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Sample records for a3 receptor stimulation

  1. A(3) adenosine receptor ligands: history and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Baraldi, P G; Cacciari, B; Romagnoli, R; Merighi, S; Varani, K; Borea, P A; Spalluto, G

    2000-03-01

    Adenosine regulates many physiological functions through specific cell membrane receptors. On the basis of pharmacological studies and molecular cloning, four different adenosine receptors have been identified and classified as A(1), A(2A), A(2B), and A(3). These adenosine receptors are members of the G-protein-coupled receptor family. While adenosine A(1) and A(2A) receptor subtypes have been pharmacologically characterized through the use of selective ligands, the A(3) adenosine receptor subtype is presently under study in order to better understand its physio-pathological functions. Activation of adenosine A(3) receptors has been shown to stimulate phospholipase C and D and to inhibit adenylate cyclase. Activation of A(3) adenosine receptors also causes the release of inflammatory mediators such as histamine from mast cells. These mediators are responsible for processes such as inflammation and hypotension. It has also been suggested that the A(3) receptor plays an important role in brain ischemia, immunosuppression, and bronchospasm in several animal models. Based on these results, highly selective A(3) adenosine receptor agonists and/or antagonists have been indicated as potential drugs for the treatment of asthma and inflammation, while highly selective agonists have been shown to possess cardioprotective effects. The updated material related to this field of research has been rationalized and arranged in order to offer an overview of the topic. PMID:10723024

  2. Role of A3 adenosine receptor in diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Heng; Zhang, Enshui; Feng, Chang; Zhao, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Neuropathy is the most common diabetic complication. Although the A1 and A2A adenosine receptors are important pharmacological targets in alleviating diabetic neuropathy, the role of the A3 adenosine receptor remains unknown. Because the A3 adenosine receptor regulates pain induced by chronic constriction injury or chemotherapy, its stimulation might also attenuate diabetic neuropathy. This study examines the effects of systemic treatment with the A3 adenosine receptor agonist 1-deoxy-1-[6-[[(3-iodophenyl)methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-N-methyl-β-d-ribofuranuronamide (IB-MECA) on diabetic neuropathy and explores the putative mechanisms underlying its pharmacological effects. We show that IB-MECA alleviated mechanical hyperalgesia and thermal hypoalgesia in mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after streptozocin (STZ) treatment. Furthermore, IB-MECA prevented the reduction in sciatic motor nerve conduction velocity and sensory nerve conduction velocity in diabetic mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after STZ treatment. Similarly, IB-MECA inhibited the activation of nuclear factor-κB and decreased the generation of tumor necrosis factor-α in the spinal cord of mice 2 weeks but not 4 weeks after STZ treatment. These phenomena were associated with reduction of A3 adenosine receptor expression in the spinal cord after long-term diabetes. Our results suggest that the A3 adenosine receptor plays a critical role in regulating diabetic neuropathy and that reduction in A3 adenosine receptor expression/function might contribute to the progression of diabetic neuropathy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27319979

  3. Progesterone receptors and ventilatory stimulation by progestin.

    PubMed

    Brodeur, P; Mockus, M; McCullough, R; Moore, L G

    1986-02-01

    Progestin is thought to be a ventilatory stimulant but its effectiveness in raising ventilation is variable in humans and other species. We hypothesized that the level of progesterone receptors was an important determinant of the ventilatory response to progestin. Since estradiol induces progesterone receptor formation, we compared the ventilatory effect of the synthetic progestin medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) given in combination with estradiol with the effects of estradiol alone, MPA alone, or vehicle (saline) in ovariectomized rats. Animals receiving MPA alone had low numbers of progesterone receptors (2.43 pmol/g uterine wt) and had no change in ventilation, arterial Pco2, or Po2. MPA administration raised ventilation 23 +/- 5%, lowered arterial Pco2 3.2 +/- 0.9 Torr (both P less than 0.01) and tended to raise arterial Po2 when given in combination with estradiol to animals with increased numbers of progesterone receptors (4.85 pmol/g uterine wt). Estradiol alone produced the highest number of progesterone receptors (12.3 pmol/g uterine wt) but had no effect on ventilation or arterial Pco2 and decreased arterial Po2. Combined estradiol plus MPA treatment produced a greater fall in arterial Pco2 than did treatment with MPA alone, estradiol, or saline (all P less than 0.05). These results suggest that both an elevation in progestin levels and progesterone receptor numbers are required to stimulate ventilation. PMID:2936712

  4. Can Eph receptors stimulate the mind?

    PubMed

    Murai, Keith K; Pasquale, Elena B

    2002-01-17

    The Eph receptors are multitalented tyrosine kinases capable of performing many tasks. The receptors together with their ligands--the ephrins--are well known to play a critical role in the initial assembly of neuronal circuits in the embryo. However, the recently discovered function of these receptors in the adult brain is now receiving significant acclaim. Three new articles show that the Eph receptors continue to be important in modifying the strength of existing neuronal connections (synapses). They do so in close association with at least one family of ion channels, the NMDA receptors. PMID:11804564

  5. Cloning, expression and pharmacological characterization of rabbit adenosine A1 and A3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Hill, R J; Oleynek, J J; Hoth, C F; Kiron, M A; Weng, W; Wester, R T; Tracey, W R; Knight, D R; Buchholz, R A; Kennedy, S P

    1997-01-01

    The role of adenosine A1 and A3 receptors in mediating cardioprotection has been studied predominantly in rabbits, yet the pharmacological characteristics of rabbit adenosine A1 and A3 receptor subtypes are unknown. Thus, the rabbit adenosine A3 receptor was cloned and expressed, and its pharmacology was compared with that of cloned adenosine A1 receptors. Stable transfection of rabbit A1 or A3 cDNAs in Chinese hamster ovary-K1 cells resulted in high levels of expression of each of the receptors, as demonstrated by high-affinity binding of the A1/A3 adenosine receptor agonist N6-(4-amino-3-[125I]iodobenzyl)adenosine (125I-ABA). For both receptors, binding of 125I-ABA was inhibited by the GTP analog 5'-guanylimidodiphosphate, and forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation was inhibited by the adenosine receptor agonist (R)-phenylisopropyladenosine. The rank orders of potency of adenosine receptor agonists for inhibition of 125I-ABA binding were as follows: rabbit A1, N6-cyclopentyladenosine = (R)-phenylisopropyladenosine > N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine > or = I-ABA > or = N6-2-(4-aminophenyl) ethyladenosine > > N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide > N6-(4-amino-3-benzyl)adenosine; rabbit A3, N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide > or = I-ABA > > N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine > N6-2-(4-aminophenyl) ethyladenosine = N6-cyclopentyladenosine = (R)-phenylisopropyladenosine > N6-(4-amino-3-benzyl)adenosine. The adenosine receptor antagonist rank orders were as follow: rabbit A1, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine > 1,3- dipropyl-8-(4-acrylate)phenylxanthine > or = xanthine amine congener > > 8-(p-sulfophenyl)theophylline; rabbit A3, xanthine amine congener > 1,3-dipropyl-8-(4-acrylate)phenylxanthine > or = 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine > > 8-(p-sulfophenyl)theophylline. These observations confirm the identity of the expressed proteins as A1 and A3 receptors. The results will facilitate further in-depth studies of the roles of A1 and A3 receptors in

  6. Pharmacological and Therapeutic Effects of A3 Adenosine Receptor (A3AR) Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, Pnina; Bar-Yehuda, Sara; Liang, Bruce T.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2011-01-01

    The Gi-coupled A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) mediates anti-inflammatory, anticancer and anti-ischemic protective effects. The receptor is overexpressed in inflammatory and cancer cells, while low expression is found in normal cells, rendering the A3AR as a potential therapeutic target. Highly selective A3AR agonists have been synthesized and molecular recognition in the binding site has been characterized. The present review summarizes preclinical and clinical human studies demonstrating that A3AR agonists induce specific anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects via a molecular mechanism that entails modulation of the Wnt and the NF-κB signal transduction pathways. Currently, A3AR agonists are being developed for the treatment of inflammatory diseases including rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis; ophthalmic diseases such as dry eye syndrome and glaucoma; liver diseases such as hepatocellular carcinoma and hepatitis. PMID:22033198

  7. Stimulation of the dopamine 1 receptor increases lung edema clearance.

    PubMed

    Barnard, M L; Ridge, K M; Saldias, F; Friedman, E; Gare, M; Guerrero, C; Lecuona, E; Bertorello, A M; Katz, A I; Sznajder, J I

    1999-09-01

    We previously reported that lung edema clearance was stimulated by dopamine (DA). The purpose of this study was to determine whether the DA-mediated stimulation of edema clearance occurs via an adrenergic or dopaminergic regulation of alveolar epithelial Na, K-ATPase. When isolated perfused rat lungs were coinstilled with DA and SCH 23390 (a specific D(1) receptor antagonist), there was a dose-dependent attenuation of the stimulatory effects of DA. Coinstillation with S-sulpiride (a specific D(2) receptor antagonist) or propranolol (a beta-adrenergic antagonist) did not alter DA-stimulated clearance. Similarly, the specific dopaminergic D(1) agonist fenoldopam increased lung edema clearance, but quinpirole (a specific dopaminergic D(2) agonist) did not. (125)I-SCH 23982 binding studies suggested that D(1) receptors are expressed on alveolar type II (ATII) cells with an apparent dissociation constant (K(d)) of 4.4 nM and binding maximum (Bmax) 9.8 pmol/mg. Consistent with these results, the D(1) receptor messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein were detected in ATII cells by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot analysis, respectively. These data demonstrate a novel mechanism involving the activation of dopaminergic D(1) receptors which mediates DA-stimulated edema removal from rat lungs. PMID:10471628

  8. The A3 adenosine receptor: history and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Tabrizi, Mojgan Aghazadeh; Merighi, Stefania; Gessi, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    By general consensus, the omnipresent purine nucleoside adenosine is considered a major regulator of local tissue function, especially when energy supply fails to meet cellular energy demand. Adenosine mediation involves activation of a family of four G protein-coupled adenosine receptors (ARs): A(1), A(2)A, A(2)B, and A(3). The A(3) adenosine receptor (A(3)AR) is the only adenosine subtype to be overexpressed in inflammatory and cancer cells, thus making it a potential target for therapy. Originally isolated as an orphan receptor, A(3)AR presented a twofold nature under different pathophysiologic conditions: it appeared to be protective/harmful under ischemic conditions, pro/anti-inflammatory, and pro/antitumoral depending on the systems investigated. Until recently, the greatest and most intriguing challenge has been to understand whether, and in which cases, selective A(3) agonists or antagonists would be the best choice. Today, the choice has been made and A(3)AR agonists are now under clinical development for some disorders including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, glaucoma, and hepatocellular carcinoma. More specifically, the interest and relevance of these new agents derives from clinical data demonstrating that A(3)AR agonists are both effective and safe. Thus, it will become apparent in the present review that purine scientists do seem to be getting closer to their goal: the incorporation of adenosine ligands into drugs with the ability to save lives and improve human health. PMID:25387804

  9. Peripheral Adenosine A3 Receptor Activation Causes Regulated Hypothermia in Mice That Is Dependent on Central Histamine H1 Receptors.

    PubMed

    Carlin, Jesse Lea; Tosh, Dilip K; Xiao, Cuiying; Piñol, Ramón A; Chen, Zhoumou; Salvemini, Daniela; Gavrilova, Oksana; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Reitman, Marc L

    2016-02-01

    Adenosine can induce hypothermia, as previously demonstrated for adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) agonists. Here we use the potent, specific A3AR agonists MRS5698, MRS5841, and MRS5980 to show that adenosine also induces hypothermia via the A3AR. The hypothermic effect of A3AR agonists is independent of A1AR activation, as the effect was fully intact in mice lacking A1AR but abolished in mice lacking A3AR. A3AR agonist-induced hypothermia was attenuated by mast cell granule depletion, demonstrating that the A3AR hypothermia is mediated, at least in part, via mast cells. Central agonist dosing had no clear hypothermic effect, whereas peripheral dosing of a non-brain-penetrant agonist caused hypothermia, suggesting that peripheral A3AR-expressing cells drive the hypothermia. Mast cells release histamine, and blocking central histamine H1 (but not H2 or H4) receptors prevented the hypothermia. The hypothermia was preceded by hypometabolism and mice with hypothermia preferred a cooler environmental temperature, demonstrating that the hypothermic state is a coordinated physiologic response with a reduced body temperature set point. Importantly, hypothermia is not required for the analgesic effects of A3AR agonists, which occur with lower agonist doses. These results support a mechanistic model for hypothermia in which A3AR agonists act on peripheral mast cells, causing histamine release, which stimulates central histamine H1 receptors to induce hypothermia. This mechanism suggests that A3AR agonists will probably not be useful for clinical induction of hypothermia. PMID:26606937

  10. Peripheral Adenosine A3 Receptor Activation Causes Regulated Hypothermia in Mice That Is Dependent on Central Histamine H1 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Carlin, Jesse Lea; Tosh, Dilip K.; Xiao, Cuiying; Piñol, Ramón A.; Chen, Zhoumou; Salvemini, Daniela; Gavrilova, Oksana; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine can induce hypothermia, as previously demonstrated for adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) agonists. Here we use the potent, specific A3AR agonists MRS5698, MRS5841, and MRS5980 to show that adenosine also induces hypothermia via the A3AR. The hypothermic effect of A3AR agonists is independent of A1AR activation, as the effect was fully intact in mice lacking A1AR but abolished in mice lacking A3AR. A3AR agonist–induced hypothermia was attenuated by mast cell granule depletion, demonstrating that the A3AR hypothermia is mediated, at least in part, via mast cells. Central agonist dosing had no clear hypothermic effect, whereas peripheral dosing of a non–brain-penetrant agonist caused hypothermia, suggesting that peripheral A3AR-expressing cells drive the hypothermia. Mast cells release histamine, and blocking central histamine H1 (but not H2 or H4) receptors prevented the hypothermia. The hypothermia was preceded by hypometabolism and mice with hypothermia preferred a cooler environmental temperature, demonstrating that the hypothermic state is a coordinated physiologic response with a reduced body temperature set point. Importantly, hypothermia is not required for the analgesic effects of A3AR agonists, which occur with lower agonist doses. These results support a mechanistic model for hypothermia in which A3AR agonists act on peripheral mast cells, causing histamine release, which stimulates central histamine H1 receptors to induce hypothermia. This mechanism suggests that A3AR agonists will probably not be useful for clinical induction of hypothermia. PMID:26606937

  11. Increased expression of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in stimulated muscle.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Clare; Pette, Dirk; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2003-01-10

    Chronic low-frequency stimulation has been used as a model for investigating responses of skeletal muscle fibres to enhanced neuromuscular activity under conditions of maximum activation. Fast-to-slow isoform shifting of markers of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the contractile apparatus demonstrated successful fibre transitions prior to studying the effect of chronic electro-stimulation on the expression of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Comparative immunoblotting revealed that the alpha- and delta-subunits of the receptor were increased in 10-78 day stimulated specimens, while an associated component of the surface utrophin-glycoprotein complex, beta-dystroglycan, was not drastically changed in stimulated fast skeletal muscle. Previous studies have shown that electro-stimulation induces degeneration of fast glycolytic fibres, trans-differentiation leading to fast-to-slow fibre transitions and activation of muscle precursor cells. In analogy, our results indicate a molecular modification of the central functional unit of the post-synaptic muscle surface within existing neuromuscular junctions and/or during remodelling of nerve-muscle contacts. PMID:12504123

  12. Manipulation of P2X Receptor Activities by Light Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Seong

    2016-01-01

    P2X receptors are involved in amplification of inflammatory responses in peripheral nociceptive fibers and in mediating pain-related signals to the CNS. Control of P2X activation has significant importance in managing unwanted hypersensitive neuron responses. To overcome the limitations of chemical ligand treatment, optical stimulation methods of optogenetics and photoswitching achieve efficient control of P2X activation while allowing specificity at the target site and convenient stimulation by light illumination. There are many potential applications for photosensitive elements, such as improved uncaging methods, photoisomerizable ligands, photoswitches, and gold nanoparticles. Each technique has both advantages and downsides, and techniques are selected according to the purpose of the application. Technical advances not only provide novel approaches to manage inflammation or pain mediated by P2X receptors but also suggest a similar approach for controlling other ion channels. PMID:26884649

  13. A 3D glass optrode array for optical neural stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Abaya, T.V.F.; Blair, S.; Tathireddy, P.; Rieth, L.; Solzbacher, F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents optical characterization of a first-generation SiO2 optrode array as a set of penetrating waveguides for both optogenetic and infrared (IR) neural stimulation. Fused silica and quartz discs of 3-mm thickness and 50-mm diameter were micromachined to yield 10 × 10 arrays of up to 2-mm long optrodes at a 400-μm pitch; array size, length and spacing may be varied along with the width and tip angle. Light delivery and loss mechanisms through these glass optrodes were characterized. Light in-coupling techniques include using optical fibers and collimated beams. Losses involve Fresnel reflection, coupling, scattering and total internal reflection in the tips. Transmission efficiency was constant in the visible and near-IR range, with the highest value measured as 71% using a 50-μm multi-mode in-coupling fiber butt-coupled to the backplane of the device. Transmittance and output beam profiles of optrodes with different geometries was investigated. Length and tip angle do not affect the amount of output power, but optrode width and tip angle influence the beam size and divergence independently. Finally, array insertion in tissue was performed to demonstrate its robustness for optical access in deep tissue. PMID:23243561

  14. Identification and function of adenosine A3 receptor in afferent arterioles.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Zhang, Rui; Ge, Ying; Carlstrom, Mattias; Wang, Shaohui; Fu, Yiling; Cheng, Liang; Wei, Jin; Roman, Richard J; Wang, Lei; Gao, Xichun; Liu, Ruisheng

    2015-05-01

    Adenosine plays an important role in regulation of renal microcirculation. All receptors of adenosine, A1, A2A, A2B, and A3, have been found in the kidney. However, little is known about the location and function of the A3 receptor in the kidney. The present study determined the expression and role of A3 receptors in mediating the afferent arteriole (Af-Art) response and studied the interaction of A3 receptors with angiotensin II (ANG II), A1 and A2 receptors on the Af-Art. We found that the A3 receptor expressed in microdissected isolated Af-Art and the mRNA levels of A3 receptor were 59% of A1. In the isolated microperfused Af-Art, A3 receptor agonist IB-MECA did not have a constrictive effect. Activation of A3 receptor dilated the preconstricted Af-Art by norepinephrine and blunted the vasoconstrictive effect of both adenosine A1 receptor activation and ANG II on the Af-Art, respectively. Selective A2 receptor antagonist (both A2A and A2B) had no effect on A3 receptor agonist-induced vasodilation, indicating that the dilatory effect of A3 receptor activation is not mediated by activation of A2 receptor. We conclude that the A3 receptor is expressed in the Af-Art, and activation of the A3 receptor dilates the Af-Art. PMID:25608966

  15. Endocannabinoids Stimulate Human Melanogenesis via Type-1 Cannabinoid Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Mariangela; Pasquariello, Nicoletta; Battista, Natalia; Di Tommaso, Monia; Rapino, Cinzia; Fezza, Filomena; Zuccolo, Michela; Jourdain, Roland; Finazzi Agrò, Alessandro; Breton, Lionel; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    We show that a fully functional endocannabinoid system is present in primary human melanocytes (normal human epidermal melanocyte cells), including anandamide (AEA), 2-arachidonoylglycerol, the respective target receptors (CB1, CB2, and TRPV1), and their metabolic enzymes. We also show that at higher concentrations AEA induces normal human epidermal melanocyte apoptosis (∼3-fold over controls at 5 μm) through a TRPV1-mediated pathway that increases DNA fragmentation and p53 expression. However, at lower concentrations, AEA and other CB1-binding endocannabinoids dose-dependently stimulate melanin synthesis and enhance tyrosinase gene expression and activity (∼3- and ∼2-fold over controls at 1 μm). This CB1-dependent activity was fully abolished by the selective CB1 antagonist SR141716 or by RNA interference of the receptor. CB1 signaling engaged p38 and p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinases, which in turn activated the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein and the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor. Silencing of tyrosinase or microphthalmia-associated transcription factor further demonstrated the involvement of these proteins in AEA-induced melanogenesis. In addition, CB1 activation did not engage the key regulator of skin pigmentation, cyclic AMP, showing a major difference compared with the regulation of melanogenesis by α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone through melanocortin 1 receptor. PMID:22431736

  16. Prostaglandin A2 enhances cellular insulin sensitivity via a mechanism that involves the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A3.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X; Walton, R G; Tian, L; Luo, N; Ho, S-R; Fu, Y; Garvey, W T

    2013-03-01

    We have previously reported that members of the NR4A family of orphan nuclear receptors can augment insulin's ability to stimulate glucose transport in adipocytes. In the current study, we endeavored to test for an insulin-sensitizing effect in muscle cells and to identify a potential transactivator. Lentiviral constructs were used to engineer both hyperexpression and shRNA silencing of NR4A3 in C2C12 myocytes. The NR4A3 hyper-expression construct led to a significant increase in glucose transport rates in the presence of maximal insulin while the NR4A3 knock-down exhibited a significant reduction in insulin-stimulated glucose transport rates. Consistently, insulin-mediated AKT phosphorylation was increased by NR4A3 hyperexpression and decreased following shRNA NR4A3 suppression. Then, we examined effects of prostaglandin A2 (PGA2) on insulin action and NR4A3 transactivation. PGA2 augmented insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in C2C12 myocytes and AKT phosphorylation after 12-h treatment, without significant effects on basal transport or basal AKT phosphorylation. More importantly, we demonstrated that PGA2 led to a greater improvement in insulin-stimulated glucose rates in NR4A3 overexpressing C2C12 myocytes, when compared with Lac-Z controls stimulated with insulin and PGA2. Moreover, the sensitizing effect of PGA2 was significantly diminished in NR4A3 knockdown myocytes compared to scramble controls. These results show for the first time that: (i) PGA2 augments insulin action in myocytes as manifested by enhanced stimulation of glucose transport and AKT phosphorylation; and (ii) the insulin sensitizing effect is dependent upon the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A3. PMID:23104421

  17. Adenosine A3 receptor activation is neuroprotective against retinal neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Galvao, Joana; Elvas, Filipe; Martins, Tiago; Cordeiro, M Francesca; Ambrósio, António Francisco; Santiago, Ana Raquel

    2015-11-01

    Death of retinal neural cells, namely retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), is a characteristic of several retinal neurodegenerative diseases. Although the role of adenosine A3 receptor (A3R) in neuroprotection is controversial, A3R activation has been reported to afford protection against several brain insults, with few studies in the retina. In vitro models (retinal neural and organotypic cultures) and animal models [ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) and partial optic nerve transection (pONT)] were used to study the neuroprotective properties of A3R activation against retinal neurodegeneration. The A3R selective agonist (2-Cl-IB-MECA, 1 μM) prevented apoptosis (TUNEL(+)-cells) induced by kainate and cyclothiazide (KA + CTZ) in retinal neural cultures (86.5 ± 7.4 and 37.2 ± 6.1 TUNEL(+)-cells/field, in KA + CTZ and KA + CTZ + 2-Cl-IB-MECA, respectively). In retinal organotypic cultures, 2-Cl-IB-MECA attenuated NMDA-induced cell death, assessed by TUNEL (17.3 ± 2.3 and 8.3 ± 1.2 TUNEL(+)-cells/mm(2) in NMDA and NMDA+2-Cl-IB-MECA, respectively) and PI incorporation (ratio DIV4/DIV2 3.3 ± 0.3 and 1.3 ± 0.1 in NMDA and NMDA+2-Cl-IB-MECA, respectively) assays. Intravitreal 2-Cl-IB-MECA administration afforded protection against I-R injury decreasing the number of TUNEL(+) cells by 72%, and increased RGC survival by 57%. Also, intravitreal administration of 2-Cl-IB-MECA inhibited apoptosis (from 449.4 ± 37.8 to 207.6 ± 48.9 annexin-V(+)-cells) and RGC loss (from 1.2 ± 0.6 to 8.1 ± 1.7 cells/mm) induced by pONT. This study demonstrates that 2-Cl-IB-MECA is neuroprotective to the retina, both in vitro and in vivo. Activation of A3R may have great potential in the management of retinal neurodegenerative diseases characterized by RGC death, as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, and ischemic diseases. PMID:26297614

  18. Stimulation by toll-like receptors inhibits osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Takami, Masamichi; Kim, Nacksung; Rho, Jaerang; Choi, Yongwon

    2002-08-01

    Osteoclasts, the cells capable of resorbing bone, are derived from hemopoietic precursor cells of monocyte-macrophage lineage. The same precursor cells can also give rise to macrophages and dendritic cells, which are essential for proper immune responses to various pathogens. Immune responses to microbial pathogens are often triggered because various microbial components induce the maturation and activation of immunoregulatory cells such as macrophages or dendritic cells by stimulating Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Since osteoclasts arise from the same precursors as macrophages, we tested whether TLRs play any role during osteoclast differentiation. We showed here that osteoclast precursors prepared from mouse bone marrow cells expressed all known murine TLRs (TLR1-TLR9). Moreover, various TLR ligands (e.g., peptidoglycan, poly(I:C) dsRNA, LPS, and CpG motif of unmethylated DNA, which act as ligands for TLR2, 3, 4, and 9, respectively) induced NF-kappa B activation and up-regulated TNF-alpha production in osteoclast precursor cells. Unexpectedly, however, TLR stimulation of osteoclast precursors by these microbial products strongly inhibited their differentiation into multinucleated, mature osteoclasts induced by TNF-related activation-induced cytokine. Rather, TLR stimulation maintained the phagocytic activity of osteoclast precursors in the presence of osteoclastogenic stimuli M-CSF and TNF-related activation-induced cytokine. Taken together, these results suggest that TLR stimulation of osteoclast precursors inhibits their differentiation into noninflammatory mature osteoclasts during microbial infection. This process favors immune responses and may be critical to prevent pathogenic effects of microbial invasion on bone. PMID:12133979

  19. Transferrin receptor expression by stimulated cells in mixed lymphocyte culture.

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, M; Bacon, P A; Symmons, D P; Walton, K W

    1985-01-01

    Transferrin receptor (TRFr) expression by cells in mixed lymphocyte culture increases steadily for the first 5 days, but then reaches a plateau. By the sixth day in culture, about 20% of viable cells express TRFr in two-way mixed lymphocyte reactions. This subpopulation of TRFr-positive cells represents the proliferating population; it is heterogeneous, containing T-cell blasts and smaller cells which are a mixture of T and non-T cells. A small group of non-T cells have phenotypic similarity to natural killer (NK) cells. T cells appear to divide earlier in the course of the response than non-T cells. The biphasic nature of this response and the slower non-T reactivity may be due to a secondary stimulation of non-T cells by factors released from activated T cells (such as interleukin-2). PMID:2982734

  20. Thrombin stimulates insulin secretion via protease-activated receptor-3

    PubMed Central

    Hänzelmann, Sonja; Wang, Jinling; Güney, Emre; Tang, Yunzhao; Zhang, Enming; Axelsson, Annika S; Nenonen, Hannah; Salehi, Albert S; Wollheim, Claes B; Zetterberg, Eva; Berntorp, Erik; Costa, Ivan G; Castelo, Robert; Rosengren, Anders H

    2015-01-01

    The disease mechanisms underlying type 2 diabetes (T2D) remain poorly defined. Here we aimed to explore the pathophysiology of T2D by analyzing gene co-expression networks in human islets. Using partial correlation networks we identified a group of co-expressed genes (‘module’) including F2RL2 that was associated with glycated hemoglobin. F2Rl2 is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that encodes protease-activated receptor-3 (PAR3). PAR3 is cleaved by thrombin, which exposes a 6-amino acid sequence that acts as a ‘tethered ligand’ to regulate cellular signaling. We have characterized the effect of PAR3 activation on insulin secretion by static insulin secretion measurements, capacitance measurements, studies of diabetic animal models and patient samples. We demonstrate that thrombin stimulates insulin secretion, an effect that was prevented by an antibody that blocks the thrombin cleavage site of PAR3. Treatment with a peptide corresponding to the PAR3 tethered ligand stimulated islet insulin secretion and single β-cell exocytosis by a mechanism that involves activation of phospholipase C and Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. Moreover, we observed that the expression of tissue factor, which regulates thrombin generation, was increased in human islets from T2D donors and associated with enhanced β-cell exocytosis. Finally, we demonstrate that thrombin generation potential in patients with T2D was associated with increased fasting insulin and insulinogenic index. The findings provide a previously unrecognized link between hypercoagulability and hyperinsulinemia and suggest that reducing thrombin activity or blocking PAR3 cleavage could potentially counteract the exaggerated insulin secretion that drives insulin resistance and β-cell exhaustion in T2D. PMID:26742564

  1. Metabolic mapping of A3 adenosine receptor agonist MRS5980.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhong-Ze; Tosh, Dilip K; Tanaka, Naoki; Wang, Haina; Krausz, Kristopher W; O'Connor, Robert; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2015-09-15

    (1S,2R,3S,4R,5S)-4-(2-((5-Chlorothiophen-2-yl)ethynyl)-6-(methylamino)-9H-purin-9-yl)-2,3-dihydroxy-N-methylbicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-1-carboxamide (MRS5980) is an A3AR selective agonist containing multiple receptor affinity- and selectivity-enhancing modifications and a therapeutic candidate drug for many inflammatory diseases. Metabolism-related poor pharmacokinetic behavior and toxicities are a major reason for drug R&D failure. Metabolomics with UPLC-MS was employed to profile the metabolism of MRS5980 and MRS5980-induced disruption of endogenous compounds. Recombinant drug-metabolizing enzymes screening experiment were used to determine the enzymes involved in MRS5980 metabolism. Analysis of lipid metabolism-related genes was performed to investigate the reason for MRS5980-induced lipid metabolic disorders. Unsupervised principal components analysis separated the control and MRS5980 treatment groups in feces, urine, and liver samples, but not in bile and serum. The major ions mainly contributing to the separation of feces and urine were oxidized MRS5980, glutathione (GSH) conjugates and cysteine conjugate (degradation product of the GSH conjugates) of MRS5980. The major ions contributing to the group separation of liver samples were phosphatidylcholines. In vitro incubation experiments showed the involvement of CYP3A enzymes in the oxidative metabolism of MRS5980 and direct GSH reactivity of MRS5980. The electrophilic attack by MRS5980 is a minor pathway and did not alter GSH levels in liver or liver histology, and thus may be of minor clinical consequence. Gene expression analysis further showed decreased expression of PC biosynthetic genes choline kinase a and b, which further accelerated conversion of lysophosphatidylcholine to phosphatidylcholines through increasing the expression of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 3. These data will be useful to guide rational design of drugs targeting A3AR, considering efficacy, metabolic elimination, and

  2. Behavioral meaningful opioidergic stimulation activates kappa receptor gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Teodorov, E.; Ferrari, M.F.R.; Fior-Chadi, D.R.; Camarini, R.; Felício, L.F.

    2012-01-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG) has been reported to be a location for opioid regulation of pain and a potential site for behavioral selection in females. Opioid-mediated behavioral and physiological responses differ according to the activity of opioid receptor subtypes. The present study investigated the effects of the peripheral injection of the kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69593 into the dorsal subcutaneous region of animals on maternal behavior and on Oprk1 gene activity in the PAG of female rats. Female Wistar rats weighing 200-250 g at the beginning of the study were randomly divided into 2 groups for maternal behavior and gene expression experiments. On day 5, pups were removed at 7:00 am and placed in another home cage that was distant from their mother. Thirty minutes after removing the pups, the dams were treated with U69593 (0.15 mg/kg, sc) or 0.9% saline (up to 1 mL/kg) and after 30 min were evaluated in the maternal behavior test. Latencies in seconds for pup retrieval, grouping, crouching, and full maternal behavior were scored. The results showed that U69593 administration inhibited maternal behavior (P < 0.05) because a lower percentage of U69593 group dams showed retrieval of first pup, retrieving all pups, grouping, crouching and displaying full maternal behavior compared to the saline group. Opioid gene expression was evaluated using real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A single injection of U69593 increased Oprk1 PAG expression in both virgin (P < 0.05) and lactating female rats (P < 0.01), with no significant effect on Oprm1 or Oprd1 gene activity. Thus, the expression of kappa-opioid receptors in the PAG may be modulated by single opioid receptor stimulation and behavioral meaningful opioidergic transmission in the adult female might occur simultaneously to specific changes in gene expression of kappa-opioid receptor subtype. This is yet another alert for the complex role of the opioid system in female

  3. In vivo stimulation of oestrogen receptor α increases insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle glucose uptake

    PubMed Central

    Gorres, Brittany K; Bomhoff, Gregory L; Morris, Jill K; Geiger, Paige C

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies suggest oestrogen receptor α (ERα) is involved in oestrogen-mediated regulation of glucose metabolism and is critical for maintenance of whole body insulin action. Despite this, the effect of direct ERα modulation in insulin-responsive tissues is unknown. The purpose of the current study was to determine the impact of ERα activation, using the ER subtype-selective ligand propylpyrazoletriyl (PPT), on skeletal muscle glucose uptake. Two-month-old female Sprague–Dawley rats, ovariectomized for 1 week, were given subcutaneous injections of PPT (10 mg kg−1), oestradiol benzoate (EB; 20 μg kg−1), the ERβ agonist diarylpropionitrile (DPN, 10 mg kg−1) or vehicle every 24 h for 3 days. On the fourth day, insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle glucose uptake was measured in vitro and insulin signalling intermediates were assessed via Western blotting. Activation of ERα with PPT resulted in increased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake into the slow-twitch soleus and fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles, activation of insulin signalling intermediates (as measured by phospho-Akt (pAkt) and pAkt substrate (PAS)) and phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). GLUT4 protein was increased only in the EDL muscle. Rats treated with EB or DPN for 3 days did not show an increase in insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle glucose uptake compared to vehicle-treated animals. These new findings reveal that direct activation of ERα positively mediates glucose uptake and insulin action in skeletal muscle. Evidence that oestrogens and ERα stimulate glucose uptake has important implications for understanding mechanisms of glucose homeostasis, particularly in postmenopausal women. PMID:21486807

  4. Allosteric interactions at adenosine A1 and A3 receptors: new insights into the role of small molecules and receptor dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Stephen J; May, Lauren T; Kellam, Barrie; Woolard, Jeanette

    2014-01-01

    The purine nucleoside adenosine is present in all cells in tightly regulated concentrations. It is released under a variety of physiological and pathophysiological conditions to facilitate protection and regeneration of tissues. Adenosine acts via specific GPCRs to either stimulate cyclic AMP formation, as exemplified by Gs-protein-coupled adenosine receptors (A2A and A2B), or inhibit AC activity, in the case of Gi/o-coupled adenosine receptors (A1 and A3). Recent advances in our understanding of GPCR structure have provided insights into the conformational changes that occur during receptor activation following binding of agonists to orthosteric (i.e. at the same binding site as an endogenous modulator) and allosteric regulators to allosteric sites (i.e. at a site that is topographically distinct from the endogenous modulator). Binding of drugs to allosteric sites may lead to changes in affinity or efficacy, and affords considerable potential for increased selectivity in new drug development. Herein, we provide an overview of the properties of selective allosteric regulators of the adenosine A1 and A3 receptors, focusing on the impact of receptor dimerization, mechanistic approaches to single-cell ligand-binding kinetics and the effects of A1- and A3-receptor allosteric modulators on in vivo pharmacology. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of GPCRs. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-5 PMID:24024783

  5. Pharmacology of the Adenosine A3 Receptor in the Vasculature and Essential Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Ming-Fen; Low, Leanne M.; Rose’Meyer, Roselyn B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Essential hypertension is considered to be a multifactorial disorder and its aetiology has yet to be clearly identified. As the adenosine receptors have a significant role in mediating vasodilation, alterations in their structures or signalling pathways may be involved in the development of hypertension. This study aimed to measure the expression of adenosine A3 receptors in a range of cardiovascular tissues and determine whether they could be altered with essential hypertension, and to functionally test responses to adenosine A3 receptor agonists in coronary blood vessels using the isolated perfused heart preparation. Methods mRNA samples from cardiovascular tissues and a range of blood vessels were collected from 10 week old male spontaneously hypertensive rats and age-gender matched Wistar rats (n = 8). The Langendorff heart perfusion preparation was used to characterise adenosine A3 receptor mediated coronary vasodilation in the rat heart. Results Adenosine A3 receptor agonists induced coronary vasodilation. The expression of adenosine A3 receptors in cardiovascular tissues was altered in a tissue-specific pattern. Specifically, down-regulation of adenosine A3 receptor expression occurred in hypertensive hearts, which might be associated with attenuated vasodilator responses observed in coronary vessels to adenosine A3 receptor agonists. Conclusions This study demonstrated alterations in the expression of adenosine A3 receptors occurred in a tissue specific mode, and reduced adenosine A3 receptor mediated coronary vasodilation in hearts from spontaneously hypertensive rats. Our findings with regard to changes in the adenosine A3 receptor in hypertensive hearts suggest that adenosine A3 receptor might play a role in the physiopathology of essential hypertension and potentially open the way to pharmacologic manipulation of vasomotor activity by the use of adenosine A3 receptor agonists. PMID:26907173

  6. A Binding Site Model and Structure-Activity Relationships for the Rat A3 Adenosine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    VAN GALEN, PHILIP J. M.; VAN BERGEN, ANDREW H.; GALLO-RODRIGUEZ, CAROLA; MELMAN, NELI; OLAH, MARK E.; IJZERMAN, AD P.; STILES, GARY L.; JACOBSON, KENNETH A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY A novel adenosine receptor, the A3 receptor, has recently been cloned. We have systematically investigated the hitherto largely unexplored structure-activity relationships (SARs) for binding at A3 receptors, using 125I-N6-2-(4-aminophenyl)ethyladenosine as a radioligand and membranes from Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with the rat A3-cDNA. As is the case for A1 and A2a, receptors, substitutions at the N6 and 5′ positions of adenosine, the prototypic agonist ligand, may yield fairly potent compounds. However, the highest affinity and A3 selectivity is found for N6,5′-disubstituted compounds, in contrast to A1 and A2a receptors. Thus, N6-benzyladenosine-5′-N-ethylcarboxamide is highly potent (Ki, 6.8 nM) and moderately selective (13- and 14-fold versus A1 and A2a). The N6 region of the A3 receptor also appears to tolerate hydrophilic substitutions, in sharp contrast to the other subtypes. Potencies of N6,5′-disubstituted compounds in inhibition of adenylate cyclase via A3 receptors parallel their high affinity in the binding assay. None of the typical xanthine or nonxanthine (A1/A2) antagonists tested show any appreciable affinity for rat A3 receptors. 1,3-Dialkylxanthines did not antagonize the A3 agonist-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase. A His residue in helix 6 that is absent in A3 receptors but present in A1/A2 receptors may be causal in this respect. In a molecular model for the rat A3 receptor, this mutation, together with an increased bulkiness of residues surrounding the ligand, make antagonist binding unfavorable when compared with a previously developed A1 receptor model. Second, this A3 receptor model predicted similarities with A1 and A2 receptors in the binding requirements for the ribose moiety and that xanthine-7-ribosides would bind to rat A3 receptors. This hypothesis was supported experimentally by the moderate affinity (Ki 6 μM) of 7-riboside of 1,3-dibutylxanthine, which appears to be a partial agonist at

  7. Identification of A3 adenosine receptor agonists as novel non-narcotic analgesics.

    PubMed

    Janes, K; Symons-Liguori, A M; Jacobson, K A; Salvemini, D

    2016-04-01

    Chronic pain negatively impacts the quality of life in a variety of patient populations. The current therapeutic repertoire is inadequate in managing patient pain and warrants the development of new therapeutics. Adenosine and its four cognate receptors (A1 , A2A , A2B and A3 ) have important roles in physiological and pathophysiological states, including chronic pain. Preclinical and clinical studies have revealed that while adenosine and agonists of the A1 and A2A receptors have antinociceptive properties, their therapeutic utility is limited by adverse cardiovascular side effects. In contrast, our understanding of the A3 receptor is only in its infancy, but exciting preclinical observations of A3 receptor antinociception, which have been bolstered by clinical trials of A3 receptor agonists in other disease states, suggest pain relief without cardiovascular side effects and with sufficient tolerability. Our goal herein is to briefly discuss adenosine and its receptors in the context of pathological pain and to consider the current data regarding A3 receptor-mediated antinociception. We will highlight recent findings regarding the impact of the A3 receptor on pain pathways and examine the current state of selective A3 receptor agonists used for these studies. The adenosine-to-A3 receptor pathway represents an important endogenous system that can be targeted to provide safe, effective pain relief from chronic pain. PMID:26804983

  8. Extracellular Nucleotides Inhibit Insulin Receptor Signaling, Stimulate Autophagy and Control Lipoprotein Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Cynthia; Sparks, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is associated with abnormal plasma lipoprotein metabolism and with an elevation in circulating nucleotide levels. We evaluated how extracellular nucleotides may act to perturb hepatic lipoprotein secretion. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) (>10 µM) acts like a proteasomal inhibitor to stimulate apoB100 secretion and inhibit apoA-I secretion from human liver cells at 4 h and 24 h. ADP blocks apoA-I secretion by stimulating autophagy. The nucleotide increases cellular levels of the autophagosome marker, LC3-II, and increases co-localization of LC3 with apoA-I in punctate autophagosomes. ADP affects autophagy and apoA-I secretion through P2Y13. Overexpression of P2Y13 increases cellular LC3-II levels by ∼50% and blocks induction of apoA-I secretion. Conversely, a siRNA-induced reduction in P2Y13 protein expression of 50% causes a similar reduction in cellular LC3-II levels and a 3-fold stimulation in apoA-I secretion. P2Y13 gene silencing blocks the effects of ADP on autophagy and apoA-I secretion. A reduction in P2Y13 expression suppresses ERK1/2 phosphorylation, increases the phosphorylation of IR-β and protein kinase B (Akt) >3-fold, and blocks the inhibition of Akt phosphorylation by TNFα and ADP. Conversely, increasing P2Y13 expression significantly inhibits insulin-induced phosphorylation of insulin receptor (IR-β) and Akt, similar to that observed after treatment with ADP. Nucleotides therefore act through P2Y13, ERK1/2 and insulin receptor signaling to stimulate autophagy and affect hepatic lipoprotein secretion. PMID:22590634

  9. Epidermal growth factor receptor-dependent stimulation of amphiregulin expression in androgen-stimulated human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, I; Bailey, J; Hitzemann, K; Pittelkow, M R; Maihle, N J

    1994-01-01

    Amphiregulin is a heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (EGF)-related peptide that binds to the EGF receptor (EGF-R) with high affinity. In this study, we report a role for amphiregulin in androgen-stimulated regulation of prostate cancer cell growth. Androgen is known to enhance EGF-R expression in the androgen-sensitive LNCaP human prostate carcinoma cell line, and it has been suggested that androgenic stimuli may regulate proliferation, in part, through autocrine mechanisms involving the EGF-R. In this study, we demonstrate that LNCaP cells express amphiregulin mRNA and peptide and that this expression is elevated by androgenic stimulation. We also show that ligand-dependent EGF-R stimulation induces amphiregulin expression and that androgenic effects on amphiregulin synthesis are mediated through this EGF-R pathway. Parallel studies using the estrogen-responsive breast carcinoma cell line, MCF-7, suggest that regulation of amphiregulin by estrogen may also be mediated via an EGF-R pathway. In addition, heparin treatment of LNCaP cells inhibits androgen-stimulated cell growth further suggesting that amphiregulin can mediate androgen-stimulated LNCaP proliferation. Together, these results implicate an androgen-regulated autocrine loop composed of amphiregulin and its receptor in prostate cancer cell growth and suggest that the mechanism of steroid hormone regulation of amphiregulin synthesis may occur through androgen upregulation of the EGF-R and subsequent receptor-dependent pathways. Images PMID:8049525

  10. Activation of brain somatostatin2 receptors stimulates feeding in mice: analysis of food intake microstructure

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Wang, Lixin; Rivier, Jean; Kobelt, Peter; Mönnikes, Hubert; Taché, Yvette

    2010-01-01

    We recently reported that the oligosomatostatin receptor agonist, ODT8-SST increases food intake in rats via the somatostatin2 receptor (sst2). We characterized ingestive behavior following intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of a selective sst2 agonist in freely fed mice during the light phase. The sst2 agonist (0.01, 0.03, 0.1, 0.3 or 1µg/mouse) injected icv under short inhalation anesthesia dose-dependently increased cumulative light phase food intake over 4h compared to vehicle with a 3.1-times increase at 1µg/mouse (p<0.05). Likewise, the sst2,3,5 agonist octreotide (0.3 or 1µg/mouse) dose-dependently increased 4-h food intake, whereas selective sst1 or sst4 agonists at 1µg/mouse did not. In vehicle-treated mice, high fat diet increased caloric intake/4h by 2.8-times compared to regular diet (p<0.05) and values were further increased 1.4-times/4h by the sst2 agonist. Automated continuous assessment of food intake established a 6.6-times higher food intake during the dark phase due to increased number of meals, meal size, meal duration and rate of ingestion compared to non-treated mice during the light phase. During the first 4h post icv sst2 agonist injection, mice had a 57% increase in number of meals with a 60% higher rate of ingestion, and a 61% reduction in inter-meal intervals, whereas meal sizes were not altered compared to vehicle. These data indicate that activation of brain sst2 receptors potently stimulates ingestive behavior under basal or high fat diet-stimulated conditions in mice. The shortened inter-meal interval suggests an inhibitory effect of the sst2 agonist on “satiety”, whereas “satiation” is not altered as indicated by normal meal size. PMID:20851136

  11. Calmodulin-stimulated phosphorylation of 17 beta-estradiol receptor on tyrosine.

    PubMed Central

    Migliaccio, A; Rotondi, A; Auricchio, F

    1984-01-01

    The calf uterine 17 beta-estradiol receptor is a phosphoprotein. Phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of the receptor is controlled by a cytosol receptor kinase that activates the hormone binding and by a nuclear phosphatase that inactivates this binding. This report concerns the nature of the 17 beta-estradiol receptor kinase. Highly purified calf uterus 17 beta-estradiol receptor preinactivated by the nuclear phosphatase was used as substrate of the purified receptor kinase. Ca2+ and calmodulin stimulate both the kinase-dependent activation of the hormone binding and 32P incorporation from [gamma-32P]-ATP into the receptor. Maximal stimulation of hormone binding activation requires 1 microM Ca2+ and 0.6 microM calmodulin. Fifteen micromolar trifluoperazine is the lowest concentration that will prevent completely Ca2+-calmodulin stimulation of the kinase. The receptor is phosphorylated by the receptor kinase exclusively on tyrosine. Phosphorylation of proteins on tyrosine is a rare event implicated in hormone-induced cell growth and cell transformation. Images PMID:6207535

  12. Autoregulation by the Juxtamembrane Region of the Human Ephrin Receptor Tyrosine Kinase A3 (EphA3)

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Tara L.; Walker, John R.; Loppnau, Peter; Butler-Cole, Christine; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano

    2008-07-08

    Ephrin receptors (Eph) affect cell shape and movement, unlike other receptor tyrosine kinases that directly affect proliferative pathways. The kinase domain of EphA3 is activated by ephrin binding and receptor oligomerization. This activation is associated with two tyrosines in the juxtamembrane region; these tyrosines are sites of autophosphorylation and interact with the active site of the kinase to modulate activity. This allosteric event has important implications both in terms of understanding signal transduction pathways mediated by Eph kinases as well as discovering specific therapeutic ligands for receptor kinases. In order to provide further details of the molecular mechanism through which the unphosphorylated juxtamemebrane region blocks catalysis, we studied wild-type and site-specific mutants in detail. High-resolution structures of multiple states of EphA3 kinase with and without the juxtamembrane segment allowed us to map the coupled pathway of residues that connect the juxtamembrane segment, the activation loop, and the catalytic residues of the kinase domain. This highly conserved set of residues likely delineates a molecular recognition pathway for most of the Eph RTKs, helping to characterize the dynamic nature of these physiologically important enzymes.

  13. Decrease in the Sensitivity of Myocardium to M3 Muscarinic Receptor Stimulation during Postnatal Ontogenisis.

    PubMed

    Tapilina, S V; Abramochkin, D V

    2016-01-01

    Type 3 muscarinic receptors (M3 receptors) participate in the mediation of cholinergic effects in mammalian myocardium, along with M2 receptors. However, myocardium of adult mammals demonstrates only modest electrophysiological effects in response to selective stimulation of M3 receptors which are hardly comparable to the effects produced by M2 stimulation. In the present study, the effects of selective M3 stimulation induced by application of the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine (10 μM) in the presence of the selective M2 blocker methoctramine (100 nM) on the action potential (AP) waveform were investigated in isolated atrial and ventricular preparations from newborn and 3-week-old rats and compared to those in preparations from adult rats. In the atrial myocardium, stimulation of M3 receptors produced a comparable reduction of AP duration in newborn and adult rats, while in 3-week-old rats the effect was negligible. In ventricular myocardial preparations from newborn rats, the effect of M3 stimulation was more than 3 times stronger compared to that from adult rats, while preparations from 3-week old rats demonstrated no definite effect, similarly to atrial preparations. In all studied types of cardiac preparations, the effects of M3 stimulation were eliminated by the selective M3 antagonist 4-DAMP (10 nM). The results of RT-PCR show that the amount of product of the M3 receptor gene decreases with the maturation of animals both in atrial and ventricular myocardium. We concluded that the contribution of M3 receptors to the mediation of cardiac cholinergic responses decreases during postnatal ontogenesis. These age-related changes may be associated with downregulation of M3 receptor gene expression. PMID:27437147

  14. Decrease in the Sensitivity of Myocardium to M3 Muscarinic Receptor Stimulation during Postnatal Ontogenisis

    PubMed Central

    Tapilina, S.V.; Abramochkin, D.V.

    2016-01-01

    Type 3 muscarinic receptors (M3 receptors) participate in the mediation of cholinergic effects in mammalian myocardium, along with M2 receptors. However, myocardium of adult mammals demonstrates only modest electrophysiological effects in response to selective stimulation of M3 receptors which are hardly comparable to the effects produced by M2 stimulation. In the present study, the effects of selective M3 stimulation induced by application of the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine (10 μM) in the presence of the selective M2 blocker methoctramine (100 nM) on the action potential (AP) waveform were investigated in isolated atrial and ventricular preparations from newborn and 3-week-old rats and compared to those in preparations from adult rats. In the atrial myocardium, stimulation of M3 receptors produced a comparable reduction of AP duration in newborn and adult rats, while in 3-week-old rats the effect was negligible. In ventricular myocardial preparations from newborn rats, the effect of M3 stimulation was more than 3 times stronger compared to that from adult rats, while preparations from 3-week old rats demonstrated no definite effect, similarly to atrial preparations. In all studied types of cardiac preparations, the effects of M3 stimulation were eliminated by the selective M3 antagonist 4-DAMP (10 nM). The results of RT-PCR show that the amount of product of the M3 receptor gene decreases with the maturation of animals both in atrial and ventricular myocardium. We concluded that the contribution of M3 receptors to the mediation of cardiac cholinergic responses decreases during postnatal ontogenesis. These age-related changes may be associated with downregulation of M3 receptor gene expression. PMID:27437147

  15. The A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR): therapeutic target and predictive biological marker in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Pnina; Cohen, Shira

    2016-09-01

    The Gi protein-associated A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) is over-expressed in inflammatory cells, and this high expression is also reflected in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with autoimmune inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and Crohn's disease. CF101, a selective agonist with high affinity to the A3AR, is known to induce robust anti-inflammatory effect in experimental animal models of adjuvant-, collagen-, and tropomyosin-induced arthritis. The effect is mediated via a definitive molecular mechanism entailing deregulation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and the Wnt signal transduction pathways resulting in apoptosis of inflammatory cells. CF101 was found to be safe and well tolerated in all preclinical, phase I, and phase II human clinical studies. In two phase II clinical studies where CF101 was administered to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients as a stand-alone drug, a significant anti-rheumatic effect and a direct significant correlation were found between receptor expression at baseline and patients' response to the drug, suggesting that A3AR may be utilized as a predictive biomarker. The A3AR is a promising therapeutic target in rheumatoid arthritis and can be used also as a biological marker to predict patients' response to CF101. This is a unique type of a personalized medicine approach which may pave the way for a safe and efficacious treatment for this patient population. PMID:26886128

  16. Cyclin D1 stimulation of estrogen receptor transcriptional activity independent of cdk4.

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, E; Ladha, M H; Lin, N; Upton, T M; Miller, S J; DiRenzo, J; Pestell, R G; Hinds, P W; Dowdy, S F; Brown, M; Ewen, M E

    1997-01-01

    Cyclin D1 plays an important role in the development of breast cancer and is required for normal breast cell proliferation and differentiation associated with pregnancy. We show that ectopic expression of cyclin D1 can stimulate the transcriptional activity of the estrogen receptor in the absence of estradiol and that this activity can be inhibited by 4-hydroxytamoxifen and ICI 182,780. Cyclin D1 can form a specific complex with the estrogen receptor. Stimulation of the estrogen receptor by cyclin D1 is independent of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 activation. Cyclin D1 may manifest its oncogenic potential in breast cancer in part through binding to the estrogen receptor and activation of the transcriptional activity of the receptor. PMID:9271411

  17. Role of the Extracellular and Intracellular Loops of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Receptor in Its Function

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Antara A.; Mahale, Smita D.

    2015-01-01

    Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) is a leucine-rich repeat containing class A G-protein coupled receptor belonging to the subfamily of glycoprotein hormone receptors (GPHRs), which includes luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor (LH/CGR) and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor. Its cognate ligand, follicle-stimulating hormone binds to, and activates FSHR expressed on the surface of granulosa cells of the ovary, in females, and Sertoli cells of the testis, in males, to bring about folliculogenesis and spermatogenesis, respectively. FSHR contains a large extracellular domain (ECD) consisting of leucine-rich repeats at the N-terminal end and a hinge region at the C-terminus that connects the ECD to the membrane spanning transmembrane domain (TMD). The TMD consists of seven α-helices that are connected to each other by means of three extracellular loops (ELs) and three intracellular loops (ILs) and ends in a short-cytoplasmic tail. It is well established that the ECD is the primary hormone binding domain, whereas the TMD is the signal transducing domain. However, several studies on the ELs and ILs employing site directed mutagenesis, generation of chimeric receptors and in vitro characterization of naturally occurring mutations have proven their indispensable role in FSHR function. Their role in every phase of the life cycle of the receptor like post translational modifications, cell surface trafficking, hormone binding, activation of downstream signaling, receptor phosphorylation, hormone–receptor internalization, and recycling of hormone–receptor complex have been documented. Mutations in the loops causing dysregulation of these processes lead to pathophysiological conditions. In other GPHRs as well, the loops have been convincingly shown to contribute to various aspects of receptor function. This review article attempts to summarize the extensive contributions of FSHR loops and C-terminal tail to its function. PMID:26236283

  18. Aggregation Limits Surface Expression of Homomeric GluA3 Receptors.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Sarah K; Hou, Ying; Willibald, Marina; Semenov, Artur; Möykkynen, Tommi; Keinänen, Kari

    2016-04-15

    AMPA receptors are glutamate-gated cation channels assembled from GluA1-4 subunits and have properties that are strongly dependent on the subunit composition. The subunits have different propensities to form homomeric or various heteromeric receptors expressed on cell surface, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we examined the biochemical basis for the poor ability of GluA3 subunits to form homomeric receptors, linked previously to two amino acid residues, Tyr-454 and Arg-461, in its ligand binding domain (LBD). Surface expression of GluA3 was improved by co-assembly with GluA2 but not with stargazin, a trafficking chaperone and modulator of AMPA receptors. The secretion efficiency of GluA2 and GluA3 LBDs paralleled the transport difference between the respective full-length receptors and was similarly dependent on Tyr-454/Arg-461 but not on LBD stability. In comparison to GluA2, GluA3 homomeric receptors showed a strong and Tyr-454/Arg-461-dependent tendency to aggregate both in the macroscopic scale measured as lower solubility in nonionic detergent and in the microscopic scale evident as the preponderance of hydrodynamically large structures in density gradient centrifugation and native gel electrophoresis. We conclude that the impaired surface expression of homomeric GluA3 receptors is caused by nonproductive assembly and aggregation to which LBD residues Tyr-454 and Arg-461 strongly contribute. This aggregation inhibits the entry of newly synthesized GluA3 receptors to the secretory pathway. PMID:26912664

  19. Anandamide, an endogenous cannabimimetic eicosanoid, binds to the cloned human cannabinoid receptor and stimulates receptor-mediated signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Felder, C C; Briley, E M; Axelrod, J; Simpson, J T; Mackie, K; Devane, W A

    1993-01-01

    Arachidonylethanolamide (anandamide), a candidate endogenous cannabinoid ligand, has recently been isolated from porcine brain and displayed cannabinoid-like binding activity to synaptosomal membrane preparations and mimicked cannabinoid-induced inhibition of the twitch response in isolated murine vas deferens. In this study, anandamide and several congeners were evaluated as cannabinoid agonists by examining their ability to bind to the cloned cannabinoid receptor, inhibit forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation, inhibit N-type calcium channels, and stimulate one or more functional second messenger responses. Synthetic anandamide, and all but one congener, competed for [3H]CP55,940 binding to plasma membranes prepared from L cells expressing the rat cannabinoid receptor. The ability of anandamide to activate receptor-mediated signal transduction was evaluated in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the human cannabinoid receptor (HCR, termed CHO-HCR cells) and compared to control CHO cells expressing the muscarinic m5 receptor (CHOm5 cells). Anandamide inhibited forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation in CHO-HCR cells, but not in CHOm5 cells, and this response was blocked with pertussis toxin. N-type calcium channels were inhibited by anandamide and several active congeners in N18 neuroblastoma cells. Anandamide stimulated arachidonic acid and intracellular calcium release in both CHOm5 and CHO-HCR cells and had no effect on the release of inositol phosphates or phosphatidylethanol, generated after activation of phospholipase C and D, respectively. Anandamide appears to exhibit the essential criteria required to be classified as a cannabinoid/anandamide receptor agonist and shares similar nonreceptor effects on arachidonic acid and intracellular calcium release as other cannabinoid agonists. PMID:8395053

  20. Serotonin-2C Receptor Agonists Decrease Potassium-Stimulated GABA Release In the Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, James M; Booth, Raymond G; Peris, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin 5-HT2C receptor has shown promise in vivo as a pharmacotherapeutic target for alcoholism. For example, recently, a novel 4-phenyl-2-N,N-dimethylaminotetralin (PAT) drug candidate, that demonstrates 5-HT2C receptor agonist activity together with 5-HT2A/2B receptor inverse agonist activity, was shown to reduce operant responding for ethanol after peripheral administration to rats. Previous studies have shown that the 5-HT2C receptor is found throughout the mesoaccumbens pathway and that 5-HT2C receptor agonism causes activation of ventral tegmental area (VTA) GABA neurons. It is unknown what effect 5-HT2C receptor modulation has on GABA release in the nucleus accumbens core (NAcc). To this end, microdialysis coupled to capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence was used to quantify extracellular neurotransmitter concentrations in the NAcc under basal and after potassium stimulation conditions, in response to PAT analogs and other 5-HT2C receptor modulators administered by reverse dialysis to rats. 5-HT2C receptor agonists specifically attenuated stimulated GABA release in the NAcc while 5-HT2C antagonists or inverse agonists had no effect. Agents with activity at 5-HT2A receptors had no effect on GABA release. Thus, in contrast to results reported for the VTA, current results suggest 5-HT2C receptor agonists decrease stimulated GABA release in the NAcc, and provide a possible mechanism of action for 5HT2C-mediated negative modulation of ethanol self-administration. PMID:25382408

  1. Association of EP2 receptor and SLC19A3 in regulating breast cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Cheuk, Isabella W; Shin, Vivian Y; Siu, Man T; Tsang, Julia Y; Ho, John C; Chen, Jiawei; Tse, Gary M; Wang, Xian; Kwong, Ava

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Triple-negative breast cancer patients have higher metastatic rate than patients with other breast cancer subtypes. Distant metastasis is one of the causes leading to the high mortality rates. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) is associated with breast cancer metastasis and the downstream prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) exerted its effect through EP receptors (EP1-EP4). However, the exact molecular events of EP receptors in breast cancer metastasis remain undefined. Expressions of EP receptors were determined during cancer development in NOD-SCID mice inoculated with MB-231 and MB-231-EP2 clone. EP2 overexpressing stable clone was constructed to investigate the proliferation and invasion potentials in vivo and in vitro. Drug transporter array was used to identify EP2 receptor-associated drug transported genes in breast cancer metastasis. Localization of EP2 receptor in primary tissues and xenografts were examined by immunostaining. Stable EP2-expression cells formed larger tumors than parental cells in mice model and was highly expressed in both primary and metastatic tissues. Silencing of EP2 receptor by siRNA and antagonist (AH 6809) significantly decreased cell proliferation and invasion, concomitant with reduced MMP-2 and MMP-9 expressions. Results from array data showed that expression of SLC19A3 was markedly increased in EP2 siRNA transfected cells. Ectopic expression of SLC19A3 retarded cell proliferation, invasion and MMPs expressions. Notably, SLC19A3 had a lower expression in primary tissues and was negatively correlated with EP2 receptor expression. Our novel finding revealed that EP2 receptor regulated metastasis through downregulation of SLC19A3. Thus, targeting EP2-SLC19A3 signaling is a potential therapeutic therapy for treating metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26807319

  2. Association of EP2 receptor and SLC19A3 in regulating breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Cheuk, Isabella W; Shin, Vivian Y; Siu, Man T; Tsang, Julia Y; Ho, John C; Chen, Jiawei; Tse, Gary M; Wang, Xian; Kwong, Ava

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Triple-negative breast cancer patients have higher metastatic rate than patients with other breast cancer subtypes. Distant metastasis is one of the causes leading to the high mortality rates. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) is associated with breast cancer metastasis and the downstream prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) exerted its effect through EP receptors (EP1-EP4). However, the exact molecular events of EP receptors in breast cancer metastasis remain undefined. Expressions of EP receptors were determined during cancer development in NOD-SCID mice inoculated with MB-231 and MB-231-EP2 clone. EP2 overexpressing stable clone was constructed to investigate the proliferation and invasion potentials in vivo and in vitro. Drug transporter array was used to identify EP2 receptor-associated drug transported genes in breast cancer metastasis. Localization of EP2 receptor in primary tissues and xenografts were examined by immunostaining. Stable EP2-expression cells formed larger tumors than parental cells in mice model and was highly expressed in both primary and metastatic tissues. Silencing of EP2 receptor by siRNA and antagonist (AH 6809) significantly decreased cell proliferation and invasion, concomitant with reduced MMP-2 and MMP-9 expressions. Results from array data showed that expression of SLC19A3 was markedly increased in EP2 siRNA transfected cells. Ectopic expression of SLC19A3 retarded cell proliferation, invasion and MMPs expressions. Notably, SLC19A3 had a lower expression in primary tissues and was negatively correlated with EP2 receptor expression. Our novel finding revealed that EP2 receptor regulated metastasis through downregulation of SLC19A3. Thus, targeting EP2-SLC19A3 signaling is a potential therapeutic therapy for treating metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26807319

  3. Functionalized Congeners of 1,4-Dihydropyridines as Antagonist Molecular Probes for A3 Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Li, An-Hu; Chang, Louis; Ji, Xiao-duo; Melman, Neli; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    4-Phenylethynyl-6-phenyl-1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives are selective antagonists at human A3 adenosine receptors, with Ki values in a radioligand binding assay vs [125I]AB-MECA [N6-(4-amino-3-iodobenzyl)-5′-N-methylcarbamoyl-adenosine] in the submicromolar range. In this study, functionalized congeners of 1,4-dihydropyridines were designed as chemically reactive adenosine A3 antagonists, for the purpose of synthesizing molecular probes for this receptor subtype. Selectivity of the new analogues for cloned human A3 adenosine receptors was determined in radioligand binding in comparison to binding at rat brain A1 and A2A receptors. Benzyl ester groups at the 3- and/or 5-positions and phenyl groups at the 2- and/or 6-positions were introduced as potential sites for chain attachment. Structure–activity analysis at A3 adenosine receptors indicated that 3,5-dibenzyl esters, but not 2,6-diphenyl groups, are tolerated in binding. Ring substitution of the 5-benzyl ester with a 4-fluorosulfonyl group provided enhanced A3 receptor affinity resulting in a Ki value of 2.42 nM; however, a long-chain derivative containing terminal amine functionalization at the 4-position of the 5-benzyl ester showed only moderate affinity. This sulfonyl fluoride derivative appeared to bind irreversibly to the human A3 receptor (1 h incubation at 100 nM resulting in the loss of 56% of the specific radioligand binding sites), while the binding of other potent dihydropyridines and other antagonists was generally reversible. At the 3-position of the dihydropyridine ring, an amine-functionalized chain attached at the 4-position of a benzyl ester provided higher A3 receptor affinity than the corresponding 5-position isomer. This amine congener was also used as an intermediate in the synthesis of a biotin conjugate, which bound to A3 receptors with a Ki value of 0.60 μM. PMID:10411465

  4. Dissociation of insulin receptor phosphorylation and stimulation of glucose transport in BC3H-1 myocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Mojsilovic, L.P.; Standaert, M.L.; Rosic, N.K.; Pollet, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have investigated insulin receptor phosphorylation in differentiated cultured BC3H-1 myocytes. As for other insulin-responsive cell systems in partially purified wheat germ agglutinin receptor preparations, insulin stimulates the phosphorylation of its own receptor (95K ..beta..-subunits) in a dose dependent manner (0-400 nM), as identified by immunoprecipitation with antiinsulin receptor antibodies and SDS-PAGE. In the same preparations they show that 12-0-tetradecanyl phorbol acetate (TPA), which in many respect ..beta..-subunits in the same dose dependent manner (0-5 ..mu..M). In addition, antiinsulin receptor antibodies (B-10) also induced phosphorylation of mimics insulin action, also induced phosphorylation of the insulin receptor and HPLC tryptic maps of the /sup 32/P-labeled ..beta..-subunit were identical to those for insulin-induced receptor phosphorylation. However, while insulin and TPA are potent stimulators of glucose transport in these muscle cells, the antireceptor antibodies alone failed to provoke glucose transport at any concentration. The specificity and activity of these antibodies were confirmed in their system by their ability to inhibit insulin binding and insulin-stimulated glucose transport in a concentration-dependent manner. Their results indicate that phosphorylation of insulin receptor is not a crucial event in mediating insulin action, at least with respect to glucose transport. While the effects of the B-10 antibody in the BC3H-1 myocyte differ from those in the adipocyte, their results provide independent confirmation of their essential conclusion that phosphorylation of the insulin receptor may not be necessary nor sufficient for its acute action in promoting glucose transport.

  5. Pyran Template Approach to the Design of Novel A3 Adenosine Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Li, An-Hu; Ji, Xiao-duo; Kim, Hak Sung; Melman, Neli; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    Strategy, Management and Health PolicyVenture Capital Enabling TechnologyPreclinical ResearchPreclinical Development Toxicology, Formulation Drug Delivery, PharmacokineticsClinical Development Phases I–III Regulatory, Quality, ManufacturingPostmarketing Phase IV A3 adenosine receptor antagonists have potential as anti-inflammatory, anti-asthmatic, and anti-ischemic agents. We previously reported the preparation of chemical libraries of 1,4-dihydropyridine (DHP) and pyridine derivatives and identification of members having high affinity at A3 adenosine receptors. These derivatives were synthesized through standard three-component condensation/oxidation reactions, which permitted versatile ring substitution at five positions, i.e., the central ring served as a molecular scaffold for structurally diverse substituents. We extended this template approach from the DHP series to chemically stable pyran derivatives, in which the ring NH is replaced by O and which is similarly derived from a stepwise reaction of three components. Since the orientation of substituent groups may be conformationally similar to the 1,4-DHPs, a direct comparison between the structure activity relationships of key derivatives in binding to adenosine receptors was carried out. Affinity at human A3 receptors expressed in CHO cells was determined vs. binding of [125I]AB-MECA (N6-(4-amino-3-iodobenzyl)-5′-N-methyl-carbamoyladenosine). There was no potency-enhancing effect, as was observed for DHPs, of 4-styryl, 4-phenylethynyl, or 6-phenyl substitutions. The most potent ligands in this group in binding to human A3 receptors were 6-methyl and 6-phenyl analogs, 3a (MRS 1704) and 4a (MRS 1705), respectively, of 3,5-diethyl 2-methyl-4-phenyl-4H-pyran-3,5-dicarboxylate, which had Ki values of 381 and 583 nM, respectively. These two derivatives were selective for human A3 receptors vs. rat brain A1 receptors by 57-fold and 24-fold, respectively. These derivatives were inactive in binding at rat brain A

  6. Cross-adaptation to odor stimulation of olfactory receptor cells in the box turtle, Terrapene carolina.

    PubMed

    Tonosaki, K

    1993-01-01

    Electrical recording from small twigs of olfactory nerve and electro-olfactogram (EOG) from olfactory epithelium in a turtle shows that olfactory receptors in the nose are responsive to various odors. I have used the effects of cross-adaptation to odor stimulation on the olfactory receptors to investigate the stimulus-specific components of these responses and to provide information about the responsiveness of cells. The results of the cross-adaptation experiments strongly support the hypothesis that different categories of receptor cells exist in the olfactory epithelium. PMID:8386588

  7. Apical and basolateral ATP stimulates tracheal epithelial chloride secretion via multiple purinergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Hwang, T H; Schwiebert, E M; Guggino, W B

    1996-06-01

    Stimulation of Cl- secretion across the airway epithelium by ATP or UTP as agonists has therapeutic implications for cystic fibrosis. Our results demonstrate that ATP stimulates Cl- secretion in rat tracheal epithelial cell monolayers in primary culture from the apical or basolateral side of the monolayer. Multiple types of ATP-sensitive Cl- conductances in intact monolayers were elucidated through inhibition by Cl- channel-blocking drugs. Multiple Cl- conductances stimulated by ATP and adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) (tested for comparison) were also deciphered more specifically by nystatin permeabilization of the basolateral membrane, subsequent imposition of symmetrical Cl-, I-, or Br- solutions to test halide permselectivity, inhibition by Cl- channel-blocking drugs, and construction of current-voltage plots to study time and voltage dependence of the currents. Apical ATP stimulates Cl- secretion through P2U (or P2Y2) purinergic receptors via both intracellular Ca2+ (Ca(2+)i)-dependent and Cai(2+)-independent signaling pathways by opening outwardly rectifying Cl- channels (ORCCs), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channels, and Cai(2+)-dependent Cl- channels. Basolateral ATP stimulates Cl- secretion via a combination of receptor subtypes (P2T and P2U) or a novel type of receptor (P2Y3), independent of Cai2+ or cAMP signaling by opening only CFTR channels. cAMP also stimulated multiple types of Cl- conductances, consistent with simultaneous activation of CFTR and ORCCs. Together, these results suggest that ATP as an agonist stimulates Cl- secretion via multiple purinergic receptors and multiple signal transduction pathways activated in different membrane domains of tracheal epithelia. PMID:8764143

  8. Renal opiate receptor mediation of renin secretion to renal nerve stimulation in the dog.

    PubMed

    Koyama, S; Hosomi, H

    1986-06-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate renal opiate receptor mediation of the renin secretion response to electrical stimulation of the renal nerves in the pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized dog by use of the opiate agonist leucine-enkephalin (Leu-enk) and the opiate antagonist naloxone. In all animals studied, left kidneys were pump perfused at a constant renal blood flow. Renal perfusion pressure (RPP) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were unaltered at a stimulation frequency of 1.0 Hz; however, renin secretion rate (RSR) increased significantly in the nontreated group. High-frequency renal nerve stimulation (10 Hz) increased RPP and decreased GFR. RSR at the high-frequency stimulation was significantly augmented in the nontreated group. Renal arterial infusion of either Leu-enk (25 micrograms X kg-1 X min-1) or naloxone (7 micrograms X kg-1 X min-1) did not alter base-line levels of renal hemodynamics and RSR and did not produce significant changes in these variables even when renal nerves were stimulated at the low frequency; however, Leu-enk inhibited RPP and RSR responses to the high-frequency stimulation, and naloxone augmented these responses. Phentolamine (13 micrograms X kg-1 X min-1) prevented renal hemodynamic responses to the renal nerve stimulation, whereas RSR responses to the stimulation were unaffected. Propranolol (8 micrograms X kg-1 X min-1) resulted in decreases in RSR at the renal nerve stimulation despite the presence of changes in renal hemodynamics similar to the other groups. The results indicate that intrarenal opiate receptors may participate in inhibiting renal secretion of renin mediated by the renal nerves when renal vasoconstriction and reduction of GFR occurred at the high-frequency stimulation. PMID:3013030

  9. κ-Opioid Receptor Stimulation Improves Endothelial Function via Akt-stimulated NO Production in Hyperlipidemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Fei; Zheng, Xu-Yang; Li, Juan; Zhang, Shu-Miao; Feng, Na; Guo, Hai-Tao; Jia, Min; Wang, Yue-Min; Fan, Rong; Pei, Jian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of U50,488H (a selective κ-opioid receptor agonist) on endothelial function impaired by hyperlipidemia and to determine the role of Akt-stimulated NO production in it. Hyperlipidemic model was established by feeding rats with a high-fat diet for 14 weeks. U50,488H and nor-BNI (a selective κ-opioid receptor antagonist) were administered intraperitoneally. In vitro, the involvement of the PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway in the effect of U50,488H was studied using cultured endothelial cells subjected to artificial hyperlipidemia. Serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations dramatically increased after high-fat diet feeding. Administration of U50,488H significantly alleviated endothelial ultrastructural destruction and endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation impairment caused by hyperlipidemia. U50,488H also increased Akt/eNOS phosphorylation and serum/medium NO level both in vivo and in vitro. U50,488H increased eNOS activity and suppressed iNOS activity in vivo. The effects of U50,488H were abolished in vitro by siRNAs targeting κ-opioid receptor and Akt or PI3K/Akt/eNOS inhibitors. All effects of U50,488H were blocked by nor-BNI. These results demonstrate that κ-opioid receptor stimulation normalizes endothelial ultrastructure and function under hyperlipidemic condition. Its mechanism is related to the preservation of eNOS phosphorylation through activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and downregulation of iNOS expression/activity. PMID:27226238

  10. κ-Opioid Receptor Stimulation Improves Endothelial Function via Akt-stimulated NO Production in Hyperlipidemic Rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fei; Zheng, Xu-Yang; Li, Juan; Zhang, Shu-Miao; Feng, Na; Guo, Hai-Tao; Jia, Min; Wang, Yue-Min; Fan, Rong; Pei, Jian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of U50,488H (a selective κ-opioid receptor agonist) on endothelial function impaired by hyperlipidemia and to determine the role of Akt-stimulated NO production in it. Hyperlipidemic model was established by feeding rats with a high-fat diet for 14 weeks. U50,488H and nor-BNI (a selective κ-opioid receptor antagonist) were administered intraperitoneally. In vitro, the involvement of the PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway in the effect of U50,488H was studied using cultured endothelial cells subjected to artificial hyperlipidemia. Serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations dramatically increased after high-fat diet feeding. Administration of U50,488H significantly alleviated endothelial ultrastructural destruction and endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation impairment caused by hyperlipidemia. U50,488H also increased Akt/eNOS phosphorylation and serum/medium NO level both in vivo and in vitro. U50,488H increased eNOS activity and suppressed iNOS activity in vivo. The effects of U50,488H were abolished in vitro by siRNAs targeting κ-opioid receptor and Akt or PI3K/Akt/eNOS inhibitors. All effects of U50,488H were blocked by nor-BNI. These results demonstrate that κ-opioid receptor stimulation normalizes endothelial ultrastructure and function under hyperlipidemic condition. Its mechanism is related to the preservation of eNOS phosphorylation through activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and downregulation of iNOS expression/activity. PMID:27226238

  11. Antinociceptive effects induced through the stimulation of spinal cannabinoid type 2 receptors in chronically inflamed mice.

    PubMed

    Curto-Reyes, Verdad; Boto, Tamara; Hidalgo, Agustín; Menéndez, Luis; Baamonde, Ana

    2011-10-01

    The stimulation of spinal cannabinoid type 2 (CB(2)) receptors is a suitable strategy for the alleviation of experimental pain symptoms. Several reports have described the up-regulation of spinal cannabinoid CB(2) receptors in neuropathic settings together with the analgesic effects derived from their activation. Besides, we have recently reported in two murine bone cancer models that the intrathecal administration of cannabinoid CB(2) receptor agonists completely abolishes hyperalgesia and allodynia, whereas spinal cannabinoid CB(2) receptor expression remains unaltered. The present experiments were designed to measure the expression of spinal cannabinoid CB(2) receptors as well as the analgesic efficacy derived from their stimulation in mice chronically inflamed by the intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant 1 week before. Both spinal cannabinoid CB(2) receptors mRNA measured by real-time PCR and cannabinoid CB(2) receptor protein levels measured by western blot remained unaltered in inflamed mice. Besides, the intrathecal (i.t.) administration of the cannabinoid CB(2) receptor agonists AM1241, (R,S)-3-(2-Iodo-5-nitrobenzoyl)-1-(1-methyl-2-piperidinylmethyl)-1H-indole, (0.03-1 μg) and JWH 133, (6aR,10aR)-3-(1,1-Dimethylbutyl)-6a,7,10,10a-tetrahydro-6,6,9-trimethyl-6H-dibenzo[b,d]pyran, (3-30 μg) dose-dependently blocked inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. The analgesic effects induced by both agonists were counteracted by the coadministration of the selective cannabinoid CB(2) receptor antagonist SR144528, 5-(4-chloro-3-methylphenyl)-1-[(4-methylphenyl)methyl]-N-[(1S,2S,4R)-1,3,3-trimethylbicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-yl]-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide, (5 μg) but not by the cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist AM251, N-(Piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide, (10 μg). The effects induced by AM1241 were also inhibited by the coadministration of the opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone

  12. Excitation of type II anterior caudate neurons by stimulation of dopamine D3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Piercey, M F; Hyslop, D K; Hoffmann, W E

    1997-07-11

    Previous studies have demonstrated that both direct- and indirect-acting dopamine (DA) receptor agonists excite type II neurons in the anterior caudate (CN) by stimulation of DA receptors belonging to the D2 receptor subfamily (D2, D3, D4 receptor subtypes). In the present study, pramipexole, a D3-preferring DA agonist effective in treating Parkinson's disease, excited type II anterior CN neurons. As with other direct-acting agonists, excitation of the CN neurons occurred only at doses above those that silenced DA neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNPC). Although more potent than pramipexole in inhibiting SNPC cells, PNU-91356A, a D2-preferring agonist, did not excite type II CN cells. The D3-preferring antagonist (+)-AJ76 was weaker than haloperidol, a D2-preferring antagonist, in reversing the effects of amphetamine on firing rates in dopaminergic neurons in both the SNPC and the CN. However, in relationship to its potency in the SNPC, (+)-AJ76 was more potent than haloperidol in the CN. PNU-101387, a selective D4 antagonist, did not alter amphetamine-induced stimulation of type II CN neurons. We conclude that DA agonists may excite type II anterior CN neurons via D3 receptor activation. The stimulation of these neurons may contribute to the anti-parkinsonian effects of pramipexole. PMID:9262154

  13. Evidence for two different types of P2 receptors stimulating insulin secretion from pancreatic B cell.

    PubMed

    Petit, P; Hillaire-Buys, D; Manteghetti, M; Debrus, S; Chapal, J; Loubatières-Mariani, M M

    1998-11-01

    Adenine nucleotides have been shown to stimulate insulin secretion by acting on P2 receptors of the P2Y type. Since there have been some discrepancies in the insulin response of different analogues of ATP and ADP, we investigated whether two different types of P2 receptors exist on pancreatic B cells. The effects of alpha,beta-methylene ATP, which is more specific for the P2X subtype, were studied in vitro in pancreatic islets and isolated perfused pancreas from rats, in comparison with the potent P2Y receptor agonist ADPbetaS. In isolated islets, incubated with a slightly stimulating glucose concentration (8.3 mM), alpha,beta-me ATP (200 microM) and ADPbetaS (50 microM) similarly stimulated insulin secretion; by contrast, under a non stimulating glucose concentration (3 mM), alpha,beta-me ATP was still effective whereas ADPbetaS was not. In the same way, in islets perifused with 3 mM glucose, alpha,beta-me ATP but not ADPbetaS induced a partial but significant reduction in the peak 86Rb efflux induced by the ATP-dependent potassium channel opener diazoxide. In the isolated pancreas, perfused with a non stimulating glucose concentration (4.2 mM), ADPbetaS and alpha,beta-me ATP (5-50 microM), administered for 10 min, induced an immediate, transient and concentration-dependent increase in the insulin secretion; their relative potency was not significantly different. In contrast, with a slightly stimulating glucose concentration (8.3 mM), ADPbetaS was previously shown to be 100 fold more potent than alpha,beta-me ATP. Furthermore, at 4.2 mM glucose a second administration of alpha,beta-me ATP was ineffective. In the same way, ADPbetaS was also able to desensitize its own insulin response. At 3 mM glucose, alpha,beta-me ATP as well as ADPbetaS (50 microM) induced a transient stimulation of insulin secretion and down regulated the action of each other. These results give evidence that pancreatic B cells, in addition to P2Y receptors, which potentiate glucose

  14. Direct or indirect stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors enhances bone regeneration as well as bone morphogenetic protein-2

    PubMed Central

    Mediero, Aránzazu; Wilder, Tuere; Perez-Aso, Miguel; Cronstein, Bruce N.

