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Sample records for a3 receptor affinity

  1. Structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Largent, B.L.; Wikstroem, H.G.; Gundlach, A.L.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-12-01

    The structural determinants of sigma receptor affinity have been evaluated by examining a wide range of compounds related to opioids, neuroleptics, and phenylpiperidine dopaminergic structures for affinity at sigma receptor-binding sites labeled with (+)-(/sup 3/H)3-PPP. Among opioid compounds, requirements for sigma receptor affinity differ strikingly from the determinants of affinity for conventional opiate receptors. Sigma sites display reverse stereoselectivity to classical opiate receptors. Multi-ringed opiate-related compounds such as morphine and naloxone have negligible affinity for sigma sites, with the highest sigma receptor affinity apparent for benzomorphans which lack the C ring of opioids. Highest affinity among opioids and other compounds occurs with more lipophilic N-substituents. This feature is particularly striking among the 3-PPP derivatives as well as the opioids. The butyrophenone haloperidol is the most potent drug at sigma receptors we have detected. Among the series of butyrophenones, receptor affinity is primarily associated with the 4-phenylpiperidine moiety. Conformational calculations for various compounds indicate a fairly wide range of tolerance for distances between the aromatic ring and the amine nitrogen, which may account for the potency at sigma receptors of structures of considerable diversity. Among the wide range of structures that bind to sigma receptor-binding sites, the common pharmacophore associated with high receptor affinity is a phenylpiperidine with a lipophilic N-substituent.

  2. Combining selectivity and affinity predictions using an integrated Support Vector Machine (SVM) approach: An alternative tool to discriminate between the human adenosine A(2A) and A(3) receptor pyrazolo-triazolo-pyrimidine antagonists binding sites.

    PubMed

    Michielan, Lisa; Bolcato, Chiara; Federico, Stephanie; Cacciari, Barbara; Bacilieri, Magdalena; Klotz, Karl-Norbert; Kachler, Sonja; Pastorin, Giorgia; Cardin, Riccardo; Sperduti, Alessandro; Spalluto, Giampiero; Moro, Stefano

    2009-07-15

    G Protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) selectivity is an important aspect of drug discovery process, and distinguishing between related receptor subtypes is often the key to therapeutic success. Nowadays, very few valuable computational tools are available for the prediction of receptor subtypes selectivity. In the present study, we present an alternative application of the Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Support Vector Regression (SVR) methodologies to simultaneously describe both A(2A)R versus A(3)R subtypes selectivity profile and the corresponding receptor binding affinities. We have implemented an integrated application of SVM-SVR approach, based on the use of our recently reported autocorrelated molecular descriptors encoding for the Molecular Electrostatic Potential (autoMEP), to simultaneously discriminate A(2A)R versus A(3)R antagonists and to predict their binding affinity to the corresponding receptor subtype of a large dataset of known pyrazolo-triazolo-pyrimidine analogs. To validate our approach, we have synthetized 51 new pyrazolo-triazolo-pyrimidine derivatives anticipating both A(2A)R/A(3)R subtypes selectivity and receptor binding affinity profiles.

  3. Structure-Affinity Relationships and Structure-Kinetics Relationships of Pyrido[2,1-f]purine-2,4-dione Derivatives as Human Adenosine A3 Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lizi; Burger, Wessel A C; van Veldhoven, Jacobus P D; Kuiper, Boaz J; van Duijl, Tirsa T; Lenselink, Eelke B; Paasman, Ellen; Heitman, Laura H; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2017-09-14

    We expanded on a series of pyrido[2,1-f]purine-2,4-dione derivatives as human adenosine A3 receptor (hA3R) antagonists to determine their kinetic profiles and affinities. Many compounds showed high affinities and a diverse range of kinetic profiles. We found hA3R antagonists with very short residence time (RT) at the receptor (2.2 min for 5) and much longer RTs (e.g., 376 min for 27 or 391 min for 31). Two representative antagonists (5 and 27) were tested in [(35)S]GTPγS binding assays, and their RTs appeared correlated to their (in)surmountable antagonism. From a kon-koff-KD kinetic map, we divided the antagonists into three subgroups, providing a possible direction for the further development of hA3R antagonists. Additionally, we performed a computational modeling study that sheds light on the crucial receptor interactions, dictating the compounds' binding kinetics. Knowledge of target binding kinetics appears useful for developing and triaging new hA3R antagonists in the early phase of drug discovery.

  4. High-affinity neuropeptide Y receptor antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, A J; Matthews, J E; Slepetis, R J; Jansen, M; Viveros, O H; Tadepalli, A; Harrington, W; Heyer, D; Landavazo, A; Leban, J J

    1995-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant peptide transmitters in the mammalian brain. In the periphery it is costored and coreleased with norepinephrine from sympathetic nerve terminals. However, the physiological functions of this peptide remain unclear because of the absence of specific high-affinity receptor antagonists. Three potent NPY receptor antagonists were synthesized and tested for their biological activity in in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo functional assays. We describe here the effects of these antagonists inhibiting specific radiolabeled NPY binding at Y1 and Y2 receptors and antagonizing the effects of NPY in human erythroleukemia cell intracellular calcium mobilization perfusion pressure in the isolated rat kidney, and mean arterial blood pressure in anesthetized rats. PMID:7568074

  5. High-affinity neuropeptide Y receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Daniels, A J; Matthews, J E; Slepetis, R J; Jansen, M; Viveros, O H; Tadepalli, A; Harrington, W; Heyer, D; Landavazo, A; Leban, J J; Spaltenstein, A

    1995-09-26

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most abundant peptide transmitters in the mammalian brain. In the periphery it is costored and coreleased with norepinephrine from sympathetic nerve terminals. However, the physiological functions of this peptide remain unclear because of the absence of specific high-affinity receptor antagonists. Three potent NPY receptor antagonists were synthesized and tested for their biological activity in in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo functional assays. We describe here the effects of these antagonists inhibiting specific radiolabeled NPY binding at Y1 and Y2 receptors and antagonizing the effects of NPY in human erythroleukemia cell intracellular calcium mobilization perfusion pressure in the isolated rat kidney, and mean arterial blood pressure in anesthetized rats.

  6. Affinity Regulates Spatial Range of EGF Receptor Autocrine Ligand Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, Ann; Iida, Tomoko; Lam, Ho-Yan; Hill, Virginia; Wiley, H S.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2002-08-08

    Proper spatial localization of EGFR signaling activated by autocrine ligands represents a critical factor in embryonic development as well as tissue organization and function, and ligand/receptor binding affinity is among the molecular and cellular properties suggested to play a role in governing this localization. The authors employ a computational model to predict how receptor-binding affinity affects local capture of autocrine ligand vis-a-vis escape to distal regions, and provide experimental test by constructing cell lines expressing EGFR along with either wild-type EGF or a low-affinity mutant, EGF{sup L47M}. The model predicts local capture of a lower affinity autocrine ligand to be less efficient when the ligand production rate is small relative to receptor appearance rate. The experimental data confirm this prediction, demonstrating that cells can use ligand/receptor binding affinity to regulate ligand spatial distribution when autocrine ligand production is limiting for receptor signaling.

  7. Solution assembly of the pseudo-high affinity and intermediate affinity interleukin-2 receptor complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Z.; Goldstein, B.; Laue, T. M.; Liparoto, S. F.; Nemeth, M. J.; Ciardelli, T. L.

    1999-01-01

    The high affinity interleukin-2 receptor is composed of three cell surface subunits, IL-2Ralpha, IL-2Rbeta, and IL-2Rgamma. Functional forms of the IL-2 receptor exist, however, that enlist only two of the three subunits. On activated T-cells, the alpha- and beta-subunits combine as a preformed heterodimer (the pseudo-high affinity receptor) that serves to capture IL-2. On a subpopulation of natural killer cells, the beta- and gamma-subunits interact in a ligand-dependent manner to form the intermediate affinity receptor site. Previously, we have demonstrated the feasibility of employing coiled-coil molecular recognition for the solution assembly of a heteromeric IL-2 receptor complex. In that study, although the receptor was functional, the coiled-coil complex was a trimer rather than the desired heterodimer. We have now redesigned the hydrophobic heptad sequences of the coiled-coils to generate soluble forms of both the pseudo-high affinity and the intermediate affinity heterodimeric IL-2 receptors. The properties of these complexes were examined and their relevance to the physiological IL-2 receptor mechanism is discussed. PMID:10091650

  8. Affinities of dihydrocodeine and its metabolites to opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Helmut; Vormfelde, Stefan v; Klinder, Klaus; Gundert-Remy, Ursula; Gleiter, Christoph H; Skopp, Gisela; Aderjan, Rolf; Fuhr, Uwe

    2002-08-01

    Dihydrocodeine is metabolized to dihydromorphine, dihydrocodeine-6-O-, dihydromorphine-3-O- and dihydromorphine-6-O-glucuronide, and nordihydrocodeine. The current study was conducted to evaluate the affinities of dihydrocodeine and its metabolites to mu-, delta- and kappa-opioid receptors. Codeine, morphine, d,1-methadone and levomethadone were used as controls. Displacement binding experiments were carried out at the respective opioid receptor types using preparations of guinea pig cerebral cortex and the specific opioid agonists [5H]DAMGO (mu-opioid receptor), [3H]DPDPE (delta-opioid receptor) and [3H]U69,593 (K-opioid receptor) as radioactive ligands at concentrations of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.0 nmol/l, respectively. All substances had their greatest affinity to the mu-opioid receptor. The affinities of dihydromorphine and dihydromorphine-6-O-glucuronide were at least 70 times greater compared with dihydrocodeine (Ki 0.3 micromol/l), whereas the other metabolites yielded lower affinities. For the delta-opioid receptor, the order of affinities was similar with the exception that dihydrocodeine-6-O-glucuronide revealed a doubled affinity in relation to dihydrocodeine (Ki 5.9 micromol/l). In contrast, for the K-opioid receptor, dihydrocodeine-6-O- and dihydromorphine-6-O-glucuronide had clearly lower affinities compared to the respective parent compounds. The affinity of nordihydrocodeine was almost identical to that of dihydrocodeine (Ki 14 micromol/l), whereas dihydromorphine had a 60 times higher affinity. These results suggest that dihydromorphine and its 6-O-glucuronide may provide a relevant contribution to the pharmacological effects of dihydrocodeine. The O-demethylation of dihydrocodeine to dihydromorphine is mediated by the polymorphic cytochrome P-450 enzyme CYP2D6, resulting in different metabolic profiles in extensive and poor metabolizers. About 7% of the caucasian population which are CYP2D6 poor metabolizers thus may experience therapeutic failure after

  9. Optimal T-cell receptor affinity for inducing autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Koehli, Sabrina; Naeher, Dieter; Galati-Fournier, Virginie; Zehn, Dietmar; Palmer, Ed

    2014-01-01

    T-cell receptor affinity for self-antigen has an important role in establishing self-tolerance. Three transgenic mouse strains expressing antigens of variable affinity for the OVA transgenic-I T-cell receptor were generated to address how TCR affinity affects the efficiency of negative selection, the ability to prime an autoimmune response, and the elimination of the relevant target cell. Mice expressing antigens with an affinity just above the negative selection threshold exhibited the highest risk of developing experimental autoimmune diabetes. The data demonstrate that close to the affinity threshold for negative selection, sufficient numbers of self-reactive T cells escape deletion and create an increased risk for the development of autoimmunity. PMID:25411315

  10. MTD-PLS: a PLS-based variant of the MTD method. A 3D-QSAR analysis of receptor affinities for a series of halogenated dibenzoxin and biphenyl derivatives.

    PubMed

    Oprea, T I; Kurunczi, L; Olah, M; Simon, Z

    2001-01-01

    MTD-PLS, the Partial Least Squares (PLS) variant of the Minimum Topological Difference (MTD) method is described. In MTD-PLS, molecules are characterised not only by the occupancy or nonoccupancy of the hypermolecular vertices (as in classical MTD), but also by additional descriptors for each vertex: fragmental van der Waals volumes, fragmental hydrophobicities, partial atomic charges, etc. This method was applied to a series of 73 polyhalogenated derivatives of dibenzo-p-dioxine, dibenzofuran and biphenyl (induction of aryl hydrocarbon hydrolase and affinities to rat cytosolic receptor), previously studied by MTD. The separation of steric, hydrophobic, and electrostatic effects was achieved retranslating from the latent variable space into a linear combination of the initial structural variables. The MTD-PLS method yields more detailed results compared to classical MTD, indicating the importance of electrostatic effects at some substituent positions.

  11. Low and high affinity receptors mediate cellular uptake of heparanase

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Zaken, Olga; Shafat, Itay; Gingis-Velitski, Svetlana; Bangio, Haim; Kelson, Idil Kasuto; Alergand, Tal; Amor, Yehudit; Maya, Ruth Ben-Yakar; Vlodavsky, Israel; Ilan, Neta

    2008-01-01

    Heparanase is an endoglycosidase which cleaves heparan sulfate and hence participates in degradation and remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Importantly, heparanase activity correlated with the metastatic potential of tumor-derived cells, attributed to enhanced cell dissemination as a consequence of heparan sulfate cleavage and remodeling of the extracellular matrix barrier. Heparanase has been characterized as a glycoprotein, yet glycan biochemical analysis was not performed to date. Here, we applied the Qproteome™ GlycoArray kit to perform glycan analysis of heparanase, and compared the kit results with the more commonly used biochemical analyses. We employed fibroblasts isolated from patients with I-cell disease (mucolipidosis II), fibroblasts deficient of low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and fibroblasts lacking mannose 6-phosphate receptor, to explore the role of mannose 6-phosphate in heparanase uptake. Iodinated heparanase has been utilized to calculate binding affinity. We provide evidence for hierarchy of binding to cellular receptors as a function of heparanase concentration. We report the existence of a high affinity, low abundant (i.e., low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein, mannose 6-phosphate receptor), as well as a low affinity, high abundant (i.e., heparan sulfate proteoglycan) receptors that mediate heparanase binding, and suggest that these receptors cooperate to establish high affinity binding sites for heparanase, thus maintaining extracellular retention of the enzyme tightly regulated. PMID:17981072

  12. Receptor crosstalk protein, calcyon, regulates affinity state of dopamine D1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Lidow, M S; Roberts, A; Zhang, L; Koh, P O; Lezcano, N; Bergson, C

    2001-09-21

    The recently cloned protein, calcyon, potentiates crosstalk between G(s)-coupled dopamine D1 receptors and heterologous G(q/11)-coupled receptors allowing dopamine D1 receptors to stimulate intracellular Ca(2+) release, in addition to cAMP production. This crosstalk also requires the participating G(q/11)-coupled receptors to be primed by their agonists. We examined the ability of calcyon and priming to regulate the affinity of dopamine D1 receptors for its ligands. Receptor binding assays were performed on HEK293 cell membrane preparations expressing dopamine D1 receptors either alone or in combination with calcyon. Co-expression of dopamine D1 receptor and calcyon affected neither the affinity of this receptor for antagonists nor the affinity of agonist binding to this receptor high and low-affinity states. However, the presence of calcyon dramatically decreased the proportion of the high-affinity dopamine D1 receptor agonist binding sites. This decrease was reversed by carbachol, which primes the receptor crosstalk by stimulating endogenous G(q/11)-coupled muscarinic receptors. Our findings suggest that calcyon regulates the ability of dopamine D1 receptors to achieve the high-affinity state for agonists, in a manner that depends on priming of receptor crosstalk.

  13. HIGH AFFINITY ACYLATING ANTAGONISTS FOR MUSCARINIC RECEPTORS

    PubMed Central

    Baumgold, Jesse; Karton, Yishai; Malka, Naftali; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The muscarinic antagonists pirenzepine and telenzepine were derivitized as alkylamino derivatives at a site on the molecules corresponding to a region of bulk tolerance in receptor binding. The distal primary amino groups were coupled to the cross-linking reagent meta-phenylene diisothiocyanate, resulting in two isothiocyanate derivatives that were found to inhibit muscarinic receptors irreversibly and in a dose-dependent fashion. Preincubation of rat forebrain membranes with an isothiocyanate derivative followed by radioligand binding using [3H]N-methylscopolamine diminished the Bmax value, but did not affect the Kd value. The receptor binding site was not restored upon repeated washing, indicating that irreversible inhibition had occurred. IC50 values for the irreversible inhibition at rat forebrain muscarinic receptors were 0.15 nM and 0.19 nM, for derivatives of pirenzepine and telenzepine, respectively. The isothiocyanate derivative of pirenzepine was non-selective as an irreversible muscarinic inhibitor, and the corresponding derivative prepared from telenzepine was 5-fold selective for forebrain (mainly m1) vs. heart (m2) muscarinic receptors. PMID:1625525

  14. Methods for quantifying T cell receptor binding affinities and thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Gloor, Brian E.; Armstrong, Kathryn M.; Baker, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    αβ T cell receptors (TCRs) recognize peptide antigens bound and presented by class I or class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. Recognition of a peptide/MHC complex is required for initiation and propagation of a cellular immune response, as well as the development and maintenance of the T cell repertoire. Here we discuss methods to quantify the affinities and thermodynamics of interactions between soluble ectodomains of TCRs and their peptide/MHC ligands, focusing on titration calorimetry, surface plasmon resonance, and fluorescence anisotropy. As TCRs typically bind ligand with weak-to-moderate affinities, we focus the discussion on means to enhance the accuracy and precision of low affinity measurements. In addition to further elucidating the biology of the T cell mediated immune response, more reliable low affinity measurements will aid with more probing studies with mutants or altered peptides that can help illuminate the physical underpinnings of how TCRs achieve their remarkable recognition properties. PMID:21609868

  15. Affinity Labeling of Membrane Receptors Using Tissue-Penetrating Radiations

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Franklin C.; Boja, John; Ho, Beng; Kuhar, Michael J.; Wong, Dean F.

    2013-01-01

    Photoaffinity labeling, a useful in vivo biochemical tool, is limited when applied in vivo because of the poor tissue penetration by ultraviolet (UV) photons. This study investigates affinity labeling using tissue-penetrating radiation to overcome the tissue attenuation and irreversibly label membrane receptor proteins. Using X-ray (115 kVp) at low doses (<50 cGy or Rad), specific and irreversible binding was found on striatal dopamine transporters with 3 photoaffinity ligands for dopamine transporters, to different extents. Upon X-ray exposure (115 kVp), RTI-38 and RTI-78 ligands showed irreversible and specific binding to the dopamine transporter similar to those seen with UV exposure under other conditions. Similarly, gamma rays at higher energy (662 keV) also affect irreversible binding of photoreactive ligands to peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (by PK14105) and to the dopamine (D2) membrane receptors (by azidoclebopride), respectively. This study reports that X-ray and gamma rays induced affinity labeling of membrane receptors in a manner similar to UV with photoreactive ligands of the dopamine transporter, D2 dopamine receptor (D2R), and peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBDZR). It may provide specific noninvasive irreversible block or stimulation of a receptor using tissue-penetrating radiation targeting selected anatomic sites. PMID:23936811

  16. Limited proteolysis for assaying ligand binding affinities of nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Benkoussa, M; Nominé, B; Mouchon, A; Lefebvre, B; Bernardon, J M; Formstecher, P; Lefebvre, P

    1997-01-01

    The binding of natural or synthetic ligands to nuclear receptors is the triggering event leading to gene transcription activation or repression. Ligand binding to the ligand binding domain of these receptors induces conformational changes that are evidenced by an increased resistance of this domain to proteases. In vitro labeled receptors were incubated with various synthetic or natural agonists or antagonists and submitted to trypsin digestion. Proteolysis products were separated by SDS-PAGE and quantified. The amount of trypsin-resistant fragments was proportional to receptor occupancy by the ligand, and allowed the determination of dissociation constants (kDa). Using the wild-type or mutated human retinoic acid receptor alpha as a model, kDa values determined by classical competition binding assays using tritiated ligands are in agreement with those measured by the proteolytic assay. This method was successfully extended to human retinoic X receptor alpha, glucocorticoid receptor, and progesterone receptor, thus providing a basis for a new, faster assay to determine simultaneously the affinity and conformation of receptors when bound to a given ligand.

  17. High-affinity carbamate analogues of morphinan at opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xuemei; Knapp, Brian I; Bidlack, Jean M; Neumeyer, John L

    2007-03-15

    A series of carbamate analogues were synthesized from levorphanol (1a), cyclorphan (2a) or butorphan (3a) and evaluated in vitro for their binding affinity at mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors. Functional activities of these compounds were measured in the [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding assay. Phenyl carbamate derivatives 2d and 3d showed the highest binding affinity for kappa receptor (K(i)=0.046 and 0.051 nM) and for mu receptor (K(i)=0.11 and 0.12 nM). Compound 1c showed the highest mu selectivity. The preliminary assay for agonist and antagonist properties of these ligands in stimulating [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding mediated by the kappa opioid receptor illustrated that all of these ligands were kappa agonists. At the mu receptor, compounds 1b, 1c, 2b, and 3b were agonists, while compounds 2c-e and 3c-e were mu agonists/antagonists.

  18. Benzodiazepines: electron affinity, receptors and cell signaling - a multifaceted approach.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Peter; Ott, Nadia; Cooksy, Andrew L

    2013-12-01

    This report entails a multifaceted approach to benzodiazepine (BZ) action, involving electron affinity, receptors, cell signaling and other aspects. Computations of the electron affinities (EAs) of different BZs have been carried out to establish the effect of various substituents on their EA. These computations were undertaken to serve as a first step in determining what role electron transfer (ET) plays in BZ activity. The calculations were conducted on the premise that the nature of the substituent will either decrease or increase the electron density of the benzene ring, thus altering the ability of the molecule to accept an electron. Investigations were performed on the effect of drug protonation on EA. Similarities involving substituent effects in prior electrochemical studies are also discussed. As part of the multifaceted approach, EA is linked to ET, which appears to play a role in therapeutic activity and toxicity. There is extensive literature dealing with the role of receptors in BZ activity. Significant information on receptor involvement was reported more than 40 years ago. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is known to be importantly involved. GABA is a probable mediator of BZ effects. BZ and GABA receptors, although not identical, are physiologically linked. Cell signaling is known to play a part in the biochemistry of BZ action. Various factors participated, such as gene expression, allosteric influence, toxic effects and therapeutic action. Evidence points to involvement of EA and ET in the mode of action in cell signaling. Oxidative stress and antioxidant effects are also addressed.

  19. Altered catecholamine receptor affinity in rabbit aortic intimal hyperplasia

    SciTech Connect

    O'Malley, M.K.; Cotecchia, S.; Hagen, P.O. )

    1991-08-01

    Intimal thickening is a universal response to endothelial denudation and is also thought to be a precursor of atherosclerosis. The authors have demonstrated selective supersensitivity in arterial intimal hyperplasia to norepinephrine and they now report a possible mechanism for this. Binding studies in rabbit aorta with the selective alpha 1-adrenergic radioligand 125I-HEAT demonstrated that there was no change in receptor density (20 {plus minus} 4 fmole/10(6) cells) in intact vascular smooth muscle cells at either 5 or 14 days after denudation. However, competition studies showed a 2.6-fold increase in alpha 1-adrenergic receptor affinity for norepinephrine in intimal hyperplastic tissue (P less than 0.05). This increased affinity for norepinephrine was associated with a greater increase in 32P-labeled phosphatidylinositol (148% intimal thickening versus 76% control) and phosphatidic acid (151% intimal thickening versus 56% control) following norepinephrine stimulation of free floating rings of intimal hyperplastic aorta. These data suggest that the catecholamine supersensitivity in rabbit aortic intimal hyperplasia is receptor mediated and may be linked to the phosphatidylinositol cycle.

  20. KW-3902, a selective high affinity antagonist for adenosine A1 receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, H.; Ichimura, M.; Takeda, M.; Kanda, T.; Shimada, J.; Suzuki, F.; Kase, H.

    1996-01-01

    1. We demonstrate that 8-(noradamantan-3-yl)-1,3-dipropylxanthine (KW-3902) is a very potent and selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, assessed by radioligand binding and cyclic AMP response in cells. 2. In rat forebrain adenosine A1 receptors labelled with [3H]-cyclohexyladenosine (CHA), KW-3902 had a Ki value of 0.19 nM, whereas it showed a Ki value of 170 nM in rat striatal A2A receptors labelled with [3H]-2-[p-(2-carboxyethyl)-phenethylamino]-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoad enosine (CGS21680), indicating 890 fold A1 receptor selectivity versus the A2A receptor. KW-3902 at 10 microM showed no effect on recombinant rat A3 receptors expressed on CHO cells. 3. Saturation studies with [3H]-KW-3902 revealed that it bound with high affinity (Kd = 77 pM) and limited capacity (Bmax = 470 fmol mg-1 of protein) to a single class of recognition sites. A high positive correlation was observed between the pharmacological profile of adenosine ligands inhibiting the binding of [3H]-KW-3902 and that of [3H]-CHA. 4. KW-3902 showed potent A1 antagonism against the inhibition of forskolin-induced cyclic AMP accumulation in DDT1 MF-2 cells by the A1-selective agonist, cyclopentyladenosine with a dissociation constant (KB value) of 0.34 nM. KW-3902 antagonized 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine-elicited cyclic AMP accumulation via A2B receptors with a KB value of 52 nM. 5. KW-3902 exhibited marked species-dependent differences in the binding affinities. The highest affinity was for the rat A1 receptor (ki = 0.19 nM) and these values for guinea-pig and dog A1 receptors were 1.3 and 10 nM, respectively. PMID:8732272

  1. Diversity-Oriented Synthesis of Cyclic Azapeptides by A(3) -Macrocyclization Provides High-Affinity CD36-Modulating Peptidomimetics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinqiang; Mulumba, Mukandila; Ong, Huy; Lubell, William D

    2017-01-16

    Macrocyclization has enabled the use of peptides in drug discovery creating a need for methods to synthesize diverse peptide macrocycles. Azapeptides have advanced to clinically used drugs, however, few cyclic azapeptides have been studied. A multiple component "A(3) -macrocyclization" strategy is described for the preparation of diverse cyclic azapeptides and is demonstrated by the synthesis of 15 growth hormone releasing hormone-6 (GHRP-6) analogs. Certain cyclic aza-GHRP-6 analogs exhibited unprecedented affinity for the CD36 receptor, and capacity to modulate Toll-like receptor agonist-induced overproduction of nitric oxide, and reduce pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production in macrophages.

  2. Synthetic studies of neoclerodane diterpenoids from Salvia splendens and evaluation of Opioid Receptor affinity.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Gianfranco; Savona, Giuseppe; Rodríguez, Benjamín; Dersch, Christina M; Rothman, Richard B; Prisinzano, Thomas E

    2008-12-20

    Salvinorin A (1), a neoclerodane diterpene from the hallucinogenic mint Salvia divinorum, is the only known non-nitrogenous and specific kappa-opioid agonist. Several structural congeners of 1 isolated from Salvia splendens (2 - 8) together with a series of semisynthetic derivatives (9 - 24), some of which possess a pyrazoline structural moiety (9, 19 - 22), have been tested for affinity at human mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors. None of these compounds showed high affinity binding to these receptors. However, 10 showed modest affinity for kappa receptors suggesting other naturally neoclerodanes from different Salvia species may possess opioid affinity.

  3. Correlation between myometrial receptor affinity, lipophilicity and antagonistic potency of oxytocin analogues in the rat.

    PubMed

    Atke, A; Vilhardt, H; Melin, P

    1988-08-01

    Purified myometrial plasma membrane fractions were prepared from rats treated with oestradiol to induce oestrus. The binding affinities of 11 antagonistic oxytocin analogues to the oxytocin receptor of the plasma membranes were measured. Furthermore, lipophilicity of the peptides was assessed by reversed-phase high pressure liquid chromatography. No significant correlation was found between lipophilicity of the analogues and values for antagonistic potencies or binding affinities. Also, receptor-binding affinity did not correlate with in-vitro antagonistic activity whereas a significant correlation was obtained between binding affinities and in-vivo antagonistic potency for analogues void of partial agonist properties. It is concluded that neither receptor affinity nor lipophilicity in the analogues can predict the potency of the antagonists in vitro. However, receptor affinity was found to be a relatively good predictor of the in-vivo potency, while the usefulness of measuring antagonistic potency in vitro is questioned.

  4. Thiophene bioisosteres of spirocyclic σ receptor ligands: relationships between substitution pattern and σ receptor affinity.

    PubMed

    Oberdorf, Christoph; Schepmann, Dirk; Vela, Jose Miguel; Buschmann, Helmut; Holenz, Jörg; Wünsch, Bernhard

    2012-06-14

    On the basis of the 6',7'-dihydrospiro[piperidine-4,4'-thieno[3,2-c]pyran] framework, a series of more than 30 σ ligands with versatile substituents in 1-, 2'-, and 6'-position has been synthesized and pharmacologically evaluated in order to find novel structure-affinity relationships. It was found that a cyclohexylmethyl residue at the piperidine N-atom instead of a benzyl moiety led to increased σ(2) affinity and therefore to decreased σ(1)/σ(2) selectivity. Small substituents (e.g., OH, OCH(3), CN, CH(2)OH) in 6'-position adjacent to the O-atom were well tolerated by the σ(1) receptor. Removal of the substituent in 6'-position resulted in very potent but unselective σ ligands (13). A broad range of substituents with various lipophilic and H-bond forming properties was introduced in 2'-position adjacent to the S-atom without loss of σ(1) affinity. However, very polar and basic substituents in both 2'- and 6'-position decreased the σ(1) affinity considerably. It is postulated that the electron density of the thiophene moiety has a big impact on the σ(1) affinity.

  5. [Cardioprotective effect of fluvoxamine, sigma-1 receptor high affinity agonist].

    PubMed

    Tagashira, Hideaki; Fukunaga, Kohji

    2012-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are known to reduce post-myocardial infarction (MI)-induced morbidity and mortality. However, the molecular mechanism underlying SSRI-induced cardioprotection remains unclear. Here, we investigated the role of sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) stimulation with fluvoxamine on myocardial hypertrophy and cardioprotection. Male ICR mice were subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC) in the cardiac aortic arch. To confirm the cardioprotective role of Sig-1R stimulation by fluvoxamine, we treated mice with fluvoxamine (0.5 or 1 mg/kg) orally once a day for 4 weeks after onset of aortic banding. Interestingly, in untreated mice, Sig-1R expression in the left ventricle (LV) markedly decreased over 4 weeks with increased hypertrophy. By contrast, fluvoxamine administration significantly attenuated TAC-induced myocardial hypertrophy concomitant with recovery of Sig-1R expression in LV. Fluvoxamine also attenuated hypertrophy-induced impaired LV fractional shortening. The fluvoxamine cardioprotective effect was nullified by treatment with a Sig-1R antagonist, NE-100 (1 mg/kg). Importantly, another SSRI with very low affinity for Sig-1R, paroxetine, did not exhibit antihypertrophic effects in TAC mice and in cultured cardiomyocyte treated with angiotensin II. Fluvoxamine treatment significantly restored TAC-induced impaired Akt and eNOS phosphorylation in LV. Our findings suggest that fluvoxamine protects heart against TAC-induced cardiac dysfunction via upregulation of Sig-1R and stimulation of Sig-1R-mediated Akt-eNOS signaling in mice. This is the first report of a potential role of Sig-1R stimulation by fluvoxamine in preventing cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial injury in TAC mice.

  6. High-affinity benzodiazepine receptor ligands among benzodiazepines and betacarbolines with different intrinsic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Yliniemelae, A.; Gynther, J. ); Konschin, H.; Tylli, H. ); Rouvinen, J. )

    1989-01-01

    Structural and electrostatic features of diazepam, flumazenil, and methyl betacarboline-3-carboxylate (BCCM) have been investigated using the molecular superimposition method. These high-affinity benzodiazepine (BZ) receptor ligands are structurally unrelated and they have different intrinsic activity. These ligands are superimposed in such a way that common structural and electrostatic features essential for the high receptor binding affinity overlap. In addition to this binding pharmacophore, there are roughly three separate binding zones in the BZ receptor, one for each class of ligands. The intrinsic activity of BZ receptor ligands depends on the molecular structures and the way the ligand approaches the receptor.

  7. Regulation of osteosarcoma EGF receptor affinity by phorbol ester and cyclic AMP

    SciTech Connect

    Borst, S.E.; Catherwood, B.D. )

    1989-04-01

    We studied the binding and degradation of 125I-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF) by UMR-106 osteosarcoma cells and the regulation of EGF receptor affinity for EGF by the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and by treatments that raise intracellular levels of cyclic AMP. Cell surface binding of (125I)EGF to A431 cells reached a plateau after a 30 minute incubation at 37 degrees C but was undetectable in UMR-106 cells. Degradation of (125I)EGF proceeded at a 50-fold higher rate in A431 cells on a per cell basis, but receptor-bound (125I)EGF was internalized and degraded at a 3.5-fold higher rate by UMR-106 cells on a per receptor basis. At 4 degrees C, (125I)EGF labeled a single class of surface binding sites in the UMR-106 cell. Treatment with TPA at 37 degrees C reduced subsequent cell surface binding of (125I)EGF at 4 degrees C a maximum of 80% with an IC50 of 1.25 ng/ml. Maximal TPA reduction of (125I)EGF binding was observed within 5-15 minutes and was due to a reduction in the affinity of cell surface receptors of (125I)EGF without a change in receptor density. Pretreatment of the cells for 4 h with 30 microM forskolin, 1 mM isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX) plus 30 microM forskolin, or 1 mM IBMX plus 100 ng/ml parathyroid hormone (PTH) attenuated the loss in (125I)EGF binding caused by a subsequent dose of 10 ng/ml of TPA by 17% (p less than 0.0005), 39% (p less than 0.0002), and 35% (p less than 0.002), respectively.

  8. Only high-affinity receptors for interleukin 2 mediate internalization of ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, A.M.; Harford, J.B.; Svetlik, P.B.; Leonard, W.L.; Depper, J.M.; Waldmann, T.A.; Greene, W.C.; Klausner, R.D.

    1986-03-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptors are expressed on activated T cells and in select T-cell leukemias. Recently, it has been demonstrated that at least two classes of receptor for IL-2 exist with markedly different affinities for ligand. All known biological actions of IL-2 have been correlated with occupancy of high-affinity sites; the function of the low-affinity sites remains unknown. Receptor-mediated endocytosis is the primary means of internalization of cell-surface receptors and their ligands. The internalization of IL-2 bound to high- and low-affinity receptor sites was studied in a human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-infected human T-cell leukemia cell line and in a cloned murine cytotoxic T-cell line (CTLL). Internalization of IL-2 occurred only when bound to high-affinity sites. In addition, an anti-receptor antibody (anti-Tac), which binds equally well to high- and low-affinity sites, demonstrated no detectable internalization. The implications of these findings as they relate to IL-2 receptor structure and function are discussed.

  9. GHB receptor targets in the CNS: focus on high-affinity binding sites.

    PubMed

    Bay, Tina; Eghorn, Laura F; Klein, Anders B; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2014-01-15

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound in the mammalian brain with both low- and high-affinity receptor targets. GHB is used clinically in the treatment of symptoms of narcolepsy and alcoholism, but also illicitly abused as the recreational drug Fantasy. Major pharmacological effects of exogenous GHB are mediated by GABA subtype B (GABAB) receptors that bind GHB with low affinity. The existence of GHB high-affinity binding sites has been known for more than three decades, but the uncovering of their molecular identity has only recently begun. This has been prompted by the generation of molecular tools to selectively study high-affinity sites. These include both genetically modified GABAB knock-out mice and engineered selective GHB ligands. Recently, certain GABA subtype A (GABAA) receptor subtypes emerged as high-affinity GHB binding sites and potential physiological mediators of GHB effects. In this research update, a description of the various reported receptors for GHB is provided, including GABAB receptors, certain GABAA receptor subtypes and other reported GHB receptors. The main focus will thus be on the high-affinity binding targets for GHB and their potential functional roles in the mammalian brain.

  10. Antigen affinity discrimination is an intrinsic function of the B cell receptor

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wanli; Meckel, Tobias; Tolar, Pavel; Sohn, Hae Won

    2010-01-01

    Antibody affinity maturation, a hallmark of adaptive immune responses, results from the selection of B cells expressing somatically hypermutated B cell receptors (BCRs) with increased affinity for antigens. Despite the central role of affinity maturation in antibody responses, the molecular mechanisms by which the increased affinity of a B cell for antigen is translated into a selective advantage for that B cell in immune responses is incompletely understood. We use high resolution live-cell imaging to provide evidence that the earliest BCR-intrinsic events that follow within seconds of BCR–antigen binding are highly sensitive to the affinity of the BCR for antigen. High affinity BCRs readily form oligomers and the resulting microclusters grow rapidly, resulting in enhanced recruitment of Syk kinase and calcium fluxes. Thus, B cells are able to read the affinity of antigen by BCR-intrinsic mechanisms during the earliest phases of BCR clustering, leading to the initiation of B cell responses. PMID:20404102

  11. High-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine to muscarinic cholinergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Kellar, K.J.; Martino, A.M.; Hall, D.P. Jr.; Schwartz, R.D.; Taylor, R.L.

    1985-06-01

    High-affinity binding of (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine to muscarinic cholinergic sites in rat CNS and peripheral tissues was measured in the presence of cytisin, which occupies nicotinic cholinergic receptors. The muscarinic sites were characterized with regard to binding kinetics, pharmacology, anatomical distribution, and regulation by guanyl nucleotides. These binding sites have characteristics of high-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors with a Kd of approximately 30 nM. Most of the muscarinic agonist and antagonist drugs tested have high affinity for the (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binding site, but pirenzepine, an antagonist which is selective for M-1 receptors, has relatively low affinity. The ratio of high-affinity (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binding sites to total muscarinic binding sites labeled by (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate varies from 9 to 90% in different tissues, with the highest ratios in the pons, medulla, and heart atrium. In the presence of guanyl nucleotides, (/sup 3/H) acetylcholine binding is decreased, but the extent of decrease varies from 40 to 90% in different tissues, with the largest decreases being found in the pons, medulla, cerebellum, and heart atrium. The results indicate that (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine binds to high-affinity M-1 and M-2 muscarinic receptors, and they suggest that most M-2 sites have high affinity for acetylcholine but that only a small fraction of M-1 sites have such high affinity.

  12. Class II-restricted T cell receptor engineered in vitro for higher affinity retains peptide specificity and function

    PubMed Central

    Weber, K. Scott; Donermeyer, David L.; Allen, Paul M.; Kranz, David M.

    2005-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) αβ heterodimer determines the peptide and MHC specificity of a T cell. It has been proposed that in vivo selection processes maintain low TCR affinities because T cells with higher-affinity TCRs would (i) have reduced functional capacity or (ii) cross-react with self-peptides resulting in clonal deletion. We used the class II-restricted T cell clone 3.L2, specific for murine hemoglobin (Hb/I-Ek), to explore these possibilities by engineering higher-affinity TCR mutants. A 3.L2 single-chain TCR (Vβ-linker-Vα) was mutagenized and selected for thermal stability and surface expression in a yeast display system. Stabilized mutants were used to generate a library with CDR3 mutations that were selected with Hb/I-Ek to isolate a panel of affinity mutants with KD values as low as 25 nM. Kinetic analysis of soluble single-chain TCRs showed that increased affinities were the result of both faster on-rates and slower off-rates. T cells transfected with the mutant TCRs and wild-type TCR responded to similar concentrations of peptide, indicating that the increased affinity was not detrimental to T cell activation. T cell transfectants maintained exquisite hemoglobin peptide specificity, but an altered peptide ligand that acted as an antagonist for the wild-type TCR was converted to a strong agonist with higher-affinity TCRs. These results show that T cells with high-affinity class II reactive TCRs are functional, but there is an affinity threshold above which an increase in affinity does not result in significant enhancement of T cell activation. PMID:16365315

  13. Short-term desensitization of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in mouse neuroblastoma cells: selective loss of agonist low-affinity and pirenzepine high-affinity binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Cioffi, C.L.; el-Fakahany, E.E.

    1986-09-01

    The effects of brief incubation with carbamylcholine on subsequent binding of (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine were investigated in mouse neuroblastoma cells (clone N1E-115). This treatment demonstrated that the muscarinic receptors in this neuronal clone can be divided into two types; one which is readily susceptible to regulation by receptor agonists, whereas the other is resistant in this regard. In control cells, both pirenzepine and carbamylcholine interacted with high- and low-affinity subsets of muscarinic receptors. Computer-assisted analysis of the competition between pirenzepine and carbamylcholine with (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine showed that the receptor sites remaining upon desensitization are composed mainly of pirenzepine low-affinity and agonist high-affinity binding sites. Furthermore, there was an excellent correlation between the ability of various muscarinic receptor agonists to induce a decrease in consequent (/sup 3/H)N-methylscopolamine binding and their efficacy in stimulating cyclic GMP synthesis in these cells. Thus, only the agonists that are known to recognize the receptor's low-affinity conformation in order to elicit increases in cyclic GMP levels were capable of diminishing ligand binding. Taken together, our present results suggest that the receptor population that is sensitive to regulation by agonists includes both the pirenzepine high-affinity and the agonist low-affinity receptor binding states. In addition, the sensitivity of these receptor subsets to rapid regulation by agonists further implicates their involvement in desensitization of muscarinic receptor-mediated cyclic GMP formation.

  14. Characterization of opiate receptor heterogeneity using affinity ligands and phospholipase A/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Reichman, M.

    1985-01-01

    The primary aim of the dissertation was to study the heterogeneity of opiate receptors by utilizing affinity ligands, and by modification of the receptor lipid-microenvironment with phospholipase A/sub 2/ (PLA/sub 2/). The affinity ligands, 14-bromacetamidomorphine (BAM) and 14-chloroacetylnaltrexone (CAN), selectively inactivated high affinity dihydromorphine binding sites in an apparently irreversible manner (the inhibition was resistant to extensive washes of treated neural membrane homogenates). The inhibitory effect of PLA/sub 2/ (10 ng/ml) on opiate receptor subtypes was determined using (/sup 3/H)-dihydromorphine (..mu..-type agonist), (/sup 3/H)-enkephalin (delta agonist) and (/sup 3/H)-naloxone (..mu.. antagonist). PLA/sub 2/ abolished the high affinity antagonist binding site, whereas it inhibited high and low affinity agonist binding sites similarly. The results suggest that high affinity antagonist binding sites are different from high affinity agonist binding sites. Indirect binding assays demonstrated that the selectivities of ..mu..- and delta receptors are not affected significantly by PLA/sub 2/ treatment.

  15. Affinity of cyamemazine metabolites for serotonin, histamine and dopamine receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Benyamina, Amine; Arbus, Christophe; Nuss, Philippe; Garay, Ricardo P; Neliat, Gervais; Hameg, Ahcène

    2008-01-14

    Animal and human pharmacological studies indicate that the antipsychotic action of cyamemazine results from blockade of dopamine D(2) receptors, its anxiolytic properties from serotonin 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonism and the low incidence of extrapyramidal side effects from a potent 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonistic action. Cyamemazine is metabolized in monodesmethyl cyamemazine and cyamemazine sulfoxide, which are not known for their affinities for serotonin, dopamine and other brain receptor types considered to mediate central nervous systems effects of drugs. Hence, metabolite affinities were determined in human recombinant receptors expressed in CHO cells (hD(2) and hD4.4 receptors, h5-HT(1A), h5-HT(2A), h5-HT(2C) and h5-HT(7) receptors and hM(1), hM(2) and hM(3) receptors) and HEK-293 cells (h5-HT(3) receptors) or natively present in rat cerebral cortex (non-specific alpha(1)- and alpha(2)-adrenoceptors, GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptors) and guinea pig cerebellum (H(1) central histamine receptors) membranes. Monodesmethyl cyamemazine showed a neurotransmitter receptor profile similar to that of its parent compound cyamemazine, i.e.: high affinity for h5-HT(2A) receptors (K(i)=1.5 nM), h5-HT(2C) receptors (K(i)=12 nM) and hD(2) receptors (K(i)=12 nM). Cyamemazine sulfoxide showed high affinity for h5-HT(2A) receptors (K(i)=39 nM) and histamine H(1) receptors (K(i)=15 nM) and a reduced affinity for D(2) and 5-HT(2C) receptors. Therefore, monodesmethyl cyamemazine can contribute to enhance and prolong the therapeutic actions of cyamemazine. Further investigation is required to see if the high affinities of cyamemazine sulfoxide for H(1) and 5-HT(2A) receptors are of therapeutic benefit against sleep onset insomnia and/or sleep maintenance insomnia respectively.

  16. Intermediate affinity and potency of clozapine and low affinity of other neuroleptics and of antidepressants at H3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Kathmann, M; Schlicker, E; Göthert, M

    1994-12-01

    It was the aim of the present study to determine the affinities of four neuroleptics and five antidepressants for histamine H3 receptors. In rat brain cortex membranes, the specifically bound [3H]-N alpha-methylhistamine was monophasically displaced by clozapine (pKi 6.15). The other drugs did not completely displace the radioligand even at 100 microM; the pKi values were: haloperidol (4.91); sulpiride (4.73); amitriptyline (4.56); desipramine (4.15); levomepromazine (4.14); fluovoxamine (4.13); maprotiline (4.09); moclobemide (< 4.0). The effect of clozapine was further examined in a functional H3 receptor model, i.e., in superfused mouse brain cortex slices preincubated with [3H]-noradrenaline. The electrically evoked tritium overflow was not affected by clozapine 0.5-32 microM. However, clozapine shifted the concentration-response curve of histamine for its inhibitory effect on the evoked overflow to the right, but did not affect the maximum effect of histamine. The Schild plot yielded a pA2 value of 6.33. In conclusion, clozapine shows an intermediate affinity and potency (as a competitive antagonist) at H3 receptors. The Ki value of clozapine at H3 receptors resembles its Ki value at D2 receptors (the target of the classical neuroleptics), but is higher than its Ki values at D4, 5-HT2 or muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, which according to current hypotheses, might be involved in the atypical profile of clozapine.

  17. Agonist-receptor-arrestin, an alternative ternary complex with high agonist affinity.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, V V; Pals-Rylaarsdam, R; Benovic, J L; Hosey, M M; Onorato, J J

    1997-11-14

    The rapid decrease of a response to a persistent stimulus, often termed desensitization, is a widespread biological phenomenon. Signal transduction by numerous G protein-coupled receptors appears to be terminated by a strikingly uniform two-step mechanism, most extensively characterized for the beta2-adrenergic receptor (beta2AR), m2 muscarinic cholinergic receptor (m2 mAChR), and rhodopsin. The model predicts that activated receptor is initially phosphorylated and then tightly binds an arrestin protein that effectively blocks further G protein interaction. Here we report that complexes of beta2AR-arrestin and m2 mAChR-arrestin have a higher affinity for agonists (but not antagonists) than do receptors not complexed with arrestin. The percentage of phosphorylated beta2AR in this high affinity state in the presence of full agonists varied with different arrestins and was enhanced by selective mutations in arrestins. The percentage of high affinity sites also was proportional to the intrinsic activity of an agonist, and the coefficient of proportionality varies for different arrestin proteins. Certain mutant arrestins can form these high affinity complexes with unphosphorylated receptors. Mutations that enhance formation of the agonist-receptor-arrestin complexes should provide useful tools for manipulating both the efficiency of signaling and rate and specificity of receptor internalization.

  18. B Cell Receptor Affinity for Insulin Dictates Autoantigen Acquisition and B Cell Functionality in Autoimmune Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Packard, Thomas A.; Smith, Mia J.; Conrad, Francis J.; Johnson, Sara A.; Getahun, Andrew; Lindsay, Robin S.; Hinman, Rochelle M.; Friedman, Rachel S.; Thomas, James W.; Cambier, John C.

    2016-01-01

    B cells have been strongly implicated in the development of human type 1 diabetes and are required for disease in the NOD mouse model. These functions are dependent on B cell antigen receptor (BCR) specificity and expression of MHC, implicating linked autoantigen recognition and presentation to effector T cells. BCR-antigen affinity requirements for participation in disease are unclear. We hypothesized that BCR affinity for the autoantigen insulin differentially affects lymphocyte functionality, including tolerance modality and the ability to acquire and become activated in the diabetogenic environment. Using combined transgenic and retrogenic heavy and light chain to create multiple insulin-binding BCRs, we demonstrate that affinity for insulin is a critical determinant of the function of these autoreactive cells. We show that both BCR affinity for insulin and genetic background affect tolerance induction in immature B cells. We also find new evidence that may explain the enigmatic ability of B cells expressing 125 anti-insulin BCR to support development of TID in NOD mice despite a reported affinity beneath requirements for binding insulin at in vivo concentrations. We report that when expressed as an antigen receptor the affinity of 125 is much higher than determined by measurements of the soluble form. Finally, we show that in vivo acquisition of insulin requires both sufficient BCR affinity and permissive host/tissue environment. We propose that a confluence of BCR affinity, pancreas environment, and B cell tolerance-regulating genes in the NOD animal allows acquisition of insulin and autoimmunity. PMID:27834793

  19. Affinity labeling of rat liver thyroid hormone nuclear receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Nikodem, V M; Cheng, S Y; Rall, J E

    1980-01-01

    The thyroid hormone receptor from rat liver nuclei has been covalently labeled with the N-bromoacetyl derivatives of L-thyroxine (T4) and 3,3',5-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3). Displacement binding studies showed that, in the presence of 100-fold molar excess of unlabeled N-bromoacetyl-T3 or T4, binding of [125I]T3 or [125I]T4 was nearly totally inhibited. Heat inactivation of the receptor (55 degrees C for 15 min) resulted in parallel losses in the binding of T3 (95%) and N-bromoacetyl-T3 (93%). These results indicated that T3 and T4 and their bromoacetyl derivatives compete for the same binding site. The nuclear receptor showed identical behavior in high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) whether bound to T3 or T4 or covalently labeled with their bromoacetyl derivatives. HPLC provided a single-step 100-fold purification of the nuclear receptor. Na-DodSO4 gel electrophoresis of the nuclear receptor labeled with N-bromoacetyl derivatives of [125I]T3 or [125I]T4 showed one major radioactive component with a molecular weight of 56,000. Furthermore, in the absence of denaturant, the nuclear receptor either bound to [125I]T3 or covalently labeled with N-bromoacetyl-[125I]T3 showed identical mobility. These results suggested that the nuclear receptor is a single polypeptide chain and binds either T3 or T4. Nuclear receptors covalently linked with N-bromoacetyl derivatives of [125I]T3 or [125I]T4 may be useful as a marker for the preparative purification of receptor. PMID:6261237

  20. Trifluoromethoxyl Substituted Phenylethylene Diamines as High Affinity σ Receptor Ligands with Potent Anti-Cocaine Actions

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Trudy A.; Yang, Xiaowen; Wu, Huifang; Pouw, Buddy; Matsumoto, Rae R.; Coop, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The phenylethylene diamines are a class of σ receptor ligands with excellent selectivity over other biological systems and with anti-cocaine actions that involve antagonism of σ1 receptors. In order to increase the potency of the aromatic methoxyl substituted analogues, trifluoromethoxyl groups were introduced to prevent metabolic demethylation. The para-substituted trifluoromethoxyl substituted analogues were shown to have increased σ receptor affinity and represent the most potent anti-cocaine phenylethylene diamines yet described. PMID:18461921

  1. Positron-labeled dopamine agonists for probing the high affinity states of dopamine subtype 2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Dah-Ren; Narendran, Raj; Laruelle, Marc

    2005-01-01

    It is well documented that guanidine nucleotide-coupled dopamine subtype 2 receptors (D2) are configured in high and low affinity states for the dopamine agonist in vitro. However, it is still unclear whether these functional states exist in vivo. We hypothesized that positron-labeled D2 agonist and Positron Emission Tomography can be used to probe these functional states noninvasively. Recently, we demonstrated in nonhuman primates that N-[11C]propyl-norapomorphine (NPA), a full D2 agonist, is a suitable tracer for imaging the high affinity states of D2 receptors in vivo. We also developed kinetic modeling method to derive receptor parameters, such as binding potential (BP) and specific uptake ratios (V3''). When coupled with a dopamine releasing drug, amphetamine, NPA was found to be more sensitive than antagonist tracers, such as [11C]raclopride (RAC), to endogenous dopamine concentration changes (by about 42%). This finding suggests that NPA is a superior tracer for reporting endogenous DA concentration. In addition, the difference of the BP or V3'' of NPA and RAC under control and amphetamine challenge conditions could be used to estimate the functional states of D2 receptors in vivo. On the basis of our findings and the assumptions that NPA binds only to the high affinity states and RAC binds equally to both affinity states, we proposed that about 70% of the D2 receptors are configured in the high affinity states in vivo.

  2. High-affinity interactions of ligands at recombinant Guinea pig 5HT7 receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, R. E.; Ragan, J. E.; Pearlman, R. S.; Brusniak, M. Y.-. K.; Eglen, R. M.; Bonhaus, D. W.; Tenner, T. E., Jr.; Miller, J. D.

    2001-10-01

    The serotonin 5HT7 receptor has been implicated in numerous physiological and pathological processes from circadian rhythms [1] to depression and schizophrenia. Clonal cell lines heterologously expressing recombinant receptors offer good models for understanding drug-receptor interactions and development of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR). Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) is an important modern QSAR procedure that relates the steric and electrostatic fields of a set of aligned compounds to affinity. Here, we utilized CoMFA to predict affinity for a number of high-affinity ligands at the recombinant guinea pig 5HT7 receptor. Using R-lisuride as the template, a final CoMFA model was derived using procedures similar to those of our recent papers [2, 3, 4] The final cross-validated model accounted for >85% of the variance in the compound affinity data, while the final non-cross validated model accounted for >99% of the variance. Model evaluation was done using cross-validation methods with groups of 5 ligands. Twenty cross-validation runs yielded an average predictive r2(q2) of 0.779 ± 0.015 (range: 0.669-0.867). Furthermore, 3D-chemical database search queries derived from the model yielded hit lists of promising agents with high structural similarity to the template. Together, these results suggest a possible basis for high-affinity drug action at 5HT7 receptors.

  3. PREDICTING RETINOID RECEPTOR BINDING AFFINITY: COREPA-M APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Retinoic acid and associated vitamin A derivatives comprise a class of endogenous hormones that activate different retinoic acid receptors RARs). Transcriptional events subsequent to this activation are key to controlling several aspects of vertebrate development. As such, identi...

  4. PREDICTING RETINOID RECEPTOR BINDING AFFINITY: COREPA-M APPLICATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Retinoic acid and associated vitamin A derivatives comprise a class of endogenous hormones that activate different retinoic acid receptors RARs). Transcriptional events subsequent to this activation are key to controlling several aspects of vertebrate development. As such, identi...

  5. Piperazinyl benzamidines: synthesis and affinity for the delta opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Nortey, S O; Baxter, E W; Codd, E E; Zhang, S P; Reitz, A B

    2001-07-09

    Piperazinyl benzamidines were prepared and found to bind to the rat delta (delta) opioid receptor. The most active compounds had a N,N-diethylcarboxamido group and a N-benzyl piperazine. The most potent among these was N,N-diethyl-4-[4-(phenylmethyl)-1-piperazinyl][2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]iminomethyl]benzamide (27) with a 1.22nM K(i) for the rat delta opioid receptor and ca. 1000 x selectivity relative to the mu opioid subtype.

  6. Ontogeny of high-affinity GABA and benzodiazepine receptors in the rat cerebellum: an autoradiographic study.

    PubMed

    Palacios, J M; Kuhar, M J

    1981-11-01

    High-affinity GABA and benzodiazepine receptors were localized by light microscopic autoradiography in the developing rat cerebellum. [3H]muscimol was used for the labeling of GABA receptors and [3H]flunitrazepam for benzodiazepine receptors. Very low densities of GABA sites were found during the first postnatal week. GABA receptors start increasing linearly at the end of the second week up to adult levels around the fourth postnatal week. The increase in receptor density is concentrated in the developing granule cell layer. Benzodiazepine receptors are present at birth and increases in the density of receptors were observed already during the first postnatal week. Receptor concentrations reached adult values around the third to fourth weeks postnatally. The increase in benzodiazepine receptors in concentrated in the growing molecular layer with little change in the granule cell layer. The immature cell of the external granule layer were characterized by the absence of receptor sites. At least partial association of high-affinity GABA receptors with granule cells and benzodiazepine receptor with Purkinje cell dendrites is suggested by these developmental profiles.

  7. Pyrazolo-triazolo-pyrimidines as adenosine receptor antagonists: Effect of the N-5 bond type on the affinity and selectivity at the four adenosine receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Bolcato, Chiara; Cusan, Claudia; Pastorin, Giorgia; Cacciari, Barbara; Klotz, Karl Norbert; Morizzo, Erika

    2007-01-01

    In the last few years, many efforts have been made to search for potent and selective human A3 adenosine antagonists. In particular, one of the most promising human A3 adenosine receptor antagonists is represented by the pyrazolo-triazolo-pyrimidine family. This class of compounds has been strongly investigated from the point of view of structure-activity relationships. In particular, it has been observed that fundamental requisites for having both potency and selectivity at the human A3 adenosine receptors are the presence of a small substituent at the N8 position and an unsubstitued phenyl carbamoyl moiety at the N5 position. In this study, we report the role of the N5-bond type on the affinity and selectivity at the four adenosine receptor subtypes. The observed structure-activity relationships of this class of antagonists are also exhaustively rationalized using the recently published ligand-based homology modeling approach. PMID:18368532

  8. Binding affinities of anti-acetylcholine receptor autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis

    SciTech Connect

    Bray, J.J.; Drachman, D.B.

    1982-01-01

    Antibodies directed against acetylcholine (ACh) receptors are present in the sera of nearly 90% of patients with myasthenia gravis (MG), and are involved in the pathogenesis of this autoimmune disease. However, the antibody titers measured by the standard radioimmunoassay correspond poorly with the clinical severity of the disease. To determine whether this disparity could be accounted for by differences in the binding affinities of anti-ACh receptor antibodies in different patients, we have measured the binding affinities of these autoantibodies in 15 sera from MG patients. The affinity constants (K/sub o/), as determined by Scatchard analysis, were all in the range of 10/sup 10/ M/sup -1/, comparable to the highest values reported in immunized animals. The affinity constants were truly representative of the population of autoantibodies detected by the radioimmunoassay, as shown by the remarkable linearity of the Scatchard plots (r/sup 2/>0.90) and the close correlation between the antibody titers determined by extrapolation of the Scatchard plots and by saturation analysis (r = 0.99; p < 0.001). There was only a 6-fold variation in affinity constants measured in this series of patients despite widely differing antibody titers and severity of the disease. Factors other than the titer and affinity of anti-ACh receptor antibodies may correlate better with the clinical manifestations of MG.

  9. Effect of sodium ion on the affinity of naloxone for the kappa opioid receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Cheney, B.V.; Lahti, R.A.

    1987-03-16

    Several investigators have observed that sodium ion enhances the binding of naloxone to opioid receptors. This effect has generally been attributed to allosteric modulation of the state of the mu receptor. However, a recent claim has been made that the enhancement does not involve a change in the mu receptor, but instead occurs because naloxone becomes a more kappa-specific drug when sodium ion is present in high concentration. Since the claim was not based on experimental evidence from binding studies involving known high-affinity kappa ligands, the authors have investigated the competition of naloxone for the kappa site using (/sup 3/H)U-69593 as the marker for receptor binding. Assays were carried out in the presence and absence of 100 mM NaCl. The results of the study indicate that sodium ion does not increase the affinity of naloxone or U-69593 for the kappa receptor. 9 references, 1 figure.

  10. Tuned-Affinity Bivalent Ligands for the Characterization of Opioid Receptor Heteromers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Opioid receptors, including the μ- and δ-opioid receptors (MOR and DOR), are important targets for the treatment of pain. Although there is mounting evidence that these receptors form heteromers, the functional role of the MOR/DOR heteromer remains unresolved. We have designed and synthesized bivalent ligands as tools to elucidate the functional role of the MOR/DOR heteromer. Our ligands (L2 and L4) are comprised of a compound with low affinity at the DOR tethered to a compound with high affinity at the MOR, with the goal of producing ligands with “tuned affinity” at MOR/DOR heteromers as compared to DOR homomers. Here, we show that both L2 and L4 demonstrate enhanced affinity at MOR/DOR heteromers as compared to DOR homomers, thereby providing unique pharmacological tools to dissect the role of the MOR/DOR heteromer in pain. PMID:23585918

  11. Characterization of the Staphylococcal enterotoxin A: Vβ receptor interaction using human receptor fragments engineered for high affinity.

    PubMed

    Sharma, P; Postel, S; Sundberg, E J; Kranz, D M

    2013-12-01

    Staphylococcal food poisoning is a gastrointestinal disorder caused by the consumption of food containing Staphylococcal enterotoxins. Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) is the most common enterotoxin recovered from food poisoning outbreaks in the USA. In addition to its enteric activity, SEA also acts as a potent superantigen through stimulation of T cells, although less is known about its interactions than the superantigens SEB, SEC and toxic shock syndrome toxin-1. To understand more about SEA:receptor interactions, and to develop toxin-detection systems for use in food testing, we engineered various SEA-binding receptor mutants. The extracellular domain of the receptor, a variable region of the beta chain (Vβ22) of the T-cell receptor, was engineered for stability as a soluble protein and for high affinity, using yeast-display technology. The highest affinity mutant was shown to bind SEA with a Kd value of 4 nM. This was a 25 000-fold improvement in affinity compared with the wild-type receptor, which bound to SEA with low affinity (Kd value of 100 µM), similar to other superantigen:Vβ interactions. The SEA:Vβ interface was centered around residues within the complementarity determining region 2 loop. The engineered receptor was specific for SEA, in that it did not bind to two other closely related enterotoxins SEE or SED, providing information on the SEA residues possibly involved in the interaction. The specificity and affinity of these high-affinity Vβ proteins also provide useful agents for the design of more sensitive and specific systems for SEA detection.

  12. CORAL: prediction of binding affinity and efficacy of thyroid hormone receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Toropova, A P; Toropov, A A; Benfenati, E

    2015-08-28

    Quantitative structure - activity relationships (QSARs) for binding affinity of thyroid hormone receptors based on attributes of molecular structure extracted from simplified molecular input-line entry systems (SMILES) are established using the CORAL software (http://www.insilico.eu/coral). The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) is used as the measure of the binding affinity of thyroid hormone receptors. Molecular features which are statistically reliable promoters of increase and decrease for IC50 are suggested. The examples of modifications of molecular structure which lead to the increase or to the decrease of the endpoint are represented. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Aminopyrazoles with high affinity for the human neuropeptide Y5 receptor.

    PubMed

    Kordik, C P; Luo, C; Zanoni, B C; Dax, S L; McNally, J J; Lovenberg, T W; Wilson, S J; Reitz, A B

    2001-09-03

    1,3-Disubstituted-5-aminopyrazoles were prepared based on a lead compound found through high-throughput screening of our corporate compound library in an assay measuring affinity for the human neuropeptide Y5 receptor. The target compounds were prepared by cyclization of alpha-cyanoketones with appropriate hydrazines, followed by reduction and coupling to various sulfonamido-carboxylic acids. Several of these arylpyrazoles (e.g., 19 and 45) displayed high affinity for the human NPY Y5 receptor (<20nM IC(50)s).

  14. Metabolic mapping of A3 adenosine receptor agonist MRS5980.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhong-Ze; Tosh, Dilip K; Tanaka, Naoki; Wang, Haina; Krausz, Kristopher W; O'Connor, Robert; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2015-09-15

    (1S,2R,3S,4R,5S)-4-(2-((5-Chlorothiophen-2-yl)ethynyl)-6-(methylamino)-9H-purin-9-yl)-2,3-dihydroxy-N-methylbicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-1-carboxamide (MRS5980) is an A3AR selective agonist containing multiple receptor affinity- and selectivity-enhancing modifications and a therapeutic candidate drug for many inflammatory diseases. Metabolism-related poor pharmacokinetic behavior and toxicities are a major reason for drug R&D failure. Metabolomics with UPLC-MS was employed to profile the metabolism of MRS5980 and MRS5980-induced disruption of endogenous compounds. Recombinant drug-metabolizing enzymes screening experiment were used to determine the enzymes involved in MRS5980 metabolism. Analysis of lipid metabolism-related genes was performed to investigate the reason for MRS5980-induced lipid metabolic disorders. Unsupervised principal components analysis separated the control and MRS5980 treatment groups in feces, urine, and liver samples, but not in bile and serum. The major ions mainly contributing to the separation of feces and urine were oxidized MRS5980, glutathione (GSH) conjugates and cysteine conjugate (degradation product of the GSH conjugates) of MRS5980. The major ions contributing to the group separation of liver samples were phosphatidylcholines. In vitro incubation experiments showed the involvement of CYP3A enzymes in the oxidative metabolism of MRS5980 and direct GSH reactivity of MRS5980. The electrophilic attack by MRS5980 is a minor pathway and did not alter GSH levels in liver or liver histology, and thus may be of minor clinical consequence. Gene expression analysis further showed decreased expression of PC biosynthetic genes choline kinase a and b, which further accelerated conversion of lysophosphatidylcholine to phosphatidylcholines through increasing the expression of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3. These data will be useful to guide rational design of drugs targeting A3AR, considering efficacy, metabolic elimination, and

  15. Metabolic mapping of A3 adenosine receptor agonist MRS5980

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zhong-Ze; Tosh, Dilip K.; Tanaka, Naoki; Wang, Haina; Krausz, Kristopher W.; O'Connor, Robert; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    (1S,2R,3S,4R,5S)-4-(2-((5-Chlorothiophen-2-yl)ethynyl)-6-(methylamino)-9H-purin-9-yl)-2,3-dihydroxy-N-methylbicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-1-carboxamide (MRS5980) is an A3AR selective agonist containing multiple receptor affinity- and selectivity-enhancing modifications and a therapeutic candidate drug for many inflammatory diseases. Metabolism-related poor pharmacokinetic behavior and toxicities are a major reason of drug R&D failure. Metabolomics with UPLC-MS was employed to profile the metabolism of MRS5980 and MRS5980-induced disruption of endogenous compounds. Recombinant drug-metabolizing enzymes screening experiment were used to determine the enzymes involved in MRS5980 metabolism. Analysis of lipid metabolism-related genes was performed to investigate the reason for MRS5980-induced lipid metabolic disorders. Unsupervised principal components analysis separated the control and MRS5980 treatment group in feces, urine, and liver samples, but not in bile and serum. The major ions mainly contributing to the separation for feces and urine were oxidized MRS5980, glutathione (GSH) conjugates and cysteine conjugate (degradation product of the GSH conjugates) of MRS5980. The major ions contributing to the group separation of liver samples were phosphatidylcholines. In vitro incubation experiments showed the major involvement of CYP3A enzymes in the oxidative metabolism of MRS5980 and direct GSH reactivity of MRS5980. The electrophilic attack by MRS5980 is a minor pathway and did not alter GSH levels in liver or liver histology, and thus may be of minor clinical consequence. Gene expression analysis further showed decreased expression of PC biosynthetic genes choline kinase a and b, which further accelerated conversion of lysophosphatidylcholine to phosphatidylcholines through increasing the expression of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3. These data will be useful to guide rational design of drugs targeting A3AR, considering efficacy, metabolic elimination, and

  16. Steroidal affinity labels of the estrogen receptor. 1. 17 alpha-(Bromoacetoxy)alkyl/alkynylestradiols.

    PubMed

    el Garrouj, D; Aumelas, A; Borgna, J L

    1993-10-01

    To develop steroidal affinity labels for the estrogen receptor, we prepared five electrophilic estradiol derivatives bearing the 17 alpha-propyl, 17 alpha-(1'-butynyl), or 17 alpha-(1'octynyl) chain, with either a terminal epoxy function (for the 17 alpha-propyl substituent) or a terminal bromoacetoxy function (for all three 17 alpha-substituent types). These compounds displayed low affinity for the lamb uterine estrogen receptor; with apparent relative affinity constants ranging from 0.02% to 0.24% that of estradiol. They were also rapidly transformed in cytosol, probably to the corresponding vicinal diols (epoxy compounds) or primary alcohols (bromoacetoxy compounds). Nevertheless, bromoacetates induced irreversible inactivation of the hormone-binding site but only with ligand-free binding sites. The effect of bromoacetates was prevented by treatment of the cytosol with the thiol-specific reagent methyl methanethiosulfonate. Inactivation of the receptor at 0 degrees C was rapid (< 1 h) and strongly dependent on both compound concentration and pH, with significant effects obtained at either > 150 nM (at pH 9) or pH > 7.5 (at 5 microM). Regardless of the conditions used, the order of efficiency for bromoacetates was always: 17 alpha-propyl derivative < 17 alpha-butynyl derivative < 17 alpha-octynyl derivative, with maximal inactivation of approximately 30% and approximately 70% of the hormone-binding sites obtained for the less active and more active compounds, respectively. Characteristics of the receptor inactivation suggest that (i) prepared bromoacetates are highly reactive affinity labels for the estrogen receptor, (ii) they react with similar (or even a single) nucleophilic amino acid residues located within or near the hormone-binding site of the receptor; these residues are probably the -SH of cysteines, and (iii) position 17 alpha of steroidal ligands is suitable for introducing electrophilic substituents to develop efficient affinity labels for the

  17. Two distinct functional high affinity receptors for mouse interleukin-3 (IL-3).

    PubMed Central

    Hara, T; Miyajima, A

    1992-01-01

    The human interleukin-3 receptor (IL-3R) is composed of an IL-3 specific alpha subunit (IL-3R alpha) and a common beta subunit (beta c) that is shared by IL-3, granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and IL-5 receptors. In contrast to the human, the mouse has two distinct but related genes, AIC2A and AIC2B, both of which are homologous to the human beta c gene. AIC2B has proved to encode a common beta subunit between mouse GM-CSF and IL-5 receptors. AIC2A is unique to the mouse and encodes a low affinity IL-3 binding protein. Based on the observation that the AIC2A protein is a component of a high affinity IL-3R, we searched for a cDNA encoding a protein which conferred high affinity IL-3 binding when coexpressed with the AIC2A protein in COS7 cells. We obtained such a cDNA (SUT-1) encoding a mature protein of 70 kDa that has weak homology to the human IL-3R alpha. The SUT-1 protein bound IL-3 with low affinity and formed high affinity receptors not only with the AIC2A protein but also with the AIC2B protein. Both high affinity IL-3Rs expressed on a mouse T cell line, CTLL-2, showed similar IL-3 binding properties and transmitted a growth signal in response to IL-3. Thus, the mouse has two distinct functional high affinity IL-3Rs, providing a molecular explanation for the differences observed between mouse and human IL-3Rs. Images PMID:1582416

  18. Rat alpha6beta2delta GABAA receptors exhibit two distinct and separable agonist affinities.

    PubMed

    Hadley, Stephen H; Amin, Jahanshah

    2007-06-15

    The onset of motor learning in rats coincides with exclusive expression of GABAA receptors containing alpha6 and delta subunits in the granule neurons of the cerebellum. This development temporally correlates with the presence of a spontaneously active chloride current through alpha6-containing GABAA receptors, known as tonic inhibition. Here we report that the coexpression of alpha6, beta2, and delta subunits produced receptor-channels which possessed two distinct and separable states of agonist affinity, one exhibiting micromolar and the other nanomolar affinities for GABA. The high-affinity state was associated with a significant level of spontaneous channel activity. Increasing the level of expression or the ratio of beta2 to alpha6 and delta subunits increased the prevalence of the high-affinity state. Comparative studies of alpha6beta2delta, alpha1beta2delta, alpha6beta2gamma2, alpha1beta2gamma2 and alpha4beta2delta receptors under equivalent levels of expression demonstrated that the significant level of spontaneous channel activity is uniquely attributable to alpha6beta2delta receptors. The pharmacology of spontaneous channel activity arising from alpha6beta2delta receptor expression corresponded to that of tonic inhibition. For example, GABAA receptor antagonists, including furosemide, blocked the spontaneous current. Further, the neuroactive steroid 5alpha-THDOC and classical glycine receptor agonists beta-alanine and taurine directly activated alpha6beta2delta receptors with high potency. Specific mutation within the GABA-dependent activation domain (betaY157F) impaired both low- and high-affinity components of GABA agonist activity in alpha6betaY157Fdelta receptors, but did not attenuate the spontaneous current. In comparison, a mutation located between the second and third transmembrane segments of the delta subunit (deltaR287M) significantly diminished the nanomolar component and the spontaneous activity. The possibility that the high affinity state

  19. Steroidal affinity labels of the estrogen receptor. 2. 17 alpha-[(Haloacetamido)alkyl]estradiols.

    PubMed

    el Garrouj, D; Aliau, S; Aumelas, A; Borgna, J L

    1995-06-23

    In a previous study, we described affinity labeling of the lamb uterine estrogen receptor by 17 alpha-[(bromoacetoxy)alkyl/alkynyl]estradiols. However, the intrinsic receptor-alkylating activities of these compounds were probably very hampered by their poor hydrolytic stability in estrogen receptor-containing tissue extracts. Therefore, (i) to develop affinity labels of the receptor not susceptible to hydrolysis and (ii) to specify the structural requirements for 17 alpha-electrophilic estradiol derivatives to be potent affinity labels of the receptor, we prepared four 17 alpha-[(haloacetamido)alkyl]estradiols. Three were bromoacetamides differing at the alkyl substituent (methyl, ethyl, or propyl), and the last was an [(iodoacetamido)propyl]estradiol prepared under both nonradioactive and 3H-labeled forms. Although their affinities for the estrogen receptor were very low (from 0.008% to 0.02% that of estradiol), they appeared to be efficient affinity labels of the receptor due to their irreversible inhibition of [3H]estradiol specific binding in lamb uterine cytosol. The effect of the compounds was time-, pH-, and concentration-dependent, with > 50% and > 80% estrogen-binding sites inactivated at 0 degrees C and pH 8.5, for the less active and more active compounds, respectively; the corresponding IC50 values varied from approximately 20 nM to approximately 10 microM. The order of efficiency was [(bromoacetamido)methyl]estradiol < [(bromoacetamido)ethyl]estradiol < [(bromoacetamido)propyl]estradiol < [(iodoacetamido)propyl]estradiol. Affinity labeling was directly demonstrated by ethanol-resistant binding of [3H][(iodoacetamido)propyl]estradiol to the receptor. The irreversible inactivation of the hormone-binding site by the four haloacetamides was prevented by treatment of the cytosol with the thiol-specific reagent methyl methanethiosulfonate, suggesting that the target of these compounds was probably the -SH of cysteines. Negative results obtained with other 17

  20. Expression cloning of a high-affinity melatonin receptor from Xenopus dermal melanophores.

    PubMed Central

    Ebisawa, T; Karne, S; Lerner, M R; Reppert, S M

    1994-01-01

    Using an expression cloning strategy, a high-affinity melatonin receptor cDNA has been isolated from Xenopus laevis dermal melanophores. Transient expression of the cDNA in COS-7 cells resulted in high-affinity 2-[125I]-iodomelatonin binding (Kd = 6.3 +/- 0.3 x 10(-11) M). In addition, six ligands exhibited a rank order of inhibition of specific 2-[125I]iodomelatonin binding that was identical to that reported for endogenous high-affinity receptors. Functional studies of CHO cells stably expressing the receptor cDNA showed that melatonin acting through the cloned receptor inhibited forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation in a dose-dependent manner. Northern blot analysis showed that melatonin receptor transcripts are moderately expressed in Xenopus dermal melanophores. The cDNA encodes a protein of 420 amino acids, which contains seven hydrophobic segments. Structural analysis revealed that the receptor protein is a newly discovered member of the guanine nucleotide binding protein-coupled receptor family. Images PMID:7517042

  1. Characterization of receptor proteins using affinity cross-linking with biotinylated ligands.

    PubMed

    Shinya, Tomonori; Osada, Tomohiko; Desaki, Yoshitake; Hatamoto, Masahiro; Yamanaka, Yuko; Hirano, Hisashi; Takai, Ryota; Che, Fang-Sik; Kaku, Hanae; Shibuya, Naoto

    2010-02-01

    The plant genome encodes a wide range of receptor-like proteins but the function of most of these proteins is unknown. We propose the use of affinity cross-linking of biotinylated ligands for a ligand-based survey of the corresponding receptor molecules. Biotinylated ligands not only enable the analysis of receptor-ligand interactions without the use of radioactive compounds but also the isolation and identification of receptor molecules by a simple affinity trapping method. We successfully applied this method for the characterization, isolation and identification of the chitin elicitor binding protein (CEBiP). A biocytin hydrazide conjugate of N-acetylchitooctaose (GN8-Bio) was synthesized and used for the detection of CEBiP in the plasma or microsomal membrane preparations from rice and carrot cells. Binding characteristics of CEBiP analyzed by inhibition studies were in good agreement with the previous results obtained with the use of a radiolabeled ligand. The biotin-tagged CEBiP could be purified by avidin affinity chromatography and identified by LC-MALDI-MS/MS after tryptic digestion. We also used this method to detect OsFLS2, a rice receptor-like kinase for the perception of the peptide elicitor flg22, in membrane preparations from rice cells overexpressing OsFLS2. This work demonstrates the applicability of this method to the purification and identification of plant receptor proteins.

