposure, but not in darkness, WO3/Pt nanoparticles manufacture reactive oxygen species, promote lipid peroxidation, and trigger lysosomal membrane disruption. As cells of the immune system degrade organic molecules, produce reactive oxygen species, and activate the lipid peroxidation pathway within target cells, these nanoparticles mimic the chemical attributes of immune effector cells. These biomimetic nanoparticles should become useful in managing certain cancers, especially ocular cancer.

  10. Interconversion of the Specificities of Human Lysosomal Enzymes Associated with Fabry and Schindler Diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasic, Ivan B.; Metcalf, Matthew C.; Guce, Abigail I.

    2010-09-03

    The human lysosomal enzymes {alpha}-galactosidase ({alpha}-GAL, EC 3.2.1.22) and {alpha}-N-acetylgalactosaminidase ({alpha}-NAGAL, EC 3.2.1.49) share 46% amino acid sequence identity and have similar folds. The active sites of the two enzymes share 11 of 13 amino acids, differing only where they interact with the 2-position of the substrates. Using a rational protein engineering approach, we interconverted the enzymatic specificity of {alpha}-GAL and {alpha}-NAGAL. The engineered {alpha}-GAL (which we call {alpha}-GALSA) retains the antigenicity of {alpha}-GAL but has acquired the enzymatic specificity of {alpha}-NAGAL. Conversely, the engineered {alpha}-NAGAL (which we call {alpha}-NAGAL{sup EL}) retains the antigenicity of {alpha}-NAGAL but has acquired themore » enzymatic specificity of the {alpha}-GAL enzyme. Comparison of the crystal structures of the designed enzyme {alpha}-GAL{sup SA} to the wild-type enzymes shows that active sites of {alpha}-GAL{sup SA} and {alpha}-NAGAL superimpose well, indicating success of the rational design. The designed enzymes might be useful as non-immunogenic alternatives in enzyme replacement therapy for treatment of lysosomal storage disorders such as Fabry disease.« less