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Sample records for a3 receptor stimulation

  1. Impulsivity, Stimulant Abuse, and Dopamine Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    London, E D

    2016-01-01

    The nonmedical use of amphetamine-type stimulants is a worldwide problem, with substantial medical and social consequences. Nonetheless, the identification of a pharmacological treatment for amphetamine use disorder remains elusive. Stimulant users exhibit neurochemical evidence of dopamine-system dysfunction as well as impulsive behaviors that may interfere with the success of treatments for their addiction. This review focuses on the potential role of dopaminergic neurotransmission in impulsivity, both in healthy individuals and chronic stimulant users who meet criteria for methamphetamine dependence. Presented are findings related to the potential contributions of signaling through dopamine D1- and D2-type receptors to self-control impulsivity in methamphetamine- dependent users. The information available points to signaling through striatal D2-type dopamine receptors as a potential therapeutic target for stimulant use disorders, but medications that target D2-type dopamine receptors have not been successful in treating stimulant-use disorders, possibly because D2-type receptors are downregulated. Other means to augment D2-type receptor signaling are therefore under consideration, and one promising approach is the addition of exercise training as an adjunct to behavioral treatment for addiction. PMID:27288074

  2. Role of A3 adenosine receptor in diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Heng; Zhang, Enshui; Feng, Chang; Zhao, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Neuropathy is the most common diabetic complication. Although the A1 and A2A adenosine receptors are important pharmacological targets in alleviating diabetic neuropathy, the role of the A3 adenosine receptor remains unknown. Because the A3 adenosine receptor regulates pain induced by chronic constriction injury or chemotherapy, its stimulation might also attenuate diabetic neuropathy. This study examines the effects of systemic treatment with the A3 adenosine receptor agonist 1-deoxy-1-[6-[[(3-iodophenyl)methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-N-methyl-β-d-ribofuranuronamide (IB-MECA) on diabetic neuropathy and explores the putative mechanisms underlying its pharmacological effects. We show that IB-MECA alleviated mechanical hyperalgesia and thermal hypoalgesia in mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after streptozocin (STZ) treatment. Furthermore, IB-MECA prevented the reduction in sciatic motor nerve conduction velocity and sensory nerve conduction velocity in diabetic mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after STZ treatment. Similarly, IB-MECA inhibited the activation of nuclear factor-κB and decreased the generation of tumor necrosis factor-α in the spinal cord of mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after STZ treatment. These phenomena were associated with reduction of A3 adenosine receptor expression in the spinal cord after long-term diabetes. Our results suggest that the A3 adenosine receptor plays a critical role in regulating diabetic neuropathy and that reduction in A3 adenosine receptor expression/function might contribute to the progression of diabetic neuropathy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Pharmacology and therapeutic applications of A3 receptor subtype.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Pnina; Bar-Yehuda, Sara

    2003-01-01

    The present study summarizes the biological effects elicit upon A(3) adenosine receptor (A(3)AR) activation in normal and tumor cells. Anti-inflamatory response is mediated upon A(3)AR activation in neutrophils, eosinophils and macrophages via direct effect on cell degranulation or the production of anti-inflamatory cytokines. In basophils, which highly express A(3)AR, degranulation and mediator release upon receptor activation lead to pro-inflammatory effects resulting in bronchospasm and asthma. In other normal cells such as cardiomyocytes, neuronal cells and bone marrow cells A(1)AR activation induces cytoprotective effects in vitro. In vivo, A(3)AR agonists act as cardio- and neuroprotective agents and attenuate ischemic damage. Furthermore, agonists to A(3)AR induce granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) production and myeloprotective effect in chemotherapy treated mice. Interestingly, A(3)AR agonists inhibit tumor cell growth both in vitro and in vivo through a cytostatic effect mediated via the de-regulation of the Wnt signaling pathway. The variety of activities elicit by A(3)AR agonists suggest their potential use as therapeutic agents in inflammation, brain/cardiac ischemia and cancer. Antagonists to A(3)AR may be implemented to the therapy of asthma and additional allergic conditions.

  4. Purine derivatives as ligands for A3 adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Bhalchandra V; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2005-01-01

    Selective agonists and antagonists for A3 adenosine receptors (ARs) are being explored for the treatment of a variety of disorders, including brain and heart ischemic conditions, cancer, and rheumatoid arthritis. This review covers both the structure activity relationships of nucleoside agonist ligands and selected antagonists acting at this receptor and the routes of synthesis. Highly selective agonists have been designed, using both empirical approaches and a semi-rational approach based on molecular modeling. The prototypical A3 agonists IB-MECA 10 and the more receptor-subtype-selective Cl-IB-MECA 11, both of which have affinity in binding to the receptor of approximately 1 nM, have been used widely as pharmacological probes in the elucidation of the physiological role of this receptor. In addition to the exploration of the effects of structural modification of the adenine and ribose moieties on A3AR affinity, the effects of these structural changes on the intrinsic efficacy have also been studied in a systematic fashion. Key structural features determining A3AR interaction include the N6-benzyl group, 2-position substitution such as halo, substitution of ribose (e.g., the (N)-methanocarba ring system, various 2'- and 3'-substitutions and 4'-thio substitution of oxygen). Conformational studies of the ribose moiety and its equivalents indicate that the ring oxygen is not required and the North (N) ring conformation is preferred in binding to the A3AR. Using these observations, a series of ring constrained (N)-methanocarba 5'-uronamide derivatives was recently reported to be highly selective A3AR agonists, the most notable amongst them was MRS3558 113 having a Ki value in binding to the human A3 receptor of 0.3 nM. PMID:16305531

  5. Stimulation of a Primary Taste Receptor by Salts

    PubMed Central

    Evans, David R.; Mellon, DeForest

    1962-01-01

    A quantitative study was made of the repetitive response of the salt receptor cell of the blowfly taste receptor. The response begins at a high frequency and declines to a steady frequency during brief stimuli. The initial response was found to be a sigmoid function of the log of stimulus intensity over a short range of intensities. It was shown that a theory (Beidler, 1954; for mammalian salt receptors) that relates the magnitude of the steady response to stimulus intensity applies to this receptor. From the theory, it was calculated that the relative free energy change of the reaction between salt and receptor site was in the range 0 to -1 kcal/mole; and, therefore, the reaction probably involves weak physical forces. Evidence is given that the salt-combining sites of the receptor are anionic and strongly acidic and that consequently the cation of a salt largely dominates stimulation. Preliminary evidence suggests that the receptor has a high degree of specificity toward salts, being stimulated primarily by monovalent inorganic cations. PMID:13890972

  6. Peripheral Adenosine A3 Receptor Activation Causes Regulated Hypothermia in Mice That Is Dependent on Central Histamine H1 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Carlin, Jesse Lea; Tosh, Dilip K.; Xiao, Cuiying; Piñol, Ramón A.; Chen, Zhoumou; Salvemini, Daniela; Gavrilova, Oksana; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine can induce hypothermia, as previously demonstrated for adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) agonists. Here we use the potent, specific A3AR agonists MRS5698, MRS5841, and MRS5980 to show that adenosine also induces hypothermia via the A3AR. The hypothermic effect of A3AR agonists is independent of A1AR activation, as the effect was fully intact in mice lacking A1AR but abolished in mice lacking A3AR. A3AR agonist–induced hypothermia was attenuated by mast cell granule depletion, demonstrating that the A3AR hypothermia is mediated, at least in part, via mast cells. Central agonist dosing had no clear hypothermic effect, whereas peripheral dosing of a non–brain-penetrant agonist caused hypothermia, suggesting that peripheral A3AR-expressing cells drive the hypothermia. Mast cells release histamine, and blocking central histamine H1 (but not H2 or H4) receptors prevented the hypothermia. The hypothermia was preceded by hypometabolism and mice with hypothermia preferred a cooler environmental temperature, demonstrating that the hypothermic state is a coordinated physiologic response with a reduced body temperature set point. Importantly, hypothermia is not required for the analgesic effects of A3AR agonists, which occur with lower agonist doses. These results support a mechanistic model for hypothermia in which A3AR agonists act on peripheral mast cells, causing histamine release, which stimulates central histamine H1 receptors to induce hypothermia. This mechanism suggests that A3AR agonists will probably not be useful for clinical induction of hypothermia. PMID:26606937

  7. Mast Cell Adenosine Receptors Function: A Focus on the A3 Adenosine Receptor and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rudich, Noam; Ravid, Katya; Sagi-Eisenberg, Ronit

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine is a metabolite, which has long been implicated in a variety of inflammatory processes. Inhaled adenosine provokes bronchoconstriction in asthmatics or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients, but not in non-asthmatics. This hyper responsiveness to adenosine appears to be mediated by mast cell activation. These observations have marked the receptor that mediates the bronchoconstrictor effect of adenosine on mast cells (MCs), as an attractive drug candidate. Four subtypes (A1, A2a, A2b, and A3) of adenosine receptors have been cloned and shown to display distinct tissue distributions and functions. Animal models have firmly established the ultimate role of the A3 adenosine receptor (A3R) in mediating hyper responsiveness to adenosine in MCs, although the influence of the A2b adenosine receptor was confirmed as well. In contrast, studies of the A3R in humans have been controversial. In this review, we summarize data on the role of different adenosine receptors in mast cell regulation of inflammation and pathology, with a focus on the common and distinct functions of the A3R in rodent and human MCs. The relevance of mouse studies to the human is discussed. PMID:22675325

  8. Acute stimulation of brain mu opioid receptors inhibits glucose-stimulated insulin secretion via sympathetic innervation.

    PubMed

    Tudurí, Eva; Beiroa, Daniel; Stegbauer, Johannes; Fernø, Johan; López, Miguel; Diéguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén

    2016-11-01

    Pancreatic insulin-secreting β-cells express opioid receptors, whose activation by opioid peptides modulates hormone secretion. Opioid receptors are also expressed in multiple brain regions including the hypothalamus, where they play a role in feeding behavior and energy homeostasis, but their potential role in central regulation of glucose metabolism is unknown. Here, we investigate whether central opioid receptors participate in the regulation of insulin secretion and glucose homeostasis in vivo. C57BL/6J mice were acutely treated by intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection with specific agonists for the three main opioid receptors, kappa (KOR), delta (DOR) and mu (MOR) opioid receptors: activation of KOR and DOR did not alter glucose tolerance, whereas activation of brain MOR with the specific agonist DAMGO blunted glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), reduced insulin sensitivity, increased the expression of gluconeogenic genes in the liver and, consequently, impaired glucose tolerance. Pharmacological blockade of α2A-adrenergic receptors prevented DAMGO-induced glucose intolerance and gluconeogenesis. Accordingly, DAMGO failed to inhibit GSIS and to impair glucose tolerance in α2A-adrenoceptor knockout mice, indicating that the effects of central MOR activation on β-cells are mediated via sympathetic innervation. Our results show for the first time a new role of the central opioid system, specifically the MOR, in the regulation of insulin secretion and glucose metabolism. PMID:27511839

  9. Endocannabinoids Stimulate Human Melanogenesis via Type-1 Cannabinoid Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Mariangela; Pasquariello, Nicoletta; Battista, Natalia; Di Tommaso, Monia; Rapino, Cinzia; Fezza, Filomena; Zuccolo, Michela; Jourdain, Roland; Finazzi Agrò, Alessandro; Breton, Lionel; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    We show that a fully functional endocannabinoid system is present in primary human melanocytes (normal human epidermal melanocyte cells), including anandamide (AEA), 2-arachidonoylglycerol, the respective target receptors (CB1, CB2, and TRPV1), and their metabolic enzymes. We also show that at higher concentrations AEA induces normal human epidermal melanocyte apoptosis (∼3-fold over controls at 5 μm) through a TRPV1-mediated pathway that increases DNA fragmentation and p53 expression. However, at lower concentrations, AEA and other CB1-binding endocannabinoids dose-dependently stimulate melanin synthesis and enhance tyrosinase gene expression and activity (∼3- and ∼2-fold over controls at 1 μm). This CB1-dependent activity was fully abolished by the selective CB1 antagonist SR141716 or by RNA interference of the receptor. CB1 signaling engaged p38 and p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinases, which in turn activated the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein and the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor. Silencing of tyrosinase or microphthalmia-associated transcription factor further demonstrated the involvement of these proteins in AEA-induced melanogenesis. In addition, CB1 activation did not engage the key regulator of skin pigmentation, cyclic AMP, showing a major difference compared with the regulation of melanogenesis by α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone through melanocortin 1 receptor. PMID:22431736

  10. Prostaglandin A2 enhances cellular insulin sensitivity via a mechanism that involves the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A3.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X; Walton, R G; Tian, L; Luo, N; Ho, S-R; Fu, Y; Garvey, W T

    2013-03-01

    We have previously reported that members of the NR4A family of orphan nuclear receptors can augment insulin's ability to stimulate glucose transport in adipocytes. In the current study, we endeavored to test for an insulin-sensitizing effect in muscle cells and to identify a potential transactivator. Lentiviral constructs were used to engineer both hyperexpression and shRNA silencing of NR4A3 in C2C12 myocytes. The NR4A3 hyper-expression construct led to a significant increase in glucose transport rates in the presence of maximal insulin while the NR4A3 knock-down exhibited a significant reduction in insulin-stimulated glucose transport rates. Consistently, insulin-mediated AKT phosphorylation was increased by NR4A3 hyperexpression and decreased following shRNA NR4A3 suppression. Then, we examined effects of prostaglandin A2 (PGA2) on insulin action and NR4A3 transactivation. PGA2 augmented insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in C2C12 myocytes and AKT phosphorylation after 12-h treatment, without significant effects on basal transport or basal AKT phosphorylation. More importantly, we demonstrated that PGA2 led to a greater improvement in insulin-stimulated glucose rates in NR4A3 overexpressing C2C12 myocytes, when compared with Lac-Z controls stimulated with insulin and PGA2. Moreover, the sensitizing effect of PGA2 was significantly diminished in NR4A3 knockdown myocytes compared to scramble controls. These results show for the first time that: (i) PGA2 augments insulin action in myocytes as manifested by enhanced stimulation of glucose transport and AKT phosphorylation; and (ii) the insulin sensitizing effect is dependent upon the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A3. PMID:23104421

  11. Insulin and rabbit anti-insulin receptor antibodies stimulate additively the intrinsic receptor kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Ponzio, G; Dolais-Kitabgi, J; Louvard, D; Gautier, N; Rossi, B

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the properties of rabbit polyclonal antibodies directed against purified human insulin receptor which strongly stimulate the intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. The stimulatory effect of the antibodies on the kinase activity was obtained on the insulin receptor autophosphorylation as well as on the kinase activity towards a synthetic substrate. This stimulation is additive to that induced by insulin. Moreover, rabbit antibodies do not impair insulin binding. These data strongly suggest that antibodies and insulin act through separate pathways. This conclusion is reinforced by the differences observed on the phosphopeptide maps of the receptor's beta subunit whose phosphorylation was performed either in the presence of insulin or rabbit antibodies. Interestingly, these polyclonal antibodies can also induce an activation of the receptor autophosphorylation by interacting only with extracellular determinants. The anti-insulin receptor antibodies mimic insulin in their stimulatory effect on amino acid (AIB) uptake, but they have a different effect to that found on the kinase activity; the simultaneous addition of the antiserum and insulin failed to stimulate this amino acid transport over the level induced by a saturating concentration of hormone. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:3034584

  12. Chicken interferons, their receptors and interferon-stimulated genes.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Kate E; Ward, Alister C; Lowenthal, John W; Bean, Andrew G D

    2013-11-01

    The prevalence of pathogenic viruses is a serious issue as they pose a constant threat to both the poultry industry and to human health. To prevent these viral infections an understanding of the host-virus response is critical, especially for the development of novel therapeutics. One approach in the control of viral infections would be to boost the immune response through administration of cytokines, such as interferons. However, the innate immune response in chickens is poorly characterised, particularly concerning the interferon pathway. This review will provide an overview of our current understanding of the interferon system of chickens, including their cognate receptors and known interferon-stimulated gene products.

  13. Cannabinoid receptor stimulation increases motivation for nicotine and nicotine seeking.

    PubMed

    Gamaleddin, Islam; Wertheim, Carrie; Zhu, Andy Z X; Coen, Kathleen M; Vemuri, Kiran; Makryannis, Alex; Goldberg, Steven R; Le Foll, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    The cannabinoid system appears to play a critical facilitative role in mediating the reinforcing effects of nicotine and relapse to nicotine-seeking behaviour in abstinent subjects based on the actions of cannabinoid (CB) receptor antagonists. However, the effects of CB receptor stimulation on nicotine self-administration and reinstatement have not been systematically studied. Here, we studied the effects of WIN 55,212-2, a CB1/2 agonist, on intravenous nicotine self-administration under fixed-ratio (FR) and progressive-ratio (PR) schedules of reinforcement in rats. The effects of WIN 55,212-2 on responding for food under similar schedules were also studied. In addition, the effects of WIN 55,212-2 on nicotine- and cue-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking were also studied, as well as the effects of WIN 55,212-2 on nicotine discrimination. WIN 55,212-2 decreased nicotine self-administration under the FR schedule. However, co-administration of WIN 55,212-2 with nicotine decreased responding for food, which suggests that this effect was non-selective. In contrast, WIN 55,212-2 increased both nicotine self-administration and responding for food under the PR schedule, produced dose-dependent reinstatement of nicotine seeking, and enhanced the reinstatement effects of nicotine-associated cues. Some of these effects were reversed by the CB1 antagonist rimonabant, but not by the CB2 antagonist AM630. In the drug discrimination tests between saline and 0.4 mg/kg nicotine, WIN 55,212-2 produced no nicotine-like discriminative effects but significantly potentiated discriminative stimulus effects of nicotine at the low dose through a CB1-receptor-dependent mechanism. These findings indicate that cannabinoid CB1-receptor stimulation increases the reinforcing effects of nicotine and precipitates relapse to nicotine-seeking behaviour in abstinent subjects. Thus, modulating CB1-receptor signalling might have therapeutic value for treating nicotine dependence. PMID:21521420

  14. EP4 receptor stimulation down-regulates human eosinophil function.

    PubMed

    Luschnig-Schratl, Petra; Sturm, Eva M; Konya, Viktoria; Philipose, Sonia; Marsche, Gunther; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Samberger, Claudia; Lang-Loidolt, Doris; Gattenlöhner, Stefan; Lippe, Irmgard Th; Peskar, Bernhard A; Schuligoi, Rufina; Heinemann, Akos

    2011-11-01

    Accumulation of eosinophils in tissue is a hallmark of allergic inflammation. Here we observed that a selective agonist of the PGE(2) receptor EP4, ONO AE1-329, potently attenuated the chemotaxis of human peripheral blood eosinophils, upregulation of the adhesion molecule CD11b and the production of reactive oxygen species. These effects were accompanied by the inhibition of cytoskeletal rearrangement and Ca(2+) mobilization. The involvement of the EP4 receptor was substantiated by a selective EP4 antagonist, which reversed the inhibitory effects of PGE(2) and the EP4 agonist. Selective kinase inhibitors revealed that the inhibitory effect of EP4 stimulation on eosinophil migration depended upon activation of PI 3-kinase and PKC, but not cAMP. Finally, we found that EP4 receptors are expressed by human eosinophils, and are also present on infiltrating leukocytes in inflamed human nasal mucosa. These data indicate that EP4 agonists might be a novel therapeutic option in eosinophilic diseases.

  15. Metabolic mapping of A3 adenosine receptor agonist MRS5980.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhong-Ze; Tosh, Dilip K; Tanaka, Naoki; Wang, Haina; Krausz, Kristopher W; O'Connor, Robert; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2015-09-15

    (1S,2R,3S,4R,5S)-4-(2-((5-Chlorothiophen-2-yl)ethynyl)-6-(methylamino)-9H-purin-9-yl)-2,3-dihydroxy-N-methylbicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-1-carboxamide (MRS5980) is an A3AR selective agonist containing multiple receptor affinity- and selectivity-enhancing modifications and a therapeutic candidate drug for many inflammatory diseases. Metabolism-related poor pharmacokinetic behavior and toxicities are a major reason for drug R&D failure. Metabolomics with UPLC-MS was employed to profile the metabolism of MRS5980 and MRS5980-induced disruption of endogenous compounds. Recombinant drug-metabolizing enzymes screening experiment were used to determine the enzymes involved in MRS5980 metabolism. Analysis of lipid metabolism-related genes was performed to investigate the reason for MRS5980-induced lipid metabolic disorders. Unsupervised principal components analysis separated the control and MRS5980 treatment groups in feces, urine, and liver samples, but not in bile and serum. The major ions mainly contributing to the separation of feces and urine were oxidized MRS5980, glutathione (GSH) conjugates and cysteine conjugate (degradation product of the GSH conjugates) of MRS5980. The major ions contributing to the group separation of liver samples were phosphatidylcholines. In vitro incubation experiments showed the involvement of CYP3A enzymes in the oxidative metabolism of MRS5980 and direct GSH reactivity of MRS5980. The electrophilic attack by MRS5980 is a minor pathway and did not alter GSH levels in liver or liver histology, and thus may be of minor clinical consequence. Gene expression analysis further showed decreased expression of PC biosynthetic genes choline kinase a and b, which further accelerated conversion of lysophosphatidylcholine to phosphatidylcholines through increasing the expression of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3. These data will be useful to guide rational design of drugs targeting A3AR, considering efficacy, metabolic elimination, and

  16. Metabolic mapping of A3 adenosine receptor agonist MRS5980

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zhong-Ze; Tosh, Dilip K.; Tanaka, Naoki; Wang, Haina; Krausz, Kristopher W.; O'Connor, Robert; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    (1S,2R,3S,4R,5S)-4-(2-((5-Chlorothiophen-2-yl)ethynyl)-6-(methylamino)-9H-purin-9-yl)-2,3-dihydroxy-N-methylbicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-1-carboxamide (MRS5980) is an A3AR selective agonist containing multiple receptor affinity- and selectivity-enhancing modifications and a therapeutic candidate drug for many inflammatory diseases. Metabolism-related poor pharmacokinetic behavior and toxicities are a major reason of drug R&D failure. Metabolomics with UPLC-MS was employed to profile the metabolism of MRS5980 and MRS5980-induced disruption of endogenous compounds. Recombinant drug-metabolizing enzymes screening experiment were used to determine the enzymes involved in MRS5980 metabolism. Analysis of lipid metabolism-related genes was performed to investigate the reason for MRS5980-induced lipid metabolic disorders. Unsupervised principal components analysis separated the control and MRS5980 treatment group in feces, urine, and liver samples, but not in bile and serum. The major ions mainly contributing to the separation for feces and urine were oxidized MRS5980, glutathione (GSH) conjugates and cysteine conjugate (degradation product of the GSH conjugates) of MRS5980. The major ions contributing to the group separation of liver samples were phosphatidylcholines. In vitro incubation experiments showed the major involvement of CYP3A enzymes in the oxidative metabolism of MRS5980 and direct GSH reactivity of MRS5980. The electrophilic attack by MRS5980 is a minor pathway and did not alter GSH levels in liver or liver histology, and thus may be of minor clinical consequence. Gene expression analysis further showed decreased expression of PC biosynthetic genes choline kinase a and b, which further accelerated conversion of lysophosphatidylcholine to phosphatidylcholines through increasing the expression of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3. These data will be useful to guide rational design of drugs targeting A3AR, considering efficacy, metabolic elimination, and

  17. Evidence for Follicle-stimulating Hormone Receptor as a Functional Trimer*

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xuliang; Fischer, David; Chen, Xiaoyan; McKenna, Sean D.; Liu, Heli; Sriraman, Venkataraman; Yu, Henry N.; Goutopoulos, Andreas; Arkinstall, Steve; He, Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR), a G-protein coupled receptor, is an important drug target in the development of novel therapeutics for reproductive indications. The FSHR extracellular domains were observed in the crystal structure as a trimer, which enabled us to propose a novel model for the receptor activation mechanism. The model predicts that FSHR binds Asnα52-deglycosylated FSH at a 3-fold higher capacity than fully glycosylated FSH. It also predicts that, upon dissociation of the FSHR trimer into monomers, the binding of glycosylated FSH, but not deglycosylated FSH, would increase 3-fold, and that the dissociated monomers would in turn enhance FSHR binding and signaling activities by 3-fold. This study presents evidence confirming these predictions and provides crystallographic and mutagenesis data supporting the proposed model. The model also provides a mechanistic explanation to the agonist and antagonist activities of thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor autoantibodies. We conclude that FSHR exists as a functional trimer. PMID:24692546

  18. SLC9A3R1 stimulates autophagy via BECN1 stabilization in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Ma, Yan; He, Hong-Wei; Wang, Jia-Ping; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Shao, Rong-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, a self-catabolic process, has been found to be involved in abrogating the proliferation and metastasis of breast cancer. SLC9A3R1 (solute carrier family 9, subfamily A [NHE3, cation proton antiporter 3], member 3 regulator 1), a multifunctional scaffold protein, is involved in suppressing breast cancer cells proliferation and the SLC9A3R1-related signaling pathway regulates the activation of autophagy processes. However, the precise regulatory mechanism and signaling pathway of SLC9A3R1 in the regulation of autophagy processes in breast cancer cells remains unknown. Here, we report that the stability of BECN1, the major component of the autophagic core lipid kinase complex, is augmented in SLC9A3R1-overexpressing breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells, subsequently stimulating autophagy by attenuating the interaction between BECN1 and BCL2. Initially, we found that SLC9A3R1 partially stimulated autophagy through the PTEN-PI3K-AKT1 signaling cascade in MDA-MB-231 cells. SLC9A3R1 then attenuated the interaction between BECN1 and BCL2 to stimulate the autophagic core lipid kinase complex. Further findings revealed that SLC9A3R1 bound to BECN1 and subsequently blocked ubiquitin-dependent BECN1 degradation. And the deletion of the C-terminal domain of SLC9A3R1 resulted in significantly reduced binding to BECN1. Moreover, the lack of C-terminal of SLC9A3R1 neither reduced the ubiquitination of BECN1 nor induced autophagy in breast cancer cells. The decrease in BECN1 degradation induced by SLC9A3R1 resulted in the activity of autophagy stimulation in breast cancer cells. These findings indicate that the SLC9A3R1-BECN1 signaling pathway participates in the activation of autophagy processes in breast cancer cells.

  19. Effect of a toggle switch mutation in TM6 of the human adenosine A3 receptor on Gi protein-dependent signalling and Gi-independent receptor internalization

    PubMed Central

    Stoddart, Leigh A; Kellam, Barrie; Briddon, Stephen J; Hill, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The highly conserved tryptophan (W6.48) in transmembrane domain 6 of GPCRs has been shown to play a central role in forming an active conformation in response to agonist binding. We set out to characterize the effect of this mutation on the efficacy of two agonists at multiple signalling pathways downstream of the adenosine A3 receptor. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Residue W6.48 in the human adenosine A3 receptor fused to yellow fluorescent protein was mutated to phenylalanine and expressed in CHO-K1 cells containing a cAMP response element reporter gene. The effects on agonist-mediated receptor internalization were monitored by automated confocal microscopy and image analysis. Further experiments were carried out to investigate agonist-mediated ERK1/2 phosphorylation, inhibition of [3H]-cAMP accumulation and β-arrestin2 binding. KEY RESULTS NECA was able to stimulate agonist-mediated internalization of the W6.48F mutant receptor, while the agonist HEMADO was inactive. Investigation of other downstream signalling pathways indicated that G-protein coupling was impaired for both agonists tested. Mutation of W6.48F therefore resulted in differential effects on agonist efficacy, and introduced signalling pathway bias for HEMADO at the adenosine A3 receptor. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Investigation of the pharmacology of the W6.48F mutant of the adenosine A3 receptor confirms that this region is important in forming the active conformation of the receptor for stimulating a number of different signalling pathways and that mutations in this residue can lead to changes in agonist efficacy and signalling bias. PMID:24750014

  20. Transferrin receptor expression by stimulated cells in mixed lymphocyte culture.

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, M; Bacon, P A; Symmons, D P; Walton, K W

    1985-01-01

    Transferrin receptor (TRFr) expression by cells in mixed lymphocyte culture increases steadily for the first 5 days, but then reaches a plateau. By the sixth day in culture, about 20% of viable cells express TRFr in two-way mixed lymphocyte reactions. This subpopulation of TRFr-positive cells represents the proliferating population; it is heterogeneous, containing T-cell blasts and smaller cells which are a mixture of T and non-T cells. A small group of non-T cells have phenotypic similarity to natural killer (NK) cells. T cells appear to divide earlier in the course of the response than non-T cells. The biphasic nature of this response and the slower non-T reactivity may be due to a secondary stimulation of non-T cells by factors released from activated T cells (such as interleukin-2). PMID:2982734

  1. Pharmacology of the Adenosine A3 Receptor in the Vasculature and Essential Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ming-Fen; Low, Leanne M.; Rose’Meyer, Roselyn B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Essential hypertension is considered to be a multifactorial disorder and its aetiology has yet to be clearly identified. As the adenosine receptors have a significant role in mediating vasodilation, alterations in their structures or signalling pathways may be involved in the development of hypertension. This study aimed to measure the expression of adenosine A3 receptors in a range of cardiovascular tissues and determine whether they could be altered with essential hypertension, and to functionally test responses to adenosine A3 receptor agonists in coronary blood vessels using the isolated perfused heart preparation. Methods mRNA samples from cardiovascular tissues and a range of blood vessels were collected from 10 week old male spontaneously hypertensive rats and age-gender matched Wistar rats (n = 8). The Langendorff heart perfusion preparation was used to characterise adenosine A3 receptor mediated coronary vasodilation in the rat heart. Results Adenosine A3 receptor agonists induced coronary vasodilation. The expression of adenosine A3 receptors in cardiovascular tissues was altered in a tissue-specific pattern. Specifically, down-regulation of adenosine A3 receptor expression occurred in hypertensive hearts, which might be associated with attenuated vasodilator responses observed in coronary vessels to adenosine A3 receptor agonists. Conclusions This study demonstrated alterations in the expression of adenosine A3 receptors occurred in a tissue specific mode, and reduced adenosine A3 receptor mediated coronary vasodilation in hearts from spontaneously hypertensive rats. Our findings with regard to changes in the adenosine A3 receptor in hypertensive hearts suggest that adenosine A3 receptor might play a role in the physiopathology of essential hypertension and potentially open the way to pharmacologic manipulation of vasomotor activity by the use of adenosine A3 receptor agonists. PMID:26907173

  2. Medicinal Chemistry of the A3 Adenosine Receptor: Agonists, Antagonists, and Receptor Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Klutz, Athena M.; Tosh, Dilip K.; Ivanov, Andrei A.; Preti, Delia; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) ligands have been modified to optimize their interaction with the A3AR. Most of these modifications have been made to the N6 and C2 positions of adenine as well as the ribose moiety, and using a combination of these substitutions leads to the most efficacious, selective, and potent ligands. A3AR agonists such as IB-MECA and Cl-IB-MECA are now advancing into Phase II clinical trials for treatments targeting diseases such as cancer, arthritis, and psoriasis. Also, a wide number of compounds exerting high potency and selectivity in antagonizing the human (h)A3AR have been discovered. These molecules are generally characterized by a notable structural diversity, taking into account that aromatic nitrogen-containing monocyclic (thiazoles and thiadiazoles), bicyclic (isoquinoline, quinozalines, (aza)adenines), tricyclic systems (pyrazoloquinolines, triazoloquinoxalines, pyrazolotriazolopyrimidines, triazolopurines, tricyclic xanthines) and nucleoside derivatives have been identified as potent and selective A3AR antagonists. Probably due to the “enigmatic” physiological role of A3AR, whose activation may produce opposite effects (for example, concerning tissue protection in inflammatory and cancer cells) and may produce effects that are species dependent, only a few molecules have reached preclinical investigation. Indeed, the most advanced A3AR antagonists remain in preclinical testing. Among the antagonists described above, compound OT-7999 is expected to enter clinical trials for the treatment of glaucoma, while several thiazole derivatives are in development as antiallergic, antiasthmatic and/or antiinflammatory drugs. PMID:19639281

  3. Do heterotrimeric G proteins redistribute upon G protein-coupled receptor stimulation in platelets?

    PubMed

    Kahner, Bryan N; Quinton, Todd M; Langan, Sarah; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2006-09-01

    Previous studies have proposed that stimulation of G protein-coupled receptors can cause a redistribution of G proteins to other receptors. The redistribution would cause a greater functional sensitivity of unsensitized 'secondary' receptors toward their agonists. Using platelets as a model system, we utilized a proximal signaling event, intracellular calcium mobilization, to determine if agonist stimulation of particular Gq-coupled receptors would result in increased sensitivity for stimulation of other Gq-coupled receptors. Platelets express three Gq-coupled receptors for thrombin, thromboxane A2, and ADP with different potencies. Varying concentrations of a primary agonist (PAR-1 agonist SFLLRN, or the TXA2 agonist U46619) was followed by a constant submaximal concentration of a secondary agonist (U46619, or the P2Y1 agonist ADP). We observed that initial stimulation by SFLLRN was followed by a decrease in the extent of secondary U46619 or ADP-mediated calcium mobilization in comparison to control responses (i.e. without primary stimulation). To extend these studies we examined calcium mobilization in platelets from mice that were either wild-type or homozygous null for the PAR-4 or P2Y1 receptors, hypothesizing that the loss of PAR-4 or P2Y1 receptors would cause redistribution of its Galphaq proteins to other receptors, and elicit a greater response when stimulated with other agonists than in platelets from a wild-type mouse. However, our results showed almost identical levels of peak calcium between wild-type or PAR-4 null mice when stimulated with either ADP or U46619. Similar results were obtained for the P2Y1 null mice stimulated with AYPGKF or U46619. We conclude that stimulation of one Gq coupled receptor does not result in redistribution of Gq to other Gq-coupled receptors. PMID:16973501

  4. Stimulation of brain muscarinic acetylcholine receptors acutely reverses radiogenic hypodipsia

    SciTech Connect

    Mickley, G.A.; Stevens, K.E.

    1986-03-01

    A sufficiently large dose of ionizing radiation produces changes in water consumption. However, the direction, durations, and physiological substrates of these alterations remain in question. Here we report a 5-d hypodipsia in rats exposed to 600 rads /sup 60/Co but a more transient, albeit larger, reduction in drinking after 1000 /sup 60/Co. Brain cholinergic neurons have been implicated as mediators of thirst. Therefore, we explored the role of hypothalamic muscarinic receptors in the production of radiation-induced hypodipsia. This was accomplished through the intrahypothalamic injection of carbachol (a muscarinic agonist) or atropine (a muscarinic antagonist) in irradiated rats. Intracranial carbachol produced acute reversal of radiogenic hypodipsia while atropine potentiated the hypodipsia. These post-irradiation drug-induced behaviors were similar to those observed after the same drug treatments before irradiation. Since cholinergic neuronal functions persist and are labile (can be pharmacologically stimulated and blocked) after irradiation, this suggests that other neuronal systems and/or neurochemicals may be more prominently involved in radiogenic hypodipsia.

  5. Epidermal growth factor receptor-dependent stimulation of amphiregulin expression in androgen-stimulated human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, I; Bailey, J; Hitzemann, K; Pittelkow, M R; Maihle, N J

    1994-01-01

    Amphiregulin is a heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (EGF)-related peptide that binds to the EGF receptor (EGF-R) with high affinity. In this study, we report a role for amphiregulin in androgen-stimulated regulation of prostate cancer cell growth. Androgen is known to enhance EGF-R expression in the androgen-sensitive LNCaP human prostate carcinoma cell line, and it has been suggested that androgenic stimuli may regulate proliferation, in part, through autocrine mechanisms involving the EGF-R. In this study, we demonstrate that LNCaP cells express amphiregulin mRNA and peptide and that this expression is elevated by androgenic stimulation. We also show that ligand-dependent EGF-R stimulation induces amphiregulin expression and that androgenic effects on amphiregulin synthesis are mediated through this EGF-R pathway. Parallel studies using the estrogen-responsive breast carcinoma cell line, MCF-7, suggest that regulation of amphiregulin by estrogen may also be mediated via an EGF-R pathway. In addition, heparin treatment of LNCaP cells inhibits androgen-stimulated cell growth further suggesting that amphiregulin can mediate androgen-stimulated LNCaP proliferation. Together, these results implicate an androgen-regulated autocrine loop composed of amphiregulin and its receptor in prostate cancer cell growth and suggest that the mechanism of steroid hormone regulation of amphiregulin synthesis may occur through androgen upregulation of the EGF-R and subsequent receptor-dependent pathways. Images PMID:8049525

  6. The human thyrotropin receptor: a heptahelical receptor capable of stimulating members of all four G protein families.

    PubMed Central

    Laugwitz, K L; Allgeier, A; Offermanns, S; Spicher, K; Van Sande, J; Dumont, J E; Schultz, G

    1996-01-01

    Thyrotropin is the primary hormone that, via one heptahelical receptor, regulates thyroid cell functions such as secretion, specific gene expression, and growth. In human thyroid, thyrotropin receptor activation leads to stimulation of the adenylyl cyclase and phospholipase C cascades. However, the G proteins involved in thyrotropin receptor action have been only partially defined. In membranes of human thyroid gland, we immunologically identified alpha subunits of the G proteins Gs short, Gs long, Gi1, Gi2, Gi3, G(o) (Go2 and another form of Go, presumably Go1), Gq, G11, G12, and G13. Activation of the thyrotropin (TSH) receptor by bovine TSH led to increased incorporation of the photoreactive GTP analogue [alpha-32P]GTP azidoanilide into immunoprecipitated alpha subunits of all G proteins detected in thyroid membranes. This effect was receptor-dependent and not due to direct G protein stimulation because it was mimicked by TSH receptor-stimulating antibodies of patients suffering from Grave disease and was abolished by a receptor-blocking antiserum from a patient with autoimmune hypothyroidism. The TSH-induced activation of individual G proteins occurred with EC50 values of 5-50 milliunits/ml, indicating that the activated TSH receptor coupled with similar potency to different G proteins. When human thyroid slices were pretreated with pertussis toxin, the TSH receptor-mediated accumulation of cAMP increased by approximately 35% with TSH at 1 milliunits/ml, indicating that the TSH receptor coupled to Gs and G(i). Taken together, these findings show that, at least in human thyroid membranes, in which the protein is expressed at its physiological levels, the TSH receptor resembles a naturally occurring example of a general G protein-activating receptor. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8552586

  7. Functional expression of adenosine A2A and A3 receptors in the mouse dendritic cell line XS-106.

    PubMed

    Dickenson, John M; Reeder, Steve; Rees, Bob; Alexander, Steve; Kendall, Dave

    2003-08-01

    There is increasing evidence to suggest that adenosine receptors can modulate the function of cells involved in the immune system. For example, human dendritic cells derived from blood monocytes have recently been described to express functional adenosine A1, A2A and A3 receptors. Therefore, in the present study, we have investigated whether the recently established murine dendritic cell line XS-106 expresses functional adenosine receptors. The selective adenosine A3 receptor agonist 1-[2-chloro-6[[(3-iodophenyl)methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-1-deoxy-N-methyl-beta-D-ribofuranuronamide (2-Cl-IB-MECA) inhibited forskolin-mediated [3H]cyclic AMP accumulation and stimulated concentration-dependent increases in p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation. The selective adenosine A2A receptor agonist 4-[2-[[-6-amino-9-(N-ethyl-beta-D-ribofuranuronamidosyl)-9H-purin-2-yl]amino]ethyl]benzene-propanoic acid (CGS 21680) stimulated a robust increase in [3H]cyclic AMP accumulation and p42/p44 MAPK phosphorylation. In contrast, the selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist CPA (N6-cyclopentyladenosine) did not inhibit forskolin-mediated [3H]cyclic AMP accumulation or stimulate increases in p42/p44 MAPK phosphorylation. These observations suggest that XS-106 cells express functional adenosine A2A and A3 receptors. The non-selective adenosine receptor agonist 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) release from XS-106 cells in a concentration-dependent fashion. Furthermore, treatment with Cl-IB-MECA (1 microM) or CGS 21680 (1 microM) alone produced a partial inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-alpha release (when compared to NECA), whereas a combination of both agonists resulted in the inhibition of TNF-alpha release comparable to that observed with NECA alone. Treatment of cells with the adenosine A2A receptor selective antagonists 4-(2-[7-amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a

  8. Autoregulation by the Juxtamembrane Region of the Human Ephrin Receptor Tyrosine Kinase A3 (EphA3)

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Tara L.; Walker, John R.; Loppnau, Peter; Butler-Cole, Christine; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano

    2008-07-08

    Ephrin receptors (Eph) affect cell shape and movement, unlike other receptor tyrosine kinases that directly affect proliferative pathways. The kinase domain of EphA3 is activated by ephrin binding and receptor oligomerization. This activation is associated with two tyrosines in the juxtamembrane region; these tyrosines are sites of autophosphorylation and interact with the active site of the kinase to modulate activity. This allosteric event has important implications both in terms of understanding signal transduction pathways mediated by Eph kinases as well as discovering specific therapeutic ligands for receptor kinases. In order to provide further details of the molecular mechanism through which the unphosphorylated juxtamemebrane region blocks catalysis, we studied wild-type and site-specific mutants in detail. High-resolution structures of multiple states of EphA3 kinase with and without the juxtamembrane segment allowed us to map the coupled pathway of residues that connect the juxtamembrane segment, the activation loop, and the catalytic residues of the kinase domain. This highly conserved set of residues likely delineates a molecular recognition pathway for most of the Eph RTKs, helping to characterize the dynamic nature of these physiologically important enzymes.

  9. GabaB receptors activation in the NTS blocks the glycemic responses induced by carotid body receptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lemus, Mónica; Montero, Sergio; Cadenas, José Luis; Lara, José Jesús; Tejeda-Chávez, Héctor Rafael; Alvarez-Buylla, Ramón; de Alvarez-Buylla, Elena Roces

    2008-08-18

    The carotid body receptors participate in glucose regulation sensing glucose levels in blood entering the cephalic circulation. The carotid body receptors information, is initially processed within the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) and elicits changes in circulating glucose and brain glucose uptake. Previous work has shown that gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in NTS modulates respiratory reflexes, but the role of GABA within NTS in glucose regulation remains unknown. Here we show that GABA(B) receptor agonist (baclofen) or antagonists (phaclofen and CGP55845A) locally injected into NTS modified arterial glucose levels and brain glucose retention. Control injections outside NTS did not elicit these responses. In contrast, GABA(A) agonist and antagonist (muscimol or bicuculline) produced no significant changes in blood glucose levels. When these GABAergic drugs were applied before carotid body receptors stimulation, again, only GABA(B) agonist or antagonist significantly affected glycemic responses; baclofen microinjection significantly reduced the hyperglycemic response and brain glucose retention observed after carotid body receptors stimulation, while phaclofen produced the opposite effect, increasing significantly hyperglycemia and brain glucose retention. These results indicate that activation of GABA(B), but not GABA(A), receptors in the NTS modulates the glycemic responses after anoxic stimulation of the carotid body receptors, and suggest the presence of a tonic inhibitory mechanism in the NTS to avoid hyperglycemia.

  10. Stimulation of acid secretion and phosphoinositol production by rat parietal cell muscarinic M sub 2 receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, A.; Rochlitz, H.; Herz, A.; Paumgartner, G. )

    1988-04-01

    The muscarinic receptor system involved in hydrogen production by enriched rat gastric parietal cells was investigated. Muscarinic receptor density determined by (N-methyl-{sup 3}H)scopolamine binding was 8,100/cell. The receptor appeared to be of the M{sub 2} muscarinic receptor subtype, since it had a low affinity (K{sub d} 189 nM) for the M{sub 1} receptor antagonist pirenzepine compared with atropine. Receptor activation by carbachol rapidly augmented levels of polyphosphoinositides, indicating an activation of phospholipase C. The dose-response relations for the increase in inositol phosphates closely paralleled the binding of carbachol to muscarinic receptors. The inositol phosphate response was antagonized by pirenzepine with a K{sub i} of 177 nM. the stimulation of inositol phosphate levels by carbachol correlated well with the stimulation of ({sup 14}C)aminopyrine uptake, determine as an index of acid secretion. The muscarinic agonists oxotremorine, pilocarpine, and bethanechol elicited partial increases in inositol phosphates at maximal drug concentrations, and these partial increases correlated with their ability to stimulate ({sup 14}C)aminopyrine uptake. These data indicate that inositolpolyphosphates may be a second messenger of M{sub 2} receptors stimulating acid secretion.

  11. A(1) and A(3) adenosine receptors inhibit LPS-induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1 accumulation in murine astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Gessi, Stefania; Merighi, Stefania; Stefanelli, Angela; Fazzi, Debora; Varani, Katia; Borea, Pier Andrea

    2013-10-01

    Adenosine (Ado) exerts neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory functions by acting through four receptor subtypes A1, A2A, A2B and A3. Astrocytes are one of its targets in the central nervous system. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), a master regulator of oxygen homeostasis, is induced after hypoxia, ischemia and inflammation and plays an important role in brain injury. HIF-1 is expressed by astrocytes, however the regulatory role played by Ado on HIF-1α modulation induced by inflammatory and hypoxic conditions has not been investigated. Primary murine astrocytes were activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with or without Ado, Ado receptor agonists, antagonists and receptor silencing, before exposure to normoxia or hypoxia. HIF-1α accumulation and downstream genes regulation were determined. Ado inhibited LPS-increased HIF-1α accumulation under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions, through activation of A1 and A3 receptors. In cells incubated with the blockers of p44/42 MAPK and Akt, LPS-induced HIF-1α accumulation was significantly decreased in normoxia and hypoxia, suggesting the involvement of p44/42 MAPK and Akt in this effect and Ado inhibited kinases phosphorylation. A series of angiogenesis and metabolism related genes were modulated by hypoxia in an HIF-1 dependent way, but not further increased by LPS, with the exception of GLUT-1 and hexochinase II that were elevated by LPS only in normoxia and inhibited by Ado receptors. Instead, genes involved in inflammation, like inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) and A2B receptors, were increased by LPS in normoxia, strongly stimulated by LPS in concert with hypoxia and inhibited by Ado, through A1 and A3 receptor subtypes. In conclusion A1 and A3 receptors reduce the LPS-mediated HIF-1α accumulation in murine astrocytes, resulting in a downregulation of genes involved in inflammation and hypoxic injury, like iNOS and A2B receptors, in both normoxic and hypoxic conditions.

  12. Stimulation of the extracellular Ca²⁺-sensing receptor by denatonium.

    PubMed

    Rogachevskaja, Olga A; Churbanov, Gleb D; Bystrova, Marina F; Romanov, Roman A; Kolesnikov, Stanislav S

    2011-12-16

    The extracellular Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CASR) is a promiscuous G-protein-coupled receptor closely related to the taste receptors T1R1-T1R3. Here we analyzed the possibility that apart from being stimulated by external Ca(2+) and amino acids, the substances effective as tastants, CASR might serve as a receptor for other sapid compounds. CASR was heterologously expressed in HEK-293 cells, and their responsivity to a variety of bitter and sweet substances was examined. Among them, solely denatonium was found to stimulate Ca(2+) signaling in CASR-positive HEK-293 cells. Apparently, these Ca(2+) responses were specific, as those were inhibited by the CASR antagonist NSP-4123. Altogether, our findings indicate that denatonium stimulates CASR by shifting a dose-response curve for the principal CASR agonist Ca(2+) to lower concentrations.

  13. A novel member of the integrin receptor family mediates Arg-Gly-Asp- stimulated neutrophil phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Human neutrophils (PMN) express a heterodimeric receptor that has ligand binding specificity for the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence within many adhesive proteins. A monoclonal antibody, B6H12, which binds to this receptor, inhibits both RGD-mediated ligand binding and stimulation of IgG-mediated phagocytosis by fibronectin, fibrinogen, vitronectin, von Willebrand's factor, and collagen type IV. By several criteria this receptor is neither a known very late antigen, a known cytoadhesin (gp IIb/IIIa-vitronectin receptor), nor a member of the LFA- 1, Mac-1, p150,95 group of integrin receptors. Ligand binding via this receptor is rapidly inactivated by products of the myeloperoxidase- hydrogen peroxide-halide system of PMN. We conclude that this receptor, for which we propose the name leukocyte response integrin, is a signal- transducing molecule on PMN which may have a significant early role in modulation of PMN function at inflammatory sites. PMID:2785522

  14. Niacin stimulates adiponectin secretion through the GPR109A receptor.

    PubMed

    Plaisance, Eric P; Lukasova, Martina; Offermanns, Stefan; Zhang, Youyan; Cao, Guoqing; Judd, Robert L

    2009-03-01

    Niacin (nicotinic acid) has recently been shown to increase serum adiponectin concentrations in men with the metabolic syndrome. However, little is known about the mechanism(s) by which niacin regulates the intracellular trafficking and secretion of adiponectin. Since niacin appears to exert its effects on lipolysis through receptor (GPR109A)-dependent and -independent pathways, the purpose of this investigation was to examine the role of the recently identified GPR109A receptor in adiponectin secretion. Initial in vivo studies in rats demonstrated that niacin (30 mg/kg po) acutely increases serum adiponectin concentrations, whereas it decreases NEFAs. Further in vitro studies demonstrated an increase in adiponectin secretion and a decrease in lipolysis in primary adipocytes following treatment with niacin or beta-hydroxybutyrate (an endogenous ligand of the GPR109A receptor), but these effects were blocked when adipocytes were pretreated with pertussis toxin. Niacin had no effect on adiponectin secretion or lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, which have limited cell surface expression of the GPR109A receptor. To further substantiate these in vitro findings, wild-type and GPR109A receptor knockout mice were administered a single dose of niacin or placebo, and serum was obtained for the determination of adiponectin and NEFA concentrations. Serum adiponectin concentrations increased and serum NEFAs decreased in the wild-type mice within 10 min following niacin administration. However, niacin administration had no effect on adiponectin and NEFA concentrations in the GPR109A receptor knockout mice. These results demonstrate that the GPR109A receptor plays an important role in the dual regulation of adiponectin secretion and lipolysis.

  15. Aggregation Limits Surface Expression of Homomeric GluA3 Receptors.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Sarah K; Hou, Ying; Willibald, Marina; Semenov, Artur; Möykkynen, Tommi; Keinänen, Kari

    2016-04-15

    AMPA receptors are glutamate-gated cation channels assembled from GluA1-4 subunits and have properties that are strongly dependent on the subunit composition. The subunits have different propensities to form homomeric or various heteromeric receptors expressed on cell surface, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we examined the biochemical basis for the poor ability of GluA3 subunits to form homomeric receptors, linked previously to two amino acid residues, Tyr-454 and Arg-461, in its ligand binding domain (LBD). Surface expression of GluA3 was improved by co-assembly with GluA2 but not with stargazin, a trafficking chaperone and modulator of AMPA receptors. The secretion efficiency of GluA2 and GluA3 LBDs paralleled the transport difference between the respective full-length receptors and was similarly dependent on Tyr-454/Arg-461 but not on LBD stability. In comparison to GluA2, GluA3 homomeric receptors showed a strong and Tyr-454/Arg-461-dependent tendency to aggregate both in the macroscopic scale measured as lower solubility in nonionic detergent and in the microscopic scale evident as the preponderance of hydrodynamically large structures in density gradient centrifugation and native gel electrophoresis. We conclude that the impaired surface expression of homomeric GluA3 receptors is caused by nonproductive assembly and aggregation to which LBD residues Tyr-454 and Arg-461 strongly contribute. This aggregation inhibits the entry of newly synthesized GluA3 receptors to the secretory pathway. PMID:26912664

  16. Dopamine D2High receptors stimulated by phencyclidines, lysergic acid diethylamide, salvinorin A, and modafinil.

    PubMed

    Seeman, Philip; Guan, Hong-Chang; Hirbec, Hélène

    2009-08-01

    Although it is commonly stated that phencyclidine is an antagonist at ionotropic glutamate receptors, there has been little measure of its potency on other receptors in brain tissue. Although we previously reported that phencyclidine stimulated cloned-dopamine D2Long and D2Short receptors, others reported that phencyclidine did not stimulate D2 receptors in homogenates of rat brain striatum. This study, therefore, examined whether phencyclidine and other hallucinogens and psychostimulants could stimulate the incorporation of [(35)S]GTP-gamma-S into D2 receptors in homogenates of rat brain striatum, using the same conditions as previously used to study the cloned D2 receptors. Using 10 microM dopamine to define 100% stimulation, phencyclidine elicited a maximum incorporation of 46% in rat striata, with a half-maximum concentration of 70 nM for phencyclidine, when compared with 80 nM for dopamine, 89 nM for salvinorin A (48 nM for D2Long), 105 nM for lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), 120 nM for R-modafinil, 710 nM for dizocilpine, 1030 nM for ketamine, and >10,000 nM for S-modafinil. These compounds also inhibited the binding of the D2-selective ligand [(3)H]domperidone. The incorporation was inhibited by the presence of 200 microM guanylylimidodiphosphate and also by D2 blockade, using 10 microM S-sulpiride, but not by D1 blockade with 10 microM SCH23390. Hypertonic buffer containing 150 mM NaCl inhibited the stimulation by phencyclidine, which may explain negative results by others. It is concluded that phencyclidine and other psychostimulants and hallucinogens can stimulate dopamine D2 receptors at concentrations related to their behavioral actions.

  17. Role of the Extracellular and Intracellular Loops of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Receptor in Its Function

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Antara A.; Mahale, Smita D.

    2015-01-01

    Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) is a leucine-rich repeat containing class A G-protein coupled receptor belonging to the subfamily of glycoprotein hormone receptors (GPHRs), which includes luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor (LH/CGR) and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor. Its cognate ligand, follicle-stimulating hormone binds to, and activates FSHR expressed on the surface of granulosa cells of the ovary, in females, and Sertoli cells of the testis, in males, to bring about folliculogenesis and spermatogenesis, respectively. FSHR contains a large extracellular domain (ECD) consisting of leucine-rich repeats at the N-terminal end and a hinge region at the C-terminus that connects the ECD to the membrane spanning transmembrane domain (TMD). The TMD consists of seven α-helices that are connected to each other by means of three extracellular loops (ELs) and three intracellular loops (ILs) and ends in a short-cytoplasmic tail. It is well established that the ECD is the primary hormone binding domain, whereas the TMD is the signal transducing domain. However, several studies on the ELs and ILs employing site directed mutagenesis, generation of chimeric receptors and in vitro characterization of naturally occurring mutations have proven their indispensable role in FSHR function. Their role in every phase of the life cycle of the receptor like post translational modifications, cell surface trafficking, hormone binding, activation of downstream signaling, receptor phosphorylation, hormone–receptor internalization, and recycling of hormone–receptor complex have been documented. Mutations in the loops causing dysregulation of these processes lead to pathophysiological conditions. In other GPHRs as well, the loops have been convincingly shown to contribute to various aspects of receptor function. This review article attempts to summarize the extensive contributions of FSHR loops and C-terminal tail to its function. PMID:26236283

  18. Role of the Extracellular and Intracellular Loops of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Receptor in Its Function.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Antara A; Mahale, Smita D

    2015-01-01

    Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) is a leucine-rich repeat containing class A G-protein coupled receptor belonging to the subfamily of glycoprotein hormone receptors (GPHRs), which includes luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor (LH/CGR) and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor. Its cognate ligand, follicle-stimulating hormone binds to, and activates FSHR expressed on the surface of granulosa cells of the ovary, in females, and Sertoli cells of the testis, in males, to bring about folliculogenesis and spermatogenesis, respectively. FSHR contains a large extracellular domain (ECD) consisting of leucine-rich repeats at the N-terminal end and a hinge region at the C-terminus that connects the ECD to the membrane spanning transmembrane domain (TMD). The TMD consists of seven α-helices that are connected to each other by means of three extracellular loops (ELs) and three intracellular loops (ILs) and ends in a short-cytoplasmic tail. It is well established that the ECD is the primary hormone binding domain, whereas the TMD is the signal transducing domain. However, several studies on the ELs and ILs employing site directed mutagenesis, generation of chimeric receptors and in vitro characterization of naturally occurring mutations have proven their indispensable role in FSHR function. Their role in every phase of the life cycle of the receptor like post translational modifications, cell surface trafficking, hormone binding, activation of downstream signaling, receptor phosphorylation, hormone-receptor internalization, and recycling of hormone-receptor complex have been documented. Mutations in the loops causing dysregulation of these processes lead to pathophysiological conditions. In other GPHRs as well, the loops have been convincingly shown to contribute to various aspects of receptor function. This review article attempts to summarize the extensive contributions of FSHR loops and C-terminal tail to its function. PMID:26236283

  19. Inhibition of muscarinic receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism by cocaine, norcocaine and cocaethylene in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Tan, X X; Costa, L G

    1994-05-13

    The interaction of cocaine, its metabolites norcocaine and benzoylecgonine, and cocaethylene, which is formed following a combined cocaine and ethanol exposure, with muscarinic receptor binding and phosphoinositide metabolism was investigated in brain from immature rats. Cocaine and norcocaine inhibited binding of [3H]telenzepine and carbachol-stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism in cerebral cortex, while benzoylecgonine was devoid of any inhibitory activity. Cocaethylene was the most potent inhibitor of both binding and phosphoinositide metabolism. The effect of cocaine was more pronounced at the muscarinic receptors, but a small inhibition of histamine--and serotonin--stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism was also observed.

  20. Dissociation of insulin receptor phosphorylation and stimulation of glucose transport in BC3H-1 myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Mojsilovic, L.P.; Standaert, M.L.; Rosic, N.K.; Pollet, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have investigated insulin receptor phosphorylation in differentiated cultured BC3H-1 myocytes. As for other insulin-responsive cell systems in partially purified wheat germ agglutinin receptor preparations, insulin stimulates the phosphorylation of its own receptor (95K ..beta..-subunits) in a dose dependent manner (0-400 nM), as identified by immunoprecipitation with antiinsulin receptor antibodies and SDS-PAGE. In the same preparations they show that 12-0-tetradecanyl phorbol acetate (TPA), which in many respect ..beta..-subunits in the same dose dependent manner (0-5 ..mu..M). In addition, antiinsulin receptor antibodies (B-10) also induced phosphorylation of mimics insulin action, also induced phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and HPLC tryptic maps of the /sup 32/P-labeled ..beta..-subunit were identical to those for insulin-induced receptor phosphorylation. However, while insulin and TPA are potent stimulators of glucose transport in these muscle cells, the antireceptor antibodies alone failed to provoke glucose transport at any concentration. The specificity and activity of these antibodies were confirmed in their system by their ability to inhibit insulin binding and insulin-stimulated glucose transport in a concentration-dependent manner. Their results indicate that phosphorylation of insulin receptor is not a crucial event in mediating insulin action, at least with respect to glucose transport. While the effects of the B-10 antibody in the BC3H-1 myocyte differ from those in the adipocyte, their results provide independent confirmation of their essential conclusion that phosphorylation of the insulin receptor may not be necessary nor sufficient for its acute action in promoting glucose transport.

  1. κ-Opioid Receptor Stimulation Improves Endothelial Function via Akt-stimulated NO Production in Hyperlipidemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fei; Zheng, Xu-Yang; Li, Juan; Zhang, Shu-Miao; Feng, Na; Guo, Hai-Tao; Jia, Min; Wang, Yue-Min; Fan, Rong; Pei, Jian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of U50,488H (a selective κ-opioid receptor agonist) on endothelial function impaired by hyperlipidemia and to determine the role of Akt-stimulated NO production in it. Hyperlipidemic model was established by feeding rats with a high-fat diet for 14 weeks. U50,488H and nor-BNI (a selective κ-opioid receptor antagonist) were administered intraperitoneally. In vitro, the involvement of the PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway in the effect of U50,488H was studied using cultured endothelial cells subjected to artificial hyperlipidemia. Serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations dramatically increased after high-fat diet feeding. Administration of U50,488H significantly alleviated endothelial ultrastructural destruction and endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation impairment caused by hyperlipidemia. U50,488H also increased Akt/eNOS phosphorylation and serum/medium NO level both in vivo and in vitro. U50,488H increased eNOS activity and suppressed iNOS activity in vivo. The effects of U50,488H were abolished in vitro by siRNAs targeting κ-opioid receptor and Akt or PI3K/Akt/eNOS inhibitors. All effects of U50,488H were blocked by nor-BNI. These results demonstrate that κ-opioid receptor stimulation normalizes endothelial ultrastructure and function under hyperlipidemic condition. Its mechanism is related to the preservation of eNOS phosphorylation through activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and downregulation of iNOS expression/activity. PMID:27226238

  2. Possible mechanisms and function of nuclear trafficking of the colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Rovida, Elisabetta; Dello Sbarba, Persio

    2014-10-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) have long being studied with respect to the "canonical" signaling. This includes ligand-induced activation of a receptor tyrosine kinase at the cell surface that leads to receptor dimerization, followed by its phosphorylation in the intracellular domain and activation. The activated receptor then recruits cytoplasmic signaling molecules including other kinases. Activation of the downstream signaling cascade frequently leads to changes in gene expression following nuclear translocation of downstream targets. However, RTK themselves may localize within the nucleus, as either full-length molecules or cleaved fragments, with or without their ligands. Significant differences in this mechanism have been reported depending on the individual RTK, cellular context or disease. Accumulating evidences indicate that the colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R) may localize within the nucleus. To date, however, little is known about the mechanism of CSF-1R nuclear shuttling, as well as the functional role of nuclear CSF-1R.

  3. Phorbol esters stimulate the phosphorylation of receptors for insulin and somatomedin C.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, S; Sahyoun, N E; Saltiel, A R; Cuatrecasas, P

    1983-01-01

    The effect of phorbol esters on the extent of phosphorylation of receptors for insulin and somatomedin C (insulin-like growth factor I) was studied in intact IM-9 cells that were labeled by incubation with H332PO4. The tumor-promoting phorbol esters phorbol tetradecanoate acetate (TPA) and phorbol dibutyrate, but not the inactive 4 alpha-phorbol, enhanced phosphorylation of the beta subunit of both receptors approximately 4-fold; 70 nM TPA maximally stimulated phosphorylation of both receptors, whereas concentrations less than or equal to 0.7 nM had no observable effect. Insulin also enhanced the phosphorylation of the beta subunit of the insulin receptor, and its effects appeared to be additive to those of TPA. Peptide maps indicated that at least some of the residues phosphorylated by these two agents are distinct. These results suggest a possible role of protein kinase C in regulating insulin and somatomedin C receptors. Images PMID:6312447

  4. Histamine receptors on adult rat cardiomyocytes: antagonism of alpha/sub 1/-receptor stimulation of cAMP degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Buxton, I.L.O.; Bowen, S.M.

    1986-03-01

    Incubation of intact cardiomyocytes with the histamine antagonist (/sup 3/H)mepyramine results in rapid reversible binding to a single class of high affinity sites (K/sub D/ = 1.2nM; 50,000 sites/myocyte). In membranes from purified myocytes histamine competition of (/sup 3/H)mepyramine binding (K/sub D/ = 300nM) is not altered by GTP (10..mu..M). Competition of (/sup 3/H)mepyramine binding by H-receptor subtype-selective antagonists suggests the presence of a single class of H/sub 1/-receptors. Incubation of intact myocytes with histamine (luM, H/sub 1/ receptor activation) plus norepinephrine (NE 1uM, alpha/sub 1/ + beta/sub 1/ receptor activation) for 3 min leads to significantly more cAMP accumulation (36.5 pmol/10/sup 6/ myocytes) than NE alone (30 pmol/10/sup 6/ myocytes). Histamine alone does not alter basal cAMP = 10.4 pmol/10/sup 6/ myocytes, or beta/sub 1/ stimulation (isoproternol, 1uM) = 39.6 pmol/10/sup 6/ myocytes. Cyclic AMP accumulation with NE plus prazosin 10nM, (alpha/sub 1/ + beta/sub 1/ + alpha/sub 1/ blockade) is indistinguishable from NE + histamine, (alpha/sub 1/ + beta/sub 1/ + H/sub 1/) stimulation. Histamine competition for (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding suggests that histamine does not block alpha/sub 1/ receptors on the myocyte. These data suggest that H/sub 1/ receptor activation leads to antagonism of the alpha/sub 1/ receptor mediated activation of cAMP phosphodiesterase the authors have recently described.

  5. Stimulators of the soluble guanylyl cyclase: promising functional insights from rare coding atherosclerosis-related GUCY1A3 variants.

    PubMed

    Wobst, Jana; von Ameln, Simon; Wolf, Bernhard; Wierer, Michael; Dang, Tan An; Sager, Hendrik B; Tennstedt, Stephanie; Hengstenberg, Christian; Koesling, Doris; Friebe, Andreas; Braun, Siegmund L; Erdmann, Jeanette; Schunkert, Heribert; Kessler, Thorsten

    2016-07-01

    Stimulators of the soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) are emerging therapeutic agents in cardiovascular diseases. Genetic alterations of the GUCY1A3 gene, which encodes the α1 subunit of the sGC, are associated with coronary artery disease. Studies investigating sGC stimulators in subjects with CAD and carrying risk-related variants in sGC are, however, lacking. Here, we functionally investigate the impact of coding GUCY1A3 variants on sGC activity and the therapeutic potential of sGC stimulators in vitro. In addition to a known loss-of-function variant, eight coding variants in GUCY1A3 were cloned and expressed in HEK 293 cells. Protein levels and dimerization capability with the β1 subunit were analysed by immunoblotting and co-immunoprecipitation, respectively. All α1 variants found in MI patients dimerized with the β1 subunit. Protein levels were reduced by 72 % in one variant (p < 0.01). Enzymatic activity was analysed using cGMP radioimmunoassay after stimulation with a nitric oxide (NO) donor. Five variants displayed decreased cGMP production upon NO stimulation (p < 0.001). The addition of the sGC stimulator BAY 41-2272 increased cGMP formation in all of these variants (p < 0.01). Except for the variant leading to decreased protein level, cGMP amounts reached the wildtype NO-induced level after addition of BAY 41-2272. In conclusion, rare coding variants in GUCY1A3 lead to reduced cGMP formation which can be rescued by a sGC stimulator in vitro. These results might therefore represent the starting point for discovery of novel treatment strategies for patients at risk with coding GUCY1A3 variants. PMID:27342234

  6. Mechanisms mediating regional sympathoactivatory responses to stimulation of NTS A(1) adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Scislo, Tadeusz J; O'Leary, Donal S

    2002-10-01

    Selective activation of adenosine A(1) and A(2a) receptors in the subpostremal nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) increases and decreases mean arterial pressure (MAP), respectively, and decreases heart rate (HR). We have previously shown that the decreases in MAP evoked by NTS A(2a) receptor stimulation were accompanied with differential sympathetic responses in renal (RSNA), lumbar (LSNA), and preganglionic adrenal sympathetic nerve activity (pre-ASNA). Therefore, now we investigated whether stimulation of NTS A(1) receptors via unilateral microinjection of N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) elicits differential activation of the same sympathetic outputs in alpha-chloralose-urethane-anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats. CPA (0.33-330.0 pmol in 50 nl) evoked dose-dependent increases in MAP, variable decreases in HR, and differential increases in all recorded sympathetic outputs: upward arrow pre-ASNA > upward arrow RSNA > or = upward arrow LSNA. Sinoaortic denervation + vagotomy abolished the MAP and LSNA responses, reversed the normal increases in RSNA into decreases, and significantly attenuated increases in pre-ASNA. NTS ionotropic glutamatergic receptor blockade with kynurenate sodium (4.4 nmol/100 nl) reversed the responses in MAP, LSNA, and RSNA and attenuated the responses in pre-ASNA. We conclude that afferent inputs and intact glutamatergic transmission in the NTS are necessary to mediate the pressor and differential sympathoactivatory responses to stimulation of NTS A(1) receptors.

  7. Stimulation of NTS A1 adenosine receptors evokes counteracting effects on hindlimb vasculature.

    PubMed

    McClure, Joseph M; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2005-12-01

    Our previous studies concluded that stimulation of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) A2a receptors evokes preferential hindlimb vasodilation mainly via inducing increases in preganglionic sympathetic nerve activity (pre-ASNA) directed to the adrenal medulla. This increase in pre-ASNA causes the release of epinephrine and subsequent activation of beta-adrenergic receptors that are preferentially located in the skeletal muscle vasculature. Selective activation of NTS A1 adenosine receptors evokes variable, mostly pressor effects and increases pre-ASNA, as well as lumbar sympathetic activity, which is directed to the hindlimb. These counteracting factors may have opposite effects on the hindlimb vasculature resulting in mixed vascular responses. Therefore, in chloralose-urethane-anesthetized rats, we evaluated the contribution of vasodilator versus vasoconstrictor effects of stimulation of NTS A1 receptors on the hindlimb vasculature. We compared the changes in iliac vascular conductance evoked by microinejctions into the NTS of the selective A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (330 pmol in 50 nl volume) in intact animals with the responses evoked after beta-adrenergic blockade, bilateral adrenalectomy, bilateral lumbar sympathectomy, and combined adrenalectomy + lumbar sympathectomy. In intact animals, stimulation of NTS A1 receptors evoked variable effects: increases and decreases in mean arterial pressure and iliac conductance with prevailing pressor and vasoconstrictor effects. Peripheral beta-adrenergic receptor blockade and bilateral adrenalectomy eliminated the depressor component of the responses, markedly potentiated iliac vasoconstriction, and tended to increase the pressor responses. Lumbar sympathectomy tended to decrease the pressor and vasoconstrictor responses. After bilateral adrenalectomy plus lumbar sympathectomy, a marked vasoconstriction in iliac vascular bed still persisted, suggesting that the vasoconstrictor component of the

  8. Direct or indirect stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors enhances bone regeneration as well as bone morphogenetic protein-2

    PubMed Central

    Mediero, Aránzazu; Wilder, Tuere; Perez-Aso, Miguel; Cronstein, Bruce N.

    2015-01-01

    Promoting bone regeneration and repair of bone defects is a need that has not been well met to date. We have previously found that adenosine, acting via A2A receptors (A2AR) promotes wound healing and inhibits inflammatory osteolysis and hypothesized that A2AR might be a novel target to promote bone regeneration. Therefore, we determined whether direct A2AR stimulation or increasing endogenous adenosine concentrations via purine transport blockade with dipyridamole regulates bone formation. We determined whether coverage of a 3 mm trephine defect in a mouse skull with a collagen scaffold soaked in saline, bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2; 200 ng), 1 μM CGS21680 (A2AR agonist, EC50 = 160 nM), or 1 μM dipyridamole (EC50 = 32 nM) promoted bone regeneration. Microcomputed tomography examination demonstrated that CGS21680 and dipyridamole markedly enhanced bone regeneration as well as BMP-2 8 wk after surgery (60 ± 2%, 79 ± 2%, and 75 ± 1% bone regeneration, respectively, vs. 32 ± 2% in control, P < 0.001). Blockade by a selective A2AR antagonist (ZM241385, 1 μM) or deletion of A2AR abrogated the effect of CGS21680 and dipyridamole on bone regeneration. Both CGS21680 and dipyridamole treatment increased alkaline phosphatase-positive osteoblasts and diminished tartrate resistance acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts in the defects. In vivo imaging with a fluorescent dye for new bone formation revealed a strong fluorescent signal in treated animals that was equivalent to BMP-2. In conclusion, stimulation of A2AR by specific agonists or by increasing endogenous adenosine levels stimulates new bone formation as well as BMP-2 and represents a novel approach to stimulating bone regeneration.—Mediero, A., Wilder, T., Perez-Aso, M., Cronstein, B. N. Direct or indirect stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors enhances bone regeneration as well as bone morphogenetic protein-2. PMID:25573752

  9. Kappa opioid receptors stimulate phosphoinositide turnover in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Periyasamy, S.; Hoss, W. )

    1990-01-01

    The effects of various subtype-selective opioid agonists and antagonists on the phosphoinositide (PI) turnover response were investigated in the rat brain. The {kappa}-agonists U-50,488H and ketocyclazocine produced a concentration-dependent increase in the accumulation of IP's in hippocampal slices. The other {kappa}-agonists Dynorphin-A (1-13) amide, and its protected analog D(Ala){sup 2}-dynorphin-A (1-13) amide also produced a significant increase in the formation of ({sup 3}H)-IP's, whereas the {mu}-selective agonists (D-Ala{sup 2}-N-Me-Phe{sup 4}-Gly{sup 5}-ol)-enkephalin and morphine and the {delta}-selective agonist (D-Pen{sup 2,5})-enkephalin were ineffective. The increase in IP's formation elicited by U-50,488H was partially antagonized by naloxone and more completely antagonized by the {kappa}-selective antagonists nor-binaltorphimine and MR 2266. The formation of IP's induced by U-50,488H varies with the regions of the brain used, being highest in hippocampus and amygdala, and lowest in striatum and pons-medullar. The results indicate that brain {kappa}- but neither {mu}- nor {delta}- receptors are coupled to the PI turnover response.

  10. Stimulants

    MedlinePlus

    Stimulants are drugs that increase your heart rate, breathing rate, and brain function. Some stimulants affect only a specific organ, such as the heart, lungs, brain, or nervous system. Epinephrine is a stimulant. It ...

  11. Adrenaline Rush: The Role of Adrenergic Receptors in Stimulant-Induced Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Karl T.

    2014-01-01

    Psychostimulants, such as cocaine and amphetamines, act primarily through the monoamine neurotransmitters dopamine (DA), norepinephrine, and serotonin. Although stimulant addiction research has largely focused on DA, medication development efforts targeting the dopaminergic system have thus far been unsuccessful, leading to alternative strategies aimed at abating stimulant abuse. Noradrenergic compounds have shown promise in altering the behavioral effects of stimulants in rodents, nonhuman primates, and humans. In this review, we discuss the contribution of each adrenergic receptor (AR) subtype (α1, α2, and β) to five stimulant-induced behaviors relevant to addiction: locomotor activity, conditioned place preference, anxiety, discrimination, and self-administration. AR manipulation has diverse effects on these behaviors; each subtype profoundly influences outcomes in some paradigms but is inconsequential in others. The functional neuroanatomy and intracellular signaling mechanisms underlying the impact of AR activation/blockade on these behaviors remain largely unknown, presenting a new frontier for research on psychostimulant–AR interactions. PMID:24499709

  12. Adrenaline rush: the role of adrenergic receptors in stimulant-induced behaviors.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Karl T; Weinshenker, David

    2014-04-01

    Psychostimulants, such as cocaine and amphetamines, act primarily through the monoamine neurotransmitters dopamine (DA), norepinephrine, and serotonin. Although stimulant addiction research has largely focused on DA, medication development efforts targeting the dopaminergic system have thus far been unsuccessful, leading to alternative strategies aimed at abating stimulant abuse. Noradrenergic compounds have shown promise in altering the behavioral effects of stimulants in rodents, nonhuman primates, and humans. In this review, we discuss the contribution of each adrenergic receptor (AR) subtype (α1, α2, and β) to five stimulant-induced behaviors relevant to addiction: locomotor activity, conditioned place preference, anxiety, discrimination, and self-administration. AR manipulation has diverse effects on these behaviors; each subtype profoundly influences outcomes in some paradigms but is inconsequential in others. The functional neuroanatomy and intracellular signaling mechanisms underlying the impact of AR activation/blockade on these behaviors remain largely unknown, presenting a new frontier for research on psychostimulant-AR interactions.

  13. AT(2) receptor stimulation enhances antihypertensive effect of AT(1) receptor antagonist in hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Barber, M N; Sampey, D B; Widdop, R E

    1999-11-01

    In the present study, we investigated the role of the angiotensin type 2 (AT(2)) receptor in the regulation of blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY). We tested the hypothesis that AT(2) receptor activation may contribute to the antihypertensive effects of angiotensin type 1 (AT(1)) receptor antagonists. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate were measured over a 4-day protocol in various groups of rats that received the following drug combinations: the AT(1) receptor antagonist candesartan (0.01 or 0.1 mg/kg IV) alone, the AT(2) receptor agonist CGP42112 (1 microg/kg per minute) alone, and candesartan plus CGP42112. In both SHR and WKY, 4-hour infusions of saline and CGP42112 alone did not alter MAP. In WKY, both doses of candesartan alone caused small decreases in MAP, which were similar when combined with CGP42112. In SHR, candesartan (0.1 mg/kg) caused an immediate, marked decrease in MAP, which was unaffected when combined with CGP42112. By contrast, in separate SHR, a 10-fold lower dose of candesartan (0.01 mg/kg) caused a slower-onset depressor response, which was enhanced when combined with CGP42112. The involvement of AT(2) receptors was confirmed in another group of SHR, since this facilitation of the antihypertensive effect of candesartan by CGP42112 was abolished by the coinfusion of the AT(2) receptor antagonist PD123319 (50 microg/kg per minute) with the candesartan/CGP42112 combination. Collectively, these data suggest that in SHR, AT(2) receptor activation can facilitate the initial depressor response caused by an AT(1) receptor antagonist.

  14. Characterization by flow cytometry of fluorescent, selective agonist probes of the A(3) adenosine receptor.

    PubMed

    Kozma, Eszter; Gizewski, Elizabeth T; Tosh, Dilip K; Squarcialupi, Lucia; Auchampach, John A; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2013-04-15

    Various fluorescent nucleoside agonists of the A3 adenosine receptor (AR) were compared as high affinity probes using radioligands and flow cytometry (FCM). They contained a fluorophore linked through the C2 or N(6) position and rigid A3AR-enhancing (N)-methanocarba modification. A hydrophobic C2-(1-pyrenyl) derivative MRS5704 bound nonselectively. C2-Tethered cyanine5-dye labeled MRS5218 bound selectively to hA3AR expressed in whole CHO cells and membranes. By FCM, binding was A3AR-mediated (blocked by A3AR antagonist, at least half through internalization), with t1/2 for association 38min in mA3AR-HEK293 cells; 26.4min in sucrose-treated hA3AR-CHO cells (Kd 31nM). Membrane binding indicated moderate mA3AR affinity, but not selectivity. Specific accumulation of fluorescence (50nM MRS5218) occurred in cells expressing mA3AR, but not other mouse ARs. Evidence was provided suggesting that MRS5218 detects endogenous expression of the A3AR in the human promyelocytic leukemic HL-60 cell line. Therefore, MRS5218 promises to be a useful tool for characterizing the A3AR.

  15. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulated robust human colon cancer cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-matrix metalloproteinase1 antibody pre-treatment blocks cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acids stimulate MMP1 expression, cell migration and MMP1-dependent invasion. -- Abstract: Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers - this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre

  16. Amyloid-β effects on synapses and memory require AMPA receptor subunit GluA3

    PubMed Central

    Reinders, Niels R.; Pao, Yvonne; Renner, Maria C.; da Silva-Matos, Carla M.; Lodder, Tessa R.; Malinow, Roberto; Kessels, Helmut W.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) is a prime suspect for causing cognitive deficits during the early phases of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Experiments in AD mouse models have shown that soluble oligomeric clusters of Aβ degrade synapses and impair memory formation. We show that all Aβ-driven effects measured in these mice depend on AMPA receptor (AMPAR) subunit GluA3. Hippocampal neurons that lack GluA3 were resistant against Aβ-mediated synaptic depression and spine loss. In addition, Aβ oligomers blocked long-term synaptic potentiation only in neurons that expressed GluA3. Furthermore, although Aβ-overproducing mice showed significant memory impairment, memories in GluA3-deficient congenics remained unaffected. These experiments indicate that the presence of GluA3-containing AMPARs is critical for Aβ-mediated synaptic and cognitive deficits. PMID:27708157

  17. Characterization of phorbol ester-stimulated serine phosphorylation of the human insulin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Feener, E P; Shiba, T; Hu, K Q; Wilden, P A; White, M F; King, G L

    1994-01-01

    Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated phosphorylation of the human insulin receptor (IR) was characterized and compared in two cell types of different lineage: normal rat kidney epithelial (NRK) cells and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) fibroblasts. PMA stimulation increased IR beta-subunit phosphorylation to 252 +/- 43 and 25- +/- 47% (+/- S.D.) of the unstimulated control in NRK and CHO cells respectively. Tryptic phosphopeptide analysis by Tricine/SDS/PAGE revealed significant differences in the PMA-stimulated phosphorylation of the IR in these two cell types. This phosphorylation of the IR was predominantly located in two tryptic phosphopeptides, and these phosphopeptides were absent in an IR mutant truncated by 43 C-terminal amino acids. The major PMA-stimulated tryptic phosphopeptide from in vivo-labelled CHO/IR was immunoprecipitated with an antibody against residues Ser1315 to Lys1329, and this precipitation was blocked with excess unlabelled peptide containing this sequence. Radiosequencing by manual Edman degradation revealed that this tryptic phosphopeptide was phosphorylated at Ser1315. This PMA-stimulated phosphorylation did not inhibit autophosphorylation of the IR in vivo. These results demonstrate that PMA-stimulated phosphorylation of the IR can exhibit significant differences when expressed in different cell types, and that Ser1315 is a major PMA-stimulated phosphorylation site on the human IR. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7945263

  18. Alpha-galactosidase stimulates acetylcholine receptor aggregation in skeletal muscle cells via PNA-binding carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Parkhomovskiy, N; Martin, P T

    2000-04-21

    Aggregation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in skeletal muscle is an essential step in the formation of the mammalian neuromuscular junction. While proteins that bind to myotube receptors such as agrin and laminin can stimulate AChR aggregation in cultured myotubes, removal of cell surface sialic acids stimulates aggregation in a ligand-independent manner. Here, we show that removal of cell surface alpha-galactosides also stimulates AChR aggregation in the absence of added laminin or agrin. AChR aggregation stimulated by alpha-galactosidase was blocked by peanut agglutinin (PNA), which binds to lactosamine-containing disaccharides, but not by the GalNAc-binding lectin Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA-B4). AChR aggregation stimulated by alpha-galactosidase potentiated AChR clustering induced by either neural agrin or laminin-1 and could be inhibited by muscle agrin. These data suggest that capping of cell surface lactosamines or N-acetyllactosamines with alpha-galactose affects AChR aggregation much as capping with sialic acids does.