  2. Affinity Purification and Characterization of a G-Protein Coupled Receptor, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ste2p

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Byung-Kwon; Jung, Kyung-Sik; Son, Cagdas D; Kim, Heejung; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Arshava, Boris; Naider, Fred; Becker, Jeffrey Marvin

    2007-01-01

    We present a rare example of a biologically active G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) whose purity and identity were verified by mass spectrometry after being purified to near homogeneity from its native system. An overexpression vector was constructed to encode the Saccharomyces cerevisiae GPCR -factor receptor (Ste2p, the STE2 gene product) containing a 9-amino acid sequence of rhodopsin that served as an epitope/affinity tag. In the construct, two glycosylation sites and two cysteine residues were removed to aid future structural and functional studies. The receptor was expressed in yeast cells and was detected as a single band in a western blot indicating the absence of glycosylation. Tests of the epitope-tagged, mutated receptor showed it maintained its full biological activity. For extraction of Ste2p, yeast membranes were solubilized with 0.5 % n-dodecyl maltoside (DM). Approximately 120 g of purified -factor receptor was obtained per liter of culture by single-step affinity chromatography using a monoclonal antibody to the rhodopsin epitope. The binding affinity (Kd) of the purified -factor receptor in DM micelles was 28 nM as compared to Kd = 12.7 nM for Ste2p in cell membranes, and approximately 40 % of the purified receptor was correctly folded as judged by ligand saturation binding. About 50 % of the receptor sequence was retrieved from MALDITOF and nanospray mass spectrometry after CNBr digestion of the purified receptor. The methods described will enable structural studies of the -factor receptor and may provide an efficient technique to purify other GPCRs that have been functionally expressed in yeast.

  3. Tension-compression asymmetry in the binding affinity of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guang-Kui; Liu, Zishun; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Gao, Huajian

    2016-03-01

    Cell adhesion plays a crucial role in many biological processes of cells, e.g., immune responses, tissue morphogenesis, and stem cell differentiation. An essential problem in the molecular mechanism of cell adhesion is to characterize the binding affinity of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands under different physiological conditions. In this paper, a theoretical model is presented to study the binding affinity between a large number of anchored receptors and ligands under both tensile and compressive stresses, and corroborated by demonstrating excellent agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. It is shown that the binding affinity becomes lower as the magnitude of the applied stress increases, and drops to zero at a critical tensile or compressive stress. Interestingly, the critical compressive stress is found to be substantially smaller than the critical tensile stress for relatively long and flexible receptor-ligand complexes. This counterintuitive finding is explained by using the Euler instability theory of slender columns under compression. The tension-compression asymmetry in the binding affinity of anchored receptors and ligands depends subtly on the competition between the breaking and instability of their complexes. This study helps in understanding the role of mechanical forces in cell adhesion mediated by specific binding molecules.

  4. Estimation of Ligand-Receptor Binding Affinity from Fluctuation of Their Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Koji; Ode, Hirotaka; Ohta, Masami; Misu, Takashi; Hata, Masayuki; Neya, Saburo; Hoshino, Tyuji

    2005-10-01

    It is necessary for the understanding of protein interactions or in silico drug designs to accurately estimate ligand-receptor affinity. The energy calculation based on the electrostatic force, van der Waals force, and solvation effect is a direct method of computing the magnitude of the interaction between ligand and receptor. By this conventional method, however, it is difficult to estimate a slight difference in binding affinity with sufficient accuracy. We propose a novel concept for the evaluation of binding affinity between a ligand and its receptor by functionalizing the fluctuation at the ligand-receptor interface. This method enables an adequate estimation with a high accuracy compared with the conventional energetic approach. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease and its inhibitor are used to explain how binding affinity is extracted from the fluctuation in interfacial energy, and a combination of an antigen and its antibody is examined to demonstrate the compatibility between the estimation from the interfacial fluctuation and the experimentally measured binding energy.

  5. Tension-compression asymmetry in the binding affinity of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-Kui; Liu, Zishun; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Gao, Huajian

    2016-03-01

    Cell adhesion plays a crucial role in many biological processes of cells, e.g., immune responses, tissue morphogenesis, and stem cell differentiation. An essential problem in the molecular mechanism of cell adhesion is to characterize the binding affinity of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands under different physiological conditions. In this paper, a theoretical model is presented to study the binding affinity between a large number of anchored receptors and ligands under both tensile and compressive stresses, and corroborated by demonstrating excellent agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. It is shown that the binding affinity becomes lower as the magnitude of the applied stress increases, and drops to zero at a critical tensile or compressive stress. Interestingly, the critical compressive stress is found to be substantially smaller than the critical tensile stress for relatively long and flexible receptor-ligand complexes. This counterintuitive finding is explained by using the Euler instability theory of slender columns under compression. The tension-compression asymmetry in the binding affinity of anchored receptors and ligands depends subtly on the competition between the breaking and instability of their complexes. This study helps in understanding the role of mechanical forces in cell adhesion mediated by specific binding molecules.

  6. Cannabinoid CB(1) receptor expression and affinity in the rat hippocampus following bilateral vestibular deafferentation.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jean Ha; Zheng, Yiwen; Darlington, Cynthia L; Smith, Paul F

    2011-01-10

    Numerous studies have shown that bilateral vestibular deafferentation (BVD) results in spatial memory deficits and hippocampal dysfunction in rats and humans. Since cannabinoid CB(1) receptors are well known to regulate synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus, we investigated whether BVD resulted in changes in CB(1) receptor expression and affinity in the rat hippocampus at 1, 3 and 7 days post-surgery, using a combination of Western blotting and radioligand binding. Using Western blotting, we found that CB(1) receptor expression was significantly lower in BVD animals compared to sham controls only in the CA3 area across the 3 time points (P=0.03). CB(1) receptor expression decreased significantly over time for both the BVD and sham animals (P=0.000). The radioligand binding assays showed no significant change in the IC(50) of the CB(1) receptor for the cannabinoid CB(1)/CB(2) receptor agonist, WIN55,212-2. These results suggest that the CB(1) receptor down-regulates in the CA3 region of the hippocampus following BVD, but with no changes in the affinity of the CB(1) receptor for WIN55,212-2.

  7. The A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR): therapeutic target and predictive biological marker in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Pnina; Cohen, Shira

    2016-09-01

    The Gi protein-associated A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) is over-expressed in inflammatory cells, and this high expression is also reflected in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with autoimmune inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and Crohn's disease. CF101, a selective agonist with high affinity to the A3AR, is known to induce robust anti-inflammatory effect in experimental animal models of adjuvant-, collagen-, and tropomyosin-induced arthritis. The effect is mediated via a definitive molecular mechanism entailing deregulation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and the Wnt signal transduction pathways resulting in apoptosis of inflammatory cells. CF101 was found to be safe and well tolerated in all preclinical, phase I, and phase II human clinical studies. In two phase II clinical studies where CF101 was administered to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients as a stand-alone drug, a significant anti-rheumatic effect and a direct significant correlation were found between receptor expression at baseline and patients' response to the drug, suggesting that A3AR may be utilized as a predictive biomarker. The A3AR is a promising therapeutic target in rheumatoid arthritis and can be used also as a biological marker to predict patients' response to CF101. This is a unique type of a personalized medicine approach which may pave the way for a safe and efficacious treatment for this patient population.

  8. Determine equilibrium dissociation constant of drug-membrane receptor affinity using the cell membrane chromatography relative standard method.

    PubMed

    Ma, Weina; Yang, Liu; Lv, Yanni; Fu, Jia; Zhang, Yanmin; He, Langchong

    2017-06-23

    The equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of drug-membrane receptor affinity is the basic parameter that reflects the strength of interaction. The cell membrane chromatography (CMC) method is an effective technique to study the characteristics of drug-membrane receptor affinity. In this study, the KD value of CMC relative standard method for the determination of drug-membrane receptor affinity was established to analyze the relative KD values of drugs binding to the membrane receptors (Epidermal growth factor receptor and angiotensin II receptor). The KD values obtained by the CMC relative standard method had a strong correlation with those obtained by the frontal analysis method. Additionally, the KD values obtained by CMC relative standard method correlated with pharmacological activity of the drug being evaluated. The CMC relative standard method is a convenient and effective method to evaluate drug-membrane receptor affinity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Guanine nucleotide regulation of dopamine receptor agonist affinity states in rat estradiol-induced pituitary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Di Paolo, T.; Falardeau, P.

    1987-08-31

    The authors have investigated dopamine (DA) receptor agonist high- and low-affinity states in female rate estradiol-induced prolactin (PRL)-secreting pituitary tumors and intact pituitary tissue. Estradiol treatment increased the anterior pituitary weight 9-fold and plasma prolactin levels 74-fold and these measures are correlated (R = 0.745, n = 73, p < 0.001). Competition for (/sup 3/H)-spiperone binding to the DA receptor by apomorphine was compared in normal and adenomatous pituitary tissue. The inhibition constants (Ki) and the proportions of the two apomorphine sites are unchanged in tumors compared to intact pituitary tissue. Guanosine 5'-(..beta..-..gamma..-imino)triphosphate (Gpp(NH)p) causes complete conversion of the high into low affinity dopaminergic agonist site in normal pituitary and in tumors. These results suggest that rats with primary estradiol-induced pituitary tumors have normal and functional DA receptors. 9 references, 2 tables.

  10. Imaging progesterone receptor in breast tumors: Synthesis and receptor binding affinity of fluoroalkyl-substituted analogs of Tanaproget

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hai-Bing; Lee, Jae Hak; Mayne, Christopher G.; Carlson, Kathryn E.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.

    2010-01-01

    The progesterone receptor (PR) is estrogen regulated, and PR levels in breast tumors can be used to predict the success of endocrine therapies targeting the estrogen receptor (ER). Tanaproget is a non-steroidal progestin agonist with very high PR binding affinity and excellent in vivo potency. When appropriately radiolabeled, it might be used to image PR-positive breast tumors non-invasively, by positron emission tomography (PET). We describe the synthesis and PR binding affinities of a series of fluoroalkyl-substituted 6-aryl-1,4-dihydrobenzo[d][1,3]oxazine-2-thiones, analogs of Tanaproget. Some of these compounds have subnanomolar binding affinities, higher than that of either Tanaproget itself or the high affinity PR ligand R5020. Structure-binding affinity relationships can be rationalized by molecular modeling of ligand complexes with PR, and the enantioselectivity of binding has been predicted. These compounds are being further evaluated as potential diagnostic PET imaging agents for breast cancer, and enantiomerically pure materials of defined stereochemistry are being prepared. PMID:20355713

  11. Stereoselective synthesis and structure-affinity relationships of bicyclic kappa receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Kracht, Daniel; Rack, Elisabeth; Schepmann, Dirk; Fröhlich, Roland; Wünsch, Bernhard

    2010-01-07

    Reductive amination of the bicyclic ketone 4 led diastereoselectively to endo-configured amines, which were transformed into the amides 7-10. The synthesis of the diastereomers 25 with an exo-configured amino moiety at position 6 was only successful after deactivation of both N-atoms of the 1,4-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane system. The N-1-oxide 19 with an N-4-tosyl moiety was the crucial intermediate, which allows SN2 substitution with NaN3 under inversion of the configuration at position 6. Whereas the endo-configured pyrrolidine 7a (WMS-1302) revealed a kappa receptor affinity of 73 nM, the exo-configured diastereomer 25a was almost inactive at the kappa receptor (Ki > 1 microM). Replacement of the 3,4-dichlorophenylacetyl residue by other acyl and sulfonyl residues showed that it is essential for high kappa affinity. The kappa receptor affinities of the conformationally constrained pyrrolidines 7a and 25a were correlated with the dihedral angle N(pyrrolidine)-C-C-N(acetamide). A systematic conformational analysis of the potent but flexible kappa agonist 2 showed that a dihedral angle of 168 degrees (as in 25a) is energetically more disfavored than a dihedral angle of 58 degrees (7a). However, even the conformation with a dihedral angle of 58 degrees does not represent an energy minimum, which might explain the reduced kappa affinity of 7a.

  12. Molecular identification of high and low affinity receptors for nicotinic acid.

    PubMed

    Wise, Alan; Foord, Steven M; Fraser, Neil J; Barnes, Ashley A; Elshourbagy, Nabil; Eilert, Michelle; Ignar, Diane M; Murdock, Paul R; Steplewski, Klaudia; Green, Andrew; Brown, Andrew J; Dowell, Simon J; Szekeres, Philip G; Hassall, David G; Marshall, Fiona H; Wilson, Shelagh; Pike, Nicholas B

    2003-03-14

    Nicotinic acid has been used clinically for over 40 years in the treatment of dyslipidemia producing a desirable normalization of a range of cardiovascular risk factors, including a marked elevation of high density lipoprotein and a reduction in mortality. The precise mechanism of action of nicotinic acid is unknown, although it is believed that activation of a G(i)-G protein-coupled receptor may contribute. Utilizing available information on the tissue distribution of nicotinic acid receptors, we identified candidate orphan receptors. The selected orphan receptors were screened for responses to nicotinic acid, in an assay for activation of G(i)-G proteins. Here we describe the identification of the G protein-coupled receptor HM74 as a low affinity receptor for nicotinic acid. We then describe the subsequent identification of HM74A in follow-up bioinformatics searches and demonstrate that it acts as a high affinity receptor for nicotinic acid and other compounds with related pharmacology. The discovery of HM74A as a molecular target for nicotinic acid may facilitate the discovery of superior drug molecules to treat dyslipidemia.

  13. Importin {beta}-type nuclear transport receptors have distinct binding affinities for Ran-GTP

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Silvia; Schlenstedt, Gabriel

    2011-03-18

    Highlights: {yields} Determination of binding properties of nuclear transport receptor/Ran-GTP complexes. {yields} Biosensor measurements provide constants for dissociation, on-rates, and off-rates. {yields} The affinity of receptors for Ran-GTP is widely divergent. {yields} Dissociation constants differ for three orders of magnitude. {yields} The cellular concentration of yeast Ran is not limiting. -- Abstract: Cargos destined to enter or leave the cell nucleus are typically transported by receptors of the importin {beta} family to pass the nuclear pore complex. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae comprises 14 members of this protein family, which can be divided in importins and exportins. The Ran GTPase regulates the association and dissociation of receptors and cargos as well as the transport direction through the nuclear pore. All receptors bind to Ran exclusively in its GTP-bound state and this event is restricted to the nuclear compartment. We determined the Ran-GTP binding properties of all yeast transport receptors by biosensor measurements and observed that the affinity of importins for Ran-GTP differs significantly. The dissociation constants range from 230 pM to 270 nM, which is mostly based on a variability of the off-rate constants. The divergent affinity of importins for Ran-GTP suggests the existence of a novel mode of nucleocytoplasmic transport regulation. Furthermore, the cellular concentration of {beta}-receptors and of other Ran-binding proteins was determined. We found that the number of {beta}-receptors altogether about equals the amounts of yeast Ran, but Ran-GTP is not limiting in the nucleus. The implications of our results for nucleocytoplasmic transport mechanisms are discussed.

  14. The Affinity of Elongated Membrane-Tethered Ligands Determines Potency of T Cell Receptor Triggering

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bing-Mae; Al-Aghbar, Mohammad Ameen; Lee, Chien-Hsin; Chang, Tien-Ching; Su, Yu-Cheng; Li, Ya-Chen; Chang, Shih-En; Chen, Chin-Chuan; Chung, Tsai-Hua; Liao, Yuan-Chun; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Roffler, Steve R.

    2017-01-01

    T lymphocytes are important mediators of adoptive immunity but the mechanism of T cell receptor (TCR) triggering remains uncertain. The interspatial distance between engaged T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) is believed to be important for topological rearrangement of membrane tyrosine phosphatases and initiation of TCR signaling. We investigated the relationship between ligand topology and affinity by generating a series of artificial APCs that express membrane-tethered anti-CD3 scFv with different affinities (OKT3, BC3, and 2C11) in addition to recombinant class I and II pMHC molecules. The dimensions of membrane-tethered anti-CD3 and pMHC molecules were progressively increased by insertion of different extracellular domains. In agreement with previous studies, elongation of pMHC molecules or low-affinity anti-CD3 scFv caused progressive loss of T cell activation. However, elongation of high-affinity ligands (BC3 and OKT3 scFv) did not abolish TCR phosphorylation and T cell activation. Mutation of key amino acids in OKT3 to reduce binding affinity to CD3 resulted in restoration of topological dependence on T cell activation. Our results show that high-affinity TCR ligands can effectively induce TCR triggering even at large interspatial distances between T cells and APCs. PMID:28740495

  15. 3-Chlorotyramine Acting as Ligand of the D2 Dopamine Receptor. Molecular Modeling, Synthesis and D2 Receptor Affinity.

    PubMed

    Angelina, Emilio; Andujar, Sebastian; Moreno, Laura; Garibotto, Francisco; Párraga, Javier; Peruchena, Nelida; Cabedo, Nuria; Villecco, Margarita; Cortes, Diego; Enriz, Ricardo D

    2015-01-01

    We synthesized and tested 3-chlorotyramine as a ligand of the D2 dopamine receptor. This compound displayed a similar affinity by this receptor to that previously reported for dopamine. In order to understand further the experimental results we performed a molecular modeling study of 3-chlorotyramine and structurally related compounds. By combining molecular dynamics simulations with semiempirical (PM6), ab initio and density functional theory calculations, a simple and generally applicable procedure to evaluate the binding energies of these ligands interacting with the D2 dopamine receptors is reported here. These results provided a clear picture of the binding interactions of these compounds from both structural and energetic view points. A reduced model for the binding pocket was used. This approach allowed us to perform more accurate quantum mechanical calculations as well as to obtain a detailed electronic analysis using the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) technique. Molecular aspects of the binding interactions between ligands and the D2 dopamine receptor are discussed in detail. A good correlation between the relative binding energies obtained from theoretical calculations and experimental IC50 values was obtained. These results allowed us to predict that 3-chlorotyramine possesses a significant affinity by the D2 -DR. Our theoretical predictions were experimentally corroborated when we synthesized and tested 3-chlorotyramine which displayed a similar affinity by the D2 -DR to that reported for DA. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Phytosphingosine 1-phosphate: a high affinity ligand for the S1P(4)/Edg-6 receptor.

    PubMed

    Candelore, Mari Rios; Wright, Michael J; Tota, Laurie M; Milligan, James; Shei, Gan-ju; Bergstrom, James D; Mandala, Suzanne M

    2002-09-27

    It has been reported recently that the phosphorylated form of the immunomodulator FTY720 activates sphingosine 1-phosphate G protein-coupled receptors. Therefore, understanding the biology of this new class of receptors will be important in clarifying the immunological function of bioactive lysosphingolipid ligands. The S1P(4) receptor has generated interest due to its lymphoid tissue distribution. While the S1P(4) receptor binds the prototypical ligand, S1P, a survey of other lysosphingolipids demonstrated that 4D-hydroxysphinganine 1-phosphate, more commonly known as phytosphingosine 1-phosphate (PhS1P), binds to S1P(4) with higher affinity. Using radiolabeled S1P (S133P), the affinity of PhS1P for the S1P(4) receptor is 1.6nM, while that of S1P is nearly 50-fold lower (119+/-20nM). Radiolabeled PhS1P proved to be superior to S133P in routine binding assays due to improved signal-to-noise ratio. The present study demonstrates the utility of a novel radiolabeled probe, PhS133P, for in vitro studies of the S1P(4) receptor pharmacology.

  17. Purification of high affinity benzodiazepine receptor binding site fragments from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    In central nervous system benzodiazepine recognition sites occur on neuronal cell surfaces as one member of a multireceptor complex, including recognition sites for benzodiazepines, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), barbiturates and a chloride ionophore. During photoaffinity labelling, the benzodiazepine agonist, /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam, is irreversibly bound to central benzodiazepine high affinity recognition sites in the presence of ultraviolet light. In these studies a /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam radiolabel was used to track the isolation and purification of high affinity agonist binding site fragments from membrane-bound benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain. The authors present a method for limited proteolysis of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled rat brain membranes, generating photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site. Using trypsin chymotrypsin A/sub 4/, or a combination of these two proteases, they have demonstrated the extent and time course for partial digestion of benzodiazepine receptor, yielding photolabeled receptor binding site fragments. These photolabeled receptor fragments have been further purified on the basis of size, using ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography, and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) as well as on the basis of hydrophobicity, using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) precolumn, several HPLC elution schemes, and two different HPLC column types. Using these procedures, they have purified three photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site which appear to have a molecular weight of less than 2000 daltons each.

  18. Nerve growth factor evokes hyperalgesia in mice lacking the low-affinity neurotrophin receptor p75.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, I; Reiter, R; Toyka, K V; Koltzenburg, M

    1998-10-16

    Endogenous nerve growth factor (NGF) has been shown to be an important mediator of inflammatory pain and exogenous application of recombinant human NGF (rhNGF) produces pain and hyperalgesia in animals and humans. Since NGF can act through two receptors types, the high affinity tyrosine kinase A (trkA) receptor and the low affinity p75 receptor, we used transgenic mice lacking p75 to analyse the relative importance of these receptors. After systemic injection of rhNGF (5 mg/ kg), pharmacokinetic studies revealed similar serum levels and elimination profiles of exogenously administered rhNGF in both strains of mice. Although animals lacking p75 have increased mechanical and thermal withdrawal thresholds they developed both heat and mechanical hyperalgesia after systemic injection of rhNGF whose magnitude did not differ significantly from wildtype animals. This means that NGF-induced hyperalgesia can occur in the absence of the p75 receptor and suggests that the trkA receptor is sufficient to mediate the acute noxious action of NGF.

  19. Purification and affinity labeling of dihydropyridine receptor from rabbit skeletal muscle membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kanngiesser, U.; Nalik, P.; Pongs, O.

    1988-05-01

    Undegraded dihydropyridine (DHP)-receptor (putatively a voltage-gated Ca/sup 2 +/ channel) has been purified as a 340-kDa protein complex to approx.80% homogeneity (2.4 nmol of DHP-receptor per mg of protein) from rabbit skeletal muscle by a rapid purification protocol. Transverse-tubule membranes were prepared in high yield by Ribi-press treatment. The DHP-receptor complex was solubilized in 1% digitonin followed by a two step-chromatographic purification procedure. The equilibrium dissociation constant of (/sup 3/H) (+) -PN200-110 binding (K/sub d/; 0.9 nM) was not significantly changed by solubilization or purification. The purified DHP-receptor is composed of two subunits with apparent molecular masses of 148 kDa and 195 kDa migrating in polyacrylamide gels under nonreducing conditions as a single moiety of approx.300 kDa. The 195-kDa subunit was affinity-labeled with (/sup 3/H)azidopine in both transverse-tubule membranes and purified DHP-receptor preparations. The subunit can be degraded by high-energy irradiation to a 26-kDa peptide and by proteolysis to a 32-kDa peptide. Thus, it is probably due to proteolytic cleavage and/or photolysis that neither purification nor affinity-labeling studies have previously identified a DHP-receptor subunit of comparable molecular mass (195 kDa).

  20. A quantitative method to identify microRNAs targeting a messenger RNA using a 3'UTR RNA affinity technique.

    PubMed

    Shi, Miao; Han, Weiguo; Spivack, Simon D

    2013-12-01

    The identification of specific microRNAs (miRNAs) that target a given messenger RNA (mRNA) is essential for studies in gene regulation, but the available bioinformatic software programs are often unreliable. We have developed a unique experimental miRNA affinity assay whereby a 3'UTR RNA is end-labeled with biotin, immobilized, and then used as a bait sequence for affinity pull-down of miRNAs. After washes and release, cloning and sequencing identify the miRNAs. Binding affinity is quantitated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), comparing released and original input concentrations. As an initial demonstration, the TCF8/ZEB1 mRNA affinity pull-down yielded miR-200 family member miRs in the majority of clones, and binding affinity was approximately 100%; virtually all copies of miR-200c bound the immobilized mRNA transcript. For validation in cells, miR-200c strongly inhibited expression of a TCF8 luciferase reporter, native TCF8 mRNA, and protein levels, which contrasted with other recovered miRNAs with lower binding affinities. For Smad4 mRNA, miR-150 (and others) displayed a binding affinity of 39% (or less) yet did not inhibit a Smad4 reporter, native Smad4 mRNA, or protein levels. These results were not predicted by available software. This work demonstrates this miRNA binding affinity assay to be a novel yet facile experimental means of identification of miRNAs targeting a given mRNA.

  1. Low affinity purinergic receptor modulates the response of rat submandibular glands to carbachol and substance P.

    PubMed

    Métioui, M; Amsallem, H; Alzola, E; Chaib, N; Elyamani, A; Moran, A; Marino, A; Dehaye, J P

    1996-08-01

    The effect of extracellular ATP on the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in rat submandibular glands was tested. The dose-response curve for ATP was biphasic with a first increase in the 1-30 microM concentration range and a further increase at concentrations higher than 100 microM. Among ATP analogs, only benzoyl-ATP stimulated the low affinity component. ATP tau S blocked this response. All the other analogs tested reproduced the high-affinity low capacity response. Magnesium and Coomassie blue selectively blocked the low affinity component. High concentrations of ATP blocked the increase of the intracellular calcium concentration [Ca2+]i in response to 100 microM carbachol. By itself, substance P (100 pM-1 microM) increased the [Ca2+]i. One mM ATP potentiated the response to concentrations of substance P higher than 10 nM. This potentiation was reversed by extracellular magnesium. Carbachol 100 microM and substance P (100 pM-1 microM) increased the release of inositol trisphosphate (IP3) from polyphosphoinositides (polyPI). Activation of the low affinity ATP receptors did not activate the polyPI-specific phospholipase C but inhibited its activation by 100 microM carbachol (-50%) and by 100 nM substance P (-60% at 1 nM substance P and -40% at 100 nM substance P). Substance P induced a strong homologous desensitization: a preincubation with 1 nM substance P nearly completely abolished the response to 1 microM substance P. When the cells were exposed to ATP before the second addition of substance P, the purinergic agonist partially restored the response to the tachykinin without totally reversing the desensitization. It is concluded that two types of purinergic receptors coexist in rat submandibular glands; a high-affinity, low capacity receptor which remains pharmacologically and functionally undefined and a low affinity site, high capacity receptor of the P2z type coupled to a non-selective cation channel. The occupancy of these low affinity sites

  2. Identification of high- and low-affinity NGF receptors during development of the chicken central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Escandon, E.; Chao, M.V. )

    1990-12-01

    In order to study regulation of the nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor during embryogenesis in chick brain, we have used affinity crosslinking of tissues with {sup 125}I-NGF. NGF interacts with high- and low-affinity receptors; high-affinity receptors are required for the majority of NGF's actions. Most measurements of receptor levels do not distinguish between high- and low-affinity forms of the receptor. We have used the lipophilic crosslinking agent HSAB to identify the high-affinity, functional receptor during development of the chicken central nervous system. A peak of expression during Embryonic Days 5-10 was detected in all regions of the chicken central nervous system, but, shortly after birth, only the cerebellar region displays significant levels of NGF receptor protein. The time course of expression confirms the dramatic regulation of the NGF receptor gene during defined embryonic periods. The detection of high-affinity NGF receptors in brain and neural retina provides strong evidence that NGF is involved in essential ontogenetic events in the development of the chicken central nervous system.

  3. Novel neonicotinoid-agarose affinity column for Drosophila and Musca nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, M; Latli, B; Casida, J E

    1996-10-01

    Neonicotinoids such as the insecticide imidacloprid (IMI) act as agonists at the insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). Head membranes of Drosophila melanogaster and Musca domestica have a single high-affinity binding site for [3H]IMI with KD values of 1-2 nM and Bmax values of 560-850 fmol/mg of protein. Locusta and Periplaneta nAChRs isolated with an alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BGT)-agarose affinity column are known to be alpha-subunit homooligomers. This study uses 1-[N-(6-chloro-3-pyridylmethyl)-N-ethyl]amino-1-amino-2-nitroethene++ + (which inhibits [3H]IMI binding to Drosophila and Musca head membranes at 2-3 nM) to develop a neonicotinoid-agarose affinity column. The procedure-introduction of Triton-solubilized Drosophila or Musca head membranes into this neonicotinoid-based column, elution with IMI, and analysis by lithium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamicle gel electrophoresis-gives only three proteins (69, 66, and 61 kDa) tentatively assigned as putative subunits of the nAChR; the same three proteins are obtained with Musca using the alpha-BGT-agarose affinity column. Photoaffinity labeling of the Drosophila and Musca putative subunits from the neonicotinoid column with 125I-alpha-BGT-4-azidosalicylic acid gives a labeled derivative of 66-69 kDa. The yield is 2-5 micrograms of receptor protein from 1 g of Drosophila or Musca heads. Neonicotinoid affinity chromatography to isolate native Drosophila and Musca receptors will facilitate studies on the structure and function of insect nAChRs.

  4. Affinity Labeling of the Acetylcholine Receptor in the Electroplax: Electrophoretic Separation in Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Michael J.; Cowburn, David A.; Prives, Joav M.; Karlin, Arthur

    1972-01-01

    Electroplax, single cells dissected from electric tissue of Electrophorus, are labeled in a two-step procedure: reduction by dithiothreitol followed by alkylation by the affinity label 4-(N-maleimido)-α-benzyltri-[methyl-3H]methylammonium iodide, either alone or in combination with [2,3-14C]N-ethylmaleimide. Electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate on polyacrylamide gel of an extract, prepared with this detergent, of single-labeled or of double-labeled cells results in a major peak of 3H activity, with a mobility corresponding to a polypeptide of molecular weight 42,000. In addition, in the double-labeled samples, there is a unique peak in the ratio of 3H to 14C that is coincident with the 3H peak. The electrophoretic patterns of extracts of cells in which affinity alkylation of the reduced receptor has been suppressed by dithiobischoline, an affinity oxidizing agent, by cobratoxin, an irreversible ligand, or by hexamethonium, a reversible ligand, show a considerably diminished peak of 3H activity in the region of molecular weight 42,000. This is the predominant difference between the electrophoretic patterns of extracts of unprotected and of protected cells. Furthermore, extracts of cells protected with dithiobischoline before labeling with both tritiated affinity label and [14C]N-ethylmaleimide do not show the peak in the 3H to 14C ratio seen in the absence of protection. Thus, by several diverse criteria, the peak of 3H activity corresponding to a molecular weight of 42,000 contains affinity-labeled acetylcholine receptor or receptor subunit. PMID:4504331

  5. Bodilisant-a novel fluorescent, highly affine histamine h3 receptor ligand.

    PubMed

    Tomasch, Miriam; Schwed, J Stephan; Paulke, Alexander; Stark, Holger

    2013-02-14

    A piperidine-based lead structure for the human histamine H3 receptor (hH3R) was coupled with the BODIPY fluorophore and resulted in a strong green fluorescent (quantum yield, 0.92) hH3R ligand with affinity in the nanomolar concentration range (K i hH3R = 6.51 ± 3.31 nM), named Bodilisant. Screening for affinities at histamine and dopamine receptor subtypes showed high hH3R preference. Bodilisant was used for visualization of hH3R in hH3R overexpressing HEK-293 cells with fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy. In addition, in native human brain tissues, Bodilisant showed clear and displaceable images of labeled hH3R.

  6. Role of A3 adenosine receptor in diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Heng; Zhang, Enshui; Feng, Chang; Zhao, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Neuropathy is the most common diabetic complication. Although the A1 and A2A adenosine receptors are important pharmacological targets in alleviating diabetic neuropathy, the role of the A3 adenosine receptor remains unknown. Because the A3 adenosine receptor regulates pain induced by chronic constriction injury or chemotherapy, its stimulation might also attenuate diabetic neuropathy. This study examines the effects of systemic treatment with the A3 adenosine receptor agonist 1-deoxy-1-[6-[[(3-iodophenyl)methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-N-methyl-β-d-ribofuranuronamide (IB-MECA) on diabetic neuropathy and explores the putative mechanisms underlying its pharmacological effects. We show that IB-MECA alleviated mechanical hyperalgesia and thermal hypoalgesia in mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after streptozocin (STZ) treatment. Furthermore, IB-MECA prevented the reduction in sciatic motor nerve conduction velocity and sensory nerve conduction velocity in diabetic mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after STZ treatment. Similarly, IB-MECA inhibited the activation of nuclear factor-κB and decreased the generation of tumor necrosis factor-α in the spinal cord of mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after STZ treatment. These phenomena were associated with reduction of A3 adenosine receptor expression in the spinal cord after long-term diabetes. Our results suggest that the A3 adenosine receptor plays a critical role in regulating diabetic neuropathy and that reduction in A3 adenosine receptor expression/function might contribute to the progression of diabetic neuropathy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Rational development of high-affinity T-cell receptor-like antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Stewart-Jones, Guillaume; Wadle, Andreas; Hombach, Anja; Shenderov, Eugene; Held, Gerhard; Fischer, Eliane; Kleber, Sascha; Nuber, Natko; Stenner-Liewen, Frank; Bauer, Stefan; McMichael, Andrew; Knuth, Alexander; Abken, Hinrich; Hombach, Andreas A.; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Jones, E. Yvonne; Renner, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    T-cell interaction with a target cell is a key event in the adaptive immune response and primarily driven by T-cell receptor (TCR) recognition of peptide-MHC (pMHC) complexes. TCR avidity for a given pMHC is determined by number of MHC molecules, availability of coreceptors, and TCR affinity for MHC or peptide, respectively, with peptide recognition being the most important factor to confer target specificity. Here we present high-resolution crystal structures of 2 Fab antibodies in complex with the immunodominant NY-ESO-1157–165 peptide analogue (SLLMWITQV) presented by HLA-A*0201 and compare them with a TCR recognizing the same pMHC. Binding to the central methionine-tryptophan peptide motif and orientation of binding were almost identical for Fabs and TCR. As the MW “peg” dominates the contacts between Fab and peptide, we estimated the contributions of individual amino acids between the Fab and peptide to provide the rational basis for a peptide-focused second-generation, high-affinity antibody library. The final Fab candidate achieved better peptide binding by 2 light-chain mutations, giving a 20-fold affinity improvement to 2–4 nM, exceeding the affinity of the TCR by 1,000-fold. The high-affinity Fab when grafted as recombinant TCR on T cells conferred specific killing of HLA-A*0201/NY-ESO-1157–165 target cells. In summary, we prove that affinity maturation of antibodies mimicking a TCR is possible and provide a strategy for engineering high-affinity antibodies that can be used in targeting specific pMHC complexes for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:19307587

  8. High affinity receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide on a human glioma cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, F.C.; Gammeltoft, S.; Westermark, B.; Fahrenkrug, J. )

    1990-11-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) bound with high affinity (Kd 0.13 nmol/l) to receptors on the human glioma cell line U-343 MG Cl 2:6. The receptors bound the related peptides helodermin, PHM and secretin with 10, 400 and 5000 times lower affinity, respectively. Deamidated VIP (VIP-COOH) and (des-His1)VIP bound with 10 and 100 times lower affinity. The fragment VIP(7-28) displaced 25% of the receptor-bound {sup 125}I-VIP whereas VIP(16-28) and VIP(1-22-NH2) were inactive. The binding of {sup 125}I-VIP could be completely inhibited by 10 mumol/l of the antagonists (N-Ac-Tyr1,D-Phe2)GRF(1-29)-NH2, (pCl-D-Phe6,Leu17)VIP and VIP(10-28); in contrast, the antagonist L-8-K was inactive. Affinity labeling showed that VIP bound to proteins with Mr's of 75 kDa, 66 kDa and 50 kDa, respectively. Following binding, the peptide was rapidly internalized, and at steady-state only 20% of cell-associated {sup 125}I-VIP was bound to receptors on the cell surface. The internalized {sup 125}I-VIP was completely degraded to {sup 125}I-tyrosine which was released from the cells. Degradation of internalized {sup 125}I-VIP was significantly reduced by chloroquine phenanthroline and pepstatin-A. Surface binding and internalization of {sup 125}I-VIP was increased 3 times by phenanthroline, and pepstatin-A caused a 5 times increase in surface binding. Chloroquine reduced surface-bound {sup 125}I-VIP, but caused retention of internalized {sup 125}I-VIP.

  9. Serotonin receptor binding affinities of several hallucinogenic phenylalkylamine and N,N-dimethyltryptamine analogues.

    PubMed

    Glennon, R A; Liebowitz, S M; Mack, E C

    1978-08-01

    Hallucinogenic phenylalkylamine and N,N-dimethyltryptamine analogues are known to affect serotonergic systems both in vivo and in vitro. Using a rat stomach fundus model, the 5-HT receptor binding affinities of several of these analogues were determined and compared. The most behaviorally potent analogues examined, DOB, DOM, and 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine, were found to possess rather high affirmities (pA2 = 7.35, 7.12, and 7.08, respectively) for the 5-HT receptors of the model system.

  10. Identification of a High Affinity Nuclear Acceptor Site for Estrogen Receptor of Calf Uterus

    PubMed Central

    Puca, Giovanni Alfredo; Sica, Vincenzo; Nola, Ernesto

    1974-01-01

    By means of affinity chromatography, specific nuclear acceptor sites for estradiol receptors are identified in a fraction that can be solubilized from purified nuclei with 2 M NaCl. Interaction between these acceptor sites and crude or partially purified estradiol receptor shows a high association constant (over 109 M). Receptor-acceptor interaction is dependent on physiological concentrations of 17β-estradiol; it is disrupted by high ionic strength. The nuclear acceptor sites appear to be protein in nature and exist in 5- to 10-fold excess over the estrogen binding sites present in the cytosol. Single- or double-stranded DNA does not bind estrogen-receptor complexes. Acceptor sites appear to be associated with basic nuclear proteins as judged by hydroxyapatite chromatography. The nuclear acceptor sites probably represent less than 0.1% of the purified basic proteins from the nucleus. PMID:4362642

  11. Correlation between conformational equilibria of free host and guest binding affinity in non-preorganized receptors.

    PubMed

    Carrillo, Romen; Morales, Ezequiel Q; Martín, Víctor S; Martín, Tomás

    2013-08-16

    Positive cooperativity between host conformational equilibria and guest binding has been widely reported in protein receptors. However, reported examples of this kind of cooperativity in synthetic hosts are scarce and largely serendipitous, among other things because it is hard to envision systems which display this kind of cooperativity. In order to shed some light on the correlation between conformational equilibria of free host and guest binding, selected structural modifications have been performed over a family of nonpreorganized hosts in order to induce conformational changes and to analyze their effect on the binding affinity. The conformational effect was evaluated by a theoretical conformational search and correlated with the ability of the receptors. All data suggest that those receptors that display the best association constants are able to sample folded conformations analogous to the conformational requirements for the binding of the guests. On the contrary, for those receptors where folded conformers are scarce, then the association constant and enantioselectivity clearly drop.

  12. Affinity chromatography purification of angiotensin II receptor using photoactivable biotinylated probes.

    PubMed

    Marie, J; Seyer, R; Lombard, C; Desarnaud, F; Aumelas, A; Jard, S; Bonnafous, J C

    1990-09-25

    We have developed biotinylated photoactivable probes that are suitable for covalent labeling of angiotensin II (AII) receptors and the subsequent purification of covalent complexes through immobilized avidin or streptavidin. One of these probes, biotin-NH(CH2)2SS(CH2)2CO-[Ala1,Phe(4N3)8]AII, which contains a cleavable disulfide bridge in its spacer arm and which displays, in its radioiodinated form, very high affinity for AII receptors (Kd approximately 1 nM), proved to be suitable for indirect affinity chromatography of rat liver receptor with facilitated recovery from avidin gels by use of reducing agents. This constituted the central step of an efficient partial purification scheme involving hydroxylapatite chromatography, streptavidin chromatography, and thiopropyl-Sepharose chromatography. SDS-PAGE analysis and autoradiography established the identity of the purified entity (molecular weight 65K) as the AII receptor. Possible ways of completing purification to homogeneity and extrapolation of the protocols to a preparative scale are discussed, as well as the potential contribution of our new probes to the study of the structural properties of angiotensin receptors.

  13. Design of angiotensin II derivatives suitable for indirect affinity techniques: potential applications to receptor studies.

    PubMed

    Bonnafous, J C; Seyer, R; Tence, M; Marie, J; Kabbaj, M; Aumelas, A

    1988-01-01

    The design of angiotensin II (A II)-derived probes suitable for indirect affinity techniques is presented. Biotin or dinitrophenyl moieties have been added at the N-terminus of A II, through aminohexanoic acid as spacer arm, to generate (6-biotinylamido)-hexanoyl-AII (Bio-Ahx-AII) and dinitrophenyl- aminohexanoyl-AII (Dnp-Ahx-AII). Monoiodinated and highly labeled radioiodinated forms of these probes have been prepared. The two bifunctional ligands displayed high affinities for rat liver A II receptors (Kd values in the nanomolar range) and their secondary acceptors: streptavidin and monoclonal anti-Dnp antibodies respectively. Bio-Ahx-AII and Dnp-Ahx-AII behaved as agonists on several AII-sensitive systems. Based on these structural assessments, the parent photoactivable azido probe: Bio-Ahx-(Ala1,Phe(4N3)8)A II. A II was synthesized and proved to possess similar biological properties than the non-azido compound. The hepatic A II receptor could be covalently labeled by the radioiodinated probe, with a particularly high yield (15-20%); SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of solubilized complexes revealed specific labeling of a 65 Kdaltons binding unit, in agreement with previous data obtained with other azido AII-derived compounds. The potential applications of these probes are: i) receptor purification by combination of its photoaffinity labeling and adsorption of biotin-tagged solubilized hormone-receptor complexes on avidin gels. ii) cell labeling and sorting. iii) histochemical receptor visualization.

  14. Free energy calculations offer insights into the influence of receptor flexibility on ligand-receptor binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Dolenc, Jožica; Riniker, Sereina; Gaspari, Roberto; Daura, Xavier; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2011-08-01

    Docking algorithms for computer-aided drug discovery and design often ignore or restrain the flexibility of the receptor, which may lead to a loss of accuracy of the relative free enthalpies of binding. In order to evaluate the contribution of receptor flexibility to relative binding free enthalpies, two host-guest systems have been examined: inclusion complexes of α-cyclodextrin (αCD) with 1-chlorobenzene (ClBn), 1-bromobenzene (BrBn) and toluene (MeBn), and complexes of DNA with the minor-groove binding ligands netropsin (Net) and distamycin (Dist). Molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations reveal that restraining of the flexibility of the receptor can have a significant influence on the estimated relative ligand-receptor binding affinities as well as on the predicted structures of the biomolecular complexes. The influence is particularly pronounced in the case of flexible receptors such as DNA, where a 50% contribution of DNA flexibility towards the relative ligand-DNA binding affinities is observed. The differences in the free enthalpy of binding do not arise only from the changes in ligand-DNA interactions but also from changes in ligand-solvent interactions as well as from the loss of DNA configurational entropy upon restraining.

  15. Upregulation of high affinity GABAA receptors in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kwan Yeop; Charbonnet, Marcel; Gold, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Despite evidence that high-affinity GABAA receptor subunit mRNA and protein are present in dorsal root ganglia (DRG), low affinity currents dominate those detected in acutely dissociated DRG neurons in vitro. This observation raises the possibility that high affinity receptors are normally trafficked out of the DRG toward central and peripheral terminals. We therefore hypothesized that with time in culture, there would be an increase in high-affinity GABAA currents in DRG neurons. To test this hypothesis, we studied dissociated DRG neurons 2 hrs (acute) and 24 hrs (cultured) after plating with whole cell patch clamp techniques, western blot and qRT-PCR analysis. GABAA current density increases dramatically with time in culture in association with the emergence of two persistent currents with EC50’s of 0.25 ± 0.01 μM and 3.2 ± 0.02 μM for GABA activation. In a subpopulation of neurons, there was also an increase in the potency of GABA activation of the transient current from an EC50 of 78.16 ± 10.1 μM to 9.56 ± 1.3 μM with time in culture. A fraction of the high affinity current was potentiated by δ-subunit agonist 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridine-3-ol (THIP). δ-subunit immunoreactivity was largely restricted to the cytosolic fraction in acute but the membrane fraction in cultured DRG neurons with no detectable change in δ-subunit mRNA. However, the emergence of a high affinity current blocked by THIP and insensitive to bicuculline was detected in a subpopulation of cultured neurons as well in association with an increase in ρ2 and 3-subunit mRNA in cultured DRG neurons. Our results suggest that high-affinity δ-subunit containing GABAA receptors are normally trafficked out of the DRG where they are targeted to peripheral and central processes. They also highlight that the interpretation of data obtained from cultured DRG neurons should be made with caution. PMID:22366297

  16. LNP 906, the first high-affinity photoaffinity ligand selective for I1 imidazoline receptors

    PubMed Central

    Dragan, Urosevic; Stephan, Schann; Jean-Daniel, Ehrhardt; Pascal, Bousquet; Hugues, Greney

    2004-01-01

    The hypotensive effect of imidazoline-like drugs, such as clonidine, was attributed both to α2-adrenergic receptors and nonadrenergic imidazoline receptors, which are divided into I1, I2 and I3 subtypes. We have recently synthesized a derivative of (2-(2-chloro-4-iodo-phenylamino)-5-methyl-pyrroline (LNP 911), the first high-affinity and selective ligand for I1 receptors (I1R), with a photoactivable function (LNP 906). This work aims to test whether this derivative retained the binding properties of LNP 911 and bound irreversibly to I1R. Binding studies showed that LNP 906 exhibited nanomolar affinity for I1R and was selective for I1R over I2 receptors and α2-adrenergic receptors (α2Ars). Upon exposure to u.v. light, LNP 906 irreversibly blocked the binding of [125I]-paraiodoclonidine (PIC) to I1R, time- and dose-dependently, on PC12 cell membranes and interacted with I1R in a reversible and competitive manner in the absence of light. Pharmacological studies showed that this blockade was prevented by the concomitant presence of rilmenidine (a well-known I1 agonist), but not by rauwolscine (an α2 antagonist). Finally, LNP 906 clearly antagonized the decrease in forskolin-stimulated cAMP level induced by rilmenidine, but not by melatonin. These results indicate that LNP 906 is the first high-affinity and selective photoaffinity ligand for I1R and that it behaves as an I1R antagonist. PMID:15178642

  17. 2-Dialkynyl derivatives of (N)-methanocarba nucleosides: 'Clickable' A(3) adenosine receptor-selective agonists.

    PubMed

    Tosh, Dilip K; Chinn, Moshe; Yoo, Lena S; Kang, Dong Wook; Luecke, Hans; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2010-01-15

    We modified a series of (N)-methanocarba nucleoside 5'-uronamides to contain dialkyne groups on an extended adenine C2 substituent, as synthetic intermediates leading to potent and selective A(3) adenosine receptor (AR) agonists. The proximal alkyne was intended to promote receptor recognition, and the distal alkyne reacted with azides to form triazole derivatives (click cycloaddition). Click chemistry was utilized to couple an octadiynyl A(3)AR agonist to azido-containing fluorescent, chemically reactive, biotinylated, and other moieties with retention of selective binding to the A(3)AR. A bifunctional thiol-reactive crosslinking reagent was introduced. The most potent and selective novel compound was a 1-adamantyl derivative (K(i) 6.5nM), although some of the click products had K(i) values in the range of 200-400nM. Other potent, selective derivatives (K(i) at A(3)AR innM) were intended as possible receptor affinity labels: 3-nitro-4-fluorophenyl (10.6), alpha-bromophenacyl (9.6), thiol-reactive isothiazolone (102), and arylisothiocyanate (37.5) derivatives. The maximal functional effects in inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP were measured, indicating that this class of click adducts varied from partial to full A(3)AR agonist compared to other widely used agonists. Thus, this strategy provides a general chemical approach to linking potent and selective A(3)AR agonists to reporter groups of diverse structure and to carrier moieties.

  18. Computational estimation of rainbow trout estrogen receptor binding affinities for environmental estrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Shyu, Conrad; Cavileer, Timothy D.; Nagler, James J.; Ytreberg, F. Marty

    2011-02-01

    Environmental estrogens have been the subject of intense research due to their documented detrimental effects on the health of fish and wildlife and their potential to negatively impact humans. A complete understanding of how these compounds affect health is complicated because environmental estrogens are a structurally heterogeneous group of compounds. In this work, computational molecular dynamics simulations were utilized to predict the binding affinity of different compounds using rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) estrogen receptors (ERs) as a model. Specifically, this study presents a comparison of the binding affinity of the natural ligand estradiol-17{beta} to the four rainbow trout ER isoforms with that of three known environmental estrogens 17{alpha}-ethinylestradiol, bisphenol A, and raloxifene. Two additional compounds, atrazine and testosterone, that are known to be very weak or non-binders to ERs were tested. The binding affinity of these compounds to the human ER{alpha} subtype is also included for comparison. The results of this study suggest that, when compared to estradiol-17{beta}, bisphenol A binds less strongly to all four receptors, 17{alpha}-ethinylestradiol binds more strongly, and raloxifene has a high affinity for the {alpha} subtype only. The results also show that atrazine and testosterone are weak or non-binders to the ERs. All of the results are in excellent qualitative agreement with the known in vivo estrogenicity of these compounds in the rainbow trout and other fishes. Computational estimation of binding affinities could be a valuable tool for predicting the impact of environmental estrogens in fish and other animals.

  19. Putative M2 muscarinic receptors of rat heart have high affinity for organophosphorus anticholinesterases

    SciTech Connect

    Silveira, C.L.; Eldefrawi, A.T.; Eldefrawi, M.E. )

    1990-05-01

    The M2 subtype of muscarinic receptor is predominant in heart, and such receptors were reported to be located in muscles as well as in presynaptic cholinergic and adrenergic nerve terminals. Muscarinic receptors of rat heart were identified by the high affinity binding of the agonist (+)-(3H)cis-methyldioxolane ((3H)CD), which has been used to label a high affinity population of M2 receptors. A single population of sites was detected and (3H)CD binding was sensitive to the M2 antagonist himbacine but much less so to pirenzepine, the M1 antagonist. These cardiac receptors had different sensitivities to NiCl2 and N-ethylmaleimide from brain muscarinic receptors, that were also labeled with (3H)CD and considered to be of the M2 subtype. Up to 70% of the (3H)CD-labeled cardiac receptors had high affinities for several organophosphate (OP) anticholinesterases. (3H)CD binding was inhibited by the nerve agents soman, VX, sarin, and tabun, with K0.5 values of 0.8, 2, 20, and 50 nM, respectively. It was also inhibited by echothiophate and paraoxon with K0.5 values of 100 and 300 nM, respectively. The apparent competitive nature of inhibition of (3H)CD binding by both sarin and paraoxon suggests that the OPs bind to the acetylcholine binding site of the muscarinic receptor. Other OP insecticides had lower potencies, inhibiting less than 50% of 5 nM (3H)CD binding by 1 microM of EPN, coumaphos, dioxathion, dichlorvos, or chlorpyriphos. There was poor correlation between the potencies of the OPs in reversibly inhibiting (3H)CD binding, and their anticholinesterase activities and toxicities. Acetylcholinesterases are the primary targets for these OP compounds because of the irreversible nature of their inhibition, which results in building of acetylcholine concentrations that activate muscarinic and nicotinic receptors and desensitize them, thereby inhibiting respiration.

  20. The A3 adenosine receptor: history and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Tabrizi, Mojgan Aghazadeh; Merighi, Stefania; Gessi, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    By general consensus, the omnipresent purine nucleoside adenosine is considered a major regulator of local tissue function, especially when energy supply fails to meet cellular energy demand. Adenosine mediation involves activation of a family of four G protein-coupled adenosine receptors (ARs): A(1), A(2)A, A(2)B, and A(3). The A(3) adenosine receptor (A(3)AR) is the only adenosine subtype to be overexpressed in inflammatory and cancer cells, thus making it a potential target for therapy. Originally isolated as an orphan receptor, A(3)AR presented a twofold nature under different pathophysiologic conditions: it appeared to be protective/harmful under ischemic conditions, pro/anti-inflammatory, and pro/antitumoral depending on the systems investigated. Until recently, the greatest and most intriguing challenge has been to understand whether, and in which cases, selective A(3) agonists or antagonists would be the best choice. Today, the choice has been made and A(3)AR agonists are now under clinical development for some disorders including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, glaucoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma. More specifically, the interest and relevance of these new agents derives from clinical data demonstrating that A(3)AR agonists are both effective and safe. Thus, it will become apparent in the present review that purine scientists do seem to be getting closer to their goal: the incorporation of adenosine ligands into drugs with the ability to save lives and improve human health.

  1. Human receptor kinetics and lung tissue retention of the enhanced-affinity glucocorticoid fluticasone furoate

    PubMed Central

    Valotis, Anagnostis; Högger, Petra

    2007-01-01

    Fluticasone furoate (FF) – USAN approved name, a new topically active glucocorticoid has been recently identified. The aim of this study was to characterise the binding affinity of this compound to the human lung glucocorticoid receptor in relation to other glucocorticoids. Additionally, we sought to determine the binding behaviour of fluticasone furoate to human lung tissue. The glucocorticoid receptor binding kinetics of fluticasone furoate revealed a remarkably fast association and a slow dissociation resulting in a relative receptor affinity (RRA) of 2989 ± 135 with reference to dexamethasone (RRA: 100 ± 5). Thus, the RRA of FF exceeds the RRAs of all currently clinically used corticosteroids such as mometasone furoate (MF; RRA 2244), fluticasone propionate (FP; RRA 1775), ciclesonide's active metabolite (RRA 1212 – rat receptor data) or budesonide (RRA 855). FP and FF displayed pronounced retention in human lung tissue in vitro. Lowest tissue binding was found for MF. There was no indication of instability or chemical modification of FF in human lung tissue. These advantageous binding attributes may contribute to a highly efficacious profile for FF as a topical treatment for inflammatory disorders of the respiratory tract. PMID:17650349

  2. Structure-Based Understanding of Binding Affinity and Mode of Estrogen Receptor α Agonists and Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Barron, Mace G.

    2017-01-01

    The flexible hydrophobic ligand binding pocket (LBP) of estrogen receptor α (ERα) allows the binding of a wide variety of endocrine disruptors. Upon ligand binding, the LBP reshapes around the contours of the ligand and stabilizes the complex by complementary hydrophobic interactions and specific hydrogen bonds with the ligand. Here we present a framework for quantitative analysis of the steric and electronic features of the human ERα-ligand complex using three dimensional (3D) protein-ligand interaction description combined with 3D-QSAR approach. An empirical hydrophobicity density field is applied to account for hydrophobic contacts of ligand within the LBP. The obtained 3D-QSAR model revealed that hydrophobic contacts primarily determine binding affinity and govern binding mode with hydrogen bonds. Several residues of the LBP appear to be quite flexible and adopt a spectrum of conformations in various ERα-ligand complexes, in particular His524. The 3D-QSAR was combined with molecular docking based on three receptor conformations to accommodate receptor flexibility. The model indicates that the dynamic character of the LBP allows accommodation and stable binding of structurally diverse ligands, and proper representation of the protein flexibility is critical for reasonable description of binding of the ligands. Our results provide a quantitative and mechanistic understanding of binding affinity and mode of ERα agonists and antagonists that may be applicable to other nuclear receptors. PMID:28061508

  3. Affinity biosensors using recombinant native membrane proteins displayed on exosomes: application to botulinum neurotoxin B receptor.

    PubMed

    Desplantes, Richard; Lévêque, Christian; Muller, Benjamin; Lotierzo, Manuela; Ferracci, Géraldine; Popoff, Michel; Seagar, Michael; Mamoun, Robert; El Far, Oussama

    2017-04-21

    The development of simple molecular assays with membrane protein receptors in a native conformation still represents a challenging task. Exosomes are extracellular vesicles which, due to their stability and small size, are suited for analysis in various assay formats. Here, we describe a novel approach to sort recombinant fully native and functional membrane proteins to exosomes using a targeting peptide. Specific binding of high affinity ligands to the potassium channel Kv1.2, the G-protein coupled receptor CXCR4, and the botulinum neurotoxin type B (BoNT/B) receptor, indicated their correct assembly and outside out orientation in exosomes. We then developed, using a label-free optical biosensor, a new method to determine the kinetic constants of BoNT/B holotoxin binding to its receptor synaptotagmin2/GT1b ganglioside (kon = 2.3 ×10(5) M(-1).s(-1), koff = 1.3 10(-4) s(-1)), yielding an affinity constant (KD = 0.6 nM) similar to values determined from native tissue. In addition, the recombinant binding domain of BoNT/B, a potential vector for neuronal delivery, bound quasi-irreversibly to synaptotagmin 2/GT1b exosomes. Engineered exosomes provide thus a novel means to study membrane proteins for biotechnology and clinical applications.

  4. Pharmacological and biochemical characterization of A3 adenosine receptors in Jurkat T cells

    PubMed Central

    Gessi, Stefania; Varani, Katia; Merighi, Stefania; Morelli, Anna; Ferrari, Davide; Leung, Edward; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Spalluto, Giampiero; Borea, Pier Andrea

    2001-01-01

    The present work was devoted to the study of A3 adenosine receptors in Jurkat cells, a human leukemia line. The A3 subtype was found by means of RT-PCR experiments and characterized by using the new A3 adenosine receptor antagonist [3H]-MRE 3008F20, the only A3 selective radioligand currently available. Saturation experiments revealed a single high affinity binding site with KD of 1.9±0.2 nM and Bmax of 1.3±0.1 pmol mg−1 of protein. The pharmacological profile of [3H]-MRE 3008F20 binding on Jurkat cells was established using typical adenosine ligands which displayed a rank order of potency typical of the A3 subtype. Thermodynamic data indicated that [3H]-MRE 3008F20 binding to A3 subtype in Jurkat cells was entropy- and enthalpy-driven, according with that found in cells expressing the recombinant human A3 subtype. In functional assays the high affinity A3 agonists Cl-IB-MECA and IB-MECA were able to inhibit cyclic AMP accumulation and stimulate Ca2+ release from intracellular Ca2+ pools followed by Ca2+ influx. The presence of the other adenosine subtypes was investigated in Jurkat cells. A1 receptors were characterized using [3H]-DPCPX binding with a KD of 0.9±0.1 nM and Bmax of 42±3 fmol mg−1 of protein. A2A receptors were studied with [3H]-SCH 58261 binding and revealed a KD of 2.5±0.3 nM and a Bmax of 1.4±0.2 pmol mg−1 of protein. In conclusion, by means of the first antagonist radioligand [3H]-MRE 3008F20 we could demonstrate the existence of functional A3 receptors on Jurkat cells. PMID:11522603

  5. Detection of multiple H3 receptor affinity states utilizing [3H]A-349821, a novel, selective, non-imidazole histamine H3 receptor inverse agonist radioligand.

    PubMed

    Witte, David G; Yao, Betty Bei; Miller, Thomas R; Carr, Tracy L; Cassar, Steven; Sharma, Rahul; Faghih, Ramin; Surber, Bruce W; Esbenshade, Timothy A; Hancock, Arthur A; Krueger, Kathleen M

    2006-07-01

    1. A-349821 is a selective histamine H3 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist. Herein, binding of the novel non-imidazole H3 receptor radioligand [3H]A-349821 to membranes expressing native or recombinant H3 receptors from rat or human sources was characterized and compared with the binding of the agonist [3H]N--methylhistamine ([3H]NMH). 2. [3H]A-349821 bound with high affinity and specificity to an apparent single class of saturable sites and recognized human H3 receptors with 10-fold higher affinity compared to rat H3 receptors. [3H]A-349821 detected larger populations of receptors compared to [3H]NMH. 3. Displacement of [3H]A-349821 binding by H3 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists was monophasic, suggesting recognition of a single binding site, while that of H3 receptor agonists was biphasic, suggesting recognition of both high- and low-affinity H3 receptor sites. 4. pKi values of high-affinity binding sites for H3 receptor competitors utilizing [3H]A-349821 were highly correlated with pKi values obtained with [3H]NalphaMH, consistent with labelling of H3 receptors by [3H]A-349821. 5. Unlike assays utilizing [3H]NMH, addition of GDP had no effect on saturation parameters measured with [3H]A-349821, while displacement of [3H]A-349821 binding by the H3 receptor agonist histamine was sensitive to GDP. 6. In conclusion, [3H]A-349821 labels interconvertible high- and low-affinity states of the H3 receptor, and displays improved selectivity over imidazole-containing H3 receptor antagonist radioligands. [3H]A-349821 competition studies showed significant differences in the proportions and potencies of high- and low-affinity sites across species, providing new information about the fundamental pharmacological nature of H3 receptors.

  6. Antigen-affinity controls pre-germinal centser B cell selection by promoting Mcl-1 induction through BAFF receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wensveen, Felix M.; Slinger, Erik; van Attekum, Martijn HA; Brink, Robert; Eldering, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Upon antigen encounter, the responsive B cell pool undergoes stringent selection which eliminates cells with low B cell receptor (BCR) affinity. Already before formation of the germinal center, activated B cells of low-affinity are negatively selected in a process that is molecularly not well understood. In this study, we investigated the mechanism behind pre-GC affinity-mediated B cell selection. We applied affinity mutants of HEL antigen and found that rapidly after activation B cells become highly dependent on the cytokine BAFF. Moreover, expression of BAFF receptor CD268 is regulated in a BCR-affinity dependent fashion. High affinity responses via BAFF correlated with PI3K activation, which controlled expression of the pro-survival protein Mcl-1, and thereby increased survival. In the presence of excess BAFF, or in absence of the Mcl-1 antagonist Noxa, more low-affinity B cells survived the first two days after antigen encounter. This resulted in increased numbers of antigen-specific B cells of low affinity upon immunization and reduced the overall affinity of cells that contributed to the germinal center reaction. Our findings elucidate a crucial molecular pathway of B cell selection in the earliest phases of activation by identifying a novel link between BCR affinity and BAFF-R signaling towards Mcl-1. PMID:27762293

  7. Network-of-queues approach to B-cell-receptor affinity discrimination.

    PubMed

    Felizzi, Federico; Comoglio, Federico

    2012-06-01

    The immune system is one of the most complex signal processing machineries in biology. The adaptive immune system, consisting of B and T lymphocytes, is activated in response to a large spectrum of pathogen antigens. B cells recognize and bind the antigen through B-cell receptors (BCRs) and this is fundamental for B-cell activation. However, the system response is dependent on BCR-antigen affinity values that span several orders of magnitude. Moreover, the ability of the BCR to discriminate between affinities at the high end (e.g., 10^{9}M^{-1}-10^{10}M^{-1}) challenges the formulation of a mathematical model able to robustly separate these affinity-dependent responses. Queuing theory enables the analysis of many related processes, such as those resulting from the stochasticity of protein binding and unbinding events. Here we define a network of queues, consisting of BCR early signaling states and transition rates related to the propensity of molecular aggregates to form or disassemble. By considering the family of marginal distributions of BCRs in a given signaling state, we report a significant separation (measured as Jensen-Shannon divergence) that arises from a broad spectrum of antigen affinities.

  8. Network-of-queues approach to B-cell-receptor affinity discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felizzi, Federico; Comoglio, Federico

    2012-06-01

    The immune system is one of the most complex signal processing machineries in biology. The adaptive immune system, consisting of B and T lymphocytes, is activated in response to a large spectrum of pathogen antigens. B cells recognize and bind the antigen through B-cell receptors (BCRs) and this is fundamental for B-cell activation. However, the system response is dependent on BCR-antigen affinity values that span several orders of magnitude. Moreover, the ability of the BCR to discriminate between affinities at the high end (e.g., 109M-1-1010M-1) challenges the formulation of a mathematical model able to robustly separate these affinity-dependent responses. Queuing theory enables the analysis of many related processes, such as those resulting from the stochasticity of protein binding and unbinding events. Here we define a network of queues, consisting of BCR early signaling states and transition rates related to the propensity of molecular aggregates to form or disassemble. By considering the family of marginal distributions of BCRs in a given signaling state, we report a significant separation (measured as Jensen-Shannon divergence) that arises from a broad spectrum of antigen affinities.

  9. Structural correlates of affinity in fetal versus adult endplate nicotinic receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Chakraborty, Srirupa; Zheng, Wenjun; Auerbach, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    Adult-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) mediate signalling at mature neuromuscular junctions and fetal-type AChRs are necessary for proper synapse development. Each AChR has two neurotransmitter binding sites located at the interface of a principal and a complementary subunit. Although all agonist binding sites have the same core of five aromatic amino acids, the fetal site has ~30-fold higher affinity for the neurotransmitter ACh. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations of adult versus fetal homology models to identify complementary-subunit residues near the core that influence affinity, and use single-channel electrophysiology to corroborate the results. Four residues in combination determine adult versus fetal affinity. Simulations suggest that at lower-affinity sites, one of these unsettles the core directly and the others (in loop E) increase backbone flexibility to unlock a key, complementary tryptophan from the core. Swapping only four amino acids is necessary and sufficient to exchange function between adult and fetal AChRs.

  10. Point mutations affecting antagonist affinity and agonist dependent gating of GABAA receptor channels.

    PubMed Central

    Sigel, E; Baur, R; Kellenberger, S; Malherbe, P

    1992-01-01

    Two variant amino acid sequences, which differ in a single amino acid residue, have been reported for the alpha 1-subunit of the rat brain GABAA receptor. We separately co-expressed these two variants in Xenopus oocytes, in combination with beta 2 and gamma 2. This experiment showed that substitution of alpha 1-Phe64 by Leu strongly decreases the apparent affinity for GABA dependent channel gating from 6 microM to 1260 microM. Starting from this observation, we used in vitro mutagenesis to obtain information relevant for the localization of the agonist/antagonist binding site in the GABAA receptor. Homologous mutation in alpha 5 had similar consequences for alpha 5 beta 2 gamma 2. Homologous mutation in beta 2 and gamma 2 resulted in intermediate and small shifts in EC50, respectively. The apparent affinities of the competitive antagonists bicuculline methiodide and SR95531, the latter sharing close structural similarity with the agonist GABA, were decreased 60- to 200-fold by these mutations in alpha-subunits. Interestingly, these affinities remained nearly unaffected upon introduction of the homologous mutations in beta 2 and gamma 2, or upon mutation of the neighbouring amino acid in alpha 1, Phe65 to Leu. These results suggest close functional and structural association of alpha-subunits with the agonist/antagonist binding site, and involvement of N-terminal portions of the extracellular domains of all subunits in the gating of the channel. PMID:1376242

  11. Pyrido pyrimidinones as selective agonists of the high affinity niacin receptor GPR109A: optimization of in vitro activity.

    PubMed

    Peters, Jens-Uwe; Kühne, Holger; Dehmlow, Henrietta; Grether, Uwe; Conte, Aurelia; Hainzl, Dominik; Hertel, Cornelia; Kratochwil, Nicole A; Otteneder, Michael; Narquizian, Robert; Panousis, Constantinos G; Ricklin, Fabienne; Röver, Stephan

    2010-09-15

    Pyrido pyrimidinones are selective agonists of the human high affinity niacin receptor GPR109A (HM74A). They show no activity on the highly homologous low affinity receptor GPR109B (HM74). Starting from a high throughput screening hit the in vitro activity of the pyrido pyrimidinones was significantly improved providing lead compounds suitable for further optimization. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Imaging the high-affinity state of the dopamine D2 receptor in vivo: Fact or fiction?

    PubMed Central

    Skinbjerg, Mette; Sibley, David R.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Abi-Dargham, Anissa

    2013-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has been used for more than three decades to image and quantify dopamine D2 receptors (D2R) in vivo with antagonist radioligands but in the recent years agonist radioligands have also been employed. In vitro competition studies have demonstrated that agonists bind to both a high and a low-affinity state of the D2Rs, of which the high affinity state reflects receptors that are coupled to G-proteins and the low-affinity state reflects receptors uncoupled from G-proteins. In contrast, antagonists bind with uniform affinity to the total pool of receptors. Results of these studies led to the proposal that D2Rs exist in high and low-affinity states for agonists in vivo and sparked the development and use of agonist radioligands for PET imaging with the primary purpose of measuring the proportion of receptors in the high-affinity (activating) state. Although several lines of research support the presence of high and low-affinity states of D2Rs and their detection by in vivo imaging paradigms, a growing body of controversial data has now called this into question. These include both in vivo and ex vivo studies of anesthesia effects, rodent models with increased proportions of high-affinity state D2Rs as well as the molecular evidence for stable receptor–G-protein complexes. In this commentary we review these data and discuss the evidence for the in vivo existence of D2Rs configured in high and low-affinity states and whether or not the high-affinity state of the D2R can, in fact, be imaged in vivo with agonist radioligands. PMID:21945484

  13. In Vitro Opioid Receptor Affinity and in Vivo Behavioral Studies of Nelumbo nucifera Flower

    PubMed Central

    Kumarihamy, Mallika; León, Francisco; Pettaway, Sara; Wilson, Lisa; Lambert, Janet A.; Wang, Mei; Hill, Christopher; McCurdy, Christopher R.; ElSohly, Mahmoud A.; Cutler, Stephen J.; Muhammad, Ilias

    2015-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Nelumbo nucifera Geartn., known as sacred lotus, has been used traditionally in South East Asia as a traditional medicine for various CNS disorders including stress, fever, depression, insomnia, and cognitive conditions. Aim of the study To investigate the in vitro cannabinoid and opioid receptor binding affinities, and in vivo behavioral actions of Nelumbo flower extracts and to isolate the potential compounds to treat CNS associated disorders. Materials and methods The white and pink flowers of N. nucifera were extracted with 95% EtOH, followed by acid-base partitioning using CHCl3 to give acidic and basic partitions. These partitions were subjected to Centrifugal Preparative TLC (CPTLC) to yield benzyltetrahydroisoquinoline (BTIQ) alkaloids and long chain fatty acids, identified by physical and spectroscopic methods. In addition, EtOH extracts and partitions were analyzed for chemical markers by UHPLC/MS and GC/MS. In vitro neuropharmacological effects were evaluated by cannabinoid (CB1 and CB2) and opioid [delta (δ), kappa (κ), and mu (μ)] competitive radioligand binding and GTPγS functional assays. The in vivo behavioral effect was studied through the use of the mouse tetrad assay at 10, 30, 75 and 100 mg/kg/ip doses that revealed the effect on locomotion, catalepsy, body temperature, and nociception of acidic and basic CHCl3 partitions, fractions, and compounds. Results Three aporphines, nuciferine (1), N-nor-nuciferine (2), asimilobine (3), and five BTIQs, armepavine (4), O-methylcoclaurine (5), N-methylcoclaurine (6), coclaurine (7), neferine (10), and a mixture of linoleic and palmitic acids (LA and PA), were identified and evaluated for cannabinoid and opioid receptor displacement activities. Compounds 5–7 showed binding affinities for the κ opioid receptor with equilibrium dissociation constant (Ki) values of 3.5±0.3, 0.9±0.1, 2.2±0.2 µM, respectively. Compound 10 displayed affinities for δ-and μ- opioid

  14. In vitro opioid receptor affinity and in vivo behavioral studies of Nelumbo nucifera flower.

    PubMed

    Kumarihamy, Mallika; León, Francisco; Pettaway, Sara; Wilson, Lisa; Lambert, Janet A; Wang, Mei; Hill, Christopher; McCurdy, Christopher R; ElSohly, Mahmoud A; Cutler, Stephen J; Muhammad, Ilias

    2015-11-04

    Nelumbo nucifera Geartn., known as sacred lotus, has been used traditionally in South East Asia as a traditional medicine for various CNS disorders including stress, fever, depression, insomnia, and cognitive conditions. To investigate the in vitro cannabinoid and opioid receptor binding affinities, and in vivo behavioral actions of Nelumbo flower extracts and to isolate the potential compounds to treat CNS associated disorders. The white and pink flowers of N. nucifera were extracted with 95% EtOH, followed by acid-base partitioning using CHCl3 to give acidic and basic partitions. These partitions were subjected to Centrifugal Preparative TLC (CPTLC) to yield benzyltetrahydroisoquinoline (BTIQ) alkaloids and long chain fatty acids, identified by physical and spectroscopic methods. In addition, EtOH extracts and partitions were analyzed for chemical markers by UHPLC/MS and GC/MS. In vitro neuropharmacological effects were evaluated by cannabinoid (CB1 and CB2) and opioid [delta (δ), kappa (ĸ), and mu (µ)] competitive radioligand binding and GTPγS functional assays. The in vivo behavioral effect was studied through the use of the mouse tetrad assay at 10, 30, 75 and 100mg/kg/ip doses that revealed the effect on locomotion, catalepsy, body temperature, and nociception of acidic and basic CHCl3 partitions, fractions, and compounds. Three aporphines, nuciferine (1), N-nor-nuciferine (2), asimilobine (3), and five BTIQs, armepavine (4), O-methylcoclaurine (5), N-methylcoclaurine (6), coclaurine (7), neferine (10), and a mixture of linoleic and palmitic acids (LA and PA), were identified and evaluated for cannabinoid and opioid receptor displacement activities. Compounds 5-7 showed binding affinities for the ĸ opioid receptor with equilibrium dissociation constant (Ki) values of 3.5 ± 0.3, 0.9 ± 0.1, 2.2 ± 0.2 μM, respectively. Compound 10 displayed affinities for δ-and µ- opioid receptors with Ki values of 0.7 ± 0.1 and 1.8 ± 0.2 μM, respectively, and was

  15. Two high-affinity ligand binding states of uterine estrogen receptor distinguished by modulation of hydrophobic environment

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchens, T.W.; Li, C.M.; Zamah, N.M.; Besch, P.K.

    1987-02-10

    The steroid binding function of soluble (cytosolic) estrogen receptors from calf uteri was evaluated under conditions known to modify the extent of hydrophobic interaction with receptor-associated proteins. Receptor preparations were equilibrated into 6 M urea buffers and control buffers by chromatography through small columns of Sephadex G-25 or by dialysis at 0.6 /sup 0/C. Equilibrium dissociation constants (K/sub d/) and binding capacities (n) of experimental and control receptor preparations were determined by 13-point Scatchard analyses using concentrations of 17..beta..-(/sup 3/H)estradiol from 0.05 to 10 nM. Nonspecific binding was determined at each concentration by parallel incubations with a 200-fold molar excess of the receptor-specific competitor diethylstilbestrol. The control receptor population was consistently found to be a single class of binding sites with a high affinity for estradiol which was unaffected by G-25 chromatography, by dialysis, by dilution, or by the presence of 0.4 M KCl. However, equilibration into 6 M urea induced a discrete (10-fold) reduction in receptor affinity to reveal a second, thermodynamically stable, high-affinity binding state. The presence of 0.4 M KCl did not significantly influence the discrete change in receptor affinity induced by urea. The effects of urea on both receptor affinity and binding capacity were reversible, suggesting a lack of covalent modification. These results demonstrate nonenzymatic means by which not only the binding capacity but also the affinity of receptor for estradiol can be reversibly controlled, suggesting that high concentrations of urea might be more effectively utilized during the physicochemical characterization and purification of steroid receptor proteins.

  16. The gall bladder cholecystokinin receptor exists in two guanine nucleotide-binding protein-regulated affinity states

    SciTech Connect

    Molero, X.; Miller, L.J. )

    1991-02-01

    To study proximal events in cholecystokinin (CCK) action on bovine gall bladder smooth muscle, we used the hormone analogue D-Tyr-Gly-((N1e28,31)CCK-26-32)-phenethyl ester (OPE), which has unique biological properties. This fully efficacious agonist differs from native CCK by not expressing supramaximal inhibition of cell shortening, yet it clearly interacts with the same receptor molecule. This was demonstrated in binding and affinity labeling studies, where both peptides label the same Mr 70,000-85,000 protein and both fully compete for binding of the other ligand. Further, its relatively high affinity for the low affinity CCK receptor permits the clear demonstration of two affinity states of a CCK receptor on a membrane preparation and makes possible evaluation of the molecular basis of these affinity states and their regulation. Analysis of homologous and heterologous binding curves performed with both CCK and OPE peptides and radioligands demonstrated the presence of two affinity states, with CCK being able to distinguish them (Kd1 = 0.48 +/- 0.04 nM and Kd2 = 56.5 +/- 7.4 nM) and OPE recognizing them equally (Kd1 = 0.94 +/- 0.31 nM and Kd2 = 0.96 +/- 0.23 nM). In the presence of nonhydrolyzable GTP analogues, there was a shift in distribution of receptors toward the low affinity state, with the total number of receptors and their absolute affinities for each peptide remaining constant. Thus, the gall bladder CCK receptor is a single molecule capable of assuming two interconvertible affinity states, regulated by a guanine nucleotide-binding protein. Two full agonists are capable of interacting with this molecule to yield different biological responses via different molecular events.