    2015-01-01

    Promoting bone regeneration and repair of bone defects is a need that has not been well met to date. We have previously found that adenosine, acting via A2A receptors (A2AR) promotes wound healing and inhibits inflammatory osteolysis and hypothesized that A2AR might be a novel target to promote bone regeneration. Therefore, we determined whether direct A2AR stimulation or increasing endogenous adenosine concentrations via purine transport blockade with dipyridamole regulates bone formation. We determined whether coverage of a 3 mm trephine defect in a mouse skull with a collagen scaffold soaked in saline, bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2; 200 ng), 1 μM CGS21680 (A2AR agonist, EC50 = 160 nM), or 1 μM dipyridamole (EC50 = 32 nM) promoted bone regeneration. Microcomputed tomography examination demonstrated that CGS21680 and dipyridamole markedly enhanced bone regeneration as well as BMP-2 8 wk after surgery (60 ± 2%, 79 ± 2%, and 75 ± 1% bone regeneration, respectively, vs. 32 ± 2% in control, P < 0.001). Blockade by a selective A2AR antagonist (ZM241385, 1 μM) or deletion of A2AR abrogated the effect of CGS21680 and dipyridamole on bone regeneration. Both CGS21680 and dipyridamole treatment increased alkaline phosphatase-positive osteoblasts and diminished tartrate resistance acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts in the defects. In vivo imaging with a fluorescent dye for new bone formation revealed a strong fluorescent signal in treated animals that was equivalent to BMP-2. In conclusion, stimulation of A2AR by specific agonists or by increasing endogenous adenosine levels stimulates new bone formation as well as BMP-2 and represents a novel approach to stimulating bone regeneration.—Mediero, A., Wilder, T., Perez-Aso, M., Cronstein, B. N. Direct or indirect stimulation of adenosine A2A receptors enhances bone regeneration as well as bone morphogenetic protein-2. PMID:25573752

  15. Oestradiol stimulates tyrosine phosphorylation and hormone binding activity of its own receptor in a cell-free system.

    PubMed Central

    Auricchio, F; Migliaccio, A; Di Domenico, M; Nola, E

    1987-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that calf uterus oestrogen receptor exists in a tyrosine-phosphorylated hormone binding form and in non-phosphorylated, non-hormone binding form. We report here that physiological concentrations of oestradiol in complex with the receptor stimulate the calf uterus receptor kinase that converts the non-hormone binding receptor into hormone binding receptor through phosphorylation of the receptor on tyrosine. The activity of this enzyme has been followed by reactivation of hormone binding sites and phosphorylation on tyrosine of calf uterus phosphatase-inactivated receptor. Phosphorylation of the receptor has been demonstrated by interaction of kinase 32P-phosphorylated proteins with anti-receptor antibody followed either by sucrose gradient centrifugation or SDS-PAGE of the immunoprecipitated proteins. Hormone stimulation of the kinase is inhibited by receptor occupancy of the anti-oestrogen tamoxifen. Oestradiol-receptor complex increases the affinity of the kinase for the dephosphorylated receptor. Findings of this report are consistent with the observation that several protein tyrosine kinases that are associated with peptide hormone receptors are stimulated by the binding of the hormone to the receptor. This is the first report on the activation of a tyrosine kinase by a steroid hormone. The finding that hormones can regulate their own receptor binding activity through a tyrosine kinase is also new. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3691476

  16. Epidermal growth factor receptor is required for estradiol-stimulated bovine satellite cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Reiter, B C; Kamanga-Sollo, E; Pampusch, M S; White, M E; Dayton, W R

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the role of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in estradiol-17β (E2)-stimulated proliferation of cultured bovine satellite cells (BSCs). Treatment of BSC cultures with AG1478 (a specific inhibitor of EGFR tyrosine kinase activity) suppresses E2-stimulated BSC proliferation (P < 0.05). In addition, E2-stimulated proliferation is completely suppressed (P < 0.05) in BSCs in which EGFR expression is silenced by treatment with EGFR small interfering RNA (siRNA). These results indicate that EGFR is required for E2 to stimulate proliferation in BSC cultures. Both AG1478 treatment and EGFR silencing also suppress proliferation stimulated by LR3-IGF-1 (an IGF1 analogue that binds normally to the insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR)-1 but has little or no affinity for IGF binding proteins) in cultured BSCs (P < 0.05). Even though EGFR siRNA treatment has no effect on IGFR-1β mRNA expression in cultured BSCs, IGFR-1β protein level is substantially reduced in BSCs treated with EGFR siRNA. These data suggest that EGFR silencing results in post-transcriptional modifications that result in decreased IGFR-1β protein levels. Although it is clear that functional EGFR is necessary for E2-stimulated proliferation of BSCs, the role of EGFR is not clear. Transactivation of EGFR may directly stimulate proliferation, or EGFR may function to maintain the level of IGFR-1β which is necessary for E2-stimulated proliferation. It also is possible that the role of EGFR in E2-stimulated BSC proliferation may involve both of these mechanisms. PMID:24906928

  17. Phorbol ester stimulates secretory activity while inhibiting receptor-activated aminopyrine uptake by gastric glands

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.R.; Chew, C.S.

    1986-03-05

    Both cyclic AMP-dependent and -independent secretagogues stimulate pepsinogen release, respiration and H/sup +/ secretory activity (AP uptake) in rabbit gastric glands. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (T), a diacyglycerol analog, activates protein kinase C (PKC) and stimulates secretion in many systems. T stimulated respiration and pepsinogen release by glands and increased AP uptake by both glands and purified parietal cells. However, T reduced AP uptake by glands stimulated with carbachol (C) or histamine (H) with an apparent IC/sub 50/ of 1 nM. Preincubation with T for 30 min produced maximum inhibition which was not reversed by removal of T. T accelerated the decline of the transient C peak while the late steady state response to H was most inhibited. H-stimulated AP uptake was also inhibited by 50 ..mu..g/ml 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-glycerol, a reported PKC activator, but not by the inactive phorbol, 4..cap alpha..-phorbol-12,13-didecanoate. In contrast, T potentiated AP uptake by glands stimulated with submaximal doses of dibutyryl cyclic AMP. These results suggest inhibition by T is a specific effect of PKC activators. The differing effects of T on secretion indicators may result from a dual action of T on receptor and post-receptor intracellular events.

  18. Kappa opioid receptors stimulate phosphoinositide turnover in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Periyasamy, S.; Hoss, W. )

    1990-01-01

    The effects of various subtype-selective opioid agonists and antagonists on the phosphoinositide (PI) turnover response were investigated in the rat brain. The {kappa}-agonists U-50,488H and ketocyclazocine produced a concentration-dependent increase in the accumulation of IP's in hippocampal slices. The other {kappa}-agonists Dynorphin-A (1-13) amide, and its protected analog D(Ala){sup 2}-dynorphin-A (1-13) amide also produced a significant increase in the formation of ({sup 3}H)-IP's, whereas the {mu}-selective agonists (D-Ala{sup 2}-N-Me-Phe{sup 4}-Gly{sup 5}-ol)-enkephalin and morphine and the {delta}-selective agonist (D-Pen{sup 2,5})-enkephalin were ineffective. The increase in IP's formation elicited by U-50,488H was partially antagonized by naloxone and more completely antagonized by the {kappa}-selective antagonists nor-binaltorphimine and MR 2266. The formation of IP's induced by U-50,488H varies with the regions of the brain used, being highest in hippocampus and amygdala, and lowest in striatum and pons-medullar. The results indicate that brain {kappa}- but neither {mu}- nor {delta}- receptors are coupled to the PI turnover response.

  19. Stimulators of the soluble guanylyl cyclase: promising functional insights from rare coding atherosclerosis-related GUCY1A3 variants.

    PubMed

    Wobst, Jana; von Ameln, Simon; Wolf, Bernhard; Wierer, Michael; Dang, Tan An; Sager, Hendrik B; Tennstedt, Stephanie; Hengstenberg, Christian; Koesling, Doris; Friebe, Andreas; Braun, Siegmund L; Erdmann, Jeanette; Schunkert, Heribert; Kessler, Thorsten

    2016-07-01

    Stimulators of the soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) are emerging therapeutic agents in cardiovascular diseases. Genetic alterations of the GUCY1A3 gene, which encodes the α1 subunit of the sGC, are associated with coronary artery disease. Studies investigating sGC stimulators in subjects with CAD and carrying risk-related variants in sGC are, however, lacking. Here, we functionally investigate the impact of coding GUCY1A3 variants on sGC activity and the therapeutic potential of sGC stimulators in vitro. In addition to a known loss-of-function variant, eight coding variants in GUCY1A3 were cloned and expressed in HEK 293 cells. Protein levels and dimerization capability with the β1 subunit were analysed by immunoblotting and co-immunoprecipitation, respectively. All α1 variants found in MI patients dimerized with the β1 subunit. Protein levels were reduced by 72 % in one variant (p < 0.01). Enzymatic activity was analysed using cGMP radioimmunoassay after stimulation with a nitric oxide (NO) donor. Five variants displayed decreased cGMP production upon NO stimulation (p < 0.001). The addition of the sGC stimulator BAY 41-2272 increased cGMP formation in all of these variants (p < 0.01). Except for the variant leading to decreased protein level, cGMP amounts reached the wildtype NO-induced level after addition of BAY 41-2272. In conclusion, rare coding variants in GUCY1A3 lead to reduced cGMP formation which can be rescued by a sGC stimulator in vitro. These results might therefore represent the starting point for discovery of novel treatment strategies for patients at risk with coding GUCY1A3 variants. PMID:27342234

  20. Adrenaline Rush: The Role of Adrenergic Receptors in Stimulant-Induced Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Karl T.

    2014-01-01

    Psychostimulants, such as cocaine and amphetamines, act primarily through the monoamine neurotransmitters dopamine (DA), norepinephrine, and serotonin. Although stimulant addiction research has largely focused on DA, medication development efforts targeting the dopaminergic system have thus far been unsuccessful, leading to alternative strategies aimed at abating stimulant abuse. Noradrenergic compounds have shown promise in altering the behavioral effects of stimulants in rodents, nonhuman primates, and humans. In this review, we discuss the contribution of each adrenergic receptor (AR) subtype (α1, α2, and β) to five stimulant-induced behaviors relevant to addiction: locomotor activity, conditioned place preference, anxiety, discrimination, and self-administration. AR manipulation has diverse effects on these behaviors; each subtype profoundly influences outcomes in some paradigms but is inconsequential in others. The functional neuroanatomy and intracellular signaling mechanisms underlying the impact of AR activation/blockade on these behaviors remain largely unknown, presenting a new frontier for research on psychostimulant–AR interactions. PMID:24499709

  1. Peripheral NMDA Receptors Mediate Antidromic Nerve Stimulation-Induced Tactile Hypersensitivity in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jun Ho; Nam, Taick Sang; Jun, Jaebeom; Jung, Se Jung; Kim, Dong-Wook; Leem, Joong Woo

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of peripheral NMDA receptors (NMDARs) in antidromic nerve stimulation-induced tactile hypersensitivity outside the skin area innervated by stimulated nerve. Tetanic electrical stimulation (ES) of the decentralized L5 spinal nerve, which induced enlargement of plasma extravasation, resulted in tactile hypersensitivity in the L4 plantar dermatome of the hind-paw. When intraplantar (i.pl.) injection was administered into the L4 dermatome before ES, NMDAR and group-I metabotropic Glu receptor (mGluR) antagonists and group-II mGluR agonist but not AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist prevented ES-induced hypersensitivity. I.pl. injection of PKA or PKC inhibitors also prevented ES-induced hypersensitivity. When the same injections were administered after establishment of ES-induced hypersensitivity, hypersensitivity was partially reduced by NMDAR antagonist only. In naïve animals, i.pl. Glu injection into the L4 dermatome induced tactile hypersensitivity, which was blocked by NMDAR antagonist and PKA and PKC inhibitors. These results suggest that the peripheral release of Glu, induced by antidromic nerve stimulation, leads to the expansion of tactile hypersensitive skin probably via nociceptor sensitization spread due to the diffusion of Glu into the skin near the release site. In addition, intracellular PKA- and PKC-dependent mechanisms mediated mainly by NMDAR activation are involved in Glu-induced nociceptor sensitization and subsequent hypersensitivity. PMID:26770021

  2. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulated robust human colon cancer cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-matrix metalloproteinase1 antibody pre-treatment blocks cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acids stimulate MMP1 expression, cell migration and MMP1-dependent invasion. -- Abstract: Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers - this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre

  3. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng

    2011-11-18

    Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers - this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre-treatment with anti-MMP1 antibody. This study contributes to understanding mechanisms underlying muscarinic receptor agonist-induced promotion of colon cancer and, more importantly, indicates that blocking MMP1 expression and activation has therapeutic promise to stop or retard colon cancer invasion and dissemination. PMID:22027145

  4. Artificial Sweeteners Stimulate Adipogenesis and Suppress Lipolysis Independently of Sweet Taste Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Becky R.; Parlee, Sebastian D.; Learman, Brian S.; Mori, Hiroyuki; Scheller, Erica L.; Cawthorn, William P.; Ning, Xiaomin; Gallagher, Katherine; Tyrberg, Björn; Assadi-Porter, Fariba M.; Evans, Charles R.; MacDougald, Ormond A.

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors mediate responses to a myriad of ligands, some of which regulate adipocyte differentiation and metabolism. The sweet taste receptors T1R2 and T1R3 are G protein-coupled receptors that function as carbohydrate sensors in taste buds, gut, and pancreas. Here we report that sweet taste receptors T1R2 and T1R3 are expressed throughout adipogenesis and in adipose tissues. Treatment of mouse and human precursor cells with artificial sweeteners, saccharin and acesulfame potassium, enhanced adipogenesis. Saccharin treatment of 3T3-L1 cells and primary mesenchymal stem cells rapidly stimulated phosphorylation of Akt and downstream targets with functions in adipogenesis such as cAMP-response element-binding protein and FOXO1; however, increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α was not observed until relatively late in differentiation. Saccharin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation at Thr-308 occurred within 5 min, was phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent, and occurred in the presence of high concentrations of insulin and dexamethasone; phosphorylation of Ser-473 occurred more gradually. Surprisingly, neither saccharin-stimulated adipogenesis nor Thr-308 phosphorylation was dependent on expression of T1R2 and/or T1R3, although Ser-473 phosphorylation was impaired in T1R2/T1R3 double knock-out precursors. In mature adipocytes, artificial sweetener treatment suppressed lipolysis even in the presence of forskolin, and lipolytic responses were correlated with phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase. Suppression of lipolysis by saccharin in adipocytes was also independent of T1R2 and T1R3. These results suggest that some artificial sweeteners have previously uncharacterized metabolic effects on adipocyte differentiation and metabolism and that effects of artificial sweeteners on adipose tissue biology may be largely independent of the classical sweet taste receptors, T1R2 and T1R3. PMID

  5. Artificial sweeteners stimulate adipogenesis and suppress lipolysis independently of sweet taste receptors.

    PubMed

    Simon, Becky R; Parlee, Sebastian D; Learman, Brian S; Mori, Hiroyuki; Scheller, Erica L; Cawthorn, William P; Ning, Xiaomin; Gallagher, Katherine; Tyrberg, Björn; Assadi-Porter, Fariba M; Evans, Charles R; MacDougald, Ormond A

    2013-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors mediate responses to a myriad of ligands, some of which regulate adipocyte differentiation and metabolism. The sweet taste receptors T1R2 and T1R3 are G protein-coupled receptors that function as carbohydrate sensors in taste buds, gut, and pancreas. Here we report that sweet taste receptors T1R2 and T1R3 are expressed throughout adipogenesis and in adipose tissues. Treatment of mouse and human precursor cells with artificial sweeteners, saccharin and acesulfame potassium, enhanced adipogenesis. Saccharin treatment of 3T3-L1 cells and primary mesenchymal stem cells rapidly stimulated phosphorylation of Akt and downstream targets with functions in adipogenesis such as cAMP-response element-binding protein and FOXO1; however, increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α was not observed until relatively late in differentiation. Saccharin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation at Thr-308 occurred within 5 min, was phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent, and occurred in the presence of high concentrations of insulin and dexamethasone; phosphorylation of Ser-473 occurred more gradually. Surprisingly, neither saccharin-stimulated adipogenesis nor Thr-308 phosphorylation was dependent on expression of T1R2 and/or T1R3, although Ser-473 phosphorylation was impaired in T1R2/T1R3 double knock-out precursors. In mature adipocytes, artificial sweetener treatment suppressed lipolysis even in the presence of forskolin, and lipolytic responses were correlated with phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase. Suppression of lipolysis by saccharin in adipocytes was also independent of T1R2 and T1R3. These results suggest that some artificial sweeteners have previously uncharacterized metabolic effects on adipocyte differentiation and metabolism and that effects of artificial sweeteners on adipose tissue biology may be largely independent of the classical sweet taste receptors, T1R2 and T1R3. PMID

  6. Adenosine A(1), A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) receptors in hematopoiesis. 2. Expression of receptor mRNA in resting and lipopolysaccharide-activated mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Streitová, D; Hofer, M; Holá, J; Vacek, A; Pospísil, M

    2010-01-01

    Expression of mRNA for adenosine receptor subtypes A(1), A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) in normal and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated murine RAW 264.7 macrophages has been investigated using the method of quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results have shown a very low, unquantifiable expression of adenosine A(1) receptor mRNA in both normal and LPS-activated macrophages. The other three adenosine receptor mRNAs have been found to be expressed at various but always quantifiable levels. Activation of the macrophages by LPS induced upregulation of the expression of adenosine receptor A(2a) and A(2b) mRNA, whereas the expression of adenosine receptor A(3) mRNA was downregulated. Unstimulated macrophages exhibited a high expression of the A(2b) adenosine receptor mRNA. The findings are discussed from the point of view of the antiinflammatory and hematopoiesis-stimulating roles of the adenosine receptor signaling. PMID:19249906

  7. Skeletal muscle beta-receptors and isoproterenol-stimulated vasodilation in canine heart failure

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, M.J.; Lanoce, V.; Molinoff, P.B.; Wilson, J.R. )

    1989-11-01

    To investigate whether heart failure alters beta-adrenergic receptors on skeletal muscle and its associated vasculature, the density of beta-adrenergic receptors, isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity, and coupling of the guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein were compared in 18 control dogs and 16 dogs with heart failure induced by 5-8 wk of ventricular pacing at 260 beats/min. Hindlimb vascular responses to isoproterenol were compared in eight controls and eight of the dogs with heart failure. In dogs with heart failure, the density of beta-receptors on skeletal muscle was reduced in both gastrocnemius (control: 50 +/- 5; heart failure: 33 +/- 8 fmol/mg of protein) and semitendinosus muscle (control: 43 +/- 9; heart failure: 27 +/- 9 fmol/mg of protein, both P less than 0.05). Receptor coupling to the ternary complex, as determined by isoproterenol competition curves with and without guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP), was unchanged. Isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was significantly decreased in semitendinosus muscle (control: 52.4 +/- 4.6; heart failure: 36.5 +/- 9.5 pmol.mg-1.min-1; P less than 0.05) and tended to be decreased in gastrocnemius muscle (control: 40.1 +/- 8.5; heart failure: 33.5 +/- 4.5 pmol.mg-1.min-1; P = NS). Isoproterenol-induced hindlimb vasodilation was not significantly different in controls and in dogs with heart failure. These findings suggest that heart failure causes downregulation of skeletal muscle beta-adrenergic receptors, probably due to receptor exposure to elevated catecholamine levels, but does not reduce beta-receptor-mediated vasodilation in muscle.

  8. Extracellular matrix hyaluronan signals via its CD44 receptor in the increased responsiveness to mechanical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, L F; Araldi, D; Bogen, O; Levine, J D

    2016-06-01

    We propose that the extracellular matrix (ECM) signals CD44, a hyaluronan receptor, to increase the responsiveness to mechanical stimulation in the rat hind paw. We report that intradermal injection of hyaluronidase induces mechanical hyperalgesia, that is inhibited by co-administration of a CD44 receptor antagonist, A5G27. The intradermal injection of low (LMWH) but not high (HMWH) molecular weight hyaluronan also induces mechanical hyperalgesia, an effect that was attenuated by pretreatment with HMWH or A5G27. Pretreatment with HMWH also attenuated the hyperalgesia induced by hyaluronidase. Similarly, intradermal injection of A6, a CD44 receptor agonist, produced hyperalgesia that was inhibited by HMWH and A5G27. Inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA) and Src, but not protein kinase C (PKC), significantly attenuated the hyperalgesia induced by both A6 and LMWH. Finally, to determine if CD44 receptor signaling is involved in a preclinical model of inflammatory pain, we evaluated the effect of A5G27 and HMWH on the mechanical hyperalgesia associated with the inflammation induced by carrageenan. Both A5G27 and HMWH attenuated carrageenan-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. Thus, while LMWH acts at its cognate receptor, CD44, to induce mechanical hyperalgesia, HMWH acts at the same receptor as an antagonist. That the local administration of HMWH or A5G27 inhibits carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia supports the suggestion that carrageenan produces changes in the ECM that contributes to inflammatory pain. These studies define a clinically relevant role for signaling by the hyaluronan receptor, CD44, in increased responsiveness to mechanical stimulation. PMID:26996509

  9. Endogenous adenosine A3 receptor activation selectively alleviates persistent pain states

    PubMed Central

    Little, Joshua W.; Ford, Amanda; Symons-Liguori, Ashley M.; Chen, Zhoumou; Janes, Kali; Doyle, Timothy; Xie, Jennifer; Luongo, Livio; Tosh, Dillip K.; Maione, Sabatino; Bannister, Kirsty; Dickenson, Anthony H.; Vanderah, Todd W.; Porreca, Frank; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain is a global burden that promotes disability and unnecessary suffering. To date, efficacious treatment of chronic pain has not been achieved. Thus, new therapeutic targets are needed. Here, we demonstrate that increasing endogenous adenosine levels through selective adenosine kinase inhibition produces powerful analgesic effects in rodent models of experimental neuropathic pain through the A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR, now known as ADORA3) signalling pathway. Similar results were obtained by the administration of a novel and highly selective A3AR agonist. These effects were prevented by blockade of spinal and supraspinal A3AR, lost in A3AR knock-out mice, and independent of opioid and endocannabinoid mechanisms. A3AR activation also relieved non-evoked spontaneous pain behaviours without promoting analgesic tolerance or inherent reward. Further examination revealed that A3AR activation reduced spinal cord pain processing by decreasing the excitability of spinal wide dynamic range neurons and producing supraspinal inhibition of spinal nociception through activation of serotonergic and noradrenergic bulbospinal circuits. Critically, engaging the A3AR mechanism did not alter nociceptive thresholds in non-neuropathy animals and therefore produced selective alleviation of persistent neuropathic pain states. These studies reveal A3AR activation by adenosine as an endogenous anti-nociceptive pathway and support the development of A3AR agonists as novel therapeutics to treat chronic pain. PMID:25414036

  10. EphA3 Expressed in the Chicken Tectum Stimulates Nasal Retinal Ganglion Cell Axon Growth and Is Required for Retinotectal Topographic Map Formation

    PubMed Central

    Rapacioli, Melina; Salierno, Marcelo; Etchenique, Roberto; Flores, Vladimir; Sanchez, Viviana; Carri, Néstor Gabriel; Scicolone, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Background Retinotopic projection onto the tectum/colliculus constitutes the most studied model of topographic mapping and Eph receptors and their ligands, the ephrins, are the best characterized molecular system involved in this process. Ephrin-As, expressed in an increasing rostro-caudal gradient in the tectum/colliculus, repel temporal retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons from the caudal tectum and inhibit their branching posterior to their termination zones. However, there are conflicting data regarding the nature of the second force that guides nasal axons to invade and branch only in the caudal tectum/colliculus. The predominant model postulates that this second force is produced by a decreasing rostro-caudal gradient of EphA7 which repels nasal optic fibers and prevents their branching in the rostral tectum/colliculus. However, as optic fibers invade the tectum/colliculus growing throughout this gradient, this model cannot explain how the axons grow throughout this repellent molecule. Methodology/Principal Findings By using chicken retinal cultures we showed that EphA3 ectodomain stimulates nasal RGC axon growth in a concentration dependent way. Moreover, we showed that nasal axons choose growing on EphA3-expressing cells and that EphA3 diminishes the density of interstitial filopodia in nasal RGC axons. Accordingly, in vivo EphA3 ectodomain misexpression directs nasal optic fibers toward the caudal tectum preventing their branching in the rostral tectum. Conclusions We demonstrated in vitro and in vivo that EphA3 ectodomain (which is expressed in a decreasing rostro-caudal gradient in the tectum) is necessary for topographic mapping by stimulating the nasal axon growth toward the caudal tectum and inhibiting their branching in the rostral tectum. Furthermore, the ability of EphA3 of stimulating axon growth allows understanding how optic fibers invade the tectum growing throughout this molecular gradient. Therefore, opposing tectal gradients of repellent ephrin

  11. Receptor-mediated uptake of low density lipoprotein stimulates bile acid synthesis by cultured rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Junker, L.H.; Davis, R.A. )

    1989-12-01

    The cellular mechanisms responsible for the lipoprotein-mediated stimulation of bile acid synthesis in cultured rat hepatocytes were investigated. Adding 280 micrograms/ml of cholesterol in the form of human or rat low density lipoprotein (LDL) to the culture medium increased bile acid synthesis by 1.8- and 1.6-fold, respectively. As a result of the uptake of LDL, the synthesis of (14C)cholesterol from (2-14C)acetate was decreased and cellular cholesteryl ester mass was increased. Further studies demonstrated that rat apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich high density lipoprotein (HDL) both stimulated bile acid synthesis 1.5-fold, as well as inhibited the formation of (14C)cholesterol from (2-14C)acetate. Reductive methylation of LDL blocked the inhibition of cholesterol synthesis, as well as the stimulation of bile acid synthesis, suggesting that these processes require receptor-mediated uptake. To identify the receptors responsible, competitive binding studies using 125I-labeled apoE-free LDL and 125I-labeled apoE-rich HDL were performed. Both apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich HDL displayed an equal ability to compete for binding of the other, suggesting that a receptor or a group of receptors that recognizes both apolipoproteins is involved. Additional studies show that hepatocytes from cholestyramine-treated rats displayed 2.2- and 3.4-fold increases in the binding of apoE-free LDL and apoE-rich HDL, respectively. These data show for the first time that receptor-mediated uptake of LDL by the liver is intimately linked to processes activating bile acid synthesis.

  12. Inhibitory effect of PYY on vagally stimulated acid secretion is mediated predominantly by Y1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, K C; Grandt, D; Aurang, K; Eysselein, V E; Schimiczek, M; Reeve, J R

    1996-01-01

    Two molecular forms of peptide YY (PYY), PYY-(1--36) and PYY-(3--36), are abundant in rabbit intestine and blood. We have previously shown that PYY-(1--36) (PYYI) activates equipotently Y1 and Y2 receptors and PYY-(3--36) (PYY II) is a highly selective agonist for Y2 receptors. In the present study, we examined the effect of exogenous infusion of PYY on vagally stimulated gastric acid secretion in awake rabbits with chronic gastric fistula. To determine the specific PYY receptor(s) that mediates this effect, we used a highly selective Y1 agonist, Pro34-PYY, a synthetic PYY, and a Y2-selective agonist, PYY II. Vagal stimulation of acid secretion was elicited by an intravenous bolus injection of insulin (0.125 U/kg) 30 min after beginning a 180-min intravenous infusion of either PYY I, PYY II, or [Pro34]-PYY after a 50 micrograms/kg i.v. bolus of atropine followed immediately by a 500 micrograms/kg sc injection. During infusion of 200 pmol.kg 1.h-1 PYY I, acid output was significantly inhibited to 45 +/- 13% of maximum acid output 60 min after injection of insulin. Similarly, acid output during infusion of 200 pmol.kg-1.h-1 [Pro34]-PYY was significantly inhibited to 52 +/- 12% of maximum. In contrast, acid output during infusion of 200 pmol.kg-1.h-1 of PYY II was not significantly inhibited (101 +/- 18% of maximum). Infusion of double the dose (400 pmol.kg-1.h-1) of PYY II resulted in acid inhibition (51 = 15% of maximum), whereas infusion of the same dose did not significantly enhance acid inhibition by infusion of either PYY I or [Pro34]-PYY (28 +/- 11 and 42 +/- 15% of maximum). These results indicate that PYY, acting predominantly at Y1 receptors, is a potent inhibitor of vagally stimulated acid secretion in adult rabbits. PMID:8772509

  13. β-Cell deletion of Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 nuclear receptors impedes mitochondrial respiration and insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Merrick S; Hancock, Chad R; Ray, Jason D; Kener, Kyle B; Draney, Carrie; Garland, Kevin; Hardman, Jeremy; Bikman, Benjamin T; Tessem, Jeffery S

    2016-07-01

    β-Cell insulin secretion is dependent on proper mitochondrial function. Various studies have clearly shown that the Nr4a family of orphan nuclear receptors is essential for fuel utilization and mitochondrial function in liver, muscle, and adipose. Previously, we have demonstrated that overexpression of Nr4a1 or Nr4a3 is sufficient to induce proliferation of pancreatic β-cells. In this study, we examined whether Nr4a expression impacts pancreatic β-cell mitochondrial function. Here, we show that β-cell mitochondrial respiration is dependent on the nuclear receptors Nr4a1 and Nr4a3. Mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized cells was significantly decreased in β-cells lacking Nr4a1 or Nr4a3. Furthermore, respiration rates of intact cells deficient for Nr4a1 or Nr4a3 in the presence of 16 mM glucose resulted in decreased glucose mediated oxygen consumption. Consistent with this reduction in respiration, a significant decrease in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion rates is observed with deletion of Nr4a1 or Nr4a3. Interestingly, the changes in respiration and insulin secretion occur without a reduction in mitochondrial content, suggesting decreased mitochondrial function. We establish that knockdown of Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 results in decreased expression of the mitochondrial dehydrogenase subunits Idh3g and Sdhb. We demonstrate that loss of Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 impedes production of ATP and ultimately inhibits glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. These data demonstrate for the first time that the orphan nuclear receptors Nr4a1 and Nr4a3 are critical for β-cell mitochondrial function and insulin secretion. PMID:27221116

  14. Synaptic NMDA receptor stimulation activates PP1 by inhibiting its phosphorylation by Cdk5

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Hailong; Sun, Lu; Siddoway, Benjamin A.; Petralia, Ronald S.; Yang, Hongtian; Gu, Hua; Nairn, Angus C.

    2013-01-01

    The serine/threonine protein phosphatase protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is known to play an important role in learning and memory by mediating local and downstream aspects of synaptic signaling, but how PP1 activity is controlled in different forms of synaptic plasticity remains unknown. We find that synaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor stimulation in neurons leads to activation of PP1 through a mechanism involving inhibitory phosphorylation at Thr320 by Cdk5. Synaptic stimulation led to proteasome-dependent degradation of the Cdk5 regulator p35, inactivation of Cdk5, and increased auto-dephosphorylation of Thr320 of PP1. We also found that neither inhibitor-1 nor calcineurin were involved in the control of PP1 activity in response to synaptic NMDA receptor stimulation. Rather, the PP1 regulatory protein, inhibitor-2, formed a complex with PP1 that was controlled by synaptic stimulation. Finally, we found that inhibitor-2 was critical for the induction of long-term depression in primary neurons. Our work fills a major gap regarding the regulation of PP1 in synaptic plasticity. PMID:24189275

  15. Gastrointestinal hormones stimulate growth of Foregut Neuroendocrine Tumors by transactivating the EGF receptor

    PubMed Central

    Di Florio, Alessia; Sancho, Veronica; Moreno, Paola; Fave, Gianfranco Delle; Jensen, Robert T.

    2012-01-01

    Foregut Neuroendocrine Tumors[NETs] usually pursuit a benign course, but some show aggressive behavior. The treatment of patients with advanced NETs is marginally effective and new approaches are needed. In other tumors, transactivation of the EGF receptor(EGFR) by growth factors, gastrointestinal(GI) hormones and lipids can stimulate growth, which has led to new treatments. Recent studies show a direct correlation between NET malignancy and EGFR expression, EGFR inhibition decreases basal NET growth and an autocrine growth effect exerted by GI hormones, for some NETs. To determine if GI hormones can stimulate NET growth by inducing transactivation of EGFR, we examined the ability of EGF, TGFα and various GI hormones to stimulate growth of the human foregut carcinoid, BON, the somatostatinoma QGP-1 and the rat islet tumor, Rin-14B-cell lines. The EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitor, AG1478 strongly inhibited EGF and the GI hormones stimulated cell growth, both in BON and QGP-1 cells. In all the three neuroendocrine cell lines studied, we found EGF, TGFα and the other growth-stimulating GI hormones increased Tyr1068 EGFR phosphorylation. In BON cells, both the GI hormones neurotensin and a bombesin analogue caused a time- and dose-dependent increase in EGFR phosphorylation, which was strongly inhibited by AG1478. Moreover, we found this stimulated phosphorylation was dependent on Src kinases, PKCs, matrix metalloproteinase activation and the generation of reactive oxygen species. These results raise the possibility that disruption of this signaling cascade by either EGFR inhibition alone or combined with receptor antagonists may be a novel therapeutic approach for treatment of foregut NETs/PETs. PMID:23220008

  16. A neomutation of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor in a severe neonatal hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    de Roux, N; Polak, M; Couet, J; Leger, J; Czernichow, P; Milgrom, E; Misrahi, M

    1996-06-01

    Until recently, neonatal hyperthyroidism has been considered to be related to the transplacental passage of thyroid-stimulating Ig present in the serum of the mother. We report here the case of a newborn who presented with severe hyperthyroidism, diffuse goiter, and important ocular signs (eyelid retraction and possibly proptosis). However, the absence of thyroid pathology in the parents and the lack of antithyroid antibodies in the mother and in the patient led us to suspect a nonimmune aetiology. Direct genomic sequencing of the last exon of the TSH receptor in the patient revealed a T-->C transversion yielding to a Met453-->Thr heterozygous substitution in the second transmembrane domain of the receptor. The mutation was absent in both parents. Eukaryotic expression analysis in COS-7 cells yielded a mutated receptor that produced constitutive activation of adenylate cyclase without enhancement of phospholipase C activity. PMID:8964822

  17. Direct angiotensin II type 2 receptor stimulation decreases dopamine synthesis in the rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Birgit; Vanderheyden, Patrick; Michotte, Yvette; Sarre, Sophie

    2010-06-01

    A relationship between the central renin angiotensin system and the dopaminergic system has been described in the striatum. However, the role of the angiotensin II type 2 (AT(2)) receptor in this interaction has not yet been established. The present study examined the outcome of direct AT(2) receptor stimulation on dopamine (DA) release and synthesis by means of the recently developed nonpeptide AT(2) receptor agonist, compound 21 (C21). The effects of AT(2) receptor agonism on the release of DA and its major metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and on the activity of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in the catecholamine biosynthesis, were investigated using in vivo microdialysis. Local administration of C21 (0.1 and 1 microM) resulted in a decrease of the extracellular DOPAC levels, whereas extracellular DA concentrations remained unaltered, suggesting a reduced synthesis of DA. This effect was mediated by the AT(2) receptor since it could be blocked by the AT(2) receptor antagonist PD123319 (1 microM). A similar effect was observed after local striatal (10 nM) as well as systemic (0.3 and 3 mg/kg i.p.) administration of the AT(1) receptor antagonist, candesartan. TH activity as assessed by accumulation of extracellular levels of L-DOPA after inhibition of amino acid decarboxylase with NSD1015, was also reduced after local administration of C21 (0.1 and 1 microM) and candesartan (10 nM). Together, these data suggest that AT(1) and AT(2) receptors in the striatum exert an opposite effect on the modulation of DA synthesis rather than DA release. PMID:20097214

  18. Properties of follicle-stimulating-hormone receptor in cell membranes of bovine testis.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, K W

    1975-01-01

    A simple method for preparing plasma membranes from bovine testes is described. Bovine testicular receptor has a high affinity and specificity for 125I-labelled human FSH (follicle-stimulating hormone). The specific binding of 125I-labelled human FSH to the plasma membranes is a saturable process with respect to the amounts of receptor protein and FSH added. The association and dissociation of 125I-labelled human FSH are time- and temperature-dependent, and the binding of labelled human FSH to bovine testicular receptor is strong and not readily reversible. Scatchard [Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. (1949) 51, 660-672] analysis indicates a dissociation constant, Kd, of 9.8 X10(-11)M, and 5.9 X 10(-14)mol of binding sites/mg of membrane protein. The testicular membrane receptor is heat-labile. Preheating at 40 degrees C for 15 min destroyed 30% of the binding activity. Specific binding is pH-dependent, with an optimum between pH 7.0 and 7.5. Brief exposure to extremes of pH caused irreversible damage to the receptors. The ionic strength of the incubation medium markedly affects the association of 125I-labelled human FSH with its testicular receptor. Various cations at concentrations of 0.1M inhibit almost completely the binding of 125I-labelled human FSH. Nuclectides and steroid hormones at concentrations of 1mM and 5mu/ml respectively have no effect on the binding of FSH to its receptor. Incubation of membranes with and chymotrypsin resulted in an almost complete loss of binding activity, suggesting that protein moieties are essential for the binding of 125I-labelled human FSH. Binding of 125I-labelled human FSH to bovine testicular receptor does not result in destruction or degradation of the hormone. PMID:242318

  19. Activation of EP4 receptors contributes to prostaglandin E2-mediated stimulation of renal sensory nerves.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Ulla C; Cicha, Michael Z; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Nüsing, Rolf M; Smith, Lori A; Hökfelt, Tomas

    2004-12-01

    Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the renal pelvic wall increases prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) leading to stimulation of cAMP production, which results in substance P (SP) release and activation of renal mechanosensory nerves. The subtype of PGE receptors involved, EP2 and/or EP4, was studied by immunohistochemistry and renal pelvic administration of agonists and antagonists of EP2 and EP4 receptors. EP4 receptor-like immunoreactivity (LI) was colocalized with calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-LI in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) at Th(9)-L(1) and in nerve terminals in the renal pelvic wall. Th(9)-L(1) DRG neurons also contained EP3 receptor-LI and COX-2-LI, each of which was colocalized with CGRP-LI in some neurons. No renal pelvic nerves contained EP3 receptor-LI and only very few nerves COX-2-LI. The EP1/EP2 receptor antagonist AH-6809 (20 microM) had no effect on SP release produced by PGE(2) (0.14 microM) from an isolated rat renal pelvic wall preparation. However, the EP4 receptor antagonist L-161,982 (10 microM) blocked the SP release produced by the EP2/EP4 receptor agonist butaprost (10 microM) 12 +/- 2 vs. 2 +/- 1 and PGE(2), 9 +/- 1 vs. 1 +/- 0 pg/min. The SP release by butaprost and PGE(2) was similarly blocked by the EP4 receptor antagonist AH-23848 (30 microM). In anesthetized rats, the afferent renal nerve activity (ARNA) responses to butaprost 700 +/- 100 and PGE(2).780 +/- 100%.s (area under the curve of ARNA vs. time) were unaffected by renal pelvic perfusion with AH-6809. However, 1 microM L-161,982 and 10 microM AH-23848 blocked the ARNA responses to butaprost by 94 +/- 5 and 78 +/- 10%, respectively, and to PGE(2) by 74 +/- 16 and 74 +/- 11%, respectively. L-161,982 also blocked the ARNA response to increasing renal pelvic pressure 10 mmHg, 85 +/- 5%. In conclusion, PGE(2) increases renal pelvic release of SP and ARNA by activating EP4 receptors on renal sensory nerve fibers. PMID:15292051

  20. Liver X receptor-α and miR-130a-3p regulate expression of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Aihui; Wang, Qian; Yuan, Yongjun; Cheng, Jilun; Chen, Lixian; Guo, Xiaohua; Li, Qiang; Chen, Bo; Huang, Xuliang; Huang, Qiaobing

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that activation of liver X receptors (LXRs) attenuates the development of atherosclerosis, not only by regulating lipid metabolism but also by suppressing inflammatory signaling. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1PR2), an important inflammatory gene product, plays a role in the development of various inflammatory diseases. It was proposed that S1PR2 might be regulated by LXR-α. In the present study, the effect of LXR-α on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced S1PR2 expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was investigated and the underlying mechanism was explored. The results demonstrated that TNF-α led to an increase in S1PR2 expression and triggered a downregulation of LXR-α expression in HUVECs as well. Downregulation of LXR-α with specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) remarkably enhanced the primary as well as TNF-α-induced expression of S1PR2 in HUVECs. Activation of LXR-α by agonist GW3965 inhibited both primary and TNF-α-induced S1PR2 expression. GW3965 also attenuated S1PR2-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction. The data further showed that TNF-α induced a significant decrease in miR-130a-3p expression. Overexpression of miR-130a-3p with mimic product reduced S1PR2 protein expression, and inhibition of miR-130a-3p by specific inhibitor resulted in an increase in S1PR2 protein expression. Furthermore, activation of LXRs with agonist enhanced the expression of miR-130a-3p, and knockdown of LXR-α by siRNA suppressed miR-130a-3p expression. These results suggest that LXR-α might downregulate S1PR2 expression via miR-130a-3p in quiescent HUVECs. Stimulation of TNF-α attenuates the activity of LXR-α and results in enhanced S1PR2 expression. PMID:26669941

  1. Hypotonicity stimulates renal epithelial sodium transport by activating JNK via receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Taruno, Akiyuki; Niisato, Naomi; Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2007-07-01

    We previously reported that hypotonic stress stimulated transepithelial Na(+) transport via a pathway dependent on protein tyrosine kinase (PTK; Niisato N, Van Driessche W, Liu M, Marunaka Y. J Membr Biol 175: 63-77, 2000). However, it is still unknown what type of PTK mediates this stimulation. In the present study, we investigated the role of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) in the hypotonic stimulation of Na(+) transport. In renal epithelial A6 cells, we observed inhibitory effects of AG1478 [an inhibitor of the EGF receptor (EGFR)] and AG1296 [an inhibitor of the PDGF receptor (PDGFR)] on both the hypotonic stress-induced stimulation of Na(+) transport and the hypotonic stress-induced ligand-independent activation of EGFR. We further studied whether hypotonic stress activates members of the MAP kinase family, ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, and JNK/SAPK, via an RTK-dependent pathway. The present study indicates that hypotonic stress induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK/SAPK, but not p38 MAPK, that the hypotonic stress-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK/SAPK was diminished by coapplication of AG1478 and AG1296, and that only JNK/SAPK was involved in the hypotonic stimulation of Na(+) transport. A further study using cyclohexamide (a protein synthesis inhibitor) suggests that both RTK and JNK/SAPK contributed to the protein synthesis-independent early phase in hypotonic stress-induced Na(+) transport, but not to the protein synthesis-dependent late phase. The present study also suggests involvement of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) in RTK-JNK/SAPK cascade-mediated Na(+) transport. These observations indicate that 1) hypotonic stress activates JNK/SAPK via RTKs in a ligand-independent pathway, 2) the RTK-JNK/SAPK cascade acts as a mediator of hypotonic stress for stimulation of Na(+) transport, and 3) PI3-kinase is involved in the RTK-JNK/SAPK cascade for the hypotonic stress-induced stimulation of Na(+) transport. PMID:17344192

  2. Angiotensin AT2-receptor stimulation improves survival and neurological outcome after experimental stroke in mice.

    PubMed

    Schwengel, Katja; Namsolleck, Pawel; Lucht, Kristin; Clausen, Bettina H; Lambertsen, Kate L; Valero-Esquitino, Veronica; Thöne-Reineke, Christa; Müller, Susanne; Widdop, Robert E; Denton, Kate M; Horiuchi, Masatsugu; Iwai, Masaru; Boato, Francesco; Dahlöf, Björn; Hallberg, Anders; Unger, Thomas; Steckelings, U Muscha

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of post-stroke, direct AT2-receptor (AT2R) stimulation with the non-peptide AT2R-agonist compound 21 (C21) on infarct size, survival and neurological outcome after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in mice and looked for potential underlying mechanisms. C57/BL6J or AT2R-knockout mice (AT2-KO) underwent MCAO for 30 min followed by reperfusion. Starting 45 min after MCAO, mice were treated once daily for 4 days with either vehicle or C21 (0.03 mg/kg ip). Neurological deficits were scored daily. Infarct volumes were measured 96 h post-stroke by MRI. C21 significantly improved survival after MCAO when compared to vehicle-treated mice. C21 treatment had no impact on infarct size, but significantly attenuated neurological deficits. Expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB) (receptor for BDNF) and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43) were significantly increased in the peri-infarct cortex of C21-treated mice when compared to vehicle-treated mice. Furthermore, the number of apoptotic neurons was significantly decreased in the peri-infarct cortex in mice treated with C21 compared to controls. There were no effects of C21 on neurological outcome, infarct size and expression of BDNF or GAP-43 in AT2-KO mice. From these data, it can be concluded that AT2R stimulation attenuates early mortality and neurological deficits after experimental stroke through neuroprotective mechanisms in an AT2R-specific way. Key message • AT2R stimulation after MCAO in mice reduces mortality and neurological deficits.• AT2R stimulation increases BDNF synthesis and protects neurons from apoptosis.• The AT2R-agonist C21 acts protectively when applied post-stroke and peripherally. PMID:26983606

  3. Interaction of urokinase with specific receptors stimulates mobilization of bovine adrenal capillary endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fibbi, G.; Ziche, M.; Morbidelli, L. ); Magnelli, L.; Del Rosso, M. )

    1988-12-01

    On the basis of {sup 125}I-labeled plasminogen activator binding analysis the authors have found that bovine adrenal capillary endothelial cells have specific receptors for human urinary-type plasminogen activator on the cell membrane. Each cell exposes about 37,000 free receptors with a K{sub d} of 0.8958{times}10{sup {minus}12} M. A monoclonal antibody against the 17,500 proteolytic fragment of the A chain of the plasminogen activator, not containing the catalytic site of the enzyme, impaired the specific binding, thus suggesting the involvement of a sequence present on the A chain in the interaction with the receptor, as previously shown in other cell model systems. Both the native molecule and the A chain are able to stimulate endothelial cell motility in the Boyden chamber, when used at nanomolar concentrations. The use of the same monoclonal antibody that can inhibit ligand-receptor interaction can impair the plasminogen activator and A-chain-induced endothelial cell motility, suggesting that under the conditions used in this in vitro model system, the motility of bovine adrenal capillary endothelial cells depends on the specific interaction of the ligand with free receptors on the surface of endothelial cells.

  4. Dissociation between neural and vascular responses to sympathetic stimulation : contribution of local adrenergic receptor function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, G.; Costa, F.; Shannon, J.; Robertson, D.; Biaggioni, I.

    2000-01-01

    Sympathetic activation produced by various stimuli, eg, mental stress or handgrip, evokes regional vascular responses that are often nonhomogeneous. This phenomenon is believed to be the consequence of the recruitment of differential central neural pathways or of a sympathetically mediated vasodilation. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a similar heterogeneous response occurs with cold pressor stimulation and to test the hypothesis that local differences in adrenergic receptor function could be in part responsible for this diversity. In 8 healthy subjects, local norepinephrine spillover and blood flow were measured in arms and legs at baseline and during sympathetic stimulation induced by baroreflex mechanisms (nitroprusside infusion) or cold pressor stimulation. At baseline, legs had higher vascular resistance (27+/-5 versus 17+/-2 U, P=0.05) despite lower norepinephrine spillover (0.28+/-0.04 versus 0.4+/-0.05 mg. min(-1). dL(-1), P=0.03). Norepinephrine spillover increased similarly in both arms and legs during nitroprusside infusion and cold pressor stimulation. On the other hand, during cold stimulation, vascular resistance increased in arms but not in legs (20+/-9% versus -7+/-4%, P=0.03). Increasing doses of isoproterenol and phenylephrine were infused intra-arterially in arms and legs to estimate beta-mediated vasodilation and alpha-induced vasoconstriction, respectively. beta-Mediated vasodilation was significantly lower in legs compared with arms. Thus, we report a dissociation between norepinephrine spillover and vascular responses to cold stress in lower limbs characterized by a paradoxical decrease in local resistance despite increases in sympathetic activity. The differences observed in adrenergic receptor responses cannot explain this phenomenon.

  5. Stimulation of pulmonary rapidly adapting receptors by inhaled wood smoke in rats.

    PubMed

    Lai, C J; Kou, Y R

    1998-04-15

    1. The stimulation of pulmonary rapidly adapting receptors (RARs) by wood smoke was investigated. Impulses from seventy RARs were recorded in fifty-nine anaesthetized, open-chest and artificially ventilated rats; responses to delivery of 6 ml of wood smoke into the lungs were studied in sixty-one receptors whereas responses to histamine (10 or 100 microg kg-1, i.v.) were studied in the other nine. 2. Delivery of wood smoke stimulated fifty-two of the sixty-one RARs studied. When stimulated, an intense burst of discharge was evoked within 1 or 2 s of smoke delivery. This increased activity quickly peaked in 1-3 s (Delta = 15.8 +/- 1.6 impulses s-1; n = 61; mean +/- s.e.m.), then declined and yet remained at a level higher than the baseline activity. The mean duration of the stimulation was 25.1 +/- 2.7 s. In contrast, smoke delivery did not affect tracheal pressure. 3. Peak responses of RARs to wood smoke were partially reduced by removal of smoke particulates and were largely attenuated by pretreatment with dimethylthiourea (DMTU, a hydroxyl radical scavenger), indomethacin (Indo, a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor), or both DMTU and Indo (DMTU + Indo). Conversely, the peak responses of RARs were not significantly affected by pretreatment with isoprenaline (a bronchodilator) or vehicle for these chemicals. Additionally, pretreatment with DMTU, Indo, or DMTU + Indo did not significantly alter the RAR sensitivity to mechanical stimulation (constant-pressure lung inflation; 20 cmH2O). 4. Of the nine RARs tested, six were stimulated by histamine and their sensitivity to this chemical irritant was not altered by pretreatment with DMTU + Indo. 5. The results suggest that both the particulates and gas phases are responsible for, and both the hydroxyl radical and cyclo-oxygenase products are involved in, the stimulation of RARs by wood smoke. Furthermore, changes in lung mechanics following smoke delivery are not the cause of this afferent stimulation. PMID:9508820

  6. The therapeutic potential of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents for tissue protection: a tale of two receptors.

    PubMed

    Brines, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a well-known therapeutic protein employed widely in the treatment of anemia. Over the past decade, abundant evidence has shown that in addition to its systemic role in the regulation of plasma pO(2) by modulating erythrocyte numbers, EPO is also a cytoprotective molecule made locally in response to injury or metabolic stress. Many studies have shown beneficial effects of EPO administration in reducing damage caused by ischemia-reperfusion, trauma, cytotoxicity, infection and inflammation in a variety of organs and tissues. Notably, the receptor mediating the nonerythropoietic effects of EPO differs from the one responsible for hematopoiesis. The tissue-protective receptor exhibits a lower affinity for EPO and is a heteromer consisting of EPO receptor monomers in association with the common receptor that is also employed by granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin 3, and interleukin 5. This heteromeric receptor is expressed immediately following injury, whereas EPO production is delayed. Thus, early administration of EPO can dramatically reduce the deleterious components of the local inflammatory cascade. However, a high dose of EPO is required and this also stimulates the bone marrow to produce highly reactive platelets and activates the vascular endothelium into a prothrombotic state. To circumvent these undesirable effects, the EPO molecule has been successfully altered to selectively eliminate erythropoietic and prothrombotic potencies, while preserving tissue-protective activities. Very recently, small peptide mimetics have been developed that recapitulate the tissue-protective activities of EPO. Nonerythropoietic tissue-protective molecules hold high promise in a wide variety of acute and chronic diseases. PMID:20093809

  7. Studies on the structure of the follicle-stimulating hormone receptor using photoaffinity labeling procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The general objective of this project was to study the structure of the follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) receptor using affinity labeling methods. A low density fraction derived from homogenates of bovine testis was found to contain high affinity and low capacity receptors specific for FSH. Electron microscopic examination of the fraction revealed structure resembling multilamellar membranous vesicles (MV). For photoaffinity labeling of the FSH receptors in MV, an azidobenzoyl-/sup 125/I-analog of human FSH was prepared (/sup 125/I-AB-hFSH) and binding of specific FSH receptors was studied. /sup 125/I-AB-hFSH binding of receptors was inhibited in a dose dependent manner by unlabeled hFSH, and binding was not prevented by structurally-related human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). The formation of photocrosslinked protein of relative molecular mass (M/sub r/) 54,000, 64,000, 76,000, 84,000, 97,000 and 116,000 was found to be inhibited by unlabeled hFSH in a dose related manner, and to be dependent on photoactivation of the FSH derivative. The interpretation of the photoaffinity labeling experiments was that three proteins associated with the FSH receptor were photoaffinity labeled. Analysis by indirect means suggested that the three proteins were assembled to form oligomeric complexes, and based on the intensities and composition of the oligomeric species, spatial relationships of the polypeptides with respect to each other on the membrane surface were deduced. The results of photoaffinity labeling suggest the FSH receptor is composed of three subunits of M/sub r/ 38,000, 48,000, and 81,000 and exists in the membrane in part as a M/sub r/ 330,000 dimer.

  8. Preselection Thymocytes Are More Sensitive to T Cell Receptor Stimulation Than Mature T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Gayle M.; Schober, Sonya L.; Endrizzi, Bart T.; Dutcher, Angela K.; Jameson, Stephen C.; Hogquist, Kristin A.

    1998-01-01

    During T cell development, thymocytes which are tolerant to self-peptides but reactive to foreign peptides are selected. The current model for thymocyte selection proposes that self-peptide–major histocompatibility complex (MHC) complexes that bind the T cell receptor with low affinity will promote positive selection while those with high affinity will result in negative selection. Upon thymocyte maturation, such low affinity self-peptide–MHC ligands no longer provoke a response, but foreign peptides can incidentally be high affinity ligands and can therefore stimulate T cells. For this model to work, thymocytes must be more sensitive to ligand than mature T cells. Contrary to this expectation, several groups have shown that thymocytes are less responsive than mature T cells to anti-T cell receptor for antigen (TCR)/CD3 mAb stimulation. Additionally, the lower TCR levels on thymocytes, compared with T cells, would potentially correlate with decreased thymocyte sensitivity. Here we compared preselection thymocytes and mature T cells for early activation events in response to peptide–MHC ligands. Remarkably, the preselection thymocytes were more responsive than mature T cells when stimulated with low affinity peptide variants, while both populations responded equally well to the antigenic peptide. This directly demonstrates the increased sensitivity of thymocytes compared with T cells for TCR engagement by peptide–MHC complexes. PMID:9815264

  9. Thrombin stimulates fibroblast procollagen production via proteolytic activation of protease-activated receptor 1.

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, R C; Dabbagh, K; McAnulty, R J; Gray, A J; Blanc-Brude, O P; Laurent, G J

    1998-01-01

    Thrombin is a multifunctional serine protease that has a crucial role in blood coagulation. It is also a potent mesenchymal cell mitogen and chemoattractant and might therefore have an important role in the recruitment and local proliferation of mesenchymal cells at sites of tissue injury. We hypothesized that thrombin might also affect the deposition of connective tissue proteins at these sites by directly stimulating fibroblast procollagen production. To address this hypothesis, the effect of thrombin on procollagen production and gene expression by human foetal lung fibroblasts was assessed over 48 h. Thrombin stimulated procollagen production at concentrations of 1 nM and above, with maximal increases of between 60% and 117% at 10 nM thrombin. These effects of thrombin were, at least in part, due to increased steady-state levels of alpha1(I) procollagen mRNA. They could furthermore be reproduced with thrombin receptor-activating peptides for the protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1) and were completely abolished when thrombin was rendered proteolytically inactive with the specific inhibitors d-Phe-Pro-ArgCH2Cl and hirudin, indicating that thrombin is mediating these effects via the proteolytic activation of PAR-1. These results suggest that thrombin might influence the deposition of connective tissue proteins during normal wound healing and the development of tissue fibrosis by stimulating fibroblast procollagen production. PMID:9639571

  10. Nonlinear relationship between alpha 1-adrenergic receptor occupancy and norepinephrine-stimulated calcium flux in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Colucci, W.S.; Brock, T.A.; Gimbrone, M.A. Jr.; Alexander, R.W.

    1985-05-01

    To determine the relationship between vascular alpha 1-adrenergic receptor occupancy and receptor-coupled calcium flux, the authors have studied (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding and l-norepinephrine-induced /sup 45/Ca efflux in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells isolated from the rabbit aorta. In a crude cellular homogenate, (/sup 3/H)prazosin bound to a single high affinity site, whereas l-norepinephrine (NE) binding was best described by a two-site model. NE-stimulated /sup 45/Ca efflux was concentration-dependent (EC/sup 50/ = 108 nM) and potently inhibited by prazosin (IC/sup 50/ = 0.15 nM). For the total receptor pool identified by (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding, the relationship between receptor occupancy by NE and NE-stimulated /sup 45/Ca efflux was markedly nonlinear, such that 50% of maximum NE-stimulated efflux occurred with occupancy of only approximately 7% of receptors. These two experimental approaches provide direct evidence for the presence in cultured rabbit aortic smooth muscle cells of a sizable pool of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors in excess of those needed for maximum NE-stimulated /sup 45/Ca efflux. This evidence of ''spare'' receptors, together with the finding of two affinity states of agonist binding, raises the possibility of functional heterogeneity of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors in this system.

  11. Hormone stimulation of androgen receptor mediates dynamic changes in DNA methylation patterns at regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Vineet K.; Attwood, Kristopher; Campbell, Moray J.; Smiraglia, Dominic J.

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that contributes to stable gene silencing by interfering with the ability of transcriptional regulators to bind to DNA. Recent findings have revealed that hormone stimulation of certain nuclear receptors induces rapid, dynamic changes in DNA methylation patterns alongside transcriptional responses at a subset of target loci, over time. However, the ability of androgen receptor (AR) to dynamically regulate gene transcription is relatively under-studied and its role in the regulation of DNA methylation patterns remains to be elucidated. Here we demonstrate in normal prostate cells that hormone stimulated AR activity results in dynamic changes in the transcription rate and DNA methylation patterns at the AR target genes, TIPARP and SGK1. Time-resolved chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments on the SGK1 locus reveals dynamic recruitment of AR and RNA Polymerase II, as well as the recruitment of proteins involved in the DNA demethylation process, TET1 and TDG. Furthermore, the presence of DNA methylation at dynamic regions inhibits protein binding and transcriptional activity of SGK1. These findings establish AR activity as a contributing factor to the dynamic regulation of DNA methylation patterns at target genes in prostate biology and infer further complexity involved in nuclear receptor mediation of transcriptional regulation. PMID:26646795

  12. Wedelolactone induces growth of breast cancer cells by stimulation of estrogen receptor signalling.

    PubMed

    Nehybova, Tereza; Smarda, Jan; Daniel, Lukas; Brezovsky, Jan; Benes, Petr

    2015-08-01

    Wedelolactone, a plant coumestan, was shown to act as anti-cancer agent for breast and prostate carcinomas in vitro and in vivo targeting multiple cellular proteins including androgen receptors, 5-lipoxygenase and topoisomerase IIα. It is cytotoxic to breast, prostate, pituitary and myeloma cancer cell lines in vitro at μM concentrations. In this study, however, a novel biological activity of nM dose of wedelolactone was demonstrated. Wedelolactone acts as agonist of estrogen receptors (ER) α and β as demonstrated by transactivation of estrogen response element (ERE) in cells transiently expressing either ERα or ERβ and by molecular docking of this coumestan into ligand binding pocket of both ERα and ERβ. In breast cancer cells, wedelolactone stimulates growth of estrogen receptor-positive cells, expression of estrogen-responsive genes and activates rapid non-genomic estrogen signalling. All these effects can be inhibited by pretreatment with pure ER antagonist ICI 182,780 and they are not observed in ER-negative breast cancer cells. We conclude that wedelolactone acts as phytoestrogen in breast cancer cells by stimulating ER genomic and non-genomic signalling pathways. PMID:25934092

  13. A model for the stimulation of taste receptor cells by salt.

    PubMed Central

    DeSimone, J A; Price, S

    1976-01-01

    A taste cell mucosal surface is regarded as a planar region containing bound anionic sites and openings to ionic channels. It is assumed that the bulk aqueous properties of the exterior phase are not continuous with the surface but terminate at a plane near the surface. The region between the (Stern) plane and the membrane is regarded as having a lower dielectric constant than bulk water. This fact admits the possibility of ion pair formation between fixed sites and mobile cations. Mobile ion pairs entering the region may also bind to a fixed anionic site. Thus, it is assumed that mobile cations and ion pairs are potential determining species at the surface. Binding cations neutralizes surface charges, whereas binding mobile ion pairs does not. This competition accounts for the observed anion effect on stimulation of tast receptors by sodium salts. The potential profile is constructed by superimposing the phase boundary potentials with an ionic diffusion potential across the membrane. The model accounts for the anion effect on receptor potential, pH effects, the reversal of polarity when cells are treated with FeCl3, and the so-called "water reponse," depolarization of the taste cell upon dilution of the stimulant solution below a critical lower limit. The proposed model does not require both bound cationic and anionic receptors, and further suggests that limited access to a Stern-like region continuous with membrane channels may generally serve to control transport of ions. PMID:938727

  14. Immunoglobulin-like domain containing receptor 1 mediates fat-stimulated cholecystokinin secretion.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Rashmi; Wang, Yu; Shahid, Rafiq A; Vigna, Steven R; Freedman, Neil J; Liddle, Rodger A

    2013-08-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a satiety hormone produced by discrete enteroendocrine cells scattered among absorptive cells of the small intestine. CCK is released into blood following a meal; however, the mechanisms inducing hormone secretion are largely unknown. Ingested fat is the major stimulant of CCK secretion. We recently identified a novel member of the lipoprotein remnant receptor family known as immunoglobulin-like domain containing receptor 1 (ILDR1) in intestinal CCK cells and postulated that this receptor conveyed the signal for fat-stimulated CCK secretion. In the intestine, ILDR1 is expressed exclusively in CCK cells. Orogastric administration of fatty acids elevated blood levels of CCK in wild-type mice but not Ildr1-deficient mice, although the CCK secretory response to trypsin inhibitor was retained. The uptake of fluorescently labeled lipoproteins in ILDR1-transfected CHO cells and release of CCK from isolated intestinal cells required a unique combination of fatty acid plus HDL. CCK secretion secondary to ILDR1 activation was associated with increased [Ca2+]i, consistent with regulated hormone release. These findings demonstrate that ILDR1 regulates CCK release through a mechanism dependent on fatty acids and lipoproteins and that absorbed fatty acids regulate gastrointestinal hormone secretion. PMID:23863714

  15. Activation of adenosine A(3) receptors potentiates stimulatory effects of IL-3, SCF, and GM-CSF on mouse granulocyte-macrophage hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Hofer, M; Vacek, A; Pospísil, M; Holá, J; Streitová, D; Znojil, V

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine A(3) receptor agonist N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA) has been tested from the point of view of potentiating the effects of hematopoietic growth factors interleukin-3 (IL-3), stem cell factor (SCF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on the growth of hematopoietic progenitor cells for granulocytes and macrophages (GM-CFC) in suspension of normal mouse bone marrow cells in vitro. IB-MECA alone induced no GM-CFC growth. Significant elevation of numbers of GM-CFC evoked by the combinations of IB-MECA with IL-3, SCF, or GM-CSF as compared with these growth factors alone has been noted. Combination of IB-MECA with G-CSF did not induce significantly higher numbers of GM-CFC in comparison with G-CSF alone. Joint action of three drugs, namely of IB-MECA + IL-3 + GM-CSF, produced significantly higher numbers of GM-CFC in comparison with the combinations of IB-MECA + IL-3, IB-MECA + GM-CSF, or IL-3 + GM-CSF. These results give evidence of a significant role of selective activation of adenosine A(3) receptors in stimulation of the growth of granulocyte/ macrophage hematopoietic progenitor cells. PMID:18380545

  16. Interaction of the Clostridium difficile Binary Toxin CDT and Its Host Cell Receptor, Lipolysis-stimulated Lipoprotein Receptor (LSR)*

    PubMed Central

    Hemmasi, Sarah; Czulkies, Bernd A.; Schorch, Björn; Veit, Antonia; Aktories, Klaus; Papatheodorou, Panagiotis

    2015-01-01

    CDT (Clostridium difficile transferase) is a binary, actin ADP-ribosylating toxin frequently associated with hypervirulent strains of the human enteric pathogen C. difficile, the most serious cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis. CDT leads to the collapse of the actin cytoskeleton and, eventually, to cell death. Low doses of CDT result in the formation of microtubule-based protrusions on the cell surface that increase the adherence and colonization of C. difficile. The lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) is the host cell receptor for CDT, and our aim was to gain a deeper insight into the interplay between both proteins. We show that CDT interacts with the extracellular, Ig-like domain of LSR with an affinity in the nanomolar range. We identified LSR splice variants in the colon carcinoma cell line HCT116 and disrupted the LSR gene in these cells by applying the CRISPR-Cas9 technology. LSR truncations ectopically expressed in LSR knock-out cells indicated that intracellular parts of LSR are not essential for plasma membrane targeting of the receptor and cellular uptake of CDT. By generating a series of N- and C-terminal truncations of the binding component of CDT (CDTb), we found that amino acids 757–866 of CDTb are sufficient for binding to LSR. With a transposon-based, random mutagenesis approach, we identified potential LSR-interacting epitopes in CDTb. This study increases our understanding about the interaction between CDT and its receptor LSR, which is key to the development of anti-toxin strategies for preventing cell entry of the toxin. PMID:25882847

  17. Vasopressin receptors in the brain, liver and kidney of rats following osmotic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Landgraf, R; Szot, P; Dorsa, D M

    1991-03-29

    The binding site concentration (Bmax) and equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for [3H]-arginine vasopressin (AVP) binding sites were measured in limbic brain areas (septum, dorsal hippocampus, amygdala) and liver and kidney of control and osmotically stimulated male Wistar rats. Membrane binding was performed in these five areas 30, 60 and 180 min following intraperitoneal injection of hypertonic saline. This paradigm resulted in no significant change in binding characteristics in the septum, dorsal hippocampus, amygdala and liver from control treated rats. In contrast, the kidney Bmax was significantly reduced 60 min following osmotic stimulation, with no effect on affinity. These results also suggest that AVP receptors in the CNS are relatively resistant to regulatory effects of an acute AVP exposure. PMID:1828184

  18. Caloric restriction stimulates autophagy in rat cortical neurons through neuropeptide Y and ghrelin receptors activation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Marques, Marisa; Aveleira, Célia A; Carmo-Silva, Sara; Botelho, Mariana; Pereira de Almeida, Luís; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2016-07-01

    Caloric restriction is an anti-aging intervention known to extend lifespan in several experimental models, at least in part, by stimulating autophagy. Caloric restriction increases neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the hypothalamus and plasma ghrelin, a peripheral gut hormone that acts in hypothalamus to modulate energy homeostasis. NPY and ghrelin have been shown to be neuroprotective in different brain areas and to induce several physiological modifications similar to those induced by caloric restriction. However, the effect of NPY and ghrelin in autophagy in cortical neurons is currently not known. Using a cell culture of rat cortical neurons we investigate the involvement of NPY and ghrelin in caloric restriction-induced autophagy. We observed that a caloric restriction mimetic cell culture medium stimulates autophagy in rat cortical neurons and NPY or ghrelin receptor antagonists blocked this effect. On the other hand, exogenous NPY or ghrelin stimulate autophagy in rat cortical neurons. Moreover, NPY mediates the stimulatory effect of ghrelin on autophagy in rat cortical neurons. Since autophagy impairment occurs in aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases, NPY and ghrelin synergistic effect on autophagy stimulation may suggest a new strategy to delay aging process. PMID:27441412

  19. Leptospiral lipopolysaccharide stimulates the expression of toll-like receptor 2 and cytokines in pig fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yijie; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Donai, Kenichiro; Kuroda, Kengo; Masuda, Mizuki; Nakamura, Shuichi; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Isogai, Emiko

    2015-02-01

    Pigs throughout the world are afflicted with leptospirosis, causing serious economic losses and potential hazards to human health. Although it has been known that leptospiral lipopolysaccharide (L-LPS) is involved in an immunological reaction between an antigen and a host cell, little is known about how the immune system of pigs can respond to L-LPS. Here, we stimulated pig fibroblasts by L-LPS and then quantitatively measured gene and protein expression levels of two toll-like receptors (TLRs), TLR2 and TLR4, by real-time PCR and Western blotting. As a result, expression of TLR2 was found to be significantly up-regulated within 24 h after L-LPS stimulation whereas induction of TLR4 expression was relatively weak. We also revealed that of myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-8 gene expressions were markedly up-regulated by L-LPS stimulation. These results may suggest that the pig cell can activate TLR2 rather than TLR4 by L-LPS stimulation, thereby inducing expression of cytokines. PMID:25039909

  20. Caloric restriction stimulates autophagy in rat cortical neurons through neuropeptide Y and ghrelin receptors activation

    PubMed Central

    Carmo-Silva, Sara; Botelho, Mariana; de Almeida, Luís Pereira; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction is an anti-aging intervention known to extend lifespan in several experimental models, at least in part, by stimulating autophagy. Caloric restriction increases neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the hypothalamus and plasma ghrelin, a peripheral gut hormone that acts in hypothalamus to modulate energy homeostasis. NPY and ghrelin have been shown to be neuroprotective in different brain areas and to induce several physiological modifications similar to those induced by caloric restriction. However, the effect of NPY and ghrelin in autophagy in cortical neurons is currently not known. Using a cell culture of rat cortical neurons we investigate the involvement of NPY and ghrelin in caloric restriction-induced autophagy. We observed that a caloric restriction mimetic cell culture medium stimulates autophagy in rat cortical neurons and NPY or ghrelin receptor antagonists blocked this effect. On the other hand, exogenous NPY or ghrelin stimulate autophagy in rat cortical neurons. Moreover, NPY mediates the stimulatory effect of ghrelin on autophagy in rat cortical neurons. Since autophagy impairment occurs in aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases, NPY and ghrelin synergistic effect on autophagy stimulation may suggest a new strategy to delay aging process. PMID:27441412

  1. Functional interaction between mutations in the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor in severe congenital neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Ward, Alister C; Gits, Judith; Majeed, Fidel; Aprikyan, Andrew A; Lewis, Rowena S; O'Sullivan, Lynda A; Freedman, Melvin; Shigdar, Sarah; Touw, Ivo P; Dale, David C; Dror, Yigal

    2008-08-01

    Most severe congenital neutropenia (SCN) cases possess constitutive neutrophil elastase mutations; a smaller cohort has acquired mutations truncating the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (G-CSF-R). We have described a case with constitutive extracellular G-CSF-R mutation hyporesponsive to ligand. Here we report two independent acquired G-CSF-R truncation mutations and a novel constitutive neutrophil elastase mutation in this patient. Co-expression of a truncated receptor chain restored STAT5 signalling responses of the extracellular G-CSF-R mutant, while constitutively-active STAT5 enhanced its proliferative capacity. These data add to our knowledge of SCN and further highlight the importance of STAT5 in mediating proliferative responses to G-CSF. PMID:18513286

  2. Stimulation of peripheral cholinergic nerves by glutamate indicates a new peripheral glutamate receptor.

    PubMed

    Aas, P; Tansø, R; Fonnum, F

    1989-05-01

    The bronchial smooth muscle of the rat was examined for contractile responses to excitatory amino acids. The nerve-mediated contraction induced by electrical field stimulation was enhanced by exogenous L-glutamate (L-Glu). The apparent affinity (ED50) of L-Glu was 3.5 +/- 0.1 mM. Both tetrodotoxin and hemicholinium-3 completely abolished the electrical field-induced contraction and therefore the potentiation by L-Glu, which indicates that L-Glu has a prejunctional effect. Concentrations of L-Glu higher than 22 mM inhibited the electrical field-induced contractions and enhanced the tonus of the smooth muscle by postjunctional stimulation. The ED50 of exogenous ACh was not altered by L-Glu. High concentrations (62 mM) of L-Glu increased the intrinsic activity (alpha) of ACh, indicating a postjunctional potentiation of ACh-induced contractions. L-Glu did not inhibit the activity of acetylcholinesterase, therefore the postjunctional potentiation was not due to ACh accumulation. Inhibition of the electrical field-induced contraction was seen with high concentrations of D-Glu, L-aspartate (L-Asp), L-alpha-amino adipate and ibotenate. Neither glutamate diethyl ester nor 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate had any inhibitory effects on the L-Glu- and L-Asp-induced alterations of the electrical field-stimulated contraction or on the L-Glu-enhanced tonus of the bronchial smooth muscle. Kainate, N-methyl-D-aspartate, quisqualate and N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate had only minor transient potentiating effects on the electrical field-induced contraction. The results provide evidence for a L-Glu receptor in rat bronchi that has a different specificity for glutamate agonists and antagonists than the L-Glu receptor described in the CNS. The receptor seems to be located prejunctionally and enhances nerve-mediated responses and thereby stimulates the bronchial smooth muscle to contract. The possible involvement of this type of receptor in the 'Chinese restaurant syndrome' is discussed. PMID

  3. The prolactin receptor mediates HOXA1-stimulated oncogenicity in mammary carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hou, Lin; Xu, Bing; Mohankumar, Kumarasamypet M; Goffin, Vincent; Perry, Jo K; Lobie, Peter E; Liu, Dong-Xu

    2012-12-01

    The HOX genes are a highly conserved subgroup of homeodomain-containing transcription factors that are crucial to normal development. Forced expression of HOXA1 results in oncogenic transformation of immortalized human mammary cells with aggressive tumour formation in vivo. Microarray analysis identified that the prolactin receptor (PRLR) was significantly upregulated by forced expression of HOXA1 in mammary carcinoma cells. To determine prolactin (PRL) involvement in HOXA1‑induced oncogenicity in mammary carcinoma cells (MCF-7), we examined the effect of human prolactin (hPRL)-initiated PRLR signal transduction on changes in cellular behaviour mediated by HOXA1. Forced expression of HOXA1 in MCF-7 cells increased PRLR mRNA and protein expression. Forced expression of HOXA1 also enhanced hPRL-stimulated phosphorylation of both STAT5A/B and p44/42 MAPK, and increased subsequent transcriptional activity of STAT5A and STAT5B, and Elk-1 and Sap1a, respectively. Moreover, forced expression of HOXA1 in MCF-7 cells enhanced the hPRL‑stimulated increase in total cell number as a consequence of enhanced cell proliferation and cell survival, and also enhanced hPRL-stimulated anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. Increased anchorage-independent growth was attenuated by the PRLR antagonist ∆1-9-G129R‑hPRL. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that HOXA1 increases expression of the cell surface receptor PRLR and enhances PRLR-mediated signal transduction. Thus, the PRLR is one mediator of HOXA1‑stimulated oncogenicity in mammary carcinoma cells. PMID:23064471

  4. A selective TSH receptor antagonist inhibits stimulation of thyroid function in female mice.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Susanne; Nir, Eshel A; Eliseeva, Elena; Huang, Wenwei; Marugan, Juan; Xiao, Jingbo; Dulcey, Andrés E; Gershengorn, Marvin C

    2014-01-01

    Because the TSH receptor (TSHR) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of thyroid disease, a TSHR antagonist could be a novel treatment. We attempted to develop a small molecule, drug-like antagonist of TSHR signaling that is selective and active in vivo. We synthesized NCGC00242364 (ANTAG3) by chemical modification of a previously reported TSHR antagonist. We tested its potency, efficacy, and selectivity in a model cell system in vitro by measuring its activity to inhibit stimulation of cAMP production stimulated by TSH, LH, or FSH. We tested the in vivo activity of ANTAG3 by measuring its effects to lower serum free T4 and thyroid gene expression in female BALB/c mice continuously treated with ANTAG3 for 3 days and given low doses of TRH continuously or stimulated by a single administration of a monoclonal thyroid-stimulating antibody M22. ANTAG3 was selective for TSHR inhibition; half-maximal inhibitory doses were 2.1 μM for TSHR and greater than 30 μM for LH and FSH receptors. In mice treated with TRH, ANTAG3 lowered serum free T4 by 44% and lowered mRNAs for sodium-iodide cotransporter and thyroperoxidase by 75% and 83%, respectively. In mice given M22, ANTAG3 lowered serum free T4 by 38% and lowered mRNAs for sodium-iodide cotransporter and thyroperoxidase by 73% and 40%, respectively. In conclusion, we developed a selective TSHR antagonist that is effective in vivo in mice. This is the first report of a small-molecule TSHR antagonist active in vivo and may lead to a drug to treat Graves' disease. PMID:24169564

  5. Misfolding Ectodomain Mutations of the Lutropin Receptor Increase Efficacy of Hormone Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Charmandari, E; Guan, R; Zhang, M; Silveira, L G; Fan, Q R; Chrousos, G P; Sertedaki, A C; Latronico, A C; Segaloff, D L

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate 2 novel mutations of the LHCGR, each homozygous, in a 46,XY patient with severe Leydig cell hypoplasia. One is a mutation in the signal peptide (p.Gln18_Leu19ins9; referred to here as SP) that results in an alteration of the coding sequence of the N terminus of the mature mutant receptor. The other mutation (p.G71R) is also within the ectodomain. Similar to many other inactivating mutations, the cell surface expression of recombinant human LHR(SP,G71R) is greatly reduced due to intracellular retention. However, we made the unusual discovery that the intrinsic efficacy for agonist-stimulated cAMP in the reduced numbers of receptors on the cell surface was greatly increased relative to the same low number of cell surface wild-type receptor. Remarkably, this appears to be a general attribute of misfolding mutations in the ectodomains, but not serpentine domains, of the gonadotropin receptors. These findings suggest that there must be a common, shared mechanism by which disparate mutations in the ectodomain that cause misfolding and therefore reduced cell surface expression concomitantly confer increased agonist efficacy to those receptor mutants on the cell surface. Our data further suggest that, due to their increased agonist efficacy, extremely small changes in cell surface expression of misfolded ectodomain mutants cause larger than expected alterations in the cellular response to agonist. Therefore, for inactivating LHCGR mutations causing ectodomain misfolding, the numbers of cell surface mutant receptors on fetal Leydig cells of 46,XY individuals exert a more exquisite effect on the relative severity of the clinical phenotypes than already appreciated. PMID:26554443

  6. PGE2 Signaling Through the EP4 Receptor on Fibroblasts Upregulates RANKL and Stimulates Osteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Xie, Chao; Wei, Xiaochao; Zhang, Minjie; Zhang, Xinping; Flick, Lisa M.; Schwarz, Edward M.; O'Keefe, Regis J.