  19. Endogenous adenosine A3 receptor activation selectively alleviates persistent pain states.

    PubMed

    Little, Joshua W; Ford, Amanda; Symons-Liguori, Ashley M; Chen, Zhoumou; Janes, Kali; Doyle, Timothy; Xie, Jennifer; Luongo, Livio; Tosh, Dillip K; Maione, Sabatino; Bannister, Kirsty; Dickenson, Anthony H; Vanderah, Todd W; Porreca, Frank; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Salvemini, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain is a global burden that promotes disability and unnecessary suffering. To date, efficacious treatment of chronic pain has not been achieved. Thus, new therapeutic targets are needed. Here, we demonstrate that increasing endogenous adenosine levels through selective adenosine kinase inhibition produces powerful analgesic effects in rodent models of experimental neuropathic pain through the A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR, now known as ADORA3) signalling pathway. Similar results were obtained by the administration of a novel and highly selective A3AR agonist. These effects were prevented by blockade of spinal and supraspinal A3AR, lost in A3AR knock-out mice, and independent of opioid and endocannabinoid mechanisms. A3AR activation also relieved non-evoked spontaneous pain behaviours without promoting analgesic tolerance or inherent reward. Further examination revealed that A3AR activation reduced spinal cord pain processing by decreasing the excitability of spinal wide dynamic range neurons and producing supraspinal inhibition of spinal nociception through activation of serotonergic and noradrenergic bulbospinal circuits. Critically, engaging the A3AR mechanism did not alter nociceptive thresholds in non-neuropathy animals and therefore produced selective alleviation of persistent neuropathic pain states. These studies reveal A3AR activation by adenosine as an endogenous anti-nociceptive pathway and support the development of A3AR agonists as novel therapeutics to treat chronic pain. PMID:25414036

  20. Adenosine A(1), A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) receptors in hematopoiesis. 2. Expression of receptor mRNA in resting and lipopolysaccharide-activated mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Streitová, D; Hofer, M; Holá, J; Vacek, A; Pospísil, M

    2010-01-01

    Expression of mRNA for adenosine receptor subtypes A(1), A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) in normal and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated murine RAW 264.7 macrophages has been investigated using the method of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results have shown a very low, unquantifiable expression of adenosine A(1) receptor mRNA in both normal and LPS-activated macrophages. The other three adenosine receptor mRNAs have been found to be expressed at various but always quantifiable levels. Activation of the macrophages by LPS induced upregulation of the expression of adenosine receptor A(2a) and A(2b) mRNA, whereas the expression of adenosine receptor A(3) mRNA was downregulated. Unstimulated macrophages exhibited a high expression of the A(2b) adenosine receptor mRNA. The findings are discussed from the point of view of the antiinflammatory and hematopoiesis-stimulating roles of the adenosine receptor signaling.

  1. Artificial Sweeteners Stimulate Adipogenesis and Suppress Lipolysis Independently of Sweet Taste Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Becky R.; Parlee, Sebastian D.; Learman, Brian S.; Mori, Hiroyuki; Scheller, Erica L.; Cawthorn, William P.; Ning, Xiaomin; Gallagher, Katherine; Tyrberg, Björn; Assadi-Porter, Fariba M.; Evans, Charles R.; MacDougald, Ormond A.

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors mediate responses to a myriad of ligands, some of which regulate adipocyte differentiation and metabolism. The sweet taste receptors T1R2 and T1R3 are G protein-coupled receptors that function as carbohydrate sensors in taste buds, gut, and pancreas. Here we report that sweet taste receptors T1R2 and T1R3 are expressed throughout adipogenesis and in adipose tissues. Treatment of mouse and human precursor cells with artificial sweeteners, saccharin and acesulfame potassium, enhanced adipogenesis. Saccharin treatment of 3T3-L1 cells and primary mesenchymal stem cells rapidly stimulated phosphorylation of Akt and downstream targets with functions in adipogenesis such as cAMP-response element-binding protein and FOXO1; however, increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α was not observed until relatively late in differentiation. Saccharin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation at Thr-308 occurred within 5 min, was phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent, and occurred in the presence of high concentrations of insulin and dexamethasone; phosphorylation of Ser-473 occurred more gradually. Surprisingly, neither saccharin-stimulated adipogenesis nor Thr-308 phosphorylation was dependent on expression of T1R2 and/or T1R3, although Ser-473 phosphorylation was impaired in T1R2/T1R3 double knock-out precursors. In mature adipocytes, artificial sweetener treatment suppressed lipolysis even in the presence of forskolin, and lipolytic responses were correlated with phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase. Suppression of lipolysis by saccharin in adipocytes was also independent of T1R2 and T1R3. These results suggest that some artificial sweeteners have previously uncharacterized metabolic effects on adipocyte differentiation and metabolism and that effects of artificial sweeteners on adipose tissue biology may be largely independent of the classical sweet taste receptors, T1R2 and T1R3. PMID

  2. Alpha/sub 1/ receptor stimulated phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis in rat cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Raulli, R.; Crews, F.T.

    1986-03-05

    The potency of various alpha adrenergic compounds on stimulation of phosphatidylinositol (PI) hydrolysis was determined using (/sup 3/H)-inositol labelled cerebral cortical slices. Norepinephrine-induced PI hydrolysis was inhibited by the alpha/sub 1/ selective antagonist prazosin (1 ..mu..M) but not the beta receptor antagonist propranolol (1 ..mu..M). Tramazoline, (-)-ephedrine, and (+/-)-phenylpropanolamine were all found to be partial agonists at 1 mM concentrations. Clonidine, naphazoline, trazodone, and the novel antidepressant mianserin at concentrations of 100 ..mu..M to 1 mM produced no significant increase in PI hydrolysis above control levels. The relationship between responses and receptor binding will be discussed.

  3. EphA3 Expressed in the Chicken Tectum Stimulates Nasal Retinal Ganglion Cell Axon Growth and Is Required for Retinotectal Topographic Map Formation

    PubMed Central

    Rapacioli, Melina; Salierno, Marcelo; Etchenique, Roberto; Flores, Vladimir; Sanchez, Viviana; Carri, Néstor Gabriel; Scicolone, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Background Retinotopic projection onto the tectum/colliculus constitutes the most studied model of topographic mapping and Eph receptors and their ligands, the ephrins, are the best characterized molecular system involved in this process. Ephrin-As, expressed in an increasing rostro-caudal gradient in the tectum/colliculus, repel temporal retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons from the caudal tectum and inhibit their branching posterior to their termination zones. However, there are conflicting data regarding the nature of the second force that guides nasal axons to invade and branch only in the caudal tectum/colliculus. The predominant model postulates that this second force is produced by a decreasing rostro-caudal gradient of EphA7 which repels nasal optic fibers and prevents their branching in the rostral tectum/colliculus. However, as optic fibers invade the tectum/colliculus growing throughout this gradient, this model cannot explain how the axons grow throughout this repellent molecule. Methodology/Principal Findings By using chicken retinal cultures we showed that EphA3 ectodomain stimulates nasal RGC axon growth in a concentration dependent way. Moreover, we showed that nasal axons choose growing on EphA3-expressing cells and that EphA3 diminishes the density of interstitial filopodia in nasal RGC axons. Accordingly, in vivo EphA3 ectodomain misexpression directs nasal optic fibers toward the caudal tectum preventing their branching in the rostral tectum. Conclusions We demonstrated in vitro and in vivo that EphA3 ectodomain (which is expressed in a decreasing rostro-caudal gradient in the tectum) is necessary for topographic mapping by stimulating the nasal axon growth toward the caudal tectum and inhibiting their branching in the rostral tectum. Furthermore, the ability of EphA3 of stimulating axon growth allows understanding how optic fibers invade the tectum growing throughout this molecular gradient. Therefore, opposing tectal gradients of repellent ephrin

  4. Measurement of stapes vibration in Human temporal bones by round window stimulation using a 3-coil transducer.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Ho; Kim, Dong Wook; Lim, Hyung Gyu; Jung, Eui Sung; Seong, Ki Woong; Lee, Jyung Hyun; Kim, Myoung Nam; Cho, Jin Ho

    2014-01-01

    Round window placement of a 3-coil transducer offers a new approach for coupling an implantable hearing aid to the inner ear. The transducer exhibits high performance at low-frequencies. One remarkable feature of the 3-coil transducer is that it minimizes leakage flux. Thus, the transducer, which consists of two permanent magnets and three coils, can enhance vibrational displacement. In human temporal bones, stapes vibration was observed by laser Doppler vibrometer in response to round window stimulation using the 3-coil transducer. Coupling between the 3-coil transducer and the round window was connected by a wire-rod. The stimulation created stapes velocity when the round window stimulated. Performance evaluation was conducted by measuring stapes velocity. To verify the performance of the 3-coil transducer, stapes velocity for round window and tympanic membrane stimulation were compared, respectively. Stapes velocity by round window stimulation using the 3-coil transducer was approximately 14 dB higher than that achieved by tympanic membrane stimulation. The study shows that 3-coil transducer is suitable for implantable hearing aids. PMID:24211922

  5. Measurement of stapes vibration in Human temporal bones by round window stimulation using a 3-coil transducer.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Ho; Kim, Dong Wook; Lim, Hyung Gyu; Jung, Eui Sung; Seong, Ki Woong; Lee, Jyung Hyun; Kim, Myoung Nam; Cho, Jin Ho

    2014-01-01

    Round window placement of a 3-coil transducer offers a new approach for coupling an implantable hearing aid to the inner ear. The transducer exhibits high performance at low-frequencies. One remarkable feature of the 3-coil transducer is that it minimizes leakage flux. Thus, the transducer, which consists of two permanent magnets and three coils, can enhance vibrational displacement. In human temporal bones, stapes vibration was observed by laser Doppler vibrometer in response to round window stimulation using the 3-coil transducer. Coupling between the 3-coil transducer and the round window was connected by a wire-rod. The stimulation created stapes velocity when the round window stimulated. Performance evaluation was conducted by measuring stapes velocity. To verify the performance of the 3-coil transducer, stapes velocity for round window and tympanic membrane stimulation were compared, respectively. Stapes velocity by round window stimulation using the 3-coil transducer was approximately 14 dB higher than that achieved by tympanic membrane stimulation. The study shows that 3-coil transducer is suitable for implantable hearing aids.

  6. Extracellular matrix hyaluronan signals via its CD44 receptor in the increased responsiveness to mechanical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, L F; Araldi, D; Bogen, O; Levine, J D

    2016-06-01

    We propose that the extracellular matrix (ECM) signals CD44, a hyaluronan receptor, to increase the responsiveness to mechanical stimulation in the rat hind paw. We report that intradermal injection of hyaluronidase induces mechanical hyperalgesia, that is inhibited by co-administration of a CD44 receptor antagonist, A5G27. The intradermal injection of low (LMWH) but not high (HMWH) molecular weight hyaluronan also induces mechanical hyperalgesia, an effect that was attenuated by pretreatment with HMWH or A5G27. Pretreatment with HMWH also attenuated the hyperalgesia induced by hyaluronidase. Similarly, intradermal injection of A6, a CD44 receptor agonist, produced hyperalgesia that was inhibited by HMWH and A5G27. Inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA) and Src, but not protein kinase C (PKC), significantly attenuated the hyperalgesia induced by both A6 and LMWH. Finally, to determine if CD44 receptor signaling is involved in a preclinical model of inflammatory pain, we evaluated the effect of A5G27 and HMWH on the mechanical hyperalgesia associated with the inflammation induced by carrageenan. Both A5G27 and HMWH attenuated carrageenan-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. Thus, while LMWH acts at its cognate receptor, CD44, to induce mechanical hyperalgesia, HMWH acts at the same receptor as an antagonist. That the local administration of HMWH or A5G27 inhibits carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia supports the suggestion that carrageenan produces changes in the ECM that contributes to inflammatory pain. These studies define a clinically relevant role for signaling by the hyaluronan receptor, CD44, in increased responsiveness to mechanical stimulation. PMID:26996509

  7. Involvement of histaminergic receptor mechanisms in the stimulation of NT-3 synthesis in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jurič, Damijana M; Mele, Tina; Carman-Kržan, Marija

    2011-06-01

    Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) is produced by astrocytes, in addition to neurons, and monoamine neurotransmitters play a role in controlling NT-3 synthesis. The impact of histamine (HA) on the regulation of NT-3 synthesis in cultured astrocytes has not been studied. We evaluated the involvement of histamine receptors and intracellular mechanisms in the regulation of NT-3 production by HA. Real-time PCR was performed to examine the expression of all known histamine receptor subtypes in cultured rat cortical astrocytes. Pharmacological tools, selective for the H₁, H₂ and H₃ receptors and intracellular systems, were utilized to confirm functional properties of HA receptors in histaminergic up-regulation of astrocytic NT-3 synthesis. HA potently and transiently elevated NT-3 expression and protein levels by more than twofold. In addition to H₁ and H₂ receptors, cultured astrocytes also express H₃ receptors, which activate G(i/o) proteins to inhibit adenylyl cyclase and modulate MAP kinase activity. Histaminergic stimulation was partly inhibited by selective H₁, H₂, and H₃ antagonists whereas selective H₁, H₂, and H₃ agonists or mediators of the intracellular histaminergic pathways increased NT-3 levels. Inhibitors of PKA, PKC, and CaMK II significantly reduced the HA-induced increase in NT-3 cellular levels whereas the MAP kinase cascade inhibitor completely blocked the stimulatory action of HA and all selective agonists. In conclusion, the synthesis of astrocytic NT-3 stimulated by HA is a receptor-mediated process, which is fine-tuned via subtle modulation of parallel histaminergic H₁, H₂, and H₃ pathways that converge at the level of MAP kinase activity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Trends in neuropharmacology: in memory of Erminio Costa'.

  8. β-Cell deletion of Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 nuclear receptors impedes mitochondrial respiration and insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Merrick S; Hancock, Chad R; Ray, Jason D; Kener, Kyle B; Draney, Carrie; Garland, Kevin; Hardman, Jeremy; Bikman, Benjamin T; Tessem, Jeffery S

    2016-07-01

    β-Cell insulin secretion is dependent on proper mitochondrial function. Various studies have clearly shown that the Nr4a family of orphan nuclear receptors is essential for fuel utilization and mitochondrial function in liver, muscle, and adipose. Previously, we have demonstrated that overexpression of Nr4a1 or Nr4a3 is sufficient to induce proliferation of pancreatic β-cells. In this study, we examined whether Nr4a expression impacts pancreatic β-cell mitochondrial function. Here, we show that β-cell mitochondrial respiration is dependent on the nuclear receptors Nr4a1 and Nr4a3. Mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized cells was significantly decreased in β-cells lacking Nr4a1 or Nr4a3. Furthermore, respiration rates of intact cells deficient for Nr4a1 or Nr4a3 in the presence of 16 mM glucose resulted in decreased glucose mediated oxygen consumption. Consistent with this reduction in respiration, a significant decrease in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion rates is observed with deletion of Nr4a1 or Nr4a3. Interestingly, the changes in respiration and insulin secretion occur without a reduction in mitochondrial content, suggesting decreased mitochondrial function. We establish that knockdown of Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 results in decreased expression of the mitochondrial dehydrogenase subunits Idh3g and Sdhb. We demonstrate that loss of Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 impedes production of ATP and ultimately inhibits glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. These data demonstrate for the first time that the orphan nuclear receptors Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 are critical for β-cell mitochondrial function and insulin secretion.

  9. β-Cell deletion of Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 nuclear receptors impedes mitochondrial respiration and insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Merrick S; Hancock, Chad R; Ray, Jason D; Kener, Kyle B; Draney, Carrie; Garland, Kevin; Hardman, Jeremy; Bikman, Benjamin T; Tessem, Jeffery S

    2016-07-01

    β-Cell insulin secretion is dependent on proper mitochondrial function. Various studies have clearly shown that the Nr4a family of orphan nuclear receptors is essential for fuel utilization and mitochondrial function in liver, muscle, and adipose. Previously, we have demonstrated that overexpression of Nr4a1 or Nr4a3 is sufficient to induce proliferation of pancreatic β-cells. In this study, we examined whether Nr4a expression impacts pancreatic β-cell mitochondrial function. Here, we show that β-cell mitochondrial respiration is dependent on the nuclear receptors Nr4a1 and Nr4a3. Mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized cells was significantly decreased in β-cells lacking Nr4a1 or Nr4a3. Furthermore, respiration rates of intact cells deficient for Nr4a1 or Nr4a3 in the presence of 16 mM glucose resulted in decreased glucose mediated oxygen consumption. Consistent with this reduction in respiration, a significant decrease in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion rates is observed with deletion of Nr4a1 or Nr4a3. Interestingly, the changes in respiration and insulin secretion occur without a reduction in mitochondrial content, suggesting decreased mitochondrial function. We establish that knockdown of Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 results in decreased expression of the mitochondrial dehydrogenase subunits Idh3g and Sdhb. We demonstrate that loss of Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 impedes production of ATP and ultimately inhibits glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. These data demonstrate for the first time that the orphan nuclear receptors Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 are critical for β-cell mitochondrial function and insulin secretion. PMID:27221116

  10. Receptor-mediated uptake of low density lipoprotein stimulates bile acid synthesis by cultured rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Junker, L.H.; Davis, R.A. )

    1989-12-01

    The cellular mechanisms responsible for the lipoprotein-mediated stimulation of bile acid synthesis in cultured rat hepatocytes were investigated. Adding 280 micrograms/ml of cholesterol in the form of human or rat low density lipoprotein (LDL) to the culture medium increased bile acid synthesis by 1.8- and 1.6-fold, respectively. As a result of the uptake of LDL, the synthesis of (14C)cholesterol from (2-14C)acetate was decreased and cellular cholesteryl ester mass was increased. Further studies demonstrated that rat apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich high density lipoprotein (HDL) both stimulated bile acid synthesis 1.5-fold, as well as inhibited the formation of (14C)cholesterol from (2-14C)acetate. Reductive methylation of LDL blocked the inhibition of cholesterol synthesis, as well as the stimulation of bile acid synthesis, suggesting that these processes require receptor-mediated uptake. To identify the receptors responsible, competitive binding studies using 125I-labeled apoE-free LDL and 125I-labeled apoE-rich HDL were performed. Both apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich HDL displayed an equal ability to compete for binding of the other, suggesting that a receptor or a group of receptors that recognizes both apolipoproteins is involved. Additional studies show that hepatocytes from cholestyramine-treated rats displayed 2.2- and 3.4-fold increases in the binding of apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich HDL, respectively. These data show for the first time that receptor-mediated uptake of LDL by the liver is intimately linked to processes activating bile acid synthesis.

  11. Lack of tolerance to motor stimulant effects of a selective adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Halldner, L; Lozza, G; Lindström, K; Fredholm, B B

    2000-10-20

    It is well known that tolerance develops to the actions of caffeine, which acts as an antagonist on adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptors. Since selective adenosine A(2A) antagonists have been proposed as adjuncts to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) therapy in Parkinson's disease we wanted to examine if tolerance also develops to the selective A(2A) receptor antagonist 5-amino-7-(2-phenylethyl)-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo-[4,3-e]-1,2, 4-triazolo [1,5-c]pyrimidine (SCH 58261). SCH 58261 (0.1 and 7.5 mg/kg) increased basal locomotion and the motor stimulation afforded by apomorphine. Neither effect was subject to tolerance following long-term treatment with the same doses given intraperitoneally twice daily. There were no adaptive changes in A(1) and A(2A) adenosine receptors or their corresponding messenger RNA or in dopamine D(1) or D(2) receptors. These results demonstrate that the tolerance that develops to caffeine is not secondary to its inhibition of adenosine A(2A) receptors. The results also offer hope that long-term treatment with an adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist may be possible in man.

  12. Effects of histamine type 2 receptor stimulation on myocardial function in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, J; Dargie, H J; Brown, M J; Krikler, D M; Dollery, C T

    1982-01-01

    Myocardial histamine(H)2 receptor stimulation has been studied in six normal men. Since histamine is a potent vasodilator, the haemodynamic effects of histamine infusion were compared with those of nitroprusside at equihypotensive doses, to identify changes in myocardial contractility attributable to vasodilatation. After H1 receptor blockade with mepyramine, subjects received, in single blind crossover fashion, either histamine alone and with the H2 receptor antagonist cimetidine, or nitroprusside alone and with cimetidine. Echocardiographic left ventricular dimensions, plasma catecholamines, blood pressure, and heart rate were measured. The rise in catecholamines suggested similar baroreflex activation by both histamine and nitroprusside. Echo ejection phase indices did not alter significantly after nitroprusside, but histamine caused an increase in percentage fractional shortening from 38.2 +/- 4.1 to 53.5 +/- 3-6% and in mean fibre shortening velocity from 1.31 +/- 0.19 to 1.99 +/- 0.22 cm/s. These changes were both greatly reduced by cimetidine and suggest that H2 receptor stimulation in man causes a direct positive inotropic response. PMID:7082501

  13. PTPH1 cooperates with vitamin D receptor to stimulate breast cancer growth through their mutual stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Hui-Ying; Hou, Song-Wang; Li, Rong-Shan; Basir, Zainab; Xiang, Qun; Szabo, Aniko; Chen, Guan

    2010-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation is tightly regulated by protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), and plays a critical role in malignant transformation and progression. While PTKs have a well-established role in regulating breast cancer growth, contribution of PTPs remains mostly unknown. Here, we report that the tyrosine phosphatase PTPH1 stimulates breast cancer growth through regulating vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression. PTPH1 was shown to be over-expressed in 49% of primary breast cancer and levels of its protein expression positively correlate with the clinic metastasis, suggesting its oncogenic activity. Indeed, PTPH1 promotes breast cancer growth by a mechanism independent of its phosphatase activity but dependent of its stimulatory effect on the nuclear receptor VDR protein expression and depletion of induced VDR abolishes the PTPH1 oncogenic activity. Additional analyses showed that PTPH1 binds VDR and increases its cytoplasmic accumulation leading to their mutual stabilization and stable expression of a nuclear localization deficient VDR abolishes the growth-inhibitory activity of the receptor independent of 1, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (vitamin D3). These results reveal a new paradigm in which a protein tyrosine phosphatase may stimulate breast cancer growth through increasing cytoplasmic translocation of a nuclear receptor leading to their mutual stabilization. PMID:21119599

  14. A neomutation of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor in a severe neonatal hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    de Roux, N; Polak, M; Couet, J; Leger, J; Czernichow, P; Milgrom, E; Misrahi, M

    1996-06-01

    Until recently, neonatal hyperthyroidism has been considered to be related to the transplacental passage of thyroid-stimulating Ig present in the serum of the mother. We report here the case of a newborn who presented with severe hyperthyroidism, diffuse goiter, and important ocular signs (eyelid retraction and possibly proptosis). However, the absence of thyroid pathology in the parents and the lack of antithyroid antibodies in the mother and in the patient led us to suspect a nonimmune aetiology. Direct genomic sequencing of the last exon of the TSH receptor in the patient revealed a T-->C transversion yielding to a Met453-->Thr heterozygous substitution in the second transmembrane domain of the receptor. The mutation was absent in both parents. Eukaryotic expression analysis in COS-7 cells yielded a mutated receptor that produced constitutive activation of adenylate cyclase without enhancement of phospholipase C activity. PMID:8964822

  15. Direct Demonstration of Separate Receptors for Growth and Metabolic Activities of Insulin and Multiplication-stimulating Activity (an Insulinlike Growth Factor) Using Antibodies to the Insulin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    King, George L.; Kahn, C. Ronald; Rechler, Matthew M.; Nissley, S. Peter

    1980-01-01

    Insulin and such insulinlike growth factors as multiplication stimulating activity (MSA) are related polypeptides that have common biological activities. Both insulin and MSA produce acute metabolic responses (stimulation of glucose oxidation in isolated fat cells) as well as growth effects (stimulation of [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA in cultured fibroblasts). In addition, most cells have separate receptors for insulin and insulinlike growth factors, and both peptides have weaker affinity for each other's specific receptors than for their own. To determine, therefore, whether these effects are mediated by receptors for insulin, insulinlike growth factors, or both, we have selectively blocked insulin receptors with a specific antagonist, namely Fab fragments derived from naturally occurring antibodies to the insulin receptor. In rat adipocytes, 10 μg/ml of antireceptor Fab inhibited insulin binding by 90%, whereas it inhibited MSA binding <5%. The anti-insulin receptor Fab is without intrinsic biological activity, but acts as a competitive inhibitor of insulin receptors. Blockade of insulin receptors with Fab fragments produced a 30-fold rightward shift in the dose response for stimulation of glucose oxidation by both insulin and MSA. The dose-response curves for stimulation of oxidation by vitamin K5 and spermine, agents that stimulate glucose oxidation through noninsulin receptor pathways, were not affected by the blockade of insulin receptors with Fab antibody fragments. These data suggest that this acute metabolic effect of both insulin and MSA is mediated via the insulin receptor. In cultured human fibroblasts, 10 μg/ml of Fab inhibited insulin binding by 90% and MSA binding by 15%. In fibroblasts, however, blockade of the insulin receptor did not alter the dose response for stimulation of thymidine incorporation into DNA by either insulin or MSA. Furthermore, intact antireceptor antibody immunoglobulin (Ig)G, which produces multiple other insulinlike

  16. Synthesis and Evaluation of N6-Substituted Apioadenosines as Potential Adenosine A3 Receptor Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Toti, Kiran S.; Moss, Steven M.; Paoletta, Silvia; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Van Calenbergh, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine receptors (ARs) trigger signal transduction pathways inside the cell when activated by extracellular adenosine. Selective modulation of the A3AR subtype may be beneficial in controlling diseases such as colorectal cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. Here, we report the synthesis and evaluation of β-D-apio-D-furano- and α-D-apio-L-furanoadenosines and derivatives thereof. Introduction of a 2-methoxy-5-chlorobenzyl group at N6 of β-D-apio-D-furanoadenosine afforded an A3AR antagonist (10c, Ki = 0.98 μM), while a similar modification of an α-D-apio-L-furanoadenosine gave rise to a partial agonist (11c, Ki = 3.07 μM). The structural basis for this difference was examined by docking to an A3AR model; the antagonist lacked a crucial interaction with Thr94. PMID:24931275

  17. Direct angiotensin II type 2 receptor stimulation decreases dopamine synthesis in the rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Birgit; Vanderheyden, Patrick; Michotte, Yvette; Sarre, Sophie

    2010-06-01

    A relationship between the central renin angiotensin system and the dopaminergic system has been described in the striatum. However, the role of the angiotensin II type 2 (AT(2)) receptor in this interaction has not yet been established. The present study examined the outcome of direct AT(2) receptor stimulation on dopamine (DA) release and synthesis by means of the recently developed nonpeptide AT(2) receptor agonist, compound 21 (C21). The effects of AT(2) receptor agonism on the release of DA and its major metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and on the activity of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in the catecholamine biosynthesis, were investigated using in vivo microdialysis. Local administration of C21 (0.1 and 1 microM) resulted in a decrease of the extracellular DOPAC levels, whereas extracellular DA concentrations remained unaltered, suggesting a reduced synthesis of DA. This effect was mediated by the AT(2) receptor since it could be blocked by the AT(2) receptor antagonist PD123319 (1 microM). A similar effect was observed after local striatal (10 nM) as well as systemic (0.3 and 3 mg/kg i.p.) administration of the AT(1) receptor antagonist, candesartan. TH activity as assessed by accumulation of extracellular levels of L-DOPA after inhibition of amino acid decarboxylase with NSD1015, was also reduced after local administration of C21 (0.1 and 1 microM) and candesartan (10 nM). Together, these data suggest that AT(1) and AT(2) receptors in the striatum exert an opposite effect on the modulation of DA synthesis rather than DA release. PMID:20097214

  18. Properties of follicle-stimulating-hormone receptor in cell membranes of bovine testis.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, K W

    1975-01-01

    A simple method for preparing plasma membranes from bovine testes is described. Bovine testicular receptor has a high affinity and specificity for 125I-labelled human FSH (follicle-stimulating hormone). The specific binding of 125I-labelled human FSH to the plasma membranes is a saturable process with respect to the amounts of receptor protein and FSH added. The association and dissociation of 125I-labelled human FSH are time- and temperature-dependent, and the binding of labelled human FSH to bovine testicular receptor is strong and not readily reversible. Scatchard [Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. (1949) 51, 660-672] analysis indicates a dissociation constant, Kd, of 9.8 X10(-11)M, and 5.9 X 10(-14)mol of binding sites/mg of membrane protein. The testicular membrane receptor is heat-labile. Preheating at 40 degrees C for 15 min destroyed 30% of the binding activity. Specific binding is pH-dependent, with an optimum between pH 7.0 and 7.5. Brief exposure to extremes of pH caused irreversible damage to the receptors. The ionic strength of the incubation medium markedly affects the association of 125I-labelled human FSH with its testicular receptor. Various cations at concentrations of 0.1M inhibit almost completely the binding of 125I-labelled human FSH. Nuclectides and steroid hormones at concentrations of 1mM and 5mu/ml respectively have no effect on the binding of FSH to its receptor. Incubation of membranes with and chymotrypsin resulted in an almost complete loss of binding activity, suggesting that protein moieties are essential for the binding of 125I-labelled human FSH. Binding of 125I-labelled human FSH to bovine testicular receptor does not result in destruction or degradation of the hormone. PMID:242318

  19. Stimulation of RNA polymerase I and II activities by 17 beta -estradiol receptor on chick liver chromatin.

    PubMed Central

    Dierks-Ventling, C; Bieri-Bonniot, F

    1977-01-01

    The endogenous transcriptional capacity (RNA polymerase I and II activity) of liver chromatin from chicks treated with 17 beta-estradiol for 24 h (E 24) was double that of the controls. E 24 chromatin contained estradiol receptor activity while control chromatin did not. Its presence suggested an implication in the enhanced activities of RNA polymerases of E 24 chromatin. When semi-purified estradiol receptor was added to control chromatin, the endogenous transcriptional capacity of this chromatin was greatly increased. Studies with alpha-amanitin showed that both RNA polymerase I and II were stimulated by the estradiol receptor. This stimulation was observed as long as homology of the system was maintained. Solubilized homologous RNA polymerases were stimulated much less by the hormone complex in the presence of heterologous DNA than with homologous chromatin. Prokaryotic RNA polymerase could not be stimulated by chick liver estradiol receptor in the presence of heterologous DNA. PMID:840645

  20. Basal adenosine modulates the functional properties of AMPA receptors in mouse hippocampal neurons through the activation of A1R A2AR and A3R

    PubMed Central

    Di Angelantonio, Silvia; Bertollini, Cristina; Piccinin, Sonia; Rosito, Maria; Trettel, Flavia; Pagani, Francesca; Limatola, Cristina; Ragozzino, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine is a widespread neuromodulator within the CNS and its extracellular level is increased during hypoxia or intense synaptic activity, modulating pre- and postsynaptic sites. We studied the neuromodulatory action of adenosine on glutamatergic currents in the hippocampus, showing that activation of multiple adenosine receptors (ARs) by basal adenosine impacts postsynaptic site. Specifically, the stimulation of both A1R and A3R reduces AMPA currents, while A2AR has an opposite potentiating effect. The effect of ARs stimulation on glutamatergic currents in hippocampal cultures was investigated using pharmacological and genetic approaches. A3R inhibition by MRS1523 increased GluR1-Ser845 phosphorylation and potentiated AMPA current amplitude, increasing the apparent affinity for the agonist. A similar effect was observed blocking A1R with DPCPX or by genetic deletion of either A3R or A1R. Conversely, impairment of A2AR reduced AMPA currents, and decreased agonist sensitivity. Consistently, in hippocampal slices, ARs activation by AR agonist NECA modulated glutamatergic current amplitude evoked by AMPA application or afferent fiber stimulation. Opposite effects of AR subtypes stimulation are likely associated to changes in GluR1 phosphorylation and represent a novel mechanism of physiological modulation of glutamatergic transmission by adenosine, likely acting in normal conditions in the brain, depending on the level of extracellular adenosine and the distribution of AR subtypes. PMID:26528137

  1. Inflammation stimulates niacin receptor (GPR109A/HCA2) expression in adipose tissue and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Feingold, Kenneth R.; Moser, Arthur; Shigenaga, Judy K.; Grunfeld, Carl

    2014-01-01

    Many of the beneficial and adverse effects of niacin are mediated via a G protein receptor, G protein-coupled receptor 109A/hydroxycarboxylic acid 2 receptor (GPR109A/HCA2), which is highly expressed in adipose tissue and macrophages. Here we demonstrate that immune activation increases GPR109A/HCA2 expression. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), TNF, and interleukin (IL) 1 increase GPR109A/HCA2 expression 3- to 5-fold in adipose tissue. LPS also increased GPR109A/HCA2 mRNA levels 5.6-fold in spleen, a tissue rich in macrophages. In peritoneal macrophages and RAW cells, LPS increased GPR109A/HCA2 mRNA levels 20- to 80-fold. Zymosan, lipoteichoic acid, and polyinosine-polycytidylic acid, other Toll-like receptor activators, and TNF and IL-1 also increased GPR109A/HCA2 in macrophages. Inhibition of the myeloid differentiation factor 88 or TIR-domain-containing adaptor protein inducing IFNβ pathways both resulted in partial inhibition of LPS stimulation of GPR109A/HCA2, suggesting that LPS signals an increase in GPR109A/HCA2 expression by both pathways. Additionally, inhibition of NF-κB reduced the ability of LPS to increase GPR109A/HCA2 expression by ∼50% suggesting that both NF-κB and non-NF-κB pathways mediate the LPS effect. Finally, preventing the LPS-induced increase in GPR109A/HCA2 resulted in an increase in TG accumulation and the expression of enzymes that catalyze TG synthesis. These studies demonstrate that inflammation stimulates GPR109A/HCA2 and there are multiple intracellular signaling pathways that mediate this effect. The increase in GPR109A/HCA2 that accompanies macrophage activation inhibits the TG accumulation stimulated by macrophage activation. PMID:25320346

  2. Accelerated phagocytosis of amyloid-beta by mouse and human microglia overexpressing the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Mitrasinovic, Olivera M; Murphy, Greer M

    2002-08-16

    Microglia surrounding A beta plaques in Alzheimer's disease and in the APPV717F transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease have enhanced immunoreactivity for the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (M-CSFR), encoded by the proto-oncogene c-fms. Increased expression of M-CSFR on cultured microglia results in proliferation and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and expression of inducible nitric-oxide synthase. We transfected mouse BV-2 and human SV-A3 microglia to overexpress M-CSFR and examined microglial phagocytosis of fluorescein-conjugated A beta. Flow cytometry and laser confocal microscopy showed accelerated phagocytosis of A beta in mouse and human microglia because of M-CSFR overexpression that was time- and concentration-dependent. In contrast, microglial uptake of 1-microm diameter polystyrene microspheres was not enhanced by M-CSFR overexpression. Microglial uptake of A beta was blocked by cytochalasin D, which inhibits phagocytosis. M-CSFR overexpression increased the mRNA for macrophage scavenger receptor A, and fucoidan blocking of macrophage scavenger receptors inhibited uptake of A beta. M-CSFR antibody blocking experiments demonstrated that increased A beta uptake depended on the interaction of the M-CSFR with its ligand. These results suggest that overexpression of M-CSFR in APPV717F mice may prime microglia for phagocytosis of A beta after immunization.

  3. Electrical Stimulation to Restore Vestibular Function – Development of a 3-D Vestibular Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Della Santina, Charles C.; Migliaccio, Americo A.; Patel, Amit H.

    2009-01-01

    Patients who fail to compensate for bilateral loss of vestibular sensory function are disabled by disequilibrium and illusory movement of the visual field during head movement. An implantable prosthesis that restores vestibular sensation could significantly improve quality of life for these patients. To be effective, such a device should encode head rotation in all 3 dimensions. We describe the 3-dimensional angular vestibulo-ocular reflex of normal chinchillas and vestibular-deficient chinchillas undergoing functional electrical stimulation of the vestibular nerve. We also describe the design and fabrication of a head-mounted, 8 electrode vestibular prosthesis that encodes head movement in 3 dimensions. PMID:17281986

  4. alpha-1 Adrenergic receptors stimulation induces the proliferation of neural progenitor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hiramoto, Takeshi; Ihara, Yoshiaki; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2006-11-01

    The proliferation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) is regulated by classical neurotransmitters such as dopamine, serotonin and acetylcholine, via its own receptors. Previous studies have reported that the depletion of L-norepinephrine decreases the proliferation of NPCs in the adult rat hippocampus and it has been suggested that L-norepinephrine regulates the proliferation of NPCs. However, it remains unknown whether or not adrenergic receptors are involved in the increased proliferation of NPCs. In the present study, an MTT cell proliferation assay was carried out in order to investigate the roles played by adrenergic receptors in the proliferation of NPCs. We demonstrated that L-epinephrine enhanced the proliferation of embryonic NPCs in vitro. In addition, the alpha-1 adrenergic receptor agonist L-phenylephrine was found to enhance the proliferation of NPCs, whereas an alpha-adrenergic antagonist and selective alpha-1 antagonists significantly inhibited cell proliferation increases induced by L-epinephrine and L-phenylephrine. These results suggest that stimulation with alpha-1 adrenergic receptors induces the proliferation of embryonic NPCs.

  5. Interaction of urokinase with specific receptors stimulates mobilization of bovine adrenal capillary endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fibbi, G.; Ziche, M.; Morbidelli, L. ); Magnelli, L.; Del Rosso, M. )

    1988-12-01

    On the basis of {sup 125}I-labeled plasminogen activator binding analysis the authors have found that bovine adrenal capillary endothelial cells have specific receptors for human urinary-type plasminogen activator on the cell membrane. Each cell exposes about 37,000 free receptors with a K{sub d} of 0.8958{times}10{sup {minus}12} M. A monoclonal antibody against the 17,500 proteolytic fragment of the A chain of the plasminogen activator, not containing the catalytic site of the enzyme, impaired the specific binding, thus suggesting the involvement of a sequence present on the A chain in the interaction with the receptor, as previously shown in other cell model systems. Both the native molecule and the A chain are able to stimulate endothelial cell motility in the Boyden chamber, when used at nanomolar concentrations. The use of the same monoclonal antibody that can inhibit ligand-receptor interaction can impair the plasminogen activator and A-chain-induced endothelial cell motility, suggesting that under the conditions used in this in vitro model system, the motility of bovine adrenal capillary endothelial cells depends on the specific interaction of the ligand with free receptors on the surface of endothelial cells.

  6. Activation of adenosine A(3) receptors potentiates stimulatory effects of IL-3, SCF, and GM-CSF on mouse granulocyte-macrophage hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Hofer, M; Vacek, A; Pospísil, M; Holá, J; Streitová, D; Znojil, V

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine A(3) receptor agonist N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA) has been tested from the point of view of potentiating the effects of hematopoietic growth factors interleukin-3 (IL-3), stem cell factor (SCF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on the growth of hematopoietic progenitor cells for granulocytes and macrophages (GM-CFC) in suspension of normal mouse bone marrow cells in vitro. IB-MECA alone induced no GM-CFC growth. Significant elevation of numbers of GM-CFC evoked by the combinations of IB-MECA with IL-3, SCF, or GM-CSF as compared with these growth factors alone has been noted. Combination of IB-MECA with G-CSF did not induce significantly higher numbers of GM-CFC in comparison with G-CSF alone. Joint action of three drugs, namely of IB-MECA + IL-3 + GM-CSF, produced significantly higher numbers of GM-CFC in comparison with the combinations of IB-MECA + IL-3, IB-MECA + GM-CSF, or IL-3 + GM-CSF. These results give evidence of a significant role of selective activation of adenosine A(3) receptors in stimulation of the growth of granulocyte/ macrophage hematopoietic progenitor cells.

  7. Dissociation between neural and vascular responses to sympathetic stimulation : contribution of local adrenergic receptor function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, G.; Costa, F.; Shannon, J.; Robertson, D.; Biaggioni, I.

    2000-01-01

    Sympathetic activation produced by various stimuli, eg, mental stress or handgrip, evokes regional vascular responses that are often nonhomogeneous. This phenomenon is believed to be the consequence of the recruitment of differential central neural pathways or of a sympathetically mediated vasodilation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a similar heterogeneous response occurs with cold pressor stimulation and to test the hypothesis that local differences in adrenergic receptor function could be in part responsible for this diversity. In 8 healthy subjects, local norepinephrine spillover and blood flow were measured in arms and legs at baseline and during sympathetic stimulation induced by baroreflex mechanisms (nitroprusside infusion) or cold pressor stimulation. At baseline, legs had higher vascular resistance (27+/-5 versus 17+/-2 U, P=0.05) despite lower norepinephrine spillover (0.28+/-0.04 versus 0.4+/-0.05 mg. min(-1). dL(-1), P=0.03). Norepinephrine spillover increased similarly in both arms and legs during nitroprusside infusion and cold pressor stimulation. On the other hand, during cold stimulation, vascular resistance increased in arms but not in legs (20+/-9% versus -7+/-4%, P=0.03). Increasing doses of isoproterenol and phenylephrine were infused intra-arterially in arms and legs to estimate beta-mediated vasodilation and alpha-induced vasoconstriction, respectively. beta-Mediated vasodilation was significantly lower in legs compared with arms. Thus, we report a dissociation between norepinephrine spillover and vascular responses to cold stress in lower limbs characterized by a paradoxical decrease in local resistance despite increases in sympathetic activity. The differences observed in adrenergic receptor responses cannot explain this phenomenon.

  8. Stimulation of pulmonary rapidly adapting receptors by inhaled wood smoke in rats.

    PubMed

    Lai, C J; Kou, Y R

    1998-04-15

    1. The stimulation of pulmonary rapidly adapting receptors (RARs) by wood smoke was investigated. Impulses from seventy RARs were recorded in fifty-nine anaesthetized, open-chest and artificially ventilated rats; responses to delivery of 6 ml of wood smoke into the lungs were studied in sixty-one receptors whereas responses to histamine (10 or 100 microg kg-1, i.v.) were studied in the other nine. 2. Delivery of wood smoke stimulated fifty-two of the sixty-one RARs studied. When stimulated, an intense burst of discharge was evoked within 1 or 2 s of smoke delivery. This increased activity quickly peaked in 1-3 s (Delta = 15.8 +/- 1.6 impulses s-1; n = 61; mean +/- s.e.m.), then declined and yet remained at a level higher than the baseline activity. The mean duration of the stimulation was 25.1 +/- 2.7 s. In contrast, smoke delivery did not affect tracheal pressure. 3. Peak responses of RARs to wood smoke were partially reduced by removal of smoke particulates and were largely attenuated by pretreatment with dimethylthiourea (DMTU, a hydroxyl radical scavenger), indomethacin (Indo, a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor), or both DMTU and Indo (DMTU + Indo). Conversely, the peak responses of RARs were not significantly affected by pretreatment with isoprenaline (a bronchodilator) or vehicle for these chemicals. Additionally, pretreatment with DMTU, Indo, or DMTU + Indo did not significantly alter the RAR sensitivity to mechanical stimulation (constant-pressure lung inflation; 20 cmH2O). 4. Of the nine RARs tested, six were stimulated by histamine and their sensitivity to this chemical irritant was not altered by pretreatment with DMTU + Indo. 5. The results suggest that both the particulates and gas phases are responsible for, and both the hydroxyl radical and cyclo-oxygenase products are involved in, the stimulation of RARs by wood smoke. Furthermore, changes in lung mechanics following smoke delivery are not the cause of this afferent stimulation. PMID:9508820

  9. Muscarinic receptor subtypes mediating the mucosal response to neural stimulation of guinea pig ileum

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, H.V.; Tien, X.Y.; Wallace, L.J.; Cooke, H.J.

    1987-09-01

    Muscarinic receptors involved in the secretory response evoked by electrical stimulation of submucosal neutrons were investigated in muscle-stripped flat sheets of guinea pig ileum set up in flux chambers. Neural stimulation produced a biphasic increase in short-circuit current due to active chloride secretion. Atropine and 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperadine methiodide (4-DAMP) (10/sup -7/ M) were more potent inhibitors of the cholinergic phase of the response than was pirenzepine. Dose-dependent increases in base-line short-circuit current were evoked by carbachol and bethanechol; 4-hydroxy-2-butynyl trimethylammonium chloride (McN A343) produced a much smaller effect. Tetrodotoxin abolished the effects of McN A343 but did not alter the responses of carbachol and bethanechol. McN A343 significantly reduced the cholinergic phase of the neurally evoked response and caused a rightward shift of the carbachol dose-response curve. All muscarinic compounds inhibited (/sup 3/H)quinuclidinyl benzilate binding to membranes from muscosal scrapings, with a rank order of potency of 4-DAMP > pirenzepine > McN A343 > carbachol > bethanechol. These results suggest that acetylcholine released from submucosal neurons mediates chloride secretion by interacting with muscarinic cholinergic receptors that display a high binding affinity for 4-DAMP. Activation of neural muscarinic receptors makes a relatively small contribution to the overall secretory response.

  10. Hormone stimulation of androgen receptor mediates dynamic changes in DNA methylation patterns at regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Vineet K.; Attwood, Kristopher; Campbell, Moray J.; Smiraglia, Dominic J.

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that contributes to stable gene silencing by interfering with the ability of transcriptional regulators to bind to DNA. Recent findings have revealed that hormone stimulation of certain nuclear receptors induces rapid, dynamic changes in DNA methylation patterns alongside transcriptional responses at a subset of target loci, over time. However, the ability of androgen receptor (AR) to dynamically regulate gene transcription is relatively under-studied and its role in the regulation of DNA methylation patterns remains to be elucidated. Here we demonstrate in normal prostate cells that hormone stimulated AR activity results in dynamic changes in the transcription rate and DNA methylation patterns at the AR target genes, TIPARP and SGK1. Time-resolved chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments on the SGK1 locus reveals dynamic recruitment of AR and RNA Polymerase II, as well as the recruitment of proteins involved in the DNA demethylation process, TET1 and TDG. Furthermore, the presence of DNA methylation at dynamic regions inhibits protein binding and transcriptional activity of SGK1. These findings establish AR activity as a contributing factor to the dynamic regulation of DNA methylation patterns at target genes in prostate biology and infer further complexity involved in nuclear receptor mediation of transcriptional regulation. PMID:26646795

  11. Immunoglobulin-like domain containing receptor 1 mediates fat-stimulated cholecystokinin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Rashmi; Wang, Yu; Shahid, Rafiq A.; Vigna, Steven R.; Freedman, Neil J.; Liddle, Rodger A.

    2013-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a satiety hormone produced by discrete enteroendocrine cells scattered among absorptive cells of the small intestine. CCK is released into blood following a meal; however, the mechanisms inducing hormone secretion are largely unknown. Ingested fat is the major stimulant of CCK secretion. We recently identified a novel member of the lipoprotein remnant receptor family known as immunoglobulin-like domain containing receptor 1 (ILDR1) in intestinal CCK cells and postulated that this receptor conveyed the signal for fat-stimulated CCK secretion. In the intestine, ILDR1 is expressed exclusively in CCK cells. Orogastric administration of fatty acids elevated blood levels of CCK in wild-type mice but not Ildr1-deficient mice, although the CCK secretory response to trypsin inhibitor was retained. The uptake of fluorescently labeled lipoproteins in ILDR1-transfected CHO cells and release of CCK from isolated intestinal cells required a unique combination of fatty acid plus HDL. CCK secretion secondary to ILDR1 activation was associated with increased [Ca2+]i, consistent with regulated hormone release. These findings demonstrate that ILDR1 regulates CCK release through a mechanism dependent on fatty acids and lipoproteins and that absorbed fatty acids regulate gastrointestinal hormone secretion. PMID:23863714

  12. Ligand-stimulated downregulation of the alpha interferon receptor: role of protein kinase D2.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui; Qian, Juan; Varghese, Bentley; Baker, Darren P; Fuchs, Serge

    2011-02-01

    Alpha interferon (IFN-α) controls homeostasis of hematopoietic stem cells, regulates antiviral resistance, inhibits angiogenesis, and suppresses tumor growth. This cytokine is often used to treat cancers and chronic viral infections. The extent of cellular responses to IFN-α is limited by the IFN-induced ubiquitination and degradation of the IFN-α/β receptor chain 1 (IFNAR1) chain of the cognate receptor. IFNAR1 ubiquitination is facilitated by the βTrcp E3 ubiquitin ligase that is recruited to IFNAR1 upon its degron phosphorylation, which is induced by the ligand. Here we report identification of protein kinase D2 (PKD2) as a kinase that mediates the ligand-inducible phosphorylation of IFNAR1 degron and enables binding of βTrcp to the receptor. Treatment of cells with IFN-α induces catalytic activity of PKD2 and stimulates its interaction with IFNAR1. Expression and kinase activity of PKD2 are required for the ligand-inducible stimulation of IFNAR1 ubiquitination and endocytosis and for accelerated proteolytic turnover of IFNAR1. Furthermore, inhibition or knockdown of PKD2 robustly augments intracellular signaling induced by IFN-α and increases the efficacy of its antiviral effects. The mechanisms of the ligand-inducible elimination of IFNAR1 are discussed, along with the potential medical significance of this regulation. PMID:21173164

  13. Wedelolactone induces growth of breast cancer cells by stimulation of estrogen receptor signalling.

    PubMed

    Nehybova, Tereza; Smarda, Jan; Daniel, Lukas; Brezovsky, Jan; Benes, Petr

    2015-08-01

    Wedelolactone, a plant coumestan, was shown to act as anti-cancer agent for breast and prostate carcinomas in vitro and in vivo targeting multiple cellular proteins including androgen receptors, 5-lipoxygenase and topoisomerase IIα. It is cytotoxic to breast, prostate, pituitary and myeloma cancer cell lines in vitro at μM concentrations. In this study, however, a novel biological activity of nM dose of wedelolactone was demonstrated. Wedelolactone acts as agonist of estrogen receptors (ER) α and β as demonstrated by transactivation of estrogen response element (ERE) in cells transiently expressing either ERα or ERβ and by molecular docking of this coumestan into ligand binding pocket of both ERα and ERβ. In breast cancer cells, wedelolactone stimulates growth of estrogen receptor-positive cells, expression of estrogen-responsive genes and activates rapid non-genomic estrogen signalling. All these effects can be inhibited by pretreatment with pure ER antagonist ICI 182,780 and they are not observed in ER-negative breast cancer cells. We conclude that wedelolactone acts as phytoestrogen in breast cancer cells by stimulating ER genomic and non-genomic signalling pathways.

  14. Structure-Activity Analysis of Biased Agonism at the Human Adenosine A3 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Baltos, Jo-Anne; Paoletta, Silvia; Nguyen, Anh T. N.; Gregory, Karen J.; Tosh, Dilip K.; Christopoulos, Arthur; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    Biased agonism at G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) has significant implications for current drug discovery, but molecular determinants that govern ligand bias remain largely unknown. The adenosine A3 GPCR (A3AR) is a potential therapeutic target for various conditions, including cancer, inflammation, and ischemia, but for which biased agonism remains largely unexplored. We now report the generation of bias “fingerprints” for prototypical ribose containing A3AR agonists and rigidified (N)-methanocarba 5′-N-methyluronamide nucleoside derivatives with regard to their ability to mediate different signaling pathways. Relative to the reference prototypical agonist IB-MECA, (N)-methanocarba 5′-N-methyluronamide nucleoside derivatives with significant N6 or C2 modifications, including elongated aryl-ethynyl groups, exhibited biased agonism. Significant positive correlation was observed between the C2 substituent length (in Å) and bias toward cell survival. Molecular modeling suggests that extended C2 substituents on (N)-methanocarba 5′-N-methyluronamide nucleosides promote a progressive outward shift of the A3AR transmembrane domain 2, which may contribute to the subset of A3AR conformations stabilized on biased agonist binding. PMID:27136943

  15. Selective ligands for rat A3 adenosine receptors: structure-activity relationships of 1,3-dialkylxanthine 7-riboside derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kim, H O; Ji, X D; Melman, N; Olah, M E; Stiles, G L; Jacobson, K A

    1994-11-11

    1,3-Dibutylxanthine 7-riboside has been found to be a partial agonist at A3 adenosine receptors (van Galen et al. Mol. Pharmacol. 1994, 45, 1101-1111). 1,3-Dialkylxanthine 7-riboside analogues modified at the 1-, 3-, and 8-purine positions and at the ribose 5'-position were synthesized. The nucleoside analogues were examined for affinity in radioligand binding assays at rat brain A3 adenosine receptors stably expressed in CHO cells, using the radioligand [[125I]-4-amino-3-iodobenzyl]adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (AB-MECA). Affinity was assayed at rat brain A1 and A2a receptors using [3H]PIA and [3H]CGS 21680, respectively. The affinity of xanthine 7-ribosides at A3 receptors depended on the 1,3-dialkyl substituents in the order: Pent > or = Bu > Hx > Pr approximately Me. 1,3-Dipentylxanthine 7-riboside was slightly selective for A3 receptors (2-fold vs A1 and 10-fold vs A2a). 8-Methoxy substitution was tolerated at A3 receptors. 2-Thio vs 2-oxo substitution increased potency at all three subtypes and slightly increased A3 vs A1 selectivity. The 5'-uronamide modification, which was previously found to enhance A3 selectivity in N6-benzyladenosine derivatives, was also incorporated into the xanthine 7-ribosides, with similar results. The affinity of 1,3-dialkylxanthine 7-riboside 5'-uronamides at A3 receptors depended on the N-alkyluronamide substituent in the order: MeNH > EtNH > NH2 > Me2N. Affinity of the 5'-uronamides at A3 receptors was dependent on the 1,3-dialkyl substitution in the order: Bu > Pent > Hex. 1,3-Dibutylxanthine 7-riboside 5'-N-methylcarboxamide, with a Ki value of 229 nM at A3 receptors, was 160-fold selective for rat A3 vs A1 receptors and > 400-fold selective vs A2a receptors. This derivative acted as a full agonist in the A3 receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase.

  16. Fragment Screening at Adenosine-A3 Receptors in Living Cells Using a Fluorescence-Based Binding Assay

    PubMed Central

    Stoddart, Leigh A.; Vernall, Andrea J.; Denman, Jessica L.; Briddon, Stephen J.; Kellam, Barrie; Hill, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) comprise the largest family of transmembrane proteins. For GPCR drug discovery, it is important that ligand affinity is determined in the correct cellular environment and preferably using an unmodified receptor. We developed a live cell high-content screening assay that uses a fluorescent antagonist, CA200645, to determine binding affinity constants of competing ligands at human adenosine-A1 and -A3 receptors. This method was validated as a tool to screen a library of low molecular weight fragments, and identified a hit with submicromolar binding affinity (KD). This fragment was structurally unrelated to substructures of known adenosine receptor antagonists and was optimized to show selectivity for the adenosine-A3 receptor. This technology represents a significant advance that will allow the determination of ligand and fragment affinities at receptors in their native membrane environment. PMID:22999879

  17. Interaction of the Clostridium difficile Binary Toxin CDT and Its Host Cell Receptor, Lipolysis-stimulated Lipoprotein Receptor (LSR).

    PubMed

    Hemmasi, Sarah; Czulkies, Bernd A; Schorch, Björn; Veit, Antonia; Aktories, Klaus; Papatheodorou, Panagiotis

    2015-05-29

    CDT (Clostridium difficile transferase) is a binary, actin ADP-ribosylating toxin frequently associated with hypervirulent strains of the human enteric pathogen C. difficile, the most serious cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. CDT leads to the collapse of the actin cytoskeleton and, eventually, to cell death. Low doses of CDT result in the formation of microtubule-based protrusions on the cell surface that increase the adherence and colonization of C. difficile. The lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) is the host cell receptor for CDT, and our aim was to gain a deeper insight into the interplay between both proteins. We show that CDT interacts with the extracellular, Ig-like domain of LSR with an affinity in the nanomolar range. We identified LSR splice variants in the colon carcinoma cell line HCT116 and disrupted the LSR gene in these cells by applying the CRISPR-Cas9 technology. LSR truncations ectopically expressed in LSR knock-out cells indicated that intracellular parts of LSR are not essential for plasma membrane targeting of the receptor and cellular uptake of CDT. By generating a series of N- and C-terminal truncations of the binding component of CDT (CDTb), we found that amino acids 757-866 of CDTb are sufficient for binding to LSR. With a transposon-based, random mutagenesis approach, we identified potential LSR-interacting epitopes in CDTb. This study increases our understanding about the interaction between CDT and its receptor LSR, which is key to the development of anti-toxin strategies for preventing cell entry of the toxin.

  18. Interaction of the Clostridium difficile Binary Toxin CDT and Its Host Cell Receptor, Lipolysis-stimulated Lipoprotein Receptor (LSR)*

    PubMed Central

    Hemmasi, Sarah; Czulkies, Bernd A.; Schorch, Björn; Veit, Antonia; Aktories, Klaus; Papatheodorou, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    CDT (Clostridium difficile transferase) is a binary, actin ADP-ribosylating toxin frequently associated with hypervirulent strains of the human enteric pathogen C. difficile, the most serious cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. CDT leads to the collapse of the actin cytoskeleton and, eventually, to cell death. Low doses of CDT result in the formation of microtubule-based protrusions on the cell surface that increase the adherence and colonization of C. difficile. The lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) is the host cell receptor for CDT, and our aim was to gain a deeper insight into the interplay between both proteins. We show that CDT interacts with the extracellular, Ig-like domain of LSR with an affinity in the nanomolar range. We identified LSR splice variants in the colon carcinoma cell line HCT116 and disrupted the LSR gene in these cells by applying the CRISPR-Cas9 technology. LSR truncations ectopically expressed in LSR knock-out cells indicated that intracellular parts of LSR are not essential for plasma membrane targeting of the receptor and cellular uptake of CDT. By generating a series of N- and C-terminal truncations of the binding component of CDT (CDTb), we found that amino acids 757–866 of CDTb are sufficient for binding to LSR. With a transposon-based, random mutagenesis approach, we identified potential LSR-interacting epitopes in CDTb. This study increases our understanding about the interaction between CDT and its receptor LSR, which is key to the development of anti-toxin strategies for preventing cell entry of the toxin. PMID:25882847

  19. Rare coding variants of the adenosine A3 receptor are increased in autism: on the trail of the serotonin transporter regulome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rare genetic variation is an important class of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) risk factors and can implicate biological networks for investigation. Altered serotonin (5-HT) signaling has been implicated in ASD, and we and others have discovered multiple, rare, ASD-associated variants in the 5-HT transporter (SERT) gene leading to elevated 5-HT re-uptake and perturbed regulation. We hypothesized that loci encoding SERT regulators harbor variants that impact SERT function and/or regulation and therefore could contribute to ASD risk. The adenosine A3 receptor (A3AR) regulates SERT via protein kinase G (PKG) and other signaling pathways leading to enhanced SERT surface expression and catalytic activity. Methods To test our hypothesis, we asked whether rare variants in the A3AR gene (ADORA3) were increased in ASD cases vs. controls. Discovery sequencing in a case-control sample and subsequent analysis of comparison exome sequence data were conducted. We evaluated the functional impact of two variants from the discovery sample on A3AR signaling and SERT activity. Results Sequencing discovery showed an increase of rare coding variants in cases vs. controls (P=0.013). While comparison exome sequence data did not show a significant enrichment (P=0.071), combined analysis strengthened evidence for association (P=0.0025). Two variants discovered in ASD cases (Leu90Val and Val171Ile) lie in or near the ligand-binding pocket, and Leu90Val was enriched individually in cases (P=0.040). In vitro analysis of cells expressing Val90-A3AR revealed elevated basal cGMP levels compared with the wildtype receptor. Additionally, a specific A3AR agonist increased cGMP levels across the full time course studied in Val90-A3AR cells, compared to wildtype receptor. In Val90-A3AR/SERT co-transfections, agonist stimulation elevated SERT activity over the wildtype receptor with delayed 5-HT uptake activity recovery. In contrast, Ile171-A3AR was unable to support agonist stimulation of

  20. Vasopressin receptors in the brain, liver and kidney of rats following osmotic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Landgraf, R; Szot, P; Dorsa, D M

    1991-03-29

    The binding site concentration (Bmax) and equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for [3H]-arginine vasopressin (AVP) binding sites were measured in limbic brain areas (septum, dorsal hippocampus, amygdala) and liver and kidney of control and osmotically stimulated male Wistar rats. Membrane binding was performed in these five areas 30, 60 and 180 min following intraperitoneal injection of hypertonic saline. This paradigm resulted in no significant change in binding characteristics in the septum, dorsal hippocampus, amygdala and liver from control treated rats. In contrast, the kidney Bmax was significantly reduced 60 min following osmotic stimulation, with no effect on affinity. These results also suggest that AVP receptors in the CNS are relatively resistant to regulatory effects of an acute AVP exposure. PMID:1828184

  1. Caloric restriction stimulates autophagy in rat cortical neurons through neuropeptide Y and ghrelin receptors activation

    PubMed Central

    Carmo-Silva, Sara; Botelho, Mariana; de Almeida, Luís Pereira; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction is an anti-aging intervention known to extend lifespan in several experimental models, at least in part, by stimulating autophagy. Caloric restriction increases neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the hypothalamus and plasma ghrelin, a peripheral gut hormone that acts in hypothalamus to modulate energy homeostasis. NPY and ghrelin have been shown to be neuroprotective in different brain areas and to induce several physiological modifications similar to those induced by caloric restriction. However, the effect of NPY and ghrelin in autophagy in cortical neurons is currently not known. Using a cell culture of rat cortical neurons we investigate the involvement of NPY and ghrelin in caloric restriction-induced autophagy. We observed that a caloric restriction mimetic cell culture medium stimulates autophagy in rat cortical neurons and NPY or ghrelin receptor antagonists blocked this effect. On the other hand, exogenous NPY or ghrelin stimulate autophagy in rat cortical neurons. Moreover, NPY mediates the stimulatory effect of ghrelin on autophagy in rat cortical neurons. Since autophagy impairment occurs in aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases, NPY and ghrelin synergistic effect on autophagy stimulation may suggest a new strategy to delay aging process. PMID:27441412

  2. The prolactin receptor mediates HOXA1-stimulated oncogenicity in mammary carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lin; Xu, Bing; Mohankumar, Kumarasamypet M; Goffin, Vincent; Perry, Jo K; Lobie, Peter E; Liu, Dong-Xu

    2012-12-01

    The HOX genes are a highly conserved subgroup of homeodomain-containing transcription factors that are crucial to normal development. Forced expression of HOXA1 results in oncogenic transformation of immortalized human mammary cells with aggressive tumour formation in vivo. Microarray analysis identified that the prolactin receptor (PRLR) was significantly upregulated by forced expression of HOXA1 in mammary carcinoma cells. To determine prolactin (PRL) involvement in HOXA1‑induced oncogenicity in mammary carcinoma cells (MCF-7), we examined the effect of human prolactin (hPRL)-initiated PRLR signal transduction on changes in cellular behaviour mediated by HOXA1. Forced expression of HOXA1 in MCF-7 cells increased PRLR mRNA and protein expression. Forced expression of HOXA1 also enhanced hPRL-stimulated phosphorylation of both STAT5A/B and p44/42 MAPK, and increased subsequent transcriptional activity of STAT5A and STAT5B, and Elk-1 and Sap1a, respectively. Moreover, forced expression of HOXA1 in MCF-7 cells enhanced the hPRL‑stimulated increase in total cell number as a consequence of enhanced cell proliferation and cell survival, and also enhanced hPRL-stimulated anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. Increased anchorage-independent growth was attenuated by the PRLR antagonist ∆1-9-G129R‑hPRL. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that HOXA1 increases expression of the cell surface receptor PRLR and enhances PRLR-mediated signal transduction. Thus, the PRLR is one mediator of HOXA1‑stimulated oncogenicity in mammary carcinoma cells. PMID:23064471

  3. Involvement of prefrontal AMPA receptors in encounter stimulation-induced hyperactivity in isolation-reared mice.

    PubMed

    Araki, Ryota; Ago, Yukio; Hasebe, Shigeru; Nishiyama, Saki; Tanaka, Tatsunori; Oka, Satoshi; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Toshio

    2014-06-01

    We recently showed that social encounter stimulation induces hyperactivity in mice reared in social isolation from early life and this is associated with the transient activation of prefrontal dopaminergic and serotonergic systems. In the present study, we examined the effect of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) receptor antagonist 2, 3-dioxo-6-nitro-1, 2, 3, 4-tetrahydrobenzo[f]quinoxaline-7-sulfonamide (NBQX) on encounter-induced behavioural and neurochemical changes to study the role of the receptor in abnormal behaviours in isolation-reared mice. The encounter to an intruder mouse induced hyperactivity with transient increases in prefrontal dopamine and serotonin levels in isolation-reared mice. NBQX attenuated the encounter-induced hyperactivity and the associated neurochemical changes in isolation-reared mice. In addition, NBQX reduced aggressive behaviour and cognitive impairment in isolation-reared mice, but did not affect depressive-like behaviour or spontaneous hyper-locomotion in these animals. The AMPA receptor agonist (S)-AMPA increased prefrontal dopamine and serotonin release, and this effect was higher in isolation-reared mice than in the group-reared mice, suggesting higher prefrontal AMPA receptor activity in isolation-reared mice. Furthermore, isolation rearing increased the expression of AMPA receptor subunits (GluR1, GluR2 and GluR3) and GluR1 Ser845 phosphorylation in the prefrontal cortex, but not in the hippocampus or nucleus accumbens. Taken together, these results suggest that an increase in AMPA receptor activity in the prefrontal cortex contributes to some, but not all, abnormal behaviours in isolation-reared mice.

  4. Characterization of the receptor binding determinants of granulocyte colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Young, D. C.; Zhan, H.; Cheng, Q. L.; Hou, J.; Matthews, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    We performed a series of experiments using alanine-scanning mutagenesis to locate side chains within human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) that are involved in human G-CSF receptor binding. We constructed a panel of 28 alanine mutants that examined all surface exposed residues on helices A and D, as well as all charged residues on the surface of G-CSF. The G-CSF mutants were expressed in a transiently transfected mammalian cell line and quantitated by a sensitive biosensor method. We measured the activity of mutant proteins using an in vitro proliferation assay and an ELISA binding competition assay. These studies show that there is a region of five charged residues on helices A and C employed by G-CSF in binding its receptor, with the most important residue in this binding patch being Glu 19. Both wild-type G-CSF and the E19A mutant were expressed in E. coli. The re-folded proteins were found to have proliferative activities similar to the analogous proteins from mammalian cells: furthermore, biophysical analysis indicated that the E19A mutation does not cause gross structural perturbations in G-CSF. Although G-CSF is likely to signal through receptor homo-dimerization, we found no compelling evidence for a second receptor binding region. We also found no evidence of self-antagonism at high G-CSF concentrations, suggesting that, in contrast to human growth hormone (hGH) and erythropoietin (EPO), G-CSF probably does not signal via a pure 2:1 receptor ligand complex. Thus, G-CSF, while having a similar tertiary structure to hGH and EPO, uses different areas of the four helix bundle for high-affinity interaction with its receptor. PMID:9194183

  5. PGE2 Signaling Through the EP4 Receptor on Fibroblasts Upregulates RANKL and Stimulates Osteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Xie, Chao; Wei, Xiaochao; Zhang, Minjie; Zhang, Xinping; Flick, Lisa M.; Schwarz, Edward M.; O'Keefe, Regis J.

    2009-01-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis is the most common cause of aseptic loosening in total joint arthroplasty. The role of inflammatory mediators such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and osteoclast promoting factors including RANKL in the pathogenesis of osteolysis has been well characterized. However, the PGE2 receptor (EP1, EP2, or EP4), and cell type in which it is expressed, which is responsible for PGE2 induction of RANKL during wear debris–induced osteolysis, has yet to be elucidated. To address this, we used mice genetically deficient in these EP receptors to assess PGE2 and wear debris responses in vitro and in vivo. Wear debris–induced osteolysis and RANKL expression were observed at similar levels in WT, EP1−/−, and EP2−/− mice, indicating that these receptors do not mediate PGE2 signals in this process. A conditional knockout approach was used to eliminate EP4 expression in FSP1+ fibroblasts that are the predominant source of RANKL. In the absence of EP4, fibroblasts do not express RANKL after stimulation with particles or PGE2, nor do they exhibit high levels of osteoclasts and osteolysis. These results show that periprosthetic fibroblasts are important mediators of osteolysis through the expression of RANKL, which is induced after PGE2 signaling through the EP4 receptor. PMID:19419302

  6. Polyubiquitination of Prolactin Receptor Stimulates Its Internalization, Postinternalization Sorting, and Degradation via the Lysosomal Pathway▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Bentley; Barriere, Herve; Carbone, Christopher J.; Banerjee, Anamika; Swaminathan, Gayathri; Plotnikov, Alexander; Xu, Ping; Peng, Junmin; Goffin, Vincent; Lukacs, Gergely L.; Fuchs, Serge Y.

    2008-01-01

    The ubiquitination of the receptor that mediates signaling induced by the polypeptide pituitary hormone prolactin (PRL) has been shown to lead to the degradation of this receptor and to the ensuing negative regulation of cellular responses to PRL. However, the mechanisms of PRL receptor (PRLr) proteolysis remain largely to be determined. Here we provide evidence that PRLr is internalized and primarily degraded via the lysosomal pathway. Ubiquitination of PRLr is essential for the rapid internalization of PRLr, which proceeds through a pathway dependent on clathrin and the assembly polypeptide 2 (AP2) adaptor complexes. Recruitment of AP2 to PRLr is stimulated by PRLr ubiquitination, which also is required for the targeting of already internalized PRLr to the lysosomal compartment. While mass spectrometry analysis revealed that both monoubiquitination and polyubiquitination (via both K48- and K63-linked chains) occur on PRLr, the results of experiments using forced expression of ubiquitin mutants indicate that PRLr polyubiquitination via K63-linked chains is important for efficient interaction of PRLr with AP2 as well as for efficient internalization, postinternalization sorting, and proteolytic turnover of PRLr. We discuss how specific ubiquitination may regulate early and late stages of endocytosis of PRLr and of related receptors to contribute to the negative regulation of the magnitude and duration of downstream signaling. PMID:18573876

  7. Modulation of nicotinic receptor channels by adrenergic stimulation in rat pinealocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jin-Young; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Hille, Bertil

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin secretion from the pineal gland is triggered by norepinephrine released from sympathetic terminals at night. In contrast, cholinergic and parasympathetic inputs, by activating nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChR), have been suggested to counterbalance the noradrenergic input. Here we investigated whether adrenergic signaling regulates nAChR channels in rat pinealocytes. Acetylcholine or the selective nicotinic receptor agonist 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium iodide (DMPP) activated large nAChR currents in whole cell patch-clamp experiments. Norepinephrine (NE) reduced the nAChR currents, an effect partially mimicked by a β-adrenergic receptor agonist, isoproterenol, and blocked by a β-adrenergic receptor antagonist, propranolol. Increasing intracellular cAMP levels using membrane-permeable 8-bromoadenosine (8-Br)-cAMP or 5,6-dichlorobenzimidazole riboside-3′,5′-cyclic monophosphorothioate (cBIMPS) also reduced nAChR activity, mimicking the effects of NE and isoproterenol. Further, removal of ATP from the intracellular pipette solution blocked the reduction of nAChR currents, suggesting involvement of protein kinases. Indeed protein kinase A inhibitors, H-89 and Rp-cAMPS, blocked the modulation of nAChR by adrenergic stimulation. After the downmodulation by NE, nAChR channels mediated a smaller Ca2+ influx and less membrane depolarization from the resting potential. Together these results suggest that NE released from sympathetic terminals at night attenuates nicotinic cholinergic signaling. PMID:24553185

  8. Identification and biological activity of ovine and caprine calcitonin receptor-stimulating peptides 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Charles, Christopher J; Katafuchi, Takeshi; Yandle, Timothy G; Minamino, Naoto

    2008-08-01

    We have recently reported the isolation of three new members of the calcitonin (CT) gene-related peptide family of peptides, the CT receptor (CT-R)-stimulating peptides (CRSPs). We now report the sequencing and characterization of ovine/caprine CRSP-1 and caprine CRSP-2. Mature ovine and caprine CRSP-1 are identical and have strong structural homology to CRSP-1s identified to date from other species. As with other CRSP-1s, ovine/caprine CRSP-1 binds to and activates the CT-R but not the CT-like receptor (CL-R) in combination with the receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs). By contrast, caprine CRSP-2 does not activate any of these receptor-RAMP complexes. Intravenous infusions of ovine CRSP-1 to normal conscious sheep induced dose-dependent reduction in plasma total Ca levels (P=0.02) and corrected Ca levels (P=0.017) associated with increases in plasma cAMP (P=0.002). CRSP-1 reduced both plasma amino-terminal pro-C-type natriuretic peptide levels (P=0.006) and plasma renin activity (P=0.028). There were no significant effects observed on hemodynamic or renal indices measured. In conclusion, we have sequenced ovine/caprine CRSP-1 and caprine CRSP-2 precursors. This newly identified CRSP-1 has been shown to share the structural and biological features of CRSP-1s known to date. In vivo studies confirm that ovine CRSP-1 reduces plasma Ca levels in sheep, presumably via a cAMP-mediated mechanism. By contrast, caprine CRSP-2 did not stimulate any combination of CT-R, CL-R, and RAMPs. Accession numbers of cDNA determined in this study are caprine CRSP-1, AB364646; caprine CRSP-2, AB364647; and ovine CRSP-1, AB364648.

  9. Effects of serotonin 2A/1A receptor stimulation on social exclusion processing.

    PubMed

    Preller, Katrin H; Pokorny, Thomas; Hock, Andreas; Kraehenmann, Rainer; Stämpfli, Philipp; Seifritz, Erich; Scheidegger, Milan; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2016-05-01

    Social ties are crucial for physical and mental health. However, psychiatric patients frequently encounter social rejection. Moreover, an increased reactivity to social exclusion influences the development, progression, and treatment of various psychiatric disorders. Nevertheless, the neuromodulatory substrates of rejection experiences are largely unknown. The preferential serotonin (5-HT) 2A/1A receptor agonist, psilocybin (Psi), reduces the processing of negative stimuli, but whether 5-HT2A/1A receptor stimulation modulates the processing of negative social interactions remains unclear. Therefore, this double-blind, randomized, counterbalanced, cross-over study assessed the neural response to social exclusion after the acute administration of Psi (0.215 mg/kg) or placebo (Pla) in 21 healthy volunteers by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and resting-state magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Participants reported a reduced feeling of social exclusion after Psi vs. Pla administration, and the neural response to social exclusion was decreased in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the middle frontal gyrus, key regions for social pain processing. The reduced neural response in the dACC was significantly correlated with Psi-induced changes in self-processing and decreased aspartate (Asp) content. In conclusion, 5-HT2A/1A receptor stimulation with psilocybin seems to reduce social pain processing in association with changes in self-experience. These findings may be relevant to the normalization of negative social interaction processing in psychiatric disorders characterized by increased rejection sensitivity. The current results also emphasize the importance of 5-HT2A/1A receptor subtypes and the Asp system in the control of social functioning, and as prospective targets in the treatment of sociocognitive impairments in psychiatric illnesses.

  10. Effects of serotonin 2A/1A receptor stimulation on social exclusion processing.

    PubMed

    Preller, Katrin H; Pokorny, Thomas; Hock, Andreas; Kraehenmann, Rainer; Stämpfli, Philipp; Seifritz, Erich; Scheidegger, Milan; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2016-05-01

    Social ties are crucial for physical and mental health. However, psychiatric patients frequently encounter social rejection. Moreover, an increased reactivity to social exclusion influences the development, progression, and treatment of various psychiatric disorders. Nevertheless, the neuromodulatory substrates of rejection experiences are largely unknown. The preferential serotonin (5-HT) 2A/1A receptor agonist, psilocybin (Psi), reduces the processing of negative stimuli, but whether 5-HT2A/1A receptor stimulation modulates the processing of negative social interactions remains unclear. Therefore, this double-blind, randomized, counterbalanced, cross-over study assessed the neural response to social exclusion after the acute administration of Psi (0.215 mg/kg) or placebo (Pla) in 21 healthy volunteers by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and resting-state magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Participants reported a reduced feeling of social exclusion after Psi vs. Pla administration, and the neural response to social exclusion was decreased in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the middle frontal gyrus, key regions for social pain processing. The reduced neural response in the dACC was significantly correlated with Psi-induced changes in self-processing and decreased aspartate (Asp) content. In conclusion, 5-HT2A/1A receptor stimulation with psilocybin seems to reduce social pain processing in association with changes in self-experience. These findings may be relevant to the normalization of negative social interaction processing in psychiatric disorders characterized by increased rejection sensitivity. The current results also emphasize the importance of 5-HT2A/1A receptor subtypes and the Asp system in the control of social functioning, and as prospective targets in the treatment of sociocognitive impairments in psychiatric illnesses. PMID:27091970

  11. Effects of serotonin 2A/1A receptor stimulation on social exclusion processing

    PubMed Central

    Preller, Katrin H.; Pokorny, Thomas; Hock, Andreas; Kraehenmann, Rainer; Stämpfli, Philipp; Seifritz, Erich; Scheidegger, Milan; Vollenweider, Franz X.