  17. 8-epi-Salvinorin B: crystal structure and affinity at the κ opioid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Thomas A; Duncan, Katharine K; Staples, Richard J; Xu, Wei; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan; Béguin, Cécile; Carlezon, William A; Cohen, Bruce M

    2007-01-01

    There have been many reports of epimerization of salvinorins at C-8 under basic conditions, but little evidence has been presented to establish the structure of these compounds. We report here the first crystal structure of an 8-epi-salvinorin or derivative: the title compound, 2b. The lactone adopts a boat conformation with the furan equatorial. Several lines of evidence suggest that epimerization proceeds via enolization of the lactone rather than a previously proposed indirect mechanism. Consistent with the general trend in related compounds, the title compound showed lower affinity at the kappa opioid receptor than the natural epimer salvinorin B (2a). The related 8-epi-acid 4b showed no affinity. PMID:17212822

  18. Steroidal Bivalent Ligands for the Estrogen Receptor: Design, Synthesis, Characterization and Binding Affinities

    PubMed Central

    LaFrate, Andrew L.; Carlson, Kathryn E.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Steroidal bivalent ligands for the estrogen receptor (ER) were designed using crystal structures of ERα dimers as a template. The syntheses of several 17α-ethynylestradiol-based bivalent ligands with varying linker compositions and lengths are described. The binding affinities of these bivalent ligands for ERα and ERβ were determined. In the two series of bivalent ligands that we synthesized, there is a clear correlation between linker length and binding affinity, both of which reach a maximum at the same tether length. Further studies are underway to explore aspects of bivalent ligand and control compound binding to the ERs and their effects on ER dimer formation; these results will be reported in a subsequent publication. PMID:19394231

  19. Ligand binding affinities of arctigenin and its demethylated metabolites to estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jong-Sik; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Hattori, Masao

    2013-01-16

    Phytoestrogens are defined as plant-derived compounds with estrogen-like activities according to their chemical structures and activities. Plant lignans are generally categorized as phytoestrogens. It was reported that (-)-arctigenin, the aglycone of arctiin, was demethylated to (-)-dihydroxyenterolactone (DHENL) by Eubacterium (E.) sp. ARC-2. Through stepwise demethylation, E. sp. ARC-2 produced six intermediates, three mono-desmethylarctigenins and three di-desmethylarctigenins. In the present study, ligand binding affinities of (-)-arctigenin and its seven metabolites, including DHENL, were investigated for an estrogen receptor alpha, and found that demethylated metabolites had stronger binding affinities than (-)-arctigenin using a ligand binding screen assay method. The IC(50) value of (2R,3R)-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxybenzyl)-butyrolactone was 7.9 × 10⁻⁴ M.

  20. Micromolar-Affinity Benzodiazepine Receptors Regulate Voltage-Sensitive Calcium Channels in Nerve Terminal Preparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taft, William C.; Delorenzo, Robert J.

    1984-05-01

    Benzodiazepines in micromolar concentrations significantly inhibit depolarization-sensitive Ca2+ uptake in intact nerve-terminal preparations. Benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake is concentration dependent and stereospecific. Micromolar-affinity benzodiazepine receptors have been identified and characterized in brain membrane and shown to be distinct from nanomolar-affinity benzodiazepine receptors. Evidence is presented that micromolar, and not nanomolar, benzodiazepine binding sites mediate benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake. Irreversible binding to micromolar benzodiazepine binding sites also irreversibly blocked depolarization-dependent Ca2+ uptake in synaptosomes, indicating that these compounds may represent a useful marker for identifying the molecular components of Ca2+ channels in brain. Characterization of benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake demonstrates that these drugs function as Ca2+ channel antagonists, because benzodiazepines effectively blocked voltage-sensitive Ca2+ uptake inhibited by Mn2+, Co2+, verapamil, nitrendipine, and nimodipine. These results indicate that micromolar benzodiazepine binding sites regulate voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels in brain membrane and suggest that some of the neuronal stabilizing effects of micromolar benzodiazepine receptors may be mediated by the regulation of Ca2+ conductance.

  1. Synthetic Receptors for the High‐Affinity Recognition of O‐GlcNAc Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Rios, Pablo; Carter, Tom S.; Crump, Matthew P.; Lisbjerg, Micke; Pittelkow, Michael; Supekar, Nitin T.; Boons, Geert‐Jan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The combination of a pyrenyl tetraamine with an isophthaloyl spacer has led to two new water‐soluble carbohydrate receptors (“synthetic lectins”). Both systems show outstanding affinities for derivatives of N‐acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) in aqueous solution. One receptor binds the methyl glycoside GlcNAc‐β‐OMe with K a≈20 000 m −1, whereas the other one binds an O‐GlcNAcylated peptide with K a≈70 000 m −1. These values substantially exceed those usually measured for GlcNAc‐binding lectins. Slow exchange on the NMR timescale enabled structural determinations for several complexes. As expected, the carbohydrate units are sandwiched between the pyrenes, with the alkoxy and NHAc groups emerging at the sides. The high affinity of the GlcNAcyl–peptide complex can be explained by extra‐cavity interactions, raising the possibility of a family of complementary receptors for O‐GlcNAc in different contexts. PMID:26822115

  2. Fine specificity of the IgE interaction with the low and high affinity Fc receptor.

    PubMed

    Nissim, A; Schwarzbaum, S; Siraganian, R; Eshhar, Z

    1993-02-15

    The characterization of the site(s) on the IgE molecule that accommodate the high (Fc epsilon RI) and low (Fc epsilon RII) affinity receptors for IgE should allow the design of IgE analogues that can be used to block the onset of the allergic response or to regulate IgE production. To identify the IgE domain responsible for receptor binding, we generated a series of chimeric IgE antibodies in which constant region domains were interchanged between the human and mouse molecules. Binding studies with these chimeras revealed that both the high and low affinity receptor binding-sites reside primarily in the third constant domain of IgE (C epsilon 3). Additional chimeric IgE molecules were generated in which different parts of the human C epsilon 3 domain were exchanged with their murine homologues. Binding experiments with these chimeras suggest that not only the sequence of a particular C epsilon 3 fragment, but the entire C epsilon 3 domain in its native configuration is essential for binding to the Fc epsilon RI. The amino acid residues determining the species specificity of the Fc epsilon RII are not contained in the first 16 amino acids of the C epsilon 3 domain.

  3. Predicting the relative binding affinity of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists by density functional methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roos, Katarina; Hogner, Anders; Ogg, Derek; Packer, Martin J.; Hansson, Eva; Granberg, Kenneth L.; Evertsson, Emma; Nordqvist, Anneli

    2015-12-01

    In drug discovery, prediction of binding affinity ahead of synthesis to aid compound prioritization is still hampered by the low throughput of the more accurate methods and the lack of general pertinence of one method that fits all systems. Here we show the applicability of a method based on density functional theory using core fragments and a protein model with only the first shell residues surrounding the core, to predict relative binding affinity of a matched series of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists. Antagonists of MR are used for treatment of chronic heart failure and hypertension. Marketed MR antagonists, spironolactone and eplerenone, are also believed to be highly efficacious in treatment of chronic kidney disease in diabetes patients, but is contra-indicated due to the increased risk for hyperkalemia. These findings and a significant unmet medical need among patients with chronic kidney disease continues to stimulate efforts in the discovery of new MR antagonist with maintained efficacy but low or no risk for hyperkalemia. Applied on a matched series of MR antagonists the quantum mechanical based method gave an R2 = 0.76 for the experimental lipophilic ligand efficiency versus relative predicted binding affinity calculated with the M06-2X functional in gas phase and an R2 = 0.64 for experimental binding affinity versus relative predicted binding affinity calculated with the M06-2X functional including an implicit solvation model. The quantum mechanical approach using core fragments was compared to free energy perturbation calculations using the full sized compound structures.

  4. Relative affinity of angiotensin peptides and novel ligands at AT1 and AT2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Bosnyak, Sanja; Jones, Emma S; Christopoulos, Arthur; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel; Thomas, Walter G; Widdop, Robert E

    2011-10-01

    AT1R (angiotensin type 1 receptor) and AT2R (angiotensin type 2 receptor) are well known to be involved in the complex cardiovascular actions of AngII (angiotensin II). However, shorter peptide fragments of AngII are thought to have biological activity in their own right and elicit effects that oppose those mediated by AngII. In the present study, we have used HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells stably transfected with either AT1R or AT2R to perform a systematic analysis of binding affinities of all the major angiotensin peptides. Additionally, we tested the novel AT2R agonist Compound 21, as well as the MasR (Mas receptor) agonist and antagonist AVE0991 and A-779 respectively, for their ability to bind to AT1R or AT2R. Candesartan, CGP42214 and PD123319 were used as reference compounds. Binding studies using 125I-[Sar1Ile8]AngII on the AT1R-transfected HEK-293 cells revealed only AngII, AngIII [angiotensin III; angiotensin-(2-8)] and candesartan to have high affinity for AT1R. In the AT2R-transfected HEK-293 cells, competition for 125I-[Sar1Ile8]AngII binding was observed for all ligands except candesartan, AVE0991 and A-779, the latter two compounds having negligible affinity at either AT1R or AT2R. The rank order of affinity of ligands at AT2R was CGP42112>AngII≥AngIII>Compound 21≥PD123319≫AngIV [angiotensin IV; angiotensin-(3-8)]>Ang-(1-7) [angiotensin-(1-7)]. Of note, although AngIV and Ang-(1-7) exhibited only modest affinity at AT2R compared with AngII, these two angiotensin peptides, together with AngIII, had substantial AT2R selectivity over AT1R. Collectively, our results suggest that shorter angiotensin peptides can act as endogenous ligands at AT2R.

  5. The bovine peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor: A receptor with low affinity for benzodiazepines

    SciTech Connect

    Parola, A.L.; Laird, H.E. II )

    1991-01-01

    The density of bovine peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) in four tissues was highest in adrenal cortex. The adrenal cortex PBR cofractionated with a mitochondrial membrane marker enzyme and could be solubilized with intact ligand binding properties using digitonin. The membrane bound and soluble mitochondrial receptors were pharmacologically characterized and showed the rank order of potency to inhibit ({sup 3}H)PK 11195 binding was PK 11195 > protoporphyrin IX > benzodiazepines. ({sup 3}H)PK 11195 binding to bovine adrenal mitochondria was unaffected by diethylpyrocarbonate, a histidine residue modifying reagent that decreased binding to rat liver mitochondria by 70%. ({sup 3}H)PK 14105 photolabeled the bovine PBR and the Mr was estimated under nondenaturing and denaturing conditions. These results demonstrate the bovine peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor is pharmacologically and biochemically distinct from the rat receptor, but the receptor component photolabeled by an isoquinoline ligand has a similar molecular weight.

  6. Synthesis of new 11 beta-substituted spirolactone derivatives. Relationship with affinity for mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Claire, M; Faraj, H; Grassy, G; Aumelas, A; Rondot, A; Auzou, G

    1993-08-06

    Various steroidal 17-spirolactones substituted in the 11 beta-position were synthesized to study the relationship between the nature of the 11 beta-arm and their affinity for cytosolic mineralocorticoid (MR) and glucocorticoid (GR) receptors prepared from adrenalectomized rabbit kidney or liver. One of them, the 11 beta-allenyl-3-oxo-19-nor-17-pregna-4,9-diene-21,17- carbolactone derivative, exhibited the same affinity for MR as aldosterone and a 5-fold higher affinity than mespirenone. Its affinity for GR was found to be relatively low. As suggested by molecular modeling, the marked differences in mineralocorticoid receptor binding affinity could be related to the structural features induced by this 11 beta-allenic substituent.

  7. Age-dependent decrease in the affinity of muscarinic M1 receptors in neocortex of rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed Central

    Vannucchi, M G; Goldman-Rakic, P S

    1991-01-01

    In vitro autoradiography on tissue sections and receptor assay in cortical membrane homogenates revealed that pirenzepine high-affinity muscarinic sites (M1) decrease in affinity in the prefrontal cortex and in other cortical areas of aged rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta). Carbachol competition experiments detected only a single, low-affinity class of sites in old monkeys, while two classes of sites (low and high affinity) were observed in young adults. The change in affinity in the aged monkeys is not accompanied by a decrease in the density of these sites and, further, the age-related decline in the affinity of the M1 site is reversible. In the presence of Mg2+, the M1 muscarinic receptors in the aged monkeys were capable of forming carbachol high-affinity sites. These results provide evidence for age-dependent functional changes in receptor activity in cerebral cortex and indicate that these receptors maintain a degree of plasticity that could be a strategic target for research aimed at treatment of memory disorders in aged humans. Images PMID:1763062

  8. Receptor binding profiles and quantitative structure-affinity relationships of some 5-substituted-N,N-diallyltryptamines.

    PubMed

    Cozzi, Nicholas V; Daley, Paul F

    2016-02-01

    N,N-Diallyltryptamine (DALT) and 5-methoxy-N,N-diallyltryptamine (5-MeO-DALT) are two tryptamines synthesized and tested by Alexander Shulgin. In self-experiments, 5-MeO-DALT was reported to be psychoactive in the 12-20mg range, while the unsubstituted compound DALT had few discernible effects in the 42-80 mg range. Recently, 5-MeO-DALT has been used in nonmedical settings for its psychoactive effects, but these effects have been poorly characterized and little is known of its pharmacological properties. We extended the work of Shulgin by synthesizing additional 5-substituted-DALTs. We then compared them to DALT and 5-MeO-DALT for their binding affinities at 45 cloned receptors and transporter proteins. Based on in vitro binding affinity, we identified 27 potential receptor targets for the 5-substituted-DALT compounds. Five of the DALT compounds had affinity in the 10-80 nM range for serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT2B receptors, while the affinity of DALT itself at 5-HT1A receptors was slightly lower at 100 nM. Among the 5-HT2 subtypes, the weakest affinity was at 5-HT2A receptors, spanning 250-730 nM. Five of the DALT compounds had affinity in the 50-400 nM range for serotonin 5-HT1D, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors; again, it was the unsubstituted DALT that had the weakest affinity at all three subtypes. The test drugs had even weaker affinity for 5-HT1B, 5-HT1E, and 5-HT5A subtypes and little or no affinity for the 5-HT3 subtype. These compounds also had generally nanomolar affinities for adrenergic α2A, α2B, and α2C receptors, sigma receptors σ1 and σ2, histamine H1 receptors, and norepinephrine and serotonin uptake transporters. They also bound to other targets in the nanomolar-to-low micromolar range. Based on these binding results, it is likely that multiple serotonin receptors, as well as several nonserotonergic sites are important for the psychoactive effects of DALT drugs. To learn whether any quantitative structure-affinity relationships existed, we evaluated

  9. Synthesis, structure-affinity relationships, and radiolabeling of selective high-affinity 5-HT4 receptor ligands as prospective imaging probes for positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rong; Hong, Jinsoo; Morse, Cheryl L; Pike, Victor W

    2010-10-14

    In a search for high-affinity receptor ligands that might serve for development as radioligands for the imaging of brain 5-HT(4) receptors in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET), structural modifications were made to the high-affinity 5-HT(4) antagonist (1-butylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl 8-amino-7-iodo-2,3-dihydrobenzo[b][1,4]dioxine-5-carboxylate (1, SB 207710). These modifications were made mainly on the aryl side of the ester bond to permit possible rapid labeling of the carboxylic acid component with a positron emitter, either carbon-11 (t(1/2) = 20.4 min) or fluorine-18 (t(1/2) = 109.7 min), and included (i) replacement of the iodine atom with a small substituent such as nitrile, methyl, or fluoro, (ii) methylation of the 8-amino group, (iii) opening of the dioxan ring, and (iv) alteration of the length of the N-alkyl goup. High-affinity ligands were discovered for recombinant human 5-HT(4) receptors with amenability to labeling with a positron emitter and potential for development as imaging probes. The ring-opened radioligand, (([methoxy-(11)C]1-butylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl 4-amino-3-methoxybenzoate; [(11)C]13), showed an especially favorable array of properties for future evaluation as a PET radioligand for brain 5-HT(4) receptors.

  10. Synthesis, Structure-affinity Relationships and Radiolabeling of Selective High-affinity 5-HT4 Receptor Ligands as Prospective Imaging Probes for PET

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rong; Hong, Jinsoo; Morse, Cheryl L.; Pike, Victor W.

    2010-01-01

    In a search for high-affinity receptor ligands that might serve for development as radioligands for the imaging of brain 5-HT4 receptors in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET), structural modifications were made to the high-affinity 5-HT4 antagonist, (1-butylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl 8-amino-7-iodo-2,3-dihydrobenzo[b][1,4]dioxine-5-carboxylate (1, SB 207710). These modifications were made mainly on the aryl side of the ester bond to permit possible rapid labeling of the carboxylic acid component with a positron-emitter, either carbon-11 (t1/2 = 20.4 min) or fluorine-18 (t1/2 = 109.7 min), and included, i) replacement of the iodine atom with a small substituent such as nitrile, methyl or fluoro, ii) methylation of the 8-amino group, iii) opening of the dioxan ring, and iv) alteration of the length of the N-alkyl goup. High-affinity ligands were discovered for recombinant human 5-HT4 receptors with amenability to labeling with a positron-emitter and potential for development as imaging probes. The ring-opened radioligand, (([methoxy-11C]1-butylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl 4-amino-3-methoxybenzoate; [11C]13), showed an especially favorable array of properties for future evaluation as a PET radioligand for brain 5-HT4 receptors. PMID:20812727

  11. A selective, high affinity 5-HT 2B receptor antagonist inhibits visceral hypersensitivity in rats.

    PubMed

    Ohashi-Doi, K; Himaki, D; Nagao, K; Kawai, M; Gale, J D; Furness, J B; Kurebayashi, Y

    2010-02-01

    RS-127445 is a selective, high affinity 5-HT(2B)receptor antagonist. We investigated whether 5-HT(2B)receptor antagonists can reduce colonic visceral hypersensitivity caused by restraint stress or by proximal colonic inflammation. Visceral hypersensitivity was induced in rats by either restraint stress or injection of 2, 4, 6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) into the proximal colon. Restraint stress produced a significant increase in numbers of abdominal contractions evoked by colorectal distension (CRD), measured as a quantitative index of visceral nociception in rats. Seven days after TNBS injection, the pain threshold to CRD at the non-inflamed distal colon, that was determined as the minimum pressure required to evoke abdominal cramp, was significantly decreased. The effect of RS-127445 on visceral hypersensitivity was assessed in either naïve or TNBS-treated rats. Oral administration of a selective, high affinity 5-HT(2B)receptor antagonist, RS-127445, significantly inhibited visceral hypersensitivity provoked by restraint stress (35 to 74% inhibition at 1 to 10 mg kg(-1)). Oral RS-127445 produced a significant suppression of TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity (15 to 62% inhibition at 3 to 30 mg kg(-1)), although it was without significant effect on the visceral nociceptive threshold of naïve rats. RS-127445 (1 to 30 mg kg(-1), p.o.) also dose-dependently reduced the restraint stress-induced defecation in naïve and TNBS-treated rats. These results suggest that 5-HT(2B)receptors are involved in signaling from the colon in rats in which there is visceral hypersensitivity and that a selective 5-HT(2B)receptor antagonist could have therapeutic potential for the treatment of gut disorders characterized by visceral hypersensitivity.

  12. Receptor affinity purification of a lipid-binding adhesin from Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Lingwood, C A; Wasfy, G; Han, H; Huesca, M

    1993-01-01

    Our previous work has shown that Helicobacter pylori specifically recognizes gangliotetraosylceramide, gangliotriaosylceramide, and phosphatidylethanolamine in vitro. This binding specificity is shared by exoenzyme S from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and monoclonal antibodies against this adhesin prevent the attachment of H. pylori to its lipid receptors. We now report the use of a novel, versatile affinity matrix to purify a 63-kDa exoenzyme S-like adhesin from H. pylori which is responsible for the lipid-binding specificity of this organism. Images PMID:8500882

  13. Computational analysis of binding affinity and neural response at the l-alanine receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venanzi, Thomas J.; Bryant, Bruce P.; Venanzi, Carol A.

    1995-10-01

    A model of analogue-receptor binding is developed for the l-alanine receptor in the channel catfish using the AM1-SM2 and ab initio SCRF computational methods. Besides interactions involving the zwitterionic moiety of the amino acid analogue and complementary subsites on the receptor, the model suggests the presence of a hydrophobic pocket with dispersion interactions between the receptor and the residue on the amino acid analogue. Conformational analysis suggests not only a small compact active site on the receptor, but also that the analogues with the highest affinity occupy nearly identical regions of space. Although the binding interaction is dominated by the ionic terms, AM1-SM2 calculations indicate that free energy terms associated with cavity formation, solvent reorganization, and dispersion interactions can be correlated to activation and neural response. From a consideration of this model, molecular features of the analogues that are important for binding and neural response were deduced and other analogues or ligands were developed and tested.

  14. Decreased agonist affinity and chloride conductance of mutant glycine receptors associated with human hereditary hyperekplexia.

    PubMed Central

    Langosch, D; Laube, B; Rundström, N; Schmieden, V; Bormann, J; Betz, H

    1994-01-01

    Hereditary hyperekplexia is a dominant neurological disorder associated with point mutations at the channel-forming segment M2 of the glycine receptor alpha 1 subunit. Voltage-clamp recordings from the heterologously expressed mutants (alpha 1R271L or alpha 1R271Q) revealed 146- to 183-fold decreased potencies of glycine to activate the chloride channel, and significantly reduced maximal whole-cell currents as compared with wild-type receptors. In contrast, the ability of the competitive antagonist strychnine to block glycine-induced currents was similar in all cases. Radioligand binding assays showed a 90- to 1365-fold reduction in the ability of glycine to displace [3H]strychnine from its binding site on the mutant receptors. Paralleling the reductions in whole-cell current, the elementary main-state conductances of the mutants (alpha 1R271L, 64 pS; alpha 1R271Q, 14 pS) were lower than that of the wild-type receptor (86 pS). The decreased agonist affinities and chloride conductances of the mutants are likely to cause neural hyperexcitability of affected patients by impairing glycinergic inhibition. In addition, our data reveal that structural modifications of the ion-channel region can affect agonist binding to the glycine receptor. PMID:7925268

  15. Affinity labeling of muscarinic receptors in rat cerebral cortex with a photolabile antagonist.

    PubMed Central

    Amitai, G; Avissar, S; Balderman, D; Sokolovsky, M

    1982-01-01

    Highly potent photoaffinity probes for muscarinic binding sites were prepared by the incorporation of an azido group into the benzilic acid moiety in two compound, 3-quinuclidinyl benzilate (3QNB) and N-methyl-4-piperidyl benzilate (4NMPB). Inactivation of muscarinic sites in rat cortex depends on the formation of a reversible complex with the azides prior to their photolytic conversion to the highly reactive nitrenes. During photolysis, radiolabeled azido-4NMPB interacted specifically and with high affinity (Kd = 1.06 nM) with the muscarinic receptors, and the ligand could be covalently incorporated into a macromolecule of about 86,000 Mr, presumably the muscarinic receptor. The incorporation was almost stoichiometric when compared to determination of receptor density by reversible ligands. Atropine (10 microM) afforded specific protection (greater than 83%) of the receptor against inactivation by azido-[3H]4NMPB. This compound and the other ligands described here (i.e., amino-4NMPB, amino-3QNB, and azido-3QNB) represent powerful potential probes for the biochemical isolation and characterization of muscarinic receptors. Images PMID:6952181

  16. Synthesis, opioid receptor affinity, and enzymatic hydrolysis of sterically hindered morphine 3-esters.

    PubMed

    Mignat, C; Heber, D; Schlicht, H; Ziegler, A

    1996-07-01

    With the intention of preparing prodrugs, 10 morphine 3-esters were synthesized and evaluated in vitro for opioid receptor binding and enzymatic hydrolysis. The results of binding assays performed on homogenates of guinea pig brain demonstrate a loss in affinity of morphine to mu-, delta-, and kappa-receptors by esterification at the 3-position. The conversion of the esters to morphine was determined in human plasma by HPLC analysis. The half-lives of hydrolysis ranged from 0.5 to > 300 h. The investigations indicate that esterification at the 3-position results in morphine prodrugs with variable hydrolytic stability. Sterically hindered morphine 3-esters may be a promising approach to manipulate the rate of release of morphine.

  17. Antiparkinson therapeutic potencies correlate with their affinities at dopamine D2(High) receptors.

    PubMed

    Seeman, Philip

    2007-12-01

    To determine whether antiparkinson dopamine agonists preferentially act on the high-affinity or the low-affinity states of dopamine D1 and D2 receptors, the agonist potencies were obtained by competition against [(3)H]SCH23390 for D1(High) and D1(Low), and against [(3)H]domperidone for D2(High) and D2(Low). N-propylnorapomorphine and cabergoline were the most potent at D2(High), with dissociation constants of 0.18 and 0.36 nM, respectively. Other agonists had D2(High)K(i) values of 0.52 nM for quinagolide, 0.6 nM for (+)PHNO, 0.9 for bromocriptine, 1.8 nM for apomorphine, 2.4 nM for pergolide, 3 nM for quinpirole, and 6.2 nM for lergotrile. There was a clear correlation between the K(i) values at D2(High) and their therapeutic concentrations in the plasma water, as derived from the known concentrations after correction for the fraction bound to the human plasma proteins. The data suggest that D2(High) is the primary and common target for the antiparkinson action of dopamine agonists. Bromocriptine, cabergoline, lergotrile, pergolide, and pramipexole had no affinity for D1(High), consistent with the clinical observations that the D2-selective bromocriptine and pramipexole elicit low levels of dyskinesia.

  18. DOTA-Derivatives of Octreotide Dicarba-Analogs with High Affinity for Somatostatin sst2,5 Receptors.

    PubMed

    Pratesi, Alessandro; Ginanneschi, Mauro; Lumini, Marco; Papini, Anna M; Novellino, Ettore; Brancaccio, Diego; Carotenuto, Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    In vivo somatostatin receptor scintigraphy is a valuable method for the visualization of human endocrine tumors and their metastases. In fact, peptide ligands of somatostatin receptors (sst's) conjugated with chelating agents are in clinical use. We have recently developed octreotide dicarba-analogs, which show interesting binding profiles at sst's. In this context, it was mandatory to explore the possibility that our analogs could maintain their activity also upon conjugation with DOTA. In this paper, we report and discuss the synthesis, binding affinity and conformational preferences of three DOTA-conjugated dicarba-analogs of octreotide. Interestingly, two conjugated analogs exhibited nanomolar affinities on sst2 and sst5 somatostatin receptor subtypes.

  19. Characterization of high affinity binding motifs for the discoidin domain receptor DDR2 in collagen.

    PubMed

    Konitsiotis, Antonios D; Raynal, Nicolas; Bihan, Dominique; Hohenester, Erhard; Farndale, Richard W; Leitinger, Birgit

    2008-03-14

    The discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2, are receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by native triple-helical collagen. Here we have located three specific DDR2 binding sites by screening the entire triple-helical domain of collagen II, using the Collagen II Toolkit, a set of overlapping triple-helical peptides. The peptide sequence that bound DDR2 with highest affinity interestingly contained the sequence for the high affinity binding site for von Willebrand factor in collagen III. Focusing on this sequence, we used a set of truncated and alanine-substituted peptides to characterize the sequence GVMGFO (O is hydroxyproline) as the minimal collagen sequence required for DDR2 binding. Based on a recent NMR analysis of the DDR2 collagen binding domain, we generated a model of the DDR2-collagen interaction that explains why a triple-helical conformation is required for binding. Triple-helical peptides comprising the DDR2 binding motif not only inhibited DDR2 binding to collagen II but also activated DDR2 transmembrane signaling. Thus, DDR2 activation may be effected by single triple-helices rather than fibrillar collagen.

  20. Regulator of insulin receptor affinity in rat skeletal muscle sarcolemmal vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Whitson, R.H.; Barnard, K.J.; Kaplan, S.A.; Itakura, K.

    1986-05-01

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) affinity purification of detergent solubilized insulin receptors (IR) from rat skeletal muscle sarcolemmal vesicles resulted in an apparent increase in total insulin binding activity of greater than 5-fold, suggesting that an inhibitory component had been removed. This was verified when the flow-through fraction from the WGA column was dialyzed and added back to the partially purified receptor. The addition of a 100-fold dilution of the inhibitor preparation caused a 50% reduction in binding to trace amounts of /sup 125/I-insulin. Scatchard analysis revealed that the effect of the inhibitor was to decrease the affinity of the muscle IR. The inhibitor appeared to be tissue specific, inasmuch as the I/sub 50/'s for WGA-purified IR from rat fat and liver were 10 times the I/sub 50/ for muscle IR. The I/sub 50/ for insulin binding to intact IM-9 cells was 30 times the value for muscle IR. The inhibitor eluted in the void volume of Sephadex G-50 columns. Its activity was not destroyed by heating at 90/sup 0/C for 10 minutes, or by prolonged incubation with trypsin or dithiothreitol. The inhibitor described here may have a role in modulating insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle.

  1. Neuroprotective Effects of a Structurally New Family of High Affinity Imidazoline I2 Receptor Ligands.

    PubMed

    Abás, Sònia; Erdozain, Amaia M; Keller, Benjamin; Rodríguez-Arévalo, Sergio; Callado, Luis F; García-Sevilla, Jesús A; Escolano, Carmen

    2017-01-04

    The imidazoline I2 receptors (I2-IRs) are widely distributed in the brain, and I2-IR ligands may have therapeutic potential as neuroprotective agents. Since structural data for I2-IR remains unknown, the discovery of selective I2-IR ligands devoid of α2-adrenoceptor (α2-AR) affinity is likely to provide valuable tools in defining the pharmacological characterization of these receptors. We report the pharmacological characterization of a new family of (2-imidazolin-4-yl)phosphonates. Radioligand binding studies showed that they displayed a higher affinity for I2-IRs than idazoxan, and high I2/α2 selectivity. In vivo studies in mice showed that acute treatments with 1b and 2c significantly increased p-FADD/FADD ratio (an index of cell survival) in the hippocampus when compared with vehicle-treated controls. Additionally, acute and repeated treatments with 2c, but not with 1b, markedly reduced hippocampal p35 cleavage into neurotoxic p25. The present results indicate a neuroprotective potential of (2-imidazolin-4-yl)phosphonates acting at I2-IRs.

  2. Ligand binding affinity and changes in the lateral diffusion of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE).

    PubMed

    Syed, Aleem; Zhu, Qiaochu; Smith, Emily A

    2016-12-01

    The effect of ligand on the lateral diffusion of receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE), a receptor involved in numerous pathological conditions, remains unknown. Single particle tracking experiments that use quantum dots specifically bound to hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged RAGE (HA-RAGE) are reported to elucidate the effect of ligand binding on HA-RAGE diffusion in GM07373 cell membranes. The ligand used in these studies is methylglyoxal modified-bovine serum albumin (MGO-BSA) containing advanced glycation end products modifications. The binding affinity between soluble RAGE and MGO-BSA increases by 1.8 to 9.7-fold as the percent primary amine modification increases from 24 to 74% and with increasing negative charge on the MGO-BSA. Ligand incubation affects the HA-RAGE diffusion coefficient, the radius of confinement, and duration of confinement. There is, however, no correlation between MGO-BSA ligand binding affinity with soluble RAGE and the extent of the changes in HA-RAGE lateral diffusion. The ligand induced changes to HA-RAGE lateral diffusion do not occur when cholesterol is depleted from the cell membrane, indicating the mechanism for ligand-induced changes to HA-RAGE diffusion is cholesterol dependent. The results presented here serve as a first step in unraveling how ligand influences RAGE lateral diffusion. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Selection of DNA aptamers against epidermal growth factor receptor with high affinity and specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Deng-Liang; Song, Yan-Ling; Zhu, Zhi; Li, Xi-Lan; Zou, Yuan; Yang, Hai-Tao; Wang, Jiang-Jie; Yao, Pei-Sen; Pan, Ru-Jun; Yang, Chaoyong James; Kang, De-Zhi

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • This is the first report of DNA aptamer against EGFR in vitro. • Aptamer can bind targets with high affinity and selectivity. • DNA aptamers are more stable, cheap and efficient than RNA aptamers. • Our selected DNA aptamer against EGFR has high affinity with K{sub d} 56 ± 7.3 nM. • Our selected DNA aptamer against EGFR has high selectivity. - Abstract: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/HER1/c-ErbB1), is overexpressed in many solid cancers, such as epidermoid carcinomas, malignant gliomas, etc. EGFR plays roles in proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis of malignant cancer cells and is the ideal antigen for clinical applications in cancer detection, imaging and therapy. Aptamers, the output of the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), are DNA/RNA oligonucleotides which can bind protein and other substances with specificity. RNA aptamers are undesirable due to their instability and high cost of production. Conversely, DNA aptamers have aroused researcher’s attention because they are easily synthesized, stable, selective, have high binding affinity and are cost-effective to produce. In this study, we have successfully identified DNA aptamers with high binding affinity and selectivity to EGFR. The aptamer named TuTu22 with K{sub d} 56 ± 7.3 nM was chosen from the identified DNA aptamers for further study. Flow cytometry analysis results indicated that the TuTu22 aptamer was able to specifically recognize a variety of cancer cells expressing EGFR but did not bind to the EGFR-negative cells. With all of the aforementioned advantages, the DNA aptamers reported here against cancer biomarker EGFR will facilitate the development of novel targeted cancer detection, imaging and therapy.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of a high affinity radioiodinated probe for the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Lanier, S.M.; Hess, H.J.; Grodski, A.; Graham, R.M.; Homcy, C.J.

    1986-03-01

    The availability of radioiodinated probes has facilitated the localization and molecular characterization of cell membrane receptors for hormones and neurotransmitters. However, such probes are not available for the study of the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor. This report describes the synthesis and characterization of functionalized derivatives of the selective alpha 2-adrenergic antagonists, rauwolscine and yohimbine, which can be radiolabeled to high specific activity with 125I. Following demethylation of rauwolscine or yohimbine, the resultant carboxylic acid derivatives were reacted with 4-aminophenethylamine to yield the respective 4-aminophenethyl carboxamides, 17 alpha-hydroxy-20 alpha-yohimban-16 beta-(N-4-amino-phenethyl)carboxamide (rau-pAPC) and 17 alpha-hydroxy-20 beta-yohimban-16 alpha-(N-4-aminophenethyl)carboxamide. In competitive inhibition studies using rat renal membranes and the radioligand (3H)rauwolscine, rau-pAPC (Ki = 11 +/- 1 nM) exhibited a 14-fold greater affinity than the corresponding yohimbine derivative (Ki = 136 +/- 45 nM). The higher affinity compound, rau-pAPC, was radioiodinated by the chloramine T method, and the product, 125I-rau-pAPC (17 alpha-hydroxy-20 alpha-yohimban-16 beta-(N-4-amino-3 -(125I)iodophenethyl)carboxamide), was purified by reverse phase HPLC to high specific activity (2175 Ci/mmol) and its binding characteristics were investigated in rat kidney membranes. Specific binding of 125I-rau-pAPC was saturable and of high affinity as determined by Scatchard analysis (KD = 1.8 +/- 0.3 nM) or from kinetic studies (KD = k2/k1 = 0.056 +/- 0.013 min-1)/4.3 +/- 0.2 X 10(7) M-1 min-1 = 1.3 +/- 0.3 nM).

  5. A novel somatostatin conjugate with a high affinity to all five somatostatin receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Wulbrand, Ulrich; Feldman, Martin; Pfestroff, Andreas; Fehman, Hans-Cristophe; Du, Jin; Hiltunen, Jukka; Marquez, Marcela; Arnold, Rudolf; Westlin, Jan-Erik; Nilsson, Sten; Holmberg, Anders R

    2002-02-15

    Somatostatin receptors (SRS, five subtypes) are expressed in a variety of human tumors, including most tumors of neuroendocrine origin, breast tumors, certain brain tumors, renal cell tumors, lymphomas, and prostate cancer. Somatostatin (SMS) triggers cytostatic and cytotoxic effects and has a general inhibitory effect on secretion mediated through its interaction with SRS. That is the basis for its use in the treatment of SRS-positive tumors. Radiolabeled SMS analogs can also be used for systemic radiotherapy and for diagnostic investigations. Sms-14 was conjugated to a periodate-activated dextran70 (mean molecular weight, 70 kD) by reductive amination. The human tumor cell line LCC-18, from a neuroendocrine colonic tumor, was used for stable transfection with each SRS gene separately; transfection was achieved with the expression system TETon (Clontech, Palo Alto, CA). Clones were selected by culturing with G418 and hygromycin B, and positive clones were identified by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and binding of iodine-125-labeled SMS-14. The binding affinity for each SRS subtype was then determined for the SMS-dextran conjugate (with SMS-14 used as a positive control). Sms-dextran70 showed high affinity binding to all five receptor subtypes. The IC50 values were between 3 and 80 nM. This conjugate has a long circulation half-life (i.e., approximately 27 hours after subcutaneous administration in mice) and, with high SRS pan-affinity demonstrated in this study, it has potential in the therapy of SRS-positive tumors. Currently, the clinical significance of SMS-dextran70 is being explored in a clinical Phase I-II study of patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer. The outcome of this study will be reported when it is available. Copyright 2002 American Cancer Society.

  6. Differences in affinity of cardiac beta-adrenergic receptors for (3H)dihydroalprenolol

    SciTech Connect

    Muntz, K.H.; Calianos, T.A.; Vandermolen, D.T.; Willerson, J.T.; Buja, L.M.

    1986-03-01

    We performed quantitative light microscopic autoradiography of (3H)dihydroalprenolol (DHA) binding to frozen sections of canine myocardium to test the hypothesis that there are differences in the density or affinity of beta-adrenergic receptors on various tissue compartments. In one study, with concentrations of (3H)DHA from 0.34 to 5.1 nM, specific binding to cardiac myocytes was saturable, whereas nonspecific binding was linear with ligand concentration. Arterioles had more specific grain counts than muscle cells (P less than 0.0001), and Scatchard analysis showed that the arterioles had a much higher affinity for (3H)DHA than myocytes. In a second study with lower concentrations of (3H)DHA (0.19-1.98 nM), binding to the arterioles saturated, whereas binding to the cardiac myocytes did not. Specific binding to arterioles was significantly higher (P less than 0.0001) than binding to myocytes at all concentrations of (3H)DHA. The dissociation constants for the subendocardial and subepicardial myocytes were 1.57 and 1.71 nM, respectively, while the dissociation constant for the arterioles was 0.26 nM. The maximum number of binding sites was 911 grains/0.9 X 10(-2) mm2 for subepicardial myocytes, 936 for subendocardial myocytes, and 986 for arterioles. The large nerves accompanying an epicardial artery also demonstrated specific (3H)DHA binding. Thus this study has demonstrated major differences in the distribution and affinity of beta-adrenergic receptors, which may help to explain various physiological responses to beta-adrenergic stimulation.

  7. Synthesis and opioid receptor binding affinities of 2-substituted and 3-aminomorphinans: ligands for mu, kappa, and delta opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Decker, Michael; Si, Yu-Gui; Knapp, Brian I; Bidlack, Jean M; Neumeyer, John L

    2010-01-14

    The phenolic group of the potent mu and kappa opioid morphinan agonist/antagonists cyclorphan and butorphan was replaced by phenylamino and benzylamino groups including compounds with para-substituents in the benzene ring. These compounds are highly potent mu and kappa ligands, e.g., p-methoxyphenylaminocyclorphan showing a K(i) of 0.026 nM at the mu receptor and a K(i) of 0.03 nM at the kappa receptor. Phenyl carbamates and phenylureas were synthesized and investigated. Selective o-formylation of butorphan and levorphanol was achieved. This reaction opened the way to a large set of 2-substituted 3-hydroxymorphinans, including 2-hydroxymethyl-, 2-aminomethyl-, and N-substituted 2-aminomethyl-3-hydroxymorphinans. Bivalent ligands bridged in the 2-position were also synthesized and connected with secondary and tertiary aminomethyl groups, amide bonds, and hydroxymethylene groups, respectively. Although most of the 2-substituted morphinans showed considerably lower affinities compared to their parent compounds, the bivalent ligand approach led to significantly higher affinities compared to the univalent 2-substituted morphinans.

  8. Functional correlation between subclasses of brain receptor affinities and ethanol-induced motor incoordination (EIMI) in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Dar, M.S. )

    1991-03-11

    To further study if the modulation of EIMI is by brain adenosine A{sub 1} and/or A{sub 2} receptor, adenosine analogs with wide variability in their affinity for A{sub 1} and A{sub 2} subtypes were administered icv and their effect on E(ip)-IMI was evaluated by rotorod. A dose-dependent marked accentuation of EIMI by adenosine agonists (CHA, NECA, CPA, DCCA) tested, with nearly no effect on normal motor coordination in the absence of ethanol, was observed. There was a positive correlation between A{sub 2} affinity, A{sub 2}/A{sub 1} affinity ratio but a negative correlation between A{sub 1} affinity and the potency (ED50) of adenosine agonists to accentuate EIMI. However, with the high potency of CHA and NECA, both having significant affinity for A{sub 1} and A{sub 2} receptors, together with the well known membrane perturbation by ethanol, it seems difficult to rule out, until more information becomes available, the contribution of A{sub 1} receptor activation to adenosine modulation of EIMI. The high density of high affinity A{sub 2} (A{sub 2a}) in the striatum and of A{sub 1} in the cerebellum and several brain areas and the known importance of these two brain areas in the motor control, indirectly supports or at least provides circumstantial evidence for a functional correlation between EIMI and brain adenosine receptors.

  9. The affinity of norgestimate for uterine progestogen receptors and its direct action on the uterus.

    PubMed

    Killinger, J; Hahn, D W; Phillips, A; Hetyei, N S; McGuire, J L

    1985-09-01

    Norgestimate is a new orally active progestational agent. Studies were conducted to demonstrate that norgestimate is active pharmacologically without requiring biotransformation to an active metabolite. In in vitro studies, norgestimate exhibited a relatively high affinity for the rabbit uterine progestogen receptor. To demonstrate that norgestimate was not being degraded to a biologically active entity, which was binding to receptor sites in the cytosol preparation, the stability of 14C-norgestimate in the preparation was determined. Following the incubation of 14C-norgestimate with the cytosol fraction used in the receptor assay, the labeled material was extracted and analyzed by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. 14C-Norgestimate was recovered from these incubation mixtures, confirming that norgestimate was available to bind to the progestogen receptor. In in vivo studies, norgestimate stimulated the endometrium in immature rabbits when applied directly to the uterus, again suggesting that bio-transformation to an active metabolite is not required for expression of norgestimate's pharmacological activity. These in vitro and in vivo studies, when considered with previously reported studies, show that norgestimate is a unique progestogen.

  10. Muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding sites differentiated by their affinity for pirenzepine do not interconvert

    SciTech Connect

    Gil, D.W.; Wolfe, B.B.

    1986-05-01

    Although it has been suggested by many investigators that subtypes of muscarinic cholinergic receptors exist, physical studies of solubilized receptors have indicated that only a single molecular species may exist. To test the hypothesis that the putative muscarinic receptor subtypes in rat forebrain are interconvertible states of the same receptor, the selective antagonist pirenzepine (PZ) was used to protect muscarinic receptors from blockade by the irreversible muscarinic receptor antagonist propylbenzilylcholine mustard (PBCM). If interconversion of high (M1) and low (M2) affinity binding sites for PZ occurs, incubation of cerebral cortical membranes with PBCM in the presence of PZ should not alter the proportions of M1 and M2 binding sites that are unalkylated (i.e., protected). If, on the other hand, the binding sites are not interconvertible, PZ should be able to selectively protect M1 sites and alter the proportions of unalkylated M1 and M2 binding sites. In the absence of PZ, treatment of cerebral cortical membranes with 20 nM PBCM at 4 degrees C for 50 min resulted in a 69% reduction in the density of M1 binding sites and a 55% reduction in the density of M2 binding sites with no change in the equilibrium dissociation constants of the radioligands (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate or (/sup 3/H)PZ. The reasons for this somewhat selective effect of PBCM are not apparent. In radioligand binding experiments using cerebral cortical membranes, PZ inhibited the binding of (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate in a biphasic manner.

  11. Azapeptide analogues of the growth hormone releasing peptide 6 as cluster of differentiation 36 receptor ligands with reduced affinity for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a.

    PubMed

    Proulx, Caroline; Picard, Émilie; Boeglin, Damien; Pohankova, Petra; Chemtob, Sylvain; Ong, Huy; Lubell, William D

    2012-07-26

    The synthetic hexapeptide growth hormone releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6) exhibits dual affinity for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHS-R1a) and the cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) receptor. Azapeptide GHRP-6 analogues have been synthesized, exhibiting micromolar affinity to the CD36 receptor with reduced affinity toward the GHS-R1a. A combinatorial split-and-mix approach furnished aza-GHRP-6 leads, which were further examined by alanine scanning. Incorporation of an aza-amino acid residue respectively at the D-Trp(2), Ala(3), or Trp(4) position gave aza-GHRP-6 analogues with reduced affinity toward the GHS-R1a by at least a factor of 100 and in certain cases retained affinity for the CD36 receptor. In the latter cases, the D-Trp(2) residue proved important for CD36 receptor affinity; however, His(1) could be replaced by Ala(1) without considerable loss of binding. In a microvascular sprouting assay using a choroid explant, [azaTyr(4)]-GHRP-6 (15), [Ala(1), azaPhe(2)]-GHRP-6 (16), and [azaLeu(3), Ala(6)]-GHRP-6 (33) all exhibited antiangiogenic activity.

  12. Agonist high- and low-affinity states of dopamine D₂ receptors: methods of detection and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    van Wieringen, Jan-Peter; Booij, Jan; Shalgunov, Vladimir; Elsinga, Philip; Michel, Martin C

    2013-02-01

    Dopamine D(2) receptors, similar to other G-protein-coupled receptors, exist in a high- and low-affinity state for agonists. Based upon a review of the methods for detecting D(2) receptor agonist high-affinity states, we discuss alterations of such states in animal models of disease and the implications of such alterations for their labelling with positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tracers. The classic approach of detecting agonist high-affinity states compares agonist competition for antagonist radioligands, in most cases using [(3)H]-spiperone as the radioligand; alternative approaches and radioligands have been proposed, but their claimed advantages have not been substantiated by other investigators. In view of the advantages and disadvantages of various techniques, we critically have reviewed reported findings on the detection of D(2) receptor agonist high-affinity states in a variety of animal models. These data are compared to the less numerous findings from human in vivo studies based on PET and SPECT tracers; they are interpreted in light of the finding that D(2) receptor agonist high-affinity states under control conditions may differ between rodent and human brain. The potential advantages of agonist ligands in studies of pathophysiology and as diagnostics are being discussed.

  13. Melatonin Administration Alters Nicotine Preference Consumption via Signaling Through High-Affinity Melatonin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Horton, William J.; Gissel, Hannah J.; Saboy, Jennifer E.; Wright, Kenneth P.; Stitzel, Jerry A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale While it is known that tobacco use varies across the 24-hour day, the time-of-day effects are poorly understood. Findings from several previous studies indicate a potential role for melatonin in these time-of-day effects; however the specific underlying mechanisms have not been well characterized. Understanding of these mechanisms may lead to potential novel smoking cessation treatments. Objective Examine the role of melatonin and melatonin receptors in nicotine free choice consumption Methods A two-bottle oral nicotine choice paradigm was utilized with melatonin supplementation in melatonin deficient mice (C57BL/6J) or without melatonin supplementation in mice proficient at melatonin synthesis (C3H/Ibg) compared to melatonin proficient mice lacking both or one of the high affinity melatonin receptors (MT1 and MT2; double null mutant DM, or MT1 or MT2). Preference for bitter and sweet tastants also was assessed in wild type and MT1 and MT2 DM mice. Finally, home cage locomotor monitoring was performed to determine the effect of melatonin administration on activity patterns. Results Supplemental melatonin in drinking water significantly reduced free-choice nicotine consumption in C57BL/6J mice, which do not produce endogenous melatonin, while not altering activity patterns. Independently, genetic deletion of both MT1 and MT2 receptors in a melatonin proficient mouse strain (C3H) resulted in significantly more nicotine consumption than controls. However single genetic deletion of either the MT1 or MT2 receptor alone did not result in increased nicotine consumption. Deletion of MT1 and MT2 did not impact taste preference. Conclusions This study demonstrates that nicotine consumption can be affected by exogenous or endogenous melatonin and requires at least one of the high-affinity melatonin receptors. The fact that expression of either the MT1 or MT2 melatonin receptor is sufficient to maintain lower nicotine consumption suggests functional overlap and

  14. Quantitation of the P2Y1 Receptor with a High Affinity Radiolabeled Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Waldo, Gary L.; Corbitt, James; Boyer, José L.; Ravi, Gnana; Kim, Hak Sung; Ji, Xiao-Duo; Lacy, James; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Harden, T. Kendall

    2015-01-01

    2-Chloro-N6-methyl-(N)-methanocarba-2′-deoxyadenosine-3′,5′-bisphosphate (MRS2279) was developed previously as a selective high-affinity, non-nucleotide P2Y1 receptor (P2Y1-R) antagonist (J Med Chem 43:829–842, 2002; Br J Pharmacol 135:2004–2010, 2002). We have taken advantage of the N6-methyl substitution in the adenine base to incorporate [3H]methylamine into the synthesis of [3H]MRS2279 to high (89 Ci/mmol) specific radioactivity and have used this molecule as a radioligand for the P2Y1-R. [3H]MRS2279 bound to membranes from Sf9 insect cells expressing recombinant human P2Y1-R but not to membranes from wild-type Sf9 cells or Sf9 cells expressing high levels of recombinant P2Y2 or P2Y12 receptors. Equilibrium binding of [3H]MRS2279 to P2Y1-R expressed in Sf9 membranes was with a high affinity (Kd = 8 nM) essentially identical to the apparent affinity of MRS2279 determined previously in studies of P2Y1-R–promoted inositol phosphate accumulation or platelet aggregation. A kinetically derived Kd calculated from independent determinations of the rate constants of association (7.15 × 107 M−1 min−1) and dissociation (0.72 min−1) of [3H]MRS2279 also was in good agreement with the Kd derived from equilibrium binding studies. Competition binding assays with [3H]MRS2279 and P2Y1-R expressing Sf9 cell membranes revealed Ki values for the P2Y1-R antagonists MRS2279 (Ki = 13 nM), N6-methyl-2′-deoxyadenosine-3′,5′-bisphosphate (MRS2179; Ki = 84 nM), adenosine-3′, 5′-bisphosphate (Ki = 900 nM), and pyridoxal phosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulfonic acid (Ki = 6 µM) that were in good agreement with antagonist activities of these molecules previously determined at the P2Y1-R in intact tissues. Moreover, [3H]MRS2279 also bound with high affinity (Kd = 4–8 nM) to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) or 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells stably expressing the human P2Y1-R, but specific binding was not observed in wild-type CHO or 1321N1 cells. [3H]MRS2279 bound

  15. Conformational analysis of 6α- and 6β-naltrexol and derivatives and relationship to opioid receptor affinity.

    PubMed

    Bayron, Jennifer A; Deveau, Amy M; Stubbs, John M

    2012-02-27

    Naltrexol and its C₆ α and β desoxy, iodo, mesyl, tosyl, trifyl, dimethylcarbamyl, and diphenylcarbamyl derivatives were studied in their energy-minimized C ring chair-like and boat-like conformations using B3LYP/6-31G** and SM5.4/A to estimate aqueous solvation free energy. The results were compared to experimental opioid receptor binding affinities. The total energy difference between β conformers correlated well with MOR binding affinity, while the aqueous solvation free energy correlated well with the KOR binding affinity.

  16. HIGH-AFFINITY T CELL RECEPTOR DIFFERENTIATES COGNATE PEPTIDE-MHC AND ALTERED PEPTIDE LIGANDS WITH DISTINCT KINETICS AND THERMODYNAMICS

    PubMed Central

    Persaud, Stephen P.; Donermeyer, David L.; Weber, K. Scott; Kranz, David M.; Allen, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    Interactions between the T cell receptor and cognate peptide-MHC are crucial initiating events in the adaptive immune response. These binding events are highly specific yet occur with micromolar affinity. Even weaker interactions between TCR and self-pMHC complexes play critical regulatory roles in T cell development, maintenance and coagonist activity. Due to their low affinity, the kinetics and thermodynamics of such weak interactions are difficult to study. In this work, we used M15, a high-affinity TCR engineered from the 3.L2 TCR system, to study the binding properties, thermodynamics, and specificity of two altered peptide ligands (APLs). Our affinity measurements of the high-affinity TCR support the view that the wild type TCR binds these APLs in the millimolar affinity range, and hence very low affinities can still elicit biological functions. Finally, single methylene differences among the APLs gave rise to strikingly different binding thermodynamics. These minor changes in the pMHC antigen were associated with significant and unpredictable changes in both the entropy and enthalpy of the reaction. As the identical TCR was analyzed with several structurally similar ligands, the distinct thermodynamic binding profiles provide a mechanistic perspective on how exquisite antigen specificity is achieved by the T cell receptor. PMID:20334923

  17. Covalent affinity labeling, radioautography, and immunocytochemistry localize the glucocorticoid receptor in rat testicular Leydig cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, A.; Hermo, L.; Antakly, T. )

    1989-12-01

    The presence and distribution of glucocorticoid receptors in the rat testis were examined by using 2 approaches: in vivo quantitative radioautography and immunocytochemistry. Radioautographic localization was made possible through the availability of a glucocorticoid receptor affinity label, dexamethasone 21-mesylate, which binds covalently to the glucocorticoid receptor, thereby preventing dissociation of the steroid-receptor complex. Adrenalectomized adult rats were injected with a tritiated (3H) form of this steroid into the testis and the tissue was processed for light-microscope radioautography. Silver grains were observed primarily over the Leydig cells of the interstitial space and to a lesser extent, over the cellular layers which make up the seminiferous epithelium, with no one cell type showing preferential labeling. To determine the specificity of the labeling, a 25- or 50-fold excess of unlabeled dexamethasone was injected simultaneously with the same dose of (3H)-dexamethasone 21-mesylate. In these control experiments, a marked reduction in label intensity was noted over the Leydig as well as tubular cells. Endocytic macrophages of the interstitium were non-specifically labeled, indicating uptake of the ligand possibly by fluid-phase endocytosis. A quantitative analysis of the label confirmed the presence of statistically significant numbers of specific binding sites for glucocorticoids in both Leydig cells and the cellular layers of the seminiferous epithelium; 86% of the label was found over Leydig cells, and only 14% over the cells of the seminiferous epithelium. These binding data were confirmed by light-microscope immunocytochemistry using a monoclonal antibody to the glucocorticoid receptor.

  18. Differential affinities of molindone, metoclopramide and domperidone for classes of [3H]spiroperidol binding sites in rat striatum: evidence for pharmacologically distinct classes of receptors.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, M R; Dvorkin, B; Klein, P N; Makman, M H

    1982-03-04

    Rat striatum contains two populations of dopaminergic [3H]spiroperidol binding sites. The two populations are similar in their affinities for chlorpromazine and dopamine. Only one population, that with a somewhat higher affinity for spiroperidol itself, exhibits high affinity for the selective D2 antagonists molindone, metoclopramide and domperidone. Hence, this population may represent D2 receptor sites. The other larger population may represent either a separate class of receptor sites or a different form of D2 receptor sites.

  19. Latest QSAR study of adenosine A[Formula: see text] receptor affinity of xanthines and deazaxanthines.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Garrido, Alfonso; Rivero-Buceta, Virginia; Cano, Gaspar; Kumar, Sanjay; Pérez-Sánchez, Horacio; Bautista, Marta Teijeira

    2015-11-01

    Adenosine, a widespread and endogenous nucleoside that acts as a powerful neuromodulator in the nervous system, is a promising therapeutic target in a wide range of conditions. The structural similarity between xanthine derivatives and neurotransmitter adenosine has led to the derivatives of the heterocyclic ring being among the most abundant chemical classes of ligand antagonists of adenosine receptor subtypes. Small changes in the xanthine scaffold have resulted in a wide array of adenosine receptor antagonists. In this work, we developed a QSAR model for the [Formula: see text] subtype, which is, as yet, not well characterized, with two purposes in mind: to predict adenosine [Formula: see text] antagonist activity and to offer a substructural interpretation of this group of xanthines. The QSAR model provided good classifications of both the test and external sets. In addition, most of the contributions to adenosine [Formula: see text] receptor affinity derived by subfragmentation of the molecules in the training set agree with the relationships observed in the literature. These two factors mean that this QSAR ensemble could be used as a model to predict future adenosine [Formula: see text] antagonist candidates.

  20. Energetics of ligand-receptor binding affinity on endothelial cells: An in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Fotticchia, Iolanda; Guarnieri, Daniela; Fotticchia, Teresa; Falanga, Andrea Patrizia; Vecchione, Raffaele; Giancola, Concetta; Netti, Paolo Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Targeted therapies represent a challenge in modern medicine. In this contest, we propose a rapid and reliable methodology based on Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) coupled with confluent cell layers cultured around biocompatible templating microparticles to quantify the number of overexpressing receptors on cell membrane and study the energetics of receptor-ligand binding in near-physiological conditions. In the in vitro model here proposed we used the bEnd3 cell line as brain endothelial cells to mimic the blood brain barrier (BBB) cultured on dextran microbeads ranging from 67μm to 80μm in size (Cytodex) and the primary human umbilical vein cells (HUVEC) for comparison. The revealed affinity between transferrin (Tf) and transferrin receptor (TfR) in both systems is very high, Kd values are in the order of nM. Conversely, the value of TfRs/cell reveals a 100-fold increase in the number of TfRs per bEnd3 cells compared to HUVEC cells. The presented methodology can represent a novel and helpful strategy to identify targets, to address drug design and selectively deliver therapeutics that can cross biological barriers such as the blood brain barrier.

  1. Selective anxiolytics: are the actions related to partial "agonist" activity or a preferential affinity for benzodiazepine receptor subtypes?

    PubMed

    Gee, K W; Yamamura, H I

    1983-01-01

    Both pharmacological and biochemical evidence support the existence of BZ receptor subtypes. Determination of the molecular basis of BZ receptor heterogeneity requires additional research. The physiological significance of BZ receptor subtypes is not currently understood. One hypothesis presented to explain the unique pharmacological effects of CL 218872 suggests that CL 218872 has preferential affinity for a BZ receptor subtype (i.e., type I sites) that mediates the anxiolytic effects of the clinically active BZs. An alternative hypothesis has been proposed to account for these observations and is based upon the possibility that CL 218872 may act as a partial agonist at the BZ receptor. The partial agonist theory is supported by behavioral evidence and the relatively small differences in affinity of the BZ receptor subtypes discriminated by CL 218872 at physiological temperatures. In addition, in vivo binding studies suggest that occupancy of type II BZ receptor subtypes (i.e., those with low affinity for CL 218872) is necessary for CL 218872 to produce minimal anticonflict activity (4). Unlike certain other neurotransmitter systems, it is difficult to correlate the heterogeneous binding properties of BZ receptor ligands with their agonist/antagonist potential at BZ receptor. For example, CL 218872 discriminates BZ receptor subtypes and acts as an agonist at the BZ receptor. Beta-carbolines such as PCC also discriminate receptor subtypes, yet they act as antagonists at the BZ receptor. Compounding the complexity, neither the nature nor the existence of an endogenous ligand is known. So, the designation of agonist or antagonist effects is made on a purely functional basis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Two affinities for a single antagonist at the neuronal NK1 tachykinin receptor: evidence from quantitation of receptor endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Jenkinson, Karl M; Southwell, Bridget R; Furness, John B

    1999-01-01

    In smooth muscle contractility assays, many NK1 receptor (NK1r) antagonists inhibit responses to the neurotransmitter, substance P (SP), and its analogue, septide, with markedly different potency, leading to the proposal that there is a septide-preferring receptor related to the NK1r.We used fluorescence immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy to visualize agonist-induced NK1r endocytosis and analyse agonist/antagonist interactions at native NK1r in neurons of the myenteric plexus of guinea-pig ileum.SP and septide gave sigmoid log concentration-response curves and were equipotent in inducing NK1r endocytosis.The NK1r antagonists, CP-99994 (2S,3S)-3-(2-methoxybenzyl)amino-2-phenylpiperidine dihydrochloride and MEN-10581, cyclo(Leuψ[CH2NH]Lys(benzyloxycarbonyl)-Gln-Trp-Phe-βAla) were both more potent in inhibiting endocytosis (50× and 8× greater respectively) against septide than against SP.The results suggest that SP and septide interact differently with the NK1r, and that a single antagonist can exhibit different affinities at a single NK1r population, depending on the agonist with which it competes. Thus it may not be necessary to posit a separate septide-preferring tachykinin receptor. PMID:10051129

  3. High affinity nanobodies against human epidermal growth factor receptor selected on cells by E. coli display.

    PubMed

    Salema, Valencio; Mañas, Carmen; Cerdán, Lidia; Piñero-Lambea, Carlos; Marín, Elvira; Roovers, Rob C; Van Bergen En Henegouwen, Paul M P; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2016-10-01

    Most therapeutic antibodies (Abs) target cell surface proteins on tumor and immune cells. Cloning of Ab gene libraries in E. coli and their display on bacteriophages is commonly used to select novel therapeutic Abs binding target antigens, either purified or expressed on cells. However, the sticky nature of bacteriophages renders phage display selections on cells challenging. We previously reported an E. coli display system for expression of VHHs (i.e., nanobodies, Nbs) on the surface of bacteria and selection of high-affinity clones by magnetic cell sorting (MACS). Here, we demonstrate that E. coli display is also an attractive method for isolation of Nbs against cell surface antigens, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), upon direct selection and screening of Ab libraries on live cells. We employ a whole cell-based strategy using a VHH library obtained by immunization with human tumor cells over-expressing EGFR (i.e., A431), and selection of bacterial clones bound to murine fibroblast NIH-3T3 cells transfected with human EGFR, after depletion of non-specific clones on untransfected cells. This strategy resulted in the isolation of high-affinity Nbs binding distinct epitopes of EGFR, including Nbs competing with the ligand, EGF, as characterized by flow cytometry of bacteria displaying the Nbs and binding assays with purified Nbs using surface plasmon resonance. Hence, our study demonstrates that E. coli display of VHH libraries and selection on cells enables efficient isolation and characterization of high-affinity Nbs against cell surface antigens.

  4. High affinity nanobodies against human epidermal growth factor receptor selected on cells by E. coli display

    PubMed Central

    Salema, Valencio; Mañas, Carmen; Cerdán, Lidia; Piñero-Lambea, Carlos; Marín, Elvira; Roovers, Rob C.; Van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M.P.; Fernández, Luis Ángel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most therapeutic antibodies (Abs) target cell surface proteins on tumor and immune cells. Cloning of Ab gene libraries in E. coli and their display on bacteriophages is commonly used to select novel therapeutic Abs binding target antigens, either purified or expressed on cells. However, the sticky nature of bacteriophages renders phage display selections on cells challenging. We previously reported an E. coli display system for expression of VHHs (i.e., nanobodies, Nbs) on the surface of bacteria and selection of high-affinity clones by magnetic cell sorting (MACS). Here, we demonstrate that E. coli display is also an attractive method for isolation of Nbs against cell surface antigens, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), upon direct selection and screening of Ab libraries on live cells. We employ a whole cell-based strategy using a VHH library obtained by immunization with human tumor cells over-expressing EGFR (i.e., A431), and selection of bacterial clones bound to murine fibroblast NIH-3T3 cells transfected with human EGFR, after depletion of non-specific clones on untransfected cells. This strategy resulted in the isolation of high-affinity Nbs binding distinct epitopes of EGFR, including Nbs competing with the ligand, EGF, as characterized by flow cytometry of bacteria displaying the Nbs and binding assays with purified Nbs using surface plasmon resonance. Hence, our study demonstrates that E. coli display of VHH libraries and selection on cells enables efficient isolation and characterization of high-affinity Nbs against cell surface antigens. PMID:27472381

  5. Development of a High-Affinity PET Radioligand for Imaging Cannabinoid Subtype 2 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, Rareş-Petru; Teodoro, Rodrigo; Gao, Yongjun; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Kranz, Mathias; Wang, Yuchuan; Kuwabara, Hiroto; Nakano, Masayoshi; Valentine, Heather; Fischer, Steffen; Pomper, Martin G; Wong, Dean F; Dannals, Robert F; Brust, Peter; Horti, Andrew G

    2016-09-08

    Cannabinoid receptors type 2 (CB2) represent a target with increasing importance for neuroimaging due to its upregulation under various pathological conditions. Encouraged by preliminary results obtained with [(11)C](Z)-N-(3-(2-methoxyethyl)-4,5-dimethylthiazol-2(3H)-ylidene)-2,2,3,3-tetramethyl-cyclopropanecarboxamide ([(11)C]A-836339, [(11)C]1) in a mouse model of acute neuroinflammation (induced by lipopolysaccharide, LPS), we designed a library of fluorinated analogues aiming for an [(18)F]-labeled radiotracer with improved CB2 binding affinity and selectivity. Compound (Z)-N-(3-(4-fluorobutyl)-4,5-dimethylthiazol-2(3H)-ylidene)-2,2,3,3-tetramethyl-cyclopropanecarboxamide (29) was selected as the ligand with the highest CB2 affinity (Ki = 0.39 nM) and selectivity over those of CB1 (factor of 1000). [(18)F]29 was prepared starting from the bromo precursor (53). Specific binding was shown in vitro, whereas fast metabolism was observed in vivo in CD-1 mice. Animal PET revealed a brain uptake comparable to that of [(11)C]1. In the LPS-treated mice, a 20-30% higher uptake in brain was found in comparison to that in nontreated mice (n = 3, P < 0.05).

  6. Steroid binding by antibodies and artificial receptors: Exploration of theoretical methods to determine the origins of binding affinities and specificities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handschuh, Sandra; Goldfuss, Bernd; Chen, Jiangang; Gasteiger, Johann; Houk, K. N.

    2000-10-01

    Binding mode calculations for complexes between an artificial paracyclophane receptor and digoxins, cholic acids as well as cortisone steroids show encapsulation of different ring combinations. Docking experiments were performed between the 26-10 antibody and digoxins. Coordination affinity arises from hydrophobic desolvation and van der Waals interactions rather than from hydrogen bonds. The specificity and affinity arises mainly from shape complementarity. Computed binding free energies and Kohonen neural network computations both point to physicochemical and structural similarities of natural antibodies and artificial receptors.

  7. Glycan-based high-affinity ligands for toxins and pathogen receptors.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ashish A; Weiss, Alison A; Iyer, Suri S

    2010-03-01

    Glycans decorate over 95% of the mammalian cell surface in the form of glycolipids and glycoproteins. Several toxins and pathogens bind to these glycans to enter the cells. Understanding the fundamentals of the complex interplay between microbial pathogens and their glycan receptors at the molecular level could lead to the development of novel therapeutics and diagnostics. Using Shiga toxin and influenza virus as examples, we describe the complex biological interface between host glycans and these infectious agents, and recent strategies to develop glycan-based high-affinity ligands. These molecules are expected to ultimately be incorporated into diagnostics and therapeutics, and can be used as probes to study important biological processes. Additionally, by focusing on the specific glycans that microbial pathogens target, we can begin to decipher the "glycocode" and how these glycans participate in normal and aberrant cellular communication.

  8. Conformational Destabilization of Immunoglobulin G Increases the Low pH Binding Affinity with the Neonatal Fc Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Benjamin T.; Jensen, Pernille F.; Larraillet, Vincent; Lin, Kevin; Patapoff, Thomas; Schlothauer, Tilman; Rand, Kasper D.; Zhang, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Crystallographic evidence suggests that the pH-dependent affinity of IgG molecules for the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) receptor primarily arises from salt bridges involving IgG histidine residues, resulting in moderate affinity at mildly acidic conditions. However, this view does not explain the diversity in affinity found in IgG variants, such as the YTE mutant (M252Y,S254T,T256E), which increases affinity to FcRn by up to 10×. Here we compare hydrogen exchange measurements at pH 7.0 and pH 5.5 with and without FcRn bound with surface plasmon resonance estimates of dissociation constants and FcRn affinity chromatography. The combination of experimental results demonstrates that differences between an IgG and its cognate YTE mutant vary with their pH-sensitive dynamics prior to binding FcRn. The conformational dynamics of these two molecules are nearly indistinguishable upon binding FcRn. We present evidence that pH-induced destabilization in the CH2/3 domain interface of IgG increases binding affinity by breaking intramolecular H-bonds and increases side-chain adaptability in sites that form intermolecular contacts with FcRn. Our results provide new insights into the mechanism of pH-dependent affinity in IgG-FcRn interactions and exemplify the important and often ignored role of intrinsic conformational dynamics in a protein ligand, to dictate affinity for biologically important receptors. PMID:26627822

  9. Estrogen receptors colocalize with low-affinity nerve growth factor receptors in cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain.

    PubMed Central

    Toran-Allerand, C D; Miranda, R C; Bentham, W D; Sohrabji, F; Brown, T J; Hochberg, R B; MacLusky, N J

    1992-01-01

    The rodent and primate basal forebrain is a target of a family of endogenous peptide signaling molecules, the neurotrophins--nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and neurotrophin 3--and of the gonadal steroid hormone estrogen, both of which have been implicated in cholinergic function. To investigate whether or not these ligands may act on the same neurons in the developing and adult rodent basal forebrain, we combined autoradiography with 125I-labeled estrogen and either nonisotopic in situ hybridization histochemistry or immunohistochemistry. We now report colocalization of intranuclear estrogen binding sites with the mRNA and immunoreactive protein for the low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor, which binds all three neurotrophins, and for the cholinergic marker enzyme choline acetyltransferase (acetyl-CoA:choline O-acetyltransferase, EC 2.3.1.6). Colocalization of estrogen and low-affinity nerve growth factor receptors implies that their ligands may act on the same neuron, perhaps synergistically, to regulate the expression of specific genes or gene networks that may influence neuronal survival, differentiation, regeneration, and plasticity. That cholinergic neurons in brain regions subserving cognitive functions may be regulated not only by the neurotrophins but also by estrogen may have considerable relevance for the development and maintenance of neural substrates of cognition. If estrogen-neurotrophin interactions are important for survival of target neurons, then clinical conditions associated with estrogen deficiency could contribute to the atrophy or death of these neurons. These findings have implications for the subsequent decline in those differentiated neural functions associated with aging and Alzheimer disease. Images PMID:1316615

  10. Nicotinic alpha5 subunit deletion locally reduces high-affinity agonist activation without altering nicotinic receptor numbers.

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert W B; Collins, Allan C; Lindstrom, Jon M; Whiteaker, Paul

    2007-10-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit alpha5 mRNA is widely expressed in the CNS. An alpha5 gene polymorphism has been implicated in behavioral differences between mouse strains, and alpha5-null mutation induces profound changes in mouse acute responses to nicotine. In this study, we have examined the distribution and prevalence of alpha5* nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in mouse brain, and quantified the effects of alpha5-null mutation on pre-synaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor function (measured using synaptosomal (86)Rb(+) efflux) and overall [(125)I]epibatidine binding site expression. alpha5* nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expression was found in nine of fifteen regions examined, although < 20% of the total nicotinic acetylcholine receptor population in any region contained alpha5. Deletion of the alpha5 subunit gene resulted in localized loss of function (thalamus, striatum), which was itself confined to the DHbetaE-sensitive receptor population. No changes in receptor expression were seen. Consequently, functional changes must occur as a result of altered function per unit of receptor. The selective depletion of high agonist activation affinity sites results in overall nicotinic function being reduced, and increases the overall agonist activation affinity. Together, these results describe the receptor-level changes underlying altered behavioral responses to nicotine in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha5 subunit-null mutants.

  11. Antagonist Selective Modulation of Adenosine A1 and A3 Receptor Pharmacology by the Food Dye Brilliant Black BN: Evidence for Allosteric Interactions

    PubMed Central

    May, L. T.; Briddon, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    Allosteric binding sites on the adenosine receptor family represent potential therapeutic targets for a number of conditions involving metabolic stress. This study has identified Brilliant Black BN as a novel allosteric modulator of the adenosine A1 and A3 receptors. In addition to being a food dye and pharmaceutical excipient, Brilliant Black BN is commonly used within calcium mobilization assays to quench extracellular fluorescence. Brilliant Black BN (5–500 μM) had no significant effect on the calcium mobilization stimulated by the nonselective adenosine receptor agonist 5′-(N-ethylcarboxamido)adenosine in Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with the human adenosine A1 or A3 receptor. Likewise, calcium mobilization and radioligand binding assays found that Brilliant Black BN (5–500 μM) did not significantly influence the antagonism mediated by 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (100 nM) at the A1 receptor. In contrast, the affinity of N-[9-chloro-2-(2-furanyl)[1,2,4]-triazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-yl]benzene acetamide (MRS1220) at the A3 receptor and xanthine amine congener (XAC) and XAC-X-BY630 at the A1 and A3 receptors was significantly decreased in the presence of 500 μM Brilliant Black BN. A reduction in XAC potency at the A1 and A3 receptor was achieved within 1 min of Brilliant Black BN addition, despite receptors having been pre-equilibrated with antagonist. Dissociation kinetics of the fluorescent XAC derivative, XAC-X-BY630, revealed that the decrease in affinity is probably due to a significant increase in dissociation rate of the antagonist in the presence of Brilliant Black BN. Taken together, these results suggest that Brilliant Black BN can act allosterically to modify ligand affinity at A1 and A3 receptors. PMID:20086038

  12. Pharmacological characterization of F-180: a selective human V1a vasopressin receptor agonist of high affinity

    PubMed Central

    Andrés, Miriam; Trueba, Miguel; Guillon, Gilles

    2002-01-01

    The pharmacological properties of F-180, a vasopressin (VP) structural analogue, were determined on CHO cells expressing the different human vasopressin and oxytocin (OT) receptor subtypes. Binding experiments revealed that F-180 exhibited a high affinity for the human V1a receptor subtype (Ki=11 nM) and was selective for this receptor subtype. Functional studies performed on CHO cells expressing human V1a receptors indicate that similarly to AVP, F-180 can stimulate the accumulation of inositol phosphate. The activation constant (Kact) for both F-180 and AVP was 1.7 nM. F-180 was also an agonist for the human V2 and V1b receptor subtypes and an antagonist for the human OT receptor. Since marked species pharmacological differences for vasopressin receptors have been described, we studied the properties of F-180 on various mammalian species. F-180 showed high affinity and good selectivity for human and bovine V1a receptors, but weak affinity and non selective properties for rat V1a receptors. To assess the functional properties of F-180 on a native biological model, we performed studies on primary cultures of cells from bovine zona fasciculata (ZF). As AVP, F-180 stimulated inositol phosphate accumulation and cortisol secretion with similar efficiency. In conclusion, we demonstrate that F-180 is the first selective V1a agonist described for human and bovine vasopressin receptors. Therefore F-180 can be used as a powerful pharmacological tool to characterize the actions of vasopressin that are mediated by V1a receptor subtypes. PMID:11934825

  13. Determining force dependence of two-dimensional receptor-ligand binding affinity by centrifugation.

    PubMed Central

    Piper, J W; Swerlick, R A; Zhu, C

    1998-01-01

    Analyses of receptor-ligand interactions are important to the understanding of cellular adhesion. Traditional methods of measuring the three-dimensional (3D) dissociation constant (Kd) require at least one of the molecular species in solution and hence cannot be directly applied to the case of cell adhesion. We describe a novel method of measuring 2D binding characteristics of receptors and ligands that are attached to surfaces and whose bonds are subjected to forces. The method utilizes a common centrifugation assay to quantify adhesion. A model for the experiment has been formulated, solved exactly, and tested carefully. The model is stochastically based and couples the bond force to the binding affinity. The method was applied to examine tumor cell adherence to recombinant E-selectin. Satisfactory agreement was found between predictions and data. The estimated zero-force 2D Kd for E-selectin/carbohydrate ligand binding was approximately 5 x 10(3) microm(-2), and the bond interaction range was subangstrom. Our results also suggest that the number of bonds mediating adhesion was small (<5). PMID:9449350

  14. Rational Design of Sulfonated A3 Adenosine Receptor-Selective Nucleosides as Pharmacological Tools to Study Chronic Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Paoletta, Silvia; Tosh, Dilip K.; Finley, Amanda; Gizewski, Elizabeth T.; Moss, Steven M.; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Auchampach, John A.; Salvemini, Daniela; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    (N)-Methanocarba (bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane)-adenosine derivatives were probed for sites of charged sulfonate substitution, which precludes diffusion across biological membranes, e.g. blood brain barrier. Molecular modeling predicted that sulfonate groups on C2-phenylethynyl substituents would provide high affinity at both mouse (m) and human (h) A3 adenosine receptors (ARs), while a N6-p-sulfo-phenylethyl substituent would determine higher hA3AR vs. mA3AR affinity. These modeling predictions, based on steric fitting of the binding cavity and crucial interactions with key residues, were confirmed by binding/efficacy studies of synthesized sulfonates. N6-3-Chlorobenzyl-2-(3-sulfophenylethynyl) derivative 7 (MRS5841) bound selectively to h/m A3ARs (Ki hA3AR 1.9 nM) as agonist, while corresponding p-sulfo isomer 6 (MRS5701) displayed mixed A1/A3AR agonism. Both nucleosides administered i.p. reduced mouse chronic neuropathic pain that was ascribed to either A3 or A1/A3ARs using A3AR genetic deletion. Thus, rational design methods based on A3AR homology models successfully predicted sites for sulfonate incorporation, for delineating adenosine’s CNS vs. peripheral actions. PMID:23789857

  15. Solubilization of high affinity corticotropin-releasing factor receptors from rat brain: Characterization of an active digitonin-solubilized receptor complex

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriadis, D.E.; Zaczek, R.; Pearsall, D.M.; De Souza, E.B. )

    1989-12-01

    The binding characteristics of CRF receptors in rat frontal cerebral cortex membranes solubilized in 1% digitonin were determined. The binding of (125I)Tyro-ovine CRF ((125I)oCRF) to solubilized membrane proteins was dependent on incubation time, temperature, and protein concentration, was saturable and of high affinity, and was absent in boiled tissue. The solubilized receptors retained their high affinity for (125I) oCRF in the solubilized state, exhibiting a dissociation constant (KD) of approximately 200 pM, as determined by direct binding saturation isotherms. Solubilized CRF receptors maintained the rank order of potencies for various related and unrelated CRF peptides characteristic of the membrane CRF receptor: rat/human CRF congruent to ovine CRF congruent to Nle21,38-rat CRF greater than alpha-helical oCRF-(9-41) greater than oCRF-(7-41) much greater than vasoactive intestinal peptide, arginine vasopressin, or the substance-P antagonist. Furthermore, the absolute potencies (Ki values) for the various CRF-related peptides in solubilized receptors were almost identical to those observed in the membrane preparations, indicating that the CRF receptor retained its high affinity binding capacity in the digitonin-solubilized state. Chemical affinity cross-linking of digitonin-solubilized rat cortical membrane proteins revealed a specifically labeled protein with an apparent mol wt of 58,000 which was similar to the labeled protein in native membrane homogenates. Although solubilized CRF receptors retained their high affinity for agonists, their sensitivity for guanine nucleotide was lost. Size exclusion chromatography substantiated these results, demonstrating that in the presence or absence of guanine nucleotides, (125I)oCRF labeled the same size receptor complex.