    2009-01-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis is the most common cause of aseptic loosening in total joint arthroplasty. The role of inflammatory mediators such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and osteoclast promoting factors including RANKL in the pathogenesis of osteolysis has been well characterized. However, the PGE2 receptor (EP1, EP2, or EP4), and cell type in which it is expressed, which is responsible for PGE2 induction of RANKL during wear debris–induced osteolysis, has yet to be elucidated. To address this, we used mice genetically deficient in these EP receptors to assess PGE2 and wear debris responses in vitro and in vivo. Wear debris–induced osteolysis and RANKL expression were observed at similar levels in WT, EP1−/−, and EP2−/− mice, indicating that these receptors do not mediate PGE2 signals in this process. A conditional knockout approach was used to eliminate EP4 expression in FSP1+ fibroblasts that are the predominant source of RANKL. In the absence of EP4, fibroblasts do not express RANKL after stimulation with particles or PGE2, nor do they exhibit high levels of osteoclasts and osteolysis. These results show that periprosthetic fibroblasts are important mediators of osteolysis through the expression of RANKL, which is induced after PGE2 signaling through the EP4 receptor. PMID:19419302

  7. Effects of serotonin 2A/1A receptor stimulation on social exclusion processing.

    PubMed

    Preller, Katrin H; Pokorny, Thomas; Hock, Andreas; Kraehenmann, Rainer; Stämpfli, Philipp; Seifritz, Erich; Scheidegger, Milan; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2016-05-01

    Social ties are crucial for physical and mental health. However, psychiatric patients frequently encounter social rejection. Moreover, an increased reactivity to social exclusion influences the development, progression, and treatment of various psychiatric disorders. Nevertheless, the neuromodulatory substrates of rejection experiences are largely unknown. The preferential serotonin (5-HT) 2A/1A receptor agonist, psilocybin (Psi), reduces the processing of negative stimuli, but whether 5-HT2A/1A receptor stimulation modulates the processing of negative social interactions remains unclear. Therefore, this double-blind, randomized, counterbalanced, cross-over study assessed the neural response to social exclusion after the acute administration of Psi (0.215 mg/kg) or placebo (Pla) in 21 healthy volunteers by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and resting-state magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Participants reported a reduced feeling of social exclusion after Psi vs. Pla administration, and the neural response to social exclusion was decreased in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the middle frontal gyrus, key regions for social pain processing. The reduced neural response in the dACC was significantly correlated with Psi-induced changes in self-processing and decreased aspartate (Asp) content. In conclusion, 5-HT2A/1A receptor stimulation with psilocybin seems to reduce social pain processing in association with changes in self-experience. These findings may be relevant to the normalization of negative social interaction processing in psychiatric disorders characterized by increased rejection sensitivity. The current results also emphasize the importance of 5-HT2A/1A receptor subtypes and the Asp system in the control of social functioning, and as prospective targets in the treatment of sociocognitive impairments in psychiatric illnesses. PMID:27091970

  8. Structure-Activity Analysis of Biased Agonism at the Human Adenosine A3 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Baltos, Jo-Anne; Paoletta, Silvia; Nguyen, Anh T. N.; Gregory, Karen J.; Tosh, Dilip K.; Christopoulos, Arthur; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    Biased agonism at G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) has significant implications for current drug discovery, but molecular determinants that govern ligand bias remain largely unknown. The adenosine A3 GPCR (A3AR) is a potential therapeutic target for various conditions, including cancer, inflammation, and ischemia, but for which biased agonism remains largely unexplored. We now report the generation of bias “fingerprints” for prototypical ribose containing A3AR agonists and rigidified (N)-methanocarba 5′-N-methyluronamide nucleoside derivatives with regard to their ability to mediate different signaling pathways. Relative to the reference prototypical agonist IB-MECA, (N)-methanocarba 5′-N-methyluronamide nucleoside derivatives with significant N6 or C2 modifications, including elongated aryl-ethynyl groups, exhibited biased agonism. Significant positive correlation was observed between the C2 substituent length (in Å) and bias toward cell survival. Molecular modeling suggests that extended C2 substituents on (N)-methanocarba 5′-N-methyluronamide nucleosides promote a progressive outward shift of the A3AR transmembrane domain 2, which may contribute to the subset of A3AR conformations stabilized on biased agonist binding. PMID:27136943

  9. Structure-Activity Analysis of Biased Agonism at the Human Adenosine A3 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Baltos, Jo-Anne; Paoletta, Silvia; Nguyen, Anh T N; Gregory, Karen J; Tosh, Dilip K; Christopoulos, Arthur; Jacobson, Kenneth A; May, Lauren T

    2016-07-01

    Biased agonism at G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has significant implications for current drug discovery, but molecular determinants that govern ligand bias remain largely unknown. The adenosine A3 GPCR (A3AR) is a potential therapeutic target for various conditions, including cancer, inflammation, and ischemia, but for which biased agonism remains largely unexplored. We now report the generation of bias "fingerprints" for prototypical ribose containing A3AR agonists and rigidified (N)-methanocarba 5'-N-methyluronamide nucleoside derivatives with regard to their ability to mediate different signaling pathways. Relative to the reference prototypical agonist IB-MECA, (N)-methanocarba 5'-N-methyluronamide nucleoside derivatives with significant N(6) or C2 modifications, including elongated aryl-ethynyl groups, exhibited biased agonism. Significant positive correlation was observed between the C2 substituent length (in Å) and bias toward cell survival. Molecular modeling suggests that extended C2 substituents on (N)-methanocarba 5'-N-methyluronamide nucleosides promote a progressive outward shift of the A3AR transmembrane domain 2, which may contribute to the subset of A3AR conformations stabilized on biased agonist binding. PMID:27136943

  10. Rare coding variants of the adenosine A3 receptor are increased in autism: on the trail of the serotonin transporter regulome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rare genetic variation is an important class of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) risk factors and can implicate biological networks for investigation. Altered serotonin (5-HT) signaling has been implicated in ASD, and we and others have discovered multiple, rare, ASD-associated variants in the 5-HT transporter (SERT) gene leading to elevated 5-HT re-uptake and perturbed regulation. We hypothesized that loci encoding SERT regulators harbor variants that impact SERT function and/or regulation and therefore could contribute to ASD risk. The adenosine A3 receptor (A3AR) regulates SERT via protein kinase G (PKG) and other signaling pathways leading to enhanced SERT surface expression and catalytic activity. Methods To test our hypothesis, we asked whether rare variants in the A3AR gene (ADORA3) were increased in ASD cases vs. controls. Discovery sequencing in a case-control sample and subsequent analysis of comparison exome sequence data were conducted. We evaluated the functional impact of two variants from the discovery sample on A3AR signaling and SERT activity. Results Sequencing discovery showed an increase of rare coding variants in cases vs. controls (P=0.013). While comparison exome sequence data did not show a significant enrichment (P=0.071), combined analysis strengthened evidence for association (P=0.0025). Two variants discovered in ASD cases (Leu90Val and Val171Ile) lie in or near the ligand-binding pocket, and Leu90Val was enriched individually in cases (P=0.040). In vitro analysis of cells expressing Val90-A3AR revealed elevated basal cGMP levels compared with the wildtype receptor. Additionally, a specific A3AR agonist increased cGMP levels across the full time course studied in Val90-A3AR cells, compared to wildtype receptor. In Val90-A3AR/SERT co-transfections, agonist stimulation elevated SERT activity over the wildtype receptor with delayed 5-HT uptake activity recovery. In contrast, Ile171-A3AR was unable to support agonist stimulation of

  11. Protection against ventricular fibrillation via cholinergic receptor stimulation and the generation of nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Kalla, Manish; Chotalia, Minesh; Coughlan, Charles; Hao, Guoliang; Crabtree, Mark J.; Tomek, Jakub; Bub, Gil; Paterson, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Animal studies suggest an anti‐fibrillatory action of the vagus nerve on the ventricle, although the exact mechanism is controversial.Using a Langendorff perfused rat heart, we show that the acetylcholine analogue carbamylcholine raises ventricular fibrillation threshold (VFT) and flattens the electrical restitution curve.The anti‐fibrillatory action of carbamylcholine was prevented by the nicotinic receptor antagonist mecamylamine, inhibitors of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), and can be mimicked by the nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside.Carbamylcholine increased NO metabolite content in the coronary effluent and this was prevented by mecamylamine.The anti‐fibrillatory action of both carbamylcholine and sodium nitroprusside was ultimately dependent on muscarinic receptor stimulation as all effects were blocked by atropine.These data demonstrate a protective effect of carbamylcholine on VFT that depends upon both muscarinic and nicotinic receptor stimulation, where the generation of NO is likely to be via a neuronal nNOS–sGC dependent pathway. Abstract Implantable cardiac vagal nerve stimulators are a promising treatment for ventricular arrhythmia in patients with heart failure. Animal studies suggest the anti‐fibrillatory effect may be nitric oxide (NO) dependent, although the exact site of action is controversial. We investigated whether a stable analogue of acetylcholine could raise ventricular fibrillation threshold (VFT), and whether this was dependent on NO generation and/or muscarinic/nicotinic receptor stimulation. VFT was determined in Langendorff perfused rat hearts by burst pacing until sustained VF was induced. Carbamylcholine (CCh, 200 nmol l–1, n = 9) significantly (P < 0.05) reduced heart rate from 292 ± 8 to 224 ± 6 b.p.m. Independent of this heart rate change, CCh caused a significant increase in VFT (control 1.5 ± 0.3 mA, CCh 2.4 ± 0.4 mA, wash 1.1

  12. The human D2 dopamine receptor synergizes with the A2A adenosine receptor to stimulate adenylyl cyclase in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Kudlacek, Oliver; Just, Herwig; Korkhov, Vladimir M; Vartian, Nina; Klinger, Markus; Pankevych, Halyna; Yang, Qiong; Nanoff, Christian; Freissmuth, Michael; Boehm, Stefan

    2003-07-01

    The adenosine A(2A) receptor and the dopamine D(2) receptor are prototypically coupled to G(s) and G(i)/G(o), respectively. In striatal intermediate spiny neurons, these receptors are colocalized in dendritic spines and act as mutual antagonists. This antagonism has been proposed to occur at the level of the receptors or of receptor-G protein coupling. We tested this model in PC12 cells which endogenously express A(2A) receptors. The human D(2) receptor was introduced into PC12 cells by stable transfection. A(2A)-agonist-mediated inhibition of D(2) agonist binding was absent in PC12 cell membranes but present in HEK293 cells transfected as a control. However, in the resulting PC12 cell lines, the action of the D(2) agonist quinpirole depended on the expression level of the D(2) receptor: at low and high receptor levels, the A(2A)-agonist-induced elevation of cAMP was enhanced and inhibited, respectively. Forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation was invariably inhibited by quinpirole. The effects of quinpirole were abolished by pretreatment with pertussis toxin. A(2A)-receptor-mediated cAMP formation was inhibited by other G(i)/G(o)-coupled receptors that were either endogenously present (P(2y12)-like receptor for ADP) or stably expressed after transfection (A(1) adenosine, metabotropic glutamate receptor-7A). Similarly, voltage activated Ca(2+) channels were inhibited by the endogenous P(2Y) receptor and by the heterologously expressed A(1) receptor but not by the D(2) receptor. These data indicate functional segregation of signaling components. Our observations are thus compatible with the proposed model that D(2) and A(2A) receptors are closely associated, but they highlight the fact that this interaction can also support synergism. PMID:12784121

  13. Androgen receptor and miRNA-126* axis controls follicle-stimulating hormone receptor expression in porcine ovarian granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Xing; Li, Qiqi; Pan, Zengxiang; Li, Qifa

    2016-08-01

    Androgen, which acts via the androgen receptor (AR), plays crucial roles in mammalian ovarian function. Recent studies showed that androgen/AR signaling regulates follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) expression in follicles; however, the detailed mechanism underlying this regulation remained unknown. Here, we demonstrate that AR and miR-126* cooperate to inhibit FSHR expression and function in pig follicular granulosa cells (pGCs). In pGCs, overexpression of AR decreased, whereas knockdown increased, FSHR mRNA and protein expression; however, neither manipulation affected FSHR promoter activity. Using a dual-luciferase reporter assay, we found that the FSHR gene is a direct target of miR-126*, which inhibits FSHR expression and increases the rate of AR-induced apoptosis in pGCs. Collectively, our data show for the first time that the AR/miR-126* axis exerts synergetic effects in the regulation of FSHR expression and apoptosis in pGCs. Our findings thus define a novel pathway, AR/miR-126*/FSHR, that regulates mammalian GC functions. PMID:27222597

  14. Stimulation of Sigma-1 Receptor Ameliorates Depressive-like Behaviors in CaMKIV Null Mice.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Shigeki; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Yabuki, Yasushi; Sasaki, Yuzuru; Izumi, Hisanao; Zhang, Chen; Han, Feng; Fukunaga, Kohji

    2015-12-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) is a molecular chaperone regulating calcium efflux from the neuronal endoplasmic reticulum to the mitochondria. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) null mice exhibit depressive-like behaviors and impaired neurogenesis as assessed by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation into newborn cells of the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). Here, we demonstrate that chronic stimulation of Sig-1R by treatment with the agonist SA4503 or the SSRI fluvoxamine for 14 days improves depressive-like behaviors in CaMKIV null mice. By contrast, treatment with paroxetine, which lacks affinity for Sig-1R, did not alter these behaviors. Reduced numbers of BrdU-positive cells and decreased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression and protein kinase B (Akt; Ser-473) phosphorylation seen in the DG of CaMKIV null mice were significantly rescued by chronic Sig-1R stimulation. Interestingly, reduced ATP production observed in the DG of CaMKIV null mice was improved by chronic Sig-1R stimulation. Such stimulation also improved hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) induction and maintenance, which are impaired in the DG of CaMKIV null mice. LTP rescue was closely associated with both increases in calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) autophosphorylation and GluA1 (Ser-831) phosphorylation. Taken together, Sig-1R stimulation by SA4503 or fluvoxamine treatment increased hippocampal neurogenesis, which is closely associated with amelioration of depressive-like behaviors in CaMKIV null mice. PMID:25316382

  15. Beta2-adrenergic receptor stimulation inhibits nitric oxide generation by Mycobacterium avium infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Boomershine, C S; Lafuse, W P; Zwilling, B S

    1999-11-01

    Catecholamine regulation of nitric oxide (NO) production by IFNgamma-primed macrophages infected with Mycobacterium avium was investigated. Epinephrine treatment of IFNgamma-primed macrophages at the time of M. avium infection inhibited the anti-mycobacterial activity of the cells. The anti-mycobacterial activity of macrophages correlated with NO production. Using specific adrenergic receptor agonists, the abrogation of mycobacterial killing and decreased NO production by catecholamines was shown to be mediated via the beta2-adrenergic receptor. Elevation of intracellular cAMP levels mimicked the catecholamine-mediated inhibition of NO in both M. avium infected and LPS stimulated macrophages. Specific inhibitors of both adenylate cyclase and protein kinase A prevented the beta2-adrenoceptor-mediated inhibition of nitric oxide production. Beta2-adrenoreceptor stimulation at the time of M. avium infection of IFNgamma-primed macrophages also inhibited expression of iNOS mRNA. These observations show that catecholamine hormones can affect the outcome of macrophage-pathogen interactions and suggest that one result of sympathetic nervous system activation is the suppression of the capacity of macrophages to produce anti-microbial effector molecules. PMID:10580815

  16. Acute inhalation of ozone stimulates bronchial C-fibers and rapidly adapting receptors in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Coleridge, J.C.G.; Coleridge, H.M.; Schelegle, E.S.; Green, J.F. Univ. of California, San Francisco )

    1993-05-01

    To identify the afferents responsible for initiating the vagally mediated respiratory changes evoked by acute exposure to ozone, the authors recorded vagal impulses in anesthetized, open-chest, artificially ventilated dogs and examined the pulmonary afferent response to ozone (2--3 ppM in air) delivered to the lower trachea for 20--60 min. Bronchial C-fibers (BrCs) were the lung afferents most susceptible to ozone, the activity of 10 of 11 BrCs increasing from 0.2 [+-] 0.2 to 4.6 [+-] 1.3 impulses/s within 1--7 min of ozone exposure. Ten of 15 rapidly adapting receptors (RARs) were stimulated by ozone, their activity increasing from 1.5 [+-] 0.4 to 4.7 [+-] 0.7 impulses/s. Stimulation of RARs (but not of BrCs) appeared secondary to the ozone-induced reduction of lung compliance because it was abolished by hyperinflation of the lungs. Ozone had little effect on pulmonary C-fibers or slowly adapting pulmonary stretch receptors. The authors' results suggest that both BrCs and RARs contribute to the tachypnea and bronchoconstriction evoked by acute exposure to ozone when vagal conduction is intact and that BrCs alone are responsible for the vagally mediated tachypnea that survives vagal cooling to 7[degrees]C. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Profiles of Basal and stimulated receptor signaling networks predict drug response in breast cancer lines.

    PubMed

    Niepel, Mario; Hafner, Marc; Pace, Emily A; Chung, Mirra; Chai, Diana H; Zhou, Lili; Schoeberl, Birgit; Sorger, Peter K

    2013-09-24

    Identifying factors responsible for variation in drug response is essential for the effective use of targeted therapeutics. We profiled signaling pathway activity in a collection of breast cancer cell lines before and after stimulation with physiologically relevant ligands, which revealed the variability in network activity among cells of known genotype and molecular subtype. Despite the receptor-based classification of breast cancer subtypes, we found that the abundance and activity of signaling proteins in unstimulated cells (basal profile), as well as the activity of proteins in stimulated cells (signaling profile), varied within each subtype. Using a partial least-squares regression approach, we constructed models that significantly predicted sensitivity to 23 targeted therapeutics. For example, one model showed that the response to the growth factor receptor ligand heregulin effectively predicted the sensitivity of cells to drugs targeting the cell survival pathway mediated by PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) and Akt, whereas the abundance of Akt or the mutational status of the enzymes in the pathway did not. Thus, basal and signaling protein profiles may yield new biomarkers of drug sensitivity and enable the identification of appropriate therapies in cancers characterized by similar functional dysregulation of signaling networks. PMID:24065145

  18. Stimulation of olfactory receptors alters regulation of [Cai] in olfactory neurons of the catfish (Ictalurus punctatus).

    PubMed

    Restrepo, D; Boyle, A G

    1991-03-01

    Intracellular calcium was measured in single olfactory neurons from the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) using the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator fura 2. In 5% of the cells, olfactory stimuli (amino acids) elicited an influx of calcium through the plasma membrane which led to a rapid transient increase in intracellular calcium concentration. Amino acids did not induce release of calcium from internal stores in these cells. Some cells responded specifically to one stimulus (L-alanine, L-arginine, L-norleucine and L-glutamate) while one cell responded to all stimuli. An increase in intracellular calcium could also be elicited in 50% of the cells by direct G-protein stimulation using aluminum fluoride. Because the fraction of cells which respond to direct G-protein stimulation is substantially larger than the fraction of cells responding to amino acids, we tested for possible damage of receptor proteins due to exposure of the olfactory neurons to papain during cell isolation. We find that pretreatment with papain does not alter specific binding of L-alanine and L-arginine to olfactory receptor sites in isolated olfactory cilia. The results are discussed in terms of their relevance to olfactory transduction. PMID:2051471

  19. Antagonizing the parathyroid calcium receptor stimulates parathyroid hormone secretion and bone formation in osteopenic rats.

    PubMed

    Gowen, M; Stroup, G B; Dodds, R A; James, I E; Votta, B J; Smith, B R; Bhatnagar, P K; Lago, A M; Callahan, J F; DelMar, E G; Miller, M A; Nemeth, E F; Fox, J

    2000-06-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is an effective bone anabolic agent, but it must be administered parenterally. An orally active anabolic agent would provide a valuable alternative for treating osteoporosis. NPS 2143 is a novel, selective antagonist (a "calcilytic") of the parathyroid cell Ca(2+) receptor. Daily oral administration of NPS 2143 to osteopenic ovariectomized (OVX) rats caused a sustained increase in plasma PTH levels, provoking a dramatic increase in bone turnover but no net change in bone mineral density. Concurrent oral administration of NPS 2143 and subcutaneous infusion of 17beta-estradiol also resulted in increased bone turnover. However, the antiresorptive action of estrogen decreased the extent of bone resorption stimulated by the elevated PTH levels, leading to an increase in bone mass compared with OVX controls or to either treatment alone. Despite the sustained stimulation to the parathyroid gland, parathyroid cells did not undergo hyperplasia. These data demonstrate that an increase in endogenous PTH secretion, induced by antagonism of the parathyroid cell Ca(2+) receptor with a small molecule, leads to a dramatic increase in bone turnover, and they suggest a novel approach to the treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:10841518

  20. Antagonizing the parathyroid calcium receptor stimulates parathyroid hormone secretion and bone formation in osteopenic rats

    PubMed Central

    Gowen, Maxine; Stroup, George B.; Dodds, Robert A.; James, Ian E.; Votta, Bart J.; Smith, Brian R.; Bhatnagar, Pradip K.; Lago, Amparo M.; Callahan, James F.; DelMar, Eric G.; Miller, Michael A.; Nemeth, Edward F.; Fox, John

    2000-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is an effective bone anabolic agent, but it must be administered parenterally. An orally active anabolic agent would provide a valuable alternative for treating osteoporosis. NPS 2143 is a novel, selective antagonist (a “calcilytic”) of the parathyroid cell Ca2+ receptor. Daily oral administration of NPS 2143 to osteopenic ovariectomized (OVX) rats caused a sustained increase in plasma PTH levels, provoking a dramatic increase in bone turnover but no net change in bone mineral density. Concurrent oral administration of NPS 2143 and subcutaneous infusion of 17β-estradiol also resulted in increased bone turnover. However, the antiresorptive action of estrogen decreased the extent of bone resorption stimulated by the elevated PTH levels, leading to an increase in bone mass compared with OVX controls or to either treatment alone. Despite the sustained stimulation to the parathyroid gland, parathyroid cells did not undergo hyperplasia. These data demonstrate that an increase in endogenous PTH secretion, induced by antagonism of the parathyroid cell Ca2+ receptor with a small molecule, leads to a dramatic increase in bone turnover, and they suggest a novel approach to the treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:10841518

  1. Rac-mediated Stimulation of Phospholipase Cγ2 Amplifies B Cell Receptor-induced Calcium Signaling.

    PubMed

    Walliser, Claudia; Tron, Kyrylo; Clauss, Karen; Gutman, Orit; Kobitski, Andrei Yu; Retlich, Michael; Schade, Anja; Röcker, Carlheinz; Henis, Yoav I; Nienhaus, G Ulrich; Gierschik, Peter

    2015-07-10

    The Rho GTPase Rac is crucially involved in controlling multiple B cell functions, including those regulated by the B cell receptor (BCR) through increased cytosolic Ca(2+). The underlying molecular mechanisms and their relevance to the functions of intact B cells have thus far remained unknown. We have previously shown that the activity of phospholipase Cγ2 (PLCγ2), a key constituent of the BCR signalosome, is stimulated by activated Rac through direct protein-protein interaction. Here, we use a Rac-resistant mutant of PLCγ2 to functionally reconstitute cultured PLCγ2-deficient DT40 B cells and to examine the effects of the Rac-PLCγ2 interaction on BCR-mediated changes of intracellular Ca(2+) and regulation of Ca(2+)-regulated and nuclear-factor-of-activated-T-cell-regulated gene transcription at the level of single, intact B cells. The results show that the functional Rac-PLCγ2 interaction causes marked increases in the following: (i) sensitivity of B cells to BCR ligation; (ii) BCR-mediated Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores; (iii) Ca(2+) entry from the extracellular compartment; and (iv) nuclear translocation of the Ca(2+)-regulated nuclear factor of activated T cells. Hence, Rac-mediated stimulation of PLCγ2 activity serves to amplify B cell receptor-induced Ca(2+) signaling. PMID:25903139

  2. Phencyclidine-induced social withdrawal results from deficient stimulation of cannabinoid CB₁ receptors: implications for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Seillier, Alexandre; Martinez, Alex A; Giuffrida, Andrea

    2013-08-01

    The neuronal mechanisms underlying social withdrawal, one of the core negative symptoms of schizophrenia, are not well understood. Recent studies suggest an involvement of the endocannabinoid system in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and, in particular, of negative symptoms. We used biochemical, pharmacological, and behavioral approaches to investigate the role played by the endocannabinoid system in social withdrawal induced by sub-chronic administration of phencyclidine (PCP). Pharmacological enhancement of endocannabinoid levels via systemic administration of URB597, an inhibitor of endocannabinoid degradation, reversed social withdrawal in PCP-treated rats via stimulation of CB1 receptors, but reduced social interaction in control animals through activation of a cannabinoid/vanilloid-sensitive receptor. In addition, the potent CB agonist CP55,940 reversed PCP-induced social withdrawal in a CB₁-dependent manner, whereas pharmacological blockade of CB₁ receptors by either AM251 or SR141716 reduced the time spent in social interaction in control animals. PCP-induced social withdrawal was accompanied by a decrease of anandamide (AEA) levels in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex, and these deficits were reversed by URB597. As CB₁ receptors are predominantly expressed on GABAergic interneurons containing the anxiogenic peptide cholecystokinin (CCK), we also examined whether the PCP-induced social withdrawal resulted from deficient CB₁-mediated modulation of CCK transmission. The selective CCK2 antagonist LY225910 blocked both PCP- and AM251-induced social withdrawal, but not URB597 effect in control rats. Taken together, these findings indicate that AEA-mediated activation of CB₁ receptors is crucial for social interaction, and that PCP-induced social withdrawal results from deficient endocannabinoid transmission. PMID:23563893

  3. Association of follicle stimulating hormone receptor promoter with ovarian response in IVF-ET patients

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Wang; Jing, Gao; Liangbin, Xia; Ting, Zhang; Ying, Zeng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Poor ovarian response phenomenon has been observed in some of the in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer patients. Some investigations found that follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene plays a role in the process, but no direct evidence shows the correlation between genotypes of FSHR and ovarian response. Objective: Exploring the molecular mechanism behind the mutation of FSHR promoter association with ovarian granulosa cells and poor ovarian response. Materials and Methods: This cross sectional study was performed using 158 women undergoing the controlled short program ovarian stimulation for IVF treatment. The 263 bp DNA fragments before the follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) receptor 5' initiation site were sequenced in the patients under IVF cycle, 70 of which had poor ovarian response and 88 showed normal ovarian responses. Results: With a mutation rate of 40%, 63 in 158 cases showed a 29th site G→A point mutation; among the mutated cases, the mutation rate of the poor ovarian responders was significantly higher than the normal group (60% versus 23.9%; χ2=21.450, p<0.001). Besides, the variability was also obvious in antral follicle count, and ovum pick-ups. The estradiol peak values and the number of mature eggs between the two groups had significant difference. However, there was no obvious variability (t=0.457, p=0.324) in the basic FSH values between the two groups (normal group, 7.2±2.3 U/L; mutation group, 7.1±2.0 U/L). Conclusion: The activity of FSHR promoter is significantly affected by the 29th site G→A mutation that will weaken promoter activity and result in poor response to FSH. PMID:26730247

  4. Molecular characterization and quantification of the follicle-stimulating hormone receptor in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus).

    PubMed

    Jia, Yudong; Sun, Ai; Meng, Zhen; Liu, Baoliang; Lei, Jilin

    2016-02-01

    Molecular cloning, characterization, and functional analysis of follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) in female turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) were evaluated. Results showed that the full-length FSHR cDNA was 3824 bp long and contained a 2202 bp open reading frame that encoded a mature protein of 733 amino acids (aa) and a signal peptide of 18 aa. Multiple sequence analyses showed that turbot FSHR has high homology with the corresponding genes of other teleosts and significant homology with that of Hippoglossus hippoglossus. Turbot FSHR has the typical structural architecture of glycoprotein hormone receptors consisting of a large N-terminal extracellular domain, seven transmembrane domains and short C-terminal intracellular domain. FSHR mRNA was found to be abundant in the ovaries, but deficient in eyes, intestine, brain, muscle, gills, spleen, stomach, heart and kidney. Furthermore, FSHR mRNA was found to increase gradually from pre-vitellogenesis to migratory nucleus stages, with the highest values observed during the late vitellogenesis stage of the reproductive cycle. However, FSHR mRNA was found to decrease dramatically during the atresia stage. Meanwhile, functional analysis with HEK293T cells continual expressing FSHR demonstrated that FSHR was specifically stimulated by ovine FSH, but not ovine LH. These results indicate that turbot FSHR is mainly involved in the stimulation of vitellogenesis, regulation of oocyte maturation as well as promotion of ovarian development via specific ligand binding. These findings open doors to further investigation of physiological functions of FSHR, which will be valuable for fish reproduction and broodstock management. PMID:26358315

  5. Magnesium Sulfate Protects Against the Bioenergetic Consequences of Chronic Glutamate Receptor Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Clerc, Pascaline; Young, Christina A.; Bordt, Evan A.; Grigore, Alina M.; Fiskum, Gary; Polster, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular glutamate is elevated following brain ischemia or trauma and contributes to neuronal injury. We tested the hypothesis that magnesium sulfate (MgSO4, 3 mM) protects against metabolic failure caused by excitotoxic glutamate exposure. Rat cortical neuron preparations treated in medium already containing a physiological concentration of Mg2+ (1 mM) could be segregated based on their response to glutamate (100 µM). Type I preparations responded with a decrease or small transient increase in oxygen consumption rate (OCR). Type II neurons responded with >50% stimulation in OCR, indicating a robust response to increased energy demand without immediate toxicity. Pre-treatment with MgSO4 improved the initial bioenergetic response to glutamate and ameliorated subsequent loss of spare respiratory capacity, measured following addition of the uncoupler FCCP, in Type I but not Type II neurons. Spare respiratory capacity in Type I neurons was also improved by incubation with MgSO4 or NMDA receptor antagonist MK801 in the absence of glutamate treatment. This finding indicates that the major difference between Type I and Type II preparations is the amount of endogenous glutamate receptor activity. Incubation of Type II neurons with 5 µM glutamate prior to excitotoxic (100 µM) glutamate exposure recapitulated a Type I phenotype. MgSO4 protected against an excitotoxic glutamate-induced drop in neuronal ATP both with and without prior 5 µM glutamate exposure. Results indicate that MgSO4 protects against chronic moderate glutamate receptor stimulation and preserves cellular ATP following treatment with excitotoxic glutamate. PMID:24236167

  6. A1-, A2A- and A3-subtype adenosine receptors modulate intraocular pressure in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Marcel Y; Stone, Richard A; Civan, Mortimer M

    2001-01-01

    Despite the potential importance of the mouse in studying the pharmacology of aqueous dynamics, measurement of intraocular pressure (IOP) in its very small eye has been problematic. Utilizing a novel servo-null electrophysiologic approach recently applied to the mouse, we have identified a diversity of adenosine-receptor mechanisms in modulating IOP in this species. We report the first evidence that A3 receptors increase IOP in any species, and verify in the mouse reports with larger mammals that A1 receptors lower and A2A receptors increase IOP. PMID:11564641

  7. Methylphenidate and μ opioid receptor interactions: A pharmacological target for prevention of stimulant abuse

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jinmin; Spencer, Thomas J.; Kachroo, Anil; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan; Biederman, Joseph; Bhide, Pradeep G.

    2011-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH) is one of the most commonly used and highly effective treatments for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adults. As the therapeutic use of MPH has increased, so has its abuse and illicit street-use. Yet, the mechanisms associated with development of MPH-associated abuse and dependence are not well understood making it difficult to develop methods to help its mitigation. As a result, many ADHD patients especially children and youth, that could benefit from MPH treatment do not receive it and risk life-long disabilities associated with untreated ADHD. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms associated with development of MPH addiction and designing methods to prevent it assume high public health significance. Using a mouse model we show that supra-therapeutic doses of MPH produce rewarding effects (surrogate measure for addiction in humans) in a conditioned place preference paradigm and upregulate μ opioid receptor (MOPR) activity in the striatum and nucleus accumbens, brain regions associated with reward circuitry. Co-administration of naltrexone, a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, prevents MPH-induced MOPR activation and the rewarding effects. The MPH-induced MOPR activation and rewarding effect require activation of the dopamine D1 but not the D2 receptor. These findings identify the MOPR as a potential target for attenuating rewarding effects of MPH and suggest that a formulation that combines naltrexone with MPH could be a useful pharmaceutical approach to alleviate abuse potential of MPH and other stimulants. PMID:21545805

  8. Extranuclear Actions of the Androgen Receptor Enhance Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion in the Male.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Guadalupe; Xu, Weiwei; Jacobson, David A; Wicksteed, Barton; Allard, Camille; Zhang, Guanyi; De Gendt, Karel; Kim, Sung Hoon; Wu, Hongju; Zhang, Haitao; Verhoeven, Guido; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck

    2016-05-10

    Although men with testosterone deficiency are at increased risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D), previous studies have ignored the role of testosterone and the androgen receptor (AR) in pancreatic β cells. We show that male mice lacking AR in β cells (βARKO) exhibit decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), leading to glucose intolerance. The AR agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT) enhances GSIS in cultured male islets, an effect that is abolished in βARKO(-/y) islets and human islets treated with an AR antagonist. In β cells, DHT-activated AR is predominantly extranuclear and enhances GSIS by increasing islet cAMP and activating the protein kinase A. In mouse and human islets, the insulinotropic effect of DHT depends on activation of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor, and accordingly, DHT amplifies the incretin effect of GLP-1. This study identifies AR as a novel receptor that enhances β cell function, a finding with implications for the prevention of T2D in aging men. PMID:27133133

  9. Adenosine A(3) receptor agonist acts as a homeostatic regulator of bone marrow hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Pospísil, Milan; Znojil, Vladimír; Holá, Jirina; Vacek, Antonín; Streitová, Denisa

    2007-07-01

    The present study was performed to define the optimum conditions of the stimulatory action of the adenosine A(3) receptor agonist, N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA), on bone marrow hematopoiesis in mice. Effects of 2-day treatment with IB-MECA given at single doses of 200nmol/kg twice daily were investigated in normal mice and in mice whose femoral bone marrow cells were either depleted or regenerating after pretreatment with the cytotoxic drug 5-fluorouracil. Morphological criteria were used to determine the proliferation state of the granulocytic and erythroid cell systems. Significant negative correlation between the control proliferation state and the increase of cell proliferation after IB-MECA treatment irrespective of the cell lineage investigated was found. The results suggest the homeostatic character of the induced stimulatory effects and the need to respect the functional state of the target tissue when investigating effects of adenosine receptor agonists under in vivo conditions. PMID:17383145

  10. Prolactin stimulates cell proliferation through a long form of prolactin receptor and K+ channel activation.

    PubMed Central

    Van Coppenolle, Fabien; Skryma, Roman; Ouadid-Ahidouch, Halima; Slomianny, Christian; Roudbaraki, Morad; Delcourt, Philippe; Dewailly, Etienne; Humez, Sandrine; Crépin, Alexandre; Gourdou, Isabelle; Djiane, Jean; Bonnal, Jean-Louis; Mauroy, Brigitte; Prevarskaya, Natalia

    2004-01-01

    PRL (prolactin) has been implicated in the proliferation and differentiation of numerous tissues, including the prostate gland. However, the PRL-R (PRL receptor) signal transduction pathway, leading to the stimulation of cell proliferation, remains unclear and has yet to be mapped. The present study was undertaken to develop a clear understanding of the mechanisms involved in this pathway and, in particular, to determine the role of K(+) channels. We used androgen-sensitive prostate cancer (LNCaP) cells whose proliferation is known to be stimulated by PRL. Reverse transcriptase PCR analysis showed that LNCaP cells express a long form of PRL-R, but do not produce its intermediate isoform. Patch-clamp techniques showed that the application of 5 nM PRL increased both the macroscopic K(+) current amplitude and the single K(+)-channel open probability. This single-channel activity increase was reduced by the tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein, herbimycin A and lavandustine A, thereby indicating that tyrosine kinase phosphorylation is required in PRL-induced K(+) channel stimulation. PRL enhances p59( fyn ) phosphorylation by a factor of 2 after a 10 min application in culture. In addition, where an antip59( fyn ) antibody is present in the patch pipette, PRL no longer increases K(+) current amplitude. Furthermore, the PRL-stimulated proliferation is inhibited by the K(+) channel inhibitors alpha-dendrotoxin and tetraethylammonium. Thus, as K(+) channels are known to be involved in LNCaP cell proliferation, we suggest that K(+) channel modulation by PRL, via p59( fyn ) pathway, is the primary ionic event in PRL signal transduction, triggering cell proliferation. PMID:14565846

  11. Central oxytocin receptor stimulation attenuates the orexigenic effects of butorphanol tartrate.

    PubMed

    Olszewski, Pawel K; Klockars, Oscar A; Klockars, Anica; Levine, Allen S

    2016-09-28

    Butorphanol tartrate (BT), a mixed µ/κ/δ opioid receptor agonist, is one of the most potent orexigens known to date. The central mechanisms through which BT causes hyperphagia are largely unknown. Interestingly, BT suppresses meal-end activation of neurons synthesizing anorexigenic neuropeptide, oxytocin (OT), which suggests that BT promotes hyperphagia by silencing OT-derived satiety signaling. As OT terminates consumption by acting by distinct hindbrain and forebrain circuits, we investigated whether stimulation of the OT receptor in the forebrain or the hindbrain [through lateral ventricular (LV) and fourth ventricular (4V) OT injections] leads to termination of food intake induced by BT. We established effective doses of BT on chow intake in ad-libitum-fed and overnight-deprived rats as well as effective doses of LV and 4V OT in deprived animals. Then, we determined doses of LV and 4V OT that reduce hyperphagia produced by BT in sated and deprived rats. Finally, we assessed whether OT's effects on BT-induced feeding can be suppressed by an OT receptor antagonist. 4 mg/kg BT increased intake in ad-libitum-fed and overnight-deprived rats, whereas LV and 4V OT at 1 μg caused a decrease in deprived rats. BT-induced chow intake in hungry and sated animals was suppressed by a very low, 0.1 μg dose of 4V OT, whereas 1 μg OT was effective LV. The effect of OT was attenuated by OT receptor antagonist, L-368 899. Reduced activity of the OT circuit, especially its hindbrain component, is a critical factor in shaping the magnitude of consumption in response to BT treatment. PMID:27471903

  12. Nitric oxide and hypoxia stimulate erythropoietin receptor via MAPK kinase in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cokic, Bojana B Beleslin; Cokic, Vladan P; Suresh, Sukanya; Wirt, Stacey; Noguchi, Constance Tom

    2014-03-01

    Erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) expression level determines the extent of erythropoietin (EPO) response. Previously we showed that EPOR expression in endothelial cells is increased at low oxygen tension and that EPO stimulation of endothelial cells during hypoxia can increase endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) expression and activation as well as NO production. We now observe that while EPO can stimulate NO production, NO in turn can regulate EPOR expression. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) treated with 10-50 μM of NO donor diethylenetriamine NONOate (DETANO) for 24h showed significant induction of EPOR gene expression at 5% and 2% of oxygen. Also human bone marrow microvascular endothelial cell line (TrHBMEC) cultured at 21 and 2% oxygen with 50 μM DETANO demonstrated a time and oxygen dependent induction of EPOR mRNA expression after 24 and 48 h, particularly at low oxygen tension. EPOR protein was also induced by DETANO at 2% oxygen in TrHBMEC and HUVEC. The activation of signaling pathways by NO donor stimulation appeared to be distinct from EPO stimulation. In reporter gene assays, DETANO treatment of HeLa cells at 2% oxygen increased EPOR promoter activity indicated by a 48% increase in luciferase activity with a 2 kb EPOR promoter fragment and a 71% increase in activity with a minimal EPOR promoter fragment containing 0.2 kb 5'. We found that DETANO activated MAPK kinase in TrHBMEC both in normoxia and hypoxia, while MAPK kinase inhibition showed significant reduction of EPOR mRNA gene expression at low oxygen tension, suggesting MAPK involvement in NO mediated induction of EPOR. Furthermore, DETANO stimulated Akt anti-apoptotic activity after 30 min in normoxia, whereas it inhibited Akt phosphorylation in hypoxia. In contrast, EPO did not significantly increase MAPK activity while EPO stimulated Akt phosphorylation in TrHBMEC in normoxia and hypoxia. These observations provide a new effect of NO on EPOR expression to enhance EPO

  13. Stimulation of rat hepatic low density lipoprotein receptors by glucagon. Evidence of a novel regulatory mechanism in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Rudling, M; Angelin, B

    1993-01-01

    We studied the influence of glucagon on hepatic LDL receptors and plasma lipoproteins in rats. A dose-dependent (maximum, threefold) increase in LDL-receptor binding was evident already at a dose of 2 x 4 micrograms, and detectable 3 h after injection; concomitantly, cholesterol and apolipoprotein (apo) B and apoE within LDL and large HDL decreased in plasma. LDL receptor mRNA levels were however unaltered or reduced. Hepatic microsomal cholesterol was increased and the enzymatic activities of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase in hepatic microsomes were reduced. Insulin alone increased receptor binding and receptor mRNA levels twofold, but plasma cholesterol was unchanged and plasma apoE and apoB increased. Administration of insulin to glucagon-treated animals reduced the LDL-receptor binding to control levels and apoB appeared in LDL particles. Estrogen treatment increased LDL-receptor binding and mRNA levels five- and eightfold, respectively. Combined treatment with glucagon and estrogen reduced the stimulation of LDL-receptor mRNA levels by 80% although LDL-receptor binding was unchanged. Immunoblot analysis showed that glucagon increased the number of hepatic LDL receptors. We conclude that glucagon induces the number of hepatic LDL receptors by a mechanism not related to increased mRNA levels, suggesting the presence of a posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism present in the liver in vivo. Images PMID:8514887

  14. What is the effect of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor stimulation on osteoarthritis in a rodent animal model?

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Kilian; Plaass, Christian; Coger, Vincent; Peck, Claas-Tido; Reimers, Kerstin; Stukenborg-Colsman, Christina; Claassen, Leif

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Despite the rising number of patients with osteoarthritis, no sufficient chondroprotective and prophylactic therapy for osteoarthritis has been established yet. The purpose of this study was to verify whether stimulation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor via nicotine has a beneficial effect on cartilage degeneration in the development of osteoarthritis and is capable of reducing the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and cartilage degrading enzymes in synovial membranes after osteoarthritis induction. Methods: Experimental osteoarthritis was induced in Lewis rats using a standardized osteoarthritis model with monoiodoacetate. A total of 16 Lewis rats were randomized into four groups: control, sham + nicotine application, osteoarthritis, and osteoarthritis + nicotine application. Nicotine (0.625 mg/kg twice daily) was administered intraperitoneally for 42 days. We analyzed histological sections, radiological images and the expression of the proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6, and of matrix metalloproteases 3, 9 and 13 and tissue inhibitors of metalloprotease-1 in synovial membranes via quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results: Histological and x-ray examination revealed cartilage degeneration in the osteoarthritis group compared to control or sham + nicotine groups (histological control vs osteoarthritis: p = 0.002 and x-ray control vs osteoarthritis: p = 0.004). Nicotine treatment reduced the cartilage degeneration without significant differences. Osteoarthritis induction led to a higher expression of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteases as compared to control groups. This effect was attenuated after nicotine administration. The differences of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteases did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion: With the present small-scale study, we could not prove a positive effect of nicotinic

  15. Positive AMPA receptor modulation rapidly stimulates BDNF release and increases dendritic mRNA translation.

    PubMed

    Jourdi, Hussam; Hsu, Yu-Tien; Zhou, Miou; Qin, Qingyu; Bi, Xiaoning; Baudry, Michel

    2009-07-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) stimulates local dendritic mRNA translation and is involved in formation and consolidation of memory. 2H,3H,6aH-pyrrolidino[2'',1''-3',2']1,3-oxazino[6',5'-5,4]-benzo[e]1,4-dioxan-10-one (CX614), one of the best-studied positive AMPA receptor modulators (also known as ampakines), increases BDNF mRNA and protein and facilitates long-term potentiation (LTP) induction. Several other ampakines also improve performance in various behavioral and learning tasks. Since local dendritic protein synthesis has been implicated in LTP stabilization and in memory consolidation, this study investigated whether CX614 could influence synaptic plasticity by upregulating dendritic protein translation. CX614 treatment of primary neuronal cultures and acute hippocampal slices rapidly activated the translation machinery and increased local dendritic protein synthesis. CX614-induced activation of translation was blocked by K252a [(9S,10R,12R)-2,3,9,10,11,12-hexahydro-10-hydroxy-9-methyl-1-oxo-9,12-epoxy-1H-diindolo[1,2,3-fg:3',2',1'-kl]pyrrolo[3,4-i][1,6]benzodiazocine-10-carboxylic acid methyl ester], CNQX, APV, and TTX, and was inhibited in the presence of an extracellular BDNF scavenger, TrkB-Fc. The acute effect of CX614 on translation was mediated by increased BDNF release as demonstrated with a BDNF scavenging assay using TrkB-Fc during CX614 treatment of cultured primary neurons and was blocked by nifedipine, ryanodine, and lack of extracellular Ca(2+) in acute hippocampal slices. Finally, CX614, like BDNF, rapidly increased dendritic translation of an exogenous translation reporter. Together, our results demonstrate that positive modulation of AMPA receptors rapidly stimulates dendritic translation, an effect mediated by BDNF secretion and TrkB receptor activation. They also suggest that increased BDNF secretion and stimulation of local protein synthesis contribute to the effects of ampakines on synaptic plasticity. PMID:19587275

  16. Caffeine-induced behavioral stimulation is dose-dependent and associated with A1 adenosine receptor occupancy.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, G B; Greenblatt, D J; Kent, M A; Cotreau, M M; Arcelin, G; Shader, R I

    1992-05-01

    Caffeine's psychomotor stimulant effects may relate to its blockade of central adenosine receptors. We examined acute caffeine effects on motor activity, adenosine receptor occupancy in vivo, and receptor affinity and density ex vivo. Acute doses of caffeine-sodium benzoate (0, 20, 40, and 60 mg/kg, intraperitoneally [0, 0.10, 0.21, 0.31 mu mol/kg]) were given to CD-1 mice and their activity was measured in an animal activity monitor over a 1-hour period. Adenosine receptor occupancy in vivo was quantified in mice 1 hour postdosage, using the high-affinity, A1 receptor selective adenosine antagonist [3H]-8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine. Adenosine receptor binding affinities and densities were determined from analyses of binding studies in cortical, hippocampal, and brainstem membranes from treated mice (0 and 40 mg/kg caffeine). Caffeine doses of 20 and 40 mg/kg, corresponding to mean brain concentrations of 5 and 17 micrograms/g, increased all horizontal and vertical motor activity measures and stereotypy counts, as compared to doses of 0 and 60 mg/kg. Additionally, all acute caffeine doses significantly altered specific A1 binding in vivo (decreasing binding between 55% and 73% versus vehicle), presumably as it occupied A1 receptors. Therefore, at doses of 20 and 40 mg/kg, caffeine stimulated motor activity as it occupied A1 receptors; at a dose of 60 mg/kg (mean brain concentration of 26 micrograms/g) caffeine had no stimulant effect even though it appeared to occupy A1 receptors. Acute caffeine dosage did not alter ex vivo adenosine receptor binding affinity or density in any brain regions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1599605

  17. Electrical Stimulation Decreases Coupling Efficiency Between Beta-Adrenergic Receptors and Cyclic AMP Production in Cultured Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.

    1999-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of skeletal muscle cells in culture is an effective way to simulate the effects of muscle contraction and its effects on gene expression in muscle cells. Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor and its coupling to cyclic AMP synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy, and the goal of this project was to determine if electrical stimulation altered the beta-adrenergic response in muscle cells. Chicken skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for seven days in culture were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional two days at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. At the end of this two-day stimulation period, beta-adrenergic receptor population was measured by the binding of tritium-labeled CGP-12177 to muscle cells, and coupling to cAMP synthesis was measured by Radioimmunoassay (RIA) after treating the cells for 10 min with the potent (beta)AR agonist, isoproterenol. The number of beta adrenergic receptors and the basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP were not affected by electrical stimulation. However, the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately 50%. Thus, an enhanced level of contraction reduces the coupling efficiency of beta-adrenergic receptors for cyclic AMP production.

  18. Basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated levels of cAMP are reduced in lymphocytes from alcoholic patients

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, I.; Wrubel, B.; Estrin, W.; Gordon, A.

    1987-03-01

    Alcoholism causes serious neurologic disease that may be due, in part, to the ability of ethanol to interact with neural cell membranes and change neuronal function. Adenosine receptors are membrane-bound proteins that appear to mediate some of the effects of ethanol in the brain. Human lymphocytes also have adenosine receptors, and their activation causes increases in cAMP levels. To test the hypothesis that basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated cAMP levels in lymphocytes might be abnormal in alcoholism, the authors studied lymphocytes from 10 alcoholic subjects, 10 age- and sex-matched normal individuals, and 10 patients with nonalcoholic liver disease. Basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated cAMP levels were reduced 75% in lymphocytes from alcoholic subjects. Also, there was a 76% reduction in ethanol stimulation of cAMP accumulation in lymphocytes from alcoholics. Similar results were demonstrable in isolated T cells. Unlike other laboratory tests examined, these measurements appeared to distinguish alcoholics from normal subjects and from patients with nonalcoholic liver disease. Reduced basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated levels of cAMP in lymphocytes from alcoholics may reflect a change in cell membranes due either to chronic alcohol abuse or to a genetic predisposition unique to alcoholic subjects.

  19. [Leu]enkephalin stimulates carbohydrate metabolism in isolated hepatocytes and kidney tubule fragments by interaction with angiotensin II receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Hothi, S K; Randall, D P; Titheradge, M A

    1989-01-01

    The possibility that the effects of [Leu]enkephalin in vitro on hepatic carbohydrate metabolism are mediated by interaction with angiotensin II receptors has been examined. Preincubation of hepatocytes with either the angiotensin II receptor antagonist [Sar1,Ile8]angiotensin II or 10 mM-dithiothreitol abolished the ability of both angiotensin II and [Leu]enkephalin to increase phosphorylase a in hepatocytes prepared from fed rats. Dithiothreitol had no effect on the stimulation of phosphorylase in the presence of glucagon or phenylephrine, although it also inhibited the response to vasopressin. [Leu]enkephalin displaced specifically bound 125I-labelled angiotensin II from hepatic plasma membranes over a concentration range of 10(-7)-10(-5) M. This correlated with the dose-response required to stimulate phosphorylase activity in intact hepatocytes and suggests that the effects of the opioid peptides on carbohydrate metabolism in liver are the result of cross-reactivity of the peptides with angiotensin II receptors. Addition of 10(-5) M-[Leu]enkephalin to isolated kidney tubule fragments stimulated gluconeogenesis from 5 mM-pyruvate, the magnitude of stimulation being comparable to that by either angiotensin II or adrenaline. This effect of the opioid peptide was also abolished by pretreatment of the tubules with [Sar1,Ile8]angiotensin II, suggesting that the ability of [Leu]enkephalin to interact with angiotensin II receptors is not restricted to the liver, but may occur in other tissues where both receptors occur together. PMID:2930480

  20. Functional role for the angiotensin II receptor (AT1A) 3'-untranslated region in determining cellular responses to agonist: evidence for recognition by RNA binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Thekkumkara, T J; Thomas, W G; Motel, T J; Baker, K M

    1998-01-01

    cells with and without the 3'-UTR revealed that the normally unstable AT1A receptor mRNA became highly stable by removing its 3'-UTR, identifying a role for the 3'-UTR in mRNA destabilization. Interestingly, both cells express similar levels of receptors at the cell surface, suggesting that the 3'-UTR is also involved in the efficient translation and/or translocation of the receptor protein to the plasma membrane. We hypothesized that these 3'-UTR-mediated functions of the receptor are regulated by RNA-binding proteins. To identify possible RNA-binding proteins for the AT1A 3'-UTR, cellular extracts were prepared from parental CHO-K1 cells and 3'-UTR-binding assays, electrophoretic mobility-shift assays and UV crosslinking studies were performed. A major cellular protein of 55 kDa was identified, which specifically interacted with the 3'-UTR. Our data suggest that the 3'-UTR of the AT1A can control specific receptor functions, perhaps via selective recognition of the 3'-UTR by RNA-binding proteins. PMID:9425107

  1. A Long Lasting β1 Adrenergic Receptor Stimulation of cAMP/Protein Kinase A (PKA) Signal in Cardiac Myocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qin; Kim, Sungjin; Soto, Dagoberto; De Arcangelis, Vania; DiPilato, Lisa; Liu, Shubai; Xu, Bing; Shi, Qian; Zhang, Jin; Xiang, Yang K.

    2014-01-01

    Small-molecule, ligand-activated G protein-coupled receptors are generally thought to be rapidly desensitized within a period of minutes through receptor phosphorylation and internalization after repeated or prolonged stimulation. This transient G protein-coupled receptor activation remains at odds with many observed long-lasting cellular and physiological responses. Here, using live cell imaging of cAMP with a FRET-based biosensor and myocyte contraction assay, we show that the catecholamine-activated β1 adrenergic receptor (β1AR) continuously stimulates second messenger cAMP synthesis in primary cardiac myocytes and neurons, which lasts for more than 8 h (a decay t½ of 3.9 h) in cardiac myocytes. However, the β1AR-induced cAMP signal is counterbalanced and masked by the receptor-bound phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4D8-dependent cAMP hydrolysis. Inhibition of PDE4 activity recovers the receptor-induced cAMP signal and promotes contractile response in mouse hearts during extended periods of agonist stimulation. β1AR associates with PDE4D8 through the receptor C-terminal PDZ motif-dependent binding to synaptic-associated protein 97 (SAP97). Knockdown of SAP97 or mutation of the β1AR PDZ motif disrupts the complex and promotes sustained agonist-induced cAMP activity, PKA phosphorylation, and cardiac myocyte contraction response. Together, these findings unveil a long lasting adrenergic signal in neurons and myocytes under prolonged stimulation and an underappreciated role of PDE that is essential in classic receptor signaling desensitization and in maintaining a long lasting cAMP equilibrium for ligand-induced physiological response. PMID:24713698

  2. Enhancement of peripheral nerve regeneration due to treadmill training and electrical stimulation is dependent on androgen receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Nicholas J; Sengelaub, Dale R; English, Arthur W

    2014-05-01

    Moderate exercise in the form of treadmill training and brief electrical nerve stimulation both enhance axon regeneration after peripheral nerve injury. Different regimens of exercise are required to enhance axon regeneration in male and female mice (Wood et al.: Dev Neurobiol 72 (2012) 688-698), and androgens are suspected to be involved. We treated mice with the androgen receptor blocker, flutamide, during either exercise or electrical stimulation, to evaluate the role of androgen receptor signaling in these activity-based methods of enhancing axon regeneration. The common fibular (CF) and tibial (TIB) nerves of thy-1-YFP-H mice, in which axons in peripheral nerves are marked by yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), were transected and repaired using CF and TIB nerve grafts harvested from non-fluorescent donor mice. Silastic capsules filled with flutamide were implanted subcutaneously to release the drug continuously. Exercised mice were treadmill trained 5 days/week for 2 weeks, starting on the third day post-transection. For electrical stimulation, the sciatic nerve was stimulated continuously for 1 h prior to nerve transection. After 2 weeks, lengths of YFP+ profiles of regenerating axons were measured from harvested nerves. Both exercise and electrical stimulation enhanced axon regeneration, but this enhancement was blocked completely by flutamide treatments. Signaling through androgen receptors is necessary for the enhancing effects of treadmill exercise or electrical stimulation on axon regeneration in cut peripheral nerves. PMID:24293191

  3. Targeting the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor with small molecule ligands and antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Terry F; Latif, Rauf

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) is the essential molecule for thyroid growth and thyroid hormone production. Since it is also a key autoantigen in Graves’ disease and is involved in thyroid cancer pathophysiology, the targeting of the TSHR offers a logical model for disease control. Areas covered We review the structure and function of the TSHR and the progress in both small molecule ligands and TSHR antibodies for their therapeutic potential. Expert opinion Stabilization of a preferential conformation for the TSHR by allosteric ligands and TSHR antibodies with selective modulation of the signaling pathways is now possible. These tools may be the next generation of therapeutics for controlling the pathophysiological consequences mediated by the effects of the TSHR in the thyroid and other extrathyroidal tissues. PMID:25768836

  4. Graves' Disease Mechanisms: The Role of Stimulating, Blocking, and Cleavage Region TSH Receptor Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Morshed, S A; Davies, T F

    2015-09-01

    The immunologic processes involved in Graves' disease (GD) have one unique characteristic--the autoantibodies to the TSH receptor (TSHR)--which have both linear and conformational epitopes. Three types of TSHR antibodies (stimulating, blocking, and cleavage) with different functional capabilities have been described in GD patients, which induce different signaling effects varying from thyroid cell proliferation to thyroid cell death. The establishment of animal models of GD by TSHR antibody transfer or by immunization with TSHR antigen has confirmed its pathogenic role and, therefore, GD is the result of a breakdown in TSHR tolerance. Here we review some of the characteristics of TSHR antibodies with a special emphasis on new developments in our understanding of what were previously called "neutral" antibodies and which we now characterize as autoantibodies to the "cleavage" region of the TSHR ectodomain. PMID:26361259

  5. Activating Parabrachial Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors Selectively Stimulates Feeding of Palatable Foods in Rats

    PubMed Central

    DiPatrizio, Nicholas V.; Simansky, Kenny J.

    2009-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system is emerging as an integral component in central and peripheral regulation of feeding and energy balance. Our investigation analyzed behavioral roles for cannabinoid mechanisms of the pontine parabrachial nucleus (PBN) in modulating intake of presumably palatable foods containing fat and/or sugar. The PBN serves to gate neurotransmission associated with, but not limited to, the gustatory properties of food. Immunofluorescence and in vitro [35S]GTPγS autoradiography of rat tissue sections containing the PBN revealed the presence of cannabinoid receptors and their functional capability to couple to their G-proteins following incubation with the endocannabinoid, 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG). The selective cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R) antagonist, AM251, prevented the response, demonstrating CB1R mediation of 2-AG induced coupling. Microinfusions of 2-AG into the PBN in behaving rats robustly stimulated feeding of pellets high in content of fat and sucrose (HFS), pure sucrose and pure fat (Crisco®), during the first 30min following infusion. In contrast, 2-AG failed to increase consumption of standard chow, even when the feeding regimen was manipulated to match baseline intakes of HFS. Orexigenic responses to 2-AG were attenuated by AM251, again indicating CB1R mediation of 2-AG actions. Furthermore, responses were regionally specific, as 2-AG failed to alter intake when infused into sites ~500µm caudal to infusions that successfully stimulated feeding. Our data suggest that hedonically-positive sensory properties of food enable endocannabinoids at PBN CB1Rs to initiate increases in eating and more generally, these pathways may serve a larger role in brain functions controlling behavioral responses for natural reward. PMID:18815256

  6. Impaired Cognition after Stimulation of P2Y1 Receptors in the Rat Medial Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Holger; Bespalov, Anton; Drescher, Karla; Franke, Heike; Krügel, Ute

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesize that cortical ATP and ADP accumulating in the extracellular space, eg during prolonged network activity, contribute to a decline in cognitive performance in particular via stimulation of the G protein-coupled P2Y1 receptor (P2Y1R) subtype. Here, we report first evidence on P2Y1R-mediated control of cognitive functioning in rats using bilateral microinfusions of the selective agonist MRS2365 into medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). MRS2365 attenuated prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex while having no impact on startle amplitude. Stimulation of P2Y1Rs deteriorated performance accuracy in the delayed non-matching to position task in a delay dependent manner and increased the rate of magazine entries consistent with both working memory disturbances and impaired impulse control. Further, MRS2365 significantly impaired performance in the reversal learning task. These effects might be related to MRS2365-evoked increase of dopamine observed by microdialysis to be short-lasting in mPFC and long-lasting in the nucleus accumbens. P2Y1Rs were identified on pyramidal cells and parvalbumin-positive interneurons, but not on tyrosine hydroxylase-positive fibers, which argues for an indirect activation of dopaminergic afferents in the cortex by MRS2365. Collectively, these results suggest that activation of P2Y1Rs in the mPFC impairs inhibitory control and behavioral flexibility mediated by increased mesocorticolimbic activity and local disinhibition. PMID:25027332

  7. Statins stimulate the production of a soluble form of the receptor for advanced glycation end products

    PubMed Central

    Quade-Lyssy, Patricia; Kanarek, Anna Maria; Baiersdörfer, Markus; Postina, Rolf; Kojro, Elzbieta

    2013-01-01

    The beneficial effects of statin therapy in the reduction of cardiovascular pathogenesis, atherosclerosis, and diabetic complications are well known. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) plays an important role in the progression of these diseases. In contrast, soluble forms of RAGE act as decoys for RAGE ligands and may prevent the development of RAGE-mediated disorders. Soluble forms of RAGE are either produced by alternative splicing [endogenous secretory RAGE (esRAGE)] or by proteolytic shedding mediated by metalloproteinases [shed RAGE (sRAGE)]. Therefore we analyzed whether statins influence the production of soluble RAGE. Lovastatin treatment of either mouse alveolar epithelial cells endogenously expressing RAGE or HEK cells overexpressing RAGE caused induction of RAGE shedding, but did not influence secretion of esRAGE from HEK cells overexpressing esRAGE. Lovastatin-induced secretion of sRAGE was also evident after restoration of the isoprenylation pathway, demonstrating a correlation of sterol biosynthesis and activation of RAGE shedding. Lovastatin-stimulated induction of RAGE shedding was completely abolished by a metalloproteinase ADAM10 inhibitor. We also demonstrate that statins stimulate RAGE shedding at low physiologically relevant concentrations. Our results show that statins, due to their cholesterol-lowering effects, increase the soluble RAGE level by inducing RAGE shedding, and by doing this, might prevent the development of RAGE-mediated pathogenesis. PMID:23966666

  8. Trypanosoma cruzi and Its Soluble Antigens Induce NET Release by Stimulating Toll-Like Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Diniz, Larissa Figueiredo Alves; Souza, Priscila Silva Sampaio; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Toledo, Karina Alves

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils release fibrous traps of DNA, histones, and granule proteins known as neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which contribute to microbicidal killing and have been implicated in autoimmunity. The role of NET formation in the host response to nonbacterial pathogens is not well-understood. In this study, we investigated the release of NETs by human neutrophils upon their interaction with Trypanosoma cruzi (Y strain) parasites. Our results showed that human neutrophils stimulated by T. cruzi generate NETs composed of DNA, histones, and elastase. The release occurred in a dose-, time-, and reactive oxygen species-dependent manner to decrease trypomastigote and increase amastigote numbers of the parasites without affecting their viability. NET release was decreased upon blocking with antibodies against Toll-like receptors 2 and 4. In addition, living parasites were not mandatory in the release of NETs induced by T. cruzi, as the same results were obtained when molecules from its soluble extract were tested. Our results increase the understanding of the stimulation of NETs by parasites, particularly T. cruzi. We suggest that contact of T. cruzi with NETs during Chagas’s disease can limit infection by affecting the infectivity/pathogenicity of the parasite. PMID:26431537

  9. The angiotensin II-AT1 receptor stimulates reactive oxygen species within the cell nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergrass, Karl D.; Gwathmey, TanYa M.; Michalek, Ryan D.; Grayson, Jason M.; Chappell, Mark C.

    2009-06-26

    We and others have reported significant expression of the Ang II Type 1 receptor (AT1R) on renal nuclei; thus, the present study assessed the functional pathways and distribution of the intracellular AT1R on isolated nuclei. Ang II (1 nM) stimulated DCF fluorescence, an intranuclear indicator of reactive oxygen species (ROS), while the AT1R antagonist losartan or the NADPH oxidase (NOX) inhibitor DPI abolished the increase in ROS. Dual labeling of nuclei with antibodies against nucleoporin 62 (Nup62) and AT1R or the NADPH oxidase isoform NOX4 revealed complete overlap of the Nup62 and AT1R (99%) by flow cytometry, while NOX4 was present on 65% of nuclei. Treatment of nuclei with a PKC agonist increased ROS while the PKC inhibitor GF109203X or PI3 kinase inhibitor LY294002 abolished Ang II stimulation of ROS. We conclude that the Ang II-AT1R-PKC axis may directly influence nuclear function within the kidney through a redox sensitive pathway.

  10. Promotion of adipogenesis by an EP2 receptor agonist via stimulation of angiogenesis in pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Takao; Yamaguchi, Kazuhiro; Kikuchi, Ryota; Itoh, Masayuki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Nagai, Atsushi; Aoshiba, Kazutetsu

    2014-08-01

    Body weight loss is a common manifestation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), particularly those with severe emphysema. Adipose angiogenesis is a key mediator of adipogenesis and use of pro-angiogenic agents may serve as a therapeutic option for lean COPD patients. Since angiogenesis is stimulated by PGE2, we examined whether ONO-AE1-259, a selective E-prostanoid (EP) 2 receptor agonist, might promote adipose angiogenesis and adipogenesis in a murine model of elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema (EIE mice). Mice were intratracheally instilled with elastase or saline, followed after 4 weeks by intraperitoneal administration of ONO-AE1-259 for 4 weeks. The subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) weight decreased in the EIE mice, whereas in the EIE mice treated with ONO-AE1-259, the SAT weight was largely restored, which was associated with significant increases in SAT adipogenesis, angiogenesis, and VEGF protein production. In contrast, ONO-AE1-259 administration induced no alteration in the weight of the visceral adipose tissue. These results suggest that in EIE mice, ONO-AE1-259 stimulated adipose angiogenesis possibly via VEGF production, and thence, adipogenesis. Our data pave the way for the development of therapeutic interventions for weight loss in emphysema patients, e.g., use of pro-angiogenic agents targeting the adipose tissue vascular component. PMID:24911647

  11. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated stimulation of retinal ganglion cell photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, Puneet; Hartwick, Andrew T E

    2016-09-01

    Melanopsin-dependent phototransduction in intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) involves a Gq-coupled phospholipase C (PLC) signaling cascade. Acetylcholine, released in the mammalian retina by starburst amacrine cells, can also activate Gq-PLC pathways through certain muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). Using multielectrode array recordings of rat retinas, we demonstrate that robust spiking responses can be evoked in neonatal and adult ipRGCs after bath application of the muscarinic agonist carbachol. The stimulatory action of carbachol on ipRGCs was a direct effect, as confirmed through calcium imaging experiments on isolated ipRGCs in purified cultures. Using flickering (6 Hz) yellow light stimuli at irradiances below the threshold for melanopsin activation, spiking responses could be elicited in ipRGCs that were suppressed by mAChR antagonism. Therefore, this work identified a novel melanopsin-independent pathway for stimulating sustained spiking in ganglion cell photoreceptors. This mAChR-mediated pathway could enhance ipRGC spiking responses in conditions known to evoke retinal acetylcholine release, such as those involving flickering or moving visual stimuli. Furthermore, this work identifies a pharmacological approach for light-independent ipRGC stimulation that could be targeted by mAChR agonists. PMID:27055770

  12. Enhanced emotional empathy after mineralocorticoid receptor stimulation in women with borderline personality disorder and healthy women.

    PubMed

    Wingenfeld, Katja; Kuehl, Linn K; Janke, Katrin; Hinkelmann, Kim; Dziobek, Isabel; Fleischer, Juliane; Otte, Christian; Roepke, Stefan

    2014-07-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is highly expressed in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. MR have an important role in appraisal processes and in modulating stress-associated emotional reactions but it is not known whether the MR affects empathy. Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by disturbed emotion regulation and alterations in empathy. In the current study, we examined whether stimulation of the MR enhances empathy in patients with BPD and healthy individuals. In a placebo-controlled study, we randomized 38 women with BPD and without psychotropic medication, and 35 healthy women to either placebo or 0.4 mg fludrocortisone, an MR agonist. Subsequently, all participants underwent two tests of social cognition, the Multifaceted Empathy Test (MET) and the Movie for the Assessment of Social Cognition (MASC), measuring cognitive and emotional facets of empathy. Eighteen BPD patients and 18 healthy women received placebo, whereas 20 BPD patients and 17 healthy women received fludrocortisone. In the MET, fludrocortisone enhanced emotional empathy across groups, whereas cognitive empathy was not affected. In the MASC, no effect of fludrocortisone could be revealed. In both tests, BPD patients and healthy women did not differ significantly in cognitive and emotional empathy and in their response to fludrocortisone. Stimulation of MR enhanced emotional empathy in healthy women and in BPD patients. Whether fludrocortisone might have a therapeutic role in psychotherapeutic processes, remains to be elucidated. PMID:24535100

  13. Tamoxifen stimulates in vivo growth of drug-resistant estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Maenpaa, J; Wiebe, V; Koester, S; Wurz, G; Emshoff, V; Seymour, R; Sipila, P; DeGregorio, M

    1993-01-01

    An estrogen receptor-negative, multidrug-resistant MDA-MB-A1 human breast cancer cell line was grown in culture with and without a noninhibitory concentration (0.5 microM) of tamoxifen for 122 days. Tamoxifen-treated and control cells were inoculated into opposite flanks of nine nude mice, where they produced measurable tumors in every case. Six of the animals were treated with tamoxifen at 500 micrograms/day for 22 days. Although no inhibitory nor stimulatory effect of tamoxifen was seen in vitro, tamoxifen had a clear tumor-growth-stimulating effect in mice. The most pronounced stimulatory effects were observed in the cells that had been cultured with tamoxifen. Within 3 weeks of the start of tamoxifen therapy, the cells grown in the presence of tamoxifen produced tumors with a mean size of 380 mm2, whereas the cells not pretreated with tamoxifen had tumors of 220 mm2. In contrast, in mice not receiving tamoxifen, the sizes of the tumors were 190 and 140 mm2, respectively. These preliminary results suggest that prolonged in vitro tamoxifen exposure induces cellular changes that result in tumors that are stimulated to grow faster in mice following tamoxifen treatment. PMID:8339392

  14. Adenosine A(1), A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) receptors in hematopoiesis. 1. Expression of receptor mRNA in four mouse hematopoietic precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Streitová, D; Sefc, L; Savvulidi, F; Pospísil, M; Holá, J; Hofer, M

    2010-01-01

    Four mouse bone marrow or thymus cell populations, namely granulopoietic/monocytopoietic, erythropoietic, B-lymphopoietic, and T-lymphopoietic precursor cells have been assayed by RT-PCR technique for the presence and relative amounts of adenosine A(1), A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) receptor mRNA. It has been found that (i) all four populations studied express all four adenosine receptor subtypes, (ii) the A(1), receptor is the least expressed in all populations studied, (iii) the A(3) receptor is markedly expressed in the populations of granulopoietic/monocytopoietic and erythropoietic cells, (iv) the A(2a) receptor is markedly expressed in the populations of B-lymphopoietic and T-lymphopoietic cells, and v) the A(2b) receptor does not predominate in any of the precursor cells studied. Our data offer a new possibility for the assessment of the readiness of these cells to respond, by receptor-mediated mechanisms, to adenosine or its analogs present in the tissues as a result of endogenous processes and/or following their administration. PMID:19249907

  15. The Therapeutic Potential of Toll-like Receptor 7 Stimulation in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Matthew G.; Kaufman, Elad H.; Fryer, Allison D.; Jacoby, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory disorder of the airways frequently characterized by an excessive Th2 adaptive immune response. Activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-7, a single-stranded viral RNA receptor that is highly expressed in the airways, triggers a rapid innate immune response and favors a subsequent Th1 response. Because of this role in pulmonary immunoregulation, TLR7 has gained considerable interest as a therapeutic target in asthma. Synthetic TLR7 ligands, including the imidazoquinolines imiquimod (R837) and resiquimod (R848), and 8-hydroxyadenine derivatives have been developed for other clinical indications. TLR7 activation prevents ovalbumin-induced airway hyperreactivity, eosinophilic inflammation, goblet cell hyperplasia and airway remodeling in murine models of asthma. TLR7 activation also inhibits viral replication in the lung and prevents virus-induced airway hyperreactivity. Furthermore, it has recently been shown that stimulating TLR7 rapidly relaxes airway smooth muscle, dilating the airways. This bronchodilating effect, which occurs in seconds to minutes and depends on rapid production of nitric oxide, indicates that TLR7 can signal via previously unrecognized pathways. The effects of decreasing the allergic Th2 response, acting as an immediate bronchodilator, and promoting an antiviral immune environment, make TLR7 an attractive drug target. We examine the current understanding of TLR7 as a therapeutic target and its translation to asthma treatment in humans. PMID:23078048

  16. Monte Carlo loop refinement and virtual screening of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor transmembrane domain

    PubMed Central

    Ali, M. Rejwan; Latif, Rauf; Davies, Terry F.; Mezei, Mihaly

    2015-01-01

    Metropolis Monte Carlo (MMC) loop refinement has been performed on the three extracellular loops (ECLs) of rhodopsin and opsin-based homology models of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor transmembrane domain, a class A type G protein-coupled receptor. The Monte Carlo sampling technique, employing torsion angles of amino acid side chains and local moves for the six consecutive backbone torsion angles, has previously reproduced the conformation of several loops with known crystal structures with accuracy consistently less than 2 Å. A grid-based potential map, which includes van der Waals, electrostatics, hydrophobic as well as hydrogen-bond potentials for bulk protein environment and the solvation effect, has been used to significantly reduce the computational cost of energy evaluation. A modified sigmoidal distance-dependent dielectric function has been implemented in conjunction with the desolvation and hydrogen-bonding terms. A long high-temperature simulation with 2 kcal/mol repulsion potential resulted in extensive sampling of the conformational space. The slow annealing leading to the low-energy structures predicted secondary structure by the MMC technique. Molecular docking with the reported agonist reproduced the binding site within 1.5 Å. Virtual screening performed on the three lowest structures showed that the ligand-binding mode in the inter-helical region is dependent on the ECL conformations. PMID:25012978

  17. Development of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Receptor Binding Probes to Image Ovarian Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chung-Wein; Guo, Lili; Matei, Daniela; Stantz, Keith

    2015-01-01

    The Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Receptor (FSHR) is used as an imaging biomarker for the detection of ovarian cancer (OC). FSHR is highly expressed on ovarian tumors and involved with cancer development and metastatic signaling pathways. A decapeptide specific to the FSHR extracellular domain is synthesized and conjugated to fluorescent dyes to image OC cells in vitro and tumors xenograft model in vivo. The in vitro binding curve and the average number of FSHR per cell are obtained for OVCAR-3 cells by a high resolution flow cytometer. For the decapeptide, the measured EC50 was 160 μM and the average number of receptors per cell was 1.7 × 107. The decapeptide molecular imaging probe reached a maximum tumor to muscle ratio five hours after intravenous injection and a dose-dependent plateau after 24–48 hours. These results indicate the potential application of a small molecular weight imaging probe specific to ovarian cancer through binding to FSHR. Based on these results, multimeric constructs are being developed to optimize binding to ovarian cells and tumors. PMID:26779384

  18. Progesterone stimulates respiration through a central nervous system steroid receptor-mediated mechanism in cat.

    PubMed Central

    Bayliss, D A; Millhorn, D E; Gallman, E A; Cidlowski, J A

    1987-01-01

    We have examined the effect on respiration of the steroid hormone progesterone, administered either intravenously or directly into the medulla oblongata in anesthetized and paralyzed male and female cats. The carotid sinus and vagus nerves were cut, and end-tidal PCO2 and temperature were kept constant with servo-controllers. Phrenic nerve activity was used to quantitate central respiratory activity. Repeated doses of progesterone (from 0.1 to 2.0 micrograms/kg, cumulative) caused a sustained (greater than 45 min) facilitation of phrenic nerve activity in female and male cats; however, the response was much more variable in females. Progesterone injected into the region of nucleus tractus solitarii, a respiratory-related area in the medulla oblongata, also caused a prolonged stimulation of respiration. Progesterone administration at high concentration by both routes also caused a substantial hypotension. Identical i.v. doses of other classes of steroid hormones (17 beta-estradiol, testosterone, and cortisol) did not elicit the same respiratory effect. Pretreatment with RU 486, a progesterone-receptor antagonist, blocked the facilitatory effect of progesterone. We conclude that progesterone acts centrally through a steroid receptor-mediated mechanism to facilitate respiration. PMID:3478727

  19. Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone down-regulates CXC receptors through activation of neutrophil elastase.

    PubMed

    Manna, Sunil K; Sarkar, Abira; Sreenivasan, Yashin

    2006-03-01

    Considering the role of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in a large number of acute and chronic inflammatory diseases, the regulation of IL-8-mediated biological responses is important. Alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH), a tridecapeptide, inhibits most forms of inflammation by an unknown mechanism. In the present study, we have found that alpha-MSH interacts predominantly with melanocortin-1 receptors and inhibits several IL-8-induced biological responses in macrophages and neutrophils. It down-regulated receptors for IL-8 but not for TNF, IL-4, IL-13 or TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in neutrophils. It down-regulated CXCR type 1 and 2 but not mRNA levels. alpha-MSH did not inhibit IL-8 binding in purified cell membrane or affinity-purified CXCR. IL-8 or anti-CXCR Ab protected against alpha-MSH-mediated inhibition of IL-8 binding. The level of neutrophil elastase, a specific serine protease, but not cathepsin G or proteinase 3 increased in alpha-MSH-treated cells, and restoration of CXCR by specific neutrophil elastase or serine protease inhibitors indicates the involvement of elastase in alpha-MSH-induced down-regulation of CXCR. These studies suggest that alpha-MSH inhibits IL-8-mediated biological responses by down-regulating CXCR through induction of serine protease and that alpha-MSH acts as a potent immunomodulator in neutrophil-driven inflammatory distress. PMID:16479540

  20. Monte Carlo loop refinement and virtual screening of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor transmembrane domain.

    PubMed

    Ali, M Rejwan; Latif, Rauf; Davies, Terry F; Mezei, Mihaly

    2015-01-01

    Metropolis Monte Carlo (MMC) loop refinement has been performed on the three extracellular loops (ECLs) of rhodopsin and opsin-based homology models of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor transmembrane domain, a class A type G protein-coupled receptor. The Monte Carlo sampling technique, employing torsion angles of amino acid side chains and local moves for the six consecutive backbone torsion angles, has previously reproduced the conformation of several loops with known crystal structures with accuracy consistently less than 2 Å. A grid-based potential map, which includes van der Waals, electrostatics, hydrophobic as well as hydrogen-bond potentials for bulk protein environment and the solvation effect, has been used to significantly reduce the computational cost of energy evaluation. A modified sigmoidal distance-dependent dielectric function has been implemented in conjunction with the desolvation and hydrogen-bonding terms. A long high-temperature simulation with 2 kcal/mol repulsion potential resulted in extensive sampling of the conformational space. The slow annealing leading to the low-energy structures predicted secondary structure by the MMC technique. Molecular docking with the reported agonist reproduced the binding site within 1.5 Å. Virtual screening performed on the three lowest structures showed that the ligand-binding mode in the inter-helical region is dependent on the ECL conformations. PMID:25012978

  1. Progesterone stimulates respiration through a central nervous system steroid receptor-mediated mechanism in cat.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, D A; Millhorn, D E; Gallman, E A; Cidlowski, J A

    1987-11-01

    We have examined the effect on respiration of the steroid hormone progesterone, administered either intravenously or directly into the medulla oblongata in anesthetized and paralyzed male and female cats. The carotid sinus and vagus nerves were cut, and end-tidal PCO2 and temperature were kept constant with servo-controllers. Phrenic nerve activity was used to quantitate central respiratory activity. Repeated doses of progesterone (from 0.1 to 2.0 micrograms/kg, cumulative) caused a sustained (greater than 45 min) facilitation of phrenic nerve activity in female and male cats; however, the response was much more variable in females. Progesterone injected into the region of nucleus tractus solitarii, a respiratory-related area in the medulla oblongata, also caused a prolonged stimulation of respiration. Progesterone administration at high concentration by both routes also caused a substantial hypotension. Identical i.v. doses of other classes of steroid hormones (17 beta-estradiol, testosterone, and cortisol) did not elicit the same respiratory effect. Pretreatment with RU 486, a progesterone-receptor antagonist, blocked the facilitatory effect of progesterone. We conclude that progesterone acts centrally through a steroid receptor-mediated mechanism to facilitate respiration. PMID:3478727

  2. Activation of macrophages stimulated by the bengkoang fiber extract through toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Kumalasari, Ika Dyah; Nishi, Kosuke; Putra, Agus Budiawan Naro; Sugahara, Takuya

    2014-07-25

    Bengkoang (Pachyrhizus erosus (L.) Urban) is an edible root tuber containing fairly large amounts of carbohydrates and crude fibers. Our previous studies showed that the bengkoang fiber extract (BFE) stimulates activation of macrophages, leading to induction of phagocytotic activity and cytokine production. In the present study we investigated the mechanism underlying activation of murine macrophages by BFE. BFE increased production of TNF-α, IL-6, and nitric oxide by J774.1 cells. In addition BFE also facilitated the gene expression levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase. We examined the effect of a TLR4 inhibitor on cytokine production to investigate the membrane receptor of macrophage activation by BFE. Treatment of J774.1 cells with the TLR4 inhibitor significantly inhibited production of IL-6 and TNF-α, suggesting that TLR4 is the target membrane receptor for BFE. The main signal molecules located downstream of TLR4 such as JNK, p38, ERK, and NF-κB were activated by BFE treatment. The immunostimulatory effect of BFE was cancelled by the pectinase treatment, suggesting that the active ingredient in BFE is pectin-like molecules. Overall results suggested that BFE activates J774.1 cells via the MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:24770453

  3. Iron Mediates N-Methyl-d-aspartate Receptor-dependent Stimulation of Calcium-induced Pathways and Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity*

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Pablo; Humeres, Alexis; Elgueta, Claudio; Kirkwood, Alfredo; Hidalgo, Cecilia; Núñez, Marco T.