    2016-01-01

    Social ties are crucial for physical and mental health. However, psychiatric patients frequently encounter social rejection. Moreover, an increased reactivity to social exclusion influences the development, progression, and treatment of various psychiatric disorders. Nevertheless, the neuromodulatory substrates of rejection experiences are largely unknown. The preferential serotonin (5-HT) 2A/1A receptor agonist, psilocybin (Psi), reduces the processing of negative stimuli, but whether 5-HT2A/1A receptor stimulation modulates the processing of negative social interactions remains unclear. Therefore, this double-blind, randomized, counterbalanced, cross-over study assessed the neural response to social exclusion after the acute administration of Psi (0.215 mg/kg) or placebo (Pla) in 21 healthy volunteers by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and resting-state magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Participants reported a reduced feeling of social exclusion after Psi vs. Pla administration, and the neural response to social exclusion was decreased in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the middle frontal gyrus, key regions for social pain processing. The reduced neural response in the dACC was significantly correlated with Psi-induced changes in self-processing and decreased aspartate (Asp) content. In conclusion, 5-HT2A/1A receptor stimulation with psilocybin seems to reduce social pain processing in association with changes in self-experience. These findings may be relevant to the normalization of negative social interaction processing in psychiatric disorders characterized by increased rejection sensitivity. The current results also emphasize the importance of 5-HT2A/1A receptor subtypes and the Asp system in the control of social functioning, and as prospective targets in the treatment of sociocognitive impairments in psychiatric illnesses. PMID:27091970

  12. Protection against ventricular fibrillation via cholinergic receptor stimulation and the generation of nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Kalla, Manish; Chotalia, Minesh; Coughlan, Charles; Hao, Guoliang; Crabtree, Mark J.; Tomek, Jakub; Bub, Gil; Paterson, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Animal studies suggest an anti‐fibrillatory action of the vagus nerve on the ventricle, although the exact mechanism is controversial.Using a Langendorff perfused rat heart, we show that the acetylcholine analogue carbamylcholine raises ventricular fibrillation threshold (VFT) and flattens the electrical restitution curve.The anti‐fibrillatory action of carbamylcholine was prevented by the nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine, inhibitors of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), and can be mimicked by the nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside.Carbamylcholine increased NO metabolite content in the coronary effluent and this was prevented by mecamylamine.The anti‐fibrillatory action of both carbamylcholine and sodium nitroprusside was ultimately dependent on muscarinic receptor stimulation as all effects were blocked by atropine.These data demonstrate a protective effect of carbamylcholine on VFT that depends upon both muscarinic and nicotinic receptor stimulation, where the generation of NO is likely to be via a neuronal nNOS–sGC dependent pathway. Abstract Implantable cardiac vagal nerve stimulators are a promising treatment for ventricular arrhythmia in patients with heart failure. Animal studies suggest the anti‐fibrillatory effect may be nitric oxide (NO) dependent, although the exact site of action is controversial. We investigated whether a stable analogue of acetylcholine could raise ventricular fibrillation threshold (VFT), and whether this was dependent on NO generation and/or muscarinic/nicotinic receptor stimulation. VFT was determined in Langendorff perfused rat hearts by burst pacing until sustained VF was induced. Carbamylcholine (CCh, 200 nmol l–1, n = 9) significantly (P < 0.05) reduced heart rate from 292 ± 8 to 224 ± 6 b.p.m. Independent of this heart rate change, CCh caused a significant increase in VFT (control 1.5 ± 0.3 mA, CCh 2.4 ± 0.4 mA, wash 1.1

  13. Impaired vascular responses to parasympathetic nerve stimulation and muscarinic receptor activation in the submandibular gland in nonobese diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Berggreen, Ellen; Nyløkken, Krister; Delaleu, Nicolas; Hajdaragic-Ibricevic, Hamijeta; Jonsson, Malin V

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Decreased vascular responses to salivary gland stimulation are observed in Sjögren's syndrome patients. We investigate whether impaired vascular responses to parasympathetic stimulation and muscarinic receptor activation in salivary glands parallels hyposalivation in an experimental model for Sjögren's syndrome. Methods Blood flow responses in the salivary glands were measured by laser Doppler flowmeter. Muscarinic receptor activation was followed by saliva secretion measurements. Nitric oxide synthesis-mediated blood flow responses were studied after administration of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor. Glandular autonomic nerves and muscarinic 3 receptor distributions were also investigated. Results Maximal blood flow responses to parasympathetic stimulation and muscarinic receptor activation were significantly lower in nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice compared with BALB/c mice, coinciding with impaired saliva secretion in nonobese diabetic mice (P < 0.005). Nitric oxide synthase inhibitor had less effect on blood flow responses after parasympathetic nerve stimulation in nonobese diabetic mice compared with BALB/c mice (P < 0.02). In nonobese diabetic mice, salivary gland parasympathetic nerve fibres were absent in areas of focal infiltrates. Muscarinic 3 receptor might be localized in the blood vessel walls of salivary glands. Conclusions Impaired vasodilatation in response to parasympathetic nerve stimulation and muscarinic receptor activation may contribute to hyposalivation observed in nonobese diabetic mice. Reduced nitric oxide signalling after parasympathetic nerve stimulation may contribute in part to the impaired blood flow responses. The possibility of muscarinic 3 receptor in the vasculature supports the notion that muscarinic 3 receptor autoantibodies present in nonobese diabetic mice might impair the fluid transport required for salivation. Parasympathetic nerves were absent in areas of focal infiltrates, whereas a normal distribution was

  14. Effects of adenosine A(3) receptor agonist on bone marrow granulocytic system in 5-fluorouracil-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Pospísil, Milan; Vacek, Antonín; Holá, Jirina; Znojil, Vladimír; Weiterová, Lenka; Streitová, Denisa

    2006-05-24

    The purpose of the experiments reported was to investigate effects of N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA), a selective adenosine A(3) receptor agonist, on the granulocytic system in femoral marrow of mice depleted by the cytotoxic drug 5-fluorouracil. In the phase of the highest cell depletion IB-MECA was injected i.p. at single doses of 200 nmol/kg given either once or twice daily in 2- and 4-day regimens starting on day 1 after 5-fluorouracil administration; the effects were evaluated on days 3 and 5, respectively. The general effect of IB-MECA in all these experiments was an enhancement of the counts of morphologically recognizable proliferative granulocytic cells, interpreted as evidence of the differentiation of committed progenitor cells. A more expressive effect was observed after IB-MECA injected twice daily. It was found that the induction of the strong differentiation pressures by IB-MECA given twice daily shortly after 5-fluorouracil treatment can be counterproductive due to the preponderance of differentiaton processes over the proliferation control. In additional experiments, it has been shown that the use of the 2-day administration of IB-MECA given twice daily in the recovery phase, i.e., on days 5 and 6 after 5-fluorouracil administration, does not induce stimulatory effects. Thus, the dosing and timing of IB-MECA treatment determines its effectivity in stimulating granulopoiesis under conditions of myelosuppression.

  15. Blockade of adenosine A2A receptors prevents protein phosphorylation in the striatum induced by cortical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, César; Gomes, Catarina; Pak, Arlene C; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Goldberg, Steven R; Hope, Bruce T; Ferré, Sergi

    2006-10-18

    Previous studies have shown that cortical stimulation selectively activates extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation and immediate early gene expression in striatal GABAergic enkephalinergic neurons. In the present study, we demonstrate that blockade of adenosine A2A receptors with caffeine or a selective A2A receptor antagonist counteracts the striatal activation of cAMP-protein kinase A cascade (phosphorylation of the Ser845 residue of the glutamate receptor 1 subunit of the AMPA receptor) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK1/2 phosphorylation) induced by the in vivo stimulation of corticostriatal afferents. The results indicate that A2A receptors strongly modulate the efficacy of glutamatergic synapses on striatal enkephalinergic neurons.

  16. Stimulation of Sigma-1 Receptor Ameliorates Depressive-like Behaviors in CaMKIV Null Mice.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Shigeki; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Yabuki, Yasushi; Sasaki, Yuzuru; Izumi, Hisanao; Zhang, Chen; Han, Feng; Fukunaga, Kohji

    2015-12-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) is a molecular chaperone regulating calcium efflux from the neuronal endoplasmic reticulum to the mitochondria. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) null mice exhibit depressive-like behaviors and impaired neurogenesis as assessed by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation into newborn cells of the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). Here, we demonstrate that chronic stimulation of Sig-1R by treatment with the agonist SA4503 or the SSRI fluvoxamine for 14 days improves depressive-like behaviors in CaMKIV null mice. By contrast, treatment with paroxetine, which lacks affinity for Sig-1R, did not alter these behaviors. Reduced numbers of BrdU-positive cells and decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression and protein kinase B (Akt; Ser-473) phosphorylation seen in the DG of CaMKIV null mice were significantly rescued by chronic Sig-1R stimulation. Interestingly, reduced ATP production observed in the DG of CaMKIV null mice was improved by chronic Sig-1R stimulation. Such stimulation also improved hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) induction and maintenance, which are impaired in the DG of CaMKIV null mice. LTP rescue was closely associated with both increases in calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) autophosphorylation and GluA1 (Ser-831) phosphorylation. Taken together, Sig-1R stimulation by SA4503 or fluvoxamine treatment increased hippocampal neurogenesis, which is closely associated with amelioration of depressive-like behaviors in CaMKIV null mice.

  17. Hypothyroidism Stimulates D2 Receptor-mediated Breathing in Response to Acute Hypoxia and alters D2 Receptors Levels in Carotid Bodies & Brain

    PubMed Central

    Schlenker, Evelyn H.; Schultz, Harold D.

    2011-01-01

    Hypothyroidism can depress breathing and alter dopamine D2 receptor expression and function. We hypothesized that relative to euthyroid hamsters (EH), hypothyroid hamsters (HH) contain increased D2 receptors in brain regions associated with breathing and carotid bodies (CB), and that stimulation of D2 receptors would decease ventilation more in the HH compared to the EH. Hamsters were treated with vehicle, carmoxirile (peripherally acting D2 receptor agonist), or bromocriptine (central and peripherally acting D2 receptor agonist) and breathing was evaluated during exposure to air, hypoxia, and then air. HH exhibited increased D2 receptor protein levels in the striatum and CB’s, but decreased levels in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus. Relative to vehicle, carmoxirole and bromocriptine stimulated ventilation in the HH during and following exposure to hypoxia. Only bromocriptine depressed ventilation in the EH during and after exposure to hypoxia. Thus,, hypothyroidism impacts the expression of D2 receptors in the carotid body, PVN and striatum, and D2 stimulation affects ventilation remarkably differently than in EH. PMID:22051191

  18. Adenosine A(3) receptor agonist acts as a homeostatic regulator of bone marrow hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Pospísil, Milan; Znojil, Vladimír; Holá, Jirina; Vacek, Antonín; Streitová, Denisa

    2007-07-01

    The present study was performed to define the optimum conditions of the stimulatory action of the adenosine A(3) receptor agonist, N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA), on bone marrow hematopoiesis in mice. Effects of 2-day treatment with IB-MECA given at single doses of 200nmol/kg twice daily were investigated in normal mice and in mice whose femoral bone marrow cells were either depleted or regenerating after pretreatment with the cytotoxic drug 5-fluorouracil. Morphological criteria were used to determine the proliferation state of the granulocytic and erythroid cell systems. Significant negative correlation between the control proliferation state and the increase of cell proliferation after IB-MECA treatment irrespective of the cell lineage investigated was found. The results suggest the homeostatic character of the induced stimulatory effects and the need to respect the functional state of the target tissue when investigating effects of adenosine receptor agonists under in vivo conditions.

  19. The liver X-receptor alpha controls hepatic expression of the human bile acid-glucuronidating UGT1A3 enzyme in human cells and transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Verreault, Mélanie; Senekeo-Effenberger, Kathy; Trottier, Jocelyn; Bonzo, Jessica A; Bélanger, Julie; Kaeding, Jenny; Staels, Bart; Caron, Patrick; Tukey, Robert H; Barbier, Olivier

    2006-08-01

    Glucuronidation, an important bile acid detoxification pathway, is catalyzed by enzymes belonging to the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) family. Among UGT enzymes, UGT1A3 is considered the major human enzyme for the hepatic C24-glucuronidation of the primary chenodeoxycholic (CDCA) and secondary lithocholic (LCA) bile acids. We identify UGT1A3 as a positively regulated target gene of the oxysterol-activated nuclear receptor liver X-receptor alpha (LXRalpha). In human hepatic cells and human UGT1A transgenic mice, LXRalpha activators induce UGT1A3 mRNA levels and the formation of CDCA-24glucuronide (24G) and LCA-24G. Furthermore, a functional LXR response element (LXRE) was identified in the UGT1A3 promoter by site-directed mutagenesis, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiment. In addition, LXRalpha is found to interact with the SRC-1alpha and NCoR cofactors to regulate the UGT1A3 gene, but not with PGC-1beta. In conclusion, these observations establish LXRalpha as a crucial regulator of bile acid glucuronidation in humans and suggest that accumulation of oxysterols in hepatocytes during cholestasis favors bile acid detoxification as glucuronide conjugates. LXR agonists may be useful for stimulating both bile acid detoxification and cholesterol removal in cholestatic or hypercholesterolemic patients, respectively. PMID:16871576

  20. Association of follicle stimulating hormone receptor promoter with ovarian response in IVF-ET patients

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Wang; Jing, Gao; Liangbin, Xia; Ting, Zhang; Ying, Zeng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Poor ovarian response phenomenon has been observed in some of the in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer patients. Some investigations found that follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene plays a role in the process, but no direct evidence shows the correlation between genotypes of FSHR and ovarian response. Objective: Exploring the molecular mechanism behind the mutation of FSHR promoter association with ovarian granulosa cells and poor ovarian response. Materials and Methods: This cross sectional study was performed using 158 women undergoing the controlled short program ovarian stimulation for IVF treatment. The 263 bp DNA fragments before the follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) receptor 5' initiation site were sequenced in the patients under IVF cycle, 70 of which had poor ovarian response and 88 showed normal ovarian responses. Results: With a mutation rate of 40%, 63 in 158 cases showed a 29th site G→A point mutation; among the mutated cases, the mutation rate of the poor ovarian responders was significantly higher than the normal group (60% versus 23.9%; χ2=21.450, p<0.001). Besides, the variability was also obvious in antral follicle count, and ovum pick-ups. The estradiol peak values and the number of mature eggs between the two groups had significant difference. However, there was no obvious variability (t=0.457, p=0.324) in the basic FSH values between the two groups (normal group, 7.2±2.3 U/L; mutation group, 7.1±2.0 U/L). Conclusion: The activity of FSHR promoter is significantly affected by the 29th site G→A mutation that will weaken promoter activity and result in poor response to FSH. PMID:26730247

  1. Magnesium Sulfate Protects Against the Bioenergetic Consequences of Chronic Glutamate Receptor Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Clerc, Pascaline; Young, Christina A.; Bordt, Evan A.; Grigore, Alina M.; Fiskum, Gary; Polster, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular glutamate is elevated following brain ischemia or trauma and contributes to neuronal injury. We tested the hypothesis that magnesium sulfate (MgSO4, 3 mM) protects against metabolic failure caused by excitotoxic glutamate exposure. Rat cortical neuron preparations treated in medium already containing a physiological concentration of Mg2+ (1 mM) could be segregated based on their response to glutamate (100 µM). Type I preparations responded with a decrease or small transient increase in oxygen consumption rate (OCR). Type II neurons responded with >50% stimulation in OCR, indicating a robust response to increased energy demand without immediate toxicity. Pre-treatment with MgSO4 improved the initial bioenergetic response to glutamate and ameliorated subsequent loss of spare respiratory capacity, measured following addition of the uncoupler FCCP, in Type I but not Type II neurons. Spare respiratory capacity in Type I neurons was also improved by incubation with MgSO4 or NMDA receptor antagonist MK801 in the absence of glutamate treatment. This finding indicates that the major difference between Type I and Type II preparations is the amount of endogenous glutamate receptor activity. Incubation of Type II neurons with 5 µM glutamate prior to excitotoxic (100 µM) glutamate exposure recapitulated a Type I phenotype. MgSO4 protected against an excitotoxic glutamate-induced drop in neuronal ATP both with and without prior 5 µM glutamate exposure. Results indicate that MgSO4 protects against chronic moderate glutamate receptor stimulation and preserves cellular ATP following treatment with excitotoxic glutamate. PMID:24236167

  2. Estrogen-related receptors stimulate pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoform 4 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Ma, Ke; Sadana, Prabodh; Chowdhury, Farhana; Gaillard, Stephanie; Wang, Fang; McDonnell, Donald P; Unterman, Terry G; Elam, Marshall B; Park, Edwards A

    2006-12-29

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) catalyzes the conversion of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA in mitochondria and is a key regulatory enzyme in the oxidation of glucose to acetyl-CoA. Phosphorylation of PDC by the pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases (PDK2 and PDK4) inhibits PDC activity. Expression of the PDK genes is elevated in diabetes, leading to the decreased oxidation of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. In these studies we have investigated the transcriptional regulation of the PDK4 gene by the estrogen-related receptors (ERRalpha and ERRgamma). The ERRs are orphan nuclear receptors whose physiological roles include the induction of fatty acid oxidation in heart and muscle. Previously, we found that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC-1alpha) stimulates the expression of PDK4. Here we report that ERRalpha and ERRgamma stimulate the PDK4 gene in hepatoma cells, suggesting a novel role for ERRs in controlling pyruvate metabolism. In addition, both ERR isoforms recruit PGC-1alpha to the PDK4 promoter. Insulin, which decreases the expression of the PDK4 gene, inhibits the induction of PDK4 by ERRalpha and ERRgamma. The forkhead transcription factor (FoxO1) binds the PDK4 gene and contributes to the induction of PDK4 by ERRs and PGC-1alpha. Insulin suppresses PDK4 expression in part through the dissociation of FoxO1 and PGC-1alpha from the PDK4 promoter. Our data demonstrate a key role for the ERRs in the induction of hepatic PDK4 gene expression. PMID:17079227

  3. Follicle stimulating hormone receptor in mesenchymal stem cells integrates effects of glycoprotein reproductive hormones.

    PubMed

    Tourkova, Irina L; Witt, Michelle R; Li, La; Larrouture, Quitterie; Liu, Li; Luo, Jianhua; Robinson, Lisa J; Blair, Harry C

    2015-01-01

    Previously we reported that follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) affects bone degradation in human cells and in follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSH-R) null mice. Here we describe a FSH-R knockout bone-formation phenotype. We used mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), osteoblast precursors that express FSH-R, to determine whether FSH regulates bone formation. FSH stimulates MSC cell adhesion 1-3 h and proliferation at 24 h after addition. On the basis of phylogenetic and clinical precedents, we also examined effects of pregnant levels of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) on MSCs. We found effects similar to those of FSH, and RNAi knockdown of FSH-R abrogated both FSH and hCG effects on MSCs. In contrast to effects on MSCs, neither FSH nor hCG had significant effects on osteoblast maturation. Also in MSCs, short-term treatment by FSH and hCG altered signaling pathways for proliferation, including Erk1/2 phosphorylation. Our results show augmentation of MSC proliferation by either FSH at menopausal levels or hCG at normal pregnant levels. We conclude that FSH-R participates in regulation of MSC precursor pools in response to either FSH or hCG, integrating the effects of these two glycoprotein hormones.

  4. Kinetic analysis of antagonist-occupied adenosine-A3 receptors within membrane microdomains of individual cells provides evidence of receptor dimerization and allosterism

    PubMed Central

    Corriden, Ross; Kilpatrick, Laura E.; Kellam, Barrie; Briddon, Stephen J.; Hill, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    In our previous work, using a fluorescent adenosine-A3 receptor (A3AR) agonist and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), we demonstrated high-affinity labeling of the active receptor (R*) conformation. In the current study, we used a fluorescent A3AR antagonist (CA200645) to study the binding characteristics of antagonist-occupied inactive receptor (R) conformations in membrane microdomains of individual cells. FCS analysis of CA200645-occupied A3ARs revealed 2 species, τD2 and τD3, that diffused at 2.29 ± 0.35 and 0.09 ± 0.03 μm2/s, respectively. FCS analysis of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged A3AR exhibited a single diffusing species (0.105 μm2/s). The binding of CA200645 to τD3 was antagonized by nanomolar concentrations of the A3 antagonist MRS 1220, but not by the agonist NECA (up to 300 nM), consistent with labeling of R. CA200645 normally dissociated slowly from the A3AR, but inclusion of xanthine amine congener (XAC) or VUF 5455 during washout markedly accelerated the reduction in the number of particles exhibiting τD3 characteristics. It is notable that this effect was accompanied by a significant increase in the number of particles with τD2 diffusion. These data show that FCS analysis of ligand-occupied receptors provides a unique means of monitoring ligand A3AR residence times that are significantly reduced as a consequence of allosteric interaction across the dimer interface.—Corriden, R., Kilpatrick, L. E., Kellam, B., Briddon, S. J., Hill, S. J. Kinetic analysis of antagonist-occupied adenosine-A3 receptors within membrane microdomains of individual cells provides evidence for receptor dimerization and allosterism. PMID:24970394

  5. The granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor: linking its structure to cell signaling and its role in disease.

    PubMed

    Hercus, Timothy R; Thomas, Daniel; Guthridge, Mark A; Ekert, Paul G; King-Scott, Jack; Parker, Michael W; Lopez, Angel F

    2009-08-13

    Already 20 years have passed since the cloning of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor alpha-chain, the first member of the GM-CSF/interleukin (IL)-3/IL-5 family of hemopoietic cytokine receptors to be molecularly characterized. The intervening 2 decades have uncovered a plethora of biologic functions transduced by the GM-CSF receptor (pleiotropy) and revealed distinct signaling networks that couple the receptor to biologic outcomes. Unlike other hemopoietin receptors, the GM-CSF receptor has a significant nonredundant role in myeloid hematologic malignancies, macrophage-mediated acute and chronic inflammation, pulmonary homeostasis, and allergic disease. The molecular mechanisms underlying GM-CSF receptor activation have recently been revealed by the crystal structure of the GM-CSF receptor complexed to GM-CSF, which shows an unexpected higher order assembly. Emerging evidence also suggests the existence of intracellular signosomes that are recruited in a concentration-dependent fashion to selectively control cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation by GM-CSF. These findings begin to unravel the mystery of cytokine receptor pleiotropy and are likely to also apply to the related IL-3 and IL-5 receptors as well as other heterodimeric cytokine receptors. The new insights in GM-CSF receptor activation have clinical significance as the structural and signaling nuances can be harnessed for the development of new treatments for malignant and inflammatory diseases.

  6. Stimulation of NTS A1 adenosine receptors differentially resets baroreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs.

    PubMed

    Scislo, Tadeusz J; Ichinose, Tomoko K; O'Leary, Donal S

    2008-01-01

    Previously we showed that pressor and differential regional sympathoexcitatory responses (adrenal > renal >/= lumbar) evoked by stimulation of A(1) adenosine receptors located in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) were attenuated/abolished by baroreceptor denervation or blockade of glutamatergic transmission in the NTS, suggesting A(1) receptor-elicited inhibition of glutamatergic transmission in baroreflex pathways. Therefore we tested the hypothesis that stimulation of NTS A(1) adenosine receptors differentially inhibits/resets baroreflex responses of preganglionic adrenal (pre-ASNA), renal (RSNA), and lumbar (LSNA) sympathetic nerve activity. In urethane-chloralose-anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 65) we compared baroreflex-response curves (iv nitroprusside and phenylephrine) evoked before and after bilateral microinjections into the NTS of A(1) adenosine receptor agonist (N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine, CPA; 0.033-330 pmol/50 nl). CPA evoked typical dose-dependent pressor and differential sympathoexcitatory responses and similarly shifted baroreflex curves for pre-ASNA, RSNA, and LSNA toward higher mean arterial pressure (MAP) in a dose-dependent manner; the maximal shifts were 52.6 +/- 2.8, 48.0 +/- 3.6, and 56.8 +/- 6.7 mmHg for pre-ASNA, RSNA, and LSNA, respectively. These shifts were not a result of simple baroreceptor resetting because they were two to three times greater than respective increases in baseline MAP evoked by CPA. Baroreflex curves for pre-ASNA were additionally shifted upward: the maximal increases of upper and lower plateaus were 41.8 +/- 16.4% and 45.3 +/- 8.7%, respectively. Maximal gain (%/mmHg) measured before vs. after CPA increased for pre-ASNA (3.0 +/- 0.6 vs. 4.9 +/- 1.3), decreased for RSNA (4.1 +/- 0.6 vs. 2.3 +/- 0.3), and remained unaltered for LSNA (2.1 +/- 0.2 vs. 2.0 +/- 0.1). Vehicle control did not alter the baroreflex curves. We conclude that the activation of NTS A(1) adenosine receptors differentially inhibits

  7. Prolactin stimulates cell proliferation through a long form of prolactin receptor and K+ channel activation.

    PubMed Central

    Van Coppenolle, Fabien; Skryma, Roman; Ouadid-Ahidouch, Halima; Slomianny, Christian; Roudbaraki, Morad; Delcourt, Philippe; Dewailly, Etienne; Humez, Sandrine; Crépin, Alexandre; Gourdou, Isabelle; Djiane, Jean; Bonnal, Jean-Louis; Mauroy, Brigitte; Prevarskaya, Natalia

    2004-01-01

    PRL (prolactin) has been implicated in the proliferation and differentiation of numerous tissues, including the prostate gland. However, the PRL-R (PRL receptor) signal transduction pathway, leading to the stimulation of cell proliferation, remains unclear and has yet to be mapped. The present study was undertaken to develop a clear understanding of the mechanisms involved in this pathway and, in particular, to determine the role of K(+) channels. We used androgen-sensitive prostate cancer (LNCaP) cells whose proliferation is known to be stimulated by PRL. Reverse transcriptase PCR analysis showed that LNCaP cells express a long form of PRL-R, but do not produce its intermediate isoform. Patch-clamp techniques showed that the application of 5 nM PRL increased both the macroscopic K(+) current amplitude and the single K(+)-channel open probability. This single-channel activity increase was reduced by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein, herbimycin A and lavandustine A, thereby indicating that tyrosine kinase phosphorylation is required in PRL-induced K(+) channel stimulation. PRL enhances p59( fyn ) phosphorylation by a factor of 2 after a 10 min application in culture. In addition, where an antip59( fyn ) antibody is present in the patch pipette, PRL no longer increases K(+) current amplitude. Furthermore, the PRL-stimulated proliferation is inhibited by the K(+) channel inhibitors alpha-dendrotoxin and tetraethylammonium. Thus, as K(+) channels are known to be involved in LNCaP cell proliferation, we suggest that K(+) channel modulation by PRL, via p59( fyn ) pathway, is the primary ionic event in PRL signal transduction, triggering cell proliferation. PMID:14565846

  8. Tenascin-C Produced by Oxidized LDL-Stimulated Macrophages Increases Foam Cell Formation through Toll-like Receptor-4

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; He, Yong; Li, Bo; Liu, Jun; Ren, Yingang; Han, Wei; Wang, Xing; Zhang, Lihua

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease in which both innate and adaptive immunity are involved. Although there have been major advances in the involvement of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and CD36 in the initiation and development of this disease, detailed mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we show that tenascin-C (TN-C) can stimulate foam cell formation and this can be inhibited by a TLR4-blocking antibody or CD36 gene silencing. Our results identify TN-C-TLR4 activation as a common molecular mechanism in oxLDL-stimulated foam cell formation and atherosclerosis. In addition, CD36 is the major scavenger receptor responsible for the TN-C-mediated foam cell formation. Taken together, we have identified that TN-C produced by oxLDL-stimulated macrophages increases foam cell formation through TLR4 and scavenger receptor CD36. PMID:22699754

  9. Central oxytocin receptor stimulation attenuates the orexigenic effects of butorphanol tartrate.

    PubMed

    Olszewski, Pawel K; Klockars, Oscar A; Klockars, Anica; Levine, Allen S

    2016-09-28

    Butorphanol tartrate (BT), a mixed µ/κ/δ opioid receptor agonist, is one of the most potent orexigens known to date. The central mechanisms through which BT causes hyperphagia are largely unknown. Interestingly, BT suppresses meal-end activation of neurons synthesizing anorexigenic neuropeptide, oxytocin (OT), which suggests that BT promotes hyperphagia by silencing OT-derived satiety signaling. As OT terminates consumption by acting by distinct hindbrain and forebrain circuits, we investigated whether stimulation of the OT receptor in the forebrain or the hindbrain [through lateral ventricular (LV) and fourth ventricular (4V) OT injections] leads to termination of food intake induced by BT. We established effective doses of BT on chow intake in ad-libitum-fed and overnight-deprived rats as well as effective doses of LV and 4V OT in deprived animals. Then, we determined doses of LV and 4V OT that reduce hyperphagia produced by BT in sated and deprived rats. Finally, we assessed whether OT's effects on BT-induced feeding can be suppressed by an OT receptor antagonist. 4 mg/kg BT increased intake in ad-libitum-fed and overnight-deprived rats, whereas LV and 4V OT at 1 μg caused a decrease in deprived rats. BT-induced chow intake in hungry and sated animals was suppressed by a very low, 0.1 μg dose of 4V OT, whereas 1 μg OT was effective LV. The effect of OT was attenuated by OT receptor antagonist, L-368 899. Reduced activity of the OT circuit, especially its hindbrain component, is a critical factor in shaping the magnitude of consumption in response to BT treatment. PMID:27471903

  10. Nitric oxide and hypoxia stimulate erythropoietin receptor via MAPK kinase in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cokic, Bojana B Beleslin; Cokic, Vladan P; Suresh, Sukanya; Wirt, Stacey; Noguchi, Constance Tom

    2014-03-01

    Erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) expression level determines the extent of erythropoietin (EPO) response. Previously we showed that EPOR expression in endothelial cells is increased at low oxygen tension and that EPO stimulation of endothelial cells during hypoxia can increase endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) expression and activation as well as NO production. We now observe that while EPO can stimulate NO production, NO in turn can regulate EPOR expression. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) treated with 10-50 μM of NO donor diethylenetriamine NONOate (DETANO) for 24h showed significant induction of EPOR gene expression at 5% and 2% of oxygen. Also human bone marrow microvascular endothelial cell line (TrHBMEC) cultured at 21 and 2% oxygen with 50 μM DETANO demonstrated a time and oxygen dependent induction of EPOR mRNA expression after 24 and 48 h, particularly at low oxygen tension. EPOR protein was also induced by DETANO at 2% oxygen in TrHBMEC and HUVEC. The activation of signaling pathways by NO donor stimulation appeared to be distinct from EPO stimulation. In reporter gene assays, DETANO treatment of HeLa cells at 2% oxygen increased EPOR promoter activity indicated by a 48% increase in luciferase activity with a 2 kb EPOR promoter fragment and a 71% increase in activity with a minimal EPOR promoter fragment containing 0.2 kb 5'. We found that DETANO activated MAPK kinase in TrHBMEC both in normoxia and hypoxia, while MAPK kinase inhibition showed significant reduction of EPOR mRNA gene expression at low oxygen tension, suggesting MAPK involvement in NO mediated induction of EPOR. Furthermore, DETANO stimulated Akt anti-apoptotic activity after 30 min in normoxia, whereas it inhibited Akt phosphorylation in hypoxia. In contrast, EPO did not significantly increase MAPK activity while EPO stimulated Akt phosphorylation in TrHBMEC in normoxia and hypoxia. These observations provide a new effect of NO on EPOR expression to enhance EPO

  11. What is the effect of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor stimulation on osteoarthritis in a rodent animal model?

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Kilian; Plaass, Christian; Coger, Vincent; Peck, Claas-Tido; Reimers, Kerstin; Stukenborg-Colsman, Christina; Claassen, Leif

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Despite the rising number of patients with osteoarthritis, no sufficient chondroprotective and prophylactic therapy for osteoarthritis has been established yet. The purpose of this study was to verify whether stimulation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor via nicotine has a beneficial effect on cartilage degeneration in the development of osteoarthritis and is capable of reducing the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and cartilage degrading enzymes in synovial membranes after osteoarthritis induction. Methods: Experimental osteoarthritis was induced in Lewis rats using a standardized osteoarthritis model with monoiodoacetate. A total of 16 Lewis rats were randomized into four groups: control, sham + nicotine application, osteoarthritis, and osteoarthritis + nicotine application. Nicotine (0.625 mg/kg twice daily) was administered intraperitoneally for 42 days. We analyzed histological sections, radiological images and the expression of the proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6, and of matrix metalloproteases 3, 9 and 13 and tissue inhibitors of metalloprotease-1 in synovial membranes via quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results: Histological and x-ray examination revealed cartilage degeneration in the osteoarthritis group compared to control or sham + nicotine groups (histological control vs osteoarthritis: p = 0.002 and x-ray control vs osteoarthritis: p = 0.004). Nicotine treatment reduced the cartilage degeneration without significant differences. Osteoarthritis induction led to a higher expression of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteases as compared to control groups. This effect was attenuated after nicotine administration. The differences of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteases did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion: With the present small-scale study, we could not prove a positive effect of nicotinic

  12. Nkx6.1 regulates islet β-cell proliferation via Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Tessem, Jeffery S; Moss, Larry G; Chao, Lily C; Arlotto, Michelle; Lu, Danhong; Jensen, Mette V; Stephens, Samuel B; Tontonoz, Peter; Hohmeier, Hans E; Newgard, Christopher B

    2014-04-01

    Loss of functional β-cell mass is a hallmark of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and methods for restoring these cells are needed. We have previously reported that overexpression of the homeodomain transcription factor NK6 homeobox 1 (Nkx6.1) in rat pancreatic islets induces β-cell proliferation and enhances glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, but the pathway by which Nkx6.1 activates β-cell expansion has not been defined. Here, we demonstrate that Nkx6.1 induces expression of the nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, members 1 and 3 (Nr4a1 and Nr4a3) orphan nuclear receptors, and that these factors are both necessary and sufficient for Nkx6.1-mediated β-cell proliferation. Consistent with this finding, global knockout of Nr4a1 results in a decrease in β-cell area in neonatal and young mice. Overexpression of Nkx6.1 and the Nr4a receptors results in increased expression of key cell cycle inducers E2F transcription factor 1 and cyclin E1. Furthermore, Nkx6.1 and Nr4a receptors induce components of the anaphase-promoting complex, including ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2C, resulting in degradation of the cell cycle inhibitor p21. These studies identify a unique bipartite pathway for activation of β-cell proliferation, suggesting several unique targets for expansion of functional β-cell mass.

  13. Agonist-induced desensitization of dopamine D1 receptor-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity is temporally and biochemically separated from D1 receptor internalization.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, G Y; Trogadis, J; Stevens, J; Bouvier, M; O'Dowd, B F; George, S R

    1995-01-01

    The regulation of the dopamine D1 receptor was investigated by using c-myc epitope-tagged D1 receptors expressed in Sf9 (fall armyworm ovary) cells. Treatment of D1 receptors with 10 microM dopamine for 15 min led to a loss of the dopamine-detected high-affinity state of the receptor accompanying a 40% reduction in the ability of the receptor to mediate maximal dopamine stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity. After 60 min of agonist exposure, 45 min after the occurrence of desensitization, 28% of the cell surface receptors were internalized into an intracellular light vesicular membrane fraction as determined by radioligand binding and supported by photoaffinity labeling, immunocytochemical staining, and immunoblot analysis. Pretreatment of cells with concanavalin A or sucrose completely blocked agonist-induced D1 receptor internalization without preventing agonist-induced desensitization, indicating a biochemical separation of these processes. Collectively, these findings indicate that the desensitization of D1 receptor-coupled adenylyl cyclase activity and D1 receptor internalization are temporarily and biochemically distinct mechanisms regulating D1 receptor function following agonist activation. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7479745

  14. Caffeine stimulates locomotor activity in the mammalian spinal cord via adenosine A1 receptor-dopamine D1 receptor interaction and PKA-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, JeanMarie; Santana-Almansa, Alexandra; Matos-Vergara, Nikol; Marrero-Cordero, Luis René; Cabezas-Bou, Ernesto; Díaz-Ríos, Manuel

    2016-02-01

    Caffeine is a potent psychostimulant that can have significant and widely variable effects on the activity of multiple neuronal pathways. The most pronounced caffeine-induced behavioral effect seen in rodents is to increase locomotor activity which has been linked to a dose-dependent inhibition of A1 and A(2A) receptors. The effects of caffeine at the level of the lumbar spinal central pattern generator (CPG) network for hindlimb locomotion are lacking. We assessed the effects of caffeine to the locomotor function of the spinal CPG network via extracellular ventral root recordings using the isolated neonatal mouse spinal cord preparation. Addition of caffeine and of an A1 receptor antagonist significantly decreased the cycle period accelerating the ongoing locomotor rhythm, while decreasing burst duration reversibly in most preparations suggesting the role of A1 receptors as the primary target of caffeine. Caffeine and an A1 receptor antagonist failed to stimulate ongoing locomotor activity in the absence of dopamine or in the presence of a D1 receptor antagonist supporting A1/D1 receptor-dependent mechanism of action. The use of caffeine or an A1 receptor blocker failed to stimulate an ongoing locomotor rhythm in the presence of a blocker of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) supporting the need of this intracellular pathway for the modulatory effects of caffeine to occur. These results support a stimulant effect of caffeine on the lumbar spinal network controlling hindlimb locomotion through the inhibition of A1 receptors and subsequent activation of D1 receptors via a PKA-dependent intracellular mechanism.

  15. Electrical Stimulation Decreases Coupling Efficiency Between Beta-Adrenergic Receptors and Cyclic AMP Production in Cultured Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.

    1999-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of skeletal muscle cells in culture is an effective way to simulate the effects of muscle contraction and its effects on gene expression in muscle cells. Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor and its coupling to cyclic AMP synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy, and the goal of this project was to determine if electrical stimulation altered the beta-adrenergic response in muscle cells. Chicken skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for seven days in culture were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional two days at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. At the end of this two-day stimulation period, beta-adrenergic receptor population was measured by the binding of tritium-labeled CGP-12177 to muscle cells, and coupling to cAMP synthesis was measured by Radioimmunoassay (RIA) after treating the cells for 10 min with the potent (beta)AR agonist, isoproterenol. The number of beta adrenergic receptors and the basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP were not affected by electrical stimulation. However, the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately 50%. Thus, an enhanced level of contraction reduces the coupling efficiency of beta-adrenergic receptors for cyclic AMP production.

  16. Basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated levels of cAMP are reduced in lymphocytes from alcoholic patients

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, I.; Wrubel, B.; Estrin, W.; Gordon, A.

    1987-03-01

    Alcoholism causes serious neurologic disease that may be due, in part, to the ability of ethanol to interact with neural cell membranes and change neuronal function. Adenosine receptors are membrane-bound proteins that appear to mediate some of the effects of ethanol in the brain. Human lymphocytes also have adenosine receptors, and their activation causes increases in cAMP levels. To test the hypothesis that basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated cAMP levels in lymphocytes might be abnormal in alcoholism, the authors studied lymphocytes from 10 alcoholic subjects, 10 age- and sex-matched normal individuals, and 10 patients with nonalcoholic liver disease. Basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated cAMP levels were reduced 75% in lymphocytes from alcoholic subjects. Also, there was a 76% reduction in ethanol stimulation of cAMP accumulation in lymphocytes from alcoholics. Similar results were demonstrable in isolated T cells. Unlike other laboratory tests examined, these measurements appeared to distinguish alcoholics from normal subjects and from patients with nonalcoholic liver disease. Reduced basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated levels of cAMP in lymphocytes from alcoholics may reflect a change in cell membranes due either to chronic alcohol abuse or to a genetic predisposition unique to alcoholic subjects.

  17. Adenosine A(1), A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) receptors in hematopoiesis. 1. Expression of receptor mRNA in four mouse hematopoietic precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Streitová, D; Sefc, L; Savvulidi, F; Pospísil, M; Holá, J; Hofer, M

    2010-01-01

    Four mouse bone marrow or thymus cell populations, namely granulopoietic/monocytopoietic, erythropoietic, B-lymphopoietic, and T-lymphopoietic precursor cells have been assayed by RT-PCR technique for the presence and relative amounts of adenosine A(1), A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) receptor mRNA. It has been found that (i) all four populations studied express all four adenosine receptor subtypes, (ii) the A(1), receptor is the least expressed in all populations studied, (iii) the A(3) receptor is markedly expressed in the populations of granulopoietic/monocytopoietic and erythropoietic cells, (iv) the A(2a) receptor is markedly expressed in the populations of B-lymphopoietic and T-lymphopoietic cells, and v) the A(2b) receptor does not predominate in any of the precursor cells studied. Our data offer a new possibility for the assessment of the readiness of these cells to respond, by receptor-mediated mechanisms, to adenosine or its analogs present in the tissues as a result of endogenous processes and/or following their administration.

  18. CGRP stimulates gill carbonic anhydrase activity in molluscs via a common CT/CGRP receptor.

    PubMed

    Cudennec, Benoit; Rousseau, Marthe; Lopez, Evelyne; Fouchereau-Peron, Martine

    2006-11-01

    The physiological significance of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) during biomineralization was investigated by assessing the effect of human CGRP on the carbonic anhydrase activity in gill membranes of the pearl oyster, Pinctada margaritifera. Salmon CT and human CGRP were able to induce a 150% increase of the basal activity. No additive effect was observed suggesting that both activities are mediated by the same receptor. The CGRP-stimulated effect was specific as demonstrated by the inhibition produced by the CGRP antagonist, hCGRP8-37. So, CGRP by its specific action on gill carbonic anhydrase controls the calcification process, an ancient role both in invertebrates and non-mammalian vertebrates.

  19. Graves' Disease Mechanisms: The Role of Stimulating, Blocking, and Cleavage Region TSH Receptor Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Morshed, S. A.; Davies, T. F.

    2016-01-01

    The immunologic processes involved in Graves' disease (GD) have one unique characteristic – the autoantibodies to the TSH receptor (TSHR) – which have both linear and conformational epitopes. Three types of TSHR antibodies (stimulating, blocking, and cleavage) with different functional capabilities have been described in GD patients, which induce different signaling effects varying from thyroid cell proliferation to thyroid cell death. The establishment of animal models of GD by TSHR antibody transfer or by immunization with TSHR antigen has confirmed its pathogenic role and, therefore, GD is the result of a breakdown in TSHR tolerance. Here we review some of the characteristics of TSHR antibodies with a special emphasis on new developments in our understanding of what were previously called “neutral” antibodies and which we now characterize as autoantibodies to the “cleavage” region of the TSHR ectodomain. PMID:26361259

  20. Targeting the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor with small molecule ligands and antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Terry F; Latif, Rauf

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) is the essential molecule for thyroid growth and thyroid hormone production. Since it is also a key autoantigen in Graves’ disease and is involved in thyroid cancer pathophysiology, the targeting of the TSHR offers a logical model for disease control. Areas covered We review the structure and function of the TSHR and the progress in both small molecule ligands and TSHR antibodies for their therapeutic potential. Expert opinion Stabilization of a preferential conformation for the TSHR by allosteric ligands and TSHR antibodies with selective modulation of the signaling pathways is now possible. These tools may be the next generation of therapeutics for controlling the pathophysiological consequences mediated by the effects of the TSHR in the thyroid and other extrathyroidal tissues. PMID:25768836

  1. beta2-adrenergic receptor polymorphisms and salbutamol-stimulated energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Oomen, J M; van Rossum, C T M; Hoebee, B; Saris, W H M; van Baak, M A

    2005-04-01

    The beta-adrenergic system is involved in the control of energy metabolism and expenditure. The beta2-adrenergic receptor (beta2-AR) gene shows polymorphisms that have been associated with obesity in several studies. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest differences in beta2-AR-mediated function between these polymorphisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of genetic variation in codon 16 of the beta2-AR gene on energy metabolism in humans. Thirty-four subjects were recruited [Gly16Gly (n = 13), Gly16Arg (n = 16), or Arg16Arg (n = 5)]. The beta2-AR was stimulated with two doses of salbutamol (50 and 100 ng/kg fat-free mass per minute) after blockade of the beta1-adrenergic receptors with atenolol. Energy expenditure and plasma substrate and hormone concentrations were measured. The increase in energy expenditure (DeltaEE) was significantly different among groups in which the Arg16Arg group showed the lowest increase (P < 0.05 vs. Gly carriers). In a multiple regression model, variations in the increase in nonesterified fatty acid concentration during salbutamol infusion (partial r = 0.51) and the polymorphism contributed significantly to the variation in DeltaEE. Thirty-five percent of the variation in DeltaEE was explained by these two factors. We conclude that subjects with the Arg16Arg polymorphism of the beta2-AR gene have a reduced thermogenic response to beta2-adrenergic stimulation. Although this relatively small study needs confirmation, the findings support a role for this polymorphism in the development and maintenance of overweight and obesity.

  2. Promotion of adipogenesis by an EP2 receptor agonist via stimulation of angiogenesis in pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Takao; Yamaguchi, Kazuhiro; Kikuchi, Ryota; Itoh, Masayuki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Nagai, Atsushi; Aoshiba, Kazutetsu

    2014-08-01

    Body weight loss is a common manifestation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), particularly those with severe emphysema. Adipose angiogenesis is a key mediator of adipogenesis and use of pro-angiogenic agents may serve as a therapeutic option for lean COPD patients. Since angiogenesis is stimulated by PGE2, we examined whether ONO-AE1-259, a selective E-prostanoid (EP) 2 receptor agonist, might promote adipose angiogenesis and adipogenesis in a murine model of elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema (EIE mice). Mice were intratracheally instilled with elastase or saline, followed after 4 weeks by intraperitoneal administration of ONO-AE1-259 for 4 weeks. The subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) weight decreased in the EIE mice, whereas in the EIE mice treated with ONO-AE1-259, the SAT weight was largely restored, which was associated with significant increases in SAT adipogenesis, angiogenesis, and VEGF protein production. In contrast, ONO-AE1-259 administration induced no alteration in the weight of the visceral adipose tissue. These results suggest that in EIE mice, ONO-AE1-259 stimulated adipose angiogenesis possibly via VEGF production, and thence, adipogenesis. Our data pave the way for the development of therapeutic interventions for weight loss in emphysema patients, e.g., use of pro-angiogenic agents targeting the adipose tissue vascular component.

  3. The angiotensin II-AT1 receptor stimulates reactive oxygen species within the cell nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergrass, Karl D.; Gwathmey, TanYa M.; Michalek, Ryan D.; Grayson, Jason M.; Chappell, Mark C.

    2009-06-26

    We and others have reported significant expression of the Ang II Type 1 receptor (AT1R) on renal nuclei; thus, the present study assessed the functional pathways and distribution of the intracellular AT1R on isolated nuclei. Ang II (1 nM) stimulated DCF fluorescence, an intranuclear indicator of reactive oxygen species (ROS), while the AT1R antagonist losartan or the NADPH oxidase (NOX) inhibitor DPI abolished the increase in ROS. Dual labeling of nuclei with antibodies against nucleoporin 62 (Nup62) and AT1R or the NADPH oxidase isoform NOX4 revealed complete overlap of the Nup62 and AT1R (99%) by flow cytometry, while NOX4 was present on 65% of nuclei. Treatment of nuclei with a PKC agonist increased ROS while the PKC inhibitor GF109203X or PI3 kinase inhibitor LY294002 abolished Ang II stimulation of ROS. We conclude that the Ang II-AT1R-PKC axis may directly influence nuclear function within the kidney through a redox sensitive pathway.

  4. Promotion of adipogenesis by an EP2 receptor agonist via stimulation of angiogenesis in pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Takao; Yamaguchi, Kazuhiro; Kikuchi, Ryota; Itoh, Masayuki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Nagai, Atsushi; Aoshiba, Kazutetsu

    2014-08-01

    Body weight loss is a common manifestation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), particularly those with severe emphysema. Adipose angiogenesis is a key mediator of adipogenesis and use of pro-angiogenic agents may serve as a therapeutic option for lean COPD patients. Since angiogenesis is stimulated by PGE2, we examined whether ONO-AE1-259, a selective E-prostanoid (EP) 2 receptor agonist, might promote adipose angiogenesis and adipogenesis in a murine model of elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema (EIE mice). Mice were intratracheally instilled with elastase or saline, followed after 4 weeks by intraperitoneal administration of ONO-AE1-259 for 4 weeks. The subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) weight decreased in the EIE mice, whereas in the EIE mice treated with ONO-AE1-259, the SAT weight was largely restored, which was associated with significant increases in SAT adipogenesis, angiogenesis, and VEGF protein production. In contrast, ONO-AE1-259 administration induced no alteration in the weight of the visceral adipose tissue. These results suggest that in EIE mice, ONO-AE1-259 stimulated adipose angiogenesis possibly via VEGF production, and thence, adipogenesis. Our data pave the way for the development of therapeutic interventions for weight loss in emphysema patients, e.g., use of pro-angiogenic agents targeting the adipose tissue vascular component. PMID:24911647

  5. Activation of macrophages stimulated by the bengkoang fiber extract through toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Kumalasari, Ika Dyah; Nishi, Kosuke; Putra, Agus Budiawan Naro; Sugahara, Takuya

    2014-07-25

    Bengkoang (Pachyrhizus erosus (L.) Urban) is an edible root tuber containing fairly large amounts of carbohydrates and crude fibers. Our previous studies showed that the bengkoang fiber extract (BFE) stimulates activation of macrophages, leading to induction of phagocytotic activity and cytokine production. In the present study we investigated the mechanism underlying activation of murine macrophages by BFE. BFE increased production of TNF-α, IL-6, and nitric oxide by J774.1 cells. In addition BFE also facilitated the gene expression levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase. We examined the effect of a TLR4 inhibitor on cytokine production to investigate the membrane receptor of macrophage activation by BFE. Treatment of J774.1 cells with the TLR4 inhibitor significantly inhibited production of IL-6 and TNF-α, suggesting that TLR4 is the target membrane receptor for BFE. The main signal molecules located downstream of TLR4 such as JNK, p38, ERK, and NF-κB were activated by BFE treatment. The immunostimulatory effect of BFE was cancelled by the pectinase treatment, suggesting that the active ingredient in BFE is pectin-like molecules. Overall results suggested that BFE activates J774.1 cells via the MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:24770453

  6. Development of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Receptor Binding Probes to Image Ovarian Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chung-Wein; Guo, Lili; Matei, Daniela; Stantz, Keith

    2015-01-01

    The Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Receptor (FSHR) is used as an imaging biomarker for the detection of ovarian cancer (OC). FSHR is highly expressed on ovarian tumors and involved with cancer development and metastatic signaling pathways. A decapeptide specific to the FSHR extracellular domain is synthesized and conjugated to fluorescent dyes to image OC cells in vitro and tumors xenograft model in vivo. The in vitro binding curve and the average number of FSHR per cell are obtained for OVCAR-3 cells by a high resolution flow cytometer. For the decapeptide, the measured EC50 was 160 μM and the average number of receptors per cell was 1.7 × 107. The decapeptide molecular imaging probe reached a maximum tumor to muscle ratio five hours after intravenous injection and a dose-dependent plateau after 24–48 hours. These results indicate the potential application of a small molecular weight imaging probe specific to ovarian cancer through binding to FSHR. Based on these results, multimeric constructs are being developed to optimize binding to ovarian cells and tumors. PMID:26779384

  7. The Glu727 Allele of Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor Gene is Associated with Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ren-De; Chen, Rui-Xiong; Li, Wen-Rui; Huang, Yu-Liang; Li, Wen-Hu; Cai, Guang-Rong; Zhang, Heng

    2012-01-01

    Background: Published data indicate that thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) activities are associated with osteoporosis in some patients. Aim: This study aimed to elucidate whether a given polymorphism of the TSHR gene is associated with osteoporosis. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifty subjects with osteoporosis were recruited in this study. The diagnosis of osteoporosis was performed with quantitative ultrasound system. The TSHR gene polymorphism was examined by polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism. Results: The results showed a nucleotide substitution in the first position of codon 36 of the TSHR gene. The nucleotide substitution was from G to C, leading to a 36D → 36H change (D36H) in the predicted amino acid sequence of the receptor. The change did not show significance between healthy subjects and patients with osteoporosis (P > 0.05). On the other hand, we identified another single nucleotide polymorphism that is a C-to-G substitution at codon 727 (GAC to GAG); its frequency was significantly higher in patients with osteoporosis than that in healthy subjects. Using logistic regression analysis, significant correlation was revealed between the genotype D727E and the serum levels of TSH, or the quantitative ultrasound value of the calcaneal bone. Conclusions: The present study suggests that the genotype D727E of the TSHR, but not the genotype D36H, may be a genetic risk factor for osteoporosis. PMID:22866266

  8. Progesterone stimulates respiration through a central nervous system steroid receptor-mediated mechanism in cat.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, D A; Millhorn, D E; Gallman, E A; Cidlowski, J A

    1987-11-01

    We have examined the effect on respiration of the steroid hormone progesterone, administered either intravenously or directly into the medulla oblongata in anesthetized and paralyzed male and female cats. The carotid sinus and vagus nerves were cut, and end-tidal PCO2 and temperature were kept constant with servo-controllers. Phrenic nerve activity was used to quantitate central respiratory activity. Repeated doses of progesterone (from 0.1 to 2.0 micrograms/kg, cumulative) caused a sustained (greater than 45 min) facilitation of phrenic nerve activity in female and male cats; however, the response was much more variable in females. Progesterone injected into the region of nucleus tractus solitarii, a respiratory-related area in the medulla oblongata, also caused a prolonged stimulation of respiration. Progesterone administration at high concentration by both routes also caused a substantial hypotension. Identical i.v. doses of other classes of steroid hormones (17 beta-estradiol, testosterone, and cortisol) did not elicit the same respiratory effect. Pretreatment with RU 486, a progesterone-receptor antagonist, blocked the facilitatory effect of progesterone. We conclude that progesterone acts centrally through a steroid receptor-mediated mechanism to facilitate respiration. PMID:3478727

  9. Angiopoietin-like proteins stimulate HSPC development through interaction with notch receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Michelle I; Price, Emily N; Boatman, Sonja; Hagedorn, Elliott J; Trompouki, Eirini; Satishchandran, Sruthi; Carspecken, Charles W; Uong, Audrey; DiBiase, Anthony; Yang, Song; Canver, Matthew C; Dahlberg, Ann; Lu, Zhigang; Zhang, Cheng Cheng; Orkin, Stuart H; Bernstein, Irwin D; Aster, Jon C; White, Richard M; Zon, Leonard I

    2015-01-01

    Angiopoietin-like proteins (angptls) are capable of ex vivo expansion of mouse and human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). Despite this intriguing ability, their mechanism is unknown. In this study, we show that angptl2 overexpression is sufficient to expand definitive HSPCs in zebrafish embryos. Angptl1/2 are required for definitive hematopoiesis and vascular specification of the hemogenic endothelium. The loss-of-function phenotype is reminiscent of the notch mutant mindbomb (mib), and a strong genetic interaction occurs between angptls and notch. Overexpressing angptl2 rescues mib while overexpressing notch rescues angptl1/2 morphants. Gene expression studies in ANGPTL2-stimulated CD34+ cells showed a strong MYC activation signature and myc overexpression in angptl1/2 morphants or mib restored HSPCs formation. ANGPTL2 can increase NOTCH activation in cultured cells and ANGPTL receptor interacted with NOTCH to regulate NOTCH cleavage. Together our data provide insight to the angptl-mediated notch activation through receptor interaction and subsequent activation of myc targets. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05544.001 PMID:25714926

  10. Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone down-regulates CXC receptors through activation of neutrophil elastase.

    PubMed

    Manna, Sunil K; Sarkar, Abira; Sreenivasan, Yashin

    2006-03-01

    Considering the role of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in a large number of acute and chronic inflammatory diseases, the regulation of IL-8-mediated biological responses is important. Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH), a tridecapeptide, inhibits most forms of inflammation by an unknown mechanism. In the present study, we have found that alpha-MSH interacts predominantly with melanocortin-1 receptors and inhibits several IL-8-induced biological responses in macrophages and neutrophils. It down-regulated receptors for IL-8 but not for TNF, IL-4, IL-13 or TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in neutrophils. It down-regulated CXCR type 1 and 2 but not mRNA levels. alpha-MSH did not inhibit IL-8 binding in purified cell membrane or affinity-purified CXCR. IL-8 or anti-CXCR Ab protected against alpha-MSH-mediated inhibition of IL-8 binding. The level of neutrophil elastase, a specific serine protease, but not cathepsin G or proteinase 3 increased in alpha-MSH-treated cells, and restoration of CXCR by specific neutrophil elastase or serine protease inhibitors indicates the involvement of elastase in alpha-MSH-induced down-regulation of CXCR. These studies suggest that alpha-MSH inhibits IL-8-mediated biological responses by down-regulating CXCR through induction of serine protease and that alpha-MSH acts as a potent immunomodulator in neutrophil-driven inflammatory distress. PMID:16479540

  11. Steroid hormone modulation of cAMP production in response to beta adrenergic receptor stimulation in genital tract myocytes.

    PubMed

    DiGiovanni, L; Austin, R; Phillippe, M

    1992-01-01

    beta-Adrenergic receptor stimulation results in smooth muscle relaxation through activation of adenylyl cyclase and subsequent cyclic AMP (cAMP) production. The present study was performed to evaluate the effects of steroid hormones (i.e. testosterone and hydrocortisone) on beta 2-adrenergic receptors and their signal transduction in the DDT1 MF-2 genital tract myocyte. Radioligand binding studies demonstrated that these two steroid hormones produced a 70 to 80% increase in the density of beta 2-adrenergic receptors in these myocytes. Stimulation of the beta 2-adrenergic receptors with isoproterenol resulted in a significant increase of cAMP in control myocytes; cells treated with testosterone for 24 h demonstrated a comparable response to isoproterenol, whereas hydrocortisone for 24 h resulted in a 50% greater cAMP response. In contrast to the response at 24 h, stimulation of myocytes after testosterone treatment for 48 h resulted in a cAMP response comparable to that seen in response to hydrocortisone at 24 h. Studies performed using theophylline demonstrated similar cAMP responses at 24 h between the control and testosterone-treated myocytes, thereby ruling out the possibility that the delayed increase of the cAMP response after testosterone was caused by stimulation of phosphodiesterase. Direct stimulation with forskolin resulted in greater cAMP production in the testosterone-treated myocytes compared to controls, thereby refuting the possibility that testosterone directly suppresses adenylyl cyclase activity at 24 h. These findings suggest that although both testosterone and hydrocortisone produce a twofold increase in beta 2-adrenergic receptor density in the DDT1 myocytes, beta 2-adrenergic receptors expressed in response to hydrocortisone appear functional at 24 h resulting in increased cAMP production, whereas those expressed in response to testosterone require 48 h to demonstrate increased functional activity.

  12. Mechanisms of amphibian macrophage development: characterization of the Xenopus laevis colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Grayfer, Leon; Edholm, Eva-Stina; Robert, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Macrophage-lineage cells are indispensable to vertebrate homeostasis and immunity. In turn, macrophage development is largely regulated through colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF1) binding to its cognate receptor (CSF1R). To study amphibian monopoiesis, we identified and characterized the X. laevis CSF1R cDNA transcript. Quantitative analysis revealed that CSF1R tissue gene expression increased with X. laevis development, with greatest transcript levels detected in the adult lung, spleen and liver tissues. Notably, considerable levels of CSF1R mRNA were also detected in the regressing tails of metamorphosing animals, suggesting macrophage involvement in this process, and in the adult bone marrow; corroborating the roles for this organ in Xenopus monopoiesis. Following animal infections with the ranavirus Frog Virus 3 (FV3), both tadpole and adult X. laevis exhibited increased kidney CSF1R gene expression. Conversely, while FV3-infected tadpoles increased their spleen and liver CSF1R mRNA levels, the FV3-challenged adults did not. Notably, FV3 induced elevated bone marrow CSF1R expression, and while stimulation of tadpoles with heat-killed E. coli had no transcriptional effects, bacterial stimulation of adult frogs resulted in significantly increased spleen, liver and bone marrow CSF1R expression. We produced the X. laevis CSF1R in recombinant form (rXlCSF1R) and determined, via in vitro cross-linking studies, that two molecules of rXlCSF1R bound the dimeric rXlCSF1. Finally, administration of rXlCSF1R abrogated the rXlCSF1-induced tadpole macrophage recruitment and differentiation as well as bacterial and FV3-elicited peritoneal leukocyte accumulation. This work marks a step towards garnering greater understanding of the unique mechanisms governing amphibian macrophage biology.

  13. Kisspeptin directly stimulates gonadotropin-releasing hormone release via G protein-coupled receptor 54.

    PubMed

    Messager, Sophie; Chatzidaki, Emmanouella E; Ma, Dan; Hendrick, Alan G; Zahn, Dirk; Dixon, John; Thresher, Rosemary R; Malinge, Isabelle; Lomet, Didier; Carlton, Mark B L; Colledge, William H; Caraty, Alain; Aparicio, Samuel A J R

    2005-02-01

    We have recently described a molecular gatekeeper of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis with the observation that G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) is required in mice and men for the pubertal onset of pulsatile luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) secretion to occur. In the present study, we investigate the possible central mode of action of GPR54 and kisspeptin ligand. First, we show that GPR54 transcripts are colocalized with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons in the mouse hypothalamus, suggesting that kisspeptin, the GPR54 ligand, may act directly on these neurons. Next, we show that GnRH neurons seem anatomically normal in gpr54-/- mice, and that they show projections to the median eminence, which demonstrates that the hypogonadism in gpr54-/- mice is not due to an abnormal migration of GnRH neurons (as occurs with KAL1 mutations), but that it is more likely due to a lack of GnRH release or absence of GnRH neuron stimulation. We also show that levels of kisspeptin injected i.p., which stimulate robust LH and FSH release in wild-type mice, have no effect in gpr54-/- mice, and therefore that kisspeptin acts directly and uniquely by means of GPR54 signaling for this function. Finally, we demonstrate by direct measurement, that the central administration of kisspeptin intracerebroventricularly in sheep produces a dramatic release of GnRH into the cerebrospinal fluid, with a parallel rise in serum LH, demonstrating that a key action of kisspeptin on the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis occurs directly at the level of GnRH release. The localization and GnRH release effects of kisspeptin thus define GPR54 as a major control point in the reproductive axis and suggest kisspeptin to be a neurohormonal effector.

  14. Thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor in brown adipose tissue is involved in the regulation of thermogenesis.

    PubMed

    Endo, Toyoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro

    2008-08-01

    C.RF- Tshr(hyt/hyt) mice have a mutated thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR), and, without thyroid hormone supplementation, these mice develop severe hypothyroidism. When hypothyroid Tshr(hyt/hyt) mice were exposed to cold (4 degrees C), rectal temperature rapidly dropped to 23.9 +/- 0.40 degrees C at 90 min, whereas the wild-type mice temperatures were 37.0 +/- 0.15 degrees C. When we carried out functional rat TSHR gene transfer in the brown adipose tissues by plasmid injection combined with electroporation, there was no effect on the serum levels of thyroxine, although rectal temperature of the mice transfected with pcDNA3.1/Zeo-rat TSHR 90 min after cold exposure remained at 34.6 +/- 0.34 degrees C, which was significantly higher than that of Tshr(hyt/hyt) mice. Transfection of TSHR cDNA increased mRNA and protein levels of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP-1) in brown adipose tissues, and the weight ratio of brown adipose tissue to overall body weight also increased. Exogenous thyroid hormone supplementation to Tshr(hyt/hyt) mice restored rectal temperature 90 min after exposure to cold (36.8 +/- 0.10 degrees C). These results indicate that not only thyroid hormone but also thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)/TSHR are involved in the expression mechanism of UCP-1 in mouse brown adipose tissue. TSH stimulates thermogenesis and functions to protect a further decrease in body temperature in the hypothyroid state. PMID:18559984

  15. Iron Mediates N-Methyl-d-aspartate Receptor-dependent Stimulation of Calcium-induced Pathways and Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity*

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Pablo; Humeres, Alexis; Elgueta, Claudio; Kirkwood, Alfredo; Hidalgo, Cecilia; Núñez, Marco T.

    2011-01-01

    Iron deficiency hinders hippocampus-dependent learning processes and impairs cognitive performance, but current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms underlying the unique role of iron in neuronal function is sparse. Here, we investigated the participation of iron on calcium signal generation and ERK1/2 stimulation induced by the glutamate agonist N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA), and the effects of iron addition/chelation on hippocampal basal synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation (LTP). Addition of NMDA to primary hippocampal cultures elicited persistent calcium signals that required functional NMDA receptors and were independent of calcium influx through L-type calcium channels or α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors; NMDA also promoted ERK1/2 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. Iron chelation with desferrioxamine or inhibition of ryanodine receptor (RyR)-mediated calcium release with ryanodine-reduced calcium signal duration and prevented NMDA-induced ERK1/2 activation. Iron addition to hippocampal neurons readily increased the intracellular labile iron pool and stimulated reactive oxygen species production; the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine or the hydroxyl radical trapper MCI-186 prevented these responses. Iron addition to primary hippocampal cultures kept in calcium-free medium elicited calcium signals and stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation; RyR inhibition abolished these effects. Iron chelation decreased basal synaptic transmission in hippocampal slices, inhibited iron-induced synaptic stimulation, and impaired sustained LTP in hippocampal CA1 neurons induced by strong stimulation. In contrast, iron addition facilitated sustained LTP induction after suboptimal tetanic stimulation. Together, these results suggest that hippocampal neurons require iron to generate RyR-mediated calcium signals after NMDA receptor stimulation, which in turn promotes ERK1/2 activation, an essential step of sustained LTP. PMID:21296883

  16. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor c-fms is a novel target of imatinib.

    PubMed

    Dewar, Andrea L; Cambareri, Antony C; Zannettino, Andrew C W; Miller, Bernadette L; Doherty, Kathleen V; Hughes, Timothy P; Lyons, A Bruce

    2005-04-15

    Imatinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that suppresses the growth of bcr-abl-expressing chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) progenitor cells by blockade of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding site of the kinase domain of bcr-abl. Imatinib also inhibits the c-abl, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor, abl-related gene (ARG) and stem-cell factor (SCF) receptor tyrosine kinases, and has been used clinically to inhibit the growth of malignant cells in patients with CML and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Although initially considered to have minimal effects of normal hematopoiesis, recent studies show that imatinib also inhibits the growth of some nonmalignant hematopoietic cells, including monocyte/macrophages. This inhibition could not be attributed to the known activity profile of imatinib. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that imatinib targets the macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) receptor c-fms. Phosphorylation of c-fms was inhibited by therapeutic concentrations of imatinib, and this was not due to down-regulation in c-fms expression. Imatinib was also found to inhibit M-CSF-induced proliferation of a cytokine-dependent cell line, further supporting the hypothesis that imatinib affects the growth and development of monocyte and/or macrophages through inhibition of c-fms signaling. Importantly, these results identify an additional biologic target to those already defined for imatinib. Imatinib should now be assessed for activity in diseases where c-fms activation is implicated, including breast and ovarian cancer and inflammatory conditions.

  17. L1CAM stimulates glioma cell motility and proliferation through the fibroblast growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Mohanan, Vishnu; Temburni, Murali K; Kappes, John C; Galileo, Deni S

    2013-04-01

    The L1CAM cell adhesion/recognition molecule (L1, CD171) and fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) both are expressed by human high-grade glioma cells, but their potential actions in controlling cell behavior have not been linked. L1 actions in cancer cells have been attributed mainly to integrin receptors, and we demonstrated previously that L1-stimulated glioma cell migration correlates with integrin expression, increased focal adhesion kinase activation and focal complex turnover. Our analyses of datasets revealed FGFR is overexpressed in glioma regardless of grade, while ADAM10 metalloprotease expression increases with glioma grade. Here, we used dominant-negative and short hairpin RNA approaches to inhibit the activation of FGFR1 and expression of L1, respectively. An L1 peptide that inhibits L1-FGFR interaction and PD173074, a chemical inhibitor of FGFR1 activity, also were used to elucidate the involvement of L1-FGFR interactions on glioma cell behavior. Time-lapse cell motility studies and flow cytometry cell cycle analyses showed that L1 operates to increase glioma cell motility and proliferation through FGFR activation. Shutdown of both L1 expression and FGFR activity in glioma cells resulted in a complete termination of cell migration in vitro. These studies show for the first time that soluble L1 ectodomain (L1LE) acts on glioma cells through FGFRs, and that FGFRs are used by glioma cells for increasing motility as well as proliferation in response to activation by L1LE ligand. Thus, effective treatment of high-grade glioma may require simultaneous targeting of L1, FGFRs, and integrin receptors, which would reduce glioma cell motility as well as proliferation.

  18. Homeobox A7 stimulates breast cancer cell proliferation by up-regulating estrogen receptor-alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Huang, He-Feng; Leung, Peter C.K.

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •HOXA7 regulates MCF7 cell proliferation. •HOXA7 up-regulates ERα expression. •HOXA7 mediates estrogen-induced MCF7 cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Breast cancer is the most common hormone-dependent malignancy in women. Homeobox (HOX) transcription factors regulate many cellular functions, including cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. The aberrant expression of HOX genes has been reported to be associated with human reproductive cancers. Estradiol (E2) and its nuclear receptors, estrogen receptor (ER)-alpha and ER-beta, are known to play critical roles in the regulation of breast cancer cell growth. However, an understanding of the potential relationship between HOXA7 and ER in breast cancer cells is limited. In this study, our results demonstrate that knockdown of HOXA7 in MCF7 cells significantly decreased cell proliferation and ERα expression. In addition, HOXA7 knockdown attenuated E2-induced cell proliferation as well as progesterone receptor (PR) expression. The stimulatory effects of E2 on cell proliferation and PR expression were abolished by co-treatment with ICI 182780, a selective ERα antagonist. In contrast, overexpression of HOXA7 significantly stimulated cell proliferation and ERα expression. Moreover, E2-induced cell proliferation, as well as PR expression, was enhanced by the overexpression of HOXA7. Neither knockdown nor overexpression of HOXA7 affected the ER-beta levels. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanistic role for HOXA7 in modulating breast cancer cell proliferation via regulation of ERα expression. This finding contributes to our understanding of the role HOXA7 plays in regulating the proliferation of ER-positive cancer cells.

  19. δ-Opioid receptors stimulate the metabolic sensor AMP-activated protein kinase through coincident signaling with G(q/11)-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Olianas, Maria C; Dedoni, Simona; Olianas, Alessandra; Onali, Pierluigi

    2012-02-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and δ-opioid receptors (DORs) are both involved in controlling cell survival, energy metabolism, and food intake, but little is known on the interaction between these two signaling molecules. Here we show that activation of human DORs stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells increased AMPK activity and AMPK phosphorylation on Thr172. DOR-induced AMPK phosphorylation was prevented by pertussis toxin, reduced by protein kinase A (PKA) activators, and unaffected by PKA, transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and protein kinase C inhibitors. Conversely, the DOR effect was reduced by Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK) inhibition, apyrase treatment, G(q/11) antagonism, and blockade of P2 purinergic receptors. Apyrase treatment also depressed DOR stimulation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, whereas P2 receptor antagonism blocked DOR stimulation of inositol phosphate accumulation. In SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and primary olfactory bulb neurons, DOR activation failed to affect AMPK phosphorylation per se but potentiated the stimulation by either muscarinic agonists or 2-methyl-thio-ADP. Sequestration of G protein βγ subunits (Gβγ) blocked the DOR potentiation of AMPK phosphorylation induced by oxotremorine-M. In CHO cells, the AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide1-β-D-ribonucleoside stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and glucose uptake, whereas pharmacological inhibition of AMPK, expression of a dominant-negative mutant of AMPKα1, and P2Y receptor blockade reduced DOR-stimulated glucose uptake. The data indicate that in different cell systems, DOR activation up-regulates AMPK through a Gβγ-dependent synergistic interaction with G(q/11)-coupled receptors, potentiating Ca(2+) release and CaMKKβ-dependent AMPK phosphorylation. In CHO cells, this coincident signaling mechanism is involved in DOR-induced glucose uptake. PMID:22031472

  20. Differential expression of adenosine A3 receptors controls adenosine A2A receptor-mediated inhibition of TLR responses in microglia.

    PubMed

    van der Putten, Céline; Zuiderwijk-Sick, Ella A; van Straalen, Linda; de Geus, Eveline D; Boven, Leonie A; Kondova, Ivanela; IJzerman, Ad P; Bajramovic, Jeffrey J

    2009-06-15

    Microglia activation is a prominent feature in many neuroinflammatory disorders. Unrestrained activation can generate a chronic inflammatory environment that might lead to neurodegeneration and autoimmunity. Extracellular adenosine modulates cellular activation through adenosine receptor (ADORA)-mediated signaling. There are four ADORA subtypes that can either increase (A(2A) and A(2B) receptors) or decrease (A(1) and A(3) receptors) intracellular cyclic AMP levels. The expression pattern of the subtypes thus orchestrates the cellular response to extracellular adenosine. We have investigated the expression of ADORA subtypes in unstimulated and TLR-activated primary rhesus monkey microglia. Activation induced an up-regulation of A(2A) and a down-regulation of A(3) receptor (A(3)R) levels. The altered ADORA-expression pattern sensitized microglia to A(2A) receptor (A(2A)R)-mediated inhibition of subsequent TLR-induced cytokine responses. By using combinations of subtype-specific agonists and antagonists, we revealed that in unstimulated microglia, A(2A)R-mediated inhibitory signaling was effectively counteracted by A(3)R-mediated signaling. In activated microglia, the decrease in A(3)R-mediated signaling sensitized them to A(2A)R-mediated inhibitory signaling. We report a differential, activation state-specific expression of ADORA in microglia and uncover a role for A(3)R as dynamically regulated suppressors of A(2A)R-mediated inhibition of TLR-induced responses. This would suggest exploration of combinations of A(2A)R agonists and A(3)R antagonists to dampen microglial activation during chronic neuroinflammatory conditions.

  1. Activation of transmembrane bile acid receptor TGR5 stimulates insulin secretion in pancreatic {beta} cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Divya P.; Rajagopal, Senthilkumar; Mahavadi, Sunila; Mirshahi, Faridoddin; Grider, John R.; Murthy, Karnam S.; Sanyal, Arun J.

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G protein coupled receptor TGR5 is expressed in mouse and human islets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGR5 is coupled to activation of Gs and Ca{sup 2+} release via cAMP/Epac/PLC-{epsilon} pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of TGR5 by bile salts and selective ligands causes insulin secretion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGR5 could be a potential therapeutic target to treat diabetes. -- Abstract: Bile acids act as signaling molecules and stimulate the G protein coupled receptor, TGR5, in addition to nuclear farnesoid X receptor to regulate lipid, glucose and energy metabolism. Bile acid induced activation of TGR5 in the enteroendocrine cells promotes glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) release, which has insulinotropic effect in the pancreatic {beta} cells. In the present study, we have identified the expression of TGR5 in pancreatic {beta} cell line MIN6 and also in mouse and human pancreatic islets. TGR5 selective ligands, oleanolic acid (OA) and INT-777 selectively activated G{alpha}{sub s} and caused an increase in intracellular cAMP and Ca{sup 2+}. OA and INT-777 also increased phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis and the increase was blocked by NF449 (a selective G{alpha}{sub s} inhibitor) or (U73122) (PI hydrolysis inhibitor). OA, INT-777 and lithocholic acid increased insulin release in MIN6 and human islets and the increase was inhibited by treatment with NF449, (U73122) or BAPTA-AM (chelator of calcium), but not with myristoylated PKI (PKA inhibitor), suggesting that the release is dependent on G{sub s}/cAMP/Ca{sup 2+} pathway. 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP, a cAMP analog, which activates Epac, but not PKA also stimulated PI hydrolysis. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the TGR5 expressed in the pancreatic {beta} cells regulates insulin secretion and highlights the importance of ongoing therapeutic strategies targeting TGR5 in the control of glucose homeostasis.

  2. Vasopressin V1 receptors contribute to hemodynamic and sympathoinhibitory responses evoked by stimulation of adenosine A2a receptors in NTS.

    PubMed

    Scislo, Tadeusz J; O'Leary, Donal S

    2006-05-01

    Activation of adenosine A2a receptors in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) decreases mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), whereas increases in preganglionic adrenal sympathetic nerve activity (pre-ASNA) occur, a pattern similar to that observed during hypotensive hemorrhage. Central vasopressin V1 receptors may contribute to posthemorrhagic hypotension and bradycardia. Both V1 and A2a receptors are densely expressed in the NTS, and both of these receptors are involved in cardiovascular control; thus they may interact. The responses elicited by NTS A2a receptors are mediated mostly via nonglutamatergic mechanisms, possibly via release of vasopressin. Therefore, we investigated whether blockade of NTS V1 receptors alters the autonomic response patterns evoked by stimulation of NTS A2a receptors (CGS-21680, 20 pmol/50 nl) in alpha-chloralose-urethane anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats. In addition, we compared the regional sympathetic responses to microinjections of vasopressin (0.1-100 ng/50 nl) into the NTS. Blockade of V1 receptors reversed the normal decreases in MAP into increases (-95.6 +/- 28.3 vs. 51.4 +/- 15.7 integralDelta%), virtually abolished the decreases in HR (-258.3 +/- 54.0 vs. 18.9 +/- 57.8 integralDeltabeats/min) and RSNA (-239.3 +/- 47.4 vs. 15.9 +/- 36.1 integralDelta%), and did not affect the increases in pre-ASNA (279.7 +/- 48.3 vs. 233.1 +/- 54.1 integralDelta%) evoked by A2a receptor stimulation. The responses partially returned toward normal values approximately 90 min after the blockade. Microinjections of vasopressin into the NTS evoked dose-dependent decreases in HR and RSNA and variable MAP and pre-ASNA responses with a tendency toward increases. We conclude that the decreases in MAP, HR, and RSNA in response to NTS A2a receptor stimulation may be mediated via release of vasopressin from neural terminals in the NTS. The differential effects of NTS V1 and A2a receptors on

  3. Transcranial random noise stimulation-induced plasticity is NMDA-receptor independent but sodium-channel blocker and benzodiazepines sensitive

    PubMed Central

    Chaieb, Leila; Antal, Andrea; Paulus, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Background: Application of transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) between 0.1 and 640 Hz of the primary motor cortex (M1) for 10 min induces a persistent excitability increase lasting for at least 60 min. However, the mechanism of tRNS-induced cortical excitability alterations is not yet fully understood. Objective: The main aim of this study was to get first efficacy data with regard to the possible neuronal effect of tRNS. Methods: Single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to measure levels of cortical excitability before and after combined application of tRNS at an intensity of 1 mA for 10 min stimulation duration and a pharmacological agent (or sham) on eight healthy male participants. Results: The sodium channel blocker carbamazepine showed a tendency toward inhibiting MEPs 5–60 min poststimulation. The GABAA agonist lorazepam suppressed tRNS-induced cortical excitability increases at 0–20 and 60 min time points. The partial NMDA receptor agonist D-cycloserine, the NMDA receptor antagonist dextromethorphan and the D2/D3 receptor agonist ropinirole had no significant effects on the excitability increases seen with tRNS. Conclusions: In contrast to transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), aftereffects of tRNS are seem to be not NMDA receptor dependent and can be suppressed by benzodiazepines suggesting that tDCS and tRNS depend upon different mechanisms. PMID:25914617

  4. Stimulation of serotonin-1A receptors in mammals to alleviate motion sickness and emesis induced by chemical agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucot, James B. (Inventor); Crampton, George H. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A method for the alleviation of both motion sickness and chemically-induced emesis is provided which includes the administration of a nontoxic, therapeutically effective amount of a composition which stimulates serotonin-1A receptors in a mammal in need of such treatment. The preferred compounds for use are buspirone and 8-hydroxy-2(di-n-propylamino)-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT).

  5. Blockage of A2A and A3 adenosine receptors decreases the desensitization of human GABAA receptors microtransplanted to Xenopus oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Roseti, Cristina; Palma, Eleonora; Martinello, Katiuscia; Fucile, Sergio; Morace, Roberta; Esposito, Vincenzo; Cantore, Gianpaolo; Arcella, Antonietta; Giangaspero, Felice; Aronica, Eleonora; Mascia, Addolorata; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Quarato, Pier Paolo; Manfredi, Mario; Cristalli, Gloria; Lambertucci, Catia; Marucci, Gabriella; Volpini, Rosaria; Limatola, Cristina; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2009-01-01

    We previously found that the endogenous anticonvulsant adenosine, acting through A2A and A3 adenosine receptors (ARs), alters the stability of currents (IGABA) generated by GABAA receptors expressed in the epileptic human mesial temporal lobe (MTLE). Here we examined whether ARs alter the stability (desensitization) of IGABA expressed in focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) and in periglioma epileptic tissues. The experiments were performed with tissues from 23 patients, using voltage-clamp recordings in Xenopus oocytes microinjected with membranes isolated from human MTLE and FCD tissues or using patch-clamp recordings of pyramidal neurons in epileptic tissue slices. On repetitive activation, the epileptic GABAA receptors revealed instability, manifested by a large IGABA rundown, which in most of the oocytes (≈70%) was obviously impaired by the new A2A antagonists ANR82, ANR94, and ANR152. In most MTLE tissue-microtransplanted oocytes, a new A3 receptor antagonist (ANR235) significantly improved IGABA stability. Moreover, patch-clamped pyramidal neurons from human neocortical slices of periglioma epileptic tissues exhibited altered IGABA rundown on ANR94 treatment. Our findings indicate that antagonizing A2A and A3 receptors increases the IGABA stability in different epileptic tissues and suggest that adenosine derivatives may offer therapeutic opportunities in various forms of human epilepsy. PMID:19721003

  6. Serum amyloid A stimulates macrophage foam cell formation via lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 upregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ha Young; Kim, Sang Doo; Baek, Suk-Hwan; Choi, Joon Hyuk; Cho, Kyung-Hyun; Zabel, Brian A.; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. ► SAA stimulated upregulation of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1). ► SAA-induced LOX1 expression and foam cell formation is mediated by JNK/NF-κB signaling. ► HDL-conjugated SAA also stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 upregulation. ► The finding reveals a novel mechanism of action of SAA in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Elevated levels of serum amyloid A (SAA) is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, however, the role of SAA in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis remains unclear. Here we show that SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. SAA-stimulated foam cell formation was mediated by c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. Moreover, both SAA and SAA-conjugated high density lipoprotein stimulated the expression of the important scavenger receptor lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1) via nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). A LOX1 antagonist carrageenan significantly blocked SAA-induced foam cell formation, indicating that SAA promotes foam cell formation via LOX1 expression. Our findings therefore suggest that SAA stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 induction, and thus likely contributes to atherogenesis.