  16. New ursane triterpenoids from Ficus pandurata and their binding affinity for human cannabinoid and opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Khedr, Amgad I M; Ibrahim, Sabrin R M; Mohamed, Gamal A; Ahmed, Hany E A; Ahmad, Amany S; Ramadan, Mahmoud A; El-Baky, Atef E Abd; Yamada, Koji; Ross, Samir A

    2016-07-01

    Phytochemical investigation of Ficus pandurata Hance (Moraceae) fruits has led to the isolation of two new triterpenoids, ficupanduratin A [1β-hydroxy-3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-urs-12-ene] (11) and ficupanduratin B [21α-hydroxy-3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-urs-12-ene] (17), along with 20 known compounds: α-amyrin acetate (1), α-amyrin (2), 3β-acetoxy-20-taraxasten-22-one (3), 3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-olean-12-ene (4), 3β-acetoxy-11α-methoxy-12-ursene (5), 11-oxo-α-amyrin acetate (6), 11-oxo-β-amyrin acetate (7), palmitic acid (8), stigmast-4,22-diene-3,6-dione (9), stigmast-4-ene-3,6-dione (10), stigmasterol (12), β-sitosterol (13), stigmast-22-ene-3,6-dione (14), stigmastane-3,6-dione (15), 3β,21β-dihydroxy-11α-methoxy-olean-12-ene (16), 3β-hydroxy-11α-methoxyurs-12-ene (18), 6-hydroxystigmast-4,22-diene-3-one (19), 6-hydroxystigmast-4-ene-3-one (20), 11α,21α-dihydroxy-3β-acetoxy-urs-12-ene (21), and β-sitosterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (22). Compound 21 is reported for the first time from a natural source. The structures of the 20 compounds were elucidated on the basis of IR, 1D ((1)H and (13)C), 2D ((1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY) NMR and MS spectroscopic data, in addition to comparison with literature data. The isolated compounds were evaluated for their anti-microbial, anti-malarial, anti-leishmanial, and cytotoxic activities. In addition, their radioligand displacement affinity on opioid and cannabinoid receptors was assessed. Compounds 4, 11, and 15 exhibited good affinity towards the CB2 receptor, with displacement values of 69.7, 62.5 and 86.5 %, respectively. Furthermore, the binding mode of the active compounds in the active site of the CB2 cannabinoid receptors was investigated through molecular modelling.

  17. Allosteric interactions at adenosine A1 and A3 receptors: new insights into the role of small molecules and receptor dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Stephen J; May, Lauren T; Kellam, Barrie; Woolard, Jeanette

    2014-01-01

    The purine nucleoside adenosine is present in all cells in tightly regulated concentrations. It is released under a variety of physiological and pathophysiological conditions to facilitate protection and regeneration of tissues. Adenosine acts via specific GPCRs to either stimulate cyclic AMP formation, as exemplified by Gs-protein-coupled adenosine receptors (A2A and A2B), or inhibit AC activity, in the case of Gi/o-coupled adenosine receptors (A1 and A3). Recent advances in our understanding of GPCR structure have provided insights into the conformational changes that occur during receptor activation following binding of agonists to orthosteric (i.e. at the same binding site as an endogenous modulator) and allosteric regulators to allosteric sites (i.e. at a site that is topographically distinct from the endogenous modulator). Binding of drugs to allosteric sites may lead to changes in affinity or efficacy, and affords considerable potential for increased selectivity in new drug development. Herein, we provide an overview of the properties of selective allosteric regulators of the adenosine A1 and A3 receptors, focusing on the impact of receptor dimerization, mechanistic approaches to single-cell ligand-binding kinetics and the effects of A1- and A3-receptor allosteric modulators on in vivo pharmacology. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of GPCRs. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-5 PMID:24024783

  18. A functionally active presynaptic high-affinity kainate receptor in the rat hippocampal CA3 subregion.

    PubMed

    Malva, J O; Ambrósio, A F; Cunha, R A; Ribeiro, J A; Carvalho, A P; Carvalho, C M

    1995-02-09

    We studied the modulation of the intracellular free calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i) by kainate/AMPA receptor activation in synaptosomes isolated from whole rat hippocampus, or from its CA1, CA3 or dentate gyrus subregions. The receptor was activated either by 100 microM S-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolopropionic acid (AMPA) (EC50 = 26.6 +/- 4.9 microM) or by 100 microM kainate (EC50 = 0.81 +/- 0.1 microM), but the effects of these agonists were not additive. The response to either AMPA or kainate was competitively inhibited by 10 microM 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dioxine. Higher [Ca2+]i responses to 100 microM AMPA or to 100 microM kainate were observed in the CA3 subregion (43.2 +/- 2.5 nM or 42.8 +/- 2.3 nM, respectively) than in the whole hippocampus (22.4 +/- 1.1 nM or 22.4 +/- 1.6, respectively), in the CA1 subregion (26.4 +/- 1.1 nM or 26.6 +/- 2.6 nM, respectively) or in dentate gyrus (24.6 +/- 1.4 nM or 21.5 +/- 1.0 nM, respectively). These results indicate that the CA3 subregion of the hippocampus is enriched in a presynaptic high-affinity kainate receptor which modulates the [Ca2+]i in nerve terminals.

  19. Axonal transport of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat vagus nerve: high and low affinity agonist receptors move in opposite directions and differ in nucleotide sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Zarbin, M.A.; Wamsley, J.K.; Kuhar, M.J.

    1982-07-01

    The presence and transport of muscarinic cholinergic binding sites have been detected in the rat vagus nerve. These binding sites accumulate both proximal and distal to ligatures in a time-dependent manner. The results of double ligature and colchicine experiments are compatible with the notion that the anterogradely transported binding sites move by fast transport. Most of the sites accumulating proximal to ligatures bind the agonist carbachol with high affinity, while most of the sites accumulating distally bind carbachol with a low affinity. Also, the receptors transported in the anterograde direction are affected by a guanine nucleotide analogue (GppNHp), while those transported in the retrograde direction are less, or not, affected. The bulk of the sites along the unligated nerve trunk bind carbachol with a low affinity and are less sensitive to GppNHp modulation than the anterogradely transported sites. These results suggest that some receptors in the vagus may undergo axonal transport in association with regulatory proteins and that receptor molecules undergo changes in their binding and regulatory properties during their life cycle. These data also support the notion that the high and low affinity agonist form of the muscarinic receptor represent different modulated forms of a single receptor molecule.

  20. Characterisation of the affinity of different anabolics and synthetic hormones to the human androgen receptor, human sex hormone binding globulin and to the bovine progestin receptor.

    PubMed

    Bauer, E R; Daxenberger, A; Petri, T; Sauerwein, H; Meyer, H H

    2000-12-01

    For the steroidal growth promoters trenbolone acetate (TBA) and melengestrol acetate (MGA) neither the complete spectrum of biological activities nor the potential endocrine disrupting activity of their excreted metabolites in the environment is fully understood. The potency of these substances in [3H]dihydrotestosterone ([3H]-DHT) displacement from the recombinant human androgen receptor (rhAR) and from human sex-hormone binding globulin (hSHBG) was evaluated. In addition, the potency for [3H]-ORG2058 displacement from the bovine uterine progestin receptor (bPR) was tested. For comparison, different anabolics and synthetic hormones were also tested for their binding affinities. For 17beta-trenbolone (17beta-TbOH), the active compound after TBA administration, an affinity the rhAR similar to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and a slightly higher affinity to the bPR than progesterone were demonstrated. The affinity of the two major metabolites, 17alpha-trenbolone and trendione, was reduced to less than 5% of the 17beta-TbOH-value. The affinity of these three compounds and of MGA to the hSHBG was much lower compared with DHT. MGA showed a 5.3-fold higher affinity than progesterone to the bPR but only a weak affinity to the rhAR. The major MGA metabolites have an affinity to the bPR between 85% and 28% of the affinity of progesterone. In consequence, MGA and TBA metabolites may be hormonally active substances, which will be present in edible tissues and in manure. We conclude that detailed investigations on biodegradation, distribution and bio-efficacy of these substances are necessary.

  1. The hemochromatosis gene product complexes with the transferrin receptor and lowers its affinity for ligand binding

    PubMed Central

    Feder, John N.; Penny, David M.; Irrinki, Alivelu; Lee, Vince K.; Lebrón, José A.; Watson, Nicole; Tsuchihashi, Zenta; Sigal, Elliott; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Schatzman, Randall C.

    1998-01-01

    We recently reported the positional cloning of a candidate gene for hereditary hemochromatosis called HFE. The gene product, a member of the major histocompatibility complex class I-like family, was found to have a mutation, Cys-282 → Tyr (C282Y), in 85% of patient chromosomes. This mutation eliminates the ability of HFE to associate with β2-microglobulin (β2m) and prevents cell-surface expression. A second mutation that has no effect on β2m association, H63D, was found in eight out of nine patients heterozygous for the C282Y mutant. In this report, we demonstrate in cultured 293 cells overexpressing wild-type or mutant HFE proteins that both the wild-type and H63D HFE proteins form stable complexes with the transferrin receptor (TfR). The C282Y mutation nearly completely prevents the association of the mutant HFE protein with the TfR. Studies on cell-associated transferrin at 37°C suggest that the overexpressed wild-type HFE protein decreases the affinity of the TfR for transferrin. The overexpressed H63D protein does not have this effect, providing the first direct evidence for a functional consequence of the H63D mutation. Addition of soluble wild-type HFE/β2m heterodimers to cultured cells also decreased the apparent affinity of the TfR for its ligand under steady-state conditions, both in 293 cells and in HeLa cells. Furthermore, at 4°C, the added soluble complex of HFE/β2m inhibited binding of transferrin to HeLa cell TfR in a concentration-dependent manner. Scatchard plots of these data indicate that the added heterodimer substantially reduced the affinity of TfR for transferrin. These results establish a molecular link between HFE and a key protein involved in iron transport, the TfR, and raise the possibility that alterations in this regulatory mechanism may play a role in the pathogenesis of hereditary hemochromatosis. PMID:9465039

  2. The high-affinity receptor for IgG, FcγRI, of humans and non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Chenoweth, Alicia M; Trist, Halina M; Tan, Peck-Szee; Wines, Bruce D; Hogarth, P Mark

    2015-11-01

    Non-human primate (NHP) models, especially involving macaques, are considered important models of human immunity and have been essential in preclinical testing for vaccines and therapeutics. Despite this, much less characterization of macaque Fc receptors has occurred compared to humans or mice. Much of the characterization of macaque Fc receptors so far has focused on the low-affinity Fc receptors, particularly FcγRIIIa. From these studies, it is clear that there are distinct differences between the human and macaque low-affinity receptors and their interaction with human IgG. Relatively little work has been performed on the high-affinity IgG receptor, FcγRI, especially in NHPs. This review will focus on what is currently known of how FcγRI interacts with IgG, from mutation studies and recent crystallographic studies of human FcγRI, and how amino acid sequence differences in the macaque FcγRI may affect this interaction. Additionally, this review will look at the functional consequences of differences in the amino acid sequences between humans and macaques. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Synthesis and binding affinity of novel mono- and bivalent morphinan ligands for κ, μ, and δ opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Tangzhi; Sromek, Anna W; Scrimale, Thomas; Bidlack, Jean M; Neumeyer, John L

    2011-05-01

    A novel series of homo- and heterodimeric ligands containing κ/μ agonist and μ agonist/antagonist pharmacophores joined by a 10-carbon ester linker chain were synthesized and evaluated for their in vitro binding affinity at κ, μ, and δ opioid receptors, and their functional activities were determined at κ and μ receptors in [(35)S]GTPγS functional assays. Most of these compounds had high binding affinity at μ and κ receptors (K(i) values less than 1nM). Compound 15b, which contains butorphan (1) at one end of linking chain and butorphanol (5) at the other end, was the most potent ligand in this series with binding affinity K(i) values of 0.089nM at the μ receptor and 0.073nM at the κ receptor. All of the morphinan-derived ligands were found to be partial κ and μ agonists; ATPM-derived ligands 12 and 11 were found to be full κ agonists and partial μ agonists.

  4. Differences in receptor binding affinity of several phytocannabinoids do not explain their effects on neural cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Rosenthaler, Sarah; Pöhn, Birgit; Kolmanz, Caroline; Huu, Chi Nguyen; Krewenka, Christopher; Huber, Alexandra; Kranner, Barbara; Rausch, Wolf-Dieter; Moldzio, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Phytocannabinoids are potential candidates for neurodegenerative disease treatment. Nonetheless, the exact mode of action of major phytocannabinoids has to be elucidated, but both, receptor and non-receptor mediated effects are discussed. Focusing on the often presumed structure-affinity-relationship, Ki values of phytocannabinoids cannabidiol (CBD), cannabidivarin (CBDV), cannabichromene (CBC), cannabigerol (CBG), cannabinol (CBN), THC acid (THCA) and THC to human CB1 and CB2 receptors were detected by using competitive inhibition between radioligand [(3)H]CP-55,940 and the phytocannabinoids. The resulting Ki values to CB1 range from 23.5 nM (THCA) to 14711 nM (CBDV), whereas Ki values to CB2 range from 8.5 nM (THC) to 574.2 nM (CBDV). To study the relationship between binding affinity and effects on neurons, we investigated possible CB1 related cytotoxic properties in murine mesencephalic primary cell cultures and N18TG2 neuroblastoma cell line. Most of the phytocannabinoids did not affect the number of dopaminergic neurons in primary cultures, whereas propidium iodide and resazurin formation assays revealed cytotoxic properties of CBN, CBDV and CBG. However, THC showed positive effects on N18TG2 cell viability at a concentration of 10 μM, whereas CBC and THCA also displayed slightly positive activities. These findings are not linked to the receptor binding affinity therewith pointing to another mechanism than a receptor mediated one. [Corrected] Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Synthetic studies of neoclerodane diterpenes from Salvia divinorum: role of the furan in affinity for opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Denise S; Lovell, Kimberly M; Lozama, Anthony; Han, Nina; Day, Victor W; Dersch, Christina M; Rothman, Richard B; Prisinzano, Thomas E

    2009-09-21

    Further synthetic modification of the furan ring of salvinorin A (1), the major active component of Salvia divinorum, has resulted in novel neoclerodane diterpenes with opioid receptor affinity and activity. A computational study has predicted 1 to be a reproductive toxicant in mammals and is suggestive that use of 1 may be associated with adverse effects. We report in this study that piperidine 21 and thiomorpholine 23 have been identified as selective partial agonists at kappa opioid receptors. This indicates that additional structural modifications of 1 may provide ligands with good selectivity for opioid receptors but with reduced potential for toxicity.

  6. DOTA-Derivatives of Octreotide Dicarba-Analogs with High Affinity for Somatostatin sst2,5 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Pratesi, Alessandro; Ginanneschi, Mauro; Lumini, Marco; Papini, Anna M.; Novellino, Ettore; Brancaccio, Diego; Carotenuto, Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    In vivo somatostatin receptor scintigraphy is a valuable method for the visualization of human endocrine tumors and their metastases. In fact, peptide ligands of somatostatin receptors (sst's) conjugated with chelating agents are in clinical use. We have recently developed octreotide dicarba-analogs, which show interesting binding profiles at sst's. In this context, it was mandatory to explore the possibility that our analogs could maintain their activity also upon conjugation with DOTA. In this paper, we report and discuss the synthesis, binding affinity and conformational preferences of three DOTA-conjugated dicarba-analogs of octreotide. Interestingly, two conjugated analogs exhibited nanomolar affinities on sst2 and sst5 somatostatin receptor subtypes. PMID:28286746

  7. Evidence for monomeric and oligomeric hormone-binding domains in affinity-purified gonadotropin receptor from rat ovary

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q.Y.; Menon, K.M.J. )

    1989-11-01

    Rat ovarian lutropin/choriogonadotropin receptor was purified from a Triton X-100-solubilized membrane preparation by affinity chromatography with Affi-Gel 10 coupled to purified human choriogonadotropin. The affinity-purified receptor preparations contained a single class of high-affinity binding sites for {sup 125}I-labeled human choriogonadotropin, with an equilibrium dissociation constant (K{sub d}) of 2.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} M, which is comparable to the K{sub d} values for membrane-bound and solubilized receptors. The purified receptor appeared as two dominant bands with molecular weights of 135,000 and 92,000 after sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS/PAGE) under nonreducing conditions. When the individual affinity-purified receptor bands were electroeluted from the gel and analyzed again by SDS/PAGE under nonreducing conditions, both the M{sub r} 92,000 and the 135,000 proteins retained their original molecular form even when 8 M urea was included in the gel. However, when the electrophoretically purified M{sub r} 92,000 and 135,000 bands were subjected to SDS/PAGE under reducing conditions, the M{sub r} 135,000 species was almost completely converted to a M{sub r} 92,000 band, but the M{sub r} 92,000 species did not undergo any alteration in molecular weight. The results suggest that the lutropin/choriogonadotropin receptor from rat ovary exists in two molecular forms, and the higher molecular weight form appears to be composed of disulfide-linked M{sup r} 92,000 subunit, which comprises the hormone-binding domain.

  8. Identification of Key Residues in Subgroup A Avian Leukosis Virus Envelope Determining Receptor Binding Affinity and Infectivity of Cells Expressing Chicken or Quail Tva Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Holmen, Sheri L.; Melder, Deborah C.; Federspiel, Mark J.

    2001-01-01

    To better understand retroviral entry, we have characterized the interactions between subgroup A avian leukosis virus [ALV(A)] envelope glycoproteins and Tva, the receptor for ALV(A), that result in receptor interference. We have recently shown that soluble forms of the chicken and quail Tva receptor (sTva), expressed from genes delivered by retroviral vectors, block ALV(A) infection of cultured chicken cells (∼200-fold antiviral effect) and chickens (>98% of the birds were not infected). We hypothesized that inhibition of viral replication by sTva would select virus variants with mutations in the surface glycoprotein (SU) that altered the binding affinity of the subgroup A SU for the sTva protein and/or altered the normal receptor usage of the virus. Virus propagation in the presence of quail sTva-mIgG, the quail Tva extracellular region fused to the constant region of the mouse immunoglobulin G (IgG) protein, identified viruses with three mutations in the subgroup A hr1 region of SU, E149K, Y142N, and Y142N/E149K. These mutations reduced the binding affinity of the subgroup A envelope glycoproteins for quail sTva-mIgG (32-, 324-, and 4,739-fold, respectively) but did not alter their binding affinity for chicken sTva-mIgG. The ALV(A) mutants efficiently infected cells expressing the chicken Tva receptor but were 2-fold (E149K), 10-fold (Y142N), and 600-fold (Y142N/E149K) less efficient at infecting cells expressing the quail Tva receptor. These mutations identify key determinants of the interaction between the ALV(A) glycoproteins and the Tva receptor. We also conclude from these results that, at least for the wild-type and variant ALV(A)s tested, the receptor binding affinity was directly related to infection efficiency. PMID:11134286

  9. Are high-affinity progesterone binding site(s) from porcine liver microsomes members of the sigma receptor family?

    PubMed

    Meyer, C; Schmieding, K; Falkenstein, E; Wehling, M

    1998-04-24

    Membrane progesterone binding sites have been purified recently from pig liver. Since progesterone is considered as an endogenous sigma (sigma) receptor ligand, these sites were characterized pharmacologically by ligands selective for sigma receptor and dopamine receptor binding sites, and by other drugs from distinct pharmacological classes. Binding studies using the radioligand [3H]progesterone were done in crude membrane preparations and solubilized fractions to determine half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values, from which inhibitory constants (Ki values) were calculated. Radioligand binding was inhibited by the sigma receptor ligands haloperidol, carbetapentane citrate, 1,3-Di(2-tolyl)guanidine (DTG), R(-)-N-(3-phenyl-1-propyl)-1-phenyl-2 aminopropane HCl (R(-)-PPAAP HCl), or sigma receptor antagonists like (+)-3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-propylpiperidine HCl (R(+)-PPP HCl) and cis-9-[3-(3,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)propyl]-9H-carbazole dihydrochloride (rimcazole 2HCl). The hierarchy of inhibitory action was not fully compatible with either sigma receptor class I (moderate affinity of pentazocine, diphenylhydantoin (phenytoin) insensitivity) or II sites (high affinity of carbetapentane). The data thus suggest that progesterone binding sites in porcine liver membranes are related to the sigma receptor binding site superfamily, but may represent a particular species with progesterone specificity.

  10. Direct Measurement of T Cell Receptor Affinity and Sequence from Naïve Anti-Viral T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuqi; Parker, Patricia; Ma, Keyue; He, Chenfeng; Shi, Qian; Cui, Zhonghao; Williams, Chad; Wendel, Ben S.; Meriwether, Amanda; Salazar, Mary A.; Jiang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    T cells recognize and kill a myriad of pathogen-infected or cancer cells using a diverse set of T cell receptors (TCR). The affinity of TCR to cognate antigen is of high interest in adoptive T cell transfer immunotherapy and antigen-specific T cell repertoire immune profiling because it is widely known to correlate with downstream T cell responses. Here, we introduce the in situ TCR affinity and sequence test (iTAST) for simultaneous measurement of TCR affinity and sequence from single primary CD8+ T cells in human blood. We demonstrate that the repertoire of primary antigen-specific T cells from pathogen inexperienced individuals has a surprisingly broad affinity range of 1000-fold composed of diverse TCR sequences. Within this range, samples from older individuals contained a reduced frequency of high affinity T cells compared to young individuals, demonstrating an age-related effect of T cell attrition that could cause holes in the repertoire. iTAST should enable the rapid selection of high affinity TCRs ex vivo for adoptive immunotherapy and measurement of T cell response for immune monitoring applications. PMID:27252176

  11. Galpha-subunits differentially alter the conformation and agonist affinity of kappa-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Yan, Feng; Mosier, Philip D; Westkaemper, Richard B; Roth, Bryan L

    2008-02-12

    Although ligand-induced conformational changes in G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are well-documented, there is little direct evidence for G protein-induced changes in GPCR conformation. To investigate this possibility, the effects of overexpressing Galpha-subunits (Galpha16 or Galphai2) with the kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) were examined. The changes in KOR conformation were subequently examined via the substituted cysteine accessibility method (SCAM) in transmembrane domains 6 (TM6) and 7 (TM7) and extracellular loop 2 (EL2). Significant conformational changes were observed on TM7, the extracellular portion of TM6, and EL2. Seven SCAM-sensitive residues (S3107.33, F3147.37, and I3167.39 to Y3207.43) on TM7 presented a cluster pattern when the KOR was exposed to baseline amounts of G protein, and additional residues became sensitive upon overexpression of various G proteins. In TM7, S3117.34 and N3267.49 were found to be sensitive in Galpha16-overexpressed cells and Y3137.36, N3227.45, S3237.46, and L3297.52 in Galphai2-overexpressed cells. In addition, the degree of sensitivity for various TM7 residues was augmented, especially in Galphai2-overexpressed cells. A similar phenomenon was also observed for residues in TM6 and EL2. In addition to an enhanced sensitivity of certain residues, our findings also indicated that a slight rotation was predicted to occur in the upper part of TM7 upon G protein overexpression. These relatively modest conformational changes engendered by G protein overexpression had both profound and differential effects on the abilities of agonists to bind to KOR. These data are significant because they demonstrate that Galpha-subunits differentially modulate the conformation and agonist affinity of a prototypical GPCR.

  12. Ultrafiltration Tandem Mass Spectrometry of Estrogens for Characterization of Structure and Affinity for Human Estrogen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yongkai; Gu, Chungang; Liu, Xuemei; Liang, Wenzhong; Yao, Ping; Bolton, Judy L.; van Breemen, Richard B.

    2006-01-01

    Although hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is used by post-menopausal women for the relief of menopausal symptoms and the potential reduction of osteoporosis, HRT also increases their risk of Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, breast cancer, and endometrial cancer. Since the majority of these effects are associated primarily with estrogen binding to only one of the estrogen receptors (ER), new assays are needed that can more efficiently evaluate ER-binding and identify ligands selective for ER-α and ER-β. High performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) was combined with ultrafiltration as a new method to investigate the relative binding of compounds to the ERs and to evaluate the structures of these estrogens. Mixtures of estradiol and six equine estrogens including equilin, equilenin, 8,9-dehydroestrone, and their 17β-hydroxyl derivatives were assayed simultaneously to determine their relative binding to human ER-α and ER-β. Estrogens containing a 17β-OH group were found to have higher relative affinities for the estrogen receptors than their ketone analogs. In addition, 17β-EN showed selectivity for binding to ER-β over ER-α. The results were compared to the IC50 values obtained by using a conventional radiolabled estradiol competitive binding assay. Finally, the utility of negative ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry for the unambiguous identification these estrogen isomers was investigated. Several characteristic recyclization pathways during tandem mass spectrometry were identified, which might be useful for distinguishing related estrogens. PMID:15694777

  13. Estimation of the receptor-state affinity constants of ligands in functional studies using wild type and constitutively active mutant receptors: Implications for estimation of agonist bias.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Frederick J; Stein, Richard S L

    We describe a method for estimating the affinities of ligands for active and inactive states of a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). Our protocol involves measuring agonist-induced signaling responses of a wild type GPCR and a constitutively active mutant of it under control conditions and after partial receptor inactivation or reduced receptor expression. Our subsequent analysis is based on the assumption that the activating mutation increases receptor isomerization into the active state without affecting the affinities of ligands for receptor states. A means of confirming this assumption is provided. Global nonlinear regression analysis yields estimates of 1) the active (Kact) and inactive (Kinact) receptor-state affinity constants, 2) the isomerization constant of the unoccupied receptor (Kq-obs), and 3) the sensitivity constant of the signaling pathway (KE-obs). The latter two parameters define the output response of the receptor, and hence, their ratio (Kq-obs/KE) is a useful measure of system bias. If the cellular system is reasonably stable and the Kq-obs and KE-obs values of the signaling pathway are known, the Kact and Kinact values of additional agonists can be estimated in subsequent experiments on cells expressing the wild type receptor. We validated our method through computer simulation, an analytical proof, and analysis of previously published data. Our approach provides 1) a more meaningful analysis of structure-activity relationships, 2) a means of validating in silico docking experiments on active and inactive receptor structures and 3) an absolute, in contrast to relative, measure of agonist bias.

  14. Low-affinity receptor for IgE on human bronchial epithelial cells in asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, A M; Vignola, A M; Chanez, P; Godard, P; Bousquet, J

    1994-01-01

    Bronchial epithelial cells are activated in asthma but the mechanisms underlying this activation are poorly understood. We tested the possibility that bronchial epithelial cells recovered by brushing from 15 asthmatic and 11 control subjects may be activated by an IgE-dependent mechanism. The expression of the low-affinity IgE receptor (CD23) was studied by immunocytochemistry using the alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase technique and immunofluorescence using confocal microscopy. Four of eight allergic asthmatic patients and none of the seven non-allergic asthmatic or control subjects had a positive expression of CD23. The functional activity of CD23 was examined in the cells recovered from these subjects by stimulating them with IgE/anti-IgE. 15-HETE was not released but endothelin was released in the three or four asthmatic patients who had a positive expression of CD23. None of the other subjects released any endothelin. This study suggests that bronchial epithelial cells of asthmatic patients may be directly activated by an IgE-mediated mechanism. Images Figure 1 PMID:7835911

  15. Seasonal changes in cortisol sensitivity and glucocorticoid receptor affinity and number in leukocytes of coho salmon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maule, Alec G.; Schreck, Carl B.; Sharpe, Cameron

    1993-01-01

    To determine if there were organ-specific changes in immune responses or immune-endocrine interaction, we monitored in vitro immune response, cortisol sensitivity and number and affinity of glucocorticoid receptors (GR) in leukocytes from freshwater-adapted juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) during the physiological changes that prepare them to enter the marine environment. During this period, absolute immune response declined, but splenic leukocytes generated more antibody-producing cells than did cells from anterior kidney. Splenic leukocytes were initially more sensitive to the suppressive effects of cortisol and had fewer GR than leukocytes from the anterior kidney. Leukocytes from the anterior kidney were initially insensitive to cortisol but developed sensitivity at about the same time as the dissociation constant and number of GR increased. In vitro incubation of anterior kidney leukocytes in cortisol altered GR variables when experiments were conducted during March through September but not during November through February. In some years, changes in GR or immune responses were correlated with plasma cortisol titers, but in other years there was no correlation. Thus, the exact relation between cortisol, GR and immune response in anadromous salmonids is unclear and other factors are involved.

  16. New Regulatory Roles of Galectin-3 in High-Affinity IgE Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Bambouskova, Monika; Polakovicova, Iva; Halova, Ivana; Goel, Gautam; Draberova, Lubica; Bugajev, Viktor; Doan, Aivi; Utekal, Pavol; Gardet, Agnes; Xavier, Ramnik J; Draber, Petr

    2016-05-01

    Aggregation of the high-affinity receptor for IgE (FcεRI) in mast cells initiates activation events that lead to degranulation and release of inflammatory mediators. To better understand the signaling pathways and genes involved in mast cell activation, we developed a high-throughput mast cell degranulation assay suitable for RNA interference experiments using lentivirus-based short hairpin RNA (shRNA) delivery. We tested 432 shRNAs specific for 144 selected genes for effects on FcεRI-mediated mast cell degranulation and identified 15 potential regulators. In further studies, we focused on galectin-3 (Gal3), identified in this study as a negative regulator of mast cell degranulation. FcεRI-activated cells with Gal3 knockdown exhibited upregulated tyrosine phosphorylation of spleen tyrosine kinase and several other signal transduction molecules and enhanced calcium response. We show that Gal3 promotes internalization of IgE-FcεRI complexes; this may be related to our finding that Gal3 is a positive regulator of FcεRI ubiquitination. Furthermore, we found that Gal3 facilitates mast cell adhesion and motility on fibronectin but negatively regulates antigen-induced chemotaxis. The combined data indicate that Gal3 is involved in both positive and negative regulation of FcεRI-mediated signaling events in mast cells.

  17. Expression of high affinity folate receptor in breast cancer brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Leone, José Pablo; Bhargava, Rohit; Theisen, Brian K; Hamilton, Ronald L; Lee, Adrian V; Brufsky, Adam M

    2015-10-06

    High affinity folate receptor (HFR) can be overexpressed in breast cancer and is associated with poor prognosis, however the expression in breast cancer brain metastases (BCBM) is unknown. The aim of this study was to analyze the rate of HFR expression in BCBM and its role in the prognosis of this high-risk cohort. We analyzed 19 brain metastasis (BM) and 13 primary tumors (PT) from a total of 25 patients. HFR status was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Median follow-up was 4.2 years (range 0.6-18.5). HFR was positive in 4/19 BM (21.1%) and in 1/13 PT (7.7%). Positive samples had low H-scores (range 1-50). 56% of patients had apocrine differentiation. OS was similar between patients with positive HFR (median OS 48 months) and negative HFR (median OS 69 months) (P = 0.25); and between patients with apocrine differentiation (median OS 63 months) and those without apocrine differentiation (median OS 69 months) (P = 0.49). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first analysis of HFR expression in BCBM. While previous studies associated the presence of HFR with worse prognosis; in our cohort HFR was positive in only 21.1% of BM with low levels of positivity. Neither HFR nor apocrine features had impact in OS.

  18. Analysis of cutaneous sensory neurons in transgenic mice lacking the low affinity neurotrophin receptor p75.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, I; Priestley, J V; McMahon, S B; Bröcker, E B; Toyka, K V; Koltzenburg, M

    1997-01-01

    Mice with a targeted mutation of the p75 low affinity neurotrophin receptor display smaller peripheral nerves and dorsal root ganglia. Here we show that transgenic mice have a significant elevation of thresholds to noxious mechanical and heat stimuli compared with p75+/+ control mice. Immunocytochemical analysis using antibodies against PGP 9.5 (a panaxonal marker) and calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP, which labels peptidergic neurons) showed a reduction to 73% and 54%, respectively, of the epidermal innervation density. However, analysis of the cell size distribution of toluidine blue-stained dorsal root ganglia showed no selective loss of neurons of particular diameters. Moreover, the neurochemical profile of dorsal root ganglia cells as defined by trkA, CGRP, IB4 and RT97 immunostaining revealed no significant differences in comparison with p75+/+ animals. Staining of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord for CGRP and IB4 was also normal in p75-/- animals. Taking into account a previously reported loss of approximately 50% dorsal root ganglion neurons, we conclude that all types of sensory neurons are equally depleted in p75-/- mice and that the absence of p75 impedes the development of more than one neuronal subtype.

  19. Comparison of three high affinity SPECT radiotracers for the dopamine D2 receptor.

    PubMed

    al-Tikriti, M S; Baldwin, R M; Zea-Ponce, Y; Sybirska, E; Zoghbi, S S; Laruelle, M; Malison, R T; Kung, H F; Kessler, R M; Charney, D S

    1994-02-01

    The regional brain distribution and pharmacological specificity of three high affinity tracers for the dopamine (DA) D2 receptor: [123I]IBF, [123I]epidepride, and [123I]2'-ISP were assessed by SPECT imaging of non-human primates. The ratios of striatal-to-occipital activities at the time of peak striatal uptake were 2.2, 6.3 and 1.7, respectively. From the peak striatal activities, washout rates were 33, 4 and 16%/h for [123I]IBF, [123I]epidepride and [123I]2'-ISP, respectively. The reversibility of the striatal uptake of all three agents was demonstrated by the rapid displacement induced by the dopamine D2 selective antipsychotic agent raclopride, which increased washout rates to 96, 58 and 43%/h. The administration of d-amphetamine, which induces release of dopamine, had no noticeable effect on [123I]epidepride but increased the washout rate of [123I]IBF. These results suggest that, among these three agents, [123I]epidepride is the superior tracer for in vivo displacement studies because of its slow washout and high target-to-background ratios. However, for tracer kinetic modeling, [123I]IBF may be the superior agent because of its early time of peak uptake and its higher target-to-background ratios than [123I]2'-ISP.

  20. Treatment of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis with antisense oligonucleotides against the low affinity neurotrophin receptor.

    PubMed

    Soilu-Hänninen, M; Epa, R; Shipham, K; Butzkueven, H; Bucci, T; Barrett, G; Bartlett, P F; Kilpatrick, T J

    2000-03-15

    Upregulated expression of the low-affinity neurotrophin receptor (p75) in the central nervous system (CNS) during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) has recently been demonstrated. To investigate whether p75 plays a role in disease pathogenesis, we adopted a gene therapy approach, utilizing antisense oligonucleotides to downregulate p75 expression during EAE. Phosphorothioate antisense oligonucleotides (AS), nonsense oligonucleotides (NS) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were injected daily for 18 days after immunization of SJL/J (H-2s)-mice with myelin proteolipid protein (PLP) peptide 139-151. In the AS group, there was a statistically significant reduction in both the mean maximal disease score (1.85 in the AS, 2.94 in the NS and 2.75 in the PBS-groups, respectively, P < 0.025) and in the cumulative disease incidence ( approximately 60% in the AS group and approximately 90% in the control groups). Histological and immunohistochemical analysis showed reduced inflammation and demyelination, as well as reduced p75 expression at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the AS-treated mice in comparison with both control groups. There was no difference, however, in p75 expression on neural cells within the CNS between the three groups of mice. We conclude that p75 could play a proactive role in the pathogenesis of EAE and may exert its effect at the level of the BBB.

  1. New Regulatory Roles of Galectin-3 in High-Affinity IgE Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bambouskova, Monika; Polakovicova, Iva; Halova, Ivana; Goel, Gautam; Draberova, Lubica; Bugajev, Viktor; Doan, Aivi; Utekal, Pavol; Gardet, Agnes; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2016-01-01

    Aggregation of the high-affinity receptor for IgE (FcεRI) in mast cells initiates activation events that lead to degranulation and release of inflammatory mediators. To better understand the signaling pathways and genes involved in mast cell activation, we developed a high-throughput mast cell degranulation assay suitable for RNA interference experiments using lentivirus-based short hairpin RNA (shRNA) delivery. We tested 432 shRNAs specific for 144 selected genes for effects on FcεRI-mediated mast cell degranulation and identified 15 potential regulators. In further studies, we focused on galectin-3 (Gal3), identified in this study as a negative regulator of mast cell degranulation. FcεRI-activated cells with Gal3 knockdown exhibited upregulated tyrosine phosphorylation of spleen tyrosine kinase and several other signal transduction molecules and enhanced calcium response. We show that Gal3 promotes internalization of IgE-FcεRI complexes; this may be related to our finding that Gal3 is a positive regulator of FcεRI ubiquitination. Furthermore, we found that Gal3 facilitates mast cell adhesion and motility on fibronectin but negatively regulates antigen-induced chemotaxis. The combined data indicate that Gal3 is involved in both positive and negative regulation of FcεRI-mediated signaling events in mast cells. PMID:26929198

  2. Alterations of cortical pyramidal neurons in mice lacking high-affinity nicotinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ballesteros-Yáñez, Inmaculada; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Bourgeois, Jean-Pierre; Changeux, Jean-Pierre; DeFelipe, Javier

    2010-01-01

    The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are allosteric membrane proteins involved in multiple cognitive processes, including attention, learning, and memory. The most abundant form of heterooligomeric nAChRs in the brain contains the β2- and α4- subunits and binds nicotinic agonists with high affinity. In the present study, we investigated in the mouse the consequences of the deletion of one of the nAChR components: the β2-subunit (β2−/−) on the microanatomy of cortical pyramidal cells. Using an intracellular injection method, complete basal dendritic arbors of 650 layer III pyramidal neurons were sampled from seven cortical fields, including primary sensory, motor, and associational areas, in both β2−/− and WT animals. We observed that the pyramidal cell phenotype shows significant quantitative differences among different cortical areas in mutant and WT mice. In WT mice, the density of dendritic spines was rather similar in all cortical fields, except in the prelimbic/infralimbic cortex, where it was significantly higher. In the absence of the β2-subunit, the most significant reduction in the density of spines took place in this high-order associational field. Our data suggest that the β2-subunit is involved in the dendritic morphogenesis of pyramidal neurons and, in particular, in the circuits that contribute to the high-order functional connectivity of the cerebral cortex. PMID:20534523

  3. A high-affinity near-infrared fluorescent probe to target bombesin receptors.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Ajay; Ding, Haiming; Kothandaraman, Shankaran; Wang, Shu-Huei; Gong, Li; Williams, Michelle; Milum, Keisha; Zhang, Song; Tweedle, Michael F

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to create new optical surgical navigation NIRF probes for prostate and breast cancers. IR800-linker-QWAVGHLM-NH2 with linker = GSG, GGG, and G-Abz4 were synthesized and characterized. IC50 for bombesin receptors (BBN-R) in PC-3 prostate and T47D breast cancer cells, fluorescence microscopy in PC-3 cells, and NIRF imaging in mice PC-3 tumor xenografts were studied. GGG, GSG, and G-Abz4 derivatives had IC50 (nM) for BBN-R+ PC-3 cells = 187 ± 31, 56 ± 5, and 2.6 ± 0.2 and T47D cells = 383 ± 1, 57.4 ± 1.2, and 3.1 ± 1.1, respectively. By microscopy the Abz4 derivative showed the highest uptake, was competed with by BBN, and had little to no binding to BBN-R- cells. In NIRF imaging the G-Abz4 probe was brighter than GGG probe in BBN-R+ tissues in vivo and tissues, tumors, and tumor slices ex vivo. Uptake could be partially blocked in BBN-R+ pancreas but not visibly in tumor. Linker choice can dominate peptidic BBN-R binding. The G-Abz4 linker yields a higher affinity and specific BBN-R binder in this series of molecules.

  4. High-affinity cannabinoid binding site in brain: A possible marijuana receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Nye, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which delta{sup 9} tetrahydrocannabinol (delta{sup 9}THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana or hashish, produces its potent psychological and physiological effects is unknown. To find receptor binding sites for THC, we designed a water-soluble analog for use as a radioligand. 5{prime}-Trimethylammonium-delta{sup 8}THC (TMA) is a positively charged analog of delta-{sup 8}THC modified on the 5{prime} carbon, a portion of the molecule not important for its psychoactivity. We have studied the binding of ({sup 3}H)-5{prime}-trimethylammonium-delta-{sup 8}THC (({sup 3}H)TMA) to rat neuronal membranes. ({sup 3}H)TMA binds saturably and reversibly to brain membranes with high affinity to apparently one class of sites. Highest binding site density occurs in brain, but several peripheral organs also display specific binding. Detergent solubilizes the sites without affecting their pharmacologial properties. Molecular sieve chromatography reveals a bimodal peak of ({sup 3}H)TMA binding activity of approximately 60,000 daltons apparent molecular weight.

  5. Inter-residue coupling contributes to high-affinity subtype-selective binding of α-bungarotoxin to nicotinic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Sine, Steven M.; Huang, Sun; Li, Shu-Xing; daCosta, Corrie J. B.; Chen, Lin

    2013-09-01

    The crystal structure of a pentameric α7 ligand-binding domain chimaera with bound α-btx (α-bungarotoxin) showed that of the five conserved aromatic residues in α7, only Tyr184 in loop C of the ligand-binding site was required for high-affinity binding. To determine whether the contribution of Tyr184 depends on local residues, we generated mutations in an α7/5HT3A (5-hydroxytryptamine type 3A) receptor chimaera, individually and in pairs, and measured 125I-labelled α-btx binding. The results show that mutations of individual residues near Tyr184 do not affect α-btx affinity, but pairwise mutations decrease affinity in an energetically coupled manner. Kinetic measurements show that the affinity decreases arise through increases in the α-btx dissociation rate with little change in the association rate. Replacing loop C in α7 with loop C from the α-btx-insensitive α2 or α3 subunits abolishes high-affinity α-btx binding, but preserves acetylcholine-elicited single channel currents. However, in both the α2 and α3 construct, mutating either residue that flanks Tyr184 to its α7 counterpart restores high-affinity α-btx binding. Analogously, in α7, mutating both residues that flank Tyr184 to the α2 or α3 counterparts abolishes high-affinity α-btx binding. Thus interaction between Tyr184 and local residues contributes to high-affinity subtype-selective α-btx binding.

  6. Inter-residue coupling contributes to high-affinity subtype-selective binding of α-bungarotoxin to nicotinic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Sine, Steven M.; Huang, Sun; Li, Shu-Xing; daCOSTA, Corrie J. B.; Chen, Lin

    2014-01-01

    The crystal structure of a pentameric α7 ligand-binding domain chimaera with bound α-btx (α-bungarotoxin) showed that of the five conserved aromatic residues in α7, only Tyr184 in loop C of the ligand-binding site was required for high-affinity binding. To determine whether the contribution of Tyr184 depends on local residues, we generated mutations in an α7/5HT3A (5-hydroxytryptamine type 3A) receptor chimaera, individually and in pairs, and measured 125I-labelled α-btx binding. The results show that mutations of individual residues near Tyr184 do not affect α-btx affinity, but pairwise mutations decrease affinity in an energetically coupled manner. Kinetic measurements show that the affinity decreases arise through increases in the α-btx dissociation rate with little change in the association rate. Replacing loop C in α7 with loop C from the α-btx-insensitive α2 or α3 subunits abolishes high-affinity α-btx binding, but preserves acetylcholine-elicited single channel currents. However, in both the α2 and α3 construct, mutating either residue that flanks Tyr184 to its α7 counterpart restores high-affinity α-btx binding. Analogously, in α7, mutating both residues that flank Tyr184 to the α2 or α3 counterparts abolishes high-affinity α-btx binding. Thus interaction between Tyr184 and local residues contributes to high-affinity subtype-selective α-btx binding. PMID:23802200

  7. Purine (N)-Methanocarba Nucleoside Derivatives Lacking an Exocyclic Amine as Selective A3 Adenosine Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purine (N)-methanocarba-5′-N-alkyluronamidoriboside A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) agonists lacking an exocyclic amine resulted from an unexpected reaction during a Sonogashira coupling and subsequent aminolysis. Because the initial C6-Me and C6-styryl derivatives had unexpectedly high A3AR affinity, other rigid nucleoside analogues lacking an exocyclic amine were prepared. Of these, the C6-Me-(2-phenylethynyl) and C2-(5-chlorothienylethynyl) analogues were particularly potent, with human A3AR Ki values of 6 and 42 nM, respectively. Additionally, the C2-(5-chlorothienyl)-6-H analogue was potent and selective at A3AR (MRS7220, Ki 60 nM) and also completely reversed mouse sciatic nerve mechanoallodynia (in vivo, 3 μmol/kg, po). The lack of a C6 H-bond donor while maintaining A3AR affinity and efficacy could be rationalized by homology modeling and docking of these hypermodified nucleosides. The modeling suggests that a suitable combination of stabilizing features can partially compensate for the lack of an exocyclic amine, an otherwise important contributor to recognition in the A3AR binding site. PMID:26890707

  8. 1,3-dialkyl-8-N-substituted benzyloxycarbonylamino-9-deazaxanthines as potent adenosine receptor ligands: Design, synthesis, structure-affinity and structure-selectivity relationships.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Franco; Caamaño, Olga; Isabel Nieto, M; López, Carmen; García-Mera, Xerardo; Stefanachi, Angela; Nicolotti, Orazio; Isabel Loza, M; Brea, Jose; Esteve, Cristina; Segarra, Victor; Vidal, Bernat; Carotti, Angelo

    2009-05-15

    A number of 1,3-dialkyl-9-deazaxanthines (9-dAXs), bearing a variety of N-substituted benzyloxycarbonylamino substituents at position 8, were prepared and evaluated for their binding affinity to the recombinant human adenosine receptors (hARs), chiefly to the hA(2B) and hA(2A) AR subtypes. Several ligands endowed with excellent binding affinity to the hA(2B) receptors, but low selectivity versus hA(2A) and hA(1) were identified. Among these, 1,3-dimethyl-N-3'-thienyl carbamate 15 resulted as the most potent ligand at hA(2B) (K(i)=0.8 nM), with a low selectivity versus hA(2A) (hA(2A)/hA(2B)=12.6) and hA(1) (hA(1)/hA(2B)=12.5) and a higher selectivity versus hA(3) (hA(3)/hA(2B)=454). When tested in functional assays in vitro, compound 15 exhibited high antagonist activities and efficacies versus both the A(2A) and A(2B) receptor subtypes, with pA(2) values close to the corresponding pK(i)s. A comparative analysis of structure-affinity and structure-selectivity relationships of the similar analogues 8-N-substituted benzyloxycarbonylamino- and 8-N-substituted phenoxyacetamido-9-dAXs suggested that their binding modes at the hA(2B) and hA(2A) ARs may strongly differ. Computational studies help to clarify this striking difference arising from a simple, albeit crucial, structural change, from CH(2)OCON to OCH(2)CON, in the para-position of the 8-phenyl ring.

  9. Structure-activity relationships for hallucinogenic N,N-dialkyltryptamines: photoelectron spectra and serotonin receptor affinities of methylthio and methylenedioxy derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, T.B.; Benington, F.; Morin, R.D.; Beaton, J.M.; Glennon, R.A.; Domelsmith, L.N.; Houk, K.N.; Rozeboom, M.D.

    1982-11-01

    Serotonin receptor affinity and photelectron spectral data were obtained on a number of substituted N,N-dimethyltryptamines. Evidence is presented that electron-donating substituents in the 5-position lead to enhanced behavioral disruption activity and serotonin receptor affinity as compared to unsubstituted N,N-dimethyltryptamine and analogues substituted in the 4- or 6-position. Some correlation was found between ionization potentials and behavioral activity, which may have implications concerning the mechanism of receptor binding.

  10. Affinity labeling of the galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine-specific receptor of rat hepatocytes: preferential labeling of one of the subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.T.; Lee, Y.C.

    1987-10-06

    The galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine-specific receptor (also known as asialoglycoprotein receptor) of rat hepatocytes consists of three subunits, one of which (43 kilodalton (kDa)) exists in a greater abundance (up to 70% of total protein) over the two minor species (52 and 60 kDa). When the receptor on the hepatocyte membranes was photoaffinity labeled with an /sup 125/I-labeled high-affinity reagent the labeling occurred mainly (51-80%) on one of the minor bands (52 kDa). Similarly, affinity-bound, N-acetylgalactosamine-modified lactoperoxidase radioiodinated the same 52-kDa band preferentially. In contrast, both the photoaffinity labeling and lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination of the purified, detergent-solubilized receptor resulted in a distribution of the label that is comparable to the Coomassie blue staining pattern of the three bands; i.e., the 43-kDa band was the major band labeled. These and other experimental results suggest that the preferential labeling of the minor band and inefficient labeling of the major band on the hepatocyte membrane resulted from a specific topological arrangement of these subunits on the membranes. The authors postulate that in the native, membrane-bound state of the receptor, the 52-kDa minor band is topologically prominent, while the major (43 kDa) band is partially masked. This partial masking may result from a tight packing of the receptor subunits on the membranes to form a lattice work.

  11. The kangaroo cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor binds insulin-like growth factor II with low affinity.

    PubMed

    Yandell, C A; Dunbar, A J; Wheldrake, J F; Upton, Z

    1999-09-17

    The mammalian cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CI-MPR) binds mannose 6-phosphate-bearing glycoproteins and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II. However, the CI-MPR from the opossum has been reported to bind bovine IGF-II with low affinity (Dahms, N. M., Brzycki-Wessell, M. A., Ramanujam, K. S., and Seetharam, B. (1993) Endocrinology 133, 440-446). This may reflect the use of a heterologous ligand, or it may represent the intrinsic binding affinity of this receptor. To examine the binding of IGF-II to a marsupial CI-MPR in a homologous system, we have previously purified kangaroo IGF-II (Yandell, C. A., Francis, G. L., Wheldrake, J. F., and Upton, Z. (1998) J. Endocrinol. 156, 195-204), and we now report the purification and characterization of the CI-MPR from kangaroo liver. The interaction of the kangaroo CI-MPR with IGF-II has been examined by ligand blotting, radioreceptor assay, and real-time biomolecular interaction analysis. Using both a heterologous and homologous approach, we have demonstrated that the kangaroo CI-MPR has a lower binding affinity for IGF-II than its eutherian (placental mammal) counterparts. Furthermore, real-time biomolecular interaction analysis revealed that the kangaroo CI-MPR has a higher affinity for kangaroo IGF-II than for human IGF-II. The cDNA sequence of the kangaroo CI-MPR indicates that there is considerable divergence in the area corresponding to the IGF-II binding site of the eutherian receptor. Thus, the acquisition of a high-affinity binding site for regulating IGF-II appears to be a recent event specific to the eutherian lineage.

  12. Receptor regulation of the glutamate, GABA and taurine high-affinity uptake into astrocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Hansson, E; Rönnbäck, L

    1991-05-10

    From experiments using dissociated primary astroglial cultures from newborn rat cerebral cortex, the stimulation of monoamine receptors (alpha, beta and 5HT) was shown to affect the high-affinity uptake kinetics of glutamate, GABA and taurine. In the presence of the alpha 1 agonist phenylephrine, there was an increased uptake (Vmax) of glutamate, while beta adrenoceptor activation slightly inhibited the glutamate uptake and stimulated the GABA and taurine uptakes. 5HT2 receptor stimulation caused a slight inhibition of the taurine uptake. The uptake rate of GABA was not affected by 5HT, alpha 1 or alpha 2 receptor agonists and the glutamate uptake was not affected by 5HT or alpha 2 receptor agonists. Nor was the taurine uptake affected by alpha 1 or alpha 2 receptor agonists. The active uptake of aspartate was unaffected by the presence of any of the monoamine receptor agonists used in this study. When the mechanisms behind these effects were studied, the GABA uptake seemed to be mediated via the G protein-adenylate cyclase complex in the receptor domain. Moreover, the K+ channels seemed to be involved. The taurine uptake, however, did not seem to be regulated by the same mechanism. It seems more probable that there is a direct interaction between the receptor and carrier of taurine at the membrane level. The mechanism underlying the receptor-regulated glutamate uptake is at present unclear, although it does not seem to involve protein kinase C.

  13. Biological profile of L-745,870, a selective antagonist with high affinity for the dopamine D4 receptor.

    PubMed

    Patel, S; Freedman, S; Chapman, K L; Emms, F; Fletcher, A E; Knowles, M; Marwood, R; Mcallister, G; Myers, J; Curtis, N; Kulagowski, J J; Leeson, P D; Ridgill, M; Graham, M; Matheson, S; Rathbone, D; Watt, A P; Bristow, L J; Rupniak, N M; Baskin, E; Lynch, J J; Ragan, C I

    1997-11-01

    L-745,870,(3-([4-(4-chlorophenyl)piperazin-1-yl]methyl)-1H- pyrollo[2,3-b] pyridine, was identified as a selective dopamine D4 receptor antagonist with excellent oral bioavailability and brain penetration. L-745,870 displaced specific binding of 0.2 nM [3H] spiperone to cloned human dopamine D4 receptors with a binding affinity (Ki) of 0. 43 nM which was 5- and 20-fold higher than that of the standard antipsychotics haloperidol and clozapine, respectively. L-745,870 exhibited high selectivity for the dopamine D4 receptor (>2000 fold) compared to other dopamine receptor subtypes and had moderate affinity for 5HT2, sigma and alpha adrenergic receptors(IC50 < 300 nM). In vitro, L-745,870 (0.1-1 microM) exhibited D4 receptor antagonist activity, reversing dopamine (1 microM) mediated 1) inhibition of adenylate cyclase in hD4HEK and hD4CHO cells; 2) stimulation of [35S] GTPgammaS binding and 3) stimulation of extracellular acidification rate, but did not exhibit any significant intrinsic activity in these assays. Although standard antipsychotics increase dopamine metabolism or plasma prolactin levels in rodents, L-745,870 (receptor activation prompted the use of in vivo surrogate marker assays which confirmed that doses of 5-60 microg/kg L-745,870 would be sufficient to occupy 50% D4 receptors in the brain. These results show that dopamine D4 receptor antagonism in the brain does not result in the same neurochemical consequences (increased dopamine metabolism or hyperprolactinemia) observed with typical neuroleptics.

  14. Laccase-mediated transformations of endocrine disrupting chemicals abolish binding affinities to estrogen receptors and their estrogenic activity in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Torres-Duarte, Cristina; Viana, María Teresa; Vazquez-Duhalt, Rafael

    2012-10-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are known to mainly affect aquatic organisms, producing negative effects in aquaculture. Transformation of the estrogenic compounds 17β-estradiol (E2), bisphenol-A (BPA), nonylphenol (NP), and triclosan (TCS) by laccase of Coriolopsis gallica was studied. Laccase is able to efficiently transform them into polymers. The estrogenic activity of the EDCs and their laccase transformation products was evaluated in vitro as their affinity for the human estrogen receptor alpha (hERα) and for the ligand binding domain of zebrafish (Danio rerio) estrogen receptor alpha (zfERαLBD). E2, BPA, NP, and TCS showed higher affinity for the zfERαLBD than for hERα. After laccase treatment, no affinity was found, except a marginal affinity of E2 products for the zfERαLBD. Endocrine disruption studies in vivo on zebrafish were performed using the induction of vitellogenin 1 as a biomarker (VTG1 mRNA levels). The use of enzymatic bioreactors, containing immobilized laccase, efficiently eliminates the endocrine activity of BPA and TCS, and significantly reduces the effects of E2. The potential use of enzymatic reactors to eliminate the endocrine activity of EDCs in supply water for aquaculture is discussed.

  15. Synthesis, characterization and binding affinities of rhenium(I) thiosemicarbazone complexes for the estrogen receptor (α/β).

    PubMed

    Núñez-Montenegro, Ara; Carballo, Rosa; Vázquez-López, Ezequiel M

    2014-11-01

    The binding affinities towards estrogen receptors (ERs) α and β of a set of thiosemicarbazone ligands (HL(n)) and their rhenium(I) carbonyl complexes [ReX(HL(n))(CO)3] (X=Cl, Br) were determined by a competitive standard radiometric assay with [(3)H]-estradiol. The ability of the coordinated thiosemicarbazone ligands to undergo deprotonation and the lability of the ReX bond were used as a synthetic strategy to obtain [Re(hpy)(L(n))(CO)3] (hpy=3- or 4-hydroxypyridine). The inclusion of the additional hpy ligand endows the new thiosemicarbazonate complexes with an improved affinity towards the estrogen receptors and, consequently, the values of the inhibition constant (Ki) could be determined for some of them. In general, the values of Ki for both ER subtypes suggest an appreciable selectivity towards ERα. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Discovery of novel A3 adenosine receptor ligands based on chromone scaffold.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Alexandra; Reis, Joana; Kachler, Sonja; Paoletta, Silvia; Uriarte, Eugenio; Klotz, Karl-Norbert; Moro, Stefano; Borges, Fernanda

    2012-07-01

    A project focused on the discovery of new chemical entities (NCEs) as AR ligands that incorporate a benzo-γ-pyrone [(4H)-1-benzopyran-4-one] substructure has been developed. Accordingly, two series of novel chromone carboxamides placed at positions C2 (compounds 2-13) and C3 (compounds 15-26) of the γ-pyrone ring were synthesized using chromone carboxylic acids (compounds 1 or 14) as starting materials. From this study and on the basis of the obtained structure-activity relationships it was concluded that the chromone carboxamide scaffold represent a novel class of AR ligands. The most remarkable chromones were compounds 21 and 26 that present a better affinity for A3AR (Ki = 3680 nM and Ki = 3750 nM, respectively). Receptor-driven molecular modeling studies provide information on the binding/selectivity data of the chromone. The data so far acquired are instrumental for future optimization of chromone carboxamide as a selective A3AR antagonist. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Affinity of D2-Like Dopamine Receptor Antagonists Determines the Time to Maximal Effect on Cocaine Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    Tabet, Michael R.; Norman, Mantana K.; Fey, Brittney K.; Tsibulsky, Vladimir L.; Millard, Ronald W.

    2011-01-01

    Differences in the time to maximal effect (Tmax) of a series of dopamine receptor antagonists on the self-administration of cocaine are not consistent with their lipophilicity (octanol-water partition coefficients at pH 7.4) and expected rapid entry into the brain after intravenous injection. It was hypothesized that the Tmax reflects the time required for maximal occupancy of receptors, which would occur as equilibrium was approached. If so, the Tmax should be related to the affinity for the relevant receptor population. This hypothesis was tested using a series of nine antagonists having a 2500-fold range of Ki or Kd values for D2-like dopamine receptors. Rats self-administered cocaine at regular intervals and then were injected intravenously with a dose of antagonist, and the self-administration of cocaine was continued for 6 to 10 h. The level of cocaine at the time of every self-administration (satiety threshold) was calculated throughout the session. The satiety threshold was stable before the injection of antagonist and then increased approximately 3-fold over the baseline value at doses of antagonists selected to produce this approximately equivalent maximal magnitude of effect (maximum increase in the equiactive cocaine concentration, satiety threshold; Cmax). Despite the similar Cmax, the mean Tmax varied between 5 and 157 min across this series of antagonists. Furthermore, there was a strong and significant correlation between the in vivo Tmax values for each antagonist and the affinity for D2-like dopamine receptors measured in vitro. It is concluded that the cocaine self-administration paradigm offers a reliable and predictive bioassay for measuring the affinity of a competitive antagonist for D2-like dopamine receptors. PMID:21606176

  18. α4βδ GABA(A) receptors are high-affinity targets for γ-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB).

    PubMed

    Absalom, Nathan; Eghorn, Laura F; Villumsen, Inge S; Karim, Nasiara; Bay, Tina; Olsen, Jesper V; Knudsen, Gitte M; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Frølund, Bente; Clausen, Rasmus P; Chebib, Mary; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2012-08-14

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) binding to brain-specific high-affinity sites is well-established and proposed to explain both physiological and pharmacological actions. However, the mechanistic links between these lines of data are unknown. To identify molecular targets for specific GHB high-affinity binding, we undertook photolinking studies combined with proteomic analyses and identified several GABA(A) receptor subunits as possible candidates. A subsequent functional screening of various recombinant GABA(A) receptors in Xenopus laevis oocytes using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique showed GHB to be a partial agonist at αβδ- but not αβγ-receptors, proving that the δ-subunit is essential for potency and efficacy. GHB showed preference for α4 over α(1,2,6)-subunits and preferably activated α4β1δ (EC(50) = 140 nM) over α4β(2/3)δ (EC(50) = 8.41/1.03 mM). Introduction of a mutation, α4F71L, in α4β1(δ)-receptors completely abolished GHB but not GABA function, indicating nonidentical binding sites. Radioligand binding studies using the specific GHB radioligand [(3)H](E,RS)-(6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5-hydroxy-5H-benzocyclohept-6-ylidene)acetic acid showed a 39% reduction (P = 0.0056) in the number of binding sites in α4 KO brain tissue compared with WT controls, corroborating the direct involvement of the α4-subunit in high-affinity GHB binding. Our data link specific GHB forebrain binding sites with α4-containing GABA(A) receptors and postulate a role for extrasynaptic α4δ-containing GABA(A) receptors in GHB pharmacology and physiology. This finding will aid in elucidating the molecular mechanisms behind the proposed function of GHB as a neurotransmitter and its unique therapeutic effects in narcolepsy and alcoholism.

  19. Response Element Composition Governs Correlations between Binding Site Affinity and Transcription in Glucocorticoid Receptor Feed-forward Loops.

    PubMed

    Sasse, Sarah K; Zuo, Zheng; Kadiyala, Vineela; Zhang, Liyang; Pufall, Miles A; Jain, Mukesh K; Phang, Tzu L; Stormo, Gary D; Gerber, Anthony N

    2015-08-07

    Combinatorial gene regulation through feed-forward loops (FFLs) can bestow specificity and temporal control to client gene expression; however, characteristics of binding sites that mediate these effects are not established. We previously showed that the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and KLF15 form coherent FFLs that cooperatively induce targets such as the amino acid-metabolizing enzymes AASS and PRODH and incoherent FFLs exemplified by repression of MT2A by KLF15. Here, we demonstrate that GR and KLF15 physically interact and identify low affinity GR binding sites within glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) for PRODH and AASS that contribute to combinatorial regulation with KLF15. We used deep sequencing and electrophoretic mobility shift assays to derive in vitro GR binding affinities across sequence space. We applied these data to show that AASS GRE activity correlated (r(2) = 0.73) with predicted GR binding affinities across a 50-fold affinity range in transfection assays; however, the slope of the linear relationship more than doubled when KLF15 was expressed. Whereas activity of the MT2A GRE was even more strongly (r(2) = 0.89) correlated with GR binding site affinity, the slope of the linear relationship was sharply reduced by KLF15, consistent with incoherent FFL logic. Thus, GRE architecture and co-regulator expression together determine the functional parameters that relate GR binding site affinity to hormone-induced transcriptional responses. Utilization of specific affinity response functions and GR binding sites by FFLs may contribute to the diversity of gene expression patterns within GR-regulated transcriptomes.

  20. Response Element Composition Governs Correlations between Binding Site Affinity and Transcription in Glucocorticoid Receptor Feed-forward Loops*

    PubMed Central

    Sasse, Sarah K.; Zuo, Zheng; Kadiyala, Vineela; Zhang, Liyang; Pufall, Miles A.; Jain, Mukesh K.; Phang, Tzu L.; Stormo, Gary D.; Gerber, Anthony N.

    2015-01-01

    Combinatorial gene regulation through feed-forward loops (FFLs) can bestow specificity and temporal control to client gene expression; however, characteristics of binding sites that mediate these effects are not established. We previously showed that the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and KLF15 form coherent FFLs that cooperatively induce targets such as the amino acid-metabolizing enzymes AASS and PRODH and incoherent FFLs exemplified by repression of MT2A by KLF15. Here, we demonstrate that GR and KLF15 physically interact and identify low affinity GR binding sites within glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) for PRODH and AASS that contribute to combinatorial regulation with KLF15. We used deep sequencing and electrophoretic mobility shift assays to derive in vitro GR binding affinities across sequence space. We applied these data to show that AASS GRE activity correlated (r2 = 0.73) with predicted GR binding affinities across a 50-fold affinity range in transfection assays; however, the slope of the linear relationship more than doubled when KLF15 was expressed. Whereas activity of the MT2A GRE was even more strongly (r2 = 0.89) correlated with GR binding site affinity, the slope of the linear relationship was sharply reduced by KLF15, consistent with incoherent FFL logic. Thus, GRE architecture and co-regulator expression together determine the functional parameters that relate GR binding site affinity to hormone-induced transcriptional responses. Utilization of specific affinity response functions and GR binding sites by FFLs may contribute to the diversity of gene expression patterns within GR-regulated transcriptomes. PMID:26088140

  1. Early Signs of Pathological Cognitive Aging in Mice Lacking High-Affinity Nicotinic Receptors.

    PubMed

    Konsolaki, Eleni; Tsakanikas, Panagiotis; Polissidis, Alexia V; Stamatakis, Antonios; Skaliora, Irini

    2016-01-01

    In order to address pathological cognitive decline effectively, it is critical to adopt early preventive measures in individuals considered at risk. It is therefore essential to develop approaches that identify such individuals before the onset of irreversible dementia. A deficient cholinergic system has been consistently implicated as one of the main factors associated with a heightened vulnerability to the aging process. In the present study we used mice lacking high affinity nicotinic receptors (β2-/-), which have been proposed as an animal model of accelerated/premature cognitive aging. Our aim was to identify behavioral signs that could serve as indicators or predictors of impending cognitive decline. We used test batteries in order to assess cognitive functions and additional tasks to investigate spontaneous behaviors, such as species-specific activities and exploration/locomotion in a novel environment. Our data confirm the hypothesis that β2-/- animals exhibit age-related cognitive impairments in spatial learning. In addition, they document age-related deficits in other areas, such as recognition memory, burrowing and nesting building, thereby extending the validity of this animal model for the study of pathological aging. Finally, our data reveal deficits in spontaneous behavior and habituation processes that precede the onset of cognitive decline and could therefore be useful as a non-invasive behavioral screen for identifying animals at risk. To our knowledge, this is the first study to perform an extensive behavioral assessment of an animal model of premature cognitive aging, and our results suggest that β2-nAChR dependent cognitive deterioration progressively evolves from initial subtle behavioral changes to global dementia due to the combined effect of the neuropathology and aging.

  2. Early Signs of Pathological Cognitive Aging in Mice Lacking High-Affinity Nicotinic Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Konsolaki, Eleni; Tsakanikas, Panagiotis; Polissidis, Alexia V.; Stamatakis, Antonios; Skaliora, Irini

    2016-01-01

    In order to address pathological cognitive decline effectively, it is critical to adopt early preventive measures in individuals considered at risk. It is therefore essential to develop approaches that identify such individuals before the onset of irreversible dementia. A deficient cholinergic system has been consistently implicated as one of the main factors associated with a heightened vulnerability to the aging process. In the present study we used mice lacking high affinity nicotinic receptors (β2-/-), which have been proposed as an animal model of accelerated/premature cognitive aging. Our aim was to identify behavioral signs that could serve as indicators or predictors of impending cognitive decline. We used test batteries in order to assess cognitive functions and additional tasks to investigate spontaneous behaviors, such as species-specific activities and exploration/locomotion in a novel environment. Our data confirm the hypothesis that β2-/- animals exhibit age-related cognitive impairments in spatial learning. In addition, they document age-related deficits in other areas, such as recognition memory, burrowing and nesting building, thereby extending the validity of this animal model for the study of pathological aging. Finally, our data reveal deficits in spontaneous behavior and habituation processes that precede the onset of cognitive decline and could therefore be useful as a non-invasive behavioral screen for identifying animals at risk. To our knowledge, this is the first study to perform an extensive behavioral assessment of an animal model of premature cognitive aging, and our results suggest that β2-nAChR dependent cognitive deterioration progressively evolves from initial subtle behavioral changes to global dementia due to the combined effect of the neuropathology and aging. PMID:27199738

  3. A new therapeutic approach to erectile dysfunction: urotensin-II receptor high affinity agonist ligands.

    PubMed

    di Villa Bianca, Roberta d'Emmanuele; Mitidieri, Emma; Donnarumma, Erminia; Fusco, Ferdinando; Longo, Nicola; Rosa, Giuseppe De; Novellino, Ettore; Grieco, Paolo; Mirone, Vincenzo; Cirino, Giuseppe; Sorrentino, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Urotensin-II (U-II) is a cyclic peptide that acts through a G protein-coupled receptor (urotensin-II receptor [UTR]) mainly involved in cardiovascular function in humans. The urotensinergic system is also implicated in the urogenital tract. Indeed, U-II relaxes human corpus cavernosum strips and causes an increase in intracavernous pressure (ICP) in rats. In light of this, the U-II/UTR pathway can be considered a new target for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. On this hypothesis, herein we report on two new UTR high affinity-agonists, P5U (H-Asp-c[Pen-Phe-Trp-Lys-Tyr-Cys]-Val-OH) and UPG84(H-Asp-c[Pen-Phe-DTrp-Orn-(pNH 2 ) Phe-Cys]-Val-OH). The effects of P5U and UPG84 were each compared separately with U-II by monitoring the ICP in anesthetized rats. Intracavernous injection of U-II (0.03-1 nmol), P5U (0.03-1 nmol) or UPG84 (0.03-1 nmol) caused an increase in ICP. P5U, in particular, elicited a significant increase in ICP as compared to U-II. The observed effect by using P5U at a dose of 0.1 nmol per rat was comparable to the effect elicited by U-II at a dose of 0.3 nmol. Moreover, UPG84 at the lowest dose (0.03 nmol) showed an effect similar to the highest dose of U-II (1 nmol). Furthermore, UPG84 was found to be more effective than P5U. Indeed, while the lowest dose of P5U (0.03 nmol) did not affect the ICP, UPG84, at the same dose, induced a prominent penile erection in rat. These compounds did not modify the blood pressure, which indicates a good safety profile. In conclusion, UPG84 and P5U may open new perspectives for the management of erectile dysfunction.

  4. Modulation of Immunoglobulin (Ig)E-mediated Systemic Anaphylaxis by Low-Affinity Fc Receptors for IgG

    PubMed Central

    Ujike, Azusa; Ishikawa, Yoko; Ono, Masao; Yuasa, Takae; Yoshino, Tadashi; Fukumoto, Manabu; Ravetch, Jeffrey V.; Takai, Toshiyuki

    1999-01-01

    It is widely accepted that immunoglobulin (Ig)E triggers immediate hypersensitivity responses by activating a cognate high-affinity receptor, FcεRI, leading to mast cell degranulation with release of vasoactive and proinflammatory mediators. This apparent specificity, however, is complicated by the ability of IgE to bind with low affinity to Fc receptors for IgG, FcγRII and III. We have addressed the in vivo significance of this interaction by studying IgE-mediated passive systemic anaphylaxis in FcγR-deficient mice. Mice deficient in the inhibitory receptor for IgG, FcγRIIB, display enhanced IgE-mediated anaphylactic responses, whereas mice deficient in an IgG activation receptor, FcγRIII, display a corresponding attenuation of IgE-mediated responses. Thus, in addition to modulating IgG-triggered hypersensitivity responses, FcγRII and III on mast cells are potent regulators of IgE-mediated responses and reveal the existence of a regulatory pathway for IgE triggering of effector cells through IgG Fc receptors that could contribute to the etiology of the atopic response. PMID:10330436

  5. ZK91587: a novel synthetic antimineralocorticoid displays high affinity for corticosterone (type I) receptors in the rat hippocampus

    SciTech Connect

    Sutanto, W.; de Kloet, E.R.

    1988-01-01

    In vitro cytosol binding assays have shown the properties of binding of a novel steroid, ZK91587 (15..beta.., 16..beta..b-methylene-mexrenone) in the brain of rats. Scatchard and Woolf analyses of the binding data reveal the binding of (/sup 3/H) ZK91587 to the total hippocampal coritcosteroid receptor sites with high affinity, and low capacity. When 100-fold excess RU28362 was included simultaneously with (/sup 3/H) ZK91587, the labelled steroid binds with the same affinity and capacity. Relative binding affinities (RBA) of various steroids for the Type I or Type II corticosteroid receptor in these animals are: Type I: ZK91587 = corticosterone (B) > cortisol (F); Type II: B > F >>> ZK91587. In the binding kinetic study, ZK91587 has a high association rate of binding in the rat. The steroid dissociates following a one slope pattern, indicating, the present data demonstrate that in the rat hippocampus, ZK91587 binds specifically to the Type I (corticosterone-preferring/mineralocorticoid-like receptor.

  6. A Cyclic Tetrapeptide ("Cyclodal") and Its Mirror-Image Isomer Are Both High-Affinity μ Opioid Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Weltrowska, Grazyna; Nguyen, Thi M-D; Chung, Nga N; Wood, JodiAnne; Ma, Xiaoyu; Guo, Jason; Wilkes, Brian C; Ge, Yang; Laferrière, André; Coderre, Terence J; Schiller, Peter W

    2016-10-13

    Head-to-tail cyclization of the μ opioid receptor (MOR) agonist [Dmt(1)]DALDA (H-Dmt-d-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2 (9; Dmt = 2',6'-dimethyltyrosine) resulted in a highly active, selective MOR antagonist, c[-d-Arg-Phe-Lys-Dmt-] (1) ("cyclodal"), with subnanomolar binding affinity. A docking study of cyclodal using the crystal structure of MOR in the inactive form showed a unique binding mode with the two basic residues of the ligand forming salt bridges with the Asp(127) and Glu(229) receptor residues. Cyclodal showed high plasma stability and was able to cross the blood-brain barrier to reverse morphine-induced, centrally mediated analgesia when given intravenously. Surprisingly, the mirror-image isomer (optical antipode) of cyclodal, c[-Arg-d-Phe-d-Lys-d-Dmt-] (2), also turned out to be a selective MOR antagonist with 1 nM binding affinity, and thus, these two compounds represent the first example of mirror image opioid receptor ligands with both optical antipodes having high binding affinity. Reduction of the Lys-Dmt peptide bond in cyclodal resulted in an analogue, c[-d-Arg-Phe-LysΨ[CH2NH]Dmt-] (8), with MOR agonist activity.

  7. Evaluation of Synthetic Isoflavones on Cell Proliferation, Estrogen Receptor Binding Affinity, and Apoptosis in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Danyetta D.; Díaz-Cruz, Edgar S.; Landini, Serena; Kim, Young-Woo; Brueggemeier, Robert W.