    2011-01-01

    Iron deficiency hinders hippocampus-dependent learning processes and impairs cognitive performance, but current knowledge on the molecular mechanisms underlying the unique role of iron in neuronal function is sparse. Here, we investigated the participation of iron on calcium signal generation and ERK1/2 stimulation induced by the glutamate agonist N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA), and the effects of iron addition/chelation on hippocampal basal synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation (LTP). Addition of NMDA to primary hippocampal cultures elicited persistent calcium signals that required functional NMDA receptors and were independent of calcium influx through L-type calcium channels or α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors; NMDA also promoted ERK1/2 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. Iron chelation with desferrioxamine or inhibition of ryanodine receptor (RyR)-mediated calcium release with ryanodine-reduced calcium signal duration and prevented NMDA-induced ERK1/2 activation. Iron addition to hippocampal neurons readily increased the intracellular labile iron pool and stimulated reactive oxygen species production; the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine or the hydroxyl radical trapper MCI-186 prevented these responses. Iron addition to primary hippocampal cultures kept in calcium-free medium elicited calcium signals and stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation; RyR inhibition abolished these effects. Iron chelation decreased basal synaptic transmission in hippocampal slices, inhibited iron-induced synaptic stimulation, and impaired sustained LTP in hippocampal CA1 neurons induced by strong stimulation. In contrast, iron addition facilitated sustained LTP induction after suboptimal tetanic stimulation. Together, these results suggest that hippocampal neurons require iron to generate RyR-mediated calcium signals after NMDA receptor stimulation, which in turn promotes ERK1/2 activation, an essential step of sustained LTP. PMID:21296883

  4. δ-Opioid receptors stimulate the metabolic sensor AMP-activated protein kinase through coincident signaling with G(q/11)-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Olianas, Maria C; Dedoni, Simona; Olianas, Alessandra; Onali, Pierluigi

    2012-02-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and δ-opioid receptors (DORs) are both involved in controlling cell survival, energy metabolism, and food intake, but little is known on the interaction between these two signaling molecules. Here we show that activation of human DORs stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells increased AMPK activity and AMPK phosphorylation on Thr172. DOR-induced AMPK phosphorylation was prevented by pertussis toxin, reduced by protein kinase A (PKA) activators, and unaffected by PKA, transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase 1, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and protein kinase C inhibitors. Conversely, the DOR effect was reduced by Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK) inhibition, apyrase treatment, G(q/11) antagonism, and blockade of P2 purinergic receptors. Apyrase treatment also depressed DOR stimulation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, whereas P2 receptor antagonism blocked DOR stimulation of inositol phosphate accumulation. In SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and primary olfactory bulb neurons, DOR activation failed to affect AMPK phosphorylation per se but potentiated the stimulation by either muscarinic agonists or 2-methyl-thio-ADP. Sequestration of G protein βγ subunits (Gβγ) blocked the DOR potentiation of AMPK phosphorylation induced by oxotremorine-M. In CHO cells, the AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide1-β-D-ribonucleoside stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and glucose uptake, whereas pharmacological inhibition of AMPK, expression of a dominant-negative mutant of AMPKα1, and P2Y receptor blockade reduced DOR-stimulated glucose uptake. The data indicate that in different cell systems, DOR activation up-regulates AMPK through a Gβγ-dependent synergistic interaction with G(q/11)-coupled receptors, potentiating Ca(2+) release and CaMKKβ-dependent AMPK phosphorylation. In CHO cells, this coincident signaling mechanism is involved in DOR-induced glucose uptake. PMID:22031472

  5. Ceramide stimulates ABCA12 expression via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {delta} in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan J; Uchida, Yoshikazu; Lu, Biao; Kim, Peggy; Mao, Cungui; Akiyama, Masashi; Elias, Peter M; Holleran, Walter M; Grunfeld, Carl; Feingold, Kenneth R

    2009-07-10

    ABCA12 (ATP binding cassette transporter, family 12) is a cellular membrane transporter that facilitates the delivery of glucosylceramides to epidermal lamellar bodies in keratinocytes, a process that is critical for permeability barrier formation. Following secretion of lamellar bodies into the stratum corneum, glucosylceramides are metabolized to ceramides, which comprise approximately 50% of the lipid in stratum corneum. Gene mutations of ABCA12 underlie harlequin ichthyosis, a devastating skin disorder characterized by abnormal lamellar bodies and a severe barrier abnormality. Recently we reported that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) and liver X receptor activators increase ABCA12 expression in human keratinocytes. Here we demonstrate that ceramide (C(2)-Cer and C(6)-Cer), but not C(8)-glucosylceramides, sphingosine, or ceramide 1-phosphate, increases ABCA12 mRNA expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Inhibitors of glucosylceramide synthase, sphingomyelin synthase, and ceramidase and small interfering RNA knockdown of human alkaline ceramidase, which all increase endogenous ceramide levels, also increased ABCA12 mRNA levels. Moreover, simultaneous treatment with C(6)-Cer and each of these same inhibitors additively increased ABCA12 expression, indicating that ceramide is an important inducer of ABCA12 expression and that the conversion of ceramide to other sphingolipids or metabolites is not required. Finally, both exogenous and endogenous ceramides preferentially stimulate PPARdelta expression (but not other PPARs or liver X receptors), whereas PPARdelta knockdown by siRNA transfection specifically diminished the ceramide-induced increase in ABCA12 mRNA levels, indicating that PPARdelta is a mediator of the ceramide effect. Together, these results show that ceramide, an important lipid component of epidermis, up-regulates ABCA12 expression via the PPARdelta-mediated signaling pathway, providing a substrate-driven, feed

  6. Nitric oxide stimulates the proliferation of neural stem cells bypassing the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Bruno Pereira; Morte, Maria Inês; Inácio, Angela; Costa, Gabriel; Rosmaninho-Salgado, Joana; Agasse, Fabienne; Carmo, Anália; Couceiro, Patrícia; Brundin, Patrik; Ambrósio, António Francisco; Carvalho, Caetana Monteiro; Araújo, Inês Maria

    2010-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) was described to inhibit the proliferation of neural stem cells. Some evidence suggests that NO, under certain conditions, can also promote cell proliferation, although the mechanisms responsible for a potential proliferative effect of NO in neural stem cells have remained unaddressed. In this work, we investigated and characterized the proliferative effect of NO in cell cultures obtained from the mouse subventricular zone. We found that the NO donor NOC-18 (10 microM) increased cell proliferation, whereas higher concentrations (100 microM) inhibited cell proliferation. Increased cell proliferation was detected rapidly following exposure to NO and was prevented by blocking the mitogen-activated kinase (MAPK) pathway, independently of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. Downstream of the EGF receptor, NO activated p21Ras and the MAPK pathway, resulting in a decrease in the nuclear presence of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1, p27(KIP1), allowing for cell cycle progression. Furthermore, in a mouse model that shows increased proliferation of neural stem cells in the hippocampus following seizure injury, we observed that the absence of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS(-/-) mice) prevented the increase in cell proliferation observed following seizures in wild-type mice, showing that NO from iNOS origin is important for increased cell proliferation following a brain insult. Overall, we show that NO is able to stimulate the proliferation of neural stem cells bypassing the EGF receptor and promoting cell division. Moreover, under pathophysiological conditions in vivo, NO from iNOS origin also promotes proliferation in the hippocampus. PMID:20506358

  7. Insulin Receptor Substrate 1, the Hub Linking Follicle-stimulating Hormone to Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Activation.

    PubMed

    Law, Nathan C; Hunzicker-Dunn, Mary E

    2016-02-26

    The ubiquitous phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway regulates many cellular functions. However, the mechanism by which G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) signal to activate PI3K is poorly understood. We have used ovarian granulosa cells as a model to investigate this pathway, based on evidence that the GPCR agonist follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) promotes the protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) on tyrosine residues that activate PI3K. We report that in the absence of FSH, granulosa cells secrete a subthreshold concentration of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) that primes the IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) but fails to promote tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS1. FSH via PKA acts to sensitize IRS1 to the tyrosine kinase activity of the IGF-1R by activating protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) to promote dephosphorylation of inhibitory Ser/Thr residues on IRS1, including Ser(789). Knockdown of PP1β blocks the ability of FSH to activate PI3K in the presence of endogenous IGF-1. Activation of PI3K thus requires both PKA-mediated relief of IRS1 inhibition and IGF-1R-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS1. Treatment with FSH and increasing concentrations of exogenous IGF-1 triggers synergistic IRS1 tyrosine phosphorylation at PI3K-activating residues that persists downstream through protein kinase B (AKT) and FOXO1 (forkhead box protein O1) to drive synergistic expression of genes that underlies follicle maturation. Based on the ability of GPCR agonists to synergize with IGFs to enhance gene expression in other cell types, PP1 activation to relieve IRS1 inhibition may be a more general mechanism by which GPCRs act with the IGF-1R to activate PI3K/AKT. PMID:26702053

  8. Vasopressin/V2 receptor stimulates renin synthesis in the collecting duct.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Alexis A; Cifuentes-Araneda, Flavia; Ibaceta-Gonzalez, Cristobal; Gonzalez-Vergara, Alex; Zamora, Leonardo; Henriquez, Ricardo; Rosales, Carla B; Navar, L Gabriel; Prieto, Minolfa C

    2016-02-15

    Renin is synthesized in the principal cells of the collecting duct (CD), and its production is increased via cAMP in angiotensin (ANG) II-dependent hypertension, despite suppression of juxtaglomerular (JG) renin. Vasopressin, one of the effector hormones of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) via the type 2-receptor (V2R), activates the cAMP/PKA/cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) pathway and aquaporin-2 expression in principal cells of the CD. Accordingly, we hypothesized that activation of V2R increases renin synthesis via PKA/CREB, independently of ANG II type 1 (AT1) receptor activation in CD cells. Desmopressin (DDAVP; 10(-6) M), a selective V2R agonist, increased renin mRNA (∼3-fold), prorenin (∼1.5-fold), and renin (∼2-fold) in cell lysates and cell culture media in the M-1 CD cell line. Cotreatment with DDAVP+H89 (PKA inhibitor) or CREB short hairpin (sh) RNA prevented this response. H89 also blunted DDAVP-induced CREB phosphorylation and nuclear localization. In 48-h water-deprived (WD) mice, prorenin-renin protein levels were increased in the renal inner medulla (∼1.4- and 1.8-fold). In WD mice treated with an ACE inhibitor plus AT1 receptor blockade, renin mRNA and prorenin protein levels were still higher than controls, while renin protein content was not changed. In M-1 cells, ANG II or DDAVP increased prorenin-renin protein levels; however, there were no further increases by combined treatment. These results indicate that in the CD the activation of the V2R stimulates renin synthesis via the PKA/CREB pathway independently of RAS, suggesting a critical role for vasopressin in the regulation of renin in the CD. PMID:26608789

  9. Homeobox A7 stimulates breast cancer cell proliferation by up-regulating estrogen receptor-alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Huang, He-Feng; Leung, Peter C.K.

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •HOXA7 regulates MCF7 cell proliferation. •HOXA7 up-regulates ERα expression. •HOXA7 mediates estrogen-induced MCF7 cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Breast cancer is the most common hormone-dependent malignancy in women. Homeobox (HOX) transcription factors regulate many cellular functions, including cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. The aberrant expression of HOX genes has been reported to be associated with human reproductive cancers. Estradiol (E2) and its nuclear receptors, estrogen receptor (ER)-alpha and ER-beta, are known to play critical roles in the regulation of breast cancer cell growth. However, an understanding of the potential relationship between HOXA7 and ER in breast cancer cells is limited. In this study, our results demonstrate that knockdown of HOXA7 in MCF7 cells significantly decreased cell proliferation and ERα expression. In addition, HOXA7 knockdown attenuated E2-induced cell proliferation as well as progesterone receptor (PR) expression. The stimulatory effects of E2 on cell proliferation and PR expression were abolished by co-treatment with ICI 182780, a selective ERα antagonist. In contrast, overexpression of HOXA7 significantly stimulated cell proliferation and ERα expression. Moreover, E2-induced cell proliferation, as well as PR expression, was enhanced by the overexpression of HOXA7. Neither knockdown nor overexpression of HOXA7 affected the ER-beta levels. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanistic role for HOXA7 in modulating breast cancer cell proliferation via regulation of ERα expression. This finding contributes to our understanding of the role HOXA7 plays in regulating the proliferation of ER-positive cancer cells.

  10. Icariin Stimulates Differentiation and Suppresses Adipocytic Transdifferentiation of Primary Osteoblasts Through Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dawei; Fong, Chichun; Jia, Zhenbin; Cui, Liao; Yao, Xinsheng; Yang, Mengsu

    2016-08-01

    Icariin, the main constituent of Herba Epimedii, appears to be a promising alternative to classic drugs used to treat osteoporosis. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms of its action and the role of icariin in the cross-talk between osteoblasts and adipocytes remain unclear. The present study was designed to investigate the gene expression profile of primary osteoblasts in the presence of icariin, and the effects of icariin on the differentiation and adipogenic transdifferentiation of osteoblasts. Cellular and molecular markers expressed during osteoblastic differentiation were assessed by cytochemical analysis, real-time quantitative PCR, Western blotting, and cDNA microarray analysis. Results indicated that icariin up-regulated the expression of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), bone morphogenetic protein 2 (Bmp2), and collagen type 1 (Col1) genes, and down-regulated the expression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (Pparg) and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (Cebpb) genes. These effects were blocked by ICI 182,780, suggesting that icariin may be acting via the estrogen receptor (ER). Results also demonstrated that the ratio of osteoprotegerin (Opg)/receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (Rankl) expression was up-regulated following treatment with icariin. In total, osteoblastic gene expression profile analysis suggested that 33 genes were affected by icariin; these could be sub-divided into nine functional categories. It appears that icariin could stimulate the differentiation and mineralization of osteoblasts, regulate the differentiation of osteoclasts, and inhibit the adipogenic transdifferentiation of osteoblasts, therefore increasing the number of osteoblasts undergoing differentiation to mature osteoblasts, via an ER-mediated pathway. In summary, icariin may exhibit beneficial effects on bone health, especially for patients with osteoporosis and obesity. PMID:27061090

  11. Role of CRF receptor 1 in central CRF-induced stimulation of colonic propulsion in rats.

    PubMed

    Martínez, V; Taché, Y

    2001-03-01

    The CRF receptor subtype mediating the colonic and gastric motor responses to central CRF was investigated in conscious rats. CRF (0.6 microg/rat) injected intracerebroventicularly (i.c.v.) or 1 h water avoidance stress stimulated defecation (pellet/60 min: 4.1+/-1.0 and 8.7+/-0.7 respectively vs. 0.3+/-0.3 in i.c.v. vehicle/no stress). The CRF receptor 1 (CRF-R1) antagonist, NBI-27914 (50-100 microg/rat) injected i.c.v., abolished the colonic response to i.c.v. CRF and dose-dependently reduced that induced by water avoidance stress. NBI-27914 (100 microg/rat) injected peripherally did not influence the defecatory response to stress. The peptide CRF-R1/R2 antagonist, astressin (10 microg/rat, i.c.v.) inhibited the colonic motor response to i.c.v. CRF and stress similarly as NBI-27914 injected i.c.v. at 100 microg/rat. Intracisternal (i.c.) injection of astressin (10 microg/rat) also completely prevented CRF (0.6 g, i.c.)-induced delayed gastric emptying while i.c. NBI-27914 (50 or 100 microg) had no effect. These results indicate a differential role of central CRF receptor subtypes in the colonic stimulatory and gastric inhibitory motor responses to central CRF and that the CRF component of stress-related activation of colonic expulsion is primarily mediated by CRF-R1. PMID:11222989

  12. Regulation of surface expression of the granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor in normal human myeloid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cannistra, S.A.; Groshek, P.; Griffin, J.D. ); Garlick, R.; Miller, J. )

    1990-01-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) exerts stimulatory effects on hematopoietic cells through binding to specific, high-affinity receptors. By using radiolabeled GM-CSF with high specific activity, the authors have investigated the factors and mechanisms that regulate GM-CSF receptor expression in normal human neutrophils, monocytes, and partially purified bone marrow myeloid progenitor cells. The neutrophil GM-CSF receptor was found to rapidly internalize in the presence of ligand through a mechanism that required endocytosis. Out of a large panel of naturally occurring humoral factors tested, only GM-CSF itself, tumor necrosis factor, and formyl-Met-Leu-Phe were found to down-regulate neutrophil GM-CSF receptor expression after a 2-hr exposure at biologically active concentrations. Since formyl-Met-Leu-Phe is known to stimulate neutrophil protein kinase C activity, they also tested the ability of protein kinase C agonists to modulate GM-CSF receptor expression. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, bryostatin-1, and 1,2-dioctanoylglycerol were found to induce rapid down-regulation of the GM-CSF receptor in neutrophils, monocytes, and partially purified myeloid progenitor cells, suggesting that this effect may be at least partially mediated by protein kinase C. These data suggest that certain activators of neutrophil function may negatively regulate their biological effects by inducing down-regulation of the GM-CSF receptor.

  13. Effects of left atrial receptor stimulation on carotid chemoreceptor-induced renal responses in dogs.

    PubMed

    Karim, F; al-Obaidi, M

    1992-10-01

    1. Dogs were anaesthetized with thiopentone sodium and alpha-chloralose and artificially ventilated. The carotid sinus regions were vascularly isolated and perfused with arterial or venous blood to stimulate the chemoreceptors. Left atrial receptors were stimulated by distending four balloons, three in the left pulmonary vein-atrial junctions and one in the left atrial appendage. Mean aortic pressure was held constant by means of a pressure control device. Atenolol and atropine (2.0 and 0.5 mg kg-1, respectively), and gallamine triethiodide (3.0 mg kg-1 h-1) were given I.V. Renal blood flow was measured by an electromagnetic flowmeter, glomerular filtration rate by creatinine clearance, urinary sodium by flame photometry and solute excretion by osmometry. 2. In fifteen tests in eight dogs (in one dog responses of both left and right kidneys were determined), at a constant aortic pressure (AoP) of 92.0 +/- 3.2 mmHg, and carotid sinus pressure (CSP) of 95.0 +/- 2.0 mmHg, stimulation of left atrial receptors with balloon inflation resulted in significant increases in renal blood flow (RBF) by 8.3 +/- 0.9 from 255.0 +/- 14.6 ml min-1 (100 g kidney weight)-1 (n = 9), in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) by 4.1 +/- 0.6 from 21.2 +/- 1.9 ml min-1 (100 g)-1, in filtration fraction (FF) by 0.04 +/- 0.003 from 0.20 +/- 0.01, in urine flow rate (V) by 0.08 +/- 0.02 from 0.33 +/- 0.05 ml min-1 (100 g)-1, in sodium excretion (UNaV) by 4.4 +/- 0.9 from 27.7 +/- 4.2 mumol min-1 (100 g)-1, in osmolar excretion (UosmV) by 62.0 +/- 5.6 from 303.0 +/- 28.3 mu osmol min-1 (100 g)-1, and in a decrease in free water clearance (CH2O) by 0.13 +/- 0.03 from -0.63 +/- 0.04 ml min-1 (100 g)-1. Left atrial pressure (LAP) and heart rate (HR) did not change significantly from 6.9 +/- 0.3 cmH2O, and 133.0 +/- 3.4 beats min-1 respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1293287

  14. Activation of transmembrane bile acid receptor TGR5 stimulates insulin secretion in pancreatic {beta} cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Divya P.; Rajagopal, Senthilkumar; Mahavadi, Sunila; Mirshahi, Faridoddin; Grider, John R.; Murthy, Karnam S.; Sanyal, Arun J.

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G protein coupled receptor TGR5 is expressed in mouse and human islets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGR5 is coupled to activation of Gs and Ca{sup 2+} release via cAMP/Epac/PLC-{epsilon} pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of TGR5 by bile salts and selective ligands causes insulin secretion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGR5 could be a potential therapeutic target to treat diabetes. -- Abstract: Bile acids act as signaling molecules and stimulate the G protein coupled receptor, TGR5, in addition to nuclear farnesoid X receptor to regulate lipid, glucose and energy metabolism. Bile acid induced activation of TGR5 in the enteroendocrine cells promotes glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) release, which has insulinotropic effect in the pancreatic {beta} cells. In the present study, we have identified the expression of TGR5 in pancreatic {beta} cell line MIN6 and also in mouse and human pancreatic islets. TGR5 selective ligands, oleanolic acid (OA) and INT-777 selectively activated G{alpha}{sub s} and caused an increase in intracellular cAMP and Ca{sup 2+}. OA and INT-777 also increased phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis and the increase was blocked by NF449 (a selective G{alpha}{sub s} inhibitor) or (U73122) (PI hydrolysis inhibitor). OA, INT-777 and lithocholic acid increased insulin release in MIN6 and human islets and the increase was inhibited by treatment with NF449, (U73122) or BAPTA-AM (chelator of calcium), but not with myristoylated PKI (PKA inhibitor), suggesting that the release is dependent on G{sub s}/cAMP/Ca{sup 2+} pathway. 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP, a cAMP analog, which activates Epac, but not PKA also stimulated PI hydrolysis. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the TGR5 expressed in the pancreatic {beta} cells regulates insulin secretion and highlights the importance of ongoing therapeutic strategies targeting TGR5 in the control of glucose homeostasis.

  15. Stimulation of serotonin-1A receptors in mammals to alleviate motion sickness and emesis induced by chemical agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucot, James B. (Inventor); Crampton, George H. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A method for the alleviation of both motion sickness and chemically-induced emesis is provided which includes the administration of a nontoxic, therapeutically effective amount of a composition which stimulates serotonin-1A receptors in a mammal in need of such treatment. The preferred compounds for use are buspirone and 8-hydroxy-2(di-n-propylamino)-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT).

  16. The Anti-Tumor Effect of A3 Adenosine Receptors Is Potentiated by Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields in Cultured Neural Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Targa, Martina; Corciulo, Carmen; Gessi, Stefania; Merighi, Stefania; Setti, Stefania; Cadossi, Ruggero; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2012-01-01

    A3 adenosine receptors (ARs) play a pivotal role in the development of cancer and their activation is involved in the inhibition of tumor growth. The effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) on cancer have been controversially discussed and the detailed mechanisms are not yet fully understood. In the past we have demonstrated that PEMFs increased A2A and A3AR density and functionality in human neutrophils, human and bovine synoviocytes, and bovine chondrocytes. In the same cells, PEMF exposure increased the anti-inflammatory effect mediated by A2A and/or A3ARs. The primary aim of the present study was to evaluate if PEMF exposure potentiated the anti-tumor effect of A3ARs in PC12 rat adrenal pheochromocytoma and U87MG human glioblastoma cell lines in comparison with rat cortical neurons. Saturation binding assays and mRNA analysis revealed that PEMF exposure up-regulated A2A and A3ARs that are well coupled to adenylate cyclase activity and cAMP production. The activation of A2A and A3ARs resulted in the decrease of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB) levels in tumor cells, whilst only A3ARs are involved in the increase of p53 expression. A3AR stimulation mediated an inhibition of tumor cell proliferation evaluated by thymidine incorporation. An increase of cytotoxicity by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and apoptosis by caspase-3 activation in PC12 and U87MG cells, but not in cortical neurons, was observed following A3AR activation. The effect of the A3AR agonist in tumor cells was enhanced in the presence of PEMFs and blocked by using a well-known selective antagonist. Together these results demonstrated that PEMF exposure significantly increases the anti-tumor effect modulated by A3ARs. PMID:22761760

  17. Serum amyloid A stimulates macrophage foam cell formation via lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 upregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ha Young; Kim, Sang Doo; Baek, Suk-Hwan; Choi, Joon Hyuk; Cho, Kyung-Hyun; Zabel, Brian A.; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. ► SAA stimulated upregulation of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1). ► SAA-induced LOX1 expression and foam cell formation is mediated by JNK/NF-κB signaling. ► HDL-conjugated SAA also stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 upregulation. ► The finding reveals a novel mechanism of action of SAA in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Elevated levels of serum amyloid A (SAA) is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, however, the role of SAA in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis remains unclear. Here we show that SAA induced macrophage foam cell formation. SAA-stimulated foam cell formation was mediated by c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. Moreover, both SAA and SAA-conjugated high density lipoprotein stimulated the expression of the important scavenger receptor lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX1) via nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). A LOX1 antagonist carrageenan significantly blocked SAA-induced foam cell formation, indicating that SAA promotes foam cell formation via LOX1 expression. Our findings therefore suggest that SAA stimulates foam cell formation via LOX1 induction, and thus likely contributes to atherogenesis.

  18. Dopamine D1 receptor stimulation modulates the formation and retrieval of novel object recognition memory: Role of the prelimbic cortex

    PubMed Central

    Pezze, Marie A.; Marshall, Hayley J.; Fone, Kevin C.F.; Cassaday, Helen J.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that dopamine D1 receptor antagonists impair novel object recognition memory but the effects of dopamine D1 receptor stimulation remain to be determined. This study investigated the effects of the selective dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF81297 on acquisition and retrieval in the novel object recognition task in male Wistar rats. SKF81297 (0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg s.c.) given 15 min before the sampling phase impaired novel object recognition evaluated 10 min or 24 h later. The same treatments also reduced novel object recognition memory tested 24 h after the sampling phase and when given 15 min before the choice session. These data indicate that D1 receptor stimulation modulates both the encoding and retrieval of object recognition memory. Microinfusion of SKF81297 (0.025 or 0.05 μg/side) into the prelimbic sub-region of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in this case 10 min before the sampling phase also impaired novel object recognition memory, suggesting that the mPFC is one important site mediating the effects of D1 receptor stimulation on visual recognition memory. PMID:26277743

  19. The mouse lp(A3)/Edg7 lysophosphatidic acid receptor gene: genomic structure, chromosomal localization, and expression pattern.

    PubMed

    Contos, J J; Chun, J

    2001-04-18

    The extracellular signaling molecule, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), mediates proliferative and morphological effects on cells and has been proposed to be involved in several biological processes including neuronal development, wound healing, and cancer progression. Three mammalian G protein-coupled receptors, encoded by genes designated lp (lysophospholipid) receptor or edg (endothelial differentiation gene), mediate the effects of LPA, activating similar (e.g. Ca(2+) release) as well as distinct (neurite retraction) responses. To understand the evolution and function of LPA receptor genes, we characterized lp(A3)/Edg7 in mouse and human and compared the expression pattern with the other two known LPA receptor genes (lp(A1)/Edg2 and lp(A2)/Edg4non-mutant). We found mouse and human lp(A3) to have nearly identical three-exon genomic structures, with introns upstream of the coding region for transmembrane domain (TMD) I and within the coding region for TMD VI. This structure is similar to lp(A1) and lp(A2), indicating a common ancestral gene with two introns. We localized mouse lp(A3) to distal Chromosome 3 near the varitint waddler (Va) gene, in a region syntenic with the human lp(A3) chromosomal location (1p22.3-31.1). We found highest expression levels of each of the three LPA receptor genes in adult mouse testes, relatively high expression levels of lp(A2) and lp(A3) in kidney, and moderate expression of lp(A2) and lp(A3) in lung. All lp(A) transcripts were expressed during brain development, with lp(A1) and lp(A2) transcripts expressed during the embryonic neurogenic period, and lp(A3) transcript during the early postnatal period. Our results indicate both overlapping as well as distinct functions of lp(A1), lp(A2), and lp(A3). PMID:11313151

  20. Endothelin receptor B protects granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor mRNA from degradation.

    PubMed

    Jungck, David; Knobloch, Jürgen; Körber, Sandra; Lin, Yingfeng; Konradi, Jürgen; Yanik, Sarah; Stoelben, Erich; Koch, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    Evidence is lacking on the differential effects of the two therapeutic concepts of endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs): the blockade of only the endothelin receptor A (ETAR; selective antagonism) versus both ETAR and endothelin receptor B (ETBR; dual blockade). Ambrisentan, a selective ERA, and bosentan, a dual blocker, are both available for therapy. We hypothesized that there are differences in the potential of ERAs to ameliorate inflammatory processes in human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) and aimed to unravel underlying mechanisms. We used HASMC culture, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) induced transcription and expression of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 2 (CXCL2), chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 3 (CXCL3), granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and matrix metalloproteinase 12 (MMP12) in HASMCs. In concentration-response experiments, bosentan led to a significantly greater reduction of GM-CSF and MMP12 protein release than ambrisentan, whereas there was no significant difference in their effect on GM-CSF and MMP12 mRNA. Both ERAs reduced CXCL3 protein and mRNA equally but had no effect on CXCL2. Blocking mitogen-activated protein kinases revealed that both ETAR and ETBR signal through p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, but ETBR also signals through extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 to induce GM-CSF expression. In the presence of the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D, bosentan, but not ambrisentan, reduced GM-CSF but not MMP12 or CXCL3 mRNA. In conclusion, blockade of each endothelin receptor subtype reduces GM-CSF transcription, but blocking ETBR additionally protects GM-CSF mRNA from degradation via ERK-1/2. Accordingly, blocking both ETAR and ETBR leads to a stronger reduction of TNFα-induced GM-CSF protein expression. This mechanism might be specific to GM-CSF. Our data stress the anti-inflammatory potential

  1. Blockage of A2A and A3 adenosine receptors decreases the desensitization of human GABAA receptors microtransplanted to Xenopus oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Roseti, Cristina; Palma, Eleonora; Martinello, Katiuscia; Fucile, Sergio; Morace, Roberta; Esposito, Vincenzo; Cantore, Gianpaolo; Arcella, Antonietta; Giangaspero, Felice; Aronica, Eleonora; Mascia, Addolorata; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Quarato, Pier Paolo; Manfredi, Mario; Cristalli, Gloria; Lambertucci, Catia; Marucci, Gabriella; Volpini, Rosaria; Limatola, Cristina; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2009-01-01

    We previously found that the endogenous anticonvulsant adenosine, acting through A2A and A3 adenosine receptors (ARs), alters the stability of currents (IGABA) generated by GABAA receptors expressed in the epileptic human mesial temporal lobe (MTLE). Here we examined whether ARs alter the stability (desensitization) of IGABA expressed in focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) and in periglioma epileptic tissues. The experiments were performed with tissues from 23 patients, using voltage-clamp recordings in Xenopus oocytes microinjected with membranes isolated from human MTLE and FCD tissues or using patch-clamp recordings of pyramidal neurons in epileptic tissue slices. On repetitive activation, the epileptic GABAA receptors revealed instability, manifested by a large IGABA rundown, which in most of the oocytes (≈70%) was obviously impaired by the new A2A antagonists ANR82, ANR94, and ANR152. In most MTLE tissue-microtransplanted oocytes, a new A3 receptor antagonist (ANR235) significantly improved IGABA stability. Moreover, patch-clamped pyramidal neurons from human neocortical slices of periglioma epileptic tissues exhibited altered IGABA rundown on ANR94 treatment. Our findings indicate that antagonizing A2A and A3 receptors increases the IGABA stability in different epileptic tissues and suggest that adenosine derivatives may offer therapeutic opportunities in various forms of human epilepsy. PMID:19721003

  2. The NOP (ORL1) receptor antagonist Compound B stimulates mesolimbic dopamine release and is rewarding in mice by a non-NOP-receptor-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Miwako; Sakoori, Kazuto; Midorikawa, Naoko; Murphy, Niall P

    2004-09-01

    1. Compound B (1-[(3R, 4R)-1-cyclooctylmethyl-3-hydroxymethyl-4-piperidyl]-3-ethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-one, CompB) is a nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) antagonist showing high selectivity for the NOP (ORL1) receptor over classical opioid receptors. We studied the effect of subcutaneous CompB administration on the release of mesolimbic dopamine (DA) and the expression of hedonia in mice. 2. CompB (0.3-30 mg kg(-1)) dose dependently stimulated mesolimbic DA release as measured by in vivo freely moving microdialysis, without any change in locomotor activity. However, intracerebroventricular administered N/OFQ (endogenous agonist of the NOP receptor, 6 nmol) did not influence CompB- (10 mg kg(-1)) induced DA release, despite clearly suppressing release when administered alone. 3. Studies using NOP receptor knockout mice and no-net-flux microdialysis revealed mildly, but not statistically significantly higher endogenous DA levels in mice lacking the NOP receptor compared to wild-type mice. Administration of CompB (10 mg kg(-1)) induced identical increases in mesolimbic DA release in wild-type and NOP receptor knockout mice. 4. CompB was rewarding in approximately the same dose range in which CompB induced major increases in mesolimbic DA release when assayed using a conditioned place preference paradigm. The rewarding effect of CompB (30 mg kg(-1)) was maintained in NOP receptor knockout mice. 5. These results show that CompB stimulates mesolimbic DA release and is rewarding by an action independent of the NOP receptor, the precise site of which is unclear. Consequently, caution should be exercised when interpreting the results of studies using this drug, particularly when administered by a peripheral route. PMID:15289286

  3. Thin-fibre receptors responding to mechanical, chemical, and thermal stimulation in the skeletal muscle of the dog

    PubMed Central

    Kumazawa, T.; Mizumura, K.

    1977-01-01

    1. Unitary activities of muscular thin fibre afferents, which were not sensitive to muscle stretching, were recorded from the nerve of the medial gastrocnemius muscle of the dog. Responses to mechanical stimulation, intra-arterial injection and local application of chemical solutions, and thermal stimulation of the surface of the muscle were studied. It was observed that polymodal receptors which responded to all types of stimulation existed in the thin fibre afferents of the muscle. 2. The receptive area of these units tested by mechanical stimulation was spot-like and appeared to be located not only on the surface but in the midst of the muscle. 3. The mechanical response varied among these units with respect to the threshold and the pattern of discharges. 4. In these units, NaCl, KCl, and bradykinin consistently evoked responses, with differences in the latencies and discharge patterns, while solutions of histamine, acetylcholine and sodium citrate caused responses less consistently and less effectively. In the stretch receptors, chemical stimulation applied in the same way as tested in the thin fibre afferents produced quite different features in their responses. 5. Heating the receptive area of the muscle surface caused responses in twenty-five out of thirty-six units, which were sensitive both to mechanical and to chemical stimulations. The threshold varied from 38·0 to 48·3 °C, with a mean of 43·1 °C for C fibre units and 41 °C for A-δ fibre units. 6. The responses to heating were consistently obtained in the units responding to the surface application of chemical solutions. However, the above response was never obtained in the units which did not respond to surface chemical stimulation but responded to intra-arterial injection. These results suggest a large population of polymodal receptors in the muscular thin fibre afferents. PMID:599419

  4. An Antagonistic Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Variant Inhibits VEGF-Stimulated Receptor Autophosphorylation and Proliferation of Human Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemeister, Gerhard; Schirner, Michael; Reusch, Petra; Barleon, Bernhard; Marme, Dieter; Martiny-Baron, Georg

    1998-04-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent mitogen with a unique specificity for endothelial cells and a key mediator of aberrant endothelial cell proliferation and vascular permeability in a variety of human pathological situations, such as tumor angiogenesis, diabetic retinopathy, rheumatoid arthritis, or psoriasis. VEGF is a symmetric homodimeric molecule with two receptor binding interfaces lying on each pole of the molecule. Herein we report on the construction and recombinant expression of an asymmetric heterodimeric VEGF variant with an intact receptor binding interface at one pole and a mutant receptor binding interface at the second pole of the dimer. This VEGF variant binds to VEGF receptors but fails to induce receptor activation. In competition experiments, the heterodimeric VEGF variant antagonizes VEGF-stimulated receptor autophosphorylation and proliferation of endothelial cells. A 15-fold excess of the heterodimer was sufficient to inhibit VEGF-stimulated endothelial cell proliferation by 50%, and a 100-fold excess resulted in an almost complete inhibition. By using a rational approach that is based on the structure of VEGF, we have shown the feasibility to construct a VEGF variant that acts as an VEGF antagonist.

  5. Expression of transferrin receptors on mitogen-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes: relation to cellular activation and related metabolic events.

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, R M; Galbraith, G M

    1981-01-01

    Mitogen-activated normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes bind transferrin to specific membrane receptors. In this study, lymphocytes stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin for 0-66 hr were examined to determine the relation of this phenomenon to cellular activation and related metabolic events. Transferrin receptors were first detected at 20-24 hr. This event was consistently preceded by RNA and protein turnover which commenced during the first 6 hr of culture, whereas initiation of DNA synthesis was detected concurrently with the appearance of receptors or slightly later (24-30 hr). Exposure of cells to inhibitors of RNA and protein synthesis early during culture (at 0 or 24 hr) prevented the expression of transferrin receptors, but also caused generalized metabolic failure, and abrogated cellular activation. In contrast, later addition of these agents at 48 hr did not interfere significantly with the process of activation, but did suppress the terminal increase in receptor-bearing cells observed during the final 18 hr in control cultures lacking inhibitor. After deliberate thermal stripping of receptors from activated cells, the reappearance of membrance binding sites which normally occurred within 30 min, was also blocked by cycloheximide, puromycin and actinomycin D. However, similar inhibition of DNA which was induced by hydroxyurea had much less effect upon both the initial appearance of receptors and their reappearance after ligand-induced depletion. These results demonstrate that the appearance of transferrin receptors upon human lymphocytes is dependent upon cellular activation and requires synthesis of protein and RNA. PMID:6172372

  6. NGF stimulation of erk phosphorylation is impaired by a point mutation in the transmembrane domain of trkA receptor.

    PubMed

    Monshipouri, M; Jiang, H; Lazarovici, P

    2000-01-01

    The nerve growth factor (NGF) trkA receptor is a transmembrane glycoprotein composed of a large extracellular ligand-binding region connected to the cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase region by a single transmembrane domain (TMD). To explore the role of TMD in the process of receptor activation, we substituted the hydrophobic amino-acid residue valine 432 with the charged amino-acid glutamic acid (designated V432E mutant) by utilizing in vitro site-directed mutagenesis. NIH 3T3 cells lacking endogenous NGF receptors were stably transfected with a pRc/CMV vector carrying either wild-type (trkA) or mutated (V432E) receptors. Stable transfectants were shown, using 125I-NGF binding and Western-blot analysis, to express the trkA recombinant receptors. Scatchard analysis revealed similar affinity for NGF in wild-type and V432E receptors. Although the level of basal trkA receptor tyrosine phosphorylation was higher in the mutant than in the wild-type, NGF stimulation of WT 11 and V432E transfectants resulted in a rapid increase in receptor tyrosine phosphorylation and of its intracellular adaptor protein SHC. In contrast to WT 11, V432E mutants showed very low levels of NGF-, and moderate levels of FGF-induced erks phosphorylation, respectively. Collectively, these findings suggest that a single substitution (V432E) in the trkA TMD results in a selective impairment of trkA-mediated erks signaling pathway. PMID:10854038

  7. Stimulation of glutamate receptors in the ventral tegmental area is necessary for serotonin-2 receptor-induced increases in mesocortical dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Pehek, E A; Hernan, A E

    2015-04-01

    Modulation of dopamine (DA) released by serotonin-2 (5-HT2) receptors has been implicated in the mechanism of action of antipsychotic drugs. The mesocortical DA system has been implicated particularly in the cognitive deficits observed in schizophrenia. Agonism at 5-HT2A receptors in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is associated with increases in cortical DA release. Evidence indicates that 5-HT2A receptors in the cortex regulate mesocortical DA release through stimulation of a "long-loop" feedback system from the PFC to the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and back. However, a causal role for VTA glutamate in the 5-HT2-induced increases in PFC DA has not been established. The present study does so by measuring 5-HT2 agonist-induced DA release in the cortex after infusions of glutamate antagonists into the VTA of the rat. Infusions of a combination of a N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) (AP-5: 2-amino-5-phosphopentanoic acid) and an AMPA/kainate (CNQX: 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione) receptor antagonist into the VTA blocked the increases in cortical DA produced by administration of the 5-HT2 agonist DOI [(±)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine] (2.5mg/kg s.c.). These results demonstrate that stimulation of glutamate receptors in the VTA is necessary for 5-HT2 agonist-induced increases in cortical DA. PMID:25637799

  8. Angiotensin AT2 Receptor Stimulation Inhibits Early Renal Inflammation in Renovascular Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Matavelli, Luis C.; Huang, Jiqian; Siragy, Helmy M.

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) counteracts most effects of angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R). We hypothesized that direct AT2R stimulation reduces renal production of the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and enhances the production of nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP) in the clipped kidney of 2-kidney, 1-clip (2K1C) hypertension rat model. We used Sprague-Dawley rats to evaluate changes in renal interstitial fluid recovery levels of TNF-α, IL-6, NO, and cGMP; renal expression of AT1R, AT2R, TGF-β1, TNF-α, and IL-6 in sham and 2K1C rats treated for 4 days with vehicle, AT2R agonist compound 21 (C21), or AT2R antagonist PD123319 (PD), alone and combined (n=6, each group). Systolic blood pressure increased significantly in 2K1C and was not influenced by any treatment. Clipped kidneys showed significant increases in renal expression of AT1R, AT2R, TNF-α, IL-6, TGF-β1 and decreases in NO and cGMP levels. These factors were not influenced by PD treatment. In contrast, C21 caused significant decrease in renal TNF-α, IL-6, TGF-β1 and an increase in NO and cGMP levels. Combined C21 and PD treatment partially reversed the observed C21 effects. Compared to sham, there were no significant changes in TNF-α, IL-6, TGF-β1, NO, or cGMP in the nonclipped kidneys of 2K1C animals. We conclude that direct AT2R stimulation reduces early renal inflammatory responses and improves production of NO and cGMP in renovascular hypertension independent of blood pressure reduction. PMID:21189405

  9. Hypoxia stimulates urokinase receptor expression through a heme protein-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Graham, C H; Fitzpatrick, T E; McCrae, K R

    1998-05-01

    Hypoxia underlies a number of biologic processes in which cellular migration and invasion occur. Because earlier studies have shown that the receptor for urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPAR) may facilitate such events, we studied the effect of hypoxia on the expression of uPAR by first trimester human trophoblasts (HTR-8/SVneo) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Compared with control cells cultured under standard conditions (20% O2), HTR-8/SVneo cells and HUVEC cultured in 1% O2 expressed more uPAR, as determined by flow cytometric and [125I]-prourokinase ligand binding analyses. Increased uPAR expression paralleled increases in uPAR mRNA. The involvement of a heme protein in the hypoxia-induced expression of uPAR was suggested by the observations that culture of cells with cobalt chloride, or sodium 4, 5-dihydroxybenzene-1,3-disulfonate (Tiron), an iron-chelating agent, also stimulated uPAR expression, and that the hypoxia-induced uPAR expression was inhibited by adding carbon monoxide to the hypoxic atmosphere. Culture of HTR-8/SVneo cells with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) did not increase uPAR mRNA levels, suggesting that the hypoxia-mediated effect on uPAR expression by these cells did not occur through a VEGF-dependent mechanism. The functional importance of these findings is suggested by the fact that HTR-8/SVneo cells cultured under hypoxia displayed higher levels of cell surface plasminogen activator activity and greater invasion through a reconstituted basement membrane. These results suggest that hypoxia may promote cellular invasion by stimulating the expression of uPAR through a heme protein-dependent pathway. PMID:9558386

  10. Stimulation of the mineralocorticoid receptor improves memory in young and elderly healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Hinkelmann, Kim; Wingenfeld, Katja; Kuehl, Linn K; Fleischer, Juliane; Heuser, Isabella; Wiedemann, Klaus; Otte, Christian

    2015-02-01

    Glucocorticoids play an important role in cognitive function and act on glucocorticoid receptors and mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) in the brain. Previously, the blockade of the MR has been shown to impair visuospatial and working memory in healthy young men. Here, we investigated the effects of the MR agonist fludrocortisone on memory in young and elderly healthy individuals. Thirty-one young (mean age 25.4 ± 4.6 years) and 22 elderly (mean age 63.2 ± 8.2 years) healthy participants received the MR agonist fludrocortisone (0.4 mg) or placebo at least 3 days apart in a randomized, double-blind within-subject cross-over design. We measured verbal memory (auditory verbal learning test), nonverbal memory (Rey/Taylor complex figure test), and working memory (digit-span task). As expected, young participants performed significantly better than elderly individuals in visuospatial memory (effect of group: F = 42.7, p < 0.01), verbal memory (F = 33.1, p < 0.01), and working memory (digit-span backward: F = 4.5, p = 0.04). For visuospatial memory (F = 5.0, p = 0.03) and short-term and working memory (digit-span forward: F = 4.2, p = 0.05), we found a significant treatment effect indicating better memory performance after fludrocortisone compared with placebo across groups. In concert with the previous studies, our data suggest a role of the MR in memory function. A cognitive enhancing effect by MR stimulation warrants future studies. PMID:25442112

  11. Calcitonin Receptor-Zonula Occludens-1 Interaction Is Critical for Calcitonin-Stimulated Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Aljameeli, Ahmed; Thakkar, Arvind; Thomas, Shibu; Lakshmikanthan, Vijaybasker; Iczkowski, Kenneth A.; Shah, Girish V.

    2016-01-01

    The role of neuroendocrine peptide calcitonin (CT) and its receptor (CTR) in epithelial cancer progression is an emerging concept with great clinical potential. Expression of CT and CTR is frequently elevated in prostate cancers (PCs) and activation of CT–CTR axis in non-invasive PC cells induces an invasive phenotype. Here we show by yeast-two hybrid screens that CTR associates with the tight junction protein Zonula Occludens-1 (ZO-1) via the interaction between the type 1 PDZ motif at the carboxy-terminus of CTR and the PDZ3 domain of ZO-1. Mutation of either the CTR C-PDZ-binding motif or the ZO-1-PDZ3 domain did not affect binding of CTR with its ligand or G-protein-mediated signaling but abrogated destabilizing actions of CT on tight junctions and formation of distant metastases by orthotopically implanted PC cells in nude mice, indicating that these PDZ domain interactions were pathologically relevant. Further, we observed CTR-ZO-1 interactions in PC specimens by proximity ligation immunohistochemistry, and identified that the number of interactions in metastatic PC specimens was several-fold larger than in non-metastatic PC. Our results for the first time demonstrate a mechanism by which PDZ-mediated interaction between CTR and ZO1 is required for CT-stimulated metastasis of prostate cancer. Since many receptors contain PDZ-binding motifs, this would suggest that PDZ-binding motif-adaptor protein interactions constitute a common mechanism for cancer metastasis. PMID:26934365

  12. Role of urokinase and its receptor in basal and stimulated colonic epithelial cell migration in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, A; Gibson, P

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Migration of colonic epithelial cells is important for mucosal repair following injury. The urokinase (u-PA) system regulates migration in other cell types.
AIM—To examine the role of u-PA and its receptor (u-PAR) in colonic epithelial cell migration.
METHODS—Migration was assessed over 24 hours in circular wounds made in confluent monolayers of LIM1215 and Caco-2 human colon cancer cells. The function of u-PA and u-PAR was ablated with antisense oligonucleotides to block expression, with synthetic u-PA peptides to block interaction, and with aprotinin to block u-PA mediated proteolysis.
RESULTS—Migration was stimulated two to threefold by exogenous u-PA, an effect dependent on u-PAR binding but independent of u-PA mediated mitogenesis and proteolysis. Expression of u-PA and u-PAR was inhibited by 80% by the appropriate antisense oligonucleotide. Basal migration and the motogenic effects of butyrate, epidermal growth factor, and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate were suppressed by the u-PAR antisense oligonucleotide (40-60%) but were at best minimally affected following inhibition of u-PA expression and binding. 
CONCLUSIONS—In an in vitro model of wounded colonic epithelium, u-PAR promotes cell migration through mechanisms that are not exclusively dependent on u-PA binding. Therefore, u-PA and u-PAR may contribute to colonic mucosal repair in vivo.


Keywords: colon; migration; urokinase; urokinase receptor; epidermal growth factor; butyrate; protein kinase C PMID:10861271

  13. Differential Roles of GABAA Receptor Subtypes in Benzodiazepine-Induced Enhancement of Brain-Stimulation Reward

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Lauren M; Engin, Elif; Tantillo, Gabriella; Lau, Hew Mun; Muschamp, John W; Carlezon, William A; Rudolph, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    Benzodiazepines such as diazepam are widely prescribed as anxiolytics and sleep aids. Continued use of benzodiazepines, however, can lead to addiction in vulnerable individuals. Here, we investigate the neural mechanisms of the behavioral effects of benzodiazepines using the intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) test, a procedure with which the reward-enhancing effects of these drugs can be measured. Benzodiazepines bind nonselectively to several different GABAA receptor subtypes. To elucidate the α subunit(s) responsible for the reward-enhancing effects of benzodiazepines, we examined mice carrying a histidine-to-arginine point mutation in the α1, α2, or α3 subunit, which renders the targeted subunit nonresponsive to diazepam, other benzodiazepines and zolpidem. In wild-type and α1-point-mutated mice, diazepam caused a dose-dependent reduction in ICSS thresholds (reflecting a reward-enhancing effect) that is comparable to the reduction observed following cocaine administration. This effect was abolished in α2- and α3-point-mutant mice, suggesting that these subunits are necessary for the reward-enhancing action of diazepam. α2 Subunits appear to be particularly important, since diazepam increased ICSS thresholds (reflecting an aversive-like effect) in α2-point-mutant animals. Zolpidem, an α1-preferring benzodiazepine-site agonist, had no reward-enhancing effects in any genotype. Our findings implicate α2 and α3 subunit containing GABAA receptors as key mediators of the reward-related effects of benzodiazepines. This finding has important implications for the development of new medications that retain the therapeutic effects of benzodiazepines but lack abuse liability. PMID:22763624

  14. The frequency of follicle stimulating hormone receptor gene polymorphisms in Iranian infertile men with azoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Gharesi-Fard, Behrouz; Ghasemi, Zahra; Shakeri, Saeed; Behdin, Shabnam; Aghaei, Fatemeh; Malek-Hosseini, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Azoospermia is the medical condition of a man not having any measurable level of sperm in his semen. Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) is a member of the glycoprotein hormone family that plays an important role in human reproduction because of its essential role in normal spermatogenesis. Various Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) have been reported within FSH receptor (FSHR) gene that may affect the receptor function. Objective: The present study aimed to investigate the correlation between two FSHR SNPs at positions A919G, A2039G, and susceptibility to azoospermia in a group of Iranian azoospermic men. The association between FSH levels within the sera and A919G and A2039G alleles and genotypes were also investigated. Materials and Methods: This case control study was performed on 212 men with azoospermia (126 non-obstructive and 86 obstructive) and 200 healthy Iranian men. Two FSHR gene SNPs were genotyped using PCR-RFLP method. The relationship between FSH levels within the sera and A919G and A2039G alleles and genotypes were also investigated. Results: Statistical analysis indicated that at A919G position, AA genotype and A allele were more frequent in obstructive azoospermia cases compared to non-obstructive or normal men (p=0.001). Regarding A2039G polymorphisms, no significant difference was observed between both azoospermia groups and the controls. The mean level of serum FSH was higher in the non-obstructive men compared to the obstructive patients (23.8 versus 13.8, respectively, p= 0.04). Conclusion: The results of the present study indicated that the genetic polymorphisms in the FSHR gene might increase the susceptibility to azoospermia in Iranian men. PMID:26730241

  15. Serotonin stimulates lateral habenula via activation of the post-synaptic serotonin 2/3 receptors and transient receptor potential channels.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Wanhong; Zhang, Yong; Xie, Guiqin; Gregor, Danielle; Bekker, Alex; Ye, Jiang-Hong

    2016-02-01

    There is growing interest on the role of the lateral habenula (LHb) in depression, because it closely and bilaterally connects with the serotoninergic raphe nuclei. The LHb sends glutamate efferents to the raphe nuclei, while it receives serotoninergic afferents, and expresses a high density of serotonin (5-HT) receptors. Recent studies suggest that 5-HT receptors exist both in the presynaptic and postsynaptic sites of LHb neurons, and activation of these receptors may have different effects on the activity of LHb neurons. The current study focused on the effect of 5-HT on the postsynaptic membrane. We found that 5-HT initiated a depolarizing inward current (I((5-HTi))) and accelerated spontaneous firing in ∼80% of LHb neurons in rat brain slices. I((5-HTi)) was also induced by the 5-HT uptake blocker citalopram, indicating activity of endogenous 5-HT. I((5-HTi)) was diminished by 5-HT(2/3) receptor antagonists (ritanserin, SB-200646 or ondansetron), and activated by the selective 5-HT(2/3) agonists 1-(3-Chlorophenyl) piperazine hydrochloride or 1-(3-Chlorophenyl) biguanide hydrochloride. Furthermore, I((5-HTi)) was attenuated by 2-Aminoethyl diphenylborinate, a blocker of transient receptor potential channels, and an IP3 receptor inhibitor, indicating the involvement of transient receptor potential channels. These results demonstrate that the reciprocal connection between the LHb and the 5-HT system highlights a key role for 5-HT stimulation of LHb neurons that may be important in the pathogenesis of depression. PMID:26471419

  16. Forkhead box A3 mediates glucocorticoid receptor function in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xinran; Xu, Lingyan; Mueller, Elisabetta

    2016-03-22

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are widely prescribed anti-inflammatory agents, but their chronic use leads to undesirable side effects such as excessive expansion of adipose tissue. We have recently shown that the forkhead box protein A3 (Foxa3) is a calorie-hoarding factor that regulates the selective enlargement of epididymal fat depots and suppresses energy expenditure in a nutritional- and age-dependent manner. It has been demonstrated that Foxa3 levels are elevated in adipose depots in response to high-fat diet regimens and during the aging process; however no studies to date have elucidated the mechanisms that control Foxa3's expression in fat. Given the established effects of GCs in increasing visceral adiposity and in reducing thermogenesis, we assessed the existence of a possible link between GCs and Foxa3. Computational prediction analysis combined with molecular studies revealed that Foxa3 is regulated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in preadipocytes, adipocytes, and adipose tissues and is required to facilitate the binding of the GR to its target gene promoters in fat depots. Analysis of the long-term effects of dexamethasone treatment in mice revealed that Foxa3 ablation protects mice specifically against fat accretion but not against other pathological side effects elicited by this synthetic GC in tissues such as liver, muscle, and spleen. In conclusion our studies provide the first demonstration, to our knowledge, that Foxa3 is a direct target of GC action in adipose tissues and point to a role of Foxa3 as a mediator of the side effects induced in fat tissues by chronic treatment with synthetic steroids. PMID:26957608

  17. Forkhead box A3 mediates glucocorticoid receptor function in adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xinran; Xu, Lingyan; Mueller, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are widely prescribed anti-inflammatory agents, but their chronic use leads to undesirable side effects such as excessive expansion of adipose tissue. We have recently shown that the forkhead box protein A3 (Foxa3) is a calorie-hoarding factor that regulates the selective enlargement of epididymal fat depots and suppresses energy expenditure in a nutritional- and age-dependent manner. It has been demonstrated that Foxa3 levels are elevated in adipose depots in response to high-fat diet regimens and during the aging process; however no studies to date have elucidated the mechanisms that control Foxa3’s expression in fat. Given the established effects of GCs in increasing visceral adiposity and in reducing thermogenesis, we assessed the existence of a possible link between GCs and Foxa3. Computational prediction analysis combined with molecular studies revealed that Foxa3 is regulated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in preadipocytes, adipocytes, and adipose tissues and is required to facilitate the binding of the GR to its target gene promoters in fat depots. Analysis of the long-term effects of dexamethasone treatment in mice revealed that Foxa3 ablation protects mice specifically against fat accretion but not against other pathological side effects elicited by this synthetic GC in tissues such as liver, muscle, and spleen. In conclusion our studies provide the first demonstration, to our knowledge, that Foxa3 is a direct target of GC action in adipose tissues and point to a role of Foxa3 as a mediator of the side effects induced in fat tissues by chronic treatment with synthetic steroids. PMID:26957608

  18. Epidermal growth factor–stimulated Akt phosphorylation requires clathrin or ErbB2 but not receptor endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Garay, Camilo; Judge, Gurjeet; Lucarelli, Stefanie; Bautista, Stephen; Pandey, Rohan; Singh, Tanveer; Antonescu, Costin N.

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) binding to its receptor (EGFR) activates several signaling intermediates, including Akt, leading to control of cell survival and metabolism. Concomitantly, ligand-bound EGFR is incorporated into clathrin-coated pits—membrane structures containing clathrin and other proteins—eventually leading to receptor internalization. Whether clathrin might regulate EGFR signaling at the plasma membrane before vesicle scission is poorly understood. We compared the effect of clathrin perturbation (preventing formation of, or receptor recruitment to, clathrin structures) to that of dynamin2 (allowing formation of clathrin structures but preventing EGFR internalization) under conditions in which EGFR endocytosis is clathrin dependent. Clathrin perturbation by siRNA gene silencing, with the clathrin inhibitor pitstop2, or knocksideways silencing inhibited EGF-simulated Gab1 and Akt phosphorylation in ARPE-19 cells. In contrast, perturbation of dynamin2 with inhibitors or by siRNA gene silencing did not affect EGF-stimulated Gab1 or Akt phosphorylation. EGF stimulation enriched Gab1 and phospho-Gab1 within clathrin structures. ARPE-19 cells have low ErbB2 expression, and overexpression and knockdown experiments revealed that robust ErbB2 expression bypassed the requirement for clathrin for EGF-stimulated Akt phosphorylation. Thus clathrin scaffolds may represent unique plasma membrane signaling microdomains required for signaling by certain receptors, a function that can be separated from vesicle formation. PMID:26246598

  19. The anti-inflammatory target A(3) adenosine receptor is over-expressed in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Ochaion, A; Bar-Yehuda, S; Cohen, S; Barer, F; Patoka, R; Amital, H; Reitblat, T; Reitblat, A; Ophir, J; Konfino, I; Chowers, Y; Ben-Horin, S; Fishman, P

    2009-01-01

    The Gi protein associated A(3) adenosine receptor (A(3)AR) was recently defined as a novel anti-inflammatory target. The aim of this study was to look at A(3)AR expression levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of patients with autoimmune inflammatory diseases and to explore transcription factors involved receptor expression. Over-expression of A(3)AR was found in PBMCs derived from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriasis and Crohn's disease compared with PBMCs from healthy subjects. Bioinformatics analysis demonstrated the presence of DNA binding sites for nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) in the A(3)AR gene promoter. Up-regulation of NF-kappaB and CREB was found in the PBMCs from patients with RA, psoriasis and Crohn's disease. The PI3K-PKB/Akt signaling pathway, known to regulate both the NF-kappaB and CREB, was also up-regulated in the patients' PBMCs. Taken together, NF-kappaB and CREB are involved with the over-expression of A(3)AR in patients with autoimmune inflammatory diseases. The receptor may be considered as a specific target to combat inflammation. PMID:19426966

  20. Roles of mitogen activated protein kinases and EGF receptor in arsenite-stimulated matrix metalloproteinase-9 production

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Karen L.; Myers, Terrance Alix; Rosenberg, Martina; Chavez, Miquella; Hudson, Laurie G. . E-mail: lghudson@unm.edu

    2004-11-01

    The dermatotoxicity of arsenic is well established and epidemiological studies identify an increased incidence of keratinocytic tumors (basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma) associated with arsenic exposure. Little is known about the underlying mechanisms of arsenic-mediated skin carcinogenesis, but activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases and subsequent regulation of downstream target genes may contribute to tumor promotion and progression. In this study, we investigated activation of the extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) and the stress-associated kinase p38 by arsenite in HaCat cells, a spontaneously immortalized human keratinocyte cell line. Arsenite concentrations {>=}100 {mu}M stimulate rapid activation of p38 and ERK MAP kinases. However, upon extended exposure (24 h), persistent stimulation of p38 and ERK MAP kinases was detected at low micromolar concentrations of arsenite. Although ERK and p38 were activated with similar time and concentration dependence, the mechanism of activation differed for these two MAP kinases. ERK activation by arsenite was fully dependent on the catalytic activity of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor and partially dependent on Src-family kinase activity. In contrast, p38 activation was independent of EGF receptor or Src-family kinase activity. Arsenite-stimulated MAP kinase signal transduction resulted in increased production of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, an AP-1 regulated gene product. MMP-9 induction by arsenite was prevented when EGF receptor or MAP kinase signaling was inhibited. These studies indicate that EGF receptor activation is a component of arsenite-mediated signal transduction and gene expression in keratinocytes and that low micromolar concentrations of arsenite stimulate key signaling pathways upon extended exposure. Stimulation of MAP kinase cascades by arsenic and subsequent regulation of genes including c-fos, c-jun, and the matrix degrading proteases may play an important

  1. Eicosanoid receptor subtype-mediated opposing regulation of TLR-stimulated expression of astrocyte glial-derived neurotrophic factor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xianwu; Cudaback, Eiron; Breyer, Richard M.; Montine, Kathleen S.; Keene, C. Dirk; Montine, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    A major therapeutic target for Parkinson's disease (PD) is providing increased glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) to dopaminergic neurons. We tested the hypothesis that innate immune activation increases astrocyte GDNF production and that this is regulated by specific eicosanoid receptors. Innate immune-activated primary murine astrocytes were assayed for GDNF expression and secretion. Controls were agent vehicle exposure and wild-type mice. Rank order for up to 10-fold selectively increased GDNF expression was activators of TLR3 > TLR2 or TLR4 > TLR9. TLR3 activator-stimulated GDNF expression was selectively JNK-dependent, followed cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, was coincident with membranous PGE2 synthase, and was not significantly altered by a nonspecific COX- or a COX-2-selective inhibitor. Specific eicosanoid receptors had opposing effects on TLR3 activator-induced GDNF expression: ∼60% enhancement by blocking or ablating of PGE2 receptor subtype 1 (EP1), ∼30% enhancement by activating PGF2α receptor or thromboxane receptor, or ∼15% enhancement by activating EP4. These results demonstrate functionally antagonistic eicosanoid receptor subtype regulation of innate immunity-induced astrocyte GDNF expression and suggest that selective inhibition of EP1 signaling might be a means to augment astrocyte GDNF secretion in the context of innate immune activation in diseased regions of brain in PD.—Li, X., Cudaback, E., Breyer, R. M., Montine, K. S., Keene, C. D., Montine, T. J. Eicosanoid receptor subtype-mediated opposing regulation of Toll-like receptor-stimulated expression of astrocyte glial-derived neurotrophic factor. PMID:22499581

  2. A Gα-Stimulated RapGEF Is a Receptor-Proximal Regulator of Dictyostelium Chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Youtao; Lacal, Jesus; Veltman, Douwe M; Fusetti, Fabrizia; van Haastert, Peter J M; Firtel, Richard A; Kortholt, Arjan

    2016-06-01

    Chemotaxis, or directional movement toward extracellular chemical gradients, is an important property of cells that is mediated through G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Although many chemotaxis pathways downstream of Gβγ have been identified, few Gα effectors are known. Gα effectors are of particular importance because they allow the cell to distinguish signals downstream of distinct chemoattractant GPCRs. Here we identify GflB, a Gα2 binding partner that directly couples the Dictyostelium cyclic AMP GPCR to Rap1. GflB localizes to the leading edge and functions as a Gα-stimulated, Rap1-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor required to balance Ras and Rap signaling. The kinetics of GflB translocation are fine-tuned by GSK-3 phosphorylation. Cells lacking GflB display impaired Rap1/Ras signaling and actin and myosin dynamics, resulting in defective chemotaxis. Our observations demonstrate that GflB is an essential upstream regulator of chemoattractant-mediated cell polarity and cytoskeletal reorganization functioning to directly link Gα activation to monomeric G-protein signaling. PMID:27237792

  3. Notoginsenoside R1 stimulates osteogenic function in primary osteoblasts via estrogen receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Wan, Daqian; Shao, Lei; Dai, Jiezhi; Jiang, Chaoyin

    2015-10-16

    Notoginsenoside R1 (NGR1), a novel phytoestrogen isolated from Panax notoginseng, has been widely used in the treatment of microcirculatory diseases in Asian countries. Here we investigated the effect of NGR1 on osteoblast differentiation and mineralization process. Furthermore, we also evaluated NGR1's estrogenic properties, especially its effects on estrogen receptors (ERs). NGR1 activated the transcriptional activity of phosphorylated estrogen response element (pERE)-luciferase (Luc) and induced ERα phosphorylation in hBMSC. In addition, ER activation correlated with induction and was associated with osteoblast differentiation biomarkers including alkaline phosphatase activity and transcription of osteoblastic genes, e.g., type I collagen (COL1), osteonectin, osteocalcin (OC), runt related protein 2 (Runx2), and osterix. NGR1 also promoted the mineralization process of osteoblasts. The NGR1-induced effects were confirmed to be mediated by the ER by the observation that pretreatment of the osteoblasts with the ER antagonist, ICI 182,780 fully blocked the effects. Our results showed that NGR1 stimulates osteogenic differentiation of cultured osteoblasts by activating ER signaling and in turn might be a potential therapeutic alternative for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:26362186

  4. The non-benzodiazepine anxiolytic drug etifoxine causes a rapid, receptor-independent stimulation of neurosteroid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    do Rego, Jean Luc; Vaudry, David; Vaudry, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Neurosteroids can modulate the activity of the GABAA receptors, and thus affect anxiety-like behaviors. The non-benzodiazepine anxiolytic compound etifoxine has been shown to increase neurosteroid concentrations in brain tissue but the mode of action of etifoxine on neurosteroid formation has not yet been elucidated. In the present study, we have thus investigated the effect and the mechanism of action of etifoxine on neurosteroid biosynthesis using the frog hypothalamus as an experimental model. Exposure of frog hypothalamic explants to graded concentrations of etifoxine produced a dose-dependent increase in the biosynthesis of 17-hydroxypregnenolone, dehydroepiandrosterone, progesterone and tetrahydroprogesterone, associated with a decrease in the production of dihydroprogesterone. Time-course experiments revealed that a 15-min incubation of hypothalamic explants with etifoxine was sufficient to induce a robust increase in neurosteroid synthesis, suggesting that etifoxine activates steroidogenic enzymes at a post-translational level. Etifoxine-evoked neurosteroid biosynthesis was not affected by the central-type benzodiazepine (CBR) receptor antagonist flumazenil, the translocator protein (TSPO) antagonist PK11195 or the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline. In addition, the stimulatory effects of etifoxine and the triakontatetraneuropeptide TTN, a TSPO agonist, were additive, indicating that these two compounds act through distinct mechanisms. Etifoxine also induced a rapid stimulation of neurosteroid biosynthesis from frog hypothalamus homogenates, a preparation in which membrane receptor signalling is disrupted. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that etifoxine stimulates neurosteroid production through a membrane receptor-independent mechanism. PMID:25785994

  5. The Non-Benzodiazepine Anxiolytic Drug Etifoxine Causes a Rapid, Receptor-Independent Stimulation of Neurosteroid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    do Rego, Jean Luc; Vaudry, David; Vaudry, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Neurosteroids can modulate the activity of the GABAA receptors, and thus affect anxiety-like behaviors. The non-benzodiazepine anxiolytic compound etifoxine has been shown to increase neurosteroid concentrations in brain tissue but the mode of action of etifoxine on neurosteroid formation has not yet been elucidated. In the present study, we have thus investigated the effect and the mechanism of action of etifoxine on neurosteroid biosynthesis using the frog hypothalamus as an experimental model. Exposure of frog hypothalamic explants to graded concentrations of etifoxine produced a dose-dependent increase in the biosynthesis of 17-hydroxypregnenolone, dehydroepiandrosterone, progesterone and tetrahydroprogesterone, associated with a decrease in the production of dihydroprogesterone. Time-course experiments revealed that a 15-min incubation of hypothalamic explants with etifoxine was sufficient to induce a robust increase in neurosteroid synthesis, suggesting that etifoxine activates steroidogenic enzymes at a post-translational level. Etifoxine-evoked neurosteroid biosynthesis was not affected by the central-type benzodiazepine (CBR) receptor antagonist flumazenil, the translocator protein (TSPO) antagonist PK11195 or the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline. In addition, the stimulatory effects of etifoxine and the triakontatetraneuropeptide TTN, a TSPO agonist, were additive, indicating that these two compounds act through distinct mechanisms. Etifoxine also induced a rapid stimulation of neurosteroid biosynthesis from frog hypothalamus homogenates, a preparation in which membrane receptor signalling is disrupted. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that etifoxine stimulates neurosteroid production through a membrane receptor-independent mechanism. PMID:25785994

  6. 2-Triazole-Substituted Adenosines: A New Class of Selective A3 Adenosine Receptor Agonists, Partial Agonists, and Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Cosyn, Liesbet; Palaniappan, Krishnan K.; Kim, Soo-Kyung; Duong, Heng T.; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Van Calenbergh, Serge

    2016-01-01

    “Click chemistry” was explored to synthesize two series of 2-(1,2,3-triazolyl)adenosine derivatives (1–14). Binding affinity at the human A1, A2A, and A3ARs (adenosine receptors) and relative efficacy at the A3AR were determined. Some triazol-1-yl analogues showed A3AR affinity in the low nanomolar range, a high ratio of A3/A2A selectivity, and a moderate-to-high A3/A1 ratio. The 1,2,3-triazol-4-yl regiomers typically showed decreased A3AR affinity. Sterically demanding groups at the adenine C2 position tended to reduce relative A3AR efficacy. Thus, several 5′-OH derivatives appeared to be selective A3AR antagonists, i.e., 10, with 260-fold binding selectivity in comparison to the A1AR and displaying a characteristic docking mode in an A3AR model. The corresponding 5′-ethyluronamide analogues generally showed increased A3AR affinity and behaved as full agonists, i.e., 17, with 910-fold A3/A1 selectivity. Thus, N6-substituted 2-(1,2,3-triazolyl)-adenosine analogues constitute a novel class of highly potent and selective nucleoside-based A3AR antagonists, partial agonists, and agonists. PMID:17149867

  7. Mitochondrial respiratory chain is involved in insulin-stimulated hydrogen peroxide production and plays an integral role in insulin receptor autophosphorylation in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Storozhevykh, Tatiana P; Senilova, Yana E; Persiyantseva, Nadezhda A; Pinelis, Vsevolod G; Pomytkin, Igor A

    2007-01-01

    Background Accumulated evidence suggests that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generated in cells during insulin stimulation plays an integral role in insulin receptor signal transduction. The role of insulin-induced H2O2 in neuronal insulin receptor activation and the origin of insulin-induced H2O2 in neurons remain unclear. The aim of the present study is to test the following hypotheses (1) whether insulin-induced H2O2 is required for insulin receptor autophosphorylation in neurons, and (2) whether mitochondrial respiratory chain is involved in insulin-stimulated H2O2 production, thus playing an integral role in insulin receptor autophosphorylation in neurons. Results Insulin stimulation elicited rapid insulin receptor autophosphorylation accompanied by an increase in H2O2 release from cultured cerebellar granule neurons (CGN). N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a H2O2 scavenger, inhibited both insulin-stimulated H2O2 release and insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation of insulin receptor. Inhibitors of respiratory chain-mediated H2O2 production, malonate and carbonyl cyanide-4-(trifluoromethoxy)-phenylhydrazone (FCCP), inhibited both insulin-stimulated H2O2 release from neurons and insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation of insulin receptor. Dicholine salt of succinic acid, a respiratory substrate, significantly enhanced the effect of suboptimal insulin concentration on the insulin receptor autophosphorylation in CGN. Conclusion Results of the present study suggest that insulin-induced H2O2 is required for the enhancement of insulin receptor autophosphorylation in neurons. The mitochondrial respiratory chain is involved in insulin-stimulated H2O2 production, thus playing an integral role in the insulin receptor autophosphorylation in neurons. PMID:17919343

  8. mu-Opioid receptor stimulation in the nucleus accumbens elevates fatty tastant intake by increasing palatability and suppressing satiety signals.

    PubMed

    Katsuura, Yoshihiro; Heckmann, Jennifer A; Taha, Sharif A

    2011-07-01

    Infusion of a μ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonist into the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) drives voracious food intake, an effect hypothesized to occur through increased tastant palatability. While intake of many palatable foods is elevated by MOR stimulation, this manipulation has a preferential effect on fatty food ingestion. Consumption of high-fat foods is increased by NAcc MOR stimulation even in rats that prefer a carbohydrate-rich alternative under baseline conditions. This suggests that NAcc MOR stimulation may not simply potentiate palatability signals and raises the possibility that mechanisms mediating fat intake may be distinct from those underlying intake of other tastants. The present study was conducted to investigate the physiological mechanisms underlying the effects of NAcc MOR stimulation on fatty food intake. In experiment 1, we analyzed lick microstructure in rats ingesting Intralipid to identify the changes underlying feeding induced by infusion of a MOR-specific agonist into the NAcc. MOR stimulation in the NAcc core, but not shell, increased burst duration and first-minute licks, while simultaneously increasing the rate and duration of Intralipid ingestion. These results suggest that MOR activation in the core increases Intralipid palatability and attenuates inhibitory postingestive feedback. In experiment 2, we measured the effects of MOR stimulation in the NAcc core on consumption of nonnutritive olestra. A MOR-specific agonist dose dependently increased olestra intake, demonstrating that caloric signaling is not required for hyperphagia induced by NAcc MOR stimulation. Feeding induced by drug infusion in both experiments 1 and 2 was blocked by a MOR antagonist. In experiment 3, we determined whether MOR activation in the NAcc core could attenuate satiety-related signaling caused by infusion of the melanocortin agonist MTII into the third ventricle. Suppression of intake caused by MTII was reversed by MOR stimulation. Together, our results suggest

  9. Activation of Distinct P2Y Receptor Subtypes Stimulates Insulin Secretion in MIN6 Mouse Pancreatic β Cells

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Ramachandran; de Azua, Inigo Ruiz; Wess, Jürgen; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular nucleotides and their receptor antagonists have therapeutic potential in disorders such as inflammation, brain disorders, and cardiovascular diseases. Pancreatic β cells express several purinergic receptors, and reported nucleotide effects on insulin secretion are contradictory. We studied the effect of P2Y receptors on insulin secretion and cell death in MIN6, mouse pancreatic β cells. Expression of P2Y1 and P2Y6 receptors was revealed by total mRNA analysis using RT-PCR. MIN6 cells were stimulated in the presence of 16.7 mM glucose with or without P2Y1 and P2Y6 agonists, 2-MeSADP and Up3U, respectively. Both the agonists increased insulin secretion with EC50 values of 44.6±7.0 nM and 30.7±12.7 nM respectively. The insulin secretion by P2Y1 and P2Y6 agonists was blocked by their selective antagonists MRS2179 and MRS2578, respectively. Binding of the selective P2Y1 receptor antagonist radioligand [125I]MRS2500 in MIN6 cell membranes was saturable (KD 4.74±0.47 nM), and known P2Y1 ligands competed with high affinities. Inflammation and glucose toxicity leads to pancreatic β cell death in diabetes. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that Up3U but not 2-MeSADP protected MIN6 cells against TNF-α induced apoptosis. Overall, the results demonstrate that selective stimulation of P2Y1 and P2Y6 receptors increases insulin secretion that accompanies intracellular calcium release, suggesting potential application of P2Y receptor ligands in the treatment of diabetes. PMID:20067775

  10. Stimulation of LDL receptor activity in Hep-G2 cells by a serum factor(s)

    SciTech Connect

    Ellsworth, J.L.; Brown, C.; Cooper, A.D.

    1988-05-01

    The regulation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor activity in the human hepatoma cell line Hep-G2 by serum components was examined. Incubation of dense monolayers of Hep-G2 cells with fresh medium containing 10% fetal calf serum (FM) produced a time-dependent increase in LDL receptor activity. Uptake and degradation of 125I-LDL was stimulated two- to four-fold, as compared with that of Hep-G2 cells cultured in the same media in which they had been grown to confluence (CM); the maximal 125I-LDL uptake plus degradation increased from 0.2 microgram/mg cell protein/4 h to 0.8 microgram/mg cell protein/4 h. In addition, a two-fold increase in cell surface binding of 125I-LDL to Hep-G2 cells was observed when binding was measured at 4 degrees C. There was no change in the apparent Kd. The stimulation of LDL receptor activity was suppressed in a concentration-dependent manner by the addition of cholesterol, as LDL, to the cell medium. In contrast to the stimulation of LDL receptor activity, FM did not affect the uptake or degradation of 125I-asialoorosomucoid. Addition of FM increased the protein content per dish, and DNA synthesis was stimulated approximately five-fold, as measured by (3H)thymidine incorporation into DNA; however, the cell number did not change. Cellular cholesterol biosynthesis was also stimulated by FM; (14C)acetate incorporation into unesterified and esterified cholesterol was increased approximately five-fold. Incubation of Hep-G2 cells with high-density lipoproteins (200 micrograms protein/ml) or albumin (8.0 mg/ml) in the absence of the serum factor did not significantly increase the total processed 125I-LDL. Stimulation of LDL receptor activity was dependent on a heat-stable, nondialyzable serum component that eluted in the inclusion volume of a Sephadex G-75 column.

  11. Stimulation of renin release by prostaglandin E2 is mediated by EP2 and EP4 receptors in mouse kidneys.

    PubMed

    Schweda, Frank; Klar, Jürgen; Narumiya, Shuh; Nüsing, Rolf M; Kurtz, Armin

    2004-09-01

    PGE(2) is a potent stimulator of renin release. So far, the contribution of each of the four PGE(2) receptor subtypes (EP(1)-EP(4)) in the regulation of renin release has not been characterized. Therefore, we investigated the effects PGE(2) on renin secretion rates (RSR) from isolated, perfused kidneys of EP(1)-/-, EP(2)-/-, EP(3)-/-, EP(4)-/-, and wild-type mice. PGE(2) concentration dependently stimulated RSR from kidneys of all four knockout strains with a threshold concentration of 1 nM in EP(1)-/-, EP(2)-/-, EP(3)-/-, and wild-type mice, whereas the threshold concentration was shifted to 10 nM in EP(4)-/- mice. Moreover, the maximum stimulation of RSR by PGE(2) at 1 microM was significantly reduced in EP(4)-/- (12.8-fold of control) and EP(2)-/- (15.9-fold) compared with wild-type (20.7-fold), EP(1)-/- (23.8-fold), and EP(3)-/- (20.1-fold). In contrast, stimulation of RSR by either the loop diuretic bumetanide or the beta-adrenoceptor agonist isoproterenol was similar in all strains. PGE(2) exerted a dual effect on renal vascular tone, inducing vasodilatation at low concentrations (1 nmol/) and vasoconstriction at higher concentrations (100 nmol/) in kidneys of wild-type mice. In kidneys of EP(2)-/- as well as EP(4)-/- mice, vasodilatation at low PGE(2) concentrations was prevented, whereas vasoconstriction at higher concentrations was augmented. In contrast, the vasodilatory component was pronounced in kidneys of EP(1) and EP(3) knockout mice, whereas in both genotypes the vasoconstriction at higher PGE(2) concentrations was markedly blunted. Our data provide evidence that PGE(2) stimulates renin release via activation of EP(2) and EP(4) receptors, whereas EP(1) and EP(3) receptors appear to be without functional relevance in juxtaglomerular cells. In contrast, all four receptor subtypes are involved in the control of renal vascular tone, EP(1) and EP(3) receptors increasing, and EP(2) as well as EP(4) receptors, decreasing it. PMID:15113745

  12. Lipoic acid stimulates cAMP production via G protein-coupled receptor-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Salinthone, Sonemany; Schillace, Robynn V; Tsang, Catherine; Regan, John W; Bourdette, Dennis N; Carr, Daniel W

    2011-07-01

    Lipoic acid (LA) is a naturally occurring fatty acid that exhibits anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and is being pursued as a therapeutic for many diseases including multiple sclerosis, diabetic polyneuropathy and Alzheimer's disease. We previously reported on the novel finding that racemic LA (50:50 mixture of R-LA and S-LA) stimulates cAMP production, activates prostanoid EP2 and EP4 receptors and adenylyl cyclases (AC), and suppresses activation and cytotoxicity in NK cells. In this study, we present evidence that furthers our understanding of the mechanisms of action of LA. Using various LA derivatives, such as dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA), S,S-dimethyl lipoic acid (DMLA) and lipoamide (LPM), we discovered that only LA is capable of stimulating cAMP production in NK cells. Furthermore, there is no difference in cAMP production after stimulation with either R-LA, S-LA or racemic LA. Competition and synergistic studies indicate that LA may also activate AC independent of the EP2 and EP4 receptors. Pretreatment of PBMCs with KH7 (a specific peptide inhibitor of soluble AC) and the calcium inhibitor (Bapta) prior to LA treatment resulted in reduced cAMP levels, suggesting that soluble AC and calcium signaling mediate LA stimulation of cAMP production. In addition, pharmacological inhibitor studies demonstrate that LA also activates other G protein-coupled receptors, including histamine and adenosine but not the β-adrenergic receptors. These novel findings provide information to better understand the mechanisms of action of LA, which can help facilitate the use of LA as a therapeutic for various diseases. PMID:21036588

  13. Stimulation of 5-HT1B receptors enhances cocaine reinforcement yet reduces cocaine-seeking behavior

    PubMed Central

    Pentkowski, Nathan S.; Acosta, Jazmin I.; Browning, Jenny R.; Hamilton, Elizabeth C.; Neisewander, Janet L.