  7. The significance of functional receptor heterogeneity in the biological responses of the rabbit neutrophil to stimulation by chemotactic formyl peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Kermode, J C; Freer, R J; Becker, E L

    1991-01-01

    The characteristics of binding to the chemotactic receptors on rabbit peritoneal neutrophils were examined for seven formyl peptide analogues. These receptor-binding characteristics were compared with the abilities of the analogues to induce the biological responses of degranulation and chemotaxis. Five of the analogues showed distinct functional heterogeneity in their receptor-binding patterns, whereas the two most potent compounds displayed homogeneous binding patterns. The relative potencies of the formyl peptide analogues for stimulation of degranulation correlated well with their relative potencies for high-affinity, but not low-affinity, binding. The biphasic patterns for stimulation of chemotactic migration were similar for the less potent analogues, and their potencies paralleled those for both degranulation and receptor binding. In contrast, the most potent analogues induced a greater maximal extent of chemotactic migration than the other compounds, but displayed a lower than expected potency (i.e. they required higher than expected concentrations). These anomalies in the patterns of the chemotactic response cannot be reconciled with a simple receptor model comprising two independent classes of receptors. Instead, a model comprising interconvertible states of different affinities is proposed. The state of higher affinity appears to play a central role in initiation of both degranulation and chemotaxis. The more potent formyl peptide analogues are thought to stabilize an activated, higher-affinity, state of the receptor; this can explain their greater efficacy in stimulating chemotaxis. The proposed model may also be applicable to other receptors that are coupled by a guanine-nucleotide-binding regulatory protein to their associated effector. PMID:2064609

  8. Dopamine D1 receptor stimulation modulates the formation and retrieval of novel object recognition memory: Role of the prelimbic cortex

    PubMed Central

    Pezze, Marie A.; Marshall, Hayley J.; Fone, Kevin C.F.; Cassaday, Helen J.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that dopamine D1 receptor antagonists impair novel object recognition memory but the effects of dopamine D1 receptor stimulation remain to be determined. This study investigated the effects of the selective dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF81297 on acquisition and retrieval in the novel object recognition task in male Wistar rats. SKF81297 (0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg s.c.) given 15 min before the sampling phase impaired novel object recognition evaluated 10 min or 24 h later. The same treatments also reduced novel object recognition memory tested 24 h after the sampling phase and when given 15 min before the choice session. These data indicate that D1 receptor stimulation modulates both the encoding and retrieval of object recognition memory. Microinfusion of SKF81297 (0.025 or 0.05 μg/side) into the prelimbic sub-region of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in this case 10 min before the sampling phase also impaired novel object recognition memory, suggesting that the mPFC is one important site mediating the effects of D1 receptor stimulation on visual recognition memory. PMID:26277743

  9. Differential role of nitric oxide in regional sympathetic responses to stimulation of NTS A2a adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Scislo, Tadeusz J; Tan, Nobusuke; O'Leary, Donal S

    2005-02-01

    Our previous studies showed that preganglionic adrenal (pre-ASNA), renal (RSNA), lumbar, and postganglionic adrenal sympathetic nerve activities (post-ASNA) are inhibited after stimulation of arterial baroreceptors, nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), and glutamatergic and P2x receptors and are activated after stimulation of adenosine A1 receptors. However, stimulation of adenosine A2a receptors inhibited RSNA and post-ASNA, whereas it activated pre-ASNA. Because the effects evoked by NTS A2a receptors may be mediated via activation of nitric oxide (NO) mechanisms in NTS neurons, we tested the hypothesis that NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors would attenuate regional sympathetic responses to NTS A2a receptor stimulation, whereas NO donors would evoke contrasting responses from pre-ASNA versus RSNA and post-ASNA. Therefore, in chloralose/urethane-anesthetized rats, we compared hemodynamic and regional sympathetic responses to microinjections of selective A2a receptor agonist (CGS-21680, 20 pmol/50 nl) after pretreatment with NOS inhibitors Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (10 nmol/100 nl) and 1-[2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]imidazole (100 pmol/100 nl) versus pretreatment with vehicle (100 nl). In addition, responses to microinjections into the NTS of different NO donors [40 and 400 pmol/50 nl sodium nitroprusside (SNP); 0.5 and 5 nmol/50 nl 3,3-bis(aminoethyl)-1-hydroxy-2-oxo-1-triazene (DETA NONOate, also known as NOC-18), and 2 nmol/50 nl 3-(2-hydroxy-2-nitroso-1-propylhydrazino)-1-propanamine (PAPA NONOate, also known as NOC-15)], the NO precursor L-arginine (10-50 nmol/50 nl), and sodium glutamate (500 pmol/50 nl) were evaluated. SNP, DETA NONOate, and PAPA NONOate activated pre-ASNA and inhibited RSNA and post-ASNA, whereas l-arginine and glutamate microinjected into the same site of the NTS inhibited all these sympathetic outputs. Decreases in heart rate and depressor or biphasic responses accompanied the neural responses. Pretreatment with NOS inhibitors

  10. Endothelin receptor B protects granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor mRNA from degradation.

    PubMed

    Jungck, David; Knobloch, Jürgen; Körber, Sandra; Lin, Yingfeng; Konradi, Jürgen; Yanik, Sarah; Stoelben, Erich; Koch, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    Evidence is lacking on the differential effects of the two therapeutic concepts of endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs): the blockade of only the endothelin receptor A (ETAR; selective antagonism) versus both ETAR and endothelin receptor B (ETBR; dual blockade). Ambrisentan, a selective ERA, and bosentan, a dual blocker, are both available for therapy. We hypothesized that there are differences in the potential of ERAs to ameliorate inflammatory processes in human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) and aimed to unravel underlying mechanisms. We used HASMC culture, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) induced transcription and expression of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 2 (CXCL2), chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 3 (CXCL3), granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and matrix metalloproteinase 12 (MMP12) in HASMCs. In concentration-response experiments, bosentan led to a significantly greater reduction of GM-CSF and MMP12 protein release than ambrisentan, whereas there was no significant difference in their effect on GM-CSF and MMP12 mRNA. Both ERAs reduced CXCL3 protein and mRNA equally but had no effect on CXCL2. Blocking mitogen-activated protein kinases revealed that both ETAR and ETBR signal through p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, but ETBR also signals through extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 to induce GM-CSF expression. In the presence of the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D, bosentan, but not ambrisentan, reduced GM-CSF but not MMP12 or CXCL3 mRNA. In conclusion, blockade of each endothelin receptor subtype reduces GM-CSF transcription, but blocking ETBR additionally protects GM-CSF mRNA from degradation via ERK-1/2. Accordingly, blocking both ETAR and ETBR leads to a stronger reduction of TNFα-induced GM-CSF protein expression. This mechanism might be specific to GM-CSF. Our data stress the anti-inflammatory potential

  11. Enhanced response to mouse thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor immunization in TSH receptor-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Mami; Mitsutake, Norisato; Sakamoto, Hikaru; Chen, Chun-Rong; Rapoport, Basil; McLachlan, Sandra M; Nagayama, Yuji

    2010-08-01

    Graves-like hyperthyroidism is induced in BALB/c mice by immunization with adenovirus expressing the human TSH receptor (TSHR) A-subunit (amino acids 1-289). However, because of nonidentity between the human and mouse TSHR ( approximately 87% amino acid homology), we compared the responses of mice immunized with adenoviruses expressing either the mouse or the human TSHR A-subunit. Wild-type (wt) BALB/c mice immunized with the mouse A-subunit developed neither TSHR antibodies (measured by flow cytometry) nor thyroid lymphocytic infiltration. However, wt C57BL/6 mice developed sparse intrathyroidal lymphocyte infiltration without antibody production. Depletion of naturally occurring regulatory CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells had little effect. These results indicate the inability to break tolerance to the mouse TSHR in wt mice. In contrast, TSHR knockout (KO) BALB/c mice generated mouse TSHR antibodies in response to mouse A-subunit immunization and augmented human TSHR antibody response to human A-subunit immunization. Thyroid-stimulating antibody titers measured in a functional bioassay were comparable in human A-subunit immunized wt mice and in TSHR KO mice immunized with either the mouse or human A-subunit. In conclusion, immune response to the mouse TSHR is readily induced in TSHR KO but not in wt mice. Only in the former does immunization with adenovirus expressing the mouse A-subunit generate antibodies capable of activating the mouse TSHR. TSHR KO mice are, therefore, of value for future studies dissecting the autoimmune response to the mouse TSHR.

  12. Forkhead box A3 mediates glucocorticoid receptor function in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xinran; Xu, Lingyan; Mueller, Elisabetta

    2016-03-22

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are widely prescribed anti-inflammatory agents, but their chronic use leads to undesirable side effects such as excessive expansion of adipose tissue. We have recently shown that the forkhead box protein A3 (Foxa3) is a calorie-hoarding factor that regulates the selective enlargement of epididymal fat depots and suppresses energy expenditure in a nutritional- and age-dependent manner. It has been demonstrated that Foxa3 levels are elevated in adipose depots in response to high-fat diet regimens and during the aging process; however no studies to date have elucidated the mechanisms that control Foxa3's expression in fat. Given the established effects of GCs in increasing visceral adiposity and in reducing thermogenesis, we assessed the existence of a possible link between GCs and Foxa3. Computational prediction analysis combined with molecular studies revealed that Foxa3 is regulated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in preadipocytes, adipocytes, and adipose tissues and is required to facilitate the binding of the GR to its target gene promoters in fat depots. Analysis of the long-term effects of dexamethasone treatment in mice revealed that Foxa3 ablation protects mice specifically against fat accretion but not against other pathological side effects elicited by this synthetic GC in tissues such as liver, muscle, and spleen. In conclusion our studies provide the first demonstration, to our knowledge, that Foxa3 is a direct target of GC action in adipose tissues and point to a role of Foxa3 as a mediator of the side effects induced in fat tissues by chronic treatment with synthetic steroids.

  13. Forkhead box A3 mediates glucocorticoid receptor function in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xinran; Xu, Lingyan; Mueller, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are widely prescribed anti-inflammatory agents, but their chronic use leads to undesirable side effects such as excessive expansion of adipose tissue. We have recently shown that the forkhead box protein A3 (Foxa3) is a calorie-hoarding factor that regulates the selective enlargement of epididymal fat depots and suppresses energy expenditure in a nutritional- and age-dependent manner. It has been demonstrated that Foxa3 levels are elevated in adipose depots in response to high-fat diet regimens and during the aging process; however no studies to date have elucidated the mechanisms that control Foxa3’s expression in fat. Given the established effects of GCs in increasing visceral adiposity and in reducing thermogenesis, we assessed the existence of a possible link between GCs and Foxa3. Computational prediction analysis combined with molecular studies revealed that Foxa3 is regulated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in preadipocytes, adipocytes, and adipose tissues and is required to facilitate the binding of the GR to its target gene promoters in fat depots. Analysis of the long-term effects of dexamethasone treatment in mice revealed that Foxa3 ablation protects mice specifically against fat accretion but not against other pathological side effects elicited by this synthetic GC in tissues such as liver, muscle, and spleen. In conclusion our studies provide the first demonstration, to our knowledge, that Foxa3 is a direct target of GC action in adipose tissues and point to a role of Foxa3 as a mediator of the side effects induced in fat tissues by chronic treatment with synthetic steroids. PMID:26957608

  14. Stimulation of Hepatic Apolipoprotein A-I Production by Novel Thieno-Triazolodiazepines: Roles of the Classical Benzodiazepine Receptor, PAF Receptor, and Bromodomain Binding.

    PubMed

    Kempen, Herman J; Bellus, Daniel; Fedorov, Oleg; Nicklisch, Silke; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Picaud, Sarah; Knapp, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Expression and secretion of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) by cultured liver cells can be markedly stimulated by triazolodiazepines (TZDs). It has been shown previously that the thieno-TZD Ro 11-1464 increases plasma levels of apoA-I and in vivomacrophage reverse cholesterol transport in mice. However, these effects were only seen at high doses, at which the compound could act on central benzodiazepine (BZD) receptors or platelet activating factor (PAF) receptors, interfering with its potential utility. In this work, we describe 2 new thieno-TZDs MDCO-3770 and MDCO-3783, both derived from Ro 11-1464. These compounds display the same high efficacy on apoA-I production, metabolic stability, and lack of cytotoxicity in cultured hepatocytes as Ro 11-1464, but they do not bind to the central BZD receptor and PAF receptor. The quinazoline RVX-208 was less efficacious in stimulating apoA-I production and displayed signs of cytotoxicity. Certain TZDs stimulating apoA-I production are now known to be inhibitors of bromodomain (BRD) extra-terminal (BET) proteins BRDT, BRD2, BRD3, and BRD4, and this inhibition was inferred as a main molecular mechanism for their effect on apoA-I expression. We show here that the thieno-TZD (+)-JQ1, a potent BET inhibitor, strongly stimulated apoA-I production in Hep-G2 cells, but that its enantiomer (-)-JQ1, which has no BET inhibitor activity, also showed considerable effect on apoA-I production. MDCO-3770 and MDCO-3783 also inhibited BRD3 and BRD4 in vitro, with potency somewhat below that of (+)-JQ1. We conclude that the effect of thieno-TZDs on apoA-I expression is not due to inhibition of the BZD or PAF receptors and is not completely explained by transcriptional repression by BET proteins. PMID:25278768

  15. Stimulation of Hepatic Apolipoprotein A-I Production by Novel Thieno-Triazolodiazepines: Roles of the Classical Benzodiazepine Receptor, PAF Receptor, and Bromodomain Binding

    PubMed Central

    Kempen, Herman J; Bellus, Daniel; Fedorov, Oleg; Nicklisch, Silke; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Picaud, Sarah; Knapp, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Expression and secretion of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) by cultured liver cells can be markedly stimulated by triazolodiazepines (TZDs). It has been shown previously that the thieno-TZD Ro 11-1464 increases plasma levels of apoA-I and in vivomacrophage reverse cholesterol transport in mice. However, these effects were only seen at high doses, at which the compound could act on central benzodiazepine (BZD) receptors or platelet activating factor (PAF) receptors, interfering with its potential utility. In this work, we describe 2 new thieno-TZDs MDCO-3770 and MDCO-3783, both derived from Ro 11-1464. These compounds display the same high efficacy on apoA-I production, metabolic stability, and lack of cytotoxicity in cultured hepatocytes as Ro 11-1464, but they do not bind to the central BZD receptor and PAF receptor. The quinazoline RVX-208 was less efficacious in stimulating apoA-I production and displayed signs of cytotoxicity. Certain TZDs stimulating apoA-I production are now known to be inhibitors of bromodomain (BRD) extra-terminal (BET) proteins BRDT, BRD2, BRD3, and BRD4, and this inhibition was inferred as a main molecular mechanism for their effect on apoA-I expression. We show here that the thieno-TZD (+)-JQ1, a potent BET inhibitor, strongly stimulated apoA-I production in Hep-G2 cells, but that its enantiomer (−)-JQ1, which has no BET inhibitor activity, also showed considerable effect on apoA-I production. MDCO-3770 and MDCO-3783 also inhibited BRD3 and BRD4 in vitro, with potency somewhat below that of (+)-JQ1. We conclude that the effect of thieno-TZDs on apoA-I expression is not due to inhibition of the BZD or PAF receptors and is not completely explained by transcriptional repression by BET proteins. PMID:25278768

  16. An Antagonistic Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Variant Inhibits VEGF-Stimulated Receptor Autophosphorylation and Proliferation of Human Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemeister, Gerhard; Schirner, Michael; Reusch, Petra; Barleon, Bernhard; Marme, Dieter; Martiny-Baron, Georg

    1998-04-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent mitogen with a unique specificity for endothelial cells and a key mediator of aberrant endothelial cell proliferation and vascular permeability in a variety of human pathological situations, such as tumor angiogenesis, diabetic retinopathy, rheumatoid arthritis, or psoriasis. VEGF is a symmetric homodimeric molecule with two receptor binding interfaces lying on each pole of the molecule. Herein we report on the construction and recombinant expression of an asymmetric heterodimeric VEGF variant with an intact receptor binding interface at one pole and a mutant receptor binding interface at the second pole of the dimer. This VEGF variant binds to VEGF receptors but fails to induce receptor activation. In competition experiments, the heterodimeric VEGF variant antagonizes VEGF-stimulated receptor autophosphorylation and proliferation of endothelial cells. A 15-fold excess of the heterodimer was sufficient to inhibit VEGF-stimulated endothelial cell proliferation by 50%, and a 100-fold excess resulted in an almost complete inhibition. By using a rational approach that is based on the structure of VEGF, we have shown the feasibility to construct a VEGF variant that acts as an VEGF antagonist.

  17. Characterization of cholinergic muscarinic receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism in brain from immature rats

    SciTech Connect

    Balduini, W.; Murphy, S.D.; Costa, L.G. )

    1990-05-01

    Hydrolysis of phosphoinositides elicited by stimulation of cholinergic muscarinic receptors has been studied in brain from neonatal (7-day-old) rats in order to determine: (1) whether the neonatal rat could provide a good model system to study this signal-transduction pathway; and (2) whether potential differences with adult nerve tissue would explain the differential, age-related effects of cholinergic agonists. Accumulation of (3H) inositol phosphates in (3H)inositol prelabeled slices from neonatal and adult rats was measured as an index of phosphoinositide metabolism. Full (acetylcholine, methacholine, carbachol) and partial (oxotremorine, bethanechol) agonists had qualitatively similar, albeit quantitatively different, effects in neonatal and adult rats. Atropine and pirenzepine effectively blocked the carbachol-induced response with inhibition constants of 1.2 and 20.7 nM, respectively. In all brain areas, response to all agonists was higher in neonatal than adult rats, and in hippocampus and cerebral cortex the response was higher than in cerebellum or brainstem. The relative intrinsic activity of partial agonists was higher in the latter two areas (0.6-0.7) than in the former two (0.3-0.4). Carbachol-stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism in brain areas correlated well with the binding of (3H)QNB (r2 = 0.627) and, particularly, with (3H)pirenzepine (r2 = 0.911). In cerebral cortex the effect of carbachol was additive to that of norepinephrine and glutamate. The presence of calcium (250-500 microM) was necessary for maximal response to carbachol to be elicited; the EC50 value for Ca2+ was 65.4 microM. Addition of EDTA completely abolished the response. Removal of sodium ions from the incubation medium reduced the response to carbachol by 50%.

  18. Effects of α-amanitin on the stimulation of prostatic ribonucleic acid polymerase by prostatic steroid–protein receptor complexes (Short Communication)

    PubMed Central

    Davies, P.; Griffiths, K.

    1974-01-01

    Stimulation of prostatic RNA polymerase in vitro by prostatic 17β-hydroxy-5α-androstan-3-one (5α-dihydrotestosterone)–receptor complexes has been previously reported. By use of the selective inhibitor, α-amanitin, we have shown that both nucleolar and extranucleolar RNA polymerase activities may be stimulated, but stimulation is abolished at high ionic strength. PMID:4374943

  19. Stimulation of the mineralocorticoid receptor improves memory in young and elderly healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Hinkelmann, Kim; Wingenfeld, Katja; Kuehl, Linn K; Fleischer, Juliane; Heuser, Isabella; Wiedemann, Klaus; Otte, Christian

    2015-02-01

    Glucocorticoids play an important role in cognitive function and act on glucocorticoid receptors and mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) in the brain. Previously, the blockade of the MR has been shown to impair visuospatial and working memory in healthy young men. Here, we investigated the effects of the MR agonist fludrocortisone on memory in young and elderly healthy individuals. Thirty-one young (mean age 25.4 ± 4.6 years) and 22 elderly (mean age 63.2 ± 8.2 years) healthy participants received the MR agonist fludrocortisone (0.4 mg) or placebo at least 3 days apart in a randomized, double-blind within-subject cross-over design. We measured verbal memory (auditory verbal learning test), nonverbal memory (Rey/Taylor complex figure test), and working memory (digit-span task). As expected, young participants performed significantly better than elderly individuals in visuospatial memory (effect of group: F = 42.7, p < 0.01), verbal memory (F = 33.1, p < 0.01), and working memory (digit-span backward: F = 4.5, p = 0.04). For visuospatial memory (F = 5.0, p = 0.03) and short-term and working memory (digit-span forward: F = 4.2, p = 0.05), we found a significant treatment effect indicating better memory performance after fludrocortisone compared with placebo across groups. In concert with the previous studies, our data suggest a role of the MR in memory function. A cognitive enhancing effect by MR stimulation warrants future studies.

  20. Chronic stimulation of farnesoid X receptor impairs nitric oxide sensitivity of vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Kida, Taiki; Murata, Takahisa; Hori, Masatoshi; Ozaki, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that is highly expressed in enterohepatic tissue, is implicated in bile acid, lipid, and glucose metabolisms. Although recent studies showed that FXR is also expressed in vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells, its physiological and/or pathological roles in vasculature tissue remain unknown. The aim of this study is to examine the chronic effect of synthetic FXR agonist GW4064 on vascular contraction and endothelium-dependent relaxation using tissue culture procedure. In cultured rabbit mesenteric arteries, the treatment with 0.1-10 microM GW4064 for 7 days did not influence vascular contractility induced by high K(+) (15-65 mM), norepinephrine (0.1-100 microM), and endothelin-1 (0.1-100 nM). However, the chronic treatment with GW4064 (1-10 microM for 7 days) dose dependently impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation induced by substance P (0.1-30 nM). In hematoxylin-eosin cross sectioning and en face immunostaining, GW4064 had no effects on the morphology of endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In endothelium-denuded arteries treated with GW4064 (1-10 microM) for 7 days, 3 nM-100 microM sodium nitroprusside-induced vasorelaxation, but not membrane-permeable cGMP analog 8-bromoguanosine-cGMP (8-Br-cGMP; 1-100 microM)-induced vasorelaxation, was significantly impaired. In these GW4064-treated arteries, 1 muM sodium nitroprusside-induced intracellular cGMP elevations were impaired. In RT-PCR, any changes were detected in mRNA expression level of alpha(1)- and beta(1)-subunit of soluble guanylyl cyclase. These results suggest that chronic stimulation of FXR impairs endothelium-dependent relaxation, which is due to decreased sensitivity of smooth muscle cells to nitric oxide.

  1. Estrogen receptor mediates simvastatin-stimulated osteogenic effects in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Shu-Chun; Chen, Chung-Hwan; Fu, Yin-Chin; Tai, I-Chun; Li, Ching-Ju; Chang, Li-Fu; Ho, Mei-Ling; Chang, Je-Ken

    2015-12-01

    Simvastatin, an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, is known to promote osteogenic differentiation. However, the mechanism underlying simvastatin-induced osteogenesis is not well understood. In this study, we hypothesize that the estrogen receptor (ER) mediates simvastatin-induced osteogenic differentiation. ER antagonists and siRNA were used to determine the involvement of the ER in simvastatin-induced osteogenesis in mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (D1 cells). Osteogenesis was evaluated by mRNA expression, protein level/activity of osteogenic markers, and mineralization. The estrogen response element (ERE) promoter activity and the ER-simvastatin binding affinity were examined. Our results showed that the simvastatin-induced osteogenic effects were decreased by treatment with ERα antagonists and ERα siRNA but not by an antagonist specific for the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER-1). The simvastatin-induced osteogenic effects were further increased by E2 treatment and were reversed by ERα antagonists or siRNA treatment. Luciferase reporter gene assays demonstrated that simvastatin increase ERα-dependent transcriptional activity that was suppressed by ERα antagonists. Furthermore, the ERα-simvastatin binding assay showed that IC50 value of simvastatin is 7.85 μM and that of E2 is 32.8 nM, indicating that simvastatin is a weak ligand for ERα. These results suggest that simvastatin-stimulated osteogenesis is mediated by ERα but not GPER-1. Moreover, this is the first report to demonstrate that simvastatin acts as an ERα ligand and a co-activator to enhance ERα-dependent transcriptional activity and thus promotes osteogenesis. These results indicate that simvastatin-induced osteogenesis is mediated via an ERα-dependent pathway.

  2. Cardiac oxytocin receptor blockade stimulates adverse cardiac remodeling in ovariectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Marek; Wang, Donghao; Danalache, Bogdan; Gangal, Marius; Gutkowska, Jolanta

    2010-08-01

    An increasing amount of evidence demonstrates the beneficial role of oxytocin (OT) in the cardiovascular system. Similar actions are attributed to genistein, an isoflavonic phytoestrogen. The treatment with genistein activates the OT system in the aorta of ovariectomized (OVX) Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of low doses of genistein on the OT-induced effects in rat hypertension. The hypothesis tested was that treatment of OVX spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) with genistein improves heart structure and heart work through a mechanism involving the specific OT receptor (OTR). OVX SHRs or SD rats were treated with genistein (in microg/g body wt sc, 10 days) in the presence or absence of an OT antagonist (OTA) [d(CH(2))(5), Tyr(Me)(2), Orn(8)]-vasotocin or a nonspecific estrogen receptor antagonist (ICI-182780). Vehicle-treated OVX rats served as controls. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis demonstrated that left ventricular (LV) OTR, downregulated by ovariectomy, increased in response to genistein. In SHRs or SD rats, this effect was blocked by OTA or ICI-182780 administration. The OTR was mainly localized in microvessels expressing the CD31 marker and colocalized with endothelial nitric oxide synthase. In SHRs, the genistein-stimulated OTR increases were associated with improved fractional shortening, decreased blood pressure (12 mmHg), decreased heart weight-to-body weight ratio, decreased fibrosis, and lowered brain natriuretic peptide in the LV. The prominent finding of the study is the detrimental effect of OTA treatment on the LV of SHRs. OTA treatment of OVX SHRs resulted in a dramatic worsening of ejection fractions and an augmented fibrosis. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that cardiac OTRs are involved in the regulation of cardiac function of OVX SHRs. The decreases of OTRs may contribute to cardiac pathology following menopause.

  3. Role of urokinase and its receptor in basal and stimulated colonic epithelial cell migration in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, A; Gibson, P

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Migration of colonic epithelial cells is important for mucosal repair following injury. The urokinase (u-PA) system regulates migration in other cell types.
AIM—To examine the role of u-PA and its receptor (u-PAR) in colonic epithelial cell migration.
METHODS—Migration was assessed over 24 hours in circular wounds made in confluent monolayers of LIM1215 and Caco-2 human colon cancer cells. The function of u-PA and u-PAR was ablated with antisense oligonucleotides to block expression, with synthetic u-PA peptides to block interaction, and with aprotinin to block u-PA mediated proteolysis.
RESULTS—Migration was stimulated two to threefold by exogenous u-PA, an effect dependent on u-PAR binding but independent of u-PA mediated mitogenesis and proteolysis. Expression of u-PA and u-PAR was inhibited by 80% by the appropriate antisense oligonucleotide. Basal migration and the motogenic effects of butyrate, epidermal growth factor, and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate were suppressed by the u-PAR antisense oligonucleotide (40-60%) but were at best minimally affected following inhibition of u-PA expression and binding. 
CONCLUSIONS—In an in vitro model of wounded colonic epithelium, u-PAR promotes cell migration through mechanisms that are not exclusively dependent on u-PA binding. Therefore, u-PA and u-PAR may contribute to colonic mucosal repair in vivo.


Keywords: colon; migration; urokinase; urokinase receptor; epidermal growth factor; butyrate; protein kinase C PMID:10861271

  4. Calcitonin Receptor-Zonula Occludens-1 Interaction Is Critical for Calcitonin-Stimulated Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Aljameeli, Ahmed; Thakkar, Arvind; Thomas, Shibu; Lakshmikanthan, Vijaybasker; Iczkowski, Kenneth A.; Shah, Girish V.

    2016-01-01

    The role of neuroendocrine peptide calcitonin (CT) and its receptor (CTR) in epithelial cancer progression is an emerging concept with great clinical potential. Expression of CT and CTR is frequently elevated in prostate cancers (PCs) and activation of CT–CTR axis in non-invasive PC cells induces an invasive phenotype. Here we show by yeast-two hybrid screens that CTR associates with the tight junction protein Zonula Occludens-1 (ZO-1) via the interaction between the type 1 PDZ motif at the carboxy-terminus of CTR and the PDZ3 domain of ZO-1. Mutation of either the CTR C-PDZ-binding motif or the ZO-1-PDZ3 domain did not affect binding of CTR with its ligand or G-protein-mediated signaling but abrogated destabilizing actions of CT on tight junctions and formation of distant metastases by orthotopically implanted PC cells in nude mice, indicating that these PDZ domain interactions were pathologically relevant. Further, we observed CTR-ZO-1 interactions in PC specimens by proximity ligation immunohistochemistry, and identified that the number of interactions in metastatic PC specimens was several-fold larger than in non-metastatic PC. Our results for the first time demonstrate a mechanism by which PDZ-mediated interaction between CTR and ZO1 is required for CT-stimulated metastasis of prostate cancer. Since many receptors contain PDZ-binding motifs, this would suggest that PDZ-binding motif-adaptor protein interactions constitute a common mechanism for cancer metastasis. PMID:26934365

  5. Colony-stimulating Factor-1 Receptor Utilizes Multiple Signaling Pathways to Induce Cyclin D2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Arunangsu; She, Hongyun; Kim, Leopold; Boruch, Allan; Guris, Deborah L.; Carlberg, Kristen; Sebti, Saïd M.; Woodley, David T.; Imamoto, Akira; Li, Wei

    2000-01-01

    Colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) induces expression of immediate early gene, such as c-myc and c-fos and delayed early genes such as D-type cyclins (D1 and D2), whose products play essential roles in the G1 to S phase transition of the cell cycle. Little is known, however, about the cytoplasmic signal transduction pathways that connect the surface CSF-1 receptor to these genes in the nucleus. We have investigated the signaling mechanism of CSF-1-induced D2 expression. Analyses of CSF-1 receptor autophosphorylation mutants show that, although certain individual mutation has a partial inhibitory effect, only multiple combined mutations completely block induction of D2 in response to CSF-1. We report that at least three parallel pathways, the Src pathway, the MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway, and the c-myc pathway, are involved. Induction of D2 is partially inhibited in Src−/− bone marrow-derived macrophages and by Src inhibitor PP1 and is enhanced in v-Src-overexpressing cells. Activation of myc's transactivating activity selectively induces D2 but not D1. Blockade of c-myc expression partially blocks CSF-1-induced D2 expression. Complete inhibition of the MEK/ERK pathway causes 50% decrease of D2 expression. Finally, simultaneous inhibition of Src, MEK activation, and c-myc expression additively blocks CSF-1-induced D2 expression. This study indicates that multiple signaling pathways are involved in full induction of a single gene, and this finding may also apply broadly to other growth factor-inducible genes. PMID:11071910

  6. Expression of transferrin receptors on mitogen-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes: relation to cellular activation and related metabolic events.

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, R M; Galbraith, G M

    1981-01-01

    Mitogen-activated normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes bind transferrin to specific membrane receptors. In this study, lymphocytes stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin for 0-66 hr were examined to determine the relation of this phenomenon to cellular activation and related metabolic events. Transferrin receptors were first detected at 20-24 hr. This event was consistently preceded by RNA and protein turnover which commenced during the first 6 hr of culture, whereas initiation of DNA synthesis was detected concurrently with the appearance of receptors or slightly later (24-30 hr). Exposure of cells to inhibitors of RNA and protein synthesis early during culture (at 0 or 24 hr) prevented the expression of transferrin receptors, but also caused generalized metabolic failure, and abrogated cellular activation. In contrast, later addition of these agents at 48 hr did not interfere significantly with the process of activation, but did suppress the terminal increase in receptor-bearing cells observed during the final 18 hr in control cultures lacking inhibitor. After deliberate thermal stripping of receptors from activated cells, the reappearance of membrance binding sites which normally occurred within 30 min, was also blocked by cycloheximide, puromycin and actinomycin D. However, similar inhibition of DNA which was induced by hydroxyurea had much less effect upon both the initial appearance of receptors and their reappearance after ligand-induced depletion. These results demonstrate that the appearance of transferrin receptors upon human lymphocytes is dependent upon cellular activation and requires synthesis of protein and RNA. PMID:6172372

  7. Stimulation of glutamate receptors in the ventral tegmental area is necessary for serotonin-2 receptor-induced increases in mesocortical dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Pehek, E A; Hernan, A E

    2015-04-01

    Modulation of dopamine (DA) released by serotonin-2 (5-HT2) receptors has been implicated in the mechanism of action of antipsychotic drugs. The mesocortical DA system has been implicated particularly in the cognitive deficits observed in schizophrenia. Agonism at 5-HT2A receptors in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is associated with increases in cortical DA release. Evidence indicates that 5-HT2A receptors in the cortex regulate mesocortical DA release through stimulation of a "long-loop" feedback system from the PFC to the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and back. However, a causal role for VTA glutamate in the 5-HT2-induced increases in PFC DA has not been established. The present study does so by measuring 5-HT2 agonist-induced DA release in the cortex after infusions of glutamate antagonists into the VTA of the rat. Infusions of a combination of a N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) (AP-5: 2-amino-5-phosphopentanoic acid) and an AMPA/kainate (CNQX: 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione) receptor antagonist into the VTA blocked the increases in cortical DA produced by administration of the 5-HT2 agonist DOI [(±)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine] (2.5mg/kg s.c.). These results demonstrate that stimulation of glutamate receptors in the VTA is necessary for 5-HT2 agonist-induced increases in cortical DA.

  8. Stimulation of glutamate receptors in the ventral tegmental area is necessary for serotonin-2 receptor-induced increases in mesocortical dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Pehek, E A; Hernan, A E

    2015-04-01

    Modulation of dopamine (DA) released by serotonin-2 (5-HT2) receptors has been implicated in the mechanism of action of antipsychotic drugs. The mesocortical DA system has been implicated particularly in the cognitive deficits observed in schizophrenia. Agonism at 5-HT2A receptors in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is associated with increases in cortical DA release. Evidence indicates that 5-HT2A receptors in the cortex regulate mesocortical DA release through stimulation of a "long-loop" feedback system from the PFC to the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and back. However, a causal role for VTA glutamate in the 5-HT2-induced increases in PFC DA has not been established. The present study does so by measuring 5-HT2 agonist-induced DA release in the cortex after infusions of glutamate antagonists into the VTA of the rat. Infusions of a combination of a N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) (AP-5: 2-amino-5-phosphopentanoic acid) and an AMPA/kainate (CNQX: 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione) receptor antagonist into the VTA blocked the increases in cortical DA produced by administration of the 5-HT2 agonist DOI [(±)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine] (2.5mg/kg s.c.). These results demonstrate that stimulation of glutamate receptors in the VTA is necessary for 5-HT2 agonist-induced increases in cortical DA. PMID:25637799

  9. Serotonin stimulates lateral habenula via activation of the post-synaptic serotonin 2/3 receptors and transient receptor potential channels.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Wanhong; Zhang, Yong; Xie, Guiqin; Gregor, Danielle; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2016-02-01

    There is growing interest on the role of the lateral habenula (LHb) in depression, because it closely and bilaterally connects with the serotoninergic raphe nuclei. The LHb sends glutamate efferents to the raphe nuclei, while it receives serotoninergic afferents, and expresses a high density of serotonin (5-HT) receptors. Recent studies suggest that 5-HT receptors exist both in the presynaptic and postsynaptic sites of LHb neurons, and activation of these receptors may have different effects on the activity of LHb neurons. The current study focused on the effect of 5-HT on the postsynaptic membrane. We found that 5-HT initiated a depolarizing inward current (I((5-HTi))) and accelerated spontaneous firing in ∼80% of LHb neurons in rat brain slices. I((5-HTi)) was also induced by the 5-HT uptake blocker citalopram, indicating activity of endogenous 5-HT. I((5-HTi)) was diminished by 5-HT(2/3) receptor antagonists (ritanserin, SB-200646 or ondansetron), and activated by the selective 5-HT(2/3) agonists 1-(3-Chlorophenyl) piperazine hydrochloride or 1-(3-Chlorophenyl) biguanide hydrochloride. Furthermore, I((5-HTi)) was attenuated by 2-Aminoethyl diphenylborinate, a blocker of transient receptor potential channels, and an IP3 receptor inhibitor, indicating the involvement of transient receptor potential channels. These results demonstrate that the reciprocal connection between the LHb and the 5-HT system highlights a key role for 5-HT stimulation of LHb neurons that may be important in the pathogenesis of depression.

  10. Heating induced near deep brain stimulation lead electrodes during magnetic resonance imaging with a 3 T transceive volume head coil.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Devashish; Abosch, Aviva; Hughes, John; Goerke, Ute; DelaBarre, Lance; Visaria, Rachana; Harel, Noam; Vaughan, J Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Heating induced near deep brain stimulation (DBS) lead electrodes during magnetic resonance imaging with a 3 T transceive head coil was measured, modeled, and imaged in three cadaveric porcine heads (mean body weight = 85.47 ± 3.19 kg, mean head weight = 5.78 ± 0.32 kg). The effect of the placement of the extra-cranial portion of the DBS lead on the heating was investigated by looping the extra-cranial lead on the top, side, and back of the head, and placing it parallel to the coil's longitudinal axial direction. The heating was induced using a 641 s long turbo spin echo sequence with the mean whole head average specific absorption rate of 3.16 W kg(-1). Temperatures were measured using fluoroptic probes at the scalp, first and second electrodes from the distal lead tip, and 6 mm distal from electrode 1 (T(6 mm)). The heating was modeled using the maximum T(6 mm) and imaged using a proton resonance frequency shift-based MR thermometry method. Results showed that the heating was significantly reduced when the extra-cranial lead was placed in the longitudinal direction compared to the other placements (peak temperature change = 1.5-3.2 °C versus 5.1-24.7 °C). Thermal modeling and MR thermometry may be used together to determine the heating and improve patient safety online.

  11. Mineralocorticoid receptor in the NTS stimulates saline intake during fourth ventricular infusions of aldosterone.

    PubMed

    Koneru, Bhuvaneswari; Bathina, Chandra Sekhar; Cherry, Brandon H; Mifflin, Steve W

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether neurons within the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) that express the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) play a role in aldosterone stimulation of salt intake. Adult Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats received microinjections into the NTS of a short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) for the MR, to site specifically reduce levels of the MR by RNA interference (shRNA; n = 9) or scrambled RNA as a control (scRNA; n = 8). After injection of the viral construct, aldosterone-filled osmotic minipumps were implanted subcutaneously and connected to a cannula extending into the fourth ventricle to infuse aldosterone at a rate of 25 ng/h. Before and after surgeries, rats had ad libitum access to normal sodium (0.26%) rat chow and two graduated drinking bottles filled with either distilled water or 0.3 M NaCl. Before the surgeries, basal saline intake was 1.6 ± 0.6 ml in the scRNA group and 1.56 ± 0.6 ml in the shRNA group. Twenty-four days postsurgery, saline intake was elevated to a greater extent in the scRNA group (5.9 ± 1.07 ml) than in the shRNA group (2.41 ± 0.6 ml). Post mortem immunohistochemistry revealed a significant reduction in the number of NTS neurons exhibiting immunoreactivity for MR in shRNA-injected rats (23 ± 1 cells/section) versus scRNA-injected rats (33 ± 2 cells/section; P = 0.008). shRNA did not alter the level of 11-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type II (HSD2) protein in the NTS as judged by the number of HSD2 immunoreactive neurons. These results suggest that fourth ventricular infusions of aldosterone stimulate saline intake, and that this stimulation is at least in part mediated by hindbrain NTS neurons that express MR.

  12. Follicle-stimulating hormone interacts with exoloop 3 of the receptor.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Johann; Ryu, KiSung; Sievert, Gail; Jeoung, MyoungKun; Ji, Inhae; Ji, Tae H

    2002-12-20

    The human follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) receptor consists of two distinct domains of approximately 330 amino acids, the N-terminal extracellular exodomain and membrane-associated endodomain including three exoloops and seven transmembrane helices. The exodomain binds the hormone with high affinity, and the resulting hormone/exodomain complex modulates the endodomain where receptor activation occurs. It has been an enigma whether the hormone interacts with the endodomain. In a step to address the question, exoloop 3 of (580)KVPLITVSKAK(590) was examined by Ala scan, multiple substitution, assays for hormone binding, cAMP and inositol phosphate (IP) induction, and photoaffinity labeling. We present the evidence for the interaction of FSH and exoloop 3. A peptide mimic of exoloop 3 specifically and saturably photoaffinity-labels FSH alpha but not FSH beta. This is in contrast to photoaffinity labeling of FSH beta by the peptide mimic of the N-terminal region of the receptor. Leu(583) and Ile(584) are crucial for the interaction of FSH and exoloop 3. Substitutions of these two residues enhanced the hormone binding affinity. This is due to the loss of the original side chains but not the introduction of new side chains. The Leu(583) and Ile(584) side chains appear to project in opposite directions. Ile(584) appears to be so specific and to require flexibility and stereo specificity so that no other amino acids can fit into its place. Leu(583) is less specific. The improvement in hormone binding by substitutions was offset by the severe impairment of signal generation of cAMP and/or inositol phosphate. For example, the Phe or Tyr substitution of Leu(583) improved the hormone binding and cAMP induction but impaired IP induction. On the other hand, the substitutions for Ile(584) and Lys(590) abolished the cAMP and IP induction. Our results open a logical question whether Leu(583), Ile(584), and Lys(590) interact with the exodomain and/or the hormone. The answers will

  13. Epidermal growth factor–stimulated Akt phosphorylation requires clathrin or ErbB2 but not receptor endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Garay, Camilo; Judge, Gurjeet; Lucarelli, Stefanie; Bautista, Stephen; Pandey, Rohan; Singh, Tanveer; Antonescu, Costin N.

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) binding to its receptor (EGFR) activates several signaling intermediates, including Akt, leading to control of cell survival and metabolism. Concomitantly, ligand-bound EGFR is incorporated into clathrin-coated pits—membrane structures containing clathrin and other proteins—eventually leading to receptor internalization. Whether clathrin might regulate EGFR signaling at the plasma membrane before vesicle scission is poorly understood. We compared the effect of clathrin perturbation (preventing formation of, or receptor recruitment to, clathrin structures) to that of dynamin2 (allowing formation of clathrin structures but preventing EGFR internalization) under conditions in which EGFR endocytosis is clathrin dependent. Clathrin perturbation by siRNA gene silencing, with the clathrin inhibitor pitstop2, or knocksideways silencing inhibited EGF-simulated Gab1 and Akt phosphorylation in ARPE-19 cells. In contrast, perturbation of dynamin2 with inhibitors or by siRNA gene silencing did not affect EGF-stimulated Gab1 or Akt phosphorylation. EGF stimulation enriched Gab1 and phospho-Gab1 within clathrin structures. ARPE-19 cells have low ErbB2 expression, and overexpression and knockdown experiments revealed that robust ErbB2 expression bypassed the requirement for clathrin for EGF-stimulated Akt phosphorylation. Thus clathrin scaffolds may represent unique plasma membrane signaling microdomains required for signaling by certain receptors, a function that can be separated from vesicle formation. PMID:26246598

  14. Roles of mitogen activated protein kinases and EGF receptor in arsenite-stimulated matrix metalloproteinase-9 production

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Karen L.; Myers, Terrance Alix; Rosenberg, Martina; Chavez, Miquella; Hudson, Laurie G. . E-mail: lghudson@unm.edu

    2004-11-01

    The dermatotoxicity of arsenic is well established and epidemiological studies identify an increased incidence of keratinocytic tumors (basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma) associated with arsenic exposure. Little is known about the underlying mechanisms of arsenic-mediated skin carcinogenesis, but activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases and subsequent regulation of downstream target genes may contribute to tumor promotion and progression. In this study, we investigated activation of the extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) and the stress-associated kinase p38 by arsenite in HaCat cells, a spontaneously immortalized human keratinocyte cell line. Arsenite concentrations {>=}100 {mu}M stimulate rapid activation of p38 and ERK MAP kinases. However, upon extended exposure (24 h), persistent stimulation of p38 and ERK MAP kinases was detected at low micromolar concentrations of arsenite. Although ERK and p38 were activated with similar time and concentration dependence, the mechanism of activation differed for these two MAP kinases. ERK activation by arsenite was fully dependent on the catalytic activity of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor and partially dependent on Src-family kinase activity. In contrast, p38 activation was independent of EGF receptor or Src-family kinase activity. Arsenite-stimulated MAP kinase signal transduction resulted in increased production of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, an AP-1 regulated gene product. MMP-9 induction by arsenite was prevented when EGF receptor or MAP kinase signaling was inhibited. These studies indicate that EGF receptor activation is a component of arsenite-mediated signal transduction and gene expression in keratinocytes and that low micromolar concentrations of arsenite stimulate key signaling pathways upon extended exposure. Stimulation of MAP kinase cascades by arsenic and subsequent regulation of genes including c-fos, c-jun, and the matrix degrading proteases may play an important

  15. Effects of peripherally restricted κ opioid receptor agonists on pain-related stimulation and depression of behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Negus, S Stevens; O'Connell, Robert; Morrissey, Ember; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C

    2012-03-01

    κ opioid receptor agonists that do not readily cross the blood-brain barrier are peripherally restricted and distribute poorly to the central nervous system after systemic administration. Peripherally restricted κ agonists have promise as candidate analgesics, because they may produce antinociception mediated by peripheral κ receptors more potently than they produce undesirable sedative and psychotomimetic effects mediated by central κ receptors. The present study used assays of pain-related stimulation and depression of behavior in rats to compare effects of 1) two peripherally restricted κ agonists [the tetrapeptide D-Phe-D-Phe-D-Ile-D-Arg-NH(2) (ffir) and the nonpeptidic compound ((R,S)-N-[2-(N-methyl-3,4-dichlorophenylacetamido)-2-(3-carboxyphenyl)-ethyl]pyrrolidine hydrochloride (ICI204448)], 2) a centrally penetrating κ agonist (salvinorin A), and 3) several reference drugs, including a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID; ketoprofen). Intraperitoneal injection of dilute lactic acid served as a noxious stimulus to stimulate a stretching response and depress intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) maintained by the delivery of electrical brain stimulation to the medial forebrain bundle. Acid-stimulated stretching was blocked by ketoprofen, the peripherally restricted κ agonists, and salvinorin A. However, acid-induced depression of ICSS was blocked only by ketoprofen. The peripherally restricted κ agonists had little effect, and salvinorin A exacerbated acid-induced depression of ICSS. These results suggest that peripherally restricted κ agonists may be safer than centrally penetrating κ agonists but less efficacious than NSAIDS or μ opioid receptor agonists to block pain-related depression of behavior; however, the peripheral selectivity of ffir and ICI204448 is limited, and future studies with κ agonists capable of greater peripheral selectivity are warranted.

  16. Cannabinoid type-1 receptors in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus inhibit stimulated food intake.

    PubMed

    Soria-Gómez, E; Massa, F; Bellocchio, L; Rueda-Orozco, P E; Ciofi, P; Cota, D; Oliet, S H R; Prospéro-García, O; Marsicano, G

    2014-03-28

    Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1)-dependent signaling in the brain is known to modulate food intake. Recent evidence has actually shown that CB1 can both inhibit and stimulate food intake in fasting/refeeding conditions, depending on the specific neuronal circuits involved. However, the exact brain sites where this bimodal control is exerted and the underlying neurobiological mechanisms are not fully understood yet. Using pharmacological and electrophysiological approaches, we show that local CB1 blockade in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) increases fasting-induced hyperphagia in rats. Furthermore, local CB1 blockade in the PVN also increases the orexigenic effect of the gut hormone ghrelin in animals fed ad libitum. At the electrophysiological level, CB1 blockade in slices containing the PVN potentiates the decrease of the activity of PVN neurons induced by long-term application of ghrelin. Hence, the PVN is (one of) the site(s) where signals associated with the body's energy status determine the direction of the effects of endocannabinoid signaling on food intake.

  17. Vitamin D receptor negatively regulates bacterial-stimulated NF-kappaB activity in intestine.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaoping; Liao, Anne P; Xia, Yinglin; Li, Yan Chun; Li, Jian-Dong; Sartor, R Balfour; Sun, Jun

    2010-08-01

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) plays an essential role in gastrointestinal inflammation. Most investigations have focused on the immune response; however, how bacteria regulate VDR and how VDR modulates the nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB pathway in intestinal epithelial cells remain unexplored. This study investigated the effects of VDR ablation on NF-kappaB activation in intestinal epithelia and the role of enteric bacteria on VDR expression. We found that VDR(-/-) mice exhibited a pro-inflammatory bias. After Salmonella infection, VDR(-/-) mice had increased bacterial burden and mortality. Serum interleukin-6 in noninfected VDR(+/+) mice was undetectable, but was easily detectable in VDR(-/-) mice. NF-kappaB p65 formed a complex with VDR in noninfected wild-type mouse intestine. In contrast, deletion of VDR abolished VDR/P65 binding. P65 nuclear translocation occurred in colonic epithelial cells of untreated VDR(-/-) mice. VDR deletion also elevated NF-kappaB activity in intestinal epithelia. VDR was localized to the surface epithelia of germ-free mice, but to crypt epithelial cells in conventionalized mice. VDR expression, distribution, transcriptional activity, and target genes were regulated by Salmonella stimulation, independent of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Our study demonstrates that commensal and pathogenic bacteria directly regulate colonic epithelial VDR expression and location in vivo. VDR negatively regulates bacterial-induced intestinal NF-kappaB activation and attenuates response to infection. Therefore, VDR is an important contributor to intestinal homeostasis and host protection from bacterial invasion and infection.

  18. Endotoxin down-modulates granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (CD114) on human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hollenstein, U; Homoncik, M; Stohlawetz, P J; Marsik, C; Sieder, A; Eichler, H G; Jilma, B

    2000-07-01

    During infection, the development of nonresponsiveness to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may be influenced by the down-modulation of G-CSF receptor (G-CSFR) by cytokines. This down-modulation was studied during experimental human endotoxemia. Healthy volunteers received either 2 ng/kg endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS], n=20) or placebo (n=10) in a randomized, controlled trial. Endotoxin infusion increased the mean fluorescence intensity of the neutrophil activation marker CD11b >300% after 1 h (P<.001 vs. placebo). LPS infusion down-modulated G-CSFR expression in as early as 60 min (-17%; P=.001 vs. placebo). Down-modulation was almost maximal at 90 min and persisted for 6 h (-50% from baseline; P<.0001 vs. placebo). Plasma levels of G-CSF started to increase only after G-CSFR down-modulation had occurred and peaked 37-fold above baseline at 4 h (P<.0001 vs. placebo). In conclusion, LPS down-modulates G-CSFR expression in humans, which may render neutrophils less responsive to the effects of G-CSF and, thereby, compromise host defense mechanisms.

  19. A Gα-Stimulated RapGEF Is a Receptor-Proximal Regulator of Dictyostelium Chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Youtao; Lacal, Jesus; Veltman, Douwe M; Fusetti, Fabrizia; van Haastert, Peter J M; Firtel, Richard A; Kortholt, Arjan

    2016-06-01

    Chemotaxis, or directional movement toward extracellular chemical gradients, is an important property of cells that is mediated through G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Although many chemotaxis pathways downstream of Gβγ have been identified, few Gα effectors are known. Gα effectors are of particular importance because they allow the cell to distinguish signals downstream of distinct chemoattractant GPCRs. Here we identify GflB, a Gα2 binding partner that directly couples the Dictyostelium cyclic AMP GPCR to Rap1. GflB localizes to the leading edge and functions as a Gα-stimulated, Rap1-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor required to balance Ras and Rap signaling. The kinetics of GflB translocation are fine-tuned by GSK-3 phosphorylation. Cells lacking GflB display impaired Rap1/Ras signaling and actin and myosin dynamics, resulting in defective chemotaxis. Our observations demonstrate that GflB is an essential upstream regulator of chemoattractant-mediated cell polarity and cytoskeletal reorganization functioning to directly link Gα activation to monomeric G-protein signaling. PMID:27237792

  20. Eicosanoid receptor subtype-mediated opposing regulation of TLR-stimulated expression of astrocyte glial-derived neurotrophic factor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianwu; Cudaback, Eiron; Breyer, Richard M.; Montine, Kathleen S.; Keene, C. Dirk; Montine, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    A major therapeutic target for Parkinson's disease (PD) is providing increased glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to dopaminergic neurons. We tested the hypothesis that innate immune activation increases astrocyte GDNF production and that this is regulated by specific eicosanoid receptors. Innate immune-activated primary murine astrocytes were assayed for GDNF expression and secretion. Controls were agent vehicle exposure and wild-type mice. Rank order for up to 10-fold selectively increased GDNF expression was activators of TLR3 > TLR2 or TLR4 > TLR9. TLR3 activator-stimulated GDNF expression was selectively JNK-dependent, followed cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, was coincident with membranous PGE2 synthase, and was not significantly altered by a nonspecific COX- or a COX-2-selective inhibitor. Specific eicosanoid receptors had opposing effects on TLR3 activator-induced GDNF expression: ∼60% enhancement by blocking or ablating of PGE2 receptor subtype 1 (EP1), ∼30% enhancement by activating PGF2α receptor or thromboxane receptor, or ∼15% enhancement by activating EP4. These results demonstrate functionally antagonistic eicosanoid receptor subtype regulation of innate immunity-induced astrocyte GDNF expression and suggest that selective inhibition of EP1 signaling might be a means to augment astrocyte GDNF secretion in the context of innate immune activation in diseased regions of brain in PD.—Li, X., Cudaback, E., Breyer, R. M., Montine, K. S., Keene, C. D., Montine, T. J. Eicosanoid receptor subtype-mediated opposing regulation of Toll-like receptor-stimulated expression of astrocyte glial-derived neurotrophic factor. PMID:22499581

  1. Inosine induces presynaptic inhibition of acetylcholine release by activation of A3 adenosine receptors at the mouse neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Cinalli, A R; Guarracino, J F; Fernandez, V; Roquel, L I; Losavio, A S

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The role of inosine at the mammalian neuromuscular junction (NMJ) has not been clearly defined. Moreover, inosine was classically considered to be the inactive metabolite of adenosine. Hence, we investigated the effect of inosine on spontaneous and evoked ACh release, the mechanism underlying its modulatory action and the receptor type and signal transduction pathway involved. Experimental Approach End-plate potentials (EPPs) and miniature end-plate potentials (MEPPs) were recorded from the mouse phrenic-nerve diaphragm preparations using conventional intracellular electrophysiological techniques. Key Results Inosine (100 μM) reduced MEPP frequency and the amplitude and quantal content of EPPs; effects inhibited by the selective A3 receptor antagonist MRS-1191. Immunohistochemical assays confirmed the presence of A3 receptors at mammalian NMJ. The voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) blocker Cd2+, the removal of extracellular Ca2+ and the L-type and P/Q-type VGCC antagonists, nitrendipine and ω-agatoxin IVA, respectively, all prevented inosine-induced inhibition. In the absence of endogenous adenosine, inosine decreased the hypertonic response. The effects of inosine on ACh release were prevented by the Gi/o protein inhibitor N-ethylmaleimide, PKC antagonist chelerytrine and calmodulin antagonist W-7, but not by PKA antagonists, H-89 and KT-5720, or the inhibitor of CaMKII KN-62. Conclusion and Implications Our results suggest that, at motor nerve terminals, inosine induces presynaptic inhibition of spontaneous and evoked ACh release by activating A3 receptors through a mechanism that involves L-type and P/Q-type VGCCs and the secretory machinery downstream of calcium influx. A3 receptors appear to be coupled to Gi/o protein. PKC and calmodulin may be involved in these effects of inosine. PMID:23731236

  2. Pleiotrophin stimulates tyrosine phosphorylation of beta-adducin through inactivation of the transmembrane receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta/zeta.

    PubMed

    Pariser, Harold; Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Ezquerra, Laura; Herradon, Gonzalo; Deuel, Thomas F

    2005-09-16

    Pleiotrophin (PTN the protein, Ptn the gene) signals through a unique mechanism; it inactivates the tyrosine phosphatase activity of its receptor, the transmembrane receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP)beta/zeta, and increases tyrosine phosphorylation of the substrates of RPTPbeta/zeta through the continued activity of a yet to be described protein tyrosine kinase(s) in PTN-stimulated cells. We have now found that the cytoskeletal protein beta-adducin interacts with the intracellular domain of RPTPbeta/zeta in a yeast two-hybrid system, that beta-adducin is a substrate of RPTPbeta/zeta, that beta-adducin is phosphorylated in tyrosine in cells not stimulated by PTN, and that tyrosine phosphorylation of beta-adducin is sharply increased in PTN-stimulated cells, suggesting that beta-adducin is a downstream target of and regulated by the PTN/RPTPbeta/zeta signaling pathway. beta-Catenin was the first downstream target of the PTN/RPTPbeta/zeta signaling pathway to be identified; these data thus also suggest that PTN coordinately regulates steady state levels of tyrosine phosphorylation of the important cytoskeletal proteins beta-adducin and beta-catenin and, through PTN-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation, beta-adducin may contribute to the disruption of cytoskeletal structure, increased plasticity, and loss of homophilic cell-cell adhesion that are the consequences of PTN stimulation of cells and a characteristic feature of different malignant cells with mutations that activate constitutive expression of the endogenous Ptn gene.

  3. Posterior hypothalamic receptors involved in the cardiovascular changes elicited by electrical stimulation of the rostral ventrolateral medulla.

    PubMed

    Bachelard, H; Rivest, R; Marsden, C A

    1991-07-01

    The posterior hypothalamic receptors involved in the cardiovascular responses to electrical stimulation of the rostral ventrolateral medulla were investigated in urethane-anaesthetized rats. Electrical stimulation of the rostral ventrolateral medulla produced a significant increase in systolic blood pressure. This response was significantly attenuated by the prior administration of d,l-propranolol (20 micrograms), clonidine (8 micrograms), atropine (8 micrograms) or methysergide (10 micrograms) into the posterior hypothalamus, but not by cimetidine (11 micrograms), chlorpheniramine (12 micrograms), naloxone (10 micrograms) or a vasopressin V1 antagonist (100 ng). The effect of clonidine (8 micrograms) on the pressor response to stimulation of the rostral ventrolateral medulla was antagonized by idazoxan (66 micrograms). These results confirm that the cardiovascular changes elicited by stimulation of the rostral ventrolateral medulla area are, in part, centrally modulated by alpha 2 and beta-adrenoceptors in the posterior hypothalamus which exert respectively, inhibitory and stimulatory effect. Furthermore the results indicate the involvement of posterior hypothalamic cholinergic and serotonergic receptors in the pressor response produced by stimulation of the rostral ventrolateral medulla.

  4. The EWSR1/NR4A3 fusion protein of extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma activates the PPARG nuclear receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Filion, C; Motoi, T; Olshen, A B; Laé, M; Emnett, R J; Gutmann, D H; Perry, A; Ladanyi, M; Labelle, Y

    2009-01-01

    The NR4A3 nuclear receptor is implicated in the development of extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (EMC), primitive sarcoma unrelated to conventional chondrosarcomas, through a specific fusion with EWSR1 resulting in an aberrant fusion protein that is thought to disrupt the transcriptional regulation of specific target genes. We performed an expression microarray analysis of EMC tumours expressing the EWSR1/NR4A3 fusion protein, comparing their expression profiles to those of other sarcoma types. We thereby identified a set of genes significantly overexpressed in EMC relative to other sarcomas, including PPARG and NDRG2. Western blot or immunohistochemical analyses confirm that PPARG and NDRG2 are expressed in tumours positive for EWSR1/NR4A3. Bioinformatic analysis identified a DNA response element for EWSR1/NR4A3 in the PPARG promoter, and band-shift experiments and transient transfections indicate that EWSR1/NR4A3 can activate transcription through this element. Western blots further show that an isoform of the native NR4A3 receptor lacking the C-terminal domain is very highly expressed in tumours positive for EWSR1/NR4A3, and co-transfections of this isoform along with EWSR1/NR4A3 indicate that it may negatively regulate the activity of the fusion protein on the PPARG promoter. These results suggest that the overall expression of PPARG in EMC may be regulated in part by the balance between EWSR1/NR4A3 and NR4A3, and that PPARG may play a crucial role in the development of these tumours. The specific up-regulation of PPARG by EWSR1/NR4A3 may also have potential therapeutic implications.

  5. The Non-Benzodiazepine Anxiolytic Drug Etifoxine Causes a Rapid, Receptor-Independent Stimulation of Neurosteroid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    do Rego, Jean Luc; Vaudry, David; Vaudry, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Neurosteroids can modulate the activity of the GABAA receptors, and thus affect anxiety-like behaviors. The non-benzodiazepine anxiolytic compound etifoxine has been shown to increase neurosteroid concentrations in brain tissue but the mode of action of etifoxine on neurosteroid formation has not yet been elucidated. In the present study, we have thus investigated the effect and the mechanism of action of etifoxine on neurosteroid biosynthesis using the frog hypothalamus as an experimental model. Exposure of frog hypothalamic explants to graded concentrations of etifoxine produced a dose-dependent increase in the biosynthesis of 17-hydroxypregnenolone, dehydroepiandrosterone, progesterone and tetrahydroprogesterone, associated with a decrease in the production of dihydroprogesterone. Time-course experiments revealed that a 15-min incubation of hypothalamic explants with etifoxine was sufficient to induce a robust increase in neurosteroid synthesis, suggesting that etifoxine activates steroidogenic enzymes at a post-translational level. Etifoxine-evoked neurosteroid biosynthesis was not affected by the central-type benzodiazepine (CBR) receptor antagonist flumazenil, the translocator protein (TSPO) antagonist PK11195 or the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline. In addition, the stimulatory effects of etifoxine and the triakontatetraneuropeptide TTN, a TSPO agonist, were additive, indicating that these two compounds act through distinct mechanisms. Etifoxine also induced a rapid stimulation of neurosteroid biosynthesis from frog hypothalamus homogenates, a preparation in which membrane receptor signalling is disrupted. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that etifoxine stimulates neurosteroid production through a membrane receptor-independent mechanism. PMID:25785994

  6. Engagement of the scavenger receptor is not responsible for beta-amyloid stimulation of monocytes to a neurocytopathic state.

    PubMed

    Antic, A; Dzenko, K A; Pachter, J S

    2000-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine if scavenger receptors (SRs) play a role in amyloid beta (Abeta) stimulation of peripheral blood monocyte (PBM) neurotoxicity. Results indicate that Abeta does not block binding of the SR ligand DiI-acetylated low density lipoprotein to PBM, nor does another SR ligand, fucoidin, inhibit Abeta-PBM binding. Moreover, neither of three SR ligands alone stimulates neurotoxicity in PBM, nor antagonizes the ability of Abeta to activate PBM to a neurocytopathic state. Such findings suggest that Abeta's action is not dependent upon engagement of the SR ligand binding domain and raise doubts about the role of SR in Abeta neurotoxicity.

  7. Serotonin increases ERK1/2 phosphorylation in astrocytes by stimulation of 5-HT2B and 5-HT2C receptors.

    PubMed

    Li, Baoman; Zhang, Shiquen; Li, Min; Hertz, Leif; Peng, Liang

    2010-11-01

    We have previously shown that fluoxetine causes ERK(1/2) phosphorylation in cultured mouse astrocytes mediated exclusively by stimulation of 5-HT(2B) receptors (Li et al., 2008b). This raises the question whether this is also the case for serotonin (5-HT) itself. In the present study serotonin was found to induce ERK(1/2) phosphorylation by stimulation of 5-HT(2B) receptors with high affinity (EC(50): 20-30 pM), and by stimulation of 5-HT(2C) receptor with low affinity (EC(50): 1 microM or higher). ERK(1/2) phosphorylation induced by stimulation of either 5-HT(2B) or 5-HT(2C) receptors was mediated by epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor transactivation (Peng et al., this issue), shown by the inhibitory effect of AG1478, an inhibitor of the EGF receptor tyrosine kinase, and GM6001, an inhibitor of Zn-dependent metalloproteinases, and thus of 5-HT(2B) receptor-mediated EGF receptor agonist release. It is discussed that the high potency of the 5-HT(2B)-mediated effect is consistent with literature data for binding affinity of serotonin to cloned human 5-HT(2B) receptors and with observations of low extracellular concentrations of serotonin in brain, which would allow a demonstrated moderate and modality-dependent increase in specific brain areas to activate 5-HT(2B) receptors. In contrast the relevance of the observed 5-HT(2C) receptors on astrocytes is questioned.

  8. The nuclear orphan receptor NR4A1 and NR4A3 as tumor suppressors in hematologic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Wenzl, Kerstin; Troppan, Katharina; Neumeister, Peter; Deutsch, Alexander J A

    2015-01-01

    NR4A1 (Nur77) belongs together with NR4A2 (Nurr1) and NR4A3 (NOR-1) to the nuclear orphan receptors of the NR4A-family. Their activation is generally short lived, the cellular outcome is a stimulus- and cell context-dependent differential activation of NR4A target genes that regulate cell cycle, apoptosis, inflammation, atherogenesis, metabolism, DNA repair and tumorigenesis. NR4A1 and NR4A3 were identified to function as tumor suppressors in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Deletion of both nuclear receptors led to rapid development of AML in mice. Loss of NR4A1 and NR4A3 was a common feature in human AML patients. Additionally, NR4A1 and NR4A3 hypoallelic mice - mice with a reduced NR4A1 and NR4A3 expression - develop a chronic myeloid malignancy that recapitulates the pathological features of myelodysplastic/ myeloproliferative neoplasms with progression to AML in rare cases. Recently, a reduced NR4A1 and NR4A3 expression was described in aggressive lymphomas and low NR4A1 expression was associated with poor overall survival. Overexpression of NR4A1 in aggressive lymphoma cells led to induction of apoptosis and abrogated tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model. Recently, it was shown that NR4A inducing agents or NR4A agonist possess/induce apoptotic effects in AML and lymphoma cells. Due to this fact and the growing number of NR4A1 and NR4A3 inducing agents and NR4A agonists, both receptors represent new targets for anti tumor therapy.

  9. Rational Design of Sulfonated A3 Adenosine Receptor-Selective Nucleosides as Pharmacological Tools to Study Chronic Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Paoletta, Silvia; Tosh, Dilip K.; Finley, Amanda; Gizewski, Elizabeth T.; Moss, Steven M.; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Auchampach, John A.; Salvemini, Daniela; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    (N)-Methanocarba (bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane)-adenosine derivatives were probed for sites of charged sulfonate substitution, which precludes diffusion across biological membranes, e.g. blood brain barrier. Molecular modeling predicted that sulfonate groups on C2-phenylethynyl substituents would provide high affinity at both mouse (m) and human (h) A3 adenosine receptors (ARs), while a N6-p-sulfo-phenylethyl substituent would determine higher hA3AR vs. mA3AR affinity. These modeling predictions, based on steric fitting of the binding cavity and crucial interactions with key residues, were confirmed by binding/efficacy studies of synthesized sulfonates. N6-3-Chlorobenzyl-2-(3-sulfophenylethynyl) derivative 7 (MRS5841) bound selectively to h/m A3ARs (Ki hA3AR 1.9 nM) as agonist, while corresponding p-sulfo isomer 6 (MRS5701) displayed mixed A1/A3AR agonism. Both nucleosides administered i.p. reduced mouse chronic neuropathic pain that was ascribed to either A3 or A1/A3ARs using A3AR genetic deletion. Thus, rational design methods based on A3AR homology models successfully predicted sites for sulfonate incorporation, for delineating adenosine’s CNS vs. peripheral actions. PMID:23789857

  10. Receptor Surface Models in the Classroom: Introducing Molecular Modeling to Students in a 3-D World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geldenhuys, Werner J.; Hayes, Michael; Van der Schyf, Cornelis J.; Allen, David D.; Malan, Sarel F.

    2007-01-01

    A simple, novel and generally applicable method to demonstrate structure-activity associations of a group of biologically interesting compounds in relation to receptor binding is described. This method is useful for undergraduates and graduate students in medicinal chemistry and computer modeling programs.

  11. Angiotensin II stimulates expression of the chemokine RANTES in rat glomerular endothelial cells. Role of the angiotensin type 2 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, G; Ziyadeh, F N; Thaiss, F; Tomaszewski, J; Caron, R J; Wenzel, U; Zahner, G; Helmchen, U; Stahl, R A

    1997-01-01

    Glomerular influx of monocytes/macrophages (M/M) occurs in many immune- and non-immune-mediated renal diseases. The mechanisms targeting M/M into the glomerulus are incompletely understood, but may involve stimulated expression of chemokines. We investigated whether angiotensin II (ANG II) induces the chemokine RANTES in cultured glomerular endothelial cells of the rat and in vivo. ANG II stimulated mRNA and protein expression of RANTES in cultured glomerular endothelial cells. The ANG II-induced RANTES protein was chemotactic for human monocytes. Surprisingly, the ANG II-stimulated RANTES expression was transduced by AT2 receptors because the AT2 receptor antagonists PD 123177 and CGP-42112A, but not an AT1 receptor blocker, abolished the induced RANTES synthesis. Intraperitoneal infusion of ANG II (500 ng/h) into naive rats for 4 d significantly stimulated glomerular RANTES mRNA and protein expression compared with solvent-infused controls. Immunohistochemistry revealed induction of RANTES protein mainly in glomerular endothelial cells and small capillaries. Moreover, ANG II- infused animals exhibited an increase in glomerular ED-1- positive cells compared with controls. Oral treatment with PD 123177 (50 mg/liter drinking water) attenuated the glomerular M/M influx without normalizing the slightly elevated systolic blood pressure caused by ANG II infusion, suggesting that the effects on blood pressure and RANTES induction can be separated. We conclude that the vasoactive peptide ANG II may play an important role in glomerular chemotaxis of M/M through local induction of the chemokine RANTES. The observation that the ANG II- mediated induction of RANTES is transduced by AT2 receptors may influence the decision as to which substances might be used for the therapeutic interference with the activity of the renin-angiotensin system. PMID:9276721

  12. Enhanced type 1alpha metabotropic glutamate receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide signaling after pertussis toxin treatment.

    PubMed

    Carruthers, A M; Challiss, R A; Mistry, R; Saunders, R; Thomsen, C; Nahorski, S R

    1997-09-01

    The regulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis by the type 1alpha metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR1alpha) was investigated in stably transfected baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells. Incubation of the cells with L-glutamate, quisqualate, and 1-aminocyclopentane-1S, 3R-dicarboxylic acid resulted in a marked accumulation of [3H]inositol monophosphate (InsP1) and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P3] mass in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Pretreatment of BHK-mGluR1alpha cells with pertussis toxin [ 100 ng/ml, 24 hr] led to a dramatic 12-16-fold increase in the accumulation of [3H]InsP1 and a 2-fold increase in Ins(1,4,5)P3 in the absence of added agonist. Although only very low levels (/=75%, and the EC50 shifted leftward by 65-fold [-log EC50 values (molar), 7.26 +/- 0.23 versus 5.45 +/- 0.07; n = 4) in PTX-treated compared with control cells. In contrast, antagonist effects on agonist-stimulated [3H]InsP1 responses were similar in control and PTX-treated BHK-mGluR1alpha cells. These changes in the concentration-effect curves for mGluR agonists are consistent with a model in which the receptor associates with PTX-sensitive inhibitory (Gi/o) and PTX-insensitive stimulatory (Gq/11) G proteins that can each influence PIC activity. The present observations are consistent with a dual regulation of mGluR1alpha-mediated PIC activity that could be fundamental in

  13. Attenuation of Cocaine's Reinforcing and Discriminative Stimulus Effects via Muscarinic M1 Acetylcholine Receptor StimulationS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Conn, P. Jeffrey; Lindsley, Craig; Wess, Jürgen; Boon, Joon Y.; Fulton, Brian S.; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Caine, S. Barak

    2010-01-01

    Muscarinic cholinergic receptors modulate dopaminergic function in brain pathways thought to mediate cocaine's abuse-related effects. Here, we sought to confirm and extend in the mouse species findings that nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonists can enhance cocaine's discriminative stimulus. More importantly, we tested the hypothesis that muscarinic receptor agonists with varied receptor subtype selectivity can blunt cocaine's discriminative stimulus and reinforcing effects; we hypothesized a critical role for the M1 and/or M4 receptor subtypes in this modulation. Mice were trained to discriminate cocaine from saline, or to self-administer intravenous cocaine chronically. The nonselective muscarinic antagonists scopolamine and methylscopolamine, the nonselective muscarinic agonists oxotremorine and pilocarpine, the M1/M4-preferring agonist xanomeline, the putative M1-selective agonist (4-hydroxy-2-butynyl)-1-trimethylammonium-3-chlorocarbanilate chloride (McN-A-343), and the novel M1-selective agonist 1-(1-2-methylbenzyl)-1,4-bipiperidin-4-yl)-1H benzo[d]imidazol-2(3H)-one (TBPB) were tested as substitution and/or pretreatment to cocaine. Both muscarinic antagonists partially substituted for cocaine and enhanced its discriminative stimulus. Conversely, muscarinic agonists blunted cocaine discrimination and abolished cocaine self-administration with varying effects on food-maintained behavior. Specifically, increasing selectivity for the M1 subtype (oxotremorine < xanomeline < TBPB) conferred lesser nonspecific rate-suppressing effects, with no rate suppression for TBPB. In mutant mice lacking M1 and M4 receptors, xanomeline failed to diminish cocaine discrimination while rate-decreasing effects were intact. Our data suggest that central M1 receptor activation attenuates cocaine's abuse-related effects, whereas non-M1/M4 receptors probably contribute to undesirable effects of muscarinic stimulation. These data provide the first demonstration of anticocaine

  14. Activation of histamine H3 receptor decreased cytoplasmic Ca(2+) imaging during electrical stimulation in the skeletal myotubes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Paavola, Jere; Stegajev, Vasili; Stark, Holger; Chazot, Paul L; Wen, Jian Guo; Konttinen, Yrjö T

    2015-05-01

    Histamine is a neurotransmitter and chemical mediator in multiple physiological processes. Histamine H3 receptor is expressed in the nervous system, heart, and gastrointestinal tract; however, little is known about H3 receptor in skeletal muscle. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of H3 receptor in skeletal myotubes. The expression of H3 receptor and myosin heavy chain (MHC), a late myogenesis marker, was assessed by real-time PCR and immunostaining in C2C12 skeletal myogenesis and adult mid-urethral skeletal muscle tissues. H3 receptor mRNA showed a significant increase upon differentiation of C2C12 into myotubes: 1-, 26-, 91-, and 182-fold at days 0, 2, 4, and 6, respectively. H3 receptor immunostaining in differentiated C2C12 cells and adult skeletal muscles was positive and correlated with that of MHC. The functional role of H3receptor in differentiated myotubes was assessed using an H3 receptor agonist, (R)-a-methylhistamine ((R)-α-MeHA). Ca(2+) imaging, stimulated by electric pacing, was decreased by 55% after the treatment of mature C2C12 myotubes with 1μM (R)-α-MeHA for 10min and 20min, while treatment with 100nm (R)-α-MeHA for 5min caused 45% inhibition. These results suggested that H3 receptor may participate in the maintenance of the relaxed state and prevention of over-contraction in mature differentiated myotubes. The elucidation of the role of H3R in skeletal myogenesis and adult skeletal muscle may open a new direction in the treatment of skeletal muscle disorders, such as muscle weakness, atrophy, and myotonia in motion systems or peri-urethral skeletal muscle tissues.

  15. Novel Small Molecule Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonist Stimulates Insulin Secretion in Rodents and From Human Islets

    PubMed Central

    Sloop, Kyle W.; Willard, Francis S.; Brenner, Martin B.; Ficorilli, James; Valasek, Kathleen; Showalter, Aaron D.; Farb, Thomas B.; Cao, Julia X.C.; Cox, Amy L.; Michael, M. Dodson; Gutierrez Sanfeliciano, Sonia Maria; Tebbe, Mark J.; Coghlan, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The clinical effectiveness of parenterally-administered glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mimetics to improve glucose control in patients suffering from type 2 diabetes strongly supports discovery pursuits aimed at identifying and developing orally active, small molecule GLP-1 receptor agonists. The purpose of these studies was to identify and characterize novel nonpeptide agonists of the GLP-1 receptor. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Screening using cells expressing the GLP-1 receptor and insulin secretion assays with rodent and human islets were used to identify novel molecules. The intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) and hyperglycemic clamp characterized the insulinotropic effects of compounds in vivo. RESULTS Novel low molecular weight pyrimidine-based compounds that activate the GLP-1 receptor and stimulate glucose-dependent insulin secretion are described. These molecules induce GLP-1 receptor-mediated cAMP signaling in HEK293 cells expressing the GLP-1 receptor and increase insulin secretion from rodent islets in a dose-dependent manner. The compounds activate GLP-1 receptor signaling, both alone or in an additive fashion when combined with the endogenous GLP-1 peptide; however, these agonists do not compete with radiolabeled GLP-1 in receptor-binding assays. In vivo studies using the IVGTT and the hyperglycemic clamp in Sprague Dawley rats demonstrate increased insulin secretion in compound-treated animals. Further, perifusion assays with human islets isolated from a donor with type 2 diabetes show near-normalization of insulin secretion upon compound treatment. CONCLUSIONS These studies characterize the insulinotropic effects of an early-stage, small molecule GLP-1 receptor agonist and provide compelling evidence to support pharmaceutical optimization. PMID:20823098

  16. Modulation of the vagal bradycardia evoked by stimulation of upper airway receptors by central 5-HT1 receptors in anaesthetized rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Dando, Simon B; Skinner, Matthew R; Jordan, David; Ramage, Andrew G

    1998-01-01

    The effects of central application of 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B/1D receptor ligands on the reflex bradycardia, apnoea, renal sympathoexcitation and pressor response evoked by stimulating upper airway receptors with smoke in atenolol-pretreated anaesthetized rabbits were studied.Intracisternal administration of the 5-HT1A receptor antagonists WAY-100635 (100 μg kg−1) and (−)pindolol (100 μg kg−1) significantly reduced the smoke-induced bradycardia, attenuated the pressor response and in the case of (−)pindolol, sympathetic nerve activity. The same dose of WAY-100635 i.v. was without effect.Buspirone (200 μg kg−1, i.c.) potentiated the reflex bradycardia. This action was prevented if the animals were pretreated with WAY-100635 (100 μg kg−1, i.v.)(+)8-OH-DPAT (25 μg kg−1, i.c.) attenuated the evoked bradycardia, pressor response, apnoea and renal sympathoexcitation. The attenuation of the apnoea and renal sympathoexcitation, but not the bradycardia or pressor response was prevented in animals pretreated with WAY-100635 (100 μg kg−1, i.v.). The attenuation of the reflex bradycardia and the reduction in the renal sympathoexcitation were reduced by pretreatment with the 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist GR127935 (100 μg kg−1, i.v.).In WAY-100635 (100 μg kg−1, i.v.) pretreated animals, sumatriptan (a 5-HT1B/1D receptor agonist) reduced the reflex bradycardia and the pressor response. The 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist GR127935 (20 μg kg−1, i.c. or 100 μg kg−1, i.v.) had no effect on the reflex responses.In conclusion, the present data are consistent with the hypothesis that activation of central 5-HT1A receptors potentiate whilst activation of 5-HT1B/1D receptors attenuate the reflex activation of cardiac preganglionic vagal motoneurones evoked by stimulation of upper airway receptors with smoke in rabbits. PMID:9786516

  17. Biolistic expression of the macrophage colony stimulating factor receptor in organotypic cultures induces an inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Mitrasinovic, Olivera M; Robinson, Christopher C; Tenen, Daniel G; Lee, Yuen Ling; Poon, Clara; Murphy, Greer M

    2004-08-01

    The receptor for macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSFR; c-fms) is expressed at increased levels by microglia in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in mouse models for AD. Increased expression of M-CSFR on cultured microglia results in a strong proinflammatory response, but the relevance of this cell culture finding to intact brain is unknown. To determine the effects of increased microglial expression of M-CSFR in a complex organotypic environment, we developed a system for biolistic transfection of microglia in hippocampal slice cultures. The promoter for the Mac-1 integrin alpha subunit CD11b is active in cells of myeloid origin. In the brain, CD11b expression is restricted to microglia. Constructs consisting of the promoter for CD11b and a c-fms cDNA or an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) cDNA were introduced into monotypic cultures of microglia, neurons, and astrocytes. Strong CD11b promoter activity was observed in microglia, whereas little activity was observed in other cell types. Biolistic transfection of organotypic hippocampal cultures with the CD11b/c-fms construct resulted in expression of the c-fms mRNA and protein that was localized to microglia. Furthermore, biolistic overexpression of M-CSFR on microglia resulted in significantly increased production by the hippocampal cultures of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1alpha macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-1alpha), and trends toward increased production of IL-6 and M-CSF. These findings demonstrate that microglial overexpression of M-CSFR in an organotypic environment induces an inflammatory response, and suggest that increased microglial expression of M-CSFR could contribute to the inflammatory response observed in AD brain.