    2009-01-01

    Natural isoflavones have demonstrated numerous pharmacological activities in breast cancer cells, including antiproliferative activities and binding affinities for estrogen receptors (ERs). Chemical modifications on the isoflavone ring system have been prepared and explored for the development of new therapeutics for hormone-dependent breast cancer. The antiproliferative actions of the synthesized isoflavones on MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells were examined, as well as cytotoxicity, interaction with estrogen receptors, and proapoptotic activity. The compounds were screened in the absence and in the presence of estradiol to evaluate whether or not estradiol could rescue cell proliferation on MCF-7 cells. Several compounds were able to inhibit cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, and compounds containing the bulky 7-phenylmethoxy substituent resulted in cell toxicity not only in MCF-7 cells but also in MDA-MB-231 cells. Selected synthetic isoflavones were able to bind to estrogen receptor with low affinity. Apoptotic pathways were also activated by these compounds in breast cancer cells. The majority of the compounds can bind to both ERs. With low affinity, and their effects on hormone-independent breast cancer cells suggest that their ability to inhibit cell growth in breast cancer cells is not exclusively mediated by ERs. Thus, the synthetic trisubstituted isoflavones act on multiple signaling pathways leading to activation of mechanisms of cell death and ultimately affecting breast cancer cell survival. PMID:17962013

  8. A quantitative method to identify microRNAs targeting a messenger RNA using a 3′UTR RNA affinity technique

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Miao; Han, Weiguo; Spivack, Simon D.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of specific microRNAs (miRNAs) that target a given messenger RNA (mRNA) is essential for studies in gene regulation, but the available bioinformatic software programs are often unreliable. We have developed a unique experimental miRNA affinity assay whereby a 3′UTR RNA is end-labeled with biotin, immobilized, and then used as a bait sequence for affinity pull-down of miRNAs. After washes and release, cloning and sequencing identify the miRNAs. Binding affinity is quantitated by quantitatvie polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), comparing released and original input concentrations. As an initial demonstration, the TCF8/ZEB1 mRNA affinity pull-down yielded miR-200 family member miRs in the majority of clones, and binding affinity was approximately 100%; virtually all copies of miR-200c bound the immobilized mRNA transcript. For validation in cells, miR-200c strongly inhibited expression of a TCF8 luciferase reporter, native TCF8 mRNA, and protein levels, which contrasted with other recovered miRNAs with lower binding affinities. For Smad4 mRNA, miR-150 (and others) displayed a binding affinity of 39% (or less) yet did not inhibit a Smad4 reporter, native Smad4 mRNA, or protein levels. These results were not predicted by available software. This work demonstrates this miRNA binding affinity assay to be a novel yet facile experimental means of identification of miRNAs targeting a given mRNA. PMID:23938772

  9. Novel histamine H3 receptor antagonists: affinities in an H3 receptor binding assay and potencies in two functional H3 receptor models.

    PubMed

    Schlicker, E; Kathmann, M; Reidemeister, S; Stark, H; Schunack, W

    1994-08-01

    1. We determined the affinities of ten novel H3 receptor antagonists in an H3 receptor binding assay and their potencies in two functional H3 receptor models. The novel compounds differ from histamine in that the aminoethyl side chain is replaced by a propyl or butyl chain linked to a polar group (amide, thioamide, ester, guanidine, guanidine ester or urea) which, in turn, is connected to a hexocyclic ring or to an alicyclic ring-containing alkyl residue [corrected]. 2. The specific binding of [3H]-N alpha-methylhistamine to rat brain cortex membranes was monophasically displaced by each of the ten compounds at pKi values ranging from 7.56 to 8.68. 3. Inhibition by histamine of the electrically evoked tritium overflow from mouse brain cortex slices preincubated with [3H]-noradrenaline was antagonized by the ten compounds and the concentration-response curve was shifted to the right with apparent pA2 values ranging from 7.07 to 9.20. 4. The electrically induced contraction in guinea-pig ileum strips (which was abolished by atropine) was inhibited by the H3 receptor agonists R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine (pEC50 7.76), N alpha-methylhistamine (7.90) and imetit (8.18). The concentration-response curve of R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine was shifted to the right by thioperamide (apparent pA2 8.79) and by the ten novel compounds (range of pA2 values 6.64-8.81). 5. The affinities and potencies were compared by linear regression analysis. This analysis was extended to thioperamide, the standard H3 receptor antagonist, which is also capable of differentiating between H3A and H3B sites. Comparison of the apparent pA2 values in the two functional H3 receptor models yielded a regression coefficient of 0.77 (P<0.02). When the pA2 of the drugs in the mouse brain cortex were compared to the pXj for H3 sites (ten novel compounds) and for H3A sites (thioperamide), a significant correlation (r = 0.87; P<0.001) was obtained. There was, however, no significant correlation when the pKi of

  10. Novel Bivalent Ligands for D2/D3 Dopamine Receptors: Significant Cooperative Gain in D2 Affinity and Potency

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This report describes development of a series of novel bivalent molecules with a pharmacophore derived from the D2/D3 agonist 5-OH-DPAT. The spacer length in the bivalent compounds had a pronounced influence on affinity for D2 receptors. A 23-fold increase of D2 affinity was observed at a spacer length of 9 or 10 (compounds 11d and 14b) as compared to monovalent 5-OH-DPAT (Ki; 2.5 and 2.0 vs 59 nM for 11d and 14b vs 5-OH-DPAT, respectively). The functional potency of 11d and 14b indicated a 24- and 94-fold increase in potency at the D2 receptor as compared to 5-OH-DPAT (EC50; 1.7 and 0.44 vs 41 nM for 11d and 14b vs 5-OH-DPAT, respectively). These are the most potent bivalent agonists for the D2 receptor known to date. This synergism is consonant with cooperative interaction at the two orthosteric binding sites in the homodimeric receptor. PMID:23275802

  11. The high-affinity niacin receptor HM74A is decreased in the anterior cingulate cortex of individuals with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Miller, Christine L; Dulay, Jeannette R

    2008-09-05

    The pathway for de novo synthesis of the suite of niacin congeners, the kynurenine pathway, has been shown to be upregulated in prior studies of postmortem brain tissue from individuals with schizophrenia. The cause of the upregulation is unknown, but one factor may be a defect in feedback regulation via receptors responsive to niacin. A high-affinity and low-affinity receptor for niacin have been identified, HM74A and HM74, respectively. We used RT-QPCR and Western blots to quantify expression of HM74A and HM74 receptors in brain tissue obtained postmortem from patients with schizophrenia (N=12) or bipolar disorder (N=14) and from normal controls (N=14). Although the protein for the HM74 receptor was unchanged, the protein for HM74A was significantly decreased in the schizophrenia group, both when normalized to GAPDH protein or to HM74 as an internal control for degradation and gel-loading error (0.56-fold+/-0.36, p=0.016 and 0.58-fold+/-0.19 the mean control value, p=0.001, respectively). In contrast, the transcript for HM74A was significantly increased, revealing a striking dysregulation between gene transcription and final protein product. No significant differences in HM74A were found for the bipolar group relative to controls. These results are consistent with the blunted niacin flush response reported for individuals with schizophrenia and may be relevant to different rates of comorbid disease.

  12. Affinity of the enantiomers of. alpha. - and. beta. -cyclazocine for binding to the phencyclidine and. mu. opioid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, S.L.; Balster, R.L.; Martin, B.R. )

    1990-01-01

    The enantiomers in the {alpha} and {beta} series of cyclazocine were evaluated for their ability to bind to phencyclidine (PCP) and {mu}-opioid receptors in order to determine their receptor selectivity. The affinity of (-)-{beta}-cyclazocine for the PCP receptor was 1.5 greater than PCP itself. In contrast, (-)-{alpha}-cyclazocine, (+)-{alpha}-cyclazocine, and (+)-{beta}-cyclazocine were 3-, 5- and 138-fold less potent than PCP, respectively. Scatchard analysis of saturable binding of ({sup 3}H)Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-N-MePhe-Gly-ol (DAMGO) also exhibited a homogeneous population of binding sites with an apparent K{sub D} of 1.9 nM and an estimated Bmax of 117 pM. (3H)Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-N-MePhe-Gly-ol (DAMGO) binding studies revealed that (-)-{alpha}-cyclazocine (K{sub D} = 0.48 nM) was 31-, 1020- and 12,600-fold more potent than (-)-{beta}-cyclazocine, (+)-{alpha}-cyclazocine and (+)-{beta}-cyclazocine, respectively, for binding to the {mu}-opioid receptor. These data show that, although (-)-{beta}-cyclazocine is a potent PCP receptor ligand consistent with its potent PCP-like discriminative stimulus effects, it shows little selectivity for PCP receptor since it also potently displaces {mu}-opioid binding. However, these cyclazocine isomers, due to their extraordinary degree of stereoselectivity, may be useful in characterizing the structural requirements for benzomorphans having activity at the PCP receptor.

  13. The intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 receptor, cubilin, is a high-affinity apolipoprotein A-I receptor facilitating endocytosis of high-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Kozyraki, R; Fyfe, J; Kristiansen, M; Gerdes, C; Jacobsen, C; Cui, S; Christensen, E I; Aminoff, M; de la Chapelle, A; Krahe, R; Verroust, P J; Moestrup, S K

    1999-06-01

    Cubilin is the intestinal receptor for the endocytosis of intrinsic factor-vitamin B12. However, several lines of evidence, including a high expression in kidney and yolk sac, indicate it may have additional functions. We isolated apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), the main protein of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), using cubilin affinity chromatography. Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated a high-affinity binding of apoA-I and HDL to cubilin, and cubilin-expressing yolk sac cells showed efficient 125I-HDL endocytosis that could be inhibited by IgG antibodies against apoA-I and cubilin. The physiological relevance of the cubilin-apoA-I interaction was further emphasized by urinary apoA-I loss in some known cases of functional cubilin deficiency. Therefore, cubilin is a receptor in epithelial apoA-I/HDL metabolism.

  14. Identification of a high-affinity ligand that exhibits complete aryl hydrocarbon receptor antagonism.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kayla J; Murray, Iain A; Tanos, Rachel; Tellew, John; Boitano, Anthony E; Bisson, William H; Kolluri, Siva K; Cooke, Michael P; Perdew, Gary H

    2011-07-01

    The biological functions of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) can be delineated into dioxin response element (DRE)-dependent or -independent activities. Ligands exhibiting either full or partial agonist activity, e.g., 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and α-naphthoflavone, have been demonstrated to potentiate both DRE-dependent and -independent AHR function. In contrast, the recently identified selective AHR modulators (SAhRMs), e.g., 1-allyl-3-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-7-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-indazole (SGA360), bias AHR toward DRE-independent functionality while displaying antagonism with regard to ligand-induced DRE-dependent transcription. Recent studies have expanded the physiological role of AHR to include modulation of hematopoietic progenitor expansion and immunoregulation. It remains to be established whether such physiological roles are mediated through DRE-dependent or -independent pathways. Here, we present evidence for a third class of AHR ligand, "pure" or complete antagonists with the capacity to suppress both DRE-dependent and -independent AHR functions, which may facilitate dissection of physiological AHR function with regard to DRE or non-DRE-mediated signaling. Competitive ligand binding assays together with in silico modeling identify N-(2-(1H-indol-3-yl)ethyl)-9-isopropyl-2-(5-methylpyridin-3-yl)-9H-purin-6-amine (GNF351) as a high-affinity AHR ligand. DRE-dependent reporter assays, in conjunction with quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of AHR targets, reveal GNF351 as a potent AHR antagonist that demonstrates efficacy in the nanomolar range. Furthermore, unlike many currently used AHR antagonists, e.g., α-naphthoflavone, GNF351 is devoid of partial agonist potential. It is noteworthy that in a model of AHR-mediated DRE-independent function, i.e., suppression of cytokine-induced acute-phase gene expression, GNF351 has the capacity to antagonize agonist and SAhRM-mediated suppression of SAA1. Such data indicate that GNF351 is a

  15. Whole transcriptome analysis for T cell receptor-affinity and IRF4-regulated clonal expansion of T cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Man, Kevin; Smyth, Gordon K; Nutt, Stephen L; Kallies, Axel

    2014-12-01

    Clonal population expansion of T cells during an immune response is dependent on the affinity of the T cell receptor (TCR) for its antigen [1]. However, there is little understanding of how this process is controlled transcriptionally. We found that the transcription factor IRF4 was induced in a manner dependent on TCR-affinity and was critical for the clonal expansion and maintenance of effector function of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. We performed a genome-wide expression profiling experiment using RNA sequencing technology (RNA-seq) to interrogate global expression changes when IRF4 was deleted in CD8(+) T cells activated with either a low or high affinity peptide ligand. This allowed us not only to determine IRF4-dependent transcriptional changes but also to identify transcripts dependent on TCR-affinity [2]. Here we describe in detail the analyses of the RNA-seq data, including quality control, read mapping, quantification, normalization and assessment of differential gene expression. The RNA-seq data can be accessed from Gene Expression Omnibus database (accession number GSE49929).

  16. Structural Basis of Species-Dependent Differential Affinity of 6-Alkoxy-5-Aryl-3-Pyridinecarboxamide Cannabinoid-1 Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Malliga R; Cinar, Resat; Liu, Jie; Godlewski, Grzegorz; Szanda, Gergö; Puhl, Henry; Ikeda, Stephen R; Deschamps, Jeffrey; Lee, Yong-Sok; Steinbach, Peter J; Kunos, George

    2015-08-01

    6-Alkoxy-5-aryl-3-pyridincarboxamides, including the brain-penetrant compound 14G: [5-(4-chlorophenyl)-6-(cyclopropylmethoxy)-N-[(1R,2R)-2-hydroxy-cyclohexyl]-3-pyridinecarboxamide] and its peripherally restricted analog 14H: [5-(4-chlorophenyl)-N-[(1R,2R)-2-hydroxycyclohexyl]-6-(2-methoxyethoxy)-3-pyridinecarboxamide], have been recently introduced as selective, high-affinity antagonists of the human cannabinoid-1 receptor (hCB1R). Binding analyses revealed two orders of magnitude lower affinity of these compounds for mouse and rat versus human CB1R, whereas the affinity of rimonabant is comparable for all three CB1Rs. Modeling of ligand binding to CB1R and binding assays with native and mutant (Ile105Met) hCB1Rs indicate that the Ile105 to Met mutation in rodent CB1Rs accounts for the species-dependent affinity of 14G: and 14H: . Our work identifies Ile105 as a new pharmacophore component for developing better hCB1R antagonists and invalidates rodent models for assessing the antiobesity efficacy of 14G: and 14H: .

  17. Prediction of ligand binding affinity using a multiple-conformations-multiple-protonation scheme: application to estrogen receptor α.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Miho Y; Takamatsu, Yoshihiro; Ichinose, Tazuko; Itai, Akiko

    2012-01-01

    A fast method that can predict the binding affinities of chemicals to a target protein with a high degree of accuracy will be very useful in drug design and regulatory science. We have been developing a scoring function for affinity prediction, which can be applied to extensive protein systems, and also trying to generate a prediction scheme that specializes in each target protein, with as high a predictive power as possible. In this study, we have constructed a prediction scheme with target-specific scores for estimating ligand-binding affinities to human estrogen receptor α (ERα), considering the major conformational change between agonist- and antagonist-bound forms and the change in protonation states of histidine at the ligand-binding site. The generated scheme calibrated with fewer training compounds (23 for the agonist-bound form, 17 for the antagonist-bound form) demonstrated good predictive power (a predictive r(2) of 0.83 for 154 validation compounds); this was also true for compounds with frameworks that were quite different from those of the training compounds. Our prediction scheme will be useful in drug development targeting ERα and in primary screening of endocrine disruptors, and provides a successful method of affinity prediction considering the major conformational changes in a protein.

  18. Structure and Dynamics of PD-L1 and an Ultra-High-Affinity PD-1 Receptor Mutant.

    PubMed

    Pascolutti, Roberta; Sun, Xianqiang; Kao, Joseph; Maute, Roy L; Ring, Aaron M; Bowman, Gregory R; Kruse, Andrew C

    2016-10-04

    The immune checkpoint receptor PD-1 and its ligand, PD-L1, have emerged as key regulators of anti-tumor immunity in humans. Recently, we reported an ultra-high-affinity PD-1 mutant, termed high-affinity consensus (HAC) PD-1, which shows superior therapeutic efficacy in mice compared with antibodies. However, the molecular details underlying the action of this agent remain incompletely understood, and a molecular view of PD-1/PD-L1 interactions in general is only beginning to emerge. Here, we report the structure of HAC PD-1 in complex with PD-L1, showing that it binds PD-L1 using a unique set of polar interactions. Biophysical studies and long-timescale molecular dynamics experiments reveal the mechanisms by which ten point mutations confer a 35,000-fold enhancement in binding affinity, and offer atomic-scale views of the role of conformational dynamics in PD-1/PD-L1 interactions. Finally, we show that the HAC PD-1 exhibits pH-dependent affinity, with pseudo-irreversible binding in a low pH setting akin to the tumor microenvironment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Synthetic cannabinoids: In silico prediction of the cannabinoid receptor 1 affinity by a quantitative structure-activity relationship model.

    PubMed

    Paulke, Alexander; Proschak, Ewgenij; Sommer, Kai; Achenbach, Janosch; Wunder, Cora; Toennes, Stefan W

    2016-03-14

    The number of new synthetic psychoactive compounds increase steadily. Among the group of these psychoactive compounds, the synthetic cannabinoids (SCBs) are most popular and serve as a substitute of herbal cannabis. More than 600 of these substances already exist. For some SCBs the in vitro cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) affinity is known, but for the majority it is unknown. A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model was developed, which allows the determination of the SCBs affinity to CB1 (expressed as binding constant (Ki)) without reference substances. The chemically advance template search descriptor was used for vector representation of the compound structures. The similarity between two molecules was calculated using the Feature-Pair Distribution Similarity. The Ki values were calculated using the Inverse Distance Weighting method. The prediction model was validated using a cross validation procedure. The predicted Ki values of some new SCBs were in a range between 20 (considerably higher affinity to CB1 than THC) to 468 (considerably lower affinity to CB1 than THC). The present QSAR model can serve as a simple, fast and cheap tool to get a first hint of the biological activity of new synthetic cannabinoids or of other new psychoactive compounds.

  20. A431 cell variants lacking the blood group A antigen display increased high affinity epidermal growth factor-receptor number, protein-tyrosine kinase activity, and receptor turnover

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) of human A431 cells bears an antigenic determinant that is closely related to the human blood group A carbohydrate structure. Labeling studies with blood group A reactive anti-EGF-R monoclonal antibodies and various lectins revealed that A431 cultures are heterogeneous with respect to blood group A expression. We have isolated clonal variants of these cells that either express (A431A+ cells) or completely lack (A431A- cells) the blood group A specific N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc) residue. We show that this difference is due to the absence of a UDP-GalNAc:Gal transferase activity in A431A- cells. Subsequently, we have compared EGF-R functioning in these cell lines. Scatchard analysis of EGF- binding shows that in A431A- cells 6.3% of the EGF-R belongs to a high affinity subclass (Kd = 0.4 nM) while in A431A+ this subclass represents only 3.2% of the total receptor pool. The elevated level of high affinity receptors in A431A- cells is accompanied by a parallel increase in receptor protein- tyrosine kinase activity. In membrane preparations of A431A- cells, receptor autophosphorylation as well as phosphorylation of a tyrosine-containing peptide substrate is 2-3-fold higher as compared with A431A+ cells. In intact A431A-cells, the difference in receptor activity is measured as a 2-3-fold elevated level of receptor phosphorylation and a 2-3-fold higher abundance of phosphotyrosine in total cellular protein in A431A- cells. In addition, [35S]methionine pulse-chase experiments showed a ligand-independent increase in turnover of EGF-R in A431A- cells: the receptor's half life in these cells is 10 h as compared with 17 h in A431A+ cells. Our results suggest a possible involvement of GalNAc residue(s) in determining EGF-R affinity, protein-tyrosine kinase activity and turnover in A431 cells. Furthermore, our results indicate that high affinity EGF-R are the biologically active species with respect to protein-tyrosine kinase

  1. Identification of high affinity bioactive Salbutamol conformer directed against mutated (Thr164Ile) beta 2 adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Bandaru, Srinivas; Tiwari, Geet; Akka, Jyothy; Marri, Vijaya Kumar; Alvala, Mallika; Gutlapalli, Venkata Ravi; Nayarisseri, Anuraj; Mundluru, Hema Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Salbutamol forms an important and widely administered β2 agonist prescribed in the symptomatic treatment of bronchial asthma. Unfortunately, a subset of patients show refractoriness to it owing to ADRB2 gene variant (rs 1800888). The variant substitutes Thr to Ile at the position 164 in the β2 adrenergic receptor leading to sub-optimal binding of agonists. The present study aims to associate the Salbutamol response with the variant and select the bioactive conformer of Sabutamol with optimal binding affinity against mutated receptor by in silico approaches. To assess bronchodilator response spirometry was performed before and 15 min after Salbutamol (200 mcg) inhalation. Responders to Salbutamol were categorized if percentage reversibility was greater than or equal to 12%, while those showing FEV₁ reversibility less than 12% were classified as non-responders. Among the 344 subjects screened, 238 were responders and 106 were non-responders. The frequency of mutant allele "T" was significantly higher in case of non-responders (p < 0.05). In silico process involved generation of Salbutamol conformer ensembles supported by systematic search algorithm. 4369 conformers were generated of which only 1882 were considered bioactive conformers (threshold RMSD≤1 in reference to normalized structure of salbutamol). All the bioactive conformers were evaluated for the binding affinity against (Thr164 Ile) receptor through MolDock aided docking algorithm. One of the bioactive conformer (P.E. = -57.0038, RMSD = 0.6) demonstrated 1.54 folds greater affinity than the normal Salbutamol in the mutated receptor. The conformer identified in the present study may be put to pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic studies in future ahead.

  2. Covalent labeling of a high-affinity, guanyl nucleotide sensitive parathyroid hormone receptor in canine renal cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Nissenson, R.A.; Karpf, D.; Bambino, T.; Winer, J.; Canga, M.; Nyiredy, K.; Arnaud, C.D.

    1987-04-07

    Putative parathyroid hormone (PTH) receptors in canine renal membranes were affinity labeled with /sup 125/I-bPTH(1-34) using the heterobifunctional cross-linking reagent N-hydroxysuccinimidyl 4-azido-benzoate. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of a major 85,000 molecular weight (M/sub r/) PTH binding component, the labeling of which was inhibited by nanomolar concentrations of unlabeled PTH and by micromolar concentrations of 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate (Gpp-(NH)p). Labeling was not influenced by the unrelated peptides insulin and arginine vasopressin. Minor PTH binding components of M/sub r/ 55,000 and 130,000 were also seen, and labeling of these was likewise sensitive to unlabeled PTH and to Gpp(NH)p. Omission of protease inhibitors during the isolation of plasma membranes resulted in the loss of the M/sub r/ 85,000 PTH binding species and the appearance of an M/sub r/ 70,000 form. Several minor PTH binding components also were observed. Equilibrium binding studies showed that such membranes had an affinity for PTH indistinguishable from that in membranes isolated with protease inhibitors and displaying a major M/sub r/ 85,000 PTH binding species. The authors conclude that the major form of the adenylate cyclase coupled PTH receptor in canine renal membranes is an M/sub r/ 85,000 protein. An endogenous enzyme, probably a lysosomal cathepsin, can cleave this form to produce an M/sub r/ 70,000 receptor that retains full functional activity with respect to high-affinity, guanyl nucleotide sensitive PTH binding. The ability to covalently label the PTH receptor in high yield represents a major step toward the structural characterization of this important detector molecule.

  3. In vivo gene transfer to dopamine neurons of rat substantia nigra via the high-affinity neurotensin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Maya, I.; Navarro-Quiroga, I.; Meraz-Ríos, M. A.; Aceves, J.; Martinez-Fong, D.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently, we synthesized a nonviral gene vector capable of transfecting cell lines taking advantage of neurotensin (NT) internalization. The vector is NT cross-linked with poly-L-lysine, to which a plasmid DNA was bound to form a complex (NT-polyplex). Nigral dopamine neurons are able to internalize NT, thus representing a target for gene transfer via NT-polyplex. This hypothesis was tested here using reporter genes encoding green fluorescent protein or chloramphenicol acetyl transferase. MATERIALS AND METHODS: NT-polyplex was injected into the substantia nigra. Double immunofluorescence labeling was used to reveal the cell type involved in the propidium iodide-labeled polyplex internalization and reporter gene expression. RESULTS: Polyplex internalization was observed within dopamine neurons but not within glial cells, and was prevented by both hypertonic sucrose solution and SR-48692, a selective nonpeptide antagonist of NT receptors. Reporter gene expression was observed in dopamine neurons from 48 hr up to 15 days after NT-polyplex injection, and was prevented by SR-48692. However, no expression was seen when the NT-polyplex was injected into the ansiform lobule of the cerebellum, which contains low- but not high-affinity NT receptors. Neither internalization nor expression was observed in cultured glial cells, despite the NT-polyplex binding to those cells that was prevented by levocabastine, a low-affinity NT receptor antagonist. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that high-affinity NT receptors mediate the uptake of NT-polyplex with the subsequent reporter gene expression in vivo. NT polyfection may be used to transfer genes of physiologic interest to nigrostriatal dopamine neurons, and to produce transgenic animal models of dopamine-related diseases. PMID:11471555

  4. Mixed kappa agonists and mu agonists/antagonists as potential pharmacotherapeutics for cocaine abuse: synthesis and opioid receptor binding affinity of N-substituted derivatives of morphinan.

    PubMed

    Neumeyer, J L; Gu, X H; van Vliet, L A; DeNunzio, N J; Rusovici, D E; Cohen, D J; Negus, S S; Mello, N K; Bidlack, J M

    2001-10-22

    A series of new N-substituted derivatives of morphinan was synthesized and their binding affinity for the three opioid receptors (mu, delta, and kappa) was determined. A paradoxical effect of N-propargyl (MCL-117) and N-(3-iodoprop-(2E)-enyl) (MCL-118) substituents on the binding affinities for the mu and kappa opioid receptors was observed. All of these novel derivatives showed a preference for the mu and kappa versus delta binding.

  5. Further Optimization and Evaluation of Bioavailable, Mixed-Efficacy µ-Opioid Receptor (MOR) Agonists/δ-Opioid Receptor (DOR) Antagonists: Balancing MOR and DOR Affinities

    PubMed Central

    Harland, Aubrie A.; Yeomans, Larisa; Griggs, Nicholas W.; Anand, Jessica P.; Pogozheva, Irina D.; Jutkiewicz, Emily M.; Traynor, John R.; Mosberg, Henry I.

    2016-01-01

    In a previously described peptidomimetic series, we reported the development of bifunctional µ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist and δ-opioid receptor (DOR) antagonist ligands with a lead compound that produced antinociception for 1 h after intraperitoneal administration in mice. In this paper, we expand on our original series by presenting two modifications, both of which were designed with the following objectives: 1) probing bioavailability and improving metabolic stability, 2) balancing affinities between MOR and DOR while reducing affinity and efficacy at the Κ-opioid receptor (KOR), and 3) improving in vivo efficacy. Here we establish that through N-acetylation of our original peptidomimetic series, we are able to improve DOR affinity and increase selectivity relative to KOR while maintaining the desired MOR agonist/DOR antagonist profile. From initial in vivo studies, one compound (14a) was found to produce dose-dependent antinociception after peripheral administration with an improved duration of action of longer than 3 h. PMID:26524472

  6. New ligands with affinity for the alpha4beta2 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Synthesis, receptor binding, and 3D-QSAR modeling.

    PubMed

    Audouze, Karine; Nielsen, Elsebet Østergaard; Olsen, Gunnar M; Ahring, Philip; Jørgensen, Tino Dyhring; Peters, Dan; Liljefors, Tommy; Balle, Thomas

    2006-06-01

    A new series of piperazines, diazepanes, diazocanes, diazabicyclononanes, and diazabicyclodecanes with affinity for the alpha4beta2 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors were synthesized on the basis of results from a previous computational study. A predictive 3D-QSAR model was developed using the GRID/GOLPE approach (R2 = 0.94, Q2 = 0.83, SDEP = 0.34). The SAR was interpreted in terms of contour maps of the PLS coefficients and in terms of a homology model of the alpha4beta2 subtype of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The results reveal that hydrogen bonding from both hydrogens on the protonated amine and from the pyridine nitrogen to a water molecule as well as van der Waals interactions between the substituent bearing the protonated amine and the receptor is of importance for ligand affinity. The combination of 3D-QSAR and homology modeling proved successful for the interpretation of structure-affinity relationships as well as the validation of the individual modeling approaches.

  7. Wheat germ lectin-Sepharose affinity adsorption assay for the soluble glucagon receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Iyengar, R.; Herberg, J.T.

    1985-01-01

    An assay was developed based on the observation that many hormone receptors are glycoproteins. To test if the glucagon receptor is a glycoprotein, the receptor was used that had (/sup 125/I-Tyr/sup 10/)monoiodoglucagon covalently attached. The covalently labelled receptor was solubilized and exposed to wheat germ lectin-Sepharose in the presence and absence of various sugars. The sugar specificity for the adsorption of the glucagon receptor indicated that the receptor is a glycoprotein. The primary structure of glucagon is known and has been shown that it has no sugars attached to it. Therefore, the different in covalently attached sugars between the hormone and the receptor was used to develop an assay for the solubilized receptor. The hormone-receptor complex was specifically adsorbed onto the lectin-Sepharose while the free hormone remained in solution.

  8. Presence in neuroblastoma cells of a mu 3 receptor with selectivity for opiate alkaloids but without affinity for opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Cruciani, R A; Dvorkin, B; Klinger, H P; Makman, M H

    1994-12-26

    Evidence is presented for the occurrence of a unique opiate alkaloid-selective, opioid peptide-insensitive binding site in N18TG2 mouse neuroblastoma cells and in late passage hybrid F-11 cells, derived from N18TG2 neuroblastoma cells and rat dorsal root ganglion cells. Those cells lacked classical opioid peptide-sensitive receptor subtypes, but contained [3H]morphine and [3H]diprenorphine binding sites with affinity for certain opiate alkaloids but not for any endogenously occurring opioid peptide or peptide analog tested, including D-ala2-D-leu5-enkephalin (DADLE), D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol (DAGO) and dynorphin A(1-17). The binding site differed from hitherto described mu, delta and kappa neuronal opioid receptors not only on the basis of peptide insensitivity, but also on the basis of selectivity and affinities of alkaloids. Saturation experiments with [3H]morphine indicated the presence of a single site with Kd = 49 nM and Bmax = 1510 fmol/mg protein. This novel binding site was not present in F-11 hybrid cells at early passage. Instead the hybrid cells contained conventional opioid receptors (predominantly delta and also mu) capable of binding DADLE and other peptides as well as opiate alkaloids. With additional passage (cell divisions) of the hybrid cells, during which a limited change occurred in mouse chromosome number, the peptide-insensitive binding appeared and the opioid peptide-binding (delta and mu) receptors were lost reciprocally. Thus, expression of the peptide-insensitive binding normally may be repressed when conventional opioid receptors are expressed. The peptide-insensitive opiate binding site described here appears to correspond to the mu 3 receptor subtype, recently identified pharmacologically and functionally in several cell types of the immune system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. The A3 adenosine receptor attenuates the calcium rise triggered by NMDA receptors in retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mei; Hu, Huiling; Zhang, Xiulan; Lu, Wennan; Lim, Jason; Eysteinsson, Thor; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Laties, Alan M; Mitchell, Claire H

    2010-01-01

    The A(3) adenosine receptor is emerging as an important regulator of neuronal signaling, and in some situations receptor stimulation can limit excitability. As the NMDA receptor frequently contributes to neuronal excitability, this study examined whether A(3) receptor activation could alter the calcium rise accompanying NMDA receptor stimulation. Calcium levels were determined from fura-2 imaging of isolated rat retinal ganglion cells as these neurons possess both receptor types. Brief application of glutamate or NMDA led to repeatable and reversible elevations of intracellular calcium. The A(3) agonist Cl-IB-MECA reduced the response to both glutamate and NMDA. While adenosine mimicked the effect of Cl-IB-MECA, the A(3) receptor antagonist MRS 1191 impeded the block by adenosine, implicating a role for the A(3) receptor in response to the natural agonist. The A(1) receptor antagonist DPCPX provided additional inhibition, implying a contribution from both A(1) and A(3) adenosine receptors. The novel A(3) agonist MRS 3558 (1'S,2'R,3'S,4'R,5'S)-4-(2-chloro-6-(3-chlorobenzylamino)-9H-purin-9-yl)-2,3-dihydroxy-N-methylbicyclo [3.1.0] hexane-1-carboxamide and mixed A(1)/A(3) agonist MRS 3630 (1'S,2'R,3'S,4'R,5'S)-4-(2-chloro-6-(cyclopentylamino)-9H-purin-9-yl)-2,3-dihydroxy-N-methylbicyclo [3.1.0] hexane-1-carboxamide also inhibited the calcium rise induced by NMDA. Low levels of MRS 3558 were particularly effective, with an IC(50) of 400 pM. In all cases, A(3) receptor stimulation inhibited only 30-50% of the calcium rise. In summary, stimulation of the A(3) adenosine receptor by either endogenous or synthesized agonists can limit the calcium rise accompanying NMDA receptor activation. It remains to be determined if partial block of the calcium rise by A(3) agonists can modify downstream responses to NMDA receptor stimulation.

  10. Omega-conotoxin GVIA binding to a high-affinity receptor in brain: characterization, calcium sensitivity, and solubilization

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.A.; Snowman, A.M.; Biswas, A.; Olivera, B.M.; Snyder, S.H.

    1988-09-01

    We describe unique, high-affinity binding sites for omega(/sup 125/I)conotoxin GVIA in membranes from rat brain and rabbit sympathetic ganglia which appear to be primarily associated with N-type voltage-dependent calcium channels. The dissociation constant (KD) for the toxin in rat brain membranes is 60 pM. Physiologic extracellular concentrations of calcium inhibit toxin binding noncompetitively (IC50 = 0.2 mM). The regional distribution of the binding sites in rat brain differs markedly from that of dihydropyridine calcium antagonist receptors associated with L-type calcium channels. In detergent-solubilized brain membranes, toxin binding retains the same affinity, specificity, and ionic sensitivity as in particulate preparations.

  11. The membrane proximal region of the cannabinoid receptor CB1 N-terminus can allosterically modulate ligand affinity.

    PubMed

    Fay, Jonathan F; Farrens, David L

    2013-11-19

    The human cannabinoid receptor, CB1, a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), contains a relatively long (∼110 a.a.) amino terminus, whose function is still not defined. Here we explore a potential role for the CB1 N-terminus in modulating ligand binding to the receptor. Although most of the CB1 N-terminus is not necessary for ligand binding, previous studies have found that mutations introduced into its conserved membrane proximal region (MPR) do impair the receptors ability to bind ligand. Moreover, within the highly conserved MPR (∼ residues 90-110) lie two cysteine residues that are invariant in all CB1 receptors. We find these two cysteines (C98 and C107) form a disulfide in heterologously expressed human CB1, and this C98-C107 disulfide is much more accessible to reducing agents than the previously known disulfide in extracellular loop 2 (EL2). Interestingly, the presence of the C98-C107 disulfide modulates ligand binding to the receptor in a way that can be quantitatively analyzed by an allosteric model. The C98-C107 disulfide also alters the effects of allosteric ligands for CB1, Org 27569 and PSNCBAM-1. Together, these results provide new insights into how the N-terminal MPR and EL2 act together to influence the high-affinity orthosteric ligand binding site in CB1 and suggest that the CB1 N-terminal MPR may be an area through which allosteric modulators can act.

  12. Mutational Analysis of the Putative High-Affinity Propofol Binding Site in Human β3 Homomeric GABAA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Megan M.; Cao, Lily Q.; Chen, Ziwei; Franks, Nicholas P.; Evers, Alex S.

    2015-01-01

    Propofol is a sedative and anesthetic agent that can both activate GABAA receptors and potentiate receptor activation elicited by submaximal concentrations of the transmitter. A recent modeling study of the β3 homomeric GABAA receptor postulated a high-affinity propofol binding site in a hydrophobic pocket in the middle of a triangular cleft lined by the M1 and M2 membrane-spanning domains of one subunit and the M2 domain of the neighboring subunit. The goal of the present study was to gain functional evidence for the involvement of this pocket in the actions of propofol. Human β3 and α1β3 receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and the effects of substitutions of selected residues were probed on channel activation by propofol and pentobarbital. The data demonstrate the vital role of the β3(Y143), β3(F221), β3(Q224), and β3(T266) residues in the actions of propofol but not pentobarbital in β3 receptors. The effects of β3(Y143W) and β3(Q224W) on activation by propofol are likely steric because propofol analogs with less bulky ortho substituents activated both wild-type and mutant receptors. The T266W mutation removed activation by propofol in β3 homomeric receptors; however, this mutation alone or in combination with a homologous mutation (I271W) in the α1 subunit had almost no effect on activation properties in α1β3 heteromeric receptors. We hypothesize that heteromeric α1β3 receptors can be activated by propofol interactions with β3–β3, α1–β3, and β3–α1 interfaces, but the exact locations of the binding site and/or nature of interactions vary in different classes of interfaces. PMID:26206487

  13. Mutational Analysis of the Putative High-Affinity Propofol Binding Site in Human β3 Homomeric GABAA Receptors.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Megan M; Cao, Lily Q; Chen, Ziwei; Franks, Nicholas P; Evers, Alex S; Akk, Gustav

    2015-10-01

    Propofol is a sedative and anesthetic agent that can both activate GABA(A) receptors and potentiate receptor activation elicited by submaximal concentrations of the transmitter. A recent modeling study of the β3 homomeric GABA(A) receptor postulated a high-affinity propofol binding site in a hydrophobic pocket in the middle of a triangular cleft lined by the M1 and M2 membrane-spanning domains of one subunit and the M2 domain of the neighboring subunit. The goal of the present study was to gain functional evidence for the involvement of this pocket in the actions of propofol. Human β3 and α1β3 receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and the effects of substitutions of selected residues were probed on channel activation by propofol and pentobarbital. The data demonstrate the vital role of the β3(Y143), β3(F221), β3(Q224), and β3(T266) residues in the actions of propofol but not pentobarbital in β3 receptors. The effects of β3(Y143W) and β3(Q224W) on activation by propofol are likely steric because propofol analogs with less bulky ortho substituents activated both wild-type and mutant receptors. The T266W mutation removed activation by propofol in β3 homomeric receptors; however, this mutation alone or in combination with a homologous mutation (I271W) in the α1 subunit had almost no effect on activation properties in α1β3 heteromeric receptors. We hypothesize that heteromeric α1β3 receptors can be activated by propofol interactions with β3-β3, α1-β3, and β3-α1 interfaces, but the exact locations of the binding site and/or nature of interactions vary in different classes of interfaces.

  14. Characterization of a bombesin receptor on Swiss mouse 3T3 cells by affinity cross-linking

    SciTech Connect

    Sinnett-Smith, J.; Zachary, I.; Rozengurt, E.

    1988-12-01

    We have previously identified by chemical cross-linking a cell surface protein in Swiss 3T3 cells of apparent Mr 75,000-85,000, which may represent a major component of the receptor for peptides of the bombesin family in these cells. Because bombesin-like peptides may interact with other cell surface molecules, it was important to establish the correlation between receptor binding and functions of this complex and further characterize the Mr 75,000-85,000 cross-linked protein. Detailed time courses carried out at different temperatures demonstrated that the Mr 75,000-85,000 affinity-labelled band was the earliest cross-linked complex detected in Swiss 3T3 cells incubated with 125I-labelled gastrin-releasing peptide (125I-GRP). Furthermore, the ability of various nonradioactive bombesin agonists and antagonists to block the formation of the Mr 75,000-85,000 cross-linked complex correlated extremely well (r = 0.994) with the relative capacity of these peptides to inhibit 125I-GRP specific binding. Pretreatment with unlabelled GRP for up to 6 h caused only a slight decrease in both specific 125I-GRP binding and the affinity labelling of the Mr 75,000-85,000 protein. We also show that the cross-linked complex is a glycoprotein. First, solubilized affinity labelled Mr 75,000-85,000 complex applied to wheat germ lectin-sepharose columns was eluted by addition of 0.3 M N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. Second, treatment with endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase F reduced the apparent molecular weight of the affinity-labelled band from 75,000-85,000 to 43,000, indicating the presence of N-linked oligosaccharide groups.

  15. Tamoxifen Isomers and Metabolites Exhibit Distinct Affinity and Activity at Cannabinoid Receptors: Potential Scaffold for Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Benjamin M.; Franks, Lirit N.; Radominska-Pandya, Anna; Prather, Paul L.

    2016-01-01

    Tamoxifen (Tam) is a selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulator (SERM) that is an essential drug to treat ER-positive breast cancer. Aside from known actions at ERs, recent studies have suggested that some SERMs like Tam also exhibit novel activity at cannabinoid subtype 1 and 2 receptors (CB1R and CB2Rs). Interestingly, cis- (E-Tam) and trans- (Z-Tam) isomers of Tam exhibit over a 100-fold difference in affinity for ERs. Therefore, the current study assessed individual isomers of Tam and subsequent cytochrome P450 metabolic products, 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4OHT) and 4-hydroxy-N-desmethyl tamoxifen (End) for affinity and activity at CBRs. Results showed that Z-4OHT, but not Z-Tam or Z-End, exhibits higher affinity for both CB1 and CB2Rs relative to the E-isomer. Furthermore, Z- and E-isomers of Tam and 4OHT show slightly higher affinity for CB2Rs, while both End isomers are relatively CB1R-selective. When functional activity was assessed by G-protein activation and regulation of the downstream effector adenylyl cyclase, all isomers examined act as full CB1 and CB2R inverse agonists. Interestingly, Z-Tam appears to be more efficacious than the full inverse agonist AM630 at CB2Rs, while both Z-Tam and Z-End exhibit characteristics of insurmountable antagonism at CB1 and CB2Rs, respectively. Collectively, these results suggest that the SERMs Tam, 4OHT and End elicit ER-independent actions via CBRs in an isomer-specific manner. As such, this novel structural scaffold might be used to develop therapeutically useful drugs for treatment of a variety of diseases mediated via CBRs. PMID:27936172

  16. Using three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships to examine estrogen receptor binding affinities of polychlorinated hydroxybiphenyls

    SciTech Connect

    Waller, C.L.; Minor, D.L.; McKinney, J.D.

    1995-07-01

    Certain phenyl-substituted hydrocarbons of environmental concern have the potential to disrupt the endocrine system of animals, apparently in association with their estrogenic properties. Competition with natural estrogens for the estrogen receptor is a possible mechanism by which such effects could occur. We used comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), a three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) paradigm, to examine the underlying structural properties of ortho-chlorinated hydroxybiphenyl analogs known to bind to the estrogen receptor. The cross-validated and conventional statistical results indicate a high degree of internal predictability for the molecules included in the training data set. In addition to the phenolic (A) ring system, conformational restriction of the overall structure appears to play an important role in estrogen receptor binding affinity. Hydrophobic character as assessed using hydropathic interaction fields also contributes in a positive way to binding affinity. The CoMFA-derived QSARs may be useful in examining the estrogenic activity of a wider range of phenyl-substituted hydrocarbons of environmental concern. 37 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Calcium-independent inhibition of PCSK9 by affinity-improved variants of the LDL receptor EGF(A) domain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingnan; Zhou, Lijuan; Kong-Beltran, Monica; Li, Wei; Moran, Paul; Wang, Jianyong; Quan, Clifford; Tom, Jeffrey; Kolumam, Ganesh; Elliott, J Michael; Skelton, Nicholas J; Peterson, Andrew S; Kirchhofer, Daniel

    2012-10-05

    LDL (low-density lipoprotein) receptor (LDLR) binds to its negative regulator proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) through the first EGF (epidermal growth factor-like) domain [EGF(A)]. The isolated EGF(A) domain is a poor antagonist due to its low affinity for PCSK9. To improve binding affinity, we used a phage display approach by randomizing seven PCSK9 contact residues of EGF(A), including the Ca(2+)-coordinating Asp310. The library was panned in Ca(2+)-free solution, and 26 unique clones that bind to PCSK9 were identified. Four selected variants demonstrated improved inhibitory activities in a PCSK9-LDLR competition binding ELISA. The Fc fusion protein of variant EGF66 bound to PCSK9 with a K(d) value of 71 nM versus 935 nM of wild type [EGF(A)-Fc] and showed significantly improved potency in inhibiting LDLR degradation in vitro and in vivo. The five mutations in EGF66 could be modeled in the EGF(A) structure without perturbation of the EGF domain fold, and their contribution to affinity improvement could be rationalized. The most intriguing change was the substitution of the Ca(2+)-coordinating Asp310 by a Lys residue, whose side-chain amine may have functionally replaced Ca(2+). EGF66-Fc and other EGF variants having the Asp310Lys change bound to PCSK9 in a Ca(2+)-independent fashion. The findings indicate that randomization of an important Ca(2+)-chelating residue in conjunction with "selection pressure" applied by Ca(2+)-free phage selection conditions can yield variants with an alternatively stabilized Ca(2+) loop and with increased binding affinities. This approach may provide a new paradigm for the use of diversity libraries to improve affinities of members of the Ca(2+)-binding EGF domain subfamily.

  18. Redesigning Protein Cavities as a Strategy for Increasing Affinity in Protein-Protein Interaction: Interferon-γ Receptor 1 as a Model

    PubMed Central

    Biedermannová, Lada; Mikulecký, Pavel; Zahradník, Jiří; Charnavets, Tatsiana; Šebo, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Combining computational and experimental tools, we present a new strategy for designing high affinity variants of a binding protein. The affinity is increased by mutating residues not at the interface, but at positions lining internal cavities of one of the interacting molecules. Filling the cavities lowers flexibility of the binding protein, possibly reducing entropic penalty of binding. The approach was tested using the interferon-γ receptor 1 (IFNγR1) complex with IFNγ as a model. Mutations were selected from 52 amino acid positions lining the IFNγR1 internal cavities by using a protocol based on FoldX prediction of free energy changes. The final four mutations filling the IFNγR1 cavities and potentially improving the affinity to IFNγ were expressed, purified, and refolded, and their affinity towards IFNγ was measured by SPR. While individual cavity mutations yielded receptor constructs exhibiting only slight increase of affinity compared to WT, combinations of these mutations with previously characterized variant N96W led to a significant sevenfold increase. The affinity increase in the high affinity receptor variant N96W+V35L is linked to the restriction of its molecular fluctuations in the unbound state. The results demonstrate that mutating cavity residues is a viable strategy for designing protein variants with increased affinity. PMID:26060819

  19. Introduction of unsaturation into the N-n-alkyl chain of the nicotinic receptor antagonists, NONI and NDNI: effect on affinity and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Sumithran, Sangeetha P; Crooks, Peter A; Xu, Rui; Zhu, Jun; Deaciuc, Agripina G; Wilkins, Lincoln H; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2005-08-29

    N-n-octylnicotinium iodide (NONI) and N-n-decylnicotinium iodide (NDNI) are selective nicotinic receptor (nAChR) antagonists mediating nicotine-evoked striatal dopamine (DA) release, and inhibiting [3H]nicotine binding, respectively. This study evaluated effects of introducing unsaturation into the N-n-alkyl chains of NONI and NDNI on inhibition of [3H]nicotine and [3H]methyllycaconitine binding (alpha4beta2* and alpha7* nAChRs, respectively), (86)Rb+ efflux and [3H]DA release (agonist or antagonist effects at alpha4beta2* and alpha6beta2*-containing nAChRs, respectively). In the NONI series, introduction of a C3-cis- (NONB3c), C3-trans- (NONB3t), C7-double-bond (NONB7e), or C3-triple-bond (NONB3y) afforded a 4-fold to 250-fold increased affinity for [3H]nicotine binding sites compared with NONI. NONB7e and NONB3y inhibited nicotine-evoked 86Rb+ efflux, indicating alpha4beta2* antagonism. NONI analogs exhibited a 3-fold to 8-fold greater potency inhibiting nicotine-evoked [3H]DA overflow compared with NONI (IC50 = 0.62 microM; Imax = 89%), with no change in Imax, except for NONB3y (Imax = 50%). In the NDNI series, introduction of a C4-cis- (NDNB4c), C4-trans-double-bond (NDNB4t), or C3-triple-bond (NDNB3y) afforded a 4-fold to 80-fold decreased affinity for [3H]nicotine binding sites compared with NDNI, whereas introduction of a C9 double-bond (NDNB9e) did not alter affinity. NDNB3y and NDNB4t inhibited nicotine-evoked 86Rb+ efflux, indicating antagonism at alpha4beta2* nAChRs. Although NDNI had no effect, NDNB4t and NDNB9e potently inhibited nicotine-evoked [3H]DA overflow (IC50 = 0.02-0.14 microM, Imax = 90%), as did NDNB4c (IC50 = 0.08 microM; Imax = 50%), whereas NDNB3y showed no inhibition. None of the analogs had significant affinity for alpha7* nAChRs. Thus, unsaturated NONI analogs had enhanced affinity at alpha4beta2*- and alpha6beta2*-containing nAChRs, however a general reduction of affinity at alpha4beta2* and an uncovering of antagonist effects at

  20. Further characterization of the low and high affinity binding components of the thyrotropin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    McQuade, R.; Thomas, C.G. Jr.; Nayfeh, S.N.

    1986-05-29

    Following cross-linking with disuccinimdiyl suberate and analysis by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography, both the high- and low-affinity TSH binding components exhibited two similar /sup 125/I-TSH-labeled bands, with Mr values of 80,000 and 68,000. IgG fractions from patients with Graves' disease inhibited /sup 125/I-TSH binding to both components, while normal IgG had no effect. Although not entirely conclusive, these results suggest that the high- and low-affinity components share similar subunit composition and antigenic determinants.

  1. RELATIVE BINDING AFFINITY OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS TO ESTROGEN RECEPTOR IN TWO SPECIES OF FRESHWATER FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA has been mandated to screen industrial chemicals and pesticides for potential endocrine activity. To evaluate the potential for chemicals to cause endocrine disruption in fish we have previously measured the affinity of a number of chemicals for the rainbow trout estr...

  2. High-affinity prorenin binding to cardiac man-6-P/IGF-II receptors precedes proteolytic activation to renin.

    PubMed

    Saris, J J; Derkx, F H; De Bruin, R J; Dekkers, D H; Lamers, J M; Saxena, P R; Schalekamp, M A; Jan Danser, A H

    2001-04-01

    Mannose-6-phosphate (man-6-P)/insulin-like growth factor-II (man-6-P/IgF-II) receptors are involved in the activation of recombinant human prorenin by cardiomyocytes. To investigate the kinetics of this process, the nature of activation, the existence of other prorenin receptors, and binding of native prorenin, neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were incubated with recombinant, renal, or amniotic fluid prorenin with or without man-6-P. Intact and activated prorenin were measured in cell lysates with prosegment- and renin-specific antibodies, respectively. The dissociation constant (K(d)) and maximum number of binding sites (B(max)) for prorenin binding to man-6-P/IGF-II receptors were 0.6 +/- 0.1 nM and 3,840 +/- 510 receptors/myocyte, respectively. The capacity for prorenin internalization was greater than 10 times B(max). Levels of internalized intact prorenin decreased rapidly (half-life = 5 +/- 3 min) indicating proteolytic prosegment removal. Prorenin subdivision into man-6-P-free and man-6-P-containing fractions revealed that only the latter was bound. Cells also bound and activated renal but not amniotic fluid prorenin. We concluded that cardiomyocytes display high-affinity binding of renal but not extrarenal prorenin exclusively via man-6-P/IGF-II receptors. Binding precedes internalization and proteolytic activation to renin thereby supporting the concept of cardiac angiotensin formation by renal prorenin.

  3. Cloning and expression of two distinct high-affinity receptors cross-reacting with acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors.

    PubMed Central

    Dionne, C A; Crumley, G; Bellot, F; Kaplow, J M; Searfoss, G; Ruta, M; Burgess, W H; Jaye, M; Schlessinger, J

    1990-01-01

    The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family consists of at least seven closely related polypeptide mitogens which exert their activities by binding and activation of specific cell surface receptors. Unanswered questions have been whether there are multiple FGF receptors and what factors determine binding specificity and biological response. We report the complete cDNA cloning of two human genes previously designated flg and bek. These genes encode two similar but distinct cell surface receptors comprised of an extracellular domain with three immunoglobulin-like regions, a single transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic portion containing a tyrosine kinase domain with a typical kinase insert. The expression of these two cDNAs in transfected NIH 3T3 cells led to the biosynthesis of proteins of 150 kd and 135 kd for flg and bek, respectively. Direct binding experiments with radiolabeled acidic FGF (aFGF) or basic FGF (bFGF), inhibition of binding with native growth factors, and Scatchard analysis of the binding data indicated that bek and flg bind either aFGF or bFGF with dissociation constants of (2-15) x 10(-11) M. The high affinity binding of two distinct growth factors to each of two different receptors represents a unique double redundancy without precedence among polypeptide growth factor-receptor interactions. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1697263

  4. Inhibition of Coxsackie B Virus Infection by Soluble Forms of Its Receptors: Binding Affinities, Altered Particle Formation, and Competition with Cellular Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Goodfellow, Ian G.; Evans, David J.; Blom, Anna M.; Kerrigan, Dave; Miners, J. Scott; Morgan, B. Paul; Spiller, O. Brad

    2005-01-01

    We previously reported that soluble decay-accelerating factor (DAF) and coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) blocked coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) myocarditis in mice, but only soluble CAR blocked CVB3-mediated pancreatitis. Here, we report that the in vitro mechanisms of viral inhibition by these soluble receptors also differ. Soluble DAF inhibited virus infection through the formation of reversible complexes with CVB3, while binding of soluble CAR to CVB induced the formation of altered (A) particles with a resultant irreversible loss of infectivity. A-particle formation was characterized by loss of VP4 from the virions and required incubation of CVB3-CAR complexes at 37°C. Dimeric soluble DAF (DAF-Fc) was found to be 125-fold-more effective at inhibiting CVB3 than monomeric DAF, which corresponded to a 100-fold increase in binding affinity as determined by surface plasmon resonance analysis. Soluble CAR and soluble dimeric CAR (CAR-Fc) bound to CVB3 with 5,000- and 10,000-fold-higher affinities than the equivalent forms of DAF. While DAF-Fc was 125-fold-more effective at inhibiting virus than monomeric DAF, complement regulation by DAF-Fc was decreased 4 fold. Therefore, while the virus binding was a cooperative event, complement regulation was hindered by the molecular orientation of DAF-Fc, indicating that the regions responsible for complement regulation and virus binding do not completely overlap. Relative contributions of CVB binding affinity, receptor binding footprint on the virus capsid, and induction of capsid conformation alterations for the ability of cellular DAF and CAR to act as receptors are discussed. PMID:16140777

  5. In Vivo Phenotypic Screening for Treating Chronic Neuropathic Pain: Modification of C2-Arylethynyl Group of Conformationally Constrained A3 Adenosine Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    (N)-Methanocarba adenosine 5′-methyluronamides containing 2-arylethynyl groups were synthesized as A3 adenosine receptor (AR) agonists and screened in vivo (po) for reduction of neuropathic pain. A small N6-methyl group maintained binding affinity, with human > mouse A3AR and MW < 500 and other favorable physicochemical properties. Emax (maximal efficacy in a mouse chronic constriction injury pain model) of previously characterized A3AR agonist, 2-(3,4-difluorophenylethynyl)-N6-(3-chlorobenzyl) derivative 6a, MRS5698, was surpassed. More efficacious analogues (in vivo) contained the following C2-arylethynyl groups: pyrazin-2-yl 23 (binding Ki, hA3AR, nM 1.8), fur-2-yl 27 (0.6), thien-2-yl 32 (0.6) and its 5-chloro 33, MRS5980 (0.7) and 5-bromo 34 (0.4) equivalents, and physiologically unstable ferrocene 36, MRS5979 (2.7). 33 and 36 displayed particularly long in vivo duration (>3 h). Selected analogues were docked to an A3AR homology model to explore the environment of receptor-bound C2 and N6 groups. Various analogues bound with μM affinity at off-target biogenic amine (M2, 5HT2A, β3, 5HT2B, 5HT2C, and α2C) or other receptors. Thus, we have expanded the structural range of orally active A3AR agonists for chronic pain treatment. PMID:25422861

  6. Analysis of high-affinity assembly for AMPA receptor amino-terminal domains

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huaying; Berger, Anthony J.; Brown, Patrick H.; Kumar, Janesh; Balbo, Andrea; May, Carrie A.; Casillas, Ernesto; Laue, Thomas M.; Patterson, George H.

    2012-01-01

    Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) and steady-state fluorescence anisotropy were used to measure the equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for formation of dimers by the amino-terminal domains (ATDs) of the GluA2 and GluA3 subtypes of AMPA receptor. Previous reports on GluA2 dimerization differed in their estimate of the monomer–dimer Kd by a 2,400-fold range, with no consensus on whether the ATD forms tetramers in solution. We find by sedimentation velocity (SV) analysis performed using absorbance detection a narrow range of monomer–dimer Kd values for GluA2, from 5 to 11 nM for six independent experiments, with no detectable formation of tetramers and no effect of glycosylation or the polypeptide linker connecting the ATD and ligand-binding domains; for GluA3, the monomer–dimer Kd was 5.6 µM, again with no detectable tetramer formation. For sedimentation equilibrium (SE) experiments, a wide range of Kd values was obtained for GluA2, from 13 to 284 nM, whereas for GluA3, the Kd of 3.1 µM was less than twofold different from the SV value. Analysis of cell contents after the ∼1-week centrifuge run by silver-stained gels revealed low molecular weight GluA2 breakdown products. Simulated data for SE runs demonstrate that the apparent Kd for GluA2 varies with the extent of proteolysis, leading to artificially high Kd values. SV experiments with fluorescence detection for GluA2 labeled with 5,6-carboxyfluorescein, and fluorescence anisotropy measurements for GluA2 labeled with DyLight405, yielded Kd values of 5 and 11 nM, consistent with those from SV with absorbance detection. However, the sedimentation coefficients measured by AUC using absorbance and fluorescence systems were strikingly different, and for the latter are not consistent with hydrodynamic protein models. Thus, for unknown reasons, the concentration dependence of sedimentation coefficients obtained with fluorescence detection SV may be unreliable, limiting the usefulness of this technique for

  7. Effects of Anticholinesterase Exposure on Transport and Distribution of High vs. Low Affinity Muscarinic Cholinergic Receptors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-11

    atypical antagonist pirenzepine . Thus, it will be possible to localize several different muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes in animals chronically... pirenzepine . These results indicate the presence of two distinct muscarinic receptor subtypes (M1 and M2 ) in the brain. The data suggest that these two...defined by direct labeling for receptor autoradiography. The discovery of the atypical muscarinic antagonist pirenzepine has prompted the definition of

  8. Isolation of human beta-interferon receptor by wheat germ lectin affinity and immunosorbent column chromatographies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.Q.; Fournier, A.; Tan, Y.H.

    1986-06-15

    Radioiodinated human beta-interferon-Ser 17 (Betaseron) was reversibly cross-linked to Daudi cells by dithiobis(succinimidylpropionate). The radioactive ligand was cross-linked to three macromolecules forming labeled complexes of apparent Mr values of 130,000, 220,000, and 320,000. Betaseron, human alpha-interferon, human interleukin 2 but not recombinant human gamma-interferon competed with the labeled ligand for binding to these putative receptor(s). Human leukocyte-produced gamma-interferon competed weakly with /sup 125/I-Betaseron for binding to Daudi cells. The Betaseron-receptor complex(es) was purified by passage through a wheat germ lectin column followed by chromatography on an anti-interferon immunosorbent column and semipreparative gel electrophoresis. The cross-linked ligand-receptor complex was shown to be highly purified by sodium dodecyl sulfate and acetic acid:urea:Triton X-100 polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. It can be dissociated into the labeled Betaseron (Mr = 17,000) ligand and a receptor moiety which has an apparent molecular weight of 110,000. The chromatographic behavior of the ligand-receptor complex on wheat germ lectin column suggests that the receptor is a glycoprotein. The described procedure yielded about 1 microgram of Betaseron receptor from 10(10) Daudi cells, estimated to contain a maximum of about 15 micrograms of the receptor.

  9. Structural Changes in the Lectin Domain of CD23, the Low-Affinity IgE Receptor, upon Calcium Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Wurzburg, Beth A.; Tarchevskaya, Svetlana S.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2010-03-08

    CD23, the low-affinity receptor for IgE (Fc{var_epsilon}RII), regulates IgE synthesis and also mediates IgE-dependent antigen transport and processing. CD23 is a unique Fc receptor belonging to the C-type lectin-like domain superfamily and binds IgE in an unusual, non-lectin-like manner, requiring calcium but not carbohydrate. We have solved the high-resolution crystal structures of the human CD23 lectin domain in the presence and absence of Ca{sup 2+}. The crystal structures differ significantly from a previously determined NMR structure and show that calcium binding occurs at the principal binding site, but not at an auxiliary site that appears to be absent in human CD23. Conformational differences between the apo and Ca{sup 2+} bound structures suggest how IgE-Fc binding can be both calcium-dependent and carbohydrate-independent.

  10. Differential role of the low affinity neurotrophin receptor (p75) in retrograde axonal transport of the neurotrophins.

    PubMed

    Curtis, R; Adryan, K M; Stark, J L; Park, J S; Compton, D L; Weskamp, G; Huber, L J; Chao, M V; Jaenisch, R; Lee, K F

    1995-06-01

    The receptor mechanisms mediating the retrograde axonal transport of the neurotrophins have been investigated in adult rats. We show that transport of the TrkB ligands NT-4 and BDNF to peripheral neurons is dependent on the low affinity neurotrophin receptor (LNR). Pharmacological manipulation of LNR in vivo using either an anti-LNR antibody or a soluble recombinant LNR extracellular domain completely blocked retrograde transport of NT-4 and BDNF to sensory neurons, while having minimal effects on the transport of NGF in either sensory or sympathetic neurons. Furthermore, in mice with a null mutation of LNR, the transport of NT-4 and BDNF, but not NGF, was dramatically reduced. These observations demonstrate a selective role for LNR in retrograde transport of the various neurotrophins from distinct target regions in vivo.

  11. Synthesis of imidacloprid derivatives with a chiral alkylated imidazolidine ring and evaluation of their insecticidal activity and affinity to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Nishiwaki, Hisashi; Kuriyama, Mituhiro; Nagaoka, Hikaru; Kato, Akira; Akamatsu, Miki; Yamauchi, Satoshi; Shuto, Yoshihiro

    2012-11-01

    A series of imidacloprid (IMI) derivatives with an alkylated imidazolidine ring were asymmetrically synthesized to evaluate their insecticidal activity against adult female housefly, Musca domestica, and affinity to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor of the flies. The bulkier the alkyl group, the lower was the receptor affinity, but the derivatives methylated and ethylated at the R-5-position of the imidazolidine ring were equipotent to the unsubstituted compound. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis of the receptor affinity demonstrated that the introduction of a substituent into the imidazolidine ring was fundamentally disadvantageous, but the introduction of a substituent at the R-5-position was permissible in the case of its small size. The binding model of the synthesized derivatives with the receptor supported the QSAR analysis, indicating the existence of space for a short alkyl group around the R-5-position in the ligand-binding site. In addition, positive correlation was observed between the insecticidal activity and receptor affinity, suggesting that the receptor affinity was the primary factor in influencing the insecticidal activity even if the imidazolidine ring was modified.

  12. Mechanisms of anaphylaxis in human low-affinity IgG receptor locus knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Caitlin M; Jönsson, Friederike; Mancardi, David A; Tu, Naxin; Beutier, Héloïse; Van Rooijen, Nico; Macdonald, Lynn E; Murphy, Andrew J; Bruhns, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Anaphylaxis can proceed through distinct IgE- or IgG-dependent pathways, which have been investigated in various mouse models. We developed a novel mouse strain in which the human low-affinity IgG receptor locus, comprising both activating (hFcγRIIA, hFcγRIIIA, and hFcγRIIIB) and inhibitory (hFcγRIIB) hFcγR genes, has been inserted into the equivalent murine locus, corresponding to a locus swap. We sought to determine the capabilities of hFcγRs to induce systemic anaphylaxis and identify the cell types and mediators involved. hFcγR expression on mouse and human cells was compared to validate the model. Passive systemic anaphylaxis was induced by injection of heat-aggregated human intravenous immunoglobulin and active systemic anaphylaxis after immunization and challenge. Anaphylaxis severity was evaluated based on hypothermia and mortality. The contribution of receptors, mediators, or cell types was assessed based on receptor blockade or depletion. The human-to-mouse low-affinity FcγR locus swap engendered hFcγRIIA/IIB/IIIA/IIIB expression in mice comparable with that seen in human subjects. Knock-in mice were susceptible to passive and active anaphylaxis, accompanied by downregulation of both activating and inhibitory hFcγR expression on specific myeloid cells. The contribution of hFcγRIIA was predominant. Depletion of neutrophils protected against hypothermia and mortality. Basophils contributed to a lesser extent. Anaphylaxis was inhibited by platelet-activating factor receptor or histamine receptor 1 blockade. Low-affinity FcγR locus-switched mice represent an unprecedented model of cognate hFcγR expression. Importantly, IgG-related anaphylaxis proceeds within a native context of activating and inhibitory hFcγRs, indicating that, despite robust hFcγRIIB expression, activating signals can dominate to initiate a severe anaphylactic reaction. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  13. Structural characterization of Y1 and Y2 receptors for neuropeptide Y and peptide YY by affinity cross-linking

    SciTech Connect

    Sheikh, S.P.; Williams, J.A. )

    1990-05-15

    Pharmacological studies indicate that peptide YY (PYY) and neuropeptide Y interact with multiple binding sites, categorized as Y1 and Y2 subtypes. In order to identify and structurally characterize the Y1 and Y2 receptors we covalently cross-linked (125I-Tyr36)PYY to its receptors. The Y2 receptor in rat hippocampus and rabbit kidney membranes was affinity labeled using different homo- and heterobifunctional cross-linking reagents. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography resulted in a major labeled protein band of Mr = 50,000 in both hippocampal and kidney membranes, which was unaffected by reducing agents. The Y1 receptor was analyzed in membranes from the MC-IXC human neuroblastoma cell line. Autoradiography revealed two labeled bands at Mr = 70,000 and 45,000. As the intensity of the Mr = 45,000 band was reduced by protease inhibitors, it is likely that this band is a degradation product of the larger band. Labeling of these proteins was obtained only when N-5-azido-2-nitrobenzoyloxysuccinimide was employed for cross-linking followed by exposure to UV light. Labeling of the two cross-linked bands was unaffected by reducing agents. The binding of radiolabeled PYY and the intensity of the cross-linked bands, for both the Y1 and Y2 receptors, were inhibited similarly in a dose-dependent manner by increasing concentrations of unlabeled PYY. When exposed to agarose-coupled lectins, the detergent-solubilized Y1 receptor-hormone complex was completely adsorbed by wheat germ agglutinin and partially by ricin communis II. The cross-linked Y2 receptor was almost totally adsorbed by wheat germ agglutinin-agarose and partially adsorbed by concanavalin A. The adsorptions were in all cases blocked by the appropriate hapten sugar.

  14. Specificity and Structure of a High Affinity Activin Receptor-like Kinase 1 (ALK1) Signaling Complex

    PubMed Central

    Townson, Sharon A.; Martinez-Hackert, Erik; Greppi, Chloe; Lowden, Patricia; Sako, Dianne; Liu, June; Ucran, Jeffrey A.; Liharska, Katia; Underwood, Kathryn W.; Seehra, Jasbir; Kumar, Ravindra; Grinberg, Asya V.

    2012-01-01

    Activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1), an endothelial cell-specific type I receptor of the TGF-β superfamily, is an important regulator of normal blood vessel development as well as pathological tumor angiogenesis. As such, ALK1 is an important therapeutic target. Thus, several ALK1-directed agents are currently in clinical trials as anti-angiogenic cancer therapeutics. Given the biological and clinical importance of the ALK1 signaling pathway, we sought to elucidate the biophysical and structural basis underlying ALK1 signaling. The TGF-β family ligands BMP9 and BMP10 as well as the three type II TGF-β family receptors ActRIIA, ActRIIB, and BMPRII have been implicated in ALK1 signaling. Here, we provide a kinetic and thermodynamic analysis of BMP9 and BMP10 interactions with ALK1 and type II receptors. Our data show that BMP9 displays a significant discrimination in type II receptor binding, whereas BMP10 does not. We also report the crystal structure of a fully assembled ternary complex of BMP9 with the extracellular domains of ALK1 and ActRIIB. The structure reveals that the high specificity of ALK1 for BMP9/10 is determined by a novel orientation of ALK1 with respect to BMP9, which leads to a unique set of receptor-ligand interactions. In addition, the structure explains how BMP9 discriminates between low and high affinity type II receptors. Taken together, our findings provide structural and mechanistic insights into ALK1 signaling that could serve as a basis for novel anti-angiogenic therapies. PMID:22718755

  15. Familial ligand-defective apolipoprotein B. Identification of a new mutation that decreases LDL receptor binding affinity.

    PubMed Central

    Pullinger, C R; Hennessy, L K; Chatterton, J E; Liu, W; Love, J A; Mendel, C M; Frost, P H; Malloy, M J; Schumaker, V N; Kane, J P

    1995-01-01

    Detection of new ligand-defective mutations of apolipoprotein B (apoB) will enable identification of sequences involved in binding to the LDL receptor. Genomic DNA from patients attending a lipid clinic was screened by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis for novel mutations in the putative LDL receptor-binding domain of apoB-100. A 46-yr-old woman of Celtic and Native American ancestry with primary hypercholesterolemia (total cholesterol [TC] 343 mg/dl; LDL cholesterol [LDL-C] 241 mg/dl) and pronounced peripheral vascular disease was found to be heterozygous for a novel Arg3531-->Cys mutation, caused by a C-->T transition at nucleotide 10800. One unrelated 59-yr-old man of Italian ancestry was found with the same mutation after screening 1,560 individuals. He had coronary heart disease, a TC of 310 mg/dl, and an LDL-C of 212 mg/dl. A total of eight individuals were found with the defect in the families of the two patients. They had an age- and sex-adjusted TC of 240 +/- 14 mg/dl and LDL-C of 169 +/- 10 mg/dl. This compares with eight unaffected family members with age- and sex-adjusted TC of 185 +/- 12 mg/dl and LDL-C of 124 +/- 12 mg/dl. In a dual-label fibroblast binding assay, LDL from the eight subjects with the mutation had an affinity for the LDL receptor that was 63% that of control LDL. LDL from eight unaffected family members had an affinity of 91%. By way of comparison, LDL from six patients heterozygous for the Arg3500-->Gln mutation had an affinity of 36%. The percentage mass ratio of the defective Cys3531 LDL to normal LDL was 59:41, as determined using the mAb MB19 and dynamic laser light scattering. Thus, the defective LDL had accumulated in the plasma of these patients. Using this mass ratio, it was calculated that the defective Cys3531 LDL particles bound with 27% of normal affinity. Deduced haplotypes using 10 apoB gene markers showed the Arg3531-->Cys alleles to be different in the two kindreds and indicates that the mutations arose

  16. Molecular cloning of a second subunit of the receptor for human granulocyte - macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF): Reconstitution of a high-affinity GM-CSF receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashida, Kazuhiro; Kitamura, Toshio; Gorman, D.M.; Miyajima, Atsushi ); Arai, Kenichi; Yokota, Takashi )

    1990-12-01

    Using the mouse interleukin 3 (IL-3) receptor cDNA as a probe, the authors obtained a monologous cDNA (KH97) from a cDNA library of a human hemopoietic cell line, TF-1. The protein encoded by the KH97 cDNA has 56% amino acid sequence identity with the mouse IL-3 receptor and retains features common to the family of cytokine receptors. Fibroblasts transfected with the KH97 cDNA expressed a protein of 120 kDa but did not bind any human cytokines, including IL-3 and granulocyte - macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Interestingly, cotransfection of cDNAs for KH97 and the low-affinity human GM-CSF receptor in fibroblasts resulted in formation of a high-affinity receptor for GM-CSF. The dissociation rate of GM-CSF from the reconstituted high-affinity receptor was slower than that from the low-affinity site, whereas the association rate was unchanged. Cross-linking of {sup 125}I-labeled GM-CSF to fibroblasts cotransfected with both cDNAs revealed the same cross-linking patterns as in TF-1 cells - i.e., two major proteins of 80 and 120 kDa which correspond to the low-affinity GM-CSF receptor and the KH97 protein, respectively. These results indicate that the high-affinity GM-CSF receptor is composed of at least two components in a manner analogous to the IL-2 receptor. They therefore propose to designate the low-affinity GM-CSF receptor and the KH97 protein as the {alpha} and {beta} subunits of the GM-CSF receptor, respectively.

  17. Site-specific modification of calmodulin Ca²(+) affinity tunes the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor activation profile.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jie; Zhou, Yubin; Zou, Jin; Chen, Yanyi; Patel, Priya; Yang, Jenny J; Balog, Edward M

    2010-11-15

    The skeletal muscle isoform of the ryanodine receptor Ca²(+)-release channel (RyR1) is regulated by Ca²(+) and CaM (calmodulin). CaM shifts the biphasic Ca²(+)-dependence of RyR1 activation leftward, effectively increasing channel opening at low Ca²(+) and decreasing channel opening at high Ca²(+). The conversion of CaM from a RyR1 activator into an inhibitor is due to the binding of Ca²(+) to CaM; however, which of CaM's four Ca²(+)-binding sites serves as the switch for this conversion is unclear. We engineered a series of mutant CaMs designed to individually increase the Ca²(+) affinity of each of CaM's EF-hands by increasing the number of acidic residues in Ca²(+)-chelating positions. Domain-specific Ca²(+) affinities of each CaM variant were determined by equilibrium fluorescence titration. Mutations in sites I (T26D) or II (N60D) in CaM's N-terminal domain had little effect on CaM Ca²(+) affinity and regulation of RyR1. However, the site III mutation N97D increased the Ca²(+)-binding affinity of CaM's C-terminal domain and caused CaM to inhibit RyR1 at a lower Ca²(+) concentration than wild-type CaM. Conversely, the site IV mutation Q135D decreased the Ca²(+)-binding affinity of CaM's C-terminal domain and caused CaM to inhibit RyR1 at higher Ca²(+) concentrations. These results support the hypothesis that Ca²(+) binding to CaM's C-terminal acts as the switch converting CaM from a RyR1 activator into a channel inhibitor. These results indicate further that targeting CaM's Ca²(+) affinity may be a valid strategy to tune the activation profile of CaM-regulated ion channels.

  18. Development of indazolylpyrimidine derivatives as high-affine EphB4 receptor ligands and potential PET radiotracers.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Kristin; Wiemer, Jens; Caballero, Julio; Köckerling, Martin; Steinbach, Jörg; Pietzsch, Jens; Mamat, Constantin

    2015-09-01

    Due to their essential role in the pathogenesis of cancer, members of the Eph (erythropoietin-producing hepatoma cell line-A2) receptor tyrosine kinase family represent promising candidates for molecular imaging. Thus, the development and preparation of novel radiotracers for the noninvasive imaging of the EphB4 receptor via positron emission tomography (PET) is described. First in silico investigations with the indazolylpyrimidine lead compound which is known to be highly affine to EphB4 were executed to identify favorable labeling positions for an introduction of fluorine-18 to retain the affinity. Based on this, reference compounds as well as precursors were developed and labeled with carbon-11 and fluorine-18, respectively. For this purpose, a protecting group strategy essentially had to be generated to prevent unwanted methylation and to enable the introduction of fluorine-18. Further, a convenient radiolabeling strategy using [(11)C]methyl iodide was established which afforded the isotopically labeled radiotracer in 30-35% RCY (d.c.) which is identical with the original inhibitor molecule. A spiro ammonium precursor was prepared for radiolabeling with fluorine-18. Unfortunately, the labeling did not lead to the desired (18)F-radiotracer under the chosen conditions.