    2010-01-01

    Paradoxically, stimulation of 5-HT1B receptors (5-HT1BRs) enhances sensitivity to the reinforcing effects of cocaine but attenuates incentive motivation for cocaine as measured using the extinction/reinstatement model. We revisited this issue by examining the effects of a 5-HT1BR agonist, CP94253, on cocaine reinforcement and cocaine-primed reinstatement, predicting that CP94253would enhance cocaine-seeking behavior reinstated by a low priming dose, similar to its effect on cocaine reinforcement. Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine (0.75 mg/kg, i.v.) paired with light and tone cues. For reinstatement experiments, they then underwent daily extinction training to reduce cocaine-seeking behavior (operant responses without cocaine reinforcement). Next, they were pre-treated with CP94253 (3–10 mg/kg, s.c.) and either tested for cocaine-primed (10 or 2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) or cue-elicited reinstatement of extinguished cocaine-seeking behavior. For reinforcement, effects of CP94253 (5.6 mg/kg) across a range of self-administered cocaine doses (0–1.5 mg/kg, i.v.) were examined. Cocaine dose-dependently reinstated cocaine-seeking behavior, but contrary to our prediction, CP94253 reduced reinstatement with both priming doses. Similarly, CP94253 reduced cue-elicited reinstatement. In contrast, CP94253 shifted the self-administration dose-effect curve leftward, consistent with enhanced cocaine reinforcement. When saline was substituted for cocaine, CP94253 reduced response rates (i.e. cocaine-seeking behavior). In subsequent control experiments, CP94253 decreased open-arm exploration in an elevated plus-maze suggesting an anxiogenic effect, but had no effect on locomotion or sucrose reinforcement. These results provide strong evidence that stimulation of 5-HT1BRs produces opposite effects on cocaine reinforcement and cocaine-seeking behavior, and further suggest that 5-HT1BRs may be a novel target for developing medications for cocaine dependence. PMID:19650818

  14. Stimulation of 5-HT(1B) receptors enhances cocaine reinforcement yet reduces cocaine-seeking behavior.

    PubMed

    Pentkowski, Nathan S; Acosta, Jazmin I; Browning, Jenny R; Hamilton, Elizabeth C; Neisewander, Janet L

    2009-09-01

    Paradoxically, stimulation of 5-HT(1B) receptors (5-HT(1B)Rs) enhances sensitivity to the reinforcing effects of cocaine but attenuates incentive motivation for cocaine as measured using the extinction/reinstatement model. We revisited this issue by examining the effects of a 5-HT(1B)R agonist, CP94253, on cocaine reinforcement and cocaine-primed reinstatement, predicting that CP94253 would enhance cocaine-seeking behavior reinstated by a low priming dose, similar to its effect on cocaine reinforcement. Rats were trained to self-administer cocaine (0.75 mg/kg, i.v.) paired with light and tone cues. For reinstatement experiments, they then underwent daily extinction training to reduce cocaine-seeking behavior (operant responses without cocaine reinforcement). Next, they were pre-treated with CP94253 (3-10 mg/kg, s.c.) and either tested for cocaine-primed (10 or 2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) or cue-elicited reinstatement of extinguished cocaine-seeking behavior. For reinforcement, effects of CP94253 (5.6 mg/kg) across a range of self-administered cocaine doses (0-1.5 mg/kg, i.v.) were examined. Cocaine dose-dependently reinstated cocaine-seeking behavior, but contrary to our prediction, CP94253 reduced reinstatement with both priming doses. Similarly, CP94253 reduced cue-elicited reinstatement. In contrast, CP94253 shifted the self-administration dose-effect curve leftward, consistent with enhanced cocaine reinforcement. When saline was substituted for cocaine, CP94253 reduced response rates (i.e. cocaine-seeking behavior). In subsequent control experiments, CP94253 decreased open-arm exploration in an elevated plus-maze suggesting an anxiogenic effect, but had no effect on locomotion or sucrose reinforcement. These results provide strong evidence that stimulation of 5-HT(1B)Rs produces opposite effects on cocaine reinforcement and cocaine-seeking behavior, and further suggest that 5-HT(1B)Rs may be a novel target for developing medications for cocaine dependence. PMID:19650818

  15. Enhanced type 1alpha metabotropic glutamate receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide signaling after pertussis toxin treatment.

    PubMed

    Carruthers, A M; Challiss, R A; Mistry, R; Saunders, R; Thomsen, C; Nahorski, S R

    1997-09-01

    The regulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis by the type 1alpha metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR1alpha) was investigated in stably transfected baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells. Incubation of the cells with L-glutamate, quisqualate, and 1-aminocyclopentane-1S, 3R-dicarboxylic acid resulted in a marked accumulation of [3H]inositol monophosphate (InsP1) and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P3] mass in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Pretreatment of BHK-mGluR1alpha cells with pertussis toxin [ 100 ng/ml, 24 hr] led to a dramatic 12-16-fold increase in the accumulation of [3H]InsP1 and a 2-fold increase in Ins(1,4,5)P3 in the absence of added agonist. Although only very low levels (/=75%, and the EC50 shifted leftward by 65-fold [-log EC50 values (molar), 7.26 +/- 0.23 versus 5.45 +/- 0.07; n = 4) in PTX-treated compared with control cells. In contrast, antagonist effects on agonist-stimulated [3H]InsP1 responses were similar in control and PTX-treated BHK-mGluR1alpha cells. These changes in the concentration-effect curves for mGluR agonists are consistent with a model in which the receptor associates with PTX-sensitive inhibitory (Gi/o) and PTX-insensitive stimulatory (Gq/11) G proteins that can each influence PIC activity. The present observations are consistent with a dual regulation of mGluR1alpha-mediated PIC activity that could be fundamental in

  16. Endothelin-stimulated secretion of natriuretic peptides by rat atrial myocytes is mediated by endothelin A receptors.

    PubMed

    Thibault, G; Doubell, A F; Garcia, R; Larivière, R; Schiffrin, E L

    1994-03-01

    Endothelin (ET), a potent vasoconstrictor peptide, is known to enhance the secretion of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) by the heart. In the present study, we investigated the potency of ET isopeptides to stimulate ANF and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) secretion in primary cultures of neonatal atrial myocytes, and we characterized the receptor mediating these effects. All ET isopeptides caused a twofold increase of ANF and BNP secretion with the following order of potency: ET-1 approximately ET-2 > sarafotoxin 6b > ET-3. Secretion of the natriuretic peptides was blocked by BQ-123, an ETA-receptor antagonist, but was not affected by either IRL-1620 or [Ala1,3,11,15]ET-1, two ETB-receptor agonists. ET receptors were localized by autoradiography on the surface of atrial myocytes, indicating that contaminating cells were not responsible for 125I-ET-1 binding. Competition binding analyses were then used to assess the ET-receptor subtype on atrial myocyte membrane preparations. A high-affinity (100 pmol/L) binding site with high density (approximately 1500 fmol/mg) was found to preferentially bind the ET isopeptides in the following order: ET-1 > or = ET-2 > or = sarafotoxin 6b > ET-3. Binding was totally displaced by BQ-123 but not by IRL-1620. The ET binding site therefore had the characteristics of an ETA-like receptor. Analysis by cross-linking and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that it possessed a molecular mass of approximately 50 kD. Northern blot analysis of both ETA- and ETB-receptor mRNAs allowed only the detection of the former, indicating that the ETB receptor may be expressed in very small amounts. These results demonstrate that ANF and BNP secretion by atrial myocytes is enhanced by ET via binding to an ETA-like receptor. PMID:8118954

  17. Modulation of the vagal bradycardia evoked by stimulation of upper airway receptors by central 5-HT1 receptors in anaesthetized rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Dando, Simon B; Skinner, Matthew R; Jordan, David; Ramage, Andrew G

    1998-01-01

    The effects of central application of 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B/1D receptor ligands on the reflex bradycardia, apnoea, renal sympathoexcitation and pressor response evoked by stimulating upper airway receptors with smoke in atenolol-pretreated anaesthetized rabbits were studied.Intracisternal administration of the 5-HT1A receptor antagonists WAY-100635 (100 μg kg−1) and (−)pindolol (100 μg kg−1) significantly reduced the smoke-induced bradycardia, attenuated the pressor response and in the case of (−)pindolol, sympathetic nerve activity. The same dose of WAY-100635 i.v. was without effect.Buspirone (200 μg kg−1, i.c.) potentiated the reflex bradycardia. This action was prevented if the animals were pretreated with WAY-100635 (100 μg kg−1, i.v.)(+)8-OH-DPAT (25 μg kg−1, i.c.) attenuated the evoked bradycardia, pressor response, apnoea and renal sympathoexcitation. The attenuation of the apnoea and renal sympathoexcitation, but not the bradycardia or pressor response was prevented in animals pretreated with WAY-100635 (100 μg kg−1, i.v.). The attenuation of the reflex bradycardia and the reduction in the renal sympathoexcitation were reduced by pretreatment with the 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist GR127935 (100 μg kg−1, i.v.).In WAY-100635 (100 μg kg−1, i.v.) pretreated animals, sumatriptan (a 5-HT1B/1D receptor agonist) reduced the reflex bradycardia and the pressor response. The 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist GR127935 (20 μg kg−1, i.c. or 100 μg kg−1, i.v.) had no effect on the reflex responses.In conclusion, the present data are consistent with the hypothesis that activation of central 5-HT1A receptors potentiate whilst activation of 5-HT1B/1D receptors attenuate the reflex activation of cardiac preganglionic vagal motoneurones evoked by stimulation of upper airway receptors with smoke in rabbits. PMID:9786516

  18. Antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophage chemotaxis via formyl peptide receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Jung; Lee, Ha Young; Jung, Young Su; Park, Joon Seong; Hwang, Jae Sam; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we report that one of the antimicrobial peptides scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates actin polymerization and the subsequent chemotactic migration of macrophages through the activation of ERK and protein kinase B (Akt) activity. The scolopendrasin VII-induced chemotactic migration of macrophages is inhibited by the formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) antagonist cyclosporine H. We also found that scolopendrasin VII stimulate the chemotactic migration of FPR1-transfected RBL-2H3 cells, but not that of vector-transfected cells; moreover, scolopendrasin VII directly binds to FPR1. Our findings therefore suggest that the antimicrobial peptide scolopendrasin VII, derived from Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, stimulates macrophages, resulting in chemotactic migration via FPR1 signaling, and the peptide can be useful in the study of FPR1-related biological responses. PMID:26129676

  19. Insulin-stimulated Na/sup +/ transport in a model renal epithelium: protein synthesis dependence and receptor interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Blazer-Yost, B.L.; Cox, M.

    1987-05-01

    The urinary bladder of the toad, Bufo marinus, is a well characterized model of the mammalian distal nephron. Porcine insulin (approx. 0.5-5.0 ..mu..M) stimulates net mucosal to serosal Na/sup +/ flux within 10 minutes of hormone addition. The response is maintained for at least 5 hr and is completely abolished by low doses (10..mu..M) of the epithelial Na/sup +/ channel blocker amiloride. Insulin-stimulated Na/sup +/ transport does not require new protein synthesis since it is actinomycin-D (10..mu..g/ml) insensitive. Also in 3 separate experiments in which epithelial cell proteins were examined by /sup 35/S-methionine labeling, 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis/autoradiography, no insulin induced proteins were observed. Equimolar concentrations of purified porcine proinsulin and insulin (0.64..mu..M) stimulate Na/sup +/ transport to the same extent. Thus, the putative toad insulin receptor may have different affinity characteristics than those demonstrated for insulin and proinsulin in mammalian tissues. Alternatively, the natriferic action of insulin in toad urinary bladders may be mediated by occupancy of another receptor. Preliminary experiments indicating that nanomolar concentrations of IGF/sub 1/ stimulate Na/sup +/ transport in this tissue support the latter contention.

  20. RNA editing of the human serotonin 5-HT(2C) receptor delays agonist-stimulated calcium release.

    PubMed

    Price, R D; Sanders-Bush, E

    2000-10-01

    RNA encoding the human 5-HT(2C) receptor undergoes adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing events at five positions in the putative second intracellular loop, with a corresponding reduction in receptor/G-protein coupling. Agonist-stimulated calcium release was examined in NIH-3T3 fibroblasts stably expressing the nonedited human INI (hINI) or the edited hVSV or hVGV variants. We hypothesized that different receptor isoforms would show altered dynamics of agonist-induced calcium release. The three isoforms showed a rightward shift in agonist concentration-response curves for eliciting calcium release (EC(50) values: hINI, 2.2 nM; hVSV, 15 nM; hVGV, 49 nM). Additionally, the hVGV receptor showed a blunted and delayed [Ca(2+)](i) peak compared with the hINI or hVSV receptor isoforms. These distinctions in agonist-induced [Ca(2+)](i) release imply that edited 5-HT(2C) receptors may produce distinct physiological responses within the central nervous system. PMID:10999958

  1. Recombinant epoetins do not stimulate tumor growth in erythropoietin receptor-positive breast carcinoma models.

    PubMed

    LaMontagne, Kenneth R; Butler, Jeannene; Marshall, Deborah J; Tullai, Jennifer; Gechtman, Ze'ev; Hall, Chassidy; Meshaw, Alan; Farrell, Francis X

    2006-02-01

    We investigated the significance of erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) expression following treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO; epoetin alpha) and the effect of recombinant epoetins (epoetin alpha, epoetin beta, and darbepoetin alpha) alone or in combination with anticancer therapy on tumor growth in two well-established preclinical models of breast carcinoma (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cell lines). Expression and localization of EPOR under hypoxic and normoxic conditions in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells were evaluated by immunoblotting, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemistry. EPOR binding was evaluated using [125I]rHuEPO. Proliferation, migration, and signaling in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells following treatment with rHuEPO were evaluated. Tumor growth was assessed following administration of recombinant epoetins alone and in combination with paclitaxel (anticancer therapy) in orthotopically implanted MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast carcinoma xenograft models in athymic mice. EPOR expression was detected in both tumor cell lines. EPOR localization was found to be exclusively cytosolic and no specific [125I]rHuEPO binding was observed. There was no stimulated migration, proliferation, or activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and AKT following rHuEPO treatment. In mice, treatment with recombinant epoetins alone and in combination with paclitaxel resulted in equivalent tumor burdens compared with vehicle-treated controls. Results from our study suggest that although EPOR expression was observed in two well-established breast carcinoma cell lines, it was localized to a cytosolic distribution and did not transduce a signaling cascade in tumors that leads to tumor growth. The addition of recombinant epoetins to paclitaxel did not affect the outcome of paclitaxel therapy in breast carcinoma xenograft models. These results show that recombinant epoetins do not evoke a physiologic response on EPOR-bearing tumor cells as assessed by numerous variables

  2. The role of lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor in breast cancer and directing breast cancer cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Reaves, Denise K; Fagan-Solis, Katerina D; Dunphy, Karen; Oliver, Shannon D; Scott, David W; Fleming, Jodie M

    2014-01-01

    The claudin-low molecular subtype of breast cancer is of particular interest for clinically the majority of these tumors are poor prognosis, triple negative, invasive ductal carcinomas. Claudin-low tumors are characterized by cancer stem cell-like features and low expression of cell junction and adhesion proteins. Herein, we sought to define the role of lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) in breast cancer and cancer cell behavior as LSR was recently correlated with tumor-initiating features. We show that LSR was expressed in epithelium, endothelium, and stromal cells within the healthy breast tissue, as well as in tumor epithelium. In primary breast tumor bioposies, LSR expression was significantly correlated with invasive ductal carcinomas compared to invasive lobular carcinomas, as well as ERα positive tumors and breast cancer cell lines. LSR levels were significantly reduced in claudin-low breast cancer cell lines and functional studies illustrated that re-introduction of LSR into a claudin-low cell line suppressed the EMT phenotype and reduced individual cell migration. However, our data suggest that LSR may promote collective cell migration. Re-introduction of LSR in claudin-low breast cancer cell lines reestablished tight junction protein expression and correlated with transepithelial electrical resistance, thereby reverting claudin-low lines to other intrinsic molecular subtypes. Moreover, overexpression of LSR altered gene expression of pathways involved in transformation and tumorigenesis as well as enhanced proliferation and survival in anchorage independent conditions, highlighting that reestablishment of LSR signaling promotes aggressive/tumor initiating cell behaviors. Collectively, these data highlight a direct role for LSR in driving aggressive breast cancer behavior. PMID:24637461

  3. NMDA receptor mediates chronic visceral pain induced by neonatal noxious somatic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Adrian; Mickle, Aaron; Bruckert, Mitchell; Kannampalli, Pradeep; Banerjee, Banani; Sengupta, Jyoti N.

    2014-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDAR) are important in the development and maintenance of central sensitization. Our objective was to investigate the role of spinal neurons and NMDAR in the maintenance of chronic visceral pain. Neonatal rats were injected with acidic saline adjusted to pH4.0 in the gastrocnemius muscle every other day for 12 days. In adult rats, NR1 and NR2B subunits were examined in the lumbo-sacral (LS) spinal cord. A baseline, visceromotor response (VMR) to graded colorectal distension (CRD) was recorded before and after administration of the NMDA antagonist, CGS-19755. Extracellular recordings were performed from CRD-sensitive LS spinal neurons and pelvic nerve afferents (PNA) before and after CGS-19755. Rats that received pH 4.0 saline injections demonstrated a significant increase in the expression NR2B subunits and VMR response to CRD >20mmHg. CGS-19755 (i.v. or i.t.) had no effect in naïve rats, but significantly decreased the response to CRD in pH4.0 saline injected rats. CGS-19755 had no effect on the spontaneous firing of SL-A, but decreased that of SL-S. Similarly, CGS-19755 attenuates the responses of SL-S neurons to CRD, but had no effect on SL-A neurons or on the response characteristics of PNA fibers. Neonatal noxious somatic stimulation results in chronic visceral hyperalgesia and sensitizes a specific subpopulation of CRD-sensitive spinal neurons. The sensitization of these SL-S spinal neurons is attenuated by the NMDAR antagonist. The results of this study suggest that spinal NMDARs play an important role in the development of hyperalgesia early in life. PMID:25281204

  4. Angiotensin receptor I stimulates osteoprogenitor proliferation through TGFβ-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Querques, Francesca; Cantilena, Bruno; Cozzolino, Carmine; Esposito, Maria Teresa; Passaro, Fabiana; Parisi, Silvia; Lombardo, Barbara; Russo, Tommaso; Pastore, Lucio

    2015-07-01

    Clinical studies of large human populations and pharmacological interventions in rodent models have recently suggested that anti-hypertensive drugs that target angiotensin II (Ang II) activity may also reduce loss of bone mineral density. Here, we identified in a genetic screening the Ang II type I receptor (AT1R) as a potential determinant of osteogenic differentiation and, implicitly, bone formation. Silencing of AT1R expression by RNA interference severely impaired the maturation of a multipotent mesenchymal cell line (W20-17) along the osteoblastic lineage. The same effect was also observed after the addition of the AT1R antagonist losartan but not the AT2R inhibitor PD123,319. Additional cell culture assays traced the time of greatest losartan action to the early stages of W20-17 differentiation, namely during cell proliferation. Indeed, addition of Ang II increased proliferation of differentiating W20-17 and primary mesenchymal stem cells and this stimulation was reversed by losartan treatment. Cells treated with losartan also displayed an appreciable decrease of activated (phosphorylated)-Smad2/3 proteins. Moreover, Ang II treatment elevated endogenous transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) expression considerably and in an AT1R-dependent manner. Finally, exogenous TGFβ was able to restore high proliferative activity to W20-17 cells that were treated with both Ang II and losartan. Collectively, these results suggest a novel mechanism of Ang II action in bone metabolism that is mediated by TGFβ and targets proliferation of osteoblast progenitors. PMID:25556973

  5. Galantamine-induced amyloid-{beta} clearance mediated via stimulation of microglial nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Takata, Kazuyuki; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Saeki, Mana; Terada, Maki; Kagitani, Sachiko; Kitamura, Risa; Fujikawa, Yasuhiro; Maelicke, Alfred; Tomimoto, Hidekazu; Taniguchi, Takashi; Shimohama, Shun

    2010-12-17

    Reduction of brain amyloid-β (Aβ) has been proposed as a therapeutic target for Alzheimer disease (AD), and microglial Aβ phagocytosis is noted as an Aβ clearance system in brains. Galantamine is an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor approved for symptomatic treatment of AD. Galantamine also acts as an allosterically potentiating ligand (APL) for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). APL-binding site is located close to but distinct from that for acetylcholine on nAChRs, and FK1 antibody specifically binds to the APL-binding site without interfering with the acetylcholine-binding site. We found that in human AD brain, microglia accumulated on Aβ deposits and expressed α7 nAChRs including the APL-binding site recognized with FK1 antibody. Treatment of rat microglia with galantamine significantly enhanced microglial Aβ phagocytosis, and acetylcholine competitive antagonists as well as FK1 antibody inhibited the enhancement. Thus, the galantamine-enhanced microglial Aβ phagocytosis required the combined actions of an acetylcholine competitive agonist and the APL for nAChRs. Indeed, depletion of choline, an acetylcholine-competitive α7 nAChR agonist, from the culture medium impeded the enhancement. Similarly, Ca(2+) depletion or inhibition of the calmodulin-dependent pathways for the actin reorganization abolished the enhancement. These results suggest that galantamine sensitizes microglial α7 nAChRs to choline and induces Ca(2+) influx into microglia. The Ca(2+)-induced intracellular signaling cascades may then stimulate Aβ phagocytosis through the actin reorganization. We further demonstrated that galantamine treatment facilitated Aβ clearance in brains of rodent AD models. In conclusion, we propose a further advantage of galantamine in clinical AD treatment and microglial nAChRs as a new therapeutic target. PMID:20947502

  6. Serotonin activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis via serotonin 2C receptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Heisler, Lora K; Pronchuk, Nina; Nonogaki, Katsunori; Zhou, Ligang; Raber, Jacob; Tung, Loraine; Yeo, Giles S H; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Colmers, William F; Elmquist, Joel K; Tecott, Laurence H

    2007-06-27

    The dynamic interplay between serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] neurotransmission and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been extensively studied over the past 30 years, but the underlying mechanism of this interaction has not been defined. A possibility receiving little attention is that 5-HT regulates upstream corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) signaling systems via activation of serotonin 2C receptors (5-HT(2C)Rs) in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH). Through complementary approaches in wild-type rodents and 5-HT(2C)R-deficient mice, we determined that 5-HT(2C)Rs are necessary for 5-HT-induced HPA axis activation. We used laser-capture PVH microdissection followed by microarray analysis to compare the expression of 13 5-HTRs. Only 5-HT(2C)R and 5-HT(1D)R transcripts were consistently identified as present in the PVH, and of these, the 5-HT(2C)R was expressed at a substantially higher level. The abundant expression of 5-HT(2C)Rs in the PVH was confirmed with in situ hybridization histochemistry. Dual-neurohistochemical labeling revealed that approximately one-half of PVH CRH-containing neurons coexpressed 5-HT(2C)R mRNA. We observed that PVH CRH neurons consistently depolarized in the presence of a high-affinity 5-HT(2C)R agonist, an effect blocked by a 5-HT(2C)R antagonist. Supporting the importance of 5-HT(2C)Rs in CRH neuronal activity, genetic inactivation of 5-HT(2C)Rs produced a downregulation of CRH mRNA and blunted CRH and corticosterone release after 5-HT compound administration. These findings thus provide a mechanistic explanation for the longstanding observation of HPA axis stimulation in response to 5-HT and thereby give insight into the neural circuitry mediating the complex neuroendocrine responses to stress. PMID:17596444

  7. Angiotensin II type-2 receptor stimulation induces neuronal VEGF synthesis after cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Mateos, Laura; Perez-Alvarez, Maria Jose; Wandosell, Francisco

    2016-07-01

    Intense efforts are being undertaken to understand the pathobiology of ischemia and to develop novel and effective treatments. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) is related with a beneficial role in neurodegenerative disorders, including ischemia. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we have established that AT2R stimulation by C21 compound, a specific AT2R agonist, caused a VEGF upregulation. Using mouse primary cortical neurons exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), we established that this effect was mediated by a mechanism dependent of mTORC1 signaling since mTOR inhibition abolished the C21-induced VEGF upregulation. Also, we have temporally characterized the changes on VEGF levels after ischemia induction in rats using two different approaches: transient and permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO and pMCAO). VEGF levels were permanently augmented after reperfusion (tMCAO) whereas lower levels of VEGF were found after pMCAO, remarkably at 21days. Therefore, C21 compound accelerated the recovery of the neurological status of pMCAO rats, reduced the ischemic damage area and abolished pMCAO-induced VEGF downregulation at 21days. This effect of C21 compound was mainly observed in neurons of the peri-infarct area. Our results suggest that a C21-induced VEGF upregulation may be crucial after an ischemic neuronal insult in both of our experimental approaches. This upregulation was mediated by a mechanism dependent of Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, since mTOR inhibition abolished the VEGF upregulation induced by C21. Considering that VEGF is involved in regenerative processes, we propose that AT2R activation could be used as a potential pharmacological strategy after ischemic stroke. PMID:27045356

  8. Role of brainstem adenosine A1 receptors in the cardiovascular response to hypothalamic defence area stimulation in the anaesthetized rat.

    PubMed Central

    St Lambert, J. H.; Dashwood, M. R.; Spyer, K. M.

    1996-01-01

    1. The role of centrally located adenosine A1 receptors in the cardiovascular changes associated with the hypothalamic defence response has been investigated by in vitro autoradiography and the intraventricular application of an A1 receptor antagonist. 2. 8-Cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX), a highly selective adenosine A1 antagonist and its vehicle, ethanol, were administered directly into the posterior portion of the fourth ventricle of alpha-chloralose anaesthetized, paralysed and artificially ventilated rats. 3. DPCPX (0.01 to 0.3 mg kg-1) caused a dose-dependent decrease in the magnitude of the evoked pressor response (from -13 to -23 mmHg) elicited on hypothalamic defence area stimulation at a dose 10 fold lower than that required to produce an equivalent effect following systemic administration whilst ethanol, the vehicle, had no effect. 4. In vitro autoradiography revealed a heterogeneous distribution of adenosine A1 binding sites in the lower brainstem of rats. Image analysis showed the ventrolateral medulla to have the highest density of A1 receptors. Intermediate levels of binding were seen in caudal regions of the nucleus tractus solitarii and the hypoglossal nucleus. 5. These data imply that a proportion of the cardiovascular response to hypothalamic defence area stimulation are produced by the activation of adenosine A1 receptors localized close to the surface of, or adjacent to, the fourth ventricle in the immediate vicinity of the injection site. PMID:8789379

  9. Enhanced thrombopoietin but not G-CSF receptor stimulation induces self-renewing hematopoietic stem cell divisions in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kovtonyuk, Larisa V; Manz, Markus G; Takizawa, Hitoshi

    2016-06-23

    In steady-state adult hematopoiesis, most hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are in the resting phase of the cell cycle. Upon enhanced hematopoietic demand, HSCs can be induced to divide and self-renew or differentiate. However, the cell-extrinsic signals inducing HSC cycling remain to be elucidated. Using in vivo high-resolution single HSC divisional tracking, we directly demonstrate that clinically applied thrombopoietin receptor but not granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) receptor agonists drive HSCs into self-renewing divisions leading to quantitative expansion of functional HSC as defined by their in vivo serial multilineage and long-term repopulating potential. These results suggest that thrombopoietin mimetics might be applicable to expand HSCs in vivo and to sensitize thrombopoietin receptor-expressing HSCs to cell cycle-dependent cytotoxic agents. PMID:27146433

  10. Neoceptor Concept Based on Molecular Complementarity in GPCRs: A Mutant Adenosine A3 Receptor with Selectively Enhanced Affinity for Amine-Modified Nucleosides

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Chen, Aishe; Barak, Dov; Kim, Soon-Ai; Lee, Kyeong; Link, Andreas; Van Rompaey, Philippe; van Calenbergh, Serge; Liang, Bruce T.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine A3 receptors are of interest in the treatment of cardiac ischemia, inflammation, and neurodegenerative diseases. In an effort to create a unique receptor mutant that would be activated by tailor-made synthetic ligands, we mutated the human A3 receptor at the site of a critical His residue in TM7, previously proposed to be involved in ligand recognition through interaction with the ribose moiety. The H272E mutant receptor displayed reduced affinity for most of the uncharged A3 receptor agonists and antagonists examined. For example, the nonselective agonist 1a was 19-fold less potent at the mutant receptor than at the wild-type receptor. The introduction of an amino group on the ribose moiety of adenosine resulted in either equipotency or enhanced binding affinity at the H272E mutant relative to wild-type A3 receptors, depending on the position of the amino group. 3′-Amino-3′-deoxyadenosine proved to be 7-fold more potent at the H272E mutant receptor than at the wild-type receptor, while the corresponding 2′- and 5′-amino analogues did not display significantly enhanced affinities. An 3′-amino-N6-iodobenzyl analogue showed only a small enhancement at the mutant (Ki = 320 nM) vs wild-type receptors. The 3′-amino group was intended for a direct electrostatic interaction with the negatively charged ribose-binding region of the mutant receptor, yet molecular modeling did not support this notion. This design approach is an example of engineering the structure of mutant receptors to recognize synthetic ligands for which they are selectively matched on the basis of molecular complementarity between the mutant receptor and the ligand. We have termed such engineered receptors “neoceptors”, since the ligand recognition profile of such mutant receptors need not correspond to the profile of the parent, native receptor. PMID:11708915

  11. Activation of delta-type opioid receptors modulates the responses of cat terminal ileum to field electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Venkova, K; Pencheva, N; Radomirov, R

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of (D-Ala2, D-Leu5) enkephalin amide (DADLE) on the responses of the cat terminal ileum to field electrical stimulation (pulse duration of 0.5 msec, train duration of 10 sec, 30 V) were evaluated by the changes in the contractile or the relaxatory responses of longitudinal and circular strips to electrical stimuli with a frequency of 2, 10 or 30 Hz. 2. Stimulation with a frequency of 2, 10 or 30 Hz elicited contractile responses from the longitudinal strips while in the circular strips 2 Hz stimulation induced contractions and 10 or 30 Hz stimulation caused relaxation. Tetrodotoxin (TTX) (0.1 mumol/l) abolished the electrically-induced responses in both longitudinal and circular strips. 3. DADLE (1 nmol/l) significantly inhibited the cholinergic contractile responses of the longitudinal strips to 2, 10 or 30 Hz stimulation and the contractile responses of the circular strips to 2 Hz stimulation. The relaxatory responses of the circular strips to 10 or 30 Hz stimulation were insignificantly increased by DADLE. 4. On the background of guanetidine (10 mumol/l) and atropine (3 mumol/l) DADLE significantly decreased the nonadrenergic, noncholinergic relaxatory responses of the circular strips to 2, 10 or 30 Hz stimulation. 5. DADLE did not change the maximum effects and the EC50 values of acetylcholine and noradrenaline in both longitudinal and circular strips. 6. It is suggested that in the cat terminal ileum activation of delta-type opioid receptors modulates the mechanical activity suppressing the cholinergic responses in the longitudinal and circular layers as well as the adrenergic and nonadrenergic, noncholinergic responses in the circular layer. PMID:2153605

  12. Receptor Surface Models in the Classroom: Introducing Molecular Modeling to Students in a 3-D World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geldenhuys, Werner J.; Hayes, Michael; Van der Schyf, Cornelis J.; Allen, David D.; Malan, Sarel F.

    2007-01-01

    A simple, novel and generally applicable method to demonstrate structure-activity associations of a group of biologically interesting compounds in relation to receptor binding is described. This method is useful for undergraduates and graduate students in medicinal chemistry and computer modeling programs.

  13. In adult female hamsters hypothyroidism stimulates D1 receptor-mediated breathing without altering D1 receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Schlenker, Evelyn H; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Schultz, Harold D

    2015-11-01

    Hypothyroidism affects cardiopulmonary regulation and function of dopaminergic receptors. Here we evaluated effects of 5 months of hypothyroidism on dopamine D1 receptor modulation of breathing in female hamsters using a D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390. Euthyroid hamsters (EH) served as controls. Results indicated that hypothyroid female hamsters (HH) exhibited decreased body weights and minute ventilation (VE) following hypoxia due to decreased frequency of breathing (F). Moreover, SCH 23390 administration in HH increased VE by increasing tidal volume during exposure to air, hypoxia and following hypoxia. Relative to vehicle, SCH 23390 treatment decreased body temperature and hypoxic VE responsiveness in both groups. In EH, SCH 23390 decreased F in air, hypoxia and post hypoxia, and VE during hypoxia trended to decrease (P=0.053). Finally, expression of D1 receptor protein was not different between the two groups in any region evaluated. Thus, hypothyroidism in older female hamsters affected D1 receptor modulation of ventilation differently relative to euthyroid animals, but not expression of D1 receptors. PMID:26232642

  14. The angiotensin II receptor type 2 agonist CGP 42112A stimulates NO production in the porcine jejunal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Ewert, Sara; Laesser, Mats; Johansson, Bernalt; Holm, Mathias; Aneman, Anders; Fandriks, Lars

    2003-01-01

    Background This study was conducted to elucidate if nitric oxide is released by the porcine jejunal mucosa upon selective stimulation of AT2 receptors and the possible involvement of iNOS, and to investigate the presence of jejunal AT1 and AT2 receptors. Young landrace pigs were anaesthetized with ketamine and α-chloralose. Jejunal luminal NO output was assessed by intraluminal tonometry and analysed by chemiluminescense. Western blot analysis quantified mucosal iNOS and detected AT1 and AT2 receptor protein expression. AT1 and AT2 receptor RNA expression was detected by rtPCR. Results Baseline luminal NO output correlated significantly to baseline mucosal iNOS-protein content. In animals treated with the AT2-receptor agonist CGP42112A (n = 11) luminal NO output increased significantly (at 0.1 micrograms kg-1 min-1 and 1.0 micrograms kg-1 min-1), but not in animals simultaneously treated with the AT2-receptor antagonist PD123319 (bolus 0.3 mgkg-1, infusion 0.03 mg kg-1 h-1) (n = 7). No differences in iNOS protein expression were found between groups or before/after the administration of drugs. Western blot and rtPCR recognised expression of the AT1 and AT2 receptors in jejunal tissue. Conclusion The results suggest that activation of AT2 receptors increases jejunal luminal NO output. This response was not due to an increase in the expression of the iNOS protein in the mucosa. PMID:12689346

  15. Toll-Like Receptor 2 Stimulation of Osteoblasts Mediates Staphylococcus Aureus Induced Bone Resorption and Osteoclastogenesis through Enhanced RANKL

    PubMed Central

    Kassem, Ali; Lindholm, Catharina; Lerner, Ulf H

    2016-01-01

    Severe Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) infections pose an immense threat to population health and constitute a great burden for the health care worldwide. Inter alia, S. aureus septic arthritis is a disease with high mortality and morbidity caused by destruction of the infected joints and systemic bone loss, osteoporosis. Toll-Like receptors (TLRs) are innate immune cell receptors recognizing a variety of microbial molecules and structures. S. aureus recognition via TLR2 initiates a signaling cascade resulting in production of various cytokines, but the mechanisms by which S. aureus causes rapid and excessive bone loss are still unclear. We, therefore, investigated how S. aureus regulates periosteal/endosteal osteoclast formation and bone resorption. S. aureus stimulation of neonatal mouse parietal bone induced ex vivo bone resorption and osteoclastic gene expression. This effect was associated with increased mRNA and protein expression of receptor activator of NF-kB ligand (RANKL) without significant change in osteoprotegerin (OPG) expression. Bone resorption induced by S. aureus was abolished by OPG. S. aureus increased the expression of osteoclastogenic cytokines and prostaglandins in the parietal bones but the stimulatory effect of S. aureus on bone resorption and Tnfsf11 mRNA expression was independent of these cytokines and prostaglandins. Stimulation of isolated periosteal osteoblasts with S. aureus also resulted in increased expression of Tnfsf11 mRNA, an effect lost in osteoblasts from Tlr2 knockout mice. S. aureus stimulated osteoclastogenesis in isolated periosteal cells without affecting RANKL-stimulated resorption. In contrast, S. aureus inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast formation in bone marrow macrophages. These data show that S. aureus enhances bone resorption and periosteal osteoclast formation by increasing osteoblast RANKL production through TLR2. Our study indicates the importance of using different in vitro approaches for studies of how S

  16. Effect of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor stimulation on mitochondrial [Ca2+] and secretion in chromaffin cells.

    PubMed Central

    Montero, Mayte; Alonso, Maria Teresa; Albillos, Almudena; Cuchillo-Ibáñez, Inmaculada; Olivares, Román; Villalobos, Carlos; Alvarez, Javier

    2002-01-01

    Ca(2+) uptake by mitochondria is a potentially important buffering system able to control cytosolic [Ca(2+)]. In chromaffin cells, we have shown previously that stimulation of either Ca(2+) entry or Ca(2+) release via ryanodine receptors triggers large increases in mitochondrial [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)](M)) approaching the millimolar range, whose blockade dramatically enhances catecholamine secretion [Montero, Alonso, Carnicero, Cuchillo-Ibañez, Albillos, Garcia, Carcia-Sancho and Alvarez (2000) Nat. Cell Biol. 2, 57-61]. In the present study, we have studied the effect of stimulation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP(3)) receptors using histamine. We find that histamine produces a heterogeneous increase in [Ca(2+)](M), reaching peak levels at approx. 1 microM in 70% of the mitochondrial space to several hundred micromolar in 2-3% of mitochondria. Intermediate levels were found in the rest of the mitochondrial space. Single-cell imaging experiments with aequorin showed that the heterogeneity had both an intercellular and a subcellular origin. Those mitochondria responding to histamine with increases in [Ca(2+)](M) much greater than 1 microM (30%) were the same as those that also responded with large increases in [Ca(2+)](M) following stimulation with either high-K(+) medium or caffeine. Blocking mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake with protonophores or mitochondrial inhibitors also enhanced catecholamine secretion induced by histamine. These results suggest that some InsP(3) receptors tightly co-localize with ryanodine receptors and voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels in defined subplasmalemmal functional units designed to control secretion induced by different stimuli. PMID:11931633

  17. Induction of hyperphagia and carbohydrate intake by mu-opioid receptor stimulation in circumscribed regions of frontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Mena, Jesus D.; Sadeghian, Ken; Baldo, Brian A.

    2011-01-01

    Frontal cortical regions are activated by food-associated stimuli, and this activation appears to be dysregulated in individuals with eating disorders. Nevertheless, frontal control of basic unconditioned feeding responses remains poorly understood. Here we show that hyperphagia can be driven by μ-opioid receptor stimulation in restricted regions of ventral medial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and orbitofrontal cortex. In both ad libitum-fed and food-restricted male Sprague-Dawley rats, bilateral infusions of the μ-opioid agonist, DAMGO, markedly increased intake of standard rat chow. When given a choice between palatable fat- versus carbohydrate enriched test diets, intra-vmPFC DAMGO infusions selectively increased carbohydrate intake, even in rats with a baseline fat preference. Rats also exhibited motor hyperactivity characterized by rapid switching between brief bouts of investigatory and ingestive behaviors. Intra-vmPFC DAMGO affected neither water intake nor non-specific oral behavior. Similar DAMGO infusions into neighboring areas of lateral orbital or anterior motor cortex had minimal effects on feeding. Neither stimulation of vmPFC-localized delta-opioid, kappa-opioid, dopaminergic, serotonergic, or noradrenergic receptors, nor antagonism of D1, 5HT1A, or alpha- or beta-adrenoceptors, reproduced the profile of DAMGO effects. Muscimol-mediated inactivation of the vmPFC, and intra-vmPFC stimulation of κ-opioid receptors or blockade of 5HT2A receptors, suppressed motor activity and increased feeding bout duration-a profile opposite to that seen with DAMGO. Hence, μ-opioid-induced hyperphagia and carbohydrate intake can be elicited with remarkable pharmacological and behavioral specificity from discrete subterritories of the frontal cortex. These findings may have implications for understanding affect-driven feeding and loss of restraint in eating disorders. PMID:21368037

  18. Affinity purification of human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor alpha-chain. Demonstration of binding by photoaffinity labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Chiba, S.; Shibuya, K.; Miyazono, K.; Tojo, A.; Oka, Y.; Miyagawa, K.; Takaku, F. )

    1990-11-15

    The human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor alpha-chain, a low affinity component of the receptor, was solubilized and affinity-purified from human placenta using biotinylated GM-CSF. Scatchard analysis of {sup 125}I-GM-CSF binding to the placental membrane extract disclosed that the GM-CSF receptor had a dissociation constant (Kd) of 0.5-0.8 nM, corresponding to the Kd value of the GM-CSF receptor alpha-chain on the intact placental membrane. Affinity labeling of the solubilized protein using a photoreactive cross-linking agent, N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-azidobenzoate (HSAB), demonstrated a single specific band of 70-95 kDa representing a ligand-receptor complex. Approximately 2 g of the placental membrane extract was subjected to a biotinylated GM-CSF-fixed streptavidin-agarose column, resulting in a single major band at 70 kDa on a silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate gel. The radioiodination for the purified material disclosed that the purified protein had an approximate molecular mass of 70 kDa and a pI of 6.6. Binding activity of the purified material was demonstrated by photoaffinity labeling using HSAB-{sup 125}I-GM-CSF, producing a similar specific band at 70-95 kDa as was demonstrated for the crude protein.

  19. Structure of macrophage colony stimulating factor bound to FMS: Diverse signaling assemblies of class III receptor tyrosine kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaoyan; Liu, Heli; Focia, Pamela J.; Shim, Ann Hye-Ryong; He, Xiaolin

    2009-06-12

    Macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), through binding to its receptor FMS, a class III receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), regulates the development and function of mononuclear phagocytes, and plays important roles in innate immunity, cancer and inflammation. We report a 2.4 {angstrom} crystal structure of M-CSF bound to the first 3 domains (D1-D3) of FMS. The ligand binding mode of FMS is surprisingly different from KIT, another class III RTK, in which the major ligand-binding domain of FMS, D2, uses the CD and EF loops, but not the {beta}-sheet on the opposite side of the Ig domain as in KIT, to bind ligand. Calorimetric data indicate that M-CSF cannot dimerize FMS without receptor-receptor interactions mediated by FMS domains D4 and D5. Consistently, the structure contains only 1 FMS-D1-D3 molecule bound to a M-CSF dimer, due to a weak, hydrophilic M-CSF:FMS interface, and probably a conformational change of the M-CSF dimer in which binding to the second site is rendered unfavorable by FMS binding at the first site. The partial, intermediate complex suggests that FMS may be activated in two steps, with the initial engagement step distinct from the subsequent dimerization/activation step. Hence, the formation of signaling class III RTK complexes can be diverse, engaging various modes of ligand recognition and various mechanistic steps for dimerizing and activating receptors.

  20. The G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor Agonist G-1 Inhibits Nuclear Estrogen Receptor Activity and Stimulates Novel Phosphoproteomic Signatures.

    PubMed

    Smith, L Cody; Ralston-Hooper, Kimberly J; Ferguson, P Lee; Sabo-Attwood, Tara

    2016-06-01

    Estrogen exerts cellular effects through both nuclear (ESR1 and ESR2) and membrane-bound estrogen receptors (G-protein coupled estrogen receptor, GPER); however, it is unclear if they act independently or engage in crosstalk to influence hormonal responses. To investigate each receptor's role in proliferation, transcriptional activation, and protein phosphorylation in breast cancer cells (MCF-7), we employed selective agonists for ESR1 propyl-pyrazole-triol (PPT), ESR2 diarylpropionitrile (DPN), and GPER (G-1) and also determined the impact of xenoestrogens bisphenol-A (BPA) and genistein on these effects. As anticipated, 17β-estradiol (E2), PPT, DPN, BPA, and genistein each enhanced proliferation and activation of an ERE-driven reporter gene whereas G-1 had no significant impact. However, G-1 significantly reduced E2-, PPT-, DPN-, BPA-, and genistein-induced proliferation and ERE activation at doses greater than 500 nM indicating that G-1 mediated inhibition is not ESR isotype specific. As membrane receptors initiate cascades of phosphorylation events, we performed a global phosphoproteomic analysis on cells exposed to E2 or G-1 to identify potential targets of receptor crosstalk via downstream protein phosphorylation targets. Of the 211 phosphorylated proteins identified, 40 and 13 phosphoproteins were specifically modified by E2 and G-1, respectively. Subnetwork enrichment analysis revealed several processes related to cell cycle were specifically enriched by G-1 compared with E2. Further there existed a number of newly identified proteins that were specifically phosphorylated by G-1. These phosphorylation networks highlight specific proteins that may modulate the inhibitory effects of G-1 and suggest a novel role for interference with nuclear receptor activity driven by E2 and xenoestrogens. PMID:27026707

  1. Novel Fluorescent Antagonist as a Molecular Probe in A3 Adenosine Receptor Binding Assays Using Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Kozma, Eszter; Kumar, T. Santhosh; Federico, Stephanie; Phan, Khai; Balasubramanian, Ramachandran; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Paoletta, Silvia; Moro, Stefano; Spalluto, Giampiero; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    The physiological role of the A3 adenosine receptor (AR) was explored in cardiac ischaemia, inflammatory diseases and cancer. We report a new fluorophore-conjugated human (h) A3AR antagonist for application to cell-based assays in ligand discovery and for receptor imaging. Fluorescent pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-ylamine (pyrazolo-triazolo-pyrimidine, PTP) and triazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-yl)amine (triazolo-quinazoline, TQ) AR antagonists were compared. A chain-extended and click-conjugated Alexa Fluor-488 TQ derivative (MRS5449) displayed a radioligand binding Ki value of 6.4 ± 2.5 nM in hA3AR-expressing CHO cell membranes. MRS5449 antagonized hA3AR agonist-induced inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner (KB 4.8 nM). Using flow cytometry (FCM), MRS5449 saturated hA3ARs with very high specific-to-nonspecific binding ratio with an equilibrium binding constant 5.15 nM, comparable to the Kd value of 6.65 nM calculated from kinetic experiments. Ki values of known AR antagonists in inhibition of MRS5449 binding in whole cell FCM were consistent with radioligand binding in membranes, but agonist binding was 5–20 fold weaker than obtained with agonist radioligand [125I]I-AB-MECA. Further binding analysis of MRS5549 suggested multiple agonist binding states of the A3AR. Molecular docking predicted binding modes of these fluorescent antagonists. Thus, MRS5449 is a useful tool for hA3AR characterization. PMID:22402302

  2. Effects of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists in assays of acute pain-stimulated and pain-depressed behaviors in rats.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Kelen C; Carroll, F Ivy; Negus, S Stevens

    2015-11-01

    Agonists at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) constitute one drug class being evaluated as candidate analgesics. Previous preclinical studies have implicated α4β2 and α7 nAChRs as potential mediators of the antinociceptive effects of (–)-nicotine hydrogen tartrate (nicotine) and other nAChR agonists; however, these studies have relied exclusively on measures of pain-stimulated behavior, which can be defined as behaviors that increase in frequency, rate, or intensity after presentation of a noxious stimulus. Pain is also associated with depression of many behaviors, and drug effects can differ in assays of pain-stimulated versus pain-depressed behavior. Accordingly, this study compared the effects of nicotine, the selective α4/6β2 agonist 5-(123I)iodo-3-[2(S)-2-azetidinylmethoxy]pyridine (5-I-A-85380), and the selective α7 agonist N-(3R)-1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl-4-chlorobenzamide in assays of pain-stimulated and pain-depressed behavior in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Intraperitoneal injection of dilute lactic acid served as an acute noxious stimulus to either stimulate a stretching response or depress the operant responding, which is maintained by electrical brain stimulation in an intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) procedure. Nicotine produced a dose-dependent, time-dependent, and mecamylamine-reversible blockade of both acid-stimulated stretching and acid-induced depression of ICSS. 5-I-A-85380 also blocked both acid-stimulated stretching and acid-induced depression of ICSS, whereas N-(3R)-1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl-4-chlorobenzamide produced no effect in either procedure. Both nicotine and 5-I-A-85380 were ≥10-fold more potent in blocking the acid-induced depression of ICSS than in blocking the acid-induced stimulation of stretching. These results suggest that stimulation of α4β2 and/or α6β2 nAChRs may be especially effective to alleviate the signs of pain-related behavioral depression in rats; however, nonselective behavioral effects

  3. Reevaluation of Fatty Acid Receptor 1 as a Drug Target for the Stimulation of Insulin Secretion in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Robert; Kaiser, Gabriele; Gerst, Felicia; Christiansen, Elisabeth; Due-Hansen, Maria E.; Grundmann, Manuel; Machicao, Fausto; Peter, Andreas; Kostenis, Evi; Ulven, Trond; Fritsche, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Ullrich, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    The role of free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFAR1/GPR40) in glucose homeostasis is still incompletely understood. Small receptor agonists stimulating insulin secretion are undergoing investigation for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Surprisingly, genome-wide association studies did not discover diabetes risk variants in FFAR1. We reevaluated the role of FFAR1 in insulin secretion using a specific agonist, FFAR1-knockout mice and human islets. Nondiabetic individuals were metabolically phenotyped and genotyped. In vitro experiments indicated that palmitate and a specific FFAR1 agonist, TUG-469, stimulate glucose-induced insulin secretion through FFAR1. The proapoptotic effect of chronic exposure of β-cells to palmitate was independent of FFAR1. TUG-469 was protective, whereas inhibition of FFAR1 promoted apoptosis. In accordance with the proapoptotic effect of palmitate, in vivo cross-sectional observations demonstrated a negative association between fasting free fatty acids (NEFAs) and insulin secretion. Because NEFAs stimulate secretion through FFAR1, we examined the interaction of genetic variation in FFAR1 with NEFA and insulin secretion. The inverse association of NEFA and secretion was modulated by rs1573611 and became steeper for carriers of the minor allele. In conclusion, FFAR1 agonists support β-cell function, but variation in FFAR1 influences NEFA effects on insulin secretion and therefore could affect therapeutic efficacy of FFAR1 agonists. PMID:23378609

  4. CD95 co-stimulation blocks activation of naive T cells by inhibiting T cell receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lindquist, Jonathan A.; Arhel, Nathalie; Felder, Edward; Karl, Sabine; Haas, Tobias L.; Fulda, Simone; Walczak, Henning; Kirchhoff, Frank; Debatin, Klaus-Michael

    2009-01-01

    CD95 is a multifunctional receptor that induces cell death or proliferation depending on the signal, cell type, and cellular context. Here, we describe a thus far unknown function of CD95 as a silencer of T cell activation. Naive human T cells triggered by antigen-presenting cells expressing a membrane-bound form of CD95 ligand (CD95L) or stimulated by anti-CD3 and -CD28 antibodies in the presence of recombinant CD95L had reduced activation and proliferation, whereas preactivated, CD95-sensitive T cells underwent apoptosis. Triggering of CD95 during T cell priming interfered with proximal T cell receptor signaling by inhibiting the recruitment of ζ-chain–associated protein of 70 kD, phospholipase-γ, and protein kinase C-θ into lipid rafts, thereby preventing their mutual tyrosine protein phosphorylation. Subsequently, Ca2+ mobilization and nuclear translocation of transcription factors NFAT, AP1, and NF-κB were strongly reduced, leading to impaired cytokine secretion. CD95-mediated inhibition of proliferation in naive T cells could not be reverted by the addition of exogenous interleukin-2 and T cells primed by CD95 co-stimulation remained partially unresponsive upon secondary T cell stimulation. HIV infection induced CD95L expression in primary human antigeen-presenting cells, and thereby suppressed T cell activation, suggesting that CD95/CD95L-mediated silencing of T cell activation represents a novel mechanism of immune evasion. PMID:19487421

  5. Reevaluation of fatty acid receptor 1 as a drug target for the stimulation of insulin secretion in humans.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Robert; Kaiser, Gabriele; Gerst, Felicia; Christiansen, Elisabeth; Due-Hansen, Maria E; Grundmann, Manuel; Machicao, Fausto; Peter, Andreas; Kostenis, Evi; Ulven, Trond; Fritsche, Andreas; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Ullrich, Susanne

    2013-06-01

    The role of free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFAR1/GPR40) in glucose homeostasis is still incompletely understood. Small receptor agonists stimulating insulin secretion are undergoing investigation for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Surprisingly, genome-wide association studies did not discover diabetes risk variants in FFAR1. We reevaluated the role of FFAR1 in insulin secretion using a specific agonist, FFAR1-knockout mice and human islets. Nondiabetic individuals were metabolically phenotyped and genotyped. In vitro experiments indicated that palmitate and a specific FFAR1 agonist, TUG-469, stimulate glucose-induced insulin secretion through FFAR1. The proapoptotic effect of chronic exposure of β-cells to palmitate was independent of FFAR1. TUG-469 was protective, whereas inhibition of FFAR1 promoted apoptosis. In accordance with the proapoptotic effect of palmitate, in vivo cross-sectional observations demonstrated a negative association between fasting free fatty acids (NEFAs) and insulin secretion. Because NEFAs stimulate secretion through FFAR1, we examined the interaction of genetic variation in FFAR1 with NEFA and insulin secretion. The inverse association of NEFA and secretion was modulated by rs1573611 and became steeper for carriers of the minor allele. In conclusion, FFAR1 agonists support β-cell function, but variation in FFAR1 influences NEFA effects on insulin secretion and therefore could affect therapeutic efficacy of FFAR1 agonists. PMID:23378609

  6. Nucleoside-derived antagonists to A3 adenosine receptors lower mouse intraocular pressure and act across species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao; Do, Chi Wai; Avila, Marcel Y; Peterson-Yantorno, Kim; Stone, Richard A; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Joshi, Bhalchandra; Besada, Pedro; Jeong, Lak Shin; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Civan, Mortimer M

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether novel, selective antagonists of human A3 adenosine receptors (ARs) derived from the A3-selective agonist Cl-IB-MECA lower intraocular pressure (IOP) and act across species. IOP was measured invasively with a micropipette by the Servo-Null Micropipette System (SNMS) and by non-invasive pneumotonometry during topical drug application. Antagonist efficacy was also assayed by measuring inhibition of adenosine-triggered shrinkage of native bovine nonpigmented ciliary epithelial (NPE) cells. Five agonist-based A3AR antagonists lowered mouse IOP measured with SNMS tonometry by 3-5 mm Hg within minutes of topical application. Of the five agonist derivatives, LJ 1251 was the only antagonist to lower IOP measured by pneumotonometry. No effect was detected pneumotonometrically over 30 min following application of the other four compounds, consonant with slower, smaller responses previously measured non-invasively following topical application of A3AR agonists and the dihydropyridine A3AR antagonist MRS 1191. Latanoprost similarly lowered SNMS-measured IOP, but not IOP measured non-invasively over 30 min. Like MRS 1191, agonist-based A3AR antagonists applied to native bovine NPE cells inhibited adenosine-triggered shrinkage. In summary, the results indicate that antagonists of human A3ARs derived from the potent, selective A3 agonist Cl-IB-MECA display efficacy in mouse and bovine cells, as well. When intraocular delivery was enhanced by measuring mouse IOP invasively, five derivatives of the A3AR agonist Cl-IB-MECA lowered IOP but only one rapidly reduced IOP measured non-invasively after topical application. We conclude that derivatives of the highly-selective A3AR agonist Cl-IB-MECA can reduce IOP upon reaching their intraocular target, and that nucleoside-based derivatives are promising A3 antagonists for study in multiple animal models. PMID:19878673

  7. Nucleoside-Derived Antagonists to A3 Adenosine Receptors Lower Mouse Intraocular Pressure and Act across Species

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhao; Do, Chi Wai; Avila, Marcel Y.; Peterson-Yantorno, Kim; Stone, Richard A.; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Joshi, Bhalchandra; Besada, Pedro; Jeong, Lak Shin; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Civan, Mortimer M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether novel, selective antagonists of human A3 adenosine receptors (ARs) derived from the A3-selective agonist Cl-IB-MECA lower intraocular pressure (IOP) and act across species. IOP was measured invasively with a micropipette by the Servo-Null Micropipette System (SNMS) and by non-invasive pneumotonometry during topical drug application. Antagonist efficacy was also assayed by measuring inhibition of adenosine-triggered shrinkage of native bovine nonpigmented ciliary epithelial (NPE) cells. Five agonist-based A3AR antagonists lowered mouse IOP measured with SNMS tonometry by 3–5 mm Hg within minutes of topical application. Of the five agonist derivatives, LJ 1251 was the only antagonist to lower IOP measured by pneumotonometry. No effect was detected pneumotonometrically over 30 min following application of the other four compounds, consonant with slower, smaller responses previously measured non-invasively following topical application of A3AR agonists and the dihydropyridine A3AR antagonist MRS 1191. Latanoprost similarly lowered SNMS-measured IOP, but not IOP measured non-invasively over 30 minutes. Like MRS 1191, agonist-based A3AR antagonists applied to native bovine NPE cells inhibited adenosine-triggered shrinkage. In summary, the results indicate that antagonists of human A3ARs derived from the potent, selective A3 agonist Cl-IB-MECA display efficacy in mouse and bovine cells, as well. When intraocular delivery was enhanced by measuring mouse IOP invasively, five derivatives of the A3AR agonist Cl-IB-MECA lowered IOP but only one rapidly reduced IOP measured non-invasively after topical application. We conclude that derivatives of the highly selective A3AR agonist Cl-IB-MECA can reduce IOP upon reaching their intraocular target, and that nucleoside-based derivatives are promising A3 antagonists for study in multiple animal models. PMID:19878673

  8. Purine (N)-Methanocarba Nucleoside Derivatives Lacking an Exocyclic Amine as Selective A3 Adenosine Receptor Agonists.

    PubMed

    Tosh, Dilip K; Ciancetta, Antonella; Warnick, Eugene; O'Connor, Robert; Chen, Zhoumou; Gizewski, Elizabeth; Crane, Steven; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Auchampach, John A; Salvemini, Daniela; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2016-04-14

    Purine (N)-methanocarba-5'-N-alkyluronamidoriboside A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) agonists lacking an exocyclic amine resulted from an unexpected reaction during a Sonogashira coupling and subsequent aminolysis. Because the initial C6-Me and C6-styryl derivatives had unexpectedly high A3AR affinity, other rigid nucleoside analogues lacking an exocyclic amine were prepared. Of these, the C6-Me-(2-phenylethynyl) and C2-(5-chlorothienylethynyl) analogues were particularly potent, with human A3AR Ki values of 6 and 42 nM, respectively. Additionally, the C2-(5-chlorothienyl)-6-H analogue was potent and selective at A3AR (MRS7220, Ki 60 nM) and also completely reversed mouse sciatic nerve mechanoallodynia (in vivo, 3 μmol/kg, po). The lack of a C6 H-bond donor while maintaining A3AR affinity and efficacy could be rationalized by homology modeling and docking of these hypermodified nucleosides. The modeling suggests that a suitable combination of stabilizing features can partially compensate for the lack of an exocyclic amine, an otherwise important contributor to recognition in the A3AR binding site. PMID:26890707

  9. A [3]rotaxane with two porphyrinic plates acting as an adaptable receptor.

    PubMed

    Frey, Julien; Tock, Christian; Collin, Jean-Paul; Heitz, Valérie; Sauvage, Jean-Pierre

    2008-04-01

    Following a multistep procedure, the copper(I)-templated strategy allowed preparation of a multifunctional [3]rotaxane. The dumbbell consists of a central two-bidentate chelate unit and two terminal stoppers. The two rings threaded on the rotaxane axis consist each of a 1,10-phenanthroline-incorporating macrocycle, rigidly connected to an appended zinc-complexed porphyrin. The copper(I) template can be removed, affording a free rotaxane whose two rings can glide freely along the axis and spin around it. The dumbbell being very long (approximately 85 A in its extended conformation from one stopper to the other), the porphyrin-porphyrin distance can be varied over a wide range. The two porphyrinic plates constitute the key elements of a receptor able to complex various guests between the plates. The ability of the threaded rings to move freely makes the host perfectly adjustable, allowing capture of geometrically very different guests. The copper(I)-complexed rotaxane also acts as an efficient receptor, although its adaptability is obviously more limited than that of its free rotaxane counterpart. PMID:18338892

  10. Identification of a receptor necessary for Nogo-B stimulated chemotaxis and morphogenesis of endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Robert Qing; Gao, Yuan; Harrison, Kenneth D.; Prendergast, Jay; Acevedo, Lisette M.; Yu, Jun; Hu, Fenghua; Strittmatter, Stephen M.; Sessa, William C.

    2006-01-01

    Nogo isoforms (Nogo-A and -B) have been implicated in regulating neural and cardiovascular functions, such as cell spreading and chemotaxis. Unlike the loop domain (Nogo-66) found in all Nogo isoforms that can interact with a neural-specific Nogo-66 receptor, the receptor for the amino terminus of Nogo-B that mediates vascular function is unknown. Here, we identify a previously uncharacterized Nogo-B receptor specific for the amino terminus of Nogo-B and show that Nogo-B receptor localizes with the ligand Nogo-B during VEGF and wound healing angiogenesis in vivo, mediates chemotaxis in a heterologous expression system and chemotaxis, and 3D tube formation in native endothelial cells. Thus, identification of this receptor may lead to the discovery of agonists or antagonists of this pathway to regulate vascular remodeling and angiogenesis. PMID:16835300

  11. Activation of P2X(7) receptors stimulates the expression of P2Y(2) receptor mRNA in astrocytes cultured from rat brain.

    PubMed

    D'Alimonte, I; Ciccarelli, R; Di Iorio, P; Nargi, E; Buccella, S; Giuliani, P; Rathbone, M P; Jiang, S; Caciagli, F; Ballerini, P

    2007-01-01

    Under pathological conditions brain cells release ATP at concentrations reported to activate P2X(7) ionotropic receptor subtypes expressed in both neuronal and glial cells. In the present study we report that the most potent P2X(7) receptor agonist BzATP stimulates the expression of the metabotropic ATP receptor P2Y(2) in cultured rat brain astrocytes. In other cell types several kinds of stimulation, including stress or injury, induce P2Y(2) expression that, in turn, is involved in different cell reactions. Similarly, it has recently been found that in astrocytes and astrocytoma cells P2Y(2) sites can trigger neuroprotective pathways through the activation of several mechanisms, including the induction of genes for antiapoptotic factors, neurotrophins, growth factors and neuropeptides. Here we present evidence that P2Y(2) mRNA expression in cultured astrocytes peaks 6 h after BzATP exposure and returns to basal levels after 24 h. This effect was mimicked by high ATP concentrations (1 mM) and was abolished by P2X(7)-antagonists oATP and BBG. The BzATP-evoked P2Y(2) receptor up-regulation in cultured astrocytes was coupled to an increased UTP-mediated intracellular calcium response. This effect was inhibited by oATP and BBG and by P2Y(2)siRNA, thus supporting evidence of increased P2Y(2) activity. To further investigate the mechanisms by which P2X(7) receptors mediated the P2Y(2) mRNA up-regulation, the cells were pre-treated with the chelating agent EGTA, or with inhibitors of mitogen-activated kinase (MAPK) (PD98059) or protein kinase C, (GF109203X). Each inhibitor significantly reduced the extent to which BzATP induced P2Y(2) mRNA. Both BzATP and ATP (1 mM) increased ERK1/2 activation. P2X(7)-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation was unaffected by pre-treatment of astrocytes with EGTA whereas it was inhibited by GF109203X. Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), an activator of PKCs, rapidly increased ERK1/2 activation. We conclude that activation of P2X(7) receptors in

  12. Temporal patterns and selectivity in the unitary responses of olfactory receptors in the tiger salamander to odor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Baylin, F

    1979-07-01

    Temporal patterns and selectivity in unitary responses of 100 single olfactory receptors in the tiger salamander to odor stimulation were investigated. An olfactometer which permitted control of stimulus concentration, duration, and flow rate was calibrated with a gas chromatograph. Stimulus pulses were monitored by recording the electroolfactogram from the surface of the olfactory epithelium. Both diphasic and triphasic spikes were recorded extracellularly. No discernible differences in types of responses, reproducibility of responses, and cross-unit distribution of spontaneous rates distinguished diphasic from triphasic units. The cross-unit selectivity in responses to the seven olfactory stimulants used and the range of odorant concentrations which effectively evoked these responses suggest variations in types and number of types of receptive sites on each cell. Temporal patterns in the unitary responses were generally less complex than those observed in the olfactory bulb. Phasic stimulations evoked phasic patterns. Tonic stimulations evoked phasic/tonic patterns. Occasionally poststimulus depressions or elevations in firing rates were observed. The nature of these patterns varied somewhat with odorant concentration for a particular unit. PMID:479819

  13. Kaempferol stimulates gene expression of low-density lipoprotein receptor through activation of Sp1 in cultured hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ochiai, Ayasa; Miyata, Shingo; Iwase, Masamori; Shimizu, Makoto; Inoue, Jun; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2016-01-01

    A high level of plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is considered a risk factor for atherosclerosis. Because the hepatic LDL receptor (LDLR) is essential for clearing plasma LDL cholesterol, activation of LDLR is a promising therapeutic target for patients with atherosclerotic disease. Here we demonstrated how the flavonoid kaempferol stimulated the gene expression and activity of LDLR in HepG2 cells. The kaempferol-mediated stimulation of LDLR gene expression was completely inhibited by knockdown of Sp1 gene expression. Treatment of HepG2 cells with kaempferol stimulated the recruitment of Sp1 to the promoter region of the LDLR gene, as well as the phosphorylation of Sp1 on Thr-453 and Thr-739. Moreover, these kaempferol-mediated processes were inhibited in the presence of U0126, an ERK pathway inhibitor. These results suggest that kaempferol may increase the activity of Sp1 through stimulation of Sp1 phosphorylation by ERK1/2 and subsequent induction of LDLR expression and activity. PMID:27109240

  14. A novel tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonist prevents motility-stimulating effects of neurokinin A in small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Lördal, Mikael; Navalesi, Giovanni; Theodorsson, Elvar; Maggi, Carlo A; Hellström, Per M

    2001-01-01

    MEN 11420 (nepadutant) is a potent, selective and competitive antagonist of tachykinin NK2 receptors. The objective of the present study was to assess the capability of the drug to antagonize the stimulatory effects of neurokinin A (NKA) on gastrointestinal motility, as well as to change the fasting migrating motor complex (MMC). Thirty-four male volunteers were randomized to treatment with either placebo or MEN 11420 in a double-blinded manner. Effects of MEN 11420 (8 mg intravenously) were evaluated as changes in phases I, II and III of MMC, as well as contraction frequency, amplitude and motility index during baseline conditions and during stimulation of motility using NKA (25 pmol kg−1 min−1 intravenously). NKA preceded by placebo increased the fraction of time occupied by phase II, increased contraction frequency, amplitude and motility index. MEN 11420 effectively antagonized the motility-stimulating effects of NKA. MEN 11420 reduced the phase II-stimulating effect of NKA. In addition, the stimulatory effect of NKA on contraction frequency and amplitude, as well as motility index were inhibited by MEN 11420. MEN 11420 did not affect the characteristics of MMC during saline infusion. Plasma levels of MEN 11420 peaked during the first hour after infusion and decreased to less than half during the first 2 h. In conclusion, intravenous MEN 11420 effectively inhibited NKA-stimulated, but not basal gastrointestinal motility, and was well tolerated by all subjects. PMID:11522614

  15. Tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 alpha stimulate late shedding of p75 TNF receptors but not p55 TNF receptors from human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Joyce, D A; Steer, J H

    1995-11-01

    Soluble receptors for TNF (sTNF-R) are present at elevated concentrations in the synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. They are presumably released by cells of the synovial membrane, including the monocyte-derived synovial macrophages. Cytokines from the synovium, including IL-1 and TNF-alpha, may stimulate release. We therefore examined the release of sTNF-R from monocytes exposed to IL-1 and TNF-alpha. Elutriator-purified human blood monocytes spontaneously released both the p75 and the p55 sTNF-R (1011 +/- 199 and 177 +/- 20 pg/10(6) cells, respectively, mean +/- SEM) during 48 h of in vitro culture. TNF-alpha and IL-1 alpha induced time- and concentration-dependent increases in the release of sTNF-R75 from monocytes, but neither had a measurable effect on the release of sTNF-R55. The release of sTNF-R75 was inhibited by cycloheximide. Neither lymphocytes nor polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) released measurable sTNF-R spontaneously or in response to stimulation with IL-1 alpha, but TNF-alpha stimulated the release of small amounts of sTNF-R75 by PMN. The timing, cycloheximide sensitivity, and selectivity of stimulated release of TNF-R75 by monocytes are consistent with previous observations on other cell types of late (8-20 h) increased synthesis and turnover of cell surface TNF-R75, but not TNF-R55, after stimulation with TNF-alpha or IL-1. These observations help to explain why elevated levels of sTNF-R in synovial fluid coexist with enhanced expression of cell surface TNF-R on synovial macrophages in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:8590306

  16. A dimeric peptide with erythropoiesis-stimulating activity uniquely affects erythropoietin receptor ligation and cell surface expression.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rakesh; Green, Jennifer M; Schatz, Peter J; Wojchowski, Don M

    2016-08-01

    Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) that exert long-acting antianemia effects have been developed recently, but their mechanisms are poorly understood. Analyses reveal unique erythropoietin receptor (EPOR)-binding properties for one such ESA, the synthetic EPOR agonist peginesatide. Compared with recombinant human EPO and darbepoietin, peginesatide exhibited a slow on rate, but sustained EPOR residency and resistant displacement. In EPO-dependent human erythroid progenitor UT7epo cells, culture in peginesatide unexpectedly upmodulated endogenous cell surface EPOR levels with parallel increases in full-length EPOR-68K levels. These unique properties are suggested to contribute to the durable activity of this (and perhaps additional) dimeric peptide hematopoietic growth factor receptor agonist. PMID:27174804

  17. Bidirectional TSH and IGF-1 Receptor Cross Talk Mediates Stimulation of Hyaluronan Secretion by Graves' Disease Immunoglobins

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Christine C.; Neumann, Susanne; Place, Robert F.; Marcus-Samuels, Bernice

    2015-01-01

    Context: There is no pathogenetically linked medical therapy for Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO). Lack of animal models and conflicting in vitro studies have hindered the development of such therapy. Recent reports propose that Graves' Igs bind to and activate thyrotropin receptors (TSHRs) and IGF-1 receptors (IGF-1Rs) on cells in orbital fat, stimulating hyaluronan (HA) secretion, a component of GO. Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate potential cross talk between TSHRs and IGF-1Rs in the pathogenesis of GO using a sensitive HA assay. Design/Setting/Participants: Orbital fibroblasts from GO patients were collected in an academic clinical practice and cultured in a research laboratory. Cells were treated with TSH, IGF-1, and a monoclonal Graves' Ig M22. Main Outcome Measures: HA was measured by a modified ELISA. Results: Simultaneous activation by TSH and IGF-1 synergistically increased HA secretion from 320 ± 52 for TSH and 430 ± 65 μg/mL for IGF-1 alone, to 1300 ± 95 μg/mL. IGF-1 shifted the TSH EC50 19-fold to higher potency. The dose response to M22 was biphasic. An IGF-1R antagonist inhibited the higher potency phase but had no effect on the lower potency phase. M22 did not cause IGF-1R autophosphorylation. A TSHR antagonist abolished both phases of M22-stimulated HA secretion. Conclusions: M22 stimulation of HA secretion by GO fibroblasts/preadipocytes involves cross talk between TSHR and IGF-1R. This cross talk relies on TSHR activation rather than direct activation of IGF-1R and leads to synergistic stimulation of HA secretion. These data propose a model for GO pathogenesis that explains previous contradictory results and argues for TSHR as the primary therapeutic target for GO. PMID:25485727

  18. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motile activity through LPA receptor-3 in liver epithelial WB-F344 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Ayano; Tanabe, Eriko; Inoue, Serina; Kitayoshi, Misaho; Okimoto, Souta; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motility of WB-F344 cells. •LPA{sub 3} is induced by hydrogen peroxide in WB-F344 cells. •Cell motility by hydrogen peroxide is inhibited in LPA{sub 3} knockdown cells. •LPA signaling is involved in cell migration by hydrogen peroxide. -- Abstract: Hydrogen peroxide which is one of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates a variety of biological responses, including cell proliferation and migration. In the present study, we investigated whether lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling is involved in cell motile activity stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. The rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide at 0.1 or 1 μM for 48 h. In cell motility assays, hydrogen peroxide treated cells showed significantly high cell motile activity, compared with untreated cells. To measure the expression levels of LPA receptor genes, quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis was performed. The expressions of LPA receptor-3 (Lpar3) in hydrogen peroxide treated cells were significantly higher than those in control cells, but not Lpar1 and Lpar2 genes. Next, to assess the effect of LPA{sub 3} on cell motile activity, the Lpar3 knockdown cells from WB-F344 cells were also treated with hydrogen peroxide. The cell motile activity of the knockdown cells was not stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, in liver cancer cells, hydrogen peroxide significantly activated cell motility of Lpar3-expressing cells, but not Lpar3-unexpressing cells. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA{sub 3} may be mainly involved in cell motile activity of WB-F344 cells stimulated by hydrogen peroxide.

  19. DCP-LA stimulates AMPA receptor exocytosis through CaMKII activation due to PP-1 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Takeshi; Yaguchi, Takahiro; Nagata, Tetsu; Tanaka, Akito; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2009-10-01

    The linoleic acid derivative 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA) activated Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) by inhibiting protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1). DCP-LA induced a transient huge facilitation of synaptic transmission monitored from the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices, which was largely inhibited by the CaMKII inhibitor KN-93. DCP-LA potentiated kainate-evoked whole-cell membrane currents for Xenopus oocytes expressing alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors composed of the GluR1, GluR3, GluR1/GluR2, GluR1/GluR3, and GluR1/GluR2/GluR3 subunits, and the potentiation was significantly inhibited by KN-93. A similar potentiation was still found with mutant GluR1 (S831A) receptor lacking CaMKII phosphorylation site. The GluR1 and GluR2 subunits formed AMPA receptors in the rat hippocampus, and DCP-LA increased expression of both the subunits on the plasma membrane. The DCP-LA action was blocked by KN-93 and the exocytosis inhibitor botulinum toxin type A, but not by the endocytosis inhibitor phenylarsine oxide. DCP-LA, thus, appears to activate CaMKII through PP-1 inhibition, that stimulates AMPA receptor exocytosis to increase expression of the receptors on the plasma membrane, responsible for potentiate AMPA receptor responses and facilitation of hippocampal synaptic transmission. PMID:19492412

  20. Transforming Growth Factor {beta} Can Stimulate Smad1 Phosphorylation Independently of Bone Morphogenic Protein Receptors.

    PubMed

    Wrighton, Katharine H; Lin, Xia; Yu, Paul B; Feng, Xin-Hua

    2009-04-10

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) superfamily ligands control a diverse set of cellular processes by activating type I and type II serine-threonine receptor kinases. Canonical TGFbeta signaling is mediated via the TbetaRI/ALK5 type I receptor that phosphorylates Smad2 and Smad3 in their SXS motif to facilitate their activation and subsequent role in transcriptional regulation. Canonical bone morphogenic protein (BMP) signaling is mediated via the ALK1/2/3/6 type I receptors that phosphorylate Smad1, Smad5, and Smad8 in their SXS motif. However, studies in endothelial cells have shown that TGFbeta can also lead to the phosphorylation of Smad1, dependent on ALK1 receptor activity. Here we present data showing that TGFbeta can significantly induce Smad1 phosphorylation in several non-endothelial cell lineages. Additionally, by using chemical inhibitors specific for the TGFbeta/activin/nodal (ALK4/5/7) and BMP (ALK1/2/3/6) type I receptors, we show that in some cell types TGFbeta induces Smad1 phosphorylation independently of the BMP type I receptors. Thus, TGFbeta-mediated Smad1 phosphorylation appears to occur via different receptor complexes in a cell type-specific manner. PMID:19224917

  1. CF102 an A3 Adenosine Receptor Agonist Mediates Anti-Tumor and Anti-Inflammatory Effects in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    COHEN, S.; STEMMER, S.M.; ZOZULYA, G.; OCHAION, A.; PATOKA, R.; BARER, F.; BAR-YEHUDA, S.; RATH-WOLFSON, L.; JACOBSON, K.A.; FISHMAN, P.

    2012-01-01

    The Gi protein-associated A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) is a member of the adenosine receptor family. Selective agonists at the A3AR, such as CF101 and CF102 were found to induce anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects. In this study, we examined the differential effect of CF102 in pathological conditions of the liver. The anti-inflammatory protective effect of CF101 was tested in a model of liver inflammation induced by Concanavalin A (Con. A) and the anti-cancer effect of CF102 was examined in vitro and in a xenograft animal model utilizing Hep-3B hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. The mechanism of action was explored by following the expression levels of key signaling proteins in the inflamed and tumor liver tissues, utilizing Western blot (WB) analysis. In the liver inflammation model, CF102 (100 μg/kg) markedly reduced the secretion of serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase and serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase in comparison to the vehicle-treated group. Mechanistically, CF102 treatment decreased the expression level of phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase-3β, NF-κB, and TNF-α and prevented apoptosis in the liver. This was demonstrated by decreased expression levels of Fas receptor (FasR) and of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and Bad in liver tissues. In addition, CF102-induced apoptosis of Hep-3B cells both in vitro and in vivo via de-regulation of the PI3K-NF-κB signaling pathway, resulting in up-regulation of pro-apoptotic proteins. Taken together, CF102 acts as a protective agent in liver inflammation and inhibits HCC tumor growth. These results suggest that CF102 through its differential effect is a potential drug candidate to treat various pathological liver conditions. PMID:21660967

  2. CF102 an A3 adenosine receptor agonist mediates anti-tumor and anti-inflammatory effects in the liver.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S; Stemmer, S M; Zozulya, G; Ochaion, A; Patoka, R; Barer, F; Bar-Yehuda, S; Rath-Wolfson, L; Jacobson, K A; Fishman, P

    2011-09-01

    The Gi protein-associated A(3) adenosine receptor (A(3) AR) is a member of the adenosine receptor family. Selective agonists at the A(3) AR, such as CF101 and CF102 were found to induce anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects. In this study, we examined the differential effect of CF102 in pathological conditions of the liver. The anti-inflammatory protective effect of CF101 was tested in a model of liver inflammation induced by Concanavalin A (Con. A) and the anti-cancer effect of CF102 was examined in vitro and in a xenograft animal model utilizing Hep-3B hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. The mechanism of action was explored by following the expression levels of key signaling proteins in the inflamed and tumor liver tissues, utilizing Western blot (WB) analysis. In the liver inflammation model, CF102 (100 µg/kg) markedly reduced the secretion of serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase and serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase in comparison to the vehicle-treated group. Mechanistically, CF102 treatment decreased the expression level of phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase-3β, NF-κB, and TNF-α and prevented apoptosis in the liver. This was demonstrated by decreased expression levels of Fas receptor (FasR) and of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and Bad in liver tissues. In addition, CF102-induced apoptosis of Hep-3B cells both in vitro and in vivo via de-regulation of the PI3K-NF-κB signaling pathway, resulting in up-regulation of pro-apoptotic proteins. Taken together, CF102 acts as a protective agent in liver inflammation and inhibits HCC tumor growth. These results suggest that CF102 through its differential effect is a potential drug candidate to treat various pathological liver conditions. PMID:21660967

  3. Effects of GABA receptor antagonists on thresholds of P23H rat retinal ganglion cells to electrical stimulation of the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Ralph J.; Rizzo, Joseph F., III

    2011-06-01

    An electronic retinal prosthesis may provide useful vision for patients suffering from retinitis pigmentosa (RP). In animal models of RP, the amount of current needed to activate retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is higher than in normal, healthy retinas. In this study, we sought to reduce the stimulation thresholds of RGCs in a degenerate rat model (P23H-line 1) by blocking GABA receptor mediated inhibition in the retina. We examined the effects of TPMPA, a GABAC receptor antagonist, and SR95531, a GABAA receptor antagonist, on the electrically evoked responses of RGCs to biphasic current pulses delivered to the subretinal surface through a 400 µm diameter electrode. Both TPMPA and SR95531 reduced the stimulation thresholds of ON-center RGCs on average by 15% and 20% respectively. Co-application of the two GABA receptor antagonists had the greatest effect, on average reducing stimulation thresholds by 32%. In addition, co-application of the two GABA receptor antagonists increased the magnitude of the electrically evoked responses on average three-fold. Neither TPMPA nor SR95531, applied alone or in combination, had consistent effects on the stimulation thresholds of OFF-center RGCs. We suggest that the effects of the GABA receptor antagonists on ON-center RGCs may be attributable to blockage of GABA receptors on the axon terminals of ON bipolar cells.