  18. Mechanisms by which calcium receptor stimulation modifies electromechanical coupling in isolated ventricular cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Schreckenberg, Rolf; Dyukova, Elena; Sitdikova, Guzel; Abdallah, Yaser; Schlüter, Klaus-Dieter

    2015-02-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is widely expressed throughout the entire cardiovascular system and is capable of activating signaling pathways in different cells. Alongside calcium, the CaR also responds to physiological polycations such as putrescine underlining a participation in physiological and pathophysiological processes. Here, we aimed to determine mechanisms as to how CaR activation affects the contractile responsiveness of ventricular cardiomyocytes under basal and stimulated conditions. For that purpose, cardiac myocytes from 3-month-old male Wistar rats were isolated, and the acute effects of an antagonist (NPS2390), agonists (putrescine and gadolinium), or of downregulation of the CaR by siRNA on cell shortening were recorded in a cell-edge-detection system. In addition, experiments were performed on muscle stripes and Langendorff preparations. Mechanistic insights were taken from calcium transients of beating fura-2 AM-loaded cardiomyocytes and western blots. Isolated ventricular cardiomyocytes constitutively express CaR. The expression in the atria is less pronounced. Acute inhibition of CaR reduced basal cell shortening of ventricular myocytes at nearly physiological levels of extracellular calcium. Inhibition of CaR strongly reduced contractility of ventricular muscle stripes but not of atria. Activation of CaR by putrescine and gadolinium influences the contractile responsiveness of isolated cardiomyocytes. Increased calcium mobilization from the sarcoplasmic reticulum via an IP3-dependent mechanism was responsible for amplified systolic calcium transients and a subsequent improvement in cell shortening. Alongside with these effects, activation of CaR increased relaxation velocity of the cells. In conclusion, ventricular CaR expression affects contractile parameters of ventricular heart muscle cells and modifies electromechanical coupling of cardiomyocytes.

  19. Transient congenital hypothyroidism due to thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor blocking antibodies: a case series.

    PubMed

    Evans, Carol; Gregory, John W; Barton, John; Bidder, Christopher; Gibbs, John; Pryce, Rebekah; Al-Muzaffar, Iyad; Ludgate, Marian; Warner, Justin; John, Rhys; Moat, Stuart J

    2011-07-01

    We describe seven infants with transient congenital hypothyroidism (CH) due to maternal thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSH-R) blocking antibodies (TRAb) identified over three decades of newborn screening for CH in Wales, UK that represents a minimum incidence of 1.6% of CH cases. Infants with transient CH due to maternal TRAb presented with a spectrum of clinical and biochemical hypothyroidism. Blood spot TSH concentrations ranged 60.5-332 mIU/L. CH was confirmed by plasma thyroid function tests in all cases (plasma TSH ranged 21-752 mIU/L). The seven infants belonged to five different families. On examination, four infants were clinically hypothyroid. Five infants had a thyroid ultrasound, of which three were abnormal. All infants were treated with thyroxine, which was subsequently withdrawn from three. Following thyroxine withdrawal, one infant resumed normal thyroid function and two developed compensated hypothyroidism. Of the five mothers, two had undiagnosed hypothyroidism and three were receiving thyroxine for longstanding hypothyroidism. Thyroid peroxidase antibody (aTPO) was measured in four and was negative in two, borderline positive in one and strongly positive in another. TRAb was measured in all five women and was strongly positive in all of them. This case series highlights the importance of identifying CH due to TRAb by investigating both the infant and the mother following a raised TSH found on newborn screening. The identification of those infants with transient CH caused by maternal transfer of TRAb is essential for optimizing management during childhood (including potential withdrawal of thyroxine replacement in the longer term) and in any subsequent pregnancy.

  20. Oxaliplatin elicits mechanical and cold allodynia in rodents via TRPA1 receptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Nassini, Romina; Gees, Maarten; Harrison, Selena; De Siena, Gaetano; Materazzi, Serena; Moretto, Nadia; Failli, Paola; Preti, Delia; Marchetti, Nicola; Cavazzini, Alberto; Mancini, Francesca; Pedretti, Pamela; Nilius, Bernd; Patacchini, Riccardo; Geppetti, Pierangelo

    2011-07-01

    Platinum-based anticancer drugs cause neurotoxicity. In particular, oxaliplatin produces early-developing, painful, and cold-exacerbated paresthesias. However, the mechanism underlying these bothersome and dose-limiting adverse effects is unknown. We hypothesized that the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), a cation channel activated by oxidative stress and cold temperature, contributes to mechanical and cold hypersensitivity caused by oxaliplatin and cisplatin. Oxaliplatin and cisplatin evoked glutathione-sensitive relaxation, mediated by TRPA1 stimulation and the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide from sensory nerve terminals in isolated guinea pig pulmonary arteries. No calcium response was observed in cultured mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons or in naïve Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells exposed to oxaliplatin or cisplatin. However, oxaliplatin, and with lower potency, cisplatin, evoked a glutathione-sensitive calcium response in CHO cells expressing mouse TRPA1. One single administration of oxaliplatin produced mechanical and cold hyperalgesia in rats, an effect selectively abated by the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. Oxaliplatin administration caused mechanical and cold allodynia in mice. Both responses were absent in TRPA1-deficient mice. Administration of cisplatin evoked mechanical allodynia, an effect that was reduced in TRPA1-deficient mice. TRPA1 is therefore required for oxaliplatin-evoked mechanical and cold hypersensitivity, and contributes to cisplatin-evoked mechanical allodynia. Channel activation is most likely caused by glutathione-sensitive molecules, including reactive oxygen species and their byproducts, which are generated after tissue exposure to platinum-based drugs from cells surrounding nociceptive nerve terminals.

  1. The Role of Lipolysis Stimulated Lipoprotein Receptor in Breast Cancer and Directing Breast Cancer Cell Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Reaves, Denise K.; Fagan-Solis, Katerina D.; Dunphy, Karen; Oliver, Shannon D.; Scott, David W.; Fleming, Jodie M.

    2014-01-01

    The claudin-low molecular subtype of breast cancer is of particular interest for clinically the majority of these tumors are poor prognosis, triple negative, invasive ductal carcinomas. Claudin-low tumors are characterized by cancer stem cell-like features and low expression of cell junction and adhesion proteins. Herein, we sought to define the role of lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) in breast cancer and cancer cell behavior as LSR was recently correlated with tumor-initiating features. We show that LSR was expressed in epithelium, endothelium, and stromal cells within the healthy breast tissue, as well as in tumor epithelium. In primary breast tumor bioposies, LSR expression was significantly correlated with invasive ductal carcinomas compared to invasive lobular carcinomas, as well as ERα positive tumors and breast cancer cell lines. LSR levels were significantly reduced in claudin-low breast cancer cell lines and functional studies illustrated that re-introduction of LSR into a claudin-low cell line suppressed the EMT phenotype and reduced individual cell migration. However, our data suggest that LSR may promote collective cell migration. Re-introduction of LSR in claudin-low breast cancer cell lines reestablished tight junction protein expression and correlated with transepithelial electrical resistance, thereby reverting claudin-low lines to other intrinsic molecular subtypes. Moreover, overexpression of LSR altered gene expression of pathways involved in transformation and tumorigenesis as well as enhanced proliferation and survival in anchorage independent conditions, highlighting that reestablishment of LSR signaling promotes aggressive/tumor initiating cell behaviors. Collectively, these data highlight a direct role for LSR in driving aggressive breast cancer behavior. PMID:24637461

  2. Galantamine-induced amyloid-{beta} clearance mediated via stimulation of microglial nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Takata, Kazuyuki; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Saeki, Mana; Terada, Maki; Kagitani, Sachiko; Kitamura, Risa; Fujikawa, Yasuhiro; Maelicke, Alfred; Tomimoto, Hidekazu; Taniguchi, Takashi; Shimohama, Shun

    2010-12-17

    Reduction of brain amyloid-β (Aβ) has been proposed as a therapeutic target for Alzheimer disease (AD), and microglial Aβ phagocytosis is noted as an Aβ clearance system in brains. Galantamine is an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor approved for symptomatic treatment of AD. Galantamine also acts as an allosterically potentiating ligand (APL) for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). APL-binding site is located close to but distinct from that for acetylcholine on nAChRs, and FK1 antibody specifically binds to the APL-binding site without interfering with the acetylcholine-binding site. We found that in human AD brain, microglia accumulated on Aβ deposits and expressed α7 nAChRs including the APL-binding site recognized with FK1 antibody. Treatment of rat microglia with galantamine significantly enhanced microglial Aβ phagocytosis, and acetylcholine competitive antagonists as well as FK1 antibody inhibited the enhancement. Thus, the galantamine-enhanced microglial Aβ phagocytosis required the combined actions of an acetylcholine competitive agonist and the APL for nAChRs. Indeed, depletion of choline, an acetylcholine-competitive α7 nAChR agonist, from the culture medium impeded the enhancement. Similarly, Ca(2+) depletion or inhibition of the calmodulin-dependent pathways for the actin reorganization abolished the enhancement. These results suggest that galantamine sensitizes microglial α7 nAChRs to choline and induces Ca(2+) influx into microglia. The Ca(2+)-induced intracellular signaling cascades may then stimulate Aβ phagocytosis through the actin reorganization. We further demonstrated that galantamine treatment facilitated Aβ clearance in brains of rodent AD models. In conclusion, we propose a further advantage of galantamine in clinical AD treatment and microglial nAChRs as a new therapeutic target. PMID:20947502

  3. Improvement of endothelial dysfunction by selective estrogen receptor-alpha stimulation in ovariectomized SHR.

    PubMed

    Widder, Julian; Pelzer, Theo; von Poser-Klein, Christine; Hu, Kai; Jazbutyte, Virginija; Fritzemeier, Karl-Heinrich; Hegele-Hartung, Christa; Neyses, Ludwig; Bauersachs, Johann

    2003-11-01

    Both known estrogen receptors, ERalpha and ERbeta, are expressed in blood vessels. To gain further insight into the role of ERalpha in a functional setting, we investigated the effect of the novel highly selective ERalpha agonist Cpd1471 on vascular reactivity in ovariectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). After ovariectomy or sham operation, 12-week-old female SHR received either 17beta-estradiol (E2, 2 microg/kg body wt per day), the selective ERalpha agonist Cpd1471 (30 microg/kg body wt per day), or placebo. Acetylcholine-induced endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation was significantly blunted in aortas from ovariectomized rats (Rmax, 53%+/-3% versus sham, 79%+/-2%; P<0.001). Treatment with E2 or Cpd1471 significantly augmented acetylcholine-induced relaxation in ovariectomized rats (Rmax, 70%+/-2%; resp, 73%+/-2%). Endothelium-independent relaxation induced by sodium nitroprusside was not different among the four groups. The contractile response induced by the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor Nomega-nitro-l-arginine, an index of basal NO formation, was significantly lower in ovariectomized rats compared with sham-operated animals (53+/-2% versus 77%+/-5%; P<0.01) and was normalized by both E2 (70%+/-2%) and Cpd1471 (70%+/-3%). Aortic endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) expression and phosphorylation of the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, an index of NO/cGMP-signaling, was reduced in ovariectomized SHR and normalized by E2 and Cpd1471. In SHR after ovariectomy, endothelium-dependent NO-mediated vasorelaxation and eNOS expression are attenuated. The novel selective ERalpha agonist Cpd1471 prevented these pathophysiological changes to a similar extent as E2. Thus, the pharmacological principle of selective ERalpha activation mediates positive vascular effects.

  4. Antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophage chemotaxis via formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Ha Young; Jung, Young Su; Park, Joon Seong; Hwang, Jae Sam; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we report that one of the antimicrobial peptides scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates actin polymerization and the subsequent chemotactic migration of macrophages through the activation of ERK and protein kinase B (Akt) activity. The scolopendrasin VII-induced chemotactic migration of macrophages is inhibited by the formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antagonist cyclosporine H. We also found that scolopendrasin VII stimulate the chemotactic migration of FPR1-transfected RBL-2H3 cells, but not that of vector-transfected cells; moreover, scolopendrasin VII directly binds to FPR1. Our findings therefore suggest that the antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophages, resulting in chemotactic migration via FPR1 signaling, and the peptide can be useful in the study of FPR1-related biological responses.

  5. Antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophage chemotaxis via formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Ha Young; Jung, Young Su; Park, Joon Seong; Hwang, Jae Sam; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we report that one of the antimicrobial peptides scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates actin polymerization and the subsequent chemotactic migration of macrophages through the activation of ERK and protein kinase B (Akt) activity. The scolopendrasin VII-induced chemotactic migration of macrophages is inhibited by the formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antagonist cyclosporine H. We also found that scolopendrasin VII stimulate the chemotactic migration of FPR1-transfected RBL-2H3 cells, but not that of vector-transfected cells; moreover, scolopendrasin VII directly binds to FPR1. Our findings therefore suggest that the antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophages, resulting in chemotactic migration via FPR1 signaling, and the peptide can be useful in the study of FPR1-related biological responses. PMID:26129676

  6. Insulin-stimulated Na/sup +/ transport in a model renal epithelium: protein synthesis dependence and receptor interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Blazer-Yost, B.L.; Cox, M.

    1987-05-01

    The urinary bladder of the toad, Bufo marinus, is a well characterized model of the mammalian distal nephron. Porcine insulin (approx. 0.5-5.0 ..mu..M) stimulates net mucosal to serosal Na/sup +/ flux within 10 minutes of hormone addition. The response is maintained for at least 5 hr and is completely abolished by low doses (10..mu..M) of the epithelial Na/sup +/ channel blocker amiloride. Insulin-stimulated Na/sup +/ transport does not require new protein synthesis since it is actinomycin-D (10..mu..g/ml) insensitive. Also in 3 separate experiments in which epithelial cell proteins were examined by /sup 35/S-methionine labeling, 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis/autoradiography, no insulin induced proteins were observed. Equimolar concentrations of purified porcine proinsulin and insulin (0.64..mu..M) stimulate Na/sup +/ transport to the same extent. Thus, the putative toad insulin receptor may have different affinity characteristics than those demonstrated for insulin and proinsulin in mammalian tissues. Alternatively, the natriferic action of insulin in toad urinary bladders may be mediated by occupancy of another receptor. Preliminary experiments indicating that nanomolar concentrations of IGF/sub 1/ stimulate Na/sup +/ transport in this tissue support the latter contention.

  7. Serotonin directly stimulates luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone release from GT1 cells via 5-HT7 receptors.

    PubMed

    Héry, M; François-Bellan, A M; Héry, F; Deprez, P; Becquet, D

    1997-10-01

    Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH release, which serves as the primary drive to the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis, is controlled by many neuromediators. Serotonin has been implicated in this regulation. However, it is unclear whether the central effect of serotonin on LHRH secretion is exerted directly on LHRH neurosecretory neurons or indirectly via multisynaptic pathways. The present studies were undertaken in order to examine whether LHRH secretion from immortalized LHRH cell lines is directly regulated by serotonin and, if so, to identify the receptor subtype involved. 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT), a 5-HT1A/7 receptor agonist, stimulated LHRH release from GT1-1 cells. This effect was blocked by ritanserin, a 5-HT2/7 receptor antagonist, but not by SDZ-216-525, a 5-HT1A antagonist. Basal LHRH release was not affected by the 5-HT2 agonist DOI. Reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction technique (RT-PCR) was used in order to identify 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptor mRNA in immortalized LHRH cell lines. GT1-1 cells express mRNA for the 5-HT7, but not the 5-HT1A receptor subtypes. These results demonstrate a direct stimulatory effect of serotonin on LHRH release via 5-HT7 receptor.

  8. Measurement of thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins using a novel thyroid stimulating hormone receptor-guanine nucleotide-binding protein, (GNAS) fusion bioassay.

    PubMed

    Pierce, M; Sandrock, R; Gillespie, G; Meikle, A W

    2012-11-01

    Hyperthyroidism, defined by overproduction of thyroid hormones, has a 2-3% prevalence in the population. The most common form of hyperthyroidism is Graves' disease. A diagnostic biomarker for Graves' disease is the presence of immunoglobulins which bind to, and stimulate, the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR), a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR). We hypothesized that the ectopically expressed TSHR gene in a thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI) assay could be engineered to increase the accumulation of the GPCR pathway second messenger, cyclic AMP (cAMP), the molecule measured in the assay as a marker for pathway activation. An ectopically expressing TSHR-mutant guanine nucleotide-binding protein, (GNAS) Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell clone was constructed using standard molecular biology techniques. After incubation of the new clone with sera containing various levels of TSI, GPCR pathway activation was then quantified by measuring cAMP accumulation in the clone. The clone, together with a NaCl-free cell assay buffer containing 5% polyethylene glycol (PEG)6000, was tested against 56 Graves' patients, 27 toxic thyroid nodule patients and 119 normal patients. Using receiver operating characteristic analysis, when comparing normal with Graves' sera, the assay yielded a sensitivity of 93%, a specificity of 99% and an efficiency of 98%. Total complex precision (within-run, across runs and across days), presented as a percentage coefficient of variation, was found to be 7·8, 8·7 and 7·6% for low, medium and high TSI responding serum, respectively. We conclude that the performance of the new TSI assay provides sensitive detection of TSI, allowing for accurate, early detection of Graves' disease.

  9. Enhanced thrombopoietin but not G-CSF receptor stimulation induces self-renewing hematopoietic stem cell divisions in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kovtonyuk, Larisa V; Manz, Markus G; Takizawa, Hitoshi

    2016-06-23

    In steady-state adult hematopoiesis, most hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are in the resting phase of the cell cycle. Upon enhanced hematopoietic demand, HSCs can be induced to divide and self-renew or differentiate. However, the cell-extrinsic signals inducing HSC cycling remain to be elucidated. Using in vivo high-resolution single HSC divisional tracking, we directly demonstrate that clinically applied thrombopoietin receptor but not granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) receptor agonists drive HSCs into self-renewing divisions leading to quantitative expansion of functional HSC as defined by their in vivo serial multilineage and long-term repopulating potential. These results suggest that thrombopoietin mimetics might be applicable to expand HSCs in vivo and to sensitize thrombopoietin receptor-expressing HSCs to cell cycle-dependent cytotoxic agents. PMID:27146433

  10. Activation of delta-type opioid receptors modulates the responses of cat terminal ileum to field electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Venkova, K; Pencheva, N; Radomirov, R

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of (D-Ala2, D-Leu5) enkephalin amide (DADLE) on the responses of the cat terminal ileum to field electrical stimulation (pulse duration of 0.5 msec, train duration of 10 sec, 30 V) were evaluated by the changes in the contractile or the relaxatory responses of longitudinal and circular strips to electrical stimuli with a frequency of 2, 10 or 30 Hz. 2. Stimulation with a frequency of 2, 10 or 30 Hz elicited contractile responses from the longitudinal strips while in the circular strips 2 Hz stimulation induced contractions and 10 or 30 Hz stimulation caused relaxation. Tetrodotoxin (TTX) (0.1 mumol/l) abolished the electrically-induced responses in both longitudinal and circular strips. 3. DADLE (1 nmol/l) significantly inhibited the cholinergic contractile responses of the longitudinal strips to 2, 10 or 30 Hz stimulation and the contractile responses of the circular strips to 2 Hz stimulation. The relaxatory responses of the circular strips to 10 or 30 Hz stimulation were insignificantly increased by DADLE. 4. On the background of guanetidine (10 mumol/l) and atropine (3 mumol/l) DADLE significantly decreased the nonadrenergic, noncholinergic relaxatory responses of the circular strips to 2, 10 or 30 Hz stimulation. 5. DADLE did not change the maximum effects and the EC50 values of acetylcholine and noradrenaline in both longitudinal and circular strips. 6. It is suggested that in the cat terminal ileum activation of delta-type opioid receptors modulates the mechanical activity suppressing the cholinergic responses in the longitudinal and circular layers as well as the adrenergic and nonadrenergic, noncholinergic responses in the circular layer.

  11. In adult female hamsters hypothyroidism stimulates D1 receptor-mediated breathing without altering D1 receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Schlenker, Evelyn H; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Schultz, Harold D

    2015-11-01

    Hypothyroidism affects cardiopulmonary regulation and function of dopaminergic receptors. Here we evaluated effects of 5 months of hypothyroidism on dopamine D1 receptor modulation of breathing in female hamsters using a D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390. Euthyroid hamsters (EH) served as controls. Results indicated that hypothyroid female hamsters (HH) exhibited decreased body weights and minute ventilation (VE) following hypoxia due to decreased frequency of breathing (F). Moreover, SCH 23390 administration in HH increased VE by increasing tidal volume during exposure to air, hypoxia and following hypoxia. Relative to vehicle, SCH 23390 treatment decreased body temperature and hypoxic VE responsiveness in both groups. In EH, SCH 23390 decreased F in air, hypoxia and post hypoxia, and VE during hypoxia trended to decrease (P=0.053). Finally, expression of D1 receptor protein was not different between the two groups in any region evaluated. Thus, hypothyroidism in older female hamsters affected D1 receptor modulation of ventilation differently relative to euthyroid animals, but not expression of D1 receptors.

  12. Modern approaches to the design of memory and cognitive function stimulants based on AMPA receptor ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, V. V.; Proshin, A. N.; Kinzirsky, A. S.; Bachurin, Sergey O.

    2009-05-01

    Data on the structure and properties of compounds acting on AMPA receptors, the key subtype of ionotropic glutamate receptors of the mammalian central nervous system, are analyzed. Data on the role of these receptors in provision of memory and cognitive function formation and impairment processes are presented. The attention is focused on the modern views on the mechanisms of AMPA receptor desensitization and deactivation and action of substances affecting these processes. The structures of key positive modulators of AMPA receptors are given. The problems of application of these substances as therapeutic means for preventing and treating neurodegenerative and psychoneurological diseases are discussed. Bibliography — 121 references.

  13. Novel fluorescent antagonist as a molecular probe in A(3) adenosine receptor binding assays using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Kozma, Eszter; Kumar, T Santhosh; Federico, Stephanie; Phan, Khai; Balasubramanian, Ramachandran; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Paoletta, Silvia; Moro, Stefano; Spalluto, Giampiero; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2012-06-01

    The physiological role of the A(3) adenosine receptor (AR) was explored in cardiac ischaemia, inflammatory diseases and cancer. We report a new fluorophore-conjugated human (h) A(3)AR antagonist for application to cell-based assays in ligand discovery and for receptor imaging. Fluorescent pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-ylamine (pyrazolo-triazolo-pyrimidine, PTP) and triazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-yl)amine (triazolo-quinazoline, TQ) AR antagonists were compared. A chain-extended and click-conjugated Alexa Fluor-488 TQ derivative (MRS5449) displayed a radioligand binding K(i) value of 6.4±2.5nM in hA(3)AR-expressing CHO cell membranes. MRS5449 antagonized hA(3)AR agonist-induced inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner (K(B)=4.8nM). Using flow cytometry (FCM), MRS5449 saturated hA(3)ARs with very high specific-to-nonspecific binding ratio with an equilibrium binding constant 5.15nM, comparable to the K(d) value of 6.65nM calculated from kinetic experiments. K(i) values of known AR antagonists in inhibition of MRS5449 binding in whole cell FCM were consistent with radioligand binding in membranes, but agonist binding was 5-20 fold weaker than obtained with agonist radioligand [(125)I]I-AB-MECA. Further binding analysis of MRS5549 suggested multiple agonist binding states of the A(3)AR. Molecular docking predicted binding modes of these fluorescent antagonists. Thus, MRS5449 is a useful tool for hA(3)AR characterization.

  14. Novel Fluorescent Antagonist as a Molecular Probe in A3 Adenosine Receptor Binding Assays Using Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Kozma, Eszter; Kumar, T. Santhosh; Federico, Stephanie; Phan, Khai; Balasubramanian, Ramachandran; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Paoletta, Silvia; Moro, Stefano; Spalluto, Giampiero; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    The physiological role of the A3 adenosine receptor (AR) was explored in cardiac ischaemia, inflammatory diseases and cancer. We report a new fluorophore-conjugated human (h) A3AR antagonist for application to cell-based assays in ligand discovery and for receptor imaging. Fluorescent pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-ylamine (pyrazolo-triazolo-pyrimidine, PTP) and triazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-yl)amine (triazolo-quinazoline, TQ) AR antagonists were compared. A chain-extended and click-conjugated Alexa Fluor-488 TQ derivative (MRS5449) displayed a radioligand binding Ki value of 6.4 ± 2.5 nM in hA3AR-expressing CHO cell membranes. MRS5449 antagonized hA3AR agonist-induced inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner (KB 4.8 nM). Using flow cytometry (FCM), MRS5449 saturated hA3ARs with very high specific-to-nonspecific binding ratio with an equilibrium binding constant 5.15 nM, comparable to the Kd value of 6.65 nM calculated from kinetic experiments. Ki values of known AR antagonists in inhibition of MRS5449 binding in whole cell FCM were consistent with radioligand binding in membranes, but agonist binding was 5–20 fold weaker than obtained with agonist radioligand [125I]I-AB-MECA. Further binding analysis of MRS5549 suggested multiple agonist binding states of the A3AR. Molecular docking predicted binding modes of these fluorescent antagonists. Thus, MRS5449 is a useful tool for hA3AR characterization. PMID:22402302

  15. Toll-Like Receptor 2 Stimulation of Osteoblasts Mediates Staphylococcus Aureus Induced Bone Resorption and Osteoclastogenesis through Enhanced RANKL

    PubMed Central

    Kassem, Ali; Lindholm, Catharina; Lerner, Ulf H

    2016-01-01

    Severe Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) infections pose an immense threat to population health and constitute a great burden for the health care worldwide. Inter alia, S. aureus septic arthritis is a disease with high mortality and morbidity caused by destruction of the infected joints and systemic bone loss, osteoporosis. Toll-Like receptors (TLRs) are innate immune cell receptors recognizing a variety of microbial molecules and structures. S. aureus recognition via TLR2 initiates a signaling cascade resulting in production of various cytokines, but the mechanisms by which S. aureus causes rapid and excessive bone loss are still unclear. We, therefore, investigated how S. aureus regulates periosteal/endosteal osteoclast formation and bone resorption. S. aureus stimulation of neonatal mouse parietal bone induced ex vivo bone resorption and osteoclastic gene expression. This effect was associated with increased mRNA and protein expression of receptor activator of NF-kB ligand (RANKL) without significant change in osteoprotegerin (OPG) expression. Bone resorption induced by S. aureus was abolished by OPG. S. aureus increased the expression of osteoclastogenic cytokines and prostaglandins in the parietal bones but the stimulatory effect of S. aureus on bone resorption and Tnfsf11 mRNA expression was independent of these cytokines and prostaglandins. Stimulation of isolated periosteal osteoblasts with S. aureus also resulted in increased expression of Tnfsf11 mRNA, an effect lost in osteoblasts from Tlr2 knockout mice. S. aureus stimulated osteoclastogenesis in isolated periosteal cells without affecting RANKL-stimulated resorption. In contrast, S. aureus inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast formation in bone marrow macrophages. These data show that S. aureus enhances bone resorption and periosteal osteoclast formation by increasing osteoblast RANKL production through TLR2. Our study indicates the importance of using different in vitro approaches for studies of how S

  16. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor primes interleukin-13 production by macrophages via protease-activated receptor-2.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Manabu; Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Ono, Tomomichi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2015-04-01

    Chronic inflammation is often linked to the presence of type 2-polarized macrophages, which are induced by the T helper type 2 cytokines interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 (IL-13). IL-13 is a key mediator of tissue fibrosis caused by T helper type 2-based inflammation. Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. This study investigated the priming effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on IL-13 expression by macrophages stimulated with HNE. Adherent macrophages were obtained from primary cultures of human mononuclear cells. Expression of IL-13 mRNA and protein by GM-CSF-dependent macrophages was investigated after stimulation with HNE, using the polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. GM-CSF had a priming effect on IL-13 mRNA and protein expression by macrophages stimulated with HNE, while this effect was not observed for various other cytokines. GM-CSF-dependent macrophages showed a significant increase in the expression of protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) mRNA and protein. The response of IL-13 mRNA to HNE was significantly decreased by pretreatment with alpha1-antitrypsin, a PAR-2 antibody (SAM11), or a PAR-2 antagonist (ENMD-1068). These findings suggest that stimulation with HNE can induce IL-13 production by macrophages, especially GM-CSF-dependent macrophages. Accordingly, neutrophil elastase may have a key role in fibrosis associated with chronic inflammation.

  17. Activation of mGlu2/3 metabotropic glutamate receptors negatively regulates the stimulation of inositol phospholipid hydrolysis mediated by 5-hydroxytryptamine2A serotonin receptors in the frontal cortex of living mice.

    PubMed

    Molinaro, G; Traficante, A; Riozzi, B; Di Menna, L; Curto, M; Pallottino, S; Nicoletti, F; Bruno, V; Battaglia, G

    2009-08-01

    The interaction between 5-hydroxytryptamine(2A) (5-HT(2A)) serotonin receptors and metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) 2/3 receptors underlies the antipsychotic activity of mGlu2/3 receptor agonists in experimental animals and humans. The molecular nature of this interaction is only partially known. We here report for the first time that pharmacological activation of mGlu2/3 receptors attenuates the stimulation of polyphosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis mediated by 5-HT(2A) receptors in the frontal cortex of living mice. Mice were injected intracerebroventricularly with [myo-(3)H]inositol and treated with drugs 1 h after a pretreatment with lithium, which blocks the conversion of inositol monophosphate into free inositol. Systemic injection of the mGlu2/3 receptor agonist (-)-2-oxa-4-aminocyclo[3.1.0]hexane-4,6-dicarboxylic acid (LY379268) inhibited the stimulation of PI hydrolysis induced by the hallucinogenic 5-HT(2A) receptor agonist (+/-)-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI) without affecting the stimulation by mGlu1/5 or muscarinic receptors. The action of LY379268 was prevented by the preferential mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist (2S,1'S,2'S)-2-(9-xanthylmethyl)-2-(2'-carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (LY341495). N-(4'-cyano-biphenyl-3-yl)-N-(3-pyridinylmethyl)-ethanesulfonamide hydrochloride (LY566332), a selective mGlu2 receptor enhancer, also reduced DOI-stimulated PI hydrolysis when combined with subthreshold doses of LY379268. Systemic LY379268 inhibited DOI-stimulated PI hydrolysis in mice lacking either mGlu2 or mGlu3 receptors but was inactive in double mGlu2/mGlu3 receptor knockout mice, suggesting that both mGlu2 and mGlu3 receptors interact with 5-HT(2A) receptors. Surprisingly, contrasting results were obtained in cortical slice preparations, where LY379268 amplified both DOI- and 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine-stimulated PI hydrolysis. Amplification was abrogated by the mGlu5 receptor antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine, suggesting that

  18. Affinity purification of human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor alpha-chain. Demonstration of binding by photoaffinity labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, S.; Shibuya, K.; Miyazono, K.; Tojo, A.; Oka, Y.; Miyagawa, K.; Takaku, F. )

    1990-11-15

    The human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor alpha-chain, a low affinity component of the receptor, was solubilized and affinity-purified from human placenta using biotinylated GM-CSF. Scatchard analysis of {sup 125}I-GM-CSF binding to the placental membrane extract disclosed that the GM-CSF receptor had a dissociation constant (Kd) of 0.5-0.8 nM, corresponding to the Kd value of the GM-CSF receptor alpha-chain on the intact placental membrane. Affinity labeling of the solubilized protein using a photoreactive cross-linking agent, N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-azidobenzoate (HSAB), demonstrated a single specific band of 70-95 kDa representing a ligand-receptor complex. Approximately 2 g of the placental membrane extract was subjected to a biotinylated GM-CSF-fixed streptavidin-agarose column, resulting in a single major band at 70 kDa on a silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate gel. The radioiodination for the purified material disclosed that the purified protein had an approximate molecular mass of 70 kDa and a pI of 6.6. Binding activity of the purified material was demonstrated by photoaffinity labeling using HSAB-{sup 125}I-GM-CSF, producing a similar specific band at 70-95 kDa as was demonstrated for the crude protein.

  19. Porphyromonas gingivalis Stimulates Bone Resorption by Enhancing RANKL (Receptor Activator of NF-κB Ligand) through Activation of Toll-like Receptor 2 in Osteoblasts*

    PubMed Central

    Kassem, Ali; Henning, Petra; Lundberg, Pernilla; Souza, Pedro P. C.; Lindholm, Catharina; Lerner, Ulf H.

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis has been associated with rheumatoid arthritis. In experimental arthritis, concomitant periodontitis caused by oral infection with Porphyromonas gingivalis enhances articular bone loss. The aim of this study was to investigate how lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from P. gingivalis stimulates bone resorption. The effects by LPS P. gingivalis and four other TLR2 ligands on bone resorption, osteoclast formation, and gene expression in wild type and Tlr2-deficient mice were assessed in ex vivo cultures of mouse parietal bones and in an in vivo model in which TLR2 agonists were injected subcutaneously over the skull bones. LPS P. gingivalis stimulated mineral release and matrix degradation in the parietal bone organ cultures by increasing differentiation and formation of mature osteoclasts, a response dependent on increased RANKL (receptor activator of NF-κB ligand). LPS P. gingivalis stimulated RANKL in parietal osteoblasts dependent on the presence of TLR2 and through a MyD88 and NF-κB-mediated mechanism. Similarly, the TLR2 agonists HKLM, FSL1, Pam2, and Pam3 stimulated RANKL in osteoblasts and parietal bone resorption. LPS P. gingivalis and Pam2 robustly enhanced osteoclast formation in periosteal/endosteal cell cultures by increasing RANKL. LPS P. gingivalis and Pam2 also up-regulated RANKL and osteoclastic genes in vivo, resulting in an increased number of periosteal osteoclasts and immense bone loss in wild type mice but not in Tlr2-deficient mice. These data demonstrate that LPS P. gingivalis stimulates periosteal osteoclast formation and bone resorption by stimulating RANKL in osteoblasts via TLR2. This effect might be important for periodontal bone loss and for the enhanced bone loss seen in rheumatoid arthritis patients with concomitant periodontal disease. PMID:26085099

  20. Association between colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor gene polymorphisms and asthma risk.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eun Kyong; Lee, Shin-Hwa; Cho, Sung-Hwan; Jung, Seok; Yoon, Sang Hyuk; Park, Sung Woo; Park, Jong Sook; Uh, Soo Taek; Kim, Yang Ki; Kim, Yong Hoon; Choi, Jae-Sung; Park, Byung-Lae; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Park, Choon-Sik

    2010-09-01

    Colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) is expressed in monocytes/macrophages and dendritic cells. These cells play important roles in the innate immune response, which is regarded as an important aspect of asthma development. Genetic alterations in the CSF1R gene may contribute to the development of asthma. We investigated whether CSF1R gene polymorphisms were associated with the risk of asthma. Through direct DNA sequencing of the CSF1R gene, we identified 28 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genotyped them in 303 normal controls and 498 asthmatic patients. Expression of CSF1R protein and mRNA were measured on CD14-positive monocytes and neutrophils in peripheral blood of asthmatic patients using flow cytometry and real-time PCR. Among the 28 polymorphisms, two intronic polymorphism (+20511C>T and +22693T>C) were associated with the risk of asthma by logistic regression analysis. The frequencies of the minor allele at CSF1R +20511C>T and +22693T>C were higher in asthmatic subjects than in normal controls (4.6 vs. 7.7%, p = 0.001 in co-dominant and dominant models; 16.4 vs. 25.8%, p = 0.0006 in a recessive model). CSF1R mRNA levels in neutrophils of the asthmatic patients having the +22693CC allele were higher than in those having the +22693TT allele (p = 0.026). Asthmatic patients with the +22693CC allele also showed significantly higher CSF1R expression on CD14-positive monocytes and neutrophils than did those with the +22693TT allele (p = 0.045 and p = 0.044). The +20511C>T SNP had no association with CSF1R mRNA or protein expression. In conclusion, the minor allele at CSF1R +22693T>C may have a susceptibility effect in the development of asthma, via increased CSF1R protein and mRNA expression in inflammatory cells.

  1. Up-regulation of transferrin receptor gene expression by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Y; Kataoka, T; Towatari, M; Ito, T; Inoue, H; Ogura, M; Morishima, Y; Saito, H

    1990-12-15

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) enhanced surface transferrin receptor (TfR) expression in two human myeloid leukemia cell lines, NKM-1 and NOMO-1, which possess G-CSF receptors. Radioligand-binding assay revealed that 10 ng/ml G-CSF significantly increased TfR to 186 +/- 20 and 276 +/- 38% of control for NKM-1 cells and NOMO-1 cells, respectively, in a 24-h culture. Scatchard analysis showed the increase of transferrin (Tf)-binding sites but no change in the receptor affinity. The enhanced TfR expression was not mediated either by the kinetic change of receptor cycling or by cellular iron content. Immunoprecipitation with anti-TfR antibody was used, and the increased biosynthesis of the receptor was demonstrated in G-CSF-stimulated cells. Northern blot analysis showed a 2- to 3-fold increase of TfR mRNA of NKM-1 cells cultured in medium containing Tf and G-CSF, whereas the mRNA declined without G-CSF. The effect of G-CSF on the TfR mRNA was observed within 2 h, which preceded the increase of surface TfR and the transition to the S phase of the cell cycle. G-CSF also potentiated TfR expression in freshly obtained myeloid leukemia cells. The present study shows up-regulation of TfR expression by G-CSF in myeloid leukemia cells and provides evidence that the regulation is mediated by controlling the steady-state level of the mRNA. PMID:1701357

  2. Transfected adenosine A1 receptor-mediated modulation of thrombin-stimulated phospholipase C and phospholipase A2 activity in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Dickenson, J M; Hill, S J

    1997-02-19

    Thrombin receptor activation in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stimulates the hydrolysis of inositol phospholipids and the release of arachidonic acid. Our previous studies have shown that activation of the human transfected adenosine A1 receptor in CHO cells (CHO-A1) potentiates the accumulation of inositol phosphates elicited by endogenous P2U purinoceptors and CCKA receptors. In this study we have investigated whether adenosine A1 receptor activation can modulate thrombin-stimulated arachidonic acid release and/or inositol phospholipid hydrolysis in CHO-A1 cells. Thrombin stimulated [3H]arachidonic acid release and total [3H]inositol phosphate accumulation in CHO-A1 cells. Both these responses to thrombin were were insensitive to pertussis toxin. The protein kinase C activator, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), potentiated thrombin-stimulated [3H]arachidonic acid. In marked contrast, PMA inhibited thrombin-stimulated [3H]inositol phosphate accumulation. The selective protein kinase C inhibitor Ro 31-8220 (3-¿1-[3-(2-isothioureido)propyl] indol-3-yl¿-4-(1-methylindol-3-yl)-3-pyrrolin-2,5-dione) had no effect on thrombin-stimulated [3H]arachidonic acid release but reversed the potentiation of thrombin-stimulated [3H]arachidonic acid release elicited by PMA. The selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) augmented the release of [3H]arachidonic acid produced by thrombin. Co-activation of the adenosine A1 receptor also potentiated thrombin-stimulated [3H]inositol phosphate accumulation. The synergistic interactions between the adenosine A1 receptor and thrombin were abolished in pertussis-toxin-treated cells. The potentiation of [3H]arachidonic acid release by CPA was blocked by the protein kinase C inhibitors Ro 31-8220 and GF 109203X (3-[1-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]-1 H-indol-3-yl]-4-(1 H-indol-3-yl)- 1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione). In conclusion, thrombin receptor activation in CHO-A1 cells stimulates the accumulation of [3H

  3. Effects of dorsal periaqueductal gray CRF1- and CRF2-receptor stimulation in animal models of panic.

    PubMed

    Sergio, Thatiane de Oliveira; Spiacci, Ailton; Zangrossi, Hélio

    2014-11-01

    An increasing amount of evidence suggests that dysregulation of corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling may contribute to the etiology of anxiety disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder and panic. The dorsal periaqueductal gray matter (dPAG) in the midbrain has been considered a key region involved in the physiopathology of anxiety and panic. Administration of CRF in this structure enhances the expression of anxiety-related defensive behaviors in different animal models. Controversial results have been obtained regarding the involvement of CRF1 and CRF2 receptors in the regulation of panic-related responses. We report here that CRF (0.0625-1 μg) in the dPAG facilitates escape expression in two animal models that associate this behavior with panic, the elevated T-maze and the electrical stimulation of the dPAG. This effect, equally observed after CRF injection in the dorsomedial and dorsolateral columns of the PAG, is due to the activation of CRF1 receptors as revealed by its blockade by the CRF1 receptor antagonist antalarmin. In the elevated T-maze, CRF also facilitates inhibitory avoidance acquisition, suggesting an anxiogenic effect. Local administration of urocortin 2 (0.01-0.1 μg), a preferential CRF2 receptor agonist, failed to change escape expression, but impaired avoidance learning, indicating an anxiolytic effect. The results indicate that CRF1 receptors in the dPAG play a pervasive role in the regulation of defensive responses associated with both generalized anxiety and panic. Recruitment of CRF2 receptors only impacts upon the former type of behaviors, leading to an effect opposed to that caused by CRF1 receptor activation.

  4. The Estrogen-Related Receptor Alpha Upregulates Secretin Expressions in Response to Hypertonicity and Angiotensin II Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Vien H. Y.; Lam, Ian P. Y.; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Chow, Billy K. C.; Lee, Leo T. O.

    2012-01-01

    Osmoregulation via maintenance of water and salt homeostasis is a vital process. In the brain, a functional secretin (SCT) and secretin receptor (SCTR) axis has recently been shown to mediate central actions of angiotensin II (ANGII), including initiation of water intake and stimulation of vasopressin (VP) expression and release. In this report, we provide evidence that estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα, NR3B1), a transcription factor mainly involved in metabolism, acts as an upstream activator of the SCT gene. In vitro studies using mouse hypothalamic cell line N-42 show that ERRα upregulates SCT promoter and gene expression. More importantly, knockdown of endogenous ERRα abolishes SCT promoter activation in response to hypertonic and ANGII stimulations. In mouse brain, ERRα coexpresses with SCT in various osmoregulatory brain regions, including the lamina terminalis and the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, and its expression is induced by hyperosmotic and ANGII treatments. Based on our data, we propose that both the upregulation of ERRα and/or the increased binding of ERRα to the mouse SCT promoter are two possible mechanisms for the elevated SCT expression upon hyperosmolality and central ANGII stimulation. PMID:22761926

  5. Effects of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists in assays of acute pain-stimulated and pain-depressed behaviors in rats.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Kelen C; Carroll, F Ivy; Negus, S Stevens

    2015-11-01

    Agonists at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) constitute one drug class being evaluated as candidate analgesics. Previous preclinical studies have implicated α4β2 and α7 nAChRs as potential mediators of the antinociceptive effects of (–)-nicotine hydrogen tartrate (nicotine) and other nAChR agonists; however, these studies have relied exclusively on measures of pain-stimulated behavior, which can be defined as behaviors that increase in frequency, rate, or intensity after presentation of a noxious stimulus. Pain is also associated with depression of many behaviors, and drug effects can differ in assays of pain-stimulated versus pain-depressed behavior. Accordingly, this study compared the effects of nicotine, the selective α4/6β2 agonist 5-(123I)iodo-3-[2(S)-2-azetidinylmethoxy]pyridine (5-I-A-85380), and the selective α7 agonist N-(3R)-1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl-4-chlorobenzamide in assays of pain-stimulated and pain-depressed behavior in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Intraperitoneal injection of dilute lactic acid served as an acute noxious stimulus to either stimulate a stretching response or depress the operant responding, which is maintained by electrical brain stimulation in an intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) procedure. Nicotine produced a dose-dependent, time-dependent, and mecamylamine-reversible blockade of both acid-stimulated stretching and acid-induced depression of ICSS. 5-I-A-85380 also blocked both acid-stimulated stretching and acid-induced depression of ICSS, whereas N-(3R)-1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl-4-chlorobenzamide produced no effect in either procedure. Both nicotine and 5-I-A-85380 were ≥10-fold more potent in blocking the acid-induced depression of ICSS than in blocking the acid-induced stimulation of stretching. These results suggest that stimulation of α4β2 and/or α6β2 nAChRs may be especially effective to alleviate the signs of pain-related behavioral depression in rats; however, nonselective behavioral effects

  6. Sustained Receptor Stimulation Leads to Sequestration of Recycling Endosomes in a Classical Protein Kinase C- and Phospholipase D-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Idkowiak-Baldys, Jolanta; Baldys, Aleksander; Raymond, John R.; Hannun, Yusuf A.

    2009-01-01

    Considerable insight has been garnered on initial mechanisms of endocytosis of plasma membrane proteins and their subsequent trafficking through the endosomal compartment. It is also well established that ligand stimulation of many plasma membrane receptors leads to their internalization. However, stimulus-induced regulation of endosomal trafficking has not received much attention. In previous studies, we showed that sustained stimulation of protein kinase C (PKC) with phorbol esters led to sequestration of recycling endosomes in a juxtanuclear region. In this study, we investigated whether G-protein-coupled receptors that activate PKC exerted effects on endosomal trafficking. Stimulation of cells with serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)) led to sequestration of the 5-HT receptor (5-HT2AR) into a Rab11-positive juxtanuclear compartment. This sequestration coincided with translocation of PKC as shown by confocal microscopy. Mechanistically the observed sequestration of 5-HT2AR was shown to require continuous PKC activity because it was inhibited by pretreatment with classical PKC inhibitor Gö6976 and could be reversed by posttreatment with this inhibitor. In addition, classical PKC autophosphorylation was necessary for receptor sequestration. Moreover inhibition of phospholipase D (PLD) activity and inhibition of PLD1 and PLD2 using dominant negative constructs also prevented this process. Functionally this sequestration did not affect receptor desensitization or resensitization as measured by intracellular calcium increase. However, the PKC- and PLD-dependent sequestration of receptors resulted in co-sequestration of other plasma membrane proteins and receptors as shown for epidermal growth factor receptor and protease activated receptor-1. This led to heterologous desensitization of those receptors and diverted their cellular fate by protecting them from agonist-induced degradation. Taken together, these results demonstrate a novel role for sustained receptor

  7. Signalling pathway leading to an activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase by stimulating M3 muscarinic receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, J Y; Yang, M S; Oh, C D; Kim, K T; Ha, M J; Kang, S S; Chun, J S

    1999-01-15

    The signalling pathway leading to an activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase subtypes Erk-1 and -2 upon stimulation of muscarinic receptor with carbachol in human neuroblastoma SK-N-BE2(C) cells was investigated. Carbachol activated Erk-1/-2 by stimulating M3 muscarinic receptor, as determined by specific antagonists for individual muscarinic receptors. The activation of Erk-1/-2 by carbachol was blocked by the inhibition or down-regulation of protein kinase C (PKC). Among the multiple PKC isoforms expressed in SK-N-BE2(C) cells, only PKCepsilon was activated by the treatment of carbachol, and selective down-regulation of PKCepsilon was sufficient to block Erk-1/-2 activation. Carbachol treatment induced activation of the serine/threonine protein kinase Raf, and an inhibition of Raf blocked Erk-1/-2 activation. Ectopic expression of inhibitory small GTPase Ras, RasN17, blocked the carbachol-induced Raf activation without affecting the activation of PKCepsilon, while the inhibition of PKC blocked the Raf activation. Thus, these results suggest that carbachol-induced activation of PKCepsilon mediates Erk-1/-2 activation by a sequential activation of Ras, Raf and MAP kinase kinase.

  8. Modulation of stress-induced and stimulated hyperprolactinemia with the group II metabotropic glutamate receptor selective agonist, LY379268.

    PubMed

    Johnson, M P; Chamberlain, M

    2002-10-01

    It is well recognized that glutamate is an integral excitatory neurotransmitter in the neuroendocrine control of several hormonal factors. While the ability of pharmacological agents acting at ionotropic glutamate receptors to modulate the levels of serum prolactin levels has been investigated, there have been few reports of the effects mediated by the G-protein coupled, metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors. The present work was undertaken to investigate the role of the Group II mGlu receptors, mGlu2 and mGlu3 in the regulation of serum polactin levels. LY379268, a Group II selective agonist, did not alter basal levels of circulating prolactin in young (36-40 day old) male rats. However, when an immobilization stress-induced hyperprolactinemia was examined, 10 mg/kg s.c. of LY379268 significantly lowered serum prolactin levels. Similarly, pretreatment with LY379268 was able to reverse the hyperprolactinemia induced with the catecholamine synthesis inhibitor, alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine (aMPT). This inhibition of hyperprolactinemia could be prevented by pretreatment with LY341495, a Group II mGlu receptor antagonist. The Group II antagonist alone had no effect on either basal nor stimulated prolactin levels. The agonist LY379268 was able to prevent the transient hyperprolactinemia associated with stimulation of serotonin 5-HT2A receptors by 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI), but did not alter the high levels of circulating prolactin induced with the D2 antagonist, haloperidol. When treatment with LY379268 was delayed until 1 h after aMPT, a time demonstrated to show a full effect of aMPT on serum prolactin levels, the Group II agonist was similarly able to reverse hyperprolactinemia, suggesting LY379268 did not act by preventing the partial catecholamine depletion by aMPT. Similarly, high doses of amphetamine, a dopamine (DA) releaser, were able to reverse the aMPT-induced hyperprolactinemia, consistent with sufficient levels of dopamine remaining after a

  9. Dynamic Distribution of Chemoattractant Receptors in Living Cells During Chemotaxis and Persistent Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zhan; Zhang, Ning; Murphy, Douglas B.; Devreotes, Peter N.

    1997-01-01

    While the localization of chemoattractant receptors on randomly oriented cells has been previously studied by immunohistochemistry, the instantaneous distribution of receptors on living cells undergoing directed migration has not been determined. To do this, we replaced cAR1, the primary cAMP receptor of Dictyostelium, with a cAR1-green fluorescence protein fusion construct. We found that this chimeric protein is functionally indistinguishable from wild-type cAR1. By time-lapse imaging of single cells, we observed that the receptors remained evenly distributed on the cell surface and all of its projections during chemotaxis involving turns and reversals of polarity directed by repositioning of a chemoattractant-filled micropipet. Thus, cell polarization cannot result from a gradient-induced asymmetric distribution of chemoattractant receptors. Some newly extended pseudopods at migration fronts showed a transient drop in fluorescence signals, suggesting that the flow of receptors into these zones may slightly lag behind the protrusion process. Challenge with a uniform increase in chemoattractant, sufficient to cause a dramatic decrease in the affinity of surface binding sites and cell desensitization, also did not significantly alter the distribution profile. Hence, the induced reduction in binding activity and cellular sensitivity cannot be due to receptor relocalization. The chimeric receptors were able to “cap” rapidly during treatment with Con A, suggesting that they are mobile in the plane of the cell membrane. This capping was not influenced by pretreatment with chemoattractant. PMID:9334341

  10. Identification of a receptor necessary for Nogo-B stimulated chemotaxis and morphogenesis of endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Robert Qing; Gao, Yuan; Harrison, Kenneth D.; Prendergast, Jay; Acevedo, Lisette M.; Yu, Jun; Hu, Fenghua; Strittmatter, Stephen M.; Sessa, William C.

    2006-01-01

    Nogo isoforms (Nogo-A and -B) have been implicated in regulating neural and cardiovascular functions, such as cell spreading and chemotaxis. Unlike the loop domain (Nogo-66) found in all Nogo isoforms that can interact with a neural-specific Nogo-66 receptor, the receptor for the amino terminus of Nogo-B that mediates vascular function is unknown. Here, we identify a previously uncharacterized Nogo-B receptor specific for the amino terminus of Nogo-B and show that Nogo-B receptor localizes with the ligand Nogo-B during VEGF and wound healing angiogenesis in vivo, mediates chemotaxis in a heterologous expression system and chemotaxis, and 3D tube formation in native endothelial cells. Thus, identification of this receptor may lead to the discovery of agonists or antagonists of this pathway to regulate vascular remodeling and angiogenesis. PMID:16835300

  11. Design of (N)-Methanocarba Adenosine 5′-Uronamides as Species-Independent A3 Receptor-Selective Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Melman, Artem; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Kumar, Deepmala; Wan, Tina C.; Gizewski, Elizabeth; Auchampach, John A.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2008-01-01

    2-Chloro-5′ -N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine analogues containing the (N)-methanocarba (bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane) ring system as a ribose substitute display increased selectivity as agonists of the human A3 adenosine receptor (AR). However, the selectivity in mouse was greatly reduced due to an increased tolerance of this ring system at the mouse A1AR. Therefore, we varied substituents at the N6 and C2 positions in search of compounds that have improved A3AR selectivity and are species independent. An N6-methyl analogue was balanced in affinity at mouse A1/A3ARs, with high selectivity in comparison to the A2AAR. Substitution of the 2-chloro atom with larger and more hydrophobic substituents, such as iodo and alkynyl groups, tended to increase the A3AR selectivity (up to 430-fold) in mouse and preserve it in human. Extended and chemically functionalized alkynyl chains attached at the C2 position of the purine moiety preserved A3AR selectivity more effectively than similar chains attached at the 3 position of the N6–benzyl group. PMID:18424135

  12. A novel tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonist prevents motility-stimulating effects of neurokinin A in small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Lördal, Mikael; Navalesi, Giovanni; Theodorsson, Elvar; Maggi, Carlo A; Hellström, Per M

    2001-01-01

    MEN 11420 (nepadutant) is a potent, selective and competitive antagonist of tachykinin NK2 receptors. The objective of the present study was to assess the capability of the drug to antagonize the stimulatory effects of neurokinin A (NKA) on gastrointestinal motility, as well as to change the fasting migrating motor complex (MMC). Thirty-four male volunteers were randomized to treatment with either placebo or MEN 11420 in a double-blinded manner. Effects of MEN 11420 (8 mg intravenously) were evaluated as changes in phases I, II and III of MMC, as well as contraction frequency, amplitude and motility index during baseline conditions and during stimulation of motility using NKA (25 pmol kg−1 min−1 intravenously). NKA preceded by placebo increased the fraction of time occupied by phase II, increased contraction frequency, amplitude and motility index. MEN 11420 effectively antagonized the motility-stimulating effects of NKA. MEN 11420 reduced the phase II-stimulating effect of NKA. In addition, the stimulatory effect of NKA on contraction frequency and amplitude, as well as motility index were inhibited by MEN 11420. MEN 11420 did not affect the characteristics of MMC during saline infusion. Plasma levels of MEN 11420 peaked during the first hour after infusion and decreased to less than half during the first 2 h. In conclusion, intravenous MEN 11420 effectively inhibited NKA-stimulated, but not basal gastrointestinal motility, and was well tolerated by all subjects. PMID:11522614

  13. Activation of 5-HT7 receptor stimulates neurite elongation through mTOR, Cdc42 and actin filaments dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Speranza, Luisa; Giuliano, Teresa; Volpicelli, Floriana; De Stefano, M. Egle; Lombardi, Loredana; Chambery, Angela; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Bellenchi, Gian C.; di Porzio, Umberto; Crispino, Marianna; Perrone-Capano, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the serotonin receptor subtype 7 (5-HT7R) plays a crucial role in shaping neuronal morphology during embryonic and early postnatal life. Here we show that pharmacological stimulation of 5-HT7R using a highly selective agonist, LP-211, enhances neurite outgrowth in neuronal primary cultures from the cortex, hippocampus and striatal complex of embryonic mouse brain, through multiple signal transduction pathways. All these signaling systems, involving mTOR, the Rho GTPase Cdc42, Cdk5, and ERK, are known to converge on the reorganization of cytoskeletal proteins that subserve neurite outgrowth. Indeed, our data indicate that neurite elongation stimulated by 5-HT7R is modulated by drugs affecting actin polymerization. In addition, we show, by 2D Western blot analyses, that treatment of neuronal cultures with LP-211 alters the expression profile of cofilin, an actin binding protein involved in microfilaments dynamics. Furthermore, by using microfluidic chambers that physically separate axons from the soma and dendrites, we demonstrate that agonist-dependent activation of 5-HT7R stimulates axonal elongation. Our results identify for the first time several signal transduction pathways, activated by stimulation of 5-HT7R, that converge to promote cytoskeleton reorganization and consequent modulation of axonal elongation. Therefore, the activation of 5-HT7R might represent one of the key elements regulating CNS connectivity and plasticity during development. PMID:25814944

  14. Antitumor Responses Stimulated by Dendritic Cells Are Improved by Triiodothyronine Binding to the Thyroid Hormone Receptor β.

    PubMed

    Alamino, Vanina A; Mascanfroni, Iván D; Montesinos, María M; Gigena, Nicolás; Donadio, Ana C; Blidner, Ada G; Milotich, Sonia I; Cheng, Sheue-Yann; Masini-Repiso, Ana M; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Pellizas, Claudia G

    2015-04-01

    Bidirectional cross-talk between the neuroendocrine and immune systems orchestrates immune responses in both physiologic and pathologic settings. In this study, we provide in vivo evidence of a critical role for the thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3) in controlling the maturation and antitumor functions of dendritic cells (DC). We used a thyroid hormone receptor (TR) β mutant mouse (TRβPV) to establish the relevance of the T3-TRβ system in vivo. In this model, TRβ signaling endowed DCs with the ability to stimulate antigen-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses during tumor development. T3 binding to TRβ increased DC viability and augmented DC migration to lymph nodes. Moreover, T3 stimulated the ability of DCs to cross-present antigens and to stimulate cytotoxic T-cell responses. In a B16-OVA mouse model of melanoma, vaccination with T3-stimulated DCs inhibited tumor growth and prolonged host survival, in part by promoting the generation of IFNγ-producing CD8(+) T cells. Overall, our results establish an adjuvant effect of T3-TRβ signaling in DCs, suggesting an immediately translatable method to empower DC vaccination approaches for cancer immunotherapy.

  15. Activation of 5-HT7 receptor stimulates neurite elongation through mTOR, Cdc42 and actin filaments dynamics.

    PubMed

    Speranza, Luisa; Giuliano, Teresa; Volpicelli, Floriana; De Stefano, M Egle; Lombardi, Loredana; Chambery, Angela; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Bellenchi, Gian C; di Porzio, Umberto; Crispino, Marianna; Perrone-Capano, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the serotonin receptor subtype 7 (5-HT7R) plays a crucial role in shaping neuronal morphology during embryonic and early postnatal life. Here we show that pharmacological stimulation of 5-HT7R using a highly selective agonist, LP-211, enhances neurite outgrowth in neuronal primary cultures from the cortex, hippocampus and striatal complex of embryonic mouse brain, through multiple signal transduction pathways. All these signaling systems, involving mTOR, the Rho GTPase Cdc42, Cdk5, and ERK, are known to converge on the reorganization of cytoskeletal proteins that subserve neurite outgrowth. Indeed, our data indicate that neurite elongation stimulated by 5-HT7R is modulated by drugs affecting actin polymerization. In addition, we show, by 2D Western blot analyses, that treatment of neuronal cultures with LP-211 alters the expression profile of cofilin, an actin binding protein involved in microfilaments dynamics. Furthermore, by using microfluidic chambers that physically separate axons from the soma and dendrites, we demonstrate that agonist-dependent activation of 5-HT7R stimulates axonal elongation. Our results identify for the first time several signal transduction pathways, activated by stimulation of 5-HT7R, that converge to promote cytoskeleton reorganization and consequent modulation of axonal elongation. Therefore, the activation of 5-HT7R might represent one of the key elements regulating CNS connectivity and plasticity during development.

  16. Immunization of mice with a newly identified thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor splice variant induces Graves'-like disease.

    PubMed

    Endo, Toyoshi; Kobayashi, Teturo

    2013-06-01

    We have cloned a thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) cDNA from mouse thyroid glands. The sequence of this cDNA indicated that it encoded a 739 amino acid TSHR splice variant that lacked exon 5 (TSHR739). In thyroid gland samples from adult mice, the amount of TSHR739 mRNA was about 10% of the amount of full-length TSHR (TSHR764) mRNA. A eCFP-tagged TSHR739 integrated into plasma membrane, but lacked TSH binding activity and it did not produce cAMP in response to TSH. However, thyroid-stimulating antibodies from patients with Graves' disease stimulated cAMP production in HEK293 cells that expressed TSHR739. Quantitative PCR revealed that TSHR739 transcript levels were low in the fetal mouse thyroid samples, but TSHR739 transcript levels increased after birth and as the mice grew. We used plasmid injection combined with electroporation into skeletal muscles to immunize BALB/c mice with TSHR739, TSHR764,, or control plasmid; TSHR739 caused goiters, high (125)I uptake activity, thyrotoxicosis, and production of thyroid-stimulating antibodies, but TSHR764, or control did not. These results indicated that immunization with an autologous TSHR antigen, TSHR739, induced Graves'-like disease in mice, and that TSHR739 is a candidate autoantigen in autoimmune thyroid disease. PMID:23538203

  17. Identification and mutagenesis of the TACE and γ-secretase cleavage sites in the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Vahidi, Arrash; Glenn, Gary; van der Geer, Peter

    2014-07-18

    Stimulation of macrophages with phorbolesters, bacterial DNA, or lipopolysaccharides causes regulated intramembrane proteolysis or RIPping of the CSF-1 receptor. This process involves TACE-mediated cleavage in the extracellular domain, followed by γ-secretase-mediated cleavage within the transmembrane region. In the current study, we have identified the TACE cleavage site, which is present twelve residues from the carboxy-terminal end of the extracellular domain. Replacement of fourteen residues at the end of the extracellular domain blocked TACE cleavage. In addition, we identified the γ-secretase cleavage site, which is present four residues from the carboxy-terminal end of the transmembrane region. Replacement of six residues surrounding this site strongly reduced intramembrane cleavage. Our results provide new insights into the molecular physiology of the CSF-1 receptor and contribute to our understanding of substrate selection by TACE and γ-secretase.

  18. The transcriptional regulation of the Colony-Stimulating Factor 1 Receptor (csf1r) gene during hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Bonifer, Constanze; Hume, David A

    2008-01-01

    The colony-stimulating-factor 1 receptor (CSF-1 R) is a tyrosine kinase receptor that is absolutely required for macrophage differentiation and thus occupies a central role in hematopoiesis. Mice deficient for the csf1r gene show multiple defects in macrophage development, reproduction and tissue remodeling. Moreover, deregulation of this gene is a hallmark of many tumors. This includes repression of expression in acute myeloid leukemia and aberrant activation in certain solid tumors, such as breast cancer. Expression of this gene therefore needs to be tightly controlled. This review summarizes experiments providing a detailed picture of how transcription of csf1r gene expression is regulated. Aside from the direct relevance to hematopoiesis, studies of csf1r transcriptional regulation provide a model for understanding the molecular mechanisms that control mammalian cell fate.

  19. Thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor levels and binding affinity in the thyroid gland of growth-retarded mice.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kenichi; Sato, Mirei; Machida, Takeo; Kobayashi, Tetsuya

    2005-09-01

    Growth-retarded (grt/grt) mice are congenitally primary hypothyroid. Our previous study indicated that thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) responsiveness was defective in the grt/grt thyroid gland. We now report additional studies of impaired grt/grt thyroid function. Semiquantitative RT-PCR confirmed that TSH receptor (TSHR) mRNA expression in the grt/grt thyroid was significantly decreased compared with +/+ thyroids. Scatchard analysis revealed that grt/grt and +/+ mice have only one type of TSH binding site. grt/grt thyroids had fewer TSH binding sites, although this did not apparently affect the affinity of TSH for its receptor. The present data suggest that reduced TSHR levels or defects in TSHR signaling could be one of the possible defective sites in the grt/grt thyroid gland.

  20. Tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 alpha stimulate late shedding of p75 TNF receptors but not p55 TNF receptors from human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Joyce, D A; Steer, J H

    1995-11-01

    Soluble receptors for TNF (sTNF-R) are present at elevated concentrations in the synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. They are presumably released by cells of the synovial membrane, including the monocyte-derived synovial macrophages. Cytokines from the synovium, including IL-1 and TNF-alpha, may stimulate release. We therefore examined the release of sTNF-R from monocytes exposed to IL-1 and TNF-alpha. Elutriator-purified human blood monocytes spontaneously released both the p75 and the p55 sTNF-R (1011 +/- 199 and 177 +/- 20 pg/10(6) cells, respectively, mean +/- SEM) during 48 h of in vitro culture. TNF-alpha and IL-1 alpha induced time- and concentration-dependent increases in the release of sTNF-R75 from monocytes, but neither had a measurable effect on the release of sTNF-R55. The release of sTNF-R75 was inhibited by cycloheximide. Neither lymphocytes nor polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) released measurable sTNF-R spontaneously or in response to stimulation with IL-1 alpha, but TNF-alpha stimulated the release of small amounts of sTNF-R75 by PMN. The timing, cycloheximide sensitivity, and selectivity of stimulated release of TNF-R75 by monocytes are consistent with previous observations on other cell types of late (8-20 h) increased synthesis and turnover of cell surface TNF-R75, but not TNF-R55, after stimulation with TNF-alpha or IL-1. These observations help to explain why elevated levels of sTNF-R in synovial fluid coexist with enhanced expression of cell surface TNF-R on synovial macrophages in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:8590306

  1. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motile activity through LPA receptor-3 in liver epithelial WB-F344 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Ayano; Tanabe, Eriko; Inoue, Serina; Kitayoshi, Misaho; Okimoto, Souta; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motility of WB-F344 cells. •LPA{sub 3} is induced by hydrogen peroxide in WB-F344 cells. •Cell motility by hydrogen peroxide is inhibited in LPA{sub 3} knockdown cells. •LPA signaling is involved in cell migration by hydrogen peroxide. -- Abstract: Hydrogen peroxide which is one of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates a variety of biological responses, including cell proliferation and migration. In the present study, we investigated whether lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling is involved in cell motile activity stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. The rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide at 0.1 or 1 μM for 48 h. In cell motility assays, hydrogen peroxide treated cells showed significantly high cell motile activity, compared with untreated cells. To measure the expression levels of LPA receptor genes, quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis was performed. The expressions of LPA receptor-3 (Lpar3) in hydrogen peroxide treated cells were significantly higher than those in control cells, but not Lpar1 and Lpar2 genes. Next, to assess the effect of LPA{sub 3} on cell motile activity, the Lpar3 knockdown cells from WB-F344 cells were also treated with hydrogen peroxide. The cell motile activity of the knockdown cells was not stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, in liver cancer cells, hydrogen peroxide significantly activated cell motility of Lpar3-expressing cells, but not Lpar3-unexpressing cells. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA{sub 3} may be mainly involved in cell motile activity of WB-F344 cells stimulated by hydrogen peroxide.

  2. DCP-LA stimulates AMPA receptor exocytosis through CaMKII activation due to PP-1 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Takeshi; Yaguchi, Takahiro; Nagata, Tetsu; Tanaka, Akito; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2009-10-01

    The linoleic acid derivative 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA) activated Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) by inhibiting protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1). DCP-LA induced a transient huge facilitation of synaptic transmission monitored from the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices, which was largely inhibited by the CaMKII inhibitor KN-93. DCP-LA potentiated kainate-evoked whole-cell membrane currents for Xenopus oocytes expressing alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors composed of the GluR1, GluR3, GluR1/GluR2, GluR1/GluR3, and GluR1/GluR2/GluR3 subunits, and the potentiation was significantly inhibited by KN-93. A similar potentiation was still found with mutant GluR1 (S831A) receptor lacking CaMKII phosphorylation site. The GluR1 and GluR2 subunits formed AMPA receptors in the rat hippocampus, and DCP-LA increased expression of both the subunits on the plasma membrane. The DCP-LA action was blocked by KN-93 and the exocytosis inhibitor botulinum toxin type A, but not by the endocytosis inhibitor phenylarsine oxide. DCP-LA, thus, appears to activate CaMKII through PP-1 inhibition, that stimulates AMPA receptor exocytosis to increase expression of the receptors on the plasma membrane, responsible for potentiate AMPA receptor responses and facilitation of hippocampal synaptic transmission.

  3. Correlation between GABA(A) receptor density and vagus nerve stimulation in individuals with drug-resistant partial epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Marrosu, Francesco; Serra, Alessandra; Maleci, Alberto; Puligheddu, Monica; Biggio, Giovanni; Piga, Mario

    2003-01-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is an important option for the treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy. Through delivery of a battery-supplied intermittent current, VNS protects against seizure development in a manner that correlates experimentally with electrophysiological modifications. However, the mechanism by which VNS inhibits seizures in humans remains unclear. The impairment of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated neuronal inhibition associated with epilepsy has suggested that GABA(A) receptors might contribute to the therapeutic efficacy of VNS. We have now applied single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with the benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist [123I]iomazenil to examine cortical GABA(A) receptor density (GRD) before and 1 year after implantation of a VNS device in 10 subjects with drug-resistant partial epilepsy. VNS therapeutic responses resulted significantly correlated with the normalization of GRD. Moreover, a comparable control group, scheduled for a possible VNS implant, failed to show significant GRD variations after 1 year of a stable anti-epileptic treatment. These results suggest that VNS may modulate the cortical excitability of brain areas associated with epileptogenesis and that GABA(A) receptor plasticity contributes to this effect.

  4. Adenosine A(2A) receptor stimulation reduces inflammation and neointimal growth in a murine carotid ligation model.

    PubMed

    McPherson, J A; Barringhaus, K G; Bishop, G G; Sanders, J M; Rieger, J M; Hesselbacher, S E; Gimple, L W; Powers, E R; Macdonald, T; Sullivan, G; Linden, J; Sarembock, I J

    2001-05-01

    Endothelial activation and leukocyte recruitment are early events in atherosclerosis and the vascular response to injury. Adenosine has anti-inflammatory effects on leukocytes and endothelial cells mediated through its A(2A) receptor. We tested the hypothesis that A(2A) activation would reduce inflammation and neointimal formation in a murine carotid ligation model. Before injury, mice were randomized to a 7-day subcutaneous infusion of a specific A(2A) receptor agonist (ATL-146e, 0.004 microg/kg per minute), vehicle control, ATL-146e plus ZM241385 (a selective A(2A) antagonist), or ZM241385 alone. Leukocyte recruitment and adhesion molecule expression were assessed at early time points, and the neointimal area was measured at 14 and 28 days after injury. Compared with control mice, ATL-146e-treated mice had significantly less neutrophil and macrophage recruitment and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and P-selectin expression in the first 7 days after injury. Neointimal area was markedly and persistently reduced by 80% at 14 and 28 days, despite termination of ATL infusion at 7 days. ATL-146e+ZM241385-treated and ZM241385-treated animals had neointimal areas similar to those of control animals, confirming that the observed effects of ATL-146e were mediated specifically by the A(2A) receptor. These data demonstrate that novel stimulation of adenosine A(2A) receptors can inhibit early inflammatory processes that are important in neointimal formation after vascular injury.

  5. Histamine Stimulates Ciliary Beat Frequency via the H2 Receptor in the Protochordate Botryllus schlosseri.

    PubMed

    Cima, Francesca; Franchi, Nicola

    2016-05-01

    Histamine is a biogenic molecule that plays a role in many physiological pathways via binding to a specific receptor. Histaminergic receptors belong to the large family of seven-transmembrane α-helix domain receptors classified in mammals into four distinct classes: H1, H2, H3, and H4. Despite being widely studied in vertebrates, few data are available on the invertebrate receptors, with only predicted H1 and H2 sequences for nonchordate deuterostomes. Here, we report the first characterized transcript sequence for an H2 receptor from the colonial ascidian Botryllus schlosseri, describing the localization of both transcript and protein during blastogenic development through in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Its phylogenetic relationships with deuterostome orthologous proteins are reported, its role in ciliary beat frequency (CBF) in cultured stigma cells of the branchial basket is outlined, and the effects of histamine and its receptor agonists and antagonists are analyzed. In the presence of increasing concentrations of histamine in the medium, CBF increases similarly to the selective H2 receptor agonist dimaprit. In contrast, ranitidine, which is an inhibitor of the H2 receptor, causes a significant inhibition of CBF, similar to that observed after preincubation with the specific anti-BsHRH2 or the anti-human HRH2 antibody. In cells bordering the branchial basket stigmata, both antibodies colocalize in the proximal region of the ciliary plasmalemma, and histamine is present inside vesicles of the apical region, thus supporting the hypothesis of a histamine-binding H2 receptor control of the pharyngeal mucociliary transport similar to that of the upper respiratory tract and middle ear in mammals. PMID:27139577

  6. Homeostatic action of adenosine A3 and A1 receptor agonists on proliferation of hematopoietic precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Pospísil, Milan; Znojil, Vladimír; Holá, Jirina; Streitová, Denisa; Vacek, Antonín

    2008-07-01

    Two adenosine receptor agonists, N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA) and N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), which selectively activate adenosine A3 and A1 receptors, respectively, were tested for their ability to influence proliferation of granulocytic and erythroid cells in femoral bone marrow of mice using morphological criteria. Agonists were given intraperitoneally to mice in repeated isomolar doses of 200 nmol/kg. Three variants of experiments were performed to investigate the action of the agonists under normal resting state of mice and in phases of cell depletion and subsequent regeneration after treatment with the cytotoxic drug 5-fluorouracil. In the case of granulopoiesis, IB-MECA 1) increased by a moderate but significant level proliferation of cells under normal resting state; 2) strongly increased proliferation of cells in the cell depletion phase; but 3) did not influence cell proliferation in the regeneration phase. CPA did not influence cell proliferation under normal resting state and in the cell depletion phase, but strongly suppressed the overshooting cell proliferation in the regeneration phase. The stimulatory effect of IB-MECA on cell proliferation of erythroid cells was observed only when this agonist was administered during the cell depletion phase. CPA did not modulate erythroid proliferation in any of the functional states investigated, probably due to the lower demand for cell production as compared with granulopoiesis. The results indicate opposite effects of the two adenosine receptor agonists on proliferation of hematopoietic cells and suggest the plasticity and homeostatic role of the adenosine receptor expression.

  7. Effects of GABA receptor antagonists on thresholds of P23H rat retinal ganglion cells to electrical stimulation of the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Ralph J.; Rizzo, Joseph F., III

    2011-06-01

    An electronic retinal prosthesis may provide useful vision for patients suffering from retinitis pigmentosa (RP). In animal models of RP, the amount of current needed to activate retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is higher than in normal, healthy retinas. In this study, we sought to reduce the stimulation thresholds of RGCs in a degenerate rat model (P23H-line 1) by blocking GABA receptor mediated inhibition in the retina. We examined the effects of TPMPA, a GABAC receptor antagonist, and SR95531, a GABAA receptor antagonist, on the electrically evoked responses of RGCs to biphasic current pulses delivered to the subretinal surface through a 400 µm diameter electrode. Both TPMPA and SR95531 reduced the stimulation thresholds of ON-center RGCs on average by 15% and 20% respectively. Co-application of the two GABA receptor antagonists had the greatest effect, on average reducing stimulation thresholds by 32%. In addition, co-application of the two GABA receptor antagonists increased the magnitude of the electrically evoked responses on average three-fold. Neither TPMPA nor SR95531, applied alone or in combination, had consistent effects on the stimulation thresholds of OFF-center RGCs. We suggest that the effects of the GABA receptor antagonists on ON-center RGCs may be attributable to blockage of GABA receptors on the axon terminals of ON bipolar cells.

  8. Serotonin increases ERK1/2 phosphorylation in astrocytes by stimulation of 5-HT2B and 5-HT2C receptors.

    PubMed

    Li, Baoman; Zhang, Shiquen; Li, Min; Hertz, Leif; Peng, Liang

    2010-11-01

    We have previously shown that fluoxetine causes ERK(1/2) phosphorylation in cultured mouse astrocytes mediated exclusively by stimulation of 5-HT(2B) receptors (Li et al., 2008b). This raises the question whether this is also the case for serotonin (5-HT) itself. In the present study serotonin was found to induce ERK(1/2) phosphorylation by stimulation of 5-HT(2B) receptors with high affinity (EC(50): 20-30 pM), and by stimulation of 5-HT(2C) receptor with low affinity (EC(50): 1 microM or higher). ERK(1/2) phosphorylation induced by stimulation of either 5-HT(2B) or 5-HT(2C) receptors was mediated by epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor transactivation (Peng et al., this issue), shown by the inhibitory effect of AG1478, an inhibitor of the EGF receptor tyrosine kinase, and GM6001, an inhibitor of Zn-dependent metalloproteinases, and thus of 5-HT(2B) receptor-mediated EGF receptor agonist release. It is discussed that the high potency of the 5-HT(2B)-mediated effect is consistent with literature data for binding affinity of serotonin to cloned human 5-HT(2B) receptors and with observations of low extracellular concentrations of serotonin in brain, which would allow a demonstrated moderate and modality-dependent increase in specific brain areas to activate 5-HT(2B) receptors. In contrast the relevance of the observed 5-HT(2C) receptors on astrocytes is questioned. PMID:20450948

  9. Cannabinoid agonists stimulate [3H]GABA release in the globus pallidus of the rat when G(i) protein-receptor coupling is restricted: role of dopamine D2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Brenda; Paz, Francisco; Florán, Leonor; Aceves, Jorge; Erlij, David; Florán, Benjamín

    2009-03-01

    The motor effects of cannabinoids in the globus pallidus appear to be caused by increases in interstitial GABA. To elucidate the mechanism of this response, we investigated the effect of the selective cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1) cannabinoid agonist arachidonyl-2-chloroethylamide (ACEA) on [(3)H]GABA release in slices of the rat globus pallidus. ACEA had two effects: concentrations between 10(-8) and 10(-6) M stimulated release, whereas higher concentrations (IC(50) approximately 10(-6) M) inhibited it. Another cannabinoid agonist, WIN-55,212-2, also had bimodal effects on release. Studies of cAMP production indicate that under conditions of low G(i/o), availability the coupling of CB1 receptors with G(i/o) proteins can be changed into CB1:G(s/olf) coupling; therefore, we determined the effects of conditions that limit G(i/o) availability on [(3)H]GABA release. Blockers of G(i/o) protein interactions, pertussis toxin and N-ethylmaleimide, transformed the inhibitory effects of ACEA on GABA release into stimulation. It also has been suggested that stimulation of D2 receptors can reduce G(i/o) availability. Blocking D2 receptors with sulpiride [(S)-5-aminosulfonyl-N-[(1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl]-2-methoxybenzamidersqb] or depleting dopamine with reserpine inhibited the ACEA-induced stimulation of release. Thus, the D2 dependence of stimulation is consistent with the proposal that D2 receptors reduce G(i/o) proteins available for binding to the CB1 receptor. In summary, CB1 receptor activation has dual effects on GABA release in the globus pallidus. Low concentrations stimulate release through a process that depends on activation of dopamine D2 receptors that may limit G(i/o) protein availability. Higher concentrations of cannabinoid inhibit GABA release through mechanisms that are independent of D2 receptor activation.