  19. A novel high throughput screening assay for binding affinities of perfluoroalkyl iodide for estrogen receptor alpha and beta isoforms.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenting; Zhao, Lixia; Sun, Zhendong; Yang, Xiaoxi; Zhou, Qunfang; Jiang, Guibin

    2017-12-01

    Contaminants of emerging concern are continuously increasing, which makes it important to develop high throughput screening techniques for the evaluation of their potential biological effects, especially endocrine disrupting effects, which would directly influence the population dynamics in environment. A novel competitive binding assay based on enzyme fragmentation complementation technology was established to screen the binding affinities of emerging chemicals for estrogen receptor (ER) α or β isoforms. Exogenous compounds could compete with the fragment (ED-ES) of genetically engineered β-galactosidase enzyme (β-gal) for the binding to ERα or β, thus quantitatively altering the formation of enzymatically active β-gal and the hydrolysis of luminescent substrate. According to the monitoring of luminescence curves and the optimization of ERα or β concentrations, it was found that luminescent signals were sustainably emitted for 9h, and 40nM ERα or β in the system would lead to the most sensitive luminescence response. Using 17β-estrodiol (E2) and genistein as the representative estrogenic hormones, their binding affinities for ERα and β were evaluated. The results were consistent with those determined by traditional methods, which confirmed the reliability of this competitive binding assay based on β-gal. Four polyfluorinated iodine alkanes (PFIs) with specific structural characteristics in iodine substitution and carbon chain length were screened, and the results showed diverse binding affinities and different preferences of these chemicals to ERα or β isoforms. The binding affinities of PFIs for ERα were consistent with the result from MVLN transcriptional reporter assay. Overall, the competitive binding assay presented in this study provided a promising alternative to high throughput screening of emerging chemicals with estrogenic effects, which would be important in explanation of their potential toxicological effects and human exposure risks

  20. AGIA Tag System Based on a High Affinity Rabbit Monoclonal Antibody against Human Dopamine Receptor D1 for Protein Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Tomoya; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Uematsu, Atsushi; Yamanaka, Satoshi; Nomura, Shunsuke; Nemoto, Keiichirou; Iwasaki, Takahiro; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Sawasaki, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Polypeptide tag technology is widely used for protein detection and affinity purification. It consists of two fundamental elements: a peptide sequence and a binder which specifically binds to the peptide tag. In many tag systems, antibodies have been used as binder due to their high affinity and specificity. Recently, we obtained clone Ra48, a high-affinity rabbit monoclonal antibody (mAb) against dopamine receptor D1 (DRD1). Here, we report a novel tag system composed of Ra48 antibody and its epitope sequence. Using a deletion assay, we identified EEAAGIARP in the C-terminal region of DRD1 as the minimal epitope of Ra48 mAb, and we named this sequence the “AGIA” tag, based on its central sequence. The tag sequence does not include the four amino acids, Ser, Thr, Tyr, or Lys, which are susceptible to post-translational modification. We demonstrated performance of this new tag system in biochemical and cell biology applications. SPR analysis demonstrated that the affinity of the Ra48 mAb to the AGIA tag was 4.90 × 10−9 M. AGIA tag showed remarkably high sensitivity and specificity in immunoblotting. A number of AGIA-fused proteins overexpressed in animal and plant cells were detected by anti-AGIA antibody in immunoblotting and immunostaining with low background, and were immunoprecipitated efficiently. Furthermore, a single amino acid substitution of the second Glu to Asp (AGIA/E2D) enabled competitive dissociation of AGIA/E2D-tagged protein by adding wild-type AGIA peptide. It enabled one-step purification of AGIA/E2D-tagged recombinant proteins by peptide competition under physiological conditions. The sensitivity and specificity of the AGIA system makes it suitable for use in multiple methods for protein analysis. PMID:27271343

  1. A Soluble Form of the High Affinity IgE Receptor, Fc-Epsilon-RI, Circulates in Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Dehlink, Eleonora; Platzer, Barbara; Baker, Alexandra H.; LaRosa, Jessica; Pardo, Michael; Dwyer, Peter; Yen, Elizabeth H.; Szépfalusi, Zsolt

    2011-01-01

    Soluble IgE receptors are potential in vivo modulators of IgE-mediated immune responses and are thus important for our basic understanding of allergic responses. We here characterize a novel soluble version of the IgE-binding alpha-chain of Fc-epsilon-RI (sFcεRI), the high affinity receptor for IgE. sFcεRI immunoprecipitates as a protein of ∼40 kDa and contains an intact IgE-binding site. In human serum, sFcεRI is found as a soluble free IgE receptor as well as a complex with IgE. Using a newly established ELISA, we show that serum sFcεRI levels correlate with serum IgE in patients with elevated IgE. We also show that serum of individuals with normal IgE levels can be found to contain high levels of sFcεRI. After IgE-antigen-mediated crosslinking of surface FcεRI, we detect sFcεRI in the exosome-depleted, soluble fraction of cell culture supernatants. We further show that sFcεRI can block binding of IgE to FcεRI expressed at the cell surface. In summary, we here describe the alpha-chain of FcεRI as a circulating soluble IgE receptor isoform in human serum. PMID:21544204

  2. Phenylalanine-780 near the C-terminus of the mouse glucocorticoid receptor is important for ligand binding affinity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Chen, D; Kohli, K; Zhang, S; Danielsen, M; Stallcup, M R

    1994-04-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis was employed to make two single amino acid substitutions for highly conserved amino acid residues near the C-terminus of the 783-amino acid mouse glucocorticoid receptor. Substitution of leucine for histidine-781 caused little or no change in the concentration of dexamethasone required for half-maximal activation of a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene expressed from a mouse mammary tumor virus promoter. However, when phenylalanine-780 was changed to alanine, the half-maximal concentrations of various agonists were increased as follows, compared with the wild-type glucocorticoid receptor: triamcinolone acetonide by 7-fold, dexamethasone by 25-fold, and hydrocortisone and deoxycorticosterone by more than 150-fold. Binding of labeled steroids by the mutant receptor in vitro and in vivo was also decreased. In contrast, this mutation caused a small decrease in the concentration of RU486 required for antagonist or partial agonist activity. Thus, the phenyl group of phenylalanine-780 of the mouse glucocorticoid receptor is an important determinant of ligand binding affinity and specificity.

  3. Design, synthesis, cytocidal activity and estrogen receptor α affinity of doxorubicin conjugates at 16α-position of estrogen for site-specific treatment of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Saha, Pijus; Fortin, Sébastien; Leblanc, Valérie; Parent, Sophie; Asselin, Éric; Bérubé, Gervais

    2012-09-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is an important medicine for the treatment of breast cancer, which is the most frequently diagnosed and the most lethal cancer in women worldwide. However, the clinical use of DOX is impeded by serious toxic effects such as cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure. Covalently linking DOX to estrogen to selectively deliver the drug to estrogen receptor-positive (ER(+)) cancer tissues is one of the strategies under investigation for improving the efficacy and decreasing the cardiac toxicity of DOX. However, conjugation of drug performed until now was at 3- or 17-position of estrogen, which is not ideal since the hydroxyl groups at this position are important for receptor binding affinity. In this study, we designed, prepared and evaluated in vitro the first estrogen-doxorubicin conjugates at 16α-position of estradiol termed E-DOXs (8a-d). DOX was conjugated using a 3-9 carbon atoms alkylamide linking arm. E-DOXs were prepared from estrone using a seven-step procedure to afford the desired conjugates in low to moderate yields. The antiproliferative activities of the E-DOX 8a conjugate through a 3-carbon spacer chain on ER(+) MCF7 and HT-29 are in the micromolar range while inactive on M21 and the ER(-) MDA-MB-231 cells (>50 μM). Compound 8a exhibits a selectivity ratio (ER(+)/ER(-) cell lines) of >3.5. Compounds 8b-8d bearing alkylamide linking arms ranging from 5 to 9 carbon atoms were inactive at the concentrations tested (>50 μM). Interestingly, compounds 8a-8c exhibited affinity for the estrogen receptor α (ERα) in the nanomolar range (72-100 nM) whereas compound 8d exhibited no affinity at concentrations up to 215 nM. These results indicate that a short alkylamide spacer is required to maintain both antiproliferative activity toward ER(+) MCF7 and affinity for the ERα of the E-DOX conjugates. Compound 8a is potentially a promising conjugate to target ER(+) breast cancer and might be useful also for the design of more potent E

  4. Thujone exhibits low affinity for cannabinoid receptors but fails to evoke cannabimimetic responses.

    PubMed

    Meschler, J P; Howlett, A C

    1999-03-01

    Absinthe, an abused drug in the early 1900s, has been speculated to activate the receptors responsible for marijuana intoxication (the CB1 cannabinoid receptor) (Nature 253:365-356; 1975). To test this hypothesis, we investigated oil of wormwood (Artemisia absinthium) the active plant product found in absinthe, and thujone, the active compound found in oil of wormwood. Radioligand receptor binding assays employing membrane preparations from rat brains containing CB1 cannabinoid receptors, and human tonsils containing CB2 receptors, demonstrated that thujone displaced [3H]CP55940, a cannabinoid agonist, only at concentrations above 10 microM. HPLC analysis of oil of wormwood revealed that only the fractions having mobility close to thujone displaced [3H]CP55940 from the CB1 cannabinoid receptor. [35S]GTPgammaS binding assays revealed that thujone failed to stimulate G-proteins even at 0.1 mM. Thujone failed to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in N18TG2 membranes at 1 mM. Rats administered thujone exhibited different behavioral characteristics compared with rats administered a potent cannabinoid agonist, levonantradol. Therefore, the hypothesis that activation of cannabinoid receptors is responsible for the intoxicating effects of thujone is not supported by the present data.

  5. Purification to homogeneity of an active opioid receptor from rat brain by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Loukas, S; Mercouris, M; Panetsos, F; Zioudrou, C

    1994-05-10

    Active opioid binding proteins were solubilized from rat brain membranes in high yield with sodium deoxycholate in the presence of NaCl. Purification of opioid binding proteins was accomplished by opioid antagonist affinity chromatography. Chromatography using the delta-opioid antagonist N,N-diallyl-Tyr-D-Leu-Gly-Tyr-Leu attached to omega-aminododecyl-agarose (Affi-G) (procedure A) yielded a partially purified protein that binds selectively the delta-opioid agonist [3H]Tyr-D-Ser-Gly-Phe-Leu-Thr ([3H]DSLET), with a Kd of 19 +/- 3 nM and a Bmax of 5.1 +/- 0.4 nmol/mg of protein. Subsequently, Lens culinaris agglutinin-Sepharose 4B chromatography of the Affi-G eluate resulted in isolation of an electrophoretically homogeneous protein of 58 kDa that binds selectively [3H]DSLET with a Kd of 21 +/- 3 nM and a Bmax of 16.5 +/- 1.0 nmol/mg of protein. Chromatography using the nonselective antagonist 6-aminonaloxone coupled to 6-aminohexanoic acid-Sepharose 4B (Affi-NAL) (procedure B) resulted in isolation of a protein that binds selectively [3H]DSLET with a Kd of 32 +/- 2 nM and a Bmax of 12.4 +/- 0.5 nmol/mg of protein, and NaDodSO4/PAGE revealed a major band of apparent molecular mass 58 kDa. Polyclonal antibodies (Anti-R IgG) raised against the Affi-NAL protein inhibit the specific [3H]DSLET binding to the Affi-NAL eluate and to the solubilized membranes. Moreover, the Anti-R IgG inhibits the specific binding of radiolabeled Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-N-methyl-Phe-Gly-ol (DAMGO; mu-agonist), DSLET (delta-agonist), and naloxone to homogenates of rat brain membranes with equal potency. Furthermore, immunoaffinity chromatography of solubilized membranes resulted in the retention of a major protein of apparent molecular mass 58 kDa. In addition, immunoblotting of solubilized membranes and purified proteins from the Affi-G and Affi-NAL matrices revealed that the Anti-R IgG interacts with a protein of 58 kDa.

  6. Purification to homogeneity of an active opioid receptor from rat brain by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed Central

    Loukas, S; Mercouris, M; Panetsos, F; Zioudrou, C

    1994-01-01

    Active opioid binding proteins were solubilized from rat brain membranes in high yield with sodium deoxycholate in the presence of NaCl. Purification of opioid binding proteins was accomplished by opioid antagonist affinity chromatography. Chromatography using the delta-opioid antagonist N,N-diallyl-Tyr-D-Leu-Gly-Tyr-Leu attached to omega-aminododecyl-agarose (Affi-G) (procedure A) yielded a partially purified protein that binds selectively the delta-opioid agonist [3H]Tyr-D-Ser-Gly-Phe-Leu-Thr ([3H]DSLET), with a Kd of 19 +/- 3 nM and a Bmax of 5.1 +/- 0.4 nmol/mg of protein. Subsequently, Lens culinaris agglutinin-Sepharose 4B chromatography of the Affi-G eluate resulted in isolation of an electrophoretically homogeneous protein of 58 kDa that binds selectively [3H]DSLET with a Kd of 21 +/- 3 nM and a Bmax of 16.5 +/- 1.0 nmol/mg of protein. Chromatography using the nonselective antagonist 6-aminonaloxone coupled to 6-aminohexanoic acid-Sepharose 4B (Affi-NAL) (procedure B) resulted in isolation of a protein that binds selectively [3H]DSLET with a Kd of 32 +/- 2 nM and a Bmax of 12.4 +/- 0.5 nmol/mg of protein, and NaDodSO4/PAGE revealed a major band of apparent molecular mass 58 kDa. Polyclonal antibodies (Anti-R IgG) raised against the Affi-NAL protein inhibit the specific [3H]DSLET binding to the Affi-NAL eluate and to the solubilized membranes. Moreover, the Anti-R IgG inhibits the specific binding of radiolabeled Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-N-methyl-Phe-Gly-ol (DAMGO; mu-agonist), DSLET (delta-agonist), and naloxone to homogenates of rat brain membranes with equal potency. Furthermore, immunoaffinity chromatography of solubilized membranes resulted in the retention of a major protein of apparent molecular mass 58 kDa. In addition, immunoblotting of solubilized membranes and purified proteins from the Affi-G and Affi-NAL matrices revealed that the Anti-R IgG interacts with a protein of 58 kDa. Images PMID:8183950

  7. Positive allosteric modulation of the GHB high-affinity binding site by the GABAA receptor modulator monastrol and the flavonoid catechin.

    PubMed

    Eghorn, Laura F; Hoestgaard-Jensen, Kirsten; Kongstad, Kenneth T; Bay, Tina; Higgins, David; Frølund, Bente; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2014-10-05

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a metabolite of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and a proposed neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain. We recently identified α4βδ GABAA receptors as possible high-affinity GHB targets. GABAA receptors are highly sensitive to allosteric modulation. Thus to investigate whether GHB high-affinity binding sites are also sensitive to allosteric modulation, we screened both known GABAA receptor ligands and a library of natural compounds in the rat cortical membrane GHB specific high-affinity [3H]NCS-382 binding assay. Two hits were identified: Monastrol, a positive allosteric modulator of GABA function at δ-containing GABAA receptors, and the naturally occurring flavonoid catechin. These compounds increased [3H]NCS-382 binding to 185-272% in high micromolar concentrations. Monastrol and (+)-catechin significantly reduced [3H]NCS-382 dissociation rates and induced conformational changes in the binding site, demonstrating a positive allosteric modulation of radioligand binding. Surprisingly, binding of [3H]GHB and the GHB high-affinity site-specific radioligands [125I]BnOPh-GHB and [3H]HOCPCA was either decreased or only weakly increased, indicating that the observed modulation was critically probe-dependent. Both monastrol and (+)-catechin were agonists at recombinant α4β3δ receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. When monastrol and GHB were co-applied no changes were seen compared to the individual responses. In summary, we have identified the compounds monastrol and catechin as the first allosteric modulators of GHB high-affinity binding sites. Despite their relatively weak affinity, these compounds may aid in further characterization of the GHB high-affinity sites that are likely to represent certain GABAA receptors.

  8. Fluctuations in the affinity and concentration of insulin receptors on circulating monocytes of obese patients: effects of starvation, refeeding, and dieting.

    PubMed Central

    Bar, R S; Gorden, P; Roth, J; Kahn, C R; De Meyts, P

    1976-01-01

    The binding of 125I-insulin to insulin receptors on circulating monocytes of obese patients and normal volunteers has been determined under various dietary states. In the basal, fed state the monocytes of obese patients with clinical insulin resistance (n= 6) bound less insulin than normals (n =10) because of a decrease in insulin receptor concentration (obese = 6,000-13,000 sites per monocyte versus normals 15,000-28,000 sites per monocyte). The single obese patient without evidence of clinical insulin resistance demonstrated normal binding of insulin with 16,000 sites per monocyte. In all patients, the total receptor concentration was inversely related to the circulating levels of insulin measured at rest after an overnight fast. For the obese patients with basally depressed insulin binding, a 48-72-h fast lowered circulating insulin and increased binding to normal levels but only at low hormone concentrations; this limited normalization of 125I-insulin binding was associated with increased receptor affinity for insulin without change in receptor concentration. Refeeding after the acute fasting periods resulted in return to the elevated plasma insulin levels, the basal receptor affinity, and the depressed insulin binding observed in the basal, fed state. Chronic diet restored plasma insulin levels, insulin binding, and receptor concentration to normal without change in affinity. When the data from this study are coupled with previous in vivo and in vitro findings they suggest that the insulin receptor of human monocytes is more sensitive to regulation by ambient insulin than the receptors of obese mice and cultured human lymphocytes. The results further indicate than an insulin receptor undergoes in vivo modulation of its interaction with insulin by changing receptor concentration and by altering the affinity of existing receptors. Images PMID:993336

  9. The MC3 receptor binding affinity of melanocortins correlates with the nitric oxide production inhibition in mice brain inflammation model.

    PubMed

    Muceniece, Ruta; Zvejniece, Liga; Liepinsh, Edgars; Kirjanova, Olga; Baumane, Larisa; Petrovska, Ramona; Mutulis, Felikss; Mutule, Ilze; Kalvinsh, Ivars; Wikberg, Jarl E S; Dambrova, Maija

    2006-06-01

    Melanocortins possess strong anti-inflammatory effects acting in the central nervous system via inhibition of the production of nitric oxide (NO) during brain inflammation. To shed more light into the role of melanocortin (MC) receptor subtypes involved we synthesized and evaluated some novel peptides, modified in the melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) core structure, natural MCs and known MC receptor selective peptides - MS05, MS06. Since the study included both selective, high affinity binders and the novel peptides, it was possible to do the correlation analysis of binding activities and the NO induction-related anti-inflammatory effect of the peptides. beta-MSH, gamma1-MSH, gamma2-MSH, alpha-MSH, MS05, Ac-MS06 and Ac-[Ser12]MS06 caused dose dependent inhibition of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced increase of NO overproduction in the mice forebrain whereas MSH core modified peptides Ac-[Asp9,Ser12]MS06, [Asp9]alpha-MSH and [Asp16]beta-MSH were devoid of this effect in doses up to 10 nmol per mouse. When the minimal effective dose required for inhibition of NO production was correlated with the in vitro binding activity to MC receptor subtypes a strong and significant correlation was found for the MC3 receptor (r = 0.90; p = 0.0008), whereas weak correlation was present for the other receptors. Our results suggest that the MC3 receptor is the major player in mediating the anti-inflammatory activity of MCs in the central nervous system.

  10. CB2 cannabinoid receptor agonist enantiomers HU-433 and HU-308: An inverse relationship between binding affinity and biological potency

    PubMed Central

    Smoum, Reem; Baraghithy, Saja; Chourasia, Mukesh; Breuer, Aviva; Mussai, Naama; Attar-Namdar, Malka; Kogan, Natalya M.; Raphael, Bitya; Bolognini, Daniele; Cascio, Maria G.; Marini, Pietro; Pertwee, Roger G.; Shurki, Avital; Mechoulam, Raphael; Bab, Itai

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the CB2 receptor is apparently an endogenous protective mechanism. Thus, it restrains inflammation and protects the skeleton against age-related bone loss. However, the endogenous cannabinoids, as well as Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main plant psychoactive constituent, activate both cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. HU-308 was among the first synthetic, selective CB2 agonists. HU-308 is antiosteoporotic and antiinflammatory. Here we show that the HU-308 enantiomer, designated HU-433, is 3–4 orders of magnitude more potent in osteoblast proliferation and osteoclast differentiation culture systems, as well as in mouse models, for the rescue of ovariectomy-induced bone loss and ear inflammation. HU-433 retains the HU-308 specificity for CB2, as shown by its failure to bind to the CB1 cannabinoid receptor, and has no activity in CB2-deficient cells and animals. Surprisingly, the CB2 binding affinity of HU-433 in terms of [3H]CP55,940 displacement and its effect on [35S]GTPγS accumulation is substantially lower compared with HU-308. A molecular-modeling analysis suggests that HU-433 and -308 have two different binding conformations within CB2, with one of them possibly responsible for the affinity difference, involving [35S]GTPγS and cAMP synthesis. Hence, different ligands may have different orientations relative to the same binding site. This situation questions the usefulness of universal radioligands for comparative binding studies. Moreover, orientation-targeted ligands have promising potential for the pharmacological activation of distinct processes. PMID:26124120

  11. CB2 cannabinoid receptor agonist enantiomers HU-433 and HU-308: An inverse relationship between binding affinity and biological potency.

    PubMed

    Smoum, Reem; Baraghithy, Saja; Chourasia, Mukesh; Breuer, Aviva; Mussai, Naama; Attar-Namdar, Malka; Kogan, Natalya M; Raphael, Bitya; Bolognini, Daniele; Cascio, Maria G; Marini, Pietro; Pertwee, Roger G; Shurki, Avital; Mechoulam, Raphael; Bab, Itai

    2015-07-14

    Activation of the CB2 receptor is apparently an endogenous protective mechanism. Thus, it restrains inflammation and protects the skeleton against age-related bone loss. However, the endogenous cannabinoids, as well as Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main plant psychoactive constituent, activate both cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2. HU-308 was among the first synthetic, selective CB2 agonists. HU-308 is antiosteoporotic and antiinflammatory. Here we show that the HU-308 enantiomer, designated HU-433, is 3-4 orders of magnitude more potent in osteoblast proliferation and osteoclast differentiation culture systems, as well as in mouse models, for the rescue of ovariectomy-induced bone loss and ear inflammation. HU-433 retains the HU-308 specificity for CB2, as shown by its failure to bind to the CB1 cannabinoid receptor, and has no activity in CB2-deficient cells and animals. Surprisingly, the CB2 binding affinity of HU-433 in terms of [(3)H]CP55,940 displacement and its effect on [(35)S]GTPγS accumulation is substantially lower compared with HU-308. A molecular-modeling analysis suggests that HU-433 and -308 have two different binding conformations within CB2, with one of them possibly responsible for the affinity difference, involving [(35)S]GTPγS and cAMP synthesis. Hence, different ligands may have different orientations relative to the same binding site. This situation questions the usefulness of universal radioligands for comparative binding studies. Moreover, orientation-targeted ligands have promising potential for the pharmacological activation of distinct processes.

  12. PET studies with low and high affinity dopamine D2 receptor radioligands: Effects of 4-hydroxybutyrate (4HB)

    SciTech Connect

    Gatley, S.J.; Fowler, J.S.; Dewey, S.

    1994-05-01

    D2 radioligands of varying affinities have been developed as PET and SPECT radiotracers, but no consensus has been reached on the abilities of these tracers to quantify D2 receptor concentrations in vivo. Amongst other differences, competition of the radioligand with endogenous DA is expected to depend on affinity for the D2 receptor, so that changes in DA might confound estimates of Bmax. We examined the uptake and kinetics if C-11 raclopride (RAC; Kd = 1.2 nM) and C-11 N-methylspiperone (NMS); Kd = 75 pM in baboon striatum after pretreatment with 4HB (200 mg/Kg, i/v) which inhibits DA release by nigrostriatal nerve terminals. While 4HB diminished uptake (%ID/g) of NMS, it prolonged tissue retention of RAC, confirming previous observations in rodent models. Logan (for RAC) and Patlak (for NMS) plots gave changes of +24% and -20%, respectively, between control and 4HB treated animals. Since decreased competition with DA should increase uptake of NMS as well as RAC the paradoxical decrease in NMS uptake could be due to a second synaptic effect of DA, such as a decrease in agonist mediated internalization of NMS. Alternatively, it could result from an independent effect of 4HB, perhaps related to this drug`s ability to induce anesthesia and to depress cerebral glucose utilization. Although previous work in the rat suggests that 4HB does not alter brain blood flow, we found O-15 water that baboon striatal blood flow was decreased 22% and 42% at 30 and 60 minutes, respectively, after 4HB. Smaller changes were seen in cerebellar blood flow. Though a 4HB induced decrease in blood flow does not rule out a DA mediated alteration in D2 receptor Bmax or Kd for NMS, or other factor, it is unnecessary to invoke this to account for our results.

  13. Apparent CB1 Receptor Rimonabant Affinity Estimates: Combination with THC and Synthetic Cannabinoids in the Mouse In Vivo Triad Model.

    PubMed

    Grim, T W; Morales, A J; Thomas, B F; Wiley, J L; Endres, G W; Negus, S S; Lichtman, A H

    2017-07-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) represent an emerging class of abused drugs associated with psychiatric complications and other substantial health risks. These ligands are largely sold over the internet for human consumption, presumably because of their high cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) affinity and their potency in eliciting pharmacological effects similar to Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), as well as circumventing laws illegalizing this plant. Factors potentially contributing to the increased prevalence of SC abuse and related hospitalizations, such as increased CB1R efficacy and non-CB1R targets, highlight the need for quantitative pharmacological analyses to determine receptor mediation of the pharmacological effects of cannabinoids. Accordingly, the present study used pA2 and pKB analyses for quantitative determination of CB1R mediation in which we utilized the CB1R-selective inverse agonist/antagonist rimonabant to elicit rightward shifts in the dose-response curves of five SCs (i.e., A-834,735D; WIN55,212-2; CP55,950; JWH-073; and CP47,497) and THC in producing common cannabimimetic effects (i.e., catalepsy, antinociception, and hypothermia). The results revealed overall similarity of pA2 and pKB values for these compounds and suggest that CB1Rs, and not other pharmacological targets, largely mediated the central pharmacological effects of SCs. More generally, affinity estimation offers a powerful pharmacological approach to assess potential receptor heterogeneity subserving in vivo pharmacological effects of SCs. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  14. Pharmacological characterization of metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated high-affinity GTPase activity in rat cerebral cortical membranes

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, Nobuyuki; Odagaki, Yuji; Koyama, Tsukasa

    2000-01-01

    Activation of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G-proteins) functionally coupled to metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) was assessed by agonist-induced high-affinity GTPase (EC3.6.1.-) activity in rat cerebral cortical membranes. L-Glutamate (1 mM) stimulated high-affinity GTPase activity to the same extent throughout the incubation period up to 20 min, in a Mg2+-dependent manner. The addition of 1 mM L-glutamate augmented Vmax of the enzyme activity (1670 to 3850 pmol mg−1 protein 15 min−1) with slight increase in KM value (0.26 to 0.63 μM). The high-affinity GTPase activity was stimulated by the following compounds with a rank order of potency of (2S,2′R,3′R)-2-(2′,3′-dicarboxycyclopropyl) glycine (DCG-IV) >  (2S,1′S,2′S)-2-(carboxycyclopyropyl)glycine (L-CCG-I) > L-glutamate ≥ 2R,4R-4-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate [(2R,4R)-APDC] > 1S,3R-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylate [(1S,3R)-ACPD] > (S)-4-carboxy-3-hydroxyphenylglycine [(S)-4C3HPG] > (S)-3-carboxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycine [(S)-3C4HPG] > ibotenate, but not by L-(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (L-AP4), (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine [(RS)-3,5-DHPG], quisqualate, or L-serine-O-phosphate (L-SOP), indicative of involvement of group II mGluRs, in particular mGluR2. (2S)-α-Ethylglutamate (EGLU), a presumably selective antagonist against group II mGluRs, inhibited DCG-IV-stimulated high-affinity GTPase activity in a competitive manner with an apparent KB of 220 μM. L-Glutamate-stimulated activity was eliminated by pretreatment of the membranes with sulfhydryl alkylating agent N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) at 30–50 μM, indicating that G-proteins of the Gi family are involved. These results indicate that mGluR agonist-induced high-affinity GTPase activity in rat cerebral cortical membranes may be used to detect the functional interaction between group II mGluRs, in particular mGluR2, and NEM-sensitive Gi proteins. PMID:10928972

  15. V101L of human formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) increases receptor affinity and augments the antagonism mediated by cyclosporins

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Caihong; Zhou, Yan; Wang, Jia; Feng, Yang; Wang, Haonan; Xue, Jinglun; Chen, Yani; Ye, Richard D.; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variation plays a major role in drug response variability. CsA (cyclosporin A), a widely used immunosuppressive agent, is a specific antagonist for FPR1 (formyl peptide receptor 1), which is an important G-protein-coupled chemoattractant receptor in the innate immune system. In order to study the variable responses of cyclosporins to different FPR1 mutants, we investigated the distribution of human FPR1 haplotypes among 209 healthy Han Chinese subjects. The haplotype pattern in Han Chinese were characterized on the basis of five SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms), including rs5030878 (p.T11I), rs2070745 (p.V101L), rs5030880 (p.R190W), rs1042229 (p.N192K) and rs867228 (p.A346E). Receptor binding affinity of cyclosporins to FPR1 haplotypes was assessed using N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys–FITC in CHO-Gα16 cells stably transfected with cDNAs encoding the top 12 FPR1 haplotypes in the Han Chinese. Variants of FPR1 carrying a single amino acid substitution of leucine for valine at position 101 (p.Leu101) displayed significantly higher pKi values for CsA and CsH (cyclosporin H), indicative of an improved receptor affinity. The polymorphism of FPR1 p.Leu101 also enhanced the inhibitory effects of cyclosporins on fMLF (N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine)-induced activities, including calcium mobilization, cell chemotaxis and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) phosphorylation. These results point to a possible complication for clinical use of CsA in patients carrying the p.Leu101 allele of FPR1. PMID:23373827

  16. V101L of human formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) increases receptor affinity and augments the antagonism mediated by cyclosporins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Caihong; Zhou, Yan; Wang, Jia; Feng, Yang; Wang, Haonan; Xue, Jinglun; Chen, Yani; Ye, Richard D; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2013-04-15

    Genetic variation plays a major role in drug response variability. CsA (cyclosporin A), a widely used immunosuppressive agent, is a specific antagonist for FPR1 (formyl peptide receptor 1), which is an important G-protein-coupled chemoattractant receptor in the innate immune system. In order to study the variable responses of cyclosporins to different FPR1 mutants, we investigated the distribution of human FPR1 haplotypes among 209 healthy Han Chinese subjects. The haplotype pattern in Han Chinese were characterized on the basis of five SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms), including rs5030878 (p.T11I), rs2070745 (p.V101L), rs5030880 (p.R190W), rs1042229 (p.N192K) and rs867228 (p.A346E). Receptor binding affinity of cyclosporins to FPR1 haplotypes was assessed using N-formyl-Nle-Leu-Phe-Nle-Tyr-Lys-FITC in CHO-G(α16) cells stably transfected with cDNAs encoding the top 12 FPR1 haplotypes in the Han Chinese. Variants of FPR1 carrying a single amino acid substitution of leucine for valine at position 101 (p.Leu(101)) displayed significantly higher pK(i) values for CsA and CsH (cyclosporin H), indicative of an improved receptor affinity. The polymorphism of FPR1 p.Leu(101) also enhanced the inhibitory effects of cyclosporins on fMLF (N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine)-induced activities, including calcium mobilization, cell chemotaxis and MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) phosphorylation. These results point to a possible complication for clinical use of CsA in patients carrying the p.Leu(101) allele of FPR1.

  17. SH2 domain proteins as high-affinity receptor tyrosine kinase substrates.

    PubMed

    Sierke, S L; Koland, J G

    1993-09-28

    Activation of a growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) is accompanied by a rapid autophosphorylation of the receptor on tyrosine residues. Receptor activation has been shown to promote the association of signal-transducing proteins containing SH2 domains (second domain of src homology). These receptor-associated proteins can, in turn, be phosphorylated by the RTK, an event which presumably regulates their activities. It has been suggested that SH2 domains in signal-transducing proteins target these proteins as substrates of the activated RTK. To test this hypothesis, recombinant proteins were generated that contained tyrosine phosphorylation sites of the erbB3 receptor and/or the SH2 domain of c-src. Incorporation of the SH2 domain led to a decrease in KM and an increase in Vmax for the substrate. The KM determined for one chimeric SH2/erbB3 substrate was among the lowest reported for epidermal growth factor RTK substrates. Experiments with a truncated kinase lacking C-terminal autophosphorylation sites indicated that the reduction in KM for these substrates was mediated by interactions between the substrate SH2 domain and phosphotyrosine residues of the RTK. These interactions could also inhibit RTK activity. These results demonstrate that the SH2 domain can effectively target substrates to a RTK and that SH2 domain proteins can regulate RTK activity.

  18. Discovery of the first small-molecule opioid pan antagonist with nanomolar affinity at mu, delta, kappa, and nociceptin opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Zaveri, Nurulain T; Journigan, V Blair; Polgar, Willma E

    2015-04-15

    The trans-(3R,4R)-dimethyl-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine scaffold is a known pharmacophore for mu opioid (MOP), kappa opioid (KOP), and delta opioid (DOP) receptor antagonists; however, it has not been explored in nociceptin opioid (NOP/ORL-1) receptor ligands. We recently found that the selective KOP antagonist JDTic, (3R)-7-hydroxy-N-((1S)-1-{[(3R,4R)-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-3,4-dimethyl-1-piperidinyl]methyl}-2-methylpropyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-3-isoquinolinecarboxamide, containing this opioid antagonist pharmacophore, has significant binding affinity at the NOP receptor (Ki 16.67 ± 0.76 nM), with no intrinsic activity in the [(35)S]GTPγS functional assay. Since this is the first ligand containing the trans-(3R,4R)-dimethyl-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine opioid antagonist pharmacophore to have affinity for the NOP receptor, we explored the structural determinants of its NOP binding affinity. When rational chemical modifications of JDTic were carried out, based on our previously established NOP pharmacophoric structure-activity relationship (SAR) model, most modifications led to a significant decrease in NOP and opioid binding affinity compared to JDTic. Interestingly, however, removal of the 3,4-dimethyl groups of the trans-(3R,4R)-dimethyl-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine antagonist scaffold of JDTic increased the binding affinity at NOP by 10-fold (Ki 1.75 ± 0.74 nM) while maintaining comparable affinity for KOP, MOP, and DOP receptors (Ki 1.14 ± 0.63, 1.67 ± 0.6, and 19.6 ± 1.3 nM, respectively). In vitro functional efficacy studies using the [(35)S]GTPγS assay showed that this compound AT-076 functions as an antagonist at all four opioid receptors. Detailed characterization of the antagonist activity of AT-076 shows that it has a noncompetitive antagonist profile at the NOP and KOP receptors (insurmountable antagonism), but is a potent competitive antagonist at the MOP and DOP receptors, with Ke values 3-6-fold more potent than those of JDTic. AT-076 is the

  19. Assembly of high-affinity insulin receptor agonists and antagonists from peptide building blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäffer, Lauge; Brissette, Renee E.; Spetzler, Jane C.; Pillutla, Renuka C.; Østergaard, Søren; Lennick, Michael; Brandt, Jakob; Fletcher, Paul W.; Danielsen, Gillian M.; Hsiao, Ku-Chuan; Andersen, Asser S.; Dedova, Olga; Ribel, Ulla; Hoeg-Jensen, Thomas; Hertz Hansen, Per; Blume, Arthur J.; Markussen, Jan; Goldstein, Neil I.

    2003-04-01

    Insulin is thought to elicit its effects by crosslinking the two extracellular -subunits of its receptor, thereby inducing a conformational change in the receptor, which activates the intracellular tyrosine kinase signaling cascade. Previously we identified a series of peptides binding to two discrete hotspots on the insulin receptor. Here we show that covalent linkage of such peptides into homodimers or heterodimers results in insulin agonists or antagonists, depending on how the peptides are linked. An optimized agonist has been shown, both in vitro and in vivo, to have a potency close to that of insulin itself. The ability to construct such peptide derivatives may offer a path for developing agonists or antagonists for treatment of a wide variety of diseases.

  20. Analysis of agonism and inverse agonism in functional assays with constitutive activity: estimation of orthosteric ligand affinity constants for active and inactive receptor states.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Frederick J; Suga, Hinako; Griffin, Michael T

    2011-08-01

    We describe a modification of receptor theory for the estimation of observed affinities (K(obs)) and relative efficacies of orthosteric ligands in functional assays that exhibit constitutive activity. Our theory includes parameters for the fractions of the occupied receptor population in the active (intrinsic efficacy, ε) and inactive (ε(i)) states and analogous parameters for the fractions of the free receptor population in the active (ε(sys)) and inactive (ε(i-sys)) states. The total stimulus represents the summation of the active states of the free and occupied receptor populations. A modified operational model is developed that expresses the response as a logistic function of the total stimulus. This function includes the standard parameters related to affinity and efficacy (K(obs) and τ) as well as a parameter proportional to the activity of the free receptor complex, τ(sys). Two related parameters are proportional to the fraction of the free (τ(i-sys)) and occupied (τ(i)) receptor populations in the inactive state. We show that the estimates of the affinity constants of orthosteric ligands for the active (K(b)) and inactive (K(a)) states of the receptor are equivalent to τK(obs)/τ(sys) and τ(i)K(obs)/τ(i-sys), respectively. We verify our method with computer simulation techniques and apply it to the analysis of M(2) and M(3) muscarinic receptors. Our method is applicable in the analysis of ligand bias in drug discovery programs.

  1. Selected C8 two-chain linkers enhance the adenosine A1/A2A receptor affinity and selectivity of caffeine.

    PubMed

    van der Walt, M M; Terre'Blanche, G

    2017-01-05

    Recent research exploring C8 substitution on the caffeine core identified 8-(2-phenylethyl)-1,3,7-trimethylxanthine as a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist. To elaborate further, we included various C8 two-chain-length linkers to enhance adenosine receptor affinity. The results indicated that the unsubstituted benzyloxy linker (1e A1Ki = 1.52 μM) displayed the highest affinity for the A1 adenosine receptor and the para-chloro-substituted phenoxymethyl (1d A2AKi = 1.33 μM) linker the best A2A adenosine receptor affinity. The position of the oxygen revealed that the phenoxymethyl linker favoured A1 adenosine receptor selectivity over the benzyloxy linker and, by introducing a para-chloro substituent, A2A adenosine receptor selectivity was obtained. Selected compounds (1c, 1e) behaved as A1 adenosine receptor antagonists in GTP shift assays and therefore represent selective and non-selective A1 and A2A adenosine receptor antagonists that may have potential for treating neurological disorders.

  2. Stimulation of high affinity gamma-aminobutyric acidB receptors potentiates the depolarization-induced increase of intraneuronal ionized calcium content in cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    De Erausquin, G; Brooker, G; Costa, E; Wojcik, W J

    1992-09-01

    In the treatment of spasticity, the therapeutic cerebrospinal fluid levels of (+/-)-baclofen, a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)B receptor agonist, are below 1 microM. However, the mechanism of the therapeutic action of (+/-)-baclofen remains unknown, because, for the most part, the action of (+/-)-baclofen on GABAB receptors requires micromolar concentrations. Using fura-2 fluorescence microscopy, intracellular ionized calcium was measured in cerebellar granule neurons. Stimulation of a high affinity GABAB receptor potentiated by 2-3-fold the rise in intracellular calcium observed after depolarization of the cell with a Krebs Ringer's buffered solution containing 40 mM K+. Both GABA (100 nM) and (+/-)-baclofen (10-100 nM) stimulated this high affinity receptor. The potentiation of the depolarization-induced rise in intracellular calcium by (+/-)-baclofen (100 nM) was completely blocked by the GABAB receptor antagonist CGP 35348 (200 microM). Also, the intracellular calcium response induced by the activation of high affinity GABAB receptors was prevented by dantrolene (10 microM). The cerebellar granule neurons contained calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) stores. Caffeine (3 mM) and ryanodine (100 microM) potentiated the depolarization-induced rise in intracellular calcium, and this response to both drugs was blocked by dantrolene (10 microM). Because dantrolene does not prevent the rise in intracellular calcium after cell depolarization (this calcium originated from the influx of extracellular calcium), (+/-)-baclofen acting via the high affinity GABAB receptor indirectly activates the CICR stores, allowing the influx of extracellular calcium to trigger the release of calcium from these dantrolene-sensitive CICR stores. Thus, this high affinity GABAB receptor might become activated during persistent depolarization caused by pathological states and could be a mechanism to be studied for the therapeutic action of (+/-)-baclofen in spasticity.

  3. Preparation and characterization of chemical affinity probes for the hepatic galactosyl receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Herzig, M.C.; Weigel, P.H.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have developed a protocol to covalently attach asialo-orosomucoid (ASOR) to the Galactosyl receptor. /sup 125/I-ASOR was modified to an NHS ester by reaction with either disuccinimidyl suberate to give NHS-/sup 125/I-ASOR or dithiobis(succinimidylpropionate) to give NHS-S-S/sup 125/I-ASOR. The specificity of binding of the purified derivatives to isolated rat hepatocytes at 4/sup 0/C, assessed in the presence of ASOR, was >90%. Derivatized ASOR was shown to be covalently cross-linked by the inability of EGTA, to release radioactivity. Optimum cross-linking of the specifically bound derivative was greater than or equal to40%. The specificity of cross-linking to receptor with both cross-linkers was approx.80% as determined by immunoprecipitation of EGTA-treated cells with a goat anti-receptor antisera. SDS-PAGE and autoradiography of extracts from cells cross-linked with either derivative revealed bands of M/sub r/ approx. 108-110 kDa, and 82 kDa under both reducing and nonreducing conditions. Thus, receptor and ASOR could be cross-linked with both high efficiency and high specificity. In order to assess cellular internalization of cross-linked receptor-ligand complexes, cells were treated with dithiothreitol or trypsin to remove, respectively, only the surface bound NHS-S-S-/sup 125/I-ASOR or NHS-/sup 125/I-ASOR. The kinetics of internalization for both derivatized or underivatized ASOR were identical. These results directly show for the first time that both surface receptor and ligand are internalized.

  4. Cubilin, a High Affinity Receptor for Fibroblast Growth Factor 8, Is Required for Cell Survival in the Developing Vertebrate Head*

    PubMed Central

    Cases, Olivier; Perea-Gomez, Aitana; Aguiar, Diego P.; Nykjaer, Anders; Amsellem, Sabine; Chandellier, Jacqueline; Umbhauer, Muriel; Cereghini, Silvia; Madsen, Mette; Collignon, Jérôme; Verroust, Pierre; Riou, Jean-François; Creuzet, Sophie E.; Kozyraki, Renata

    2013-01-01

    Cubilin (Cubn) is a multiligand endocytic receptor critical for the intestinal absorption of vitamin B12 and renal protein reabsorption. During mouse development, Cubn is expressed in both embryonic and extra-embryonic tissues, and Cubn gene inactivation results in early embryo lethality most likely due to the impairment of the function of extra-embryonic Cubn. Here, we focus on the developmental role of Cubn expressed in the embryonic head. We report that Cubn is a novel, interspecies-conserved Fgf receptor. Epiblast-specific inactivation of Cubn in the mouse embryo as well as Cubn silencing in the anterior head of frog or the cephalic neural crest of chick embryos show that Cubn is required during early somite stages to convey survival signals in the developing vertebrate head. Surface plasmon resonance analysis reveals that fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8), a key mediator of cell survival, migration, proliferation, and patterning in the developing head, is a high affinity ligand for Cubn. Cell uptake studies show that binding to Cubn is necessary for the phosphorylation of the Fgf signaling mediators MAPK and Smad1. Although Cubn may not form stable ternary complexes with Fgf receptors (FgfRs), it acts together with and/or is necessary for optimal FgfR activity. We propose that plasma membrane binding of Fgf8, and most likely of the Fgf8 family members Fgf17 and Fgf18, to Cubn improves Fgf ligand endocytosis and availability to FgfRs, thus modulating Fgf signaling activity. PMID:23592779

  5. Isopropylamino and isobutylamino groups as recognition sites for carbohydrates: acyclic receptors with enhanced binding affinity toward β-galactosides.

    PubMed

    Mazik, Monika; Sonnenberg, Claudia

    2010-10-01

    Binding motifs observed in the crystal structures of protein-carbohydrate complexes, in particular the participation of the isopropyl/isobutyl side chain of valine/leucine in the formation of van der Waals contacts, have inspired the design of new artificial carbohydrate receptors. The new compounds, containing a trisubstituted triethylbenzene core, were expected to recognize sugar molecules through a combination of NH···O and OH···N hydrogen bonds, CH···π interactions, and numerous van der Waals contacts. (1)H NMR spectroscopic titrations in competitive and noncompetitive media, as well as binding studies in two-phase systems, such as dissolution of solid carbohydrates in apolar media and phase transfer of sugars from aqueous into organic solvents, revealed effective recognition of neutral carbohydrates and β- vs α-anomer binding preferences in the recognition of glycosides as well as significantly increased binding affinity of the receptors toward β-galactoside in comparison with the previously described receptors.

  6. Cubilin, a high affinity receptor for fibroblast growth factor 8, is required for cell survival in the developing vertebrate head.

    PubMed

    Cases, Olivier; Perea-Gomez, Aitana; Aguiar, Diego P; Nykjaer, Anders; Amsellem, Sabine; Chandellier, Jacqueline; Umbhauer, Muriel; Cereghini, Silvia; Madsen, Mette; Collignon, Jérôme; Verroust, Pierre; Riou, Jean-François; Creuzet, Sophie E; Kozyraki, Renata

    2013-06-07

    Cubilin (Cubn) is a multiligand endocytic receptor critical for the intestinal absorption of vitamin B12 and renal protein reabsorption. During mouse development, Cubn is expressed in both embryonic and extra-embryonic tissues, and Cubn gene inactivation results in early embryo lethality most likely due to the impairment of the function of extra-embryonic Cubn. Here, we focus on the developmental role of Cubn expressed in the embryonic head. We report that Cubn is a novel, interspecies-conserved Fgf receptor. Epiblast-specific inactivation of Cubn in the mouse embryo as well as Cubn silencing in the anterior head of frog or the cephalic neural crest of chick embryos show that Cubn is required during early somite stages to convey survival signals in the developing vertebrate head. Surface plasmon resonance analysis reveals that fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8), a key mediator of cell survival, migration, proliferation, and patterning in the developing head, is a high affinity ligand for Cubn. Cell uptake studies show that binding to Cubn is necessary for the phosphorylation of the Fgf signaling mediators MAPK and Smad1. Although Cubn may not form stable ternary complexes with Fgf receptors (FgfRs), it acts together with and/or is necessary for optimal FgfR activity. We propose that plasma membrane binding of Fgf8, and most likely of the Fgf8 family members Fgf17 and Fgf18, to Cubn improves Fgf ligand endocytosis and availability to FgfRs, thus modulating Fgf signaling activity.

  7. Novel modified carboxy terminal fragments of neuropeptide Y with high affinity for Y2-type receptors and potent functional antagonism at a Y1-type receptor.

    PubMed

    Leban, J J; Heyer, D; Landavazo, A; Matthews, J; Aulabaugh, A; Daniels, A J

    1995-03-31

    Peptide analogs of neuropeptide Y (NPY) with a Tyr-32 and Leu-34 replacement resulted in the decapeptide TyrIleAsnLeuIleTyrArgLeuArgTyr-NH2 (9; Table 1) and a 3700-fold improvement in affinity at Y2 (rat brain; IC50 = 8.2 +/- 3 nM) receptors when compared to the native NPY(27-36) C-terminal fragment. In addition, compound 9 was an agonist at Y1 (human erythroleukemia (HEL) cell; ED50 = 8.8 +/- 0.5 nM) receptors with potency comparable to that of NPY(1-36) (ED50 = 5 nM). Molecular dynamics and 1H-NMR were used to propose a solution structure of decapeptide 9 and for subsequent analog design. The replacement of Leu with Pro at position 4 of decapeptide 9 afforded an antagonist of NPY in HEL cells (18, TyrIleAsnProIleTyrArgLeuArgTyr-NH2; IC50 = 100 +/- 5 nM). Deletion of the N-terminal tyrosine of 18 resulted in a 10-fold improvement in antagonistic activity with a parallel 4-fold decrease in Y2 affinity. This potent antagonist may provide further insight into the physiological role(s) for NPY in the mammalian and peripheral nervous system.

  8. Stimulating and blocking thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor autoantibodies from patients with Graves' disease and autoimmune hypothyroidism have very similar concentration, TSH receptor affinity, and binding sites.

    PubMed

    Morgenthaler, Nils G; Ho, Su Chin; Minich, Waldemar B

    2007-03-01

    The distinct biological properties of TSH receptor (TSH-R) autoantibodies (TRAbs) from patients with Graves' disease (GD) are yet unexplained on the molecular level. Here we compare serum concentration, affinity to the TSH-R, and binding sites on the TSH-R of stimulating (TSAb) and blocking (TBAb) TRAbs. Four-step affinity purification using human recombinant TSH-R was performed with 22 TRAb-positive sera from GD patients (11 with only TSAb and 11 with only TBAb) and five control sera. Antibody concentration, TSH binding inhibition (TBII), and TSAb/TBAb activity of the purified TRAb were assessed. Labeled purified TRAbs were used for displacement studies with TRAb and an additional 30 patients and 10 control sera. TRAbs could be purified to 80-93% purity with recovery of the TBII and TSAb and TBAb activity. No TRAbs could be purified from healthy individuals. The mean +/- SD concentration of TRAb was 17.3 +/- 5.4 microg/IU for the TSAb sera (range, 9.6-25.9) and 18.2 +/- 8.5 microg/IU for the TBAb sera (range, 4.6-29.2), respectively (P = 0.79). Affinity was in the picomolar range for both TRAb subtypes with mean +/- sd dissociation constant of 167 +/- 109 pM (60-410 pM) for TSAb and 253 +/- 132 pM (80-410 pM) for TBAb (P = 0.12). Purified and labeled TSAb and TBAb showed a very similar binding pattern to the TSH-R in displacement studies with unlabeled TSAb/TBAb or unpurified patients sera, indicating binding sites on the TSH-R in close proximity to each other. TSAbs and TBAbs in the serum of patients with GD have similar characteristics. They are of low concentration with high affinity and have also similar binding epitopes on the TSH-R.

  9. Antibody to FcεRIα Suppresses Immunoglobulin E Binding to High-Affinity Receptor I in Allergic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jung Yeon; Bae, Jong-Hwan; Lee, Kyung Eun; Kim, Mina; Kim, Min Hee; Kang, Hyun Jung; Park, Eun Hye; Yoo, Kyung Sook; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Kim, Kyung Won; Kim, Kyu-Earn

    2016-01-01

    Purpose High-affinity receptor I (FcεRI) on mast cells and basophils plays a key role in the immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated type I hypersensitivity mediated by allergen cross-linking of the specific IgE-FcεRI complex. Thus, prevention of IgE binding to FcεRI on these cells is an effective therapy for allergic disease. We have developed a strategy to disrupt IgE binding to FcεRI using an antibody targeting FcεRIα. Materials and Methods Fab fragment antibodies, which lack the Fc domain, with high affinity and specificity for FcεRIα and effective inhibitory activity against IgE-FcεRI binding were screened. IgE-induced histamine, β-hexosaminidase and Ca2+ release in basophils were determined by ELISA. A B6.Cg-Fcer1atm1Knt Tg(FCER1A)1Bhk/J mouse model of passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) was used to examine the inhibitory effect of NPB311 on allergic skin inflammation. Results NPB311 exhibited high affinity to human FcεRIα (KD=4 nM) and inhibited histamine, β-hexosaminidase and Ca2+ release in a concentration-dependent manner in hFcεRI-expressing cells. In hFcεRIα-expressing mice, dye leakage was higher in the PCA group than in controls, but decreased after NPB311 treatment. NPB311 could form a complex with FcεRIα and inhibit the release of inflammation mediators. Conclusion Our approach for producing anti-FcεRIα Fab fragment antibody NPB311 may enable clinical application to a therapeutic pathway in IgE/FcεRI-mediated diseases. PMID:27593869

  10. Quantitative cumulative biodistribution of antibodies in mice: effect of modulating binding affinity to the neonatal Fc receptor.

    PubMed

    Yip, Victor; Palma, Enzo; Tesar, Devin B; Mundo, Eduardo E; Bumbaca, Daniela; Torres, Elizabeth K; Reyes, Noe A; Shen, Ben Q; Fielder, Paul J; Prabhu, Saileta; Khawli, Leslie A; Boswell, C Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) plays an important and well-known role in antibody recycling in endothelial and hematopoietic cells and thus it influences the systemic pharmacokinetics (PK) of immunoglobulin G (IgG). However, considerably less is known about FcRn's role in the metabolism of IgG within individual tissues after intravenous administration. To elucidate the organ distribution and gain insight into the metabolism of humanized IgG1 antibodies with different binding affinities FcRn, comparative biodistribution studies in normal CD-1 mice were conducted. Here, we generated variants of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D-specific antibody (humanized anti-gD) with increased and decreased FcRn binding affinity by genetic engineering without affecting antigen specificity. These antibodies were expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cell lines, purified and paired radiolabeled with iodine-125 and indium-111. Equal amounts of I-125-labeled and In-111-labeled antibodies were mixed and intravenously administered into mice at 5 mg/kg. This approach allowed us to measure both the real-time IgG uptake (I-125) and cumulative uptake of IgG and catabolites (In-111) in individual tissues up to 1 week post-injection. The PK and distribution of the wild-type IgG and the variant with enhanced binding for FcRn were largely similar to each other, but vastly different for the rapidly cleared low-FcRn-binding variant. Uptake in individual tissues varied across time, FcRn binding affinity, and radiolabeling method. The liver and spleen emerged as the most concentrated sites of IgG catabolism in the absence of FcRn protection. These data provide an increased understanding of FcRn's role in antibody PK and catabolism at the tissue level.

  11. Structure-Based Understanding of Binding Affinity and Mode of Estrogen Receptor α Agonists and Antagonists

    EPA Science Inventory

    The flexible hydrophobic ligand binding pocket (LBP) of estrogen receptor α (ERα) allows the binding of a wide variety of endocrine disruptors. Upon ligand binding, the LBP reshapes around the contours of the ligand and stabilizes the complex by complementary hydrophobic interact...

  12. Structure-based Understanding of Binding Affinity and Mode of Estrogen Receptor α Agonists and Antagonists.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The flexible hydrophobic ligand binding pocket (LBP) of estrogen receptor α (ERα) allows the binding of a wide variety of endocrine disruptors. Upon ligand binding, the LBP reshapes around the contours of the ligand and stabilizes the complex by complementary hydropho...

  13. Relative binding affinity prediction of farnesoid X receptor in the D3R Grand Challenge 2 using FEP+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Christina; Rippmann, Friedrich; Kuhn, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    Physics-based free energy simulations have increasingly become an important tool for predicting binding affinity and the recent introduction of automated protocols has also paved the way towards a more widespread use in the pharmaceutical industry. The D3R 2016 Grand Challenge 2 provided an opportunity to blindly test the commercial free energy calculation protocol FEP+ and assess its performance relative to other affinity prediction methods. The present D3R free energy prediction challenge was built around two experimental data sets involving inhibitors of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) which is a promising anticancer drug target. The FXR binding site is predominantly hydrophobic with few conserved interaction motifs and strong induced fit effects making it a challenging target for molecular modeling and drug design. For both data sets, we achieved reasonable prediction accuracy (RMSD ≈ 1.4 kcal/mol, rank 3-4 according to RMSD out of 20 submissions) comparable to that of state-of-the-art methods in the field. Our D3R results boosted our confidence in the method and strengthen our desire to expand its applications in future in-house drug design projects.

  14. Changes in benzodiazepine receptor ligand affinity in the presence of 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo-(5,4-c-)-pyridin-3-ol (THIP)

    SciTech Connect

    Zharkovskii, A.M.; Shavrin, A.S.; Zharkovskaya, T.A.

    1987-07-01

    The authors give data showing that benzodiazepine (BD) receptor ligands change their affinity in the presence of THIP, and that the shift of affinity induced by THIP can be used to predict the activity of these substances in vitro. Rats were used in the experiments and aliquots of the homogenate were incubated with /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam (/sup 3/H-FNZ). THIP inhibited binding of /sup 3/H-FNZ with intact membranes in proportion to its concentration. The inhibitory concentrations and inhibition constants of BD receptor ligands in the absence and presence of THIP are shown.

  15. Identification of the Cardiac Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Protein: Solubilization and Purification by Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Lefkowitz, Robert J.; Haber, Edgar; O'Hara, Donald

    1972-01-01

    A protein that binds catecholamines with a specificity parallel to that of their in vivo effects on cardiac contractility (isoproterenol > epinephrine or norepinephrine > dopamine > dihydroxyphenylalanine) was solubilized from a microsomal fraction of canine ventricular myocardium. The binding protein was purified 500 to 800-fold by solubilization and subsequent affinity chromatography with conjugates of norepinephrine linked to agarose beads. Purified β-adrenergic binding protein exists in two forms, corresponding to molecular weights of 40,000 and 160,000. The purified material has a single association constant, 2.3 × 105 liters/mol (as compared to two association constants, 107 and 106 liters/mol, for the binding protein in particulate form) but retains the identical binding specificity for β-adrenergic drugs and antagonists. Images PMID:4507606

  16. Assessment of dopamine D1 receptor affinity and efficacy of three tetracyclic conformationally-restricted analogs of SKF38393

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Alia H.; McCorvy, John D.; Watts, Val J.; Nichols, David E.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the effect of conformational mobility on receptor activity, the β-phenyl substituent of dopamine D1 agonist ligands of the phenylbenzazepine class, (±)-6,6a,7,8,9,13b-hexahydro-5Hbenzo[d]naphtho[2,1-b]azepine-11,12-diol (8), and its oxygen and sulfur bioisosteres 9 and 10, respectively, were synthesized as conformationally-restricted analogues of SKF38393, a dopamine D1-selective partial agonist. Compounds trans-8b, 9, and 10 showed binding affinity comparable to that of SKF38393, but functionally, they displayed only very weak agonist activity. These results suggest that the conformationally-restricted structure of the analogues cannot adopt a binding orientation that is necessary for agonist activity. PMID:21862338

  17. New neoclerodane diterpenoids isolated from the leaves of Salvia divinorum and their binding affinities for human kappa opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Lee, David Y W; Ma, Zhongze; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan; Wang, Yulin; Chen, Yong; Carlezon, William A; Cohen, Bruce

    2005-10-01

    Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the leaves of Salvia divinorum has resulted in the isolation of three new neoclerodane diterpenoids: divinatorin D (1), divinatorin E (2), and salvinorin G (3), together with 10 known terpenoids, divinatorin C (4), hardwickiic acid (5), salvinorin-A (6), -B (7), -C (8), -D (9), -E (10), and -F (11), presqualene alcohol (12), and (E)-phytol (13). The structures of these three new compounds were characterized by spectroscopic methods. All these compounds were evaluated for their binding affinities to the human kappa opioid receptors. In comparison with divinatorin D (1), divinatorin E (2), and salvinorin G (3), salvinorin A (6) is still the most potent kappa agonist.

  18. Characterization of rat leydig cell gonadotropin receptor structure by affinity cross-linking

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Q.Y.; Hwang, J.; Menon, K.M.J.

    1986-05-01

    The gonadotropin receptor from rat leydig cell has been characterized with respect to binding kinetics and physiological regulation. The present study was intended to examine the structure of the receptor. Leydig cell suspension was prepared by either collagenase digestion or by mechanical disruption of the testis. The cells were incubated with /sup 125/I-hCG and the unreacted hCG was removed by centrifugation. The /sup 125/I-hCG was then covalently linked to the cell surface receptor using cleavable (dithiobis (succinimidyl propionate)) and non-cleavable (disuccinimidyl suberate) cross-linking reagents. The extracted cross-linked membrane proteins were resolved on SDS-polyacrylamide gels under reducing and non-reducing conditions and subjected to autoradiographic analysis. Under non-reducing conditions, two labeled species with M/sub r/ = 87,000 and 120,000 were detected. However, only one labeled band was detected under reducing conditions with M/sub r/ = 64,000. The binding of /sup 125/I-hCG to the receptor was inhibited by hCG and LH, but not by a number of peptides and proteins. The data suggest that hCG receptor in leydig cell is an oligomeric complex consisting of four subunits, ..cap alpha cap alpha beta gamma... The ..beta.. and ..gamma.. subunits are each linked to an ..cap alpha.. subunit through disulfide linkage and the hormone binds to each ..cap alpha.. subunit. The two dimers formed (..cap alpha beta cap alpha gamma..) are associated by noncovalent interactions.

  19. The role of 5-arylalkylamino- and 5-piperazino- moieties on the 7-aminopyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidine core in affecting adenosine A1 and A2A receptor affinity and selectivity profiles.

    PubMed

    Squarcialupi, Lucia; Betti, Marco; Catarzi, Daniela; Varano, Flavia; Falsini, Matteo; Ravani, Annalisa; Pasquini, Silvia; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Salmaso, Veronica; Sturlese, Mattia; Varani, Katia; Moro, Stefano; Colotta, Vittoria

    2017-12-01

    New 7-amino-2-phenylpyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidine derivatives, substituted at the 5-position with aryl(alkyl)amino- and 4-substituted-piperazin-1-yl- moieties, were synthesized with the aim of targeting human (h) adenosine A1 and/or A2A receptor subtypes. On the whole, the novel derivatives 1-24 shared scarce or no affinities for the off-target hA2B and hA3 ARs. The 5-(4-hydroxyphenethylamino)- derivative 12 showed both good affinity (Ki = 150 nM) and the best selectivity for the hA2A AR while the 5-benzylamino-substituted 5 displayed the best combined hA2A (Ki = 123 nM) and A1 AR affinity (Ki = 25 nM). The 5-phenethylamino moiety (compound 6) achieved nanomolar affinity (Ki = 11 nM) and good selectivity for the hA1 AR. The 5-(N(4)-substituted-piperazin-1-yl) derivatives 15-24 bind the hA1 AR subtype with affinities falling in the high nanomolar range. A structure-based molecular modeling study was conducted to rationalize the experimental binding data from a molecular point of view using both molecular docking studies and Interaction Energy Fingerprints (IEFs) analysis.[Formula: see text].

  20. Synthesis and receptor binding of N-substituted tropane derivatives. High-affinity ligands for the cocaine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Milius, R.A.; Saha, J.K.; Madras, B.K.; Neumeyer, J.L. )

    1991-05-01

    The synthesis and pharmacological characterization of a series of N-substituted 3-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane derivatives is reported. The compounds displayed binding characteristics that paralleled those of cocaine, and several had substantially higher affinity at cocaine recognition sites. Conjugate addition of 4-fluorophenyl magnesium bromide to anhydroecgonine methyl ester gave 2 beta-(carbomethoxy)-3 beta-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane (4a, designated CFT, also known as WIN 35,428) after flash chromatography. N demethylation of 4a was effected by Zn/HOAc reduction of the corresponding 2,2,2-trichloroethyl carbamate to give 2 beta-carbomethoxy-3 beta-(4-fluorophenyl)nortropane (5), which was alkylated with allyl bromide to afford the N-allyl analogue, 6. The N-propyl analogue, 7, was prepared by catalytic reduction (Pd/C) of 6. The most potent analogue, 4a, was tritiated at a specific activity of 81.3 Ci/mmol. ({sup 3}H)4a bound rapidly and reversibly to caudate putamen membranes; the two-component binding curve typical of cocaine analogues was observed. Equilibrium was achieved within 2 h and was stable for at least 4 h. High- and low-affinity Kd values observed for ({sup 3}H)4a (4.7 and 60 nM, respectively) were more than 4 times lower than those for ({sup 3}H)cocaine, and the density of binding sites (Bmax = 50 pmol/g, high, and 290 pmol/g, low) for the two drugs were comparable. Nonspecific binding of ({sup 3}H)4a was 5-10% of total binding.

  1. Prediction of binding affinity and efficacy of thyroid hormone receptor ligands using QSAR and structure based modeling methods

    PubMed Central

    Politi, Regina; Rusyn, Ivan; Tropsha, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The thyroid hormone receptor (THR) is an important member of the nuclear receptor family that can be activated by endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC). Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models have been developed to facilitate the prioritization of THR-mediated EDC for the experimental validation. The largest database of binding affinities available at the time of the study for ligand binding domain (LBD) of THRβ was assembled to generate both continuous and classification QSAR models with an external accuracy of R2=0.55 and CCR=0.76, respectively. In addition, for the first time a QSAR model was developed to predict binding affinities of antagonists inhibiting the interaction of coactivators with the AF-2 domain of THRβ (R2=0.70). Furthermore, molecular docking studies were performed for a set of THRβ ligands (57 agonists and 15 antagonists of LBD, 210 antagonists of the AF-2 domain, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using several THRβ structures retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. We found that two agonist-bound THRβ conformations could effectively discriminate their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Moreover, one of the agonist conformations could discriminate agonists from antagonists. Finally, we have conducted virtual screening of a chemical library compiled by the EPA as part of the Tox21 program to identify potential THRβ-mediated EDCs using both QSAR models and docking. We concluded that the library is unlikely to have any EDC that would bind to the THRβ. Models developed in this study can be employed either to identify environmental chemicals interacting with the THR or, conversely, to eliminate the THR-mediated mechanism of action for chemicals of concern. PMID:25058446

  2. Human Adenosine A2A Receptor Binds Calmodulin with High Affinity in a Calcium-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Piirainen, Henni; Hellman, Maarit; Tossavainen, Helena; Permi, Perttu; Kursula, Petri; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how ligands bind to G-protein-coupled receptors and how binding changes receptor structure to affect signaling is critical for developing a complete picture of the signal transduction process. The adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) is a particularly interesting example, as it has an exceptionally long intracellular carboxyl terminus, which is predicted to be mainly disordered. Experimental data on the structure of the A2AR C-terminus is lacking, because published structures of A2AR do not include the C-terminus. Calmodulin has been reported to bind to the A2AR C-terminus, with a possible binding site on helix 8, next to the membrane. The biological meaning of the interaction as well as its calcium dependence, thermodynamic parameters, and organization of the proteins in the complex are unclear. Here, we characterized the structure of the A2AR C-terminus and the A2AR C-terminus-calmodulin complex using different biophysical methods, including native gel and analytical gel filtration, isothermal titration calorimetry, NMR spectroscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering. We found that the C-terminus is disordered and flexible, and it binds with high affinity (Kd = 98 nM) to calmodulin without major conformational changes in the domain. Calmodulin binds to helix 8 of the A2AR in a calcium-dependent manner that can displace binding of A2AR to lipid vesicles. We also predicted and classified putative calmodulin-binding sites in a larger group of G-protein-coupled receptors. PMID:25692595

  3. Optimizing electrostatic affinity in ligand-receptor binding: Theory, computation, and ligand properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kangas, Erik; Tidor, Bruce

    1998-11-01

    The design of a tight-binding molecular ligand involves a tradeoff between an unfavorable electrostatic desolvation penalty incurred when the ligand binds a receptor in aqueous solution and the generally favorable intermolecular interactions made in the bound state. Using continuum electrostatic models we have developed a theoretical framework for analyzing this problem and have shown that the ligand-charge distribution can be optimized to produce the most favorable balance of these opposing free energy contributions [L.-P. Lee and B. Tidor, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 8681 (1997)]. Herein the theoretical framework is extended and calculations are performed for a wide range of model receptors. We examine methods for computing optimal ligands (including cases where there is conformational change) and the resulting properties of optimized ligands. In particular, indicators are developed to aid in the determination of the deficiencies in a specific ligand or basis. A connection is established between the optimization problem here and a generalized image problem, from which an inverse-image basis set can be defined; this basis is shown to perform very well in optimization calculations. Furthermore, the optimized ligands are shown to have favorable electrostatic binding free energies (in contrast to many natural ligands), there is a strong correlation between the receptor desolvation penalty and the optimized binding free energy for fixed geometry, and the ligand and receptor cannot generally be mutually optimal. Additionally, we introduce the display of complementary desolvation and interaction potentials and the deviation of their relationship from ideal as a useful tool for judging effective complementarity. Scripts for computing and displaying these potentials with GRASP are available at http://mit.edu/tidor.

  4. Improved Glucose Metabolism In Vitro and In Vivo by an Allosteric Monoclonal Antibody That Increases Insulin Receptor Binding Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Corbin, John A.; Bhaskar, Vinay; Goldfine, Ira D.; Bedinger, Daniel H.; Lau, Angela; Michelson, Kristen; Gross, Lisa M.; Maddux, Betty A.; Kuan, Hua F.; Tran, Catarina; Lao, Llewelyn; Handa, Masahisa; Watson, Susan R.; Narasimha, Ajay J.; Zhu, Shirley; Levy, Raphael; Webster, Lynn; Wijesuriya, Sujeewa D.; Liu, Naichi; Wu, Xiaorong; Chemla-Vogel, David; Lee, Steve R.; Wong, Steve; Wilcock, Diane; White, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Previously we reported studies of XMetA, an agonist antibody to the insulin receptor (INSR). We have now utilized phage display to identify XMetS, a novel monoclonal antibody to the INSR. Biophysical studies demonstrated that XMetS bound to the human and mouse INSR with picomolar affinity. Unlike monoclonal antibody XMetA, XMetS alone had little or no agonist effect on the INSR. However, XMetS was a strong positive allosteric modulator of the INSR that increased the binding affinity for insulin nearly 20-fold. XMetS potentiated insulin-stimulated INSR signaling ∼15-fold or greater including; autophosphorylation of the INSR, phosphorylation of Akt, a major enzyme in the metabolic pathway, and phosphorylation of Erk, a major enzyme in the growth pathway. The enhanced signaling effects of XMetS were more pronounced with Akt than with Erk. In cultured cells, XMetS also enhanced insulin-stimulated glucose transport. In contrast to its effects on the INSR, XMetS did not potentiate IGF-1 activation of the IGF-1 receptor. We studied the effect of XMetS treatment in two mouse models of insulin resistance and diabetes. The first was the diet induced obesity mouse, a hyperinsulinemic, insulin resistant animal, and the second was the multi-low dose streptozotocin/high-fat diet mouse, an insulinopenic, insulin resistant animal. In both models, XMetS normalized fasting blood glucose levels and glucose tolerance. In concert with its ability to potentiate insulin action at the INSR, XMetS reduced insulin and C-peptide levels in both mouse models. XMetS improved the response to exogenous insulin without causing hypoglycemia. These data indicate that an allosteric monoclonal antibody can be generated that markedly enhances the binding affinity of insulin to the INSR. These data also suggest that an INSR monoclonal antibody with these characteristics may have the potential to both improve glucose metabolism in insulinopenic type 2 diabetes mellitus and correct compensatory

  5. Prediction of binding affinity and efficacy of thyroid hormone receptor ligands using QSAR and structure-based modeling methods

    SciTech Connect

    Politi, Regina; Rusyn, Ivan; Tropsha, Alexander

    2014-10-01

    The thyroid hormone receptor (THR) is an important member of the nuclear receptor family that can be activated by endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC). Quantitative Structure–Activity Relationship (QSAR) models have been developed to facilitate the prioritization of THR-mediated EDC for the experimental validation. The largest database of binding affinities available at the time of the study for ligand binding domain (LBD) of THRβ was assembled to generate both continuous and classification QSAR models with an external accuracy of R{sup 2} = 0.55 and CCR = 0.76, respectively. In addition, for the first time a QSAR model was developed to predict binding affinities of antagonists inhibiting the interaction of coactivators with the AF-2 domain of THRβ (R{sup 2} = 0.70). Furthermore, molecular docking studies were performed for a set of THRβ ligands (57 agonists and 15 antagonists of LBD, 210 antagonists of the AF-2 domain, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using several THRβ structures retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. We found that two agonist-bound THRβ conformations could effectively discriminate their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Moreover, one of the agonist conformations could discriminate agonists from antagonists. Finally, we have conducted virtual screening of a chemical library compiled by the EPA as part of the Tox21 program to identify potential THRβ-mediated EDCs using both QSAR models and docking. We concluded that the library is unlikely to have any EDC that would bind to the THRβ. Models developed in this study can be employed either to identify environmental chemicals interacting with the THR or, conversely, to eliminate the THR-mediated mechanism of action for chemicals of concern. - Highlights: • This is the largest curated dataset for ligand binding domain (LBD) of the THRβ. • We report the first QSAR model for antagonists of AF-2 domain of THRβ. • A combination of QSAR and docking enables

  6. Effects of imidafenacin (KRP-197/ONO-8025), a new anti-cholinergic agent, on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. High affinities for M3 and M1 receptor subtypes and selectivity for urinary bladder over salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Fumiyoshi; Yageta, Yuichi; Segawa, Mitsuru; Matsuzawa, Shigeki

    2007-01-01

    Imidafenacin (CAS 170105-16-5, KRP-197, ONO-8025) is an antagonist for the muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor currently under development for the treatment of overactive bladder. Affinities of imidafenacin and other drugs for muscarinic ACh receptor subtypes were investigated by examining inhibitory effects on ACh release in the rat urinary bladder and K+ efflux in the rat salivary gland in functional and binding assays. In the functional assay, imidafenacin had higher affnities for M3 and M1 receptors than for the M2 receptor. In contrast, metabolites of imidafenacin (M-2, M-4 and M-9) had low affinities for muscarinic ACh receptor subtypes. Darifenacin had selectivity for the M3 receptor, while propiverine, tolterodine and oxybutynin had no selectivity for muscarinic ACh receptors. In carbamylcholine (CCh)-induced contraction in the urinary bladder, imidafenacin, propiverine, tolterodine and oxybutynin had affinities similar to those for the M3 receptor in the ileum. In the binding assay for human muscarinic ACh receptor subtypes, imidafenacin had higher affinities for m3 and m1 receptors than for m2 receptor, but tolterodine had no selectivity for m1, m2 and m3 receptors. In ACh release in the urinary bladder, inhibitory effects of imidafenacin, tolterodine, oxybutynin and darifenacin seemed to be partially mediated by the M1 receptor. In ACh-induced and electrical stimulation-induced K+ efflux from the salivary gland, inhibitory effects (IC50) of imidafenacin, propiverine, tolterodine, oxybutynin and darifenacin might be closely related to those for the M3 receptor in the ileum. These results suggest that imidafenacin more strongly antagonizes cholinomimetics on M3 and M1 receptors than on the M2 receptor. Moreover, imidafenacin seems to inhibit the contraction of the bladder smooth muscle by mediating antagonism to the M3 receptor and to regulate ACh release by mediating prejunctional facilitatory M1 receptor. Imidafenacin also inhibited K+ efflux from

  7. Probes for narcotic receptor mediated phenomena. 44. Synthesis of an N-substituted 4-hydroxy-5-(3-hydroxyphenyl)morphan with high affinity and selective μ-antagonist activity

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Malliga R.; Lee, Yong Sok; Deschamps, Jeffrey R.; Dersch, Christina M.; Rothman, Richard B.; Jacobson, Arthur E.; Rice, Kenner C.

    2012-01-01

    A simple three-step synthesis of 5-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-2-methyl-2-azabicyclo[3.3.1]nonan-4-ol (3a) was achieved using an osmium tetroxide mediated oxidation of the known intermediate 6. A pyrrolidine-ring variant of 3a (3-(7-(hydroxymethyl)-6-methyl-6-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octan-1-yl)phenol (5)) was isolated when other routes were used. The epimeric hydroxy analogue 4a was synthesized by simple inversion of the stereochemistry at C-4. Both N-methyl (3a and 4a) and N-phenethyl (3b and 4b) derivatives were synthesized. The compounds were examined for their opioid receptor affinity and the N-phenethyl analogue 3b was found to have relatively weak affinity for the μ-opioid receptor (Ki = 74 nM). However, the N-phenethyl analogue of the C-4 epimer, 4b, had about 15 fold higher affinity than 3b and was selective for the μ-opioid receptor (Ki = 4.6 nM). Compound 4b was a moderately potent μ-opioid antagonist (Ke = 12 nM), as determined by [35S]GTP-γ-S assays. Compounds 3b and 4b were energy minimized at the level of B3LYP/6-31G*, and then overlaid onto the 5-phenylmorphan, the (1R,5R,9S)-(−)-enantiomer of 2b (Fig. 1) with the α or β-OH group at the C-9 position. The spatial orientation of the hydroxyl moiety in 3b, 4b, 2a, and 2b is proposed to be the structural requirement for high μ-opioid receptor binding affinity and their agonist or antagonist activity. The modest change in spatial position of the hydroxyl moiety, and not the N-substituent, induced the change from potent agonist to an antagonist of moderate potency. PMID:22341895

  8. Association of EP2 receptor and SLC19A3 in regulating breast cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Cheuk, Isabella W; Shin, Vivian Y; Siu, Man T; Tsang, Julia Y; Ho, John C; Chen, Jiawei; Tse, Gary M; Wang, Xian; Kwong, Ava

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Triple-negative breast cancer patients have higher metastatic rate than patients with other breast cancer subtypes. Distant metastasis is one of the causes leading to the high mortality rates. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) is associated with breast cancer metastasis and the downstream prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) exerted its effect through EP receptors (EP1-EP4). However, the exact molecular events of EP receptors in breast cancer metastasis remain undefined. Expressions of EP receptors were determined during cancer development in NOD-SCID mice inoculated with MB-231 and MB-231-EP2 clone. EP2 overexpressing stable clone was constructed to investigate the proliferation and invasion potentials in vivo and in vitro. Drug transporter array was used to identify EP2 receptor-associated drug transported genes in breast cancer metastasis. Localization of EP2 receptor in primary tissues and xenografts were examined by immunostaining. Stable EP2-expression cells formed larger tumors than parental cells in mice model and was highly expressed in both primary and metastatic tissues. Silencing of EP2 receptor by siRNA and antagonist (AH 6809) significantly decreased cell proliferation and invasion, concomitant with reduced MMP-2 and MMP-9 expressions. Results from array data showed that expression of SLC19A3 was markedly increased in EP2 siRNA transfected cells. Ectopic expression of SLC19A3 retarded cell proliferation, invasion and MMPs expressions. Notably, SLC19A3 had a lower expression in primary tissues and was negatively correlated with EP2 receptor expression. Our novel finding revealed that EP2 receptor regulated metastasis through downregulation of SLC19A3. Thus, targeting EP2-SLC19A3 signaling is a potential therapeutic therapy for treating metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26807319

  9. Affinities and densities of high-affinity (/sup 3/H)muscimol (GABA-A) binding sites and of central benzodiazepine receptors are unchanged in autopsied brain tissue from cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Butterworth, R.F.; Lavoie, J.; Giguere, J.F.; Pomier-Layrargues, G.