  4. Histamine Stimulates Ciliary Beat Frequency via the H2 Receptor in the Protochordate Botryllus schlosseri.

    PubMed

    Cima, Francesca; Franchi, Nicola

    2016-05-01

    Histamine is a biogenic molecule that plays a role in many physiological pathways via binding to a specific receptor. Histaminergic receptors belong to the large family of seven-transmembrane α-helix domain receptors classified in mammals into four distinct classes: H1, H2, H3, and H4. Despite being widely studied in vertebrates, few data are available on the invertebrate receptors, with only predicted H1 and H2 sequences for nonchordate deuterostomes. Here, we report the first characterized transcript sequence for an H2 receptor from the colonial ascidian Botryllus schlosseri, describing the localization of both transcript and protein during blastogenic development through in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Its phylogenetic relationships with deuterostome orthologous proteins are reported, its role in ciliary beat frequency (CBF) in cultured stigma cells of the branchial basket is outlined, and the effects of histamine and its receptor agonists and antagonists are analyzed. In the presence of increasing concentrations of histamine in the medium, CBF increases similarly to the selective H2 receptor agonist dimaprit. In contrast, ranitidine, which is an inhibitor of the H2 receptor, causes a significant inhibition of CBF, similar to that observed after preincubation with the specific anti-BsHRH2 or the anti-human HRH2 antibody. In cells bordering the branchial basket stigmata, both antibodies colocalize in the proximal region of the ciliary plasmalemma, and histamine is present inside vesicles of the apical region, thus supporting the hypothesis of a histamine-binding H2 receptor control of the pharyngeal mucociliary transport similar to that of the upper respiratory tract and middle ear in mammals. PMID:27139577

  5. Cannabinoid agonists stimulate [3H]GABA release in the globus pallidus of the rat when G(i) protein-receptor coupling is restricted: role of dopamine D2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Brenda; Paz, Francisco; Florán, Leonor; Aceves, Jorge; Erlij, David; Florán, Benjamín

    2009-03-01

    The motor effects of cannabinoids in the globus pallidus appear to be caused by increases in interstitial GABA. To elucidate the mechanism of this response, we investigated the effect of the selective cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1) cannabinoid agonist arachidonyl-2-chloroethylamide (ACEA) on [(3)H]GABA release in slices of the rat globus pallidus. ACEA had two effects: concentrations between 10(-8) and 10(-6) M stimulated release, whereas higher concentrations (IC(50) approximately 10(-6) M) inhibited it. Another cannabinoid agonist, WIN-55,212-2, also had bimodal effects on release. Studies of cAMP production indicate that under conditions of low G(i/o), availability the coupling of CB1 receptors with G(i/o) proteins can be changed into CB1:G(s/olf) coupling; therefore, we determined the effects of conditions that limit G(i/o) availability on [(3)H]GABA release. Blockers of G(i/o) protein interactions, pertussis toxin and N-ethylmaleimide, transformed the inhibitory effects of ACEA on GABA release into stimulation. It also has been suggested that stimulation of D2 receptors can reduce G(i/o) availability. Blocking D2 receptors with sulpiride [(S)-5-aminosulfonyl-N-[(1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl]-2-methoxybenzamidersqb] or depleting dopamine with reserpine inhibited the ACEA-induced stimulation of release. Thus, the D2 dependence of stimulation is consistent with the proposal that D2 receptors reduce G(i/o) proteins available for binding to the CB1 receptor. In summary, CB1 receptor activation has dual effects on GABA release in the globus pallidus. Low concentrations stimulate release through a process that depends on activation of dopamine D2 receptors that may limit G(i/o) protein availability. Higher concentrations of cannabinoid inhibit GABA release through mechanisms that are independent of D2 receptor activation. PMID:19106171

  6. Responses of Purkinje-cells of the cerebellar anterior vermis to stimulation of vestibular and somatosensory receptors.

    PubMed

    Bruschini, L; Andre, P; Pompeiano, O; Manzoni, D

    2006-09-29

    In decerebrate cats, sinusoidal rotation of the forepaw around the wrist modifies the activity of the ipsilateral forelimb extensor triceps brachii (TB) and leads to plastic changes of adaptive nature in the gain of vestibulospinal (VS) reflexes (VSRs). Both effects are depressed by functional inactivation of the cerebellar anterior vermis, which also decreases the gain of VSRs. In order to better understand the mechanisms of these phenomena, the simple spike activity of Purkinje (P-) cells was recorded from the vermal cortex of the cerebellar anterior lobe during individual and/or combined stimulation of somatosensory wrist, neck and vestibular receptors. About one third of the recorded units were affected by sinusoidal rotation of the ipsilateral forepaw around the wrist axis (0.16 Hz, +/-10 degrees ). Most of these neurons ( approximately 60%) increased their activity during ventral flexion of the wrist and decreased it during the oppositely directed movement, with an average phase lag of -141 degrees with respect to the position of maximal dorsiflexion. The remaining cells ( approximately 40%) were excited during dorsiflexion of the wrist, with an average phase lead of 59 degrees with respect to the extreme dorsal flexion. Both populations showed comparable response gains, with an average value of 0.42+/-0.52, S.D., imp/s/deg. About half of the recorded units were also tested during sinusoidal roll tilt of the animal around the longitudinal axis (0.16 Hz, +/-10 degrees ), leading to stimulation of labyrinthine receptors. When both stimuli were applied simultaneously, the responses to combined stimulation usually corresponded to the sum of individual responses. While the phase distribution of somatosensory responses was clearly bimodal, vestibular responses showed phase angle values uniformly scattered between +/-180 degrees and 0 degrees , so that, during combined stimulation, each neuron could be maximally activated by coupling the two stimuli with a

  7. TAM receptor-dependent regulation of SOCS3 and MAPKs contributes to pro-inflammatory cytokine downregulation following chronic NOD2 stimulation of human macrophages1

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shasha; Hedl, Matija; Abraham, Clara

    2014-01-01

    Microbial-induced cytokine regulation is critical to intestinal immune homeostasis. Acute stimulation of NOD2, the Crohn’s disease-associated sensor of bacterial peptidoglycan, induces cytokines. However, cytokines are attenuated after chronic NOD2 and pattern recognition receptor (PRR) stimulation of macrophages; similar attenuation is observed in intestinal macrophages. The role of Tyro3, Axl and Mer (TAM) receptors in regulating chronic PRR stimulation and NOD2-induced outcomes has not been examined. Moreover, TAM receptors have been relatively less investigated in human macrophages. Whereas TAM receptors did not downregulate acute NOD2-induced cytokines in primary human macrophages, they were essential for downregulating signaling and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion after chronic NOD2 and TLR4 stimulation. Axl and Mer were similarly required in mice for cytokine downregulation after chronic NOD2 stimulation in vivo and in intestinal tissues. Consistently, TAM expression was increased in human intestinal myeloid-derived cells. Chronic NOD2 stimulation led to IL-10- and TGFβ-dependent TAM upregulation in human macrophages, which in turn, upregulated SOCS3 expression. Restoring SOCS3 expression under TAM knockdown conditions restored chronic NOD2-mediated pro-inflammatory cytokine downregulation. In contrast to the upregulated pro-inflammatory cytokines, attenuated IL-10 secretion was maintained in TAM-deficient macrophages upon chronic NOD2 stimulation. The level of MAPK activation in TAM-deficient macrophages after chronic NOD2 stimulation was insufficient to upregulate IL-10 secretion; however, full restoration of MAPK activation under these conditions restored c-Fos, c-Jun, MAFK and PU.1 binding to the IL-10 promoter and IL-10 secretion. Therefore, TAM receptors are critical for downregulating pro-inflammatory cytokines under the chronic NOD2 stimulation conditions observed in the intestinal environment. PMID:25567680

  8. Modified Low Density Lipoprotein Stimulates Complement C3 Expression and Secretion via Liver X Receptor and Toll-like Receptor 4 Activation in Human Macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Mogilenko, Denis A.; Kudriavtsev, Igor V.; Trulioff, Andrey S.; Shavva, Vladimir S.; Dizhe, Ella B.; Missyul, Boris V.; Zhakhov, Alexander V.; Ischenko, Alexander M.; Perevozchikov, Andrej P.; Orlov, Sergey V.

    2012-01-01

    Complement C3 is a pivotal component of three cascades of complement activation. C3 is expressed in human atherosclerotic lesions and is involved in atherogenesis. However, the mechanism of C3 accumulation in atherosclerotic lesions is not well elucidated. We show that acetylated low density lipoprotein and oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) increase C3 gene expression and protein secretion by human macrophages. Modified LDL (mLDL)-mediated activation of C3 expression mainly depends on liver X receptor (LXR) and partly on Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), whereas C3 secretion is increased due to TLR4 activation by mLDL. LXR agonist TO901317 stimulates C3 gene expression in human monocyte-macrophage cells but not in human hepatoma (HepG2) cells. We find LXR-responsive element inside of the promoter region of the human C3 gene, which binds to LXRβ in macrophages but not in HepG2 cells. We show that C3 expression and secretion is decreased in IL-4-treated (M2) and increased in IFNγ/LPS-stimulated (M1) human macrophages as compared with resting macrophages. LXR agonist TO901317 potentiates LPS-induced C3 gene expression and protein secretion in macrophages, whereas oxLDL differently modulates LPS-mediated regulation of C3 in M1 or M2 macrophages. Treatment of human macrophages with anaphylatoxin C3a results in stimulation of C3 transcription and secretion as well as increased oxLDL accumulation and augmented oxLDL-mediated up-regulation of the C3 gene. These data provide a novel mechanism of C3 gene regulation in macrophages and suggest new aspects of cross-talk between mLDL, C3, C3a, and TLR4 during development of atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:22194611

  9. Paired Burst Stimulation Causes GABAA Receptor-Dependent Spike Firing Facilitation in CA1 of Rat Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Tominaga, Takashi; Tominaga, Yoko

    2016-01-01

    The theta oscillation (4–8 Hz) is a pivotal form of oscillatory activity in the hippocampus that is intermittently concurrent with gamma (25–100 Hz) burst events. In in vitro preparation, a stimulation protocol that mimics the theta oscillation, theta burst stimulation (TBS), is used to induce long-term potentiation. Thus, TBS is thought to have a distinct role in the neural network of the hippocampal slice preparation. However, the specific mechanisms that make TBS induce such neural circuit modifications are still unknown. Using electrophysiology and voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDI), we have found that TBS induces augmentation of spike firing. The augmentation was apparent in the first couple of brief burst stimulation (100 Hz four pulses) on a TBS-train in a presence of NMDA receptor blocker (APV 50 μM). In this study, we focused on the characterizes of the NMDA independent augmentation caused by a pair of the brief burst stimulation (the first pair of the TBS; paired burst stimulation-PBS). We found that PBS enhanced membrane potential responses on VSDI signal and intracellular recordings while it was absent in the current recording under whole-cell clamp condition. The enhancement of the response accompanied the augmentation of excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) to spike firing (E-S) coupling. The paired burst facilitation (PBF) reached a plateau when the number of the first burst stimulation (priming burst) exceeds three. The interval between the bursts of 150 ms resulted in the maximum PBF. Gabazine (a GABAA receptor antagonist) abolished PBF. The threshold for spike generation of the postsynaptic cells measured with a current injection to cells was not lowered by the priming burst of PBS. These results indicate that PBS activates the GABAergic system to cause short-term E-S augmentation without raising postsynaptic excitability. We propose that a GABAergic system of area CA1 of the hippocampus produce the short-term E-S plasticity that could

  10. Serotonin stimulates phospholipase A sub 2 and the release of arachidonic acid in hippocampal neurons by a type 2 serotonin receptor that is independent of inositolphospholipid hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Felder, C.C.; Ma, A.L.; Axelrod, J.; Kanterman, R.Y. )

    1990-03-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) stimulated the release of arachidonic acid in hippocampal neurons cocultured with glial cells but not in glial cultures alone. Similar results were observed for the 5-HT-stimulated release of inositol phosphates. These results suggest a neural but not glial origin of both responses. Pharmacological studies suggested that release of arachidonic acid and inositol phosphates was mediated by a type 2 5-HTT (5-HT{sub 2}) receptor. 5-HT-stimulated release of arachidonic acid was also detected in cortical neurons, which contain high levels of 5-HT{sub 2} receptors, but not striatum, spinal cord, or cerebellar granule cells, which have very low levels or are devoid of 5-HT{sub 2} receptors. The phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate augmented the 5-HT-stimulated release of arachidonic acid but inhibited the 5-HT-stimulated release of inositol phosphates. 5-HT-stimulated release of arachidonic acid, but not inositol phosphates, was dependent on extracellular calcium. 5-HT stimulated the release of ({sup 3}H)lysophosphatidylcholine from ({sup 3}H)choline-labeled cells with no increase in the release of ({sup 3}H)choline or phospho({sup 3}H)choline. These data suggest that 5-HT stimulated the release of arachidonic acid in hippocampal neurons through the activation of phospholipase A{sub 2}, independent of the activation of phospholipase C.

  11. Serotonin stimulates phospholipase A2 and the release of arachidonic acid in hippocampal neurons by a type 2 serotonin receptor that is independent of inositolphospholipid hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Felder, C C; Kanterman, R Y; Ma, A L; Axelrod, J

    1990-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) stimulated the release of arachidonic acid in hippocampal neurons cocultured with glial cells but not in glial cultures alone. Similar results were observed for the 5-HT-stimulated release of inositol phosphates. These results suggest a neural but not glial origin of both responses. Pharmacological studies suggested that release of arachidonic acid and inositol phosphates was mediated by a type 2 5-HT (5-HT2) receptor. 5-HT-stimulated release of arachidonic acid was also detected in cortical neurons, which contain high levels of 5-HT2 receptors, but not striatum, spinal cord, or cerebellar granule cells, which have very low levels or are devoid of 5-HT2 receptors. The phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate augmented the 5-HT-stimulated release of arachidonic acid but inhibited the 5-HT-stimulated release of inositol phosphates. 5-HT-stimulated release of arachidonic acid, but not inositol phosphates, was dependent on extracellular calcium. 5-HT stimulated the release of [3H]lysophosphatidylcholine from [3H]choline-labeled cells with no increase in the release of [3H]choline or phospho[3H]choline. These data suggest that 5-HT stimulated the release of arachidonic acid in hippocampal neurons through the activation of phospholipase A2, independent of the activation of phospholipase C. PMID:2315313

  12. Stimulation of TM3 Leydig cell proliferation via GABAA receptors: A new role for testicular GABA

    PubMed Central

    Geigerseder, Christof; Doepner, Richard FG; Thalhammer, Andrea; Krieger, Annette; Mayerhofer, Artur

    2004-01-01

    The neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and subtypes of GABA receptors were recently identified in adult testes. Since adult Leydig cells possess both the GABA biosynthetic enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), as well as GABAA and GABAB receptors, it is possible that GABA may act as auto-/paracrine molecule to regulate Leydig cell function. The present study was aimed to examine effects of GABA, which may include trophic action. This assumption is based on reports pinpointing GABA as regulator of proliferation and differentiation of developing neurons via GABAA receptors. Assuming such a role for the developing testis, we studied whether GABA synthesis and GABA receptors are already present in the postnatal testis, where fetal Leydig cells and, to a much greater extend, cells of the adult Leydig cell lineage proliferate. Immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, Western blotting and a radioactive enzymatic GAD assay evidenced that fetal Leydig cells of five-six days old rats possess active GAD protein, and that both fetal Leydig cells and cells of the adult Leydig cell lineage possess GABAA receptor subunits. TM3 cells, a proliferating mouse Leydig cell line, which we showed to possess GABAA receptor subunits by RT-PCR, served to study effects of GABA on proliferation. Using a colorimetric proliferation assay and Western Blotting for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) we demonstrated that GABA or the GABAA agonist isoguvacine significantly increased TM3 cell number and PCNA content in TM3 cells. These effects were blocked by the GABAA antagonist bicuculline, implying a role for GABAA receptors. In conclusion, GABA increases proliferation of TM3 Leydig cells via GABAA receptor activation and proliferating Leydig cells in the postnatal rodent testis bear a GABAergic system. Thus testicular GABA may play an as yet unrecognized role in the development of Leydig cells during the differentiation of the testicular interstitial compartment. PMID:15040802

  13. Glucocorticoid-dependent induction of interleukin-6 receptor expression in human hepatocytes facilitates interleukin-6 stimulation of amino acid transport.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, C P; Bode, B P; Takahashi, K; Tanabe, K K; Souba, W W

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors studied the effects of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) on glutamine and alanine transport in isolated human hepatocytes. They also evaluated the role of dexamethasone in modulating this response and its effects on the expression of the plasma membrane high-affinity IL-6 receptor. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Animal studies indicate that cytokines are important mediators of the increased hepatic amino acid uptake that occurs during cancer and sepsis, but studies in human tissues are lacking. The control of transport by cytokines and cytokine receptor expression in the liver may provide a mechanism by which hepatocytes can modulate amino acid availability during catabolic disease states. METHODS: Human hepatocytes were isolated from wedge biopsy specimens and plated in 24-well trays. Interleukin-6 and TNF-alpha, in combination with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone, were added to hepatocytes in culture, and the transport of radiolabeled glutamine and alanine was measured. Fluorescent-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis was used to study the effects of dexamethasone on IL-6 receptor number in the well-differentiated human hepatoma HepG2. RESULTS: Both IL-6 and TNF-alpha exerted a small stimulatory effect on alanine and glutamine transport. Dexamethasone alone did not alter transport rates, but pretreatment of cells augmented the effects of both cytokines on carrier-mediated amino acid uptake. Dexamethasone pretreatment and a combination of IL-6 and TNF-alpha resulted in a greater than twofold increase in transport activity. Fluorescent-activated cell sorter analysis demonstrated that dexamethasone induced a threefold increase in the expression of high-affinity IL-6 receptors. CONCLUSIONS: Interleukin-6 and TNF-alpha work coordinately with glucocorticoids to stimulate amino acid uptake in human hepatocytes. Dexamethasone exerts a permissive effect on cytokine-mediated increases in transport by increasing IL

  14. Dorsal periaqueductal gray post-stimulation freezing is counteracted by neurokinin-1 receptor antagonism in the central nucleus of the amygdala in rats.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, M C; Santos, J M; Brandão, M L

    2015-05-01

    Electrical stimulation of the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) in rats generates defensive responses that are characterized by freezing and escape behaviors, followed by post-stimulation freezing that resembles symptoms of panic attacks. dPAG post-stimulation freezing involves the processing of ascending aversive information to prosencephalic centers, including the amygdala, which allows the animal to evaluate the consequences of stressful situations. The basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) is thought to act as a filter for innate and learned aversive information that is transmitted to higher structures. The central (CeA) and medial (MeA) nuclei of the amygdala constitute an output for the expression of fear reactions through projections to limbic and brainstem regions. Neurokinin (NK) receptors are abundant in the CeA, MeA, and BLA, but their role in the expression of defensive responses and processing of aversive information that is evoked by electrical stimulation of the dPAG is still unclear. In the present study, we examined the role of NK1 receptors in these amygdala nuclei in the expression of defensive responses induced by electrical stimulation of the dPAG in rats and fear memory of this aversive stimulation. Rats were implanted with an electrode into the dPAG for electrical stimulation and one cannula in the CeA, MeA, or BLA for injections of vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline) or the NK1 receptor antagonist spantide (SPA; 100 pmol/0.2 μl). Injections of SPA into the CeA but not BLA or MeA reduced the duration of post-stimulation freezing evoked by electrical stimulation of the dPAG, without changing the aversive thresholds of freezing or escape. Twenty-four hours later, exploratory behavior was evaluated in the elevated plus maze test (EPM) in the CeA group of rats. Electrical stimulation of the dPAG rats that received vehicle exhibited higher aversion to the open arms of the EPM than sham rats that did not receive any dPAG stimulation. SPA

  15. Rac-mediated Stimulation of Phospholipase Cγ2 Amplifies B Cell Receptor-induced Calcium Signaling*♦

    PubMed Central

    Walliser, Claudia; Tron, Kyrylo; Clauss, Karen; Gutman, Orit; Kobitski, Andrei Yu.; Retlich, Michael; Schade, Anja; Röcker, Carlheinz; Henis, Yoav I.; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich; Gierschik, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Rho GTPase Rac is crucially involved in controlling multiple B cell functions, including those regulated by the B cell receptor (BCR) through increased cytosolic Ca2+. The underlying molecular mechanisms and their relevance to the functions of intact B cells have thus far remained unknown. We have previously shown that the activity of phospholipase Cγ2 (PLCγ2), a key constituent of the BCR signalosome, is stimulated by activated Rac through direct protein-protein interaction. Here, we use a Rac-resistant mutant of PLCγ2 to functionally reconstitute cultured PLCγ2-deficient DT40 B cells and to examine the effects of the Rac-PLCγ2 interaction on BCR-mediated changes of intracellular Ca2+ and regulation of Ca2+-regulated and nuclear-factor-of-activated-T-cell-regulated gene transcription at the level of single, intact B cells. The results show that the functional Rac-PLCγ2 interaction causes marked increases in the following: (i) sensitivity of B cells to BCR ligation; (ii) BCR-mediated Ca2+ release from intracellular stores; (iii) Ca2+ entry from the extracellular compartment; and (iv) nuclear translocation of the Ca2+-regulated nuclear factor of activated T cells. Hence, Rac-mediated stimulation of PLCγ2 activity serves to amplify B cell receptor-induced Ca2+ signaling. PMID:25903139

  16. Reflex cardiopulmonary responses by stimulation to type J receptors in rats exposed to NO/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Tsubone, H.; Suzuki, A.K.

    1984-01-01

    To examine the role of the vagal pathway on the cardiopulmonary functions in NO/sub 2/-exposed rats, phenyl diguanide, which stimulates type J receptors in the lungs, was injected to control and exposed rats at a constant dose. Based on a statistcal test, a decrease in the heart rate (HR) after the injection was observed in the groups exposed to 20 ppm NO/sub 2/ for 1.5 h and 3 h, and 10 ppm for 24 h. On the other hand, an increase in respiratory rate (RR) was observed in the groups exposed to 10 ppm for 3 h and 4 ppm for 1 wk. No change in HR and RR was found in the group exposed to 0.4 ppm for 4 wk. These results suggest that the augmentation of the reflex cardiopulmonary responses due to stimulation to the type J receptors was produced by exposures with a higher concentration of NO/sub 2/. 24 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

  17. Homeostatic action of adenosine A3 and A1 receptor agonists on proliferation of hematopoietic precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Pospísil, Milan; Znojil, Vladimír; Holá, Jirina; Streitová, Denisa; Vacek, Antonín

    2008-07-01

    Two adenosine receptor agonists, N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA) and N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), which selectively activate adenosine A3 and A1 receptors, respectively, were tested for their ability to influence proliferation of granulocytic and erythroid cells in femoral bone marrow of mice using morphological criteria. Agonists were given intraperitoneally to mice in repeated isomolar doses of 200 nmol/kg. Three variants of experiments were performed to investigate the action of the agonists under normal resting state of mice and in phases of cell depletion and subsequent regeneration after treatment with the cytotoxic drug 5-fluorouracil. In the case of granulopoiesis, IB-MECA 1) increased by a moderate but significant level proliferation of cells under normal resting state; 2) strongly increased proliferation of cells in the cell depletion phase; but 3) did not influence cell proliferation in the regeneration phase. CPA did not influence cell proliferation under normal resting state and in the cell depletion phase, but strongly suppressed the overshooting cell proliferation in the regeneration phase. The stimulatory effect of IB-MECA on cell proliferation of erythroid cells was observed only when this agonist was administered during the cell depletion phase. CPA did not modulate erythroid proliferation in any of the functional states investigated, probably due to the lower demand for cell production as compared with granulopoiesis. The results indicate opposite effects of the two adenosine receptor agonists on proliferation of hematopoietic cells and suggest the plasticity and homeostatic role of the adenosine receptor expression. PMID:18445770

  18. The unliganded long isoform of estrogen receptor beta stimulates brain ryanodine receptor single channel activity alongside with cytosolic Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Rybalchenko, Volodymyr; Grillo, Michael A.; Gastinger, Matthew J.; Rybalchenko, Nataliya; Payne, Andrew J.; Koulen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Ca2+ release from intracellular stores mediated by endoplasmic reticulum membrane ryanodine receptors (RyR) plays a key role in activating and synchronizing downstream Ca2+-dependent mechanisms, in different cells varying from apoptosis to nuclear transcription and development of defensive responses. Recently discovered, atypical “non-genomic” effects mediated by estrogen receptors (ER) include rapid Ca2+ release upon estrogen exposure in conditions implicitly suggesting involvement of RyRs. In the present study, we report various levels of co-localization between RyR type 2 (RyR2) and ER type β (ERβ) in the neuronal cell line HT-22, indicating a possible functional interaction. Electrophysiological analyses revealed a significant increase in single channel ionic currents generated by mouse brain RyRs after application of the soluble monomer of the long form ERβ (ERβ1). The effect was due to a strong increase in open probability of RyR higher open channel sublevels at cytosolic [Ca2+] concentrations of 100 nM, suggesting a synergistic action of ERβ1 and Ca2+ in RyR activation, and a potential contribution to Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release rather than to basal intracellular Ca2+ concentration level at rest. This RyR/ERβ interaction has potential effects on cellular physiology, including roles of shorter ERβ isoforms and modulation of the RyR/ERβ complexes by exogenous estrogens. PMID:19899956

  19. Inhibition of Chemokine (C-C Motif) Receptor 7 Sialylation Suppresses CCL19-Stimulated Proliferation, Invasion and Anti-Anoikis

    PubMed Central

    Su, Mei-Lin; Chang, Tsung-Ming; Chiang, Chi-Hsiang; Chang, Han-Chen; Hou, Ming-Feng; Li, Wen-Shan; Hung, Wen-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 7 (CCR7) is involved in lymph-node homing of naive and regulatory T cells and lymphatic metastasis of cancer cells. Sialic acids comprise a group of monosaccharide units that are added to the terminal position of the oligosaccharide chain of glycoproteins by sialyation. Recent studies suggest that aberrant sialylation of receptor proteins contributes to proliferation, motility, and drug resistance of cancer cells. In this study, we addressed whether CCR7 is a sialylated receptor protein and tried to elucidate the effect of sialylation in the regulation of signal transduction and biological function of CCR7. Our results demonstrated that α-2, 3-sialyltransferase which catalyze sialylation reaction in vivo was overexpressed in breast tumor tissues and cell lines. Lectin blot analysis clearly demonstrated that CCR7 receptor was sialyated in breast cancer cells. Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 19 (CCL19), the cognate ligand for CCR7, induced the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and AKT signaling and increased the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins and proliferation of breast cancer cells. When cells were pre-treated with a sialyltransferase inhibitor AL10 or sialidase, CCL19-induced cell growth was significantly suppressed. CCL19 also increased invasion and prevented anoikis by up-regulating pro-survival proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. Inhibition of sialylation by AL10 totally abolished these effects. Finally, we showed that AL10 inhibited tumorigenicity of breast cancer in experimental animals. Taken together, we demonstrate for the first time that CCR7 receptor is a sialylated protein and sialylation is important for the paracrine stimulation by its endogenous ligand CCL19. In addition, inhibition of aberrant sialylation of CCR7 suppresses proliferation and invasion and triggers anoikis in breast cancer cells. Targeting of sialylation enzymes may be a novel strategy for breast cancer treatment. PMID:24915301

  20. Characterization of metabotropic glutamate receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis in rat cultured cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed Central

    Toms, N. J.; Jane, D. E.; Tse, H. W.; Roberts, P. J.

    1995-01-01

    1. The pharmacology of excitatory amino acid (EAA)-stimulated phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis, monitored via [3H]-inositol monophosphate accumulation, was investigated in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule cells. 2. EAA-stimulated PI hydrolysis peaked after 4-5 days in vitro and subsequently declined. 3. The agonist order of potency was found to be (EC50): L-quisqualic acid (Quis) (2 microM) >> L-glutamate (50 microM) > (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid ((1S,3R)-ACPD) (102 microM). L-Glutamate (Emax = 873% of basal activity) elicited the largest stimulation of PI hydrolysis, whereas Quis (Emax = 603%) and (1S,3R)-ACPD (Emax = 306%) produced somewhat lower stimulations. 4. Several phenylglycine derivatives were found to be active in inhibiting 2 microM Quis-stimulated PI hydrolysis, in order of potency (IC50): (S)-4-carboxy-3-hydroxyphenylglycine (41 microM) > or = (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine (51 microM) >> (+)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (243 microM). 5. Cultured cerebellar granule cells of the rat appear to have Group I mGluR pharmacology similar to that reported for cloned mGluR1 and provide an ideal system for investigating novel mGluR1 ligands in a native environment. PMID:8680712

  1. Chronic ethanol inhibits receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis in rat liver slices

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzales, R.A.; Crews, F.T. )

    1991-03-01

    The effects of chronic ethanol feeding on norepinephrine (NE)- and arginine-vasopressin (AVP)-stimulated phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis in rat liver slices was determined. The maximum NE-stimulated PI response was significantly reduced by 40% in liver slices from 8-month-old rats which had been treated for 5 months with a liquid diet containing ethanol compared to pair-fed controls. The maximum AVP-stimulated PI response was decreased by 39% in liver slices from the ethanol-fed rats compared to control. EC50 values for NE- and AVP-stimulated PI hydrolysis in liver slices were not affected by the chronic ethanol treatment. Similar reductions in the maximal NE- and AVP-stimulated PI hydrolysis (28% and 27%, respectively) were found in 22-month-old rats which had been maintained on an ethanol containing diet for 5 months compared to pair-fed controls. The binding of (3H)prazosin and (3H)AVP to liver plasma membranes from 8-month-old ethanol-fed rats was not significantly different from binding to liver membranes from sucrose-fed controls. Our data suggest that chronic ethanol ingestion may lead to a reduction in PI-linked signal transduction in liver.

  2. β-Adrenergic receptor stimulation increases surface NKCC2 expression in rat thick ascending limbs in a process inhibited by phosphodiesterase 4.

    PubMed

    Haque, Mohammed Z; Caceres, Paulo S; Ortiz, Pablo A

    2012-11-01

    The thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle (THAL) reabsorbs ∼30% of the filtered NaCl in a process mediated by the apical Na-K-2Cl cotransporter NKCC2. Stimulation of β-adrenergic receptors in the THAL enhances NaCl reabsorption and increases intracellular cAMP. We found that intracellular cAMP stimulates NKCC2 trafficking to the apical membrane via protein kinase A (PKA). Several cAMP-specific phosphodiesterases (PDE) have been identified in rat THALs, and PDE4 decreases cAMP generated by β-adrenergic stimulation in other cells. However, it is not known whether β-adrenergic receptors activation stimulates NKCC2 trafficking. Thus we hypothesized that β-adrenergic receptor stimulation enhances THAL apical membrane NKCC2 expression via the PKA pathway and PDE4 blunts this effect. THAL suspensions were obtained from Sprague-Dawley rats, and surface NKCC2 expression was measured by surface biotinylation and Western blot. Incubation of THALs with the β-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol at 0.5 and 1.0 μM increased surface NKCC2 by 17 ± 1 and 29 ± 5% respectively (P < 0.05). Preventing cAMP degradation with 3-isobutyl-methylxanthine (IBMX; a nonselective phosphodiesterase inhibitor) enhanced isoproterenol-stimulated surface NKCC2 expression to 51 ± 7% (P < 0.05 vs. isoproterenol). The β-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol or the PKA inhibitor H-89 completely blocked isoproterenol + IBMX-induced increase on surface NKCC2, while propranolol or H-89 alone had no effect. Selective inhibition of PDE4 with rolipram (20 μM) potentiated the effect of isoproterenol on surface NKCC2 and increased cAMP levels. We concluded that β-adrenergic receptor stimulation enhances surface NKCC2 expression in the THALs via PKA and PDE4 blunts this effect. PMID:22933300

  3. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists inhibit basal as well as low-density lipoprotein and platelet-activating factor-stimulated human monocyte chemoattractant protein-1.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, Julie M; Croft, Kevin D; Puddey, Ian B; Beilin, Lawrence J

    2003-06-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) is a potent chemotactic agent for monocytes and other cells and is thought to be involved in atherosclerosis, recruiting monocytes to the subendothelial space or to the site of inflammation. Angiotensin II has been demonstrated, at least in animal models, to stimulate MCP-1 expression. We investigated the effect of the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonists irbesartan and losartan on MCP-1 production by freshly isolated human monocytes. Irbesartan and losartan inhibited basal MCP-1 production in a dose-dependent manner. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) stimulated MCP-1 in a concentration-dependent manner, with 200 microg/ml LDL protein giving a 2-fold increase in MCP-1. Irbesartan and losartan dose dependently blocked LDL-stimulated MCP-1. An angiotensin II type 2 receptor antagonist, S-(+)-1-([4-(dimethylamino)-3-methylphenyl]methyl)-5-(diphenylacetyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-imidazo(4,5-c)pyridine-6-carboxylic acid (PD123319), had no significant effect on basal MCP-1 levels or LDL-stimulated MCP-1. After noting homology between the AT1 receptor and the platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor, we showed that irbesartan inhibited both [3H]PAF binding to human monocytes and carbamyl-PAF stimulation of MCP-1. However, irbesartan affinity for the PAF receptor was 700 times less than PAF, suggesting that there may be another mechanism for irbesartan inhibition of PAF-stimulated MCP-1. This is the first report showing that AT1 receptor antagonists inhibit basal as well as LDL- and PAF-stimulated MCP-1 production in freshly isolated human monocytes. PMID:12626661

  4. Stimulation of Toll-Like Receptors profoundly influences the titer of polyreactive antibodies in the circulation.

    PubMed

    Gunti, Sreenivasulu; Messer, Ronald J; Xu, Chengfu; Yan, Ming; Coleman, William G; Peterson, Karin E; Hasenkrug, Kim J; Notkins, Abner L

    2015-01-01

    Polyreactive antibodies are a major component of the natural antibody repertoire and bind to a variety of structurally unrelated molecules. These antibodies are thought to provide a first line of defense against bacterial infections and play a major role in the clearance of apoptotic cells. What triggers the secretion of these antibodies has remained an enigma. Using a surrogate assay for measuring polyreactive antibodies, we found that about 50% of serum IgM is polyreactive and that stimulation of TLR4(+/+), but not TLR4(-/-), mice resulted in a 40 fold increase in polyreactive antibodies. Stimulation of TLRs 3, 7, 9 also increased the secretion of polyreactive antibodies. Infection with a virus or tissue damage induced by a toxin similarly led to an increase in polyreactive antibodies in MyD88(+/+), but not MyD88(-/-) mice. We conclude that stimulation of TLRs is a key link in the mechanism of polyreactive antibody secretion into the circulation. PMID:26463758

  5. Transcriptional Stimulation of Anthrax Toxin Receptors by Anthrax Edema Toxin and Bacillus anthracis Sterne Spore

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingfu; Hesek, Eric D.; Zeng, Mingtao

    2007-01-01

    We used quantitative real-time RT-PCR to not only investigate the mRNA levels of anthrax toxin receptor 1 (ANTXR1) and 2 (ANTXR2) in the murine J774A.1 macrophage cells and different tissues of mice, but also evaluate the effect of anthrax edema toxin and Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores on the expression of mRNA of these receptors. The mRNA transcripts of both receptors was detected in J774A.1 cells and mouse tissues such as the lung, heart, kidney, spleen, stomach, jejunum, brain, skeleton muscle, and skin. The ANTXR2 mRNA level was significantly higher than that of ANTXR1 in J774A.1 cells and all tissues examined. The mRNA expression of both receptors in the lung was the highest among the tissues evaluated. Interestingly, the mRNA expression of both receptors in J774A.1 cells was up-regulated by edema toxin. In addition, ANTXR mRNA expression in the lung was down-regulated after subcutaneous inoculation of B. anthracis Sterne spores as well as after intranasal administration of anthrax toxin-based vaccine BioThrax™. These results suggest that anthrax edema toxin and B. anthracis Sterne spore are involved in the ANTXR mRNA regulation in host cells. PMID:17459655

  6. {delta}-Opioid receptor-stimulated Akt signaling in neuroblastoma x glioma (NG108-15) hybrid cells involves receptor tyrosine kinase-mediated PI3K activation

    SciTech Connect

    Heiss, Anika; Ammer, Hermann; Eisinger, Daniela A.

    2009-07-15

    {delta}-Opioid receptor (DOR) agonists possess cytoprotective properties, an effect associated with activation of the 'pro-survival' kinase Akt. Here we delineate the signal transduction pathway by which opioids induce Akt activation in neuroblastoma x glioma (NG108-15) hybrid cells. Exposure of the cells to both [D-Pen{sup 2,5}]enkephalin and etorphine resulted in a time- and dose-dependent increase in Akt activity, as measured by means of an activation-specific antibody recognizing phosphoserine-473. DOR-mediated Akt signaling is blocked by the opioid antagonist naloxone and involves inhibitory G{sub i/o} proteins, because pre-treatment with pertussis toxin, but not over-expression of the G{sub q/11} scavengers EBP50 and GRK2-K220R, prevented this effect. Further studies with Wortmannin and LY294002 revealed that phophoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) plays a central role in opioid-induced Akt activation. Opioids stimulate Akt activity through transactivation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK), because pre-treatment of the cells with inhibitors for neurotrophin receptor tyrosine kinases (AG879) and the insulin-like growth factor receptor IGF-1 (AG1024), but not over-expression of the G{beta}{gamma} scavenger phosducin, abolished this effect. Activated Akt translocates to the nuclear membrane, where it promotes GSK3 phosphorylation and prevents caspase-3 cleavage, two key events mediating inhibition of cell apoptosis and enhancement of cell survival. Taken together, these results demonstrate that in NG108-15 hybrid cells DOR agonists possess cytoprotective properties mediated by activation of the RTK/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  7. Toll-like receptor stimulation in splenic marginal zone lymphoma can modulate cell signaling, activation and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Fonte, Eleonora; Agathangelidis, Andreas; Reverberi, Daniele; Ntoufa, Stavroula; Scarfò, Lydia; Ranghetti, Pamela; Cutrona, Giovanna; Tedeschi, Alessandra; Xochelli, Aliki; Caligaris-Cappio, Federico; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Belessi, Chrysoula; Davis, Zadie; Piris, Miguel A.; Oscier, David; Ghia, Paolo; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Muzio, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies on splenic marginal zone lymphoma identified distinct mutations in genes belonging to the B-cell receptor and Toll-like receptor signaling pathways, thus pointing to their potential implication in the biology of the disease. However, limited data is available regarding the exact role of TLRs. We aimed at characterizing the expression pattern of TLRs in splenic marginal zone lymphoma cells and their functional impact on the activation, proliferation and viability of malignant cells in vitro. Cells expressed significant levels of TLR1, TLR6, TLR7, TLR8, TLR9 and TLR10 mRNA; TLR2 and TLR4 showed a low, variable pattern of expression among patients whereas TLR3 and TLR5 mRNAs were undetectable; mRNA specific for TLR signaling molecules and adapters was also expressed. At the protein level, TLR1, TLR6, TLR7, TLR9 and TLR10 were detected. Stimulation of TLR1/2, TLR2/6 and TLR9 with their respective ligands triggered the activation of IRAK kinases, MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways, and the induction of CD86 and CD25 activation molecules, although in a heterogeneous manner among different patient samples. TLR-induced activation and cell viability were also inhibited by a specific IRAK1/4 inhibitor, thus strongly supporting the specific role of TLR signaling in these processes. Furthermore, TLR2/6 and TLR9 stimulation also significantly increased cell proliferation. In conclusion, we demonstrate that splenic marginal zone lymphoma cells are equipped with functional TLR and signaling molecules and that the stimulation of TLR1/2, TLR2/6 and TLR9 may play a role in regulating disease pathobiology, likely promoting the expansion of the neoplastic clone. PMID:26294727

  8. In Estimated Good Prognosis Patients Could Unexpected "Hyporesponse" to Controlled Ovarian Stimulation be Related to Genetic Polymorphisms of FSH Receptor?

    PubMed

    Alviggi, Carlo; Conforti, Alessandro; Caprio, Francesca; Gizzo, Salvatore; Noventa, Marco; Strina, Ida; Pagano, Tiziana; De Rosa, Pasquale; Carbone, Floriana; Colacurci, Nicola; De Placido, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    It has been reported that 10% to 15% of young normogonadotrophic women show suboptimal response to standard gonadotropin-releasing hormone-a long protocol. These patients require higher doses of exogenous follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). This phenomenon could be associated with genetic characteristics. In this study, FSH receptor polymorphism was retrospectively evaluated in 42 normoresponder young women undergoing an in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycle; patients were stratified according to recombinant human FSH (r-hFSH) consumption. We selected 17 normoresponder young patients who required a cumulative dose of recombinant FSH (rFSH) >2500 UI (group A). A control group was randomly selected among patients who required a cumulative dose of rFSH <2500 UI (group B). Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSH-R) 307Ala and 680Ser variants were analyzed in all our patients. Our results show that the mean number of rFSH vials (36.3 ± 7.5 vs 28.6 ± 4.5, P = .0001) and days of stimulation (12.7 ± 2.4 vs 10.8 ± 2.8, P = .03) were significantly lower in group B, whereas the number of oocytes retrieved (7.1 ± 1.5 vs 9.6 ± 2.4; P = .0005) and the average number of embryos transferred (2.1 ± 0.7 vs 2.7 ± 0.4; P = .001) were significantly lower in group A. Estradiol serum levels on the human chorionic gonadotrophin day were significantly lower in group A (997.8 ± 384.9 pg/mL vs 1749.1 ± 644.4; P = .0001). The incidence of the Ser/Ser genotype was higher in patients with higher r-hFSH consumption (group A; P = .02). Based on our results, we hypothesize an association between the FSH-R polymorphisms and a "hyporesponse" to exogenous FSH. PMID:26902430

  9. Toll-like receptor stimulation in splenic marginal zone lymphoma can modulate cell signaling, activation and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Fonte, Eleonora; Agathangelidis, Andreas; Reverberi, Daniele; Ntoufa, Stavroula; Scarfò, Lydia; Ranghetti, Pamela; Cutrona, Giovanna; Tedeschi, Alessandra; Xochelli, Aliki; Caligaris-Cappio, Federico; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Belessi, Chrysoula; Davis, Zadie; Piris, Miguel A; Oscier, David; Ghia, Paolo; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Muzio, Marta

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies on splenic marginal zone lymphoma identified distinct mutations in genes belonging to the B-cell receptor and Toll-like receptor signaling pathways, thus pointing to their potential implication in the biology of the disease. However, limited data is available regarding the exact role of TLRs. We aimed at characterizing the expression pattern of TLRs in splenic marginal zone lymphoma cells and their functional impact on the activation, proliferation and viability of malignant cells in vitro. Cells expressed significant levels of TLR1, TLR6, TLR7, TLR8, TLR9 and TLR10 mRNA; TLR2 and TLR4 showed a low, variable pattern of expression among patients whereas TLR3 and TLR5 mRNAs were undetectable; mRNA specific for TLR signaling molecules and adapters was also expressed. At the protein level, TLR1, TLR6, TLR7, TLR9 and TLR10 were detected. Stimulation of TLR1/2, TLR2/6 and TLR9 with their respective ligands triggered the activation of IRAK kinases, MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways, and the induction of CD86 and CD25 activation molecules, although in a heterogeneous manner among different patient samples. TLR-induced activation and cell viability were also inhibited by a specific IRAK1/4 inhibitor, thus strongly supporting the specific role of TLR signaling in these processes. Furthermore, TLR2/6 and TLR9 stimulation also significantly increased cell proliferation. In conclusion, we demonstrate that splenic marginal zone lymphoma cells are equipped with functional TLR and signaling molecules and that the stimulation of TLR1/2, TLR2/6 and TLR9 may play a role in regulating disease pathobiology, likely promoting the expansion of the neoplastic clone. PMID:26294727

  10. Expression and Functional Role of α7 Nicotinic Receptor in Human Cytokine-stimulated Natural Killer (NK) Cells.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Samanta R; Ziblat, Andrea; Torres, Nicolás I; Zwirner, Norberto W; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2016-08-01

    The homomeric α7 nicotinic receptor (nAChR) is one of the most abundant nAChRs in the central nervous system where it contributes to cognition, attention, and working memory. α7 nAChR is also present in lymphocytes, dendritic cells (DCs), and macrophages and it is emerging as an important drug target for intervention in inflammation and sepsis. Natural killer (NK) cells display cytotoxic activity against susceptible target cells and modulate innate and adaptive immune responses through their interaction with DCs. We here show that human NK cells also express α7 nAChR. α7 nAChR mRNA is detected by RT-PCR and cell surface expression of α7 nAChR is detected by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry using α-bungarotoxin, a specific antagonist. Both mRNA and protein levels increase during NK stimulation with cytokines (IL-12, IL-18, and IL-15). Exposure of cytokine-stimulated NK cells to PNU-282987, a specific α7 nAChR agonist, increases intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) mainly released from intracellular stores, indicating that α7 nAChR is functional. Moreover, its activation by PNU-282987 plus a specific positive allosteric modulator greatly enhances the Ca(2+) responses in NK cells. Stimulation of NK cells with cytokines and PNU-282987 decreases NF-κB levels and nuclear mobilization, down-regulates NKG2D receptors, and decreases NKG2D-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and IFN-γ production. Also, such NK cells are less efficient to trigger DC maturation. Thus, our results demonstrate the anti-inflammatory role of α7 nAChR in NK cells and suggest that modulation of its activity in these cells may constitute a novel target for regulation of the immune response. PMID:27284006

  11. A novel function of colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor in hTERT immortalization of human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, N F; Kocher, H M; Salako, M A; Obermueller, E; Sandle, J; Balkwill, F

    2009-02-01

    The receptor for macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) is a product of the proto-oncogene c-fms and a member of the class III transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor family. Earlier, we described increased mRNA expression of CSF1R in human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) immortalized human ovarian surface epithelial (IOSE) cell lines derived from a single donor. Here, we further describe that CSF1R is upregulated at both the mRNA and protein level in hTERT immortalized human normal OSE cells from two different donors and in hTERT immortalized human pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. CSF1R was not upregulated in hTERT immortalized epithelial clones that subsequently underwent senescence or in immortalized fibroblasts. Upon stimulation by the CSF1R ligand CSF1, the immortalized epithelial cell lines showed rapid internalization of CSF1R with concomitant down-modulation and colocalization of phosphorylated NFkappaBp65 with hTERT protein, hTERT translocation into the nucleus and the binding of c-Myc to the hTERT promoter region. Reducing the expression of CSF1R using short hairpin interfering RNA abolished these effects and also decreased cell survival and the number of population doublings under suboptimal culture conditions. The telomerase inhibitor GRN163L confirmed a role for telomerase in the cleavage of the intracellular domain of CSF1R. On the basis of these findings, we suggest that CSF1R may be a critical factor facilitating hTERT immortalization of epithelial cells. PMID:18997822

  12. Transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor mediates muscarinic stimulation of focal adhesion kinase in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Calandrella, Sean O; Barrett, Kim E; Keely, Stephen J

    2005-04-01

    We have previously shown that the Gq protein coupled receptor (GqPCR) agonist, carbachol (CCh), transactivates and recruits epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr)-dependent signaling mechanisms in intestinal epithelial cells. Increasing evidence suggests that GqPCR agonists can also recruit focal adhesion-dependent signaling pathways in some cell types. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate if CCh stimulates activation of the focal adhesion-associated protein, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), in intestinal epithelia and, if so, to examine the signaling mechanisms involved. Experiments were carried out on monolayers of T84 cells grown on permeable supports. CCh rapidly induced tyrosine phosphorylation of FAK in T84 cells. This effect was accompanied by phosphorylation of another focal adhesion-associated protein, paxillin, and association of FAK with paxillin. CCh-stimulated FAK phosphorylation was inhibited by a chelator of intracellular Ca2+, BAPTA/AM (20 microM), and was mimicked by thapsigargin (2 microM), which mobilizes intracellular Ca2+ in a receptor-independent fashion. CCh also induced association of FAK with the EGFr and FAK phosphorylation was attenuated by an EGFr inhibitor, tyrphostin AG1478, and an inhibitor of Src family kinases, PP2. The actin cytoskeleton disruptor, cytochalasin D (20 microM), abolished FAK phosphorylation in response to CCh but did not alter CCh-induced EGFr or ERK MAPK activation. In summary, these data demonstrate that agonists of GqPCRs have the ability to induce FAK activation in intestinal epithelial cells. GqPCR-induced FAK activation is mediated by via a pathway involving transactivation of the EGFr and alterations in the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:15389641

  13. CB1 cannabinoid receptor stimulation during adolescence impairs the maturation of GABA function in the adult rat prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Cass, D K; Flores-Barrera, E; Thomases, D R; Vital, W F; Caballero, A; Tseng, K Y

    2014-05-01

    Converging epidemiological studies indicate that cannabis abuse during adolescence increases the risk of developing psychosis and prefrontal cortex (PFC)-dependent cognitive impairments later in life. However, the mechanisms underlying the adolescent susceptibility to chronic cannabis exposure are poorly understood. Given that the psychoactive constituent of cannabis binds to the CB1 cannabinoid receptor, the present study was designed to determine the impact of a CB1 receptor agonist (WIN) during specific windows of adolescence on the functional maturation of the rat PFC. By means of local field potential recordings and ventral hippocampal stimulation in vivo, we found that a history of WIN exposure during early (postnatal days - P35-40) or mid-(P40-45) adolescence, but not in late adolescence (P50-55) or adulthood (P75-80), is sufficient to yield a state of frequency-dependent prefrontal disinhibition in adulthood comparable to that seen in the juvenile PFC. Remarkably, this prefrontal disinhibition could be normalized following a single acute local infusion of the GABA-Aα1 positive allosteric modulator Indiplon, suggesting that adolescent exposure to WIN causes a functional downregulation of GABAergic transmission in the PFC. Accordingly, in vitro recordings from adult rats exposed to WIN during adolescence demonstrate that local prefrontal GABAergic transmission onto layer V pyramidal neurons is markedly reduced to the level seen in the P30-35 PFC. Together, these results indicate that early and mid-adolescence constitute a critical period during which repeated CB1 receptor stimulation is sufficient to elicit an enduring state of PFC network disinhibition resulting from a developmental impairment of local prefrontal GABAergic transmission. PMID:24589887

  14. Neuromedin U directly stimulates growth of cultured rat calvarial osteoblast-like cells acting via the NMU receptor 2 isoform.

    PubMed

    Rucinski, Marcin; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Tyczewska, Marianna; Szyszka, Marta; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2008-09-01

    The neuromedin U (NMU) system is composed of NMU, neuromedin S (NMS) and their receptors NMUR1 and NMUR2. This system is involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis, neuroendocrine functions, immune response, circadian rhythm and spermatogenesis. The present study aimed to investigate the possible role of the NMU system in regulating functions of cultured rat calvarial osteoblast-like (ROB) cells. By using QPCR, high expression of NMU mRNA was found in freshly isolated ROB cells while after 7, 14, and 21 days of culture, expression of the studied gene was very low. In contrast, NMUR2 mRNA expression in freshly isolated ROB cells was negligible and very high in cultured cells. The highest NMUR2 mRNA expression was observed at day 7, and was followed by lower levels at days 14 and 21 of culture. Neither NMS nor NMUR1 mRNA was found in studied cells. Exposure of cultured ROB cells to NMU8 at concentrations 10(-6) to 10(-10) M had no effect on expression levels of the genes. During the entire culture period, NMU8 did not affect osteocalcin production, but stimulated proliferative activity of ROB cells at days 14 and 21 of culture. Thus, we demonstrated that cultured rat calvarial osteoblast-like cells are provided with NMUR2, the receptor isoform typical for the central nervous system. Acting via this receptor NMU8 stimulates proliferation of cultured cells and has no effect on their differentiated function (osteocalcin secretion). PMID:18698496

  15. T-cell activation is enhanced by targeting IL-10 cytokine production in toll-like receptor-stimulated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Walk, Ryan M; Elliott, Steven T; Blanco, Felix C; Snyder, Jason A; Jacobi, Ashley M; Rose, Scott D; Behlke, Mark A; Salem, Aliasger K; Vukmanovic, Stanislav; Sandler, Anthony D

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists represent potentially useful cancer vaccine adjuvants in their ability to stimulate antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and subsequently amplify the cytotoxic T-cell response. The purpose of this study was to characterize APC responses to TLR activation and to determine the subsequent effect on lymphocyte activation. We exposed murine primary bone marrow-derived macrophages to increasing concentrations of agonists to TLRs 2, 3, 4, and 9. This resulted in a dose-dependent increase in production of not only tumor necrosis factor–alpha (TNF-α), a surrogate marker of the proinflammatory response, but also interleukin 10 (IL-10), a well-described inhibitory cytokine. Importantly, IL-10 secretion was not induced by low concentrations of TLR agonists that readily produced TNF-α. We subsequently stimulated lymphocytes with anti-CD3 antibody in the presence of media from macrophages activated with higher doses of TLR agonists and observed suppression of interferon gamma release. Use of both IL-10 knockout macrophages and IL-10 small-interfering RNA (siRNA) ablated this suppressive effect. Finally, IL-10 siRNA was successfully used to suppress CpG-induced IL-10 production in vivo. We conclude that TLR-mediated APC stimulation can induce a paradoxical inhibitory effect on T-cell activation mediated by IL-10.

  16. Parallel maturation of the pancreatic secretory response to cholinergic stimulation and the muscarinic receptor population.

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Y.; Larose, L.; Morisset, J.; Poirier, G. G.

    1981-01-01

    1 The appearance of pancreatic muscarinic receptors during development has been measured by use of the specific ligand [3H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]-QNB). 2 QNB binding sites are present in foetal pancreas; their maximal concentration is attained at the age of 30 days and a significant decrease is observed in one year old animals. 3 Affinity of [3H]-QNB for the muscarinic receptor does not change with age. 4 An evaluation of the pancreatic secretory response to a cholinoceptor agonist as a function of age indicates that the development of this response parallels that of the receptor population. 5 It is suggested that, at all ages from 3 days after birth onwards, the maximal secretory response of the exocrine pancreas to a cholinoceptor agonist mobilizes the same proportion of the total population of QNB binding sites. PMID:6165420

  17. Inverted-U shaped effects of D1 dopamine receptor stimulation in the medial preoptic nucleus on sexually motivated song in male European starlings.

    PubMed

    Riters, Lauren V; Pawlisch, Benjamin A; Kelm-Nelson, Cynthia A; Stevenson, Sharon A

    2014-02-01

    Past studies in songbirds have highlighted a central role for the medial preoptic nucleus (mPOA) in context-appropriate vocal communication. During the breeding season, male songbirds sing primarily to attract females (sexually motivated song) and to repel competitors (agonistically motivated song). Past data have linked dopamine and D1 dopamine receptors in the mPOA to sexually motivated but not agonistically motivated song; however, direct effects of dopamine receptor manipulations in the mPOA on song have not been experimentally tested. Here, we tested the hypothesis that D1 receptor stimulation in the mPOA selectively influences sexually motivated male song, and the possibility that the effects of D1 receptor agonism differ at low and high doses. In a first study, breeding-condition male European starlings received infusions of saline or a single dose of the D1 receptor agonist SKF 38393 on separate test days into the mPOA or hypothalamic control areas. Stimulation of D1 receptors in the mPOA triggered sexually motivated but not agonistically motivated song. A second study showed inverted-U shaped dose-response effects of the agonist, such that low levels of sexually motivated song were observed at low and high levels of D1 receptor activation. A third study showed that the effects of the D1 receptor agonist were blocked by the D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390. These findings suggest that an optimal level of D1 receptor stimulation in the mPOA is needed to facilitate sexually motivated vocal production. The results support a central, context-specific role for the mPOA in vocal communication, and more broadly demonstrate a complex, modulatory influence of D1 receptors in the mPOA on sexually motivated behavior. PMID:24528137

  18. Brain Natriuretic Peptide Stimulates Lipid Metabolism through Its Receptor NPR1 and the Glycerolipid Metabolism Pathway in Chicken Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, H Y; Zhao, G P; Liu, R R; Li, Q H; Zheng, M Q; Li, S F; Liang, Z; Zhao, Z H; Wen, J

    2015-11-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is related to lipid metabolism in mammals, but its effect and the molecular mechanisms underlying it in chickens are incompletely understood. We found that the level of natriuretic peptide precursor B (NPPB, which encodes BNP) mRNA expression in high-abdominal-fat chicken groups was significantly higher than that of low-abdominal-fat groups. Partial correlations indicated that changes in the weight of abdominal fat were positively correlated with NPPB mRNA expression level. In vitro, compared with the control group, preadipocytes with NPPB interference showed reduced levels of proliferation, differentiation, and glycerin in media. Treatments of cells with BNP led to enhanced proliferation and differentiation of cells and glycerin concentration, and mRNA expression of its receptor natriuretic peptide receptor 1 (NPR1) was upregulated significantly. In cells exposed to BNP, 482 differentially expressed genes were identified compared with controls without BNP. Four genes known to be related to lipid metabolism (diacylglycerol kinase; lipase, endothelial; 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 1; and 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 2) were enriched in the glycerolipid metabolism pathway and expressed differentially. In conclusion, BNP stimulates the proliferation, differentiation, and lipolysis of preadipocytes through upregulation of the levels of expression of its receptor NPR1 and key genes enriched in the glycerolipid metabolic pathway. PMID:26463554

  19. Stimulation of proliferation of a human osteosarcoma cell line by exogenous acidic fibroblast growth factor requires both activation of receptor tyrosine kinase and growth factor internalization.

    PubMed Central

    Wiedłocha, A; Falnes, P O; Rapak, A; Muñoz, R; Klingenberg, O; Olsnes, S

    1996-01-01

    U2OS Dr1 cells, originating from a human osteosarcoma, are resistant to the intracellular action of diphtheria toxin but contain toxin receptors on their surfaces. These cells do not have detectable amounts of fibroblast growth factor receptors. When these cells were transfected with fibroblast growth factor receptor 4, the addition of acidic fibroblast growth factor to the medium induced tyrosine phosphorylation, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. A considerable fraction of the cell-associated growth factor was found in the nuclear fraction. When the growth factor was fused to the diphtheria toxin A fragment, it was still bound to the growth factor receptor and induced tyrosine phosphorylation but did not induce DNA synthesis or cell proliferation, nor was any fusion protein recovered in the nuclear fraction. On the other hand, when the fusion protein was associated with the diphtheria toxin B fragment to allow translocation to the cytosol by the toxin pathway, the fusion protein was targeted to the nucleus and stimulated both DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. In untransfected cells containing toxin receptors but not fibroblast growth factor receptors, the fusion protein was translocated to the cytosol and targeted to the nucleus, but in this case, it stimulated only DNA synthesis. These data indicate that the following two signals are required to stimulate cell proliferation in transfected U2OS Dr1 cells: the tyrosine kinase signal from the activated fibroblast growth factor receptor and translocation of the growth factor into the cell. PMID:8524304

  20. Stimulation of neuropeptide Y gene expression by brain-derived neurotrophic factor requires both the phospholipase Cgamma and Shc binding sites on its receptor, TrkB.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, A G; Hargreaves, A C; Gunn-Moore, F J; Tavaré, J M

    1998-01-01

    In PC12 cells, it has been previously reported that nerve growth factor stimulates neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene expression. In the current study we examined the signalling pathways involved in this effect by transiently expressing in PC12 cells the receptor (TrkB) for the related neurotrophin, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF caused a 3-fold induction of luciferase expression from a transiently co-transfected plasmid possessing the firefly luciferase gene under the control of the NPY promoter. This effect of BDNF was completely blocked by either a Y484F mutation in TrkB (which blocks high-affinity Shc binding to TrkB) or by a Y785F substitution [which blocks the binding, phosphorylation and activation of phospholipase Cgamma (PLCgamma)]. Activation of the NPY promoter by neurotrophin-3 in PC12 cells overexpressing TrkC was also completely blocked by a naturally occurring kinase insert which prevents the high-affinity binding of Shc and PLCgamma. NPY promoter activation by BDNF was blocked by PD98059, suggesting a role for mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase). Stimulation of NPY gene expression by PMA, but not by BDNF, was blocked by Ro-31-8220, a protein kinase C inhibitor, excluding a role for this serine/threonine protein kinase in the effect of BDNF. In addition, BDNF did not cause an elevation in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration. Taken together, our results suggest that stimulation of the NPY promoter by BDNF requires the simultaneous activation of two distinct pathways; one involves Shc and MAP kinase, and the other appears to be PLCgamma-independent but requires an intact tyrosine-785 on TrkB and so may involve an effector of TrkB signalling that remains to be identified. PMID:9677306

  1. BLOCKAGE OF A-1 ADRENERGIC RECEPTOR INHIBOTS HEPATIC DNA SYNTHESIS STIMULATED BY TUMOR PROMOTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies with regenerating liver and hepatocyte cultures have shown that the a-1 adrenergic receptor (A1AR) is involved in the early events which transmit a mitogenic signal to hepatocytes after 2/3 partial hepatectomy. n this study, we investigated the role of A1AR in DNA synthes...

  2. Activiation of the calcium sensing receptor stimulates serum gastrin and gastric acid secretion in healthy subjects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastric acid secretion is a complex process regulated by neuronal and hormonal pathways. Ex vivo studies in human gastric tissues indicate that the calcium sensing receptor (CaR), expressed on the surface of G and parietal cells, may be involved in this regulation. We sought to determine whether cin...

  3. Activation of the calcium sensing receptor stimulates gastrin and gastric acid secretion in healthy participants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastric acid secretion is a complex process regulated by neuronal and hormonal pathways. Ex vivo studies in human gastric tissues indicate that the calcium sensing receptor (CaR), expressed on the surface of G and parietal cells, may be involved in this regulation. We sought to determine whether cin...

  4. Activation of the calcium sensing receptor stimulates serum gastrin and gastric acid secretion in healthy subjects

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gastric acid secretion is a complex process regulated by neuronal and hormonal pathways. Ex vivo studies in human gastric tissues indicate that the calcium sensing receptor (CaR), expressed on the surface of G and parietal cells, may be involved in this regulation. We sought to determine whether cin...

  5. Serotomide and Safflomide Modulate Forskolin-Stimulated cAMP Formation via 5-HT1 Receptor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serotomide (N-caffeoylserotonin) and safflomide (N-caffeoyltryptamine) are serotonin-derived phenylpropenoid amides found in plants. In this paper, safflomide and serotomide were investigated to determine their effects on serotonin receptor 5-HT1 in the renal epithelial (OK) cells, due to their stru...

  6. Liver X receptor activation stimulates iron export in human alternative macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bories, Gael; Colin, Sophie; Vanhoutte, Jonathan; Derudas, Bruno; Copin, Corinne; Fanchon, Melanie; Daoudi, Mehdi; Belloy, Loic; Haulon, Stephan; Zawadzki, Christophe; Jude, Brigitte; Staels, Bart; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia

    2013-01-01

    Rationale In atherosclerotic plaques, iron preferentially accumulates in macrophages where it can exert pro-oxidant activities. Objective The objective of this study is, first, to better characterize the iron distribution and metabolism in macrophage sub-populations in human atherosclerotic plaques and, second, to determine whether iron homeostasis is under the control of nuclear receptors, such as the Liver X Receptors (LXR). Methods and Results Here we report that iron depots accumulate in human atherosclerotic plaque areas enriched in CD68 and Mannose Receptor (MR) positive (CD68+MR+) alternative M2 macrophages. In vitro IL-4 polarization of human monocytes into M2 macrophages also resulted in a gene expression profile and phenotype favouring iron accumulation. However, upon iron exposure, M2 macrophages acquire a phenotype favouring iron release, through a strong increase in ferroportin expression, illustrated by a more avid oxidation of extra-cellular LDL by iron-loaded M2 macrophages. In line, in human atherosclerotic plaques, CD68+MR+ macrophages accumulate oxidized lipids, which activate Liver X Receptors (LXRα and LXRβ), resulting in the induction of ABCA1, ABCG1 and ApoE expression. Moreover, in iron-loaded M2 macrophages, LXR activation induces nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 (NRF2) expression, hence increasing ferroportin expression, which, together with a decrease of hepcidin mRNA levels, promotes iron export. Conclusions These data identify a role for M2 macrophages in iron handling, a process which is regulated by LXR activation. PMID:24036496

  7. Toll-Like Receptor Stimulation Induces Nondefensin Protein Expression and Reverses Antibiotic-Induced Gut Defense Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ying-Ying; Hsu, Ching-Mei; Chen, Pei-Hsuan; Fung, Chang-Phone

    2014-01-01

    Prior antibiotic exposure is associated with increased mortality in Gram-negative bacteria-induced sepsis. However, how antibiotic-mediated changes of commensal bacteria promote the spread of enteric pathogenic bacteria in patients remains unclear. In this study, the effects of systemic antibiotic treatment with or without Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation on bacterium-killing activity, antibacterial protein expression in the intestinal mucosa, and bacterial translocation were examined in mice receiving antibiotics with or without oral supplementation of dead Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus. We developed a systemic ampicillin, vancomycin, and metronidazole treatment protocol to simulate the clinical use of antibiotics. Antibiotic treatment decreased the total number of bacteria, including aerobic bacteria belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae and the genus Enterococcus as well as organisms of the anaerobic genera Lactococcus and Bifidobacterium in the intestinal mucosa and lumen. Antibiotic treatment significantly decreased the bacterium-killing activity of the intestinal mucosa and the expression of non-defensin-family proteins, such as RegIIIβ, RegIIIγ, C-reactive protein-ductin, and RELMβ, but not the defensin-family proteins, and increased Klebsiella pneumoniae translocation. TLR stimulation after antibiotic treatment increased NF-κB DNA binding activity, nondefensin protein expression, and bacterium-killing activity in the intestinal mucosa and decreased K. pneumoniae translocation. Moreover, germfree mice showed a significant decrease in nondefensin proteins as well as intestinal defense against pathogen translocation. Since TLR stimulation induced NF-κB DNA binding activity, TLR4 expression, and mucosal bacterium-killing activity in germfree mice, we conclude that the commensal microflora is critical in maintaining intestinal nondefensin protein expression and the intestinal barrier. In turn, we suggest that TLR stimulation induces

  8. Vitamin A and immune function: retinoic acid modulates population dynamics in antigen receptor and CD38-stimulated splenic B cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiuyan; Ross, A Catharine

    2005-10-01

    Vitamin A and its active metabolite, all-trans retinoic acid (RA), regulate the antibody response in vivo, although the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. We have investigated the regulation by RA of B cell population dynamics and Ig gene expression in purified splenic mouse B cells stimulated through the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) and/or CD38, a BCR coreceptor. After ligation of the BCR and/or CD38, B cells became more heterogeneous in size. RA substantially restrained this change, concomitant with inhibition of cell proliferation. To examine B cell heterogeneity more closely, we categorized stimulated B cells by size (forward angle light scatter) and determined cell division dynamics, germ-line Ig heavy chain gene transcription and surface IgG1 (sIgG1) expression. Flow cytometric analysis of carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester-labeled B cells costained for sIgG1 showed that the more proliferative groups of B cells were smaller, whereas cells expressing more sIgG1 were larger. RA enriched the latter population, whereas cell division frequency in general and the number of smaller B cells that had undergone division cycles were reduced. Although RA significantly inhibited Ig germ-line transcript levels in the total B cell population, CD19(-)IgG1(+) B cells, which represent a more differentiated phenotype, were enriched. Furthermore, pax-5 mRNA was decreased and activation-induced cytidine deaminase mRNA was increased in RA-treated stimulated B cells. Thus, RA regulated factors known to be required for Ig class switch recombination and modulated the population dynamics of ligation-stimulated B cells, while promoting the progression of a fraction of B cells into differentiated sIgG-expressing cells. PMID:16093312

  9. Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) alternative skipping of exon 2 or 3 affects ovarian response to FSH

    PubMed Central

    Karakaya, Cengiz; Guzeloglu-Kayisli, Ozlem; Hobbs, Rebecca J.; Gerasimova, Tsilya; Uyar, Asli; Erdem, Mehmet; Oktem, Mesut; Erdem, Ahmet; Gumuslu, Seyhan; Ercan, Deniz; Sakkas, Denny; Comizzoli, Pierre; Seli, Emre; Lalioti, Maria D.

    2014-01-01

    Genes critical for fertility are highly conserved in mammals. Interspecies DNA sequence variation, resulting in amino acid substitutions and post-transcriptional modifications, including alternative splicing, are a result of evolution and speciation. The mammalian follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene encodes distinct species-specific forms by alternative splicing. Skipping of exon 2 of the human FSHR was reported in women of North American origin and correlated with low response to ovarian stimulation with exogenous follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). To determine whether this variant correlated with low response in women of different genetic backgrounds, we performed a blinded retrospective observational study in a Turkish cohort. Ovarian response was determined as low, intermediate or high according to retrieved oocyte numbers after classifying patients in four age groups (<35, 35–37, 38–40, >40). Cumulus cells collected from 96 women undergoing IVF/ICSI following controlled ovarian hyperstimulation revealed four alternatively spliced FSHR products in seven patients (8%): exon 2 deletion in four patients; exon 3 and exons 2 + 3 deletion in one patient each, and a retention of an intron 1 fragment in one patient. In all others (92%) splicing was intact. Alternative skipping of exons 2, 3 or 2 + 3 were exclusive to low responders and was independent of the use of agonist or antagonist. Interestingly, skipping of exon 3 occurs naturally in the ovaries of domestic cats—a good comparative model for human fertility. We tested the signaling potential of human and cat variants after transfection in HEK293 cells and FSH stimulation. None of the splicing variants initiated cAMP signaling despite high FSH doses, unlike full-length proteins. These data substantiate the occurrence of FSHR exon skipping in a subgroup of low responders and suggest that species-specific regulation of FSHR splicing plays diverse roles in mammalian ovarian function. PMID

  10. Stimulation of calcium-sensing receptors induces endothelium-dependent vasorelaxations via nitric oxide production and activation of IKCa channels.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Harry Z E; Shi, Jian; Jahan, Kazi S; Martinucci, Matthew C; Gilbert, Steven J; Vanessa Ho, W-S; Albert, Anthony P

    2016-05-01

    Stimulation of vascular calcium-sensing receptors (CaSRs) is reported to induce both constrictions and relaxations. However, cellular mechanisms involved in these responses remain unclear. The present study investigates the effect of stimulating CaSRs on vascular contractility and focuses on the role of the endothelium, nitric oxide (NO) and K(+) channels in these responses. In wire myography studies, increasing [Ca(2+)]o from 1mM to 6mM induced concentration-dependent relaxations of methoxamine pre-contracted rabbit mesenteric arteries. [Ca(2+)]o-induced relaxations were dependent on a functional endothelium, and were inhibited by the negative allosteric CaSR modulator Calhex-231. [Ca(2+)]o-induced relaxations were reduced by inhibitors of endothelial NO synthase, guanylate cyclase, and protein kinase G. CaSR activation also induced NO production in freshly isolated endothelial cells (ECs) in experiments using the fluorescent NO indicator DAF-FM. Pre-treatment with inhibitors of large (BKCa) and intermediate (IKCa) Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (iberiotoxin and charybdotoxin), and Kv7 channels (linopirdine) also reduced [Ca(2+)]o-induced vasorelaxations. Increasing [Ca(2+)]o also activated IKCa currents in perforated-patch recordings of isolated mesenteric artery ECs. These findings indicate that stimulation of CaSRs induces endothelium-dependent vasorelaxations which are mediated by two separate pathways involving production of NO and activation of IKCa channels. NO stimulates PKG leading to BKCa activation in vascular smooth muscle cells, whereas IKCa activity contributes to endothelium-derived hyperpolarisations. PMID:26772767

  11. Preconditioning of Microglia by α-Synuclein Strongly Affects the Response Induced by Toll-like Receptor (TLR) Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Rey, Elena; Lachaud, Christian C.; Guilliams, Tim; Fernandez-Montesinos, Rafael; Benitez-Rondan, Alicia; Robledo, Gema; Hmadcha, Abdelkrim; Delgado, Mario; Dobson, Christopher M.; Pozo, David

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, it has become accepted that α-synuclein (αSyn) has a key role in the microglia-mediated neuroinflammation, which accompanies the development of Parkinson’s disease and other related disorders, such as Dementia with Lewy Bodies and Alzheimer’s disease. Nevertheless, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying its pathological actions, especially in the sporadic forms of the diseases, are not completely understood. Intriguingly, several epidemiological and animal model studies have revealed a link between certain microbial infections and the onset or progression of sporadic forms of these neurodegenerative disorders. In this work, we have characterized the effect of toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation on primary murine microglial cultures and analysed the impact of priming cells with extracellular wild-type (Wt) αSyn on the subsequent TLR stimulation of cells with a set of TLR ligands. By assaying key interleukins and chemokines we report that specific stimuli, in particular Pam3Csk4 (Pam3) and single-stranded RNA40 (ssRNA), can differentially affect the TLR2/1- and TLR7-mediated responses of microglia when pre-conditioned with αSyn by augmenting IL-6, MCP-1/CCL2 or IP-10/CXCL10 secretion levels. Furthermore, we report a skewing of αSyn-primed microglia stimulated with ssRNA (TLR7) or Pam3 (TLR2/1) towards intermediate but at the same time differential, M1/M2 phenotypes. Finally, we show that the levels and intracellular location of activated caspase-3 protein change significantly in αSyn-primed microglia after stimulation with these particular TLR agonists. Overall, we report a remarkable impact of non-aggregated αSyn pre-sensitization of microglia on TLR-mediated immunity, a phenomenon that could contribute to triggering the onset of sporadic α-synuclein-related neuropathologies. PMID:24236103

  12. Stimulation of calcium-sensing receptors induces endothelium-dependent vasorelaxations via nitric oxide production and activation of IKCa channels

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Harry Z.E.; Shi, Jian; Jahan, Kazi S.; Martinucci, Matthew C.; Gilbert, Steven J.; Vanessa Ho, W.-S.; Albert, Anthony P.

    2016-01-01

    Stimulation of vascular calcium-sensing receptors (CaSRs) is reported to induce both constrictions and relaxations. However, cellular mechanisms involved in these responses remain unclear. The present study investigates the effect of stimulating CaSRs on vascular contractility and focuses on the role of the endothelium, nitric oxide (NO) and K+ channels in these responses. In wire myography studies, increasing [Ca2 +]o from 1 mM to 6 mM induced concentration-dependent relaxations of methoxamine pre-contracted rabbit mesenteric arteries. [Ca2 +]o-induced relaxations were dependent on a functional endothelium, and were inhibited by the negative allosteric CaSR modulator Calhex-231. [Ca2 +]o-induced relaxations were reduced by inhibitors of endothelial NO synthase, guanylate cyclase, and protein kinase G. CaSR activation also induced NO production in freshly isolated endothelial cells (ECs) in experiments using the fluorescent NO indicator DAF-FM. Pre-treatment with inhibitors of large (BKCa) and intermediate (IKCa) Ca2 +-activated K+ channels (iberiotoxin and charybdotoxin), and Kv7 channels (linopirdine) also reduced [Ca2 +]o-induced vasorelaxations. Increasing [Ca2 +]o also activated IKCa currents in perforated-patch recordings of isolated mesenteric artery ECs. These findings indicate that stimulation of CaSRs induces endothelium-dependent vasorelaxations which are mediated by two separate pathways involving production of NO and activation of IKCa channels. NO stimulates PKG leading to BKCa activation in vascular smooth muscle cells, whereas IKCa activity contributes to endothelium-derived hyperpolarisations. PMID:26772767

  13. Secreted APE1/Ref-1 inhibits TNF-α-stimulated endothelial inflammation via thiol-disulfide exchange in TNF receptor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Myoung Soo; Choi, Sunga; Lee, Yu Ran; Joo, Hee Kyoung; Kang, Gun; Kim, Cuk-Seong; Kim, Soo Jin; Lee, Sang Do; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Apurinic apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/Redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) is a multifunctional protein with redox activity and is proved to be secreted from stimulated cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functions of extracellular APE1/Ref-1 with respect to leading anti-inflammatory signaling in TNF-α-stimulated endothelial cells in response to acetylation. Treatment of TNF-α-stimulated endothelial cells with an inhibitor of deacetylase that causes intracellular acetylation, considerably suppressed vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). During TSA-mediated acetylation in culture, a time-dependent increase in secreted APE1/Ref-1 was confirmed. The acetyl moiety of acetylated-APE1/Ref-1 was rapidly removed based on the removal kinetics. Additionally, recombinant human (rh) APE1/Ref-1 with reducing activity induced a conformational change in rh TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) by thiol-disulfide exchange. Following treatment with the neutralizing anti-APE1/Ref-1 antibody, inflammatory signals via the binding of TNF-α to TNFR1 were remarkably recovered, leading to up-regulation of reactive oxygen species generation and VCAM-1, in accordance with the activation of p66shc and p38 MAPK. These results strongly indicate that anti-inflammatory effects in TNF-α-stimulated endothelial cells by acetylation are tightly linked to secreted APE1/Ref-1, which inhibits TNF-α binding to TNFR1 by reductive conformational change, with suggestion as an endogenous inhibitor of vascular inflammation. PMID:26964514

  14. Hepatocyte nuclear factor-6 stimulates transcription of the alpha-fetoprotein gene and synergizes with the retinoic-acid-receptor-related orphan receptor alpha-4.