  10. Paired Burst Stimulation Causes GABAA Receptor-Dependent Spike Firing Facilitation in CA1 of Rat Hippocampal Slices.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Takashi; Tominaga, Yoko

    2016-01-01

    The theta oscillation (4-8 Hz) is a pivotal form of oscillatory activity in the hippocampus that is intermittently concurrent with gamma (25-100 Hz) burst events. In in vitro preparation, a stimulation protocol that mimics the theta oscillation, theta burst stimulation (TBS), is used to induce long-term potentiation. Thus, TBS is thought to have a distinct role in the neural network of the hippocampal slice preparation. However, the specific mechanisms that make TBS induce such neural circuit modifications are still unknown. Using electrophysiology and voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDI), we have found that TBS induces augmentation of spike firing. The augmentation was apparent in the first couple of brief burst stimulation (100 Hz four pulses) on a TBS-train in a presence of NMDA receptor blocker (APV 50 μM). In this study, we focused on the characterizes of the NMDA independent augmentation caused by a pair of the brief burst stimulation (the first pair of the TBS; paired burst stimulation-PBS). We found that PBS enhanced membrane potential responses on VSDI signal and intracellular recordings while it was absent in the current recording under whole-cell clamp condition. The enhancement of the response accompanied the augmentation of excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) to spike firing (E-S) coupling. The paired burst facilitation (PBF) reached a plateau when the number of the first burst stimulation (priming burst) exceeds three. The interval between the bursts of 150 ms resulted in the maximum PBF. Gabazine (a GABAA receptor antagonist) abolished PBF. The threshold for spike generation of the postsynaptic cells measured with a current injection to cells was not lowered by the priming burst of PBS. These results indicate that PBS activates the GABAergic system to cause short-term E-S augmentation without raising postsynaptic excitability. We propose that a GABAergic system of area CA1 of the hippocampus produce the short-term E-S plasticity that could

  11. TAM receptor-dependent regulation of SOCS3 and MAPKs contributes to pro-inflammatory cytokine downregulation following chronic NOD2 stimulation of human macrophages1

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shasha; Hedl, Matija; Abraham, Clara

    2014-01-01

    Microbial-induced cytokine regulation is critical to intestinal immune homeostasis. Acute stimulation of NOD2, the Crohn’s disease-associated sensor of bacterial peptidoglycan, induces cytokines. However, cytokines are attenuated after chronic NOD2 and pattern recognition receptor (PRR) stimulation of macrophages; similar attenuation is observed in intestinal macrophages. The role of Tyro3, Axl and Mer (TAM) receptors in regulating chronic PRR stimulation and NOD2-induced outcomes has not been examined. Moreover, TAM receptors have been relatively less investigated in human macrophages. Whereas TAM receptors did not downregulate acute NOD2-induced cytokines in primary human macrophages, they were essential for downregulating signaling and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion after chronic NOD2 and TLR4 stimulation. Axl and Mer were similarly required in mice for cytokine downregulation after chronic NOD2 stimulation in vivo and in intestinal tissues. Consistently, TAM expression was increased in human intestinal myeloid-derived cells. Chronic NOD2 stimulation led to IL-10- and TGFβ-dependent TAM upregulation in human macrophages, which in turn, upregulated SOCS3 expression. Restoring SOCS3 expression under TAM knockdown conditions restored chronic NOD2-mediated pro-inflammatory cytokine downregulation. In contrast to the upregulated pro-inflammatory cytokines, attenuated IL-10 secretion was maintained in TAM-deficient macrophages upon chronic NOD2 stimulation. The level of MAPK activation in TAM-deficient macrophages after chronic NOD2 stimulation was insufficient to upregulate IL-10 secretion; however, full restoration of MAPK activation under these conditions restored c-Fos, c-Jun, MAFK and PU.1 binding to the IL-10 promoter and IL-10 secretion. Therefore, TAM receptors are critical for downregulating pro-inflammatory cytokines under the chronic NOD2 stimulation conditions observed in the intestinal environment. PMID:25567680

  12. Glucocorticoid-dependent induction of interleukin-6 receptor expression in human hepatocytes facilitates interleukin-6 stimulation of amino acid transport.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, C P; Bode, B P; Takahashi, K; Tanabe, K K; Souba, W W

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors studied the effects of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) on glutamine and alanine transport in isolated human hepatocytes. They also evaluated the role of dexamethasone in modulating this response and its effects on the expression of the plasma membrane high-affinity IL-6 receptor. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Animal studies indicate that cytokines are important mediators of the increased hepatic amino acid uptake that occurs during cancer and sepsis, but studies in human tissues are lacking. The control of transport by cytokines and cytokine receptor expression in the liver may provide a mechanism by which hepatocytes can modulate amino acid availability during catabolic disease states. METHODS: Human hepatocytes were isolated from wedge biopsy specimens and plated in 24-well trays. Interleukin-6 and TNF-alpha, in combination with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone, were added to hepatocytes in culture, and the transport of radiolabeled glutamine and alanine was measured. Fluorescent-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis was used to study the effects of dexamethasone on IL-6 receptor number in the well-differentiated human hepatoma HepG2. RESULTS: Both IL-6 and TNF-alpha exerted a small stimulatory effect on alanine and glutamine transport. Dexamethasone alone did not alter transport rates, but pretreatment of cells augmented the effects of both cytokines on carrier-mediated amino acid uptake. Dexamethasone pretreatment and a combination of IL-6 and TNF-alpha resulted in a greater than twofold increase in transport activity. Fluorescent-activated cell sorter analysis demonstrated that dexamethasone induced a threefold increase in the expression of high-affinity IL-6 receptors. CONCLUSIONS: Interleukin-6 and TNF-alpha work coordinately with glucocorticoids to stimulate amino acid uptake in human hepatocytes. Dexamethasone exerts a permissive effect on cytokine-mediated increases in transport by increasing IL

  13. Pituitary gonadotrophic hormone synthesis, secretion, subunit gene expression and cell structure in normal and follicle-stimulating hormone β knockout, follicle-stimulating hormone receptor knockout, luteinising hormone receptor knockout, hypogonadal and ovariectomised female mice.

    PubMed

    Abel, M H; Widen, A; Wang, X; Huhtaniemi, I; Pakarinen, P; Kumar, T R; Christian, H C

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the relationship between gonadotroph function and ultrastructure, we have compared, in parallel in female mice, the effects of several different mutations that perturb the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Specifically, serum and pituitary gonadotrophin concentrations, gonadotrophin gene expression, gonadotroph structure and number were measured. Follicle-stimulating hormone β knockout (FSHβKO), follicle-stimulating hormone receptor knockout (FSHRKO), luteinising hormone receptor knockout (LuRKO), hypogonadal (hpg) and ovariectomised mice were compared with control wild-type or heterozygote female mice. Serum levels of LH were elevated in FSHβKO and FSHRKO compared to heterozygote females, reflecting the likely decreased oestrogen production in KO females, as demonstrated by the threadlike uteri and acyclicity. As expected, there was no detectable FSH in the serum or pituitary and an absence of expression of the FSHβ subunit gene in FSHβKO mice. However, there was a significant increase in expression of the FSHβ and LHβ subunit genes in FSHRKO female mice. The morphology of FSHβKO and FSHRKO gonadotrophs was not significantly different from the control, except that secretory granules in FSHRKO gonadotrophs were larger in diameter. In LuRKO and ovariectomised mice, stimulation of LHβ and FSHβ mRNA, as well as serum protein concentrations, were reflected in subcellular changes in gonadotroph morphology, including more dilated rough endoplasmic reticula and fewer, larger secretory granules. In the gonadotophin-releasing hormone deficient hpg mouse, gonadotrophin mRNA and protein levels were significantly lower than in control mice and gonadotrophs were correspondingly smaller with less abundant endoplasmic reticula and reduced numbers of secretory granules. In summary, major differences in pituitary content and serum concentrations of the gonadotrophins LH and FSH were found between control and mutant female mice. These changes were

  14. The central nervous system convulsant pentylenetetrazole stimulates gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-activated current in picrotoxin-resistant GABA(A) receptors in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Dibas, M I; Dillon, G H

    2000-05-19

    We tested the ability of the central nervous system convulsant pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) to inhibit gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-gated current in receptors expressing a mutation that rendered them resistant to picrotoxin. Consistent with previous reports, receptors expressing beta2(T246F), along with alpha3 and gamma2 subunits, resulted in a greatly diminished sensitivity to picrotoxin. Sensitivity to PTZ was completely abolished in the mutant receptor, confirming the hypothesis that PTZ acts at the picrotoxin site. Quite unexpected, however, was our finding that PTZ elicited marked stimulation (up to 400% of control) in the mutated receptors. This stimulatory effect was not mediated via an interaction with the benzodiazepine site, as preincubation with the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil did not block the PTZ-induced stimulation. Our results reveal the existence of a novel stimulatory domain of PTZ in GABA(A) receptors.

  15. The unliganded long isoform of estrogen receptor beta stimulates brain ryanodine receptor single channel activity alongside with cytosolic Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Rybalchenko, Volodymyr; Grillo, Michael A.; Gastinger, Matthew J.; Rybalchenko, Nataliya; Payne, Andrew J.; Koulen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Ca2+ release from intracellular stores mediated by endoplasmic reticulum membrane ryanodine receptors (RyR) plays a key role in activating and synchronizing downstream Ca2+-dependent mechanisms, in different cells varying from apoptosis to nuclear transcription and development of defensive responses. Recently discovered, atypical “non-genomic” effects mediated by estrogen receptors (ER) include rapid Ca2+ release upon estrogen exposure in conditions implicitly suggesting involvement of RyRs. In the present study, we report various levels of co-localization between RyR type 2 (RyR2) and ER type β (ERβ) in the neuronal cell line HT-22, indicating a possible functional interaction. Electrophysiological analyses revealed a significant increase in single channel ionic currents generated by mouse brain RyRs after application of the soluble monomer of the long form ERβ (ERβ1). The effect was due to a strong increase in open probability of RyR higher open channel sublevels at cytosolic [Ca2+] concentrations of 100 nM, suggesting a synergistic action of ERβ1 and Ca2+ in RyR activation, and a potential contribution to Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release rather than to basal intracellular Ca2+ concentration level at rest. This RyR/ERβ interaction has potential effects on cellular physiology, including roles of shorter ERβ isoforms and modulation of the RyR/ERβ complexes by exogenous estrogens. PMID:19899956

  16. Flexible modulation of agonist efficacy at the human A3 adenosine receptor by the imidazoquinoline allosteric enhancer LUF6000

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhan-Guo; Ye, Kai; Göblyös, Anikó; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2008-01-01

    Background A series of 1H-imidazo- [4,5-c]quinolin-4-amine derivatives, represented by LUF6000 (N-(3,4-dichloro-phenyl)-2-cyclohexyl-1H-imidazo [4,5-c]quinolin-4-amine), are allosteric modulators of the human A3 adenosine receptor (AR). Here we studied the modulation by LUF6000 of the maximum effect (Emax) of structurally diverse agonists at the A3 AR stably expressed in CHO cells. Results In an assay of [35S]GTPγS binding, the Emax of the A3 AR agonist Cl-IB-MECA at the A3 AR was lower than that of the non-selective AR agonist NECA. LUF6000 exerted an Emax-enhancing effect at a concentration of 0.1 μM or higher, and was shown to increase the Emax of Cl-IB-MECA and other low-efficacy agonists to a larger extent than that of the high-efficacy agonist NECA. Interestingly, LUF6000 converted a nucleoside A3 AR antagonist MRS542, but not a non-nucleoside antagonist MRS1220, into an agonist. LUF6000 alone did not show any effect. Mathematical modeling was performed to explain the differential effects of LUF6000 on agonists with various Emax. A simple explanation for the observation that LUF6000 has a much stronger effect on Cl-IB-MECA than on NECA derived from the mathematical modeling is that NECA has relatively strong intrinsic efficacy, such that the response is already close to the maximum response. Therefore, LUF6000 cannot enhance Emax much further. Conclusion LUF6000 was found to be an allosteric enhancer of Emax of structurally diverse agonists at the A3 AR, being more effective for low-Emax agonists than for high-Emax agonists. LUF6000 was demonstrated to convert an antagonist into an agonist, which represents the first example in G protein-coupled receptors. The observations from the present study are consistent with that predicted by mathematical modeling. PMID:19077268

  17. Synthesis and Characterization of [76Br]-Labeled High Affinity A3 Adenosine Receptor Ligands for Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Lang, Lixin; Ma, Ying; Bhattacharjee, Abesh Kumar; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Joshi, Bhalchandra V.; Melman, Artem; de Castro, Sonia; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Bromine-76 radiolabeled analogues of previously reported high affinity A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) nucleoside ligands have been prepared as potential radiotracers for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Methods The radiosyntheses were accomplished by oxidative radiobromination on the N6-benzyl moiety of trimethyltin precursors. Biodistribution studies of the kinetics of uptake were conducted in awake rats. Results We prepared an agonist ligand {[76Br](1′R,2′R,3′S,4′R,5′S)-4-{2-chloro-6-[(3-bromophenylmethyl)amino]purin-9-yl}-1-(methylaminocarbonyl)bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,3-diol (MRS3581)} in 59% radiochemical yield (RCY) with a specific activity of 19.5 GBq/μmol and an antagonist ligand {[76Br](1R,2R,3S,4R,5S)-4-(6-(3-bromobenzylamino)-2-chloro-9H-purin-9-yl)bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,3-diol. (MRS5147)} in 65% RCY with a specific activity of 22 GBq/μmol). The resultant products exhibited the expected high affinity (Ki ~ 0.6 nM) and specific binding at the human A3AR in vitro. Biodistribution studies in the rat showed uptake in the organs of excretion and metabolism. The antagonist MRS5147 exhibited increasing uptake in testes, an organ that contains significant quantities of A3AR, over a 2 h time course, which suggests the presence of a specific A3AR retention mechanism. Conclusion We were able to compare uptake of the [76Br]labeled antagonist MRS5147 to [76Br]agonist MRS3581. The antagonist MRS5147 shows increasing uptake in the testes, an A3AR rich tissue, suggesting that this ligand may have promise as a molecular imaging agent. PMID:19181263

  18. Chronic ethanol inhibits receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis in rat liver slices

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzales, R.A.; Crews, F.T. )

    1991-03-01

    The effects of chronic ethanol feeding on norepinephrine (NE)- and arginine-vasopressin (AVP)-stimulated phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis in rat liver slices was determined. The maximum NE-stimulated PI response was significantly reduced by 40% in liver slices from 8-month-old rats which had been treated for 5 months with a liquid diet containing ethanol compared to pair-fed controls. The maximum AVP-stimulated PI response was decreased by 39% in liver slices from the ethanol-fed rats compared to control. EC50 values for NE- and AVP-stimulated PI hydrolysis in liver slices were not affected by the chronic ethanol treatment. Similar reductions in the maximal NE- and AVP-stimulated PI hydrolysis (28% and 27%, respectively) were found in 22-month-old rats which had been maintained on an ethanol containing diet for 5 months compared to pair-fed controls. The binding of (3H)prazosin and (3H)AVP to liver plasma membranes from 8-month-old ethanol-fed rats was not significantly different from binding to liver membranes from sucrose-fed controls. Our data suggest that chronic ethanol ingestion may lead to a reduction in PI-linked signal transduction in liver.

  19. Identification of an isoform of colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor mRNA in the rat testis.

    PubMed

    Su, Hong; Wang, Yibiao; Söder, Olle; Hou, Mi

    2014-06-01

    Because alternative RNA splicing regulation in the testis is prevalent, we explored testes of Sprague-Dawley rats for existence of alternatively spliced colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) mRNA. Using RT-PCR and sequencing, we identified a variant of CSF-1R mRNA that was 284 bp shorter than the full-length CSF-1R transcript. This variant was present in the testis (late fetal stage to adult) and in other organs of rats (7 and 60 days old). The deletion of 284 bp disrupted the open reading frame, resulting in a noncoding mRNA product. When testicular macrophages were stimulated with CSF-1R ligand and lipopolysaccharide, proportionally increased expression of both short isoform and full-length CSF-1R mRNA was observed. Thus, the identified isoform of CSF-1R mRNA may interfere with the expression of full-length CSF-1R mRNA, thereby affecting the biological activity of the ligand/receptor signaling axis in Sprague-Dawley rats.

  20. Rac-mediated Stimulation of Phospholipase Cγ2 Amplifies B Cell Receptor-induced Calcium Signaling*♦

    PubMed Central

    Walliser, Claudia; Tron, Kyrylo; Clauss, Karen; Gutman, Orit; Kobitski, Andrei Yu.; Retlich, Michael; Schade, Anja; Röcker, Carlheinz; Henis, Yoav I.; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich; Gierschik, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Rho GTPase Rac is crucially involved in controlling multiple B cell functions, including those regulated by the B cell receptor (BCR) through increased cytosolic Ca2+. The underlying molecular mechanisms and their relevance to the functions of intact B cells have thus far remained unknown. We have previously shown that the activity of phospholipase Cγ2 (PLCγ2), a key constituent of the BCR signalosome, is stimulated by activated Rac through direct protein-protein interaction. Here, we use a Rac-resistant mutant of PLCγ2 to functionally reconstitute cultured PLCγ2-deficient DT40 B cells and to examine the effects of the Rac-PLCγ2 interaction on BCR-mediated changes of intracellular Ca2+ and regulation of Ca2+-regulated and nuclear-factor-of-activated-T-cell-regulated gene transcription at the level of single, intact B cells. The results show that the functional Rac-PLCγ2 interaction causes marked increases in the following: (i) sensitivity of B cells to BCR ligation; (ii) BCR-mediated Ca2+ release from intracellular stores; (iii) Ca2+ entry from the extracellular compartment; and (iv) nuclear translocation of the Ca2+-regulated nuclear factor of activated T cells. Hence, Rac-mediated stimulation of PLCγ2 activity serves to amplify B cell receptor-induced Ca2+ signaling. PMID:25903139

  1. Reflex cardiopulmonary responses by stimulation to type J receptors in rats exposed to NO/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Tsubone, H.; Suzuki, A.K.

    1984-01-01

    To examine the role of the vagal pathway on the cardiopulmonary functions in NO/sub 2/-exposed rats, phenyl diguanide, which stimulates type J receptors in the lungs, was injected to control and exposed rats at a constant dose. Based on a statistcal test, a decrease in the heart rate (HR) after the injection was observed in the groups exposed to 20 ppm NO/sub 2/ for 1.5 h and 3 h, and 10 ppm for 24 h. On the other hand, an increase in respiratory rate (RR) was observed in the groups exposed to 10 ppm for 3 h and 4 ppm for 1 wk. No change in HR and RR was found in the group exposed to 0.4 ppm for 4 wk. These results suggest that the augmentation of the reflex cardiopulmonary responses due to stimulation to the type J receptors was produced by exposures with a higher concentration of NO/sub 2/. 24 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

  2. Derivatives of benzimidazol-2-ylquinoline and benzimidazol-2-ylisoquinoline as selective A1 adenosine receptor antagonists with stimulant activity on human colon motility.

    PubMed

    Cosimelli, Barbara; Taliani, Sabrina; Greco, Giovanni; Novellino, Ettore; Sala, Annalisa; Severi, Elda; Da Settimo, Federico; La Motta, Concettina; Pugliesi, Isabella; Antonioli, Luca; Fornai, Matteo; Colucci, Rocchina; Blandizzi, Corrado; Daniele, Simona; Trincavelli, Maria Letizia; Martini, Claudia

    2011-10-01

    A number of quinolines and isoquinolines connected in various ways to a substituted benzimidazol-2-yl system were synthesized and evaluated as novel antagonists of adenosine receptors (ARs) by competition experiments using human A(1), A(2A), and A(3) ARs. The new compounds were designed based on derivatives of 2-(benzimidazol-2-yl)quinoxaline, previously reported as potent and selective antagonists of A(1) and A(3) ARs. Among these, 3-[4-(ethylthio)-1H-benzimidazol-2-yl]isoquinoline 4b exhibited the best combination of potency toward the A(1) AR (K(i) =1.4 nM) and selectivity against the A(2A) (K(i) >10 μM), A(2B) (K(i)>10 μM), and A(3) ARs (K(i)>1 μM). Functional experiments in circular smooth muscle preparations of isolated human colon showed that 4b behaves as a potent and selective antagonist of the A(1) AR in the neuromuscular compartment of this intestinal region. Biological and pharmacological data suggest that 4b is a suitable starting point for the development of novel agents endowed with stimulant properties on colonic activity.

  3. Activation of mGlu3 receptors stimulates the production of GDNF in striatal neurons.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Giuseppe; Molinaro, Gemma; Riozzi, Barbara; Storto, Marianna; Busceti, Carla L; Spinsanti, Paola; Bucci, Domenico; Di Liberto, Valentina; Mudò, Giuseppina; Corti, Corrado; Corsi, Mauro; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Belluardo, Natale; Bruno, Valeria

    2009-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors have been considered potential targets for the therapy of experimental parkinsonism. One hypothetical advantage associated with the use of mGlu receptor ligands is the lack of the adverse effects typically induced by ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists, such as sedation, ataxia, and severe learning impairment. Low doses of the mGlu2/3 metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, LY379268 (0.25-3 mg/kg, i.p.) increased glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) mRNA and protein levels in the mouse brain, as assessed by in situ hybridization, real-time PCR, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. This increase was prominent in the striatum, but was also observed in the cerebral cortex. GDNF mRNA levels peaked at 3 h and declined afterwards, whereas GDNF protein levels progressively increased from 24 to 72 h following LY379268 injection. The action of LY379268 was abrogated by the mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, LY341495 (1 mg/kg, i.p.), and was lost in mGlu3 receptor knockout mice, but not in mGlu2 receptor knockout mice. In pure cultures of striatal neurons, the increase in GDNF induced by LY379268 required the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase pathways, as shown by the use of specific inhibitors of the two pathways. Both in vivo and in vitro studies led to the conclusion that neurons were the only source of GDNF in response to mGlu3 receptor activation. Remarkably, acute or repeated injections of LY379268 at doses that enhanced striatal GDNF levels (0.25 or 3 mg/kg, i.p.) were highly protective against nigro-striatal damage induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine in mice, as assessed by stereological counting of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons in the pars compacta of the substantia nigra. We speculate that selective mGlu3 receptor agonists or enhancers are potential candidates as neuroprotective agents in Parkinson's disease, and their use might

  4. Stimulation of Toll-Like Receptors profoundly influences the titer of polyreactive antibodies in the circulation.

    PubMed

    Gunti, Sreenivasulu; Messer, Ronald J; Xu, Chengfu; Yan, Ming; Coleman, William G; Peterson, Karin E; Hasenkrug, Kim J; Notkins, Abner L

    2015-01-01

    Polyreactive antibodies are a major component of the natural antibody repertoire and bind to a variety of structurally unrelated molecules. These antibodies are thought to provide a first line of defense against bacterial infections and play a major role in the clearance of apoptotic cells. What triggers the secretion of these antibodies has remained an enigma. Using a surrogate assay for measuring polyreactive antibodies, we found that about 50% of serum IgM is polyreactive and that stimulation of TLR4(+/+), but not TLR4(-/-), mice resulted in a 40 fold increase in polyreactive antibodies. Stimulation of TLRs 3, 7, 9 also increased the secretion of polyreactive antibodies. Infection with a virus or tissue damage induced by a toxin similarly led to an increase in polyreactive antibodies in MyD88(+/+), but not MyD88(-/-) mice. We conclude that stimulation of TLRs is a key link in the mechanism of polyreactive antibody secretion into the circulation. PMID:26463758

  5. Stimulation of endocannabinoid formation in brain slice cultures through activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwang-Mook; Mangieri, Regina; Stapleton, Christopher; Kim, Janet; Fegley, Darren; Wallace, Matthew; Mackie, Ken; Piomelli, Daniele

    2005-11-01

    Activation of group I metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors drives the endocannabinoid system to cause both short- and long-term changes of synaptic strength in the striatum, hippocampus, and other brain areas. Although there is strong electrophysiological evidence for a role of endocannabinoid release in mGlu receptor-dependent plasticity, the identity of the endocannabinoid transmitter mediating this phenomenon remains undefined. In this study, we show that activation of group I mGlu receptors triggers the biosynthesis of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), but not anandamide, in primary cultures of corticostriatal and hippocampal slices prepared from early postnatal rat brain. Pharmacological studies suggest that 2-AG biosynthesis is initiated by activation of mGlu5 receptors, is catalyzed by phospholipase C (PLC) and 1,2-diacylglycerol lipase (DGL) activities, and is dependent on intracellular Ca2+ ions. Realtime polymerase chain reaction and immunostaining analyses indicate that DGL-beta is the predominant DGL isoform expressed in corticostriatal and hippocampal slices and that this enzyme is highly expressed in striatal neurons, where it is colocalized with PLC-beta1. The results suggest that 2-AG is a primary endocannabinoid mediator of mGlu receptor-dependent neuronal plasticity.

  6. {delta}-Opioid receptor-stimulated Akt signaling in neuroblastoma x glioma (NG108-15) hybrid cells involves receptor tyrosine kinase-mediated PI3K activation

    SciTech Connect

    Heiss, Anika; Ammer, Hermann; Eisinger, Daniela A.

    2009-07-15

    {delta}-Opioid receptor (DOR) agonists possess cytoprotective properties, an effect associated with activation of the 'pro-survival' kinase Akt. Here we delineate the signal transduction pathway by which opioids induce Akt activation in neuroblastoma x glioma (NG108-15) hybrid cells. Exposure of the cells to both [D-Pen{sup 2,5}]enkephalin and etorphine resulted in a time- and dose-dependent increase in Akt activity, as measured by means of an activation-specific antibody recognizing phosphoserine-473. DOR-mediated Akt signaling is blocked by the opioid antagonist naloxone and involves inhibitory G{sub i/o} proteins, because pre-treatment with pertussis toxin, but not over-expression of the G{sub q/11} scavengers EBP50 and GRK2-K220R, prevented this effect. Further studies with Wortmannin and LY294002 revealed that phophoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) plays a central role in opioid-induced Akt activation. Opioids stimulate Akt activity through transactivation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK), because pre-treatment of the cells with inhibitors for neurotrophin receptor tyrosine kinases (AG879) and the insulin-like growth factor receptor IGF-1 (AG1024), but not over-expression of the G{beta}{gamma} scavenger phosducin, abolished this effect. Activated Akt translocates to the nuclear membrane, where it promotes GSK3 phosphorylation and prevents caspase-3 cleavage, two key events mediating inhibition of cell apoptosis and enhancement of cell survival. Taken together, these results demonstrate that in NG108-15 hybrid cells DOR agonists possess cytoprotective properties mediated by activation of the RTK/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  7. In Estimated Good Prognosis Patients Could Unexpected "Hyporesponse" to Controlled Ovarian Stimulation be Related to Genetic Polymorphisms of FSH Receptor?

    PubMed

    Alviggi, Carlo; Conforti, Alessandro; Caprio, Francesca; Gizzo, Salvatore; Noventa, Marco; Strina, Ida; Pagano, Tiziana; De Rosa, Pasquale; Carbone, Floriana; Colacurci, Nicola; De Placido, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    It has been reported that 10% to 15% of young normogonadotrophic women show suboptimal response to standard gonadotropin-releasing hormone-a long protocol. These patients require higher doses of exogenous follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). This phenomenon could be associated with genetic characteristics. In this study, FSH receptor polymorphism was retrospectively evaluated in 42 normoresponder young women undergoing an in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycle; patients were stratified according to recombinant human FSH (r-hFSH) consumption. We selected 17 normoresponder young patients who required a cumulative dose of recombinant FSH (rFSH) >2500 UI (group A). A control group was randomly selected among patients who required a cumulative dose of rFSH <2500 UI (group B). Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSH-R) 307Ala and 680Ser variants were analyzed in all our patients. Our results show that the mean number of rFSH vials (36.3 ± 7.5 vs 28.6 ± 4.5, P = .0001) and days of stimulation (12.7 ± 2.4 vs 10.8 ± 2.8, P = .03) were significantly lower in group B, whereas the number of oocytes retrieved (7.1 ± 1.5 vs 9.6 ± 2.4; P = .0005) and the average number of embryos transferred (2.1 ± 0.7 vs 2.7 ± 0.4; P = .001) were significantly lower in group A. Estradiol serum levels on the human chorionic gonadotrophin day were significantly lower in group A (997.8 ± 384.9 pg/mL vs 1749.1 ± 644.4; P = .0001). The incidence of the Ser/Ser genotype was higher in patients with higher r-hFSH consumption (group A; P = .02). Based on our results, we hypothesize an association between the FSH-R polymorphisms and a "hyporesponse" to exogenous FSH. PMID:26902430

  8. Cholinergic stimulation of pancreatic amylase release and muscarinic receptors: effect of ionophore A23187

    SciTech Connect

    Larose, L.; Morisset, J.

    1985-07-22

    Dispersed rat pancreatic acini were incubated in 0.5 mM calcium medium with increasing concentrations of carbamylcholine, with or without the ionophore A23187 (10/sup -6/M). Addition of the ionophore reduced maximal amylase release, increased the maximal effective concentration of carbamylcholine and dramatically impaired the agonist's capacity to induce enzyme secretion at low concentration. The ionophore also abolished the inhibition of secretion observed at high carbamylcholine concentrations. These effects of the ionophore on the cholinergic secretory response cannot be explained by interaction at the muscarinic receptor since neither the Bmax, the affinity of the receptor for the (/sup 3/H)QNB nor the binding of carbamylcholine were affected by the ionophore. It is suggested that for the conditions studied, the ionophore can interact with the secretory process at one or several points ulterior to the initial recognition site of carbamylcholine on its receptor. 30 references, 3 figures.

  9. Parallel maturation of the pancreatic secretory response to cholinergic stimulation and the muscarinic receptor population.

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Y.; Larose, L.; Morisset, J.; Poirier, G. G.

    1981-01-01

    1 The appearance of pancreatic muscarinic receptors during development has been measured by use of the specific ligand [3H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]-QNB). 2 QNB binding sites are present in foetal pancreas; their maximal concentration is attained at the age of 30 days and a significant decrease is observed in one year old animals. 3 Affinity of [3H]-QNB for the muscarinic receptor does not change with age. 4 An evaluation of the pancreatic secretory response to a cholinoceptor agonist as a function of age indicates that the development of this response parallels that of the receptor population. 5 It is suggested that, at all ages from 3 days after birth onwards, the maximal secretory response of the exocrine pancreas to a cholinoceptor agonist mobilizes the same proportion of the total population of QNB binding sites. PMID:6165420

  10. A novel function of colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor in hTERT immortalization of human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, N F; Kocher, H M; Salako, M A; Obermueller, E; Sandle, J; Balkwill, F

    2009-02-01

    The receptor for macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) is a product of the proto-oncogene c-fms and a member of the class III transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor family. Earlier, we described increased mRNA expression of CSF1R in human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) immortalized human ovarian surface epithelial (IOSE) cell lines derived from a single donor. Here, we further describe that CSF1R is upregulated at both the mRNA and protein level in hTERT immortalized human normal OSE cells from two different donors and in hTERT immortalized human pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. CSF1R was not upregulated in hTERT immortalized epithelial clones that subsequently underwent senescence or in immortalized fibroblasts. Upon stimulation by the CSF1R ligand CSF1, the immortalized epithelial cell lines showed rapid internalization of CSF1R with concomitant down-modulation and colocalization of phosphorylated NFkappaBp65 with hTERT protein, hTERT translocation into the nucleus and the binding of c-Myc to the hTERT promoter region. Reducing the expression of CSF1R using short hairpin interfering RNA abolished these effects and also decreased cell survival and the number of population doublings under suboptimal culture conditions. The telomerase inhibitor GRN163L confirmed a role for telomerase in the cleavage of the intracellular domain of CSF1R. On the basis of these findings, we suggest that CSF1R may be a critical factor facilitating hTERT immortalization of epithelial cells.

  11. Drug-induced hyperploidy stimulates an antitumor NK cell response mediated by NKG2D and DNAM-1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Acebes-Huerta, Andrea; Lorenzo-Herrero, Seila; Folgueras, Alicia R.; Huergo-Zapico, Leticia; Lopez-Larrea, Carlos; López-Soto, Alejandro; Gonzalez, Segundo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Formation of polyploid or aneuploid cells is a pathological hallmark of malignant tumors. Cell cycle checkpoint mechanisms play a crucial role in ensuring genomic integrity during mitosis, avoiding the generation of aneuploid cells. Additionally, cancer cell DNA ploidy is subjected to extrinsic controls operated by activation of adaptive immune responses mediated by T cells. NK cells exert a central role in the innate anticancer immunity; however, the mechanisms involved in the recognition of tumor cells by NK cells have not been fully elucidated. Herein, we report that drug-induced polyploidy in cancer cells activates antitumor responses mediated by NK cells. Thus, hyperploidy-inducing chemotherapeutic agents strongly upregulate the tumor expression of ligands for the NK cell activating receptors NKG2D and DNAM-1. Drug-induced hyperploidy modulated the repertoire of activating receptors and the cytokine profile of NK cells, rendering tumor cells more susceptible to NK cell-mediated lysis through the activation of NKG2D and DNAM-1 receptors. In addition, hyperploidization stimulated the production of IL-2 by CD4 T cells, which induced NK cell proliferation and activity. The stimulation of MICA, a key NKG2D ligand, in hyperploid cells was mainly mediated by ATM protein kinase. Likewise, pharmacological inhibition of key regulators of endoplasmic reticulum stress in certain cell models supports a role for this pathway in NKG2D ligand upregulation. Overall, our findings indicate that, besides the cytotoxic effect on tumor cells, the therapeutic activity of anti-mitotic drugs may be mediated by the induction of a coordinated antitumor immune response involving NK and T cells. PMID:27057443

  12. Assay of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor function in cultured cardiac cells by stimulation of /sup 86/Rb+ efflux

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, D.D.; Nathanson, N.M.

    1985-09-01

    An assay for the increase in potassium permeability mediated by muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) in cultured cardiac cells is described, using the K+ ion substitute /sup 86/Rb+ as the tracer ion. Cardiac cells accumulate /sup 86/Rb+ from the extracellular medium in a Na+/K+ ATPase-dependent manner. Subsequent efflux of /sup 86/Rb+ in the absence and presence of muscarinic agonists follows kinetics similar to those previously reported for /sup 42/K+. The mAChR agonist carbamylcholine (carbachol) stimulated /sup 86/Rb+ efflux with an EC50 of 50 nM. The half-time for efflux is reduced by greater than 40% at maximally effective concentrations of agonist. Stimulation of /sup 86/Rb+ efflux by carbachol is blocked by the mAChR antagonist atropine with an IC50 of 15 nM. The stimulation of 86Rb+ efflux by carbachol is not affected by the presence of the Na+/K+ ATPase inhibitor ouabain. This assay provides a method for quantitating the mAChR-mediated increase in K+ permeability in cardiac cells without the use of /sup 42/K+.

  13. Disabled-2 is a negative immune regulator of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated Toll-like receptor 4 internalization and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Wei-Shan; Ling, Pin; Cheng, Ju-Chien; Chang, Shy-Shin; Tseng, Ching-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays a pivotal role in the host response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a major cell wall component of Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we elucidated whether the endocytic adaptor protein Disabled-2 (Dab2), which is abundantly expressed in macrophages, plays a role in LPS-stimulated TLR4 signaling and trafficking. Molecular analysis and transcriptome profiling of RAW264.7 macrophage-like cells expressing short-hairpin RNA of Dab2 revealed that Dab2 regulated the TLR4/TRIF pathway upon LPS stimulation. Knockdown of Dab2 augmented TRIF-dependent interferon regulatory factor 3 activation and the expression of subsets of inflammatory cytokines and interferon-inducible genes. Dab2 acted as a clathrin sponge and sequestered clathrin from TLR4 in the resting stage of macrophages. Upon LPS stimulation, clathrin was released from Dab2 to facilitate endocytosis of TLR4 for triggering the TRIF-mediated pathway. Dab2 functions as a negative immune regulator of TLR4 endocytosis and signaling, supporting a novel role for a Dab2-associated regulatory circuit in controlling the inflammatory response of macrophages to endotoxin. PMID:27748405

  14. Muscarinic receptor modulation of basal and beta-adrenergic stimulated function of the failing human left ventricle.

    PubMed

    Newton, G E; Parker, A B; Landzberg, J S; Colucci, W S; Parker, J D

    1996-12-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of muscarinic receptor modulation on basal and beta-adrenergic stimulated left ventricular function in patients with heart failure. 21 heart failure patients and 14 subjects with normal ventricular function were studied. In Protocol 1 intracoronary acetylcholine resulted in a 60+/-8% inhibition of the left ventricular +dP/dt response to intracoronary dobutamine in the normal group, and a similar 70+/-13% inhibition in the heart failure group. Acetylcholine also attenuated the dobutamine-mediated acceleration of isovolumic relaxation (Tau) in both groups. Acetylcholine alone had no effect on Tau in the normal group, while it prolonged Tau in the heart failure group. In Protocol 2 intracoronary atropine resulted in a 35+/-10% augmentation of the inotropic response to dobutamine in the normal group, versus a non-significant 12+/-15% augmentation of the dobutamine response in the heart failure group. In Protocol 3, in 6 heart failure patients, both effects of acetylcholine, the slowing of ventricular relaxation and the inhibition of beta-adrenergic responses, were reversed by the addition of atropine. Therefore, in the failing human left ventricle muscarinic stimulation has an independent negative lusitropic effect and antagonizes the effects of beta-adrenergic stimulation.

  15. The role of colony-stimulating factor 1 and its receptor in the etiopathogenesis of endometrial adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Smith, H O; Anderson, P S; Kuo, D Y; Goldberg, G L; DeVictoria, C L; Boocock, C A; Jones, J G; Runowicz, C D; Stanley, E R; Pollard, J W

    1995-03-01

    Colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) is a homodimeric growth factor that humorally regulates the growth and differentiation of mononuclear phagocytes, and locally regulates maternal-fetal interactions during pregnancy. It exerts these actions through a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor, colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R), the product of the c-fms proto-oncogene. Recent studies have demonstrated overexpression of CSF-1 and its receptor in breast, ovarian, and endometrial adenocarcinomas. To further investigate the possible role of CSF-1 and its receptor in the pathogenesis of endometrial adenocarcinoma, a prospective study was undertaken to study CSF-1 expression in benign and neoplastic endometrial epithelium and to compare serum CSF-1 levels in endometrial adenocarcinoma patients with healthy perimenopausal women. The mean serum levels of CSF-1 in 71 patients with endometrial cancer (4.9 +/- 1.8 microgram/liter) were significantly elevated compared with levels found in the 32 controls (3.5 +/- 1.1 microgram/liter). Within the endometrial adenocarcinoma group, circulating CSF-1 levels were significantly elevated in patients with large tumor volume, high grade, myometrial invasion, residual disease, and circulating CA-125 levels. High serum levels of serum CSF-1 were associated with elevated serum CA19-9 and CA-125 levels. Immunohistochemistry results revealed in tumor epithelium intense staining for CSF-1R (27 of 54 cases, 50%) and elevated staining for CSF-1 (41 of 54 cases, 75.9%), with intense staining of CSF-1 in 16 of 54 cases (29.6%). Staining was significantly greater in intensity and number of cells involved in malignant compared with benign epithelium for CSF-1R and CSF-1 (P = 0.05 and <0.0001, respectively). A positive correlation between amount and intensity of CSF-1 and CSF-1R staining in endometrial adenocarcinoma tissue was also demonstrated (P = 0.007). CSF-1 and CSF-1R mRNA was also detected in the tumor samples, confirming the

  16. The metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist 1S,3R-ACPD stimulates and modulates NMDA receptor mediated excitotoxicity in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    PubMed

    Blaabjerg, M; Kristensen, B W; Bonde, C; Zimmer, J

    2001-04-13

    The potential toxic effects of the metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (ACPD) and its interactions with the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor were studied in hippocampal brain slice cultures, using densitometric measurements of the cellular uptake of propidium iodide (PI) to quantify neuronal degeneration. Cultures exposed to ACPD, showed a concentration (2-5 mM) and time (1-4 days) dependent increase in PI uptake in CA1, CA3 and dentate subfields after 24 h and 48 h of exposure, with CA1 pyramidal cells being most sensitive. The neurodegeneration induced by 2 mM ACPD was completely abolished by addition of 10 microM of the NMDA receptor antagonist (5R,10S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine (MK-801), while 20 microM of the 2-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA)/kainic acid receptor antagonist 2,3-dioxo-6-nitro-1,2,3,4-tetrahydrobenzo[f]quinoxaline-7-sulfonamide (NBQX) had no effect. Co-exposing cultures to a subtoxic dose of 300 microM ACPD together with 10 microM NMDA, which at this dose is known to induce a fairly selective degeneration of CA1 pyramidal cells, significantly increased the PI uptake in both CA1 and CA3, compared to cultures exposed to 10 microM NMDA only. Adding the 300 microM ACPD as pretreatment for 30 min followed by a 30 min wash in normal medium before the ACPD/NMDA co-exposure, eliminated the potentiation of NMDA toxicity. The potentiation was also blocked by addition of 10 or 100 microM 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP) (mGluR5 antagonist) during the co-exposure, while a corresponding addition of 10 or 100 microM 7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxylate ethyl ester (CPCCOEt) (mGluR1 antagonist) had no effect. We conclude that, stimulation of metabotropic glutamate receptors with ACPD at concentrations of 2 mM or higher induces a distinct subfield-related and time and concentration dependent pattern of hippocampal

  17. Brain Natriuretic Peptide Stimulates Lipid Metabolism through Its Receptor NPR1 and the Glycerolipid Metabolism Pathway in Chicken Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, H Y; Zhao, G P; Liu, R R; Li, Q H; Zheng, M Q; Li, S F; Liang, Z; Zhao, Z H; Wen, J

    2015-11-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is related to lipid metabolism in mammals, but its effect and the molecular mechanisms underlying it in chickens are incompletely understood. We found that the level of natriuretic peptide precursor B (NPPB, which encodes BNP) mRNA expression in high-abdominal-fat chicken groups was significantly higher than that of low-abdominal-fat groups. Partial correlations indicated that changes in the weight of abdominal fat were positively correlated with NPPB mRNA expression level. In vitro, compared with the control group, preadipocytes with NPPB interference showed reduced levels of proliferation, differentiation, and glycerin in media. Treatments of cells with BNP led to enhanced proliferation and differentiation of cells and glycerin concentration, and mRNA expression of its receptor natriuretic peptide receptor 1 (NPR1) was upregulated significantly. In cells exposed to BNP, 482 differentially expressed genes were identified compared with controls without BNP. Four genes known to be related to lipid metabolism (diacylglycerol kinase; lipase, endothelial; 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 1; and 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 2) were enriched in the glycerolipid metabolism pathway and expressed differentially. In conclusion, BNP stimulates the proliferation, differentiation, and lipolysis of preadipocytes through upregulation of the levels of expression of its receptor NPR1 and key genes enriched in the glycerolipid metabolic pathway. PMID:26463554

  18. Specific Activation of A3, A2A and A1 Adenosine Receptors in CD73-Knockout Mice Affects B16F10 Melanoma Growth, Neovascularization, Angiogenesis and Macrophage Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Koszałka, Patrycja; Gołuńska, Monika; Urban, Aleksandra; Stasiłojć, Grzegorz; Stanisławowski, Marcin; Majewski, Marceli; Składanowski, Andrzej C.; Bigda, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    CD73 (ecto-5'-nucleotidase), a cell surface enzyme hydrolyzing AMP to adenosine, was lately demonstrated to play a direct role in tumor progression including regulation of tumor vascularization. It was also shown to stimulate tumor macrophage infiltration. Interstitial adenosine, accumulating in solid tumors due to CD73 enzymatic activity, is recognized as a main mediator regulating the production of pro- and anti-angiogenic factors, but the engagement of specific adenosine receptors in tumor progression in vivo is still poorly researched. We have analyzed the role of high affinity adenosine receptors A1, A2A, and A3 in B16F10 melanoma progression using specific agonists (CCPA, CGS-21680 and IB-MECA, respectively). We limited endogenous extracellular adenosine background using CD73 knockout mice treated with CD73 chemical inhibitor, AOPCP (adenosine α,β-methylene 5’-diphosphate). Activation of any adenosine receptor significantly inhibited B16F10 melanoma growth but only at its early stage. At 14th day of growth, the decrease in tumor neovascularization and MAPK pathway activation induced by CD73 depletion was reversed by all agonists. Activation of A1AR primarily increased angiogenic activation measured by expression of VEGF-R2 on tumor blood vessels. However, mainly A3AR activation increased both the microvessel density and expression of pro-angiogenic factors. All agonists induced significant increase in macrophage tumor infiltration, with IB-MECA being most effective. This effect was accompanied by substantial changes in cytokines regulating macrophage polarization between pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic phenotype. Our results demonstrate an evidence that each of the analyzed receptors has a specific role in the stimulation of tumor angiogenesis and confirm significantly more multifaceted role of adenosine in its regulation than was already observed. They also reveal previously unexplored consequences to extracellular adenosine signaling depletion in

  19. Stimulation of neuropeptide Y gene expression by brain-derived neurotrophic factor requires both the phospholipase Cgamma and Shc binding sites on its receptor, TrkB.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, A G; Hargreaves, A C; Gunn-Moore, F J; Tavaré, J M

    1998-01-01

    In PC12 cells, it has been previously reported that nerve growth factor stimulates neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene expression. In the current study we examined the signalling pathways involved in this effect by transiently expressing in PC12 cells the receptor (TrkB) for the related neurotrophin, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF caused a 3-fold induction of luciferase expression from a transiently co-transfected plasmid possessing the firefly luciferase gene under the control of the NPY promoter. This effect of BDNF was completely blocked by either a Y484F mutation in TrkB (which blocks high-affinity Shc binding to TrkB) or by a Y785F substitution [which blocks the binding, phosphorylation and activation of phospholipase Cgamma (PLCgamma)]. Activation of the NPY promoter by neurotrophin-3 in PC12 cells overexpressing TrkC was also completely blocked by a naturally occurring kinase insert which prevents the high-affinity binding of Shc and PLCgamma. NPY promoter activation by BDNF was blocked by PD98059, suggesting a role for mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase). Stimulation of NPY gene expression by PMA, but not by BDNF, was blocked by Ro-31-8220, a protein kinase C inhibitor, excluding a role for this serine/threonine protein kinase in the effect of BDNF. In addition, BDNF did not cause an elevation in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration. Taken together, our results suggest that stimulation of the NPY promoter by BDNF requires the simultaneous activation of two distinct pathways; one involves Shc and MAP kinase, and the other appears to be PLCgamma-independent but requires an intact tyrosine-785 on TrkB and so may involve an effector of TrkB signalling that remains to be identified. PMID:9677306

  20. Liver X receptor activation stimulates iron export in human alternative macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bories, Gael; Colin, Sophie; Vanhoutte, Jonathan; Derudas, Bruno; Copin, Corinne; Fanchon, Melanie; Daoudi, Mehdi; Belloy, Loic; Haulon, Stephan; Zawadzki, Christophe; Jude, Brigitte; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia

    2013-01-01

    Rationale In atherosclerotic plaques, iron preferentially accumulates in macrophages where it can exert pro-oxidant activities. Objective The objective of this study is, first, to better characterize the iron distribution and metabolism in macrophage sub-populations in human atherosclerotic plaques and, second, to determine whether iron homeostasis is under the control of nuclear receptors, such as the Liver X Receptors (LXR). Methods and Results Here we report that iron depots accumulate in human atherosclerotic plaque areas enriched in CD68 and Mannose Receptor (MR) positive (CD68+MR+) alternative M2 macrophages. In vitro IL-4 polarization of human monocytes into M2 macrophages also resulted in a gene expression profile and phenotype favouring iron accumulation. However, upon iron exposure, M2 macrophages acquire a phenotype favouring iron release, through a strong increase in ferroportin expression, illustrated by a more avid oxidation of extra-cellular LDL by iron-loaded M2 macrophages. In line, in human atherosclerotic plaques, CD68+MR+ macrophages accumulate oxidized lipids, which activate Liver X Receptors (LXRα and LXRβ), resulting in the induction of ABCA1, ABCG1 and ApoE expression. Moreover, in iron-loaded M2 macrophages, LXR activation induces nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 (NRF2) expression, hence increasing ferroportin expression, which, together with a decrease of hepcidin mRNA levels, promotes iron export. Conclusions These data identify a role for M2 macrophages in iron handling, a process which is regulated by LXR activation. PMID:24036496

  1. Structure of follicle-stimulating hormone in complex with the entire ectodomain of its receptor

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xuliang; Liu, Heli; Chen, Xiaoyan; Chen, Po-Han; Fischer, David; Sriraman, Venkataraman; Yu, Henry N.; Arkinstall, Steve; He, Xiaolin

    2012-01-01

    FSH, a glycoprotein hormone, and the FSH receptor (FSHR), a G protein-coupled receptor, play central roles in human reproduction. We report the crystal structure of FSH in complex with the entire extracellular domain of FSHR (FSHRED), including the enigmatic hinge region that is responsible for signal specificity. Surprisingly, the hinge region does not form a separate structural unit as widely anticipated but is part of the integral structure of FSHRED. In addition to the known hormone-binding site, FSHRED provides interaction sites with the hormone: a sulfotyrosine (sTyr) site in the hinge region consistent with previous studies and a potential exosite resulting from putative receptor trimerization. Our structure, in comparison to others, suggests FSHR interacts with its ligand in two steps: ligand recruitment followed by sTyr recognition. FSH first binds to the high-affinity hormone-binding subdomain of FSHR and reshapes the ligand conformation to form a sTyr-binding pocket. FSHR then inserts its sTyr (i.e., sulfated Tyr335) into the FSH nascent pocket, eventually leading to receptor activation. PMID:22802634

  2. Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated osteoclastogenesis is mediated by tumor necrosis factor via its P55 receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Amer, Y; Ross, F P; Edwards, J; Teitelbaum, S L

    1997-01-01

    Chronic bone infection, as attends periodontitis, is often complicated by severe osteolysis. While LPS is believed to be central to the pathogenesis of the osteolytic lesion, the mechanisms by which this bacteria-derived molecule promotes bone resorption are unknown. We find that LPS induces bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) to express c-src, a protooncogene product that we demonstrate is a specific marker of commitment to the osteoclast phenotype. We next turned to possible soluble mediators of LPS-induced c-src. Of a number of osteoclastogenic cytokines tested, only TNF-alpha mirrors the c-src-enhancing effect of LPS. Suggesting that LPS augmentation of c-src is TNF-mediated, endotoxin sequentially induces BMM expression of TNF, followed by c-src. TNF and c-src expression, by cultured BMMs derived from LPS-injected mice, reflects duration of exposure to circulating endotoxin, intimating that endotoxin's effect in vivo is also mediated by TNF. Consistent with these findings, thalidomide (which antagonizes TNF action) attenuates c-src induction by LPS. An anti-TNF antibody blocks LPS enhancement of c-src mRNA, validating the cytokine's modulating role in vitro. Using BMMs of TNF receptor-deleted mice, we demonstrate that TNF induction of c-src is transmitted through the cytokine's p55, but not p75, receptor. Most importantly, LPS administered to wild-type mice prompts osteoclast precursor differentiation, manifest by profound osteoclastogenesis in marrow cultured ex vivo, and by a profusion of marrow-residing cells expressing the osteoclast marker tartrate resistant acid phosphatase, in vivo. In contrast, LPS does not substantially enhance osteoclast proliferation in mice lacking the p55TNF receptor, confirming that LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis is mediated by TNF in vivo via this receptor. Thus, therapy targeting TNF and/or its p55 receptor presents itself as a means of preventing the osteolysis of chronic bacterial infection. PMID:9294124

  3. Preconditioning of Microglia by α-Synuclein Strongly Affects the Response Induced by Toll-like Receptor (TLR) Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Rey, Elena; Lachaud, Christian C.; Guilliams, Tim; Fernandez-Montesinos, Rafael; Benitez-Rondan, Alicia; Robledo, Gema; Hmadcha, Abdelkrim; Delgado, Mario; Dobson, Christopher M.; Pozo, David

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, it has become accepted that α-synuclein (αSyn) has a key role in the microglia-mediated neuroinflammation, which accompanies the development of Parkinson’s disease and other related disorders, such as Dementia with Lewy Bodies and Alzheimer’s disease. Nevertheless, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying its pathological actions, especially in the sporadic forms of the diseases, are not completely understood. Intriguingly, several epidemiological and animal model studies have revealed a link between certain microbial infections and the onset or progression of sporadic forms of these neurodegenerative disorders. In this work, we have characterized the effect of toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation on primary murine microglial cultures and analysed the impact of priming cells with extracellular wild-type (Wt) αSyn on the subsequent TLR stimulation of cells with a set of TLR ligands. By assaying key interleukins and chemokines we report that specific stimuli, in particular Pam3Csk4 (Pam3) and single-stranded RNA40 (ssRNA), can differentially affect the TLR2/1- and TLR7-mediated responses of microglia when pre-conditioned with αSyn by augmenting IL-6, MCP-1/CCL2 or IP-10/CXCL10 secretion levels. Furthermore, we report a skewing of αSyn-primed microglia stimulated with ssRNA (TLR7) or Pam3 (TLR2/1) towards intermediate but at the same time differential, M1/M2 phenotypes. Finally, we show that the levels and intracellular location of activated caspase-3 protein change significantly in αSyn-primed microglia after stimulation with these particular TLR agonists. Overall, we report a remarkable impact of non-aggregated αSyn pre-sensitization of microglia on TLR-mediated immunity, a phenomenon that could contribute to triggering the onset of sporadic α-synuclein-related neuropathologies. PMID:24236103

  4. Stimulation of calcium-sensing receptors induces endothelium-dependent vasorelaxations via nitric oxide production and activation of IKCa channels

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Harry Z.E.; Shi, Jian; Jahan, Kazi S.; Martinucci, Matthew C.; Gilbert, Steven J.; Vanessa Ho, W.-S.; Albert, Anthony P.

    2016-01-01

    Stimulation of vascular calcium-sensing receptors (CaSRs) is reported to induce both constrictions and relaxations. However, cellular mechanisms involved in these responses remain unclear. The present study investigates the effect of stimulating CaSRs on vascular contractility and focuses on the role of the endothelium, nitric oxide (NO) and K+ channels in these responses. In wire myography studies, increasing [Ca2 +]o from 1 mM to 6 mM induced concentration-dependent relaxations of methoxamine pre-contracted rabbit mesenteric arteries. [Ca2 +]o-induced relaxations were dependent on a functional endothelium, and were inhibited by the negative allosteric CaSR modulator Calhex-231. [Ca2 +]o-induced relaxations were reduced by inhibitors of endothelial NO synthase, guanylate cyclase, and protein kinase G. CaSR activation also induced NO production in freshly isolated endothelial cells (ECs) in experiments using the fluorescent NO indicator DAF-FM. Pre-treatment with inhibitors of large (BKCa) and intermediate (IKCa) Ca2 +-activated K+ channels (iberiotoxin and charybdotoxin), and Kv7 channels (linopirdine) also reduced [Ca2 +]o-induced vasorelaxations. Increasing [Ca2 +]o also activated IKCa currents in perforated-patch recordings of isolated mesenteric artery ECs. These findings indicate that stimulation of CaSRs induces endothelium-dependent vasorelaxations which are mediated by two separate pathways involving production of NO and activation of IKCa channels. NO stimulates PKG leading to BKCa activation in vascular smooth muscle cells, whereas IKCa activity contributes to endothelium-derived hyperpolarisations. PMID:26772767

  5. Ligand specific variation in cardiac response to stimulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha in spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Ismael, Saifudeen; Purushothaman, Sreeja; Harikrishnan, V S; Nair, R Renuka

    2015-08-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is an independent risk factor for cardiac failure. Reduction of LVH has beneficial effects on the heart. LVH is associated with shift in energy substrate preference from fatty acid to glucose, mediated by down regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPAR-α). As long-term dependence on glucose can promote adverse cardiac remodeling, it was hypothesized that, prevention of metabolic shift by averting down regulation of PPAR-α can reduce cardiac remodeling in spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). Cardiac response to stimulation of PPAR-α presumably depends on the type of ligand used. Therefore, the study was carried out in SHR, using two different PPAR-α ligands. SHR were treated with either fenofibrate (100 mg/kg/day) or medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) Tricaprylin (5% of diet) for 4 months. Expression of PPAR-α and medium-chain acylCoA dehydrogenase served as markers, for stimulation of PPAR-α. Both ligands stimulated PPAR-α. Decrease of blood pressure was observed only with fenofibrate. LVH was assessed from heart-weight/body weight ratio, histology and brain natriuretic peptide expression. As oxidative stress is linked with hypertrophy, serum and cardiac malondialdehyde and cardiac 3-nitrotyrosine levels were determined. Compared to untreated SHR, LVH and oxidative stress were lower on supplementation with MCT, but higher on treatment with fenofibrate. The observations indicate that reduction of blood pressure is not essentially accompanied by reduction of LVH, and that, progressive cardiac remodeling can be prevented with decrease in oxidative stress. Contrary to the notion that reactivation of PPAR-α is detrimental; the study substantiates that cardiac response to stimulation of PPAR-α is ligand specific. PMID:25976666

  6. Secreted APE1/Ref-1 inhibits TNF-α-stimulated endothelial inflammation via thiol-disulfide exchange in TNF receptor.

    PubMed

    Park, Myoung Soo; Choi, Sunga; Lee, Yu Ran; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Kang, Gun; Kim, Cuk-Seong; Kim, Soo Jin; Lee, Sang Do; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2016-03-11

    Apurinic apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/Redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) is a multifunctional protein with redox activity and is proved to be secreted from stimulated cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functions of extracellular APE1/Ref-1 with respect to leading anti-inflammatory signaling in TNF-α-stimulated endothelial cells in response to acetylation. Treatment of TNF-α-stimulated endothelial cells with an inhibitor of deacetylase that causes intracellular acetylation, considerably suppressed vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). During TSA-mediated acetylation in culture, a time-dependent increase in secreted APE1/Ref-1 was confirmed. The acetyl moiety of acetylated-APE1/Ref-1 was rapidly removed based on the removal kinetics. Additionally, recombinant human (rh) APE1/Ref-1 with reducing activity induced a conformational change in rh TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) by thiol-disulfide exchange. Following treatment with the neutralizing anti-APE1/Ref-1 antibody, inflammatory signals via the binding of TNF-α to TNFR1 were remarkably recovered, leading to up-regulation of reactive oxygen species generation and VCAM-1, in accordance with the activation of p66(shc) and p38 MAPK. These results strongly indicate that anti-inflammatory effects in TNF-α-stimulated endothelial cells by acetylation are tightly linked to secreted APE1/Ref-1, which inhibits TNF-α binding to TNFR1 by reductive conformational change, with suggestion as an endogenous inhibitor of vascular inflammation.

  7. Renoprotective Effects of a Highly Selective A3 Adenosine Receptor Antagonist in a Mouse Model of Adriamycin-induced Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Min, Hye Sook; Cha, Jin Joo; Kim, Kitae; Kim, Jung Eun; Ghee, Jung Yeon; Kim, Hyunwook; Lee, Ji Eun; Han, Jee Young; Jeong, Lak Shin; Cha, Dae Ryong; Kang, Young Sun

    2016-09-01

    The concentration of adenosine in the normal kidney increases markedly during renal hypoxia, ischemia, and inflammation. A recent study reported that an A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) antagonist attenuated the progression of renal fibrosis. The adriamycin (ADX)-induced nephropathy model induces podocyte injury, which results in severe proteinuria and progressive glomerulosclerosis. In this study, we investigated the preventive effect of a highly selective A3AR antagonist (LJ1888) in ADX-induced nephropathy. Three groups of six-week-old Balb/c mice were treated with ADX (11 mg/kg) for four weeks and LJ1888 (10 mg/kg) for two weeks as following: 1) control; 2) ADX; and 3) ADX + LJ1888. ADX treatment decreased body weight without a change in water and food intake, but this was ameliorated by LJ1888 treatment. Interestingly, LJ1888 lowered plasma creatinine level, proteinuria, and albuminuria, which had increased during ADX treatment. Furthermore, LJ1888 inhibited urinary nephrin excretion as a podocyte injury marker, and urine 8-isoprostane and kidney lipid peroxide concentration, which are markers of oxidative stress, increased after injection of ADX. ADX also induced the activation of proinflammatory and profibrotic molecules such as TGF-β1, MCP-1, PAI-1, type IV collagen, NF-κB, NOX4, TLR4, TNFα, IL-1β, and IFN-γ, but they were remarkably suppressed after LJ1888 treatment. In conclusion, our results suggest that LJ1888 has a renoprotective effect in ADX-induced nephropathy, which might be associated with podocyte injury through oxidative stress. Therefore, LJ1888, a selective A3AR antagonist, could be considered as a potential therapeutic agent in renal glomerular diseases which include podocyte injury and proteinuria. PMID:27510383

  8. Renoprotective Effects of a Highly Selective A3 Adenosine Receptor Antagonist in a Mouse Model of Adriamycin-induced Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The concentration of adenosine in the normal kidney increases markedly during renal hypoxia, ischemia, and inflammation. A recent study reported that an A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) antagonist attenuated the progression of renal fibrosis. The adriamycin (ADX)-induced nephropathy model induces podocyte injury, which results in severe proteinuria and progressive glomerulosclerosis. In this study, we investigated the preventive effect of a highly selective A3AR antagonist (LJ1888) in ADX-induced nephropathy. Three groups of six-week-old Balb/c mice were treated with ADX (11 mg/kg) for four weeks and LJ1888 (10 mg/kg) for two weeks as following: 1) control; 2) ADX; and 3) ADX + LJ1888. ADX treatment decreased body weight without a change in water and food intake, but this was ameliorated by LJ1888 treatment. Interestingly, LJ1888 lowered plasma creatinine level, proteinuria, and albuminuria, which had increased during ADX treatment. Furthermore, LJ1888 inhibited urinary nephrin excretion as a podocyte injury marker, and urine 8-isoprostane and kidney lipid peroxide concentration, which are markers of oxidative stress, increased after injection of ADX. ADX also induced the activation of proinflammatory and profibrotic molecules such as TGF-β1, MCP-1, PAI-1, type IV collagen, NF-κB, NOX4, TLR4, TNFα, IL-1β, and IFN-γ, but they were remarkably suppressed after LJ1888 treatment. In conclusion, our results suggest that LJ1888 has a renoprotective effect in ADX-induced nephropathy, which might be associated with podocyte injury through oxidative stress. Therefore, LJ1888, a selective A3AR antagonist, could be considered as a potential therapeutic agent in renal glomerular diseases which include podocyte injury and proteinuria. PMID:27510383

  9. Synergistic Induction of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone β-Subunit Gene Expression by Gonadal Steroid Hormone Receptors and Smad Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Thackray, Varykina G.; Mellon, Pamela L.

    2008-01-01

    LH and FSH play crucial roles in mammalian reproduction by mediating steroidogenesis and gametogenesis. Gonadal steroid hormones influence gonadotropin production via feedback to the hypothalamus and pituitary. We previously demonstrated that progesterone and testosterone can stimulate expression of the FSH β-subunit gene in immortalized gonadotrope-derived LβT2 cells. Herein, we investigate how these gonadal steroids modulate activin signaling in the gonadotrope. Cotreatment of LβT2 cells or mouse primary pituitary cells with steroids and activin results in a synergistic induction of FSHβ gene expression. This synergy decreases when DNA-binding mutations are introduced into the steroid receptors or when mutations that reduce steroid hormone responsiveness are introduced into the FSHβ promoter, indicating that synergy requires direct DNA binding of the steroid receptors. Furthermore, classical activin signaling via Smad proteins is necessary for this synergy. In addition, these steroid receptors physically interact with Smads and are sufficient for the synergism to occur on the FSHβ promoter. Disruption of Smad binding to the promoter with a Smad protein lacking the DNA-binding domain or an FSHβ promoter containing mutated activin-response elements prevents the synergistic enhancement of FSHβ transcription. Collectively, our data demonstrate that the molecular mechanism for gonadal steroid hormone action on the FSHβ promoter involves cross-talk between the steroid and activin signaling pathways. They also reveal that this synergism requires binding of both the steroid receptors and Smad proteins to their cognate DNA-binding elements and likely involves a direct protein-protein interaction between the two types of transcription factors. PMID:18079204

  10. Contribution of opioid and metabotropic glutamate receptor mechanisms to inhibition of bladder overactivity by tibial nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Matsuta, Yosuke; Mally, Abhijith D; Zhang, Fan; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2013-07-15

    The contribution of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) and opioid receptors to inhibition of bladder overactivity by tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) was investigated in cats under α-chloralose anesthesia using LY341495 (a group II mGluR antagonist) and naloxone (an opioid receptor antagonist). Slow infusion cystometry was used to measure the volume threshold (i.e., bladder capacity) for inducing a large bladder contraction. After measuring the bladder capacity during saline infusion, 0.25% acetic acid (AA) was infused to irritate the bladder, activate the nociceptive C-fiber bladder afferents, and induce bladder overactivity. AA significantly (P < 0.0001) reduced bladder capacity to 26.6 ± 4.7% of saline control capacity. TNS (5 Hz, 0.2 ms) at 2 and 4 times the threshold (T) intensity for inducing an observable toe movement significantly increased bladder capacity to 62.2 ± 8.3% at 2T (P < 0.01) and 80.8 ± 9.2% at 4T (P = 0.0001) of saline control capacity. LY341495 (0.1-5 mg/kg iv) did not change bladder overactivity, but completely suppressed the inhibition induced by TNS at a low stimulus intensity (2T) and partially suppressed the inhibition at high intensity (4T). Following administration of LY341495, naloxone (0.01 mg/kg iv) completely eliminated the high-intensity TNS-induced inhibition. However, without LY341495 treatment a 10 times higher dose (0.1 mg/kg) of naloxone was required to completely block TNS inhibition. These results indicate that interactions between group II mGluR and opioid receptor mechanisms contribute to TNS inhibition of AA-induced bladder overactivity. Understanding neurotransmitter mechanisms underlying TNS inhibition of bladder overactivity is important for the development of new treatments for bladder disorders. PMID:23576608

  11. T cell antigen receptor engagement stimulates c-raf phosphorylation and induces c-raf-associated kinase activity via a protein kinase C-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Siegel, J N; Klausner, R D; Rapp, U R; Samelson, L E

    1990-10-25

    The c-raf kinase has been shown to be activated following stimulation of several tyrosine kinase growth factor receptors. We examined changes in c-raf following engagement of the T cell receptor for antigen (TCR), a stimulus which activates both a non-receptor tyrosine kinase and protein kinase C (PKC). We found that activation of the T-cell receptor on the T cell hybridoma 2B4 causes a rapid and stoichiometric hyperphosphorylation of c-raf and an increase in c-raf-associated kinase activity. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that the phosphorylation was entirely on serine residues. High-resolution phosphopeptide mapping showed the appearance of a single major new phosphopeptide with TCR stimulation. That phosphopeptide was shown to comigrate with the major new phosphopeptide induced in response to phorbol ester. When cells were depleted of PKC by pretreatment with high concentrations of phorbol ester, TCR stimulation was no longer capable of inducing c-raf-associated kinase activity. To determine whether activation of the tyrosine kinase alone would activate c-raf, we examined the 2B4 variant cell line FL.8. In response to Thy-1 stimulation, these cells activate the tyrosine kinase but not protein kinase C due to a deficiency in TCR eta chain expression. We found that in contrast to Thy-1 stimulation of 2B4 cells, stimulation of FL.8 cells does not lead to the induction of c-raf-associated kinase activity, although phorbol ester activates the kinase to an equivalent degree in both cells. We conclude that T cell receptor activation of c-raf occurs via phosphorylation by the serine/threonine kinase PKC. Activation of c-raf through PKC represents a mechanism distinct from that reported for tyrosine kinase growth factor receptors.

  12. Low intensity pulse ultrasound stimulate chondrocytes growth in a 3-D alginate scaffold through improved porosity and permeability.

    PubMed

    Guo, Gepu; Lu, Lu; Ji, Hongfei; Ma, Yong; Dong, Rui; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Qiu, Yuanyuan; Wu, Junru; Zhang, Dong

    2015-04-01

    A 3-D scaffold culture system has been used to promote in producing functional chondrocytes for repairing damaged cartilage. In the present study, the low intensity pulse ultrasound (LIPUS) (P(-)=0, 0.055, 0.085 and 0.11 MPa) was applied to improve the porosity and permeability of a 3-D alginate scaffold which was beneficial for the nutrition supply and metabolism during cell growth in 3-D alginate scaffold. The porosity and permeability of the scaffold was quantitatively analyzed based on scanning electron microscopy examination and fluorescence image observation. The results suggest that, for the scaffold exposed to LIPUS, its porosity and permeability could be significantly enhanced by the increasing LIPUS amplitude, which might be induced by the microstreaming shear stress generated by ultrasound-driven microbubble oscillations. Furthermore, the assessments of cell proliferation and collagen II expression confirmed that chondrocytes growth could be effectively promoted in 3-D alginate scaffolds treated by LIPUS, because of the improved scaffold porosity and permeability might benefit cell growth space and nutrition supply. It should also be noticed that appropriate LIPUS driving parameters should be adapted to achieve optimized chondrocytes culture effect in 3-D alginate scaffold. PMID:25543661

  13. Low intensity pulse ultrasound stimulate chondrocytes growth in a 3-D alginate scaffold through improved porosity and permeability.

    PubMed

    Guo, Gepu; Lu, Lu; Ji, Hongfei; Ma, Yong; Dong, Rui; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Qiu, Yuanyuan; Wu, Junru; Zhang, Dong

    2015-04-01

    A 3-D scaffold culture system has been used to promote in producing functional chondrocytes for repairing damaged cartilage. In the present study, the low intensity pulse ultrasound (LIPUS) (P(-)=0, 0.055, 0.085 and 0.11 MPa) was applied to improve the porosity and permeability of a 3-D alginate scaffold which was beneficial for the nutrition supply and metabolism during cell growth in 3-D alginate scaffold. The porosity and permeability of the scaffold was quantitatively analyzed based on scanning electron microscopy examination and fluorescence image observation. The results suggest that, for the scaffold exposed to LIPUS, its porosity and permeability could be significantly enhanced by the increasing LIPUS amplitude, which might be induced by the microstreaming shear stress generated by ultrasound-driven microbubble oscillations. Furthermore, the assessments of cell proliferation and collagen II expression confirmed that chondrocytes growth could be effectively promoted in 3-D alginate scaffolds treated by LIPUS, because of the improved scaffold porosity and permeability might benefit cell growth space and nutrition supply. It should also be noticed that appropriate LIPUS driving parameters should be adapted to achieve optimized chondrocytes culture effect in 3-D alginate scaffold.

  14. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype 4 is essential for cholinergic stimulation of duodenal bicarbonate secretion in mice - relationship to D cell/somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, K; Kita, K; Takahashi, K; Aihara, E; Hayashi, S

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the roles of muscarinic (M) acetylcholine receptor subtype in the cholinergic stimulation of duodenal HCO3(-) secretion using knockout (KO) mice. Wild-type and M1-M5 KO C57BL/6J mice were used. The duodenal mucosa was mounted on an Ussing chamber, and HCO3(-) secretion was measured at pH 7.0 using a pH-stat method in vitro. Carbachol (CCh) or other agents were added to the serosal side. CCh dose-dependently stimulated HCO3(-) secretion in wild-type mice, and this effect was completely inhibited in the presence of atropine. The HCO3(-) response to CCh in wild-type mice was also inhibited by pirenzepine (M1 antagonist), 4DAMP (M3 antagonist), and tropicamide (M4 antagonist), but not by methoctramine (M2 antagonist). CCh stimulated HCO3(-) secretion in M2 and M5 KO animals as effectively as in WT mice; however, this stimulatory effect was significantly attenuated in M1, M3, and M4 KO mice. The decrease observed in the CCh-stimulated HCO3(-) response in M4 KO mice was reversed by the co-application of CYN154806, a somatostatin receptor type 2 (SST2) antagonist. Octreotide (a somatostatin analogue) decreased the basal and CCh-stimulated secretion of HCO3(-) in wild-type mice. The co-localized expression of somatostatin and M4 receptors was confirmed immunohistologically in the duodenum. We concluded that the duodenal HCO3(-) response to CCh was directly mediated by M1/M3 receptors and indirectly modified by M4 receptors. The activation of M4 receptors was assumed to inhibit the release of somatostatin from D cells and potentiate the HCO3(-) response by removing the negative influence of somatostatin via the activation of SST2 receptors.

  15. Thrombin receptor agonist Peptide immobilized in microspheres stimulates reparative processes in rats with gastric ulcer.

    PubMed

    Rusanova, A V; Makarova, A M; Strukova, S M; Markvicheva, E A; Gorbachyova, L R; Stashevskaya, K S; Vasil'eva, T V; Sidorova, E I; Bespalova, Zh D; Grandfils, Ch

    2006-07-01

    The effect of synthetic thrombin receptor (PAR1) agonist peptide encapsulated in microspheres made of lactic and glycolic acid copolymer on tissue reparation was studied in rats with acetate-induced ulcer. PAR1 agonist peptide was immobilized in biodegraded lactic and glycolic acid microspheres by double emulgation, the kinetics of peptide release was analyzed, and the dynamics of ulcer healing was studied in experimental (administration of microspheres with the peptide into the stomach) and two control groups (administration of saline or spheres without peptide). Thrombin receptor agonist peptide gradually released from lactic and glycolic acid microspheres into the stomach shortened the inflammation phase and shifted the proliferation phase to the earlier period, thus accelerating healing of experimental ulcers in rats. PMID:17369897

  16. Dendrite-selective redistribution of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 following agonist stimulation.

    PubMed

    Baudouin, Stéphane J; Pujol, Fabien; Nicot, Arnaud; Kitabgi, Patrick; Boudin, Hélène

    2006-10-01

    The chemokine SDF-1 is a secreted protein that plays a critical role in several aspects of neuron development through interaction with its unique receptor CXCR4. A key mechanism that controls neuron responsiveness to extracellular signals during neuronal growth is receptor endocytosis. Since we previously reported that SDF-1 regulates axon development without affecting the other neurites, we asked whether this could correlate with a compartment-selective trafficking of CXCR4. We thus studied CXCR4 behavior upon SDF-1 exposure in rat hippocampus slices and in transfected neuron cultures. A massive agonist-induced redistribution of CXCR4 in endosomes was observed in dendrites whereas no modification was evidenced in axons. Our data suggest that CXCR4 trafficking may play a role in mediating selective effects of SDF-1 on distinct neuronal membrane subdomains.

  17. Expression of E-Cadherin, Leukemia Inhibitory Factor and Progesterone Receptor in Mouse Blastocysts after Ovarian Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Movaghar, Bahar; Askarian, Saeedeh

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The appropriate interaction between a blastocyst and the endometrium is essential for successful implantation. Numerous factors, including hormone receptors (progesterone receptor), cytokines [leukemia inhibitory factors (LIF)], and adherence molecules such as E-cadherin are involved in the cross-talk that occurs between the embryo and endometrium. Studies show that a lack of these genes impact endometrial receptivity. In this study, we compare the expression levels of E-cadherin, LIF, and progesterone receptor (PgR) genes in blastocysts that have been obtained from superovulated mice to those obtained from natural cycles. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, for the experimental group, a total of 17 virgin female NMRI mice (6- 8 weeks old) were injected with 7.5 IU pregnant mare serum gonadotropin (PMSG). Their blastocysts (approximately n= 120) were flushed out after 3.5 days, following administration of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). The control group consisted of blastocysts from 62 female mice that were mated with male mice. The natural cycle blastocysts were flushed out from the female mice uteri 3.5 days after mating. The expression levels of E-cadherin, LIF, t PgR genes were examined by quantitative real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Data were analyzed by the student’s t-test (one sample t-test). Results: Expression levels of all studied genes were significantly lower in the hormone-treated group compared to the natural cycle blastocysts (p<0.05). Conclusion: Although ovarian stimulation is utilized to obtain more oocytes in ART cycles, it seems that this could disadvantageous to implantation because of the decrease in expression levels of certain genes. Because of the important roles of E-cadherin, LIF, and progesterone receptor in the implantation process, we have shown lower expression levels of these genes in mouse blastocysts obtained from ovarian-stimulated mice than those derived from

  18. Steroid receptor coactivators, HER-2 and HER-3 expression is stimulated by tamoxifen treatment in DMBA-induced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Steroid receptor coactivators (SRCs) may modulate estrogen receptor (ER) activity and the response to endocrine treatment in breast cancer, in part through interaction with growth factor receptor signaling pathways. In the present study the effects of tamoxifen treatment on the expression of SRCs and human epidermal growth factor receptors (HERs) were examined in an animal model of ER positive breast cancer. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats with DMBA-induced breast cancer were randomized to 14 days of oral tamoxifen 40 mg/kg bodyweight/day or vehicle only (controls). Tumors were measured throughout the study period. Blood samples and tumor tissue were collected at sacrifice and tamoxifen and its main metabolites were quantified using LC-MS/MS. The gene expression in tumor of SRC-1, SRC-2/transcription intermediary factor-2 (TIF-2), SRC-3/amplified in breast cancer 1 (AIB1), ER, HER-1, -2, -3 and HER-4, as well as the transcription factor Ets-2, was measured by real-time RT-PCR. Protein levels were further assessed by Western blotting. Results Tamoxifen and its main metabolites were detected at high concentrations in serum and accumulated in tumor tissue in up to tenfolds the concentration in serum. Mean tumor volume/rat decreased in the tamoxifen treated group, but continued to increase in controls. The mRNA expression levels of SRC-1 (P = 0.035), SRC-2/TIF-2 (P = 0.002), HER-2 (P = 0.035) and HER-3 (P = 0.006) were significantly higher in tamoxifen treated tumors compared to controls, and the results were confirmed at the protein level using Western blotting. SRC-3/AIB1 protein was also higher in tamoxifen treated tumors. SRC-1 and SRC-2/TIF-2 mRNA levels were positively correlated with each other and with HER-2 (P ≤ 0.001), and the HER-2 mRNA expression correlated with the levels of the other three HER family members (P < 0.05). Furthermore, SRC-3/AIB1 and HER-4 were positively correlated with each other and Ets-2 (P < 0

  19. Role of 5-HT2C Receptors in Effects of Monoamine Releasers on Intracranial Self-Stimulation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Clayton T.; Banks, Matthew L.; Blough, Bruce E.; Negus, S. Stevens

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Many monoamine releasers are abused by humans and produce abuse-related facilitation of intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) in rats. Facilitation of ICSS in rats can be limited by monoamine releaser-induced serotonin (5-HT) release, but receptors that mediate 5-HT effects of monoamine releasers are unknown. Objectives Investigate whether 5-HT2C receptor activation is necessary for rate-decreasing effects produced in an ICSS procedure in rats by the 5-HT-selective monoamine releaser fenfluramine and the non-selective releasers napthylisopropylamine (PAL-287) and (+)-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine ((+)-MDMA). Methods Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats with electrodes implanted in the medial forebrain bundle were trained to lever press for brain stimulation under a “frequency-rate” ICSS procedure. Effectiveness of the 5-HT2C antagonist SB 242,084 was evaluated to block rate-decreasing effects produced by (1) the 5-HT2C agonist Ro 60-0175, (2) the 5-HT-selective releaser fenfluramine, and (3) the mixed-action dopamine (DA)/norepinephrine (NE)/5-HT releasers PAL-287 (1.0-5.6 mg/kg), and (+)-MDMA (1.0-3.2 mg/kg). For comparison, effectiveness of SB 242,084 to alter rate-decreasing effects of the kappa opioid receptor agonist U69,593 and rate-increasing effects of the DA>5-HT releaser amphetamine were also examined. Results SB 242,084 pretreatment blocked rate-decreasing effects of Ro 60-0175 and fenfluramine, but not the rate-decreasing effects of U69,593 or the rate-increasing effects of amphetamine. SB 242,084 blunted the rate-decreasing effects and enhanced expression of rate-increasing effects of PAL-287 and (+)-MDMA. Conclusions These data suggest that 5-HT2C receptor activation contributes to rate-decreasing effects that are produced by selective and mixed-action 5-HT releasers in rats and that may oppose and limit the expression of abuse-related ICSS facilitation by these compounds. PMID:26041338

  20. Mechanistic Model of Natural Killer Cell Proliferative Response to IL-15 Receptor Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yun M.; French, Anthony R.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes that provide early host defense against intracellular pathogens, such as viruses. Although NK cell development, homeostasis, and proliferation are regulated by IL-15, the influence of IL-15 receptor (IL-15R)-mediated signaling at the cellular level has not been quantitatively characterized. We developed a mathematical model to analyze the kinetic interactions that control the formation and localization of IL-15/IL-15R complexes. Our computational results demonstrated that IL-15/IL-15R complexes on the cell surface were a key determinant of the magnitude of the IL-15 proliferative signal and that IL-15R occupancy functioned as an effective surrogate measure of receptor signaling. Ligand binding and receptor internalization modulated IL-15R occupancy. Our work supports the hypothesis that the total number and duration of IL-15/IL-15R complexes on the cell surface crosses a quantitative threshold prior to the initiation of NK cell division. Furthermore, our model predicted that the upregulation of IL-15Rα on NK cells substantially increased IL-15R complex formation and accelerated the expansion of dividing NK cells with the greatest impact at low IL-15 concentrations. Model predictions of the threshold requirement for NK cell recruitment to the cell cycle and the subsequent exponential proliferation correlated well with experimental data. In summary, our modeling analysis provides quantitative insight into the regulation of NK cell proliferation at the receptor level and provides a framework for the development of IL-15 based immunotherapies to modulate NK cell proliferation. PMID:24068905

  1. NMDA receptors in the medial zona incerta stimulate luteinizing hormone and prolactin release.

    PubMed

    Bregonzio, Claudia; Moreno, Griselda N; Cabrera, Ricardo J; Donoso, Alfredo O

    2004-06-01

    1. The aim of the present work is to demonstrate the interaction between the glutamatergic/NMDA and dopaminergic systems in the medial zona incerta on the control of luteinizing hormone and prolactin secretion and the influence of reproductive hormones. 2. Proestrus and ovariectomized rats were primed with estrogen and progesterone to induce high or low levels of luteinizing hormone and prolactin. 2-Amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid, an NMDA receptor antagonist, and dopamine were injected in the medial zona incerta. Blood samples were withdrawn every hour between 1,600 and 2,000 hours or 2,200 hours via intracardiac catheter from conscious rats. Additional groups of animals injected with the NMDA receptor antagonist were killed 1 or 4 h after injection. Dopamine and its metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid were measured in different hypothalamic regions. 3. 2-Amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid blocked the ovulatory luteinizing hormone surge in proestrus rats. 2-Amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid also blocked the increase in luteinizing hormone induced by ovarian hormones in ovariectomized rats, an effect that was partially reversed by dopamine injection. Conversely, the increased release of luteinizing hormone and prolactin induced by dopamine was prevented by 2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid. We found that the NMDA antagonist injection decreased the dopaminergic activity--as evaluated by the 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid/dopamine ratio--in the medio basal hypothalamus and increased in the preoptic area. 4. Our results show an stimulatory role of NMDA receptors on the ovulatory luteinizing hormone release and on luteinizing hormone release induced by sexual hormones and demonstrate that the stimulatory effect of dopamine on luteinizing hormone and prolactin is mediated by the NMDA receptors. These results suggest a close interaction between the glutamatergic and dopaminergic incertohypothalamic systems on the control of luteinizing hormone and prolactin release

  2. Photoaffinity labelling of MSH receptors on Anolis melanophores: irradiation technique and MSH photolabels for irreversible stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, A.N.