    1988-09-01

    The integrity of GABA-A receptors and of central benzodiazepine receptors was evaluated in membrane preparations from prefrontal cortex and caudate nuclei obtained at autopsy from nine cirrhotic patients who died in hepatic coma and an equal number of age-matched control subjects. Histopathological studies revealed Alzheimer Type II astrocytosis in all cases in the cirrhotic group; controls were free from neurological, psychiatric or hepatic diseases. Binding to GABA-A receptors was studied using (/sup 3/H)muscimol as radioligand. The integrity of central benzodiazepine receptors was evaluated using (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam and (/sup 3/H)Ro15-1788. Data from saturation binding assays was analyzed by Scatchard plot. No modifications of either affinities (Kd) or densities (Bmax) of (/sup 3/H)muscimol of central benzodiazepine binding sites were observed. These findings do not support recent suggestions that alterations of either high-affinity GABA or benzodiazepine receptors play a significant role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

  10. Synthesis, estrogen receptor binding affinity and molecular docking of pyrimidine-piperazine-chromene and -quinoline conjugates.

    PubMed

    Parveen, Iram; Ahmed, Naseem; Idrees, Danish; Khan, Parvez; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2017-09-15

    Substituted 2-amino-7-((6-(4-(2-hydroxyethyl) piperazin-1-yl)-2-methylpyrimidin-4-yl)oxy)-4-phenyl-4H-chromene-3-carbonitriles and 2-amino-7-((6-(4-(2-hydroxyethyl)piperazin-1-yl)-2-methylpyrimidin-4-yl)oxy)-4-phenyl-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carbonitriles were synthesized via an efficient multi-component one pot synthesis under mild conditions. These compounds 1-20 were evaluated against human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7) and human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) for cytotoxic activities. Among them, compounds 6, 7, 15, 17 and 19 showed better anti-proliferative activities as (IC50 value 48±1.70, 65±1.13, 92±1.18, 30±1.17 and 16±1.10µM) than curcumin drug (48±1.11µM). Molecular docking was also performed with active compounds 6, 7 and 15 against Bcl-2 protein which gave good binding affinity (ΔG=-9.08, -8.29 and -7.70kcal/mol) respectively. Furthermore, the structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis revealed that the chromene and quinoline moieties, when attached with pyrimide and piperazine moieties, enhanced anti-proliferative activities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. KKHA-761, a potent D3 receptor antagonist with high 5-HT1A receptor affinity, exhibits antipsychotic properties in animal models of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Park, Woo-Kyu; Jeong, Daeyoung; Cho, Heeyeong; Lee, Seong Jin; Cha, Mi Young; Pae, Ae Nim; Choi, Kyung Il; Koh, Hun Yeong; Kong, Jae Yang

    2005-10-01

    KKHA-761, 1-{4-[3-(3,4-dimethoxy-phenyl)-isoxazol-5-yl]-butyl}-4-(2-methoxy-phenyl)-piperazine, has a high affinity (Ki=3.85 nM) for human dopamine D3 receptor with about 70-fold selectivity over the human dopamine D(2L) receptor (Ki=270 nM). KKHA-761 also showed high affinity for cloned human 5-HT1A receptor (Ki=6.4 nM). KKHA-761 exhibited D3 and 5-HT1A receptor antagonist activities in vitro, reversing dopamine- or 5-HT-mediated stimulation of [35S]GTPrS binding. The in vivo pharmacological profile of KKHA-761 was compared with both typical and atypical antipsychotics including clozapine and haloperidol. Apomorphine-induced dopaminergic behavior, cage climbing, in mice was potently blocked by a single administration (i.p.) of KKHA-761 (ID50=4.06 mg/kg) or clozapine (ID50=4.0 mg/kg). Cocaine- or MK-801-induced hyperactivity in animals was markedly inhibited by KKHA-761 or clozapine. In addition, KKHA-761 significantly reversed the disruption of prepulse inhibition (PPI) produced by apomorphine in mice, indicating the antidopaminergic or antipsychotic activity of KKHA-761 in mice. However, KKHA-761 was inactive in the forced swimming behavioral despair model in mice, suggesting lack of antidepressant properties. KKHA-761 attenuated the hypothermia induced by a selective dopamine D3 agonist, 7-OH-DPAT, in mice, whereas clozapine enhanced it. Moderate doses of both KKHA-761 and clozapine did not increase serum prolactin levels in rats. Lower doses of, however, haloperidol significantly increased prolactin secretion. KKHA-761 did not induce cataleptic response up to 20 mg/kg, but significant catalepsy was shown at lower doses of clozapine and haloperidol. Furthermore, KKHA-761 showed a low incidence of rotarod ataxia (TD50=34.4 mg/kg, i.p.) in mice. The present results, therefore, suggest that KKHA-761 is a potent antipsychotic agent with combined dopamine D3 and serotonin 5-HT1A receptors modulation activity, which may further enhance its therapeutic potential for

  12. 3- and 4-O-sulfoconjugated and methylated dopamine: highly reduced binding affinity to dopamine D2 receptors in rat striatal membranes.

    PubMed

    Werle, E; Lenz, T; Strobel, G; Weicker, H

    1988-07-01

    The binding properties of 3- and 4-O-sulfo-conjugated dopamine (DA-3-O-S, DA-4-O-S) as well as 3-O-methylated dopamine (MT) to rat striatal dopamine D2 receptors were investigated. 3H-spiperone was used as a radioligand in the binding studies. In saturation binding experiments (+)butaclamol, which has been reported to bind to dopaminergic D2 and serotoninergic 5HT2 receptors, was used in conjunction with ketanserin and sulpiride, which preferentially label 5HT2 and D2 receptors, respectively, in order to discriminate between 3H-spiperone binding to D2 and to 5HT2 receptors. Under our particular membrane preparation and assay conditions, 3H-spiperone binds to D2 and 5HT2 receptors with a maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of 340 fmol/mg protein in proportions of about 75%:25% with similar dissociation constants KD (35 pmol/l; 43 pmol/l). This result was verified by the biphasic competition curve of ketanserin, which revealed about 20% high (KD = 24 nmol/l) and 80% low (KD = 420 nmol/l) affinity binding sites corresponding to 5HT2 and D2 receptors, respectively. Therefore, all further competition experiments at a tracer concentration of 50 pmol/l were performed in the presence of 0.1 mumol/l ketanserin to mask the 5HT2 receptors. DA competition curves were best fitted assuming two binding sites, with high (KH = 0.12 mumol/l) and low (KL = 18 mumol/l) affinity, present in a ratio of 3:1. The high affinity binding sites were interconvertible by 100 mumol/l guanyl-5-yl imidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p], resulting in a homogenous affinity state of DA receptors (KD = 2.8 mumol/l).2+ off

  13. Cloning and activation of the bullfrog apelin receptor: Gi/o coupling and high affinity for [Pro1]apelin-13.

    PubMed

    Moon, Mi Jin; Oh, Da Young; Moon, Jung Sun; Kim, Dong-Ki; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Lee, Ju Yeon; Kim, Jae Il; Cho, Sehyung; Kwon, Hyuk Bang; Seong, Jae Young

    2007-10-15

    In mammals, apelin and its G protein-coupled receptor, APJ, regulate blood pressure, intake of food and water, and cardiac contractility. In this study, we report the cloning and functional characterization of APJ in the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana. Bullfrog APJ (bfAPJ) cDNA contains an open reading frame of 1083 nucleotides encoding a protein of 360 amino acid residues. Sequence alignment reveals 75% amino acid identity with Xenopus, 63% identity with zebrafish and 40-42% identity with mammalian APJs. RT-PCR analysis and tissue binding assay reveal high expression of bfAPJ mRNA in the brain, particularly in the hypothalamus, and moderate expression in the pituitary, testis, adrenal gland and lung. Whereas [pGlu(1)]apelin-13 did not induce CRE-luc (protein kinase A-specific reporter) and SRE-luc (protein kinase C-specific reporter) activity in cells expressing bfAPJ, this apelin-13 decreased forskolin-induced CRE-luc activity and cAMP accumulation in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner. This study indicates that bfAPJ may couple to G(i/o). [Pro(1)]apelin-13, a synthetic apelin based on the sequence of the putative apelin gene from many non-mammalian species, activates bfAPJ with 5-10-fold greater sensitivity/affinity than mammalian apelin-13. Collectively, this study expands our understanding of the physiological roles of this receptor system in non-mammalian species.

  14. Age-Related Yield of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Bearing the Low-Affinity Nerve Growth Factor Receptor

    PubMed Central

    González-Garza, Maria Teresa; Cardenas-Lopez, Alejandro; Chavez-Castilla, Luis; Cruz-Vega, Delia Elva; Moreno-Cuevas, Jorge E.

    2013-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are a heterogeneous cell population that may be enriched by positive selection with antibodies against the low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor (LNGFR or CD271), yielding a selective cell universe with higher proliferation and differentiation potential. This paper addresses the need for determining the quantity of ADSCs positive for the CD271 receptor and its correlation with donor's age. Mononuclear cells were harvested from the lower backs of 35 female donors and purified using magnetic beads. Multipotency capacity was tested by the expression of stemness genes and through differentiation into preosteoblasts and adipocytes. A significant statistical difference was found in CD271+ concentrations between defined age intervals. The highest yield was found within women on the 30–40-year-old age range. CD271+ ADSCs from all age groups showed differentiation capabilities as well as expression of typical multipotent stem cell genes. Our data suggest that the amount of CD271+ cells correlates inversely with age. However, the ability to obtain these cells was maintained through all age ranges with a yield higher than what has been reported from bone marrow. Our findings propose CD271+ ADSCs as the primary choice for tissue regeneration and autologous stem cell therapies in older subjects. PMID:24376462

  15. The Analysis of the Human High Affinity IgE Receptor FceRIa from Multiple Crystal Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Garman, S.C.; Sechi, S.; Kinet, J.-P.; Jardetzky, T.S.

    2010-03-05

    We have solved the structure of the human high affinity IgE receptor, Fc{var_epsilon}RI{alpha}, in six different crystal forms, showing the structure in 15 different chemical environments. This database of structures shows no change in the overall shape of the molecule, as the angle between domains 1 and 2 (D1 and D2) varies little across the ensemble. However, the receptor has local conformational variability in the C' strand of D2 and in the BC loop of D1. In every crystal form, a residue inserts between tryptophan residues 87 and 110, mimicking the position of a proline from the IgE ligand. The different crystal forms reveal a distribution of carbohydrates lining the front and back surfaces of the structure. An analysis of crystal contacts in the different forms indicates regions where the molecule interacts with other proteins, and reveals a potential new binding site distal to the IgE binding site. The results of this study point to new directions for the design of molecules to inhibit the interaction of Fc{var_epsilon}RI{alpha} with its natural ligand and thus to prevent a primary step in the allergic response.

  16. Photocontrol of Anion Binding Affinity to a Bis-urea Receptor Derived from Stiff-Stilbene

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Toward the development of photoresponsive anion receptors, a stiff-stilbene photoswitch has been equipped with two urea anion-binding motifs. Photoinduced E/Z isomerization has been studied in detail by UV–vis and NMR spectroscopy. Titration experiments (1H NMR) reveal strong binding of acetate and phosphate to the (Z)-isomer, in which the urea groups are closely together. Isomerization to the (E)-form separates the urea motifs, resulting in much weaker binding. Additionally, geometry optimizations by density functional theory (DFT) illustrate that oxo-anion binding to the (Z)-form involves four hydrogen bonds. PMID:28074657

  17. Iodination of vasopressin analogues with agonistic and antagonistic properties: effects on biological properties and affinity for vascular and renal vasopressin receptors.

    PubMed

    Jard, S; Lombard, C; Seyer, R; Aumelas, A; Manning, M; Sawyer, W H

    1987-09-01

    Twelve L- and D-tyrosine-containing vasopressin analogues were prepared in their mono- and diiodinated forms. These include six arginine vasopressin (AVP) vascular (V1) type antagonists/antidiuretic (V2) agonists, four V1/V2 antagonists, and two V1/V2 agonists, one of which is AVP itself. Ten peptides were iodinated on the tyrosyl residue in position 2; two were iodinated on a tyrosyl amide residue replacing the glycyl amide residue at position 9. All peptides were tested both for their biological activities in vivo (rat vasopressor and antidiuretic tests) and for their ability to bind to vasopressin receptors of the V1 (vascular) and V2 (renal) types from rat liver and rat kidney membranes, respectively. It is shown that monoiodination of the tyrosyl residue in the vasopressin analogues that were tested either preserves or reduces to a highly variable extent the in vivo and in vitro biological activities of these analogues. In most cases diiodonitation resulted in a marked decrease in biological activity. The effects of iodination on the affinity of vasopressin analogues for hepatic V1 receptors and renal V2 receptors were more related to the affinity of the noniodinated peptide for these receptors than to the biological properties (antagonist versus agonist) of the tested analogues, the nature (L versus D) of the iodinated tyrosyl residue, or the position (2 versus 9) at which this residue was introduced. The loss of affinity due to iodination was usually more pronounced for peptides exhibiting high affinity for vasopressin receptors. However, we show that among the monoiodinated peptides some (especially monoiodinated [2-D-Tyrosine]-AVP) retained enough affinity for vasopressin binding sites to suggest that their radioiodinated conterparts would be promising labeled ligands for use in studies in vasopressin receptors.

  18. Isoflavones suppress the expression of the FcεRI high-affinity immunoglobulin E receptor independent of the estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Shuya; Tsukamoto, Shuntaro; Kumazoe, Motofumi; Kim, Yoon-hee; Yamada, Koji; Tachibana, Hirofumi

    2012-08-29

    Isoflavones found in soybeans and soy products possess clinically relevant properties. However, the anti-allergic effect of isoflavones has been poorly studied. We examined the effects of isoflavones, genistein, daidzein, and equol, on the expression of the high-affinity immunoglobulin E (IgE) receptor, FcεRI, which plays a central role in IgE-mediated allergic response. Flow cytometric analysis showed that all of these isoflavones reduced the cell surface expression of FcεRI on mouse bone-marrow-derived mast cells and human basophilic KU812 cells. All isoflavones decreased the levels of the FcεRIα mRNA in the cells. Genistein reduced the mRNA expression of the β chain, and daidzein and equol downregulated that of the γ chain. The suppressive effects of isoflavones on FcεRI expression were unaffected by ICI 182,780, an estrogen receptor antagonist, suggesting that these effects were independent of estrogen receptors.

  19. Structure-affinity relationships and pharmacological characterization of new alkyl-resorcinol cannabinoid receptor ligands: Identification of a dual cannabinoid receptor/TRPA1 channel agonist.

    PubMed

    Brizzi, Antonella; Aiello, Francesca; Marini, Pietro; Cascio, Maria Grazia; Corelli, Federico; Brizzi, Vittorio; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Ligresti, Alessia; Luongo, Livio; Lamponi, Stefania; Maione, Sabatino; Pertwee, Roger G; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2014-09-01

    In our ongoing program aimed at deeply investigating the endocannabinoid system (ES), a set of new alkyl-resorcinol derivatives was prepared focusing on the nature and the importance of the carboxamide functionality. Binding studies on CB1 and CB2 receptors, monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) showed that some of the newly developed compounds behaved as very potent cannabinoid receptor ligands (Ki in the nanomolar range) while, however, none of them was able to inhibit MAGL and/or FAAH. Derivative 11 was a potent CB1 and CB2 ligand, with Ki values similar to WIN 55,212, exhibiting a CB1 and CB2 agonist profile in vitro. In the formalin test of peripheral acute and inflammatory pain in mice, this compound showed a weak and delayed antinociceptive effect against the second phase of the nocifensive response, exhibiting, interestingly, a quite potent transient receptor potential ankyrin type-1 (TRPA1) channel agonist activity. Moreover, derivative 14, characterized by lower affinity but higher CB2 selectivity than 11, proved to behave as a weak CB2 competitive inverse agonist.

  20. An efficient analytical platform for on-line microfluidic profiling of neuroactive snake venoms towards nicotinic receptor affinity.

    PubMed

    Heus, Ferry; Vonk, Freek; Otvos, Reka A; Bruyneel, Ben; Smit, August B; Lingeman, Henk; Richardson, Michael; Niessen, Wilfried M A; Kool, Jeroen

    2013-01-01

    Venomous snakes have evolved their efficient venomous arsenals mainly to immobilize prey. The highly variable toxic peptides in these venoms target a myriad of neurotoxic and haemotoxic receptors and enzymes and comprise highly interesting candidates for drug discovery. Discovery of bioactive compounds from snake venoms, however, is a challenge to achieve. We have developed and applied a methodology to rapidly assess bioactives in a snake venom proteome. Our microfluidic platform opens up efficient and rapid profiling of venomous anti-cholinergic receptor compounds. The key advantages of our methodology are: (i) nano amounts of venom needed; and (ii) a direct correlation of selected bioaffinities with accurate mass. To achieve this, we have for the first time successfully constructed a functional post nano-LC split to MS and bioaffinity profiling. In our method, comprehensive venom profiles with accurate masses and corresponding bioaffinities are obtained in one analytical run and will subsequently allow immediate purification of bioactive peptides with LC-MS, guided by accurate masses of the bioactives only. We profiled several neurotoxic Elapidae snake venoms using our methodology in combination with the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP) as biological target protein. The latter is a homologue of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), a drug target in neurodegenerative diseases and cognitive decline such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's, and in pain related diseases. Our methodology was evaluated and validated with high-affinity α-bungarotoxin and haemotoxic/proteolytic Vipera ammodytes venom spiked with α-bungarotoxin. Thereafter, the methodology was applied to profile the venom proteomes of Dendroaspis jamesoni kaimosae, Naja annulifera and Naja nivea. Gathering comprehensive profiling data took less than 2 h per snake venom measured. The data yielded 20 AChBP ligands of which the corresponding accurate masses were used to retrieve information from

  1. Deep Mutational Scans as a Guide to Engineering High Affinity T Cell Receptor Interactions with Peptide-bound Major Histocompatibility Complex.

    PubMed

    Harris, Daniel T; Wang, Ningyan; Riley, Timothy P; Anderson, Scott D; Singh, Nishant K; Procko, Erik; Baker, Brian M; Kranz, David M

    2016-11-18

    Proteins are often engineered to have higher affinity for their ligands to achieve therapeutic benefit. For example, many studies have used phage or yeast display libraries of mutants within complementarity-determining regions to affinity mature antibodies and T cell receptors (TCRs). However, these approaches do not allow rapid assessment or evolution across the entire interface. By combining directed evolution with deep sequencing, it is now possible to generate sequence fitness landscapes that survey the impact of every amino acid substitution across the entire protein-protein interface. Here we used the results of deep mutational scans of a TCR-peptide-MHC interaction to guide mutational strategies. The approach yielded stable TCRs with affinity increases of >200-fold. The substitutions with the greatest enrichments based on the deep sequencing were validated to have higher affinity and could be combined to yield additional improvements. We also conducted in silico binding analyses for every substitution to compare them with the fitness landscape. Computational modeling did not effectively predict the impacts of mutations distal to the interface and did not account for yeast display results that depended on combinations of affinity and protein stability. However, computation accurately predicted affinity changes for mutations within or near the interface, highlighting the complementary strengths of computational modeling and yeast surface display coupled with deep mutational scanning for engineering high affinity TCRs. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Enhanced-affinity murine T-cell receptors for tumor/self-antigens can be safe in gene therapy despite surpassing the threshold for thymic selection

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Thomas M.; Aggen, David H.; Stromnes, Ingunn M.; Dossett, Michelle L.; Richman, Sarah A.; Kranz, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Many of the most promising tumor antigens for T-cell-based cancer immunotherapies are unmodified self-antigens. Unfortunately, the avidity of T cells specific for these antigens is limited by central tolerance during T-cell development in the thymus, resulting in decreased anti-tumor efficacy of these T cells. One approach to overcoming this obstacle is to mutate T-cell receptor (TCR) genes from naturally occurring T cells to enhance the affinity for the target antigen. These enhanced-affinity TCRs can then be developed for use in TCR gene therapy. Although TCRs with significantly enhanced affinity have been generated using this approach, it is not clear whether these TCRs, which bypass the affinity limits imposed by negative selection, remain unresponsive to the low levels of self-antigen generally expressed by some normal tissues. Here we show that 2 variants of a high-affinity WT1-specific TCR with enhanced affinity for WT1 are safe and do not mediate autoimmune tissue infiltration or damage when transduced into peripheral CD8 T cells and transferred in vivo. However, if expressed in developing T cells and subjected to thymic selection, the same enhanced-affinity TCRs signal tolerance mechanisms in the thymus, resulting in T cells with attenuated antigen sensitivity in the periphery. PMID:23673862

  3. Measurement of the relative binding affinity of zearalenone, alpha-zearalenol and beta-zearalenol for uterine and oviduct estrogen receptors in swine, rats and chickens: an indicator of estrogenic potencies.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, D W; Picken, C A; Murphy, L C; Buhr, M M

    1989-01-01

    1. The relative binding affinity of zearalenone, alpha-zearalenol, and beta-zearalenol for estrogen receptors was determined in the pig, rat and chicken. 2. Similar relative binding patterns were observed, with alpha-zearalenol exhibiting greater affinity than zearalenone and beta-zearalenol the least binding affinity in all species. 3. The relative binding affinity of alpha-zearalenol was greater in pig, than in rat and significantly greater than in chicken. 4. Interspecies differences in zearalenone sensitivity may be due to the binding affinity of alpha-zearalenol for estrogen receptors and differences in zearalenone metabolites formed.

  4. Adenosine A1 and A3 receptors protect astrocytes from hypoxic damage.

    PubMed

    Björklund, Olga; Shang, Mingmei; Tonazzini, Ilaria; Daré, Elisabetta; Fredholm, Bertil B

    2008-10-31

    Brain levels of adenosine are elevated during hypoxia. Through effects on adenosine receptors (A(1), A(2A), A(2B) and A(3)) on astrocytes, adenosine can influence functions such as glutamate uptake, reactive gliosis, swelling, as well as release of neurotrophic and neurotoxic factors having an impact on the outcome of metabolic stress. We have studied the roles of these receptors in astrocytes by evaluating their susceptibility to damage induced by oxygen deprivation or exposure to the hypoxia mimic cobalt chloride (CoCl(2)). Hypoxia caused ATP breakdown and purine release, whereas CoCl(2) (0.8 mM) mainly reduced ATP by causing cell death in human D384 astrocytoma cells. Further experiments were conducted in primary astrocytes prepared from specific adenosine receptor knock-out (KO) and wild type (WT) mice. In WT cells purine release following CoCl(2) exposure was mainly due to nucleotide release, whereas hypoxia-induced intracellular ATP breakdown followed by nucleoside efflux. N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA), an unselective adenosine receptor agonist, protected from cell death following hypoxia. Cytotoxicity was more pronounced in A(1)R KO astrocytes and tended to be higher in WT cells in the presence of the A(1) receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX). Genetic deletion of A(2A) receptor resulted in less prominent effects. A(3)R KO glial cells were more affected by hypoxia than WT cells. Accordingly, the A(3) receptor agonist 2-chloro-N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)-N-methyl-5'-carbamoyladenosine (CL-IB-MECA) reduced ATP depletion caused by hypoxic conditions. It also reduced apoptosis in human astroglioma D384 cells after oxygen deprivation. In conclusion, the data point to a cytoprotective role of adenosine mediated by both A(1) and A(3) receptors in primary mouse astrocytes.

  5. Synthesis of high affinity fluorine-substituted ligands for the androgen receptor. Potential agents for imaging prostatic cancer by positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Liu, A; Carlson, K E; Katzenellenbogen, J A

    1992-05-29

    We have prepared nine androgens substituted with fluorine at C-16 or C-20 to evaluate their potential, as positron emission tomographic (PET) imaging agents for prostatic cancer when labeled with the positron emitting radionuclide fluorine-18 (t1/2 = 110 min). These compounds represent members from the following classes of androgens: testosterone (T), 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), 7 alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone (MNT), mibolerone (Mib), and metribolone (R1881). All of these compounds were prepared by functionalization of suitable androgen precursors, and the synthetic routes were developed to allow the introduction of fluorine by a fluoride ion displacement reaction late in the synthesis, as is required for the preparation of these compounds in fluorine-18 labeled form. We have also prepared four androgens in which the C-3 carbonyl or 17 beta-hydroxyl groups are replaced by fluorine. Most of the fluorine-substituted androgens show high affinity for the androgen receptor (AR), although fluorine substitution lowers their affinity by a small factor. None of the androgens where fluorine replaces oxygen functions at C-3 or C-17 have substantial affinity for AR. Derivatives of the natural androgens (T and DHT) as well as MNT have little affinity for other steroid hormone receptors (progesterone and mineralocorticoid receptors), whereas the Mib and R1881 derivatives have somewhat greater heterologous binding. With sex steroid binding protein, a human serum binding protein, the pattern of binding affinities is nearly the reverse, with derivatives of Mib, R1881 and MNT having low affinity, and DHT and T, high affinity. From these fluorine-substituted compounds, we can select several whose preparation in fluorine-18 labeled form for further tissue distribution studies is merited.

  6. Peripheral Adenosine A3 Receptor Activation Causes Regulated Hypothermia in Mice That Is Dependent on Central Histamine H1 Receptors.

    PubMed

    Carlin, Jesse Lea; Tosh, Dilip K; Xiao, Cuiying; Piñol, Ramón A; Chen, Zhoumou; Salvemini, Daniela; Gavrilova, Oksana; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Reitman, Marc L

    2016-02-01

    Adenosine can induce hypothermia, as previously demonstrated for adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) agonists. Here we use the potent, specific A3AR agonists MRS5698, MRS5841, and MRS5980 to show that adenosine also induces hypothermia via the A3AR. The hypothermic effect of A3AR agonists is independent of A1AR activation, as the effect was fully intact in mice lacking A1AR but abolished in mice lacking A3AR. A3AR agonist-induced hypothermia was attenuated by mast cell granule depletion, demonstrating that the A3AR hypothermia is mediated, at least in part, via mast cells. Central agonist dosing had no clear hypothermic effect, whereas peripheral dosing of a non-brain-penetrant agonist caused hypothermia, suggesting that peripheral A3AR-expressing cells drive the hypothermia. Mast cells release histamine, and blocking central histamine H1 (but not H2 or H4) receptors prevented the hypothermia. The hypothermia was preceded by hypometabolism and mice with hypothermia preferred a cooler environmental temperature, demonstrating that the hypothermic state is a coordinated physiologic response with a reduced body temperature set point. Importantly, hypothermia is not required for the analgesic effects of A3AR agonists, which occur with lower agonist doses. These results support a mechanistic model for hypothermia in which A3AR agonists act on peripheral mast cells, causing histamine release, which stimulates central histamine H1 receptors to induce hypothermia. This mechanism suggests that A3AR agonists will probably not be useful for clinical induction of hypothermia.

  7. Peripheral Adenosine A3 Receptor Activation Causes Regulated Hypothermia in Mice That Is Dependent on Central Histamine H1 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Carlin, Jesse Lea; Tosh, Dilip K.; Xiao, Cuiying; Piñol, Ramón A.; Chen, Zhoumou; Salvemini, Daniela; Gavrilova, Oksana; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine can induce hypothermia, as previously demonstrated for adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) agonists. Here we use the potent, specific A3AR agonists MRS5698, MRS5841, and MRS5980 to show that adenosine also induces hypothermia via the A3AR. The hypothermic effect of A3AR agonists is independent of A1AR activation, as the effect was fully intact in mice lacking A1AR but abolished in mice lacking A3AR. A3AR agonist–induced hypothermia was attenuated by mast cell granule depletion, demonstrating that the A3AR hypothermia is mediated, at least in part, via mast cells. Central agonist dosing had no clear hypothermic effect, whereas peripheral dosing of a non–brain-penetrant agonist caused hypothermia, suggesting that peripheral A3AR-expressing cells drive the hypothermia. Mast cells release histamine, and blocking central histamine H1 (but not H2 or H4) receptors prevented the hypothermia. The hypothermia was preceded by hypometabolism and mice with hypothermia preferred a cooler environmental temperature, demonstrating that the hypothermic state is a coordinated physiologic response with a reduced body temperature set point. Importantly, hypothermia is not required for the analgesic effects of A3AR agonists, which occur with lower agonist doses. These results support a mechanistic model for hypothermia in which A3AR agonists act on peripheral mast cells, causing histamine release, which stimulates central histamine H1 receptors to induce hypothermia. This mechanism suggests that A3AR agonists will probably not be useful for clinical induction of hypothermia. PMID:26606937

  8. High-affinity insulin binding to an atypical insulin-like growth factor-I receptor in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Milazzo, G; Yip, C C; Maddux, B A; Vigneri, R; Goldfine, I D

    1992-01-01

    We studied the nature of insulin receptor binding in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. In both intact cells and solubilized receptor preparations, high-affinity insulin binding was seen. However, unlabeled insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) was five-fold more potent in inhibiting 125I-insulin binding than insulin itself. With monoclonal antibodies to the insulin receptor, 30% of 125I-insulin binding was inhibited. In contrast when alpha-IR3, a monoclonal antibody that recognizes typical IGF-I receptor, was employed over 60% of 125I-insulin binding was inhibited. The B29-MAB-125I-insulin photoprobe was then cross-linked to MCF-7 membranes. Cross-linking was inhibited by both unlabeled insulin and IGF-I. Further, the B29-MAB-125I-insulin photoprobe cross-linked to MCF-7 membranes was strongly immunoprecipitated by alpha-IR3. Employing sequential affinity chromatography with insulin-Affi-gel followed by insulin receptor monoclonal antibody agarose, atypical insulin binding activity was separated from insulin receptor binding activity. This atypical receptor had intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. Both insulin and IGF-I stimulated the phosphorylation of the receptor's beta subunit. In MCF-7 cells both IGF-I and insulin stimulated [3H]thymidine incorporation; alpha-IR3 blocked all of the IGF-I effect but only 50-60% of the insulin effect. This study demonstrates in MCF-7 cells that, in addition to typical insulin and IGF-I receptors, there is another receptor that binds both insulin and IGF-I with high affinity. Images PMID:1311720

  9. Introducing ligand-based hydrogen bond donors to a receptor: both selectivity and binding affinity for anion recognition in water can be improved.

    PubMed

    Huang, Feihu; Cheng, Chen; Feng, Guoqiang

    2012-12-21

    Introducing hydrogen bond donors to a receptor was found to be an effective approach to improve both its selectivity and binding affinity for pyrophosphate in water. The crystal structure of Zn3-ADP complex showed the improvements come from the combination of H-bonding and metal coordination in a manner similar to many metalloenzymes.

  10. The Ketamine Analogue Methoxetamine and 3- and 4-Methoxy Analogues of Phencyclidine Are High Affinity and Selective Ligands for the Glutamate NMDA Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Bryan L.; Gibbons, Simon; Arunotayanun, Warunya; Huang, Xi-Ping; Setola, Vincent; Treble, Ric; Iversen, Les

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we determined the pharmacological profiles of novel ketamine and phencyclidine analogues currently used as ‘designer drugs’ and compared them to the parent substances via the resources of the National Institute of Mental Health Psychoactive Drug Screening Program. The ketamine analogues methoxetamine ((RS)-2-(ethylamino)-2-(3-methoxyphenyl)cyclohexanone) and 3-MeO-PCE (N-ethyl-1-(3-methoxyphenyl)cyclohexanamine) and the 3- and 4-methoxy analogues of phencyclidine, (1-[1-(3-methoxyphenyl)cyclohexyl]piperidine and 1-[1-(4-methoxyphenyl)cyclohexyl]piperidine), were all high affinity ligands for the PCP-site on the glutamate NMDA receptor. In addition methoxetamine and PCP and its analogues displayed appreciable affinities for the serotonin transporter, whilst the PCP analogues exhibited high affinities for sigma receptors. Antagonism of the NMDA receptor is thought to be the key pharmacological feature underlying the actions of dissociative anaesthetics. The novel ketamine and PCP analogues had significant affinities for the NMDA receptor in radioligand binding assays, which may explain their psychotomimetic effects in human users. Additional actions on other targets could be important for delineating side-effects. PMID:23527166

  11. Mapping of the high affinity Fc epsilon receptor binding site to the third constant region domain of IgE.

    PubMed Central

    Nissim, A; Jouvin, M H; Eshhar, Z

    1991-01-01

    Identification of the precise region(s) on the IgE molecule that take part in the binding of IgE to its high affinity receptor (Fc epsilon RI) may lead to the design of IgE analogues able to block the allergic response. To localize the Fc epsilon RI-binding domain of mouse IgE, we attempted to confer on human IgE, which normally does not bind to the rodent receptor, the ability to bind to the rat Fc epsilon RI. Employing exon shuffling, we have expressed chimeric epsilon-heavy chain genes composed of a mouse (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl)acetic acid (NP)-binding VH domain, and human C epsilon in which various domains were replaced by their murine counterparts. This has enabled us to test the Fc epsilon RI-binding of each mouse IgE domain while maintaining the overall conformation of the molecule. All of the chimeric IgE molecules which contain the murine C epsilon 3, bound equally to both the rodent and human receptor, as well as to monoclonal antibodies recognizing a site on IgE which is identical or very close to the Fc epsilon RI binding site. Deletion of the second constant region domain did not impair either the binding capacity of the mutated IgE or its ability to mediate mast cell degradation. These results assign the third epsilon domain of IgE as the principal region involved in the interaction with the Fc epsilon RI. Images PMID:1824934

  12. Apparent affinity of some 8-phenyl-substituted xanthines at adenosine receptors in guinea-pig aorta and atria.

    PubMed Central

    Collis, M. G.; Jacobson, K. A.; Tomkins, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    1 Some 8-phenyl-substituted, 1,3 dipropyl xanthines have previously been demonstrated to have a 20-400 fold greater affinity for A1 binding sites in rat CNS membranes than for A2 adenosine receptors in intact CNS cells from guinea-pigs. In the present study these compounds (1,3, dipropyl-8-phenylxanthine: DPPX; 1,3 dipropyl-8-(2 amino-4-chlorophenyl) xanthine: PACPX; 8-(4-(2-amino-ethyl)amino) carbonyl methyl oxyphenyl)-1,3-dipropylxanthine: XAC; and D-Lys-XAC) together with two that have not been reported to exhibit A1-receptor selectively (8-(p-sulphophenyl)theophylline: 8-PST; 8-(4-carboxy methyl oxyphenyl)-1,3-dipropylxanthine: XCC) have been evaluated as antagonists of the effects of 2-chloroadenosine in two isolated cardiovascular tissues. 2 The isolated tissues used were guinea-pig atria (bradycardic response) and aorta (relaxation), which are thought to possess A1 and A2 adenosine receptors, respectively. 3 All the xanthines antagonized responses evoked by 2-chloroadenosine in both tissues but did not affect responses evoked by acetylcholine (atria) or sodium nitrite (aorta). 4 The xanthines, 8-PST, XAC, D-Lys XAC, XCC and DPPX appeared to be competitive antagonists of the effects of 2-chloroadenosine, as Schild plot slopes did not differ significantly from unity. The 1,3-dipropyl substituted compounds had pA2 values from 6.5 to 7.4 and were more potent than the 1,3 dimethyl substituted 8-PST (pA2 4.9 to 5). 5 For individual xanthines, there was no difference between pA2 values obtained in the atria and in the aorta.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3664093

  13. Postthymic expansion in human CD4 naive T cells defined by expression of functional high-affinity IL-2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Pekalski, Marcin L; Ferreira, Ricardo C; Coulson, Richard M R; Cutler, Antony J; Guo, Hui; Smyth, Deborah J; Downes, Kate; Dendrou, Calliope A; Castro Dopico, Xaquin; Esposito, Laura; Coleman, Gillian; Stevens, Helen E; Nutland, Sarah; Walker, Neil M; Guy, Catherine; Dunger, David B; Wallace, Chris; Tree, Timothy I M; Todd, John A; Wicker, Linda S

    2013-03-15

    As the thymus involutes with age, the maintenance of peripheral naive T cells in humans becomes strongly dependent on peripheral cell division. However, mechanisms that orchestrate homeostatic division remain unclear. In this study we present evidence that the frequency of naive CD4 T cells that express CD25 (IL-2 receptor α-chain) increases with age on subsets of both CD31(+) and CD31(-) naive CD4 T cells. Analyses of TCR excision circles from sorted subsets indicate that CD25(+) naive CD4 T cells have undergone more rounds of homeostatic proliferation than their CD25(-) counterparts in both the CD31(+) and CD31(-) subsets, indicating that CD25 is a marker of naive CD4 T cells that have preferentially responded to survival signals from self-Ags or cytokines. CD25 expression on CD25(-) naive CD4 T cells can be induced by IL-7 in vitro in the absence of TCR activation. Although CD25(+) naive T cells respond to lower concentrations of IL-2 as compared with their CD25(-) counterparts, IL-2 responsiveness is further increased in CD31(-) naive T cells by their expression of the signaling IL-2 receptor β-chain CD122, forming with common γ-chain functional high-affinity IL-2 receptors. CD25 plays a role during activation: CD25(+) naive T cells stimulated in an APC-dependent manner were shown to produce increased levels of IL-2 as compared with their CD25(-) counterparts. This study establishes CD25(+) naive CD4 T cells, which are further delineated by CD31 expression, as a major functionally distinct immune cell subset in humans that warrants further characterization in health and disease.

  14. Investigating Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 Allosteric Modulator Cooperativity, Affinity, and Agonism: Enriching Structure-Function Studies and Structure-Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Karen J.; Noetzel, Meredith J.; Rook, Jerri M.; Vinson, Paige N.; Stauffer, Shaun R.; Rodriguez, Alice L.; Emmitte, Kyle A.; Zhou, Ya; Chun, Aspen C.; Felts, Andrew S.; Chauder, Brian A.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Niswender, Colleen M.

    2012-01-01

    Drug discovery programs increasingly are focusing on allosteric modulators as a means to modify the activity of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) targets. Allosteric binding sites are topographically distinct from the endogenous ligand (orthosteric) binding site, which allows for co-occupation of a single receptor with the endogenous ligand and an allosteric modulator that can alter receptor pharmacological characteristics. Negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) inhibit and positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) enhance the affinity and/or efficacy of orthosteric agonists. Established approaches for estimation of affinity and efficacy values for orthosteric ligands are not appropriate for allosteric modulators, and this presents challenges for fully understanding the actions of novel modulators of GPCRs. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) is a family C GPCR for which a large array of allosteric modulators have been identified. We took advantage of the many tools for probing allosteric sites on mGlu5 to validate an operational model of allosterism that allows quantitative estimation of modulator affinity and cooperativity values. Affinity estimates derived from functional assays fit well with affinities measured in radioligand binding experiments for both PAMs and NAMs with diverse chemical scaffolds and varying degrees of cooperativity. We observed modulation bias for PAMs when we compared mGlu5-mediated Ca2+ mobilization and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation data. Furthermore, we used this model to quantify the effects of mutations that reduce binding or potentiation by PAMs. This model can be applied to PAM and NAM potency curves in combination with maximal fold-shift data to derive reliable estimates of modulator affinities. PMID:22863693

  15. CD84 negatively regulates IgE high affinity receptor signaling in human mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Errico, Damiana; Oliver-Vila, Irene; Aínsua-Enrich, Erola; Gilfillan, Alasdair M.; Picado, César; Sayós, Joan; Martín, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    CD84 is a self-binding receptor from the CD150 family that is broadly expressed in hematopoietic cells. It has been described that the adaptors SAP and EAT-2 are critical for CD150 family members signaling and function. We observed that human mast cells express CD84 but lack SAP or EAT-2, that CD84 is tyrosine phosphorylated upon FcεRI engagement, and that the release of granule contents is reduced when FcεRI is co-engaged with CD84 in LAD2 and human CD34+-derived mast cells (huMCs). In addition, we observed that the release of IL-8 and GM-CSF was also reduced in FcεRI/CD84 costimulated cells as compared to FcεRI/Ig control. In order to understand how CD84 down-regulates FcεRI-mediated function, we analyzed signaling pathways affected by CD84 in human mast cells. Our results showed that CD84 dampens FcεRI-mediated calcium mobilization after its co-crosslinking with the receptor. Furthermore, FcεRI-mediated Syk-LAT-PLCγ1 axis activity is down-regulated after CD84 stimulation, compared to FcεRI/Ig control. The inhibitory kinase Fes phosphorylates mainly the inhibitory motif for CD84. Moreover Fes, which has been described to become phosphorylated after substrate binding, also gets phosphorylated when co-expressed with CD84. Consistently, Fes was observed to be more phosphorylated after CD84 and FcεRI co-crosslinking. The phosphorylation of the protein phosphatase SHP-1 also increases after CD84 and FcεRI coengagement. Taken together, our results show that CD84 is highly expressed in mast cells and that it contributes to the regulation of FcεRI signaling in a SAP and EAT-2 independent and Fes and SHP-1 dependent mechanisms. PMID:22068234

  16. Evidence that TSH Receptor A-Subunit Multimers, Not Monomers, Drive Antibody Affinity Maturation in Graves' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aliesky, Holly A.; Chen, Chun-Rong; McLachlan, Sandra M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The TSH receptor (TSHR) A-subunit shed from the cell surface contributes to the induction and/or affinity maturation of pathogenic TSHR autoantibodies in Graves' disease. Objective: This study aimed to determine whether the quaternary structure (multimerization) of shed A-subunits influences pathogenic TSHR autoantibody generation. Design: The isolated TSHR A-subunit generated by transfected mammalian cells exists in two forms; one (active) is recognized only by Graves' TSHR autoantibodies, the second (inactive) is recognized only by mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb) 3BD10. Recent evidence suggests that both Graves' TSHR autoantibodies and mAb 3BD10 recognize the A-subunit monomer. Therefore, if the A-subunit monomer is an immunogen, Graves' sera should have antibodies to both active and inactive A-subunits. Conversely, restriction of TSHR autoantibodies to active A-subunits would be evidence of a role for shed A-subunit multimers, not monomers, in the pathogenesis of Graves' disease. Therefore, we tested a panel of Graves' sera for their relative recognition of active and inactive A-subunits. Results: Of 34 sera from unselected Graves' patients, 28 were unequivocally positive in a clinical TSH binding inhibition assay. None of the latter sera, as well as 8/9 sera from control individuals, recognized inactive A-subunits on ELISA. In contrast to Graves' sera, antibodies induced in mice, not by shedding from the TSHR holoreceptor, but by immunization with adenovirus expressing the free human A-subunit, were directed to both the active and inactive A-subunit forms. Conclusions: The present study supports the concept that pathogenic TSHR autoantibody affinity maturation in Graves' disease is driven by A-subunit multimers, not monomers. PMID:25856215

  17. High-affinity α4β2 nicotinic receptors mediate the impairing effects of acute nicotine on contextual fear extinction

    PubMed Central

    Kutlu, Munir Gunes; Holliday, Erica; Gould, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Previously, studies from our lab have shown that while acute nicotine administered prior to training and testing enhances contextual fear conditioning, acute nicotine injections prior to extinction sessions impair extinction of contextual fear. Although there is also strong evidence showing that the acute nicotine’s enhancing effects on contextual fear conditioning require high-affinity α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), it is unknown which nAChR subtypes are involved in the acute nicotine-induced impairment of contextual fear extinction. In this study, we investigated the effects of acute nicotine administration on contextual fear extinction in knock-out (KO) mice lacking α4, β2 or α7 subtypes of nAChRs and their wild-type (WT) littermates. Both KO and WT mice were first trained and tested for contextual fear conditioning and received a daily contextual extinction session for 4 days. Subjects received intraperitoneal injections of nicotine (0.18 mg/kg) or saline 2–4 mins prior to each extinction session. Our results showed that the that mice lack α4 and β2 subtypes of nAChRs showed normal contextual fear extinction but not the acute nicotine-induced impairment while the mice that lack the α7 subtype showed both normal contextual extinction and nicotine-induced impairment of contextual extinction. In addition, control experiments showed that acute nicotine-induced impairment of contextual fear extinction persisted when nicotine administration was ceased and repeated acute nicotine administrations alone did not induce freezing behavior in the absence of context-shock learning. These results clearly demonstrate that high-affinity α4β2 nAChRs are necessary for the effects of acute nicotine on contextual fear extinction. PMID:26688111

  18. Evidence that TSH Receptor A-Subunit Multimers, Not Monomers, Drive Antibody Affinity Maturation in Graves' Disease.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, Basil; Aliesky, Holly A; Chen, Chun-Rong; McLachlan, Sandra M

    2015-06-01

    The TSH receptor (TSHR) A-subunit shed from the cell surface contributes to the induction and/or affinity maturation of pathogenic TSHR autoantibodies in Graves' disease. This study aimed to determine whether the quaternary structure (multimerization) of shed A-subunits influences pathogenic TSHR autoantibody generation. The isolated TSHR A-subunit generated by transfected mammalian cells exists in two forms; one (active) is recognized only by Graves' TSHR autoantibodies, the second (inactive) is recognized only by mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb) 3BD10. Recent evidence suggests that both Graves' TSHR autoantibodies and mAb 3BD10 recognize the A-subunit monomer. Therefore, if the A-subunit monomer is an immunogen, Graves' sera should have antibodies to both active and inactive A-subunits. Conversely, restriction of TSHR autoantibodies to active A-subunits would be evidence of a role for shed A-subunit multimers, not monomers, in the pathogenesis of Graves' disease. Therefore, we tested a panel of Graves' sera for their relative recognition of active and inactive A-subunits. Of 34 sera from unselected Graves' patients, 28 were unequivocally positive in a clinical TSH binding inhibition assay. None of the latter sera, as well as 8/9 sera from control individuals, recognized inactive A-subunits on ELISA. In contrast to Graves' sera, antibodies induced in mice, not by shedding from the TSHR holoreceptor, but by immunization with adenovirus expressing the free human A-subunit, were directed to both the active and inactive A-subunit forms. The present study supports the concept that pathogenic TSHR autoantibody affinity maturation in Graves' disease is driven by A-subunit multimers, not monomers.

  19. Studies on molecular properties prediction and histamine H3 receptor affinities of novel ligands with uracil-based motifs.

    PubMed

    Lipani, Luca; Odadzic, Dalibor; Weizel, Lilia; Schwed, Johannes-Stephan; Sadek, Bassem; Stark, Holger

    2014-10-30

    The histamine H3 receptor (H3R) plays a role in cognitive and memory processes and is involved in different neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and narcolepsy. Therefore, several hH3R antagonists/inverse agonists entered clinical phases for a broad spectrum of mainly centrally occurring diseases. However, many other promising candidates failed due to their pharmacokinetic profile, mostly because of their strong lipophilicity accompanied with low solubility. Analysis of previous potential H3R selective antagonists/inverse agonists, e.g. pitolisant, revealed promising results concerning physicochemical properties and drug-likeness. Herein, a series of new hH3R ligands 8-20 consisting of piperidin-1-yl or piperidin-1-yl-propoxyphenyl coupled to different uracil, thymine, and 5,6-dimethyluracil related moieties, were synthesized, evaluated on their binding properties at the hH3R and the estimation of different physicochemical and drug-likeness properties. Due to the coupling to various positions at pyrimidine-2,4-(1H,3H)-dione, affinity at hH3Rs and drug-likeness parameters have been improved. For instance, compound 9 showed in addition to high affinity at the hH3R (pKi (hH3R) = 8.14) clog S, clog P, LE, LipE, and drug-likeness score values of -4.36, 3.47, 0.34, 4.63, and 1.54, respectively. Also, the methyl substituted analog 17 (pKi (hH3R) = 8.15) revealed LE, LipE and drug-likeness score values of -3.29, 2.47, 0.49, 5.52, and 1.76, respectively.

  20. High-affinity α4β2 nicotinic receptors mediate the impairing effects of acute nicotine on contextual fear extinction.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Munir Gunes; Holliday, Erica; Gould, Thomas J

    2016-02-01

    Previously, studies from our lab have shown that while acute nicotine administered prior to training and testing enhances contextual fear conditioning, acute nicotine injections prior to extinction sessions impair extinction of contextual fear. Although there is also strong evidence showing that the acute nicotine's enhancing effects on contextual fear conditioning require high-affinity α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), it is unknown which nAChR subtypes are involved in the acute nicotine-induced impairment of contextual fear extinction. In this study, we investigated the effects of acute nicotine administration on contextual fear extinction in knock-out (KO) mice lacking α4, β2 or α7 subtypes of nAChRs and their wild-type (WT) littermates. Both KO and WT mice were first trained and tested for contextual fear conditioning and received a daily contextual extinction session for 4 days. Subjects received intraperitoneal injections of nicotine (0.18 mg/kg) or saline 2-4 min prior to each extinction session. Our results showed that the mice that lack α4 and β2 subtypes of nAChRs showed normal contextual fear extinction but not the acute nicotine-induced impairment while the mice that lack the α7 subtype showed both normal contextual extinction and nicotine-induced impairment of contextual extinction. In addition, control experiments showed that acute nicotine-induced impairment of contextual fear extinction persisted when nicotine administration was ceased and repeated acute nicotine administrations alone did not induce freezing behavior in the absence of context-shock learning. These results clearly demonstrate that high-affinity α4β2 nAChRs are necessary for the effects of acute nicotine on contextual fear extinction.

  1. Protein engineering of Bacillus thuringiensis δ-endotoxin: Mutations at domain II of CryIAb enhance receptor affinity and toxicity toward gypsy moth larvae

    PubMed Central

    Rajamohan, Francis; Alzate, Oscar; Cotrill, Jeffrey A.; Curtiss, April; Dean, Donald H.

    1996-01-01

    Substitutions or deletions of domain II loop residues of Bacillus thuringiensis δ-endotoxin CryIAb were constructed using site-directed mutagenesis techniques to investigate their functional roles in receptor binding and toxicity toward gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar). Substitution of loop 2 residue N372 with Ala or Gly (N372A, N372G) increased the toxicity against gypsy moth larvae 8-fold and enhanced binding affinity to gypsy moth midgut brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) ≈4-fold. Deletion of N372 (D3), however, substantially reduced toxicity (>21 times) as well as binding affinity, suggesting that residue N372 is involved in receptor binding. Interestingly, a triple mutant, DF-1 (N372A, A282G and L283S), has a 36-fold increase in toxicity to gypsy moth neonates compared with wild-type toxin. The enhanced activity of DF-1 was correlated with higher binding affinity (18-fold) and binding site concentrations. Dissociation binding assays suggested that the off-rate of the BBMV-bound mutant toxins was similar to that of the wild type. However, DF-1 toxin bound 4 times more than the wild-type and N372A toxins, and it was directly correlated with binding affinity and potency. Protein blots of gypsy moth BBMV probed with labeled N372A, DF-1, and CryIAb toxins recognized a common 210-kDa protein, indicating that the increased activity of the mutants was not caused by binding to additional receptor(s). The improved binding affinity of N372A and DF-1 suggest that a shorter side chain at these loops may fit the toxin more efficiently to the binding pockets. These results offer an excellent model system for engineering δ-endotoxins with higher potency and wider spectra of target pests by improving receptor binding interactions. PMID:8962052

  2. In vitro and in vivo properties of (/sup 125/I) (R,S) 4IQNB: A lower affinity diastereomeric muscarinic receptor radiotracer

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, R.E.; Schneidau, T.A.; Rzeszotarski, W.J.; Cohen, V.I.; Eckelman, W.C.; Reba, R.C.

    1985-05-01

    The (R,R) diastereomer of 3-Quinuclidinyl 4-Iodobenzilate (4IQNB) is a high affinity muscarinic acetylcholine receptor radiotracer which has provided images of receptor distribution in the CNS of man. The radiotracer is of such high affinity that dissociation in vivo is not evident in man after 6-half-lives I-123. Since the dissociation kinetics of radiotracer may be helpful for receptor quantitation, the authors have prepared (/sup 125/I) (R,S) 4IQNB: a diastereomer of 4IQNB which as a lower affinity for the m-AChR than the (R,R) isomer. The equilibrium association constant for the (R,S) diastereomer is 1.10 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/, which is 4-fold lower in affinity than (/sup 3/H) (R) QNB and 2-fold lower than that of the (R,R) 4IQNB. Of more interest, the dissociation rate constant of (R,S) 4IQNB is 0.099 (+0.01)/min., 15-fold more rapid than that of the (R,R) isomer. The systemic distribution of (R,S) 4IQNB is similar to that of (R,R) 4IQNB except localization in the myocardium is 2-fold lower, reflecting the lower affinity. Nonreceptor interactions are the same since the compounds differ only as optical isomers around the carbinol chiral center. In the CNS peak activities are obtained in the corpus striatum (and other M/sub 1/-receptor rich structures) which are the same as obtained with (R,R) 4IQNB. However, no washout of (R,R) 4IQNB is observed after 4 hrs and only 60% in 24 hrs. By contrast, 65% of (R,S) 4IQNB washes out in 4 hrs and no significant activity is detected after 24 hrs. The increased washout kinetics should provide a better radiotracer for determining muscarinic receptor concentrations in the CNS of man.

  3. Tetrahydroquinoline glucocorticoid receptor agonists: discovery of a 3-hydroxyl for improving receptor selectivity.

    PubMed

    Roach, Steven L; Higuchi, Robert I; Hudson, Andrew R; Adams, Mark E; Syka, Peter M; Mais, Dale E; Miner, Jeffrey N; Marschke, Keith B; Zhi, Lin

    2011-01-01

    We have previously disclosed a series of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) ligands derived from 6-indole-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinolines through structure-activity relationship (SAR) of the pendent C6-indole ring. In parallel with this effort, we now report SAR of the tetrahydroquinoline A-ring that identified the importance of a C3 hydroxyl in improving GR selectivity within a series of non-steroidal GR agonists. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Potential Modes of Interaction of 9-Aminomethyl-9,10-dihydroanthracene (AMDA) Derivatives with the 5-HT2A Receptor: A Ligand Structure-Affinity Relationship, Receptor Mutagenesis and Receptor Modeling Investigation⊕

    PubMed Central

    Runyon, Scott P.; Mosier, Philip D.; Roth, Bryan L.; Glennon, Richard A.; Westkaemper, Richard B.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of 3-position substitution of 9-aminomethyl-9,10-dihydroanthracene (AMDA) on 5-HT2A receptor affinity were determined and compared to a parallel series of DOB-like 1-(2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-aminopropanes substituted at the 4-position. The results were interpreted within the context of 5-HT2A receptor models that suggest that members of the DOB-like series can bind to the receptor in two distinct modes that correlate with the compounds’ functional activity. Automated ligand docking and molecular dynamics suggest that all of the AMDA derivatives, the parent of which is a 5-HT2A antagonist, bind in a fashion analogous to that for the sterically demanding antagonist DOB-like compounds. The failure of the F3406.52L mutation to adversely affect the affinity of AMDA and the 3-bromo derivative is consistent with the proposed modes of orientation. Evaluation of ligand-receptor complex models suggest that a valine/threonine exchange between the 5-HT2A and D2 receptors may be the origin of selectivity for AMDA and two substituted derivatives. PMID:18847250

  5. Structural analogs of human insulin-like growth factor I with reduced affinity for serum binding proteins and the type 2 insulin-like growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Bayne, M.L.; Applebaum, J.; Chicchi, G.G.; Hayes, N.S.; Green, B.G.; Cascieri, M.A.

    1988-05-05

    Four structural analogs of human insulin-like growth factor I (hIGF-I) have been prepared by site-directed mutagenesis of a synthetic IGF-I gene and subsequent expression and purification of the mutant protein from the conditioned media of transformed yeast. (Phe/sup -1/, Val/sup 1/, Asn/sup 2/, Gln/sup 3/, His/sup 4/, Ser/sup 8/, His/sup 9/, Glu/sup 12/, Tyr/sup 15/, Leu/sup 16/)IGF-I (B-chain mutant), in which the first 16 amino acids of hIGF-I were replaced with the first 17 amino acids of the B-chain of insulin, has >1000-, 100-, and 2-fold reduced potency for human serum binding proteins, the rat liver type 2 IGF receptor, and the human placental type 1 IGF receptor, respectively. The B-chain mutant also has 4-fold increased affinity for the human placental insulin receptor. (Gln/sup 3/, Ala/sup 4/) IGF-I has 4-fold reduced affinity for human serum binding proteins, but is equipotent to hIGF-I at the types 1 and 2 IGF and insulin receptors. (Tyr/sup 15/, Leu/sup 16/) IGH-I has 4-fold reduced affinity for human serum binding proteins and 10-fold increased affinity for the insulin receptor. The peptide in which these four-point mutations are combined, (Gln/sup 3/, Ala/sup 4/, Tyr/sup 15/,Leu/sup 16/)IGF-I, has 600-fold reduced affinity for the serum binding proteins. All four of these mutants stimulate DNA synthesis in the rat vascular smooth muscle cell line A10 with potencies reflecting their potency at the type 1 IGF receptor. These studies identify some of the domains of hIGF-I which are responsible for maintaining high affinity binding with the serum binding protein and the type 2 IGF receptor. In addition, These peptides will be useful in defining the role of the type 2 IGF receptor and serum binding proteins in the physiological actions of hIGF-I.

  6. Fancy bioisosteres: novel paracyclophane derivatives as super-affinity dopamine D3 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Schlotter, Karin; Boeckler, Frank; Hübner, Harald; Gmeiner, Peter

    2006-06-15

    The exploration of the chemical diversity space depends on the discovery of novel bioisosteric elements. As a continuation of our project on bilayered arene surrogates, we herein report on [2.2]paracyclophane-derived dopamine D3 receptor antagonists of type 4 and 6. For the most promising test compound 6a, bearing a 2-methoxyphenyl substituent, a stereocontrolled preparation was performed when the planar chirality of enantiomers (R)-6a (FAUC 418) and (S)-6a caused a considerable differentiation of D3 binding, which is indicated by K(i) values of 0.19 and 3.0 nM, respectively. Functional experiments showed D3 antagonist properties for the paracyclophane derivatives of type 6. To elucidate putative bioactive low-energy conformations, DFT-based studies including the calculation of diagnostic magnetic shielding properties were performed. An 89% increase in volume for the [2.2]paracyclophane moiety compared to that of the monolayered benzofurane of lead compound 3b indicates higher plasticity of GPCR binding regions than usually expected.

  7. Behavioral interactions between ethanol and imidazodiazepines with high affinities for benzodiazepine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Lister, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    The intrinsic effect of two imidazodiazepines RO 15-3505 and RO 17-1812 on the behavior of mice in a holeboard test were investigated. The interactions of these two drugs with ethanol were also studied. RO 15-3505 failed to significantly alter either exploratory head-dipping or locomotor activity when administered alone but doses of 0.75 and 1.5 mg/kg reversed the reduction in the number of head-dips caused by ethanol and partially reversed ethanol's locomotor stimulant action. In contrast, RO 17-1812 increased locomotor activity when administered alone, and enhanced the reduction in exploration caused by ethanol. Neither RO 15-3505 nor RO 17-1812 altered blood alcohol concentrations suggesting a pharmacodynamic basis for these interactions. The results suggest that in the holeboard test the interactions of imidazodiazepines with ethanol are related to the nature of their interaction with benzodiazepine receptors, inverse agonists antagonising and agonists enhancing ethanol's effects on exploration.

  8. Affinity Chromatography of Native and Recombinant Proteins from Receptors for Insulin and IGF-I to Recombinant Single Chain Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Fujita-Yamaguchi, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    Affinity chromatography is an efficient method to isolate proteins by taking advantage of their affinities for specific molecules such as substrates, inhibitors, antigens, ligands, antibodies, and other interacting molecules, including subunits. Nowadays, we take the effectiveness and excellence of this technology for granted. This essay will mainly cover the use of affinity chromatography based on my experience. PMID:26579073

  9. Acylation of the alpha-amino group in neuropeptide Y(12-36) increases binding affinity for the Y2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Murase, S; Yumoto, N; Petukhov, M G; Yoshikawa, S

    1996-01-01

    Competition assays using three series of analogs of neuropeptide Y (NPY) ([Xaa11]NPY(11-36), [Xaa12]NPY(12-36), and [Xaa13]NPY(13-36) revealed that the binding affinity for the Y2 receptor was considerably lowered by truncation of residue 11. Upon acetylation or succinylation of the alpha-amino group, the binding affinity of [Xaa12]NPY(12-36) recovered to a level similar to that of [Xaa11]NPY(11-36). No significant difference was observed between the increases caused by acetylation and those caused by succinylation, suggesting that the increase in binding affinity cannot be explained by the change in the net charge at the N-terminus as a consequence of the modification. The scattered data points on a plot of the alpha-helix content vs. IC50 of all these analogs revealed the absence of any apparent relationship, an indication that prior formation of the alpha-helix is not necessary for binding to the Y2 receptor. It has been widely accepted that fewer than 12 residues from the C-terminus are directly involved in binding of NPY to the Y2 receptor, while the remaining part of NPY only assists in the adoption of a favorable conformation by the C-terminal hexapeptide for recognition by the receptor. However, the present results suggest that the region around residue 12 does not project from the Y2 receptor.

  10. Structure-Activity Study of Ghrelin(1-8) Resulting in High Affinity Fluorine-Bearing Ligands for the Ghrelin Receptor.

    PubMed

    Charron, Carlie L; Hou, Jinqiang; McFarland, Mark S; Dhanvantari, Savita; Kovacs, Michael S; Luyt, Leonard G

    2017-09-14

    The ghrelin receptor, also known as the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHS-R1a), is a G-protein-coupled receptor that is differentially expressed in healthy tissue and several cancers, including prostate, testicular, and ovarian. Selectively targeting the ghrelin receptor using fluorine-18 tagged entities would allow localization and visualization of ghrelin receptor expressing carcinomas using PET imaging. The endogenous ligand ghrelin, a 28 amino acid peptide with 3.1 nM affinity, has poor in vivo stability. Here we report on ghrelin(1-8) analogues bearing modifications at residues 1, 3, 4, and 8. The lead analogue, [Inp(1),Dpr(3)(6-fluoro-2-naphthoate),1-Nal(4),Thr(8)]ghrelin(1-8), possessed an IC50 value of 0.11 nM that is a 28-fold improvement compared to the natural ligand. A novel 6-fluoro-2-pentafluorophenyl naphthoate (PFPN) prosthetic group was synthesized to incorporate fluorine-18 for PET imaging. This is not only the highest affinity ghrelin analogue reported but also the shortest ghrelin analogue capable of binding GHS-R1a with better affinity than ghrelin(1-28).

  11. Presynaptic localization of GluK5 in rod photoreceptors suggests a novel function of high affinity glutamate receptors in the mammalian retina

    PubMed Central

    Frotscher, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Kainate receptors mediate glutamatergic signaling through both pre- and presynaptic receptors. Here, we studied the expression of the high affinity kainate receptor GluK5 in the mouse retina. Double-immunofluoresence labeling and electron microscopic analysis revealed a presynaptic localization of GluK5 in the outer plexiform layer. Unexpectedly, we found GluK5 almost exclusively localized to the presynaptic ribbon of photoreceptor terminals. Moreover, in GluK5-deficient mutant mice the structural integrity of synaptic ribbons was severely altered pointing to a novel function of GluK5 in organizing synaptic ribbons in the presynaptic terminals of rod photoreceptors. PMID:28235022

  12. The Synthesis of 1,3,5-triazine Derivatives and JNJ7777120 Analogues with Histamine H4 Receptor Affinity and Their Interaction with PTEN Promoter.

    PubMed

    Latacz, Gniewomir; Kechagioglou, Petros; Papi, Rigini; Łażewska, Dorota; Więcek, Małgorzata; Kamińska, Katarzyna; Wencel, Przemysław; Karcz, Tadeusz; Schwed, Johannes S; Stark, Holger; Kyriakidis, Dimitrios A; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2016-08-01

    The involvement of histamine and H4 receptor (H4 R) in cancer has been investigated recently using the H4 R agonists and antagonists. The scope of the research project was synthesis and exploration of the consequences of a group of compounds with histamine H4 receptor (H4 R) affinity on the promoter of PTEN gene encoding the antitumor PTEN protein. The series of novel compounds based either on H4 R antagonists JNJ7777120 structure or 1,3,5-triazine scaffold were synthesized, evaluated for histamine H4 R affinity and used in this study. Compounds 5 and 7 belonging to the group of JNJ7777120 analogues showed the highest interaction with the promoter of PTEN gene and weak affinity against H4 R with Ki value >100 μm. These compounds showed no significant effect on neuroblastoma IMR-32 cells viability indicating no correlation between PTEN gene promoter affinity and antitumor activity. Compound 6, another JNJ7777120 analogue, showed the highest effect on IMR-32 viability with calculated IC50 = 23.27 μm. The 1,3,5-triazine derivatives exhibited generally low or medium interaction with PTEN gene promoter. However, the 1,3,5-triazine derivative 11 with the para-bromo substituent showed the highest affinity against H4 R with Ki value of 520 nm and may be considered as a new lead structure. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Toxicological profiles of selected synthetic cannabinoids showing high binding affinities to the cannabinoid receptor subtype CB₁.

    PubMed

    Koller, Verena J; Zlabinger, Gerhard J; Auwärter, Volker; Fuchs, Sabine; Knasmueller, Siegfried

    2013-07-01

    Products containing synthetic cannabinoids are consumed as a surrogate for marihuana due to their non-detectability with commonly used drug tests and their strong cannabimimetic effects. Because data concerning their toxicological properties are scarce, the cytotoxic, genotoxic, immunomodulatory, and hormonal activities of four naphthoylindole compounds (JWH-018, JWH-073, JWH-122 and JWH-210) and of one benzoylindole (AM-694) were studied in human cell lines and primary cells; tetrahydrocannabinol was included as the classical non-endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligand. All compounds induced damage to the cell membranes of buccal (TR146) and breast (MCF-7) derived cells at concentrations of ≥75-100 μM. No cytotoxic responses were seen in other assays which reflect mitochondrial damage, protein synthesis, and lysosomal activities. JWH-073 and JWH-122 induced DNA migration in buccal and liver cells (HepG2) in single cell gel electrophoresis assays, while JWH-210 was only in the latter cell line active. No estrogenic activities were detected in bone marrow cells (U2-OS), but all compounds caused anti-estrogenic effects at levels between 2.1 and 23.0 μM. Furthermore, no impact on cytokine release (i.e., on IL-10, IL-6, IL-12/23p40 and TNFα levels) was seen in LPS-stimulated human PBMCs, except with JWH-210 and JWH-122 which caused a decrease of TNFα and IL-12/23p40. All toxic effects were observed with concentrations higher than those expected in body fluids of users. Since genotoxic effects are in general linear over a wide concentration range and the exposure levels may be higher in epithelial cells than [corrected] in serum, further experimental work is required to find out if DNA damage takes place in drug users.

  14. Design of novel 3,6-diazabicyclo[3.1.1]heptane derivatives with potent and selective affinities for α4β2 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Deligia, Francesco; Deiana, Valeria; Gotti, Cecilia; Lazzari, Paolo; Bottazzi, Mirko E H; Pucci, Luca; Fasoli, Francesca; Ragusa, Giulio; Pinna, Gerard A; Murineddu, Gabriele

    2015-10-20

    New analogues (3a-l) of the previously described α4β2 selective ligand 3-(6-halopyridin-3-yl)-3,6-diazabicyclo[3.1.1]heptanes (2a,b) have been synthesized and their binding activity for neuronal acetylcholine receptor subtypes α4β2 and α7 were assayed. Six of these compounds (3a,b,c,j,k and l) showed high affinity and selectivity for α4β2 receptors. The phenylpyridyl-diazabicycloheptane 3c displayed Ki value of 11.17 pM for α4β2, in line with that of the halogenated homologues 3a,b, although it was characterized by an improved selectivity (Ki = 17 μM for α7 receptors). The influence of substitutions on the phenylpyridyl moiety on binding at both α4β2 and α7 receptors has been examined through the Topliss decision tree analysis. Substitution with electron-donating groups (as CH3 and OCH3) resulted in a good affinity for α4β2 receptors and substantially no affinity for α7. Amongst all the tested phenyl-substituted compounds, the p-NO2-phenyl substituted analogue 3j exhibited the highest α4β2 affinity, with Ki value comparable to that of 3c. Intrinsic α4β2 receptor mediated activity in [(3)H]-DA release assay was showed by compound 3a as well as by the reference analogue 2a, whereas phenyl substituted derivative 3c exhibited α4β2 antagonist activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Establishment of a novel high-affinity IgE receptor-positive canine mast cell line with wild-type c-kit receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Amagai, Yosuke; Tanaka, Akane; Ohmori, Keitaro; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2008-02-15

    Much is known regarding participations of mast cells with innate and acquired immunity by secreting various cytokines and chemical mediators. However, details of mast cell biology still remain unclear. In this study, we successfully established a novel growth factor-independent mast cell line (MPT-1) derived from canine mast cell tumor. MPT-1 cells manifested factor-independent proliferation as floating cells containing a large amount of histamine, as well as chymase-like dog mast cell protease 3, in cytosolic granules. Particularly, MPT-1 cells expressed high-affinity IgE receptors (Fc{epsilon}RI) and wild-type c-kit receptors. Degranulation of MPT-1 cells was induced not only by stimulation with calcium ionophore but also by cross-linkage of the surface IgE. Given that MPT-1 is the first mast cell line with Fc{epsilon}RI which has no c-kit mutations, MPT-1 cells may provide great contribution for investigation of IgE-mediated activation mechanisms of mast cells, leading to development of effective treatment for allergic disorders.

  16. Michael Acceptor Approach to the Design of New Salvinorin A-based High Affinity Ligands for the Kappa-Opioid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Polepally, Prabhakar R.; Huben, Krzysztof; Vardy, Eyal; Setola, Vincent; Mosier, Philip D.; Roth, Bryan L.; Zjawiony, Jordan K.

    2014-01-01

    The neoclerodane diterpenoid salvinorin A is a major secondary metabolite isolated from the psychoactive plant Salvia divinorum. Salvinorin A has been shown to have high affinity and selectivity for the κ-opioid receptor (KOR). To study the ligand–receptor interactions that occur between salvinorin A and the KOR, a new series of salvinorin A derivatives bearing potentially reactive Michael acceptor functional groups at C-2 was synthesized and used to probe the salvinorin A binding site. The κ-, δ-, and μ-opioid receptor (KOR, DOR and MOR, respectively) binding affinities and KOR efficacies were measured for the new compounds. Although none showed wash-resistant irreversible binding, most of them showed high affinity for the KOR, and some exhibited dual affinity to KOR and MOR. Molecular modeling techniques based on the recently-determined crystal structure of the KOR combined with results from mutagenesis studies, competitive binding, functional assays and structure–activity relationships, and previous salvinorin A–KOR interaction models were used to identify putative interaction modes of the new compounds with the KOR and MOR. PMID:25193297

  17. Michael acceptor approach to the design of new salvinorin A-based high affinity ligands for the kappa-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Polepally, Prabhakar R; Huben, Krzysztof; Vardy, Eyal; Setola, Vincent; Mosier, Philip D; Roth, Bryan L; Zjawiony, Jordan K

    2014-10-06

    The neoclerodane diterpenoid salvinorin A is a major secondary metabolite isolated from the psychoactive plant Salvia divinorum. Salvinorin A has been shown to have high affinity and selectivity for the κ-opioid receptor (KOR). To study the ligand-receptor interactions that occur between salvinorin A and the KOR, a new series of salvinorin A derivatives bearing potentially reactive Michael acceptor functional groups at C-2 was synthesized and used to probe the salvinorin A binding site. The κ-, δ-, and μ-opioid receptor (KOR, DOR and MOR, respectively) binding affinities and KOR efficacies were measured for the new compounds. Although none showed wash-resistant irreversible binding, most of them showed high affinity for the KOR, and some exhibited dual affinity to KOR and MOR. Molecular modeling techniques based on the recently-determined crystal structure of the KOR combined with results from mutagenesis studies, competitive binding, functional assays and structure-activity relationships, and previous salvinorin A-KOR interaction models were used to identify putative interaction modes of the new compounds with the KOR and MOR.

  18. Predicting the effects of amino acid replacements in peptide hormones on their binding affinities for class B GPCRs and application to the design of secretin receptor antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Te, Jerez A.; Dong, Maoqing; Miller, Laurence J.; Bordner, Andrew J.

    2012-07-01

    Computational prediction of the effects of residue changes on peptide-protein binding affinities, followed by experimental testing of the top predicted binders, is an efficient strategy for the rational structure-based design of peptide inhibitors. In this study we apply this approach to the discovery of competitive antagonists for the secretin receptor, the prototypical member of class B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Proteins in this family are involved in peptide hormone-stimulated signaling and are implicated in several human diseases, making them potential therapeutic targets. We first validated our computational method by predicting changes in the binding affinities of several peptides to their cognate class B GPCRs due to alanine replacement and compared the results with previously published experimental values. Overall, the results showed a significant correlation between the predicted and experimental ΔΔG values. Next, we identified candidate inhibitors by applying this method to a homology model of the secretin receptor bound to an N-terminal truncated secretin peptide. Predictions were made for single residue replacements to each of the other nineteen naturally occurring amino acids at peptide residues within the segment binding the receptor N-terminal domain. Amino acid replacements predicted to most enhance receptor binding were then experimentally tested by competition-binding assays. We found two residue changes that improved binding affinities by almost one log unit. Furthermore, a peptide combining both of these favorable modifications resulted in an almost two log unit improvement in binding affinity, demonstrating the approximately additive effect of these changes on binding. In order to further investigate possible physical effects of these residue changes on receptor binding affinity, molecular dynamics simulations were performed on representatives of the successful peptide analogues (namely A17I, G25R, and A17I/G25R) in bound and

  19. Molecular cloning and pharmacological characterization of monkey MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptors showing high affinity for the agonist ramelteon.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Keiji; Shintani, Yasushi; Hirai, Keisuke; Yoshikubo, Shin-ichi

    2009-09-01

    Melatonin receptor agonists such as melatonin and ramelteon [(S)-N-[2-(1,6,7,8-tetrahydro-2H-indeno-[5,4-b]furan-8-yl)ethyl]-propionamide; TAK-375] have sleep-promoting effects in humans. In preclinical models, these effects are more similar to those observed in monkeys than in other species. However, in contrast to the human melatonin receptors, the pharmacological characteristics of the monkey melatonin receptors have yet to be elucidated. In this study, we cloned the cynomolgus monkey MT(1) and MT(2) melatonin receptors based on rhesus monkey genome sequences and then characterized the monkey melatonin receptors and compared their pharmacological properties with those of the human homologs. The overall amino acid sequences of the monkey MT(1) and MT(2) melatonin receptors showed high homology to the human MT(1) (95%) and MT(2) (96%) receptors, respectively. Saturation binding experiments with 2-[(125)I]iodomelatonin revealed that the dissociation constants (K(d)) for the monkey MT(1) and MT(2) melatonin receptors were 19.9 and 70.4 pM, respectively. In ligand competition assays using 2-[(125)I]iodomelatonin, ramelteon displayed approximately 3- to 7-fold higher affinities than melatonin for the recombinant monkey MT(1) and MT(2) melatonin receptors and monkey suprachiasmatic nucleus membranes. This higher affinity of ramelteon compared with melatonin has also been observed in human melatonin receptors. Furthermore, ramelteon inhibited pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-27-stimulated cAMP production with higher potency than melatonin. In conclusion, this information will help us to understand the pharmacological effects of melatonin receptor agonists in monkeys.

  20. Synthesis and opioid receptor affinity of morphinan and benzomorphan derivatives: mixed kappa agonists and mu agonists/antagonists as potential pharmacotherapeutics for cocaine dependence.

    PubMed

    Neumeyer, J L; Bidlack, J M; Zong, R; Bakthavachalam, V; Gao, P; Cohen, D J; Negus, S S; Mello, N K

    2000-01-13

    This report concerns the synthesis and preliminary pharmacological evaluation of a novel series of kappa agonists related to the morphinan (-)-cyclorphan (3a) and the benzomorphan (-)-cyclazocine (2) as potential agents for the pharmacotherapy of cocaine abuse. Recent evidence suggests that agonists acting at kappa opioid receptors may modulate the activity of dopaminergic neurons and alter the neurochemical and behavioral effects of cocaine. We describe the synthesis and chemical characterization of a series of morphinans 3a-c, structural analogues of cyclorphan [(-)-3-hydroxy-N-cyclopropylmethylmorphinan S(+)-mandelate, 3a], the 10-ketomorphinans 4a,b, and the 8-ketobenzomorphan 1b. Binding experiments demonstrated that the cyclobutyl analogue 3b [(-)-3-hydroxy-N-cyclobutylmethylmorphinan S(+)-mandelate, 3b, MCL-101] of cyclorphan (3a) had a high affinity for mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors in guinea pig brain membranes. Both 3a,b were approximately 2-fold more selective for the kappa receptor than for the mu receptor. However 3b (the cyclobutyl analogue) was 18-fold more selective for the kappa receptor in comparison to the delta receptor, while cyclorphan (3a) had only 4-fold greater affinity for the kappa receptor in comparison to the delta receptor. These findings were confirmed in the antinociceptive tests (tail-flick and acetic acid writhing) in mice, which demonstrated that cyclorphan (3a) produced antinociception that was mediated by the delta receptor while 3b did not produce agonist or antagonist effects at the delta receptor. Both 3a,b had comparable kappa agonist properties. 3a,b had opposing effects at the mu receptor: 3b was a mu agonist whereas 3a was a mu antagonist.