    PubMed Central

    Nacer-Cherif, Habib; Bois-Joyeux, Brigitte; Rousseau, Guy G; Lemaigre, Frédéric P; Danan, Jean-Louis

    2003-01-01

    The rat alpha-fetoprotein ( afp ) gene is controlled by three enhancers whose function depends on their interaction with liver-enriched transcription factors. The afp enhancer III, located at -6 kb, is composed of three regions that act in synergy. Two of these regions, called s1 and s2, contain a putative binding site for hepatocyte nuclear factor-6 (HNF-6). This factor is the prototype of the ONECUT family of cut-homoeodomain proteins and is a known regulator of liver gene expression in adults and during development. We show here that the two splicing isoforms of HNF-6 bind to a site in the s1 region and in the s2 region. The core sequence of the s1 site corresponds to none of the known HNF-6 binding sites. Nevertheless, the binding properties of the s1 site are identical with those of the s2 site and of previously characterized HNF-6 binding sequences. The HNF-6 consensus should therefore be rewritten as DRRTCVATND. Binding of HNF-6 to the s1 and s2 sites requires both the cut and the homoeo domains, is co-operative and induces DNA bending. HNF-6 strongly stimulates the activity of the afp enhancer III in transient transfection experiments. This effect requires the stereo-specific alignment of the two HNF-6 sites. Moreover, HNF-6 stimulates the enhancer in synergy with the retinoic-acid-receptor-related orphan receptor alpha (RORalpha), which binds to a neighbouring site in the s1 region. Thus expression of the afp gene requires functional interactions between HNF-6 molecules and between HNF-6 and RORalpha. PMID:12379144

  15. Two cases of mild serotonin toxicity via 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A receptor stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Hiroto; Umeda, Sumiyo; Nibuya, Masashi; Terao, Takeshi; Nisijima, Koichi; Nomura, Soichiro

    2014-01-01

    We propose the possibility of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)1A receptor involvement in mild serotonin toxicity. A 64-year-old woman who experienced hallucinations was treated with perospirone (8 mg/day). She also complained of depressed mood and was prescribed paroxetine (10 mg/day). She exhibited finger tremors, sweating, coarse shivering, hyperactive knee jerks, vomiting, diarrhea, tachycardia, and psychomotor agitation. After the discontinuation of paroxetine and perospirone, the symptoms disappeared. Another 81-year-old woman, who experienced delusions, was treated with perospirone (8 mg/day). Depressive symptoms appeared and paroxetine (10 mg/day) was added. She exhibited tachycardia, finger tremors, anxiety, agitation, and hyperactive knee jerks. The symptoms disappeared after the cessation of paroxetine and perospirone. Recently, the effectiveness of coadministrating 5-HT1A agonistic psychotropics with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) has been reported, and SSRIs with 5-HT1A agonistic activity have been newly approved in the treatment of depression. Perospirone is a serotonin–dopamine antagonist and agonistic on the 5-HT1A receptors. Animal studies have indicated that mild serotonin excess induces low body temperature through 5-HT1A, whereas severe serotonin excess induces high body temperature through 5-HT2A activation. Therefore, it could be hypothesized that mild serotonin excess induces side effects through 5-HT1A, and severe serotonin excess induces lethal side effects with hyperthermia through 5-HT2A. Serotonin toxicity via a low dose of paroxetine that is coadministered with perospirone, which acts agonistically on the 5-HT1A receptor and antagonistically on the 5-HT2A receptor, clearly indicated 5-HT1A receptor involvement in mild serotonin toxicity. Careful measures should be adopted to avoid serotonin toxicity following the combined use of SSRIs and 5-HT1A agonists. PMID:24627634

  16. Specific Activation of A3, A2A and A1 Adenosine Receptors in CD73-Knockout Mice Affects B16F10 Melanoma Growth, Neovascularization, Angiogenesis and Macrophage Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Koszałka, Patrycja; Gołuńska, Monika; Urban, Aleksandra; Stasiłojć, Grzegorz; Stanisławowski, Marcin; Majewski, Marceli; Składanowski, Andrzej C.; Bigda, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    CD73 (ecto-5'-nucleotidase), a cell surface enzyme hydrolyzing AMP to adenosine, was lately demonstrated to play a direct role in tumor progression including regulation of tumor vascularization. It was also shown to stimulate tumor macrophage infiltration. Interstitial adenosine, accumulating in solid tumors due to CD73 enzymatic activity, is recognized as a main mediator regulating the production of pro- and anti-angiogenic factors, but the engagement of specific adenosine receptors in tumor progression in vivo is still poorly researched. We have analyzed the role of high affinity adenosine receptors A1, A2A, and A3 in B16F10 melanoma progression using specific agonists (CCPA, CGS-21680 and IB-MECA, respectively). We limited endogenous extracellular adenosine background using CD73 knockout mice treated with CD73 chemical inhibitor, AOPCP (adenosine α,β-methylene 5’-diphosphate). Activation of any adenosine receptor significantly inhibited B16F10 melanoma growth but only at its early stage. At 14th day of growth, the decrease in tumor neovascularization and MAPK pathway activation induced by CD73 depletion was reversed by all agonists. Activation of A1AR primarily increased angiogenic activation measured by expression of VEGF-R2 on tumor blood vessels. However, mainly A3AR activation increased both the microvessel density and expression of pro-angiogenic factors. All agonists induced significant increase in macrophage tumor infiltration, with IB-MECA being most effective. This effect was accompanied by substantial changes in cytokines regulating macrophage polarization between pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic phenotype. Our results demonstrate an evidence that each of the analyzed receptors has a specific role in the stimulation of tumor angiogenesis and confirm significantly more multifaceted role of adenosine in its regulation than was already observed. They also reveal previously unexplored consequences to extracellular adenosine signaling depletion in

  17. NOD2 Stimulation by Staphylococcus aureus-Derived Peptidoglycan Is Boosted by Toll-Like Receptor 2 Costimulation with Lipoproteins in Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Demircioglu, Dogan Doruk; Kühner, Daniel; Menz, Sarah; Bender, Annika; Autenrieth, Ingo B.; Bodammer, Peggy; Lamprecht, Georg; Götz, Friedrich; Frick, Julia-Stefanie

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 2 (NOD2) play an important role in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease. NOD2 is an intracellular pattern recognition receptor (PRR) that senses bacterial peptidoglycan (PGN) structures, e.g., muramyl dipeptide (MDP). Here we focused on the effect of more-cross-linked, polymeric PGN fragments (PGNpol) in the activation of the innate immune system. In this study, the effect of combined NOD2 and Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) stimulation was examined compared to single stimulation of the NOD2 receptor alone. PGNpol species derived from a lipoprotein-containing Staphylococcus aureus strain (SA113) and a lipoprotein-deficient strain (SA113 Δlgt) were isolated. While PGNpol constitutes a combined NOD2 and TLR2 ligand, lipoprotein-deficient PGNpolΔlgt leads to activation of the immune system only via the NOD2 receptor. Murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs), J774 cells, and Mono Mac 6 (MM6) cells were stimulated with these ligands. Cytokines (interleukin-6 [IL-6], IL-12p40, and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α]) as well as DC activation and maturation parameters were measured. Stimulation with PGNpolΔlgt did not lead to enhanced cytokine secretion or DC activation and maturation. However, stimulation with PGNpol led to strong cytokine secretion and subsequent DC maturation. These results were confirmed in MM6 and J774 cells. We showed that the NOD2-mediated activation of DCs with PGNpol was dependent on TLR2 costimulation. Therefore, signaling via both receptors leads to a more potent activation of the immune system than that with stimulation via each receptor alone. PMID:25156723

  18. Contribution of opioid and metabotropic glutamate receptor mechanisms to inhibition of bladder overactivity by tibial nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Matsuta, Yosuke; Mally, Abhijith D; Zhang, Fan; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2013-07-15

    The contribution of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) and opioid receptors to inhibition of bladder overactivity by tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) was investigated in cats under α-chloralose anesthesia using LY341495 (a group II mGluR antagonist) and naloxone (an opioid receptor antagonist). Slow infusion cystometry was used to measure the volume threshold (i.e., bladder capacity) for inducing a large bladder contraction. After measuring the bladder capacity during saline infusion, 0.25% acetic acid (AA) was infused to irritate the bladder, activate the nociceptive C-fiber bladder afferents, and induce bladder overactivity. AA significantly (P < 0.0001) reduced bladder capacity to 26.6 ± 4.7% of saline control capacity. TNS (5 Hz, 0.2 ms) at 2 and 4 times the threshold (T) intensity for inducing an observable toe movement significantly increased bladder capacity to 62.2 ± 8.3% at 2T (P < 0.01) and 80.8 ± 9.2% at 4T (P = 0.0001) of saline control capacity. LY341495 (0.1-5 mg/kg iv) did not change bladder overactivity, but completely suppressed the inhibition induced by TNS at a low stimulus intensity (2T) and partially suppressed the inhibition at high intensity (4T). Following administration of LY341495, naloxone (0.01 mg/kg iv) completely eliminated the high-intensity TNS-induced inhibition. However, without LY341495 treatment a 10 times higher dose (0.1 mg/kg) of naloxone was required to completely block TNS inhibition. These results indicate that interactions between group II mGluR and opioid receptor mechanisms contribute to TNS inhibition of AA-induced bladder overactivity. Understanding neurotransmitter mechanisms underlying TNS inhibition of bladder overactivity is important for the development of new treatments for bladder disorders. PMID:23576608

  19. Trypsin stimulates proteinase-activated receptor-2-dependent and -independent activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Belham, C M; Tate, R J; Scott, P H; Pemberton, A D; Miller, H R; Wadsworth, R M; Gould, G W; Plevin, R

    1996-01-01

    We have examined protease-mediated activation of the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade in rat aortic smooth-muscle cells and bovine pulmonary arterial fibroblasts. Exposure of smooth-muscle cells to trypsin evoked rapid and transient activation of c-Raf-1, MAP kinase kinase 1 and 2 and MAP kinase that was sensitive to inhibition by soybean trypsin inhibitor. The actions of trypsin were closely mimicked by the proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2)-activating peptide sequence SLIGRL but not LSIGRL. Peak MAP kinase activation in response to both trypsin and SLIGRL was also dependent on concentration, with EC50 values of 12.1 +/- 3.4 nM and 62.5 +/- 4.5 microM respectively. Under conditions where MAP kinase activation by SLIGRL was completely desensitized by prior exposure of smooth-muscle cells to the peptide, trypsin-stimulated MAP kinase activity was markedly attenuated (78.9 +/- 15.1% desensitization), whereas the response to thrombin was only marginally affected (16.6 +/- 12.1% desensitization). Trypsin and SLIGRL also weakly stimulated the activation of the MAP kinase homologue p38 in smooth-muscle cells without any detectable activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase. Strong activation of the MAP kinase cascade and modest activation of p38 by trypsin were also observed in fibroblasts, although in this cell type these effects were not mimicked by SLIGRL nor by the thrombin receptor-activating peptide SFLLRNPNDKYEPF. Reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis confirmed the presence of PAR-2 mRNA in smooth-muscle cells but not fibroblasts. Our results suggest that in vascular smooth-muscle cells, trypsin stimulates the activation of the MAP kinase cascade relatively selectively, in a manner consistent with an interaction with the recently described PAR-2. Activation of MAP kinase by trypsin in vascular fibroblasts, however, seems to be independent of PAR-2 and occurs by an undefined mechanism possibly involving novel receptor species. PMID:9003384

  20. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype 4 is essential for cholinergic stimulation of duodenal bicarbonate secretion in mice - relationship to D cell/somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, K; Kita, K; Takahashi, K; Aihara, E; Hayashi, S

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the roles of muscarinic (M) acetylcholine receptor subtype in the cholinergic stimulation of duodenal HCO3(-) secretion using knockout (KO) mice. Wild-type and M1-M5 KO C57BL/6J mice were used. The duodenal mucosa was mounted on an Ussing chamber, and HCO3(-) secretion was measured at pH 7.0 using a pH-stat method in vitro. Carbachol (CCh) or other agents were added to the serosal side. CCh dose-dependently stimulated HCO3(-) secretion in wild-type mice, and this effect was completely inhibited in the presence of atropine. The HCO3(-) response to CCh in wild-type mice was also inhibited by pirenzepine (M1 antagonist), 4DAMP (M3 antagonist), and tropicamide (M4 antagonist), but not by methoctramine (M2 antagonist). CCh stimulated HCO3(-) secretion in M2 and M5 KO animals as effectively as in WT mice; however, this stimulatory effect was significantly attenuated in M1, M3, and M4 KO mice. The decrease observed in the CCh-stimulated HCO3(-) response in M4 KO mice was reversed by the co-application of CYN154806, a somatostatin receptor type 2 (SST2) antagonist. Octreotide (a somatostatin analogue) decreased the basal and CCh-stimulated secretion of HCO3(-) in wild-type mice. The co-localized expression of somatostatin and M4 receptors was confirmed immunohistologically in the duodenum. We concluded that the duodenal HCO3(-) response to CCh was directly mediated by M1/M3 receptors and indirectly modified by M4 receptors. The activation of M4 receptors was assumed to inhibit the release of somatostatin from D cells and potentiate the HCO3(-) response by removing the negative influence of somatostatin via the activation of SST2 receptors. PMID:26084221

  1. Alpha 2-adrenergic receptor stimulation of phospholipase A2 and of adenylate cyclase in transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells is mediated by different mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.B.; Halenda, S.P.; Bylund, D.B. )

    1991-02-01

    The effect of alpha 2-adrenergic receptor activation on adenylate cyclase activity in Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with the alpha 2A-adrenergic receptor gene is biphasic. At lower concentrations of epinephrine forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production is inhibited, but at higher concentrations the inhibition is reversed. Both of these effects are blocked by the alpha 2 antagonist yohimbine but not by the alpha 1 antagonist prazosin. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin attenuates inhibition at lower concentrations of epinephrine and greatly potentiates forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production at higher concentrations of epinephrine. alpha 2-Adrenergic receptor stimulation also causes arachidonic acid mobilization, presumably via phospholipase A2. This effect is blocked by yohimbine, quinacrine, removal of extracellular Ca2+, and pretreatment with pertussis toxin. Quinacrine and removal of extracellular Ca2+, in contrast, have no effect on the enhanced forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production. Thus, it appears that the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor in these cells can simultaneously activate distinct signal transduction systems; inhibition of adenylate cyclase and stimulation of phospholipase A2, both via G1, and potentiation of cyclic AMP production by a different (pertussis toxin-insensitive) mechanism.

  2. Role of 5-HT2C Receptors in Effects of Monoamine Releasers on Intracranial Self-Stimulation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Clayton T.; Banks, Matthew L.; Blough, Bruce E.; Negus, S. Stevens

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Many monoamine releasers are abused by humans and produce abuse-related facilitation of intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) in rats. Facilitation of ICSS in rats can be limited by monoamine releaser-induced serotonin (5-HT) release, but receptors that mediate 5-HT effects of monoamine releasers are unknown. Objectives Investigate whether 5-HT2C receptor activation is necessary for rate-decreasing effects produced in an ICSS procedure in rats by the 5-HT-selective monoamine releaser fenfluramine and the non-selective releasers napthylisopropylamine (PAL-287) and (+)-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine ((+)-MDMA). Methods Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats with electrodes implanted in the medial forebrain bundle were trained to lever press for brain stimulation under a “frequency-rate” ICSS procedure. Effectiveness of the 5-HT2C antagonist SB 242,084 was evaluated to block rate-decreasing effects produced by (1) the 5-HT2C agonist Ro 60-0175, (2) the 5-HT-selective releaser fenfluramine, and (3) the mixed-action dopamine (DA)/norepinephrine (NE)/5-HT releasers PAL-287 (1.0-5.6 mg/kg), and (+)-MDMA (1.0-3.2 mg/kg). For comparison, effectiveness of SB 242,084 to alter rate-decreasing effects of the kappa opioid receptor agonist U69,593 and rate-increasing effects of the DA>5-HT releaser amphetamine were also examined. Results SB 242,084 pretreatment blocked rate-decreasing effects of Ro 60-0175 and fenfluramine, but not the rate-decreasing effects of U69,593 or the rate-increasing effects of amphetamine. SB 242,084 blunted the rate-decreasing effects and enhanced expression of rate-increasing effects of PAL-287 and (+)-MDMA. Conclusions These data suggest that 5-HT2C receptor activation contributes to rate-decreasing effects that are produced by selective and mixed-action 5-HT releasers in rats and that may oppose and limit the expression of abuse-related ICSS facilitation by these compounds. PMID:26041338

  3. Chondrocyte IGF-1 receptor expression and responsiveness to IGF-1 stimulation in mouse articular cartilage during various phases of experimentally induced arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Verschure, P J; van Marle, J; Joosten, L A; van den Berg, W B

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the distribution of insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) receptors and the biological response to IGF-1 stimulation in articular cartilage of normal mouse knee joints and arthritic joints taken at various stages of experimentally induced arthritis. METHODS--In situ IGF-1 receptor expression and responsiveness to IGF-1 stimulation were examined in murine articular cartilage at different phases in two models of experimentally induced arthritis. IGF-1 receptor expression was visualised in joint sections with the use of anti-IGF-1 receptor antibodies and quantified by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Chondrocyte proteoglycan (PG) synthesis was measured by incorporation of 35S-sulphate. RESULTS--In control cartilage, the majority of IGF-1 receptors were found on chondrocytes localised in the middle and deeper zones of the cartilage, whereas receptor expression in surface zone chondrocytes was very low. During culture of normal articular cartilage, IGF-1 was able to maintain chondrocyte PG synthesis at the in vivo level. Concurrently with the development of arthritis, cartilage lost its capacity to react to IGF-1, but IGF-1 stimulation recovered when the inflammatory response waned. Shortly after induction of arthritis, IGF-1 receptor expression initially declined, but it had returned to normal levels by day 1 and remained increased thereafter. CONCLUSION--The distribution of IGF-1 receptor expression in the different zones of normal articular cartilage reflects IGF-1 stimulation and metabolic activity of chondrocytes in these layers. This correlation is disturbed in arthritic cartilage, suggesting inadequate or overruled signalling. Images PMID:7677441

  4. CPAP inhibits non-nutritive swallowing through stimulation of bronchopulmonary receptors.

    PubMed

    Samson, Nathalie; Duvareille, Charles; St-Hilaire, Marie; Clapperton, Véronique; Praud, Jean-Paul

    2008-01-01

    While swallowing and respiratory problems are among the most frequent disorders encountered in neonates, the interrelationships between both functions are not completely understood. This is especially true for non-nutritive swallowing (NNS), which fulfills the important function of clearing upper airways from both local secretions and liquids refluxed from the stomach. Recently, we showed that nasal CPAP inhibits NNS during quiet sleep in the newborn lamb (Samson, St-Hilaire, Nsegbe, Reix, Moreau-Bussière and Praud 2005). The present study was aimed at testing the hypothesis that NNS inhibition is eliminated when CPAP is directly administered through a tracheostomy, thus eliminating reflexes originating from upper airway receptors. Results show that both nasal and tracheal CPAP 6cm H2O similarly inhibit total NNS during quiet sleep, thus suggesting that the inhibiting effect of nasal CPAP on NNS is mainly mediated through bronchopulmonary mechanical receptors with minimal participation of the upper airways. PMID:18085310

  5. Photoaffinity labelling of MSH receptors on Anolis melanophores: irradiation technique and MSH photolabels for irreversible stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, A.N.

    1984-01-01

    Excised dorsal skin of Anolis carolinensis was exposed to high intensity UV-irradiation in the presence of different photoreactive alpha-MSH derivatives. The resulting covalent binding of the hormone to its receptor induced irreversible pigment dispersion. The duration of the longlasting response depended on the type and length of irradiation; it was maximal after two 5 min irradiation phases with a light intensity of approximately 180 mW/cm/sup 2/ and a spectrum from 310 to 550 nm, fresh hormone being added after the first phase. (N alpha-(4-Azidophenylacetyl-serine1)-alpha-MSH (I), (2'-(2-nitro-4-azidophenylsulphenyl)-tryptophan/sub 9/)-alpha-MSH (II) and (p-azidophenylalanine/sub 13/)-alpha-MSH (III) all inserted into the receptor to about the same extent, as judged from the persistence of the longlasting signal. In contrast, (D-alanine1, p-azidophenylalanin2/sub 2/, norvaline/sub 4/)-alpha-MSH (IV) and (N alpha-(4-azidophenylacetyl)-serine1, leucine/sub 9/)-alpha-MSH (V) gave much less insertion and (leucine/sub 9/, p-azidophenylalanine/sub 13/)-alpha-MSH (VI) hardly any insertion when applied in the same relative excess (5-fold the concentration inducing a maximal response). Covalent attachment of the cleavable photolabel (N alpha-(4-azidophenyl)-1, 3'-dithio-propionyl-serine1)-alpha-MSH (VII) and subsequent washing of the skin in buffer containing 1% beta-mercaptoethanol released the peptide from the receptor. Insertion of the C-terminal photolabel (p-azidophenylalanine/sub 13/)-alpha-MSH was reduced by the weak antagonist H-Phe-Ala-Trp-Gly-Gly-Pro-Val-NH/sub 2/. These experiments prove that hormone receptors can be covalently labelled in tissue with very limited light transparency.

  6. Mechanistic Model of Natural Killer Cell Proliferative Response to IL-15 Receptor Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yun M.; French, Anthony R.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes that provide early host defense against intracellular pathogens, such as viruses. Although NK cell development, homeostasis, and proliferation are regulated by IL-15, the influence of IL-15 receptor (IL-15R)-mediated signaling at the cellular level has not been quantitatively characterized. We developed a mathematical model to analyze the kinetic interactions that control the formation and localization of IL-15/IL-15R complexes. Our computational results demonstrated that IL-15/IL-15R complexes on the cell surface were a key determinant of the magnitude of the IL-15 proliferative signal and that IL-15R occupancy functioned as an effective surrogate measure of receptor signaling. Ligand binding and receptor internalization modulated IL-15R occupancy. Our work supports the hypothesis that the total number and duration of IL-15/IL-15R complexes on the cell surface crosses a quantitative threshold prior to the initiation of NK cell division. Furthermore, our model predicted that the upregulation of IL-15Rα on NK cells substantially increased IL-15R complex formation and accelerated the expansion of dividing NK cells with the greatest impact at low IL-15 concentrations. Model predictions of the threshold requirement for NK cell recruitment to the cell cycle and the subsequent exponential proliferation correlated well with experimental data. In summary, our modeling analysis provides quantitative insight into the regulation of NK cell proliferation at the receptor level and provides a framework for the development of IL-15 based immunotherapies to modulate NK cell proliferation. PMID:24068905

  7. RNA mediated toll-like receptor stimulation in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Dalpke, Alexander H.; Helm, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Besides their well known functions in storage and translation of information nucleic acids have emerged as a target of pattern recognition receptors that drive activation of innate immunity. Due to the paucity of building block monomers used in nucleic acids, discrimination of host and microbial nucleic acids as a means of self/foreign discrimination is a complicated task. Pattern recognition receptors rely on discrimination by sequence, structural features and spatial compartmentalization to differentiate microbial derived nucleic acids from host ones. Microbial nucleic acid detection is important for the sensing of infectious danger and initiating an immune response to microbial attack. Failures in the underlying recognitions systems can have severe consequences: thus, inefficient recognition of microbial nucleic acids may increase susceptibility to infectious diseases. On the other hand, excessive immune responses as a result of failed self/foreign discrimination are associated with autoimmune diseases. This review gives a general overview over the underlying concepts of nucleic acid sensing by Toll-like receptors. Within this general framework, we focus on bacterial RNA and synthetic RNA oligomers. PMID:22617878

  8. Action of adenosine receptor antagonists on the cardiovascular response to defence area stimulation in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    St Lambert, J H; Dawid-Milner, M S; Silva-Carvalho, L; Spyer, K M

    1994-01-01

    1. The action of adenosine in the mediation of the cardiovascular changes associated with the defence reaction has been investigated in the rat using two A1 receptor antagonists. 2. Cumulative doses of 1,3 dipropyl-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX) (0.3-3 mg kg-1) and ethanol (0.03-0.25 ml) and bolus doses of DPCPX (3 mg kg-1) and 8-sulphophenyltheophylline (8-SPT) (20 mg kg-1) were given into alpha-chloralose, paralysed and artificially ventilated rats. Recordings were made of arterial blood pressure and heart rate. 3. Ethanol, the vehicle for DPCPX, failed to modify the magnitude of the defence response; however, cumulative doses of DPCPX produced a dose-dependent decrease in the HDA (hypothalamic defence area)-evoked increase in arterial blood pressure, accompanied by a similar fall in the magnitude of the evoked heart rate response. 4. The evoked rise in arterial blood pressure was reduced significantly by intravenous injection of DPCPX (3 mg kg-1) but not 8-SPT (20 mg kg-1), a purely peripherally acting adenosine antagonist. 5. These results suggest that adenosine acting at A1 receptors located in the central nervous system, is involved in the HDA-evoked pressor response. Whilst the site of action of the A1 receptors is not known, possible locations are discussed. PMID:7812606

  9. Detection of transcripts for the receptor for macrophage colony-stimulating factor, c-fms, in murine osteoclasts.

    PubMed Central

    Hofstetter, W; Wetterwald, A; Cecchini, M C; Felix, R; Fleisch, H; Mueller, C

    1992-01-01

    Macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), whose action is restricted to the cell populations of the mononuclear phagocyte system, has recently been found to be required for osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. To investigate the cells involved in the action of M-CSF in these processes, expression of c-fms mRNA, encoding the M-CSF receptor, was studied by in situ hybridization. Paws from murine embryos and newborn mice, tibiae from 2-day-old animals, as well as isolated osteoclasts, were hybridized with a c-fms-specific RNA probe. In bone, c-fms mRNA was detected only in cells at the late stages of osteoclastogenesis and in mature osteoclasts. The findings strengthen the relation between osteoclasts and the mononuclear phagocyte system. Furthermore, they suggest that M-CSF acts directly on osteoclast precursors and on mature osteoclasts during osteoclastogenesis. Images PMID:1409676

  10. The Drosophila HNF4 nuclear receptor promotes glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and mitochondrial function in adults.

    PubMed

    Barry, William E; Thummel, Carl S

    2016-01-01

    Although mutations in HNF4A were identified as the cause of Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young 1 (MODY1) two decades ago, the mechanisms by which this nuclear receptor regulates glucose homeostasis remain unclear. Here we report that loss of Drosophila HNF4 recapitulates hallmark symptoms of MODY1, including adult-onset hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). These defects are linked to a role for dHNF4 in promoting mitochondrial function as well as the expression of Hex-C, a homolog of the MODY2 gene Glucokinase. dHNF4 is required in the fat body and insulin-producing cells to maintain glucose homeostasis by supporting a developmental switch toward oxidative phosphorylation and GSIS at the transition to adulthood. These findings establish an animal model for MODY1 and define a developmental reprogramming of metabolism to support the energetic needs of the mature animal. PMID:27185732

  11. TARM1 is a novel LRC-encoded ITAM receptor that co-stimulates pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion by macrophages and neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Radjabova, Valeria; Mastroeni, Piero; Skjødt, Karsten; Zaccone, Paola; de Bono, Bernard; Goodall, Jane C; Chilvers, Edwin R; Juss, Jatinder K; Jones, Des C; Trowsdale, John; Barrow, Alexander David

    2015-01-01

    We identified a novel, evolutionarily conserved receptor encoded within the human Leukocyte Receptor Complex (LRC) and syntenic region of mouse chromosome 7, named T cell-interacting, activating receptor on myeloid cells-1 (TARM1). The transmembrane region of TARM1 contained a conserved arginine residue, consistent with association with a signaling adaptor. TARM1 associated with the ITAM adaptor Fc receptor common γ chain but not with DAP10 or DAP12. In healthy mice, TARM1 is constitutively expressed on the cell-surface of mature and immature CD11b+ Gr-1+ neutrophils within the bone marrow. Following intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment or systemic bacterial challenge TARM1 expression was upregulated by neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes and TARM1+ cells were rapidly recruited to sites of inflammation. TARM1 expression was also upregulated by bone marrow-derived macrophages and dendritic cells following stimulation with TLR agonists in vitro. Ligation of TARM1 receptor in the presence of TLR ligands, such as LPS, enhanced the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by macrophages and primary mouse neutrophils, whereas TARM1 stimulation alone had no effect. Finally, an immobilized TARM1-Fc fusion protein suppressed CD4+ T cell activation and proliferation in vitro. These results suggest that a putative T cell ligand can interact with TARM1 receptor resulting in bi-directional signaling, raising the T cell activation threshold whilst co-stimulating the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines by macrophages and neutrophils. PMID:26311901

  12. Toll-like Receptor 2 (TLR2), Transforming Growth Factor-β, Hyaluronan (HA), and Receptor for HA-mediated Motility (RHAMM) Are Required for Surfactant Protein A-stimulated Macrophage Chemotaxis*

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Joseph P.; Lam, David; Jiang, Hongmei; Liao, Jie; Cheong, Naeun; McDevitt, Theresa M.; Zaman, Aisha; Wright, Jo Rae; Savani, Rashmin C.

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune system protects the host from bacterial and viral invasion. Surfactant protein A (SPA), a lung-specific collectin, stimulates macrophage chemotaxis. However, the mechanisms regulating this function are unknown. Hyaluronan (HA) and its receptors RHAMM (receptor for HA- mediated motility, CD168) and CD44 also regulate cell migration and inflammation. We therefore examined the role of HA, RHAMM, and CD44 in SPA-stimulated macrophage chemotaxis. Using antibody blockade and murine macrophages, SPA-stimulated macrophage chemotaxis was dependent on TLR2 but not the other SPA receptors examined. Anti-TLR2 blocked SPA-induced production of TGFβ. In turn, TGFβ1-stimulated chemotaxis was inhibited by HA-binding peptide and anti-RHAMM antibody but not anti-TLR2 antibody. Macrophages from TLR2−/− mice failed to migrate in response to SPA but responded normally to TGFβ1 and HA, effects that were blocked by anti-RHAMM antibody. Macrophages from WT and CD44−/− mice had similar responses to SPA, whereas those from RHAMM−/− mice had decreased chemotaxis to SPA, TGFβ1, and HA. In primary macrophages, SPA-stimulated TGFβ production was dependent on TLR2, JNK, and ERK but not p38. Pam3Cys, a specific TLR2 agonist, stimulated phosphorylation of JNK, ERK, and p38, but only JNK and ERK inhibition blocked Pam3Cys-stimulated chemotaxis. We have uncovered a novel pathway for SPA-stimulated macrophage chemotaxis where SPA stimulation via TLR2 drives JNK- and ERK-dependent TGFβ production. TGFβ1, in turn, stimulates macrophage chemotaxis in a RHAMM and HA-dependent manner. These findings are highly relevant to the regulation of innate immune responses by SPA with key roles for specific components of the extracellular matrix. PMID:22948158

  13. Retinoids stimulate fibrinogen production both in vitro (hepatocytes) and in vivo. Induction requires activation of the retinoid X receptor.

    PubMed

    Nicodeme, E; Nicaud, M; Issandou, M

    1995-10-01

    The in vitro effects of retinoids on fibrinogen synthesis were investigated in HepG2 cells and primary human hepatocytes. In vivo effects were studied in the rat. In HepG2 cells, maximal stimulation (twofold) of fibrinogen secretion was obtained when cells were incubated in the presence of 1 mumol/L all-trans retinoic acid (T-RA) for 24 hours. A comparable increase was observed for both de novo fibrinogen synthesis and fibrinogen beta chain mRNA level. In primary cultures of human hepatocytes, treatment with 1 mumol/L T-RA for 72 hours also gave a twofold increase in fibrinogen production. Furthermore, rats treated for 6 days with 100 mg.kg-1.d-1 T-RA presented increased fibrinogen plasma levels (110%). A selective retinoic X receptor (RXR) agonist, 4-[1-3,5,5,8,8-pentamethyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-2-naphthyl)-ethenyl]benzoi c acid (3-methyl TTNEB), as well as 9-cis retinoic acid, a natural RXR ligand, mimicked the effects of T-RA on fibrinogen synthesis in vitro at lower concentrations. In contrast, a selective retinoic A receptor alpha (RAR alpha) agonist was a poor activator. The ED50 of the different retinoids on fibrinogen secretion by HepG2 cells was 25 nmol/L for T-RA, 4 nmol/L for 9-cis retinoic acid, 11 nmol/L for the synthetic RXR agonist, and > 500 nmol/L for the RAR alpha agonist. However, incubation of HepG2 cells with RXR agonist together with RAR alpha agonist resulted in a further increase in fibrinogen production. The secretion of two other acute-phase proteins, alpha-antichymotrypsin and caeruloplasmin, was also stimulated by retinoids in HepG2 cells but by a different regulatory mechanism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7583541

  14. Long-lasting beneficial effects of central serotonin receptor 7 stimulation in female mice modeling Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, Bianca; Chiodi, Valentina; Adriani, Walter; Lacivita, Enza; Mallozzi, Cinzia; Leopoldo, Marcello; Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Fuso, Andrea; Laviola, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by severe behavioral and physiological symptoms. Mutations in the methyl CpG binding protein 2 gene (MECP2) cause more than 95% of classic cases, and currently there is no cure for this devastating disorder. Recently we have demonstrated that specific behavioral and brain molecular alterations can be rescued in MeCP2-308 male mice, a RTT mouse model, by pharmacological stimulation of the brain serotonin receptor 7 (5-HT7R). This member of the serotonin receptor family-crucially involved in the regulation of brain structural plasticity and cognitive processes-can be stimulated by systemic repeated treatment with LP-211, a brain-penetrant selective 5-HT7R agonist. The present study extends previous findings by demonstrating that the LP-211 treatment (0.25 mg/kg, once per day for 7 days) rescues RTT-related phenotypic alterations, motor coordination (Dowel test), spatial reference memory (Barnes maze test) and synaptic plasticity (hippocampal long-term-potentiation) in MeCP2-308 heterozygous female mice, the genetic and hormonal milieu that resembles that of RTT patients. LP-211 also restores the activation of the ribosomal protein (rp) S6, the downstream target of mTOR and S6 kinase, in the hippocampus of RTT female mice. Notably, the beneficial effects on neurobehavioral and molecular parameters of a seven-day long treatment with LP-211 were evident up to 2 months after the last injection, thus suggesting long-lasting effects on RTT-related impairments. Taken together with our previous study, these results provide compelling preclinical evidence of the potential therapeutic value for RTT of a pharmacological approach targeting the brain 5-HT7R. PMID:25926782

  15. Long-lasting beneficial effects of central serotonin receptor 7 stimulation in female mice modeling Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    De Filippis, Bianca; Chiodi, Valentina; Adriani, Walter; Lacivita, Enza; Mallozzi, Cinzia; Leopoldo, Marcello; Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Fuso, Andrea; Laviola, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by severe behavioral and physiological symptoms. Mutations in the methyl CpG binding protein 2 gene (MECP2) cause more than 95% of classic cases, and currently there is no cure for this devastating disorder. Recently we have demonstrated that specific behavioral and brain molecular alterations can be rescued in MeCP2-308 male mice, a RTT mouse model, by pharmacological stimulation of the brain serotonin receptor 7 (5-HT7R). This member of the serotonin receptor family—crucially involved in the regulation of brain structural plasticity and cognitive processes—can be stimulated by systemic repeated treatment with LP-211, a brain-penetrant selective 5-HT7R agonist. The present study extends previous findings by demonstrating that the LP-211 treatment (0.25 mg/kg, once per day for 7 days) rescues RTT-related phenotypic alterations, motor coordination (Dowel test), spatial reference memory (Barnes maze test) and synaptic plasticity (hippocampal long-term-potentiation) in MeCP2-308 heterozygous female mice, the genetic and hormonal milieu that resembles that of RTT patients. LP-211 also restores the activation of the ribosomal protein (rp) S6, the downstream target of mTOR and S6 kinase, in the hippocampus of RTT female mice. Notably, the beneficial effects on neurobehavioral and molecular parameters of a seven-day long treatment with LP-211 were evident up to 2 months after the last injection, thus suggesting long-lasting effects on RTT-related impairments. Taken together with our previous study, these results provide compelling preclinical evidence of the potential therapeutic value for RTT of a pharmacological approach targeting the brain 5-HT7R. PMID:25926782

  16. Renoprotective Effects of a Highly Selective A3 Adenosine Receptor Antagonist in a Mouse Model of Adriamycin-induced Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Min, Hye Sook; Cha, Jin Joo; Kim, Kitae; Kim, Jung Eun; Ghee, Jung Yeon; Kim, Hyunwook; Lee, Ji Eun; Han, Jee Young; Jeong, Lak Shin; Cha, Dae Ryong; Kang, Young Sun

    2016-09-01

    The concentration of adenosine in the normal kidney increases markedly during renal hypoxia, ischemia, and inflammation. A recent study reported that an A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) antagonist attenuated the progression of renal fibrosis. The adriamycin (ADX)-induced nephropathy model induces podocyte injury, which results in severe proteinuria and progressive glomerulosclerosis. In this study, we investigated the preventive effect of a highly selective A3AR antagonist (LJ1888) in ADX-induced nephropathy. Three groups of six-week-old Balb/c mice were treated with ADX (11 mg/kg) for four weeks and LJ1888 (10 mg/kg) for two weeks as following: 1) control; 2) ADX; and 3) ADX + LJ1888. ADX treatment decreased body weight without a change in water and food intake, but this was ameliorated by LJ1888 treatment. Interestingly, LJ1888 lowered plasma creatinine level, proteinuria, and albuminuria, which had increased during ADX treatment. Furthermore, LJ1888 inhibited urinary nephrin excretion as a podocyte injury marker, and urine 8-isoprostane and kidney lipid peroxide concentration, which are markers of oxidative stress, increased after injection of ADX. ADX also induced the activation of proinflammatory and profibrotic molecules such as TGF-β1, MCP-1, PAI-1, type IV collagen, NF-κB, NOX4, TLR4, TNFα, IL-1β, and IFN-γ, but they were remarkably suppressed after LJ1888 treatment. In conclusion, our results suggest that LJ1888 has a renoprotective effect in ADX-induced nephropathy, which might be associated with podocyte injury through oxidative stress. Therefore, LJ1888, a selective A3AR antagonist, could be considered as a potential therapeutic agent in renal glomerular diseases which include podocyte injury and proteinuria. PMID:27510383

  17. Structure–Activity Relationships and Molecular Modeling of 3,5-Diacyl-2,4-dialkylpyridine Derivatives as Selective A3 Adenosine Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Li, An-Hu; Moro, Stefano; Melman, Neli; Ji, Xiao-duo; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    The structure-activity relationships of 6-phenyl-1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives as selective antagonists at human A3 adenosine receptors have been explored (Jiang et al. J. Med. Chem. 1997, 39, 4667-4675). In the present study, related pyridine derivatives have been synthesized and tested for affinity at adenosine receptors in radioligand binding assays. Ki values in the nanomolar range were observed for certain 3,5-diacyl-2,4-dialkyl-6-phenylpyridine derivatives in displacement of [125I]AB-MECA (N6-(4-amino-3-iodobenzyl)-5′-N-methylcarbamoyladenosine) at recombinant human A3 adenosine receptors. Selectivity for A3 adenosine receptors was determined vs radioligand binding at rat brain A1 and A2A receptors. Structure–activity relationships at various positions of the pyridine ring (the 3- and 5-acyl substituents and the 2- and 4-alkyl substituents) were probed. A 4-phenylethynyl group did not enhance A3 selectivity of pyridine derivatives, as it did for the 4-substituted dihydropyridines. At the 2-and 4-positions ethyl was favored over methyl. Also, unlike the dihydropyridines, a thioester group at the 3-position was favored over an ester for affinity at A3 adenosine receptors, and a 5-position benzyl ester decreased affinity. Small cycloalkyl groups at the 6-position of 4-phenylethynyl-1,4-dihydropyridines were favorable for high affinity at human A3 adenosine receptors, while in the pyridine series a 6-cyclopentyl group decreased affinity. 5-Ethyl 2,4-diethyl-3-(ethylsulfanylcarbonyl)-6-phenylpyridine-5-carboxylate, 38, was highly potent at human A3 receptors, with a Ki value of 20 nM. A 4-propyl derivative, 39b, was selective and highly potent at both human and rat A3 receptors, with Ki values of 18.9 and 113 nM, respectively. A 6-(3-chlorophenyl) derivative, 44, displayed a Ki value of 7.94 nM at human A3 receptors and selectivity of 5200-fold. Molecular modeling, based on the steric and electrostatic alignment (SEAL) method, defined common pharmacophore

  18. Effects of the blockade of opioid receptor on defensive reactions elicited by electrical stimulation within the deep layers of the superior colliculus and DPAG.

    PubMed

    Coimbra, N C; Eichenberger, G C; Gorchinski, R T; Maisonnette, S

    1996-10-14

    The effects of peripheral administration of naloxone and naltrexone on aversive thresholds (freezing and escape reactions) elicited by electrical stimulation of the midbrain tectum were determined. Naloxone caused a significant increase in the freezing and flight thresholds elicited by electrical stimulation in the deep layers of the superior colliculus and of dorsal regions of the periaqueductal grey matter, as compared with controls. These effects were confirmed by the peripheral administration of naltrexone. These findings suggest that opioid receptors can modulate aversive behaviour elicited by midbrain tectum stimulation. PMID:8930342

  19. The effects of exercise and neuromuscular electrical stimulation in subjects with knee osteoarthritis: a 3-month follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Laufer, Yocheved; Shtraker, Haim; Elboim Gabyzon, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Background Strengthening exercises of the quadriceps femoris muscle (QFM) are beneficial for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Studies reporting short-term effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) of the QFM in this population support the use of this modality as an adjunct treatment. The objectives of this follow-up study are to compare the effects of an exercise program with and without NMES of the QFM on pain, functional performance, and muscle strength immediately posttreatment and 12 weeks after completion of the intervention. Methods Sixty-three participants with knee OA were randomly assigned into two groups receiving 12 biweekly treatments: An exercise-only program or an exercise program combined with NMES. Results A significantly greater reduction in knee pain was observed immediately after treatment in the NMES group, which was maintained 12 weeks postintervention in both groups. Although at this stage NMES had no additive effect, both groups demonstrated an immediate increase in muscle strength and in functional abilities, with no differences between groups. Although the improvements in gait velocity and in self-report functional ability were maintained at the follow-up session, the noted improvements in muscle strength, time to up and go, and stair negotiation were not maintained. Conclusion Supplementing an exercise program with NMES to the QFM increased pain modulation immediately after treatment in patients with knee OA. Maintenance of the positive posttreatment effects during a 12-week period was observed only for pain, self-reported functional ability, and walk velocity, with no difference between groups. Clinical rehabilitation effect The effects of a comprehensive group exercise program with or without NMES are partially maintained 12 weeks after completion of the intervention. The addition of NMES is recommended primarily for its immediate effect on pain. Further studies are necessary to determine the effects of repeated bouts

  20. Attenuation of the stimulant response to ethanol is associated with enhanced ataxia for a GABAA, but not a GABAB, receptor agonist

    PubMed Central

    Holstein, Sarah E.; Dobbs, Lauren; Phillips, Tamara J.

    2008-01-01

    Background The γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system is implicated in the neurobiological actions of ethanol, and pharmacological agents that increase the activity of this system have been proposed as potential treatments for alcohol use disorders. As ethanol has its own GABA mimetic properties, it is critical to determine the mechanism by which GABAergic drugs may reduce the response to ethanol (i.e. via an inhibition or an accentuation of the neurobiological effects of ethanol). Methods In the present study, we examined the ability of three different types of GABAergic compounds, the GABA reuptake inhibitor NO-711, the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol, and the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen, to attenuate the locomotor stimulant response to ethanol in FAST mice, which were selectively bred for extreme sensitivity to ethanol-induced locomotor stimulation. In order to determine whether these compounds produced a specific reduction in stimulation, their effects on ethanol-induced motor incoordination were also examined. Results NO-711, muscimol, and baclofen were all found to potently attenuate the locomotor stimulant response to ethanol in FAST mice. However, both NO-711 and muscimol produced a marked increase in ethanol-induced ataxia, whereas baclofen did not accentuate this response. Conclusions These results suggest that pharmacological agents that increase extracellular concentrations of GABA and GABAA receptor activity may attenuate the stimulant effects of ethanol by accentuating its intoxicating and sedative properties. However, selective activation of the GABAB receptor appears to produce a specific attenuation of ethanol-induced stimulation, suggesting that GABAB receptor agonists may hold greater promise as potential pharmacotherapies for alcohol use disorders. PMID:18945218

  1. Some sweet and bitter tastants stimulate inhibitory pathway of adenylyl cyclase via melatonin and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in Xenopus laevis melanophores.

    PubMed

    Zubare-Samuelov, Meirav; Peri, Irena; Tal, Michael; Tarshish, Mark; Spielman, Andrew I; Naim, Michael

    2003-11-01

    The sweeteners saccharin, D-tryptophan, and neohesperidin dihydrochalcone (NHD) and the bitter tastant cyclo(Leu-Trp) stimulated concentration-dependent pigment aggregation in a Xenopus laevis melanophore cell line similar to melatonin. Like melatonin, these tastants inhibited (by 45-92%) cAMP formation in melanophores; pertussis toxin pretreatment almost completely abolished the tastant-induced cAMP inhibition, suggesting the involvement of the inhibitory pathway (Gi) of adenylyl cyclase. The presence of luzindole (melatonin receptor antagonist) almost completely abolished the inhibition of cAMP formation induced by saccharin, D-tryptophan, and cyclo(Leu-Trp) but only slightly affected the inhibitory effect of NHD. In contrast, the presence of an alpha2-adrenergic receptor antagonist, yohimbine, almost completely abolished the inhibition of cAMP formation induced by NHD but had only a minor effect on that induced by the other tastants. Thus saccharin, D-tryptophan, and cyclo(Leu-Trp) are melatonin receptor agonists whereas NHD is an alpha2-adrenergic receptor agonist, but both pathways lead to the same transduction output and cellular response. Formation of D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) in melanophores was reduced (15-58%, no concentration dependence) by saccharin, D-tryptophan, and cyclo(Leu-Trp) stimulation but increased by NHD stimulation. Tastant stimulation did not affect cGMP. Although some of the above tastants were found to be membrane permeant, their direct activation of downstream transduction components in this experimental system is questionable. MT1 and MT2 melatonin receptor mRNAs were identified in rat circumvallate papilla taste buds and nonsensory epithelium, suggesting the occurrence of MT1 and MT2 receptors in these tissues. Melatonin stimulation reduced the cellular content of cAMP in taste cells, which may or may not be related to taste sensation. PMID:12839835

  2. Cocaine alters mu but not delta or kappa opioid receptor-stimulated in situ [35S]GTPgammaS binding in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Joseph A; Niculescu, Michelle; Unterwald, Ellen M

    2003-01-01

    Chronic cocaine administration produces alterations in mu and kappa opioid receptor density as well as striatal and accumbens opioid-regulated adenylyl cyclase activity, suggesting a psychostimulant responsive interaction between opioidergic and dopaminergic systems. Stimulation of G-protein-coupled opioid receptors inhibits adenylyl cyclase production of cyclic AMP. The present study employed in situ [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding to measure opioid receptor-stimulated activation of G-proteins in response to acute and chronic cocaine exposure. Male Fischer rats received acute (1 or 3 days) or chronic (14 days) binge pattern cocaine administration. Three and 14 days of cocaine injections resulted in greater increases in the ability of the mu receptor agonist DAMGO to stimulate [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding in both the core and the shell of the nucleus accumbens, all regions of the caudate putamen and the cingulate cortex compared with saline-matched controls. The greatest increases in DAMGO-stimulated [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding were observed in the dorsal areas of the caudate putamen in animals that received 14 days of cocaine. No significant changes in delta (DPDPE), or kappa (dynorphin A(1-17)) receptor-stimulated [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding were found in any brain region in response to cocaine administration. These results demonstrate that binge pattern cocaine administration induce changes in mu but not delta or kappa opioid receptor-mediated G-protein activity. This study provides support for the hypothesis that the addictive properties of both psychostimulants and opiates may share common neurochemical signaling substrates. PMID:12422370

  3. LDL immune complexes stimulate LDL receptor expression in U937 histiocytes via extracellular signal-regulated kinase and AP-1.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yuchang; Huang, Yan; Bandyopadhyay, Sumita; Virella, Gabriel; Lopes-Virella, Maria F

    2003-07-01

    We have previously shown that LDL-containing immune complexes (LDL-ICs) induce up-regulation of LDL receptor (LDLR) expression in human macrophages. The present study further investigated the molecular mechanisms leading to LDLR up-regulation by LDL-ICs as well as the signaling pathways involved. Results showed that treatment of U937 histiocytes with LDL-ICs did not increase the precursors and the cleaved forms of sterol-regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) 1a and 2, suggesting that SREBPs may not be involved in LDLR up-regulation by LDL-ICs. Promoter deletion and mutation studies showed that the AP-1 binding sites were essential for LDL-IC-stimulated LDLR expression. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays further demonstrated that LDL-ICs stimulated transcription factor AP-1 activity. Studies assessing the signaling pathways involved in LDLR up-regulation by LDL-ICs showed that the up-regulation of LDLR was extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) dependent. In conclusion, the present study shows that LDL-ICs up-regulate LDLR expression via the ERK signaling pathway and the AP-1 motif-dependent transcriptional activation. PMID:12730303

  4. GABAB receptor-mediated, layer-specific synaptic plasticity reorganizes gamma-frequency neocortical response to stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ainsworth, Matthew; Lee, Shane; Kaiser, Marcus; Simonotto, Jennifer; Kopell, Nancy J; Whittington, Miles A

    2016-05-10

    Repeated presentations of sensory stimuli generate transient gamma-frequency (30-80 Hz) responses in neocortex that show plasticity in a task-dependent manner. Complex relationships between individual neuronal outputs and the mean, local field potential (population activity) accompany these changes, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms responsible. Here we show that transient stimulation of input layer 4 sufficient to generate gamma oscillations induced two different, lamina-specific plastic processes that correlated with lamina-specific changes in responses to further, repeated stimulation: Unit rates and recruitment showed overall enhancement in supragranular layers and suppression in infragranular layers associated with excitatory or inhibitory synaptic potentiation onto principal cells, respectively. Both synaptic processes were critically dependent on activation of GABAB receptors and, together, appeared to temporally segregate the cortical representation. These data suggest that adaptation to repetitive sensory input dramatically alters the spatiotemporal properties of the neocortical response in a manner that may both refine and minimize cortical output simultaneously. PMID:27118845

  5. GABAB receptor-mediated, layer-specific synaptic plasticity reorganizes gamma-frequency neocortical response to stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ainsworth, Matthew; Lee, Shane; Kaiser, Marcus; Simonotto, Jennifer; Kopell, Nancy J.

    2016-01-01

    Repeated presentations of sensory stimuli generate transient gamma-frequency (30–80 Hz) responses in neocortex that show plasticity in a task-dependent manner. Complex relationships between individual neuronal outputs and the mean, local field potential (population activity) accompany these changes, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms responsible. Here we show that transient stimulation of input layer 4 sufficient to generate gamma oscillations induced two different, lamina-specific plastic processes that correlated with lamina-specific changes in responses to further, repeated stimulation: Unit rates and recruitment showed overall enhancement in supragranular layers and suppression in infragranular layers associated with excitatory or inhibitory synaptic potentiation onto principal cells, respectively. Both synaptic processes were critically dependent on activation of GABAB receptors and, together, appeared to temporally segregate the cortical representation. These data suggest that adaptation to repetitive sensory input dramatically alters the spatiotemporal properties of the neocortical response in a manner that may both refine and minimize cortical output simultaneously. PMID:27118845

  6. Fluoride Exposure, Follicle Stimulating Hormone Receptor Gene Polymorphism and Hypothalamus-pituitary-ovarian Axis Hormones in Chinese Women.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming Xu; Zhou, Guo Yu; Zhu, Jing Yuan; Gong, Biao; Hou, Jia Xiang; Zhou, Tong; Duan, Li Ju; Ding, Zhong; Cui, Liu Xin; Ba, Yue

    2015-09-01

    The effects of fluoride exposure on the functions of reproductive and endocrine systems have attracted widespread attention in academic circle nowadays. However, it is unclear whether the gene-environment interaction may modify the secretion and activity of hypothalamus-pituitary- ovarian (HPO) axis hormones. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore the influence of fluoride exposure and follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene polymorphism on reproductive hormones in Chinese women. A cross sectional study was conducted in seven villages of Henan Province, China during 2010-2011. A total of 679 women aged 18-48 years were recruited through cluster sampling and divided into three groups, i.e. endemic fluorosis group (EFG), defluoridation project group (DFPG), and control group (CG) based on the local fluoride concentration in drinking water. The serum levels of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and estradiol (E2) were determined respectively and the FSHR polymorphism was detected by real time PCR assay. The results provided the preliminary evidence indicating the gene-environment interaction on HPO axis hormones in women. PMID:26464260

  7. An oncolytic adenovirus enhanced for toll-like receptor 9 stimulation increases antitumor immune responses and tumor clearance.

    PubMed

    Cerullo, Vincenzo; Diaconu, Iulia; Romano, Valentina; Hirvinen, Mari; Ugolini, Matteo; Escutenaire, Sophie; Holm, Sirkka-Liisa; Kipar, Anja; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-11-01

    Oncolytic viruses represent a multifaceted tool for cancer treatment. In addition to specific killing of cancer cells (oncolysis), these agents also provide danger signals prompting the immune system to stimulate an antitumor immune response. To increase adenovirus adjuvancy, we engineered the genome of Ad5D24 by inserting 18 immunostimulatory islands (Ad5D24-CpG). The toxicity and immunogenicity profile of Ad5D24-CpG showed that the safety of the maternal virus was retained. The efficacy of the CpG-enriched virus was assessed in a xenograft model of lung cancer where a significant increase in antitumor effect was seen in comparison with controls. When the experiment was repeated in animal depleted of natural killer (NK) cells, Ad5D24-CpG lost its advantage. The same was seen when Toll-like receptor (TLR)9 was blocked systemically. In a syngeneic model of melanoma (B16-OVA), we observed a significant increase of OVA-specific T cells and a decrease of activation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in Ad5D24-CpG-treated mice. In conclusion, we have generated the first genetically modified oncolytic adenovirus backbone able to enhance TLR9-stimulation for increased antitumor activity. PMID:22828500

  8. Dimethyl fumarate activates the prostaglandin EP2 receptor and stimulates cAMP signaling in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Sarah E; Kerns, Amelia R; Tsang, Catherine; Tsang, Vivian; Bourdette, Dennis; Salinthone, Sonemany

    2016-06-17

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) was recently approved by the FDA for the treatment of relapsing remitting MS. The pathology of MS is a result of both immune dysregulation and oxidative stress induced damage, and DMF is believed to have therapeutic effects on both of these processes. However, the mechanisms of action of DMF are not fully understood. To determine if DMF is able to activate signaling cascades that affect immune dysregulation, we treated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with DMF. We discovered that DMF stimulates cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production after 1 min treatment in vitro. cAMP is a small molecule second messenger that has been shown to modulate immune response. Using pharmacological inhibitors, we determined that adenylyl cyclase mediates DMF induced cAMP production; DMF activated the prostaglandin EP2 receptor to produce cAMP. This response was not due to increased endogenous production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), but was enhanced by addition of exogenous PGE2. Furthermore, we determined that the bioactive metabolite of DMF, monomethyl fumarate (MMF), also stimulates cAMP production. These novel findings suggest that DMF may provide protection against MS by inhibiting immune cell function via the cAMP signaling pathway. PMID:27157139

  9. An Oncolytic Adenovirus Enhanced for Toll-like Receptor 9 Stimulation Increases Antitumor Immune Responses and Tumor Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Cerullo, Vincenzo; Diaconu, Iulia; Romano, Valentina; Hirvinen, Mari; Ugolini, Matteo; Escutenaire, Sophie; Holm, Sirkka-Liisa; Kipar, Anja; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2012-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses represent a multifaceted tool for cancer treatment. In addition to specific killing of cancer cells (oncolysis), these agents also provide danger signals prompting the immune system to stimulate an antitumor immune response. To increase adenovirus adjuvancy, we engineered the genome of Ad5D24 by inserting 18 immunostimulatory islands (Ad5D24-CpG). The toxicity and immunogenicity profile of Ad5D24-CpG showed that the safety of the maternal virus was retained. The efficacy of the CpG-enriched virus was assessed in a xenograft model of lung cancer where a significant increase in antitumor effect was seen in comparison with controls. When the experiment was repeated in animal depleted of natural killer (NK) cells, Ad5D24-CpG lost its advantage. The same was seen when Toll-like receptor (TLR)9 was blocked systemically. In a syngeneic model of melanoma (B16-OVA), we observed a significant increase of OVA-specific T cells and a decrease of activation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in Ad5D24-CpG–treated mice. In conclusion, we have generated the first genetically modified oncolytic adenovirus backbone able to enhance TLR9-stimulation for increased antitumor activity. PMID:22828500

  10. Interaction of urokinase A chain with the receptor of human keratinocytes stimulates release of urokinase-like plasminogen activator

    SciTech Connect

    Fibbi, G.; Magnelli, L.; Pucci, M.; Del Rosso, M. )

    1990-03-01

    On the basis of a fibrinolytic assay with {sup 125}I-fibrin, zymography, and immunoprobing with anti-human urokinase antibody, the authors have observed that the in vitro established NCTC human keratinocyte cell line releases into the culture medium a 54,000-Da plasminogen activator which is indistinguishable from human urokinase. Only the early release following the washing of keratinocyte monolayers is accounted for by secretion of preformed enzyme, while late secretory events require the de novo synthesis of urokinase. The released enzyme can interact by autocriny with its own receptor present on keratinocytes. The addition to the keratinocyte culture medium of the urokinase A chain can stimulate a concentration-dependent urokinase oversecretion, which is not paralleled by oversecretion of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Since stimulation of urokinase production can be obtained by an A chain concentration which was previously shown to be efficient in inducing keratinocyte mobilization in an in vitro migration model system, they hypothesize that this mechanism may be important in vivo during the process of wound repair.

  11. Activation of AMPA Receptors Mediates the Antidepressant Action of Deep Brain Stimulation of the Infralimbic Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Sánchez, Laura; Castañé, Anna; Pérez-Caballero, Laura; Grifoll-Escoda, Marc; López-Gil, Xavier; Campa, Leticia; Galofré, Mireia; Berrocoso, Esther; Adell, Albert

    2016-06-01

    Although deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been used with success in treatment-resistant depression, little is known about its mechanism of action. We examined the antidepressant-like activity of short (1 h) DBS applied to the infralimbic prefrontal cortex in the forced swim test (FST) and the novelty-suppressed feeding test (NSFT). We also used in vivo microdialysis to evaluate the release of glutamate, γ-aminobutyric acid, serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline in the prefrontal cortex and c-Fos immunohistochemistry to determine the brain regions activated by DBS. One hour of DBS of the infralimbic prefrontal cortex has antidepressant-like effects in FST and NSFT, and increases prefrontal efflux of glutamate, which would activate AMPA receptors (AMPARs). This effect is specific of the infralimbic area since it is not observed after DBS of the prelimbic subregion. The activation of prefrontal AMPARs would result in a stimulation of prefrontal output to the brainstem, thus increasing serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline in the prefrontal cortex. Further, the activation of prefrontal AMPARs is necessary and sufficient condition for the antidepressant response of 1 h DBS. PMID:26088969

  12. Sterol O-Acyltransferase 2-Driven Cholesterol Esterification Opposes Liver X Receptor-Stimulated Fecal Neutral Sterol Loss.

    PubMed

    Warrier, Manya; Zhang, Jun; Bura, Kanwardeep; Kelley, Kathryn; Wilson, Martha D; Rudel, Lawrence L; Brown, J Mark

    2016-02-01

    Statin drugs have proven a successful and relatively safe therapy for the treatment of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, even with the substantial low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol lowering achieved with statin treatment, CVD remains the top cause of death in developed countries. Selective inhibitors of the cholesterol esterifying enzyme sterol-O acyltransferase 2 (SOAT2) hold great promise as effective CVD therapeutics. In mouse models, previous work has demonstrated that either antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) or small molecule inhibitors of SOAT2 can effectively reduce CVD progression, and even promote regression of established CVD. Although it is well known that SOAT2-driven cholesterol esterification can alter both the packaging and retention of atherogenic apoB-containing lipoproteins, here we set out to determine whether SOAT2-driven cholesterol esterification can also impact basal and liver X receptor (LXR)-stimulated fecal neutral sterol loss. These studies demonstrate that SOAT2 is a negative regulator of LXR-stimulated fecal neutral sterol loss in mice. PMID:26729489

  13. Electrophoretic purification of radioiodinated follicle-stimulating hormone for radioligand receptor assay and radioimmunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    Schneyer, A.L.; Sluss, P.M.; Bosukonda, D.; Reichert, L.E. Jr.

    1986-10-01

    A method is described for electrophoretic purification of (/sup 125/I)human (h) FSH after radioiodination that improves radioligand binding to FSH membrane receptors. Lactoperoxidase-iodinated hFSH was separated from reaction products by electrophoresis on 7.5% polyacrylamide tube gels (PAGE). Material eluted from 3-mm gel slices was analyzed for incorporation of /sup 125/I and binding to antibody (RIA) or receptor (RRA), and by sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE for protein composition. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE analysis of individual PAGE fractions demonstrated that iodinated proteins, both higher and lower in apparent mol wt than intact FSH, were separated by PAGE, but not by gel filtration chromatography (Sephadex G-25). PAGE purification of radioligand resulted in significantly greater (compared to gel filtration) RRA sensitivity and specificity. Maximum binding of PAGE-purified (/sup 125/I)hFSH to excess calf tests membrane receptors was 45%, with a specific activity of approximately 26 microCi/micrograms, as determined by the method of self-displacement. Maximum binding to excess hFSH antisera (NIH anti-hFSH 4) was 80-85%. This allowed a useful final dilution of 1:120,000, thereby facilitating development of a sensitive and specific RIA with this antiserum. These data indicate that PAGE separation of intact (/sup 125/I)hFSH from other iodinated proteins results in improved radioligand binding, assay sensitivity, and assay specificity. In addition, PAGE-purified lactoperoxidase-iodinated hFSH is suitable for use in both RIA and RRA.

  14. Activation of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtype 4 Is Essential for Cholinergic Stimulation of Gastric Acid Secretion: Relation to D Cell/Somatostatin

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Koji; Endoh, Takuya; Hayashi, Shusaku; Aihara, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors exist in five subtypes (M1∼M5), and they are widely expressed in various tissues to mediate diverse autonomic functions, including gastric secretion. In the present study, we demonstrated, using M1∼M5 KO mice, the importance of M4 receptors in carbachol (CCh) stimulation of acid secretion and investigated how the secretion is modulated by the activation of M4 receptors. Methods: C57BL/6J mice of wild-type (WT) and M1–M5 KO were used. Under urethane anesthesia, acid secretion was measured in the stomach equipped with an acute fistula. CCh (30 μg/kg) was given subcutaneously (s.c.) to stimulate acid secretion. Atropine or octreotide (a somatostatin analog) was given s.c. 20 min before the administration of CCh. CYN154806 (a somatostatin SST2 receptor antagonist) was given i.p. 20 min before the administration of octreotide or CCh. Results: CCh caused an increase of acid secretion in WT mice, and the effect was totally inhibited by prior administration of atropine. The effect of CCh was similarly observed in the animals lacking M1, M2 or M5 receptors but significantly decreased in M3 or M4 KO mice. CYN154806, the SST2 receptor antagonist, dose-dependently and significantly reversed the decreased acid response to CCh in M4 but not M3 KO mice. Octreotide, the somatostatin analog, inhibited the secretion of acid under CCh-stimulated conditions in WT mice. The immunohistochemical study showed the localization of M4 receptors on D cells in the stomach. Serum somatostatin levels in M4 KO mice were higher than WT mice under basal conditions, while those in WT mice were significantly decreased in response to CCh. Conclusions: These results suggest that under cholinergic stimulation the acid secretion is directly mediated by M3 receptors and indirectly modified by M4 receptors. It is assumed that the activation of M4 receptors inhibits the release of somatostatin from D cells and minimizes the acid inhibitory effect of

  15. Stimulation of catecholamine synthesis through unique estrogen receptors in the bovine adrenomedullary plasma membrane by 17{beta}-estradiol

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagihara, Nobuyuki . E-mail: yanagin@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp; Liu, Minhui; Toyohira, Yumiko; Tsutsui, Masato; Ueno, Susumu; Shinohara, Yuko; Takahashi, Kojiro; Tanaka, Kazumi

    2006-01-13

    Incubation of cultured bovine adrenal medullary cells with 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}) (0.3-100 nM) or membrane-impermeable E{sub 2}-bovine serum albumin (100 nM) acutely increased {sup 14}C-catecholamine synthesis from [{sup 14}C]tyrosine. The stimulatory effect of E{sub 2} was not inhibited by ICI182,780, a nuclear estrogen receptor inhibitor. E{sub 2} also increased tyrosine hydroxylase activity and p44/42MAPK phosphorylation, the former of which was attenuated by U0126, an inhibitor of p44/42MAPK kinase. The plasma membrane isolated from the gland showed two classes of specific binding sites of [{sup 3}H]E{sub 2} with apparent K {sub d}s of 3.2 and 106 nM, and B {sub max}s of 0.44 and 8.5 pmol/mg protein, respectively. The high-affinity binding of [{sup 3}H]E{sub 2} was most strongly inhibited by E{sub 2} and phytoestrogens, and to lesser extents by other steroid hormones, while it was enhanced by ICI182,780 and environmental estrogenic pollutants. These findings suggest that E{sub 2} acutely stimulates catecholamine synthesis via activation of p44/42MAPK through unique estrogen receptors in the plasma membrane of bovine adrenal medulla.

  16. Differential Regulation of 6- and 7-Transmembrane Helix Variants of μ-Opioid Receptor in Response to Morphine Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Convertino, Marino; Samoshkin, Alexander; Viet, Chi T.; Gauthier, Josee; Li Fraine, Steven P.; Sharif-Naeini, Reza; Schmidt, Brian L.; Maixner, William; Diatchenko, Luda; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacological effect of opioids originates, at the cellular level, by their interaction with the μ-opioid receptor (mOR) resulting in the regulation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and inwardly rectifying K+ channels that ultimately modulate the synaptic transmission. Recently, an alternative six trans-membrane helix isoform of mOR, (6TM-mOR) has been identified, but its function and signaling are still largely unknown. Here, we present the structural and functional mechanisms of 6TM-mOR signaling activity upon binding to morphine. Our data suggest that despite the similarity of binding modes of the alternative 6TM-mOR and the dominant seven trans-membrane helix variant (7TM-mOR), the interaction with morphine generates different dynamic responses in the two receptors, thus, promoting the activation of different mOR-specific signaling pathways. We characterize a series of 6TM-mOR-specific cellular responses, and observed that they are significantly different from those for 7TM-mOR. Morphine stimulation of 6TM-mOR does not promote a cellular cAMP response, while it increases the intracellular Ca2+ concentration and reduces the cellular K+ conductance. Our findings indicate that 6TM-mOR has a unique contribution to the cellular opioid responses. Therefore, it should be considered as a relevant target for the development of novel pharmacological tools and medical protocols involving the use of opioids. PMID:26554831

  17. Infusion of ACTH stimulates expression of adrenal ACTH receptor and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein mRNA in fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Carey, Luke C; Su, Yixin; Valego, Nancy K; Rose, James C

    2006-08-01

    The late-gestation plasma cortisol surge in the sheep fetus is critical for stimulating organ development and parturition. Increased adrenal responsiveness is one of the key reasons for the surge; however, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Our recent studies suggest that ACTH-mediated increased expression of ACTH receptor (ACTH-R) and steroid acute regulatory protein (StAR) may play a role in enhancing responsiveness. Hence, we examined effects of ACTH infusion in fetal sheep on mRNA expression of these two mediators of adrenal responsiveness and assessed the functional consequences of this treatment in vitro. Fetuses of approximately 118 and 138 days of gestational age (dGA) were infused with ACTH-(1-24) for 24 h. Controls received saline infusion. Arterial blood was sampled throughout the infusion. Adrenals were isolated and analyzed for ACTH-R and StAR mRNA, or cells were cultured for 48 h. Cells were stimulated with ACTH, and medium was collected for cortisol measurement. Fetal plasma ACTH and cortisol concentrations increased over the infusion period in both groups. ACTH-R mRNA levels were significantly higher in ACTH-infused fetuses in both the 118 and 138 dGA groups. StAR mRNA increased significantly in both the 118 and 138 dGA groups. Adrenal cells from ACTH-infused fetuses were significantly more responsive to ACTH stimulation in terms of cortisol secretion than those from saline-infused controls. These findings demonstrate that increases in circulating ACTH levels promote increased expression of ACTH-R and StAR mRNA and are coupled to heightened adrenal responsiveness. PMID:16478774

  18. Type I Helicobacter pylori Lipopolysaccharide Stimulates Toll-Like Receptor 4 and Activates Mitogen Oxidase 1 in Gastric Pit Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Tsukasa; Teshima, Shigetada; Oka, Ayuko; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Kishi, Kyoichi; Rokutan, Kazuhito

    2001-01-01

    Guinea pig gastric pit cells express an isozyme of gp91-phox, mitogen oxidase 1 (Mox1), and essential components for the phagocyte NADPH oxidase (p67-, p47-, p40-, and p22-phox). Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Escherichia coli LPS have been shown to function as potent activators for the Mox1 oxidase. These cells spontaneously secreted about 10 nmol of superoxide anion (O2−)/mg of protein/h under LPS-free conditions. They expressed the mRNA and protein of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) but not those of TLR2. LPS from type I H. pylori at 2.1 endotoxin units/ml or higher stimulated TLR4-mediated phosphorylations of transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 and its binding protein 1 induced TLR4 and p67-phox and up-regulated O2− production 10-fold. In contrast, none of these events occurred with H. pylori LPS from complete or partial deletion mutants of the cag pathogenicity island. Lipid A was confirmed to be a bioactive component for the priming effects, while removal of bisphosphates from lipid A completely eliminated the effects, suggesting the importance of the phosphorylation pattern besides the acylation pattern for the bioactivity. H. pylori LPS is generally accepted as having low toxicity; however, our results suggest that type I H. pylori lipid A may be a potent stimulator for innate immune responses of gastric mucosa by stimulating the TLR4 cascade and Mox1 oxidase in pit cells. PMID:11401977

  19. Human 5-HT1F receptor-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding: correlation with inhibition of guinea pig dural plasma protein extravasation.

    PubMed

    Wainscott, D B; Johnson, K W; Phebus, L A; Schaus, J M; Nelson, D L

    1998-07-01

    To determine the potency and efficacy of 5-HT1F receptor ligands, a [35S]GTPgammaS binding assay was developed and optimized for the human 5-HT1F receptor. Compounds which are known to be effective in the abortive treatment of migraine were tested for efficacy and potency in this assay. Naratriptan, sumatriptan, zolmitriptan, and rizatriptan all had agonist activity. The 5-HT1F receptor ligand LY334370 (4-fluoro-N-[3-(1-methyl-4-piperidinyl)-1H-indol-5-yl]-benzamide) was the most potent compound tested with an EC50 of 2.13 +/- 0.15 nM. LY302148 (5-fluoro-3-[1-[2-(1-methyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)ethyl]-4-piperidinyl]-1H-ind ole), methysergide, LY306258 (3-dimethylamino-2,3,4,9-tetrahydro-1H-carbazol-6-ol), dihydroergotamine (DHE), L-694,247 and CP-122,288 were also investigated for potency and efficacy. There was a statistically significant correlation between the pEC50 for the stimulation of [35S]GTPgammaS binding and the pID50 for the inhibition of trigeminal nerve-stimulated dural plasma protein extravasation in the guinea pig. In the course of these studies, it was found that the purportedly selective 5-HT1D receptor antagonist GR127935 inhibited 5-HT1F receptor-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding with a Ki of 39.6 +/- 9.5 nM. These studies demonstrate that 5-HT1F receptor-mediated stimulation of [35S]GTPgammaS binding in a clonal cell system is a reproducible, high throughput assay that is predictive of an in vivo model of 5-HT1F receptor activation. PMID:9718276

  20. TRPA1 receptor stimulation by hydrogen peroxide is critical to trigger hyperalgesia and inflammation in a model of acute gout.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Gabriela; Hoffmeister, Carin; Rossato, Mateus Fortes; Oliveira, Sara Marchesan; Silva, Mariane Arnoldi; Silva, Cássia Regina; Fusi, Camilla; Tonello, Raquel; Minocci, Daiana; Guerra, Gustavo Petri; Materazzi, Serena; Nassini, Romina; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Ferreira, Juliano

    2014-07-01

    Acute gout attacks produce severe joint pain and inflammation associated with monosodium urate (MSU) crystals leading to oxidative stress production. The transient potential receptor ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is expressed by a subpopulation of peptidergic nociceptors and, via its activation by endogenous reactive oxygen species, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), contributes to pain and neurogenic inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of TRPA1 in hyperalgesia and inflammation in a model of acute gout attack in rodents. Inflammatory parameters and mechanical hyperalgesia were measured in male Wistar rats and in wild-type (Trpa1(+/+)) or TRPA1-deficient (Trpa1(-/-)) male mice. Animals received intra-articular (ia, ankle) injection of MSU. The role of TRPA1 was assessed by receptor antagonism, gene deletion or expression, sensory fiber defunctionalization, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release. We found that nociceptor defunctionalization, TRPA1 antagonist treatment (via ia or oral administration), and Trpa1 gene ablation abated hyperalgesia and inflammatory responses (edema, H2O2 generation, interleukin-1β release, and neutrophil infiltration) induced by ia MSU injection. In addition, we showed that MSU evoked generation of H2O2 in synovial tissue, which stimulated TRPA1 producing CGRP release and plasma protein extravasation. The MSU-elicited responses were also reduced by the H2O2-detoxifying enzyme catalase and the reducing agent dithiothreitol. TRPA1 activation by MSU challenge-generated H2O2 mediates the entire inflammatory response in an acute gout attack rodent model, thus strengthening the role of the TRPA1 receptor and H2O2 production as potential targets for treatment of acute gout attacks. PMID:24780252

  1. Decrease of prolactin secretion via stimulation of pituitary dopamine D-2 receptors after application of talipexole and SND 919.

    PubMed

    Domae, M; Yamada, K; Hanabusa, Y; Matsumoto, S; Furukawa, T

    1990-04-10

    The present experiments were performed to investigate the effects of talipexole (B-HT 920) and SND 919 on prolactin release from the anterior pituitary glands of rats both in vivo and in vitro. The basal serum prolactin levels were reduced dose dependently by s.c. administration of talipexole or SND 919 at doses of 5-100 micrograms/kg. Daily treatment with estradiol (35 micrograms/kg for 3 days) increased serum prolactin levels in male rats to levels 4-fold higher than those of non-primed rats. This increase was suppressed by administration of talipexole or SND 919. In vitro, the spontaneous prolactin release into perfusates from isolated anterior pituitary was inhibited by talipexole or SND 919 added at concentrations ranging from 10(-9) to 10(-6) M. This inhibitory effect of SND 919 was blocked by concurrent application of a dopamine D-2 receptor antagonist, YM-09151-2. The spontaneous prolactin release from the anterior pituitary isolated from estradiol-primed rats was 2-fold higher than that from non-primed rats. This increased release was also inhibited by application of either drug. The inhibitory effects of these drugs were greater in estradiol-primed rats than in non-primed rats when expressed as percent inhibition of control prolactin release. The results suggest that talipexole and SND 919 have a selective dopamine D-2 receptor agonistic property and are almost completely effective to counteract the enhancement of prolactin release induced by estrogens via stimulation of dopamine D-2 receptors in the anterior pituitary. PMID:2142088

  2. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α stimulates ADAM10-mediated proteolysis of APP.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Grant T; Gonzalez, Frank J; Pahan, Kalipada

    2015-07-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) derivative β-amyloid (Aβ) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Sequential proteolysis of APP by β-secretase and γ-secretase generates Aβ. Conversely, the α-secretase "a disintegrin and metalloproteinase" 10 (ADAM10) cleaves APP within the eventual Aβ sequence and precludes Aβ generation. Therefore, up-regulation of ADAM10 represents a plausible therapeutic strategy to combat overproduction of neurotoxic Aβ. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is a transcription factor that regulates genes involved in fatty acid metabolism. Here, we determined that the Adam10 promoter harbors PPAR response elements; that knockdown of PPARα, but not PPARβ or PPARγ, decreases the expression of Adam10; and that lentiviral overexpression of PPARα restored ADAM10 expression in Ppara(-/-) neurons. Gemfibrozil, an agonist of PPARα, induced the recruitment of PPARα:retinoid x receptor α, but not PPARγ coactivator 1α (PGC1α), to the Adam10 promoter in wild-type mouse hippocampal neurons and shifted APP processing toward the α-secretase, as determined by augmented soluble APPα and decreased Aβ production. Accordingly, Ppara(-/-) mice displayed elevated SDS-stable, endogenous Aβ and Aβ1-42 relative to wild-type littermates, whereas 5XFAD mice null for PPARα (5X/α(-/-)) exhibited greater cerebral Aβ load relative to 5XFAD littermates. These results identify PPARα as an important factor regulating neuronal ADAM10 expression and, thus, α-secretase proteolysis of APP. PMID:26080426

  3. Retinoic acid receptor stimulation protects midbrain dopaminergic neurons from inflammatory degeneration via BDNF-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Katsuki, Hiroshi; Kurimoto, Emi; Takemori, Sachiko; Kurauchi, Yuki; Hisatsune, Akinori; Isohama, Yoichiro; Izumi, Yasuhiko; Kume, Toshiaki; Shudo, Koichi; Akaike, Akinori

    2009-07-01

    Functions of retinoic acid receptors (RARs) in adult CNS have been poorly characterized. Here we investigated potential neuroprotective action of tamibarotene (Am80), an RARalpha/beta agonist available for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia, on midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Am80 protected dopaminergic neurons in rat midbrain slice culture from injury mediated by lipopolysaccharide-activated microglia, without affecting production of nitric oxide, a key mediator of cell injury. The effect of Am80 was mimicked by another RAR agonist, TAC-101, but not by a retinoid X receptor agonist, HX630, and HX630 did not synergize with Am80. We observed neuronal expression of RARalpha and RARbeta in midbrain slice culture and also found that Am80 increased tissue level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA. Exogenous BDNF prevented dopaminergic neurodegeneration, and the neuroprotective effect of Am80 was suppressed by a TrkB inhibitor, K252a, or by anti-BDNF neutralizing antibody. These results reveal a novel action of RARs mediated by enhancement of BDNF expression. Finally, oral administration of Am80 prevented dopaminergic cell loss in the substantia nigra induced by local injection of lipopolysaccharide in mice, indicating that RARs are a promising target of therapeutics for neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:19457078

  4. Diabetes Stimulates Osteoclastogenesis by Acidosis-Induced Activation of Transient Receptor Potential Cation Channels.