    1984-01-01

    Excised dorsal skin of Anolis carolinensis was exposed to high intensity UV-irradiation in the presence of different photoreactive alpha-MSH derivatives. The resulting covalent binding of the hormone to its receptor induced irreversible pigment dispersion. The duration of the longlasting response depended on the type and length of irradiation; it was maximal after two 5 min irradiation phases with a light intensity of approximately 180 mW/cm/sup 2/ and a spectrum from 310 to 550 nm, fresh hormone being added after the first phase. (N alpha-(4-Azidophenylacetyl-serine1)-alpha-MSH (I), (2'-(2-nitro-4-azidophenylsulphenyl)-tryptophan/sub 9/)-alpha-MSH (II) and (p-azidophenylalanine/sub 13/)-alpha-MSH (III) all inserted into the receptor to about the same extent, as judged from the persistence of the longlasting signal. In contrast, (D-alanine1, p-azidophenylalanin2/sub 2/, norvaline/sub 4/)-alpha-MSH (IV) and (N alpha-(4-azidophenylacetyl)-serine1, leucine/sub 9/)-alpha-MSH (V) gave much less insertion and (leucine/sub 9/, p-azidophenylalanine/sub 13/)-alpha-MSH (VI) hardly any insertion when applied in the same relative excess (5-fold the concentration inducing a maximal response). Covalent attachment of the cleavable photolabel (N alpha-(4-azidophenyl)-1, 3'-dithio-propionyl-serine1)-alpha-MSH (VII) and subsequent washing of the skin in buffer containing 1% beta-mercaptoethanol released the peptide from the receptor. Insertion of the C-terminal photolabel (p-azidophenylalanine/sub 13/)-alpha-MSH was reduced by the weak antagonist H-Phe-Ala-Trp-Gly-Gly-Pro-Val-NH/sub 2/. These experiments prove that hormone receptors can be covalently labelled in tissue with very limited light transparency.

  3. [Platelets "Toll-like receptor" engagement stimulates the release of immunomodulating molecules].

    PubMed

    Cognasse, F; Hamzeh-Cognasse, H; Garraud, O

    2008-09-01

    Platelets are nonnucleated cellular elements that play a role in the process of haemostasis, and also in various ways in innate immunity and in inflammation. Platelets also contain numerous secretory products and can exert critical roles in several aspects of haemostasis. In addition, they house and secrete a variety of cytokines, chemokines and associated molecules which behave as ligands for receptors/counterparts displayed by endothelial cells lining tissue vessels and most leukocyte subsets. These latter studies show that platelets have an important role in innate as well as adaptive immunity; thus platelets can take part in an immune directive response. Moreover, platelets display receptors for several types of cytokines/chemokines along with FcgammaRII receptors. Finally, platelets not only express a variety of Toll-like receptors, with recently identified functions or not as-yet fully identified, but have also been demonstrated to express the key tandem pair of inflammatory and antigen presentation molecules (CD40 and CD40-ligand/CD154), this latter function making them the major purveyors of soluble CD40L in the plasma. It appears that platelets may be regarded as one of the neglected components of immune cell regulators, and platelets contribute to some interesting aspects in bridging innate and adaptive immunity. We propose that platelets discriminate danger signals and adapt the subsequent responses, with polarized cytokine secretion. Platelets may recognize several types of infectious pathogens and limit microbial colonization by sequestering these pathogens and releasing immunomodulatory factors. This review allows us to re-explore indications that platelets exert direct anti-infection immunity and we will present experimentally-driven arguments in favour of a role of platelet TLR in regulating certain immune activities.

  4. Stimulation of microglial metabotropic glutamate receptor mGlu2 triggers tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced neurotoxicity in concert with microglial-derived Fas ligand.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Deanna L; Jones, Fleur; Kubota, Eva S F Chen Seho; Pocock, Jennifer M

    2005-03-16

    Activated microglia may be detrimental to neuronal survival in a number of neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, strategies that reduce microglial neurotoxicity may have therapeutic benefit. Stimulation of group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors on rat primary microglia with the specific group II agonist 2S,2'R,3'R-2-(2',3'-dicarboxy-cyclopropyl)glycine for 24 h induced microglial activation and resulted in a neurotoxic microglial phenotype. These effects were attributable to preferential mGlu2 stimulation, because N-acetyl-L-aspartyl-L-glutamate, a specific mGlu3 agonist, did not induce microglial activation or neurotoxicity. Stimulation of microglial mGlu2 but not mGlu3 induced caspase-3 activation in cerebellar granule neurons in culture, using microglial-conditioned media as well as cocultures. Stimulation of microglial mGlu2 induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) release, which contributed to microglial neurotoxicity mediated via neuronal TNF receptor 1 and caspase-3 activation. Stimulation of microglial group I or III mGlu receptors did not induce TNFalpha release. TNFalpha was only neurotoxic in the presence of microglia or microglial-conditioned medium. The toxicity of TNFalpha could be prevented by coexposure of neurons to conditioned medium from microglia stimulated by the specific group III agonist L-2-amino-4-phosphono-butyric acid. The neurotoxicity of TNFalpha derived from mGlu2-stimulated microglia was potentiated by microglial-derived Fas ligand (FasL), the death receptor ligand. FasL was constitutively expressed in microglia and shed after mGlu2 stimulation. Our data suggest that selective and inverse modulation of microglial mGlu2 and mGlu3 may prove a therapeutic target in neuroinflammatory diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis. PMID:15772355

  5. RNA mediated toll-like receptor stimulation in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Dalpke, Alexander H.; Helm, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Besides their well known functions in storage and translation of information nucleic acids have emerged as a target of pattern recognition receptors that drive activation of innate immunity. Due to the paucity of building block monomers used in nucleic acids, discrimination of host and microbial nucleic acids as a means of self/foreign discrimination is a complicated task. Pattern recognition receptors rely on discrimination by sequence, structural features and spatial compartmentalization to differentiate microbial derived nucleic acids from host ones. Microbial nucleic acid detection is important for the sensing of infectious danger and initiating an immune response to microbial attack. Failures in the underlying recognitions systems can have severe consequences: thus, inefficient recognition of microbial nucleic acids may increase susceptibility to infectious diseases. On the other hand, excessive immune responses as a result of failed self/foreign discrimination are associated with autoimmune diseases. This review gives a general overview over the underlying concepts of nucleic acid sensing by Toll-like receptors. Within this general framework, we focus on bacterial RNA and synthetic RNA oligomers. PMID:22617878

  6. Action of adenosine receptor antagonists on the cardiovascular response to defence area stimulation in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    St Lambert, J H; Dawid-Milner, M S; Silva-Carvalho, L; Spyer, K M

    1994-01-01

    1. The action of adenosine in the mediation of the cardiovascular changes associated with the defence reaction has been investigated in the rat using two A1 receptor antagonists. 2. Cumulative doses of 1,3 dipropyl-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX) (0.3-3 mg kg-1) and ethanol (0.03-0.25 ml) and bolus doses of DPCPX (3 mg kg-1) and 8-sulphophenyltheophylline (8-SPT) (20 mg kg-1) were given into alpha-chloralose, paralysed and artificially ventilated rats. Recordings were made of arterial blood pressure and heart rate. 3. Ethanol, the vehicle for DPCPX, failed to modify the magnitude of the defence response; however, cumulative doses of DPCPX produced a dose-dependent decrease in the HDA (hypothalamic defence area)-evoked increase in arterial blood pressure, accompanied by a similar fall in the magnitude of the evoked heart rate response. 4. The evoked rise in arterial blood pressure was reduced significantly by intravenous injection of DPCPX (3 mg kg-1) but not 8-SPT (20 mg kg-1), a purely peripherally acting adenosine antagonist. 5. These results suggest that adenosine acting at A1 receptors located in the central nervous system, is involved in the HDA-evoked pressor response. Whilst the site of action of the A1 receptors is not known, possible locations are discussed. PMID:7812606

  7. Serum Amyloid A Stimulates PKR Expression and HMGB1 Release Possibly through TLR4/RAGE Receptors.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Zhu, Shu; Li, Jianhua; D'Amore, Jason; D'Angelo, John; Yang, Huan; Wang, Ping; Tracey, Kevin J; Wang, Haichao

    2015-06-02

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) proteins are known to be surrogate markers of sepsis, but their pathogenic roles remain poorly elucidated. Here we provide evidence to support a possible role of SAA as a pathogenic mediator of lethal sepsis. In a subset of septic patients for which serum high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) levels paralleled the clinical scores, some anti-HMGB1 antibodies detected a 12-kDa protein belonging to the SAA family. In contrast to the most abundant SAA1, human SAA induced double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase R (PKR) expression and HMGB1 release in the wild-type, but not toll-like receptor 4/receptor for advanced glycation end products (TLR4/RAGE)-deficient, macrophages. Pharmacological inhibition of PKR phosphorylation blocked SAA-induced HMGB1 release, suggesting an important role of PKR in SAA-induced HMGB1 release. In animal models of lethal endotoxemia and sepsis, recombinant SAA exacerbated endotoxemic lethality, whereas SAA-neutralizing immunoglobulins G (IgGs) significantly improved animal survival. Collectively, these findings have suggested SAA as an important mediator of inflammatory diseases. Highlights of this study include: human SAA is possibly only expressed in a subset of septic patients; SAA induces HMGB1 release via TLR4 and RAGE receptors; SAA supplementation worsens the outcome of lethal endotoxemia; whereas SAA-neutralizing antibodies confer protection against lethal endotoxemia and sepsis.

  8. IGF-I, IGF-II, and Insulin Stimulate Different Gene Expression Responses through Binding to the IGF-I Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Versteyhe, Soetkin; Klaproth, Birgit; Borup, Rehannah; Palsgaard, Jane; Jensen, Maja; Gray, Steven G.; De Meyts, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Insulin and the insulin-like growth factors (IGF)-I and -II are closely related peptides important for regulation of metabolism, growth, differentiation, and development. The IGFs exert their main effects through the IGF-I receptor. Although the insulin receptor is the main physiological receptor for insulin, this peptide hormone can also bind at higher concentrations to the IGF-I receptor and exert effects through it. We used microarray gene expression profiling to investigate the gene expression regulated by IGF-I, IGF-II, and insulin after stimulation of the IGF-I receptor. Fibroblasts from mice, knockout for IGF-II and the IGF-II/cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor, and expressing functional IGF-I but no insulin receptors, were stimulated for 4 h with equipotent saturating concentrations of insulin, IGF-I, and IGF-II. Each ligand specifically regulated a group of transcripts that was not regulated by the other two ligands. Many of the functions and pathways these regulated genes were involved in, were consistent with the known biological effects of these ligands. The differences in gene expression might therefore account for some of the different biological effects of insulin, IGF-I, and IGF-II. This work adds to the evidence that not only the affinity of a ligand determines its biological response, but also its nature, even through the same receptor. PMID:23950756

  9. Chondrocyte IGF-1 receptor expression and responsiveness to IGF-1 stimulation in mouse articular cartilage during various phases of experimentally induced arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Verschure, P J; van Marle, J; Joosten, L A; van den Berg, W B

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the distribution of insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) receptors and the biological response to IGF-1 stimulation in articular cartilage of normal mouse knee joints and arthritic joints taken at various stages of experimentally induced arthritis. METHODS--In situ IGF-1 receptor expression and responsiveness to IGF-1 stimulation were examined in murine articular cartilage at different phases in two models of experimentally induced arthritis. IGF-1 receptor expression was visualised in joint sections with the use of anti-IGF-1 receptor antibodies and quantified by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Chondrocyte proteoglycan (PG) synthesis was measured by incorporation of 35S-sulphate. RESULTS--In control cartilage, the majority of IGF-1 receptors were found on chondrocytes localised in the middle and deeper zones of the cartilage, whereas receptor expression in surface zone chondrocytes was very low. During culture of normal articular cartilage, IGF-1 was able to maintain chondrocyte PG synthesis at the in vivo level. Concurrently with the development of arthritis, cartilage lost its capacity to react to IGF-1, but IGF-1 stimulation recovered when the inflammatory response waned. Shortly after induction of arthritis, IGF-1 receptor expression initially declined, but it had returned to normal levels by day 1 and remained increased thereafter. CONCLUSION--The distribution of IGF-1 receptor expression in the different zones of normal articular cartilage reflects IGF-1 stimulation and metabolic activity of chondrocytes in these layers. This correlation is disturbed in arthritic cartilage, suggesting inadequate or overruled signalling. Images PMID:7677441

  10. Microglia overexpressing the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor are neuroprotective in a microglial-hippocampal organotypic coculture system.

    PubMed

    Mitrasinovic, Olivera M; Grattan, Alicia; Robinson, Christopher C; Lapustea, Nicolae B; Poon, Clara; Ryan, Heather; Phong, Connie; Murphy, Greer M

    2005-04-27

    Microglia with increased expression of the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (M-CSFR; c-fms) are found surrounding plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in mouse models for AD and after ischemic or traumatic brain injury. Increased expression of M-CSFR causes microglia to adopt an activated state that results in proliferation, release of cytokines, and enhanced phagocytosis. To determine whether M-CSFR-induced microglial activation affects neuronal survival, we assembled a coculture system consisting of BV-2 microglia transfected to overexpress the M-CSFR and hippocampal organotypic slices treated with NMDA. Twenty-four hours after assembly of the coculture, microglia overexpressing M-CSFR proliferated at a higher rate than nontransfected control cells and exhibited enhanced migration toward NMDA-injured hippocampal cultures. Surprisingly, coculture with c-fms-transfected microglia resulted in a dramatic reduction in NMDA-induced neurotoxicity. Similar results were observed when cocultures were treated with the teratogen cyclophosphamide. Biolistic overexpression of M-CSFR on microglia endogenous to the organotypic culture also rescued neurons from excitotoxicity. Furthermore, c-fms-transfected microglia increased neuronal expression of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), the M-CSFR, and neurotrophin receptors in the NMDA-treated slices, as determined with laser capture microdissection. In the coculture system, direct contact between the exogenous microglia and the slice was necessary for neuroprotection. Finally, blocking expression of the M-CSF ligand by exogenous c-fms-transfected microglia with a hammerhead ribozyme compromised their neuroprotective properties. These results demonstrate a protective role for microglia overexpressing M-CSFR in our coculture system and suggest under certain circumstances, activated microglia can help rather than harm neurons subjected to excitotoxic and teratogen-induced injury.

  11. Long-lasting beneficial effects of central serotonin receptor 7 stimulation in female mice modeling Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, Bianca; Chiodi, Valentina; Adriani, Walter; Lacivita, Enza; Mallozzi, Cinzia; Leopoldo, Marcello; Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Fuso, Andrea; Laviola, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by severe behavioral and physiological symptoms. Mutations in the methyl CpG binding protein 2 gene (MECP2) cause more than 95% of classic cases, and currently there is no cure for this devastating disorder. Recently we have demonstrated that specific behavioral and brain molecular alterations can be rescued in MeCP2-308 male mice, a RTT mouse model, by pharmacological stimulation of the brain serotonin receptor 7 (5-HT7R). This member of the serotonin receptor family-crucially involved in the regulation of brain structural plasticity and cognitive processes-can be stimulated by systemic repeated treatment with LP-211, a brain-penetrant selective 5-HT7R agonist. The present study extends previous findings by demonstrating that the LP-211 treatment (0.25 mg/kg, once per day for 7 days) rescues RTT-related phenotypic alterations, motor coordination (Dowel test), spatial reference memory (Barnes maze test) and synaptic plasticity (hippocampal long-term-potentiation) in MeCP2-308 heterozygous female mice, the genetic and hormonal milieu that resembles that of RTT patients. LP-211 also restores the activation of the ribosomal protein (rp) S6, the downstream target of mTOR and S6 kinase, in the hippocampus of RTT female mice. Notably, the beneficial effects on neurobehavioral and molecular parameters of a seven-day long treatment with LP-211 were evident up to 2 months after the last injection, thus suggesting long-lasting effects on RTT-related impairments. Taken together with our previous study, these results provide compelling preclinical evidence of the potential therapeutic value for RTT of a pharmacological approach targeting the brain 5-HT7R.

  12. Long-lasting beneficial effects of central serotonin receptor 7 stimulation in female mice modeling Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    De Filippis, Bianca; Chiodi, Valentina; Adriani, Walter; Lacivita, Enza; Mallozzi, Cinzia; Leopoldo, Marcello; Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Fuso, Andrea; Laviola, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by severe behavioral and physiological symptoms. Mutations in the methyl CpG binding protein 2 gene (MECP2) cause more than 95% of classic cases, and currently there is no cure for this devastating disorder. Recently we have demonstrated that specific behavioral and brain molecular alterations can be rescued in MeCP2-308 male mice, a RTT mouse model, by pharmacological stimulation of the brain serotonin receptor 7 (5-HT7R). This member of the serotonin receptor family—crucially involved in the regulation of brain structural plasticity and cognitive processes—can be stimulated by systemic repeated treatment with LP-211, a brain-penetrant selective 5-HT7R agonist. The present study extends previous findings by demonstrating that the LP-211 treatment (0.25 mg/kg, once per day for 7 days) rescues RTT-related phenotypic alterations, motor coordination (Dowel test), spatial reference memory (Barnes maze test) and synaptic plasticity (hippocampal long-term-potentiation) in MeCP2-308 heterozygous female mice, the genetic and hormonal milieu that resembles that of RTT patients. LP-211 also restores the activation of the ribosomal protein (rp) S6, the downstream target of mTOR and S6 kinase, in the hippocampus of RTT female mice. Notably, the beneficial effects on neurobehavioral and molecular parameters of a seven-day long treatment with LP-211 were evident up to 2 months after the last injection, thus suggesting long-lasting effects on RTT-related impairments. Taken together with our previous study, these results provide compelling preclinical evidence of the potential therapeutic value for RTT of a pharmacological approach targeting the brain 5-HT7R. PMID:25926782

  13. Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), transforming growth factor-β, hyaluronan (HA), and receptor for HA-mediated motility (RHAMM) are required for surfactant protein A-stimulated macrophage chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Foley, Joseph P; Lam, David; Jiang, Hongmei; Liao, Jie; Cheong, Naeun; McDevitt, Theresa M; Zaman, Aisha; Wright, Jo Rae; Savani, Rashmin C

    2012-10-26

    The innate immune system protects the host from bacterial and viral invasion. Surfactant protein A (SPA), a lung-specific collectin, stimulates macrophage chemotaxis. However, the mechanisms regulating this function are unknown. Hyaluronan (HA) and its receptors RHAMM (receptor for HA-mediated motility, CD168) and CD44 also regulate cell migration and inflammation. We therefore examined the role of HA, RHAMM, and CD44 in SPA-stimulated macrophage chemotaxis. Using antibody blockade and murine macrophages, SPA-stimulated macrophage chemotaxis was dependent on TLR2 but not the other SPA receptors examined. Anti-TLR2 blocked SPA-induced production of TGFβ. In turn, TGFβ1-stimulated chemotaxis was inhibited by HA-binding peptide and anti-RHAMM antibody but not anti-TLR2 antibody. Macrophages from TLR2(-/-) mice failed to migrate in response to SPA but responded normally to TGFβ1 and HA, effects that were blocked by anti-RHAMM antibody. Macrophages from WT and CD44(-/-) mice had similar responses to SPA, whereas those from RHAMM(-/-) mice had decreased chemotaxis to SPA, TGFβ1, and HA. In primary macrophages, SPA-stimulated TGFβ production was dependent on TLR2, JNK, and ERK but not p38. Pam3Cys, a specific TLR2 agonist, stimulated phosphorylation of JNK, ERK, and p38, but only JNK and ERK inhibition blocked Pam3Cys-stimulated chemotaxis. We have uncovered a novel pathway for SPA-stimulated macrophage chemotaxis where SPA stimulation via TLR2 drives JNK- and ERK-dependent TGFβ production. TGFβ1, in turn, stimulates macrophage chemotaxis in a RHAMM and HA-dependent manner. These findings are highly relevant to the regulation of innate immune responses by SPA with key roles for specific components of the extracellular matrix.

  14. Distinctive Structure of the EphA3/Ephrin-A5 Complex Reveals a Dual Mode of Eph Receptor Interaction for Ephrin-A5

    PubMed Central

    Forse, Garry Jason; Uson, Maria Loressa; Nasertorabi, Fariborz; Kolatkar, Anand; Lamberto, Ilaria; Pasquale, Elena Bianca; Kuhn, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Eph receptor tyrosine kinase/ephrin ligand system regulates a wide spectrum of physiological processes, while its dysregulation has been implicated in cancer progression. The human EphA3 receptor is widely upregulated in the tumor microenvironment and is highly expressed in some types of cancer cells. Furthermore, EphA3 is among the most highly mutated genes in lung cancer and it is also frequently mutated in other cancers. We report the structure of the ligand-binding domain of the EphA3 receptor in complex with its preferred ligand, ephrin-A5. The structure of the complex reveals a pronounced tilt of the ephrin-A5 ligand compared to its orientation when bound to the EphA2 and EphB2 receptors and similar to its orientation when bound to EphA4. This tilt brings an additional area of ephrin-A5 into contact with regions of EphA3 outside the ephrin-binding pocket thereby enlarging the size of the interface, which is consistent with the high binding affinity of ephrin-A5 for EphA3. This large variation in the tilt of ephrin-A5 bound to different Eph receptors has not been previously observed for other ephrins. PMID:25993310

  15. Mitigation of Radiation Injury by Selective Stimulation of the LPA2 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Gyöngyi N.; Lee, Sue-Chin; Fells, James; Liu, Jiangxiong; Valentine, William J.; Fujiwara, Yuko; Emmons-Thompson, Karin; Yates, Charles R.; Sümegi, Balázs; Tigyi, Gabor

    2012-01-01

    Due to its antiapoptotic action, derivatives of the lipid mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) provide potential therapeutic utility in diseases associated with programmed cell death. Apoptosis is one of the major pathophysiological processes elicited by radiation injury to the organism. Consequently, therapeutic explorations applying compounds that mimic the antiapoptotic action of LPA have begun. Here we present a brief account of our decade-long drug discovery effort aimed at developing LPA mimics with a special focus on specific agonists of the LPA2 receptor subtype, which was found to be highly effective in protecting cells from apoptosis. We describe new evidence that 2-((3-(1,3-dioxo-1H-benzo[de]isoquinolin-2(3H)-yl)propyl)thio)benzoic acid (GRI977143), a prototypic nonlipid agonist specific to the LPA2 receptor subtype, rescues apoptotically condemned cells in vitro and in vivo from injury caused by high-dose γ-irradiation. GRI977143 shows the features of a radiomitigator because it is effective in rescuing the lives of mice from deadly levels of radiation when administered 24 h after radiation exposure. Our findings suggest that by specifically activating LPA2 receptors GRI977143 activates the ERK1/2 prosurvival pathway, effectively reduces Bax translocation to the mitochondrion, attenuates the activation of initiator and effector caspases, reduces DNA fragmentation, and inhibits PARP-1 cleavage associated with γ-irradiation-induced apoptosis. GRI977143 also inhibits bystander apoptosis elicited by soluble proapoptotic mediators produced by irradiated cells. Thus, GRI977143 can serve as a prototype scaffold for lead optimization paving the way to more potent analogs amenable for therapeutic exploration. PMID:23127512

  16. Electrophoretic purification of radioiodinated follicle-stimulating hormone for radioligand receptor assay and radioimmunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Schneyer, A.L.; Sluss, P.M.; Bosukonda, D.; Reichert, L.E. Jr.

    1986-10-01

    A method is described for electrophoretic purification of (/sup 125/I)human (h) FSH after radioiodination that improves radioligand binding to FSH membrane receptors. Lactoperoxidase-iodinated hFSH was separated from reaction products by electrophoresis on 7.5% polyacrylamide tube gels (PAGE). Material eluted from 3-mm gel slices was analyzed for incorporation of /sup 125/I and binding to antibody (RIA) or receptor (RRA), and by sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE for protein composition. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE analysis of individual PAGE fractions demonstrated that iodinated proteins, both higher and lower in apparent mol wt than intact FSH, were separated by PAGE, but not by gel filtration chromatography (Sephadex G-25). PAGE purification of radioligand resulted in significantly greater (compared to gel filtration) RRA sensitivity and specificity. Maximum binding of PAGE-purified (/sup 125/I)hFSH to excess calf tests membrane receptors was 45%, with a specific activity of approximately 26 microCi/micrograms, as determined by the method of self-displacement. Maximum binding to excess hFSH antisera (NIH anti-hFSH 4) was 80-85%. This allowed a useful final dilution of 1:120,000, thereby facilitating development of a sensitive and specific RIA with this antiserum. These data indicate that PAGE separation of intact (/sup 125/I)hFSH from other iodinated proteins results in improved radioligand binding, assay sensitivity, and assay specificity. In addition, PAGE-purified lactoperoxidase-iodinated hFSH is suitable for use in both RIA and RRA.

  17. Dimethyl fumarate activates the prostaglandin EP2 receptor and stimulates cAMP signaling in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Sarah E; Kerns, Amelia R; Tsang, Catherine; Tsang, Vivian; Bourdette, Dennis; Salinthone, Sonemany

    2016-06-17

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) was recently approved by the FDA for the treatment of relapsing remitting MS. The pathology of MS is a result of both immune dysregulation and oxidative stress induced damage, and DMF is believed to have therapeutic effects on both of these processes. However, the mechanisms of action of DMF are not fully understood. To determine if DMF is able to activate signaling cascades that affect immune dysregulation, we treated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with DMF. We discovered that DMF stimulates cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production after 1 min treatment in vitro. cAMP is a small molecule second messenger that has been shown to modulate immune response. Using pharmacological inhibitors, we determined that adenylyl cyclase mediates DMF induced cAMP production; DMF activated the prostaglandin EP2 receptor to produce cAMP. This response was not due to increased endogenous production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), but was enhanced by addition of exogenous PGE2. Furthermore, we determined that the bioactive metabolite of DMF, monomethyl fumarate (MMF), also stimulates cAMP production. These novel findings suggest that DMF may provide protection against MS by inhibiting immune cell function via the cAMP signaling pathway. PMID:27157139

  18. Mutations in the colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) gene cause hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids.

    PubMed

    Rademakers, Rosa; Baker, Matt; Nicholson, Alexandra M; Rutherford, Nicola J; Finch, NiCole; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra; Lash, Jennifer; Wider, Christian; Wojtas, Aleksandra; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Adamson, Jennifer; Kouri, Naomi; Sundal, Christina; Shuster, Elizabeth A; Aasly, Jan; MacKenzie, James; Roeber, Sigrun; Kretzschmar, Hans A; Boeve, Bradley F; Knopman, David S; Petersen, Ronald C; Cairns, Nigel J; Ghetti, Bernardino; Spina, Salvatore; Garbern, James; Tselis, Alexandros C; Uitti, Ryan; Das, Pritam; Van Gerpen, Jay A; Meschia, James F; Levy, Shawn; Broderick, Daniel F; Graff-Radford, Neill; Ross, Owen A; Miller, Bradley B; Swerdlow, Russell H; Dickson, Dennis W; Wszolek, Zbigniew K

    2011-12-25

    Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS) is an autosomal-dominant central nervous system white-matter disease with variable clinical presentations, including personality and behavioral changes, dementia, depression, parkinsonism, seizures and other phenotypes. We combined genome-wide linkage analysis with exome sequencing and identified 14 different mutations affecting the tyrosine kinase domain of the colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (encoded by CSF1R) in 14 families with HDLS. In one kindred, we confirmed the de novo occurrence of the mutation. Follow-up sequencing identified an additional CSF1R mutation in an individual diagnosed with corticobasal syndrome. In vitro, CSF-1 stimulation resulted in rapid autophosphorylation of selected tyrosine residues in the kinase domain of wild-type but not mutant CSF1R, suggesting that HDLS may result from partial loss of CSF1R function. As CSF1R is a crucial mediator of microglial proliferation and differentiation in the brain, our findings suggest an important role for microglial dysfunction in HDLS pathogenesis.

  19. Interaction of urokinase A chain with the receptor of human keratinocytes stimulates release of urokinase-like plasminogen activator

    SciTech Connect

    Fibbi, G.; Magnelli, L.; Pucci, M.; Del Rosso, M. )

    1990-03-01

    On the basis of a fibrinolytic assay with {sup 125}I-fibrin, zymography, and immunoprobing with anti-human urokinase antibody, the authors have observed that the in vitro established NCTC human keratinocyte cell line releases into the culture medium a 54,000-Da plasminogen activator which is indistinguishable from human urokinase. Only the early release following the washing of keratinocyte monolayers is accounted for by secretion of preformed enzyme, while late secretory events require the de novo synthesis of urokinase. The released enzyme can interact by autocriny with its own receptor present on keratinocytes. The addition to the keratinocyte culture medium of the urokinase A chain can stimulate a concentration-dependent urokinase oversecretion, which is not paralleled by oversecretion of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Since stimulation of urokinase production can be obtained by an A chain concentration which was previously shown to be efficient in inducing keratinocyte mobilization in an in vitro migration model system, they hypothesize that this mechanism may be important in vivo during the process of wound repair.

  20. Fluoride Exposure, Follicle Stimulating Hormone Receptor Gene Polymorphism and Hypothalamus-pituitary-ovarian Axis Hormones in Chinese Women.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming Xu; Zhou, Guo Yu; Zhu, Jing Yuan; Gong, Biao; Hou, Jia Xiang; Zhou, Tong; Duan, Li Ju; Ding, Zhong; Cui, Liu Xin; Ba, Yue

    2015-09-01

    The effects of fluoride exposure on the functions of reproductive and endocrine systems have attracted widespread attention in academic circle nowadays. However, it is unclear whether the gene-environment interaction may modify the secretion and activity of hypothalamus-pituitary- ovarian (HPO) axis hormones. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore the influence of fluoride exposure and follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene polymorphism on reproductive hormones in Chinese women. A cross sectional study was conducted in seven villages of Henan Province, China during 2010-2011. A total of 679 women aged 18-48 years were recruited through cluster sampling and divided into three groups, i.e. endemic fluorosis group (EFG), defluoridation project group (DFPG), and control group (CG) based on the local fluoride concentration in drinking water. The serum levels of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and estradiol (E2) were determined respectively and the FSHR polymorphism was detected by real time PCR assay. The results provided the preliminary evidence indicating the gene-environment interaction on HPO axis hormones in women.

  1. Fluoride Exposure, Follicle Stimulating Hormone Receptor Gene Polymorphism and Hypothalamus-pituitary-ovarian Axis Hormones in Chinese Women.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming Xu; Zhou, Guo Yu; Zhu, Jing Yuan; Gong, Biao; Hou, Jia Xiang; Zhou, Tong; Duan, Li Ju; Ding, Zhong; Cui, Liu Xin; Ba, Yue

    2015-09-01

    The effects of fluoride exposure on the functions of reproductive and endocrine systems have attracted widespread attention in academic circle nowadays. However, it is unclear whether the gene-environment interaction may modify the secretion and activity of hypothalamus-pituitary- ovarian (HPO) axis hormones. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore the influence of fluoride exposure and follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene polymorphism on reproductive hormones in Chinese women. A cross sectional study was conducted in seven villages of Henan Province, China during 2010-2011. A total of 679 women aged 18-48 years were recruited through cluster sampling and divided into three groups, i.e. endemic fluorosis group (EFG), defluoridation project group (DFPG), and control group (CG) based on the local fluoride concentration in drinking water. The serum levels of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and estradiol (E2) were determined respectively and the FSHR polymorphism was detected by real time PCR assay. The results provided the preliminary evidence indicating the gene-environment interaction on HPO axis hormones in women. PMID:26464260

  2. Activation of AMPA Receptors Mediates the Antidepressant Action of Deep Brain Stimulation of the Infralimbic Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Sánchez, Laura; Castañé, Anna; Pérez-Caballero, Laura; Grifoll-Escoda, Marc; López-Gil, Xavier; Campa, Leticia; Galofré, Mireia; Berrocoso, Esther; Adell, Albert

    2016-06-01

    Although deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been used with success in treatment-resistant depression, little is known about its mechanism of action. We examined the antidepressant-like activity of short (1 h) DBS applied to the infralimbic prefrontal cortex in the forced swim test (FST) and the novelty-suppressed feeding test (NSFT). We also used in vivo microdialysis to evaluate the release of glutamate, γ-aminobutyric acid, serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline in the prefrontal cortex and c-Fos immunohistochemistry to determine the brain regions activated by DBS. One hour of DBS of the infralimbic prefrontal cortex has antidepressant-like effects in FST and NSFT, and increases prefrontal efflux of glutamate, which would activate AMPA receptors (AMPARs). This effect is specific of the infralimbic area since it is not observed after DBS of the prelimbic subregion. The activation of prefrontal AMPARs would result in a stimulation of prefrontal output to the brainstem, thus increasing serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline in the prefrontal cortex. Further, the activation of prefrontal AMPARs is necessary and sufficient condition for the antidepressant response of 1 h DBS.

  3. T cell receptor V gene usage by human T cells stimulated with the superantigen streptococcal M protein

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    M proteins, the major virulence factor of group A streptococci, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and other streptococcal related autoimmune diseases. A 22-kD fragment of M type 5 protein is a potent stimulant of human T cells and has recently been shown by our laboratory to belong to the newly designated family of superantigens. Using flow cytometry and the polymerase chain reaction, we demonstrate that this molecule reacts with subsets of human T cells expressing specific T cell receptor (TCR) V beta elements, namely V beta 2, 4, and 8. We employed similar techniques to analyze the TCR V alpha usage of pep M5-stimulated T cells. These studies revealed that the preferential usage of particular V alpha elements is not specific for the superantigen; rather, it may reflect the repertoire of the individual being tested. The expansion of a large number of T cells bearing specific TCR V beta sequences by M protein may account for its role in mediating the pathogenesis of post- streptococcal diseases. Furthermore, the preferential usage of TCR V alpha elements in certain individuals may be an important factor that predisposes them to development of self-reactivity. PMID:1711564

  4. GABAB receptor-mediated, layer-specific synaptic plasticity reorganizes gamma-frequency neocortical response to stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ainsworth, Matthew; Lee, Shane; Kaiser, Marcus; Simonotto, Jennifer; Kopell, Nancy J.

    2016-01-01

    Repeated presentations of sensory stimuli generate transient gamma-frequency (30–80 Hz) responses in neocortex that show plasticity in a task-dependent manner. Complex relationships between individual neuronal outputs and the mean, local field potential (population activity) accompany these changes, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms responsible. Here we show that transient stimulation of input layer 4 sufficient to generate gamma oscillations induced two different, lamina-specific plastic processes that correlated with lamina-specific changes in responses to further, repeated stimulation: Unit rates and recruitment showed overall enhancement in supragranular layers and suppression in infragranular layers associated with excitatory or inhibitory synaptic potentiation onto principal cells, respectively. Both synaptic processes were critically dependent on activation of GABAB receptors and, together, appeared to temporally segregate the cortical representation. These data suggest that adaptation to repetitive sensory input dramatically alters the spatiotemporal properties of the neocortical response in a manner that may both refine and minimize cortical output simultaneously. PMID:27118845

  5. Sterol O-Acyltransferase 2-Driven Cholesterol Esterification Opposes Liver X Receptor-Stimulated Fecal Neutral Sterol Loss.

    PubMed

    Warrier, Manya; Zhang, Jun; Bura, Kanwardeep; Kelley, Kathryn; Wilson, Martha D; Rudel, Lawrence L; Brown, J Mark

    2016-02-01

    Statin drugs have proven a successful and relatively safe therapy for the treatment of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, even with the substantial low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol lowering achieved with statin treatment, CVD remains the top cause of death in developed countries. Selective inhibitors of the cholesterol esterifying enzyme sterol-O acyltransferase 2 (SOAT2) hold great promise as effective CVD therapeutics. In mouse models, previous work has demonstrated that either antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) or small molecule inhibitors of SOAT2 can effectively reduce CVD progression, and even promote regression of established CVD. Although it is well known that SOAT2-driven cholesterol esterification can alter both the packaging and retention of atherogenic apoB-containing lipoproteins, here we set out to determine whether SOAT2-driven cholesterol esterification can also impact basal and liver X receptor (LXR)-stimulated fecal neutral sterol loss. These studies demonstrate that SOAT2 is a negative regulator of LXR-stimulated fecal neutral sterol loss in mice. PMID:26729489

  6. Reflex respiratory and cardiovascular effects of stimulation of receptors in the nose of the dog.

    PubMed

    James, J E; De Burgh Daly, M

    1972-02-01

    1. In forty-one out of forty-seven dogs under chloralose-urethane or Nembutal anaesthesia, mechanical stimulation of the nasal mucous membrane caused a reduction or inhibition of respiration, bradycardia, variable changes of arterial blood pressure, and a small rise in venous pressure.2. Simultaneous measurements of arterial and venous pressures, and also of blood flow in various arteries by means of an electromagnetic flowmeter indicate that the calculated vascular resistance increases in the intact limb, muscle, and skin, and the vascular beds of the vertebral, superior mesenteric, renal and splenic arteries. No changes in vascular resistance occur in the common carotid circulation.3. Evidence is presented that the increase in vascular resistance is due to vasoconstriction, and occurs in the absence of changes in pulmonary ventilation.4. Stimulation of the nasal mucous membrane causes a reduction in volume of the spleen.5. The respiratory and cardiovascular responses are reflex in nature, being abolished by the application of a local anaesthetic to the nose or by combined division of the maxillary and ethmoidal branches of the trigeminal nerves. The cardiac response is mediated largely by the vagus nerves, and the vascular responses by sympathetic adrenergic fibres.6. Cessation of the stimulus to the nose not infrequently results in the following temporary after-effects: hyperventilation, tachycardia, hypertension, and vasodilatation in the intact limb and in muscle.

  7. Magnetic Field-Induced T Cell Receptor Clustering by Nanoparticles Enhances T Cell Activation and Stimulates Antitumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Iron–dextran nanoparticles functionalized with T cell activating proteins have been used to study T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. However, nanoparticle triggering of membrane receptors is poorly understood and may be sensitive to physiologically regulated changes in TCR clustering that occur after T cell activation. Nano-aAPC bound 2-fold more TCR on activated T cells, which have clustered TCR, than on naive T cells, resulting in a lower threshold for activation. To enhance T cell activation, a magnetic field was used to drive aggregation of paramagnetic nano-aAPC, resulting in a doubling of TCR cluster size and increased T cell expansion in vitro and after adoptive transfer in vivo. T cells activated by nano-aAPC in a magnetic field inhibited growth of B16 melanoma, showing that this novel approach, using magnetic field-enhanced nano-aAPC stimulation, can generate large numbers of activated antigen-specific T cells and has clinically relevant applications for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:24564881

  8. Colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) signaling in injured neurons facilitates protection and survival.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian; Elwood, Fiona; Britschgi, Markus; Villeda, Saul; Zhang, Hui; Ding, Zhaoqing; Zhu, Liyin; Alabsi, Haitham; Getachew, Ruth; Narasimhan, Ramya; Wabl, Rafael; Fainberg, Nina; James, Michelle L; Wong, Gordon; Relton, Jane; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Pollard, Jeffrey W; Wyss-Coray, Tony

    2013-01-14

    Colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1) and interleukin-34 (IL-34) are functional ligands of the CSF1 receptor (CSF1R) and thus are key regulators of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. We discovered that systemic administration of human recombinant CSF1 ameliorates memory deficits in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. CSF1 and IL-34 strongly reduced excitotoxin-induced neuronal cell loss and gliosis in wild-type mice when administered systemically before or up to 6 h after injury. These effects were accompanied by maintenance of cAMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB) signaling in neurons rather than in microglia. Using lineage-tracing experiments, we discovered that a small number of neurons in the hippocampus and cortex express CSF1R under physiological conditions and that kainic acid-induced excitotoxic injury results in a profound increase in neuronal receptor expression. Selective deletion of CSF1R in forebrain neurons in mice exacerbated excitotoxin-induced death and neurodegeneration. We conclude that CSF1 and IL-34 provide powerful neuroprotective and survival signals in brain injury and neurodegeneration involving CSF1R expression on neurons.

  9. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule-1 regulates granulopoiesis by inhibition of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hao; Shively, John E

    2010-10-29

    Although carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule-1 (CEACAM1) is an activation marker for neutrophils and delays neutrophil apoptosis, the role of CEACAM1 in granulopoiesis and neutrophil-dependent host immune responses has not been investigated. CEACAM1 expression correlated with granulocytic differentiation, and Ceacam1(-/-) mice developed neutrophilia because of loss of the Src-homology-phosphatase-1 (SHP-1)-dependent inhibition of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (G-CSFR) signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat3) pathway provided by CEACAM1. Moreover, Ceacam1(-/-) mice were hypersensitive to Listeria Monocytogenes (LM) infection with an accelerated mortality. Reintroduction of CEACAM1 into Ceacam1(-/-) bone marrow restored normal granulopoiesis and host sensitivity to LM infection, while mutation of its immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) abrogated this restoration. shRNA-mediated reduction of Stat3 amounts rescued normal granulopoiesis, attenuating host sensitivity to LM infection in Ceacam1(-/-) mice. Thus, CEACAM1 acted as a coinhibitory receptor for G-CSFR regulating granulopoiesis and host innate immune response to bacterial infections.

  10. Downregulation of steroid receptor coactivator-2 modulates estrogen-responsive genes and stimulates proliferation of mcf-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fenne, Ingvild S; Helland, Thomas; Flågeng, Marianne H; Dankel, Simon N; Mellgren, Gunnar; Sagen, Jørn V

    2013-01-01

    The p160/Steroid Receptor Coactivators SRC-1, SRC-2/GRIP1, and SRC-3/AIB1 are important regulators of Estrogen Receptor alpha (ERα) activity. However, whereas the functions of SRC-1 and SRC-3 in breast tumourigenesis have been extensively studied, little is known about the role of SRC-2. Previously, we reported that activation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, PKA, facilitates ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of SRC-2 which in turn leads to inhibition of SRC-2-coactivation of ERα and changed expression of the ERα target gene, pS2. Here we have characterized the global program of transcription in SRC-2-depleted MCF-7 breast cancer cells using short-hairpin RNA technology, and in MCF-7 cells exposed to PKA activating agents. In order to identify genes that may be regulated through PKA-induced downregulation of SRC-2, overlapping transcriptional targets in response to the respective treatments were characterized. Interestingly, we observed decreased expression of several breast cancer tumour suppressor genes (e.g., TAGLN, EGR1, BCL11b, CAV1) in response to both SRC-2 knockdown and PKA activation, whereas the expression of a number of other genes implicated in cancer progression (e.g., RET, BCAS1, TFF3, CXCR4, ADM) was increased. In line with this, knockdown of SRC-2 also stimulated proliferation of MCF-7 cells. Together, these results suggest that SRC-2 may have an antiproliferative function in breast cancer cells.

  11. Active macropinocytosis induction by stimulation of epidermal growth factor receptor and oncogenic Ras expression potentiates cellular uptake efficacy of exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Nakase, Ikuhiko; Kobayashi, Nahoko Bailey; Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka; Yoshida, Tetsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are approximately 100-nm vesicles that consist of a lipid bilayer of cellular membranes secreted in large quantities from various types of normal and disease-related cells. Endocytosis has been reported as a major pathway for the cellular uptake of exosomes; however, the detailed mechanisms of their cellular uptake are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate the active induction of macropinocytosis (accompanied by actin reorganisation, ruffling of plasma membrane, and engulfment of large volumes of extracellular fluid) by stimulation of cancer-related receptors and show that the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor significantly enhances the cellular uptake of exosomes. We also demonstrate that oncogenic K-Ras-expressing MIA PaCa-2 cells exhibit intensive macropinocytosis that actively transports extracellular exosomes into the cells compared with wild-type K-Ras-expressing BxPC-3 cells. Furthermore, encapsulation of the ribosome-inactivating protein saporin with EGF in exosomes using our simple electroporation method produces superior cytotoxicity via the enhanced cellular uptake of exosomes. Our findings contribute to the biological, pharmaceutical, and medical research fields in terms of understanding the macropinocytosis-mediated cellular uptake of exosomes with applications for exosomal delivery systems. PMID:26036864

  12. Active macropinocytosis induction by stimulation of epidermal growth factor receptor and oncogenic Ras expression potentiates cellular uptake efficacy of exosomes.

    PubMed

    Nakase, Ikuhiko; Kobayashi, Nahoko Bailey; Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka; Yoshida, Tetsuhiko

    2015-06-03

    Exosomes are approximately 100-nm vesicles that consist of a lipid bilayer of cellular membranes secreted in large quantities from various types of normal and disease-related cells. Endocytosis has been reported as a major pathway for the cellular uptake of exosomes; however, the detailed mechanisms of their cellular uptake are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate the active induction of macropinocytosis (accompanied by actin reorganisation, ruffling of plasma membrane, and engulfment of large volumes of extracellular fluid) by stimulation of cancer-related receptors and show that the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor significantly enhances the cellular uptake of exosomes. We also demonstrate that oncogenic K-Ras-expressing MIA PaCa-2 cells exhibit intensive macropinocytosis that actively transports extracellular exosomes into the cells compared with wild-type K-Ras-expressing BxPC-3 cells. Furthermore, encapsulation of the ribosome-inactivating protein saporin with EGF in exosomes using our simple electroporation method produces superior cytotoxicity via the enhanced cellular uptake of exosomes. Our findings contribute to the biological, pharmaceutical, and medical research fields in terms of understanding the macropinocytosis-mediated cellular uptake of exosomes with applications for exosomal delivery systems.

  13. Stimulation of catecholamine synthesis through unique estrogen receptors in the bovine adrenomedullary plasma membrane by 17{beta}-estradiol

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagihara, Nobuyuki . E-mail: yanagin@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp; Liu, Minhui; Toyohira, Yumiko; Tsutsui, Masato; Ueno, Susumu; Shinohara, Yuko; Takahashi, Kojiro; Tanaka, Kazumi

    2006-01-13

    Incubation of cultured bovine adrenal medullary cells with 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}) (0.3-100 nM) or membrane-impermeable E{sub 2}-bovine serum albumin (100 nM) acutely increased {sup 14}C-catecholamine synthesis from [{sup 14}C]tyrosine. The stimulatory effect of E{sub 2} was not inhibited by ICI182,780, a nuclear estrogen receptor inhibitor. E{sub 2} also increased tyrosine hydroxylase activity and p44/42MAPK phosphorylation, the former of which was attenuated by U0126, an inhibitor of p44/42MAPK kinase. The plasma membrane isolated from the gland showed two classes of specific binding sites of [{sup 3}H]E{sub 2} with apparent K {sub d}s of 3.2 and 106 nM, and B {sub max}s of 0.44 and 8.5 pmol/mg protein, respectively. The high-affinity binding of [{sup 3}H]E{sub 2} was most strongly inhibited by E{sub 2} and phytoestrogens, and to lesser extents by other steroid hormones, while it was enhanced by ICI182,780 and environmental estrogenic pollutants. These findings suggest that E{sub 2} acutely stimulates catecholamine synthesis via activation of p44/42MAPK through unique estrogen receptors in the plasma membrane of bovine adrenal medulla.

  14. Beta 3-adrenergic receptor stimulation restores message and expression of brown-fat mitochondrial uncoupling protein in adult dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Champigny, O; Ricquier, D; Blondel, O; Mayers, R M; Briscoe, M G; Holloway, B R

    1991-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is present throughout life in rodents and plays an important role in energy balance. However, whereas BAT is clearly recognizable in the neonates of larger mammals (including dogs, cats, sheep, cattle, and humans), it is undetectable or present in only small quantities in adults of these species and is replaced by a tissue with the gross characteristics of white adipose tissue. Here we provide evidence that treatment of adult dogs with a beta 3-adrenergic receptor agonist (ICI D7114) that has thermogenic and antiobesity properties leads to the appearance of BAT at several anatomical sites. The presence of BAT was primarily demonstrated by monitoring the inner mitochondrial membrane uncoupling protein and its mRNA, which are unique to the tissue. Neither message nor protein was detected in adipose tissue samples from control dogs but both were detected in samples from dogs treated with ICI D7114. The data suggest that stimulation of beta 3-adrenergic receptors can reactivate nascent BAT (which has the appearance of white adipose tissue) by increasing expression of the gene coding for uncoupling protein or lead to the recruitment of fully differentiated BAT from preadipocyte precursor cells. Images PMID:1720550

  15. Beta 3-adrenergic receptor stimulation restores message and expression of brown-fat mitochondrial uncoupling protein in adult dogs.

    PubMed

    Champigny, O; Ricquier, D; Blondel, O; Mayers, R M; Briscoe, M G; Holloway, B R

    1991-12-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is present throughout life in rodents and plays an important role in energy balance. However, whereas BAT is clearly recognizable in the neonates of larger mammals (including dogs, cats, sheep, cattle, and humans), it is undetectable or present in only small quantities in adults of these species and is replaced by a tissue with the gross characteristics of white adipose tissue. Here we provide evidence that treatment of adult dogs with a beta 3-adrenergic receptor agonist (ICI D7114) that has thermogenic and antiobesity properties leads to the appearance of BAT at several anatomical sites. The presence of BAT was primarily demonstrated by monitoring the inner mitochondrial membrane uncoupling protein and its mRNA, which are unique to the tissue. Neither message nor protein was detected in adipose tissue samples from control dogs but both were detected in samples from dogs treated with ICI D7114. The data suggest that stimulation of beta 3-adrenergic receptors can reactivate nascent BAT (which has the appearance of white adipose tissue) by increasing expression of the gene coding for uncoupling protein or lead to the recruitment of fully differentiated BAT from preadipocyte precursor cells. PMID:1720550

  16. A flagellin-derived toll-like receptor 5 agonist stimulates cytotoxic lymphocyte-mediated tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Leigh, Nicholas D; Bian, Guanglin; Ding, Xilai; Liu, Hong; Aygun-Sunar, Semra; Burdelya, Lyudmila G; Gudkov, Andrei V; Cao, Xuefang

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) mediated recognition of pathogen associated molecular patterns allows the immune system to rapidly respond to a pathogenic insult. The "danger context" elicited by TLR agonists allows an initially non-immunogenic antigen to become immunogenic. This ability to alter environment is highly relevant in tumor immunity, since it is inherently difficult for the immune system to recognize host-derived tumors as immunogenic. However, immune cells may have encountered certain TLR ligands associated with tumor development, yet the endogenous stimulation is typically not sufficient to induce spontaneous tumor rejection. Of special interest are TLR5 agonists, because there are no endogenous ligands that bind TLR5. CBLB502 is a pharmacologically optimized TLR5 agonist derived from Salmonella enterica flagellin. We examined the effect of CBLB502 on tumor immunity using two syngeneic lymphoma models, both of which do not express TLR5, and thus do not directly respond to CBLB502. Upon challenge with the T-cell lymphoma RMAS, CBLB502 treatment after tumor inoculation protects C57BL/6 mice from death caused by tumor growth. This protective effect is both natural killer (NK) cell- and perforin-dependent. In addition, CBLB502 stimulates clearance of the B-cell lymphoma A20 in BALB/c mice in a CD8(+) T cell-dependent fashion. Analysis on the cellular level via ImageStream flow cytometry reveals that CD11b(+) and CD11c(+) cells, but neither NK nor T cells, directly respond to CBLB502 as determined by NFκB nuclear translocation. Our findings demonstrate that CBLB502 stimulates a robust antitumor response by directly activating TLR5-expressing accessory immune cells, which in turn activate cytotoxic lymphocytes.

  17. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma abrogates Smad-dependent collagen stimulation by targeting the p300 transcriptional coactivator.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Asish K; Bhattacharyya, Swati; Wei, Jun; Kim, Suyeon; Barak, Yaacov; Mori, Yasuji; Varga, John

    2009-09-01

    Ligands of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) abrogate the stimulation of collagen gene transcription induced by transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). Here, we delineate the mechanisms underlying this important novel physiological function for PPAR-gamma in connective tissue homeostasis. First, we demonstrated that antagonistic regulation of TGF-beta activity by PPAR-gamma ligands involves cellular PPAR-gamma, since 15-deoxy-Delta12,14-prostaglandin J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) failed to block TGF-beta-induced responses in either primary cultures of PPAR-gamma-null murine embryonic fibroblasts, or in normal human skin fibroblasts with RNAi-mediated knockdown of PPAR-gamma. Next, we examined the molecular basis underlying the abrogation of TGF-beta signaling by PPAR-gamma in normal human fibroblasts in culture. The results demonstrated that Smad-dependent transcriptional responses were blocked by PPAR-gamma without preventing Smad2/3 activation. In contrast, the interaction between activated Smad2/3 and the transcriptional coactivator and histone acetyltransferase p300 induced by TGF-beta, and the accumulation of p300 on consensus Smad-binding DNA sequences and histone H4 hyperacetylation at the COL1A2 locus, were all prevented by PPAR-gamma. Wild-type p300, but not a mutant form of p300 lacking functional histone acetyltransferase, was able to restore TGF-beta-induced stimulation of COL1A2 in the presence of PPAR-gamma ligands. Collectively, these results indicate that PPAR-gamma blocked Smad-mediated transcriptional responses by preventing p300 recruitment and histone H4 hyperacetylation, resulting in the inhibition of TGF-beta-induced collagen gene expression. Pharmacological activation of PPAR-gamma thus may represent a novel therapeutic approach to target p300-dependent TGF-beta profibrotic responses such as stimulation of collagen gene expression.

  18. Activation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtype 4 Is Essential for Cholinergic Stimulation of Gastric Acid Secretion: Relation to D Cell/Somatostatin

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Koji; Endoh, Takuya; Hayashi, Shusaku; Aihara, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors exist in five subtypes (M1∼M5), and they are widely expressed in various tissues to mediate diverse autonomic functions, including gastric secretion. In the present study, we demonstrated, using M1∼M5 KO mice, the importance of M4 receptors in carbachol (CCh) stimulation of acid secretion and investigated how the secretion is modulated by the activation of M4 receptors. Methods: C57BL/6J mice of wild-type (WT) and M1–M5 KO were used. Under urethane anesthesia, acid secretion was measured in the stomach equipped with an acute fistula. CCh (30 μg/kg) was given subcutaneously (s.c.) to stimulate acid secretion. Atropine or octreotide (a somatostatin analog) was given s.c. 20 min before the administration of CCh. CYN154806 (a somatostatin SST2 receptor antagonist) was given i.p. 20 min before the administration of octreotide or CCh. Results: CCh caused an increase of acid secretion in WT mice, and the effect was totally inhibited by prior administration of atropine. The effect of CCh was similarly observed in the animals lacking M1, M2 or M5 receptors but significantly decreased in M3 or M4 KO mice. CYN154806, the SST2 receptor antagonist, dose-dependently and significantly reversed the decreased acid response to CCh in M4 but not M3 KO mice. Octreotide, the somatostatin analog, inhibited the secretion of acid under CCh-stimulated conditions in WT mice. The immunohistochemical study showed the localization of M4 receptors on D cells in the stomach. Serum somatostatin levels in M4 KO mice were higher than WT mice under basal conditions, while those in WT mice were significantly decreased in response to CCh. Conclusions: These results suggest that under cholinergic stimulation the acid secretion is directly mediated by M3 receptors and indirectly modified by M4 receptors. It is assumed that the activation of M4 receptors inhibits the release of somatostatin from D cells and minimizes the acid inhibitory effect of

  19. Activation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtype 4 Is Essential for Cholinergic Stimulation of Gastric Acid Secretion: Relation to D Cell/Somatostatin

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Koji; Endoh, Takuya; Hayashi, Shusaku; Aihara, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors exist in five subtypes (M1∼M5), and they are widely expressed in various tissues to mediate diverse autonomic functions, including gastric secretion. In the present study, we demonstrated, using M1∼M5 KO mice, the importance of M4 receptors in carbachol (CCh) stimulation of acid secretion and investigated how the secretion is modulated by the activation of M4 receptors. Methods: C57BL/6J mice of wild-type (WT) and M1–M5 KO were used. Under urethane anesthesia, acid secretion was measured in the stomach equipped with an acute fistula. CCh (30 μg/kg) was given subcutaneously (s.c.) to stimulate acid secretion. Atropine or octreotide (a somatostatin analog) was given s.c. 20 min before the administration of CCh. CYN154806 (a somatostatin SST2 receptor antagonist) was given i.p. 20 min before the administration of octreotide or CCh. Results: CCh caused an increase of acid secretion in WT mice, and the effect was totally inhibited by prior administration of atropine. The effect of CCh was similarly observed in the animals lacking M1, M2 or M5 receptors but significantly decreased in M3 or M4 KO mice. CYN154806, the SST2 receptor antagonist, dose-dependently and significantly reversed the decreased acid response to CCh in M4 but not M3 KO mice. Octreotide, the somatostatin analog, inhibited the secretion of acid under CCh-stimulated conditions in WT mice. The immunohistochemical study showed the localization of M4 receptors on D cells in the stomach. Serum somatostatin levels in M4 KO mice were higher than WT mice under basal conditions, while those in WT mice were significantly decreased in response to CCh. Conclusions: These results suggest that under cholinergic stimulation the acid secretion is directly mediated by M3 receptors and indirectly modified by M4 receptors. It is assumed that the activation of M4 receptors inhibits the release of somatostatin from D cells and minimizes the acid inhibitory effect of

  20. Stimulation of cannabinoid receptors by using Rubus coreanus extracts to control osteoporosis in aged male rats.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hae-Kyoung; Lee, Hye-Rim; Do, Sun Hee

    2015-06-01

    A substantial proportion of men with prostatic disease have an increased risk of bone loss. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Rubus coreanus Miquel (RCM) extracts on osteoporosis that occurs with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced prostatic hyperplasia. The rats used in this study were categorized into groups of healthy controls, rats treated with MNU, and rats treated with MNU and RCM. The rats were sacrificed after 10 weeks of RCM treatment, after which ultrasonography, serum biochemical tests, histopathological examinations, immunohistochemical analysis, and semi-quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis were performed. There were no marked differences in body weight gain and the size and weight of the prostate gland between the MNU group and the MNU and RCM group. However, treatment with RCM inhibited osteoclastic osteolysis and reduced dysplastic progress in the prostate gland, as observed by histopathological evaluation and by analyzing changes in the levels of bone regulatory factors. In addition, the group treated with MNU and RCM had higher expression levels of cannabinoid receptors-1, -2, and osteoprotegerin. These results indicate that the anti-osteoporotic effect of RCM in prostatic hyperplasia is attributable to the cannabinoid receptor-related upregulation of osteoblastogenesis and inhibition of prostatic hyperplasia. The results of the present study suggest that treatment with RCM may benefit osteoporotic patients with prostatic disease by simultaneously altering the activation of osteoblasts and osteoclasts.

  1. Diabetes Stimulates Osteoclastogenesis by Acidosis-Induced Activation of Transient Receptor Potential Cation Channels

    PubMed Central

    Reni, Carlotta; Mangialardi, Giuseppe; Meloni, Marco; Madeddu, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes have lower bone mineral density and higher risk of fractures. The role of osteoblasts in diabetes-related osteoporosis is well acknowledged whereas the role of osteoclasts (OCLs) is still unclear. We hypothesize that OCLs participate in pathological bone remodeling. We conducted studies in animals (streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice) and cellular models to investigate canonical and non-canonical mechanisms underlying excessive OCL activation. Diabetic mice show an increased number of active OCLs. In vitro studies demonstrate the involvement of acidosis in OCL activation and the implication of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1). In vivo studies confirm the establishment of local acidosis in the diabetic bone marrow (BM) as well as the ineffectiveness of insulin in correcting the pH variation and osteoclast activation. Conversely, treatment with TRPV1 receptor antagonists re-establishes a physiological OCL availability. These data suggest that diabetes causes local acidosis in the BM that in turn increases osteoclast activation through the modulation of TRPV1. The use of clinically available TRPV1 antagonists may provide a new means to combat bone problems associated with diabetes. PMID:27468810

  2. Prolonged stimulation of μ-opioid receptors produces β-arrestin-2-mediated heterologous desensitization of α(2)-adrenoceptor function in locus ceruleus neurons.

    PubMed

    Dang, Vu C; Chieng, Billy C; Christie, MacDonald J

    2012-09-01

    Prolonged agonist stimulation of the μ-opioid receptor (MOR) initiates receptor regulatory events that rapidly attenuate receptor-mediated signaling (homologous desensitization). Emerging evidence suggests that persistent MOR stimulation can also reduce responsiveness of effectors to other G-protein-coupled receptors, termed heterologous desensitization. However, the mechanisms by which heterologous desensitization is triggered by MOR stimulation are unclear. This study used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of ligand activated G-protein-activated inwardly rectifying potassium channel currents in mouse brain slices containing locus ceruleus (LC) neurons to determine the effects of prolonged stimulation of MOR on α(2)-adrenoceptor (α(2)-AR) function. The results show distinct and sequential development of homologous and heterologous desensitization during persistent stimulation of MOR in LC neurons with Met(5)-enkephalin (ME). ME stimulation of MOR promoted rapid homologous desensitization that reached a steady state after 5 min and partially recovered over 30 min. Longer stimulation of MOR (10 min) induced heterologous desensitization of α(2)-AR function that exhibited slower recovery than homologous desensitization. Heterologous (but not homologous) desensitization required β-arrestin-2 (βarr-2) because it was nearly abolished in βarr-2-knockout (ko) mice. Heterologous (but not homologous) desensitization was also prevented by inhibition of ERK1/2 and c-Src signaling in wild-type (wt) mouse LC neurons. Heterologous desensitization may be physiologically relevant during exposure to high doses of opioids because α(2)-AR-mediated slow inhibitory postsynaptic currents were depressed in wt but not βarr-2 ko LC neurons after prolonged exposure to opioids. Together, these findings demonstrate a novel mechanism by which βarr-2 can regulate postsynaptic responsiveness to neurotransmitter release.

  3. Human 5-HT1F receptor-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding: correlation with inhibition of guinea pig dural plasma protein extravasation.

    PubMed

    Wainscott, D B; Johnson, K W; Phebus, L A; Schaus, J M; Nelson, D L

    1998-07-01

    To determine the potency and efficacy of 5-HT1F receptor ligands, a [35S]GTPgammaS binding assay was developed and optimized for the human 5-HT1F receptor. Compounds which are known to be effective in the abortive treatment of migraine were tested for efficacy and potency in this assay. Naratriptan, sumatriptan, zolmitriptan, and rizatriptan all had agonist activity. The 5-HT1F receptor ligand LY334370 (4-fluoro-N-[3-(1-methyl-4-piperidinyl)-1H-indol-5-yl]-benzamide) was the most potent compound tested with an EC50 of 2.13 +/- 0.15 nM. LY302148 (5-fluoro-3-[1-[2-(1-methyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)ethyl]-4-piperidinyl]-1H-ind ole), methysergide, LY306258 (3-dimethylamino-2,3,4,9-tetrahydro-1H-carbazol-6-ol), dihydroergotamine (DHE), L-694,247 and CP-122,288 were also investigated for potency and efficacy. There was a statistically significant correlation between the pEC50 for the stimulation of [35S]GTPgammaS binding and the pID50 for the inhibition of trigeminal nerve-stimulated dural plasma protein extravasation in the guinea pig. In the course of these studies, it was found that the purportedly selective 5-HT1D receptor antagonist GR127935 inhibited 5-HT1F receptor-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding with a Ki of 39.6 +/- 9.5 nM. These studies demonstrate that 5-HT1F receptor-mediated stimulation of [35S]GTPgammaS binding in a clonal cell system is a reproducible, high throughput assay that is predictive of an in vivo model of 5-HT1F receptor activation. PMID:9718276

  4. microRNA-26a modulates inflammatory response induced by toll-like receptor 4 stimulation in microglia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Asit; Bhatia, Harsharan Singh; de Oliveira, Antonio Carlos Pinheiro; Fiebich, Bernd L

    2015-12-01

    MiRNAs, a family of small non-coding RNAs, have emerged as novel post-transcriptional regulators of numerous cellular responses. Although the involvement of miRNAs in the regulation of neuroinflammation in various neurological diseases has been previously studied, their role in the production of inflammatory mediators during microglia activation is poorly understood. In this study, the role of miR-26a has been investigated in the modulation of inflammatory response in cultured microglia. Using real-time PCR, the expression of miR-26a was studied in toll-like receptors 4 stimulated primary mouse microglia. miR-26a expression was found to be rapidly reduced after the stimulation of toll-like receptors 4 in microglia. Over-expression of miR-26a significantly decreased the production of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor α and IL-6, whereas knockdown of miR-26a increased the expression of these mediators. Furthermore, using in silico analysis, we identified that the activating transcription factor (ATF) 2 is directly targeted by miR-26a. This finding was confirmed by loss and gain of function studies. Similar to the effect of miR-26a over-expression, knockdown of activating transcription factor 2 inhibited the production of proinflammatory cytokines, particularly IL-6. Taken together, our results suggest the involvement of miR-26a in the regulation of the production of proinflammatory cytokines in microglia. We proposed that in microglia, activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) down-regulates miR-26a. The down-regulation of this miR increases expression of activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2). This event, in addition to the activation of ATF2 by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), increases interleukin-6 (IL-6) production. On the other hand, miR-26a also increases the production of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) by a mechanism independent of ATF2.

  5. Activation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors underlies microglial reactivity and neurotoxicity following stimulation with chromogranin A, a peptide up-regulated in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D L; Diemel, L T; Cuzner, M L; Pocock, J M

    2002-09-01

    Regulation of microglial reactivity and neurotoxicity is critical for neuroprotection in neurodegenerative diseases. Here we report that microglia possess functional group II metabotropic glutamate receptors, expressing mRNA and receptor protein for mGlu2 and mGlu3, negatively coupled to adenylate cyclase. Two different agonists of these receptors were able to induce a neurotoxic microglial phenotype which was attenuated by a specific antagonist. Chromogranin A, a secretory peptide expressed in amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease, activates microglia to a reactive neurotoxic phenotype. Chromogranin A-induced microglial activation and subsequent neurotoxicity may also involve an underlying stimulation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors since their inhibition reduced chromogranin A-induced microglial reactivity and neurotoxicity. These results show that selective inhibition of microglial group II metabotropic glutamate receptors has a positive impact on neuronal survival, and may prove a therapeutic target in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:12358765

  6. Adenosine Receptor Stimulation by Polydeoxyribonucleotide Improves Tissue Repair and Symptomology in Experimental Colitis.

    PubMed

    Pallio, Giovanni; Bitto, Alessandra; Pizzino, Gabriele; Galfo, Federica; Irrera, Natasha; Squadrito, Francesco; Squadrito, Giovanni; Pallio, Socrate; Anastasi, Giuseppe P; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Macrì, Antonio; Altavilla, Domenica

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the adenosine receptor pathway has been demonstrated to be effective in improving tissue remodeling and blunting the inflammatory response. Active colitis is characterized by an intense inflammatory reaction resulting in extensive tissue damage. Symptomatic improvement requires both control of the inflammatory process and repair and remodeling of damaged tissues. We investigated the ability of an A2A receptor agonist, polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN), to restore tissue structural integrity in two experimental colitis models using male Sprague-Dawley rats. In the first model, colitis was induced with a single intra-colonic instillation of dinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (DNBS), 25 mg diluted in 0.8 ml 50% ethanol. After 6 h, animals were randomized to receive either PDRN (8 mg/kg/i.p.), or PDRN + the A2A antagonist [3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (DMPX); 10 mg/kg/i.p.], or vehicle (0.8 ml saline solution) daily. In the second model, dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) was dissolved in drinking water at a concentration of 8%. Control animals received standard drinking water. After 24 h animals were randomized to receive PDRN or PDRN+DMPX as described above. Rats were sacrificed 7 days after receiving DNBS or 5 days after DSS. In both experimental models of colitis, PDRN ameliorated the clinical symptoms and weight loss associated with disease as well as promoted the histological repair of damaged tissues. Moreover, PDRN reduced expression of inflammatory cytokines, myeloperoxidase activity, and malondialdehyde. All these effects were abolished by the concomitant administration of the A2A antagonist DMPX. Our study suggests that PDRN may represent a promising treatment for improving tissue repair during inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:27601997

  7. Glutamate Receptor Stimulation Up-Regulates Glutamate Uptake in Human Müller Glia Cells.

    PubMed

    López-Colomé, Ana María; López, Edith; Mendez-Flores, Orquidia G; Ortega, Arturo

    2016-07-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory amino acid in the vertebrate retina, is a well know activator of numerous signal transduction pathways, and has been critically involved in long-term synaptic changes acting through ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. However, recent findings underlining the importance of intensity and duration of glutamate stimuli for specific neuronal responses, including excitotoxicity, suggest a crucial role for Na(+)-dependent glutamate transporters, responsible for the removal of this neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft, in the regulation of glutamate-induced signaling. Transporter proteins are expressed in neurons and glia cells, albeit most of glutamate uptake occurs in the glial compartment. Within the retina, Müller glia cells are in close proximity to glutamatergic synapses and participate in the recycling of glutamate through the glutamate/glutamine shuttle. In this context, we decided to investigate a plausible role of glutamate as a regulatory signal for its own transport in human retinal glia cells. To this end, we determined [(3)H]-D-aspartate uptake in cultures of spontaneously immortalized human Müller cells (MIO-M1) exposed to distinct glutamatergic ligands. A time and dose-dependent increase in the transporter activity was detected. This effect was dependent on the activation of the N-methyl D-aspartate subtype of glutamate receptors, due to a dual effect: an increase in affinity and an augmented expression of the transporter at the plasma membrane, as established via biotinylation experiments. Furthermore, a NMDA-dependent association of glutamate transporters with the cystoskeletal proteins ezrin and glial fibrillary acidic protein was also found. These results add a novel mediator of the glutamate transporter modulation and further strengthen the notion of the critical involvement of glia cells in synaptic function. PMID:27017513

  8. Adenosine Receptor Stimulation by Polydeoxyribonucleotide Improves Tissue Repair and Symptomology in Experimental Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Pallio, Giovanni; Bitto, Alessandra; Pizzino, Gabriele; Galfo, Federica; Irrera, Natasha; Squadrito, Francesco; Squadrito, Giovanni; Pallio, Socrate; Anastasi, Giuseppe P.; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Macrì, Antonio; Altavilla, Domenica

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the adenosine receptor pathway has been demonstrated to be effective in improving tissue remodeling and blunting the inflammatory response. Active colitis is characterized by an intense inflammatory reaction resulting in extensive tissue damage. Symptomatic improvement requires both control of the inflammatory process and repair and remodeling of damaged tissues. We investigated the ability of an A2A receptor agonist, polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN), to restore tissue structural integrity in two experimental colitis models using male Sprague-Dawley rats. In the first model, colitis was induced with a single intra-colonic instillation of dinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (DNBS), 25 mg diluted in 0.8 ml 50% ethanol. After 6 h, animals were randomized to receive either PDRN (8 mg/kg/i.p.), or PDRN + the A2A antagonist [3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (DMPX); 10 mg/kg/i.p.], or vehicle (0.8 ml saline solution) daily. In the second model, dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) was dissolved in drinking water at a concentration of 8%. Control animals received standard drinking water. After 24 h animals were randomized to receive PDRN or PDRN+DMPX as described above. Rats were sacrificed 7 days after receiving DNBS or 5 days after DSS. In both experimental models of colitis, PDRN ameliorated the clinical symptoms and weight loss associated with disease as well as promoted the histological repair of damaged tissues. Moreover, PDRN reduced expression of inflammatory cytokines, myeloperoxidase activity, and malondialdehyde. All these effects were abolished by the concomitant administration of the A2A antagonist DMPX. Our study suggests that PDRN may represent a promising treatment for improving tissue repair during inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:27601997

  9. ETA receptor specific stimulation of glomerular inflammation and injury in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, M. A.; Boesen, E. I.; Pollock, J. S.; Savin, V. J.; Pollock, D. M.

    2013-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis ETA receptor activation increases glomerular permeability to albumin (Palb) and elevates pre-inflammatory markers in hyperglycaemic (HG) rats. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given streptozotocin (STZ), n=32 or saline (sham,), n=32. Half of the animals in each group received the ETA-selective antagonist, ABT-627 (atrasentan; p.o.), beginning immediately after hyperglycaemia was confirmed. Glomeruli were isolated by sieving techniques and Palb determined from the change in glomerular volume induced by oncotic gradients of albumin. Glomerular nephrin expression was assessed by immunofluorescence, whereas urinary nephrin was measured by immunoassay. Results Three and six weeks after STZ injection, proteinuria was significantly increased compared to sham controls and was significantly reduced by ABT-627 treatment. Palb was also increased at 3 and 6 wk post-STZ; ABT-627 had no effect on Palb or protein excretion in sham rats. In glomeruli isolated from HG rats, incubation with BQ-123, a selective ETA antagonist, reduced Palb, whereas BQ-788, a selective ETB antagonist had no effect (n=6 rats/group, 5-8 glomeruli/rat). Glomerular and plasma content of soluble inter-cellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) were significantly increased 6 wk after STZ (ELISA). ABT-627 attenuated these increases. After 6 weeks of hyperglycaemia, glomerular nephrin expression was decreased with a concurrent increase in urinary nephrin excretion; ABT-627 prevented glomerular nephrin loss in the HG rats (n=5-8 rats in the eight groups). Conclusions/Interpretation These observations support the hypothesis that ET-1, via the ETA receptor, directly increases glomerular permeability to albumin, possibly via nephrin loss, as well as early inflammation in the HG rat. PMID:21191784

  10. Adenosine Receptor Stimulation by Polydeoxyribonucleotide Improves Tissue Repair and Symptomology in Experimental Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Pallio, Giovanni; Bitto, Alessandra; Pizzino, Gabriele; Galfo, Federica; Irrera, Natasha; Squadrito, Francesco; Squadrito, Giovanni; Pallio, Socrate; Anastasi, Giuseppe P.; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Macrì, Antonio; Altavilla, Domenica

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the adenosine receptor pathway has been demonstrated to be effective in improving tissue remodeling and blunting the inflammatory response. Active colitis is characterized by an intense inflammatory reaction resulting in extensive tissue damage. Symptomatic improvement requires both control of the inflammatory process and repair and remodeling of damaged tissues. We investigated the ability of an A2A receptor agonist, polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN), to restore tissue structural integrity in two experimental colitis models using male Sprague-Dawley rats. In the first model, colitis was induced with a single intra-colonic instillation of dinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (DNBS), 25 mg diluted in 0.8 ml 50% ethanol. After 6 h, animals were randomized to receive either PDRN (8 mg/kg/i.p.), or PDRN + the A2A antagonist [3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (DMPX); 10 mg/kg/i.p.], or vehicle (0.8 ml saline solution) daily. In the second model, dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) was dissolved in drinking water at a concentration of 8%. Control animals received standard drinking water. After 24 h animals were randomized to receive PDRN or PDRN+DMPX as described above. Rats were sacrificed 7 days after receiving DNBS or 5 days after DSS. In both experimental models of colitis, PDRN ameliorated the clinical symptoms and weight loss associated with disease as well as promoted the histological repair of damaged tissues. Moreover, PDRN reduced expression of inflammatory cytokines, myeloperoxidase activity, and malondialdehyde. All these effects were abolished by the concomitant administration of the A2A antagonist DMPX. Our study suggests that PDRN may represent a promising treatment for improving tissue repair during inflammatory bowel diseases.

  11. Stimulation of postsynapse adrenergic α2A receptor improves attention/cognition performance in an animal model of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Kawaura, Kazuaki; Karasawa, Jun-ichi; Chaki, Shigeyuki; Hikichi, Hirohiko

    2014-08-15

    A 5-trial inhibitory avoidance test using spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) pups has been used as an animal model of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the roles of noradrenergic systems, which are involved in the pathophysiology of ADHD, have not been investigated in this model. In the present study, the effects of adrenergic α2 receptor stimulation, which has been an effective treatment for ADHD, on attention/cognition performance were investigated in this model. Moreover, neuronal mechanisms mediated through adrenergic α2 receptors were investigated. We evaluated the effects of both clonidine, a non-selective adrenergic α2 receptor agonist, and guanfacine, a selective adrenergic α2A receptor agonist, using a 5-trial inhibitory avoidance test with SHR pups. Juvenile SHR exhibited a shorter transfer latency, compared with juvenile Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. Both clonidine and guanfacine significantly prolonged the transfer latency of juvenile SHR. The effects of clonidine and guanfacine were significantly blocked by pretreatment with an adrenergic α2A receptor antagonist. In contrast, the effect of clonidine was not attenuated by pretreatment with an adrenergic α2B receptor antagonist, or an adrenergic α2C receptor antagonist, while it was attenuated by a non-selective adrenergic α2 receptor antagonist. Furthermore, the effects of neither clonidine nor guanfacine were blocked by pretreatment with a selective noradrenergic neurotoxin. These results suggest that the stimulation of the adrenergic α2A receptor improves the attention/cognition performance of juvenile SHR in the 5-trial inhibitory avoidance test and that postsynaptic, rather than presynaptic, adrenergic α2A receptor is involved in this effect.