  1. A3 adenosine receptor inhibition improves the efficacy of hypertonic saline resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Sumi, Yuka; Woehrle, Tobias; Chen, Yu; Hirsh, Mark I.; Junger, Wolfgang G.

    2011-01-01

    We reported previously that hypertonic saline (HS) treatment can prevent or upregulate the function of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) via A2a adenosine receptors (A2aR) or A3 adenosine receptors (A3R), respectively. A3R translocate to the cell surface upon PMN stimulation and thus HS promotes PMN responses under conditions of delayed HS treatment. Here we investigated if inhibition of A3R improves the protective effects of HS resuscitation in a mouse sepsis model. We found that HS nearly triples extracellular adenosine concentrations in whole blood and that inhibition of A3R with the selective antagonist MRS-1191 dose-dependently improves the inhibitory effect of HS. MRS-1191 at a concentration of 1 nM enhanced the inhibitory effect of HS and reduced stimulatory effects of delayed HS treatment. Using a mouse model of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis, we found that MRS-1191 reduces acute lung injury and PMN accumulation in lung tissue. While delayed HS treatment (4 ml/kg of 7.5 % NaCl) of mice 1 h after CLP aggravated PMN accumulation, lung tissue damage, and mortality 24 h after CLP, infusion of MRS-1191 (2 ng/kg body weight) combined with HS reduced these detrimental effects of delayed HS treatment. Our data thus show that A3 receptor antagonists can strengthen the beneficial effects of HS resuscitation by avoiding stimulatory side effects that result from delayed HS administration. PMID:20661181

  2. Relating Surfactant Properties to Activity and Solubilization of the Human Adenosine A3 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Bryan W.; García, Roxana Y.; Lenhoff, Abraham M.; Kaler, Eric W.; Robinson, Clifford R.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of various surfactants on the activity and stability of the human adenosine A3 receptor (A3) were investigated. The receptor was expressed using stably transfected HEK293 cells at a concentration of 44 pmol functional receptor per milligram membrane protein and purified using over 50 different nonionic surfactants. A strong correlation was observed between a surfactant's ability to remove A3 from the membrane and the ability of the surfactant to remove A3 selectively relative to other membrane proteins. The activity of A3 once purified also correlates well with the selectivity of the surfactant used. The effects of varying the surfactant were much stronger than those achieved by including A3 ligands in the purification scheme. Notably, all surfactants that gave high efficiency, selectivity and activity fall within a narrow range of hydrophile-lipophile balance values. This effect may reflect the ability of the surfactant to pack effectively at the hydrophobic transmembrane interface. These findings emphasize the importance of identifying appropriate surfactants for a particular membrane protein, and offer promise for the development of rapid, efficient, and systematic methods to facilitate membrane protein purification. PMID:15849244

  3. Allosteric Inhibition of a Semaphorin 4D Receptor Plexin B1 by a High-Affinity Macrocyclic Peptide.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Yukiko; Bashiruddin, Nasir K; Kitago, Yu; Takagi, Junichi; Suga, Hiroaki

    2016-11-17

    Semaphorin axonal guidance factors are multifunctional proteins that play important roles in immune response, cancer cell proliferation, and organogenesis, making semaphorins and their signaling receptor plexins important drug targets for various diseases. However, the large and flat binding surface of the semaphorin-plexin interaction interface is difficult to target by traditional small-molecule drugs. Here, we report the discovery of a high-affinity plexin B1 (PlxnB1)-binding macrocyclic peptide, PB1m6 (KD = 3.5 nM). PB1m6 specifically inhibited the binding of physiological ligand semaphorin 4D (Sema4D) in vitro and completely suppressed Sema4D-induced cell collapse. Structural studies revealed that PB1m6 binds at a groove between the fifth and sixth blades of the sema domain in PlxnB1 distant from the Sema4D-binding site, indicating the non-competitive and allosteric nature of the inhibitory activity. The discovery of this novel allosteric site can potentially be used to target plexin family proteins for the development of drugs that modulate semaphorin and plexin signaling.

  4. Opiorphin highly improves the specific binding and affinity of MERF and MEGY to rat brain opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Fanni; Tóth, Géza; Benyhe, Sándor; Rougeot, Catherine; Wollemann, Mária

    2012-10-10

    Endogenously occurring opioid peptides are rapidly metabolized by different ectopeptidases. Human opiorphin is a recently discovered natural inhibitor of the enkephalin-inactivating neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and aminopeptidase-N (AP-N) (Wisner et al., 2006). To date, in vitro receptor binding experiments must be performed either in the presence of a mixture of peptidase inhibitors and/or at low temperatures, to block peptidase activity. Here we demonstrate that, compared to classic inhibitor cocktails, opiorphin dramatically increases the binding of [(3)H]MERF and [(3)H]MEGY ligands to rat brain membrane preparations. We found that at 0 °C the increase in specific binding is as high as 40-60% and at 24 °C this rise was even higher. In contrast, the binding of the control [(3)H]endomorphin-1, which is relatively slowly degraded in rat brain membrane preparations, was not enhanced by opiorphin compared to other inhibitors. In addition, in homologous binding displacement experiments, the IC(50) affinity values measured at 24 °C were also significantly improved using opiorphin compared to the inhibitor cocktail. In heterologous binding experiments the differences were less obvious, but still pronounced using [(3)H]MERF and MEGY compared to dynorphin(1-11), or naloxone and DAGO competitor ligands.

  5. Human metabolites of synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 bind with high affinity and act as potent agonists at cannabinoid type-2 receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Brents, Lisa K.; Franks, Lirit N.; Moran, Jeffery H.; Prather, Paul L.

    2013-06-01

    K2 or Spice is an emerging drug of abuse that contains synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073. Recent reports indicate that monohydroxylated metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 retain high affinity and activity at cannabinoid type-1 receptors (CB{sub 1}Rs), potentially contributing to the enhanced toxicity of K2 compared to marijuana. Since the parent compounds also bind to cannabinoid type-2 receptors (CB{sub 2}Rs), this study investigated the affinity and intrinsic activity of JWH-018, JWH-073 and several monohydroxylated metabolites at human CB{sub 2}Rs (hCB{sub 2}Rs). The affinity of cannabinoids for hCB{sub 2}Rs was determined by competition binding studies employing CHO-hCB{sub 2} membranes. Intrinsic activity of compounds was assessed by G-protein activation and adenylyl cyclase (AC)-inhibition in CHO-hCB{sub 2} cells. JWH-073, JWH-018 and several of their human metabolites exhibit nanomolar affinity and act as potent agonists at hCB{sub 2}Rs. Furthermore, a major omega hydroxyl metabolite of JWH-073 (JWH-073-M5) binds to CB{sub 2}Rs with 10-fold less affinity than the parent molecule, but unexpectedly, is equipotent in regulating AC-activity when compared to the parent molecule. Finally, when compared to CP-55,940 and Δ{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ{sup 9}-THC), JWH-018, JWH-018-M5 and JWH-073-M5 require significantly less CB{sub 2}R occupancy to produce similar levels of AC-inhibition, indicating that these compounds may more efficiently couple CB{sub 2}Rs to AC than the well characterized cannabinoid agonists examined. These results indicate that JWH-018, JWH-073 and several major human metabolites of these compounds exhibit high affinity and demonstrate distinctive signaling properties at CB{sub 2}Rs. Therefore, future studies examining pharmacological and toxicological properties of synthetic cannabinoids present in K2 products should consider potential actions of these drugs at both CB{sub 1} and CB{sub 2}Rs. - Highlights: • JWH-018

  6. Nicotine Ameliorates NMDA Receptor Antagonist-Induced Deficits in Contextual Fear Conditioning through High Affinity Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    André, Jessica M.; Leach, Prescott T.; Gould, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    NMDA glutamate receptors (NMDARs) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are both involved in learning and synaptic plasticity. Increasing evidence suggests processes mediated by these receptors may interact to modulate learning; however, little is known about the neural substrates involved in these interactive processes. The present studies investigated the effects of nicotine on MK-801 hydrogen maleate (MK-801) and DL-2-Amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV) induced disruption of contextual fear conditioning in male C57BL/6J mice, using direct drug infusion and selective nAChR antagonists to define the brain regions and the nAChR subtypes involved. Mice treated with MK-801 showed a deficit in contextual fear conditioning that was ameliorated by nicotine. Direct drug infusion demonstrated that the NMDAR antagonists disrupted hippocampal function and that nicotine acted in the dorsal hippocampus to ameliorate the deficit in learning. The high-affinity nAChR antagonist Dihydro-β-erythroidine hydrobromide (DhβE) blocked the effects of nicotine on MK-801-induced deficits while the α7 nAChR antagonist methyllycaconitine citrate salt hydrate (MLA) did not. These results suggest that NMDARs and nAChRs may mediate similar hippocampal processes involved in contextual fear conditioning. Furthermore, these results may have implications for developing effective therapeutics for the cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia because a large subset of patients with schizophrenia exhibit cognitive deficits that may be related to NMDAR dysfunction and smoke at much higher rates than the healthy population, which may be an attempt to ameliorate cognitive deficits. PMID:21167848

  7. Functional comparison of engineered T cells carrying a native TCR versus TCR-like antibody-based chimeric antigen receptors indicates affinity/avidity thresholds.

    PubMed

    Oren, Ravit; Hod-Marco, Moran; Haus-Cohen, Maya; Thomas, Sharyn; Blat, Dan; Duvshani, Nerri; Denkberg, Galit; Elbaz, Yael; Benchetrit, Fabrice; Eshhar, Zelig; Stauss, Hans; Reiter, Yoram

    2014-12-01

    Adoptive transfer of Ag-specific T lymphocytes is an attractive form of immunotherapy for cancers. However, acquiring sufficient numbers of host-derived tumor-specific T lymphocytes by selection and expansion is challenging, as these cells may be rare or anergic. Using engineered T cells can overcome this difficulty. Such engineered cells can be generated using a chimeric Ag receptor based on common formats composed from Ag-recognition elements such as αβ-TCR genes with the desired specificity, or Ab variable domain fragments fused with T cell-signaling moieties. Combining these recognition elements are Abs that recognize peptide-MHC. Such TCR-like Abs mimic the fine specificity of TCRs and exhibit both the binding properties and kinetics of high-affinity Abs. In this study, we compared the functional properties of engineered T cells expressing a native low affinity αβ-TCR chains or high affinity TCR-like Ab-based CAR targeting the same specificity. We isolated high-affinity TCR-like Abs recognizing HLA-A2-WT1Db126 complexes and constructed CAR that was transduced into T cells. Comparative analysis revealed major differences in function and specificity of such CAR-T cells or native TCR toward the same antigenic complex. Whereas the native low-affinity αβ-TCR maintained potent cytotoxic activity and specificity, the high-affinity TCR-like Ab CAR exhibited reduced activity and loss of specificity. These results suggest an upper affinity threshold for TCR-based recognition to mediate effective functional outcomes of engineered T cells. The rational design of TCRs and TCR-based constructs may need to be optimized up to a given affinity threshold to achieve optimal T cell function.

  8. A proteomic approach based on peptide affinity chromatography, 2-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to identify multiprotein complexes interacting with membrane-bound receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bécamel, Carine; Galéotti, Nathalie; Poncet, Joël; Jouin, Patrick; Dumuis, Aline; Bockaert, Joël

    2002-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that membrane-bound receptors interact with many intracellular proteins. Multiprotein complexes associated with ionotropic receptors have been extensively characterized, but the identification of proteins interacting with G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has so far only been achieved in a piecemeal fashion, focusing on one or two protein species. We describe a method based on peptide affinity chromatography, two-dimensional electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and immunoblotting to identify the components of multiprotein complexes interacting directly or indirectly with intracellular domains of GPCRs or, more generally, any other membrane-bound receptor. Using this global approach, we have characterized multiprotein complexes that bind to the carboxy-terminal tail of the 5-hydroxytryptamine type 2C receptor and are important for its subcellular localization in CNS cells (Bécamel et al., EMBO J., 21(10): 2332, 2002). PMID:12734563

  9. Design and Investigation of a [(18)F]-Labeled Benzamide Derivative as a High Affinity Dual Sigma Receptor Subtype Radioligand for Prostate Tumor Imaging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongzhi; Comeau, Anthony; Bowen, Wayne D; Mach, Robert H; Ross, Brian D; Hong, Hao; Van Dort, Marcian E

    2017-03-06

    High overexpression of sigma (σ) receptors (σ1 and σ2 subtypes) in a variety of human solid tumors has prompted the development of σ receptor-targeting radioligands, as imaging agents for tumor detection. A majority of these radioligands to date target the σ2 receptor, a potential marker of tumor proliferative status. The identification of approximately equal proportions of both σ receptor subtypes in prostate tumors suggests that a high affinity, dual σ receptor-targeting radioligand could potentially provide enhanced tumor targeting efficacy in prostate cancer. To accomplish this goal, we designed a series of ligands which bind to both σ receptor subtypes with high affinity. Ligand 3a in this series, displaying optimal dual σ receptor subtype affinity (σ1, 6.3 nM; σ2, 10.2 nM) was radiolabeled with fluorine-18 ((18)F) to give [(18)F]3a and evaluated as a σ receptor-targeting radioligand in the mouse PC-3 prostate tumor model. Cellular assays with PC-3 cells demonstrated that a major proportion of [(18)F]3a was localized to cell surface σ receptors, while ∼10% of [(18)F]3a was internalized within cells after incubation for 3.5 h. Serial PET imaging in mice bearing PC-3 tumors revealed that uptake of [(18)F]3a was 1.6 ± 0.8, 4.4 ± 0.3, and 3.6 ± 0.6% ID/g (% injection dose per gram) in σ receptor-positive prostate tumors at 15 min, 1.5 h, and 3.5 h postinjection, respectively (n = 3) resulting in clear tumor visualization. Blocking studies conducted with haloperidol (a nonselective inhibitor for both σ receptor subtypes) confirmed that the uptake of [(18)F]3a was σ receptor-mediated. Histology analysis confirmed similar expression of σ1 and σ2 in PC-3 tumors which was significantly greater than its expression in normal organs/tissues such as liver, kidney, and muscle. Metabolite studies revealed that >50% of radioactivity in PC-3 tumors at 30 min postinjection represented intact [(18)F]3a. Prominent σ receptor-specific uptake of [(18)F]3a in

  10. Galphas-coupled receptor signaling actively down-regulates α4β1-integrin affinity: A possible mechanism for cell de-adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Chigaev, Alexandre; Waller, Anna; Amit, Or; Sklar, Larry A

    2008-01-01

    Background Activation of integrins in response to inside-out signaling serves as a basis for leukocyte arrest on endothelium, and migration of immune cells. Integrin-dependent adhesion is controlled by the conformational state of the molecule (i.e. change in the affinity for the ligand and molecular unbending (extension)), which is regulated by seven-transmembrane Guanine nucleotide binding Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs). α4β1-integrin (CD49d/CD29, Very Late Antigen-4, VLA-4) is expressed on leukocytes, hematopoietic stem cells, hematopoietic cancer cells, and others. Affinity and extension of VLA-4 are both rapidly up-regulated by inside-out signaling through several Gαi-coupled GPCRs. The goal of the current report was to study the effect of Gαs-coupled GPCRs upon integrin activation. Results Using real-time fluorescent ligand binding to assess affinity and a FRET based assay to probe α4β1-integrin unbending, we show that two Gαs-coupled GPCRs (H2-histamine receptor and β2-adrenergic receptor) as well as several cAMP agonists can rapidly down modulate the affinity of VLA-4 activated through two Gαi-coupled receptors (CXCR4 and FPR) in U937 cells and primary human peripheral blood monocytes. This down-modulation can be blocked by receptor-specific antagonists. The Gαs-induced responses were not associated with changes in the expression level of the Gαi-coupled receptors. In contrast, the molecular unbending of VLA-4 was not significantly affected by Gαs-coupled GPCR signaling. In a VLA-4/VCAM-1-specific myeloid cell adhesion system, inhibition of the VLA-4 affinity change by Gαs-coupled GPCR had a statistically significant effect upon cell aggregation. Conclusion We conclude that Gαs-coupled GPCRs can rapidly down modulate the affinity state of VLA-4 binding pocket through a cAMP dependent pathway. This plays an essential role in the regulation of cell adhesion. We discuss several possible implications of this described phenomenon. PMID:18534032

  11. Potential antidepressant properties of SR 57746A, a novel compound with selectivity and high affinity for 5-HT1A receptors.

    PubMed

    Cervo, L; Bendotti, C; Tarizzo, G; Cagnotto, A; Skorupska, M; Mennini, T; Samanin, R

    1994-02-21

    SR 57746A, 4-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)-N-[2-(naphth-2-yl)ethyl]-1,2,3,6- tetrahydropyridine HCl, was studied for its specific 5-HT1A receptor agonist action and antidepressant-like effects in the rat. The compound showed a high affinity for 5-HT1A specific binding sites in the rat hippocampus (IC50 3 nM), moderate affinity (10(-7)-10(-6) M) for dopamine D2 receptor, 5-HT uptake, 5-HT2 and alpha 1-adrenoceptor binding sites and practically no effect on binding sites of monoamine, GABAA, benzodiazepine and histamine receptors. It inhibited forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in rat hippocampal membranes at concentrations of 10(-6) and 10(-5) M. The effect of 10(-6) M SR 57746A on forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was completely antagonized by 10(-6) M (-)-propranolol. Administered per os as a three-dose course to rats, SR 57746A significantly increased struggling in the forced swimming test at doses from 0.3 to 3 mg/kg. Single doses had no such effect. The effect of a three-dose course with 1 mg/kg SR 57746A on rats' struggling was antagonized by pretreatment with 5 mg/kg i.p. metergoline, a non-selective 5-HT receptor antagonist, and by 20 mg/kg i.p. (-)-propranolol, an antagonist at 5-HT1 receptors. Three oral doses of 100 mg/kg parachlorophenylalanine, an inhibitor of 5-HT synthesis, and 100 mg/kg i.p. (+/-)-sulpiride, an antagonist at dopamine D2 receptors, also antagonized the effect of SR 57746A in the forced swimming test. The results show that SR 57746A has selectivity and high affinity for 5-HT1A receptors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Cloning of a murine IL-11 receptor alpha-chain; requirement for gp130 for high affinity binding and signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, D J; Hilton, A A; Raicevic, A; Rakar, S; Harrison-Smith, M; Gough, N M; Begley, C G; Metcalf, D; Nicola, N A; Willson, T A

    1994-01-01

    An adult mouse liver cDNA library was screened with oligonucleotides corresponding to the conserved WSXWS motif of the haemopoietin receptor family. Using this method, cDNA clones encoding a novel receptor were isolated. The new receptor, named NR1, was most similar in sequence and predicted structure to the alpha-chain of the IL-6 receptor and mRNA was expressed in the 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytic cell line and in a range of primary tissues. Expression of NR1 in the factor-dependent haemopoietic cell line Ba/F3 resulted in the generation of low affinity receptors for IL-11 (Kd approximately 10 nM). The capacity to bind IL-11 with high affinity (Kd = 300-800 pM) appeared to require coexpression of both NR1 and gp130, the common subunit of the IL-6, leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF), oncostatin M (OSM) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) receptors. The expression of both NR1 and gp130 was also necessary for Ba/F3 cells to proliferate and M1 cells to undergo macrophage differentiation in response to IL-11. Images PMID:7957045

  13. The sensor kinase CitA (DpiB) of Escherichia coli functions as a high-affinity citrate receptor.

    PubMed

    Kaspar, Sibylle; Bott, Michael

    2002-04-01

    For the CitA-CitB (DpiB-DpiA) two-component signal transduction system from Escherichia coli, three diverse functions have been reported: induction of the citrate fermentation genes citCDEFXGT, repression of the regulator gene appY, and destabilization of the inheritance of iteron-containing plasmids such as pSC101. This poses the question of the principal biological role of this system. Here it is shown that the periplasmic domain of the E. coli sensor kinase CitA functions as a high-affinity citrate receptor. Two CitA derivatives were purified by affinity chromatography and subjected to binding studies using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). One of them, termed CitA215MBP, comprised the N-terminal part of CitA (amino acid residues 1-215), including the two transmembrane helices, and was fused to the amino terminus of the E. coli maltose-binding protein lacking its signal peptide. The second CitA derivative, designated CitAP(Ec), encompassed only the periplasmic domain (amino acid residues 38-177). CitA215MBP bound citrate at 25 degrees C with a K(d) of 0.3 microM and a binding stoichiometry of up to 0.9 in 50 mM sodium phosphate buffer, pH 7. Binding was driven by the enthalpy change (Delta H of -95.7 kJ mol(-1)), whereas the entropy change was not favorable for binding ( T Delta S of -58.6 kJ mol(-1)). ITC experiments with CitAP(Ec) yielded similar K(d) values for citrate (0.15-1.0 microM). Besides citrate, also isocitrate ( K(d) approximately tricarballylate ( K(d) approximately t not malate were bound by CitAP(Ec). The results favor the assumption that the primary biological function of the CitA-CitB system is the regulation of the citrate fermentation genes.

  14. [125I]2-(2-chloro-4-iodo-phenylamino)-5-methyl-pyrroline (LNP 911), a high-affinity radioligand selective for I1 imidazoline receptors.

    PubMed

    Greney, Hugues; Urosevic, Dragan; Schann, Stephan; Dupuy, Laurence; Bruban, Véronique; Ehrhardt, Jean-Daniel; Bousquet, Pascal; Dontenwill, Monique

    2002-07-01

    The I1 subtype of imidazoline receptors (I1R) is a plasma membrane protein that is involved in diverse physiological functions. Available radioligands used so far to characterize the I(1)R were able to bind with similar affinities to alpha2-adrenergic receptors (alpha2-ARs) and to I1R. This feature was a major drawback for an adequate characterization of this receptor subtype. New imidazoline analogs were therefore synthesized and the present study describes one of these compounds, 2-(2-chloro-4-iodo-phenylamino)-5-methyl-pyrroline (LNP 911), which was of high affinity and selectivity for the I1R. LNP 911 was radioiodinated and its binding properties characterized in different membrane preparations. Saturation experiments with [125I]LNP 911 revealed a single high affinity binding site in PC-12 cell membranes (K(D) = 1.4 nM; B(max) = 398 fmol/mg protein) with low nonspecific binding. [125I]LNP 911 specific binding was inhibited by various imidazolines and analogs but was insensitive to guanosine-5'-O-(3-thio)triphosphate. The rank order of potency of some competing ligands [LNP 911, PIC, rilmenidine, 4-chloro-2-(imidazolin-2-ylamino)-isoindoline (BDF 6143), lofexidine, and clonidine] was consistent with the definition of [125I]LNP 911 binding sites as I1R. However, other high-affinity I1R ligands (moxonidine, efaroxan, and benazoline) exhibited low affinities for these binding sites in standard binding assays. In contrast, when [125I]LNP 911 was preincubated at 4 degrees C, competition curves of moxonidine became biphasic. In this case, moxonidine exhibited similar high affinities on [125I]LNP 911 binding sites as on I1R defined with [125I]PIC. Moxonidine proved also able to accelerate the dissociation of [125I]LNP 911 from its binding sites. These results suggest the existence of an allosteric modulation at the level of the I1R, which seems to be corroborated by the dose-dependent enhancement by LNP 911 of the agonist effects on the adenylate cyclase pathway

  15. Engineered α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors as models for measuring agonist binding and effect at the orthosteric low-affinity α4-α4 interface.

    PubMed

    Ahring, Philip K; Olsen, Jeppe A; Nielsen, Elsebet Ø; Peters, Dan; Pedersen, Martin H F; Rohde, Line A; Kastrup, Jette S; Shahsavar, Azadeh; Indurthi, Dinesh C; Chebib, Mary; Gajhede, Michael; Balle, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α4β2 is important for normal mammalian brain function and is known to express in two different stoichiometries, (α4)2(β2)3 and (α4)3(β2)2. While these are similar in many aspects, the (α4)3(β2)2 stoichiometry differs by harboring a third orthosteric acetylcholine binding site located at the α4-α4 interface. Interestingly, the third binding site has, so far, only been documented using electrophysiological assays, actual binding affinities of nicotinic receptor ligands to this site are not known. The present study was therefore aimed at determining binding affinities of nicotinic ligands to the α4-α4 interface. Given that epibatidine shows large functional potency differences at α4-β2 vs. α4-α4 interfaces, biphasic binding properties would be expected at (α4)3(β2)2 receptors. However, standard saturation binding experiments with [(3)H]epibatidine did not reveal biphasic binding under the conditions utilized. Therefore, an engineered β2 construct (β2(HQT)), which converts the β(-) face to resemble that of an α4(-) face, was utilized to create (α4)3(β2(HQT))2 receptors harboring three α4-α4 interfaces. With this receptor, low affinity binding of epibatidine with a Kd of ∼5 nM was observed in sharp contrast to a Kd value of ∼10 pM observed for wild-type receptors. A strong correlation between binding affinities at the (α4)3(β2(HQT))2 receptor and functional potencies at the wild-type receptor of a range of nicotinic ligands highlighted the validity of using the mutational approach. Finally, large differences in activities at α4-β2 vs. α4-α4 interfaces were observed for structurally related agonists underscoring the need for establishing all binding parameters of compounds at α4β2 receptors.

  16. High-Affinity Ligand Binding by Wild-Type:Mutant Heteromeric Complexes of the Mannose 6-Phosphate/Insulin-like Growth Factor II Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Michelle A.; Kreiling, Jodi L.; Byrd, James C.; MacDonald, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The mannose 6-phosphate/insulin-like growth factor II receptor (M6P/IGF2R) has diverse ligand-binding properties contributing to its roles in lysosome biogenesis and growth suppression. Optimal receptor binding and internalization of mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P)-bearing ligands requires a dimeric structure leading to bivalent high-affinity binding, presumably mediated by cooperation between sites on both subunits. Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) binds to a single site on each monomer. It is hypothesized that IGF-II binding to cognate sites on each monomer occurs independently, but bivalent Man-6-P ligand binding requires cooperative contributions from sites on both monomers. To test this hypothesis, we co-immunoprecipitated differentially epitope-tagged soluble mini-receptors and assessed ligand binding. Pairing of wild-type and point-mutated IGF-II binding sites between two dimerized mini-receptors had no effect on the function of the contralateral binding site, indicating IGF-II binding to each side of the dimer is independent and manifests no intersubunit effects. As expected, heterodimeric receptors composed of a wild-type monomer and a mutant bearing two Man-6-P-binding knockout mutations form functional IGF-II binding sites. In contrast to prediction, such heterodimeric receptors also bind Man-6-P–based ligands with high affinity, and the amount of binding can be attributed entirely to the immunoprecipitated wild-type receptors. Anchoring of both C-terminal ends of the heterodimer produces optimal binding of both IGF-II and Man-6-P ligands. Thus, IGF-II binds independently to both subunits of the dimeric M6P/IGF2R. Although wild-type/mutant heterooligomers from readily when mixed, it appears that multivalent Man-6-P ligands bind preferentially to wild-type sites, possibly by cross-bridging receptors within clusters of immobilized receptors. PMID:19236480

  17. Amyloid-β effects on synapses and memory require AMPA receptor subunit GluA3

    PubMed Central

    Reinders, Niels R.; Pao, Yvonne; Renner, Maria C.; da Silva-Matos, Carla M.; Lodder, Tessa R.; Malinow, Roberto; Kessels, Helmut W.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is a prime suspect for causing cognitive deficits during the early phases of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Experiments in AD mouse models have shown that soluble oligomeric clusters of Aβ degrade synapses and impair memory formation. We show that all Aβ-driven effects measured in these mice depend on AMPA receptor (AMPAR) subunit GluA3. Hippocampal neurons that lack GluA3 were resistant against Aβ-mediated synaptic depression and spine loss. In addition, Aβ oligomers blocked long-term synaptic potentiation only in neurons that expressed GluA3. Furthermore, although Aβ-overproducing mice showed significant memory impairment, memories in GluA3-deficient congenics remained unaffected. These experiments indicate that the presence of GluA3-containing AMPARs is critical for Aβ-mediated synaptic and cognitive deficits. PMID:27708157

  18. Synthesis and structure-affinity relationships of selective high-affinity 5-HT(4) receptor antagonists: application to the design of new potential single photon emission computed tomography tracers.

    PubMed

    Dubost, Emmanuelle; Dumas, Noé; Fossey, Christine; Magnelli, Rosa; Butt-Gueulle, Sabrina; Ballandonne, Céline; Caignard, Daniel H; Dulin, Fabienne; Sopkova de-Oliveira Santos, Jana; Millet, Philippe; Charnay, Yves; Rault, Sylvain; Cailly, Thomas; Fabis, Frederic

    2012-11-26

    The work described herein aims at finding new potential ligands for the brain imaging of 5-HT(4) receptors (5-HT(4)Rs) using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Starting from the nonsubstituted phenanthridine compound 4a, exhibiting a K(i) value of 51 nM on the 5-HT(4)R, we explored the structure-affinity in this series. We found that substitution in position 4 of the tricycle with a fluorine atom gave the best result. Introduction of an additional nitrogen atom inside the tricyclic framework led to an increase of both the affinity and selectivity for 5-HT(4)R, suggesting the design of the antagonist 4v, exhibiting a high affinity of 0.04 nM. Several iodinated analogues were then synthesized as potential SPECT tracers. The iodinated compound 11d was able to displace the reference radioiodinated 5-HT(4)R antagonist (1-butylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl-8-amino-7-iodo[(123)I]-2,3-dihydrobenzo[b][1,4]dioxine-5-carboxylate {[(123)I]1, [(123)I]SB 207710} both in vitro and in vivo in brain. Compound 11d was radiolabeled with [(125)I]iodine, providing a potential SPECT candidate for brain imaging of 5-HT(4)R.

  19. Synthesis and Structure-Affinity Relationships of Selective High-Affinity 5-HT4 Receptor Antagonists: Application to the Design of New Potential Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) Tracers

    PubMed Central

    Dubost, Emmanuelle; Dumas, Noé; Fossey, Christine; Magnelli, Rosa; Butt-Gueulle, Sabrina; Ballandonne, Céline; Caignard, Daniel H.; Dulin, Fabienne; de-Oliveira Santos, Jana Sopkova; Millet, Philippe; Charnay, Yves; Rault, Sylvain; Cailly, Thomas; Fabis, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    The work described herein aims at finding new potential ligands for the brain imaging of 5-HT4 receptors using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Starting from the non-substituted phenanthridine compound 4a exhibiting a Ki value of 51 nM on 5-HT4R, we explored structure-affinity in this series. We found that substitution in position 4 of the tricycle with a fluorine atom gave the best result. Introduction of an additional nitrogen atom inside the tricyclic framework led to increase both the affinity and the selectivity for 5-HT4R suggesting the design of the antagonist 4v exhibiting a high affinity of 0.04 nM. Several iodinated analogues were then synthesized as potential SPECT tracers. The iodinated compound 11d was able to displace the reference radioiodinated 5-HT4R antagonist (1-butylpiperidin-4-yl)methyl-8-amino-7-iodo[123I]-2,3-dihydrobenzo[b][1,4]dioxine-5-carboxylate ([123I]1, [123I]SB 207710) both in vitro and in vivo in brain. Compound 11d was radiolabeled with [125I]iodine, providing a potential SPECT candidate for brain imaging of 5-HT4R. PMID:23102207

  20. 2-, 5-, and 6-Halo-3-(2(S)-azetidinylmethoxy)pyridines: synthesis, affinity for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Koren, A O; Horti, A G; Mukhin, A G; Gündisch, D; Kimes, A S; Dannals, R F; London, E D

    1998-09-10

    3-(2(S)-Azetidinylmethoxy)pyridine (A-85380) has been identified recently as a ligand with high affinity for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Here we report the synthesis and in vitro nAChR binding of a series of 10 pyridine-modified analogues of A-85380. The novel compounds feature a halogen substituent at position 2, 5, or 6 of the 3-pyridyl fragment. Those with the substituents at position 5 or 6, as well as the 2-fluoro analogue, possess subnanomolar affinity for nAChRs in membranes from rat brain. For these ligands, Ki values range from 11 to 210 pM, as measured by competition with (+/-)-[3H]epibatidine. In contrast, 2-chloro, 2-bromo, and 2-iodo analogues exhibit substantially lower affinity. AM1 quantum chemical calculations demonstrate that the bulky substituents at position 2 cause notable changes in the molecular geometry. The high-affinity members of the series and (+)-epibatidine display a tight fit superposition of low-energy stable conformers. The new ligands with high affinity for nAChRs may be of interest as pharmacological probes, potential medications, and candidates for developing radiohalogenated tracers to study nAChRs.

  1. Different Thermodynamic Binding Mechanisms and Peptide Fine Specificities Associated with a Panel of Structurally Similar High-Affinity T Cell Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.; Colf, L; Bankovich, A; Stone, J; Gao, Y; Chan, C; Huang, R; Garcia, K; Kranz, D

    2008-01-01

    To understand the mechanisms that govern T cell receptor (TCR)-peptide MHC (pMHC) binding and the role that different regions of the TCR play in affinity and antigen specificity, we have studied the TCR from T cell clone 2C. High-affinity mutants of the 2C TCR that bind QL9-L{sup d} as a strong agonist were generated previously by site-directed mutagenesis of complementarity determining regions (CDRs) 1{Beta}, 2{alpha}, 3{alpha}, or 3{Beta}. We performed isothermal titration calorimetry to assess whether they use similar thermodynamic mechanisms to achieve high affinity for QL9-L{sup d}. Four of the five TCRs examined bound to QL9-L{sup d} in an enthalpically driven, entropically unfavorable manner. In contrast, the high-affinity CDR1{Beta} mutant resembled the wild-type 2C TCR interaction, with favorable entropy. To assess fine specificity, we measured the binding and kinetics of these mutants for both QL9-L{sup d} and a single amino acid peptide variant of QL9, called QL9-Y5-Ld. While 2C and most of the mutants had equal or higher affinity for the Y5 variant than for QL9, mutant CDR1{Beta} exhibited 8-fold lower affinity for Y5 compared to QL9. To examine possible structural correlates of the thermodynamic and fine specificity signatures of the TCRs, the structure of unliganded QL9-L{sup d} was solved and compared to structures of the 2C TCR/QL9-L{sup d} complex and three high-affinity TCR/QL9-L{sup d} complexes. Our findings show that the QL9-L{sup d} complex does not undergo major conformational changes upon binding. Thus, subtle changes in individual CDRs account for the diverse thermodynamic and kinetic binding mechanisms and for the different peptide fine specificities.

  2. Nordimaprit, homodimaprit, clobenpropit and imetit: affinities for H3 binding sites and potencies in a functional H3 receptor model.

    PubMed

    Kathmann, M; Schlicker, E; Detzner, M; Timmerman, H

    1993-11-01

    We determined the affinities of nordimaprit, homodimaprit, clobenpropit and imetit for H3 binding sites (labelled by 3H-N alpha-methylhistamine) in rat brain cortex homogenates and their potencies at presynaptic H3A receptors on noradrenergic nerve endings in mouse brain cortex slices. 3H-N alpha-Methylhistamine bound saturably to rat brain cortex homogenates with a Kd of 0.70 nmol/l and a Bmax of 98 fmol/mg protein. Binding of 3H-N alpha-methylhistamine was displaced monophasically by dimaprit (pKi 6.55), nordimaprit (5.94), homodimaprit (6.44), clobenpropit (9.16), imetit (9.83), R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine (8.87) and histamine (8.20), and biphasically by burimamide (pKi high 7.73, pKi low 5.97). In superfused mouse brain cortex slices preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline, the electrically (0.3 Hz) evoked tritium overflow was inhibited by imetit (pIC35 8.93), R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine (7.87) and histamine (7.03). The effect of histamine was attenuated by nordimaprit, homodimaprit, clobenpropit and N-ethoxycarbonyl-2- ethoxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline (EEDQ); EEDQ (but not nordimaprit, homodimaprit and clobenpropit) attenuated the effect of histamine also in slices pre-exposed to the drug 60-30 min prior to superfusion. The concentration-response curve of histamine was shifted to the right by homodimaprit and clobenpropit; Schild plots yielded straight lines with a slope of unity for both drugs (pA2 5.94 and 9.55, respectively). Nordimaprit depressed the maximum effect of histamine (pD'2 5.55) and also slightly increased the concentration of histamine producing the half-maximum effect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Affinity capillary electrophoresis and quantum mechanical calculations applied to the investigation of hexaarylbenzene-based receptor binding with lithium ion.

    PubMed

    Ehala, Sille; Toman, Petr; Rathore, Rajendra; Makrlík, Emanuel; Kašička, Václav

    2011-09-01

    In this study, two complementary approaches, affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE) and quantum mechanical density functional theory (DFT) calculations, have been employed for quantitative characterization and structure elucidation of the complex between hexaarylbenzene (HAB)-based receptor R and lithium ion Li(+) . First, by means of ACE, the apparent binding constant of LiR(+) complex (K LiR +) in methanol was determined from the dependence of the effective electrophoretic mobilities of LiR(+) complex on the concentration of lithium ions in the 25 mM Tris/50 mM chloroacetate background electrolyte (BGE) using non-linear regression analysis. Prior to regression analysis, the effective electrophoretic mobilities of the LiR(+) complex were corrected to reference temperature 25 °C and constant ionic strength 25 mM. The apparent binding constant of the LiR(+) complex in the above methanolic BGE was evaluated as logK LiR + = 1.15±0.09. Second, the most probable structures of nonhydrated LiR(+) and hydrated LiR(+)·3H(2)O complexes were derived by DFT calculations. The optimized structure of the hydrated LiR(+)·3H(2)O complex was found to be more realistic than the nonhydrated LiR(+) complex because of the considerably higher binding energy of LiR(+)·3H(2)O complex (500.4 kJ/mol) as compared with LiR(+) complex (427.5 kJ/mol). Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Human eosinophils express the high affinity IgE receptor, FcεRI, in bullous pemphigoid.

    PubMed

    Messingham, Kelly N; Holahan, Heather M; Frydman, Alexandra S; Fullenkamp, Colleen; Srikantha, Rupasree; Fairley, Janet A

    2014-01-01

    Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is an autoimmune blistering disease mediated by autoantibodies targeting BP180 (type XVII collagen). Patient sera and tissues typically have IgG and IgE autoantibodies and elevated eosinophil numbers. Although the pathogenicity of the IgE autoantibodies is established in BP, their contribution to the disease process is not well understood. Our aims were two-fold: 1) To establish the clinical relationships between total and BP180-specific IgE, eosinophilia and other markers of disease activity; and 2) To determine if eosinophils from BP patients express the high affinity IgE receptor, FcεRI, as a potential mechanism of action for IgE in BP. Our analysis of 48 untreated BP patients revealed a correlation between BP180 IgG and both BP180 IgE and peripheral eosinophil count. Additionally, we established a correlation between total IgE concentration and both BP180 IgE levels and eosinophil count. When only sera from patients (n = 16) with total IgE ≥ 400 IU/ml were analyzed, BP180 IgG levels correlated with disease severity, BP230 IgG, total circulating IgE and BP180 IgE. Finally, peripheral eosinophil count correlated more strongly with levels of BP180 IgE then with BP180 IgG. Next, eosinophil FcεRI expression was investigated in the blood and skin using several methods. Peripheral eosinophils from BP patients expressed mRNA for all three chains (α, β and γ) of the FcεRI. Surface expression of the FcεRIα was confirmed on both peripheral and tissue eosinophils from most BP patients by immunostaining. Furthermore, using a proximity ligation assay, interaction of the α- and β-chains of the FcεRI was observed in some biopsy specimens, suggesting tissue expression of the trimeric receptor form in some patients. These studies provide clinical support for the relevance of IgE in BP disease and provide one mechanism of action of these antibodies, via binding to the FcεRI on eosinophils.

  5. Ionic flow enhances low-affinity binding: a revised mechanistic view into Mg2+ block of NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Chin; Lee, Chia-Hsueh; Kuo, Chung-Chin

    2010-02-15

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) channel is one of the major excitatory amino acid receptors in the mammalian brain. Since external Mg(2+) blocks the channel in an apparently voltage-dependent fashion, this ligand-gated channel displays intriguing voltage-dependent control of Na(+) and Ca(2+) permeability and thus plays an important role in synaptic physiology. We found that the essential features of Mg(2+) block could not be solely envisaged by binding of a charged blocker in the membrane electric field. Instead, the blocking effect of Mg(2+) is critically regulated by, and quantitatively correlated with, the relative tendency of outward and inward ionic fluxes. The 'intrinsic' affinity of Mg(2+) to the binding sites, however, is low (in the millimolar range) in the absence of net ionic flow at 0 mV. Besides, extracellular and intracellular Mg(2+) blocks the channel at distinct sites of electrical distances 0.7 and 0.95 from the outside, respectively. The two sites are separated by a high energy barrier for the movement of Mg(2+) (but not Na(+) or the other ions), and functionally speaking, each could accommodate 1.1 and 0.8 coexisting permeating ions, respectively. Mg(2+) block of the ionic flow thus is greatly facilitated by the flux-coupling effect or the ionic flow (the preponderant direction of permeant ion movement) per se, as if the poorly permeable Mg(2+) is 'pushed' against a high energy barrier by the otherwise permeating ions. Extracellular and intracellular Mg(2+) block then is in essence 'use dependent', more strongly inhibiting both Na(+) and Ca(2+) fluxes with stronger tendencies of influx and efflux, respectively. In conclusion, although permeant ions themselves could compete with Mg(2+), the flow or the tendency of movement of the permeant ions may actually enhance rather than interfere with Mg(2+) block, making the unique current-voltage relationship of NMDAR and the molecular basis of many important neurobiological phenomena.

  6. Selective and high affinity labeling of neuronal and recombinant nociceptin receptors with the hexapeptide radioprobe [(3)H]Ac-RYYRIK-ol.

    PubMed

    Bojnik, Engin; Farkas, Judit; Magyar, Anna; Tömböly, Csaba; Güçlü, Umit; Gündüz, Ozge; Borsodi, Anna; Corbani, Maïthe; Benyhe, Sándor

    2009-12-01

    The synthetic hexapeptide Ac-Arg-Tyr-Tyr-Arg-Ile-Lys-ol (Ac-RYYRIK-ol) represents a highly potent and selective partial agonist ligand for the nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) peptide receptor (nociceptin receptor, NOPr). Ac-RYYRIK-ol has been labeled with tritium yielding [(3)H]Ac-RYYRIK-ol with exceptionally high specific radioactivity of 94Ci/mmol. The radioprobe is chemically stable even at 24 degrees C in ethanol solution for at least 4 days. No significant decomposition of the [(3)H]ligand occurred under the condition of the binding experiments indicating a fine enzymatic stability of the peptide. Radioreceptor binding studies were conducted using native neuronal NOPr preparation of rat brain membrane fractions and recombinant human nociceptin receptor ((h)NOPr) preparations from cultured Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells stably expressing (h)NOPr. Specific binding of the compound was reversible, saturable and of high affinity. No cross-reaction with the opioid receptors was observed suggesting superior NOPr selectivity of the ligand. Monophasic isotherm curves obtained in radioligand binding saturation and homologous displacement experiments indicated the presence of single binding sites in both preparations. Average densities of the [(3)H]Ac-RYYRIK-ol recognition sites were 237 and 749fmol/mg protein in rat brain and transfected cells, respectively. Equilibrium affinity values (K(d)s) were determined by three independent way providing identical results. In rat brain membranes K(d)s of 0.3-1.3nM were found depending upon the assay type. In homologous competition studies performed on (h)NOP-CHO cell membranes almost the same binding affinities were measured for Ac-RYYRIK-ol either with [(3)H]Ac-RYYRIK-ol (K(i) 2.8nM) or with [(3)H](Leu(14))nociceptin (2.3nM). A number of NOPr and opioid ligands were screened in heterologous displacement experiments and displayed a rank order of affinity profile being consistent with fairly good NOPr selectivity of the sites

  7. A DFT and Semiempirical Model-Based Study of Opioid Receptor Affinity and Selectivity in a Group of Molecules with a Morphine Structural Core

    PubMed Central

    Bruna-Larenas, Tamara; Gómez-Jeria, Juan S.

    2012-01-01

    We report the results of a search for model-based relationships between mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptor binding affinity and molecular structure for a group of molecules having in common a morphine structural core. The wave functions and local reactivity indices were obtained at the ZINDO/1 and B3LYP/6-31G∗∗ levels of theory for comparison. New developments in the expression for the drug-receptor interaction energy expression allowed several local atomic reactivity indices to be included, such as local electronic chemical potential, local hardness, and local electrophilicity. These indices, together with a new proposal for the ordering of the independent variables, were incorporated in the statistical study. We found and discussed several statistically significant relationships for mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptor binding affinity at both levels of theory. Some of the new local reactivity indices incorporated in the theory appear in several equations for the first time in the history of model-based equations. Interaction pharmacophores were generated for mu, delta, and kappa receptors. We discuss possible differences regulating binding and selectivity in opioid receptor subtypes. This study, contrarily to the statistically backed ones, is able to provide a microscopic insight of the mechanisms involved in the binding process. PMID:25379287

  8. A DFT and semiempirical model-based study of opioid receptor affinity and selectivity in a group of molecules with a morphine structural core.

    PubMed

    Bruna-Larenas, Tamara; Gómez-Jeria, Juan S

    2012-01-01

    We report the results of a search for model-based relationships between mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptor binding affinity and molecular structure for a group of molecules having in common a morphine structural core. The wave functions and local reactivity indices were obtained at the ZINDO/1 and B3LYP/6-31G(∗∗) levels of theory for comparison. New developments in the expression for the drug-receptor interaction energy expression allowed several local atomic reactivity indices to be included, such as local electronic chemical potential, local hardness, and local electrophilicity. These indices, together with a new proposal for the ordering of the independent variables, were incorporated in the statistical study. We found and discussed several statistically significant relationships for mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptor binding affinity at both levels of theory. Some of the new local reactivity indices incorporated in the theory appear in several equations for the first time in the history of model-based equations. Interaction pharmacophores were generated for mu, delta, and kappa receptors. We discuss possible differences regulating binding and selectivity in opioid receptor subtypes. This study, contrarily to the statistically backed ones, is able to provide a microscopic insight of the mechanisms involved in the binding process.

  9. The most effective influence of 17-(3-ethoxypropyl) substituent on the binding affinity and the agonistic activity in KNT-127 derivatives, δ opioid receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Toru; Ida, Yoshihiro; Iihara, Yusuke; Nakajima, Ryo; Hirayama, Shigeto; Iwai, Takashi; Fujii, Hideaki; Nagase, Hiroshi

    2013-12-15

    We investigated the structure-activity relationship of KNT-127 (opioid δ agonist) derivatives with various 17-substituents which are different in length and size. The 17-substituent in KNT-127 derivatives exerted a great influence on the affinity and agonistic activity for the δ receptor. While the compounds with electron-donating 17-substituents showed higher affinities for the δ receptor than those with electron-withdrawing groups, KNT-127 derivatives with 17-fluoroalkyl groups (the high electron-withdrawing groups) showed high selectivities for the δ receptor among evaluated compounds. In addition, the basicity of nitrogen as well as the structure of the 17-N substituent such as the length and configuration at an asymmetric carbon atom contributed to agonist properties for the δ receptor. Thus, the analog with a 17-(3-ethoxypropyl) group showed the best selectively and potent agonistic activity for the δ receptor among KNT-127 derivatives. These findings should be useful for designing novel δ selective agonists.

  10. A Cyclic Tetrapeptide (“Cyclodal”) and Its Mirror-Image Isomer Are Both High-Affinity μ Opioid Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Weltrowska, Grazyna; Nguyen, Thi M.-D.; Chung, Nga N.; Wood, JodiAnne; Ma, Xiaoyu; Guo, Jason; Wilkes, Brian C.; Ge, Yang; Laferrière, André; Coderre, Terence J.; Schiller, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    Head-to-tail cyclization of the μ opioid receptor (MOR) agonist [Dmt1]DALDA (H-Dmt-d-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2 (9; Dmt = 2′,6′-dimethyltyrosine) resulted in a highly active, selective MOR antagonist, c[-d-Arg-Phe-Lys-Dmt-] (1) (“cyclodal”), with subnanomolar binding affinity. A docking study of cyclodal using the crystal structure of MOR in the inactive form showed a unique binding mode with the two basic residues of the ligand forming salt bridges with the Asp127 and Glu229 receptor residues. Cyclodal showed high plasma stability and was able to cross the blood–brain barrier to reverse morphine-induced, centrally mediated analgesia when given intravenously. Surprisingly, the mirror-image isomer (optical antipode) of cyclodal, c[-Arg-d-Phe-d-Lys-d-Dmt-] (2), also turned out to be a selective MOR antagonist with 1 nM binding affinity, and thus, these two compounds represent the first example of mirror image opioid receptor ligands with both optical antipodes having high binding affinity. Reduction of the Lys-Dmt peptide bond in cyclodal resulted in an analogue, c[-d-Arg-Phe-LysΨ[CH2NH]Dmt-] (8), with MOR agonist activity. PMID:27676089

  11. Distinction between high-affinity (/sup 3/H)phencyclidine binding sites and muscarinic receptors in guinea-pig ileum muscle

    SciTech Connect

    El-Fakahany, E.E.; Triggle, D.J.; Eldefrawi, A.T.; Eldefrawi, M.E.

    1984-05-01

    (/sup 3/H)Phencyclidine ((/sup 3/H)PCP) binding was studied in guinea-pig ileum muscle membranes. Specific binding of (/sup 3/H)PCP was time dependent, reversible and saturable, with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 154 nM and maximum binding of 12.9 pmol/mg of protein at pH 9. Its pH dependency suggests that the un-ionized PCP is the pharmacologically active form. The binding site was on a protein which was sensitive to heat, proteolytic enzymes and the carboxylic group reagent dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, but insensitive to phospholipase A and C, concanavalin A, dithiothreitol and N-ethylmaleimide. Specific (/sup 3/H)PCP binding was displaced effectively by several PCP analogs and Ca/sup + +/ channel antagonists including verapamil, to which these sites had a high affinity. These high-affinity PCP-binding sites were found at a much higher concentration in the same membrane preparation than muscarinic receptor sites identified by their specific binding of (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate. PCP bound to both sites, but with a lower affinity to the muscarinic receptor sites. The PCP and muscarinic receptor sites differed in their sensitivities to pH and drug specifities.

  12. Analysis of D2 dopamine receptor occupancy with quantitative SPET using the high-affinity ligand [123I]epidepride: resolving conflicting findings.

    PubMed

    Erlandsson, Kjell; Bressan, Rodrigo A; Mulligan, Rachel S; Ell, Peter J; Cunningham, Vincent J; Pilowsky, Lyn S

    2003-07-01

    Recent studies of limbic cortical dopamine D(2) receptor occupancy by clozapine using high-affinity PET and SPET radioligands have produced conflicting findings. It has been suggested that these divergent findings are due to between-study differences in the method used to estimate D(2) receptor-binding potential. We compared different methods for estimating striatal and temporal cortical D(2) receptor occupancy with high-affinity tracers. In vivo experimental SPET data, obtained with [(123)I]epidepride were analysed with reference tissue kinetic modeling and with the ratio method, applied to data corresponding to short (60 min) and long (240 min) acquisition times. Dopamine D(2) receptor occupancy by the atypical antipsychotic drug risperidone was evaluated. Simulation experiments were also performed, comparing occupancy values obtained for different receptor densities in relation to different data acquisition times. The simulation results revealed that previously published data regarding errors in occupancy estimation by analysis of time activity data acquired for 60 min cannot be extrapolated to studies performed over 240 min. The ratio method provided accurate temporal cortical D(2) receptor occupancy values when applied to data from a late time period, but underestimated the occupancy with earlier data. In striatum, both the late data ratio method and reference tissue kinetic modeling using all data underestimated D(2) receptor occupancy. However, more accurate analyses of striatal D(2) occupancy still showed selective limbic/cortical occupancy by risperidone. Our results substantiate the previous [(123)I]epidepride findings of high temporal cortical occupancy by other atypical antipsychotic drugs and suggest that a potential source of conflicting findings might be short scanning times imposed by [(11)C]FLB 457, leading to underestimation of temporal cortical D(2) receptor occupancy by this method.

  13. Steroidal affinity labels of the estrogen receptor. 3. Estradiol 11 beta-n-alkyl derivatives bearing a terminal electrophilic group: antiestrogenic and cytotoxic properties.

    PubMed

    Lobaccaro, C; Pons, J F; Duchesne, M J; Auzou, G; Pons, M; Nique, F; Teutsch, G; Borgna, J L

    1997-07-04

    With the aim of developing a new series of steroidal affinity labels of the estrogen receptor, six electrophilic 11 beta-ethyl (C2), 11 beta-butyl (C4), or 11 beta-decyl (C10) derivatives of estradiol bearing an 11 beta-terminal electrophilic functionality, i.e. bromine (C4), (methylsulfonyl)oxy (C2 and C4), bromoacetamido (C2 and C4), and (p-tolylsulfonyl)oxy (C10), were synthesized. The range of their affinity constants for binding the estrogen receptor was 0.4-37% that of estradiol; the order of increasing affinity (i) relative to the 11 beta-alkyl arm was ethyl < butyl and (ii) relative to the electrophilic functionality was bromoacetamido < bromine < (methylsulfonyl)oxy. Regardless of the conditions used, including prolonged exposure of the receptor to various pH levels (7-9) and temperatures (0-25 degrees C), the extent of receptor affinity labeling by the 11 beta-ethyl and 11 beta-butyl compounds, if any, was under 10%. This was in sharp contrast to results obtained using 11 beta-((tosyloxy)decyl)estradiol which labeled from 60% to 90% of the receptor hormone-binding sites with an EC50 of approximately 10 nM. Estrogenic and antiestrogenic activities of the compounds were determined using the MVLN cell line, which was established from the estrogen-responsive mammary tumor MCF-7 cells by stable transfection of a recombinant estrogen-responsive luciferase gene. The two 11 beta-ethyl compounds were mainly estrogenic, whereas the three 11 beta-butyl and the 11 beta-decyl compounds essentially showed antiestrogenic activity. The fact that the chemical reactivities of 11 beta-ethyl and 11 beta-butyl compounds were not compromised by interaction with the estrogen receptor made the synthesized high-affinity compounds potential cytotoxic agents which might be able to exert either (i) a specific action on estrogen-regulated genes or (ii) a more general action in estrogen-target cells. Therefore the ability of the compounds (1) to irreversibly abolish estrogen

  14. Imprinting the Fate of Antigen-Reactive B Cells through the Affinity of the B Cell Receptor

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Brian P.; Vogel, Laura A.; Zhang, Weijun; Loo, William; Shnider, Danielle; Lind, Evan F.; Ratliff, Michelle; Noelle, Randolph J.; Erickson, Loren D.

    2010-01-01

    Long-lived plasma cells (PCs) and memory B cells (Bmem) constitute the cellular components of enduring humoral immunity, whereas short-lived PCs that rapidly produce Ig correspond to the host's need for immediate protection against pathogens. In this study we show that the innate affinity of the BCR for Ag imprints upon naive B cells their differentiation fate to become short-or long-lived PCs and Bmem. Using BCR transgenic mice with varying affinities for Ag, naive B cells with high affinity lose their capacity to form germinal centers (GCs), develop neither Bmem nor long-lived PCs, and are destined to a short-lived PC fate. Moderate affinity interactions result in hastened GC responses, and differentiation to long-lived PCs, but Bmem remain extinct. In contrast, lower affinity interactions show tempered GCs, producing Bmem and affinity-matured, long-lived PCs. Thus, a continuum of elementary to comprehensive humoral immune responses exists that is controlled by inherent BCR affinity. PMID:17114443

  15. PC12 cell mutants that possess low- but not high-affinity nerve growth factor receptors neither respond to nor internalize nerve growth factor

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Four mutant PC12 pheochromocytoma cell lines that are nerve growth factor (NGF)-nonresponsive (PC12nnr) have been selected from chemically mutagenized cultures by a double selection procedure: failure both to grow neurites in the presence of NGF and to survive in NGF-supplemented serum-free medium. The PC12nnr cells were deficient in all additional NGF responses surveyed: abatement of cell proliferation, changes in glycoprotein composition, induction of ornithine decarboxylase, rapid changes in protein phosphorylation, and cell surface ruffling. However, PC12nnr cells closely resembled non-NGF-treated PC12 cells in most properties tested: cell size and shape; division rate; protein, phosphoprotein, and glycoprotein composition; and cell surface morphology. All four PC12nnr lines differed from PC12 cells in three ways in addition to failure of NGF response: PC12nnr cells failed to internalize bound NGF by the normal, saturable, high-affinity mechanism present in PC12 cells. The PC12nnr cells bound NGF but entirely, or nearly entirely, at low-affinity sites only, whereas PC12 cells possess both high- and low-affinity NGF binding sites. The responses to dibutyryl cyclic AMP that were tested appeared to be enhanced or altered in the PC12nnr cells compared to PC12 cells. Internalization of, and responses to, epidermal growth factor were normal in the PC12nnr cells ruling out a generalized defect in hormonal binding, uptake, or response mechanisms. These findings are consistent with a causal association between the presence of high-affinity NGF receptors and of NGF responsiveness and internalization. A possible relationship is also suggested between regulation of cAMP responses and regulation of NGF responses or NGF receptor affinity. PMID:3005338

  16. The ability of denbufylline to inhibit cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase and its affinity for adenosine receptors and the adenosine re-uptake site.

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, C. D.; Jackman, S. A.; Wilke, R.

    1989-01-01

    1. Denbufylline has been examined for its ability to inhibit cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase isoenzymes from rat cardiac ventricle and cerebrum, as well as for its affinity for adenosine A1 and A2 receptors and the re-uptake site. For comparison, SK&F 94120, theophylline and 3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xanthine (IBMX) were examined as phosphodiesterase inhibitors whilst N6-cyclohexyladenosine, R(-)-N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)-adenosine, 5'-N-ethylcarboxamido-adenosine, 2-nitrobenzylthioinosine, theophylline and IBMX were examined for their affinity for adenosine binding sites. 2. This investigation confirmed the presence of four phosphodiesterase activities in rat cardiac ventricle; in rat cerebrum only three were present. 3. Denbufylline selective inhibited one form of Ca2+-independent, low Km cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase. The form inhibited was one of two present in cardiac ventricle and the sole one in cerebrum. This form was not inhibited by cyclic GMP. The inotropic agent SK&F 94120 selectively inhibited the form of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase which was inhibited by cyclic GMP present in cardiac ventricle. Theophylline and IBMX were relatively non-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitors. 4. Denbufylline was a less potent inhibitor of ligand binding to adenosine receptors than of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase. This contrasted with theophylline, which had a higher affinity for adenosine receptors, and IBMX which showed no marked selectivity. Denbufylline, theophylline and IBMX all had a low affinity for the adenosine re-uptake site. 5. Denbufylline is being developed as an agent for the therapy of multi-infarct dementia. The selective inhibition of a particular low Km cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase may account for the activity of this compound. PMID:2474352

  17. Regulation of pigmentation in human epidermal melanocytes by functional high-affinity beta-melanocyte-stimulating hormone/melanocortin-4 receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Spencer, J D; Schallreuter, K U

    2009-03-01

    To date, the principal receptor considered to regulate human pigmentation is the melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1-R) via induction of the cAMP/protein kinase A pathway by the melanocortins alpha-MSH and ACTH. In this context, it is noteworthy that beta-MSH can also induce melanogenesis, although it has a low affinity for the MC1-R, whereas the preferred receptor for this melanocortin is the MC4-R. Because beta-MSH is present in the epidermal compartment, it was of interest to ascertain whether functioning MC4-Rs are present in human epidermal keratinocytes and melanocytes. Our results provide evidence that the MC4-R is expressed in situ and in vitro throughout the human epidermis at the mRNA and protein level using RT-PCR, Western blotting, and double immunofluorescence staining. Moreover, radioligand binding studies yielded high-affinity receptors for beta-MSH on epidermal melanocytes (3600 receptors per cell), undifferentiated keratinocytes (7200 receptors per cell), and differentiated keratinocytes (72,700 receptors per cell), indicating that MC4-R expression correlates with epidermal differentiation. Importantly, increased melanogenesis after stimulation of the beta-MSH/cAMP/microphthalmia-associated transcription factor/tyrosinase cascade proved the functionality of this signal in melanocytes, which was attenuated in the presence of the specific MC4-R antagonist HS014. In summary, our results imply an important role for the beta-MSH/MC4-R cascade in human melanocyte biology, although the function and purpose of this signal in keratinocytes needs further elucidation.

  18. Peptides derived from HIV-1, HIV-2, Ebola virus, SARS coronavirus and coronavirus 229E exhibit high affinity binding to the formyl peptide receptor

    PubMed Central

    Mills, John S.

    2007-01-01

    Peptides derived from the membrane proximal region of fusion proteins of human immunodeficiency viruses 1 and 2, Coronavirus 229 E, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and Ebola virus were all potent antagonists of the formyl peptide receptor expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Binding of viral peptides was affected by the naturally occurring polymorphisms at residues 190 and 192, which are located at second extracellular loop-transmembrane helix 5 interface. Substitution of R190 with W190 enhanced the affinity for a severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus peptide 6 fold but reduced the affinity for N-formyl-Nle–Leu-Phe by 2.5 fold. A 12 mer peptide derived from coronavirus 229E (ETYIKPWWVWL) was the most potent antagonist of the formyl peptide receptor W190 with a Ki of 230 nM. Fluorescently labeled ETYIKPWWVWL was effectively internalized by all three variants with EC50 of ~25 nM. An HKU-1 coronavirus peptide, MYVKWPWYVWL, was a potent antagonist but N-formyl-MYVKWPWYVWL was a potent agonist. ETYIKPWWVWL did not stimulate GTPγS binding but inhibited the stimulation by formyl-NleLeuPhe. It also blocked β arrestin translocation and receptor downregulation induced by formyl-Nle–Leu–Phe. This indicates that formyl peptide receptor may be important in viral infections and that variations in its sequence among individuals may affect their likelihood of viral and bacterial infections. PMID:16842982

  19. In vivo effector functions of high-affinity mouse IgG receptor FcγRI in disease and therapy models.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Caitlin M; Zenatti, Priscila P; Mancardi, David A; Beutier, Héloïse; Fiette, Laurence; Macdonald, Lynn E; Murphy, Andrew J; Celli, Susanna; Bousso, Philippe; Jönsson, Friederike; Bruhns, Pierre

    2016-10-10

    Two activating mouse IgG receptors (FcγRs) have the ability to bind monomeric IgG, the high-affinity mouse FcγRI and FcγRIV. Despite high circulating levels of IgG, reports using FcγRI(-/-) or FcγRIV(-/-) mice or FcγRIV-blocking antibodies implicate these receptors in IgG-induced disease severity or therapeutic Ab efficacy. From these studies, however, one cannot conclude on the effector capabilities of a given receptor, because different activating FcγRs possess redundant properties in vivo, and cooperation between FcγRs may occur, or priming phenomena. To help resolve these uncertainties, we used mice expressing only FcγRI to determine its intrinsic properties in vivo. FcγRI(only) mice were sensitive to IgG-induced autoimmune thrombocytopenia and anti-CD20 and anti-tumour immunotherapy, but resistant to IgG-induced autoimmune arthritis, anaphylaxis and airway inflammation. Our results show that the in vivo roles of FcγRI are more restricted than initially reported using FcγRI(-/-) mice, but confirm effector capabilities for this high-affinity IgG receptor in vivo.

  20. The predicted 3D structure of the human D2 dopamine receptor and the binding site and binding affinities for agonists and antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Hall, Spencer E.; Trabanino, Rene J.; Freddolino, Peter L.; Kalani, Maziyar A.; Floriano, Wely B.; Tak Kam, Victor Wai; Goddard, William A., III

    2004-03-01

    Dopamine neurotransmitter and its receptors play a critical role in the cell signaling process responsible for information transfer in neurons functioning in the nervous system. Development of improved therapeutics for such disorders as Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia would be significantly enhanced with the availability of the 3D structure for the dopamine receptors and of the binding site for dopamine and other agonists and antagonists. We report here the 3D structure of the long isoform of the human D2 dopamine receptor, predicted from primary sequence using first-principles theoretical and computational techniques (i.e., we did not use bioinformatic or experimental 3D structural information in predicting structures). The predicted 3D structure is validated by comparison of the predicted binding site and the relative binding affinities of dopamine, three known dopamine agonists (antiparkinsonian), and seven known antagonists (antipsychotic) in the D2 receptor to experimentally determined values. These structures correctly predict the critical residues for binding dopamine and several antagonists, identified by mutation studies, and give relative binding affinities that correlate well with experiments. The predicted binding site for dopamine and agonists is located between transmembrane (TM) helices 3, 4, 5, and 6, whereas the best antagonists bind to a site involving TM helices 2, 3, 4, 6, and 7 with minimal contacts to TM helix 5. We identify characteristic differences between the binding sites of agonists and antagonists.

  1. Design, synthesis, and structure-affinity relationships of regioisomeric N-benzyl alkyl ether piperazine derivatives as sigma-1 receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Iman A; Banister, Samuel D; Beinat, Corinne; Giboureau, Nicolas; Reynolds, Aaron J; Kassiou, Michael

    2010-08-26

    A series of N-(benzofuran-2-ylmethyl)-N'-benzylpiperazines bearing alkyl or fluoroalkyl aryl ethers were synthesized and evaluated at various central nervous system receptors. Examination of in vitro sigma1 {[3H]+-pentazocine} and sigma2 ([3H]DTG) receptor binding profiles of piperazines 11-13 and 25-36 revealed several highly potent and sigma1 selective ligands, notably, N-(benzofuran-2-ylmethyl)-N'-(4'-methoxybenzyl)piperazine (13, Ki=2.7 nM, sigma2/sigma1=38) and N-(benzofuran-2-ylmethyl)-N'-(4'-(2''-fluoroethoxy)benzyl)piperazine (30, Ki=2.6 nM, sigma2/sigma1=187). Structural features for optimal sigma1 receptor affinity and selectivity over the sigma2 receptor were identified. On the basis of its favorable log D value, 13 was selected as a candidate for the development of a sigma1 receptor positron emission tomography radiotracer. [11C]13 showed high uptake in the brain and other sigma receptor-rich organs of a Papio hamadryas baboon. The in vivo evaluation of [11C]13 indicates that this radiotracer is a suitable candidate for imaging the sigma1 receptor in neurodegenerative processes.

  2. Anxiolytic-like effect of a serotonergic ligand with high affinity for 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A and 5-HT3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Mercedes; Caicoya, Anne G; Greciano, Virginia; Benhamú, Bellinda; López-Rodríguez, María Luz; Fernández-Alfonso, María Soledad; Pozo, Miguel A; Manzanares, Jorge; Fuentes, José A

    2005-03-21

    S-(-)-2-[[4-(napht-1-yl)piperazin-1-yl]methyl]-1,4-dioxoperhydropyrrolo[1,2-alpha]-pyrazine (CSP-2503) is a serotonin (5-HT) receptor ligand with selectivity and high affinity for 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A and 5-HT3 receptors. CSP-2503 reduced rectal temperature and 5-HT neuronal hypothalamic activity in mice, decreased electrical activity of raphe nuclei cells in rats and blocked the enhancement of adenylate cyclase activity induced by forskolin in HeLa cells transfected with the human 5-HT1A receptor. This compound also blocked head-twitches induced by the 5-HT(2A/2C) receptor agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI). Contractions of guinea pig ileum induced by the 5-HT3 receptor agonist 2-methyl-5-HT were prevented by CSP-2503. Moreover, it reduced the bradycardia reflex induced by 2-methyl-5-HT in anaesthetized rats. In the light/dark box and social interaction tests, CSP-2503 presented anxiolytic activity, an action shared by 5-HT1 agonists and 5-HT3 antagonists. Taken together, these results suggest that CSP-2503 is a new 5-HT1 receptor agonist with 5-HT2A and 5-HT3)receptor antagonist activities that might be useful in a number of conditions associated with anxiety.

  3. Interaction of p72syk with the gamma and beta subunits of the high-affinity receptor for immunoglobulin E, Fc epsilon RI.

    PubMed Central

    Shiue, L; Green, J; Green, O M; Karas, J L; Morgenstern, J P; Ram, M K; Taylor, M K; Zoller, M J; Zydowsky, L D; Bolen, J B

    1995-01-01

    Activation of protein tyrosine kinases is one of the initial events following aggregation of the high-affinity receptor for immunoglobulin E (Fc epsilon RI) on RBL-2H3 cells, a model mast cell line. The protein tyrosine kinase p72syk (Syk), which contains two Src homology 2 (SH2) domains, is activated and associates with phosphorylated Fc epsilon RI subunits after receptor aggregation. In this report, we used Syk SH2 domains, expressed in tandem or individually, as fusion proteins to identify Syk-binding proteins in RBL-2H3 lysates. We show that the tandem Syk SH2 domains selectively associate with tyrosine-phosphorylated forms of the gamma and beta subunits of Fc epsilon RI. The isolated carboxy-proximal SH2 domain exhibited a significantly higher affinity for the Fc epsilon RI subunits than did the amino-proximal domain. When in tandem, the Syk SH2 domains showed enhanced binding to phosphorylated gamma and beta subunits. The conserved tyrosine-based activation motifs contained in the cytoplasmic domains of the gamma and beta subunits, characterized by two YXXL/I sequences in tandem, represent potential high-affinity binding sites for the dual SH2 domains of Syk. Peptide competition studies indicated that Syk exhibits a higher affinity for the phosphorylated tyrosine activation motif of the gamma subunit than for that of the beta subunit. In addition, we show that Syk is the major protein in RBL-2H3 cells that is affinity isolated with phosphorylated peptides corresponding to the phosphorylated gamma subunit motif. These data suggest that Syk associates with the gamma subunit of the high-affinity receptor for immunoglobulin E through an interaction between the tandem SH2 domains of SH2 domains of Syk and the phosphorylated tyrosine activation motif of the gamma subunit and that Syk may be the major signaling protein that binds to Fc epsilon RI tyrosine activation motif of the gamma subunit and that Syk may be the major signaling protein that binds to Dc epsilon

  4. Synthesis, pharmacological activity and structure affinity relationships of spirocyclic σ(1) receptor ligands with a (2-fluoroethyl) residue in 3-position.

    PubMed

    Maestrup, Eva Grosse; Wiese, Christian; Schepmann, Dirk; Brust, Peter; Wünsch, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    In order to develop a fluorinated radiotracer for imaging of σ(1) receptors in the central nervous system a series of (2-fluoroethyl) substituted spirocyclic piperidines 3 has been prepared. In the key step of the synthesis 2-bromocinnamaldehyde acetal 5 was added to piperidones 6 with various substituents at the N-atom. Unexpectedly, this reaction led to 2-benzoxepines 8, which were contracted with acid to afford the spirocyclic 2-benzofuranacetaldehydes 9. The best yields were obtained, when the transformations up to the alcohols 10 were performed without isolation of intermediates. Generally the (2-fluoroethyl) derivatives 3 have higher σ(1) affinity and σ(1)/σ(2) selectivity than the corresponding (3-fluoropropyl) derivatives 2. The most promising candidate for the development as radiotracer is the (2-fluoroethyl) derivative 3a (WMS-1828, fluspidine, 1'-benzyl-3-(2-fluoroethyl)-3H-spiro[[2]benzofuran-1,4'-piperidine]), which shows subnanomolar σ(1) affinity (K(i)=0.59nM) and excellent selectivity over the σ(2) subtype (1331-fold) as well as some other receptor systems. The novel synthetic strategy also allows the systematic pharmacological evaluation of intermediate alcohols 10. Despite their high σ(1) affinity (K(i)=6-32nM) and selectivity the alcohols 10 are 10-30-fold less potent than the bioisosteric fluoro derivatives 3. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Targeting of adenovirus vectors to the LRP receptor family with the high-affinity ligand RAP via combined genetic and chemical modification of the pIX capsomere.

    PubMed

    Corjon, Stéphanie; Wortmann, Andreas; Engler, Tatjana; van Rooijen, Nico; Kochanek, Stefan; Kreppel, Florian

    2008-11-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) vector targeting requires presentation of specific ligands on the virion's surface. Geneti-chemical targeting is based on the genetic introduction of cysteine residues bearing reactive thiol groups into solvent-accessible capsomeres of the virion and subsequent chemical coupling of ligands. Here, we exploited this technology to modify the pIX capsomere with high-affinity ligands. Genetic introduction of C-terminal cysteines to pIX allowed for specific coupling of full-length proteins to the virion, while not affecting vector production. Direct comparison of the two high-affinity ligands receptor- associated protein (RAP) and transferrin (Tf) revealed that targeting after coupling of a high-affinity ligand to pIX presumably requires release of the ligand from its receptor after cell entry. In addition, data obtained by live cell imaging of labeled vector particles demonstrated that coupling of very large proteins to pIX can impair intracellular vector particle trafficking. Finally, we demonstrate that the geneti-chemical targeting technology is suitable for in vivo targeting to liver after intravenous injection. Our data provide significant insight into basic requirements for successful targeting of pIX-modified Ad vectors.

  6. Fluoxetine, a selective inhibitor of serotonin uptake, potentiates morphine analgesia without altering its discriminative stimulus properties or affinity for opioid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hynes, M.D.; Lochner, M.A.; Bemis, K.G.; Hymson, D.L.

    1985-06-17

    The analgesic effect of morphine in the rat tail jerk assay was enhanced by the serotonin uptake inhibitor, fluoxetine. Tail jerk latency was not affected by fluoxetine alone. Morphine's affinity for opioid receptors labeled in vitro with /sup 3/H-naloxone or /sup 3/H-D-Ala/sup 2/-D-Leu/sup 5/-enkephalin was not altered by fluoxetine, which has no affinity for these sites at concentrations as high as 1000 nM. In rats trained to discriminate morphine from saline, fluoxetine at doses of 5 or 10 mg/kg were recognized as saline. Increasing the fluoxetine dose to 20 mg/kg did not result in generalization to either saline or morphine. The dose response curve for morphine generalization was not significantly altered by fluoxetine doses of 5 or 10 mg/kg. Those rats treated with the combination of morphine and 20 mg/kg of fluoxetine did not exhibit saline or morphine appropriate responding. Fluoxetine potentiates the analgesic properties of morphine without enhancing its affinity for opioid receptors or its discriminative stimulus properties. 30 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  7. Rescue of a H3N2 Influenza Virus Containing a Deficient Neuraminidase Protein by a Hemagglutinin with a Low Receptor-Binding Affinity

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Mathilde; Erny, Alexandra; Caré, Bertrand; Traversier, Aurélien; Barthélémy, Mendy; Hay, Alan; Lin, Yi Pu; Ferraris, Olivier; Lina, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Influenza viruses possess at their surface two glycoproteins, the hemagglutinin and the neuraminidase, of which the antagonistic functions have to be well balanced for the virus to grow efficiently. Ferraris et al. isolated in 2003–2004 viruses lacking both a NA gene and protein (H3NA- viruses) (Ferraris O., 2006, Vaccine, 24(44–46):6656-9). In this study we showed that the hemagglutinins of two of the H3NA- viruses have reduced affinity for SAα2.6Gal receptors, between 49 and 128 times lower than that of the A/Moscow/10/99 (H3N2) virus and no detectable affinity for SAα2.3Gal receptors. We also showed that the low hemagglutinin affinity of the H3NA- viruses compensates for the lack of NA activity and allows the restoration of the growth of an A/Moscow/10/99 virus deficient in neuraminidase. These observations increase our understanding of H3NA- viruses in relation to the balance between the functional activities of the neuraminidase and hemagglutinin. PMID:22563453

  8. A human high affinity interleukin-5 receptor (IL5R) is composed of an IL5-specific alpha chain and a beta chain shared with the receptor for GM-CSF.

    PubMed

    Tavernier, J; Devos, R; Cornelis, S; Tuypens, T; Van der Heyden, J; Fiers, W; Plaetinck, G

    1991-09-20

    cDNA clones encoding two receptor proteins involved in the binding of human interleukin 5 (hIL5) have been isolated. A first class codes for an IL5-specific chain (hIL5R alpha). The major transcript of this receptor gene, as analyzed in both HL-60 eosinophilic cells and eosinophilic myelocytes grown from cord blood, encodes a secreted form of this receptor. This soluble hIL5R alpha has antagonistic properties. A second component of the hIL5R is found to be identical to the beta chain of the human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) high affinity receptor. The finding that IL5 and GM-CSF share a receptor subunit provides a molecular basis for the observation that these cytokines can partially interfere with each other's binding and have highly overlapping biological activities on eosinophils.

  9. A3 adenosine receptor agonist reduces brain ischemic injury and inhibits inflammatory cell migration in rats.

    PubMed

    Choi, In-Young; Lee, Jae-Chul; Ju, Chung; Hwang, Sunyoung; Cho, Geum-Sil; Lee, Hyuk Woo; Choi, Won Jun; Jeong, Lak Shin; Kim, Won-Ki

    2011-10-01

    A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) is recognized as a novel therapeutic target for ischemic injury; however, the mechanism underlying anti-ischemic protection by the