    PubMed

    Reni, Carlotta; Mangialardi, Giuseppe; Meloni, Marco; Madeddu, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes have lower bone mineral density and higher risk of fractures. The role of osteoblasts in diabetes-related osteoporosis is well acknowledged whereas the role of osteoclasts (OCLs) is still unclear. We hypothesize that OCLs participate in pathological bone remodeling. We conducted studies in animals (streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice) and cellular models to investigate canonical and non-canonical mechanisms underlying excessive OCL activation. Diabetic mice show an increased number of active OCLs. In vitro studies demonstrate the involvement of acidosis in OCL activation and the implication of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1). In vivo studies confirm the establishment of local acidosis in the diabetic bone marrow (BM) as well as the ineffectiveness of insulin in correcting the pH variation and osteoclast activation. Conversely, treatment with TRPV1 receptor antagonists re-establishes a physiological OCL availability. These data suggest that diabetes causes local acidosis in the BM that in turn increases osteoclast activation through the modulation of TRPV1. The use of clinically available TRPV1 antagonists may provide a new means to combat bone problems associated with diabetes. PMID:27468810

  5. Diabetes Stimulates Osteoclastogenesis by Acidosis-Induced Activation of Transient Receptor Potential Cation Channels

    PubMed Central

    Reni, Carlotta; Mangialardi, Giuseppe; Meloni, Marco; Madeddu, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes have lower bone mineral density and higher risk of fractures. The role of osteoblasts in diabetes-related osteoporosis is well acknowledged whereas the role of osteoclasts (OCLs) is still unclear. We hypothesize that OCLs participate in pathological bone remodeling. We conducted studies in animals (streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice) and cellular models to investigate canonical and non-canonical mechanisms underlying excessive OCL activation. Diabetic mice show an increased number of active OCLs. In vitro studies demonstrate the involvement of acidosis in OCL activation and the implication of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1). In vivo studies confirm the establishment of local acidosis in the diabetic bone marrow (BM) as well as the ineffectiveness of insulin in correcting the pH variation and osteoclast activation. Conversely, treatment with TRPV1 receptor antagonists re-establishes a physiological OCL availability. These data suggest that diabetes causes local acidosis in the BM that in turn increases osteoclast activation through the modulation of TRPV1. The use of clinically available TRPV1 antagonists may provide a new means to combat bone problems associated with diabetes. PMID:27468810

  6. ATP- and adenosine-mediated signaling in the central nervous system: adenosine stimulates glutamate release from astrocytes via A2a adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2004-02-01

    Adenosine enhanced intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations in astrocytes via A(2a) adenosine receptors involving protein kinase A (PKA) activation. The Ca(2+) rise is inhibited by brefeldin A, an inhibitor of vesicular transport; but not by neomycin and U73122, phospholipase C inhibitors; xestospongin, an IP(3)-receptor inhibitor; ryanodine, a ryanodine-receptor inhibitor; TMB-8, an endoplasmic reticulum calcium-release blocker; octanol, a gap-junction inhibitor; or cadmium, a non-selective, calcium-channel blocker. Adenosine stimulates astrocytic glutamate release via an A(2a) adenosine receptors/PKA pathway, and the release is inhibited by the vesicular transport inhibitors brefeldin A and bafilomycin A1. A(2a) adenosine receptors and the ensuing PKA events, thus, are endowed with vesicular Ca(2+) release from an unknown intracellular calcium store and vesicular glutamate release from astrocytes. PMID:14978344

  7. Distinctive Structure of the EphA3/Ephrin-A5 Complex Reveals a Dual Mode of Eph Receptor Interaction for Ephrin-A5

    PubMed Central

    Forse, Garry Jason; Uson, Maria Loressa; Nasertorabi, Fariborz; Kolatkar, Anand; Lamberto, Ilaria; Pasquale, Elena Bianca; Kuhn, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Eph receptor tyrosine kinase/ephrin ligand system regulates a wide spectrum of physiological processes, while its dysregulation has been implicated in cancer progression. The human EphA3 receptor is widely upregulated in the tumor microenvironment and is highly expressed in some types of cancer cells. Furthermore, EphA3 is among the most highly mutated genes in lung cancer and it is also frequently mutated in other cancers. We report the structure of the ligand-binding domain of the EphA3 receptor in complex with its preferred ligand, ephrin-A5. The structure of the complex reveals a pronounced tilt of the ephrin-A5 ligand compared to its orientation when bound to the EphA2 and EphB2 receptors and similar to its orientation when bound to EphA4. This tilt brings an additional area of ephrin-A5 into contact with regions of EphA3 outside the ephrin-binding pocket thereby enlarging the size of the interface, which is consistent with the high binding affinity of ephrin-A5 for EphA3. This large variation in the tilt of ephrin-A5 bound to different Eph receptors has not been previously observed for other ephrins. PMID:25993310

  8. Stimulation of postsynapse adrenergic α2A receptor improves attention/cognition performance in an animal model of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Kawaura, Kazuaki; Karasawa, Jun-ichi; Chaki, Shigeyuki; Hikichi, Hirohiko

    2014-08-15

    A 5-trial inhibitory avoidance test using spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) pups has been used as an animal model of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the roles of noradrenergic systems, which are involved in the pathophysiology of ADHD, have not been investigated in this model. In the present study, the effects of adrenergic α2 receptor stimulation, which has been an effective treatment for ADHD, on attention/cognition performance were investigated in this model. Moreover, neuronal mechanisms mediated through adrenergic α2 receptors were investigated. We evaluated the effects of both clonidine, a non-selective adrenergic α2 receptor agonist, and guanfacine, a selective adrenergic α2A receptor agonist, using a 5-trial inhibitory avoidance test with SHR pups. Juvenile SHR exhibited a shorter transfer latency, compared with juvenile Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. Both clonidine and guanfacine significantly prolonged the transfer latency of juvenile SHR. The effects of clonidine and guanfacine were significantly blocked by pretreatment with an adrenergic α2A receptor antagonist. In contrast, the effect of clonidine was not attenuated by pretreatment with an adrenergic α2B receptor antagonist, or an adrenergic α2C receptor antagonist, while it was attenuated by a non-selective adrenergic α2 receptor antagonist. Furthermore, the effects of neither clonidine nor guanfacine were blocked by pretreatment with a selective noradrenergic neurotoxin. These results suggest that the stimulation of the adrenergic α2A receptor improves the attention/cognition performance of juvenile SHR in the 5-trial inhibitory avoidance test and that postsynaptic, rather than presynaptic, adrenergic α2A receptor is involved in this effect. PMID:24882610

  9. Nuclear receptor TLX stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis and enhances learning and memory in a transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Murai, Kiyohito; Qu, Qiuhao; Sun, GuoQiang; Ye, Peng; Li, Wendong; Asuelime, Grace; Sun, Emily; Tsai, Guochuan E.; Shi, Yanhong

    2014-01-01

    The role of the nuclear receptor TLX in hippocampal neurogenesis and cognition has just begun to be explored. In this study, we generated a transgenic mouse model that expresses TLX under the control of the promoter of nestin, a neural precursor marker. Transgenic TLX expression led to mice with enlarged brains with an elongated hippocampal dentate gyrus and increased numbers of newborn neurons. Specific expression of TLX in adult hippocampal dentate gyrus via lentiviral transduction increased the numbers of BrdU+ cells and BrdU+NeuN+ neurons. Furthermore, the neural precursor-specific expression of the TLX transgene substantially rescued the neurogenic defects of TLX-null mice. Consistent with increased neurogenesis in the hippocampus, the TLX transgenic mice exhibited enhanced cognition with increased learning and memory. These results suggest a strong association between hippocampal neurogenesis and cognition, as well as significant contributions of TLX to hippocampal neurogenesis, learning, and memory. PMID:24927526

  10. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 stimulates macrophage activation through Toll-like Receptor-4.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kamlesh K; Xu, Zhi; Castellino, Francis J; Ploplis, Victoria A

    2016-08-26

    While inflammation is often associated with increased Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), the functional consequences of PAI-1 in inflammation have yet to be fully determined. The aim of this study was to establish the in vivo relevance of PAI-1 in inflammation. A mouse model of systemic inflammation was employed in wild-type (WT) and PAI-1 deficient (PAI-1(-/-)) mice. Mice survival, macrophage infiltration into the lungs, and plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were assessed after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) infusion. In vitro experiments were conducted to examine changes in LPS-induced inflammatory responses after PAI-1 exposure. PAI-1 was shown to regulate inflammation, in vivo, and affect macrophage infiltration into lungs. Further, PAI-1 activated macrophages, and increased pro-inflammatory cytokines at both the mRNA and protein levels in these cells. The effect of PAI-1 on macrophage activation was dose-dependent and LPS-independent. Proteolytic inhibitory activity and Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein (LRP) and vitronectin (VN) binding functions, were not involved in PAI-1-mediated activation of macrophages. However, the effect of PAI-1 on macrophage activation was partially blocked by a TLR4 neutralizing antibody. Furthermore, PAI-1-induced Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNF-α) and Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-2 (MIP-2) expression was reduced in TLR4(-/-) macrophages compared to WT macrophages. These results demonstrate that PAI-1 is involved in the regulation of host inflammatory responses through Toll-like Receptor-4 (TLR4)-mediated macrophage activation. PMID:27317488

  11. Glutamate Receptor Stimulation Up-Regulates Glutamate Uptake in Human Müller Glia Cells.

    PubMed

    López-Colomé, Ana María; López, Edith; Mendez-Flores, Orquidia G; Ortega, Arturo

    2016-07-01

    Glutamate, the main excitatory amino acid in the vertebrate retina, is a well know activator of numerous signal transduction pathways, and has been critically involved in long-term synaptic changes acting through ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. However, recent findings underlining the importance of intensity and duration of glutamate stimuli for specific neuronal responses, including excitotoxicity, suggest a crucial role for Na(+)-dependent glutamate transporters, responsible for the removal of this neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft, in the regulation of glutamate-induced signaling. Transporter proteins are expressed in neurons and glia cells, albeit most of glutamate uptake occurs in the glial compartment. Within the retina, Müller glia cells are in close proximity to glutamatergic synapses and participate in the recycling of glutamate through the glutamate/glutamine shuttle. In this context, we decided to investigate a plausible role of glutamate as a regulatory signal for its own transport in human retinal glia cells. To this end, we determined [(3)H]-D-aspartate uptake in cultures of spontaneously immortalized human Müller cells (MIO-M1) exposed to distinct glutamatergic ligands. A time and dose-dependent increase in the transporter activity was detected. This effect was dependent on the activation of the N-methyl D-aspartate subtype of glutamate receptors, due to a dual effect: an increase in affinity and an augmented expression of the transporter at the plasma membrane, as established via biotinylation experiments. Furthermore, a NMDA-dependent association of glutamate transporters with the cystoskeletal proteins ezrin and glial fibrillary acidic protein was also found. These results add a novel mediator of the glutamate transporter modulation and further strengthen the notion of the critical involvement of glia cells in synaptic function. PMID:27017513

  12. Adenosine Receptor Stimulation by Polydeoxyribonucleotide Improves Tissue Repair and Symptomology in Experimental Colitis.

    PubMed

    Pallio, Giovanni; Bitto, Alessandra; Pizzino, Gabriele; Galfo, Federica; Irrera, Natasha; Squadrito, Francesco; Squadrito, Giovanni; Pallio, Socrate; Anastasi, Giuseppe P; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Macrì, Antonio; Altavilla, Domenica

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the adenosine receptor pathway has been demonstrated to be effective in improving tissue remodeling and blunting the inflammatory response. Active colitis is characterized by an intense inflammatory reaction resulting in extensive tissue damage. Symptomatic improvement requires both control of the inflammatory process and repair and remodeling of damaged tissues. We investigated the ability of an A2A receptor agonist, polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN), to restore tissue structural integrity in two experimental colitis models using male Sprague-Dawley rats. In the first model, colitis was induced with a single intra-colonic instillation of dinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (DNBS), 25 mg diluted in 0.8 ml 50% ethanol. After 6 h, animals were randomized to receive either PDRN (8 mg/kg/i.p.), or PDRN + the A2A antagonist [3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (DMPX); 10 mg/kg/i.p.], or vehicle (0.8 ml saline solution) daily. In the second model, dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) was dissolved in drinking water at a concentration of 8%. Control animals received standard drinking water. After 24 h animals were randomized to receive PDRN or PDRN+DMPX as described above. Rats were sacrificed 7 days after receiving DNBS or 5 days after DSS. In both experimental models of colitis, PDRN ameliorated the clinical symptoms and weight loss associated with disease as well as promoted the histological repair of damaged tissues. Moreover, PDRN reduced expression of inflammatory cytokines, myeloperoxidase activity, and malondialdehyde. All these effects were abolished by the concomitant administration of the A2A antagonist DMPX. Our study suggests that PDRN may represent a promising treatment for improving tissue repair during inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:27601997

  13. Adenosine Receptor Stimulation by Polydeoxyribonucleotide Improves Tissue Repair and Symptomology in Experimental Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Pallio, Giovanni; Bitto, Alessandra; Pizzino, Gabriele; Galfo, Federica; Irrera, Natasha; Squadrito, Francesco; Squadrito, Giovanni; Pallio, Socrate; Anastasi, Giuseppe P.; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Macrì, Antonio; Altavilla, Domenica

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the adenosine receptor pathway has been demonstrated to be effective in improving tissue remodeling and blunting the inflammatory response. Active colitis is characterized by an intense inflammatory reaction resulting in extensive tissue damage. Symptomatic improvement requires both control of the inflammatory process and repair and remodeling of damaged tissues. We investigated the ability of an A2A receptor agonist, polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN), to restore tissue structural integrity in two experimental colitis models using male Sprague-Dawley rats. In the first model, colitis was induced with a single intra-colonic instillation of dinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (DNBS), 25 mg diluted in 0.8 ml 50% ethanol. After 6 h, animals were randomized to receive either PDRN (8 mg/kg/i.p.), or PDRN + the A2A antagonist [3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (DMPX); 10 mg/kg/i.p.], or vehicle (0.8 ml saline solution) daily. In the second model, dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) was dissolved in drinking water at a concentration of 8%. Control animals received standard drinking water. After 24 h animals were randomized to receive PDRN or PDRN+DMPX as described above. Rats were sacrificed 7 days after receiving DNBS or 5 days after DSS. In both experimental models of colitis, PDRN ameliorated the clinical symptoms and weight loss associated with disease as well as promoted the histological repair of damaged tissues. Moreover, PDRN reduced expression of inflammatory cytokines, myeloperoxidase activity, and malondialdehyde. All these effects were abolished by the concomitant administration of the A2A antagonist DMPX. Our study suggests that PDRN may represent a promising treatment for improving tissue repair during inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:27601997

  14. Developing oligodendrocytes express functional GABA(B) receptors that stimulate cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Luyt, Karen; Slade, Timothy P; Dorward, Jienchi J; Durant, Claire F; Wu, Yue; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Mundell, Stuart J; Váradi, Anikó; Molnár, Elek

    2007-02-01

    GABA(B) receptors (GABA(B)Rs) are involved in early events during neuronal development. The presence of GABA(B)Rs in developing oligodendrocytes has not been established. Using immunofluorescent co-localization, we have identified GABA(B)R proteins in O4 marker-positive oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) in 4-day-old mouse brain periventricular white matter. In culture, OPCs, differentiated oligodendrocytes (DOs) and type 2 astrocytes (ASTs) express both the GABA(B1abcdf) and GABA(B2) subunits of the GABA(B)R. Using semiquantitative PCR analysis with GABA(B)R isoform-selective primers we found that the expression level of GABA(B1abd) was substantially higher in OPCs or ASTs than in DOs. In contrast, the GABA(B2) isoform showed a similar level of expression in OPCs and DOs, and a significantly higher level in ASTs. This indicates that the expression of GABA(B1) and GABA(B2) subunits are under independent control during oligodendroglial development. Activation of GABA(B)Rs using the selective agonist baclofen demonstrated that these receptors are functionally active and negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase. Manipulation of GABA(B)R activity had no effect on OPC migration in a conventional agarose drop assay, whereas baclofen significantly increased OPC migration in a more sensitive transwell microchamber-based assay. Exposure of cultured OPCs to baclofen increased their proliferation, providing evidence for a functional role of GABA(B)Rs in oligodendrocyte development. The presence of GABA(B)Rs in developing oligodendrocytes provides a new mechanism for neuronal-glial interactions during development and may offer a novel target for promoting remyelination following white matter injury. PMID:17144904

  15. Insulin: its binding to specific receptors and its stimulation of DNA synthesis and 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide phosphohydrolase in embryonic mouse brain cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Shanker, G.; Pieringer, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    Previously, the authors demonstrated that ornithine decarboxylase was stimulated by insulin in cultures of embryonic mouse brain cells. In the present work, they have investigated the presence and specificity of insulin receptors in these cultures. A time study showed that maximum binding of /sup 125/(I) labelled insulin was around 75 min. Other studies measured the influence of concentration and age on insulin binding. A displacement study using increasing concentrations of cold insulin, glucagon or growth hormone demonstrated that the specificity of the receptors for insulin was rather high. It was also found that insulin displayed a clear dose-dependent stimulation of thymidine incorporation into the brain cells. Insulin also stimulated the glial enzyme 2':3'-cyclic nucleotide phosphohydrolase (CNP-ase). The results suggest a dual role for insulin; it regulates both cell proliferation as well as differentiation.

  16. Preferred recycling pathway by internalized PGE2 EP4 receptor following agonist stimulation in cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons contributes to enhanced EP4 receptor sensitivity.

    PubMed

    St-Jacques, Bruno; Ma, Weiya

    2016-06-21

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a well-known pain mediator abundantly produced in injured tissues, sensitizes nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons (nociceptors) through its four EP receptors (EP1-4). Our prior study showed that PGE2 or EP4 agonist stimulates EP4 externalization and this event was not only suppressed by the inhibitor of anterograde export, but also by the recycling inhibitor (St-Jacques and Ma, 2013). These data suggest that EP4 recycling also contributes to agonist-enhanced EP4 surface abundance. In the current study, we tested this hypothesis using antibody-feeding-based internalization assay, recycling assay and FITC-PGE2 binding assay. We observed that selective EP4 agonist 1-hydroxy-PGE1 (1-OH-PGE1) or CAY10850 time- and concentration-dependently increased EP4 internalization in cultured DRG neuron. Internalized EP4 was predominantly localized in the early endosomes and recycling endosomes, but rarely in the late endosomes and lysosomes. These observations were confirmed by FITC-PGE2 binding assay. We further revealed that 1-OH-PGE1 or CAY10850 time- and concentration-dependently increased EP4 recycling. Double exposures to 1-OH-PGE1 induced a greater increase in calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) release than a single exposure or vehicle exposure, an event blocked by pre-treatment with the recycling inhibitor monensin. Our data suggest that EP4 recycling contributes to agonist-induced cell surface abundance and consequently enhanced receptor sensitivity. Facilitating EP4 externalization and recycling is a novel mechanism underlying PGE2-induced nociceptor sensitization. PMID:27060485

  17. Electrophysiological investigation of chemoreceptors of the maxillary palps of Locusta migratoria migratorioides R. et F. I. General characteristics of receptor responses evoked by NaCl stimulation.

    PubMed

    Varanka, I

    1982-01-01

    Following stimulation with NaCl of different concentrations, responses from one, two or three receptor cells of the sensillae could be recorded, one of them being always "dominant". The other one or two secondary cells showed a lower frequency and a faster adaptation. The responses of the dominant cells proved to be variable, even to repeated stimulations using the same concentration of the same substance. Increasing the concentration from 0.01 mol/l to 1.0 mol/l, the initial frequency may increase or decrease, however, frequency minimum or maximum may also occur at an intermediate concentration. These findings indicate a less specialized stage of the receptor cells. The individual characteristics of the receptor cells may be surpassed when averaging the responses of sufficiently high number of cells. PMID:7180512

  18. Characterization of the inward current induced by metabotropic glutamate receptor stimulation in rat ventromedial hypothalamic neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, K; Boden, P R

    1997-01-01

    1. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were made from rat ventromedial hypothalamic neurones in slices of brain tissue in vitro. Bath application of 50 microM (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (1S,3R-ACPD) depolarized all neurones tested by activation of an inward current of approximately 55 pA at -60 mV. 2. The inward current elicited by 1S,3R-ACPD was unaffected by K+ channel blockade with external Cs+, Ba2+ or TEA. However, the current was significantly reduced by replacement of the external NaCl with either Tris-HCl or LiCl. 3. The 1S,3R-ACPD-induced current was reduced by the heavy metal ions Ni2+ or La3+ and also by the Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange current inhibitor 3',4'-dichlorobenzamil. 4. The effects of 1S,3R-ACPD were mimicked by the group I metabotropic agonist 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) but not by the group III selective agonist, L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutanoate (L-AP4). Furthermore, the effects of 1S,3R-ACPD were inhibited by the metabotropic antagonists alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG) and 1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA) but not by the presynaptic metabotropic receptor antagonists alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG) or alpha-methyl-4-tetrazolylphenylglycine (MTPG). 5. Photorelease of caged GDP beta S inside neurones irreversibly blocked the 1S,3R-ACPD-induced current whilst photolysis of caged GTP gamma S inside neurones irreversibly potentiated this current. 6. The PLC inhibitor U-73,122 significantly reduced the size of the inward current induced by 1S,3R-ACPD. This effect was not mimicked by the inactive analogue U-73,343. 7. Flash photolysis of the caged calcium chelator diazo-2 inside neurones diminished the response to 1S,3R-ACPD. 8. It is concluded that group I metabotropic glutamate receptors depolarize neurones in the VMH by activation of a Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange current through a G-protein coupled increase in intracellular Ca2+. PMID:9401972

  19. Characterization of the inward current induced by metabotropic glutamate receptor stimulation in rat ventromedial hypothalamic neurones.

    PubMed

    Lee, K; Boden, P R

    1997-11-01

    1. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were made from rat ventromedial hypothalamic neurones in slices of brain tissue in vitro. Bath application of 50 microM (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (1S,3R-ACPD) depolarized all neurones tested by activation of an inward current of approximately 55 pA at -60 mV. 2. The inward current elicited by 1S,3R-ACPD was unaffected by K+ channel blockade with external Cs+, Ba2+ or TEA. However, the current was significantly reduced by replacement of the external NaCl with either Tris-HCl or LiCl. 3. The 1S,3R-ACPD-induced current was reduced by the heavy metal ions Ni2+ or La3+ and also by the Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange current inhibitor 3',4'-dichlorobenzamil. 4. The effects of 1S,3R-ACPD were mimicked by the group I metabotropic agonist 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) but not by the group III selective agonist, L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutanoate (L-AP4). Furthermore, the effects of 1S,3R-ACPD were inhibited by the metabotropic antagonists alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG) and 1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA) but not by the presynaptic metabotropic receptor antagonists alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG) or alpha-methyl-4-tetrazolylphenylglycine (MTPG). 5. Photorelease of caged GDP beta S inside neurones irreversibly blocked the 1S,3R-ACPD-induced current whilst photolysis of caged GTP gamma S inside neurones irreversibly potentiated this current. 6. The PLC inhibitor U-73,122 significantly reduced the size of the inward current induced by 1S,3R-ACPD. This effect was not mimicked by the inactive analogue U-73,343. 7. Flash photolysis of the caged calcium chelator diazo-2 inside neurones diminished the response to 1S,3R-ACPD. 8. It is concluded that group I metabotropic glutamate receptors depolarize neurones in the VMH by activation of a Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange current through a G-protein coupled increase in intracellular Ca2+. PMID:9401972

  20. IL-17 receptor A signaling is protective in infection-stimulated periapical bone destruction.

    PubMed

    AlShwaimi, Emad; Berggreen, Ellen; Furusho, Hisako; Rossall, Jonathan Caleb; Dobeck, Justine; Yoganathan, Subbiah; Stashenko, Philip; Sasaki, Hajime

    2013-08-15

    IL-17 is a pleiotropic cytokine produced by Th17 T cells that induces a myriad of proinflammatory mediators. However, different models of inflammation report opposite functional roles of IL-17 signal in terms of its effects on bone destruction. In this study we determined the role of IL-17RA signal in bone resorption stimulated by dentoalveolar infections. Infrabony resorptive lesions were induced by surgical pulp exposure and microbial infection of mouse molar teeth. IL-17 was strongly induced in periapical tissues in wild-type (WT) mice by 7 d after the infection but was not expressed in uninfected mice. Dentoalveolar infections of IL-17RA knockout (KO) mice demonstrated significantly increased bone destruction and more abscess formation in the apical area compared with WT mice. Infected IL-17RA KO mice exhibited significantly increased neutrophils and macrophages compared with the WT littermates at day 21, suggesting a failure of transition from acute to chronic inflammation in the IL-17RA KO mice. The expression of IL-1 (both α and β isoforms) and MIP2 were significantly upregulated in the IL-17RA KO compared with WT mice at day 21 postinfection. The development of periapical lesions in IL-17RA KO mice was significantly attenuated by neutralization of IL-1β and MIP2. Taken together, these results demonstrate that IL-17RA signal seems to be protective against infection-induced periapical inflammation and bone destruction via suppression of neutrophil and mononuclear inflammation. PMID:23863904

  1. Stimulation of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor expression by PMA requires JNK1-dependent and -independent signaling modules.

    PubMed

    Gum, R; Juarez, J; Allgayer, H; Mazar, A; Wang, Y; Boyd, D

    1998-07-16

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (u-PAR) has been implicated in tumor progression, and previous studies have shown that the expression of this gene is strongly up-regulated by PMA. Although the signaling mechanism by which PMA modulates u-PAR expression is not known, the effect of this phorbol ester on the expression of other genes has been ascribed to activation of the c-Raf-1-ERK signaling pathway. However, in the current study we examined an alternate possibility that the inductive effect of PMA on u-PAR expression also required a JNK1-dependent signaling cascade usually associated with stress-inducing stimuli. PMA treatment of the u-PAR-deficient OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cells, which contain low JNK activities, resulted in a rapid (5 min) increase in JNK activity. Maximal JNK activity (12-fold induction) occurred after 30 min; this preceding the earliest detected rise in u-PAR protein (2 h). Dose-response studies with PMA also indicated that the increased JNK activity was tightly correlated with elevated u-PAR protein levels. The stimulation of u-PAR promoter activity by PMA required an intact upstream AP-1 motif (-184) and in PMA-treated cells this motif was bound with c-Jun as indicated from mobility shift assays. PMA up-regulated the c-Jun trans acting activity as indicated by the higher activity of a GAL4-regulated luciferase reporter in phorbol-ester-treated cells co-transfected with an expression vector encoding the c-Jun transactivation domain fused to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain. The ability of PMA to stimulate u-PAR promoter activity was effectively titrated out by the co-expression of either a kinase-defective JNK1 or a dominant negative MEKK1 the latter being an upstream activator of JNK1. Conversely, u-PAR promoter activity was stimulated by the co-expression of a constitutively active MEKK1 and this induction was antagonized by the inclusion of the kinase-defective JNK1 plasmid. We also determined the biological significance of the

  2. Sustained elevated levels of circulating vasopressin selectively stimulate the proliferation of kidney tubular cells via the activation of V2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Gérard; Galibert, Evelyne; Boulay, Véra; Guillou, Anne; Jean, Alexandra; Compan, Valérie; Guillon, Gilles

    2009-01-01

    The hypothalamic hormone vasopressin (AVP) has known mitogenic effects on various cell types. This study was designed to determine whether sustained elevated levels of circulating AVP could influence cell proliferation within adult tissues known to express different AVP receptors, including the pituitary, adrenal gland, liver, and kidney. Plasmatic AVP was chronically increased by submitting animals to prolonged hyperosmotic stimulation or implanting them with a AVP-containing osmotic minipump. After several days of either treatment, increased cell proliferation was detected only within the kidney. This kidney cell proliferation was not affected by the administration of selective V1a or V1b receptor antagonists but was either inhibited or mimicked by the administration of a selective V2 receptor antagonist or agonist, respectively. Kidney proliferative cells mostly concerned a subpopulation of differentiated tubular cells known to express the V2 receptors and were associated with the phosphorylation of ERK. These data indicate that in the adult rat, sustained elevated levels of circulating AVP stimulates the proliferation of a subpopulation of kidney tubular cells expressing the V2 receptor, providing the first illustration of a mitogenic effect of AVP via the activation of the V2 receptor subtype. PMID:18787031

  3. D1 dopamine receptor stimulation impairs striatal proteasome activity in Parkinsonism through 26S proteasome disassembly.

    PubMed

    Barroso-Chinea, Pedro; Thiolat, Marie-Laure; Bido, Simone; Martinez, Audrey; Doudnikoff, Evelyne; Baufreton, Jérôme; Bourdenx, Mathieu; Bloch, Bertrand; Bezard, Erwan; Martin-Negrier, Marie-Laure

    2015-06-01

    Among the mechanisms underlying the development of L-dopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) in Parkinson's disease, complex alterations in dopamine signaling in D1 receptor (D1R)-expressing medium spiny striatal neurons have been unraveled such as, but not limited to, dysregulation of D1R expression, lateral diffusion, intraneuronal trafficking, subcellular localization and desensitization, leading to a pathological anchorage of D1R at the plasma membrane. Such anchorage is partly due to a decreased proteasomal activity that is specific of the L-dopa-exposed dopamine-depleted striatum, results from D1R activation and feeds-back the D1R exaggerated cell surface abundance. The precise mechanisms by which L-dopa affects striatal proteasome activity remained however unknown. We here show, in a series of in vitro ex vivo and in vivo models, that such rapid modulation of striatal proteasome activity intervenes through D1R-mediated disassembly of the 26S proteasome rather than change in transcription or translation of proteasome or proteasome subunits intraneuronal relocalization. PMID:25766677

  4. Stimulation of dopamine D₁ receptor improves learning capacity in cooperating cleaner fish.

    PubMed

    Messias, João P M; Santos, Teresa P; Pinto, Maria; Soares, Marta C

    2016-01-27

    Accurate contextual decision-making strategies are important in social environments. Specific areas in the brain are tasked to process these complex interactions and generate correct follow-up responses. The dorsolateral and dorsomedial parts of the telencephalon in the teleost fish brain are neural substrates modulated by the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA), and are part of an important neural circuitry that drives animal behaviour from the most basic actions such as learning to search for food, to properly choosing partners and managing decisions based on context. The Indo-Pacific cleaner wrasse Labroides dimidiatus is a highly social teleost fish species with a complex network of interactions with its 'client' reef fish. We asked if changes in DA signalling would affect individual learning ability by presenting cleaner fish two ecologically different tasks that simulated a natural situation requiring accurate decision-making. We demonstrate that there is an involvement of the DA system and D1 receptor pathways on cleaners' natural abilities to learn both tasks. Our results add significantly to the growing literature on the physiological mechanisms that underlie and facilitate the expression of cooperative abilities. PMID:26791613

  5. Attenuation of signaling pathways stimulated by pathologically activated FGF-receptor 2 mutants prevents craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Eswarakumar, V P; Ozcan, F; Lew, E D; Bae, J H; Tomé, F; Booth, C J; Adams, D J; Lax, I; Schlessinger, J

    2006-12-01

    Craniosynostosis, the fusion of one or more of the sutures of the skull vault before the brain completes its growth, is a common (1 in 2,500 births) craniofacial abnormality, approximately 20% of which occurrences are caused by gain-of-function mutations in FGF receptors (FGFRs). We describe a genetic and pharmacological approach for the treatment of a murine model system of Crouzon-like craniosynostosis induced by a dominant mutation in Fgfr2c. Using genetically modified mice, we demonstrate that premature fusion of sutures mediated by Crouzon-like activated Fgfr2c mutant is prevented by attenuation of signaling pathways by selective uncoupling between the docking protein Frs2alpha and activated Fgfr2c, resulting in normal skull development. We also demonstrate that attenuation of Fgfr signaling in a calvaria organ culture with an Fgfr inhibitor prevents premature fusion of sutures without adversely affecting calvaria development. These experiments show that attenuation of FGFR signaling by pharmacological intervention could be applied for the treatment of craniosynostosis or other severe bone disorders caused by mutations in FGFRs that currently have no treatment. PMID:17132737

  6. Eplerenone attenuates cardiac dysfunction and oxidative stress in β-receptor stimulated myocardial infarcted rats

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Navya M; Mahajan, Umesh B; Patil, Chandragouda R; Agrawal, Yogeeta O; Ojha, Shreesh; Goyal, Sameer N

    2015-01-01

    Eplerenone is a competitive antagonist of the aldosterone receptor with an additional PI3K-Akt activity. The existing cram has been intended to explore, whether eplerenone treatment attenuates the expansion of myocardial infarction in isoproterenol treated rats by restoring hemodynamic, biochemical, and histopathological changes. Isoproterenol induced cardiotoxicity was evidenced by marked ST elevation, decrease in systolic, diastolic, mean arterial pressures. Maximal positive rate of developed left ventricular pressure (+LVdP/dt max, a indicator of myocardial contraction), maximal negative rate of developed left ventricular pressure (-LVdP/dt max, a meter of myocardial relaxation) and an increase in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP, a marker of pre-load) were also shown. In addition, a significant reduction in activities of myocardial creatine kinase-MB isoenzyme, lactate dehydrogenase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and reduced glutathione level along with increase in malondialdehyde content were observed. Oral pre-treatment with eplerenone (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg) daily for a period of 14 days, constructively modulated the studied parameters in isoproterenol-induced myocardial injury. The protective role of eplerenone on isoproterenolinduced myocardial damage was further confirmed by histopathological examinations. Eplerenone at doses of 100 mg/kg and 150 mg/kg produced more pronounced protective effects than 50 mg/kg body weight. Together, our study provides evidence for protective effects of eplerenone on myocardium in experimentally induced myocardial infarction. PMID:26550459

  7. Comparative stimulation of motilin duodenal receptor by porcine or canine motilin.

    PubMed

    Poitras, P; Lahaie, R G; St-Pierre, S; Trudel, L

    1987-03-01

    Motilins purified from porcine and canine intestine differ in their amino acid composition in positions 7-8-12-13-14. We studied in vitro the contractile response of longitudinal duodenal muscles from various animals (guinea pig, rabbit, dog) to porcine and canine synthetic motilins. Both substances failed to elicit contraction of the guinea pig duodenum but were active and equally potent on rabbit muscle. In dogs, porcine motilin was inactive at the concentrations tested (up to 10(-4) M) whereas canine motilin induced duodenal contractions in a dose-response fashion (mean dose required to induce half-maximal response: 4.82 +/- 0.25 X 10(-5) M). The contraction generated by synthetic canine motilin (10(-5) M) was not influenced by atropine, hexamethonium, tetrodotoxin, naloxone, or sodium nitroprusside (all used at 10(-4) M) but was blocked by verapamil (10(-4)). Our study shows that species-related structural alterations in motilin molecules generate different bioactive capacities in some animal species, suggests that the middle portion of the molecule is important for its bioactive expression, suggests the presence of motilin receptors on canine duodenal muscle, and suggests that an influx of extracellular calcium is involved in the canine duodenal muscle contraction elicited by canine motilin. PMID:3817389

  8. DNA-Polymer Conjugates for Immune Stimulation through Toll-like Receptor 9 Mediated Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Levenson, Eric A.; Kiick, Kristi L.

    2014-01-01

    Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) containing unmethylated CpG dinucleotide motifs are agonists of Toll-like receptor 9 and are currently being investigated for use as vaccine adjuvants through promotion of type I immunity. Several classes of ODN have been developed which differ in their propensity to aggregate, which in turn, alter cytokine profiles and cellular subsets activated. Although aggregation state is correlated with the change in cytokine response, it is unknown if this results from a change in the number of ODN available for binding and/or the possible engagement of multiple TLR9 molecules. Here, we examined the role of ligand valency on the activation of TLR9 through the synthesis of ODN-poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) conjugates. The compositions and size of the conjugates were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, 1H NMR, gel permeation chromatography, and dynamic light scattering. ELISA-based assays of cytokine secretion by murine-like macrophages indicate that these ODN-PAA polymer conjugates show enhanced immunostimulation at 100-fold lower concentrations than those required for ODN alone, for both TNF-α and IL-6 release, and are more potent than any other previously reported multivalent ODN constructs. Increasing valency was shown to significantly enhance cytokine expression, particularly for IL-6. Knockdown by siRNA demonstrates that these polymer conjugates are specific to TLR9. Our results define valency as a critical design parameter and polymer conjugation as an advantageous strategy for producing ODN immunomodulatory agents. PMID:24316364

  9. DNA-polymer conjugates for immune stimulation through Toll-like receptor 9 mediated pathways.

    PubMed

    Levenson, Eric A; Kiick, Kristi L

    2014-03-01

    Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing unmethylated CpG dinucleotide motifs are agonists of Toll-like receptor 9 and are currently being investigated for use as vaccine adjuvants through the promotion of type I immunity. Several classes of ODN have been developed which differ in their propensity to aggregate, which in turn alters cytokine profiles and cellular subsets activated. Although aggregation state is correlated with the change in cytokine response, it is unknown if this results from a change in the number of ODNs available for binding and/or the possible engagement of multiple TLR9 molecules. Here, we examined the role of ligand valency on the activation of TLR9 through the synthesis of ODN-poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) conjugates. The compositions and size of the conjugates were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, proton nuclear magnetic resonance, gel permeation chromatography and dynamic light scattering. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays of cytokine secretion by murine-like macrophages indicate that these ODN-PAA polymer conjugates show enhanced immunostimulation at 100-fold lower concentrations than those required for ODN alone, for both TNF-α and IL-6 release, and are more potent than any other previously reported multivalent ODN constructs. Increasing valency was shown to significantly enhance cytokine expression, particularly for IL-6. Knockdown by siRNA demonstrates that these polymer conjugates are specific to TLR9. Our results define valency as a critical design parameter and polymer conjugation as an advantageous strategy for producing ODN immunomodulatory agents. PMID:24316364

  10. Stimulation of angiogenesis and survival of endothelial cells by human monoclonal Tie2 receptor antibody.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Byungtae; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Jang-Seong; Moon, Ji Hyun; Jeung, In Cheul; Lee, Na Geum; Park, Jongjin; Hong, Hyo Jeong; Cho, Young-Lai; Jung, Haiyoung; Park, Young-Jun; Lee, Seon-Jin; Lee, Hee Gu; Kim, Won Kon; Han, Baek Soo; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Chung, Sang J; Kwon, Young-Guen; Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Sang Jik; Min, Jeong-Ki

    2015-05-01

    Angiopoietin-1 (Ang1) and its endothelium-specific receptor, tyrosine kinase with Ig and epidermal growth factor homology domain 2 (Tie2), play critical roles in vascular development. Although the Ang1/Tie2 system has been considered a promising target for therapeutic neovascularization, several imitations of large-scale production have hampered the development of recombinant Ang1 for therapeutics. In this study, we produced a fully human agonistic antibody against Tie2, designated 1-4h, and tested the applicability of 1-4h as an alternative to native Ang1 in therapeutic angiogenesis. 1-4h significantly enhanced the phosphorylation of Tie2 in a dose- and time-dependent manner in human Tie2-expressing HEK293 cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Moreover, 1-4h induced the activation of Tie2-mediated intracellular signaling such as AKT, eNOS, MAPK, and Focal Adhesion Kinase p125(FAK). In addition, 1-4h increased the chemotactic motility and capillary-like tube formation of endothelial cells in vitro and enhanced the survival of serum-deprived endothelial cells. Taken together, our data clearly suggest that a human Tie2 agonistic antibody is a potentially useful therapeutic approach for the treatment of several ischemic diseases including delayed-wound healing and ischemic heart and limb diseases. PMID:25771003

  11. Estrogen receptor-α signaling in osteoblast progenitors stimulates cortical bone accrual

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Maria; Iyer, Srividhya; Martin-Millan, Marta; Bartell, Shoshana M.; Han, Li; Ambrogini, Elena; Onal, Melda; Xiong, Jinhu; Weinstein, Robert S.; Jilka, Robert L.; O’Brien, Charles A.; Manolagas, Stavros C.

    2012-01-01

    The detection of estrogen receptor-α (ERα) in osteoblasts and osteoclasts over 20 years ago suggested that direct effects of estrogens on both of these cell types are responsible for their beneficial effects on the skeleton, but the role of ERα in osteoblast lineage cells has remained elusive. In addition, estrogen activation of ERα in osteoclasts can only account for the protective effect of estrogens on the cancellous, but not the cortical, bone compartment that represents 80% of the entire skeleton. Here, we deleted ERα at different stages of differentiation in murine osteoblast lineage cells. We found that ERα in osteoblast progenitors expressing Osterix1 (Osx1) potentiates Wnt/β-catenin signaling, thereby increasing proliferation and differentiation of periosteal cells. Further, this signaling pathway was required for optimal cortical bone accrual at the periosteum in mice. Notably, this function did not require estrogens. The osteoblast progenitor ERα mediated a protective effect of estrogens against endocortical, but not cancellous, bone resorption. ERα in mature osteoblasts or osteocytes did not influence cancellous or cortical bone mass. Hence, the ERα in both osteoblast progenitors and osteoclasts functions to optimize bone mass but at distinct bone compartments and in response to different cues. PMID:23221342

  12. 64Cu-labeled alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone analog for microPET imaging of melanocortin 1 receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhen; Xiong, Zhengming; Subbarayan, Murugesan; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2007-01-01

    The alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) receptor (melanocortin type 1 receptor, or MC1R) plays an important role in the development and growth of melanoma cells. It was found that MC1R was overexpressed on most murine and human melanoma, making it a promising molecular target for melanoma imaging and therapy. Radiolabeled alpha-MSH peptide and its analogs that can specifically bind with MC1R have been extensively explored for developing novel agents for melanoma detection and radionuclide therapy. The goal of this study was to evaluate a 64Cu-labeled alpha-MSH analog, Ac-Nle-Asp-His-D-Phe-Arg-Trp-Gly-Lys(DOTA)-NH2 (DOTA-NAPamide), as a potential molecular probe for microPET imaging of melanoma and MC1R expression in melanoma xenografted mouse models. 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) conjugated NAPamide was synthesized and radiolabeled with 64Cu (t1/2=12 h) in NH4OAc (0.1 M; pH 5.5) buffered solution for 60 min at 50 degrees C. Cell culture studies reveal rapid and high uptake and internalization of 64Cu-DOTA-NAPamide in B16F10 cells. Over 90% of receptor-bound tracer is internalized at 3 h incubation. A cellular retention study demonstrates that the receptor-bound 64Cu-DOTA-NAPamide is slowly released from the B16F10 cells into the medium; 66% of the radioactivity is still associated with the cells even after 3 h incubation. The biodistribution of 64Cu-DOTA-NAPamide was then investigated in C57BL/6 mice bearing subcutaneous murine B16F10 melanoma tumors with high capacity of MC1R and Fox Chase Scid mice bearing human A375M melanoma with a relatively low number of MC1R receptors. Tumor uptake values of 64Cu-DOTA-NAPamide are found to be 4.63 +/- 0.45% and 2.49 +/- 0.31% ID/g in B16F10 and A375M xenografted melanoma at 2 h postinjection (pi), respectively. The B16F10 tumor uptake at 2 h pi is further inhibited to 2.29 +/- 0.24% ID/g, while A375M tumor uptake at 2 h pi remains 2.20 +/- 0.41% ID/g with a coinjection of excess

  13. Repeated stimulation of D1 dopamine receptors enhances (-)-11-hydroxy-delta 8-tetrahydrocannabinol-dimethyl-heptyl-induced catalepsy in male rats.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez de Fonseca, F; Martín Calderón, J L; Mechoulam, R; Navarro, M

    1994-03-21

    Dopaminergic and cannabinoid receptors are localized in the outflow nuclei of the basal ganglia. We have investigated the possible interrelation of these receptors in the regulation of motor activity in male rats. To this end we have first studied the behavioural effects of the highly potent cannabinoid receptor agonist (-)11-hydroxy-delta 8-tetrahydrocannabinol-dimethylheptyl (HU-210, 20 micrograms mg) after chronic stimulation of dopamine D1 and D2 receptors. The catalepsy induced by the synthetic cannabinoid, measured as the descent latency in the bar test, was enhanced in male rats chronically treated with the dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF38393 (8 mg kg-1, twice a day during 21 days). However, animals exposed to the dopamine D2 agonist quinpirole (1 mg kg-1 daily during 21 days) displayed the same degree of catalepsy as those exposed to HU-210 alone. Although a possible involvement of D2 receptors cannot be excluded, this finding suggests a predominant role for dopamine D1 receptors in the regulation of the cataleptic response to cannabinoids. The possible cross-talk between dopamine D1 and cannabinoid receptors is further supported by the decreased responsiveness to the acute behavioural effects of SKF38393 (8 mg kg-1) observed in animals chronically exposed to HU-210 (20 micrograms kg-1 daily during 14 days). PMID:7912554

  14. Dose-Dependent Bidirectional Effect of Angiotensin IV on Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm via Variable Angiotensin Receptor Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jing; Zhang, Kai; Meng, Xiao; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Cheng

    2015-09-01

    Angiotensin IV (Ang IV), as an effector peptide of the rennin-angiotensin system, possesses many biological properties yet not completely known. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of Ang IV in the development of Ang II-induced abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in apolipoprotein E-knockout mice. We used Ang II infusion to induce AAA, and animals were treated with Ang II (1.44 mg/kg per day) plus no treatment, Ang II (1.44 mg/kg per day) plus low-, medium-, and high-dose Ang IV (0.72, 1.44, and 2.88 mg/kg per day, respectively). The incidence of AAA was 87.5%, 66.7%, 37.5%, and 83.3% in the no treatment, the low-, medium-, or high-dose Ang IV group, respectively. Compared with the no treatment group, medium-dose Ang IV treatment markedly reduced macrophage infiltration; levels of proinflammatory cytokines, including monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, interleukin 6, and intercellular adhesion molecule 1; the expression and activity of metalloproteinases 2 and 9; but increased smooth muscle cells, and collagen content in AAA. However, high-dose Ang IV treatment did not have obvious protective effect. The beneficial effect of medium-dose Ang IV may be contributed to the stimulation of type 4 angiotensin receptor (AT4R) and AT2R with suppression of AT1R, activation of Akt, and inhibition of nuclear factor-κB, as these beneficial effects were largely reversed by cotreatment with the AT4R antagonist divalinal-Ang IV in Ang II-infused mice or with the Akt inhibitor A6730 in Ang II-stimulated human smooth muscle cells. Therefore, medium dose of Ang IV may provide a novel and promising approach to the treatment of AAA. PMID:26238445

  15. Label-Free Proteomic Identification of Endogenous, Insulin-Stimulated Interaction Partners of Insulin Receptor Substrate-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geetha, Thangiah; Langlais, Paul; Luo, Moulun; Mapes, Rebekka; Lefort, Natalie; Chen, Shu-Chuan; Mandarino, Lawrence J.; Yi, Zhengping

    2011-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions are key to most cellular processes. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS)-based proteomics combined with co-immunoprecipitation (CO-IP) has emerged as a powerful approach for studying protein complexes. However, a majority of systematic proteomics studies on protein-protein interactions involve the use of protein overexpression and/or epitope-tagged bait proteins, which might affect binding stoichiometry and lead to higher false positives. Here, we report an application of a straightforward, label-free CO-IP-MS/MS method, without the use of protein overexpression or protein tags, to the investigation of changes in the abundance of endogenous proteins associated with a bait protein, which is in this case insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), under basal and insulin stimulated conditions. IRS-1 plays a central role in the insulin signaling cascade. Defects in the protein-protein interactions involving IRS-1 may lead to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analyses identified eleven novel endogenous insulin-stimulated IRS-1 interaction partners in L6 myotubes reproducibly, including proteins play an important role in protein dephosphorylation [protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 12A, (PPP1R12A)], muscle contraction and actin cytoskeleton rearrangement, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and protein folding, as well as protein synthesis. This novel application of label-free CO-IP-MS/MS quantification to assess endogenous interaction partners of a specific protein will prove useful for understanding how various cell stimuli regulate insulin signal transduction.

  16. MyD88-dependent IL-1 receptor signaling is essential for gouty inflammation stimulated by monosodium urate crystals

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Jen; Shi, Yan; Hearn, Arron; Fitzgerald, Kate; Golenbock, Douglas; Reed, George; Akira, Shizuo; Rock, Kenneth L.

    2006-01-01

    While it is known that monosodium urate (MSU) crystals cause the disease gout, the mechanism by which these crystals stimulate this inflammatory condition has not been clear. Here we find that the Toll/IL-1R (TIR) signal transduction adaptor myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MyD88) is required for acute gouty inflammation. In contrast, other TIR adaptor molecules, TIRAP/Mal, TRIF, and TRAM, are not required for this process. The MyD88-dependent TLR1, -2, -4, -6, -7, -9, and -11 and IL-18 receptor (IL-18R) are not essential for MSU-induced inflammation. Moreover, MSU does not stimulate HEK cells expressing TLR1–11 to activate NF-κB. In contrast, mice deficient in the MyD88-dependent IL-1R showed reduced inflammatory responses, similar to those observed in MyD88-deficient mice. Similarly, mice treated with IL-1 neutralizing antibodies also showed reduced MSU-induced inflammation, demonstrating that IL-1 production and IL-1R activation play essential roles in MSU-triggered inflammation. IL-1R deficiency in bone marrow–derived cells did not affect the inflammatory response; however, it was required in non–bone marrow–derived cells. These results indicate that IL-1 is essential for the MSU-induced inflammatory response and that the requirement of MyD88 in this process is primarily through its function as an adaptor molecule in the IL-1R signaling pathway. PMID:16886064

  17. Estrogen Receptor β-Selective Agonists Stimulate Calcium Oscillations in Human and Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lili; Blackman, Brigitte E.; Schonemann, Marcus D.; Zogovic-Kapsalis, Tatjana; Pan, Xiaoyu; Tagliaferri, Mary; Harris, Heather A.; Cohen, Isaac; Reijo Pera, Renee A.; Mellon, Synthia H.; Weiner, Richard I.; Leitman, Dale C.

    2010-01-01

    Estrogens are used extensively to treat hot flashes in menopausal women. Some of the beneficial effects of estrogens in hormone therapy on the brain might be due to nongenomic effects in neurons such as the rapid stimulation of calcium oscillations. Most studies have examined the nongenomic effects of estrogen receptors (ER) in primary neurons or brain slices from the rodent brain. However, these cells can not be maintained continuously in culture because neurons are post-mitotic. Neurons derived from embryonic stem cells could be a potential continuous, cell-based model to study nongenomic actions of estrogens in neurons if they are responsive to estrogens after differentiation. In this study ER-subtype specific estrogens were used to examine the role of ERα and ERβ on calcium oscillations in neurons derived from human (hES) and mouse embryonic stem cells. Unlike the undifferentiated hES cells the differentiated cells expressed neuronal markers, ERβ, but not ERα. The non-selective ER agonist 17β-estradiol (E2) rapidly increased [Ca2+]i oscillations and synchronizations within a few minutes. No change in calcium oscillations was observed with the selective ERα agonist 4,4′,4″-(4-Propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)trisphenol (PPT). In contrast, the selective ERβ agonists, 2,3-bis(4-Hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile (DPN), MF101, and 2-(3-fluoro-4-hydroxyphenyl)-7-vinyl-1,3 benzoxazol-5-ol (ERB-041; WAY-202041) stimulated calcium oscillations similar to E2. The ERβ agonists also increased calcium oscillations and phosphorylated PKC, AKT and ERK1/2 in neurons derived from mouse ES cells, which was inhibited by nifedipine demonstrating that ERβ activates L-type voltage gated calcium channels to regulate neuronal activity. Our results demonstrate that ERβ signaling regulates nongenomic pathways in neurons derived from ES cells, and suggest that these cells might be useful to study the nongenomic mechanisms of estrogenic compounds. PMID:20668547

  18. Diagnosis and discrimination of autoimmune Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease using thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor-containing recombinant proteoliposomes.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Hidetaka; Matsuo, Hideaki; Imamura, Koji; Morino, Kazuhiko; Okumura, Katsuzumi; Tsumoto, Kanta; Yoshimura, Tetsuro

    2009-12-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is an autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland caused by autoantibodies against thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR). Currently, the diagnostic test for TSHR autoantibodies is based on an indirect competitive binding assay that measures the ability of TSHR autoantibodies to inhibit the binding of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) to TSHR. Here, we have developed a specific and direct diagnostic method for autoantibodies in GD that incorporates immobilized TSHR-containing recombinant proteoliposomes into an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To reduce non-specific binding of autoantibodies to recombinant proteoliposomes, we investigated the effect of polyethylene glycol (PEG)-lipid on the binding of commercially available anti-TSHR antibodies (aTSHRAb). The incorporation of PEG-lipids into liposomes decreased non-specific binding, as compared to liposomes that did not contain PEG-lipids, and the addition of blocking reagents further decreased non-specific reactivity. aTSHRAb exhibited higher reactivity towards PEG-modified TSHR recombinant proteoliposomes than PEG-modified liposomes without TSHR (bare liposomes). Importantly, serum autoantibodies from patients with GD, which is associated with hyperthyroidism, exhibited remarkably specific binding to TSHR recombinant proteoliposomes. Serum autoantibodies from patients with Hashimoto's disease (HD), which is associated with hypothyroidism, also reacted specifically with proteoliposomal TSHR. These results suggest that immobilized TSHR recombinant proteoliposomes can serve as a direct diagnostic test for GD and HD. Furthermore, given that there is no competition test currently available for detecting autoantibodies in HD, the combination of TSHR recombinant proteoliposome ELISA and indirect competitive TSHR binding assay might be an effective way to discriminate between GD and HD. PMID:19914592

  19. G Protein-Coupled Receptor 30 Expression Is Required for Estrogen Stimulation of Primordial Follicle Formation in the Hamster Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng; Prossnitz, Eric R.; Roy, Shyamal K.

    2008-01-01

    Estradiol-17β (E2) plays an important role in the formation and development of primordial follicles, but the mechanisms remain unclear. G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) can mediate a rapid and transcription-independent E2 signaling in various cells. The objectives of this study were to examine whether GPR30 was expressed in the neonatal hamster ovary and whether it could mediate estrogen action during the formation of primordial follicles. GPR30 mRNA levels decreased from the 13th day of gestation (E13) through the second day of postnatal (P2) life, followed by steady increases from P3 through P6. Consistent with the changes in mRNA levels, GPR30 protein expression decreased from E13 to P2 followed by a significant increase by P7, the day before the first appearance of primordial follicles in the hamster ovary. GPR30 was expressed both in the oocytes and somatic cells, although the expression in the oocytes was low. GPR30 protein was located primarily in the perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum, which was also the site of E2-BSA-FITC (E2-BSA-fluorescein isothiocyanate) binding. E2 or E2-BSA increased intracellular calcium in neonatal hamster ovary cells in vitro. Exposure to GPR30 small interfering RNA in vitro significantly reduced GPR30 mRNA and protein levels in cultured hamster ovaries, attenuated E-BSA binding to cultured P6 ovarian cells, and markedly suppressed estrogen-stimulated primordial follicle formation. These results suggest that a membrane estrogen receptor, GPR30, is expressed in the ovary during perinatal development and mediates E2 action on primordial follicle formation. PMID:18499747

  20. Acidosis Activation of the Proton-Sensing GPR4 Receptor Stimulates Vascular Endothelial Cell Inflammatory Responses Revealed by Transcriptome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Lixue; Li, Zhigang; Leffler, Nancy R.; Asch, Adam S.; Chi, Jen-Tsan; Yang, Li V.

    2013-01-01

    Acidic tissue microenvironment commonly exists in inflammatory diseases, tumors, ischemic organs, sickle cell disease, and many other pathological conditions due to hypoxia, glycolytic cell metabolism and deficient blood perfusion. However, the molecular mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to the acidic microenvironment are not well understood. GPR4 is a proton-sensing receptor expressed in endothelial cells and other cell types. The receptor is fully activated by acidic extracellular pH but exhibits lesser activity at the physiological pH 7.4 and minimal activity at more alkaline pH. To delineate the function and signaling pathways of GPR4 activation by acidosis in endothelial cells, we compared the global gene expression of the acidosis response in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) with varying level of GPR4. The results demonstrated that acidosis activation of GPR4 in HUVEC substantially increased the expression of a number of inflammatory genes such as chemokines, cytokines, adhesion molecules, NF-κB pathway genes, and prostaglandin-endoperoxidase synthase 2 (PTGS2 or COX-2) and stress response genes such as ATF3 and DDIT3 (CHOP). Similar GPR4-mediated acidosis induction of the inflammatory genes was also noted in other types of endothelial cells including human lung microvascular endothelial cells and pulmonary artery endothelial cells. Further analyses indicated that the NF-κB pathway was important for the acidosis/GPR4-induced inflammatory gene expression. Moreover, acidosis activation of GPR4 increased the adhesion of HUVEC to U937 monocytic cells under a flow condition. Importantly, treatment with a recently identified GPR4 antagonist significantly reduced the acidosis/GPR4-mediated endothelial cell inflammatory response. Taken together, these results show that activation of GPR4 by acidosis stimulates the expression of a wide range of inflammatory genes in endothelial cells. Such inflammatory response can be suppressed by

  1. Pharmacological Stimulation of the Brain Serotonin Receptor 7 as a Novel Therapeutic Approach for Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    De Filippis, Bianca; Nativio, Paola; Fabbri, Alessia; Ricceri, Laura; Adriani, Walter; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Passarelli, Francesca; Fuso, Andrea; Laviola, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by severe behavioral and physiological symptoms. Mutations in the methyl CpG-binding protein 2 gene (MECP2) cause >95% of classic cases, and currently there is no cure for this devastating disorder. The serotonin receptor 7 (5-HT7R) is linked to neuro-physiological regulation of circadian rhythm, mood, cognition, and synaptic plasticity. We presently report that 5-HT7R density is consistently reduced in cortical and hippocampal brain areas of symptomatic MeCP2–308 male mice, a RTT model. Systemic repeated treatment with LP-211 (0.25 mg/kg once/day for 7 days), a brain-penetrant selective 5-HT7R agonist, was able to rescue RTT-related defective performance: anxiety-related profiles in a Light/Dark test, motor abilities in a Dowel test, the exploratory behavior in the Marble Burying test, as well as memory in the Novelty Preference task. In the brain of RTT mice, LP-211 also reversed the abnormal activation of PAK and cofilin (key regulators of actin cytoskeleton dynamics) and of the ribosomal protein (rp) S6, whose reduced activation in MECP2 mutant neurons by mTOR is responsible for the altered protein translational control. Present findings indicate that pharmacological targeting of 5-HT7R improves specific behavioral and molecular manifestations of RTT, thus representing a first step toward the validation of an innovative systemic treatment. Beyond RTT, the latter might be extended to other disorders associated with intellectual disability. PMID:24809912

  2. Microenvironmental stiffness enhances glioma cell proliferation by stimulating epidermal growth factor receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Umesh, Vaibhavi; Rape, Andrew D; Ulrich, Theresa A; Kumar, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    The aggressive and rapidly lethal brain tumor glioblastoma (GBM) is associated with profound tissue stiffening and genomic lesions in key members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that increasing microenvironmental stiffness in culture can strongly enhance glioma cell behaviors relevant to tumor progression, including proliferation, yet it has remained unclear whether stiffness and EGFR regulate proliferation through common or independent signaling mechanisms. Here we test the hypothesis that microenvironmental stiffness regulates cell cycle progression and proliferation in GBM tumor cells by altering EGFR-dependent signaling. We began by performing an unbiased reverse phase protein array screen, which revealed that stiffness modulates expression and phosphorylation of a broad range of signals relevant to proliferation, including members of the EGFR pathway. We subsequently found that culturing human GBM tumor cells on progressively stiffer culture substrates both dramatically increases proliferation and facilitates passage through the G1/S checkpoint of the cell cycle, consistent with an EGFR-dependent process. Western Blots showed that increasing microenvironmental stiffness enhances the expression and phosphorylation of EGFR and its downstream effector Akt. Pharmacological loss-of-function studies revealed that the stiffness-sensitivity of proliferation is strongly blunted by inhibition of EGFR, Akt, or PI3 kinase. Finally, we observed that stiffness strongly regulates EGFR clustering, with phosphorylated EGFR condensing into vinculin-positive focal adhesions on stiff substrates and dispersing as microenvironmental stiffness falls to physiological levels. Our findings collectively support a model in which tissue stiffening promotes GBM proliferation by spatially and biochemically amplifying EGFR signaling. PMID:25000176

  3. Recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor stimulates in vitro mature human neutrophil and eosinophil function, surface receptor expression, and survival.

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, A F; Williamson, D J; Gamble, J R; Begley, C G; Harlan, J M; Klebanoff, S J; Waltersdorph, A; Wong, G; Clark, S C; Vadas, M A

    1986-01-01

    A purified recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (rH GM-CSF) was a powerful stimulator of mature human eosinophils and neutrophils. The purified rH GM-CSF enhanced the cytotoxic activity of neutrophils and eosinophils against antibody-coated targets, stimulated phagocytosis of serum-opsonized yeast by both cell types in a dose-dependent manner, and stimulated neutrophil-mediated iodination in the presence of zymosan. In addition, rH GM-CSF enhanced N-formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine(FMLP)-stimulated degranulation of Cytochalasin B pretreated neutrophils and FMLP-stimulated superoxide production. In contrast, rH GM-CSF did not promote adherence of granulocytes to endothelial cells or plastic surfaces. rH GM-CSF selectively enhanced the surface expression of granulocyte functional antigens 1 and 2, and the Mo1 antigen. rH GM-CSF induced morphological changes and enhanced the survival of both neutrophils and eosinophils by 6 and 9 h, respectively. These experiments show that granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor can selectively stimulate mature granulocyte function. PMID:3021817

  4. Estrogen stimulated migration and invasion of estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer cells involves an ezrin-dependent crosstalk between G protein-coupled receptor 30 and estrogen receptor beta signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kewen; Sun, Peng; Zhang, Yaxing; You, Xinchao; Li, Ping; Wang, Tinghuai

    2016-07-01

    Estrogen mediates important cellular activities in estrogen receptor negative (ER-) breast cancer cells via membrane associated G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30). However, the biological role and mechanism of estrogen action on cell motility and invasion in this aggressive kind of tumors remains poorly understood. We showed here that treatment with 17β-estradiol (E2) in ER-negative cancer cells resulted in ezrin-dependent cytoskeleton rearrangement and elicited a stimulatory effect on cell migration and invasion. Mechanistically, E2 induced ezrin activation was mediated by distinct mechanisms in different cell contexts. In SK-BR-3 cells with a high GPR30/ERβ ratio, silencing of GPR30 was able to abolish E2 induced ERK1/2, AKT phosphorylation and ezrin activation, whereas in MDA-MB-231 cells with low GPR30/ERβ ratio, E2 stimulated ezrin activation was mediated by the ERβ/PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Importantly, we showed that activation of GPR30 signaling significantly prevents ERβ activation induced ezrin phosphorylation, cell migration and invasion, indicating an antagonist effect between GPR30 and ERβ signaling in MDA-MB-231 cells. These findings highlight the important interplay between different estrogen receptors in estrogen induced cell motility and invasiveness in ER-negative breast cancer cells. PMID:26850467

  5. Glutamate Stimulates Local Protein Synthesis in the Axons of Rat Cortical Neurons by Activating α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic Acid (AMPA) Receptors and Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wei-Lun; Chung, Hui-Wen; Wu, Chih-Yueh; Wu, Huei-Ing; Lee, Yu-Tao; Chen, En-Chan; Fang, Weilun; Chang, Yen-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian CNS. By analyzing the metabolic incorporation of azidohomoalanine, a methionine analogue, in newly synthesized proteins, we find that glutamate treatments up-regulate protein translation not only in intact rat cortical neurons in culture but also in the axons emitting from cortical neurons before making synapses with target cells. The process by which glutamate stimulates local translation in axons begins with the binding of glutamate to the ionotropic AMPA receptors and metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 and members of group 2 metabotropic glutamate receptors on the plasma membrane. Subsequently, the activated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway and the rise in Ca2+, resulting from Ca2+ influxes through calcium-permeable AMPA receptors, voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, and transient receptor potential canonical channels, in axons stimulate the local translation machinery. For comparison, the enhancement effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on the local protein synthesis in cortical axons were also studied. The results indicate that Ca2+ influxes via transient receptor potential canonical channels and activated the mTOR pathway in axons also mediate BDNF stimulation to local protein synthesis. However, glutamate- and BDNF-induced enhancements of translation in axons exhibit different kinetics. Moreover, Ca2+ and mTOR signaling appear to play roles carrying different weights, respectively, in transducing glutamate- and BDNF-induced enhancements of axonal translation. Thus, our results indicate that exposure to transient increases of glutamate and more lasting increases of BDNF would stimulate local protein synthesis in migrating axons en route to their targets in the developing brain. PMID:26134564

  6. Expression and function of hematopoiesis-stimulating factor receptors on the GPI− and GPI+ hematopoietic stem cells of patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria/aplastic anemia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    FU, RONG; DING, SHAO-XUE; LIU, YI; LI, LI-JUAN; LIU, HUI; WANG, HONG-LEI; ZHANG, TIAN; SHAO, ZONG-HONG

    2016-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria/aplastic anemia (PNH/AA) syndrome presents a markedly increased population of cells deficient in glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI− cells) and signs of bone marrow failure, which requires treatment with hematopoiesis-stimulating factors, such as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and stem cell factor (SCF). However, little is known about the effects of these stimulating factors on GPI− cells. In order to explore the effects of stimulating factors in PNH/AA, G-CSF receptor (CD114) and SCF receptor (CD117) expression levels on GPI+ and GPI− hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) were measured by flow cytometry (FCM). The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) values of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) and phosphorylated (P)-STAT5 were measured in GPI+ and GPI− HSCs by FCM following stimulation with G-CSF or SCF in vitro. The expression levels of CD114 and CD117 on GPI− HSCs were significantly lower (P<0.01) than those on GPI+ HSCs in PNH/AA patients and normal controls. The MFI values of STAT5 in the GPI− and GPI+ HSCs of PNH/AA patients and normal controls were not significantly different. However, the MFI values of P-STAT5 in the GPI− HSCs of PNH/AA patients were significantly lower than those in the GPI+ HSCs of PNH/AA patients and normal controls prior to and following stimulation with G-CSF or SCF (P<0.01). The GPI− HSCs of PNH/AA patients responded poorly to stimulation by hematopoiesis-stimulating factors, which indicates that these factors can be used safely in patients with PNH/AA. PMID:27168787

  7. Characterization of prejunctional 5-HT1 receptors that mediate the inhibition of pressor effects elicited by sympathetic stimulation in the pithed rat

    PubMed Central

    Morán, A; Fernández, M M; Velasco, C; Martín, M L; San Román, L

    1998-01-01

    A study was made of the effects of 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) on pressor responses induced in vivo by electrical stimulation of the sympathetic outflow from the spinal cord of pithed rats. All animals had been pretreated with atropine. Sympathetic stimulation (0.1, 0.5, 1 and 5 Hz) resulted in frequency-dependent increases in blood pressure. Intravenous infusion of 5-CT at doses of 0.01, 0.1 and 1 μg kg−1 min−1 reduced the pressor effects obtained by electrical stimulation. The inhibitory effect of 5-CT was significantly more pronounced at lower frequencies of stimulation. In the present study we characterized the pharmacological profile of the receptors mediating the above inhibitory effect of 5-CT.The inhibition induced by 0.01 μg kg−1 min−1 of 5-CT on sympathetically-induced pressor responses was partially blocked after i.v. treatment with methiothepin (10  μg kg−1), WAY-100,635 (100 μg kg−1) or GR127935T (250 μg kg−1), but was not affected by cyanopindolol (100 μg kg−1).The selective 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT and the selective 5-HT1B/1D receptor agonists sumatriptan and L-694,247 inhibited the pressor response, whereas the 5-HT1B receptor agonists CGS-12066B and CP-93,129 and the 5-HT2C receptor agonist m-CPP did not modify the pressor symapthetic responses.The selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY-100,635 (100 μg kg−1) blocked the inhibition induced by 8-OH-DPAT and the selective 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist GR127935T (250 μg kg−1) abolished the inhibition induced either by L-694,247 or sumatriptan.None of the 5-HT receptor agonists used in our experiments modified the pressor responses induced by exogenous noradrenaline (NA).These results suggest that the presynaptic inhibitory action of 5-CT on the electrically-induced pressor response is mediated by both r-5-HT1D and 5-HT1A receptors. PMID:9559906

  8. Stimulation of α2-adrenergic receptors in the central nucleus of the amygdala attenuates stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Hidetaka; Bruijnzeel, Adrie W.

    2010-01-01

    Tobacco addiction is a chronic disorder that is characterized by craving for tobacco products, withdrawal upon smoking cessation, and relapse after periods of abstinence. Previous studies demonstrated that systemic administration of α2-adrenergic receptor agonists attenuates stress-induced reinstatement of drug seeking in rats. The aim of the present experiments was to investigate the role of noradrenergic transmission in the central nucleus of amygdala (CeA) in stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking. Rats self-administered nicotine for 14–16 days and then nicotine seeking was extinguished by substituting saline for nicotine. The effect of the intra-CeA infusion of the α2-adrenergic receptor agonists clonidine and dexmedetomidine, the nonselective β1/β2-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol, and the α1-adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin on stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking was investigated. In all the experiments, exposure to footshocks reinstated extinguished nicotine seeking. The administration of clonidine or dexmedetomidine into the CeA attenuated stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking. The administration of propranolol or prazosin into the CeA did not affect stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking. Furthermore, intra-CeA administration of clonidine or dexmedetomidine did not affect operant responding for food pellets. This suggests that the effects of clonidine and dexmedetomidine on stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking were not mediated by motor impairments or sedation. Taken together, these findings indicate that stimulation of α2-adrenergic receptors, but not blockade of α1 or β-adrenergic receptors, in the CeA attenuates stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking. These findings suggest that α2-adrenergic receptor agonists may at least partly attenuate stress-induced reinstatement of nicotine seeking by stimulating α2-adrenergic receptors in the CeA. PMID:20854830

  9. An unbalanced translocation unmasks a recessive mutation in the follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene and causes FSH resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kuechler, Amla; Hauffa, Berthold P; Köninger, Angela; Kleinau, Gunnar; Albrecht, Beate; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Gromoll, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) mediated by its receptor (FSHR) is pivotal for normal gametogenesis. Inactivating FSHR mutations are known to cause hypergonadotropic hypogonadism with disturbed follicular maturation in females. So far, only very few recessive point mutations have been described. We report on a 17-year-old female with primary amenorrhea, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and disturbed folliculogenesis. Chromosome analysis detected a seemingly balanced translocation 46,XX,t(2;8)(p16.3or21;p23.1)mat. FSHR sequence analysis revealed a novel non-synonymous point mutation in exon 10 (c.1760C>A, p.Pro587His), but no wild-type allele. The mutation was also found in the father, but not in the mother. Furthermore, molecular-cytogenetic analyses of the breakpoint region on chromosome 2 showed the translocation to be unbalanced, containing a deletion with one breakpoint within the FSHR gene. The deletion size was narrowed down by array analysis to approximately 163 kb, involving exons 9 and 10 of the FSHR gene. Functional studies of the mutation revealed the complete lack of signal transduction presumably caused by a changed conformational structure of transmembrane helix 6. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a compound heterozygosity of an inactivating FSHR point mutation unmasked by a partial deletion. This coincidence of two rare changes caused clinical signs consistent with FSH resistance. PMID:20087398

  10. Stimulation of the α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Protects against Neuroinflammation after Tibia Fracture and Endotoxemia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Terrando, Niccolò; Yang, Ting; Ryu, Jae Kyu; Newton, Phillip T; Monaco, Claudia; Feldmann, Marc; Ma, Daqing; Akassoglou, Katerina; Maze, Mervyn

    2014-01-01

    Surgery and critical illness often associate with cognitive decline. Surgical trauma or infection can lead independently to learning and memory impairments via similar, but not identical, cellular signaling of the innate immune system that promotes neuroinflammation. In this study we explored the putative synergism between aseptic orthopedic surgery and infection, the latter reproduced by postoperative lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration. We observed that surgery and LPS augmented systemic inflammation up to postoperative d 3 and this was associated with further neuroinflammation (CD11b and CD68 immunoreactivity) in the hippocampus in mice compared with those receiving surgery or LPS alone. Administration of a selective α7 subtype nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) agonist 2 h after LPS significantly improved neuroinflammation and hippocampal-dependent memory dysfunction. Modulation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation in monocytes and regulation of the oxidative stress response through nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) signaling appear to be key targets in modulating this response. Overall, these results suggest that it may be conceivable to limit and possibly prevent postoperative complications, including cognitive decline and/or infections, through stimulation of the cholinergic antiinflammatory pathway. PMID:25365546

  11. Vagal Nerve Stimulation Rapidly Activates Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Receptor TrkB in Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Background Vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) has been approved for treatment-resistant depression. Many antidepressants increase expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in brain or activate, via phosphorylation, its receptor, TrkB. There have been no studies yet of whether VNS would also cause phosphorylation of TrkB. Methods Western blot analysis was used to evaluate the phosphorylation status of TrkB in the hippocampus of rats administered VNS either acutely or chronically. Acute effects of VNS were compared with those caused by fluoxetine or desipramine (DMI) whereas its chronic effects were compared with those of sertraline or DMI. Results All treatments, given either acutely or chronically, significantly elevated phosphorylation of tyrosines 705 and 816 on TrkB in the hippocampus. However, only VNS increased the phosphorylation of tyrosine 515, with both acute and chronic administration causing this effect. Pretreatment with K252a, a nonspecific tyrosine kinase inhibitor, blocked the phosphorylation caused by acute VNS at all three tyrosines. Downstream effectors of Y515, namely Akt and ERK, were also phosphorylated after acute treatment with VNS, whereas DMI did not cause this effect. Conclusion VNS rapidly activates TrkB phosphorylation and this effect persists over time. VNS-induced phosphorylation of tyrosine 515 is distinct from the effect of standard antidepressant drugs. PMID:22563458

  12. Stimulation of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor protects against neuroinflammation after tibia fracture and endotoxemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Terrando, Niccolò; Yang, Ting; Ryu, Jae Kyu; Newton, Phillip T; Monaco, Claudia; Feldmann, Marc; Ma, Daqing; Akassoglou, Katerina; Maze, Mervyn

    2014-01-01

    Surgery and critical illness often associate with cognitive decline. Surgical trauma or infection can lead independently to learning and memory impairments via similar, but not identical, cellular signaling of the innate immune system that promotes neuroinflammation. In this study we explored the putative synergism between aseptic orthopedic surgery and infection, the latter reproduced by postoperative lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration. We observed that surgery and LPS augmented systemic inflammation up to postoperative d 3 and this was associated with further neuroinflammation (CD11b and CD68 immunoreactivity) in the hippocampus in mice compared with those receiving surgery or LPS alone. Administration of a selective α7 subtype nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) agonist 2 h after LPS significantly improved neuroinflammation and hippocampal-dependent memory dysfunction. Modulation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation in monocytes and regulation of the oxidative stress response through nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) signaling appear to be key targets in modulating this response. Overall, these results suggest that it may be conceivable to limit and possibly prevent postoperative complications, including cognitive decline and/or infections, through stimulation of the cholinergic antiinflammatory pathway. PMID:25365546

  13. The Drosophila HNF4 nuclear receptor promotes glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and mitochondrial function in adults

    PubMed Central

    Barry, William E; Thummel, Carl S

    2016-01-01

    Although mutations in HNF4A were identified as the cause of Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young 1 (MODY1) two decades ago, the mechanisms by which this nuclear receptor regulates glucose homeostasis remain unclear. Here we report that loss of Drosophila HNF4 recapitulates hallmark symptoms of MODY1, including adult-onset hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). These defects are linked to a role for dHNF4 in promoting mitochondrial function as well as the expression of Hex-C, a homolog of the MODY2 gene Glucokinase. dHNF4 is required in the fat body and insulin-producing cells to maintain glucose homeostasis by supporting a developmental switch toward oxidative phosphorylation and GSIS at the transition to adulthood. These findings establish an animal model for MODY1 and define a developmental reprogramming of metabolism to support the energetic needs of the mature animal. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11183.001 PMID:27185732

  14. Comparative Effects of Prolonged and Intermittent Stimulation of the Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor on Gastric Emptying and Glycemia

    PubMed Central

    Umapathysivam, Mahesh M.; Lee, Michael Y.; Jones, Karen L.; Annink, Christopher E.; Cousins, Caroline E.; Trahair, Laurence G.; Rayner, Chris K.; Chapman, Marianne J.; Nauck, Michael A.; Horowitz, Michael; Deane, Adam M.

    2014-01-01

    Acute administration of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and its agonists slows gastric emptying, which represents the major mechanism underlying their attenuation of postprandial glycemic excursions. However, this effect may diminish during prolonged use. We compared the effects of prolonged and intermittent stimulation of the GLP-1 receptor on gastric emptying and glycemia. Ten healthy men received intravenous saline (placebo) or GLP-1 (0.8 pmol/kg ⋅ min), as a continuous 24-h infusion (“prolonged”), two 4.5-h infusions separated by 20 h (“intermittent”), and a 4.5-h infusion (“acute”) in a randomized, double-blind, crossover fashion. Gastric emptying of a radiolabeled mashed potato meal was measured using scintigraphy. Acute GLP-1 markedly slowed gastric emptying. The magnitude of the slowing was attenuated with prolonged but maintained with intermittent infusions. GLP-1 potently diminished postprandial glycemia during acute and intermittent regimens. These observations suggest that short-acting GLP-1 agonists may be superior to long-acting agonists when aiming specifically to reduce postprandial glycemic excursions in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. PMID:24089511

  15. Toll-like receptor 7 stimulates production of specialized pro-resolving lipid mediators and promotes resolution of airway inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Koltsida, Ourania; Karamnov, Sergey; Pyrillou, Katerina; Vickery, Thad; Chairakaki, Aikaterini-Dimitra; Tamvakopoulos, Constantin; Sideras, Paschalis; Serhan, Charles N; Andreakos, Evangelos

    2013-01-01

    Although specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPMs) biosynthesized from polyunsaturated fatty acids are critical for the resolution of acute inflammation, the molecules and pathways that induce their production remain elusive. Here, we show that TLR7, a receptor recognizing viral ssRNA and damaged self-RNA, mobilizes the docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-derived biosynthetic pathways that lead to the generation of D-series SPMs. In mouse macrophages and human monocytes, TLR7 activation triggered production of DHA-derived monohydroxy metabolome markers and generation of protectin D1 (PD1) and resolvin D1 (RvD1). In mouse allergic airway inflammation, TLR7 activation enhanced production of DHA-derived SPMs including PD1 and accelerated the catabasis of Th2-mediated inflammation. D-series SPMs were critical for TLR7-mediated resolution of airway inflammation as this effect was lost in Alox15−/− mice, while resolution was enhanced after local administration of PD1 or RvD1. Together, our findings reveal a new previously unsuspected role of TLR7 in the generation of D-series SPMs and the resolution of allergic airway inflammation. They also identify TLR stimulation as a new approach to drive SPMs and resolution of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23584892

  16. In vivo knockdown of basal forebrain p75 neurotrophin receptor stimulates choline acetyltransferase activity in the mature hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Graham L; Naim, Timur; Trieu, Jennifer; Huang, Mengjie

    2016-05-01

    This study seeks to determine whether knockdown of basal forebrain p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR) ) expression elicits increased hippocampal choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) activity in mature animals. Antisense (AS) oligonucleotides (oligos) targeting p75(NTR) were infused into the medial septal area of mature rats continuously for 4 weeks. In all rats, the cannula outlet was placed equidistant between the left and the right sides of the vertical diagonal band of Broca. We tested phosphorothioate (PS), morpholino (Mo), and gapmer (mixed PS/RNA) oligos. Gapmer AS infusions of 7.5 and 22 μg/day decreased septal p75(NTR) mRNA by 34% and 48%, respectively. The same infusions increased hippocampal ChAT activity by 41% and 55%. Increased hippocampal ChAT activity correlated strongly with septal p75(NTR) downregulation in individual rats. Infusions of PS and Mo AS oligos did not downregulate p75(NTR) mRNA or stimulate ChAT activity. These results demonstrate that p75(NTR) can dynamically regulate hippocampal ChAT activity in the mature CNS. They also reveal the different efficacies of three diverse AS oligo chemistries when infused intracerebrally. Among the three types, gapmer oligos worked best. PMID:26864466

  17. Effects of the neuropeptide S receptor antagonist RTI-118 on abuse-related facilitation of intracranial self-stimulation produced by cocaine and methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) in rats

    PubMed Central

    Bonano, Julie S.; Runyon, Scott P.; Hassler, Carla; Glennon, Richard A.; Negus, S. Stevens

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) is a neurotransmitter that activates the NPS receptor to modulate biological functions including anxiety-like behaviors, feeding, and drug reinforcement. RTI-118 is a novel NPS receptor antagonist that decreased cocaine self-administration in rats at doses that had little or no effect on food-maintained responding. To build on these previous findings, this study examined effects of RTI-118 on cocaine-induced facilitation of intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) in rats. To provide a context for data interpretation, effects of RTI-118 were compared to effects of the kappa opioid receptor agonist U69,593, because the kappa opioid receptor is another peptide neurotransmitter receptor reported to modulate abuse-related cocaine effects. RTI-118 effects were also examined on ICSS facilitation produced by methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), a novel designer drug of abuse with some cocaine-like effects. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=12) with electrodes targeting the medial forebrain bundle responded under a fixed-ratio 1 schedule for range of brain stimulation frequencies. Under control conditions, brain stimulation maintained a frequency-dependent increase in ICSS rates. Cocaine (1.0–10 mg/kg) and MDPV (3.2 mg/kg) facilitated ICSS. RTI-118 (3.2––32 mg/kg) alone produced little effect on ICSS but dose dependently blocked cocaine-induced ICSS facilitation. U69,593 (0.25–0.5 mg/kg) also attenuated cocaine effects, but blockade of cocaine effects was incomplete even at a U69,593 dose that alone depressed ICSS. RTI-118 (32 mg/kg) failed to block MDPV-induced ICSS facilitation. These results support further consideration of NPS receptor antagonists as candidate treatments for cocaine abuse and provide evidence for differential effects of a candidate treatment on abuse-related effects of cocaine and MDPV. PMID:25220242

  18. 2-Phenylpyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidin-7-one as a new scaffold to obtain potent and selective human A3 adenosine receptor antagonists: new insights into the receptor-antagonist recognition.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, Ombretta; Colotta, Vittoria; Catarzi, Daniela; Varano, Flavia; Poli, Daniela; Filacchioni, Guido; Varani, Katia; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Borea, Pier Andrea; Paoletta, Silvia; Morizzo, Erika; Moro, Stefano

    2009-12-10

    A molecular simplification approach of previously reported 2-arylpyrazolo[3,4-c]quinolin-4-ones was applied to design 2-arylpyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidin-7-one derivatives as new human A(3) adenosine receptor antagonists. Substituents with different lipophilicity and steric hindrance were introduced at the 5-position of the bicyclic scaffold (R(5) = H, Me, Et, Ph, CH(2)Ph) and on the 2-phenyl ring (OMe, Me). Most of the synthesized derivatives were highly potent hA(3) adenosine receptor antagonists, the best being the 2-(4-methoxyphenyl)pyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidin-7-one (K(i) = 1.2 nM). The new compounds were also highly selective, being completely devoid of affinity toward hA(1), hA(2A), and hA(2B) adenosine receptors. On the basis of the recently published human A(2A) receptor crystallographic information, we propose a novel receptor-driven hypothesis to explain both A(3) AR affinity and A(3) versus A(2A) selectivity profiles of these new antagonists. PMID:19743865

  19. In Vivo Phenotypic Screening for Treating Chronic Neuropathic Pain: Modification of C2-Arylethynyl Group of Conformationally Constrained A3 Adenosine Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    (N)-Methanocarba adenosine 5′-methyluronamides containing 2-arylethynyl groups were synthesized as A3 adenosine receptor (AR) agonists and screened in vivo (po) for reduction of neuropathic pain. A small N6-methyl group maintained binding affinity, with human > mouse A3AR and MW < 500 and other favorable physicochemical properties. Emax (maximal efficacy in a mouse chronic constriction injury pain model) of previously characterized A3AR agonist, 2-(3,4-difluorophenylethynyl)-N6-(3-chlorobenzyl) derivative 6a, MRS5698, was surpassed. More efficacious analogues (in vivo) contained the following C2-arylethynyl groups: pyrazin-2-yl 23 (binding Ki, hA3AR, nM 1.8), fur-2-yl 27 (0.6), thien-2-yl 32 (0.6) and its 5-chloro 33, MRS5980 (0.7) and 5-bromo 34 (0.4) equivalents, and physiologically unstable ferrocene 36, MRS5979 (2.7). 33 and 36 displayed particularly long in vivo duration (>3 h). Selected analogues were docked to an A3AR homology model to explore the environment of receptor-bound C2 and N6 groups. Various analogues bound with μM affinity a