  12. Preferential Signaling and Induction of Allergy-promoting Lymphokines Upon Weak Stimulation of the High Affinity IgE Receptor on Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Espinosa, Claudia; Odom, Sandra; Olivera, Ana; Hobson, J. Peyton; Martinez, Maria Eugenia Cid; Oliveira-dos-Santos, Antonio; Barra, Lillian; Spiegel, Sarah; Penninger, Josef M.; Rivera, Juan

    2003-01-01

    Mast cell degranulation and de novo cytokine production is a consequence of antigen-aggregation of the immunoglobulin E (IgE)-occupied high affinity receptor for IgE (FcɛRI). Herein, we report that lymphokines that promote allergic inflammation, like MCP-1, were potently induced at low antigen (Ag) concentrations or at low receptor occupancy with IgE whereas some that down-regulate this response, like interleukin (IL)-10, required high receptor occupancy. Weak stimulation of mast cells caused minimal degranulation whereas a half-maximal secretory response was observed for chemokines and, with the exception of TNF-α, a weaker cytokine secretory response was observed. The medium from weakly stimulated mast cells elicited a monocyte/macrophage chemotactic response similar to that observed at high receptor occupancy. Weak stimulation also favored the phosphorylation of Gab2 and p38MAPK, while LAT and ERK2 phosphorylation was induced by a stronger stimulus. Gab2-deficient mast cells were severely impaired in chemokine mRNA induction whereas LAT-deficient mast cells showed a more pronounced defect in cytokines. These findings demonstrate that perturbation of small numbers of IgE receptors on mast cells favors certain signals that contribute to a lymphokine response that can mediate allergic inflammation. PMID:12782712

  13. Preferred recycling pathway by internalized PGE2 EP4 receptor following agonist stimulation in cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons contributes to enhanced EP4 receptor sensitivity.

    PubMed

    St-Jacques, Bruno; Ma, Weiya

    2016-06-21

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a well-known pain mediator abundantly produced in injured tissues, sensitizes nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons (nociceptors) through its four EP receptors (EP1-4). Our prior study showed that PGE2 or EP4 agonist stimulates EP4 externalization and this event was not only suppressed by the inhibitor of anterograde export, but also by the recycling inhibitor (St-Jacques and Ma, 2013). These data suggest that EP4 recycling also contributes to agonist-enhanced EP4 surface abundance. In the current study, we tested this hypothesis using antibody-feeding-based internalization assay, recycling assay and FITC-PGE2 binding assay. We observed that selective EP4 agonist 1-hydroxy-PGE1 (1-OH-PGE1) or CAY10850 time- and concentration-dependently increased EP4 internalization in cultured DRG neuron. Internalized EP4 was predominantly localized in the early endosomes and recycling endosomes, but rarely in the late endosomes and lysosomes. These observations were confirmed by FITC-PGE2 binding assay. We further revealed that 1-OH-PGE1 or CAY10850 time- and concentration-dependently increased EP4 recycling. Double exposures to 1-OH-PGE1 induced a greater increase in calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release than a single exposure or vehicle exposure, an event blocked by pre-treatment with the recycling inhibitor monensin. Our data suggest that EP4 recycling contributes to agonist-induced cell surface abundance and consequently enhanced receptor sensitivity. Facilitating EP4 externalization and recycling is a novel mechanism underlying PGE2-induced nociceptor sensitization.

  14. Cross-linking of IgG receptors inhibits membrane immunoglobulin-stimulated calcium influx in B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Choquet, D; Partiseti, M; Amigorena, S; Bonnerot, C; Fridman, W H; Korn, H

    1993-04-01

    By cross-linking membrane immunoglobulins (mIg), the antigenic stimulation of B lymphocytes induces an increase in intracellular free calcium levels ([Ca2+]i) because of a combination of release from intracellular stores and transmembrane influx. It has been suggested that both events are linked, as in a number of other cases of receptor-induced increase in [Ca2+]i. Conversely, in B lymphocytes, type II receptors for the Fc fragment of IgG (Fc gamma RII) inhibit mIg-mediated signaling. Thus, we have investigated at the level of single cells if these receptors could act on specific phases of mIg Ca2+ signaling. Lipopolysaccharide-activated murine B splenocytes and B lymphoma cells transfected with intact or truncated Fc gamma RII-cDNA were used to determine the domains of Fc gamma RII implicated in the inhibition of the Ca2+ signal. [Ca2+]i was measured in single fura-2-loaded cells by microfluorometry. The phases of release from intracellular stores and of transmembrane influx were discriminated by using manganese, which quenches fura-2, in the external medium as a tracer for bivalent cation entry. The role of membrane potential was studied by recording [Ca2+]i in cells voltage-clamped using the perforated patch-clamp method. Cross-linking of mIgM or mIgG with F(ab')2 fragments of anti-Ig antibodies induced a sustained rise in [Ca2+]i due to an extremely fast and transitory release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores and a long lasting transmembrane Ca2+ influx. The phase of influx, but not that of release, was inhibited by membrane depolarization. The increase in [Ca2+]i occurred after a delay inversely related to the dose of ligand. Co-cross-linking mIgs and Fc gamma RII with intact anti-Ig antibodies only triggered transitory release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores but no Ca2+ influx, even when the cell was voltage-clamped at negative membrane potentials. These transitory Ca2+ rises had similar amplitudes and delays to those induced by cross-linking mIgs alone

  15. Parkinsonian apathy responds to dopaminergic stimulation of D2/D3 receptors with piribedil.

    PubMed

    Thobois, Stéphane; Lhommée, Eugénie; Klinger, Hélène; Ardouin, Claire; Schmitt, Emmanuelle; Bichon, Amélie; Kistner, Andrea; Castrioto, Anna; Xie, Jing; Fraix, Valerie; Pelissier, Pierre; Chabardes, Stephan; Mertens, Patrick; Quesada, Jean-Louis; Bosson, Jean-Luc; Pollak, Pierre; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Krack, Paul

    2013-05-01

    Apathy is one of the most common symptoms encountered in Parkinson's disease, and is defined as a lack of motivation accompanied by reduced goal-directed cognition, behaviour and emotional involvement. In a previous study we have described a delayed withdrawal syndrome after successful motor improvement related to subthalamic stimulation allowing for a major decrease in dopaminergic treatment. This withdrawal syndrome correlated with a diffuse mesolimbic dopaminergic denervation. To confirm our hypothesis of parkinsonian apathy being related to mesolimbic dopaminergic denervation, we performed a randomized controlled study using piribedil, a relatively selective D2/D3 dopamine agonist to treat parkinsonian apathy, using the model of postoperative apathy. A 12-week prospective, placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blinded trial was conducted in 37 patients with Parkinson's disease presenting with apathy (Starkstein Apathy Scale score > 14) following subthalamic nucleus stimulation. Patients received either piribedil up to 300 mg per day (n = 19) or placebo (n = 18) for 12 weeks. The primary end point was the improvement of apathy under treatment, as assessed by the reduction of the Starkstein Apathy Scale score in both treatment groups. Secondary end points included alleviation in depression (Beck Depression Inventory), anxiety (Beck Anxiety Inventory), improvement of quality of life (PDQ39) and anhedonia (Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale). Exploratory endpoints consisted in changes of the Robert Inventory score and Hamilton depression scales. An intention to treat analysis of covariance analysis was performed to compare treatment effects (P < 0.05). The number of premature study dropouts was seven in the placebo and five in the piribedil groups, mostly related to intolerance to hypodopaminergic symptoms. At follow-up evaluation, the apathy score was reduced by 34.6% on piribedil versus 3.2% on placebo (P = 0.015). With piribedil, modifications in the Beck

  16. Proteinase-activated receptor-2 stimulates prostaglandin production in keratinocytes: analysis of prostaglandin receptors on human melanocytes and effects of PGE2 and PGF2alpha on melanocyte dendricity.

    PubMed

    Scott, Glynis; Leopardi, Sonya; Printup, Stacey; Malhi, Namrita; Seiberg, Miri; Lapoint, Randi

    2004-05-01

    Prostaglandins (PG) are key mediators of diverse functions in the skin and several reports suggest that PG mediate post-inflammatory pigmentary changes through modulation of melanocyte dendricity and melanin synthesis. The proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) is important for skin pigmentation because activation of keratinocyte PAR-2 stimulates uptake of melanosomes through phagocytosis in a Rho-dependent manner. In this report, we show that activation of keratinocyte PAR-2 stimulates release of PGE(2) and PGF(2alpha) and that PGE(2) and PGF(2alpha) act as paracrine factors that stimulate melanocyte dendricity. We characterized the expression of the EP and FP receptors in human melanocytes and show that human melanocytes express EP1 and EP3, and the FP receptor, but not EP2 and EP4. Treatment of melanocytes with EP1 and EP3 receptor agonists resulted in increased melanocyte dendricity, indicating that both EP1 and EP3 receptor signaling contribute to PGE(2)-mediated melanocyte dendricity. Certain EP3 receptor subtypes have been shown to increase adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) through coupling to Gs, whereas EP1 is known to couple to Gq to activate phospholipase C with elevation in Ca(2+). The cAMP/protein kinase A system is known to modulate melanocyte dendrite formation through modulation of Rac and Rho activity. Neither PGF(2alpha) or PGE(2) elevated cAMP in human melanocytes showing that dendricity observed in response to PGE(2) and PGF(2alpha) is cAMP-independent. Our data suggest that PAR-2 mediates cutaneous pigmentation both through increased uptake of melanosomes by keratinocytes, as well as by release of PGE(2) and PGF(2alpha) that stimulate melanocyte dendricity through EP1, EP3, and FP receptors.

  17. Cardiac baroreflex facilitation evoked by hypothalamus and prefrontal cortex stimulation: role of the nucleus tractus solitarius 5-HT2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Sévoz-Couche, C; Comet, M A; Bernard, J F; Hamon, M; Laguzzi, R

    2006-10-01

    We previously showed that serotonin (5-HT2) receptor activation in the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) produced hypotension, bradycardia, and facilitation of the baroreflex bradycardia. Activation of the preoptic area (POA) of the hypothalamus, which is involved in shock-evoked passive behaviors, induces similar modifications. In addition, previous studies showed that blockade of the infralimbic (IL) part of the medial prefrontal cortex, which sends projections to POA, produced an inhibitory influence on the baroreflex cardiac response. Thus, to assess the possible implication of NTS 5-HT2 receptors in passive cardiovascular responses, we analyzed in anesthetized rats the effects of NTS inhibition and NTS 5-HT2 receptor blockade on the cardiovascular modifications induced by chemical (0.3 M D,L-homocysteic acid) and electrical (50 Hz, 150-200 microA) stimulation of IL or POA. Intra-NTS microinjections of muscimol, a GABAA receptor agonist, prevented the decreases in blood pressure and heart rate normally evoked by IL or POA activation. In addition, we found that intra-NTS microinjection of R(+)-alpha-(2,3-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-[2-(4-fluorophenylethyl)]-4-piperidine-methanol, a specific 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, did not affect the decreases in cardiovascular baseline parameters induced by IL or POA stimulation but prevented the facilitation of the aortic baroreflex bradycardia normally observed during IL (+65 and +60%) or POA (+70 and +69%) electrical and chemical stimulation, respectively. These results show that NTS 5-HT2A receptors play a key role in the enhancement of the cardiac response of the baroreflex but not in the changes in basal heart rate and blood pressure induced by IL or POA stimulation. PMID:16763082

  18. Stimulation of dopamine D₁ receptor improves learning capacity in cooperating cleaner fish.

    PubMed

    Messias, João P M; Santos, Teresa P; Pinto, Maria; Soares, Marta C

    2016-01-27

    Accurate contextual decision-making strategies are important in social environments. Specific areas in the brain are tasked to process these complex interactions and generate correct follow-up responses. The dorsolateral and dorsomedial parts of the telencephalon in the teleost fish brain are neural substrates modulated by the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA), and are part of an important neural circuitry that drives animal behaviour from the most basic actions such as learning to search for food, to properly choosing partners and managing decisions based on context. The Indo-Pacific cleaner wrasse Labroides dimidiatus is a highly social teleost fish species with a complex network of interactions with its 'client' reef fish. We asked if changes in DA signalling would affect individual learning ability by presenting cleaner fish two ecologically different tasks that simulated a natural situation requiring accurate decision-making. We demonstrate that there is an involvement of the DA system and D1 receptor pathways on cleaners' natural abilities to learn both tasks. Our results add significantly to the growing literature on the physiological mechanisms that underlie and facilitate the expression of cooperative abilities. PMID:26791613

  19. DNA-polymer conjugates for immune stimulation through Toll-like receptor 9 mediated pathways.

    PubMed

    Levenson, Eric A; Kiick, Kristi L

    2014-03-01

    Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing unmethylated CpG dinucleotide motifs are agonists of Toll-like receptor 9 and are currently being investigated for use as vaccine adjuvants through the promotion of type I immunity. Several classes of ODN have been developed which differ in their propensity to aggregate, which in turn alters cytokine profiles and cellular subsets activated. Although aggregation state is correlated with the change in cytokine response, it is unknown if this results from a change in the number of ODNs available for binding and/or the possible engagement of multiple TLR9 molecules. Here, we examined the role of ligand valency on the activation of TLR9 through the synthesis of ODN-poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) conjugates. The compositions and size of the conjugates were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, proton nuclear magnetic resonance, gel permeation chromatography and dynamic light scattering. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays of cytokine secretion by murine-like macrophages indicate that these ODN-PAA polymer conjugates show enhanced immunostimulation at 100-fold lower concentrations than those required for ODN alone, for both TNF-α and IL-6 release, and are more potent than any other previously reported multivalent ODN constructs. Increasing valency was shown to significantly enhance cytokine expression, particularly for IL-6. Knockdown by siRNA demonstrates that these polymer conjugates are specific to TLR9. Our results define valency as a critical design parameter and polymer conjugation as an advantageous strategy for producing ODN immunomodulatory agents. PMID:24316364

  20. Eplerenone attenuates cardiac dysfunction and oxidative stress in β-receptor stimulated myocardial infarcted rats

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Navya M; Mahajan, Umesh B; Patil, Chandragouda R; Agrawal, Yogeeta O; Ojha, Shreesh; Goyal, Sameer N

    2015-01-01

    Eplerenone is a competitive antagonist of the aldosterone receptor with an additional PI3K-Akt activity. The existing cram has been intended to explore, whether eplerenone treatment attenuates the expansion of myocardial infarction in isoproterenol treated rats by restoring hemodynamic, biochemical, and histopathological changes. Isoproterenol induced cardiotoxicity was evidenced by marked ST elevation, decrease in systolic, diastolic, mean arterial pressures. Maximal positive rate of developed left ventricular pressure (+LVdP/dt max, a indicator of myocardial contraction), maximal negative rate of developed left ventricular pressure (-LVdP/dt max, a meter of myocardial relaxation) and an increase in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP, a marker of pre-load) were also shown. In addition, a significant reduction in activities of myocardial creatine kinase-MB isoenzyme, lactate dehydrogenase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and reduced glutathione level along with increase in malondialdehyde content were observed. Oral pre-treatment with eplerenone (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg) daily for a period of 14 days, constructively modulated the studied parameters in isoproterenol-induced myocardial injury. The protective role of eplerenone on isoproterenolinduced myocardial damage was further confirmed by histopathological examinations. Eplerenone at doses of 100 mg/kg and 150 mg/kg produced more pronounced protective effects than 50 mg/kg body weight. Together, our study provides evidence for protective effects of eplerenone on myocardium in experimentally induced myocardial infarction. PMID:26550459

  1. Eplerenone attenuates cardiac dysfunction and oxidative stress in β-receptor stimulated myocardial infarcted rats.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Navya M; Mahajan, Umesh B; Patil, Chandragouda R; Agrawal, Yogeeta O; Ojha, Shreesh; Goyal, Sameer N

    2015-01-01

    Eplerenone is a competitive antagonist of the aldosterone receptor with an additional PI3K-Akt activity. The existing cram has been intended to explore, whether eplerenone treatment attenuates the expansion of myocardial infarction in isoproterenol treated rats by restoring hemodynamic, biochemical, and histopathological changes. Isoproterenol induced cardiotoxicity was evidenced by marked ST elevation, decrease in systolic, diastolic, mean arterial pressures. Maximal positive rate of developed left ventricular pressure (+LVdP/dt max, a indicator of myocardial contraction), maximal negative rate of developed left ventricular pressure (-LVdP/dt max, a meter of myocardial relaxation) and an increase in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP, a marker of pre-load) were also shown. In addition, a significant reduction in activities of myocardial creatine kinase-MB isoenzyme, lactate dehydrogenase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and reduced glutathione level along with increase in malondialdehyde content were observed. Oral pre-treatment with eplerenone (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg) daily for a period of 14 days, constructively modulated the studied parameters in isoproterenol-induced myocardial injury. The protective role of eplerenone on isoproterenolinduced myocardial damage was further confirmed by histopathological examinations. Eplerenone at doses of 100 mg/kg and 150 mg/kg produced more pronounced protective effects than 50 mg/kg body weight. Together, our study provides evidence for protective effects of eplerenone on myocardium in experimentally induced myocardial infarction.

  2. Ca2+ stimulates COX-2 expression through calcium-sensing receptor in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Sachie; Kubota, Yasutaka; Satoh, Shinji; Ito, Shinich; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Ashizuka, Megumi; Shirasuna, Kanemitsu

    2006-12-29

    Fibroblasts isolated from jaw cysts expressed calcium-sensing receptor (CasR). In the fibroblasts elevated extracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](o)) increased fluo-3 fluorescence intensity, and the production of inositol(1,4,5)trisphosphate and active protein kinase C. Phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 attenuated the Ca(2+)-induced increase in fluo-3 fluorescence intensity. Elevated [Ca(2+)](o) enhanced the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA and protein, and the secretion of prostaglandin E(2) in the fibroblasts. CasR activator neomycin also increased the expression of COX-2 mRNA, and U-73122 attenuated the Ca(2+)-induced expression of COX-2 mRNA. Elevated [Ca(2+)](o)-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase-1/2 (ERK1/2), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and U-73122 inhibited the Ca(2+)-induced phosphorylation. The inhibitors for each kinase, PD98059, SB203580, and SP600125, attenuated the Ca(2+)-induced expression of COX-2 mRNA. These results suggest that in jaw cyst fibroblasts elevated extracellular Ca(2+) may enhance COX-2 expression via the activation of ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and JNK through CasR.

  3. Pharmacological Preconditioning by Adenosine A2a Receptor Stimulation: Features of the Protected Liver Cell Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Alchera, Elisa; Imarisio, Chiara; Mandili, Giorgia; Merlin, Simone; Chandrashekar, Bangalore R.; Novelli, Francesco; Follenzi, Antonia; Carini, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IP) of the liver by a brief interruption of the blood flow protects the damage induced by a subsequent ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) preventing parenchymal and nonparenchymal liver cell damage. The discovery of IP has shown the existence of intrinsic systems of cytoprotection whose activation can stave off the progression of irreversible tissue damage. Deciphering the molecular mediators that underlie the cytoprotective effects of preconditioning can pave the way to important therapeutic possibilities. Pharmacological activation of critical mediators of IP would be expected to emulate or even to intensify its salubrious effects. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated the role of the adenosine A2a receptor (A2aR) as a trigger of liver IP. This review will provide insight into the phenotypic changes that underline the resistance to death of liver cells preconditioned by pharmacological activation of A2aR and their implications to develop innovative strategies against liver IR damage. PMID:26539478

  4. Stimulation of dopamine D₁ receptor improves learning capacity in cooperating cleaner fish.

    PubMed

    Messias, João P M; Santos, Teresa P; Pinto, Maria; Soares, Marta C

    2016-01-27

    Accurate contextual decision-making strategies are important in social environments. Specific areas in the brain are tasked to process these complex interactions and generate correct follow-up responses. The dorsolateral and dorsomedial parts of the telencephalon in the teleost fish brain are neural substrates modulated by the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA), and are part of an important neural circuitry that drives animal behaviour from the most basic actions such as learning to search for food, to properly choosing partners and managing decisions based on context. The Indo-Pacific cleaner wrasse Labroides dimidiatus is a highly social teleost fish species with a complex network of interactions with its 'client' reef fish. We asked if changes in DA signalling would affect individual learning ability by presenting cleaner fish two ecologically different tasks that simulated a natural situation requiring accurate decision-making. We demonstrate that there is an involvement of the DA system and D1 receptor pathways on cleaners' natural abilities to learn both tasks. Our results add significantly to the growing literature on the physiological mechanisms that underlie and facilitate the expression of cooperative abilities.

  5. Stimulation of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor expression by PMA requires JNK1-dependent and -independent signaling modules.

    PubMed

    Gum, R; Juarez, J; Allgayer, H; Mazar, A; Wang, Y; Boyd, D

    1998-07-16

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (u-PAR) has been implicated in tumor progression, and previous studies have shown that the expression of this gene is strongly up-regulated by PMA. Although the signaling mechanism by which PMA modulates u-PAR expression is not known, the effect of this phorbol ester on the expression of other genes has been ascribed to activation of the c-Raf-1-ERK signaling pathway. However, in the current study we examined an alternate possibility that the inductive effect of PMA on u-PAR expression also required a JNK1-dependent signaling cascade usually associated with stress-inducing stimuli. PMA treatment of the u-PAR-deficient OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cells, which contain low JNK activities, resulted in a rapid (5 min) increase in JNK activity. Maximal JNK activity (12-fold induction) occurred after 30 min; this preceding the earliest detected rise in u-PAR protein (2 h). Dose-response studies with PMA also indicated that the increased JNK activity was tightly correlated with elevated u-PAR protein levels. The stimulation of u-PAR promoter activity by PMA required an intact upstream AP-1 motif (-184) and in PMA-treated cells this motif was bound with c-Jun as indicated from mobility shift assays. PMA up-regulated the c-Jun trans acting activity as indicated by the higher activity of a GAL4-regulated luciferase reporter in phorbol-ester-treated cells co-transfected with an expression vector encoding the c-Jun transactivation domain fused to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain. The ability of PMA to stimulate u-PAR promoter activity was effectively titrated out by the co-expression of either a kinase-defective JNK1 or a dominant negative MEKK1 the latter being an upstream activator of JNK1. Conversely, u-PAR promoter activity was stimulated by the co-expression of a constitutively active MEKK1 and this induction was antagonized by the inclusion of the kinase-defective JNK1 plasmid. We also determined the biological significance of the

  6. Chronic high-magnitude cyclic stretch stimulates EC inflammatory response via VEGF receptor 2-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gawlak, Grzegorz; Son, Sophia; Tian, Yufeng; O'Donnell, James J; Birukov, Konstantin G; Birukova, Anna A

    2016-06-01

    Ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) is associated with activated inflammatory signaling, such as cytokine production by endothelial and epithelial cells and macrophages, although the precise mechanisms of inflammatory activation induced by VILI-relevant cyclic stretch (CS) amplitude remain poorly understood. We show that exposure of human pulmonary endothelial cells (EC) to chronic CS at 18% linear distension (18% CS), but not at physiologically relevant 5% CS, induces "EC-activated phenotype," which is characterized by time-dependent increase in ICAM1 and VCAM1 expression. A preconditioning of 18% CS also increased in a time-dependent fashion the release of soluble ICAM1 (sICAM1) and IL-8. Investigation of potential signaling mechanisms of CS-induced EC inflammatory activation showed that 18% CS, but not 5% CS, induced time-dependent upregulation of VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), as monitored by increased protein expression and VEGFR2 tyrosine phosphorylation. Both CS-induced VEGFR2 expression and tyrosine phosphorylation were abrogated by cotreatment with reactive oxygen species inhibitor, N-acetyl cysteine. Molecular inhibition of VEGFR2 expression by gene-specific siRNA or treatment with VEGFR2 pharmacological inhibitor SU-1498 attenuated CS-induced activation of ICAM1 and VCAM1 expression and sICAM1 release. Chronic EC preconditioning at 18% CS augmented EC inflammation and barrier-disruptive response induced by proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α. This effect of chronic 18% CS preconditioning was attenuated by siRNA-induced VEGFR2 knockdown. This study demonstrates for the first time a VEGFR2-dependent mechanism of EC inflammatory activation induced by pathological CS. We conclude that, despite the recognized role of VEGF as a prosurvival and angiogenic factor, excessive activation of VEGFR2 signaling by high-tidal-volume lung mechanical ventilation may contribute to ventilator-induced (biotrauma) lung inflammation and barrier dysfunction by augmenting cell response

  7. Pharmacological Stimulation of the Brain Serotonin Receptor 7 as a Novel Therapeutic Approach for Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    De Filippis, Bianca; Nativio, Paola; Fabbri, Alessia; Ricceri, Laura; Adriani, Walter; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Passarelli, Francesca; Fuso, Andrea; Laviola, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by severe behavioral and physiological symptoms. Mutations in the methyl CpG-binding protein 2 gene (MECP2) cause >95% of classic cases, and currently there is no cure for this devastating disorder. The serotonin receptor 7 (5-HT7R) is linked to neuro-physiological regulation of circadian rhythm, mood, cognition, and synaptic plasticity. We presently report that 5-HT7R density is consistently reduced in cortical and hippocampal brain areas of symptomatic MeCP2–308 male mice, a RTT model. Systemic repeated treatment with LP-211 (0.25 mg/kg once/day for 7 days), a brain-penetrant selective 5-HT7R agonist, was able to rescue RTT-related defective performance: anxiety-related profiles in a Light/Dark test, motor abilities in a Dowel test, the exploratory behavior in the Marble Burying test, as well as memory in the Novelty Preference task. In the brain of RTT mice, LP-211 also reversed the abnormal activation of PAK and cofilin (key regulators of actin cytoskeleton dynamics) and of the ribosomal protein (rp) S6, whose reduced activation in MECP2 mutant neurons by mTOR is responsible for the altered protein translational control. Present findings indicate that pharmacological targeting of 5-HT7R improves specific behavioral and molecular manifestations of RTT, thus representing a first step toward the validation of an innovative systemic treatment. Beyond RTT, the latter might be extended to other disorders associated with intellectual disability. PMID:24809912

  8. Pharmacological stimulation of the brain serotonin receptor 7 as a novel therapeutic approach for Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, Bianca; Nativio, Paola; Fabbri, Alessia; Ricceri, Laura; Adriani, Walter; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Passarelli, Francesca; Fuso, Andrea; Laviola, Giovanni

    2014-10-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by severe behavioral and physiological symptoms. Mutations in the methyl CpG-binding protein 2 gene (MECP2) cause >95% of classic cases, and currently there is no cure for this devastating disorder. The serotonin receptor 7 (5-HT7R) is linked to neuro-physiological regulation of circadian rhythm, mood, cognition, and synaptic plasticity. We presently report that 5-HT7R density is consistently reduced in cortical and hippocampal brain areas of symptomatic MeCP2-308 male mice, a RTT model. Systemic repeated treatment with LP-211 (0.25 mg/kg once/day for 7 days), a brain-penetrant selective 5-HT7R agonist, was able to rescue RTT-related defective performance: anxiety-related profiles in a Light/Dark test, motor abilities in a Dowel test, the exploratory behavior in the Marble Burying test, as well as memory in the Novelty Preference task. In the brain of RTT mice, LP-211 also reversed the abnormal activation of PAK and cofilin (key regulators of actin cytoskeleton dynamics) and of the ribosomal protein (rp) S6, whose reduced activation in MECP2 mutant neurons by mTOR is responsible for the altered protein translational control. Present findings indicate that pharmacological targeting of 5-HT7R improves specific behavioral and molecular manifestations of RTT, thus representing a first step toward the validation of an innovative systemic treatment. Beyond RTT, the latter might be extended to other disorders associated with intellectual disability. PMID:24809912

  9. Phenethyl isothiocyanate suppresses EGF-stimulated SAS human oral squamous carcinoma cell invasion by targeting EGF receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui-Jye; Lin, Chung-Ming; Lee, Chao-Ying; Shih, Nai-Chen; Amagaya, Sakae; Lin, Yung-Chang; Yang, Jai-Sing

    2013-08-01

    Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) is a natural compound that is involved in chemoprevention as well as inhibition of cell growth and induction of apoptosis in several types of cancer cells. Previous studies have revealed that PEITC suppresses the invasion of AGS gastric and HT-29 colorectal cancer cells. However, the effects of PEITC on the metastasis of SAS oral cancer cells remain to be determined. Our results showed that PEITC treatment inhibited the invasion of EGF-stimulated SAS cells in a concentration-dependent manner, but appeared not to affect the cell viability. The expression and enzymatic activities of matrix metalloprotease-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9) were suppressed by PEITC. Concomitantly, we observed an increase in the protein expression of both tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) and -2 (TIMP-2) in treated cells. Furthermore, PEITC treatments decreased the protein phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and downstream signaling proteins including PDK1, PI3K (p85), AKT, phosphorylated IKK and IκB to inactivate NF-κB for the suppression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression. In addition, PEITC can trigger the MAPK signaling pathway through the increase in phosphorylated p38, JNK and ERK in treated cells. Our data indicate that PEITC is able to inhibit the invasion of EGF-stimulated SAS oral cancer cells by targeting EGFR and its downstream signaling molecules and finally lead to the reduced expression and enzymatic activities of both MMP-2 and MMP-9. These results suggest that PEITC is promising for the therapy of oral cancer metastasis.

  10. Activation of epidermal growth factor receptor mediates mucin production stimulated by p40, a Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-derived protein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihong; Cao, Hailong; Liu, Liping; Wang, Bangmao; Walker, W Allan; Acra, Sari A; Yan, Fang

    2014-07-18

    The mucus layer coating the gastrointestinal tract serves as the first line of intestinal defense against infection and injury. Probiotics promote mucin production by goblet cells in the intestine. p40, a Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-derived soluble protein, has been shown to transactivate the EGF receptor (EGFR) in intestinal epithelial cells, which is required for inhibition of apoptosis and preservation of barrier function in the colon, thereby ameliorating intestinal injury and colitis. Because activation of EGFR has been shown to up-regulate mucin production in goblet cells, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects and mechanisms of p40 regulation of mucin production. p40 activated EGFR and its downstream target, Akt, in a concentration-dependent manner in LS174T cells. p40 stimulated Muc2 gene expression and mucin production in LS174T cells, which were abolished by inhibition of EGFR kinase activity, down-regulation of EGFR expression by EGFR siRNA transfection, or suppression of Akt activation. Treatment with p40 increased mucin production in the colonic epithelium, thus thickening the mucus layer in the colon of wild type, but not of Egfr(wa5) mice, which have a dominant negative mutation in the EGFR kinase domain. Furthermore, inhibition of mucin-type O-linked glycosylation suppressed the effect of p40 on increasing mucin production and protecting intestinal epithelial cells from TNF-induced apoptosis in colon organ culture. Thus, these results suggest that p40-stimulated activation of EGFR mediates up-regulation of mucin production, which may contribute to the mechanisms by which p40 protects the intestinal epithelium from injury.

  11. Label-Free Proteomic Identification of Endogenous, Insulin-Stimulated Interaction Partners of Insulin Receptor Substrate-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geetha, Thangiah; Langlais, Paul; Luo, Moulun; Mapes, Rebekka; Lefort, Natalie; Chen, Shu-Chuan; Mandarino, Lawrence J.; Yi, Zhengping

    2011-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions are key to most cellular processes. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS)-based proteomics combined with co-immunoprecipitation (CO-IP) has emerged as a powerful approach for studying protein complexes. However, a majority of systematic proteomics studies on protein-protein interactions involve the use of protein overexpression and/or epitope-tagged bait proteins, which might affect binding stoichiometry and lead to higher false positives. Here, we report an application of a straightforward, label-free CO-IP-MS/MS method, without the use of protein overexpression or protein tags, to the investigation of changes in the abundance of endogenous proteins associated with a bait protein, which is in this case insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), under basal and insulin stimulated conditions. IRS-1 plays a central role in the insulin signaling cascade. Defects in the protein-protein interactions involving IRS-1 may lead to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analyses identified eleven novel endogenous insulin-stimulated IRS-1 interaction partners in L6 myotubes reproducibly, including proteins play an important role in protein dephosphorylation [protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 12A, (PPP1R12A)], muscle contraction and actin cytoskeleton rearrangement, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and protein folding, as well as protein synthesis. This novel application of label-free CO-IP-MS/MS quantification to assess endogenous interaction partners of a specific protein will prove useful for understanding how various cell stimuli regulate insulin signal transduction.

  12. Stimulation of Toll-like receptor 2 in human platelets induces a thromboinflammatory response through activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Blair, Price; Rex, Sybille; Vitseva, Olga; Beaulieu, Lea; Tanriverdi, Kahraman; Chakrabarti, Subrata; Hayashi, Chie; Genco, Caroline A; Iafrati, Mark; Freedman, Jane E

    2009-02-13

    Cells of the innate immune system use Toll-like receptors (TLRs) to initiate the proinflammatory response to microbial infection. Recent studies have shown acute infections are associated with a transient increase in the risk of vascular thrombotic events. Although platelets play a central role in acute thrombosis and accumulating evidence demonstrates their role in inflammation and innate immunity, investigations into the expression and functionality of platelet TLRs have been limited. In the present study, we demonstrate that human platelets express TLR2, TLR1, and TLR6. Incubation of isolated platelets with Pam(3)CSK4, a synthetic TLR2/TLR1 agonist, directly induced platelet aggregation and adhesion to collagen. These functional responses were inhibited in TLR2-deficient mice and, in human platelets, by pretreatment with TLR2-blocking antibody. Stimulation of platelet TLR2 also increased P-selectin surface expression, activation of integrin alpha(IIb)beta(3), generation of reactive oxygen species, and, in human whole blood, formation of platelet-neutrophil heterotypic aggregates. TLR2 stimulation also activated the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K)/Akt signaling pathway in platelets, and inhibition of PI3-K significantly reduced Pam(3)CSK4-induced platelet responses. In vivo challenge with live Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative pathogenic bacterium that uses TLR2 for innate immune signaling, also induced significant formation of platelet-neutrophil aggregates in wild-type but not TLR2-deficient mice. Together, these data provide the first demonstration that human platelets express functional TLR2 capable of recognizing bacterial components and activating the platelet thrombotic and/or inflammatory pathways. This work substantiates the role of platelets in the immune and inflammatory response and suggests a mechanism by which bacteria could directly activate platelets.

  13. Selective stimulation and blockade of beta-adrenergic receptors in the mandibular gland of the red kangaroo, Macropus rufus.

    PubMed

    Beal, A M

    2000-12-01

    Intracarotid infusions of noradrenaline (0.15 nmol x kg(-1) x min(-1)) either alone or accompanied by phentolamine (1.5 nmol x kg(-1) x min(-1)) caused similar-sized increases in salivary protein, magnesium and bicarbonate, and decreases in osmolality, sodium, potassium and chloride whereas intravenous noradrenaline stimulated much smaller responses. Concurrent infusions of the beta1-antagonist, CGP20712A, blocked these noradrenaline-induced changes in salivary composition more effectively than equimolar infusions of the beta2-antagonist, ICI118551, thereby confirming the presence of beta1-adrenoceptors. Intracarotid infusion of salbutamol at 0.15, 0.3 and 1.5 nmol x kg(-1) x min(-1) caused increasing but qualitatively similar changes in salivary composition, sodium excepted, to intracarotid noradrenaline with 0.3 nmol being most similar quantitatively. Intravenous infusion of salbutamol caused larger changes in salivary composition than equimolar intravenous noradrenaline thereby indicating that the response to salbutamol may, in part, be mediated by reflex increases in general sympathetic tone triggered by lowered blood pressure. Eliminating this hypotensive effect by concurrent intravenous and intracarotid infusions of beta1-(CGP or atenolol) and beta2-(ICII18551) antagonists with intracarotid salbutamol showed that IC1118551 was more potent than the beta1-antagonists thereby demonstrating the presence of beta2-receptors. It was concluded that the kangaroo mandibular has functional beta1- and beta2-adrenoceptor subtypes in both endpieces and excurrent ducts and that the duct system has two populations of cells, each expressing one receptor subtype.

  14. Acidosis Activation of the Proton-Sensing GPR4 Receptor Stimulates Vascular Endothelial Cell Inflammatory Responses Revealed by Transcriptome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lixue; Li, Zhigang; Leffler, Nancy R.; Asch, Adam S.; Chi, Jen-Tsan; Yang, Li V.

    2013-01-01

    Acidic tissue microenvironment commonly exists in inflammatory diseases, tumors, ischemic organs, sickle cell disease, and many other pathological conditions due to hypoxia, glycolytic cell metabolism and deficient blood perfusion. However, the molecular mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to the acidic microenvironment are not well understood. GPR4 is a proton-sensing receptor expressed in endothelial cells and other cell types. The receptor is fully activated by acidic extracellular pH but exhibits lesser activity at the physiological pH 7.4 and minimal activity at more alkaline pH. To delineate the function and signaling pathways of GPR4 activation by acidosis in endothelial cells, we compared the global gene expression of the acidosis response in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) with varying level of GPR4. The results demonstrated that acidosis activation of GPR4 in HUVEC substantially increased the expression of a number of inflammatory genes such as chemokines, cytokines, adhesion molecules, NF-κB pathway genes, and prostaglandin-endoperoxidase synthase 2 (PTGS2 or COX-2) and stress response genes such as ATF3 and DDIT3 (CHOP). Similar GPR4-mediated acidosis induction of the inflammatory genes was also noted in other types of endothelial cells including human lung microvascular endothelial cells and pulmonary artery endothelial cells. Further analyses indicated that the NF-κB pathway was important for the acidosis/GPR4-induced inflammatory gene expression. Moreover, acidosis activation of GPR4 increased the adhesion of HUVEC to U937 monocytic cells under a flow condition. Importantly, treatment with a recently identified GPR4 antagonist significantly reduced the acidosis/GPR4-mediated endothelial cell inflammatory response. Taken together, these results show that activation of GPR4 by acidosis stimulates the expression of a wide range of inflammatory genes in endothelial cells. Such inflammatory response can be suppressed by

  15. G Protein-Coupled Receptor 30 Expression Is Required for Estrogen Stimulation of Primordial Follicle Formation in the Hamster Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng; Prossnitz, Eric R.; Roy, Shyamal K.

    2008-01-01

    Estradiol-17β (E2) plays an important role in the formation and development of primordial follicles, but the mechanisms remain unclear. G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) can mediate a rapid and transcription-independent E2 signaling in various cells. The objectives of this study were to examine whether GPR30 was expressed in the neonatal hamster ovary and whether it could mediate estrogen action during the formation of primordial follicles. GPR30 mRNA levels decreased from the 13th day of gestation (E13) through the second day of postnatal (P2) life, followed by steady increases from P3 through P6. Consistent with the changes in mRNA levels, GPR30 protein expression decreased from E13 to P2 followed by a significant increase by P7, the day before the first appearance of primordial follicles in the hamster ovary. GPR30 was expressed both in the oocytes and somatic cells, although the expression in the oocytes was low. GPR30 protein was located primarily in the perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum, which was also the site of E2-BSA-FITC (E2-BSA-fluorescein isothiocyanate) binding. E2 or E2-BSA increased intracellular calcium in neonatal hamster ovary cells in vitro. Exposure to GPR30 small interfering RNA in vitro significantly reduced GPR30 mRNA and protein levels in cultured hamster ovaries, attenuated E-BSA binding to cultured P6 ovarian cells, and markedly suppressed estrogen-stimulated primordial follicle formation. These results suggest that a membrane estrogen receptor, GPR30, is expressed in the ovary during perinatal development and mediates E2 action on primordial follicle formation. PMID:18499747

  16. Repeated stimulation of D1 dopamine receptors enhances (-)-11-hydroxy-delta 8-tetrahydrocannabinol-dimethyl-heptyl-induced catalepsy in male rats.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez de Fonseca, F; Martín Calderón, J L; Mechoulam, R; Navarro, M

    1994-03-21

    Dopaminergic and cannabinoid receptors are localized in the outflow nuclei of the basal ganglia. We have investigated the possible interrelation of these receptors in the regulation of motor activity in male rats. To this end we have first studied the behavioural effects of the highly potent cannabinoid receptor agonist (-)11-hydroxy-delta 8-tetrahydrocannabinol-dimethylheptyl (HU-210, 20 micrograms mg) after chronic stimulation of dopamine D1 and D2 receptors. The catalepsy induced by the synthetic cannabinoid, measured as the descent latency in the bar test, was enhanced in male rats chronically treated with the dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF38393 (8 mg kg-1, twice a day during 21 days). However, animals exposed to the dopamine D2 agonist quinpirole (1 mg kg-1 daily during 21 days) displayed the same degree of catalepsy as those exposed to HU-210 alone. Although a possible involvement of D2 receptors cannot be excluded, this finding suggests a predominant role for dopamine D1 receptors in the regulation of the cataleptic response to cannabinoids. The possible cross-talk between dopamine D1 and cannabinoid receptors is further supported by the decreased responsiveness to the acute behavioural effects of SKF38393 (8 mg kg-1) observed in animals chronically exposed to HU-210 (20 micrograms kg-1 daily during 14 days).

  17. Repeated stimulation of D1 dopamine receptors enhances (-)-11-hydroxy-delta 8-tetrahydrocannabinol-dimethyl-heptyl-induced catalepsy in male rats.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez de Fonseca, F; Martín Calderón, J L; Mechoulam, R; Navarro, M

    1994-03-21

    Dopaminergic and cannabinoid receptors are localized in the outflow nuclei of the basal ganglia. We have investigated the possible interrelation of these receptors in the regulation of motor activity in male rats. To this end we have first studied the behavioural effects of the highly potent cannabinoid receptor agonist (-)11-hydroxy-delta 8-tetrahydrocannabinol-dimethylheptyl (HU-210, 20 micrograms mg) after chronic stimulation of dopamine D1 and D2 receptors. The catalepsy induced by the synthetic cannabinoid, measured as the descent latency in the bar test, was enhanced in male rats chronically treated with the dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF38393 (8 mg kg-1, twice a day during 21 days). However, animals exposed to the dopamine D2 agonist quinpirole (1 mg kg-1 daily during 21 days) displayed the same degree of catalepsy as those exposed to HU-210 alone. Although a possible involvement of D2 receptors cannot be excluded, this finding suggests a predominant role for dopamine D1 receptors in the regulation of the cataleptic response to cannabinoids. The possible cross-talk between dopamine D1 and cannabinoid receptors is further supported by the decreased responsiveness to the acute behavioural effects of SKF38393 (8 mg kg-1) observed in animals chronically exposed to HU-210 (20 micrograms kg-1 daily during 14 days). PMID:7912554

  18. Cloning and expression of porcine Colony Stimulating Factor-1 (CSF-1) and Colony Stimulating Factor-1 Receptor (CSF-1R) and analysis of the species specificity of stimulation by CSF-1 and Interleukin 34.

    PubMed

    Gow, Deborah J; Garceau, Valerie; Kapetanovic, Ronan; Sester, David P; Fici, Greg J; Shelly, John A; Wilson, Thomas L; Hume, David A

    2012-12-01

    Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (CSF-1) controls the survival, differentiation and proliferation of cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system. A second ligand for the CSF-1R, Interleukin 34 (IL-34), has been described, but its physiological role is not yet known. The domestic pig provides an alternative to traditional rodent models for evaluating potential therapeutic applications of CSF-1R agonists and antagonists. To enable such studies, we cloned and expressed active pig CSF-1. To provide a bioassay, pig CSF-1R was expressed in the factor-dependent Ba/F3 cell line. On this transfected cell line, recombinant porcine CSF-1 and human CSF-1 had identical activity. Mouse CSF-1 does not interact with the human CSF-1 receptor but was active on pig. By contrast, porcine CSF-1 was active on mouse, human, cat and dog cells. IL-34 was previously shown to be species-specific, with mouse and human proteins demonstrating limited cross-species activity. The pig CSF-1R was equally responsive to both mouse and human IL-34. Based upon the published crystal structures of CSF-1/CSF-1R and IL34/CSF-1R complexes, we discuss the molecular basis for the species specificity.

  19. The role of adenosine A2A and A3 receptors on the differential modulation of norepinephrine and neuropeptide Y release from peripheral sympathetic nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Donoso, M Verónica; Aedo, Felipe; Huidobro-Toro, J Pablo

    2006-03-01

    The pre-synaptic sympathetic modulator role of adenosine was assessed by studying transmitter release following electrical depolarization of nerve endings from the rat mesenteric artery. Mesentery perfusion with exogenous adenosine exclusively inhibited the release of norepinephrine (NA) but did not affect the overflow of neuropeptide Y (NPY), establishing the basis for a differential pre-synaptic modulator mechanism. Several adenosine structural analogs mimicked adenosine's effect on NA release and their relative order of potency was: 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine hydrochloride = 1-[2-chloro-6-[[(3-iodophenyl)methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-1-deoxy-N-methyl-beta-d-ribofuranuronamide = 5'-(N-ethylcarboxamido)adenosine > adenosine > N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine. The use of selective receptor subtype antagonists confirmed the involvement of A(2A) and A(3) adenosine receptors. The modulator role of adenosine is probably due to the activation of both receptors; co-application of 1 nM 2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine hydrochloride plus 1 nM 1-[2-chloro-6-[[(3-iodophenyl)methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-1-deoxy-N-methyl-beta-D-ribofuranuronamide caused additive reductions in NA released. Furthermore, while 1 nM of an A(2A) or A(3) receptor antagonist only partially reduced the inhibitory action of adenosine, the combined co-application of the two antagonists fully blocked the adenosine-induced inhibition. Only the simultaneous blockade of the adenosine A(2A) plus A(3) receptors with selective antagonists elicited a significant increase in NA overflow. H 89 reduced the release of both NA and NPY. We conclude that pre-synaptic A(2A) and A(3) adenosine receptor activation modulates sympathetic co-transmission by exclusively inhibiting the release of NA without affecting immunoreactive (ir)-NPY and we suggest separate mechanisms for vesicular release modulation.

  20. Scavenger receptor-independent stimulation of cholesterol esterification in macrophages by low density lipoprotein extracted from human aortic intima.

    PubMed

    Steinbrecher, U P; Lougheed, M

    1992-05-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that suggests that modification of low density lipoprotein (LDL) in the artery wall may contribute to atherogenesis. A number of physiologically plausible modifications have been studied in vitro, including oxidation, aggregation, formation of complexes with glycosaminoglycans, and generation of LDL-immune complexes. Several studies of the properties of LDL extracted from the aortic intima have been published, but these indicate disagreement about both the nature and the extent of modification of LDL in the artery wall. The objectives of the present study were to determine the nature and extent of modification of LDL extracted from both normal and diseased human aortic intimas and to correlate this with the rate of LDL uptake in cultured cells. Analyses were performed on LDLs isolated from aortic intimas obtained at autopsy or at the time of organ harvest from 33 subjects. LDL from normal intima showed no clear evidence of oxidation but had slightly increased electrophoretic mobility compared with native plasma LDL, whereas LDL from plaques or fatty streaks exhibited variable but usually modest signs of oxidative change. Aortic LDL was more rapidly degraded by cultured macrophages than was plasma LDL and resulted in a greater stimulation of cholesterol esterification. The degree of stimulation of cholesterol esterification was correlated with the extent of modification of LDL as reflected by the degree of apolipoprotein B fragmentation. However, in all aortic LDLs the extent of oxidative change, as assessed by electrophoretic mobility or other physical parameters, was less than that required for scavenger receptor-mediated uptake. In all cases where sufficient amounts of LDL were recovered to permit degradation experiments, the uptake of aortic LDL was nonsaturable and could not be inhibited by polyinosinic acid or acetylated LDL. Chromatography on Sepharose CL-4B showed that most LDLs isolated from plaque contained a fraction

  1. INS-1 cell glucose-stimulated insulin secretion is reduced by the downregulation of the 67 kDa laminin receptor.

    PubMed

    Sabra, Georges; Dubiel, Evan A; Kuehn, Carina; Khalfaoui, Taoufik; Beaulieu, Jean-François; Vermette, Patrick

    2015-12-01

    Understanding β cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions can advance our knowledge of the mechanisms that control glucose homeostasis and improve culture methods used in islet transplantation for the treatment of diabetes. Laminin is the main constituent of the basement membrane and is involved in pancreatic β cell survival and function, even enhancing glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Most of the studies on cell responses towards laminin have focused on integrin-mediated interactions, while much less attention has been paid on non-integrin receptors, such as the 67 kDa laminin receptor (67LR). The specificity of the receptor-ligand interaction through the adhesion of INS-1 cells (a rat insulinoma cell line) to CDPGYIGSR-, GRGDSPC- or CDPGYIGSR + GRGDSPC-covered surfaces was evaluated. Also, the effects of the 67LR knocking down over glucose-stimulated insulin secretion were investigated. Culture of the INS-1 cells on the bioactive surfaces was improved compared to the low-fouling carboxymethyl dextran (CMD) surfaces, while downregulation of the 67LR resulted in reduced cell adhesion to surfaces bearing the CDPGYIGSR peptide. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was hindered by downregulation of the 67LR, regardless of the biological motif available on the biomimetic surfaces on which the cells were cultured. This finding illustrates the importance of the 67LR in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and points to a possible role of the 67LR in the mechanisms of insulin secretion.

  2. Do imipramine and dihydroergosine possess two components - one stimulating 5-HT sub 1 and the other inhibiting 5-HT sub 2 receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Pericic, D.; Mueck-Seler, D. )

    1990-01-01

    The mechanisms by which imipramine and dihydroergosine stimulate the 5-HT syndrome in rats and inhibit the head-twitch response in rats and mice were studied. Imipramine- and dihydroergosine-included stimulation of the 5-HT syndrome was inhibited stereoselectively by propranolol, a high affinity ligand for 5-HT{sub 1} receptor sites, but not by ritanserin, a specific 5-HT{sub 2} receptor antagonist. (-) -Propranolol potentiated the inhibitory effect of imipramine, but not of dihydroergosine on the head-twitch response, while ritanserin was without effect. As expected, 8-OH-DPAT, a selective 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor agonist, stimulated, and 5-HT{sub 1B} agonists CGS 12066B and 1-(trifluoromethylphenyl) piperazine (TFMPP) failed to stimulate the 5-HT syndrome induced in rats by pargyline and 5-HTP administration. A higher dose of ritanserin inhibited the syndrome. While 8-OH-DPAT alone produced all behavioral components of the 5-HT syndrome, dihydroergosine or imipramine alone even at very high doses never produced tremor or a more intensive forepaw padding as seen when these drugs were given in combination with pargyline and 5-HTP. A single administration of (-)-propranolol also inhibited the head-twitch response. This effect lasted in mice longer that after ritanserin administration. In in vitro experiments dihydroergosine expressed approximately twenty-fold higher affinity for {sup 3}H-ketanserin binding sites than imipramine.

  3. Glutamate Stimulates Local Protein Synthesis in the Axons of Rat Cortical Neurons by Activating α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic Acid (AMPA) Receptors and Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wei-Lun; Chung, Hui-Wen; Wu, Chih-Yueh; Wu, Huei-Ing; Lee, Yu-Tao; Chen, En-Chan; Fang, Weilun; Chang, Yen-Chung

    2015-08-21

    Glutamate is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian CNS. By analyzing the metabolic incorporation of azidohomoalanine, a methionine analogue, in newly synthesized proteins, we find that glutamate treatments up-regulate protein translation not only in intact rat cortical neurons in culture but also in the axons emitting from cortical neurons before making synapses with target cells. The process by which glutamate stimulates local translation in axons begins with the binding of glutamate to the ionotropic AMPA receptors and metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 and members of group 2 metabotropic glutamate receptors on the plasma membrane. Subsequently, the activated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway and the rise in Ca(2+), resulting from Ca(2+) influxes through calcium-permeable AMPA receptors, voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, and transient receptor potential canonical channels, in axons stimulate the local translation machinery. For comparison, the enhancement effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on the local protein synthesis in cortical axons were also studied. The results indicate that Ca(2+) influxes via transient receptor potential canonical channels and activated the mTOR pathway in axons also mediate BDNF stimulation to local protein synthesis. However, glutamate- and BDNF-induced enhancements of translation in axons exhibit different kinetics. Moreover, Ca(2+) and mTOR signaling appear to play roles carrying different weights, respectively, in transducing glutamate- and BDNF-induced enhancements of axonal translation. Thus, our results indicate that exposure to transient increases of glutamate and more lasting increases of BDNF would stimulate local protein synthesis in migrating axons en route to their targets in the developing brain.

  4. Functional granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor receptor is constitutively expressed on neoplastic plasma cells and mediates tumour cell longevity.

    PubMed

    Villunger, A; Egle, A; Kos, M; Egle, D; Tinhofer, I; Henn, T; Uberall, F; Maly, K; Greil, R

    1998-09-01

    It has been shown that granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is able to support myeloma cell propagation in cooperation with interleukin (IL)-6, the major growth factor for malignant plasma cells, although the biological mechanisms involved remain unknown. Therefore we investigated (i) the expression levels of the GM-CSF receptor (GM-CSFR) constituents in three malignant plasma cell lines and in native malignant plasma cells, (ii) the ability of the receptor to mediate common signalling pathways regulating proliferation and cell survival in malignant plasma cell lines, and (iii) the effects of GM-CSF on tumour cell biology. The GM-CSFRalpha subunit was detected in the malignant plasma cell lines RPMI-8226, MC/CAR, IM-9 as well as 6/6 native myeloma cell samples derived from the bone marrow of patients with overt disease. Furthermore, GM-CSFR expression was also detected in the CD19+ fraction from 2/3 bone marrow samples and 5/8 peripheral blood samples derived from patients with malignant plasma cell disorders, but not in the CD19+ fraction of peripheral blood from healthy donors. The expressed cytokine receptor alpha-subunit was able to constitute a functional signalling complex with the ubiquitously expressed GM-CSFRbeta subunit, as demonstrated by the fact that GM-CSF induced the p21-ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling cascade in malignant plasma cell lines. Since this signalling cascade plays an essential role in the mediation of both proliferation and cell survival, we investigated the impact of GM-CSF on these two events. Application of GM-CSF led to an increase of DNA-synthesis in MC/CAR, IM-9 and RPMI-8226 cells. Furthermore, it increased longevity of these malignant plasma cell lines by reducing the rates of spontaneous apoptosis. We conclude that (i) the functional GM-CSFR is commonly expressed on malignant plasma cells and that (ii) GM-CSF promotes the clonal expansion of myeloma cells by inhibiting spontaneous

  5. The protein product of the c-cbl protooncogene is phosphorylated after B cell receptor stimulation and binds the SH3 domain of Bruton's tyrosine kinase

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia, a B cell immunodeficiency, is caused by mutations in the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) gene. The absence of a functional Btk protein leads to a failure of B cell differentiation and antibody production. B cell receptor stimulation leads to the phosphorylation of the Btk protein and it is, therefore, likely that Btk is involved in B cell receptor signaling. As a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, Btk is likely to interact with several proteins within the context of a signal transduction pathway. To understand such interactions, we have generated glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins corresponding to different domains of the human Btk protein. We have identified a 120-kD protein present in human B cells as being bound by the SH3 domain of Btk and which, after B cell receptor stimulation, is one of the major substrates of tyrosine phosphorylation. We have shown that this 120-kD protein is the protein product of c-cbl, a protooncogene, which is known to be phosphorylated in response to T cell receptor stimulation and to interact with several other tyrosine kinases. Association of the SH3 domain of Btk with p120cbl provides evidence for an analogous role for p120cbl in B cell signaling pathways. The p120cbl protein is the first identified ligand of the Btk SH3 domain. PMID:7629518

  6. Identification of des-(Gly-Ile)-endozepine as an effector of corticotropin-dependent adrenal steroidogenesis: stimulation of cholesterol delivery is mediated by the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Besman, M J; Yanagibashi, K; Lee, T D; Kawamura, M; Hall, P F; Shively, J E

    1989-01-01

    Delivery of cholesterol to inner mitochondrial membranes is rate-limiting for steroidogenesis in the zona fasciculata of adrenal cortex. A protein that stimulates this process was isolated to homogeneity from bovine adrenal tissue. This protein's primary structure has been determined in its entirety by a combination of automated Edman microsequencing, fast-atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS). The sequence was identical to that previously reported for bovine brain endozepine, except that it lacks the last two residues, -Gly-Ile, at the C terminus. To our knowledge, isolation of an endozepine-related protein from a tissue other than brain has not been reported previously. Endozepine competes with benzodiazepines for saturable binding sites in synaptosomes and in mitochondria of specific peripheral tissues. Previous reports have localized the adrenal benzodiazepine receptor to the outer mitochondrial membrane. In this report, we show that the prototypic benzodiazepine, diazepam, effects a stimulation of adrenal mitochondrial cholesterol delivery similar to that observed for endozepine. The effective diazepam concentration was consistent with that previously shown to displace a high-affinity ligand of the mitochondrial benzodiazepine receptor. The action of diazepam in adrenal mitochondria suggests that the mediation of corticotropin-induced steroidogenesis may be the physiological function of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor. These studies provide new insights into the previously unknown function of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors and should allow new investigations into the stimulation of steroidogenesis by endozepines and benzodiazepines in the brain and in certain peripheral tissues. PMID:2544879

  7. The influence of endogenously generated reactive oxygen species on the inotropic and chronotropic effects of adrenoceptor and ET-receptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Sand, Carsten; Peters, Stephan L M; Pfaffendorf, Martin; van Zwieten, Pieter A

    2003-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a role in cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure and hypertension. Furthermore, increasing evidence has accumulated suggesting that ROS can also be formed subsequent to the stimulation of various receptors, thus functioning as second messengers. The objective of the present study was to elucidate the role of intracellular-generated ROS in the inotropic and chronotropic effects of the alpha1- and beta-adrenoceptor and the ET-receptor stimulation in isolated rat atria. In addition, we investigated whether the MAPKerk pathway is involved in the ROS-provoked rise of contractile force. For this purpose hydrogen peroxide was applied, which is known to serve several endogenous functions as a second messenger. Moreover, hydrogen peroxide readily crosses cell membranes, which thus allows to mimic the intracellular formation. Preincubation of atria with EUK 8 (400 microM), a cell permeable superoxide dismutase- and catalase-mimetic, reduced the positive inotropic effect upon alpha1-adrenoceptor and ET-receptor stimulation. The responsiveness to beta-adrenoceptor stimulation remained unaffected by this pretreatment. The chronotropic effects were not altered by preincubation with EUK 8. In contrast to the MAPK(p38) inhibitor SB203580 (2 and 10 microM), the two MKKmek inhibitors PD98059 (30 and 100 microM) and U0126 (10 microM) significantly attenuated the positive inotropic response to hydrogen peroxide in isolated rat left atria. In addition, inhibition of the Na+/H+ exchange (NHE) by cariporide (1 microM) counteracted ROS-provoked increase of contractile force. From the present study we conclude that the inotropic responses to alpha1-adrenoceptor and ET-receptor stimulation are, at least partially, caused by intracellular-formed ROS, that subsequently may activate the MAPKerk pathway and the NHE.

  8. Effects of methyllycaconitine (MLA), an alpha 7 nicotinic receptor antagonist, on nicotine- and cocaine-induced potentiation of brain stimulation reward.

    PubMed

    Panagis, G; Kastellakis, A; Spyraki, C; Nomikos, G

    2000-05-01

    It has been shown that nicotine facilitates intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) reward and that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) are of primary importance for its reinforcing and dependence-producing actions. Recently, we have shown that alpha 7 nicotinic receptors in the VTA contribute to both the acute effects of nicotine on the mesolimbic dopamine system, as well as to nicotine withdrawal reactions. However, it is not yet known whether the same receptor conformation is directly involved in the reinforcing actions of nicotine. Here, using the curve-shift method we studied the effects of methyllycaconitine (MLA), a selective alpha 7 receptor antagonist, microinjected (graded doses: 1, 3, 9 micrograms/microliter per side) into the VTA on the rewarding efficacy of lateral hypothalamic self-stimulation and on the systemic nicotine-induced potentiation of brain stimulation reward. MLA did not affect baseline self-stimulation. Nicotine produced a significant reduction in ICSS threshold, without altering maximal rates of responding, while MLA attenuated the effect of nicotine at the two lower doses. Given the reported interaction between nicotine and cocaine at both the neuronal and the behavioral level, we also examined whether alpha 7 receptor antagonism within the VTA can affect the reinforcing action of cocaine, as measured with ICSS. Interestingly, MLA attenuated the reinforcing effect of cocaine in all doses tested, without altering the maximal rate of responding, i.e. the performance of the animals. These results suggest that alpha 7 nAChRs in the VTA are involved in mediating the reinforcing actions of drugs of abuse, such as nicotine and cocaine, and provide evidence that alpha 7 nAChR antagonists may be clinically useful in attenuating the rewarding effects of addictive drugs.

  9. The melanocyte-stimulating hormone receptor (MC1-R) gene as a tool in evolutionary studies of artiodactyles.

    PubMed

    Klungland, H; Røed, K H; Nesbø, C L; Jakobsen, K S; Våge, D I

    1999-01-01

    The complete coding region of the melanocyte-stimulating hormone receptor (MC1-R) gene was characterized in species belonging to the two families Bovidae and Cervidae; cattle (Bos taurus), sheep (Ovis aries), goat (Capra hircus), muskox (Ovibos moschatus), roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), reindeer (Rangifer tarandus), moose (Alces alces), red deer (Cervus elaphus) and fallow deer (Dama dama). This well conserved gene is a central regulator of mammalian coat colour. Examination of the interspecies variability revealed a 5.3-6.8% divergence between the Cervidae and Bovidae families, whereas the divergence within the families were 1.0-3.1% and 1.2-4.6%, respectively. Complete identity was found when two subspecies of reindeer, Eurasian tundra reindeer (R.t. tarandus) and Svalbard reindeer (R.t. platvrhynehus), were analyzed. An rooted phylogenetic tree based on Bovidae and Cervidae MC1-R DNA sequences was in complete agreement with current taxonomy, and was supported by bootstrapping analysis. Due to different frequencies of silent vs. replacement mutations, the amino acid based phylogenetic tree contains several dissimilarities when compared to the DNA based phylogenetic tree.

  10. Stimulation of the α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Protects against Neuroinflammation after Tibia Fracture and Endotoxemia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Terrando, Niccolò; Yang, Ting; Ryu, Jae Kyu; Newton, Phillip T; Monaco, Claudia; Feldmann, Marc; Ma, Daqing; Akassoglou, Katerina; Maze, Mervyn

    2014-01-01

    Surgery and critical illness often associate with cognitive decline. Surgical trauma or infection can lead independently to learning and memory impairments via similar, but not identical, cellular signaling of the innate immune system that promotes neuroinflammation. In this study we explored the putative synergism between aseptic orthopedic surgery and infection, the latter reproduced by postoperative lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration. We observed that surgery and LPS augmented systemic inflammation up to postoperative d 3 and this was associated with further neuroinflammation (CD11b and CD68 immunoreactivity) in the hippocampus in mice compared with those receiving surgery or LPS alone. Administration of a selective α7 subtype nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) agonist 2 h after LPS significantly improved neuroinflammation and hippocampal-dependent memory dysfunction. Modulation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation in monocytes and regulation of the oxidative stress response through nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) signaling appear to be key targets in modulating this response. Overall, these results suggest that it may be conceivable to limit and possibly prevent postoperative complications, including cognitive decline and/or infections, through stimulation of the cholinergic antiinflammatory pathway. PMID:25365546

  11. Characterization of macrophages from the bony fish gilthead seabream using an antibody against the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Mulero, Iván; Pilar Sepulcre, M; Roca, Francisco J; Meseguer, José; García-Ayala, Alfonsa; Mulero, Victoriano

    2008-01-01

    Two major professional phagocyte populations have been described in fish, namely granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages. Although the distribution and localization of macrophages have been documented in several teleost species using mainly light and/or electron microscopy, the lack of appropriate markers for these cells has hampered our in-depth knowledge of their biology. We report here the generation of a monospecific rabbit polyclonal antibody against the gilthead seabream macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (Mcsfr), which is an excellent marker of macrophages in mammals and the zebrafish. The anti-Mcsfr has been found to be very useful in immunohistochemistry (IHC) to specifically immunostain the purified macrophages (adherent cells) obtained from the head-kidney as well as different cell populations in paraffin-embedded organs, including the head-kidney, spleen, thymus, gills and liver. Unexpectedly, however, no Mcsfr immunoreactive (Mcsfr(+)) cells were observed in the brain and intestine of the gilthead seabream. We also show that the distribution of Mcsfr(+) cells in the head-kidney and the spleen is unaltered following infection with the fish pathogenic bacterium Vibrio anguillarum and that the Il1b-producing cells in these two organs after infection are exclusively acidophilic granulocytes. Finally, as the epitope recognized by the anti-Mcsfr is well conserved, we illustrate the potential usefulness of this antibody in other teleost species, such as the European seabass.

  12. Role of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor signaling in development and differentiation of the thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Postiglione, M P; Parlato, R; Rodriguez-Mallon, A; Rosica, A; Mithbaokar, P; Maresca, M; Marians, R C; Davies, T F; Zannini, M S; De Felice, M; Di Lauro, R

    2002-11-26

    The thyroid-stimulating hormone/thyrotropin (TSH) is the most relevant hormone in the control of thyroid gland physiology in adulthood. TSH effects on the thyroid gland are mediated by the interaction with a specific TSH receptor (TSHR). We studied the role of TSHTSHR signaling on gland morphogenesis and differentiation in the mouse embryo using mouse lines deprived either of TSH (pit(dw)pit(dw)) or of a functional TSHR (tshr(hyt)tshr(hyt) and TSHR-knockout lines). The results reported here show that in the absence of either TSH or a functional TSHR, the thyroid gland develops to a normal size, whereas the expression of thyroperoxidase and the sodium/iodide symporter are reduced greatly. Conversely, no relevant changes are detected in the amounts of thyroglobulin and the thyroid-enriched transcription factors TTF-1, TTF-2, and Pax8. These data suggest that the major role of the TSH/TSHR pathway is in controlling genes involved in iodide metabolism such as sodium/iodide symporter and thyroperoxidase. Furthermore, our data indicate that in embryonic life TSH does not play an equivalent role in controlling gland growth as in the adult thyroid.

  13. Oleic acid stimulates system A amino acid transport in primary human trophoblast cells mediated by toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Lager, Susanne; Gaccioli, Francesca; Ramirez, Vanessa I; Jones, Helen N; Jansson, Thomas; Powell, Theresa L

    2013-03-01

    Obese women have an increased risk to deliver large babies. However, the mechanisms underlying fetal overgrowth in these pregnancies are not well understood. Obese pregnant women typically have elevated circulating lipid levels. We tested the hypothesis that fatty acids stimulate placental amino acid transport, mediated via toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways. Circulating NEFA levels and placental TLR4 expression were assessed in women with varying prepregnancy body mass index (BMI). The effects of oleic acid on system A and system L amino acid transport, and on the activation of the mTOR (4EBP1, S6K1, rpS6), TLR4 (IĸB, JNK, p38 MAPK), and STAT3 signaling pathways were determined in cultured primary human trophoblast cells. Maternal circulating NEFAs (n = 33), but not placental TLR4 mRNA expression (n = 16), correlated positively with BMI (P < 0.05). Oleic acid increased trophoblast JNK and STAT3 phosphorylation (P < 0.05), whereas mTOR activity was unaffected. Furthermore, oleic acid doubled trophoblast system A activity (P < 0.05), without affecting system L activity. siRNA-mediated silencing of TLR4 expression prevented the stimulatory effect of oleic acid on system A activity. Our data suggest that maternal fatty acids can increase placental nutrient transport via TLR4, thereby potentially affecting fetal growth.

  14. The Drosophila HNF4 nuclear receptor promotes glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and mitochondrial function in adults

    PubMed Central

    Barry, William E; Thummel, Carl S

    2016-01-01

    Although mutations in HNF4A were identified as the cause of Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young 1 (MODY1) two decades ago, the mechanisms by which this nuclear receptor regulates glucose homeostasis remain unclear. Here we report that loss of Drosophila HNF4 recapitulates hallmark symptoms of MODY1, including adult-onset hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). These defects are linked to a role for dHNF4 in promoting mitochondrial function as well as the expression of Hex-C, a homolog of the MODY2 gene Glucokinase. dHNF4 is required in the fat body and insulin-producing cells to maintain glucose homeostasis by supporting a developmental switch toward oxidative phosphorylation and GSIS at the transition to adulthood. These findings establish an animal model for MODY1 and define a developmental reprogramming of metabolism to support the energetic needs of the mature animal. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11183.001 PMID:27185732

  15. Single cell analysis of innate cytokine responses to pattern recognition receptor stimulation in children across four continents

    PubMed Central

    Smolen, Kinga K; Cai, Bing; Fortuno, Edgardo S; Gelinas, Laura; Larsen, Martin; Speert, David P; Chamekh, Mustapha; Kollmann, Tobias R

    2014-01-01

    Innate immunity instructs adaptive immunity, and suppression of innate immunity is associated with increased risk for infection. We had previously shown that whole blood cellular components from a cohort of South African children secreted significantly lower levels of most cytokines following stimulation of pattern recognition receptors (PRR) as compared to whole blood from cohorts of Ecuadorian, Belgian, or Canadian children. To begin dissecting the responsible molecular mechanisms, we now set out to identify the relevant cellular source of these differences. Across the four cohorts represented in our study, we identified significant variation in the cellular composition of whole blood; however, significant reduction of the intracellular cytokine production on the single cell level was only detected in South African childrens’ monocytes, cDC, and pDC. We also uncovered a marked reduction in polyfunctionality for each of these cellular compartments in South African children as compared to children from other continents. Together our data identify differences in cell composition as well as profoundly lower functional responses of innate cells in our cohort of South African children. A possible link between altered innate immunity and increased risk for infection or lower response to vaccines in South African infants needs to be explored. PMID:25135829

  16. Isolation of murine peritoneal macrophages to carry out gene expression analysis upon Toll-like receptors stimulation.

    PubMed

    Layoun, Antonio; Samba, Macha; Santos, Manuela M

    2015-01-01

    During infection and inflammation, circulating monocytes leave the bloodstream and migrate into tissues, where they differentiate into macrophages. Macrophages express surface Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which recognize molecular patterns conserved through evolution in a wide range of microorganisms. TLRs play a central role in macrophage activation which is usually associated with gene expression alteration. Macrophages are critical in many diseases and have emerged as attractive targets for therapy. In the following protocol, we describe a procedure to isolate murine peritoneal macrophages using Brewer's thioglycollate medium. The latter will boost monocyte migration into the peritoneum, accordingly this will raise macrophage yield by 10-fold. Several studies have been carried out using bone marrow, spleen or peritoneal derived macrophages. However, peritoneal macrophages were shown to be more mature upon isolation and are more stable in their functionality and phenotype. Thus, macrophages isolated from murine peritoneal cavity present an important cell population that can serve in different immunological and metabolic studies. Once isolated, macrophages were stimulated with different TLR ligands and consequently gene expression was evaluated.

  17. CD22-mediated stimulation of T cells regulates T-cell receptor/CD3-induced signaling.

    PubMed Central

    Aruffo, A; Kanner, S B; Sgroi, D; Ledbetter, J A; Stamenkovic, I

    1992-01-01

    Interaction between B lymphocytes and other cell types is mediated in part by the B-cell adhesion molecule CD22. Recent work has suggested one of the T-cell ligands of B cells to be CD45RO, an isoform of the receptor-linked phosphotyrosine phosphatase CD45. Here we demonstrate direct interaction between CD22 and several isoforms of CD45, including CD45RO, and propose that the interaction may participate in regulation of lymphocyte signaling. Cross-linking of CD3 and CD22 T-cell ligands with anti-CD3 antibody and soluble CD22 is shown to block anti-CD3-induced intracellular calcium increase and to inhibit tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C gamma 1. These effects are consistent with those observed upon coligation of CD3 and CD45 with antibody, providing support to the possibility that ligand-mediated stimulation of CD45 may result in modulation of substrate phosphorylation and lymphocyte activation. Images PMID:1438211

  18. The melanocyte-stimulating hormone receptor (MC1-R) gene as a tool in evolutionary studies of artiodactyles.

    PubMed

    Klungland, H; Røed, K H; Nesbø, C L; Jakobsen, K S; Våge, D I

    1999-01-01

    The complete coding region of the melanocyte-stimulating hormone receptor (MC1-R) gene was characterized in species belonging to the two families Bovidae and Cervidae; cattle (Bos taurus), sheep (Ovis aries), goat (Capra hircus), muskox (Ovibos moschatus), roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), reindeer (Rangifer tarandus), moose (Alces alces), red deer (Cervus elaphus) and fallow deer (Dama dama). This well conserved gene is a central regulator of mammalian coat colour. Examination of the interspecies variability revealed a 5.3-6.8% divergence between the Cervidae and Bovidae families, whereas the divergence within the families were 1.0-3.1% and 1.2-4.6%, respectively. Complete identity was found when two subspecies of reindeer, Eurasian tundra reindeer (R.t. tarandus) and Svalbard reindeer (R.t. platvrhynehus), were analyzed. An rooted phylogenetic tree based on Bovidae and Cervidae MC1-R DNA sequences was in complete agreement with current taxonomy, and was supported by bootstrapping analysis. Due to different frequencies of silent vs. replacement mutations, the amino acid based phylogenetic tree contains several dissimilarities when compared to the DNA based phylogenetic tree. PMID:10628296

  19. Shockwave therapy differentially stimulates endothelial cells: implications on the control of inflammation via toll-Like receptor 3.

    PubMed

    Holfeld, Johannes; Tepeköylü, Can; Kozaryn, Radoslaw; Urbschat, Anja; Zacharowski, Kai; Grimm, Michael; Paulus, Patrick

    2014-02-01

    Shock wave therapy (SWT) reportedly improves ventricular function in ischemic heart failure. Angiogenesis and inflammation modulatory effects were described. However, the mechanism remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that SWT modulates inflammation via toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) through the release of cytosolic RNA. SWT was applied to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with 250 impulses, 0.08 mJ/mm(2) and 3 Hz. Gene expression of TLR3, inflammatory genes and signalling molecules was analysed at different time points by real-time polymerase chain reaction. SWT showed activation of HUVECs: enhanced expression of TLR3 and of the transporter protein for nucleic acids cyclophilin B, of pro-inflammatory cytokines cyclophilin A and interleukin-6 and of anti-inflammatory interleukin-10. No changes were found in the expression of vascular endothelial cell adhesion molecule. SWT modulates inflammation via the TLR3 pathway. The interaction between interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 in TLR3 stimulation can be schematically seen as a three-phase regulation over time.

  20. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor stimulation increases blood pressure and heart rate and activates autonomic regulatory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Lee, Charlotte E.; Marcus, Jacob N.; Williams, Todd D.; Overton, J. Michael; Lopez, Marisol E.; Hollenberg, Anthony N.; Baggio, Laurie; Saper, Clifford B.; Drucker, Daniel J.; Elmquist, Joel K.

    2002-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) released from the gut functions as an incretin that stimulates insulin secretion. GLP-1 is also a brain neuropeptide that controls feeding and drinking behavior and gastric emptying and elicits neuroendocrine responses including development of conditioned taste aversion. Although GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists are under development for the treatment of diabetes, GLP-1 administration may increase blood pressure and heart rate in vivo. We report here that centrally and peripherally administered GLP-1R agonists dose-dependently increased blood pressure and heart rate. GLP-1R activation induced c-fos expression in the adrenal medulla and neurons in autonomic control sites in the rat brain, including medullary catecholamine neurons providing input to sympathetic preganglionic neurons. Furthermore, GLP-1R agonists rapidly activated tyrosine hydroxylase transcription in brainstem catecholamine neurons. These findings suggest that the central GLP-1 system represents a regulator of sympathetic outflow leading to downstream activation of cardiovascular responses in vivo. PMID:12093887

  1. G Protein-Coupled Receptor and RhoA-Stimulated Transcriptional Responses: Links to Inflammation, Differentiation, and Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Olivia M; Brown, Joan Heller

    2015-07-01

    The low molecular weight G protein RhoA (rat sarcoma virus homolog family member A) serves as a node for transducing signals through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Activation of RhoA occurs through coupling of G proteins, most prominently, G12/13, to Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors. The GPCR ligands that are most efficacious for RhoA activation include thrombin, lysophosphatidic acid, sphingosine-1-phosphate, and thromboxane A2. These ligands also stimulate proliferation, differentiation, and inflammation in a variety of cell and tissues types. The molecular events underlying these responses are the activation of transcription factors, transcriptional coactivators, and downstream gene programs. This review describes the pathways leading from GPCRs and RhoA to the regulation of activator protein-1, NFκB (nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells), myocardin-related transcription factor A, and Yes-associated protein. We also focus on the importance of two prominent downstream transcriptional gene targets, the inflammatory mediator cyclooxygenase 2, and the matricellular protein cysteine-rich angiogenic inducer 61 (CCN1). Finally, we describe the importance of GPCR-induced activation of these pathways in the pathophysiology of cancer, fibrosis, and cardiovascular disease.

  2. Adenosine A2A receptor stimulation decreases GAT-1-mediated GABA uptake in the globus pallidus of the rat.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Brenda; Paz, Francisco; Florán, Leonor; Aceves, Jorge; Erlij, David; Florán, Benjamín

    2006-07-01

    We examined modulation of [(3)H]GABA uptake in slices of the rat globus pallidus because stimulation of adenosine A(2A) receptors increases extracellular GABA in this structure. Pharmacological analysis showed that GAT-1 is the main transporter present in these slices. Both adenosine and the A(2A) agonist CGS 21680 reduced GABA uptake. Antagonist ZM 241385 prevented these effects. Agents that increase protein kinase A activity like forskolin and 8-bromo-cAMP also inhibited GABA uptake. The inhibition of uptake produced by these substances and by CGS 21680 was prevented by the protein kinase A blocker H-89. The protein phosphatase blocker okadaic acid reduced uptake; this effect and the response to CGS 21680 were not additive. The effective concentrations of adenosine (EC(50)=15.2microM) are within the range measured in the interstitial fluid under some physiological conditions. Thus, inhibition of uptake may be important in increasing interstitial GABA during endogenous adenosine release.

  3. Single-cell analysis of innate cytokine responses to pattern recognition receptor stimulation in children across four continents.

    PubMed

    Smolen, Kinga K; Cai, Bing; Gelinas, Laura; Fortuno, Edgardo S; Larsen, Martin; Speert, David P; Chamekh, Mustapha; Cooper, Philip J; Esser, Monika; Marchant, Arnaud; Kollmann, Tobias R

    2014-09-15

    Innate immunity instructs adaptive immunity, and suppression of innate immunity is associated with an increased risk for infection. We showed previously that whole-blood cellular components from a cohort of South African children secreted significantly lower levels of most cytokines following stimulation of pattern recognition receptors compared with whole blood from cohorts of Ecuadorian, Belgian, or Canadian children. To begin dissecting the responsible molecular mechanisms, we set out to identify the relevant cellular source of these differences. Across the four cohorts represented in our study, we identified significant variation in the cellular composition of whole blood; however, a significant reduction in the intracellular cytokine production on the single-cell level was only detected in South African children's monocytes, conventional dendritic cells, and plasmacytoid dendritic cells. We also uncovered a marked reduction in polyfunctionality for each of these cellular compartments in South African children compared with children from the other continents. Together, our data identify differences in cell composition, as well as profoundly lower functional responses of innate cells, in our cohort of South African children. A possible link between altered innate immunity and increased risk for infection or lower response to vaccines in South African infants needs to be explored.

  4. The interaction of reflexes elicited by stimulation of carotid body chemoreceptors and receptors in the nasal mucosa affecting respiration and pulse interval in the dog.

    PubMed

    Angell-James, J E; Daly, M de B

    1973-02-01

    1. The effects on respiration and pulse interval of stimulation of the carotid body chemoreceptors before, during and after stimulation of receptors in the nose have been studied in the anaesthetized dog.2. Stimulation of a carotid body by infusion of cyanide into the ipsi-lateral common carotid artery causes hyperpnoea and either an increase, decrease or no change in pulse interval.3. Excitation of